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  1. Effect of L-Caldesmon on Osteoclastogenesis in RANKL-Induced RAW264.7 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Ying-Ming; Chan, Chu-Lung; Huang, Renjian; Wang, Chih-Lueh Albert

    2018-01-29

    Non-muscle caldesmon (l-CaD) is involved in the regulation of actin cytoskeletal remodeling in the podosome formation, but its function in osteoclastogenesis remains to be determined. In this study, RANKL-induced differentiation of RAW264.7 murine macrophages to osteoclast-like cells (OCs) was used as a model to determine the physiological role of l-CaD and its phosphorylation in osteoclastogenesis. Upon RANKL treatment, RAW264.7 cells undergo cell-cell fusion into multinucleate and TRAP-positive large OCs with a concomitant increase of l-CaD expression. Using gain- and loss-of-function in OC precursor cells followed by RANKL induction, we showed that the expression of l-CaD in response to RANKL activation is an important event for osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption. To determine the effect of l-CaD phosphorylation in osteoclastogenesis, three decoy peptides of l-CaD were used with, respectively, Ser-to-Ala mutations at the Erk- and Pak1-mediated phosphorylation sites, and Ser-to-Asp mutation at the Erk-mediated phosphorylation sites. Both the former two peptides competed with the C-terminal segment of l-CaD for F-actin binding and accelerated formation of podosome-like structures in RANKL-induced OCs, while the third peptide did not significantly affect the F-actin binding of l-CaD and decreased the formation of podosome-like structures in OCs. With the experiments using dephosphorylated and phosphorylated l-CaD mutants, we further showed that dephosphorylated l-CaD mutant facilitated RANKL-induced TRAP activity with an increased cell fusion index, whereas phosphorylated l-CaD decreased the TRAP activity and cell fusion. Our findings suggested that both the level of l-CaD expression and the extent of l-CaD phosphorylation play a role in RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of ω3- and ω6-Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids on RANKL-Induced Osteoclast Differentiation of RAW264.7 Cells: A Comparative in Vitro Study

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    Jan C. A. Boeyens

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs have been reported to have an anabolic effect on bone in vivo, but comparative studies to identify inhibitors of osteoclast formation amongst ω3- and ω6-PUFAs are still lacking. Here we assessed the effects of the ω3-PUFAs, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA and the ω6-PUFAs, arachidonic acid (AA and γ-linolenic acid (GLA on a RAW264.7 osteoclast differentiation model. The effects of PUFAs on RANKL-induced osteoclast formation were evaluated by counting tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP-positive multinucleated cells. PUFAs significantly inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclast formation in a dose-dependent manner with AA- and DHA-mediated inhibition being the strongest. Furthermore, RANKL-induced mRNA- and protein expression of the key osteoclastogenic genes cathepsin K and TRAP were inhibited by AA and more potently by DHA. Owing to the attenuated osteoclastogenesis by DHA and AA, actin ring formation and bone resorptive activity of these cells as evaluated on bone-mimetic plates were severely compromised. Hence, of the tested PUFAs, AA and DHA were found to be the most effective in inhibiting RANKL-induced osteoclast formation with the latter providing the strongest inhibitory effects. Collectively, the data indicates that these PUFAs may play an important role in regulating bone diseases characterized by excessive osteoclast activity.

  3. Halenaquinone inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis.

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    Tsukamoto, Sachiko; Takeuchi, Tomoharu; Kawabata, Tetsuro; Kato, Hikaru; Yamakuma, Michiko; Matsuo, Kanae; El-Desoky, Ahmed H; Losung, Fitje; Mangindaan, Remy E P; de Voogd, Nicole J; Arata, Yoichiro; Yokosawa, Hideyoshi

    2014-11-15

    Halenaquinone was isolated from the marine sponge Petrosia alfiani as an inhibitor of osteoclastogenic differentiation of murine RAW264 cells. It inhibited the RANKL (receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand)-induced upregulation of TRAP (tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase) activity as well as the formation of multinuclear osteoclasts. In addition, halenaquinone substantially suppressed RANKL-induced IκB degradation and Akt phosphorylation. Thus, these results suggest that halenaquinone inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis at least by suppressing the NF-κB and Akt signaling pathways. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Ormeloxifene inhibits osteoclast differentiation in parallel to downregulating RANKL-induced ROS generation and suppressing the activation of ERK and JNK in murine RAW264.7 cells.

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    Kharkwal, Geetika; Chandra, Vishal; Fatima, Iram; Dwivedi, Anila

    2012-06-01

    Ormeloxifene (Orm), a triphenylethylene compound, has been established as a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) that suppresses the ovariectomy-induced bone resorption in rats. However, the precise mechanism underlying the bone-preserving action of Orm remains unclear. In this study, we evaluated the effect of Orm on osteoclast formation induced by receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL) in the murine macrophage cell line RAW264.7. We also explored the mechanism of action of Orm by studying the RANKL-induced signaling pathways required for osteoclast differentiation. We found that Orm inhibited osteoclast formation from murine macrophage RAW264.7 cells induced by RANKL in a dose-dependent manner. Orm was able to abolish RANKL-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) elevation and inhibited the transcriptional activation of two key RANKL-induced transcription factors namely activator protein-1 (AP-1) and NF-κB through mechanisms involving MAPKs. Activation of two MAPKs, i.e. ERK (MAPK1) and JNK (MAPK8), was alleviated by Orm effectively, which subsequently affected the activation of c-Jun and c-Fos, which are the essential components of the AP-1 transcription complex. Taken together, our results demonstrate that Orm potentially inhibits osteoclastogenesis by inhibiting ROS generation and thereby suppressing the activation of ERK1/2 (MAPK3/MAPK1) and JNK (MAPK8) and transcription factors (NF-κB and AP-1), which subsequently affect the regulation of osteoclastogenesis. These results provide a possible mechanism of action of Orm in regulating osteoclastogenesis, thereby supporting the beneficial bone-protective effects of this compound.

  5. AG490 inhibits NFATc1 expression and STAT3 activation during RANKL induced osteoclastogenesis

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    Li, Chang-hong; Zhao, Jin-xia; Sun, Lin; Yao, Zhong-qiang; Deng, Xiao-li; Liu, Rui; Liu, Xiang-yuan, E-mail: liu-xiangyuan@263.net

    2013-06-14

    Highlights: •AG490 inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in RAW264.7 cells. •AG490 affects cell proliferation and cell cycle distribution. •AG490 reduces NFATc1 expression during RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis. •AG490 disrupts the activation of RANKL-mediated JAK2/STAT3 signaling pathway. •STAT3 depletion partly mimics the effect of AG490 on RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis. -- Abstract: Commonly, JAK/STAT relays cytokine signals for cell activation and proliferation, and recent studies have shown that the elevated expression of JAK/STAT is associated with the immune rejection of allografts and the inflammatory processes of autoimmune disease. However, the role which JAK2/STAT3 signaling plays in the receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-mediated osteoclastogenesis is unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of AG490, specific JAK2 inhibitor, on osteoclast differentiation in vitro. AG490 significantly inhibited osteoclastogenesis in murine osteoclast precursor cell line RAW264.7 induced by RANKL. AG490 suppressed cell proliferation and delayed the G1 to S cell cycle transition. Furthermore, AG490 also suppressed the expression of nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) c1 but not c-Fos in RAW264.7. Subsequently, we investigated various intracellular signaling components associated with osteoclastogenesis. AG490 had no effects on RANKL-induced activation of Akt, ERK1/2. Interestingly, AG490 partly inhibited RANKL-induced phosphorylation of Ser{sup 727} in STAT3. Additionally, down-regulation of STAT3 using siRNA resulted in suppression of TRAP, RANK and NFATc1 expression. In conclusion, we demonstrated that AG490 inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis by suppressing NFATc1 production and cell proliferation via the STAT3 pathway. These results suggest that inhibition of JAK2 may be useful for the treatment of bone diseases characterized by excessive osteoclastogenesis.

  6. Curcumol suppresses RANKL-induced osteoclast formation by attenuating the JNK signaling pathway

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    Yu, Mingxiang, E-mail: yu.mingxiang@zs-hospital.sh.cn [Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Chen, Xianying [Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Hainan Provincial Nong Ken Hospital, Hainan (China); Lv, Chaoyang [Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Yi, Xilu [Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Shanghai Songjiang District Central Hospital, Shanghai (China); Zhang, Yao; Xue, Mengjuan; He, Shunmei [Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Zhu, Guoying [Institute of Radiation Medicine, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Wang, Hongfu, E-mail: hfwang@shmu.edu.cn [Institute of Radiation Medicine, Fudan University, Shanghai (China)

    2014-05-02

    Highlights: • Curcumol suppresses osteoclasts differentiation in vitro. • Curcumol impairs JNK/AP-1 signaling pathway. • Curcumol may be used for treating osteoclast related diseases. - Abstract: Osteoclasts, derived from hemopoietic progenitors of the monocyte/macrophage lineage, have a unique role in bone resorption, and are considered a potential therapeutic target in the treatment of such pathologic bone diseases as osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and periodontitis. In the present study, we demonstrate that curcumol, one of the major components of the essential oil of Rhizoma Curcumae, exhibits an inhibitory effect on receptor activator of nuclear factor kappaB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast differentiation with both bone marrow-derived macrophages and RAW264.7 cells in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, RANKL-induced mRNA expression of osteoclast-specific genes, such as tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase, calcitonin receptor, and cathepsin K, is prominently reduced in the presence of curcumol. Furthermore, the molecular mechanism of action was investigated, and curcumol inhibited osteoclastogenesis by specifically impairing RANKL-induced c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)/activator protein-1 (AP-1) signaling, which was further identified in rescue studies by means of anisomycin, a JNK signaling-specific activator. Taken together, these findings suggest that curcumol suppresses RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation through the JNK/AP-1 signaling pathway, and may be useful as a therapeutic treatment for bone resorption-associated diseases.

  7. IL-33 inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclast formation through the regulation of Blimp-1 and IRF-8 expression

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    Kiyomiya, Hiroyasu [Division of Infections and Molecular Biology, Department of Health Promotion, Kyushu Dental University, 2-6-1 Manazuru, Kokurakita-ku, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka 803-8580 (Japan); Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Department of Science of Physical Functions, Kyushu Dental University, 2-6-1 Manazuru, Kokurakita-ku, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka 803-8580 (Japan); Ariyoshi, Wataru; Okinaga, Toshinori [Division of Infections and Molecular Biology, Department of Health Promotion, Kyushu Dental University, 2-6-1 Manazuru, Kokurakita-ku, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka 803-8580 (Japan); Kaneuji, Takeshi [Division of Oral Medicine, Department of Science of Physical Functions, Kyushu Dental University, 2-6-1 Manazuru, Kokurakita-ku, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka 803-8580 (Japan); Mitsugi, Sho [Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Department of Science of Physical Functions, Kyushu Dental University, 2-6-1 Manazuru, Kokurakita-ku, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka 803-8580 (Japan); Sakurai, Takuma [Division of Infections and Molecular Biology, Department of Health Promotion, Kyushu Dental University, 2-6-1 Manazuru, Kokurakita-ku, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka 803-8580 (Japan); Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Department of Science of Physical Functions, Kyushu Dental University, 2-6-1 Manazuru, Kokurakita-ku, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka 803-8580 (Japan); Habu, Manabu [Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Department of Science of Physical Functions, Kyushu Dental University, 2-6-1 Manazuru, Kokurakita-ku, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka 803-8580 (Japan); Yoshioka, Izumi [Division of Oral Medicine, Department of Science of Physical Functions, Kyushu Dental University, 2-6-1 Manazuru, Kokurakita-ku, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka 803-8580 (Japan); Tominaga, Kazuhiro [Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Department of Science of Physical Functions, Kyushu Dental University, 2-6-1 Manazuru, Kokurakita-ku, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka 803-8580 (Japan); and others

    2015-05-01

    Interleukin (IL)-33 is a recently discovered proinflammatory cytokine that belongs to the IL-1 family. Several studies have reported that IL-33 inhibits osteoclast differentiation. However, the mechanism of IL-33 regulation of osteoclastogenesis remains unclear. In the present study, we examined the effect of IL-33 on osteoclast formation in vitro. IL-33 suppressed osteoclast formation in both mouse bone marrow cells and monocyte/macrophage cell line RAW264.7 cells induced by receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) and/or macrophage stimulating factor (M-CSF). IL-33 also inhibited the expression of RANKL-induced nuclear factor of activated T-cell cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1), thereby decreasing the expression of osteoclastogenesis-related marker genes, including Cathepsin K, Osteoclast stimulatory transmembrane protein (Oc-stamp) and Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (Trap). Blockage of IL-33-ST2 binding suppressed the IL-33-mediated inhibition of NFATc1. RANKL-induced B-lymphocyte-induced maturation protein-1 (Blimp-1) expression was also suppressed by IL-33, which was followed by the stimulation of anti-osteoclastic genes such as interferon regulatory factor-8 (IRF-8). These results suggest that IL-33-ST2 interactions down-regulate both RANKL-induced NFATc1 activation and osteoclast differentiation via the regulation of Blimp-1 and IRF-8 expression. - Highlights: • IL-33 inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclast formation. • IL-33 has inhibitory effect on the RANKL-induced NFATc1 expression. • IL-33-induced NFATc1 suppression depends on the regulation of Blimp-1 and IRF-8.

  8. The Sirt1 Activators SRT2183 and SRT3025 Inhibit RANKL-Induced Osteoclastogenesis in Bone Marrow-Derived Macrophages and Down-Regulate Sirt3 in Sirt1 Null Cells.

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    Irina Gurt

    Full Text Available Increased osteoclast-mediated bone resorption is characteristic of osteoporosis, malignant bone disease and inflammatory arthritis. Targeted deletion of Sirtuin1 (Sirt1, a key player in aging and metabolism, in osteoclasts results in increased osteoclast-mediated bone resorption in vivo, making it a potential novel therapeutic target to block bone resorption. Sirt1 activating compounds (STACs were generated and were investigated in animal disease models and in humans however their mechanism of action was a source of controversy. We studied the effect of SRT2183 and SRT3025 on osteoclastogenesis in bone-marrow derived macrophages (BMMs in vitro, and discovered that these STACs inhibit RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation, fusion and resorptive capacity without affecting osteoclast survival. SRT2183 and SRT3025 activated AMPK, increased Sirt1 expression and decreased RelA/p65 lysine310 acetylation, critical for NF-κB activation, and an established Sirt1 target. However, inhibition of osteoclastogenesis by these STACs was also observed in BMMs derived from sirt1 knock out (sirt1-/- mice lacking the Sirt1 protein, in which neither AMPK nor RelA/p65 lysine 310 acetylation was affected, confirming that these effects require Sirt1, but suggesting that Sirt1 is not essential for inhibition of osteoclastogenesis by these STACs under these conditions. In sirt1 null osteoclasts treated with SRT2183 or SRT3025 Sirt3 was found to be down-regulated. Our findings suggest that SRT2183 and SRT3025 activate Sirt1 and inhibit RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in vitro however under conditions of Sirt1 deficiency can affect Sirt3. As aging is associated with reduced Sirt1 level and activity, the influence of STACs on Sirt3 needs to be investigated in vivo in animal and human disease models of aging and osteoporosis.

  9. Aldehydic components of cinnamon bark extract suppresses RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis through NFATc1 downregulation.

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    Tsuji-Naito, Kentaro

    2008-10-15

    Several major bone diseases are directly attributable to bone loss, including osteoporosis, bone metastasis, and rheumatoid arthritis. The nuclear factor of activated T cell 1 (NFATc1), a transcription factor, has recently been shown to play an essential role in osteoclastogenesis. In this study, we found that of several herbs, Cinnamomum zeylanicum (C. zeylanicum) exhibited the strong inhibitory effects on osteoclastogenesis and that its mechanism of action involves the suppression of NFATc1-mediated signal transduction. C. zeylanicum dose-dependently inhibited osteoclast-like cell formation at concentrations of 12.5-50 microg/ml without affecting cell viability. Resorption pit assays have shown that C. zeylanicum also inhibits the bone-resorbing activity of mature osteoclasts. Treatment with C. zeylanicum inhibited the receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB ligand (RANKL)-induced NFATc1 and c-fos expression. Additionally, C. zeylanicum moderately inhibited phosphorylation of IkappaB-alpha, suggesting that the c-fos/NFATc1 pathway, rather than the nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) pathway, is the primary target of C. zeylanicum during RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis. Using an HPLC-DAD system, we identified three major peaks for four characteristic components in the C. zeylanicum extract and identified an unknown peak as 2-methoxycinnamaldehyde via HPLC and a 2D-COSY (1)H NMR study. We identified cinnamaldehyde and 2-methoxycinnamaldehyde as active components reducing osteoclast-like cell formation and inhibiting NFATc1 expression. Notably, in a resorption pit assay, 2-methoxycinnamaldehyde exhibited remarkable inhibition rates of 95% at 2 microM on bone resorption. In summary, this study points to the conclusion that C. zeylanicum inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis. This finding raises prospects for the development of a novel approach in the treatment of osteopenic disease.

  10. Scoparone attenuates RANKL-induced osteoclastic differentiation through controlling reactive oxygen species production and scavenging

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    Lee, Sang-Hyun; Jang, Hae-Dong, E-mail: haedong@hnu.kr

    2015-02-15

    Scoparone, one of the bioactive components of Artemisia capillaris Thunb, has various biological properties including immunosuppressive, hepatoprotective, anti-allergic, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant effects. This study aims at evaluating the anti-osteoporotic effect of scoparone and its underlying mechanism in vitro. Scoparone demonstrated potent cellular antioxidant capacity. It was also found that scoparone inhibited the receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast differentiation and suppressed cathepsin K and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) expression via c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)/p38-mediated c-Fos–nuclear factor of activated T cells, cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1) signaling pathway. During osteoclast differentiation, the production of general reactive oxygen species (ROS) and superoxide anions was dose-dependently attenuated by scoparone. In addition, scoparone diminished NADPH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate) oxidase 1 (Nox1) expression and activation via the tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6)–cSrc–phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3k) signaling pathway and prevented the disruption of mitochondrial electron transport chain system. Furthermore, scoparone augmented the expression of superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) and catalase (CAT). The overall results indicate that the inhibitory effect of scoparone on RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation is attributed to the suppressive effect on ROS and superoxide anion production by inhibiting Nox1 expression and activation and protecting the mitochondrial electron transport chain system and the scavenging effect of ROS resulting from elevated SOD1 and CAT expression. - Highlights: • Scoparone dose-dependently inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation. • Scoparone diminished general ROS and superoxide anions in a dose-dependent manner. • Scoparone inhibited Nox1 expression and

  11. Carbon Monoxide Inhibits Receptor Activator of NF-κB (RANKL-Induced Osteoclastogenesis

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    Feng-Jen Tseng

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Low concentrations of carbon monoxide (CO have anti-inflammatory effects and can reduce bone erosion in a murine collagen-induced arthritis model. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of CO on receptor activator of NF-γB ligand (RANKL, one of the key stimulators of osteoclastogenesis. Methods: The in vivo effects of CO on RANKL expression were assessed in a collagen antibody-induced arthritis model in mice. Cell proliferation and apoptosis were assessed in the RAW246.7 cell line stimulated with RANKL and exposed to either air or CO. The number of tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP-positive RAW246.7 cells was also examined after treatment with RANKL and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ agonist, Troglitazone. Results: CO reduced RANKL expression in the synovium of arthritic mice. Although CO slightly increased RAW246.7 cell proliferation, no differences in activated caspase 3 levels were detected. In addition, Troglitazone ameliorated the inhibitory effects of CO on RANKL-induced TRAP expression by RAW246.7 cells. Conclusions: CO suppresses osteoclast differentiation by inhibiting the RANKL-induced activation of PPAR-γ. Given the role of the PPAR-γ/cFos (AP-1 pathway in regulating the transcription factor, NFATc1, the master regulator of osteoclastogenesis, further studies are warranted to explore CO in treating inflammatory bone disorders.

  12. The inhibitory effect of vitamin K on RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption.

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    Wu, Wei-Jie; Kim, Min Seuk; Ahn, Byung-Yong

    2015-10-01

    To further understand the correlation between vitamin K and bone metabolism, the effects of vitamins K1, menaquinone-4 (MK-4), and menaquinone-7 (MK-7) on RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption were comparatively investigated. Vitamin K2 groups (MK-4 and MK-7) were found to significantly inhibit RANKL-medicated osteoclast cell formation of bone marrow macrophages (BMMs) in a dose-dependent manner, without any evidence of cytotoxicity. The mRNA expression of specific osteoclast differentiation markers, such as c-Fos, NFATc1, OSCAR, and TRAP, as well as NFATc1 protein expression and TRAP activity in RANKL-treated BMMs were inhibited by vitamin K2, although MK-4 exhibited a significantly greater efficiency compared to MK-7. In contrast, the same dose of vitamin K1 had no inhibitory effect on RANKL-induced osteoclast cell formation, but increased the expression of major osteoclastogenic genes. Interestingly, vitamins K1, MK-4 and MK-7 all strongly inhibited osteoclastic bone resorption (p vitamins K1, MK-4 and MK-7 have anti-osteoporotic properties, while their regulation effects on osteoclastogenesis are somewhat different.

  13. Irreversible inhibition of RANK expression as a possible mechanism for IL-3 inhibition of RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis

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    Khapli, Shruti M.; Tomar, Geetanjali B.; Barhanpurkar, Amruta P.; Gupta, Navita; Yogesha, S.D.; Pote, Satish T. [National Center for Cell Science, University of Pune Campus, Pune 411 007 (India); Wani, Mohan R., E-mail: mohanwani@nccs.res.in [National Center for Cell Science, University of Pune Campus, Pune 411 007 (India)

    2010-09-03

    Research highlights: {yields} IL-3 inhibits receptor activator of NF-{kappa}B ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclastogenesis. {yields} IL-3 inhibits RANKL-induced JNK activation. {yields} IL-3 down-regulates expression of c-Fos and NFATc1 transcription factors. {yields} IL-3 down-regulates RANK expression posttranscriptionally and irreversibly. {yields} IL-3 inhibits in vivo RANK expression. -- Abstract: IL-3, a cytokine secreted by activated T lymphocytes, stimulates the proliferation, differentiation and survival of pluripotent hematopoietic stem cells. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of inhibitory action of IL-3 on osteoclast differentiation. We show here that IL-3 significantly inhibits receptor activator of NF-{kappa}B (RANK) ligand (RANKL)-induced activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). IL-3 down-regulates expression of c-Fos and nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFATc1) transcription factors. In addition, IL-3 down-regulates RANK expression posttranscriptionally in both purified osteoclast precursors and whole bone marrow cells. Furthermore, the inhibitory effect of IL-3 on RANK expression was irreversible. Interestingly, IL-3 inhibits in vivo RANK expression in mice. Thus, we provide the first evidence that IL-3 irreversibly inhibits RANK expression that results in inhibition of important signaling molecules induced by RANKL.

  14. Palmitoleic Acid Inhibits RANKL-Induced Osteoclastogenesis and Bone Resorption by Suppressing NF-κB and MAPK Signalling Pathways.

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    van Heerden, Bernadette; Kasonga, Abe; Kruger, Marlena C; Coetzee, Magdalena

    2017-04-28

    Osteoclasts are large, multinucleated cells that are responsible for the breakdown or resorption of bone during bone remodelling. Studies have shown that certain fatty acids (FAs) can increase bone formation, reduce bone loss, and influence total bone mass. Palmitoleic acid (PLA) is a 16-carbon, monounsaturated FA that has shown anti-inflammatory properties similar to other FAs. The effects of PLA in bone remain unexplored. Here we investigated the effects of PLA on receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast formation and bone resorption in RAW264.7 murine macrophages. PLA decreased the number of large, multinucleated tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) positive osteoclasts and furthermore, suppressed the osteolytic capability of these osteoclasts. This was accompanied by a decrease in expression of resorption markers (Trap, matrix metalloproteinase 9 (Mmp9), cathepsin K (Ctsk)). PLA further decreased the expression of genes involved in the formation and function of osteoclasts. Additionally, PLA inhibited NF-κB activity and the activation of mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Moreover, PLA induced apoptosis in mature osteoclasts. This study reveals that PLA inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclast formation in RAW264.7 murine macrophages through suppression of NF-κB and MAPK signalling pathways. This may indicate that PLA has potential as a therapeutic for bone diseases characterized by excessive osteoclast formation.

  15. Alliin Attenuated RANKL-Induced Osteoclastogenesis by Scavenging Reactive Oxygen Species through Inhibiting Nox1

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    Yueqi Chen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The healthy skeleton requires a perfect coordination of the formation and degradation of bone. Metabolic bone disease like osteoporosis is resulted from the imbalance of bone formation and/or bone resorption. Osteoporosis also reflects lower level of bone matrix, which is contributed by up-regulated osteoclast-mediated bone resorption. It is reported that monocytes/macrophage progenitor cells or either hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs gave rise to multinucleated osteoclasts. Thus, inhibition of osteoclastic bone resorption generally seems to be a predominant therapy for treating osteoporosis. Recently, more and more natural compounds have been discovered, which have the ability of inhibiting osteoclast differentiation and fusion. Alliin (S-allyl-l-cysteine sulfoxides, SACSO is the major component of aged garlic extract (AGE, bearing broad-spectrum natural antioxidant properties. However, its effects on bone health have not yet been explored. Hence, we designed the current study to explore its effects and role in receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL-induced osteoclast fusion and differentiation. It was revealed that alliin had an inhibitory effect in osteoclasteogenesis with a dose-dependent manner via blocking the c-Fos-NFATc1 signaling pathway. In addition, alliin decreased the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS and down-regulated the expression of NADPH oxidase 1 (Nox1. The overall results revealed that alliin could be a potential therapeutic agent in the treatment of osteoporosis.

  16. Niclosamide suppresses RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis and prevents LPS-induced bone loss

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    Cheon, Yoon-Hee [Center for Metabolic Function Regulation, Wonkwang University School of Medicine, Iksan, Jeonbuk 570-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ju-Young [Imaging Science-based Lung and Bone Diseases Research Center, Wonkwang University School of Medicine, Iksan, Jeonbuk 570-749 (Korea, Republic of); Baek, Jong Min; Ahn, Sung-Jun [Department of Anatomy, School of Medicine, Wonkwang University School of Medicine, Iksan, Jeonbuk 570-749 (Korea, Republic of); So, Hong-Seob, E-mail: jeanso@wku.ac.kr [Center for Metabolic Function Regulation, Wonkwang University School of Medicine, Iksan, Jeonbuk 570-749 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Jaemin, E-mail: jmoh@wku.ac.kr [Imaging Science-based Lung and Bone Diseases Research Center, Wonkwang University School of Medicine, Iksan, Jeonbuk 570-749 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Anatomy, School of Medicine, Wonkwang University School of Medicine, Iksan, Jeonbuk 570-749 (Korea, Republic of); Institute for Skeletal Disease, Wonkwang University School of Medicine, Iksan, Jeonbuk 570-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-05

    Niclosamide (5-chloro-salicyl-(2-chloro-4-nitro) anilide) is an oral anthelmintic drug used for treating intestinal infection of most tapeworms. Recently, niclosamide was shown to have considerable efficacy against some tumor cell lines, including colorectal, prostate, and breast cancers, and acute myelogenous leukemia. Specifically, the drug was identified as a potent inhibitor of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), which is associated with osteoclast differentiation and function. In this study, we assessed the effect of niclosamide on osteoclastogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Our in vitro study showed that receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast differentiation was inhibited by niclosamide, due to inhibition of serine–threonine protein kinase (Akt) phosphorylation, inhibitor of nuclear factor-kappaB (IκB), and STAT3 serine{sup 727}. Niclosamide decreased the expression of the major transcription factors c-Fos and NFATc1, and thereafter abrogated the mRNA expression of osteoclast-specific genes, including TRAP, OSCAR, αv/β3 integrin (integrin αv, integrin β3), and cathepsin K (CtsK). In an in vivo model, niclosamide prevented lipopolysaccharide-induced bone loss by diminishing osteoclast activity. Taken together, our results show that niclosamide is effective in suppressing osteoclastogenesis and may be considered as a new and safe therapeutic candidate for the clinical treatment of osteoclast-related diseases such as osteoporosis. - Highlights: • We first investigated the anti-osteoclastogenic effects of niclosamide in vitro and in vivo. • Niclosamide impairs the activation of the Akt-IκB-STAT3 ser{sup 727} signaling axis. • Niclosamide acts a negative regulator of actin ring formation during osteoclast differentiation. • Niclosamide suppresses LPS-induced bone loss in vivo. • Niclosamide deserves new evaluation as a potential treatment target in various bone diseases.

  17. Inhibitory effects of eugenol on RANKL-induced osteoclast formation via attenuation of NF-κB and MAPK pathways.

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    Deepak, Vishwa; Kasonga, Abe; Kruger, Marlena C; Coetzee, Magdalena

    2015-06-01

    Bone loss diseases are often associated with increased receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast formation. Compounds that can attenuate RANKL-mediated osteoclast formation are of great biomedical interest. Eugenol, a phenolic constituent of clove oil possesses medicinal properties; however, its anti-osteoclastogenic potential is unexplored hitherto. Here, we found that eugenol dose-dependently inhibited the RANKL-induced multinucleated osteoclast formation and TRAP activity in RAW264.7 macrophages. The underlying molecular mechanisms included the attenuation of RANKL-mediated degradation of IκBα and subsequent activation of NF-κB pathway. Furthermore, increase in phosphorylation and activation of RANKL-induced mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways (MAPK) was perturbed by eugenol. RANKL-induced expression of osteoclast-specific marker genes such as TRAP, cathepsin K (CtsK) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) was remarkably downregulated by eugenol. These findings provide the first line of evidence that eugenol mediated attenuation of RANKL-induced NF-κB and MAPK pathways could synergistically contribute to the inhibition of osteoclast formation. Eugenol could be developed as therapeutic agent against diseases with excessive osteoclast activity.

  18. Physical Guidance of Cell Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losert, Wolfgang

    Cells migrate as individuals or groups, to perform critical functions in life from organ development to wound healing and the immune response. While directed migration of cells is often mediated by chemical or physical gradients, our recent work has demonstrated that the physical properties of the microenvironment can also control and guide migration. I will describe how an underlying wave-like process of the actin scaffolding drives persistent migration, and how such actin waves are nucleated and guided by the texture of the microenvironment. Based on this observation we design textures capable of guiding cells in a single preferred direction using local asymmetries in nano/microtopography on subcellular scales, or altering migration in other ways. This phenomenon is observed both for the pseudopod-dominated migration of Dictyostelium cells and for the lamellipod-driven migration of human neutrophils. The conservation of this mechanism across cell types suggests that actin-wave-based guidance is important in biology and physiology.

  19. Substrate curvature regulates cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiuxiu; Jiang, Yi

    2017-05-23

    Cell migration is essential in many aspects of biology. Many basic migration processes, including adhesion, membrane protrusion and tension, cytoskeletal polymerization, and contraction, have to act in concert to regulate cell migration. At the same time, substrate topography modulates these processes. In this work, we study how substrate curvature at micrometer scale regulates cell motility. We have developed a 3D mechanical model of single cell migration and simulated migration on curved substrates with different curvatures. The simulation results show that cell migration is more persistent on concave surfaces than on convex surfaces. We have further calculated analytically the cell shape and protrusion force for cells on curved substrates. We have shown that while cells spread out more on convex surfaces than on concave ones, the protrusion force magnitude in the direction of migration is larger on concave surfaces than on convex ones. These results offer a novel biomechanical explanation to substrate curvature regulation of cell migration: geometric constrains bias the direction of the protrusion force and facilitates persistent migration on concave surfaces.

  20. Echinocystic acid inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis by regulating NF-κB and ERK signaling pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jian-hui, E-mail: jianhui_yangxa@163.com [Rehabilitation Center, First Affiliated Hospital of Health Science Center, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, 710061, Shaanxi Province (China); Li, Bing [Department of Dermatology, the 451st Hospital of People’s Liberation Army, Xi’an 710054, Shaanxi Province (China); Wu, Qiong; Lv, Jian-guo; Nie, Hui-Yong [Rehabilitation Center, First Affiliated Hospital of Health Science Center, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, 710061, Shaanxi Province (China)

    2016-09-02

    Receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL) is a key factor in the differentiation and activation of osteoclasts. Echinocystic acid (EA), a pentacyclic triterpene isolated from the fruits of Gleditsia sinensis Lam, was reported to prevent reduction of bone mass and strength and improve the cancellous bone structure and biochemical properties in ovariectomy rats. However, the molecular mechanism of EA on the osteoclast formation has not been reported. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects and mechanism of EA on RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis. Our results showed that EA inhibited the formation of osteoclast, as well as the expression of osteoclastogenesis-related marker proteins in bone marrow macrophages (BMMs). At molecular levels, EA inhibited RANKL-induced NF-κB activation and ERK phosphorylation in BMMs. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that EA can suppress osteoclastogenesis in vitro. Moreover, we clarified that these inhibitory effects of EA occur through suppression of NF-κB and ERK activation. Therefore, EA may be a potential agent in the treatment of osteoclast-related diseases such as osteoporosis. - Highlights: • EA inhibited the formation of osteoclast in BMMs. • EA inhibits the expression of osteoclastogenesis-related marker proteins in BMMs. • EA inhibits RANKL-induced NF-κB activation in BMMs. • EA inhibits RANKL-induced ERK phosphorylation in BMMs.

  1. Geraniin suppresses RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in vitro and ameliorates wear particle-induced osteolysis in mouse model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Fei; Zhai, Zanjing; Jiang, Chuan; Liu, Xuqiang; Li, Haowei; Qu, Xinhua [Department of Orthopedics, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Orthopedic Implant, Shanghai Ninth People' s Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Ouyang, Zhengxiao [Department of Orthopedics, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Orthopedic Implant, Shanghai Ninth People' s Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Department of Orthopaedics, Hunan Provincial Tumor Hospital and Tumor Hospital of Xiangya School of Medicine, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410013 (China); Fan, Qiming; Tang, Tingting [Department of Orthopedics, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Orthopedic Implant, Shanghai Ninth People' s Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Qin, An, E-mail: dr.qinan@gmail.com [Department of Orthopedics, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Orthopedic Implant, Shanghai Ninth People' s Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Gu, Dongyun, E-mail: dongyungu@gmail.com [Department of Orthopedics, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Orthopedic Implant, Shanghai Ninth People' s Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Engineering Research Center of Digital Medicine and Clinical Translation, Ministry of Education of PR China (China); School of Biomedical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 1954 Huashan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China)

    2015-01-01

    Wear particle-induced osteolysis and subsequent aseptic loosening remains the most common complication that limits the longevity of prostheses. Wear particle-induced osteoclastogenesis is known to be responsible for extensive bone erosion that leads to prosthesis failure. Thus, inhibition of osteoclastic bone resorption may serve as a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of wear particle induced osteolysis. In this study, we demonstrated for the first time that geraniin, an active natural compound derived from Geranium thunbergii, ameliorated particle-induced osteolysis in a Ti particle-induced mouse calvaria model in vivo. We also investigated the mechanism by which geraniin exerts inhibitory effects on osteoclasts. Geraniin inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in a dose-dependent manner, evidenced by reduced osteoclast formation and suppressed osteoclast specific gene expression. Specially, geraniin inhibited actin ring formation and bone resorption in vitro. Further molecular investigation demonstrated geraniin impaired osteoclast differentiation via the inhibition of the RANKL-induced NF-κB and ERK signaling pathways, as well as suppressed the expression of key osteoclast transcriptional factors NFATc1 and c-Fos. Collectively, our data suggested that geraniin exerts inhibitory effects on osteoclast differentiation in vitro and suppresses Ti particle-induced osteolysis in vivo. Geraniin is therefore a potential natural compound for the treatment of wear particle induced osteolysis in prostheses failure. - Highlights: • Geraniin suppresses osteoclasts formation and function in vitro. • Geraniin impairs RANKL-induced nuclear factor-κB and ERK signaling pathway. • Geraniin suppresses osteolysis in vivo. • Geraniin may be used for treating osteoclast related diseases.

  2. The plant limonoid 7-oxo-deacetoxygedunin inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis by suppressing activation of the NF-{kappa}B and MAPK pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wisutsitthiwong, Chonnaree; Buranaruk, Chayanit [Graduate Program in Industrial Microbiology, Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Phayathai Road, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Pudhom, Khanitha [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Center for Petroleum, Petrochemicals and Advanced Materials, Chulalongkorn University, Phayathai Road, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Palaga, Tanapat, E-mail: tanapat.p@chula.ac.th [Graduate Program in Industrial Microbiology, Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Phayathai Road, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand)

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A gedunin type limonoid from seeds of mangroves, 7-oxo-7-deacetoxygedunin, exhibits strong anti-osteoclastogenic activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Treatment with this limonoid results in significant decrease in expression of NFATc1 and osteoclast-related genes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mode of action of this limonoid is by inhibiting activation of the NF-{kappa}B and MAPK pathways which are activated by RANKL. -- Abstract: Osteoclasts together with osteoblasts play pivotal roles in bone remodeling. Aberrations in osteoclast differentiation and activity contribute to osteopenic disease. Osteoclasts differentiate from monocyte/macrophage progenitors, a process that is initiated by the interaction between receptor activator of NF-{kappa}B (RANK) and its ligand, RANKL. In this study, we identified 7-oxo-7-deacetoxygedunin (7-OG), a gedunin type limonoid from seeds of the mangrove Xylocarpus moluccensis, as a potent inhibitor of osteoclastogenesis. Additionally, 7-OG showed strong anti-osteoclastogenic activity with low cytotoxicity against the monocyte/macrophage progenitor cell line, RAW264.7. The IC50 for anti-osteoclastogenic activity was 4.14 {mu}M. Treatment with 7-OG completely abolished the appearance of multinucleated giant cells with tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase activity in RAW264.7 cells stimulated with RANKL. When the expression of genes related to osteoclastogenesis was investigated, a complete downregulation of NFATc1 and cathepsin K and a delayed downregulation of irf8 were observed upon 7-OG treatment in the presence of RANKL. Furthermore, treatment with this limonoid suppressed RANKL-induced activation of p38, MAPK and Erk and nuclear localization of NF-{kappa}B p65. Taken together, we present evidence indicating a plant limonoid as a novel osteoclastogenic inhibitor that could be used for osteoporosis and related conditions.

  3. Tuning Collective Cell Migration by Cell-Cell Junction Regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friedl, P.; Mayor, R.

    2017-01-01

    Collective cell migration critically depends on cell-cell interactions coupled to a dynamic actin cytoskeleton. Important cell-cell adhesion receptor systems implicated in controlling collective movements include cadherins, immunoglobulin superfamily members (L1CAM, NCAM, ALCAM), Ephrin/Eph

  4. Migrasomes: a new organelle of migrating cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Rocha-Azevedo, Bruno; Schmid, Sandra L

    2015-01-01

    Cell migration is a multi-step process that involves the coordinated action of signaling networks, cytoskeletal dynamics and vesicular trafficking, leading to protrusion and adhesion at the leading edge of cells and contraction and detachment at their rear. In a recent paper in Cell Research, Ma et al. describe the biogenesis of a new exosome-like organelle--named migrasomes--that derive from retraction fibers at the rear of migrating cells and their potential roles in inter-cellular signaling.

  5. Human neutrophils facilitate tumor cell transendothelial migration.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wu, Q D

    2012-02-03

    Tumor cell extravasation plays a key role in tumor metastasis. However, the precise mechanisms by which tumor cells migrate through normal vascular endothelium remain unclear. In this study, using an in vitro transendothelial migration model, we show that human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) assist the human breast tumor cell line MDA-MB-231 to cross the endothelial barrier. We found that tumor-conditioned medium (TCM) downregulated PMN cytocidal function, delayed PMN apoptosis, and concomitantly upregulated PMN adhesion molecule expression. These PMN treated with TCM attached to tumor cells and facilitated tumor cell migration through different endothelial monolayers. In contrast, MDA-MB-231 cells alone did not transmigrate. FACScan analysis revealed that these tumor cells expressed high levels of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) but did not express CD11a, CD11b, or CD18. Blockage of CD11b and CD18 on PMN and of ICAM-1 on MDA-MB-231 cells significantly attenuated TCM-treated, PMN-mediated tumor cell migration. These tumor cells still possessed the ability to proliferate after PMN-assisted transmigration. These results indicate that TCM-treated PMN may serve as a carrier to assist tumor cell transendothelial migration and suggest that tumor cells can exploit PMN and alter their function to facilitate their extravasation.

  6. Human neutrophils facilitate tumor cell transendothelial migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Q D; Wang, J H; Condron, C; Bouchier-Hayes, D; Redmond, H P

    2001-04-01

    Tumor cell extravasation plays a key role in tumor metastasis. However, the precise mechanisms by which tumor cells migrate through normal vascular endothelium remain unclear. In this study, using an in vitro transendothelial migration model, we show that human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) assist the human breast tumor cell line MDA-MB-231 to cross the endothelial barrier. We found that tumor-conditioned medium (TCM) downregulated PMN cytocidal function, delayed PMN apoptosis, and concomitantly upregulated PMN adhesion molecule expression. These PMN treated with TCM attached to tumor cells and facilitated tumor cell migration through different endothelial monolayers. In contrast, MDA-MB-231 cells alone did not transmigrate. FACScan analysis revealed that these tumor cells expressed high levels of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) but did not express CD11a, CD11b, or CD18. Blockage of CD11b and CD18 on PMN and of ICAM-1 on MDA-MB-231 cells significantly attenuated TCM-treated, PMN-mediated tumor cell migration. These tumor cells still possessed the ability to proliferate after PMN-assisted transmigration. These results indicate that TCM-treated PMN may serve as a carrier to assist tumor cell transendothelial migration and suggest that tumor cells can exploit PMN and alter their function to facilitate their extravasation.

  7. Rho GTPases in collective cell migration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zegers, M.M.; Friedl, P.

    2014-01-01

    The family of Rho GTPases are intracellular signal transducers that link cell surface signals to multiple intracellular responses. They are best known for their role in regulating actin dynamics required for cell migration, but in addition control cell-cell adhesion, polarization, vesicle

  8. Primordial Germ Cell Specification and Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlow, Florence

    2015-01-01

    Primordial germ cells are the progenitor cells that give rise to the gametes. In some animals, the germline is induced by zygotic transcription factors, whereas in others, primordial germ cell specification occurs via inheritance of maternally provided gene products known as germ plasm. Once specified, the primordial germ cells of some animals must acquire motility and migrate to the gonad in order to survive. In all animals examined, perinuclear structures called germ granules form within germ cells. This review focuses on some of the recent studies, conducted by several groups using diverse systems, from invertebrates to vertebrates, which have provided mechanistic insight into the molecular regulation of germ cell specification and migration.

  9. Ethanol Extracts of Fresh Davallia formosana (WL1101) Inhibit Osteoclast Differentiation by Suppressing RANKL-Induced Nuclear Factor-κB Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tzu-Hung; Yang, Rong-Sen; Wang, Kuan-Chin; Lu, Dai-Hua; Liou, Houng-Chi; Ma, Yun; Chang, Shao-Han; Fu, Wen-Mei

    2013-01-01

    The rhizome of Davallia formosana is commonly used to treat bone disease including bone fracture, arthritis, and osteoporosis in Chinese herbal medicine. Here, we report the effects of WL1101, the ethanol extracts of fresh rhizomes of Davallia formosana on ovariectomy-induced osteoporosis. In addition, excess activated bone-resorbing osteoclasts play crucial roles in inflammation-induced bone loss diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis and osteoporosis. In this study, we examined the effects of WL1101 on receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclastogenesis. Treatment with WL1101 significantly inhibited RANKL-stimulated osteoclastogenesis. Two isolated active compounds, ((−)-epicatechin) or WL14 (4-hydroxy-3-aminobenzoic acid) could also inhibit RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis. WL1101 suppressed the RANKL-induced nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation and nuclear translocation, which is the key process during osteoclastogenesis, by inhibiting the activation of IκB kinase (IKK) and IκBα. In animal model, oral administration of WL1101 (50 or 200 mg/kg/day) effectively decreased the excess bone resorption and significantly antagonized the trabecular bone loss in ovariectomized rats. Our results demonstrate that the ethanol extracts of fresh rhizomes of Davallia formosana inhibit osteoclast differentiation via the inhibition of NF-κB activation and effectively ameliorate ovariectomy-induced osteoporosis. WL1101 may thus have therapeutic potential for the treatment of diseases associated with excessive osteoclastic activity. PMID:24191169

  10. Tenuigenin inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis by down-regulating NF-κB activation and suppresses bone loss in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Shuo [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, The Xiangya Hospital of Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410008 (China); Department of Orthopedics, Hunan Cancer Hospital and The Affiliated Cancer Hospital of Xiangya School of Medicine, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410012 (China); Li, Xianan [Department of Orthopedics, Hunan Cancer Hospital and The Affiliated Cancer Hospital of Xiangya School of Medicine, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410012 (China); Cheng, Liang [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, The Xiangya Hospital of Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410008 (China); Wu, Hongwei [Department of Orthopedics, Hunan Cancer Hospital and The Affiliated Cancer Hospital of Xiangya School of Medicine, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410012 (China); Zhang, Can [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, The Xiangya Hospital of Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410008 (China); Li, Kanghua, E-mail: lkh8738@sina.com [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, The Xiangya Hospital of Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410008 (China)

    2015-10-30

    Tenuigenin, a major active component of polygala tenuifolia root, has been used to treat patients with insomnia, dementia, and neurosis. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of tenuigenin on osteoclastogenesis and clarify the possible mechanism. We showed that tenuigenin inhibited receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption without cytotoxicity, which was further demonstrated by reduced osteoclast specific gene expression such as TRAP, c-Src, ATP6v0d2, etc. Moreover, the inhibitory effect of tenuigenin was associated with impaired NF-κB activity owing to delayed degradation/regeneration of IkBa and inhibition of p65 nuclear translocation. Consistent with the in vitro results, micro-ct scanning and analysis data showed that tenuigenin suppressed RANKL-induced bone loss in an animal model. Taken together, our data demonstrate that tenuigenin inhibit osteoclast formation and bone resorption both in vitro and in vivo, and comprise a potential therapeutic alternative for osteoclast-related disorders such as osteoporosis and cancer-induced bone destruction. - Highlights: • Tenuigenin suppresses osteoclasts formation, survival and function in vitro. • Tenuigenin impairs NF-κB activation. • Tenuigenin suppresses RANKL-induced bone lose in vivo. • Tenuigenin may be used for treating osteoclast related diseases.

  11. Ethanol Extracts of Fresh Davallia formosana (WL1101 Inhibit Osteoclast Differentiation by Suppressing RANKL-Induced Nuclear Factor-κB Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Hung Lin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The rhizome of Davallia formosana is commonly used to treat bone disease including bone fracture, arthritis, and osteoporosis in Chinese herbal medicine. Here, we report the effects of WL1101, the ethanol extracts of fresh rhizomes of Davallia formosana on ovariectomy-induced osteoporosis. In addition, excess activated bone-resorbing osteoclasts play crucial roles in inflammation-induced bone loss diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis and osteoporosis. In this study, we examined the effects of WL1101 on receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis. Treatment with WL1101 significantly inhibited RANKL-stimulated osteoclastogenesis. Two isolated active compounds, ((−-epicatechin or WL14 (4-hydroxy-3-aminobenzoic acid could also inhibit RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis. WL1101 suppressed the RANKL-induced nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB activation and nuclear translocation, which is the key process during osteoclastogenesis, by inhibiting the activation of IκB kinase (IKK and IκBα. In animal model, oral administration of WL1101 (50 or 200 mg/kg/day effectively decreased the excess bone resorption and significantly antagonized the trabecular bone loss in ovariectomized rats. Our results demonstrate that the ethanol extracts of fresh rhizomes of Davallia formosana inhibit osteoclast differentiation via the inhibition of NF-κB activation and effectively ameliorate ovariectomy-induced osteoporosis. WL1101 may thus have therapeutic potential for the treatment of diseases associated with excessive osteoclastic activity.

  12. Study of Cell Migration in Microfabricated Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Pablo; Terriac, Emmanuel; Lennon-Duménil, Ana-Maria; Piel, Matthieu

    2014-01-01

    The method described here allows the study of cell migration under confinement in one dimension. It is based on the use of microfabricated channels, which impose a polarized phenotype to cells by physical constraints. Once inside channels, cells have only two possibilities: move forward or backward. This simplified migration in which directionality is restricted facilitates the automatic tracking of cells and the extraction of quantitative parameters to describe cell movement. These parameters include cell velocity, changes in direction, and pauses during motion. Microchannels are also compatible with the use of fluorescent markers and are therefore suitable to study localization of intracellular organelles and structures during cell migration at high resolution. Finally, the surface of the channels can be functionalized with different substrates, allowing the control of the adhesive properties of the channels or the study of haptotaxis. In summary, the system here described is intended to analyze the migration of large cell numbers in conditions in which both the geometry and the biochemical nature of the environment are controlled, facilitating the normalization and reproducibility of independent experiments. PMID:24637569

  13. Study of cell migration in microfabricated channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Pablo; Terriac, Emmanuel; Lennon-Duménil, Ana-Maria; Piel, Matthieu

    2014-02-21

    The method described here allows the study of cell migration under confinement in one dimension. It is based on the use of microfabricated channels, which impose a polarized phenotype to cells by physical constraints. Once inside channels, cells have only two possibilities: move forward or backward. This simplified migration in which directionality is restricted facilitates the automatic tracking of cells and the extraction of quantitative parameters to describe cell movement. These parameters include cell velocity, changes in direction, and pauses during motion. Microchannels are also compatible with the use of fluorescent markers and are therefore suitable to study localization of intracellular organelles and structures during cell migration at high resolution. Finally, the surface of the channels can be functionalized with different substrates, allowing the control of the adhesive properties of the channels or the study of haptotaxis. In summary, the system here described is intended to analyze the migration of large cell numbers in conditions in which both the geometry and the biochemical nature of the environment are controlled, facilitating the normalization and reproducibility of independent experiments.

  14. Bu-Shen-Ning-Xin decoction: inhibition of osteoclastogenesis by abrogation of the RANKL-induced NFATc1 and NF-κB signaling pathways via selective estrogen receptor α

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang L

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Ling Wang,1,2,* Xue-Min Qiu,1,2,* Yu-Yan Gui,1,2 Ying-Ping Xu,1,2 Hans-Jürgen Gober,3 Da-Jin Li11Laboratory for Reproductive Immunology, Hospital and Institute of Obstetrics and Gynecology, IBS, Fudan University Shanghai Medical College, 2Shanghai Key Laboratory of Female Reproductive Endocrine Related Diseases, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Pharmacy, Wagner Jauregg Hospital and Children’s Hospital, Wagner Jauregg Weg, Linz, Austria*These authors contributed equally to this workIntroduction: Bu-Shen-Ning-Xin decoction (BSNXD is a traditional Chinese medicinal composition that has been used as a remedy for postmenopausal osteoporosis, but the mechanisms affecting bone metabolism are not fully understood.Purpose: We investigated the molecular mechanism and signaling pathway underlying the effect of BSNXD on osteoclastogenesis.Materials and methods: A postmenopausal osteoporosis animal model generated by ovariectomy was administered BSNXD and drug-derived serum was prepared. An enzyme immunoassay was conducted to measure the 17-β-estradiol (E2 concentration in the drug-derived serum. Bone marrow-derived monocyte/macrophage precursor cells were treated with drug-derived serum, and tartrate-resistance acid phosphatase staining was conducted to observe osteoclastogenesis. A bone resorption assay was performed to analyze the effect on osteoclastic resorptive function. Real-time PCR, flow cytometry, Western blotting, transfection, and luciferase assays were conducted to explore the related mechanism.Results: E2 was not elevated in BSNXD-derived serum. BSNXD-derived serum suppressed receptor activation of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL-activated osteoclastogenesis in a dose-dependent manner; this effect could be reversed by estrogen receptor α antagonist methyl-piperidino-pyrazole. The serum suppressed RANKL-induced NF-κB transcription and inhibited the accumulation of nuclear factor of activated T-cells, cytoplasmic 1

  15. Modeling cell migration in 3D: Status and challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Rangarajan, Rajagopal; Zaman, Muhammad H.

    2008-01-01

    Cell migration is a multi-scale process that integrates signaling, mechanics and biochemical reaction kinetics. Various mathematical models accurately predict cell migration on 2D surfaces, but are unable to capture the complexities of 3D migration. Additionally, quantitative 3D cell migration models have been few and far between. In this review we look and characterize various mathematical models available in literature to predict cell migration in 3D matrices and analyze their strengths and...

  16. Inhibitory Effect of Chrysanthemum zawadskii Herbich var. latilobum Kitamura Extract on RANKL-Induced Osteoclast Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Ryun Gu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chrysanthemum zawadskii Herbich var. latilobum Kitamura, known as “Gujulcho” in Korea, has been used in traditional medicine to treat various inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis. However, these effects have not been tested on osteoclasts, the bone resorbing cells that regulate bone metabolism. Here, we investigated the effects of C. zawadskii Herbich var. latilobum Kitamura ethanol extract (CZE on osteoclast differentiation induced by treatment with the receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL. CZE inhibited osteoclast differentiation and formation in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibitory effect of CZE on osteoclastogenesis was due to the suppression of ERK activation and the ablation of RANKL-stimulated Ca2+-oscillation via the inactivation of PLCγ2, followed by the inhibition of CREB activation. These inhibitory effects of CZE resulted in a significant repression of c-Fos expression and a subsequent reduction of NFATc1, a key transcription factor for osteoclast differentiation, fusion, and activation in vitro and in vivo. These results indicate that CZE negatively regulates osteoclast differentiation and may be a therapeutic candidate for the treatment of various bone diseases, such as postmenopausal osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and periodontitis.

  17. Migration of cells in a social context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedel, Søren; Tay, Savas; Johnston, Darius M

    2013-01-01

    In multicellular organisms and complex ecosystems, cells migrate in a social context. Whereas this is essential for the basic processes of life, the influence of neighboring cells on the individual remains poorly understood. Previous work on isolated cells has observed a stereotypical migratory...... based on the experimentally identified "cellular traffic rules" and basic physics that revealed that these emergent behaviors are caused by the interplay of single-cell properties and intercellular interactions, the latter being dominated by a pseudopod formation bias mediated by secreted chemicals...... and pseudopod collapse following collisions. The model demonstrates how aspects of complex biology can be explained by simple rules of physics and constitutes a rapid test bed for future studies of collective migration of individual cells....

  18. Modeling collective cell migration in geometric confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarle, Victoria; Gauquelin, Estelle; Vedula, S. R. K.; D'Alessandro, Joseph; Lim, C. T.; Ladoux, Benoit; Gov, Nir S.

    2017-06-01

    Monolayer expansion has generated great interest as a model system to study collective cell migration. During such an expansion the culture front often develops ‘fingers’, which we have recently modeled using a proposed feedback between the curvature of the monolayer’s leading edge and the outward motility of the edge cells. We show that this model is able to explain the puzzling observed increase of collective cellular migration speed of a monolayer expanding into thin stripes, as well as describe the behavior within different confining geometries that were recently observed in experiments. These comparisons give support to the model and emphasize the role played by the edge cells and the edge shape during collective cell motion.

  19. A medium-chain fatty acid, capric acid, inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation via the suppression of NF-κB signaling and blocks cytoskeletal organization and survival in mature osteoclasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Ju; Yoon, Hye-Jin; Kim, Shin-Yoon; Yoon, Young-Ran

    2014-08-01

    Fatty acids, important components of a normal diet, have been reported to play a role in bone metabolism. Osteoclasts are bone-resorbing cells that are responsible for many bone-destructive diseases such as osteoporosis. In this study, we investigated the impact of a medium-chain fatty acid, capric acid, on the osteoclast differentiation, function, and survival induced by receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (MCSF). Capric acid inhibited RANKL-mediated osteoclastogenesis in bone marrow-derived macrophages and suppressed RANKL-induced IκBα phosphorylation, p65 nuclear translocation, and NF-κB transcriptional activity. Capric acid further blocked the RANKL-stimulated activation of ERK without affecting JNK or p38. The induction of NFATc1 in response to RANKL was also attenuated by capric acid. In addition, capric acid abrogated M-CSF and RANKL-mediated cytoskeleton reorganization, which is crucial for the efficient bone resorption of osteoclasts. Capric acid also increased apoptosis in mature osteoclasts through the induction of Bim expression and the suppression of ERK activation by M-CSF. Together, our results reveal that capric acid has inhibitory effects on osteoclast development. We therefore suggest that capric acid may have potential therapeutic implications for the treatment of bone resorption-associated disorders.

  20. Substrate Curvature Regulates Cell Migration -A Computational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiuxiu; Jiang, Yi

    Cell migration in host microenvironment is essential to cancer etiology, progression and metastasis. Cellular processes of adhesion, cytoskeletal polymerization, contraction, and matrix remodeling act in concert to regulate cell migration, while local extracellular matrix architecture modulate these processes. In this work we study how stromal microenvironment with native and cell-derived curvature at micron-meter scale regulate cell motility pattern. We developed a 3D model of single cell migration on a curved substrate. Mathematical analysis of cell morphological adaption to the cell-substrate interface shows that cell migration on convex surfaces deforms more than on concave surfaces. Both analytical and simulation results show that curved surfaces regulate the cell motile force for cell's protruding front through force balance with focal adhesion and cell contraction. We also found that cell migration on concave substrates is more persistent. These results offer a novel biomechanical explanation to substrate curvature regulation of cell migration. NIH 1U01CA143069.

  1. Cell Structure Controls Endothelial Cell Migration under Fluid Shear Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiefan; Helmke, Brian P

    2009-06-01

    Cobblestone-shaped endothelial cells in confluent monolayers undergo triphasic mechanotaxis in response to steady unidirectional shear stress, but cells that are elongated and aligned on micropatterned substrates do not change their migration behavior in response to either perpendicular or parallel flow. Whether mechanotaxis of micropatterned endothelial cell layers is suppressed by elongated cytoskeletal structure or limited availability of adhesion area remains unknown. In this study, cells were examined on wide (100-200 μm) micropatterned lines after onset of shear stress. Cells in center regions of the lines exhibited cobblestone morphology and triphasic mechanotaxis behavior similar to that in unpatterned monolayers, whereas cells along the edges migrated parallel to the line axis regardless of the flow direction. When scratch wounds were created perpendicular to the micropatterned lines, the cells became less elongated before migrating into the denuded area. In sparsely populated lines oriented perpendicular to the flow direction, elongated cells along the upstream edge migrated parallel to the edge for 7 h before migrating parallel to the shear stress direction, even though adhesion area existed in the downstream direction. Thus, cytoskeletal structure and not available adhesion area serves as the dominant factor in determining whether endothelial mechanotaxis occurs in response to shear stress.

  2. Collective cell migration: Implications for wound healing and cancer invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Li

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available During embryonic morphogenesis, wound repair and cancer invasion, cells often migrate collectively via tight cell-cell junctions, a process named collective migration. During such migration, cells move as coherent groups, large cell sheets, strands or tubes rather than individually. One unexpected finding regarding collective cell migration is that being a "multicellular structure" enables cells to better respond to chemical and physical cues, when compared with isolated cells. This is important because epithelial cells heal wounds via the migration of large sheets of cells with tight intercellular connections. Recent studies have gained some mechanistic insights that will benefit the clinical understanding of wound healing in general. In this review, we will briefly introduce the role of collective cell migration in wound healing, regeneration and cancer invasion and discuss its underlying mechanisms as well as implications for wound healing.

  3. Quercetin Inhibits Cell Migration and Invasion in Human Osteosarcoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Haifeng; Hong, Wei; Fan, Pan; Qian, Dongyang; Zhu, Jianwei; Bai, Bo

    2017-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is a malignant tumor associated with high mortality; however, no effective therapies for the disease have been developed. Several studies have focused on elucidating the pathogenesis of osteosarcoma and have aimed to develop novel therapies for the disease. Quercetin is a vital dietary flavonoid that has been shown to have a variety of anticancer effects, as it induces cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and differentiation and is involved in cell adhesion, metastasis and angiogenesis. Herein, we aimed to investigate the effects of quercetin on osteosarcoma migration and invasion in vitro and in vivo and to explore the molecular mechanisms underlying its effects on osteosarcoma migration and invasion. Cell viability, cell cycle activity and cell apoptosis were measured using CCK-8 assay and flow cytometry, and cell migration and invasion were evaluated by wound healing and transwell assays, respectively. The mRNA and protein expression levels of several proteins of interest were assessed by real-time quantitative PCR and western blotting, respectively. Moreover, a nude mouse model of human osteosarcoma lung metastasis was established to assess the anti-metastatic effects of quercetin in vivo. We noted no significant differences in cell cycle activity and apoptosis between HOS and MG63 cells and control cells. Treatment with quercetin significantly attenuated cell migration and invasion in HOS and MG63 cells compared with treatment with control medium. Moreover HIF-1α, VEGF, MMP2, and MMP9 mRNA and protein expression levels were significantly downregulated in HOS cells treated with quercetin compared with HOS cells treated with controls. Additionally, treatment with quercetin attenuated metastatic lung tumor formation and growth in the nude mouse model of osteosarcoma compared with treatment with controls. Our findings regarding the inhibitory effects of quercetin on cell migration and invasion suggest that quercetin may have potential as a therapy for human

  4. Cell shape dynamics: from waves to migration.

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    Meghan K Driscoll

    Full Text Available We observe and quantify wave-like characteristics of amoeboid migration. Using the amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum, a model system for the study of chemotaxis, we demonstrate that cell shape changes in a wave-like manner. Cells have regions of high boundary curvature that propagate from the leading edge toward the back, usually along alternating sides of the cell. Curvature waves are easily seen in cells that do not adhere to a surface, such as cells that are electrostatically repelled from surfaces or cells that extend over the edge of micro-fabricated cliffs. Without surface contact, curvature waves travel from the leading edge to the back of a cell at -35 µm/min. Non-adherent myosin II null cells do not exhibit these curvature waves. At the leading edge of adherent cells, curvature waves are associated with protrusive activity. Like regions of high curvature, protrusive activity travels along the boundary in a wave-like manner. Upon contact with a surface, the protrusions stop moving relative to the surface, and the boundary shape thus reflects the history of protrusive motion. The wave-like character of protrusions provides a plausible mechanism for the zig-zagging of pseudopods and for the ability of cells both to swim in viscous fluids and to navigate complex three dimensional topography.

  5. Clara cell adhesion and migration to extracellular matrix

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    deMello Daphne

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clara cells are the epithelial progenitor cell of the small airways, a location known to be important in many lung disorders. Although migration of alveolar type II and bronchiolar ciliated epithelial cells has been examined, the migratory response of Clara cells has received little attention. Methods Using a modification of existing procedures for Clara cell isolation, we examined mouse Clara cells and a mouse Clara-like cell line (C22 for adhesion to and migration toward matrix substrate gradients, to establish the nature and integrin dependence of migration in Clara cells. Results We observed that Clara cells adhere preferentially to fibronectin (Fn and type I collagen (Col I similar to previous reports. Migration of Clara cells can be directed by a fixed gradient of matrix substrates (haptotaxis. Migration of the C22 cell line was similar to the Clara cells so integrin dependence of migration was evaluated with this cell line. As determined by competition with an RGD containing-peptide, migration of C22 cells toward Fn and laminin (Lm 511 (formerly laminin 10 was significantly RGD integrin dependent, but migration toward Col I was RGD integrin independent, suggesting that Clara cells utilize different receptors for these different matrices. Conclusion Thus, Clara cells resemble alveolar type II and bronchiolar ciliated epithelial cells by showing integrin mediated pro-migratory changes to extracellular matrix components that are present in tissues after injury.

  6. Natural Germacrane Sesquiterpenes Inhibit Osteoclast Formation, Bone Resorption, RANKL-Induced NF-κB Activation, and IκBα Degradation

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    Shengnan Qin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Osteolytic bone diseases are commonly presented with enhanced osteoclast formation and bone resorption. Sesquiterpene lactone natural compounds have been found to possess anti-inflammatory and immune-modulation effects. Here, we identified three germacrane sesquiterpenes using computer-based virtual screening for the structural similarity with sesquiterpene lactone, parthenolide. We showed that natural germacrane sesquiterpene compounds A, B, and C inhibit osteoclast formation and bone resorption in a dose-dependent manner, with relative potency compound A > compound C > compound B based on their equimolar concentrations. Mechanistic studies by Luciferase reporter gene assay and Western blot analysis showed that germacrane sesquiterpene compound A inhibits RANKL-induced activation of NF-κB and IκBα degradation. This study reveals that natural germacrane sesquiterpene compounds are inhibitors for osteoclast formation and bone resorption, and provides evidence that naturally-occurring compounds might be beneficial as alternative medicine for the prevention and treatment of osteolysis.

  7. Primary Cilia, Signaling Networks and Cell Migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veland, Iben Rønn

    on formation of the primary cilium and CDE at the pocket region. The ciliary protein Inversin functions as a molecular switch between canonical and non-canonical Wnt signaling. In paper II, we show that Inversin and the primary cilium control Wnt signaling and are required for polarization and cell migration....... A number of central Wnt components localize to the fibroblast primary cilium, including the Wnt5a-receptor, Fzd3, and Dvl proteins. Inversin-deficient MEFs have an elevated expression of canonical Wnt-associated genes and proteins, in addition to dysregulation of components in non-canonical Wnt signaling......, which leads to uncontrolled cell movements. Together, the results obtained from my PhD studies reflect the high level of complexity within signaling systems regulated by the primary cilium that control cellular processes during embryonic development and in tissue homeostasis. As such, this dissertation...

  8. Fine Tuning Cell Migration by a Disintegrin and Metalloproteinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreymueller, D; Theodorou, K; Donners, M; Ludwig, A

    2017-01-01

    Cell migration is an instrumental process involved in organ development, tissue homeostasis, and various physiological processes and also in numerous pathologies. Both basic cell migration and migration towards chemotactic stimulus consist of changes in cell polarity and cytoskeletal rearrangement, cell detachment from, invasion through, and reattachment to their neighboring cells, and numerous interactions with the extracellular matrix. The different steps of immune cell, tissue cell, or cancer cell migration are tightly coordinated in time and place by growth factors, cytokines/chemokines, adhesion molecules, and receptors for these ligands. This review describes how a disintegrin and metalloproteinases interfere with several steps of cell migration, either by proteolytic cleavage of such molecules or by functions independent of proteolytic activity.

  9. Fine Tuning Cell Migration by a Disintegrin and Metalloproteinases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodorou, K.

    2017-01-01

    Cell migration is an instrumental process involved in organ development, tissue homeostasis, and various physiological processes and also in numerous pathologies. Both basic cell migration and migration towards chemotactic stimulus consist of changes in cell polarity and cytoskeletal rearrangement, cell detachment from, invasion through, and reattachment to their neighboring cells, and numerous interactions with the extracellular matrix. The different steps of immune cell, tissue cell, or cancer cell migration are tightly coordinated in time and place by growth factors, cytokines/chemokines, adhesion molecules, and receptors for these ligands. This review describes how a disintegrin and metalloproteinases interfere with several steps of cell migration, either by proteolytic cleavage of such molecules or by functions independent of proteolytic activity. PMID:28260841

  10. Directional Cell Migration in Response to Repeated Substratum Stretching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okimura, Chika; Iwadate, Yoshiaki

    2017-10-01

    Crawling migration plays an essential role in a variety of biological phenomena, including development, wound healing, and immune system function. Migration properties such as anterior-posterior polarity, directionality, and velocity are regulated not only by the reception of a chemoattractant but also by sensing mechanical inputs from the external environment. In this review, we describe the mechanical response of migrating cells, particularly under repeated stretching of the elastic substratum, highlighting the fact that there appear to be two independent mechanosensing systems that generate the polarity needed for migration. Cells that have no stress fibers, such as Dictyostelium cells and neutrophil-like differentiated HL-60 cells, migrate perpendicular to the stretching direction via myosin II localization. Cells that do possess stress fibers, however, such as fish keratocytes, migrate parallel to the stretching via a stress-fiber-dependent process.

  11. Neural crest delamination and migration: from epithelium-to-mesenchyme transition to collective cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theveneau, Eric; Mayor, Roberto

    2012-06-01

    After induction and specification in the ectoderm, at the border of the neural plate, the neural crest (NC) population leaves its original territory through a delamination process. Soon afterwards, the NC cells migrate throughout the embryo and colonize a myriad of tissues and organs where they settle and differentiate. The delamination involves a partial or complete epithelium-to-mesenchyme transition (EMT) regulated by a complex network of transcription factors including several proto-oncogenes. Studying the relationship between these genes at the time of emigration, and their individual or collective impact on cell behavior, provides valuable information about their role in EMT in other contexts such as cancer metastasis. During migration, NC cells are exposed to large number of positive and negative regulators that control where they go by generating permissive and restricted areas and by modulating their motility and directionality. In addition, as most NC cells migrate collectively, cell-cell interactions play a crucial role in polarizing the cells and interpreting external cues. Cell cooperation eventually generates an overall polarity to the population, leading to directional collective cell migration. This review will summarize our current knowledge on delamination, EMT and migration of NC cells using key examples from chicken, Xenopus, zebrafish and mouse embryos. Given the similarities between neural crest migration and cancer invasion, these cells may represent a useful model for understanding the mechanisms of metastasis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Lutein Inhibits the Migration of Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells via Cytosolic and Mitochondrial Akt Pathways (Lutein Inhibits RPE Cells Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Chieh Su

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available During the course of proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR, the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE cells will de-differentiate, proliferate, and migrate onto the surfaces of the sensory retina. Several studies have shown that platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF can induce migration of RPE cells via an Akt-related pathway. In this study, the effect of lutein on PDGF-BB-induced RPE cells migration was examined using transwell migration assays and Western blot analyses. We found that both phosphorylation of Akt and mitochondrial translocation of Akt in RPE cells induced by PDGF-BB stimulation were suppressed by lutein. Furthermore, the increased migration observed in RPE cells with overexpressed mitochondrial Akt could also be suppressed by lutein. Our results demonstrate that lutein can inhibit PDGF-BB induced RPE cells migration through the inhibition of both cytoplasmic and mitochondrial Akt activation.

  13. Lutein Inhibits the Migration of Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells via Cytosolic and Mitochondrial Akt Pathways (Lutein Inhibits RPE Cells Migration)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ching-Chieh; Chan, Chi-Ming; Chen, Han-Min; Wu, Chia-Chun; Hsiao, Chien-Yu; Lee, Pei-Lan; Lin, Victor Chia-Hsiang; Hung, Chi-Feng

    2014-01-01

    During the course of proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR), the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells will de-differentiate, proliferate, and migrate onto the surfaces of the sensory retina. Several studies have shown that platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) can induce migration of RPE cells via an Akt-related pathway. In this study, the effect of lutein on PDGF-BB-induced RPE cells migration was examined using transwell migration assays and Western blot analyses. We found that both phosphorylation of Akt and mitochondrial translocation of Akt in RPE cells induced by PDGF-BB stimulation were suppressed by lutein. Furthermore, the increased migration observed in RPE cells with overexpressed mitochondrial Akt could also be suppressed by lutein. Our results demonstrate that lutein can inhibit PDGF-BB induced RPE cells migration through the inhibition of both cytoplasmic and mitochondrial Akt activation. PMID:25110866

  14. Leader Cells Define Directionality of Trunk, but Not Cranial, Neural Crest Cell Migration

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    Jo Richardson

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Collective cell migration is fundamental for life and a hallmark of cancer. Neural crest (NC cells migrate collectively, but the mechanisms governing this process remain controversial. Previous analyses in Xenopus indicate that cranial NC (CNC cells are a homogeneous population relying on cell-cell interactions for directional migration, while chick embryo analyses suggest a heterogeneous population with leader cells instructing directionality. Our data in chick and zebrafish embryos show that CNC cells do not require leader cells for migration and all cells present similar migratory capacities. In contrast, laser ablation of trunk NC (TNC cells shows that leader cells direct movement and cell-cell contacts are required for migration. Moreover, leader and follower identities are acquired before the initiation of migration and remain fixed thereafter. Thus, two distinct mechanisms establish the directionality of CNC cells and TNC cells. This implies the existence of multiple molecular mechanisms for collective cell migration.

  15. Multi-cellular logistics of collective cell migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masataka Yamao

    Full Text Available During development, the formation of biological networks (such as organs and neuronal networks is controlled by multicellular transportation phenomena based on cell migration. In multi-cellular systems, cellular locomotion is restricted by physical interactions with other cells in a crowded space, similar to passengers pushing others out of their way on a packed train. The motion of individual cells is intrinsically stochastic and may be viewed as a type of random walk. However, this walk takes place in a noisy environment because the cell interacts with its randomly moving neighbors. Despite this randomness and complexity, development is highly orchestrated and precisely regulated, following genetic (and even epigenetic blueprints. Although individual cell migration has long been studied, the manner in which stochasticity affects multi-cellular transportation within the precisely controlled process of development remains largely unknown. To explore the general principles underlying multicellular migration, we focus on the migration of neural crest cells, which migrate collectively and form streams. We introduce a mechanical model of multi-cellular migration. Simulations based on the model show that the migration mode depends on the relative strengths of the noise from migratory and non-migratory cells. Strong noise from migratory cells and weak noise from surrounding cells causes "collective migration," whereas strong noise from non-migratory cells causes "dispersive migration." Moreover, our theoretical analyses reveal that migratory cells attract each other over long distances, even without direct mechanical contacts. This effective interaction depends on the stochasticity of the migratory and non-migratory cells. On the basis of these findings, we propose that stochastic behavior at the single-cell level works effectively and precisely to achieve collective migration in multi-cellular systems.

  16. Magnetically actuated microstructured surfaces can actively modify cell migration behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khademolhosseini, F; Liu, C-C; Lim, C J; Chiao, M

    2016-02-01

    We present a study on the application of magnetically actuated polymer micropillar surfaces in modifying the migration behaviour of cells. We show that micropillar surfaces actuated at a frequency of 1 Hz can cause more than a 5-fold decrease in cell migration rates compared to controls, whereas non-actuated micropillar surfaces cause no statistically significant alterations in cell migration rates. The effectiveness of the micropillar arrays in impeding cell migration depends on micropillar density and placement patterns, as well as the direction of micropillar actuation with respect to the direction of cell migration. Since the magnetic micropillar surfaces presented can be actuated remotely with small external magnetic fields, their integration with implants could provide new possibilities for in-vivo tissue engineering applications.

  17. Automated migration analysis based on cell texture: method & reliability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chittenden Thomas W

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this paper, we present and validate a way to measure automatically the extent of cell migration based on automated examination of a series of digital photographs. It was designed specifically to identify the impact of Second Hand Smoke (SHS on endothelial cell migration but has broader applications. The analysis has two stages: (1 preprocessing of image texture, and (2 migration analysis. Results The output is a graphic overlay that indicates the front lines of cell migration superimposed on each original image, with automated reporting of the distance traversed vs. time. Expert preference compares to manual placement of leading edge shows complete equivalence of automated vs. manual leading edge definition for cell migration measurement. Conclusion Our method is indistinguishable from careful manual determinations of cell front lines, with the advantages of full automation, objectivity, and speed.

  18. Direct observations of the kinetics of migrating T cells suggest active retention by endothelial cells with continual bidirectional migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGettrick, Helen M; Hunter, Kirsty; Moss, Paul A; Buckley, Christopher D; Rainger, G Ed; Nash, Gerard B

    2009-01-01

    The kinetics and regulatory mechanisms of T cell migration through the endothelium have not been fully defined. In experimental, filter-based assays in vitro, transmigration of lymphocytes takes hours, compared with minutes, in vivo. We cultured endothelial cell (EC) monolayers on filters, solid substrates, or collagen gels and treated them with TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma, or both prior to analysis of lymphocyte migration in the presence or absence of flow. PBL, CD4+ cells, or CD8+ cells took many hours to migrate through EC-filter constructs for all cytokine treatments. However, direct microscopic observations of EC filters, which had been mounted in a flow chamber, showed that PBL crossed the endothelial monolayer in minutes and were highly motile in the subendothelial space. Migration through EC was also observed on clear plastic, with or without flow. After a brief settling without flow, PBL and isolated CD3+ or CD4+ cells crossed EC in minutes, but the numbers of migrated cells varied little with time. Close observation revealed that lymphocytes migrated back and forth continuously across endothelium. Under flow, migration kinetics and the proportions migrating back and forth were altered little. On collagen gels, PBL again crossed EC in minutes and migrated back and forth but showed little penetration of the gel over hours. In contrast, neutrophils migrated efficiently through EC and into gels. These observations suggest a novel model for lymphoid migration in which EC support migration but retain lymphocytes (as opposed to neutrophils), and additional signal(s) are required for onward migration.

  19. Migrating glioma cells express stem cell markers and give rise to new tumors upon xenografting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munthe, Sune; Sørensen, Mia D; Thomassen, Mads

    2016-01-01

    -related genes and the HOX-gene list in migrating cells compared to spheroids. Determination of GBM molecular subtypes revealed that subtypes of spheroids and migrating cells were identical. In conclusion, migrating tumor cells preserve expression of stem cell markers and functional CSC characteristics. Since...

  20. Serum factors affecting the cell migration inhibition response to lepromin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fliess, E L; Ruibal-Ares, B; Braun, M

    1975-01-01

    Cell migration inhibition of white blood cells in the presence of total protein lepromin (TPL) was studied in ten lepromatous patients, six tuberculoid patients, and ten normal controls; adding normal, tuberculoid, lepromatous, or no serum to the culture medium. Using normal or no serum, lepromatous patients and skin negative controls gave negative reactions, while tuberculoid patients and skin positive controls gave positive cell migration inhibitions. The addition of lepromatous serum gave a very significant overall increase of migration indices in all groups of subjects, turning to negative the positive reactions of lepromatous patients and positive controls. On the contrary, the addition of tuberculoid serum gave a decrease of migration index in all groups of subjects, turning to positive the reactions in lepromatous patients. The significance of these circulating factors, able to enhance or inhibit cell migration inhibition responses in patients and controls, is discussed.

  1. Cancer cell motility: lessons from migration in confined spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Colin D.; Mistriotis, Panagiotis; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos

    2017-01-01

    Time-lapse, deep-tissue imaging made possible by advances in intravital microscopy has demonstrated the importance of tumour cell migration through confining tracks in vivo. These tracks may either be endogenous features of tissues or be created by tumour or tumour-associated cells. Importantly, migration mechanisms through confining microenvironments are not predicted by 2D migration assays. Engineered in vitro models have been used to delineate the mechanisms of cell motility through confining spaces encountered in vivo. Understanding cancer cell locomotion through physiologically relevant confining tracks could be useful in developing therapeutic strategies to combat metastasis. PMID:27909339

  2. Collective cell migration drives morphogenesis of the kidney nephron.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandr Vasilyev

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Tissue organization in epithelial organs is achieved during development by the combined processes of cell differentiation and morphogenetic cell movements. In the kidney, the nephron is the functional organ unit. Each nephron is an epithelial tubule that is subdivided into discrete segments with specific transport functions. Little is known about how nephron segments are defined or how segments acquire their distinctive morphology and cell shape. Using live, in vivo cell imaging of the forming zebrafish pronephric nephron, we found that the migration of fully differentiated epithelial cells accounts for both the final position of nephron segment boundaries and the characteristic convolution of the proximal tubule. Pronephric cells maintain adherens junctions and polarized apical brush border membranes while they migrate collectively. Individual tubule cells exhibit basal membrane protrusions in the direction of movement and appear to establish transient, phosphorylated Focal Adhesion Kinase-positive adhesions to the basement membrane. Cell migration continued in the presence of camptothecin, indicating that cell division does not drive migration. Lengthening of the nephron was, however, accompanied by an increase in tubule cell number, specifically in the most distal, ret1-positive nephron segment. The initiation of cell migration coincided with the onset of fluid flow in the pronephros. Complete blockade of pronephric fluid flow prevented cell migration and proximal nephron convolution. Selective blockade of proximal, filtration-driven fluid flow shifted the position of tubule convolution distally and revealed a role for cilia-driven fluid flow in persistent migration of distal nephron cells. We conclude that nephron morphogenesis is driven by fluid flow-dependent, collective epithelial cell migration within the confines of the tubule basement membrane. Our results establish intimate links between nephron function, fluid flow, and morphogenesis.

  3. Minimum Entropy Autofocus Correction of Residual Range Cell Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-02

    Minimum Entropy Autofocus Correction of Residual Range Cell Migration Joshua M. Kantor Abstract—In this article we present a SAR autofocus algorithm...residual range shift, or operate by cross correlating range profiles to estimate residual range migration . These approaches are quite effective in many...range migration by cross-correlating range profiles can be difficult when the single pulse SNR is low and the scene does not have prominent point-like

  4. The Inhibition of RANKL-Induced Osteoclastogenesis through the Suppression of p38 Signaling Pathway by Naringenin and Attenuation of Titanium-Particle-Induced Osteolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wengang Wang

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the effect of naringenin on osteoclastogenesis and titanium particle-induced osteolysis. Osteolysis from wear-induced particles and aseptic loosening are the most frequent late complications of total joint arthroplasty leading to revision of the prosthesis. Osteolysis during aseptic loosening is most likely due to increased bone resorption by osteoclasts. Through in vitro studies, we demonstrated that naringenin, a naturally occurring flavanone in grapefruit and tomatoes, exerts potent inhibitory effects on the ligand of the receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB (RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis and revealed that the mechanism of action of naringenin, which inhibited osteoclastogenesis by suppression of the p38 signaling pathway. Through in vivo studies, we proved that naringenin attenuated titanium particle-induced osteolysis in a mouse calvarial model. In general, we demonstrated that naringenin inhibited osteoclastogenesis via suppression of p38 signaling in vitro and attenuated titanium particle-induced osteolysis in vivo. This study also suggested that naringenin has significant potential for the treatment of osteolysis-related diseases caused by excessive osteoclast formation and activity.

  5. Insulin promotes cell migration by regulating PSA-NCAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monzo, Hector J.; Coppieters, Natacha [Centre for Brain Research, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, The University of Auckland, Private Bag, 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Department of Anatomy and Medical Imaging, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, The University of Auckland, Private Bag, 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Park, Thomas I.H. [Centre for Brain Research, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, The University of Auckland, Private Bag, 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, The University of Auckland, Private Bag, 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Dieriks, Birger V.; Faull, Richard L.M. [Centre for Brain Research, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, The University of Auckland, Private Bag, 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Department of Anatomy and Medical Imaging, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, The University of Auckland, Private Bag, 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Dragunow, Mike [Centre for Brain Research, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, The University of Auckland, Private Bag, 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, The University of Auckland, Private Bag, 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Curtis, Maurice A., E-mail: m.curtis@auckland.ac.nz [Centre for Brain Research, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, The University of Auckland, Private Bag, 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Department of Anatomy and Medical Imaging, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, The University of Auckland, Private Bag, 92019, Auckland (New Zealand)

    2017-06-01

    Cellular interactions with the extracellular environment are modulated by cell surface polysialic acid (PSA) carried by the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM). PSA-NCAM is involved in cellular processes such as differentiation, plasticity, and migration, and is elevated in Alzheimer's disease as well as in metastatic tumour cells. Our previous work demonstrated that insulin enhances the abundance of cell surface PSA by inhibiting PSA-NCAM endocytosis. In the present study we have identified a mechanism for insulin-dependent inhibition of PSA-NCAM turnover affecting cell migration. Insulin enhanced the phosphorylation of the focal adhesion kinase leading to dissociation of αv-integrin/PSA-NCAM clusters, and promoted cell migration. Our results show that αv-integrin plays a key role in the PSA-NCAM turnover process. αv-integrin knockdown stopped PSA-NCAM from being endocytosed, and αv-integrin/PSA-NCAM clusters co-labelled intracellularly with Rab5, altogether indicating a role for αv-integrin as a carrier for PSA-NCAM during internalisation. Furthermore, inhibition of p-FAK caused dissociation of αv-integrin/PSA-NCAM clusters and counteracted the insulin-induced accumulation of PSA at the cell surface and cell migration was impaired. Our data reveal a functional association between the insulin/p-FAK-dependent regulation of PSA-NCAM turnover and cell migration through the extracellular matrix. Most importantly, they identify a novel mechanism for insulin-stimulated cell migration. - Highlights: • Insulin modulates PSA-NCAM turnover through upregulation of p-FAK. • P-FAK modulates αv-integrin/PSA-NCAM clustering. • αv-integrin acts as a carrier for PSA-NCAM endocytosis. • Cell migration is promoted by cell surface PSA. • Insulin promotes PSA-dependent migration in vitro.

  6. Migration of dendritic cell based cancer vaccines: in vivo veritas?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adema, Gosse J.; de Vries, I. Jolanda M.; Punt, Cornelis J. A.; Figdor, Carl G.

    2005-01-01

    Ex vivo generated cancer vaccines based on dendritic cells (DCs) are currently applied in the clinic. The migration of DCs from the tissues to the lymph nodes is tightly controlled and involves many different mediators and their receptors. A recent study demonstrated that the rate of migration of

  7. Analysis of primary cilia in directional cell migration in fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Søren Tvorup; Veland, Iben; Schwab, Albrecht

    2013-01-01

    Early studies of migrating fibroblasts showed that primary cilia orient in front of the nucleus and point toward the leading edge. Recent work has shown that primary cilia coordinate a series of signaling pathways critical to fibroblast cell migration during development and in wound healing. In p...

  8. Analysis of cell dispersion and migration by video-microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnomet, Arnaud; Terryn, Christine; Cutrona, Jérôme; Jonquet, Antoine; Birembaut, Philippe; Zahm, Jean-Marie

    2012-01-01

    In different physiopathological situations such as embryogenesis, wound repair and tumor invasion, isolated cells, or cell populations exhibit changes to their normal behavior and may acquire different migratory phenotypes. Live-cell imaging associated with the use of appropriate in vitro models in culture has become a powerful analytical tool for studying factors involved in cell migration and in cell-to-cell interactions. The scope of this chapter is to give an overview of in vitro models of cell migration and the technical advances permitting multiparameter quantification. The chapter hereby provides a detailed description of two-dimensional and three-dimensional approaches of cell dispersion and migration and finally gives a brief insight on computational quantification of the cell behavior. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A pilgrim's progress: Seeking meaning in primordial germ cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantú, Andrea V; Laird, Diana J

    2017-10-01

    Comparative studies of primordial germ cell (PGC) development across organisms in many phyla reveal surprising diversity in the route of migration, timing and underlying molecular mechanisms, suggesting that the process of migration itself is conserved. However, beyond the perfunctory transport of cellular precursors to their later arising home of the gonads, does PGC migration serve a function? Here we propose that the process of migration plays an additional role in quality control, by eliminating PGCs incapable of completing migration as well as through mechanisms that favor PGCs capable of responding appropriately to migration cues. Focusing on PGCs in mice, we explore evidence for a selective capacity of migration, considering the tandem regulation of proliferation and migration, cell-intrinsic and extrinsic control, the potential for tumors derived from failed PGC migrants, the potential mechanisms by which migratory PGCs vary in their cellular behaviors, and corresponding effects on development. We discuss the implications of a selective role of PGC migration for in vitro gametogenesis. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. A pilgrim's progress: Seeking meaning in primordial germ cell migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea V. Cantú

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Comparative studies of primordial germ cell (PGC development across organisms in many phyla reveal surprising diversity in the route of migration, timing and underlying molecular mechanisms, suggesting that the process of migration itself is conserved. However, beyond the perfunctory transport of cellular precursors to their later arising home of the gonads, does PGC migration serve a function? Here we propose that the process of migration plays an additional role in quality control, by eliminating PGCs incapable of completing migration as well as through mechanisms that favor PGCs capable of responding appropriately to migration cues. Focusing on PGCs in mice, we explore evidence for a selective capacity of migration, considering the tandem regulation of proliferation and migration, cell-intrinsic and extrinsic control, the potential for tumors derived from failed PGC migrants, the potential mechanisms by which migratory PGCs vary in their cellular behaviors, and corresponding effects on development. We discuss the implications of a selective role of PGC migration for in vitro gametogenesis.

  11. The thioredoxin system in breast cancer cell invasion and migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maneet Bhatia

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Metastasis is the most life threatening aspect of breast cancer. It is a multi-step process involving invasion and migration of primary tumor cells with a subsequent colonization of these cells at a secondary location. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of thioredoxin (Trx1 in the invasion and migration of breast cancer cells and to assess the strength of the association between high levels of Trx1 and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR1 expression with breast cancer patient survival. Our results indicate that the expression of both Trx1 and TrxR1 are statistically significantly increased in breast cancer patient cells compared with paired normal breast tissue from the same patient. Over-expression of Trx1 in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines enhanced cell invasion in in vitro assays while expression of a redox inactive mutant form of Trx1 (designated 1SS or the antisense mRNA inhibited cell invasion. Addition of exogenous Trx1 also enhanced cell invasion, while addition of a specific monoclonal antibody that inhibits Trx1 redox function decreased cell invasion. Over-expression of intracellular Trx1 did not increase cell migration but expression of intracellular 1SS inhibited migration. Addition of exogenous Trx1 enhanced cell migration while 1SS had no effect. Treatment with auranofin inhibited TrxR activity, cell migration and clonogenic activity of MDA-MB-231 cells, while increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS levels. Analysis of 25 independent cohorts with 5910 patients showed that Trx1 and TrxR1 were both associated with a poor patient prognosis in terms of overall survival, distant metastasis free survival and disease free survival. Therefore, targeting the Trx system with auranofin or other specific inhibitors may provide improved breast cancer patient outcomes through inhibition of cancer invasion and migration.

  12. Long-Term Live Cell Imaging of Cell Migration: Effects of Pathogenic Fungi on Human Epithelial Cell Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wöllert, Torsten; Langford, George M

    2016-01-01

    Long-term live cell imaging was used in this study to determine the responses of human epithelial cells to pathogenic biofilms formed by Candida albicans. Epithelial cells of the skin represent the front line of defense against invasive pathogens such as C. albicans but under certain circumstances, especially when the host's immune system is compromised, the skin barrier is breached. The mechanisms by which the fungal pathogen penetrates the skin and invade the deeper layers are not fully understood. In this study we used keratinocytes grown in culture as an in vitro model system to determine changes in host cell migration and the actin cytoskeleton in response to virulence factors produced by biofilms of pathogenic C. albicans. It is clear that changes in epithelial cell migration are part of the response to virulence factors secreted by biofilms of C. albicans and the actin cytoskeleton is the downstream effector that mediates cell migration. Our goal is to understand the mechanism by which virulence factors hijack the signaling pathways of the actin cytoskeleton to alter cell migration and thereby invade host tissues. To understand the dynamic changes of the actin cytoskeleton during infection, we used long-term live cell imaging to obtain spatial and temporal information of actin filament dynamics and to identify signal transduction pathways that regulate the actin cytoskeleton and its associated proteins. Long-term live cell imaging was achieved using a high resolution, multi-mode epifluorescence microscope equipped with specialized light sources, high-speed cameras with high sensitivity detectors, and specific biocompatible fluorescent markers. In addition to the multi-mode epifluorescence microscope, a spinning disk confocal long-term live cell imaging system (Olympus CV1000) equipped with a stage incubator to create a stable in vitro environment for long-term real-time and time-lapse microscopy was used. Detailed descriptions of these two long-term live

  13. Importance and regulation of adult stem cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lucas, Beatriz; Pérez, Laura M; Gálvez, Beatriz G

    2018-02-01

    Cell migration is an essential process throughout the life of vertebrates, beginning during embryonic development and continuing throughout adulthood. Stem cells have an inherent ability to migrate, that is as important as their capacity for self-renewal and differentiation, enabling them to maintain tissue homoeostasis and mediate repair and regeneration. Adult stem cells reside in specific tissue niches, where they remain in a quiescent state until called upon and activated by tissue environmental signals. Cell migration is a highly regulated process that involves the integration of intrinsic signals from the niche and extrinsic factors. Studies using three-dimensional in vitro models have revealed the astonishing plasticity of cells in terms of the migration modes employed in response to changes in the microenvironment. These same properties can, however, be subverted during the development of some pathologies such as cancer. In this review, we describe the response of adult stem cells to migratory stimuli and the mechanisms by which they sense and transduce intracellular signals involved in migratory processes. Understanding the molecular events underlying migration may help develop therapeutic strategies for regenerative medicine and to treat diseases with a cell migration component. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  14. Mechanical integration of actin and adhesion dynamics in cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardel, Margaret L; Schneider, Ian C; Aratyn-Schaus, Yvonne; Waterman, Clare M

    2010-01-01

    Directed cell migration is a physical process that requires dramatic changes in cell shape and adhesion to the extracellular matrix. For efficient movement, these processes must be spatiotemporally coordinated. To a large degree, the morphological changes and physical forces that occur during migration are generated by a dynamic filamentous actin (F-actin) cytoskeleton. Adhesion is regulated by dynamic assemblies of structural and signaling proteins that couple the F-actin cytoskeleton to the extracellular matrix. Here, we review current knowledge of the dynamic organization of the F-actin cytoskeleton in cell migration and the regulation of focal adhesion assembly and disassembly with an emphasis on how mechanical and biochemical signaling between these two systems regulate the coordination of physical processes in cell migration.

  15. Generating parabiotic zebrafish embryos for cell migration and homing studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demy, Doris Lou; Ranta, Zachary; Giorgi, Jean-Michel; Gonzalez, Magali; Herbomel, Philippe; Kissa, Karima

    2013-03-01

    Parabiosis, the surgical generation of conjoined organisms sharing a common bloodstream, has been a powerful tool for studying hematopoietic cell migration and interaction with stromal niches in rodent and avian systems. We describe a technique to generate parabiotic zebrafish embryos based on blastula fusion. This procedure permits the in vivo visualization of hematopoietic cell migration and homing to niches and peripheral tissues in zebrafish parabiotes of different genetic backgrounds.

  16. The integration of T cell migration, differentiation and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masopust, David; Schenkel, Jason M

    2013-05-01

    T cells function locally. Accordingly, T cells' recognition of antigen, their subsequent activation and differentiation, and their role in the processes of infection control, tumour eradication, autoimmunity, allergy and alloreactivity are intrinsically coupled with migration. Recent discoveries revise our understanding of the regulation and patterns of T cell trafficking and reveal limitations in current paradigms. Here, we review classic and emerging concepts, highlight the challenge of integrating new observations with existing T cell classification schemes and summarize the heuristic framework provided by viewing T cell differentiation and function first through the prism of migration.

  17. [Chemokines and their participation in leukemic cells migration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parfieńczyk, Adam; Kiersnowska-Rogowska, Beata; Rogowski, Franciszek

    2003-11-01

    Impaired migration of leukocytes is characteristic feature of leukaemias. Knowledge of the mechanisms of leukaemia cells migration has expanded greatly in recent years. Leukocytes infiltrates are formed in surrounding tissues due to changes in chemokines and adhesion molecules concentrations. The adhesive interactions of cells with other cells and between cells and with the extracellular matrix are started by activation leukaemic leukocytes by specific chemokines. There are four groups of chemokines receptors: CXC, CC, C and CX3C. Unfortunately pathological processes of cells activation in the curse of leukaemias have not been fully explained yet. The paper presents current opinions about structure and role of some chemokines and their receptors in leukaemic cells migration.

  18. Mechanisms for fast cell migration in complex environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Pablo; Barbier, Lucie; Sáez, Pablo José; Piel, Matthieu

    2017-10-01

    Cell migration depends on a combination of the cell's intrinsic capacity to move and the proper interpretation of external cues. This multistep process enables leukocytes to travel long distances in organs in just a few hours. This fast migration is partly due to the leukocytes' high level of plasticity, which helps them to adapt to a changing environment. Here, we review recent progress in understanding the mechanisms used by leukocytes to move rapidly and efficiently in intricate anatomical landscapes. We shall focus on specific cytoskeletal rearrangements used by neutrophils and dendritic cells to migrate within confined environments. Lastly, we will describe the properties that facilitate the rapid migration of leukocyte in complex tissue geometries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Laser-photophoretic migration and fractionation of human blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monjushiro, Hideaki; Tanahashi, Yuko; Watarai, Hitoshi

    2013-05-13

    Laser photophoretic migration behavior of human blood cells in saline solution was investigated under the irradiation of Nd:YAG laser beam (532 nm) in the absence and the presence of the flow in a fused silica capillary. Red blood cells (RBC) were migrated faster than white blood cells (WBC) and blood pellets to the direction of propagation of laser light. The observed photophoretic velocity of RBC was about 11 times faster than those of others. This was understood from the larger photophoretic efficiency of RBC than that of WBC, which was simulated based on the Mie scattering theory. Furthermore, it was found that, during the photophoretic migration, RBCs spontaneously orientated parallel to the migration direction so as to reduce the drag force. Finally, it was demonstrated that RBC and WBC were separated in a micro-channel flow system by the laser photophoresis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Cell proliferation within small intestinal crypts is the principal driving force for cell migration on villi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Aimee; Maclaren, Oliver J; Fletcher, Alexander G; Muraro, Daniele; Kreuzaler, Peter A; Byrne, Helen M; Maini, Philip K; Watson, Alastair J M; Pin, Carmen

    2017-02-01

    The functional integrity of the intestinal epithelial barrier relies on tight coordination of cell proliferation and migration, with failure to regulate these processes resulting in disease. It is not known whether cell proliferation is sufficient to drive epithelial cell migration during homoeostatic turnover of the epithelium. Nor is it known precisely how villus cell migration is affected when proliferation is perturbed. Some reports suggest that proliferation and migration may not be related while other studies support a direct relationship. We used established cell-tracking methods based on thymine analog cell labeling and developed tailored mathematical models to quantify cell proliferation and migration under normal conditions and when proliferation is reduced and when it is temporarily halted. We found that epithelial cell migration velocities along the villi are coupled to cell proliferation rates within the crypts in all conditions. Furthermore, halting and resuming proliferation results in the synchronized response of cell migration on the villi. We conclude that cell proliferation within the crypt is the primary force that drives cell migration along the villus. This methodology can be applied to interrogate intestinal epithelial dynamics and characterize situations in which processes involved in cell turnover become uncoupled, including pharmacological treatments and disease models.-Parker, A., Maclaren, O. J., Fletcher, A. G., Muraro, D., Kreuzaler, P. A., Byrne, H. M., Maini, P. K., Watson, A. J. M., Pin, C. Cell proliferation within small intestinal crypts is the principal driving force for cell migration on villi. © The Author(s).

  1. The role of Vimentin in Regulating Cell Invasive Migration in Dense Cultures of Breast Carcinoma Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messica, Yonatan; Laser-Azogui, Adi; Volberg, Tova; Elisha, Yair; Lysakovskaia, Kseniia; Eils, Roland; Gladilin, Evgeny; Geiger, Benjamin; Beck, Roy

    2017-11-01

    Cell migration and mechanics are tightly regulated by the integrated activities of the various cytoskeletal networks. In cancer cells, cytoskeletal modulations have been implicated in the loss of tissue integrity, and acquisition of an invasive phenotype. In epithelial cancers, for example, increased expression of the cytoskeletal filament protein vimentin correlates with metastatic potential. Nonetheless, the exact mechanism whereby vimentin affects cell motility remains poorly understood. In this study, we measured the effects of vimentin expression on the mechano-elastic and migratory properties of the highly invasive breast carcinoma cell line MDA231. We demonstrate here that vimentin stiffens cells and enhances cell migration in dense cultures, but exerts little or no effect on the migration of sparsely plated cells. These results suggest that cell-cell interactions play a key role in regulating cell migration, and coordinating cell movement in dense cultures. Our findings pave the way towards understanding the relationship between cell migration and mechanics, in a biologically relevant context.

  2. Insulin promotes cell migration by regulating PSA-NCAM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monzo, Hector J; Coppieters, Natacha; Park, Thomas I H; Dieriks, Birger V; Faull, Richard L M; Dragunow, Mike; Curtis, Maurice A

    2017-06-01

    Cellular interactions with the extracellular environment are modulated by cell surface polysialic acid (PSA) carried by the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM). PSA-NCAM is involved in cellular processes such as differentiation, plasticity, and migration, and is elevated in Alzheimer's disease as well as in metastatic tumour cells. Our previous work demonstrated that insulin enhances the abundance of cell surface PSA by inhibiting PSA-NCAM endocytosis. In the present study we have identified a mechanism for insulin-dependent inhibition of PSA-NCAM turnover affecting cell migration. Insulin enhanced the phosphorylation of the focal adhesion kinase leading to dissociation of αv-integrin/PSA-NCAM clusters, and promoted cell migration. Our results show that αv-integrin plays a key role in the PSA-NCAM turnover process. αv-integrin knockdown stopped PSA-NCAM from being endocytosed, and αv-integrin/PSA-NCAM clusters co-labelled intracellularly with Rab5, altogether indicating a role for αv-integrin as a carrier for PSA-NCAM during internalisation. Furthermore, inhibition of p-FAK caused dissociation of αv-integrin/PSA-NCAM clusters and counteracted the insulin-induced accumulation of PSA at the cell surface and cell migration was impaired. Our data reveal a functional association between the insulin/p-FAK-dependent regulation of PSA-NCAM turnover and cell migration through the extracellular matrix. Most importantly, they identify a novel mechanism for insulin-stimulated cell migration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Migrating into the Tumor: a Roadmap for T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Woude, Lieke L; Gorris, Mark A J; Halilovic, Altuna; Figdor, Carl G; de Vries, I Jolanda M

    2017-11-01

    Tumors can be divided into 'hot' (T cell inflamed) or 'cold' (T cell noninflamed) according to the presence of immune cells. In this review, we discuss variables that influence T cell migration into the tumor microenvironment. Chemokines can attract T cells to the tumor site and tumor intrinsic pathways can influence the composition of local chemokines. Tumor-induced vasculature can hamper T cell migration. Other immune cells and tumor-derived molecules can block T cell proliferation and survival. It is important to better understand these mechanisms in order to target them therapeutically. Enhancing T cell infiltration may increase response rates to immunotherapy and increase survival. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Mechanical guidance of collective cell migration and invasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trepat, Xavier

    A broad range of biological processes such as morphogenesis, tissue regeneration, and cancer invasion depend on the collective migration of epithelial cells. Guidance of collective cell migration is commonly attributed to soluble or immobilized chemical gradients. I will present novel mechanisms of collective cellular guidance that are physical in origin rather than chemical. Firstly, I will focus on how the mechanical interaction between the tumor and its stroma guides cancer cell invasion. I will show that cancer associated fibroblasts exert a physical force on cancer cells that enables their collective invasion. In the second part of my talk I will focus on durotaxis, the ability of cells to follow gradients of extracellular matrix stiffness. Durotaxis is well established as a single cell phenomenon but whether it can direct the motion of cell collectives is unknown. I will show that durotaxis emerges in cell collectives even if isolated constituent cells are unable to durotax. Collective durotaxis applies to a broad variety of epithelial cell types and requires the action of myosin motors and the integrity of cell-cell junctions. Collective durotaxis is more efficient than any previous report of single cell durotaxis; it thus emerges as robust mechanism to direct collective cell migration in development and disease.eplace this text with your abstract.

  5. Multidisciplinary approaches to understanding collective cell migration in developmental biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Linus J; Kulesa, Paul M; McLennan, Rebecca; Baker, Ruth E; Maini, Philip K

    2016-06-01

    Mathematical models are becoming increasingly integrated with experimental efforts in the study of biological systems. Collective cell migration in developmental biology is a particularly fruitful application area for the development of theoretical models to predict the behaviour of complex multicellular systems with many interacting parts. In this context, mathematical models provide a tool to assess the consistency of experimental observations with testable mechanistic hypotheses. In this review, we showcase examples from recent years of multidisciplinary investigations of neural crest cell migration. The neural crest model system has been used to study how collective migration of cell populations is shaped by cell-cell interactions, cell-environmental interactions and heterogeneity between cells. The wide range of emergent behaviours exhibited by neural crest cells in different embryonal locations and in different organisms helps us chart out the spectrum of collective cell migration. At the same time, this diversity in migratory characteristics highlights the need to reconcile or unify the array of currently hypothesized mechanisms through the next generation of experimental data and generalized theoretical descriptions. © 2016 The Authors.

  6. Human Alternative Macrophages Populate Calcified Areas of Atherosclerotic Lesions and Display Impaired RANKL-Induced Osteoclastic Bone Resorption Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia; Daoudi, Mehdi; Rosa, Mickael; Vinod, Manjula; Louvet, Loïc; Copin, Corinne; Fanchon, Mélanie; Vanhoutte, Jonathan; Derudas, Bruno; Belloy, Loic; Haulon, Stephan; Zawadzki, Christophe; Susen, Sophie; Massy, Ziad A; Eeckhoute, Jérôme; Staels, Bart

    2017-06-23

    Vascular calcification is a process similar to bone formation leading to an inappropriate deposition of calcium phosphate minerals in advanced atherosclerotic plaques. Monocyte-derived macrophages, located in atherosclerotic lesions and presenting heterogeneous phenotypes, from classical proinflammatory M1 to alternative anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages, could potentially display osteoclast-like functions. To characterize the phenotype of macrophages located in areas surrounding the calcium deposits in human atherosclerotic plaques. Macrophages near calcium deposits display an alternative phenotype being both CD68 and mannose receptor-positive, expressing carbonic anhydrase type II, but relatively low levels of cathepsin K. In vitro interleukin-4-polarization of human primary monocytes into macrophages results in lower expression and activity of cathepsin K compared with resting unpolarized macrophages. Moreover, interleukin-4 polarization lowers expression levels of the osteoclast transcriptional activator nuclear factor of activated T cells type c-1, associated with increased gene promoter levels of the transcriptional repression mark H3K27me3 (histone 3 lysine 27 trimethylation). Despite higher expression of the receptor activator of nuclear factor κB receptor, receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand/macrophage colony-stimulating factor induction of nuclear factor of activated T cells type c-1 and cathepsin K expression is defective in these macrophages because of reduced Erk/c-fos-mediated downstream signaling resulting in impaired bone resorption capacity. These results indicate that macrophages surrounding calcium deposits in human atherosclerotic plaques are phenotypically defective being unable to resorb calcification. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. ADP-Ribosylation Factor 1 Regulates Proliferation, Migration, and Fusion in Early Stage of Osteoclast Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Jae Kim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Small G-protein adenosine diphosphate (ADP-ribosylation factors (ARFs regulate a variety of cellular functions, including actin cytoskeleton remodeling, plasma membrane reorganization, and vesicular transport. Here, we propose the functional roles of ARF1 in multiple stages of osteoclast differentiation. ARF1 was upregulated during receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation and transiently activated in an initial stage of their differentiation. Differentiation of ARF1-deficient osteoclast precursors into mature osteoclasts temporarily increased in pre-maturation stage of osteoclasts followed by reduced formation of mature osteoclasts, indicating that ARF1 regulates the osteoclastogenic process. ARF1 deficiency resulted in reduced osteoclast precursor proliferation and migration as well as increasing cell-cell fusion. In addition, ARF1 silencing downregulated c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK, Akt, osteopontin, and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF-receptor c-Fms as well as upregulating several fusion-related genes including CD44, CD47, E-cadherin, and meltrin-α. Collectively, we showed that ARF1 stimulated proliferation and migration of osteoclast precursors while suppressing their fusion, suggesting that ARF1 may be a plausible inter-player that mediates the transition to osteoclast fusion at multiple steps during osteoclast differentiation

  8. How Tissue Mechanical Properties Affect Enteric Neural Crest Cell Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, N. R.; Gazguez, E.; Bidault, L.; Guilbert, T.; Vias, C.; Vian, E.; Watanabe, Y.; Muller, L.; Germain, S.; Bondurand, N.; Dufour, S.; Fleury, V.

    2016-02-01

    Neural crest cells (NCCs) are a population of multipotent cells that migrate extensively during vertebrate development. Alterations to neural crest ontogenesis cause several diseases, including cancers and congenital defects, such as Hirschprung disease, which results from incomplete colonization of the colon by enteric NCCs (ENCCs). We investigated the influence of the stiffness and structure of the environment on ENCC migration in vitro and during colonization of the gastrointestinal tract in chicken and mouse embryos. We showed using tensile stretching and atomic force microscopy (AFM) that the mesenchyme of the gut was initially soft but gradually stiffened during the period of ENCC colonization. Second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy revealed that this stiffening was associated with a gradual organization and enrichment of collagen fibers in the developing gut. Ex-vivo 2D cell migration assays showed that ENCCs migrated on substrates with very low levels of stiffness. In 3D collagen gels, the speed of the ENCC migratory front decreased with increasing gel stiffness, whereas no correlation was found between porosity and ENCC migration behavior. Metalloprotease inhibition experiments showed that ENCCs actively degraded collagen in order to progress. These results shed light on the role of the mechanical properties of tissues in ENCC migration during development.

  9. Laser-photophoretic migration and fractionation of human blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monjushiro, Hideaki; Tanahashi, Yuko; Watarai, Hitoshi, E-mail: watarai@chem.sci.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2013-05-13

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •RBCs were migrated faster than WBCs and blood pellets by laser photophoresis. •Photophoretic efficiency of RBC and WBC was simulated by the Mie scattering theory. •Spontaneous orientation of RBC parallel to the migration direction was elucidated. •Laser photophoretic separation of RBC and WBC was possible in a tip flow system. -- Abstract: Laser photophoretic migration behavior of human blood cells in saline solution was investigated under the irradiation of Nd:YAG laser beam (532 nm) in the absence and the presence of the flow in a fused silica capillary. Red blood cells (RBC) were migrated faster than white blood cells (WBC) and blood pellets to the direction of propagation of laser light. The observed photophoretic velocity of RBC was about 11 times faster than those of others. This was understood from the larger photophoretic efficiency of RBC than that of WBC, which was simulated based on the Mie scattering theory. Furthermore, it was found that, during the photophoretic migration, RBCs spontaneously orientated parallel to the migration direction so as to reduce the drag force. Finally, it was demonstrated that RBC and WBC were separated in a micro-channel flow system by the laser photophoresis.

  10. Loss of Gadkin Affects Dendritic Cell Migration In Vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Schachtner

    Full Text Available Migration is crucial for the function of dendritic cells (DCs, which act as outposts of the immune system. Upon detection of pathogens, skin- and mucosa-resident DCs migrate to secondary lymphoid organs where they activate T cells. DC motility relies critically on the actin cytoskeleton, which is regulated by the actin-related protein 2/3 (ARP2/3 complex, a nucleator of branched actin networks. Consequently, loss of ARP2/3 stimulators and upstream Rho family GTPases dramatically impairs DC migration. However, nothing is known yet about the relevance of ARP2/3 inhibitors for DC migration. We previously demonstrated that the AP-1-associated adaptor protein Gadkin inhibits ARP2/3 by sequestering it on intracellular vesicles. Consistent with a role of Gadkin in DC physiology, we here report Gadkin expression in bone marrow-derived DCs and show that its protein level and posttranslational modification are regulated upon LPS-induced DC maturation. DCs derived from Gadkin-deficient mice were normal with regards to differentiation and maturation, but displayed increased actin polymerization. While the actin-dependent processes of macropinocytosis and cell spreading were not affected, loss of Gadkin significantly impaired DC migration in vitro, however, in vivo DC migration was unperturbed suggesting the presence of compensatory mechanisms.

  11. A large-scale (19)F MRI-based cell migration assay to optimize cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonetto, F; Srinivas, M; Weigelin, B; Cruz, L J; Heerschap, A; Friedl, P; Figdor, C G; de Vries, I J M

    2012-09-01

    Adoptive transfer of cells for therapeutic purposes requires efficient and precise delivery to the target organ whilst preserving cell function. Therefore, therapeutically applied cells need to migrate and integrate within their target tissues after delivery, e.g. dendritic cells (DCs) need to migrate to lymph nodes to elicit an antigen-specific immune response. Previous studies have shown that inappropriate cell delivery can hinder DC migration and result in insufficient immune induction. As migration can be extremely difficult to study quantitatively in vivo, we propose an in vitro assay that reproduces key in vivo conditions to optimize cell delivery and migration in vivo. Using DC migration along a chemokine gradient, we describe here a novel (19)F MR-based, large-scale, quantitative assay to measure cell migration in a three-dimensional collagen scaffold. Unlike conventional migration assays, this set-up is amenable to both large and small cell numbers, as well as opaque tissue samples and the inclusion of chemokines or other factors. We labeled primary human DCs with a (19)F label suitable for clinical use; (0.5-15) × 10(6) cells in the scaffolds were imaged sequentially, and migration was assessed using two independent methods. We found no migration with larger numbers of cells, but up to 3% with less than one million cells. Hence, we show that the cell density in cell bolus injections has a decisive impact on migration, and this may explain the limited migration observed using large cell numbers in the clinic. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Low Doses of Curcuma longa Modulates Cell Migration and Cell-Cell Adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Campos, Paloma Santos; Matte, Bibiana Franzen; Diel, Leonardo Francisco; Jesus, Luciano Henrique; Bernardi, Lisiane; Alves, Alessandro Menna; Rados, Pantelis Varvaki; Lamers, Marcelo Lazzaron

    2017-09-01

    Cell invasion and metastasis are involved in clinical failures in cancer treatment, and both events require the acquisition of a migratory behavior by tumor cells. Curcumin is a promising natural product with anti-proliferative activity, but its effects on cell migration are still unclear. We evaluated the effects of curcumin on the proliferation, apoptosis, migration, and cell-cell adhesion of keratinocyte, oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), and fibroblast cell lines, as well as in a xenograft model of OSCC. Curcumin (2 μM) decreased cell proliferation in cell lines with mesenchymal characteristics, while cell death was detected only at 50 μM. We observed that highly migratory cells showed a decrease on migration speed and directionality when treated with 2 or 5 μM of curcumin (50% and 40%, respectively, p < 0.05). Using spheroids, we observed that curcumin dose dependently decreased cell-cell adhesion, especially on tumor-derived spheroids. Also, in a xenograft model with patient-derived OSCC cells, the administration of curcumin decreased tumor growth and aggressiveness when compared with untreated tumors, indicating the potential antitumor effect in oral cancer. These results suggest that lower doses of curcumin can influence several steps involved in tumorigenesis, including migration properties, suggesting a possible use in cancer therapy. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Role of laminin receptor in tumor cell migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, U M; Taraboletti, G; Sobel, M E

    1987-01-01

    ). These antisera were used to study the potential role of laminin receptor in laminin-mediated attachment and haptotactic migration of human A2058 melanoma cells. The anti-laminin receptor antisera reacted with the surface of suspended, nonpermeabilized melanoma and carcinoma cells. The anti-laminin receptor...... antisera blocked the surface interaction of A2058 cells with endogenous laminin, resulting in the inhibition of laminin-mediated cell attachment. The A2058 melanoma cells migrated toward a gradient of solid phase laminin or fibronectin (haptotaxis). Anti-laminin antiserum abolished haptotaxis on laminin...... but not on fibronectin. Synthetic peptide GRGDS corresponding to the fibronectin cell-binding domain inhibited haptotaxis on fibronectin but not on laminin. Both types of anti-laminin receptor antisera inhibited haptotaxis on laminin but not on fibronectin. Using immunohistochemistry, invading human carcinoma cells...

  14. High glucose-mediated oxidative stress impairs cell migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo L Lamers

    Full Text Available Deficient wound healing in diabetic patients is very frequent, but the cellular and molecular causes are poorly defined. In this study, we evaluate the hypothesis that high glucose concentrations inhibit cell migration. Using CHO.K1 cells, NIH-3T3 fibroblasts, mouse embryonic fibroblasts and primary skin fibroblasts from control and diabetic rats cultured in 5 mM D-glucose (low glucose, LG, 25 mM D-glucose (high glucose, HG or 25 mM L-glucose medium (osmotic control--OC, we analyzed the migration speed, protrusion stability, cell polarity, adhesion maturation and the activity of the small Rho GTPase Rac1. We also analyzed the effects of reactive oxygen species by incubating cells with the antioxidant N-Acetyl-Cysteine (NAC. We observed that HG conditions inhibited cell migration when compared to LG or OC. This inhibition resulted from impaired cell polarity, protrusion destabilization and inhibition of adhesion maturation. Conversely, Rac1 activity, which promotes protrusion and blocks adhesion maturation, was increased in HG conditions, thus providing a mechanistic basis for the HG phenotype. Most of the HG effects were partially or completely rescued by treatment with NAC. These findings demonstrate that HG impairs cell migration due to an increase in oxidative stress that causes polarity loss, deficient adhesion and protrusion. These alterations arise, in large part, from increased Rac1 activity and may contribute to the poor wound healing observed in diabetic patients.

  15. Directed Migration of Embryonic Stem Cell-derived Neural Cells In An Applied Electric Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Mark; Yao, Li

    2014-01-01

    Spinal cord injury or diseases, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, can cause the loss of motor neurons and therefore results in the paralysis of muscles. Stem cells may improve functional recovery by promoting endogenous regeneration, or by directly replacing neurons. Effective directional migration of grafted neural cells to reconstruct functional connections is crucial in the process. Steady direct current electric fields (EFs) play an important role in the development of the central nervous system. A strong biological effect of EFs is the induction of directional cell migration. In this study, we investigated the guided migration of embryonic stem cell (ESC) derived presumptive motor neurons in an applied EF. The dissociated mouse ESC derived presumptive motor neurons or embryoid bodies were subjected to EFs stimulation and the cell migration was studied. We found that the migration of neural precursors from embryoid bodies was toward cathode pole of applied EFs. Single motor neurons migrated to the cathode of the EFs and reversal of EFs poles reversed their migration direction. The directedness and displacement of cathodal migration became more significant when the field strength was increased from 50 mV/mm to 100 mV/mm. EFs stimulation did not influence the cell migration velocity. Our work suggests that EFs may serve as a guidance cue to direct grafted cell migration in vivo. PMID:24804615

  16. Directed migration of embryonic stem cell-derived neural cells in an applied electric field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongchao; Weiss, Mark; Yao, Li

    2014-10-01

    Spinal cord injury or diseases, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, can cause the loss of motor neurons and therefore results in the paralysis of muscles. Stem cells may improve functional recovery by promoting endogenous regeneration, or by directly replacing neurons. Effective directional migration of grafted neural cells to reconstruct functional connections is crucial in the process. Steady direct current electric fields (EFs) play an important role in the development of the central nervous system. A strong biological effect of EFs is the induction of directional cell migration. In this study, we investigated the guided migration of embryonic stem cell (ESC) derived presumptive motor neurons in an applied EF. The dissociated mouse ESC derived presumptive motor neurons or embryoid bodies were subjected to EFs stimulation and the cell migration was studied. We found that the migration of neural precursors from embryoid bodies was toward cathode pole of applied EFs. Single motor neurons migrated to the cathode of the EFs and reversal of EFs poles reversed their migration direction. The directedness and displacement of cathodal migration became more significant when the field strength was increased from 50 mV/mm to 100 mV/mm. EFs stimulation did not influence the cell migration velocity. Our work suggests that EFs may serve as a guidance cue to direct grafted cell migration in vivo.

  17. Extracellular matrix type modulates cell migration on mechanical gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Christopher D; Isenberg, Brett C; Chua, Samantha G; Wong, Joyce Y

    2017-10-15

    Extracellular matrix composition and stiffness are known to be critical determinants of cell behavior, modulating processes including differentiation, traction generation, and migration. Recent studies have demonstrated that the ECM composition can modulate how cells migrate in response to gradients in environmental stiffness, altering a cell's ability to undergo durotaxis. These observations were limited to single varieties of extracellular matrix, but typically cells are exposed to environments containing complex mixtures of extracellular matrix proteins. Here, we investigate migration of NIH 3T3 fibroblasts on mechanical gradients coated with one or more type of extracellular matrix protein. Our results show that NIH 3T3 fibroblasts exhibit durotaxis on fibronectin-coated mechanical gradients but not on those coated with laminin, demonstrating that extracellular matrix type can act as a regulator of cell response to mechanical gradients. Interestingly, NIH 3T3 fibroblasts were also observed to migrate randomly on gradients coated with a mixture of both fibronectin and laminin, suggesting that there may be a complex interplay in the cellular response to mechanical gradients in the presence of multiple extracellular matrix signals. These findings indicate that specific composition of available adhesion ligands is a critical determinant of a cell's migratory response to mechanical gradients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Cell Migration According to Shape of Graphene Oxide Micropatterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Eun Kim

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Photolithography is a unique process that can effectively manufacture micro/nano-sized patterns on various substrates. On the other hand, the meniscus-dragging deposition (MDD process can produce a uniform surface of the substrate. Graphene oxide (GO is the oxidized form of graphene that has high hydrophilicity and protein absorption. It is widely used in biomedical fields such as drug delivery, regenerative medicine, and tissue engineering. Herein, we fabricated uniform GO micropatterns via MDD and photolithography. The physicochemical properties of the GO micropatterns were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and Raman spectroscopy. Furthermore, cell migration on the GO micropatterns was investigated, and the difference in cell migration on triangle and square GO micropatterns was examined for their effects on cell migration. Our results demonstrated that the GO micropatterns with a desired shape can be finely fabricated via MDD and photolithography. Moreover, it was revealed that the shape of GO micropatterns plays a crucial role in cell migration distance, speed, and directionality. Therefore, our findings suggest that the GO micropatterns can serve as a promising biofunctional platform and cell-guiding substrate for applications to bioelectric devices, cell-on-a-chip, and tissue engineering scaffolds.

  19. Migration of Cells in a Social Context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedel, Søren; Tay, Savas; Johnston, Darius M.

    2013-01-01

    and speed, which are all modulated by the local cell density. We developed a mathematical model based on the experimentally identified ‘‘cellular traffic rules’’, previous knowledge from isolated-cell chemotaxis and Newton’s second law, which revealed that these emergent behaviors are caused...

  20. Effects of radiation on metastasis and tumor cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilalta, Marta; Rafat, Marjan; Graves, Edward E

    2016-08-01

    It is well known that tumor cells migrate from the primary lesion to distant sites to form metastases and that these lesions limit patient outcome in a majority of cases. However, the extent to which radiation influences this process and to which migration in turn alters radiation response remains controversial. There are preclinical and clinical reports showing that focal radiotherapy can both increase the development of distant metastasis, as well as that it can induce the regression of established metastases through the abscopal effect. More recently, preclinical studies have suggested that radiation can attract migrating tumor cells and may, thereby, facilitate tumor recurrence. In this review, we summarize these phenomena and their potential mechanisms of action, and evaluate their significance for modern radiation therapy strategies.

  1. Rho GTPase signaling complexes in cell migration and invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Campbell D; Ridley, Anne J

    2017-12-12

    Cell migration is dependent on the dynamic formation and disassembly of actin filament-based structures, including lamellipodia, filopodia, invadopodia, and membrane blebs, as well as on cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix adhesions. These processes all involve Rho family small guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases), which are regulated by the opposing actions of guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) and GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs). Rho GTPase activity needs to be precisely tuned at distinct cellular locations to enable cells to move in response to different environments and stimuli. In this review, we focus on the ability of RhoGEFs and RhoGAPs to form complexes with diverse binding partners, and describe how this influences their ability to control localized GTPase activity in the context of migration and invasion. © 2018 Lawson and Ridley.

  2. Reciprocal control of cell proliferation and migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Donatis Alina

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In adult tissue the quiescent state of a single cell is maintained by the steady state conditions of its own microenvironment for what concern both cell-cell as well as cell-ECM interaction and soluble factors concentration. Physiological or pathological conditions can alter this quiescent state through an imbalance of both soluble and insoluble factors that can trigger a cellular phenotypic response. The kind of cellular response depends by many factors but one of the most important is the concentration of soluble cytokines sensed by the target cell. In addition, due to the intrinsic plasticity of many cellular types, every single cell is able, in response to the same stimulus, to rapidly switch phenotype supporting minimal changes of microenviromental cytokines concentration. Wound healing is a typical condition in which epithelial, endothelial as well as mesenchymal cells are firstly subjected to activation of their motility in order to repopulate the damaged region and then they show a strong proliferative response in order to successfully complete the wound repair process. This schema constitute the leitmotif of many other physiological or pathological conditions such as development vasculogenesis/angiogenesis as well as cancer outgrowth and metastasis. Our review focuses on the molecular mechanisms that control the starting and, eventually, the switching of cellular phenotypic outcome in response to changes in the symmetry of the extracellular environment.

  3. Syndecan-1 regulates cell migration and fibronectin fibril assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepp, Mary Ann; Daley, William P; Bernstein, Audrey M; Pal-Ghosh, Sonali; Tadvalkar, Gauri; Shashurin, Alexey; Palsen, Sarah; Jurjus, Rosalyn A; Larsen, Melinda

    2010-08-15

    Corneal scarring is a major cause of blindness worldwide and can result from the deposition of abnormal amounts of collagen fibers lacking the correct size and spacing required to produce a clear cornea. Collagen fiber formation requires a preformed fibronectin (FN) matrix. We demonstrate that the loss of syndecan1 (sdc1) in corneal stromal cells (CSC) impacts cell migration rates, the sizes and composition of focal and fibrillar adhesions, the activation of integrins, and the assembly of fibronectin into fibrils. Integrin and fibronectin expression are not altered on sdc1-null CSCs. Cell adhesion, spreading, and migration studies using low compared to high concentrations of FN and collagen I (CNI) or vitronectin (VN) with and without activation of integrins by manganese chloride show that the impact of sdc1 depletion on integrin activation varies depending on the integrin-mediated activity evaluated. Differences in FN fibrillogenesis and migration in sdc1-null CSCs are reversed by addition of manganese chloride but cell spreading differences remain. To determine if our findings on sdc1 were specific to the cornea, we compared the phenotypes of sdc1-null dermal fibroblasts with those of CSCs. We found that without sdc1, both cell types migrate faster; however, cell-type-specific differences in FN expression and its assembly into fibrils exist between these two cell types. Together, our data demonstrate that sdc1 functions to regulate integrin activity in multiple cell types. Loss of sdc1-mediated integrin function results in cell-type specific differences in matrix assembly. A better understanding of how different cell types regulate FN fibril formation via syndecans and integrins will lead to better treatments for scarring and fibrosis.

  4. NHERF-1: Modulator of Glioblastoma Cell Migration and Invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerri L. Kislin

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The invasive nature of malignant gliomas is a clinical problem rendering tumors incurable by conventional treatment modalities such as surgery, ionizing radiation, and temozolomide. Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor 1 (NHERF-1 is a multifunctional adaptor protein, recruiting cytoplasmic signaling proteins and membrane receptors/transporters into functional complexes. This study revealed that NHERF-1 expression is increased in highly invasive cells that reside in the rim of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM tumors and that NHERF-1 sustains glioma migration and invasion. Gene expression profiles were evaluated from laser capture-microdissected human GBM cells isolated from patient tumor cores and corresponding invaded white matter regions. The role of NHERF-1 in the migration and dispersion of GBM cell lines was examined by reducing its expression with small-interfering RNA followed by radial migration, three-dimensional collagen dispersion, immunofluorescence, and survival assays. The in situ expression of NHERF-1 protein was restricted to glioma cells and the vascular endothelium, with minimal to no detection in adjacent normal brain tissue. Depletion of NHERF-1 arrested migration and dispersion of glioma cell lines and caused an increase in cell-cell cohesiveness. Glioblastoma multiforme cells with depleted NHERF-1 evidenced a marked decrease in stress fibers, a larger cell size, and a more rounded shape with fewer cellular processes. When NHERF-1 expression was reduced, glioma cells became sensitized to temozolomide treatment resulting in increased apoptosis. Taken together, these results provide the first evidence for NHERF-1 as a participant in the highly invasive phenotype of malignant gliomas and implicate NHERF-1 as a possible therapeutic target for treatment of GBM.

  5. Migrastatin analogues inhibit canine mammary cancer cell migration and invasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinga Majchrzak

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cancer spread to other organs is the main cause of death of oncological patients. Migration of cancer cells from a primary tumour is the crucial step in the complex process of metastasis, therefore blocking this process is currently the main treatment strategy. Metastasis inhibitors derived from natural products, such as, migrastatin, are very promising anticancer agents. Thus, the aim of our study was to investigate the effect of six migrastatin analogues (MGSTA-1 to 6 on migration and invasion of canine mammary adenocarcinoma cell lines isolated from primary tumours and their metastases to the lungs. Canine mammary tumours constitute a valuable tool for studying multiple aspect of human cancer. RESULTS: OUR RESULTS SHOWED THAT TWO OF SIX FULLY SYNTHETIC ANALOGUES OF MIGRASTATIN: MGSTA-5 and MGSTA-6 were potent inhibitors of canine mammary cancer cells migration and invasion. These data were obtained using the wound healing test, as well as trans-well migration and invasion assays. Furthermore, the treatment of cancer cells with the most effective compound (MGSTA-6 disturbed binding between filamentous F-actin and fascin1. Confocal microscopy analyses revealed that treatment with MGSTA-6 increased the presence of unbound fascin1 and reduced co-localization of F-actin and fascin1 in canine cancer cells. Most likely, actin filaments were not cross-linked by fascin1 and did not generate the typical filopodial architecture of actin filaments in response to the activity of MGSTA-6. Thus, administration of MGSTA-6 results in decreased formation of filopodia protrusions and stress fibres in canine mammary cancer cells, causing inhibition of cancer migration and invasion. CONCLUSION: Two synthetic migrastatin analogues (MGSTA-5 and MGSTA-6 were shown to be promising compounds for inhibition of cancer metastasis. They may have beneficial therapeutic effects in cancer therapy in dogs, especially in combination with other anticancer drugs

  6. Migrastatin analogues inhibit canine mammary cancer cell migration and invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majchrzak, Kinga; Lo Re, Daniele; Gajewska, Małgorzata; Bulkowska, Małgorzata; Homa, Agata; Pawłowski, Karol; Motyl, Tomasz; Murphy, Paul V; Król, Magdalena

    2013-01-01

    Cancer spread to other organs is the main cause of death of oncological patients. Migration of cancer cells from a primary tumour is the crucial step in the complex process of metastasis, therefore blocking this process is currently the main treatment strategy. Metastasis inhibitors derived from natural products, such as, migrastatin, are very promising anticancer agents. Thus, the aim of our study was to investigate the effect of six migrastatin analogues (MGSTA-1 to 6) on migration and invasion of canine mammary adenocarcinoma cell lines isolated from primary tumours and their metastases to the lungs. Canine mammary tumours constitute a valuable tool for studying multiple aspect of human cancer. OUR RESULTS SHOWED THAT TWO OF SIX FULLY SYNTHETIC ANALOGUES OF MIGRASTATIN: MGSTA-5 and MGSTA-6 were potent inhibitors of canine mammary cancer cells migration and invasion. These data were obtained using the wound healing test, as well as trans-well migration and invasion assays. Furthermore, the treatment of cancer cells with the most effective compound (MGSTA-6) disturbed binding between filamentous F-actin and fascin1. Confocal microscopy analyses revealed that treatment with MGSTA-6 increased the presence of unbound fascin1 and reduced co-localization of F-actin and fascin1 in canine cancer cells. Most likely, actin filaments were not cross-linked by fascin1 and did not generate the typical filopodial architecture of actin filaments in response to the activity of MGSTA-6. Thus, administration of MGSTA-6 results in decreased formation of filopodia protrusions and stress fibres in canine mammary cancer cells, causing inhibition of cancer migration and invasion. Two synthetic migrastatin analogues (MGSTA-5 and MGSTA-6) were shown to be promising compounds for inhibition of cancer metastasis. They may have beneficial therapeutic effects in cancer therapy in dogs, especially in combination with other anticancer drugs. However, further in vivo studies are required to

  7. Epac inhibits migration and proliferation of human prostate carcinoma cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grandoch, M.; Rose, A.; ter Braak, M.; Jendrossek, V.; Ruebben, H.; Fischer, J. W.; Schmidt, M.; Weber, A. A.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It was recently found that cAMP mediates protein kinase A-independent effects through Epac proteins. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of Epac in migration and proliferation of prostate carcinoma cells. METHODS: The effect of Epac activation was determined by [(3)H

  8. Molecular mechanisms governing primordial germ cell migration in zebrafish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doitsidou, M.

    2005-01-01

    In most sexually reproducing organisms primordial germ cells (pGCs) are specified early in development in places that are distinct from the region where the somatic part of the gonad develops. From their places of specification they have to migrate towards the site where they associate with somatic

  9. STRIPAK components determine mode of cancer cell migration and metastasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Chris D; Hooper, Steven; Tozluoglu, Melda

    2015-01-01

    and MST4 kinases, which promote the co-localization of the contractile actomyosin machinery with the Ezrin/Radixin/Moesin family proteins by phosphorylating the inhibitors of PPP1CB, PPP1R14A-D. Using computational modelling, in vitro cell migration assays and in vivo breast cancer metastasis assays we...

  10. Mast cell progenitors: origin, development and migration to tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlin, Joakim S; Hallgren, Jenny

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells in tissues are developed from mast cell progenitors emerging from the bone marrow in a process highly regulated by transcription factors. Through the advancement of the multicolor flow cytometry technique, the mast cell progenitor population in the mouse has been characterized in terms of surface markers. However, only cell populations with enriched mast cell capability have been described in human. In naïve mice, the peripheral tissues have a constitutive pool of mast cell progenitors. Upon infections in the gut and in allergic inflammation in the lung, the local mast cell progenitor numbers increase tremendously. This review focuses on the origin and development of mast cell progenitors. Furthermore, the evidences for cells and molecules that govern the migration of these cells in mice in vivo are described. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Single and collective cell migration: the mechanics of adhesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pascalis, Chiara; Etienne-Manneville, Sandrine

    2017-01-01

    Chemical and physical properties of the environment control cell proliferation, differentiation, or apoptosis in the long term. However, to be able to move and migrate through a complex three-dimensional environment, cells must quickly adapt in the short term to the physical properties of their surroundings. Interactions with the extracellular matrix (ECM) occur through focal adhesions or hemidesmosomes via the engagement of integrins with fibrillar ECM proteins. Cells also interact with their neighbors, and this involves various types of intercellular adhesive structures such as tight junctions, cadherin-based adherens junctions, and desmosomes. Mechanobiology studies have shown that cell–ECM and cell–cell adhesions participate in mechanosensing to transduce mechanical cues into biochemical signals and conversely are responsible for the transmission of intracellular forces to the extracellular environment. As they migrate, cells use these adhesive structures to probe their surroundings, adapt their mechanical properties, and exert the appropriate forces required for their movements. The focus of this review is to give an overview of recent developments showing the bidirectional relationship between the physical properties of the environment and the cell mechanical responses during single and collective cell migration. PMID:28684609

  12. Drosophila syndecan regulates tracheal cell migration by stabilizing Robo levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Joachim G; Ceulemans, Helga; Caussinus, Emmanuel; Baietti, Maria F; Affolter, Markus; Hassan, Bassem A; David, Guido

    2011-01-01

    Here we identify a new role for Syndecan (Sdc), the only transmembrane heparan sulphate proteoglycan in Drosophila, in tracheal development. Sdc is required cell autonomously for efficient directed migration and fusion of dorsal branch cells, but not for dorsal branch formation per se. The cytoplasmic domain of Sdc is dispensable, indicating that Sdc does not transduce a signal by itself. Although the branch-specific phenotype of sdc mutants resembles those seen in the absence of Slit/Robo2 signalling, genetic interaction experiments indicate that Sdc also helps to suppress Slit/Robo2 signalling. We conclude that Sdc cell autonomously regulates Slit/Robo2 signalling in tracheal cells to guarantee ordered directional migration and branch fusion. PMID:21836636

  13. Untangling cell tracks: Quantifying cell migration by time lapse image data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Carl-Magnus; Medyukhina, Anna; Belyaev, Ivan; Al-Zaben, Naim; Figge, Marc Thilo

    2017-10-04

    Automated microscopy has given researchers access to great amounts of live cell imaging data from in vitro and in vivo experiments. Much focus has been put on extracting cell tracks from such data using a plethora of segmentation and tracking algorithms, but further analysis is normally required to draw biologically relevant conclusions. Such relevant conclusions may be whether the migration is directed or not, whether the population has homogeneous or heterogeneous migration patterns. This review focuses on the analysis of cell migration data that are extracted from time lapse images. We discuss a range of measures and models used to analyze cell tracks independent of the biological system or the way the tracks were obtained. For single-cell migration, we focus on measures and models giving examples of biological systems where they have been applied, for example, migration of bacteria, fibroblasts, and immune cells. For collective migration, we describe the model systems wound healing, neural crest migration, and Drosophila gastrulation and discuss methods for cell migration within these systems. We also discuss the role of the extracellular matrix and subsequent differences between track analysis in vitro and in vivo. Besides methods and measures, we are putting special focus on the need for openly available data and code, as well as a lack of common vocabulary in cell track analysis. © 2017 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. © 2017 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  14. Bleb Expansion in Migrating Cells Depends on Supply of Membrane from Cell Surface Invaginations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudarzi, Mohammad; Tarbashevich, Katsiaryna; Mildner, Karina; Begemann, Isabell; Garcia, Jamie; Paksa, Azadeh; Reichman-Fried, Michal; Mahabaleshwar, Harsha; Blaser, Heiko; Hartwig, Johannes; Zeuschner, Dagmar; Galic, Milos; Bagnat, Michel; Betz, Timo; Raz, Erez

    2017-12-04

    Cell migration is essential for morphogenesis, organ formation, and homeostasis, with relevance for clinical conditions. The migration of primordial germ cells (PGCs) is a useful model for studying this process in the context of the developing embryo. Zebrafish PGC migration depends on the formation of cellular protrusions in form of blebs, a type of protrusion found in various cell types. Here we report on the mechanisms allowing the inflation of the membrane during bleb formation. We show that the rapid expansion of the protrusion depends on membrane invaginations that are localized preferentially at the cell front. The formation of these invaginations requires the function of Cdc42, and their unfolding allows bleb inflation and dynamic cell-shape changes performed by migrating cells. Inhibiting the formation and release of the invaginations strongly interfered with bleb formation, cell motility, and the ability of the cells to reach their target. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Gliadin fragments promote migration of dendritic cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chládková, Barbara; Kamanová, Jana; Palová-Jelínková, Lenka; Cinová, Jana; Šebo, Peter; Tučková, Ludmila

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 4 (2011), 938-948 ISSN 1582-1838 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/07/0414; GA ČR GD310/08/H077; GA ČR GA310/08/0447; GA AV ČR IAA500200801; GA AV ČR IAA500200914 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : celiac disease * gliadin * dendritic cell Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 4.125, year: 2011

  16. Controlled Cell Growth and Cell Migration in Periodic Mesoporous Organosilica/Alginate Nanocomposite Hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seda Kehr, Nermin; Riehemann, Kristina

    2016-01-21

    Nanocomposite (NC) hydrogels with different periodic mesoporous organosilica (PMO) concentrations and a NC hydrogel bilayer with various PMO concentrations inside the layers of the hydrogel matrix are prepared. The effect of the PMO concentration on cell growth and migration of cells is reported. The cells migrate in the bilayer NC hydrogel towards higher PMO concentrations and from cell culture plates to NC hydrogel scaffolds. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. A model for cell type localization in the migrating slug of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH

    . Localization of the three major cell types within the migrating slug stage is a dynamic process (Sternfeld 1992;. A model for cell type localization in the migrating slug of Dictyostelium discoideum based on differential chemotactic sensitivity to ...

  18. Primary Cilia, Signaling Networks and Cell Migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veland, Iben Rønn

    composition of receptors and signal components in the cilium to regulate cellular processes such as transcriptional control or cytoskeletal reorganization. This dissertation focuses on selected signaling systems regulated by the primary cilium, including the PDGFRα, TGFβ and Wnt pathways, and how......, which leads to uncontrolled cell movements. Together, the results obtained from my PhD studies reflect the high level of complexity within signaling systems regulated by the primary cilium that control cellular processes during embryonic development and in tissue homeostasis. As such, this dissertation......-dependent regulation of signal transduction. Upon ligand-binding and activation in the cilium, TGFβ receptors accumulate and are internalized at the ciliary base together with Smad2/3 transcription factors that are phosphorylated here and translocated to the nucleus for target gene expression. These processes depend...

  19. Cell migration and antigen capture are antagonistic processes coupled by myosin II in dendritic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabaud, Mélanie; Heuzé, Mélina L.; Bretou, Marine; Vargas, Pablo; Maiuri, Paolo; Solanes, Paola; Maurin, Mathieu; Terriac, Emmanuel; Le Berre, Maël; Lankar, Danielle; Piolot, Tristan; Adelstein, Robert S.; Zhang, Yingfan; Sixt, Michael; Jacobelli, Jordan; Bénichou, Olivier; Voituriez, Raphaël; Piel, Matthieu; Lennon-Duménil, Ana-Maria

    2015-01-01

    The immune response relies on the migration of leukocytes and on their ability to stop in precise anatomical locations to fulfil their task. How leukocyte migration and function are coordinated is unknown. Here we show that in immature dendritic cells, which patrol their environment by engulfing extracellular material, cell migration and antigen capture are antagonistic. This antagonism results from transient enrichment of myosin IIA at the cell front, which disrupts the back-to-front gradient of the motor protein, slowing down locomotion but promoting antigen capture. We further highlight that myosin IIA enrichment at the cell front requires the MHC class II-associated invariant chain (Ii). Thus, by controlling myosin IIA localization, Ii imposes on dendritic cells an intermittent antigen capture behaviour that might facilitate environment patrolling. We propose that the requirement for myosin II in both cell migration and specific cell functions may provide a general mechanism for their coordination in time and space. PMID:26109323

  20. The origin and migration of primordial germ cells in sturgeons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taiju Saito

    Full Text Available Primordial germ cells (PGCs arise elsewhere in the embryo and migrate into developing gonadal ridges during embryonic development. In several model animals, formation and migration patterns of PGCs have been studied, and it is known that these patterns vary. Sturgeons (genus Acipenser have great potential for comparative and evolutionary studies of development. Sturgeons belong to the super class Actinoptergii, and their developmental pattern is similar to that of amphibians, although their phylogenetic position is an out-group to teleost fishes. Here, we reveal an injection technique for sturgeon eggs allowing visualization of germplasm and PGCs. Using this technique, we demonstrate that the PGCs are generated at the vegetal pole of the egg and they migrate on the yolky cell mass toward the gonadal ridge. We also provide evidence showing that PGCs are specified by inheritance of maternally supplied germplasm. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the migratory mechanism is well-conserved between sturgeon and other remotely related teleosts, such as goldfish, by a single PGCs transplantation (SPT assay. The mode of PGCs specification in sturgeon is similar to that of anurans, but the migration pattern resembles that of teleosts.

  1. The Origin And Migration Of Primordial Germ Cells In Sturgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Taiju; Pšenička, Martin; Goto, Rie; Adachi, Shinji; Inoue, Kunio; Arai, Katsutoshi; Yamaha, Etsuro

    2014-01-01

    Primordial germ cells (PGCs) arise elsewhere in the embryo and migrate into developing gonadal ridges during embryonic development. In several model animals, formation and migration patterns of PGCs have been studied, and it is known that these patterns vary. Sturgeons (genus Acipenser) have great potential for comparative and evolutionary studies of development. Sturgeons belong to the super class Actinoptergii, and their developmental pattern is similar to that of amphibians, although their phylogenetic position is an out-group to teleost fishes. Here, we reveal an injection technique for sturgeon eggs allowing visualization of germplasm and PGCs. Using this technique, we demonstrate that the PGCs are generated at the vegetal pole of the egg and they migrate on the yolky cell mass toward the gonadal ridge. We also provide evidence showing that PGCs are specified by inheritance of maternally supplied germplasm. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the migratory mechanism is well-conserved between sturgeon and other remotely related teleosts, such as goldfish, by a single PGCs transplantation (SPT) assay. The mode of PGCs specification in sturgeon is similar to that of anurans, but the migration pattern resembles that of teleosts. PMID:24505272

  2. Mib1 contributes to persistent directional cell migration by regulating the Ctnnd1-Rac1 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizoguchi, Takamasa; Ikeda, Shoko; Watanabe, Saori; Sugawara, Michiko; Itoh, Motoyuki

    2017-10-31

    Persistent directional cell migration is involved in animal development and diseases. The small GTPase Rac1 is involved in F-actin and focal adhesion dynamics. Local Rac1 activity is required for persistent directional migration, whereas global, hyperactivated Rac1 enhances random cell migration. Therefore, precise control of Rac1 activity is important for proper directional cell migration. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the regulation of Rac1 activity in persistent directional cell migration is not fully understood. Here, we show that the ubiquitin ligase mind bomb 1 (Mib1) is involved in persistent directional cell migration. We found that knockdown of MIB1 led to an increase in random cell migration in HeLa cells in a wound-closure assay. Furthermore, we explored novel Mib1 substrates for cell migration and found that Mib1 ubiquitinates Ctnnd1. Mib1-mediated ubiquitination of Ctnnd1 K547 attenuated Rac1 activation in cultured cells. In addition, we found that posterior lateral line primordium cells in the zebrafish mib1ta52b mutant showed increased random migration and loss of directional F-actin-based protrusion formation. Knockdown of Ctnnd1 partially rescued posterior lateral line primordium cell migration defects in the mib1ta52b mutant. Taken together, our data suggest that Mib1 plays an important role in cell migration and that persistent directional cell migration is regulated, at least in part, by the Mib1-Ctnnd1-Rac1 pathway. Published under the PNAS license.

  3. Inhibition of Rho-associated kinases disturbs the collective cell migration of stratified TE-10 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taro Mikami

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The collective cell migration of stratified epithelial cells is considered to be an important phenomenon in wound healing, development, and cancer invasion; however, little is known about the mechanisms involved. Furthermore, whereas Rho family proteins, including RhoA, play important roles in cell migration, the exact role of Rho-associated coiled coil-containing protein kinases (ROCKs in cell migration is controversial and might be cell-type dependent. Here, we report the development of a novel modified scratch assay that was used to observe the collective cell migration of stratified TE-10 cells derived from a human esophageal cancer specimen. RESULTS: Desmosomes were found between the TE-10 cells and microvilli of the surface of the cell sheet. The leading edge of cells in the cell sheet formed a simple layer and moved forward regularly; these rows were followed by the stratified epithelium. ROCK inhibitors and ROCK small interfering RNAs (siRNAs disturbed not only the collective migration of the leading edge of this cell sheet, but also the stratified layer in the rear. In contrast, RhoA siRNA treatment resulted in more rapid migration of the leading rows and disturbed movement of the stratified portion. CONCLUSIONS: The data presented in this study suggest that ROCKs play an important role in mediating the collective migration of TE-10 cell sheets. In addition, differences between the effects of siRNAs targeting either RhoA or ROCKs suggested that distinct mechanisms regulate the collective cell migration in the simple epithelium of the wound edge versus the stratified layer of the epithelium.

  4. Differential roles of leptin in regulating cell migration in thyroid cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shih-Ping; Yin, Pen-Hui; Chang, Yuan-Ching; Lee, Chen-Hsen; Huang, Shih-Yuan; Chi, Chin-Wen

    2010-06-01

    Excess body weight is associated with a moderately increased risk of thyroid cancer. Adipocyte-derived hormone, leptin, has been shown to enhance cell growth and migration in many cancer types. Limited evidence suggests that leptin has direct actions on the thyroid gland, but there are no data available on the effect of leptin on thyroid cancer cells. We evaluated the action of leptin on gene expression, cell growth, cell cycle, and cell migration in anaplastic (ARO), follicular (WRO) and papillary (CGTH-W3) thyroid carcinoma cell lines. Expression of long-form leptin receptors was observed in all thyroid cancer cell lines. Leptin stimulation did not alter the expression levels of leptin, leptin receptor and sodium-iodide symporter. Cell growth and cell cycle were not changed after leptin treatment. However, leptin was able to promote cell migration of papillary thyroid cancer cells, but inhibited migration of anaplastic and follicular cancer cells. In summary, our study suggests that leptin modulates cell migration of thyroid cancer cells in a cell type-specific manner.

  5. Nifedipine promotes the proliferation and migration of breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Qing Guo

    Full Text Available Nifedipine is widely used as a calcium channel blocker (CCB to treat angina and hypertension,but it is controversial with respect the risk of stimulation of cancers. In this study, we demonstrated that nifedipine promoted the proliferation and migration of breast cancer cells both invivo and invitro. However, verapamil, another calcium channel blocker, didn't exert the similar effects. Nifedipine and high concentration KCl failed to alter the [Ca2+]i in MDA-MB-231 cells, suggesting that such nifedipine effect was not related with calcium channel. Moreover, nifedipine decreased miRNA-524-5p, resulting in the up-regulation of brain protein I3 (BRI3. Erk pathway was consequently activated and led to the proliferation and migration of breast cancer cells. Silencing BRI3 reversed the promoting effect of nifedipine on the breast cancer. In a summary, nifedipine stimulated the proliferation and migration of breast cancer cells via the axis of miRNA-524-5p-BRI3-Erk pathway independently of its calcium channel-blocking activity. Our findings highlight that nifedipine but not verapamil is conducive for breast cancer growth and metastasis, urging that the caution should be taken in clinic to prescribe nifedipine to women who suffering both hypertension and breast cancer, and hypertension with a tendency in breast cancers.

  6. The NANIVID: a new device for cancer cell migration studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, Waseem K.; Cady, Nathaniel C.; Castracane, James; Gligorijevic, Bojana; van Rheenen, Jacobus W.; Condeelis, John S.

    2008-02-01

    Cancerous tumors are dynamic microenvironments that require unique analytical tools for their study. Better understanding of tumor microenvironments may reveal mechanisms behind tumor progression and generate new strategies for diagnostic marker development, which can be used routinely in histopathological analysis. Previous studies have shown that cell invasion and intravasation are related to metastatic potential and have linked these activities to gene expression patterns seen in migratory and invasive tumor cells in vivo. Existing analytical methods for tumor microenvironments include collection of tumor cells through a catheter needle loaded with a chemical or protein attractant (chemoattractant). This method has some limitations and restrictions, including time constraints of cell collection, long term anesthetization, and in vivo imaging inside the catheter. In this study, a novel implantable device was designed to replace the catheter-based method. The 1.5mm x 0.5mm x 0.24mm device is designed to controllably release chemoattractants for stimulation of tumor cell migration and subsequent cell capture. Devices were fabricated using standard microfabrication techniques and have been shown to mediate controlled release of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and epidermal growth factor (EGF). Optically transparent indium tin oxide (ITO) electrodes have been incorporated into the device for impedance-based measurement of cell density and have been shown to be compatible with in vivo multi-photon imaging of cell migration.

  7. Molecular aspects of tumor cell migration and invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppina Bozzuto

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Cell migration and invasion are crucial steps in many physiological events. However, they are also implicated in the physiopathology of many diseases, such as cancer. To spread through the tissues, tumor cells use mechanisms that involve several molecular actors: adhesion receptor families, receptor tyrosine kinases, cytoskeleton proteins, adapter and signalling proteins interplay in a complex scenario. The balance of cellular signals for proliferation and survival responses also regulates migratory behaviours of tumor cells. To complicate the scene of crime drug resistance players can interfere thus worsening this delicate situation. The complete understanding of this molecular jungle is an impossible mission: some molecular aspects are reviewed in this paper.

  8. Analysis of individual cell trajectories in lattice-gas cellular automaton models for migrating cell populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mente, Carsten; Voss-Böhme, Anja; Deutsch, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    Collective dynamics of migrating cell populations drive key processes in tissue formation and maintenance under normal and diseased conditions. Collective cell behavior at the tissue level is typically characterized by considering cell density patterns such as clusters and moving cell fronts. However, there are also important observables of collective dynamics related to individual cell behavior. In particular, individual cell trajectories are footprints of emergent behavior in populations of migrating cells. Lattice-gas cellular automata (LGCA) have proven successful to model and analyze collective behavior arising from interactions of migrating cells. There are well-established methods to analyze cell density patterns in LGCA models. Although LGCA dynamics are defined by cell-based rules, individual cells are not distinguished. Therefore, individual cell trajectories cannot be analyzed in LGCA so far. Here, we extend the classical LGCA framework to allow labeling and tracking of individual cells. We consider cell number conserving LGCA models of migrating cell populations where cell interactions are regulated by local cell density and derive stochastic differential equations approximating individual cell trajectories in LGCA. This result allows the prediction of complex individual cell trajectories emerging in LGCA models and is a basis for model-experiment comparisons at the individual cell level.

  9. Modeling, signaling and cytoskeleton dynamics: integrated modeling-experimental frameworks in cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Meng; Zaman, Muhammad H

    2017-01-01

    Cell migration is a complex and multistep process involved in homeostasis maintenance, morphogenesis, and disease development, such as cancer metastasis. Modeling cell migration and the relevant cytoskeleton dynamics have profound implications for studying fundamental development and disease diagnosis. This review focuses on some recent models of both cell migration and migration-related cytoskeleton dynamics, addressing issues such as the difference between amoeboid and mesenchymal migration modes, and between single-cell migration and collective cell migration. The review also highlights the computational integration among variable external cues, especially the biochemical and mechanical signaling that affects cell migration. Finally, we aim to identify the gaps in our current knowledge and potential strategies to develop integrated modeling-experimental frameworks for multiscale behavior integrating gene expression, cell signaling, mechanics, and multicellular dynamics. WIREs Syst Biol Med 2017, 9:e1365. doi: 10.1002/wsbm.1365 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Angiotensin II facilitates breast cancer cell migration and metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie Rodrigues-Ferreira

    Full Text Available Breast cancer metastasis is a leading cause of death by malignancy in women worldwide. Efforts are being made to further characterize the rate-limiting steps of cancer metastasis, i.e. extravasation of circulating tumor cells and colonization of secondary organs. In this study, we investigated whether angiotensin II, a major vasoactive peptide both produced locally and released in the bloodstream, may trigger activating signals that contribute to cancer cell extravasation and metastasis. We used an experimental in vivo model of cancer metastasis in which bioluminescent breast tumor cells (D3H2LN were injected intra-cardiacally into nude mice in order to recapitulate the late and essential steps of metastatic dissemination. Real-time intravital imaging studies revealed that angiotensin II accelerates the formation of metastatic foci at secondary sites. Pre-treatment of cancer cells with the peptide increases the number of mice with metastases, as well as the number and size of metastases per mouse. In vitro, angiotensin II contributes to each sequential step of cancer metastasis by promoting cancer cell adhesion to endothelial cells, trans-endothelial migration and tumor cell migration across extracellular matrix. At the molecular level, a total of 102 genes differentially expressed following angiotensin II pre-treatment were identified by comparative DNA microarray. Angiotensin II regulates two groups of connected genes related to its precursor angiotensinogen. Among those, up-regulated MMP2/MMP9 and ICAM1 stand at the crossroad of a network of genes involved in cell adhesion, migration and invasion. Our data suggest that targeting angiotensin II production or action may represent a valuable therapeutic option to prevent metastatic progression of invasive breast tumors.

  11. Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Regulates Cell Proliferation and Migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Costa de Alvarenga

    Full Text Available The angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE plays a central role in the renin-angiotensin system, acting by converting the hormone angiotensin-I to the active peptide angiotensin-II (Ang-II. More recently, ACE was shown to act as a receptor for Ang-II, and its expression level was demonstrated to be higher in melanoma cells compared to their normal counterparts. However, the function that ACE plays as an Ang-II receptor in melanoma cells has not been defined yet.Therefore, our aim was to examine the role of ACE in tumor cell proliferation and migration.We found that upon binding to ACE, Ang-II internalizes with a faster onset compared to the binding of Ang-II to its classical AT1 receptor. We also found that the complex Ang-II/ACE translocates to the nucleus, through a clathrin-mediated process, triggering a transient nuclear Ca2+ signal. In silico studies revealed a possible interaction site between ACE and phospholipase C (PLC, and experimental results in CHO cells, demonstrated that the β3 isoform of PLC is the one involved in the Ca2+ signals induced by Ang-II/ACE interaction. Further studies in melanoma cells (TM-5 showed that Ang-II induced cell proliferation through ACE activation, an event that could be inhibited either by ACE inhibitor (Lisinopril or by the silencing of ACE. In addition, we found that stimulation of ACE by Ang-II caused the melanoma cells to migrate, at least in part due to decreased vinculin expression, a focal adhesion structural protein.ACE activation regulates melanoma cell proliferation and migration.

  12. Rho GTPases and regulation of cell migration and polarization in human corneal epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aihua Hou

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Epithelial cell migration is required for regeneration of tissues and can be defective in a number of ocular surface diseases. This study aimed to determine the expression pattern of Rho family small G-proteins in human corneal epithelial cells to test their requirement in directional cell migration. METHODS: Rho family small G-protein expression was assessed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Dominant-inhibitory constructs encoding Rho proteins or Rho protein targeting small interfering RNA were transfected into human corneal epithelial large T antigen cells, and wound closure rate were evaluated by scratch wounding assay, and a complementary non-traumatic cell migration assay. Immunofluorescence staining was performed to study cell polarization and to assess Cdc42 downstream effector. RESULTS: Cdc42, Chp, Rac1, RhoA, TC10 and TCL were expressed in human corneal epithelial cells. Among them, Cdc42 and TCL were found to significantly affect cell migration in monolayer scratch assays. These results were confirmed through the use of validated siRNAs directed to Cdc42 and TCL. Scramble siRNA transfected cells had high percentage of polarized cells than Cdc42 or TCL siRNA transfected cells at the wound edge. We showed that the Cdc42-specific effector p21-activated kinase 4 localized predominantly to cell-cell junctions in cell monolayers, but failed to translocate to the leading edge in Cdc42 siRNA transfected cells after monolayer wounding. CONCLUSION: Rho proteins expressed in cultured human corneal epithelial cells, and Cdc42, TCL facilitate two-dimensional cell migration in-vitro. Although silencing of Cdc42 and TCL did not noticeably affect the appearance of cell adhesions at the leading edge, the slower migration of these cells indicates both GTP-binding proteins play important roles in promoting cell movement of human corneal epithelial cells.

  13. Enucleated cells reveal differential roles of the nucleus in cell migration, polarity, and mechanotransduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, David M; Andersen, Tomas; Sharek, Lisa; Uzer, Gunes; Rothenberg, Katheryn; Hoffman, Brenton D; Rubin, Janet; Balland, Martial; Bear, James E; Burridge, Keith

    2018-01-19

    The nucleus has long been postulated to play a critical physical role during cell polarization and migration, but that role has not been defined or rigorously tested. Here, we enucleated cells to test the physical necessity of the nucleus during cell polarization and directed migration. Using enucleated mammalian cells (cytoplasts), we found that polarity establishment and cell migration in one dimension (1D) and two dimensions (2D) occur without the nucleus. Cytoplasts directionally migrate toward soluble (chemotaxis) and surface-bound (haptotaxis) extracellular cues and migrate collectively in scratch-wound assays. Consistent with previous studies, migration in 3D environments was dependent on the nucleus. In part, this likely reflects the decreased force exerted by cytoplasts on mechanically compliant substrates. This response is mimicked both in cells with nucleocytoskeletal defects and upon inhibition of actomyosin-based contractility. Together, our observations reveal that the nucleus is dispensable for polarization and migration in 1D and 2D but critical for proper cell mechanical responses. © 2018 Graham et al.

  14. Migration and Tissue Tropism of Innate Lymphoid Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chang H.; Hashimoto-Hill, Seika; Kim, Myunghoo

    2016-01-01

    Innate lymphoid cell (ILCs) subsets differentially populate various barrier and non-barrier tissues, where they play important roles in tissue homeostasis and tissue-specific responses to pathogen attack. Recent findings have provided insight into the molecular mechanisms that guide ILC migration into peripheral tissues, revealing common features among different ILC subsets as well as important distinctions. Recent studies have also highlighted the impact of tissue-specific cues on ILC migration, and the importance of the local immunological milieu. We review these findings here and discuss how the migratory patterns and tissue tropism of different ILC subsets relate to the development and differentiation of these cells, and to ILC-mediated tissue-specific regulation of innate and adaptive immune responses. In this context we outline open questions and important areas of future research. PMID:26708278

  15. Dock-family exchange factors in cell migration and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadea, Gilles; Blangy, Anne

    2014-10-01

    Dock family proteins are evolutionary conserved exchange factors for the Rho GTPases Rac and Cdc42. There are 11 Dock proteins in mammals, named Dock1 (or Dock180) to Dock11 that play different cellular functions. In particular, Dock proteins regulate actin cytoskeleton, cell adhesion and migration. Not surprisingly, members of the Dock family have been involved in various pathologies, including cancer and defects in the central nervous and immune systems. This review proposes an update of the recent findings regarding the function of Dock proteins, focusing on their role in the control of cell migration and invasion and the consequences in human diseases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. Integrin-mediated cell surface recruitment of autotaxin promotes persistent directional cell migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tao; Kooi, Craig Vander; Shah, Pritom; Charnigo, Richard; Huang, Cai; Smyth, Susan S.; Morris, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Autotaxin (ATX) is a secreted lysophospholipase D (lysoPLD) that binds to integrin adhesion receptors. We dissected the roles of integrin binding and lysoPLD activity in stimulation of human breast cancer and mouse aortic vascular smooth muscle cell migration by ATX. We compared effects of wild-type human ATX, catalytically inactive ATX, an integrin binding-defective ATX variant with wild-type lysoPLD activity, the isolated ATX integrin binding N-terminal domain, and a potent ATX selective lysoPLD inhibitor on cell migration using transwell and single-cell tracking assays. Stimulation of transwell migration was reduced (18 or 27% of control, respectively) but not ablated by inactivation of integrin binding or inhibition of lysoPLD activity. The N-terminal domain increased transwell migration (30% of control). ATX lysoPLD activity and integrin binding were necessary for a 3.8-fold increase in the fraction of migrating breast cancer cell step velocities >0.7 μm/min. ATX increased the persistent directionality of single-cell migration 2-fold. This effect was lysoPLD activity independent and recapitulated by the integrin binding N-terminal domain. Integrin binding enables uptake and intracellular sequestration of ATX, which redistributes to the front of migrating cells. ATX binding to integrins and lysoPLD activity therefore cooperate to promote rapid persistent directional cell migration.—Wu, T., Kooi, C. V., Shah, P., Charnigo, R., Huang, C., Smyth, S. S., Morris, A. J. Integrin-mediated cell surface recruitment of autotaxin promotes persistent directional cell migration. PMID:24277575

  17. Syndecan regulates cell migration and axon guidance in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhiner, Christa; Gysi, Stephan; Fröhli, Erika; Hengartner, Michael O; Hajnal, Alex

    2005-10-01

    During nervous system development, axons that grow out simultaneously in the same extracellular environment are often sorted to different target destinations. As there is only a restricted set of guidance cues known, regulatory mechanisms are likely to play a crucial role in controlling cell migration and axonal pathfinding. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) carry long chains of differentially modified sugar residues that have been proposed to encode specific information for nervous system development. Here, we show that the cell surface proteoglycan syndecan SDN-1 functions autonomously in neurons to control the neural migration and guidance choices of outgrowing axons. Epistasis analysis suggests that heparan sulfate (HS) attached to SDN-1 can regulate guidance signaling by the Slit/Robo pathway. Furthermore, SDN-1 acts in parallel with other HSPG core proteins whose HS side chains are modified by the C5-epimerase HSE-5, and/or the 2O-sulfotransferase HST-2, depending on the cellular context. Taken together, our experiments show that distinct HS modification patterns on SDN-1 are involved in regulating axon guidance and cell migration in C. elegans.

  18. MEIS1 inhibits clear cell renal cell carcinoma cells proliferation and in vitro invasion or migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jie; Cui, Liang; Xu, Axiang; Yin, Xiaotao; Li, Fanglong; Gao, Jiangping

    2017-03-07

    Myeloid ecotropic viral integration site 1 (MEIS1) protein plays a synergistic causative role in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, MEIS1 has also shown to be a potential tumor suppressor in some other cancers, such as non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and prostate cancer. Although multiple roles of MEIS1 in cancer development and progression have been identified, there is an urgent demand to discover more functions of this molecule for further therapeutic design. MEIS1 was overexpressed via adenovirus vector in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) cells. Western blot and real-time qPCR (quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction) was performed to examine the protein and mRNA levels of MEIS1. Cell proliferation, survival, in vitro migration and invasion were tested by MTT, colony formation, soft-agar, transwell (in vitro invasion/migration) assays, and tumor in vivo growthwas measured on nude mice model. In addition, flow-cytometry analysis was used to detect cell cycle arrest or non-apoptotic cell death of ccRCC cells induced by MEIS1. MEIS1 exhibits a decreased expression in ccRCC cell lines than that in non-tumor cell lines. MEIS1 overexpression inhibits ccRCC cells proliferation and induces G1/S arrest concomitant with marked reduction of G1/S transition regulators, Cyclin D1 and Cyclin A. Moreover, MEIS1-1 overexpression also induces non-apoptotic cell death of ccRCC cells via decreasing the levels of pro-survival regulators Survivin and BCL-2. Transwell migration assay (TMA) shows that MEIS1 attenuates in vitro invasion and migration of ccRCC cells with down-regulated epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) process. Further, in nude mice model, MEIS1 inhibits the in vivo growth of Caki-1 cells. By investigating the role of MEIS1 in ccRCC cells' survival, proliferation, anchorage-independent growth, cell cycle progress, apoptosis and metastasis, in the present work, we propose that MEIS1 may play an important role in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (cc

  19. Adhesion and migration of cells responding to microtopography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estévez, Maruxa; Martínez, Elena; Yarwood, Stephen J; Dalby, Matthew J; Samitier, Josep

    2015-05-01

    It is known that cells respond strongly to microtopography. However, cellular mechanisms of response are unclear. Here, we study wild-type fibroblasts responding to 25 µm(2) posts and compare their response to that of FAK(-/-) fibroblasts and fibroblasts with PMA treatment to stimulate protein kinase C (PKC) and the small g-protein Rac. FAK knockout cells modulated adhesion number and size in a similar way to cells on topography; that is, they used more, smaller adhesions, but migration was almost completely stalled demonstrating the importance of FAK signaling in contact guidance and adhesion turnover. Little similarity, however, was observed to PKC stimulated cells and cells on the topography. Interestingly, with PKC stimulation the cell nuclei became highly deformable bringing focus on these surfaces to the study of metastasis. Surfaces that aid the study of cellular migration are important in developing understanding of mechanisms of wound healing and repair in aligned tissues such as ligament and tendon. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. From cell differentiation to cell collectives : Bacillus subtilis uses division of labor to migrate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gestel, Jordi; Vlamakis, Hera; Kolter, Roberto

    The organization of cells, emerging from cell-cell interactions, can give rise to collective properties. These properties are adaptive when together cells can face environmental challenges that they separately cannot. One particular challenge that is important for microorganisms is migration. In

  1. A large-scale (19) F MRI-based cell migration assay to optimize cell therapy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonetto, F.J.; Srinivas, M.; Weigelin, B.; Cruz, L.J.; Heerschap, A.; Friedl, P.H.A.; Figdor, C.G.; Vries, I.J.M. de

    2012-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of cells for therapeutic purposes requires efficient and precise delivery to the target organ whilst preserving cell function. Therefore, therapeutically applied cells need to migrate and integrate within their target tissues after delivery, e.g. dendritic cells (DCs) need to

  2. Collective cell migration of thyroid carcinoma cells: a beneficial ability to override unfavourable substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobastova, Liudmila; Kraus, Dominik; Glassmann, Alexander; Khan, Dilaware; Steinhäuser, Christian; Wolff, Christina; Veit, Nadine; Winter, Jochen; Probstmeier, Rainer

    2017-02-01

    Tumor cell invasion and metastasis are life threatening events. Invasive tumor cells tend to migrate as collective sheets. In the present in vitro study we aimed to (i) assess whether collective tumor cells gain benefits in their migratory potential compared to single cells and (ii) to identify its putative underlying molecular mechanisms. The migratory potential of single and collective carcinoma cells was assessed using video time lapse microscopy and cell migration assays in the absence and presence of seven potential gap junction inhibitors or the Rac1 inhibitor Z62954982. The perturbation of gap junctions was assessed using a dye diffusion assay. In addition, LDH-based cytotoxicity and RT-PCR-based expression analyses were performed. Whereas single breast, cervix and thyroid carcinoma cells were virtually immobile on unfavourable plastic surfaces, we found that they gained pronounced migratory capacities as collectives under comparable conditions. Thyroid carcinoma cells, that were studied in more detail, were found to express specific subsets of connexins and to form active gap junctions as revealed by dye diffusion analysis. Although all potential gap junction blockers suppressed intercellular dye diffusion in at least one of the cell lines tested, only two of them were found to inhibit collective cell migration and none of them to inhibit single cell migration. In the presence of the Rac1 inhibitor Z62954982 collective migration, but not single cell migration, was found to be reduced up to 20 %. Our data indicate that collective migration enables tumor cells to cross otherwise unfavourable substrate areas. This capacity seems to be independent of intercellular communication via gap junctions, whereas Rac1-dependent intracellular signalling seems to be essential.

  3. Intracellular pH gradients in migrating cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, Christine; Pedersen, Stine Helene Falsig; Schwab, Albrecht

    2011-01-01

    might function as such unevenly distributed regulators as they modulate the interaction of focal adhesion proteins and components of the cytoskeleton in vitro. However, an intracellular pH (pH(i)) gradient reflecting a spatial asymmetry of protons has not been shown so far. One major regulator of pH......(i), the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger NHE1, is essential for cell migration and accumulates at the cell front. Here, we test the hypothesis that the uneven distribution of NHE1 activity creates a pH(i) gradient in migrating cells. Using the pH-sensitive fluorescent dye BCECF, pH(i) was measured in five cell lines (MV......3, B16V, NIH3T3, MDCK-F1, EA.hy926) along the axis of movement. Differences in pH(i) between the front and the rear end (¿pH(i) front-rear) were present in all cell lines, and inhibition of NHE1 either with HOE642 or by absence of extracellular Na(+) caused the pH(i) gradient to flatten or disappear...

  4. Natural killer cell signal integration balances synapse symmetry and migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culley, Fiona J; Johnson, Matthew; Evans, J Henry; Kumar, Sunil; Crilly, Rupert; Casasbuenas, Juan; Schnyder, Tim; Mehrabi, Maryam; Deonarain, Mahendra P; Ushakov, Dmitry S; Braud, Veronique; Roth, Günter; Brock, Roland; Köhler, Karsten; Davis, Daniel M

    2009-07-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells discern the health of other cells by recognising the balance of activating and inhibitory ligands expressed by each target cell. However, how the integration of activating and inhibitory signals relates to formation of the NK cell immune synapse remains a central question in our understanding of NK cell recognition. Here we report that ligation of LFA-1 on NK cells induced asymmetrical cell spreading and migration. In contrast, ligation of the activating receptor NKG2D induced symmetrical spreading of ruffled lamellipodia encompassing a dynamic ring of f-actin, concurrent with polarization towards a target cell and a "stop" signal. Ligation of both LFA-1 and NKG2D together resulted in symmetrical spreading but co-ligation of inhibitory receptors reverted NK cells to an asymmetrical migratory configuration leading to inhibitory synapses being smaller and more rapidly disassembled. Using micropatterned activating and inhibitory ligands, signals were found to be continuously and locally integrated during spreading. Together, these data demonstrate that NK cells spread to form large, stable, symmetrical synapses if activating signals dominate, whereas asymmetrical migratory "kinapses" are favoured if inhibitory signals dominate. This clarifies how the integration of activating and inhibitory receptor signals is translated to an appropriate NK cell response.

  5. Cell Image Velocimetry (CIV): boosting the automated quantification of cell migration in wound healing assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milde, Florian; Franco, Davide; Ferrari, Aldo; Kurtcuoglu, Vartan; Poulikakos, Dimos; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2012-11-01

    Cell migration is commonly quantified by tracking the speed of the cell layer interface in wound healing assays. This quantification is often hampered by low signal to noise ratio, in particular when complex substrates are employed to emulate in vivo cell migration in geometrically complex environments. Moreover, information about the cell motion, readily available inside the migrating cell layers, is not usually harvested. We introduce Cell Image Velocimetry (CIV), a combination of cell layer segmentation and image velocimetry algorithms, to drastically enhance the quantification of cell migration by wound healing assays. The resulting software analyses the speed of the interface as well as the detailed velocity field inside the cell layers in an automated fashion. CIV is shown to be highly robust for images with low signal to noise ratio, low contrast and frame shifting and it is portable across various experimental settings. The modular design and parametrization of CIV is not restricted to wound healing assays and allows for the exploration and quantification of flow phenomena in any optical microscopy dataset. Here, we demonstrate the capabilities of CIV in wound healing assays over topographically engineered surfaces and quantify the relative merits of differently aligned gratings on cell migration.

  6. Co-culture with Sertoli cells promotes proliferation and migration of umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Fenxi, E-mail: fxzhang0824@gmail.com [Department of Anatomy, Sanquan College, Xinxiang Medical University, Henan 453003, People' s Republic of China (China); Hong, Yan; Liang, Wenmei [Department of Histology and Embryology, Guiyang Medical University, Guizhou 550004, People' s Republic of China (China); Ren, Tongming [Department of Anatomy, Sanquan College, Xinxiang Medical University, Henan 453003, People' s Republic of China (China); Jing, Suhua [ICU Center, The Third Hospital of Xinxiang Medical University, Henan 453003, People' s Republic of China (China); Lin, Juntang [Stem Cell Center, Xinxiang Medical University, Henan 453003, People' s Republic of China (China)

    2012-10-12

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co-culture of Sertoli cells (SCs) with human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (UCMSCs). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Presence of SCs dramatically increased proliferation and migration of UCMSCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Presence of SCs stimulated expression of Mdm2, Akt, CDC2, Cyclin D, CXCR4, MAPKs. -- Abstract: Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs) have been recently used in transplant therapy. The proliferation and migration of MSCs are the determinants of the efficiency of MSC transplant therapy. Sertoli cells are a kind of 'nurse' cells that support the development of sperm cells. Recent studies show that Sertoli cells promote proliferation of endothelial cells and neural stem cells in co-culture. We hypothesized that co-culture of UCMSCs with Sertoli cells may also promote proliferation and migration of UCMSCs. To examine this hypothesis, we isolated UCMSCs from human cords and Sertoli cells from mouse testes, and co-cultured them using a Transwell system. We found that UCMSCs exhibited strong proliferation ability and potential to differentiate to other cell lineages such as osteocytes and adipocytes. The presence of Sertoli cells in co-culture significantly enhanced the proliferation and migration potential of UCMSCs (P < 0.01). Moreover, these phenotypic changes were accompanied with upregulation of multiple genes involved in cell proliferation and migration including phospho-Akt, Mdm2, phospho-CDC2, Cyclin D1, Cyclin D3 as well as CXCR4, phospho-p44 MAPK and phospho-p38 MAPK. These findings indicate that Sertoli cells boost UCMSC proliferation and migration potential.

  7. Glypican4 modulates lateral line collective cell migration non cell-autonomously.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venero Galanternik, Marina; Lush, Mark E; Piotrowski, Tatjana

    2016-11-15

    Collective cell migration is an essential process during embryonic development and diseases such as cancer, and still much remains to be learned about how cell intrinsic and environmental cues are coordinated to guide cells to their targets. The migration-dependent development of the zebrafish sensory lateral line proves to be an excellent model to study how proteoglycans control collective cell migration in a vertebrate. Proteoglycans are extracellular matrix glycoproteins essential for the control of several signaling pathways including Wnt/β-catenin, Fgf, BMP and Hh. In the lateral line primordium the modified sugar chains on proteoglycans are important regulators of cell polarity, ligand distribution and Fgf signaling. At least five proteoglycans show distinct expression patterns in the primordium; however, their individual functions have not been studied. Here, we describe the function of glypican4 during zebrafish lateral line development. glypican4 is expressed in neuromasts, interneuromast cells and muscle cells underlying the lateral line. knypek fr6 /glypican4 mutants show severe primordium migration defects and the primordium often U-turns and migrates back toward the head. Our analysis shows that Glypican4 regulates the feedback loop between Wnt/β-catenin/Fgf signaling in the primordium redundantly with other Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycans. In addition, the primordium migration defect is caused non-cell autonomously by the loss of cxcl12a-expressing muscle precursors along the myoseptum via downregulation of Hh. Our results show that glypican4 has distinct functions in primordium cells and cells in the environment and that both of these functions are essential for collective cell migration. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Src activates Abl to augment Robo1 expression in order to promote tumor cell migration

    OpenAIRE

    Khusial, P. Raaj; Vadla, Bhaskar; Krishnan, Harini; Ramlall, Trudy F.; Shen, Yongquan; Ichikawa, Hitoshi; Geng, Jian-Guo; Goldberg, Gary S.

    2010-01-01

    Cell migration is an essential step in cancer invasion and metastasis. A number of orchestrated cellular events involving tyrosine kinases and signaling receptors enable cancer cells to dislodge from primary tumors and colonize elsewhere in the body. For example, activation of the Src and Abl kinases can mediate events that promote tumor cell migration. Also, activation of the Robo1 receptor can induce tumor cell migration. However, while the importance of Src, Abl, and Robo1 in cell migratio...

  9. Ponatinib reduces viability, migration, and functionality of human endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gover-Proaktor, Ayala; Granot, Galit; Shapira, Saar; Raz, Oshrat; Pasvolsky, Oren; Nagler, Arnon; Lev, Dorit L; Inbal, Aida; Lubin, Ido; Raanani, Pia; Leader, Avi

    2017-06-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have revolutionized the prognosis of chronic myeloid leukemia. With the advent of highly efficacious therapy, the focus has shifted toward managing TKI adverse effects, such as vascular adverse events (VAEs). We used an in vitro angiogenesis model to investigate the TKI-associated VAEs. Our data show that imatinib, nilotinib, and ponatinib reduce human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) viability. Pharmacological concentrations of ponatinib induced apoptosis, reduced migration, inhibited tube formation of HUVECs, and had a negative effect on endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) function. Furthermore, in HUVECs transfected with VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2), the effect of ponatinib on tube formation and on all parameters representing normal endothelial cell function was less prominent than in control cells. This is the first report regarding the pathogenesis of ponatinib-associated VAEs. The antiangiogenic effect of ponatinib, possibly mediated by VEGFR2 inhibition, as shown in our study, is another piece in the intricate puzzle of TKI-associated VAEs.

  10. TCDD induces cell migration via NFATc1/ATX-signaling in MCF-7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Anja; Rau, Steffi; Küllertz, Gerhard; Fischer, Bernd; Santos, Anne Navarrete

    2009-01-10

    Breast cancer is characterized, among others, by the concurrence of lipophilic xenobiotica such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-para-dioxin (TCDD) with hypoxic tissue conditions. This condition activates the transcription factors hypoxia inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha) and aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) that are known to promote tumor progression. An interrelation between these transcription factors and nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) was implied by gene array analysis. In the present study, the interplay of the three transcription factors was studied and correlated with the migration of MCF-7 cells in response to TCDD and/or hypoxia. An AhR-activation by 10nM TCDD and HIF-1alpha activation by 5% oxygen induced activation of NFATc1. The effects were inhibited by cyclosporine A (CsA), suggesting that the activation of NFAT by AhR or HIF-1alpha signaling is calcineurin-dependent. The expression/activity of the NFAT target gene autotaxin (ATX) was increased. ATX is known to stimulate migration of tumor cells. The hydrolysis product of ATX, lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), increased the migration of MCF-7 cells under normoxia but not under hypoxia. This effect correlated with increased migration observed after TCDD treatment. Hypoxia did not promote migration of MCF-7 cells, suggesting that ATX down-stream signaling was inhibited by hypoxia. In conclusion, the TCDD-mediated activation of NFATc1 is suggested to promote cell migration via ATX/LPA-signaling.

  11. Probing Leader Cells in Endothelial Collective Migration by Plasma Lithography Geometric Confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yongliang; Jamilpour, Nima; Yao, Baoyin; Dean, Zachary S.; Riahi, Reza; Wong, Pak Kin

    2016-01-01

    When blood vessels are injured, leader cells emerge in the endothelium to heal the wound and restore the vasculature integrity. The characteristics of leader cells during endothelial collective migration under diverse physiological conditions, however, are poorly understood. Here we investigate the regulation and function of endothelial leader cells by plasma lithography geometric confinement generated. Endothelial leader cells display an aggressive phenotype, connect to follower cells via peripheral actin cables and discontinuous adherens junctions, and lead migrating clusters near the leading edge. Time-lapse microscopy, immunostaining, and particle image velocimetry reveal that the density of leader cells and the speed of migrating clusters are tightly regulated in a wide range of geometric patterns. By challenging the cells with converging, diverging and competing patterns, we show that the density of leader cells correlates with the size and coherence of the migrating clusters. Collectively, our data provide evidence that leader cells control endothelial collective migration by regualting the migrating clusters. PMID:26936382

  12. Probing Leader Cells in Endothelial Collective Migration by Plasma Lithography Geometric Confinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yongliang; Jamilpour, Nima; Yao, Baoyin; Dean, Zachary S; Riahi, Reza; Wong, Pak Kin

    2016-03-03

    When blood vessels are injured, leader cells emerge in the endothelium to heal the wound and restore the vasculature integrity. The characteristics of leader cells during endothelial collective migration under diverse physiological conditions, however, are poorly understood. Here we investigate the regulation and function of endothelial leader cells by plasma lithography geometric confinement generated. Endothelial leader cells display an aggressive phenotype, connect to follower cells via peripheral actin cables and discontinuous adherens junctions, and lead migrating clusters near the leading edge. Time-lapse microscopy, immunostaining, and particle image velocimetry reveal that the density of leader cells and the speed of migrating clusters are tightly regulated in a wide range of geometric patterns. By challenging the cells with converging, diverging and competing patterns, we show that the density of leader cells correlates with the size and coherence of the migrating clusters. Collectively, our data provide evidence that leader cells control endothelial collective migration by regualting the migrating clusters.

  13. The migrations of Drosophila muscle founders and primordial germ cells are interdependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanik, Vincent; Dunipace, Leslie; Bae, Young-Kyung; Macabenta, Frank; Sun, Jingjing; Trisnadi, Nathanie; Stathopoulos, Angelike

    2016-09-01

    Caudal visceral mesoderm (CVM) cells migrate from posterior to anterior of the Drosophila embryo as two bilateral streams of cells to support the specification of longitudinal muscles along the midgut. To accomplish this long-distance migration, CVM cells receive input from their environment, but little is known about how this collective cell migration is regulated. In a screen we found that wunen mutants exhibit CVM cell migration defects. Wunens are lipid phosphate phosphatases known to regulate the directional migration of primordial germ cells (PGCs). PGC and CVM cell types interact while PGCs are en route to the somatic gonadal mesoderm, and previous studies have shown that CVM impacts PGC migration. In turn, we found here that CVM cells exhibit an affinity for PGCs, localizing to the position of PGCs whether mislocalized or trapped in the endoderm. In the absence of PGCs, CVM cells exhibit subtle changes, including more cohesive movement of the migrating collective, and an increased number of longitudinal muscles is found at anterior sections of the larval midgut. These data demonstrate that PGC and CVM cell migrations are interdependent and suggest that distinct migrating cell types can coordinately influence each other to promote effective cell migration during development. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  14. Src activates Abl to augment Robo1 expression in order to promote tumor cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khusial, P Raaj; Vadla, Bhaskar; Krishnan, Harini; Ramlall, Trudy F; Shen, Yongquan; Ichikawa, Hitoshi; Geng, Jian-Guo; Goldberg, Gary S

    2010-07-01

    Cell migration is an essential step in cancer invasion and metastasis. A number of orchestrated cellular events involving tyrosine kinases and signaling receptors enable cancer cells to dislodge from primary tumors and colonize elsewhere in the body. For example, activation of the Src and Abl kinases can mediate events that promote tumor cell migration. Also, activation of the Robo1 receptor can induce tumor cell migration. However, while the importance of Src, Abl, and Robo1 in cell migration have been demonstrated, molecular mechanisms by which they collectively influence cell migration have not been clearly elucidated. In addition, little is known about mechanisms that control Robo1 expression. We report here that Src activates Abl to stabilize Robo1 in order to promote cell migration. Inhibition of Abl kinase activity by siRNA or kinase blockers decreased Robo1 protein levels and suppressed the migration of transformed cells. We also provide evidence that Robo1 utilizes Cdc42 and Rac1 GTPases to induce cell migration. In addition, inhibition of Robo1 signaling can suppress transformed cell migration in the face of robust Src and Abl kinase activity. Therefore, inhibitors of Src, Abl, Robo1 and small GTPases may target a coordinated pathway required for tumor cell migration.

  15. Tre1, a G protein-coupled receptor, directs transepithelial migration of Drosophila germ cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhat S Kunwar

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available In most organisms, germ cells are formed distant from the somatic part of the gonad and thus have to migrate along and through a variety of tissues to reach the gonad. Transepithelial migration through the posterior midgut (PMG is the first active step during Drosophila germ cell migration. Here we report the identification of a novel G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR, Tre1, that is essential for this migration step. Maternal tre1 RNA is localized to germ cells, and tre1 is required cell autonomously in germ cells. In tre1 mutant embryos, most germ cells do not exit the PMG. The few germ cells that do leave the midgut early migrate normally to the gonad, suggesting that this gene is specifically required for transepithelial migration and that mutant germ cells are still able to recognize other guidance cues. Additionally, inhibiting small Rho GTPases in germ cells affects transepithelial migration, suggesting that Tre1 signals through Rho1. We propose that Tre1 acts in a manner similar to chemokine receptors required during transepithelial migration of leukocytes, implying an evolutionarily conserved mechanism of transepithelial migration. Recently, the chemokine receptor CXCR4 was shown to direct migration in vertebrate germ cells. Thus, germ cells may more generally use GPCR signaling to navigate the embryo toward their target.

  16. Arecoline inhibits endothelial cell growth and migration and the attachment to mononuclear cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuei-Kuen Tseng

    2014-09-01

    Conclusion: Arecoline impaired vascular endothelial cells by inhibiting their growth and migration and their adhesion to U937 mononuclear cells. These results reveal that arecoline may contribute to the pathogenesis of oral submucous fibrosis and cardiovascular diseases by affecting endothelial cell function in BQ chewers.

  17. Notch1-Dll4 signaling and mechanical force regulate leader cell formation during collective cell migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riahi, Reza; Sun, Jian; Wang, Shue; Long, Min; Zhang, Donna D.; Wong, Pak Kin

    2015-01-01

    At the onset of collective cell migration, a subset of cells within an initially homogenous population acquires a distinct “leader” phenotype with characteristic morphology and motility. However, the factors driving leader cell formation as well as the mechanisms regulating leader cell density during the migration process remain to be determined. Here, we use single cell gene expression analysis and computational modeling to show that leader cell identity is dynamically regulated by Dll4 signaling through both Notch1 and cellular stress in a migrating epithelium. Time-lapse microscopy reveals that Dll4 is induced in leader cells after the creation of the cell-free region and leader cells are regulated via Notch1-Dll4 lateral inhibition. Furthermore, mechanical stress inhibits Dll4 expression and leader cell formation in the monolayer. Collectively, our findings suggest that a reduction of mechanical force near the boundary promotes Notch1-Dll4 signaling to dynamically regulate the density of leader cells during collective cell migration. PMID:25766473

  18. Notch1-Dll4 signalling and mechanical force regulate leader cell formation during collective cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riahi, Reza; Sun, Jian; Wang, Shue; Long, Min; Zhang, Donna D; Wong, Pak Kin

    2015-03-13

    At the onset of collective cell migration, a subset of cells within an initially homogenous population acquires a distinct 'leader' phenotype with characteristic morphology and motility. However, the factors driving the leader cell formation as well as the mechanisms regulating leader cell density during the migration process remain to be determined. Here we use single-cell gene expression analysis and computational modelling to show that the leader cell identity is dynamically regulated by Dll4 signalling through both Notch1 and cellular stress in a migrating epithelium. Time-lapse microscopy reveals that Dll4 is induced in leader cells after the creation of the cell-free region and leader cells are regulated via Notch1-Dll4 lateral inhibition. Furthermore, mechanical stress inhibits Dll4 expression and leader cell formation in the monolayer. Collectively, our findings suggest that a reduction of mechanical force near the boundary promotes Notch1-Dll4 signalling to dynamically regulate the density of leader cells during collective cell migration.

  19. RNase L Suppresses Androgen Receptor Signaling, Cell Migration and Matrix Metalloproteinase Activity in Prostate Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shubham Dayal

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The interferon antiviral pathways and prostate cancer genetics converge on a regulated endoribonuclease, RNase L. Positional cloning and linkage studies mapped Hereditary Prostate Cancer 1 (HPC1 to RNASEL. To date, there is no correlation of viral infections with prostate cancer, suggesting that RNase L may play additional roles in tumor suppression. Here, we demonstrate a role of RNase L as a suppressor of androgen receptor (AR signaling, cell migration and matrix metalloproteinase activity. Using RNase L mutants, we show that its nucleolytic activity is dispensable for both AR signaling and migration. The most prevalent HPC1-associated mutations in RNase L, R462Q and E265X, enhance AR signaling and cell migration. RNase L negatively regulates cell migration and attachment on various extracellular matrices. We demonstrate that RNase L knockdown cells promote increased cell surface expression of integrin β1 which activates Focal Adhesion Kinase-Sarcoma (FAK-Src pathway and Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1-guanosine triphosphatase (Rac1-GTPase activity to increase cell migration. Activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-2 and -9 is significantly increased in cells where RNase L levels are ablated. We show that mutations in RNase L found in HPC patients may promote prostate cancer by increasing expression of AR-responsive genes and cell motility and identify novel roles of RNase L as a prostate cancer susceptibility gene.

  20. RNase L Suppresses Androgen Receptor Signaling, Cell Migration and Matrix Metalloproteinase Activity in Prostate Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayal, Shubham; Zhou, Jun; Manivannan, Praveen; Siddiqui, Mohammad Adnan; Ahmad, Omaima Farid; Clark, Matthew; Awadia, Sahezeel; Garcia-Mata, Rafael; Shemshedini, Lirim; Malathi, Krishnamurthy

    2017-01-01

    The interferon antiviral pathways and prostate cancer genetics converge on a regulated endoribonuclease, RNase L. Positional cloning and linkage studies mapped Hereditary Prostate Cancer 1 (HPC1) to RNASEL. To date, there is no correlation of viral infections with prostate cancer, suggesting that RNase L may play additional roles in tumor suppression. Here, we demonstrate a role of RNase L as a suppressor of androgen receptor (AR) signaling, cell migration and matrix metalloproteinase activity. Using RNase L mutants, we show that its nucleolytic activity is dispensable for both AR signaling and migration. The most prevalent HPC1-associated mutations in RNase L, R462Q and E265X, enhance AR signaling and cell migration. RNase L negatively regulates cell migration and attachment on various extracellular matrices. We demonstrate that RNase L knockdown cells promote increased cell surface expression of integrin β1 which activates Focal Adhesion Kinase-Sarcoma (FAK-Src) pathway and Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1-guanosine triphosphatase (Rac1-GTPase) activity to increase cell migration. Activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and -9 is significantly increased in cells where RNase L levels are ablated. We show that mutations in RNase L found in HPC patients may promote prostate cancer by increasing expression of AR-responsive genes and cell motility and identify novel roles of RNase L as a prostate cancer susceptibility gene. PMID:28257035

  1. Glioma migration: clues from the biology of neural progenitor cells and embryonic CNS cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirks, P B

    2001-06-01

    Neural stem cells have recently come to the forefront in neurobiology because of the possibilities for CNS repair by transplantation. Further understanding of the biology of these cells is critical for making their use in CNS repair possible. It is likely that these discoveries will also have spin-offs for neuro-oncology as primary brain tumors may arise from a CNS progenitor cell. An understanding of the normal migratory ability of these cells is also likely to have a very important impact on the knowledge of brain tumor invasion.

  2. Proton beam irradiation inhibits the migration of melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasińska-Konior, Katarzyna; Pochylczuk, Katarzyna; Czajka, Elżbieta; Michalik, Marta; Romanowska-Dixon, Bożena; Swakoń, Jan; Urbańska, Krystyna; Elas, Martyna

    2017-01-01

    In recent years experimental data have indicated that low-energy proton beam radiation might induce a difference in cellular migration in comparison to photons. We therefore set out to compare the effect of proton beam irradiation and X-rays on the survival and long-term migratory properties of two cell lines: uveal melanoma Mel270 and skin melanoma BLM. Cells treated with either proton beam or X-rays were analyzed for their survival using clonogenic assay and MTT test. Long-term migratory properties were assessed with time-lapse monitoring of individual cell movements, wound test and transpore migration, while the expression of the related proteins was measured with western blot. Exposure to proton beam and X-rays led to similar survival but the quality of the cell colonies was markedly different. More paraclones with a low proliferative activity and fewer highly-proliferative holoclones were found after proton beam irradiation in comparison to X-rays. At 20 or 40 days post-irradiation, migratory capacity was decreased more by proton beam than by X-rays. The beta-1-integrin level was decreased in Mel270 cells after both types of radiation, while vimentin, a marker of EMT, was increased in BLM cells only. We conclude that proton beam irradiation induced long-term inhibition of cellular motility, as well as changes in the level of beta-1 integrin and vimentin. If confirmed, the change in the quality, but not in the number of colonies after proton beam irradiation might favor tumor growth inhibition after fractionated proton therapy.

  3. Influence of stromal cells on lymphocyte adhesion and migration on endothelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    McGettrick, Helen M.; Buckley, Chris D.; Rainger, G.Ed; Nash, Gerard B

    2010-01-01

    Methods are described for analysing adhesion and migration of isolated lymphocytes on endothelial cell monolayers which have been co-cultured with different stromal cells, with or without additional cytokine treatment. The different cells types are grown on opposite sides of 3.0 or 0.4μm pore filters, depending on whether migration through the whole construct is to be analysed, or adhesion to the endothelial cells alone. Assays may be ‘static’ or filters can be incorporated into flow chambers...

  4. Urokinase and tissue-type plasminogen activator stimulate human vascular smooth muscle cell migration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnberg, M.J.; Nieuwenbroek, N.M.E.; Slomp, J.; Quax, P.H.A.; Verheijen, J.H.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the role of the plasminogen activation system in the migration of human vascular smooth muscle cells in vitro. After wounding of confluent human smooth muscle cell cultures by stripping cells from their extracellular matrix, cells start to migrate from

  5. Cytoglobin inhibits migration through PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway in fibroblast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirci, Selami; Doğan, Ayşegül; Apdik, Hüseyin; Tuysuz, Emre Can; Gulluoglu, Sukru; Bayrak, Omer Faruk; Şahin, Fikrettin

    2018-01-01

    Cell proliferation and migration are crucial in many physiological processes including development, cancer, tissue repair, and wound healing. Cell migration is regulated by several signaling molecules. Identification of genes related to cell migration is required to understand molecular mechanism of non-healing chronic wounds which is a major concern in clinics. In the current study, the role of cytoglobin (CYGB) gene in fıbroblast cell migration and proliferation was described. L929 mouse fibroblast cells were transduced with lentiviral particles for CYGB and GFP, and analyzed for cell proliferation and migration ability. Fibroblast cells overexpressing CYGB displayed decreased cell proliferation, colony formation capacity, and cell migration. Phosphorylation levels of mTOR and two downstream effectors S6 and 4E-BP1 which take part in PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling declined in CYGB-overexpressing cells. Microarray analysis indicated that CYGB overexpression leads to downregulation of cell proliferation, migration, and tumor growth associated genes in L929 cell line. This study demonstrated the role of CYGB in fibroblast cell motility and proliferation. CYGB could be a promising candidate for further studies as a potential target for diseases related to cell migration such as cancer and chronic wound treatment.

  6. Inferring single-cell behaviour from large-scale epithelial sheet migration patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Rachel M; Yue, Haicen; Rappel, Wouter-Jan; Losert, Wolfgang

    2017-05-01

    Cell migration plays an important role in a wide variety of biological processes and can incorporate both individual cell motion and collective behaviour. The emergent properties of collective migration are receiving increasing attention as collective motion's role in diseases such as metastatic cancer becomes clear. Yet, how individual cell behaviour influences large-scale, multi-cell collective motion remains unclear. In this study, we provide insight into the mechanisms behind collective migration by studying cell migration in a spreading monolayer of epithelial MCF10A cells. We quantify migration using particle image velocimetry and find that cell groups have features of motion that span multiple length scales. Comparing our experimental results to a model of collective cell migration, we find that cell migration within the monolayer can be affected in qualitatively different ways by cell motion at the boundary, yet it is not necessary to introduce leader cells at the boundary or specify other large-scale features to recapitulate this large-scale phenotype in simulations. Instead, in our model, collective motion can be enhanced by increasing the overall activity of the cells or by giving the cells a stronger coupling between their motion and polarity. This suggests that investigating the activity and polarity persistence of individual cells will add insight into the collective migration phenotypes observed during development and disease. © 2017 The Author(s).

  7. Dancing Styles of Collective Cell Migration: Image-Based Computational Analysis of JRAB/MICAL-L2

    OpenAIRE

    Ayuko Sakane; Shin Yoshizawa; Hideo Yokota; Takuya Sasaki

    2018-01-01

    Collective cell migration is observed during morphogenesis, angiogenesis, and wound healing, and this type of cell migration also contributes to efficient metastasis in some kinds of cancers. Because collectively migrating cells are much better organized than a random assemblage of individual cells, there seems to be a kind of order in migrating clusters. Extensive research has identified a large number of molecules involved in collective cell migration, and these factors have been analyzed u...

  8. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition transcription factors control pluripotent adult stem cell migration in vivo in planarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abnave, Prasad; Aboukhatwa, Ellen; Kosaka, Nobuyoshi; Thompson, James; Hill, Mark A; Aboobaker, A Aziz

    2017-10-01

    Migration of stem cells underpins the physiology of metazoan animals. For tissues to be maintained, stem cells and their progeny must migrate and differentiate in the correct positions. This need is even more acute after tissue damage by wounding or pathogenic infection. Inappropriate migration also underpins metastasis. Despite this, few mechanistic studies address stem cell migration during repair or homeostasis in adult tissues. Here, we present a shielded X-ray irradiation assay that allows us to follow stem cell migration in planarians. We demonstrate the use of this system to study the molecular control of stem cell migration and show that snail-1, snail-2 and zeb-1 EMT transcription factor homologs are necessary for cell migration to wound sites and for the establishment of migratory cell morphology. We also observed that stem cells undergo homeostatic migration to anterior regions that lack local stem cells, in the absence of injury, maintaining tissue homeostasis. This requires the polarity determinant notum Our work establishes planarians as a suitable model for further in-depth study of the processes controlling stem cell migration in vivo. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  9. Collective cell migration of smooth muscle and endothelial cells: impact of injury versus non-injury stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammann, Kaitlyn R; DeCook, Katrina J; Tran, Phat L; Merkle, Valerie M; Wong, Pak K; Slepian, Marvin J

    2015-01-01

    Cell migration is a vital process for growth and repair. In vitro migration assays, utilized to study cell migration, often rely on physical scraping of a cell monolayer to induce cell migration. The physical act of scrape injury results in numerous factors stimulating cell migration - some injury-related, some solely due to gap creation and loss of contact inhibition. Eliminating the effects of cell injury would be useful to examine the relative contribution of injury versus other mechanisms to cell migration. Cell exclusion assays can tease out the effects of injury and have become a new avenue for migration studies. Here, we developed two simple non-injury techniques for cell exclusion: 1) a Pyrex® cylinder - for outward migration of cells and 2) a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) insert - for inward migration of cells. Utilizing these assays smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) migratory behavior was studied on both polystyrene and gelatin-coated surfaces. Differences in migratory behavior could be detected for both smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and endothelial cells (ECs) when utilizing injury versus non-injury assays. SMCs migrated faster than HUVECs when stimulated by injury in the scrape wound assay, with rates of 1.26 % per hour and 1.59 % per hour on polystyrene and gelatin surfaces, respectively. The fastest overall migration took place with HUVECs on a gelatin-coated surface, with the in-growth assay, at a rate of 2.05 % per hour. The slowest migration occurred with the same conditions but on a polystyrene surface at a rate of 0.33 % per hour. For SMCs, injury is a dominating factor in migration when compared to the two cell exclusion assays, regardless of the surface tested: polystyrene or gelatin. In contrast, the migrating surface, namely gelatin, was a dominating factor for HUVEC migration, providing an increase in cell migration over the polystyrene surface. Overall, the cell exclusion assays - the in

  10. Prostaglandins in Cancer Cell Adhesion, Migration, and Invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David G. Menter

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostaglandins exert a profound influence over the adhesive, migratory, and invasive behavior of cells during the development and progression of cancer. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 and microsomal prostaglandin E2 synthase-1 (mPGES-1 are upregulated in inflammation and cancer. This results in the production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2, which binds to and activates G-protein-coupled prostaglandin E1-4 receptors (EP1-4. Selectively targeting the COX-2/mPGES-1/PGE2/EP1-4 axis of the prostaglandin pathway can reduce the adhesion, migration, invasion, and angiogenesis. Once stimulated by prostaglandins, cadherin adhesive connections between epithelial or endothelial cells are lost. This enables cells to invade through the underlying basement membrane and extracellular matrix (ECM. Interactions with the ECM are mediated by cell surface integrins by “outside-in signaling” through Src and focal adhesion kinase (FAK and/or “inside-out signaling” through talins and kindlins. Combining the use of COX-2/mPGES-1/PGE2/EP1-4 axis-targeted molecules with those targeting cell surface adhesion receptors or their downstream signaling molecules may enhance cancer therapy.

  11. From cell differentiation to cell collectives: Bacillus subtilis uses division of labor to migrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gestel, Jordi; Vlamakis, Hera; Kolter, Roberto

    2015-04-01

    The organization of cells, emerging from cell-cell interactions, can give rise to collective properties. These properties are adaptive when together cells can face environmental challenges that they separately cannot. One particular challenge that is important for microorganisms is migration. In this study, we show how flagellum-independent migration is driven by the division of labor of two cell types that appear during Bacillus subtilis sliding motility. Cell collectives organize themselves into bundles (called "van Gogh bundles") of tightly aligned cell chains that form filamentous loops at the colony edge. We show, by time-course microscopy, that these loops migrate by pushing themselves away from the colony. The formation of van Gogh bundles depends critically on the synergistic interaction of surfactin-producing and matrix-producing cells. We propose that surfactin-producing cells reduce the friction between cells and their substrate, thereby facilitating matrix-producing cells to form bundles. The folding properties of these bundles determine the rate of colony expansion. Our study illustrates how the simple organization of cells within a community can yield a strong ecological advantage. This is a key factor underlying the diverse origins of multicellularity.

  12. From cell differentiation to cell collectives: Bacillus subtilis uses division of labor to migrate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi van Gestel

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The organization of cells, emerging from cell-cell interactions, can give rise to collective properties. These properties are adaptive when together cells can face environmental challenges that they separately cannot. One particular challenge that is important for microorganisms is migration. In this study, we show how flagellum-independent migration is driven by the division of labor of two cell types that appear during Bacillus subtilis sliding motility. Cell collectives organize themselves into bundles (called "van Gogh bundles" of tightly aligned cell chains that form filamentous loops at the colony edge. We show, by time-course microscopy, that these loops migrate by pushing themselves away from the colony. The formation of van Gogh bundles depends critically on the synergistic interaction of surfactin-producing and matrix-producing cells. We propose that surfactin-producing cells reduce the friction between cells and their substrate, thereby facilitating matrix-producing cells to form bundles. The folding properties of these bundles determine the rate of colony expansion. Our study illustrates how the simple organization of cells within a community can yield a strong ecological advantage. This is a key factor underlying the diverse origins of multicellularity.

  13. Integrin-mediated cell migration is blocked by inhibitors of human neuraminidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Feng; Howlader, Md Amran; Cairo, Christopher W

    2016-09-01

    Integrins are critical receptors in cell migration and adhesion. A number of mechanisms are known to regulate the function of integrins, including phosphorylation, conformational change, and cytoskeletal anchoring. We investigated whether native neuraminidase (Neu, or sialidase) enzymes which modify glycolipids could play a role in regulating integrin-mediated cell migration. Using a scratch assay, we found that exogenously added Neu3 and Neu4 activity altered rates of cell migration. We observed that Neu4 increased the rate of migration in two cell lines (HeLa, A549); while Neu3 only increased migration in HeLa cells. A bacterial neuraminidase was able to increase the rate of migration in HeLa, but not in A549 cells. Treatment of cells with complex gangliosides (GM1, GD1a, GD1b, and GT1b) resulted in decreased cell migration rates, while LacCer was able to increase rates of migration in both lines. Importantly, our results show that treatment of cells with inhibitors of native Neu enzymes had a dramatic effect on the rates of cell migration. The most potent compound tested targeted the human Neu4 isoenzyme, and was able to substantially reduce the rate of cell migration. We found that the lateral mobility of integrins was reduced by treatment of cells with Neu3, suggesting that Neu3 enzyme activity resulted in changes to integrin-co-receptor or integrin-cytoskeleton interactions. Finally, our results support the hypothesis that inhibitors of human Neu can be used to investigate mechanisms of cell migration and for the development of anti-adhesive therapies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Fast-crawling cell types migrate to avoid the direction of periodic substratum stretching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okimura, Chika; Ueda, Kazuki; Sakumura, Yuichi; Iwadate, Yoshiaki

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT To investigate the relationship between mechanical stimuli from substrata and related cell functions, one of the most useful techniques is the application of mechanical stimuli via periodic stretching of elastic substrata. In response to this stimulus, Dictyostelium discoideum cells migrate in a direction perpendicular to the stretching direction. The origins of directional migration, higher migration velocity in the direction perpendicular to the stretching direction or the higher probability of a switch of migration direction to perpendicular to the stretching direction, however, remain unknown. In this study, we applied periodic stretching stimuli to neutrophil-like differentiated HL-60 cells, which migrate perpendicular to the direction of stretch. Detailed analysis of the trajectories of HL-60 cells and Dictyostelium cells obtained in a previous study revealed that the higher probability of a switch of migration direction to that perpendicular to the direction of stretching was the main cause of such directional migration. This directional migration appears to be a strategy adopted by fast-crawling cells in which they do not migrate faster in the direction they want to go, but migrate to avoid a direction they do not want to go. PMID:26980079

  15. ERP44 inhibits human lung cancer cell migration mainly via IP3R2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xue; Jin, Meng; Chen, Ying-Xiao; Wang, Jun; Zhai, Kui; Chang, Yan; Yuan, Qi; Yao, Kai-Tai; Ji, Guangju

    2016-06-01

    Cancer cell migration is involved in tumour metastasis. However, the relationship between calcium signalling and cancer migration is not well elucidated. In this study, we used the human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cell line to examine the role of endoplasmic reticulum protein 44 (ERP44), which has been reported to regulate calcium release inside of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), in cell migration. We found that the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs/ITPRs) inhibitor 2-APB significantly inhibited A549 cell migration by inhibiting cell polarization and pseudopodium protrusion, which suggests that Ca2+ is necessary for A549 cell migration. Similarly, the overexpression of ERP44 reduced intracellular Ca2+ release via IP3Rs, altered cell morphology and significantly inhibited the migration of A549 cells. These phenomena were primarily dependent on IP3R2 because wound healing in A549 cells with IP3R2 rather than IP3R1 or IP3R3 siRNA was markedly inhibited. Moreover, the overexpression of ERP44 did not affect the migration of the human neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y, which mainly expresses IP3R1. Based on the above observations, we conclude that ERP44 regulates A549 cell migration mainly via an IP3R2-dependent pathway.

  16. Computational modelling of multi-cell migration in a multi-signalling substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamaleddin Mousavi, Seyed; Doblaré, Manuel; Hamdy Doweidar, Mohamed

    2014-04-01

    Cell migration is a vital process in many biological phenomena ranging from wound healing to tissue regeneration. Over the past few years, it has been proven that in addition to cell-cell and cell-substrate mechanical interactions (mechanotaxis), cells can be driven by thermal, chemical and/or electrical stimuli. A numerical model was recently presented by the authors to analyse single cell migration in a multi-signalling substrate. That work is here extended to include multi-cell migration due to cell-cell interaction in a multi-signalling substrate under different conditions. This model is based on balancing the forces that act on the cell population in the presence of different guiding cues. Several numerical experiments are presented to illustrate the effect of different stimuli on the trajectory and final location of the cell population within a 3D heterogeneous multi-signalling substrate. Our findings indicate that although multi-cell migration is relatively similar to single cell migration in some aspects, the associated behaviour is very different. For instance, cell-cell interaction may delay single cell migration towards effective cues while increasing the magnitude of the average net cell traction force as well as the local velocity. Besides, the random movement of a cell within a cell population is slightly greater than that of single cell migration. Moreover, higher electrical field strength causes the cell slug to flatten near the cathode. On the other hand, as with single cell migration, the existence of electrotaxis dominates mechanotaxis, moving the cells to the cathode or anode pole located at the free surface. The numerical results here obtained are qualitatively consistent with related experimental works.

  17. Modulation of epithelial tissue and cell migration by microgrooves.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dalton, B.A.; Walboomers, X.F.; Dziegielewski, M.; Evans, M.D.; Taylor, S.; Jansen, J.A.; Steele, J.G.

    2001-01-01

    We used a polystyrene substratum to study the response of migrating epithelium to 1- or 5-microm depth microgrooves with groove/ridge widths of 1, 2, 5, or 10 microm. The migration of a tissue sheet was enhanced along the microgrooves, while migration across the microgrooves was inhibited. Changing

  18. Melanocortin 1 Receptor Regulates Melanoma Cell Migration by Controlling Syndecan-2 Expression*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Heesung; Lee, Jung-hyun; Jeong, Dayun; Han, Inn-Oc; Oh, Eok-Soo

    2012-01-01

    The melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R), a key regulator of melanogenesis, is known to control inflammation, acting in concert with the MC1R ligand α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone. Although cell migration is a key event in inflammation, few studies have addressed the function of MC1R in this context. Using highly motile melanoma cells, we found that the expression level of MC1R was associated with the extent of migration of mouse melanoma cells, suggesting that MC1R plays a functional role in controlling this migration. Overexpression of MC1R enhanced melanoma cell migration, whereas the opposite was true when MC1R levels were knocked down using small inhibitory RNAs. Interestingly, MC1R expression enhanced the synthesis of syndecan-2, a cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycan known to be involved in melanoma cell migration. Knockdown of syndecan-2 expression decreased MC1R-mediated cell migration. Further, MC1R inhibited the activation of p38 MAPK, subsequently enhancing expression of sydnecan-2, in parallel with an increase in the extent of cell migration. Consistently, activation of p38 by H2O2 inhibited syndecan-2 expression and cell migration, whereas inhibition of p38 activation enhanced syndecan-2 expression and cell migration. Finally, we found that α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone inhibited MC1R-mediated cell migration via activation of p38 and inhibition of syndecan-2 expression. Together, the data strongly suggest that MC1R regulates melanoma cell migration via inhibition of syndecan-2 expression. PMID:22493442

  19. Proteolytic and non-proteolytic migration of tumour cells and leucocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedl, Peter; Wolf, Katarina

    2003-01-01

    The migration of different cell types, such as leucocytes and tumour cells, involves cellular strategies to overcome the physical resistance of three-dimensional tissue networks, including proteolytic degradation of extracellular matrix (ECM) components. High-resolution live-cell imaging techniques have recently provided structural and biochemical insight into the differential use of matrix-degrading enzymes in the migration processes of different cell types within the three-dimensional ECM. Proteolytic migration is achieved by slow-moving cells, such as fibroblasts and mesenchymally moving tumour cells, by engaging matrix metalloproteinases, cathepsins and serine proteases at the cell surface in a focalized manner ('pericellular proteolysis'), while adhesion and migratory traction are provided by integrins. Pericellular breakdown of ECM components generates localized matrix defects and remodelling along migration tracks. In contrast with tumour cells, constitutive non-proteolytic migration is used by rapidly moving T lymphocytes. This migration type does not generate proteolytic matrix remodelling, but rather depends on shape change to allow cells to glide and squeeze through gaps and trails present in connective tissues. In addition, constitutive proteolytic migration can be converted into non-proteolytic movement by protease inhibitors. After the simultaneous inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases, serine/threonine proteases and cysteine proteases in tumour cells undergoing proteolysis-dependent movement, a fundamental adaptation towards amoeboid movement is able to sustain non-proteolytic migration in these tumour cells (the mesenchymal-amoeboid transition). Instead of using proteases for matrix degradation, the tumour cells use leucoyte-like strategies of shape change and squeezing through matrix gaps along tissue scaffolds. The diversity of protease function in cell migration by different cell types highlights response diversity and molecular adaptation of

  20. Discovery of the migrasome, an organelle mediating release of cytoplasmic contents during cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Liang; Li, Ying; Peng, Junya; Wu, Danni; Zhao, Xiaoxin; Cui, Yitong; Chen, Lilian; Yan, Xiaojun; Du, Yanan; Yu, Li

    2015-01-01

    Cells communicate with each other through secreting and releasing proteins and vesicles. Many cells can migrate. In this study, we report the discovery of migracytosis, a cell migration-dependent mechanism for releasing cellular contents, and migrasomes, the vesicular structures that mediate migracytosis. As migrating cells move, they leave long tubular strands, called retraction fibers, behind them. Large vesicles, which contain numerous smaller vesicles, grow on the tips and intersections of retraction fibers. These fibers, which connect the vesicles with the main cell body, eventually break, and the vesicles are released into the extracellular space or directly taken up by surrounding cells. Since the formation of these vesicles is migration-dependent, we named them "migrasomes". We also found that cytosolic contents can be transported into migrasomes and released from the cell through migrasomes. We named this migration-dependent release mechanism "migracytosis".

  1. Evaluation of cancer stem cell migration using compartmentalizing microfluidic devices and live cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu; Agrawal, Basheal; Clark, Paul A; Williams, Justin C; Kuo, John S

    2011-12-23

    In the last 40 years, the United States invested over 200 billion dollars on cancer research, resulting in only a 5% decrease in death rate. A major obstacle for improving patient outcomes is the poor understanding of mechanisms underlying cellular migration associated with aggressive cancer cell invasion, metastasis and therapeutic resistance. Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM), the most prevalent primary malignant adult brain tumor, exemplifies this difficulty. Despite standard surgery, radiation and chemotherapies, patient median survival is only fifteen months, due to aggressive GBM infiltration into adjacent brain and rapid cancer recurrence. The interactions of aberrant cell migratory mechanisms and the tumor microenvironment likely differentiate cancer from normal cells. Therefore, improving therapeutic approaches for GBM require a better understanding of cancer cell migration mechanisms. Recent work suggests that a small subpopulation of cells within GBM, the brain tumor stem cell (BTSC), may be responsible for therapeutic resistance and recurrence. Mechanisms underlying BTSC migratory capacity are only starting to be characterized. Due to a limitation in visual inspection and geometrical manipulation, conventional migration assays are restricted to quantifying overall cell populations. In contrast, microfluidic devices permit single cell analysis because of compatibility with modern microscopy and control over micro-environment. We present a method for detailed characterization of BTSC migration using compartmentalizing microfluidic devices. These PDMS-made devices cast the tissue culture environment into three connected compartments: seeding chamber, receiving chamber and bridging microchannels. We tailored the device such that both chambers hold sufficient media to support viable BTSC for 4-5 days without media exchange. Highly mobile BTSCs initially introduced into the seeding chamber are isolated after migration though bridging microchannels to the parallel

  2. PLACENTAL SECRETORY FACTORS INFLUENCE TO THP-1 CELLS PHENOTYPE AND THP-1 CELLS TRANSENDOTHELIAL MIGRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. I. Stepanova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Decidual and placental macrophage pools are renewed due to its transendothelial monocyte migration from peripheral blood. Tissue macrophages control placental development and provide fetomaternal immunological tolerance. Preeclamptic pregnancy is accompanied by increased monocyte migration to decidual tissue and local inflammatory events. Regulatory mechanisms of monocyte recruitment to placental and decidual tissues is still unclear. Therefore we investigated the influence soluble placental factors (SPFs during the first- and third-trimester normal pregnancy, as compared to effects of these factors in preeclamptic pregnancy. We studied biological actions of SPF upon transendothelial migration of monocyte-like THP-1 cells and their phenotypic pattern. Transendothelial migration of THP-1 cells was more intensive with firsttrimester SPFs from normal pregnancy, when compared with third-trimester samples, and it was accompanied by decreased CD11a expression. SPFs from pre-eclamptic pregnancy caused an increase in transendothelial migration of THP-1 cells, as compared to SPFs from normal pregnancies, being accompanied by increased CD11b expression. The present study was supported by grants ГК №  02.740.11.0711, НШ-3594.2010.7, МД-150.2011.7 and a grant from St.-Petersburg Goverment for young scientists.

  3. Progesterone promotes cell migration, invasion and cofilin activation in human astrocytoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piña-Medina, Ana Gabriela; Hansberg-Pastor, Valeria; González-Arenas, Aliesha; Cerbón, Marco; Camacho-Arroyo, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    Astrocytomas are the most common and aggressive primary brain tumors in humans. Invasiveness of these tumors has been attributed in part to deregulation of cell motility-dependent cytoskeletal dynamics that involves actin-binding proteins such as cofilin. Progesterone (P4) has been found to induce migration and invasion of cells derived from breast cancer and endothelium. However, the role of P4 in migration and invasion of astrocytoma cells as well as its effects on astrocytomas cytoskeleton remodeling is not known. In this work we evaluated these aspects in D54 and U251 cells derived from human astrocytomas from the highest degree of malignancy (grade IV, glioblastoma). Our results showed that in scratch-wound assays P4 increased the number of D54 and U251 cells migrating from 3 to 48 h. Both RU486, a P4 receptor (PR) antagonist, and an oligonucleotide antisense against PR significantly blocked P4 effects. Transwell assays showed that P4 significantly increased the number of invasive cells at 24h. As in the case of migration, this effect was blocked by RU486. Finally, by Western blotting, an increase in the cofilin/p-cofilin ratio at 15 and 30 min and a decrease at 30 and 60 min in U251 and D54 cells, respectively, was observed after P4, P4+RU486 and RU486 treatments. These data suggest that P4 increases human astrocytoma cells migration and invasion through its intracellular receptor, and that cofilin activation by P4 is independent of PR action. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Spatial and temporal action of chicken primordial germ cells during initial migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Kyung Soo; Lee, Hyung Chul; Kim, Hyun Jeong; Lee, Hyo Gun; Kim, Young Min; Lee, Hong Jo; Park, Young Hyun; Yang, Seo Yeong; Rengaraj, Deivendran; Park, Tae Sub; Han, Jae Yong

    2015-02-01

    In most animals, primordial germ cells (PGCs) originate from an extragonadal region and migrate across the embryo to the gonads, where they differentiate and function. During their migration, PGCs move passively by morphogenetic movement of the embryo or move actively through signaling molecules. To uncover the underlying mechanism of first-phase PGC migration toward the germinal crescent in chickens, we investigated the spatial and temporal action of PGCs during primitive streak formation. Exogenously transplanted PGCs migrated toward the anterior region of the embryo and the embryonic gonads when they were transplanted into the subgerminal cavity, but not into the posterior marginal zone, in Eyal-Giladi and Kochav stage X embryos. These results indicate that for passive migration toward the anterior region the initial location of PGCs should be the central region. Notably, although PGCs and DF-1 cells migrated passively toward the anterior region, only PGCs migrated to the germinal crescent, where endogenous PGCs mainly reside, by active movement. In a live-imaging experiment with green fluorescence protein-expressing transgenic embryos, exogenous PGCs demonstrated markedly faster migration when they reached the anterior one-third of the embryo, while somatic cells showed epiblast movement with constant speed. Also, migrating PGCs exhibited successive contraction and expansion indicating their active migration. Our results suggest that chicken PGCs use sequential passive and active forces to migrate toward the germinal crescent. © 2015 Society for Reproduction and Fertility.

  5. Influence of stromal cells on lymphocyte adhesion and migration on endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGettrick, Helen M.; Buckley, Chris D.; Rainger, G. Ed; Nash, Gerard B.

    2011-01-01

    Methods are described for analysing adhesion and migration of isolated lymphocytes on endothelial cell monolayers which have been co-cultured with different stromal cells, with or without additional cytokine treatment. The different cells types are grown on opposite sides of 3.0 or 0.4μm pore filters, depending on whether migration through the whole construct is to be analysed, or adhesion to the endothelial cells alone. Assays may be ‘static’ or filters can be incorporated into flow chambers so that cell behaviour can be directly observed under conditions simulating those in vivo. In general, by choice of method, one can evaluate efficiency of attachment, and ability of cells to migrate across the endothelial monolayer, through the filter and through the stromal cell layer. Fluorescence microscopic examination of fixed filters can be used e.g., to ascertain whether lymphocytes are retained by stromal cells. In general, static assays have the higher throughput and greatest ease of use, while the flow-based assays are more physiologically-relevant and allow detailed recording of cell behaviour in real time. PMID:20379868

  6. The Effects of kisspeptin-10 on Migration and Proliferation of Endothelial Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Golzar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Migration, expansion and survival of endothelial cells that are an important cellular component of blood vessels plays an important role in the induction of tumor growth. Kisspeptins (kp, peptides that bind to coupled-G protein receptor (GPR54, inhibit each step of metastatic cascade include invasion, migration and homing, angiogenesis, survival and proliferation. In this study we investigated effects of kisspeptin-10, the most potent member of kisspeptin family, on Migration and proliferation of endothelial cells that are necessary for angiogenesis and tumor metastasis. Materials and Methods: We compared migration of Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVECs were treated with 10-100 or 500 nM kp-10 for 24 hours and no treated cells using an in vitro trans membrane migration assay and HUVEC proliferation of treated endothelial cells with 10-100 or 500 nM kp-10 for 48 hours and no treated cells was measured by MTT Cell Proliferation Assay Kit. Analysis of data was performed using the Kruskal-Wallis test followed by the Mann-Whitney test. Results: Migration and proliferation of endothelial cells were increased at lower concentration of kp-10 specially at 100 nM while higher concentration reduced both migration and proliferation. Conclusion: Our data showed that different concentrations of kp-10 have distinct effects on migration and proliferation of endothelial cells.

  7. FASN, ErbB2-mediated glycolysis is required for breast cancer cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lan; Jiang, Sufang; Fu, Qiang; Smith, Kelly; Tu, Kailing; Li, Hua; Zhao, Yuhua

    2016-05-01

    Both fatty acid synthase (FASN) and ErbB2 have been shown to promote breast cancer cell migration. However, the underlying molecular mechanism remains poorly understood and there is no reported evidence that directly links glycolysis to breast cancer cell migration. In this study, we investigated the role of FASN, ErbB2-mediated glycolysis in breast cancer cell migration. First, we compared lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA) protein levels, glycolysis and cell migration between FASN, ErbB2-overexpressing SK-BR-3 cells and FASN, ErbB2-low-expressing MCF7 cells. Then, SK-BR-3 cells were treated with cerulenin (Cer), an inhibitor of FASN, and ErbB2, LDHA protein levels, glycolysis, and cell migration were detected. Next, we transiently transfected ErbB2 plasmid into MCF7 cells and detected FASN, LDHA protein levels, glycolysis and cell migration. Heregulin-β1 (HRG-β1) is an activator of ErbB2 and 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) and oxamate (OX) are inhibitors of glycolysis. MCF7 cells were treated with HRG-β1 alone, HRG-β1 plus 2-DG, OX or cerulenin and glycolysis, and cell migration were measured. We found that FASN, ErbB2-high-expressing SK-BR-3 cells displayed higher levels of glycolysis and migration than FASN, ErbB2-low-expressing MCF7 cells. Inhibition of FASN by cerulenin impaired glycolysis and migration in SK-BR-3 cells. Transient overexpression of ErbB2 in MCF7 cells promotes glycolysis and migration. Moreover, 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG), oxamate (OX), or cerulenin partially reverses heregulin-β1 (HRG-β1)-induced glycolysis and migration in MCF7 cells. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that FASN, ErbB2-mediated glycolysis is required for breast cancer cell migration. These novel findings indicate that targeting FASN, ErbB2-mediated glycolysis may be a new approach to reverse breast cancer cell migration.

  8. Ordered patterns of cell shape and orientational correlation during spontaneous cell migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke T Maeda

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In the absence of stimuli, most motile eukaryotic cells move by spontaneously coordinating cell deformation with cell movement in the absence of stimuli. Yet little is known about how cells change their own shape and how cells coordinate the deformation and movement. Here, we investigated the mechanism of spontaneous cell migration by using computational analyses. METHODOLOGY: We observed spontaneously migrating Dictyostelium cells in both a vegetative state (round cell shape and slow motion and starved one (elongated cell shape and fast motion. We then extracted regular patterns of morphological dynamics and the pattern-dependent systematic coordination with filamentous actin (F-actin and cell movement by statistical dynamic analyses. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We found that Dictyostelium cells in both vegetative and starved states commonly organize their own shape into three ordered patterns, elongation, rotation, and oscillation, in the absence of external stimuli. Further, cells inactivated for PI3-kinase (PI3K and/or PTEN did not show ordered patterns due to the lack of spatial control in pseudopodial formation in both the vegetative and starved states. We also found that spontaneous polarization was achieved in starved cells by asymmetric localization of PTEN and F-actin. This breaking of the symmetry of protein localization maintained the leading edge and considerably enhanced the persistence of directed migration, and overall random exploration was ensured by switching among the different ordered patterns. Our findings suggest that Dictyostelium cells spontaneously create the ordered patterns of cell shape mediated by PI3K/PTEN/F-actin and control the direction of cell movement by coordination with these patterns even in the absence of external stimuli.

  9. Cell-surface proteoglycan in sea urchin primary mesenchyme cell migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lane, M.C.

    1989-01-01

    Early in the development of the sea urchin embryo, the primary mesenchyme cells (PMC) migrate along the basal lamina of the blastocoel. Migration is inhibited in L. pictus embryos cultured in sulfate-free seawater and in S. purpuratus embryos exposed to exogenous {beta}-D-xylosides. An in vitro assay was developed to test the migratory capacity of normal PMC on normal and treated blastocoelic matrix. Sulfate deprivation and exposure to exogenous xyloside render PMC nonmotile on either matrix. Materials removed from the surface of normal PMC by treatment with 1 M urea restored migratory ability to defective cells, whereas a similar preparation isolated from the surface of epithelial cells at the same stage did not. Migration also resumed when cells were removed from the xyloside or returned to normal seawater. The urea extract was partially purified and characterized by radiolabeling, gel electrophoresis, fluorography, ion exchange chromatography, and western blotting. The PMC synthesize a large chondroitin sulfate/dermatan sulfate proteoglycan that is present in an active fraction isolated by chromatography. Chondroitinase ABC digestion of live cells blocked migration reversibly, further supporting the identification of the chondroitin sulfate/dermatan sulfate proteoglycan as the active component in the urea extract. Much of the incorporated sulfate was distributed along the filopodia in {sup 35}SO{sub 4}-labelled PMC by autoradiography. The morphology of normal and treated S. purpuratus PMC was examined by scanning electron microscopy, and differences in spreading, particularly of the extensive filopodia present on the cells, was observed. A model for the role of the chondroitin sulfate/dermatan sulfate proteoglycan in cell detachment during migration is proposed.

  10. Liensinine and Nuciferine, Bioactive Components of Nelumbo nucifera, Inhibit the Growth of Breast Cancer Cells and Breast Cancer-Associated Bone Loss

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    Eun Ji Kang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Once breast cancer cells grow aggressively and become lodged in the skeleton through migration and invasion, they interact with bone microenvironment and accelerate much more tumor growth and bone destruction. We investigated whether liensinine and nuciferine, major active components in Nelumbo nucifera (lotus, could prevent breast cancer cell-mediated bone destruction. Liensinine and nuciferine inhibited the growth of MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 human breast cancer cells by inducing apoptosis and inhibiting proliferation via cell cycle arrest. Liensinine treatment led to the increased Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, activation of caspase-3, and subsequent cleavage of PARP. Liensinine also displayed significant inhibition on the migration and invasion of both MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 human breast cancer cells compared with nuciferine. In addition, liensinine and nuciferine inhibited the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand- (RANKL- induced osteoclast differentiation in mouse bone marrow macrophage cells and mature osteoclast-mediated bone resorption. Furthermore, oral administration of liensinine reduced the osteolysis in nude mice with intratibial injection of MDA-MB-231 cells. Collectively, liensinine and nuciferine may be promising candidates for preventing and treating breast cancer bone metastasis and the resulting osteolytic bone loss by targeting both cancer cells and osteoclasts. Liensinine has more potent anticancer and antibone resorptive activities than nuciferine.

  11. The mechanism for primordial germ-cell migration is conserved between Japanese eel and zebrafish.

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    Taiju Saito

    Full Text Available Primordial germ cells (PGCs are segregated and specified from somatic cells during early development. These cells arise elsewhere and have to migrate across the embryo to reach developing gonadal precursors. Several molecules associated with PGC migration (i.e. dead-end, nanos1, and cxcr4 are highly conserved across phylum boundaries. However, since cell migration is a complicated process that is regulated spatially and temporally by multiple adaptors and signal effectors, the process is unlikely to be explained by these known genes only. Indeed, it has been shown that there are variations in PGC migration pattern during development among teleost species. However, it is still unclear whether the actual mechanism of PGC migration is conserved among species. In this study, we studied the migration of PGCs in Japanese eel (Anguilla japonica embryos and tested the migration mechanism between Japanese eel and zebrafish (Danio rerio for conservation, by transplanting eel PGCs into zebrafish embryos. The experiments showed that eel PGCs can migrate toward the gonadal region of zebrafish embryos along with endogenous PGCs, even though the migration patterns, behaviors, and settlements of PGCs are somewhat different between these species. Our results demonstrate that the migration mechanism of PGCs during embryonic development is highly conserved between these two distantly related species (belonging to different teleost orders.

  12. Class 3 semaphorins induce F-actin reorganization in human dendritic cells: Role in cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curreli, Sabrina; Wong, Bin Sheng; Latinovic, Olga; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos; Stamatos, Nicholas M

    2016-12-01

    Class 3 semaphorins (Semas) are soluble proteins that are well recognized for their role in guiding axonal migration during neuronal development. In the immune system, Sema3A has been shown to influence murine dendritic cell (DC) migration by signaling through a neuropilin (NRP)-1/plexin-A1 coreceptor axis. Potential roles for class 3 Semas in human DCs have yet to be described. We tested the hypothesis that Sema3A, -3C, and -3F, each with a unique NRP-1 and/or NRP-2 binding specificity, influence human DC migration. In this report, we find that although NRP-1 and NRP-2 are expressed in human immature DCs (imDCs), NRP-2 expression increases as cells mature further, whereas expression of NRP-1 declines dramatically. Elevated levels of RNA encoding plexin-A1 and -A3 are present in both imDCs and mature DC (mDCs), supporting the relevance of Sema/NRP/plexin signaling pathways in these cells. Sema3A, -3C, and -3F bind to human DCs, with Sema3F binding predominantly through NRP-2. The binding of these Semas leads to reorganization of actin filaments at the plasma membrane and increased transwell migration in the absence or presence of chemokine CCL19. Microfluidic chamber assays failed to demonstrate consistent changes in speed of Sema3C-treated DCs, suggesting increased cell deformability as a possible explanation for enhanced transwell migration. Although monocytes express RNA encoding Sema3A, -3C, and -3F, only RNA encoding Sema3C increases robustly during DC differentiation. These data suggest that Sema3A, -3C, and -3F, likely with coreceptors NRP-1, NRP-2, and plexin-A1 and/or -A3, promote migration and possibly other activities of human DCs during innate and adaptive immune responses. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  13. Balancing Cell Migration with Matrix Degradation Enhances Gene Delivery to Cells Cultured Three-Dimensionally Within Hydrogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepard, Jaclyn A.; Huang, Alyssa; Shikanova, Ariella; Shea, Lonnie D.

    2010-01-01

    In regenerative medicine, hydrogels are employed to fill defects and support the infiltration of cells that can ultimately regenerate tissue. Gene delivery within hydrogels targeting infiltrating cells has the potential to promote tissue formation, but the delivery efficiency of nonviral vectors within hydrogels is low hindering their applicability in tissue regeneration. To improve their functionality, we have conducted a mechanistic study to investigate the contribution of cell migration and matrix degradation on gene delivery. In this report, lipoplexes were entrapped within hydrogels based on poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) crosslinked with peptides containing matrix metalloproteinase degradable sequences. The mesh size of these hydrogels is substantially less than the size of the entrapped lipoplexes, which can function to retain vectors. Cell migration and transfection were simultaneously measured within hydrogels with varying density of cell adhesion sites (Arg-Gly-Asp peptides) and solids content. Increasing RGD density increased expression levels up to 100-fold, while greater solids content sustained expression levels for 16 days. Increasing RGD density and decreasing solids content increased cell migration, which indicates expression levels increase with increased cell migration. Initially exposing cells to vector resulted in transient expression that declined after 2 days, verifying the requirement of migration to sustain expression. Transfected cells were predominantly located within the population of migrating cells for hydrogels that supported cell migration. Although the small mesh size retained at least 70% of the lipoplexes in the absence of cells after 32 days, the presence of cells decreased retention to 10% after 16 days. These results indicate that vectors retained within hydrogels contact migrating cells, and that persistent cell migration can maintain elevated expression levels. Thus matrix degradation and cell migration are fundamental design

  14. Connexin43 modulates cell polarity and directional cell migration by regulating microtubule dynamics.

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    Richard Francis

    Full Text Available Knockout mice deficient in the gap junction gene connexin43 exhibit developmental anomalies associated with abnormal neural crest, primordial germ cell, and proepicardial cell migration. These migration defects are due to a loss of directional cell movement, and are associated with abnormal actin stress fiber organization and a loss of polarized cell morphology. To elucidate the mechanism by which Cx43 regulates cell polarity, we used a wound closure assays with mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs to examine polarized cell morphology and directional cell movement. Studies using embryonic fibroblasts from Cx43 knockout (Cx43KO mice showed Cx43 deficiency caused cell polarity defects as characterized by a failure of the Golgi apparatus and the microtubule organizing center to reorient with the direction of wound closure. Actin stress fibers at the wound edge also failed to appropriately align, and stabilized microtubule (Glu-tubulin levels were markedly reduced. Forced expression of Cx43 with deletion of its tubulin-binding domain (Cx43dT in both wildtype MEFs and neural crest cell explants recapitulated the cell migration defects seen in Cx43KO cells. However, forced expression of Cx43 with point mutation causing gap junction channel closure had no effect on cell motility. TIRF imaging revealed increased microtubule instability in Cx43KO cells, and microtubule targeting of membrane localized Cx43 was reduced with expression of Cx43dT construct in wildtype cells. Together, these findings suggest the essential role of Cx43 gap junctions in development is mediated by regulation of the tubulin cytoskeleton and cell polarity by Cx43 via a nonchannel function.

  15. Cell-alignment patterns in the collective migration of cells with polarized adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Katsuyoshi

    2017-03-01

    Dictyostelium discoideum (Dd) utilizes inhomogeneities in the distribution of cell-cell adhesion molecules on cell membranes for collective cell migration. A simple example of an inhomogeneity is a front-side (leading-edge) polarization in the distribution at the early streaming stage. Experiments have shown that the polarized cell-cell adhesion induces side-by-side contact between cells [Beug et al., Nature (London) 274, 445 (1978), 10.1038/274445a0]. This result is counterintuitive, as one would expect cells to align front to front in contact with each other on the basis of front-side polarization. In this work, we theoretically examine whether front-side polarization induces side-by-side contact in collective cell migration. We construct a model for expressing cells with this polarization based on the two-dimensional cellular Potts model. By a numerical simulation with this model, we find cell-cell alignment wherein cells form lateral arrays with side-by-side contacts as observed in the experiments.

  16. Myosin-II-Mediated Directional Migration of Dictyostelium Cells in Response to Cyclic Stretching of Substratum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwadate, Yoshiaki; Okimura, Chika; Sato, Katsuya; Nakashima, Yuta; Tsujioka, Masatsune; Minami, Kazuyuki

    2013-01-01

    Living cells are constantly subjected to various mechanical stimulations, such as shear flow, osmotic pressure, and hardness of substratum. They must sense the mechanical aspects of their environment and respond appropriately for proper cell function. Cells adhering to substrata must receive and respond to mechanical stimuli from the substrata to decide their shape and/or migrating direction. In response to cyclic stretching of the elastic substratum, intracellular stress fibers in fibroblasts and endothelial, osteosarcoma, and smooth muscle cells are rearranged perpendicular to the stretching direction, and the shape of those cells becomes extended in this new direction. In the case of migrating Dictyostelium cells, cyclic stretching regulates the direction of migration, and not the shape, of the cell. The cells migrate in a direction perpendicular to that of the stretching. However, the molecular mechanisms that induce the directional migration remain unknown. Here, using a microstretching device, we recorded green fluorescent protein (GFP)-myosin-II dynamics in Dictyostelium cells on an elastic substratum under cyclic stretching. Repeated stretching induced myosin II localization equally on both stretching sides in the cells. Although myosin-II-null cells migrated randomly, myosin-II-null cells expressing a variant of myosin II that cannot hydrolyze ATP migrated perpendicular to the stretching. These results indicate that Dictyostelium cells accumulate myosin II at the portion of the cell where a large strain is received and migrate in a direction other than that of the portion where myosin II accumulated. This polarity generation for migration does not require the contraction of actomyosin. PMID:23442953

  17. Cortactin affects cell migration by regulating intercellular adhesion and cell spreading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rossum, AGSH; Moolenaar, WH; Schuuring, E

    2006-01-01

    Cortactin is an F-actin binding protein that stabilizes F-actin networks and promotes actin polymerization by activating the Arp2/3 complex. Overexpression of cortactin, as observed in several human cancers, stimulates cell migration, invasion, and experimental metastasis; however, the underlying

  18. CD31 regulates direction and rate of neutrophil migration over and under endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luu, N Thin; Rainger, G Ed; Buckley, Christopher D; Nash, Gerard B

    2003-01-01

    Mechanisms guiding migration of neutrophils through endothelium are poorly understood. We showed previously that CD31-CD31 binding acted as an 'accelerator' for neutrophils migrating on platelets, while neutrophil alpha(v)beta3-integrin acted as a sensor to align migration with the direction of imposed flow. Here, we perfused neutrophils over human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) treated with tumour necrosis factor-alpha, and characterised the kinetics of migration over, through and underneath the HUVEC. Before penetrating the monolayer, activated neutrophils migrated relatively slowly over the surface (approximately 6 microm/min), preferentially in the direction of flow. Once transmigrated, neutrophils moved more rapidly (approximately 14 microm/min) without preferred direction. Treatment of HUVEC and/or neutrophils with function-blocking antibodies against CD31 reduced directionality but not velocity of migration on top of HUVEC, and reduced velocity of migration underneath the monolayer. If neutrophils were pre-activated with formyl peptide, they did not migrate through the HUVEC, but migrated with increased velocity and directionality on top. Under these circumstances, both velocity and directionality were reduced by blocking CD31. alpha(v)beta3-integrin did not regulate migration under any conditions. We conclude that CD31-CD31 bonds act as robust sensors which can guide neutrophil migration, and also modify its velocity. Thus mechanical and adhesive signals can regulate neutrophil migration driven by locally-acting chemotactic agents. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

  19. A parallel and quantitative cell migration assay using a novel multi-well-based device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Qianghua; Zhang, Shuwen; Wang, Xudong; Ouyang, Qi; Wang, Yugang; Yang, Gen; Luo, Chunxiong

    2016-12-01

    Cell migration assays for different chemical environments are important for both scientists and clinicians searching for new therapeutics. In this study, we developed a multi-well-based microfluidic chip that has multiple units for different conditions. In each unit, cells can be patterned and then released to observe their migration. Automatic image analysis and model-based data processing were developed to describe the integrated cell migration assay precisely and quickly. As a demonstration, the migration behaviors of two types of cells in eight chemical conditions were studied. The results showed that supplementation with transforming growth factor-β(TGF-β) significantly promoted the migration of MCF-7 and MCF-10 A cells compared to several growth factors, such as Epidermal Growth Factor(EGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor(bFGF), as well as a control sample. Cells can migrate particularly fast with two or more mixed supplementary factors, such as TGF-β + bFGF + EGF, which indicated a synergy effect. Thus, this chip could be used to quantitatively observe cancer cell migration and demonstrated great potential for use in quantitative migration studies and chemical screening.

  20. Lipid raft association restricts CD44-ezrin interaction and promotion of breast cancer cell migration.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Donatello, Simona

    2012-12-01

    Cancer cell migration is an early event in metastasis, the main cause of breast cancer-related deaths. Cholesterol-enriched membrane domains called lipid rafts influence the function of many molecules, including the raft-associated protein CD44. We describe a novel mechanism whereby rafts regulate interactions between CD44 and its binding partner ezrin in migrating breast cancer cells. Specifically, in nonmigrating cells, CD44 and ezrin localized to different membranous compartments: CD44 predominantly in rafts, and ezrin in nonraft compartments. After the induction of migration (either nonspecific or CD44-driven), CD44 affiliation with lipid rafts was decreased. This was accompanied by increased coprecipitation of CD44 and active (threonine-phosphorylated) ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM) proteins in nonraft compartments and increased colocalization of CD44 with the nonraft protein, transferrin receptor. Pharmacological raft disruption using methyl-β-cyclodextrin also increased CD44-ezrin coprecipitation and colocalization, further suggesting that CD44 interacts with ezrin outside rafts during migration. Conversely, promoting CD44 retention inside lipid rafts by pharmacological inhibition of depalmitoylation virtually abolished CD44-ezrin interactions. However, transient single or double knockdown of flotillin-1 or caveolin-1 was not sufficient to increase cell migration over a short time course, suggesting complex crosstalk mechanisms. We propose a new model for CD44-dependent breast cancer cell migration, where CD44 must relocalize outside lipid rafts to drive cell migration. This could have implications for rafts as pharmacological targets to down-regulate cancer cell migration.

  1. Imaging collective cell migration and hair cell regeneration in the sensory lateral line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venero Galanternik, M; Navajas Acedo, J; Romero-Carvajal, A; Piotrowski, T

    2016-01-01

    The accessibility of the lateral line system and its amenability to long-term in vivo imaging transformed the developing lateral line into a powerful model system to study fundamental morphogenetic events, such as guided migration, proliferation, cell shape changes, organ formation, organ deposition, cell specification and differentiation. In addition, the lateral line is not only amenable to live imaging during migration stages but also during postembryonic events such as sensory organ tissue homeostasis and regeneration. The robust regenerative capabilities of the mature, mechanosensory lateral line hair cells, which are homologous to inner ear hair cells and the ease with which they can be imaged, have brought zebrafish into the spotlight as a model to develop tools to treat human deafness. In this chapter, we describe protocols for long-term in vivo confocal imaging of the developing and regenerating lateral line. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Cell migration or cytokinesis and proliferation?--revisiting the "go or grow" hypothesis in cancer cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garay, Tamás; Juhász, Éva; Molnár, Eszter; Eisenbauer, Maria; Czirók, András; Dekan, Barbara; László, Viktória; Hoda, Mir Alireza; Döme, Balázs; Tímár, József; Klepetko, Walter; Berger, Walter; Hegedűs, Balázs

    2013-12-10

    The mortality of patients with solid tumors is mostly due to metastasis that relies on the interplay between migration and proliferation. The "go or grow" hypothesis postulates that migration and proliferation spatiotemporally excludes each other. We evaluated this hypothesis on 35 cell lines (12 mesothelioma, 13 melanoma and 10 lung cancer) on both the individual cell and population levels. Following three-day-long videomicroscopy, migration, proliferation and cytokinesis-length were quantified. We found a significantly higher migration in mesothelioma cells compared to melanoma and lung cancer while tumor types did not differ in mean proliferation or duration of cytokinesis. Strikingly, we found in melanoma and lung cancer a significant positive correlation between mean proliferation and migration. Furthermore, non-dividing melanoma and lung cancer cells displayed slower migration. In contrast, in mesothelioma there were no such correlations. Interestingly, negative correlation was found between cytokinesis-length and migration in melanoma. FAK activation was higher in melanoma cells with high motility. We demonstrate that the cancer cells studied do not defer proliferation for migration. Of note, tumor cells from various organ systems may differently regulate migration and proliferation. Furthermore, our data is in line with the observation of pathologists that highly proliferative tumors are often highly invasive. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Differential effects of activated human renal epithelial cells on T-cell migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martijn W H J Demmers

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Renal tubular epithelial cells (TECs are one of the main targets of inflammatory insults during interstitial nephritis and kidney transplant rejection. While Th1 cells are know to be essential in the pathogenesis of rejection, the role of Th17 is still under debate. We hypothesize that TECs modulate the outcome of rejection process by production of distinct chemokines and cytokines that determine the attraction of different T-cell subsets. Therefore, we studied differential effects of activated human renal epithelial cells on T-cell migration. METHODS: Human primary TECs were stimulated by IFN-γ and TNF-α in vitro. Chemokines and cytokines produced by activated TECs were measured using Luminex or ELISA. Chemotaxis assay was performed using activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells composed of CD4+CXCR3+ and CD4+CCR6+ T cells migrating towards stimulated and unstimulated TECs. RESULTS: While activated TECs secreted abundant amounts of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-8, the T helper cell differentiation cytokines IL-1β, IL-12p70, IL-23 or TGF-β1 were not produced. The production of Th1 chemokines CXCL9, CXCL10 and CCL5 were significantly upregulated after TEC stimulation. In contrast, Th17 chemokine CCL20 could not be detected. Finally, activated TECs attracted significantly higher numbers of CD4+CXCR3+ T cells as compared to unstimulated TECs. No migration of CD4+CCR6+ T cells could be observed. CONCLUSION: Activated primary renal tubular epithelial cells do not attract Th17 cells nor produce cytokines promoting Th17 cell differentiation in our experimental system mimicking the proinflammatory microenvironment of rejection.

  4. Directed melanocyte migration: the role of Stem cell factor, cytoskeleton and focal adhesions

    OpenAIRE

    Wehrle-Haller, Bernhard

    2002-01-01

    Cell adhesion and migration are critical for the development of multicellular organisms and the maintenance of tissue integrity. This thesis explores the roles of the growth factor "Stem Cell factor and its receptor c-kit, in the process of cell migration and developmental patterning. In addition changes of the cytoskeleton and adhesion receptors of the family of integrins were analysed by live cell imaging and quantitative dynamic analysis. The thesis focusses on the specific contributions o...

  5. Directed Migration of Embryonic Stem Cell-derived Neural Cells In An Applied Electric Field

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yongchao; Weiss, Mark; Yao, Li

    2014-01-01

    Spinal cord injury or diseases, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, can cause the loss of motor neurons and therefore results in the paralysis of muscles. Stem cells may improve functional recovery by promoting endogenous regeneration, or by directly replacing neurons. Effective directional migration of grafted neural cells to reconstruct functional connections is crucial in the process. Steady direct current electric fields (EFs) play an important role in the development of the central ne...

  6. Actein inhibits cell proliferation and migration and promotes cell apoptosis in human non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Lian, Jianchun; Wang, Xiaowei

    2018-03-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the leading cause of death in smokers and the most common cause for cancer mortality in both males and females in the United States. Predisposition of this malignancy to distant metastasis leads to poor prognosis; therefore, it is urgent to discover novel therapeutic agents for metastatic NSCLC. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of actein treatment on NSCLC cell growth and migration. Cell viability assays demonstrated that administration of actein markedly inhibited NSCLC cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Transwell assays demonstrated that actein treatment suppressed cell migration and invasion in two NSCLC cell lines, A549 and 95D. Furthermore, treatment with actein remarkably increased the activities of caspase-3 and -9 in NSCLC cells. The protein expression levels of cytoplasmic BCL2 apoptosis regulator (Bcl-2) and BCL2 associated X (Bax) were markedly decreased, while the protein expression levels of mitochondrial Bax, caspase-3, -9 and cytochrome c were upregulated following actein treatment, as evidenced by western blot analysis. The present results demonstrated that actein inhibited cell proliferation and metastasis and promoted cell apoptosis in NSCLC cells, which indicated that actein administration might serve as a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of NSCLC in the clinic.

  7. Cell migration or cytokinesis and proliferation? – Revisiting the “go or grow” hypothesis in cancer cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garay, Tamás; Juhász, Éva; Molnár, Eszter [2nd Department of Pathology, Semmelweis University, Budapest (Hungary); Eisenbauer, Maria [Institute of Cancer Research and Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Czirók, András [Department of Biological Physics, Eötvös University, Budapest (Hungary); Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Dekan, Barbara; László, Viktória; Hoda, Mir Alireza [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Döme, Balázs [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); National Korányi Institute of TB and Pulmonology, Budapest (Hungary); Tímár, József [2nd Department of Pathology, Semmelweis University, Budapest (Hungary); MTA-SE Tumor Progression Research Group, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest (Hungary); Klepetko, Walter [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Berger, Walter [Institute of Cancer Research and Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Hegedűs, Balázs, E-mail: balazs.hegedus@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); MTA-SE Tumor Progression Research Group, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest (Hungary)

    2013-12-10

    The mortality of patients with solid tumors is mostly due to metastasis that relies on the interplay between migration and proliferation. The “go or grow” hypothesis postulates that migration and proliferation spatiotemporally excludes each other. We evaluated this hypothesis on 35 cell lines (12 mesothelioma, 13 melanoma and 10 lung cancer) on both the individual cell and population levels. Following three-day-long videomicroscopy, migration, proliferation and cytokinesis-length were quantified. We found a significantly higher migration in mesothelioma cells compared to melanoma and lung cancer while tumor types did not differ in mean proliferation or duration of cytokinesis. Strikingly, we found in melanoma and lung cancer a significant positive correlation between mean proliferation and migration. Furthermore, non-dividing melanoma and lung cancer cells displayed slower migration. In contrast, in mesothelioma there were no such correlations. Interestingly, negative correlation was found between cytokinesis-length and migration in melanoma. FAK activation was higher in melanoma cells with high motility. We demonstrate that the cancer cells studied do not defer proliferation for migration. Of note, tumor cells from various organ systems may differently regulate migration and proliferation. Furthermore, our data is in line with the observation of pathologists that highly proliferative tumors are often highly invasive. - Highlights: • We investigated the “go or grow” hypothesis in human cancer cells in vitro. • Proliferation and migration positively correlate in melanoma and lung cancer cells. • Duration of cytokinesis and migration shows inverse correlation. • Increased FAK activation is present in highly motile melanoma cells.

  8. Immature human dendritic cells enhance their migration through KCa3.1 channel activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crottès, David; Félix, Romain; Meley, Daniel; Chadet, Stéphanie; Herr, Florence; Audiger, Cindy; Soriani, Olivier; Vandier, Christophe; Roger, Sébastien; Angoulvant, Denis; Velge-Roussel, Florence

    2016-04-01

    Migration capacity is essential for dendritic cells (DCs) to present antigen to T cells for the induction of immune response. The DC migration is supposed to be a calcium-dependent process, while not fully understood. Here, we report a role of the KCa3.1/IK1/SK4 channels in the migration capacity of both immature (iDC) and mature (mDC) human CD14(+)-derived DCs. KCa3.1 channels were shown to control the membrane potential of human DC and the Ca(2+) entry, which is directly related to migration capacities. The expression of migration marker such as CCR5 and CCR7 was modified in both types of DCs by TRAM-34 (100nM). But, only the migration of iDC was decreased by use of both TRAM-34 and KCa3.1 siRNA. Confocal analyses showed a close localization of CCR5 with KCa3.1 in the steady state of iDC. Finally, the implication of KCa3.1 seems to be limited to the migration capacities as T cell activation of DCs appeared unchanged. Altogether, these results demonstrated that KCa3.1 channels have a pro-migratory effect on iDC migration. Our findings suggest that KCa3.1 in human iDC play a major role in their migration and constitute an attractive target for the cell therapy optimization. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A quorum-sensing factor in vegetative Dictyostelium discoideum cells revealed by quantitative migration analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golé, Laurent; Rivière, Charlotte; Hayakawa, Yoshinori; Rieu, Jean-Paul

    2011-01-01

    Many cells communicate through the production of diffusible signaling molecules that accumulate and once a critical concentration has been reached, can activate or repress a number of target genes in a process termed quorum sensing (QS). In the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum, QS plays an important role during development. However little is known about its effect on cell migration especially in the growth phase. To investigate the role of cell density on cell migration in the growth phase, we use multisite timelapse microscopy and automated cell tracking. This analysis reveals a high heterogeneity within a given cell population, and the necessity to use large data sets to draw reliable conclusions on cell motion. In average, motion is persistent for short periods of time (t ≤ 5 min), but normal diffusive behavior is recovered over longer time periods. The persistence times are positively correlated with the migrated distances. Interestingly, the migrated distance decreases as well with cell density. The adaptation of cell migration to cell density highlights the role of a secreted quorum sensing factor (QSF) on cell migration. Using a simple model describing the balance between the rate of QSF generation and the rate of QSF dilution, we were able to gather all experimental results into a single master curve, showing a sharp cell transition between high and low motile behaviors with increasing QSF. This study unambiguously demonstrates the central role played by QSF on amoeboid motion in the growth phase.

  10. [Relationship between Golgi apparatus and cell migration direction in vivo and in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bin; Liu, Zhi-feng; Ren, Bing-cheng; Chen, Cong; Ming, Hao-lang; Wang, Lei-lei; Zhao, Kai; Yang, Xue-jun

    2013-07-02

    To explore the relationship between Golgi apparatus and the direction of tumor cell migration in vivo and in vitro. Cell migration assays were conducted with rat C6 glioma cells, human U251 and SNB19 glioma cells respectively. Then immunofluorescence was used to detect the position of Golgi apparatus in migrating cells. The percentage of cells with Golgi apparatus facing towards wound edge was calculated. Cell pseudopodium was stained with TRITC-phalloidin and the relationship between Golgi apparatus and pseudopodium detected. Immunohistochemistry was used to reveal the Golgi apparatus in tumor tissue samples. And the percentage of cells with Golgi apparatus facing opposite to the necrotic zones was calculated. In cells located at wound edge, the Golgi apparatus was found facing towards the wound in the vast majority of cells (C6 83% ± 6%, U251 80% ± 7%, SNB19 82% ± 6%). In U251 and SNB19 cells, the golgi apparatus was located in the same direction with cellular pseudopodium. Immunohistochemical staining showed that in cells located around the necrotic zone, the Golgi apparatus faced opposite to the necrotic zones in most cells (rat tissue samples 80% ± 7%, human tissue samples 82% ± 6%). The Golgi apparatus is closely correlated with cell migration and it may be considered as a direction indicator of cell migration. And it provides an important index for the study of tumor cell invasion both in vivo and in vitro.

  11. Phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate in the Golgi apparatus regulates cell-cell adhesion and invasive cell migration in human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokuda, Emi; Itoh, Toshiki; Hasegawa, Junya; Ijuin, Takeshi; Takeuchi, Yukiko; Irino, Yasuhiro; Fukumoto, Miki; Takenawa, Tadaomi

    2014-06-01

    Downregulation of cell-cell adhesion and upregulation of cell migration play critical roles in the conversion of benign tumors to aggressive invasive cancers. In this study, we show that changes in cell-cell adhesion and cancer cell migration/invasion capacity depend on the level of phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate [PI(4)P] in the Golgi apparatus in breast cancer cells. Attenuating SAC1, a PI(4)P phosphatase localized in the Golgi apparatus, resulted in decreased cell-cell adhesion and increased cell migration in weakly invasive cells. In contrast, silencing phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase IIIβ, which generates PI(4)P in the Golgi apparatus, increased cell-cell adhesion and decreased invasion in highly invasive cells. Furthermore, a PI(4)P effector, Golgi phosphoprotein 3, was found to be involved in the generation of these phenotypes in a manner that depends on its PI(4)P-binding ability. Our results provide a new model for breast cancer cell progression in which progression is controlled by PI(4)P levels in the Golgi apparatus. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. Envisioning migration: mathematics in both experimental analysis and modeling of cell behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Elizabeth R; Wu, Lani F; Altschuler, Steven J

    2013-10-01

    The complex nature of cell migration highlights the power and challenges of applying mathematics to biological studies. Mathematics may be used to create model equations that recapitulate migration, which can predict phenomena not easily uncovered by experiments or intuition alone. Alternatively, mathematics may be applied to interpreting complex data sets with better resolution--potentially empowering scientists to discern subtle patterns amid the noise and heterogeneity typical of migrating cells. Iteration between these two methods is necessary in order to reveal connections within the cell migration signaling network, as well as to understand the behavior that arises from those connections. Here, we review recent quantitative analysis and mathematical modeling approaches to the cell migration problem. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Myosin II governs collective cell migration behaviour downstream of guidance receptor signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combedazou, Anne; Choesmel-Cadamuro, Valérie; Gay, Guillaume; Liu, Jiaying; Dupré, Loïc; Ramel, Damien; Wang, Xiaobo

    2017-01-01

    Border cell migration during Drosophila oogenesis is a potent model to study collective cell migration, a process involved in development and metastasis. Border cell clusters adopt two main types of behaviour during migration: linear and rotational. However, the molecular mechanism controlling the switch from one to the other is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that non-muscle Myosin II (NMII, also known as Spaghetti squash) activity controls the linear-to-rotational switch. Furthermore, we show that the regulation of NMII takes place downstream of guidance receptor signalling and is critical to ensure efficient collective migration. This study thus provides new insight into the molecular mechanism coordinating the different cell behaviours in a migrating cluster. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  14. Directional migration of cancer cells induced by a blue light intensity gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Chien-Chih; Lu, Eugene Youjhen; Pan, Huei-Jyuan; Lee, Chau-Hwang

    2015-07-01

    We used a spatial light modulator to project an optical micropattern of 473 nm light with a quartic intensity gradient on a single lung cancer cell. We observed that the intracellular amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS) of the cancer cells were proportional to the intensity of the blue light, and the blue light intensity gradients could drive directional cell migration. This optically induced directional cell migration was inhibited by a ROS scavenger in the culture medium in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, the ROS levels in fibroblasts were saturated by the blue light at low intensity and therefore the fibroblasts did not exhibit directional migration in the intensity gradient.

  15. Palmitoylation at Cys574 is essential for MT1-MMP to promote cell migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anilkumar, Narayanapanicker; Uekita, Takamasa; Couchman, John R

    2005-01-01

    MT1-MMP is a type I transmembrane proteinase that promotes cell migration and invasion. Here, we report that MT1-MMP is palmitoylated at Cys574 in the cytoplasmic domain, and this lipid modification is critical for its promotion of cell migration and clathrin-mediated internalization...... of the palmitoylated cysteine relative to LLY573, a motif that interacts with mu2 subunit of adaptor protein 2, is critical for the cell motility-promoting activity of MT1-MMP and its clathrin-mediated internalization. Taken together, palmitoylation of MT1-MMP is one of the key posttranslational modifications...... that determines MT1-MMP-dependent cell migration....

  16. Tumor cell migration screen identifies SRPK1 as breast cancer metastasis determinant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Roosmalen, Wies; Le Dévédec, Sylvia E; Golani, Ofra; Smid, Marcel; Pulyakhina, Irina; Timmermans, Annemieke M; Look, Maxime P; Zi, Di; Pont, Chantal; de Graauw, Marjo; Naffar-Abu-Amara, Suha; Kirsanova, Catherine; Rustici, Gabriella; Hoen, Peter A C 't; Martens, John W M; Foekens, John A; Geiger, Benjamin; van de Water, Bob

    2015-04-01

    Tumor cell migration is a key process for cancer cell dissemination and metastasis that is controlled by signal-mediated cytoskeletal and cell matrix adhesion remodeling. Using a phagokinetic track assay with migratory H1299 cells, we performed an siRNA screen of almost 1,500 genes encoding kinases/phosphatases and adhesome- and migration-related proteins to identify genes that affect tumor cell migration speed and persistence. Thirty candidate genes that altered cell migration were validated in live tumor cell migration assays. Eight were associated with metastasis-free survival in breast cancer patients, with integrin β3-binding protein (ITGB3BP), MAP3K8, NIMA-related kinase (NEK2), and SHC-transforming protein 1 (SHC1) being the most predictive. Examination of genes that modulate migration indicated that SRPK1, encoding the splicing factor kinase SRSF protein kinase 1, is relevant to breast cancer outcomes, as it was highly expressed in basal breast cancer. Furthermore, high SRPK1 expression correlated with poor breast cancer disease outcome and preferential metastasis to the lungs and brain. In 2 independent murine models of breast tumor metastasis, stable shRNA-based SRPK1 knockdown suppressed metastasis to distant organs, including lung, liver, and spleen, and inhibited focal adhesion reorganization. Our study provides comprehensive information on the molecular determinants of tumor cell migration and suggests that SRPK1 has potential as a drug target for limiting breast cancer metastasis.

  17. The RhoGEF TEM4 Regulates Endothelial Cell Migration by Suppressing Actomyosin Contractility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Mitin

    Full Text Available Persistent cellular migration requires efficient protrusion of the front of the cell, the leading edge where the actin cytoskeleton and cell-substrate adhesions undergo constant rearrangement. Rho family GTPases are essential regulators of the actin cytoskeleton and cell adhesion dynamics. Here, we examined the role of the RhoGEF TEM4, an activator of Rho family GTPases, in regulating cellular migration of endothelial cells. We found that TEM4 promotes the persistence of cellular migration by regulating the architecture of actin stress fibers and cell-substrate adhesions in protruding membranes. Furthermore, we determined that TEM4 regulates cellular migration by signaling to RhoC as suppression of RhoC expression recapitulated the loss-of-TEM4 phenotypes, and RhoC activation was impaired in TEM4-depleted cells. Finally, we showed that TEM4 and RhoC antagonize myosin II-dependent cellular contractility and the suppression of myosin II activity rescued the persistence of cellular migration of TEM4-depleted cells. Our data implicate TEM4 as an essential regulator of the actin cytoskeleton that ensures proper membrane protrusion at the leading edge of migrating cells and efficient cellular migration via suppression of actomyosin contractility.

  18. Trajectory Analysis Unveils Reelin's Role in the Directed Migration of Granule Cells in the Dentate Gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shaobo; Brunne, Bianka; Zhao, Shanting; Chai, Xuejun; Li, Jiawei; Lau, Jeremie; Failla, Antonio Virgilio; Zobiak, Bernd; Sibbe, Mirjam; Westbrook, Gary L; Lutz, David; Frotscher, Michael

    2018-01-03

    Reelin controls neuronal migration and layer formation. Previous studies in reeler mice deficient in Reelin focused on the result of the developmental process in fixed tissue sections. It has remained unclear whether Reelin affects the migratory process, migration directionality, or migrating neurons guided by the radial glial scaffold. Moreover, Reelin has been regarded as an attractive signal because newly generated neurons migrate toward the Reelin-containing marginal zone. Conversely, Reelin might be a stop signal because migrating neurons in reeler , but not in wild-type mice, invade the marginal zone. Here, we monitored the migration of newly generated proopiomelanocortin-EGFP -expressing dentate granule cells in slice cultures from reeler , reeler -like mutants and wild-type mice of either sex using real-time microscopy. We discovered that not the actual migratory process and migratory speed, but migration directionality of the granule cells is controlled by Reelin. While wild-type granule cells migrated toward the marginal zone of the dentate gyrus, neurons in cultures from reeler and reeler -like mutants migrated randomly in all directions as revealed by vector analyses of migratory trajectories. Moreover, live imaging of granule cells in reeler slices cocultured to wild-type dentate gyrus showed that the reeler neurons changed their directions and migrated toward the Reelin-containing marginal zone of the wild-type culture, thus forming a compact granule cell layer. In contrast, directed migration was not observed when Reelin was ubiquitously present in the medium of reeler slices. These results indicate that topographically administered Reelin controls the formation of a granule cell layer. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Neuronal migration and the various factors controlling its onset, speed, directionality, and arrest are poorly understood. Slice cultures offer a unique model to study the migration of individual neurons in an almost natural environment. In the

  19. Cdc42 is not essential for filopodium formation, directed migration, cell polarization, and mitosis in fibroblastoid cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czuchra, Aleksandra; Wu, Xunwei; Meyer, Hannelore

    2005-01-01

    of Cdc42 did not affect filopodium or lamellipodium formation and had no significant influence on the speed of directed migration nor on mitosis. Cdc42-deficient cells displayed a more elongated cell shape and had a reduced area. Furthermore, directionality during migration and reorientation of the Golgi...

  20. Biphasic and directed translocation of protein kinase Cα inside cultured endothelial cells before migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masataka Arai

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical wounding of an endothelial monolayer induces an immediate Ca2+ wave. Several hours later, the denuded area is covered by endothelial cells (ECs that migrate to the wound. This migration process is closely related to protein kinase Cα (PKCα, a Ca2+-dependent protein that translocates from the cytosol to the cell membrane. Because the cells adjacent to the wounded area are the first to migrate into the wound, we investigated whether a mechanical wound immediately induces PKCα translocation in adjacent cells. We monitored Ca2+ dynamics and PKCα translocation simultaneously using fluorescent microscopy. For this simultaneous observation, we used Fura-2–acetoxymethyl ester to visualize Ca2+ and constructed a green fluorescent protein-tagged fusion protein to visualize PKCα. Mechanical wounding of the endothelial monolayer induced an immediate Ca2+ wave in cells adjacent to the wounded cells before their migration. Almost concurrently, PKCα in the neighboring cells translocated to the cell membrane, then accumulated at the periphery near the wounded cell. This report is the first description of this biphasic and directed translocation of PKCα in cells before cell migration. Our results may provide new insights into the directed migration of ECs.

  1. Aptamers Binding to c-Met Inhibiting Tumor Cell Migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit Piater

    Full Text Available The human receptor tyrosine kinase c-Met plays an important role in the control of critical cellular processes. Since c-Met is frequently over expressed or deregulated in human malignancies, blocking its activation is of special interest for therapy. In normal conditions, the c-Met receptor is activated by its bivalent ligand hepatocyte growth factor (HGF. Also bivalent antibodies can activate the receptor by cross linking, limiting therapeutic applications. We report the generation of the RNA aptamer CLN64 containing 2'-fluoro pyrimidine modifications by systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX. CLN64 and a previously described single-stranded DNA (ssDNA aptamer CLN3 exhibited high specificities and affinities to recombinant and cellular expressed c-Met. Both aptamers effectively inhibited HGF-dependent c-Met activation, signaling and cell migration. We showed that these aptamers did not induce c-Met activation, revealing an advantage over bivalent therapeutic molecules. Both aptamers were shown to bind overlapping epitopes but only CLN3 competed with HGF binding to cMet. In addition to their therapeutic and diagnostic potential, CLN3 and CLN64 aptamers exhibit valuable tools to further understand the structural and functional basis for c-Met activation or inhibition by synthetic ligands and their interplay with HGF binding.

  2. Proteolytic Enzymes Clustered in Specialized Plasma-Membrane Domains Drive Endothelial Cells' Migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Salamone

    Full Text Available In vitro cultured endothelial cells forming a continuous monolayer establish stable cell-cell contacts and acquire a "resting" phenotype; on the other hand, when growing in sparse conditions these cells acquire a migratory phenotype and invade the empty area of the culture. Culturing cells in different conditions, we compared expression and clustering of proteolytic enzymes in cells having migratory versus stationary behavior. In order to observe resting and migrating cells in the same microscopic field, a continuous cell monolayer was wounded. Increased expression of proteolytic enzymes was evident in cell membranes of migrating cells especially at sprouting sites and in shed membrane vesicles. Gelatin zymography and western blotting analyses confirmed that in migrating cells, expression of membrane-bound and of vesicle-associated proteolytic enzymes are increased. The enzymes concerned include MMP-2, MMP-9, MT1-MMP, seprase, DPP4 (DiPeptidyl Peptidase 4 and uPA. Shed membrane vesicles were shown to exert degradative activity on ECM components and produce substrates facilitating cell migration. Vesicles shed by migrating cells degraded ECM components at an increased rate; as a result their effect on cell migration was amplified. Inhibiting either Matrix Metallo Proteases (MMPs or Serine Integral Membrane Peptidases (SIMPs caused a decrease in the stimulatory effect of vesicles, inhibiting the spontaneous migratory activity of cells; a similar result was also obtained when a monoclonal antibody acting on DPP4 was tested. We conclude that proteolytic enzymes have a synergistic stimulatory effect on cell migration and that their clustering probably facilitates the proteolytic activation cascades needed to produce maximal degradative activity on cell substrates during the angiogenic process.

  3. Piperine impairs the migration and T cell-activating function of dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Gemma; Doucette, Carolyn D; Soutar, David A; Liwski, Robert S; Hoskin, David W

    2016-02-03

    Piperine, a major alkaloid found in the fruits of black and long pepper plants, has anti-inflammatory properties; however, piperine's effect on dendritic cell (DC) migration and T cell-activating function has not been investigated. Bone marrow-derived mouse DCs that were matured in the presence of 100 μM piperine showed reduced in vitro migration in response to CCL21, as well as reduced in vivo migration to lymph nodes. In addition, piperine-treated DCs had reduced CCR7 expression and elevated CCR5 expression, as well as reduced expression of CD40 and class II major histocompatibility complex molecules and decreased nuclear accumulation of RelB. DC production of interleukin (IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor α, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in response to lipopolysaccharide stimulation was also reduced following piperine treatment. Exposure to piperine during maturation therefore caused DCs to retain an immature phenotype, which was associated with a reduced capacity to promote T cell activation since co-culture of ovalbumin (OVA323-339)-specific T cells with OVA323-339-pulsed DCs that were previously matured in the presence of piperine showed reduced interferon-γ and IL-2 expression. OVA323-339-specific T cell proliferation was also reduced in vivo in the presence of piperine-treated DCs. Inhibition of DC migration and function by piperine may therefore be a useful strategy to down-regulate potentially harmful DC-driven T cell responses to self-antigens and transplantation antigens. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Tumorigenic hybrids between mesenchymal stem cells and gastric cancer cells enhanced cancer proliferation, migration and stemness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Jianguo; Zhu, Yuan; Sun, Zixuan; Ji, Runbi; Zhang, Xu; Xu, Wenrong; Yuan, Xiao; Zhang, Bin; Yan, Yongmin; Yin, Lei; Xu, Huijuan; Zhang, Leilei; Zhu, Wei; Qian, Hui

    2015-10-24

    Emerging evidence indicates that inappropriate cell-cell fusion might contribute to cancer progression. Similarly, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can also fuse with other cells spontaneously and capable of adopting the phenotype of other cells. The aim of our study was to investigate the role of MSCs participated cell fusion in the tumorigenesis of gastric cancer. We fused human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hucMSCs) with gastric cancer cells in vitro by polyethylene glycol (PEG), the hybrid cells were sorted by flow cytometer. The growth and migration of hybrids were assessed by cell counting, cell colony formation and transwell assays. The proteins and genes related to epithelial- mesenchymal transition and stemness were tested by western blot, immunocytochemistry and real-time RT-PCR. The expression of CD44 and CD133 was examined by immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry. The xenograft assay was used to evaluation the tumorigenesis of the hybrids. The obtained hybrids exhibited epithelial- mesenchymal transition (EMT) change with down-regulation of E-cadherin and up-regulation of Vimentin, N-cadherin, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), and fibroblast activation protein (FAP). The hybrids also increased expression of stemness factors Oct4, Nanog, Sox2 and Lin28. The expression of CD44 and CD133 on hybrid cells was stronger than parental gastric cancer cells. Moreover, the migration and proliferation of heterotypic hybrids were enhanced. In addition, the heterotypic hybrids promoted the growth abilities of gastric xenograft tumor in vivo. Taken together, our results suggest that cell fusion between hucMSCs and gastric cancer cells could contribute to tumorigenic hybrids with EMT and stem cell-like properties, which may provide a flexible tool for investigating the roles of MSCs in gastric cancer.

  5. Controlled skeletal progenitor cell migration on nanostructured porous silicon/silicon micropatterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Costa, V.; Sánchez-Vaquero, V.; Muñoz-Noval, Á.; González-Méndez, L.; Punzón-Quijorna, E.; Gallach-Pérez, D.; Manso-Silván, M.; Martínez-Muñoz, G.; Climent-Font, A.; García-Ruiz, J. P.; Martín-Palma, R. J.

    2011-10-01

    In this work nanostructured porous silicon (nanoPS) was used for the fabrication of surface micropatterns aiming at controlling cell adhesion and migration. In particular, surface patterns of nanoPS and Si were engineered by high-energy ion-beam irradiation and subsequent anodization. It was found that human skeletal progenitor cells are sensitive to oneand two-dimensional patterns and that focal adhesion is inhibited on nanoPS areas. In spite of this anti-fouling characteristics, studies on patterns with reduced Si areas show that cells conform to nanoPS pathways favoring migration through cell protrusion, body translocation and tail retraction from two parallel Si traction rails. Moreover, migration can be blocked and cells tend to arrange when grid patterns with the appropriate dimensions are fabricated. The experimental results confirm that progenitor cells are able to exploit nanoPS anti-fouling designs by adapting to it for migration purposes.

  6. Transcellular migration of neutrophils is a quantitatively significant pathway across dermal microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmon, Shana; Cammer, Michael; Raine, Cedric S; Lisanti, Michael P

    2009-01-01

    Neutrophil extravasation is central to inflammatory skin diseases like psoriasis and atopic dermatitis. In vivo, neutrophils have been shown to migrate through cell-to-cell junctions (paracellular pathway) or directly through the body of the endothelial cell (transcellular pathway). In vitro, however, neutrophil migration is a largely paracellular process where cells preferentially cross at tricellular corners devoid of tight junctions. To approximate the type of cells encountered by extravasating neutrophils in vivo, we developed a neutrophil-migration assay using primary human dermal microvascular endothelial cells. We show here that a large proportion of migrating neutrophils traverse a monolayer of microvascular endothelium using a purely transcellular pathway. In addition, we demonstrate that F-actin is rearranged similarly in neutrophils undergoing diapedesis along either route. This in vitro model closely simulates the physiological process of neutrophil extravasation in vivo and can be further utilized to evaluate the relative contribution of distinct migratory pathways to the pathophysiology of inflammatory skin disease.

  7. Stimulation of cortical myosin phosphorylation by p114RhoGEF drives cell migration and tumor cell invasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen J Terry

    Full Text Available Actinomyosin activity is an important driver of cell locomotion and has been shown to promote collective cell migration of epithelial sheets as well as single cell migration and tumor cell invasion. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying activation of cortical myosin to stimulate single cell movement, and the relationship between the mechanisms that drive single cell locomotion and those that mediate collective cell migration of epithelial sheets are incompletely understood. Here, we demonstrate that p114RhoGEF, an activator of RhoA that associates with non-muscle myosin IIA, regulates collective cell migration of epithelial sheets and tumor cell invasion. Depletion of p114RhoGEF resulted in specific spatial inhibition of myosin activation at cell-cell contacts in migrating epithelial sheets and the cortex of migrating single cells, but only affected double and not single phosphorylation of myosin light chain. In agreement, overall elasticity and contractility of the cells, processes that rely on persistent and more constant forces, were not affected, suggesting that p114RhoGEF mediates process-specific myosin activation. Locomotion was p114RhoGEF-dependent on Matrigel, which favors more roundish cells and amoeboid-like actinomyosin-driven movement, but not on fibronectin, which stimulates flatter cells and lamellipodia-driven, mesenchymal-like migration. Accordingly, depletion of p114RhoGEF led to reduced RhoA, but increased Rac activity. Invasion of 3D matrices was p114RhoGEF-dependent under conditions that do not require metalloproteinase activity, supporting a role of p114RhoGEF in myosin-dependent, amoeboid-like locomotion. Our data demonstrate that p114RhoGEF drives cortical myosin activation by stimulating myosin light chain double phosphorylation and, thereby, collective cell migration of epithelial sheets and amoeboid-like motility of tumor cells.

  8. Caffeine inhibits migration in glioma cells through the ROCK-FAK pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying; Chou, Wei-Chung; Ding, You-Ming; Wu, Ya-Chieh

    2014-01-01

    Glioma is the most malignant brain tumor that has the ability to migrate and invade the CNS. In this study, we investigated the signaling mechanism of caffeine on the migration of glioma cells. The effect of caffeine on cell migration was evaluated using Transwell and wound healing assays. The expression of the focal adhesion complex as it related to cell migration was assayed using Western blotting and immunostaining. Caffeine decreased the migration of rat C6 and human U87MG glioma cells and down-regulated the expression of phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase (p-FAK) and p-paxillin. Caffeine also decreased p-FAK staining at the edge of glioma cells and disassembled actin stress fibers. Additionally, caffeine elevated expression of phosphorylated myosin light chain (p-MLC), an effect that could be blocked by Y27632, a rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) inhibitor, but not myosin light chain kinase inhibitor, ML-7. Y27632 also inhibited the caffeine-reduced expression of p-FAK and p-paxillin as well as cell migration. Caffeine decreased the migration of glioma cell through the ROCK-focal adhesion complex pathway; this mechanism may be useful as part of clinical therapy in the future. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel

  9. Suppression of calpain expression by NSAIDs is associated with inhibition of cell migration in rat duodenum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Kristopher; Littlejohn, A; Thomas, Laurel; Bawa, Bhupinder; Lillich, James D

    2017-05-15

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely used for the alleviation of pain and inflammation, but these drugs are also associated with a suite of negative side effects. Gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity is particularly concerning since it affects an estimated 70% of individuals taking NSAIDs routinely, and evidence suggests the majority of toxicity is occurring in the small intestine. Traditionally, NSAID-induced GI toxicity has been associated with indiscriminate inhibition of cyclooxygenase isoforms, but other mechanisms, including inhibition of cell migration, intestinal restitution, and wound healing, are likely to contribute to toxicity. Previous efforts demonstrated that treatment of cultured intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) with NSAIDs inhibits expression and activity of calpain proteases, but the effects of specific inhibition of calpain expression in vitro or the effects of NSAIDs on intestinal cell migration in vivo remain to be determined. Accordingly, we examined the effect of suppression of calpain protease expression with siRNA on cell migration in cultured IECs and evaluated the effects of NSAID treatment on epithelial cell migration and calpain protease expression in rat duodenum. Our results show that calpain siRNA inhibits protease expression and slows migration in cultured IECs. Additionally, NSAID treatment of rats slowed migration up the villus axis and suppressed calpain expression in duodenal epithelial cells. Our results are supportive of the hypothesis that suppression of calpain expression leading to slowing of cell migration is a potential mechanism through which NSAIDs cause GI toxicity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Caffeine Inhibits Migration in Glioma Cells through the ROCK-FAK Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Chen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Glioma is the most malignant brain tumor that has the ability to migrate and invade the CNS. In this study, we investigated the signaling mechanism of caffeine on the migration of glioma cells. Methods: The effect of caffeine on cell migration was evaluated using Transwell and wound healing assays. The expression of the focal adhesion complex as it related to cell migration was assayed using Western blotting and immunostaining. Results: Caffeine decreased the migration of rat C6 and human U87MG glioma cells and down-regulated the expression of phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase (p-FAK and p-paxillin. Caffeine also decreased p-FAK staining at the edge of glioma cells and disassembled actin stress fibers. Additionally, caffeine elevated expression of phosphorylated myosin light chain (p-MLC, an effect that could be blocked by Y27632, a rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK inhibitor, but not myosin light chain kinase inhibitor, ML-7. Y27632 also inhibited the caffeine-reduced expression of p-FAK and p-paxillin as well as cell migration. Conclusion: Caffeine decreased the migration of glioma cell through the ROCK-focal adhesion complex pathway; this mechanism may be useful as part of clinical therapy in the future.

  11. Plasticity in the macromolecular-scale causal networks of cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lock, John G; Mamaghani, Mehrdad Jafari; Shafqat-Abbasi, Hamdah; Gong, Xiaowei; Tyrcha, Joanna; Strömblad, Staffan

    2014-01-01

    Heterogeneous and dynamic single cell migration behaviours arise from a complex multi-scale signalling network comprising both molecular components and macromolecular modules, among which cell-matrix adhesions and F-actin directly mediate migration. To date, the global wiring architecture characterizing this network remains poorly defined. It is also unclear whether such a wiring pattern may be stable and generalizable to different conditions, or plastic and context dependent. Here, synchronous imaging-based quantification of migration system organization, represented by 87 morphological and dynamic macromolecular module features, and migration system behaviour, i.e., migration speed, facilitated Granger causality analysis. We thereby leveraged natural cellular heterogeneity to begin mapping the directionally specific causal wiring between organizational and behavioural features of the cell migration system. This represents an important advance on commonly used correlative analyses that do not resolve causal directionality. We identified organizational features such as adhesion stability and adhesion F-actin content that, as anticipated, causally influenced cell migration speed. Strikingly, we also found that cell speed can exert causal influence over organizational features, including cell shape and adhesion complex location, thus revealing causality in directions contradictory to previous expectations. Importantly, by comparing unperturbed and signalling-modulated cells, we provide proof-of-principle that causal interaction patterns are in fact plastic and context dependent, rather than stable and generalizable.

  12. Plasticity in the macromolecular-scale causal networks of cell migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John G Lock

    Full Text Available Heterogeneous and dynamic single cell migration behaviours arise from a complex multi-scale signalling network comprising both molecular components and macromolecular modules, among which cell-matrix adhesions and F-actin directly mediate migration. To date, the global wiring architecture characterizing this network remains poorly defined. It is also unclear whether such a wiring pattern may be stable and generalizable to different conditions, or plastic and context dependent. Here, synchronous imaging-based quantification of migration system organization, represented by 87 morphological and dynamic macromolecular module features, and migration system behaviour, i.e., migration speed, facilitated Granger causality analysis. We thereby leveraged natural cellular heterogeneity to begin mapping the directionally specific causal wiring between organizational and behavioural features of the cell migration system. This represents an important advance on commonly used correlative analyses that do not resolve causal directionality. We identified organizational features such as adhesion stability and adhesion F-actin content that, as anticipated, causally influenced cell migration speed. Strikingly, we also found that cell speed can exert causal influence over organizational features, including cell shape and adhesion complex location, thus revealing causality in directions contradictory to previous expectations. Importantly, by comparing unperturbed and signalling-modulated cells, we provide proof-of-principle that causal interaction patterns are in fact plastic and context dependent, rather than stable and generalizable.

  13. Androgen-induced cell migration: role of androgen receptor/filamin A association.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Castoria

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Androgen receptor (AR controls male morphogenesis, gametogenesis and prostate growth as well as development of prostate cancer. These findings support a role for AR in cell migration and invasiveness. However, the molecular mechanism involved in AR-mediated cell migration still remains elusive. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Mouse embryo NIH3T3 fibroblasts and highly metastatic human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells harbor low levels of transcriptionally incompetent AR. We now report that, through extra nuclear action, AR triggers migration of both cell types upon stimulation with physiological concentrations of the androgen R1881. We analyzed the initial events leading to androgen-induced cell migration and observed that challenging NIH3T3 cells with 10 nM R1881 rapidly induces interaction of AR with filamin A (FlnA at cytoskeleton. AR/FlnA complex recruits integrin beta 1, thus activating its dependent cascade. Silencing of AR, FlnA and integrin beta 1 shows that this ternary complex controls focal adhesion kinase (FAK, paxillin and Rac, thereby driving cell migration. FAK-null fibroblasts migrate poorly and Rac inhibition by EHT impairs motility of androgen-treated NIH3T3 cells. Interestingly, FAK and Rac activation by androgens are independent of each other. Findings in human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells strengthen the role of Rac in androgen signaling. The Rac inhibitor significantly impairs androgen-induced migration in these cells. A mutant AR, deleted of the sequence interacting with FlnA, fails to mediate FAK activation and paxillin tyrosine phosphorylation in androgen-stimulated cells, further reinforcing the role of AR/FlnA interaction in androgen-mediated motility. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The present report, for the first time, indicates that the extra nuclear AR/FlnA/integrin beta 1 complex is the key by which androgen activates signaling leading to cell migration. Assembly of this ternary complex may control organ development

  14. Alpha9beta1 integrin in melanoma cells can signal different adhesion states for migration and anchorage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lydolph, Magnus C; Morgan-Fisher, Marie; Høye, Anette M

    2009-01-01

    migration. Melanoma cells express abundant alpha9beta1 integrin, and its role in cell migration was assessed. Ligands derived from Tenascin-C and ADAM12 supported alpha9beta1 integrin-mediated cell attachment and GTP-Rac dependent migration, but not focal adhesion formation. Manganese ions induced alpha9...

  15. An integrated method for cell isolation and migration on a chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Xiaoqing; Geng, Zhaoxin; Fan, Zhiyuan; Wang, Shicai; Pei, WeiHua; Chen, Hongda

    2017-08-21

    Tumour cell migration has an important impact on tumour metastasis. Magnetic manipulation is an ascendant method for guiding and patterning cells. Here, a unique miniaturized microfluidic chip integrating cell isolation and migration assay was designed to isolate and investigate cell migration. The chip was fabricated and composed of a magnet adapter, a polytetrafluoroethylene(PDMS) microfluidic chip and six magnetic rings. This device was used to isolate MCF-7 cells from MDA-MB-231-RFP cells and evaluate the effects of TGF-β on MCF-7 cells. First, the two cell types were mixed and incubated with magnetic beads modified with an anti-EpCAM antibody. Then, they were slowly introduced into the chip. MCF-7 cells bond to the magnetic beads in a ring-shaped pattern, while MDA-MB-231-RFP cells were washed away by PBS. Cell viability was examined during culturing in the micro-channel. The effects of TGF-β on MCF-7 cells were evaluated by migration distance and protein expression. The integrated method presented here is novel, low-cost and easy for performing cell isolation and migration assay. The method could be beneficial for developing microfluidic device applications for cancer metastasis research and could provide a new method for biological experimentation.

  16. Stable SET knockdown in breast cell carcinoma inhibits cell migration and invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jie [Department of Occupational Health and Occupational Medicine, School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou (China); Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology of Shenzhen, Shenzhen Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shenzhen (China); Yang, Xi-fei [Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology of Shenzhen, Shenzhen Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shenzhen (China); Ren, Xiao-hu [Department of Occupational Health and Occupational Medicine, School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou (China); Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology of Shenzhen, Shenzhen Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shenzhen (China); Meng, Xiao-jing [Department of Occupational Health and Occupational Medicine, School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou (China); Huang, Hai-yan [Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology of Shenzhen, Shenzhen Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shenzhen (China); Zhao, Qiong-hui [Shenzhen Entry-Exit Inspection and Quarantine Bureau, Shenzhen (China); Yuan, Jian-hui; Hong, Wen-xu; Xia, Bo; Huang, Xin-feng; Zhou, Li [Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology of Shenzhen, Shenzhen Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shenzhen (China); Liu, Jian-jun, E-mail: bio-research@hotmail.com [Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology of Shenzhen, Shenzhen Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shenzhen (China); Zou, Fei, E-mail: zoufei616@163.com [Department of Occupational Health and Occupational Medicine, School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou (China)

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • We employed RNA interference to knockdown SET expression in breast cancer cells. • Knockdown of SET expression inhibits cell proliferation, migration and invasion. • Knockdown of SET expression increases the activity and expression of PP2A. • Knockdown of SET expression decreases the expression of MMP-9. - Abstract: Breast cancer is the most malignant tumor for women, however, the mechanisms underlying this devastating disease remain unclear. SET is an endogenous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and involved in many physiological and pathological processes. SET could promote the occurrence of tumor through inhibiting PP2A. In this study, we explore the role of SET in the migration and invasion of breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231 and ZR-75-30. The stable suppression of SET expression through lentivirus-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) was shown to inhibit the growth, migration and invasion of breast cancer cells. Knockdown of SET increases the activity and expression of PP2Ac and decrease the expression of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9). These data demonstrate that SET may be involved in the pathogenic processes of breast cancer, indicating that SET can serve as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of breast cancer.

  17. Coagulation Factor Xa inhibits cancer cell migration via LIMK1-mediated cofilin inactivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borensztajn, Keren; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; Spek, C. Arnold

    2010-01-01

    Previously, we showed that activated coagulation factor X (FXa) inhibits migration of breast, lung and colon cancer cells. We showed that the effect of FXa on migration was protease-activated receptor (PAR)-1-dependent, but the subsequent cellular signaling routes remained elusive. In the current

  18. Coagulation Factor Xa inhibits cancer cell migration via LIMK1-mediated cofilin inactivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borensztajn, Keren; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; Spek, C. Arnold

    Previously, we showed that activated coagulation factor X (FXa) inhibits migration of breast, lung and colon cancer cells. We showed that the effect of FXa on migration was protease-activated receptor (PAR)-1-dependent, but the subsequent cellular signaling routes remained elusive. In the current

  19. MRI visualization of endogenous neural progenitor cell migration along the RMS in the adult mouse brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vreys, Ruth; Vande Velde, Greetje; Krylychkina, Olga

    2010-01-01

    The adult rodent brain contains neural progenitor cells (NPCs), generated in the subventricular zone (SVZ), which migrate along the rostral migratory stream (RMS) towards the olfactory bulb (OB) where they differentiate into neurons. The aim of this study was to visualize endogenous NPC migration...

  20. Autotaxin induces lung epithelial cell migration through lysoPLD activity-dependent and -independent pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; He, Donghong; Berdyshev, Evgeny; Zhong, Mintao; Salgia, Ravi; Morris, Andrew J.; Smyth, Susan S.; Natarajan, Viswanathan; Zhao, Yutong

    2013-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Lung cell migration is a crucial step for re-epithelialization that in turn is essential for remodeling and repair after lung injury. We hypothesize that secreted autotaxin (ATX), which exhibits lysophospholipase D (lysoPLD) activity, stimulates lung epithelial cell migration through lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) generation-dependent and -independent pathways. Release of endogenous ATX protein and activity was detected in lung epithelial cell culture medium. ATX with V5 tag (ATX-V5) overexpressed conditional medium had higher LPA levels compared to control medium and stimulated cell migration through Gαi-coupled LPA receptors, cytoskeleton rearrangement, phosphorylation of PKCδ and cortactin at the leading edge of migrating cells. Inhibition of PKCδ attenuated ATX-V5 overexpressed conditional medium-mediated phosphorylation of cortactin. In addition, a recombinant ATX mutant, lacking lysoPLD activity, or heat-inactived ATX also induced lung epithelial cell migration. Extracelluar ATX bound to LPA receptor and integrin β4 complex on A549 cell surface. Finally, intratracheal administration of lipopolysaccharide into mouse airway induced ATX release and LPA production in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. These results suggested a significant role for ATX in lung epithelial cell migration and remodeling through its ability to induce LPA production-mediated phosphorylation of PKCδ and cortactin. In addition we also demonstrated assocation of ATX with epithelial cell surface LPA receptor and integrin β4. PMID:21696367

  1. MNT inhibits the migration of human hepatocellular carcinoma SMMC7721 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Jian [Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, 58 ZhongShan 2nd Road, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510080 (China); Zhou, Qi, E-mail: Zhouqi197195@126.com [Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, 58 ZhongShan 2nd Road, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510080 (China); Wang, Yafeng; Zhou, Xiangbing [Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, 58 ZhongShan 2nd Road, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510080 (China); Li, Jiaping, E-mail: Jpli3s@126.com [Department of Interventional Oncology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, 58 ZhongShan 2nd Road, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510080 (China)

    2012-02-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MNT is a member of the Myc/Max/Mad network that plays a role in cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our study further emphasized the role of MNT in migration inhibition of SMMC7721 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MNT might be a promising target for HCC chemotherapy. -- Abstract: Max binding protein (MNT) is a member of the Myc/Max/Mad network that plays a role in cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. We previously observed that MNT was differentially expressed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and interacted with Nck1 by 2-DE. Nck family adaptor proteins function to couple tyrosine phosphorylation signals, regulate actin cytoskeletal reorganization and lead to cell motility. In order to investigate the regulatory role of MNT in HCC migration, we used transient transfection with a MNT expressing vector to overexpress MNT protein in SMMC7721 cells, and MNT siRNA to knockdown MNT expression. Rho Family Small GTPase activation assay, Western blots and transwell assay were used to determine the migration potential of cells. We found that knockdown of MNT expression might promote SMMC7721 cell migration, while the overexpressed MNT could significantly inhibit cell migration. It further emphasized the role of MNT in inhibition of cell migration that might be a promising target for HCC chemotherapy.

  2. A Mathematical Model of Collective Cell Migration in a Three-Dimensional, Heterogeneous Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stonko, David P.; Manning, Lathiena; Starz-Gaiano, Michelle; Peercy, Bradford E.

    2015-01-01

    Cell migration is essential in animal development, homeostasis, and disease progression, but many questions remain unanswered about how this process is controlled. While many kinds of individual cell movements have been characterized, less effort has been directed towards understanding how clusters of cells migrate collectively through heterogeneous, cellular environments. To explore this, we have focused on the migration of the border cells during Drosophila egg development. In this case, a cluster of different cell types coalesce and traverse as a group between large cells, called nurse cells, in the center of the egg chamber. We have developed a new model for this collective cell migration based on the forces of adhesion, repulsion, migration and stochastic fluctuation to generate the movement of discrete cells. We implement the model using Identical Math Cells, or IMCs. IMCs can each represent one biological cell of the system, or can be aggregated using increased adhesion forces to model the dynamics of larger biological cells. The domain of interest is filled with IMCs, each assigned specific biophysical properties to mimic a diversity of cell types. Using this system, we have successfully simulated the migration of the border cell cluster through an environment filled with larger cells, which represent nurse cells. Interestingly, our simulations suggest that the forces utilized in this model are sufficient to produce behaviors of the cluster that are observed in vivo, such as rotation. Our framework was developed to capture a heterogeneous cell population, and our implementation strategy allows for diverse, but precise, initial position specification over a three- dimensional domain. Therefore, we believe that this model will be useful for not only examining aspects of Drosophila oogenesis, but also for modeling other two or three-dimensional systems that have multiple cell types and where investigating the forces between cells is of interest. PMID:25875645

  3. A mathematical model of collective cell migration in a three-dimensional, heterogeneous environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David P Stonko

    Full Text Available Cell migration is essential in animal development, homeostasis, and disease progression, but many questions remain unanswered about how this process is controlled. While many kinds of individual cell movements have been characterized, less effort has been directed towards understanding how clusters of cells migrate collectively through heterogeneous, cellular environments. To explore this, we have focused on the migration of the border cells during Drosophila egg development. In this case, a cluster of different cell types coalesce and traverse as a group between large cells, called nurse cells, in the center of the egg chamber. We have developed a new model for this collective cell migration based on the forces of adhesion, repulsion, migration and stochastic fluctuation to generate the movement of discrete cells. We implement the model using Identical Math Cells, or IMCs. IMCs can each represent one biological cell of the system, or can be aggregated using increased adhesion forces to model the dynamics of larger biological cells. The domain of interest is filled with IMCs, each assigned specific biophysical properties to mimic a diversity of cell types. Using this system, we have successfully simulated the migration of the border cell cluster through an environment filled with larger cells, which represent nurse cells. Interestingly, our simulations suggest that the forces utilized in this model are sufficient to produce behaviors of the cluster that are observed in vivo, such as rotation. Our framework was developed to capture a heterogeneous cell population, and our implementation strategy allows for diverse, but precise, initial position specification over a three- dimensional domain. Therefore, we believe that this model will be useful for not only examining aspects of Drosophila oogenesis, but also for modeling other two or three-dimensional systems that have multiple cell types and where investigating the forces between cells is of

  4. Delphinidin inhibits BDNF-induced migration and invasion in SKOV3 ovarian cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Won-Chul; Kim, Hyunhee; Kim, Young-Joo; Park, Seung-Ho; Song, Ji-Hye; Lee, Ki Heon; Lee, In Ho; Lee, Yoo-Kyung; So, Kyeong A; Choi, Kyung-Chul; Ko, Hyeonseok

    2017-12-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), the TrkB ligand, is associated with aggressive malignant behavior, including migration and invasion, in tumor cells and a poor prognosis in patients with various types of cancer. Delphinidin is a diphenylpropane-based polyphenolic ring structure-harboring compound, which exhibits a wide range of pharmacological activities, anti-tumor, anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-angiogenic and anti-mutagenic activity. However, the possible role of delphinidin in the cancer migration and invasion is unclear. We investigated the suppressive effect of delphinidin on the cancer migration and invasion. Thus, we found that BDNF enhanced cancer migration and invasion in SKOV3 ovarian cancer cell. To exam the inhibitory role of delphinidin in SKOV3 ovarian cancer migration and invasion, we investigated the use of delphinidin as inhibitors of BDNF-induced motility and invasiveness in SKOV3 ovarian cancer cells in vitro. Here, we found that delphinidin prominently inhibited the BDNF-induced increase in cell migration and invasion of SKOV3 ovarian cancer cells. Furthermore, delphinidin remarkably inhibited BDNF-stimulated expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9. Also, delphinidin antagonized the phosphorylation of Akt and nuclear translocation of NF-κB permitted by the BDNF in SKOV3 ovarian cancer cells. Taken together, our findings provide new evidence that delphinidin suppressed the BDNF-induced ovarian cancer migration and invasion through decreasing of Akt activation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Patterning of Endothelial Cells and Mesenchymal Stem Cells by Laser-Assisted Bioprinting to Study Cell Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Manuela; Rémy, Murielle; Thébaud, Noélie Brunehilde; Bareille, Reine; Chassande, Olivier; Amédée, Joëlle; Catros, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    Tissue engineering of large organs is currently limited by the lack of potent vascularization in vitro. Tissue-engineered bone grafts can be prevascularized in vitro using endothelial cells (ECs). The microvascular network architecture could be controlled by printing ECs following a specific pattern. Using laser-assisted bioprinting, we investigated the effect of distance between printed cell islets and the influence of coprinted mesenchymal cells on migration. When printed alone, ECs spread out evenly on the collagen hydrogel, regardless of the distance between cell islets. However, when printed in coculture with mesenchymal cells by laser-assisted bioprinting, they remained in the printed area. Therefore, the presence of mesenchymal cell is mandatory in order to create a pattern that will be conserved over time. This work describes an interesting approach to study cell migration that could be reproduced to study the effect of trophic factors. PMID:27833916

  6. Interplanetary Migration of Eucaryotic Cell, Spore of Schizosaccharomyces Pombe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, N.; Nosaka, J.; Ando, R.; Hashimoto, H.; Yokobori, S.; Narumi, I.; Nakagawa, K.; Yamagishi, A.; Tohda, H.

    2013-11-01

    The Tanpopo mission to examine possible interplanetary migration of microbes is progressing. Spore of Schizosaccharomyces pombe are considered as the exposed samples. In this paper, results of preliminary experiments for the exposure are shown.

  7. Computational models reveal a passive mechanism for cell migration in the crypt.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara-Jane Dunn

    Full Text Available Cell migration in the intestinal crypt is essential for the regular renewal of the epithelium, and the continued upward movement of cells is a key characteristic of healthy crypt dynamics. However, the driving force behind this migration is unknown. Possibilities include mitotic pressure, active movement driven by motility cues, or negative pressure arising from cell loss at the crypt collar. It is possible that a combination of factors together coordinate migration. Here, three different computational models are used to provide insight into the mechanisms that underpin cell movement in the crypt, by examining the consequence of eliminating cell division on cell movement. Computational simulations agree with existing experimental results, confirming that migration can continue in the absence of mitosis. Importantly, however, simulations allow us to infer mechanisms that are sufficient to generate cell movement, which is not possible through experimental observation alone. The results produced by the three models agree and suggest that cell loss due to apoptosis and extrusion at the crypt collar relieves cell compression below, allowing cells to expand and move upwards. This finding suggests that future experiments should focus on the role of apoptosis and cell extrusion in controlling cell migration in the crypt.

  8. Autocrine CCL19 blocks dendritic cell migration toward weak gradients of CCL21

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten; Met, Özcan; Larsen, Niels Bent

    2016-01-01

    Background aims. Maturation of dendritic cells (DCs) induces their homing from peripheral to lymphatic tissues guided by CCL21. However, in vitro matured human monocyte-derived DC cancer vaccines injected intradermally migrate poorly to lymph nodes (LNs). In vitro maturation protocols generate DCs...... the effect of autocrine CCL19 on in vitro migration of human DCs toward CCL21. Results. Using human monocyte-derived DCs in a 3D chemotaxis assay, we are the first to demonstrate that CCL19 more potently induces directed migration of human DCs compared with CCL21. When comparing migration of type 1 DCs...... and PGE2-DCs, migration of type 1 DCs was strikingly impaired compared with PGE2-DCs, but only toward low concentrations of CCL21. When type 1 DCs were cultured overnight in fresh culture medium (reducing autocrine CCL19 levels), a rescuing effect was observed on migration toward low concentrations of CCL...

  9. Aspirin Inhibits Platelet-Derived Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Induced Endothelial Cell Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polzin, Amin; Knoop, Betül; Böhm, Andreas; Dannenberg, Lisa; Zurek, Mark; Zeus, Tobias; Kelm, Malte; Levkau, Bodo; Rauch, Bernhard H

    2018-01-01

    Aspirin plays a crucial role in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases. We previously described that aspirin has effects beyond inhibition of platelet aggregation, as it inhibited thrombin-mediated release of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) from human platelets. S1P is a bioactive lipid with important functions on inflammation and apoptosis. In endothelial cells (EC), S1P is a key regulator of cell migration. In this study, we aimed to analyze the effects of aspirin on platelet-induced EC migration. Human umbilical EC migration was measured by Boyden chamber assay. EC migration was induced by platelet supernatants of thrombin receptor-activating peptide-1 (AP1) stimulated platelets. To investigate the S1P receptor subtype that promotes EC migration, specific inhibitors of S1P receptor subtypes were applied. S1P induced EC migration in a concentration-dependent manner. EC migration induced by AP1-stimulated platelet supernatants was reduced by aspirin. S1P1 receptor inhibition almost completely abolished EC migration induced by activated platelets. The inhibition of S1P2 or S1P3 receptor had no effect. Aspirin inhibits EC migration induced by activated platelets that is in part due to S1P and mediated by the endothelial S1P1 receptor. The clinical significance of this novel mechanism of aspirin action has to be investigated in future studies. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Direct visualization of protease activity on cells migrating in three-dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packard, Beverly Z; Artym, Vira V; Komoriya, Akira; Yamada, Kenneth M

    2009-01-01

    Determining the specific role(s) of proteases in cell migration and invasion will require high-resolution imaging of sites of protease activity during live-cell migration through extracellular matrices. We have designed a novel fluorescent biosensor to detect localized extracellular sites of protease activity and to test requirements for matrix metalloprotease (MMP) function as cells migrate and invade three-dimensional collagen matrices. This probe fluoresces after cleavage of a peptide site present in interstitial collagen by a variety of proteases including MMP-2, -9, and -14 (MT1-MMP) without requiring transfection or modification of the cells being characterized. Using matrices derivatized with this biosensor, we show that protease activity is localized at the polarized leading edge of migrating tumor cells rather than further back on the cell body. This protease activity is essential for cell migration in native cross-linked but not pepsin-treated collagen matrices. The new type of high-resolution probe described in this study provides site-specific reporting of protease activity and insights into mechanisms by which cells migrate through extracellular matrices; it also helps to clarify discrepancies between previous studies regarding the contributions of proteases to metastasis.

  11. Multiple scale model for cell migration in monolayers: Elastic mismatch between cells enhances motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmieri, Benoit; Bresler, Yony; Wirtz, Denis; Grant, Martin

    2015-07-02

    We propose a multiscale model for monolayer of motile cells that comprise normal and cancer cells. In the model, the two types of cells have identical properties except for their elasticity; cancer cells are softer and normal cells are stiffer. The goal is to isolate the role of elasticity mismatch on the migration potential of cancer cells in the absence of other contributions that are present in real cells. The methodology is based on a phase-field description where each cell is modeled as a highly-deformable self-propelled droplet. We simulated two types of nearly confluent monolayers. One contains a single cancer cell in a layer of normal cells and the other contains normal cells only. The simulation results demonstrate that elasticity mismatch alone is sufficient to increase the motility of the cancer cell significantly. Further, the trajectory of the cancer cell is decorated by several speed "bursts" where the cancer cell quickly relaxes from a largely deformed shape and consequently increases its translational motion. The increased motility and the amplitude and frequency of the bursts are in qualitative agreement with recent experiments.

  12. Brief Report: Robo1 Regulates the Migration of Human Subventricular Zone Neural Progenitor Cells During Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero-Cazares, Hugo; Lavell, Emily; Chen, Linda; Schiapparelli, Paula; Lara-Velazquez, Montserrat; Capilla-Gonzalez, Vivian; Clements, Anna Christina; Drummond, Gabrielle; Noiman, Liron; Thaler, Katrina; Burke, Anne; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo

    2017-07-01

    Human neural progenitor cell (NPC) migration within the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ganglionic eminence is an active process throughout early brain development. The migration of human NPCs from the SVZ to the olfactory bulb during fetal stages resembles what occurs in adult rodents. As the human brain develops during infancy, this migratory stream is drastically reduced in cell number and becomes barely evident in adults. The mechanisms regulating human NPC migration are unknown. The Slit-Robo signaling pathway has been defined as a chemorepulsive cue involved in axon guidance and neuroblast migration in rodents. Slit and Robo proteins expressed in the rodent brain help guide neuroblast migration from the SVZ through the rostral migratory stream to the olfactory bulb. Here, we present the first study on the role that Slit and Robo proteins play in human-derived fetal neural progenitor cell migration (hfNPC). We describe that Robo1 and Robo2 isoforms are expressed in the human fetal SVZ. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Slit2 is able to induce a chemorepellent effect on the migration of hfNPCs derived from the human fetal SVZ. In addition, when Robo1 expression is inhibited, hfNPCs are unable to migrate to the olfactory bulb of mice when injected in the anterior SVZ. Our findings indicate that the migration of human NPCs from the SVZ is partially regulated by the Slit-Robo axis. This pathway could be regulated to direct the migration of NPCs in human endogenous neural cell therapy. Stem Cells 2017;35:1860-1865. © 2017 AlphaMed Press.

  13. In toto imaging of the migrating Zebrafish lateral line primordium at single cell resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogare, Damian Dalle; Nikaido, Masataka; Somers, Katherine; Head, Jeffery; Piotrowski, Tatjana; Chitnis, Ajay B

    2017-02-01

    The zebrafish Posterior Lateral Line primordium (PLLp) has emerged as an important model system for studying many aspects of development, including cell migration, cell type specification and tissue morphogenesis. Despite this, basic aspects of PLLp biology remain incompletely understood. The PLLp is a group of approximately 140 cells which pioneers the formation of the Posterior Lateral Line (LL) system by migrating along the length of the embryo, periodically depositing clusters of epithelial cells, which will go on to form the mature sense organs of the lateral line, called neuromasts. The neuromasts are formed within the migrating PLLp as protoneuromasts: the first protoneuromast is formed close to the trailing end and additional protoneuromasts are formed sequentially, progressively closer to the leading edge of the migrating collective. We imaged the migration of PLL primordia and tracked every cell in the lateral line system over the course of migration. From this data set we unambiguously determined the lineage and fate of every cell deposited by the migrating PLLp. We show that, on average, proliferation across the entire PLLp is weakly patterned, with leading cells tending to divide more slowly than trailing cells. Neuromasts are formed sequentially by local expansion of existing cells along the length of the PLLp, not by self-renewing stem cell-like divisions of a restricted leading population that is highly proliferative. The fate of deposited cells, either within neuromasts or as interneuromast cells (in between deposited neuromasts) is not determined by any obvious stereotyped lineages. Instead, it is determined somewhat stochasitcailly, as a function of a cells distance from the center of a maturing protoneuromast. Together, our data provide a rigorous baseline for the behavior of the PLLp, which can be used to inform further study of this important model system. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Stromal Cell Networks Regulate Lymphocyte Entry, Migration, and Territoriality in Lymph Nodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajénoff, Marc; Egen, Jackson; Koo, Lily Y.; Laugier, Jean Pierre; Brau, Frédéric; Glaichenhaus, Nicolas; Germain, Ronald N.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Following entry into lymph nodes (LNs), B cells migrate to follicles, whereas T cells remain in the paracortex, with each lymphocyte type showing apparently random migration within these distinct areas. Other than chemokines, the factors contributing to this spatial segregation and to the observed patterns of lymphocyte movement are poorly characterized. By combining confocal, electron, and intravital microscopy, we show here that the fibroblastic reticular cell (FRC) network regulates naïve T cell access to the paracortex and also supports and defines the limits of T cell movement within this domain, whereas a distinct follicular dendritic cell (FDC) network similarly serves as the substratum for movement of follicular B cells. These results highlight the central role of stromal microanatomy in orchestrating cell migration within the LN. PMID:17112751

  15. Interactions between CXCR4 and CXCL12 promote cell migration and invasion of canine hemangiosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, K S; Graef, A J; Breen, M; Lindblad-Toh, K; Modiano, J F; Kim, J-H

    2017-06-01

    The CXCR4/CXCL12 axis plays an important role in cell locomotion and metastasis in many cancers. In this study, we hypothesized that the CXCR4/CXCL12 axis promotes migration and invasion of canine hemangiosarcoma (HSA) cells. Transcriptomic analysis across 12 HSA cell lines and 58 HSA whole tumour tissues identified heterogeneous expression of CXCR4 and CXCL12, which was associated with cell movement. In vitro, CXCL12 promoted calcium mobilization, cell migration and invasion that were directly proportional to surface expression of CXCR4; furthermore, these responses proved sensitive to the CXCR4 antagonist, AMD3100, in HSA cell lines. These results indicate that CXCL12 potentiates migration and invasion of canine HSA cells through CXCR4 signalling. The direct relationship between these responses in HSA cells suggests that the CXCR4/CXCL12 axis contributes to HSA progression. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Inhibitory effect of blue light emitting diode on migration and invasion of cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Phil-Sun; Kim, Hyun-Soo; Kim, Eun-Mi; Hwang, Hyosook; Ryu, Hyang Hwa; Lim, SeokTae; Sohn, Myung-Hee; Jeong, Hwan-Jeong

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects and molecular mechanism of blue light emitting diode (LED) in tumor cells. A migration and invasion assay for the metastatic behavior of mouse colon cancer CT-26 and human fibrosarcoma HT-1080 cells was performed. Cancer cell migration-related proteins were identified by obtaining a 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) in total cellular protein profile of blue LED-irradiated cancer cells, followed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) analysis of proteins. Protein levels were examined by immunoblotting. Irradiation with blue LED inhibited CT-26 and HT-1080 cell migration and invasion. The anti-metastatic effects of blue LED irradiation were associated with inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 expression. P38 MAPK phosphorylation was increased in blue LED-irradiated CT-26 and HT-1080 cells, but was inhibited after pretreatment with SB203580, a specific inhibitor of p38 MAPK. Inhibition of p38 MAPK phosphorylation by SB203580 treatment increased number of migratory cancer cells in CT-26 and HT-1080 cells, indicating that blue LED irradiation inhibited cancer cell migration via phosphorylation of p38 MAPK. Additionally blue LED irradiation of mice injected with CT-26 cells expressing luciferase decreased early stage lung metastasis compared to untreated control mice. These results indicate that blue LED irradiation inhibits cancer cell migration and invasion in vitro and in vivo. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. The Maf factor Traffic jam both enables and inhibits collective cell migration in Drosophila oogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawan, Felix; Arandjelovic, Mimi; Godt, Dorothea

    2013-07-01

    Border cell cluster (BCC) migration in the Drosophila ovary is an excellent system to study the gene regulatory network that enables collective cell migration. Here, we identify the large Maf transcription factor Traffic jam (Tj) as an important regulator of BCC migration. Tj has a multifaceted impact on the known core cascade that enables BCC motility, consisting of the Jak/Stat signaling pathway, the C/EBP factor Slow border cells (Slbo), and the downstream effector DE-cadherin (DEcad). The initiation of BCC migration coincides with a Slbo-dependent decrease in Tj expression. This reduction of Tj is required for normal BCC motility, as high Tj expression strongly impedes migration. At high concentration, Tj has a tripartite negative effect on the core pathway: a decrease in Slbo, an increase in the Jak/Stat inhibitor Socs36E, and a Slbo-independent reduction of DEcad. However, maintenance of a low expression level of Tj in the BCC during migration is equally important, as loss of tj function also results in a significant delay in migration concomitant with a reduction of Slbo and consequently of DEcad. Taken together, we conclude that the regulatory feedback loop between Tj and Slbo is necessary for achieving the correct activity levels of migration-regulating factors to ensure proper BCC motility.

  18. Loss of myoferlin redirects breast cancer cell motility towards collective migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonithas I Volakis

    Full Text Available Cell migration plays a central role in the invasion and metastasis of tumors. As cells leave the primary tumor, they undergo an epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT and migrate as single cells. Epithelial tumor cells may also migrate in a highly directional manner as a collective group in some settings. We previously discovered that myoferlin (MYOF is overexpressed in breast cancer cells and depletion of MYOF results in a mesenchymal to epithelial transition (MET and reduced invasion through extracellular matrix (ECM. However, the biomechanical mechanisms governing cell motility during MYOF depletion are poorly understood. We first demonstrated that lentivirus-driven shRNA-induced MYOF loss in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells (MDA-231(MYOF-KD leads to an epithelial morphology compared to the mesenchymal morphology observed in control (MDA-231(LTVC and wild-type cells. Knockdown of MYOF led to significant reductions in cell migration velocity and MDA-231(MYOF-KD cells migrated directionally and collectively, while MDA-231(LTVC cells exhibited single cell migration. Decreased migration velocity and collective migration were accompanied by significant changes in cell mechanics. MDA-231(MYOF-KD cells exhibited a 2-fold decrease in cell stiffness, a 2-fold increase in cell-substrate adhesion and a 1.5-fold decrease in traction force generation. In vivo studies demonstrated that when immunocompromised mice were implanted with MDA-231(MYOF-KD cells, tumors were smaller and demonstrated lower tumor burden. Moreover, MDA-231(MYOF-KD tumors were highly circularized and did not invade locally into the adventia in contrast to MDA-231(LTVC-injected animals. Thus MYOF loss is associated with a change in tumor formation in xenografts and leads to smaller, less invasive tumors. These data indicate that MYOF, a previously unrecognized protein in cancer, is involved in MDA-MB-231 cell migration and contributes to biomechanical alterations. Our results indicate

  19. Expression of Rho GTPases family in melanoma cells and its influence on cytoskeleton and migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Si-Jian; Zhang, Wei; Ni, Na-Na; Wu, Qiong; Wang, Xiao-Po; Lin, You-Kun; Sun, Jian-Fang

    2017-05-02

    Rho GTPases family members influenced the filopodia, lamellipodia, stress fiber and adhesion plaque of melanoma cells through regulating cytoskeleton recombination. The role of Rho GTPases family in the migration and invasion of melanoma and its molecular mechanism were explored. The morphological difference between three types of melanoma cells (M14, A375 and MV3) and human melanocyte (MC) was observed by the Hoffman microscope. Cells were stained by phalloidin labeled by rhodamine. The differences between 4 types of cells in filopodia, lamellipodia, stress fiber and adhesion plaque (microfilament is the main constituent) were observed under the super-high resolution microscope. The migration ability of 4 types of cells was detected by Transwell migration assay. QPCR was used to detect the mRNA transcription level of Rho GTPases family. WB was adopted to detect the expression of RhoD and DIAPH2 proteins. There were significant differences in filopodia, lamellipodia, stress fiber and adhesion plaque between MC and 3 types of melanoma cells (M14, A375 and MV3). MC did not have stress fiber or adhesion plaque, while M14, A375 and MV3 had stress fiber and adhesion plaque. All 4 types of cells had thin and short filopodia. MV3 had fewer but thicker stress fibers than the latter two. Transwell migration test indicated the followings: M14 and A375 had a similar high migration rate; the migration rate of MV3 was slightly low; MC did not have the ability of transmembrane migration. QPCR results of Rho GTPases family in 4 types of cells showed the change corresponding to immunofluorescence. WB results showed that RhoD was barely expressed in M14, A375 or MV3. DIAPH2, the downstream effector molecule of RhoD, had the corresponding change. Rho GTPases influences the migration and invasion of melanoma cells through regulating filopodia, lamellipodia, stress fiber and adhesion plaque (microfilament is the main constituent).

  20. Tipping the balance: robustness of tip cell selection, migration and fusion in angiogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie Bentley

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Vascular abnormalities contribute to many diseases such as cancer and diabetic retinopathy. In angiogenesis new blood vessels, headed by a migrating tip cell, sprout from pre-existing vessels in response to signals, e.g., vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF. Tip cells meet and fuse (anastomosis to form blood-flow supporting loops. Tip cell selection is achieved by Dll4-Notch mediated lateral inhibition resulting, under normal conditions, in an interleaved arrangement of tip and non-migrating stalk cells. Previously, we showed that the increased VEGF levels found in many diseases can cause the delayed negative feedback of lateral inhibition to produce abnormal oscillations of tip/stalk cell fates. Here we describe the development and implementation of a novel physics-based hierarchical agent model, tightly coupled to in vivo data, to explore the system dynamics as perpetual lateral inhibition combines with tip cell migration and fusion. We explore the tipping point between normal and abnormal sprouting as VEGF increases. A novel filopodia-adhesion driven migration mechanism is presented and validated against in vivo data. Due to the unique feature of ongoing lateral inhibition, 'stabilised' tip/stalk cell patterns show sensitivity to the formation of new cell-cell junctions during fusion: we predict cell fates can reverse. The fusing tip cells become inhibited and neighbouring stalk cells flip fate, recursively providing new tip cells. Junction size emerges as a key factor in establishing a stable tip/stalk pattern. Cell-cell junctions elongate as tip cells migrate, which is shown to provide positive feedback to lateral inhibition, causing it to be more susceptible to pathological oscillations. Importantly, down-regulation of the migratory pathway alone is shown to be sufficient to rescue the sprouting system from oscillation and restore stability. Thus we suggest the use of migration inhibitors as therapeutic agents for vascular

  1. Tipping the balance: robustness of tip cell selection, migration and fusion in angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Katie; Mariggi, Giovanni; Gerhardt, Holger; Bates, Paul A

    2009-10-01

    Vascular abnormalities contribute to many diseases such as cancer and diabetic retinopathy. In angiogenesis new blood vessels, headed by a migrating tip cell, sprout from pre-existing vessels in response to signals, e.g., vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Tip cells meet and fuse (anastomosis) to form blood-flow supporting loops. Tip cell selection is achieved by Dll4-Notch mediated lateral inhibition resulting, under normal conditions, in an interleaved arrangement of tip and non-migrating stalk cells. Previously, we showed that the increased VEGF levels found in many diseases can cause the delayed negative feedback of lateral inhibition to produce abnormal oscillations of tip/stalk cell fates. Here we describe the development and implementation of a novel physics-based hierarchical agent model, tightly coupled to in vivo data, to explore the system dynamics as perpetual lateral inhibition combines with tip cell migration and fusion. We explore the tipping point between normal and abnormal sprouting as VEGF increases. A novel filopodia-adhesion driven migration mechanism is presented and validated against in vivo data. Due to the unique feature of ongoing lateral inhibition, 'stabilised' tip/stalk cell patterns show sensitivity to the formation of new cell-cell junctions during fusion: we predict cell fates can reverse. The fusing tip cells become inhibited and neighbouring stalk cells flip fate, recursively providing new tip cells. Junction size emerges as a key factor in establishing a stable tip/stalk pattern. Cell-cell junctions elongate as tip cells migrate, which is shown to provide positive feedback to lateral inhibition, causing it to be more susceptible to pathological oscillations. Importantly, down-regulation of the migratory pathway alone is shown to be sufficient to rescue the sprouting system from oscillation and restore stability. Thus we suggest the use of migration inhibitors as therapeutic agents for vascular normalisation in cancer.

  2. Past matrix stiffness primes epithelial cells and regulates their future collective migration through a mechanical memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasrollahi, Samila; Walter, Christopher; Loza, Andrew J; Schimizzi, Gregory V; Longmore, Gregory D; Pathak, Amit

    2017-11-01

    During morphogenesis and cancer metastasis, grouped cells migrate through tissues of dissimilar stiffness. Although the influence of matrix stiffness on cellular mechanosensitivity and motility are well-recognized, it remains unknown whether these matrix-dependent cellular features persist after cells move to a new microenvironment. Here, we interrogate whether priming of epithelial cells by a given matrix stiffness influences their future collective migration on a different matrix - a property we refer to as the 'mechanical memory' of migratory cells. To prime cells on a defined matrix and track their collective migration onto an adjoining secondary matrix of dissimilar stiffness, we develop a modular polyacrylamide substrate through step-by-step polymerization of different PA compositions. We report that epithelial cells primed on a stiff matrix migrate faster, display higher actomyosin expression, form larger focal adhesions, and retain nuclear YAP even after arriving onto a soft secondary matrix, as compared to their control behavior on a homogeneously soft matrix. Priming on a soft ECM causes a reverse effect. The depletion of YAP dramatically reduces this memory-dependent migration. Our results present a previously unidentified regulation of mechanosensitive collective cell migration by past matrix stiffness, in which mechanical memory depends on YAP activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Chronic toluene exposure induces cell proliferation in the mice SVZ but not migration through the RMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Ireri; Valdez-Tapia, Mariana; Sanchez-Serrano, Sinthia L; Cruz, Silvia L; Lamas, Monica

    2014-07-11

    Abuse of toluene-containing inhalants is associated to various cognitive impairments that have been partly associated to deviation of the hippocampal neurogenesis processes during adulthood. In the present study we analyzed the effect of chronic toluene exposure (6000ppm) on cell proliferation and migration in the other selected area of the rodent brain where neurogenesis persist throughout adulthood, the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricle (SVZ). We used an anti-Ki67 antibody to evaluate SVZ cell proliferation, BrdU to evaluate cell survival and double-staining with BrdU and the migration marker doublecortin (DCX) to evaluate migration, by immunofluorescence 2h, 1, 5, 10 or 15 days after 20 sessions of toluene exposure. We found that toluene induced an initial burst of cell proliferation in the SVZ but not a significant increase in migration toward the rostral migratory stream (RMS) or the number of cells that migrate to the olfactory bulb. In addition, we detected a small number of new migrating cells in the corpus callosum and striatum of control mice that was similar in toluene-exposed brains. These results may underline the homeostatic capabilities of the populations of dividing cells, previously demonstrated using other drugs of abuse and demonstrate that toluene misuse can alter cellular proliferation in the postnatal brain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Vaccinium angustifolium (lowbush blueberry) leaf extract increases extravillous trophoblast cell migration and invasion in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, Christina; Ferrier, Jonathan; Gaudet, Jeremiah; Yockell-Lelièvre, Julien; Arnason, John Thor; Gruslin, Andrée; Bainbridge, Shannon

    2018-01-29

    Perturbations to extravillous trophoblast (EVT) cell migration and invasion are associated with the development of placenta-mediated diseases. Phytochemicals found in the lowbush blueberry plant (Vaccinium angustifolium) have been shown to influence cell migration and invasion in models of tumorigenesis and noncancerous, healthy cells, however never in EVT cells. We hypothesized that the phenolic compounds present in V. angustifolium leaf extract promote trophoblast migration and invasion. Using the HTR-8/SVneo human EVT cell line and Boyden chamber assays, the influence of V. angustifolium leaf extract (0 to 2 × 104  ng/ml) on trophoblast cell migration (n = 4) and invasion (n = 4) was determined. Cellular proliferation and viability were assessed using immunoreactivity to Ki67 (n = 3) and trypan blue exclusion assays (n = 3), respectively. At 20 ng/ml, V. angustifolium leaf extract increased HTR-8/SVneo cell migration and invasion (p extract and the most active compound. Evidence from Western blot analysis (n = 3) suggests that the effects of the leaf extract and chlorogenic acid on trophoblast migration and invasion are mediated through an adenosine monophosphate-activated protein (AMP) kinase-dependent mechanism. Further investigations examining the potential therapeutic applications of this natural health product extract and its major chemical compounds in the context of placenta-mediated diseases are warranted. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Effects of arecoline on cell growth, migration, and differentiation in cementoblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Juai Chen

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: Taken together, these results suggest that arecoline could inhibit cell growth, migration, and differentiation in cementoblasts. Areca quid chewers might be more susceptible to the destruction of periodontium and less responsive to regenerative procedure during periodontal therapy.

  6. Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor Controls Migration in Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schmidt, Annette; Ladage, Dennis; Schinköthe, Timo; Klausmann, Ursula; Ulrichs, Christoph; Klinz, Franz‐Josef; Brixius, Klara; Arnhold, Stefan; Desai, Biren; Mehlhorn, Uwe; Schwinger, Robert H.G; Staib, Peter; Addicks, Klaus; Bloch, Wilhelm

    2006-01-01

    Little is known about the migration of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Some therapeutic approaches had demonstrated that MSCs were able to regenerate injured tissues when applied from different sites of application...

  7. Circadian Clock Genes Modulate Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Differentiation, Migration and Cell Cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helene Boucher

    Full Text Available Many of the components that regulate the circadian clock have been identified in organisms and humans. The influence of circadian rhythm (CR on the regulation of stem cells biology began to be evaluated. However, little is known on the role of CR on human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSCs properties. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of CR on the differentiation capacities of bone marrow hMSCs, as well as the regulation of cell cycle and migration capabilities. To that, we used both a chemical approach with a GSK-3β specific inhibitor (2'E,3'Z-6-bromoindirubin-3'-oxime, BIO and a knockdown of CLOCK and PER2, two of the main genes involved in CR regulation. In these experimental conditions, a dramatic inhibition of adipocyte differentiation was observed, while osteoblastic differentiation capacities were not modified. In addition, cell migration was decreased in PER2-/- cells. Lastly, downregulation of circadian clock genes induced a modification of the hMSCs cell cycle phase distribution, which was shown to be related to a change of the cyclin expression profile. Taken together, these data showed that CR plays a role in the regulation of hMSCs differentiation and division, and likely represent key factor in maintaining hMSCs properties.

  8. Circadian Clock Genes Modulate Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Differentiation, Migration and Cell Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, Helene; Vanneaux, Valerie; Domet, Thomas; Parouchev, Alexandre; Larghero, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    Many of the components that regulate the circadian clock have been identified in organisms and humans. The influence of circadian rhythm (CR) on the regulation of stem cells biology began to be evaluated. However, little is known on the role of CR on human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSCs) properties. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of CR on the differentiation capacities of bone marrow hMSCs, as well as the regulation of cell cycle and migration capabilities. To that, we used both a chemical approach with a GSK-3β specific inhibitor (2'E,3'Z-6-bromoindirubin-3'-oxime, BIO) and a knockdown of CLOCK and PER2, two of the main genes involved in CR regulation. In these experimental conditions, a dramatic inhibition of adipocyte differentiation was observed, while osteoblastic differentiation capacities were not modified. In addition, cell migration was decreased in PER2-/- cells. Lastly, downregulation of circadian clock genes induced a modification of the hMSCs cell cycle phase distribution, which was shown to be related to a change of the cyclin expression profile. Taken together, these data showed that CR plays a role in the regulation of hMSCs differentiation and division, and likely represent key factor in maintaining hMSCs properties.

  9. C6 glioma cell invasion and migration of rat brain after neural homografting: ultrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, J J; Goldberg, W J; Laws, E R; Conger, D; Morreale, V; Wood, L R

    1990-04-01

    C6 tumor cells (10(6] were grafted as suspensions into freshly made implantation pockets in rat host cerebral cortex. Specimens were prepared for transmission and scanning electron microscopy 1 to 7 days postimplantation (DPI). By 3 DPI vacuolated C6 cells had migrated on or invaded the host brain. C6 cells were observed on the glia limitans on the surface of the brain, in the corpus callosum, subependymal space, and perivascular space and had invaded the cortex under the implantation pocket. In addition to the tumor mass that was observed under the implantation pocket, by 7 DPI individual C6 cells had migrated into the corpus callosum and internal capsule. Migrated C6 cells were observed in a perineuronal position in the hippocampus and other gray matter structures inferior to the corpus callosum. Micropockets were found around each C6 cell and the processes of these cells had replaced host parenchyma. The preferred routes of migration were on basal lamina and parallel and intersecting nerve fiber bundles. Invasion occurred through gray and white matter. The movement of homografted C6 cells in the brain suggests that these cells actively migrate as individual cells in addition to invading as a mass.

  10. XB130 translocation to microfilamentous structures mediates NNK-induced migration of human bronchial epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qifei; Nadesalingam, Jeya; Moodley, Serisha; Bai, Xiaohui; Liu, Mingyao

    2015-07-20

    Cigarette smoking contributes to the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer. Nicotine-derived nitrosamine ketone (NNK) is the most potent carcinogen among cigarette smoking components, and is known to enhance migration of cancer cells. However, the effect of NNK on normal human bronchial epithelial cells is not well studied. XB130 is a member of actin filament associated protein family and is involved in cell morphology changes, cytoskeletal rearrangement and outgrowth formation, as well as cell migration. We hypothesized that XB130 mediates NNK-induced migration of normal human bronchial epithelial cells. Our results showed that, after NNK stimulation, XB130 was translocated to the cell periphery and enriched in cell motility-associated structures, such as lamellipodia, in normal human bronchial epithelial BEAS2B cells. Moreover, overexpression of XB130 significantly enhanced NNK-induced migration, which requires both the N- and C-termini of XB130. Overexpression of XB130 enhanced NNK-induced protein tyrosine phosphorylation and promoted matrix metalloproteinase-14 translocation to cell motility-associated cellular structures after NNK stimulation. XB130-mediated NNK-induced cell migration may contribute to airway epithelial repair; however, it may also be involved in cigarette smoking-related chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer.

  11. Light directed migration of a cluster of cells in the centimeter scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosabbir, Abdullah Al; Truong, Kevin

    2017-11-26

    Protein-based systems for light directed migration of cells have been demonstrated up to distances of several hundred microns, but larger distances in the centimeter scale would allow new possible applications. Light activated migration in mammalian cells can be achieved by cells expressing channelrhodopsin-2 and an engineered Ca2+ sensitive Rac1 protein called RACer. In this study, light was used to induce wound healing, localize cells into a region of interest, and move cells over centimeter scale distances. Given the spatially complex organization of different types of cells in real tissue, light directed migration over the centimeter scale could potentially organize cell type arrangement to help develop more realistic tissues for transplantation.

  12. ATM regulation of IL-8 links oxidative stress to cancer cell migration and invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Ta; Ebelt, Nancy D; Stracker, Travis H; Xhemalce, Blerta; Van Den Berg, Carla L; Miller, Kyle M

    2015-06-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein kinase regulates the DNA damage response (DDR) and is associated with cancer suppression. Here we report a cancer-promoting role for ATM. ATM depletion in metastatic cancer cells reduced cell migration and invasion. Transcription analyses identified a gene network, including the chemokine IL-8, regulated by ATM. IL-8 expression required ATM and was regulated by oxidative stress. IL-8 was validated as an ATM target by its ability to rescue cell migration and invasion defects in ATM-depleted cells. Finally, ATM-depletion in human breast cancer cells reduced lung tumors in a mouse xenograft model and clinical data validated IL-8 in lung metastasis. These findings provide insights into how ATM activation by oxidative stress regulates IL-8 to sustain cell migration and invasion in cancer cells to promote metastatic potential. Thus, in addition to well-established roles in tumor suppression, these findings identify a role for ATM in tumor progression.

  13. Doxycycline inhibits leukemic cell migration via inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases and phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    WANG, CHUNHUAI; XIANG, RU; ZHANG, XIANGZHONG; CHEN, YUNXIAN

    2015-01-01

    Doxycycline, a tetracycline-based antibiotic, has been reported to attenuate melanoma cell migration through inhibiting the focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signaling pathway. However, it remains to be elucidated whether doxycycline exerts this effect on leukemia cell migration. The present study aimed to examine the role of doxycycline in leukemia cell migration. The invasion capacities of the human leukemia cell lines KG1a (acute myelogenous leukemia) and K562 (chronic myelogenous leukemia) were evaluated using Matrigel® matrix-coated Transwell® chamber assays; leukemic cell lines treated with doxycycline (1 µg/ml) or anti-β1-integrin antibodies were added to the upper chamber, while untreated cells were included as controls. Reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction was performed in order to further understand the influence of doxycycline treatment on the expression of FAK and gelatinases in the KG1a and K562 leukemic cell lines. In addition, FAK protein expression and phosphorylation were determined using western blot analysis in order to investigate the mechanism by which doxycycline inhibited leukemic cell migration. The results revealed that doxycycline treatment significantly attenuated the migration of KG1a and K562 cells, which was demonstrated to be associated with inhibition of the expression and phosphorylation of FAK. In addition, doxycycline treatment inhibited matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 expression. Furthermore, incubation with blocking anti-β1-integrin antibodies had an analogous inhibitory effect on leukemic cell migration to that of doxycycline. In conclusion, the results of the present study suggested that doxycycline attenuated leukemic cell migration through inhibiting the FAK signaling pathway. Therefore, doxycycline may have potential for use as a novel strategy for the treatment of leukemia. PMID:26004127

  14. Hyaluronan synthase 3 (HAS3) overexpression downregulates MV3 melanoma cell proliferation, migration and adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takabe, Piia, E-mail: piia.takabe@uef.fi [University of Eastern Finland, Institute of Biomedicine, 70211 Kuopio (Finland); Bart, Geneviève [University of Eastern Finland, Institute of Biomedicine, 70211 Kuopio (Finland); Ropponen, Antti [University of Eastern Finland, Institute of Clinical Medicine, 70211 Kuopio (Finland); Rilla, Kirsi; Tammi, Markku; Tammi, Raija; Pasonen-Seppänen, Sanna [University of Eastern Finland, Institute of Biomedicine, 70211 Kuopio (Finland)

    2015-09-10

    Malignant skin melanoma is one of the most deadly human cancers. Extracellular matrix (ECM) influences the growth of malignant tumors by modulating tumor cells adhesion and migration. Hyaluronan is an essential component of the ECM, and its amount is altered in many tumors, suggesting an important role for hyaluronan in tumorigenesis. Nonetheless its role in melanomagenesis is not understood. In this study we produced a MV3 melanoma cell line with inducible expression of the hyaluronan synthase 3 (HAS3) and studied its effect on the behavior of the melanoma cells. HAS3 overexpression expanded the cell surface hyaluronan coat and decreased melanoma cell adhesion, migration and proliferation by cell cycle arrest at G1/G0. Melanoma cell migration was restored by removal of cell surface hyaluronan by Streptomyces hyaluronidase and by receptor blocking with hyaluronan oligosaccharides, while the effect on cell proliferation was receptor independent. Overexpression of HAS3 decreased ERK1/2 phosphorylation suggesting that inhibition of MAP-kinase signaling was responsible for these suppressive effects on the malignant phenotype of MV3 melanoma cells. - Highlights: • Inducible HAS3-MV3 melanoma cell line was generated using Lentiviral transduction. • HAS3 overexpression inhibits MV3 cell migration via hyaluronan–receptor interaction. • HAS3 overexpression decreases MV3 melanoma cell proliferation and adhesion. • ERK1/2 phosphorylation is downregulated by 50% in HAS3 overexpressing cells. • The results suggest that hyaluronan has anti-cancer like effects in melanoma.

  15. Sitagliptin, An Anti-diabetic Drug, Suppresses Estrogen Deficiency-Induced OsteoporosisIn Vivo and Inhibits RANKL-Induced Osteoclast Formation and Bone Resorption In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuandong Wang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Postmenopausal osteoporosis is a disease characterized by excessive osteoclastic bone resorption. Some anti-diabetic drugs were demonstrated for anti-osteoclastic bone-loss effects. The present study investigated the skeletal effects of chronic administration of sitagliptin, a dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP IV inhibitor that is increasingly used for type 2 diabetes treatments, in an estrogen deficiency-induced osteoporosis and elucidated the associated mechanisms. This study indicated that sitagliptin effectively prevented ovariectomy-induced bone loss and reduced osteoclast numbers in vivo. It was also indicated that sitagliptin suppressed receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL-mediated osteoclast differentiation, bone resorption, and F-actin ring formation in a manner of dose-dependence. In addition, sitagliptin significantly reduced the expression of osteoclast-specific markers in mouse bone-marrow-derived macrophages, including calcitonin receptor (Calcr, dendrite cell-specific transmembrane protein (Dc-stamp, c-Fos, and nuclear factor of activated T-cells cytoplasmic 1 (Nfatc1. Further study indicated that sitagliptin inhibited osteoclastogenesis by suppressing AKT and ERK signaling pathways, scavenging ROS activity, and suppressing the Ca2+ oscillation that consequently affects the expression and/or activity of the osteoclast-specific transcription factors, c-Fos and NFATc1. Collectively, these findings suggest that sitagliptin possesses beneficial effects on bone and the suppression of osteoclast number implies that the effect is exerted directly on osteoclastogenesis.

  16. Cdc42-dependent leading edge coordination is essential for interstitial dendritic cell migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lammermann, Tim; Renkawitz, Jorg; Wu, Xunwei

    2009-01-01

    Mature dendritic cells (DCs) moving from the skin to the lymph node are a prototypic example of rapidly migrating amoeboid leukocytes. Interstitial DC migration is directionally guided by chemokines, but independent of specific adhesive interactions with the tissue as well as pericellular...... the cells to move on two-dimensional surfaces, their in vivo motility is completely abrogated. We show that this difference is entirely caused by the geometrical complexity of the environment as multiple competing protrusions lead to instantaneous entanglement within three-dimensional extracellular matrix...... scaffolds. This demonstrates that the decisive factor for migrating DCs is not specific interaction with the extracellular environment, but adequate coordination of cytoskeletal flow....

  17. The Caenorhabditis elegans Q neuroblasts : A powerful system to study cell migration at single-cell resolution in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rella, Lorenzo; Fernandes Póvoa, Euclides E; Korswagen, Hendrik C

    During development, cell migration plays a central role in the formation of tissues and organs. Understanding the molecular mechanisms that drive and control these migrations is a key challenge in developmental biology that will provide important insights into disease processes, including cancer

  18. Effect of shear stress on the migration of hepatic stellate cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sera, Toshihiro; Sumii, Tateki; Fujita, Ryosuke; Kudo, Susumu

    2018-01-01

    When the liver is damaged, hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) can change into an activated, highly migratory state. The migration of HSCs may be affected by shear stress due not only to sinusoidal flow but also by the flow in the space of Disse because this space is filled with blood plasma. In this study, we evaluated the effects of shear stress on HSC migration in a scratch-wound assay with a parallel flow chamber. At regions upstream of the wound area, the migration was inhibited by 0.6 Pa and promoted by 2.0 Pa shear stress, compared to the static condition. The platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB receptor, PDGFR-β, was expressed in all conditions and the differences were not significant. PDGF increased HSC migration, except at 0.6 Pa shear stress, which was still inhibited. These results indicate that another molecular factor, such as PDGFR-α, may act to inhibit the migration under low shear stress. At regions downstream of the wound area, the migration was smaller under shear stress than under the static condition, although the expression of PDGFR-β was significantly higher. In particular, the migration direction was opposite to the wound area under high shear stress; therefore, migration might be influenced by the intercellular environment. Our results indicate that HSC migration was influenced by shear stress intensity and the intercellular environment.

  19. Analysis of transient migration behavior of natural killer cells imaged in situ and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorshidi, Mohammad Ali; Vanherberghen, Bruno; Kowalewski, Jacob M; Garrod, Kym R; Lindström, Sara; Andersson-Svahn, Helene; Brismar, Hjalmar; Cahalan, Michael D; Önfelt, Björn

    2011-07-01

    We present a simple method for rapid and automatic characterization of lymphocyte migration from time-lapse fluorescence microscopy data. Time-lapse imaging of natural killer (NK) cells in vitro and in situ, both showed that individual cells transiently alter their migration behavior. Typically, NK cells showed periods of high motility, interrupted by transient periods of slow migration or almost complete arrests. Analysis of in vitro data showed that these periods frequently coincided with contacts with target cells, sometimes leading to target cell lysis. However, NK cells were also commonly observed to stop independently of contact with other cells. In order to objectively characterize the migration of NK cells, we implemented a simple method to discriminate when NK cells stop or have low motilities, have periods of directed migration or undergo random movement. This was achieved using a sliding window approach and evaluating the mean squared displacement (MSD) to assess the migration coefficient and MSD curvature along trajectories from individual NK cells over time. The method presented here can be used to quickly and quantitatively assess the dynamics of individual cells as well as heterogeneity within ensembles. Furthermore, it may also be used as a tool to automatically detect transient stops due to the formation of immune synapses, cell division or cell death. We show that this could be particularly useful for analysis of in situ time-lapse fluorescence imaging data where most cells, as well as the extracellular matrix, are usually unlabelled and thus invisible. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  20. N-Cadherin Regulates Cell Migration Through a Rab5-Dependent Temporal Control of Macropinocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Meng-Hsuan; Wang, Jen-Yeu; Chiu, Yu-Ting; Wang, Mei-Pin; Lee, Sue-Ping; Tai, Chin-Yin

    2016-07-01

    Macropinocytosis is a clathrin-independent endocytic pathway implicated in fluid uptake, pathogen invasion and cell migration. During collective cell migration, macropinocytosis occurs primarily at membrane ruffles arising from the leading edges of migrating cells. We report here that N-cadherin (Ncad) regulates the tempo of macropinocytosis and thereby influences wound-induced collective cell migration. Using live-cell and super-resolution imaging techniques, we observed that Ncad formed clusters at the membrane ruffles and macropinosomes. De-clustering of Ncad by an interfering antibody impaired the recruitment of Rab5-an early endosomal marker-to the macropinosomes. Moreover, we demonstrated that Ncad interacts with Rab5, and laser ablation of Ncad caused Rab5 to dissociate from the macropinosomes. Although Rab5 detached from macropinosomes upon the de-clustering of Ncad, the recruitment of late endosomal marker Rab7 occurred earlier. Consequently, both centripetal trafficking of macropinosomes and collective migration were accelerated due to de-clustering of Ncad. Thus, our results suggest that Ncad is involved in the maturation of macropinocytosis through Rab5 recruitment, linking macropinocytosis and cell migration through a novel function of Ncad. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Nuclear Membrane-Targeted Gold Nanoparticles Inhibit Cancer Cell Migration and Invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Moustafa R K; Wu, Yue; Ghosh, Deepraj; Do, Brian H; Chen, Kuangcai; Dawson, Michelle R; Fang, Ning; Sulchek, Todd A; El-Sayed, Mostafa A

    2017-04-25

    Most cancer patients die from metastasis. Recent studies have shown that gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) can slow down the migration/invasion speed of cancer cells and suppress metastasis. Since nuclear stiffness of the cell largely decreases cell migration, our hypothesis is that targeting AuNPs to the cell nucleus region could enhance nuclear stiffness, and therefore inhibit cell migration and invasion. Our results showed that upon nuclear targeting of AuNPs, the ovarian cancer cell motilities decrease significantly, compared with nontargeted AuNPs. Furthermore, using atomic force microscopy, we observed an enhanced cell nuclear stiffness. In order to understand the mechanism of cancer cell migration/invasion inhibition, the exact locations of the targeted AuNPs were clearly imaged using a high-resolution three-dimensional imaging microscope, which showed that the AuNPs were trapped at the nuclear membrane. In addition, we observed a greatly increased expression level of lamin A/C protein, which is located in the inner nuclear membrane and functions as a structural component of the nuclear lamina to enhance nuclear stiffness. We propose that the AuNPs that are trapped at the nuclear membrane both (1) add to the mechanical stiffness of the nucleus and (2) stimulate the overexpression of lamin A/C located around the nuclear membrane, thus increasing nuclear stiffness and slowing cancer cell migration and invasion.

  2. Angiogenin enhances cell migration by regulating stress fiber assembly and focal adhesion dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saisai Wei

    Full Text Available Angiogenin (ANG acts on both vascular endothelial cells and cancer cells, but the underlying mechanism remains elusive. In this study, we carried out a co-immunoprecipitation assay in HeLa cells and identified 14 potential ANG-interacting proteins. Among these proteins, β-actin, α-actinin 4, and non-muscle myosin heavy chain 9 are stress fiber components and involved in cytoskeleton organization and movement, which prompted us to investigate the mechanism of action of ANG in cell migration. Upon confirmation of the interactions between ANG and the three proteins, further studies revealed that ANG co-localized with β-actin and α-actinin 4 at the leading edge of migrating cells. Down-regulation of ANG resulted in fewer but thicker stress fibers with less dynamics, which was associated with the enlargements of focal adhesions. The focal adhesion kinase activity and cell migration capacity were significantly decreased in ANG-deficient cells. Taken together, our data demonstrated that the existence of ANG in the cytoplasm optimizes stress fiber assembly and focal adhesion formation to accommodate cell migration. The finding that ANG promoted cancer cell migration might provide new clues for tumor metastasis research.

  3. Regulatory T Cell Migration Is Dependent on Glucokinase-Mediated Glycolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishore, Madhav; Cheung, Kenneth C P; Fu, Hongmei; Bonacina, Fabrizia; Wang, Guosu; Coe, David; Ward, Eleanor J; Colamatteo, Alessandra; Jangani, Maryam; Baragetti, Andrea; Matarese, Giuseppe; Smith, David M; Haas, Robert; Mauro, Claudio; Wraith, David C; Okkenhaug, Klaus; Catapano, Alberico L; De Rosa, Veronica; Norata, Giuseppe D; Marelli-Berg, Federica M

    2017-11-21

    Migration of activated regulatory T (Treg) cells to inflamed tissue is crucial for their immune-modulatory function. While metabolic reprogramming during Treg cell differentiation has been extensively studied, the bioenergetics of Treg cell trafficking remains undefined. We have investigated the metabolic demands of migrating Treg cells in vitro and in vivo. We show that glycolysis was instrumental for their migration and was initiated by pro-migratory stimuli via a PI3K-mTORC2-mediated pathway culminating in induction of the enzyme glucokinase (GCK). Subsequently, GCK promoted cytoskeletal rearrangements by associating with actin. Treg cells lacking this pathway were functionally suppressive but failed to migrate to skin allografts and inhibit rejection. Similarly, human carriers of a loss-of-function GCK regulatory protein gene-leading to increased GCK activity-had reduced numbers of circulating Treg cells. These cells displayed enhanced migratory activity but similar suppressive function, while conventional T cells were unaffected. Thus, GCK-dependent glycolysis regulates Treg cell migration. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Redundant control of migration and adhesion by ERM proteins in vascular smooth muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baeyens, Nicolas; Latrache, Iman; Yerna, Xavier [Laboratory of Cell Physiology, IoNS, Université Catholique de Louvain (Belgium); Noppe, Gauthier; Horman, Sandrine [Pôle de Recherche Cardiovasculaire, IREC, Université Catholique de Louvain (Belgium); Morel, Nicole, E-mail: nicole.morel@uclouvain.be [Laboratory of Cell Physiology, IoNS, Université Catholique de Louvain (Belgium)

    2013-11-22

    Highlights: •The three ERM proteins are expressed in vascular smooth muscle cell. •ERM depletion inhibited PDGF-evoked migration redundantly. •ERM depletion increased cell adhesion redundantly. •ERM depletion did not affect PDGF-evoked Ca signal, Rac1 activation, proliferation. •ERM proteins control PDGF-induced migration by regulating adhesion. -- Abstract: Ezrin, radixin, and moesin possess a very similar structure with a C-terminal actin-binding domain and a N-terminal FERM interacting domain. They are known to be involved in cytoskeleton organization in several cell types but their function in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) is still unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of ERM proteins in cell migration induced by PDGF, a growth factor involved in pathophysiological processes like angiogenesis or atherosclerosis. We used primary cultured VSMC obtained from rat aorta, which express the three ERM proteins. Simultaneous depletion of the three ERM proteins with specific siRNAs abolished the effects of PDGF on cell architecture and migration and markedly increased cell adhesion and focal adhesion size, while these parameters were only slightly affected by depletion of ezrin, radixin or moesin alone. Rac1 activation, cell proliferation, and Ca{sup 2+} signal in response to PDGF were unaffected by ERM depletion. These results indicate that ERM proteins exert a redundant control on PDGF-induced VSMC migration by regulating focal adhesion turn-over and cell adhesion to substrate.

  5. Cells on the move: Modulation of guidance cues during germ cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Girish; Barr, Justinn; Gerlitz, Offer; Lebedeva, Lyubov; Shidlovskii, Yulii; Schedl, Paul

    2017-07-03

    In Drosophila melanogaster the progenitors of the germ-line stem cells, the primordial germ cells (PGCs) are formed on the outside surface of the early embryo, while the somatic gonadal precursor cells (SGPs) are specified during mid-embryogenesis. To form the primitive embryonic gonad, the PGCs travel from outside of the embryo, across the mid-gut and then migrate through the mesoderm to the SGPs. The migratory path of PGCs is dictated by a series of attractive and repulsive cues. Studies in our laboratory have shown that one of the key chemoattractants is the Hedgehog (Hh) ligand. Although, Hh is expressed in other cell types, the long-distance transmission of this ligand is specifically potentiated in the SGPs by the hmgcr isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway. The distant transmission of the Hh ligand is gated by restricting expression of hmgcr to the SGPs. This is particularly relevant in light of the recent findings that an ABC transporter, mdr49 also acts in a mesoderm specific manner to release the germ cell attractant. Our studies have demonstrated that mdr49 functions in hh signaling likely via its role in the transport of cholesterol. Given the importance of cholesterol in the processing and long distance transmission of the Hh ligand, this observation has opened up an exciting avenue concerning the possible role of components of the sterol transport machinery in PGC migration.

  6. A photoactivatable nanopatterned substrate for analyzing collective cell migration with precisely tuned cell-extracellular matrix ligand interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihisa Shimizu

    Full Text Available Collective cell migration is involved in many biological and pathological processes. Various factors have been shown to regulate the decision to migrate collectively or individually, but the impact of cell-extracellular matrix (ECM interactions is still debated. Here, we developed a method for analyzing collective cell migration by precisely tuning the interactions between cells and ECM ligands. Gold nanoparticles are arrayed on a glass substrate with a defined nanometer spacing by block copolymer micellar nanolithography (BCML, and photocleavable poly(ethylene glycol (Mw  =  12 kDa, PEG12K and a cyclic RGD peptide, as an ECM ligand, are immobilized on this substrate. The remaining glass regions are passivated with PEG2K-silane to make cells interact with the surface via the nanoperiodically presented cyclic RGD ligands upon the photocleavage of PEG12K. On this nanostructured substrate, HeLa cells are first patterned in photo-illuminated regions, and cell migration is induced by a second photocleavage of the surrounding PEG12K. The HeLa cells gradually lose their cell-cell contacts and become disconnected on the nanopatterned substrate with 10-nm particles and 57-nm spacing, in contrast to their behavior on the homogenous substrate. Interestingly, the relationship between the observed migration collectivity and the cell-ECM ligand interactions is the opposite of that expected based on conventional soft matter models. It is likely that the reduced phosphorylation at tyrosine-861 of focal adhesion kinase (FAK on the nanopatterned surface is responsible for this unique migration behavior. These results demonstrate the usefulness of the presented method in understanding the process of determining collective and non-collective migration features in defined micro- and nano-environments and resolving the crosstalk between cell-cell and cell-ECM adhesions.

  7. Effects of SOX2 on Proliferation, Migration and Adhesion of Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengfei Liu

    Full Text Available As a key factor for cell pluripotent and self-renewing phenotypes, SOX2 has attracted scientists' attention gradually in recent years. However, its exact effects in dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs are still unclear. In this study, we mainly investigated whether SOX2 could affect some biological functions of DPSCs. DPSCs were isolated from the dental pulp of human impacted third molar. SOX2 overexpressing DPSCs (DPSCs-SOX2 were established through retroviral infection. The effect of SOX2 on cell proliferation, migration and adhesion ability was evaluated with CCK-8, trans-well system and fibronectin-induced cell attachment experiment respectively. Whole genome expression of DPSCs-SOX2 was analyzed with RNA microarray. Furthermore, a rescue experiment was performed with SOX2-siRNA in DPSC-SOX2 to confirm the effect of SOX2 overexpression in DPSCs. We found that SOX2 overexpression could result in the enhancement of cell proliferation, migration, and adhesion in DPSCs obviously. RNA microarray analysis indicated that some key genes in the signal pathways associated with cell cycle, migration and adhesion were upregulated in different degree, and the results were further confirmed with qPCR and western-blot. Finally, DPSC-SOX2 transfected with SOX2-siRNA showed a decrease of cell proliferation, migration and adhesion ability, which further confirmed the biological effect of SOX2 in human DPSCs. This study indicated that SOX2 could improve the cell proliferation, migration and adhesion ability of DPSCs through regulating gene expression about cell cycle, migration and adhesion, and provided a novel strategy to develop seed cells with strong proliferation, migration and adhesion ability for tissue engineering.

  8. R-Ras regulates migration through an interaction with filamin A in melanoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna E Gawecka

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Changes in cell adhesion and migration in the tumor microenvironment are key in the initiation and progression of metastasis. R-Ras is one of several small GTPases that regulate cell adhesion and migration on the extracellular matrix, however the mechanism has not been completely elucidated. Using a yeast two-hybrid approach we sought to identify novel R-Ras binding proteins that might mediate its effects on integrins.We identified Filamin A (FLNa as a candidate interacting protein. FLNa is an actin-binding scaffold protein that also binds to integrin beta1, beta2 and beta7 tails and is associated with diverse cell processes including cell migration. Indeed, M2 melanoma cells require FLNa for motility. We further show that R-Ras and FLNa interact in co-immunoprecipitations and pull-down assays. Deletion of FLNa repeat 3 (FLNaDelta3 abrogated this interaction. In M2 melanoma cells active R-Ras co-localized with FLNa but did not co-localize with FLNa lacking repeat 3. Thus, activated R-Ras binds repeat 3 of FLNa. The functional consequence of this interaction was that active R-Ras and FLNa coordinately increased cell migration. In contrast, co-expression of R-Ras and FLNaDelta3 had a significantly reduced effect on migration. While there was enhancement of integrin activation and fibronectin matrix assembly, cell adhesion was not altered. Finally, siRNA knockdown of endogenous R-Ras impaired FLNa-dependent fibronectin matrix assembly.These data support a model in which R-Ras functionally associates with FLNa and thereby regulates integrin-dependent migration. Thus in melanoma cells R-Ras and FLNa may cooperatively promote metastasis by enhancing cell migration.

  9. The candidate tumor suppressor gene ECRG4 inhibits cancer cells migration and invasion in esophageal carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu ShihHsin

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The esophageal cancer related gene 4 (ECRG4 was initially identified and cloned in our laboratory from human normal esophageal epithelium (GenBank accession no.AF325503. ECRG4 was a new tumor suppressor gene in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC associated with prognosis. In this study, we investigated the novel tumor-suppressing function of ECRG4 in cancer cell migration, invasion, adhesion and cell cycle regulation in ESCC. Methods Transwell and Boyden chamber experiments were utilized to examined the effects of ECRG4 expression on ESCC cells migration, invasion and adhesion. And flow cytometric analysis was used to observe the impact of ECRG4 expression on cell cycle regulation. Finally, the expression levels of cell cycle regulating proteins p53 and p21 in human ESCC cells transfected with ECRG4 gene were evaluated by Western blotting. Results The restoration of ECRG4 expression in ESCC cells inhibited cancer cells migration and invasion (P P > 0.05. Furthermore, ECRG4 could cause cell cycle G1 phase arrest in ESCC (P Conclusion ECRG4 is a candidate tumor suppressor gene which suppressed tumor cells migration and invasion without affecting cell adhesion ability in ESCC. Furthermore, ECRG4 might cause cell cycle G1 phase block possibly through inducing the increased expression of p53 and p21 proteins in ESCC.

  10. Using a co-culture microsystem for cell migration under fluid shear stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Chia-Hsien; Tsai, Shen-Hsing; Wu, Li-Wha; Lin, Yu-Cheng

    2011-08-07

    We have successfully developed a microsystem to co-cultivate two types of cells with a minimum defined gap of 50 μm, and to quantitatively study the impact of fluid shear stress on the mutual influence of cell migration velocity and distance. We used the hydrostatic pressure to seed two different cells, endothelial cells (ECs) and smooth muscle cells (SMCs), on opposite sides of various gap sizes (500 μm, 200 μm, 100 μm, and 50 μm). After cultivating the cells for 12 h and peeling the co-culture microchip from the culture dish, we studied the impacts of gap size on the migration of either cell type in the absence or presence of fluid shear stress (7 dyne cm(-2) and 12 dyne cm(-2)) influence. We found that both gap size and shear stress have profound influence on cell migration. Smaller gap sizes (100 μm and 50 μm) significantly enhanced cell migration, suggesting a requirement of an effective concentration of released factor(s) by either cell type in the gap region. Flow-induced shear stress delayed the migration onset of either cell type in a dose-dependent manner regardless of the gap size. Moreover, shear stress-induced decrease of cell migration becomes evident when the gap size was 500 μm. We have developed a co-culture microsystem for two kinds of cells and overcome the conventional difficulties in observation and mixed culture, and it would have more application for bio-manipulation and tissue repair engineering. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  11. Lumican Inhibits SNAIL-Induced Melanoma Cell Migration Specifically by Blocking MMP-14 Activity.

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    Marta Stasiak

    Full Text Available Lumican, a small leucine rich proteoglycan, inhibits MMP-14 activity and melanoma cell migration in vitro and in vivo. Snail triggers epithelial-mesenchymal transitions endowing epithelial cells with migratory and invasive properties during tumor progression. The aim of this work was to investigate lumican effects on MMP-14 activity and migration of Snail overexpressing B16F1 (Snail-B16F1 melanoma cells and HT-29 colon adenocarcinoma cells. Lumican inhibits the Snail induced MMP-14 activity in B16F1 but not in HT-29 cells. In Snail-B16F1 cells, lumican inhibits migration, growth, and melanoma primary tumor development. A lumican-based strategy targeting Snail-induced MMP-14 activity might be useful for melanoma treatment.

  12. Tuning cell migration: contractility as an integrator of intracellular signals from multiple cues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordeleau, Francois; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A.

    2016-01-01

    There has been immense progress in our understanding of the factors driving cell migration in both two-dimensional and three-dimensional microenvironments over the years. However, it is becoming increasingly evident that even though most cells share many of the same signaling molecules, they rarely respond in the same way to migration cues. To add to the complexity, cells are generally exposed to multiple cues simultaneously, in the form of growth factors and/or physical cues from the matrix. Understanding the mechanisms that modulate the intracellular signals triggered by multiple cues remains a challenge. Here, we will focus on the molecular mechanism involved in modulating cell migration, with a specific focus on how cell contractility can mediate the crosstalk between signaling initiated at cell-matrix adhesions and growth factor receptors. PMID:27508074

  13. TRPV2 mediates adrenomedullin stimulation of prostate and urothelial cancer cell adhesion, migration and invasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agathe Oulidi

    Full Text Available Adrenomedullin (AM is a 52-amino acid peptide initially isolated from human pheochromocytoma. AM is expressed in a variety of malignant tissues and cancer cell lines and was shown to be a mitogenic factor capable of stimulating growth of several cancer cell types. In addition, AM is a survival factor for certain cancer cells. Some data suggest that AM might be involved in the progression cancer metastasis via angiogenesis and cell migration and invasion control. The Transient Receptor Potential channel TRPV2 is known to promote in prostate cancer cell migration and invasive phenotype and is correlated with the stage and grade of bladder cancer. In this work we show that AM induces prostate and urothelial cancer cell migration and invasion through TRPV2 translocation to plasma membrane and the subsequent increase in resting calcium level.

  14. The E3 ubiquitin ligase NEDD4 mediates cell migration signaling of EGFR in lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Genbao; Wang, Ranran; Sun, Aiqin; Wei, Jing; Peng, Ke; Dai, Qian; Yang, Wannian; Lin, Qiong

    2018-02-19

    EGFR-dependent cell migration plays an important role in lung cancer progression. Our previous study observed that the HECT E3 ubiquitin ligase NEDD4 is significantly correlated with tumor metastasis and required for migration and invasion signaling of EGFR in gastric cancer cells. However, how NEDD4 promotes the EGFR-dependent lung cancer cell migration is unknown. This study is to elucidate the mechanism by which NEDD4 mediates the EGFR lung cancer migration signaling. Lentiviral vector-loaded NEDD4 shRNA was used to deplete endogenous NEDD4 in lung cancer cell lines. Effects of the NEDD4 knockdown on the EGFR-dependent or independent lung cancer cell migration were determined using the wound-healing and transwell assays. Association of NEDD4 with activated EGFR was assayed by co-immunoprecipitation. Co-expression of NEDD4 with EGFR or PTEN was determined by immunohistochemical (IHC) staining in 63 lung adenocarcinoma tissue samples. Effects of NEDD4 ectopic expression or knockdown on PTEN ubiquitination and down-regulation, AKT activation and lysosomal secretion were examined using the GST-Uba pulldown assay, immunoblotting, immunofluorescent staining and a human cathepsin B ELISA assay respectively. The specific cathepsin B inhibitor CA-074Me was used for assessing the role of cathepsin B in lung cancer cell migration. Knockdown of NEDD4 significantly reduced EGF-stimulated cell migration in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) cells. Co-immunoprecipitation assay found that NEDD4 is associated with EGFR complex upon EGF stimulation, and IHC staining indicates that NEDD4 is co-expressed with EGFR in lung adenocarcinoma tumor tissues, suggesting that NEDD4 might mediate lung cancer cell migration by interaction with the EGFR signaling complex. Interestingly, NEDD4 promotes the EGF-induced cathepsin B secretion, possibly through lysosomal exocytosis, as overexpression of the ligase-dead mutant of NEDD4 impedes lysosomal secretion, and knockdown of NEDD4

  15. Migration of human dendritic cells induced by gliadin fragments

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pecharová, Barbara; Jelínková, Lenka; Kamanová, Jana; Tučková, Ludmila

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 39, - (2009), s. 649-649 ISSN 0014-2980. [European Congress of Immunology /2./. 13.09.2009-16.09.2009, Berlin] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : gliadin fragments * celiac disease * migration Subject RIV: EC - Immunology

  16. Strain Stiffening of Fibrillar Collagen during Individual and Collective Cell Migration Identified by AFM Nanoindentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helvert, S. van; Friedl, P.

    2016-01-01

    The multistep process of cell migration requires cells to dynamically couple to extracellular interfaces and generate traction force or friction for displacement of the cell body. When deformed, biopolymer networks, including fibrillar collagen and fibrin, undergo a nonlinear elasticity change that

  17. The impact of NudCD1 on renal carcinoma cell proliferation, migration, and invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, R-J; Wang, N; Cui, G; Chen, Y; Zhong, H; Tang, J

    2018-02-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most common malignant tumor in the urogenital system. Its easily metastatic characteristics greatly reduce the postoperative survival rate. NudCD1, as a proto-oncogene, may be involved in the proliferation, migration, and invasion of renal cell carcinoma cell. This study intends to explore the expression of NudCD1 in renal cancer tissue and its effect on renal cell behavior. NudCD1 expression in RCC tissue was tested Western blot. The cellular localization of NudCD1 was detected by immunohistochemistry (IHC). NudCD1 highly expressed RCC cell line was selected. NudCD1 knockdown or overexpression was performed through cell transfection. Cell proliferation, migration, and invasion were assessed by MTT assay, wound scratch assay, and transwell assay, respectively. NudCD1 mainly located in the cytoplasm and significantly upregulated in RCC tissue compared with adjacent normal control (p < 0.05). NudCD1 expressed highest in A498 cell line among several RCC cell lines. NudCD1 expression was positively correlated with cell proliferation, migration, and invasion in A498. NudCD1 may be treated as a key factor in regulating cell behavior. NudCD1 significantly increased in RCC and was positively correlated with cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. It could be used as an indicator for the early screening and potential treatment target for RCC.

  18. Chemokine CXCL16 Expression Suppresses Migration and Invasiveness and Induces Apoptosis in Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeying Fang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Increasing evidence argues that soluble CXCL16 promotes proliferation, migration, and invasion of cancer cells in vitro. However, the role of transmembrane or cellular CXCL16 in cancer remains relatively unknown. In this study, we determine the function of cellular CXCL16 as tumor suppressor in breast cancer cells. Methods. Expression of cellular CXCL16 in breast cancer cell lines was determined at both RNA and protein levels. In vitro and in vivo studies that overexpressed or downregulated CXCL16 were conducted in breast cancer cells. Results. We report differential expression of cellular CXCL16 in breast cancer cell lines that was negatively correlated with cell invasiveness and migration. Overexpression of CXCL16 in MDA-MB-231 cells led to a decrease in cell invasion and migration and induced apoptosis of the cells; downregulation of CXCL16 in MCF-7 cells increased cell migration and invasiveness. Consistent with the in vitro data, CXCL16 overexpression inhibited tumorigenesis in vivo. Conclusions. Cellular CXCL16 suppresses invasion and metastasis of breast cancer cells in vitro and inhibits tumorigenesis in vivo. Targeting of cellular CXCL16 expression is a potential therapeutic strategy for breast cancer.

  19. 3D computational modelling of cell migration: a mechano-chemo-thermo-electrotaxis approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavi, Seyed Jamaleddin; Doweidar, Mohamed Hamdy; Doblaré, Manuel

    2013-07-21

    Single cell migration constitutes a fundamental phenomenon involved in many biological events such as wound healing, cancer development and tissue regeneration. Several experiments have demonstrated that, besides the mechanical driving force (mechanotaxis), cell migration may be also influenced by chemical, thermal and/or electrical cues. In this paper, we present an extension of a previous model of the same authors adding the effects of chemotaxis, thermotaxis and electrotaxis to the initial mechanotaxis model of cell migration, allowing us to predict cell migration behaviour under different conditions and substrate properties. The present model is based on the balance of effective forces during cell motility in the presence of the several guiding cues. This model has been applied to several numerical experiments to demonstrate the effect of the different drivers onto the cell path and final location within a certain three-dimensional substrate with heterogeneous properties. Our findings indicate that the presence of the chemotaxis, thermotaxis and/or electrotaxis reduce, in general, the random component of cell movement, being this reduction more important in the case of electrotaxis that can be considered a dominating signal during cell migration (besides the underlying mechanical effects). These results are qualitatively in agreement with well-known experimental ones. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Linear array of multi-substrate tracts for simultaneous assessment of cell adhesion, migration, and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Rodriguez, Ricardo A; Krug, Edward L; Reyes, Leticia; Markwald, Roger R

    2017-12-01

    Cell migration, which is central to a wide variety of life processes, involves integration of the extracellular matrix (ECM) with the internal cytoskeleton and motor proteins via receptors spanning the plasma membrane. Cell migration can be induced by a variety of signals, including gradients of external soluble molecules, differences in ECM composition, or electrical gradients. Current in vitro methods to study cell migration only test one substrate at a time. Here, we present a method for assessing cell adhesion, migration, and differentiation in up to 20 different test conditions simultaneously, using only minute amounts of target substrate. Our system, which we call the linear array of multi-substrate cell migration assay (LAMA), has two configurations for direct comparison of one or two cell types in response to an array of ECM constituents under the same culture conditions. This culture model utilizes only nanogram amounts of test substrates and a minimal number of cells, which maximizes the use of limited and expensive test reagents. Moreover, LAMA can also be used for high-throughput screening of potential pharmaceuticals that target ECM-dependent cell behavior and differentiation.

  1. Cyclic AMP regulates the migration and invasion potential of human pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Noah P; Roy, Ishan; Hauser, Andrew D; Wilson, Jessica M; Williams, Carol L; Dwinell, Michael B

    2015-03-01

    Aggressive dissemination and metastasis of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) results in poor prognosis and marked lethality. Rho monomeric G protein levels are increased in pancreatic cancer tissue. As the mechanisms underlying PDAC malignancy are little understood, we investigated the role for cAMP in regulating monomeric G protein regulated invasion and migration of pancreatic cancer cells. Treatment of PDAC cells with cAMP elevating agents that activate adenylyl cyclases, forskolin, protein kinase A (PKA), 6-Bnz-cAMP, or the cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase inhibitor cilostamide significantly decreased migration and Matrigel invasion of PDAC cell lines. Inhibition was dose-dependent and not significantly different between forskolin or cilostamide treatment. cAMP elevating drugs not only blocked basal migration, but similarly abrogated transforming-growth factor-β-directed PDAC cell migration and invasion. The inhibitory effects of cAMP were prevented by the pharmacological blockade of PKA. Drugs that increase cellular cAMP levels decreased levels of active RhoA or RhoC, with a concomitant increase in phosphorylated RhoA. Diminished Rho signaling was correlated with the appearance of thickened cortical actin bands along the perimeter of non-motile forskolin or cilostamide-treated cells. Decreased migration did not reflect alterations in cell growth or programmed cell death. Collectively these data support the notion that increased levels of cAMP specifically hinder PDAC cell motility through F-actin remodeling. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Nucleoskeletal stiffness regulates stem cell migration and differentiation through lamin A/C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liujing; Jiang, Fulin; Qiao, Yini; Li, Hong; Wei, Zhangming; Huang, Tu; Lan, Jingxiang; Xia, Yue; Li, Juan

    2017-12-07

    Stem cell-based tissue engineering provides a prospective strategy to bone tissue repair. Bone tissue repair begins at the recruitment and directional movement of stem cells, and ultimately achieved on the directional differentiation of stem cells. The migration and differentiation of stem cells are regulated by nucleoskeletal stiffness. Mechanical properties of lamin A/C contribute to the nucleoskeletal stiffness and consequently to the regulation of cell migration and differentiation. Nuclear lamin A/C determines cell migration through the regulation of nucleoskeletal stiffness and rigidity and involve in nuclear-cytoskeletal coupling. Moreover, lamin A/C is the essential core module regulating stem cell differentiation. The cells with higher migration ability tend to have enhanced differentiation potential, while the optimum amount of lamin A/C in migration and differentiation of MSCs is in conflict. This contrary phenomenon may be the result of mechanical microenvironment modulation. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Cell migration is another player of the minute virus of mice infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcin, Pierre O.; Panté, Nelly, E-mail: pante@zoology.ubc.ca

    2014-11-15

    The parvovirus minute virus of mice, prototype strain (MVMp), preferentially infects and kills cancer cells. This intrinsic MVMp oncotropism may depend in part on the early stages of MVMp infection. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the early events of MVMp infection in mouse LA9 fibroblasts and a highly invasive mouse mammary tumor cell line derived from polyomavirus middle T antigen-mediated transformation. Using a combination of fluorescence and electron microscopy, we found that various parameters of the cell migration process affect MVMp infection. We show that, after binding to the plasma membrane, MVMp particles rapidly cluster at the leading edge of migrating cells, which exhibit higher levels of MVMp uptake than non-motile cells. Moreover, promoting cell migration on a fibronectin matrix increased MVMp infection, and induction of epithelial–mesenchymal transition allowed MVMp replication in non-permissive epithelial cells. Hence, we propose that cell migration influences the early stages of MVMp infection. - Highlights: • We document early steps of MVMp infection. • We report that a fibronectin matrix promotes MVMp infection. • We show that cellular migration plays a role in MVMp uptake. • We show that epithelial–mesenchymal transition allows MVMp replication.

  4. CCL20 promotes migration and invasiveness of human cancerous breast epithelial cells in primary culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscella, Antonella; Vetrugno, Carla; Marsigliante, Santo

    2017-11-01

    The relation between the tumor and its microenvironment is one of the most interesting and less understood issues. Recently, we showed a role of CCL20 chemokine in proning the healthy tissue neighboring the tumor to carcinogenesis. Besides, tumor-secreted CCL20 induced proliferation, migration, and EMT of healthy cells. In this context, we have studied here if CCL20 had effects on the migration of cancer cells and the intracellular pathways used in breast epithelial cells in primary culture. Using molecular (siRNA) and pharmacological (inhibitors) techniques, we found multiple signaling kinases to be activated and involved in CCL20-induced tumor breast cell migration. CCL20 provoked a 2.5-fold increase of cell migration and invasion; CCL20 also enhanced MMP- 2 and MMP-9 mRNAs/protein expression and activities. Cell migration and invasiveness due to CCL20 significantly decreased when MMP-2 and MMP-9 were inhibited in CCL20-stimulated cells. CCL20 controlled MMP-2 expression through the JAK2/STAT3 pathway, while the expression of MMP-9 occurred by PKC-α that activated, consequently, c-Src, Akt, and finally NF-kB. These results reveal a role for CCL20 also in tumor breast cell and point to CCL20 as a novel therapeutic target in cancer. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Suppression of TRPM7 inhibits proliferation, migration, and invasion of malignant human glioma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Tian-Dong; Li, Ming-Hua; Shen, Jian-Feng; Liu, Ming-Li; Li, Xin-Bo; Sun, Hua-Wei; Branigan, Debbie; Zeng, Zhao; Si, Hong-Fang; Li, Jun; Chen, Jeff; Xiong, Zhi-Gang

    2015-03-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and aggressive primary brain tumor with a dismal prognosis. Despite intensive study on tumor biology, the underlying mechanisms of the unlimited proliferation and progressive local invasion are still poorly understood, and no effective treatment has been developed for GBM patients. We determine the role of TRPM7 channels in the growth, migration, and infiltration of malignant glioma cells. Using a combination of RT-PCR, Western blot, and patch-clamp techniques, we demonstrated the expression of functional TRPM7 channels of A172 cells, a human glioma cell line, as well as in human glioma tissues. Furthermore, we evaluated the role of TRPM7 in growth, migration, and infiltration of A172 cells with MTT and transwell migration and invasion assays. We showed the expression of functional TRPM7 channels in both A172 cells and human glioma tissues. Suppression of TRPM7 expression with TRPM7-siRNA dramatically reduced the proliferation, migration, and invasion of A172 cells. Pharmacological inhibition of TRPM7 channel with 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB) showed a similar effect as TRPM7-siRNA. We demonstrate that human glioma cells express functional TRPM7 channel and that activation of this channel plays an important role in the proliferation, migration, and invasion of malignant glioma cells. TRPM7 channel may represent a novel and promising target for therapeutic intervention of malignant glioma. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Raf Kinase Inhibitory Protein protects cells against locostatin-mediated inhibition of migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne N Shemon

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Raf Kinase Inhibitory Protein (RKIP, also PEBP1, a member of the Phosphatidylethanolamine Binding Protein family, negatively regulates growth factor signaling by the Raf/MAP kinase pathway. Since an organic compound, locostatin, was reported to bind RKIP and inhibit cell migration by a Raf-dependent mechanism, we addressed the role of RKIP in locostatin function.We analyzed locostatin interaction with RKIP and examined the biological consequences of locostatin binding on RKIP function. NMR studies show that a locostatin precursor binds to the conserved phosphatidylethanolamine binding pocket of RKIP. However, drug binding to the pocket does not prevent RKIP association with its inhibitory target, Raf-1, nor affect RKIP phosphorylation by Protein Kinase C at a regulatory site. Similarly, exposure of wild type, RKIP-depleted HeLa cells or RKIP-deficient (RKIP(-/- mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs to locostatin has no effect on MAP kinase activation. Locostatin treatment of wild type MEFs causes inhibition of cell migration following wounding. RKIP deficiency impairs migration further, indicating that RKIP protects cells against locostatin-mediated inhibition of migration. Locostatin treatment of depleted or RKIP(-/- MEFs reveals cytoskeletal disruption and microtubule abnormalities in the spindle.These results suggest that locostatin's effects on cytoskeletal structure and migration are caused through mechanisms independent of its binding to RKIP and Raf/MAP kinase signaling. The protective effect of RKIP against drug inhibition of migration suggests a new role for RKIP in potentially sequestering toxic compounds that may have deleterious effects on cells.

  7. HGF and c-Met Interaction Promotes Migration in Human Chondrosarcoma Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsou, Hsi-Kai; Chen, Hsien-Te; Hung, Ya-Huey; Chang, Chia-Hao; Li, Te-Mao; Fong, Yi-Chin; Tang, Chih-Hsin

    2013-01-01

    Chondrosarcoma is a type of highly malignant tumor with a potent capacity for local invasion and causing distant metastasis. Chondrosarcoma shows a predilection for metastasis to the lungs. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) has been demonstrated to stimulate cancer proliferation, migration, and metastasis. However, the effect of HGF on migration activity of human chondrosarcoma cells is not well known. Here, we found that human chondrosarcoma tissues demonstrated significant expression of HGF, which was higher than that in normal cartilage. We also found that HGF increased the migration and expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 in human chondrosarcoma cells. c-Met inhibitor and siRNA reduced HGF-increased cell migration and MMP-2 expression. HGF treatment resulted in activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3′-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/PKCδ/NF-κB pathway, and HGF-induced expression of MMP-2 and cell migration was inhibited by specific inhibitors or siRNA-knockdown of PI3K, Akt, PKCδ, and NF-κB cascades. Taken together, our results indicated that HGF enhances migration of chondrosarcoma cells by increasing MMP-2 expression through the c-Met receptor/PI3K/Akt/PKCδ/NF-κB signal transduction pathway. PMID:23320110

  8. HGF and c-Met interaction promotes migration in human chondrosarcoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsi-Kai Tsou

    Full Text Available Chondrosarcoma is a type of highly malignant tumor with a potent capacity for local invasion and causing distant metastasis. Chondrosarcoma shows a predilection for metastasis to the lungs. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF has been demonstrated to stimulate cancer proliferation, migration, and metastasis. However, the effect of HGF on migration activity of human chondrosarcoma cells is not well known. Here, we found that human chondrosarcoma tissues demonstrated significant expression of HGF, which was higher than that in normal cartilage. We also found that HGF increased the migration and expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-2 in human chondrosarcoma cells. c-Met inhibitor and siRNA reduced HGF-increased cell migration and MMP-2 expression. HGF treatment resulted in activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase (PI3K/Akt/PKCδ/NF-κB pathway, and HGF-induced expression of MMP-2 and cell migration was inhibited by specific inhibitors or siRNA-knockdown of PI3K, Akt, PKCδ, and NF-κB cascades. Taken together, our results indicated that HGF enhances migration of chondrosarcoma cells by increasing MMP-2 expression through the c-Met receptor/PI3K/Akt/PKCδ/NF-κB signal transduction pathway.

  9. Isolation and identification of stem cells from degenerated human intervertebral discs and their migration characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuhao; Liang, Haifeng; Lee, Soo-Min; Li, Zheng; Zhang, Jian; Fei, Qinming

    2017-02-06

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been isolated and identified separately from the three components of intervertebral disc, i.e. annulus fibrosus (AF), nucleus pulposus (NP), and cartilage endplate (CEP). However, few studies have been carried out to compare the properties of these three kinds of stem cells, especially their migration ability which is essential for their potential clinical application. In this study, MSCs were isolated from AF, NP, and CEP, respectively, of human degenerated discs and identified by surface markers and multilineage differentiation assay at passage 3. These three types of stem cells were named as AF-MSCs, NP-MSCs, and CEP-MSCs. Then, their biological characteristics were compared in terms of proliferation, passage, colony formation, migration, and invasion capacity. Results showed that all the three types of cells were identified as MSCs and had similar characteristics in proliferation, passage, and colony formation capacity. CEP-MSCs showed the highest migration and invasion potency, while NP-MSCs showed the lowest migration ability and almost no invasion potency, suggesting that CEP-MSCs had the most powerful properties of migration and invasion when compared with AF-MSCs and NP-MSCs. It was also found that the expression of CXCR4 was higher in CEP-MSCs than in the other two, suggesting that SDF-1/CXCR4 axis may play significant roles in the migration of these cells.

  10. Talin-1 correlates with reduced invasion and migration in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Kun-Peng; Zhang, Jian-Lin; Ren, Yan-Hong; Qian, Ye-Ben

    2014-01-01

    Talin-1 is a cytoskeleton protein that participates in cell migration and plays a role in tumor formation, migration, and metastasis in different types of cancer. Chinese investigators have observed that the levels of Talin-1 protein and mRNA expression in HCC tissues are significantly lower than in the adjacent non-cancerous tissue. However, Japanese investigators have reported that Talin-1 is upregulated in HCC. Tln2 as homologous gene of Tln-1, which encodes a very similar protein, but the role of Talin-2 is very little known in primary liver cancer (PLC). We investigated whether the expression of Talin-1 in PLC may be associated with the histological subtype as well as the role of Talin-1 in tumor cell invasion and migration using human hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines. We measured the mRNA expression levels of Talin-1 and Talin-2 in five human liver cancer cell lines and normal human liver cell (LO2 cell line) by real-time PCR and the protein expression levels of Talin-1 by Western blot. Migration and invasion of the cells were assessed using transwell assays and cell scratch experiments, respectively, and proliferation was assessed by soft AGAR colony formation. Talin-1 and Talin-2 expression differed significantly between the five human liver cancer cell lines and LO2 cell line (pmigration capabilities of the five cancer cell lines differed significantly (pmigration as well as decreased malignancy in human liver cancer cell lines; the suppression of Talin-1 promotes invasion and migration. In addition, Talin-2 may be correlated with invasion and migration in human hepatocellular carcinoma.

  11. Corneal Stromal Cells use both High- and Low-Contractility Migration Mechanisms in 3-D Collagen Matrices

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Areum; Zhou, Chengxin; Lakshman, Neema; Petroll, W. Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Corneal keratocyte migration can impact both corneal clarity and refractive outcome following injury or refractive surgery. In this study, we investigated how culture conditions, ECM properties, and Rho kinase activity regulate the mechanics of keratocyte migration, using a nested collagen matrix model. Time-lapse imaging demonstrated that both serum and PDGF stimulate keratocyte migration into the outer matrix. Although the velocity of cell migration was similar, cells in serum were bipolar ...

  12. Distinct migration and contact dynamics of resting and IL-2-activated human natural killer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per Erik Olofsson

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells serve as one of the first lines of defense against viral infections and transformed cells. NK cell cytotoxicity is not dependent on antigen presentation by target cells, but is dependent on integration of activating and inhibitory signals triggered by receptor–ligand interactions formed at a tight intercellular contact between the NK and target cell, i.e. the immune synapse. We have studied the single-cell migration behavior and target-cell contact dynamics of resting and IL-2-activated human peripheral blood NK cells. Small populations of NK cells and target cells were confined in microwells and imaged by fluorescence microscopy for >8 h. Only the IL-2-activated population of NK cells showed efficient cytotoxicity against the human embryonic kidney (HEK 293T target cells. We found that although the average migration speeds were comparable, activated NK cells showed significantly more dynamic migration behavior, with more frequent transitions between periods of low and high motility. Resting NK cells formed fewer and weaker contacts with target cells, which manifested as shorter conjugation times and in many cases a complete lack of post-conjugation attachment to target cells. Activated NK cells were approximately twice as big as the resting cells, displayed a more migratory phenotype, and were more likely to employ motile scanning of the target cell surface during conjugation. Taken together, our experiments quantify, at the single-cell level, how activation by IL-2 leads to altered NK cell cytotoxicity, migration behavior and contact dynamics.

  13. MMP13 mediates cell cycle progression in melanocytes and melanoma cells: in vitro studies of migration and proliferation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meierjohann, S.; Hufnagel, A.; Wende, E.; Kleinschmidt, M.A.; Wolf, K. van der; Friedl, P.H.A.; Gaubatz, S.; Schartl, M.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Melanoma cells are usually characterized by a strong proliferative potential and efficient invasive migration. Among the multiple molecular changes that are recorded during progression of this disease, aberrant activation of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK) is often observed. Activation

  14. Specification of leading and trailing cell features during collective migration in the Drosophila trachea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebreton, Gaëlle; Casanova, Jordi

    2014-01-15

    The role of tip and rear cells in collective migration is still a matter of debate and their differences at the cytoskeletal level are poorly understood. Here, we analysed these issues in the Drosophila trachea, an organ that develops from the collective migration of clusters of cells that respond to Branchless (Bnl), a fibroblast growth factor (FGF) homologue expressed in surrounding tissues. We track individual cells in the migratory cluster and characterise their features and unveil two prototypical types of cytoskeletal organisation that account for tip and rear cells respectively. Indeed, once the former are specified, they remain as such throughout migration. Furthermore, we show that FGF signalling in a single tip cell can trigger the migration of the cells in the branch. Finally, we found specific Rac activation at the tip cells and analysed how FGF-independent cell features, such as adhesion and motility, act on coupling the behaviour of trailing and tip cells. Thus, the combined effect of FGF promoting leading cell behaviour and the modulation of cell properties in a cluster can account for the wide range of migratory events driven by FGF.

  15. beta-Adrenoreceptor antagonists reduce cancer cell proliferation, invasion, and migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Işeri, Ozlem Darcansoy; Sahin, Feride Iffet; Terzi, Yunus Kasım; Yurtcu, Erkan; Erdem, S Remzi; Sarialioglu, Faik

    2014-11-01

    Propranolol, atenolol, and ICI118,551 are non-selective β-adrenergic receptor (AR), β1-AR, and β2-AR antagonists, respectively. We investigated the efficacy of propranolol, atenolol, and ICI118,551 on proliferation, migration, and invasion of non-stimulated breast (MCF7), colon (HT-29), and hepatocellular (HepG2) cancer cells. β-AR expression profiling of cells was performed by real time PCR. Cell proliferation was determined by MTT. Boyden chamber and scratch assays were performed to evaluate invasion and migration. All cell lines expressed β-ARs. ICI118,551 was the most cytotoxic, whereas atenolol was the least effective β-AR antagonist for 24, 48, and 72 h. Cell invasion was inhibited by ICI118,551 (45, 46, and 50% for MCF7, HT29, and HepG2, respectively) and propranolol (72, 65, and 90% for MCF7, HT29, and HepG2, respectively). Propranolol, atenolol, and ICI118,551 reduced migration of MCF7, HT-29, and HepG2 cells to varying extents depending on the application concentration and duration. Propranolol and atenolol reduced migration of MCF7 and HT-29 in a concentration-dependent manner, whereas migration of these cells decreased after 48 and 72 h of ICI118,551 applications. Beta2-AR antagonist seemed to be the most cytotoxic β-blocker on non-stimulated cancer cells. Propranolol and ICI118,551 were more effective than atenolol in inhibiting invasion and migration of non-stimulated MCF7 and HT-29 cells; ICI118,551 being the most potent. Concordantly, β2-selective blockage seemed to be more effective for non-stimulated cells. Effect of the selective β-AR antagonists showed variation depending on the concentration, incubation time, and histological origin of cells.

  16. The Migration of Cancer Cells in Gradually Varying Chemical Gradients and Mechanical Constraints

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    Smitha M. N. Rao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a novel approach to study cell migration under physical stresses by utilizing established growth factor chemotaxis. This was achieved by studying cell migration in response to epidermal growth factor (EGF chemoattraction in a gradually tapered space, imposing mechanical stresses. The device consisted of two 5-mm-diameter chambers connected by ten 600 µm-long and 10 µm-high tapered microchannels. The taper region gradually changes the width of the channel. The channels tapered from 20 µm to 5 µm over a transition length of 50 µm at a distance of 250 µm from one of the chambers. The chemoattractant drove cell migration into the narrow confines of the tapered channels, while the mechanical gradient clearly altered the migration of cells. Cells traversing the channels from the wider to narrow-end and vice versa were observed using time-lapsed imaging. Our results indicated that the impact of physical stress on cell migration patterns may be cell type specific.

  17. Intracranial Tumor Cell Migration and the Development of Multiple Brain Metastases in Malignant Melanoma

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    Trude G. Simonsen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: A majority of patients with melanoma brain metastases develop multiple lesions, and these patients show particularly poor prognosis. To develop improved treatment strategies, detailed insights into the biology of melanoma brain metastases, and particularly the development of multiple lesions, are needed. The purpose of this preclinical investigation was to study melanoma cell migration within the brain after cell injection into a well-defined intracerebral site. METHODS: A-07, D-12, R-18, and U-25 human melanoma cells transfected with green fluorescent protein were injected stereotactically into the right cerebral hemisphere of nude mice. Moribund mice were killed and autopsied, and the brain was evaluated by fluorescence imaging or histological examination. RESULTS: Intracerebral inoculation of melanoma cells produced multiple lesions involving all regions of the brain, suggesting that the cells were able to migrate over substantial distances within the brain. Multiple modes of transport were identified, and all transport modes were observed in all four melanoma lines. Thus, the melanoma cells were passively transported via the flow of cerebrospinal fluid in the meninges and ventricles, they migrated actively along leptomeningeal and brain parenchymal blood vessels, and they migrated actively along the surfaces separating different brain compartments. CONCLUSION: Migration of melanoma cells after initial arrest, extravasation, and growth at a single location within the brain may contribute significantly to the development of multiple melanoma brain metastases.

  18. Research Techniques Made Simple: Analysis of Collective Cell Migration Using the Wound Healing Assay.

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    Grada, Ayman; Otero-Vinas, Marta; Prieto-Castrillo, Francisco; Obagi, Zaidal; Falanga, Vincent

    2017-02-01

    Collective cell migration is a hallmark of wound repair, cancer invasion and metastasis, immune responses, angiogenesis, and embryonic morphogenesis. Wound healing is a complex cellular and biochemical process necessary to restore structurally damaged tissue. It involves dynamic interactions and crosstalk between various cell types, interaction with extracellular matrix molecules, and regulated production of soluble mediators and cytokines. In cutaneous wound healing, skin cells migrate from the wound edges into the wound to restore skin integrity. Analysis of cell migration in vitro is a useful assay to quantify alterations in cell migratory capacity in response to experimental manipulations. Although several methods exist to study cell migration (such as Boyden chamber assay, barrier assays, and microfluidics-based assays), in this short report we will explain the wound healing assay, also known as the "in vitro scratch assay" as a simple, versatile, and cost-effective method to study collective cell migration and wound healing. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of Emdogain on proliferation and migration of different periodontal tissue-associated cells.

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    Qu, Zhe; Laky, Markus; Ulm, Christian; Matejka, Michael; Dard, Michel; Andrukhov, Oleh; Rausch-fan, Xiaohui

    2010-06-01

    Although Emdogain is widely used as a gel in periodontal therapy, the exact mechanisms underlying its regenerative ability still need to be further investigated. Therefore, we tested in vitro the effect of the product Emdogain on proliferation, viability, and migration of various human cell types of periodontium. Proliferation and viability of alveolar osteoblasts (AOBs), epithelial cell line HSC-2, and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were measured using [(3)H]-thymidine uptake and 3,4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT)-assay, respectively. Cell migration was investigated in microchemotaxis chamber. The proliferation and viability of AOB, HSC-2, and HUVECs were significantly stimulated by Emdogain (12.5-250 microg/mL) in direct relationship with the amount of product present in the cell culture medium. Cell migration was stimulated in AOB and HUVECs depending on Emdogain amount. In contrast, in HSC-2 cells the migration was stimulated only by less than 50 microg/mL of Emdogain, whereas at higher amounts this stimulating effect was either diminished or absent. Emdogain stimulates proliferation, viability, and migration of AOB, HSC-2, and HUVECs in vitro. This biological versatility of Emdogain could correspond to an essential mechanism underlying its ability to promote periodontal regeneration. Copyright 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. An artificial blood vessel implanted three-dimensional microsystem for modeling transvascular migration of tumor cells.

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    Wang, Xue-Ying; Pei, Ying; Xie, Min; Jin, Zi-He; Xiao, Ya-Shi; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Li-Na; Li, Yan; Huang, Wei-Hua

    2015-02-21

    Reproducing a tumor microenvironment consisting of blood vessels and tumor cells for modeling tumor invasion in vitro is particularly challenging. Here, we report an artificial blood vessel implanted 3D microfluidic system for reproducing transvascular migration of tumor cells. The transparent, porous and elastic artificial blood vessels are obtained by constructing polysaccharide cellulose-based microtubes using a chitosan sacrificial template, and possess excellent cytocompatibility, permeability, and mechanical characteristics. The artificial blood vessels are then fully implanted into the collagen matrix to reconstruct the 3D microsystem for modeling transvascular migration of tumor cells. Well-defined simulated vascular lumens were obtained by proliferation of the human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) lining the artificial blood vessels, which enables us to reproduce structures and functions of blood vessels and replicate various hemodynamic parameters. Based on this model, the adhesion and transvascular migration of tumor cells across the artificial blood vessel have been well reproduced.

  1. Migracins A and B, new inhibitors of cancer cell migration, produced by Streptomyces sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Yuhei; Iinuma, Hironobu; Ikeda, Yoko; Igarashi, Masayuki; Hatano, Masaki; Kinoshita, Naoko; Ukaji, Tamami; Simizu, Siro; Umezawa, Kazuo

    2013-04-01

    In the course of screening for breast cancer cell migration inhibitors, we isolated two novel compounds, migracins A and B from the culture broth of Streptomyces sp. MI264-NF2. Their structures are related to those of luminacins previously isolated from Streptomyces. Migracins A and B inhibited breast cancer cell migration, monitored by wound healing assay with IC50 values of 1.31 and 1.99 μg ml(-1), respectively, in human breast carcinoma MDA-MB-231 cells without showing any cytotoxicity. Migracins also inhibited the migration of human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells and human fibrosarcoma HT-1080 cells. Therefore, migracins may become new cancer metastasis inhibitors.

  2. Role of peptidylarginine deiminase 2 (PAD2) in mammary carcinoma cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horibata, Sachi; Rogers, Katherine E; Sadegh, David; Anguish, Lynne J; McElwee, John L; Shah, Pragya; Thompson, Paul R; Coonrod, Scott A

    2017-05-26

    Penetration of the mammary gland basement membrane by cancer cells is a crucial first step in tumor invasion. Using a mouse model of ductal carcinoma in situ, we previously found that inhibition of peptidylarginine deiminase 2 (PAD2, aka PADI2) activity appears to maintain basement membrane integrity in xenograft tumors. The goal of this investigation was to gain insight into the mechanisms by which PAD2 mediates this process. For our study, we modulated PAD2 activity in mammary ductal carcinoma cells by lentiviral shRNA-mediated depletion, lentiviral-mediated PAD2 overexpression, or PAD inhibition and explored the effects of these treatments on changes in cell migration and cell morphology. We also used these PAD2-modulated cells to test whether PAD2 may be required for EGF-induced cell migration. To determine how PAD2 might promote tumor cell migration in vivo, we tested the effects of PAD2 inhibition on the expression of several cell migration mediators in MCF10DCIS.com xenograft tumors. In addition, we tested the effect of PAD2 inhibition on EGF-induced ductal invasion and elongation in primary mouse mammary organoids. Lastly, using a transgenic mouse model, we investigated the effects of PAD2 overexpression on mammary gland development. Our results indicate that PAD2 depletion or inhibition suppresses cell migration and alters the morphology of MCF10DCIS.com cells. In addition, we found that PAD2 depletion suppresses the expression of the cytoskeletal regulatory proteins RhoA, Rac1, and Cdc42 and also promotes a mesenchymal to epithelial-like transition in tumor cells with an associated increase in the cell adhesion marker, E-cadherin. Our mammary gland organoid study found that inhibition of PAD2 activity suppresses EGF-induced ductal invasion. In vivo, we found that PAD2 overexpression causes hyperbranching in the developing mammary gland. Together, these results suggest that PAD2 plays a critical role in breast cancer cell migration. Our findings that EGF

  3. Mechanical roles of apical constriction, cell elongation, and cell migration during neural tube formation in Xenopus.

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    Inoue, Yasuhiro; Suzuki, Makoto; Watanabe, Tadashi; Yasue, Naoko; Tateo, Itsuki; Adachi, Taiji; Ueno, Naoto

    2016-12-01

    Neural tube closure is an important and necessary process during the development of the central nervous system. The formation of the neural tube structure from a flat sheet of neural epithelium requires several cell morphogenetic events and tissue dynamics to account for the mechanics of tissue deformation. Cell elongation changes cuboidal cells into columnar cells, and apical constriction then causes them to adopt apically narrow, wedge-like shapes. In addition, the neural plate in Xenopus is stratified, and the non-neural cells in the deep layer (deep cells) pull the overlying superficial cells, eventually bringing the two layers of cells to the midline. Thus, neural tube closure appears to be a complex event in which these three physical events are considered to play key mechanical roles. To test whether these three physical events are mechanically sufficient to drive neural tube formation, we employed a three-dimensional vertex model and used it to simulate the process of neural tube closure. The results suggest that apical constriction cued the bending of the neural plate by pursing the circumference of the apical surface of the neural cells. Neural cell elongation in concert with apical constriction further narrowed the apical surface of the cells and drove the rapid folding of the neural plate, but was insufficient for complete neural tube closure. Migration of the deep cells provided the additional tissue deformation necessary for closure. To validate the model, apical constriction and cell elongation were inhibited in Xenopus laevis embryos. The resulting cell and tissue shapes resembled the corresponding simulation results.

  4. Hypoxia impairs primordial germ cell migration in zebrafish (Danio rerio embryos.

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    Kwok Hong Lo

    Full Text Available As a global environmental concern, hypoxia is known to be associated with many biological and physiological impairments in aquatic ecosystems. Previous studies have mainly focused on the effect of hypoxia in adult animals. However, the effect of hypoxia and the underlying mechanism of how hypoxia affects embryonic development of aquatic animals remain unclear.In the current study, the effect of hypoxia on primordial germ cell (PGC migration in zebrafish embryos was investigated. Hypoxic embryos showed PGC migration defect as indicated by the presence of mis-migrated ectopic PGCs. Insulin-like growth factor (IGF signaling is required for embryonic germ line development. Using real-time PCR, we found that the mRNA expression levels of insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP-1, an inhibitor of IGF bioactivity, were significantly increased in hypoxic embryos. Morpholino knockdown of IGFBP-1 rescued the PGC migration defect phenotype in hypoxic embryos, suggesting the role of IGFBP-1 in inducing PGC mis-migration.This study provides novel evidence that hypoxia disrupts PGC migration during embryonic development in fish. IGF signaling is shown to be one of the possible mechanisms for the causal link between hypoxia and PGC migration. We propose that hypoxia causes PGC migration defect by inhibiting IGF signaling through the induction of IGFBP-1.

  5. Hexagonal micron scale pillars influence epithelial cell adhesion, morphology, proliferation, migration, and cytoskeletal arrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nematollahi, M; Hamilton, D W; Jaeger, N J; Brunette, D M

    2009-10-01

    A desirable attribute of implants penetrating epithelium is the inhibition of downward epithelial migration. Simple grooved topographies can inhibit this migration either directly or indirectly by promoting connective tissue attachment, but few studies have focused on the direct effect of geometrically complex topographies on epithelial behavior. Therefore, we examined the influence of novel topographies comprising square floors surrounded by six-sided pillars on periodontal ligament epithelial cell adhesion, morphology, cytoskeletal organization, and migration. Relative to cells on smooth surface, epithelial cells on the pillar substrata adhered closely, exhibited reduced proliferation, had a reduced velocity, but higher persistence. Vinculin staining demonstrated that cells formed mature adhesions on the pillar tops, but smaller punctate adhesion in the gaps and on the pillar walls. Overall more mature adhesions were found on pillars compared to smooth surfaces, which may account for the reduced speed of migration limited on the pillars. F-actin stress fibers were predominantly found on pillar tops within 6 h, whereas microtubules (MTs) had a tendency to form in the gaps between the six-sided pillars. In conclusion, microfabricated pillars altered epithelial migration in ways that could prove useful in inhibition of epithelial downward migration on transmucosal implants.

  6. Confinement and low adhesion induce fast amoeboid migration of slow mesenchymal cells.

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    Liu, Yan-Jun; Le Berre, Maël; Lautenschlaeger, Franziska; Maiuri, Paolo; Callan-Jones, Andrew; Heuzé, Mélina; Takaki, Tohru; Voituriez, Raphaël; Piel, Matthieu

    2015-02-12

    The mesenchymal-amoeboid transition (MAT) was proposed as a mechanism for cancer cells to adapt their migration mode to their environment. While the molecular pathways involved in this transition are well documented, the role of the microenvironment in the MAT is still poorly understood. Here, we investigated how confinement and adhesion affect this transition. We report that, in the absence of focal adhesions and under conditions of confinement, mesenchymal cells can spontaneously switch to a fast amoeboid migration phenotype. We identified two main types of fast migration--one involving a local protrusion and a second involving a myosin-II-dependent mechanical instability of the cell cortex that leads to a global cortical flow. Interestingly, transformed cells are more prone to adopt this fast migration mode. Finally, we propose a generic model that explains migration transitions and predicts a phase diagram of migration phenotypes based on three main control parameters: confinement, adhesion, and contractility. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of conditioned medium from LL-37 treated adipose stem cells on human fibroblast migration.

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    Yang, Eun-Jung; Bang, Sa-Ik

    2017-07-01

    Adipose stem cell-conditioned medium may promote human dermal fibroblast (HDF) proliferation and migration by activating paracrine peptides during the re-epithelization phase of wound healing. Human antimicrobial peptide LL-37 is upregulated in the skin epithelium as part of the normal response to injury. The effects of conditioned medium (CM) from LL-37 treated adipose stem cells (ASCs) on cutaneous wound healing, including the mediation of fibroblast migration, remain to be elucidated, therefore the aim of the present study was to determine how ASCs would react to an LL-37-rich microenvironment and if CM from LL-37 treated ASCs may influence the migration of HDFs. The present study conducted migration assays with HDFs treated with CM from LL-37 treated ASCs. Expression of CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4), which controls the recruitment of HDFs, was analyzed at the mRNA and protein levels. To further characterize the stimulatory effects of LL-37 on ASCs, the expression of stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α), a CXC chemokine, was investigated. CM from LL-37-treated ASCs induced migration of HDFs in a time- and dose-dependent manner, with a maximum difference in migration observed 24 h following stimulation with LL-37 at a concentration of 10 µg/ml. The HDF migration and the expression of CXCR4 in fibroblasts was markedly increased upon treatment with CM from LL-37-treated ASCs compared with CM from untreated ASCs. SDF-1α expression was markedly increased in CM from LL-37 treated ASCs. It was additionally observed that SDF-1α blockade significantly reduced HDF migration. These findings suggest the feasibility of CM from LL-37-treated ASCs as a potential therapeutic for human dermal fibroblast migration.

  8. TRIM16 inhibits proliferation and migration through regulation of interferon beta 1 in melanoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Selina K.; Koach, Jessica; Tan, Owen; Liu, Bing; Carter, Daniel R.; Wilmott, James S.; Yosufi, Benafsha; Haydu, Lauren E.; Mann, Graham J.; Thompson, John F.; Long, Georgina V.; Liu, Tao; McArthur, Grant; Zhang, Xu Dong; Scolyer, Richard A.; Cheung, Belamy B.; Marshall, Glenn M.

    2014-01-01

    High basal or induced expression of the tripartite motif protein, TRIM16, leads to reduce cell growth and migration of neuroblastoma and skin squamous cell carcinoma cells. However, the role of TRIM16 in melanoma is currently unknown. TRIM16 protein levels were markedly reduced in human melanoma cell lines, compared with normal human epidermal melanocytes due to both DNA methylation and reduced protein stability. TRIM16 knockdown strongly increased cell migration in normal human epidermal melanocytes, while TRIM16 overexpression reduced cell migration and proliferation of melanoma cells in an interferon beta 1 (IFNβ1)-dependent manner. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed TRIM16 directly bound the IFNβ1 gene promoter. Low level TRIM16 expression in 91 melanoma patient samples, strongly correlated with lymph node metastasis, and, predicted poor patient prognosis in a separate cohort of 170 melanoma patients with lymph node metastasis. The BRAF inhibitor, vemurafenib, increased TRIM16 protein levels in melanoma cells in vitro, and induced growth arrest in BRAF-mutant melanoma cells in a TRIM16-dependent manner. High levels of TRIM16 in melanoma tissues from patients treated with Vemurafenib correlated with clinical response. Our data, for the first time, demonstrates TRIM16 is a marker of cell migration and metastasis, and a novel treatment target in melanoma. PMID:25333256

  9. [Grape seed proanthocyanidins inhibits the invasion and migration of A549 lung cancer cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yehan; Ye, Xiufeng; Shi, Yao; Wang, Ke; Wan, Dan

    2016-02-01

    To explore the effect of grape seed proanthocyanidins (GSPs) on the invasion and migration of A549 lung cancer cells and the underlying mechanism. Trypan blue dye exclusion assay was used to determine the cytotoxic effect of varying doses of GSPs on the BEAS-2B normal human pulmonary epithelial cells. After treated with 0, 10, 20, 40, 80 μg/mL GSP, the proliferation of A549 cells was detected by MTT assay; the invasion and migration of A549 cells were determined by Transwell(TM) assay and scratch wound assay, respectively. The levels of epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR), E-cadherin, N-cadherin in A549 cells treated with GSPs were detected by Western blotting. (0-40) μg/mL GSPs had no significant toxic effect on BEAS-2B cells, while 80 μg/mL GSPs had significant cytotoxicity to BEAS-2B cells. The proliferation of A549 cells was significantly inhibited within limited dosage in a dose-dependent manner, and the abilities of invasion and migration of A549 cells were also inhibited. Western blotting showed that the expression of EGFR and N-cadherin decreased, while E-cadherin increased after GSPs treatment. GSPs could inhibit the abilities of proliferation, invasion and migration of A549 cells, which might be related to the dow-regulation of EGFR and N-cadherin and the up-regulation of E-cadherin.

  10. Effect of acetaminophen on osteoblastic differentiation and migration of MC3T3-E1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatsu, Yoshihiro; Nakagawa, Fumio; Higashi, Sen; Ohsumi, Tomoko; Shiiba, Shunji; Watanabe, Seiji; Takeuchi, Hiroshi

    2017-07-15

    N-acetyl-p-aminophenol (APAP, acetaminophen, paracetamol) is a widely used analgesic/antipyretic with weak inhibitory effects on cyclooxygenase (COX) compared to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). The mechanism of action of APAP is mediated by its metabolite that activates transient receptor potential channels, including transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and TRP ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) or the cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1). However, the exact molecular mechanism and target underlying the cellular actions of APAP remain unclear. Therefore, we investigated the effect of APAP on osteoblastic differentiation and cell migration, with a particular focus on TRP channels and CB1. Effects of APAP on osteoblastic differentiation and cell migration of MC3T3-E1, a mouse pre-osteoblast cell line, were assessed by the increase in alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, and both wound-healing and transwell-migration assays, respectively. APAP dose-dependently inhibited osteoblastic differentiation, which was well correlated with the effects on COX activity compared with other NSAIDs. In contrast, cell migration was promoted by APAP, and this effect was not correlated with COX inhibition. None of the agonists or antagonists of TRP channels and the CB receptor affected the APAP-induced cell migration, while the effect of APAP on cell migration was abolished by down-regulating TRPV4 gene expression. APAP inhibited osteoblastic differentiation via COX inactivation while it promoted cell migration independently of previously known targets such as COX, TRPV1, TRPA1 channels, and CB receptors, but through the mechanism involving TRPV4. APAP may have still unidentified molecular targets that modify cellular functions. Copyright © 2017 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  11. FAK phosphorylation plays a central role in thrombin-induced RPE cell migration.

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    Aguilar-Solis, E D; Lee-Rivera, I; Álvarez-Arce, A; López, E; López-Colomé, A M

    2017-08-01

    The migration of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells is an important step in various pathologic conditions including subretinal neovascularization (SRN), proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) and, importantly, as a consequence of retinal surgery. Therefore, the elucidation of the mechanisms underlying RPE trans-differentiation and migration is essential for devising effective treatments aimed to the prevention of these disorders. A common event in these pathologies is the alteration of the blood-retina barrier (BRB), which allows the interaction of RPE cells with thrombin, a pro-inflammatory protease contained in serum. Our previous work has demonstrated that thrombin induces RPE cell cytoskeletal remodeling and migration, hallmark processes in the development of PVR; however, the molecular mechanisms involved are still unclear. Cell migration requires the disassembly of focal adhesions induced by Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) phosphorylation, together with the formation of actin stress fibers. The aim of the present work was to identify thrombin-activated signaling pathways leading to FAK phosphorylation and to determine FAK participation in thrombin-induced RPE cell migration. Results demonstrate that the activation of PAR1 by thrombin induces FAK autophosphorylation at Y397 and the subsequent phosphorylation of Y576/577 within the activation loop. FAK phosphorylation was shown to be under the control of c/nPKC and PI3K/PKC-ζ, as well as by Rho/ROCK, since the inhibition of these pathways prevented thrombin-induced FAK phosphorylation and the consequent disassembly of focal adhesions, in parallel to FAK-dependent actin stress fiber formation and RPE cell migration. These findings demonstrate, for the first time, that thrombin stimulation of RPE cell transformation and migration are regulated by FAK tyrosine phosphorylation. Thus, targeting FAK phosphorylation may provide a strategical basis for PVR treatment. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Interleukin-32α induces migration of human melanoma cells through downregulation of E-cadherin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joohyun; Kim, Kyung Eun; Cheon, Soyoung; Song, Ju Han; Houh, Younkyung; Kim, Tae Sung; Gil, Minchan; Lee, Kyung Jin; Kim, Seonghan; Kim, Daejin; Hur, Dae Young; Yang, Yoolhee; Bang, Sa Ik; Park, Hyun Jeong; Cho, Daeho

    2016-10-04

    Interleukin (IL)-32α, the shortest isoform of proinflammatory cytokine IL-32, is associated with various inflammatory diseases and cancers. However, its involvement in human melanoma is not understood. To determine the effect of IL-32α in melanoma, IL-32α levels were examined in human melanoma cell lines that exhibit different migratory abilities. IL-32α levels were higher in human melanoma cell lines with more migratory ability. An IL-32α-overexpressing G361 human melanoma cell line was generated to investigate the effect of IL-32α on melanoma migration. IL-32α-overexpressing G361 cells (G361-IL-32α) exhibit an increased migratory ability compared to vector control cells (G361-vector). To identify factors involved in IL-32α-induced migration, we compared expression of E-cadherin in G361-vector and G361-IL-32α cells. We observed decreased levels of E-cadherin in G361-IL-32α cells, resulting in F-actin polymerization. To further investigate signaling pathways related to IL-32α-induced migration, we treated G361-vector and G361-IL-32α cells with PD98059, a selective MEK inhibitor. Inhibition of Erk1/2 by PD98059 restored E-cadherin expression and decreased IL-32α-induced migration. In addition, cell invasiveness of G361-IL-32α cells was tested using an in vivo lung metastasis model. As results, lung metastasis was significantly increased by IL-32α overexpression. Taken together, these data indicate that IL-32α induced human melanoma migration via Erk1/2 activation, which repressed E-cadherin expression. Our findings suggest that IL-32α is a novel regulator of migration in melanoma.

  13. Migration of myeloid cells during inflammation is differentially regulated by the cell surface receptors Slamf1 and Slamf8.

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    Guoxing Wang

    Full Text Available Previous studies have demonstrated that the cell surface receptor Slamf1 (CD150 is requisite for optimal NADPH-oxidase (Nox2 dependent reactive oxygen species (ROS production by phagocytes in response to Gram- bacteria. By contrast, Slamf8 (CD353 is a negative regulator of ROS in response to Gram+ and Gram- bacteria. Employing in vivo migration after skin sensitization, induction of peritonitis, and repopulation of the small intestine demonstrates that in vivo migration of Slamf1-/- dendritic cells and macrophages is reduced, as compared to wt mice. By contrast, in vivo migration of Slamf8-/- dendritic cells, macrophages and neutrophils is accelerated. These opposing effects of Slamf1 and Slamf8 are cell-intrinsic as judged by in vitro migration in transwell chambers in response to CCL19, CCL21 or CSF-1. Importantly, inhibiting ROS production of Slamf8-/- macrophages by diphenyleneiodonium chloride blocks this in vitro migration. We conclude that Slamf1 and Slamf8 govern ROS-dependent innate immune responses of myeloid cells, thus modulating migration of these cells during inflammation in an opposing manner.

  14. Cell migration is regulated by AGE-RAGE interaction in human oral cancer cells in vitro.

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    Shun-Yao Ko

    Full Text Available Advanced glycation end products (AGEs are produced in an irreversible non-enzymatic reaction of carbohydrates and proteins. Patients with diabetes mellitus (DM are known to have elevated AGE levels, which is viewed as a risk factor of diabetes-related complications. In a clinical setting, it has been shown that patients with oral cancer in conjunction with DM have a higher likelihood of cancer metastasis and lower cancer survival rates. AGE-RAGE (a receptor of AGEs is also correlated with metastasis and angiogenesis. Recent studies have suggested that the malignancy of cancer may be enhanced by glyceraldehyde-derived AGEs; however, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. This study examined the apparently close correlation between AGE-RAGE and the malignancy of SAS oral cancer cell line. In this study, AGEs increased ERK phosphorylation, enhanced cell migration, and promoted the expression of RAGE, MMP2, and MMP9. Using PD98059, RAGE antibody, and RAGE RNAi to block RAGE pathway resulted in the inhibition of ERK phosphorylation. Cell migration, MMP2 and MMP9 expression were also reduced by this treatment. Our findings demonstrate the importance of AGE-RAGE with regard to the malignancy of oral cancer, and help to explain the poor prognosis of DM subjects with oral cancer.

  15. Visfatin Mediates SCLC Cells Migration across Brain Endothelial Cells through Upregulation of CCL2

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    Tingting Liu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC is characterized as an aggressive tumor with brain metastasis. Although preventing SCLC metastasis to the brain is immensely important for survival, the molecular mechanisms of SCLC cells penetrating the blood–brain barrier (BBB are largely unknown. Recently, visfatin has been considered as a novel pro-inflammatory adipocytokine involved in various cancers. Herein, we present evidence that elevated levels of visfatin in the serum of SCLC patients were associated with brain metastasis, and visfain was increased in NCI-H446 cells, a SCLC cell line, during interacting with human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC. Using in vitro BBB model, we found that visfatin could promote NCI-H446 cells migration across HBMEC monolayer, while the effect was inhibited by knockdown of visfatin. Furthermore, our findings indicated that CC chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2 was involved in visfatin-mediated NCI-H446 cells transendothelial migtation. Results also showed that the upregulation of CCL2 in the co-culture system was reversed by blockade of visfatin. In particular, visfatin-induced CCL2 was attenuated by specific inhibitor of PI3K/Akt signaling in NCI-H446 cells. Taken together, we demonstrated that visfatin was a prospective target for SCLC metastasis to brain, and understanding the molecular mediators would lead to effective strategies for inhibition of SCLC brain metastasis.

  16. The urokinase receptor takes control of cell migration by recruiting integrins and FPR1 on the cell surface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Gorrasi

    Full Text Available The receptor (uPAR of the urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA is crucial in cell migration since it concentrates uPA proteolytic activity at the cell surface, binds vitronectin and associates to integrins. uPAR cross-talk with receptors for the formylated peptide fMLF (fMLF-Rs has been reported; however, cell-surface uPAR association to fMLF-Rs on the cell membrane has never been explored in detail. We now show that uPAR co-localizes at the cell-surface and co-immunoprecipitates with the high-affinity fMLF-R, FPR1, in uPAR-transfected HEK-293 (uPAR-293 cells. uPAR/β1 integrin and FPR1/β1 integrin co-localization was also observed. Serum or the WKYMVm peptide (W Pep, a FPR1 ligand, strongly increased all observed co-localizations in uPAR-293 cells, including FPR1/β1 integrin co-localization. By contrast, a low FPR1/β1 integrin co-localization was observed in uPAR-negative vector-transfected HEK-293 (V-293 cells, that was not increased by serum or W Pep stimulations. The role of uPAR interactions in cell migration was then explored. Both uPAR-293 and V-293 control cells efficiently migrated toward serum or purified EGF. However, cell treatments impairing uPAR interactions with fMLF-Rs or integrins, or inhibiting specific cell-signaling mediators abrogated uPAR-293 cell migration, without exerting any effect on V-293 control cells. Accordingly, uPAR depletion by a uPAR-targeting siRNA or uPAR blocking with an anti-uPAR polyclonal antibody in cells constitutively expressing high uPAR levels totally impaired their migration toward serum. Altogether, these results suggest that both uPAR-positive and uPAR-negative cells are able to migrate toward serum; however, uPAR expression renders cell migration totally and irreversibly uPAR-dependent, since it is completely inhibited by uPAR blocking. We propose that uPAR takes control of cell migration by recruiting fMLF-Rs and β1 integrins, thus promoting their co-localization at the cell-surface and

  17. Collective epithelial cell sheet adhesion and migration on polyelectrolyte multilayers with uniform and gradients of compliance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, Jessica S. [Department of Biological Science, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306 (United States); Schlenoff, Joseph B. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306 (United States); Keller, Thomas C.S., E-mail: tkeller@bio.fsu.edu [Department of Biological Science, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306 (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMUs) are tunable thin films that could serve as coatings for biomedical implants. PEMUs built layer by layer with the polyanion poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) modified with a photosensitive 4-(2-hydroxyethoxy) benzophenone (PAABp) group and the polycation poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) are mechanically tunable by UV irradiation, which forms covalent bonds between the layers and increases PEMU stiffness. PAH-terminated PEMUs (PAH-PEMUs) that were uncrosslinked, UV-crosslinked to a uniform stiffness, or UV-crosslinked with an edge mask or through a neutral density optical gradient filter to form continuous compliance gradients were used to investigate how differences in PEMU stiffness affect the adhesion and migration of epithelial cell sheets from scales of the fish Poecilia sphenops (Black Molly) and Carassius auratus (Comet Goldfish). During the progressive collective cell migration, the edge cells (also known as ‘leader’ cells) in the sheets on softer uncrosslinked PEMUs and less crosslinked regions of the gradient formed more actin filaments and vinculin-containing adherens junctions and focal adhesions than formed in the sheet cells on stiffer PEMUs or glass. During sheet migration, the ratio of edge cell to internal cell (also known as ‘follower’ cells) motilities were greater on the softer PEMUs than on the stiffer PEMUs or glass, causing tension to develop across the sheet and periods of retraction, during which the edge cells lost adhesion to the substrate and regions of the sheet retracted toward the more adherent internal cell region. These retraction events were inhibited by the myosin II inhibitor Blebbistatin, which reduced the motility velocity ratios to those for sheets on the stiffer PEMUs. Blebbistatin also caused disassembly of actin filaments, reorganization of focal adhesions, increased cell spreading at the leading edge, as well as loss of edge cell-cell connections in epithelial cell sheets on all

  18. Mutant p53 promotes cell spreading and migration via ARHGAP44.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jinjin; Jiao, Jian; Xu, Wei; Ji, Lei; Jiang, Dongjie; Xie, Shaofang; Kubra, Syeda; Li, Xiaotao; Fu, Junjiang; Xiao, Jianru; Zhang, Bianhong

    2017-09-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 protein is either lost or mutated in about half of all human cancers. Loss of p53 function is well known to influence cell spreading, migration and invasion. While expression of mutant p53 is not equivalent to p53 loss, mutant p53 can acquire new functions to drive cell spreading and migration via different mechanisms. In our study, we found that mutant p53 significantly increased cell spreading and migration when comparing with p53-null cells. RNA-Seq analysis suggested that Rho GTPase activating protein 44 (ARHGAP44) is a new target of mutant p53, which suppressed ARHGAP44 transcription. ARHGAP44 has GAP activity and catalyze GTP hydrolysis on Cdc42. Higher level of GTP-Cdc42 was correlated with increase expression of mutant p53 and reduced ARHGAP44. Importantly, wt-ARHGAP44 but not mutant ARHGAP44 (R291A) suppressed mutant p53 mediated cell spreading and migration. Bioinformatics analysis indicated lower expression of ARHGAP44 in lung carcinoma compared with normal tissues, which was verified by RT-qPCR using specimens from patients. More interestingly, ARHGAP44 mRNA level was lower in tumors with mutant p53 than those with normal p53. Collectively, our results disclose a new mechanism by which mutant p53 stimulates cell spreading and migration.

  19. Reaction-diffusion finite element model of lateral line primordium migration to explore cell leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allena, R; Maini, P K

    2014-12-01

    Collective cell migration plays a fundamental role in many biological phenomena such as immune response, embryogenesis and tumorigenesis. In the present work, we propose a reaction-diffusion finite element model of the lateral line primordium migration in zebrafish. The population is modelled as a continuum with embedded discrete motile cells, which are assumed to be viscoelastic and able to undergo large deformations. The Wnt/ß-catenin-FGF and cxcr4b-cxcr7b signalling pathways inside the cohort regulating the migration are described through coupled reaction-diffusion equations. The coupling between mechanics and the molecular scenario occurs in two ways. Firstly, the intensity of the protrusion-contraction movement of the cells depends on the cxcr4b concentration. Secondly, the intra-synchronization between the active deformations and the adhesion forces inside each cell is triggered by the cxcr4b-cxcr7b polarity. This influences the inter-synchronization between the cells and results in two main modes of migration: uncoordinated and coordinated. The main objectives of the work were (i) to validate our assumptions with respect to the experimental observations and (ii) to decipher the mechanical conditions leading to efficient migration of the primordium. To achieve the second goal, we will specifically focus on the role of the leader cells and their position inside the population.

  20. EMT Involved in Migration of Stem/Progenitor Cells for Pituitary Development and Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Saishu; Kato, Takako; Kato, Yukio

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) and cell migration are important processes in embryonic development of many tissues as well as oncogenesis. The pituitary gland is a master endocrine tissue and recent studies indicate that Sox2-expressing stem/progenitor cells actively migrate and develop this tissue during embryogenesis. Notably, although migration activity of stem/progenitor cells in the postnatal period seems to be reduced compared to that in the embryonic period, it is hypothesized that stem/progenitor cells in the adult pituitary re-migrate from their microenvironment niche to contribute to the regeneration system. Therefore, elucidation of EMT in the pituitary stem/progenitor cells will promote understanding of pituitary development and regeneration, as well as diseases such as pituitary adenoma. In this review, so as to gain more insights into the mechanisms of pituitary development and regeneration, we summarize the EMT in the pituitary by focusing on the migration of pituitary stem/progenitor cells during both embryonic and postnatal organogenesis. PMID:27058562

  1. CML/CD36 accelerates atherosclerotic progression via inhibiting foam cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Suining; Li, Lihua; Yan, Jinchuan; Ye, Fei; Shao, Chen; Sun, Zhen; Bao, Zhengyang; Dai, Zhiyin; Zhu, Jie; Jing, Lele; Wang, Zhongqun

    2018-01-01

    Among the various complications of type 2 diabetes mellitus, atherosclerosis causes the highest disability and morbidity. A multitude of macrophage-derived foam cells are retained in atherosclerotic plaques resulting not only from recruitment of monocytes into lesions but also from a reduced rate of macrophage migration from lesions. Nε-carboxymethyl-Lysine (CML), an advanced glycation end product, is responsible for most complications of diabetes. This study was designed to investigate the mechanism of CML/CD36 accelerating atherosclerotic progression via inhibiting foam cell migration. In vivo study and in vitro study were performed. For the in vivo investigation, CML/CD36 accelerated atherosclerotic progression via promoting the accumulation of macrophage-derived foam cells in aorta and inhibited macrophage-derived foam cells in aorta migrating to the para-aorta lymph node of diabetic apoE -/- mice. For the in vitro investigation, CML/CD36 inhibited RAW264.7-derived foam cell migration through NOX-derived ROS, FAK phosphorylation, Arp2/3 complex activation and F-actin polymerization. Thus, we concluded that CML/CD36 inhibited foam cells of plaque migrating to para-aorta lymph nodes, accelerating atherosclerotic progression. The corresponding mechanism may be via free cholesterol, ROS generation, p-FAK, Arp2/3, F-actin polymerization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Bioelectric Field Enhancement: The Influence on Membrane Potential and Cell Migration In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purnell, Marcy C; Skrinjar, Terence J

    2016-12-01

    Objective: The extracellular matrix consists of critical components that affect fibroblast polarization and migration. The existence of both intrinsic and extrinsic electrical signals that play essential roles in the development, physiology, regeneration, and pathology of cells was discovered over a century ago. In this study, we study how the Bioelectric Field Enhancement (BEFE) device and its generated electromagnetic field (EMF) by continuous direct current (DC) significantly affect the membrane potential and cell migration of fibroblasts in vitro. Approach: This is an experimental analysis of membrane potential and cell migration of murine fibroblasts when grown in treated media that has been reconstituted with an aqueous solution that has been exposed to an EMF, which is generated by this device versus fibroblasts grown in identically prepared control media that has not been exposed to the EMF. Results: The growth of fibroblasts in the treated media shows a strong percent change in polarization of the plasma membrane and significant increase in cell migration compared to control groups. Innovation: These experiments show the potential for an adjunct wound care therapy using a continuous DC EMF application through a medium of water. Conclusion: Growth media that was reconstituted with an aqueous solution that had been exposed to this DC derived EMF shows significant changes in cell polarity and cell migration of fibroblasts in vitro. The BEFE device has shown enhanced chronic wound healing in anecdotal reports from patients globally for decades when used as a footbath/bath and could lead to a novel EMF application in wound healing.

  3. Deubiquitinating enzyme USP33/VDU1 is required for Slit signaling in inhibiting breast cancer cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuasa-Kawada, Junichi; Kinoshita-Kawada, Mariko; Rao, Yi; Wu, Jane Y

    2009-08-25

    Slit regulates migration of not only neurons, but also nonneuronal cells, such as leukocytes and cancer cells. Slit effect on cancer cell migration has not been well-characterized. In this study, we used several different assays to examine Slit effect on breast cancer cell migration in vitro. We show that ubiquitin-specific protease 33 (USP33)/VDU1, originally identified as a von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor (VHL) protein-interacting deubiquitinating enzyme, binds to the Robo1 receptor, and that USP33 is required for Slit responsiveness in breast cancer cells. Slit induces redistribution of Robo1 from intracellular compartments to the plasma membrane in a USP33-dependent manner. Slit impairs directional migration of breast cancer cells without affecting their migration speed. This inhibitory effect is Robo-mediated and USP33-dependent. These data uncover a previously unknown function of USP33 and reveal a new player in Slit-Robo signaling in cancer cell migration.

  4. Amyloid precursor protein regulates migration and metalloproteinase gene expression in prostate cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyazaki, Toshiaki; Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Horie-Inoue, Kuniko [Division of Gene Regulation and Signal Transduction, Research Center for Genomic Medicine, Saitama Medical University, Saitama 350-1241 (Japan); Inoue, Satoshi, E-mail: INOUE-GER@h.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Division of Gene Regulation and Signal Transduction, Research Center for Genomic Medicine, Saitama Medical University, Saitama 350-1241 (Japan); Department of Geriatric Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8655 (Japan); Department of Anti-Aging Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8655 (Japan)

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • APP knockdown reduced proliferation and migration of prostate cancer cells. • APP knockdown reduced expression of metalloproteinase and EMT-related genes. • APP overexpression promoted LNCaP cell migration. • APP overexpression increased expression of metalloproteinase and EMT-related genes. - Abstract: Amyloid precursor protein (APP) is a type I transmembrane protein, and one of its processed forms, β-amyloid, is considered to play a central role in the development of Alzheimer’s disease. We previously showed that APP is a primary androgen-responsive gene in prostate cancer and that its increased expression is correlated with poor prognosis for patients with prostate cancer. APP has also been implicated in several human malignancies. Nevertheless, the mechanism underlying the pro-proliferative effects of APP on cancers is still not well-understood. In the present study, we explored a pathophysiological role for APP in prostate cancer cells using siRNA targeting APP (siAPP). The proliferation and migration of LNCaP and DU145 prostate cancer cells were significantly suppressed by siAPP. Differentially expressed genes in siAPP-treated cells compared to control siRNA-treated cells were identified by microarray analysis. Notably, several metalloproteinase genes, such as ADAM10 and ADAM17, and epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT)-related genes, such as VIM, and SNAI2, were downregulated in siAPP-treated cells as compared to control cells. The expression of these genes was upregulated in LNCaP cells stably expressing APP when compared with control cells. APP-overexpressing LNCaP cells exhibited enhanced migration in comparison to control cells. These results suggest that APP may contribute to the proliferation and migration of prostate cancer cells by modulating the expression of metalloproteinase and EMT-related genes.

  5. Cell-mediated immune response in rotavirus-infected calves: leucocyte migration inhibition assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, R S; Singh, N P

    1992-07-01

    The cell-mediated immune (CMI) response was determined in rotavirus-infected calves by leucocyte migration inhibition assay with blood, spleen, mesenteric lymph node and intestinal lymphocytes. The inhibition of migration was more prominent in intestinal and mesenteric lymph node lymphocytes than in spleen and blood. In rotavirus-infected calves, the assay indicated the presence of CMI response which was more prominent at the local site of infection.

  6. MicroRNA-218 inhibits cell invasion and migration of pancreatic cancer via regulating ROBO1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hang; Hao, Si-Jie; Yao, Lie; Yang, Feng; Di, Yang; Li, Ji; Jiang, Yong-Jian; Jin, Chen; Fu, De-Liang

    2014-10-01

    miRNA-218 is a highlighted tumor suppressor and its underlying role in tumor progression is still unknown. Here, we restored the expression of miRNA-218 in pancreatic cancer to clarify the function and potent downstream pathway of miRNA-218. The expressions of both miRNA-218 and its potent target gene ROBO1 were revealed by RT-PCR and western blotting analysis. Transfection of miRNA-218 precursor mimics and luciferase assay were performed to elucidate the regulation mechanism between miRNA-218 and ROBO1. Cells, stably expressing miRNA-218 followed by forced expression of mutant ROBO1, were established through co-transfections of both lentivirus vector and plasmid vector. The cell migration and invasion abilities were evaluated by migration assay and invasion assay respectively. An increased expression of ROBO1 was revealed in cell BxPC-3-LN compared with cell BxPC-3. Elevated expression of miRNA-218 would suppress the expression of ROBO1 via complementary binding to a specific region within 3'UTR of ROBO1 mRNA (sites 971-978) in pancreatic cancer cells. Stably restoring the expression of miRNA-218 in pancreatic cancer significantly downregulated the expression of ROBO1 and effectively inhibited cell migration and invasion. Forced expression of mutant ROBO1 could reverse the repression effects of miRNA-218 on cell migration and invasion. Consequently, miRNA-218 acted as a tumor suppressor in pancreatic cancer by inhibiting cell invasion and migration. ROBO1 was a functional target of miRNA-218's downstream pathway involving in cell invasion and migration of pancreatic cancer.

  7. Sox10 controls migration of B16F10 melanoma cells through multiple regulatory target genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikjoo Seong

    Full Text Available It is believed that the inherent differentiation program of melanocytes during embryogenesis predisposes melanoma cells to high frequency of metastasis. Sox10, a transcription factor expressed in neural crest stem cells and a subset of progeny lineages, plays a key role in the development of melanocytes. We show that B16F10 melanoma cells transfected with siRNAs specific for Sox10 display reduced migratory activity which in turn indicated that a subset of transcriptional regulatory target genes of Sox10 is likely to be involved in migration and metastasis of melanoma cells. We carried out a microarray-based gene expression profiling using a Sox10-specific siRNA to identify relevant regulatory targets and found that multiple genes including melanocortin-1 receptor (Mc1r partake in the regulation of migration. We provide evidences that the effect of Sox10 on migration is mediated in large part by Mitf, a transcription factor downstream to Sox10. Among the mouse melanoma cell lines examined, however, only B16F10 showed robust down-regulation of Sox10 and inhibition of cell migration indicating that further dissection of dosage effects and/or cell line-specific regulatory networks is necessary. The involvement of Mc1r in migration was studied in detail in vivo using a murine metastasis model. Specifically, B16F10 melanoma cells treated with a specific siRNA showed reduced tendency in metastasizing to and colonizing the lung after being injected in the tail vein. These data reveal a cadre of novel regulators and mediators involved in migration and metastasis of melanoma cells that represents potential targets of therapeutic intervention.

  8. Technical Advance: New in vitro method for assaying the migration of primary B cells using an endothelial monolayer as substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart-Hutchinson, Phillip J; Szasz, Taylor P; Jaeger, Emily R; Onken, Michael D; Cooper, John A; Morley, Sharon Celeste

    2017-09-01

    Migration of B cells supports their development and recruitment into functional niches. Therefore, defining factors that control B cell migration will lead to a better understanding of adaptive immunity. In vitro cell migration assays with B cells have been limited by poor adhesion of cells to glass coated with adhesion molecules. We have developed a technique using monolayers of endothelial cells as the substrate for B cell migration and used this technique to establish a robust in vitro assay for B cell migration. We use TNF-α to up-regulate surface expression of the adhesion molecule VCAM-1 on endothelial cells. The ligand VLA-4 is expressed on B cells, allowing them to interact with the endothelial monolayer and migrate on its surface. We tested our new method by examining the role of L-plastin (LPL), an F-actin-bundling protein, in B cell migration. LPL-deficient (LPL -/- ) B cells displayed decreased speed and increased arrest coefficient compared with wild-type (WT) B cells, following chemokine stimulation. However, the confinement ratios for WT and LPL -/- B cells were similar. Thus, we demonstrate how the use of endothelial monolayers as a substrate will support future interrogation of molecular pathways essential to B cell migration. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  9. TRPM7 is required for ovarian cancer cell growth, migration and invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jing; Liao, Qian-jin [The Affiliated Cancer Hospital of Xiangya School of Medicine, Central South University, Changsha 410013 (China); Zhang, Yi [Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410078 (China); Zhou, Hui; Luo, Chen-hui; Tang, Jie; Wang, Ying; Tang, Yan; Zhao, Min; Zhao, Xue-heng [The Affiliated Cancer Hospital of Xiangya School of Medicine, Central South University, Changsha 410013 (China); Zhang, Qiong-yu [Department of Basic Medical Science, Yongzhou Vocational Technical College, Yong Zhou 425100 (China); Xiao, Ling, E-mail: lingxiaocsu@126.com [Department of Histology and Embryology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Central South University, Changsha 410013 (China); Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Central South University, Changsha 410018 (China)

    2014-11-28

    Highlights: • Silence of TRPM7 in ovarian cancer cells inhibits cell proliferation, migration and invasion. • Silence of TRPM7 decreases phosphorylation levels of Akt, Src and p38 in ovarian cancer cells. • Silence of TRPM7 increases expression of filamentous actin and number of focal adhesions in ovarian cancer cells. - Abstract: Our previous study demonstrated that the melastatin-related transient receptor potential channel 7 (TRPM7) was highly expressed in ovarian carcinomas and its overexpression was significantly associated with poor prognosis in ovarian cancer patients. However, the function of TRPM7 in ovarian cancer is mostly unknown. In this study, we examined the roles of TRPM7 in ovarian cancer cell proliferation, migration and invasion. We found that short hairpin RNA interference-mediated silence of TRPM7 significantly inhibited cell proliferation, colony formation, migration and invasion in multiple ovarian cancer cell lines. Mechanistic investigation revealed that silence of TRPM7 decreased phosphorylation levels of Akt, Src and p38 and increased filamentous actin and focal adhesion number in ovarian cancer cells. Thus, our results suggest that TRPM7 is required for proliferation, migration and invasion of ovarian cancer cells through regulating multiple signaling transduction pathways and the formation of focal adhesions.

  10. Effect of photodynamic therapy with hypocrellin B on apoptosis, adhesion, and migration of cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yuan; Leung, Albert Wingnang; Wang, Xinna; Zhang, Hongwei; Xu, Chuanshan

    2014-07-01

    In the present study, we investigated effects of photodynamic therapy with hypocrellin B on apoptosis, adhesion, and migration of cancer cells in vitro. Human ovarian cancer HO-8910 cell as a cancer model cell was incubated with hypocrellin B at a concentration of 2.5 μM for 5 h and irradiated by light from a light-emitting diodes (LED) source. Cell apoptosis was analyzed by flow cytometry with annexin V/propidium iodide (PI) staining and nuclear staining 6 h after hypocrellin B photoirradiation. Cell adhesion was assessed using the 3-(4, 5-dimthylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5 diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay 4 h after photodynamic treatment. Cell migration was measured 48 h after photodynamic treatment. Flow cytometry with annexin V/PI staining showed that early apoptotic and late apoptotic (necrotic) rates following photodynamic therapy with hypocrellin B markedly increased to 16.40% and 24.67%, respectively. Nuclear staining found nuclear condensation and typical apoptotic body in the treated cells. The number of cell migration was significantly decreased to 183 ± 28 after photodynamic therapy with hypocrellin B (p adhesion inhibitory rate due to photodynamic action of hypocrellin B was 53.2 ± 1.8%, significantly higher than 2.7 ± 2.1% of light treatment alone and 1.0 ± 0.4% of hypocrellin B treatment alone (p adhesion and migration of cancer cells in vitro.

  11. Nanoencapsulated capsaicin changes migration behavior and morphology of madin darby canine kidney cell monolayers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias Kaiser

    Full Text Available We have developed a drug delivery nanosystem based on chitosan and capsaicin. Both substances have a wide range of biological activities. We investigated the nanosystem's influence on migration and morphology of Madin Darby canine kidney (MDCK-C7 epithelial cells in comparison to the capsaicin-free nanoformulation, free capsaicin, and control cells. For minimally-invasive quantification of cell migration, we applied label-free digital holographic microscopy (DHM and single-cell tracking. Moreover, quantitative DHM phase images were used as novel stain-free assay to quantify the temporal course of global cellular morphology changes in confluent cell layers. Cytoskeleton alterations and tight junction protein redistributions were complementary analyzed by fluorescence microscopy. Calcium influx measurements were conducted to characterize the influence of the nanoformulations and capsaicin on ion channel activities. We found that both, capsaicin-loaded and unloaded chitosan nanocapsules, and also free capsaicin, have a significant impact on directed cell migration and cellular motility. Increase of velocity and directionality of cell migration correlates with changes in the cell layer surface roughness, tight junction integrity and cytoskeleton alterations. Calcium influx into cells occurred only after nanoformulation treatment but not upon addition of free capsaicin. Our results pave the way for further studies on the biological significance of these findings and potential biomedical applications, e.g. as drug and gene carriers.

  12. MicroRNA-1254 inhibits the migration of colon adenocarcinoma cells by targeting PSMD10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Yi Min; Peng, Hai Xia; Xu, Ying; Yang, Da Ming; Zhou, Feng Li; Li, Ji; Kuai, Rong; Lin, Yong

    2017-03-01

    MicroRNA-1254 (miR-1254) has not been studied in colorectal cancer (CRC) to date. This study aimed to investigate the inhibitory mechanism of miR-1254 in CRC tumorigenesis. MiR-1254 expression was examined using real-time polymerase chain reaction in CRC and adjacent non-tumorous tissues. The correlation between miR-1254 expressions and proliferation and migration of cancer cells was determined using the CCK-8 and transwell assays. RNA sequencing was used to identify differentially expressed genes downstream from miR-1254. A luciferase reporter assay was used to confirm the direct interaction between miR-1254 and its predicted target gene, PSMD10. Moreover, PSMD10 was either overexpressed or silenced in colon carcinoma cells overexpressing miR-1254 to determine whether their interaction contributed to CRC migration and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Significantly lower miR-1254 expressions were observed in CRC tissues than in adjacent non-tumorous tissues. Exogenous miR-1254 expression suppressed the migration of colon carcinoma cell lines SW1116 and HCT116. RNA sequencing and luciferase assays revealed that miR-1254 directly binded to the 3'-untranslated region of PSMD10, an important regulator of EMT and cell migration. PSMD10 knockdown inhibited EMT and colon cancer cell migration, whereas PSMD10 overexpression reversed the inhibition of EMT and cell migration caused by miR-1254. MiR-1254 may act as a tumor suppressor in CRC and may inhibit CRC migration by directly targeting PSMD10 to suppress the EMT process. © 2017 Chinese Medical Association Shanghai Branch, Chinese Society of Gastroenterology, Renji Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  13. Evidence for a role of matrix metalloproteinases and their inhibitors in primordial germ cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díez-Torre, A; Díaz-Núñez, M; Eguizábal, C; Silván, U; Aréchaga, J

    2013-09-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that enable migrating cells to reach their targets is of vital importance, as several pathologies, including cardiac defects and some tumours, are consequences of altered cell migration. With a view to evaluating if matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their tissue inhibitors (TIMPs) play a role in the active migration of primordial germ cells (PGCs) from their place of origin in extra-embryonic sites towards their final destination in the developing gonads, we analysed the expression of mRNAs encoding nine MMPs and four TIMPs in migrating (E10.5) and post-migrating (E12.5) PGCs by means of quantitative polymerase chain reaction and the presence of MT1-MMP in the membrane of these cells. Our results show that PGCs express MMP-2, MMP-9, MMP-11, MT1-MMP, TIMP-1, TIMP-2 and TIMP-3 at both migrating and non-migrating stages. Comparing expression levels of MMP genes between E10.5 and E12.5 PGCs revealed higher expression in migrating PGCs of MT1- MMP (10.3-fold), MMP-2 (4.8-fold), MMP-11 (3.2-fold) and MMP-9 (2.1-fold). Similarly, the levels of TIMP gene expression were always higher in E12.5 genital ridge somatic cells: TIMP-3 (3.4-fold), TIMP-1 (2.4-fold) and TIMP-2 (1.8-fold). Moreover, the analysis at protein level showed the presence of MT1-MMP in the membrane of migrating PGCs whereas the expression of these metalloproteinase is not detected once the PGCs have reach the urogenital ridges and stop migrating. These results suggest that the change from the motile to non-motile phenotype that occurs during PGC maturation to gonocytes may be mediated in part by enhanced expression of MMPs in migrating PGCs together with higher expression of TIMPs in E12.5 genital ridges. © 2013 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  14. Nucleus and nucleus-cytoskeleton connections in 3D cell migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Lingling, E-mail: liulingling2012@163.com; Luo, Qing, E-mail: qing.luo@cqu.edu.cn; Sun, Jinghui, E-mail: sunjhemail@163.com; Song, Guanbin, E-mail: song@cqu.edu.cn

    2016-10-15

    Cell migration plays an important role in many physiological and pathological settings, ranging from embryonic development to cancer metastasis. Currently, accumulating data suggest that cells migrating in three-dimensional (3D) environments show well-defined differences compared to their well-established two-dimensional (2D) counterparts. During 3D migration, the cell body and nucleus must deform to allow cellular passage through the available spaces, and the deformability of the relatively rigid nucleus may constitute a limiting step. Here, we highlight the key evidence regarding the role of the nuclear mechanics in 3D migration, including the molecular components that govern the stiffness of the nucleus and review how the nuclear dynamics are connected to and controlled by cytoskeleton-based migration machinery. Intriguingly, nuclear movement must be coordinated with the cytoskeletal dynamics at the leading and trailing edges, which in turn impact the cytoplasmic dynamics that affect the migration efficiency. Thus, we suggest that alterations in the nuclear structure may facilitate cellular reorganizations that are necessary for efficient migration. - Graphical abstract: Schematic representations of a cell migrating on a 2D substrate and a cell migrating in a 3D extracellular matrix environment. (A) Nucleus-cytoskeleton connections are essential to 3D migration. Mechanical signals are transduced by integrins at the cell surface and channeled to cytoskeletal proteins, which generates prestress. The nucleus-cytoskeleton connections can either act as a stable skeleton to anchor the nuclei or provide active force to move the nuclei. The LINC complex is responsible for the nucleo-cytoskeletal coupling. Nesprins connect the cytoskeletal proteins to the inner nuclear membrane proteins SUN1 and SUN2. The SUN proteins connect to the lamins that form the lamina, which attaches to the chromatin. This physical connectivity transmits the mechanical signals from receptors at

  15. Interleukin-3 enhances the migration of human mesenchymal stem cells by regulating expression of CXCR4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barhanpurkar-Naik, Amruta; Mhaske, Suhas T; Pote, Satish T; Singh, Kanupriya; Wani, Mohan R

    2017-07-14

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) represent an important source for cell therapy in regenerative medicine. MSCs have shown promising results for repair of damaged tissues in various degenerative diseases in animal models and also in human clinical trials. However, little is known about the factors that could enhance the migration and tissue-specific engraftment of exogenously infused MSCs for successful regenerative cell therapy. Previously, we have reported that interleukin-3 (IL-3) prevents bone and cartilage damage in animal models of rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. Also, IL-3 promotes the differentiation of human MSCs into functional osteoblasts and increases their in-vivo bone regenerative potential in immunocompromised mice. However, the role of IL-3 in migration of MSCs is not yet known. In the present study, we investigated the role of IL-3 in migration of human MSCs under both in-vitro and in-vivo conditions. MSCs isolated from human bone marrow, adipose and gingival tissues were used for in-vitro cell migration, motility and wound healing assays in the presence or absence of IL-3. The effect of IL-3 preconditioning on expression of chemokine receptors and integrins was examined by flow cytometry and real-time PCR. The in-vivo migration of IL-3-preconditioned MSCs was investigated using a subcutaneous matrigel-releasing stromal cell-derived factor-1 alpha (SDF-1α) model in immunocompromised mice. We observed that human MSCs isolated from all three sources express IL-3 receptor-α (IL-3Rα) both at gene and protein levels. IL-3 significantly enhances in-vitro migration, motility and wound healing abilities of MSCs. Moreover, IL-3 preconditioning upregulates expression of chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 4 (CXCR4) on MSCs, which leads to increased migration of cells towards SDF-1α. Furthermore, CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 decreases the migration of IL-3-treated MSCs towards SDF-1α. Importantly, IL-3 also induces in-vivo migration of MSCs towards

  16. Cell-scale dynamic recycling and cortical flow of the actin–myosin cytoskeleton for rapid cell migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigehiko Yumura

    2012-11-01

    Actin and myosin II play major roles in cell migration. Whereas pseudopod extension by actin polymerization has been intensively researched, less attention has been paid to how the rest of the actin cytoskeleton such as the actin cortex contributes to cell migration. In this study, cortical actin and myosin II filaments were simultaneously observed in migrating Dictyostelium cells under total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. The cortical actin and myosin II filaments remained stationary with respect to the substratum as the cells advanced. However, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments and direct observation of filaments showed that they rapidly turned over. When the cells were detached from the substratum, the actin and myosin filaments displayed a vigorous retrograde flow. Thus, when the cells migrate on the substratum, the cortical cytoskeleton firmly holds the substratum to generate the motive force instead. The present studies also demonstrate how myosin II localizes to the rear region of the migrating cells. The observed dynamic turnover of actin and myosin II filaments contributes to the recycling of their subunits across the whole cell and enables rapid reorganization of the cytoskeleton.

  17. SPARC was overexpressed in human endometrial cancer stem-like cells and promoted migration activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusuf, Nurismangul; Inagaki, Tetsunori; Kusunoki, Soshi; Okabe, Hitomi; Yamada, Izumi; Matsumoto, Akemi; Terao, Yasuhisa; Takeda, Satoru; Kato, Kiyoko

    2014-08-01

    We previously demonstrated that side-population (SP) cells found in human endometrial cancer tissue have features of cancer stem cells (CSCs). Endometrial cancer SP cells show enhanced migration, the potential to differentiate into the mesenchymal cell lineage, and they are associated with the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). In this study, we analyzed the expression and function of a specific protein, SPARC (secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine) which we found to be up-regulated in endometrial cancer. We performed microarray expression analysis to screen for up-regulated genes in CSCs using a set of RK12V-SP cells and -non-SP (NSP) cells. We used the MetaCore package to identify the Gene GO pathway MAPs associated with the up-regulated genes. Here, we investigated the expression and functions of SPARC, one of the genes up-regulated in endometrial CSCs. We established SPARC-overexpressing cells by transfecting endometrial cancer cells (Ishikawa cells [IK-SPARC cells]). We characterized these cells' growth rate, tumorigenicity, migration and invasion activity. The levels and locations of SPARC protein expression in Hec1SP cells-derived tumors and endometrial cancer tissues were examined by immunohistochemistry. SPARC was detected by microarray expression analysis during screens for up-regulated genes in SP and NSP CSC. The level of SPARC expression was enhanced in Hec1 SP cells compared with that in Hec1 non-SP cells. SPARC enhanced fibronectin expression and promoted migration activity in IK cells. SPARC expression suppressed tumor growth but promoted formation of tumor stroma. SPARC was expressed in endometrial cancer tissues, in particular, poorly differentiated endometrioid adenocarcinoma, clear and serous adenocarcinoma,but not in normal endometrial tissue. This is the first report of overexpression of SPARC in endometrial cancer stem-like cells. SPARC expression is associated with cell migration and stroma formation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier

  18. Phospholipase D is essential for keratocyte-like migration of NBT-II cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasaki, Akira; Inotsume, Kimiko; Kanada, Masamitsu; Uyeda, Taro Q P

    2008-01-01

    NBT-II cells on collagen-coated substrates move rapidly and persistently, maintaining a semi-circular shape with a large lamellipodium, in a manner similar to fish keratocytes. The inhibitor of phospholipase D (PLD), n-butanol, completely blocked the migration and disturbed the characteristic localization of actin along the edge of lamellipodia. To investigate the functional difference between the two isozymes of PLD (PLD1 and PLD2), we transfected NBT-II cells with vectors expressing shRNA to deplete PLD1 or PLD2. Depletion of both PLD1 and 2 by RNA interference reduced the velocity of the migration, but depletion of PLD2 inhibited motility more severely than that of PLD1. Furthermore, GFP-PLD2 was localized to the protruding regions of lamellipodia in migrating cells. Thus, PLD is essential for the maintenance of keratocyte-like locomotion of NBT-II cells, presumably by regulating the actin cytoskeleton.

  19. Epithelial cell migration as a potential therapeutic target in early lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fraser R. Millar

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the most lethal cancer type worldwide, with the majority of patients presenting with advanced stage disease. Targeting early stage disease pathogenesis would allow dramatic improvements in lung cancer patient survival. Recently, cell migration has been shown to be an integral process in early lung cancer ontogeny, with preinvasive lung cancer cells shown to migrate across normal epithelium prior to developing into invasive disease. TP53 mutations are the most abundant mutations in human nonsmall cell lung cancers and have been shown to increase cell migration via regulation of Rho-GTPase protein activity. In this review, we explore the possibility of targeting TP53-mediated Rho-GTPase activity in early lung cancer and the opportunities for translating this preclinical research into effective therapies for early stage lung cancer patients.

  20. Cell density and actomyosin contractility control the organization of migrating collectives within an epithelium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loza, Andrew J.; Koride, Sarita; Schimizzi, Gregory V.; Li, Bo; Sun, Sean X.; Longmore, Gregory D.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying collective migration are important for understanding development, wound healing, and tumor invasion. Here we focus on cell density to determine its role in collective migration. Our findings show that increasing cell density, as might be seen in cancer, transforms groups from broad collectives to small, narrow streams. Conversely, diminishing cell density, as might occur at a wound front, leads to large, broad collectives with a distinct leader–follower structure. Simulations identify force-sensitive contractility as a mediator of how density affects collectives, and guided by this prediction, we find that the baseline state of contractility can enhance or reduce organization. Finally, we test predictions from these data in an in vivo epithelium by using genetic manipulations to drive collective motion between predicted migratory phases. This work demonstrates how commonly altered cellular properties can prime groups of cells to adopt migration patterns that may be harnessed in health or exploited in disease. PMID:27605707

  1. Thrombopoietin stimulates migration and activates multiple signaling pathways in hepatoblastoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Romanelli, Roberto G; Petrai, Ilaria; Robino, Gaia

    2005-01-01

    Thrombopoietin (TPO), a cytokine that participates in the differentiation and maturation of megakaryocytes, is produced in the liver, but only limited information is available on the biological response of liver-derived cells to TPO. In this study, we investigated whether HepG2 cells express c......-Mpl, the receptor for TPO, and whether TPO elicits biological responses and intracellular signaling in this cell type. Specific transcripts for c-Mpl were detected in HepG2 cells by RT-PCR, and expression of the protein was demonstrated by Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence. Exposure of HepG2 cells to TPO...... was associated with a dose-dependent increase in cell migration and chemoinvasion through Matrigel-coated filters. A checkerboard analysis showed that the effects of TPO on cell migration were dependent on both chemotaxis and chemokinesis. Exposure of HepG2 cells to TPO resulted in the activation of different...

  2. Defective neuronal migration and inhibition of bipolar to multipolar transition of migrating neural cells by Mesoderm-Specific Transcript, Mest, in the developing mouse neocortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Liting; Bishayee, Kausik; Sadra, Ali; Choi, Seunghyuk; Choi, Wooyul; Moon, Sungho; Jho, Eek-Hoon; Huh, Sung-Oh

    2017-07-04

    Brain developmental disorders such as lissencephaly can result from faulty neuronal migration and differentiation during the formation of the mammalian neocortex. The cerebral cortex is a modular structure, where developmentally, newborn neurons are generated as a neuro-epithelial sheet and subsequently differentiate, migrate and organize into their final positions in the cerebral cortical plate via a process involving both tangential and radial migration. The specific role of Mest, an imprinted gene, in neuronal migration has not been previously studied. In this work, we reduced expression of Mest with in utero electroporation of neuronal progenitors in the developing embryonic mouse neocortex. Reduction of Mest levels by shRNA significantly reduced the number of neurons migrating to the cortical plate. Also, Mest-knockdown disrupted the transition of bipolar neurons into multipolar neurons migrating out of the sub-ventricular zone region. The migrating neurons also adopted a more tangential migration pattern upon knockdown of the Mest message, losing their potential to attach to radial glia cells, required for radial migration. The differentiation and migration properties of neurons via Wnt-Akt signaling were affected by Mest changes. In addition, miR-335, encoded in a Mest gene intron, was identified as being responsible for blocking the default tangential migration of the neurons. Our results suggest that Mest and its intron product, miR-335, play important roles in neuronal migration with Mest regulating the morphological transition of primary neurons required in the formation of the mammalian neocortex. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Probing for protein-protein interactions during cell migration: limitations and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Jeremy Soon Kiat; Teo, Zi; Sng, Ming Keat; Tan, Nguan Soon

    2014-08-01

    Cellular migration is a fundamental biological process occurring as early as embryogenesis to the pathological state of cancer metastasis. Nearly all cellular migrations involve an extracellular signal that is transduced internally by members of a signalling cascade. These signal transduction events are driven by protein-protein interactions (PPIs) that coordinate intracellular activities to enable a cell to migrate. Understanding these PPIs will provide valuable insight into how cellular migration can be modulated perhaps towards a therapeutic end. Histologically, not many techniques are available to demonstrate PPIs. Contrasting agents only demonstrate the presence of a particular protein, and perhaps its co-localisation with another protein. Yet, co-localisation need not necessarily indicate physical interaction between the two proteins. In this review, we highlight four commonly used methods that continue to expand our understanding of PPIs underlying cell migration: co-immunoprecipitation, bimolecular fluorescence complementation, proximity ligation assay and surface plasmon resonance. The methods discussed herein allow for the study of PPIs in a wide variety of biological samples, including cell lysates, live cells, fixed cells and tissues, enabling the quantification of endogenous PPIs and exploration of the nature of PPIs. We also include a rudimentary framework for researchers to decide which experimental method best suits their research goals.

  4. Knockdown of ezrin suppresses the migration and angiogenesis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Liang-ping; Huang, Lei; Tian, Xun; Liang, Feng-qi; Wei, Jun-cheng; Zhang, Xian; Li, Sha; Zhang, Qing-hua

    2016-04-01

    Progressive tumor growth is dependent on angiogenesis. The mechanisms by which endothelial cells (ECs) are incorporated to develop new blood vessels are not well understood. Recent studies reveal that the ezrin radixin moesin (ERM) family members are key regulators of cellular activities such as adhesion, morphogenetic change, and migration. We hypothesized that ezrin, one of the ERM family members, may play important roles in ECs organization during angiogenesis, and new vessels formation in preexisting tissues. To test this hypothesis, in this study, we investigated the effects of ezrin gene silencing on the migration and angiogenesis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in vitro. HUVECs were transfected with plasmids with ezrin-targeting short hairpin RNA by using the lipofectamine-2000 system. Wound assay in vitro and three-dimensional culture were used to detect the migration and angiogenesis capacity of HUVECs. The morphological changes of transfected cells were observed by confocal and phase contrast microscopy. Our results demonstrated that the decreased expression of ezrin in HUVECs significantly induced the morphogenetic changes and cytoskeletal reorganization of the transfected cells, and also reduced cell migration and angiogenesis capacity in vitro, suggesting that ezrin play an important role in the process of HUVECs migration and angiogenesis.

  5. Gastrin stimulates MMP-1 expression in gastric epithelial cells: putative role in gastric epithelial cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, J Dinesh; Steele, Islay; Moore, Andrew R; Murugesan, Senthil V; Rakonczay, Zoltan; Venglovecz, Viktoria; Pritchard, D Mark; Dimaline, Rodney; Tiszlavicz, Laszlo; Varro, Andrea; Dockray, Graham J

    2015-07-15

    The pyloric antral hormone gastrin plays a role in remodeling of the gastric epithelium, but the specific targets of gastrin that mediate these effects are poorly understood. Glandular epithelial cells of the gastric corpus express matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, which is a potential determinant of tissue remodeling; some of these cells express the CCK-2 receptor at which gastrin acts. We have now examined the hypothesis that gastrin stimulates expression of MMP-1 in the stomach. We determined MMP-1 transcript abundance in gastric mucosal biopsies from Helicobacter pylori negative human subjects with normal gastric mucosal histology, who had a range of serum gastrin concentrations due in part to treatment with proton pump inhibitors (PPI). The effects of gastrin were studied on gastric epithelial AGS-GR cells using Western blot and migration assays. In human subjects with increased serum gastrin due to PPI usage, MMP-1 transcript abundance was increased 2-fold; there was also increased MMP-7 transcript abundance but not MMP-3. In Western blots, gastrin increased proMMP-1 abundance, as well that of a minor band corresponding to active MMP-1, in the media of AGS-GR cells, and the response was mediated by protein kinase C and p42/44 MAP kinase. There was also increased MMP-1 enzyme activity. Gastrin-stimulated AGS-GR cell migration in both scratch wound and Boyden chamber assays was inhibited by MMP-1 immunoneutralization. We conclude that MMP-1 expression is a target of gastrin implicated in mucosal remodeling. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  6. The p38/MK2/Hsp25 pathway is required for BMP-2-induced cell migration.

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    Cristina Gamell

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs have been shown to participate in the patterning and specification of several tissues and organs during development and to regulate cell growth, differentiation and migration in different cell types. BMP-mediated cell migration requires activation of the small GTPase Cdc42 and LIMK1 activities. In our earlier report we showed that activation of LIMK1 also requires the activation of PAKs through Cdc42 and PI3K. However, the requirement of additional signaling is not clearly known. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Activation of p38 MAPK has been shown to be relevant for a number of BMP-2's physiological effects. We report here that BMP-2 regulation of cell migration and actin cytoskeleton remodelling are dependent on p38 activity. BMP-2 treatment of mesenchymal cells results in activation of the p38/MK2/Hsp25 signaling pathway downstream from the BMP receptors. Moreover, chemical inhibition of p38 signaling or genetic ablation of either p38α or MK2 blocks the ability to activate the downstream effectors of the pathway and abolishes BMP-2-induction of cell migration. These signaling effects on p38/MK2/Hsp25 do not require the activity of either Cdc42 or PAK, whereas p38/MK2 activities do not significantly modify the BMP-2-dependent activation of LIMK1, measured by either kinase activity or with an antibody raised against phospho-threonine 508 at its activation loop. Finally, phosphorylated Hsp25 colocalizes with the BMP receptor complexes in lamellipodia and overexpression of a phosphorylation mutant form of Hsp25 is able to abolish the migration of cells in response to BMP-2. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that Cdc42/PAK/LIMK1 and p38/MK2/Hsp25 pathways, acting in parallel and modulating specific actin regulatory proteins, play a critical role in integrating responses during BMP-induced actin reorganization and cell migration.

  7. The effects of LPS on adhesion and migration of human dental pulp stem cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongmei; Fu, Lei; Zhang, Yaqing; Yu, Qing; Ma, Fengle; Wang, Zhihua; Luo, Zhirong; Zhou, Zeyuan; Cooper, Paul R; He, Wenxi

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on the migration and adhesion of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) and the associated intracellular signalling pathways. hDPSCs obtained from impacted third molars were exposed to LPS and in vitro cell adhesion and migration were evaluated. The effects of LPS on gene expression of adhesion molecules and chemotactic factors were investigated using quantitative real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain (qRT-PCR). The potential involvement of nuclear factor NF-kappa-B (NF-κB) or mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling pathways in the migration and adhesion of hDPSCs induced by LPS was assessed using a transwell cell migration assay and qRT-PCR. LPS promoted the adhesion of hDPSCs at 1μg/mL and 10μg/mL concentrations, 1μg/mL LPS showing the greater effect. Transwell cell migration assay demonstrated that LPS increased migration of hDPSCs at 1μg/mL concentration while decreasing it significantly at 10μg/mL. The mRNA expressions of adhesion molecules and chemotactic factors were enhanced significantly after stimulation with 1μg/mL LPS. Specific inhibitors for NF-κB and extracellular signal regulated kinases (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and P38, markedly antagonised LPS-induced adhesion and migration of hDPSCs and also significantly abrogated LPS-induced up-regulation of adhesion molecules and chemotactic factors. In addition, specific inhibitors of SDF-1/CXCR4, AMD3100 significantly diminished LPS-induced migration of hDPSCs. LPS at specific concentrations can promote cell adhesion and migration in hDPSCs via the NF-κB and MAPK pathways by up-regulating the expression of adhesion molecules and chemotactic factors. LPS may influence pulp healing through enhancing the adhesion and migration of human dental pulp stem cells when it enters into pulp during pulp exposure or deep caries. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. MiR-661 inhibits glioma cell proliferation, migration and invasion by targeting hTERT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zhen, E-mail: lizhen7111@163.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Shengjing Hospital, China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning Province, 110004 (China); Liu, Yun-hui; Diao, Hong-yu [Department of Neurosurgery, Shengjing Hospital, China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning Province, 110004 (China); Ma, Jun [Department of Neurobiology, College of Basic Medicine, China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning Province, 110001 (China); Yao, Yi-long [Department of Neurosurgery, Shengjing Hospital, China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning Province, 110004 (China)

    2015-12-25

    In this study, we analyzed the functional role of miR-661 in glioma cell proliferation, migration and invasion. We found that overexpression of miR-661 obviously suppressed the proliferation, migration and invasion of glioma cells. MiRNA target prediction algorithms implied that hTERT is a candidate target gene for miR-661. A fluorescent reporter assay confirmed that miR-661 could lead to hTERT gene silencing by recognizing and specifically binding to the predicted site of the hTERT mRNA 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR) specifically. Furthermore, hTERT knockdown significantly decreased the growth and viability of glioma cells. These results indicate that miR-661 can inhibit glioma cell proliferation, migration and invasion by targeting hTERT. - Highlights: • MiR-661 was downregulated in glioma tissues and functional as a tumor suppressor. • MiR-661 modulates cell proliferation, invasion and migration of glioma cells. • MiR-661 directly target hTERT in glioma cells. • MiR-661 inhibits glioma cell tumorgenesis by targeting hTERT.

  9. Regulation of Glioma Cell Migration by Seri ne-Phosphorylated P3111

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy S. McDonough

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available P311, an 8-kDa polypeptide, was previously shown to be highly expressed in invasive glioma cells. Here, we report the functional characteristics of P311 with regard to influencing glioma cell migration. P311 is constitutively serine-phosphorylated; decreased phosphorylation is observed in migration-activated glioma cells. The primary amino acid sequence of P311 indicates a putative serine phosphorylation site (S59 near the PEST domain. Site-directed mutagenesis of S59A retarded P311 degradation, induced glioma cell motility. In contrast, S59D mutation resulted in the rapid degradation of P311, reduced glioma cell migration. Coimmunoprecipitation coupled with matrixassisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis identified Filamin A as a binding partner of P311, immunofluorescence studies showed that both proteins colocalized at the cell periphery. Moreover, P311-induced cell migration was abrogated by inhibition of β1 integrin function using TACβ1A, a dominant-negative inhibitor of β1 integrin signaling, suggesting that P311 acts downstream of β1 signaling. Finally, overexpression of P311 or P311 S59A mutant protein activates Raci GTPase; small interfering RNA-mediated depletion of Raci suppresses P311-induced motility. Collectively, these results suggest a role for levels of P311 in regulating glioma motility, invasion through the reorganization of actin cytoskeleton at the cell periphery.

  10. Solving the Puzzle of Metastasis: The Evolution of Cell Migration in Neoplasms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Sprouffske, Kathleen; Huang, Qihong; Maley, Carlo C.

    2011-01-01

    Background Metastasis represents one of the most clinically important transitions in neoplastic progression. The evolution of metastasis is a puzzle because a metastatic clone is at a disadvantage in competition for space and resources with non-metastatic clones in the primary tumor. Metastatic clones waste some of their reproductive potential on emigrating cells with little chance of establishing metastases. We suggest that resource heterogeneity within primary tumors selects for cell migration, and that cell emigration is a by-product of that selection. Methods and Findings We developed an agent-based model to simulate the evolution of neoplastic cell migration. We simulated the essential dynamics of neoangiogenesis and blood vessel occlusion that lead to resource heterogeneity in neoplasms. We observed the probability and speed of cell migration that evolves with changes in parameters that control the degree of spatial and temporal resource heterogeneity. Across a broad range of realistic parameter values, increasing degrees of spatial and temporal heterogeneity select for the evolution of increased cell migration and emigration. Conclusions We showed that variability in resources within a neoplasm (e.g. oxygen and nutrients provided by angiogenesis) is sufficient to select for cells with high motility. These cells are also more likely to emigrate from the tumor, which is the first step in metastasis and the key to the puzzle of metastasis. Thus, we have identified a novel potential solution to the puzzle of metastasis. PMID:21556134

  11. Time lapse phase contrast video microscopy of directed migration of human microvascular endothelial cells on matrigel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meade-Tollin, L. C.; van Noorden, C. J.

    2000-01-01

    Migration of microvascular endothelial cells is an early and critical step in angiogenesis. Formation of branching and polygonal cellular aggregates by endothelial cells on matrigel has often been considered to be an in vitro model for angiogenesis, although formation of lumens has not always been

  12. MANF Promotes Differentiation and Migration of Neural Progenitor Cells with Potential Neural Regenerative Effects in Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tseng, Kuan-Yin; Anttila, Jenni E; Khodosevich, Konstantin

    2018-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia activates endogenous reparative processes, such as increased proliferation of neural stem cells (NSCs) in the subventricular zone (SVZ) and migration of neural progenitor cells (NPCs) toward the ischemic area. However, this reparative process is limited because most of the NPCs...

  13. Requirement ofPax6for the integration of guidance cues in cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arocena, Miguel; Rajnicek, Ann M; Collinson, Jon Martin

    2017-10-01

    The intricate patterns of cell migration that are found throughout development are generated through a vast array of guidance cues. Responding integratively to distinct, often conflicting, migratory signals is probably crucial for cells to reach their correct destination. Pax6 is a master transcription factor with key roles in neural development that include the control of cell migration. In this study, we have investigated the ability of cells derived from cortical neurospheres from wild-type (WT) and Pax6 -/- mouse embryos to integrate diverging guidance cues. We used two different cues, either separately or in combination: substratum nanogrooves to induce contact guidance, and electric fields (EFs) to induce electrotaxis. In the absence of an EF, both WT and Pax6 -/- cells aligned and migrated parallel to grooves, and on a flat substrate both showed marked electrotaxis towards the cathode. When an EF was applied in a perpendicular orientation to grooves, WT cells responded significantly to both cues, migrating in highly oblique trajectories in the general direction of the cathode. However, Pax6 -/- cells had an impaired response to both cues simultaneously. Our results demonstrate that these neurosphere derived cells have the capacity to integrate diverging guidance cues, which requires Pax6 function.

  14. Solving the puzzle of metastasis: the evolution of cell migration in neoplasms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Metastasis represents one of the most clinically important transitions in neoplastic progression. The evolution of metastasis is a puzzle because a metastatic clone is at a disadvantage in competition for space and resources with non-metastatic clones in the primary tumor. Metastatic clones waste some of their reproductive potential on emigrating cells with little chance of establishing metastases. We suggest that resource heterogeneity within primary tumors selects for cell migration, and that cell emigration is a by-product of that selection. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We developed an agent-based model to simulate the evolution of neoplastic cell migration. We simulated the essential dynamics of neoangiogenesis and blood vessel occlusion that lead to resource heterogeneity in neoplasms. We observed the probability and speed of cell migration that evolves with changes in parameters that control the degree of spatial and temporal resource heterogeneity. Across a broad range of realistic parameter values, increasing degrees of spatial and temporal heterogeneity select for the evolution of increased cell migration and emigration. CONCLUSIONS: We showed that variability in resources within a neoplasm (e.g. oxygen and nutrients provided by angiogenesis is sufficient to select for cells with high motility. These cells are also more likely to emigrate from the tumor, which is the first step in metastasis and the key to the puzzle of metastasis. Thus, we have identified a novel potential solution to the puzzle of metastasis.

  15. Knockdown of SVCT2 impairs in-vitro cell attachment, migration and wound healing in bone marrow stromal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajnikumar Sangani

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC adhesion and migration are fundamental to a number of pathophysiologic processes, including fracture and wound healing. Vitamin C is beneficial for bone formation, fracture repair and wound healing. However, the role of the vitamin C transporter in BMSC adhesion, migration and wound healing is not known. In this study, we knocked-down the sodium-dependent vitamin C transporter, SVCT2, the only known transporter of vitamin C in BMSCs, and performed cell adhesion, migration, in-vitro scratch wound healing and F-actin re-arrangement studies. We also investigated the role of oxidative stress on the above processes. Our results demonstrate that both oxidative stress and down-regulation of SVCT2 decreased cell attachment and spreading. A trans-well cell migration assay showed that vitamin C helped in BMSC migration and that knockdown of SVCT2 decreased cell migration. In the in-vitro scratch wound healing studies, we established that oxidative stress dose-dependently impairs wound healing. Furthermore, the supplementation of vitamin C significantly rescued the BMSCs from oxidative stress and increased wound closing. The knockdown of SVCT2 in BMSCs strikingly decreased wound healing, and supplementing with vitamin C failed to rescue cells efficiently. The knockdown of SVCT2 and induction of oxidative stress in cells produced an alteration in cytoskeletal dynamics. Signaling studies showed that oxidative stress phosphorylated members of the MAP kinase family (p38 and that vitamin C inhibited their phosphorylation. Taken together, these results indicate that both the SVCT2 transporter and oxidative stress play a vital role in BMSC attachment, migration and cytoskeletal re-arrangement. BMSC-based cell therapy and modulation of SVCT2 could lead to a novel therapeutic approach that enhances bone remodeling, fracture repair and wound healing in chronic disease conditions.

  16. EDTA conditioning of dentine promotes adhesion, migration and differentiation of dental pulp stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galler, K M; Widbiller, M; Buchalla, W; Eidt, A; Hiller, K-A; Hoffer, P C; Schmalz, G

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the effect of dentine conditioning on migration, adhesion and differentiation of dental pulp stem cells. Dentine discs prepared from extracted human molars were pre-treated with EDTA (10%), NaOCl (5.25%) or H2 O. Migration of dental pulp stem cells towards pre-treated dentine after 24 and 48 h was assessed in a modified Boyden chamber assay. Cell adhesion was evaluated indirectly by measuring cell viability. Expression of mineralization-associated genes (COL1A1, ALP, BSP, DSPP, RUNX2) in cells cultured on pre-treated dentine for 7 days was determined by RT-qPCR. Nonparametric statistical analysis was performed for cell migration and cell viability data to compare different groups and time-points (Mann-Whitney U-test, α = 0.05). Treatment of dentine with H2 O or EDTA allowed for cell attachment, which was prohibited by NaOCl with statistical significance (P = 0.000). Furthermore, EDTA conditioning induced cell migration towards dentine. The expression of mineralization-associated genes was increased in dental pulp cells cultured on dentine after EDTA conditioning compared to H2 O-pre-treated dentine discs. EDTA conditioning of dentine promoted the adhesion, migration and differentiation of dental pulp stem cells towards or onto dentine. A pre-treatment with EDTA as the final step of an irrigation protocol for regenerative endodontic procedures has the potential to act favourably on new tissue formation within the root canal. © 2015 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Interferon Gamma-treated Dental Pulp Stem Cells Promote Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell Migration In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strojny, Chelsee; Boyle, Michael; Bartholomew, Amelia; Sundivakkam, Premanand; Alapati, Satish

    2015-08-01

    Chronic inflammation disrupts dental pulp regeneration by disintegrating the recruitment process of progenitors for repair. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) share the common features with dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs). The aim of the study was to investigate the migration of BM-MSCs toward DPSCs in response to inflammatory chemoattractants. Additionally, our studies also delineated the signaling mechanisms from BM-MSCs in mediating the proliferation and differentiation of DPSCs in vitro. Human DPSCs and BM-MSCs between passages 2 and 4 were used and were grown in odontogenic differentiation medium. Mineralization was determined by alizarin red staining analysis. Migration was assessed using crystal violet staining in cells grown in Boyden chamber Transwell inserts (Corning Inc Foundation, Tewksbury, MA). The mineralization potential of DPSCs was evaluated using alkaline phosphatase activity assay. Real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis was performed to assess the gene expression profile of chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand (Cxcl) 3, 5, 6, 10, 11, 12, 14, and 16; stromal cell-derived factor (SDF) α; vascular endothelial growth factor; and fibroblast growth factor. Interferon gamma (FN-γ) treatment significantly abrogated the differentiation potential of DPSCs as shown by using alizarin red and alkaline phosphatase activity analysis. An increase in the migration of BM-MSCs was documented when cocultured with IFN-γ-treated DPSCs. RNA expression studies showed an increase in the levels of Cxcl6 and Cxcl12 in BM-MSCs when cocultured with IFN-γ-treated DPSCs. Additionally, an up-regulation of proangiogenic factors vascular endothelial growth factor and fibroblast growth factor were observed in DPSCs exposed to IFN-γ. Our findings indicate that inflamed IFN-γ-treated DPSCs release factors (presumably Cxcl6 and 12) that contribute to the homing of MSCs. This model might provide a potential research tool for studying MSC-DPSC cross talk and

  18. MiR-200a enhances the migrations of A549 and SK-MES-1 cells by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    By a series of gain-of-function and loss-offunction studies, over-expression of miR-200a was indicated to enhance cells migration, and its knock-down inhibited migration of cells in NSCLC cell lines. Furthermore, miR-200a was identified to induce TSPAN1 expression which was related to migration. TSPAN1 was proved to ...

  19. Proper migration and axon outgrowth of zebrafish cranial motoneuron subpopulations require the cell adhesion molecule MDGA2A.

    OpenAIRE

    Esther Ingold; Vom Berg-Maurer, Colette M; Burckhardt, Christoph J.; André Lehnherr; Philip Rieder; Philip J. Keller; Stelzer, Ernst H; Greber, Urs F.; Neuhauss, Stephan C F; Matthias Gesemann

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The formation of functional neuronal circuits relies on accurate migration and proper axonal outgrowth of neuronal precursors. On the route to their targets migrating cells and growing axons depend on both, directional information from neurotropic cues and adhesive interactions mediated via extracellular matrix molecules or neighbouring cells. The inactivation of guidance cues or the interference with cell adhesion can cause severe defects in neuronal migration and axon guidance. In ...

  20. Resveratrol inhibits IL-6-induced ovarian cancer cell migration through epigenetic up-regulation of autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraresi, Alessandra; Phadngam, Suratchanee; Morani, Federica; Galetto, Alessandra; Alabiso, Oscar; Chiorino, Giovanna; Isidoro, Ciro

    2017-03-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6), a pro-inflammatory cytokine released by cancer-associated fibroblasts, has been linked to the invasive and metastatic behavior of ovarian cancer cells. Resveratrol is a naturally occurring polyphenol with the potential to inhibit cancer cell migration. Here we show that Resveratrol and IL-6 affect in an opposite manner the expression of RNA messengers and of microRNAs involved in cell locomotion and extracellular matrix remodeling associated with the invasive properties of ovarian cancer cells. Among the several potential candidates responsible for the anti-invasive effect promoted by Resveratrol, here we focused our attention on ARH-I (DIRAS3), that encodes a Ras homolog GTPase of 26-kDa. This protein is known to inhibit cell motility, and it has been shown to regulate autophagy by interacting with BECLIN 1. IL-6 down-regulated the expression of ARH-I and inhibited the formation of LC3-positive autophagic vacuoles, while promoting cell migration. On opposite, Resveratrol could counteract the IL-6 induction of cell migration in ovarian cancer cells through induction of autophagy in the cells at the migration front, which was paralleled by up-regulation of ARH-I and down-regulation of STAT3 expression. Spautin 1-mediated disruption of BECLIN 1-dependent autophagy abrogated the effects of Resveratrol, while promoting cell migration. The present data indicate that Resveratrol elicits its anti-tumor effect through epigenetic mechanisms and support its inclusion in the chemotherapy regimen for highly aggressive ovarian cancers. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. NOR1 promotes hepatocellular carcinoma cell proliferation and migration through modulating the Notch signaling pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, Kun; Sun, Peisheng; Yue, Zhongyi; Li, Jian; Xiong, Wancheng; Wang, Jianguo, E-mail: jianguowangjgw@163.com

    2017-03-15

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignant tumors worldwide. Previous studies have reported that the oxidored-nitro domain containing protein 1 (NOR1) is a novel tumor suppressor in several tumors. Recent evidence suggests that NOR1 is strongly expressed in HCC cells. However, its role and mechanism in HCC are unclear. In the current study, Western blot and qPCR detected strong NOR1 mRNA and protein expression in HepG2 and Hep3B cells. After transfection with NOR1 siRNA or pcDNA3.1-myc-his-NOR1, the proliferation and migration of HepG2 and Hep3B cells were analyzed in vitro. HepG2 or Hep3B cells overexpressing NOR1 showed an increased proliferation and migration, whereas siRNA-mediated silencing of NOR1 showed the opposite effect. Furthermore, NOR1 activated the Notch signaling pathway, indicated by increased levels of Notch1, NICD, Hes1, and Hey1 in protein. Importantly, the Notch inhibitor DAPT downregulated Notch activation and further enhanced siNOR1-induced reduction of cell proliferation and migration in HepG2 and Hep3B cells, whereas DAPT reversed the effect of NOR1 overexpression on cell proliferation and migration. In conclusion, these results indicate that NOR1 may be involved in the progression of HCC and thus may be a potential target for the treatment of liver cancer. - Highlights: • NOR1 expression is up-regulated in HCC cells. • NOR1 promotes the proliferation and migration of HCC cells. • NOR1 promotes the progression of HCC cells by activating Notch pathway.

  2. Simultaneous loss of the DLC1 and PTEN tumor suppressors enhances breast cancer cell migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heering, Johanna; Erlmann, Patrik [University of Stuttgart, Institute of Cell Biology and Immunology, Allmandring 31, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Olayioye, Monilola A., E-mail: monilola.olayioye@izi.uni-stuttgart.de [University of Stuttgart, Institute of Cell Biology and Immunology, Allmandring 31, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2009-09-10

    The phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) gene is a tumor suppressor frequently deleted or mutated in sporadic tumors of the breast, prostate, endometrium and brain. The protein acts as a dual specificity phosphatase for lipids and proteins. PTEN loss confers a growth advantage to cells, protects from apoptosis and favors cell migration. The deleted in liver cancer 1 (DLC1) gene has emerged as a novel tumor suppressor downregulated in a variety of tumor types including those of the breast. DLC1 contains a Rho GTPase activating domain that is involved in the inhibition of cell proliferation, migration and invasion. To investigate how simultaneous loss of PTEN and DLC1 contributes to cell transformation, we downregulated both proteins by RNA interference in the non-invasive MCF7 breast carcinoma cell line. Joint depletion of PTEN and DLC1 resulted in enhanced cell migration in wounding and chemotactic transwell assays. Interestingly, both proteins were found to colocalize at the plasma membrane and interacted physically in biochemical pulldowns and coimmunoprecipitations. We therefore postulate that the concerted local inactivation of signaling pathways downstream of PTEN and DLC1, respectively, is required for the tight control of cell migration.

  3. PDGFBB promotes PDGFR{alpha}-positive cell migration into artificial bone in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Shigeyuki [Department of Dentistry and Oral Surgery, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinano-machi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Center for Human Metabolomic Systems Biology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinano-machi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Iwasaki, Ryotaro; Kawana, Hiromasa [Department of Dentistry and Oral Surgery, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinano-machi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Miyauchi, Yoshiteru [Center for Human Metabolomic Systems Biology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinano-machi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinano-machi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Department of Integrated Bone Metabolism and Immunology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinano-machi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Hoshi, Hiroko; Miyamoto, Hiroya; Mori, Tomoaki [Center for Human Metabolomic Systems Biology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinano-machi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinano-machi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Kanagawa, Hiroya [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinano-machi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Katsuyama, Eri; Fujie, Atsuhiro [Center for Human Metabolomic Systems Biology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinano-machi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinano-machi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Hao, Wu [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinano-machi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); and others

    2012-05-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examined effects of PDGFBB in PDGFR{alpha} positive cell migration in artificial bones. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PDGFBB was not expressed in osteoblastic cells but was expressed in peripheral blood cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PDGFBB promoted PDGFR{alpha} positive cell migration into artificial bones but not osteoblast proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PDGFBB did not inhibit osteoblastogenesis. -- Abstract: Bone defects caused by traumatic bone loss or tumor dissection are now treated with auto- or allo-bone graft, and also occasionally by artificial bone transplantation, particularly in the case of large bone defects. However, artificial bones often exhibit poor affinity to host bones followed by bony union failure. Thus therapies combining artificial bones with growth factors have been sought. Here we report that platelet derived growth factor bb (PDGFBB) promotes a significant increase in migration of PDGF receptor {alpha} (PDGFR{alpha})-positive mesenchymal stem cells/pre-osteoblastic cells into artificial bone in vivo. Growth factors such as transforming growth factor beta (TGF{beta}) and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) reportedly inhibit osteoblast differentiation; however, PDGFBB did not exhibit such inhibitory effects and in fact stimulated osteoblast differentiation in vitro, suggesting that combining artificial bones with PDGFBB treatment could promote host cell migration into artificial bones without inhibiting osteoblastogenesis.

  4. Cathepsin K modulates invasion, migration and adhesion of oral squamous cell carcinomas in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, K; Iwatake, M; Okamoto, K; Yamada, S-I; Umeda, M; Tsukuba, T

    2017-05-01

    Cathepsin K was initially discovered as an osteoclast-specific cysteine proteinase, but the enzyme is also expressed in various cancers including oral squamous cell carcinomas. This study aimed to clarify the function of cathepsin K in oral squamous cell carcinomas. Expression levels of cathepsin K were examined in six types of cell carcinomas. Carcinomas overexpressing cathepsin K were constructed. Effects of cathepsin K overexpression and treatment with odanacatib, a specific cathepsin K inhibitor, on cell invasion, migration and adhesion were analysed. Different levels of cathepsin K were expressed in carcinomas. Cathepsin K was predominantly localised in lysosomes. Cathepsin K overexpression impaired the proliferation of carcinomas. Invasion analysis showed that cathepsin K overexpression enhanced invasion and migration of carcinomas, whereas inhibition of cathepsin K by odanacatib caused the opposite effects in carcinomas. Cathepsin K overexpression also increased cell adhesion and slightly increased surface expression of the adhesion receptor CD29/integrin β1 . The enhanced invasion of carcinomas resulting from cathepsin K overexpression is probably due to the increased cell migration and adhesion. Thus, cathepsin K is implicated not only in protein degradation but also in invasion, migration and adhesion of oral squamous cell carcinomas. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Nature's rheologists: Lymphatic endothelial cells control migration in response to shear stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Gerald; Dunn, Alex; Surya, Vinay

    2015-03-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) line the inner surface of blood and lymphatic vessels and are sensitive to fluid flow as part of their physiological function. EC organization, migration and vessel development are profoundly influenced by shear stresses, with important implications in cardiovascular disease and tumor metastasis. How ECs sense fluid flow is a central and unanswered question in cardiovascular biology. We developed a high-throughput live-cell flow chamber that models the gradients in wall shear stress experienced by ECs in vivo. Live-cell imaging allows us to probe cellular responses to flow, most notably EC migration, which has a key role in vessel remodeling. We find that most EC subtypes, including ECs from the venous, arterial, and microvascular systems, migrate in the flow direction. In contrast, human lymphatic microvascular ECs (hLMVECs) migrate against flow and up spatial gradients in wall shear stress. Further experiments reveal that hLMVECs are sensitive to the magnitude, direction, and the local spatial gradients in wall shear stress. Lastly, recent efforts have aimed to link this directional migration to spatial gradients in cell-mediated small molecule emission that may be linked to the gradient in wall shear stress.

  6. Immune complexes stimulate CCR7-dependent dendritic cell migration to lymph nodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clatworthy, Menna R.; Aronin, Caren E. Petrie; Mathews, Rebeccah J.; Morgan, Nicole; Smith, Kenneth G.C.; Germain, Ronald N.

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies are critical for defence against a variety of microbes but may also be pathogenic in some autoimmune diseases. Many effector functions of antibody are mediated by Fcγ receptors (FcγRs), which are found on most immune cells, including dendritic cells (DCs). DCs are important antigen presenting cells and play a central role in inducing antigen-specific tolerance or immunity1,2. Following antigen acquisition in peripheral tissues, DCs migrate to draining lymph nodes via lymphatics to present antigen to T cells. In this study we demonstrate that FcγR engagement by IgG immune complexes (IC) stimulates DC migration from peripheral tissues to the paracortex of draining lymph nodes. In vitro, IC-stimulated murine and human DCs showed enhanced directional migration in a CCL19 gradient and increased CCR7 expression. Using intravital two-photon microscopy, we observed that local administration of IC resulted in dermal DC mobilisation. We confirmed that dermal DC migration to lymph nodes was CCR7-dependent and increased in the absence of the inhibitory receptor, FcγRIIb. These observations have relevance to autoimmunity, because autoantibody-containing serum from mice and humans with SLE also increased dermal DC migration to lymph nodes in vivo, suggesting that this process may occur in lupus, potentially driving the inappropriate localisation of autoantigen-bearing DCs. PMID:25384086

  7. Jin Fu Kang Oral Liquid Inhibits Lymphatic Endothelial Cells Formation and Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Lang He

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Jin Fu Kang (JFK, an oral liquid prescription of Chinese herbal drugs, has been clinically available for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Lymphangiogenesis is a primary event in the process of cancer development and metastasis, and the formation and migration of lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs play a key role in the lymphangiogenesis. To assess the activity of stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1 and the coeffect of SDF-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor-C (VEGF-C on the formation and migration of LECs and clarify the inhibitory effects of JFK on the LECs, the LECs were differentiated from CD34+/VEGFR-3+ endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs, and JFK-containing serums were prepared from rats. SDF-1 and VEGF-C both induced the differentiation of CD34+/VEGFR-3+ EPCs towards LECs and enhanced the LECs migration. Couse of SDF-1 and VEGF-C displayed an additive effect on the LECs formation but not on their migration. JFK inhibited the formation and migration of LECs, and the inhibitory effects were most probably via regulation of the SDF-1/CXCR4 and VEGF-C/VEGFR-3 axes. The current finding suggested that JFK might inhibit NSCLC through antilymphangiogenesis and also provided a potential to discover antilymphangiogenesis agents from natural resources.

  8. Recombinant Rat CC10 Protein Inhibits PDGF-Induced Airway Smooth Muscle Cells Proliferation and Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Wei

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abnormal migration and proliferation of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs in the airway cause airway wall thickening, which is strongly related with the development of airway remodeling in asthma. Clara cell 10 kDa protein (CC10, which is secreted by the epithelial clara cells of the pulmonary airways, plays an important role in the regulation of immunological and inflammatory processes. Previous studies suggested that CC10 protein had great protective effects against inflammation in asthma. However, the effects of CC10 protein on ASMCs migration and proliferation in airway remodeling were poorly understood. In this study, we constructed the pET-22b-CC10 recombinant plasmid, induced expression and purified the recombinant rat CC10 protein from E. coli by Ni2+ affinity chromatography and ion exchange chromatography purification. We investigated the effect of recombinant rat CC10 protein on platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-BB-induced ASMCs proliferation and migration. Our results demonstrated that the recombinant CC10 protein could inhibit PDGF-BB-induced cell viability, proliferation and migration. Western blot analysis showed that PDGF-BB-induced activation of cyclin D1 was inhibited by CC10. These findings implicated that CC10 could inhibit increased ASMCs proliferation, and migration induced by PDGF-BB, and this suppression effect might be associated with inhibition of cyclin D1 expression, which might offer hope for the future treatment of airway remodeling.

  9. Pterostilbene Inhibits Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Migration and Matrix Metalloproteinase-2 through Modulation of MAPK Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsing-Chun; Hsieh, Ming-Ju; Peng, Chiung-Huei; Yang, Shun-Fa; Huang, Chien-Ning

    2015-10-01

    Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) migration and matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) activation are main roles in atherosclerosis. Pterostilbene (trans-3, 5-dimethoxy-4-hydroxystilbene) is known to have various pharmacologic effects such as anti-inflammatory and anticarcinogenic properties. The present study aimed to investigate the anti-atheroscleroic property of pterostilbene in the rat smooth muscle cell (SMC) A7r9 cell lines and the underlying mechanisms. In this study, pterostilbene treatment significantly inhibited migration/invasion capacities of in A7r9 cell. Pterostilbene was also found to significantly decreased MMP-2 activity and expression by gelatin zymography and western blot assay in SMC. In the MAPK signaling pathway, western blot assay also indicated that pterostilbene up-regulated the phosphorylation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (Erk)1/2. Moreover, inhibition of Erk1/2 by specific inhibitors significantly abolished the pterostilbene-decreased expression of MMP-2 and migration/invasion capacities. These findings suggest that pterostilbene inhibited SMC migration and that MMP-2 activation could be mediated via Erk1/2 phosphorylation. It is further possible that pterostilbene could play a novel role in the treatment of atherosclerosis. Pterostilbene is a plant polyphenol compound that is principally found in blueberries. In this study, we found that pterostilbene could inhibit SMCs migration via down-regulation of MMP-2. Particularly, expression of MMP-2 was found to be strongly associated with the phosphorylation of Erk1/2. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  10. Shift of microRNA profile upon glioma cell migration using patient-derived spheroids and serum-free conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munthe, Sune; Halle, Bo; Boldt, Henning B; Christiansen, Helle; Schmidt, Steffen; Kaimal, Vivek; Xu, Jessica; Zabludoff, Sonya; Mollenhauer, Jan; Poulsen, Frantz R; Kristensen, Bjarne W

    2017-03-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most frequent malignant primary brain tumor. A major reason for the overall median survival being only 14.6 months is migrating tumor cells left behind after surgery. Another major reason is tumor cells having a so-called cancer stem cell phenotype being therefore resistant towards traditional chemo- and radiotherapy. A group of novel molecular targets are microRNAs (miRNAs). MiRNAs are small non-coding RNAs exerting post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. The aim of this study was to identify differentially expressed miRNAs in migrating GBM cells using serum-free stem cell conditions. We used patient-derived GBM spheroid cultures for a novel serum-free migration assay. MiRNA expression of migrating tumor cells isolated at maximum migration speed was compared with corresponding spheroids using an OpenArray Real-Time PCR System. The miRNA profiling revealed 30 miRNAs to be differentially expressed. In total 13 miRNAs were upregulated and 17 downregulated in migrating cells compared to corresponding spheroids. The three most deregulated miRNAs, miR-1227 (up-regulated), miR-32 (down-regulated) and miR-222 (down-regulated), were experimentally overexpressed. A non-significantly increased migration rate was observed after miR-1227 overexpression. A significantly reduced migration rate was observed after miR-32 and miR-222 overexpression. In conclusion a shift in microRNA profile upon glioma cell migration was identified using an assay avoiding serum-induced migration. Both the miRNA profiling and the functional validation suggested that miR-1227 may be associated with increased migration and miR-32 and miR-222 with decreased migration. These miRNAs may represent potential novel targets in migrating glioma cells.

  11. Heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycans modulate migration and survival in zebrafish primordial germ cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ke-Hsuan; Liu, I-Hsuan

    2014-06-01

    Early in embryonic development, primordial germ cells (PGCs) are specified and migrate from the site of their origin to where the gonad develops, following a specific route. Heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycans (HS-GAGs) are ubiquitous in extracellular matrix and the cell surface and have long been speculated to play a role during the migration of PGCs. In line with this speculation, whole-mount immunohistochemistry revealed the existence of HS-GAGs in the vicinity of migrating PGCs in early zebrafish embryos. To examine the roles of HS-GAGs during PGC migration, zebrafish heparanase 1 (hpse1), which degrades HS-GAGs, was cloned and overexpressed specifically in PGCs. The guidance signal for the migration of PGCs was disrupted with the overexpression of hpse1, as cluster formation and marginal localization at the blastoderm were significantly perturbed at 6 hours postfertilization. Furthermore, the number of PGCs was significantly decreased with the lack of vicinal HS-GAGs, as observed in the whole-mount in situ hybridization and quantitative PCR of the PGC marker gene vasa. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling indicated significantly increased apoptosis in PGCs overexpressing hpse1, suggesting that HS-GAGs contribute to the maintenance of PGC survival. In conclusion, HS-GAGs play multifaceted roles in PGCs during migration and are required both for guidance signals and multiplication of PGCs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Cancer Cell Migration within 3D Layer-By-Layer Microfabricated Photocrosslinked PEG Scaffolds with Tunable Stiffness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soman, Pranav; Kelber, Jonathan A.; Lee, Jin Woo; Wright, Tracy; Vecchio, Kenneth S.; Klemke, Richard L.; Chen, Shaochen

    2012-01-01

    Our current understanding of 3-dimensional (3D) cell migration is primarily based on results from fibrous scaffolds with randomly organized internal architecture. Manipulations that change the stiffness of these 3D scaffolds often alter other matrix parameters that can modulate cell motility independently or synergistically, making observations less predictive of how cells behave when migrating in 3D. In order to decouple microstructural influences and stiffness effects, we have designed and fabricated 3D polyethylene glycol (PEG) scaffolds that permit orthogonal tuning of both elastic moduli and microstructure. Scaffolds with log-pile architectures were used to compare the 3D migration properties of normal breast epithelial cells (HMLE) and Twist-transformed cells (HMLET). Our results indicate that the nature of cell migration is significantly impacted by the ability of cells to migrate in the third dimension. 2D ECM-coated PEG substrates revealed no statistically significant difference in cell migration between HMLE and HMLET cells among substrates of different stiffness. However, when cells were allowed to move along the third dimension, substantial differences were observed for cell displacement, velocity and path straightness parameters. Furthermore, these differences were sensitive to both substrate stiffness and the presence of the Twist oncogene. Importantly, these 3D modes of migration provide insight into the potential for oncogene-transformed cells to migrate within and colonize tissues of varying stiffness. PMID:22809641

  13. Ion channels involved in cell volume regulation: effects on migration, proliferation, and programmed cell death in non adherent EAT cells and adherent ELA cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Else Kay

    2011-01-01

    This mini review outlines studies of cell volume regulation in two closely related mammalian cell lines: nonadherent Ehrlich ascites tumour cells (EATC) and adherent Ehrlich Lettre ascites (ELA) cells. Focus is on the regulatory volume decrease (RVD) that occurs after cell swelling, the volume regulatory ion channels involved, and the mechanisms (cellular signalling pathways) that regulate these channels. Finally, I shall also briefly review current investigations in these two cell lines that focuses on how changes in cell volume can regulate cell functions such as cell migration, proliferation, and programmed cell death. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Nitric oxide enhances keratinocyte cell migration by regulating Rho GTPase via cGMP-PKG signalling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rixing Zhan

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO has been shown to improve wound healing, but the mechanism underlying this function is not well defined. Here, we explored the effect of NO on the migration of a human keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT and its possible mechanism.The effects of NO on HaCaT cells in the presence of different concentrations of the NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP were evaluated in a cell migration assay. Subsequently, the cytoskeleton reorganization of cultured HaCaT cells stained with rhodamine-phalloidin was observed with a confocal laser scanning microscope. The mRNA expression and active proteins of CDC42, Rac1 and RhoA in the cultured cells were determined via RT-PCR and pull-down assays, respectively. Furthermore, the roles of various inhibitors or agonists specific to cGMP, PKG and CDC42, Rac1, RhoA in the effects of NO on HaCaT cell migration, F-actin stress fibre formation, and Rho GTPase expression were observed.It was also found HaCaT cell migration was increased by SNP in a dose-dependent manner, and the other two NO donors either spermine NONOate or SNAP had almost the same effects on HaCat cell migrations. The formation of F-actin stress fibres in SNP-treated HaCaT cells was increased. The mRNA expression and the active proteins of CDC42, Rac1 and RhoA were found to be upregulated after SNP treatment. Similar effects were observed after the cells were treated with a cGMP or PKG agonist. Additionally, the SNP-mediated upregulation of the mRNA expression and the active proteins of CDC42, Rac1 and RhoA were inhibited by the addition of an inhibitor of cGMP or PKG. Moreover, the SNP-mediated promoting effects of migration and cytoskeleton reorganization were inhibited by treatment with inhibitors of cGMP, PKG, CDC42, Rac1 and RhoA respectively.Our data indicated that the stimulatory effects of NO on cell migration of HaCaT cells are mediated by the cGMP signalling pathway via the upregulation of Rho-GTPase expression, which might promote

  15. Effects of Garlic Oil on the Migration of Neutrophil-Like Cell Studied by Using a Chemotactic Gradient Labchip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Chen Shih

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We have designed and fabricated a novel chemotactic gradient Labchip for studying cell migration quantitatively. Owing to the great potential of garlic and its preparations in developing antiinflammatory drugs, the aim of the present study is to investigate the effect of garlic oil on the locomotion of a neutrophil-like cell by measuring the dynamic features of cell migration including migration direction, average migration speed, chemotactic index (CI, and motility index (MI with the newly designed Labchip. We found that garlic oil treatment lowered the values of CI and MI and reduced the average speed of cell migration from 13 to 8 μm/min. The results indicate that garlic oil is a potential inhibitor for neutrophil-like cell migration and chemotactic responsiveness. By comparing with the effects of nocodazole and cytochalasin B, we also suggest that the antiinflammatory activity exhibited by garlic oil was mainly through inhibiting the assembly-disassembly processes of the cytoskeleton.

  16. NFAT5 promotes proliferation and migration of lung adenocarcinoma cells in part through regulating AQP5 expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Kai, E-mail: gk161@163.com [Department of Respiration, Tangdu Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710038 (China); Department of Respiration, 161th Hospital, PLA, Wuhan 430015 (China); Jin, Faguang, E-mail: jinfag@fmmu.edu.cn [Department of Respiration, Tangdu Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710038 (China)

    2015-09-25

    The osmoregulated transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T-cells 5(NFAT5), has been found to play important roles in the development of many kinds of human cancers, including breast cancer, colon carcinoma, renal cell carcinoma and melanoma. The aim of the present study was to determine whether NFAT5 is involved in the proliferation and migration of lung adenocarcinoma cells. We found that NFAT5 was upregulated in lung adenocarcinoma cells and knockdown of NFAT5 decreased proliferation and migration of the cells, accompanied by a significant reduction in the expression of AQP5. AQP5 was upregulated in lung adenocarcinoma cells and knockdown of AQP5 also inhibited proliferation and migration of the cells as knockdown of NFAT5 did. Moreover, overexpression of NFAT5 promoted proliferation and migration of lung adenocarcinoma cells, accompanied by a significant increase in the expression of AQP5. These results indicate that NFAT5 plays important roles in proliferation and migration of human lung adenocarcinoma cells through regulating AQP5 expression, providing a new therapeutic option for lung adenocarcinoma therapy. - Highlights: • NFAT5 expression is higher in lung adenocarcinoma cells compared with normal cells. • NFAT5 knockdown decreases proliferation and migration of lung adenocarcinoma cells. • Knockdown of NFAT5 reduces AQP5 expression in human lung adenocarcinoma cells. • Overexpression of NFAT5 promotes proliferation and migration of lung adenocarcinoma cells. • Overexpression of NFAT5 increases AQP5 expression in human lung adenocarcinoma cells.

  17. Cross-talk between cell adhesion molecules regulates the migration velocity of neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainger, G E; Buckley, C; Simmons, D L; Nash, G B

    1997-05-01

    Although the adhesive mechanisms underlying the capture and immobilization of circulating neutrophils in inflamed blood vessels have been well described, factors controlling the subsequent migration of neutrophils over and through the blood vessel endothelium are poorly understood. Directional rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton within the neutrophil, along with modulation of integrin-mediated adhesion, are necessary for neutrophil migration. Signals from chemotactic agents and from the adhesive substrate may regulate these processes, but little is known about their relative importance or their mode of integration. We examined the kinetics of neutrophil migration after formyl tripeptide or platelet-activating factor was perfused over neutrophils that were already rolling on the adhesion molecule P-selectin, which was presented either on the surface of immobilized platelets or in purified form coated on glass capillaries. Upon activation, neutrophils stopped rolling, spread and began to migrate; each of these processes was dependent on beta2 integrin (CD11b/CD18). The rate of migration increased over a period of about 8 minutes and was modulated directly by both the P-selectin and the CD31 surface receptors. Antibody blockade of either CD31 or P-selectin on platelets resulted in a reduction in the velocity of migration, and simultaneous blockade of both receptors reduced velocity further. Purified CD31 and P-selectin (but not a control adhesion molecule, ICAM-1) increased migration velocity in a concentration-dependent and additive manner that reconstituted the migratory behaviour observed on platelets. These studies show that binding of ligands to CD31 and/or P-selectin modifies the rate of integrin-supported neutrophil migration. This novel example of 'cross-talk' between surface receptors suggests that cell adhesion molecules might generally transduce accessory signals between adjacent cells to modify their migratory responses to chemotactic signals.

  18. Neurotrophin-induced migration and neuronal differentiation of multipotent astrocytic stem cells in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Douglas-Escobar

    Full Text Available Hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE affects 2-3 per 1000 full-term neonates. Up to 75% of newborns with severe HIE die or have severe neurological handicaps. Stem cell therapy offers the potential to replace HIE-damaged cells and enhances the autoregeneration process. Our laboratory implanted Multipotent Astrocytic Stem Cells (MASCs into a neonatal rat model of hypoxia-ischemia (HI and demonstrated that MASCs move to areas of injury in the cortex and hippocampus. However, only a small proportion of the implanted MASCs differentiated into neurons. MASCs injected into control pups did not move into the cortex or differentiate into neurons. We do not know the mechanism by which the MASCs moved from the site of injection to the injured cortex. We found neurotrophins present after the hypoxic-ischemic milieu and hypothesized that neurotrophins could enhance the migration and differentiation of MASCs. Using a Boyden chamber device, we demonstrated that neurotrophins potentiate the in vitro migration of stem cells. NGF, GDNF, BDNF and NT-3 increased stem cell migration when compared to a chemokinesis control. Also, MASCs had increased differentiation toward neuronal phenotypes when these neurotrophins were added to MASC culture tissue. Due to this finding, we believed neurotrophins could guide migration and differentiation of stem cell transplants after brain injury.

  19. Tramadol inhibits proliferation, migration and invasion via α2-adrenoceptor signaling in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, M; Tong, J-H; Zhou, Z-Q; Duan, M-L; Xu, J-G; Zeng, H-J; Wang, S-H

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the function of tramadol on cell proliferation, migration and invasion in breast cancer cells in vitro, and to evaluate the effect of tramadol in vivo. Further, we explore the mechanism accounting for the role of tramadol on breast cancer cells. Cell proliferation was detected by the methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay. Wound healing assay and transwell assay was applied to quantify the migration and invasion ability of MDA-MB-231 cells. The expression of endogenous α2-adrenoceptor and ERK was measured by Western blotting. Tramadol at a clinical dose of up to 2 μM significantly inhibited the proliferation, migration and invasion in a time-dependent manner from day 0 to 28 in vitro. Moreover, tramadol suppressed the growth of xenotransplant tumor in vivo markedly. Furthermore, the protein levels of α2-adrenoceptor and phosphorylated ERK were decreased by tramadol, whereas the expression of total ERK remained unchanged. In addition, downregulation of α2-adrenoceptor by yohimbine could mimic the effect of tramadol treatment. Collectively, we demonstrated that tramadol could inhibit proliferation, migration and invasion of breast cancers via inactivating α2-adrenoceptor signaling pathway. Our data provide the experimental fundamental for further investigation of the anti-cancer effect of tramadol in breast cancer cells.

  20. Cardiotoxin III Inhibits Proliferation and Migration of Oral Cancer Cells through MAPK and MMP Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Yu Yen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiotoxin III (CTXIII, isolated from the snake venom of Formosan cobra Naja naja atra, has previously been found to induce apoptosis in many types of cancer. Early metastasis is typical for the progression of oral cancer. To modulate the cell migration behavior of oral cancer is one of the oral cancer therapies. In this study, the possible modulating effect of CTXIII on oral cancer migration is addressed. In the example of oral squamous carcinoma Ca9-22 cells, the cell viability was decreased by CTXIII treatment in a dose-responsive manner. In wound-healing assay, the cell migration of Ca9-22 cells was attenuated by CTXIII in a dose- and time-responsive manner. After CTXIII treatment, the MMP-2 and MMP-9 protein expressions were downregulated, and the phosphorylation of JNK and p38-MAPK was increased independent of ERK phosphorylation. In conclusion, CTXIII has antiproliferative and -migrating effects on oral cancer cells involving the p38-MAPK and MMP-2/-9 pathways.

  1. MiR-200c suppresses the migration of retinoblastoma cells by reversing epithelial mesenchymal transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Lei Shao

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To analyze the relationship between clinical features and epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT in retinoblastoma (RB, further to investigate whether miR-200c regulates the EMT and migration of RB cells. METHODS: Expression of EMT-related markers and tumor-related factors were detected by immuno-histochemistry analysis in RB tissue from 29 cases. Correlations between their expression and clinical characteristics were analyzed. The regulation effects of miR-200c on EMT-related markers, tumor-related factors were observed in mRNA level and protein level by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR and Western blot, respectively, in Y79 and Weri-rb1 cells. Its effects on migration force of these RB cell lines were also detected with Transwell test. RESULTS: Lower expression of E-cadherin was present in the cases with malignant prognosis. MiR-200c promoted the expression of E-cadherin and decreased the expression of Vimentin and N-cadherin in Y79 and Weri-rb1 cells. Migration force of RB cells could be inhibited by miR-200c. CONCLUSION: EMT might be associated with bad prognosis in RB. MiR-200c suppresses the migration of retinoblastomatous cells by reverse EMT.

  2. Calpain2 mediates Rab5-driven focal adhesion disassembly and cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Pablo A; Silva, Patricio; Díaz, Jorge; Arriagada, Cecilia; Canales, Jimena; Cerda, Oscar; Torres, Vicente A

    2017-11-03

    The early endosome protein Rab5 was recently shown to promote cell migration by enhancing focal adhesion disassembly through mechanisms that remain elusive. Focal adhesion disassembly is associated to proteolysis of talin, in a process that requires calpain2. Since calpain2 has been found at vesicles and endosomal compartments, we hypothesized that Rab5 stimulates calpain2 activity, leading to enhanced focal adhesion disassembly in migrating cells. We observed that calpain2 co-localizes with EEA1-positive early endosomes and co-immunoprecipitates with EEA1 and Rab5 in A549 lung carcinoma cells undergoing spreading, whereas Rab5 knock-down decreased the accumulation of calpain2 at early endosomal-enriched fractions. In addition, Rab5 silencing decreased calpain2 activity, as shown by cleavage of the fluorogenic substrate tBOC-LM-CMAC and the endogenous substrate talin. Accordingly, Rab5 promoted focal adhesion disassembly in a calpain2-dependent manner, as expression of GFP-Rab5 accelerated focal adhesion disassembly in nocodazole-synchronized cells, whereas pharmacological inhibition of calpain2 with N-acetyl-Leu-Leu-Met prevented both focal adhesion disassembly and cell migration induced by Rab5. In summary, these data uncover Rab5 as a novel regulator of calpain2 activity and focal adhesion proteolysis leading to cell migration.

  3. Fangchinoline inhibits migration and causes apoptosis of human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Binggao; Xing, Zhibo; Wang, Fengmei; Yuan, Xinyan; Zhang, Yanhui

    2017-11-01

    In order to improve outcomes after breast cancer treatment, it is essential to understand the mechanisms of action of potential therapeutic agents. The effect of fangchinoline (FAN) on migration and apoptosis of human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells and its underlying mechanisms were investigated. MDA-MB-231 cells were treated with different concentrations of FAN, growth inhibition rates were measured by MTT assay and morphological changes of apoptotic cells were observed by Hoechst staining. The wound-healing assay was used to determine of the effect of FAN on the migration of MDA-MB-231 cells. ELISA was used to detect the expression of MMP-2 and -9 in MDA-MB-231 cells treated with different concentrations of FAN and western blot analysis was used to quantify expression of NF-κβ and Iκβ proteins in the same cells. Our results showed that FAN significantly inhibited the growth of MDA-MB-231 cells in concentration-dependent manner and it induced MDA-MB-231 cell apoptosis. With the high FAN concentrations and long exposure times, the levels of MMP-2 and -9 decreased and the expression of NF-κβ decreased, while the expression of Iκβ protein increased. Based on these results, the antitumor effects of FAN on breast cancer cells can be explained at least partially by inducing apoptosis and inhibiting the migration of MDA-MB-231 cells.

  4. Use of TIRF microscopy to visualize actin and microtubules in migrating cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manneville, Jean-Baptiste

    2006-01-01

    Total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) is the technique of choice to visualize and quantify cellular events localized at the basal plasma membrane of adherent cells. By selectively illuminating the first 200 nm above the basal membrane, it allows maximal resolution in the vertical z-axis. In this chapter, I describe a prism-based TIRF setup and the procedures to visualize the actin and microtubule cytoskeleton in migrating astrocytes. TIRF microscopy provides quantitative information on the organization of the cytoskeleton in both fixed and live migrating cells.

  5. Modeled microgravity suppressed invasion and migration of human glioblastoma U87 cells through downregulating store-operated calcium entry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Zi-xuan [Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, 710032 (China); Rao, Wei [Department of Neurosurgery, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, 710032 (China); Wang, Huan [Department of Dermatology, Tangdu Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, 710032 (China); Wang, Nan-ding [Department of Cardiology, Xi' an Traditional Chinese Medicine Hospital, Xi' an, 710032 (China); Si, Jing-Wen; Zhao, Jiao; Li, Jun-chang [Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, 710032 (China); Wang, Zong-ren, E-mail: zongren@fmmu.edu.cn [Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, 710032 (China)

    2015-02-13

    Glioblastoma is the most common brain tumor and is characterized with robust invasion and migration potential resulting in poor prognosis. Previous investigations have demonstrated that modeled microgravity (MMG) could decline the cell proliferation and attenuate the metastasis potential in several cell lines. In this study, we studied the effects of MMG on the invasion and migration potentials of glioblastoma in human glioblastoma U87 cells. We found that MMG stimulation significantly attenuated the invasion and migration potentials, decreased thapsigargin (TG) induced store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) and downregulated the expression of Orai1 in U87 cells. Inhibition of SOCE by 2-APB or stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1) downregulation both mimicked the effects of MMG on the invasion and migration potentials in U87 cells. Furthermore, upregulation of Orai1 significantly weakened the effects of MMG on the invasion and migration potentials in U87 cells. Therefore, these findings indicated that MMG stimulation inhibited the invasion and migration potentials of U87 cells by downregulating the expression of Orai1 and sequentially decreasing the SOCE, suggesting that MMG might be a new potential therapeutic strategy in glioblastoma treatment in the future. - Highlights: • Modeled microgravity (MMG) suppressed migration and invasion in U87 cells. • MMG downregulated the SOCE and the expression of Orai1. • SOCE inhibition mimicked the effects of MMG on migration and invasion potentials. • Restoration of SOCE diminished the effects of MMG on migration and invasion.

  6. Helicobacter pylori induces cell migration and invasion through casein kinase 2 in gastric epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yeo Song; Lee, Do Yeon; Yu, Da Yeon; Kim, Shin; Lee, Yong Chan

    2014-12-01

    Chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is causally linked with gastric carcinogenesis. Virulent H. pylori strains deliver bacterial CagA into gastric epithelial cells. Induction of high motility and an elongated phenotype is considered to be CagA-dependent process. Casein kinase 2 plays a critical role in carcinogenesis through signaling pathways related to the epithelial mesenchymal transition. This study was aimed to investigate the effect of H. pylori infection on the casein kinase 2-mediated migration and invasion in gastric epithelial cells. AGS or MKN28 cells as human gastric epithelial cells and H. pylori strains Hp60190 (ATCC 49503, CagA(+)) and Hp8822 (CagA(-)) were used. Cells were infected with H. pylori at multiplicity of infection of 100 : 1 for various times. We measured in vitro kinase assay to examine casein kinase 2 activity and performed immunofluorescent staining to observe E-cadherin complex. We also examined β-catenin transactivation through promoter assay and MMP7 expression by real-time PCR and ELISA. H. pylori upregulates casein kinase 2 activity and inhibition of casein kinase 2 in H. pylori-infected cells profoundly suppressed cell invasiveness and motility. We confirmed that casein kinase 2 mediates membranous α-catenin depletion through dissociation of the α-/β-catenin complex in H. pylori-infected cells. We also found that H. pylori induces β-catenin nuclear translocation and increases MMP7 expressions mediated through casein kinase 2. We show for the first time that CagA(+) H. pylori upregulates cellular invasiveness and motility through casein kinase 2. The demonstration of a mechanistic interplay between H. pylori and casein kinase 2 provides important insights into the role of CagA(+) H. pylori in the gastric cancer invasion and metastasis. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Stochastic cellular automata model of cell migration, proliferation and differentiation: validation with in vitro cultures of muscle satellite cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garijo, N; Manzano, R; Osta, R; Perez, M A

    2012-12-07

    Cell migration and proliferation has been modelled in the literature as a process similar to diffusion. However, using diffusion models to simulate the proliferation and migration of cells tends to create a homogeneous distribution in the cell density that does not correlate to empirical observations. In fact, the mechanism of cell dispersal is not diffusion. Cells disperse by crawling or proliferation, or are transported in a moving fluid. The use of cellular automata, particle models or cell-based models can overcome this limitation. This paper presents a stochastic cellular automata model to simulate the proliferation, migration and differentiation of cells. These processes are considered as completely stochastic as well as discrete. The model developed was applied to predict the behaviour of in vitro cell cultures performed with adult muscle satellite cells. Moreover, non homogeneous distribution of cells has been observed inside the culture well and, using the above mentioned stochastic cellular automata model, we have been able to predict this heterogeneous cell distribution and compute accurate quantitative results. Differentiation was also incorporated into the computational simulation. The results predicted the myotube formation that typically occurs with adult muscle satellite cells. In conclusion, we have shown how a stochastic cellular automata model can be implemented and is capable of reproducing the in vitro behaviour of adult muscle satellite cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. TNF-α promotes colon cancer cell migration and invasion by upregulating TROP-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Peng; Zhang, Zhongtao

    2018-03-01

    High levels of tumor-associated calcium signal transduction protein (TROP)-2 have been demonstrated to be strongly associated with tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α levels in colon cancer. In the present study, the effect of TNF-α on the regulation of TROP-2 expression and its effect in colon cancer cell migration and invasion were investigated in vitro . TROP-2 protein levels were evaluated in HCT-116 human colon cancer cells cultured with various concentrations of TNF-α using western blot analysis. Changes in the migratory and invasive potential of the cells were evaluated using a wound healing and transwell assay, respectively. Then, TROP-2 expression was downregulated in cells by use of siRNA, and TROP-2 knockdown was confirmed at the mRNA and protein level by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting, respectively. The migration and invasion potential of cells transfected with TROP-2 siRNA was also evaluated. Levels of several mitogen-activated protein kinase proteins, namely p38, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), were detected in cells treated with TNF-α using western blot analysis. The results demonstrated that TROP-2 protein levels increased in cells treated with lower concentrations of TNF-α, but decreased in cells treated with higher concentrations of TNF-α, compared with untreated control. Maximum TROP-2 levels were observed in cells treated with 20 µg/l TNF-α. Migration and invasion were enhanced in cells treated with 20 µg/l TNF-α. When TROP-2 was silenced in colon cancer cells by siRNA, migration and invasion were significantly decreased compared with control cells. TNF-α stimulation activated the ERK1/2 pathway, but did not significantly affect p38 and JNK phosphorylation levels. Treatment with a specific ERK1/2 inhibitor suppressed the TNF-α-induced upregulation of TROP-2 and the TNF-α-induced colon cancer cell migration and invasion. In conclusion, the

  9. White mineral trioxide aggregate induces migration and proliferation of stem cells from the apical papilla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Robert; Holland, G Rex; Chiego, Daniel; Hu, Jan C C; Nör, Jacques E; Botero, Tatiana M

    2014-07-01

    Regenerative endodontic protocols recommend white mineral trioxide aggregate (WMTA) as a capping material because of its osteoinductive properties. Stem cells from the apical papilla (SCAP) are presumed to be involved in this regenerative process, but the effects of WMTA on SCAP are largely unknown. Our hypothesis was that WMTA induces proliferation and migration of SCAP. Here we used an unsorted population of SCAP (passages 3-5) characterized by high CD24, CD146, and Stro-1 expression. The effect of WMTA on SCAP migration was assessed by using transwells, and its effect on proliferation was determined by the WST-1 assay. Fetal bovine serum (FBS) and calcium chloride-enriched medium were used as positive controls. The SCAP analyzed here showed a low percentage of STRO-1+ and CD24+ cells. Both set and unset WMTA significantly increased the short-term migration of SCAP after 6 hours (P migration and proliferation were significantly and steadily induced by the presence of 2% and 10% FBS. Collectively, these data demonstrate that WMTA induced an early short-term migration and proliferation of a mixed population of stem cells from apical papilla as compared with a later and longer-term induction by calcium chloride or FBS. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Ginsenoside Rg3 attenuates cell migration via inhibition of aquaporin 1 expression in PC-3M prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xue-Yang; Guo, Hao; Han, Jing; Hao, Feng; An, Yu; Xu, Yan; Xiaokaiti, Yilixiati; Pan, Yan; Li, Xue-Jun

    2012-05-15

    Ginsenoside Rg3 (Rg3), one of the bioactive extracts found in ginseng root, was reported to have anti-cancer activity in various cancer models. The anti-proliferation effect of Rg3 on prostate cancer cells has been well reported. To test whether Rg3 has an anti-metastatic effect on prostate cancer, we treated a highly metastatic PC-3M prostate cancer cell line with Rg3. We found that Rg3 (10μM) led to remarkable inhibition of PC-3M cell migration. Simultaneously, exposure to Rg3 suppressed expression of the aquaporin 1 (AQP1) water channel protein, which has previously been reported to be involved in cell migration. Overexpression of AQP1 attenuated Rg3-induced inhibition of cell migration, and introduction of a shRNA targeting AQP1 abrogated the inhibitory effect of Rg3, although the basal level of cell migration was decreased by RNA interference. In mechanism study, estrogen receptor- and glucocorticoid receptor-dependent pathways are proved uninvolved in the AQP1 regulation by Rg3. However, Rg3 treatment triggered the activation of p38 MAPK; and SB202190, a specific inhibitor of p38 MAPK, antagonized the Rg3-induced regulation of AQP1 and cell migration, suggesting a crucial role for p38 in the regulation process. Deletion analysis of the promoter region of AQP1 was also conducted using dual-luciferase assay, which indicated that the -1000 bp to -200 bp promoter region was involved in the AQP1 regulation by Rg3. In all, we conclude that Rg3 effectively suppresses migration of PC-3M cells by down-regulating AQP1 expression through p38 MAPK pathway and some transcription factors acting on the AQP1 promoter. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Running and rotating: modelling the dynamics of migrating cell clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copenhagen, Katherine; Gov, Nir; Gopinathan, Ajay

    Collective motion of cells is a common occurrence in many biological systems, including tissue development and repair, and tumor formation. Recent experiments have shown cells form clusters in a chemical gradient, which display three different phases of motion: translational, rotational, and random. We present a model for cell clusters based loosely on other models seen in the literature that involves a Vicsek-like alignment as well as physical collisions and adhesions between cells. With this model we show that a mechanism for driving rotational motion in this kind of system is an increased motility of rim cells. Further, we examine the details of the relationship between rim and core cells, and find that the phases of the cluster as a whole are correlated with the creation and annihilation of topological defects in the tangential component of the velocity field.

  12. Mechanical feedback through E-cadherin promotes direction sensing during collective cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Danfeng; Chen, Shann-Ching; Prasad, Mohit; He, Li; Wang, Xiaobo; Choesmel-Cadamuro, Valerie; Sawyer, Jessica K; Danuser, Gaudenz; Montell, Denise J

    2014-05-22

    E-cadherin is a major homophilic cell-cell adhesion molecule that inhibits motility of individual cells on matrix. However, its contribution to migration of cells through cell-rich tissues is less clear. We developed an in vivo sensor of mechanical tension across E-cadherin molecules, which we combined with cell-type-specific RNAi, photoactivatable Rac, and morphodynamic profiling, to interrogate how E-cadherin contributes to collective migration of cells between other cells. Using the Drosophila ovary as a model, we found that adhesion between border cells and their substrate, the nurse cells, functions in a positive feedback loop with Rac and actin assembly to stabilize forward-directed protrusion and directionally persistent movement. Adhesion between individual border cells communicates direction from the lead cell to the followers. Adhesion between motile cells and polar cells holds the cluster together and polarizes each individual cell. Thus, E-cadherin is an integral component of the guidance mechanisms that orchestrate collective chemotaxis in vivo. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Downregulation of SOK1 promotes the migration of MCF-7 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xu-Dong, E-mail: xudongchen305@hotmail.com [Key Lab of Molecular Medicine, Ministry of Education, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Cho, Chien-Yu [Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Taiwan (China)

    2011-04-08

    Highlights: {yields} SOK1 is a member of GCK-III subfamily. It is activated by oxidative stress or chemical anoxia. {yields} Barr's group have found that autophosphorylation of SOK1 is triggered by binding to the Golgi matrix protein GM130 and made the cells migration through dimeric adaptor protein 14-3-3. {yields} But what we found is that downregulation of SOK1 promotes cell migration and leads to the upregulation of GM130 and Tyr861 of FAK in MCF-7 cells. -- Abstract: SOK1 is a member of the germinal center kinase (GCK-III) subfamily but little is known about it, particularly with respect to its role in signal transduction pathways relative to tumor metastasis. By stably transfecting SOK1 siRNA into the MCF-7 breast cancer cell line we found that SOK1 promotes the migration of MCF-7 cells, as determined using wound-healing and Boyden chamber assays. However, cell proliferation assays revealed that silencing SOK1 had no effect on cell growth relative to the normal cells. Silencing SOK1 also had an effect on the expression and phosphorylation status of a number of proteins in MCF-7 cells, including FAK and GM130, whereby a decrease in SOK1 led to an increase in the expression of these proteins.

  14. Nemotic human dental pulp fibroblasts promote human dental pulp stem cells migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Shafei; Wang, Yafei; Jiang, Wenkai; Jia, Qian; Li, Jie; Wang, Wei; Wang, Haijing; Ding, Yonglin; Wang, Ping; Liu, Jun; Ni, Longxing

    2013-06-10

    Dental pulp inflammation has long been perceived as a negative factor leading to pulp disruption. Previous studies have suggested that the inflammatory reaction might be a prerequisite for the burst of progenitors implicated in pulp repair. To investigate the migration of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) in response to human dental pulp fibroblasts (HDPFs) nemosis, an in vitro model of nemosis-induced inflammation in three-dimensional culture was used in this study. We observed HDPF spheroid formation and that cell-cell adhesion between HDPFs leads to necrosis. Cell death detection and cell counting kit-8 assays showed reduced live cell numbers and increased levels of cell membrane leakage in HDPF spheroids. HDPFs spheroids expressed cyclooxygenase-2 and released an increasing amount of prostaglandin E2 and interleukin-8, indicating inflammation in response to nemosis. The Transwell assays showed that the conditioned medium from HDPFs spheroids significantly induced hDPSCs migration more than the medium from the monolayer. Taken together, these results indicate that HDPFs spheroids induce nemosis and contribute to the migration of hDPSCs. This model might provide a potential research tool for studying interactions between fibroblasts and stem cells, and studies concerning nemosis-targeted stem cells might help treat pulp inflammation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. 14-3-3ε Is required for germ cell migration in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Kirki Tsigkari

    Full Text Available Although 14-3-3 proteins participate in multiple biological processes, isoform-specific specialized functions, as well as functional redundancy are emerging with tissue and developmental stage-specificity. Accordingly, the two 14-3-3ε proteins in Drosophila exhibit functional specificity and redundancy. Homozygotes for loss of function alleles of D14-3-3ε contain significantly fewer germ line cells (pole cells in their gonads, a phenotype not shared by mutants in the other 14-3-3 gene leo. We show that although D14-3-3ε is enriched within pole cells it is required in mesodermal somatic gonad precursor cells which guide pole cells in their migration through the mesoderm and coalesce with them to form the embryonic gonad. Loss of D14-3-3ε results in defective pole cell migration, reduced pole cell number. We present evidence that D14-3-3ε loss results in reduction or loss of the transcription factor Zfh-1, one of the main regulatory molecules of the pole cell migration, from the somatic gonad precursor cells.

  16. Estradiol attenuates EGF-induced rapid uPAR mobilization and cell migration via the G-protein-coupled receptor 30 in ovarian cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henic, Emir; Noskova, Vera; Høyer-Hansen, Gunilla

    2009-01-01

    and cell migration in ovarian cancer cells and further to identify the ER involved.We used 7 ovarian cancer cell lines, cell migration assay, cellular binding of (125)I-uPA, cellular degradation of (125)I-uPA/PAI-1 complex, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for uPAR, solid-phase enzyme immunoassay...

  17. Identification of Novel Regulators of the JAK/STAT Signaling Pathway that Control Border Cell Migration in the Drosophila Ovary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afsoon Saadin

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The Janus Kinase/Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription (JAK/STAT signaling pathway is an essential regulator of cell migration both in mammals and fruit flies. Cell migration is required for normal embryonic development and immune response but can also lead to detrimental outcomes, such as tumor metastasis. A cluster of cells termed “border cells” in the Drosophila ovary provides an excellent example of a collective cell migration, in which two different cell types coordinate their movements. Border cells arise within the follicular epithelium and are required to invade the neighboring cells and migrate to the oocyte to contribute to a fertilizable egg. Multiple components of the STAT signaling pathway are required during border cell specification and migration; however, the functions and identities of other potential regulators of the pathway during these processes are not yet known. To find new components of the pathway that govern cell invasiveness, we knocked down 48 predicted STAT modulators using RNAi expression in follicle cells, and assayed defective cell movement. We have shown that seven of these regulators are involved in either border cell specification or migration. Examination of the epistatic relationship between candidate genes and Stat92E reveals that the products of two genes, Protein tyrosine phosphatase 61F (Ptp61F and brahma (brm, interact with Stat92E during both border cell specification and migration.

  18. Macrophages improve survival, proliferation and migration of engrafted myogenic precursor cells into MDX skeletal muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre-François Lesault

    Full Text Available Transplantation of muscle precursor cells is of therapeutic interest for focal skeletal muscular diseases. However, major limitations of cell transplantation are the poor survival, expansion and migration of the injected cells. The massive and early death of transplanted myoblasts is not fully understood although several mechanisms have been suggested. Various attempts have been made to improve their survival or migration. Taking into account that muscle regeneration is associated with the presence of macrophages, which are helpful in repairing the muscle by both cleansing the debris and deliver trophic cues to myoblasts in a sequential way, we attempted in the present work to improve myoblast transplantation by coinjecting macrophages. The present data showed that in the 5 days following the transplantation, macrophages efficiently improved: i myoblast survival by limiting their massive death, ii myoblast expansion within the tissue and iii myoblast migration in the dystrophic muscle. This was confirmed by in vitro analyses showing that macrophages stimulated myoblast adhesion and migration. As a result, myoblast contribution to regenerating host myofibres was increased by macrophages one month after transplantation. Altogether, these data demonstrate that macrophages are beneficial during the early steps of myoblast transplantation into skeletal muscle, showing that coinjecting these stromal cells may be used as a helper to improve the efficiency of parenchymal cell engraftment.

  19. Control of directed cell migration in vivo by membrane-to-cortex attachment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba Diz-Muñoz

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Cell shape and motility are primarily controlled by cellular mechanics. The attachment of the plasma membrane to the underlying actomyosin cortex has been proposed to be important for cellular processes involving membrane deformation. However, little is known about the actual function of membrane-to-cortex attachment (MCA in cell protrusion formation and migration, in particular in the context of the developing embryo. Here, we use a multidisciplinary approach to study MCA in zebrafish mesoderm and endoderm (mesendoderm germ layer progenitor cells, which migrate using a combination of different protrusion types, namely, lamellipodia, filopodia, and blebs, during zebrafish gastrulation. By interfering with the activity of molecules linking the cortex to the membrane and measuring resulting changes in MCA by atomic force microscopy, we show that reducing MCA in mesendoderm progenitors increases the proportion of cellular blebs and reduces the directionality of cell migration. We propose that MCA is a key parameter controlling the relative proportions of different cell protrusion types in mesendoderm progenitors, and thus is key in controlling directed migration during gastrulation.

  20. FGF8 activates proliferation and migration in mouse post-natal oligodendrocyte progenitor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Cruz-Martinez

    Full Text Available Fibroblast growth factor 8 (FGF8 is a key molecular signal that is necessary for early embryonic development of the central nervous system, quickly disappearing past this point. It is known to be one of the primary morphogenetic signals required for cell fate and survival processes in structures such as the cerebellum, telencephalic and isthmic organizers, while its absence causes severe abnormalities in the nervous system and the embryo usually dies in early stages of development. In this work, we have observed a new possible therapeutic role for this factor in demyelinating disorders, such as leukodystrophy or multiple sclerosis. In vitro, oligodendrocyte progenitor cells were cultured with differentiating medium and in the presence of FGF8. Differentiation and proliferation studies were performed by immunocytochemistry and PCR. Also, migration studies were performed in matrigel cultures, where oligodendrocyte progenitor cells were placed at a certain distance of a FGF8-soaked heparin bead. The results showed that both migration and proliferation was induced by FGF8. Furthermore, a similar effect was observed in an in vivo demyelinating mouse model, where oligodendrocyte progenitor cells were observed migrating towards the FGF8-soaked heparin beads where they were grafted. In conclusion, the results shown here demonstrate that FGF8 is a novel factor to induce oligodendrocyte progenitor cell activation, migration and proliferation in vitro, which can be extrapolated in vivo in demyelinated animal models.

  1. Tumorigenic fragments of APC cause dominant defects in directional cell migration in multiple model systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott A. Nelson

    2012-11-01

    Nonsense mutations that result in the expression of truncated, N-terminal, fragments of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC tumour suppressor protein are found in most sporadic and some hereditary colorectal cancers. These mutations can cause tumorigenesis by eliminating β-catenin-binding sites from APC, which leads to upregulation of β-catenin and thereby results in the induction of oncogenes such as MYC. Here we show that, in three distinct experimental model systems, expression of an N-terminal fragment of APC (N-APC results in loss of directionality, but not speed, of cell motility independently of changes in β-catenin regulation. We developed a system to culture and fluorescently label live pieces of gut tissue to record high-resolution three-dimensional time-lapse movies of cells in situ. This revealed an unexpected complexity of normal gut cell migration, a key process in gut epithelial maintenance, with cells moving with spatial and temporal discontinuity. Quantitative comparison of gut tissue from wild-type mice and APC heterozygotes (APCMin/+; multiple intestinal neoplasia model demonstrated that cells in precancerous epithelia lack directional preference when moving along the crypt-villus axis. This effect was reproduced in diverse experimental systems: in developing chicken embryos, mesoderm cells expressing N-APC failed to migrate normally; in amoeboid Dictyostelium, which lack endogenous APC, expressing an N-APC fragment maintained cell motility, but the cells failed to perform directional chemotaxis; and multicellular Dictyostelium slug aggregates similarly failed to perform phototaxis. We propose that N-terminal fragments of APC represent a gain-of-function mutation that causes cells within tissue to fail to migrate directionally in response to relevant guidance cues. Consistent with this idea, crypts in histologically normal tissues of APCMin/+ intestines are overpopulated with cells, suggesting that a lack of migration might cause cell

  2. Microglia Activate Migration of Glioma Cells through a Pyk2 Intracellular Pathway.

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    Kimberleve Rolón-Reyes

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma is one of the most aggressive and fatal brain cancers due to the highly invasive nature of glioma cells. Microglia infiltrate most glioma tumors and, therefore, make up an important component of the glioma microenvironment. In the tumor environment, microglia release factors that lead to the degradation of the extracellular matrix and stimulate signaling pathways to promote glioma cell invasion. In the present study, we demonstrated that microglia can promote glioma migration through a mechanism independent of extracellular matrix degradation. Using western blot analysis, we found upregulation of proline rich tyrosine kinase 2 (Pyk2 protein phosphorylated at Tyr579/580 in glioma cells treated with microglia conditioned medium. This upregulation occurred in rodent C6 and GL261 as well as in human glioma cell lines with varying levels of invasiveness (U-87MG, A172, and HS683. siRNA knock-down of Pyk2 protein and pharmacological blockade by the Pyk2/focal-adhesion kinase (FAK inhibitor PF-562,271 reversed the stimulatory effect of microglia on glioma migration in all cell lines. A lower concentration of PF-562,271 that selectively inhibits FAK, but not Pyk2, did not have any effect on glioma cell migration. Moreover, with the use of the CD11b-HSVTK microglia ablation mouse model we demonstrated that elimination of microglia in the implanted tumors (GL261 glioma cells were used for brain implantation by the local in-tumor administration of Ganciclovir, significantly reduced the phosphorylation of Pyk2 at Tyr579/580 in implanted tumor cells. Taken together, these data indicate that microglial cells activate glioma cell migration/dispersal through the pro-migratory Pyk2 signaling pathway in glioma cells.

  3. Intravital characterization of tumor cell migration in pancreatic cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beerling, Evelyne; Oosterom, Ilse; Voest, Emile E; Lolkema, Martijn P; van Rheenen, Jacco

    2016-01-01

    Curing pancreatic cancer is difficult as metastases often determine the poor clinical outcome. To gain more insight into the metastatic behavior of pancreatic cancer cells, we characterized migratory cells in primary pancreatic tumors using intravital microscopy. We visualized the migratory behavior

  4. Role of the nuclear migration protein Lis1 in cell morphogenesis in Ustilago maydis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valinluck, Michael; Ahlgren, Sara; Sawada, Mizuho; Locken, Kristopher; Banuett, Flora

    2010-01-01

    Ustilago maydis is a basidiomycete fungus that exhibits a yeast-like and a filamentous form. Growth of the fungus in the host leads to additional morphological transitions. The different morphologies are characterized by distinct nuclear movements. Dynein and α-tubulin are required for nuclear movements and for cell morphogenesis of the yeast-like form. Lis1 is a microtubule plus-end tracking protein (+TIPs) conserved in eukaryotes and required for nuclear migration and spindle positioning. Defects in nuclear migration result in altered cell fate and aberrant development in metazoans, slow growth in fungi and disease in humans (e.g. lissencephaly). Here we investigate the role of the human LIS1 homolog in U. maydis and demonstrate that it is essential for cell viability, not previously seen in other fungi. With a conditional null mutation we show that lis1 is necessary for nuclear migration in the yeast-like cell and during the dimorphic transition. Studies of asynchronous exponentially growing cells and time-lapse microscopy uncovered novel functions of lis1: It is necessary for cell morphogenesis, positioning of the septum and cell wall integrity. lis1-depleted cells exhibit altered axes of growth and loss of cell polarity leading to grossly aberrant cells with clusters of nuclei and morphologically altered buds devoid of nuclei. Altered septum positioning and cell wall deposition contribute to the aberrant morphology. lis1-depleted cells lyse, indicative of altered cell wall properties or composition. We also demonstrate, with indirect immunofluorescence to visualize tubulin, that lis1 is necessary for the normal organization of the microtubule cytoskeleton: lis1-depleted cells contain more and longer microtubules that can form coils perpendicular to the long axis of the cell. We propose that lis1 controls microtubule dynamics and thus the regulated delivery of vesicles to growth sites and other cell domains that govern nuclear movements. PMID:20524583

  5. Uridine 5'-triphosphate promotes in vitro Schwannoma cell migration through matrix metalloproteinase-2 activation.

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    Aloa Lamarca

    Full Text Available In response to peripheral nerve injury, Schwann cells adopt a migratory phenotype and modify the extracellular matrix to make it permissive for cell migration and axonal re-growth. Uridine 5'-triphosphate (UTP and other nucleotides are released during nerve injury and activate purinergic receptors expressed on the Schwann cell surface, but little is known about the involvement of purine signalling in wound healing. We studied the effect of UTP on Schwannoma cell migration and wound closure and the intracellular signaling pathways involved. We found that UTP treatment induced Schwannoma cell migration through activation of P2Y2 receptors and through the increase of extracellular matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2 activation and expression. Knockdown P2Y2 receptor or MMP-2 expression greatly reduced woun