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Sample records for range rf cavity

  1. Prototype LHC RF cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    A radiofrequency (RF) cavity is a metallic chamber that contains an electromagnetic field. Its primary purpose is to accelerate charged particles. RF cavities can be structured like beads on a string, where the beads are the cavities and the string is the beam pipe of a particle accelerator, through which particles travel in a vacuum.

  2. SPS RF cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    The main RF-system of the SPS comprises four cavities: two of 20 m length and two of 16.5 m length. They are all installed in one long straight section (LSS 3). These cavities are of the travelling-wave type operating at a centre frequency of 200.2 MHz. They are wideband, filling time about 700 ns and untuned. A power of up to 790 kW can be supplied to each giving a total accelerating voltage of about 8 MV. The power amplifiers, using tetrodes are installed in a surface building 200 m from the cavities.

  3. SPS RF Accelerating Cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1979-01-01

    This picture shows one of the 2 new cavities installed in 1978-1979. The main RF-system of the SPS comprises four cavities: two of 20 m length and two of 16.5 m length. They are all installed in one long straight section (LSS 3). These cavities are of the travelling-wave type operating at a centre frequency of 200.2 MHz. They are wideband, filling time about 700 ns and untuned. The power amplifiers, using tetrodes are installed in a surface building 200 m from the cavities. Initially only two cavities were installed, a third cavity was installed in 1978 and a forth one in 1979. The number of power amplifiers was also increased: to the first 2 MW plant a second 2 MW plant was added and by end 1979 there were 8 500 kW units combined in pairs to feed each of the 4 cavities with up to about 1 MW RF power, resulting in a total accelerating voltage of about 8 MV. See also 7412016X, 7412017X, 7411048X

  4. SPS RF Cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    The picture shows one of the two initially installed cavities. The main RF-system of the SPS comprises four cavities: two of 20 m length and two of 16.5 m length. They are all installed in one long straight section (LSS 3). These cavities are of the travelling-wave type operating at a centre frequency of 200.2 MHz. They are wideband, filling time about 700 ns and untuned. The power amplifiers, using tetrodes are installed in a surface building 200 m from the cavities. Initially only two cavities were installed, a third cavity was installed in 1978 and a forth one in 1979. The number of power amplifiers was also gradually increased: by end 1980 there were 8 500 kW units combined in pairs to feed each of the 4 cavities with up to about 1 MW RF power, resulting in a total accelerating voltage of about 8 MV. See also 7412017X, 7411048X, 7505074.

  5. ISR RF cavities

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    In each ISR ring the radiofrequency cavities were installed in one 9 m long straight section. The RF system of the ISR had the main purpose to stack buckets of particles (most of the time protons)coming from the CPS and also to accelerate the stacked beam. The installed RF power per ring was 18 kW giving a peak accelerating voltage of 20 kV. The system had a very fine regulation feature allowing to lower the voltage down to 75 V in a smooth and well controlled fashion.

  6. Superconducting RF cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Bernard, Philippe

    1999-01-01

    It was 20 years ago when the research and development programme for LEP superconducting cavities was initiated. It lasted about 10 years. Today, my aim is not to tell you in great detail about the many innovations made thanks to our research, but I would like to point out some milestones in the development of superconducting cavities where Emilio's influence was particularly important.

  7. Prototype storage cavity for LEP accelerating RF

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1980-01-01

    The principle of an RF storage cavity was demonstrated with this prototype, working at 500 MHz. Ian Wilso seems to hold it in his hands. The storage cavities had 4 portholes, 1 each for: RF feed; tuning; connection to the accelerating cavity; vacuum pump. The final storage cavities were larger, to suit the lower LEP accelerating frequency of 352.2 MHz. See also 8002294, 8006510X, 8109346, 8407619X, and Annual Report 1980, p.115.

  8. Degreasing and cleaning superconducting RF Niobium cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rauchmiller, Michael; Kellett, Ron; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    The purpose and scope of this report is to detail the steps necessary for degreasing and cleaning of superconducting RF Niobium cavities in the A0 clean room. It lists the required equipment and the cleaning procedure.

  9. SPS RF System an Accelerating Cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1975-01-01

    The picture shows one of the two initially installed cavities. The main RF-system of the SPS comprises four cavities: two of 20 m length and two of 16.5 m length. They are all installed in one long straight section (LSS 3). These cavities are of the travelling-wave type operating at a centre frequency of 200.2 MHz. They are wideband, filling time about 700 ns and untuned. The power amplifiers, using tetrodes are installed in a surface building 200 m from the cavities. Initially only two cavities were installed, a third cavity was installed in 1978 and a forth one in 1979. The number of power amplifiers was also gradually increased: by end 1980 there were 8 500 kW units combined in pairs to feed each of the 4 cavities with up to about 1 MW RF power, resulting in a total accelerating voltage of about 8 MV. See also 7412017X, 7411048X.

  10. Prototype storage cavity for LEP accelerating RF

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1980-01-01

    The principle of an RF storage cavity was demonstrated with this prototype, working at 500 MHz. The final storage cavities were larger, to suit the LEP accelerating frequency of 352.2 MHz. Cu-tubes for watercooling are brazed onto the upper half, the lower half is to follow. See also 8006061, 8109346, 8407619X, and Annual Report 1980, p.115.

  11. Rf cavity primer for cyclic proton accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, J.E.

    1988-04-01

    The purpose of this note is to describe the electrical and mechanical properites of particle accelerator rf cavities in a manner which will be useful to physics and engineering graduates entering the accelerator field. The discussion will be limited to proton (or antiproton) synchrotron accelerators or storage rings operating roughly in the range of 20 to 200 MHz. The very high gradient, fixed frequency UHF or microwave devices appropriate for electron machines and the somewhat lower frequency and broader bandwidth devices required for heavy ion accelerators are discussed extensively in other papers in this series. While it is common pratice to employ field calculation programs such as SUPERFISH, URMEL, or MAFIA as design aids in the development of rf cavities, we attempt here to elucidate various of the design parameters commonly dealt with in proton machines through the use of simple standing wave coaxial resonator expressions. In so doing, we treat only standing wave structures. Although low-impedance, moderately broad pass-band travelling wave accelerating systems are used in the CERN SPS, such systems are more commonly found in linacs, and they have not been used widely in large cyclic accelerators. Two appendices providing useful supporting material regarding relativistic particle dynamics and synchrotron motion in cyclic accelerators are added to supplement the text.

  12. RF BREAKDOWN STUDIES USING PRESSURIZED CAVITIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Rolland

    2014-09-21

    Many present and future particle accelerators are limited by the maximum electric gradient and peak surface fields that can be realized in RF cavities. Despite considerable effort, a comprehensive theory of RF breakdown has not been achieved and mitigation techniques to improve practical maximum accelerating gradients have had only limited success. Part of the problem is that RF breakdown in an evacuated cavity involves a complex mixture of effects, which include the geometry, metallurgy, and surface preparation of the accelerating structures and the make-up and pressure of the residual gas in which plasmas form. Studies showed that high gradients can be achieved quickly in 805 MHz RF cavities pressurized with dense hydrogen gas, as needed for muon cooling channels, without the need for long conditioning times, even in the presence of strong external magnetic fields. This positive result was expected because the dense gas can practically eliminate dark currents and multipacting. In this project we used this high pressure technique to suppress effects of residual vacuum and geometry that are found in evacuated cavities in order to isolate and study the role of the metallic surfaces in RF cavity breakdown as a function of magnetic field, frequency, and surface preparation. One of the interesting and useful outcomes of this project was the unanticipated collaborations with LANL and Fermilab that led to new insights as to the operation of evacuated normal-conducting RF cavities in high external magnetic fields. Other accomplishments included: (1) RF breakdown experiments to test the effects of SF6 dopant in H2 and He gases with Sn, Al, and Cu electrodes were carried out in an 805 MHz cavity and compared to calculations and computer simulations. The heavy corrosion caused by the SF6 components led to the suggestion that a small admixture of oxygen, instead of SF6, to the hydrogen would allow the same advantages without the corrosion in a practical muon beam line. (2) A

  13. PEP-II RF cavity revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rimmer, R.A.; Koehler, G.; Li, D.; Hartman, N.; Folwell, N.; Hodgson, J.; Ko, K.; McCandless, B.

    1999-11-01

    This report describes the results of numerical simulations of the PEP-II RF cavity performed after the completion of the construction phase of the project and comparisons are made to previous calculations and measured results. These analyses were performed to evaluate new calculation techniques for the HOM distribution and RF surface heating that were not available at the time of the original design. These include the use of a high frequency electromagnetic element in ANSYS and the new Omega 3P code to study wall losses, and the development of broadband time domain simulation methods in MAFIA for the HOM loading. The computed HOM spectrum is compared with cavity measurements and observed beam-induced signals. The cavity fabrication method is reviewed, with the benefit of hindsight, and simplifications are discussed.

  14. Automated Hydroforming of Seamless Superconducting RF Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagata, Tomohiko [ULVAC, Inc.; Shinozawa, Seiichi [ULVAC, Inc.; Abe, Noriyuki [ULVAC, Inc.; Nagakubo, Junki [ULVAC, Inc.; Murakami, Hirohiko [ULVAC, Inc.; Tajima, Tsuyoshi [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Inoue, Hitoshi [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, KEK; Yamanaka, Masashi [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, KEK; Ueno, Kenji [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, KEK

    2012-07-31

    We are studying the possibility of automated hydroforming process for seamless superconducting RF cavities. Preliminary hydroforming tests of three-cell cavities from seamless tubes made of C1020 copper have been performed. The key point of an automated forming is to monitor and strictly control some parameters such as operation time, internal pressure and material displacements. Especially, it is necessary for our studies to be able to control axial and radial deformation independently. We plan to perform the forming in two stages to increase the reliability of successful forming. In the first stage hydroforming by using intermediate constraint dies, three-cell cavities were successfully formed in less than 1 minute. In parallel, we did elongation tests on cavity-quality niobium and confirmed that it is possible to achieve an elongation of >64% in 2 stages that is required for our forming of 1.3 GHz cavities.

  15. Pressurized rf cavities in ionizing beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Freemire

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A muon collider or Higgs factory requires significant reduction of the six dimensional emittance of the beam prior to acceleration. One method to accomplish this involves building a cooling channel using high pressure gas filled radio frequency cavities. The performance of such a cavity when subjected to an intense particle beam must be investigated before this technology can be validated. To this end, a high pressure gas filled radio frequency (rf test cell was built and placed in a 400 MeV beam line from the Fermilab linac to study the plasma evolution and its effect on the cavity. Hydrogen, deuterium, helium and nitrogen gases were studied. Additionally, sulfur hexafluoride and dry air were used as dopants to aid in the removal of plasma electrons. Measurements were made using a variety of beam intensities, gas pressures, dopant concentrations, and cavity rf electric fields, both with and without a 3 T external solenoidal magnetic field. Energy dissipation per electron-ion pair, electron-ion recombination rates, ion-ion recombination rates, and electron attachment times to SF_{6} and O_{2} were measured.

  16. Simulation of plasma loading of high-pressure RF cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Kwangmin [Brookhaven; Samulyak, Roman [SUNY, Stony Brook; Yonehara, Katsuya [Fermilab; Freemire, Ben [Northern Illinois U.

    2018-01-11

    Muon beam-induced plasma loading of radio-frequency (RF) cavities filled with high pressure hydrogen gas with 1% dry air dopant has been studied via numerical simulations. The electromagnetic code SPACE, that resolves relevant atomic physics processes, including ionization by the muon beam, electron attachment to dopant molecules, and electron-ion and ion-ion recombination, has been used. Simulations studies have been performed in the range of parameters typical for practical muon cooling channels.

  17. RF cavity using liquid dielectric for tuning and cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovic, Milorad [Warrenville, IL; Johnson, Rolland P [Newport News, VA

    2012-04-17

    A system for accelerating particles includes an RF cavity that contains a ferrite core and a liquid dielectric. Characteristics of the ferrite core and the liquid dielectric, among other factors, determine the resonant frequency of the RF cavity. The liquid dielectric is circulated to cool the ferrite core during the operation of the system.

  18. RF kicker cavity to increase control in common transport lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, David R.; Ament, Lucas J. P.

    2017-04-18

    A method of controlling e-beam transport where electron bunches with different characteristics travel through the same beam pipe. An RF kicker cavity is added at the beginning of the common transport pipe or at various locations along the common transport path to achieve independent control of different bunch types. RF energy is applied by the kicker cavity kicks some portion of the electron bunches, separating the bunches in phase space to allow independent control via optics, or separating bunches into different beam pipes. The RF kicker cavity is operated at a specific frequency to enable kicking of different types of bunches in different directions. The phase of the cavity is set such that the selected type of bunch passes through the cavity when the RF field is at a node, leaving that type of bunch unaffected. Beam optics may be added downstream of the kicker cavity to cause a further separation in phase space.

  19. Theory and Practice of Cavity RF Test Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tom Powers

    2006-08-28

    Over the years Jefferson Lab staff members have performed about 2500 cold cavity tests on about 500 different superconducting cavities. Most of these cavities were later installed in 73 different cryomodules, which were used in three different accelerators. All of the cavities were tested in our vertical test area. About 25% of the cryomodules were tested in our cryomodule test facility and later commissioned in an accelerator. The remainder of the cryomodules were tested and commissioned after they were installed in their respective accelerator. This paper is an overview which should provide a practical background in the RF systems used to test the cavities as well as provide the mathematics necessary to convert the raw pulsed or continuous wave RF signals into useful information such as gradient, quality factor, RF-heat loads and loaded Q?s. Additionally, I will provide the equations necessary for determining the measurement error associated with these values.

  20. Investigation of Microscopic Materials Limitations of Superconducting RF Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anlage, Steven [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2014-07-23

    The high-field performance of SRF cavities is often limited by breakdown events below the intrinsic limiting surface fields of Nb, and there is abundant evidence that these breakdown events are localized in space inside the cavity. Also, there is a lack of detailed understanding of the causal links between surface treatments and ultimate RF performance at low temperatures. An understanding of these links would provide a clear roadmap for improvement of SRF cavity performance, and establish a cause-and-effect ‘RF materials science’ of Nb. We propose two specific microscopic approaches to addressing these issues. First is a spatially-resolved local microwave-microscope probe that operates at SRF frequencies and temperatures to discover the microscopic origins of breakdown, and produce quantitative measurements of RF critical fields of coatings and films. Second, RF Laser Scanning Microscopy (LSM) has allowed visualization of RF current flow and sources of nonlinear RF response in superconducting devices with micro-meter spatial resolution. The LSM will be used in conjunction with surface preparation and characterization techniques to create definitive links between physical and chemical processing steps and ultimate cryogenic microwave performance. We propose to develop RF laser scanning microscopy of small-sample Nb pieces to establish surface-processing / RF performance relations through measurement of RF current distributions on micron-length scales and low temperatures.

  1. Design of an L-band normally conducting RF gun cavity for high peak and average RF power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paramonov, V., E-mail: paramono@inr.ru [Institute for Nuclear Research of Russian Academy of Sciences, 60-th October Anniversary prospect 7a, 117312 Moscow (Russian Federation); Philipp, S. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Platanenallee 6, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Rybakov, I.; Skassyrskaya, A. [Institute for Nuclear Research of Russian Academy of Sciences, 60-th October Anniversary prospect 7a, 117312 Moscow (Russian Federation); Stephan, F. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Platanenallee 6, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany)

    2017-05-11

    To provide high quality electron bunches for linear accelerators used in free electron lasers and particle colliders, RF gun cavities operate with extreme electric fields, resulting in a high pulsed RF power. The main L-band superconducting linacs of such facilities also require a long RF pulse length, resulting in a high average dissipated RF power in the gun cavity. The newly developed cavity based on the proven advantages of the existing DESY RF gun cavities, underwent significant changes. The shape of the cells is optimized to reduce the maximal surface electric field and RF loss power. Furthermore, the cavity is equipped with an RF probe to measure the field amplitude and phase. The elaborated cooling circuit design results in a lower temperature rise on the cavity RF surface and permits higher dissipated RF power. The paper presents the main solutions and results of the cavity design.

  2. Design of an L-band normally conducting RF gun cavity for high peak and average RF power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paramonov, V.; Philipp, S.; Rybakov, I.; Skassyrskaya, A.; Stephan, F.

    2017-05-01

    To provide high quality electron bunches for linear accelerators used in free electron lasers and particle colliders, RF gun cavities operate with extreme electric fields, resulting in a high pulsed RF power. The main L-band superconducting linacs of such facilities also require a long RF pulse length, resulting in a high average dissipated RF power in the gun cavity. The newly developed cavity based on the proven advantages of the existing DESY RF gun cavities, underwent significant changes. The shape of the cells is optimized to reduce the maximal surface electric field and RF loss power. Furthermore, the cavity is equipped with an RF probe to measure the field amplitude and phase. The elaborated cooling circuit design results in a lower temperature rise on the cavity RF surface and permits higher dissipated RF power. The paper presents the main solutions and results of the cavity design.

  3. COMPARISON OF RF CAVITY TRANSPORT MODELS FOR BBU SIMULATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilkyoung Shin,Byung Yunn,Todd Satogata,Shahid Ahmed

    2011-03-01

    The transverse focusing effect in RF cavities plays a considerable role in beam dynamics for low-energy beamline sections and can contribute to beam breakup (BBU) instability. The purpose of this analysis is to examine RF cavity models in simulation codes which will be used for BBU experiments at Jefferson Lab and improve BBU simulation results. We review two RF cavity models in the simulation codes elegant and TDBBU (a BBU simulation code developed at Jefferson Lab). elegant can include the Rosenzweig-Serafini (R-S) model for the RF focusing effect. Whereas TDBBU uses a model from the code TRANSPORT which considers the adiabatic damping effect, but not the RF focusing effect. Quantitative comparisons are discussed for the CEBAF beamline. We also compare the R-S model with the results from numerical simulations for a CEBAF-type 5-cell superconducting cavity to validate the use of the R-S model as an improved low-energy RF cavity transport model in TDBBU. We have implemented the R-S model in TDBBU. It will improve BBU simulation results to be more matched with analytic calculations and experimental results.

  4. Experimental studies of light emission phenomena in superconducting RF cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthony, P.L. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Delayen, J.R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport, News, VA 23606 (United States); Center for Accelerator Science, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA, 23529 (United States); Fryberger, D., E-mail: fryberger@slac.stanford.ed [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Goree, W.S. [2G Enterprises, Pacific Grove, CA 93950 (United States); Mammosser, J. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport, News, VA 23606 (United States); Szalata, Z.M.; Weisend, J.G. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)

    2009-12-21

    Experimental studies of light emission phenomena in superconducting RF cavities, which we categorize under the general heading of cavity lights, are described. The cavity lights data, which were obtained using a small CCD video camera, were collected in a series of nine experimental runs ranging from approx1/2 to approx2 h in duration. The video data were recorded on a standard VHS tape. As the runs progressed, additional instrumentation was added. For the last three runs a LabVIEW-controlled data acquisition system was included. These runs furnish evidence for several, possibly related, light emission phenomena. The most intriguing of these is what appear to be small luminous objects <=1.5 mm in size, freely moving about in the vacuum space, generally without wall contact, as verified by reflections of the tracks in the cavity walls. In addition, on a number of occasions, these objects were observed to bounce off of the cavity walls. The wall-bounce aspect of most of these events was clearly confirmed by pre-bounce and post-bounce reflections concurrent with the tracks. In one of the later runs, a mode of behavior was observed that was qualitatively different from anything observed in the earlier runs. Perhaps the most perplexing aspect of this new mode was the observation of as many as seven luminous objects arrayed in what might be described as a macromolecular formation, coherently moving about in the interior of the cavity for extended periods of time, evidently without any wall contact. It is suggested that these mobile luminous objects are without explanation within the realm of established physics. Some remarks about more exotic theoretical possibilities are made, and future plans are discussed.

  5. A New RF System for the CEBAF Normal Conducting Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curt Hovater; Hai Dong; Alicia Hofler; George Lahti; John Musson; Tomasz Plawski

    2004-08-01

    The CEBAF Accelerator at Jefferson Lab is a 6 GeV five pass electron accelerator consisting of two superconducting linacs joined by independent magnetic transport arcs. CEBAF also has numerous normal conducting cavities for beam conditioning in the injector and for RF extraction to the experimental halls. The RF systems that presently control these cavities are becoming expensive to maintain, therefore a replacement RF control system is now being developed. For the new RF system, cavity field control is maintained digitally using an FPGA which contains the feedback algorithm. The system incorporates digital down conversion, using quadrature under-sampling at an IF frequency of 70 MHz. The VXI bus-crate was chosen as the operating platform because of its excellent RFI/EMI properties and its compatibility with the EPICS control system. The normal conducting cavities operate at both the 1497 MHz accelerating frequency and the sub-harmonic frequency of 499 MHz. To accommodate this, the ne w design will use different receiver-transmitter daughter cards for each frequency. This paper discusses the development of the new RF system and reports on initial results.

  6. Accelerating RF cavity of the Booster

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1983-01-01

    Each of the 4 PS Booster rings has a single accelerating cavity.It consists of 2 quarter-wave ferrite-loaded resonators. 2 figure-of-eight loops tune the frequency throughout the accelerating cycle, from 3 to 8 MHz (from 50 MeV at injection to the original Booster energy of 800 MeV, 2 GeV today). The cavities have a flat design, to fit the ring-to-ring distance of 36 cm, and are forced-air cooled. The 2 round objects in the front-compartments are the final-stage power-tetrodes. See also 8111095.

  7. Accelerating RF cavity of the Booster

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1981-01-01

    Each of the 4 PS Booster rings has a single accelerating cavity. It consists of 2 quarter-wave ferrite-loaded resonators. There are 2 figure-of-eight loops on the ferrite loads for tuning the frequency throughout the acceleration cycle, from 3 to 8 MHz (from 50 MeV at injection to the original Booster energy of 800 MeV, 2 GeV today). The cavities have a flat design, to fit the ring-to-ring distance of 36 cm. The tube for forced-air cooling is visible in the left front. See also 8301084.

  8. Early prototype of a superconducting RF cavity for LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1979-01-01

    As early as 1979, before LEP became an approved project, studies were located in the ISR Division. Although Cu-cavities were foreseen, certainly for the 1st energy-stage, superconducting cavities were explored as a possible alternative for the 2nd energy-stage. This began with very basic studies of manufacture and properties of Nb-cavities. This one, held by Mr.Girel, was made from bulk Nb-sheet, 2.5 mm thick. It was dimensioned for tests at 500 MHz (LEP accelerating RF was 352.2 MHz). See also 8004204, 8007354, 8209255, 8210054, 8312339.

  9. Assembling one of the RF cavities for the SPS

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    The main RF-system of the SPS comprises four cavities: two of 20 m length and two of 16.5 m length. They are all installed in one long straight section (LSS 3). These cavities are of the travelling-wave type operating at a centre frequency of 200.2 MHz. They are wideband, filling time about 700 ns and untuned. A power of up to 790 kW can be supplied to each giving a total accelerating voltage of about 8 MV. The power amplifiers, using tetrodes are installed in a surface building 200 m from the cavities.

  10. First prototype Copper-Niobium RF Superconducting Cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    This is the first RF superconducting cavity made of copper with a very thin layer of pure niobium deposited on the inner wall by sputtering. This new developpment lead to a considerable increase of performance and stability of superconducting cavities and to non-negligible economy. The work was carried out in the ISR workshop. This technique was adopted for the LEP II accelerating cavities. At the centre is Cristoforo Benvenuti, inventor of this important technology, with his assistants, Nadia Circelli and Max Hauer, carrying the sputtering electrode. See also 8209255, 8312339.

  11. The effects of surface damage on RF cavity operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Hassanein; Z. Insepov; J. Norem; A. Moretti; Z. Qian; A. Bross; Y. torun; R. Rimmer; D. Li; M. Zisman; D.N. Seidman; K. Yoon

    2006-04-14

    We describe a model of damage in rf cavities and show how this damage can limit cavity operation. We first present a review of mechanisms that may or may not affect the ultimate fields that can be obtained in rf cavities, assuming that mechanical stress explains the triggers of rf breakdown events. We present a method of quantifying the surface damage caused by breakdown events in terms of the spectrum of field enhancement factors, Beta, for asperities on the surface. We then model an equilibrium that can develop between damage and conditioning effects, and show how this equilibrium can determine cavity performance and show experimental evidence for this mechanism. We define three functions that quantify damage, and explain how the parameters that determine this performance can be factored out and measured. We then show how this model can quantitatively explain the dependence of cavity performance on material, frequency, pulse length, gas, power supply and other factors. The examples given in this paper are derived from a variety of incomplete data sets, so we outline an experimental program that should improve these predictions, provide mechanisms for comparing data from different facilities, and fill in many gaps in the existing data.

  12. Effects of surface damage on rf cavity operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hassanein

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available We describe a model of damage in rf cavities and show how this damage can limit cavity operation. We first present a review of mechanisms that may or may not affect the ultimate fields that can be obtained in rf cavities, assuming that mechanical stress explains the triggers of rf breakdown events. We present a method of quantifying the surface damage caused by breakdown events in terms of the spectrum of field enhancement factors, β, for asperities on the surface. We then model an equilibrium that can develop between damage and conditioning effects, and show how this equilibrium can determine cavity performance and show experimental evidence for this mechanism. We define three functions that quantify damage, and explain how the parameters that determine performance can be factored out and measured. We then show how this model can quantitatively explain the dependence of cavity performance on material, frequency, pulse length, gas, power supply, and other factors. The examples given in this paper are derived from a variety of incomplete data sets, so we outline an experimental program that should improve these predictions, provide mechanisms for comparing data from different facilities, and fill in many gaps in the existing data.

  13. Early 500 MHz prototype LEP RF Cavity with superposed storage cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1981-01-01

    The principle of transferring the RF power back and forth between the accelerating cavity and a side-coupled storage cavity was demonstrated with this 500 MHz prototype. In LEP, the accelerating frequency was 352.2 MHz, and accelerating and storage cavities were consequently larger. See also 8002294, 8006061, 8407619X, and Annual Reports 1980, p.115; 1981, p.95; 1985, vol.I, p.13.

  14. Superconducting RF Cavities Past, Present and Future

    CERN Document Server

    Chiaveri, Enrico

    2003-01-01

    In the last two decades many laboratories around the world, notably Argonne (ANL), TJNAF (formerly CEBAF), CERN, DESY and KEK, decided to develop the technology of superconducting (SC) accelerating cavities. The aim was either to increase the accelerator energy or to save electrical consumption or both. This technology has been used extensively in the operating machines showing good performances and strong reliability. At present, the technology using bulk niobium (Nb) or Nb coated on copper (Cu) is mature enough to be applied for many different applications, such as synchrotron light sources and spallation neutron drivers. Results, R&D work and future projects will be presented with emphasis on application to linear accelerators.

  15. Comparison of Measured and Calculated Coupling between a Waveguide and an RF Cavity Using CST Microwave Studio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Shi; H. Chen; S. Zheng; D. Li; R.A. Rimmer; H. Wang

    2006-06-26

    Accurate predications of RF coupling between an RF cavity and ports attached to it have been an important study subject for years for RF coupler and higher order modes (HOM) damping design. We report recent progress and a method on the RF coupling simulations between waveguide ports and RF cavities using CST Microwave Studio in time domain (Transit Solver). Comparisons of the measured and calculated couplings are presented. The simulated couplings and frequencies agree within {approx} 10% and {approx} 0.1% with the measurements, respectively. We have simulated couplings with external Qs ranging from {approx} 100 to {approx} 100,000, and confirmed with measurements. The method should also work well for higher Qs, and can be easily applied in RF power coupler designs and HOM damping for normal-conducting and superconducting cavities.

  16. A Four-Cell Periodically HOM-Damped RF Cavity for High Current Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, G; Wang, H

    2004-01-01

    A periodically Higher Order Mode (HOM) damped RF cavity is a weakly coupled multi-cell RF cavity with HOM couplers periodically mounted between the cells. It was studied as an alternative RF structure between the single cell cavity and superstructure cavity in high beam current application requiring strong damping of the HOMs. The acceleration mode in this design is the lowest frequency mode (Zero Mode) in the pass band, in contrast to the traditional “π” acceleration mode. The acceleration mode of a four-cell Zero Mode cavity has been studied along with the monopole and dipole HOMs. Some HOMs have been modeled in HFSS with waveguide HOM couplers, which were subsequently verified by MAFIA time domain analysis. To understand the tuning challenge for the weakly coupled cavity, ANSYS and SUPERFISH codes were used to simulate the cavity frequency sensitivity and field flatness change within proper tuning range, which will influence the design of the tuner structure. This paper presen...

  17. Travelling Wave Structure of an SPS RF Cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1974-01-01

    The RF cavities for acceleration of particles in the SPS have a travelling-wave structure. They operate at a fixed frequency of 200 MHz (h = 4620). With a quality factor of Q = 100, the bandwidth covers the small frequency swing for the acceleration of protons from as low as 10 GeV to the top energy of 450 GeV. Later on, for the acceleration of ions, with a larger frequency swing, turn-to-turn phase jumps did the trick. Two cavities, each consisting of 5 tank sections, were installed in long straight section 3. Each cavity is driven by a power amplifier of 750 kW CW (1 MW pulsed). Another 2 cavities were added later on. See also 7411033 and 7802190.

  18. Measurement of high Q RF cavity impedance with beam

    CERN Document Server

    Limborg, C

    1998-01-01

    An inexpensive method to measure, with beam, the Rs and Q of narrow-band high order resonances in RF cavities was developed on SPEAR. The two main results of this study are: (1) an improved operational stability of SPEAR; and (2) the decision to keep the present cavities for the proposed SPEAR upgrade. SPEAR3 will be run initially at 200 mA, twice the present current. Just beyond the current threshold, and before step loss, there is a regime in which the beam performs large amplitude, low frequency oscillations. Detailed measurements were performed to characterize the frequency, amplitude, growth and damping time of these relaxation oscillations.

  19. Microscopic Investigation of Materials Limitations of Superconducting RF Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anlage, Steven [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2017-08-04

    Our overall goal is to contribute to the understanding of defects that limit the high accelerating gradient performance of Nb SRF cavities. Our approach is to develop a microscopic connection between materials defects and SRF performance. We developed a near-field microwave microscope to establish this connection. The microscope is based on magnetic hard drive write heads, which are designed to create very strong rf magnetic fields in very small volumes on a surface.

  20. Localization of rf breakdowns in a standing wave cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faya Wang

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available At SLAC, a five-cell, normal-conducting, L-band (1.3 GHz, standing-wave (SW cavity was built as a prototype positron capture accelerator for the ILC. The structure met the ILC gradient goal but required extensive rf processing. When rf breakdowns occurred, a large variation was observed in the decay rate of the stored energy in the cavity after the input power was shut off. It appeared that the breakdowns were isolating sections of the cavity, and that the trapped energy in those sections was then partitioned among its natural modes, producing a distinct beating pattern during the decay. To explore this phenomenon further, an equivalent circuit model of cavity was created that reproduces well its normal operating characteristics. The model was then used to compute the spectra of trapped energy for different numbers of isolated cells. The resulting modal patterns agree well with those of the breakdown data, and thus such a comparison appears to provide a means of identifying the irises on which the breakdowns occurred.

  1. A non-resonant RF cavity loaded with amorphous alloy for proton cancer therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Makita, Y; Nayayama, T; Tsuchidate, H; Tsukishima, C; Yoshida, K

    1999-01-01

    A non-resonant RF cavity loaded with amorphous alloy cores has been designed and tested. The cavity has a re-entrant structure loaded with 8 amorphous alloy toroidal core and its characteristic impedance is designed as 450 Omega . The RF power is fed by 1 kW solid state amplifier using a step-up transformer with 1:9 impedance ratio. In the high power test, an accelerating gap voltage of more than 900 V was measured with input power of 1 kW in the frequency range of 1 to 10 MHz. The voltage standing wave ratio (VSWR) was less than 2.0. The results prove that the cavity may be used successfully within a compact proton synchrotron for a cancer therapy facility. (3 refs).

  2. Physics design of APT linac with normal conducting rf cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nath, S.; Billen, J.H.; Stovall, J.E.; Takeda, Harunori; Young, L.M.

    1996-09-01

    The accelerator based production of tritium calls for a high-power, cw proton linac. Previous designs for such a linac use a radiofrequency quadrupole (RFQ), followed by a drift-tube linac (DTL) to an intermediate energy and a coupled-cavity linc (CCL) to the final energy. The Los Alamos design uses a high-energy (6.7 MeV) RFQ followed by the newly developed coupled-cavity drift-tube linac (CCDTL) and a CCL. This design accommodates external electromagnetic quadrupole lenses which provide a strong uniform focusing lattice from the end of the RFQ to the end of the CCL. The cell lengths in linacs of traditional design are typically graded as a function of particle velocity. By making groups of cells symmetric in both the CCDTL and CCL, the cavity design as well as mechanical design and fabrication is simplified without compromising the performance. At higher energies, there are some advantages of using superconducting rf cavities. Currently, such schemes are under vigorous study. This paper describes the linac design based on normal conducting cavities and presents simulation results.

  3. Design Topics for Superconducting RF Cavities and Ancillaries

    CERN Document Server

    Padamsee, H

    2014-07-17

    RF superconductivity has become a major subfield of accelerator science. There has been an explosion in the number of accelerator applications and in the number of laboratories engaged. The first lecture at this meeting of the CAS presented a review of fundamental design principles to develop cavity geometries to accelerate velocity-of-light particles (β = v/c ~ 1), moving on to the corresponding design principles for medium-velocity (medium-β) and low-velocity (low-β) structures. The lecture included mechanical design topics. The second lecture dealt with input couplers, higher-order mode extraction couplers with absorbers, and tuners of both the slow and fast varieties.

  4. Calculation of RF Properties of the Third Harmonic Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Rothemund, K; Van Rienen, U

    2004-01-01

    Recently a third harmonic structure has been proposed for the injector of the TTF-FEL to avoid nonlinear distortions in the longitudinal phase space. This structure, consists of four nine cell TESLA-like cavities. For the use of this structure in combination with the TTF-FEL it might be interesting to investigate higher order modes (HOM) in the structure and their effect on the beam dynamics. The complexity of the structure, four nine cell cavities assembled with four input couplers and eight HOM-couplers, results in an extremely high numerical effort for full 3D modelling. Therefor Coupled S-Parameter Calculation (CSC) [1] has been applied. This method is based on the scattering parameter description of the rf components found with field solving codes or analytically for components of special symmetry. This paper presents the results of the calculation of rf properties (e.g. scattering parameters, Q-values) of the complete four times nine cell structure equipped with all input- and HOM-couplers.

  5. High Powered Tests of Dielectric Loaded High Pressure RF Cavities for Use in Muon Cooling Channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freemire, Ben [IIT, Chicago; Bowring, Daniel [Fermilab; Kochemirovskiy, Alexey [Chicago U.; Moretti, Alfred [Fermilab; Peterson, David [Fermilab; Tollestrup, Alvin [Fermilab; Torun, Yagmur [IIT, Chicago; Yonehara, Katsuya [Fermilab

    2016-06-01

    Bright muon sources require six dimensional cooling to achieve acceptable luminosities. Ionization cooling is the only known method able to do so within the muon lifetime. One proposed cooling channel, the Helical Cooling Channel, utilizes gas filled radio frequency cavities to both mitigate RF breakdown in the presence of strong, external magnetic fields, and provide the cooling medium. Engineering constraints on the diameter of the magnets within which these cavities operate dictate the radius of the cavities be decreased at their nominal operating frequency. To accomplish this, one may load the cavities with a larger dielectric material. Alumina of purities ranging from 96 to 99.8% was tested in a high pressure RF test cell at the MuCool Test Area at Fermilab. The results of breakdown studies with pure nitrogen gas, and oxygen-doped nitrogen gas indicate the peak surface electric field on the alumina ranges between 10 and 15 MV/m. How these results affect the design of a prototype cooling channel cavity will be discussed.

  6. Niobium superconducting rf cavity fabrication by electrohydraulic forming

    CERN Document Server

    Cantergiani, E.; Léaux, F.; Perez Fontenla, A.T.; Prunet, S.; Dufay-Chanat, L.; Koettig, T.; Bertinelli, F.; Capatina, O.; Favre, G.; Gerigk, F.; Jeanson, A. C.; Fuzeau, J.; Avrillaud, G.; Alleman, D.; Bonafe, J.; Marty, P.

    2016-01-01

    Superconducting rf (SRF) cavities are traditionally fabricated from superconducting material sheets or made of copper coated with superconducting material, followed by trim machining and electron-beam welding. An alternative technique to traditional shaping methods, such as deep-drawing and spinning, is electrohydraulicforming (EHF). InEHF, half-cells areobtainedthrough ultrahigh-speed deformation ofblank sheets, using shockwaves induced in water by a pulsed electrical discharge. With respect to traditional methods, such a highly dynamic process can yield interesting results in terms of effectiveness, repeatability, final shape precision, higher formability, and reduced springback. In this paper, the first results of EHFon high purity niobium are presented and discussed. The simulations performed in order to master the multiphysics phenomena of EHF and to adjust its process parameters are presented. The microstructures of niobium half- cells produced by EHFand by spinning have been compared in terms of damage...

  7. Effect of low temperature baking on the RF properties of niobium superconducting cavities for particle accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gianluigi Ciovati

    2004-03-01

    Radio-frequency superconducting (SRF) cavities are widely used to accelerate a charged particle beam in particle accelerators. The performance of SRF cavities made of bulk niobium has significantly improved over the last ten years and is approaching the theoretical limit for niobium. Nevertheless, RF tests of niobium cavities are still showing some ''anomalous'' losses that require a better understanding in order to reliably obtain better performance. These losses are characterized by a marked dependence of the surface resistance on the surface electromagnetic field and can be detected by measuring the quality factor of the resonator as a function of the peak surface field. A low temperature (100 C-150 C) ''in situ'' bake under ultra-high vacuum has been successfully applied as final preparation of niobium RF cavities by several laboratories over the last few years. The benefits reported consist mainly of an improvement of the cavity quality factor at low field and a recovery from ''anomalous'' losses (so-called ''Q-drop'') without field emission at higher field. A series of experiments with a CEBAF single-cell cavity have been carried out at Jefferson Lab to carefully investigate the effect of baking at progressively higher temperatures for a fixed time on all the relevant material parameters. Measurements of the cavity quality factor in the temperature range 1.37 K-280 K and resonant frequency shift between 6 K-9.3 K provide information about the surface resistance, energy gap, penetration depth and mean free path. The experimental data have been analyzed with the complete BCS theory of superconductivity. The hydrogen content of small niobium samples inserted in the cavity during its surface preparation was analyzed with Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA). The single-cell cavity has been tested at three different temperatures before and after baking to gain some insight on thermal

  8. Multiphysics Analysis of Frequency Detuning in Superconducting RF Cavities for Proton Particle Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Awida, M. H. [Fermilab; Gonin, I. [Fermilab; Passarelli, D. [Fermilab; Sukanov, A. [Fermilab; Khabiboulline, T. [Fermilab; Yakovlev, V. [Fermilab

    2016-01-22

    Multiphysics analyses for superconducting cavities are essential in the course of cavity design to meet stringent requirements on cavity frequency detuning. Superconducting RF cavities are the core accelerating elements in modern particle accelerators whether it is proton or electron machine, as they offer extremely high quality factors thus reducing the RF losses per cavity. However, the superior quality factor comes with the challenge of controlling the resonance frequency of the cavity within few tens of hertz bandwidth. In this paper, we investigate how the multiphysics analysis plays a major role in proactively minimizing sources of frequency detuning, specifically; microphonics and Lorentz Force Detuning (LFD) in the stage of RF design of the cavity and mechanical design of the niobium shell and the helium vessel.

  9. Niobium superconducting rf cavity fabrication by electrohydraulic forming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Cantergiani

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Superconducting rf (SRF cavities are traditionally fabricated from superconducting material sheets or made of copper coated with superconducting material, followed by trim machining and electron-beam welding. An alternative technique to traditional shaping methods, such as deep-drawing and spinning, is electrohydraulic forming (EHF. In EHF, half-cells are obtained through ultrahigh-speed deformation of blank sheets, using shockwaves induced in water by a pulsed electrical discharge. With respect to traditional methods, such a highly dynamic process can yield interesting results in terms of effectiveness, repeatability, final shape precision, higher formability, and reduced springback. In this paper, the first results of EHF on high purity niobium are presented and discussed. The simulations performed in order to master the multiphysics phenomena of EHF and to adjust its process parameters are presented. The microstructures of niobium half-cells produced by EHF and by spinning have been compared in terms of damage created in the material during the forming operation. The damage was assessed through hardness measurements, residual resistivity ratio (RRR measurements, and electron backscattered diffraction analyses. It was found that EHF does not worsen the damage of the material during forming and instead, some areas of the half-cell have shown lower damage compared to spinning. Moreover, EHF is particularly advantageous to reduce the forming time, preserve roughness, and to meet the final required shape accuracy.

  10. Niobium superconducting rf cavity fabrication by electrohydraulic forming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantergiani, E.; Atieh, S.; Léaux, F.; Perez Fontenla, A. T.; Prunet, S.; Dufay-Chanat, L.; Koettig, T.; Bertinelli, F.; Capatina, O.; Favre, G.; Gerigk, F.; Jeanson, A. C.; Fuzeau, J.; Avrillaud, G.; Alleman, D.; Bonafe, J.; Marty, P.

    2016-11-01

    Superconducting rf (SRF) cavities are traditionally fabricated from superconducting material sheets or made of copper coated with superconducting material, followed by trim machining and electron-beam welding. An alternative technique to traditional shaping methods, such as deep-drawing and spinning, is electrohydraulic forming (EHF). In EHF, half-cells are obtained through ultrahigh-speed deformation of blank sheets, using shockwaves induced in water by a pulsed electrical discharge. With respect to traditional methods, such a highly dynamic process can yield interesting results in terms of effectiveness, repeatability, final shape precision, higher formability, and reduced springback. In this paper, the first results of EHF on high purity niobium are presented and discussed. The simulations performed in order to master the multiphysics phenomena of EHF and to adjust its process parameters are presented. The microstructures of niobium half-cells produced by EHF and by spinning have been compared in terms of damage created in the material during the forming operation. The damage was assessed through hardness measurements, residual resistivity ratio (RRR) measurements, and electron backscattered diffraction analyses. It was found that EHF does not worsen the damage of the material during forming and instead, some areas of the half-cell have shown lower damage compared to spinning. Moreover, EHF is particularly advantageous to reduce the forming time, preserve roughness, and to meet the final required shape accuracy.

  11. Technical training: RF superconductivity and accelerator cavity applications

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training

    2016-01-01

    We are happy to announce a new training course organised by the TE-VSC group in the field of the physics and applications of superconductors. The course provides an overview and update of the theory of radiofrequency and superconductors:   RF Superconductivity and Accelerator Cavity Applications https://cern.ch/course/?164VAC19 One timetable only:  Tuesday, 8 March 2016: from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday, 9 March 2016: from 9.30 a.m to 11.30 a.m. Thursday, 10 March 2016: from 9.30 a.m to 11.30 a.m. Monday, 14 March 2016: from 9.30 a.m to 11.30 a.m. Tuesday, 15 March 2016: from 9.30 a.m to 11.30 a.m. Wednesday, 16 March 2016: from 9.30 a.m to 11.30 a.m. Thursday, 17 March 2016: from 9.30 a.m to 11.30 a.m. Target audience: Experts in radiofrequency or solid state physics (PhD level). Pre-requisites: Basic knowledge of quantum physics and superc...

  12. Cryogenic Test of a Proof-of-Principle Superconducting RF-Dipole Deflecting and Crabbing Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    De Silva, S U; Delayen, Jean Roger

    2013-01-01

    Recent applications in need of compact low-frequency deflecting and crabbing cavities have initiated the design and development of new superconducting structures operating at high gradients with low losses. Previously, TM$_{110}$ -type deflecting and crabbing cavities were developed and have also been operated successfully. However, these geometries are not favorable designs for low operating frequencies. The superconducting rf-dipole cavity is the first compact deflecting and crabbing geometry that has demonstrated high gradients and high shunt impedance. Since the fundamental operating mode is the lowest mode and is widely separated from the nearest higher order mode, the rf-dipole design is an attractive geometry for effective damping of the higher order modes in high current applications. A 400 MHz rf-dipole cavity was designed, fabricated, and tested as a proof-of-principle cavity. The cavity achieved high operating gradients, and the multipacting levels were easily processed and did not reoccur.

  13. Transient Beam Loading Effects in Gas-filled RF Cavities for a Muon Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, M. [Fermilab; Tollestrup, A. [Fermilab; Yonehara, K. [Fermilab; Freemire, B. [IIT, Chicago

    2013-06-01

    A gas-filled RF cavity can be an effective solution for the development of a compact muon ionization cooling channel. One possible problem expected in this type of cavity is the dissipation of significant RF power through the beam-induced plasmas accumulated inside the cavity (plasma loading). In addition, for the higher muon beam intensity, the effects of the beam itself on the cavity accelerating mode are non-negligible (beam loading). These beam- cavity interactions induce a transient phase which may be very harmful to the beam quality [1]. In this study, we estimate the transient voltage in a gas-filled RF cavity with both the plasma and conventional beam loading and discuss their compensation methods.

  14. Fiber Optic Based Thermometry System for Superconducting RF Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kochergin, Vladimir [Microxact Inc.

    2013-05-06

    Thermometry is recognized as the best technique to identify and characterize losses in SRF cavities. The most widely used and reliable apparatus for temperature mapping at cryogenic temperatures is based on carbon resistors (RTDs). The use of this technology on multi-cell cavities is inconvenient due to the very large number of sensors required to obtain sufficient spatial resolution. Recent developments make feasible the use of multiplexible fiber optic sensors for highly distributed temperature measurements. However, sensitivity of multiplexible cryogenic temperature sensors was found extending only to 12K at best and thus was not sufficient for SRF cavity thermometry. During the course of the project the team of MicroXact, JLab and Virginia Tech developed and demonstrated the multiplexible fiber optic sensor with adequate response below 20K. The demonstrated temperature resolution is by at least a factor of 60 better than that of the best multiplexible fiber optic temperature sensors reported to date. The clear path toward at least 10times better temperature resolution is shown. The first to date temperature distribution measurements with ~2.5mm spatial resolution was done with fiber optic sensors at 2K to4K temperatures. The repeatability and accuracy of the sensors were verified only at 183K, but at this temperature both parameters significantly exceeded the state of the art. The results of this work are expected to find a wide range of applications, since the results are enabling the whole new testing capabilities, not accessible before.

  15. Traveling wave linear accelerator with RF power flow outside of accelerating cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolgashev, Valery A.

    2016-06-28

    A high power RF traveling wave accelerator structure includes a symmetric RF feed, an input matching cell coupled to the symmetric RF feed, a sequence of regular accelerating cavities coupled to the input matching cell at an input beam pipe end of the sequence, one or more waveguides parallel to and coupled to the sequence of regular accelerating cavities, an output matching cell coupled to the sequence of regular accelerating cavities at an output beam pipe end of the sequence, and output waveguide circuit or RF loads coupled to the output matching cell. Each of the regular accelerating cavities has a nose cone that cuts off field propagating into the beam pipe and therefore all power flows in a traveling wave along the structure in the waveguide.

  16. Beam Test of a Dielectric Loaded High Pressure RF Cavity for Use in Muon Cooling Channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freemire, Ben [IIT, Chicago; Bowring, Daniel [Fermilab; Kochemirovskiy, Alexey [Chicago U.; Moretti, Alfred [Fermilab; Peterson, David [Fermilab; Tollestrup, Alvin [Fermilab; Torun, Yagmur [IIT, Chicago; Yonehara, Katsuya [Fermilab

    2016-06-01

    Bright muon sources require six dimensional cooling to achieve acceptable luminosities. Ionization cooling is the only known method able to do so within the muon lifetime. One proposed cooling channel, the Helical Cooling Channel, utilizes gas filled radio frequency cavities to both mitigate RF breakdown in the presence of strong, external magnetic fields, and provide the cooling medium. Engineering constraints on the diameter of the magnets within which these cavities operate dictate the radius of the cavities be decreased at their nominal operating frequency. To accomplish this, one may load the cavities with a larger dielectric material. A 99.5% alumina ring was inserted in a high pressure RF test cell and subjected to an intense proton beam at the MuCool Test Area at Fermilab. The results of the performance of this dielectric loaded high pressure RF cavity will be presented.

  17. Buffer Chemical Polishing and RF Testing of the 56 MHz SRF Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burrill,A.

    2009-01-01

    The 56 MHz cavity presents a unique challenge in preparing it for RF testing prior to construction of the cryomodule. This challenge arises due to the physical dimensions and subsequent weight of the cavity, and is further complicated by the coaxial geometry, and the need to properly chemically etch and high pressure rinse the entire inner surface prior to RF testing. To the best of my knowledge, this is the largest all niobium SRF cavity to be chemically etched and subsequently tested in a vertical dewar at 4K, and these processes will be the topic of this technical note.

  18. Suppression of multipacting in high power RF couplers operating with superconducting cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostroumov, P.N., E-mail: ostroumov@frib.msu.edu [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB), Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Kazakov, S. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Morris, D.; Larter, T.; Plastun, A.S.; Popielarski, J.; Wei, J.; Xu, T. [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB), Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Capacitive input couplers based on a 50 Ω coaxial transmission line are frequently used to transmit RF power to superconducting (SC) resonators operating in CW mode. It is well known that coaxial transmission lines are prone to multipacting phenomenon in a wide range of RF power level and operating frequency. The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) being constructed at Michigan State University includes two types of quarter wave SC resonators (QWR) operating at 80.5 MHz and two types of half wave SC resonators (HWR) operating at 322 MHz. As was reported in ref. [1] a capacitive input coupler used with HWRs was experiencing strong multipacting that resulted in a long conditioning time prior the cavity testing at design levels of accelerating fields. We have developed an insert into 50 Ω coaxial transmission line that provides opportunity to bias the RF coupler antenna and protect the amplifier from the bias potential in the case of breakdown in DC isolation. Two of such devices have been built and are currently used for the off-line testing of 8 HWRs installed in the cryomodule.

  19. Metallurgical analysis and RF losses in superconducting niobium thin film cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Bloess, D; Mahner, E; Nakai, H; Weingarten, Wolfgang; Bosland, P; Mayer, J; Van Loyen, L

    1996-01-01

    Copper cavities with a thin niobium film as used in the large electron positron collider LEP would be also attractive for future linear colliders, provided the decrease of the Q-value with the accelerating gradient can be reduced. We aim at extracting the important parameters that govern this decrease. The dependence on the RF frequency is studied by exciting 500 MHz and 1500 MHz cavities in different modes. In addition we combined RF measurements for two 1500 MHz cavities of different RF performance with microscopic tests (AFM, TEM) on samples cut out of the same cavities. Their micro-structural characterisation in plan-view allows to extract the grain size and the defect densities.

  20. RF noise induced laser perturbation for improving the performance of non-resonant cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciaffoni, Luca; Couper, John; Hancock, Gus; Peverall, Robert; Robbins, Peter A; Ritchie, Grant A D

    2014-07-14

    We present a novel strategy for suppressing mode structure which often degrades off-axis cavity enhanced absorption spectra. This strategy relies on promoting small, random fluctuations in the optical frequency by perturbing the injection current of the diode laser source with radio frequency (RF) bandwidth-limited white noise. A fast and compact oxygen sensor, constructed from a 764 nm vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) and an optical cavity with re-entrant configuration, is employed to demonstrate the potential of this scheme for improving the sensitivity and robustness of a field-deployable cavity spectrometer. The RF spectral density of the current noise injected into the VCSEL has been measured, and correlated to the effects on the optical spectral signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and laser linewidth for a range of re-entrant geometries. A fourfold gain in the SNR has been achieved using the RF noise perturbation for the optimal off-axis alignment, which led to a minimum detectable absorption (MDA) predicted from an Allan variance study as low as 4.3 × 10(-5) at 1 s averaging. For the optically forbidden oxygen transition under investigation, a limit of detection (SNR = 1) of 810 ppm was achieved for a 10 ms acquisition time. This performance level paves the way for a fast, sensitive, in-line oxygen spectrometer that lends itself to a range of applications in respiratory medicine.

  1. RF and Data Acquisition Systems for Fermilab's ILC SRF Cavity Vertical Test Stand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph P. Ozelis; Roger Nehring; Christiana Grenoble; Thomas J. Powers

    2007-06-01

    Fermilab is developing a facility for vertical testing of SRF cavities as part of a program to improve cavity performance reproducibility for the ILC. The RF system for this facility, using the classic combination of oscillator, phase detector/mixer, and loop amplifier to detect the resonant cavity frequency and lock onto the cavity, is based on the proven production cavity test systems used at Jefferson Lab for CEBAF and SNS cavity testing. The design approach is modular in nature, using commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) components. This yields a system that can be easily debugged and modified, and with ready availability of spares. Data acquisition and control is provided by a PXI-based hardware platform in conjunction with software developed in the LabView programming environment. This software provides for amplitude and phase adjustment of incident RF power, and measures all relevant cavity power levels, cavity thermal environment parameters, as well as field emission-produced radiation. It also calculates the various cavity performance parameters and their associated errors. Performance during system commissioning and initial cavity tests will be presented.

  2. 3 GHz Barrel Open Cavity (BOC) RF pulse compressor for CTF3

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Peter

    2004-01-01

    A prototype 3 GHz RF pulse compressor, based on a single 'Barrel shaped Open Cavity' (BOC), was designed, manufactured and successfully high power tested into a RF load. It is now planned to install five such devices in the CTF3 drive beam linac currently being built at CERN. A specific feature of the BOC is the so-called "whispering gallery" mode which has a high internal Q-factor. Contrary to other cavity-based pulse compressors, such as SLED or LIPS, with this mode one can operate in a resonant rotating wave regime. Consequently, when used as an RF pulse compressor a single BOC is sufficient, whereas the LIPS and SLED schemes require two cavities and a 3-dB hybrid. A short description of the BOC and the results of high power operation specific to the CTF3 drive beam linac are presented.

  3. Vacuum RF Breakdown of Accelerating Cavities in Multi-Tesla Magnetic Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowring, Daniel [Fermilab; Freemire, Ben [IIT, Chicago; Kochemirovskiy, Alexey [Chicago U.; Lane, Peter [IIT, Chicago; Moretti, Alfred [Fermilab; Palmer, Mark [Fermilab; Peterson, David [Fermilab; Tollestrup, Alvin [Fermilab; Torun, Yagmur [IIT, Chicago; Yonehara, Katsuya [Fermilab

    2016-06-01

    Ionization cooling of intense muon beams requires the operation of high-gradient, normal-conducting RF structures within multi-Tesla magnetic fields. The application of strong magnetic fields has been shown to lead to an increase in vacuum RF breakdown. This phenomenon imposes operational (i.e. gradient) limitations on cavities in ionization cooling channels, and has a bearing on the design and operation of other RF structures as well, such as photocathodes and klystrons. We present recent results from Fermilab's MuCool Test Area (MTA), in which 201 and 805 MHz cavities were operated at high power both with and without the presence of multi-Tesla magnetic fields. We present an analysis of damage due to breakdown in these cavities, as well as measurements related to dark current and their relation to a conceptual model describing breakdown phenomena.

  4. DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS FOR THE MECHANICAL TUNER OF THE RHIC ELECTRON COOLER RF CAVITY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RANK, J.; BEN-ZVI,I.; HAHN,G.; MCINTYRE,G.; DALY,E.; PREBLE,J.

    2005-05-16

    The ECX Project, Brookhaven Lab's predecessor to the RHIC e-Cooler, includes a prototype RF tuner mechanism capable of both coarse and fast tuning. This tuner concept, adapted originally from a DESY design, has longer stroke and significantly higher loads attributable to the very stiff ECX cavity shape. Structural design, kinematics, controls, thermal and RF issues are discussed and certain improvements are proposed.

  5. A Single Crystal Niobium RF Cavity of the TESLA Shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, W.; Singer, X.; Kneisel, P.

    2007-08-01

    A fabrication method for single crystal niobium cavities of the TESLA shape was proposed on the basis of metallographic investigations and electron beam welding tests on niobium single crystals. These tests showed that a cavity can be produced without grain boundaries even in the welding area. An appropriate annealing allows the outgassing of hydrogen and stress relaxation of the material without destruction of the single crystal. A prototype single crystal single cell cavity was build. An accelerating gradient of 37.5 MV/m was reached after approximately 110 μm of Buffered Chemical Polishing (BCP) and in situ baking at 120°C for 6 hrs with a quality factor exceeding 2×1010 at 1.8 K. The developed fabrication method can be extended to fabrication of multi cell cavities.

  6. Study of the effect of loop inductance on the RF transmission line to cavity coupling coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Shankar; Pant, K. K.

    2016-08-01

    Coupling of RF power is an important aspect in the design and development of RF accelerating structures. RF power coupling employing coupler loops has the advantage of tunability of β, the transmission line to cavity coupling coefficient. Analytical expressions available in literature for determination of size of the coupler loop using Faraday's law of induction show reasonably good agreement with experimentally measured values of β below critical coupling (β ≤ 1) but show large deviation with experimentally measured values and predictions by simulations for higher values of β. In actual accelerator application, many RF cavities need to be over-coupled with β > 1 for reasons of beam loading compensation, reduction of cavity filling time, etc. This paper discusses a modified analytical formulation by including the effect of loop inductance in the determination of loop size for any desired coupling coefficient. The analytical formulation shows good agreement with 3D simulations and with experimentally measured values. It has been successfully qualified by the design and development of power coupler loops for two 476 MHz pre-buncher RF cavities, which have successfully been conditioned at rated power levels using these coupler loops.

  7. Characterization of a superconducting Pb photocathode in a superconducting rf photoinjector cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Barday, R; Jankowiak, A; Kamps, T; Knobloch, J; Kugeler, O; Matveenko, A; Neumann, A; Schmeißer, M; Volker, J; Kneisel, P; Nietubyc, R; Schubert S; Smedley J; Sekutowicz, J; Will, I

    2014-01-01

    Photocathodes are a limiting factor for the next generation of ultrahigh brightness photoinjectors. We studied the behavior of a superconducting Pb cathode in the cryogenic environment of a superconducting rf gun cavity to measure the quantum efficiency, its spatial distribution, and the work function. We will also discuss how the cathode surface contaminants modify the performance of the photocathode as well as the gun cavity and we discuss the possibilities to remove these contaminants.

  8. Operation of the 56 MHz superconducting RF cavity in RHIC during run 14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Q. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Belomestnykh, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Ben-Zvi, I. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Blaskiewicz, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hayes, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Mernick, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Severino, F. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Smith, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Zaltsman, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-09-11

    A 56 MHz superconducting RF cavity was designed and installed in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). It is the first superconducting quarter wave resonator (QWR) operating in a high-energy storage ring. We discuss herein the cavity operation with Au+Au collisions, and with asymmetrical Au+He3 collisions. The cavity is a storage cavity, meaning that it becomes active only at the energy of experiment, after the acceleration cycle is completed. With the cavity at 300 kV, an improvement in luminosity was detected from direct measurements, and the bunch length has been reduced. The uniqueness of the QWR demands an innovative design of the higher order mode dampers with high-pass filters, and a distinctive fundamental mode damper that enables the cavity to be bypassed during the acceleration stage.

  9. High Pressure Gas Filled RF Cavity Beam Test at the Fermilab MuCool Test Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freemire, Ben [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2013-05-01

    The high energy physics community is continually looking to push the limits with respect to the energy and luminosity of particle accelerators. In the realm of leptons, only electron colliders have been built to date. Compared to hadrons, electrons lose a large amount of energy when accelerated in a ring through synchrotron radiation. A solution to this problem is to build long, straight accelerators for electrons, which has been done with great success. With a new generation of lepton colliders being conceived, building longer, more powerful accelerators is not the most enticing option. Muons have been proposed as an alternative particle to electrons. Muons lose less energy to synchrotron radiation and a Muon Collider can provide luminosity within a much smaller energy range than a comparable electron collider. This allows a circular collider to be built with higher attainable energy than any present electron collider. As part of the accelerator, but separate from the collider, it would also be possible to allow the muons to decay to study neutrinos. The possibility of a high energy, high luminosity muon collider and an abundant, precise source of neutrinos is an attractive one. The technological challenges of building a muon accelerator are many and diverse. Because the muon is an unstable particle, a muon beam must be cooled and accelerated to the desired energy within a short amount of time. This requirement places strict requisites on the type of acceleration and focusing that can be used. Muons are generated as tertiary beams with a huge phase space, so strong magnetic fields are required to capture and focus them. Radio frequency (RF) cavities are needed to capture, bunch and accelerate the muons. Unfortunately, traditional vacuum RF cavities have been shown to break down in the magnetic fields necessary for capture and focusing.

  10. A Two-Frequency RF Cavity for the PSI Low Emittance Gun

    CERN Document Server

    Raguin, J Y; Li, K S B; Pedrozzi, M

    2005-01-01

    In the Low Emittance Gun (LEG) under development at PSI an extremely bright electron beam is produced from a field emission array and then rapidly accelerated in a diode configuration up to 1 MeV with gradients of the order of 250 to 500 MV/m. The electronic emission from such a cold cathode allows normalized intrinsic emittance below 0.1 mm.mrad well suited for X-ray FELs or linear collider applications. The diode is followed by an L-band RF-gun like cavity to further accelerate the beam. A third harmonic field is superposed to the fundamental [1] 1.5 GHz pi-mode field to minimize the RF emittance. We report here on the design of such a two-frequency RF cavity with some details on the RF coupling and possible tuning mechanisms. Beam dynamics studies, performed with PARMELA and the fully self-consistent code MAFIA, are presented and compared with the results obtained for an RF cavity excited with the fundamental frequency only.

  11. Proton acceleration by RF TE{sub 11} mode in a cylindrical cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobajima, Masaaki; Yoshikawa, Kiyoshi; Ohnishi, Masami; Yamamoto, Yasushi; Masuda, Kai [Kyoto Univ., Uji (Japan). Inst. of Advanced Energy

    1997-03-01

    We found that protons are accelerated significantly by RF TE{sub 11} mode in a cylindrical cavity. In this method, protons get the perpendicular kinetic energy, so we thought it might be a compact accelerator, and studied the feasibility by numerical simulation. (author)

  12. RF cavities of CESAR (2 MeV electron storage ring).

    CERN Multimedia

    Service Photo; CERN PhotoLab

    1968-01-01

    RF cavity. There were 2 identical ones: one for stacking (accumulation) procedures; the other for scanning with "empty buckets" (measurement of beam density distribution). Both were operated at h=2 (2nd harmonic of the revolution frequency), i.e. at around 24.4 MHz. Voltage, frequency and phase were programmed with analogue circuits.

  13. CESAR, 2 MeV electron storage ring; construction period; RF cavity.

    CERN Multimedia

    Service Photo; CERN PhotoLab

    1962-01-01

    RF cavity. There were 2 identical ones: one for stacking (accumulation) procedures; the other for scanning with "empty buckets" (measurement of beam density distribution). Both were operated at h=2 (2nd harmonic of the revolution frequency), i.e. at around 24.4 MHz. Voltage, frequency and phase were programmed with analogue circuits.

  14. RF and data acquisition systems for Fermilab's ILC SRF cavity vertical test stand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozelis, Joseph P.; Nehring, Roger; /Fermilab; Grenoble, Christiana; Powers, Thomas J.; /Jefferson Lab

    2007-06-01

    Fermilab is developing a facility for vertical testing of SRF cavities as part of its ILC program. The RF system for this facility is based on the proven production cavity test systems used at Jefferson Lab for CEBAF and SNS cavity testing. The design approach is modular in nature, using commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) components. This yields a system that can be easily debugged and modified, and with ready availability of spares. Comprehensive data acquisition and control is provided by a PXI-based hardware platform in conjunction with software developed in the LabView programming environment.

  15. A Broadband and High Gradient RF Cavity for a Compact Proton Synchrotron

    CERN Document Server

    Fang, Z; Averboukh, I I; Kijima, Y; Nagayama, T

    2002-01-01

    A broadband and high gradient RF cavity has been designed for a compact proton synchrotron, which has been approved to develop for radiation therapy, (2000), (2001) and (1999). A maximal high peak voltage of about 20 kV will be applied in the cavity, including the fundamental from 1.7 MHz to 15 MHz, and the second and possibly third harmonics. The design principle of the wideband cavity without tuning system by using high-permeability magnetic alloy (FINEMET) cores is described. Some calculation results will be presented. And a prototype will be developed and tested. (5 refs).

  16. Mechanical Design and Fabrication Studies for SPL Superconducting RF Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Atieh, S; Aviles Santillana, I; Capatina, O; Renaglia, T; Tardy, T; Valverde Alonso, N; Weingarten, W

    2011-01-01

    CERN’s R&D programme on the Superconducting Proton Linac’s (SPL) superconducting radio frequency (SRF) elliptical cavities made from niobium sheets explores new mechanical design and consequently new fabrication methods, where several opportunities for improved optimization were identified. A stainless steel helium vessel is under design rather than a titanium helium vessel using an integrated brazed transition between Nb and the SS helium vessel. Different design and fabrication aspects were proposed and the results are discussed hereafter.

  17. Cryomodule tests of four Tesla-like cavities in the Superconducting RF Test Facility at KEK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiji Kako

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available A 6-m cryomodule including four Tesla-like cavities was developed, and was tested in the Superconducting RF Test Facility phase-I at KEK. The performance as a total superconducting cavity system was checked in the cryomodule tests at 2 K with high rf power. One of the four cavities achieved a stable pulsed operation at 32  MV/m, which is higher than the operating accelerating gradient in the ILC. The maximum accelerating gradient (E_{acc,max⁡} obtained in the vertical cw tests was maintained or slightly improved in the cryomodule tests operating in a pulse mode. Compensation of the Lorentz force detuning at 31  MV/m was successfully demonstrated by a piezo tuner and predetuning.

  18. Relativistic Stern-Gerlach Interaction in an RF Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conte,M.; Luccio, A. U.; Pusterla, M.

    2009-05-01

    The general expression of the Stern-Gerlach (SG) force is deduced for a relativistic charged spin-1/2 particle which travels inside a time varying magnetic field. This result was obtained either by means of two Lorentz boosts or starting from Dirac's equation. Then, the utilization of this interaction for attaining the spin states separation is reconsidered in a new example using a new radio-frequency arrangement. On the basis of the previous estimates, we feel ready to propose the time varying SG interaction as a method for attaining a spin state separation of an unpolarized beam of, say (anti)protons, since the energy of particles with opposite spin orientations will differ and beams in the two states can be separated. In a first stage of the study of a sensible practical design, we intend to proceed with numerical simulations. As a first step, we intend to verify the correctness of Eqs.(42) and (43) setting once {beta}{sub ph} = 2 and then {beta}{sub ph} = 3, in a cavity where the field line pattern can be realistically controlled. Beyond the verification of the present theory, there is also the aim of studying the effects generated by the spin precession inside the cavity, that we did not yet address in this note. Next, we shall consider a spin splitter scheme based on the lattice of an existing or planned (anti)proton ring endowed with an array of splitting cavities. The principal aim of the latter implementations is to check the mixing effect of the longitudinal phase-plane filamentation, i.e. the actual foe which could frustrate the entire spin splitting process.

  19. RF Design of Normal Conducting 704 MHz and 2.1 GHz Cavities for LEReC Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Binping [Brookhaven Natl. Lab.; Belomestnykh, Sergey [SUNY, Stony Brook; Ben-Zvi, Ilan [RIKEN BNL; Blaskiewicz, Michael [RIKEN BNL; Brennan, Joseph [RIKEN BNL; Brutus, Jean Clifford [RIKEN BNL; Fedotov, Alexei [RIKEN BNL; Hahn, Harald [Brookhaven; McIntyre, Gary [RIKEN BNL; Pai, Chien [RIKEN BNL; Smith, Kevin [RIKEN BNL; Tuozzolo, Joseph [RIKEN BNL; Veshcherevich, Vadim [Cornell U., CLASSE; Wu, Qiong [RIKEN BNL; Xin, Tianmu [RIKEN BNL; Xu, Wencan [RIKEN BNL; Zaltsman, Alex [RIKEN BNL

    2016-06-01

    To improve RHIC luminosity for heavy ion beam energies below 10 GeV/nucleon, the Low Energy RHIC electron Cooler (LEReC) is currently under development at BNL. Two normal conducting cavities, a single cell 704 MHz cavity and a 3 cell 2.1 GHz third harmonic cavity, will be used in LEReC for energy spread correction. Currently these two cavities are under fabrication. In this paper we report the RF design of these two cavities.

  20. Estimation of the RF Characteristics of Absorbing Materials in Broad RF Frequency Ranges

    CERN Document Server

    Fandos, R

    2008-01-01

    Absorbing materials are very often used in RF applications. Their electromagnetic characteristics (relative permittivity εr, loss tangent tan δ and conductivity σ) are needed in order to obtain a high-quality design of the absorbing pieces in the frequency range of interest. Unfortunately, suppliers often do not provide these quantities. A simple technique to determine them, based on the RF measurement of the disturbance created by the insertion of a piece of absorber in a waveguide, is presented in this note. Results for samples of two different materials, silicon carbide and aluminum nitride are presented. While the former has a negligible conductivity at the working frequencies, the conductivity of the latter has to be taken into account in order to obtain a meaningful estimation of εr and tan δ. The equations of Kramers & Kronig have been applied to the data as a cross check, confirming the results.

  1. Automatic Phase Calibration for RF Cavities using Beam-Loading Signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edelen, J. P. [Fermilab; Chase, B. E. [Fermilab

    2017-10-01

    Precise calibration of the cavity phase signals is necessary for the operation of any particle accelerator. For many systems this requires human in the loop adjustments based on measurements of the beam parameters downstream. Some recent work has developed a scheme for the calibration of the cavity phase using beam measurements and beam-loading however this scheme is still a multi-step process that requires heavy automation or human in the loop. In this paper we analyze a new scheme that uses only RF signals reacting to beam-loading to calculate the phase of the beam relative to the cavity. This technique could be used in slow control loops to provide real-time adjustment of the cavity phase calibration without human intervention thereby increasing the stability and reliability of the accelerator.

  2. On active disturbance rejection based control design for superconducting RF cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, John; Morris, Dan; Usher, Nathan; Gao, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Shen; Nicoletti, Achille; Zheng, Qinling

    2011-07-01

    Superconducting RF (SRF) cavities are key components of modern linear particle accelerators. The National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) is building a 3 MeV/u re-accelerator (ReA3) using SRF cavities. Lightly loaded SRF cavities have very small bandwidths (high Q) making them very sensitive to mechanical perturbations whether external or self-induced. Additionally, some cavity types exhibit mechanical responses to perturbations that lead to high-order non-stationary transfer functions resulting in very complex control problems. A control system that can adapt to the changing perturbing conditions and transfer functions of these systems would be ideal. This paper describes the application of a control technique known as "Active Disturbance Rejection Control" (ARDC) to this problem.

  3. Fast frequency-tuning of superconducting resonant rf cavities for heavy ion linear accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peebles, Jr., Peyton Z.

    1971-12-01

    Superconducting resonant radio frequency (RF) cavities which utilize helices for producing ''slow'' wave velocities are prime candidates for creating the large accelerating electric fields needed in linear heavy ion accelerators. Because such structures are subject to mechanical vibrations, these vibrations may cause fast shifts in the cavity resonance, frequency. The result of such shifts is to cause undesirable phase modulation of the accelerating field. This report describes results of a study of an all-electronic method of fast tuning of the cavity to compensate for the vibration. Two types of control are discussed. The first employs only two electrical entrance points (ports) to the cavity. It is mechanically simpler than the second type, which uses three ports, but suffers some undesirable features not present in the three-port method.

  4. Third harmonic cavity design and RF measurements for the Frascati DAΦNE collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Alesini

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Third harmonic passive RF cavities have been proposed for installation in both rings of the DAΦNE factory collider to improve the Touschek lifetime and to increase the Landau damping. This paper illustrates the design of the harmonic cavities. The main requirements were to obtain a relatively low R/Q factor and a quality factor Q as high as possible to satisfy beam dynamics requirements and to damp all the higher order mode (HOM to a harmless level in order to avoid multibunch instabilities. A spherical shape of the cavity central body has been chosen as an optimum compromise between a high Q resonator and a low R/Q factor. HOM suppression has been provided by a ferrite ring damper designed for the superconducting cavities of the high energy ring of the KEK-B factory. The design and electromagnetic properties of the resonant modes have been studied with MAFIA and HFSS codes. Cavities have been made of aluminum and the RF measurements have been performed to characterize them. The measurements are in a good agreement with numerical simulations results, demonstrating a satisfactory HOM damping.

  5. Carbon-Fibre-Reinforced Laminates for the Tuning Structure of the LHC RF Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Pflanz, G; Tischhauser, Johann

    1997-01-01

    A carbon-fibre-reinforced tube is proposed for the tuning structure of the superconducting RF cavities of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). It has a high axial stiffness and provides thermal insulation between the cold RF cavity and the tuning actuator at room temperature. The tube is subjected to a high number of mechanical load cycles, high temperature gradients, thermal cycling, and ionizing radiation. Laminate theory is applied to a simplified model of the tube for a failure analysis. Long duration fatigue tests under nominal mechanical and thermal loads were performed on two tubes. The tubes were examined before and after the fatigue tests by geometric measurements, microscopy, and ultrasonic inspection. No damage such as fibre breakage, delamination, or matrix micro cracking could be detected.

  6. Digital Design Of The LHC Low Level rf The Tuning System For The Superconducting Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Baudrenghien, P; Ciapala, Edmond; Molendijk, J C; Olsen, R; Sorokoletov, R; Weierud, F

    2006-01-01

    The low level RF systems for the LHC are based extensively on digital technology, not only to achieve the required performance and stability but also to provide full remote control and diagnostics facilities needed since most of the RF system is inaccessible during operation. The hardware is based on modular VME with a specially designed P2 backplane for timing distribution, fast data interchange and low noise linear power supplies. Extensive design re-use and the use of graphic FPGA design tools have streamlined the design process. A milestone was the test of the tuning system for the superconducting cavities. The tuning control module is based on a 2M gate FPGA with on-board DSP. Its design and functionality are described, including features such as automatic cavity measurements. Work is ongoing on completion of other modules and building up complete software and diagnostics facilities.

  7. High gradient tests of an 88 MHz RF cavity for muon cooling

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, C; Gerigk, F; Marques-Balula, J; Vretenar, M

    2006-01-01

    The scheme for a Muon Cooling channel developed at CERN in the frame of Neutrino Factory studies foresees the use of 44 and 88 MHz cavities operating at a real-estate gradient as high as 4 MV/m. To assess the feasibility of this scheme, including high-gradient operation at relatively low frequency and the production and handling of high RF peak powers, a test stand was assembled at CERN. It included an 88 MHz resonator reconstructed from a 114 MHz cavity previously used for lepton acceleration in the PS, a 2.5 MW final amplifier made out of an old linac unit improved and down-scaled in frequency, and a PS spare amplifier used as driver stage. After only 160 hours of conditioning the cavity passed the 4 MV/m level, with local peak surface field in the gap exceeding 25 MV/m (2.4 times the Kilpatrick limit). The gradient was limited by the amplifier power, the maximum RF peak output power achieved during the tests being 2.65 MW. This paper presents the results of the tests, including an analysis of field emissio...

  8. Cavity voltage phase modulation to reduce the high-luminosity Large Hadron Collider rf power requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastoridis, T.; Baudrenghien, P.; Molendijk, J.

    2017-10-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) radio frequency (rf) and low-level rf (LLRF) systems are currently configured for constant rf voltage to minimize transient beam loading effects. The present scheme cannot be extended beyond nominal LHC beam current (0.55 A dc) and cannot be sustained for the high-luminosity (HL-LHC) beam current (1.1 A dc), since the demanded power would exceed the peak klystron power. A new scheme has therefore been proposed: for beam currents above nominal (and possibly earlier), the voltage reference will reproduce the modulation driven by the beam (transient beam loading), but the strong rf feedback and one-turn delay feedback will still be active for loop and beam stability. To achieve this, the voltage reference will be adapted for each bunch. This paper includes a theoretical derivation of the optimal cavity modulation, introduces the implemented algorithm, summarizes simulation runs that tested the algorithm performance, and presents results from a short LHC physics fill with the proposed implementation.

  9. Cavity voltage phase modulation to reduce the high-luminosity Large Hadron Collider rf power requirements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Mastoridis

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The Large Hadron Collider (LHC radio frequency (rf and low-level rf (LLRF systems are currently configured for constant rf voltage to minimize transient beam loading effects. The present scheme cannot be extended beyond nominal LHC beam current (0.55 A dc and cannot be sustained for the high-luminosity (HL-LHC beam current (1.1 A dc, since the demanded power would exceed the peak klystron power. A new scheme has therefore been proposed: for beam currents above nominal (and possibly earlier, the voltage reference will reproduce the modulation driven by the beam (transient beam loading, but the strong rf feedback and one-turn delay feedback will still be active for loop and beam stability. To achieve this, the voltage reference will be adapted for each bunch. This paper includes a theoretical derivation of the optimal cavity modulation, introduces the implemented algorithm, summarizes simulation runs that tested the algorithm performance, and presents results from a short LHC physics fill with the proposed implementation.

  10. LIGHT SOURCE: RF deflecting cavity for bunch length measurement in Tsinghua Thomson scattering X-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jia-Ru; Chen, Huai-Bi; Tang, Chuan-Xiang; Huang, Wen-Hui; Du, Ying-Chao; Zheng, Shu-Xin; Ren, Li

    2009-06-01

    An RF deflecting cavity used for bunch length measurement has been designed and fabricated at Tsinghua University for the Thomson Scattering X-Ray Source. The cavity is a 2856 MHz, π-mode, 3-cell standing-wave cavity, to diagnose the 3.5 MeV beam produced by photocathode electron gun. With a larger power source, the same cavity will again be used to measure the accelerated beam with energy of 50 MeV before colliding with the laser pulse. The RF design using MAFIA for both the cavity shape and the power coupler is reviewed, followed by presenting the fabrication procedure and bench measurement results of two cavities.

  11. rf design of a pulse compressor with correction cavity chain for klystron-based compact linear collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping; Zha, Hao; Syratchev, Igor; Shi, Jiaru; Chen, Huaibi

    2017-11-01

    We present an X-band high-power pulse compression system for a klystron-based compact linear collider. In this system design, one rf power unit comprises two klystrons, a correction cavity chain, and two SLAC Energy Doubler (SLED)-type X-band pulse compressors (SLEDX). An rf pulse passes the correction cavity chain, by which the pulse shape is modified. The rf pulse is then equally split into two ways, each deploying a SLEDX to compress the rf power. Each SLEDX produces a short pulse with a length of 244 ns and a peak power of 217 MW to power four accelerating structures. With the help of phase-to-amplitude modulation, the pulse has a dedicated shape to compensate for the beam loading effect in accelerating structures. The layout of this system and the rf design and parameters of the new pulse compressor are described in this work.

  12. Combining Cavity for RF Power Sources Higher Power Testing and Further Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Wooldridge, Emma; Rogers, James H P

    2005-01-01

    A combining cavity for RF power sources has been investigated previously reported in EPAC'04 using computer simulations in CSTs' Microwave Studio© and by building a low power model out of aluminium. The model has now been tested at higher power in a number different configurations and compared with earlier results. This paper discusses the results of the higher power test and options for a combiner that can be used at the high power required for particle accelerators. It discusses further design and future modelling.

  13. Indirect “one-side” cooling method of a magnetic-alloy–loaded rf cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Misu

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available For magnetic alloy (MA loaded rf accelerating cavity, we have developed an indirect cooling system, which is effective for retaining its shunt impedance by cooling only one side of the MA cores. Because of its low-Q high-permeability property, MA cores are suitable for constructing untuned broadband accelerating systems. Since these same cores are made of wound thin tape, the key to establishing an untuned broadband cavity with effective indirect cooling method is to suppress the reduction of core impedance when attaching metallic cooling plates to the core and keeping a good thermal contact between them. We have employed indium bonding to thermally connect both cores and cooling plates. Both cooling and endurance tests have demonstrated its successful results.

  14. Biased HiPIMS technology for superconducting rf accelerating cavities coating

    CERN Document Server

    G. Rosaz, G.; Sonato, D.; Calatroni, S.; Ehiasarian, A.; Junginger, T.; Taborelli, M.

    2016-01-01

    In the last few years the interest of the thin film science and technology community on High Impulse Power Magnetron Sputtering (HIPIMS) coatings has steadily increased. HIPIMS literature shows that better thin film morphology, denser and smoother films can be achieved when compared with standard dc Magnetron Sputtering (dcMS) coating technology. Furthermore the capability of HIPIMS to produce a high quantity of ionized species can allow conformal coatings also for complex geometries. CERN already studied the possibility to use such a coating method for SRF accelerating cavities. Results are promising but not better from a RF point of view than dcMS coatings. Thanks to these results the next step is to go towards a biased HiPIMS approach. However the geometry of the cavities leads to complex changes in the coating setup in order to apply a bias voltage. Coating system tweaking and first superconducting properties of biased samples are presented.

  15. Wakefield and RF Kicks Due to Coupler Asymmetry in TESLA-Type Accelerating Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bane, K.L.F.; Adolphsen, C.; Li, Z.; /SLAC; Dohlus, M.; Zagorodnov, I.; /DESY; Gonin, I.; Lunin, A.; Solyak, N.; Yakovlev, V.; /Fermilab; Gjonaj, E.; Weiland, T.; /Darmstadt, Tech. Hochsch.

    2008-07-07

    In a future linear collider, such as the International Linear Collider (ILC), trains of high current, low emittance bunches will be accelerated in a linac before colliding at the interaction point. Asymmetries in the accelerating cavities of the linac will generate fields that will kick the beam transversely and degrade the beam emittance and thus the collider performance. In the main linac of the ILC, which is filled with TESLA-type superconducting cavities, it is the fundamental (FM) and higher mode (HM) couplers that are asymmetric and thus the source of such kicks. The kicks are of two types: one, due to (the asymmetry in) the fundamental RF fields and the other, due to transverse wakefields that are generated by the beam even when it is on axis. In this report we calculate the strength of these kicks and estimate their effect on the ILC beam. The TESLA cavity comprises nine cells, one HM coupler in the upstream end, and one (identical, though rotated) HM coupler and one FM coupler in the downstream end (for their shapes and location see Figs. 1, 2) [1]. The cavity is 1.1 m long, the iris radius 35 mm, and the coupler beam pipe radius 39 mm. Note that the couplers reach closer to the axis than the irises, down to a distance of 30 mm.

  16. Optimization of the RF cavity heat load and trip rates for CEBAF at 12 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, He [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Roblin, Yves R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Freyberger, Arne P. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Krafft, Geoffrey A. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Terzic, Balsa P. [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2017-05-01

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility at JLab has 200 RF cavities in the north linac and the south linac respectively after the 12 GeV upgrade. The purpose of this work is to simultaneously optimize the heat load and the trip rate for the cavities and to reconstruct the pareto-optimal front in a timely manner when some of the cavities are turned down. By choosing an efficient optimizer and strategically creating the initial gradients, the pareto-optimal front for no more than 15 cavities down can be re-established within 20 seconds.

  17. Design and Prototyping of a 400 MHz RF-dipole Crabbing Cavity for the LHC High-Luminosity Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    De Silva, S U; Delayen, J R; Li, Z; Nicol, T H

    2015-01-01

    LHC High Luminosity Upgrade is in need of two crabbing systems that deflects the beam in both horizontal and vertical planes. The 400 MHz rf-dipole crabbing cavity system is capable of crabbing the proton beam in both planes. At present we are focusing our efforts on a complete crabbing system in the horizontal plane. Prior to LHC installation the crabbing system will be installed for beam test at SPS. The crabbing system consists of two rfdipole cavities in the cryomodule. This paper discusses the electromagnetic design and mechanical properties of the rf-dipole crabbing system for SPS beam test.

  18. Comparative Simulation Studies of Multipacting in Higher-Order-Mode Couplers of Superconducting RF Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Y. M. [Peking University, Beijing (China); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Liu, Kexin [Peking University, Beijing (China); Geng, Rongli [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Multipacting (MP) in higher-order-mode (HOM) couplers of the International Linear Collider (ILC) baseline cavity and the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) 12 GeV upgrade cavity is studied by using the ACE3P suites, developed by the Advanced Computations Department at SLAC. For the ILC cavity HOM coupler, the simulation results show that resonant trajectories exist in three zones, corresponding to an accelerating gradient range of 0.6-1.6 MV/m, 21-34 MV/m, 32-35 MV/m, and > 40MV/m, respectively. For the CEBAF 12 GeV upgrade cavity HOM coupler, resonant trajectories exist in one zone, corresponding to an accelerating gradient range of 6-13 MV/m. Potential implications of these MP barriers are discussed in the context of future high energy pulsed as well as medium energy continuous wave (CW) accelerators based on superconducting radio frequency cavities. Frequency scaling of MP's predicted in HOM couplers of the ILC, CBEAF upgrade, SNS and FLASH third harmonic cavity is given and found to be in good agreement with the analytical result based on the parallel plate model.

  19. Measurement of Frequency, Temperature, RF Field Dependence of Surface Resistance of Superconductors Using a Half Wave Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyekyoung; Delayen, Jean

    2017-01-01

    A theory of surface resistance of superconductor was rigorously formulated by Bardeen, Cooper, Schrieffer more than 50 years ago. Since then the accelerator community has been used the theory as a guideline to improve the surface resistance of the superconducting cavity. It has been observed that the surface resistance is dependent on frequency, temperature and rf field strength, and surface preparation. To verify these dependences, a well-controlled study is required. Although many different types of cavities have been tested, the typical superconducting cavities are built for specific frequencies of their application. They do not provide data other than at its own frequency. A superconducting half wave cavity is a cavity that enables us to collect the surface resistance data across frequencies of interest for particle accelerators and evaluate preparation techniques. This paper will present the design of the half wave cavity, its electromagnetic mode characteristics and experimental results. Research supported by NSF Award PHY-1416051.

  20. Structural and superconducting properties of sputter-deposited niobium films for applications in RF accelerating cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Peck, M A

    2000-01-01

    The present work presents the results of a systematic study of superconducting and structural properties of niobium films sputter deposited onto the inner walls of radiofrequency copper resonators. The measured superconducting quantities include the surface resistance, the critical temperature, the penetration depth and the upper and lower critical fields. In addition to films grown with different discharge gases (Xe, Kr, Ar, Ne and Ar-Ne mixtures) and to films grown on substrates prepared under different conditions, the study also includes massive niobium cavities. The surface resistance is analysed in terms of its dependence on the temperature and on the rf field amplitude and, when possible, compared to theoretical predictions. In general, good agreement with BCS theory is observed. All experimental results are presented in the form of a simple, but adequate parameterisation. The residual resistance is observed to be essentially uncorrelated with the other variables, but strongly dependent on the macroscop...

  1. Performance analysis of superconducting rf cavities for the CERN rare isotope accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Calatroni

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The first cryomodule of the new HIE-ISOLDE rare isotope accelerator has recently been commissioned with beam at CERN, with the second cryomodule ready for installation. Each cryomodule contains five superconducting low-beta quarter wave cavities, produced with the technology of sputtering a thin niobium film onto the copper substrate (Nb/Cu. This technology has several benefits compared to the bulk niobium solution, but also drawbacks among which the most relevant is the increase of surface resistance with accelerating field. Recent work has established the possible connection of this phenomenon to local defects in the Nb/Cu interface, which may lead to increased thermal impedance and thus local thermal runaway. We have analyzed the performance of the HIE-ISOLDE cavities series production, as well as of a few prototypes’, in terms of this model, and found a strong correlation between the rf properties and one of the model characteristic quantities, namely the total surface having increased interface thermal impedance.

  2. Activities on heavy ion RFQ and RF superconducting cavities at Peking University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, C.E.; Fang, J.X.; Yu, J.X.; Zhao, K. [IHIP, Peking University, Beijing (China)

    1998-11-01

    Progress on an Integrated Split Ring (ISR) RFQ with water-cooled mini vane electrodes was reported. N{sup +}, O{sup +} and O{sup -} ions have been accelerated to more than 300 KeV. The beam transmission efficiency of the RFQ reached more than 84% with an average current of {approx}38.4 {mu}A. Feasibility study of accelerating both O{sup +} and O{sup -} ion beams simultaneously in the same RFQ was also performed. An ISR RFQ for accelerating oxygen ion beam up to I MeV was designed and constructed. Two superconducting cavities with China made niobium were successfully manufactured and tested by the RF Superconductivity group. A DC photo cathode electron gun with a 2 MeV superconducting booster and a Cu-Nb sputtering system have been designed, manufactured and installed. The feasibility of a heavy ion superconducting booster with sputtering Nb QWR cavities was studied in collaboration with CIAE for their proposed project of Beijing Radioactive Nuclear Beam Facility. Both SC and RFQ groups of PKU are collaborating with IHEP and CIAE for a new proposal of accelerator driven nuclear energy source. (author)

  3. Enlargement of Tuning Range in a Ferrite-Tuned Cavity Through Superposed Orthogonal and Parallel Magnetic Bias

    CERN Document Server

    Vollinger, C

    2013-01-01

    Conventional ferrite-tuned cavities operate either with bias fields that are orthogonal or parallel to the magnetic RF-field. For a cavity that tunes rapidly over an overall frequency range around 100-400 MHz with high Q, we use ferrite garnets exposed to an innovative new biasing method consisting of a superposition of perpendicular and parallel magnetic fields. This method leads to a significant enlargement of the high-Q cavity tuning range by defining an operation point close to the magnetic saturation and thus improving ferrite material behaviour. A further advantage of this technique is the fast tuning speed resulting from the fact that tuning is carried out either with pure parallel biasing, or together with a very small change of operating point from perpendicular bias. In this paper, several scaled test models of ferrite-filled resonators are shown; measurements on the set-ups are compared and discussed.

  4. Short-range wireless communication fundamentals of RF system design and application

    CERN Document Server

    Bensky, Alan

    2004-01-01

    The Complete "Tool Kit” for the Hottest Area in RF/Wireless Design!Short-range wireless-communications over distances of less than 100 meters-is the most rapidly growing segment of RF/wireless engineering. Alan Bensky is an internationally recognized expert in short-range wireless, and this new edition of his bestselling book is completely revised to cover the latest developments in this fast moving field.You'll find coverage of such cutting-edge topics as: architectural trends in RF/wireless integrated circuits compatibility and conflict issues between differen

  5. Characterization of cold model cavity of cryocooled C-band 2.6-cell RF gun at 20 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, T.; Sakai, T.; Nogami, K.; Hayakawa, K.; Hayakawa, Y.; Nakao, K.; Takatsuka, K.; Fukuda, M.; Satoh, D.; Takatomi, T.; Terunuma, N.; Urakawa, J.; Yoshida, M.

    2017-07-01

    A cryogenic C-band 2.6-cell photocathode RF electron gun has been studied at Nihon University in collaboration with KEK for future use in a compact electron-accelerator based monochromatic X-ray source. The cold model cavity with an input coupler was fabricated at KEK in 2016 by ultraprecision machining and diffusion bonding techniques. The RF characteristics of the cavity obtained at cryogenic measurements have been in agreement with the result of the CST Studio simulation. The unloaded quality factor of ∼73000 has been obtained at the cavity temperature of 20 K, which is 5.5 times higher than that at room temperature and consistent with the simulation taking into account the anomalous skin effect of the cavity surface resistance. The input coupling coefficient of approximately 20 at 20 K has well reproduced the design value. The shift in the accelerating n-mode resonant frequency due to the cavity temperature change from 296.65 to 20 K has been 19.02 MHz, being 0.12 MHz greater than the value based on the linear expansion coefficients for copper by NIST.

  6. High Dynamic Range RF Front End with Noise Cancellation and Linearization for WiMAX Receivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-M. Wu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This research deals with verification of the high dynamic range for a heterodyne radio frequency (RF front end. A 2.6 GHz RF front end is designed and implemented in a hybrid microwave integrated circuit (HMIC for worldwide interoperability for microwave access (WiMAX receivers. The heterodyne RF front end consists of a low-noise amplifier (LNA with noise cancellation, an RF bandpass filter (BPF, a downconverter with linearization, and an intermediate frequency (IF BPF. A noise canceling technique used in the low-noise amplifier eliminates a thermal noise and then reduces the noise figure (NF of the RF front end by 0.9 dB. Use of a downconverter with diode linearizer also compensates for gain compression, which increases the input-referred third-order intercept point (IIP3 of the RF front end by 4.3 dB. The proposed method substantially increases the spurious-free dynamic range (DRf of the RF front end by 3.5 dB.

  7. Wide Stiffness Range Cavity Optomechanical Sensors for Atomic Force Microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Yuxiang; Aksyuk, Vladimir; Srinivasan, Kartik

    2012-01-01

    We report on progress in developing compact sensors for atomic force microscopy (AFM), in which the mechanical transducer is integrated with near-field optical readout on a single chip. The motion of a nanoscale, doubly-clamped cantilever was transduced by an adjacent high quality factor silicon microdisk cavity. In particular, we show that displacement sensitivity on the order of 1 fm/(Hz)^(1/2) can be achieved while the cantilever stiffness is varied over four orders of magnitude (\\approx 0.01 N/m to \\approx 290 N/m). The ability to transduce both very soft and very stiff cantilevers extends the domain of applicability of this technique, potentially ranging from interrogation of microbiological samples (soft cantilevers) to imaging with high resolution (stiff cantilevers). Along with mechanical frequencies (> 250 kHz) that are much higher than those used in conventional AFM probes of similar stiffness, these results suggest that our cavity optomechanical sensors may have application in a wide variety of hig...

  8. Dynamics of r.f. production of Stellarator plasmas in the ion cyclotron range of frequency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moiseenko, V.E. [Kharkov Inst. of Phys. and Tech. (Ukraine). Nat. Center; Lysoivan, A.I. [Kharkov Inst. of Phys. and Tech. (Ukraine). Nat. Center; Kasilov, S.V. [Kharkov Inst. of Phys. and Tech. (Ukraine). Nat. Center; Plyusnin, V.V. [Kharkov Inst. of Phys. and Tech. (Ukraine). Nat. Center

    1995-01-01

    The present study investigated numerically the process of r.f. production of plasma in the URAGAN-3M torsatron in the frequency range below the ion cyclotron frequency ({omega}<{omega}{sub ci}). The dynamics of r.f. plasma build-up at the stages of neutral gas burnout and plasma heating were studied using a zero-dimensional transport code, in which the plasma confinement law was determined by large helical device scaling. Two models for input r.f. power were used. In the first case, the r.f. power absorbed by the electrons was computed by a one-dimensional r.f. code solving Maxwell`s boundary problem equations. The mechanisms of electron heating through direct excitation of the slow wave (SW) by antennae as well as the conversion of fast wave (FW) into SW in the vicinity of Alfven resonance (scenario of Alfven heating) were taken into account in the computations. In the second case, an `ideal` model of r.f. power deposition onto the electrons as a linear function of plasma density was employed. A noticeable difference in plasma production dynamics computed for these two cases was found. Better agreement with experimental data obtained from the URAGAN-3M torsatron was found for the first case resulting from combination of the one-dimensional r.f. and zero-dimensional transport codes. ((orig.)).

  9. A SQUID-Based RF Cavity Search for Dark Matter Axions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotz, Michael T.

    The axion is a hypothetical elementary particle resulting from a solution to the "Strong-CP" problem. This serious problem in the standard model of particle physics is manifested as a 1010 discrepancy between the measured upper limit and the calculated value of the neutron's electric dipole moment. Furthermore, a light (~mueV) axion is an ideal dark matter candidate: axions would have been copiously produced during the Big Bang and would be the primary component of the dark matter in the universe. The resolution of the Strong-CP problem and the discovery of the composition of dark matter are two of the most pressing problems in physics. The observation of a light, dark-matter axion would resolve both of these problems. The Axion Dark Matter eXperiment (ADMX) is the most sensitive search for dark-matter axions. Axions in our Milky Way Galaxy may scatter off a magnetic field and convert into microwave photons. ADMX consists of a tunable high-Q RF cavity within the bore of a large, 8.5 Tesla superconducting solenoidal magnet. When the cavity's resonant frequency matches the axion's total energy, the probability of axion-to-photon conversion is enhanced. The cavity's narrow bandwidth requires ADMX to slowly scan possible axion masses. A receiver amplifies, mixes, and digitizes the power developed in the cavity from possible axion-to-photon conversions. This is the most sensitive spectral receiver of microwave radiation in the world. The resulting data is scrutinized for an axion signal above the thermal background. ADMX first operated from 1995-2005 and produced exclusion limits on the energy of dark-matter axions from 1.9 mueV to 3.3 mueV. In order to improve on these limits and continue the search for plausible dark-matter axions, the system was considerably upgraded from 2005 until 2008. In the upgrade, the key technical advance was the use of a dc Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) as a microwave amplifier. The SQUID amplifier's noise level is near

  10. Final Technical Report on STTR Project DE-FG02-02ER86145 Pressurized RF Cavities for Muon Ionization Cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Rolland

    2006-07-13

    This project was to design and build an RF test cell (TC), which could be operated at 800 MHz, filled with high pressure gases including hydrogen, at temperatures down to that of liquid nitrogen, in strong magnetic fields, in a strong radiation environment, and with interchangeable electrodes, in order to examine the use of high-pressure RF cavities for muon beam cooling.

  11. Study of quality and field limitation of superconducting 1.3 GHz 9-Cell RF-cavities at DESY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlander, Felix

    2013-01-15

    The European XFEL and the International Linear Collider are based on superconducting rf cavities made of niobium. Their advantages are low ohmic losses which allow high duty cycles and the possibility to use a large beam aperture which is substantial to prevent wake fields at high current accelerators. To reach the theoretical limits of superconducting cavities, it is required to understand the present performance limitations. These are field emission, thermal breakdown (quench) and the ohmic losses dependent on the accelerating field, which are expressed in the quality factor. As the limiting mechanisms themselves are understood in general, the origin of the quench is often unclear. To determine the quench locations, a localisation tool for thermal breakdown using the second sound in superfluid helium has been installed at the cavity test facility at DESY and the results for a sample of about 30 cavities have been examined. The features of the distribution of the quench locations have been analysed and it has been found that the quench locations are in the area of the highest surface magnetic field and not necessarily at the equator of the cells. The data sample has been extended in an attempt to characterise the average behaviour of the quality factor related to the accelerating field. An analysis of the surface resistance of individual cavities shows that a recently developed model for the surface resistance of niobium is not able to describe the measurement in all detail, but the application of an additional mechanism showed promising results.

  12. Some Estimations for Correlation Between the RF Cavity Surface Temperature and Electrical Breakdown Possibility

    CERN Document Server

    Paramonov, V V

    2004-01-01

    The electrical breakdown in accelerating cavities is the complicated phenomenon and depends on many parameters. Some reasons for breakdown can be avoided by appropriate vacuum system design and the cavity surface cleaning. This case, for normal conducting accelerating cavities free electrons - the dark currents due to Fowler-Nordheim emission can be considered as the main reason of possible electrical breakdown. It is known from the practice - the combination of the high electric field at the cavity surface with high surface temperature is the subject for risk in the cavity operation. In this paper the dependence on the surface temperature is considered and 'effective' electric field enhancement is discussed.

  13. Properties of quarter-wavelength coaxial cavity for triode-type thermionic RF gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torgasin, Konstantin; Mishima, Kenta; Zen, Heishun; Yoshida, Kohei; Negm, Hani; Omer, Muhamed; Kii, Toshiteru; Nagasaki, Kazunobu; Masuda, Kai; Ohgaki, Hideaki

    2017-09-01

    A quarter-wavelength coaxial cavity with a longitudinal radio-frequency power supply was fabricated and tested. The cavity was designed as a pre-buncher for a thermionic triode-type radio-frequency gun of a mid-infrared free electron laser facility. The triode structure was formed to ensure the reduction of the back-bombarding effect, which usually appears in thermionic radio-frequency guns. The coaxial cavity was tested using a tungsten dispenser cathode. From the results of the cold test, a cavity voltage of about 25 kV can be attained, which corresponds to designed characteristics. In contrast, the hot test showed a sudden drop in voltage, resulting in an unstable operation. The small dimensions of the cavity caused some low-field effects, which led to multipactoring. In this paper, we report the tested characteristics of the pre-bunching cavity.

  14. Study of a power coupler for superconducting RF cavities used in high intensity proton accelerator; Etude et developpement d'un coupleur de puissance pour les cavites supraconductrices destinees aux accelerateurs de protons de haute intensite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souli, M

    2007-07-15

    The coaxial power coupler needed for superconducting RF cavities used in the high energy section of the EUROTRANS driver should transmit 150 kW (CW operation) RF power to the protons beam. The calculated RF and dielectric losses in the power coupler (inner and outer conductor, RF window) are relatively high. Consequently, it is necessary to design very carefully the cooling circuits in order to remove the generated heat and to ensure stable and reliable operating conditions for the coupler cavity system. After calculating all type of losses in the power coupler, we have designed and validated the inner conductor cooling circuit using numerical simulations results. We have also designed and optimized the outer conductor cooling circuit by establishing its hydraulic and thermal characteristics. Next, an experiment dedicated to study the thermal interaction between the power coupler and the cavity was successfully performed at CRYOHLAB test facility. The critical heat load Qc for which a strong degradation of the cavity RF performance was measured leading to Q{sub c} in the range 3 W-5 W. The measured heat load will be considered as an upper limit of the residual heat flux at the outer conductor cold extremity. A dedicated test facility was developed and successfully operated for measuring the performance of the outer conductor heat exchanger using supercritical helium as coolant. The test cell used reproduces the realistic thermal boundary conditions of the power coupler mounted on the cavity in the cryo-module. The first experimental results have confirmed the excellent performance of the tested heat exchanger. The maximum residual heat flux measured was 60 mW for a 127 W thermal load. As the RF losses in the coupler are proportional to the incident RF power, we can deduce that the outer conductor heat exchanger performance is continued up to 800 kW RF power. Heat exchanger thermal conductance has been identified using a 2D axisymmetric thermal model by comparing

  15. FPC and Hi-Pass Filter HOM Coupler Design for the RF Dipole Crab Cavity for the LHC HiLumi Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Z; Delayen, Jean Roger; De Silva, S U; Park, HyeKyoung; Olave, R G

    2015-01-01

    A 400-MHz compact RF dipole (RFD) crab cavity design was jointly developed by Old Dominion University and SLAC under the support of US LARP program for the LHC HiLumi upgrade. The RFD cavity design is consisted of a rounded-square tank and two ridged deflecting poles, operating with a TE11-like dipole mode, which is the lowest mode of the cavity. A prototype RFD cavity is being manufactured and will be tested on the SPS beam line at CERN. The coaxial fundamental Power Coupler (FPC) of the prototype cavity was re-optimized to minimizing the power heating on the coupler internal antenna. A hi-pass filter HOM damping coupler was developed to achieve the required wakefield damping while maintaining a compact size to fit into the beam line space. In this paper, we will discuss the details of the RF optimization and tolerance analyses of the FPC and HOM couplers.

  16. Rf Station For Ion Beam Staking In Hirfl-csr

    CERN Document Server

    Arbuzov, V S; Bushuev, A A; Dranichnikov, A N; Gorniker, E I; Kendjebulatov, E K; Kondakov, A A; Kondaurov, M; Kruchkov, Ya G; Krutikhin, S A; Kurkin, G Ya; Mironenko, L A; Motygin, S V; Osipov, V N; Petrov, V M; Pilan, Andrey M; Popov, A M; Rashenko, V V; Selivanov, A N; Shteinke, A R; Vajenin, N F

    2004-01-01

    BINP has developed and produced the RF station for Institute of Modern Physics (IMP), Lanzhou, China, for multipurpose accelerator complex with electron cooling. The RF station will be used for accumulation of ion beams in the main ring of the system. It was successfully tested in IMP and installed into the main accelerator ring of the complex. The RF station includes accelerating RF cavity and RF power generator with power supplies. The station works within frequency range 6.0 - 14.0 MHz, maximum voltage across the accelerating gap of the RF cavity - 20 kV. In the RF cavity the 200 VNP ferrite is utilized. A residual gas pressure in vacuum chamber does not exceed 2,5E-11 mbar. Maximum output power of the RF generator 25 kW. The data acquisition and control of the RF station is based on COMPACT - PCI bus and provides all functions of monitoring and control.

  17. Design of coupler for the NSLS-II storage ring superconducting RF cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeddulla, M.; Rose, J.

    2011-03-28

    NSLS-II is a 3GeV, 500mA, high brightness, 1 MW beam power synchrotron facility that is designed with four superconducting cavities working at 499.68 MHz. To operate the cavities in over-damped coupling condition, an External Quality Factor (Qext) of {approx}65000 is required. We have modified the existing coupler for the CESR-B cavity which has a Qext of {approx}200,000 to meet the requirements of NSLS-II. CESR-B cavity has an aperture coupler with a coupler 'tongue' connecting the cavity to the waveguide. We have optimized the length, width and thickness of the 'tongue' as well as the width of the aperture to increase the coupling using the three dimensional electromagnetic field solver, HFSS. Several possible designs will be presented. We have modified the coupler of the CESR-B cavity to be used in the storage ring at the NSLS-II project using HFSS and verified using CST Microwave Studio. Using a combination of increasing the length and width of the coupler tongue and increasing the width of the aperture, the external Q of the cavity coupler was decreased to {approx}65000 as required for the design of the NSLS-II storage ring design.

  18. Wide-Range Adaptive RF-to-DC Power Converter for UHF RFIDs

    KAUST Repository

    Ouda, Mahmoud H.

    2016-07-27

    A wide-range, differential, cross-coupled rectifier is proposed with an extended dynamic range of input RF power that enables wireless powering from varying distances. The proposed architecture mitigates the reverse-leakage problem in conven- tional, cross-coupled rectifiers without degrading sensitivity. A prototype is designed for UHF RFID applications, and is imple- mented using 0.18 μ m CMOS technology. On-chip measurements demonstrate a sensitivity of − 18 dBm for 1 V output over a 100 k Ω load and a peak RF-to-DC power conversion efficiency of 65%. A conventional, fully cross-coupled rectifier is fabricated along- side for comparison and the proposed rectifier shows more than 2 × increase in dynamic range and a 25% boosting in output voltage than the conventional rectifier

  19. Reduced length design of 9.8 MHz RF accelerating cavity for the positron accumulator ring (PAR) of the Advanced Photon Source (APS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Y.W.; Bridges, J.F.; Kustom, R.L.

    1993-07-01

    A 9.8-MHz RF accelerating cavity is developed for the first harmonic system in the APS PAR and an aluminum unit is tested. The design goal si 40 kV at the accelerating gap, Q-factor of {approximately} 7,000 for the accelerating mode, 1.2-m diameter, 1.6-m length with good mechanical strength and stability. The design employs no dielectric or ferrite loading for tuning. The cavity is a plunger-loaded reentrant coaxial structure; the end of the inner conductor facing the wall has a piston-shaped loading structure which consists of a circular disk and a cylinder. The RF characteristic of the cavity was investigated using the URMEL-T and MAFIA programs. Compared with a coaxial structure with lumped element capacitive loading, this design gives improved RF characteristics.

  20. Microfluidic High-Q Circular Substrate-Integrated Waveguide (SIW) Cavity for Radio Frequency (RF) Chemical Liquid Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memon, Muhammad Usman; Lim, Sungjoon

    2018-01-06

    In this study, a high-Q circular substrate-integrated waveguide (SIW) cavity resonator is proposed as a non-contact and non-invasive radio frequency (RF) sensor for chemical sensing applications. The design of the structure utilizes SIW technology along with a circular shape to achieve a high unloaded Q factor, which is one of the important requirements for RF sensors. The resonant frequency of the proposed circular SIW cavity sensor changes when a liquid material or a chemical (microliters) is inserted in the sensitive area of the structure. The sensing of liquid materials with different permittivities is accomplished via the perturbation of the electric fields in the SIW configuration. When a microwell that is 4 mm in radius is installed vertically through the center of the bare circular SIW cavity, the operating frequency varies from 5.26 to 5.34 GHz. Similarly, when the microwell contains ethanol, the frequency shifts from 5.26 to 5.18 GHz, and the amplitude of reflection coefficient is shifted from -29 dB to -17 dB; when the microwell contains mixing deionized (DI)-water, the frequency moves from 5.26 to 4.98 GHz (which is also 0% Ethanol in our study), and the amplitude of reflection coefficient is shifted from -29 dB to -8 dB. A high unloaded Q factor is maintained throughout all experimental results. To demonstrate our idea, different concentrations of ethanol are tested and recorded. The experimental validation yields a close agreement between the simulations and the measurements.

  1. Bipolar Cascade Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers for RF Photonic Link Applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Siskaninetz, William J

    2007-01-01

    ... the transition to a VCSEL structure is detailed. A novel approach prior to growing and characterizing BC VCSELs was to investigate bipolar cascade light emitting diodes which incorporate the microcavity designs and disentangles the VCSEL cavity...

  2. 3-D electromagnetic and thermo-mechanical simulation of a RF cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Launay, F

    2003-01-01

    A 3-D thermo-mechanical study of the edge of entrance blade of IPHI's RFQ was conducted by means of I-DEAS code. The aim is to compare the temperatures reached, the constraints, and the deformations calculated on the basis of RF power density stored on the blade obtained by means of two different electromagnetic computational codes, SOPRANO and MAFIA.

  3. Mirror-smooth surfaces and repair of defects in superconducting RF cavities by mechanical polishing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, C. A. [Fermilab; Cooley, L. D. [Fermilab

    2012-11-22

    Mechanical techniques for polishing the inside surface of niobium superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities have been systematically explored. By extending known techniques to fine polishing, mirror-like finishes were produced, with <15 nm RMS (root mean square) roughness over 1 mm2 scan area. This is an order of magnitude less than the typical roughness produced by the electropolishing of niobium cavities. The extended mechanical polishing (XMP) process was applied to several SRF cavities which exhibited equator defects that caused quench at <20 MV m-1 and were not improved by further electropolishing. Cavity optical inspection equipment verified the complete removal of these defects, and minor acid processing, which dulled the mirror finish, restored performance of the defective cells to the high gradients and quality factors measured for adjacent cells when tested with other harmonics. This innate repair feature of XMP could be used to increase manufacturing yield. Excellent superconducting properties resulted after initial process optimization, with quality factor Q of 3 × 1010 and accelerating gradient of 43 MV m-1 being attained for a single-cell TESLA cavity, which are both close to practical limits. Several repaired nine-cell cavities also attained Q > 8 × 109 at 35 MV m-1, which is the specification for the International Linear Collider. Future optimization of the process and pathways for eliminating requirements for acid processing are also discussed.

  4. Optical surface properties and their RF limitations of European XFEL cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenskat, Marc

    2017-04-15

    The inner surface of superconducting cavities plays a crucial role to achieve highest accelerating fields and low losses. The industrial fabrication of cavities for the European X-Ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL) and the International Linear Collider (ILC) HiGrade Research Project allowed for an investigation of this interplay. For the serial inspection of the inner surface, the optical inspection robot OBACHT was constructed and to analyze the large amount of data, represented in the images of the inner surface, an image processing and analysis code was developed and new variables to describe the cavity surface were obtained. This quantitative analysis identified vendor specific surface properties which allow to perform a quality control and assurance during the production. In addition, a strong negative correlation of ρ=-0.93 with a significance of 6σ of the integrated grain boundary area ΣA versus the maximal achievable accelerating field E{sub acc,max} has been found.

  5. R&D for the Post-EP Processes of Superconducting RF Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saeki, Takayuki [KEK; Funahashi, Y. [KEK; Hayano, H. [KEK; Kato, Seigo [KEK; Nishiwaki, Michiru [KEK; Sawabe, Motoaki [KEK; Ueno, Kenji [KEK; Watanabe, K. [KEK; Antoine, Claire [CEA, Gif-sur-Yvette; Berry, Stefurn [CEA, Gif-sur-Yvette; Eozenou, F. [CEA, Gif-sur-Yvette; Gasser, Y. [CEA, Gif-sur-Yvette; Visentin, B. [CEA, Gif-sur-Yvette; Clemens, William A. [JLAB; Geng, Rongli [JLAB; Manus, Robert [JLAB; Tyagi, Puneet [GUAS/AS, Ibaraki

    2009-11-01

    The Electro-Polishing (EP) process is the best candidate of final surface treatment for the production of ILC cavities. Nevertheless, the broad distribution of the gradient caused by field emitters in cavities is sitll a serious problem for the EP process. A candidate source of field emitter is the sulfur component which is produced in the EP process and remains the inner-surface of cavities. We studied the effect of Ethanole- and degreaser-rinse processes after the EP process by a unique method. Moreover, we tried to test the sponge cleaning as the post-EP process to remove the field emitter inside the cavcity. This article describe the results of series tests of the post-EP process at KEK.

  6. R&D for the Sponge Cleaning of Superconducting RF Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saeki, T; Hayano, H; Kato, S; Nishiwaki, M; Sawabe, M; Ueno, K; Watanabe, K; Clemens, W A; Geng, R L

    2009-05-01

    The Electro-polishing process is the best candidate of final surface treatment for the production of ILC cavities. Nevertheless, the broad distribution of the gradient caused by field emitters in cavities is sitll a serious problem for the EP process. Ethanole- and degreaser-rinse processes after the EP process were found to be effective to decrease the field emmitter in recent studies, however, these are not perfect yet. We tried to test the sponge cleaning as the post EP process to remove the field emitter inside the cavcity. This article describe the results of series tests with a proto-type sponge-cleaning tool for single-cell cavity at KEK.

  7. Optical surface properties and their RF limitations of European XFEL cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenskat, Marc

    2017-10-01

    The inner surface of superconducting cavities plays a crucial role to achieve highest accelerating fields and low losses. The industrial fabrication of cavities for the European X-ray Free Electron Laser and the International Linear Collider HiGrade Research Project allowed for an investigation of this interplay. For the serial inspection of the inner surface, the optical inspection robot ’optical bench for automated cavity inspection with high resolution on short timescales’ OBACHT was constructed and to analyze the large amount of data, represented in the images of the inner surface, an image processing and analysis code was developed and new variables to describe the cavity surface were obtained. This quantitative analysis identified vendor-specific surface properties which allow the performance of quality control and assurance during production. In addition, a strong negative correlation of ρ =-0.93 with a significance of 6 σ of the integrated grain boundary area \\sum {A} versus the maximal achievable accelerating field {{E}}{acc,\\max } has been found.

  8. Effect of the Tuner on the Field Flatness of SNS Superconducting RF Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, A

    2004-01-01

    Field flatness in a multi-cell superconducting cavity affects not only the net accelerating voltage, but also the peak surface field and the Lorenz Force detuning coefficient. Our measurement indicates that the field flatness changes both external Q of the Fundamental Power Coupler (FPC) and external Q of the Field Probe (FP). The field amplitude tilts linearly to the distance between the cell center and the cavity’s geometry center (pivot point). The tilt rate has been measured in a cryomodule cold (2 K) test, being about 2%/100 kHz, relative the field flatness at the cavity’s center frequency of 805 MHz. Bead-pull measurements confirmed that the field flatness change is 2.0%/100 kHz for a medium β cavity with helium vessel, and 1.72%/100 kHz without helium vessel. These results matched the predictions of simulations using ANSYS and SUPERFISH. A detailed analysis reveals that longitudinal capacitive gap deformation is the main cause of the frequency change. Field flatness change ...

  9. Thermal design studies in superconducting rf cavities: Phonon peak and Kapitza conductance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Aizaz

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Thermal design studies of superconducting radio frequency (SRF cavities involve two thermal parameters, namely the temperature dependent thermal conductivity of Nb at low temperatures and the heat transfer coefficient at the Nb-He II interface, commonly known as the Kapitza conductance. During the fabrication process of the SRF cavities, Nb sheet is plastically deformed through a deep drawing process to obtain the desired shape. The effect of plastic deformation on low temperature thermal conductivity as well as Kapitza conductance has been studied experimentally. Strain induced during the plastic deformation process reduces the thermal conductivity in its phonon transmission regime (disappearance of phonon peak by 80%, which may explain the performance limitations of the defect-free SRF cavities during their high field operations. Low temperature annealing of the deformed Nb sample could not recover the phonon peak. However, moderate temperature annealing during the titanification process recovered the phonon peak in the thermal conductivity curve. Kapitza conductance measurements for the Nb-He II interface for various surface topologies have also been carried out before and after the annealing. These measurements reveal consistently increased Kapitza conductance after the annealing process was carried out in the two temperature regimes.

  10. Fermilab 500 GeV main accelerator rf cavity 128 MHz mode damper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerns, Q.A.; Miller, H.W.

    1977-01-01

    The Fermilab 500-GeV main accelerating system has been operating for a year now with the aid of 128-MHz mode dampers. Such dampers proved to be necessary to achieve stable operation and a reasonably smooth slow spill at intensities of approximately 2 x 10/sup 13/ protons per pulse, and furthermore are low-cost and reliable. The approach used to identify troublesome modes, the observed beam blow-up without dampers, and the steps taken to design and install suitable dampers on eighteen main ring cavities are discussed. Spectrum analyzer pictures help illustrate the performance.

  11. Rf Feedback free electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brau, Charles A.; Swenson, Donald A.; Boyd, Jr., Thomas J.

    1981-01-01

    A free electron laser system and electron beam system for a free electron laser which use rf feedback to enhance efficiency. Rf energy is extracted from an electron beam by decelerating cavities and returned to accelerating cavities using rf returns such as rf waveguides, rf feedthroughs, etc. This rf energy is added to rf klystron energy to lower the required input energy and thereby enhance energy efficiency of the system.

  12. Formation of long nanosecond rectangular pulses in the active RF pulse compression system with a compact resonant cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artemenko, S. N.; Gorev, S. A.; Igumnov, V. S.; Yushkov, Yu G.

    2017-05-01

    This work presents the results of the study of an active microwave pulse compression system capable of forming the rectangular pulses with duration ∼10-100 ns, while its dimensions are several times smaller than the radiated wave train. Such compression system is based on the compact planar-voluminal resonant cavity constructed in the shape of a meander from waveguide sections and H-plane tees. The resonant cavity sections are parallel and are in the same plane with tees. The energy input element is located in the input end of the first section. The output device designed as an H-plane tee interference switch is connected to the output end of the last section. Each end of remaining sections is connected through a straight arm to an H-tee with a short-circuited quarter-wave second straight arm. The side arm of each tee is connected with the side arm of the tee in the next section, thus coupling the sections. The short-circuited arm provides the “open” mode and transmission of the wave from tee to tee. We determined the expressions for wave amplitudes in the components of the meander resonant cavity made of three sections and analyzed the expressions as the functions of the parameters determining the oscillation range and energy distribution in the resonant cavity. Experiments demonstrated that under certain conditions the compressors with such resonant cavity could generate nearly rectangular pulses with duration equal to the time of wave two-way traveling along the resonant cavity, and with the power compatible with that of the wave in the resonant cavity, and the length of the radiated wave train several-fold exceeding the size of the compressor. At pulse duration equal to 25 ns, the gain coefficient was 13 dB and pulse power was 40 MW. The work demonstrates the possibility to change the geometry of the resonant cavity by rearranging its components without changing the output pulse parameters.

  13. A highly sensitive RF-to-DC power converter with an extended dynamic range

    KAUST Repository

    Almansouri, Abdullah Saud Mohammed

    2017-10-24

    This paper proposes a highly sensitive RF-to-DC power converter with an extended dynamic range that is designed to operate at the medical band 433 MHz and simulated using 0.18 μm CMOS technology. Compared to the conventional fully cross-coupled rectifier, the proposed design offers 3.2× the dynamic range. It is also highly sensitive and requires −18 dBm of input power to produce a 1 V-output voltage when operating with a 100 kΩ load. Furthermore, the proposed design offers an open circuit sensitivity of −23.4 dBm and a peak power conversion efficiency of 67%.

  14. Bulge testing of copper and niobium tubes for hydroformed RF cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, H.S., E-mail: kim.3237@osu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Sumption, M.D. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Susner, M.A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lim, H. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Collings, E.W. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2016-01-27

    The heat treatment, tensile testing, and bulge testing of Cu and Nb tubes has been carried out to gain experience for the subsequent hydroforming of Nb tube into seamless superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities for high energy particle acceleration. In the experimental part of the study samples removed from representative tubes were prepared for heat treatment, tensile testing, residual resistance ratio measurement, and orientation imaging electron microscopy (OIM). After being optimally heat treated Cu and Nb tubes were subjected to hydraulic bulge testing and the results analyzed. In the final part of the study finite-element models (FEM) incorporating constitutive (stress–strain) relationships analytically derived from the tensile and bulge tests, respectively, were used to replicate the bulge test. As expected, agreement was obtained between the experimental bulge parameters and the FEM model based on the bulge-derived constitutive relationship. Not so for the FEM model based on tensile-test data. It is concluded that a constitutive relationship based on bulge testing is necessary to predict a material's performance under hydraulic deformation.

  15. Tunable-Range, Photon-Mediated Atomic Interactions in Multimode Cavity QED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varun D. Vaidya

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Optical cavity QED provides a platform with which to explore quantum many-body physics in driven-dissipative systems. Single-mode cavities provide strong, infinite-range photon-mediated interactions among intracavity atoms. However, these global all-to-all couplings are limiting from the perspective of exploring quantum many-body physics beyond the mean-field approximation. The present work demonstrates that local couplings can be created using multimode cavity QED. This is established through measurements of the threshold of a superradiant, self-organization phase transition versus atomic position. Specifically, we experimentally show that the interference of near-degenerate cavity modes leads to both a strong and tunable-range interaction between Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs trapped within the cavity. We exploit the symmetry of a confocal cavity to measure the interaction between real BECs and their virtual images without unwanted contributions arising from the merger of real BECs. Atom-atom coupling may be tuned from short range to long range. This capability paves the way toward future explorations of exotic, strongly correlated systems such as quantum liquid crystals and driven-dissipative spin glasses.

  16. Tunable-Range, Photon-Mediated Atomic Interactions in Multimode Cavity QED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, Varun D.; Guo, Yudan; Kroeze, Ronen M.; Ballantine, Kyle E.; Kollár, Alicia J.; Keeling, Jonathan; Lev, Benjamin L.

    2018-01-01

    Optical cavity QED provides a platform with which to explore quantum many-body physics in driven-dissipative systems. Single-mode cavities provide strong, infinite-range photon-mediated interactions among intracavity atoms. However, these global all-to-all couplings are limiting from the perspective of exploring quantum many-body physics beyond the mean-field approximation. The present work demonstrates that local couplings can be created using multimode cavity QED. This is established through measurements of the threshold of a superradiant, self-organization phase transition versus atomic position. Specifically, we experimentally show that the interference of near-degenerate cavity modes leads to both a strong and tunable-range interaction between Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) trapped within the cavity. We exploit the symmetry of a confocal cavity to measure the interaction between real BECs and their virtual images without unwanted contributions arising from the merger of real BECs. Atom-atom coupling may be tuned from short range to long range. This capability paves the way toward future explorations of exotic, strongly correlated systems such as quantum liquid crystals and driven-dissipative spin glasses.

  17. High-dynamic-range and high-capacity RF and microwave fiber optic links

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Frank

    2013-05-01

    Novel fiber optic transmitter control methodologies, high optical power and low RIN source lasers, high performance photodiodes and DWDM laser capability provide high dynamic range and high capacity transport for a wide range of sensing and communications applications. Measured component and system level test data demonstrates these performance improvements. Higher spur free dynamic range in excess of 110 dB·Hz2/3 over broad range of K-band frequencies is demonstrated, increasing the practical use of fiber as a transport method for high sensitivity applications. Multichannel DWDM operation provides simplified capacity expansion without compromising system performance, allowing arrayed photonic systems to be deployed. System characterization for a wide range of optical wavelengths and RF frequencies is provided to demonstrate these levels of performance in practical applications. Photonic component cost reductions combined with compact packaging further increase the ability of high performance fiber optic transport to address a wider range of applications, as the size, weight and performance barriers are eliminated. This paper provides a summary of the current state of the art of commercially available photonic components for high performance externally modulated analog optical links from a practical perspective.

  18. Multiharmonic rf feedforward system for compensation of beam loading and periodic transient effects in magnetic-alloy cavities of a proton synchrotron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Fumihiko; Ohmori, Chihiro; Yamamoto, Masanobu; Yoshii, Masahito; Schnase, Alexander; Nomura, Masahiro; Toda, Makoto; Shimada, Taihei; Hasegawa, Katsushi; Hara, Keigo

    2013-05-01

    Beam loading compensation is a key for acceleration of a high intensity proton beam in the main ring (MR) of the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC). Magnetic alloy loaded rf cavities with a Q value of 22 are used to achieve high accelerating voltages without a tuning bias loop. The cavity is driven by a single harmonic (h=9) rf signal while the cavity frequency response also covers the neighbor harmonics (h=8,10). Therefore the wake voltage induced by the high intensity beam consists of the three harmonics, h=8,9,10. The beam loading of neighbor harmonics is the source of periodic transient effects and a possible source of coupled bunch instabilities. In the article, we analyze the wake voltage induced by the high intensity beam. We employ the rf feedforward method to compensate the beam loading of these three harmonics (h=8,9,10). The full-digital multiharmonic feedforward system was developed for the MR. We describe the system architecture and the commissioning methodology of the feedforward patterns. The commissioning of the feedforward system has been performed by using high intensity beams with 1.0×1014 proteins per pulse. The impedance seen by the beam is successfully reduced and the longitudinal oscillations due to the beam loading are reduced. By the beam loading compensation, stable high power beam operation is achieved. We also report the reduction of the momentum loss during the debunching process for the slow extraction by the feedforward.

  19. Proposal to negotiate a collaboration agreement related to the application of novel cavity fabrication techniques and Nb/Cu sputter coating technology in the field of superconducting RF for the Future Circular Collider (FCC) study

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    Proposal to negotiate a collaboration agreement related to the application of novel cavity fabrication techniques and Nb/Cu sputter coating technology in the field of superconducting RF for the Future Circular Collider (FCC) study

  20. Development of room temperature crossbar-H-mode cavities for proton and ion acceleration in the low to medium beta range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Clemente

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The crossbar H-mode (CH cavity is an accelerating structure operated in the H_{21(0} mode. The robustness of the crossbar geometry allows one to realize room temperature as well as superconducting linac cavities. The shunt impedance characteristics of this structure are attractive to develop proton and heavy ion linacs in the low and medium beta range. A first room temperature eight-cell prototype has proven the feasibility of the crossbar design in terms of mechanical construction, copper plating, and cooling. An innovative rf coupling concept has been developed where two CH cavities are connected by a two gap E_{010}-mode resonator which, at the same time, provides transverse focusing by a quadrupole triplet. The concept has been applied in the design of the new FAIR proton linac and a scaled model of the second cavity of this injector has been built and tested too. The full scale prototype is now under construction at the University of Frankfurt. In this paper, the room temperature CH cavity development as well as the general layout of the FAIR proton injector (70 MeV, 325 MHz, 70 mA is presented and discussed.

  1. WAFER TEST CAVITY -Linking Surface Microstructure to RF Performance: a ‘Short-­Sample Test Facility’ for characterizing superconducting materials for SRF cavities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pogue, Nathaniel; Comeaux, Justin; McIntyre, Peter

    2014-05-30

    The Wafer Test cavity was designed to create a short sample test system to determine the properties of the superconducting materials and S-I-S hetero-structures. The project, funded by ARRA, was successful in accomplishing several goals to achieving a high gradient test system for SRF research and development. The project led to the design and construction of the two unique cavities that each severed unique purposes: the Wafer test Cavity and the Sapphire Test cavity. The Sapphire Cavity was constructed first to determine the properties of large single crystal sapphires in an SRF environment. The data obtained from the cavity greatly altered the design of the Wafer Cavity and provided the necessary information to ascertain the Wafer Test cavity’s performance.

  2. Cavity-ring-down spectroscopy on water vapor in the range 555-604 nm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naus, H.; Ubachs, W.M.G.; Levelt, P.F.; Polyansky, O.L.; Zobov, N.F.; Tennyson, J.

    2001-01-01

    The method of pulsed cavity-ring-down spectroscopy was employed to record the water vapor absorption spectrum in the wavelength range 555-604 nm. The spectrum consists of 1830 lines, calibrated against the iodine standard with an accuracy of 0.01 cm

  3. CERN News: Slow ejection efficiency at the PS; Vacuum tests on the ISR; Fire in the neutrino beam-line; Prototype r.f . cavity for the Booster; Crane-bridge in ISR experimental hall; Modifications to the r.f . system at the PS

    CERN Multimedia

    1969-01-01

    CERN News: Slow ejection efficiency at the PS; Vacuum tests on the ISR; Fire in the neutrino beam-line; Prototype r.f . cavity for the Booster; Crane-bridge in ISR experimental hall; Modifications to the r.f . system at the PS

  4. Radio frequency plasma method for uniform surface processing of RF cavities and other three-dimensional structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popovic, Svetozar; Upadhyay, Janardan; Vuskovic, Leposava; Phillips, H. Lawrence; Valente-Feliciano, Anne-Marie

    2017-12-26

    A method for efficient plasma etching of surfaces inside three-dimensional structures can include positioning an inner electrode within the chamber cavity; evacuating the chamber cavity; adding a first inert gas to the chamber cavity; regulating the pressure in the chamber; generating a plasma sheath along the inner wall of the chamber cavity; adjusting a positive D.C. bias on the inner electrode to establish an effective plasma sheath voltage; adding a first electronegative gas to the chamber cavity; optionally readjusting the positive D.C. bias on the inner electrode reestablish the effective plasma sheath voltage at the chamber cavity; etching the inner wall of the chamber cavity; and polishing the inner wall to a desired surface roughness.

  5. Physical properties and structure of large grain/single crystal niobium for superconducting RF cavities Physical properties and structure of large grain/single crystal niobium for superconducting RF cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermakov, A.; Jelezov, I.; Singer, X.; Singer, W.; Viswanathan, G. B.; Levit, V.; Fraser, H. L.; Wen, H.; Spiwek, M.

    2008-02-01

    The R&D program on superconducting cavities fabricated from electron beam melted large grain/single crystal (LG/SC) niobium discs explores it's potential for production of approximately 1000 cavities for the European XFEL. Thermal, electrical, mechanical properties, crystal orientation and structure are investigated with the aim to make the fabrication procedure more efficient. In opposite to fine grain niobium the thermal conductivity of LG/SC has a pronounced maximum at 2K. Calculation found a correlation between thermal conductivity enhancement and phonon scattering at the grain boundaries. Detected enhancement is very susceptible to plastic deformation that can cause the complete elimination of the low temperature peak. The final annealing at 800°C of cavities made from large grain niobium is necessary for hydrogen outgassing, as well as for the thermal conductivity enhancement due to stress relaxation and recovery of crystal defects introduced at the cavity fabrication. The effects of annealing temperature up to 1200°C, heating rate, and holding time on the structure recovery after rolling are also established. Total elongation at the uniaxial tensile tests for LG is very high (50 - 110%) and depends significantly on the load direction, because only very few grains are in the gage length. The elongation after fracture by bi-axial testing (bulging test) for LG is lower (electron beam welding tests on, niobium single crystals show that an appropriate disc enlargement and annealing can be done without destruction of the single crystal. These tests showed that a cavity can be produced without grain boundaries even in the welding area. On base of the results a fabrication method of single crystal cavities is proposed.

  6. Single-Chip Fully Integrated Direct-Modulation CMOS RF Transmitters for Short-Range Wireless Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Jamal Deen

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Ultra-low power radio frequency (RF transceivers used in short-range application such as wireless sensor networks (WSNs require efficient, reliable and fully integrated transmitter architectures with minimal building blocks. This paper presents the design, implementation and performance evaluation of single-chip, fully integrated 2.4 GHz and 433 MHz RF transmitters using direct-modulation power voltage-controlled oscillators (PVCOs in addition to a 2.0 GHz phase-locked loop (PLL based transmitter. All three RF transmitters have been fabricated in a standard mixed-signal CMOS 0.18 µm technology. Measurement results of the 2.4 GHz transmitter show an improvement in drain efficiency from 27% to 36%. The 2.4 GHz and 433 MHz transmitters deliver an output power of 8 dBm with a phase noise of −122 dBc/Hz at 1 MHz offset, while drawing 15.4 mA of current and an output power of 6.5 dBm with a phase noise of −120 dBc/Hz at 1 MHz offset, while drawing 20.8 mA of current from 1.5 V power supplies, respectively. The PLL transmitter delivers an output power of 9 mW with a locking range of 128 MHz and consumes 26 mA from 1.8 V power supply. The experimental results demonstrate that the RF transmitters can be efficiently used in low power WSN applications.

  7. Accelerating Rf Station For Hirfl-csr, Lanzhou, China

    CERN Document Server

    Arbuzov, V S; Dranichnikov, A N; Gorniker, E I; Kondakov, A A; Kondaurov, M; Kruchkov, Ya G; Krutikhin, S A; Kurkin, G Ya; Mironenko, L A; Motygin, S V; Osipov, V N; Petrov, V M; Pilan, Andrey M; Popov, A M; Sedlyarov, I K; Selivanov, A N; Shteinke, A R; Vajenin, N F

    2004-01-01

    In accordance with the plan of cooperation with the Institute of Modern Physics (IMP), Lanzhou, China, the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (BINP), Novosibirsk, Russia has produced and supplied an accelerating RF station for the multipurpose Cooling Storage Ring system (CSR), which is being constructed at IMP. The RF station had been tested at IMP site and now is installed into the Main Ring of the facilities. The RF station operates in the frequency range of 0.25~1.7 MHz. Maximum accelerating voltage is 8 kV. The resonance frequency of the RF cavity is tuned in the whole frequency range by biasing of ferrites, which are used in the cavity. Ferrites of 600NN type were produced by a firm manufacture "Magneton", St. Petersburg. The pressure in the cavity vacuum chamber is lower, than 3·10-11

  8. R & D of a Gas-Filled RF Beam Profile Monitor for Intense Neutrino Beam Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yonehara, K. [Fermilab; Backfish, M. [Fermilab; Moretti, A. [Fermilab; Tollestrup, A. V. [Fermilab; Watts, A. [Fermilab; Zwaska, R. M. [Fermilab; Abrams, R. [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Cummings, M. A.; Dudas, A. [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Johnson, R. P. [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Kazakevich, G. [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Neubauer, M. [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Liu, Q. [Case Western Reserve U.

    2017-05-01

    We report the R&D of a novel radiation-robust hadron beam profile monitor based on a gas-filled RF cavity for intense neutrino beam experiments. An equivalent RF circuit model was made and simulated to optimize the RF parameter in a wide beam intensity range. As a result, the maximum acceptable beam intensity in the monitor is significantly increased by using a low-quality factor RF cavity. The plan for the demonstration test is set up to prepare for future neutrino beam experiments.

  9. High-sensitivity and large-dynamic-range refractive index sensors employing weak composite Fabry-Perot cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pengcheng; Shu, Xuewen; Cao, Haoran; Sugden, Kate

    2017-08-15

    Most sensors face a common trade-off between high sensitivity and a large dynamic range. We demonstrate here an all-fiber refractometer based on a dual-cavity Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) that possesses the advantage of both high sensitivity and a large dynamic range. Since the two composite cavities have a large cavity length difference, one can observe both fine and coarse fringes, which correspond to the long cavity and the short cavity, respectively. The short-cavity FPI and the use of an intensity demodulation method mean that the individual fine fringe dips correspond to a series of quasi-continuous highly sensitive zones for refractive index measurement. By calculating the parameters of the composite FPI, we find that the range of the ultra-sensitive zones can be considerably adjusted to suit the end requirements. The experimental trends are in good agreement with the theoretical predictions. The co-existence of high sensitivity and a large dynamic range in a composite FPI is of great significance to practical RI measurements.

  10. Beam cavity interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Gamp, A

    2011-01-01

    We begin by giving a description of the rf generator-cavity-beam coupled system in terms of basic quantities. Taking beam loading and cavity detuning into account, expressions for the cavity impedance as seen by the generator and as seen by the beam are derived. Subsequently methods of beam-loading compensation by cavity detuning, rf feedback, and feed-forward are described. Examples of digital rf phase and amplitude control for the special case of superconducting cavities are also given. Finally, a dedicated phase loop for damping synchrotron oscillations is discussed.

  11. RF feedback for KEKB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ezura, Eizi; Yoshimoto, Shin-ichi; Akai, Kazunori [National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1996-08-01

    This paper describes the present status of the RF feedback development for the KEK B-Factory (KEKB). A preliminary experiment concerning the RF feedback using a parallel comb-filter was performed through a choke-mode cavity and a klystron. The RF feedback has been tested using the beam of the TRISTAN Main Ring, and has proved to be effective in damping the beam instability. (author)

  12. A new measurement tool for characterization of superconducting rf accelerator cavities using high-performance LTS SQUIDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vodel, W [Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Helmholtzweg 5, 07743 Jena (Germany); Neubert, R [Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Helmholtzweg 5, 07743 Jena (Germany); Nietzsche, S [Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Helmholtzweg 5, 07743 Jena (Germany); Seidel, P [Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Helmholtzweg 5, 07743 Jena (Germany); Knaack, K [DESY Hamburg (Germany); Wittenburg, K [DESY Hamburg (Germany); Peters, A [Heidelberger Ionenstrahl-Therapiezentrum, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2007-11-15

    This paper presents a new system to measure very low currents in an accelerator environment, using a cryogenic current comparator (CCC). In principle a CCC is a conventional current transformer using the high-performance SQUID technology to sense the magnetic fields caused by the beam current. Since the system is sensitive on a pA level, it is an optimum device to detect dark currents of superconducting cavities. The system presented here is designed for the test facilities of the superconducting accelerator modules for the European XFEL at the Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY) in Hamburg. Measurements in a quiet environment showed that an intrinsic noise level of the CCC of 40 pA Hz{sup -1/2} could be achieved.

  13. A high dynamic range linear RF power detector with a preceding LNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yingbo, Dai; Kefeng, Han; Na, Yan; Xi, Tan

    2012-01-01

    A design of high dynamic range linear radio frequency power detector (PD), aimed for transmitter carrier leakage suppression is presented in this paper. Based on the logarithmic amplifier principle, this detector utilizes the successive detection method to achieve a high dynamic range in the radio frequency band. In order to increase sensitivity, a low noise amplifier (LNA) is placed in the front of this detector. DC coupling is adopted in this architecture to reduce parasitics and save area, but this will unavoidably cause DC offsets in the circuit which are detrimental to the dynamic range. So a DC offset cancelling (DCOC) technique is proposed to solve the problem. Finally, this detector was fabricated in the SMIC 0.13 μm CMOS process. The measured results show that it achieves a wide dynamic range of 50 dB/40 dB with log errors in ±1 dB at 900 MHz/2 GHz, while draws 16 mA from a 1.5 V power supply. The active chip area is 0.27 × 0.67 mm2.

  14. Introduction to RF linear accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Pichoff, N

    2006-01-01

    After a short introduction to applications of RF linacs and their advantages and drawbacks as opposed to circular accelerators, the model of RF resonant cavities and their excitation by RF sources or beam is introduced. Then beam dynamics notions, essential to linacs, such as transit-time factor, synchronism, r.m.s. properties, matching and mismatching in linear or nonlinear forces, are presented.

  15. Tuning range and output power optimization of an external-cavity GaN diode laser at 455 nm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chi, Mingjun; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Petersen, Paul Michael

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we discuss how different feedback gratings affect the tuning range and the output power of external feedback diode laser systems. A tunable high-power narrow-spectrum external-cavity diode laser system around 455 nm is investigated. The laser system is based on a high-power GaN diode...... laser in a Littrow external-cavity. Both a holographic diffraction grating and a ruled diffraction grating are used as feedback elements in the external cavity. The output power, spectral bandwidth, and tunable range of the external cavity diode laser system are measured and compared with the two...... gratings at different injected currents. When the holographic grating is used, the laser system can be tuned over a range of 1.4 nm with an output power around 530 mW. When the ruled grating is used, the laser system can be tuned over a range of 6.0 nm with an output power around 80 mW. The results can...

  16. Narrow-line external cavity diode laser micro-packaging in the NIR and MIR spectral range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, A.; Milde, T.; Staacke, N.; Aßmann, C.; Carpintero, G.; Sacher, J.

    2017-07-01

    Narrow-linewidth tunable diode lasers are an important tool for spectroscopic instrumentation. Conventional external cavity diode lasers offer high output power and narrow linewidth. However, most external cavity diode lasers are designed as laboratory instrument and do not allow portability. In comparison, other commonly used lasers, like distributed feedback lasers (DFB) that are capable of driving a handheld device, are limited in power and show linewidths which are not sufficiently narrow for certain applications. We present new miniaturized types of tunable external cavity diode laser which overcome the drawbacks of conventional external cavity diode lasers and which preserve the advantages of this laser concept. Three different configurations are discussed in this article. The three types of miniaturized external cavity diode laser systems achieve power values of more than 50 mW within the 1.4 μm water vapor absorption band with excellent side-mode suppression and linewidth below 100 kHz. Typical features outstand with respect to other type of laser systems which are of extended use such as DFB laser diodes. The higher output power and the lower linewidth will enable a higher sensitivity and resolution for a wide range of applications.

  17. Crab Cavity Development

    CERN Document Server

    Calaga, R; Burt, G; Ratti, A

    2015-01-01

    The HL-LHC upgrade will use deflecting (or crab) cavities to compensate for geometric luminosity loss at low β* and non-zero crossing angle. A local scheme with crab cavity pairs across the IPs is used employing compact crab cavities at 400 MHz. Design of the cavities, the cryomodules and the RF system is well advanced. The LHC crab cavities will be validated initially with proton beam in the SPS.

  18. Nano-fabricated superconducting radio-frequency composites, method for producing nano-fabricated superconducting rf composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norem, James H.; Pellin, Michael J.

    2013-06-11

    Superconducting rf is limited by a wide range of failure mechanisms inherent in the typical manufacture methods. This invention provides a method for fabricating superconducting rf structures comprising coating the structures with single atomic-layer thick films of alternating chemical composition. Also provided is a cavity defining the invented laminate structure.

  19. The CEBAF Separator Cavity Resonance Control System

    CERN Document Server

    Wissmann, Mark J; Hovater, Curt; Plawski, Tomasz

    2005-01-01

    The CEBAF energy upgrade from 6 GeV to 12GeV will increase the range of beam energies available to the experimental halls. RF deflection cavities (separators) are used to direct the electron beam to the three experimental halls. Consequently with the increase in RF separator cavity gradient needed for the higher energies, RF power will also increase requiring the cavities to have active resonance control. At the 6 GeV energy, the cavities are tuned mechanically and then stabilized with Low Conductivity Water (LCW), which is maintained at constant temperature of 95o Fahrenheit. This is no longer feasible and an active resonance control system, that controls both water temperature and flow has been built. The system uses a commercial PLC with embedded PID controls to control water temperature and flow to the cavities. The system allows the operator to remotely adjust temperature/flow and consequently cavity resonance for the full range of beam energies. Ultimately closed loop control will be maintained by monit...

  20. Excited atoms in cavities of liquid He I: long-range interatomic repulsion and broadening of atomic lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atrazhev, Vladimir M.; Eloranta, Jussi; Bonifaci, Nelly; van Nguyen, Hai; Aitken, Frederic; von Haeften, Klaus; Vermeulen, G.

    2013-02-01

    A theoretical analysis of the line broadening of localized atomic transitions in liquid helium is presented. It is shown that accurate information can be derived on the long-range part of the He*-He interaction as well as on the local structure near the He* emitters. The analysis confirms that in corona discharges in liquid helium the emitting He* atoms reside in cavities and that for known He*-He interaction the size of the cavities can be deduced from the line profile. The He*-He interaction was calculated using the full configuration interaction (CI) method as implemented in the Molpro package. The widths of atomic lines due to fluorescent transitions between different excited states of helium atoms were calculated as a function of external pressure in the range from 0.1 and 3.5 MPa using the static approximation method, and the input from the results of the CI calculation and cavity diameters calculated using the bubble model. The calculated widths showed excellent agreement with experimental data of liquid helium excited by corona discharges. A second, analytical analysis using a power function to represent the He*-He interaction showed qualitative agreement with the experimental data. Contribution to the Topical Issue "13th International Symposium on High Pressure Low Temperature Plasma Chemistry (Hakone XIII)", Edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Henryca Danuta Stryczewska and Yvan Ségui.

  1. The dielectric properties of human pineal gland tissue and RF absorption due to wireless communication devices in the frequency range 400-1850 MHz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid, Gernot [Austrian Research Centers GmbH-ARC, ITM, A-2444 Seibersdorf (Austria); Ueberbacher, Richard [Austrian Research Centers GmbH-ARC, ITM, A-2444 Seibersdorf (Austria); Samaras, Theodoros [Department of Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Tschabitscher, Manfred [Center of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Medical University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Mazal, Peter R [Department of Clinical Pathology, Medical University Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2007-09-07

    In order to enable a detailed analysis of radio frequency (RF) absorption in the human pineal gland, the dielectric properties of a sample of 20 freshly removed pineal glands were measured less than 20 h after death. Furthermore, a corresponding high resolution numerical model of the brain region surrounding the pineal gland was developed, based on a real human tissue sample. After inserting this model into a commercially available numerical head model, FDTD-based computations for exposure scenarios with generic models of handheld devices operated close to the head in the frequency range 400-1850 MHz were carried out. For typical output power values of real handheld mobile communication devices, the obtained results showed only very small amounts of absorbed RF power in the pineal gland when compared to SAR limits according to international safety standards. The highest absorption was found for the 400 MHz irradiation. In this case the RF power absorbed inside the pineal gland (organ mass 96 mg) was as low as 11 {mu}W, when considering a device of 500 mW output power operated close to the ear. For typical mobile phone frequencies (900 MHz and 1850 MHz) and output power values (250 mW and 125 mW) the corresponding values of absorbed RF power in the pineal gland were found to be lower by a factor of 4.2 and 36, respectively. These results indicate that temperature-related biologically relevant effects on the pineal gland induced by the RF emissions of typical handheld mobile communication devices are unlikely.

  2. SPS RF System a Tetrode

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    The main RF-system of the SPS comprises four cavities: two of 20 m length and two of 16.5 m length. They are all installed in one long straight section (LSS 3). These cavities are of the travelling-wave type operating at a centre frequency of 200.2 MHz. They are wideband, filling time about 700 ns and untuned. The power amplifiers, using tetrodes are installed in a surface building 200 m from the cavities. Initially only two cavities were installed, a third cavity was installed in 1978 and a forth one in 1979. The number of power amplifiers was also gradually increased: by end 1980 there were 8 500 kW units combined in pairs to feed each of the 4 cavities with up to about 1 MW RF power, resulting in a total accelerating voltage of about 8 MV. See also 7412016X, 7412017X, 7411048X.

  3. The LHC superconducting cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Boussard, Daniel; Häbel, E; Kindermann, H P; Losito, R; Marque, S; Rödel, V; Stirbet, M

    1999-01-01

    The LHC RF system, which must handle high intensity (0.5 A d.c.) beams, makes use of superconducting single-cell cavities, best suited to minimizing the effects of periodic transient beam loading. There will be eight cavities per beam, each capable of delivering 2 MV (5 MV/m accelerating field) at 400 MHz. The cavities themselves are now being manufactured by industry, using niobium-on-copper technology which gives full satisfaction at LEP. A cavity unit includes a helium tank (4.5 K operating temperature) built around a cavity cell, RF and HOM couplers and a mechanical tuner, all housed in a modular cryostat. Four-unit modules are ultimately foreseen for the LHC (two per beam), while at present a prototype version with two complete units is being extensively tested. In addition to a detailed description of the cavity and its ancillary equipment, the first test results of the prototype will be reported.

  4. RF Pulsed Heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pritzkau, David P.

    2002-01-03

    RF pulsed heating is a process by which a metal is heated from magnetic fields on its surface due to high-power pulsed RF. When the thermal stresses induced are larger than the elastic limit, microcracks and surface roughening will occur due to cyclic fatigue. Pulsed heating limits the maximum magnetic field on the surface and through it the maximum achievable accelerating gradient in a normal conducting accelerator structure. An experiment using circularly cylindrical cavities operating in the TE{sub 011} mode at a resonant frequency of 11.424 GHz is designed to study pulsed heating on OFE copper, a material commonly used in normal conducting accelerator structures. The high-power pulsed RF is supplied by an X-band klystron capable of outputting 50 MW, 1.5 {micro}s pulses. The test pieces of the cavity are designed to be removable to allow testing of different materials with different surface preparations. A diagnostic tool is developed to measure the temperature rise in the cavity utilizing the dynamic Q change of the resonant mode due to heating. The diagnostic consists of simultaneously exciting a TE{sub 012} mode to steady-state in the cavity at 18 GHz and measuring the change in reflected power as the cavity is heated from high-power pulsed RF. Two experimental runs were completed. One run was executed at a calculated temperature rise of 120 K for 56 x 10{sup 6} pulses. The second run was executed at a calculated temperature rise of 82 K for 86 x 10{sup 6} pulses. Scanning electron microscope pictures show extensive damage occurring in the region of maximum temperature rise on the surface of the test pieces.

  5. Cryogenic testing of the 2.1 GHz five-cell superconducting RF cavity with a photonic band gap coupler cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arsenyev, Sergey A., E-mail: arsenyev@mit.edu; Temkin, Richard J. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Mass. Ave., Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Haynes, W. Brian; Shchegolkov, Dmitry Yu.; Simakov, Evgenya I.; Tajima, Tsuyoshi [Los Alamos National Laboratory, PO Box 1663, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Boulware, Chase H.; Grimm, Terrence L.; Rogacki, Adam R. [Niowave, Inc., 1012 North Walnut Street, Lansing, Michigan 48906 (United States)

    2016-05-30

    We present results from cryogenic tests of the multi-cell superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavity with a photonic band gap (PBG) coupler cell. Achieving high average beam currents is particularly desirable for future light sources and particle colliders based on SRF energy-recovery-linacs (ERLs). Beam current in ERLs is limited by the beam break-up instability, caused by parasitic higher order modes (HOMs) interacting with the beam in accelerating cavities. A PBG cell incorporated in an accelerating cavity can reduce the negative effect of HOMs by providing a frequency selective damping mechanism, thus allowing significantly higher beam currents. The multi-cell cavity was designed and fabricated of niobium. Two cryogenic (vertical) tests were conducted. The high unloaded Q-factor was demonstrated at a temperature of 4.2 K at accelerating gradients up to 3 MV/m. The measured value of the unloaded Q-factor was 1.55 × 10{sup 8}, in agreement with prediction.

  6. Simulations of S-band RF gun with RF beam control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnyakov, A. M.; Levichev, A. E.; Maltseva, M. V.; Nikiforov, D. A.

    2017-08-01

    The RF gun with RF control is discussed. It is based on the RF triode and two kinds of the cavities. The first cavity is a coaxial cavity with cathode-grid assembly where beam bunches are formed, the second one is an accelerating cavity. The features of such a gun are the following: bunched and relativistic beams in the output of the injector, absence of the back bombarding electrons, low energy spread and short length of the bunches. The scheme of the injector is shown. The electromagnetic field simulation and longitudinal beam dynamics are presented. The possible using of the injector is discussed.

  7. Beam-Based Procedures for RF Guns

    CERN Document Server

    Krasilnikov, Mikhail; Grabosch, H J; Hartrott, Michael; Hui Han, Jang; Miltchev, Velizar; Oppelt, Anne; Petrosyan, Bagrat; Staykov, Lazar; Stephan, Frank

    2005-01-01

    A wide range of rf photo injector parameters has to be optimized in order to achieve an electron source performance as required for linac based high gain FELs. Some of the machine parameters can not be precisely controlled by direct measurements, whereas the tolerance on them is extremely tight. Therefore, this should be met with beam-based techniques. Procedures for beam-based alignment (BBA) of the laser on the photo cathode as well as solenoid alignment have been developed. They were applied at the Photo Injector Test facility at DESY Zeuthen (PITZ) and at the photo injector of the VUV-FEL at DESY Hamburg. A field balance of the accelerating mode in the 1 ½ cell gun cavity is one of the key beam dynamics issues of the rf gun. Since no direct field measurement in the half and full cell of the cavity is available for the PITZ gun, a beam-based technique to determine the field balance has been proposed. A beam-based rf phase monitoring procedure has been developed as well.

  8. Theory and technology for superconducting cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Lengeler, Herbert

    1993-01-01

    The course will address Physicist and Engineers who are newcomers in the field of accelerators and accelerating cavities. The elements of RF-Superconductivity will be presented with special relevance to accelerating cavities. The present ststus of achievable accelerating fields and RF losses will be given and their link to the special technologies for cavity fabrication and surface treatments will be stressed. Cavity auxiliaries like main couplers, higher order mode couplers and frequency tuners will be described.

  9. Unbalanced field RF electron gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofler, Alicia

    2013-11-12

    A design for an RF electron gun having a gun cavity utilizing an unbalanced electric field arrangement. Essentially, the electric field in the first (partial) cell has higher field strength than the electric field in the second (full) cell of the electron gun. The accompanying method discloses the use of the unbalanced field arrangement in the operation of an RF electron gun in order to accelerate an electron beam.

  10. Wide operation range in-phase coherently coupled vertical cavity surface emitting laser array based on proton implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xun, Meng; Xu, Chen; Deng, Jun; Xie, Yiyang; Jiang, Guoqing; Wang, Jun; Xu, Kun; Chen, Hongda

    2015-05-15

    In-phase coherently coupled vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) hexagonal arrays were fabricated using proton implantation. The near-field profiles, far-field profiles, and emission spectra under different injection currents were tested and analyzed. The arrays can maintain in-phase single mode in a considerably wide current range from 10 mA (I(th)) to 35 mA (3.5×I(th)), exhibiting excellent beam quality. The far-field divergence angle of the in-phase coupled array is 2.5 degrees. Approximately 29% of total power is localized in the central lobe. Compared with square structure arrays, hexagonal arrays can maintain a more stable in-phase mode because of stronger coupling among the elements. The maximum output power of 4.9 mW was obtained under pulse wave condition. The simulation of far-field was carried out to match the in-phase operation test results. The performance enhancement of the array is attainable if the condition of heat dissipation is better. The process procedure of proton implantation is relatively simple and of low cost. It can be used as an alternative to coherently coupled array implementations.

  11. Parameter-free numerical method for modeling thermal convection in square cavities in a wide range of Rayleigh numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goloviznin, V. M.; Korotkin, I. A.; Finogenov, S. A.

    2016-12-01

    Some numerical results for the two- and three-dimensional de Vahl Davis benchmark are presented. This benchmark describes thermal convection in a square (cubic) cavity with vertical heated walls in a wide range of Rayleigh numbers (104 to 1014), which covers both laminar and highly turbulent f lows. Turbulent f lows are usually described using a turbulence model with parameters that depend on the Rayleigh number and require adjustment. An alternative is Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) methods, but they demand extremely large computational grids. Recently, there has been an increasing interest in DNS methods with an incomplete resolution, which, in some cases, are able to provide acceptable results without resolving Kolmogorov scales. On the basis of this approach, the so-called parameter-free computational techniques have been developed. These methods cover a wide range of Rayleigh numbers and allow computing various integral properties of heat transport on relatively coarse computational grids. In this paper, a new numerical method based on the CABARET scheme is proposed for solving the Navier-Stokes equations in the Boussinesq approximation. This technique does not involve a turbulence model or any tuning parameters and has a second-order approximation scheme in time and space on uniform and nonuniform grids with a minimal computational stencil. Testing the technique on the de Vahl Davis benchmark and a sequence of refined grids shows that the method yields integral heat f luxes with a high degree of accuracy for both laminar and highly turbulent f lows. For Rayleigh numbers up to 1014, a several percent accuracy is achieved on an extremely coarse grid consisting of 20 × 20 cells refined toward the boundary. No definite or comprehensive explanation of this computational phenomenon has been given. Cautious optimism is expressed regarding the perspectives of using the new method for thermal convection computations at low Prandtl numbers typical of liquid metals.

  12. Niobium coaxial quarter-wave cavities for the New Delhi booster linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepard, K.W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Roy, A.; Potukuchi, P.N. [Nuclear Science Centre, New Delhi (India)

    1993-07-01

    This paper reports the design and construction status of a prototype superconducting niobium accelerating structure consisting of a pair of quarter-wave coaxial-line cavities which are strongly coupled with a superconducting loop. Quarter-wave resonators are two-gap accelerating structures and are relatively short, so that a large number of independently-phased cavities is required for a linac. Strongly coupling several cavities can reduce the number of independently-phased elements, but at the cost of reducing the range of useful velocity acceptance for each element. Coupling two cavities splits the accelerating rf eigenmode into two resonant modes each of which covers a portion of the full velocity acceptance range of the original single cavity mode. Using both of these resonant modes makes feasible the use of coupled cavity pairs for a linac with little loss m velocity acceptance. Design details for the niobium cavity pair and the results of preliminary tests of multipacting behavior are discussed.

  13. A wide area Bipolar Cascade Resonant Cavity Light Emitting Diode for a Hybrid Range-Intensity Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Reginald J.

    Autonomous Ground Vehicles (AGV) will require high-speed, real-time three dimensional (3-D) image processing to navigate treacherous terrain in order to complete their assigned mission without a human in the loop. LIDAR scanners of the 3-D variety, provide the necessary area coverage for 3-D image processing, but lack the speed to deliver the collected data for real-time processing. A novel Hybrid Range-Intensity System (HRIS) has been proposed for imaging large swaths of area very rapidly. This system is comprised of two infrared cameras, an illumination source, a control and coordination system to position the cameras, and signal processing algorithms to extract the contour image of the scene. This dissertation focused on the development of an illuminator for the HRIS. This illuminator enables faster image rendering and reduces the potential of errors in return signal data, that could be generated from extremely rough terrain. Four major achievements resulted from this work, which advance the field of 3-D image acquisition. The first is that the TJ is an effective current spreading layer for LEDs with mesa width up to 140 mum and current densities of ˜ 1 x 106A/cm2. The TJ allows fabrication of an efficient illuminator, with required geometry for the HRIS to operate as a real-time 3-D imaging system. Secondly, a design for a Bipolar Cascade-Resonant Cavity Light Emitting Diode (BC-RCLED) has been accomplished, that will illuminate the FOV of the hybrid-ranged intensity system with a single sweep of the beam. This device is capable of producing ˜ 330 mW of output power. Additionally, from this work, key parameters for HRIS design were identified. Using a collection optic with a 15 cm diameter, an HRIS mounting height of 1.5 m, and a detector integration time of 330 msec, a SNR of 20 dB was achieved. Lastly, we demonstrated that the BC-RCLED designed for the HRIS can deliver sufficient energy to produce the required SNR. Also, through parametric analysis, we

  14. RF accelerating unit installed in the PSB

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1972-01-01

    RF accelerating unit installed in the PSB ring between two bending magnets. Cool air from a heat exchanger is injected into the four cavities from the central feeder and the hot air recirculated via the lateral ducts.

  15. RF MEMS

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    bridges the gap in the signal line, thereby connecting the two ports of the device. This repre- ..... Packaging related parasitics tend to degrade RF performance, limiting the usage of the devices to much lower ... bonds are known to cause higher losses due to impedance mismatch with the 50 transmission lines. The RF bond ...

  16. A Microbolometer System for Radiation Detection in the THz Frequency Range with a Resonating Cavity Fabricated in the CMOS Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sesek, Aleksander; Zemva, Andrej; Trontelj, Janez

    2018-02-14

    The THz sensors using microbolometers as a sensing element are reported as one of the most sensitive room-temperature THz detectors suitable for THz imaging and spectroscopic applications. Microbolometer detectors are usually fabricated using different types of the MEMS technology. The patent for the detection system presented in this paper describes a method for microbolometer fabrication using a standard CMOS technology with advanced micromachining techniques. The measured sensitivity of the sensors fabricated by the patented method is 1000 V/W at an optimal frequency and is determined by the performance of a double-dipole antenna and quarter-wavelength resonant cavity. The paper presents a patented method for fabrication of a microbolometer system for radiation detection in the THz frequency range (16). The method is divided into several stages regarding the current silicon micromachining process. Main stages are fabrication of supporting structures for micro bridge, creation of micro cavities and fabrication of Aluminum antenna and Titanium microbolometer. Additional method for encapsulation in the vacuum is described which additionally improves the performance of bolometer. The CMOS technology is utilized for fabrication as it is cost effective and provides the possibility of larger sensor systems integration with included amplification. At other wavelengths (e.g. IR region) thermistors are usually also the receivers with the sensor resistance change provoked by self-heating. In the THz region the energy is received by an antenna coupled to a thermistor. Depending on the specific application requirement, two types of the antenna were designed and used; a narrow-band dipole antenna and a wideband log-periodic antenna. With method described in the paper, the microbolometer detector reaches sensitivities up to 500 V/W and noise equivalent power (NEP) down to 10 pW/√Hz. Additional encapsulation in the vacuum improves its performance at least by a factor of 2

  17. Present status of superconducting cavity developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouchi, Nobuo; Kusano, Joichi; Hasegawa, Kazuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment] [and others

    1997-11-01

    An R and D work of a superconducting (SC) cavity for the high intensity proton linac has begun at JAERI in collaboration with KEK. The RF field calculation and the structural analysis have been made to determine the cavity shape in the proton energy range between 100 and 1500 MeV. The results indicate the feasibility of a SC proton linac. A vertical test stand with clean room, water rinsing system, cavity evacuation pumping system, cryostat and data acquisition system has been installed to demonstrate the cavity performance. A single cell cavity of {beta}=0.5 has been fabricated and tested at the test stand to obtain the Q-value and the maximum surface electric field strength. The measured Q-values have been found to be high enough for our requirement while the field strength was limited to about 75% of the specification by the multipacting. We describe the preliminary design of the SC cavity, the overview of the vertical test stand and experimental results of the single cell cavity. (author)

  18. New approach in design of efficient low level RF circuit for 10 MeV cyclotron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M S Sharifi Asadi Malafeh

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The electric field in cavity accelerates charged particles and magnetic field of magnets changes the direction of these particles in cyclotrons. In order to establish the electric field inside the cavity, a noiseless radio frequency (RF signal should be generated, amplified and sent to cavity. The resonant frequency of the cavity could be changed by temperature variation. Variation of resonant frequency will cause reflected power from the cavity. in this work the low level RF circuits with task of signal generation, phase and frequency Adjustment, cavity resonant frequency Adjustment, protection of the RF set from the reflected power and stability of RF system was designed

  19. Method of electron emission control in RF guns

    CERN Document Server

    Khodak, I V

    2001-01-01

    The electron emission control method for a RF gun is considered.According to the main idea of the method,the additional resonance system is created in a cathode region where the RF field strength could be varied using the external pulse equipment. The additional resonance system is composed of a coaxial cavity coupled with a RF gun cylindrical cavity via an axial hole. Computed results of radiofrequency and electrodynamic performances of such a two-cavity system and results of the RF gun model pilot study are presented in. Results of particle dynamics simulation are described.

  20. Niobium superconducting cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1980-01-01

    This 5-cell superconducting cavity, made from bulk-Nb, stems from the period of general studies, not all directed towards direct use at LEP. This one is dimensioned for 1.5 GHz, the frequency used at CEBAF and also studied at Saclay (LEP RF was 352.2 MHz). See also 7908227, 8007354, 8209255, 8210054, 8312339.

  1. Accoustic Localization of Breakdown in Radio Frequency Accelerating Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lane, Peter Gwin [IIT, Chicago

    2016-07-01

    Current designs for muon accelerators require high-gradient radio frequency (RF) cavities to be placed in solenoidal magnetic fields. These fields help contain and efficiently reduce the phase space volume of source muons in order to create a usable muon beam for collider and neutrino experiments. In this context and in general, the use of RF cavities in strong magnetic fields has its challenges. It has been found that placing normal conducting RF cavities in strong magnetic fields reduces the threshold at which RF cavity breakdown occurs. To aid the effort to study RF cavity breakdown in magnetic fields, it would be helpful to have a diagnostic tool which can localize the source of breakdown sparks inside the cavity. These sparks generate thermal shocks to small regions of the inner cavity wall that can be detected and localized using microphones attached to the outer cavity surface. Details on RF cavity sound sources as well as the hardware, software, and algorithms used to localize the source of sound emitted from breakdown thermal shocks are presented. In addition, results from simulations and experiments on three RF cavities, namely the Aluminum Mock Cavity, the High-Pressure Cavity, and the Modular Cavity, are also given. These results demonstrate the validity and effectiveness of the described technique for acoustic localization of breakdown.

  2. RF Measurement Concepts

    CERN Document Server

    Caspers, F

    2014-01-01

    For the characterization of components, systems and signals in the radiofrequency (RF) and microwave ranges, several dedicated instruments are in use. In this article the fundamentals of the RF signal techniques are discussed. The key element in these front ends is the Schottky diode which can be used either as a RF mixer or as a single sampler. The spectrum analyser has become an absolutely indispensable tool for RF signal analysis. Here the front end is the RF mixer as the RF section of modern spectrum analyses has a ra ther complex architecture. The reasons for this complexity and certain working principles as well as limitations are discussed. In addition, an overview of the development of scalar and vector signal analysers is given. For the determination of the noise temperature of a one-port and the noise figure of a two-port, basic concepts and relations are shown as well as a brief discussion of commonly used noise-measurement techniques. In a further part of this article the operating principles of n...

  3. RF up/down-conversion based on optically injection-locked VCSEL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Peng; Zhang, Cheng; Xu, Anshi; Chen, Zhangyuan

    2013-03-25

    All-optical radio frequency conversion is proposed by directly modulated optically injection-locked vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers. The enhancement effect of second order products of RF signals by OIL technique is analyzed based on reflection-mode OIL model. Simulation results show that high injection ratio and large wavelength detuning of OIL condition lead to a high RF conversion gain. Compared with free running condition, more than 20 dB RF conversion gain enhancement is achieved in the simulation. The experimental results of the RF conversion gain improvement (+ 18 dB) by OIL show excellent agreement with our simulation results. The spurious free dynamic range improvement (+ 15 dB) of conversion signals by OIL is also experimentally demonstrated.

  4. SPS RF System Amplifier plant

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    The picture shows a 2 MW, 200 MHz amplifier plant with feeder lines. The main RF-system of the SPS comprises four cavities: two of 20 m length and two of 16.5 m length. They are all installed in one long straight section (LSS 3). These cavities are of the travelling-wave type operating at a centre frequency of 200.2 MHz. They are wideband, filling time about 700 ns and untuned. The power amplifiers, using tetrodes are installed in a surface building 200 m from the cavities. Initially only two cavities were installed, a third cavity was installed in 1978 and a forth one in 1979. The number of power amplifiers was also increased: to the first 2 MW plant a second 2 MW plant was added and by end 1979 there were 8 500 kW units combined in pairs to feed each of the 4 cavities with up to about 1 MW RF power, resulting in a total accelerating voltage of about 8 MV. See also 7412016X, 7412017X, 7411048X.

  5. Liquid Metal Droplet and Micro Corrugated Diaphragm RF-MEMS for reconfigurable RF filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irshad, Wasim

    detail and have proved pivotal to this work. The second part of the dissertation focuses on the Liquid Metal Droplet RF-MEMS. A novel tunable RF MEMS resonator that is based upon electrostatic control over the morphology of a liquid metal droplet (LMD) is conceived. We demonstrate an LMD evanescent-mode cavity resonator that simultaneously achieves wide analog tuning from 12 to 18 GHz with a measured quality factor of 1400-1840. A droplet of 250-mum diameter is utilized and the applied bias is limited to 100 V. This device operates on a principle called Electro-Wetting On Dielectric (EWOD). The liquid metal employed is a non-toxic eutectic alloy of Gallium, Indium and Tin known as Galinstan. This device also exploits interfacial surface energy and viscous body forces that dominate at nanoliter scale. We then apply our Liquid Metal Droplet (LMD) RF-MEMS architecture to demonstrate a continuously tunable electrostatic Ku-Band Filter. A 2-pole bandpass filter with measured insertion loss of less than 0.4dB and 3dB FBW of 3.4% is achieved using a Galinstan droplet of 250mum diameter and bias limited to 100V. We demonstrate that the LMD is insensitive to gravity by performing inversion and tilt experiments. In addition, we study its thermal tolerance by subjecting the LMD up to 150° C. The third part of the dissertation is dedicated to the Micro-Corrugated Diaphragm (MCD) RF-MEMS. We present an evanescent-mode cavity bandpass filter with state-of-the-art RF performance metrics like 4:1 tuning ratio from 5 to 20 GHz with less than 2dB insertion loss and 2-6% 3dB bandwidth. Micro-Corrugated Diaphragm (MCD) is a novel electrostatic MEMS design specifically engineered to provide large-scale analog deflections necessary for such continuous and wide tunable filtering with very high quality factor. We demonstrate a 1.25mm radius and 2mum thick Gold MCD which provides 30mum total deflection with nearly 60% analog range. We also present a detailed and systematic MCD design

  6. LIGA-fabricated compact mm-wave linear accelerator cavities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, J.J.; Bajikar, S.S.; DeCarlo, F.; Kang, Y.W.; Kustom, R.L.; Mancini, D.C.; Nassiri, A.; Lai, B.; Feinerman, A.D.; White, V.

    1998-03-23

    Millimeter-wave rf cavities for use in linear accelerators, free-electron lasers, and mm-wave undulatory are under development at Argonne National Laboratory. Typical cavity dimensions are in the 1000 mm range, and the overall length of the accelerator structure, which consists of 30-100 cavities, is about 50-100 mm. An accuracy of 0.2% in the cavity dimensions is necessary in order to achieve a high Q-factor of the cavity. To achieve this these structures are being fabricated using deep X-ray lithography, electroforming, and assembly (LIGA). The first prototype cavity structures are designed for 108 GHz and 2p/3-mode operation. Input and output couplers are integrated with the cavity structures. The cavities are fabricated on copper substrates by electroforming copper into 1-mm-thick PMMA resists patterned by deep x-ray lithography and polishing the copper down to the desired thickness. These are fabricated separately and subsequently assembled with precision spacing and alignment using microspheres, optical fibers, or microfabricated spacers/alignment pieces. Details of the fabrication process, alignment, and assembly work are presented in here.

  7. Digital Cavity Resonance Monitor, alternative method of measuring cavity microphonics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomasz Plawski; G. Davis; Hai Dong; J. Hovater; John Musson; Thomas Powers

    2005-09-20

    As is well known, mechanical vibration or microphonics in a cryomodule causes the cavity resonance frequency to change at the vibration frequency. One way to measure the cavity microphonics is to drive the cavity with a Phase Locked Loop. Measurement of the instantaneous frequency or PLL error signal provides information about the cavity microphonic frequencies. Although the PLL error signal is available directly, precision frequency measurements require additional instrumentation, a Cavity Resonance Monitor (CRM). The analog version of such a device has been successfully used for several cavity tests [1]. In this paper we present a prototype of a Digital Cavity Resonance Monitor designed and built in the last year. The hardware of this instrument consists of an RF downconverter, digital quadrature demodulator and digital processor motherboard (Altera FPGA). The motherboard processes received data and computes frequency changes with a resolution of 0.2 Hz, with a 3 kHz output bandwidth.

  8. SPS accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1976-01-01

    The SPS started up with 2 accelerating cavities (each consisting of 5 tank sections) in LSS3. They have a 200 MHz travelling wave structure (see 7411032 and 7802190) and 750 kW of power is fed to each of the cavities from a 1 MW tetrode power amplifier, located in a surface building above, via a coaxial transmission line. Clemens Zettler, builder of the SPS RF system, is standing at the side of one of the cavities. In 1978 and 1979 another 2 cavities were added and entered service in 1980. These were part of the intensity improvement programme and served well for the new role of the SPS as proton-antiproton collider. See also 7411032, 8011289, 8104138, 8302397.

  9. RF transformer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, James L.; Helenberg, Harold W.; Kilsdonk, Dennis J.

    1979-01-01

    There is provided an improved RF transformer having a single-turn secondary of cylindrical shape and a coiled encapsulated primary contained within the secondary. The coil is tapered so that the narrowest separation between the primary and the secondary is at one end of the coil. The encapsulated primary is removable from the secondary so that a variety of different capacity primaries can be utilized with one secondary.

  10. FERMILAB CRYOMODULE TEST STAND RF INTERLOCK SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, Troy [Fermilab; Diamond, J. S. [Fermilab; McDowell, D. [Fermilab; Nicklaus, D. [Fermilab; Prieto, P. S. [Fermilab; Semenov, A. [Fermilab

    2016-10-12

    An interlock system has been designed for the Fermilab Cryo-module Test Stand (CMTS), a test bed for the cryo- modules to be used in the upcoming Linac Coherent Light Source 2 (LCLS-II) project at SLAC. The interlock system features 8 independent subsystems, one per superconducting RF cavity and solid state amplifier (SSA) pair. Each system monitors several devices to detect fault conditions such as arcing in the waveguides or quenching of the SRF system. Additionally each system can detect fault conditions by monitoring the RF power seen at the cavity coupler through a directional coupler. In the event of a fault condition, each system is capable of removing RF signal to the amplifier (via a fast RF switch) as well as turning off the SSA. Additionally, each input signal is available for re- mote viewing and recording via a Fermilab designed digitizer board and MVME 5500 processor.

  11. Electronic sideband locking of 318.6nm UV laser to an ultrastable optical cavity with a wide continuously tunable range

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, Jiandong; He, Jun; Wang, Junmin

    2016-01-01

    We have demonstrated a frequency-stabilized tunable 318.6 nm ultraviolet (UV) laser system for the single-photon 6S1/2 - nP (n = 70 ~ 100) Rydberg excitation of cesium atoms. The 637.2 nm laser produced by single-pass sum frequency generation from two infrared fiber lasers is offset locked to a high-finesse ultra-low expansion (ULE) optical cavity placed in ultra-high vacuum using the electronic sideband locking technique. The generated 318.6 nm UV laser via cavity-enhanced second-harmonic generation can be continuously tuned over 4 GHz by indirectly changing modulation frequency on the electro-optic phase modulator while the whole laser system remains locked. We analyze the tuning range mainly depends on the modulator bandwidth and the tunable range of the seed laser. The locking scheme offers a method to compensate the frequency difference between the reference frequency and the goal frequency to a desired excited state, and has huge potential in precision spectroscopic experiments of cold atoms.

  12. Cold cathode rf guns based study on field emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangkun Li

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently cold cathodes based on field emission have drawn attention and been considered to drive accelerators and free electron lasers, due to the progress in field emitter arrays and planar emitters like diamond films. In this paper, we reviewed the characteristics of field emission in rf fields. Simulations of S-band rf guns consisting of a cathode cell and a full cell were done. We showed that a shorter cathode cell with a length of 0.25–0.3 of λ/2 is in favor of obtaining both low emittance and low energy spread bunches when the amplitude of electric field on the cathode surface ranges from 60 to 80  MV/m. A single cell test cavity has been installed to study field emission of diamond films and the measured beam current showed a good agreement with theoretical calculations.

  13. HOM Couplers for CERN SPL Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Papke, Kai; Van Rienen, U

    2013-01-01

    Higher-Order-Modes (HOMs) may affect beam stability and refrigeration requirements of superconducting proton linacs such as the SPL, which is studied at CERN as the driver for future neutrino facilities. In order to limit beam-induced HOM effects, CERN considers the use of HOM couplers on the cut-off tubes of the 5-cell superconducting cavities. These couplers consist of resonant antennas shaped as loops or probes, which are designed to couple to modes of a specific frequency range. In this paper the design process is presented and a comparison is made between various design options for the medium and high-beta SPL cavities, both operating at 704.4 MHz. The RF characteristics and thermal behaviour of the various designs are discussed.

  14. Quantum-optical magnets with competing short- and long-range interactions: Rydberg-dressed spin lattice in an optical cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Gelhausen, Michael Buchhold, Achim Rosch, Philipp Strack

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The fields of quantum simulation with cold atoms [1] and quantum optics [2] are currently being merged. In a set of recent pathbreaking experiments with atoms in optical cavities [3,4] lattice quantum many-body systems with both, a short-range interaction and a strong interaction potential of infinite range -mediated by a quantized optical light field- were realized. A theoretical modelling of these systems faces considerable complexity at the interface of: (i spontaneous symmetry-breaking and emergent phases of interacting many-body systems with a large number of atoms $N\\rightarrow\\infty$, (ii quantum optics and the dynamics of fluctuating light fields, and (iii non-equilibrium physics of driven, open quantum systems. Here we propose what is possibly the simplest, quantum-optical magnet with competing short- and long-range interactions, in which all three elements can be analyzed comprehensively: a Rydberg-dressed spin lattice [5] coherently coupled to a single photon mode. Solving a set of coupled even-odd sublattice Master equations for atomic spin and photon mean-field amplitudes, we find three key results. (R1: Superradiance and a coherent photon field can coexist with spontaneously broken magnetic translation symmetry. The latter is induced by the short-range nearest-neighbor interaction from weakly admixed Rydberg levels. (R2: This broken even-odd sublattice symmetry leaves its imprint in the light via a novel peak in the cavity spectrum beyond the conventional polariton modes. (R3: The combined effect of atomic spontaneous emission, drive, and interactions can lead to phases with anomalous photon number oscillations. Extensions of our work include nano-photonic crystals coupled to interacting atoms and multi-mode photon dynamics in Rydberg systems.

  15. Hydroforming of elliptical cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Singer

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Activities of the past several years in developing the technique of forming seamless (weldless cavity cells by hydroforming are summarized. An overview of the technique developed at DESY for the fabrication of single cells and multicells of the TESLA cavity shape is given and the major rf results are presented. The forming is performed by expanding a seamless tube with internal water pressure while simultaneously swaging it axially. Prior to the expansion the tube is necked at the iris area and at the ends. Tube radii and axial displacements are computer controlled during the forming process in accordance with results of finite element method simulations for necking and expansion using the experimentally obtained strain-stress relationship of tube material. In cooperation with industry different methods of niobium seamless tube production have been explored. The most appropriate and successful method is a combination of spinning or deep drawing with flow forming. Several single-cell niobium cavities of the 1.3 GHz TESLA shape were produced by hydroforming. They reached accelerating gradients E_{acc} up to 35  MV/m after buffered chemical polishing (BCP and up to 42  MV/m after electropolishing (EP. More recent work concentrated on fabrication and testing of multicell and nine-cell cavities. Several seamless two- and three-cell units were explored. Accelerating gradients E_{acc} of 30–35  MV/m were measured after BCP and E_{acc} up to 40  MV/m were reached after EP. Nine-cell niobium cavities combining three three-cell units were completed at the company E. Zanon. These cavities reached accelerating gradients of E_{acc}=30–35  MV/m. One cavity is successfully integrated in an XFEL cryomodule and is used in the operation of the FLASH linear accelerator at DESY. Additionally the fabrication of bimetallic single-cell and multicell NbCu cavities by hydroforming was successfully developed. Several NbCu clad single-cell and

  16. Design of RF system for CYCIAE-230 superconducting cyclotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Zhiguo, E-mail: bitbearAT@hotmail.com; Ji, Bin; Fu, Xiaoliang; Cao, Xuelong; Zhao, Zhenlu; Zhang, Tinajue

    2017-05-11

    The CYCIAE230 is a low-current, compact superconducting cyclotron designed for proton therapy. The Radio Frequency system consists of four RF cavities and applies second harmonic to accelerate beams. The driving power for the cavity system is estimated to be approximately 150 kW. The LLRF controller is a self-made device developed and tested at low power using a small-scale cavity model. In this paper, the resonator systems of an S.C. cyclotron in history are reviewed. Contrary to those RF systems, the cavities of the CYCIAE230 cyclotron connect two opposite dees. Two high-power RF windows are included in the system. Each window carries approximately 75 kW RF power from the driver to the cavities. Thus, the RF system for the CY-CIAE230 cyclotron is operated in driven push–pull mode. The two-way amplifier-coupler-cavity systems are operated with approximately the same amount of RF power but 180° out of phase compared with each other. The design, as well as the technical advantage and limitations of this operating mode, of the CYCIAE230 cyclotron RF system is analyzed.

  17. Design of RF system for CYCIAE-230 superconducting cyclotron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Zhiguo; Ji, Bin; Fu, Xiaoliang; Cao, Xuelong; Zhao, Zhenlu; Zhang, Tinajue

    2017-05-01

    The CYCIAE230 is a low-current, compact superconducting cyclotron designed for proton therapy. The Radio Frequency system consists of four RF cavities and applies second harmonic to accelerate beams. The driving power for the cavity system is estimated to be approximately 150 kW. The LLRF controller is a self-made device developed and tested at low power using a small-scale cavity model. In this paper, the resonator systems of an S.C. cyclotron in history are reviewed. Contrary to those RF systems, the cavities of the CYCIAE230 cyclotron connect two opposite dees. Two high-power RF windows are included in the system. Each window carries approximately 75 kW RF power from the driver to the cavities. Thus, the RF system for the CY-CIAE230 cyclotron is operated in driven push-pull mode. The two-way amplifier-coupler-cavity systems are operated with approximately the same amount of RF power but 180° out of phase compared with each other. The design, as well as the technical advantage and limitations of this operating mode, of the CYCIAE230 cyclotron RF system is analyzed.

  18. Nb-Pb superconducting RF-gun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekutowicz, J.; Iversen, J.; Kreps, G. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (DE)] (and others)

    2005-07-01

    We report on the status of an electron RF-gun made of two superconductors: niobium and lead. The presented design combines the advantages of the RF performance of bulk niobium superconducting cavities and the reasonably high quantum efficiency of lead, as compared to other superconducting metals. The concept, mentioned in a previous paper, follows the attractive approach of all niobium superconducting RF-gun as it has been proposed by the BNL group. Measured values of quantum efficiency for lead at various photon energies, analysis of recombination time of photon-broken Cooper pairs for lead and niobium, and preliminary cold test results are discussed in this paper. (orig.)

  19. Nb-Pb superconducting RF gun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Sekutowicz; J. Iversen; G. Kreps; W.D. Moller; W. Singer; X. Singer; I. Ben-Zvi; A. Burrill; J. Smedley; T. Rao; M. Ferrario; P. Kneisel; J. Langner; P. Strzyzewski; R. Lefferts; A. Lipski; K. Szalowski; K. Ko; L. Xiao

    2006-04-14

    We report on the status of an electron RF-gun made of two superconductors: niobium and lead. The presented design combines the advantages of the RF performance of bulk niobium superconducting cavities and the reasonably high quantum efficiency of lead, as compared to other superconducting metals. The concept, mentioned in a previous paper, follows the attractive approach of all niobium superconducting RF-gun as it has been proposed by the BNL group. Measured values of quantum efficiency for lead at various photon energies, analysis of recombination time of photon-broken Cooper pairs for lead and niobium, and preliminary cold test results are discussed in this paper.

  20. Nb-Pb Superconducting RF Gun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekutowicz, J.; Iversen, J.; Kreps, G.; Moller, W.D.; Singer, W.; Singer, X.; /DESY; Ben-Zvi, I.; Burrill, A.; Smedley, J.; Rao, T.; /Brookhaven; Ferrario, M.; /Frascati; Kneisel, P.; /Jefferson Lab; Langner, J.; Strzyzewski, P.; /Warsaw, Inst. Nucl. Studies; Lefferts, R.; Lipski, A.; /SUNY, Stony Brook; Szalowski, K.; /Lodz U.; Ko, K.; Xiao, L.; /SLAC

    2006-03-29

    We report on the status of an electron RF-gun made of two superconductors: niobium and lead. The presented design combines the advantages of the RF performance of bulk niobium superconducting cavities and the reasonably high quantum efficiency of lead, as compared to other superconducting metals. The concept, mentioned in a previous paper, follows the attractive approach of all niobium superconducting RF-gun as it has been proposed by the BNL group. Measured values of quantum efficiency for lead at various photon energies, analysis of recombination time of photon-broken Cooper pairs for lead and niobium, and preliminary cold test results are discussed in this paper.

  1. NSLS-II RF Cryogenic System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, J.; Dilgen, T.; Gash, B.; Gosman, J.; Mortazavi, P.; Papu, J.; Ravindranath, V.; Sikora, R.; Sitnikov, A.; Wilhelm, H.; Jia, Y.; Monroe, C.

    2015-05-03

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II is a 3 GeV X-ray user facility commissioned in 2014. A new helium refrigerator system has been installed and commissioned to support the superconducting RF cavities in the storage ring. Special care was taken to provide very stable helium and LN2 pressures and flow rates to minimize microphonics and thermal effects at the cavities. Details of the system design along with commissioning and early operations data will be presented.

  2. RF superconductivity for accelerators. 2. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padamsee, H. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States). Lab. of Nuclear Studies; Knobloch, J. [BESSY GmbH, Berlin (Germany); Hays, T. [Cosmic Consulting, Gore, VA (United States)

    2008-07-01

    This book introduces some of the key ideas of RF Superconductivity by using a pedagogic approach, and presents a comprehensive overview of the field. It is divided into four parts. The first part introduces the basic concepts of microwave cavities for particle acceleration. The second part is devoted to the observed behavior of superconducting cavities. In the third part, general issues connected with beam-cavity interaction and related issues for critical components are covered. The final part discusses applications of superconducting cavities to frontier accelerators of the future, drawing heavily on examples that are in their most advanced stage. Each part of the book ends in a problems section to illustrate and amplify text material as well as to draw on example applications of superconducting cavities to existing and future accelerators. From the Contents: - Basics - Performance of Superconducting Cavities - Couplers and Tuners - Frontier Accelerators. (orig.)

  3. SPS RF system:Tetrodes and waveguides

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    This picture shows one of the initially installed amplifier units of the SPS RF system. The main RF-system of the SPS comprises four cavities: two of 20 m length and two of 16.5 m length. They are all installed in one long straight section (LSS 3). These cavities are of the travelling-wave type operating at a centre frequency of 200.2 MHz. They are wideband, filling time about 700 ns and untuned. The power amplifiers, using tetrodes are installed in a surface building 200 m from the cavities. Initially only two cavities were installed, a third cavity was installed in 1978 and a forth one in 1979. The number of power amplifiers was also gradually increased: in 1980 there were 8 500 kW units combined in pairs to feed each of the 4 cavities with up to about 1 MW RF power, resulting in a total accelerating voltage of about 8 MV. See also 7412017X, 7411048X.

  4. SPS RF System:Tetrodes and Waveguides

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    The picture shows part of a RF power generating plant. The main RF-system of the SPS comprises four cavities: two of 20 m length and two of 16.5 m length. They are all installed in one long straight section (LSS 3). These cavities are of the travelling-wave type operating at a centre frequency of 200.2 MHz. They are wideband, filling time about 700 ns and untuned. The power amplifiers, using tetrodes are installed in a surface building 200 m from the cavities. Initially only two cavities were installed, a third cavity was installed in 1978 and a forth one in 1979. The number of power amplifiers was also gradually increased: by end 1980 there were 8 500 kW units combined in pairs to feed each of the 4 cavities with up to about 1 MW RF power, resulting in a total accelerating voltage of about 8 MV. See also 7412016X, 7412017X, 7411048X.

  5. Progress on the MICE RF Module at LBNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Tianhuan [LBNL, Berkeley; Anderson, Terry [Fermilab; Bross, Alan [Fermilab; DeMello, Allan [LBNL, Berkeley; Lambert, Andrew [LBNL, Berkeley; Li, Derun [LBNL, Berkeley; Loew, Tim [LBNL, Berkeley; Palmer, Mark [Fermilab; Prestemon, Soren [LBNL, Berkeley; Torun, Yagmur [IIT, Chicago (main); Virostek, Steve [LBNL, Berkeley; Wallig, Joseph [LBNL, Berkeley

    2016-06-01

    The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment aims to demonstrate the transverse cooling of a muon beam by ionization in energy absorbers. The final MICE cooling channel configuration has two RF modules, each housing a 201 MHz RF cavity used to compensate the longitudinal energy loss in the absorbers. The assembly of MICE RF Module is being carried out at LBL. In this paper we will report the recent progress on the assembly work.

  6. Studies of RF Breakdown of Metals in Dense Gases

    CERN Document Server

    Hanlet, Pierrick M; Ankenbrandt, Charles; Johnson, Rolland P; Kaplan, Daniel; Kuchnir, Moyses; Moretti, Alfred; Paul, Kevin; Popovic, Milorad; Yarba, Victor; Yonehara, Katsuya

    2005-01-01

    A study of RF breakdown of metals in gases has begun as part of a program to develop RF cavities filled with dense hydrogen gas to be used for muon ionization cooling. A pressurized 800 MHz test cell has been used at Fermilab to compare the conditioning and breakdown behavior of copper, molybdenum, chromium, and beryllium electrodes as functions of hydrogen and helium gas density. These results are compared to the predicted or known RF breakdown behavior of these metals in vacuum.

  7. Commissioning of the MICE RF System

    CERN Document Server

    Moss, A.; Stanley, T.; White, C.; Ronald, K.; Whyte, C.G.; Dick, A.J.; Speirs, D.C.; Alsari, S.

    2014-01-01

    The Muon Ionisation Cooling Experiment (MICE) is being constructed at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in the UK. The muon beam will be cooled using multiple hydrogen absorbers then reaccelerated using an RF cavity system operating at 201MHz. This paper describes recent progress in commissioning the amplifier systems at their design operation conditions, installation and operation as part of the MICE project.

  8. Higher-order mode rf guns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John W. Lewellen

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Traditional photocathode rf gun design is based around the use of TM_{0,1,0}-mode cavities. This is typically done in the interest of obtaining the highest possible gradient per unit supplied rf power and for historical reasons. In a multicell, aperture-coupled photoinjector, however, the gun as a whole is produced from strongly coupled cavities oscillating in a π mode. This design requires very careful preparation and tuning, as the field balance and resonant frequencies are easily disturbed. Side-coupled designs are often avoided because of the dipole modes introduced into the cavity fields. This paper proposes the use of a single higher-order mode rf cavity in order to generate the desired on-axis fields. It is shown that the field experienced by a beam in a higher-order mode rf gun is initially very similar to traditional 1.5- or 2.5-cell π-mode gun fields, and projected performance in terms of beam quality is also comparable. The new design has the advantages of much greater ease of fabrication, immunity from coupled-cell effects, and simpler tuning procedures. Because of the gun geometry, the possibility also exists for improved temperature stabilization and cooling for high duty-cycle applications.

  9. The Tuning Algorithm of the LHC 400 MHz Superconducting Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Baudrenghien, P

    2007-01-01

    The LHC Superconducting 400 MHz cavities are of the single-cell type, equipped with a movable coupler allowing for a range of loaded Q from 20000 to 180000. Their mechanical tuner has a range of 250 kHz with a 25 Hz resolution. The LHC bunch spacing is 25 ns but the filling pattern exhibits various gaps free of particles and of different length. Consequently the RF beam current at 400 MHz is also modulated. The largest gap has a length of 3s to accommodate for the rise-time of the beam dump kicker. It will always be kept free of particles. With the strong RF feedback the decay time of the cavity field is between one and two s, much smaller than the revolution period (90 s). Hence two steady state situations are encountered during one turn: The klystron power toggles between beam and no-beam values as the RF feedback keeps the field constant. The tuner position is set to keep the klystron power equal in both cases (Half Detuning). This note presents the tuning algorithm that sets and keeps th...

  10. Harmonically resonant cavity as a bunch-length monitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Roberts

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A compact, harmonically resonant cavity with fundamental resonant frequency 1497 MHz was used to evaluate the temporal characteristics of electron bunches produced by a 130 kV dc high voltage spin-polarized photoelectron source at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF photoinjector, delivered at 249.5 and 499 MHz repetition rates and ranging in width from 45 to 150 picoseconds (FWHM. A cavity antenna attached directly to a sampling oscilloscope detected the electron bunches as they passed through the cavity bore with a sensitivity of ∼1  mV/μA. The oscilloscope waveforms are a superposition of the harmonic modes excited by the beam, with each cavity mode representing a term of the Fourier series of the electron bunch train. Relatively straightforward post-processing of the waveforms provided a near-real time representation of the electron bunches revealing bunch-length and the relative phasing of interleaved beams. The noninvasive measurements from the harmonically resonant cavity were compared to measurements obtained using an invasive RF-deflector-cavity technique and to predictions from particle tracking simulations.

  11. Technical tasks in superconducting cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Kenji [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1997-11-01

    The feature of superconducting rf cavities is an extremely small surface resistance on the wall. It brings a large energy saving in the operation, even those are cooled with liquid helium. That also makes possible to operate themselves in a higher field gradient comparing to normal conducting cavities, and brings to make accelerators compact. These merits are very important for the future accelerator engineering which is planed at JAERI for the neutron material science and nuclear waste transmutation. This machine is a high intensity proton linac and uses sc cavities in the medium and high {beta} sections. In this paper, starting R and D of proton superconducting cavities, several important technical points which come from the small surface resistance of sc cavities, are present to succeed it and also differences between the medium and high - {beta} structures are discussed. (author)

  12. Proposed Cavity for Reduced Slip-Stacking Loss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eldred, J. [Indiana U.; Zwaska, R. [Fermilab

    2015-06-01

    This paper employs a novel dynamical mechanism to improve the performance of slip-stacking. Slip-stacking in an accumulation technique used at Fermilab since 2004 which nearly double the proton intensity. During slip-stacking, the Recycler or the Main Injector stores two particles beams that spatially overlap but have different momenta. The two particle beams are longitudinally focused by two 53 MHz 100 kV RF cavities with a small frequency difference between them. We propose an additional 106 MHz 20 kV RF cavity, with a frequency at the double the average of the upper and lower main RF frequencies. In simulation, we find the proposed RF cavity significantly enhances the stable bucket area and reduces slip-stacking losses under reasonable injection scenarios. We quantify and map the stability of the parameter space for any accelerator implementing slip-stacking with the addition of a harmonic RF cavity.

  13. Investigation of the C2H2-CO2 van der Waals complex in the overtone range using cw cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauzin, C.; Didriche, K.; Liévin, J.; Herman, M.; Perrin, A.

    2009-05-01

    A slit nozzle supersonic expansion containing acetylene [492 SCCM (SCCM denotes cubic centimeter per minute at STP)] and carbon dioxide (740 SCCM) seeded into Ar (837 SCCM) is investigated using cw-cavity ring-down spectroscopy, in the 1.5 μm range. The C2H2-CO2 van der Waals complex is observed around the ν1+ν3 acetylenic band. The rotational temperature is estimated to be close to 60 K from the comparison between observed and simulated spectra. The analysis of the main, perturbed B-type band centered near 6 549.280 cm-1, is performed. It is attributed to a dimer with the known planar, C2v geometry. The present overtone data, involving ground state levels with higher J /K states (J ≤35 and Ka≤20) than previously reported, are combined to 3 μm data [D. G. Prichard, R. N. Nandi, J. S. Muenter, and B. J. Howard, J. Chem. Phys. 89, 1245 (1988); Z. S. Huang and R. E. Miller, Chem. Phys. 132, 185 (1989)] to determine improved ground state parameters. The major perturbations affecting the upper state are accounted for through C-type Coriolis resonances involving one dark state, whose symmetry must therefore be A1. Upper state constants are obtained for the bright and dark states. The dependence upon vibrational excitation is demonstrated to arise from excitation in the acetylene unit, only, for the former, but cannot be unravelled for the latter.

  14. Experimental Studies of Light Emission Phenomena in Superconducting RF Cavitites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthony, P.L.; /SLAC; Delayen, J.R.; /Jefferson Lab; Fryberger, D.; /SLAC; Goree, W.S.; Mammosser, J.; /Jefferson Lab /SNS Project, Oak Ridge; Szalata, Z.M.; II, J.G.Weisend /SLAC

    2009-08-04

    Experimental studies of light emission phenomena in superconducting RF cavities, which we categorize under the general heading of cavity lights, are described. The cavity lights data, which were obtained using a small CCD video camera, were collected in a series of nine experimental runs ranging from {approx} 1/2 to {approx} 2 h in duration. The video data were recorded on a standard VHS tape. As the runs progressed, additional instrumentation was added. For the last three runs a LabVIEW controlled data acquisition system was included. These runs furnish evidence for several, possibly related, light emission phenomena. The most intriguing of these is what appear to be small luminous objects {le} 1.5 mm in size, freely moving about in the vacuum space, generally without wall contact, as verified by reflections of the tracks in the cavity walls. In addition, on a number of occasions, these objects were observed to bounce off of the cavity walls. The wall-bounce aspect of most of these events was clearly confirmed by pre-bounce and post-bounce reflections concurrent with the tracks. In one of the later runs, a mode of behavior was observed that was qualitatively different from anything observed in the earlier runs. Perhaps the most perplexing aspect of this new mode was the observation of as many as seven luminous objects arrayed in what might be described as a macromolecular formation, coherently moving about in the interior of the cavity for extended periods of time, evidently without any wall contact. It is suggested that these mobile luminous objects are without explanation within the realm of established physics. Some remarks about more exotic theoretical possibilities are made, and future plans are discussed.

  15. Dual-etalon, cavity-ring-down, frequency comb spectroscopy.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strecker, Kevin E.; Chandler, David W.

    2010-10-01

    The 'dual etalon frequency comb spectrometer' is a novel low cost spectometer with limited moving parts. A broad band light source (pulsed laser, LED, lamp ...) is split into two beam paths. One travels through an etalon and a sample gas, while the second arm is just an etalon cavity, and the two beams are recombined onto a single detector. If the free spectral ranges (FSR) of the two cavities are not identical, the intensity pattern at the detector with consist of a series of heterodyne frequencies. Each mode out of the sample arm etalon with have a unique frequency in RF (radio-frequency) range, where modern electronics can easily record the signals. By monitoring these RF beat frequencies we can then determine when an optical frequencies is absorbed. The resolution is set by the FSR of the cavity, typically 10 MHz, with a bandwidth up to 100s of cm{sup -1}. In this report, the new spectrometer is described in detail and demonstration experiments on Iodine absorption are carried out. Further we discuss powerful potential next generation steps to developing this into a point sensor for monitoring combustion by-products, environmental pollutants, and warfare agents.

  16. Geometry Optimization of DC/RF Photoelectron Gun

    CERN Document Server

    Chen Ping; Yu, David

    2005-01-01

    Pre-acceleration of photoelectrons in a pulsed, high voltage, short, dc gap and its subsequent injection into an rf gun is a promising method to improve electron beam emittance in rf accelerators. Simulation work has been performed in order to optimize the geometric shapes of a dc/rf gun and improve electron beam properties. Variations were made on cathode and anode shapes, dc gap distance, and inlet shape of the rf cavity. Simulations showed that significant improvement on the normalized emittance (< 1 mm-mrad), compared to a dc gun with flat cathode, could be obtained after the geometric shapes of the gun were optimized.

  17. Indirect method of measuring changes of EM field in RF-gun cavity for XFEL accelerator (Pośrednia metoda pomiaru zmian pola we wnęce działa elektronowego akceleratora XFEL)

    CERN Document Server

    Pozniak, K; Zabolotny, W; Koehler, W; Stephan, F; Simrock, S

    2009-01-01

    In the paper an RF-gun control system is described. Difficulties caused by the impossibility to observe directly the field gradient are mentioned. Calibration nd measurement procedure is discussed. A mathematical model, which provides a way to calculate the desired signal from the indirect measurements is developed and analyzed. This model is supported by both measurements and simulations discussed in the final part of the paper. Research done with participation of Ph.D. students.

  18. Double and triple-harmonic RF buckets and their use for bunch squeezing in AGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, C. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-08-24

    For the past several years we have merged bunches in AGS in order to achieve the desired intensity per bunch prior to injection into RHIC. The merging is done on a flat porch at or above AGS injection energy. Because the merges involve the reduction of the RF harmonic number by a factor of 2 (for a 2 to 1 merge) and then a factor of 3 (for a 3 to 1 merge), one requires RF frequencies 6hfs, 3hfs, 2hfs and hfs, where fs is the revolution frequency on the porch and h = 4 is the fundamental harmonic number. The standard AGS RF cavities cannot operate at the lowest frequencies 2hfs and hfs; these are provided by two modified cavities. Upon completion of the merges, the bunches are sitting in harmonic h buckets. In order to be accelerated they need to be squeezed into harmonic 3h buckets. This is accomplished by producing a double-harmonic bucket in which harmonics h and 2h act in concert, and then a triple-harmonic bucket in which harmonics h, 2h, and 3h act in concert. Simulations have shown that the squeeze presents an acceptance bottleneck which limits the longitudinal emittance that can be put into the harmonic 3h bucket. In this note the areas of the double and triple-harmonic buckets are calculated explicitly, and it is shown that these go through a minimum as the RF voltages are raised to the desired values. Several RF voltage ranges are examined, and the acceptance bottleneck is determined for each of these. Finally, the acceptance bottleneck for Au77+ bunches in AGS is calculated for several RF voltage ranges. The main result is that the RF voltages for the low-frequency harmonic h and 2h cavities both must be at least 22 kV in order to achieve an acceptance of 0:6 eV s per nucleon. If the harmonic h and 2h voltages are 15 and 22 kV, respectively, then the acceptance is reduced to 0:548 eV s per nucleon.

  19. Systematic Observation of Time-Dependent Phenomena in the RF Output Spectrum of High Power Gyrotrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kern Stefan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available At IHM/KIT, high power gyrotrons with conventional cavity (e.g. 1 MW CW at 140 GHz for the stellarator Wendelstein 7-X and coaxial cavity (2 MW shortpulse at 170 GHz for ITER for fusion applications are being developed and verified experimentally. Especially with respect to the problem of parasitic RF oscillations in the beam tunnel of some W7-X tubes, investigations of the gyrotron RF output spectrum have proved to be a valuable source of diagnostic information. Signs of transient effects in millisecond pulses, like frequency switching or intermittent low-frequency modulation, have indicated that truly time-dependent measurements with high frequency resolution and dynamic range could give deeper insight into these phenomena. In this paper, an improved measurement system is presented, which employs a fast oscilloscope as receiver. Shorttime Fourier transform (STFT is applied to the time-domain signal, yielding time-variant spectra with frequency resolutions only limited by acquisition length and STFT segmentation choice. Typical reasonable resolutions are in the range of 100 kHz to 10 MHz with a currently memory-limited maximum acquisition length of 4 ms. A key feature of the system consists in the unambiguity of frequency measurement: The system receives through two parallel channels, each using a harmonic mixer (h = 9 – 12 to convert the signal from RF millimeter wave frequencies (full D-Band, 110 – 170 GHz to IF (0 – 3 GHz. For each IF output signal of each individual mixer, injection side and receiving harmonic are initially not known. Using accordingly determined LO frequencies, this information is retrieved from the redundancy of the channels, yielding unambiguously reconstructed RF spectra with a total span of twice the usable receiver IF bandwidth, up to ≈ 6 GHz in our case. Using the system, which is still being improved continuously, various transient effects like cavity mode switching, parasitic oscillation frequency variation

  20. SPS RF System:Tetrodes and Waveguides

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    The main RF-system of the SPS comprises four cavities: two of 20 m length and two of 16.5 m length. They are all installed in one long straight section (LSS 3). These cavities are of the travelling-wave type operating at a centre frequency of 200.2 MHz. They are wideband, filling time about 700 ns and untuned. The power amplifiers, using tetrodes are installed in a surface building 200 m from the cavities. Initially only two cavities were installed, a third cavity was installed in 1978 and a forth one in 1979. The number of power amplifiers was also increased: to the first 2 MW plant a second 2 MW plant was added and by end 1979 there were 8 500 kW units combined in pairs to feed each of the 4 cavities with up to about 1 MW RF power, resulting in a total accelerating voltage of about 8 MV. See also 7412016X, 7412017X, 7411048X.

  1. Recycler barrier RF buckets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhat, C.M.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    The Recycler Ring at Fermilab uses a barrier rf systems for all of its rf manipulations. In this paper, I will give an overview of historical perspective on barrier rf system, the longitudinal beam dynamics issues, aspects of rf linearization to produce long flat bunches and methods used for emittance measurements of the beam in the RR barrier rf buckets. Current rf manipulation schemes used for antiproton beam stacking and longitudinal momentum mining of the RR beam for the Tevatron collider operation are explained along with their importance in spectacular success of the Tevatron luminosity performance.

  2. Radiation-Hardening of Best-in-Class SiGe Mixed-Signal and RF Electronics for Ultra-Wide Temperature Range Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Innovative, reliable, low-power, and low-noise electronics that can operate over a wide temperature range and high radiation are critical for future NASA missions....

  3. Status of the ILC Crab Cavity Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burt, G.; Dexter, A.; /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech.; Beard, C.; Goudket, P.; McIntosh, P.; /Daresbury; Bellantoni, L.; /Fermilab; Grimm, T.; Li, Z.; Xiao, L.; /SLAC

    2011-10-20

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) will require two dipole cavities to 'crab' the electron and positron bunches prior to their collision. It is proposed to use two 9 cell SCRF dipole cavities operating at a frequency of 3.9 GHz, with a transverse gradient of 3.8MV/m in order to provide the required transverse kick. Extensive numerical modelling of this cavity and its couplers has been performed. Aluminium prototypes have been manufactured and tested to measure the RF properties of the cavity and couplers. In addition single cell niobium prototypes have been manufactured and tested in a vertical cryostat. The International Collider (ILC) [1] collides bunches of electrons and positrons at a crossing angle of 14 mrad. The angle between these bunches causes a loss in luminosity due to geometric effects [2]. The luminosity lost from this geometric effect can be recovered by rotating the bunches into alignment prior to collision. One possible method of rotating the bunches is to use a crab cavity [3]. A crab cavity is a transverse defecting cavity, where the phase of the cavity is such that the head and tail of the bunch receive equal and opposite kicks. As the bunches are only 500 nm wide in the horizontal plane, the cavity phase must be strictly controlled to avoid the bunch centre being deflected too much. In order to keep the phase stability within the required limits it is required that the cavity be superconducting to avoid thermal effects in both the cavity and its RF source. At the location of the crab cavity in the ILC there is only 23 cm separation between the centre of the cavity and the extraction line, hence the cavity must be small enough to fit in this space. This, along with the difficulty of making high frequency SRF components, set the frequency of the cavity to 3.9 GHz.

  4. Development of new S-band RF window for stable high-power operation in linear accelerator RF system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Youngdo; Lee, Byung-Joon; Kim, Seung-Hwan; Kong, Hyung-Sup; Hwang, Woonha; Roh, Sungjoo; Ryu, Jiwan

    2017-09-01

    For stable high-power operation, a new RF window is developed in the S-band linear accelerator (Linac) RF systems of the Pohang Light Source-II (PLS-II) and the Pohang Accelerator Laboratory X-ray Free-Electron Laser (PAL-XFEL). The new RF window is designed to mitigate the strength of the electric field at the ceramic disk and also at the waveguide-cavity coupling structure of the conventional RF window. By replacing the pill-box type cavity in the conventional RF window with an overmoded cavity, the electric field component perpendicular to the ceramic disk that caused most of the multipacting breakdowns in the ceramic disk was reduced by an order of magnitude. The reduced electric field at the ceramic disk eliminated the Ti-N coating process on the ceramic surface in the fabrication procedure of the new RF window, preventing the incomplete coating from spoiling the RF transmission and lowering the fabrication cost. The overmoded cavity was coupled with input and output waveguides through dual side-wall coupling irises to reduce the electric field strength at the waveguide-cavity coupling structure and the possibility of mode competitions in the overmoded cavity. A prototype of the new RF window was fabricated and fully tested with the Klystron peak input power, pulse duration and pulse repetition rate of 75 MW, 4.5 μs and 10 Hz, respectively, at the high-power test stand. The first mass-produced new RF window installed in the PLS-II Linac is running in normal operation mode. No fault is reported to date. Plans are being made to install the new RF window to all S-band accelerator RF modules of the PLS-II and PAL-XFEL Linacs. This new RF window may be applied to the output windows of S-band power sources like Klystron as wells as the waveguide windows of accelerator facilities which operate in S-band.

  5. Additive manufacturing of RF absorbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Matthew S.

    The ability of additive manufacturing techniques to fabricate integrated electromagnetic absorbers tuned for specific radio frequency bands within structural composites allows for unique combinations of mechanical and electromagnetic properties. These composites and films can be used for RF shielding of sensitive electromagnetic components through in-plane and out-of-plane RF absorption. Structural composites are a common building block of many commercial platforms. These platforms may be placed in situations in which there is a need for embedded RF absorbing properties along with structural properties. Instead of adding radar absorbing treatments to the external surface of existing structures, which adds increased size, weight and cost; it could prove to be advantageous to integrate the microwave absorbing properties directly into the composite during the fabrication process. In this thesis, a method based on additive manufacturing techniques of composites structures with prescribed electromagnetic loss, within the frequency range 1 to 26GHz, is presented. This method utilizes screen printing and nScrypt micro dispensing to pattern a carbon based ink onto low loss substrates. The materials chosen for this study will be presented, and the fabrication technique that these materials went through to create RF absorbing structures will be described. The calibration methods used, the modeling of the RF structures, and the applications in which this technology can be utilized will also be presented.

  6. Superconducting, energy variable heavy ion linac with constant β, multicell cavities of CH-type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Minaev

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available An energy variable ion linac consisting of multigap, constant-β cavities was developed. The effect of phase sliding, unavoidable in any constant-β section, is leading to a coherent rf phase motion, which fits well to the H-type structures with their long π-mode sections and separated lenses. The exact periodicity of the cell lengths within each cavity results in technical advantages, such as higher calculation accuracy when only one single period can be simulated, simpler manufacturing, and tuning. This is most important in the case of superconducting cavities. By using this concept, an improved design for a 217 MHz cw superconducting heavy ion linac with energy variation has been worked out. The small output energy spread of ±3  AkeV is provided over the whole range of energy variation from 3.5 to 7.3 AMeV. These capabilities would allow for a competitive research in the field of radiochemistry and for a production of super heavy elements (SHE, especially. A first 19-cell cavity of that type was designed, built, and rf tested successfully at the Institute for Applied Physics (IAP Frankfurt. A 325.224 MHz, seven-cell cavity with constant β=0.16 is under development and will be operated in a frequency controlled mode. It will be equipped with a power coupler and beam tests with Unilac beams at GSI are foreseen.

  7. SRF and RF systems for LEReC Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belomestnykh, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Ben-Zvi, I. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Brutus, J. C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Fedotov, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); McIntyre, G. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Polizzo, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Smith, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Than, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Tuozzolo, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Veshcherevich, V. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Wu, Q. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Xiao, B. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Xu, W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Zaltsman, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-05-03

    The Low Energy RHIC electron Cooling (LEReC) is under development at BNL to improve RHIC luminosity at low energies. It will consist of a short electron linac and two cooling sections, one for blue and one for yellow rings. For the first stage of the project, LEReC-I, we will install a 704 MHz superconducting RF cavity and three normal conducting cavities operating at 9 MHz, 704 MHz and 2.1 GHz. The SRF cavity will boost the electron beam energy up to 2 MeV. The warm cavities will be used to correct the energy spread introduced in the SRF cavity. The paper describes layouts of the SRF and RF systems, their parameters and status.

  8. Experimental analysis of surface finish in normal conducting cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarrebini-Esfahani, A.; Aslaninejad, M.; Ristic, M.; Long, K.

    2017-10-01

    A normal conducting 805 MHz test cavity with an in built button shaped sample is used to conduct a series of surface treatment experiments. The button enhances the local fields and influences the likelihood of an RF breakdown event. Because of their smaller sizes, compared to the whole cavity surface, they allow practical investigations of the effects of cavity surface preparation in relation to RF breakdown. Manufacturing techniques and steps for preparing the buttons to improve the surface quality are described in detail. It was observed that even after the final stage of the surface treatment, defects on the surface of the cavities still could be found.

  9. Compact Antenna Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Facility consists of a folded compact antenna range including a computer controlled three axis position table, parabolic reflector and RF sources for the measurement...

  10. Superconducting RF Linac Technology for ERL Light Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tennant, Chris

    2005-08-01

    Energy Recovering Linacs (ERLs) offer an attractive alternative as drivers for light sources as they combine the desirable characteristics of both storage rings (high efficiency) and linear accelerators (superior beam quality). Using superconducting RF technology allows ERLs to operate more efficiently because of the inherent characteristics of SRF linacs, namely that they are high gradient-low impedance structures and their ability to operate in the long pulse or CW regime. We present an overview of the physics challenges encountered in the design and operation of ERL based light sources with particular emphasis on those issues related to SRF technology. These challenges include maximizing a cavity's Qo to increase cryogenic efficiency, maintaining control of the cavity field in the presence of the highest feasible loaded Q and providing adequate damping of the higher-order modes (HOMs). If not sufficiently damped, dipole HOMs can drive the multipass beam breakup (BBU) instability which ERLs are particularly susceptible to. Another challenge involves efficiently extracting the potentially large amounts of HOM power that are generated when a bunch traverses the SRF cavities and which may extend over a high range of frequencies. We present experimental data from the Jefferson Lab FEL Upgrade, a 10 mA ERL light source presently in operation, aimed at addressing some of these issues. We conclude with an outlook towards the future of ERL based light sources.

  11. Instrumentation for localized superconducting cavity diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conway, Z. A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Physics Division; Ge, M. [Cornell Lab. for Accelerator-Based Sciences and Education, Ithaca, NY (United States); Iwashita, Y. [Kyoto Univ. (Japan)

    2017-01-12

    Superconducting accelerator cavities are now routinely operated at levels approaching the theoretical limit of niobium. To achieve these operating levels more information than is available from the RF excitation signal is required to characterize and determine fixes for the sources of performance limitations. This information is obtained using diagnostic techniques which complement the analysis of the RF signal. In this paper we describe the operation and select results from three of these diagnostic techniques: the use of large scale thermometer arrays, second sound wave defect location and high precision cavity imaging with the Kyoto camera.

  12. Experimental study of rf pulsed heating

    CERN Document Server

    Laurent, L; Nantista, C; Dolgashev, V; Higashi, Y; Aicheler, M; Tantawi, S; Wuensch, W

    2011-01-01

    Cyclic thermal stresses produced by rf pulsed heating can be the limiting factor on the attainable reliable gradients for room temperature linear accelerators. This is especially true for structures that have complicated features for wakefield damping. These limits could be pushed higher by using special types of copper, copper alloys, or other conducting metals in constructing partial or complete accelerator structures. Here we present an experimental study aimed at determining the potential of these materials for tolerating cyclic thermal fatigue due to rf magnetic fields. A special cavity that has no electric field on the surface was employed in these studies. The cavity shape concentrates the magnetic field on one flat surface where the test material is placed. The materials tested in this study have included oxygen free electronic grade copper, copper zirconium, copper chromium, hot isostatically pressed copper, single crystal copper, electroplated copper, Glidcop (R), copper silver, and silver plated co...

  13. A 0.8-3 GHz RF-VGA with 35 dB dynamic range in 0.13 μm CMOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Qin; Xingli, Huang; Yajie, Qin; Zhiliang, Hong

    2012-01-01

    A wideband variable gain amplifier (VGA) implemented in 0.13 μm CMOS technology is presented. To optimize noise performance, an active feedback amplifier with 15 dB fixed gain is put in the front, followed by modified Cherry—Hooper amplifiers in cascade providing variable gain, which adopt dual loop feedback for bandwidth extension. Negative capacitive neutralization and capacitive source degeneration are employed for Miller effect compensation and DC offset cancellation, respectively. Measurement results show that the proposed VGA achieves a 35 dB gain tuning range with an upper 3-dB bandwidth larger than 3 GHz and the input 1 dB compression point of -29 dBm at the lowest gain state, while the minimum noise figure is 9 dB at the highest gain state. The core VGA (without test buffer) consumes 32 mW from 1.2 V power supply and occupies 0.48 mm2 area.

  14. At the RF Lab, EF Division

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    A four-cell superconducting RF cavity ready for installation in its cryostat, the first one at CERN. From bottom to top, on the right, Herbert Lengeler, Jean-François Malo, Enrico Chiaveri and François Grabowski, Albert Insomby. On the left, ..?, Ernst Ullrich Haebel, ..?, Jean-Marie Maugain, Artur Scharding, Hansuli Preis, R. Romjin. The place is the EF hall next to Bld. 13. (see Annual Report 1980 p. 71)

  15. Development of a low-level RF control system for PET cyclotron CYCIAE-14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pengzhan; Yin, Zhiguo; Ji, Bin; Zhang, Tianjue; Zhao, Zhenlu

    2014-01-01

    The project of a 14 MeV PET cyclotron aiming at medical diagnosis and treatment was proposed and started at CIAE in 2010. The low-level RF system is designed to stabilize acceleration voltage and control the resonance of the cavity. Based on the experience of the existing CRM Cyclotron in CIAE, a new start-up sequence is developed and tested. The frequency sweeping is used to activate the RF system. Before the tuner is put into use, a new state called "DDS tuning" is applied to trace the resonance frequency to the designed value. This new option state helps to cover the tuning range, if a large frequency variation occurs because of a thermal cavity deformation. The logic control unit detects the spark, reflection, Pulse/CW state and the frequency of the RF source to perform all kinds of protection and state operations. The test bench and on-line test are carried out to verify the initial design.

  16. Adaptive RF Transient Reduction for HIGH Intensity Beams with Gaps

    CERN Document Server

    Tückmantel, Joachim

    2006-01-01

    When a high-intensity beam with bunch-trains and gaps passes a cavity with a high-gain vector feedback enforcing a constant voltage, large transients appear, stressing the RF high power hardware and increasing the trip rate. By modulating the cavity voltage with a varying periodic waveform (set-function), the RF power can be made constant while still preserving the high feedback gain. The average cavity voltage is conserved but bunches have to settle at slightly shifted positions. A method is derived to obtain this set-function in practice while making no assumptions or measurements of the beam or RF parameters. Adiabatic iterations are made including the whole machine as an analog computing device, using all parameters as they are. A computer simulation shows the success of the method.

  17. Experimental study of rf pulsed heating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Laurent

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic thermal stresses produced by rf pulsed heating can be the limiting factor on the attainable reliable gradients for room temperature linear accelerators. This is especially true for structures that have complicated features for wakefield damping. These limits could be pushed higher by using special types of copper, copper alloys, or other conducting metals in constructing partial or complete accelerator structures. Here we present an experimental study aimed at determining the potential of these materials for tolerating cyclic thermal fatigue due to rf magnetic fields. A special cavity that has no electric field on the surface was employed in these studies. The cavity shape concentrates the magnetic field on one flat surface where the test material is placed. The materials tested in this study have included oxygen free electronic grade copper, copper zirconium, copper chromium, hot isostatically pressed copper, single crystal copper, electroplated copper, Glidcop®, copper silver, and silver plated copper. The samples were exposed to different machining and heat treatment processes prior to rf processing. Each sample was tested to a peak pulsed heating temperature of approximately 110°C and remained at this temperature for approximately 10×10^{6} rf pulses. In general, the results showed the possibility of pushing the gradient limits due to pulsed heating fatigue by the use of copper zirconium and copper chromium alloys.

  18. Characterization of nonlinear dielectric films for the tuning of microwave cavities for axion searches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salemi, Chiara; Bowring, Daniel; Sonnenschein, Andrew

    2016-09-01

    The axion is a hypothetical particle that can solve the strong CP problem and that may be the primary component of dark matter in the universe. Experiments such as the Axion Dark Matter eXperiment (ADMX) hope to find the axion through its coupling to photons in the presence of a strong magnetic field. This coupling can be detected using a microwave cavity whose fundamental resonance frequency is matched to that of the photons. By tuning the cavity resonance frequency, the corresponding axion mass range can be scanned. For axion searches above 1GHz, future generations of ADMX may use an array of small cavities locked to the same frequency. These cavities will be coarsely tuned using a tuning rod as is done in the current generation of ADMX, but fine tuning of individual resonators will be necessary for multi-cavity arrays. A candidate fine tuning method uses nonlinear dielectric films inside the cavities. DC-biasing the films changes their dielectric constant, affecting the frequencies of the cavity modes. This method makes frequency-matched resonator arrays more practical by saving space and minimizing heat load inside the cryostat. This poster presents RF design and simulation and preliminary measurements on the coplanar waveguide resonators used to test the films.

  19. Magnetoplasmonic RF mixing and nonlinear frequency generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Firby, C. J., E-mail: firby@ualberta.ca; Elezzabi, A. Y. [Ultrafast Optics and Nanophotonics Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1H9 (Canada)

    2016-07-04

    We present the design of a magnetoplasmonic Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) modulator facilitating radio-frequency (RF) mixing and nonlinear frequency generation. This is achieved by forming the MZI arms from long-range dielectric-loaded plasmonic waveguides containing bismuth-substituted yttrium iron garnet (Bi:YIG). The magnetization of the Bi:YIG can be driven in the nonlinear regime by RF magnetic fields produced around adjacent transmission lines. Correspondingly, the nonlinear temporal dynamics of the transverse magnetization component are mapped onto the nonreciprocal phase shift in the MZI arms, and onto the output optical intensity signal. We show that this tunable mechanism can generate harmonics, frequency splitting, and frequency down-conversion with a single RF excitation, as well as RF mixing when driven by two RF signals. This magnetoplasmonic component can reduce the number of electrical sources required to generate distinct optical modulation frequencies and is anticipated to satisfy important applications in integrated optics.

  20. Slot-finger superconducting structure with rf focusing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. Senichev

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available The linear accelerator based on a superconducting structure with a high accelerating gradient accordingly has a strong rf defocusing factor. Usually, a quadrupole or solenoid focusing system is used in such accelerators. Both of these systems complicate the linear accelerator. The quadrupoles are located outside the cavity and a transition between the cold and the warm systems is required. Therefore an additional drift space between cryostats is needed, which can cause parametric resonance in the longitudinal plane in the energy range of (3–20  MeV. In the system with the solenoid the high magnetic field can affect the superconductivity. We consider the novel superconducting H resonator based on the TE211 mode with a slot and rf finger, providing the high-intensity beam focusing in the large range of low energy of (3–50  MeV. Above 50 MeV we suggest using the slot structure with the external quadrupoles.

  1. accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    On the inside of the cavity there is a layer of niobium. Operating at 4.2 degrees above absolute zero, the niobium is superconducting and carries an accelerating field of 6 million volts per metre with negligible losses. Each cavity has a surface of 6 m2. The niobium layer is only 1.2 microns thick, ten times thinner than a hair. Such a large area had never been coated to such a high accuracy. A speck of dust could ruin the performance of the whole cavity so the work had to be done in an extremely clean environment.

  2. Large-scale microwave cavity search for dark-matter axions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asztalos, S.; Daw, E.; Peng, H.; Rosenberg, L. J.; Hagmann, C.; Kinion, D.; Stoeffl, W.; van Bibber, K.; Sikivie, P.; Sullivan, N. S.; Tanner, D. B.; Nezrick, F.; Turner, M. S.; Moltz, D. M.; Powell, J.; André, M.-O.; Clarke, J.; Mück, M.; Bradley, Richard F.

    2001-11-01

    We have built and operated a large-scale axion detector, based on a method originally proposed by Sikivie, to search for halo axions. The apparatus consists of a cylindrical tunable high-Q microwave cavity threaded axially by a static high magnetic field. This field stimulates axions that enter the cavity to convert into single microwave photons. The conversion is resonantly enhanced when the cavity resonant frequency is near the axion rest mass energy. The experiment is cooled to 1.5 K and the electromagnetic power spectrum emitted by the cavity is measured by an ultra-low-noise microwave receiver. The axion would be detected as excess power in a narrow line within the cavity resonance. The apparatus has achieved a power sensitivity better than 10-23 W in the mass range 2.9-3.3 μeV. For the first time the rf cavity technique has explored plausible axion models, assuming axions make up a significant fraction of the local halo density. The experiment continues to operate and will explore a large part of the mass in the range of 1-10 μeV in the near future. An upgrade of the experiment is planned with dc superconducting quantum interference device microwave amplifiers operating at a lower physical temperature. This next generation detector would be sensitive to even more weakly coupled axions contributing only fractionally to the local halo density.

  3. GBO RF Anechoic Chamber & Antenna Test Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — A shielded anechoic chamber measuring 15 by 15 by 37 feet is located in the Jansky Laboratory at Green Bank. This chamber has been outfitted as a far-field antenna...

  4. The properties of on-axis coupled structure RF gun

    CERN Document Server

    Oda, F; Nakayama, A; Koike, H; Tanabe, E

    2000-01-01

    Kawasaki Heavy Industries Ltd. (KHI) has developed the compact IR FEL device, which adopts a combination of a newly designed RF gun with a thermionic cathode and an alpha-magnet as an injector. The accelerating mode of the S-band RF gun is a pi/2 standing wave mode. The coupling cell is located on the beam axis, the so-called on-axis coupled structure (OCS). The cavity shape was designed by using electromagnetic field analytical codes. The OCS RF gun was manufactured and the electromagnetic properties were measured. The results show good agreement with the simulations.

  5. CONCEPTS FOR CAPACITIVELY RF-SHIELDED BELLOWS IN CRYOGENIC STRUCTURES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ZHAO,Y.HAHN,H.

    2004-03-24

    Bellows are frequently required in accelerators and colliders. Usually RF-shields with spring fingers are employed to screen the bellows. The lack of accessibility in cryogenic systems can be a problem and asks for alternate solutions to eliminate possible overheating, sparking, etc that occurred in intensive beams. This note addresses an alternate kind of RF shield, which uses capacitive contact instead of mechanical contact. The analysis, as well as numerical example of a superconducting cavity structure, shows that the capacitive RF shield satisfies the impedance requirements of both beam and HOMs. The capability of thermal isolation is also analyzed.

  6. A Metamaterial-Inspired Approach to RF Energy Harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Clayton; Zhou, Jiangfeng

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate an RF energy harvesting rectenna design based on a metamaterial perfect absorber (MPA). With the embedded Schottky diodes, the rectenna converts captured RF energy to DC currents. The Fabry-Perot cavity resonance of the MPA greatly improves the amount of energy captured and hence improves the rectification efficiency. Furthermore, the FP resonance exhibits a high Q-factor and significantly increases the voltage across the Schottky diodes. This leads to a factor of 16 improvement of RF-DC conversion efficiency at ambient intensity level.

  7. RF Breakdown in Normal Conducting Single-cell Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Dolgashev, Valery A; Higo, Toshiyasu; Nantista, Christopher D; Tantawi, Sami G

    2005-01-01

    Operating accelerating gradient in normal conducting accelerating structures is often limited by rf breakdown. The limit depends on multiple parameters, including input rf power, rf circuit, cavity shape and material. Experimental and theoretical study of the effects of these parameters on the breakdown limit in full scale structures is difficult and costly. We use 11.4 GHz single-cell traveling wave and standing wave accelerating structures for experiments and modeling of rf breakdown behavior. These test structures are designed so that the electromagnetic fields in one cell mimic the fields in prototype multicell structures for the X-band linear collider. Fields elsewhere in the test structures are significantly lower than that of the single cell. The setup uses matched mode converters that launch the circular TM01 mode into short test structures. The test structures are connected to the mode launchers with vacuum rf flanges. This setup allows economic testing of different cell geometries, cell materials an...

  8. 5 MW 805 MHz SNS RF System Experience

    CERN Document Server

    Young, Karen A; Hardek, Thomas; Lynch, Michael; Rees, Daniel; Roybal, William; Tallerico, Paul J; Thomas Bradley, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    The RF system for the 805 MHz normal conducting linac of the Spallation Nuetron Source (SNS) accelerator was designed, procured and tested at Los Alamos National Laboratory(LANL) and then installed and commissioned at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The RF power for this room temperature coupled cavity linac (CCL) of SNS accelerator is generated by four pulsed 5 MW peak power klystrons operating with a pulse width of 1.25 mSec and a 60 Hz repetition frequency. The RF power from each klystron is divided and delivered to the CCL through two separate RF windows. The 5 MW RF system advanced the state of the art for simultaneous peak and average power. This paper summarizes the problems encountered, lessons learned and results of the high power testing at LANL of the 5 MW klystrons, 5 MW circulators, 5 MW loads, and 2.5 MW windows.*

  9. radiofrequency cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1988-01-01

    The pulse of a particle accelerator. 128 of these radio frequency cavities were positioned around CERN's 27-kilometre LEP ring to accelerate electrons and positrons. The acceleration was produced by microwave electric oscillations at 352 MHz. The electrons and positrons were grouped into bunches, like beads on a string, and the copper sphere at the top stored the microwave energy between the passage of individual bunches. This made for valuable energy savings as it reduced the heat generated in the cavity.

  10. Preliminary Beam Tests at REX for an Automatic Cavity Phasing Routine at HIE-ISOLDE

    CERN Document Server

    Fraser, M A; Broere, J; Lanaia, D; Valuch, D

    2013-01-01

    The HIE upgrade at ISOLDE will use 32 independently phased superconducting quarterwave cavities, which will impose new demands on the operation and set-up of the linac. The large range of different radioactive species and the broad experimental programme means that the same beam species and energy are rarely studied twice, and the accelerator must be re-tuned for each experimental run. In order to expedite machine set-up it is foreseen to calculate and set automatically the cavity phases when the operator inputs the desired beam energy and A/q of the beam species. In this note we explore our understanding of the REX rf system and test our beam dynamics calculations with two independently phased 7-gap split-ring cavities.

  11. Flange joint system for SRF cavities utilizing high force spring clamps for low particle generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2017-09-05

    A flange joint system for SRF cavities. The flange joint system includes a set of high force spring clamps that produce high force on the simple flanges of Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) cavities to squeeze conventional metallic seals. The system establishes the required vacuum and RF-tight seal with minimum particle contamination to the inside of the cavity assembly. The spring clamps are designed to stay within their elastic range while being forced open enough to mount over the flange pair. Upon release, the clamps have enough force to plastically deform metallic seal surfaces and continue to a new equilibrium sprung dimension where the flanges remain held against one another with enough preload such that normal handling will not break the seal.

  12. A new technique for RF distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madrak, Robyn; Wildman, David

    2014-07-01

    For independent phase and amplitude control, RF cavities are often driven by one power source per cavity. In many cases it would be advantageous in terms of cost to instead use one higher power source for many cavities. Vector modulators have been developed, which, when used with a single source provide for the independent phase and amplitude control which would have been otherwise lost. The key components of these vector modulators are a novel type of phase shifter — adjustable fast phase shifters with perpendicularly biased garnets. The vector modulators have been constructed and used with a single klystron in a 3.4 MeV test linac to successfully accelerate proton beam.

  13. RF Power Generation in LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Brunner, O C; Valuch, D

    2003-01-01

    The counter-rotating proton beams in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will be captured and then accelerated to their final energies of 2 x 7 TeV by two identical 400 MHz RF systems. The RF power source required for each beam comprises eight 300 kW klystrons. The output power of each klystron is fed via a circulator and a waveguide line to the input coupler of a single-cell super-conducting (SC) cavity. Four klystrons are powered by a 100 kV, 40A AC/DC power converter, previously used for the operation of the LEP klystrons. A five-gap thyratron crowbar protects the four klystrons in each of these units. The technical specification and measured performance of the various high-power elements are discussed. These include the 400MHz/300kW klystrons with emphasis on their group delay and the three-port circulators, which have to cope with peak reflected power levels up to twice the simultaneously applied incident power of 300 kW. In addition, a novel ferrite loaded waveguide absorber, used as termination for port No...

  14. How to get more collisions at the LHC / crab cavities

    CERN Multimedia

    2017-01-01

    (short version) HL-LHC crab cavity engineer Ofelia Capatin, HL-LHC RF system leader Rama Calaga and HL-LHC project leader Lucio Rossiexplain how the introduction of the new Crab Cavities will enable higher luminosities at the HL-LHC.

  15. Automatic Pole and Q-Value Extraction for RF Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Potratz, H.-W. Glock, U. van Rienen, F. Marhauser

    2011-09-01

    The experimental characterization of RF structures like accelerating cavities often demands for measuring resonant frequencies of Eigenmodes and corresponding (loaded) Q-values over a wide spectral range. A common procedure to determine the Q-values is the -3dB method, which works well for isolated poles, but may not be applicable directly in case of multiple poles residing in close proximity (e.g. for adjacent transverse modes differing by polarization). Although alternative methods may be used in such cases, this often comes at the expense of inherent systematic errors. We have developed an automation algorithm, which not only speeds up the measurement time significantly, but is also able to extract Eigenfrequencies and Q-values both for well isolated and overlapping poles. At the same time the measurement accuracy may be improved as a major benefit. To utilize this procedure merely complex scattering parameters have to be recorded for the spectral range of interest. In this paper we present the proposed algorithm applied to experimental data recorded for superconducting higher-order-mode damped multi-cell cavities as an application of high importance.

  16. LLRF Control of High Loaded-Q Cavities for the LCLS-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serrano, Carlos [LBNL, Berkeley; Babel, Sandeep [SLAC; Bachimanchi, Ramakrishna [Jefferson Lab; Boyes, Matt [SLAC; Chase, Brian [Fermilab; Cullerton, Ed [Fermilab; Doolittle, Lawrence [LBNL, Berkeley; Einstein, Joshua [Fermilab; Hong, Bo [SLAC; Hovater, Curt [Jefferson Lab; Huang, Gang [LBNL, Berkeley; Ratti, Alessandro [LBNL, Berkeley

    2016-06-01

    The SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory is planning an upgrade (LCLS-II) to the Linear Coherent Light Source with a 4 GeV CW Superconducting Radio Frequency (SCRF) linac. The nature of the machine places stringent requirements in the Low-Level RF (LLRF) system, expected to control the cavity fields within 0.01 degrees in phase and 0.01% in amplitude, which is equivalent to a longitudinal motion of the cavity structure in the nanometer range. This stability has been achieved in the past but never for hundreds of superconducting cavities in Continuous-Wave (CW) operation. The difficulty resides in providing the ability to reject disturbances from the cryomodule, which is incompletely known as it depends on the cryomodule structure itself (currently under development at JLab and Fermilab) and the harsh accelerator environment. Previous experience in the field and an extrapolation to the cavity design parameters (relatively high Q_{L}c≈ 4×10⁷ , implying a half-bandwidth of around 16 Hz) suggest the use of strong RF feedback to reject the projected noise disturbances, which in turn demands careful engineering of the entire system.

  17. LHC Crab Cavity Coupler Test Boxes

    CERN Document Server

    Mitchell, James; Burt, Graeme; Calaga, Rama; Macpherson, Alick; Montesinos, Eric; Silva, Subashini; Tutte, Adam; Xiao, Binping

    2016-01-01

    The LHC double quarter wave (DQW) crab cavities have two different types of Higher Order Mode (HOM) couplers in addition to a fundamental power coupler (FPC). The FPC requires conditioning, so to achieve this we have designed a radio-frequency (RF) quarter wave resonator to provide high transmission between two opposing FPCs. For the HOM couplers we must ensure that the stop-band filter is positioned at the cavity frequency and that peak transmission occurs at the same frequencies as the strongest HOMs. We have designed two test boxes which preserve the cavity spectral response in order to test the couplers.

  18. Status of a high gradient CH - cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almomani, Ali; Ratzinger, Ulrich [IAP, Frankfurt Universitaet (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    This pulsed linac activity aims on compact designs and on a considerable increase of the voltage gain per meter. A high gradient CH-cavity operated at 325 MHz was developed at IAP-Frankfurt. The mean effective accelerating field for this cavity is expected well above 10 MV/m at β=0.164. This cavity is developed within a funded project. The results might influence the rebuilt of the UNILAC - Alvarez section, aiming to achieve the beam intensities specified for the GSI-FAIR project (15 mA U{sup 28+}). Another motivation is the development of an efficient pulsed ion accelerator for significantly higher energies like 60 AMeV. The new GSI 3 MW Thales klystron test stand will be used for the cavity RF power tests. Detailed studies on two different types of copper plating are performed with this cavity. Additionally, operating of normal conducting cavities at cryogenic temperatures are discussed for the case of very short RF pulses. The first measurement results for this cavity are presented.

  19. RF design of a C-band compact spherical RF pulse compressor for SXFEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zongbin; Fang, Wencheng; Gu, Qiang; Zhao, Zhentang

    2017-08-01

    A new C-band (5712 MHz) compact spherical radio frequency (RF) pulse compressor was designed for the Soft X-ray Free Electron Laser facility (SXFEL) at the Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics (SINAP), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS). Using only one high Q0 spherical RF resonant cavity which works on two TE113 modes and a dual-mode polarized coupler, this pulse compressor could achieve an average power gain of 3.8. Associated with the C-band accelerator, an energy gain of 1.85 with the coupling coefficient of 4.9 could be achieved. Particularly it could make the output power stable. This paper presents the scheme of the C-band spherical pulse compressor, as well as the RF design and details of the frequency sensitivities and machining considerations.

  20. First Test Results of the 4-ROD Crab Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Ambattu, P; Burt, G; Calaga, R; Capatina, O; Calatroni, S; Ciapala, E; Doherty, D; Ferreira, L; Jensen, E; Hall, B; Lingwood, C; Maesen, P; Mongelluzzo, A; Renaglia, T; Therasse, M

    2013-01-01

    The first compact prototype crab cavity with the 4rod geometry has undergone surface treatment and cold testing. Due to the complex geometry and unique fabrication procedure, RF validation of the field at beyond the nominal operating voltage at a sufficiently high Q0 is an important pre-requisite. Preliminary results of the first cold tests are presented along with cavity performance at different stages of the cavity processing is described.

  1. Beam dynamics aspects of crab cavities in the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Y P; Barranco, J; Tomás, R; Weiler, T; Zimmermann, F; Calaga, R; Morita, A

    2009-01-01

    Modern colliders bring into collision a large number of bunches to achieve a high luminosity. The long-range beam-beam effects arising from parasitic encounters at such colliders are mitigated by introducing a crossing angle. Under these conditions, crab cavities (CC) can be used to restore effective head-on collisions and thereby to increase the geometric luminosity. Such crab cavities have been proposed for both linear and circular colliders. The crab cavities are rf cavities operated in a transverse dipole mode, which imparts on the beam particles a transverse kick that varies with the longitudinal position along the bunch. The use of crab cavities in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) may not only raise the luminosity, but it could also complicate the beam dynamics, e.g., crab cavities might not only cancel synchrobetatron resonances excited by the crossing angle but they could also excite new ones, they could reduce the dynamic aperture for off-momentum particles, they could influence the aperture and orbit...

  2. The Path to High Q-Factors in Superconducting Accelerating Cavities: Flux Expulsion and Surface Resistance Optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinello, Martina [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Accelerating cavities are devices resonating in the radio-frequency (RF) range used to accelerate charged particles in accelerators. Superconducting accelerating cavities are made out of niobium and operate at the liquid helium temperature. Even if superconducting, these resonating structures have some RF driven surface resistance that causes power dissipation. In order to decrease as much as possible the power losses, the cavity quality factor must be increased by decreasing the surface resistance. In this dissertation, the RF surface resistance is analyzed for a large variety of cavities made with different state-of-the-art surface treatments, with the goal of finding the surface treatment capable to return the highest Q-factor values in a cryomodule-like environment. This study analyzes not only the superconducting properties described by the BCS surface resistance, which is the contribution that takes into account dissipation due to quasi-particle excitations, but also the increasing of the surface resistance due to trapped flux. When cavities are cooled down below their critical temperature inside a cryomodule, there is always some remnant magnetic field that may be trapped increasing the global RF surface resistance. This thesis also analyzes how the fraction of external magnetic field, which is actually trapped in the cavity during the cooldown, can be minimized. This study is performed on an elliptical single-cell horizontally cooled cavity, resembling the geometry of cavities cooled in accelerator cryomodules. The horizontal cooldown study reveals that, as in case of the vertical cooldown, when the cooling is performed fast, large thermal gradients are created along the cavity helping magnetic flux expulsion. However, for this geometry the complete magnetic flux expulsion from the cavity equator is more difficult to achieve. This becomes even more challenging in presence of orthogonal magnetic field, that is easily trapped on top of the cavity equator

  3. Microfluidic stretchable RF electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shi; Wu, Zhigang

    2010-12-07

    Stretchable electronics is a revolutionary technology that will potentially create a world of radically different electronic devices and systems that open up an entirely new spectrum of possibilities. This article proposes a microfluidic based solution for stretchable radio frequency (RF) electronics, using hybrid integration of active circuits assembled on flex foils and liquid alloy passive structures embedded in elastic substrates, e.g. polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). This concept was employed to implement a 900 MHz stretchable RF radiation sensor, consisting of a large area elastic antenna and a cluster of conventional rigid components for RF power detection. The integrated radiation sensor except the power supply was fully embedded in a thin elastomeric substrate. Good electrical performance of the standalone stretchable antenna as well as the RF power detection sub-module was verified by experiments. The sensor successfully detected the RF radiation over 5 m distance in the system demonstration. Experiments on two-dimensional (2D) stretching up to 15%, folding and twisting of the demonstrated sensor were also carried out. Despite the integrated device was severely deformed, no failure in RF radiation sensing was observed in the tests. This technique illuminates a promising route of realizing stretchable and foldable large area integrated RF electronics that are of great interest to a variety of applications like wearable computing, health monitoring, medical diagnostics, and curvilinear electronics.

  4. Microwave RF antennas and circuits nonlinearity applications in engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Aluf, Ofer

    2017-01-01

    This book describes a new concept for analyzing RF/microwave circuits, which includes RF/microwave antennas. The book is unique in its emphasis on practical and innovative microwave RF engineering applications. The analysis is based on nonlinear dynamics and chaos models and shows comprehensive benefits and results. All conceptual RF microwave circuits and antennas are innovative and can be broadly implemented in engineering applications. Given the dynamics of RF microwave circuits and antennas, they are suitable for use in a broad range of applications. The book presents analytical methods for microwave RF antennas and circuit analysis, concrete examples, and geometric examples. The analysis is developed systematically, starting with basic differential equations and their bifurcations, and subsequently moving on to fixed point analysis, limit cycles and their bifurcations. Engineering applications include microwave RF circuits and antennas in a variety of topological structures, RFID ICs and antennas, micros...

  5. Noise Immune Cavity Enhanced Optical Heterodyne Velocity Modulation Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siller, Brian; Mills, Andrew; Porambo, Michael; McCall, Benjamin

    2011-06-01

    The technique of Cavity Enhanced Velocity Modulation Spectroscopy (CEVMS) has recently been developed. By demodulating the detector signal at twice the plasma modulation frequency (2f), the velocity-modulated ionic absorption signal can be extracted. Although the concentration-modulated excited neutral molecules are also observed at 2f, the ion and neutral signals can be distinguished and separated with phase-sensitive demodulation. The optical cavity provides two major benefits. It increases both the optical path length and the intracavity laser power by a factor of 2×Finesse/π. The multipass advantage allows for much longer path length than was previously possible with unidirectional multipass White cells. The power enhancement combined with perfectly overlapped counterpropagating beams within the cavity allows for sub-Doppler spectroscopy. Although CEVMS showed much potential, its sensitivity was ultimately limited by electronic noise from the plasma interfering with the cavity-locking electronics. We have further improved upon CEVMS by combining it with Noise Immune Cavity Enhanced Optical Heterodyne Molecular Spectroscopy (NICE-OHMS). The laser is frequency modulated at precisely an integer multiple of the free spectral range of the optical cavity; this allows the heterodyne sidebands to be coupled into the optical cavity. Heterodyne detection of the cavity leak-out is immune to noise in the laser-cavity lock, and 2f demodulation further decreases electronic noise in the system and retains ion-neutral discrimination. The additional level of modulation beyond ordinary CEVMS has the added advantage of enabling the observation of both absorption and dispersion signals simultaneously by using two RF mixers, each driving its own lock-in amplifier. In a single scan, four distinct signals can be obtained: absorption and dispersion for ions and excited neutrals. The technique has been demonstrated in the near-IR for N_2^+. B. M. Siller, A. A. Mills and B. J. Mc

  6. Multi-octave tunable RF signal generation based on a dual-polarization fiber grating laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yan-Nan; Jin, Long; Cheng, Linghao; Quan, Zhan; Li, Mengping; Guan, Bai-Ou

    2012-03-26

    A simple technique has been proposed and demonstrated to generate radio-frequency (RF) signal based on a fiber grating laser with multi-octave tunablity. The laser is fabricated by inscribing a wavelength-matched Bragg grating pair in a short section of low-birefringence Er/Yb co-doped fiber. A RF signal can be obtained by beating the two-polarization mode output with its frequency determined by the birefringence within the cavity. By slicing the laser cavity into two sections and then aligning them with a rotated angle, the output beat frequency can be continuously tuned in a multi-octave frequency range as shown in the experiment from 2.05 GHz down to 289 MHz, as a result of the induced change in optical length for each polarization mode. The present technique has the advantages including simple scheme and large tuning range, and the ability of tuning could be further improved by use of active fibers with higher birefringence.

  7. RF Issues and Developments at the LHC Machine

    CERN Document Server

    Butterworth, A; Baudrenghien, P; Molendijk, J

    2007-01-01

    The main RF system of the LHC, which uses 400MHz superconducting cavities, will be used to capture, accelerate and store the injected beam. A separate transverse damper system using electrostatic deflectors will be used to damp transverse oscillations. The associated low-level RF (LLRF) equipment is responsible for fast control of the accelerating voltage and phase in the cavities, the phase and radial position of the beam, and the synchronization of beam transfers between SPS and LHC. The LLRF system combines highfrequency analogue components with digital signal processing using FPGAs and DSPs. The extensive use of digital technology allows not only to achieve the required performance and stability but also to provide full remote control and diagnostics facilities needed in a machine where most of the RF system is inaccessible during operation.

  8. RF-chopper for the JHF proton linac

    CERN Document Server

    Fu Shin Ian

    2000-01-01

    An RF-chopper possesses merits in both its high deflecting field and compactness. For this reason, it is suitable for chopping a high-current beam in a medium-energy beam-transport line (MEBT) of an ion linear accelerator. The JHF linac, as a high-current H sup - accelerator with an average current of up to 0.2 mA or higher in the second phase, took these advantages of the RF-chopper in its design. Two RF-deflecting cavities as the chopper will be used in the MEBT just downward of the 3-MeV 324-MHz RFQ. A 324-MHz RF-chopper cavity has been designed with optimization for a fast rise/fall time, which is an essential requirement for the chopper in a high-current accelerator in order to avoid radioactivity induced by the lost particles due to insufficient chopping during the transient time. The rise time can be less than 8 ns by means of a pair of ports with large coupling loops. In this paper, the details concerning the R and D of the RF-chopper are presented. Some RF properties calculated with MAFIA and HFSS co...

  9. High power RF systems for the BNL ERL project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaltsman, A.; Lambiase, R.

    2011-03-28

    The Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) project, now under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory, requires two high power RF systems. The first RF system is for the 703.75 MHz superconducting electron gun. The RF power from this system is used to drive nearly half an Ampere of beam current to 2 MeV. There is no provision to recover any of this energy so the minimum amplifier power is 1 MW. It consists of 1 MW CW klystron, transmitter and power supplies, 1 MW circulator, 1 MW dummy load and a two-way power splitter. The second RF system is for the 703.75 MHz superconducting cavity. The system accelerates the beam to 54.7 MeV and recovers this energy. It will provide up to 50 kW of CW RF power to the cavity. It consists of 50 kW transmitter, circulator, and dummy load. This paper describes the two high power RF systems and presents the test data for both.

  10. Reconfigurable RF Filters Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Space Micro proposes to build upon our existing space microelectronics and hardening technologies and products, to research and develop a novel rad hard/tolerant RF...

  11. HOM Dampers or not in Superconducting RF Proton Linacs

    CERN Document Server

    Tückmantel, Joachim

    2009-01-01

    Circular machines are plagued by Coupled Bunch Instabilities, driven by impedance peaks, irrespectively of their frequency relation to machine lines; hence all cavity Higher Order Modes are possible drivers. This is the fundamental reason that all superconducting RF cavities in circular machines are equipped with HOM dampers. This raises the question if HOM damping would not be imperative also in high current proton linacs where a mechanism akin to CBI might exist. To clarify this question we have simulated the longitudinal bunched beam dynamics in linacs, allowing bunch-to-bunch variations in time-of-arrival. Simulations were executed for a generic proton linac with properties close to SNS or the planned SPL at CERN. It was found that for monopole HOMs with high Qext large beam scatter or even beam loss cannot be excluded. Therefore omitting HOM dampers on superconducting RF cavities in high current proton linacs, even pulsed ones, is a very risky decision.

  12. HOM Dampers or not in SUPERCONDUCTING RF Proton Linacs

    CERN Document Server

    Tückmantel, Joachim

    2009-01-01

    Circular machines are plagued by Coupled Bunch Instabilities, driven by impedance peaks, irrespectively of their frequency relation to machine lines; hence all cavity Higher Order Modes are possible drivers. This is the fundamental reason that all superconducting RF cavities in circular machines are equipped with HOM dampers. This raises the question if HOM damping would not be imperative also in high current proton linacs where a mechanism akin to CBI might exist. To clarify this question we have simulated the longitudinal bunched beam dynamics in linacs, allowing bunch-to-bunch variations in time-of-arrival. Simulations were executed for a generic proton linac with properties close to SNS or the planned SPL at CERN. It was found that for monopole HOMs with high Qext large beam scatter or even beam loss cannot be excluded. Therefore omitting HOM dampers on superconducting RF cavities in high current proton linacs, even pulsed ones, is a very risky decision.

  13. The RF System for the International Muon Ionisation Cooling Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Ronald, K.; Dick, A.J.; Speirs, D.C.; Moss, A.; Grant, A.; White, C.; Griffiths, S.; Stanley, T.; Li, D.; DeMello, A.J.; Virostek, S.; Moretti, A.; Pasquinelli, R.; Peterson, D.; Schultz, R.; Volk, J.; Popovic, M.; Torun, Y.; Hanlet, P.; Alsari, S.; Long, K.; Pasternak, J.; Hunt, C.; Summers, D.; Luo, T.; Smith, P.J.

    2014-01-01

    The International Muon Ionisation Cooling Experiment (MICE) is designed to demonstrate the effectiveness of ionisation cooling to reduce the phase space footprint of a charged particle beam, principally to allow the subsequent acceleration of muons for next generation colliders and/or neutrino factories. The experiment (and indeed any subsequent accelerator cooling channel based on the same principles) poses certain unusual requirements on its RF system, whilst the precision measurement of the ionisation cooling process demands special diagnostics. This paper shall outline the key features of the RF system, including the low level RF control, the power amplifier chain, distribution network, cavities, tuners and couplers, many parts of which are required to operate in a high magnetic field environment. The RF diagnostics which, in conjunction with the other MICE diagnostics, shall allow detailed knowledge of the amplitude and phase of the acceleration field during the transit of each individual muon will also ...

  14. A NEW THERMIONIC RF ELECTRON GUN FOR SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kutsaev, Sergey; Agustsson, R.; Hartzell, J; Murokh, A.; Nassiri, A.; Savin, E.; Smirnov, A.V.; Smirnov, A. Yu; Sun, Y.; Verma, A; Waldschmidt, Geoff; Zholents, A.

    2017-06-02

    A thermionic RF gun is a compact and efficient source of electrons used in many practical applications. RadiaBeam Systems and the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory collaborate in developing of a reliable and robust thermionic RF gun for synchrotron light sources which would offer substantial improvements over existing thermionic RF guns and allow stable operation with up to 1A of beam peak current at a 100 Hz pulse repetition rate and a 1.5 μs RF pulse length. In this paper, we discuss the electromagnetic and engineering design of the cavity and report the progress towards high power tests of the cathode assembly of the new gun.

  15. Electron dynamics in RF sources with a laser controlled emission

    CERN Document Server

    Khodak, I V; Metrochenko, V V

    2001-01-01

    Photoemission radiofrequency (RF) electron sources are sources of electron beams with extremely high brightness. Beam bunching processes in such devices are well studied in case when laser pulse duration is much lower of rf oscillation period.At the same time photoemission RF guns have some merits when operating in 'long-pulse' mode. In this case the laser pulse duration is much higher of rf oscillation period but much lower of rise time of oscillations in a gun cavity. Beam parameters at the gun output are compared for photoemission and thermoemission cathode applications. The paper presents results of a beam dynamics simulation in such guns with different resonance structures. Questions connected with defining of the current pulse peak value that can be obtained in such guns are discussed.

  16. PEP-II RF feedback system simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tighe, R. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    1996-08-01

    A model containing the fundamental impedance of the PEP-II cavity along with the longitudinal beam dynamics and RF feedback system components is in use. It is prepared in a format allowing time-domain as well as frequency-domain analysis and full graphics capability. Matlab and Simulink are control system design and analysis programs (widely available) with many built-in tools. The model allows the use of compiled C-code modules for compute intensive portions. We desire to represent as nearly as possible the components of the feedback system including all delays, sample rates and applicable nonlinearities. (author)

  17. Performance of a reentrant cavity beam position monitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Simon

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The beam-based alignment and feedback systems, essential operations for the future colliders, require high resolution beam position monitors (BPMs. In the framework of the European CARE/SRF program, a reentrant cavity BPM with its associated electronics was developed by the CEA/DSM/Irfu in collaboration with DESY. The design, the fabrication, and the beam test of this monitor are detailed within this paper. This BPM is designed to be inserted in a cryomodule, work at cryogenic temperature in a clean environment. It has achieved a resolution better than 10  μm and has the possibility to perform bunch to bunch measurements for the x-ray free electron laser (X-FEL and the International Linear Collider (ILC. Its other features are a small size of the rf cavity, a large aperture (78 mm, and an excellent linearity. A first prototype of a reentrant cavity BPM was installed in the free electron laser in Hamburg (FLASH, at Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY and demonstrated its operation at cryogenic temperature inside a cryomodule. The second, installed, also, in the FLASH linac to be tested with beam, measured a resolution of approximately 4  μm over a dynamic range ±5  mm in single bunch.

  18. RF Design for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) Injector

    CERN Document Server

    Dowell, D H; Boyce, Richard F; Hodgson, J A; Li, Zenghai; Limborg-Deprey, C; Xiao, Liling; Yu, Nancy

    2004-01-01

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) will be the world’s first free electron laser, and the successful operation of this very short-wavelength FEL will require excellent beam quality from its electron source. Therefore a critical component is the RF photocathode injector. This paper describes the design issues of the LCLS RF gun and accelerator structures. The injector consists of a 1.6 cell s-band gun followed by two 3-meter SLAC sections. The gun and the first RF section will have dual RF feeds both to eliminate transverse RF kicks and to reduce the pulsed heating of the coupling ports. In addition, the input coupler cavity of the first accelerator section will be specially shaped to greatly reduce the RF quadrupole fields. The design for the accelerator section is now complete, and the RF design of the gun’s dual coupler and the full cell shape is in progress. These and other aspects of the gun and structure designs will be discussed.

  19. Introduction to Superconducting RF Structures and the Effect of High Pressure Rinsing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tajima, Tsuyoshi [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-06-30

    This presentation begins by describing RF superconductivity and SRF accelerating structures. Then the use of superconducting RF structures in a number of accelerators around the world is reviewed; for example, the International Linear Collider (ILC) will use ~16,000 SRF cavities with ~2,000 cryomodules to get 500 GeV e⁺/e⁻ colliding energy. Field emission control was (and still is) a very important practical issue for SRF cavity development. It has been found that high-pressure ultrapure water rinsing as a final cleaning step after chemical surface treatment resulted in consistent performance of single- and multicell superconducting cavities.

  20. A Survey of Coronal Cavity Density Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, J.; Gibson, S. E.

    2009-08-01

    Coronal cavities are common features of the solar corona that appear as darkened regions at the base of coronal helmet streamers in coronagraph images. Their darkened appearance indicates that they are regions of lowered density embedded within the comparatively higher density helmet streamer. Despite interfering projection effects of the surrounding helmet streamer (which we refer to as the cavity rim), Fuller et al. have shown that under certain conditions it is possible to use a Van de Hulst inversion of white-light polarized brightness (pB) data to calculate the electron density of both the cavity and cavity rim plasma. In this article, we apply minor modifications to the methods of Fuller et al. in order to improve the accuracy and versatility of the inversion process, and use the new methods to calculate density profiles for both the cavity and cavity rim in 24 cavity systems. We also examine trends in cavity morphology and how departures from the model geometry affect our density calculations. The density calculations reveal that in all 24 cases the cavity plasma has a flatter density profile than the plasma of the cavity rim, meaning that the cavity has a larger density depletion at low altitudes than it does at high altitudes. We find that the mean cavity density is over four times greater than that of a coronal hole at an altitude of 1.2 R sun and that every cavity in the sample is over twice as dense as a coronal hole at this altitude. Furthermore, we find that different cavity systems near solar maximum span a greater range in density at 1.2 R sun than do cavity systems near solar minimum, with a slight trend toward higher densities for systems nearer to solar maximum. Finally, we found no significant correlation of cavity density properties with cavity height—indeed, cavities show remarkably similar density depletions—except for the two smallest cavities that show significantly greater depletion.

  1. Plasma Treatment of Niobium SRF Cavity Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Upadhyay, M. Raskovic, L. Vuskovic, S. Popovic, A.-M. Valente-Feliciano, L. Phillips

    2010-05-01

    Plasma based surface modification provides an excellent opportunity to eliminate non- superconductive pollutants in the penetration depth region of the SRF cavity surface and to remove mechanically damaged surface layer improving surface roughness. We have demonstrated on flat samples that plasma etching in Ar / Cl2 of bulk Nb is a viable alternative surface preparation technique to BCP and EP methods, with comparable etching rates. The geometry of SRF cavities made of bulk Nb defines the use of asymmetric RF discharge configuration for plasma etching. In a specially designed single cell cavity with sample holders, discharge parameters are combined with etched surface diagnostics to obtain optimum combination of etching rates, roughness and homogeneity in a variety of discharge types, conditions, and sequences. The optimized experimental conditions will ultimately be applied to single cell SRF cavities.

  2. Muon spin rotation studies of niobium for superconducting rf applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassellino, A.; Beard, C.; Kolb, P.; Laxdal, R.; Lockyer, N. S.; Longuevergne, D.; Sonier, J. E.

    2013-06-01

    In this work we investigate superconducting properties of niobium samples via application of the muon spin rotation/relaxation (μSR) technique. We employ for the first time the μSR technique to study samples that are cut out from large and small grain 1.5 GHz radio frequency (rf) single cell niobium cavities. The rf test of these cavities was accompanied by full temperature mapping to characterize the rf losses in each of the samples. Results of the μSR measurements show that standard cavity surface treatments like mild baking and buffered chemical polishing performed on the studied samples affect their surface pinning strength. We find an interesting correlation between high field rf losses and field dependence of the sample magnetic volume fraction measured via μSR. The μSR line width observed in zero-field-μSR measurements matches the behavior of Nb samples doped with minute amounts of Ta or N impurities. A lower and an upper bound for the upper critical field Hc2 of these cutouts is found.

  3. Dark current, breakdown, and magnetic field effects in a multicell, 805 MHz cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Norem

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available We present measurements of dark currents and x rays in a six cell 805 MHz cavity, taken as part of an rf development program for muon cooling, which requires high power, high stored energy, low frequency cavities operating in a strong magnetic field. We have done the first systematic study of the behavior of high power rf in a strong (2.5–4 T magnetic field. Our measurements extend over a very large dynamic range in current and provide good fits to the Fowler-Nordheim field emission model assuming mechanical structures produce field enhancements at the surface. The locally enhanced field intensities we derive at the tips of these emitters are very large, (∼10  GV/m, and should produce tensile stresses comparable to the tensile strength of the copper cavity walls and should be capable of causing breakdown events. We also compare our data with estimates of tensile stresses from a variety of accelerating structures. Preliminary studies of the internal surface of the cavity and window are presented, which show splashes of copper with many sharp cone shaped protrusions and wires which can explain the experimentally measured field enhancements. We discuss a “cold copper” breakdown mechanism and briefly review alternatives. We also discuss a number of effects due to the 2.5 T solenoidal fields on the cavity such as altered field emission due to mechanical deformation of emitters, and dark current ring beams, which are produced from the irises by E×B drifts during the nonrelativistic part of the acceleration process.

  4. Compact rf polarizer and its application to pulse compression systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Franzi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel method of reducing the footprint and increasing the efficiency of the modern multi-MW rf pulse compressor. This system utilizes a high power rf polarizer to couple two circular waveguide modes in quadrature to a single resonant cavity in order to replicate the response of a traditional two cavity configuration using a 4-port hybrid. The 11.424 GHz, high-Q, spherical cavity has a 5.875 cm radius and is fed by the circularly polarized signal to simultaneously excite the degenerate TE_{114} modes. The overcoupled spherical cavity has a Q_{0} of 9.4×10^{4} and coupling factor (β of 7.69 thus providing a loaded quality factor Q_{L} of 1.06×10^{4} with a fill time of 150 ns. Cold tests of the polarizer demonstrated good agreement with the numerical design, showing transmission of -0.05  dB and reflection back to the input rectangular WR 90 waveguide less than -40  dB over a 100 MHz bandwidth. This novel rf pulse compressor was tested at SLAC using XL-4 Klystron that provided rf power up to 32 MW and generated peak output power of 205 MW and an average of 135 MW over the discharged signal. A general network analysis of the polarizer is discussed as well as the design and high power test of the rf pulse compressor.

  5. Beam Pipe HOM Absorber for 750 MHz RF Cavity Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Rolland; Neubauer, Michael

    2014-10-29

    This joint project of Muons, Inc., Cornell University and SLAC was supported by a Phase I and Phase II grant monitored by the SBIR Office of Science of the DOE. Beam line HOM absorbers are a critical part of future linear colliders. The use of lossy materials at cryogenic temperatures has been incorporated in several systems. The design in beam pipes requires cylinders of lossy material mechanically confined in such a way as to absorb the microwave energy from the higher-order modes and remove the heat generated in the lossy material. Furthermore, the potential for charge build-up on the surface of the lossy material requires the conductivity of the material to remain consistent from room temperature to cryogenic temperatures. In this program a mechanical design was developed that solved several design constraints: a) fitting into the existing Cornell load vacuum component, b) allowing the use of different material compositions, c) a thermal design that relied upon the compression of the lossy ceramic material without adding stress. Coating experiments were performed that indicated the design constraints needed to fully implement this approach for solving the charge build-up problem inherent in using lossy ceramics. In addition, the ACE3P program, used to calculate the performance of lossy cylinders in beam pipes in general, was supported by this project. Code development and documentation to allow for the more wide spread use of the program was a direct result of this project was well.

  6. Remote RF Battery Charging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, H.J.; Pop, V.; Op het Veld, J.H.G.; Vullers, R.J.M.

    2011-01-01

    The design of a remote RF battery charger is discussed through the analysis and design of the subsystems of a rectenna (rectifying antenna): antenna, rectifying circuit and loaded DC-to-DC voltage (buck-boost) converter. Optimum system power generation performance is obtained by adopting a system

  7. AC/RF Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Ciovati, G.

    2014-07-17

    This contribution provides a brief introduction to AC/RF superconductivity, with an emphasis on application to accelerators. The topics covered include the surface impedance of normal conductors and superconductors, the residual resistance, the field dependence of the surface resistance, and the superheating field.

  8. AC/RF Superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi [JLAB

    2015-02-01

    This contribution provides a brief introduction to AC/RF superconductivity, with an emphasis on application to accelerators. The topics covered include the surface impedance of normal conductors and superconductors, the residual resistance, the field dependence of the surface resistance, and the superheating field.

  9. Prototyping of a multicell superconducting cavity for acceleration of medium-velocity beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. C. Compton

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Three 6-cell 805 MHz superconducting cavity prototypes for acceleration in the velocity range of about 0.4 to 0.53 times the speed of light have been fabricated and tested. The quality factors (Q_{0} were between 7×10^{9} and 1.4×10^{10} at the design field (accelerating gradient of 8–10  MV/m. The maximum gradients reached were between 11 and 16  MV/m; in each case, the Q_{0} values were ≥3×10^{9} at the maximum gradient. The design, fabrication, surface preparation, and rf testing of the 6-cell cavities are reported in this paper.

  10. Time-shaped RF brazing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, J. A.; Vannasse, M. A.

    1980-01-01

    One RF generator is controlled from two independent work stations with aid of RF switch and simple control boxes. Brazing may be stopped manually or automatically by external brazing-temperature controller or timer in RF switch housing. Switch is air-operated with water-cooled contacts. If switch loses air pressure, generator stops transmitting power. Time-shared outlet increases utilization and productivity of costly RF generator.

  11. Fundamental Frequency Tuning and Its Influence on LHC 200MHz ACN Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Linnecar, Trevor Paul R; Tückmantel, Joachim; CERN. Geneva. SPS and LHC Division

    2001-01-01

    To study the influence of the tuner on the fundamental mode frequency, the Q factor as well as the shunt impedance of the LHC 200MHz ACN cavities, 3D simulations have been done in the frequency domain using MAFIA. Curves giving the variation of RF frequency and other RF parameters with tuner position relative to the inner surface of the cavity have been obtained for the fundamental mode. This paper details the simulation results.

  12. RF MEMS theory, design, and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Rebeiz, Gabriel M

    2003-01-01

    Ultrasmall Radio Frequency and Micro-wave Microelectromechanical systems (RF MEMs), such as switches, varactors, and phase shifters, exhibit nearly zero power consumption or loss. For this reason, they are being developed intensively by corporations worldwide for use in telecommunications equipment. This book acquaints readers with the basics of RF MEMs and describes how to design practical circuits and devices with them. The author, an acknowledged expert in the field, presents a range of real-world applications and shares many valuable tricks of the trade.

  13. Fundamentals of RF and microwave transistor amplifiers

    CERN Document Server

    Bahl, Inder J

    2009-01-01

    A Comprehensive and Up-to-Date Treatment of RF and Microwave Transistor Amplifiers This book provides state-of-the-art coverage of RF and microwave transistor amplifiers, including low-noise, narrowband, broadband, linear, high-power, high-efficiency, and high-voltage. Topics covered include modeling, analysis, design, packaging, and thermal and fabrication considerations. Through a unique integration of theory and practice, readers will learn to solve amplifier-related design problems ranging from matching networks to biasing and stability. More than 240 problems are included to help read

  14. Effects of Electric and Magnetic Fields on the Performance of a Superconducting Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gianluigi Ciovati; Peter Kneisel; Jacek Sekutowicz; Waldemar Singer

    2005-05-01

    A special two-cell cavity was designed to obtain surface field distributions suitable for investigation of electric and magnetic field effects on cavity performance. The cavity design and preliminary results were presented in a previous contribution. The bulk niobium cavity was heat-treated in a vacuum furnace at 1250 C to improve thermal conductivity. Three seamless hydroformed Nb/Cu cavities of the same design were fabricated to investigate the role of the electron beam welds located in high field areas. This paper will present RF test results at 2 K for the bulk niobium and one of the seamless cavities.

  15. A new awakening for accelerator cavities

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Imagine: an accelerator unbound by length; one that can bring a beam up to the TeV level in just a few hundred metres. Sounds like a dream? Perhaps not for long. At CERN’s Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment (AWAKE), physicists may soon be working to bring this contemporary fairy-tale to life.   The AWAKE experiment in the CNGS facility. Wherever you find a modern linear particle accelerator, you’ll find with it a lengthy series of RF accelerating cavities. Although based on technology first developed over half a century ago, RF cavities have dominated the accelerating world since their inception. However, new developments in plasma accelerator systems may soon be bringing a new player into the game. By harnessing the power of wakefields generated by beams in plasma cells, physicists may be able to produce accelerator gradients of many GV/m –  hundreds of times higher than those achieved in current RF cavities. “Plasma wakef...

  16. RF Design Optimization for New Injector Cryounit at CEBAF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Haipeng; Cheng, Guangfeng; Hannon, Fay E.; Hofler, Alicia S.; Kazimi, Reza; Preble, Joe; Rimmer, Robert A.

    2013-06-01

    A new injector superconducting RF (SRF) cryounit with one new 2-cell, B=0.6 cavity plus one refurbished 7-cell, B=0.97, C100 style cavity has been re-designed and optimized for the engineering compatibility of existing module for CEBAF operation. The optimization of 2-cell cavity shape for longitudinal beam dynamic of acceleration from 200keV to 533keV and the minimization of transverse kick due to the waveguide couplers to less than 1 mrad have been considered. Operating at 1497MHz, two cavities has been designed into a same footprint of CEBAF original quarter cryomodule to deliver an injection beam energy of 5MeV in less than 0.27{degree} rms bunch length and a maximum energy spread of 5keV.

  17. Systematic characterization of a 1550 nm microelectromechanical (MEMS)-tunable vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) with 7.92 THz tuning range for terahertz photomixing systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haidar, M. T.; Preu, S.; Cesar, J.; Paul, S.; Hajo, A. S.; Neumeyr, C.; Maune, H.; Küppers, F.

    2018-01-01

    Continuous-wave (CW) terahertz (THz) photomixing requires compact, widely tunable, mode-hop-free driving lasers. We present a single-mode microelectromechanical system (MEMS)-tunable vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) featuring an electrothermal tuning range of 64 nm (7.92 THz) that exceeds the tuning range of commercially available distributed-feedback laser (DFB) diodes (˜4.8 nm) by a factor of about 13. We first review the underlying theory and perform a systematic characterization of the MEMS-VCSEL, with particular focus on the parameters relevant for THz photomixing. These parameters include mode-hop-free CW tuning with a side-mode-suppression-ratio >50 dB, a linewidth as narrow as 46.1 MHz, and wavelength and polarization stability. We conclude with a demonstration of a CW THz photomixing setup by subjecting the MEMS-VCSEL to optical beating with a DFB diode driving commercial photomixers. The achievable THz bandwidth is limited only by the employed photomixers. Once improved photomixers become available, electrothermally actuated MEMS-VCSELs should allow for a tuning range covering almost the whole THz domain with a single system.

  18. Low power RF beam control electronics for the LEB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mestha, L.K.; Mangino, J.; Brouk, V.; Uher, T.; Webber, R.C.

    1993-05-01

    Beam Control Electronics for the Low Energy Booster (LEB) should provide a fine reference phase and frequency for the High Power RF System. Corrections applied on the frequency of the rf signal will reduce dipole synchrotron oscillations due to power supply regulation errors, errors in frequency source or errors in the cavity voltage. It will allow programmed beam radial position control throughout the LEB acceleration cycle. Furthermore the rf signal provides necessary connections during, adiabatic capture of the beam as injected into the LEB by the Linac and will guarantee LEB rf phase synchronism with the Medium Energy Booster (MEB) rf at a programmed time in the LEB cycle between a unique LEB bucket and a unique MEB bucket. We show in this paper a design and possible interfaces with other subsystems of the LEB such as the beam instrumentation, High Power RF Stations, global accelerator controls and the precision timing system. The outline of various components of the beam control system is also presented followed by some test results.

  19. A Practical Design of Lumped, Semi-lumped & Microwave Cavity Filters

    CERN Document Server

    Natarajan, Dhanasekharan

    2013-01-01

    This book presents the application of microwave literature for designing lumped/semi-lumped filters and combline/iris-coupled microwave cavity filters. It provides the physical understanding of the terms and characteristics of radio frequency (RF) filters. The book complements engineering text books on RF components and provides support for the project assignments of students. In addition to the functional design of RF filters, the integrated design approach for produceability and reliability is explained.

  20. Short Wave upwelling Radiative Flux (SWupRF) within NIR range for the selected greenhouse wavelength bands of O2, H2O, CO2 and CH4 by Argus 1000 along with GENSPECT line by line radiative transfer model

    CERN Document Server

    Siddiqui, Rehan; Salem, Naif Al; Quine, Brendan M

    2016-01-01

    This new study develops an algorithm for Short Wave upwelling Radiative Flux (SWupRF) for the spectral variations within near infrared (NIR) from 1100 to 1700 nm wavelength band based on remote sensing data set of Argus 1000 micro-spectrometer observations. We calculate the SWupRF by investigating the total radiative flux due to O2, H2O, CO2 and CH4 and also by the individual gas within the selected wavelength bands of interest. A GENSPECT synthetic line by line radiative transfer model is applied to perform radiative transfer simulations to calculate the radiative flux by varying surface albedo, mixing ratios of the selected greenhouse gases, surface temperature, solar sun and zenith angles with different latitude and longitude of the instrument. Finally, the SWupRFsyn estimated from GENSPECT was compared with SWupRFobs from Argus 1000 over a period of four years (2009 and 2013) covering all seasons. We calculate and compare both the synthetic and real measured observed data set. The synthetic model gives SW...

  1. Design study of a low-emittance high-repetition rate thermionic rf gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opanasenko, A.; Mytrochenko, V.; Zhaunerchyk, V.; Goryashko, V. A.

    2017-05-01

    We propose a novel gridless continuous-wave radiofrequency (rf) thermionic gun capable of generating nC ns electron bunches with a rms normalized slice emittance close to the thermal level of 0.3 mm mrad. In order to gate the electron emission, an externally heated thermionic cathode is installed into a stripline-loop conductor. Two high-voltage pulses propagating towards each other in the stripline-loop overlap in the cathode region and create a quasielectrostatic field gating the electron emission. The repetition rate of pulses is variable and can reach up to one MHz with modern solid-state pulsers. The stripline attached to a rf gun cavity wall has with the wall a common aperture that allows the electrons to be injected into the rf cavity for further acceleration. Thanks to this innovative gridless design, simulations suggest that the bunch emittance is approximately at the thermal level after the bunch injection into the cavity provided that the geometry of the cathode and aperture are properly designed. Specifically, a concave cathode is adopted to imprint an Ƨ-shaped distribution onto the beam transverse phase-space to compensate for an S-shaped beam distribution created by the spherical aberration of the aperture-cavity region. In order to compensate for the energy spread caused by rf fields of the rf gun cavity, a 3rd harmonic cavity is used. A detailed study of the electrodynamics of the stripline and rf gun cavity as well as the beam optics and bunch dynamics are presented.

  2. Resonant-frequency discharge in a multi-cell radio frequency cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popović, S.; Upadhyay, J.; Mammosser, J.; Nikolić, M.; Vušković, L.

    2014-11-01

    We are reporting experimental results on a microwave discharge operating at resonant frequency in a multi-cell radio frequency (RF) accelerator cavity. Although the discharge operated at room temperature, the setup was constructed so that it could be used for plasma generation and processing in fully assembled active superconducting radio-frequency cryo-module. This discharge offers a mechanism for removal of a variety of contaminants, organic or oxide layers, and residual particulates from the interior surface of RF cavities through the interaction of plasma-generated radicals with the cavity walls. We describe resonant RF breakdown conditions and address the issues related to resonant detuning due to sustained multi-cell cavity plasma. We have determined breakdown conditions in the cavity, which was acting as a plasma vessel with distorted cylindrical geometry. We discuss the spectroscopic data taken during plasma removal of contaminants and use them to evaluate plasma parameters, characterize the process, and estimate the volatile contaminant product removal.

  3. The Effect of 2-Directional Magnetic Biasing Used for Tuning of a Ferrite-Loaded Re-entrant Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Vollinger, C; Jensen, E

    2013-01-01

    Cavities that are partially filled with ferrite material provide a tunable resonance frequency by making use of the changing μ-characteristics of ferrites when exposed to an external magnetic bias field. The concept of using either parallel or perpendicular magnetic biasing to reach a certain resonance frequency of a cavity has been known for many years. However, a cavity based on superposition of perpendicular and parallel magnetic fields to obtain improved ferrite characteristics was suggested in [1], but to our knowledge was neither tested nor built. Such a 2-directional biasing is expected to provide a reduction in RF losses for an identical tuning range as compared with the classical 1-directional magnetic bias. We have successfully tested this theory with a measurement set-up consisting of a ferrite-filled cavity, exposed to external biases that allow the clear separation of the two orientations of superposed magnetic bias fields. The outcome is an enlargement of tuning range with high cavity Q and the...

  4. Characterization of the SPS 800MHz travelling wave cavities.

    CERN Document Server

    Bazyl, Dmitry

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that HOMs in RF cavities are a potentially dangerous source of beam impedance. Therefore, HOMs (both longitudinal and transverse) can drive the beam unstable . The 800MHz cavities of the SPS were studied in the past. However, very little documentation was left behind. Currently, the performance of the SPS is limited by a longitudinal beam instability. In order to study this instability, an accurate impedance model of the whole SPS is needed.

  5. Investigation of MIM Diodes for RF Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Adnan

    2015-05-01

    -crystalline structures and have orders of magnitude lower conductivities. Relatively lower resistances of the order of 1 k ohm with a sensitivity of 1.5 V-1 have been obtained through DC testing of these devices. Finally, RF characterization reveals that input impedances in the range of 300 Ω to 25 Ω can be achieved in the low GHz frequencies (from 1-10 GHz). From the rectification measurements at zero bias, a DC voltage of 4.7 mV has been obtained from an incoming RF signal of 0.4 W at 2.45 GHz, which indicates the suitability of these diodes for RF rectenna devices without providing any bias. It is believed that with further optimization, these devices can play an important role in RF energy harvesting without the need to bias them.

  6. Design of a higher harmonic RF system for the Advanced Light Source

    CERN Document Server

    Byrd, J M; De Santis, S; Kosta, S; Lo, C C; Plate, D; Rimmer, R A; Franks, M

    2000-01-01

    We report on the design and fabrication of a third harmonic radiofrequency (RF) system for the Advanced Light Source (ALS) to be used for lengthening the bunch and increasing the Touschek-dominated beam lifetime. We plan to install five single-cell 1.5 GHz copper RF cavities in one-half of an ALS straight section with a predicted increase in the lifetime by a factor of 3. Each RF cell is designed to sustain a maximum voltage of 125 kV with a power dissipation of 5 kW. We present measurements made on an aluminum cavity model characterizing the RF properties of cavity such as the cavity R/Q and higher-order modes (HOMs). In particular, resonances in the cavity tuners were studied in order to avoid heating of the tuner bellows. Initial measurements of the copper cavities indicate a Q value of 21 000, resulting in a shunt impedance of 1.69 M OMEGA per cell

  7. The VITROVAC Cavity for the TERA/PIMMS Medical Synchrotron

    CERN Document Server

    Crescenti, M; Primadei, G; Etzkorn, F J; Schnase, A; Fougeron, C

    2000-01-01

    A proton and light-ion medical synchrotron is characterised by a large frequency swing for the RF between the injection and the top energy. For this purpose, a VITROVAC®-loaded RF cavity has been developed for the Proton-Ion Medical Machine Study (PIMMS) at CERN, and for TERA, the Italian project of a proton and light-ion synchrotron for cancer therapy, based on the PIMMS study. The main features are a large frequency swing, particularly extended to the low frequency range, a very large relative permeability and a low Q factor. The total power needed is less than 100 kW, while a very small bias power is required for the frequency tuning. The main mechanical characteristics are compactness (less than 1.5 m), and simplicity of construction. As a result, the requirements of the medical synchrotron are comfortably satisfied, namely: 0.4 to 3 MHz swing, 3 kV peak voltage at a repetition rate of less than 1 s.

  8. The first operation of 56 MHz SRF cavity in RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Q. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Belomestnykh, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ben-Zvi, I. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Blaskiewicz, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); DeSanto, L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Goldberg, D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Harvey, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hayes, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); McIntyre, G. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Mernick, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Orfin, P. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Seberg, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Severino, F. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Smith, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Than, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Zaltsman, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-05-03

    A 56 MHz superconducting RF cavity has been designed, fabricated and installed in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The cavity operates at 4.4 K with a “quiet helium source” to isolate the cavity from environmental acoustic noise. The cavity is a beam driven quarter wave resonator. It is detuned and damped during injection and acceleration cycles and is brought to operation only at store energy. For a first test operation, the cavity voltage was stabilized at 300 kV with full beam current. Within both Au + Au and asymmetrical Au + He3 collisions, luminosity improvement was detected from direct measurement, and the hourglass effect was reduced. One higher order mode (HOM) coupler was installed on the cavity. We report in this paper on our measurement of a broadband HOM spectrum excited by the Au beam.

  9. Photocathode RF gun using cartridge-type electric tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasabe, Jun E-mail: sasabe@crl.hpk.co.jp; Hanaki, Hirofumi; Asaka, Takao; Dewa, Hideki; Kobayashi, Toshiaki; Mizuno, Akihiko; Suzuki, Shinsuke; Taniuchi, Tsutomu; Tomizawa, Hiromitsu; Yanagida, Kenichi; Uesaka, Mitsuru

    2004-08-01

    This report describes an S-band photoinjector with replaceable Cs{sub 2}Te photocathodes. The photoinjector is equipped with a cathode-module, which is composed of four cartridge-type electric tubes with Cs{sub 2}Te photocathodes. The photocathodes can be inserted into a single cell pillbox-type RF cavity. The maximum electric field strength on the photocathode surface, 90 MV/m, has been achieved for the pillbox-type cavity in only 2 h of RF processing following the exchange of the photocathode. The temporal behavior of the photocathode's quantum efficiency was measured following application of the electric field strength of 90 MV/m. The initial quantum efficiency of 3% was halved to 1.5% in 5 h and finally settled to 1% after 15 h. Analysis of the surface suggested the possibility of oxidization on the cathode surface rather than damage by vacuum discharges.

  10. Microwave and RF engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Sorrentino, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    An essential text for both students and professionals, combining detailed theory with clear practical guidance This outstanding book explores a large spectrum of topics within microwave and radio frequency (RF) engineering, encompassing electromagnetic theory, microwave circuits and components. It provides thorough descriptions of the most common microwave test instruments and advises on semiconductor device modelling. With examples taken from the authors' own experience, this book also covers:network and signal theory;electronic technology with guided electromagnetic pr

  11. The Model and Simulations of the LHC 400 MHz Cavity Controller

    CERN Document Server

    Holma, J

    2007-01-01

    The LHC RF consists of eight superconducting single-cell 400.8 MHz cavities per beam, with each cavity driven by a 300 kW klystron via a circulator and waveguide. As the LHC is a high current collider (nominal 0.6 A DC), the challenge is to keep the effective impedance of the cavity at a minimum and to reduce all sources of RF noise that may degrade the beam lifetime (target value in excess of ten hours). In order to achieve this each klystron-cavity chain has a Cavity Controller implementing three Low Level loops: RF feedback, Tuner loop and Klystron loop. This note presents simulation models for the non-linear klystron, the cavity, the RF feedback, the tuner loop and the klystron loop. A model for the tuner mechanics based on measured step responses is also derived. The gains and time constants are optimized for the various loops. For the RF feedback and the tuner loop, the simulations are in excellent agreement with measurements done on a full-size test set-up including klystron and cavity. For the klystro...

  12. RF Phase Modulation at the LNLS Electron Storage Ring

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, Natalia P; Tavares, Pedro

    2005-01-01

    In the Brazilian Electron Storage Ring, we observed that modulating the phase of accelerating fields at twice the synchrotron frequency suppressed remarkably well a longitudinal coupled-bunch mode of the beam driven by one of the RF cavities. We present results of a set of systematic measurements, in single and multi-bunch mode, aimed at characterizing the effects of the modulation on the beam. We also compare those experiments with the results of tracking simulations.

  13. Control of the Low Level RF System for J-Parc Linac

    CERN Document Server

    Michizono, S; Kadokura, E; Yamaguchi, S

    2004-01-01

    A low level RF (LLRF) system for J-Parc linac generates RF and clock signals, drives a klystron, and stabilizes accelerating fields in the cavities. The LLRF system is controlled by two units: a programmable logic controller (PLC) and a compact PCI (cPCI) controller. Functions of the PLC are ON/OFF and UP/DOWN controls, and STATUS and ANALOG monitors. The PLC is locally operated by a touch panel, and remotely operated by an EPICS IOC with Ethernet communication. The cPCI controller is for RF feedback and feed-forward controls, including a cavity tuner control, and then, locally and remotely operated by communication with the PLC. On the other hand, RF waveform data, which are stored in the memory of DSP and CPU boards in the cPCI, are directory transmitted to an EPICS OPI by a request from EPICS.

  14. Medium Power 352 MHZ solid state pulsed RF amplifiers for the CERN LINAC4 Project

    CERN Document Server

    Broere, J; Gómez Martínez, Y; Rossi, M

    2011-01-01

    Economic, modular and highly linear pulsed RF amplifiers have recently been developed to be used for the three buncher cavities in the CERN Linac4. The amplifiers are water-cooled and can provide up to 33 kW pulsed RF Power, 1.5 ms pulse length and 50 Hz repetition rate. Furthermore a 60 kW unit is under construction to provide the required RF Power for the debuncher cavity. The concept is based on 1.2 kW RF power modules using the latest 6th generation LDMOS technology. For integration into the CERN control environment the amplifiers have an internal industrial controller, which will provide easy control and extended diagnostic functions. This paper describes the construction, performance, including linearity, phase stability and EMC compliance tests

  15. RF gauging efforts with liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen as applicable to subcritical space vehicle systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, H. E.; Ott, W.; Stanley, N.

    1974-01-01

    The RF gauging concept is based on the interaction between a fluid dielectric medium in an enclosed metallic cavity and electromagnetic fields set up within that cavity. In RF gauging systems, the fundamental measurement relies on the interpretation of changes in the resonant RF frequencies of an enclosed tank as the mass of the propellant contained in the tank is changed. In addition to a discussion of the basic principles of operation of these systems, the study presents a description of the current breadboard implementation with typical test arrangements, along with supporting test data. The experimental testing of the RF gauging technique for liquid cryogen mass gauging indicates that this technique is a feasible approach to liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen gauging under all attitude or reduced gravity environments.

  16. Enhanced Method for Cavity Impedance Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank Marhauser, Robert Rimmer, Kai Tian, Haipeng Wang

    2009-05-01

    With the proposal of medium to high average current accelerator facilities the demand for cavities with extremely low Higher Order Mode (HOM) impedances is increasing. Modern numerical tools are still under development to more thoroughly predict impedances that need to take into account complex absorbing boundaries and lossy materials. With the usually large problem size it is preferable to utilize massive parallel computing when applicable and available. Apart from such computational issues, we have developed methods using available computer resources to enhance the information that can be extracted from a cavities? wakefield computed in time domain. In particular this is helpful for a careful assessment of the extracted RF power and the mitigation of potential beam break-up or emittance diluting effects, a figure of merit for the cavity performance. The method is described as well as an example of its implementation.

  17. A 700 MHZ, 1 MW CW RF System for a FEL 100mA RF Photoinjector

    CERN Document Server

    Roybal, William; Reass, William; Rees, Daniel; Tallerico, Paul J; Torrez, Phillip A

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a 700 MHz, 1 Megawatt CW, high efficiency klystron RF system utilized for a Free Electron Laser (FEL) high-brightness electron photoinjector (PI). The E2V klystron is mod-anode tube that operates with a beam voltage of 95 kV. This tube, operating with a 65% efficiency, requires ~96 watts of input power to produce in excess of 1 MW of output power. This output drives the 3rd cell of a 2½-cell, p-mode PI cavity through a pair of planar waveguide windows. Coupling is via a ridge-loaded tapered waveguide section and "dog-bone" iris. This paper will present the design of the RF, RF transport, coupling, and monitoring/protection systems that are required to support CW operations of the 100 mA cesiated, semi-porous SiC photoinjector.

  18. Preparations for Upgrading the RF Systems of the PS Booster

    CERN Document Server

    Albright, Simon; Shaposhnikova, Elena

    2016-01-01

    The accelerators of the LHC injector chain need to be upgraded to provide the HL-LHC beams. The PS Booster, the first synchrotron in the LHC injection chain, uses three different RF systems (first, second and up to tenth harmonic) in each of its four rings. As part of the LHC Injector Upgrade the current ferrite RF systems will be replaced with broadband Finemet cavities, increasing the flexibility of the RF system. A Finemet test cavity has been installed in Ring 4 to investigate its effect on machine performance, especially beam stability, during extensive experimental studies. Due to large space charge impedance Landau damping is lost through most of the cycle in single harmonic operation, but is recovered when using the second harmonic and controlled longitudinal emittance blow-up. This paper compares beam parameters during acceleration with and without the Finemet test cavity. Comparisons were made using beam measurements and simulations with the BLonD code based on a full PS Booster impedance model. Thi...

  19. Digital Measurement System for the HIE-Isolde Superconducting Accelerating Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Elias, Michal

    Extensive R&D efforts are being invested at CERN into the fundamental science of the RF superconductivity, cavity design, niobium sputtering, coating and RF properties of superconducting cavities. Fast and precise characterization and measurements of RF parameters of the newly produced cavities is essential for advances with the cavity production. The currently deployed analogue measurement system based on an analogue phase discriminators and tracking RF generators is not optimal for efficient work at the SM18 superconducting cavity test stand. If exact properties of the cavity under test are not known a traditional feedback loop will not be able to find resonant frequency in a reasonable time or even at all. This is mainly due to a very high Q factor. The resonance peak is very narrow (fraction of a Hz at 100 MHz). If the resonant frequency is off by several bandwidths, small changes of the cavity field during the tuning will not be measureable. Also cavity field will react only very slowly to any change...

  20. A Bench Measurement of the Energy Loss of a Stored Beam to a Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sands, M; Rees, J.; /SLAC

    2016-12-19

    A rather simple electronic bench experiment is proposed for obtaining a measure of the impulse energy loss of a stored particle bunch to an rf cavity or other vacuum-chamber structure--the so-called "cavity radiation". The proposed method is analyzed in some detail.

  1. Role of thermal resistance on the performance of superconducting radio frequency cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhakal, Pashupati; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Myneni, Ganapati Rao

    2017-03-01

    Thermal stability is an important parameter for the operation of the superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities used in particle accelerators. The rf power dissipated on the inner surface of the cavities is conducted to the helium bath cooling the outer cavity surface and the equilibrium temperature of the inner surface depends on the thermal resistance. In this manuscript, we present the results of direct measurements of thermal resistance on 1.3 GHz single cell SRF cavities made from high purity large-grain and fine-grain niobium as well as their rf performance for different treatments applied to outer cavity surface in order to investigate the role of the Kapitza resistance to the overall thermal resistance and to the SRF cavity performance. The results show no significant impact of the thermal resistance to the SRF cavity performance after chemical polishing, mechanical polishing or anodization of the outer cavity surface. Temperature maps taken during the rf test show nonuniform heating of the surface at medium rf fields. Calculations of Q0(Bp) curves using the thermal feedback model show good agreement with experimental data at 2 and 1.8 K when a pair-braking term is included in the calculation of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer surface resistance. These results indicate local intrinsic nonlinearities of the surface resistance, rather than purely thermal effects, to be the main cause for the observed field dependence of Q0(Bp) .

  2. Segmented trapped vortex cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grammel, Jr., Leonard Paul (Inventor); Pennekamp, David Lance (Inventor); Winslow, Jr., Ralph Henry (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An annular trapped vortex cavity assembly segment comprising includes a cavity forward wall, a cavity aft wall, and a cavity radially outer wall there between defining a cavity segment therein. A cavity opening extends between the forward and aft walls at a radially inner end of the assembly segment. Radially spaced apart pluralities of air injection first and second holes extend through the forward and aft walls respectively. The segment may include first and second expansion joint features at distal first and second ends respectively of the segment. The segment may include a forward subcomponent including the cavity forward wall attached to an aft subcomponent including the cavity aft wall. The forward and aft subcomponents include forward and aft portions of the cavity radially outer wall respectively. A ring of the segments may be circumferentially disposed about an axis to form an annular segmented vortex cavity assembly.

  3. Cavity Mode Related Wire Breaking of the SPS Wire Scanners and Loss Measurements of Wire Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Caspers, Friedhelm; Jensen, E; Koopman, J; Malo, J F; Roncarolo, F

    2003-01-01

    During the SPS high intensity run 2002 with LHC type beam, the breaking of several of the carbon wires in the wire scanners has been observed in their parking position. The observation of large changes in the wire resistivity and thermionic electron emission clearly indicated strong RF heating that was depending on the bunch length. A subsequent analysis in the laboratory, simulating the beam by two probe antennas or by a powered stretched wire, showed two main problems: i) the housing of the wire scanner acts as a cavity with a mode spectrum starting around 350 MHz and high impedance values around 700 MHz; ii) the carbon wire used so far appears to be an excellent RF absorber and thus dissipates a significant part of the beam-induced power. Different wire materials are compared with the classical cavity mode technique for the determination of the complex permittivity in the range of 2-4 GHz. As a resonator a rectangular TE_01n type device is utilized.

  4. Cavity mode related wire breaking of the SPS Wire Scanners and loss measurements of wire materials

    CERN Document Server

    Roncarolo, Federico

    2003-01-01

    During the SPS high intensity run 2002 with LHC type beam, the breaking of several of the carbon wires in the wire scanners has been observed in their parking position. The observation of large changes in the wire resistivity and thermionic electron emission clearly indicated strong RF heating that was depending on the bunch length. A subsequent analysis in the laboratory, simulating the beam by two probe antennas or by a powered stretched wire, showed two main problems: i) the housing of the wire scanner acts as a cavity with a mode spectrum starting around 350MHz and high impedance values around 700 MHz; ii) the carbon wire used so far appears to be an excellent RF absorber and thus dissipates a significant part of the beam-induced power. Different wire materials are compared with the classical cavity mode technique for the determination of the complex permittivity in the range of 2-4 GHz. As a resonator a rectangular TE01n type device is utilized.

  5. RF applications in digital signal processing

    CERN Document Server

    Schilcher, T

    2008-01-01

    Ever higher demands for stability, accuracy, reproducibility, and monitoring capability are being placed on Low-Level Radio Frequency (LLRF) systems of particle accelerators. Meanwhile, continuing rapid advances in digital signal processing technology are being exploited to meet these demands, thus leading to development of digital LLRF systems. The rst part of this course will begin by focusing on some of the important building-blocks of RF signal processing including mixer theory and down-conversion, I/Q (amplitude and phase) detection, digital down-conversion (DDC) and decimation, concluding with a survey of I/Q modulators. The second part of the course will introduce basic concepts of feedback systems, including examples of digital cavity eld and phase control, followed by radial loop architectures. Adaptive feed-forward systems used for the suppression of repetitive beam disturbances will be examined. Finally, applications and principles of system identi cation approaches will be summarized.

  6. Design Considerations for the LHC 200 MHz RF System

    CERN Document Server

    Boussard, Daniel; Kindermann, H P; Linnecar, Trevor Paul R; Marque, S; Tückmantel, Joachim

    2000-01-01

    The longitudinal beam transfer from the SPS into the LHC 400 MHz buckets will not be free of losses without a lower frequency capture system and a fast longitudinal damping system in LHC. We present a complete study of a combined system using four identical copper cavities at 200 MHz delivering 3 MV total CW voltage and having still enough bandwidth to achieve fast longitudinal damping. The shape of a cavity was designed according to the accelerating mode performance, its tuning and the higher order mode spectrum with respect to the LHC beam lines and their possible attenuation. The possibility to park the cavities during coast was included. The local heat load and the corresponding cooling water distribution as well as deformations were studied and techniques to build the cavity with all ports at low cost are proposed. The parameters of the RF generators, couplers and detuning are determined. Simulations of the total LHC RF system incorporating real delays, generator bandwidth and the control loops confirm t...

  7. Single-side electron multipacting at the photocathode in rf guns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jang-Hui Han

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple electron impacting (multipacting can take place in rf fields when the rf components are composed of materials with a secondary electron yield greater than one. In rf gun cavities, multipacting may change the properties of the vacuum components or even damage them. First systematic measurements of the multipacting occurring in a photocathode rf gun were made at the Fermilab/NICADD Photoinjector Laboratory in 2000. The multipacting properties were found to depend on the cathode material and the solenoid field configuration. In this study, we measure the multipacting properties in more detail and model the secondary electron generation for numerical simulation. Measurements and simulations for the photoinjectors at Fermilab and DESY are compared. The multipacting takes place at the photocathode in rf guns and is categorized as single-side multipacting. In a low rf field, the electrons emitted from the cathode area do not leave the gun cavity within one rf cycle and have an opportunity to travel back and hit the cathode. The solenoid field distribution in the vicinity of the cathode changes the probability of electron bombardment of the cathode and makes a major contribution to the multipacting behavior.

  8. LANSCE RF System Refurbishment

    CERN Document Server

    Rees, Daniel; Kwon, Sung-il; Lyles, John T M; Lynch, Michael; Prokop, Mark; Reass, William; Tallerico, Paul J

    2005-01-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is in the planning phase of a refurbishment project that will sustain reliable facility operations well into the next decade. The LANSCE accelerator was constructed in the late 1960s and early 1970s and is a national user facility that provides pulsed protons and spallation neutrons for defense and civilian research and applications. We will be replacing all the 201 MHz RF systems and a substantial fraction of the 805 MHz RF systems and high voltage systems. The current 44 LANSCE 805 MHz, 1.25 MW klystrons have an average in-service time in excess of 110,000 hours. All 44 must be in service to operate the accelerator. There are only 9 spares left. The klystrons receive their DC power from the power system originally installed in 1960. Although this power system has been extremely reliable, gas analysis of the insulating oil is indicating age related degradation that will need attention in the next few years. This paper will provide the design details of the new R...

  9. Result of MHI 2-Cell Seamless Dumb-Bell Cavity Vertical Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okihira, K. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd, Mihara, Hiroshima, 729-0393, Japan; Hara, H. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd, Mihara, Hiroshima, 729-0393, Japan; Ikeda, N. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd, Mihara, Hiroshima, 729-0393, Japan; Inoue, F. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd, Mihara, Hiroshima, 729-0393, Japan; Sennyu, K. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd, Mihara, Hiroshima, 729-0393, Japan; Geng, Rongli [JLAB; Rimmer, Robert A. [JLAB; Kako, E. [KEK

    2014-12-01

    MHI have supplied several 9-cell cavities for STF (R&D of ILC project at KEK) and have been considering production method for stable quality and cost reduction, seamless dumb-bell cavity was one of them. We had fabricated a 2 cell seamless dumb-bell cavity for cost reduction and measured RF performance in collaboration with JLab, KEK and MHI. Surface treatment recipe for ILC was applied for MHI 2-cell cavity and vertical test was performed at JLab. The cavity reached Eacc=32.4MV/m after BCP and EP. Details of the result are reported.

  10. Analysis of the cool down related cavity performance of the European XFEL vertical acceptance tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenskat, Marc; Schaffran, J.

    2017-09-15

    For the European X-Ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL) cavity production, the cold radio-frequency (RF) test of the cavities at 2 K after delivery from the two vendors was the mandatory acceptance test. It has been previously reported, that the cool down dynamics of a cavity across T{sub c} has a significant influence on the observed intrinsic quality factor Q{sub 0}, which is a measure of the losses on the inner cavity surface. A total number of 367 cool downs is used to analyze this correlation and we show that such a correlation is not observed during the European XFEL cavity production.

  11. High Power test for the first PIMS Cavity for LINAC4

    CERN Document Server

    Gerigk, F; Giguet, J M; Wegner, R

    2011-01-01

    The first cavity of the PI Mode Structure (PIMS) section of Linac4 has been high power tested at Linac4 conditions and under high average power to simulate the operating conditions of Linac4 as a high duty cycle injector for the SPL. The PIMS section consists of 12 seven cell cavities, which accelerate the Linac4 beam from 102 MeV to 160 MeV at an RF frequency of 352.2 MHz. The cell length is constant per cavity but is adapted to the particle speed from cavity to cavity.

  12. A Micromechanical RF Channelizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akgul, Mehmet

    The power consumption of a radio generally goes as the number and strength of the RF signals it must process. In particular, a radio receiver would consume much less power if the signal presented to its electronics contained only the desired signal in a tiny percent bandwidth frequency channel, rather than the typical mix of signals containing unwanted energy outside the desired channel. Unfortunately, a lack of filters capable of selecting single channel bandwidths at RF forces the front-ends of contemporary receivers to accept unwanted signals, and thus, to operate with sub-optimal efficiency. This dissertation focuses on the degree to which capacitive-gap transduced micromechanical resonators can achieve the aforementioned RF channel-selecting filters. It aims to first show theoretically that with appropriate scaling capacitive-gap transducers are strong enough to meet the needed coupling requirements; and second, to fully detail an architecture and design procedure needed to realize said filters. Finally, this dissertation provides an actual experimentally demonstrated RF channel-select filter designed using the developed procedures and confirming theoretical predictions. Specifically, this dissertation introduces four methods that make possible the design and fabrication of RF channel-select filters. The first of these introduces a small-signal equivalent circuit for parallel-plate capacitive-gap transduced micromechanical resonators that employs negative capacitance to model the dependence of resonance frequency on electrical stiffness in a way that facilitates the analysis of micromechanical circuits loaded with arbitrary electrical impedances. The new circuit model not only correctly predicts the dependence of electrical stiffness on the impedances loading the input and output electrodes of parallel-plate capacitive-gap transduced micromechanical device, but does so in a visually intuitive way that identifies current drive as most appropriate for

  13. RF Phase Scan for Beam Energy Measurement of KOMAC DTL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hansung; Kwon, Hyeokjung; Kim, Seonggu; Lee, Seokgeun; Cho, Yongsub [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The energy gain through the drift tube linac is a function of the synchronous phase, therefore, the output beam energy from DTL can be affected by the RF phase setting in low-level RF (LLRF) system. The DTL at Korea Multi-purpose Accelerator Complex (KOMAC) consists of 11 tanks and the RF phase setting in each tank should be matched for synchronous acceleration in successive tanks. That means a proper setting of RF phase in each DTL tank is critical for efficient and loss-free operation. The matching RF phase can be determined based on the output energy measurement from the DTL tank. The beam energy can be measured by several methods. For example, we can use a bending magnet to determine the beam energy because the higher momentum of beam means the less deflection angle in the fixed magnetic field. By measuring the range of proton beam through a material with known stopping power also can be utilized to determine the beam energy. We used a well-known time-of-flight method to determine the output beam energy from the DTL tank by measuring beam phase with a beam position monitor (BPM). Based on the energy measurement results, proper RF operating point could be obtained. We performed a RF phase scan to determine the output beam energy from KOMAC DTL by using a time-of-flight method and to set RF operating point precisely. The measured beam energy was compared with a beam dynamics simulation and showed a good agreement. RF phase setting is critical issue for the efficient operation of the proton accelerator, we have a plan to implement and integrate the RF phase measurement system into an accelerator control system for future need.

  14. Superconducting DC and RF Properties of Ingot Niobium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pashupati Dhakal, Gianluigi Ciovati, Peter Kneisel, Ganapati Rao Myneni

    2011-07-01

    The thermal conductivity, DC magnetization and penetration depth of large-grain niobium hollow cylindrical rods fabricated from ingots, manufactured by CBMM subjected to chemical and heat treatment were measured. The results confirm the influence of chemical and heat-treatment processes on the superconducting properties, with no significant dependence on the impurity concentrations in the original ingots. Furthermore, RF properties, such as the surface resistance and quench field of the niobium rods were measured using a TE{sub 011} cavity. The hollow niobium rod is the center conductor of this cavity, converting it to a coaxial cavity. The quench field is limited by the critical heat flux through the rods' cooling channel.

  15. Beam Fields in an Integrated Cavity, Coupler and Window Configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weathersby, Stephen; Novokhatski, Alexander; /SLAC

    2010-02-10

    In a multi-bunch high current storage ring, beam generated fields couple strongly into the RF cavity coupler structure when beam arrival times are in resonance with cavity fields. In this study the integrated effect of beam fields over several thousand RF periods is simulated for the complete cavity, coupler, window and waveguide system of the PEP-II B-factory storage ring collider. We show that the beam generated fields at frequencies corresponding to several bunch spacings for this case gives rise to high field strength near the ceramic window which could limit the performance of future high current storage rings such as PEP-X or Super B-factories.

  16. Cavity Voltage Phase Modulation MD blocks 3 and 4

    CERN Document Server

    Mastoridis, T; Butterworth, A; Molendijk, J; Tuckmantel, J

    2013-01-01

    The LHC RF/LLRF system is currently setup for extremely stable RF voltage to minimize transient beam loading effects. The present scheme cannot be extended beyond nominal beam current since the demanded power would push the klystrons to saturation. For beam currents above nominal (and possibly earlier), the cavity phase modulation by the beam (transient beam loading) will not be corrected, but the strong RF feedback and One-Turn Delay feedback will still be active for RF loop and beam stability in physics. To achieve this, the voltage set point should be adapted for each bunch. The goal of these MDs was to test thefirmware version of an iterative algorithm that adjusts the voltage set point to achieve the optimal phase modulation for klystron forward power considerations.

  17. RF and microwave engineering fundamentals of wireless communications

    CERN Document Server

    Gustrau, Frank

    2012-01-01

    This book provides a fundamental and practical introduction to radio frequency and microwave engineering and physical aspects of wireless communication In this book, the author addresses a wide range of radio-frequency and microwave topics with emphasis on physical aspects including EM and voltage waves, transmission lines, passive circuits, antennas, radio wave propagation. Up-to-date RF design tools like RF circuit simulation, EM simulation and computerized smith charts, are used in various examples to demonstrate how these methods can be applied effectively in RF engineering

  18. Fabrication and Testing of Deflecting Cavities for APS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mammosser, John; Wang, Haipeng; Rimmer, Robert; Jim, Henry; Katherine, Wilson; Dhakal, Pashupati; Ali, Nassiri; Jim, Kerby; Jeremiah, Holzbauer; Genfa, Wu; Joel, Fuerst; Yawei, Yang; Zenghai, Li

    2013-09-01

    Jefferson Lab (Newport News, Virginia) in collaboration with Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne, IL) has fabricated and tested four first article, 2.8 GHz, deflecting SRF cavities, for Argonne's Short-Pulse X-ray (SPX) project. These cavities are unique in many ways including the fabrication techniques in which the cavity cell and waveguides were fabricated. These cavity subcomponents were milled from bulk large grain niobium ingot material directly from 3D CAD files. No forming of sub components was used with the exception of the beam-pipes. The challenging cavity and helium vessel design and fabrication results from the stringent RF performance requirements required by the project and operation in the APS ring. Production challenges and fabrication techniques as well as testing results will be discussed in this paper.

  19. Magnetic Flux Expulsion Studies in Niobium SRF Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Posen, Sam [Fermilab; Checchin, Mattia [Fermilab; Crawford, Anthony [Fermilab; Grassellino, Anna [Fermilab; Martinello, Martina [Fermilab; Melnychuk, Oleksandr [Fermilab; Romanenko, Alexander [Fermilab; Sergatskov, Dmitri [Fermilab; Trenikhina, Yulia [Fermilab

    2016-06-01

    With the recent discovery of nitrogen doping treatment for SRF cavities, ultra-high quality factors at medium accelerating fields are regularly achieved in vertical RF tests. To preserve these quality factors into the cryomodule, it is important to consider background magnetic fields, which can become trapped in the surface of the cavity during cooldown and cause Q₀ degradation. Building on the recent discovery that spatial thermal gradients during cooldown can significantly improve expulsion of magnetic flux, a detailed study was performed of flux expulsion on two cavities with different furnace treatments that are cooled in magnetic fields amplitudes representative of what is expected in a realistic cryomodule. In this contribution, we summarize these cavity results, in order to improve understanding of the impact of flux expulsion on cavity performance.

  20. A 200 MHz SC-RF System for the HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Calaga, Rama

    2016-01-01

    A quarter wave β=1 superconducting cavity at 200 MHz is proposed for the LHC as an alternative to the present 400 MHz RF system. The primary motivation of such a system would be to accelerate higher intensity and longer bunches with improved capture efficiency. Advantages related to minimizing electron cloud effects, intra-beam scattering, heating and the possibility of luminosity levelling with bunch length are described. Some considerations related to cavity optimization, beam loading and technological challenges are addressed.

  1. Secondary electron emission in a photocathode rf gun

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. Han

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available During the last decades, photocathode rf guns have been proven to be successful for providing very high quality electron beams required for vacuum ultraviolet and x-ray free-electron lasers. Beam dynamics simulations show that the electron beam quality in a rf gun depends strongly on the beam dynamics in the vicinity of the cathode. Therefore, the injection process plays a significant role in the beam performance. Several codes are available to simulate the beam dynamics in the gun. They are able to track the beam under the influence of external fields and space charge forces, but details of the emission processes are still missing in these simulations. In photocathode rf guns, the electron beams have a high charge density. Especially during emission from the cathode, the electrons have a very low velocity and experience high longitudinal space charge forces counteracting the applied accelerating field. Because of the space charge field, some part of the electrons emitted from the cathode might move backward to the cathode where they can produce secondary electrons. A high electric field in the gun cavity, on the other hand, generates a large amount of dark current. If the field-emitted electrons from the cathode or any other surface inside the cavity hit the cathode, secondary electrons can be produced as well. For a detailed understanding of the electron beam and dark current in a rf gun, simulations including a model of the secondary electron emission are necessary. In this paper, a simple model is discussed with an application to the beam dynamics at high emission phases in rf guns. Detailed simulations have been done in comparison to measurements at the Photo Injector Test Facility at DESY in Zeuthen. The primary electrons which are photoemitted from the cathode and the secondary electrons which are produced by the primaries at the cathode could be clearly distinguished in measurements and simulations.

  2. RF breakdown by toroidal helicons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bounded whistlers are well-known for their efficient plasma production capabilities in thin cylindrical tubes. In this paper we shall present their radio frequency (RF) breakdown and discharge sustaining capabilities in toroidal systems. Pulsed RF power in the electronmagnetohydrodynamic (EMHD) frequency regime is fed to ...

  3. Circuit design for RF transceivers

    CERN Document Server

    Leenaerts, Domine; Vaucher, Cicero S

    2007-01-01

    Second edition of this successful 2001 RF Circuit Design book, has been updated, latest technology reviews have been added as well as several actual case studies. Due to the authors being active in industry as well as academia, this should prove to be an essential guide on RF Transceiver Design for students and engineers.

  4. Multi-Mode Cavity Accelerator Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Yong [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Hirshfield, Jay Leonard [Omega-P R& D, Inc., New Haven, CT (United States)

    2016-11-10

    This project aimed to develop a prototype for a novel accelerator structure comprising coupled cavities that are tuned to support modes with harmonically-related eigenfrequencies, with the goal of reaching an acceleration gradient >200 MeV/m and a breakdown rate <10-7/pulse/meter. Phase I involved computations, design, and preliminary engineering of a prototype multi-harmonic cavity accelerator structure; plus tests of a bimodal cavity. A computational procedure was used to design an optimized profile for a bimodal cavity with high shunt impedance and low surface fields to maximize the reduction in temperature rise ΔT. This cavity supports the TM010 mode and its 2nd harmonic TM011 mode. Its fundamental frequency is at 12 GHz, to benchmark against the empirical criteria proposed within the worldwide High Gradient collaboration for X-band copper structures; namely, a surface electric field Esurmax< 260 MV/m and pulsed surface heating ΔTmax< 56 °K. With optimized geometry, amplitude and relative phase of the two modes, reductions are found in surface pulsed heating, modified Poynting vector, and total RF power—as compared with operation at the same acceleration gradient using only the fundamental mode.

  5. New Control Structure of the 10 MHz RF System in the CERN PS

    CERN Document Server

    Damerau, H

    2013-01-01

    The 10MHz cavities comprise the main RF system in the CERN PS and the only one that allows acceleration. In total 11 tunable cavities (10 operational and a hot spare, grouped into 3+1 tuning groups and up to presently 6 voltage program groups) are distributed all around the circumference of the PS ring. Next to the RF drive signal each of the cavities is controlled by a voltage program and timing pulses to open and close the relays to short-circuit the cavity gaps. These control signals are presently generated by a dedicated hardware matrix. It translates voltage functions and relay timing pulses per cavity group into functions and timings per cavity. However, due to its central position in the RF beam control system, the dedicated hardware matrix can cause significant downtime in case of a major hardware failure. Instead of upgrading the existing obsolete hardware, this note suggests a replacement by standard controls hardware and dedicated application software. Thanks to advanced software concepts like “M...

  6. Superconducting rf development at ATLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepard, K.W.; Kedzie, M.; Clifft, B.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Roy, A.; Potukuchi, P. [Nuclear Science Centre, New Delhi (India); Givens, J.; Potter, J.; Crandall, K. [AccSys Technology, Inc., Pleasanton, CA (United States); Added, N. [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil)

    1993-12-31

    The ATLAS superconducting heavy-ion linac began operation in 1978 and has operated nearly continuously since that time, while undergoing a series of upgrades and expansions, the most recent being the ``uranium upgrade`` completed earlier this year and described below. In its present configuration the ATLAS linac consists of an array of 64 resonant cavities operating from 48 to 145 MHz, which match a range of particle velocities .007 < {beta} = v/c < .2. The linac provides approximately 50 MV of effective accelerating potential for ions of q/m > 1/10 over the entire periodic table. Delivered beams include 5 {minus} 7 pnA of {sup 238}U{sup 39+} at 1535 MeV. At present more than 10{sup 6} cavity-hours of operation at surface electric fields of 15 MV/m have been accumulated. Superconducting structure development at ATLAS is aimed at improving the cost/performance of existing low velocity structures both for possible future ATLAS upgrades, and also for heavy-ion linacs at other institutions. An application of particular current interest is to develop structures suitable for accelerating radioactive ion beams. Such structures must accelerate very low charge to mass ratio beams and must also have very large transverse acceptance.

  7. Beam induced RF heating

    CERN Document Server

    Salvant, B; Arduini, G; Assmann, R; Baglin, V; Barnes, M J; Bartmann, W; Baudrenghien, P; Berrig, O; Bracco, C; Bravin, E; Bregliozzi, G; Bruce, R; Bertarelli, A; Carra, F; Cattenoz, G; Caspers, F; Claudet, S; Day, H; Garlasche, M; Gentini, L; Goddard, B; Grudiev, A; Henrist, B; Jones, R; Kononenko, O; Lanza, G; Lari, L; Mastoridis, T; Mertens, V; Métral, E; Mounet, N; Muller, J E; Nosych, A A; Nougaret, J L; Persichelli, S; Piguiet, A M; Redaelli, S; Roncarolo, F; Rumolo, G; Salvachua, B; Sapinski, M; Schmidt, R; Shaposhnikova, E; Tavian, L; Timmins, M; Uythoven, J; Vidal, A; Wenninger, J; Wollmann, D; Zerlauth, M

    2012-01-01

    After the 2011 run, actions were put in place during the 2011/2012 winter stop to limit beam induced radio frequency (RF) heating of LHC components. However, some components could not be changed during this short stop and continued to represent a limitation throughout 2012. In addition, the stored beam intensity increased in 2012 and the temperature of certain components became critical. In this contribution, the beam induced heating limitations for 2012 and the expected beam induced heating limitations for the restart after the Long Shutdown 1 (LS1) will be compiled. The expected consequences of running with 25 ns or 50 ns bunch spacing will be detailed, as well as the consequences of running with shorter bunch length. Finally, actions on hardware or beam parameters to monitor and mitigate the impact of beam induced heating to LHC operation after LS1 will be discussed.

  8. Vulnerability of digitized platforms to modern rf electromagnetic weapons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frater, Michael R.; Ryan, Michael J.

    2001-08-01

    Radio Frequency Directed Energy Weapons (RF DEW) have the potential to disrupt the operation of, or cause the failure of, a broad range of military electronic equipment. Over the past 30 years, there has been considerable effort in the development of these weapons. Recent reports suggest that a number of countries, including the USA and Russia, have fielded such weapons. This paper examines the potential performance of non-nuclear RF DEW.

  9. Co-doping effects of Mg and Be on properties of ZnMgBeGaO UV-range transparent conductive oxide films prepared by RF magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jang-Ho; Cuong, Hoang Ba [Photonic and Electronic Thin Film Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Chonnam National University, 300, Yong-bong dong, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Sang-Hun, E-mail: shjeong@kbsi.re.kr [Gwangju Center, Korea Basic Science Institute, 300, Yong-bong dong, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Byung-Teak, E-mail: btlee@jnu.ac.kr [Photonic and Electronic Thin Film Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Chonnam National University, 300, Yong-bong dong, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • Zn{sub 0.96−x−y}Mg{sub x}Be{sub y}Ga{sub 0.04}O TCO films with wide band-gap were prepared by sputtering. • Controlling of band-gap and conductivity was tried by co-doping Mg and Be. • Maximum band-gap energy reached 3.88 eV at 5 at.% Mg and 10 at.% Be contents. • Post-growth annealing was performed in Ar + H{sub 2} ambient gas to improve conductivity. • The lowest resistivity was obtained from the annealed film at 400 °C. - Abstract: In this work, the Zn{sub 0.96-x−y}Mg{sub x}Be{sub y}Ga{sub 0.04}O films co-doped with different Mg and Be doping levels of 3 ∼10 at.% were prepared using an RF magnetron sputtering, and the correlation between the film properties and the doping levels was investigated. With an increase in Mg or Be doping level, the film crystal quality gradually deteriorated and the ZnO c-axis parameter was contracted or expanded due to the difference in ionic radii of Mg and Be ions, resulting in the shift of the ZnO (0 0 0 2) XRD peak position to lower 2θ or higher 2θ values and the broadening of the ZnO (0 0 0 2) XRD peak. All the grown films were highly transparent with a transmittance above 85% in the visible wavelength region and the band-gap widened from 3.74 eV to 3.88 eV at high doping level of 5 at.% Mg and 10 at.% Be, whereas the resistivity was degraded from 1.6 × 10{sup −3} Ω cm at low doping level to 1–4 × 10{sup −1} Ω cm at high doping level. In the Zn{sub 0.88}Mg{sub 0.05}Be{sub 0.03}Ga{sub 0.04}O film post growth annealed at 400 °C in Ar + H{sub 2} mixture ambient, the lowest resistivity of 8.17 × 10{sup −4} Ω cm, the highest electron concentration of 5.26 × 10{sup 20} cm{sup −3}, and the large band-gap of 3.8 eV were obtained, which is attributed to the hydrogen incorporation in film during annealing and the improved film crystal quality.

  10. SQIF Arrays as RF Sensors (Briefing Charts)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yukon, Stanford P

    2007-01-01

    ... (Superconducting Quantum Interference Filter) arrays may be employed as sensitive RF sensors. RF SQIF arrays fabricated with high Tc Josephson junctions can be cooled with small Sterling microcoolers...

  11. Multi-MW 22.8 GHz Harmonic Multiplier - RF Power Source for High-Gradient Accelerator R&D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2012-07-26

    Electrodynamic and particle simulation studies have been carried out to optimize design of a two-cavity harmonic frequency multiplier, in which a linear electron beam is energized by rotating fields near cyclotron resonance in a TE111 cavity in a uniform magnetic field, and in which the beam then radiates coherently at the nth harmonic into a TEn11 output cavity. Examples are worked out in detail for 7th and 2nd harmonic converters, showing RF-to-RF conversion efficiencies of 45% and 88%, respectively at 19.992 GHz (K-band) and 5.712 GHz (C-band), for a drive frequency of 2.856 GHz. Details are shown of RF infrastructure (S-band klystron, modulator) and harmonic converter components (drive cavity, output cavities, electron beam source and modulator, beam collector) for the two harmonic converters to be tested. Details are also given for the two-frequency (S- and C-band) coherent multi-MW test stand for RF breakdown and RF gun studies.

  12. Employing Twin Crabbing Cavities to Address Variable Transverse Coupling of Beams in the MEIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castilla, Alejandro [ODU; Delayen, Jean R. [ODU, JLAB; Morozov, Vasiliy [JLAB; Satogata, Todd [JLAB

    2014-07-01

    The design strategy of the Medium Energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) at Jefferson Lab contemplates both matching of the emittance aspect ratios and a 50 mrad crossing angle along with crab crossing scheme for both electron and ion beams over the energy range (√s=20-70 GeV) to achieve high luminosities at the interaction points (IPs). However, the desired locations for placing the crabbing cavities may include regions where the transverse degrees of freedom of the beams are coupled with variable coupling strength that depends on the collider rings’ magnetic elements (solenoids and skew quadrupoles). In this work we explore the feasibility of employing twin rf dipoles that produce a variable direction crabbing kick to account for a range of transverse coupling of both beams.

  13. Dusty plasma cavities: Probe-induced and natural

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, B. J.; Matthews, L. S.; Hyde, T. W.

    2015-06-01

    A comprehensive exploration of regional dust evacuation in complex plasma crystals is presented. Voids created in three-dimensional crystals on the International Space Station have provided a rich foundation for experiments, but cavities in dust crystals formed in ground-based experiments have not received as much attention. Inside a modified Gaseous Electronics Conference rf cell, a powered vertical probe was used to clear the central area of a dust crystal, producing a cavity with high cylindrical symmetry. Cavities generated by three mechanisms are examined. First, repulsion of micrometer-sized particles by a negatively charged probe is investigated. A model of this effect developed for a dc plasma is modified and applied to explain experimental data in rf plasma. Second, the formation of natural cavities is surveyed; a radial ion drag proposed to occur due to a curved sheath is considered in conjunction with thermophoresis and a flattened confinement potential above the center of the electrode. Finally, cavity formation upon increasing the probe potential above the plasma floating potential is justified by a combination of ion drag and sheath edge modification. The cavities produced by these methods appear similar, but each is shown to be facilitated by fundamentally different processes.

  14. RF Coupler Design for the TRIUMF ISAC-II Superconducting Quarter Wave Resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Poirier, R L; Harmer, P; Laxdal, R E; Mitra, A K; Sekatchev, I; Waraich, B; Zvyagintsev, V

    2004-01-01

    An RF Coupler for the ISAC-II medium beta (β=0.058 and 0.071) superconducting quarter wave resonators was designed and tested at TRIUMF. The main goal of this development was to achieve stable operation of superconducting cavities at high acceleration gradients and low thermal load to the helium refrigeration system. The cavities will operate at 6 MV/m acceleration gradient in overcoupled mode at a forward power 200 W at 106 MHz. The overcoupling provides ±20 Hz cavity bandwidth, which improves the stability of the RF control system for fast helium pressure fluctuations, microphonics and environmental noise. Choice of materials, cooling with liquid nitrogen, aluminum nitride RF window and thermal shields insure a small thermal load on the helium refrigeration system by the Coupler. An RF finger contact which causedμdust in the coupler housing was eliminated without any degradation of the coupler performance. RF and thermal calculations, design and test results on the coupler are p...

  15. Matching Parasitic Antenna for Single RF MIMO

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Bo; Kalis, A; Nielsen, Rasmus Hjorth

    2012-01-01

    Single RF MIMO communication emerges a novel low cost communication method which does not consume as much power as the conventional MIMO. The implementation of such single RF MIMO system is done by mapping the weighting factors to the polarizations or the radiation patterns of the antennas....... In order to have such performance, an antenna with rich pattern modes is required by the system, thus the ESPAR antenna is investigated. The critical part on such antenna is parasitic element impedance matching. Unlike the conventional smith-chart matching method which assumes the minimal resistance...... is zero and with goal of 50 ohm or 75 ohm matching, matching on such parasitic antenna will adopt negative value as well. This paper presents a matching network with controllable impedance even to the range of negative values....

  16. RF device forensics using passband filter analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    King-Smith, Deen; Mikkilineni, Aravind K.; Gelfand, Saul; Delp, Edward J., III

    2009-02-01

    Given the wide use of Radio Frequency (RF) devices for applications ranging from data networks to wireless sensors, it is of interest to be able to characterize individual devices to verify compliance with FCC Part 15 rules. In an effort to characterize these types of devices we have developed a system that utilizes specially designed probe signals to elicit a response from the device from which unique characteristics can be extracted. The features that uniquely characterize a device are referred to as device signatures or device fingerprints. We apply this approach to RF devices which employ different bandpass filters, and construct training based classifiers which are highly accurate. We also introduce a model-based framework for optimal detection that can be employed to obtain performance limits, and to study model mismatch and probe optimization.

  17. Anomalous Thrust Production from an RF Test Device Measured on a Low-Thrust Torsion Pendulum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, David A.; White, Harold G.; March, Paul; Lawrence, James T.; Davies, Frank J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the test campaigns designed to investigate and demonstrate viability of using classical magnetoplasmadynamics to obtain a propulsive momentum transfer via the quantum vacuum virtual plasma. This paper will not address the physics of the quantum vacuum plasma thruster (QVPT), but instead will describe the recent test campaign. In addition, it contains a brief description of the supporting radio frequency (RF) field analysis, lessons learned, and potential applications of the technology to space exploration missions. During the first (Cannae) portion of the campaign, approximately 40 micronewtons of thrust were observed in an RF resonant cavity test article excited at approximately 935 megahertz and 28 watts. During the subsequent (tapered cavity) portion of the campaign, approximately 91 micronewtons of thrust were observed in an RF resonant cavity test article excited at approximately 1933 megahertz and 17 watts. Testing was performed on a low-thrust torsion pendulum that is capable of detecting force at a single-digit micronewton level. Test campaign results indicate that the RF resonant cavity thruster design, which is unique as an electric propulsion device, is producing a force that is not attributable to any classical electromagnetic phenomenon and therefore is potentially demonstrating an interaction with the quantum vacuum virtual plasma.

  18. Upgrade of the 200 MHZ RF System in the CERN SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Shaposhnikova, E N; Montesinos, E

    2011-01-01

    The 200 MHz RF system used in the SPS for acceleration of all beams including the LHC-type ones has a travelling wave structure and consists of four cavities, two of them with five sections and two with four. For stability of future high intensity LHC beams in the SPS larger (than now) controlled longitudinal emittance blow-up and therefore bucket and voltage amplitude will be necessary, but less voltage will be available due to the effect of beam loading in the existing system with maximum peak RF power per cavity of 1 MW. This issue will become critical for beam acceleration and especially for beam transfer into the 400 MHz RF system of the LHC. The proposed solution is to shorten the two long cavities and using free sections together with two spare to install two extra cavities with corresponding power plants of 1.4 MW each. After this upgrade, which is a main part of more general SPS upgrade for high luminosity LHC and should be completed during 2017, the performance of the SPS RF system with high intensi...

  19. Wafer-level packaged RF-MEMS switches fabricated in a CMOS fab

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tilmans, H.A.C.; Ziad, H.; Jansen, Henricus V.; Di Monaco, O.; Jourdain, A.; De Raedt, W.; Rottenberg, X.; De Backer, E.; Decoussernaeker, A.; Baert, K.

    2001-01-01

    Reports on wafer-level packaged RF-MEMS switches fabricated in a commercial CMOS fab. Switch fabrication is based on a metal surface micromachining process. A novel wafer-level packaging scheme is developed, whereby the switches are housed in on-chip sealed cavities using benzocyclobutene (BCB) as

  20. An equivalent circuit model and power calculations for the APS SPX crab cavities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berenc, T. (Accelerator Systems Division (APS))

    2012-03-21

    An equivalent parallel resistor-inductor-capacitor (RLC) circuit with beam loading for a polarized TM110 dipole-mode cavity is developed and minimum radio-frequency (rf) generator requirements are calculated for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) short-pulse x-ray (SPX) superconducting rf (SRF) crab cavities. A beam-loaded circuit model for polarized TM110 mode crab cavities was derived. The single-cavity minimum steady-state required generator power has been determined for the APS SPX crab cavities for a storage ring current of 200mA DC current as a function of external Q for various vertical offsets including beam tilt and uncontrollable detuning. Calculations to aid machine protection considerations were given.

  1. X-ray generation by inverse Compton scattering at the superconducting RF test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Hirotaka, E-mail: hirotaka@post.kek.jp [KEK, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba 305-0801, Ibaraki (Japan); Akemoto, Mitsuo; Arai, Yasuo; Araki, Sakae; Aryshev, Alexander; Fukuda, Masafumi; Fukuda, Shigeki; Haba, Junji; Hara, Kazufumi; Hayano, Hitoshi; Higashi, Yasuo; Honda, Yosuke; Honma, Teruya; Kako, Eiji; Kojima, Yuji; Kondo, Yoshinari; Lekomtsev, Konstantin; Matsumoto, Toshihiro; Michizono, Shinichiro; Miyoshi, Toshinobu [KEK, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba 305-0801, Ibaraki (Japan); and others

    2015-02-01

    Quasi-monochromatic X-rays with high brightness have a broad range of applications in fields such as life sciences, bio-, medical applications, and microlithography. One method for generating such X-rays is via inverse Compton scattering (ICS). X-ray generation experiments using ICS were carried out at the superconducting RF test facility (STF) accelerator at KEK. A new beam line, newly developed four-mirror optical cavity system, and new X-ray detector system were prepared for experiments downstream section of the STF electron accelerator. Amplified pulsed photons were accumulated into a four-mirror optical cavity and collided with an incoming 40 MeV electron beam. The generated X-rays were detected using a microchannel plate (MCP) detector for X-ray yield measurements and a new silicon-on-insulator (SOI) detector system for energy measurements. The detected X-ray yield by the MCP detector was 1756.8±272.2 photons/(244 electron bunches). To extrapolate this result to 1 ms train length under 5 Hz operations, 4.60×10{sup 5} photons/1%-bandwidth were obtained. The peak X-ray energy, which was confirmed by the SOI detector, was 29 keV, and this is consistent with ICS X-rays.

  2. Present Status of J-PARC Ring RF Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Yoshii, Masahito; Ezura, Eizi; Hara, Keigo; Hashimoto, Yoshinori; Nomura, Masahiro; Ohmori, Chihiro; Schnase, Alexander; Takagi, Akira; Tamura, Fumihiko; Toda, Makoto; Yamamoto, Masanobu

    2005-01-01

    The accelerator of the J-PARC complex consists of the 400 MeV (initially 181 MeV) linac, the rapid cycling 3 GeV Synchrotron and the 50 GeV main Synchrotron. To accelerate an ultra-high intense proton beam, the synchrotrons require a high field gradient rf system (~25kV/m). Alleviating space charge effects is a key issue for minimizing beam losses during a cycle. Longitudinal bunch manipulation is also considered as well as acceleration. Magnetic alloy loaded cavities are the most practical choice for the J-PARC. Such system provides high field gradient, and broadband behavior. It is a stable passive system without tuning control. Multi-tone signals can be fed into the same cavity for acceleration and bunch manipulation. However, the harmonics of circulating beam current within the cavity bandwidth must be taken into account. A feed-forward scheme is used for compensating the beam induced voltages. The low level rf system is fully digital to provide precise control. The specification is based on high reliabil...

  3. Spallation Neutron Source High Power RF Installation and Commissioning Progress

    CERN Document Server

    McCarthy, Michael P; Bradley, Joseph T; Fuja, Ray E; Gurd, Pamela; Hardek, Thomas; Kang, Yoon W; Rees, Daniel; Roybal, William; Young, Karen A

    2005-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) linac will provide a 1 GeV proton beam for injection into the accumulator ring. In the normal conducting (NC) section of this linac, the Radio Frequency Quadupole (RFQ) and six drift tube linac (DTL) tanks are powered by seven 2.5 MW, 402.5 MHz klystrons and the four coupled cavity linac (CCL) cavities are powered by four 5.0 MW, 805 MHz klystrons. Eighty-one 550 kW, 805 MHz klystrons each drive a single cavity in the superconducting (SC) section of the linac. The high power radio frequency (HPRF) equipment was specified and procured by LANL and tested before delivery to ensure a smooth transition from installation to commissioning. Installation of RF equipment to support klystron operation in the 350-meter long klystron gallery started in June 2002. The final klystron was set in place in September 2004. Presently, all RF stations have been installed and high power testing has been completed. This paper reviews the progression of the installation and testing of the HPRF Sys...

  4. Eighth CW and High Average Power RF Workshop

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    We are pleased to announce the next Continuous Wave and High Average RF Power Workshop, CWRF2014, to take place at Hotel NH Trieste, Trieste, Italy from 13 to 16 May, 2014. This is the eighth in the CWRF workshop series and will be hosted by Elettra - Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A. (www.elettra.eu). CWRF2014 will provide an opportunity for designers and users of CW and high average power RF systems to meet and interact in a convivial environment to share experiences and ideas on applications which utilize high-power klystrons, gridded tubes, combined solid-state architectures, high-voltage power supplies, high-voltage modulators, high-power combiners, circulators, cavities, power couplers and tuners. New ideas for high-power RF system upgrades and novel ways of RF power generation and distribution will also be discussed. CWRF2014 sessions will start on Tuesday morning and will conclude on Friday lunchtime. A visit to Elettra and FERMI will be organized during the workshop. ORGANIZING COMMITTEE (OC): Al...

  5. Resistivity changes in superconducting-cavity-grade Nb following high-energy proton irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snead, C.L. Jr.; Hanson, A.; Greene, G.A. [and others

    1997-12-01

    Niobium superconducting rf cavities are proposed for use in the proton LINAC accelerators for spallation-neutron applications. Because of accidental beam loss and continual halo losses along the accelerator path, concern for the degradation of the superconducting properties of the cavities with accumulating damage arises. Residual-resistivity-ratio (RRR) specimens of Nb, with a range of initial RRR`s were irradiated at room temperature with protons at energies from 200 to 2000 MeV. Four-probe resistance measurements were made at room temperature and at 4.2 K both prior to and after irradiation. Nonlinear increases in resistivity simulate expected behavior in cavity material after extended irradiation, followed by periodic anneals to room temperature: For RRR = 316 material, irradiations to (2 - 3) x 10{sup 15} p/cm{sup 2} produce degradations up to the 10% level, a change that is deemed operationally acceptable. Without. periodic warming to room temperature, the accumulated damage energy would be up to a factor of ten greater, resulting in unacceptable degradations. Likewise, should higher-RRR material be used, for the same damage energy imparted, relatively larger percentage changes in the RRR will result.

  6. Novel Photonic RF Spectrometer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Leveraging on recent breakthroughs in broadband photonic devices and components for RF and microwave applications, SML proposes a new type of broadband microwave...

  7. RF system modeling and controller design for the European XFEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Christian

    2011-06-15

    The European XFEL is being constructed at the Deutsche Elektronen Synchrotron DESY to generate intense, ultrashort pulses of highly coherent and monochromatic X-Rays for material science research. X-ray flashes are generated by accelerating electron bunches within superconducting cavities with radio frequency (RF) fields to energies up to 17.5 GeV. The digital control of these fields requires extremely high quality in order to achieve the physical processes of photon generation. DESY offers with FLASH a pilot test facility, allowing to test and develop most necessary components, even before the XFEL is conducted. Current field control is based on a proportional feedback controller in addition to a constant feedforward drive, which do not meet the high requirements of the XFEL. This thesis shows that a model based controller design can achieve the necessary field regulation requirements. A linear, time invariant ''black box model'' is estimated, which characterizes the essential dynamic behavior. This model is not based on physical assumptions, but describes exclusively the transfer behavior of the plant. The acceleration modules are operated in a pulsed mode, in which the RF field must be kept constant for a finite period. The character of the disturbances and variations from pulse-to-pulse, together with the properties of the system, require a combination of controlled feedforward drive and feedback. Generally unpredictable, low frequency pulse-to-pulse variations are suppressed by the feedback controller. The structural design of the complex multivariable feedback controller is given, which constrains the model based design approach to assign the controller parameters only. Estimation of the parameters, which can not be tuned manually, is done by the method of H{sub {infinity}} loop shaping which is often applied in modern control theory. However, disturbances within a pulse are in a high frequency range concerning the short pulse duration

  8. Modeling and design of an X-band rf photoinjector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Marsh

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A design for an X-band rf photoinjector that was developed jointly by SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL is presented. The photoinjector is based around a 5.59 cell rf gun that has state-of-the-art features including: elliptical contoured irises; improved mode separation; an optimized initial half cell length; a racetrack input coupler; and coupling that balances pulsed heating with cavity fill time. Radio-frequency and beam dynamics modeling have been done using a combination of codes including PARMELA, HFSS, IMPACT-T, ASTRA, and the ACE3P suite of codes developed at SLAC. The impact of lower gradient operation, magnet misalignment, solenoid multipole errors, beam offset, mode beating, wakefields, and beam line symmetry have been analyzed and are described. Fabrication and testing plans at both LLNL and SLAC are discussed.

  9. Electron pulse shaping in the FELIX RF accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Weits, H H; Oepts, D; Van der Meer, Alex F G

    1999-01-01

    The FELIX free-electron laser uses short pulses of relativistic electrons produced by an RF accelerator. The design target for the duration of these electron bunches was around 3 ps. In experiments we observed that the bunches emit coherently enhanced spontaneous emission (CSE) when they travel through an undulator. It was demonstrated that the power level of the CSE critically depends on the settings of the accelerator. In this article we seek to explain these observations by studying the length and shape of the electron bunches as a function of the settings of the accelerator. A particle- tracking model was used to simulate the acceleration and transport processes. These include bunch compression in a 14-cell travelling wave buncher cavity, acceleration in a travelling wave linear accelerator, and passage through a (dispersive) chicane structure. The effect of the phase setting of the RF accelerating field with respect to the arrival time of the electron bunch in each accelerator structure was studied. The ...

  10. TRANSIENT BEAM LOADING EFFECTS IN RF SYSTEMS IN JLEIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Haipeng [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Guo, Jiquan [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Rimmer, Robert A. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Wang, Shaoheng [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-05-01

    The pulsed electron bunch trains generated from the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) linac to inject into the proposed Jefferson Lab Electron Ion Collider (JLEIC) e-ring will produce transient beam loading effects in the Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) systems that, if not mitigated, could cause unacceptably large beam energy deviation in the injection capture, or exceed the energy acceptance of CEBAF’s recirculating arcs. In the electron storage ring, the beam abort or ion clearing gaps or uneven bucket filling can cause large beam phase transients in the (S)RF cavity control systems and even beam loss due to Robinson instability. We have first analysed the beam stability criteria in steady state and estimated the transient effect in Feedforward and Feedback RF controls. Initial analytical models for these effects are shown for the design of the JLEIC e-ring from 3GeV to 12GeV.

  11. Developement and initial operation of a 6 GHz subsystem for the RF control system of the S-DALINAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burandt, Christoph; Bonnes, Uwe; Eichhorn, Ralf; Konrad, Martin; Nonn, Patrick; Enders, Joachim [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    During 2010 a source of polarized electrons has been installed at the S-DALINAC. Spatial constraints as well as limited cathode charge lifetime necessitate an efficient compression of the electron bunches before they enter the superconducting accelerating cavities. The new injector design therefore contains a harmonic prebunching system consisting of two cavities operated at 3 GHz and 6 GHz, respectively. While 3 GHz components are at hand, 6 GHz components had to be developed and integrated into the new RF control system. The basic idea of the new digital control system is the down conversion of the RF signals to the base band. Therefore the low frequency part of each system can be used without adaptions, while the RF module required redevelopment. This talk covers the redesign of the existing 3 GHz RF module for 6 GHz and first experiences from the commissioning of the new prebuncher system at the S-DALINAC.

  12. Low-Power RF Tuning of the Spallation Neutron Source Warm LINAC Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Deibele, C

    2004-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is an accelerator-based neutron source being built at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A conventional 402.5 MHz drift-tube linac (DTL) accelerates the beam from 2.5 to 86 MeV, and the 805 MHz coupled-cavity linac (CCL) continues acceleration to 186 MeV. Tuning the six DTL tanks involves adjusting post-coupler lengths and slug tuners to achieve the design resonant frequency and stabilized field distribution. A 2.5 MW klystron feeds RF power into each DTL tank through a ridge-loaded waveguide that does not perturb either the frequency or field distribution in the tank. The CCL consists of 4 RF modules operating in the βλ/2 mode. Each module contains 96 accelerating cavities in 12 segments of 8 cavities each, 11 active bridge coupler cavities, and 106 nominally unexcited coupling cavities. For each RF module, power from a single 5 MW klystron splits once and drives bridge couplers 3 and 9. We will discuss the special tools and measurement techniques developed f...

  13. The Design of the Orthogonal Box Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moretti, Alfred; /Fermilab

    2010-09-15

    The muon collider and/or the neutrino factory require large accelerating electric field gradients immersed in large (3 to 6 T) solenoidal magnetic fields for ionization cooling of muon beams. Our original vacuum breakdown study demonstrated a loss of achievable peak accelerating gradient in solenoidal magnetic fields by a factor 2 or greater. The Muon Collaboration has developed a theory of a method to suppress high electric field breakdown in vacuum cavities needed for a Muon collider or neutrino factory. It has been shown in our studies and by others that high gradient electric field emitted electrons (dark current) are the primary cause of breakdown. A DC magnetic field orthogonal to the RF electric accelerating field prevents dark current high field emitted electrons from traveling across the accelerating gap and then will prevent breakdown. We have decided to test this theory by building a special cavity in the shape of vacuum box. Figure 1 is a simplified view of the cavity design. The design is based on an 805 MHz WR975 waveguide cavity resonating in the TE{sub 101} mode. For the TE{sub 101} mode the resonant frequency f{sub 0} is given by the relationship f{sub 0} = c[(I/a){sup 2} + (m/b){sup 2} + (n/d){sup 2}]{sup 0.5}/2 where a and d are the lengths of the base sides and b is the height of the box in MKS units and c is the velocity of light.

  14. Design of ERL Spoke Cavity For Non-Destructive Assay Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawamura, M.; Nagai, R.; Nishimori, N.; Hajima, R.

    2015-10-01

    We are proposing non-destructive assay system of nuclear materials with laser Compton scattering combined with an energy-recovery linac (ERL) and a laser. Since constructing accelerator system for nuclear safe guard and security requires small cavities, spoke cavities have many advantages such as shortening the distance between cavities, small frequency detune due to micro-phonics and easy adjustment of field distribution for strong cell coupling. Calculations of optimized cavity shape and HOM coupler shape have been performed and rf properties with aluminum spoke cavity model have been also measured. Considering refrigerator system required for superconducting accelerator, we are planning to develop 325MHz spoke cavity which can be practically operated with 4K liquid helium. We have started to fabricate the niobium one-spoke cavity.

  15. Recent progress on improving ICRF coupling and reducing RF-specific impurities in ASDEX Upgrade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Wei

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent scientific research on ASDEX Upgrade (AUG has greatly advanced solutions to two issues of Radio Frequency (RF heating in the Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF: (a the coupling of ICRF power to the plasma is significantly improved by density tailoring with local gas puffing; (b the release of RF-specific impurities is significantly reduced by minimizing the RF near field with 3-strap antennas. This paper summarizes the applied methods and reviews the associated achievements.

  16. Recent progress on improving ICRF coupling and reducing RF-specific impurities in ASDEX Upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Bobkov, Volodymyr; Noterdaeme, Jean-Marie; Tierens, Wouter; Aguiam, Diogo; Bilato, Roberto; Coster, David; Colas, Laurent; Crombé, Kristel; Fuenfgelder, Helmut; Faugel, Helmut; Feng, Yuhe; Jacquot, Jonathan; Jacquet, Philippe; Kallenbach, Arne; Kostic, Ana; Lunt, Tilmann; Maggiora, Riccardo; Ochoukov, Roman; Silva, Antonio; Suárez, Guillermo; Tuccilo, Angelo A.; Tudisco, Onofrio; Usoltceva, Mariia; Van Eester, Dirk; Wang, Yongsheng; Yang, Qingxi

    2017-10-01

    The recent scientific research on ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) has greatly advanced solutions to two issues of Radio Frequency (RF) heating in the Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF): (a) the coupling of ICRF power to the plasma is significantly improved by density tailoring with local gas puffing; (b) the release of RF-specific impurities is significantly reduced by minimizing the RF near field with 3-strap antennas. This paper summarizes the applied methods and reviews the associated achievements.

  17. Myopericytoma in nasal cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zimmermann, Elise

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The myopericytomas represent about 1% of the vascular tumors, is relatively common in the region of head and neck, 25% of the cases, and uncommon in the nasal and paranasal cavities. Objective: To describe one case of myopericytoma in nasal cavity. Case Report: We present a case of an adult patient, of the female sex, with complaints of nasal obstruction, pain in the nasal cavities region and eventual epistaxis in the right nasal cavity, which present an angiomatous and easily bleeding, non-pulsatile mass occupying all the right nasal cavity. Final Considerations: The myopericytomas are uncommon vascular tumors, rarely located in the nasal cavity and in the paranasal sinuses. They must be included in the differential diagnosis of the well delimited, vascular and slow growth masses upon computed tomography.

  18. Hydrodynamic Drag on Streamlined Projectiles and Cavities

    KAUST Repository

    Jetly, Aditya

    2016-04-19

    The air cavity formation resulting from the water-entry of solid objects has been the subject of extensive research due to its application in various fields such as biology, marine vehicles, sports and oil and gas industries. Recently we demonstrated that at certain conditions following the closing of the air cavity formed by the initial impact of a superhydrophobic sphere on a free water surface a stable streamlined shape air cavity can remain attached to the sphere. The formation of superhydrophobic sphere and attached air cavity reaches a steady state during the free fall. In this thesis we further explore this novel phenomenon to quantify the drag on streamlined shape cavities. The drag on the sphere-cavity formation is then compared with the drag on solid projectile which were designed to have self-similar shape to that of the cavity. The solid projectiles of adjustable weight were produced using 3D printing technique. In a set of experiments on the free fall of projectile we determined the variation of projectiles drag coefficient as a function of the projectiles length to diameter ratio and the projectiles specific weight, covering a range of intermediate Reynolds number, Re ~ 104 – 105 which are characteristic for our streamlined cavity experiments. Parallel free fall experiment with sphere attached streamlined air cavity and projectile of the same shape and effective weight clearly demonstrated the drag reduction effect due to the stress-free boundary condition at cavity liquid interface. The streamlined cavity experiments can be used as the upper bound estimate of the drag reduction by air layers naturally sustained on superhydrophobic surfaces in contact with water. In the final part of the thesis we design an experiment to test the drag reduction capacity of robust superhydrophobic coatings deposited on the surface of various model vessels.

  19. Studies of RF sheaths and diagnostics on IShTAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crombé, K., E-mail: Kristel.Crombe@UGent.be [Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); LPP-ERM/KMS, Royal Military Academy, Brussels (Belgium); Devaux, S.; Faudot, E.; Heuraux, S.; Moritz, J. [YIJL, UMR7198 CNRS-Université de Lorraine, Nancy (France); D’Inca, R.; Faugel, H.; Fünfgelder, H.; Jacquot, J.; Ochoukov, R. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Louche, F.; Tripsky, M.; Van Eester, D.; Wauters, T. [LPP-ERM/KMS, Royal Military Academy, Brussels (Belgium); Noterdaeme, J.-M. [Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany)

    2015-12-10

    IShTAR (Ion cyclotron Sheath Test ARrangement) is a linear magnetised plasma test facility for RF sheaths studies at the Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik in Garching. In contrast to a tokamak, a test stand provides more liberty to impose the parameters and gives better access for the instrumentation and antennas. The project will support the development of diagnostic methods for characterising RF sheaths and validate and improve theoretical predictions. The cylindrical vacuum vessel has a diameter of 1 m and is 1.1 m long. The plasma is created by an external cylindrical plasma source equipped with a helical antenna that has been designed to excite the m=1 helicon mode. In inductive mode, plasma densities and electron temperatures have been characterised with a planar Langmuir probe as a function of gas pressure and input RF power. A 2D array of RF compensated Langmuir probes and a spectrometer are planned. A single strap RF antenna has been designed; the plasma-facing surface is aligned to the cylindrical plasma to ease the modelling. The probes will allow direct measurements of plasma density profiles in front of the RF antenna, and thus a detailed study of the density modifications induced by RF sheaths, which influences the coupling. The RF antenna frequency has been chosen to study different plasma wave interactions: the accessible plasma density range includes an evanescent and propagative behaviour of slow or fast waves, and allows the study of the effect of the lower hybrid resonance layer.

  20. Optimizing SRF Gun Cavity Profiles in a Genetic Algorithm Framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alicia Hofler, Pavel Evtushenko, Frank Marhauser

    2009-09-01

    Automation of DC photoinjector designs using a genetic algorithm (GA) based optimization is an accepted practice in accelerator physics. Allowing the gun cavity field profile shape to be varied can extend the utility of this optimization methodology to superconducting and normal conducting radio frequency (SRF/RF) gun based injectors. Finding optimal field and cavity geometry configurations can provide guidance for cavity design choices and verify existing designs. We have considered two approaches for varying the electric field profile. The first is to determine the optimal field profile shape that should be used independent of the cavity geometry, and the other is to vary the geometry of the gun cavity structure to produce an optimal field profile. The first method can provide a theoretical optimal and can illuminate where possible gains can be made in field shaping. The second method can produce more realistically achievable designs that can be compared to existing designs. In this paper, we discuss the design and implementation for these two methods for generating field profiles for SRF/RF guns in a GA based injector optimization scheme and provide preliminary results.

  1. SRF cavity testing using a FPGA Self Excited Loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Zvi, I. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2017-08-30

    Various authors have previously studied the theory and practice of cavity testing, notably an extensive treatment by Powers [1] and Padamsee [2]. The advent of the digital Low Level RF (LLRF) electronics based on Field Programmable Logic Arrays (FPGA) provides various improvements over the rather complex systems used in the past as well as enabling new measurement techniques.In this document we reintroduce a technique that seems to have fallen out of practice in recent times, that is obtaining the coupling constant β through measurements from just one port, the reflected power port, of the directional coupler placed in front of the cavity.

  2. A Family of L-band SRF Cavities for High Power Proton Driver Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert Rimmer, Frank Marhauser

    2009-05-01

    Recent global interest in high duty factor or CW superconducting linacs with high average beam power highlights the need for robust and reliable SRF structures capable of delivering high average RF power to the beam with moderate HOM damping, low interception of halo and good efficiency. Potential applications include proton or H- drivers for spallation neutron sources, neutrino physics, waste transmutation, subcritical reactors, and high-intensity high-energy physics experiments. We describe a family of SRF cavities with a range of Betas capable of transporting beam currents in excess of 10 mA CW with large irises for minimal interception of halo and HOM and power couplers capable of supporting high average power operation. Goals include an efficient cell shape, high packing factor for efficient real-estate gradient and strong HOM damping to ensure stable beam operation,

  3. Optically measuring interior cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Gary Franklin

    2008-12-21

    A method of measuring the three-dimensional volume or perimeter shape of an interior cavity includes the steps of collecting a first optical slice of data that represents a partial volume or perimeter shape of the interior cavity, collecting additional optical slices of data that represents a partial volume or perimeter shape of the interior cavity, and combining the first optical slice of data and the additional optical slices of data to calculate of the three-dimensional volume or perimeter shape of the interior cavity.

  4. Fast Ferroelectric L-Band Tuner for Superconducting Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2011-03-01

    Analysis and modeling is presented for a fast microwave tuner to operate at 700 MHz which incorporates ferroelectric elements whose dielectric permittivity can be rapidly altered by application of an external voltage. This tuner could be used to correct unavoidable fluctuations in the resonant frequency of superconducting cavities in accelerator structures, thereby greatly reducing the RF power needed to drive the cavities. A planar test version of the tuner has been tested at low levels of RF power, but at 1300 MHz to minimize the physical size of the test structure. This test version comprises one-third of the final version. The tests show performance in good agreement with simulations, but with losses in the ferroelectric elements that are too large for practical use, and with issues in bonding of ferroelectric elements to the metal walls of the tuner structure.

  5. RF Group Annual Report 2011

    CERN Document Server

    Angoletta, M E; Betz, M; Brunner, O; Baudrenghien, P; Calaga, R; Caspers, F; Ciapala, E; Chambrillon, J; Damerau, H; Doebert, S; Federmann, S; Findlay, A; Gerigk, F; Hancock, S; Höfle, W; Jensen, E; Junginger, T; Liao, K; McMonagle, G; Montesinos, E; Mastoridis, T; Paoluzzi, M; Riddone, G; Rossi, C; Schirm, K; Schwerg, N; Shaposhnikova, E; Syratchev, I; Valuch, D; Venturini Delsolaro, W; Völlinger, C; Vretenar, M; Wuensch, W

    2012-01-01

    The highest priority for the RF group in 2011 was to contribute to a successful physics run of the LHC. This comprises operation of the superconducting 400 MHz accelerating system (ACS) and the transverse damper (ADT) of the LHC itself, but also all the individual links of the injector chain upstream of the LHC – Linac2, the PSB, the PS and the SPS – don’t forget that it is RF in all these accelerators that truly accelerates! A large variety of RF systems had to operate reliably, often near their limit. New tricks had to be found and implemented to go beyond limits; not to forget the equally demanding operation with Pb ions using in addition Linac3 and LEIR. But also other physics users required the full attention of the RF group: CNGS required in 2011 beams with very short, intense bunches, AD required reliable deceleration and cooling of anti-protons, Isolde the post-acceleration of radioactive isotopes in Rex, just to name a few. In addition to the supply of beams for physics, the RF group has a num...

  6. RF & wireless technologies know it all

    CERN Document Server

    Fette, Bruce A; Chandra, Praphul; Dobkin, Daniel M; Bensky, Dan; Miron, Douglas B; Lide, David; Dowla, Farid; Olexa, Ron

    2007-01-01

    The Newnes Know It All Series takes the best of what our authors have written to create hard-working desk references that will be an engineer's first port of call for key information, design techniques and rules of thumb. Guaranteed not to gather dust on a shelf!RF (radio frequency) and wireless technologies drive communication today. This technology and its applications enable wireless phones, portable device roaming, and short-range industrial and commercial application communication such as the supply chain management wonder, RFID. Up-to-date information regarding software defined R

  7. Superconducting Cavity Control and Model Identification Based on Active Disturbance Rejection Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Zheqiao

    2017-03-01

    Superconducting cavities are widely used in linear accelerator facilities all over the world. It is challenging for the low level RF (LLRF) system to stabilize the RF field inside the cavities working in pulsed mode with heavy beam loading and strong Lorenz force detuning. Feedback loops are implemented in LLRF system which should have fast responses to the disturbances on cavities. To enhance the feedback performance, active compensation of Lorenz force detuning with Piezo tuners and the compensation of beam loading with feed forward control are strongly needed. They all require the knowledge of cavity parameters, such as the quality factor, time varying detuning and the amplitude and phase of the beam. A disturbance observer based on the active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) was designed for superconducting cavities counting the Lorenz force detuning and beam loading as disturbances to the cavities. The ADRC disturbance observer can be integrated into LLRF feedback loops to speed up the responses to disturbances and the outputs of the observer are interpreted furtherly to identify the cavity parameters. This paper presents the algorithm and architecture of the ADRC disturbance observer, the simulation of the LLRF feedback loop with disturbance rejection and the cavity parameter identification applied on the archived data of superconducting cavities in operation.

  8. Superconducting multi-cell trapped mode deflecting cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lunin, Andrei; Khabiboulline, Timergali; Gonin, Ivan; Yakovlev, Vyacheslav; Zholents, Alexander

    2017-10-10

    A method and system for beam deflection. The method and system for beam deflection comprises a compact superconducting RF cavity further comprising a waveguide comprising an open ended resonator volume configured to operate as a trapped dipole mode; a plurality of cells configured to provide a high operating gradient; at least two pairs of protrusions configured for lowering surface electric and magnetic fields; and a main power coupler positioned to optimize necessary coupling for an operating mode and damping lower dipole modes simultaneously.

  9. Ion bombardment in RF photoguns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pozdeyev,E.; Kayran, D.; Litvinenko, V. N.

    2009-05-04

    A linac-ring eRHIC design requires a high-intensity CW source of polarized electrons. An SRF gun is viable option that can deliver the required beam. Numerical simulations presented elsewhere have shown that ion bombardment can occur in an RF gun, possibly limiting lifetime of a NEA GaAs cathode. In this paper, we analytically solve the equations of motion of ions in an RF gun using the ponderomotive potential of the Rf field. We apply the method to the BNL 1/2-cell SRF photogun and demonstrate that a significant portion of ions produced in the gun can reach the cathode if no special precautions are taken. Also, the paper discusses possible mitigation techniques that can reduce the rate of ion bombardment.

  10. Dealing with Multipacting in Fundamental Power Couplers for SRF Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mircea Stirbet

    2005-03-19

    Multipacting events are well known and bothersome discharge phenomena specific to vacuum and RF exposed surfaces. Left uncontrolled, these events could affect normal machine operation, limiting performance or inducing irreversible damage of critical components such as ceramic windows. Numerical simulations have been developed and their predictions fit fairly well with real multipacting events in coaxial lines or waveguide-type fundamental power couplers. Controlling multipacting must be considered from the design stage, as well as during manufacture of subassemblies or preparation of the coupler for cavity assembly. All fundamental power couplers must be conditioned using a high power RF source, and during this process, restricting multipacting by adequate instrumentation should be considered. After RF conditioning, during beam acceleration, control of multipacting is achieved with field perturbation methods. This paper summarizes our experience in dealing with multipacting in CW or pulsed fundamental power couplers (LEP, LHC, SNS and RIA) for SRF cavities. The SNS fundamental power coupler is used as an example for controlling multipacting during high power RF conditioning.

  11. Commissioning of the 112 MHz SRF Gun and 500 MHz bunching cavities for the CeC PoP Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belomestnykh, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Ben-Zvi, I. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Brutus, J. C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Litvinenko, V. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); McIntosh, P. [Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC), Daresbury (United Kingdom). Daresbury Lab.; Moss, A. [Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC), Daresbury (United Kingdom). Daresbury Lab.; Narayan, G. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Orfin, P. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Pinayev, I. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Rao, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Skaritka, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Smith, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Than, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Tuozzolo, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wang, E. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wheelhouse, A. [Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC), Daresbury (United Kingdom). Daresbury Lab.; Wu, Q. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Xiao, B. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Xin, T. [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Xu, W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Zaltsman, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-05-03

    The Coherent electron Cooling Proof-of-Principle (CeC PoP) experiment at BNL includes a short electron linac. During Phase 1, a 112 MHz superconducting RF photo-emission gun and two 500 MHz normal conducting bunching cavities were installed and are under commissioning. The paper describes the Phase1 linac layout and presents commissioning results for the cavities and associated RF, cryogenic and other sub-systems

  12. High-power Microwave Pulse Compression of Klystrons by Phase-Modulation of High-Q Storage Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Bossart, Rudolf; Mourier, J; Syratchev, I V; Tanner, L

    2004-01-01

    At the CERN linear electron accelerators LIL and CTF, the peak RF power from the 3GHz-klystrons was doubled by means of LIPS microwave pulse compressors. To produce constant RF power from the cavity-based pulse compressors, the klystrons were driven by a fast RF-phase modulation program. For the CLIC Test Facility CTF3, a new type of a Barrel Open Cavity (BOC) with a high quality factor Q0 has been developed. Contrary to LIPS with two resonant cavities, BOC operates with a single cavity supporting two orthogonal resonant modes TM 10,1,1 in the same cavity. For both LIPS and BOC storage cavities, it is important that the RF power reflected back to the klystron is minimal. This implies that the resonant frequencies, Q-factors and coupling factors of the two resonant modes of a pulse compressor are closely matched, and that the resonant frequencies are accurate to within a few KHz. The effects of small differences between the two orthogonal modes of the BOC cavity have been investigated. The dynamic pulse respon...

  13. Superconducting cavities for LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1983-01-01

    Above: a 350 MHz superconducting accelerating cavity in niobium of the type envisaged for accelerating electrons and positrons in later phases of LEP. Below: a small 1 GHz cavity used for investigating the surface problems of superconducting niobium. Albert Insomby stays on the right. See Annual Report 1983 p. 51.

  14. SPS accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1980-01-01

    One of the SPS acceleration cavities (200 MHz, travelling wave structure). On the ceiling one sees the coaxial transmission line which feeds the power from the amplifier, located in a surface building above, to the upstream end of the cavity. See 7603195 for more details, 7411032 for the travelling wave structure, and also 8104138, 8302397.

  15. SPS accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1981-01-01

    One of the SPS accelerating cavities (200 MHz, travelling wave structure). The power that is fed into the upstream end of the cavity is extracted at the downstream end and sent into a dump load. See 7603195 for more details, 7411032 for the travelling wave structure, and also 8011289, 8302397.

  16. Plasma Treatment of Single-Cell Niobium SRF Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Upadhyay, M. Nikolić, S. Popović, L. Vušković, H.L. Phillips, A-M. Valente-Feliciano

    2011-03-01

    Superconducting radio frequency cavities of bulk Niobium are integral components of particle accelerators based on superconducting technology. Wet chemical processing is the commonly used procedure for impurities and surface defects removal and surface roughness improvement , both required to improve the RF performance of the cavity. We are studying plasma etching as an alternate technique to process these cavities. The uniformity of the plasma sheath at the inner wall of the cavity is one prerequisite for its uniform etching. We are developing electro-optic diagnostic techniques to assess the plasma uniformity. Multiple electro-optical probes are placed at different locations of the single cell cavity to diagnose the electrical and optical properties of the plasma. The electrical parameters are required to understand the kinetic nature of the plasma and the optical emission spectroscopy provides the spatial distribution of radicals in the plasma. The spatial variation of the plasma parameters inside the cavity and their effect on the etching of niobium samples placed at different locations in the cavity will be presented.

  17. A Non-invasive Technique for Configuring Low Level RF Feedback Loops in PEP-II

    CERN Document Server

    Teytelman, Dmitry

    2005-01-01

    The RF system of the PEP-II collider uses two fast feedback loops around each klystron and set of cavities. These loops reduce the impedance of the fundamental mode of the accelerating cavities seen by the beam, and are necessary to reduce the growth rates of longitudinal modes within the RF system bandwidth. Operation of the accelerator at high beam currents is very sensitive to the configuration of the low-level RF feedback loops. There are 7 loop control parameters that strongly influence the stability of the feedback loops and the achieved level of longitudinal impedance reduction. Diagnostic techniques for the analysis of the RF feedback via closed-loop system transfer function measurements will be presented. The model is fit to the measured closed-loop transfer function data and the extracted parameters are then used to calculate optimal tuning and corrections to the loop control elements in the physical channel. These techniques allow fine-tuning of RF feedback with stored beam as well as diagnosis of ...

  18. RF Loads for Energy Recovery

    CERN Document Server

    Federmann, S; Caspers, F

    2012-01-01

    Different conceptional designs for RF high power loads are presented. One concept implies the use of solid state rectifier modules for direct RF to DC conversion with efficiencies beyond 80%. In addition, robust metallic low-Q resonant structures, capable of operating at high temperatures (>150 ◦C) are discussed. Another design deals with a very high temperature (up to 800 ◦C) air cooled load using a ceramic foam block inside a metal enclosure. This porous ceramic block is the microwave absorber and is not brazed to the metallic enclosure.

  19. High-Energy Ion Linacs Based on Spoke Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Shephard, K W; Ostromov, P N

    2003-01-01

    The applicability of superconducting TEM-class spoke cavities to high-energy ion linacs is discussed, and detailed designs for two TEM-class, triple-spoke-loaded superconducting niobium resonant cavities are presented. The 345 MHz cavities have a velocity range of 0.4cavities offer several advantages compared with the higher-frequency elliptical-cell cavities that are currently being developed for this range of particle velocities. The proposed triple-spoke cavities can provide broader velocity acceptance, more accelerating voltage per cavity, reduced heat load, operation at 4.5 K, and increased longitudinal acceptance. Application to the proposed RIA driver linac is discussed in detail.

  20. Geometric characteristics of silicon cavities etched in EDP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Hui; Ohta, Takayuki; Ito, Masafumi; Sasaki, Minoru; Hane, Kazuhiro; Hori, Masaru

    2007-05-01

    Etching characteristics of hexagonal and triangular cavities on a lang1 1 1rang-oriented silicon wafer in the etchant of ethylene diamine, pyrocatechol and water (EDP/EPW) were investigated. The patterns are aligned to keep the sides perpendicular to lang1 1 0rang crystal orientations, in order that the sidewalls of cavities are parallel to {1 1 0} crystalline planes. RIE-ICP etching is used to define the depth of the triangular and hexagonal cavities, and EDP etching is followed for different etching times. The final self-etch-stop profiles of cavities are determined by the dimension of mask patterns and the depth of cavities in the wafer. The etching process of the hexagon and triangle cavities is modeled, based on the crystal structure and wet etching principle. The results of etched cavities confirm the condition to determine the final etching profiles.

  1. Generalization of susceptibility of RF systems through far-field pattern superposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdin, B.; Debroux, P.

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this paper is to perform an analysis of RF (Radio Frequency) communication systems in a large electromagnetic environment to identify its susceptibility to jamming systems. We propose a new method that incorporates the use of reciprocity and superposition of the far-field radiation pattern of the RF system and the far-field radiation pattern of the jammer system. By using this method we can find the susceptibility pattern of RF systems with respect to the elevation and azimuth angles. A scenario was modeled with HFSS (High Frequency Structural Simulator) where the radiation pattern of the jammer was simulated as a cylindrical horn antenna. The RF jamming entry point used was a half-wave dipole inside a cavity with apertures that approximates a land-mobile vehicle, the dipole approximates a leaky coax cable. Because of the limitation of the simulation method, electrically large electromagnetic environments cannot be quickly simulated using HFSS's finite element method (FEM). Therefore, the combination of the transmit antenna radiation pattern (horn) superimposed onto the receive antenna pattern (dipole) was performed in MATLAB. A 2D or 3D susceptibility pattern is obtained with respect to the azimuth and elevation angles. In addition, by incorporating the jamming equation into this algorithm, the received jamming power as a function of distance at the RF receiver Pr(Φr, θr) can be calculated. The received power depends on antenna properties, propagation factor and system losses. Test cases include: a cavity with four apertures, a cavity above an infinite ground plane, and a land-mobile vehicle approximation. By using the proposed algorithm a susceptibility analysis of RF systems in electromagnetic environments can be performed.

  2. A Three-Cell Superconducting Deflecting Cavity Design for the ALS at LBNL

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Jiaru; Chen Huai Bi; Li, Derun; Zheng, Shuxin

    2005-01-01

    Deflecting RF cavities can be used to generate sub-pico-second x-rays by creating correlations between longitudinal and transverse phase space of electron bunches in radiation devices. Up to 2-MV defecting voltage at 1.5-GHz is required for 1.9-GeV electron beam at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at LBNL. We present a conceptual design for a 1.5-GHz three-cell superconducting RF cavity and its coupler. The cavity geometry and deflecting shunt impedance are optimized using MAFIA code. The cavity impedance from lower and higher order modes (LOM and HOM) are computed. Possible schemes for damping most harmful LOM and HOM modes are discussed and simulated.

  3. DESIGN, PROTOTYPE AND MEASUREMENT OF A SINGLE-CELL DEFLECTING CAVITY FOR THE ADVANCED PHOTON SOURCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haipeng Wang, Guangfeng Cheng, Gianluigi Ciovati, Peter Kneisel, Robert Rimmer, Kai Tian, Larry Turlington, Alireza Nassiri, Geoff Waldschmidt

    2009-05-01

    After the design optimization of a squashed elliptical shape, single-cell, superconducting (SC) deflecting cavity at 2.815 GHz, a copper prototype has been bench measured to determine its rf properties and the effectiveness of waveguide damping of parasitic modes [1]. RF cold tests were also performed at 2K on niobium single-cell and two-cell prototype cavities. Details of impedance calculation using wakefiled analysis of the single-cell cavity are shown to meet the strict 200 mA beam stability requirement of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Lab where a total of 16 single-cell cavities will be divided into two cryomodule. The design of higher-order mode (HOM) waveguide damping, the simulations of the Lorenz force detuning, and the prototype of on-cell damping are presented.

  4. Reproducibility of High-Q SRF Cavities by High Temperature Heat Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhakal, Pashupati [JLAB; Ciovati, Gianluigi [JLAB; Kneisel, Peter [JLAB; Myneni, Ganapati Rao [JLAB

    2014-07-01

    Recent work on high-temperature (> 600 °C) heat treatment of ingot Nb cavities in a customized vacuum furnace for several hours showed the possibility of achieving Q0-values of up to ~5×1010 at 2.0 K, 1.5 GHz and accelerating gradients of ~20 MV/m. This contribution presents results on further studies of the heat treatment process to produce cavities with high Q0 values for continuous-wave accelerator application. Single-cell cavities of different Nb purity have been processed through few cycles of heat-treatments and chemical etching. Measurements of Q0 as a function of temperature at low RF field and of Q0 as a function of the RF field at or below 2.0 K have been made after each treatment. Measurements by TOF-SIMS of the impurities depth profiles were made on samples heat treated with the cavities.

  5. Trimming algorithm of frequency modulation for CIAE-230 MeV proton superconducting synchrocyclotron model cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Pengzhan, E-mail: lipengzhan@ciae.ac.cn; Zhang, Tianjue; Ji, Bin; Hou, Shigang; Guo, Juanjuan; Yin, Meng; Xing, Jiansheng; Lv, Yinlong; Guan, Fengping; Lin, Jun

    2017-01-21

    A new project, the 230 MeV proton superconducting synchrocyclotron for cancer therapy, was proposed at CIAE in 2013. A model cavity is designed to verify the frequency modulation trimming algorithm featuring a half-wave structure and eight sets of rotating blades for 1 kHz frequency modulation. Based on the electromagnetic (EM) field distribution analysis of the model cavity, the variable capacitor works as a function of time and the frequency can be written in Maclaurin series. Curve fitting is applied for theoretical frequency and original simulation frequency. The second-order fitting excels at the approximation given its minimum variance. Constant equivalent inductance is considered as an important condition in the calculation. The equivalent parameters of theoretical frequency can be achieved through this conversion. Then the trimming formula for rotor blade outer radius is found by discretization in time domain. Simulation verification has been performed and the results show that the calculation radius with minus 0.012 m yields an acceptable result. The trimming amendment in the time range of 0.328–0.4 ms helps to reduce the frequency error to 0.69% in Simulation C with an increment of 0.075 mm/0.001 ms, which is half of the error in Simulation A (constant radius in 0.328–0.4 ms). The verification confirms the feasibility of the trimming algorithm for synchrocyclotron frequency modulation. - Highlights: • A model cavity is designed to verify the trimming algorithm of frequency modulation. • The RF frequency is expressed by fitting approximation and Maclaurin series. • The variable capacitor of the cavity works as a function of time. • The trimming formula for blade radius is found by discretization in time domain. • The amendment solution helps to reduce the frequency error.

  6. Methodology for performing RF reliability experiments on a generic test structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sasse, G.T.; de Vries, Rein J.; Schmitz, Jurriaan

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses a new technique developed for generating well defined RF large voltage swing signals for on wafer experiments. This technique can be employed for performing a broad range of different RF reliability experiments on one generic test structure. The frequency dependence of a

  7. Industrial RF Linac Experiences and Laboratory Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Peiniger, M

    2004-01-01

    Since more than two decades ACCEL Instruments GmbH at Bergisch Gladbach (formerly Siemens/Interatom) is supplying the worldwide accelerator labs with key components like rf cavities and power couplers, s.c. magnets, insertion devices, vacuum chambers and x-ray beamline equipment. Starting with the design and production of turn key SRF accelerating modules in the late 80th, meanwhile ACCEL is engineering, manufacturing, on site commissioning and servicing complete accelerators with guaranteed beam performance. Today, with a staff of more than 100 physicists and engineers and about the same number of manufacturing specialists in our dedicated production facilities, ACCEL's know how and sales volume in this field has accumulated to more than 2000 man years and several hundred Mio €, respectively. Basis of our steady development is a cooperative partnership with the world leading research labs in the respective fields. As an example, for the supply of a turn key 100 MeV injector linac for the Swiss Ligh...

  8. Investigation of Thermal Acoustic Effects on SRF Cavities within CM1 at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGee, Mike [Fermilab; Harms, Elvin [Fermilab; Klebaner, Arkadiy [Fermilab; Leibfritz, Jerry [Fermilab; Martinez, Alex [Fermilab; Pischalnikov, Yuriy [Fermilab; Schappert, Warren [Fermilab

    2016-06-01

    Two TESLA-style 8-cavity cryomodules have been operated at Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST), formerly the Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) Accelerator Test Facility. Operational instabilities were revealed during Radio Frequency (RF) power studies. These observations were complemented by the characterization of thermal acoustic effects on cavity microphonics manifested by apparent noisy boiling of helium involving vapor bubble and liquid vibration. The thermal acoustic measurements also consider pressure and temperature spikes which drive the phenomenon at low and high frequencies.

  9. Compact Superconducting Radio-frequency Accelerators and Innovative RF Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kephart, Robert [Fermilab; Chattopadhyay, Swaapan [Northern Illinois U.; Milton, Stephen [Colorado State U.

    2015-04-10

    We will present several new technical and design breakthroughs that enable the creation of a new class of compact linear electron accelerators for industrial purposes. Use of Superconducting Radio-Frequency (SRF) cavities allow accelerators less than 1.5 M in length to create electron beams beyond 10 MeV and with average beam powers measured in 10’s of KW. These machines can have the capability to vary the output energy dynamically to produce brehmstrahlung x-rays of varying spectral coverage for applications such as rapid scanning of moving cargo for security purposes. Such compact accelerators will also be cost effective for many existing and new industrial applications. Examples include radiation crosslinking of plastics and rubbers, creation of pure materials with surface properties radically altered from the bulk, modification of bulk or surface optical properties of materials, sterilization of medical instruments animal solid or liquid waste, and destruction of organic compounds in industrial waste water effluents. Small enough to be located on a mobile platform, such accelerators will enable new remediation methods for chemical and biological spills and/or in-situ crosslinking of materials. We will describe one current design under development at Fermilab including plans for prototype and value-engineering to reduce costs. We will also describe development of new nano-structured field-emitter arrays as sources of electrons, new methods for fabricating and cooling superconducting RF cavities, and a new novel RF power source based on magnetrons with full phase and amplitude control.

  10. Reliability engineering in RF CMOS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sasse, G.T.

    2008-01-01

    In this thesis new developments are presented for reliability engineering in RF CMOS. Given the increase in use of CMOS technology in applications for mobile communication, also the reliability of CMOS for such applications becomes increasingly important. When applied in these applications, CMOS is

  11. Broadband direct RF digitization receivers

    CERN Document Server

    Jamin, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    This book discusses the trade-offs involved in designing direct RF digitization receivers for the radio frequency and digital signal processing domains.  A system-level framework is developed, quantifying the relevant impairments of the signal processing chain, through a comprehensive system-level analysis.  Special focus is given to noise analysis (thermal noise, quantization noise, saturation noise, signal-dependent noise), broadband non-linear distortion analysis, including the impact of the sampling strategy (low-pass, band-pass), analysis of time-interleaved ADC channel mismatches, sampling clock purity and digital channel selection. The system-level framework described is applied to the design of a cable multi-channel RF direct digitization receiver. An optimum RF signal conditioning, and some algorithms (automatic gain control loop, RF front-end amplitude equalization control loop) are used to relax the requirements of a 2.7GHz 11-bit ADC. A two-chip implementation is presented, using BiCMOS and 65nm...

  12. RF breakdown by toroidal helicons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bounded whistlers are well-known for their efficient plasma production capabilities in thin cylindrical tubes. ... evolution processes in a pulse RF plasma produced by toroidal helicons. 2. Experimental set-up and .... of probe potential to show initial hump and transient nature of sheath at the end of the pulse. It is to check the ...

  13. Simple Theory of Thermal Fatigue Caused by RF Pulse Heating

    CERN Document Server

    Kuzikov, S

    2004-01-01

    The projects of electron-positron linear colliders imply that accelerating structures and other RF components will undergo action of extremely high RF fields. Except for breakdown threat there is an effect of the damage due to multi-pulse mechanical stress caused by Ohmic heating of the skin layer. A new theory of the thermal fatigue is considered. The theory is based on consideration of the quasi-elastic interaction between neighbor grains of metal due to the expansion of the thermal skin-layer. The developed theory predicts a total number of the RF pulses needed for surface degradation in dependence on temperature rise, pulse duration, and average temperature. The unknown coefficients in the final formula were found, using experimental data obtained at 11.4 GHz for the copper. In order to study the thermal fatigue at higher frequencies and to compare experimental and theoretical results, the experimental investigation of degradation of the copper cavity exposed to 30 GHz radiation is carried out now, basing...

  14. Superconducting TESLA cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aune, B.; Bandelmann, R.; Bloess, D.; Bonin, B.; Bosotti, A.; Champion, M.; Crawford, C.; Deppe, G.; Dwersteg, B.; Edwards, D. A.; Edwards, H. T.; Ferrario, M.; Fouaidy, M.; Gall, P.-D.; Gamp, A.; Gössel, A.; Graber, J.; Hubert, D.; Hüning, M.; Juillard, M.; Junquera, T.; Kaiser, H.; Kreps, G.; Kuchnir, M.; Lange, R.; Leenen, M.; Liepe, M.; Lilje, L.; Matheisen, A.; Möller, W.-D.; Mosnier, A.; Padamsee, H.; Pagani, C.; Pekeler, M.; Peters, H.-B.; Peters, O.; Proch, D.; Rehlich, K.; Reschke, D.; Safa, H.; Schilcher, T.; Schmüser, P.; Sekutowicz, J.; Simrock, S.; Singer, W.; Tigner, M.; Trines, D.; Twarowski, K.; Weichert, G.; Weisend, J.; Wojtkiewicz, J.; Wolff, S.; Zapfe, K.

    2000-09-01

    The conceptional design of the proposed linear electron-positron collider TESLA is based on 9-cell 1.3 GHz superconducting niobium cavities with an accelerating gradient of Eacc>=25 MV/m at a quality factor Q0>=5×109. The design goal for the cavities of the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) linac was set to the more moderate value of Eacc>=15 MV/m. In a first series of 27 industrially produced TTF cavities the average gradient at Q0 = 5×109 was measured to be 20.1+/-6.2 MV/m, excluding a few cavities suffering from serious fabrication or material defects. In the second production of 24 TTF cavities, additional quality control measures were introduced, in particular, an eddy-current scan to eliminate niobium sheets with foreign material inclusions and stringent prescriptions for carrying out the electron-beam welds. The average gradient of these cavities at Q0 = 5×109 amounts to 25.0+/-3.2 MV/m with the exception of one cavity suffering from a weld defect. Hence only a moderate improvement in production and preparation techniques will be needed to meet the ambitious TESLA goal with an adequate safety margin. In this paper we present a detailed description of the design, fabrication, and preparation of the TESLA Test Facility cavities and their associated components and report on cavity performance in test cryostats and with electron beam in the TTF linac. The ongoing research and development towards higher gradients is briefly addressed.

  15. Cavity-enhanced spectroscopies

    CERN Document Server

    van Zee, Roger

    2003-01-01

    ""Cavity-Enhanced Spectroscopy"" discusses the use of optical resonators and lasers to make sensitive spectroscopic measurements. This volume is written by the researcchers who pioneered these methods. The book reviews both the theory and practice behind these spectroscopic tools and discusses the scientific discoveries uncovered by these techniques. It begins with a chapter on the use of optical resonators for frequency stabilization of lasers, which is followed by in-depth chapters discussing cavity ring-down spectroscopy, frequency-modulated, cavity-enhanced spectroscopy, intracavity spectr

  16. Higher-order mode-based cavity misalignment measurements at the free-electron laser FLASH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellert, Thorsten; Baboi, Nicoleta; Shi, Liangliang

    2017-12-01

    At the Free-Electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH) and the European X-Ray Free-Electron Laser, superconducting TeV-energy superconducting linear accelerator (TESLA)-type cavities are used for the acceleration of electron bunches, generating intense free-electron laser (FEL) beams. A long rf pulse structure allows one to accelerate long bunch trains, which considerably increases the efficiency of the machine. However, intrabunch-train variations of rf parameters and misalignments of rf structures induce significant trajectory variations that may decrease the FEL performance. The accelerating cavities are housed inside cryomodules, which restricts the ability for direct alignment measurements. In order to determine the transverse cavity position, we use a method based on beam-excited dipole modes in the cavities. We have developed an efficient measurement and signal processing routine and present its application to multiple accelerating modules at FLASH. The measured rms cavity offset agrees with the specification of the TESLA modules. For the first time, the tilt of a TESLA cavity inside a cryomodule is measured. The preliminary result agrees well with the ratio between the offset and angle dependence of the dipole mode which we calculated with eigenmode simulations.

  17. Design of a multi beam klystron cavity from its single beam parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kant, Deepender, E-mail: dkc@ceeri.ernet.in; Joshi, L. M. [CSIR-Central Electronics Engineering Research Institute, Pilani (India); Janyani, Vijay [Department of ECE, MNIT, Jaipur (India)

    2016-03-09

    The klystron is a well-known microwave amplifier which uses kinetic energy of an electron beam for amplification of the RF signal. There are some limitations of conventional single beam klystron such as high operating voltage, low efficiency and bulky size at higher power levels, which are very effectively handled in Multi Beam Klystron (MBK) that uses multiple low purveyance electron beams for RF interaction. Each beam propagates along its individual transit path through a resonant cavity structure. Multi-Beam klystron cavity design is a critical task due to asymmetric cavity structure and can be simulated by 3D code only. The present paper shall discuss the design of multi beam RF cavities for klystrons operating at 2856 MHz (S-band) and 5 GHz (C-band) respectively. The design approach uses some scaling laws for finding the electron beam parameters of the multi beam device from their single beam counter parts. The scaled beam parameters are then used for finding the design parameters of the multi beam cavities. Design of the desired multi beam cavity can be optimized through iterative simulations in CST Microwave Studio.

  18. Passive RF component technology materials, techniques, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Guoan

    2012-01-01

    Focusing on novel materials and techniques, this pioneering volume provides you with a solid understanding of the design and fabrication of smart RF passive components. You find comprehensive details on LCP, metal materials, ferrite materials, nano materials, high aspect ratio enabled materials, green materials for RFID, and silicon micromachining techniques. Moreover, this practical book offers expert guidance on how to apply these materials and techniques to design a wide range of cutting-edge RF passive components, from MEMS switch based tunable passives and 3D passives, to metamaterial-bas

  19. LS1 Report: A stubborn cavity will soon be replaced

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Testing on the LHC’s replacement RF cryomodule was completed last week in SM18. This module will bring them all to design-level, replacing a faulty cavity that has been acting up since the machine’s start-up.   A LHC cryomodule undergoes testing in SM18. Distributed between four cryomodules, the LHC is home to a total of 16 radiofrequency (RF) cavities. Each is designed to provide a 2 MV accelerating field… and all but one has been succeeding at this job. Ever since the machine’s startup, one stubborn cavity in a Point 4 module has quenched whenever it had to stay at 2 MV. The accelerator team found that no amount of conditioning could get the cavity to behave, and the highest continuous wave voltage it could perform at was 1.3 MV. “This was fine for physics,” says Pierre Maesen, who is leading the repair and replacement of the LHC’s cryomodules. “We were able to compensate for this ‘missing’...

  20. Portable 433 MHz RFQ linac RF system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vorogushin, M.F. [Efremov Scientific Research Inst. of Electrophysical Apparatus, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1994-12-31

    Principle and experimental analysis of RF power feed system, based on 3 db directional couplers, for undesirable modes eliminating, divided power coupling with the RFQ accelerating structure, endotron type RF power source matching, are presented. The structure fine tuning and the system adjustment results and high-speed RF autocontrol system design are considered also.

  1. RF digital-to-analog converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, P.H.; Yu, D.U.L.

    1995-02-28

    A digital-to-analog converter is disclosed for producing an RF output signal proportional to a digital input word of N bits from an RF reference input, N being an integer greater or equal to 2. The converter comprises a plurality of power splitters, power combiners and a plurality of mixers or RF switches connected in a predetermined configuration. 18 figs.

  2. Preliminary Results of Nb Thin Film Coating for HIE-ISOLDE SRF Cavities Obtained by Magnetron Sputtering

    CERN Document Server

    Sublet, A; Calatroni, S; D'Elia, A; Jecklin, N; Mondino, I; Prunet, S; Therasse, M; Venturini Delsolaro, W; Zhang, P

    2013-01-01

    In the context of the HIE-ISOLDE upgrade at CERN, several new facilities for the niobium sputter coating of QWR-type superconducting RF accelerating cavities have been developed, built, and successfully operated. In order to further optimize the production process of these cavities the magnetron sputtering technique has been further investigated and continued as an alternative to the already successfully operational DC bias diode sputtering method. The purpose of this poster is to present the results obtained with this technique. The Nb thickness profile along the cavity and its correlation with the electro-magnetic field distribution inside the cavity are discussed. Film structure, morphology and Residual Resistivity Ratio (RRR) will be considered as well and compared with films obtained by DC bias diode sputtering. Finally these results will be compared with RF measurement of a production-like magnetron-coated cavity.

  3. Glycol-Substitute for High Power RF Water Loads

    CERN Document Server

    Ebert, Michael

    2005-01-01

    In water loads for high power rf applications, power is dissipated directly into the coolant. Loads for frequencies below approx. 1GHz are ordinarily using an ethylene glycol-water mixture as coolant. The rf systems at DESY utilize about 100 glycol water loads with powers ranging up to 600kW. Due to the increased ecological awareness, the use of glycol is now considered to be problematic. In EU it is forbidden to discharge glycol into the waste water system. In case of cooling system leakages one has to make sure that no glycol is lost. Since it is nearly impossible to avoid any glycol loss in large rf systems, a glycol-substitute was searched for and found. The found sodium-molybdate based substitute is actually a additive for corrosion protection in water systems. Sodium-molybdate is ecologically harmless; for instance, it is also used as fertilizer in agriculture. A homoeopathic dose of 0.4% mixed into deionised water gives better rf absorption characteristics than a 30% glycol mixture. The rf coolant feat...

  4. First Results with a Fast Phase and Amplitude Modulator for High Power RF Application

    CERN Document Server

    Frischholz, Hans; Valuch, D; Weil, C

    2004-01-01

    In a high energy and high power superconducting proton linac, it is more economical to drive several cavities with a single high power transmitter rather than to use one transmitter per cavity. However, this option has the disadvantage of not permitting individual control for each cavity, which potentially leads to instabilities. Provided that it can be built at a reasonable cost, a fast phase and amplitude modulator inserted into each cavity feeder line can provide the necessary control capability. A prototype of such a device has been built, based on two fast and compact high power RF phase-shifters, magnetically biased by external coils. The design is described, together with the results obtained at high and low power levels.

  5. The RF Cycle of the PIMMS Medical Synchrotron

    CERN Document Server

    Crescenti, M; Knaus, P

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the design of the RF cycle of the medical synchrotron of the PIMMS (Proton-Ion Medical Machine Study) hosted at CERN. The cycle comprises adiabatic trapping, acceleration and RF gymnastics, for either protons or fully stripped carbon ions. The injection energy is 20 MeV for protons and 7 MeV/u for carbon. Maximum extraction energies are 250 MeV for protons and 400 MeV/u for carbon ions. The cycle duration is less than 1 s, with a maximum magnetic field ramp below 3 T/s. The simulations show that the beam stays inside the aperture of the machine, and that, theoretically, there are no longitudinal losses. At the end of the cycle, the beam is ready for extraction with a Dp/p = 0.4 %. The peak RF voltage is 3 kV and the frequency ranges from 0.4 to 3 MHz.

  6. Study of Arc-Related RF Faults in the CEBAF Cryomodules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglas Curry; Ganapati Myneni; Ganapati Rao Myneni; John Musson; Thomas Powers; Timothy Whitlatch; Isidoro Campisi; Haipeng Wang

    2004-07-01

    A series of measurements has been conducted on two superconducting radio-frequency (RF) cavity pairs, installed in cryomodules and routinely operated in the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, in order to study the RF-vacuum interaction during an RF fault. These arc-related fault rates increase with increasing machine energy, contribute to system downtime, and directly affect the accelerator's availability. For this study, the fundamental power coupler waveguides have been instrumented with vacuum gauges, additional arc detectors, additional infrared sensors, and temperature sensors in order to measure the system response during both steady-state operations and RF fault conditions. Residual gas analyzers have been installed on the waveguide vacuum manifolds to monitor the gas species present during cooldown, RF processing, and operation. Measurements of the signals are presented, a comparison with analysis is shown and results are discussed. The goal of this study is to characterize the RF-vacuum interaction during normal operations. With a better understanding of the installed system response, methods for reducing the fault rate may be devised, ultimately leading to improvements in availability.

  7. Cavity Enhanced Velocity Modulation Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siller, Brian; Mills, Andrew; Porambo, Michael; McCall, Benjamin

    2010-11-01

    Over the past several decades, velocity modulation spectroscopy has been used to study dozens of molecular ions of astronomical importance. This technique has been so productive because it provides the advantage of ion-neutral discrimination, which is critically important when interfering neutral molecules are many orders of magnitude more abundant, and when combined with heterodyne techniques, its sensitivity can approach the shot noise limit. Traditionally, velocity modulation experiments have utilized unidirectional multipass White cells to achieve up to about 8 passes through a positive column discharge cell. But by positioning the cell within an optical cavity, it is possible to obtain an effective path length orders of magnitude longer than was previously possible. We have demonstrated this novel technique using a Ti:Sapp laser in the near-IR to observe rovibronic transitions of N2+. By demodulating at twice the modulation frequency, 2nd derivative-like lineshapes are observed for ions that are velocity-modulated, while Gaussian lineshapes are observed for excited neutral that are concentration-modulated. The signals for N2+ and N2+* have been observed to be 78° out of phase with one another, so ion-neutral discrimination is retained. And due to the laser power enhancement and geometry of the optical cavity, Doppler-free saturation spectroscopy is now possible. Observed Lamb dips have widths of 50 MHz, and when combined with calibration by an optical frequency comb, this allows for determination of line centers to within 1 MHz. In our original demonstration of this technique, our sensitivity was limited by noise in the laser-cavity lock. Since then, we have integrated Noise Immune Cavity Enhanced Optical Heterodyne Molecular Spectroscopy (NICE-OHMS) by adding sidebands to the laser at an exact multiple of the cavity free spectral range, and demodulating at the sideband frequency before sending the signal to a lock-in amplifier for demodulating at twice the

  8. Dental Sealants Prevent Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... RSS VitalSigns RSS Error processing SSI file Dental Sealants Prevent Cavities Effective protection for children Language: English ( ... Problem About 7 million low-income children need sealants. What are sealants? Sealants are thin coatings painted ...

  9. accelerating cavity from LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    This is an accelerating cavity from LEP, with a layer of niobium on the inside. Operating at 4.2 degrees above absolute zero, the niobium is superconducting and carries an accelerating field of 6 million volts per metre with negligible losses. Each cavity has a surface of 6 m2. The niobium layer is only 1.2 microns thick, ten times thinner than a hair. Such a large area had never been coated to such a high accuracy. A speck of dust could ruin the performance of the whole cavity so the work had to be done in an extremely clean environment. These challenging requirements pushed European industry to new achievements. 256 of these cavities are now used in LEP to double the energy of the particle beams.

  10. SPS accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1983-01-01

    View towards the downstream end of one of the SPS accelerating cavities (200 MHz, travelling wave structure). See 7603195 and 8011289 for more details, 7411032 for the travelling wave structure, and also 8104138.

  11. Melatonin and Oral Cavity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cengiz, Murat İnanç; Cengiz, Seda; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2012-01-01

      While initially the oral cavity was considered to be mainly a source of various bacteria, their toxins and antigens, recent studies showed that it may also be a location of oxidative stress and periodontal inflammation...

  12. Hybrid vertical cavity laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chung, Il-Sug; Mørk, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    A new hybrid vertical cavity laser structure for silicon photonics is suggested and numerically investigated. It incorporates a silicon subwavelength grating as a mirror and a lateral output coupler to a silicon ridge waveguide.......A new hybrid vertical cavity laser structure for silicon photonics is suggested and numerically investigated. It incorporates a silicon subwavelength grating as a mirror and a lateral output coupler to a silicon ridge waveguide....

  13. The Superconducting TESLA Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Aune, B.; Bloess, D.; Bonin, B.; Bosotti, A.; Champion, M.; Crawford, C.; Deppe, G.; Dwersteg, B.; Edwards, D.A.; Edwards, H.T.; Ferrario, M.; Fouaidy, M.; Gall, P-D.; Gamp, A.; Gössel, A.; Graber, J.; Hubert, D.; Hüning, M.; Juillard, M.; Junquera, T.; Kaiser, H.; Kreps, G.; Kuchnir, M.; Lange, R.; Leenen, M.; Liepe, M.; Lilje, L.; Matheisen, A.; Möller, W-D.; Mosnier, A.; Padamsee, H.; Pagani, C.; Pekeler, M.; Peters, H-B.; Peters, O.; Proch, D.; Rehlich, K.; Reschke, D.; Safa, H.; Schilcher, T.; Schmüser, P.; Sekutowicz, J.; Simrock, S.; Singer, W.; Tigner, M.; Trines, D.; Twarowski, K.; Weichert, G.; Weisend, J.; Wojtkiewicz, J.; Wolff, S.; Zapfe, K.

    2000-01-01

    The conceptional design of the proposed linear electron-positron colliderTESLA is based on 9-cell 1.3 GHz superconducting niobium cavities with anaccelerating gradient of Eacc >= 25 MV/m at a quality factor Q0 > 5E+9. Thedesign goal for the cavities of the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) linac was set tothe more moderate value of Eacc >= 15 MV/m. In a first series of 27industrially produced TTF cavities the average gradient at Q0 = 5E+9 wasmeasured to be 20.1 +- 6.2 MV/m, excluding a few cavities suffering fromserious fabrication or material defects. In the second production of 24 TTFcavities additional quality control measures were introduced, in particular aneddy-current scan to eliminate niobium sheets with foreign material inclusionsand stringent prescriptions for carrying out the electron-beam welds. Theaverage gradient of these cavities at Q0 = 5E+9 amounts to 25.0 +- 3.2 MV/mwith the exception of one cavity suffering from a weld defect. Hence only amoderate improvement in production and preparation technique...

  14. Surface explosion cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Benusiglio, Adrien; Clanet, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    We present a fluid dynamics video on cavities created by explosions of firecrackers at the water free surface. We use three types of firecrackers containing 1, 1.3 and 5 g of flash powder. The firecrackers are held with their center at the surface of water in a cubic meter pool. The movies are recorded from the side with a high-speed video camera. Without confinement the explosion produces an hemispherical cavity. Right after the explosion this cavity grows isotropically, the bottom then stops while the sides continue to expand. In the next phase the bottom of the cavity accelerates backwards to the surface. During this phase the convergence of the flow creates a central jet that rises above the free surface. In the last part of the video the explosion is confined in a vertical open tube made of glass and of centimetric diameter. The explosion creates a cylindrical cavity that develops towards the free end of the tube. Depending on the charge, the cavity can either stop inside the tube or at its exit, but nev...

  15. Magnesium Diboride thin Films, multilayers, and coatings for SRF cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xi, Xiaoxing [Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2017-08-17

    Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities currently use low-temperature superconductor niobium, and the Nb SRF cavities have approached the performance levels predicted theoretically. Compared to Nb, MgB2 becomes superconducting at a much higher temperature and promises a better RF performance in terms of higher quality factor Q and higher acceleration capability. An MgB2 SRF technology can significantly reduce the operating costs of particle accelerators when these potentials are realized. This project aimed to advance the development of an MgB2 SRF technology. It had two main objectives: (1) materials issues of MgB2 thin films and multilayers related to their applications in SRF cavities; and (2) coating single-cell cavities for testing at RF frequencies. The key technical thrust of the project is the deposition of high quality clean MgB2 films and coatings by the hybrid physical-chemical vapor deposition (HPCVD) technique, which was developed in my group. We have achieved technical progress in each of the two areas. For the first objective, we have confirmed that MgB2 thin film coatings can be used to effectively enhance the vortex penetration field of an SRF cavity. A vortex is a normal region in the shape of spaghetti that threads through a superconductor. Its existence is due to an applied magnetic field that is greater than a so-called lower critical field, Hc1. Once a vortex enters the superconductor, its movement leads to loss. This has been shown to be the reason for an SRF cavity to break down. Thus, enhancing the magnetic field for a vortex to enter the superconductor that forms the SRF cavity has be a goal of intense research. To this end, Gurevich proposed that a coating of thin superconductor layer can impede the vortex entrance. In this project, we have done two important experiment to test this concept. One, we showed that the enhancement of Hc1 can be

  16. The LHC Superconducting RF System

    CERN Document Server

    Boussard, Daniel

    1999-01-01

    The European Laboratory for Particle Physics (CERN), the largest high energy physics laboratory worldwide, is constructing the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in the existing 27 km circumference LEP (Large Electron Positron) collider tunnel. For the LHC, superconducting cavities, operating at 4.5 K, will provide the required acceleration field for ramping the beam energy up to 7 TeV and for keeping the colliding proton beams tightly bunched. Superconducting cavities were chosen, not only because of their high acceleration field leading to a small contribution to the machine impedance, but also because of their high stored energy which minimises the effects of periodic transient beam loading associated with the high beam intensity (0.5 A). There will be eight single-cell cavities per beam, each delivering 2 MV (5.3 MV/m) at 400 MHz. The cavities themselves are now being manufactured by industrial firms, using niobium on copper technology which gives full satisfaction at LEP. A complete cavity prototype assembly in...

  17. Protection of Accelerator Hardware: RF systems

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, S.-H.

    2016-01-01

    The radio-frequency (RF) system is the key element that generates electric fields for beam acceleration. To keep the system reliable, a highly sophisticated protection scheme is required, which also should be designed to ensure a good balance between beam availability and machine safety. Since RF systems are complex, incorporating high-voltage and high-power equipment, a good portion of machine downtime typically comes from RF systems. Equipment and component damage in RF systems results in long and expensive repairs. Protection of RF system hardware is one of the oldest machine protection concepts, dealing with the protection of individual high-power RF equipment from breakdowns. As beam power increases in modern accelerators, the protection of accelerating structures from beam-induced faults also becomes a critical aspect of protection schemes. In this article, an overview of the RF system is given, and selected topics of failure mechanisms and examples of protection requirements are introduced.

  18. Linearisation of RF Power Amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Per Asbeck

    2001-01-01

    of circuitry such as the linearisation circuit. The amplifier has the highest output power compared to other published class B power in the same process. The design phase including the on-chip inductor and the lateral flux capacitors is described. The other test chips designed are envelope detectors. Three......This thesis deals with linearisation techniques of RF power amplifiers (PA), PA design techniques and integration of the necessary building blocks in a CMOS technology. The opening chapters introduces the theory of transmitter architectures, RF-signal representation and the principles of digital...... modulation. Furthermore different types of power amplifiers, models and measures of non-linearities are presented. A chapter is also devoted to different types of linearisation systems. The work carried out and described in this thesis can be divided into a more theoretical and system oriented treatment...

  19. Beam simulations with initial bunch noise in superconducting RF proton linacs

    CERN Document Server

    Tückmantel, J

    2010-01-01

    Circular machines are plagued by coupled bunch instabilities (CBI), driven by impedance peaks, where then all cavity higher order modes (HOMs) are possible drivers. Limiting the CBI growth rate is the fundamental reason that all superconducting rf cavities in circular machines are equipped with HOM dampers. The question arises if for similar reasons HOM damping would not be imperative also in high current superconducting rf proton linacs. Therefore we have simulated the longitudinal bunched beam dynamics in such machines, also including charge and position noise on the injected bunches. Simulations were executed for a generic linac with properties close to the planned SPL at CERN, SNS, or Project X at FNAL. It was found that with strong bunch noise and monopole HOMs with high Qext large beam scatter, possibly exceeding the admittance of a receiving machine, cannot be excluded. A transverse simulation shows similar requirements. Therefore including initial bunch noise in any beam dynamic study on superconducti...

  20. JACoW N-doped niobium accelerating cavities: Analyzing model applicability

    CERN Document Server

    Eichhorn, Ralf; Weingarten, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this research was to analyse data from multiple cavities in order to test the viability of a model for surface resistance proposed previously. The model intends to describe the behaviour of the quality factor with respect to the RF field strength, while exploring the physical cause of this phenomenon; the model is pretty general, but will be checked here specifically for N-doped niobium cavities. The data were obtained from two single-cell 1.3 GHz cavities manufactured and tested at Jefferson Lab in Newport News, VA, USA.

  1. 40 Gbps modulation of transverse coupled cavity VCSEL with push-pull modulation scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalir, Hamed; Koyama, Fumio

    2014-09-01

    The push-pull modulation of a transverse coupled cavity VCSEL with a bow-tie-shaped oxide aperture is demonstrated. We experimentally show the transverse-mode switching of laterally coupled VCSELs, which potentially offers a novel push-pull modulation concept. The calculated results of small-signal responses indicate an extreme expansion of the modulation bandwidth regardless of the relaxation oscillation frequency. The small-signal response was measured by tuning the RF phase of the modulation current in one cavity. A clear eye opening up to 40 Gbps with push-pull modulation has been obtained, whereas the eye pattern with the single-cavity modulation is completely closed.

  2. Low jitter RF distribution system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Russell; Doolittle, Lawrence; Huang, Gang

    2012-09-18

    A timing signal distribution system includes an optical frequency stabilized laser signal amplitude modulated at an rf frequency. A transmitter box transmits a first portion of the laser signal and receive a modified optical signal, and outputs a second portion of the laser signal and a portion of the modified optical signal. A first optical fiber carries the first laser signal portion and the modified optical signal, and a second optical fiber carries the second portion of the laser signal and the returned modified optical signal. A receiver box receives the first laser signal portion, shifts the frequency of the first laser signal portion outputs the modified optical signal, and outputs an electrical signal on the basis of the laser signal. A detector at the end of the second optical fiber outputs a signal based on the modified optical signal. An optical delay sensing circuit outputs a data signal based on the detected modified optical signal. An rf phase detect and correct signal circuit outputs a signal corresponding to a phase stabilized rf signal based on the data signal and the frequency received from the receiver box.

  3. Basketballs as spherical acoustic cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Daniel A.

    2010-06-01

    The sound field resulting from striking a basketball is found to be rich in frequency content, with over 50 partials in the frequency range of 0-12 kHz. The frequencies are found to closely match theoretical expectations for standing wave patterns inside a spherical cavity. Because of the degenerate nature of the mode shapes, explicit identification of the modes is not possible without internal investigation with a microphone probe. A basketball proves to be an interesting application of a boundary value problem involving spherical coordinates.

  4. Design and measurements of SFRFQ cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z.; Chen, J. E.; Lu, Y. R.; Zhu, K.; Kang, M. L.; Yan, X. Q.; Guo, Z. Y.; Gao, S. L.; Fang, J. X.

    2009-08-01

    Separated Function Radio Frequency Quadrupoles (SFRFQ) structure is a new post accelerator of RFQ, the higher accelerating efficiency and transmission make it become a proper choice for the post acceleration after the integral split ring RFQ (ISR RFQ)-1000 accelerator at Peking University [Y.R. Lu, J.F. Guo, W.G. Li, et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 420 (1999) 2]. A novel design strategy is proposed in this paper to avoid the sparking problem and decrease the energy spread at the exit of SFRFQ. Correspondingly, a code SFRFQCODEV1.0 was developed specially for beam dynamic simulations and error studies. A prototype cavity with 14 accelerating gaps has been constructed and tested at low and high RF power successfully. The operating energy region of SFRFQ structure and the results of error study are presented.

  5. Analysis and results of the industrial production of the superconducting Nb/Cu cavities for the LEP2 project

    CERN Document Server

    Chiaveri, Enrico; Cosso, R; Lacarrère, D; Schirm, K M; Taufer, M; Weingarten, Wolfgang

    1996-01-01

    For the energy upgrade of the Large Electron Positron Collider at CERN 216 RF superconducting cavities were ordered from three European industrial firms (Ansaldo, Cerca, Siemens/Accel) at the beginning of 1991. These cavities are made of copper (Cu), internally coated with niobium (Nb) according to a procedure developed at CERN. Up to now about 147 of these cavities fulfilling the specifications have been produced. The large-scale statistics available and the use of dedicated analytical and optical inspection techniques shed new light on the relationship between production procedures, niobium film properties and cavity performance. An overview of this subject is presented, together with some significant trends and results.

  6. Cavity Design, Fabrication and Commission Performance of a 750MHz, 4-rod Separator for CEBAF 4-Hall Beam Delivery System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Haipeng [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA; Cheng, Guangfeng [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA; Turlington, Larry T. [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA; Wissmann, Mark J. [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA

    2015-09-01

    A short version of the original CEBAF normal conducting 4-rod separator cavity has been developed into a 750MHz one * since the concept of simultaneous 4-hall operation for CEBAF is introduced **. This work has been advanced further based on the EM design optimization, bench measurement and by conducting RF-thermal coupled simulation using CST and ANSYS to confirm the cavity tuning and thermal performance. The cavity fabrication used matured technology like copper plating and machining. The cavity flanges, couplers, tuners and cooling channels adopted consistent/compatible hardware with the existing 500MHz cavities. The electromagnetic and thermal design simulations have greatly reduced the prototyping and bench tuning time of the first prototype. Four production cavities have reached a typical 1.94MV kick voltage or 3.0kW wall loss on each cavity after a minor multipactoring or no processing, 7.5% overhead power than the design specification.

  7. Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy using a Prism Cavity and Supercontinuum Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Kevin K.; Johnston, Paul S.

    2010-03-01

    The multiplex advantage of current cavity enhanced spectrometers is limited by the limited high reflectivity bandwidth of the dielectric mirrors used to construct the high finesse cavity. We report on our development of a spectrometer that uses Brewster's angle retroreflectors that is excited with supercontinuum radiation generated by a 1.06 μm pumped photonic crystal fiber, which covers the 500-1800 nm spectral range. Recent progress will be discussed including modeling of the prism cavity losses, alternative prism materials for use in the UV and mid-IR, and a new higher power source pumped by a mode-locked laser.

  8. Study of the beam-cavity interaction in the CERN PS 10 MHz cavities and investigation of hardware solutions to reduce beam loading

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2086984; Palumbo, Luigi

    In the Proton Synchrotron (PS), where the LHC protons longitudinal structure (bunch spacing) is determined as the result of a sophisticated series of Radio Frequency (RF) gymnastics, collective effects were identified as a major limitation to the achievable beam current delivered to the LHC. Dedicated machine development studies pointed out the RF cavities to be one of the major source of instability in the PS. In particular, the 10 MHz RF system, responsible for beam acceleration, was identified as the most probable impedance source in the machine. The cavity impedance limits the circulating intensity in the accelerator since the beam-induced voltage could trigger longitudinal instabilities causing beam losses. For this reason the cavity impedance seen by the beam must be kept as low as possible. In the framework of the LHC Injector Upgrade (LIU) project, the present PS 10 MHz RF system requires an upgrade, in order to reach higher beam intensities and to reduce beam loading. This thesis focuses on the impro...

  9. Prototype 350 MHz niobium spoke-loaded cavities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delayen, J. R.; Kedzie, M.; Mammosser, J.; Piller, C.; Shepard, K. W.

    1999-05-10

    This paper reports the development of 350 MHz superconducting cavities of a spoke-loaded geometry, intended for the velocity range 0.2 < v/c < 0.6. Two prototype single-cell cavities have been designed, one optimized for velocity v/c = 0.4, and the other for v/c = 0.29. Construction of the prototype niobium cavities is nearly complete. Details of the design and construction are discussed, along with the results of cold tests.

  10. A Study of Direct Digital Manufactured RF/Microwave Packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratton, John W. I.

    Various facets of direct digital manufactured (DDM) microwave packages are studied. The rippled surface inherent in fused deposition modeling (FDM) fabricated geometries is modeled in Ansoft HFSS, and its effect on the performance of microstrip transmission lines is assessed via simulation and measurement. The thermal response of DDM microstrip transmission lines is analyzed over a range of RF input powers, and linearity is confirmed over that range. Two IC packages are embedded into DDM printed circuit boards, and their performance is analyzed. The first is a low power RF switch, and the second is an RF front end device that includes a low noise amplifier (LNA) and a power amplifier (PA). The RF switch is shown to perform well, as compared to a layout designed for a Rogers 4003C microwave laminate substrate. The LNA performs within datasheet specifications. The power amplifier generates substantial heat, so a thermal management attempt is described. Finally, a capacitively loaded 6dB Wilkinson power divider is designed and fabricated using DDM techniques and materials. Its performance is analyzed and compared to simulation. The device is shown to compare favorably to a similar device fabricated on a Rogers 4003C microwave laminate using traditional printed circuit board techniques.

  11. Characterization of superconducting nanometric multilayer samples for superconducting rf applications: First evidence of magnetic screening effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Z. Antoine

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The best rf bulk niobium accelerating cavities have nearly reached their ultimate limits at rf equatorial magnetic field H≈200  mT close to the thermodynamic critical field H_{c}. In 2006 Gurevich proposed to use nanoscale layers of superconducting materials with high values of H_{c}>H_{c}^{Nb} for magnetic shielding of bulk niobium to increase the breakdown magnetic field of superconducting rf cavities. Depositing good quality layers inside a whole cavity is rather difficult, so as a first step, characterization of single layer coating and multilayers was conducted on high quality sputtered samples by applying the technique used for the preparation of superconducting electronics circuits. The samples were characterized by x-ray reflectivity, dc resistivity (PPMS, and dc magnetization (SQUID measurements. Dc magnetization curves of a 250 nm thick Nb film have been measured, with and without a magnetron sputtered coating of a single or multiple stack of 15 nm MgO and 25 nm NbN layers. The Nb samples with/without the coating exhibit different behaviors and clearly show an enhancement of the magnetic penetration field. Because SQUID measurements are influenced by edge and shape effects, we propose to develop a specific local magnetic measurement of H_{C1} based on ac third harmonic analysis in order to reveal the true screening effect of multilayers.

  12. Toward High-Power Klystrons With RF Power Conversion Efficiency on the Order of 90%

    CERN Document Server

    Baikov, Andrey Yu; Syratchev, Igor

    2015-01-01

    The increase in efficiency of RF power generation for future large accelerators is considered a high priority issue. The vast majority of the existing commercial high-power RF klystrons operates in the electronic efficiency range between 40% and 55%. Only a few klystrons available on the market are capable of operating with 65% efficiency or above. In this paper, a new method to achieve 90% RF power conversion efficiency in a klystron amplifier is presented. The essential part of this method is a new bunching technique - bunching with bunch core oscillations. Computer simulations confirm that the RF production efficiency above 90% can be reached with this new bunching method. The results of a preliminary study of an L-band, 20-MW peak RF power multibeam klystron for Compact Linear Collider with the efficiency above 85% are presented.

  13. Resonant-frequency discharge in a multi-cell radio frequency cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popovic, S; Upadhyay, J; Mammosser, J; Nikolic, M; Vuskovic, L

    2014-11-07

    We are reporting experimental results on microwave discharge operating at resonant frequency in a multi-cell radio frequency (RF) accelerator cavity. Although the discharge operated at room temperature, the setup was constructed so that it could be used for plasma generation and processing in fully assembled active superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cryomodule (in situ operation). This discharge offers an efficient mechanism for removal of a variety of contaminants, organic or oxide layers, and residual particulates from the interior surface of RF cavities through the interaction of plasma-generated radicals with the cavity walls. We describe resonant RF breakdown conditions and address the problems related to generation and sustaining the multi-cell cavity plasma, which are breakdown and resonant detuning. We have determined breakdown conditions in the cavity, which was acting as a plasma vessel with distorted cylindrical geometry. We discuss the spectroscopic data taken during plasma removal of contaminants and use them to evaluate plasma parameters, characterize the process, and estimate the volatile contaminant product removal.

  14. Analysis of Passive RF-DC Power Rectification and Harvesting Wireless RF Energy for Micro-watt Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antwi Nimo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, analytical modeling of passive rectifying circuits and the harvesting of electromagnetic (EM power from intentionally generated as well as from ubiquitous sources are presented. The presented model is based on the linearization of rectifying circuits. The model provides an accurate method of determining the output characteristics of rectifying circuits. The model was verified with Advance Design System (ADS Harmonic balance (HB simulations and measurements. The results from the presented model were in agreement with simulations and measurements. Consequently design considerations and trade-off of radio frequency (RF harvesters are discussed. To verify the exploitation of ambient RF power sources for operation of sensors, a dual-band antenna with a size of ~λ/4 at 900MHz and a passive dual-band rectifier that is able to power a commercial Thermo-Hygrometer requiring ~1.3V and 0.5MΩ from a global system for mobile communications (GSM base station is demonstrated. The RF power delivered by the receiving dual-band antenna at a distance of about 110 m from the GSM base station ranges from -27 dBm to -50 dBm from the various GSM frequency bands. Additionally, wireless range measurements of the RF harvesters in the industrial, scientific and medical (ISM band 868MHz is presented at indoor conditions.

  15. Studies on high-precision machining and assembly of CLIC RF structures

    CERN Document Server

    Huopana, J; Riddone, G; Österberg, K

    2010-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is currently under development at CERN as a potential multi-TeV e+e– collider. The manufacturing and assembly tolerances for the required RF components are essential for the final efficiency and for the operation of CLIC. The proper function of an accelerating structure is sensitive to mechanical errors in the shape and the alignment of the accelerating cavity. The current tolerances are in the micron range. This raises challenges in the field of mechanical design and demands special manufacturing technologies and processes. Currently the mechanical design of the accelerating structures is based on a disk design. Alternatively, it is possible to create the accelerating assembly from quadrants, which has the potential to be favoured for the mass production due to simplicity and cost. In this case, the functional shape inside of the accelerating structure remains the same and a single assembly uses less parts. This paper focuses on the development work done in design and sim...

  16. Simulation and characterization of the RF system and global stability analysis at the REGAE linear electron accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayet, Frank

    2012-12-15

    LAOLA (LAboratory for Laser- and beam-driven plasma Acceleration), is a collaboration between groups from DESY and the University of Hamburg. Its mission is to complement basic research in the relatively new field of plasma wakefield acceleration (PWA) by an explicit combination with DESY's conventional, modern accelerators. The linear electron accelerator REGAE is designed to produce sub 10 fs low charge electron bunches with ultra-low emittance at a repetition rate of 50 Hz. The planned experiments include femtosecond electron diffraction (R.J. Dwayne Miller), as well as the probing of laser induced plasma wakefields with well characterized bunches (LAOLA). They all require high bunch time of flight stability down to 10 fs. The REGAE machine consists of two RF cavities, both fed by a single klystron. While the first one - the gun cavity - is used for acceleration of the electrons, the second one - the buncher cavity - can be used to reduce the electron bunch length. This scheme only works for a specific RF phase relation between the two cavities. This thesis is split into two parts. In the first one the implications of the unique two cavity design on day-to-day machine operation are analyzed. To this end an analytical model of the RF system is developed, which is necessary for understanding how to individually adjust the cavity phases. In the second part the influence of the setup on time of flight stability is discussed with an emphasis on phase jitter compensation. RF phase stability measurements reveal that the current machine setup allows for a time of flight stability down to 50 fs right after the gun.

  17. Experimental investigation of cavity flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loeland, Tore

    1998-12-31

    This thesis uses LDV (Laser Doppler Velocimetry), PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry) and Laser Sheet flow Visualisation to study flow inside three different cavity configurations. For sloping cavities, the vortex structure inside the cavities is found to depend upon the flow direction past the cavity. The shape of the downstream corner is a key factor in destroying the boundary layer flow entering the cavity. The experimental results agree well with numerical simulations of the same geometrical configurations. The results of the investigations are used to find the influence of the cavity flow on the accuracy of the ultrasonic flowmeter. A method to compensate for the cavity velocities is suggested. It is found that the relative deviation caused by the cavity velocities depend linearly on the pipe flow. It appears that the flow inside the cavities should not be neglected as done in the draft for the ISO technical report on ultrasonic flowmeters. 58 refs., 147 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. RF and microwave microelectronics packaging II

    CERN Document Server

    Sturdivant, Rick

    2017-01-01

    Reviews RF, microwave, and microelectronics assembly process, quality control, and failure analysis Bridges the gap between low cost commercial and hi-res RF/Microwave packaging technologies Engages in an in-depth discussion of challenges in packaging and assembly of advanced high-power amplifiers This book presents the latest developments in packaging for high-frequency electronics. It is a companion volume to “RF and Microwave Microelectronics Packaging” (2010) and covers the latest developments in thermal management, electrical/RF/thermal-mechanical designs and simulations, packaging and processing methods, and other RF and microwave packaging topics. Chapters provide detailed coverage of phased arrays, T/R modules, 3D transitions, high thermal conductivity materials, carbon nanotubes and graphene advanced materials, and chip size packaging for RF MEMS. It appeals to practicing engineers in the electronic packaging and high-frequency electronics domain, and to academic researchers interested in underst...

  19. Moscow Meson Factory DTL RF System Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Esin, S K; Kvasha, A I; Serov, V L

    2004-01-01

    The last paper devoted to description of the first part (DTL) RF system of Moscow Meson Factory upgrade was published in the Proceedings of PAC95 Conference in Dallas. Since then some new works directed at improvement of reliability and efficiency of the RF system were carried out. Among them there are a new powerful pulse triode “Katran” installed in the output RF power amplifiers (PA) of three channels, modifications of the anode modulator control circuit and crow-bar system, a new additional RF channel for RF supply of RFQ and some alterations in placing of the anode modulator equipment decreasing a level of interference’s at crow-bar circuits. Some new checked at MMF RF channels ideas concerning of PA tuning are of interest for people working in this sphere of activity.

  20. Robust multiplatform RF emitter localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Issa, Huthaifa; Ordóñez, Raúl

    2012-06-01

    In recent years, position based services has increase. Thus, recent developments in communications and RF technology have enabled system concept formulations and designs for low-cost radar systems using state-of-the-art software radio modules. This research is done to investigate a novel multi-platform RF emitter localization technique denoted as Position-Adaptive RF Direction Finding (PADF). The formulation is based on the investigation of iterative path-loss (i.e., Path Loss Exponent, or PLE) metrics estimates that are measured across multiple platforms in order to autonomously adapt (i.e. self-adjust) of the location of each distributed/cooperative platform. Experiments conducted at the Air-Force Research laboratory (AFRL) indicate that this position-adaptive approach exhibits potential for accurate emitter localization in challenging embedded multipath environments such as in urban environments. The focus of this paper is on the robustness of the distributed approach to RF-based location tracking. In order to localize the transmitter, we use the Received Signal Strength Indicator (RSSI) data to approximate distance from the transmitter to the revolving receivers. We provide an algorithm for on-line estimation of the Path Loss Exponent (PLE) that is used in modeling the distance based on Received Signal Strength (RSS) measurements. The emitter position estimation is calculated based on surrounding sensors RSS values using Least-Square Estimation (LSE). The PADF has been tested on a number of different configurations in the laboratory via the design and implementation of four IRIS wireless sensor nodes as receivers and one hidden sensor as a transmitter during the localization phase. The robustness of detecting the transmitters position is initiated by getting the RSSI data through experiments and then data manipulation in MATLAB will determine the robustness of each node and ultimately that of each configuration. The parameters that are used in the functions are

  1. Topology optimized RF MEMS switches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philippine, M. A.; Zareie, H.; Sigmund, Ole

    2013-01-01

    optimization for an RF MEM capacitive switch. Extensive experimental data confirms that the switches perform as designed by the optimizations, and that our simulation models are accurate. A subset of measurements are presented here. Broader results have been submitted in full journal format.......Topology optimization is a rigorous and powerful method that should become a standard MEMS design tool - it can produce unique and non-intuitive designs that meet complex objectives and can dramatically improve the performance and reliability of MEMS devices. We present successful uses of topology...

  2. Summary of the production of the ACN cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Losito, R

    2004-01-01

    The LHC-ACN RF system consists of eight normal conducting cavities (four per beam) made of bulk copper and resonating at 200.4 MHz. CERN provided the forged copper parts to the contractor for the final machining and assembly (Ettore Zanon S.p.A., based in Schio, Italy). The contractor had to weld all the flanges to the body of the cavity, machine and weld the cooling channels, carry out the final machining to have the right geometry and the requested RF surface finish, and make the final assembly of all the components by electron beam welding. The precision required during the various steps is quite tight with respect to the dimension of the cavities and would have required a very time-consuming and costly quality check during production, with the constant presence of a CERN staff member at the contractor's and subcontractor's premises. It was therefore decided, in the engineering phase, to foresee a tuning procedure before the final weldings to allow the same final result (precision on fundamental mode frequ...

  3. Cavity parameters identification for TESLA control system development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czarski, T.; Pozniak, K.T.; Romaniuk, R.S. [Warsaw Univ. of Technology (Poland). ELHEP Lab., ISE; Simrock, S. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    The control system modeling for the TESLA - TeV-Energy Superconducting Linear Accelerator project has been developed for the efficient stabilization of the pulsed, accelerating EM field of the resonator. The cavity parameters identification is an essential task for the comprehensive control algorithm. The TESLA cavity simulator has been successfully implemented by applying very high speed FPGA - Field Programmable Gate Array technology. The electromechanical model of the cavity resonator includes the basic features - Lorentz force detuning and beam loading. The parameters identification bases on the electrical model of the cavity. The model is represented by the state space equation for the envelope of the cavity voltage driven by the current generator and the beam loading. For a given model structure, the over-determined matrix equation is created covering the long enough measurement range with the solution according to the least squares method. A low degree polynomial approximation is applied to estimate the time-varying cavity detuning during the pulse. The measurement channel distortion is considered, leading to the external cavity model seen by the controller. The comprehensive algorithm of the cavity parameters identification has been implemented in the Matlab system with different modes of the operation. Some experimental results have been presented for different cavity operational conditions. The following considerations have lead to the synthesis of the efficient algorithm for the cavity control system predicted for the potential FPGA technology implementation. (orig.)

  4. An Automatic Cavity Phasing Routine for HIE-ISOLDE

    CERN Document Server

    Haastrup, S

    2014-01-01

    The broad experimental programme at ISOLDE means that the same beam species and energy are rarely studied twice and the cavities of the linac must be scaled or re-phased for each experiment. In order to expedite machine set-up a software routine that automatically calculates the cavity phases has been developed. The routine takes as input the beam parameters, the state of the linac (the available cavities and their condition) and the desired final energy, and calculates the necessary phases and voltages to be applied to each cavity. Different algorithms for partitioning the voltage were implemented. A beam dynamics error study was carried out in order to better understand the challenges facing the automatic phasing routine. The effects of a variety of different errors on the efficacy of the phasing application were studied, leading to a specification of the tolerances required for the calibration of the rf system and the accuracy of the survey system that monitors the positions of the cavities.

  5. Filling a Conical Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nye, Kyle; Eslam-Panah, Azar

    2016-11-01

    Root canal treatment involves the removal of infected tissue inside the tooth's canal system and filling the space with a dense sealing agent to prevent further infection. A good root canal treatment happens when the canals are filled homogeneously and tightly down to the root apex. Such a tooth is able to provide valuable service for an entire lifetime. However, there are some examples of poorly performed root canals where the anterior and posterior routes are not filled completely. Small packets of air can be trapped in narrow access cavities when restoring with resin composites. Such teeth can cause trouble even after many years and lead the conditions like acute bone infection or abscesses. In this study, the filling of dead-end conical cavities with various liquids is reported. The first case studies included conical cavity models with different angles and lengths to visualize the filling process. In this investigation, the rate and completeness at which a variety of liquids fill the cavity were observed to find ideal conditions for the process. Then, a 3D printed model of the scaled representation of a molar with prepared post spaces was used to simulate the root canal treatment. The results of this study can be used to gain a better understanding of the restoration for endodontically treated teeth.

  6. SPS accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1983-01-01

    See photo 8302397: View from the downstream end of one of the SPS accelerating cavities (200 MHz, travelling wave structure). See 7603195 and 8011289 for more details, 7411032 for the travelling wave structure, and also 8104138. Giacomo Primadei stands on the left.

  7. Cavities/Tooth Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sharp pain when eating or drinking something sweet, hot or cold Visible holes or pits in your teeth Brown, black or white staining on any surface of a tooth Pain when you bite down When to see a dentist You may not be aware that a cavity is forming. That's why it's important to have regular dental ...

  8. Additive Manufactured Superconducting Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Eric; Rosen, Yaniv; Woolleet, Nathan; Materise, Nicholas; Voisin, Thomas; Wang, Morris; Mireles, Jorge; Carosi, Gianpaolo; Dubois, Jonathan

    Superconducting radio frequency cavities provide an ultra-low dissipative environment, which has enabled fundamental investigations in quantum mechanics, materials properties, and the search for new particles in and beyond the standard model. However, resonator designs are constrained by limitations in conventional machining techniques. For example, current through a seam is a limiting factor in performance for many waveguide cavities. Development of highly reproducible methods for metallic parts through additive manufacturing, referred to colloquially as 3D printing\\x9D, opens the possibility for novel cavity designs which cannot be implemented through conventional methods. We present preliminary investigations of superconducting cavities made through a selective laser melting process, which compacts a granular powder via a high-power laser according to a digitally defined geometry. Initial work suggests that assuming a loss model and numerically optimizing a geometry to minimize dissipation results in modest improvements in device performance. Furthermore, a subset of titanium alloys, particularly, a titanium, aluminum, vanadium alloy (Ti - 6Al - 4V) exhibits properties indicative of a high kinetic inductance material. This work is supported by LDRD 16-SI-004.

  9. LEP superconducting cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1995-01-01

    Engineers work in a clean room on one of the superconducting cavities for the upgrade to the LEP accelerator, known as LEP-2. The use of superconductors allow higher electric fields to be produced so that higher beam energies can be reached.

  10. Beam Dynamics Simulation of Photocathode RF Electron Gun at the PBP-CMU Linac Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buakor, K.; Rimjaem, S.

    2017-09-01

    Photocathode radio-frequency (RF) electron guns are widely used at many particle accelerator laboratories due to high quality of produced electron beams. By using a short-pulse laser to induce the photoemission process, the electrons are emitted with low energy spread. Moreover, the photocathode RF guns are not suffered from the electron back bombardment effect, which can cause the limited electron current and accelerated energy. In this research, we aim to develop the photocathode RF gun for the linac-based THz radiation source. Its design is based on the existing gun at the PBP-CMU Linac Laboratory. The gun consists of a one and a half cell S-band standing-wave RF cavities with a maximum electric field of about 60 MV/m at the centre of the full cell. We study the beam dynamics of electrons traveling through the electromagnetic field inside the RF gun by using the particle tracking program ASTRA. The laser properties i.e. transverse size and injecting phase are optimized to obtain low transverse emittance. In addition, the solenoid magnet is applied for beam focusing and emittance compensation. The proper solenoid magnetic field is then investigated to find the optimum value for proper emittance conservation condition.

  11. Ion tracking in photocathode rf guns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John W. Lewellen

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Projected next-generation linac-based light sources, such as PERL or the TESLA free-electron laser, generally assume, as essential components of their injector complexes, long-pulse photocathode rf electron guns. These guns, due to their design rf pulse durations of many milliseconds to continuous wave, may be more susceptible to ion bombardment damage of their cathodes than conventional rf guns, which typically use rf pulses of microsecond duration. This paper explores this possibility in terms of ion propagation within the gun, and presents a basis for future study of the subject.

  12. RF front-end world class designs

    CERN Document Server

    Love, Janine

    2009-01-01

    All the design and development inspiration and direction a harware engineer needs in one blockbuster book! Janine Love site editor for RF Design Line,columnist, and author has selected the very best RF design material from the Newnes portfolio and has compiled it into this volume. The result is a book covering the gamut of RF front end design from antenna and filter design fundamentals to optimized layout techniques with a strong pragmatic emphasis. In addition to specific design techniques and practices, this book also discusses various approaches to solving RF front end design problems and h

  13. The effect of a cavity on airfoil tones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Karn L.; Doolan, Con J.; Kelso, Richard M.

    2014-03-01

    The presence of a cavity in the pressure surface of an airfoil has been found via experiment to play a role in the production of airfoil tones, which was attributed to the presence of an acoustic feedback loop. The cavity length was sufficiently small that cavity oscillation modes did not occur for most of the investigated chord-based Reynolds number range of 70,000-320,000. The airfoil tonal noise frequencies varied as the position of the cavity was moved along a parallel section at the airfoil's maximum thickness: specifically, for a given velocity, the frequency spacing of the tones was inversely proportional to the geometric distance between the cavity and the trailing edge. The boundary layer instability waves considered responsible for the airfoil tones were only detected downstream of the cavity. This may be the first experimental verification of these aspects of the feedback loop model for airfoil tonal noise.

  14. Superconducting Multi-Cell Deflecting Cavity for Short-Pulse X-Ray Generation at the Advanced Photon Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G.J. Waldschmidt, L.H. Morrison, R. Nassiri, R.A. Rimmer, K. Tian, H. Wang

    2009-05-01

    A superconducting multi-cell cavity for the production of short x-ray pulses at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) has been explored as an alternative to a single-cell cavity design in order to improve the packing factor and potentially reduce the number of high-power RF systems and low-level RF controls required. The cavity will operate at 2815 MHz in the APS storage ring and will require heavy damping of parasitic modes to maintain stable beam operation. Novel on-cell dampers, attached directly to the cavity body, have been utilized by taking advantage of the magnetic field null on the equatorial plane in order to enhance damping. Design issues and simulation results will be discussed.

  15. Novel H-type rf deflector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. Senichev

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work we developed a new rf deflector based on the H resonator, which differs from previous ones in its design, the type of rf fundamental mode and the possibility of providing the π-mode standing wave for the beam in the deflection system. Because of the last aspect, the transverse shunt impedance of this deflector is much higher in comparison with its analogues. This idea was originally intended for application in the funneling system of the European Spallation Source, but we later found many additional applications, in particular, as the bunch separator after the electron and proton linear accelerators. We studied the beam dynamics and the electrodynamics and optimized the device parameters in the assumed range of frequency of 150–700 MHz for the proton beam and 1000–1500 MHz for the electron beam. To make the final choice we analyzed rf deflectors of different designs. We manufactured the experimental sample tested at the low rf power level.

  16. Material Selection and Characterization for High Gradient RF Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Arnau-Izquierdo, G; Heikkinen, S; Ramsvik, T; Sgobba, Stefano; Taborelli, M; Wuensch, W

    2007-01-01

    The selection of candidate materials for the accelerating cavities of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is carried out in parallel with high power RF testing. The maximum DC breakdown field of copper, copper alloys, refractory metals, aluminium and titanium have been measured with a dedicated setup. Higher maximum fields are obtained for refractory metals and for titanium, which exhibits, however, important damages after conditioning. Fatigue behaviour of copper alloys has been studied for surface and bulk by pulsed laser irradiation and ultrasonic excitation, respectively. The selected copper alloys show consistently higher fatigue resistance than copper in both experiments. In order to obtain the best local properties in the device a possible solution is a bi-metallic assembly. Junctions of molybdenum and copper-zirconium UNS C15000 alloy, achieved by HIP (Hot Isostatic Pressing) diffusion bonding or explosion bonding were evaluated for their mechanical strength. The reliability of the results obtained wit...

  17. The on axis coupled structure type RF gun

    CERN Document Server

    Oda, F; Nakayama, A; Tanabe, E

    1999-01-01

    The fundamental design of this newly developed RF gun with a thermionic cathode is the pi/2 mode standing wave structure. It has two accelerating cells and a coupling cell located on the beam axis, a so-called on axis coupled structure (OCS). This structure offers a stable operation for high beam current, owing to high group velocity and wide bandwidth. It is important to reduce damage onto the cathode caused by back bombardment, especially for long macropulse operation, such as in an FEL injector. Back bombardment, as well as output beam profile was simulated by using the electromagnetic field analytical codes 'EMSYS'(2D) and 'MAFIA'(3D). The cavity shape was optimized to reduce back bombardment power without sacrificing beam emittance.

  18. RF/optical shared aperture for high availability wideband communication RF/FSO links

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggiero, Anthony J; Pao, Hsueh-yuan; Sargis, Paul

    2015-03-24

    An RF/Optical shared aperture is capable of transmitting and receiving optical signals and RF signals simultaneously. This technology enables compact wide bandwidth communications systems with 100% availability in clear air turbulence, rain and fog. The functions of an optical telescope and an RF reflector antenna are combined into a single compact package by installing an RF feed at either of the focal points of a modified Gregorian telescope.

  19. Report on Superconducting RF Activities at CERN from 2001 to 2003

    CERN Document Server

    Losito, R; Chiaveri, Enrico; Montesinos, E; Tückmantel, Joachim; Valuch, D; 11th Workshop on RF Superconductivity

    2003-01-01

    The main project on superconducting RF at CERN in the period from 2001 to 2003 has been the 400 MHz SC system for the LHC. Five modules, each containing four single-cell niobium (Nb) sputtered cavities, have been assembled and low-power tested at room temperature and at 4.5 K. Production of the first four power couplers has been delayed but high-power tests should start on the first module this autumn. A small program of R&D is maintained on the SPL. Both the beta = 0.7 and beta = 0.8 cavities have been high-power tested up to nominal field without particular problems. A detailed characterization of the cavity mechanical resonances is going on and some preliminary results are presented. A computer code has been written to predict the effects of Lorentz detuning and microphonics on the stability of the RF feedback loops in SC linacs where several cavities are driven by a single high power source. Fast ferrite phase shifters are being developed to allow the decoupling of the feedback loops of individual cav...

  20. Large-Scale Industrial Production of Superconducting Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Chiaveri, Enrico

    1996-01-01

    Many laboratories around the world, notably CEBAF, CERN, DESY and KEK, after a period of research and development, are presently or have recently been involved in the industrial production of a large number of RF superconducting cavities. CERN, instead of using the standard bulk niobium technique, has developed a new Nb/Cu technology (niobium film deposited by magnetron sputtering on copper). The aim of this paper is to present the transfer of this technology to three European firms [Ansaldo, CERCA and Siemens (now ACCEL)]. Emphasis will be placed on the major challenges to industry of mastering the very complex procedure (which requires high quality control at every stage of the production) needed to achieve a very demanding final RF performance [Q(6 MV/m) = 3.4¥109 at 4.5 K].

  1. Short-cavity squeezing in barium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hope, D. M.; Bachor, H-A.; Manson, P. J.; Mcclelland, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    Broadband phase sensitive noise and squeezing were experimentally observed in a system of barium atoms interacting with a single mode of a short optical cavity. Squeezing of 13 +/- 3 percent was observed. A maximum possible squeezing of 45 +/- 8 percent could be inferred for out experimental conditions, after correction for measured loss factors. Noise reductions below the quantum limit were found over a range of detection frequencies 60-170 MHz and were best for high cavity transmission and large optical depths. The amount of squeezing observed is consistent with theoretical predictions from a full quantum statistical model of the system.

  2. End-point energy measurements of field emission current in a continuous-wave normal-conducting rf injector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, D. C.; Moody, N. A.; Andrews, H. L.; Bolme, G.; Castellano, L. J.; Heath, C. E.; Krawczyk, F. L.; Kwon, S. I.; McCrady, R.; Martinez, F. A.; Marroquin, P.; Prokop, M.; Renneke, R. M.; Roybal, P.; Roybal, W. T.; Tomei, T. L.; Torrez, P. A.; Tuzel, W. M.; Zaugg, T.

    2011-03-01

    The LANL/AES normal-conducting radio-frequency injector has been tested at cw cathode gradients up to 10MV/m. Field-emission electrons from a roughened copper cathode are accelerated to beam energy as high as 2.5 MeV and impinge on a stainless steel target. The energies of the resulting bremsstrahlung photons are measured at varying levels of injector cavity rf power corresponding to different accelerating gradients. At low cavity power, the bremsstrahlung spectra exhibit well-defined end-point energies at the positions where the number of single-photon events decreases to one (S/Nratio=1). Increasing the cavity power raises the probability of two-photon events in which two photons simultaneously arrive at the detector and register counts at twice the photon energy. The end-point energies at high cavity power are recorded at positions where the single-photon events transition to two-photon events. The measured end-point energies using this method are in excellent agreement with PARMELA calculations based on the cavity gradients deduced from the cavity rf power measurements.

  3. Characterization of Nb coating in HIE-ISOLDE QWR superconducting accelerating cavities by means of SEM-FIB and TEM

    CERN Document Server

    Bartova, Barbora; Taborelli, M; Aebersold, A B; Alexander, D T L; Cantoni, M; Calatroni, Sergio; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2015-01-01

    The Quarter Wave Resonators (QWR) high-β cavities (0.3 m diameter and 0.9 m height) are made from OFE 3D-forged copper and are coated by DC-bias diode sputtering with a thin superconducting layer of niobium. The Nb film thickness, morphology, purity and quality are critical parameters for RF performances of the cavity. They have been investigated in a detailed material study.

  4. Low-level rf control of Spallation Neutron Source: System and characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hengjie Ma

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The low-level rf control system currently commissioned throughout the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS LINAC evolved from three design iterations over 1 yr intensive research and development. Its digital hardware implementation is efficient, and has succeeded in achieving a minimum latency of less than 150 ns which is the key for accomplishing an all-digital feedback control for the full bandwidth. The control bandwidth is analyzed in frequency domain and characterized by testing its transient response. The hardware implementation also includes the provision of a time-shared input channel for a superior phase differential measurement between the cavity field and the reference. A companion cosimulation system for the digital hardware was developed to ensure a reliable long-term supportability. A large effort has also been made in the operation software development for the practical issues such as the process automations, cavity filling, beam loading compensation, and the cavity mechanical resonance suppression.

  5. Rf Gun with High-Current Density Field Emission Cathode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2005-12-19

    High current-density field emission from an array of carbon nanotubes, with field-emission-transistor control, and with secondary electron channel multiplication in a ceramic facing structure, have been combined in a cold cathode for rf guns and diode guns. Electrodynamic and space-charge flow simulations were conducted to specify the cathode configuration and range of emission current density from the field emission cold cathode. Design of this cathode has been made for installation and testing in an existing S-band 2-1/2 cell rf gun. With emission control and modulation, and with current density in the range of 0.1-1 kA/cm2, this cathode could provide performance and long-life not enjoyed by other currently-available cathodes

  6. Cancellation of RF Coupler-Induced Emittance Due to Astigmatism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowell, David H.; /SLAC

    2016-12-11

    It is well-known that the electron beam quality required for applications such as FEL’s and ultra-fast electron diffraction can be degraded by the asymmetric fields introduced by the RF couplers of superconducting linacs. This effect is especially troublesome in the injector where the low energy beam from the gun is captured into the first high gradient accelerator section. Unfortunately modifying the established cavity design is expensive and time consuming, especially considering that only one or two sections are needed for an injector. Instead, it is important to analyze the coupler fields to understand their characteristics and help find less costly solutions for their cancellation and mitigation. This paper finds the RF coupler-induced emittance for short bunches is mostly due to the transverse spatial sloping or tilt of the field, rather than the field’s time-dependence. It is shown that the distorting effects of the coupler can be canceled with a static (DC) quadrupole lens rotated about the z-axis.

  7. Changeability of Oral Cavity Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Surdacka, Anna; Strzyka?a, Krystyna; Rydzewska, Anna

    2007-01-01

    Objectives In dentistry, the results of in vivo studies on drugs, dental fillings or prostheses are routinely evaluated based on selected oral cavity environment parameters at specific time points. Such evaluation may be confounded by ongoing changes in the oral cavity environment induced by diet, drug use, stress and other factors. The study aimed to confirm oral cavity environment changeability. Methods 24 healthy individuals aged 20?30 had their oral cavity environment prepared by having p...

  8. CNES - Chalmers - IAP - ONERA - XLIM activities in the domain of high RF power breakdown phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puech, J.; Sorolla, E.; Semenov, V. E.; Rakova, E. I.; Anderson, D.; Belhaj, M.; Hillairet, J.

    2017-10-01

    Multipactor breakdown is an important potential failure mechanism in many different microwave devices working under close to vacuum conditions. Applications range from space borne RF equipment to high-power microwave generators. The basic physics involved in the multipactor phenomenon is well known for the case of two infinite pallel plates made of metal. However, most realistic RF device geometries involve inhomogeneous RF electric fields and curved field lines and sometimes also dielectric material. The purpose of this paper is to set up methodologies to determine the Multipactor threshold in such situations.

  9. Esthesioneuroblastoma of the nasal cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollen, Tyler R; Morris, Christopher G; Kirwan, Jessica M; Amdur, Robert J; Werning, John W; Vaysberg, Mikhail; Mendenhall, William M

    2015-06-01

    Esthesioneuroblastoma is an uncommon cancer of the nasal cavity. We describe the outcomes for 26 patients treated with curative intent with photon radiotherapy (RT) at the University of Florida. Between May 1972 and June 2007, 26 patients received RT for previously untreated esthesioneuroblastoma of the nasal cavity. Sixteen patients were males and 10 were females with a median age of 55 years (range, 3 to 82 y). The modified Kadish stage distribution was: B, 7 patients; C, 17 patients; and D, 2 patients. Treatment modalities included the following: definitive RT, 5 patients; preoperative RT, 2 patients; and postoperative RT after resection, 19 patients. Elective neck irradiation (ENI) was performed in 17 (71%) of 24 N0 patients. Rates of local control, cause-specific survival, and absolute overall survival at 5 years were 79%, 72%, and 69%, respectively. Overall survival among patients treated with definitive RT was 20% at 5 years, compared with 81% among those who underwent surgery and adjuvant RT (P=0.01). One (6%) of 17 patients who received ENI developed a recurrence in the neck and was successfully salvaged. Ultimate neck control was 100% at 5 years for patients who received ENI versus 69% among those not receiving ENI (P=0.0173). Resection combined with adjuvant RT is more effective than surgery or RT alone in the treatment of esthesioneuroblastoma. ENI reduces the risk of regional relapse in patients with Kadish stage B and C cancers.

  10. Optimization of photonic crystal cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Fengwen; Sigmund, Ole

    2017-01-01

    We present optimization of photonic crystal cavities. The optimization problem is formulated to maximize the Purcell factor of a photonic crystal cavity. Both topology optimization and air-hole-based shape optimization are utilized for the design process. Numerical results demonstrate...... that the Purcell factor of the photonic crystal cavity can be significantly improved through optimization....

  11. Substrate noise coupling in analog/RF circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Bronckers, Stephane; Vandersteen, Gerd; Rolain, Yves

    2010-01-01

    This practical resource offers you detailed guidance on the impact of substrate noise on a wide range of circuits operating from baseband frequencies up to mm-wave frequencies. This unique book presents case studies to illustrate that careful modeling of the assembly characteristics and layout details is required to bring simulations and measurements into agreement. You learn how to use a proper combination of isolation structures and circuit techniques to make analog/RF circuits more immune to substrate noise.

  12. Unexpected reduction of rf spin resonance strength for stored deuteron beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Krisch

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Stored beams of polarized protons, electrons, or deuterons can be spin flipped by sweeping an rf dipole’s or solenoid’s frequency through an rf spin resonance. Fitting such data to the modified Froissart-Stora equation’s spin resonance strength E_{FS} gave very large deviations from the ^{*}E_{Bdl} obtained from each rf magnet’s ∫B_{rms}dl. We recently varied an rf dipole’s frequency sweep range Δf, and the momentum spread Δp/p and betatron tune ν_{y} of stored 1.85  GeV/c polarized deuterons. We found a sharp constructive interference when ν_{y} was near an intrinsic spin resonance. Moreover, over large Δf and Δp/p ranges, E_{FS} was about 7 times smaller than the predicted ^{*}E_{Bdl}.

  13. Slim elliptical cavity at 800 MHz for local crab crossing

    CERN Document Server

    Ficcadenti, L

    2011-01-01

    A slim highly eccentric elliptical Crab cavity with vertical deflection at 800 MHz, compatible to beam line distances everywhere in the LHC ring, was designed. It is a good fall-back solution in case of problems with new compact 400 MHz designs. Simulated RF characteristics of the deflecting mode, HOM spectra and damping, tuning and multipacting effects are presented. First the most simple HOM coupling system from a point of view of geometry, machining and cleaning was investigated. The rejection of the working mode of such coupler depend on very tight mechanical tollerances. To overcome this issue a notch filter was added to the design. Results of both cases will be presented.

  14. Slim elliptical cavity at 800 MHz for local crab crossing

    CERN Document Server

    Ficcadenti, L

    2012-01-01

    A slim highly eccentric elliptical Crab cavity with vertical deflection at 800 MHz, compatible to beam line distances everywhere in the LHC ring, was designed. It is a good fall-back solution in case of problems with new compact 400 MHz designs. Simulated RF characteristics of the deflecting mode, HOM spectra and damping, tuning and multipacting effects are presented. First the simplest HOM coupling system was investigated. The rejection of the working mode was not sufficient and a notch filter was added. Results of both cases will be presented.

  15. Colloquium: cavity optomechanics

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    Monday 14 November 2011, 17:00 Ecole de Physique, Auditoire Stueckelberg Université de Genève Cavity optomechanics: controlling micro mechanical oscillators with laser light Prof. Tobias Kippenberg EPFL, Lausanne Laser light can be used to cool and to control trapped ions, atoms and molecules at the quantum level. This has lead to spectacular advances such as the most precise atomic clocks. An outstanding frontier is the control with lasers of nano- and micro-mechancial systems. Recent advances in cavity optomechanics have allowed such elementary control for the first time, enabling mechanical systems to be ground state cooled leading to readout with quantum limited sensitivity and permitting to explore new device concepts resulting from radiation pressure.  

  16. Cavity enhanced atomic magnetometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crepaz, Herbert; Ley, Li Yuan; Dumke, Rainer

    2015-10-20

    Atom sensing based on Faraday rotation is an indispensable method for precision measurements, universally suitable for both hot and cold atomic systems. Here we demonstrate an all-optical magnetometer where the optical cell for Faraday rotation spectroscopy is augmented with a low finesse cavity. Unlike in previous experiments, where specifically designed multipass cells had been employed, our scheme allows to use conventional, spherical vapour cells. Spherical shaped cells have the advantage that they can be effectively coated inside with a spin relaxation suppressing layer providing long spin coherence times without addition of a buffer gas. Cavity enhancement shows in an increase in optical polarization rotation and sensitivity compared to single-pass configurations.

  17. Cavity enhanced atomic magnetometry

    CERN Document Server

    Crepaz, Herbert; Dumke, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Atom sensing based on Faraday rotation is an indispensable method for precision measurements, universally suitable for both hot and cold atomic systems. Here we demonstrate an all-optical magnetometer where the optical cell for Faraday rotation spectroscopy is augmented with a low finesse cavity. Unlike in previous experiments, where specifically designed multipass cells had been employed, our scheme allows to use conventional, spherical vapour cells. Spherical shaped cells have the advantage that they can be effectively coated inside with a spin relaxation suppressing layer providing long spin coherence times without addition of a buffer gas. Cavity enhancement shows in an increase in optical polarization rotation and sensitivity compared to single-pass configurations.

  18. Final Report for "Design calculations for high-space-charge beam-to-RF conversion".

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David N Smithe

    2008-10-17

    Accelerator facility upgrades, new accelerator applications, and future design efforts are leading to novel klystron and IOT device concepts, including multiple beam, high-order mode operation, and new geometry configurations of old concepts. At the same time, a new simulation capability, based upon finite-difference “cut-cell” boundaries, has emerged and is transforming the existing modeling and design capability with unparalleled realism, greater flexibility, and improved accuracy. This same new technology can also be brought to bear on a difficult-to-study aspect of the energy recovery linac (ERL), namely the accurate modeling of the exit beam, and design of the beam dump for optimum energy efficiency. We have developed new capability for design calculations and modeling of a broad class of devices which convert bunched beam kinetic energy to RF energy, including RF sources, as for example, klystrons, gyro-klystrons, IOT's, TWT’s, and other devices in which space-charge effects are important. Recent advances in geometry representation now permits very accurate representation of the curved metallic surfaces common to RF sources, resulting in unprecedented simulation accuracy. In the Phase I work, we evaluated and demonstrated the capabilities of the new geometry representation technology as applied to modeling and design of output cavity components of klystron, IOT's, and energy recovery srf cavities. We identified and prioritized which aspects of the design study process to pursue and improve in Phase II. The development and use of the new accurate geometry modeling technology on RF sources for DOE accelerators will help spark a new generational modeling and design capability, free from many of the constraints and inaccuracy associated with the previous generation of “stair-step” geometry modeling tools. This new capability is ultimately expected to impact all fields with high power RF sources, including DOE fusion research, communications

  19. LTE RF subsystem power consumption modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Musiige, Deogratius; Vincent, Laulagnet; Anton, François

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a new power consumption emulation model, for all possible scenarios of the RF subsystem, when transmitting a LTE signal. The model takes the logical interface parameters, Tx power, carrier frequency and bandwidth between the baseband and RF subsystem as inputs to compute...

  20. 47 CFR 101.1525 - RF safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false RF safety. 101.1525 Section 101.1525 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Service and Technical Rules for the 70/80/90 GHz Bands § 101.1525 RF safety. Licensees in the 70...