WorldWideScience

Sample records for range including temperatures

  1. Enhanced battery model including temperature effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosca, B.; Wilkins, S.

    2013-01-01

    Within electric and hybrid vehicles, batteries are used to provide/buffer the energy required for driving. However, battery performance varies throughout the temperature range specific to automotive applications, and as such, models that describe this behaviour are required. This paper presents a

  2. Semiconductor Sensors for a Wide Temperature Range

    OpenAIRE

    Nikolay GORBACHUK; Mikhail LARIONOV; Aleksey FIRSOV; Nikolay SHATIL

    2014-01-01

    Prototype sensors are described that are applicable for pressure, position, temperature, and field measurements in the temperature range of 4.2 to 300 K. The strain gauges utilize the silicon substrate and thin film technology. The tensosensitivity of strain sensors is 40 µV/mln-1 or better depending on metrological characteristics of semiconductor films, orientation, and current. The temperature sensors (thermistors) make use of the germanium powder bulk. The temperature coefficient of resis...

  3. Semiconductor Sensors for a Wide Temperature Range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay GORBACHUK

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Prototype sensors are described that are applicable for pressure, position, temperature, and field measurements in the temperature range of 4.2 to 300 K. The strain gauges utilize the silicon substrate and thin film technology. The tensosensitivity of strain sensors is 40 µV/mln-1 or better depending on metrological characteristics of semiconductor films, orientation, and current. The temperature sensors (thermistors make use of the germanium powder bulk. The temperature coefficient of resistance is within 50-100 % /K at 4.2 K. The magnetic field sensors use GaAs films that offer weak temperature dependence of parameters at high sensitivity (up to 300-400 mV/T.

  4. Diel Surface Temperature Range Scales with Lake Size.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Iestyn Woolway

    Full Text Available Ecological and biogeochemical processes in lakes are strongly dependent upon water temperature. Long-term surface warming of many lakes is unequivocal, but little is known about the comparative magnitude of temperature variation at diel timescales, due to a lack of appropriately resolved data. Here we quantify the pattern and magnitude of diel temperature variability of surface waters using high-frequency data from 100 lakes. We show that the near-surface diel temperature range can be substantial in summer relative to long-term change and, for lakes smaller than 3 km2, increases sharply and predictably with decreasing lake area. Most small lakes included in this study experience average summer diel ranges in their near-surface temperatures of between 4 and 7°C. Large diel temperature fluctuations in the majority of lakes undoubtedly influence their structure, function and role in biogeochemical cycles, but the full implications remain largely unexplored.

  5. Diel Surface Temperature Range Scales with Lake Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolway, R Iestyn; Jones, Ian D; Maberly, Stephen C; French, Jon R; Livingstone, David M; Monteith, Donald T; Simpson, Gavin L; Thackeray, Stephen J; Andersen, Mikkel R; Battarbee, Richard W; DeGasperi, Curtis L; Evans, Christopher D; de Eyto, Elvira; Feuchtmayr, Heidrun; Hamilton, David P; Kernan, Martin; Krokowski, Jan; Rimmer, Alon; Rose, Kevin C; Rusak, James A; Ryves, David B; Scott, Daniel R; Shilland, Ewan M; Smyth, Robyn L; Staehr, Peter A; Thomas, Rhian; Waldron, Susan; Weyhenmeyer, Gesa A

    2016-01-01

    Ecological and biogeochemical processes in lakes are strongly dependent upon water temperature. Long-term surface warming of many lakes is unequivocal, but little is known about the comparative magnitude of temperature variation at diel timescales, due to a lack of appropriately resolved data. Here we quantify the pattern and magnitude of diel temperature variability of surface waters using high-frequency data from 100 lakes. We show that the near-surface diel temperature range can be substantial in summer relative to long-term change and, for lakes smaller than 3 km2, increases sharply and predictably with decreasing lake area. Most small lakes included in this study experience average summer diel ranges in their near-surface temperatures of between 4 and 7°C. Large diel temperature fluctuations in the majority of lakes undoubtedly influence their structure, function and role in biogeochemical cycles, but the full implications remain largely unexplored.

  6. 33 CFR 159.119 - Operability test; temperature range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Operability test; temperature... Operability test; temperature range. The device must operate in an ambient temperature of 5 °C with inlet operating fluid temperature varying from 2 °C to 32 °C and in an ambient temperature of 50 °C with inlet...

  7. 33 CFR 159.115 - Temperature range test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Temperature range test. 159.115...) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.115 Temperature range test. (a) The device must be held at a temperature of 60 °C or higher for a period of 16 hours. (b) The device...

  8. Mixture including hydrogen and hydrocarbon having pressure-temperature stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Wendy L. (Inventor); Mao, Ho-Kwang (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The invention relates to a method of storing hydrogen that employs a mixture of hydrogen and a hydrocarbon that can both be used as fuel. In one embodiment, the method involves maintaining a mixture including hydrogen and a hydrocarbon in the solid state at ambient pressure and a temperature in excess of about 10 K.

  9. Passive Wireless Temperature Sensors with Enhanced Sensitivity and Range Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal describes the development of passive surface acoustic wave (SAW) temperature sensors with enhanced sensitivity and detection range for NASA application...

  10. Changes in diurnal temperature range and national cereal yields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobell, D

    2007-04-26

    Models of yield responses to temperature change have often considered only changes in average temperature (Tavg), with the implicit assumption that changes in the diurnal temperature range (DTR) can safely be ignored. The goal of this study was to evaluate this assumption using a combination of historical datasets and climate model projections. Data on national crop yields for 1961-2002 in the 10 leading producers of wheat, rice, and maize were combined with datasets on climate and crop locations to evaluate the empirical relationships between Tavg, DTR, and crop yields. In several rice and maize growing regions, including the two major nations for each crop, there was a clear negative response of yields to increased DTR. This finding reflects a nonlinear response of yields to temperature, which likely results from greater water and heat stress during hot days. In many other cases, the effects of DTR were not statistically significant, in part because correlations of DTR with other climate variables and the relatively short length of the time series resulted in wide confidence intervals for the estimates. To evaluate whether future changes in DTR are relevant to crop impact assessments, yield responses to projected changes in Tavg and DTR by 2046-2065 from 11 climate models were estimated. The mean climate model projections indicated an increase in DTR in most seasons and locations where wheat is grown, mixed projections for maize, and a general decrease in DTR for rice. These mean projections were associated with wide ranges that included zero in nearly all cases. The estimated impacts of DTR changes on yields were generally small (<5% change in yields) relative to the consistently negative impact of projected warming of Tavg. However, DTR changes did significantly affect yield responses in several cases, such as in reducing US maize yields and increasing India rice yields. Because DTR projections tend to be positively correlated with Tavg, estimates of yields

  11. A Wide Range Temperature Sensor Using SOI Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Elbuluk, Malik E.; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2009-01-01

    Silicon-on-insulator (SOI) technology is becoming widely used in integrated circuit chips for its advantages over the conventional silicon counterpart. The decrease in leakage current combined with lower power consumption allows electronics to operate in a broader temperature range. This paper describes the performance of an SOIbased temperature sensor under extreme temperatures and thermal cycling. The sensor comprised of a temperature-to-frequency relaxation oscillator circuit utilizing an SOI precision timer chip. The circuit was evaluated under extreme temperature exposure and thermal cycling between -190 C and +210 C. The results indicate that the sensor performed well over the entire test temperature range and it was able to re-start at extreme temperatures.

  12. Thermodynamics of Quantum Gases for the Entire Range of Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Shyamal; Jana, Debnarayan

    2012-01-01

    We have analytically explored the thermodynamics of free Bose and Fermi gases for the entire range of temperature, and have extended the same for harmonically trapped cases. We have obtained approximate chemical potentials for the quantum gases in closed forms of temperature so that the thermodynamic properties of the quantum gases become…

  13. Measuring Systems for Thermometer Calibration in Low-Temperature Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szmyrka-Grzebyk, A.; Lipiński, L.; Manuszkiewicz, H.; Kowal, A.; Grykałowska, A.; Jancewicz, D.

    2011-12-01

    The national temperature standard for the low-temperature range between 13.8033 K and 273.16 K has been established in Poland at the Institute of Low Temperature and Structure Research (INTiBS). The standard consists of sealed cells for realization of six fixed points of the International Temperature Scale of 1990 (ITS-90) in the low-temperature range, an adiabatic cryostat and Isotech water and mercury triple-point baths, capsule standard resistance thermometers (CSPRT), and AC and DC bridges with standard resistors for thermometers resistance measurements. INTiBS calibrates CSPRTs at the low-temperature fixed points with uncertainties less than 1 mK. In lower temperature range—between 2.5 K and about 25 K — rhodium-iron (RhFe) resistance thermometers are calibrated by comparison with a standard which participated in the EURAMET.T-K1.1 comparison. INTiBS offers a calibration service for industrial platinum resistance thermometers and for digital thermometers between 77 K and 273 K. These types of thermometers may be calibrated at INTiBS also in a higher temperature range up to 550°C. The Laboratory of Temperature Standard at INTiBS acquired an accreditation from the Polish Centre for Accreditation. A management system according to EN ISO/IEC 17025:2005 was established at the Laboratory and presented on EURAMET QSM Forum.

  14. Note: A wide temperature range MOKE system with annealing capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahil, Narpinder Singh; Mankey, G. J.

    2017-07-01

    A novel sample stage integrated with a longitudinal MOKE system has been developed for wide temperature range measurements and annealing capabilities in the temperature range 65 K < T < 760 K. The sample stage incorporates a removable platen and copper block with inserted cartridge heater and two thermocouple sensors. It is supported and thermally coupled to a cold finger with two sapphire bars. The sapphire based thermal coupling enables the system to perform at higher temperatures without adversely affecting the cryostat and minimizes thermal drift in position. In this system the hysteresis loops of magnetic samples can be measured simultaneously while annealing the sample in a magnetic field.

  15. [Temperature range for growth of the Antarctic microorganisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanovaskaia, V A; Tashirev, A B; Gladka, G B; Tashireva, A A

    2012-01-01

    The assessment of a temperature range for growth of microorganisms isolated at various temperatures (1-5 degrees C or 30 degrees C) from biotopes of the Antarctic region (soil, grass Deschampcia antarctica, grass Colobanthus, a green moss, crustose black lichens and encrustation biofilm on vertical rocks) is made. From 40 to 70% of the investigated Antarctic microorganisms, irrespective of temperature conditions of their isolation, were capable of growing in a wide temperature range (from 1 degrees C to 30 degrees C), i.e. they are psychrotolerant. In selective conditions (1 degrees C or 5 degrees C) the psychrophilic Antarctic bacteria and yeast are isolated which grew in the range from 1 degrees C to 20 degrees C and did not grow at 30 degrees C. At the same time, among the Antarctic microorganisms isolated in nonselective conditions (at 30 degrees C), almost 50% are capable of growing at the lowest temperature (5 degrees C), and a smaller number of strains--at 1 degrees C. However with a decrease of cultivation temperature the growth lag-phase of the Antarctic bacteria increased. Thus the level of the final biomass of the investigated strains did not depend on cultivation temperature. When comparing the temperature range of growth of the mesophilic Antarctic bacteria and collection strains of the same species isolated more than 10 years ago from the region with a temperate climate, the psychrotolerant forms were also revealed among the latter. So, it is shown that the investigated Antarctic bacteria can exist in the temperature range characteristic of terrestrial biotopes of the Antarctic Region (from 1 degrees C to 10 degrees C).

  16. Platinum sensors versus KTY and NTC in low temperature range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wienand, K. [Heraeus Sensor-Nite GmbH, Kleinostheim (Germany); Gerwen, P. van [Heraeus Sensor-Nite N.V., Leuven (Netherlands); Reinwald, H.J. [Heraeus Sensor-Nite Int., Freiberg (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    On the automotive electronics market, negative temperature coefficient sensors (NTC) and silicon spreading resistance sensors (KTY) have increasingly been used above all in the temperature range between -40 and +150 C. The latest demands of the automotive industry show that these tight temperature limits will no longer meet the requirements in the future. Moreover, the automotive industry is more frequently expanding the temperature measuring range to between -55 C and 180 C, for example in engine oil. This trend can also be seen in the commercial vehicle field, for example with retarders which also heat the oil to a great extent. Due to these increasingly more demanding conditions, platinum (Pt) sensors are being used more and more, as they have a number of advantages compared with NTCs or KTYs. The pros and cons of using these three sensor types are explained in more detail in the following. (orig.)

  17. Performance of Wide Operating Temperature Range Electrolytes in Quallion Prototype Li-Ion Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, M. C.; Ratnakumar, B. V.; Tomcsi, M. R.; Nagata, M.; Visco, V.; Tsukamoto, H.

    2010-01-01

    For a number of applications, there is a continued interest in the development of rechargeable lithium-based batteries that can effectively operate over a wide temperature range (i.e., -40 to +70 deg C). These applications include powering future planetary rovers for NASA, enabling the next generation of automotive batteries for DOE, and supporting many DOD applications. Li-ion technology has been demonstrated to have good performance over a reasonably wide temperature range with many systems; however, there is still a desire to improve the low temperature rate capacity as well as the high temperature resilience. In the current study, we would like to present recent results obtained with prototype Li-Ion cells (manufactured by Quallion, LLC) which include various wide operating temperature range electrolytes developed by both JPL and Quallion. To demonstrate the viability of the technology, a number of performance tests were carried out, including: (a) discharge rate characterization over a wide temperature range (down to -60 deg C) using various rates (up to 20C rates), (b) discharge rate characterization at low temperatures with low temperature charging, (c) variable temperature cycling over a wide temperature range (-40 to +70 deg C), and (d) cycling at high temperature (50 deg C). As will be discussed, impressive rate capability was observed at low temperatures with many systems, as well as good resilience to high temperature cycling. To augment the performance testing on the prototype cells, a number of experimental three electrodes cells were fabricated (including Li reference electrodes) to allow the determination of the lithium kinetics of the respective electrodes and interfacial properties as a function of temperatures.

  18. Infrared optical element mounting techniques for wide temperature ranges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saggin, Bortolino; Tarabini, Marco; Scaccabarozzi, Diego

    2010-01-20

    We describe the optimization of a mounting system for the infrared (IR) optics of a spaceborne interferometer working in the temperature range between -120 degrees C and +150 degrees C. The concept is based on an aluminum alloy frame with designed mechanical compliance, which allows for compensation of the different coefficient of thermal expansion between the optics and the holder; at the same time, the system provides for the high stiffness required to reach natural frequencies above 200 Hz, which are mandatory in most space missions. Thermal adapters with properly chosen thermomechanical characteristics are interposed between the metallic structure and the lens, so as to reduce the interface stresses on the mechanically weak IR material, due to both the thermoelastic and acceleration loads. With the proposed mount, the competitive requirements of stiffness and stress-free mounting can be matched in wide temperature ranges. The case study of the interferometer of a miniaturized Fourier transform IR spectrometer is presented.

  19. Large diurnal temperature range increases bird sensitivity to climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briga, Michael; Verhulst, Simon

    2015-11-13

    Climate variability is changing on multiple temporal scales, and little is known of the consequences of increases in short-term variability, particularly in endotherms. Using mortality data with high temporal resolution of zebra finches living in large outdoor aviaries (5 years, 359.220 bird-days), we show that mortality rate increases almost two-fold per 1°C increase in diurnal temperature range (DTR). Interestingly, the DTR effect differed between two groups with low versus high experimentally manipulated foraging costs, reflecting a typical laboratory 'easy' foraging environment and a 'hard' semi-natural environment respectively. DTR increased mortality on days with low minimum temperature in the easy foraging environment, but on days with high minimum temperature in the semi-natural environment. Thus, in a natural environment DTR effects will become increasingly important in a warming world, something not detectable in an 'easy' laboratory environment. These effects were particularly apparent at young ages. Critical time window analyses showed that the effect of DTR on mortality is delayed up to three months, while effects of minimum temperature occurred within a week. These results show that daily temperature variability can substantially impact the population viability of endothermic species.

  20. Wide-Range Temperature Sensors with High-Level Pulse Train Output

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammoud, Ahmad; Patterson, Richard L.

    2009-01-01

    Two types of temperature sensors have been developed for wide-range temperature applications. The two sensors measure temperature in the range of -190 to +200 C and utilize a thin-film platinum RTD (resistance temperature detector) as the temperature-sensing element. Other parts used in the fabrication of these sensors include NPO (negative-positive- zero) type ceramic capacitors for timing, thermally-stable film or wirewound resistors, and high-temperature circuit boards and solder. The first type of temperature sensor is a relaxation oscillator circuit using an SOI (silicon-on-insulator) operational amplifier as a comparator. The output is a pulse train with a period that is roughly proportional to the temperature being measured. The voltage level of the pulse train is high-level, for example 10 V. The high-level output makes the sensor less sensitive to noise or electromagnetic interference. The output can be read by a frequency or period meter and then converted into a temperature reading. The second type of temperature sensor is made up of various types of multivibrator circuits using an SOI type 555 timer and the passive components mentioned above. Three configurations have been developed that were based on the technique of charging and discharging a capacitor through a resistive element to create a train of pulses governed by the capacitor-resistor time constant. Both types of sensors, which operated successfully over the wide temperature range, have potential use in extreme temperature environments including jet engines and space exploration missions.

  1. Diurnal temperature range over Europe between 1950 and 2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Makowski

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available It has been widely accepted that diurnal temperature range (DTR decreased on a global scale during the second half of the twentieth century. Here we show however, that the long-term trend of annual DTR has reversed from a decrease to an increase during the 1970s in Western Europe and during the 1980s in Eastern Europe. The analysis is based on the high-quality dataset of the European Climate Assessment and Dataset Project, from which we selected approximately 200 stations covering the area bordered by Iceland, Algeria, Turkey and Russia for the period 1950 to 2005. We investigate national and regional annual means as well as the pan-European mean with respect to trends and reversal periods. 17 of the 24 investigated regions including the pan-European mean show a statistical significant increase of DTR since 1990 at the latest. Of the remaining 7 regions, two show a non-significant increase, three a significant decrease and two no significant trend. Changes in DTR are affected by both surface shortwave and longwave radiation, the former of which has undergone a change from dimming to brightening in the period considered. Consequently, we discuss the connections between DTR, shortwave radiation and sulfur emissions which are thought to be amongst the most important factors influencing the incoming solar radiation through the primary and secondary aerosol effect. We find reasonable agreement between trends in SO2 emissions, radiation and DTR in areas affected by high pollution. Consequently, we conclude that the trends in DTR could be mostly determined by changes in emissions and the associated changes in incoming solar radiation.

  2. Impact of Reduced Diurnal Temperature Range (DTR) on Grassland Mesocosms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, J. W.; Phillips, C.; Wilson, J.

    2010-12-01

    There has been considerable variation in the magnitude of change in diel temperature range due to on-going global warming and ecological responses are poorly understood. We compared the effects of +3.5C higher temperatures distributed either symmetrically (SYM, continuously +3.5C) or asymmetrically (ASYM, +5C dawn Tmin ramped to +2C midday Tmax and back) on planted native perennial grassland communities in climate-controlled chambers (14 spp. including grasses/forbs, annuals/perennials, N-fixers/not). Here, we present an overview of NPP, phenology, community composition, and whole ecosystem gas exchange results. Biomass was greater for both SYM and ASYM treatments during the fall and winter in all three years (+28-70%). However, spring growth was truncated for the warmer treatments due to reduced soil moisture which provided several extra weeks growth for AMB treatments to ‘catch-up’ to that of SYM and ASYM. Peak spring production and flowering were shifted 1-3 weeks earlier for SYM and ASYM treatments, resulting in a concomitant decrease in water use efficiency concomitant with increased soil moisture as measured via δ13C and whole ecosystem gas exchange (CER)/ evapotranspiration. CER measurements also showed the shift in timing of production and no difference in annual C assimilation between AMB, SYM and ASYM treatments. However, annual net ecosystem production (NEP) was negative for SYM and ASYM treatments which pointed towards the likely importance of changes in stored SOM. Mortality was 70% greater for SYM and ASYM treatments in the first year and remained greater through the three years of treatment application resulting in a decline in species diversity. Differential mortality was most apparent in the forb functional group with 50% of species affected. Survival of graminoid species was generally higher with no significant differences between treatments, resulting in a shift in functional group density and LAI to favor grass species in both warming

  3. The association between diurnal temperature range and childhood bacillary dysentery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Li-ying; Zhao, Ke-fu; Cheng, Jian; Wang, Xu; Yang, Hui-hui; Li, Ke-sheng; Xu, Zhi-wei; Su, Hong

    2016-02-01

    Previous studies have found that mean, maximum, and minimum temperatures were associated with bacillary dysentery (BD). However, little is known about whether the within-day variation of temperature has any impact on bacillary dysentery. The current study aimed to identify the relationship between diurnal temperature range (DTR) and BD in Hefei, China. Daily data on BD counts among children aged 0-14 years from 1 January 2006 to 31 December 2012 were retrieved from Hefei Center for Disease Control and Prevention. Daily data on ambient temperature and relative humidity covering the same period were collected from the Hefei Bureau of Meteorology. A Poisson generalized linear regression model combined with a distributed lag non-linear model (DLNM) was used in the analysis after controlling the effects of season, long-term trends, mean temperature, and relative humidity. The results showed that there existed a statistically significant relationship between DTR and childhood BD. The DTR effect on childhood bacillary dysentery increased when DTR was over 8 °C. And it was greatest at 1-day lag, with an 8 % (95 % CI = 2.9-13.4 %) increase of BD cases per 5 °C increment of DTR. Male children and children aged 0-5 years appeared to be more vulnerable to the DTR effect. The data indicate that large DTR may increase the incidence of childhood BD. Caregivers and health practitioners should be made aware of the potential threat posed by large DTR. Therefore, DTR should be taken into consideration when making targeted health policies and programs to protect children from being harmed by climate impacts.

  4. A finite element technique for non-deterministic thermal deformation analyses including temperature dependent material properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, W. R., Jr.; Walston, W. H., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A technique utilizing the finite element displacement method is developed for the static analysis of structures subjected to non-deterministic thermal loading in which the material properties, assumed isotropic, are temperature dependent. Matrix equations are developed for the first two statistical moments of the displacements using a third order series expansion for the displacements in terms of the random temperatures. Sample problems are included to demonstrate the range of applicability of the third order series solutions. These solutions are compared with results from Monte Carlo analyses and also, for some problems, with solutions obtained by numerically integrating equations for the statistical properties of the displacements. In general, it is shown that the effect of temperature dependent material properties can have a significant effect on the covariances of the displacements.

  5. Combining 2-m temperature nowcasting and short range ensemble forecasting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kann

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available During recent years, numerical ensemble prediction systems have become an important tool for estimating the uncertainties of dynamical and physical processes as represented in numerical weather models. The latest generation of limited area ensemble prediction systems (LAM-EPSs allows for probabilistic forecasts at high resolution in both space and time. However, these systems still suffer from systematic deficiencies. Especially for nowcasting (0–6 h applications the ensemble spread is smaller than the actual forecast error. This paper tries to generate probabilistic short range 2-m temperature forecasts by combining a state-of-the-art nowcasting method and a limited area ensemble system, and compares the results with statistical methods. The Integrated Nowcasting Through Comprehensive Analysis (INCA system, which has been in operation at the Central Institute for Meteorology and Geodynamics (ZAMG since 2006 (Haiden et al., 2011, provides short range deterministic forecasts at high temporal (15 min–60 min and spatial (1 km resolution. An INCA Ensemble (INCA-EPS of 2-m temperature forecasts is constructed by applying a dynamical approach, a statistical approach, and a combined dynamic-statistical method. The dynamical method takes uncertainty information (i.e. ensemble variance from the operational limited area ensemble system ALADIN-LAEF (Aire Limitée Adaptation Dynamique Développement InterNational Limited Area Ensemble Forecasting which is running operationally at ZAMG (Wang et al., 2011. The purely statistical method assumes a well-calibrated spread-skill relation and applies ensemble spread according to the skill of the INCA forecast of the most recent past. The combined dynamic-statistical approach adapts the ensemble variance gained from ALADIN-LAEF with non-homogeneous Gaussian regression (NGR which yields a statistical mbox{correction} of the first and second moment (mean bias and dispersion for Gaussian distributed continuous

  6. A hybrid version of the SCAN functional including long-range dispersion interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Hsin-Yu; Calegari Andrade, Marcos F.; Santra, Biswajit; Selloni, Annabella; Car, Roberto

    The recently developed meta-GGA density functional, called SCAN (strongly constrained and appropriately normed), provides an accurate description of the electronic structure in a broad class of systems characterized by different bonding interactions, including intermediate range van-der-Waals (vdW) bonding. Here we consider a hybrid version of the SCAN functional with inclusion of long-range vdW interactions via a re-parameterized Tkatchenko-Scheffler scheme. Calculations for the S22 molecular database, ice hexamer clusters, and bulk ice Ih indicate that this functional further improves the description of vdW and hydrogen bonding interactions. This work has been supported by the Department of Energy under Grants No. DE-SC0008626.

  7. Carbon nanotube dry adhesives with temperature-enhanced adhesion over a large temperature range

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Ming; Du, Feng; Ganguli, Sabyasachi; Roy, Ajit; Dai, Liming

    2016-01-01

    Conventional adhesives show a decrease in the adhesion force with increasing temperature due to thermally induced viscoelastic thinning and/or structural decomposition. Here, we report the counter-intuitive behaviour of carbon nanotube (CNT) dry adhesives that show a temperature-enhanced adhesion strength by over six-fold up to 143?N?cm?2 (4?mm ? 4?mm), among the strongest pure CNT dry adhesives, over a temperature range from ?196 to 1,000??C. This unusual adhesion behaviour leads to temperat...

  8. Enhanced UWB Radio Channel Model for Short-Range Communication Scenarios Including User Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovacs, Istvan Zsolt; Nguyen, Tuan Hung; Eggers, Patrick Claus F.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we propose a SISO UWB radio channel model for short-range radio link scenarios between a fixed device and a dynamic user hand-held device. The channel model is derived based on novel experimental UWB radio propagation investigations carried out in typical indoor PAN scenarios...... including realistic device and user terminal antenna configurations. The radio channel measurements have been performed in the lower UWB frequency band of 3GHz to 5GHz with a 2x4 MIMO antenna configuration. Several environments, user scenarios and two types of user terminals have been used. The developed...... channel model represents an enhancement of the existing IEEE 802.15.3a/4a PAN channel model, where antenna and user-proximity effects are not included. Our investigations showed that significant variations of the received wideband power and time-delay signal clustering are possible due the human body...

  9. Final Environmental Impact Statement for Proposed Barry M. Goldwater Range East Range Enhancements (Including First and Second Record of Decision)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    El Pinacate Y El Gran Desierto de Altar in Mexico, managed by the Secretaria del Medio Ambiente , Recursos Naturales y Pesca (serving a similar...Enhancements at Barry M. Goldwater Range East References 9-11 Medio Ambiente y el Desarrollo Sustentable del Estado de Sonora with support from...to result in an exceedance of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards. Mitigation/Management Actions: None required. Biological Resources

  10. Carbon nanotube dry adhesives with temperature-enhanced adhesion over a large temperature range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ming; Du, Feng; Ganguli, Sabyasachi; Roy, Ajit; Dai, Liming

    2016-11-01

    Conventional adhesives show a decrease in the adhesion force with increasing temperature due to thermally induced viscoelastic thinning and/or structural decomposition. Here, we report the counter-intuitive behaviour of carbon nanotube (CNT) dry adhesives that show a temperature-enhanced adhesion strength by over six-fold up to 143 N cm-2 (4 mm × 4 mm), among the strongest pure CNT dry adhesives, over a temperature range from -196 to 1,000 °C. This unusual adhesion behaviour leads to temperature-enhanced electrical and thermal transports, enabling the CNT dry adhesive for efficient electrical and thermal management when being used as a conductive double-sided sticky tape. With its intrinsic thermal stability, our CNT adhesive sustains many temperature transition cycles over a wide operation temperature range. We discover that a `nano-interlock' adhesion mechanism is responsible for the adhesion behaviour, which could be applied to the development of various dry CNT adhesives with novel features.

  11. An Investigation on Attributes of Ambient Temperature and Diurnal Temperature Range on Mortality in Five East-Asian Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Whan-Hee; Lim, Youn-Hee; Dang, Tran Ngoc; Seposo, Xerxes; Honda, Yasushi; Guo, Yue-Liang Leon; Jang, Hye-Min; Kim, Ho

    2017-08-31

    Interest in the health effects of extremely low/high ambient temperature and the diurnal temperature range (DTR) on mortality as representative indices of temperature variability is growing. Although numerous studies have reported on these indices independently, few studies have provided the attributes of ambient temperature and DTR related to mortality, concurrently. In this study, we aimed to investigate and compare the mortality risk attributable to ambient temperature and DTR. The study included data of 63 cities in five East-Asian countries/regions during various periods between 1972 and 2013. The attributable risk of non-accidental death to ambient temperature was 9.36% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 8.98-9.69%) and to DTR was 0.59% (95% CI: 0.53-0.65%). The attributable cardiovascular mortality risks to ambient temperature (15.63%) and DTR (0.75%) are higher than the risks to non-accidental/respiratory-related mortality. We verified that ambient temperature plays a larger role in temperature-associated mortality, and cardiovascular mortality is susceptible to ambient temperature and DTR.

  12. Electrochemical reduction of oxygen catalyzed by a wide range of bacteria including Gram-positive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cournet, Amandine [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, LU49, Adhesion Bacterienne et Formation de Biofilms, 35 chemin des Maraichers, 31 062 Toulouse cedex 09 (France); Laboratoire de Genie Chimique CNRS, Universite de Toulouse, 4 allee Emile Monso, BP 84234, 31432 Toulouse cedex 04 (France); Delia, Marie-Line; Bergel, Alain [Laboratoire de Genie Chimique CNRS, Universite de Toulouse, 4 allee Emile Monso, BP 84234, 31432 Toulouse cedex 04 (France); Roques, Christine; Berge, Mathieu [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, LU49, Adhesion Bacterienne et Formation de Biofilms, 35 chemin des Maraichers, 31 062 Toulouse cedex 09 (France)

    2010-04-15

    Most bacteria known to be electrochemically active have been harvested in the anodic compartments of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) and are able to use electrodes as electron acceptors. The reverse phenomenon, i.e. using solid electrodes as electron donors, is not so widely studied. To our knowledge, most of the electrochemically active bacteria are Gram-negative. The present study implements a transitory electrochemical technique (cyclic voltammetry) to study the microbial catalysis of the electrochemical reduction of oxygen. It is demonstrated that a wide range of aerobic and facultative anaerobic bacteria are able to catalyze oxygen reduction. Among these electroactive bacteria, several were Gram-positive. The transfer of electrons was direct since no activity was obtained with the filtrate. These findings, showing a widespread property among bacteria including Gram-positive ones, open new and interesting routes in the field of electroactive bacteria research. (author)

  13. Examining a solar climate link in diurnal temperature ranges

    CERN Document Server

    Laken, Benjamin A; Shahbaz, Tariq; Pallé, Enric; 10.1029/2012JD17683

    2012-01-01

    A recent study has suggested a link between the surface level diurnal temperature range (DTR) and variations in the cosmic ray (CR) flux. As the DTR is an effective proxy for cloud cover, this result supports the notion that widespread cloud changes may be induced by the CR flux. If confirmed, this would have significant implications for our understanding of natural climate forcings. Here, we perform a detailed investigation of the relationships between DTR and solar activity (total solar irradiance and the CR flux) from more than 60 years of NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data and observations from meteorological station data. We find no statistically significant evidence to suggest that the DTR is connected to either long-term solar periodicities (11 or 1.68 year) or short-term (daily-timescale) fluctuations in solar activity, and we attribute previous reports on the contrary to an incorrect estimation of the statistical significance of the data. If a CR-DTR relationship exists, based on the estimated noise in DTR co...

  14. Influence of ambient temperature and diurnal temperature range on incidence of cardiac arrhythmias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jayeun; Kim, Ho

    2017-03-01

    We investigated the association between ambient temperature and diurnal temperature range (DTR) and the exacerbation of arrhythmia symptoms, using data from 31,629 arrhythmia-related emergency department (ED) visits in Seoul, Korea. Linear regression analyses with allowances for over-dispersion were applied to temperature variables and ED visits, adjusted for various environmental factors. The effects were expressed as percentage changes in the risk of arrhythmia-related ED visits up to 5 days later, with 95 % confidence intervals (CI), per 1 °C increase in DTR and 1 °C decrease in mean temperature. The overall risk of ED visits increased by 1.06 % (95 % CI 0.39 %, 1.73 %) for temperature and by 1.84 % (0.34, 3.37 %) for DTR. A season-specific effect was detected for temperature during both fall (1.18 % [0.01, 2.37 %]) and winter (0.87 % [0.07, 1.67 %]), and for DTR during spring (3.76 % [0.34, 7.29 %]). Females were more vulnerable, with 1.57 % [0.56, 2.59 %] and 3.84 % [1.53, 6.20 %] for the changes in temperature and DTR, respectively. An age-specific effect was detected for DTR, with 3.13 % [0.95, 5.36 %] for age ≥ 65 years, while a greater increased risk with temperature decrease was observed among those aged cardiac arrhythmias depended more on the change in DTR (4.72 % [0.37, 9.26 %]). These findings provide evidence that low-temperature and elevated DTR influence the occurrence of arrhythmia exacerbations or symptoms, suggesting a possible strategy for reducing risk by encouraging vulnerable populations to minimize exposure.

  15. Dual fluorescence sensor for trace oxygen and temperature with unmatched range and sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baleizão, Carlos; Nagl, Stefan; Schäferling, Michael; Berberan-Santos, Mário N; Wolfbeis, Otto S

    2008-08-15

    An optical dual sensor for oxygen and temperature is presented that is highly oxygen sensitive and covers a broad temperature range. Dual sensing is based on luminescence lifetime measurements. The novel sensor contains two luminescent compounds incorporated into polymer films. The temperature-sensitive dye (ruthenium tris-1,10-phenanthroline) has a highly temperature-dependent luminescence and is incorporated in poly(acrylonitrile) to avoid cross-sensitivity to oxygen. Fullerene C70 was used as the oxygen-sensitive probe owing to its strong thermally activated delayed fluorescence at elevated temperatures that is extremely oxygen sensitive. The cross-sensitivity of C70 to temperature is accounted for by means of the temperature sensor. C70 is incorporated into a highly oxygen-permeable polymer, either ethyl cellulose or organosilica. The two luminescent probes have different emission spectra and decay times, and their emissions can be discriminated using both parameters. Spatially resolved sensing is achieved by means of fluorescence lifetime imaging. The response times of the sensor to oxygen are short. The dual sensor exhibits a temperature operation range between at least 0 and 120 degrees C, and detection limits for oxygen in the ppbv range, operating for oxygen concentrations up to at least 50 ppmv. These ranges outperform all dual oxygen and temperature sensors reported so far. The dual sensor presented in this study is especially appropriate for measurements under extreme conditions such as high temperatures and ultralow oxygen levels. This dual sensor is a key step forward in a number of scientifically or commercially important applications including food packaging, for monitoring of hyperthermophilic microorganisms, in space technology, and safety and security applications in terms of detection of oxygen leaks.

  16. The diurnal temperature range in the CMIP5 models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindvall, Jenny; Svensson, Gunilla

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyzes the diurnal temperature range (DTR) over land in simulations of the recent past and in future projections by 20 models participating in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5). The annually averaged DTR is evaluated for the present-day climate using two gridded datasets (HadGHCND and CRU). The DTR varies substantially between different CMIP5 models, particularly in the subtropics, and is generally underestimated. In future projections of the high emission scenario RCP8.5, the models disagree on both the sign and the magnitude of the change in DTR. Still, a majority of the models project a globally averaged reduction in the DTR, with an increase over Europe, a decrease over the Sahara desert and a substantial decrease in DTR at high latitudes in winter. The general DTR reduction is partly linked to the enhancement of the downwelling clear sky longwave radiation due to greenhouse gases. At high latitudes in winter, the decrease in DTR seems to be enforced by an increase in cloudiness, but in most other regions counteracted by decreases in cloud fraction. Changes in the hydrological cycle and in the clear sky shortwave radiation also impact the DTR. The DTR integrates many processes and neither the model differences in the DTR nor in the change in DTR can be attributed to a single parameter. Which variables that impact the model discrepancies vary both regionally and seasonally. However, clouds seem to matter in most regions and seasons and the evaporative fraction is important in summer.

  17. Influence of ambient temperature and diurnal temperature range on incidence of cardiac arrhythmias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jayeun; Kim, Ho

    2017-03-01

    We investigated the association between ambient temperature and diurnal temperature range (DTR) and the exacerbation of arrhythmia symptoms, using data from 31,629 arrhythmia-related emergency department (ED) visits in Seoul, Korea. Linear regression analyses with allowances for over-dispersion were applied to temperature variables and ED visits, adjusted for various environmental factors. The effects were expressed as percentage changes in the risk of arrhythmia-related ED visits up to 5 days later, with 95 % confidence intervals (CI), per 1 °C increase in DTR and 1 °C decrease in mean temperature. The overall risk of ED visits increased by 1.06 % (95 % CI 0.39 %, 1.73 %) for temperature and by 1.84 % (0.34, 3.37 %) for DTR. A season-specific effect was detected for temperature during both fall (1.18 % [0.01, 2.37 %]) and winter (0.87 % [0.07, 1.67 %]), and for DTR during spring (3.76 % [0.34, 7.29 %]). Females were more vulnerable, with 1.57 % [0.56, 2.59 %] and 3.84 % [1.53, 6.20 %] for the changes in temperature and DTR, respectively. An age-specific effect was detected for DTR, with 3.13 % [0.95, 5.36 %] for age ≥ 65 years, while a greater increased risk with temperature decrease was observed among those aged influence the occurrence of arrhythmia exacerbations or symptoms, suggesting a possible strategy for reducing risk by encouraging vulnerable populations to minimize exposure.

  18. Passive Wireless Temperature Sensors with Enhanced Sensitivity and Range Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal describes the development of a wireless multisensor system for NASA application to remote wireless sensing of temperature distributions in composite...

  19. Quenched Large Deviations for Simple Random Walks on Percolation Clusters Including Long-Range Correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Noam; Mukherjee, Chiranjib; Okamura, Kazuki

    2017-12-01

    We prove a quenched large deviation principle (LDP) for a simple random walk on a supercritical percolation cluster (SRWPC) on {Z^d} ({d ≥ 2} ). The models under interest include classical Bernoulli bond and site percolation as well as models that exhibit long range correlations, like the random cluster model, the random interlacement and the vacant set of random interlacements (for {d ≥ 3} ) and the level sets of the Gaussian free field ({d≥ 3} ). Inspired by the methods developed by Kosygina et al. (Commun Pure Appl Math 59:1489-1521, 2006) for proving quenched LDP for elliptic diffusions with a random drift, and by Yilmaz (Commun Pure Appl Math 62(8):1033-1075, 2009) and Rosenbluth (Quenched large deviations for multidimensional random walks in a random environment: a variational formula. Ph.D. thesis, NYU, arXiv:0804.1444v1) for similar results regarding elliptic random walks in random environment, we take the point of view of the moving particle and prove a large deviation principle for the quenched distribution of the pair empirical measures of the environment Markov chain in the non-elliptic case of SRWPC. Via a contraction principle, this reduces easily to a quenched LDP for the distribution of the mean velocity of the random walk and both rate functions admit explicit variational formulas. The main difficulty in our set up lies in the inherent non-ellipticity as well as the lack of translation-invariance stemming from conditioning on the fact that the origin belongs to the infinite cluster. We develop a unifying approach for proving quenched large deviations for SRWPC based on exploiting coercivity properties of the relative entropies in the context of convex variational analysis, combined with input from ergodic theory and invoking geometric properties of the supercritical percolation cluster.

  20. Optical fiber voltage sensors for broad temperature ranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, A. H.; Day, G. W.

    1992-01-01

    We describe the development of an optical fiber ac voltage sensor for aircraft and spacecraft applications. Among the most difficult specifications to meet for this application is a temperature stability of +/- 1 percent from -65 C to +125 C. This stability requires a careful selection of materials, components, and optical configuration with further compensation using an optical-fiber temperature sensor located near the sensing element. The sensor is a polarimetric design, based on the linear electro-optic effect in bulk Bi4Ge3O12. The temperature sensor is also polarimetric, based on the temperature dependence of the birefringence of bulk SiO2. The temperature sensor output is used to automatically adjust the calibration of the instrument.

  1. Sugarcane Aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae): Host Range and Sorghum Resistance Including Cross-Resistance From Greenbug Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, J Scott; Rooney, William L; Peterson, Gary C; Villenueva, Raul T; Brewer, Michael J; Sekula-Ortiz, Danielle

    2015-04-01

    The graminous host range and sources of sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench.] plant resistance, including cross-resistance from greenbug, Schizaphis graminum (Rondani), were studied for the newly emerging sugarcane aphid, Melanaphis sacchari (Zehntner), in greenhouse no-choice experiments and field evaluations. The sugarcane aphid could not survive on field corn, Zea mays (L.), Teff grass, Eragrostis tef (Zucc.), proso millet, Panicum miliaceum L., barley, Hordeum vulgare L., and rye, Secale cereale L. Only sorghum genotypes served as hosts including Johnsongrass, Sorghum halepense (L.), a highly suitable noncrop host that generates high numbers of sugarcane aphid and maintains moderate phenotypic injury. The greenbug-resistant parental line RTx2783 that is resistant to greenbug biotypes C and E was resistant to sugarcane aphid in both greenhouse and field tests, while PI 55607 greenbug resistant to biotypes B, C, and E was highly susceptible. PI 55610 that is greenbug resistant to biotypes B, C, and E maintained moderate resistance to the sugarcane aphid, while greenbug-resistant PI 264453 was highly susceptible to sugarcane aphid. Two lines and two hybrids from the Texas A&M breeding program B11070, B11070, AB11055-WF1-CS1/RTx436, and AB11055-WF1-CS1/RTx437 were highly resistant to sugarcane aphid, as were parental types SC110, SC170, and South African lines Ent62/SADC, (Macia/TAM428)-LL9, (SV1*Sima/IS23250)-LG15. Tam428, a parental line that previously showed moderate resistance in South Africa and India, also showed moderate resistance in these evaluations. Overall, 9 of 20 parental sorghum entries tested for phenotypic damage in the field resulted in good resistance to the sugarcane aphid and should be utilized in breeding programs that develop agronomically acceptable sorghums for the southern regions of the United States. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. 2015. This work is written by US Government employees

  2. Electrolytes for Use in High Energy Lithium-ion Batteries with Wide Operating Temperature Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, Marshall C.; Ratnakumar, B. V.; West, W. C.; Whitcanack, L. D.; Huang, C.; Soler, J.; Krause, F. C.

    2012-01-01

    Met programmatic milestones for program. Demonstrated improved performance with wide operating temperature electrolytes containing ester co-solvents (i.e., methyl butyrate) containing electrolyte additives in A123 prototype cells: Previously demonstrated excellent low temperature performance, including 11C rates at -30 C and the ability to perform well down to -60 C. Excellent cycle life at room temperature has been displayed, with over 5,000 cycles being demonstrated. Good high temperature cycle life performance has also been achieved. Demonstrated improved performance with methyl propionate-containing electrolytes in large capacity prototype cells: Demonstrated the wide operating temperature range capability in large cells (12 Ah), successfully scaling up technology from 0.25 Ah size cells. Demonstrated improved performance at low temperature and good cycle life at 40 C with methyl propionate-based electrolyte containing increasing FEC content and the use of LiBOB as an additive. Utilized three-electrode cells to investigate the electrochemical characteristics of high voltage systems coupled with wide operating temperature range electrolytes: From Tafel polarization measurements on each electrode, it is evident the NMC-based cathode displays poor lithium kinetics (being the limiting electrode). The MB-based formulations containing LiBOB delivered the best rate capability at low temperature, which is attributed to improved cathode kinetics. Whereas, the use of lithium oxalate as an additive lead to the highest reversible capacity and lower irreversible losses.

  3. Public Land Survey (Township, Range, and Section) for northern Arizona, including Grand Canyon National Park.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This ALRIS (Arizona Land Resource Information System) coverage contains Public Land Survey gridding and labels for Townships, Ranges, and Sections for Northern Arizona

  4. Radiation Hard Wide Temperature Range Mixed-Signal Components Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Low temperature survivability, high performance and radiation tolerance of electronics in combination is required for NASA's surface missions. Modern sub-micron CMOS...

  5. MGP : a tool for wide range temperature modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales, A.F. [Inst. Tecnologico Autonomo de Mexico, Mexico City (Mexico); Seisdedos, L.V. [Univ. de Oriente, Santiago de Cuba (Cuba). Dept. de Control Automatico

    2006-07-01

    This paper proposed a practical temperature modelling tool that used genetic multivariate polynomials to determine polynomial expressions of enthalpy and empirical heat transfer equations in superheaters. The model was designed to transform static parameter estimations from distributed into lumped parameter systems. Two dynamic regimes were explored: (1) a power dynamics regime containing major inputs and outputs needed for overall plant control; and (2) a steam temperature dynamics scheme that considered consecutive superheater sections considered in terms of cooling water mass flow and steam mass flow. The single lumped parameters model was developed to provide temperature control for a fossil fuel-fired power plant. The design procedure used enthalpy to determine the plant's energy balance. The enthalpy curve was seen as a function of either temperature and steam pressure. A graphic simulation tool was used to optimize the model by comparing real and simulated plant data. The study showed that the amount of energy taken by the steam mass flow per time unit can be calculated by measuring temperatures and pressures at both ends of the superheater. An algorithm was then developed to determine the polynomial's coefficients according to best curve fitting over the training set and best maximum errors. It was concluded that a unified approach is now being developed to simulate and emulate the dynamics of steam temperature for each section's attemporator-superheater. 14 refs., 3 tabs., 5 figs.

  6. Ranging Consistency Based on Ranging-Compensated Temperature-Sensing Sensor for Inter-Satellite Link of Navigation Constellation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Zhijun; Yang, Jun; Guo, Xiye; Zhou, Yongbin

    2017-06-13

    Global Navigation Satellite System performance can be significantly enhanced by introducing inter-satellite links (ISLs) in navigation constellation. The improvement in position, velocity, and time accuracy as well as the realization of autonomous functions requires ISL distance measurement data as the original input. To build a high-performance ISL, the ranging consistency among navigation satellites is an urgent problem to be solved. In this study, we focus on the variation in the ranging delay caused by the sensitivity of the ISL payload equipment to the ambient temperature in space and propose a simple and low-power temperature-sensing ranging compensation sensor suitable for onboard equipment. The experimental results show that, after the temperature-sensing ranging compensation of the ISL payload equipment, the ranging consistency becomes less than 0.2 ns when the temperature change is 90 °C.

  7. Temperature dependence of Henry's law constant in an extended temperature range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görgényi, Miklós; Dewulf, Jo; Van Langenhove, Herman

    2002-08-01

    The Henry's law constants H for chloroform, 1,1-dichloroethane, 1,2-dichloropropane, trichloroethene, chlorobenzene, benzene and toluene were determined by the EPICS-SPME technique (equilibrium partitioning in closed systems--solid phase microextraction) in the temperature range 275-343 K. The curvature observed in the ln H vs. 1/T plot was due to the temperature dependence of the change in enthalpy delta H0 during the transfer of 1 mol solute from the aqueous solution to the gas phase. The nonlinearity of the plot was explained by means of a thermodynamic model which involves the temperature dependence of delta H0 of the compounds and the thermal expansion of water in the three-parameter equation ln (H rho TT) = A2/T + BTB + C2, where rho T is the density of water at temperature T, TB = ln(T/298) + (298-T)/T, A2 = -delta H298(0)/R, delta H298(0) is the delta H0 value at 298 K, B = delta Cp0/R, and C2 is a constant. delta Cp0 is the molar heat capacity change in volatilization from the aqueous solution. A statistical comparison of the two models demonstrates the superiority of the three-parameter equation over the two-parameter one ln H vs. 1/T). The new, three-parameter equation allows a more accurate description of the temperature dependence of H, and of the solubility of volatile organic compounds in water at higher temperatures.

  8. On the diurnal ranges of sea surface temperature (SST) in the north Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shenoi, S.S.C.; Nasnodkar, N.; Rajesh, G.; Joseph, K.J.; Suresh, I.; Almeida, A.M.

    of temperature sensor. The diurnal range estimated using the drifting buoy data was higher than the diurnal range estimated using moored buoys fitted with temperature sensors at greater depths. A simple regression model based on the peak solar radiation...

  9. Peculiarities of magnetization of second generation high-temperature superconducting tapes in a wide temperature range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudnev, I; Komarova, A; Bobin, P, E-mail: iarudnev@mephi.ru [National Research Nuclear University ' MEPHI' , Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2011-04-01

    We present the results of study of magnetization and critical current of coated conductors with magnetic and nonmagnetic substrates. The measurements of magnetization curves were done in a wide temperature range from 4,2 to 100 K and magnetic field up to 14 T. To determine the dependence of transport critical current on the magnetic field we measured a set of current-voltage characteristics in the range of magnetic field from 0 to 8 T at T = 77 K with perpendicular to the tape field orientation. It was obtained that the substrates magnetism dramatically changes the form of magnetization curves but not influence the value of critical current. Comparison of field dependence of critical current, obtained by contact and contactless method at T = 77 K shows that for both samples is observed coincidence of the curves at low fields and a strong divergence at H> 1 Tesla.

  10. An Improved Method for Including Upper Size Range Plasmids in Metamobilomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norman, Anders; Riber, Leise; Luo, Wenting

    2014-01-01

    cloning vector (pBR322), and a 56 Kbp conjugative plasmid (pKJK10), to represent lower- and upper plasmid size ranges, respectively. Subjecting a mixture of these plasmids to the overall isolation protocol revealed a 34-fold over-amplification of pBR322 after MDA. To address this bias, we propose...... the addition of an electroelution step that separates different plasmid size ranges prior to MDA in order to reduce size-dependent competition during incubation. Subsequent analyses of metamobilome data from wastewater spiked with the model plasmids showed in silica recovery of pKJK10 to be very poor...... with the established method and a 1,300-fold overrepresentation of pBR322. Conversely, complete recovery of pKJK10 was enabled with the new modified protocol although considerable care must be taken during electroelution to minimize cross-contamination between samples. For further validation, non-spiked wastewater...

  11. Rapid poleward range expansion of tropical reef corals in response to rising sea surface temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamano, Hiroya; Sugihara, Kaoru; Nomura, Keiichi

    2011-02-01

    Rising temperatures caused by climatic warming may cause poleward range shifts and/or expansions in species distribution. Tropical reef corals (hereafter corals) are some of the world's most important species, being not only primary producers, but also habitat-forming species, and thus fundamental ecosystem modification is expected according to changes in their distribution. Although most studies of climate change effects on corals have focused on temperature-induced coral bleaching in tropical areas, poleward range shifts and/or expansions may also occur in temperate areas. We show the first large-scale evidence of the poleward range expansion of modern corals, based on 80 years of national records from the temperate areas of Japan, where century-long measurements of in situ sea-surface temperatures have shown statistically significant rises. Four major coral species categories, including two key species for reef formation in tropical areas, showed poleward range expansions since the 1930s, whereas no species demonstrated southward range shrinkage or local extinction. The speed of these expansions reached up to 14 km/year, which is far greater than that for other species. Our results, in combination with recent findings suggesting range expansions of tropical coral-reef associated organisms, strongly suggest that rapid, fundamental modifications of temperate coastal ecosystems could be in progress.

  12. An improved method for including upper size range plasmids in metamobilomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Norman

    Full Text Available Two recently developed isolation methods have shown promise when recovering pure community plasmid DNA (metamobilomes/plasmidomes, which is useful in conducting culture-independent investigations into plasmid ecology. However, both methods employ multiple displacement amplification (MDA to ensure suitable quantities of plasmid DNA for high-throughput sequencing. This study demonstrates that MDA greatly favors smaller circular DNA elements (10 Kbp. Throughout the study, we used two model plasmids, a 4.4 Kbp cloning vector (pBR322, and a 56 Kbp conjugative plasmid (pKJK10, to represent lower- and upper plasmid size ranges, respectively. Subjecting a mixture of these plasmids to the overall isolation protocol revealed a 34-fold over-amplification of pBR322 after MDA. To address this bias, we propose the addition of an electroelution step that separates different plasmid size ranges prior to MDA in order to reduce size-dependent competition during incubation. Subsequent analyses of metamobilome data from wastewater spiked with the model plasmids showed in silica recovery of pKJK10 to be very poor with the established method and a 1,300-fold overrepresentation of pBR322. Conversely, complete recovery of pKJK10 was enabled with the new modified protocol although considerable care must be taken during electroelution to minimize cross-contamination between samples. For further validation, non-spiked wastewater metamobilomes were mapped to more than 2,500 known plasmid genomes. This displayed an overall recovery of plasmids well into the upper size range (median size: 30 kilobases with the modified protocol. Analysis of de novo assembled metamobilome data also suggested distinctly better recovery of larger plasmids, as gene functions associated with these plasmids, such as conjugation, was exclusively encoded in the data output generated through the modified protocol. Thus, with the suggested modification, access to a large uncharacterized pool of

  13. The influence of included minerals on the reactivity of chars prepared at low temperature in DFT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong Zhang; Jiaxing Fan; Wenxiu Pu; Ming Sun [China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou (China). School of Chemical Engineering

    2007-07-01

    In this paper four Chinese pulverized coals of different rank were separated into various density fractions with float-sink procedure. Two fractions of each coal, one for organic-rich, the other for organic with included mineral, were devolatized in a drop tube furnace at a temperature of 90{sup o}C and 1 vol% oxygen atmosphere. The reactivities of chars were measured non-isothermally in a thermal gravimetric analyser (TGA) in the range of 20-90{sup o}C. The results indicate that the role of included minerals in chars change with the rank of coals. For anthracites, minerals play catalytic effect during the combustion process, while for bituminous coals the opposite. Gas absorption studies with N{sub 2} at 77K indicate that their reactivity difference correlates with pore structure change. After a discussion about various factors affecting the formation process of chars, it was concluded that included minerals dilute and adsorb the liquid phase during pyrolysis. For anthracites, there is no or little liquid phase, minerals act as pore producer in coal matrix. For bituminous coals, the same effect of minerals cause the escape of the swelling gas inside the particles, leading to the formation of char cenospheres with less void and lower reactivity. 10 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Wavelength encoded fiber sensor for extreme temperature range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera, D.; Finazzi, V.; Coviello, G.; Bueno, A.; Sales, S.; Pruneri, V.

    2010-09-01

    We have successfully created Chemical Composition Gratings (CCGs) into two different types of optical fiber: standard telecommunications Germanium doped fibers and photosensitive Germanium/Boron co-doped fibers. We have performed temperature cycles for analyzing the sensing properties and degradation or hysteresis with respect to the CCG sensors. The results show that CCG sensors based on Germanium/Boron co-doped photosensitive fiber have an almost linear response and negligible hysteresis effects, with a response of almost 100°C/s.

  15. The Ionization Constant of Water over Wide Ranges of Temperature and Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandura, Andrei V.; Lvov, Serguei N.

    2006-03-01

    A semitheoretical approach for the ionization constant of water, KW, is used to fit the available experimental data over wide ranges of density and temperature. Statistical thermodynamics is employed to formulate a number of contributions to the standard state chemical potential of the ionic hydration process. A sorption model is developed for calculating the inner-shell term, which accounts for the ion-water interactions in the immediate ion vicinity. A new analytical expression is derived using the Bragg-Williams approximation that reproduces the dependence of a mean ion solvation number on the solvent chemical potential. The proposed model was found to be correct at the zero-density limit. The final formulation has a simple analytical form, includes seven adjustable parameters, and provides good fitting of the collected KW data, within experimental uncertainties, for a temperature range of 0-800 °C and densities of 0-1.2 g cm-3.

  16. Methanol adsorption by amorphous silica alumina in the critical temperature range

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuczynski, M.; van Ooteghem, A.; Westerterp, K.R.

    1986-01-01

    The methanol adsorption capacity of an amorphous silica-alumina was measured using an equilibrium technique. The experimental temperature range was of 140 to 260°C and the pure methanol pressure range was 0.1 to 1.2 MPa. A multilayer adsorption was found, also for temperatures above the critical

  17. Determination of plant growth rate and growth temperature range from measurement of physiological parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. S. Criddle; B. N. Smith; L. D. Hansen; J. N. Church

    2001-01-01

    Many factors influence species range and diversity, but temperature and temperature variability are always major global determinants, irrespective of local constraints. On a global scale, the ranges of many taxa have been observed to increase and their diversity decrease with increasing latitude. On a local scale, gradients in species distribution are observable with...

  18. Evaluation of Fast Switching Diode 1N4448 Over a Wide Temperature Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boomer, Kristen; Damron, James; Gray, Josh; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2017-01-01

    Electronic parts used in the design of power systems geared for space applications are often exposed to extreme temperatures and thermal cycling. Limited data exist on the performance and reliability of commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) electronic parts at temperatures beyond the manufacturers specified operating temperature range. This report summarizes preliminary results obtained on the evaluation of automotive-grade, fast switching diodes over a wide temperature range and thermal cycling. The investigations were carried out to establish a baseline on functionality of these diodes and to determine suitability for use outside their recommended temperature limits.

  19. Investigations of Temperatures of Phase Transformations of Low-Alloyed Reinforcing Steel within the Heat Treatment Temperature Range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kargul T.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of DSC analysis of steel B500SP produced in the process of continuous casting, which is intended for the production reinforcement rods with high ductility. Studies were carried out in the temperature range below 1000°C in a protective atmosphere of helium during samples heating program. The main objective of the study was to determine the temperature range of austenite structure formation during heating. As a result of performed experiments: Ac1s, Ac1f – temperatures of the beginning and finish of the eutectoid transformation, Ac2 – Curie temperature of the ferrite magnetic transformation and the temperature Ac3 of transformation of proeutectoid ferrite into austenite were elaborated. Experimental determination of phase transformations temperatures of steel B500SP has great importance for production technology of reinforcement rods, because good mechanical properties of rods are formed by the special thermal treatment in Tempcore process.

  20. Joining and fabrication techniques for high temperature structures including the first wall in fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ho Jin; Lee, B. S.; Kim, K. B

    2003-09-01

    The materials for PFC's (Plasma Facing Components) in a fusion reactor are severely irradiated with fusion products in facing the high temperature plasma during the operation. The refractory materials can be maintained their excellent properties in severe operating condition by lowering surface temperature by bonding them to the high thermal conducting materials of heat sink. Hence, the joining and bonding techniques between dissimilar materials is considered to be important in case of the fusion reactor or nuclear reactor which is operated at high temperature. The first wall in the fusion reactor is heated to approximately 1000 .deg. C and irradiated severely by the plasma. In ITER, beryllium is expected as the primary armour candidate for the PFC's; other candidates including W, Mo, SiC, B4C, C/C and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}. Since the heat affected zones in the PFC's processed by conventional welding are reported to have embrittlement and degradation in the sever operation condition, both brazing and diffusion bonding are being considered as prime candidates for the joining technique. In this report, both the materials including ceramics and the fabrication techniques including joining technique between dissimilar materials for PFC's are described. The described joining technique between the refractory materials and the dissimilar materials may be applicable for the fusion reactor and Generation-4 future nuclear reactor which are operated at high temperature and high irradiation.

  1. Diurnal temperature range and childhood asthma: a time-series study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhiwei; Huang, Cunrui; Su, Hong; Turner, Lyle R; Qiao, Zhen; Tong, Shilu

    2013-02-01

    Hot and cold temperatures have been associated with childhood asthma. However, the relationship between daily temperature variation and childhood asthma is not well understood. This study aimed to examine the relationship between diurnal temperature range (DTR) and childhood asthma. A Poisson generalized linear model combined with a distributed lag non-linear model was used to examine the relationship between DTR and emergency department admissions for childhood asthma in Brisbane, from January 1st 2003 to December 31st 2009. There was a statistically significant relationship between DTR and childhood asthma. The DTR effect on childhood asthma increased above a DTR of 10°C. The effect of DTR on childhood asthma was the greatest for lag 0-9 days, with a 31% (95% confidence interval: 11% - 58%) increase of emergency department admissions per 5°C increment of DTR. Male children and children aged 5-9 years appeared to be more vulnerable to the DTR effect than others. Large DTR may trigger childhood asthma. Future measures to control and prevent childhood asthma should include taking temperature variability into account. More protective measures should be taken after a day of DTR above 10°C.

  2. Modeling of Temperature-Dependent Noise in Silicon Nanowire FETs including Self-Heating Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Anandan, P.; Malathi, N.; Mohankumar, N.

    2014-01-01

    Silicon nanowires are leading the CMOS era towards the downsizing limit and its nature will be effectively suppress the short channel effects. Accurate modeling of thermal noise in nanowires is crucial for RF applications of nano-CMOS emerging technologies. In this work, a perfect temperature-dependent model for silicon nanowires including the self-heating effects has been derived and its effects on device parameters have been observed. The power spectral density as a function of thermal resi...

  3. Retrieval and Mapping of Soil Texture Based on Land Surface Diurnal Temperature Range Data from MODIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, De-Cai; Zhang, Gan-Lin; Zhao, Ming-Song; Pan, Xian-Zhang; Zhao, Yu-Guo; Li, De-Cheng; Macmillan, Bob

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies have investigated the direct retrieval of soil properties, including soil texture, using remotely sensed images. However, few have considered how soil properties influence dynamic changes in remote images or how soil processes affect the characteristics of the spectrum. This study investigated a new method for mapping regional soil texture based on the hypothesis that the rate of change of land surface temperature is related to soil texture, given the assumption of similar starting soil moisture conditions. The study area was a typical flat area in the Yangtze-Huai River Plain, East China. We used the widely available land surface temperature product of MODIS as the main data source. We analyzed the relationships between the content of different particle soil size fractions at the soil surface and land surface day temperature, night temperature and diurnal temperature range (DTR) during three selected time periods. These periods occurred after rainfalls and between the previous harvest and the subsequent autumn sowing in 2004, 2007 and 2008. Then, linear regression models were developed between the land surface DTR and sand (> 0.05 mm), clay (soil texture. The spatial distribution of soil texture from the studied area was mapped based on the model with the minimum RMSE. A validation dataset produced error estimates for the predicted maps of sand, clay and physical clay, expressed as RMSE of 10.69%, 4.57%, and 12.99%, respectively. The absolute error of the predictions is largely influenced by variations in land cover. Additionally, the maps produced by the models illustrate the natural spatial continuity of soil texture. This study demonstrates the potential for digitally mapping regional soil texture variations in flat areas using readily available MODIS data. PMID:26090852

  4. Retrieval and Mapping of Soil Texture Based on Land Surface Diurnal Temperature Range Data from MODIS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De-Cai Wang

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have investigated the direct retrieval of soil properties, including soil texture, using remotely sensed images. However, few have considered how soil properties influence dynamic changes in remote images or how soil processes affect the characteristics of the spectrum. This study investigated a new method for mapping regional soil texture based on the hypothesis that the rate of change of land surface temperature is related to soil texture, given the assumption of similar starting soil moisture conditions. The study area was a typical flat area in the Yangtze-Huai River Plain, East China. We used the widely available land surface temperature product of MODIS as the main data source. We analyzed the relationships between the content of different particle soil size fractions at the soil surface and land surface day temperature, night temperature and diurnal temperature range (DTR during three selected time periods. These periods occurred after rainfalls and between the previous harvest and the subsequent autumn sowing in 2004, 2007 and 2008. Then, linear regression models were developed between the land surface DTR and sand (> 0.05 mm, clay (< 0.001 mm and physical clay (< 0.01 mm contents. The models for each day were used to estimate soil texture. The spatial distribution of soil texture from the studied area was mapped based on the model with the minimum RMSE. A validation dataset produced error estimates for the predicted maps of sand, clay and physical clay, expressed as RMSE of 10.69%, 4.57%, and 12.99%, respectively. The absolute error of the predictions is largely influenced by variations in land cover. Additionally, the maps produced by the models illustrate the natural spatial continuity of soil texture. This study demonstrates the potential for digitally mapping regional soil texture variations in flat areas using readily available MODIS data.

  5. Temperature Dependence of Thin Film Spiral Inductors on Alumina Over a Temperature Range of 25 to 475 C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponchak, George E.; Jordan, Jennifer L.; Scardelletti, Maximilian C.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present an analysis of inductors on an Alumina substrate over the temperature range of 25 to 475 C. Five sets of inductors, each set consisting of a 1.5, 2.5, 3.5, and a 4.5 turn inductor with different line width and spacing, were measured on a high temperature probe station from 10 MHz to 30 GHz. From these measured characteristics, it is shown that the inductance is nearly independent of temperature for low frequencies compared to the self resonant frequency, the parasitic capacitances are independent of temperature, and the resistance varies nearly linearly with temperature. These characteristics result in the self resonant frequency decreasing by only a few percent as the temperature is increased from 25 to 475 C, but the maximum quality factor decreases by a factor of 2 to 3. These observations based on measured data are confirmed through 2D simulations using Sonnet software.

  6. Effects of diurnal temperature range and drought on wheat yield in Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Barrera, S.; Rodriguez-Puebla, C.; Challinor, A. J.

    2017-07-01

    This study aims to provide new insight on the wheat yield historical response to climate processes throughout Spain by using statistical methods. Our data includes observed wheat yield, pseudo-observations E-OBS for the period 1979 to 2014, and outputs of general circulation models in phase 5 of the Coupled Models Inter-comparison Project (CMIP5) for the period 1901 to 2099. In investigating the relationship between climate and wheat variability, we have applied the approach known as the partial least-square regression, which captures the relevant climate drivers accounting for variations in wheat yield. We found that drought occurring in autumn and spring and the diurnal range of temperature experienced during the winter are major processes to characterize the wheat yield variability in Spain. These observable climate processes are used for an empirical model that is utilized in assessing the wheat yield trends in Spain under different climate conditions. To isolate the trend within the wheat time series, we implemented the adaptive approach known as Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition. Wheat yields in the twenty-first century are experiencing a downward trend that we claim is a consequence of widespread drought over the Iberian Peninsula and an increase in the diurnal range of temperature. These results are important to inform about the wheat vulnerability in this region to coming changes and to develop adaptation strategies.

  7. A passively aligned VCSEL transmitter operating at fixed current over a wide temperature range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jonghyun; Kim, Taeyong; Kim, Sung-Han; Kim, Sang-Bae

    2009-03-30

    We have investigated low-current operation characteristics of a passively aligned VCSEL transmitter driven at fixed "on" and "off" current over a wide temperature range. GaAs/AlGaAs-based 850-nm oxide VCSELs with the minimum threshold current of 0.79 mA at 50 masculineC and small temperature dependence of the threshold current, d(2)I(th)/dT(2), as low as 0.114 muA/ masculineC(2) have been fabricated and used for the transmitter module. The superior temperature characteristics enable fixed-current operation of the VCSEL transmitter that complies with Gigabit Ethernet standard over a wide temperature range from -20 to 120 masculineC. This result paves the way to a VCSEL transmitter featured by low-power consumption, low-cost with a simple driving circuit and passive alignment, and a wide operation temperature range.

  8. Wide Temperature Range DC-DC Boost Converters for Command/Control/Drive Electronics Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We shall develop wide temperature range DC-DC boost converters that can be fabricated using commercial CMOS foundries. The boost converters will increase the low...

  9. New England observed and predicted July stream/river temperature daily range points

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The shapefile contains points with associated observed and predicted July stream/river temperature daily ranges in New England based on a spatial statistical network...

  10. New England observed and predicted August stream/river temperature daily range points

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The shapefile contains points with associated observed and predicted August stream/river temperature daily ranges in New England based on a spatial statistical...

  11. Reaction rate constants of HO2 + O3 in the temperature range 233-400 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiuyan; Suto, Masako; Lee, L. C.

    1988-01-01

    The reaction rate constants of HO2 + O3 were measured in the temperature range 233-400 K using a discharge flow system with photofragment emission detection. In the range 233-253 K, the constants are approximately a constant value, and then increase with increasing temperature. This result suggests that the reaction may have two different channels. An expression representing the reaction rate constants is presented.

  12. Attenuation of decimeter and centimeter range radio waves under low atmospheric temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhebsain, Vasiliy V.

    2017-11-01

    The paper considers the impact of hydrometeors and extremely low air temperatures on the weakening of the radio frequency range 0.8 GHz-10 GHz. The calculations of the frequency dependence of the total attenuation of the radio wave intensity for the temperature range from 0° C to 60 °C below zero have been carried out using the designed for this purpose applied computer program.

  13. Diurnal temperature range and childhood asthma: a time-series study

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Zhiwei; Huang, Cunrui; SU, HONG; Turner, Lyle R.; Qiao, Zhen; Tong, Shilu

    2013-01-01

    Background Hot and cold temperatures have been associated with childhood asthma. However, the relationship between daily temperature variation and childhood asthma is not well understood. This study aimed to examine the relationship between diurnal temperature range (DTR) and childhood asthma. Methods A Poisson generalized linear model combined with a distributed lag non-linear model was used to examine the relationship between DTR and emergency department admissions for childhood asthma in B...

  14. Summer temperature patterns in the headwater streams of the Oregon coast range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liz Dent; Danielle Vick; Kyle Abraham; Stephen Schoenholtz; Sherri Johnson

    2008-01-01

    Cool summertime stream temperature is an important component of high-quality aquatic habitat in Oregon coastal streams. Within the Oregon Coast Range, small headwater streams make up a majority of the stream network, yet little information is available on temperature patterns and the longitudinal variability for these streams. In this paper we describe preharvest...

  15. Impact of diurnal temperature range on human health: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jian; Xu, Zhiwei; Zhu, Rui; Wang, Xu; Jin, Liu; Song, Jian; Su, Hong

    2014-11-01

    Increasing epidemiological studies have shown that a rapid temperature change within 1 day is an independent risk factor for human health. This paper aimed to systematically review the epidemiological evidence on the relationship between diurnal temperature range (DTR) and human health and to propose future research directions. A literature search was conducted in October 2013 using the databases including PubMed, ScienceDirect, and EBSCO. Empirical studies regarding the relationship between DTR and mortality and morbidity were included. Twenty-five relevant studies were identified, among which, 11 investigated the relationship between DTR and mortality and 14 examined the impact of DTR on morbidity. The majority of existing studies reported that DTR was significantly associated with mortality and morbidity, particularly for cardiovascular and respiratory diseases. Notably, compared with adults, the elderly and children were more vulnerable to DTR effects. However, there were some inconsistencies regarding the susceptible groups, lag time, and threshold of DTR. The impact of DTR on human health may be confounded or modified by season, socioeconomic, and educational status. Further research is needed to further confirm the adverse effects of DTR in different geographical locations; examine the effects of DTR on the health of children aged one or under; explore extreme DTR effects on human health; analyze the difference of DTR effects on human health in different locations and the modified effects of potential confounding factors; and develop detailed preventive measures against large DTR, particularly for susceptible groups.

  16. Reliability and Analysis of Changes in Bite Marks at Different Time Intervals and Temperature Ranges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parul Khare Sinha

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of this study is to assess time-dependent changes in the morphology of bitemarks and to investigate the utility of matching bitemarks on both perishable and non-perishable objects with the passage of time at different temperatures. Subjects and Methods: The study was conducted at Maharana Pratap College of Dentistry and Research Centre, Gwalior, India. 20 volunteers were asked to bite 6 items each. These included perishable and nonperishable items. Perishable items were apple, banana and Burfi, (a milk-based popular sweet confectionary while non-perishable items included wax, clay, and rubber. Photographs were taken with a digital camera at 0-hours and 24-hours after biting these objects at temperature ranges of 24 ºC to 28 ºC and 36 ºC to 40 ºC, respectively. Life-size photographs of these bitten objects were printed on transparent overlays and compared to hand drawn transparencies prepared from suspect dentition using an X-ray viewer. The comparison of all the 960 transparencies was done by two researchers, independently. Results: All objects gave a positive identification of the biter on matching just after biting. After24-hours, all items also showed positive matching except banana and apples. Conclusion: This proposed method is simple, reliable and less technique sensitive. It narrows down the subjectivity of interpretation. It highlights that due to decomposition changes occur in perishable food items and more so in apples and bananas, making bitemarks less reliable evidence.

  17. Associations of day-to-day temperature change and diurnal temperature range with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onozuka, Daisuke; Hagihara, Akihito

    2017-01-01

    Background Although the impacts of temperature on mortality and morbidity have been documented, few studies have investigated whether day-to-day temperature change and diurnal temperature range (DTR) are independent risk factors for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). Design This was a prospective, population-based, observational study. Methods We obtained all OHCA data from 2005-2013 from six major prefectures in Japan: Hokkaido, Tokyo, Kanagawa, Aichi, Kyoto, and Osaka. We used a quasi-Poisson regression analysis with a distributed-lag non-linear model to assess the associations of day-to-day temperature change and DTR with OHCA for each prefecture. Results In total, 271,698 OHCAs of presumed cardiac origin were reported during the study period. There was a significant increase in the risk of OHCA associated with cold temperature in five prefectures, with relative risks (RRs) ranging from 1.298 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.022-1.649) in Hokkaido to 3.893 (95% CI 1.713-8.845) in Kyoto. DTR was adversely associated with OHCA on hot days in Aichi (RR 1.158; 95% CI 1.028-1.304) and on cold days in Tokyo (RR 1.030; 95% CI 1.000-1.060), Kanagawa (RR 1.042; 95% CI 1.005-1.082), Kyoto (RR 1.060; 95% CI 1.001-1.122), and Osaka (RR 1.050; 95% CI 1.014-1.088), whereas there was no significant association between day-to-day temperature change and OHCA. Conclusion We found that associations between day-to-day temperature change and DTR and OHCA were generally small compared with the association with mean temperature. Our findings suggest that preventative measures for temperature-related OHCA may be more effective when focused on mean temperature and DTR.

  18. The influence of heated or cooled seats on the acceptable ambient temperature range

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Y.F.; Wyon, David Peter; Fang, Lei

    2007-01-01

    In 11 climate chamber experiments at air temperatures ranging from 15 to 45 degrees C, a total of 24 subjects, dressed in appropriate clothing for entering a vehicle at these temperatures, were each exposed to four different seat temperatures, ranging from cool to warm. In one simulated summer...... series, subjects were preconditioned to be too hot, while in other series they were preconditioned to be thermally neutral. They reported their thermal sensations, overall thermal acceptability and comfort on visual analogue scales at regular intervals. Instantaneous heat flow to the seat was measured...

  19. Modeling of Temperature-Dependent Noise in Silicon Nanowire FETs including Self-Heating Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Anandan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Silicon nanowires are leading the CMOS era towards the downsizing limit and its nature will be effectively suppress the short channel effects. Accurate modeling of thermal noise in nanowires is crucial for RF applications of nano-CMOS emerging technologies. In this work, a perfect temperature-dependent model for silicon nanowires including the self-heating effects has been derived and its effects on device parameters have been observed. The power spectral density as a function of thermal resistance shows significant improvement as the channel length decreases. The effects of thermal noise including self-heating of the device are explored. Moreover, significant reduction in noise with respect to channel thermal resistance, gate length, and biasing is analyzed.

  20. Modulation of the sensitive temperature range of fluorescent molecular thermometers based on thermoresponsive polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Seiichi; Matsumura, Yuriko; de Silva, A Prasanna; Iwai, Kaoru

    2004-03-15

    Fluorescent molecular thermometers based on polymers showing a temperature-induced phase transition and labeled with polarity-sensitive fluorescent benzofurazans are the most sensitive known. Here we show a simple and effective method for modulating the sensitive temperature ranges of fluorescent molecular thermometers based on such temperature-responsive polymers. 4-N-(2-acryloyloxyethyl)-N-methylamino-7-N,N-dimethylaminosulfonyl-2,1,3-benzoxadiazole was adopted as a polarity-sensitive fluorescent benzofurazan, and nine copolymers of two kinds of acrylamide derivative (N-n-propylacrylamide, N-isopropylacrylamide, and/or N-isopropylmethacrylamide) with a small amount of DBD-AE were obtained. The fluorescence intensities of these copolymers in aqueous solution sharply increased with increasing temperature over a small range (6-7 degrees C). In contrast, these fluorescent molecular thermometers differed from one another in the sensitive temperature range (between 20 and 49 degrees C). Moreover, the sensitive temperature ranges were well related to the acrylamide ratios in feed. In addition, the responses from these fluorescent molecular thermometers to the change in temperature were reversible and exactly repeatable during 10 cycles of heating and cooling (relative standard deviation of the fluorescence intensity, 0.44-1.0%).

  1. Thermal Conductivity of High Performance Concrete in Wide Temperature and Moisture Ranges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Toman

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermal conductivity of two types of high performance concrete was measured in the temperature range from 100 °C to 800 °C and in the moisture range from dry material to saturation water content. A transient measuring method based on analysis of the measured temperature fields was chosen for the high temperature measurements, and a commercial hot wire device was employed in room temperature measurements of the effect of moisture on thermal conductivity. The measured results reveal that both temperature and moisture exhibit significant effects on the values of thermal conductivity, and these effects are quite comparable from the point of view of the magnitude of the observed variations.

  2. Ultra-sensitive wide dynamic range temperature sensor based on in-fiber Lyot interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikbakht, Hamed; Poorghdiri Isfahani, Mohamad Hosein; Latifi, Hamid

    2017-04-01

    An in-fiber Lyot interferometer for temperature measurement is presented. The sensor utilizes high temperature-dependence of the birefringence in Panda polarization maintaining fibers to achieve high resolution in temperature measurements. Temperature variation modulates the phase difference between the polarization modes propagating in different modes of the Panda fiber. The Lyot interferometer produces a spectrum which varies with the phase difference. Therefore, by monitoring this spectrum a high resolution of 0.003°C was achieved. A fiber Bragg grating is added to the setup to expand its dynamic range. This sensor does not need complicated fabrication process and can be implemented in many applications.

  3. Interaction processes between vacancies and dislocations in molybdenum in the temperature range around 0.3 of the melting temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zelada-Lambri, G.I. [Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Ingenieria y Agrimensura, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Laboratorio de Materiales, Escuela de Ingenieria Electrica, Avenida Pellegrini 250, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Lambri, O.A. [Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Ingenieria y Agrimensura, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Laboratorio de Materiales, Escuela de Ingenieria Electrica, Avenida Pellegrini 250, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Instituto de Fisica Rosario, Member of the CONICET' s Research Staff (Argentina)], E-mail: olambri@fceia.unr.edu.ar; Bozzano, P.B. [Laboratorio de Microscopia Electronica, Unidad de Actividad Materiales, Centro Atomico Constituyentes, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Avenida General Paz 1499, 1650 San Martin (Argentina); Garcia, J.A. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada II, Facultad de Ciencias y Tecnologia, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Apartado 644, 48080 Bilbao, Pais Vasco (Spain); Celauro, C.A. [Reactor Nuclear RA-4, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Ingenieria y Agrimensura, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Riobamba y Berruti, 2000 Rosario (Argentina)

    2008-10-15

    Mechanical spectroscopy, electrical resistivity and transmission electron microscopy studies have been performed on pre-strained neutron irradiated single crystalline molybdenum in order to check the interaction processes between vacancies and dislocations in the temperature range between room temperature and 1273 K. The anelastic relaxation in molybdenum which appears between 800 K and 1273 K has been separated in two different physical mechanisms depending on the temperature of appearance of the relaxation peak. The physical mechanism which controls the damping peak appearing at around 800 K was related with the dragging of jogs by the dislocation under movement assisted by vacancy diffusion. The damping peak which appears at higher temperatures of about 1000 K was more consistent with the formation and diffusion of vacancies assisted by the dislocation movement.

  4. SmEdA vibro-acoustic modelling in the mid-frequency range including the effect of dissipative treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, H. D.; Maxit, L.; Ege, K.; Gerges, Y.; Guyader, J.-L.

    2017-04-01

    Vibro-acoustic simulation in the mid-frequency range is of interest for automotive and truck constructors. The dissipative treatments used for noise and vibration control such as viscoelastic patches and acoustic absorbing materials must be taken into account in the problem. The Statistical modal Energy distribution Analysis (SmEdA) model consists in extending Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) to the mid-frequency range by establishing power balance equations between the modes of the different subsystems. The modal basis of uncoupled-subsystems that can be estimated by the finite element method in the mid-frequency range is used as input data. SmEdA was originally developed by considering constant modal damping factors for each subsystem. However, this means that it cannot describe the local distribution of dissipative materials. To overcome this issue, a methodology is proposed here to take into account the effect of these materials. This methodology is based on the finite element models of the subsystems that include well-known homogenized material models of dissipative treatments. The Galerkin method with subsystem normal modes is used to estimate the modal damping loss factors. Cross-modal coupling terms which appear in the formulation due to the dissipative materials are assumed to be negligible. An approximation of the energy sharing between the subsystems damped by dissipative materials is then described by SmEdA. The different steps of the method are validated experimentally by applying it to a laboratory test case composed of a plate-cavity system with different configurations of dissipative treatments. The comparison between the experimental and the simulation results shows good agreement in the mid-frequency range.

  5. Critical current measurements of high-temperature superconducting short samples at a wide range of temperatures and magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hongjun; Liu, Huajun; Liu, Fang; Zhang, Huahui; Ci, Lu; Shi, Yi; Lei, Lei

    2018-01-01

    High-Temperature Superconductors (HTS) are potential materials for high-field magnets, low-loss transmission cables, and Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) due to their high upper critical magnetic field (H c2 ) and critical temperature (T c ). The critical current (I c ) of HTS, which is one of the most important parameters for superconductor application, depends strongly on the magnetic fields and temperatures. A new I c measurement system that can carry out accurate I c measurement for HTS short samples with various temperatures (4.2-80 K), magnetic fields (0-14 T), and angles of the magnetic field (0°-90°) has been developed. The I c measurement system mainly consists of a measurement holder, temperature-control system, background magnet, test cryostat, data acquisition system, and DC power supply. The accuracy of temperature control is better than ±0.1 K over the 20-80 K range and ±0.05 K when measured below 20 K. The maximum current is over 1000 A with a measurement uncertainty of 1%. The system had been successfully used for YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x (YBCO) tapes I c determination with different temperatures and magnetic fields.

  6. Analysis of the Dryden Wet Bulb GLobe Temperature Algorithm for White Sands Missile Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaQuay, Ryan Matthew

    2011-01-01

    In locations where workforce is exposed to high relative humidity and light winds, heat stress is a significant concern. Such is the case at the White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico. Heat stress is depicted by the wet bulb globe temperature, which is the official measurement used by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists. The wet bulb globe temperature is measured by an instrument which was designed to be portable and needing routine maintenance. As an alternative form for measuring the wet bulb globe temperature, algorithms have been created to calculate the wet bulb globe temperature from basic meteorological observations. The algorithms are location dependent; therefore a specific algorithm is usually not suitable for multiple locations. Due to climatology similarities, the algorithm developed for use at the Dryden Flight Research Center was applied to data from the White Sands Missile Range. A study was performed that compared a wet bulb globe instrument to data from two Surface Atmospheric Measurement Systems that was applied to the Dryden wet bulb globe temperature algorithm. The period of study was from June to September of2009, with focus being applied from 0900 to 1800, local time. Analysis showed that the algorithm worked well, with a few exceptions. The algorithm becomes less accurate to the measurement when the dew point temperature is over 10 Celsius. Cloud cover also has a significant effect on the measured wet bulb globe temperature. The algorithm does not show red and black heat stress flags well due to shorter time scales of such events. The results of this study show that it is plausible that the Dryden Flight Research wet bulb globe temperature algorithm is compatible with the White Sands Missile Range, except for when there are increased dew point temperatures and cloud cover or precipitation. During such occasions, the wet bulb globe temperature instrument would be the preferred method of measurement. Out of the 30

  7. Thermal Stability of Austempered Ductile Iron Evaluated in a Temperature Range of 20-300K

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawid MYSZKA

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article was to determine through changes in magnetic properties the stability of the austempered ductile iron (ADI microstructure during temperature changes in a range of 20 – 300 K. The measurements were taken in a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM using Fe27Ni2TiMoAlNb austenitic stainless steel and four types of austempered ductile iron obtained under various heat treatment conditions. The plotted curves showing changes in the magnetisation degree as a function of temperature had a number of characteristic points illustrating changes taking place in the microstructure. For each of the materials examined, the martensite start temperature Ms and the temperature range within which the martensitic transformation takes place were identified.

  8. Astable Oscillator Circuits using Silicon-on-Insulator Timer Chip for Wide Range Temperature Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Culley, Dennis; Hammoud, Ahmad; Elbuluk, Malik

    2008-01-01

    Two astable oscillator circuits were constructed using a new silicon-on-insulator (SOI) 555 timer chip for potential use as a temperature sensor in harsh environments encompassing jet engine and space mission applications. The two circuits, which differed slightly in configuration, were evaluated between -190 and 200 C. The output of each circuit was made to produce a stream of rectangular pulses whose frequency was proportional to the sensed temperature. The preliminary results indicated that both circuits performed relatively well over the entire test temperature range. In addition, after the circuits were subjected to limited thermal cycling over the temperature range of -190 to 200 C, the performance of either circuit did not experience any significant change.

  9. The reactions of OH radicals with chloroalkanes in the temperature range 295-360 K

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markert, F.; Nielsen, O.J.

    1992-01-01

    The temperature dependency of the rate constants for the gas phase reaction of OH radicals with a series of chloroalkanes was measured in the temperature range from 295 to 360 K at a total pressure of 1 atm. The rate constants were obtained by using the absolute technique of pulse radiolysis...... combined with kinetic UV spectroscopy. The results are discussed in terms of reactivity trends....

  10. Short-Range Temporal Interactions in Sleep; Hippocampal Spike Avalanches Support a Large Milieu of Sequential Activity Including Replay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Matthew Mahoney

    Full Text Available Hippocampal neural systems consolidate multiple complex behaviors into memory. However, the temporal structure of neural firing supporting complex memory consolidation is unknown. Replay of hippocampal place cells during sleep supports the view that a simple repetitive behavior modifies sleep firing dynamics, but does not explain how multiple episodes could be integrated into associative networks for recollection during future cognition. Here we decode sequential firing structure within spike avalanches of all pyramidal cells recorded in sleeping rats after running in a circular track. We find that short sequences that combine into multiple long sequences capture the majority of the sequential structure during sleep, including replay of hippocampal place cells. The ensemble, however, is not optimized for maximally producing the behavior-enriched episode. Thus behavioral programming of sequential correlations occurs at the level of short-range interactions, not whole behavioral sequences and these short sequences are assembled into a large and complex milieu that could support complex memory consolidation.

  11. Movements of wolves at the northern extreme of the species' range, including during four months of darkness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L David Mech

    Full Text Available Information about wolf (Canis lupus movements anywhere near the northern extreme of the species' range in the High Arctic (>75°N latitude are lacking. There, wolves prey primarily on muskoxen (Ovibos moschatus and must survive 4 months of 24 hr/day winter darkness and temperatures reaching -53 C. The extent to which wolves remain active and prey on muskoxen during the dark period are unknown, for the closest area where information is available about winter wolf movements is >2,250 km south. We studied a pack of ≥20 wolves on Ellesmere Island, Nunavut, Canada (80°N latitude from July 2009 through mid-April 2010 by collaring a lead wolf with a Global Positioning System (GPS/Argos radio collar. The collar recorded the wolf's precise locations at 6:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m. daily and transmitted the locations by satellite to our email. Straight-line distances between consecutive 12-hr locations varied between 0 and 76 km. Mean (SE linear distance between consecutive locations (n = 554 was 11 (0.5 km. Total minimum distance traveled was 5,979 km, and total area covered was 6,640 km(2, the largest wolf range reported. The wolf and presumably his pack once made a 263-km (straight-line distance foray to the southeast during 19-28 January 2010, returning 29 January to 1 February at an average of 41 km/day straight-line distances between 12-hr locations. This study produced the first detailed movement information about any large mammal in the High Arctic, and the average movements during the dark period did not differ from those afterwards. Wolf movements during the dark period in the highest latitudes match those of the other seasons and generally those of wolves in lower latitudes, and, at least with the gross movements measurable by our methods, the 4-month period without direct sunlight produced little change in movements.

  12. Equatorial range limits of an intertidal ectotherm are more linked to water than air temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seabra, Rui; Wethey, David S; Santos, António M; Gomes, Filipa; Lima, Fernando P

    2016-10-01

    As climate change is expected to impose increasing thermal stress on intertidal organisms, understanding the mechanisms by which body temperatures translate into major biogeographic patterns is of paramount importance. We exposed individuals of the limpet Patella vulgata Linnaeus, 1758, to realistic experimental treatments aimed at disentangling the contribution of water and air temperature for the buildup of thermal stress. Treatments were designed based on temperature data collected at the microhabitat level, from 15 shores along the Atlantic European coast spanning nearly 20° of latitude. Cardiac activity data indicated that thermal stress levels in P. vulgata are directly linked to elevated water temperature, while high air temperature is only stressful if water temperature is also high. In addition, the analysis of the link between population densities and thermal regimes at the studied locations suggests that the occurrence of elevated water temperature may represent a threshold P. vulgata is unable to tolerate. By combining projected temperatures with the temperature threshold identified, we show that climate change will likely result in the westward expansion of the historical distribution gap in the Bay of Biscay (southwest France), and northward contraction of the southern range limit in south Portugal. These findings suggest that even a minor relaxing of the upwelling off northwest Iberia could lead to a dramatic increase in thermal stress, with major consequences for the structure and functioning of the intertidal communities along Iberian rocky shores. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. An Explosive Range Model Based on the Gas Composition, Temperature, and Pressure during Air Drilling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangyu Fan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Air drilling is low cost and effectively improves the penetration rate and causes minimal damage to liquid-sensitive pay zones. However, there is a potential downhole explosion when combustible gas mixed with drilling fluid reaches the combustible condition. In this paper, based on the underground combustion mechanism, an explosive range calculation model is established. This model couples the state equation and the empirical formula method, which considers the inert gas content, pressure, mixed gas component, and temperature. The result shows that increase of the inert gas content narrows the explosive range, while increase of the gas temperature and pressure improves the explosive range. A case in Chongqing, China, is used to validate the explosive range calculation model.

  14. On the diurnal ranges of Sea Surface Temperature (SST) in the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A simple regression model based on the peak solar radiation and average wind speed was good enough to estimate the ... The additional information on the rate of precipitation is found to be redundant for the estimation ... Sea surface temperature; diurnal range; Indian Ocean; drifting buoys; moored buoys; data analysis;.

  15. A near infrared luminescent metal-organic framework for temperature sensing in the physiological range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Xiusheng; Zhao, Dian; Cui, Yuanjing; Yang, Yu; Qian, Guodong

    2015-12-28

    A near infrared pumped luminescent metal-organic framework thermometer Nd(0.577)Yb(0.423)BDC-F4, with near infrared fluorescence and excellent sensitivity in the physiological temperature range (293-313 K), has been first realized, and might be potentially applied for biomedical systems.

  16. Analysis of diurnal air temperature range change in the continental United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Qu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Diurnal temperature range (DTR is an important indicator for climate change. In this paper, diurnal air temperature range variations of the continental United States over the past one hundred years were investigated to discover the temporal trend and spatial patterns. While the annual mean DTR of the United States has steadily decreased during the past decades, it is found that the decreased amplitude has spatial and seasonal patterns. Seasonal and spatial variations of DTR were analyzed for the four regions, northeastern, northwestern, southeastern, and southwestern. Fall and summer witnessed a significant decrease in DTR in all regions. Spring and winter, on the other hand, have experienced much smaller decreases. Temporal trend and spatial patterns of daily maximum and minimum temperatures were also investigated to gain insight of DTR change.

  17. Thermodynamic instabilities of nuclear matter at finite temperature with finite range effective interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ventura, J.; Polls, A.; Vinas, X.; Pi, M. (Barcelona Univ. (Spain). Dept. de Estructura y Constituyentes de la Materia); Hernandez, S. (Buenos Aires Univ. (Argentina). Dept. de Fisica)

    1992-08-03

    A systematic study of the equation of state for symmetric nuclear matter is performed in the framework of a finite-temperature density dependent Hartree-Fock method using the Gogny finite-range effective interaction. Special attention is devoted to the density and temperature dependence of the single-particle spectrum, the effective mass and the momentum distributions. The liquid-gas phase transition and the spinodal lines are discussed, in connection with the breakup of heated nucleus into small clusters that takes place in medium energy heavy ion reactions. The level density parameter, which has been derived by a low temperature expansion of the internal energy, is also discussed. Comparisons with previous calculations using zero range effective interactions are also made. (orig.).

  18. The impact of temperature on the bionomics of Aedes (Stegomyia) aegypti, with special reference to the cool geographic range margins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisen, Lars; Monaghan, Andrew J; Lozano-Fuentes, Saul; Steinhoff, Daniel F; Hayden, Mary H; Bieringer, Paul E

    2014-05-01

    developmental zero temperature (10-14 degrees C) is exceeded, there is a near-linear relationship up to 30 degrees C. Above this temperature, the development rate is relatively stable or even decreases slightly before falling dramatically near the upper developmental zero temperature, which occurs at -38-42 degrees C. Based on life stage-specific linear relationships between water temperature and development rate in the 15-28 degrees C range, the lower developmental zero temperature is estimated to be 14.0 degrees C for eggs, 11.8 degrees C for larvae, and 10.3 degrees C for pupae. We further conclude that available population dynamics models for Ae. aegypti, such as CIMSiM and Skeeter Buster, likely produce robust predictions based on water temperatures in the 16-35 degrees C range, which includes the geographic areas where Ae. aegypti and its associated pathogens present the greatest threat to human health, but that they may be less reliable in cool range margins where water temperatures regularly fall below 15 degrees C. Finally, we identify knowledge or data gaps that hinder our ability to predict risk of human exposure to Ae. aegypti at the cool margins of its range, now and in the future, based on impacts on mosquito population dynamics of temperature and other important factors, such as water nutrient content, larval density, presence of biological competitors, and human behavior.

  19. An alternate method for achieving temperature control in the -130 C to 75 C range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kenneth R.; Anderson, Mark R.; Lane, Robert W.; Cortez, Maximo G.

    1992-01-01

    Thermal vacuum testing often requires temperature control of chamber shrouds and heat exchangers within the -130 C to 75 C range. There are two conventional methods which are normally employed to achieve control through this intermediate temperature range: (1) single-pass flow where control is achieved by alternately pulsing hot gaseous nitrogen (GN2) and cold LN2 into the feed line to yield the setpoint temperature; and (2) closed-loop circulation where control is achieved by either electrically heating or LN2 cooling the circulating GN2 to yield the setpoint temperature. A third method, using a mass flow ratio controller along with modulating control valves on GN2 and LN2 lines, provides excellent control but equipment for this method is expensive and cost-prohibitive for all but long-term continuous processes. The single-pass method provides marginal control and can result in unexpected overcooling of the test article from even a short pulse of LN2. The closed-loop circulation method provides excellent control but requires an expensive blower capable of operating at elevated pressures and cryogenic temperatures. Where precise control is needed (plus or minus 2 C), single-pass flow systems typically have not provided the precision required, primarily because of overcooling temperature excursions. Where several individual circuits are to be controlled at different temperatures, the use of expensive cryogenic blowers for each circuit is also cost-prohibitive, especially for short duration of one-of-a-kind tests. At JPL, a variant of the single-pass method was developed that was shown to provide precise temperature control in the -130 C to 75 C range while exhibiting minimal setpoint overshoot during temperature transitions. This alternate method uses a commercially available temperature controller along with a GN2/LN2 mixer to dampen the amplitude of cold temperature spikes caused by LN2 pulsing. The design of the GN2/LN2 mixer, the overall control system

  20. An alternate method for achieving temperature control in the -130 C to 75 C range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kenneth R.; Anderson, Mark R.; Lane, Robert W.; Cortez, Maximo G.

    1992-11-01

    Thermal vacuum testing often requires temperature control of chamber shrouds and heat exchangers within the -130 C to 75 C range. There are two conventional methods which are normally employed to achieve control through this intermediate temperature range: (1) single-pass flow where control is achieved by alternately pulsing hot gaseous nitrogen (GN2) and cold LN2 into the feed line to yield the setpoint temperature; and (2) closed-loop circulation where control is achieved by either electrically heating or LN2 cooling the circulating GN2 to yield the setpoint temperature. A third method, using a mass flow ratio controller along with modulating control valves on GN2 and LN2 lines, provides excellent control but equipment for this method is expensive and cost-prohibitive for all but long-term continuous processes. The single-pass method provides marginal control and can result in unexpected overcooling of the test article from even a short pulse of LN2. The closed-loop circulation method provides excellent control but requires an expensive blower capable of operating at elevated pressures and cryogenic temperatures. Where precise control is needed (plus or minus 2 C), single-pass flow systems typically have not provided the precision required, primarily because of overcooling temperature excursions. Where several individual circuits are to be controlled at different temperatures, the use of expensive cryogenic blowers for each circuit is also cost-prohibitive, especially for short duration of one-of-a-kind tests. At JPL, a variant of the single-pass method was developed that was shown to provide precise temperature control in the -130 C to 75 C range while exhibiting minimal setpoint overshoot during temperature transitions. This alternate method uses a commercially available temperature controller along with a GN2/LN2 mixer to dampen the amplitude of cold temperature spikes caused by LN2 pulsing. The design of the GN2/LN2 mixer, the overall control system

  1. A luminescent Lanthanide-free MOF nanohybrid for highly sensitive ratiometric temperature sensing in physiological range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, You; Zhang, Denan; Zeng, Jin; Gan, Ning; Cuan, Jing

    2018-05-01

    Luminescent MOF materials with tunable emissions and energy/charge transfer processes have been extensively explored as ratiometric temperature sensors. However, most of the ratiometric MOF thermometers reported thus far are based on the MOFs containing photoactive lanthanides, which are potentially facing cost issue and serious supply shortage. Here, we present a ratiometric luminescent thermometer based on a dual-emitting lanthanide-free MOF hybrid, which is developed by encapsulation of a fluorescent dye into a robust nanocrystalline zirconium-based MOF through a one-pot synthesis approach. The structure and morphology of the hybrid product was characterized by Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), N 2 adsorption-desorption measurement and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The pore confinement effect well isolates the guest dye molecules and therefore suppresses the nonradiative energy transfer process between dye molecules. The incorporated dye emission is mainly sensitized by the organic linkers within MOF through fluorescence resonance energy transfer. The ratiometric luminescence of the MOF hybrid shows a significant response to temperature due to the thermal-related back energy transfer process from dye molecules and organic linkers, thus can be exploited for self-calibrated temperature sensing. The maximum thermometric sensitivity is 1.19% °C -1 in the physiological temperature range, which is among the highest for the ratiomtric MOF thermometers that operating in 25-45°C. The temperature resolution is better than 0.1°C over the entire operative range (20-60°C). By integrating the advantages of excellent stability, nanoscale nature, and high sensitivity and precision in the physiological temperature range, this dye@MOF hybrid might have potential application in biomedical diagnosis. What' more, this work has expanded the possibility of non-lanthanide luminescent MOF materials for the development of ratiometric temperature sensors. Copyright © 2018

  2. Water Vapor Sorption Properties of Polyethylene Terephthalate over a Wide Range of Humidity and Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubelley, Florence; Planes, Emilie; Bas, Corine; Pons, Emmanuelle; Yrieix, Bernard; Flandin, Lionel

    2017-03-02

    The dynamic and equilibrium water vapor sorption properties of amorphous polyethylene terephthalate were determined via gravimetric analysis over a wide range of temperatures (23-70 °C) and humidities (0-90% RH). At low temperature and relative humidity, the dynamics of the sorption process was Fickian. Increasing the temperature or relative humidity induced a distinct up-swing effect, which was associated with a plasticization/clustering phenomenon. For high temperatures and relative humidity, a densification of the polymer was evidenced. In addition to the classical Fickian diffusion, a new parameter was introduced to express the structural modifications of PET. Finally, two partial pressures were defined as thresholds that control the transition between these three phases. A simplified state diagram was finally proposed. In addition, the thermal dependence of these sorption modes was also determined and reported. The enthalpy of Henry's water sorption and the activation energy of diffusion were independent of vapor pressure and followed an Arrhenius law.

  3. Communication: Anomalous temperature dependence of the intermediate range order in phosphonium ionic liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hettige, Jeevapani J.; Kashyap, Hemant K.; Margulis, Claudio J., E-mail: claudio-margulis@uiowa.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

    2014-03-21

    In a recent article by the Castner and Margulis groups [Faraday Discuss. 154, 133 (2012)], we described in detail the structure of the tetradecyltrihexylphosphonium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)-amide ionic liquid as a function of temperature using X-ray scattering, and theoretical partitions of the computationally derived structure function. Interestingly, and as opposed to the case in most other ionic-liquids, the first sharp diffraction peak or prepeak appears to increase in intensity as temperature is increased. This phenomenon is counter intuitive as one would expect that intermediate range order fades as temperature increases. This Communication shows that a loss of hydrophobic tail organization at higher temperatures is counterbalanced by better organization of polar components giving rise to the increase in intensity of the prepeak.

  4. Long-range correlations in rectal temperature fluctuations of healthy infants during maturation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgette Stern

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Control of breathing, heart rate, and body temperature are interdependent in infants, where instabilities in thermoregulation can contribute to apneas or even life-threatening events. Identifying abnormalities in thermoregulation is particularly important in the first 6 months of life, where autonomic regulation undergoes critical development. Fluctuations in body temperature have been shown to be sensitive to maturational stage as well as system failure in critically ill patients. We thus aimed to investigate the existence of fractal-like long-range correlations, indicative of temperature control, in night time rectal temperature (T(rec patterns in maturing infants. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We measured T(rec fluctuations in infants every 4 weeks from 4 to 20 weeks of age and before and after immunization. Long-range correlations in the temperature series were quantified by the correlation exponent, alpha using detrended fluctuation analysis. The effects of maturation, room temperature, and immunization on the strength of correlation were investigated. We found that T(rec fluctuations exhibit fractal long-range correlations with a mean (SD alpha of 1.51 (0.11, indicating that T(rec is regulated in a highly correlated and hence deterministic manner. A significant increase in alpha with age from 1.42 (0.07 at 4 weeks to 1.58 (0.04 at 20 weeks reflects a change in long-range correlation behavior with maturation towards a smoother and more deterministic temperature regulation, potentially due to the decrease in surface area to body weight ratio in the maturing infant. alpha was not associated with mean room temperature or influenced by immunization CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that the quantification of long-range correlations using alpha derived from detrended fluctuation analysis is an observer-independent tool which can distinguish developmental stages of night time T(rec pattern in young infants, reflective of maturation of

  5. Assessing the Influence of Precipitation on Diurnal Temperature Range Changes: Implications for Climate Change Projection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Hoof, C.; Garreaud, R.

    2014-12-01

    . Braganza, D.J. Karoly, and J.M. Arblaster. Diurnal temperature range as an index of global climate change during the twentieth century. Geophysical Research Letters, 31:1-4, 2004. [2] A. Dai, A.D. Del Genio, and I.Y. Fung. Clouds, precipitation and temperature range. Nature, 386:665-666, 1997.

  6. Effects of regional temperature on electric vehicle efficiency, range, and emissions in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuksel, Tugce; Michalek, Jeremy J

    2015-03-17

    We characterize the effect of regional temperature differences on battery electric vehicle (BEV) efficiency, range, and use-phase power plant CO2 emissions in the U.S. The efficiency of a BEV varies with ambient temperature due to battery efficiency and cabin climate control. We find that annual energy consumption of BEVs can increase by an average of 15% in the Upper Midwest or in the Southwest compared to the Pacific Coast due to temperature differences. Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from BEVs vary primarily with marginal regional grid mix, which has three times the GHG intensity in the Upper Midwest as on the Pacific Coast. However, even within a grid region, BEV emissions vary by up to 22% due to spatial and temporal ambient temperature variation and its implications for vehicle efficiency and charging duration and timing. Cold climate regions also encounter days with substantial reduction in EV range: the average range of a Nissan Leaf on the coldest day of the year drops from 70 miles on the Pacific Coast to less than 45 miles in the Upper Midwest. These regional differences are large enough to affect adoption patterns and energy and environmental implications of BEVs relative to alternatives.

  7. Temperature characteristics of surface micromachined MEMS-VCSEL with large tuning range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gierl, C; Gründl, T; Paul, S; Zogal, K; Haidar, M T; Meissner, P; Amann, M-C; Küppers, F

    2014-06-02

    Several Applications for tunable laser diodes have strict constraints in terms of overall power consumption. Furthermore, the implementation in harsh environments with large temperature fluctuations is necessary. Due to the constraint in power consumption, the application of active cooling might not be an option. For this reason we investigate the temperature characteristics of an electrically pumped MEMS-VCSEL with wide continuous wavelength tuning. For the first time, a mode hop free single mode (side mode suppression ratio (SMSR) > 40dB) tuning range of 45nm at 70°C is demonstrated with a MEMS-VCSEL. An increase of the tuning range from 85nm at 20°C to 92nm at 40°C is measured and explained. In contrast to fixed wavelength VCSEL, the investigated device shows a negative temperature induced wavelength shift of -4.5nmK(-1), which is caused by the MEMS-mirror. At 1560nm, the fibre-coupled optical output power is above 0.6mW over the entire temperature range between 20°C to 70°C and shows a maximum of > 3mW at 20°C.

  8. Identified Moderate and High Temperature Geothermal Systems of the Western United States including AK and HI

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This layer contains the locations of identified moderate (90 - 150° C) and high (> 150° C) temperature geothermal systems and associated reservoir volumes,...

  9. The temperature dependence of intermediate range oxygen-oxygen correlations in liquid water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlesinger, Daniel; Wikfeldt, K Thor; Skinner, Lawrie B; Benmore, Chris J; Nilsson, Anders; Pettersson, Lars G M

    2016-08-28

    We analyze the recent temperature dependent oxygen-oxygen pair-distribution functions from experimental high-precision x-ray diffraction data of bulk water by Skinner et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 141, 214507 (2014)] with particular focus on the intermediate range where small, but significant, correlations are found out to 17 Å. The second peak in the pair-distribution function at 4.5 Å is connected to tetrahedral coordination and was shown by Skinner et al. to change behavior with temperature below the temperature of minimum isothermal compressibility. Here we show that this is associated also with a peak growing at 11 Å which strongly indicates a collective character of fluctuations leading to the enhanced compressibility at lower temperatures. We note that the peak at ∼13.2 Å exhibits a temperature dependence similar to that of the density with a maximum close to 277 K or 4 °C. We analyze simulations of the TIP4P/2005 water model in the same manner and find excellent agreement between simulations and experiment albeit with a temperature shift of ∼20 K.

  10. NMR study of topological insulator Bi2Te3 in a wide temperature range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonenko, A. O.; Charnaya, E. V.; Nefedov, D. Yu.; Podorozhkin, D. Yu.; Uskov, A. V.; Bugaev, A. S.; Lee, M. K.; Chang, L. J.; Naumov, S. V.; Perevozchikova, Yu. A.; Chistyakov, V. V.; Huang, J. C. A.; Marchenkov, V. V.

    2017-12-01

    NMR studies of 125Te in the topological insulator bismuth telluride Bi2Te3 in a wide temperature range from room temperature to 12.5 K are performed. The pulsed NMR spectrometer Bruker Avance 400 is applied. The NMR spectra are obtained for the powder from Bi2Te3 single crystal and monocrystalline plates with the orientations c || B and c ⊥ B. At room temperature, the spectra consist of two lines related to two nonequivalent positions of tellurium nuclei Te1 and Te2. The parameters of the NMR frequency shift tensor are found from the powder spectrum. The temperature dependences of the spectra for the powder and plates with the orientation c ⊥ B agree with each other. The line shift with decreasing temperature is explained by the reduction of the Knight shift. The thermal activation energy of charge carriers is estimated. The spectra for the plates with the orientation c || B demonstrate peculiar behavior below 91 K. The spin-lattice relaxation time for the powder and monocrystalline plates with both orientations at room temperature is measured.

  11. A lithium-ion capacitor model working on a wide temperature range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcellona, S.; Piegari, L.

    2017-02-01

    Energy storage systems are spreading both in stationary and transport applications. Among innovative storage devices, lithium ion capacitors (LiCs) are very interesting. They combine the advantages of both traditional electric double layer capacitors (EDLCs) and lithium ion batteries (LiBs). The behavior of this device is much more similar to ELDCs than to batteries. For this reason, several models developed for traditional ELDCs were extended to LiCs. Anyway, at low temperatures LiCs behavior is quite different from ELDCs and it is more similar to a LiB. Consequently, EDLC models works fine at room temperature but give worse results at low temperatures. This paper proposes a new electric model that, overcoming this issue, is a valid solution in a wide temperature range. Based on only five parameters, depending on polarization voltage and temperature, the proposed model is very simple to be implemented. Its accuracy is verified through experimental tests. From the reported results, it is also shown that, at very low temperatures, the dependence of the resistance from the current has to be taken into account.

  12. Wide-range vortex shedding flowmeter for high-temperature helium gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, S.P.; Herndon, P.G.; Ennis, R.M. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The existing design of a commercially available vortex shedding flowmeter (VSFM) was modified and optimized to produce three 4-in. and one 6-in. high-performance VSFMs for measuring helium flow in a gas-cooled fast reactor (GCFR) test loop. The project was undertaken because of the significant economic and performance advantages to be realized by using a single flowmeter capable of covering the 166:1 flow range (at 350/sup 0/C and 45:1 pressure range) of the tests. A detailed calibration in air and helium at the Colorado Engineering Experiment Station showed an accuracy of +-1% of reading for a 100:1 helium flow range and +-1.75% of reading for a 288:1 flow range in both helium and air. At an extended gas temperature of 450/sup 0/C, water cooling was necessary for reliable flowmeter operation.

  13. Geothermal data of the United States, including many original determinations of underground temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darton, Nelson Horatio

    1920-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to present all available published data bearing on the rate of increase of underground temperature with increasing depth in the United States, together with several hundred original observations by myself and my associates. A canvass of the governmental, State, and serial publications has yielded many records of temperature of flowing wells and also a few observations made with thermometers in borings and deep mines. Additional data on temperature of flows have been given by correspondents. Some of the data, especially those relating to flows from wells, may not be reliable, and as a rule these could not be discriminated. Many records are omitted because no facts are available as to the source of flow.

  14. Assessment of the quality of NCEP-2 and CFSR reanalysis daily temperature in China based on long-range correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wen-ping; Zhao, Shan-shan

    2017-03-01

    The daily temperatures from observational data, NCEP-2 and CFSR reanalysis data all exhibit long-range correlation (LRC) characteristics, which provides a test bed for assessing the reliability of reanalysis data. In this study, the quality of the NCEP-2 and CFSR data in China are evaluated on the basis of the LRC characteristics of daily temperatures, including daily average temperature (DAT), daily maximum temperature (DMAT), daily minimum temperature (DMIT), and diurnal temperature range (DTR). Compared with the observations, the quality of NCEP-2 daily temperature is relatively good in central and eastern Northwest China, and most of central and eastern China, especially for NCEP-2 DMAT. However, the NCEP-2 reanalysis data as well as CFSR has a significant difference with the LRC of the observations in most of Sichuan, Qinghai-Tibet Plateau and some areas of southwestern Xinjiang at a significance level of Alpha = 0.05. In general, the LRC characteristics of NCEP-2 daily temperature perform better than that of CFSR data. As far as DAT is concerned, CFSR perform worse in central and eastern Northwest China, and better than NCEP-2 only in South China and eastern Jiangnan. The quality of the CFSR DMAT is worse than that of NCEP-2 in central and eastern Northwest China, western Inner Mongolia, and eastern China. The quality of NCEP-2 DMIT is better than CFSR in central and eastern Northwest China, most of Inner Mongolia, and is worse than it in most of South China and eastern Jiangnan. The reliability of the CFSR DTR is very low in most of China.

  15. Assessment of the quality of NCEP-2 and CFSR reanalysis daily temperature in China based on long-range correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wen-ping; Zhao, Shan-shan

    2018-01-01

    The daily temperatures from observational data, NCEP-2 and CFSR reanalysis data all exhibit long-range correlation (LRC) characteristics, which provides a test bed for assessing the reliability of reanalysis data. In this study, the quality of the NCEP-2 and CFSR data in China are evaluated on the basis of the LRC characteristics of daily temperatures, including daily average temperature (DAT), daily maximum temperature (DMAT), daily minimum temperature (DMIT), and diurnal temperature range (DTR). Compared with the observations, the quality of NCEP-2 daily temperature is relatively good in central and eastern Northwest China, and most of central and eastern China, especially for NCEP-2 DMAT. However, the NCEP-2 reanalysis data as well as CFSR has a significant difference with the LRC of the observations in most of Sichuan, Qinghai-Tibet Plateau and some areas of southwestern Xinjiang at a significance level of Alpha = 0.05. In general, the LRC characteristics of NCEP-2 daily temperature perform better than that of CFSR data. As far as DAT is concerned, CFSR perform worse in central and eastern Northwest China, and better than NCEP-2 only in South China and eastern Jiangnan. The quality of the CFSR DMAT is worse than that of NCEP-2 in central and eastern Northwest China, western Inner Mongolia, and eastern China. The quality of NCEP-2 DMIT is better than CFSR in central and eastern Northwest China, most of Inner Mongolia, and is worse than it in most of South China and eastern Jiangnan. The reliability of the CFSR DTR is very low in most of China.

  16. SiC JFET Transistor Circuit Model for Extreme Temperature Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neudeck, Philip G.

    2008-01-01

    A technique for simulating extreme-temperature operation of integrated circuits that incorporate silicon carbide (SiC) junction field-effect transistors (JFETs) has been developed. The technique involves modification of NGSPICE, which is an open-source version of the popular Simulation Program with Integrated Circuit Emphasis (SPICE) general-purpose analog-integrated-circuit-simulating software. NGSPICE in its unmodified form is used for simulating and designing circuits made from silicon-based transistors that operate at or near room temperature. Two rapid modifications of NGSPICE source code enable SiC JFETs to be simulated to 500 C using the well-known Level 1 model for silicon metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs). First, the default value of the MOSFET surface potential must be changed. In the unmodified source code, this parameter has a value of 0.6, which corresponds to slightly more than half the bandgap of silicon. In NGSPICE modified to simulate SiC JFETs, this parameter is changed to a value of 1.6, corresponding to slightly more than half the bandgap of SiC. The second modification consists of changing the temperature dependence of MOSFET transconductance and saturation parameters. The unmodified NGSPICE source code implements a T(sup -1.5) temperature dependence for these parameters. In order to mimic the temperature behavior of experimental SiC JFETs, a T(sup -1.3) temperature dependence must be implemented in the NGSPICE source code. Following these two simple modifications, the Level 1 MOSFET model of the NGSPICE circuit simulation program reasonably approximates the measured high-temperature behavior of experimental SiC JFETs properly operated with zero or reverse bias applied to the gate terminal. Modification of additional silicon parameters in the NGSPICE source code was not necessary to model experimental SiC JFET current-voltage performance across the entire temperature range from 25 to 500 C.

  17. Artificial Temperature Anisotropy of Crystals in X-Ray Frequency Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mkrtchyan, Vahram P.; Gasparyan, Laura G.; Balyan, Minas K.

    2010-04-01

    The effect of artificial temperature anisotropy of crystals in X-ray frequency range was observed for the first time and an effort to theoretically interpret this effect in Bragg-Laue diffraction case was made. It was established that an isotropic crystal optically turns into an artificially anisotropic one with optical axis along the direction of applied external influence as a symmetry axis, giving rise to the double refraction.

  18. V-structures of ethylene glycol and monoethanolamine in the temperature range of the liquid phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balabaev, N. K.; Rodnikova, M. N.; Solonina, I. A.; Shirokova, E. V.; Sirotkin, D. A.

    2017-01-01

    Vibration-averaged V-structures for liquid ethylene glycol (EG) and monoethanolamine (MEA) are found in the temperature range of the solvents' liquid phase by means of molecular dynamics. The obtained V-structures' characteristics are compared to X-ray diffraction data on the crystalline phases of these compounds. Good agreement between theoretical and experimental data is observed. The V-structures are compared to that of water.

  19. Elevational ranges of birds on a tropical montane gradient lag behind warming temperatures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    German Forero-Medina

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Species may respond to a warming climate by moving to higher latitudes or elevations. Shifts in geographic ranges are common responses in temperate regions. For the tropics, latitudinal temperature gradients are shallow; the only escape for species may be to move to higher elevations. There are few data to suggest that they do. Yet, the greatest loss of species from climate disruption may be for tropical montane species. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We repeat a historical transect in Peru and find an average upward shift of 49 m for 55 bird species over a 41 year interval. This shift is significantly upward, but also significantly smaller than the 152 m one expects from warming in the region. To estimate the expected shift in elevation we first determined the magnitude of warming in the locality from historical data. Then we used the temperature lapse rate to infer the required shift in altitude to compensate for warming. The range shifts in elevation were similar across different trophic guilds. CONCLUSIONS: Endothermy may provide birds with some flexibility to temperature changes and allow them to move less than expected. Instead of being directly dependent on temperature, birds may be responding to gradual changes in the nature of the habitat or availability of food resources, and presence of competitors. If so, this has important implications for estimates of mountaintop extinctions from climate change.

  20. Modelling the effect of temperature on the range expansion of species by reaction-diffusion equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Otto; Moenickes, Sylvia; Suhling, Frank

    2012-02-01

    The spatial dynamics of range expansion is studied in dependence of temperature. The main elements population dynamics, competition and dispersal are combined in a coherent approach based on a system of coupled partial differential equations of the reaction-diffusion type. The nonlinear reaction terms comprise population dynamic models with temperature dependent reproduction rates subject to an Allee effect and mutual competition. The effect of temperature on travelling wave solutions is investigated for a one dimensional model version. One main result is the importance of the Allee effect for the crossing of regions with unsuitable habitats. The nonlinearities of the interaction terms give rise to a richness of spatio-temporal dynamic patterns. In two dimensions, the resulting non-linear initial boundary value problems are solved over geometries of heterogeneous landscapes. Geo referenced model parameters such as mean temperature and elevation are imported into the finite element tool COMSOL Multiphysics from a geographical information system. The model is applied to the range expansion of species at the scale of middle Europe. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The temperature dependence of the BK channel activity - kinetics, thermodynamics, and long-range correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawrzkiewicz-Jałowiecka, Agata; Dworakowska, Beata; Grzywna, Zbigniew J

    2017-10-01

    Large-conductance, voltage dependent, Ca2+-activated potassium channels (BK) are transmembrane proteins that regulate many biological processes by controlling potassium flow across cell membranes. Here, we investigate to what extent temperature (in the range of 17-37°C with ΔT=5°C step) is a regulating parameter of kinetic properties of the channel gating and memory effect in the series of dwell-time series of subsequent channel's states, at membrane depolarization and hyperpolarization. The obtained results indicate that temperature affects strongly the BK channels' gating, but, counterintuitively, it exerts no effect on the long-range correlations, as measured by the Hurst coefficient. Quantitative differences between dependencies of appropriate channel's characteristics on temperature are evident for different regimes of voltage. Examining the characteristics of BK channel activity as a function of temperature allows to estimate the net activation energy (Eact) and changes of thermodynamic parameters (ΔH, ΔS, ΔG) by channel opening. Larger Eact corresponds to the channel activity at membrane hyperpolarization. The analysis of entropy and enthalpy changes of closed to open channel's transition suggest the entropy-driven nature of the increase of open state probability during voltage activation and supports the hypothesis about the voltage-dependent geometry of the channel vestibule. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of reproductive status and high ambient temperatures on the body temperature of a free-ranging basoendotherm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levesque, Danielle L; Lobban, Kerileigh D; Lovegrove, Barry G

    2014-12-01

    Tenrecs (Order Afrosoricida) exhibit some of the lowest body temperatures (T b) of any eutherian mammal. They also have a high level of variability in both active and resting T bs and, at least in cool temperatures in captivity, frequently employ both short- and long-term torpor. The use of heterothermy by captive animals is, however, generally reduced during gestation and lactation. We present data long-term T b recordings collected from free-ranging S. setosus over the course of two reproductive seasons. In general, reproductive females had slightly higher (~32 °C) and less variable T b, whereas non-reproductive females and males showed both a higher propensity for torpor as well as lower (~30.5 °C) and more variable rest-phase T bs. Torpor expression defined using traditional means (using a threshold or cut-off T b) was much lower than predicted based on the high degree of heterothermy in captive tenrecs. However, torpor defined in this manner is likely to be underestimated in habitats where ambient temperature is close to T b. Our results caution against inferring metabolic states from T b alone and lend support to the recent call to define torpor in free-ranging animals based on mechanistic and not descriptive variables. In addition, lower variability in T b observed during gestation and lactation confirms that homeothermy is essential for reproduction in this species and probably for basoendothermic mammals in general. The relatively low costs of maintaining homeothermy in a sub-tropical environment might help shed light on how homeothermy could have evolved incrementally from an ancestral heterothermic condition.

  3. Evaluation of reusable surface insulation for space shuttle over a range of heat-transfer rate and surface temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, A. J.

    1973-01-01

    Reusable surface insulation materials, which were developed as heat shields for the space shuttle, were tested over a range of conditions including heat-transfer rates between 160 and 620 kW/sq m. The lowest of these heating rates was in a range predicted for the space shuttle during reentry, and the highest was more than twice the predicted entry heating on shuttle areas where reusable surface insulation would be used. Individual specimens were tested repeatedly at increasingly severe conditions to determine the maximum heating rate and temperature capability. A silica-base material experienced only minimal degradation during repeated tests which included conditions twice as severe as predicted shuttle entry and withstood cumulative exposures three times longer than the best mullite material. Mullite-base materials cracked and experienced incipient melting at conditions within the range predicted for shuttle entry. Neither silica nor mullite materials consistently survived the test series with unbroken waterproof surfaces. Surface temperatures for a silica and a mullite material followed a trend expected for noncatalytic surfaces, whereas surface temperatures for a second mullite material appeared to follow a trend expected for a catalytic surface.

  4. Climate variability of heat waves and their associated diurnal temperature range variations in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kueh, M.-T.; Lin, C.-Y.; Chuang, Y.-J.; Sheng, Y.-F.; Chien, Y.-Y.

    2017-07-01

    This study investigates heat waves in Taiwan and their maintenance mechanism, based upon observations and dynamically downscaled simulations. A 95th percentile threshold is used for identifying hot extremes over a period of consecutive days. Heat waves are forecast to become more severe in the future projection. Daily minimum temperatures are generally high and diurnal temperature ranges (DTR) are relatively large. The daily minimum temperature serves as the primary control in the variation in DTR during heat waves. An apparent increase in the daily minimum temperature suggests elevated heat stress at nighttime during future heat waves. Heat waves in Taiwan are associated with abnormal warming and drying atmospheric conditions under the control of an enhanced western North Pacific subtropical high. The surrounding waters serve as a vast moisture source to suppress the drying magnitude in the surface layer as the temperature rises, thereby ensuring a high humidity level during the hot spell. The subsidence and adiabatic warming above can trap the warm and humid air in the surface layer, leading to positive feedback to the abnormally hot surface condition. The associated warming and drying atmospheric conditions cover certain spatial extents, suggesting that the extreme situation identified here is not confined to just an island-wide hot spell; the abnormal hot weather can take place across a broad geographical area.

  5. A Study on Flow Behavior of AA5086 Over a Wide Range of Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgharzadeh, A.; Jamshidi Aval, H.; Serajzadeh, S.

    2016-03-01

    Flow stress behavior of AA5086 was determined using tensile testing at different temperatures from room temperature to 500 °C and strain rates varying between 0.002 and 1 s-1. The strain rate sensitivity parameter and occurrence of dynamic strain aging were then investigated in which an Arrhenius-type model was employed to study the serrated flow. Additionally, hot deformation behavior at temperatures higher than 320 °C was evaluated utilizing hyperbolic-sine constitutive equation. Finally, a feed forward artificial neural network model with back propagation learning algorithm was proposed to predict flow stress for all deformation conditions. The results demonstrated that the strain rate sensitivity at temperature range of 25-270 °C was negative due to occurrence of dynamic strain aging leading to significant reduction in fracture strain. The serrated yielding activation energy was found to be 46.1 kJ/mol. It indicated that the migration of Mg-atoms could be the main reason for this phenomenon. The hot deformation activation energy of AA5086 was also calculated about 202.3 kJ/mol while the dynamic recovery was the main softening process. Moreover, the ANN model having two hidden layers was shown to be an efficient structure for determining flow stress of the examined alloy for all temperatures and strain rates.

  6. Physical activity profile of 2014 FIFA World Cup players, with regard to different ranges of air temperature and relative humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmura, Paweł; Konefał, Marek; Andrzejewski, Marcin; Kosowski, Jakub; Rokita, Andrzej; Chmura, Jan

    2017-04-01

    The present study attempts to assess changes in soccer players' physical activity profiles under the simultaneous influence of the different combinations of ambient temperature and relative humidity characterising matches of the 2014 FIFA World Cup hosted by Brazil. The study material consisted of observations of 340 players representing 32 national teams taking part in the tournament. The measured indices included total distances covered; distances covered with low, moderate, or high intensity; numbers of sprints performed, and peak running speeds achieved. The analysis was carried out using FIFA official match data from the Castrol Performance Index system. Ultimately, consideration was given to a combination of three air temperature ranges, i.e. below 22 °C, 22-28 °C, and above 28 °C; and two relative humidity ranges below 60 % and above 60 %. The greatest average distance recorded (10.54 ± 0.91 km) covered by players at an air temperature below 22 °C and a relative humidity below 60 %, while the shortest (9.83 ± 1.08 km) characterised the same air temperature range, but conditions of relative humidity above 60 % (p ≤ 0.001). Two-way ANOVA revealed significant differences (p ≤ 0.001) in numbers of sprints performed by players, depending on whether the air temperature range was below 22 °C (40.48 ± 11.17) or above 28 °C (30.72 ± 9.40), but only where the relative humidity was at the same time below 60 %. Results presented indicate that the conditions most comfortable for physical activity on the part of players occur at 22 °C, and with relative humidity under 60 %.

  7. Physical activity profile of 2014 FIFA World Cup players, with regard to different ranges of air temperature and relative humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmura, Paweł; Konefał, Marek; Andrzejewski, Marcin; Kosowski, Jakub; Rokita, Andrzej; Chmura, Jan

    2017-04-01

    The present study attempts to assess changes in soccer players' physical activity profiles under the simultaneous influence of the different combinations of ambient temperature and relative humidity characterising matches of the 2014 FIFA World Cup hosted by Brazil. The study material consisted of observations of 340 players representing 32 national teams taking part in the tournament. The measured indices included total distances covered; distances covered with low, moderate, or high intensity; numbers of sprints performed, and peak running speeds achieved. The analysis was carried out using FIFA official match data from the Castrol Performance Index system. Ultimately, consideration was given to a combination of three air temperature ranges, i.e. below 22 °C, 22-28 °C, and above 28 °C; and two relative humidity ranges below 60 % and above 60 %. The greatest average distance recorded (10.54 ± 0.91 km) covered by players at an air temperature below 22 °C and a relative humidity below 60 %, while the shortest (9.83 ± 1.08 km) characterised the same air temperature range, but conditions of relative humidity above 60 % ( p ≤ 0.001). Two-way ANOVA revealed significant differences ( p ≤ 0.001) in numbers of sprints performed by players, depending on whether the air temperature range was below 22 °C (40.48 ± 11.17) or above 28 °C (30.72 ± 9.40), but only where the relative humidity was at the same time below 60 %. Results presented indicate that the conditions most comfortable for physical activity on the part of players occur at 22 °C, and with relative humidity under 60 %.

  8. Bayesian prediction of bacterial growth temperature range based on genome sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Dan Børge; Vesth, Tammi Camilla; Hallin, Peter Fischer

    2012-01-01

    Background: The preferred habitat of a given bacterium can provide a hint of which types of enzymes of potential industrial interest it might produce. These might include enzymes that are stable and active at very high or very low temperatures. Being able to accurately predict this based on a gen...... and psychrophilic adapted bacterial genomes....

  9. Glassy aerosols with a range of compositions nucleate ice heterogeneously at cirrus temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. W. Wilson

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric secondary organic aerosol (SOA is likely to exist in a semi-solid or glassy state, particularly at low temperatures and humidities. Previously, it has been shown that glassy aqueous citric acid aerosol is able to nucleate ice heterogeneously under conditions relevant to cirrus in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL. In this study we test if glassy aerosol distributions with a range of chemical compositions heterogeneously nucleate ice under cirrus conditions. Three single component aqueous solution aerosols (raffinose, 4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-DL-mandelic acid (HMMA and levoglucosan and one multi component aqueous solution aerosol (raffinose mixed with five dicarboxylic acids and ammonium sulphate were studied in both the liquid and glassy states at a large cloud simulation chamber. The investigated organic compounds have similar functionality to oxidised organic material found in atmospheric aerosol and have estimated temperature/humidity induced glass transition thresholds that fall within the range predicted for atmospheric SOA. A small fraction of aerosol particles of all compositions were found to nucleate ice heterogeneously in the deposition mode at temperatures relevant to the TTL (<200 K. Raffinose and HMMA, which form glasses at higher temperatures, nucleated ice heterogeneously at temperatures as high as 214.6 and 218.5 K respectively. We present the calculated ice active surface site density, ns, of the aerosols tested here and also of glassy citric acid aerosol as a function of relative humidity with respect to ice (RHi. We also propose a parameterisation which can be used to estimate heterogeneous ice nucleation by glassy aerosol for use in cirrus cloud models up to ~220 K. Finally, we show that heterogeneous nucleation by glassy aerosol may compete with ice nucleation on mineral dust particles in mid-latitudes cirrus.

  10. Investigation of Breakpoint and Trend of Daily Air Temperature Range for Mashhad, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    shideh shams

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Air temperature as an important climatic factor can influence variability and distribution of other climatic parameters. Therefore, tracking the changes in air temperature is a popular procedure in climate change studies.. According to the national academy in the last decade, global temperature has raised 0.4 to 0.8⁰C. Instrumental records show that, with the exception of 1998, the 10 warmest year (during the last 150 years, occurred since 2000, and 2014 was the warmest year. Investigation of maximum and minimum air temperature temporal trend indicates that these two parameters behave differently over time. It has been shown that the minimum air temperature raises noticeably more than the maximum air temperature, which causes a reduction in the difference of maximum and minimum daily air temperature (daily temperature range, DTR. There are several factors that have an influence on reducing DTR such as: Urban development, farms’ irrigation and desertification. It has been shown that DTR reduction occurs mostly during winter and is less frequent during summer, which shows the season’s effect on the temperature trend. Considering the significant effects of the climatological factors on economic and agricultural management issues, the aim of this study is to investigate daily air temperature range for yearly, seasonal and monthly time scales, using available statistical methods. Materials and Methods: Daily maximum and minimum air temperature records (from 1950 to 2010 were obtained from Mashhad Meteorological Organization. In order to control the quality of daily Tmax and Tmin data, four different types of quality controls were applied. First of all, gross errors were checked. In this step maximum and minimum air temperature data exceeding unlikely air temperature values, were eliminated from data series. Second, data tolerance was checked by searching for periods longer than a certain number of consecutive days with exactly the

  11. Substrate material selection method for multilayer diffractive optics in a wide environmental temperature range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, Mingxu; Cui, Qingfeng; Zhao, Chunzhu; Zhang, Bo; Mao, Shan; Zhao, Yuanming; Zhao, Lidong

    2017-04-01

    We present a substrate material selection method for multilayer diffractive optical elements (MLDOEs) to obtain high polychromatic integral diffraction efficiency (PIDE) in a wide environmental temperature range. The extended expressions of the surface relief heights for the MLDOEs are deduced with consideration of the influence of the environmental temperature. The PIDE difference Δη¯(λ) and PIDE change factor F are introduced to select a reasonable substrate material combination. A smaller value of Δη¯(λ) or F indicates a smaller decrease of the PIDE in a wide temperature range, and the corresponding substrate material combination is better. According to the deduced relation, double-layer and three-layer DOEs with different combinations are discussed. The results show that IRG26 and zinc sulfide is the best substrate material combination in the infrared waveband for double-layer DOEs, and polycarbonate is more reasonable than polymethyl methacrylate as the middle filling optical material for three-layer DOEs when the two substrate materials are the same.

  12. Defining the temperature range for cooking with extra virgin olive oil using Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Naveed; Saleem, M.; Ali, H.; Bilal, M.; Khan, Saranjam; Ullah, Rahat; Ahmed, M.; Mahmood, S.

    2017-09-01

    Using the potential of Raman spectroscopy, new findings regarding the effects of heating on extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) during frying/cooking are presented. A temperature range from 140 to 150 °C has been defined within which EVOO can be used for cooking/frying without much loss of its natural molecular composition. Raman spectra from the EVOO samples were recorded using an excitation laser at 785 nm in the range from 540 to 1800 cm-1. Due to heating, prominent variations in intensity are observed at Raman bands from 540 to 770 cm-1, 790 to 1170 cm-1 and 1267 and 1302 cm-1. The Raman bands at 1267 and 1302 cm-1 represent cis unsaturated fats and their ratio is used to investigate the effects of temperature on the molecular composition of EVOO. In addition, principal component analysis has been applied on all the groups of data to classify the heated EVOO samples at different temperatures and for different times. In addition, it has been found that use of EVOO for frying twice does not have any prominent effect on its molecular composition.

  13. A low-noise wide dynamic range CMOS image sensor with low and high temperatures resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizobuchi, Koichi; Adachi, Satoru; Tejada, Jose; Oshikubo, Hiromichi; Akahane, Nana; Sugawa, Shigetoshi

    2008-02-01

    A temperature-resistant 1/3 inch SVGA (800×600 pixels) 5.6 μm pixel pitch wide-dynamic-range (WDR) CMOS image sensor has been developed using a lateral-over-flow-integration-capacitor (LOFIC) in a pixel. The sensor chips are fabricated through 0.18 μm 2P3M process with totally optimized front-end-of-line (FEOL) & back-end-of-line (BEOL) for a lower dark current. By implementing a low electrical field potential design for photodiodes, reducing damages, recovering crystal defects and terminating interface states in the FEOL+BEOL, the dark current is improved to 12 e - /pixel-sec at 60 deg.C with 50% reduction from the previous very-low-dark-current (VLDC) FEOL and its contribution to the temporal noise is improved. Furthermore, design optimizations of the readout circuits, especially a signal-and noise-hold circuit and a programmable-gain-amplifier (PGA) are also implemented. The measured temporal noise is 2.4 e -rms at 60 fps (:36 MHz operation). The dynamic-range (DR) is extended to 100 dB with 237 ke - full well capacity. In order to secure the temperature-resistance, the sensor chip also receives both an inorganic cap onto micro lens and a metal hermetic seal package assembly. Image samples at low & high temperatures show significant improvement in image qualities.

  14. Downstream changes in spring-fed stream invertebrate communities: the effect of increased temperature range?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell G. DEATH

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Reduced thermal amplitude has been highlighted as a limiting factor for aquatic invertebrate diversity in springs. Moving downstream water temperature range increases and invertebrate richness is expected to change accordingly. In the present study temperature patterns were investigated in seven spring-fed streams, between April 2001 and November 2002, and compared to five run-off-fed streams to assess the degree of crenic temperature constancy. Temperature and physico-chemical characteristics of the water, and food resource levels were measured, and the invertebrate fauna collected at 4 distances (0, 100, 500 m and 1 km from seven springs in the North and South Islands of New Zealand. Temperature variability was greater for run-off-fed streams than for springs, and increased in the spring-fed streams with distance from the source. Periphyton and physico-chemical characteristics of the water did not change markedly over the 1 km studied, with the exception of water velocity and organic matter biomass, which increased and decreased, respectively. The rate of increase in temperature amplitude differed greatly for the studied springs, probably being affected by flow, altitude, and the number and type of tributaries (i.e., spring- or run-off-fed joining the spring-fed stream channel. Longitudinal changes in the number and evenness of invertebrate taxa were positively correlated to thermal amplitude (rs = 0.8. Moving downstream, invertebrate communities progressively incorporated taxa with higher mobility and taxa more common in nearby run-off-fed streams. Chironomids and non-insect taxa were denser at the sources. Chironomid larvae also numerically dominated communities 100 and 500 m downstream from the sources, together with Pycnocentria spp. and Zelolessica spp., while taxa such as Hydora sp. and Hydraenidae beetles, the mayflies Deleatidium spp. and Coloburiscus humeralis, and the Trichoptera Pycnocentrodes spp., all had greater abundances 1 km

  15. Elastic precursor wave decay in shock-compressed aluminum over a wide range of temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Ryan

    2017-06-01

    As a part of broader efforts to understand the dynamic strength of metals, precursor wave decay measurements are well-situated to probe time-dependent flow behavior at relatively high strain rates and low strain levels. Such measurements provide crucial data to help constrain models of underlying deformation mechanisms and microstructure evolution under shock wave loading. In previous work, wave structures were measured in aluminum plate impact experiments performed at temperatures ranging from 300 K to just below the ambient melting point (933 K). These measurements serve as a basis for evaluating and refining a dislocation-based model of high-rate metal plasticity. In the experiments, the precursor wave amplitudes were observed to increase with temperature. This effect is usually explained in terms of the temperature dependence of dislocation phonon scattering (i.e., the linear regime of damped dislocation mobility). However, the model predicts that phonon radiation provides a somewhat stronger damping effect at all temperatures, given the high speeds attained by the dislocations. The combined effects of phonon scattering and radiation then seem to be responsible for the measured precursor amplifications. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 (LLNL-ABS-724488).

  16. Modifiers of diurnal temperature range and mortality association in six Korean cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Youn-Hee; Park, Ae Kyung; Kim, Ho

    2012-01-01

    Rapid temperature changes within a single day may be critical for populations vulnerable to thermal stress who have difficulty adjusting themselves behaviorally and physiologically. We hypothesized that diurnal temperature range (DTR) is associated with mortality, and that this association is modified by season and socioeconomic status (SES). We evaluated meteorological and mortality data from six metropolitan areas in Korea from 1992 to 2007. We applied generalized linear models (GLM) for quantifying the estimated effects of DTR on mortality after adjusting for mean temperature, dew point temperature, day of the week, and seasonal and long-term trends. Most areas showed a linear DTR-mortality relationship, with evidence of increasing mortality with increasing DTR. Deaths among the elderly (75 years or older), females, the less educated, and the non-hospital population were associated more strongly with DTR than with the corresponding categories. DTR was the greatest threat to vulnerable study populations, with greater influence in the fall season. DTR was found to be a predictor of mortality, and this relationship was modified by season and SES.

  17. Temperature Range for Metasomatism at the Bakalskoe Siderite Deposits with Use of Geochemical Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. T. Krupenin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The data obtained with the quantitative microprobe ankerite–siderite composition analysis of seven samples from the different parts of Bakalskoe field showed that the wallrock ankerites in the western and central parts of the ore field differ in average concentrations of FeCO 3 (respectively 14.21 and 20.84 wt.%. However, there is no significant difference in composition of siderites. The calculation of the Mg-Fe metasomatism temperatures based on ankerite-siderite and ankerite-breinerite geothermometers showed the close agreement of the values of both methods at temperatures of 250 °C and above. The average temperatures of siderite metasomatism in the central part of the Bakalskoe ore field are in range 250-270 ° C, and, in the peripheral part, the determined temperature does not exceed 190-220 ° C. These values do not depend on the position of the siderite deposits in stratigraphic level of the Bakalskaya Suite.

  18. Modifiers of diurnal temperature range and mortality association in six Korean cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Youn-Hee; Park, Ae Kyung; Kim, Ho

    2012-01-01

    Rapid temperature changes within a single day may be critical for populations vulnerable to thermal stress who have difficulty adjusting themselves behaviorally and physiologically. We hypothesized that diurnal temperature range (DTR) is associated with mortality, and that this association is modified by season and socioeconomic status (SES). We evaluated meteorological and mortality data from six metropolitan areas in Korea from 1992 to 2007. We applied generalized linear models (GLM) for quantifying the estimated effects of DTR on mortality after adjusting for mean temperature, dew point temperature, day of the week, and seasonal and long-term trends. Most areas showed a linear DTR-mortality relationship, with evidence of increasing mortality with increasing DTR. Deaths among the elderly (75 years or older), females, the less educated, and the non-hospital population were associated more strongly with DTR than with the corresponding categories. DTR was the greatest threat to vulnerable study populations, with greater influence in the fall season. DTR was found to be a predictor of mortality, and this relationship was modified by season and SES.

  19. DC CONDUCTIVITY OF CERAMICS WITH CALCITE WASTE IN THE TEMPERATURE RANGE 20 - 1050C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Ondruska

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The temperature dependences of the electrical DC conductivity of calcite waste, kaolinite and illite based ceramics were measured in the temperature range of 20 - 1050oC. The ceramic mass that was used was a mixture of 60 wt. % kaolinitic-illitic clay, 20 - 40 wt. % of this clay was fired at 1000oC for 90 min and 0, 10 and 20 wt. % of calcite waste. During heating, several processes take place - the release of the physically bound water, the burning of organic impurities, the dehydroxylation of kaolinite and illite, the decomposition of calcite, and the creation of anorthite and mullite. All of these processes were checked by means of differential thermal analysis (DTA, derivative thermogravimetry (DTG and thermodilatometry (TDA. At low temperatures (20 - 200oC, due to the release and decomposition of physically bound water, H+ and OH- are dominant charge carriers. After completion of release of physically bound water, up to the start of dehydroxylation at the temperature of ~ 450oC, the DC conductivity is dominated by a transport of Na+, K+, and Ca2+ ions. During dehydroxylation, H+ and OH- ions, which are released from kaolinite and illite lattices, contribute to the DC conductivity. Decomposition of calcite runs between ~ 700oC and 900oC. The glassy phase has a dominant influence on the DC conductivity in the fired ceramics. Its high conductivity is determined by the high mobility of Na+, K+, and Ca2+ ions.

  20. Unified one-dimensional model of bounded plasma with nonzero ion temperature in a broad pressure range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palacio Mizrahi, J. H.; Gurovich, V. Tz.; Krasik, Ya. E. [Physics Department, Technion, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

    2013-03-15

    A one-dimensional model for steady state plasmas bounded either between large parallel walls, or by a cylinder or a sphere, valid in a wide range of gas pressures, is considered. The model includes nonzero ion temperature, inertial terms in the ion momentum equations, and allows one to calculate the plasma electron temperature and ion current density reaching the wall, as well as the spatial distributions of the ion fluid velocity, plasma density, and plasma potential in the plasma bulk. In addition, the effect of electron inertia is analyzed. The model includes as particular cases several earlier models that were based on a similar set of differential equations, but that are restricted to a specific pressure regime (low, intermediate, or high). Analytical solution is found in planar geometry, and numerical solution is given in cylindrical and spherical geometry. The results obtained are compared with those of earlier models and the differences are analyzed.

  1. Temperature range extension of an organically crosslinked polymer system and its successful field application for water and gas shutoff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasquez, Julio; Eoff, Larry; Dalrymple, Dwyann [Halliburton, Rio de Janeiro. RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    Excessive water production from hydrocarbon reservoirs is one of the most serious problems in the oil industry. Water production greatly affects the economic life of producing wells and brings along secondary problems such as sand production, corrosion, and tubular scale. Remediation techniques for controlling water production, generally referred to as conformance control, include the use of polymer systems to reduce or plug permeability to water. This paper presents the laboratory evaluation of an organically crosslinked polymer (OCP) system used as a sealant for water control problems in hydrocarbon wells. Originally, the OCP system had a limited working temperature range (140 deg to 260 deg F). Recently, an alternative base polymer (for low temperatures) and a retarder (for high temperatures) have been introduced to expand the temperature range of applicability of the OCP system from 70 deg F to 350 deg F without compromising its effectiveness or thermal stability. More than 400 jobs have been performed with the OCP system around the world to address conformance problems such as water coning/cresting, high-permeability streaks, gravel pack isolation, fracture shutoff, and casing leak repairs. This paper presents an overview of case histories that used the OCP system in various regions of the world for a wide variety of applications. (author)

  2. Mesoporous Germanium Anode Materials for Lithium-Ion Battery with Exceptional Cycling Stability in Wide Temperature Range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sinho; Cho, Yoon-Gyo; Kim, Jieun; Choi, Nam-Soon; Song, Hyun-Kon; Wang, Guoxiu; Park, Soojin

    2017-04-01

    Porous structured materials have unique architectures and are promising for lithium-ion batteries to enhance performances. In particular, mesoporous materials have many advantages including a high surface area and large void spaces which can increase reactivity and accessibility of lithium ions. This study reports a synthesis of newly developed mesoporous germanium (Ge) particles prepared by a zincothermic reduction at a mild temperature for high performance lithium-ion batteries which can operate in a wide temperature range. The optimized Ge battery anodes with the mesoporous structure exhibit outstanding electrochemical properties in a wide temperature ranging from -20 to 60 °C. Ge anodes exhibit a stable cycling retention at various temperatures (capacity retention of 99% after 100 cycles at 25 °C, 84% after 300 cycles at 60 °C, and 50% after 50 cycles at -20 °C). Furthermore, full cells consisting of the mesoporous Ge anode and an LiFePO4 cathode show an excellent cyclability at -20 and 25 °C. Mesoporous Ge materials synthesized by the zincothermic reduction can be potentially applied as high performance anode materials for practical lithium-ion batteries. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Long-range interactions in magnetic bilayer above the critical temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, R. M. V.; Pereira, T. A. S.; Godoy, M.; de Arruda, A. S.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper we have studied the stabilization of the long-range order in (z ; x) -plane of two isotropic Heisenberg ferromagnetic monolayers coupled by a short-range exchange interaction (J⊥), by a long range dipole-dipole interactions and a magnetic field. We have applied a magnetic field along of the z-direction to study the thermodynamic properties above the critical temperature. The dispersion relation ω and the magnetization are given as function of dipolar anisotropy parameter defined as Ed =(gμ) 2 S /a3J∥ and for other Hamiltonian parameters, and they are calculated by the double-time Zubarev-Tyablikov Green's functions in the random-phase approximation (RPA). The results show that the system is unstable for values of Ed ≥ 0.012 with external magnetic field ranging between H /J∥ = 0 and 10-3. The instability appears for Ed larger then Edc = 0.0158 with H /J∥ = 10-5, Edc = 0.02885 with H /J∥ = 10-4, and Edc = 0.115 with H /J∥ = 10-3, i.e., a small magnetic field is sufficient to maintain the magnetic order in a greater range of the dipolar interaction.

  4. Including temperature in a wavefunction description of the dynamics of the quantum Rabi model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werther, Michael; Grossmann, Frank

    2018-01-01

    We present a wavefunction methodology to account for finite temperature initial conditions in the quantum Rabi model. The approach is based on the Davydov Ansatz together with a statistical sampling of the canonical harmonic oscillator initial density matrix. Equations of motion are gained from a variational principle and numerical results are compared to those of the thermal Hamiltonian approach. For a system consisting of a single spin and a single oscillator and for moderate coupling strength, we compare our new results with full quantum ones as well as with other Davydov-type results based on alternative sampling/summation strategies. All of these perform better than the ones based on the thermal Hamiltonian approach. The best agreement is shown by a Boltzmann weighting of individual eigenstate propagations. Extending this to a bath of many oscillators will, however, be very demanding numerically. The use of any one of the investigated stochastic sampling approaches will then be favorable.

  5. Ethnic variability in adiposity, thrifty phenotypes and cardiometabolic risk: addressing the full range of ethnicity, including those of mixed ethnicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, J C K

    2012-12-01

    Ethnic groups vary in cardiometabolic risk, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Several components of body composition variability (fat/lean ratio, fat distribution, lean mass composition and metabolism, and adipose tissue biology) are increasingly linked with cardiometabolic risk and vary substantially across ethnic groups. Constituents of lean mass are proposed to contribute to 'metabolic capacity', a generic trait favouring the maintenance of homeostasis. Adiposity is proposed to contribute to 'metabolic load', which at higher levels challenges metabolic homeostasis, elevating cardiometabolic risk. Ethnic differences in body composition, representing different load-capacity ratios, may therefore contribute to ethnic variability in cardiometabolic risk. Ecological and evolutionary factors potentially contributing to ethnic variability in body composition are explored. In contemporary populations, clinicians encounter an increasing range of ethnicity, along with many individuals of mixed-ethnic ancestry. Increasing understanding of the contribution of body composition to cardiometabolic risk may reduce the need to treat ethnic groups as qualitatively different. A conceptual model is proposed, treating insulin sensitivity and stroke risk as composite functions of body composition variables. Operationalizing this model may potentially improve the ability to assess cardiovascular risk across the full ethnicity spectrum, and to predict cardiometabolic consequences of excess weight gain. © 2012 The Author. obesity reviews © 2012 International Association for the Study of Obesity.

  6. Characterization of thermochromic VO2 (prepared at 250 °C) in a wide temperature range by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houska, J.; Kolenaty, D.; Rezek, J.; Vlcek, J.

    2017-11-01

    The paper deals with thermochromic VO2 prepared by reactive high-power impulse magnetron sputtering and characterized by spectroscopic ellipsometry. We focus on the dispersion of optical constants in a wide temperature range and on the transmittance predicted using the optical constants. While the thermochromic behavior of VO2 in itself has been reported previously (particularly above the room temperature, RT), in this paper we present (i) optical properties achieved at a low deposition temperature of 250 °C and without any substrate bias voltage (which dramatically increases the application potential of the coating) and (ii) changes of these properties not only above but also below RT (down to -30 °C). The properties include very low (for VO2) extinction coefficient at RT (0.10 at 550 nm), low transition temperature of around or even below 50 °C (compared to the frequently cited 68 °C) and high modulation of the predicted infrared transmittance (e.g. 39% at -30 °C, 30% at RT and 3.4% above the transition temperature at 2000 nm for a 100 nm thick coating on glass). The results are important for the design of thermochromic coatings, and pathways for their preparation under industry-friendly conditions, for various technological applications.

  7. Heat transfer mechanism with thin filaments including ceramic high temperature heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Kwan H.; Ahluwalia, Rajesh K.

    1994-01-01

    A radiative heat transfer mechanism in a furnace having burners through which pulverized coal and air are burned producing combustion gases and contaminants. A plurality of elongated conduits are positioned inside the furnace proximate to the burners generally parallel to the flow of combustion gases in the furnace. A plurality of thin filaments are inside each of the elongated hollow conduits, the filaments having diameters in the range of from about 1 micrometer to about 1,000 micrometers and having an infrared radiation cross-section sufficient to cause the filaments to heat upon exposure to infrared radiation. Blower mechanism is associated with the elongated conduits for limiting the amount of soot and ash which deposit on the conduits to preserve the radiative and convective transfer of heat energy from the combustion gases to the conduits.

  8. Standard test method for determination of reference temperature, to, for ferritic steels in the transition range

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of a reference temperature, To, which characterizes the fracture toughness of ferritic steels that experience onset of cleavage cracking at elastic, or elastic-plastic KJc instabilities, or both. The specific types of ferritic steels (3.2.1) covered are those with yield strengths ranging from 275 to 825 MPa (40 to 120 ksi) and weld metals, after stress-relief annealing, that have 10 % or less strength mismatch relative to that of the base metal. 1.2 The specimens covered are fatigue precracked single-edge notched bend bars, SE(B), and standard or disk-shaped compact tension specimens, C(T) or DC(T). A range of specimen sizes with proportional dimensions is recommended. The dimension on which the proportionality is based is specimen thickness. 1.3 Median KJc values tend to vary with the specimen type at a given test temperature, presumably due to constraint differences among the allowable test specimens in 1.2. The degree of KJc variability among specimen types i...

  9. Investigation of SiGe Heterojunction Bipolar Transistor over an Extreme Temperature Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimukovitch, A.; Sakalas, P.; Ramonas, M.; Schroter, M.; Jungemann, C.; Kraus, W.

    2009-04-01

    Dc, high frequency (hf) characteristics and noise of SiGe HBTs were investigated in a wide ambient temperature (T) range from 4 K to 423 K. SiGe HBTs with low emitter concentration (LEC) and trapezoidal Ge base doping were found good candidates for cryogenic applications. Both hydrodynamic (HD) device simulation and compact model (CM) HICUM show good agreement with experimental data in the temperature range of 300 K-423 K. The collector current did not show any leakage related to electric field assisted tunneling via traps in the base. Rapid decrease of transit frequency (fT) with T is explained in terms of the carrier delay distribution. Noise figure (NFmin) analysis reveals that the main noise contributors are related to collector current fluctuations (shot-like noise) and thermal noise in the base at high T. Base current fluctuations related noise becomes of importance only at high injection. Simulated diffusion noise distribution shows that collector terminal electronic noise originates at the emitter-base (BE) junction but not in base-collector (BC) junction area.

  10. Features of austenite formation in low-carbon steel upon heating in the intercritical temperature range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panov, D. O.; Smirnov, A. I.

    2017-11-01

    The features of austenite formation upon continuous heating of low-carbon steel at the rates of 90-0.15 K/s in the intercritical temperature range (ICTR) have been studied. It has been found that, in the initially high-tempered, initially quenched, and initially cold-deformed steel, the α → γ transition in the ICTR consists of three stages. The thermokinetic diagrams of the austenite formation with the indication of the positions of the critical points Ac 1 and Ac 3 and also of the temperature ranges of the development of each identified stage of the α → γ transformation have been constructed. A complex of structural studies has been carried out, and a scheme of the austenite formation upon continuous heating at a rate of 90 K/s in the ICTR for the initially high-tempered steel, initially quenched steel, and initially cold-deformed low-carbon steel has been suggested, which reflects all stages of this process.

  11. Performance of MEMS Silicon Oscillator, ASFLM1, under Wide Operating Temperature Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2008-01-01

    Over the last few years, MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems) resonator-based oscillators began to be offered as commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) parts by a few companies [1-2]. These quartz-free, miniature silicon devices could compete with the traditional crystal oscillators in providing the timing (clock function) for many digital and analog electronic circuits. They provide stable output frequency, offer great tolerance to shock and vibration, and are immune to electro-static discharge [1-2]. In addition, they are encapsulated in compact lead-free packages, cover a wide frequency range (1 MHz to 125 MHz), and are specified, depending on the grade, for extended temperature operation from -40 C to +85 C. The small size of the MEMS oscillators along with their reliability and thermal stability make them candidates for use in space exploration missions. Limited data, however, exist on the performance and reliability of these devices under operation in applications where extreme temperatures or thermal cycling swings, which are typical of space missions, are encountered. This report presents the results of the work obtained on the evaluation of an ABRACON Corporation MEMS silicon oscillator chip, type ASFLM1, under extreme temperatures.

  12. Diurnal temperature range and mortality in Urmia, the Northwest of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharafkhani, Rahim; Khanjani, Narges; Bakhtiari, Bahram; Jahani, Yunes; Entezar Mahdi, Rasool

    2017-10-01

    Diurnal Temperature Range (DTR) is a meteorological index which represents temperature variation within a day. This study assesses the impact of high and low values of DTR on mortality. Distributed Lag Non-linear Models combined with a quasi-Poisson regression model was used to assess the impact of DTR on cause, age and gender specific mortality, controlled for potential confounders such as long-term trend of daily mortality, day of week effect, holidays, mean temperature, humidity, wind speed and air pollutants. As the effect of DTR may vary between the hot season (from May to October) and cold season (from November to April of the next year), we conducted analyses separately for these two seasons. In high DTR values (all percentiles), the Cumulative Relative Risk (CRR) of Non-Accidental Death, Respiratory Death and Cardiovascular Death increased in the full year and hot season, and especially in lag (0-6) of the hot season. In the cold season and high DTR values (all percentiles), the CRR of Non-Accidental Death and Cardiovascular Death decreased, but the CRR of Respiratory Death increased. Although there was no clear significant effect in low DTR values. High values of DTR increase the risk of mortality, especially in the heat season, in Urmia, Iran. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The Diurnal Temperature Range for Europe - a Search for Cosmic Ray Forbush Decrease manifestations and the DTR periodicities

    CERN Document Server

    Erlykin, Anatoly D; 10.5402/2013/982539

    2012-01-01

    Following on previous work by others, which gave evidence for few-day changes in the European Diurnal Temperature Range (DTR) apparently correlated with Cosmic Ray Forbush Decreases, we have made an independent study. We find no positive evidence. An analysis has also been made of the Fourier components of the time series of the DTR value (taken as deviations from a +/-10 day running mean). Evidence for a number of interesting periods is found, including one at about 27 days, albeit with a variability with time. The same period of solar irradiance (particularly in the UV) is favoured as the explanation.

  14. Long-Range Order and Critical Scattering of Neutrons below the Transition Temperature in β-Brass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage; Dietrich, O.W.

    1967-01-01

    The temperature dependence of long-range order langPrang has been determined from the temperature variation of a superlattice Bragg reflection. The results fitted a power law langPrang prop (Tc-T)beta with Tc the critical temperature and beta = 0.305plusmn0.005, in agreement with the theoretical ...

  15. Vaporization of graphite in the temperature range of 4000 to 4500 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundell, J. H.; Dickey, R. R.

    1976-01-01

    The vaporization of graphite under intense laser radiation is considered both theoretically and experimentally. Under intense radiation, the mass-loss rate can be high enough to cause the flow in the laser plume to be supersonic. It is shown that under these conditions the vaporization process is coupled to the plume gasdynamics and the mass-loss rate for graphite is 62% of the free vaporization rate. Experimental results are presented for surface temperatures from 3985 to 4555 K and mass-loss rates from 0.56 to 27.0 g per sq cm sec. The results are used to determine the vapor pressure of graphite in a pressure range of 2 to 11 atm, and the values are shown to be in agreement with the JANAF vapor pressure curve.

  16. Radiative Vaporization of Graphite in the Temperature Range of 4000 to 4500 deg K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundell, John H.; Dickey, Robert R.

    1976-01-01

    The vaporization of graphite under intense laser radiation is considered both theoretically and experimentally. Under intense radiation, the mass-loss rate can be high enough to cause the flow in the laser plume to be supersonic. Under these conditions, the vaporization process is coupled to the plume gasdynamics. Experimental results are presented for surface temperatures of 3985 to 4555 K and mass-loss rates from 0.52 to 27.0 g/sq cm sec. The data are used to determine the vapor pressure of graphite in a range of 2 to 11 atm, and the results are shown to be in good agreement with the JANAF vapor pressure curve, if the vaporization coefficients are unity. The assumption of unity vaporization coefficients is shown to be reasonable by a comparison of the present results with other recent vapor pressure results for graphite.

  17. Relaxations in metallic glasses investigated by a broad frequency and temperature range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bedorf, Dennis; Koeppe, Thomas; Hachenberg, Joerg; Samwer, Konrad [I. Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Goettingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Goettingen (Germany); Kahl, Annelen [Keck Laboratories MS 138-78 Caltech, Pasadena CA 91125 (United States); Richert, Ranko [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Arizona State University, Tempe AZ 85287-1604 (United States)

    2007-07-01

    We are interested in glassy dynamics and the atomistic processes leading to different relaxations in amorphous materials. To measure the complex elastic constants, two mechanical spectroscopy techniques were employed. The use of a double-paddle-oscillator (DPO) provides sufficient sensitivity to investigate the loss of even thin films. A DPO is driven in eigenfrequency mode at 5.4 kHz and an amorphous metallic film (PdCuSi) is evaporated onto it and measured under UHV conditions. Cooling and heating enables measurements in a broad temperature range with different heating rates. To survey the elastic constants at higher frequencies, an ultrasonic spectroscopy technique in the MHz regime is used. The pulse-echo method is applied to a bulk metallic glass in order to obtain the shear modulus and attenuation by monitoring shear wave propagation. The results are discussed in the framework of the Cooperative Shear Model.

  18. The influence of diurnal temperature range on the incidence of respiratory syncytial virus in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onozuka, D

    2015-03-01

    The incidence of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) has been reported to exhibit seasonal variation. However, the impact of diurnal temperature range (DTR) on RSV has not been investigated. After acquiring data related to cases of RSV and weather parameters of DTR in Fukuoka, Japan, between 2006 and 2012, we used negative binomial generalized linear models and distributed lag nonlinear models to assess the possible relationship between DTR and RSV cases, adjusting for confounding factors. Our analysis revealed that the weekly number of RSV cases increased with a relative risk of 3·30 (95% confidence interval 1·65-6·60) for every 1°C increase in DTR. Our study provides quantitative evidence that the number of RSV cases increased significantly with increasing DTR. We suggest that preventive measures for limiting the spread of RSV should be considered during extended periods of high DTR.

  19. Diurnal temperature range and short-term mortality in large US communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Youn-Hee; Reid, Colleen E.; Mann, Jennifer K.; Jerrett, Michael; Kim, Ho

    2015-09-01

    Research has shown that diurnal temperature range (DTR) is significantly associated with mortality and morbidity in regions of Asia; however, few studies have been conducted in other regions such as North America. Thus, we examined DTR effects on mortality in the USA. We used mortality and environmental data from the National Morbidity Mortality Air Pollution Study (NMMAPS). The data are daily mortality, air pollution, and temperature statistics from 95 large US communities collected between 1987 and 2000. To assess community-specific DTR effects on mortality, we used Poisson generalized linear models allowing for over-dispersion. After assessing community-specific DTR effects on mortality, we estimated region- and age-specific effects of DTR using two-level normal independent sampling estimation. We found a significant increase of 0.27 % [95 % confidence intervals (CI), 0.24-0.30 %] in nonaccidental mortality across 95 communities in the USA associated with a 1 °C increase in DTR, controlling for apparent temperature, day of the week, and time trend. This overall effect was driven mainly by effects of DTR on cardiovascular and respiratory mortality in the elderly: Mortality in the above 65 age group increased by 0.39 % (95 % CI, 0.33-0.44 %) and 0.33 % (95 % CI, 0.22-0.44 %), respectively. We found some evidence of regional differences in the effects of DTR on nonaccidental mortality with the highest effects in Southern California [0.31 % (95 % CI, 0.21-0.42 %)] and smallest effects in the Northwest and Upper Midwest regions [0.22 % (95 % CI, 0.11-0.33 %) and 0.22 % (95 % CI, 0.07-0.37 %), respectively]. These results indicate a statistically significant association between DTR and mortality on average for 95 large US communities. The findings indicate that DTR impacts on nonaccidental and cardiovascular-related mortality in most US regions and the elderly population was most vulnerable to the effects of DTR.

  20. Assessment of Operation of EMK21 MEMS Silicon Oscillator Over Wide Temperature Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2009-01-01

    Electronic control systems, data-acquisition instrumentation, and microprocessors require accurate timing signals for proper operation. Traditionally, ceramic resonators and crystal oscillators provided this clock function for the majority of these systems. Over the last few years, MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems) resonator-based oscillators began to surface as commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) parts by a few companies. These quartz-free, miniature silicon devices could easily replace the traditional crystal oscillators in providing the timing/clock function for many digital and analog circuits. They are reported to provide stable output frequency, offer great tolerance to shock and vibration, and are immune to electro-static discharge [ 1-2]. In addition, they are encapsulated in compact lead-free packages and cover a wide frequency range (1 MHz to 125 MHz). The small size of the MEMS oscillators along with their thermal stability make them ideal candidates for use in space exploration missions. Limited data, however, exist on the performance and reliability of these devices under operation in applications where extreme temperatures or thermal cycling swings, which are typical of space missions, are encountered. This report presents the results of the work obtained on the evaluation of an Ecliptek Corporation MEMS silicon oscillator chip under extreme temperatures.

  1. Diurnal temperature range as a novel risk factor for sudden infant death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Chen; Zhou, WenHao; Gui, YongHao; Kan, HaiDong

    2011-10-01

    To assess the relationship between diurnal temperature range (DTR) and sudden infant death (SID) between 2001 and 2004 in Shanghai, China. We conducted a time-stratified case-crossover analysis to estimate the percent increase of SID associated with changes in DTR after adjustment for daily weather conditions (temperature and relative humidity) and outdoor air pollution. DTR was significantly associated with daily SID. An increase of 1 °C in the current-day (L0) and in the 2-day moving average (L01) DTR corresponds to a 1.56% (95% CI: 0.97%, 2.15%) and a 1.89% (95% CI: 1.17%, 2.60%) increase in SID, respectively. An increased DTR was associated with an increased risk of SID in Shanghai. More studies are needed to understand the effect of DTR on infant deaths. Copyright © 2011 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Global climate change: impact of diurnal temperature range on mortality in Guangzhou, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jun; Liu, Hua-Zhang; Ou, Chun-Quan; Lin, Guo-Zhen; Zhou, Qin; Shen, Gi-Chuan; Chen, Ping-Yan; Guo, Yuming

    2013-04-01

    Diurnal temperature range (DTR) is an important meteorological indicator associated with global climate change, but little is known about the effects of DTR on mortality. We examined the effects of DTR on cause-/age-/education-specific mortality in Guangzhou, a subtropical city in China during 2003-2010. A quasi-Poisson regression model combined with distributed lag non-linear model was used to examine the effects of DTR, after controlling for daily mean temperature, air pollutants, season and day of the week. A 1 °C increase in DTR at lag 0-4 days was associated with a 0.47% (95% confidence interval: 0.01%-0.93%) increase in non-accidental mortality. Stroke mortality was most sensitive to DTR. Female, the elderly and those with low education were more susceptible to DTR than male, the youth and those with high education, respectively. Our findings suggest that vulnerable subpopulations should pay more attention to protect themselves from unstable daily weather. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Lagged effect of diurnal temperature range on mortality in a subtropical megacity of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yuan; Zhang, Yonghui; Liu, Tao; Rutherford, Shannon; Xu, Yanjun; Xu, Xiaojun; Wu, Wei; Xiao, Jianpeng; Zeng, Weilin; Chu, Cordia; Ma, Wenjun

    2013-01-01

    Many studies have found extreme temperature can increase the risk of mortality. However, it is not clear whether extreme diurnal temperature range (DTR) is associated with daily disease-specific mortality, and how season might modify any association. To better understand the acute effect of DTR on mortality and identify whether season is a modifier of the DTR effect. The distributed lag nonlinear model (DLNM) was applied to assess the non-linear and delayed effects of DTR on deaths (non-accidental mortality (NAD), cardiovascular disease (CVD), respiratory disease (RD) and cerebrovascular disease (CBD)) in the full year, the cold season and the warm season. A non-linear relationship was consistently found between extreme DTR and mortality. Immediate effects of extreme low DTR on all types of mortality were stronger than those of extreme high DTR in the full year. The cumulative effects of extreme DTRs increased with the increment of lag days for all types of mortality in cold season, and they were greater for extreme high DTRs than those of extreme low DTRs. In hot season, the cumulative effects for extreme low DTRs increased with the increment of lag days, but for extreme high DTR they reached maxima at a lag of 13 days for all types of mortality except for CBD(at lag6 days), and then decreased. Our findings suggest that extreme DTR is an independent risk factor of daily mortality, and season is a modifier of the association of DTR with daily mortality.

  4. Definition of the strain-stress distribution of porous glass in the retarded cooling temperature range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grushko Irina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The estimation of the strain-stress distribution (SSD of porous glass (foamed slag glass, FSG is assessed by annealing temperature curves according to the given values of the thermomechanical and thermophysical properties of porous glass, which are in correlation with the properties data of the host glass and its structure. When calculating cooling processes (cooling rate of porous glass products, the A.N. Dauvalter's formula, which takes into account only the stresses arising from the safe product cooling, but does not take into account those that remained there to the cooling start point, is usually used. The cooling rate in the interval of the annealing zone itself should be sufficiently low so that residual stresses, arising after they pass it, have small values. Since methods, that make it possible to determine the residual stresses that appear in the porous glass after passing through the initial annealing zone, are currently poorly developed, numerical simulation methods should be used to determine the porous glass SSD under the influence of thermal loads. Numerical study of the strain-stress distribution of porous glass allowing for thermal loads in the annealing temperature range was carried out in the Ansys Workbench software package.

  5. Density and Phonon-Stiffness Anomalies of Water and Ice in the Full Temperature Range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chang Q; Zhang, Xi; Fu, Xiaojian; Zheng, Weitao; Kuo, Jer-Lai; Zhou, Yichun; Shen, Zexiang; Zhou, Ji

    2013-10-03

    The specific-heat difference between the O:H van der Waals bond and the H-O polar-covalent bond and the Coulomb repulsion between electron pairs on adjacent oxygen atoms determine the angle-length-stiffness relaxation dynamics of the hydrogen bond (O:H-O), which is responsible for the density and phonon-stiffness oscillation of water ice over the full temperature range. Cooling shortens and stiffens the part of relatively lower specific-heat, and meanwhile lengthens and softens the other part of the O:H-O bond via repulsion. Length contraction/elongation of a specific part always stiffens/softens its corresponding phonon. In the liquid and in the solid phase, the O:H bond contracts more than the H-O elongates, hence, an O:H-O cooling contraction and the seemingly "regular" process of cooling densification take place. During freezing, the H-O contracts less than the O:H elongates, leading to an O:H-O elongation and volume expansion. At extremely low temperatures, the O:H-O angle stretching lowers the density slightly as the O:H and the H-O lengths change insignificantly. In ice, the O-O distance is longer than it is in water, resulting in a lower density, so that ice floats.

  6. Thermodynamic and Transport Properties of Real Air Plasma in Wide Range of Temperature and Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunlin; Wu, Yi; Chen, Zhexin; Yang, Fei; Feng, Ying; Rong, Mingzhe; Zhang, Hantian

    2016-07-01

    Air plasma has been widely applied in industrial manufacture. In this paper, both dry and humid air plasmas' thermodynamic and transport properties are calculated in temperature 300-100000 K and pressure 0.1-100 atm. To build a more precise model of real air plasma, over 70 species are considered for composition. Two different methods, the Gibbs free energy minimization method and the mass action law method, are used to determinate the composition of the air plasma in a different temperature range. For the transport coefficients, the simplified Chapman-Enskog method developed by Devoto has been applied using the most recent collision integrals. It is found that the presence of CO2 has almost no effect on the properties of air plasma. The influence of H2O can be ignored except in low pressure air plasma, in which the saturated vapor pressure is relatively high. The results will serve as credible inputs for computational simulation of air plasma. supported by the National Key Basic Research Program of China (973 Program)(No. 2015CB251002), National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51521065, 51577145), the Science and Technology Project Funds of the Grid State Corporation (SGTYHT/13-JS-177), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, and State Grid Corporation Project (GY71-14-004)

  7. The Effect of a Pre-Lens Aperture on the Temperature Range and Image Uniformity of Microbolometer Infrared Cameras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton [ORNL; Parris, Larkin S. [Wichita State University; Lindal, John M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Kunc, Vlastimil [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores the temperature range extension of long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) cameras by placing an aperture in front of the lens. An aperture smaller than the lens will reduce the radiance to the sensor, allowing the camera to image targets much hotter than typically allowable. These higher temperatures were accurately determined after developing a correction factor which was applied to the built-in temperature calibration. The relationship between aperture diameter and temperature range is linear. The effect of pre-lens apertures on the image uniformity is a form of anti-vignetting, meaning the corners appear brighter (hotter) than the rest of the image. An example of using this technique to measure temperatures of high melting point polymers during 3D printing provide valuable information of the time required for the weld-line temperature to fall below the glass transition temperature.

  8. Modeling and Simulation of - and Silicon Germanium-Base Bipolar Transistors Operating at a Wide Range of Temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaheed, M. Reaz

    1995-01-01

    to provide consistently accurate values for base sheet resistance for both Si- and SiGe-base transistors over a wide range of temperatures. A model for plasma-induced bandgap narrowing suitable for implementation in a numerical simulator has been developed. The appropriate method of incorporating this model in a drift -diffusion solver is described. The importance of including this model for low temperature simulation is demonstrated. With these models in place, the enhanced simulator has been used for evaluating and designing the Si- and SiGe-base bipolar transistors. Silicon-germanium heterojunction bipolar transistors offer significant performance and cost advantages over conventional technologies in the production of integrated circuits for communications, computer and transportation applications. Their high frequency performance at low cost, will find widespread use in the currently exploding wireless communication market. However, the high performance SiGe-base transistors are prone to have a low common-emitter breakdown voltage. In this dissertation, a modification in the collector design is proposed for improving the breakdown voltage without sacrificing the high frequency performance. A comprehensive simulation study of p-n-p SiGe-base transistors has been performed. Different figures of merit such as drive current, current gain, cut -off frequency and Early voltage were compared between a graded germanium profile and an abrupt germanium profile. The differences in the performance level between the two profiles diminishes as the base width is scaled down.

  9. Lagged effect of diurnal temperature range on mortality in a subtropical megacity of China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Luo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many studies have found extreme temperature can increase the risk of mortality. However, it is not clear whether extreme diurnal temperature range (DTR is associated with daily disease-specific mortality, and how season might modify any association. OBJECTIVES: To better understand the acute effect of DTR on mortality and identify whether season is a modifier of the DTR effect. METHODS: The distributed lag nonlinear model (DLNM was applied to assess the non-linear and delayed effects of DTR on deaths (non-accidental mortality (NAD, cardiovascular disease (CVD, respiratory disease (RD and cerebrovascular disease (CBD in the full year, the cold season and the warm season. RESULTS: A non-linear relationship was consistently found between extreme DTR and mortality. Immediate effects of extreme low DTR on all types of mortality were stronger than those of extreme high DTR in the full year. The cumulative effects of extreme DTRs increased with the increment of lag days for all types of mortality in cold season, and they were greater for extreme high DTRs than those of extreme low DTRs. In hot season, the cumulative effects for extreme low DTRs increased with the increment of lag days, but for extreme high DTR they reached maxima at a lag of 13 days for all types of mortality except for CBD(at lag6 days, and then decreased. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that extreme DTR is an independent risk factor of daily mortality, and season is a modifier of the association of DTR with daily mortality.

  10. Acute effects of diurnal temperature range on mortality in 8 Chinese cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaodan; Zhao, Ang; Meng, Xia; Chen, Renjie; Kuang, Xingya; Duan, Xiaoli; Kan, Haidong

    2014-09-15

    Diurnal temperature range (DTR) is a meteorological indicator closely associated with global climate change. There have been no multicity studies in China addressing the DTR-related health impact. We hypothesized that an increase of DTR is associated with higher daily mortality with a potential lag of effect, and investigated the acute effects of DTR on total, cardiovascular, and respiratory mortality in 8 large Chinese cities from 2001 to 2010. We first calculated city-specific effect of DTR in the full year, the cool season (November to the next April) and the warm season (May to October) separately using a semi-parametric generalized additive model; then we pooled the city-specific estimates with meta analysis. After adjusting for long-term and seasonal trends, temperature, relative humidity and air pollution levels, we found statistically significant associations between DTR and daily mortality, especially in cool seasons. A 1 °C increment of DTR on lag-day 1 corresponded to a 0.42% (95% CI, 0.14 to 0.70) increase in total non-accidental mortality, 0.45% (95% CI, 0.26 to 0.65) increase in cardiovascular mortality, and a 0.76% (95% CI, 0.24 to 1.29) increase in respiratory mortality in cool seasons. Deaths among females and elderly (≥ 65 years) were more strongly associated with DTR than among males and younger people (DTR is a potential trigger for death in China. Our findings may have important implications for the climate policies in the country. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Temperature-driven range expansion of an irruptive insect heightened by weakly coevolved plant defenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffa, Kenneth F; Powell, Erinn N; Townsend, Philip A

    2013-02-05

    Warming climate has increased access of native bark beetles to high-elevation pines that historically received only intermittent exposure to these tree-killing herbivores. Here we show that a dominant, relatively naïve, high-elevation species, whitebark pine, has inferior defenses against mountain pine beetle compared with its historical lower-elevation host, lodgepole pine. Lodgepole pines respond by exuding more resin and accumulating higher concentrations of toxic monoterpenes than whitebark pine, where they co-occur. Furthermore, the chemical composition of whitebark pine appears less able to inhibit the pheromonal communication beetles use to jointly overcome tree defenses. Despite whitebark pine's inferior defenses, beetles were more likely to attack their historical host in mixed stands. This finding suggests there has been insufficient sustained contact for beetles to alter their complex behavioral mechanisms driving host preference. In no-choice assays, however, beetles readily entered and tunneled in both hosts equally, and in stands containing less lodgepole pine, attacks on whitebark pines increased. High-elevation trees in pure stands may thus be particularly vulnerable to temperature-driven range expansions. Predators and competitors were more attracted to volatiles from herbivores attacking their historical host, further increasing risk in less coevolved systems. Our results suggest cold temperatures provided a sufficient barrier against herbivores for high-elevation trees to allocate resources to other physiological processes besides defense. Changing climate may reduce the viability of that evolutionary strategy, and the life histories of high-elevation trees seem unlikely to foster rapid counter adaptation. Consequences extend from reduced food supplies for endangered grizzly bears to altered landscape and hydrological processes.

  12. Differential responses of invasive and native plants to warming with simulated changes in diurnal temperature ranges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bao-Ming; Gao, Yang; Liao, Hui-Xuan; Peng, Shao-Lin

    2017-07-01

    Although many studies have documented the effects of global warming on invasive plants, little is known about whether the effects of warming on plant invasion differ depending on the imposed change in different diurnal temperature ranges (DTR). We tested the impact of warming with DTR change on seed germination and seedling growth of eight species in the family Asteraceae. Four of these are invasive (Eupatorium catarium, Mikania micrantha, Biodens pilosa var. radiate, Ageratum conyzoides) in China, and four are native (Sonchus arvensis, Senecios candens, Pterocypsela indica, Eupatorium fortunei). Four temperature treatments were set in growth chambers (three warming by 3 °C with different DTRs and control), and experiments were run to mimic wintertime and summertime conditions. The control treatment (Tc ) was set to the mean temperature for the corresponding time of year, and the three warming treatments were symmetric (i.e. equal night-and-day) (DTRsym), asymmetric warming with increased (DTRinc) and decreased (DTRdec) DTR. The warming treatments did not affect seed germination of invasive species under any of the conditions, but DTRsym and DTRinc increased seed germination of natives relative to the control, suggesting that warming may not increase success of these invasive plant species via effects on seed germination of invasive plants relative to native plants. The invasive plants had higher biomass and greater stem allocation than the native ones under all of the warming treatments. Wintertime warming increased the biomass of the invasive and wintertime DTRsym and DTRinc increased that of the native plants, whereas summertime asymmetric warming decreased the biomass of the invasives but not the natives. Therefore, warming may not facilitate invasion of these invasive species due to the suppressive effects of summertime warming (particularly the asymmetric warming) on growth. Compared with DTRsym, DTRdec decreased the biomass of both the invasive and native

  13. Shallow subsurface temperature surveys in the basin and range province, U.S.A.-I. Review and evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmsted, F.H.; Welch, A.H.; Ingebritsen, S.E.

    1986-01-01

    Temperature surveys at depths of 1-2 m have had varying success in geothermal exploration in the Basin and Range province. The most successful surveys have identified patterns of near-surface thermal-fluid flow within areas of less than 2 km2. Results have been less consistent in larger areas where zones of hydrothermal upflow are less well known, nongeothermal perturbing factors are significant and lateral variations in shallow subsurface temperature are small. Nongeothermal perturbations can be minimized by use of mean annual temperatures instead of synoptic temperatures, by physically based simulation of ground temperatures or by statistical modeling. ?? 1986.

  14. Determination of melting temperature and temperature melting range for DNA with multi-peak differential melting curves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lando, Dmitri Y; Fridman, Alexander S; Chang, Chun-Ling; Grigoryan, Inessa E; Galyuk, Elena N; Murashko, Oleg N; Chen, Chun-Chung; Hu, Chin-Kun

    2015-06-15

    Many factors that change the temperature position and interval of the DNA helix-coil transition often also alter the shape of multi-peak differential melting curves (DMCs). For DNAs with a multi-peak DMC, there is no agreement on the most useful definition for the melting temperature, Tm, and temperature melting width, ΔT, of the entire DNA transition. Changes in Tm and ΔT can reflect unstable variation of the shape of the DMC as well as alterations in DNA thermal stability and heterogeneity. Here, experiments and computer modeling for DNA multi-peak DMCs varying under different factors allowed testing of several methods of defining Tm and ΔT. Indeed, some of the methods give unreasonable "jagged" Tm and ΔT dependences on varying relative concentration of DNA chemical modifications (rb), [Na(+)], and GC content. At the same time, Tm determined as the helix-coil transition average temperature, and ΔT, which is proportional to the average absolute temperature deviation from this temperature, are suitable to characterize multi-peak DMCs. They give smoothly varying theoretical and experimental dependences of Tm and ΔT on rb, [Na(+)], and GC content. For multi-peak DMCs, Tm value determined in this way is the closest to the thermodynamic melting temperature (the helix-coil transition enthalpy/entropy ratio). Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Improved Models and Tools for Prediction of Radiation Effects on Space Electronics in Wide Temperature Range Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — All NASA exploration systems operate in the extreme environments of space and require reliable electronics capable of handling a wide temperature range (-180:C to...

  16. Diurnal Temperature Range in Relation to Daily Mortality and Years of Life Lost in Wuhan, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunquan; Yu, Chuanhua; Yang, Jin; Zhang, Lan; Cui, Fangfang

    2017-08-08

    Diurnal temperature range (DTR) is an important meteorological indicator associated with global climate change, and has been linked with mortality and morbidity in previous studies. To date, however, little evidence has been available regarding the association of DTR with years of life lost (YLL). This study aimed to evaluate the DTR-related burden on both YLL and mortality. We collected individual records of all registered deaths and daily meteorological data in Wuhan, central China, between 2009 and 2012. For the whole population, every 1 °C increase in DTR at a lag of 0-1 days was associated with an increase of 0.65% (95% CI: 0.08-1.23) and 1.42 years (-0.88-3.72) for mortality and YLL due to non-accidental deaths, respectively. Relatively stronger DTR-mortality/YLL associations were found for cardiovascular deaths. Subgroup analyses (stratified by gender, age, and education level) showed that females, the elderly (75+ years old), and those with higher education attainment (7+ years) suffered more significantly from both increased YLL and mortality due to large DTR. Our study added additional evidence that short-term exposure to large DTR was associated with increased burden of premature death using both mortality incidence and YLL.

  17. Mortality burden of diurnal temperature range and its temporal changes: A multi-country study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Whanhee; Bell, Michelle L; Gasparrini, Antonio; Armstrong, Ben G; Sera, Francesco; Hwang, Sunghee; Lavigne, Eric; Zanobetti, Antonella; Coelho, Micheline de Sousa Zanotti Stagliorio; Saldiva, Paulo Hilario Nascimento; Osorio, Samuel; Tobias, Aurelio; Zeka, Ariana; Goodman, Patrick G; Forsberg, Bertil; Rocklöv, Joacim; Hashizume, Masahiro; Honda, Yasushi; Guo, Yue-Liang Leon; Seposo, Xerxes; Van Dung, Do; Dang, Tran Ngoc; Tong, Shilu; Guo, Yuming; Kim, Ho

    2018-01-01

    Although diurnal temperature range (DTR) is a key index of climate change, few studies have reported the health burden of DTR and its temporal changes at a multi-country scale. Therefore, we assessed the attributable risk fraction of DTR on mortality and its temporal variations in a multi-country data set. We collected time-series data covering mortality and weather variables from 308 cities in 10 countries from 1972 to 2013. The temporal change in DTR-related mortality was estimated for each city with a time-varying distributed lag model. Estimates for each city were pooled using a multivariate meta-analysis. The results showed that the attributable fraction of total mortality to DTR was 2.5% (95% eCI: 2.3-2.7%) over the entire study period. In all countries, the attributable fraction increased from 2.4% (2.1-2.7%) to 2.7% (2.4-2.9%) between the first and last study years. This study found that DTR has significantly contributed to mortality in all the countries studied, and this attributable fraction has significantly increased over time in the USA, the UK, Spain, and South Korea. Therefore, because the health burden of DTR is not likely to reduce in the near future, countermeasures are needed to alleviate its impact on human health. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Rapid annealing of severely deformed low carbon steel in subcritical temperature range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiabakloo, H.; Kazeminezhad, M.

    2017-09-01

    A low-carbon steel sheet containing 0.05 C, 0.203 Mn, and 0.0229 Si (all in wt%) was rapidly annealed in a temperature range of 300 °C to 600 °C after severe plastic deformation by using constrained groove pressing (CGP) technique. Microstructure evolution was investigated by scanning electron and optical microscopes. Mechanical properties were evaluated by hardness measurements and shear punch test. The results showed a thermal stability up to 400 °C where recrystallization did not occur in the specimens even after 7200 s. This thermal stability is in agreement with previously reported results of conventional annealing of the same steel after CGP. However, annealing at 500 °C and 600 °C led to recrystallization which started after holding times of 600 s and 20 s, respectively. Longer holding times resulted to grain growth and deterioration of strength and hardness, but the final strength and hardness were still higher than those of conventionally annealed specimens. The reason has been attributed to no abnormal grain growth in the present study, in contrast to that occurs after conventional annealing of CGPed low carbon steel. The kinetics of recrystallization at 600 °C was studied using the celebrated Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov (JMAK) model; the results showed a bi-linear JMAK plot indicating two different stages of recrystallization rate before and after 70% recrystallization.

  19. Parametrization of the average ionization and radiative cooling rates of carbon plasmas in a wide range of density and temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Gil de la Fe, Juan Miguel; Rodriguez Perez, Rafael; Florido, Ricardo; Garcia Rubiano, Jesus; Mendoza, M. A.; Nuez, A. de la; Espinosa, G.; Martel Escobar, Carlos; Mínguez Torres, Emilio

    2013-01-01

    In this work we present an analysis of the influence of the thermodynamic regime on the monochromatic emissivity, the radiative power loss and the radiative cooling rate for optically thin carbon plasmas over a wide range of electron temperature and density assuming steady state situations. Furthermore, we propose analytical expressions depending on the electron density and temperature for the average ionization and cooling rate based on polynomial fittings which are valid for the whole range...

  20. A long-range and long-life telemetry data-acquisition system for heart rate and multiple body temperatures from free-ranging animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, G. F.; Westbrook, R. M.; Fryer, T. B.; Miranda, R. F.

    1979-01-01

    The system includes an implantable transmitter, external receiver-retransmitter collar, and a microprocessor-controlled demodulator. The size of the implant is suitable for animals with body weights of a few kilograms or more; further size reduction of the implant is possible. The ECG is sensed by electrodes designed for internal telemetry and to reduce movement artifacts. The R-wave characteristics are then specifically selected to trigger a short radio frequency pulse. Temperatures are sensed at desired locations by thermistors and then, based on a heartbeat counter, transmitted intermittently via pulse interval modulation. This modulation scheme includes first and last calibration intervals for a reference by ratios with the temperature intervals to achieve good accuracy even over long periods. Pulse duration and pulse sequencing are used to discriminate between heart rate and temperature pulses as well as RF interference.

  1. Sensitivity-Improved Strain Sensor over a Large Range of Temperatures Using an Etched and Regenerated Fiber Bragg Grating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yupeng Wang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A sensitivity-improved fiber-optic strain sensor using an etched and regenerated fiber Bragg grating (ER-FBG suitable for a large range of temperature measurements has been proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The process of chemical etching (from 125 µm to 60 µm provides regenerated gratings (at a temperature of 680 °C with a stronger reflective intensity (from 43.7% to 69.8%, together with an improved and linear strain sensitivity (from 0.9 pm/με to 4.5 pm/με over a large temperature range (from room temperature to 800 °C, making it a useful strain sensor for high temperature environments.

  2. Wide Temperature Range Kinetics of Elementary Combustion Reactions for Army Models

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fontijn, Arthur

    2002-01-01

    The goals of this program are to provide accurate kinetic data on isolated elementary reactions at temperatures relevant to Army combustion models, particularly for propellant combustion dark zones...

  3. Germination of Winter Annual Grass Weeds under a Range of Temperatures and Water Potentials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scherner, Ananda; Melander, Bo; Jensen, Peter Kryger

    2017-01-01

    , and rattail fescue in multiple water potentials and temperature regimes. Temperature and water potential effects were similar between silky windgrass and rattail fescue, but differed from annual bluegrass. The three grass weeds were able to germinate under low water potential (−1.0 MPa), although water...... potentials ≤−0.25 MPa strongly delayed their germination. Silky windgrass and rattail fescue seeds were able to germinate at 1 C, while the minimum temperature for annual bluegrass germination was 5 C. Germination of silky windgrass and rattail fescue was very similar across temperature and water potentials...

  4. On the Trend of the Annual Mean, Maximum, and Minimum Temperature and the Diurnal Temperature Range in the Armagh Observatory, Northern Ireland, Dataset, 1844 -2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    Examined are the annual averages, 10-year moving averages, decadal averages, and sunspot cycle (SC) length averages of the mean, maximum, and minimum surface air temperatures and the diurnal temperature range (DTR) for the Armagh Observatory, Northern Ireland, during the interval 1844-2012. Strong upward trends are apparent in the Armagh surface-air temperatures (ASAT), while a strong downward trend is apparent in the DTR, especially when the ASAT data are averaged by decade or over individual SC lengths. The long-term decrease in the decadaland SC-averaged annual DTR occurs because the annual minimum temperatures have risen more quickly than the annual maximum temperatures. Estimates are given for the Armagh annual mean, maximum, and minimum temperatures and the DTR for the current decade (2010-2019) and SC24.

  5. Innovative use of Distributed Temperature Sensing and Meteorological Data to Understand Thermoregulation of Free-Ranging Howling Monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, F. I.; Vinyard, C. J.; Williams, S. H.; Hausner, M. B.; Tyler, S. W.; Glander, K.

    2011-12-01

    Temperature fluctuations are a major driver of change in natural habitats and influence the lifestyle of all organisms because temperature impacts molecular, physiological, and behavioral processes. However, there is a lack of understanding on how temperature affects metabolism, behavior, and ecology at the organismal level. Even though physiological responses to temperature fluctuations have been well documented in laboratory conditions, it has been challenging to collect the required environmental data to study thermoregulation of free-ranging mammals such as mantled howling monkeys (Alouatta palliata). Fortunately, recent advances in fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing (DTS) now permit the observation of temperature fields in the environment at scales ranging from millimeters to kilometers. This has opened an exciting opportunity for temperature monitoring at scales that were previously not feasible. This study addresses the main limitations of previous studies of primate behavior by integrating real-time environmental data with the behavior and physiological response of free-ranging primates. In this work, we present preliminary DTS data collected in a natural habitat of howling monkeys. Fiber-optic cables were hung between the ground and an elevation of approximately 15 m within the forest canopy, providing continuous profiles of temperature without any disturbance due to the animals and habitat. These measurements were integrated with conventional meteorological data and with the ambient temperature at the location of the animal, as well as with measurements of primate's subcutaneous and core body temperatures. These data will be utilized to determine how environmental conditions relate to primate behavioral and physiological responses in time and space. The methodologies used in this study provide tools to test theories of physiological thermoregulation of other free-ranging animals.

  6. The creation of high-temperature superconducting cables of megawatt range in Russia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sytnikov, V. E., E-mail: vsytnikov@gmail.com; Bemert, S. E.; Krivetsky, I. V.; Romashov, M. A. [JSC NTTs FSC EES (Russian Federation); Popov, D. A.; Fedotov, E. V.; Komandenko, O. V. [JSC Irkutskkabel (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    Urgent problems of the power industry in the 21st century require the creation of smart energy systems, providing a high effectiveness of generation, transmission, and consumption of electric power. Simultaneously, the requirements for controllability of power systems and ecological and resource-saving characteristics at all stages of production and distribution of electric power are increased. One of the decision methods of many problems of the power industry is the development of new high-efficiency electrical equipment for smart power systems based on superconducting technologies to ensure a qualitatively new level of functioning of the electric power industry. The intensive research and development of new types of electrical devices based on superconductors are being carried out in many industrialized advanced countries. Interest in such developments has especially increased in recent years owing to the discovery of so-called high-temperature superconductors (HTS) that do not require complicated and expensive cooling devices. Such devices can operate at cooling by inexpensive and easily accessible liquid nitrogen. Taking into account the obvious advantages of superconducting cable lines for the transmission of large power flows through an electrical network, as compared with conventional cables, the Federal Grid Company of Unified Energy System (JSC FGC UES) initiated a research and development program including the creation of superconducting HTS AC and DC cable lines. Two cable lines for the transmitted power of 50 MVA/MW at 20 kV were manufactured and tested within the framework of the program.

  7. The creation of high-temperature superconducting cables of megawatt range in Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sytnikov, V. E.; Bemert, S. E.; Krivetsky, I. V.; Romashov, M. A.; Popov, D. A.; Fedotov, E. V.; Komandenko, O. V.

    2015-12-01

    Urgent problems of the power industry in the 21st century require the creation of smart energy systems, providing a high effectiveness of generation, transmission, and consumption of electric power. Simultaneously, the requirements for controllability of power systems and ecological and resource-saving characteristics at all stages of production and distribution of electric power are increased. One of the decision methods of many problems of the power industry is the development of new high-efficiency electrical equipment for smart power systems based on superconducting technologies to ensure a qualitatively new level of functioning of the electric power industry. The intensive research and development of new types of electrical devices based on superconductors are being carried out in many industrialized advanced countries. Interest in such developments has especially increased in recent years owing to the discovery of so-called high-temperature superconductors (HTS) that do not require complicated and expensive cooling devices. Such devices can operate at cooling by inexpensive and easily accessible liquid nitrogen. Taking into account the obvious advantages of superconducting cable lines for the transmission of large power flows through an electrical network, as compared with conventional cables, the Federal Grid Company of Unified Energy System (JSC FGC UES) initiated a research and development program including the creation of superconducting HTS AC and DC cable lines. Two cable lines for the transmitted power of 50 MVA/MW at 20 kV were manufactured and tested within the framework of the program.

  8. Simulation of the dynamic fracture of ceramic materials based on ZrB2 in a wide temperature range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, A. Yu.; Skripnyak, E. G.; Skripnyak, V. V.; Vaganova, I. K.

    2017-12-01

    The damage kinetics and dynamic fracture of nanostructured ZrB2-based ceramics in a wide range of temperatures were studied by the numerical simulation method. 3D models taking into account the distribution of microvoids and inclusions were used for computer simulation of deformation and fracture of ZrB2-based ceramic materials. It was shown that the dynamic fracture of ZrB2-B4C nanocomposites is quasi-brittle in a wide temperature range. The failure is caused by microcrack nucleation and coalescence. The threshold failure stresses for ZrB2-B4C nanocomposites under compression in the strain rate range 10-3-106 s-1 and temperature range from 297 to 1673 K are predicted.

  9. Impacts of diurnal temperature range on ecosystem carbon balance: an experimental test in grassland mesocosms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, C. L.; Gregg, J. W.; Wilson, J. K.; Pangle, L. A.; Bailey, D.

    2009-12-01

    Although extensive research has determined ecosystem responses to equal increases in day and night temperatures, current temperature increases have generally been asymmetrical, with increases in minimum temperature (Tmin) exceeding increases in maximum temperature (Tmax), or vice versa, depending on location. We conducted an ecosystem warming experiment in a perennial grassland to determine the effects of asymmetrically elevated diel temperature profiles using precision climate-controlled sunlit environmental chambers. Asymmetrically warmed chambers (+5/+2°C, Tmin/Tmax) were compared with symmetrically warmed (+3.5°C continuously) and control chambers (ambient). We tested three alternative hypotheses comparing the carbon balance under symmetric (SYM) and asymmetric (ASYM) warming: H1) SYM ASYM, because warmer nights in the ASYM treatment increase respiration more then photosynthesis, reducing plant growth; H3) SYM = ASYM, due to a combination of effects. Results from the third growing season support H3, that carbon balance is the same under the two elevated diel temperature profiles. During the early part of the growing season, asymmetric warming resulted in higher nighttime respiratory losses than symmetric warming, but these greater loses were compensated by increased early morning photosynthesis. As a result, carbon balance was not different in the two warming treatments at daily time steps. Furthermore, declines in soil moisture over the growing season may have important modulating impacts on the temperature sensitivity of carbon fluxes. As soils dried, carbon fluxes became less sensitive to diel temperature fluctuations, and more similar in the symmetric and asymmetric treatments.

  10. Plant-soil feedback of native and range expanding plant species is insensitive to temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grunsven, van R.H.A.; Veenendaal, E.M.; Bezemer, T.M.; Putten, van der W.H.

    2010-01-01

    Temperature change affects many aboveground and belowground ecosystem processes. Here we investigate the effect of a 5°C temperature increase on plant–soil feedback. We compare plant species from a temperate climate region with immigrant plants that originate from warmer regions and have recently

  11. Wide Range Temperature Sensors Based on One-Dimensional Photonic Crystal with a Single Defect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Transmission characteristics of one-dimensional photonic crystal structure with a defect have been studied. Transfer matrix method has been employed to find the transmission spectra of the proposed structure. We consider a Si/air multilayer system and refractive index of Si layer has been taken as temperature dependent. As the refractive index of Si layer is a function of temperature of medium, so the central wavelength of the defect mode is a function of temperature. Variation in temperature causes the shifting of defect modes. It is found that the average change or shift in central wavelength of defect modes is 0.064 nm/K. This property can be exploited in the design of a temperature sensor.

  12. On the diurnal ranges of Sea Surface Temperature (SST) in the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper describes the variability in the diurnal range of SST in the north Indian Ocean using in situ measurements and tests the suitability of simple regression models in estimating the diurnal range.SST measurements obtained from 1556 drifting and 25 moored buoys were used to determine the diurnal range of SSTs.

  13. Temperature dependence of the ozone obsorption spectrum over the wavelength range 410 to 760 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkholder, James B.; Talukdar, Ranajit K.

    1994-01-01

    The ozone, O3, absorption cross sections between 410 and 760 nm, the Chappuis band, were measured at 220, 240, 260, and 280 K relative to that at room temperature using a diode array spectrometer. The measured cross sections varied very slightly, less than 1%, with decreasing temperature between 550 and 660 nm, near the peak of the Chappuis band. At wavelengths away from the peak, the absorption cross sections decreased with decreasing temperature; e.g., about 40% at 420 nm between 298 and 220 K. These results are compared with previous measurements and the impact on atmospheric measurements are discussed.

  14. Elastic precursor wave decay in shock-compressed aluminum over a wide range of temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Ryan A.

    2018-01-01

    The effect of temperature on the dynamic flow behavior of aluminum is considered in the context of precursor wave decay measurements and simulations. In this regard, a dislocation-based model of high-rate metal plasticity is brought into agreement with previous measurements of evolving wave profiles at 300 to 933 K, wherein the amplification of the precursor structure with temperature arises naturally from the dislocation mechanics treatment. The model suggests that the kinetics of inelastic flow and stress relaxation are governed primarily by phonon scattering and radiative damping (sound wave emission from dislocation cores), both of which intensify with temperature. The manifestation of these drag effects is linked to low dislocation density ahead of the precursor wave and the high mobility of dislocations in the face-centered cubic lattice. Simulations performed using other typical models of shock wave plasticity do not reproduce the observed temperature-dependence of elastic/plastic wave structure.

  15. The long-term trend in the diurnal temperature range over Asia and its natural and anthropogenic causes

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, L.; Li, Z.; X. Yang; Gong, H; Li, C; Xiong, A.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the causes of long-term temperature trends is at the core of climate change studies. Any observed trend can result from natural variability or anthropogenic influences or both. In the present study, we evaluated the performance of 18 climate models from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 on simulating the Asian diurnal temperature range (DTR) and explored the potential causes of the long-term trend in the DTR by examining the response of the DTR to natural forcing...

  16. Stress-induced rise in body temperature is repeatable in free-ranging Eastern chipmunks (Tamias striatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Careau, Vincent; Réale, Denis; Garant, Dany; Speakman, John R; Humphries, Murray M

    2012-04-01

    In response to handling or other acute stressors, most mammals, including humans, experience a temporary rise in body temperature (T(b)). Although this stress-induced rise in T(b) has been extensively studied on model organisms under controlled environments, individual variation in this interesting phenomenon has not been examined in the field. We investigated the stress-induced rise in T(b) in free-ranging eastern chipmunks (Tamias striatus) to determine first if it is repeatable. We predicted that the stress-induced rise in T(b) should be positively correlated to factors affecting heat production and heat dissipation, including ambient temperature (T(a)), body mass (M(b)), and field metabolic rate (FMR). Over two summers, we recorded both T(b) within the first minute of handling time (T(b1)) and after 5 min of handling time (T(b5)) 294 times on 140 individuals. The mean ∆T(b) (T(b5) - T(b1)) during this short interval was 0.30 ± 0.02°C, confirming that the stress-induced rise in T(b) occurs in chipmunks. Consistent differences among individuals accounted for 40% of the total variation in ∆T(b) (i.e. the stress-induced rise in T(b) is significantly repeatable). We also found that the stress-induced rise in T(b) was positively correlated to T(a), M(b), and mass-adjusted FMR. These results confirm that individuals consistently differ in their expression of the stress-induced rise in T(b) and that the extent of its expression is affected by factors related to heat production and dissipation. We highlight some research constraints and opportunities related to the integration of this laboratory paradigm into physiological and evolutionary ecology.

  17. HTP kinetics studies on isolated elementary combustion reactions over wide temperature ranges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontijn, A.; Adusei, G.Y.; Hranisavlevic, J.; Bajaj, P.N. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goals of this project are to provide accurate data on the temperature dependence of the kinetics of elementary combustion reactions, (i) for use by combustion modelers, and (ii) to gain a better fundamental understanding of, and hence predictive ability for, the chemistry involved. Experimental measurements are made mainly by using the pseudo-static HTP (high-temperature photochemistry) technique. While continuing rate coefficient measurements, further aspects of kinetics research are being explored. Thus, starting from the data obtained, a method for predicting the temperature dependence of rate coefficients of oxygen-atom olefin experiment and confirms the underlying mechanistic assumptions. Mechanistic information of another sort, i.e. by product analysis, has recently become accessible with the inauguration of our heated flow tube mass spectrometer facility; early results are reported here. HTP experiments designed to lead to measurements of product channels by resonance fluorescence have started.

  18. Broad-temperature range spectroscopy of the two-centre modular redox metalloprotein Desulfovibrio desulfuricans desulfoferrodoxin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Niels Højmark; Harnung, S.E.; Trabjerg, I.

    2003-01-01

    /VIS, MCD, CD, and EPR spectroscopy. The UV/VIS spectra of grey DFx at room temperature is characterised by broad charge transfer (CT) transitions associated with oxidised centre 1 (495 and 368 nm) and II (335 and 635 nm). The transitions are resolved at 78 K, substantiated by VT-MCD and -CD. The data offer...

  19. Influence of Strain Rate on Tensile Strength of Woven Geotextile in the Selected Range of Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stępień Sylwia

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Investigation of geosynthetics behaviour has been carried out for many years. Before using geosynthetics in practice, the standard laboratory tests had been carried out to determine basic mechanical parameters. In order to examine the tensile strength of the sample which extends at a constant strain rate, one should measure the value of the tensile force and strain. Note that geosynthetics work under different conditions of stretching and temperatures, which significantly reduce the strength of these materials. The paper presents results of the tensile test of geotextile at different strain rates and temperatures from 20 °C to 100 °C. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of temperature and strain rate on tensile strength and strain of the woven geotextile. The article presents the method of investigation and the results. The data obtained allowed us to assess the parameters of material which should be considered in the design of the load-bearing structures that work at temperatures up to 100 °C.

  20. Long-Range Forecasting of Surface Air Temperature and Precipitation for the Korean Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    from the southeast area and Pusan (the second largest city in South Korea). The volcanic island of Cheju-do is located in the southern portion of this...highest correlation magnitude is to the northeast of Madagascar in the Indian Ocean. 35 Correlation of sea surface temperatures (SSTs) for Dec

  1. Expanded Operational Temperature Range for Space Rated Li-Ion Batteries Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Quallion's response to this solicitation calls for expanding the nominal operation range of its space rated lithium ion cells, while maintaining their long life...

  2. Expanded Operational Temperature Range for Space Rated Li-Ion Batteries Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Quallion's Phase II proposal calls for expanding the nominal operation range of its space rated lithium ion cells, while maintaining their long life capabilities. To...

  3. Distance-including rigorous upper bounds and tight estimates for two-electron integrals over long- and short-range operators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Travis H.; Ochsenfeld, Christian

    2017-10-01

    We introduce both rigorous and non-rigorous distance-dependent integral estimates for four-center two-electron integrals derived from a distance-including Schwarz-type inequality. The estimates are even easier to implement than our so far most efficient distance-dependent estimates [S. A. Maurer et al., J. Chem. Phys. 136, 144107 (2012)] and, in addition, do not require well-separated charge-distributions. They are also applicable to a wide range of two-electron operators such as those found in explicitly correlated theories and in short-range hybrid density functionals. For two such operators with exponential distance decay [e-r12 and erfc (0.11 ṡr12 ) /r12], the rigorous bound is shown to be much tighter than the standard Schwarz estimate with virtually no error penalty. The non-rigorous estimate gives results very close to an exact screening for these operators and for the long-range 1/r12 operator, with errors that are completely controllable through the integral screening threshold. In addition, we present an alternative form of our non-rigorous bound that is particularly well-suited for improving the PreLinK method [J. Kussmann and C. Ochsenfeld, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 134114 (2013)] in the context of short-range exchange calculations.

  4. Calculation of the density of solutions (sunflower oil + n-hexane) over a wide range of temperatures and pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safarov, M. M.; Abdukhamidova, Z.

    1995-09-01

    We present the results from an experimental investigation of the density of the sunflower oil system as a function of the mass concentration of n-hexane in the ranges of temperatures T=290 520 K and pressures P=0.101 98.1 MPa. A method of hydrostatic weighing was used to measure the density of the solutions under study.

  5. Quantitative effect of temperature to the absorbance of aqueous glucose in wavelength range from 1200nm to 1700nm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Houxin; An, Lin; Chen, Wenliang; Xu, Kexin

    2005-09-05

    In this paper, to find the quantitative errors of aqueous glucose induced by the temperature change at every wave point ranging from 1200nm to 1700nm, the calibration curve is calculated and shown. During the measurement the temperature varies from 30 degrees to 40 degrees , at a 2 degrees interval, and aqueous glucose concentration ranges from 100mg/dL to 500mg/dL, at a interval of 100mg/dL. The absorption of aqueous glucose decreases with the increasing of temperature, also the absorbance decreases. In addition, only 1 degrees change in the temperature induces about -7x10-3 and -4x10-3 errors in the absorbance of the aqueous glucose at the wavelength of 1550nm, 1610nm respectively. So the examined result should be correct according to the data read from the calibration curve if the temperatures of modeling and measuring are not uniform. Using this method, the error caused by the temperature change can be reduced even eliminated.

  6. Single-ion polymer electrolyte membranes enable lithium-ion batteries with a broad operating temperature range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Weiwei; Zhang, Yunfeng; Li, Jing; Sun, Yubao; Cheng, Hansong

    2014-04-01

    Conductive processes involving lithium ions are analyzed in detail from a mechanistic perspective, and demonstrate that single ion polymeric electrolyte (SIPE) membranes can be used in lithium-ion batteries with a wide operating temperature range (25-80 °C) through systematic optimization of electrodes and electrode/electrolyte interfaces, in sharp contrast to other batteries equipped with SIPE membranes that display appreciable operability only at elevated temperatures (>60 °C). The performance is comparable to that of batteries using liquid electrolyte of inorganic salt, and the batteries exhibit excellent cycle life and rate performance. This significant widening of battery operation temperatures coupled with the inherent flexibility and robustness of the SIPE membranes makes it possible to develop thin and flexible Li-ion batteries for a broad range of applications. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Measurement of Ion Motional Heating Rates over a Range of Trap Frequencies and Temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Bruzewicz, C D; Chiaverini, J

    2014-01-01

    We present measurements of the motional heating rate of a trapped ion at different trap frequencies and temperatures between $\\sim$0.6 and 1.5 MHz and $\\sim$4 and 295 K. Additionally, we examine the possible effect of adsorbed surface contaminants with boiling points below $\\sim$105$^{\\circ}$C by measuring the ion heating rate before and after locally baking our ion trap chip under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. We compare the heating rates presented here to those calculated from available electric-field noise models. We can tightly constrain a subset of these models based on their expected frequency and temperature scaling interdependence. Discrepancies between the measured results and predicted values point to the need for refinement of theoretical noise models in order to more fully understand the mechanisms behind motional trapped-ion heating.

  8. Optical properties of bismuth-doped silica fibres in the temperature range 300 - 1500 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dvoretskii, D A; Bufetov, Igor' A; Vel' miskin, V V; Zlenko, Alexander S; Khopin, V F; Semjonov, S L; Guryanov, Aleksei N; Denisov, L K; Dianov, Evgenii M

    2012-09-30

    The visible and near-IR absorption and luminescence bands of bismuth-doped silica and germanosilicate fibres have been measured for the first time as a function of temperature. The temperature-dependent IR luminescence lifetime of a bismuth-related active centre associated with silicon in the germanosilicate fibre has been determined. The Bi{sup 3+} profile across the silica fibre preform is shown to differ markedly from the distribution of IR-emitting bismuth centres associated with silicon. The present results strongly suggest that the IR-emitting bismuth centre comprises a lowvalence bismuth ion and an oxygen-deficient glass network defect. (optical fibres, lasers and amplifiers. properties and applications)

  9. Response of a continuous anaerobic digester to temperature transitions: A critical range for restructuring the microbial community structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jaai; Lee, Changsoo

    2016-02-01

    Temperature is a crucial factor that significantly influences the microbial activity and so the methanation performance of an anaerobic digestion (AD) process. Therefore, how to control the operating temperature for optimal activity of the microbes involved is a key to stable AD. This study examined the response of a continuous anaerobic reactor to a series of temperature shifts over a wide range of 35-65 °C using a dairy-processing byproduct as model wastewater. During the long-term experiment for approximately 16 months, the reactor was subjected to stepwise temperature increases by 5 °C at a fixed HRT of 15 days. The reactor showed stable performance within the temperature range of 35-45 °C, with the methane production rate and yield being maximum at 45 °C (18% and 26% greater, respectively, than at 35 °C). However, the subsequent increase to 50 °C induced a sudden performance deterioration with a complete cessation of methane recovery, indicating that the temperature range between 45 °C and 50 °C had a critical impact on the transition of the reactor's methanogenic activity from mesophilic to thermophilic. This serious process perturbation was associated with a severe restructuring of the reactor microbial community structure, particularly of methanogens, quantitatively as well as qualitatively. Once restored by interrupted feeding for about two months, the reactor maintained fairly stable performance under thermophilic conditions until it was upset again at 65 °C. Interestingly, in contrast to most previous reports, hydrogenotrophs largely dominated the methanogen community at mesophilic temperatures while acetotrophs emerged as a major group at thermophilic temperature. This implies that the primary methanogenesis route of the reactor shifted from hydrogen- to acetate-utilizing pathways with the temperature shifts from mesophilic to thermophilic temperatures. Our observations suggest that a mesophilic digester may not need to be cooled at up

  10. Application potential of thermoelectric power generation in the high-temperature range; Anwendungspotential der thermoelektrischen Stromerzeugung im Hochtemperaturbereich

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froehlich, K.; Eisenhut, Ch.; Bitschi, A.

    2009-01-15

    This final report for the Swiss Office of Energy (SFOE) discusses the potential offered by thermo-electrical electricity generation. New, efficient materials, especially in the high temperature range above 150 {sup o}C, are discussed. Various relevant scenarios of thermoelectric power generation systems have been evaluated and compared with conventional energy conversion technologies. It is noted that with today's materials the utilisation of thermoelectric generators for high temperature applications is not competitive. The advances of material science promise the availability of significantly improved materials in medium term. It is noted that thermoelectric power generation has the potential to convert low-temperature and high-temperature thermal energy into electrical power in an efficient and competitive way

  11. Hysteresis and Instability in Some IPRT Sensors Within Temperature Ranges Extending from -196 ^{circ }\\hbox {C} to 150 ^{circ }\\hbox {C}

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusby, R. L.; Machin, D.

    2017-08-01

    Industrial platinum resistance thermometer (IPRT) sensors or probes suffer from some instability on cycling over significant ranges of temperature and, specifically, from hysteresis in which the resistance tends to follow different paths for increasing temperatures compared with decreasing temperatures. The effect is well known, and cases of quite large hysteresis have been reported in the literature. Therefore, in establishing calibration and measurement capabilities for IPRT calibrations it is important to include an assessment of the performance which can be expected of a `typical good' IPRT and to include this in the overall uncertainty which the laboratory can expect to achieve in such calibrations, even though the effect itself is outside the laboratory's control. This paper presents results which have been obtained in cycling IPRT probes from four sources within various temperature ranges of current interest at NPL, between -196 ^{circ }\\hbox {C} and 150 ^{circ }\\hbox {C}, to see what levels of hysteresis may be expected. The cycles were carried out quite quickly in order to detect the hysteresis before it was mitigated by relaxation effects, but the time dependence was not itself studied. In most cases, hysteresis was {<}0.0025 ^{circ }\\hbox {C} between 0 ^{circ }\\hbox {C} and 100 ^{circ }\\hbox {C}, and {<}0.0035 ^{circ }\\hbox {C} when the range extended down to -80 ^{circ }\\hbox {C} or up to 150 ^{circ }\\hbox {C}. Greater instability occurred when the sensors were cooled to -196 ^{circ }\\hbox {C}.

  12. Temperature- and frequency-dependent dielectric properties of biological tissues within the temperature and frequency ranges typically used for magnetic resonance imaging-guided focused ultrasound surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Fanrui; Xin, Sherman Xuegang; Chen, Wufan

    2014-02-01

    This study aimed to obtain the temperature- and frequency-dependent dielectric properties of tissues subjected to magnetic resonance (MR) scanning for MR imaging-guided focused ultrasound surgery (MRgFUS). These variables are necessary to calculate radio frequency electromagnetic fields distribution and specific radio frequency energy absorption rate (SAR) in the healthy tissues surrounding the target tumours, and their variation may affect the efficacy of advanced RF pulses. The dielectric properties of porcine uterus, liver, kidney, urinary bladder, skeletal muscle, and fat were determined using an open-ended coaxial probe method. The temperature range was set from 36 °C to 60 °C; and the frequencies were set at 42.58 (1 T), 64 (1.5 T), 128 (3 T), 170 (4 T), 298 (7 T), 400 (9 T), and 468 MHz (11 T). Within the temperature and frequency ranges, the dielectric constants were listed as follows: uterus 49.6-121.64, liver 44.81-127.68, kidney 37.3-169.26, bladder 42.43-125.95, muscle 58.62-171.7, and fat 9.2327-20.2295. The following conductivities were obtained at the same temperature and frequency ranges: uterus 0.5506-1.4419, liver 0.5174-0.9709, kidney 0.8061-1.3625, bladder 0.6766-1.1817, muscle 0.8983-1.3083, and fat 0.1552-0.2316. The obtained data are consistent with the temperature and frequency ranges typically used in MRgFUS and thus can be used as reference to calculate radio frequency electromagnetic fields and SAR distribution inside the healthy tissues subjected to MR scanning for MRgFUS.

  13. Genotype effects on body temperature in dairy cows under grazing conditions in a hot climate including evidence for heterosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikmen, S.; Martins, L.; Pontes, E.; Hansen, P. J.

    2009-07-01

    We compared diurnal patterns of vaginal temperature in lactating cows under grazing conditions to evaluate genotype effects on body temperature regulation. Genotypes evaluated were Holstein, Jersey, Jersey × Holstein and Swedish Red × Holstein. The comparison of Holstein and Jersey versus Jersey × Holstein provided a test of whether heterosis effects body temperature regulation. Cows were fitted with intravaginal temperature recording devices that measured vaginal temperature every 15 min for 7 days. Vaginal temperature was affected by time of day ( P Holstein had a different pattern of vaginal temperatures than the other three genotypes (Swedish Red × Holstein vs others × time; P Holstein and Jersey had a different pattern than Jersey × Holstein [(Holstein + Jersey vs Jersey × Holstein) × time, P Holstein had a similar pattern to Jersey [(Holstein vs Jersey) × time, P > 0.10]. These genotype × time interactions reflect two effects. First, Swedish Red × Holstein had higher vaginal temperatures than the other genotypes in the late morning and afternoon but not after the evening milking. Secondly, Jersey × Holstein had lower vaginal temperatures than other genotypes in the late morning and afternoon and again in the late night and early morning. Results point out that there are effects of specific genotypes and evidence for heterosis on regulation of body temperature of lactating cows maintained under grazing conditions and suggest that genetic improvement for thermotolerance through breed choice or genetic selection is possible.

  14. Data Transfer for Multiple Sensor Networks Over a Broad Temperature Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasowski, Michael

    2013-01-01

    At extreme temperatures, cryogenic and over 300 C, few electronic components are available to support intelligent data transfer over a common, linear combining medium. This innovation allows many sensors to operate on the same wire bus (or on the same airwaves or optical channel: any linearly combining medium), transmitting simultaneously, but individually recoverable at a node in a cooler part of the test area. This innovation has been demonstrated using room-temperature silicon microcircuits as proxy. The microcircuits have analog functionality comparable to componentry designed using silicon carbide. Given a common, linearly combining medium, multiple sending units may transmit information simultaneously. A listening node, using various techniques, can pick out the signal from a single sender, if it has unique qualities, e.g. a voice. The problem being solved is commonly referred to as the cocktail party problem. The human brain uses the cocktail party effect when it is able to recognize and follow a single conversation in a party full of talkers and other noise sources. High-temperature sensors have been used in silicon carbide electronic oscillator circuits. The frequency of the oscillator changes as a function of the changes in the sensed parameter, such as pressure. This change is analogous to changes in the pitch of a person s voice. The output of this oscillator and many others may be superimposed onto a single medium. This medium may be the power lines supplying current to the sensors, a third wire dedicated to data transmission, the airwaves through radio transmission, an optical medium, etc. However, with nothing to distinguish the identities of each source that is, the source separation this system is useless. Using digital electronic functions, unique codes or patterns are created and used to modulate the output of the sensor.

  15. Temperature Range for Metasomatism at the Bakalskoe Siderite Deposits with Use of Geochemical Data

    OpenAIRE

    M. T. Krupenin

    2017-01-01

    The data obtained with the quantitative microprobe ankerite–siderite composition analysis of seven samples from the different parts of Bakalskoe field showed that the wallrock ankerites in the western and central parts of the ore field differ in average concentrations of FeCO 3 (respectively 14.21 and 20.84 wt.%). However, there is no significant difference in composition of siderites. The calculation of the Mg-Fe metasomatism temperatures based on ankerite-siderite and ankerite-breinerite ge...

  16. Variable- and fixed-point blackbody sources developed at VNIIOFI for precision measurements in radiometry and thermometry within 100K-3500K temperature range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapritsky, V. I.; Khlevnoy, B. B.; Ogarev, S. A.; Privalsky, V. E.; Samoylov, M. L.; Sakharov, M. K.; Bourdakin, A. A.; Panfilov, A. S.

    2006-09-01

    The demands of modern radiation thermometry and radiometry are being satisfied by a large variety of high-precision unique BB sources (both fixed-point and variable temperature) designed for a wide range of temperature from 100 K to 3500 K. The paper contains a detailed review of low-, medium- and high-temperature precision blackbodies developed at VNIIOFI as the basis of the spectral radiance and irradiance calibration devices in the rank of National standards. The blackbodies include: 1) variable-temperature (100K..1000K) research-grade extended-area (up to 100 mm) models intended to perform radiometric calibrations by comparison with a primary standard source, as well as can be used as the sources for high-accuracy IR calibration of space-borne and other systems not requiring a vacuum environment; 2) low-temperature fixed-point blackbodies on the basis of phase transitions of pure metals such as In and Ga sources, and the metal-metal eutectics operating within the medium-temperature range (300K to 400K); these are used for pyrometric measurements, IR-radiometry, preflight and (future aspects) in-flight calibration of space borne IR instruments; 3) high-temperature wide aperture variable-temperature blackbodies (1800K to 3500K) such as BB3500MP, BB3500YY designed and fabricated, along with fixed-point cells working above the ITS-90 temperatures on the basis of phase transitions of metal-carbon eutectic alloys (Re-C, TiC-C, ZrC-C, HfC-C), which possess unique reproducibility of 0.1% or less.

  17. Global cold curve. New representation for zero-temperature isotherm in whole density range

    CERN Document Server

    Iosilevskiy, Igor

    2014-01-01

    Non-standard representation for so-called "cold curve" of matter (i.e. isotherm $T = 0$) is proposed as Global Cold Curve (GCC). The main point is that chemical potential of substance, $\\mu$, plays role of ruling parameter in basic GCC-dependence of internal energy under compression, $U = U(\\mu)$, in contrast to the standard form $U = U(\\rho)$. This substitution changes radically low-density ("gaseous") part of GCC. Namely: ($i$) - physically meaningless part of standard cold curve $(U(\\rho)$ at $T \\rightarrow 0)$ disappears totally from new version of GCC. This deleted part corresponded to absolutely thermodynamically unstable states in standard representation $U(\\rho)$; ($ii$) - new gaseous branch of cold curve, $U = U(\\mu)$, comes in GCC. It describes in simple, schematic way thermodynamics of whole gas-like plasma in low-temperature limit (Iosilevskiy: arXiv:0902.3708) as combination of all ionization and dissociation processes available for equilibrium plasma at finite temperature. This gaseous branch co...

  18. One year in the life of Bufo punctatus: annual patterns of body temperature in a free-ranging desert anuran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rausch, Candice M.; Starkweather, Peter L.; van Breukelen, Frank

    2008-06-01

    The Mojave Desert is characterized by hot dry summers and cold winters. The red-spotted toad ( Bufo ( Anaxyrus) punctatus) is the predominant anuran species; yet little is known of their thermal histories and strategies to avoid temperature extremes. We measured body temperature ( T b) in free-ranging adult toads across all four seasons of a year using implanted data loggers. There is marked individual variation in the temperatures experienced by these toads. As expected, toads generally escape extreme seasonal and diel temperature fluctuations. However, our data demonstrate a much wider estimated T b range than was previously assumed. Though often for short periods, red-spotted toads do experience T b as low as 3.1°C and as high as 39.1°C. All animals showed periods of prolonged thermal stability in cooler months and wider diel oscillations in warmer months. Red-spotted toad thermal history is likely a function of site choice; the exploitation of different refuges results in diverse thermal experiences. These data represent the most complete record of thermal experiences for a desert anuran and reveal greater extremes in body temperature than previously suggested.

  19. Water sorption properties of Dutch type semi-hard cheese edge in the range of common storing temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Carolina Soares Pereira

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Moisture sorption isotherms of Dutch type semi-hard cheese edge in the temperature range of 10–25 ºC and water activity (Aw from 0.11 to 0.98 were determined using manometric method. The sorption curves had a sigmoid shape. The equilibrium moisture content (EMC of cheese samples increased with an increase in Aw at a constant temperature both for water adsorption and desorption. An increase in temperature caused an increase in Aw for the same moisture content (MC and, if Aw was kept constant, an increase in temperature caused a decrease in the amount of absorbed water. Critical values of equilibrium moisture content, corresponding to the Aw = 0.6, were between 11 % MC (w.b. and 17 % MC (w.b. both for moisture adsorption and desorption. Values of sorption heat were calculated from moisture sorption isotherms by applying the Clausius-Clapeyron equation. Values of the heat of desorption are higher than those of adsorption and the difference increases with the MC decrease. Heat of sorption decreased from 48.5 kJ/mol (~5.5 % MC w.b. to the values approaching the heat of vaporization of pure water, free MC. The critical value for free water evaporation is about w = 27 % (w.b. for the range of temperature 10–25 ºC.

  20. Tribological behavior and self-healing functionality of TiNbCN-Ag coatings in wide temperature range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondarev, A. V.; Kiryukhantsev-Korneev, Ph. V.; Levashov, E. A.; Shtansky, D. V.

    2017-02-01

    Ag- and Nb-doped TiCN coatings with about 2 at.% of Nb and Ag contents varied between 4.0 and 15.1 at.% were designed as promising materials for tribological applications in a wide temperature range. We report on the structure, mechanical, and tribological properties of TiNbCN-Ag coatings fabricated by simultaneous co-sputtering of TiC0.5 + 10%Nb2C and Ag targets in comparison with those of Ag-free coating. The tribological characteristics were evaluated during constant-temperature tests both at room temperature and 300 °C, as well as during dynamic temperature ramp tests in the range of 25-700 °C. The coating structure and elemental composition were studied by means of X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy. The coating microstructures and elemental compositions inside wear tracks, as well as the wear products, were examined by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. We demonstrate that simultaneous alloying with Nb and Ag permits to overcome the main drawbacks of TiCN coatings such as their relatively high values of friction coefficient at elevated temperatures and low oxidation resistance. It is shown that a relatively high amount of Ag (15 at.%) is required to provide enhanced tribological behavior in a wide temperature range of 25-700 °C. In addition, the prepared Ag-doped coatings demonstrated active oxidation protection and self-healing functionality due to the segregation of Ag metallic particles in damage areas such as cracks, pin-holes, or oxidation sites.

  1. High energy storage density over a broad temperature range in sodium bismuth titanate-based lead-free ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haibo; Yan, Fei; Lin, Ying; Wang, Tong; Wang, Fen

    2017-08-18

    A series of (1-x)Bi0.48La0.02Na0.48Li0.02Ti0.98Zr0.02O3-xNa0.73Bi0.09NbO3 ((1-x)LLBNTZ-xNBN) (x = 0-0.14) ceramics were designed and fabricated using the conventional solid-state sintering method. The phase structure, microstructure, dielectric, ferroelectric and energy storage properties of the ceramics were systematically investigated. The results indicate that the addition of Na0.73Bi0.09NbO3 (NBN) could decrease the remnant polarization (P r ) and improve the temperature stability of dielectric constant obviously. The working temperature range satisfying TCC 150 °C ≤±15% of this work spans over 400 °C with the compositions of x ≥ 0.06. The maximum energy storage density can be obtained for the sample with x = 0.10 at room temperature, with an energy storage density of 2.04 J/cm(3) at 178 kV/cm. In addition, the (1-x)LLBNTZ-xNBN ceramics exhibit excellent energy storage properties over a wide temperature range from room temperature to 90 °C. The values of energy storage density and energy storage efficiency is 0.91 J/cm(3) and 79.51%, respectively, for the 0.90LLBNTZ-0.10NBN ceramic at the condition of 100 kV/cm and 90 °C. It can be concluded that the (1-x)LLBNTZ-xNBN ceramics are promising lead-free candidate materials for energy storage devices over a broad temperature range.

  2. The mechanical behavior and reliability prediction of the HTR graphite component at various temperature and neutron dose ranges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Xiang; Yu, Suyuan [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Wang, Haitao, E-mail: wanght@tsinghua.edu.cn [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Li, Chenfeng [Civil and Computational Engineering Centre, College of Engineering, Swansea University, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • The mechanical behavior of graphite component in HTRs under high temperature and neutron irradiation conditions is simulated. • The computational process of mechanical analysis is introduced. • Deformation, stresses and failure probability of the graphite component are obtained and discussed. • Various temperature and neutron dose ranges are selected in order to investigate the effect of in-core conditions on the results. - Abstract: In a pebble-bed high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTR), nuclear graphite serves as the main structural material of the side reflectors. The reactor core is made up of a large number of graphite bricks. In the normal operation case of the reactor, the maximum temperature of the helium coolant commonly reaches about 750 °C. After around 30 years’ full power operation, the peak value of in-core fast neutron cumulative dose reaches to 1 × 10{sup 22}n cm{sup −2} (EDN). Such high temperature and neutron irradiation strongly impact the behavior of graphite component, causing obvious deformation. The temperature and neutron dose are unevenly distributed inside a graphite brick, resulting in stress concentrations. The deformation and stress concentration can both greatly affect safety and reliability of the graphite component. In addition, most of the graphite properties (such as Young's modulus and coefficient of thermal expansion) change remarkably under high temperature and neutron irradiations. The irradiation-induced creep also plays a very important role during the whole process, and provides a significant impact on the stress accumulation. In order to simulate the behavior of graphite component under various in-core conditions, all of the above factors must be considered carefully. In this paper, the deformation, stress distribution and failure probability of a side graphite component are studied at various temperature points and neutron dose levels. 400 °C, 500 °C, 600 °C and 750 °C are selected

  3. Tribological behavior and self-healing functionality of TiNbCN-Ag coatings in wide temperature range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bondarev, A.V., E-mail: abondarev88@gmail.com; Kiryukhantsev-Korneev, Ph.V.; Levashov, E.A.; Shtansky, D.V., E-mail: shtansky@shs.misis.ru

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • TiNbCN–Ag coatings for wide temperature range tribological applications. • Alloying with Nb and Ag improve tribological properties and oxidation resistance. • Ag-rich TiNbCN coatings show friction coefficient below 0.45 in range of 25–700 °C. • Ag-doped coatings show active oxidation protection and self-healing functionality. - Abstract: Ag- and Nb-doped TiCN coatings with about 2 at.% of Nb and Ag contents varied between 4.0 and 15.1 at.% were designed as promising materials for tribological applications in a wide temperature range. We report on the structure, mechanical, and tribological properties of TiNbCN-Ag coatings fabricated by simultaneous co-sputtering of TiC{sub 0.5} + 10%Nb{sub 2}C and Ag targets in comparison with those of Ag-free coating. The tribological characteristics were evaluated during constant-temperature tests both at room temperature and 300 °C, as well as during dynamic temperature ramp tests in the range of 25–700 °C. The coating structure and elemental composition were studied by means of X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy. The coating microstructures and elemental compositions inside wear tracks, as well as the wear products, were examined by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. We demonstrate that simultaneous alloying with Nb and Ag permits to overcome the main drawbacks of TiCN coatings such as their relatively high values of friction coefficient at elevated temperatures and low oxidation resistance. It is shown that a relatively high amount of Ag (15 at.%) is required to provide enhanced tribological behavior in a wide temperature range of 25–700 °C. In addition, the prepared Ag-doped coatings demonstrated active oxidation protection and self-healing functionality due to the segregation of Ag metallic particles in damage areas such as cracks, pin-holes, or oxidation sites.

  4. The assessment of the age of scleractinian coral species (Anthozoa: Scleractinia) based on the temperature ranges of their habitat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Os'kina, N. S.; Keller, N. B.; Nikolaev, S. D.

    2010-12-01

    Until now, the age of deep-water scleractinians was determined based only on rare finds of these corals in terrestrial sequences, which constitute <10% of their known diversity. Inasmuch as most of the non-zooxanthellate coral species dwell in the ocean beyond the shelf zone (up to the abyssal depths) and their fossil remains are missing from terrestrial sections, we propose a new approach to the assessment of their age based on paleoecological features: the seawater temperatures in the geological past and the habitat temperature ranges established for 53 coral species. The study confirmed our previous assumption concerning the very young age of the deep-water fauna.

  5. The response of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) subjected to large strains, high strain rates, high pressures, a range in temperatures, and variations in the intermediate principal stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmquist, T. J.; Bradley, J.; Dwivedi, A.; Casem, D.

    2016-05-01

    This article presents the response of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) subjected to large strains, high strain rates, high pressures, a range in temperatures, and variations in the intermediate principal stress. Laboratory data from the literature, and new test data provided here, are used in the evaluation. The new data include uniaxial stress compression tests (at various strain rates and temperatures) and uniaxial stress tension tests (at low strain rates and ambient temperatures). The compression tests include experiments at ˙ɛ = 13,000 s-1, significantly extending the range of known strain rate data. The observed behavior of PMMA includes the following: it is brittle in compression at high rates, and brittle in tension at all rates; strength is dependent on the pressure, strain, strain rate, temperature, and the intermediate principal stress; the shear modulus increases as the pressure increases; and it is highly compressible. Also presented are novel, high velocity impact tests (using high-speed imaging) that provide insight into the initiation and evolution of damage. Lastly, computational constitutive models for pressure, strength, and failure are presented that provide responses that are in good agreement with the laboratory data. The models are used to compute several ballistic impact events for which experimental data are available.

  6. Behaviour and modelling of aluminium alloy AA6060 subjected to a wide range of strain rates and temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilamosa Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermo-mechanical behaviour in tension of an as-cast and homogenized AA6060 alloy was investigated at a wide range of strains (the entire deformation process up to fracture, strain rates (0.01–750 s−1 and temperatures (20–350 ∘C. The tests at strain rates up to 1 s−1 were performed in a universal testing machine, while a split-Hopkinson tension bar (SHTB system was used for strain rates from 350 to 750 s−1. The samples were heated with an induction-based heating system. A typical feature of aluminium alloys at high temperatures is that necking occurs at a rather early stage of the deformation process. In order to determine the true stress-strain curve also after the onset of necking, all tests were instrumented with a digital camera. The experimental tests reveal that the AA6060 material has negligible strain-rate sensitivity (SRS for temperatures lower than 200 ∘C, while both yielding and work hardening exhibit a strong positive SRS at higher temperatures. The coupled strain-rate and temperature sensitivity is challenging to capture with most existing constitutive models. The paper presents an outline of a new semi-physical model that expresses the flow stress in terms of plastic strain, plastic strain rate and temperature. The parameters of the model were determined from the tests, and the stress-strain curves from the tests were compared with the predictions of the model. Good agreement was obtained over the entire strain rate and temperature range.

  7. Flow regime, temperature, and biotic interactions drive differential declines of trout species under climate change [includes Supporting Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seth J. Wenger; Daniel J. Isaak; Charlie Luce; Helen M. Neville; Kurt D. Fausch; Jason B. Dunham; Daniel C. Dauwalter; Michael K. Young; Marketa M. Elsner; Bruce E. Rieman; Alan F. Hamlet; Jack E. Williams

    2011-01-01

    Broad-scale studies of climate change effects on freshwater species have focused mainly on temperature, ignoring critical drivers such as flow regime and biotic interactions. We use downscaled outputs from general circulation models coupled with a hydrologic model to forecast the effects of altered flows and increased temperatures on four interacting species of trout...

  8. Flow behaviour of autoclaved, 20% cold worked, Zr-2.5Nb alloy pressure tube material in the temperature range of room temperature to 800 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dureja, A. K.; Sinha, S. K.; Srivastava, Ankit; Sinha, R. K.; Chakravartty, J. K.; Seshu, P.; Pawaskar, D. N.

    2011-05-01

    Pressure tube material of Indian Heavy Water Reactors is 20% cold-worked and stress relieved Zr-2.5Nb alloy. Inherent variability in the process parameters during the fabrication stages of pressure tube and also along the length of component have their effect on micro-structural and texture properties of the material, which in turn affect its strength parameters (yield strength and ultimate tensile strength) and flow characteristics. Data of tensile tests carried out in the temperature range from room temperature to 800 °C using the samples taken out from a single pressure tube have been used to develop correlations for characterizing the strength parameters' variation as a function of axial location along length of the tube and the test temperature. Applicability of Ramberg-Osgood, Holloman and Voce's correlations for defining the post yield behaviour of the material has been investigated. Effect of strain rate change on the deformation behaviour has also been studied.

  9. Water sorption isotherms of skimmed milk powder within the temperature range of 5–20 °C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitka Langová

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Moisture sorption isotherms (MSI’s of skimmed milk powder in the temperature range of 5–20 °C were determined using manometric method. MSI’s, which show the water content versus water activity (Aw at a constant temperature, are used to describe relationships between water content and equilibrium state relative vapour pressure (RVP. The equilibrium moisture content (EMC of skimmed milk powder samples is growing with an increase of Aw at a constant temperature both for water adsorption and desorption. Isotherms were found to be type II of Brunauer-Emmett-Teller classification. It is the type most common for foods. The shape of created isotherms was sigmoid. Structural modifications of crystals were observed during adsorption in the microscope, too. Critical value of EMC of tested samples corresponding to the Aw equal to 0.6 for adsorption was 6.50% MC (w.b. at temperature 5 °C, 9.15% MC (w.b. at temperature 10 °C, and 7.71% MC (w.b. at temperature 20 °C. These values determine optimal conditions for storage from the point of view microorganisms grow, Aw<0.6.

  10. Wide range instantaneous temperature measurements of convective fluid flows by using a schlieren system based in color images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-González, A.; Moreno-Hernández, D.; Monzón-Hernández, D.; León-Rodríguez, M.

    2017-06-01

    In the schlieren method, the deflection of light by the presence of an inhomogeneous medium is proportional to the gradient of its refractive index. Such deflection, in a schlieren system, is represented by light intensity variations on the observation plane. Then, for a digital camera, the intensity level registered by each pixel depends mainly on the variation of the medium refractive index and the status of the digital camera settings. Therefore, in this study, we regulate the intensity value of each pixel by controlling the camera settings such as exposure time, gamma and gain values in order to calibrate the image obtained to the actual temperature values of a particular medium. In our approach, we use a color digital camera. The images obtained with a color digital camera can be separated on three different color-channels. Each channel corresponds to red, green, and blue color, moreover, each one has its own sensitivity. The differences in sensitivity allow us to obtain a range of temperature values for each color channel. Thus, high, medium and low sensitivity correspond to green, blue, and red color channel respectively. Therefore, by adding up the temperature contribution of each color channel we obtain a wide range of temperature values. Hence, the basic idea in our approach to measure temperature, using a schlieren system, is to relate the intensity level of each pixel in a schlieren image to the corresponding knife-edge position measured at the exit focal plane of the system. Our approach was applied to the measurement of instantaneous temperature fields of the air convection caused by a heated rectangular metal plate and a candle flame. We found that for the metal plate temperature measurements only the green and blue color-channels were required to sense the entire phenomena. On the other hand, for the candle case, the three color-channels were needed to obtain a complete measurement of temperature. In our study, the candle temperature was took as

  11. Mangrove expansion and contraction at a poleward range limit: Climate extremes and land-ocean temperature gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osland, Michael J.; Day, Richard H.; Hall, Courtney T.; Brumfield, Marisa D; Dugas, Jason; Jones, William R.

    2017-01-01

    Within the context of climate change, there is a pressing need to better understand the ecological implications of changes in the frequency and intensity of climate extremes. Along subtropical coasts, less frequent and warmer freeze events are expected to permit freeze-sensitive mangrove forests to expand poleward and displace freeze-tolerant salt marshes. Here, our aim was to better understand the drivers of poleward mangrove migration by quantifying spatiotemporal patterns in mangrove range expansion and contraction across land-ocean temperature gradients. Our work was conducted in a freeze-sensitive mangrove-marsh transition zone that spans a land-ocean temperature gradient in one of the world's most wetland-rich regions (Mississippi River Deltaic Plain; Louisiana, USA). We used historical air temperature data (1893-2014), alternative future climate scenarios, and coastal wetland coverage data (1978-2011) to investigate spatiotemporal fluctuations and climate-wetland linkages. Our analyses indicate that changes in mangrove coverage have been controlled primarily by extreme freeze events (i.e., air temperatures below a threshold zone of -6.3 to -7.6 °C). We expect that in the past 121 years, mangrove range expansion and contraction has occurred across land-ocean temperature gradients. Mangrove resistance, resilience, and dominance were all highest in areas closer to the ocean where temperature extremes were buffered by large expanses of water and saturated soil. Under climate change, these areas will likely serve as local hotspots for mangrove dispersal, growth, range expansion, and displacement of salt marsh. Collectively, our results show that the frequency and intensity of freeze events across land-ocean temperature gradients greatly influences spatiotemporal patterns of range expansion and contraction of freeze-sensitive mangroves. We expect that, along subtropical coasts, similar processes govern the distribution and abundance of other freeze

  12. A high-pressure vessel for X-ray diffraction experiments for liquids in a wide temperature range

    CERN Document Server

    Hosokawa, S

    2001-01-01

    An internally heated high-pressure vessel was developed for angle-dispersive X-ray scattering experiments on liquids at high-temperatures and high-pressures. It consists of a closed-end Al cylinder and a steel flange. Continuous windows made of Be cover a scattering angle range up to 55 deg. In combination with a single-crystal sapphire cell and a small heating system inside the vessel, we were able to carry out diffraction measurements for liquids in a wide temperature range up to 2000 K at high pressures up to 150 bars. Some of our recent X-ray scattering experiments using synchrotron radiation, such as inelastic scattering, high-energy elastic scattering, and anomalous scattering, are also reported.

  13. Performance of a 100V Half-Bridge MOSFET Driver, Type MIC4103, Over a Wide Temperature Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    The operation of a high frequency, high voltage MOSFET (metal-oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors) driver was investigated over a wide temperature regime that extended beyond its specified range. The Micrel MIC4103 is a 100V, non-inverting, dual driver that is designed to independently drive both high-side and low-side N-channel MOSFETs. It features fast propagation delay times and can drive 1000 pF load with 10ns rise times and 6 ns fall times [1]. The device consumes very little power, has supply under-voltage protection, and is rated for a -40 C to +125 C junction temperature range. The floating high-side driver of the chip can sustain boost voltages up to 100 V. Table I shows some of the device manufacturer s specification.

  14. Synthesis and characterization of Cu-MFI catalyst for the direct medium temperature range NO decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valkaj Karolina Maduna

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study the physico-chemical and catalytic properties of copper bearing MFI zeolites (Cu-MFI with different Si/Al and Si/Cu ratios were investigated. Two different methods for incorporation of metal ions into the zeolite framework were used: the ion exchange from the solution of copper acetate and the direct hydrothermal synthesis. Direct synthesis of a zeolite in the presence of copper-phosphate complexes was expected to generate more active copper species necessary for the desired reaction than the conventional ion exchange method. Direct decomposition of NO was used as a model reaction, because this reaction still offers a very attractive approach to NOX removal. The catalytic properties of zeolite samples were studied using techniques, such as XRD, SEM, EPR and nitrogen adsorption/desorption measurements at 77 K. Results of the kinetic investigation revealed that both methods are applicable for the preparation of the catalysts with active sites capable of catalyzing the NO decomposition. It was found out that Cu-MFI zeolites obtained through direct synthesis are promising catalysts for NO decomposition, especially at lower reaction temperatures. The efficiency of the catalysts prepared by both methods is compared and discussed.

  15. Causes, prevention and correction of solar radiation induced temperature warpage of polyethylene Silhouette Rifle Range targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiner, L.R.

    1974-07-22

    A large proportion of plastics currently used in Army applications are exposed to the destructive influences of outdoor weather. Heat, cold, rain, sleet, ice, ultraviolet, infrared, ozone, oxygen, and a number of similar elements enter into a broad picture of gradual deterioration. Obvsiously, failure under environmental conditions is a critical factor limiting the use of polymeric compositions as engineering materials. Thus, determinations of these effects in advance is of a distinct economic advantage. The running of a test program over the long outdoor exposure period normally required is an unsupportable burden for many suppliers and an unacceptable delay for the military user. On the other hand, reliance on limited initial material property and appearance specification requirements (Appendix A) entails the risk of failure shown in photographs (figures 1 to 3) and described in detail (Appendix B)t. Other possible causative factors are improper design, material selection and process fabrication techniques. Steps leading to the selection and design of the 80 mii high density (linear) polyethylene to replace kneeling silhouette (E type) fiberboard targets are well documented (Ref 1 to 4) Comments regarding current difficulties have been furnished by both the target developer (Appendix c) and the raw material producer (Appendix D) Considering limitations of time and material furnished for this investigation, the most promising approach, at the time, was to determine material equivalency to Marlex 6ooi and the current extent of elevated temperature target warpage, its prevention, and corrective action to be applied to existing defective targets.

  16. Lead retention by broiler litter biochars in small arms range soil: impact of pyrolysis temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchimiya, Minori; Bannon, Desmond I; Wartelle, Lynda H; Lima, Isabel M; Klasson, K Thomas

    2012-05-23

    Phosphorus-rich manure biochar has a potential for stabilizing Pb and other heavy metal contaminants, as well as serving as a sterile fertilizer. In this study, broiler litter biochars produced at 350 and 650 °C were employed to understand how biochar's elemental composition (P, K, Ca, Mg, Na, Cu, Pb, Sb, and Zn) affects the extent of heavy metal stabilization. Soil incubation experiments were conducted using a sandy, slightly acidic (pH 6.11) Pb-contaminated (19906 mg kg(-1) total Pb primarily as PbCO(3)) small arms range (SAR) soil fraction (soils) and releasing P, K, Ca, and other plant nutrients in a sandy acidic soil.

  17. Impact of vegetation removal and soil aridation on diurnal temperature range in a semiarid region: Application to the Sahel

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Liming; Robert E. Dickinson; Tian, Yuhong; Vose, Russell S.; Dai, YongJiu

    2007-01-01

    Increased clouds and precipitation normally decrease the diurnal temperature range (DTR) and thus have commonly been offered as explanation for the trend of reduced DTR observed for many land areas over the last several decades. Observations show, however, that the DTR was reduced most in dry regions and especially in the West African Sahel during a period of unprecedented drought. Furthermore, the negative trend of DTR in the Sahel appears to have stopped and may have reversed after the rain...

  18. Predicting Success of Range-Expanding Coral Reef Fish in Temperate Habitats Using Temperature-Abundance Relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Booth

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available An 18-year database of coral reef fish expatriation poleward in South East Australia was used to estimate persistence of coal reef fish recruits on temperate reefs. Surveys have identified over 150 coral reef fish species recruiting to temperate reefs at latitudes of 34°S (Sydney and 60 species to 37°S (Merimbula with 20 and 5 species respectively overwintering in at least 1 year over the study duration. We developed indices of vulnerability of key species to drops in water temperatures, by relating drops in abundances of species to temperature drops. Twenty species were ranked according to their temperature vulnerability. Overall, the families Chaetodontidae (butterflyfishes, Acanthuridae (surgeonfishes, Labridae (wrasses and Pomacetnridae (damselfishes had similar cold-water tolerance. However, there was considerable variability within families, for instance in the Pomacentridae, species from the genus Abudefduf appeared to have better cold-temperature tolerance than the other species. Predicted minimum overwintering temperature varied from 15.6°C to 19.8°C, with some species showing lower Tzero at Merimbula, the more poleward location. There was general concordance between a species' tolerance to cold-water and its tendency to occur as an overwinter but also notable exceptions. So while this work demonstrates the potential utility of tolerance to seasonal temperature drops as a means to predict range expansion capacity of vagrant species, the exceptional cases serve to highlight alternative factors. Specifically, tolerance to seasonal cooling of water is not the only important factor when predicting the range expansion capacity of a species. Factors affecting the general abundance of the vagrants, such as habitat suitability and competitor/predator environments will also be critical where overwinter survival becomes a lottery.

  19. The correlation between dengue incidence and diurnal ranges of temperature of Colombo district, Sri Lanka 2005–2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. D. B. Ehelepola

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Meteorological factors affect dengue transmission. Mechanisms of the way in which different diurnal temperatures, ranging around different mean temperatures, influence dengue transmission were published after 2011. Objective: We endeavored to determine the correlation between dengue incidence and diurnal temperature ranges (DTRs in Colombo district, Sri Lanka, and to explore the possibilities of using our findings to improve control of dengue. Design: We calculated the weekly dengue incidence in Colombo during 2005–2014, after data on all of the reported dengue patients and estimated mid-year populations were collected. We obtained daily maximum and minimum temperatures from two Colombo weather stations, averaged, and converted them into weekly data. Weekly averages of DTR versus dengue incidence graphs were plotted and correlations observed. The count of days per week with a DTR of >7.5°C and 7.5°C with an 8-week lag period, and a positive correlation between dengue incidence and a DTR<7.5°C, also with an 8-week lag. Conclusions: Large DTRs were negatively correlated with dengue transmission in Colombo district. We propose to take advantage of that in local dengue control efforts. Our results agree with previous studies on the topic and with a mathematical model of relative vectorial capacity of Aedes aegypti. Global warming and declining DTR are likely to favor a rise of dengue, and we suggest a simple method to mitigate this.

  20. Design and fabrication of three-axis accelerometer sensor microsystem for wide temperature range applications using semi-custom process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merdassi, A.; Wang, Y.; Xereas, G.; Chodavarapu, V. P.

    2014-03-01

    This paper describes an integrated CMOS-MEMS inertial sensor microsystem, consisting of a 3-axis accelerometer sensor device and its complementary readout circuit, which is designed to operate over a wide temperature range from - 55°C to 175°C. The accelerometer device is based on capacitive transduction and is fabricated using PolyMUMPS, which is a commercial process available from MEMSCAP. The fabricated accelerometer device is then post-processed by depositing a layer of amorphous silicon carbide to form a composite sensor structure to improve its performance over an extended wide temperature range. We designed and fabricated a CMOS readout circuit in IBM 0.13μm process that interfaces with the accelerometer device to serve as a capacitance to voltage converter. The accelerometer device is designed to operate over a measurement range of +/-20g. The described sensor system allows low power, low cost and mass-producible implementation well suited for a variety of applications with harsh or wide temperature operating conditions.

  1. Improving the catalytic activity of hyperthermophilic Pyrococcus prolidases for detoxification of organophosphorus nerve agents over a broad range of temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theriot, Casey M; Du, Xuelian; Tove, Sherry R; Grunden, Amy M

    2010-08-01

    Prolidase isolated from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus has potential for application for decontamination of organophosphorus compounds in certain pesticides and chemical warfare agents under harsh conditions. However, current applications that use an enzyme-based cocktail are limited by poor long-term enzyme stability and low reactivity over a broad range of temperatures. To obtain a better enzyme for OP nerve agent decontamination and to investigate structural factors that influence protein thermostability and thermoactivity, randomly mutated P. furiosus prolidases were prepared by using XL1-red-based mutagenesis and error-prone PCR. An Escherichia coli strain JD1 (lambdaDE3) (auxotrophic for proline [DeltaproA] and having deletions in pepQ and pepP dipeptidases with specificity for proline-containing dipeptides) was constructed for screening mutant P. furiosus prolidase expression plasmids. JD1 (lambdaDE3) cells were transformed with mutated prolidase expression plasmids and plated on minimal media supplemented with 50 muM Leu-Pro as the only source of proline. By using this positive selection, Pyrococcus prolidase mutants with improved activity over a broader range of temperatures were isolated. The activities of the mutants over a broad temperature range were measured for both Xaa-Pro dipeptides and OP nerve agents, and the thermoactivity and thermostability of the mutants were determined.

  2. A Very Low Dark Current Temperature-Resistant, Wide Dynamic Range, Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor Image Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizobuchi, Koichi; Adachi, Satoru; Tejada, Jose; Oshikubo, Hiromichi; Akahane, Nana; Sugawa, Shigetoshi

    2008-07-01

    A very low dark current (VLDC) temperature-resistant approach which best suits a wide dynamic range (WDR) complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image sensor with a lateral over-flow integration capacitor (LOFIC) has been developed. By implementing a low electric field photodiode without a trade-off of full well-capacity, reduced plasma damage, re-crystallization, and termination of silicon-silicon dioxide interface states in the front end of line and back end of line (FEOL and BEOL) in a 0.18 µm, two polycrystalline silicon, three metal (2P3M) process, the dark current is reduced to 11 e-/s/pixel (0.35 e-/s/µm2: pixel area normalized) at 60 °C, which is the lowest value ever reported. For further robustness at low and high temperatures, 1/3-in., 5.6-µm pitch, 800×600 pixel sensor chips with low noise readout circuits designed for a signal and noise hold circuit and a programmable gain amplifier (PGA) have also been deposited with an inorganic cap layer on a micro-lens and covered with a metal hermetically sealed package assembly. Image sensing performance results in 2.4 e-rms temporal noise and 100 dB dynamic range (DR) with 237 ke- full well-capacity. The operating temperature range is extended from -40 to 85 °C while retaining good image quality.

  3. Active layer and permafrost properties, including snow depth, soil temperature, and soil moisture, Barrow, Alaska, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains soil temperature, soil moisture, thaw depth, and snow depth data collected at test sites near Barrow, Alaska, during the following years. Soil...

  4. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 410: Waste Disposal Trenches, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, Revision 0 (includes ROTCs 1, 2, and 3)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NNSA/NV

    2002-07-16

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 410 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 410 is located on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), which is included in the Nevada Test and Training Range (formerly the Nellis Air Force Range) approximately 140 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. This CAU is comprised of five Corrective Action Sites (CASs): TA-19-002-TAB2, Debris Mound; TA-21-003-TANL, Disposal Trench; TA-21-002-TAAL, Disposal Trench; 09-21-001-TA09, Disposal Trenches; 03-19-001, Waste Disposal Site. This CAU is being investigated because contaminants may be present in concentrations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and/or the environment, and waste may have been disposed of with out appropriate controls. Four out of five of these CASs are the result of weapons testing and disposal activities at the TTR, and they are grouped together for site closure based on the similarity of the sites (waste disposal sites and trenches). The fifth CAS, CAS 03-19-001, is a hydrocarbon spill related to activities in the area. This site is grouped with this CAU because of the location (TTR). Based on historical documentation and process know-ledge, vertical and lateral migration routes are possible for all CASs. Migration of contaminants may have occurred through transport by infiltration of precipitation through surface soil which serves as a driving force for downward migration of contaminants. Land-use scenarios limit future use of these CASs to industrial activities. The suspected contaminants of potential concern which have been identified are volatile organic compounds; semivolatile organic compounds; high explosives; radiological constituents including depleted

  5. EU-US evaluation of range extended electric vehicle performance at varying ambient temperatures

    OpenAIRE

    STUTENBERG KEVIN; GALASSI MARIA CRISTINA; OTURA GARCIA MARCOS; TRENTADUE GERMANA; SCHOLZ HARALD; CARRIERO MASSIMO; LOHSE-BUSCH H.

    2016-01-01

    The US DoE Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and the EC Joint Research Centre (JRC) collaborate to promote a common EU/US approach towards global harmonization of standards for e-mobility and smart grids, with a common work plan including pre-normative research on the energy efficiency of electric vehicles (EVs). The aim of this paper is to introduce the cooperative and complementary ANL-JRC activities focusing on chassis dynamometer testing of electrified vehicles. Within this research progr...

  6. Recent Variability of the Observed Diurnal Temperature Range in the Karakoram and its Surrounding Mountains of Northern Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahzad, M. I.; Waqas, A.; H, A.

    2016-12-01

    Spatial and temporal variability in the observed daily diurnal temperature range (DTR) for the recent 30-year period (1985-2015) is examined from a total of 17 stations in Hindukush Karakoram Himalaya region, Northern Pakistan (HKNP). Maximum temperature, minimum temperature and cloud cover data are used to establish possible relationship with regional DTR. The regional annual mean DTR (average of the 17 stations) is 13.59, with a maximum in autumn (14.99 °C) and minimum in winter (12.14 °C). The DTR in the HKNP increases with an annual rate of 0.03 °C decade-1 calculated by the Mann-Kendall method. This observed DTR trend is in clear contrast to the narrowing of DTR seen worldwide. Correlation analysis show that trend in DTR is primarily control by greater warming in maximum temperature and a slight cooling in minimum temperature in HKNP. Strong negative correlation is found between the DTR and observed cloud cover data in all seasons, indicating that variability in cloud cover have huge impact on the variation of DTR in this particular region. The statistically significant increasing trend of DTR along with decreasing trend of cloud cover explicitly in spring season suggests an early melt of snow and ice covers of the region, consequently change the hydrological cycle of the region demands better water resource managements in HKNP in coming years.

  7. Improvement of Surface Temperature Prediction Using SVR with MOGREPS Data for Short and Medium range over South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, S. J.; Choi, R. K.; Ahn, K. D.; Ha, J. C.; Cho, C. H.

    2014-12-01

    As the Korea Meteorology Administration (KMA) has operated Met Office Global and Regional Ensemble Prediction System (MOGREPS) with introduction of Unified Model (UM), many attempts have been made to improve predictability in temperature forecast in last years. In this study, post-processing method of MOGREPS for surface temperature prediction is developed with machine learning over 52 locations in South Korea. Past 60-day lag time was used as a training phase of Support Vector Regression (SVR) method for surface temperature forecast model. The selected inputs for SVR are followings: date and surface temperatures from Numerical Weather prediction (NWP), such as GDAPS, individual 24 ensemble members, mean and median of ensemble members for every 3hours for 12 days.To verify the reliability of SVR-based ensemble prediction (SVR-EP), 93 days are used (from March 1 to May 31, 2014). The result yielded improvement of SVR-EP by RMSE value of 16 % throughout entire prediction period against conventional ensemble prediction (EP). In particular, short range predictability of SVR-EP resulted in 18.7% better RMSE for 1~3 day forecast. The mean temperature bias between SVR-EP and EP at all test locations showed around 0.36°C and 1.36°C, respectively. SVR-EP is currently extending for more vigorous sensitivity test, such as increasing training phase and optimizing machine learning model.

  8. Performance of Spanish white Macael marble exposed to narrow- and medium-range temperature cycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodríguez Gordillo, J.

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available White marble specimens from Macael in the Spanish province of Almeria were exposed to narrow- (50/20 ºC and medium- (100/-20 ºC and 75/-20 ºC range thermal stress cycles. The effects were monitored with ultrasound techniques. Ultrasound velocity declined considerably in samples subjected to 100/-20 ºC cycles, more moderately when the range was 75/-20 ºC and insignificantly when it was narrowed to 50/-20 ºC. All variations were recorded in the first five to seven cycles, with values flattening thereafter. The Schmidt hardness and compression test results concurred with the ultrasound findings. Petrographic and scanning electron microscope (SEM imaging revealed some very superficial granular decohesion in the specimens subjected to forty 100/-20 ºC cycles. The concurrent results from compression testing on the one hand and surface hardness and ultrasound measurements on the other confirmed the validity of the latter two nondestructive techniques (NDT for determining the effects of thermal stress cycling on stone mechanical strength.

    Se aplican ciclos de estrés térmico de medio (100/-20 ºC y 75/-20 ºC y bajo (50/-20 ºC rango sobre probetas de mármol blanco de Macael (Almería, España, y se evalúa ciclo a ciclo su incidencia mediante ultrasonidos. Los resultados indican un considerable descenso de velocidad de los ultrasonidos en las muestras sometidas a estrés de 100/-20 ºC, más moderado en el caso de 75/-20 ºC, poco significativo en el caso de 50/-20 ºC. Las variaciones de velocidad tienen lugar durante los primeros ciclos (5-7, permaneciendo los valores constantes en ciclos posteriores. Los resultados proporcionados por medidas de dureza de Schmidt, y de rotura por compresión uniaxial son coincidentes con los proporcionados por los ultrasonidos. Las imágenes de microscopía petrográfica y electrónica (SEM manifiestan una cierta descohesión granular en zonas muy superficiales de las probetas sometidas a 40 ciclos de

  9. The exotic invasive plant Vincetoxicum rossicum is a strong competitor even outside its current realized climatic temperature range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurа Sanderson

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Dog-strangling vine (Vincetoxicum rossicum is an exotic plant originating from Central and Eastern Europe that is becoming increasingly invasive in southern Ontario, Canada. Once established, it successfully displaces local native plant species but mechanisms behind this plant’s high competitive ability are not fully understood. It is unknown whether cooler temperatures will limit the range expansion of V. rossicum, which has demonstrated high tolerance for other environmental variables such as light and soil moisture. Furthermore, if V. rossicum can establish outside its current climatic limit it is unknown whether competition with native species can significantly contribute to reduce fitness and slow down invasion. We conducted an experiment to test the potential of V. rossicum to spread into northern areas of Ontario using a set of growth chambers to simulate southern and northern Ontario climatic temperature regimes. We also tested plant-plant competition by growing V. rossicum in pots with a highly abundant native species, Solidago canadensis, and comparing growth responses to plants grown alone. We found that the fitness of V. rossicum was not affected by the cooler climate despite a delay in reproductive phenology. Growing V. rossicum with S. canadensis caused a significant reduction in seedpod biomass of V. rossicum. However, we did not detect a temperature x competition interaction in spite of evidence for adaptation of S. canadensis to cooler temperature conditions. We conclude that the spread of V. rossicum north within the tested range is unlikely to be limited by climatic temperature but competition with an abundant native species may contribute to slow it down.

  10. Thermoregulation during flight: body temperature and sensible heat transfer in free-ranging Brazilian free-tailed bats (Tadarida brasiliensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichard, Jonathan D; Fellows, Spenser R; Frank, Alexander J; Kunz, Thomas H

    2010-01-01

    Bat wings are important for thermoregulation, but their role in heat balance during flight is largely unknown. More than 80% of the energy consumed during flight generates heat as a by-product, and thus it is expected that bat wings should dissipate large amounts of heat to prevent hyperthermia. We measured rectal (T(r)) and surface (T(s)) temperatures of Brazilian free-tailed bats (Tadarida brasiliensis) as they emerged from and returned to their daytime roosts and calculated sensible heat transfer for different body regions (head, body, wings, and tail membrane). Bats' T(r) decreased from 36.8°C during emergence flights to 34.4°C during returns, and T(s) scaled positively with ambient temperature (T(a)). Total radiative heat loss from bats was significantly greater for a radiative sink to the night sky than for a sink with temperature equal to T(a). We found that free-ranging Brazilian free-tailed bats, on average, do not dissipate heat from their wings by convection but instead dissipate radiative heat (L) to the cloudless night sky during flight ([Formula: see text] W). However, within the range of T(a) measured in this study, T. brasiliensis experienced net heat loss between evening emergence and return flights. Regional hypothermia reduces heat loss from wings that are exposed to potentially high convective fluxes. Additional research is needed to establish the role of wings in evaporative cooling during flight in bats.

  11. Industrial Sites Work Plan for Leachfield Corrective Action Units: Nevada Test Site and Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (including Record of Technical Change Nos. 1, 2, 3, and 4)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DOE/NV

    1998-12-18

    This Leachfield Corrective Action Units (CAUs) Work Plan has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV); the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); and the U.S. Department of Defense (FFACO, 1996). Under the FFACO, a work plan is an optional planning document that provides information for a CAU or group of CAUs where significant commonality exists. A work plan may be developed that can be referenced by leachfield Corrective Action Investigation Plans (CAIPs) to eliminate redundant CAU documentation. This Work Plan includes FFACO-required management, technical, quality assurance (QA), health and safety, public involvement, field sampling, and waste management documentation common to several CAUs with similar site histories and characteristics, namely the leachfield systems at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and the Tonopah Test Range (TT R). For each CAU, a CAIP will be prepared to present detailed, site-specific information regarding contaminants of potential concern (COPCs), sampling locations, and investigation methods.

  12. Including a range of outcome targets offers a broader view of fibromyalgia treatment outcome: results from a retrospective review of multidisciplinary treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Dawn A; Bernstein, Cheryl D; Haq, Adeel; Breuer, Paula

    2014-06-01

    Fibromyalgia is associated with substantial functional disability. Current drug and non-drug treatments result in statistically significant but numerically small improvements in typical numeric measures of pain severity and fibromyalgia impact. The aim of the present study was to evaluate additional measures of pain severity and functional outcome that might be affected by fibromyalgia treatment. This retrospective review evaluated outcomes from 274 adults with fibromyalgia who participated in a six-week, multidisciplinary treatment programme. Pain and function were evaluated on the first and final treatment visit. Pain was evaluated using an 11-point numerical scale to determine clinically meaningful pain reduction (decrease ≥ 2 points) and from a pain drawing. Function was evaluated by measuring active range of motion (ROM), walking distance and speed, upper extremity exercise repetitions, and self-reports of daily activities. Numerical rating scores for pain decreased by 10-13% (p Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) scores decreased by 20% (p exercise repetitions doubled. Despite modest albeit statistically significant improvements in standard measures of pain severity and the FIQ, more substantial pain improvement was noted when utilizing alternative measures of pain and functional improvement. Alternative symptom assessment measures might be important outcome measures to include in drug and non-drug studies to better understand fibromyalgia treatment effectiveness. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. The association between diurnal temperature range and childhood hand, foot, and mouth disease: a distributed lag non-linear analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Fei; Ma, Yue; Zhao, Xing; Lv, Qiang; Liu, Yaqiong; Zhang, Tao; Li, Xiaosong

    2017-11-01

    In recent years, hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) has been increasingly recognized as a critical challenge to disease control and prevention in China. Previous studies have found that meteorological factors such as mean temperature and relative humidity were associated with HFMD. However, little is known about whether the diurnal temperature range (DTR) has any impact on HFMD. This study aimed to quantify the impact of DTR on childhood HFMD in 18 cities in Sichuan Province. A distributed lag non-linear model was adopted to explore the temporal lagged association of daily temperature with age-, gender- and pathogen-specific HFMD. A total of 290 123 HFMD cases aged 0-14 years were reported in the 18 cities in Sichuan Province. The DTR-HFMD relationships were non-linear in all subgroups. Children aged 6-14 years and male children were more vulnerable to the temperature changes. Large DTR had the higher risk estimates of HFMD incidence in cases of EV71 infection, while small DTR had the higher risk estimates of HFMD incidence in cases of CV-A16 infection. Our study suggested that DTR played an important role in the transmission of HFMD with non-linear and delayed effects.

  14. New Insight into Time-Temperature Correlation for Polymer Relaxations Ranging from Secondary Relaxation to Terminal Flow: Application of a Universal and Developed WLF Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonggang Shangguan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The three equations involved in the time-temperature superposition (TTS of a polymer, i.e., Williams–Landel–Ferry (WLF, Vogel–Fulcher–Tammann–Hesse (VFTH and the Arrhenius equation, were re-examined, and the mathematical equivalence of the WLF form to the Arrhenius form was revealed. As a result, a developed WLF (DWLF equation was established to describe the temperature dependence of relaxation property for the polymer ranging from secondary relaxation to terminal flow, and its necessary criteria for universal application were proposed. TTS results of viscoelastic behavior for different polymers including isotactic polypropylene (iPP, high density polyethylene (HDPE, low density polyethylene (LDPE and ethylene-propylene rubber (EPR were well achieved by the DWLF equation at high temperatures. Through investigating the phase-separation behavior of poly(methyl methacrylate/poly(styrene-co-maleic anhydride (PMMA/SMA and iPP/EPR blends, it was found that the DWLF equation can describe the phase separation behavior of the amorphous/amorphous blend well, while the nucleation process leads to a smaller shift factor for the crystalline/amorphous blend in the melting temperature region. Either the TTS of polystyrene (PS and PMMA or the secondary relaxations of PMMA and polyvinyl chloride (PVC confirmed that the Arrhenius equation can be valid only in the high temperature region and invalid in the vicinity of glass transition due to the strong dependence of apparent activation energy on temperature; while the DWLF equation can be employed in the whole temperature region including secondary relaxation and from glass transition to terminal relaxation. The theoretical explanation for the universal application of the DWLF equation was also revealed through discussing the influences of free volume and chemical structure on the activation energy of polymer relaxations.

  15. Measurement of performance of thermoacoustic heat pump in a -3 to 160 °C temperature range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Ryo; Tsuda, Kenichiro; Bassem, Mohamed Mehdi; Ueda, Yuki

    2015-11-01

    A thermoacoustic heat pump was constructed and tested. It was composed of a looped tube, a straight tube, and a regenerator. The looped tube contained the regenerator and was connected to the straight tube. The tubes were filled with nitrogen. When an acoustic wave was input to the tubes, a temperature difference formed along the regenerator. Our experiments showed that this heat pump could work as both a cooler and a heater. This heat pump achieved -39 °C as a cooler and 270 °C as a heater. Using antifreeze liquid and oil as heat media, the cooling and heating performance of the heat pump was measured within the temperature range from -3 to 160 °C.

  16. Infrared normal spectral emissivity of Ti-6Al-4V alloy in the 500-1150 K temperature range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Fernandez, L. [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnologia, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Barrio Sarriena s/n, 48940 Leioa, Bizkaia (Spain); Industria de Turbo Propulsores, S.A., Planta de Zamudio, Edificio 300, 48170 Zamudio, Bizkaia (Spain); Risueno, E. [CIC Energigune, Parque Tecnologico, Albert Einstein 48, 01510 Minano, Alava, Spain. (Spain); Perez-Saez, R.B., E-mail: raul.perez@ehu.es [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnologia, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Barrio Sarriena s/n, 48940 Leioa, Bizkaia (Spain); Instituto de Sintesis y Estudio de Materiales, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Apdo. 644,48080 Bilbao, Spain. (Spain); Tello, M.J. [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnologia, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Barrio Sarriena s/n, 48940 Leioa, Bizkaia (Spain); Instituto de Sintesis y Estudio de Materiales, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Apdo. 644,48080 Bilbao, Spain. (Spain)

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer First heating cycle acts as a annealing, relieving the surface stresses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stress relieving occurs mainly above 900 K. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Emissivity decreases between 0.35 and 0.10 in the 2.5-22 {mu}m spectral range. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Emissivity increases linearly with temperature, with the same slope for {lambda} > 10 {mu}m. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Good agreement between resistivity and emissivity by means of Hagen-Rubens relation. - Abstract: Thermal radiative emissivity is related to the optical and electrical properties of materials, and it is a key parameter required in a large number of industrial applications. In the case of Ti-6Al-4V, spectral emissivity experimental data are not available for the range of temperatures between 400 and 1200 K, where almost all industrial applications take place. The experimental results in this paper show that the normal spectral emissivity decreases with wavelength from a value of about 0.35 at 2.5 {mu}m to about 0.10 at 22 {mu}m. At the same time, the spectral emissivity shows a slight linear increase with temperature between 500 and 1150 K, with approximately the same slope for all wavelengths. Additionally, the influence of the samples thermal history on the emissivity is studied. A strong decrease in the emissivity values appears due to the effect of surface stress relaxation processes. This means that the radiative properties of this alloy strongly depend on the surface stress state. A thermal treatment to relieve the surface stress should be carried out to achieve a steady state of the radiative properties. In addition, a good qualitative agreement is found between the temperature dependence of the electrical resistivity obtained using conventional measurements and the one obtained from the emissivity experimental results by using the Hagen-Rubens equation.

  17. Elevation-Dependent Temperature Trends in the Rocky Mountain Front Range: Changes over a 56- and 20-Year Record

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Chris R.; Nufio, César R.; Bowers, M. Deane; Guralnick, Robert P.

    2012-01-01

    Determining the magnitude of climate change patterns across elevational gradients is essential for an improved understanding of broader climate change patterns and for predicting hydrologic and ecosystem changes. We present temperature trends from five long-term weather stations along a 2077-meter elevational transect in the Rocky Mountain Front Range of Colorado, USA. These trends were measured over two time periods: a full 56-year record (1953–2008) and a shorter 20-year (1989–2008) record representing a period of widely reported accelerating change. The rate of change of biological indicators, season length and accumulated growing-degree days, were also measured over the 56 and 20-year records. Finally, we compared how well interpolated Parameter-elevation Regression on Independent Slopes Model (PRISM) datasets match the quality controlled and weather data from each station. Our results show that warming signals were strongest at mid-elevations over both temporal scales. Over the 56-year record, most sites show warming occurring largely through increases in maximum temperatures, while the 20-year record documents warming associated with increases in maximum temperatures at lower elevations and increases in minimum temperatures at higher elevations. Recent decades have also shown a shift from warming during springtime to warming in July and November. Warming along the gradient has contributed to increases in growing-degree days, although to differing degrees, over both temporal scales. However, the length of the growing season has remained unchanged. Finally, the actual and the PRISM interpolated yearly rates rarely showed strong correlations and suggest different warming and cooling trends at most sites. Interpretation of climate trends and their seasonal biases in the Rocky Mountain Front Range are dependent on both elevation and the temporal scale of analysis. Given mismatches between interpolated data and the directly measured station data, we caution

  18. Elevation-dependent temperature trends in the Rocky Mountain Front Range: changes over a 56- and 20-year record.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris R McGuire

    Full Text Available Determining the magnitude of climate change patterns across elevational gradients is essential for an improved understanding of broader climate change patterns and for predicting hydrologic and ecosystem changes. We present temperature trends from five long-term weather stations along a 2077-meter elevational transect in the Rocky Mountain Front Range of Colorado, USA. These trends were measured over two time periods: a full 56-year record (1953-2008 and a shorter 20-year (1989-2008 record representing a period of widely reported accelerating change. The rate of change of biological indicators, season length and accumulated growing-degree days, were also measured over the 56 and 20-year records. Finally, we compared how well interpolated Parameter-elevation Regression on Independent Slopes Model (PRISM datasets match the quality controlled and weather data from each station. Our results show that warming signals were strongest at mid-elevations over both temporal scales. Over the 56-year record, most sites show warming occurring largely through increases in maximum temperatures, while the 20-year record documents warming associated with increases in maximum temperatures at lower elevations and increases in minimum temperatures at higher elevations. Recent decades have also shown a shift from warming during springtime to warming in July and November. Warming along the gradient has contributed to increases in growing-degree days, although to differing degrees, over both temporal scales. However, the length of the growing season has remained unchanged. Finally, the actual and the PRISM interpolated yearly rates rarely showed strong correlations and suggest different warming and cooling trends at most sites. Interpretation of climate trends and their seasonal biases in the Rocky Mountain Front Range are dependent on both elevation and the temporal scale of analysis. Given mismatches between interpolated data and the directly measured station data

  19. Evaluation of simulated climatological diurnal temperature range in CMIP5 models from the perspective of planetary boundary layer turbulent mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Nan; Zhou, Liming; Dai, Yongjiu

    2017-07-01

    This study examines the effects of modeled planetary boundary layer (PBL) mixing on the simulated temperature diurnal cycle climatology over land in 20 CMIP5 models with AMIP simulations. When compared with observations, the magnitude of diurnal temperature range (DTR) is systematically underestimated over almost all land areas due to a widespread warm bias of daily minimum temperature (Tmin) and mostly a cold bias of daily maximum temperature (Tmax). Analyses of the CMIP5 multi-model ensemble means suggest that the biases of the simulated PBL mixing could very likely contribute to the temperature biases. For the regions with the cold bias in Tmax, the daytime PBL mixing is generally underestimated. The consequent more dry air entrainment from the free atmosphere could help maintain the surface humidity gradient, and thus produce more surface evaporation and potentially lower the Tmax. The opposite situation holds true for the regions with the warm bias of Tmax. This mechanism could be particularly applicable to the regions with moderate and wet climate conditions where surface evaporation depends more on the surface humidity gradient, but less on the available soil moisture. For the widespread warm bias of Tmin, the widely-recognized overestimated PBL mixing at nighttime should play a dominant role by transferring more heat from the atmosphere to the near-surface to warm the Tmin. Further analyses using the high resolution CFMIP2 output also support the CMIP5 results about the connections of the biases between the simulated turbulent mixing and the temperature diurnal cycle. The large inter-model variations of the simulated temperature diurnal cycle primarily appear over the arid and semi-arid regions and boreal arctic regions where the model differences in the PBL turbulence mixing could make equally significant contributions to the inter-model variations of DTR, Tmax and Tmin compared to the model differences in surface radiative processes. These results

  20. Standard and routine metabolic rates of juvenile sandbar sharks (Carcharhinus plumbeus), including the effects of body mass and acute temperature change

    OpenAIRE

    Dowd, William Wesley; Brill, R W; Bushnell, P G; Musick, J A

    2006-01-01

    Standard and routine metabolic rates (SMRs and RMRs, respectively) of juvenile sandbar sharks (Carcharhinus plumbeus) were measured over a range of body sizes (n=34) and temperatures normally associated with western Atlantic coastal nursery areas. The mean SMR Q(10) (increase in metabolic rate with temperature) was 2.9 +/- 0.2. Heart rate decreased with increasing body mass but increased with temperature at a Q(10) of 1.8-2.2. Self-paired measures of SMR and RMR were obtained for 15 individua...

  1. Association of temperature and historical dynamics of malaria in the Republic of Korea, including reemergence in 1993.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linthicum, Kenneth J; Anyamba, Assaf; Killenbeck, Bradley; Lee, Won-Ja; Lee, Hee Choon S; Klein, Terry A; Kim, Heung-Chul; Pavlin, Julie A; Britch, Seth C; Small, Jennifer; Tucker, Compton J; Gaydos, Joel C

    2014-07-01

    Plasmodium vivax malaria reemerged in the Republic of Korea in 1993 after it had been declared malaria free in 1979. Malaria rapidly increased and peaked in 2000 with 4,142 cases with lower but variable numbers of cases reported through 2011. We examined the association of regional climate trends over the Korean Peninsula relative to malaria cases in U.S. military and Republic of Korea soldiers, veterans, and civilians from 1950 to 2011. Temperatures and anomaly trends in air temperature associated with satellite remotely sensed outgoing long-wave radiation were used to observe temporal changes. These changes, particularly increasing air temperatures, in combination with moderate rains throughout the malaria season, and distribution of malaria vectors, likely supported the 1993 reemergence and peaks in malaria incidence that occurred through 2011 by accelerating the rate of parasite development in mosquitoes and increased numbers as a result of an expansion of larval habitat, thereby increasing the vectorial capacity of Anopheles vectors. High malaria rates associated with a favorable climate were similarly observed during the Korean War. These findings support the need for increased investigations into malaria predictive models using climate-related variables. Reprint & Copyright © 2014 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  2. Oxygen nonstoichiometry and thermodynamic characterization of Zr doped ceria in the 1573-1773 K temperature range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takacs, M; Scheffe, J R; Steinfeld, A

    2015-03-28

    This work encompasses the thermodynamic characterization and critical evaluation of Zr(4+) doped ceria, a promising redox material for the two-step solar thermochemical splitting of H2O and CO2 to H2 and CO. As a case study, we experimentally examine 5 mol% Zr(4+) doped ceria and present oxygen nonstoichiometry measurements at elevated temperatures ranging from 1573 K to 1773 K and oxygen partial pressures ranging from 4.50 × 10(-3) atm to 2.3 × 10(-4) atm, yielding higher reduction extents compared to those of pure ceria under all conditions investigated, especially at the lower temperature range and at higher pO2. In contrast to pure ceria, a simple ideal solution model accounting for the formation of isolated oxygen vacancies and localized electrons accurately describes the defect chemistry. Thermodynamic properties are determined, namely: partial molar enthalpy, entropy, and Gibbs free energy. In general, partial molar enthalpy and entropy values of Zr(4+) doped ceria are lower. The equilibrium hydrogen yields are subsequently extracted as a function of the redox conditions for dopant concentrations as high as 20%. Although reduction extents increase greatly with dopant concentration, the oxidation of Zr(4+) doped ceria is thermodynamically less favorable compared to pure ceria. This leads to substantially larger temperature swings between reduction and oxidation steps, ultimately resulting in lower theoretical solar energy conversion efficiencies compared to ceria under most conditions. In effect, these results point to the importance of considering oxidation thermodynamics in addition to reduction when screening potential redox materials.

  3. Ab initio molecular dynamics study of fluid H2O-CO2 mixture in broad pressure-temperature range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jie; Zhao, Jijun; Plyasunov, Andrey V.; Belonoshko, Anatoly B.

    2017-11-01

    Properties of H2O and CO2 fluid and their mixtures under extreme pressures and temperatures are poorly known yet critically important in a number of applications. Several hundreds of first-principles molecular dynamics (FPMD) runs have been performed to obtain the pressure-volume-temperature (P-V-T) data on supercritical H2O, CO2, and H2O-CO2 mixtures. The pressure-temperature (P-T) range are from 0.5 GPa to 104 GPa (48.5 GPa for CO2) and from 600 K to 4000 K. Based on these data, we evaluate several existing equations of state (EOS) for the fluid H2O, CO2, and H2O-CO2 mixture. The results show that the EOS for H2O from Belonoshko et al. [Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 55, 381-387; Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 55, 3191-3208; Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 56, 3611-3626; Comput. Geosci. 18, 1267-1269] not only can be used in the studied P-T range but also is accurate enough to be used for prediction of P-V-T data. In addition, IAPWS-95 EOS for H2O shows excellent extrapolation behavior beyond 1.0 GPa and 1273 K. However, for the case of CO2, none of the existing EOS produces data in agreement with the FPMD results. We created new EOS for CO2. The precision of the new EOS is tested by comparison to the calculated P-V-T data, fugacity coefficient of the CO2 fluid derived from high P-T experimental data as well as to the (very scarce) experimental volumetric data in the high P-T range. On the basis of our FPMD data we created a new EOS for H2O-CO2 mixture. The new EOS for the mixture is in reasonable agreement with experimental data.

  4. FORECASTING OF ESTIMATED PERFORMANCE OF CONCRETE WITH ORGANIC AND HYDRAULIC BINDING AGENTS WITHIN WIDE RANGE OF TEMPERATURE AND STRAIN RATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Verenko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A methodology  for determination of estimated performance of main road-building materials (asphalt concrete and сold recycled material within wide range of temperature and strain rate, is developed in the paper and it allows to obtain the whole spectrum of parameters required for calculation of a road pavement structure with minimum number of test results. This technique can be useful in designing material and pavement structure during its repair while using the method of cold in-place recycling because it enables significantly to reduce a number of laboratory tests. The methodology has been implemented as a computer program for its practical application.

  5. Recrystallization kinetics of warm-rolled tungsten in the temperature range 1150-1350 °C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alfonso Lopez, Angel; Juul Jensen, Dorte; Luo, G.-N.

    2014-01-01

    degradation in material properties as a loss in mechanical strength and embrittlement. The thermal stability of a pure tungsten plate warm-rolled to 67% thickness reduction was investigated by long-term isothermal annealing in the temperature range between 1150 °C and 1350 °C up to 2200 h. Changes...... in the mechanical properties during annealing are quantified by Vickers hardness measurements. They are described concisely by classical kinetic models for recovery and recrystallization. The observed time spans for recrystallization and the obtained value for the activation energy of the recrystallization process...

  6. Raman spectroscopy of SrB4O7 single crystals in the temperature range 300-1273 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobol, A. A.; Shukshin, V. E.; Zaitsev, A. I.

    2016-07-01

    The polarized Raman spectra of SrB4O7 (SBO) single crystals are studied in detail in the temperature range of 300-1273 K. The TO, LO, and IO phonon lines of A 1, A 2, B 1, and B 2 symmetries of rhombic SBO at 300 K are identified. The behavior of the Raman spectra of SBO crystals is studied upon heating up to their melting. The relation of Raman spectra with the structure of boron-oxygen fragments, as well as the transformation of spectra in the process of melting of SBO crystals, is discussed.

  7. Thermodynamic Properties of Low-Density {}^{132}Xe Gas in the Temperature Range 165-275 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akour, Abdulrahman

    2018-01-01

    The method of static fluctuation approximation was used to calculate selected thermodynamic properties (internal energy, entropy, energy capacity, and pressure) for xenon in a particularly low-temperature range (165-270 K) under different conditions. This integrated microscopic study started from an initial basic assumption as the main input. The basic assumption in this method was to replace the local field operator with its mean value, then numerically solve a closed set of nonlinear equations using an iterative method, considering the Hartree-Fock B2-type dispersion potential as the most appropriate potential for xenon. The results are in very good agreement with those of an ideal gas.

  8. Multicolor fluorescent graphene quantum dots colorimetrically responsive to all-pH and a wide temperature range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Fanglong; Ding, Ling; Li, Yunchao; Li, Xiaohong; Fan, Louzhen; Zhou, Shixin; Fang, Decai; Yang, Shihe

    2015-07-01

    Smart functional nanomaterials colorimetrically responsive to all-pH and a wide temperature range are urgently needed due to their widespread applications in biotechnology, drug delivery, diagnosis and optical sensing. Although graphene quantum dots possess remarkable advantages in biological applications, they are only stable in neutral or weak acidic solutions, and strong acidic or alkaline conditions invariably suppress or diminish the fluorescence intensity. Herein, we report a new type of water-soluble, multicolor fluorescent graphene quantum dot which is responsive to all-pH from 1 to 14 with the naked eye. The synthesis was accomplished by electrolysis of the graphite rod, followed by refluxing in a concentrated nitric and sulfuric acid mixed solution. We demonstrate the novel red fluorescence of quinone structures transformed from the lactone structures under strong alkaline conditions. The fluorescence of the resulting graphene quantum dots was also found to be responsive to the temperature changes, demonstrating their great potential as a dual probe of pH and temperature in complicated environments such as biological media.Smart functional nanomaterials colorimetrically responsive to all-pH and a wide temperature range are urgently needed due to their widespread applications in biotechnology, drug delivery, diagnosis and optical sensing. Although graphene quantum dots possess remarkable advantages in biological applications, they are only stable in neutral or weak acidic solutions, and strong acidic or alkaline conditions invariably suppress or diminish the fluorescence intensity. Herein, we report a new type of water-soluble, multicolor fluorescent graphene quantum dot which is responsive to all-pH from 1 to 14 with the naked eye. The synthesis was accomplished by electrolysis of the graphite rod, followed by refluxing in a concentrated nitric and sulfuric acid mixed solution. We demonstrate the novel red fluorescence of quinone structures transformed

  9. Live cell plasma membranes do not exhibit a miscibility phase transition over a wide range of temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Il-Hyung; Saha, Suvrajit; Polley, Anirban; Huang, Hector; Mayor, Satyajit; Rao, Madan; Groves, Jay T

    2015-03-26

    Lipid/cholesterol mixtures derived from cell membranes as well as their synthetic reconstitutions exhibit well-defined miscibility phase transitions and critical phenomena near physiological temperatures. This suggests that lipid/cholesterol-mediated phase separation plays a role in the organization of live cell membranes. However, macroscopic lipid-phase separation is not generally observed in cell membranes, and the degree to which properties of isolated lipid mixtures are preserved in the cell membrane remain unknown. A fundamental property of phase transitions is that the variation of tagged particle diffusion with temperature exhibits an abrupt change as the system passes through the transition, even when the two phases are distributed in a nanometer-scale emulsion. We support this using a variety of Monte Carlo and atomistic simulations on model lipid membrane systems. However, temperature-dependent fluorescence correlation spectroscopy of labeled lipids and membrane-anchored proteins in live cell membranes shows a consistently smooth increase in the diffusion coefficient as a function of temperature. We find no evidence of a discrete miscibility phase transition throughout a wide range of temperatures: 14-37 °C. This contrasts the behavior of giant plasma membrane vesicles (GPMVs) blebbed from the same cells, which do exhibit phase transitions and macroscopic phase separation. Fluorescence lifetime analysis of a DiI probe in both cases reveals a significant environmental difference between the live cell and the GPMV. Taken together, these data suggest the live cell membrane may avoid the miscibility phase transition inherent to its lipid constituents by actively regulating physical parameters, such as tension, in the membrane.

  10. The interaction of O2 with the surface of polycrystalline gadolinium at the temperature range 300-670 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, S.; Shamir, N.; Mintz, M. H.; Jacob, I.; Zalkind, S.

    2011-08-01

    Auger-Electron-Spectroscopy (AES) and Direct-Recoils-Spectrometry (DRS) were applied to study the interaction of O2 with a polycrystalline gadolinium surface, in the temperature range 300-670 K and oxygen pressure up to 2 × 10- 6 Torr. It has been found that initial uptake of oxygen, at coverage measurable by the techniques used here, results in rapid oxide island formation. The subsurface is believed to be a mixture of oxide particles and oxygen dissolved in the Gd metal, the latter being the mobile species, even at relatively low temperatures.Enhanced inward diffusion of oxygen starts as early as 420 K and dictates the surface oxygen concentration and effective thickness of the forming oxide. The oxygen accumulation rate at the near-surface region, as measured by the O(KLL) AES signal intensity, goes through a maximum as a function of temperature at 420 K. This is a result of the combination of still efficient oxygen chemisorption that increases surface occupation and slow inward diffusion. The thickest oxide, ~ 1.7 nm, is formed at 300 K and its effective thickness was found to decrease with increasing temperature (due to oxygen dissolution into the metal bulk).Diffusion coefficients of the oxygen dissolution into the bulk were evaluated for various temperatures utilizing models for infinitely thin oxide layer and thick oxide layer, respectively. The best fit under our experimental procedure was obtained by the thick layer model, and the coefficients that were calculated are D0 = 2.2 × 10- 16m2s- 1 and Ea = 46kJ/mol.

  11. Characteristic dielectric behaviour of the wide temperature range twist grain boundary phases of unsymmetrical liquid crystal dimers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandey, M B [Physics Department, University of Allahabad, Allahabad-211 002 (India); Dhar, R [Physics Department, University of Allahabad, Allahabad-211 002 (India); Achalkumar, A S [Centre for Liquid Crystal Research, Jalahalli, Bangalore-560 103 (India); Yelamaggad, C V [Centre for Liquid Crystal Research, Jalahalli, Bangalore-560 103 (India)

    2007-10-31

    The investigated optically active dimeric compound, 4-n-undecyloxy-4{sup '}-(cholesteryloxycarbonyl-1-butyloxy)chalcone, shows wide temperature ranges of two twist grain boundary (TGB) phases, TGBA and TGBC*. Comprehensive dielectric studies have been carried out for this compound in the frequency range 1 Hz-10 MHz for different conditions of molecular anchoring. This compound shows negative dielectric anisotropy ({delta}{epsilon}'={epsilon}{sub parallel}'-{epsilon}{sub perpendicul=} a{sub r}'<0). Various electrical parameters, namely the dielectric permittivity, dielectric anisotropy, DC conductivity and activation energy, have been determined for these TGB phases. Weak relaxation processes have been detected in the TGBA and TGBC* phases, presumably due to amplitude (soft mode) and phase (Goldstone mode) fluctuations.

  12. Measurements of the conduction of heat in water vapor, nitrogen and mixtures of these gases in an extended temperature range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frohn, A.; Westerdorf, M.

    Experimental and analytical results are presented from trials with heat conduction in water vapor, nitrogen, and mixtures of the two in a cylindrical heat transfer cell. The pressures examined ranged from 100-0.01 mbar, corresponding to Knudsen numbers of 0.01-100. Formulations are defined for the continuum conditions, the free molecule conditions, the transition region, and the momentum equation solution. Experimentation with an instrumented configuration of an inner and outer cylinder over the temperature range 300-725 K is described, noting the use of a vacuum around the inner, gas-filled container in order to measure the radiative heat losses. The results are useful for predicting heat transfer in high altitude flight or among small droplets in natural fogs, cooling towers, and combustion chambers.

  13. Permalloy-Based Thin Film Structures: Magnetic Properties and the Giant Magnetoimpedance Effect in the Temperature Range Important for Biomedical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chlenova, Anna A.; Moiseev, Alexey A.; Derevyanko, Mikhail S.; Semirov, Aleksandr V.; Lepalovsky, Vladimir N.

    2017-01-01

    Permalloy-based thin film structures are excellent materials for sensor applications. Temperature dependencies of the magnetic properties and giant magneto-impedance (GMI) were studied for Fe19Ni81-based multilayered structures obtained by the ion-plasma sputtering technique. Selected temperature interval of 25 °C to 50 °C corresponds to the temperature range of functionality of many devices, including magnetic biosensors. A (Cu/FeNi)5/Cu/(Cu/FeNi)5 multilayered structure with well-defined traverse magnetic anisotropy showed an increase in the GMI ratio for the total impedance and its real part with temperature increased. The maximum of the GMI of the total impedance ratio ΔZ/Z = 56% was observed at a frequency of 80 MHz, with a sensitivity of 18%/Oe, and the maximum GMI of the real part ΔR/R = 170% at a frequency of 10 MHz, with a sensitivity of 46%/Oe. As the magnetization and direct current electrical resistance vary very little with the temperature, the most probable mechanism of the unexpected increase of the GMI sensitivity is the stress relaxation mechanism associated with magnetoelastic anisotropy. PMID:28817084

  14. Sample environment for neutron scattering measurements of internal stresses in engineering materials in the temperature range of 6 K to 300 K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirichek, O; Timms, J D; Kelleher, J F; Down, R B E; Offer, C D; Kabra, S; Zhang, S Y

    2017-02-01

    Internal stresses in materials have a considerable effect on material properties including strength, fracture toughness, and fatigue resistance. The ENGIN-X beamline is an engineering science facility at ISIS optimized for the measurement of strain and stress using the atomic lattice planes as a strain gauge. Nowadays, the rapidly rising interest in the mechanical properties of engineering materials at low temperatures has been stimulated by the dynamic development of the cryogenic industry and the advanced applications of the superconductor technology. Here we present the design and discuss the test results of a new cryogenic sample environment system for neutron scattering measurements of internal stresses in engineering materials under a load of up to 100 kN and in the temperature range of 6 K to 300 K. Complete cooling of the system starting from the room temperature down to the base temperature takes around 90 min. Understanding of internal stresses in engineering materials at cryogenic temperatures is vital for the modelling and designing of cutting-edge superconducting magnets and other superconductor based applications.

  15. Flow behaviour of autoclaved, 20% cold worked, Zr-2.5Nb alloy pressure tube material in the temperature range of room temperature to 800 deg. C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dureja, A.K., E-mail: akdureja@barc.gov.in [Reactor Design and Development Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 85 (India); Sinha, S.K.; Srivastava, Ankit; Sinha, R.K. [Reactor Design and Development Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 85 (India); Chakravartty, J.K. [Materials' Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 85 (India); Seshu, P.; Pawaskar, D.N. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 76 (India)

    2011-05-01

    Pressure tube material of Indian Heavy Water Reactors is 20% cold-worked and stress relieved Zr-2.5Nb alloy. Inherent variability in the process parameters during the fabrication stages of pressure tube and also along the length of component have their effect on micro-structural and texture properties of the material, which in turn affect its strength parameters (yield strength and ultimate tensile strength) and flow characteristics. Data of tensile tests carried out in the temperature range from room temperature to 800 deg. C using the samples taken out from a single pressure tube have been used to develop correlations for characterizing the strength parameters' variation as a function of axial location along length of the tube and the test temperature. Applicability of Ramberg-Osgood, Holloman and Voce's correlations for defining the post yield behaviour of the material has been investigated. Effect of strain rate change on the deformation behaviour has also been studied.

  16. 2D Numerical Modelling of the Resin Injection Pultrusion Process Including Experimental Resin Kinetics and Temperature Validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Filip Salling; Sonne, Mads Rostgaard; Larsen, Martin

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, a two-dimensional (2D) transient Eulerian thermo-chemical analysis of a carbon fibre epoxy thermosetting Resin Injection Pultrusion (RIP) process is carried out. The numerical model is implemented using the well known unconditionally stable Alternating Direction Implicit (ADI......) scheme. The total heat of reaction and the cure kinetics of the epoxy thermosetting are determined using Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). A very good agreement is observed between the fitted cure kinetic model and the experimental measurements. The numerical steady state temperature predictions...

  17. Accurate solid solution range of BiMnxFe3-xO6 and low temperature magnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Pengfei; Yue, Mufei; Cong, Rihong; Gao, Wenliang; Yang, Tao

    2017-11-01

    BiMnxFe3-xO6 (x = 1) represents a new type of oxide structure containing Bi3+ and competing magnetic super-exchanges. In literature, multiple magnetic states were realized at low temperatures in BiMnFe2O6, and the hypothetical parent compounds (BiMn3O6, BiFe3O6) were predicted to be different in magnetism. Herein, we performed a careful study on the syntheses of BiMnxFe3-xO6 at ambient pressure, and the solid solution range was determined to be 0.9 ≤ x ≤ 1.3 by Rietveld refinements on high-quality powder X-ray diffraction data. Due to the very similar cationic size of Mn3+ and Fe3+, and possibly the structural rigidity, there was no significant structure change in the whole range of solid solution. The magnetic behavior of BiMnxFe3-xO6 (x = 1.2, 1.22, 1.26, 1.28 and 1.3) was generally similar to BiMnFe2O6, while the relative higher concentration of Mn3+ led to the decreasing of the antiferromagnetic ordering temperature.

  18. Development of Superior Sorbents for Separation of CO2 from Flue Gas at a Wide Temperature range during Coal Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panagiotis Smirniotis

    2002-09-17

    A number basic sorbents based on CaO were synthesized, characterized with novel techniques and tested for sorption of CO{sub 2} and selected gas mixtures simulating flue gas from coal fired boilers. Our studies resulted in highly promising sorbents which demonstrated zero affinity for N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, SO{sub 2}, and NO very low affinity for water, ultrahigh CO{sub 2} sorption capacities, and rapid sorption characteristics, CO{sub 2} sorption at a very wide temperature range, durability, and low synthesis cost. One of the 'key' characteristics of the proposed materials is the fact that we can control very accurately their basicity (optimum number of basic sites of the appropriate strength) which allows for the selective chemisorption of CO{sub 2} at a wide range of temperatures. These unique characteristics of this family of sorbents offer high promise for development of advanced industrial sorbents for the effective CO{sub 2} removal.

  19. Nocturnal Near-Surface Temperature, but not Flow Dynamics, can be Predicted by Microtopography in a Mid-Range Mountain Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, Lena; Sigmund, Armin; Olesch, Johannes; Thomas, Christoph K.

    2017-11-01

    We investigate nocturnal flow dynamics and temperature behaviour near the surface of a 170-m long gentle slope in a mid-range mountain valley. In contrast to many existing studies focusing on locations with significant topographic variations, gentle slopes cover a greater spatial extent of the Earth's surface. Air temperatures were measured using the high-resolution distributed-temperature-sensing method within a two-dimensional fibre-optic array in the lowest metre above the surface. The main objectives are to characterize the spatio-temporal patterns in the near-surface temperature and flow dynamics, and quantify their responses to the microtopography and land cover. For the duration of the experiment, including even clear-sky nights with weak winds and strong radiative forcing, the classical cold-air drainage predicted by theory could not be detected. In contrast, we show that the airflow for the two dominant flow modes originates non-locally. The most abundant flow mode is characterized by vertically-decoupled layers featuring a near-surface flow perpendicular to the slope and strong stable stratification, which contradicts the expectation of a gravity-driven downslope flow of locally produced cold air. Differences in microtopography and land cover clearly affect spatio-temporal temperature perturbations. The second most abundant flow mode is characterized by strong mixing, leading to vertical coupling with airflow directed down the local slope. Here variations of microtopography and land cover lead to negligible near-surface temperature perturbations. We conclude that spatio-temporal temperature perturbations, but not flow dynamics, can be predicted by microtopography, which complicates the prediction of advective-heat components and the existence and dynamics of cold-air pools in gently sloped terrain in the absence of observations.

  20. Sensing mode coupling analysis for dual-mass MEMS gyroscope and bandwidth expansion within wide-temperature range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Huiliang; Li, Hongsheng; Shao, Xingling; Liu, Zhiyu; Kou, Zhiwei; Shan, Yanhu; Shi, Yunbo; Shen, Chong; Liu, Jun

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents the bandwidth expanding method with wide-temperature range for sense mode coupling dual-mass MEMS gyro. The real sensing mode of the gyroscope is analyzed to be the superposition of in-phase and anti-phase sensing modes. The mechanical sensitivity and bandwidth of the gyroscope structure are conflicted with each other and both governed by the frequency difference between sensing and drive modes (min {Δω1, Δω2}). The sensing mode force rebalancing combs stimulation method (FRCSM) is presented to simulate the Coriolis force, and based on this method, the gyro's dynamic characteristics are tested. The sensing closed- loop controller is achieved by operational amplifier based on phase lead method, which enable the magnitude margin and phase margin of the system to reach 7.21 dB and 34.6° respectively, and the closed-loop system also expands gyro bandwidth from 13 Hz (sensing open-loop) to 102 Hz (sensing closed-loop). What's more, the turntable test results show that the sensing closed-loop works stably in wide-temperature range (from -40 °C to 60 °C) and the bandwidth values are 107 Hz @-40 °C and 97 Hz @60 °C. The results indicate that the higher temperature causes lower bandwidth, and verify the simulation results are 103 Hz @-40 °C and 98.2 Hz @60 °C. The new bottleneck of the closed loop bandwidth is the valley generated by conjugate zeros, which is formed by superposition of sensing modes.

  1. Long-term patterns of air temperatures, daily temperature range, precipitation, grass-reference evapotranspiration and aridity index in the USA Great Plains: Part I. Spatial trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukal, M.; Irmak, S.

    2016-11-01

    Due to their substantial spatio-temporal behavior, long-term quantification and analyses of important hydrological variables are essential for practical applications in water resources planning, evaluating the water use of agricultural crop production and quantifying crop evapotranspiration patterns and irrigation management vs. hydrologic balance relationships. Observed data at over 800 sites across the Great Plains of USA, comprising of 9 states and 2,307,410 km2 of surface area, which is about 30% of the terrestrial area of the USA, were used to quantify and map large-scale and long-term (1968-2013) spatial trends of air temperatures, daily temperature range (DTR), precipitation, grass-reference evapotranspiration (ETo) and aridity index (AI) at monthly, growing season and annual time steps. Air temperatures had a strong north to south increasing trend, with annual average varying from -1 to 24 °C, and growing season average temperature varying from 8 to 30 °C. DTR gradually decreased from western to eastern parts of the region, with a regional annual and growing season averages of 14.25 °C and 14.79 °C, respectively. Precipitation had a gradual shift towards higher magnitudes from west to east, with the average annual and growing season (May-September) precipitation ranging from 163 to 1486 mm and from 98 to 746 mm, respectively. ETo had a southwest-northeast decreasing trend, with regional annual and growing season averages of 1297 mm and 823 mm, respectively. AI increased from west to east, indicating higher humidity (less arid) towards the east, with regional annual and growing season averages of 0.49 and 0.44, respectively. The spatial datasets and maps for these important climate variables can serve as valuable background for climate change and hydrologic studies in the Great Plains region. Through identification of priority areas from the developed maps, efforts of the concerned personnel and agencies and resources can be diverted towards development

  2. Ranges of moisture-source temperature estimated from Antarctic ice cores stable isotope records over glacial–interglacial cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Uemura

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A single isotope ratio (δD or δ18O of water is widely used as an air-temperature proxy in Antarctic ice core records. These isotope ratios, however, do not solely depend on air-temperature but also on the extent of distillation of heavy isotopes out of atmospheric water vapor from an oceanic moisture source to a precipitation site. The temperature changes at the oceanic moisture source (Δ Tsource and at the precipitation site (Δ Tsite can be retrieved by using deuterium-excess (d data. A new d record from Dome Fuji, Antarctica spanning the past 360 000 yr is presented and compared with records from Vostok and EPICA Dome C ice cores. In previous studies, to retrieve Δ Tsource and Δ Tsite information, different linear regression equations were proposed using theoretical isotope distillation models. A major source of uncertainty lies in the coefficient of regression, βsite which is related to the sensitivity of d to Δ Tsite. We show that different ranges of temperature and selections of isotopic model outputs may increase the value of βsite by more than a factor of two. To explore the impacts of this coefficient on reconstructed temperatures, we apply for the first time the exact same methodology to the isotope records from the three Antarctica ice cores. We show that uncertainties in the βsite coefficient strongly affect (i the glacial–interglacial magnitude of Δ Tsource; (ii the imprint of obliquity in Δ Tsource and in the site-source temperature gradient. By contrast, we highlight the robustness of Δ Tsite reconstruction using water isotopes records.

  3. Temperature drives abundance fluctuations, but spatial dynamics is constrained by landscape configuration: Implications for climate-driven range shift in a butterfly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourcade, Yoan; Ranius, Thomas; Öckinger, Erik

    2017-10-01

    Prediction of species distributions in an altered climate requires knowledge on how global- and local-scale factors interact to limit their current distributions. Such knowledge can be gained through studies of spatial population dynamics at climatic range margins. Here, using a butterfly (Pyrgus armoricanus) as model species, we first predicted based on species distribution modelling that its climatically suitable habitats currently extend north of its realized range. Projecting the model into scenarios of future climate, we showed that the distribution of climatically suitable habitats may shift northward by an additional 400 km in the future. Second, we used a 13-year monitoring dataset including the majority of all habitat patches at the species northern range margin to assess the synergetic impact of temperature fluctuations and spatial distribution of habitat, microclimatic conditions and habitat quality, on abundance and colonization-extinction dynamics. The fluctuation in abundance between years was almost entirely determined by the variation in temperature during the species larval development. In contrast, colonization and extinction dynamics were better explained by patch area, between-patch connectivity and host plant density. This suggests that the response of the species to future climate change may be limited by future land use and how its host plants respond to climate change. It is, thus, probable that dispersal limitation will prevent P. armoricanus from reaching its potential future distribution. We argue that models of range dynamics should consider the factors influencing metapopulation dynamics, especially at the range edges, and not only broad-scale climate. It includes factors acting at the scale of habitat patches such as habitat quality and microclimate and landscape-scale factors such as the spatial configuration of potentially suitable patches. Knowledge of population dynamics under various environmental conditions, and the

  4. Hysteresis in Lanthanide Zirconium Oxides Observed Using a Pulse CV Technique and including the Effect of High Temperature Annealing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qifeng Lu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A powerful characterization technique, pulse capacitance-voltage (CV technique, was used to investigate oxide traps before and after annealing for lanthanide zirconium oxide thin films deposited on n-type Si (111 substrates at 300 °C by liquid injection Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD. The results indicated that: (1 more traps were observed compared to the conventional capacitance-voltage characterization method in LaZrOx; (2 the time-dependent trapping/de-trapping was influenced by the edge time, width and peak-to-peak voltage of a gate voltage pulse. Post deposition annealing was performed at 700 °C, 800 °C and 900 °C in N2 ambient for 15 s to the samples with 200 ALD cycles. The effect of the high temperature annealing on oxide traps and leakage current were subsequently explored. It showed that more traps were generated after annealing with the trap density increasing from 1.41 × 1012 cm−2 for as-deposited sample to 4.55 × 1012 cm−2 for the 800 °C annealed one. In addition, the leakage current density increase from about 10−6 A/cm2 at Vg = +0.5 V for the as-deposited sample to 10−3 A/cm2 at Vg = +0.5 V for the 900 °C annealed one.

  5. Impact of diurnal temperature range on mortality in a high plateau area in southwest China: A time series analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Zan; Guo, Pi; Xie, Fang; Chu, Huifang; Li, Kun; Pu, Jingbo; Pang, Shaojie; Dong, Hongli; Liu, Yahui; Pi, Fuhua; Zhang, Qingying

    2015-09-01

    Diurnal temperature range (DTR) is an important meteorological indicator that reflects weather stability and is associated with global climate change and urbanization. Previous studies have explored the effect of DTR on human health in coastal cities with small daily temperature variations, but we have little evidence for high plateau regions where large DTRs usually occur. Using daily mortality data (2007-2013), we conducted a time-series analysis to assess the effect of DTR on daily mortality in Yuxi, a high plateau city in southwest China. Poisson regression with distributed lag non-linear model was used to estimate DTR effects on daily mortality, controlling for daily mean temperature, relative humidity, sunshine duration, wind speed, atmospheric pressure, day of the week, and seasonal and long-term trends. The cumulative effects of DTR were J-shaped curves for non-accidental, cardiorespiratory and cardiovascular mortality, with a U-shaped curve for respiratory mortality. Risk assessments showed strong monotonic increases in mortality starting at a DTR of approximately 16 °C. The relative risk of non-accidental morality with extreme high DTR at lag 0 and 0-21 days was 1.03 (95% confidence interval: 0.95-1.11) and 1.33 (0.94-1.89), respectively. The risk of mortality with extreme high DTR was greater for males and age DTR on mortality was non-linear, with high DTR associated with increased mortality. A DTR of 16 °C may be a cut-off point for mortality prognosis and has implications for developing intervention strategies to address high DTR exposure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of land use/land cover on diurnal temperature range in the temperate grassland region of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xiangjin; Liu, Binhui; Lu, Xianguo

    2017-01-01

    As a fragile ecological zone, the temperate grassland region of China has experienced dramatic land use/land cover (LULC) changes due to human disturbances. So far, the impacts of LULC change on climate especially the diurnal temperature range (DTR) in this region are still not well understood. Based on the OMR (observation minus reanalysis) method, this study investigated the effects of LULC on DTR in the temperate grassland region of China. Considering the possible uncertainty of the results due to spatial resolution of the reanalysis dataset, two reanalysis datasets with different spatial resolutions were utilized. Results showed that LULC generally contributed to the decline of DTR in the temperate grassland region of China during 1980 to 2005. Due to different warming effects on monthly maximum temperature (Tmax) and minimum temperature (Tmin), grassland and forest tend to slightly decrease monthly DTR (approximately -0.053 to -0.050°C/decade and approximately -0.059 to -0.055°C/decade, respectively), while bare land has a slightly positive effect on DTR (approximately 0.018-0.021°C/decade). By contrast, cropland and urban tend to slightly decrease Tmax, obviously increase Tmin and thus result in a rapid decline of DTR (approximately -0.556 to -0.503°C/decade and approximately -0.617 to -0.612°C/decade, respectively). In the temperate grassland region of China, grassland vegetation changes due to human disturbances can have some effects on DTR mainly by changing the Tmax. Conversion from grassland to cropland could decrease the DTR by slowing down the increase of Tmax. But the conversion from grassland to bare land, as well as the reduction of grassland vegetation cover will increase Tmax, and consequently the DTR. The results suggest that grassland degradation is likely to result in daylight warming and increased DTR in the temperate grassland region of China. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Thermal Conductivity of Magnesium Alloys in the Temperature Range from -125 °C to 400 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sanghyun; Ham, Hye Jeong; Kwon, Su Yong; Kim, Sok Won; Suh, Chang Min

    2013-12-01

    Magnesium alloys have been widely used in recent years as lightweight structural materials in the manufacturing of automobiles, airplanes, and portable computers. Magnesium alloys have extremely low density (as low as 1738 kg · m-3) and high rigidity, which makes them suitable for such applications. In this study, the thermal conductivity of two different magnesium alloys made by twin-roll casting was investigated using the laser-flash technique and differential scanning calorimetry for thermal diffusivity and specific heat capacity measurements, respectively. The thermal diffusivity of the magnesium alloys, AZ31 and AZ61, was measured over the temperature range from -125 °C to 400 °C. The alloys AZ31 and AZ61 are composed of magnesium, aluminum, and zinc. The thermal conductivity gradually increased with temperature. The densities of AZ31 and AZ61 were 1754 kg · m-3 and 1777 kg · m-3, respectively. The thermal conductivity of AZ31 was about 25 % higher than that of AZ61, and this is attributed to the amount of precipitation.

  8. A compilation of correlation parameters for predicting the enthalpy and thermal conductivity of solid foods within the temperature range of -40 C to +40 C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amos, N.D. [Comvita New Zealand Limited, Private Bag 1, Te Puke 3153 (New Zealand); Willix, J.; North, M.F. [AgResearch Limited, MIRINZ Centre, Ruakura Campus, East Street, Private Bag 3123, Hamilton (New Zealand); Chadderton, T. [Crop and Food Research Ltd, PO Box 5114, Nelson (New Zealand)

    2008-11-15

    This paper presents thermal conductivity data for 40 foods, enthalpy data for 58 foods and density data for nine foods, along with the compositions of the foods. Measurements cover a range of solid food types (including meats, fats, offal, fish, dairy products and horticultural products). Some measurements reported are for foods that have never before been studied, others have been published elsewhere, but are included here for convenience. Thermal conductivity was measured using a guarded hot-plate apparatus, enthalpy using an adiabatic calorimeter and density using a water displacement meter. Thermal conductivity and enthalpy values were measured within the temperature range of -40 C to +40 C. (author) [French] Cette publication presente des donnes sur la conductivite thermique, l'enthalpie et la densite respectivement de 40, 58 et 9 produits alimentaires, ainsi que leurs compositions. Les mesures couvrent une variete de types de produits alimentaires (viande, matieres grasses, abats, poisson, produits laitiers, produits horticoles). Certaines sont rapportees pour des produits qui n 'ant jamais ete etudie auparavant, d'autres ant ete publie ailleurs mais sont aussi inclues pour plus de commodite. La conductivite thermique a ete mesure avec un appareil a plaque electrique protegee, l'enthalpie avec un calorimetre adiabatique et la densite avec un appareil mesurant Ie deplacement d'eau. La conductivite thermique et l'enthalpie ont ete toutes les mesures pour une fourchette de temperatures allant de -40 C a 40 C. (orig.)

  9. Levels of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) and dioxin-like PCBs in free range eggs from Vietnam, including potential health risks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoang, T.T.; Traag, W.A.; Murk, A.J.; Hoogenboom, L.A.P.

    2014-01-01

    Chicken and duck eggs collected from three different areas in Vietnam were examined for polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs). These regions included a background area, an area sprayed with Agent Orange and the Bien Hoa airbase area where Agent Orange was handled by the US

  10. Proton inelastic mean free path in a group of bioorganic compounds and water in 0.05-10 MeV range - Including higher-order corrections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan Zhenyu, E-mail: tzy@sdu.edu.c [School of Electrical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250061, Shandong (China); Xia Yueyuan; Zhao Mingwen; Liu Xiangdong [School of Physics, Shandong University, Jinan 250100, Shandong (China)

    2010-07-15

    The systematic calculations of the inelastic mean free paths (MFP) of 0.05-10 MeV protons in a group of eleven important bioorganic compounds, i.e. DNA, five bases, three fatty acids, cellulose and {beta}-carotene, have been performed. The expressions for the calculations are derived from the Ashley's optical-data model and from the higher-order correction terms in stopping power calculations. Especially, the Bloch correction for the inelastic MFP is proposed empirically in this work. The inelastic MFPs for energetic protons in water are also evaluated and compared with other theoretical calculations. The proton inelastic MFPs for these 11 bioorganic compounds in the energy range from 0.05 to 10 MeV are presented here for the first time, and might be useful for studies of various radiation effects in these materials.

  11. OvidSP Medline-to-PubMed search filter translation: a methodology for extending search filter range to include PubMed's unique content

    OpenAIRE

    Damarell, Raechel A; Tieman, Jennifer J; Sladek, Ruth M

    2013-01-01

    Background PubMed translations of OvidSP Medline search filters offer searchers improved ease of access. They may also facilitate access to PubMed?s unique content, including citations for the most recently published biomedical evidence. Retrieving this content requires a search strategy comprising natural language terms (?textwords?), rather than Medical Subject Headings (MeSH). We describe a reproducible methodology that uses a validated PubMed search filter translation to create a textword...

  12. Topography, structure, and formation kinetic mechanism of carbon deposited onto nickel in the temperature range from 400 to 850°C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhi-yuan; Bian, Liu-zhen; Wang, Li-jun; Yu, Zi-you; Zhao, Hai-lei; Li, Fu-shen; Chou, Kuo-chih

    2017-05-01

    The carbon deposition behavior on nickel particles was observed within the temperature range from 400 to 800°C in a pure methane atmosphere. The topography, properties, and molecular structure of the deposited carbon were investigated using field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), temperature-programmed oxidation (TPO) technology, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Raman spectroscopy. The deposited carbon is present in the form of a film at 400-450°C, as fibers at 500-600°C, and as particles at 650-800°C. In addition, the structure of the deposited carbon becomes more ordered at higher temperatures because both the TPO peak temperature of deposited carbon and the Raman shift of the G band increase with the increase in experimental temperature, whereas the intensity ratio between the D bands and the G band decreases. An interesting observation is that the carbon deposition rate is suppressed in the medium-temperature range (M-T range) and the corresponding kinetic mechanism changes. Correspondingly, the FWHM of the G and D1 bands in the Raman spectrum reaches a maximum and the intensities of the D2, D3, and D4 bands decrease to low limits in the M-T range. These results indicate that carbon structure parameters exhibit two different tendencies with respect to varying temperature. Both of the two group parameters change dramatically as a peak function with increasing reaction temperature within the M-T range.

  13. Development of Superior Sorbents for Separation of CO2 from Flue Gas at a Wide Temperature Range During Coal Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panagiotis G. Smirniotis

    2007-06-30

    In chapter 1, the studies focused on the development of novel sorbents for reducing the carbon dioxide emissions at high temperatures. Our studies focused on cesium doped CaO sorbents with respect to other major flue gas compounds in a wide temperature range. The thermo-gravimetric analysis of sorbents with loadings of CaO doped on 20 wt% cesium demonstrated high CO{sub 2} sorption uptakes (up to 66 wt% CO{sub 2}/sorbent). It is remarkable to note that zero adsorption affinity for N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O and NO at temperatures as high as 600 C was observed. For water vapor and nitrogen oxide we observed a positive effect for CO{sub 2} adsorption. In the presence of steam, the CO{sub 2} adsorption increased to the highest adsorption capacity of 77 wt% CO{sub 2}/sorbent. In the presence of nitrogen oxide, the final CO{sub 2} uptake remained same, but the rate of adsorption was higher at the initial stages (10%) than the case where no nitrogen oxide was fed. In chapter 2, Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} {center_dot} 4H{sub 2}O, CaO, Ca(OH){sub 2}, CaCO{sub 3}, and Ca(CH{sub 3}COO){sub 2} {center_dot} H{sub 2}O were used as precursors for synthesis of CaO sorbents on this work. The sorbents prepared from calcium acetate (CaAc{sub 2}-CaO) resulted in the best uptake characteristics for CO{sub 2}. It possessed higher BET surface area and higher pore volume than the other sorbents. According to SEM images, this sorbent shows 'fluffy' structure, which probably contributes to its high surface area and pore volume. When temperatures were between 550 and 800 C, this sorbent could be carbonated almost completely. Moreover, the carbonation progressed dominantly at the initial short period. Under numerous adsorption-desorption cycles, the CaAc{sub 2}-CaO demonstrated the best reversibility, even under the existence of 10 vol % water vapor. In a 27 cyclic running, the sorbent sustained fairly high carbonation conversion of 62%. Pore size distributions indicate that their

  14. Radiation-Hardening of Best-in-Class SiGe Mixed-Signal and RF Electronics for Ultra-Wide Temperature Range Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Innovative, reliable, low-power, and low-noise electronics that can operate over a wide temperature range and high radiation are critical for future NASA missions....

  15. Rechargeable Lithium Sulfur (Li-S) Battery with Specific Energy 400 Wh/kg and Operating Temperature Range -60?C to 60?C Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Sion Power is developing a rechargeable lithium sulfur (Li-S) battery with a demonstrated specific energy exceeding 350 Wh/kg and the range of operating temperatures...

  16. Fluoride salts as phase change materials for thermal energy storage in the temperature range 1000-1400 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    1988-01-01

    Eutectic compositions and congruently melting intermediate compounds in binary and ternary fluoride salt systems were characterized for potential use as latent heat of fusion phase change materials to store thermal energy in the temperature range 1000-1400 K. The melting points and eutectic compositions for many systems with published phase diagrams were experimentally verified and new eutectic compositions having melting points between 1000 and 1400 K were identified. Heats of fusion of several binary and ternary eutectics and congruently melting compounds were experimentally measured by differential scanning calorimetry. For a few systems in which heats of mixing in the melts have been measured, heats of fusion of the eutectics were calculated from thermodynamic considerations and good agreement was obtained between the measured and calculated values. Several combinations of salts with high heats of fusion per unit mass (greater than 0.7 kJ/g) have been identified for possible use as phase change materials in advanced solar dynamic space power applications.

  17. Variability and trend of diurnal temperature range in China and their relationship to total cloud cover and sunshine duration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, X. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). LAGEO

    2013-07-01

    This study aims to investigate the effect of total cloud cover (TCC) and sunshine duration (SSD) in the variation of diurnal temperature range (DTR) in China during 1954-2009. As expected, the inter-annual variation of DTR was mainly determined by TCC. Analysis of trends of 30- year moving windows of DTR and TCC time series showed that TCC changes could account for that of DTR in some cases. However, TCC decreased during 1954-2009, which did not support DTR reduction across China. DTRs under sky conditions such as clear, cloudy and overcast showed nearly the same decreasing rate that completely accounted for the overall DTR reduction. Nevertheless, correlation between SSD and DTR was weak and not significant under clear sky conditions in which aerosol direct radiative effect should be dominant. Furthermore, 30-60% of DTR reduction was associated with DTR decrease under overcast conditions in south China. This implies that aerosol direct radiative effect appears not to be one of the main factors determining long-term changes in DTR in China. (orig.)

  18. Variability and trend of diurnal temperature range in China and their relationship to total cloud cover and sunshine duration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Xia

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to investigate the effect of total cloud cover (TCC and sunshine duration (SSD in the variation of diurnal temperature range (DTR in China during 1954–2009. As expected, the inter-annual variation of DTR was mainly determined by TCC. Analysis of trends of 30-year moving windows of DTR and TCC time series showed that TCC changes could account for that of DTR in some cases. However, TCC decreased during 1954–2009, which did not support DTR reduction across China. DTRs under sky conditions such as clear, cloudy and overcast showed nearly the same decreasing rate that completely accounted for the overall DTR reduction. Nevertheless, correlation between SSD and DTR was weak and not significant under clear sky conditions in which aerosol direct radiative effect should be dominant. Furthermore, 30–60% of DTR reduction was associated with DTR decrease under overcast conditions in south China. This implies that aerosol direct radiative effect appears not to be one of the main factors determining long-term changes in DTR in China.

  19. High Damping of Lightweight TiNi-Ti2Ni Shape Memory Composites for Wide Temperature Range Usage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bing; Luo, Zheng; Yuan, Bin; Liu, Jiangwen; Gao, Yan

    2017-10-01

    A bimodal porous TiNi-Ti2Ni shape memory alloy composite (SMAC) with 59% porosity was fabricated by sintering Ti-46at.%Ni elemental powders with pore-forming agent. The porous TiNi-Ti2Ni SMAC contains two irregular pores of about 400 and 120 μm. We investigated the microstructure and pore morphology correlated with the mechanical properties and damping capacities of the SMAC. Ti2Ni intermetallic phases with size of 1-3 μm were homogeneously distributed in the TiNi matrix. The porous TiNi-Ti2Ni SMAC exhibits exceptionally high inverse mechanical quality factor ( Q -1) of 0.25 at < 40 °C, which is among the highest value reported for porous/dense shape memory alloys or composites to best of our knowledge, and it shows very high compressive fracture strain of about 25%. Moreover, the fabricated porous SMAC at relatively low strain amplitude can exhibit considerable high Q -1 of 0.06 0.11 for a wide range of temperature between - 90 and 200 °C, which is attributed to the stress concentration distribution provided by the bimodal structure of pores and the massive interfaces between pore/matrix and TiNi/Ti2Ni. These porous SMACs can be an ideal candidate for using as a lightweight damping material in the energy-saving applications.

  20. Variability and trend of diurnal temperature range in China and their relationship to total cloud cover and sunshine duration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, X.

    2013-05-01

    This study aims to investigate the effect of total cloud cover (TCC) and sunshine duration (SSD) in the variation of diurnal temperature range (DTR) in China during 1954-2009. As expected, the inter-annual variation of DTR was mainly determined by TCC. Analysis of trends of 30-year moving windows of DTR and TCC time series showed that TCC changes could account for that of DTR in some cases. However, TCC decreased during 1954-2009, which did not support DTR reduction across China. DTRs under sky conditions such as clear, cloudy and overcast showed nearly the same decreasing rate that completely accounted for the overall DTR reduction. Nevertheless, correlation between SSD and DTR was weak and not significant under clear sky conditions in which aerosol direct radiative effect should be dominant. Furthermore, 30-60% of DTR reduction was associated with DTR decrease under overcast conditions in south China. This implies that aerosol direct radiative effect appears not to be one of the main factors determining long-term changes in DTR in China.

  1. Long-term patterns of air temperatures, daily temperature range, precipitation, grass-reference evapotranspiration and aridity index in the USA great plains: Part II. Temporal trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukal, M.; Irmak, S.

    2016-11-01

    Detection of long-term changes in climate variables over large spatial scales is a very important prerequisite to the development of effective mitigation and adaptation measures for the future potential climate change and for developing strategies for future hydrologic balance analyses under changing climate. Moreover, there is a need for effective approaches of providing information about these changes to decision makers, water managers and stakeholders to aid in efficient implementation of the developed strategies. This study involves computation, mapping and analyses of long-term (1968-2013) county-specific trends in annual, growing-season (1st May-30th September) and monthly air temperatures [(maximum (Tmax), minimum (Tmin) and average (Tavg)], daily temperature range (DTR), precipitation, grass reference evapotranspiration (ETo) and aridity index (AI) over the USA Great Plains region using datasets from over 800 weather station sites. Positive trends in annual Tavg, Tmax and Tmin, DTR, precipitation, ETo and AI were observed in 71%, 89%, 85%, 31%, 61%, 38% and 66% of the counties in the region, respectively, whereas these proportions were 48%, 89%, 62%, 20%, 57%, 28%, and 63%, respectively, for the growing-season averages of the same variables. On a regional average basis, the positive trends in growing-season Tavg, Tmax and Tmin, DTR, precipitation, ETo and AI were 0.18 °C decade-1, 0.19 °C decade-1, 0.17 °C decade-1, 0.09 °C decade-1, 1.12 mm yr-1, 0.4 mm yr-1 and 0.02 decade-1, respectively, and the negative trends were 0.21 °C decade-1, 0.06 °C decade-1, 0.09 °C decade-1, 0.22 °C decade-1, 1.16 mm yr-1, 0.76 mm yr-1 and 0.02 decade-1, respectively. The temporal trends were highly variable in space and were appropriately represented using monthly, annual and growing-season maps developed using Geographic Information System (GIS) techniques. The long-term and spatial and temporal information and data for a large region provided in this study can be

  2. Empirical modeling of spatial and temporal variation in warm season nocturnal air temperatures in two North Idaho mountain ranges, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachery A. Holden; Michael A. Crimmins; Samuel A. Cushman; Jeremy S. Littell

    2010-01-01

    Accurate, fine spatial resolution predictions of surface air temperatures are critical for understanding many hydrologic and ecological processes. This study examines the spatial and temporal variability in nocturnal air temperatures across a mountainous region of Northern Idaho. Principal components analysis (PCA) was applied to a network of 70 Hobo temperature...

  3. OvidSP Medline-to-PubMed search filter translation: a methodology for extending search filter range to include PubMed's unique content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damarell, Raechel A; Tieman, Jennifer J; Sladek, Ruth M

    2013-07-02

    PubMed translations of OvidSP Medline search filters offer searchers improved ease of access. They may also facilitate access to PubMed's unique content, including citations for the most recently published biomedical evidence. Retrieving this content requires a search strategy comprising natural language terms ('textwords'), rather than Medical Subject Headings (MeSH). We describe a reproducible methodology that uses a validated PubMed search filter translation to create a textword-only strategy to extend retrieval to PubMed's unique heart failure literature. We translated an OvidSP Medline heart failure search filter for PubMed and established version equivalence in terms of indexed literature retrieval. The PubMed version was then run within PubMed to identify citations retrieved by the filter's MeSH terms (Heart failure, Left ventricular dysfunction, and Cardiomyopathy). It was then rerun with the same MeSH terms restricted to searching on title and abstract fields (i.e. as 'textwords'). Citations retrieved by the MeSH search but not the textword search were isolated. Frequency analysis of their titles/abstracts identified natural language alternatives for those MeSH terms that performed less effectively as textwords. These terms were tested in combination to determine the best performing search string for reclaiming this 'lost set'. This string, restricted to searching on PubMed's unique content, was then combined with the validated PubMed translation to extend the filter's performance in this database. The PubMed heart failure filter retrieved 6829 citations. Of these, 834 (12%) failed to be retrieved when MeSH terms were converted to textwords. Frequency analysis of the 834 citations identified five high frequency natural language alternatives that could improve retrieval of this set (cardiac failure, cardiac resynchronization, left ventricular systolic dysfunction, left ventricular diastolic dysfunction, and LV dysfunction). Together these terms reclaimed

  4. Improved Wide Operating Temperature Range of LiNiCoAiO2-based Li-ion Cells with Methyl Propionate-based Electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, Marshall C.; Tomcsi, Michael R.; Hwang, C.; Whitcanack, L. D.; Bugga, Ratnakumar V.; Nagata, Mikito; Visco, Vince; Tsukamoto, Hisashi

    2012-01-01

    Demonstration of wide operating temperature range Li-ion electrolytes Methyl propionate-based wide operating temperature range electrolytes were demonstrated to provide dramatic improvement of the low temperature capability of Quallion prototype Li-ion cells (MCMB-LiNiCoAlO2). Some formulations were observed to deliver over 60% of the room temperature capacity using a 5C rate at - 40oC !! Represents over a 4-fold improvement over the baseline electrolyte system. Demonstrated operational capability of a number of systems over a wide temperature range (-40 to +70 C) Demonstrated reasonably good long term cycle life performance at high temperature (i.e., at +40deg and +50 C) A number of formulations containing electrolytes additives (i.e., FEC, VC, LiBOB, and lithium oxalate) have been shown to have enhanced lithium kinetics at low temperature and promising high temperature resilience. Demonstrated good performance in larger capacity (12 Ah) Quallion Li-ion cells with methyl propionate-based electrolytes. Current efforts focused upon performing life studies and the impact upon low temperature capability.

  5. Time constants for temperature elevation in human models exposed to dipole antennas and beams in the frequency range from 1 to 30 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Ryota; Hirata, Akimasa; Laakso, Ilkka; Ziskin, Marvin C.; Foster, Kenneth R.

    2017-03-01

    This study computes the time constants of the temperature elevations in human head and body models exposed to simulated radiation from dipole antennas, electromagnetic beams, and plane waves. The frequency range considered is from 1 to 30 GHz. The specific absorption rate distributions in the human models are first computed using the finite-difference time-domain method for the electromagnetics. The temperature elevation is then calculated by solving the bioheat transfer equation. The computational results show that the thermal time constants (defined as the time required to reach 63% of the steady state temperature elevation) decrease with the elevation in radiation frequency. For frequencies higher than 4 GHz, the computed thermal time constants are smaller than the averaging time prescribed in the ICNIRP guidelines, but larger than the averaging time in the IEEE standard. Significant differences between the different head models are observed at frequencies higher than 10 GHz, which is attributable to the heat diffusion from the power absorbed in the pinna. The time constants for beam exposures become large with the increase in beam diameter. The thermal time constant in the brain is larger than that in the superficial tissues at high frequencies, because the brain temperature elevation is caused by the heat conduction of energy absorbed in the superficial tissue. The thermal time constant is minimized with an ideal beam with a minimum investigated diameter of 10 mm this minimal time constant is approximately 30 s and is almost independent of the radiation frequency, which is supported by analytic methods. In addition, the relation between the time constant, as defined in this paper, and ‘averaging time’ as it appears in the exposure limits is discussed, especially for short intense pulses. Similar to the laser guidelines, provisions should be included in the limits to limit the fluence for such pulses.

  6. Biases in the diurnal temperature range in Central Europe in an ensemble of regional climate models and their possible causes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyselý, Jan; Plavcová, Eva

    2012-09-01

    The study examines how regional climate models (RCMs) reproduce the diurnal temperature range (DTR) in their control simulations over Central Europe. We evaluate 30-year runs driven by perfect boundary conditions (the ERA40 reanalysis, 1961-1990) and a global climate model (ECHAM5) of an ensemble of RCMs with 25-km resolution from the ENSEMBLES project. The RCMs' performance is compared against the dataset gridded from a high-density stations network. We find that all RCMs underestimate DTR in all seasons, notwithstanding whether driven by ERA40 or ECHAM5. Underestimation is largest in summer and smallest in winter in most RCMs. The relationship of the models' errors to indices of atmospheric circulation and cloud cover is discussed to reveal possible causes of the biases. In all seasons and all simulations driven by ERA40 and ECHAM5, underestimation of DTR is larger under anticyclonic circulation and becomes smaller or negligible for cyclonic circulation. In summer and transition seasons, underestimation tends to be largest for the southeast to south flow associated with warm advection, while in winter it does not depend on flow direction. We show that the biases in DTR, which seem common to all examined RCMs, are also related to cloud cover simulation. However, there is no general tendency to overestimate total cloud amount under anticyclonic conditions in the RCMs, which suggests the large negative bias in DTR for anticyclonic circulation cannot be explained by a bias in cloudiness. Errors in simulating heat and moisture fluxes between land surface and atmosphere probably contribute to the biases in DTR as well.

  7. Biases in the diurnal temperature range in Central Europe in an ensemble of regional climate models and their possible causes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kysely, Jan [Institute of Atmospheric Physics AS CR, Prague 4 (Czech Republic); Plavcova, Eva [Institute of Atmospheric Physics AS CR, Prague 4 (Czech Republic); Charles University, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2012-09-15

    The study examines how regional climate models (RCMs) reproduce the diurnal temperature range (DTR) in their control simulations over Central Europe. We evaluate 30-year runs driven by perfect boundary conditions (the ERA40 reanalysis, 1961-1990) and a global climate model (ECHAM5) of an ensemble of RCMs with 25-km resolution from the ENSEMBLES project. The RCMs' performance is compared against the dataset gridded from a high-density stations network. We find that all RCMs underestimate DTR in all seasons, notwithstanding whether driven by ERA40 or ECHAM5. Underestimation is largest in summer and smallest in winter in most RCMs. The relationship of the models' errors to indices of atmospheric circulation and cloud cover is discussed to reveal possible causes of the biases. In all seasons and all simulations driven by ERA40 and ECHAM5, underestimation of DTR is larger under anticyclonic circulation and becomes smaller or negligible for cyclonic circulation. In summer and transition seasons, underestimation tends to be largest for the southeast to south flow associated with warm advection, while in winter it does not depend on flow direction. We show that the biases in DTR, which seem common to all examined RCMs, are also related to cloud cover simulation. However, there is no general tendency to overestimate total cloud amount under anticyclonic conditions in the RCMs, which suggests the large negative bias in DTR for anticyclonic circulation cannot be explained by a bias in cloudiness. Errors in simulating heat and moisture fluxes between land surface and atmosphere probably contribute to the biases in DTR as well. (orig.)

  8. [Lagged effects of diurnal temperature range on mortality in 66 cities in China: a time-series study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Y Q; Wang, L J; Luo, Y; Yin, P; Huang, Z J; Liu, T; Lin, H L; Xiao, J P; Li, X; Zeng, W L; Ma, W J; Zhou, M G

    2017-03-10

    Objective: To estimate the effect of daily diurnal temperature range (DTR) on mortality in different areas in China. Methods: A time series study using the data collected from 66 areas in China was conducted, and Meta-analysis was used to analyze the estimates of associations between DTR and daily mortality. Modifying effects of extremely low and high DTR-mortality relationship by season and socioeconomic status (SES) were also evaluated respectively. Cumulative excess risk (CER) was used as an index to evaluate the effects. Results: The information about 1 260 913 registered deaths were collected between 1 January 2006 and 31 December 2011, we found the relationship between extreme DTR and mortality was non-linear in all regions and the exposure-response curve was J-shaped. In central and south areas of China, the result indicated the obvious acute effect of extremely high DTR, and the mortality effect in central area (CER=5.1%, 95% CI: 2.4%-7.9%) was significant higher than that in south area (CER=4.5%, 95% CI: 1.7%-7.3%). Regarding to the modification of seasons, the cumulative mortality effect of DTR in cold season (CER=5.8%, 95%CI: 2.5%-9.2%) was higher than that in hot season (CER=3.1%, 95%CI: 1.1%-5.1%). Generally, deaths among the elderly (≥75 years) were associated more strongly with extremely high DTR. Conclusions: The mortality effects of extremely DTR in different areas and seasons showed different characteristics, that in central area and in cold season it was significantly stronger. After modified by season and SES, DTRs were the greatest threat to vulnerable population, especially to the elderly (≥75 years). Therefore, more attention should be paid to vulnerable groups and protection measures should be taken according to the local and seasonal conditions.

  9. Nonlinear reflection of a nanosecond laser pulse from thin aluminum film in the temperature range 2-14 kK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabutov, A. A.; Kaptilniy, A. G.; Ksenofontov, D. M.; Makarov, V. A.; Cherepetskaya, E. B.; Podymova, N. B.

    2015-11-01

    This letter aims to experimentally demonstrate the possibility of measuring the temporal dependencies of the surface temperature of an aluminum film confined by a transparent dielectric in the range below and above the critical temperature of aluminum (from 2 kK to 14 kK). Such temperatures are achieved under the action of a powerful linearly-polarized laser pulse of one nanosecond in duration onto the film’s surface. To find the temporal dependencies of the temperature of the aluminum film the nonlinear reflection coefficient of its irradiated surface is measured to determine the radiation of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at the fundamental wavelength.

  10. Coherent detection of spontaneous Brillouin scattering combined with Raman amplification for long range distributed temperature and strain measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alahbabi, M. N.; Cho, Y. T.; Newson, T. P.

    2005-05-01

    Brillouin intensity and frequency measurements achieved temperature and strain to be unambiguously resolved with resolutions of 3.5°C and 85 μɛ at 50km. Frequency only measurements, achieved temperature or strain resolution of 1.7°C and 35 μɛ at 100km.

  11. A Combined State of Charge Estimation Method for Lithium-Ion Batteries Used in a Wide Ambient Temperature Range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Feng

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Ambient temperature is a significant factor that influences the characteristics of lithium-ion batteries, which can produce adverse effects on state of charge (SOC estimation. In this paper, an integrated SOC algorithm that combines an advanced ampere-hour counting (Adv Ah method and multistate open-circuit voltage (multi OCV method, denoted as “Adv Ah + multi OCV”, is proposed. Ah counting is a simple and general method for estimating SOC. However, the available capacity and coulombic efficiency in this method are influenced by the operating states of batteries, such as temperature and current, thereby causing SOC estimation errors. To address this problem, an enhanced Ah counting method that can alter the available capacity and coulombic efficiency according to temperature is proposed during the SOC calculation. Moreover, the battery SOCs between different temperatures can be mutually converted in accordance with the capacity loss. To compensate for the accumulating errors in Ah counting caused by the low precision of current sensors and lack of accurate initial SOC, the OCV method is used for calibration and as a complement. Given the variation of available capacities at different temperatures, rated/non-rated OCV–SOCs are established to estimate the initial SOCs in accordance with the Ah counting SOCs. Two dynamic tests, namely, constant- and alternated-temperature tests, are employed to verify the combined method at different temperatures. The results indicate that our method can provide effective and accurate SOC estimation at different ambient temperatures.

  12. Technical Note: VUV photodesorption rates from water ice in the 120–150 K temperature range – significance for Noctilucent Clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Yu. Kulikov

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory studies have been carried out with the aim to improve our understanding of physicochemical processes which take place at the water ice/air interface initiated by solar irradiation with a wavelength of 121.6 nm. It was intended to mimic the processes of ice particles characteristic of Noctilucent Clouds (NLCs. The experimental set-up used includes a high-vacuum chamber, a gas handling system, a cryostat with temperature controller, an FTIR spectrometer, a vacuum ultraviolet hydrogen lamp, and a microwave generator. We report the first results of measurements of the absolute photodesorption rate (loss of substance due to the escape of photoproducts into gas phase from thin (20–100 nm water ice samples kept in the temperature range of 120–150 K. The obtained results show that a flow of photoproducts into the gas phase is considerably lower than presumed in the recent study by Murray and Plane (2005. The experiments indicate that almost all photoproducts remain in the solid phase, and the principal chemical reaction between them is the recombination reaction H + OH → H2O which is evidently very fast. This means that direct photolysis of mesospheric ice particles seems to have no significant impact on the gas phase chemistry of the upper mesosphere.

  13. Dissemination of ultraprecise measurements in radiometry and remote sensing within 100-3500K temperature range based on blackbody sources developed in VNIIOFI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapritsky, Victor I.; Ogarev, Sergey A.; Khlevnoy, Boris B.; Samoylov, Mikhail L.; Khromchenko, Vladimir B.; Morozova, Svetlana P.

    2002-12-01

    The large variety of high-precision unique blackbody sources: those operating at fixed temperatures provided by phase transitions of metals and metal-carbon eutectics, and variable-temperature ones had been designed in VNIIOFI for high-precision radiometry, radiation thermometry and spaceborne remote sensing within a 100 to 3500K temperature range. Paper reviews the blackbodies (BBs) ranged to low, middle and high temperatures, and describes spectral radiance and irradiance calibration facilities on the base of these BBs in IR and V-UV spectral ranges. The latest investigations of high-temperature fix-points based on metal-carbon eutectics Re-C (2748K) demonstrated an excellent reproducibility of freezing plateau (up to 0.01% in terms of radiation temperature) between series of measurements/crucibles, and about 0.003% within a sample measurement session, i.e. better than 100mK. Further Re-C (spectral irradiance measurements) and TiC-C (3057° C) eutectics are being investigated for use as high-stable radiance/irradiance sources above the conventionally assigned values of temperatures of ITS-90.

  14. A low-power tool for measuring acceleration, pressure, and temperature (APT) with wide dynamic range and bandwidth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heesemann, Martin; Davis, Earl E.; Paros, Jerome; Johnson, Greg; Meldrum, Robert; Scherwath, Martin; Mihaly, Steven

    2017-04-01

    We present a new tool that facilitates the study of inter-related geodetic, geodynamic, seismic, and oceanographic phenomena. It incorporates a temperature compensated tri-axial accelerometer developed by Quartz Seismic Sensors, Inc., a pressure sensor built by Paroscientific Inc., and a low-power, high-precision frequency counter developed by Bennest Enterprises Ltd. and built by RBR, Ltd. The sensors are housed in a 7 cm o.d. titanium pressure case designed for use to full ocean depths (withstands more than 20 km of water pressure). Sampling intervals are programmable from 0.08 s to 1 hr; standard memory can store up to 130 million samples; total power consumption is roughly 115 mW when operating continuously and proportionately lower when operating intermittently (e.g., 2 mW average at 1 sample per min). Serial and USB communications protocols allow a variety of autonomous and cable-connection options. Measurement precision of the order of 10-8 of full scale (e.g., pressure equivalent to 4000 m water depth, acceleration = +/- 3 g) allows observations of pressure and acceleration variations of 0.4 Pa and 0.3 μm s-2. Long-term variations in vertical acceleration are sensitive to displacement through the gravity gradient down to a level of roughly 2 cm, and variations in horizontal acceleration are sensitive to tilt down to a level of 0.03 μrad. With the large dynamic ranges, high sensitivities and broad bandwidth (6 Hz to DC), ground motion associated with microseisms, strong and weak seismic ground motion, tidal loading, and slow and rapid geodynamic deformation - all normally studied using disparate instruments - can be observed with a single tool. Installation in the marine environment is accomplished by pushing the tool roughly 1 m vertically below the seafloor with a submersible or remotely operated vehicle, with no profile remaining above the seafloor to cause current-induced noise. The weight of the tool is designed to match the sediment it displaces to

  15. Determination of Germination Response to Temperature and Water Potential for a Wide Range of Cover Crop Species and Related Functional Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribouillois, Hélène; Dürr, Carolyne; Demilly, Didier; Wagner, Marie-Hélène; Justes, Eric

    2016-01-01

    A wide range of species can be sown as cover crops during fallow periods to provide various ecosystem services. Plant establishment is a key stage, especially when sowing occurs in summer with high soil temperatures and low water availability. The aim of this study was to determine the response of germination to temperature and water potential for diverse cover crop species. Based on these characteristics, we developed contrasting functional groups that group species with the same germination ability, which may be useful to adapt species choice to climatic sowing conditions. Germination of 36 different species from six botanical families was measured in the laboratory at eight temperatures ranging from 4.5-43°C and at four water potentials. Final germination percentages, germination rate, cardinal temperatures, base temperature and base water potential were calculated for each species. Optimal temperatures varied from 21.3-37.2°C, maximum temperatures at which the species could germinate varied from 27.7-43.0°C and base water potentials varied from -0.1 to -2.6 MPa. Most cover crops were adapted to summer sowing with a relatively high mean optimal temperature for germination, but some Fabaceae species were more sensitive to high temperatures. Species mainly from Poaceae and Brassicaceae were the most resistant to water deficit and germinated under a low base water potential. Species were classified, independent of family, according to their ability to germinate under a range of temperatures and according to their base water potential in order to group species by functional germination groups. These groups may help in choosing the most adapted cover crop species to sow based on climatic conditions in order to favor plant establishment and the services provided by cover crops during fallow periods. Our data can also be useful as germination parameters in crop models to simulate the emergence of cover crops under different pedoclimatic conditions and crop

  16. Global effects of the DEAD-box RNA helicase DeaD (CsdA) on gene expression over a broad range of temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakulskas, Christopher A.; Pannuri, Archana; Cortés-Selva, Diana; Zere, Tesfalem R.; Ahmer, Brian M.; Babitzke, Paul; Romeo, Tony

    2014-01-01

    Summary In Escherichia coli, activity of the global regulatory RNA binding protein CsrA is antagonized by two noncoding sRNAs, CsrB and CsrC, which sequester it away from its lower affinity mRNA targets. Transcription of csrB/C requires the BarA-UvrY two component signal transduction system, which responds to short chain carboxylates. We show that two DEAD-box RNA helicases, DeaD and SrmB, activate csrB/C expression by different pathways. DeaD facilitates uvrY translation by counteracting the inhibitory effect of long distance basepairing between the uvrY mRNA leader and coding region, while SrmB does not affect UvrY or UvrY-phosphate levels. Contrary to the prevailing notion that these helicases act primarily at low temperatures, DeaD and SrmB activated csrB expression over a wide temperature range. High-throughput sequencing of RNA isolated by crosslinking immunoprecipitation (HITS-CLIP) revealed in vivo interactions of DeaD with 39 mRNAs, including those of uvrY and 9 other regulatory genes. Studies on the expression of several of the identified genes revealed regulatory effects of DeaD in all cases and diverse temperature response patterns. Our findings uncover an expanded regulatory role for DeaD, which is mediated through novel mRNA targets, important global regulators and under physiological conditions that were considered to be incompatible with its function. PMID:24708042

  17. A model for steady state stage III creep regime at low-high stress/temperature range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Bonora

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Although diffusional flow creep is often considered out of practical engineering applications, the need for a model capable to account for the resulting action of both diffusional and dislocation type creep is justified by the increasing demands of reliable creep design for very long lives (exceeding 100.000h, high stress-low temperatures and high temperature-low stress regimes. In this paper, a creep model formulation, in which the change of the creep mechanism has been accounted for through an explicit dependence of the creep exponent n on stress and temperature, has been proposed. An application example of the proposed approach to high purity aluminum is given.

  18. Improving the Catalytic Activity of Hyperthermophilic Pyrococcus horikoshii Prolidase for Detoxification of Organophosphorus Nerve Agents over a Broad Range of Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casey M. Theriot

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Prolidases hydrolyze Xaa-Pro dipeptides and can also cleave the P-F and P-O bonds found in organophosphorus (OP compounds, including the nerve agents soman and sarin. Ph1prol (PH0974 has previously been isolated and characterized from Pyrococcus horikoshii and was shown to have higher catalytic activity over a broader pH range, higher affinity for metal, and increased thermostability compared to P. furiosus prolidase, Pfprol (PF1343. To obtain a better enzyme for OP nerve agent decontamination and to investigate the structural factors that may influence protein thermostability and thermoactivity, randomly mutated Ph1prol enzymes were prepared. Four Ph1prol mutants (A195T/G306S-, Y301C/K342N-, E127G/E252D-, and E36V-Ph1prol were isolated which had greater thermostability and improved activity over a broader range of temperatures against Xaa-Pro dipeptides and OP nerve agents compared to wild type Pyrococcus prolidases.

  19. Improved Models and Tools for Prediction of Radiation Effects on Space Electronics in Wide Temperature Range Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — All NASA exploration systems operate in the extreme environments of space (Moon, Mars, etc.) and require reliable electronics capable of handling a wide temperature...

  20. Large magnetic entropy change of Gd-based ternary bulk metallic glass in liquid-nitrogen temperature range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, H.; Zhang, X. Y.; Yu, H. J.; Teng, B. H.; Zu, X. T.

    2008-01-01

    Gd 60Co 26Al 14 bulk metallic glass (BMG) with a diameter of 3 mm was prepared by arc-melting and copper-mold suck-casting. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results show that the as-cast Gd 60Co 26Al 14 rod consists of a wholly amorphous phase. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements indicated that one glass transition temperature (Tg) and two crystallization temperatures (TX) occur at 570, 602, and 642 K, respectively. Moreover, two Curie temperatures of 82 and 128 K, which correspond to the two amorphous phases in the DSC trace, were determined from the thermo-magnetization curve. The maximal magnetic entropy change (ΔSM) under 0-5 T is about 10.1 J/kg K at 75 K and the refrigerant capacity (RC) is about 556 J/kg, which makes Gd 60Co 26Al 14 BMG a promising candidate for magnetic refrigerant near liquid-nitrogen temperatures.

  1. Experimental Determination of the Recovery Factor and Analytical Solution of the Conical Flow Field for a 20 deg Included Angle Cone at Mach Numbers of 4.6 and 6.0 and Stagnation Temperatures to 2600 degree R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfyl, Frank A.; Presley, Leroy L.

    1961-01-01

    The local recovery factor was determined experimentally along the surface of a thin-walled 20 deg included angle cone for Mach numbers near 6.0 at stagnation temperatures between 1200 deg R and 2600 deg R. In addition, a similar cone configuration was tested at Mach numbers near 4.5 at stagnation temperatures of approximately 612 deg R. The local Reynolds number based on flow properties at the edge of the boundary layer ranged between 0.1 x 10(exp 4) and 3.5 x 10(exp 4) for tests at temperatures above 1200 deg R and between 6 x 10(exp 4) and 25 x 10(exp 4) for tests at temperatures near 612 deg R. The results indicated, generally, that the recovery factor can be predicted satisfactorily using the square root of the Prandtl number. No conclusion could be made as to the necessity of evaluating the Prandtl number at a reference temperature given by an empirical equation, as opposed to evaluating the Prandtl number at the wall temperature or static temperature of the gas at the cone surface. For the tests at temperatures above 1200 deg R (indicated herein as the tests conducted in the slip-flow region), two definite trends in the recovery data were observed - one of increasing recovery factor with decreasing stagnation pressure, which was associated with slip-flow effects and one of decreasing recovery factor with increasing temperature. The true cause of the latter trend could not be ascertained, but it was shown that this trend was not appreciably altered by the sources of error of the magnitude considered herein. The real-gas equations of state were used to determine accurately the local stream properties at the outer edge of the boundary layer of the cone. Included in the report, therefore, is a general solution for the conical flow of a real gas using the Beattie-Bridgeman equation of state. The largest effect of temperature was seen to be in the terms which were dependent upon the internal energy of the gas. The pressure and hence the pressure drag terms were

  2. On-Board State-of-Health Estimation at a Wide Ambient Temperature Range in Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiansi Wang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A state-of-health (SOH estimation method for electric vehicles (EVs is presented with three main advantages: (1 it provides joint estimation of cell’s aging states in terms of power and energy (i.e., SOHP and SOHE—because the determination of SOHP and SOHE can be reduced to the estimation of the ohmic resistance increase and capacity loss, respectively, the ohmic resistance at nominal temperature will be taken as a health indicator, and the capacity loss is estimated based on a mechanistic model that is developed to describe the correlation between resistance increase and capacity loss; (2 it has wide applicability to various ambient temperatures—to eliminate the effects of temperature on the resistance, another mechanistic model about the resistance against temperature is presented, which can normalize the resistance at various temperatures to its standard value at the nominal temperature; and (3 it needs low computational efforts for on-board application—based on a linear equation of cell’s dynamic behaviors, the recursive least-squares (RLS algorithm is used for the resistance estimation. Based on the designed performance and validation experiments, respectively, the coefficients of the models are determined and the accuracy of the proposed method is verified. The results at different aging states and temperatures show good accuracy and reliability.

  3. Comparative analysis and approximations of space-charge formation in Langmuir probes with plane, cylindrical and spherical electrodes including temperature effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valdeblanquez, Eder [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de IngenierIa, Universidad del Zulia, Apartado 4011- A 526, Maracaibo, Venezuela and Centro de Investigacion de Matematicas Aplicadas Facultad de IngenierIa, Universidad del Zulia, Apartado 10486, Maracaibo (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)], E-mail: eder@luz.edu.ve

    2008-10-15

    In this paper the space-charge effects in Langmuir probes are compared for different kinds of symmetries: plane, cylindrical and spherical. A detailed analysis is performed here including temperature effects, and therefore kinetic theory is used instead of fluid equations as used by other authors. The nonlinear equations obtained here have been solved first by numerical computation and later by approximations using Bessel functions. The accuracy of each approximation is also discussed. Space-charge effects are more important in plane geometries than in the case of cylindrical or spherical symmetries.

  4. Complex permittivity of lanthanum aluminate in the 20 to 300 K temperature range from 26.5 to 40.0 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, F. A.; Gordon, W. L.; Bhasin, K. B.; Ebihara, B. T.; Heinen, V. O.; Chorey, C. M.

    1990-01-01

    Dielectric constants of microwave substrates are required in the design of superconducting microwave circuits at various temperatures. In this paper, the results are reported of a study of the complex permittivity of the newly developed lanthanum aluminate (LaAlO3) substrate, in the 20 to 300 K temperature range at frequencies from 26.5 to 40.0 GHz. The value of the complex permittivity was obtained by measuring the sample scattering parameters using a microwave waveguide technique. It is observed that, while the dielectric constant did not change appreciably with frequency, its value decreased by approximately 14 percent from room temperature to 20 K.

  5. Oven controlled N++ [1 0 0] length-extensional mode silicon resonator with frequency stability of 1 ppm over industrial temperature range

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Weilong; Pei, Binbin; Sun, Ke; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Heng; Li, Xinxin

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents an oven controlled N++ [1 0 0] length-extensional mode silicon resonator, with a lookup-table based control algorithm. The temperature coefficient of resonant frequency (TCF) of the N++ doped resonator is nonlinear, and there is a turnover temperature point at which the TCF is equal to zero. The resonator is maintained at the turnover point by Joule heating; this temperature is a little higher than the upper limit of the industrial temperature range. It is demonstrated that the control algorithm based on the thermoresistor on the substrate and the lookup table for heating voltage versus chip temperature is sufficiently accurate to achieve a frequency stability of  ±0.5 ppm over the industrial temperature range. Because only two leads are required for electrical heating and piezoresistive sensing, the power required for heating of this resonator can be potentially lower than that of the oscillators with closed-loop oven control algorithm. It is also shown that the phase noise can be suppressed at the turnover temperature because of the very low value of the TCF, which justifies the usage of the heating voltage as the excitation voltage of the Wheatstone half-bridge.

  6. Differential growth of Legionella pneumophila strains within a range of amoebae at various temperatures associated with in-premise plumbing

    Science.gov (United States)

    The potential effect of in-premise plumbing temperatures (24, 32, 37 and 41 °C) on the growth of five different L. pneumophila strains within free-living amoebae (Acanthamoeba polyphaga, Hartmannella vermiformis and Naegleria fowleri) was examined. Compared to controls only fed E...

  7. An adiabatic calorimeter for heat capacity measurements of polyurethane foam with blowing agent of HFC245fa in the temperature range 60-290K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, C.G.; Xu, L.; Zhang, L.Q.; Chen, N. [Institute of Refrigeration and Cryogenics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200030 (China)

    2006-06-15

    In order to meet the urgent need of heat insulating materials used under low temperature in the area of aerospace, a new polyurethane (PU) foam with HFC245fa as blowing agent was developed. In this paper, the heat capacity in the temperature range of 60-290K of the new material was measured through an automated adiabatic calorimeter, which was composed of a heat insulation system, a power measuring system, a vacuum pumping system and a cooling system. The sample cell of the calorimeter was equipped with a miniature platinum thermometer surrounded by two adiabatic shields and housed in a high vacuum can. The temperature differences among the sample cell and the inner and outer adiabatic shields could be adjusted automatically to less than 0.05K, all which ensure there was no heat exchange between the sample and surroundings. Under these conditions, the mathematical formulation of the sample with the physical model was given. Through measuring the heat capacity of {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, which is a standard reference material, a relatively high reliability with a deviation of +/-2.5% of this adiabatic calorimeter was shown compared with the standard data. The results indicate that the newly developed PU foam has a higher heat capacity compared with other heat insulating materials, and there is no obvious sign of any phase transition or thermal anomaly in the entire temperature range. That is to say, the material is thermodynamically stable when used in the low temperature range. (author)

  8. An adiabatic calorimeter for heat capacity measurements of polyurethane foam with blowing agent of HFC245fa in the temperature range 60-290 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, C.G. [Institute of Refrigeration and Cryogenics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200030 (China)]. E-mail: chunguang_yang@sjtu.edu.cn; Xu, L. [Institute of Refrigeration and Cryogenics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200030 (China); Zhang, L.Q. [Institute of Refrigeration and Cryogenics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200030 (China); Chen, N. [Institute of Refrigeration and Cryogenics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200030 (China)

    2006-06-15

    In order to meet the urgent need of heat insulating materials used under low temperature in the area of aerospace, a new PU foam with HFC245fa as blowing agent was developed. In this paper, the heat capacity in the temperature range of 60-290 K of the new material was measured through an automated adiabatic calorimeter, which was composed of a heat insulation system, a power measuring system, a vacuum pumping system and a cooling system. The sample cell of the calorimeter was equipped with a miniature platinum thermometer surrounded by two adiabatic shields and housed in a high vacuum can. The temperature differences among the sample cell and the inner and outer adiabatic shields could be adjusted automatically to less than 0.05 K, all which ensure there was no heat exchange between the sample and surroundings. Under these conditions, the mathematical formulation of the sample with the physical model was given. Through measuring the heat capacity of {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, which is a standard reference material, a relatively high reliability with a deviation of {+-}2.5% of this adiabatic calorimeter was shown compared with the standard data. The results indicate that the newly developed PU foam has a higher heat capacity compared with other heat insulating materials, and there is no obvious sign of any phase transition or thermal anomaly in the entire temperature range. That is to say, the material is thermodynamically stable when used in the low temperature range.

  9. Possible combined influences of absorbing aerosols and anomalous atmospheric circulation on summertime diurnal temperature range variation over the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jiaxi; Guan, Zhaoyong; Ma, Fenhua

    2016-12-01

    Based on the temperature data from the China Meteorological Administration, NCEP-NCAR reanalysis data, and the TOMS Aerosol Index (AI), we analyze the variations in the summertime diurnal temperature range (DTR) and temperature maxima in the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River (MLRYR) in China. The possible relationships between the direct warming effect of the absorbing aerosol and temperature variations are further investigated, although with some uncertainties. It is found that the summertime DTR exhibits a decreasing trend over the most recent 50 years, along with a slight increasing tendency since the 1980s. The trend of the maximum temperature is in agreement with those of the DTR and the absorbing aerosols. To investigate the causes of the large anomalies in the temperature maxima, composite analyses of the circulation anomalies are performed. When anomalous AI and anomalous maximum temperature over the MLRYR have the same sign, an anomalous circulation with a quasi-barotropic structure occurs there. This anomalous circulation is modulated by the Rossby wave energy propagations from the regions northwest of the MLRYR and influences the northwestern Pacific subtropical high over the MLRYR. In combination with aerosols, the anomalous circulation may increase the maximum temperature in this region. Conversely, when the anomalous AI and anomalous maximum temperature in the MLRYR have opposite signs, the anomalous circulation is not equivalently barotropic, which possibly offsets the warming effect of aerosols on the maximum temperature changes in this region. These results are helpful for a better understanding of the DTR changes and the occurrences of temperature extremes in the MLRYR region during boreal summer.

  10. High Accuracy Radiation TSP-type Thermometers for Radiometric Scale Realization in the Temperature Range from 600 to 3200 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samoylov, M. L.; Ogarev, S. A.; Khlevnoy, B. B.; Khromchenko, V. B.; Mekhontsev, S. N.; Sapritsky, V. I.

    2003-09-01

    We have designed at VNIIOFI a high-accuracy radiation thermometer, model TSP-2 (Transfer Standard Pyrometer), for radiometric scale dissemination within the temperature range from 600°C to 3200 °C. This thermometer has been recently modified and investigated. The new TSP-4 model of radiation thermometer is under development now.

  11. Moisture rivals temperature in limiting photosynthesis by trees establishing beyond their cold-edge range limit under ambient and warmed conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyes, Andrew B.; Germino, Matthew J.; Kueppers, Lara M.

    2015-01-01

    Climate change is altering plant species distributions globally, and warming is expected to promote uphill shifts in mountain trees. However, at many cold-edge range limits, such as alpine treelines in the western United States, tree establishment may be colimited by low temperature and low moisture, making recruitment patterns with warming difficult to predict.

  12. Heat capacity and Joule-Thomson coefficient of selected n-alkanes at 0.1 and 10 MPa in broad temperature ranges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Regueira Muñiz, Teresa; Varzandeh, Farhad; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2017-01-01

    Isobaric heat capacity of six n-alkanes, i.e. n-hexane, n-octane, n-decane, n-dodecane, n-tetradecane and n-hexadecane, was determined with a Calvet type differential heat-flux calorimeter at 0.1 and 10 MPa in a broad temperature range. The measured isobaric heat capacity data were combined...

  13. Note: Vectorial-magneto optical Kerr effect technique combined with variable temperature and full angular range all in a single setup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuñado, Jose Luis F.; Pedrosa, Javier; Ajejas, Fernando; Bollero, Alberto; Perna, Paolo; Teran, Francisco J.; Miranda, Rodolfo; Camarero, Julio

    2015-04-01

    Here, we report on a versatile full angular resolved/broad temperature range/vectorial magneto optical Kerr effect (MOKE) magnetometer, named TRISTAN. Its versatility relies on its capacity to probe temperature and angular dependencies of magnetization reversal processes without the need to do any intervention on the apparatus during measurements. The setup is a combination of a vectorial MOKE bench and a cryostat with optical access. The cryostat has a motorized rotatable sample holder with azimuthal correction. It allows for simultaneous and quantitative acquisition of the two in-plane magnetization components during the hysteresis loop at different temperatures from 4 K up to 500 K and in the whole angular range, without neither changing magnet orientation nor opening the cryostat. Measurements performed in a model system with competing collinear biaxial and uniaxial contributions are presented to illustrate its capabilities.

  14. Note: Vectorial-magneto optical Kerr effect technique combined with variable temperature and full angular range all in a single setup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuñado, Jose Luis F; Pedrosa, Javier; Ajejas, Fernando; Bollero, Alberto; Perna, Paolo; Teran, Francisco J; Miranda, Rodolfo; Camarero, Julio

    2015-04-01

    Here, we report on a versatile full angular resolved/broad temperature range/vectorial magneto optical Kerr effect (MOKE) magnetometer, named TRISTAN. Its versatility relies on its capacity to probe temperature and angular dependencies of magnetization reversal processes without the need to do any intervention on the apparatus during measurements. The setup is a combination of a vectorial MOKE bench and a cryostat with optical access. The cryostat has a motorized rotatable sample holder with azimuthal correction. It allows for simultaneous and quantitative acquisition of the two in-plane magnetization components during the hysteresis loop at different temperatures from 4 K up to 500 K and in the whole angular range, without neither changing magnet orientation nor opening the cryostat. Measurements performed in a model system with competing collinear biaxial and uniaxial contributions are presented to illustrate its capabilities.

  15. Lithium niobate Q-switch to prevent pre-lasing of high gain lasers operating over a wide temperature range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jundt, Dieter H.; MacKay, Peter E.

    2015-02-01

    Because of its ease of growth and large electro-optic effect, lithium niobate is the preferred choice for Q-switching mobile lasers. Temperature-induced pyro-electric charges however may lead to premature lasing. We manufactured and characterized temperature-stable LN Q-switch. A thermo-chemical anneal was performed creating a conductive material layer 0.5mm thick with increased conductivity. While this increases optical insertion loss by a few percent, this is tolerable in high gain lasers. We present details of treatment, the surface charge creation and dissipation mechanism and the setup used to assess the cold-performance used to demonstrate improved charge dissipation when compared to untreated crystals.

  16. Thermodynamic study of phase equilibrium of superionic alloys of Ag3SBr1-xClx system in the concentration range 0.0-0.4 and temperature range 370-395 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroz, M. V.; Prokhorenko, M. V.; Prokhorenko, S. V.; Reshetnyak, O. V.

    2017-03-01

    Thermodynamic assessment of the phase stability of the solid solutions of superionic alloys of the Ag3SBr1-xClx (I) system in the concentration range 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.4 and temperature range 370-395 K was performed. Partial functions of silver in the alloys of solid solution were used as the thermodynamic parameters. The values of partial thermodynamic functions were obtained with the use of the electromotive force method. Potential-forming processes were performed in electrochemical cells. Linear dependence of the electromotive force of cells on temperature was used to calculate the partial thermodynamic functions of silver in the alloys. The serpentine-like shape of the thermodynamic functions in the concentration range 0-4 is an evidence of the metastable state of solid solution. The equilibrium phase state of the alloys is predicted to feature the formation of the intermediate phase Ag3SBr0.76Cl0.24, and the solubility gap of the solid solution ranges of Ag3SBr0.76Cl0.24 and Ag3SBr.

  17. The Mechanical Properties of Wood of Different Moisture Content Within -200 Degrees to +200 Degrees C Temperature Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollmann, Franz

    1941-01-01

    Systematic experiments were undertaken with special reference to the effect of gross specific weight (specific weight inclusive of pores) and the moisture content of wood. It was found that the modules of elasticity of wood at room temperature and frozen at -8 degrees is practically the same. The effect of moisture on the compression strength of frozen wood was explored as well as the flexural and impact strength of frozen wood and frozen laminated wood.

  18. Extending the upper temperature range of gas chromatography with all-silicon microchip columns using a heater/clamp assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Abhijit; Johnson, Jacob E; Nuss, Johnathan G; Stark, Brittany A; Hawkins, Aaron R; Tolley, Luke T; Iverson, Brian D; Tolley, H Dennis; Lee, Milton L

    2017-09-29

    Miniaturization of gas chromatography (GC) instrumentation is of interest because it addresses current and future issues relating to compactness, portability and field application. While incremental advancements continue to be reported in GC with columns fabricated in microchips (referred to in this paper as "microchip columns"), the current performance is far from acceptable. This lower performance compared to conventional GC is due to factors such as pooling of the stationary phase in corners of non-cylindrical channels, adsorption of sensitive compounds on incompletely deactivated surfaces, shorter column lengths and less than optimum interfacing to injector and detector. In this work, a GC system utilizing microchip columns was developed that solves the latter challenge, i.e., microchip interfacing to injector and detector. A microchip compression clamp was constructed to heat the microchip (i.e., primary heater), and seal the injector and detector fused silica interface tubing to the inlet and outlet ports of the microchip channels with minimum extra-column dead volume. This clamp allowed occasional operation up to 375°C and routine operation up to 300°C. The compression clamp was constructed of a low expansion alloy, Kovar™, to minimize leaking due to thermal expansion mismatch at the interface during repeated thermal cycling, and it was tested over several months for more than one hundred injections without forming leaks. A 5.9m long microcolumn with rectangular cross section of 158μm×80μm, which approximately matches a 100μm i.d. cylindrical fused silica column, was fabricated in a silicon wafer using deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) and high temperature fusion bonding; finally, the channel was coated statically with a 1% vinyl, 5% phenyl, 94% methylpolysiloxane stationary phase. High temperature separations of C10-C40 n-alkanes and a commercial diesel sample were demonstrated using the system under both temperature programmed GC (TPGC) and thermal

  19. Characterization of 6H-SiC JFET Integrated Circuits Over A Broad Temperature Range from -150 C to +500 C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neudeck, Philip G.; Krasowski, Michael J.; Chen, Liang-Yu; Prokop, Norman F.

    2009-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center has previously reported prolonged stable operation of simple prototype 6H-SiC JFET integrated circuits (logic gates and amplifier stages) for thousands of hours at +500 C. This paper experimentally investigates the ability of these 6H-SiC JFET devices and integrated circuits to also function at cold temperatures expected to arise in some envisioned applications. Prototype logic gate ICs experimentally demonstrated good functionality down to -125 C without changing circuit input voltages. Cascaded operation of gates at cold temperatures was verified by externally wiring gates together to form a 3-stage ring oscillator. While logic gate output voltages exhibited little change across the broad temperature range from -125 C to +500 C, the change in operating frequency and power consumption of these non-optimized logic gates as a function of temperature was much larger and tracked JFET channel conduction properties.

  20. Measurements of complex permittivity of microwave substrates in the 20 to 300 K temperature range from 26.5 to 40.0 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Felix A.; Gordon, William L.; Heinen, Vernon O.; Ebihara, Ben T.; Bhasin, Kul B.

    1990-01-01

    A knowledge of the dielectric properties of microwve substrates at low temperatures is useful in the design of superconducting microwave circuits. Results are reported for a study of the complex permittivity of sapphire (Al2O3), magnesium oxide (MgO), silicon oxide (SiO2), lanthanum aluminate (LaAlO3), and zirconium oxide (ZrO2), in the 20 to 300 Kelvin temperature range, at frequencies from 26.5 to 40.0 GHz. The values of the real and imaginary parts of the complex permittivity were obtained from the scattering parameters, which were measured using an HP-8510 automatic network analyzer. For these measurements, the samples were mounted on the cold head of a helium gas closed cycle refrigerator, in a specially designated vacuum chamber. An arrangement of wave guides, with mica windows, was used to connect the cooling system to the network analyzer. A decrease in the value of the real part of the complex permittivity of these substrates, with decreasing temperature, was observed. For MgO and Al2O3, the decrease from room temperature to 20 K was of 7 and 15 percent, respectively. For LaAlO3, it decreased by 14 percent, for ZrO2 by 15 percent, and for SiO2 by 2 percent, in the above mentioned temperature range.

  1. Thermal Decomposition of Hydrocalumite over a Temperature Range of 400–1500°C and Its Structure Reconstruction in Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiao Tian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermal decomposition process and structure memory effect of hydrocalumite were investigated systematically for the first time over a wide temperature range of 400–1500°C. The calcined hydrocalumite samples and their rehydrated products were characterized by XRD, FT-IR, and SEM-EDX. The results show that the calcination products at temperatures ranging from 500 to 900°C are basically mayenite and lime, while one of the final products obtained by calcination at and above 1000°C is probably tricalcium aluminate (Ca3Al2O6. For the hydrocalumite samples calcined at temperatures below 1000°C, their lamellar structure can be completely recovered in deionized water at room temperature. However, the further increase of calcination temperature could impair the regeneration ability of hydrocalumite via contact with water. Upon calcination of hydrocalumite at 1000–1500°C followed by reaction with water, a stable compound tricalcium aluminate hexahydrate (Ca3Al2O6·6H2O was produced, which is the reason why less hydrocalumite could be regenerated.

  2. Determination of the Thermal Diffusivity of Electrically Non-Conductive Solids in the Temperature Range from 80 K to 300 K by Laser-Flash Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemberger, F.; Göbel, A.; Ebert, H.-P.

    2010-12-01

    The adoption of the popular laser-flash method at temperatures far below 300 K is restricted by the weak signal-to-noise ratio and the limited spectral bandwidth of the commonly used mercury cadmium tellurite (MCT) infrared (IR) detector used as a non-contacting temperature probe. In this work, a different approach to measure the temperature rise in pulse heating experiments is described and evaluated. This method utilizes the change of the temperature-dependent electrical resistance of a thin strip of sputtered gold for the detection of a temperature rise as it was proposed by Kogure et al. The main advantage of this method at lower temperatures is the significantly higher signal-to-noise ratio compared to the commonly used IR detectors. A newly developed laser-flash apparatus using this detection method for the determination of the thermal diffusivity in the temperature range from 80 K to 300 K is presented. To test the accuracy of the new detection method, the thermal diffusivity of a borosilicate crown glass (BK7) specimen at 300 K was determined and compared to results derived with a MCT detector. Good agreement of the derived thermal diffusivity values within 3 % was found. The thermal diffusivity of BK7 and polycrystalline aluminum nitride (AlN) was measured at temperatures between 80 K and 300 K by a laser-flash method to test the functionality of the apparatus. Finally, the thermal conductivity was calculated using values for the specific heat capacity determined by temperature modulated differential scanning calorimetry (MDSC). Comparisons with literature data confirm the reliability of the experimental setup.

  3. Observation of vapor pressure enhancement of rare-earth metal-halide salts in the temperature range relevant to metal-halide lamps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, J. J.; Estupiñán, E. G.; Lapatovich, W. P.; Henins, A.; Shastri, S. D.; Hardis, J. E.

    2012-02-01

    Total vapor-phase densities of Dy in equilibrium with a DyI3/InI condensate and Tm in equilibrium with a TmI3/TlI condensate have been measured for temperatures between 900 K and 1400 K. The measurements show strong enhancements in rare-earth vapor densities compared to vapors in equilibrium with the pure rare-earth metal-halides. The measurements were made with x-ray induced fluorescence on the sector 1-ID beam line at the Advanced Photon Source. The temperature range and salt mixtures are relevant to the operation of metal-halide high-intensity discharge lamps.

  4. Validation of HITEMP-2010 for carbon dioxide and water vapour at high temperatures and atmospheric pressures in 450-7600cm-1 spectral range

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alberti, Michael; Weber, Roman; Mancini, Marco

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the work is validation of HITEMP-2010 at atmospheric pressures and temperatures reaching 1770K. To this end, spectral transmissivities at 1cm-1 resolution and excellent signal-to-noise-ratio have been measured for 22 CO2/H2O/N2 mixtures. In this paper we consider the 450cm-1-7600...... absorption lines listed in HITEMP-2010 have not been observed in the measured spectra and/or are wrongly scaled with temperature. The complete (there are no missing bands) spectra spanning the 450-7600cm-1 range are appended as Supplementary Material....

  5. Details on the formation of Ti2Cu3 in the Ag-Cu-Ti system in the temperature range 790-860 °C

    OpenAIRE

    Andrieux, J.; Dezellus, Olivier; Bosselet, F.; Sacerdote-Peronnet, M.; Sigala, C.; Chiriac, R.; Viala, J.C.

    2008-01-01

    International audience; Silver-copper-titanium ternary alloys are often used as active braze alloys for joining ceramics to metals at temperatures ranging from 780 °C (the melting point of the Ag-Cu eutectic) up to 900 °C. When Ti/Ag-Cu joints are brazed at low temperature (near 800 °C), the intermetallic compound Ti2Cu3 (tetragonal, P4/nmm, a = 0.313nm, c = 1.395nm) is systematically missing from the interface reaction layer sequence. An experimental investigation based on isothermal diffusi...

  6. Fractionation of metals by sequential extraction procedures (BCR and Tessier) in soil exposed to fire of wide temperature range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajkovic, Hana; Rončević, Sanda; Nemet, Ivan; Prohić, Esad; Leontić-Vazdar, Dana

    2017-04-01

    Forest fire presents serious problem, especially in Mediterranean Region. Effects of fire are numerous, from climate change and deforestation to loss of soil organic matter and changes in soil properties. One of the effects, not well documented, is possible redistribution and/or remobilisation of pollutants previously deposited in the soil, due to the new physical and chemical soil properties and changes in equilibrium conditions. For understanding and predicting possible redistribution and/or remobilisation of potential pollutants from soil, affected by fire different in temperature, several laboratory investigations were carried out. To evaluate the influence of organic matter on soil under fire, three soil samples were analysed and compared: (a) the one with added coniferous organic matter; (b) deciduous organic matter (b) and (c) soil without additional organic matter. Type of organic matter is closely related to pH of soil, as pH is influencing the mobility of some pollutants, e.g. metals. For that reason pH was also measured through all experimental steps. Each of mentioned soil samples (a, b and c) were heated at 1+3 different temperatures (25°C, 200°C, 500°C and 850°C). After heating, whereby fire effect on soil was simulated, samples were analysed by BCR protocol with the addition of a first step of sequential extraction procedure by Tessier and analysis of residual by aqua regia. Element fractionation of heavy metals by this procedure was used to determine the amounts of selected elements (Al, Cd, Cr, Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn). Selected metal concentrations were determined using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer. Further on, loss of organic matter was calculated after each heating procedure as well as the mineral composition. The mineral composition was determined using an X-ray diffraction. From obtained results, it can be concluded that temperature has an influence on concentration of elements in specific step of

  7. Low-temperature growth of InGaN films over the entire composition range by MBE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabien, Chloe A. M.; Gunning, Brendan P.; Alan Doolittle, W.; Fischer, Alec M.; Wei, Yong O.; Xie, Hongen; Ponce, Fernando A.

    2015-09-01

    The surface morphology, microstructural, and optical properties of indium gallium nitride (InGaN) films grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy under low growth temperatures and slightly nitrogen-rich growth conditions are studied. The single-phase InGaN films exhibit improved defect density, an absence of stacking faults, efficient In incorporation, enhanced optical properties, but a grain-like morphology. With increasing In content, we observe an increase in the degree of relaxation and a complete misfit strain relaxation through the formation of a uniform array of misfit dislocations at the InGaN/GaN interface for InGaN films with indium contents higher than 55-60%.

  8. Screening mutations of OTOF gene in Chinese patients with auditory neuropathy, including a familial case of temperature-sensitive auditory neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedict-Alderfer Cindy

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations in OTOF gene, encoding otoferlin, cause DFNB9 deafness and non-syndromic auditory neuropathy (AN. The aim of this study is to identify OTOF mutations in Chinese patients with non-syndromic auditory neuropathy. Methods 73 unrelated Chinese Han patients with AN, including one case of temperature sensitive non-syndromic auditory neuropathy (TS-NSRAN and 92 ethnicity-matched controls with normal hearing were screened. Forty-five pairs of PCR primers were designed to amplify all of the exons and their flanking regions of the OTOF gene. The PCR products were sequenced and analyzed for mutation identification. Results Five novel possibly pathogenic variants (c.1740delC, c.2975_2978delAG, c.1194T>A, c.1780G>A, c.4819C > T were identified in the group of 73 AN patients, in which two novel mutant alleles (c.2975_2978delAG + c.4819C > T were identified in one Chinese TS-NSRAN case. Besides, 10 non-pathogenic variants of the OTOF gene were found in AN patients and controls. Conclusions Screening revealed that mutations in the OTOF gene account for AN in 4 of 73(5.5% sporadic AN patients, which shows a lower genetic load of that gene in contrast to the previous studies based on other populations. Notably, we found two novel mutant alleles related to temperature sensitive non-syndromic auditory neuropathy. This mutation screening study further confirms that the OTOF gene contributes to ANs and to TS-NSRAN.

  9. Daily thermal fluctuations to a range of subzero temperatures enhance cold hardiness of winter-acclimated turtles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiebler, James M; Kumar, Manisha; Muir, Timothy J

    2017-12-01

    Although seasonal increases in cold hardiness are well documented for temperate and polar ectotherms, relatively little is known about supplemental increases in cold hardiness during winter. Because many animals are exposed to considerable thermal variation in winter, they may benefit from a quick enhancement of cold tolerance prior to extreme low temperature. Hatchling painted turtles (Chrysemys picta) overwintering in their natal nests experience substantial thermal variation in winter, and recently, it was found that brief subzero chilling of winter-acclimated hatchlings decreases subsequent chilling-induced mortality, increases blood concentrations of glucose and lactate, and protects the brain from cryoinjury. Here, we further characterize that phenomenon, termed 'cold conditioning', by exposing winter-acclimated hatchling turtles to -3.5, -7.0, or -10.5 °C gradually or repeatedly via daily thermal fluctuations over the course of 5 days and assessing their survival of a subsequent cold shock to a discriminating temperature of -12.7 °C. To better understand the physiological response to cold conditioning, we measured changes in glucose and lactate concentrations in the liver, blood, and brain. Cold conditioning significantly increased cold-shock survival, from 9% in reference turtles up to 74% in cold-conditioned turtles, and ecologically relevant daily thermal fluctuations were at least as effective at conferring cryoprotection as was gradual cold conditioning. Cold conditioning increased glucose concentrations, up to 25 μmol g -1 , and lactate concentrations, up to 30 μmol g -1 , in the liver, blood, and brain. Turtles that were cold conditioned with daily thermal fluctuations accumulated more glucose in the liver, blood, and brain, and had lower brain lactate, than those gradually cold conditioned. Given the thermal variation to which hatchling painted turtles are exposed in winter, we suggest that the supplemental protection conferred by cold

  10. Response of the global surface ozone distribution to Northern Hemisphere sea surface temperature changes: implications for long-range transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Kan; Liu, Junfeng; Ban-Weiss, George; Zhang, Jiachen; Tao, Wei; Cheng, Yanli; Tao, Shu

    2017-07-01

    The response of surface ozone (O3) concentrations to basin-scale warming and cooling of Northern Hemisphere oceans is investigated using the Community Earth System Model (CESM). Idealized, spatially uniform sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies of ±1 °C are individually superimposed onto the North Pacific, North Atlantic, and North Indian oceans. Our simulations suggest large seasonal and regional variability in surface O3 in response to SST anomalies, especially in the boreal summer. The responses of surface O3 associated with basin-scale SST warming and cooling have similar magnitude but are opposite in sign. Increasing the SST by 1 °C in one of the oceans generally decreases the surface O3 concentrations from 1 to 5 ppbv. With fixed emissions, SST increases in a specific ocean basin in the Northern Hemisphere tend to increase the summertime surface O3 concentrations over upwind regions, accompanied by a widespread reduction over downwind continents. We implement the integrated process rate (IPR) analysis in CESM and find that meteorological O3 transport in response to SST changes is the key process causing surface O3 perturbations in most cases. During the boreal summer, basin-scale SST warming facilitates the vertical transport of O3 to the surface over upwind regions while significantly reducing the vertical transport over downwind continents. This process, as confirmed by tagged CO-like tracers, indicates a considerable suppression of intercontinental O3 transport due to increased tropospheric stability at lower midlatitudes induced by SST changes. Conversely, the responses of chemical O3 production to regional SST warming can exert positive effects on surface O3 levels over highly polluted continents, except South Asia, where intensified cloud loading in response to North Indian SST warming depresses both the surface air temperature and solar radiation, and thus photochemical O3 production. Our findings indicate a robust linkage between basin-scale SST

  11. Response of the global surface ozone distribution to Northern Hemisphere sea surface temperature changes: implications for long-range transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Yi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The response of surface ozone (O3 concentrations to basin-scale warming and cooling of Northern Hemisphere oceans is investigated using the Community Earth System Model (CESM. Idealized, spatially uniform sea surface temperature (SST anomalies of ±1 °C are individually superimposed onto the North Pacific, North Atlantic, and North Indian oceans. Our simulations suggest large seasonal and regional variability in surface O3 in response to SST anomalies, especially in the boreal summer. The responses of surface O3 associated with basin-scale SST warming and cooling have similar magnitude but are opposite in sign. Increasing the SST by 1 °C in one of the oceans generally decreases the surface O3 concentrations from 1 to 5 ppbv. With fixed emissions, SST increases in a specific ocean basin in the Northern Hemisphere tend to increase the summertime surface O3 concentrations over upwind regions, accompanied by a widespread reduction over downwind continents. We implement the integrated process rate (IPR analysis in CESM and find that meteorological O3 transport in response to SST changes is the key process causing surface O3 perturbations in most cases. During the boreal summer, basin-scale SST warming facilitates the vertical transport of O3 to the surface over upwind regions while significantly reducing the vertical transport over downwind continents. This process, as confirmed by tagged CO-like tracers, indicates a considerable suppression of intercontinental O3 transport due to increased tropospheric stability at lower midlatitudes induced by SST changes. Conversely, the responses of chemical O3 production to regional SST warming can exert positive effects on surface O3 levels over highly polluted continents, except South Asia, where intensified cloud loading in response to North Indian SST warming depresses both the surface air temperature and solar radiation, and thus photochemical O3 production. Our findings indicate a robust linkage

  12. An ab initio study of transition metals doped with WSe2 for long-range room temperature ferromagnetism in two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Carmen J; Pham, Anh; Yu, Aibing; Li, Sean

    2014-07-30

    We report a systematic study of the magnetic properties in transition metals doped with WSe2 through the use of first principle calculations. The results demonstrate the possibility of generating long-range room temperature ferromagnetic interaction in WSe2 with the use of Mn and Fe doping. In the case of Fe, a percolation threshold is required for long-range ferromagnetism, whereas the long-range room temperature ferromagnetic interaction in Mn-doped WSe2 persists even at a low concentration (~5.6%). The ferromagnetism is mediated by the delocalized p states in the Se atoms, which couple antiferromagnetically with the spin-down a1 and e1 states in Fe doping through a correlated interaction. In Mn doping, the p states of Se tend to couple ferromagnetically with the 3d state of Mn, which stabilizes the long-range ferromagnetism between the Mn ions, although the short-range interaction is antiferromagnetic. In addition, the calculations indicate that Fe and Mn tend to configure at a high spin state, thus they possess much larger magnetic moments in WSe2 than when they are doped into other transition metal dichalcogenides. We also discovered a strong dependence of the exchange interaction on the dopants' spatial positions, distances, and concentrations, which alters the magnetic coupling from strong ferromagnetism to strong antiferromagnetism. These results can provide useful guidance to engineer the magnetic properties of WSe2 in future experiments.

  13. Dielectric Properties of Marsh Vegetation in a Frequency Range of 0.1-18 GHz Under Variation of Temperature and Moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanov, A. N.; Kochetkova, T. D.; Suslyaev, V. I.; Shcheglova, A. S.

    2017-09-01

    Dielectric characteristics of some species of marsh vegetation: lichen Cladonia stellaris (Opiz) Pouzar, moss Sphagnum, and a representative of Bryidae mosses - Dicranum polysetum are studied in the frequency range from 100 MHz to 18 GHz. At a frequency of 1.41 GHz, the influence of temperature in the range from -12 to +20°C on the behavior of dielectric characteristics of mosses, lichens, and peat is studied. The dependences of the dielectric characteristics of vegetation on the volumetric wetness are established.

  14. Temperature dependence of the thermal diffusivity of GaAs in the 100-305 K range measured by the pulsed photothermal displacement technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltanolkotabi, M.; Bennis, G. L.; Gupta, R.

    1999-01-01

    We have measured the variation of the value of the thermal diffusivity of semi-insulating GaAs in the 100-305 K range. The method used is the pulsed photothermal displacement technique. This is a noncontact technique, and the value of the thermal diffusivity is derived from the temporal evolution of the signal rather than its amplitude. This makes the technique less susceptible to uncertainties. We find that the temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity of semi-insulating GaAs follows a power law as T-1.62, in disagreement with results obtained previously. Possible reasons for the deviation within this very important intermediate temperature range are discussed.

  15. Thermodynamic properties of spin-polarized 3He gas in the temperature range 1 mK-4 K from the quantum second virial coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Maaitah, A. F.; Sandouqa, A. S.; Joudeh, B. R.; Ghassib, H. B.

    2017-11-01

    The quantum second virial coefficient Bq of 3He↑ gas is determined in the temperature range 0.001-4 K from the Beth-Uhlenbeck formula. The corresponding phase shifts are calculated from the Lippmann-Schwinger equation using a highly-accurate matrix-inversion technique. A positive Bq corresponds to an overall repulsive interaction; whereas a negative Bq represents an overall attractive interaction. It is found that in the low-energy limit, Bq tends to increase with increasing spin polarization. The compressibility Z is evaluated as another measure of nonideality of the system. Z becomes most significant at low temperatures and increases with polarization. From the pressure-temperature (P-T) behavior of 3He↑ at low T, it is deduced that P decreases with increasing T below 8 mK.

  16. Electro- and Heat Transfer in Cd_{0.22}Hg_{0.78} Te Single Crystals in the Temperature Range of Their Practical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessmolniy, Yu. V.; Khadzhaj, G. Ya.; Beletskii, V. I.; Rokhmistrov, D. V.; Vovk, R. V.; Goulatis, I. L.; Chroneos, A.

    2018-01-01

    The thermal and electrical conductivity of a single-crystal Cd_{0.22}Hg_{0.78}Te was studied in the temperature range of practical applications (77-300 K). The sample has impurity conductivity, which is limited by the scattering of charge carriers by phonons. Heat in the sample is transferred by phonons and thermal conductivity is limited by phonon-phonon scattering. The electron contribution to the thermal conductivity can be neglected.

  17. The interrelationship between dengue incidence and diurnal ranges of temperature and humidity in a Sri Lankan city and its potential applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. D. B. Ehelepola

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Temperature, humidity, and other weather variables influence dengue transmission. Published studies show how the diurnal fluctuations of temperature around different mean temperatures influence dengue transmission. There are no published studies about the correlation between diurnal range of humidity and dengue transmission. Objective: The goals of this study were to determine the correlation between dengue incidence and diurnal fluctuations of temperature and humidity in the Sri Lankan city of Kandy and to explore the possibilities of using that information for better control of dengue. Design: We calculated the weekly dengue incidence in Kandy during the period 2003–2012, after collecting data on all of the reported dengue patients and estimated midyear populations. Data on daily maximum and minimum temperatures and night-time and daytime humidity were obtained from two weather stations, averaged, and converted into weekly data. The number of days per week with a diurnal temperature range (DTR of >10°C and 20 and 10°C and a DHR >20% with 3.3-week and 4-week lag periods, respectively. Additionally, positive correlations between dengue incidence and a DTR <10°C and a DHR <15% with 3- and 4-week lag periods, respectively, were discovered. Conclusions: These findings are consistent with the results of previous entomological studies and theoretical models of DTR and dengue transmission correlation. It is important to conduct similar studies on diurnal fluctuations of humidity in the future. We suggest ways and means to use this information for local dengue control and to mitigate the potential effects of the ongoing global reduction of DTR on dengue incidence.

  18. Absolute Viscosities of Vegetable Oils at Different Temperatures and Shear Rate Range of 64.5 to 4835 s−1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemuel M. Diamante

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A study was carried out to determine the effect of higher shear rates (64.5 to 4835 s−1 on the absolute viscosities of different vegetable oils at different temperatures (26 to 90°C. The absolute viscosities of the different vegetable oils were determined using a Lamy Viscometer RM100, a rotating viscometer with coaxial cylinder. The torque of each sample at different temperatures was recorded at different shear rates. Based on the rheograms (plot of mean shear stress against shear rate, all of the vegetable oils studied were found to be Newtonian fluids. Rice bran oil was the most viscous (0.0398 Pa·s at 38°C while walnut oil was the least viscous (0.0296 Pa·s at 38°C among the oils studied. The higher shear range used did not significantly affect the absolute viscosities of the vegetable oils at the different temperatures. The absolute viscosities of the vegetable oils decreased with increasing temperature and can be fitted with an Arrhenius type relationship. The activation energies for the different vegetable oils ranged from 21 to 30 kJ/mole. The peanut and safflower oils had the highest and lowest activation energies, respectively. This means that greater energy was needed to effect a viscosity change in the peanut oil.

  19. ;Inverted; zircon and apatite (U-Th)/He dates from the Front Range, Colorado: High-damage zircon as a low-temperature (<50 °C) thermochronometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Joshua E.; Flowers, Rebecca M.; Baird, Graham B.; Mahan, Kevin H.

    2017-05-01

    Zircon (U-Th)/He (ZHe) data were acquired for 23 Proterozoic basement samples from an E-W transect through the Colorado Front Range to evaluate whether metamict zircons yield sensible (U-Th)/He data patterns and useful thermal history information. The 112 ZHe dates vary from 147 to 7 Ma, define positive and negative date-eU correlations, and are younger than titanite (U-Th)/He dates that range from 976 to 614 Ma. At moderate to high alpha dose of 1018-1019 α /g, zircons from the range core yield Laramide (52.5 ± 9.6 Ma) dates, whereas those within ∼15 km of the range front yield Miocene (21.6 ± 7.7 Ma) results. The He dates for the high alpha dose zircons are reproducible within each sample suite despite their visibly metamict character. The ∼20 Ma range front ZHe dates are younger than apatite (U-Th)/He (AHe) dates (66.5 ± 9.6 Ma) and published apatite fission-track data (65-45 Ma) for the same and nearby samples. Thermal history simulations can reproduce the first-order range front date-eU patterns and ZHe-AHe date inversion, but the high-damage zircons are more He retentive than predicted by the zircon damage He kinetic model. The ∼20 Ma ZHe dates may be explained by reheating from hydrothermal fluids along range front faults. The results demonstrate the promise of using He data for high-damage zircons to detect low-temperature (<50 °C) events within and below the temperature sensitivity of the AHe system.

  20. The dynamic compressive behavior and constitutive modeling of D1 railway wheel steel over a wide range of strain rates and temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Lin; Su, Xingya; Zhao, Longmao

    The dynamic compressive behavior of D1 railway wheel steel at high strain rates was investigated using a split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) apparatus. Three types of specimens, which were derived from the different positions (i.e., the rim, web and hub) of a railway wheel, were tested over a wide range of strain rates from 10-3 s-1 to 2.4 × 103 s-1 and temperatures from 213 K to 973 K. Influences of the strain rate and temperature on flow stress were discussed, and rate- and temperature-dependent constitutive relationships were assessed by the Cowper-Symonds model, Johnson-Cook model and a physically-based model, respectively. The experimental results show that the compressive true stress versus true strain response of D1 wheel steel is strain rate-dependent, and the strain hardening rate during the plastic flow stage decreases with the elevation of strain rate. Besides, the D1 wheel steel displays obvious temperature-dependence, and the third-type strain aging (3rd SA) is occurred at the temperature region of 673-973 K at a strain rate of ∼1500 s-1. Comparisons of experimental results with theoretical predictions indicate that the physically-based model has a better prediction capability for the 3rd SA characteristic of the tested D1 wheel steel.

  1. Long-range distributed temperature and strain optical fibre sensor based on the coherent detection of spontaneous Brillouin scattering with in-line Raman amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alahbabi, Mohamed N.; Tat Cho, Yuh; Newson, Trevor P.

    2006-05-01

    We report an extended range distributed temperature and strain optical fibre sensor based on the coherent detection of spontaneous Brillouin scattering combined with Raman amplification. The Raman amplification was achieved within the sensing fibre using either co- or counter-propagating Raman pump configuration with respect to the probe pulse and experiments were conducted to investigate the optimum pump and probe power combination. Using Brillouin frequency shift measurements with co-propagating Raman pump configuration, a temperature resolution of 1.7 °C with a 20 m spatial resolution at 100 km was achieved. With the counter-propagating pump configuration, a temperature resolution of 5 °C with a 50 m spatial resolution at 150 km was achieved. Measuring both the power and frequency of the Brillouin signal, a simultaneous temperature and strain measurement was performed over 50 km using co-propagating Raman pump. Temperature and strain resolutions of 3.5 °C and 85 μɛ with 5 m spatial resolution were achieved.

  2. Determination of the rate constant for the OH(X2Π) + OH(X2Π) → H2O + O(3P) reaction over the temperature range 295 to 701 K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altinay, Gokhan; Macdonald, R Glen

    2014-01-09

    The rate constant for the radical-radical reaction OH(X(2)Π) + OH(X(2)Π) → H2O + O((3)P) has been measured over the temperature and pressure ranges 295-701 K and 2-12 Torr, respectively, in mixtures of CF4, N2O, and H2O. The OH radical was produced by the 193 nm laser photolysis of N2O. The resulting O((1)D) atoms reacted rapidly with H2O to produce the OH radical. The OH radical was detected by high-resolution time-resolved infrared absorption spectroscopy using a single Λ-doublet component of the OH(1,0) P1e/f(4.5) fundamental vibrational transition. A detailed kinetic model was used to determine the reaction rate constant as a function of temperature. These experiments were conducted in a new temperature controlled reaction chamber. The values of the measured rate constants are quite similar to the previous measurements from this laboratory of Bahng and Macdonald (J. Phys. Chem. A 2007 , 111 , 3850 - 3861); however, they cover a much larger temperature range. The results of the present work do not agree with recent measurements of Sangwan and Krasnoperov (J. Phys. Chem. A 2012 , 116 , 11817 - 11822). At 295 K the rate constant of the title reaction was found to be (2.52 ± 0.63) × 10(-12) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), where the uncertainty includes both experimental scatter and an estimate of systematic errors at the 95% confidence limit. Over the temperature range of the experiments, the rate constant can be represented by k1a = 4.79 × 10(-18)T(1.79) exp(879.0/T) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) with a uncertainty of ±24% at the 2σ level, including experimental scatter and systematic error.

  3. Promotion of redox and stability features of doped Ce–W–Ti for NH{sub 3}-SCR reaction over a wide temperature range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Kun [State Key Laboratory for Oxo Synthesis and Selective Oxidation, National Engineering Research Center for Fine Petrochemical Intermediates, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Key laboratory of Oil & Gas Fine Chemical, Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xinjiang University, Urumqi 830046 (China); Han, Weiliang; Lu, Gongxuan [State Key Laboratory for Oxo Synthesis and Selective Oxidation, National Engineering Research Center for Fine Petrochemical Intermediates, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Lu, Jiangyin, E-mail: jiangyinlu6410@163.com [Key laboratory of Oil & Gas Fine Chemical, Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xinjiang University, Urumqi 830046 (China); Tang, Zhicheng, E-mail: tangzhicheng@licp.cas.cn [State Key Laboratory for Oxo Synthesis and Selective Oxidation, National Engineering Research Center for Fine Petrochemical Intermediates, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Zhen, Xinping [Key laboratory of Oil & Gas Fine Chemical, Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xinjiang University, Urumqi 830046 (China)

    2016-08-30

    Graphical abstract: In this study, different transition metals were introduced into Ce–W–Ti catalyst in order to promote the low temperature activity. The Cu/Ce–W–Ti catalyst prepared via a co-precipitation method displayed more excellent performance in the wide temperature range (260–400 °C). - Highlights: • Redox ability of Ce–W–Ti was enhanced by introduction of CuO. • The optimum catalyst provided high activity and broad operation window. • Cu/Ce–W–Ti presents an adequate tolerance to SO{sub 2} and hydrothermal aging. - Abstract: In this study, transition metals Co, Mn, and Cu were introduced into a Ce–W–Ti catalyst to promote low-temperature catalytic activity. Among these metal-modified M/Ce–W–Ti catalysts (M represents Co, Mn, or Cu), the Cu/Ce–W–Ti catalyst with an optimized Cu content of 5 wt.% exhibited more than 90% conversion of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) in the selective catalytic reduction by NH{sub 3} over a wide temperature range (260–400 °C). This catalyst likewise exhibited higher resistance to SO{sub 2} gas and water vapor under severe test conditions. On the basis of the characterization results by powder X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, we concluded that the superior catalytic properties of the Cu/Ce–W–Ti catalyst could be attributed to the highly dispersed Cu species, which increased the contents of Ce{sup 3+} species and adsorbed oxygen species in the catalysts. In addition, the NH{sub 3} temperature-programmed desorption results demonstrated that the Cu species doped into the Ce–W–Ti catalysts optimized surface acid content.

  4. Zero thermal expansion and ferromagnetism in cubic Sc(1-x)M(x)F3 (M = Ga, Fe) over a wide temperature range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Lei; Chen, Jun; Fan, Longlong; Ren, Yang; Rong, Yangchun; Pan, Zhao; Deng, Jinxia; Yu, Ranbo; Xing, Xianran

    2014-10-01

    The rare physical property of zero thermal expansion (ZTE) is intriguing because neither expansion nor contraction occurs with temperature fluctuations. Most ZTE, however, occurs below room temperature. It is a great challenge to achieve isotropic ZTE at high temperatures. Here we report the unconventional isotropic ZTE in the cubic (Sc1-xMx)F3 (M = Ga, Fe) over a wide temperature range (linear coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), αl = 2.34 × 10(-7) K(-1), 300-900 K). Such a broad temperature range with a considerably negligible CTE has rarely been documented. The present ZTE property has been designed using the introduction of local distortions in the macroscopic cubic lattice by heterogeneous cation substitution for the Sc site. Even though the macroscopic crystallographic structure of (Sc0.85Ga0.05Fe0.1)F3 adheres to the cubic system (Pm3̅m) according to the results of X-ray diffraction, the local structure exhibits a slight rhombohedral distortion. This is confirmed by pair distribution function analysis of synchrotron radiation X-ray total scattering. This local distortion may weaken the contribution from the transverse thermal vibration of fluorine atoms to negative thermal expansion, and thus may presumably be responsible for the ZTE. In addition, the present ZTE compounds of (Sc1-xMx)F3 can be functionalized to exhibit high-Tc ferromagnetism and a narrow-gap semiconductor feature. The present study shows the possibility of obtaining ZTE materials with multifunctionality in future work.

  5. What Limits the Distribution of Liriomyza huidobrensis and Its Congener Liriomyza sativae in Their Native Niche: When Temperature and Competition Affect Species' Distribution Range in Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Castañeda, G; MacVean, C; Cardona, C; Hof, A R

    2017-07-01

    Factors limiting distribution range for most species are generally unknown regardless of whether they are native or invasive. We studied factors that could enable or restrict the distribution of two cosmopolitan invasive leafminer fly species, Liriomyza huidobrensis (Blanchard) and Liriomyza sativae (Blanchard) in their native niche. In order to test which ecological and environmental factors affect leafminer distribution we conducted thermal tolerance assays, sampled along elevation gradients and modeled species distribution. Findings from the field and rearing chambers showed a physiological restriction due to high temperatures for L. huidobrensis at 28-29 °C, above which adult emergence is compromised. We also found that maximum temperatures below 22 °C, typical of tropical highlands, favored L. huidobrensis. L. sativae was found across a wider temperature range (i.e., from 21 to 36 °C) in Guatemala. Our finding of a physiological threshold in temperature for L. huidobrensis may enable us to predict its invasive risk when combined with the environmental conditions at horticultural ports of entry and the global agricultural landscape. Further, it strengthens our predictions on shifts in distribution of the leafminer fly under future climate. We also found a temperature mediated competitive exclusion interaction between the two herbivore species, where L. sativae occurred at temperatures < 22 °C only in the absence of L. huidobrensis. We show that parasitoids had a negative effect on the leafminer flies, which varied with host plant. Finally, we show the importance of taking a multiaspect approach when investigating what limits distribution and invasiveness of a species. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America.

  6. Factors affecting date of implantation, parturition, and den entry estimated from activity and body temperature in free-ranging brown bears.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Friebe

    Full Text Available Knowledge of factors influencing the timing of reproduction is important for animal conservation and management. Brown bears (Ursus arctos are able to vary the birth date of their cubs in response to their fat stores, but little information is available about the timing of implantation and parturition in free-ranging brown bears. Body temperature and activity of pregnant brown bears is higher during the gestation period than during the rest of hibernation and drops at parturition. We compared mean daily body temperature and activity levels of pregnant and nonpregnant females during preimplantation, gestation, and lactation. Additionally we tested whether age, litter size, primiparity, environmental conditions, and the start of hibernation influence the timing of parturition. The mean date of implantation was 1 December (SD = 12, the mean date of parturition was 26 January (SD = 12, and the mean duration of the gestation period was 56 days (SD = 2. The body temperature of pregnant females was higher during the gestation and lactation periods than that of nonpregnant bears. The body temperature of pregnant females decreased during the gestation period. Activity recordings were also used to determine the date of parturition. The parturition dates calculated with activity and body temperature data did not differ significantly and were the same in 50% of the females. Older females started hibernation earlier. The start of hibernation was earlier during years with favorable environmental conditions. Dates of parturition were later during years with good environmental conditions which was unexpected. We suggest that free-ranging pregnant brown bears in areas with high levels of human activities at the beginning of the denning period, as in our study area, might prioritize investing energy in early denning than in early parturition during years with favorable environmental conditions, as a strategy to prevent disturbances caused by human.

  7. Factors affecting date of implantation, parturition, and den entry estimated from activity and body temperature in free-ranging brown bears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friebe, Andrea; Evans, Alina L; Arnemo, Jon M; Blanc, Stéphane; Brunberg, Sven; Fleissner, Günther; Swenson, Jon E; Zedrosser, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of factors influencing the timing of reproduction is important for animal conservation and management. Brown bears (Ursus arctos) are able to vary the birth date of their cubs in response to their fat stores, but little information is available about the timing of implantation and parturition in free-ranging brown bears. Body temperature and activity of pregnant brown bears is higher during the gestation period than during the rest of hibernation and drops at parturition. We compared mean daily body temperature and activity levels of pregnant and nonpregnant females during preimplantation, gestation, and lactation. Additionally we tested whether age, litter size, primiparity, environmental conditions, and the start of hibernation influence the timing of parturition. The mean date of implantation was 1 December (SD = 12), the mean date of parturition was 26 January (SD = 12), and the mean duration of the gestation period was 56 days (SD = 2). The body temperature of pregnant females was higher during the gestation and lactation periods than that of nonpregnant bears. The body temperature of pregnant females decreased during the gestation period. Activity recordings were also used to determine the date of parturition. The parturition dates calculated with activity and body temperature data did not differ significantly and were the same in 50% of the females. Older females started hibernation earlier. The start of hibernation was earlier during years with favorable environmental conditions. Dates of parturition were later during years with good environmental conditions which was unexpected. We suggest that free-ranging pregnant brown bears in areas with high levels of human activities at the beginning of the denning period, as in our study area, might prioritize investing energy in early denning than in early parturition during years with favorable environmental conditions, as a strategy to prevent disturbances caused by human.

  8. Northern range expansion of European populations of the wasp spider Argiope bruennichi is associated with global warming-correlated genetic admixture and population-specific temperature adaptations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krehenwinkel, Henrik; Tautz, Diethard

    2013-04-01

    Poleward range expansions are observed for an increasing number of species, which may be an effect of global warming during the past decades. However, it is still not clear in how far these expansions reflect simple geographical shifts of species ranges, or whether new genetic adaptations play a role as well. Here, we analyse the expansion of the wasp spider Argiope bruennichi into Northern Europe during the last century. We have used a range-wide sampling of contemporary populations and historical specimens from museums to trace the phylogeography and genetic changes associated with the range shift. Based on the analysis of mitochondrial, microsatellite and SNP markers, we observe a higher level of genetic diversity in the expanding populations, apparently due to admixture of formerly isolated lineages. Using reciprocal transplant experiments for testing overwintering tolerance, as well as temperature preference and tolerance tests in the laboratory, we find that the invading spiders have possibly shifted their temperature niche. This may be a key adaptation for survival in Northern latitudes. The museum samples allow a reconstruction of the invasion's genetic history. A first, small-scale range shift started around 1930, in parallel with the onset of global warming. A more massive invasion of Northern Europe associated with genetic admixture and morphological changes occurred in later decades. We suggest that the latter range expansion into far Northern latitudes may be a consequence of the admixture that provided the genetic material for adaptations to new environmental regimes. Hence, global warming could have facilitated the initial admixture of populations and this resulted in genetic lineages with new habitat preferences. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Absolute rate constant and O(3P yield for the O(1D+N2O reaction in the temperature range 227 K to 719 K

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Carl

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The absolute rate constant for the reaction that is the major source of stratospheric NOx, O(1D+N2O → products, has been determined in the temperature range 227 K to 719 K, and, in the temperature range 248 K to 600 K, the fraction of the reaction that yields O(3P. Both the rate constants and product yields were determined using a recently-developed chemiluminescence technique for monitoring O(1D that allows for higher precision determinations for both rate constants, and, particularly, O(3P yields, than do other methods. We found the rate constant, kR1, to be essentially independent of temperature between 400 K and 227 K, having a value of (1.37±0.11×10−10 cm3 s−1, and for temperatures greater than 450 K a marked decrease in rate constant was observed, with a rate constant of only (0.94±0.11×10−10 cm3 s−1 at 719 K. The rate constants determined over the 227 K–400 K range show very low scatter and are significantly greater, by 20% at room temperature and 15% at 227 K, than the current recommended values. The fraction of O(3P produced in this reaction was determined to be 0.002±0.002 at 250 K rising steadily to 0.010±0.004 at 600 K, thus the channel producing O(3P can be entirely neglected in atmospheric kinetic modeling calculations. A further result of this study is an expression of the relative quantum yields as a function of temperature for the chemiluminescence reactions (kCL1C2H + O(1D → CH(A + CO and (kCL2C2H + O(3P → CH(A + CO, both followed by CH(A → CH(X + hν, as kCL1(T/kCL2(T=(32.8T−3050/(6.29T+398.

  10. Photometric analysis of the structure evolution on the Pb-19.4%Sn melt surface in the S-L temperature range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyakhovitskii M.M.

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The structure evolution of alloys in solidification range is considered as the first-order phase transformation from the solid state to the liquid one, which occurs by the mechanism of nucleation and growth of more symmetrical phase to less symmetrical crystalline phase. The kinetic regularities of this transformation are studied by the method of the photometric analysis of structure images (PHASI, which makes it possible to establish the temperature dependence of the relationship between the solid and liquid phases and their distribution on the melt surface. The PHASI method is based on the combined analysis of the brightness spectra of the visible light reflections from the sample surface and of the distribution of its scattering centers in different intensity intervals. The data on the structure evolution of the Sn+19.4%Pb alloy upon melting and solidification were considered in parallel with the measured spectra of sound signals. It was revealed that a distinct maximum is observed in the temperature dependence of radiation energy in the temperature range of phase transformation from the liquid into the solid state and hot crack formation occurs near the transition zone in the region of the contact of the ingot with the crucible.

  11. Characteristics of individual reactions of the cardiovascular system of healthy people to changes in meteorological factors in a wide temperature range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenchenko, T. A.; Skavulyak, A. N.; Khorseva, N. I.; Breus, T. K.

    2013-12-01

    Based on the results of 4-year observations of daily variations in blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) in seven healthy volunteers, two distinct types of reaction of physiological indicators (PIs) to changes in meteorological parameters (first and foremost, atmospheric temperature T atm) are revealed. The first type is a monotonic (but nonuniform with respect to speed) decrease in systolic BP with increasing temperature, which is most pronounced for T atm 15°C, with a weaker reaction of diastolic BP and no reaction of HR (in four volunteers). The second type is a two-phase nonmonotonic dependence of BP indicators on T atm, which coincides with the first type in the range T atm -5°C (in two volunteers). The physiological mechanisms that can provide the observed compensatory-adaptive reactions of healthy individuals to atmospheric factors in different temperature ranges are analyzed in detail. It has been shown that the revealed regularities can explain the results obtained by the authors in earlier studies.

  12. Creep of Zr--Nb alloys in the temperature range 350 to 550/sup 0/C. I. Steady-state creep of alloy Zr-2. 5% Nb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pahutova, M. (Ustav Fysikalni Metalurgie, Brno); Cadek, J.; Cerny, V.

    1975-01-01

    Steady-state creep in the alloy Zr--2.5 percent Nb was studied by isothermal test techniques in the temperature range from 350 to 550/sup 0/C. The mean effective stress corresponding to steady-state creep was measured by the null creep velocity technique. Phase and dislocation structures were studied by transmission electron microscopy. The sensitivity of the steady-state creep rate to applied stress increases with decreasing temperature and with increasing applied stress. The activation energy depends on applied stress and temperature, and ranges from 60 to 110 kcal per mol. A very strong influence of niobium on the stress to which a given steady-state creep rate corresponds was found, and it depends on both the solid solution strengthening and the dispersion strengthening and its related substructural strengthening. It is proposed that the solid solution strengthening is caused by the interaction of Nb atom-O atom pairs with dislocations. The creep rate is not controlled by slip motion of dislocations but rather by recovery. (IAA)

  13. The dynamic compressive behavior and constitutive modeling of D1 railway wheel steel over a wide range of strain rates and temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Jing

    Full Text Available The dynamic compressive behavior of D1 railway wheel steel at high strain rates was investigated using a split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB apparatus. Three types of specimens, which were derived from the different positions (i.e., the rim, web and hub of a railway wheel, were tested over a wide range of strain rates from 10−3 s−1 to 2.4 × 103 s−1 and temperatures from 213 K to 973 K. Influences of the strain rate and temperature on flow stress were discussed, and rate- and temperature-dependent constitutive relationships were assessed by the Cowper-Symonds model, Johnson-Cook model and a physically-based model, respectively. The experimental results show that the compressive true stress versus true strain response of D1 wheel steel is strain rate-dependent, and the strain hardening rate during the plastic flow stage decreases with the elevation of strain rate. Besides, the D1 wheel steel displays obvious temperature-dependence, and the third-type strain aging (3rd SA is occurred at the temperature region of 673–973 K at a strain rate of ∼1500 s−1. Comparisons of experimental results with theoretical predictions indicate that the physically-based model has a better prediction capability for the 3rd SA characteristic of the tested D1 wheel steel. Keywords: Railway wheel steel, SHPB, Strain rate, Temperature effect, Strain aging

  14. Moisture rivals temperature in limiting photosynthesis by trees establishing beyond their cold-edge range limit under ambient and warmed conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyes, Andrew B; Germino, Matthew J; Kueppers, Lara M

    2015-09-01

    Climate change is altering plant species distributions globally, and warming is expected to promote uphill shifts in mountain trees. However, at many cold-edge range limits, such as alpine treelines in the western United States, tree establishment may be colimited by low temperature and low moisture, making recruitment patterns with warming difficult to predict. We measured response functions linking carbon (C) assimilation and temperature- and moisture-related microclimatic factors for limber pine (Pinus flexilis) seedlings growing in a heating × watering experiment within and above the alpine treeline. We then extrapolated these response functions using observed microclimate conditions to estimate the net effects of warming and associated soil drying on C assimilation across an entire growing season. Moisture and temperature limitations were each estimated to reduce potential growing season C gain from a theoretical upper limit by 15-30% (c. 50% combined). Warming above current treeline conditions provided relatively little benefit to modeled net assimilation, whereas assimilation was sensitive to either wetter or drier conditions. Summer precipitation may be at least as important as temperature in constraining C gain by establishing subalpine trees at and above current alpine treelines as seasonally dry subalpine and alpine ecosystems continue to warm. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  15. AlN grown on Si(1 1 1) by ammonia-molecular beam epitaxy in the 900-1200 °C temperature range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamariz, Sebastian; Martin, Denis; Grandjean, Nicolas

    2017-10-01

    We present a comprehensive study of AlN growth on Si(1 1 1) substrate by gas source molecular beam epitaxy with ammonia as nitrogen precursor in the high temperature range. We first demonstrate that the observation of the silicon 7 × 7 surface reconstruction by reflection high energy electron diffraction can be misleading as this technique is not sensitive to low density surface defects like SiC crystallites. A careful in situ cleaning procedure with annealing cycles at 1100 °C allows getting rid of any surface defects, as shown by atomic force microscopy imaging. Then, we explore the effect of the growth temperature on the surface morphology and structural properties of 100 nm thick AlN epilayers. At 1200 °C, the growth proceeds with the step flow mode regime, which induces spiral-growth around screw-type dislocations and therefore surface roughening. On the other hand, a smooth surface morphology can be achieved by setting the temperature at 1100 °C, which corresponds to the growth mode transition from two-dimensional nucleation to step flow. A further decrease of the growth temperature to 900 °C leads to surface defects ascribed to polarity inversion domains. Similar defects are observed for growths performed at 1100 °C when the NH3 flow is reduced below 100 sccm. This points out the sensitivity of AlN to the surface stoichiometry.

  16. Investigation of luminescence and scintillation properties of a ZnS-Ag/{sup 6}LiF scintillator in the 7-295 K temperature range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikhailik, V.B., E-mail: v.mikhailik@physics.ox.ac.uk [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Henry, S.; Horn, M.; Kraus, H.; Lynch, A.; Pipe, M. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom)

    2013-02-15

    The luminescence and scintillation properties of ZnS-Ag/{sup 6}LiF where studied in the 7-295 K temperature range to evaluate the suitability of the scintillator for neutron detection at very low temperature (<1 K). It is shown that decrease of temperature has little effect upon principal luminescence and scintillation characteristics of ZnS-Ag: the changes of emission intensity are small for photoexcitation and negligible for excitation with {alpha}-particles. The recombination kinetics of the scintillation decay exhibits modest shortening of the fast decay time constant, from 4.52 to 3.35 {mu}s with cooling to 10 K. It is concluded that ZnS-Ag/{sup 6}LiF is a promising scintillator for cryogenic application. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Luminescence and scintillations of ZnS-Ag/6LiF neutron scintillator are studied over 7-295 K. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interpretation of excitation spectra is offered. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Scintillation properties exhibit little changes with cooling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZnS-Ag/6LiF can be used as neutron scintillation detector at cryogenic temperatures.

  17. Method to estimate the effective temperatures of late-type giants using line-depth ratios in the wavelength range 0.97-1.32 μm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Daisuke; Matsunaga, Noriyuki; Kobayashi, Naoto; Fukue, Kei; Hamano, Satoshi; Ikeda, Yuji; Kawakita, Hideyo; Kondo, Sohei; Sameshima, Hiroaki; Yasui, Chikako

    2018-02-01

    The effective temperature, one of the most fundamental atmospheric parameters of a star, can be estimated using various methods; here, we focus on a method using line-depth ratios (LDRs). This method combines low- and high-excitation lines and makes use of relations between LDRs of these line pairs and the effective temperature. It has an advantage, for example, of being minimally affected by interstellar reddening, which changes stellar colours. We report 81 relations between LDRs and effective temperature established with high-resolution, λ/Δλ ∼ 28 000, spectra of nine G- to M-type giants in the Y and J bands. Our analysis gives the first comprehensive set of LDR relations for this wavelength range. The combination of all these relations can be used to determine the effective temperatures of stars that have 3700 < Teff < 5400 K and -0.5 < [Fe/H] < +0.3 dex, to a precision of ±10 K in the best cases.

  18. Performance Evaluation of an Automotive-Grade, High Speed Gate Driver for SiC FETs, Type UCC27531, Over a Wide Temperature Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boomer, Kristen; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) devices are becoming widely used in electronic power circuits as replacement for conventional silicon parts due to their attractive properties that include low on-state resistance, high temperature tolerance, and high frequency operation. These attributes have a significant impact by reducing system weight, saving board space, and conserving power. In this work, the performance of an automotive-grade high speed gate driver with potential use in controlling SiC FETs (field-Effect Transistors) in converters or motor control applications was evaluated under extreme temperatures and thermal cycling. The investigations were carried out to assess performance and to determine suitability of this device for use in space exploration missions under extreme temperature conditions.

  19. Room-temperature operation of MOCVD-grown GaInAs/InP strained-layer multiquantum well lasers in 1.8 micron range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forouhar, S.; Larsson, A.; Ksendzov, A.; Lang, R. J.; Tothill, N.; Scott, M. D.

    1992-01-01

    The first successful room-temperature pulsed operation is reported of InGaAs strained layer multiquantum well injection lasers grown by MOVPE on InP substrates in the 1.8 micron range. The threshold current density and the external differential quantum efficiency of the 10 micron wide ridge waveguide lasers were 2.5 kA/sq cm (cavity length = 1 mm) and 5 percent (cavity length = 400 microns), respectively. Broad-area lasers, 100 microns wide and 1 mm long, had a reverse leakage current of less than 10 microamps at -1 V indicating high quality of the epitaxial layers.

  20. Internal state variable plasticity-damage modeling of AISI 4140 steel including microstructure-property relations: temperature and strain rate effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacif el Alaoui, Reda

    Mechanical structure-property relations have been quantified for AISI 4140 steel. under different strain rates and temperatures. The structure-property relations were used. to calibrate a microstructure-based internal state variable plasticity-damage model for. monotonic tension, compression and torsion plasticity, as well as damage evolution. Strong stress state and temperature dependences were observed for the AISI 4140 steel. Tension tests on three different notched Bridgman specimens were undertaken to study. the damage-triaxiality dependence for model validation purposes. Fracture surface. analysis was performed using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) to quantify the void. nucleation and void sizes in the different specimens. The stress-strain behavior exhibited. a fairly large applied stress state (tension, compression dependence, and torsion), a. moderate temperature dependence, and a relatively small strain rate dependence.

  1. Evaluation of the possible changes in diurnal temperature range (DTR trend in some arid climates of Iran since last five decades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AA Sabziparvar

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Climate is an important and determinning factor affecting many agricultural products. Diurnal temperature range (DTR is an effective parameter in assessing climate change impacts on environment in a region. This parameter is determined by the difference between minimum and maximum air temperatures. In this study, changes in the daily DTR collected from 11 synoptic stations were analyzed. The selected sites cover 50 years of daily observations from 1956 to 2005, specifying suitable geographical distribution throughout the country. Kolmogrov-Smirnov test was used to check the normal distribution and Run-test to control the quality of the temperature data. Trend investigation of DTR data was carried out by using Mann-Kendall test (MK and linear regression method (LR at 95 percent confidence level for monthly and annual time scales. About 18 percent of the study sites showed no significant DTR trend, but the rest of the sites (82% revealed significant negative (decreasing trends for the observed diurnal temperature difference time series. However, few months experienced no DTR trend in the selected sites. In about 95.5 percent of the studies cases, the existence of trend and the decreasing DTR trends obtained by MK test were also confirmed by the LR method. In this research, the minimum and maximum slopes were determined by the LR method. The analysis of the measured temperature data showed an average decreasing in DTR slope about -0.445oC per decade for the selected sites. According to the results, the decreasing DTR trends in northern and central sites were more significant than those in the southern regions. Detailed evaluation and substantiation.

  2. Study of the chemical interaction between the beryllium powders of different particles size and the air in the temperature range 500-1000degC form the viewpoint of ITER safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davydov, D.A. [State Scientific Center of Russian Federation, Moscow (Russian Federation); Konovalov, Y.V.; Gorokhov, V.A.; Levin, V.B.; Chekhlatov, G.M.; Khomutov, A.M.

    1998-01-01

    Under an effect of some factors characteristic for the ITER- operating condition a dense beryllium facing plasma can transit into various forms, changing its structural states. As a result of the bombardment of beryllium plasma facing components by ion fluxes, the production of a dust including the particles from a few micrometers to a few millimeters in size is possible. The specific features in the behaviour of various beryllium forms under emergency conditions are of an essential interest from the viewpoint of ITER safety. Some grades of powders of different average particles size (14-31 micron) have been produced in a given study, and their chemical interaction at high temperatures with air (500-1100degC), test duration effects simulating the emergency situation at ITER in the first approximation have been studied. The temperature dependence of beryllium powders (different particles size after disc abrased) interaction with air in the temperature range 500-1000degC at the exposure of 5 hours long for each temperature and kinetic dependence of interaction of these powders with air at 800degC for the exposure from half an hour to 7 hours long were studied. An analysis of granulometric weight fraction in the metallic and oxidized beryllium powders with different particles size has been done by the photosedimentational technique with the instrument `Analysette-20`. Construction of a mathematical model for the chemical interaction of beryllium powders with air at high temperatures have been carried out. (author)

  3. Temperature effect on bacterial growth rate: quantitative microbiology approach including cardinal values and variability estimates to perform growth simulation on/in food

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Membré, J.M.; Leporq, B.; Vialette, M.; Mettler, E.; Perrier, L.; Thuault, D.; Zwietering, M.H.

    2005-01-01

    Temperature effect on growth rates of Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella, Escherichia coli, Clostridium perfringens and Bacillus cereus, was studied. Growth rates were obtained in laboratory medium by using a binary dilutions method in which 15 optical density curves were generated to determine one

  4. A ∼32–70 K FORMATION TEMPERATURE RANGE FOR THE ICE GRAINS AGGLOMERATED BY COMET 67 P/CHURYUMOV–GERASIMENKO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lectez, S.; Simon, J.-M.; Salazar, J. M. [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR 6303, CNRS-Université de Bourgogne Franche Comté, Dijon (France); Mousis, O. [Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, Laboratoire d’Astrophysique de Marseille (LAM), UMR 7326, F-13388 Marseille (France); Picaud, S. [Institut UTINAM, UMR 6213, CNRS-Université de Bourgogne Franche Comté, Besançon (France); Altwegg, K.; Rubin, M., E-mail: jmsimon@u-bourgogne.fr [Physikalisches Institut, University of Bern, Sidlerstrasse 5, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland)

    2015-05-20

    Grand Canonical Monte Carlo simulations are used to reproduce the N{sub 2}/CO ratio ranging between 1.7 × 10{sup −3} and 1.6 × 10{sup −2} observed in situ in the Jupiter-family comet 67 P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko (67 P) by the ROSINA mass spectrometer on board the Rosetta spacecraft. By assuming that this body has been agglomerated from clathrates in the protosolar nebula (PSN), simulations are developed using elaborated interatomic potentials for investigating the temperature dependence of the trapping within a multiple-guest clathrate formed from a gas mixture of CO and N{sub 2} in proportions corresponding to those expected for the PSN. By assuming that 67 P agglomerated from clathrates, our calculations suggest the cometary grains must have been formed at temperatures ranging between ∼31.8 and 69.9 K in the PSN to match the N{sub 2}/CO ratio measured by the ROSINA mass spectrometer. The presence of clathrates in Jupiter-family comets could then explain the potential N{sub 2} depletion (factor of up to ∼87 compared to the protosolar value) measured in 67 P.

  5. Development of room temperature crossbar-H-mode cavities for proton and ion acceleration in the low to medium beta range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Clemente

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The crossbar H-mode (CH cavity is an accelerating structure operated in the H_{21(0} mode. The robustness of the crossbar geometry allows one to realize room temperature as well as superconducting linac cavities. The shunt impedance characteristics of this structure are attractive to develop proton and heavy ion linacs in the low and medium beta range. A first room temperature eight-cell prototype has proven the feasibility of the crossbar design in terms of mechanical construction, copper plating, and cooling. An innovative rf coupling concept has been developed where two CH cavities are connected by a two gap E_{010}-mode resonator which, at the same time, provides transverse focusing by a quadrupole triplet. The concept has been applied in the design of the new FAIR proton linac and a scaled model of the second cavity of this injector has been built and tested too. The full scale prototype is now under construction at the University of Frankfurt. In this paper, the room temperature CH cavity development as well as the general layout of the FAIR proton injector (70 MeV, 325 MHz, 70 mA is presented and discussed.

  6. Thermal Annealing to Modulate the Shape Memory Behavior of a Biobased and Biocompatible Triblock Copolymer Scaffold in the Human Body Temperature Range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlettini, Andrea; Gigli, Matteo; Ramella, Martina; Gualandi, Chiara; Soccio, Michelina; Boccafoschi, Francesca; Munari, Andrea; Lotti, Nadia; Focarete, Maria Letizia

    2017-08-14

    A biodegradable and biocompatible electrospun scaffold with shape memory behavior in the physiological temperature range is here presented. It was obtained starting from a specifically designed, biobased PLLA-based triblock copolymer, where the central block is poly(propylene azelate-co-propylene sebacate) (P(PAz60PSeb40)) random copolymer. Shape memory properties are determined by the contemporary presence of the low melting crystals of the P(PAz60PSeb40) block, acting as switching segment, and of the high melting crystal phase of PLLA blocks, acting as physical network. It is demonstrated that a straightforward annealing process applied to the crystal phase of the switching element gives the possibility to tune the shape recovery temperature from about 25 to 50 °C, without the need of varying the copolymer's chemical structure. The thermal annealing approach here presented can be thus considered a powerful strategy for "ad hoc" programming the same material for applications requiring different recovery temperatures. Fibroblast culture experiments demonstrated scaffold biocompatibility.

  7. Solubility Measurements and Predictions of Gypsum, Anhydrite, and Calcite Over Wide Ranges of Temperature, Pressure, and Ionic Strength with Mixed Electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Zhaoyi; Kan, Amy T.; Shi, Wei; Zhang, Nan; Zhang, Fangfu; Yan, Fei; Bhandari, Narayan; Zhang, Zhang; Liu, Ya; Ruan, Gedeng; Tomson, Mason B.

    2017-02-01

    Today's oil and gas production from deep reservoirs permits exploitation of more oil and gas reserves but increases risks due to conditions of high temperature and high pressure. Predicting mineral solubility under such extreme conditions is critical for mitigating scaling risks, a common and costly problem. Solubility predictions use solubility products and activity coefficients, commonly from Pitzer theory virial coefficients. However, inaccurate activity coefficients and solubility data have limited accurate mineral solubility predictions and applications of the Pitzer theory. This study measured gypsum solubility under its stable phase conditions up to 1400 bar; it also confirmed the anhydrite solubility reported in the literature. Using a novel method, the virial coefficients for Ca2+ and {{SO}}4^{2 - } (i.e., β_{{{{CaSO}}4 }}^{(0)} ,β_{{{{CaSO}}4 }}^{(2)} ,C_{{{{CaSO}}4 }}^{φ }) were calculated over wide ranges of temperature and pressure (0-250 °C and 1-1400 bar). The determination of this set of virial coefficients widely extends the applicable temperature and pressure ranges of the Pitzer theory in Ca2+ and SO 4 2- systems. These coefficients can be applied to improve the prediction of calcite solubility in the presence of high concentrations of Ca2+ and SO 4 2- ions. These new virial coefficients can also be used to predict the solubilities of gypsum and anhydrite accurately. Moreover, based on the derived β_{{{{CaSO}}4 }}^{(2)} values in this study, the association constants of {{CaSO}}4^{( 0 )} at 1 bar and 25 °C can be estimated by K_{{assoc}} = - 2β_{{{{CaSO}}4 }}^{(2)}. These values match very well with those reported in the literature based on other methods.

  8. Hydrostatic, uniaxial, and triaxial compression tests on unpoled "Chem-prep" PZT 95/5-2Nb ceramic within temperature range of -55 to 75 degrees C.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeuch, David Henry; Montgomery, Stephen Tedford; Lee, Moo Yul; Hofer, John H.

    2003-10-01

    Sandia is currently developing a lead-zirconate-titanate ceramic 95/5-2Nb (or PNZT) from chemically prepared ('chem-prep') precursor powders. Previous PNZT ceramic was fabricated from the powders prepared using a 'mixed-oxide' process. The specimens of unpoled PNZT ceramic from batch HF803 were tested under hydrostatic, uniaxial, and constant stress difference loading conditions within the temperature range of -55 to 75 C and pressures to 500 MPa. The objective of this experimental study was to obtain mechanical properties and phase relationships so that the grain-scale modeling effort can develop and test its models and codes using realistic parameters. The stress-strain behavior of 'chem-prep' PNZT under different loading paths was found to be similar to that of 'mixed-oxide' PNZT. The phase transformation from ferroelectric to antiferroelectric occurs in unpoled ceramic with abrupt increase in volumetric strain of about 0.7 % when the maximum compressive stress, regardless of loading paths, equals the hydrostatic pressure at which the transformation otherwise takes place. The stress-volumetric strain relationship of the ceramic undergoing a phase transformation was analyzed quantitatively using a linear regression analysis. The pressure (P{sub T1}{sup H}) required for the onset of phase transformation with respect to temperature is represented by the best-fit line, P{sub T1}{sup H} (MPa) = 227 + 0.76 T (C). We also confirmed that increasing shear stress lowers the mean stress and the volumetric strain required to trigger phase transformation. At the lower bound (-55 C) of the tested temperature range, the phase transformation is permanent and irreversible. However, at the upper bound (75 C), the phase transformation is completely reversible as the stress causing phase transformation is removed.

  9. On the contrasting decadal changes of diurnal surface temperature range between the Tibetan Plateau and southeastern China during the 1980s-2000s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Ren, Rongcai

    2017-02-01

    The diurnal surface temperature range (DTR) has become significantly smaller over the Tibetan Plateau (TP) but larger in southeastern China, despite the daily mean surface temperature having increased steadily in both areas during recent decades. Based on ERA-Interim reanalysis data covering 1979-2012, this study shows that the weakened DTR over TP is caused by stronger warming of daily minimum surface temperature (Tmin) and a weak cooling of the daily maximum surface temperature (Tmax); meanwhile, the enhanced DTR over southeastern China is mainly associated with a relatively stronger/weaker warming of Tmax/Tmin. A further quantitative analysis of DTR changes through a process-based decomposition method—the Coupled Surface-Atmosphere Climate Feedback Response Analysis Method (CFRAM)—indicates that changes in radiative processes are mainly responsible for the decreased DTR over the TP. In particular, the increased low-level cloud cover tends to induce the radiative cooling/warming during daytime/nighttime, and the increased water vapor helps to decrease the DTR through the stronger radiative warming during nighttime than daytime. Contributions from the changes in all radiative processes (over -2°C) are compensated for by those from the stronger decreased surface sensible heat flux during daytime than during nighttime (approximately 2.5°C), but are co-contributed by the changes in atmospheric dynamics (approximately -0.4°C) and the stronger increased latent heat flux during daytime (approximately -0.8°C). In contrast, the increased DTR over southeastern China is mainly contributed by the changes in cloud, water vapor and atmospheric dynamics. The changes in surface heat fluxes have resulted in a decrease in DTR over southeastern China.

  10. Viscoplastic behavior of zirconium alloys in the temperatures range 20 deg C - 400 deg C: characterization and modeling of strain ageing phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graff, St

    2006-10-15

    The anomalous strain rate sensitivity of zirconium alloys over the temperatures range 20-600 C has been widely reported in the literature. This unconventional behavior is related to the existence of strain ageing phenomenon which results from the combined action of thermally activated diffusion of foreign atoms to and along dislocation cores and the long range of dislocations interactions. The important role of interstitial and substitutional atoms in zirconium alloys, responsible for strain ageing and the lack of information about the domain where strain ageing is active have not been yet adequately characterized because of the multiplicity of alloying elements and chemical impurities. The aim of this work is to characterize experimentally the range of temperatures and strain rates where strain ageing is active on the macroscopic and mesoscopic scales. We propose also a predictive approach of the strain ageing effects, using the macroscopic strain ageing model suggested by McCormick (McCormick, 1988; Zhang et al., 2000). Specific zirconium alloys were elaborated starting from a crystal bar of zirconium with 2.2 wt% hafnium and very low oxygen content (80 wt ppm), called ZrHf. Another substitutional atom was added to the solid solution under the form of 1 wt% niobium. Some zirconium alloys were doped with oxygen, others were not. All of them were characterized by various mechanical tests (standard tensile tests, tensile tests with strain rate changes, relaxation tests with unloading). The experimental results were compared with those for the standard oxygen doped zirconium alloy (1300 wt ppm) studied by Pujol (Pujol, 1994) and called Zr702. The following experimental evidences of the age-hardening phenomena were collected and then modeled: 1) low and/or negative strain rate sensitivity around 200-300 C, 2) creep arrest at 200 C, 3) relaxation arrest at 200 C and 300 C, 4) plastic strain heterogeneities observed in laser extensometry on the millimeter scale

  11. New hardware and software platform for experiments on a HUBER-5042 X-ray diffractometer with a DISPLEX DE-202 helium cryostat in the temperature range of 20-300 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudka, A. P.; Antipin, A. M.; Verin, I. A.

    2017-09-01

    Huber-5042 diffractometer with a closed-cycle Displex DE-202 helium cryostat is a unique scientific instrument for carrying out X-ray diffraction experiments when studying the single crystal structure in the temperature range of 20-300 K. To make the service life longer and develop new experimental techniques, the diffractometer control is transferred to a new hardware and software platform. To this end, a modern computer; a new detector reader unit; and new control interfaces for stepper motors, temperature controller, and cryostat vacuum pumping system are used. The system for cooling the X-ray tube, the high-voltage generator, and the helium compressor and pump for maintaining the desired vacuum in the cryostat are replaced. The system for controlling the primary beam shutter is upgraded. A biological shielding is installed. The new program tools, which use the Linux Ubuntu operating system and SPEC constructor, include a set of drivers for control units through the aforementioned interfaces. A program for searching reflections from a sample using fast continuous scanning and a priori information about crystal is written. Thus, the software package for carrying out the complete cycle of precise diffraction experiment (from determining the crystal unit cell to calculating the integral reflection intensities) is upgraded. High quality of the experimental data obtained on this equipment is confirmed in a number of studies in the temperature range from 20 to 300 K.

  12. Real-time monitoring of radiofrequency ablation of liver tumors using thermal-dose calculation by MR temperature imaging: initial results in nine patients, including follow-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepetit-Coiffe, Matthieu; Quesson, Bruno; Moonen, Chrit T.W. [Universite Victor Segalen Bordeaux 2, Laboratoire Imagerie Moleculaire et Fonctionnelle: de la physiologie a la therapie CNRS UMR 5231, Bordeaux Cedex (France); Laumonier, Herve; Trillaud, Herve [Universite Victor Segalen Bordeaux 2, Laboratoire Imagerie Moleculaire et Fonctionnelle: de la physiologie a la therapie CNRS UMR 5231, Bordeaux Cedex (France); Service de Radiologie, Hopital Saint-Andre, CHU Bordeaux, Bordeaux (France); Seror, Olivier [Universite Victor Segalen Bordeaux 2, Laboratoire Imagerie Moleculaire et Fonctionnelle: de la physiologie a la therapie CNRS UMR 5231, Bordeaux Cedex (France); Service de Radiologie, Hopital Jean Verdier, Bondy (France); Sesay, Musa-Bahazid [Service d' Anesthesie Reanimation III, Hopital Pellegrin, CHU Bordeaux, Bordeaux (France); Grenier, Nicolas [Universite Victor Segalen Bordeaux 2, Laboratoire Imagerie Moleculaire et Fonctionnelle: de la physiologie a la therapie CNRS UMR 5231, Bordeaux Cedex (France); Service d' Imagerie Diagnostique et Therapeutique de l' Adulte, Hopital Pellegrin, CHU Bordeaux, Bordeaux (France)

    2010-01-15

    To assess the practical feasibility and effectiveness of real-time magnetic resonance (MR) temperature monitoring for the radiofrequency (RF) ablation of liver tumours in a clinical setting, nine patients (aged 49-87 years, five men and four women) with one malignant tumour (14-50 mm, eight hepatocellular carcinomas and one colorectal metastasis), were treated by 12-min RF ablation using a 1.5-T closed magnet for real-time temperature monitoring. The clinical monopolar RF device was filtered at 64 MHz to avoid electromagnetic interference. Real-time computation of thermal-dose (TD) maps, based on Sapareto and Dewey's equation, was studied to determine its ability to provide a clear end-point of the RF procedure. Absence of local recurrence on follow-up MR images obtained 45 days after the RF ablation was used to assess the apoptotic and necrotic prediction obtained by real-time TD maps. Seven out of nine tumours were completely ablated according to the real-time TD maps. Compared with 45-day follow-up MR images, TD maps accurately predicted two primary treatment failures, but were not relevant in the later progression of one case of secondary local tumour. The real-time TD concept is a feasible and promising monitoring method for the RF ablation of liver tumours. (orig.)

  13. Study on Microtexture and Martensite Formation of Friction Stir Lap-welded DP 590 Steel within A1 to A3 Temperature Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Hrishikesh; Lee, Kwang-Jin; Hong, Sung-Tae

    2017-07-01

    Friction stir lap welding of dual phase 590 steel has been successfully performed within the A1 to A3 temperature range upon adjusting the process parameters. The microstructures and the texture have been characterized using scanning electron microscopy and electron back scattered diffraction analysis. The martensite volume fraction increases with an increasing travel speed from 100 to 300 mm/min for a constant tool rotational speed of 300 rpm. Under severe deformation and high strain rate during friction stir welding, the grain orientation shifts toward the and directions compared to the base metal. The base metal shows γ fiber components, whereas the friction stir welded specimen shows strong brass with weak cube fibers.

  14. Half-metallic compensated ferrimagnetism with a tunable compensation point over a wide temperature range in the Mn-Fe-V-Al Heusler system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolf Stinshoff

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The cubic Heusler compound Mn1.5FeV0.5Al with the L21 Heusler structure is the first fully compensated half-metallic ferrimagnet with 24 valence electrons. The ferrimagnetic state can be tuned by changing the composition such that the compensation point appears at finite temperatures ranging from 0 K up to 226 K, while retaining half-metallicity in the system. In this paper, the structural, magnetic and transport properties of the Mn-Fe-V-Al system are discussed. Magnetic reversal and a change of sign of the anomalous Hall effect were observed at the compensation point, which gives rise to a sublattice spin-crossing. These materials present new possibilities for potential spintronic devices because of their advantageous properties such as imperceptibility to external fields, lower power consumption and ultrafast switching in the THz region.

  15. Half-metallic compensated ferrimagnetism with a tunable compensation point over a wide temperature range in the Mn-Fe-V-Al Heusler system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinshoff, Rolf; Fecher, Gerhard H.; Chadov, Stanislav; Nayak, Ajaya K.; Balke, Benjamin; Ouardi, Siham; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Felser, Claudia

    2017-10-01

    The cubic Heusler compound Mn1.5FeV0.5Al with the L21 Heusler structure is the first fully compensated half-metallic ferrimagnet with 24 valence electrons. The ferrimagnetic state can be tuned by changing the composition such that the compensation point appears at finite temperatures ranging from 0 K up to 226 K, while retaining half-metallicity in the system. In this paper, the structural, magnetic and transport properties of the Mn-Fe-V-Al system are discussed. Magnetic reversal and a change of sign of the anomalous Hall effect were observed at the compensation point, which gives rise to a sublattice spin-crossing. These materials present new possibilities for potential spintronic devices because of their advantageous properties such as imperceptibility to external fields, lower power consumption and ultrafast switching in the THz region.

  16. Atomic long-range order effects on Curie temperature and adiabatic spin-wave dynamics in strained Fe-Co alloy films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönecker, Stephan; Li, Xiaoqing; Johansson, Börje; Vitos, Levente

    2016-08-01

    The strained Fe-Co alloy in body-centered tetragonal (bct) structure has raised considerable interest due to its giant uniaxial magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy. On the basis of the classical Heisenberg Hamiltonian with ab initio interatomic exchange interactions, we perform a theoretical study of fundamental finite temperature magnetic properties of Fe1 -xCox alloy films as a function of three variables: chemical composition 0.3 ≤x ≤0.8 , bct geometry [a ,c (a )] arising from in-plane strain and associated out-of-plane relaxation, and atomic long-range order (ALRO). The Curie temperatures TC(x ,a ) obtained from Monte Carlo simulations display a competition between a pronounced dependence on tetragonality, strong ferromagnetism in the Co-rich alloy, and the beginning instability of ferromagnetic order in the Fe-rich alloy when c /a →√{2 } . Atomic ordering enhances TC and arises mainly due to different distributions of atoms in neighboring coordination shells rather than altering exchange interactions significantly. We investigate the ordering effect on the shape of the adiabatic spin-wave spectrum for selected pairs (x ,a ) . Our results indicate that long-wavelength acoustic spin-wave excitations show dependencies on x , a , and ALRO similar to those of TC. The directional anisotropy of the spin-wave stiffness d (x ,a ) peaks in narrow ranges of composition and tetragonality. ALRO exhibits a strong effect on d for near equiconcentration Fe-Co. We also discuss our findings in the context of employing Fe-Co as perpendicular magnetic recording medium.

  17. Electron spin resonance studies of Bi1-xScxFeO3 nanoparticulates: Observation of an enhanced spin canting over a large temperature range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titus, S.; Balakumar, S.; Sakar, M.; Das, J.; Srinivasu, V. V.

    2017-12-01

    Bi1-xScxFeO3 (x = 0.0, 0.1, 0.15, 0.25) nano particles were synthesized by sol gel method. We then probed the spin system in these nano particles using electron spin resonance technique. Our ESR results strongly suggest the scenario of modified spin canted structures. Spin canting parameter Δg/g as a function of temperature for Scandium doped BFO is qualitatively different from undoped BFO. A broad peak is observed for all the Scandium doped BFO samples and an enhanced spin canting over a large temperature range (75-210 K) in the case of x = 0.15 doping. We also showed that the asymmetry parameter and thereby the magneto-crystalline anisotropy in these BSFO nanoparticles show peaks around 230 K for (x = 0.10 and 0.15) and beyond 300 K for x = 0.25 system. Thus, we established that the Sc doping significantly modifies the spin canting and magneto crystalline anisotropy in the BFO system.

  18. Gender, Age and Season as Modifiers of the Effects of Diurnal Temperature Range on Emergency Room Admissions for Cause-Specific Cardiovascular Disease among the Elderly in Beijing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Shan; Wang, Minzhen; Li, Bei; Wang, Shigong; He, Shilin; Yin, Ling; Shang, Kezheng; Li, Tanshi

    2016-04-27

    Diurnal temperature range (DTR) is an important index of climate change and variability. It is also a risk factor affecting human health. However, limited evidence is available to illustrate the effect of DTR modification on cause-specific cardiovascular disease among the elderly. A semi-parametric generalized additive model (GAM) was used to analyze the exposure-effect relationship between DTR and daily emergency room (ER) admissions for cause-specific cardiovascular diseases among the elderly from 2009 to 2011 in Beijing. We examined the effects of DTR for stratified groups by gender and age, and examined the effects of DTR in the warm season and cold season for cause-specific cardiovascular diseases. Significant associations were found between DTR and ER admissions for all cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease among elderly males, while DTR was significantly associated with ER admissions for all cardiovascular disease, ischemic heart disease and cerebrovascular disease among elderly females. People aged 75 years and older were more vulnerable to DTR. DTR caused greater adverse effects on both genders in the warm season, whereas the effect estimates on females were higher in cold season than in warm season. A short-term increase of DTR was significantly associated with ER admissions for cause-specific cardiovascular disease among the elderly in Beijing. Gender, age and season may modify the acute health effect of DTR. Some prevention programs that target the high risk subgroups in the elderly for impending large temperature changes may reduce the impact of DTR on people's health.

  19. Rapid biodegradation of aflatoxin B1 by metabolites of Fusarium sp. WCQ3361 with broad working temperature range and excellent thermostability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cuiqiong; Li, Zhongyuan; Wang, Hui; Qiu, Haiyan; Zhang, Minghui; Li, Shuang; Luo, Xuegang; Song, Yajian; Zhou, Hao; Ma, Wenjian; Zhang, Tongcun

    2017-03-01

    Contamination of food and feed by aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) poses serious economic and health problems worldwide, so the development of biological methods for effective AFB1 degradation is strongly required. Among three AFB1-degrading microorganisms isolated from moldy peanut, Fusarium sp. WCQ3361 could remove AFB1 extremely effectively, with a degradation ratio of 70.20% after 1 min and 95.38% after 24 h. Its degradation ratio was not much affected by temperature change (0-90 °C) and it also displayed excellent thermostability, maintaining 99.40% residual activity after boiling for 10 min. Since protease K could reduce the AFB1 degradation ratio by 55.15%, it is proposed that the effective component for AFB1 degradation is a protein. The AFB1 degradation ability of Fusarium sp. WCQ3361 was further verified by feed stock detoxification and the MTT test with HepG2 cells. In addition, no degradation products were detected by preliminary liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry, suggesting that AFB1 might be metabolized to products with different chemical characteristics from AFB1. Fusarium sp. WCQ3361 is the first reported AFB1 degradation fungus belonging to the genus Fusarium with broad working temperature range, excellent thermostability and high activity, which provides a potential highly useful solution for dealing with AFB1 contamination in the human diet and animal feed. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  20. Thermoeconomic Evaluation of Modular Organic Rankine Cycles for Waste Heat Recovery over a Broad Range of Heat Source Temperatures and Capacities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Preißinger

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Industrial waste heat recovery by means of an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC can contribute to the reduction of CO2 emissions from industries. Before market penetration, high efficiency modular concepts have to be developed to achieve appropriate economic value for industrial decision makers. This paper aims to investigate modularly designed ORC systems from a thermoeconomic point of view. The main goal is a recommendation for a suitable chemical class of working fluids, preferable ORC design and a range of heat source temperatures and thermal capacities in which modular ORCs can be economically feasible. For this purpose, a thermoeconomic model has been developed which is based on size and complexity parameters of the ORC components. Special emphasis has been laid on the turbine model. The paper reveals that alkylbenzenes lead to higher exergetic efficiencies compared to alkanes and siloxanes. However, based on the thermoeconomic model, the payback periods of the chemical classes are almost identical. With the ORC design, the developed model and the boundary conditions of this study, hexamethyldisiloxane is a suitable working fluid and leads to a payback period of less than 5 years for a heat source temperature of 400 to 600 °C and a mass flow rate of the gaseous waste heat stream of more than 4 kg/s.

  1. Effect of diurnal temperature range on the outpatient visits for acute bronchitis in children: a time-series study in Hefei, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, M-Y; Ni, H; Zhao, D-S; Cheng, J; Wen, L-Y; Li, K-S; Yang, H-H; Wang, S-S; Zhang, H; Wang, X; Su, H

    2017-03-01

    To determine the relationship between diurnal temperature range (DTR) and outpatient visits for childhood acute bronchitis (AB) in Hefei, China, to analyze whether DTR effect was delayed, and to explore the susceptible populations. An ecological study. A Poisson generalized linear regression model combined with a distributed lag non-linear model was used to analyze the relationship between DTR and childhood AB from Hefei, China during 2010-2013, after adjusting for long-term trend and seasonality, mean temperature and relative humidity. An adverse effect of DTR on childhood AB was observed, and the impact of DTR was greatest at three days lag, with a 1.0% (95% confidence interval = 0.5-1.6%) increase of AB cases per 1 °C increment of DTR. Female children and children aged 0-4 years appeared to be more vulnerable to DTR effect than other children. Our study suggests that large DTR may increase the incidence of childhood AB in Hefei, particularly for those who are female and young. Caregivers and health practitioners should be made aware of the potential threat posed by large DTR. Copyright © 2016 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Self-welding evaluation of type 304 and A286 stainless steel in the temperature range 800/sup 0/-1140/sup 0/F in flowing sodium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, J.Y.; Flagella, P.N.; Schrock, S.L.

    1976-01-01

    This paper covers two material combinations, Type 304 SS vs Type 304 SS and Type 304 SS vs A286, tested at temperatures from 800 to 1140/sup 0/F for time periods up to six months in flowing sodium. Contact stresses ranged from 2 to 30 ksi on contact areas for 0.63 to 1.00 in./sup 2/. Tests were performed in either tensile or shear modes on the flat-on-flat samples. Surface morphologies of the sample before and after the test were presented. Self-welding of Type 304 SS was significant at temperatures above 1080/sup 0/F while no self-welding was detected at 800/sup 0/F. Sliding friction coefficient (..mu..) data for a Type 304 SS couple at 800/sup 0/F under compressive stresses from 2000 to 30,000 psi in sodium could be correlated quite accurately by W/sigma = 0.08e/sup 9..mu../, where W is the waviness height in microinches and sigma is the compressive stress in kilo-pound per square inch. One self-weld couple of Type 304 SS/Type 304 SS exposed at 1080/sup 0/F for 3 months was not separated but rather removed intact from the test apparatus and examined in cross-section. Scanning electron micrographs of the contacted area revealed that portions of the original interface were no longer discernible. (auth)

  3. Quantum mechanical free energy profiles with post-quantization restraints: Binding free energy of the water dimer over a broad range of temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Kevin P.; Roy, Pierre-Nicholas

    2018-03-01

    Free energy calculations are a crucial part of understanding chemical systems but are often computationally expensive for all but the simplest of systems. Various enhanced sampling techniques have been developed to improve the efficiency of these calculations in numerical simulations. However, the majority of these approaches have been applied using classical molecular dynamics. There are many situations where nuclear quantum effects impact the system of interest and a classical description fails to capture these details. In this work, path integral molecular dynamics has been used in conjunction with umbrella sampling, and it has been observed that correct results are only obtained when the umbrella sampling potential is applied to a single path integral bead post quantization. This method has been validated against a Lennard-Jones benchmark system before being applied to the more complicated water dimer system over a broad range of temperatures. Free energy profiles are obtained, and these are utilized in the calculation of the second virial coefficient as well as the change in free energy from the separated water monomers to the dimer. Comparisons to experimental and ground state calculation values from the literature are made for the second virial coefficient at higher temperature and the dissociation energy of the dimer in the ground state.

  4. Luminescence of the (O2(a(1)Δ(g)))2 collisional complex in the temperature range of 90-315 K: Experiment and theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagidullin, M V; Pershin, A A; Azyazov, V N; Mebel, A M

    2015-12-28

    Experimental and theoretical studies of collision induced emission of singlet oxygen molecules O2(a(1)Δg) in the visible range have been performed. The rate constants, half-widths, and position of peaks for the emission bands of the (O2(a(1)Δg))2 collisional complex centered around 634 nm (2) and 703 nm (3) have been measured in the temperature range of 90-315 K using a flow-tube apparatus that utilized a gas-liquid chemical singlet oxygen generator. The absolute values of the spontaneous emission rate constants k2 and k3 are found to be similar, with the k3/k2 ratio monotonically decreasing from 1.1 at 300 K to 0.96 at 90 K. k2 slowly decreases with decreasing temperature but a sharp increase in its values is measured below 100 K. The experimental results were rationalized in terms of ab initio calculations of the ground and excited potential energy and transition dipole moment surfaces of singlet electronic states of the (O2)2 dimole, which were utilized to compute rate constants k2 and k3 within a statistical model. The best theoretical results reproduced experimental rate constants with the accuracy of under 40% and correctly described the observed temperature dependence. The main contribution to emission process (2), which does not involve vibrational excitation of O2 molecules at the ground electronic level, comes from the spin- and symmetry-allowed 1(1)Ag←(1)B3u transition in the rectangular H configuration of the dimole. Alternatively, emission process (3), in which one of the monomers becomes vibrationally excited in the ground electronic state, is found to be predominantly due to the vibronically allowed 1(1)Ag←2(1)Ag transition induced by the asymmetric O-O stretch vibration in the collisional complex. The strong vibronic coupling between nearly degenerate excited singlet states of the dimole makes the intensities of vibronically and symmetry-allowed transitions comparable and hence the rate constants k2 and k3 close to one another.

  5. Impact of urbanization and land-use/land-cover change on diurnal temperature range: a case study of tropical urban airshed of India using remote sensing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Manju; Kandya, Anurag

    2015-02-15

    Diurnal temperature range (DTR) is an important climate change index. Its knowledge is important to a range of issues and themes in earth sciences central to urban climatology and human-environment interactions. The present study investigates the effect of urbanization on the land surface temperature (LST) based DTR. This study presents spatial and temporal variations of satellite based estimates of annually averaged DTR over megacity Delhi, the capital of India, which are shown for a period of 11 years during 2001-2011 and analyzes this with regard to its land-use/land-cover (LU/LC) changes and population growth. Delhi which witnessed massive urbanization in terms of population growth (decadal growth rate of Delhi during 2001-2011 was 20.96%) and major transformations in the LU/LC (built-up area crossed more than 53%) are experiencing severity in its micro and macroclimate. There was a consistent increase in the areas experiencing DTR below 11°C which typically resembled the 'urban class' viz. from 26.4% in the year 2001 to 65.3% in the year 2011 and subsequently the DTR of entire Delhi which was 12.48°C in the year 2001 gradually reduced to 10.34°C in the year 2011, exhibiting a significant decreasing trend. Rapidly urbanizing areas like Rohini, Dwarka, Vasant Kunj, Kaushambi, Khanjhawala Village, IIT, Safdarjung Airport, etc. registered a significant decreasing trend in the DTR. In the background of the converging DTR, which was primarily due to the increase in the minimum temperatures, a grim situation in terms of potentially net increase in the heat-related mortality rate especially for the young children below 15years of age is envisaged for Delhi. Considering the earlier findings that the level of risk of death remained the highest and longest for Delhi, in comparison to megacities like Sao Paulo and London, the study calls for strong and urgent heat island mitigation measures. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. UV-photodegradation of desipramine: Impact of concentration, pH and temperature on formation of products including their biodegradability and toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khaleel, Nareman D.H.; Mahmoud, Waleed M.M. [Sustainable Chemistry and Material Resources, Institute of Sustainable and Environmental Chemistry, Leuphana University of Lüneburg, Scharnhorststraße 1 C13, DE 21335 Lüneburg (Germany); Pharmaceutical Analytical Chemistry Department, Faculty of Pharmacy, Suez Canal University, Ismailia 41522 (Egypt); Olsson, Oliver [Sustainable Chemistry and Material Resources, Institute of Sustainable and Environmental Chemistry, Leuphana University of Lüneburg, Scharnhorststraße 1 C13, DE 21335 Lüneburg (Germany); Kümmerer, Klaus, E-mail: klaus.kuemmerer@leuphana.de [Sustainable Chemistry and Material Resources, Institute of Sustainable and Environmental Chemistry, Leuphana University of Lüneburg, Scharnhorststraße 1 C13, DE 21335 Lüneburg (Germany)

    2016-10-01

    Desipramine (DMI) is a widely used tricyclic antidepressant, and it is the major metabolite of imipramine (IMI) and lofepramine (LMI); IMI and LMI are two of the most commonly used tricyclic antidepressants. If DMI enters the aquatic environment, it can be transformed by the environmental bacteria or UV radiation. Therefore, photolysis of DMI in water was performed using a simulated sunlight Xenon-lamp and a UV-lamp. Subsequently, the biodegradability of DMI and its photo-transformation products (PTPs) formed during its UV photolysis was studied. The influence of variable conditions, such as initial DMI concentration, solution pH, and temperature, on DMI UV photolysis behavior was also studied. The degree of mineralization of DMI and its PTPs was monitored. A Shimadzu HPLC-UV apparatus was used to follow the kinetic profile of DMI during UV-irradiation; after that, ion-trap and high-resolution mass spectrometry coupled with chromatography were used to monitor and identify the possible PTPs. The environmentally relevant properties and selected toxicity properties of DMI and the non-biodegradable PTPs were predicted using different QSAR models. DMI underwent UV photolysis with first-order kinetics. Quantum yields were very low. DOC values indicated that DMI formed new PTPs and was not completely mineralized. Analysis by means of high-resolution mass spectrometry revealed that the photolysis of DMI followed three main photolysis pathways: isomerization, hydroxylation, and ring opening. The photolysis rate was inversely proportional to initial DMI concentration. The pH showed a significant impact on the photolysis rate of DMI, and on the PTPs in terms of both formation kinetics and mechanisms. Although temperature was expected to increase the photolysis rate, it showed a non-significant impact in this study. Results from biodegradation tests and QSAR analysis revealed that DMI and its PTPs are not readily biodegradable and that some PTPs may be human and/or eco

  7. Study Modules for Calculus-Based General Physics. [Includes Modules 18-20: Sound; Temperature, Heat, and Thermodynamics: First Law; and Kinetic Theory of Gases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Robert G., Ed.; And Others

    This is part of a series of 42 Calculus Based Physics (CBP) modules totaling about 1,000 pages. The modules include study guides, practice tests, and mastery tests for a full-year individualized course in calculus-based physics based on the Personalized System of Instruction (PSI). The units are not intended to be used without outside materials;…

  8. Electrochemical characterisations and ageing of ionic liquid/γ-butyrolactone mixtures as electrolytes for supercapacitor applications over a wide temperature range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagousset, Laure; Pognon, Grégory; Nguyen, Giao T. M.; Vidal, Frédéric; Jus, Sébastien; Aubert, Pierre-Henri

    2017-08-01

    Electrochemical properties in mesoporous media of three different ionic liquids (1-propyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium-bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide - Pyr13FSI, 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium-bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide - Pyr14TFSI and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium-bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide - EMITFSI) are investigated from -50 °C to 100 °C and compared with binary mixtures with γ-butyrolactone (GBL). Buckypaper composed of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNTs) are used to prepare and study coin-cell supercapacitors. Supercapacitor using Pyr13FSI/GBL present a rapid loss of capacitance after only a thousand cycles at 100 °C. On the contrary, EMITFSI/GBL and Pyr14TFSI/GBL prove to be very promising at high temperature (the capacitance loss after 10,000 cycles is 9% and 10%). More drastic ageing tests such as floating are also carried out for these two mixtures at 100 °C and -50 °C. 23% and 15% capacitance losses have been recorded after 500 h of floating at 100 °C for EMITFSI/GBL and Pyr14TFSI/GBL. The capacitance of supercapacitors based on Pyr14TFSI/GBL dropped by 20% after 200 h of floating at -50 °C rather than EMITFSI/GBL show a remarkable stability during floating at -50 °C, with 6.6% capacitance loss after 500 h (3 V at -50 °C). These results show that the mixture EMITFSI/GBL works properly all along the broad range of temperature [-50 °C to +100 °C] and thus proved that our approach is very promising for the development of high performances supercapacitors specifically adapted for extreme environment.

  9. Oxidation behavior of Ti2AlC in the temperature range of 1400 °C-1600 °C in steam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chongchong; Steinbrück, Martin; Große, Mirco; Bergfeldt, Thomas; Seifert, Hans Jürgen

    2017-07-01

    The oxidation behavior of bulk Ti2AlC ceramic in steam has been investigated in the temperature range of 1400 °C-1600 °C. The oxidation kinetics followed a sub-parabolic law at the early stage of oxidation, then tended to be a linear law beyond 18 h at 1400 °C, and obeyed a linear law during the whole exposure up to 24 h at 1500 °C. At the initial stage of oxidation at 1400 °C and 1500 °C, randomly Al2TiO5 isolated islands with large elongated grains were observed on the surface. A continuous inner α-Al2O3 layer with a thin discontinuous outer layer of Al2TiO5 formed with prolonged exposure time. Outward diffusion of Ti and C through grain boundaries of the α-Al2O3 scale during steady-state oxidation result in segregation of TiO2 at the grain boundaries of α-Al2O3 and formation of gaseous CO and CO2, respectively. The scale adhesion was reduced in steam compared to that in air due to the accumulation of stresses, and generation of voids at the scale/substrate interface. The mechanical disruption of the oxide scale to relief the stresses contribute to the breakaway oxidation of Ti2AlC at 1400 °C and to the non-protective effect at 1500 °C. The sample was rapidly and completely consumed during isothermal oxidation at 1600 °C accompanied by release of heat and hydrogen. The maximum tolerant temperature of Ti2AlC in steam was approximate 1555 °C, which can be extended via a tailored pre-oxidation process.

  10. Gender, Age and Season as Modifiers of the Effects of Diurnal Temperature Range on Emergency Room Admissions for Cause-Specific Cardiovascular Disease among the Elderly in Beijing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan Zheng

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diurnal temperature range (DTR is an important index of climate change and variability. It is also a risk factor affecting human health. However, limited evidence is available to illustrate the effect of DTR modification on cause-specific cardiovascular disease among the elderly. Methods: A semi-parametric generalized additive model (GAM was used to analyze the exposure-effect relationship between DTR and daily emergency room (ER admissions for cause-specific cardiovascular diseases among the elderly from 2009 to 2011 in Beijing. We examined the effects of DTR for stratified groups by gender and age, and examined the effects of DTR in the warm season and cold season for cause-specific cardiovascular diseases. Results: Significant associations were found between DTR and ER admissions for all cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease among elderly males, while DTR was significantly associated with ER admissions for all cardiovascular disease, ischemic heart disease and cerebrovascular disease among elderly females. People aged 75 years and older were more vulnerable to DTR. DTR caused greater adverse effects on both genders in the warm season, whereas the effect estimates on females were higher in cold season than in warm season. Conclusions: A short-term increase of DTR was significantly associated with ER admissions for cause-specific cardiovascular disease among the elderly in Beijing. Gender, age and season may modify the acute health effect of DTR. Some prevention programs that target the high risk subgroups in the elderly for impending large temperature changes may reduce the impact of DTR on people’s health.

  11. The association between diurnal temperature range and emergency room admissions for cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive and genitourinary disease among the elderly: a time series study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Min-zhen; Zheng, Shan; He, Shi-lin; Li, Bei; Teng, Huai-jin; Wang, Shi-gong; Yin, Ling; Shang, Ke-zheng; Li, Tan-shi

    2013-07-01

    To evaluate the short-term effect of diurnal temperature range (DTR) on emergency room (ER) admissions among elderly adults in Beijing. After controlling the long-time and seasonal trend, weather, air pollution and other confounding factors, a semi-parametric generalized additive model (GAM) was used to analyze the exposure-effect relationship between DTR and daily ER admissions among elderly adults with different lag structures from 2009 to 2011 in Beijing. We examined the effects of DTR for stratified groups by age and gender, and conducted the modifying effect of season on DTR to test the possible interaction. Significant associations were found between DTR and four major causes of daily ER admissions among elderly adults in Beijing. A 1 °C increase in the 8-day moving average of DTR (lag 07) corresponded to an increase of 2.08% (95% CI: 0.88%-3.29%) in respiratory ER admissions and 2.14% (95% CI: 0.71%-3.59%) in digestive ER admissions. A 1 °C increase in the 3-day and 6-day moving average of DTR (lag 02 and lag 05) corresponded to a 0.76% (95% CI: 0.07%-1.46%) increase in cardiovascular ER admissions, and 1.81% (95% CI: 0.21%-3.45%) increase in genitourinary ER admissions, respectively. The people aged 75 years and older were associated more strongly with DTR than the 65-74 age group. The modifying effect of season on DTR was observed and it was various in four causes. This study strengthens the evidence that DTR is an independent risk factor for ER admissions among elderly persons. Some prevention programs that target the elderly and other high risk subgroups for impending large temperature changes may reduce the impact of DTR on people's health. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Rate constant and mechanism of the reaction Cl + CFCl₂H → CFCl₂ + HCl over the temperature range 298-670 K in N₂ or N₂/O₂ diluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, E W; Jawad, Khadija M

    2014-05-08

    The rate constant of the reaction Cl + CFCl2H (k1) has been measured relative to the established rate constant for the reaction Cl + CH4 (k2) at 760 Torr. The measurements were carried out in Pyrex reactors using a mixture of CFCl2H, CH4, and Cl2 in either N2 or N2/O2 diluent. Reactants and products were quantified by GC/FID analysis. Cl atoms were generated by irradiation of the mixture with 360 nm light to dissociate the Cl2 for temperatures up to ~550 K. At higher temperature, the Cl2 dissociated thermally, and no irradiation was used. Over the temperature range 298-670 K, k1 is consistently a factor of ~5 smaller than that of k2 with a nearly identical temperature dependence. The optimum non-Arrhenius rate constant is represented by the expression k1 = 1.14 × 10(-22) T(3.49) e(-241/T) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) with an estimated uncertainty of ±15% including uncertainty in the reference reaction. CFCl3 formed from the reaction CFCl2 + Cl2 (k3) is the sole product in N2 diluent. In ~20% O2 at 298 K, the CFCl3 product is suppressed. The rate constant of reaction 3 was measured relative to that of reaction 4 [CFCl2 + O2 (k4)] giving the result k3/k4 = 0.0031 ± 0.0005 at 298 K. An earlier experiment by others observed C(O)FCl to be the major product of reaction channel 4 [formed via the sequence, CFCl2(O2) → CFCl2O → C(O)FCl + Cl]. Our current experiments verified that there is a Cl atom chain reaction in the presence of O2 as required by this mechanism.

  13. Enthalpy measurement of coal-derived liquids. Technical progress report, August-January 1982. [Isobars of 517. 1, 689. 5, 1034. 2, 1379. 1, and 10342. 5 kPa temperature range of 340 to 664/sup 0/K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kidnay, A.J.; Yesavage, V.F.

    1982-04-01

    The compound quinoline is discussed. Process flow in the flow calorimeter, operational problems, and equipment modifications are described. Procedural modifications, including a new sample purification procedure, are described. Quinoline enthalpy data are presented along the isobars of 517.1, 689.5, 1034.2, 1379.0, 3799.1, and 10342.5 kPa over a temperature range of 340 to 664/sup 0/K. Experimental enthalpy values and thermodynamic properties derived from this data are compared to corresponding values found in the literature, and to values predicted using computer aided calculations involving three correlations. The three correlations are: the SRK equation of state, and two modifications of the BWR equation of state by Kesler et al. and Starling, respectively. In general, the correlations do not accurately predict the thermodynamic behavior of quinoline. However, the experimental data compare well with available literature data for quinoline vapor pressures.

  14. A preliminary test of the application of the Lightning Detection and Ranging System (LDAR) as a thunderstorm warning and location device for the FHA including a correlation with updrafts, turbulence, and radar precipitation echoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poehler, H. A.

    1978-01-01

    Results of a test of the use of a Lightning Detection and Ranging (LDAR) remote display in the Patrick AFB RAPCON facility are presented. Agreement between LDAR and radar precipitation echoes of the RAPCON radar was observed, as well as agreement between LDAR and pilot's visual observations of lightning flashes. A more precise comparison between LDAR and KSC based radars is achieved by the superposition of LDAR precipitation echoes. Airborne measurements of updrafts and turbulence by an armored T-28 aircraft flying through the thunderclouds are correlated with LDAR along the flight path. Calibration and measurements of the accuracy of the LDAR System are discussed, and the extended range of the system is illustrated.

  15. Constitutive modelling of CK45N, AlZnMgCu1.5 and Ti-6Al-4V in a wide range of strain rate and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Magd, E.; Treppmann, C.; Korthäuer, M.

    2003-09-01

    Continuous constitutive equations for wide ranges of strain rates and temperatures are gaining increasing importance for adequate simulation of dynamic deformation processes. The flow behaviour of the carbon steel CK45N, the Aluminium Alloy AIZnMgCul.5 and the Titanium Alloy Ti6A14V is studied at different strain rates between 0.001 s^{-1} and 10000 s^{-1} with temperatures varying between 23^{circ}C and 1000^{circ}C at CK45N and Ti6A14V. AIZnMgCul.5 was investigated in a temperature range from 23^{circ}C up to 500^{circ}C. The mechanical behaviour of the three materials over this wide range needs the consideration of different physical deformation mechanisms. In the range of high temperatures and low strain rates stress relaxation due to creep deformation processes are superimposed to the plastic deformation process with a relatively low strain rate sensitivity and temperature dependence. In the range of high strain rates, the damping controlled deformation mechanism is additionally active leading to a high increase of the strain rate sensitivity. In case of steel, a dynamic age hardening mechanism is superimposed causing a stress increase between 300^{circ}C and 600^{circ}C according to strain rate. The correlation between the material parameters and the instability, localisation and damage is studied on the bases of simple models.

  16. The Start-up of Hybrid, Anaerobic up-flow Sludge Blanket (HUASB under a Range of Mesophiclic and Thermophilic Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Habeeb

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available We have examined the effect of gradual increase of the temperature on the performance of anaerobic process of palm oil mill effluent (POME, and sludge granules development. Two hybrid up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (HUASB reactors R1 and R2 were employed to be run at 27±2 and 37±1°C, respectively. R1 was kept at room temperature for the whole experiment, where the temperature of R2 was increased up to 49ºC (3ºC after every steady-state occurrence. Maximum COD removal of 91% was obtained in R2 at optimum temperature of 46°C, while 84% was recorded in R1. Additional parameters were applied to evaluate the performance of the process, i.e. total suspended solids (TSS, Turbidity, and Color. The imaging of sludge aggregate has revealed the effect of temperature on granulation development during the experiment. Throughout the operation period, it can be seen that the microbial growth rate was significantly affected by temperature. Hence, the use of HUASB reactor could be productively implemented for POME treatment as an efficient system under the mesophilic and thermophilic temperatures.

  17. Water temperature and baseflow discharge of streams throughout the range of Rio Grande cutthroat trout in Colorado and New Mexico—2010 and 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeigler, Matthew P.; Todd, Andrew S.; Caldwell, Colleen A.

    2013-01-01

    This study characterized the thermal regime in a number of Colorado and New Mexico streams that contain populations of Rio Grande cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii virginalis) and had no previous record of continual temperature records. When compared to Colorado’s water temperature criteria (Cold Tier 1), a portion of these populations appeared to be at risk from elevated stream temperatures, as indicated by exceedance of both acute (17–22 percent) and chronic (2–9 percent) water quality metrics. Summer water temperature profiles recorded at sites within current Rio Grande cutthroat trout habitat indicated that although the majority of currently occupied conservation streams have temperatures that fall well below these biologically based acute and chronic thermal thresholds, several sites may be at or approaching water temperatures considered stressful to cutthroat trout. Further, water temperatures should be considered in decisions regarding the current and future thermal suitability of potential Rio Grande cutthroat trout restoration sites. Additionally, baseflow discharge sampling indicated that a majority of the sampled stream segments containing Rio Grande cutthroat trout have flows less than 1.0 cubic feet per second (cfs) in both 2010 (74 percent) and 2011 (77 percent). The relative drought sensitivity of these low baseflow streams containing Rio Grande cutthroat trout could be further evaluated to assess their probable sustainability under possible future drought conditions.

  18. Porous silicon-VO{sub 2} based hybrids as possible optical temperature sensor: Wavelength-dependent optical switching from visible to near-infrared range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antunez, E. E.; Salazar-Kuri, U.; Estevez, J. O.; Basurto, M. A.; Agarwal, V., E-mail: vagarwal@uaem.mx [Centro de Investigación en Ingeniería y Ciencias Aplicadas, Instituto de Investigación en Ciencias Básicas y Aplicadas, UAEM, Av. Universidad 1001, Col. Chamilpa, Cuernavaca, Mor. 62209 (Mexico); Campos, J. [Instituto de Energías Renovables, UNAM, Priv. Xochicalco S/N, Temixco, Mor. 62580 (Mexico); Jiménez Sandoval, S. [Laboratorio de Investigación en Materiales, Centro de Investigación y estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Unidad Querétaro, Qro. 76001 (Mexico)

    2015-10-07

    Morphological properties of thermochromic VO{sub 2}—porous silicon based hybrids reveal the growth of well-crystalized nanometer-scale features of VO{sub 2} as compared with typical submicron granular structure obtained in thin films deposited on flat substrates. Structural characterization performed as a function of temperature via grazing incidence X-ray diffraction and micro-Raman demonstrate reversible semiconductor-metal transition of the hybrid, changing from a low-temperature monoclinic VO{sub 2}(M) to a high-temperature tetragonal rutile VO{sub 2}(R) crystalline structure, coupled with a decrease in phase transition temperature. Effective optical response studied in terms of red/blue shift of the reflectance spectra results in a wavelength-dependent optical switching with temperature. As compared to VO{sub 2} film over crystalline silicon substrate, the hybrid structure is found to demonstrate up to 3-fold increase in the change of reflectivity with temperature, an enlarged hysteresis loop and a wider operational window for its potential application as an optical temperature sensor. Such silicon based hybrids represent an exciting class of functional materials to display thermally triggered optical switching culminated by the characteristics of each of the constituent blocks as well as device compatibility with standard integrated circuit technology.

  19. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); NWHI, MID; Long: -177.36784, Lat: 28.27774 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.30m; Data Range: 20020926-20030727.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  20. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); PRIA, HOW; Long: -176.62172, Lat: 00.80645 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 18.89m; Data Range: 20060128-20080205.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  1. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); NWHI, LAY; Long: -171.73890, Lat: 25.77954 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.21m; Data Range: 20040924-20060910.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  2. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); AMSM, ROS; Long: -168.16883, Lat: -14.54871 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 31.40m; Data Range: 20080313-20100303.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  3. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); MHI, HAW; Long: -155.90161, Lat: 19.07380 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 17.68m; Data Range: 20081101-20101011.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  4. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); PRIA, WAK; Long: 166.65107, Lat: 19.30617 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 13.11m; Data Range: 20070505-20090323.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  5. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); MHI, OAH; Long: -158.13685, Lat: 21.35464 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 17.98m; Data Range: 20080514-20090206.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  6. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); AMSM, OFU; Long: -169.62487, Lat: -14.16393 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 6.40m; Data Range: 20040207-20050720.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  7. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); AMSM, TUT; Long: -170.56222, Lat: -14.28368 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 8.23m; Data Range: 20050804-20060218.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  8. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); PRIA, JAR; Long: -160.00803, Lat: -00.36902 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 6.40m; Data Range: 20040328-20060102.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  9. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); PRIA, KIN; Long: -162.38440, Lat: 06.38252 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 6.40m; Data Range: 20060330-20080404.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  10. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); NWHI, PHR; Long: -175.88215, Lat: 27.78250 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 12.50m; Data Range: 20060913-20060922.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  11. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); PRIA, JAR; Long: -159.99663, Lat: -00.38183 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 9.80m; Data Range: 20040328-20060321.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  12. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); PRIA, WAK; Long: 166.62868, Lat: 19.28032 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 12.19m; Data Range: 20070505-20090324.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  13. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); NWHI, KUR; Long: -178.36842, Lat: 28.42927 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.60m; Data Range: 20030805-20041006.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  14. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); NWHI, LAY; Long: -171.72941, Lat: 25.75893 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.91m; Data Range: 20040924-20060730.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  15. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); NWHI, FFS; Long: -166.26132, Lat: 23.76897 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 3.96m; Data Range: 20040917-20060905.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  16. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); CNMI, SAR; Long: 145.76789, Lat: 16.71058 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 6.10m; Data Range: 20050918-20070524.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  17. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); NWHI, PHR; Long: -175.83133, Lat: 27.89797 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.83m; Data Range: 20030802-20040927.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  18. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); NWHI, FFS; Long: -166.26198, Lat: 23.76883 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 11.28m; Data Range: 20091009-20100513.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  19. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); AMSM, TUT; Long: -170.76260, Lat: -14.36451 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 20.10m; Data Range: 20040225-20060116.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  20. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); AMSM, ROS; Long: -168.16885, Lat: -14.54882 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 31.09m; Data Range: 20060308-20080312.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  1. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); NWHI, PHR; Long: -175.88217, Lat: 27.78245 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 13.11m; Data Range: 20070805-20080923.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  2. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); NWHI, MAR; Long: -170.53972, Lat: 25.38417 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.50m; Data Range: 20021003-20030719.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  3. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); AMSM, OFU; Long: -169.65193, Lat: -14.18062 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 18.90m; Data Range: 20080228-20100310.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  4. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); AMSM, TUT; Long: -170.56225, Lat: -14.28368 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 8.84m; Data Range: 20090529-20100225.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  5. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); CNMI, AGU; Long: 145.53725, Lat: 14.84778 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 7.60m; Data Range: 20050928-20070517.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  6. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); CNMI, AGU; Long: 145.53723, Lat: 14.84778 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 8.23m; Data Range: 20070518-20090410.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  7. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); CNMI, SAR; Long: 145.76892, Lat: 16.71057 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20030824-20050918.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  8. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); PRIA, HOW; Long: -176.62163, Lat: 00.80647 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 38.40m; Data Range: 20061028-20080207.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  9. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); PRIA, HOW; Long: -176.62401, Lat: 00.81480 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 14.63m; Data Range: 20080207-20100203.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  10. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); PRIA, HOW; Long: -176.62133, Lat: 00.80660 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 3.00m; Data Range: 20060128-20080207.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  11. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); PRIA, KIN; Long: -162.34216, Lat: 06.39241 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 6.71m; Data Range: 20080405-20100414.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  12. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); CNMI, ALA; Long: 145.81870, Lat: 17.58744 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 6.70m; Data Range: 20070527-20090504.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  13. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); AMSM, OFU; Long: -169.62661, Lat: -14.18177 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 11.28m; Data Range: 20080229-20100311.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  14. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); MHI, MAI; Long: -156.64297, Lat: 21.01736 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 12.19m; Data Range: 20081023-20101018.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  15. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); MHI, MAI; Long: -156.49718, Lat: 20.63030 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 11.58m; Data Range: 20050807-20101017.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  16. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); MHI, MAI; Long: -156.42031, Lat: 20.59198 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 14.90m; Data Range: 20060805-20071009.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  17. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); MHI, MAI; Long: -156.42031, Lat: 20.59198 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 14.90m; Data Range: 20071009-20081018.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  18. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); MHI, MAI; Long: -156.58448, Lat: 20.79079 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 11.89m; Data Range: 20081024-20100326.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  19. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); MHI, MAI; Long: -156.15112, Lat: 20.86452 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 14.63m; Data Range: 20060819-20080918.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  20. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); MHI, MAI; Long: -156.42033, Lat: 20.59195 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 14.63m; Data Range: 20081018-20101020.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  1. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); NWHI, PHR; Long: -175.88093, Lat: 27.78168 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 38.10m; Data Range: 20080923-20100913.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  2. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); PRIA, KIN; Long: -162.34218, Lat: 06.39240 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 7.30m; Data Range: 20060329-20080405.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  3. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); AMSM, OFU; Long: -169.65219, Lat: -14.18017 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 6.10m; Data Range: 20080228-20100311.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  4. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); NWHI, LIS; Long: -173.91583, Lat: 25.96762 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 10.36m; Data Range: 20081004-20090910.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  5. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); NWHI, LAY; Long: -171.74242, Lat: 25.77248 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 3.35m; Data Range: 20060910-20080920.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  6. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); PRIA, PAL; Long: -162.12820, Lat: 05.89635 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 10.97m; Data Range: 20090916-20100408.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  7. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); AMSM, OFU; Long: -169.65947, Lat: -14.18290 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.50m; Data Range: 20040825-20060505.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  8. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); NWHI, LIS; Long: -173.91588, Lat: 25.96771 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 9.75m; Data Range: 20060925-20081004.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  9. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); NWHI, KUR; Long: -178.30620, Lat: 28.44760 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.22m; Data Range: 20060918-20080929.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  10. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); NWHI, MID; Long: -177.32334, Lat: 28.24437 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.50m; Data Range: 20030729-20041001.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  11. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); PRIA, PAL; Long: -162.06217, Lat: 05.88235 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 15.84m; Data Range: 20060324-20080108.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  12. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); NWHI, MID; Long: -177.40178, Lat: 28.19358 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.91m; Data Range: 20041002-20050520.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  13. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); PRIA, JAR; Long: -159.97426, Lat: -00.37555 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 12.80m; Data Range: 20080327-20100403.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  14. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); CNMI, SAI; Long: 145.72288, Lat: 15.23746 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 7.62m; Data Range: 20050922-20070519.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  15. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); NWHI, FFS; Long: -166.27185, Lat: 23.85682 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 7.90m; Data Range: 20040918-20051009.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  16. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); NWHI, PHR; Long: -175.88088, Lat: 27.78169 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 13.72m; Data Range: 20060913-20060922.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  17. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); NWHI, PHR; Long: -175.81591, Lat: 27.85395 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.30m; Data Range: 20090925-20100914.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  18. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); NWHI, FFS; Long: -166.17373, Lat: 23.64516 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 2.13m; Data Range: 20060906-20070930.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  19. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); AMSM, TAU; Long: -169.41908, Lat: -14.23545 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 9.75m; Data Range: 20080303-20100313.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  20. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); CNMI, MAU; Long: 145.23207, Lat: 20.02910 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 8.84m; Data Range: 20050913-20070530.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  1. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); PRIA, HOW; Long: -176.62152, Lat: 00.80650 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 18.60m; Data Range: 20040121-20060125.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  2. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); Guam; Long: 144.70392, Lat: 13.24217 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 5.18m; Data Date Range: 20090410-20110507.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  3. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); CNMI, SAI; Long: 145.78947, Lat: 15.17485 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 19.20m; Data Range: 20080815-20090419.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  4. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); CNMI, ANA; Long: 145.70275, Lat: 16.33293 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 3.96m; Data Range: 20050923-20070527.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  5. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); NWHI, MAR; Long: -170.53975, Lat: 25.38410 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.52m; Data Range: 20060909-20080919.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  6. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); CNMI, FDP; Long: 144.90023, Lat: 20.53725 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 31.70m; Data Range: 20070603-20090428.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  7. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); MHI, LAN; Long: -156.87525, Lat: 20.74163 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 11.58m; Data Range: 20081020-20101022.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  8. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); NWHI, PHR; Long: -175.86298, Lat: 27.79097 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 11.60m; Data Range: 20100520-20100915.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  9. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); NWHI, PHR; Long: -175.77935, Lat: 27.80267 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.52m; Data Range: 20080924-20100914.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  10. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); PRIA, HOW; Long: -176.62216, Lat: 00.82351 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 18.90m; Data Range: 20040122-20060226.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  11. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); AMSM, OFU; Long: -169.62662, Lat: -14.18175 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 9.80m; Data Range: 20040207-20060226.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  12. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); NWHI, MAR; Long: -170.66913, Lat: 25.41957 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 11.58m; Data Range: 20080918-20090615.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  13. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); NWHI, MID; Long: -177.34437, Lat: 28.21823 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 9.14m; Data Range: 20050701-20060915.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  14. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); PRIA, PAL; Long: -162.06183, Lat: 05.88278 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 4.26m; Data Range: 20060324-20080330.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  15. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); PRIA, WAK; Long: 166.63805, Lat: 19.30092 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.22m; Data Range: 20070505-20090324.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  16. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); PRIA, WAK; Long: 166.62868, Lat: 19.28032 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 12.50m; Data Range: 20051020-20070428.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  17. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); PRIA, WAK; Long: 166.62210, Lat: 19.30740 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 3.05m; Data Range: 20070505-20090307.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  18. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); NWHI, MAR; Long: -170.51372, Lat: 25.36697 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 4.27m; Data Range: 20040921-20060909.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  19. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); NWHI, MAR; Long: -170.64291, Lat: 25.47130 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 14.33m; Data Range: 20060908-20080905.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  20. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); NWHI, MAR; Long: -170.63382, Lat: 25.44643 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 8.53m; Data Range: 20040924-20060907.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...