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Sample records for range dr measured

  1. 30 calibabor Vertical Gun Range in horizontal loading position. Dr. William Quaide and Donald Gault

    Science.gov (United States)

    1965-01-01

    30 calibabor Vertical Gun Range in horizontal loading position. Dr. William Quaide and Donald Gault of Ames planetology branch used this gun range to study the formation of impact craters on the Moon. N-204A Verticle Gun is used to simulate the physics and mechanics of planetaryimpact cratering phenomena.

  2. Automated bedside flow cytometer for mHLA-DR expression measurement: a comparison study with reference protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zouiouich, Mehdi; Gossez, Morgane; Venet, Fabienne; Rimmelé, Thomas; Monneret, Guillaume

    2017-08-30

    In various ICU conditions, measurement of diminished expression of human leukocyte antigen-DR on circulating monocytes (mHLA-DR) by flow cytometry appears to be a reliable marker of acquired immunosuppression. Low mHLA-DR is associated with an increased risk of nosocomial infections and mortality. Nevertheless, its use remains somewhat limited and has not been adopted in common medical practice. The main drawback of mHLA-DR measurement is likely related to the use of flow cytometry that is not accessible everywhere on a 24/7 basis. Recently, the Accellix system, a fully automated table top cytometer, was developed for use at bedside or emergency labs. The objective was to assess the performance of the Accellix (beta site evaluation including repeatability and method comparison with reference protocol) for the measurement of mHLA-DR expression. Accellix repeatability at low and high expression levels of mHLA-DR was < 10% (i.e., within the range of acceptability for clinical flow cytometry). In comparison study including 139 blood samples (67 septic shock patients and 17 healthy volunteers), Pearson's correlation parameters (r (2)) ranged from 0.71 to 0.97 (p < 0.001). Intra-class correlation coefficient was 0.92. This fully automated table top cytometer appears to be a suitable tool for ICU patient monitoring and on-going clinical trials as there is no sample preparation and no need for specific skills in flow cytometry. Upon validation in a larger cohort study to reinforce reliability, Accellix could represent a major step to make flow cytometry accessible to clinicians by placing the instrument inside intensive care units or emergency laboratories.

  3. Radar range measurements in the atmosphere.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2013-02-01

    The earths atmosphere affects the velocity of propagation of microwave signals. This imparts a range error to radar range measurements that assume the typical simplistic model for propagation velocity. This range error is a function of atmospheric constituents, such as water vapor, as well as the geometry of the radar data collection, notably altitude and range. Models are presented for calculating atmospheric effects on radar range measurements, and compared against more elaborate atmospheric models.

  4. Compact ranges in antenna and RCS measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audone, B.

    1989-09-01

    With the increased complexity and extended frequency range of operation model measurements and far field test ranges are no longer suitable to satisfy the demand of accurate testing. Moreover plane wave test conditions are required for Radar Cross Section (RCS) measurements which represent a key point in stealth technology. Compact ranges represent the best test facilities available presently since they allow for indoor measurements under far field conditions in real time without any calculation effort. Several types of compact ranges are described and compared discussing their relevant advantages with regard to RCS and antenna measurements. In parallel to measuring systems sophisticated computer models were developed with such a high level of accuracy that it is questionable whether experiments give better results than theory. Tests performed on simple structures show the correlation between experimental results and theoretical ones derived on the basis of GTD computer codes.

  5. Measurement of baryon acoustic oscillation correlations at z = 2.3 with SDSS DR12 Lyα-Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista, Julian E.; Busca, Nicolás G.; Guy, Julien; Rich, James; Blomqvist, Michael; du Mas des Bourboux, Hélion; Pieri, Matthew M.; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Bailey, Stephen; Delubac, Timothée; Kirkby, David; Le Goff, Jean-Marc; Margala, Daniel; Slosar, Anže; Vazquez, Jose Alberto; Brownstein, Joel R.; Dawson, Kyle S.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Miralda-Escudé, Jordi; Noterdaeme, Pasquier; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pâris, Isabelle; Petitjean, Patrick; Ross, Nicholas P.; Schneider, Donald P.; Weinberg, David H.; Yèche, Christophe

    2017-06-01

    We have used flux-transmission correlations in Lyα forests to measure the imprint of baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO). The study uses spectra of 157 783 quasars in the redshift range 2.1 ≤ z ≤ 3.5 from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data release 12 (DR12). Besides the statistical improvements on our previous studies using SDSS DR9 and DR11, we have implemented numerous improvements in the analysis procedure, allowing us to construct a physical model of the correlation function and to investigate potential systematic errors in the determination of the BAO peak position. The Hubble distance, DH = c/H(z), relative to the sound horizon is DH(z = 2.33) /rd = 9.07 ± 0.31. The best-determined combination of comoving angular-diameter distance, DM, and the Hubble distance is found to be DH0.7DM0.3 /rd = 13.94 ± 0.35. This value is 1.028 ± 0.026 times the prediction of the flat-ΛCDM model consistent with the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy spectrum. The errors include marginalization over the effects of unidentified high-density absorption systems and fluctuations in ultraviolet ionizing radiation. Independently of the CMB measurements, the combination of our results and other BAO observations determine the open-ΛCDM density parameters to be ΩM = 0.296 ± 0.029, ΩΛ = 0.699 ± 0.100 and Ωk = -0.002 ± 0.119.

  6. Ultrasonic range measurements on the human body

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weenk, D.; van Beijnum, Bernhard J.F.; Droog, Adriaan; Hermens, Hermanus J.; Veltink, Petrus H.

    2013-01-01

    Ambulatory range estimation on the human body is important for the assessment of the performance of upper- and lower limb tasks outside a laboratory. In this paper an ultrasound sensor for estimating ranges on the human body is presented and validated during gait. The distance between the feet is

  7. From the Field: Speech Therapy Outcome Measures--Interview with Dr. Pam Enderby

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Judy K.

    2015-01-01

    This article is an interview with Dr. Pam Enderby--a speech language therapist and professor at the Institute of General Practice and Primary Care at the University of Sheffield, Community Sciences Centre, Northern General Hospital, in the United Kingdom--conducted by Judy Montgomery, Editor in Chief, of "Communication Disorders…

  8. Multi-component gas emission measurements of the active lava lake of Nyiragongo, DR Congo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobrowski, N.; Giuffrida, G. B.; Yalire, M.; Lübcke, P.; Arellano, S.; Balagizi, C.; Calabrese, S.; Galle, B.; Tedesco, D.

    2017-10-01

    Between 2007 and 2011 four measurement campaigns (June 2007, July 2010, June 2011, and December 2011) were carried out at the crater rim of Nyiragongo volcano, DR Congo. Nyiragongo is one of the most active volcanoes in Africa. The ground-based remote sensing technique Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS), which uses scattered sunlight, the in-situ Multi-Component Gas Analyzer System (Multi-GAS) and alkaline impregnated filter were simultaneously applied during all field trips. The bromine monoxide to sulfur dioxide (BrO/SO2) and carbon dioxide to sulfur dioxide (CO2/SO2) molar ratios were determined, among other ratios. During the different field trips variations of the level of the lava lake up to several tens of meters were observed during intervals of the order of minutes up to days and also between the years. The measured gas ratios presented covariations with the lava lake level changes. BrO/SO2 ratios and CO2/SO2 ratios showed similar behavior. Annual CO2/SO2 and BrO/SO2 average values are generally positively correlated. In June 2011 increased BrO/SO2 as well as increased CO2/SO2 ratios have been observed before a sudden decrease of the lava lake. Overall the Cl/S ratio, determined by filter-pack sampling, shows an increasing trend with time, which is accompanied by a decreasing sulfur dioxide flux, the later measured nearly continuously by automated MAX-DOAS instruments since 2004. Mean gas emission fluxes of CO2, Cl and 'minimum-BrO' fluxes are calculated using their ratio to SO2. The first two show an increase with time, in contrast to the SO2 fluxes. A simple conceptual model is proposed which can explain in particular the June 2011 data, but as well our entire data set. The proposed model takes up the idea of convective magma cells inside the conduit and the possible temporary interruption of part of the cycling. We propose than two alternatives to explain the observed gas emission variation: 1. It is assumed that the

  9. Measurements of STI 941 from the Palomar Observatory Sky Surveys, Gaia DR1, and New CCD Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kent; Priest, Allen

    2018-01-01

    We report and compare seven new measurements of position angle and separation of the double star WDS 20023+6515 (STI 941) from images obtained from the Palomar Observatory Sky Surveys POSS I (1953) and POSS II (1991, 1994), calculated from position data provided by Gaia DR1, and from analysis of new CCD images. Trends in separation and position angle change are difficult to determine due to the possible inaccuracy of the earliest measurements. There is no indication of an elliptical orbit. Analysis of the proper motions sug-gests that STI 941 can be classed a Similar Proper Motion pair. Analysis of parallax is inconclusive due to high parallax error.

  10. The DR-2 project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ølgaard, Povl Lebeck

    2003-01-01

    DR-2 was a 5 MW tank type, water moderated and cooled research reactor, which was operated at the Risø National Laboratory from 1959 to 1975. After the close-down in1975 the DR-2 has been kept in safe enclosure until now. The aim of the DR-2 projectreported here was to characterize the present...... their activity had been measured. The activity of the radiation shield of the reactor was measured in three different ways: By drilling two cored holes through the shield, by thermo-luminescence dosimeter measurements in vertical tubes in theconcrete shield and by measurements through an open beam hole...

  11. High speed high dynamic range high accuracy measurement system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deibele, Craig E.; Curry, Douglas E.; Dickson, Richard W.; Xie, Zaipeng

    2016-11-29

    A measuring system includes an input that emulates a bandpass filter with no signal reflections. A directional coupler connected to the input passes the filtered input to electrically isolated measuring circuits. Each of the measuring circuits includes an amplifier that amplifies the signal through logarithmic functions. The output of the measuring system is an accurate high dynamic range measurement.

  12. Pile volume measurement by range imaging camera in indoor environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Altuntas

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Range imaging (RIM camera is recent technology in 3D location measurement. The new study areas have been emerged in measurement and data processing together with RIM camera. It has low-cost and fast measurement technique compared to the current measurement techniques. However its measurement accuracy varies according to effects resulting from the device and the environment. The direct sunlight is affect measurement accuracy of the camera. Thus, RIM camera should be used for indoor measurement. In this study gravel pile volume was measured by SwissRanger SR4000 camera. The measured volume is acquired as different 8.13% from the known.

  13. Gaia DR1 documentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leeuwen, F.; de Bruijne, J. H. J.; Arenou, F.; Comoretto, G.; Eyer, L.; Farras Casas, M.; Hambly, N.; Hobbs, D.; Salgado, J.; Utrilla Molina, E.; Vogt, S.; van Leeuwen, M.; Abreu, A.; Altmann, M.; Andrei, A.; Babusiaux, C.; Bastian, U.; Biermann, M.; Blanco-Cuaresma, S.; Bombrun, A.; Borrachero, R.; Brown, A. G. A.; Busonero, D.; Busso, G.; Butkevich, A.; Cantat-Gaudin, T.; Carrasco, J. M.; Castañeda, J.; Charnas, J.; Cheek, N.; Clementini, G.; Crowley, C.; Cuypers, J.; Davidson, M.; De Angeli, F.; De Ridder, J.; Evans, D.; Fabricius, C.; Findeisen, K.; Fleitas, J. M.; Gracia, G.; Guerra, R.; Guy, L.; Helmi, A.; Hernandez, J.; Holl, B.; Hutton, A.; Klioner, S.; Lammers, U.; Lecoeur-Taïbi, I.; Lindegren, L.; Luri, X.; Marinoni, S.; Marrese, P.; Messineo, R.; Michalik, D.; Mignard, F.; Montegriffo, P.; Mora, A.; Mowlavi, N.; Nienartowicz, K.; Pancino, E.; Panem, C.; Portell, J.; Rimoldini, L.; Riva, A.; Robin, A.; Siddiqui, H.; Smart, R.; Sordo, R.; Soria, S.; Turon, C.; Vallenari, A.; Voss, H.

    2017-12-01

    We present the first Gaia data release, Gaia DR1, consisting of astrometry and photometry for over 1 billion sources brighter than magnitude 20.7 in the white-light photometric band G of Gaia. The Gaia Data Processing and Analysis Consortium (DPAC) processed the raw measurements collected with the Gaia instruments during the first 14 months of the mission, and turned these into an astrometric and photometric catalogue. Gaia DR1 consists of three parts: an astrometric data set which contains the positions, parallaxes, and mean proper motions for about 2 million of the brightest stars in common with the Hipparcos and Tycho-2 catalogues (the primary astrometric data set) and the positions for an additional 1.1 billion sources (the secondary astrometric data set). The primary set forms the realisation of the Tycho-Gaia Astrometric Solution (TGAS). The second part of Gaia DR1 is the photometric data set, which contains the mean G-band magnitudes for all sources. The third part consists of the G-band light curves and the characteristics of 3000 Cepheid and RR Lyrae stars observed at high cadence around the south ecliptic pole. The positions and proper motions in the astrometric data set are given in a reference frame that is aligned with the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) to better than 0.1 mas at epoch J2015.0, and non-rotating with respect to the ICRF to within 0.03 mas yr^-1. For the primary astrometric data set, the typical standard error for the positions and parallaxes is about 0.3 mas, while for the proper motions the typical standard error is about 1 mas yr^-1. Whereas it has been suggested in Gaia Collaboration et al. (2016a) that a systematic component of ∼0.3 mas should be 'added' (in quadrature) to the parallax uncertainties, Brown (2017) clarifies that reported parallax standard errors already include local systematics as a result of the calibration of the TGAS parallax uncertainties by comparison to Hipparcos parallaxes. For the subset of

  14. Discrete filtering techniques applied to sequential GPS range measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vangraas, Frank

    1987-01-01

    The basic navigation solution is described for position and velocity based on range and delta range (Doppler) measurements from NAVSTAR Global Positioning System satellites. The application of discrete filtering techniques is examined to reduce the white noise distortions on the sequential range measurements. A second order (position and velocity states) Kalman filter is implemented to obtain smoothed estimates of range by filtering the dynamics of the signal from each satellite separately. Test results using a simulated GPS receiver show a steady-state noise reduction, the input noise variance divided by the output noise variance, of a factor of four. Recommendations for further noise reduction based on higher order Kalman filters or additional delta range measurements are included.

  15. Comparison of methods of measuring active cervical range of motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitcroft, Katherine L; Massouh, Laura; Amirfeyz, Rouin; Bannister, Gordon

    2010-09-01

    Experimental study. Cervical range of motion (CROM) was measured using different clinical methods. To compare the reliability and accuracy of visual estimation, tape measurement, and the universal goniometer (UG) with that of the CROM goniometer in measuring active CROM in healthy volunteers. The secondary objective was to identify the single neck movement that best represents overall range of motion. Neck movement is affected by pathology in the spine and shoulder. A reliable and accurate measurement of neck movement is required to quantify injury, recovery, and disability. Various methods of measuring neck movement have been described of which radiography remains the accepted reference standard. However, radiography is impractical for routine clinical assessment. Visual estimation, tape measurement, and the UG are convenient alternatives. To date, the accuracy and reliability of these methods have not been compared in healthy subjects, and the single neck movement that best reflects overall range has not yet been identified. Active cervical flexion, extension, right and left lateral flexion and rotation were measured in 100 healthy volunteers. Visual estimation, tape measurement between fixed landmarks, and the UG aligned on fixed and anatomic landmarks were compared with the CROM goniometer, which was used as the reference standard. Compared with the CROM goniometer, the UG aligned on fixed landmarks was the most accurate method, followed by the UG on anatomic landmarks. The reliability of the UG was between substantial and perfect. Visual estimation was reproducible but measured range of movement inaccurately. Tape measurement was inaccurate. Extension best reflected overall range. The UG aligned on a fixed landmark is most reliable method of measuring neck movement clinically. Where range must be quickly assessed, extension should be measured.

  16. High Precision Ranging and Range-Rate Measurements over Free-Space-Laser Communication Link

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guangning; Lu, Wei; Krainak, Michael; Sun, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    We present a high-precision ranging and range-rate measurement system via an optical-ranging or combined ranging-communication link. A complete bench-top optical communication system was built. It included a ground terminal and a space terminal. Ranging and range rate tests were conducted in two configurations. In the communication configuration with 622 data rate, we achieved a two-way range-rate error of 2 microns/s, or a modified Allan deviation of 9 x 10 (exp -15) with 10 second averaging time. Ranging and range-rate as a function of Bit Error Rate of the communication link is reported. They are not sensitive to the link error rate. In the single-frequency amplitude modulation mode, we report a two-way range rate error of 0.8 microns/s, or a modified Allan deviation of 2.6 x 10 (exp -15) with 10 second averaging time. We identified the major noise sources in the current system as the transmitter modulation injected noise and receiver electronics generated noise. A new improved system will be constructed to further improve the system performance for both operating modes.

  17. A quantum inspired model of radar range and range-rate measurements with applications to weak value measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escalante, George

    2017-05-01

    Weak Value Measurements (WVMs) with pre- and post-selected quantum mechanical ensembles were proposed by Aharonov, Albert, and Vaidman in 1988 and have found numerous applications in both theoretical and applied physics. In the field of precision metrology, WVM techniques have been demonstrated and proven valuable as a means to shift, amplify, and detect signals and to make precise measurements of small effects in both quantum and classical systems, including: particle spin, the Spin-Hall effect of light, optical beam deflections, frequency shifts, field gradients, and many others. In principal, WVM amplification techniques are also possible in radar and could be a valuable tool for precision measurements. However, relatively limited research has been done in this area. This article presents a quantum-inspired model of radar range and range-rate measurements of arbitrary strength, including standard and pre- and post-selected measurements. The model is used to extend WVM amplification theory to radar, with the receive filter performing the post-selection role. It is shown that the description of range and range-rate measurements based on the quantum-mechanical measurement model and formalism produces the same results as the conventional approach used in radar based on signal processing and filtering of the reflected signal at the radar receiver. Numerical simulation results using simple point scatterrer configurations are presented, applying the quantum-inspired model of radar range and range-rate measurements that occur in the weak measurement regime. Potential applications and benefits of the quantum inspired approach to radar measurements are presented, including improved range and Doppler measurement resolution.

  18. Smartphone photography utilized to measure wrist range of motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Eric R; Conti Mica, Megan; Shin, Alexander Y

    2018-02-01

    The purpose was to determine if smartphone photography is a reliable tool in measuring wrist movement. Smartphones were used to take digital photos of both wrists in 32 normal participants (64 wrists) at extremes of wrist motion. The smartphone measurements were compared with clinical goniometry measurements. There was a very high correlation between the clinical goniometry and smartphone measurements, as the concordance coefficients were high for radial deviation, ulnar deviation, wrist extension and wrist flexion. The Pearson coefficients also demonstrated the high precision of the smartphone measurements. The Bland-Altman plots demonstrated 29-31 of 32 smartphone measurements were within the 95% confidence interval of the clinical measurements for all positions of the wrists. There was high reliability between the photography taken by the volunteer and researcher, as well as high inter-observer reliability. Smartphone digital photography is a reliable and accurate tool for measuring wrist range of motion. II.

  19. Small Device For Short-Range Antenna Measurements Using Optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yanakiev, Boyan Radkov; Nielsen, Jesper Ødum; Christensen, Morten

    2011-01-01

    This paper gives a practical solution for implementing an antenna radiation pattern measurement device using optical fibers. It is suitable for anechoic chambers as well as short range channel sounding. The device is optimized for small size and provides a cheap and easy way to make optical antenna...

  20. Measuring the relativistic perigee advance with satellite laser ranging

    CERN Document Server

    Iorio, L; Pavlis, E C

    2002-01-01

    The pericentric advance of a test body by a central mass is one of the classical tests of general relativity. Today, this effect is measured with radar ranging by the perihelion shift of Mercury and other planets in the gravitational field of the Sun, with a relative accuracy of the order of 10 sup - sup 2 -10 sup - sup 3. In this paper, we explore the possibility of a measurement of the pericentric advance in the gravitational field of Earth by analysing the laser-ranged data of some orbiting, or proposed, laser-ranged geodetic satellites. Such a measurement of the perigee advance would place limits on hypothetical, very weak, Yukawa-type components of the gravitational interaction with a finite range of the order of 10 sup 4 km. Thus, we show that, at the present level of knowledge of the orbital perturbations, the relative accuracy, achievable with suitably combined orbital elements of LAGEOS and LAGEOS II, is of the order of 10 sup - sup 3. With the corresponding measured value of (2 + 2 gamma - beta)/3, ...

  1. Ion range measurements using fluorescent nuclear track detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klimpki, G.; Osinga, J.-M.; Herrmann, R.

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescent nuclear track detectors (FNTDs) show excellent detection properties for heavy charged particles and have, therefore, been investigated in this study in terms of their potential for in-vivo range measurements. We irradiated FNTDs with protons as well as with C, Mg, S, Fe and Xe ion beams...

  2. Absolute stress measurements at the rangely anticline, Northwestern Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Cruz, R. V.; Raleigh, C.B.

    1972-01-01

    Five different methods of measuring absolute state of stress in rocks in situ were used at sites near Rangely, Colorado, and the results compared. For near-surface measurements, overcoring of the borehole-deformation gage is the most convenient and rapid means of obtaining reliable values for the magnitude and direction of the state of stress in rocks in situ. The magnitudes and directions of the principal stresses are compared to the geologic features of the different areas of measurement. The in situ stresses are consistent in orientation with the stress direction inferred from the earthquake focal-plane solutions and existing joint patterns but inconsistent with stress directions likely to have produced the Rangely anticline. ?? 1972.

  3. Reliability of three measures of ankle dorsiflexion range of motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konor, Megan M; Morton, Sam; Eckerson, Joan M; Grindstaff, Terry L

    2012-06-01

    A variety of methods exist to measure ankle dorsiflexion range of motion (ROM). Few studies have examined the reliability of a novice rater. The purpose of this study was to determine the reliability of ankle ROM measurements using three different techniques in a novice rater. Twenty healthy subjects (mean±SD, age=24±3 years, height=173.2±8.1 cm, mass=72.6±15.2 kg) participated in this study. Ankle dorsiflexion ROM measures were obtained in a weight-bearing lunge position using a standard goniometer, digital inclinometer, and a tape measure using the distance-to-wall technique. All measures were obtained three times per side, with 10 minutes of rest between the first and second set of measures. Intrarater reliability was determined using an intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC(2,3)) and associated 95% confidence intervals (CI). Standard error of measurement (SEM) and the minimal detectable change (MDC) for each measurement technique were also calculated. The within-session intrarater reliability (ICC(2,3)) estimates for each measure are as follows: tape measure (right 0.98, left 0.99), digital inclinometer (right 0.96; left 0.97), and goniometer (right 0.85; left 0.96). The SEM for the tape measure method ranged from 0.4-0.6 cm and the MDC was between 1.1-1.5 cm. The SEM for the inclinometer was between 1.3-1.4° and the MDC was 3.7-3.8°. The SEM for the goniometer ranged from 1.8-2.8° with an MDC of 5.0-7.7°. The results indicate that reliable measures of weight-bearing ankle dorsiflexion ROM can be obtained from a novice rater. All three techniques had good reliability and low measurement error, with the distance-to-wall technique using a tape measure and inclinometer methods resulting in higher reliability coefficients (ICC(2,3)=0.96 to 0.99) and a lower SEM compared to the goniometer (ICC(2,3)=0.85 to 0.96). 2b.

  4. Entanglement-enhanced lidars for simultaneous range and velocity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Quntao; Zhang, Zheshen; Shapiro, Jeffrey H.

    2017-10-01

    Lidar is a well-known optical technology for measuring a target's range and radial velocity. We describe two lidar systems that use entanglement between transmitted signals and retained idlers to obtain significant quantum enhancements in simultaneous measurements of these parameters. The first entanglement-enhanced lidar circumvents the Arthurs-Kelly uncertainty relation for simultaneous measurements of range and radial velocity from the detection of a single photon returned from the target. This performance presumes there is no extraneous (background) light, but is robust to the round-trip loss incurred by the signal photons. The second entanglement-enhanced lidar—which requires a lossless, noiseless environment—realizes Heisenberg-limited accuracies for both its range and radial-velocity measurements, i.e., their root-mean-square estimation errors are both proportional to 1 /M when M signal photons are transmitted. These two lidars derive their entanglement-based enhancements from the use of a unitary transformation that takes a signal-idler photon pair with frequencies ωS and ωI and converts it to a signal-idler photon pair whose frequencies are (ωS+ωI)/2 and (ωS-ωI)/2 . Insight into how this transformation provides its benefits is provided through an analogy to continuous-variable superdense coding.

  5. Range-limited centrality measures in complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercsey-Ravasz, Mária; Lichtenwalter, Ryan N.; Chawla, Nitesh V.; Toroczkai, Zoltán

    2012-06-01

    Here we present a range-limited approach to centrality measures in both nonweighted and weighted directed complex networks. We introduce an efficient method that generates for every node and every edge its betweenness centrality based on shortest paths of lengths not longer than ℓ=1,...,L in the case of nonweighted networks, and for weighted networks the corresponding quantities based on minimum weight paths with path weights not larger than wℓ=ℓΔ, ℓ=1,2...,L=R/Δ. These measures provide a systematic description on the positioning importance of a node (edge) with respect to its network neighborhoods one step out, two steps out, etc., up to and including the whole network. They are more informative than traditional centrality measures, as network transport typically happens on all length scales, from transport to nearest neighbors to the farthest reaches of the network. We show that range-limited centralities obey universal scaling laws for large nonweighted networks. As the computation of traditional centrality measures is costly, this scaling behavior can be exploited to efficiently estimate centralities of nodes and edges for all ranges, including the traditional ones. The scaling behavior can also be exploited to show that the ranking top list of nodes (edges) based on their range-limited centralities quickly freezes as a function of the range, and hence the diameter-range top list can be efficiently predicted. We also show how to estimate the typical largest node-to-node distance for a network of N nodes, exploiting the afore-mentioned scaling behavior. These observations were made on model networks and on a large social network inferred from cell-phone trace logs (˜5.5×106 nodes and ˜2.7×107 edges). Finally, we apply these concepts to efficiently detect the vulnerability backbone of a network (defined as the smallest percolating cluster of the highest betweenness nodes and edges) and illustrate the importance of weight-based centrality measures in

  6. Mode-locked laser autocollimator with an expanded measurement range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuan-Liu; Shimizu, Yuki; Kudo, Yukitoshi; Ito, So; Gao, Wei

    2016-07-11

    A mode-locked laser is employed as the light source of a laser autocollimator, instead of the conventionally employed single-wavelength laser, for an expanded range of tilt angle measurement. A group of the spatially separated diffracted beams from a diffraction grating are focused by a collimator objective to form an array of light spots on the focal plane of the collimator objective where a light position-sensing photodiode is located for detecting the linear displacement of the light spot array corresponding to the tilt angle of the reflector. A prototype mode-locked femtosecond laser autocollimator is designed and constructed for achieving a measurement range of 11000 arc-seconds.

  7. An Observability Metric for Underwater Vehicle Localization Using Range Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrichiello, Filippo; Antonelli, Gianluca; Aguiar, Antonio Pedro; Pascoal, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    The paper addresses observability issues related to the general problem of single and multiple Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) localization using only range measurements. While an AUV is submerged, localization devices, such as Global Navigation Satellite Systems, are ineffective, due to the attenuation of electromagnetic waves. AUV localization based on dead reckoning techniques and the use of affordable motion sensor units is also not practical, due to divergence caused by sensor bias and drift. For these reasons, localization systems often build on trilateration algorithms that rely on the measurements of the ranges between an AUV and a set of fixed transponders using acoustic devices. Still, such solutions are often expensive, require cumbersome calibration procedures and only allow for AUV localization in an area that is defined by the geometrical arrangement of the transponders. A viable alternative for AUV localization that has recently come to the fore exploits the use of complementary information on the distance from the AUV to a single transponder, together with information provided by on-board resident motion sensors, such as, for example, depth, velocity and acceleration measurements. This concept can be extended to address the problem of relative localization between two AUVs equipped with acoustic sensors for inter-vehicle range measurements. Motivated by these developments, in this paper, we show that both the problems of absolute localization of a single vehicle and the relative localization of multiple vehicles can be treated using the same mathematical framework, and tailoring concepts of observability derived for nonlinear systems, we analyze how the performance in localization depends on the types of motion imparted to the AUVs. For this effect, we propose a well-defined observability metric and validate its usefulness, both in simulation and by carrying out experimental tests with a real marine vehicle during which the performance of an

  8. An Observability Metric for Underwater Vehicle Localization Using Range Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Arrichiello

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper addresses observability issues related to the general problem of single and multiple Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV localization using only range measurements. While an AUV is submerged, localization devices, such as Global Navigation Satellite Systems, are ineffective, due to the attenuation of electromagnetic waves. AUV localization based on dead reckoning techniques and the use of affordable motion sensor units is also not practical, due to divergence caused by sensor bias and drift. For these reasons, localization systems often build on trilateration algorithms that rely on the measurements of the ranges between an AUV and a set of fixed transponders using acoustic devices. Still, such solutions are often expensive, require cumbersome calibration procedures and only allow for AUV localization in an area that is defined by the geometrical arrangement of the transponders. A viable alternative for AUV localization that has recently come to the fore exploits the use of complementary information on the distance from the AUV to a single transponder, together with information provided by on-board resident motion sensors, such as, for example, depth, velocity and acceleration measurements. This concept can be extended to address the problem of relative localization between two AUVs equipped with acoustic sensors for inter-vehicle range measurements. Motivated by these developments, in this paper, we show that both the problems of absolute localization of a single vehicle and the relative localization of multiple vehicles can be treated using the same mathematical framework, and tailoring concepts of observability derived for nonlinear systems, we analyze how the performance in localization depends on the types of motion imparted to the AUVs. For this effect, we propose a well-defined observability metric and validate its usefulness, both in simulation and by carrying out experimental tests with a real marine vehicle during which the

  9. Optical measurements of long-range protein vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acbas, Gheorghe; Niessen, Katherine A.; Snell, Edward H.; Markelz, A. G.

    2014-01-01

    Protein biological function depends on structural flexibility and change. From cellular communication through membrane ion channels to oxygen uptake and delivery by haemoglobin, structural changes are critical. It has been suggested that vibrations that extend through the protein play a crucial role in controlling these structural changes. While nature may utilize such long-range vibrations for optimization of biological processes, bench-top characterization of these extended structural motions for engineered biochemistry has been elusive. Here we show the first optical observation of long-range protein vibrational modes. This is achieved by orientation-sensitive terahertz near-field microscopy measurements of chicken egg white lysozyme single crystals. Underdamped modes are found to exist for frequencies >10 cm-1. The existence of these persisting motions indicates that damping and intermode coupling are weaker than previously assumed. The methodology developed permits protein engineering based on dynamical network optimization.

  10. Measurement of individual loudness functions by trisection of loudness ranges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villchur, Edgar; Killion, Mead C

    2008-10-01

    Loudness-balance measurements with monaurally impaired subjects have shown that the shape of the loudness versus sound-pressure curve among hearing-impaired persons varies significantly. But the effectiveness of adjusting the compression characteristics of wide-dynamic-range compression hearing aids-the compression ratios, the variation of compression ratio with level, and the threshold of compression-to restore normal loudness growth for the individual patient has never been properly tested; individual loudness measurements have been too uncertain to permit meaningful individual adjustments. Recent investigators have reported standard deviations of such measurements in normal-hearing subjects of 6.4 dB and 7.8 dB. This investigation describes a method of measuring loudness function with a standard deviation in normal-hearing subjects of the order of 1 dB, both significantly lower than that of previous methods and sufficiently accurate for individual-subject adjustments. Each of nine normal-hearing subjects-seven of them inexperienced and one a 9-year-old was asked to make three successive loudness trisections within an amplitude range of 40 to 80 dB SPL, providing six points from which to plot a loudness-function curve between these limits. The individual and average curves were validated as accurate loudness functions by comparing them to the curve defined by the equation of loudness versus amplitude in current Standards. In a second validation experiment, the loudness functions of masked ears measured by trisection were compared to the loudness function of those ears measured by loudness balance between masked and unmasked ears. The difference between a loudness function based on the average of subject trisections and the loudness function defined by the ANSI Standard loudness equation was -1.92 dB at the lowest trisection level and +0.05 dB at the highest level. The standard deviations of subject responses were 1.63 dB for the lowest trisection level and 0.68 d

  11. Measuring Systems for Thermometer Calibration in Low-Temperature Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szmyrka-Grzebyk, A.; Lipiński, L.; Manuszkiewicz, H.; Kowal, A.; Grykałowska, A.; Jancewicz, D.

    2011-12-01

    The national temperature standard for the low-temperature range between 13.8033 K and 273.16 K has been established in Poland at the Institute of Low Temperature and Structure Research (INTiBS). The standard consists of sealed cells for realization of six fixed points of the International Temperature Scale of 1990 (ITS-90) in the low-temperature range, an adiabatic cryostat and Isotech water and mercury triple-point baths, capsule standard resistance thermometers (CSPRT), and AC and DC bridges with standard resistors for thermometers resistance measurements. INTiBS calibrates CSPRTs at the low-temperature fixed points with uncertainties less than 1 mK. In lower temperature range—between 2.5 K and about 25 K — rhodium-iron (RhFe) resistance thermometers are calibrated by comparison with a standard which participated in the EURAMET.T-K1.1 comparison. INTiBS offers a calibration service for industrial platinum resistance thermometers and for digital thermometers between 77 K and 273 K. These types of thermometers may be calibrated at INTiBS also in a higher temperature range up to 550°C. The Laboratory of Temperature Standard at INTiBS acquired an accreditation from the Polish Centre for Accreditation. A management system according to EN ISO/IEC 17025:2005 was established at the Laboratory and presented on EURAMET QSM Forum.

  12. Proton range verification in homogeneous materials through acoustic measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Wei; Jones, Kevin C.; Petro, Scott; Kassaee, Alireza; Sehgal, Chandra M.; Avery, Stephen

    2018-01-01

    Clinical proton beam quality assurance (QA) requires a simple and accurate method to measure the proton beam Bragg peak (BP) depth. Protoacoustics, the measurement of the pressure waves emitted by thermal expansion resulting from proton dose deposition, may be used to obtain the depth of the BP in a phantom by measuring the time-of-flight of the pressure wave. Rectangular and cylindrical phantoms of different materials (aluminum, lead, and polyethylene) were used for protoacoustic studies. Four different methods for analyzing the protoacoustic signals are compared. Data analysis shows that, for Methods 1 and 2, plastic phantoms have better accuracy than metallic ones because of the lower speed of sound. Method 3 does not require characterizing the speed of sound in the material, but it results in the largest error. Method 4 exhibits minimal error, less than 3 mm (with an uncertainty  ⩽1.5 mm) for all the materials and geometries. Psuedospectral wave-equation simulations (k-Wave MATLAB toolbox) are used to understand the origin of acoustic reflections within the phantom. The presented simulations and experiments show that protoacoustic measurements may provide a low cost and simple QA procedure for proton beam range verification as long as the proper phantoms and calculation methods are used.

  13. Broadband Measurement of Aerosol Extinction in the Visible Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Quanfu; Bluvshtein, Nir; Segev, Lior; Flores, Michel; Rudich, Yinon; Washenfelder, Rebecca; Brown, Steven

    2017-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosols influence the Earth's radiative budget directly by scattering and absorbing incoming solar radiation. Aerosol direct forcing remains one of the largest uncertainties in quantifying the role that aerosols play in the Earth's radiative budget. The optical properties of aerosols vary as a function of wavelength, but few measurements reported the wavelength dependence of aerosol extinction cross section and complex refractive indices, particularly in the blue and visible spectral range. There is also currently a large gap in our knowledge of how the optical properties evolve as a function of atmospheric aging in the visible spectrum. In this study, we constructed a new and novel laboratory instrument to measure aerosol extinction as a function of wavelength, using cavity enhanced spectroscopy with a white light source. This broadband cavity enhanced spectroscopy (BBCES) covers the 395-700 nm spectral region using a broadband light source and a grating spectrometer with charge-coupled device detector (CCD). We evaluated this BBCES by measuring extinction cross section for aerosols that are pure scattering, slightly absorbing and strongly absorbing atomized from standard materials. We also retrieved the refractive indices from the measured extinction cross sections. Secondary organic aerosols from biogenic and anthropogenic precursors were "aged" to differential time scales (1 to 10 days) in an Oxidation Flow Reactor (OFR) under the combined influence of OH, O3 and UV light. The new BBCES was used to online measure the extinction cross sections of the SOA. This talk will provide a comprehensive understanding of aerosol optical properties alerting during aging process in the 395 - 700 nm spectrum.

  14. Picosecond X-ray streak camera dynamic range measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuber, C., E-mail: celine.zuber@cea.fr; Bazzoli, S.; Brunel, P.; Gontier, D.; Raimbourg, J.; Rubbelynck, C.; Trosseille, C. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Fronty, J.-P.; Goulmy, C. [Photonis SAS, Avenue Roger Roncier, BP 520, 19106 Brive Cedex (France)

    2016-09-15

    Streak cameras are widely used to record the spatio-temporal evolution of laser-induced plasma. A prototype of picosecond X-ray streak camera has been developed and tested by Commissariat à l’Énergie Atomique et aux Énergies Alternatives to answer the Laser MegaJoule specific needs. The dynamic range of this instrument is measured with picosecond X-ray pulses generated by the interaction of a laser beam and a copper target. The required value of 100 is reached only in the configurations combining the slowest sweeping speed and optimization of the streak tube electron throughput by an appropriate choice of high voltages applied to its electrodes.

  15. Tunnel and Subsurface Void Detection and Range to Target Measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillip B. West

    2009-06-01

    Engineers and technicians at the Idaho National Laboratory invented, designed, built and tested a device capable of detecting and measuring the distance to, an underground void, or tunnel. Preliminary tests demonstrated positive detection of, and range to, a void thru as much as 30 meters of top-soil earth. Device uses acoustic driving point impedance principles pioneered by the Laboratory for well-bore physical properties logging. Data receipts recorded by the device indicates constructive-destructive interference patterns characteristic of acoustic wave reflection from a downward step-change in impedance mismatch. Prototype tests demonstrated that interference patterns in receipt waves could depict the patterns indicative of specific distances. A tool with this capability can quickly (in seconds) indicate the presence and depth/distance of a void or tunnel. Using such a device, border security and military personnel can identify threats of intrusion or weapons caches in most all soil conditions including moist and rocky.

  16. CENTIMETER COSMO-SKYMED RANGE MEASUREMENTS FOR MONITORING GROUND DISPLACEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Fratarcangeli

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar imagery are widely used in order to monitor displacements impacting the Earth surface and infrastructures. The main remote sensing technique to extract sub-centimeter information from SAR imagery is the Differential SAR Interferometry (DInSAR, based on the phase information only. However, it is well known that DInSAR technique may suffer for lack of coherence among the considered stack of images. New Earth observation SAR satellite sensors, as COSMO-SkyMed, TerraSAR-X, and the coming PAZ, can acquire imagery with high amplitude resolutions too, up to few decimeters. Thanks to this feature, and to the on board dual frequency GPS receivers, allowing orbits determination with an accuracy at few centimetres level, the it was proven by different groups that TerraSAR-X imagery offer the capability to achieve, in a global reference frame, 3D positioning accuracies in the decimeter range and even better just exploiting the slant-range measurements coming from the amplitude information, provided proper corrections of all the involved geophysical phenomena are carefully applied. The core of this work is to test this methodology on COSMO-SkyMed data acquired over the Corvara area (Bolzano – Northern Italy, where, currently, a landslide with relevant yearly displacements, up to decimeters, is monitored, using GPS survey and DInSAR technique. The leading idea is to measure the distance between the satellite and a well identifiable natural or artificial Persistent Scatterer (PS, taking in account the signal propagation delays through the troposphere and ionosphere and filtering out the known geophysical effects that induce periodic and secular ground displacements. The preliminary results here presented and discussed indicate that COSMO-SkyMed Himage imagery appear able to guarantee a displacements monitoring with an accuracy of few centimetres using only the amplitude data, provided few (at least one stable PS’s are

  17. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: single-probe measurements from DR12 galaxy clustering - towards an accurate model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Pellejero-Ibanez, Marcos; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Ross, Ashley J.; Zhao, Gong-bo; Wang, Yuting; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Prada, Francisco; Alam, Shadab; Beutler, Florian; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Ho, Shirley; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Percival, Will J.; Rossi, Graziano; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Samushia, Lado; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Satpathy, Siddharth; Slosar, Anže; Thomas, Daniel; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magaña, Mariana; Vazquez, Jose A.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Nichol, Robert C.; Olmstead, Matthew D.

    2017-10-01

    We analyse the broad-range shape of the monopole and quadrupole correlation functions of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey Data Release 12 (DR12) CMASS and LOWZ galaxy sample to obtain constraints on the Hubble expansion rate H(z), the angular-diameter distance DA(z), the normalized growth rate f(z)σ8(z) and the physical matter density Ωm h2. We adopt wide and flat priors on all model parameters in order to ensure the results are those of a 'single-probe' galaxy clustering analysis. We also marginalize over three nuisance terms that account for potential observational systematics affecting the measured monopole. However, such Monte Carlo Markov Chain analysis is computationally expensive for advanced theoretical models. We develop a new methodology to speed up the analysis. Using the range 40 h-1 Mpc < s < 180 h-1 Mpc, we obtain {DA(z)rs,fid/rs (Mpc), H(z)rs/rs,fid km s-1 Mpc-1, f(z)σ8(z), Ωm h2} = {956 ± 28, 75.0 ± 4.0, 0.397 ± 0.073, 0.143 ± 0.017} at z = 0.32 and {1421 ± 23, 96.7 ± 2.7, 0.497 ± 0.058, 0.137 ± 0.015} at z = 0.59 where rs is the comoving sound horizon at the drag epoch and rs,fid = 147.66 Mpc for the fiducial cosmology used in this study. Combining our measurements with Planck data, we obtain Ωm = 0.306 ± 0.009, H0 = 67.9 ± 0.7 km s-1 Mpc-1 and σ8 = 0.815 ± 0.009 assuming Λcold dark matter (CDM); Ωk = 0.000 ± 0.003 and w = -1.02 ± 0.08 assuming owCDM. Our results show no tension with the flat ΛCDM cosmological paradigm. This paper is part of a set that analyses the final galaxy clustering data set from Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey.

  18. A simple apparatus for measuring the blood urea, manufactured by Dr. Luigj Benusi in 1943 in Albania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartari, Flamur; Buzo, Stiliano; Vyshka, Gentian

    2009-01-01

    The apparatus invented by Dr. Luigj Benusi in 1943, in Tirana, was a practical application of the Kowarsky technique and Ambard laws, helping in determining blood urea levels and very important to a variety of diseases, mainly kidney disorders. The apparatus was invented and prepared from very simple laboratory materials, such as glasses, test tubes, corks and volumetric cylinders. Technologically, it was based upon the determination of blood urea through hypobromite, and, among the advantages of the apparatus of Benusi, were its extreme simplicity, the smaller amount of blood needed for producing results (2 milliliters), as well as an easiest way to clean up and to manage the apparatus from a practical point of everyday use.

  19. Fusing range measurements from ultrasonic beacons and a laser range finder for localization of a mobile robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Nak Yong; Kuc, Tae-Yong

    2015-05-11

    This paper proposes a method for mobile robot localization in a partially unknown indoor environment. The method fuses two types of range measurements: the range from the robot to the beacons measured by ultrasonic sensors and the range from the robot to the walls surrounding the robot measured by a laser range finder (LRF). For the fusion, the unscented Kalman filter (UKF) is utilized. Because finding the Jacobian matrix is not feasible for range measurement using an LRF, UKF has an advantage in this situation over the extended KF. The locations of the beacons and range data from the beacons are available, whereas the correspondence of the range data to the beacon is not given. Therefore, the proposed method also deals with the problem of data association to determine which beacon corresponds to the given range data. The proposed approach is evaluated using different sets of design parameter values and is compared with the method that uses only an LRF or ultrasonic beacons. Comparative analysis shows that even though ultrasonic beacons are sparsely populated, have a large error and have a slow update rate, they improve the localization performance when fused with the LRF measurement. In addition, proper adjustment of the UKF design parameters is crucial for full utilization of the UKF approach for sensor fusion. This study contributes to the derivation of a UKF-based design methodology to fuse two exteroceptive measurements that are complementary to each other in localization.

  20. Extending the range of turbidity measurement using polarimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baba, Justin S.

    2017-11-21

    Turbidity measurements are obtained by directing a polarized optical beam to a scattering sample. Scattered portions of the beam are measured in orthogonal polarization states to determine a scattering minimum and a scattering maximum. These values are used to determine a degree of polarization of the scattered portions of the beam, and concentrations of scattering materials or turbidity can be estimated using the degree of polarization. Typically, linear polarizations are used, and scattering is measured along an axis that orthogonal to the direction of propagation of the polarized optical beam.

  1. Large Customers (DR Sellers)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiliccot, Sila [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2011-10-25

    State of the large customers for demand response integration of solar and wind into electric grid; openADR; CAISO; DR as a pseudo generation; commercial and industrial DR strategies; California regulations

  2. Intensity autocorrelation measurements of frequency combs in the terahertz range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benea-Chelmus, Ileana-Cristina; Rösch, Markus; Scalari, Giacomo; Beck, Mattias; Faist, Jérôme

    2017-09-01

    We report on direct measurements of the emission character of quantum cascade laser based frequency combs, using intensity autocorrelation. Our implementation is based on fast electro-optic sampling, with a detection spectral bandwidth matching the emission bandwidth of the comb laser, around 2.5 THz. We find the output of these frequency combs to be continuous even in the locked regime, but accompanied by a strong intensity modulation. Moreover, with our record temporal resolution of only few hundreds of femtoseconds, we can resolve correlated intensity modulation occurring on time scales as short as the gain recovery time, about 4 ps. By direct comparison with pulsed terahertz light originating from a photoconductive emitter, we demonstrate the peculiar emission pattern of these lasers. The measurement technique is self-referenced and ultrafast, and requires no reconstruction. It will be of significant importance in future measurements of ultrashort pulses from quantum cascade lasers.

  3. Silicon device performance measurements to support temperature range enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R. Wayne; Askew, Ray; Bromstead, James; Weir, Bennett

    1991-01-01

    The results of the NPN bipolar transistor (BJT) (2N6023) breakdown voltage measurements were analyzed. Switching measurements were made on the NPN BJT, the insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) (TA9796) and the N-channel metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) (RFH75N05E). Efforts were also made to build a H-bridge inverter. Also discussed are the plans that have been made to do life testing on the devices, to build an inductive switching test circuit and to build a dc/dc switched mode converter.

  4. Offshore wind profiling using light detection and ranging measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pena Diaz, Alfredo; Hasager, Charlotte Bay; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    2009-01-01

    The advantages and limitations of the ZephlR (R), a continuous-wave, focused light detection and ranging (LiDAR) wind profiler, to observe offshore winds and turbulence characteristics were tested during a 6 month campaign at the tronsformer/platform of Hams Rev, the world's largest wind form......-derived friction velocities and roughness lengths were compared to Charnock's sea roughness model. These overage values were found to be close to the model, although the scatter of the individual estimations of sea roughness length was large. Copyright (C) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd....

  5. ALGUNAS INVESTIGACIONES DEL DR. GROOT EN LA REVISTA MEDICINA. RESEÑA HISTÓRICA DE ALGUNOS ESTUDIOS COLOMBIANOS SOBRE TRYPANOSOMA RANGELI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernando Groot Liévano

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available

    Artículo publicado en la revista MEDICINA Vol. 22 (2 del año 2000.

    Parecerá extraño que uno de los primeros artículos de esta revista no se refiera a la enfermedad de Chagas. Tanto es así que cuando el doctor Felipe Guhl tuvo la idea de llamarme para esta presentación, mi primera respuesta fue negativa porque, obviamente debería hablarse del Trvpanosoma cruzi y no del Trypanosoma rangeli. El presente artículo es un breve recuento de mi experiencia con este parásito y su importancia dado que coexiste con el T. cruzi y que, en ocasiones, la diferenciación morfológica entre los dos no es tan clara cuando se examinan preparaciones de sangre en ‘gota gruesa’ de vertebrados o preparaciones del contenido intestinal de los insectos vectores, y además porque tiene ciertas relaciones inmunológicas que es necesario tener en cuenta para evitar posibles confusiones. Por otra parte, su distribución geográfica es muy amplia extendiéndose desde México hasta el Perú y el Brasil.

    El Trypanosoma rangeli fue llamado así por un distinguido médico y posteriormente diplomático de Venezuela, el doctor Enrique Tejera, quien encontró en los chipos, o sea en los Rhodnius prolixus de Venezuela, un pequeño flagelado muy largo, bastante diferente del T. cruzi y resolvió ponerle el nombre de Trypanosoma o Crithidia rangeli, pues no estaba muy seguro del género en el cual debía colocarlo. Evidentemente, sólo había visto la morfología de estos flagelados en el intestino de los Rhodnius y, por consiguiente, no tenía ningún otro elemento para identificarlos. Únicamente comprobó que eran diferentes del T. cruzi.

    ¿Por qué le dedicó su descubrimiento a Rangel? Creo que es importante que nosotros los latinoamericanos conozcamos bien los valores científicos que han habido en nuestros países y en vez de preocuparnos por las artificiales fronteras políticas, lo cual en nada contribuye al progreso de la

  6. Measurements of Capture Efficiency of Range Hoods in Homes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simone, Angela; Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

    2015-01-01

    mapped the pollution distribution in the room, and showed that the pollutants escape more at the sides of the cooktop. These preliminary results suggest that more measurements should be conducted investigating the capture efficiency at different pollutant source temperature, size and location...

  7. Robust Long-Range Optical Tracking for Tunneling Measurement Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossel, Annette; Gerstweiler, Georg; Vonach, Emanuel; Chmelina, Klaus; Kaufmann, Hannes

    2013-04-01

    Over the last years, automation for tunnel construction and mining activities increased rapidly. To allow for enhanced tunneling measurement, monitoring of workers and remote control of machines, systems are required that are capable of real-time positioning of several static as well as moving targets. Such a system must provide continuous and precise 3D position estimation in large volumes and must be capable to be installed and work correctly during on-going tunneling or mining tasks. Tracking systems are a fundamental component of a VR system to determine the 3D-position and orientation of a target in 3D space. Infrared optical tracking systems use infrared light to track several static or moving targets simultaneously with low latency in small tracking volumes. To benefit from the capabilities of infrared optical tracking, a system is proposed to track static as well as moving optical targets in large tracking volumes with a maximum depth extend of 70 meters. Our system needs a minimal hardware setup consisting out of two high quality machine vision cameras, which are mounted on both walls of the tunnel, and a standard (portable) workstation for data processing. Targets are equipped with infrared LEDs and can be either carried by workers or attached to a machine. The two cameras form a stereo rig and face into the measurement volume to allow for continuous tracking. Using image processing techniques, the LEDs of the target(s) are detected in both 2D camera images and are back-projected into 3D using projective reconstruction algorithms. Thereby, the 3D position estimate of the target is determined. Using image filtering techniques, fitting methods based on target's geometric constraints and prediction heuristics, the system allows for unique target identification during calibration and tracking even in environments with heavy interferences such as vibrations, tunnel illumination or machine lights. We extensively tested the system to (1) determine optimal

  8. The clustering of galaxies in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: RSD measurement from the power spectrum and bispectrum of the DR12 BOSS galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Marín, Héctor; Percival, Will J.; Verde, Licia; Brownstein, Joel R.; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio A.; Olmstead, Matthew D.

    2017-02-01

    We measure and analyse the bispectrum of the final data release 12 (DR12), galaxy sample provided by the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey, splitting by selection algorithm into LOWZ and CMASS galaxies. The LOWZ sample contains 361 762 galaxies with an effective redshift of zLOWZ = 0.32, and the CMASS sample contains 777 202 galaxies with an effective redshift of zCMASS = 0.57. Combining the power spectrum, measured relative to the line of sight, with the spherically averaged bispectrum, we are able to constrain the product of the growth of structure parameter, f, and the amplitude of dark matter density fluctuations, σ8, along with the geometric Alcock-Paczynski parameters, the product of the Hubble constant and the comoving sound horizon at the baryon drag epoch, H(z)rs(zd), and the angular distance parameter divided by the sound horizon, DA(z)/rs(zd). After combining pre-reconstruction RSD analyses of the power spectrum monopole, quadrupole and bispectrum monopole with post-reconstruction analysis of the BAO power spectrum monopole and quadrupole, we find f(zLOWZ)σ8(zLOWZ) = 0.427 ± 0.056, DA(zLOWZ)/rs(zd) = 6.60 ± 0.13, H(zLOWZ)rs(zd) = (11.55 ± 0.38)103 km s-1 for the LOWZ sample, and f(zCMASS)σ8(zCMASS) = 0.426 ± 0.029, DA(zCMASS)/rs(zd) = 9.39 ± 0.10, H(zCMASS)rs(zd) = (14.02 ± 0.22)103 km s-1 for the CMASS sample. We find general agreement with previous Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey DR11 and DR12 measurements. Combining our data set with Planck15 we perform a null test of General Relativity through the γ-parametrization finding γ =0.733^{+0.068}_{-0.069}, which is ˜2.7σ away from the General Relativity predictions.

  9. Diabetic retinopathy (DR: everybody's business

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Yorston

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is on the increase worldwide, due mainly to the rise in the number of people with type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is becoming more common because:* People are living longer, and diabetes is more prevalent in older people.* As people increasingly migrate to urban areas, exercise less, eat more, and eat less healthy food, more people are becoming obese – a primary cause of type 2 diabetes.Diabetes increases the risk of a range of eye diseases, including cataract, but the main cause of blindness associated with diabetes is diabetic retinopathy (DR. DR usually develops between ten and twenty years after the onset of diabetes, and develops faster when diabetes is undiagnosed and untreated.People with DR whose sight is at risk can be treated, most commonly with laser, to prevent visual impairment and blindness. Sadly, there is no treatment that can restore vision that has already been lost.

  10. Long-range measurement system using ultrasonic range sensor with high-power transmitter array in air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sahdev; Furuhashi, Hideo

    2017-02-01

    A long-range measurement system comprising an ultrasonic range sensor with a high-power ultrasonic transmitter array in air was investigated. The system is simple in construction and can be used under adverse conditions such as fog, rain, darkness, and smoke. However, due to ultrasonic waves are well absorbed by air molecules, the measurable range is limited to a few meters. Therefore, we developed a high-power ultrasonic transmitter array consisting of 144 transmitting elements. All elements are arranged in the form of a 12×12 array pattern. The sound pressure level at 5m from the transmitter array was >30dB higher than that of a single element. A measuring range of over 25m was achieved using this transmitter array in conjunction with a receiver array having 32 receiving elements. The characteristics of the transmitter array and range sensor system are discussed by comparing simulation and experimental results. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Measured Response of Local, Mid-range and Far-range Discontinuities of Large Metal Groundplanes using Time Domain Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Schrader

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This work describes a method to detect and to quantify any local or mid-range discontinuity on extended flat metal planes. Often these planes are used for antenna calibration (open area test site - OATS or the plane could be the ground of a semi-anechoic chamber used in Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC testing. The measurement uncertainty of antenna calibration or EMC testing depends on the groundplane's quality, which can be accessed using this method. A vector network analyzer with time-domain option is used to determine the complex-valued input scattering parameter S11,F of an aperture antenna in a monostatic setup. S11,F contains the information desired about the discontinuities and is measured in the frequency domain with high dynamic range. But only after a linear filtering utilizing the Chirp-Z-Transform the obtained time-domain signal S11,T evidence of local and mid-range discontinuities.

  12. DEVELOPING MEASURES TO IMPROVE STRENGTH INDICES OF SUPPORTING STRUCTURES FOR HEAD CARS OF DIESEL TRAINS DR1A ON THE BASIS OF EXPERIMENTAL-AND-THEORETICAL WORKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Bondarev

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The objective is to determine the stress-strain state of supporting structures of the head car body and the traction transmission unit, which can be created in the operation of emergency situations, and to develop the measures aimed at improving the stress-strain state of these elements. Methodology. In order to achieve this objective, in performing the work an experimental determination of efforts and stress levels in the most loaded elements of supporting structures as well as the traction transmission units was conducted; design models for the theoretical determination of stress and effort levels were developed. Findings. Based on the analysis of the calculation results the best options for the upgrades, which have been put into the basis of proposals aimed at improving the strength indices, were revealed. Originality. Based on the experimental and theoretical studies, scientific monitoring of development works on modernization and improvement of strength indices of supporting structures of head cars of diesel trains DR1A was performed. Practical value. The technical solution to the measures, which are to be carried out beyond the limits of assigned operation lifetime for diesel train of the series specified was developed and transferred to the Ukrzaliznytsia experts to introduce the proposed measures on improving the strength indices.

  13. Drømmejobbet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrebye, Silas

    2012-01-01

    Medarbejdere vil i fremtiden også kunne arbejde, mens de sover. Virksomheder tilbyder snart deres ansatte interne kurser i ‘lucid dreaming’. Disse giver mulighed for, at man i sine drømme bliver bevidst om, at man drømmer og således kan manipulere dem. Det skal nu udnyttes. Management...

  14. Dr. Dampe - Doctor Democracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, John

    2009-01-01

    On Dr.phil. J.J.Dampe's fight for democracy in the first part of the 19th century in Denmark and his dramatic writings......On Dr.phil. J.J.Dampe's fight for democracy in the first part of the 19th century in Denmark and his dramatic writings...

  15. Dr. Daniel Carter

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Daniel Carter, president of New Century Pharmaceuticals in Huntsville, Al, is one of three principal investigators in NASA's microgravity protein crystal growth program. Dr. Carter's experties is in albumins. Albumins are proteins in the bloodstream that transport materials, drugs, nutrients, and wastes. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center

  16. Visit of Dr. Stoltenberg

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1966-01-01

    During a visit of Dr. Stoltenberg, Minister for Scientific Research of the Federal Republic of Germany (centre), Professor Paul explains a point, whilst standing by are (left to right) Dr. Schulte-Meermann, Chairman of the Finance Committee, professor Weisskopf, former Director-General, and professor Gregory Director-General.

  17. Obituary: Dr Dimitri Tassiopoulos

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-06-22

    Jun 22, 2017 ... closely together with Prof. Phaswana-Mafuya, managed to bring the journal under the Taylor & Francis Online stable with Routledge. Press. SAHARAJ's impact factor has risen during his leadership. Dr Tassiopoulos also managed the SAHARA Conference. Dr Tassiopoulos was involved in collaborating in ...

  18. Galande, Dr Sanjeev

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2010 Section: General Biology. Galande, Dr Sanjeev Ph.D. (IISc). Date of birth: 20 September 1967. Specialization: Epigenetics, Chromatin Biology, Gene Regulation, Genomics and Proteomics Address: Centre for Excellence in Epigenetics, Indian Institute of Science Education, & Research, Dr Homi Bhabha Road, ...

  19. Range Measurements of keV Hydrogen Ions in Solid Oxygen and Carbon Monoxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jørgen; Sørensen, H.; Andersen, H.H.

    1984-01-01

    Ranges of 1.3–3.5 keV/atom hydrogen and deuterium molecular ions have been measured by a thin-film reflection method. The technique, used here for range measurements in solid oxygen and carbon monoxide targets, is identical to the one used previously for range measurements in hydrogen and nitrogen....... The main aim was to look for phase-effects, i.e. gas-solid differences in the stopping processes. While measured ranges in solid oxygen were in agreement with known gas data, the ranges in solid carbon monoxide were up to 50% larger than those calculated from gas-stopping data. The latter result agrees...

  20. Communication system features dual mode range acquisition plus time delay measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwood, S. W.; Kline, A. W., Jr.; Welter, N. E.

    1968-01-01

    Communication system combines range acquisition system and time measurement system for tracking high velocity aircraft and spacecraft. The range acquisition system uses a pseudonoise code to determine range and the time measurement system reduces uncontrolled phase variations in the demodulated signal.

  1. Weightbearing and nonweightbearing ankle dorsiflexion range of motion: are we measuring the same thing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabin, Alon; Kozol, Zvi

    2012-01-01

    Ankle dorsiflexion range of motion has been measured in weightbearing and nonweightbearing conditions. The different measurement conditions may contribute to inconsistent conclusions regarding the role of ankle dorsiflexion in several pathologic conditions. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between ankle dorsiflexion range of motion as measured in weightbearing and nonweightbearing conditions. We compared ankle dorsiflexion range of motion as measured in a weightbearing versus a nonweightbearing position in 43 healthy volunteers. Measurements were taken separately by two examiners. Weightbearing and nonweightbearing ankle dorsiflexion measurements produced significantly different results (P dorsiflexion measurements produce significantly different results and only a moderate correlation, suggesting that these two measurements should not be used interchangeably as measures of ankle dorsiflexion range of motion.

  2. Gopinath, Dr Chinnakonda Subramanian

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gopinath, Dr Chinnakonda Subramanian Ph.D. (IIT, Madras). Date of birth: 4 June 1964. Specialization: Water Splitting, Materials Science, Surface Science, Heterogeneous Catalysis, Spectroscopy Address: Senior Principal Scientist, Catalysis Division, National Chemical Laboratory, Pune 411 008, Maharashtra Contact:

  3. Deshpande, Dr A A

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Period: 1989–1993. Deshpande, Dr A A . Date of birth: 23 January 1958. Specialization: Observational Radio Astronomy Address during Associateship: Raman Research Institute, C.V. Raman Avenue, Sadashivanagar P.O, Bangalore 560 080.

  4. Nair, Dr Gopalan Vijayakumaran

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nair, Dr Gopalan Vijayakumaran Ph.D. (Banaras and British Columbia). Date of birth: 5 October 1941. Specialization: Synthetic Organic Chemistry, Heterocyclic Chemistry , Organocatalysis Address: Honorary Scientist, National Institute for Interdisciplinary Science &, Technology, Thiruvananthapuram 695 019, Kerala

  5. Thiagarajan, Dr Pazhamaneri Subramaniam

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1995 Section: Mathematical Sciences. Thiagarajan, Dr Pazhamaneri Subramaniam Ph.D. (Rice), FNASc. Date of birth: 9 November 1948. Specialization: Distributed Probabilistic Systems, Hybrid Systems and Computational Systems Biology Address: Laboratory of System Pharmacology, Harvard Medical School, ...

  6. Nadkarni, Dr Vikas Madhusudan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1993 Section: Engineering & Technology. Nadkarni, Dr Vikas Madhusudan Ph.D. (Delaware). Date of birth: 6 December 1947. Specialization: Polymer Science & Engineering, Materials Science and Chemical Engineering Address: Managing Director, Techcellence Consultancy Services, Pvt. Ltd., 5, Pushkaraj, ...

  7. Balasubramanian, Dr Kalpattu Kuppusamy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1991 Section: Chemistry. Balasubramanian, Dr Kalpattu Kuppusamy Ph.D. (Madras), FNA. Date of birth: 5 September 1939. Specialization: Molecular Rearrangements, Carbohydrate Chemistry, Organic Electrophotochemistry, Synthetic Organic Chemistry and Heterocyclic Chemistry Address: No.

  8. Mistry, Dr Kekshushroo Bamanshaw

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D. (Delhi). Date of birth: 13 January 1936. Specialization: Soil Science, Fertilizers and Agrochemicals Address: 52, Sunshine, Dr Rajaballi Patel Lane, Mumbai 400 026, Maharashtra Contact: Residence: (022) 2351 7387, (022) 2351 0564

  9. Happy Birthday, Dr. Seuss!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodie, Carolyn S.

    2002-01-01

    Reports on the career of Theodor Seuss Geisel and suggests activities to celebrate his birthday. Lists selected children's books by Dr. Seuss, selected Seuss videos, Web sites, biographical resources, and biographical videos. (LRW)

  10. Jayaraman, Dr Narayanaswamy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2011 Section: Chemistry. Jayaraman, Dr Narayanaswamy Ph.D. (IIT, Kanpur). Date of birth: 25 May 1964. Specialization: Carbohydrate Chemistry, Dendrimer Chemistry, Synthetic Organic Chemistry Address: Department of Organic Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru 560 012, Karnataka Contact:

  11. Davis, Dr Trupapur Antony

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1979 Section: Plant Sciences. Davis, Dr Trupapur Antony Ph.D. (ISI). Date of birth: 9 February 1923. Date of death: 10 November 1989. Specialization: Plant Physiology. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  12. Reliability of digital compass goniometer in knee joint range of motion measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaikwawongs, Nammond; Limpaphayom, Noppachart; Wilairatana, Vajara

    2009-04-01

    To compare the reliability of range of motion measurement in the knee joint using a digital compass goniometer combined with inclinometer with standard range of motion measurement from roentgenographic picture. Range of flexion and extension of the knee joint in volunteer participants was measured by the newly developed digital compass goniometer combined with inclinometer (DCG). The results were compared with range of knee joint motion obtained from standard roentgenographic picture by intraclass correlation coefficient. Range of motion of knee joint measured by DCG correlated very well with the data obtained from standard knee roentgenographic picture. The intraclass correlation coefficient equals 0.973. The digital compass goniometer was a reliable tool to measure knee joint range of motion in flexion and extension plane.

  13. An Interview with Dr. Walter Lear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    The Editors

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In this issue of the English version of Social Medicine we are publishing the first of several pamphlets loaned to us by the US Health Activism History Collection. To introduce this collection we travelled to Philadelphia on June 18, 2008 to interview Dr. Walter J. Lear. Dr Lear, born in 1923, is the person responsible for the collection. In a wide-ranging interview in his home Dr. Lear discussed his personal background, the origins and purpose of the collection, the impact of the McCarthy period on the US health left, as well as his vision for the future.

  14. Program to perform research on use of lidar for range resolved turbulence measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskowitz, Warren P.; Garner, Richard C.

    1989-11-01

    The design of a lidar system capable of measuring remotely range resolved atmospheric turbulence is presented. The connection between the measured quantities and the accepted turbulence strength parameter (C sub n)-sq is developed theoretically. Simulations of an operating system were made, and the results provide a measure of system capability. A typical value for (C sub n)-sq of 10(exp -16) m to the -2/3 power at 3 km vertical range is measurable with a 200 m range resolution.

  15. Dryden Aeronautical Test Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Recently redesignated to honor Dr. Hugh L. Dryden, NASA's Dryden Aeronautical Test Range (DATR) supports aerospace flight research and technology integration, space...

  16. Modulation of TRAIL resistance in colon carcinoma cells: Different contributions of DR4 and DR5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Vries Elisabeth GE

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background rhTRAIL is a therapeutic agent, derived from the TRAIL cytokine, which induces apoptosis in cancer cells by activating the membrane death receptors 4 and 5 (DR4 and DR5. Here, we investigated each receptor's contribution to rhTRAIL sensitivity and rhTRAIL resistance. We assessed whether agonistic DR4 or DR5 antibodies could be used to circumvent rhTRAIL resistance, alone or in combination with various chemotherapies. Methods Our study was performed in an isogenic model comprised of the SW948 human colon carcinoma cell line and its rhTRAIL resistant sub-line SW948-TR. Effects of rhTRAIL and agonistic DR4/DR5 antibodies on cell viability were measured using MTT assays and identification of morphological changes characteristic of apoptosis, after acridine orange staining. Sensitivity to the different death receptor ligands was stimulated using pretreatment with the cytokine IFN-gamma and the proteasome inhibitor MG-132. To investigate the mechanisms underlying the changes in rhTRAIL sensitivity, alterations in expression levels of targets of interest were measured by Western blot analysis. Co-immunoprecipitation was used to determine the composition of the death-inducing signalling complex at the cell membrane. Results SW948 cells were sensitive to all three of the DR-targeting agents tested, although the agonistic DR5 antibody induced only weak caspase 8 cleavage and limited apoptosis. Surprisingly, agonistic DR4 and DR5 antibodies induced equivalent DISC formation and caspase 8 cleavage at the level of their individual receptors, suggesting impairment of further caspase 8 processing upon DR5 stimulation. SW948-TR cells were cross-resistant to all DR-targeting agents as a result of decreased caspase 8 expression levels. Caspase 8 protein expression was restored by MG-132 and IFN-gamma pretreatment, which also re-established sensitivity to rhTRAIL and agonistic DR4 antibody in SW948-TR. Surprisingly, MG-132 but not IFN

  17. Enhanced Strain Measurement Range of an FBG Sensor Embedded in Seven-Wire Steel Strands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Min Kim

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available FBG sensors offer many advantages, such as a lack of sensitivity to electromagnetic waves, small size, high durability, and high sensitivity. However, their maximum strain measurement range is lower than the yield strain range (about 1.0% of steel strands when embedded in steel strands. This study proposes a new FBG sensing technique in which an FBG sensor is recoated with polyimide and protected by a polyimide tube in an effort to enhance the maximum strain measurement range of FBG sensors embedded in strands. The validation test results showed that the proposed FBG sensing technique has a maximum strain measurement range of 1.73% on average, which is 1.73 times higher than the yield strain of the strands. It was confirmed that recoating the FBG sensor with polyimide and protecting the FBG sensor using a polyimide tube could effectively enhance the maximum strain measurement range of FBG sensors embedded in strands.

  18. Correction of motion measurement errors beyond the range resolution of a synthetic aperture radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerry, Armin W [Albuquerque, NM; Heard, Freddie E [Albuquerque, NM; Cordaro, J Thomas [Albuquerque, NM

    2008-06-24

    Motion measurement errors that extend beyond the range resolution of a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) can be corrected by effectively decreasing the range resolution of the SAR in order to permit measurement of the error. Range profiles can be compared across the slow-time dimension of the input data in order to estimate the error. Once the error has been determined, appropriate frequency and phase correction can be applied to the uncompressed input data, after which range and azimuth compression can be performed to produce a desired SAR image.

  19. Amritkar, Dr Ravindra Eknath

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amritkar, Dr Ravindra Eknath Ph.D. (Bangalore), FNASc. Date of birth: 19 August 1951. Specialization: Nonlinear Phenomena, Chaos and Statistical Physics Address: Visiting Professor, Institute of Infrastructure, Technology, Research, and Management (IITRAM), Near Khokhara Circle, Ahmedabad 380 026, Gujarat Contact ...

  20. Anil, Dr Arga Chandrashekar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 2015 Section: Earth & Planetary Sciences. Anil, Dr Arga Chandrashekar Ph.D. (Karnatak). Date of birth: 23 January 1959. Specialization: Biological Oceanography, Marine Ecology, Marine Biology Address: Chief Scientist, National Institute of Oceanography, Dona Paula 403 004, ...

  1. Chandrasekaran, Dr Chidambara

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1945 Section: Mathematical Sciences. Chandrasekaran, Dr Chidambara Ph.D. (London) 1962-64. Date of birth: 30 October 1911. Date of death: 4 January 2000. Specialization: Statistics, Public Health and Demography Address: 'Sri Kripa', 79/3, Benson Cross Road, Bengaluru ...

  2. Basu, Dr Sandip Kumar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1992 Section: General Biology. Basu, Dr Sandip Kumar Ph.D. (Calcutta), FNASc, FNA, FTWAS Council Service: 1995-97. Date of birth: 1 January 1944. Specialization: Cell Biology, Molecular Biology and Microbial Genetics Address: FD-426, Sector 3, Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700 106, W.B.. Contact:

  3. Shivanna, Dr Kundaranahalli Ramalingaiah

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1985 Section: Plant Sciences. Shivanna, Dr Kundaranahalli Ramalingaiah Ph.D. (Delhi), FNA, FNAAS, FNASc. Date of birth: 30 June 1940. Specialization: Pollen Biology, Reproductive Ecology and Conservation Biology Address: Odekar Farms, Nandihalli, via Thovinakere, Tumkur 572 138, Karnataka Contact:

  4. Sengupta, Dr Sagar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 2017 Section: General Biology. Sengupta, Dr Sagar Ph.D. (IISc), FNA, FNASc. Date of birth: 23 June 1968. Specialization: Cancer Biology, Cell Signalling, Mytochondrial Biology Address: National Institute of Immunology, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110 067, U.T.. Contact: Office: (011) 2670 3786

  5. Sharma, Dr Ram Swaroop

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1989 Section: Earth & Planetary Sciences. Sharma, Dr Ram Swaroop Ph.D. (Basel), FNA. Date of birth: 10 July 1937. Specialization: Metamorphic Petrology, Mineralogy and Precambrian Geology Address: 70/36, Pratapnagar, Sector 7, Sanganer (RHB), Jaipur 302 033, Rajasthan

  6. Godwal, Dr Budhiram Kulanand

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Godwal, Dr Budhiram Kulanand Ph.D. (Bombay), FNASc. Date of birth: 8 February 1946. Specialization: Planetary Sciences, High Pressure Physics, Electron States and Dense Plasma Physics Address: 28, Creekview Co-operative Housing Society, Plot No. 33, Sector 9A, Vashi, Navi Mumbai 400 703, Maharashtra Contact:

  7. Brahmayya Sastry, Dr Podila

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1978 Section: Medicine. Brahmayya Sastry, Dr Podila Ph.D. (McGill). Date of birth: 24 May 1913. Date of death: 28 May 1993. Specialization: Physiology, Neurophysiology and Placental Physiology Last known address: Sitaramanilayam, Plot No. 9, Doctors Co-Operative Housing Colony, Waltair, Visakhapatnam ...

  8. Gangal, Dr Sudha Gajanan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gangal, Dr Sudha Gajanan Ph.D. (Mumbai), FNA Council Service: 1995-97. Date of birth: 25 August 1934. Specialization: Cancer & Basic Immunology, Cell Biology and Genetic Diseases Address: 4, Mahavishnu Apartments, Dahanukar Colony A, Kothrud, Pune 411 029, Maharashtra Contact: Residence: (020) 2538 4382, ...

  9. Shetye, Dr Satish Ramnath

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1992 Section: Earth & Planetary Sciences. Shetye, Dr Satish Ramnath Ph.D. (Washington), FNA, FNASc. Council Service: 1998-2003. Date of birth: 25 October 1950. Specialization: Physical Oceanography Address: Yashoda, C-14/162, Tonca, Caranzalem, Panaji 403 002, Goa

  10. Gupta, Dr Pradeep Kumar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2007 Section: Physics. Gupta, Dr Pradeep Kumar Ph.D. (Heriot Watt University), FNASc. Date of birth: 16 August 1954. Specialization: Lasers, Biomedical Applications of Lasers, Nonlinear Optics, Laser Materials Address: Visiting Professor, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, New Delhi 110 016, ...

  11. Jena, Dr Prafulla Kumar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jena, Dr Prafulla Kumar Ph.D. (Utkal). Date of birth: 27 December 1931. Specialization: Extractive Metallurgy, Mineral Processing, Environmental Engineering and Materials Processing Address: Chairman, Institute of Advance Technology and Environmental Studies, 80A-831A Lewis Road, Bhubaneswar 751 002, Orissa

  12. Krishnan, Dr Raghavan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Specialization: Monsoon & Climate Dynamics, Atmosphere-Ocean-Land System, Monsoon Hydrological Cycle Address: Acting Director, Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology, Dr Homi Bhabha Road, Pashan, Pune 411 008, Maharashtra Contact: Office: (020) 2590 4301. Residence: (020) 2589 8886. Mobile: 98817 37976

  13. Kulkarni, Dr Mohan Gopalkrishna

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1996 Section: Engineering & Technology. Kulkarni, Dr Mohan Gopalkrishna Ph.D. (Mumbai), FNAE. Date of birth: 14 November 1950. Specialization: Polymer Science & Engineering, Intellectual Property Address: Emeritus Scientist, Unit for R&D of Information Products, Tapovan, NCL Campus, Pashan Road, Pune ...

  14. Bhawalkar, Dr Dilip Devidas

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1986 Section: Physics. Bhawalkar, Dr Dilip Devidas Ph.D. (Southampton), FNA, FNASc. Date of birth: 16 October 1940. Specialization: Lasers and laser Instrumentation Address: 26, Paramanu Nagar, Indore 452 013, M.P.. Contact: Office: (0731) 232 2707. Residence: (0731) 232 0031. Mobile: 93032 ...

  15. Authikesavalu, Dr Munisamy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1948 Section: Medicine. Authikesavalu, Dr Munisamy MBBS (Madras), MS (Minneapolis), FRCS. Date of birth: 16 August 1906. Date of death: 22 September 1973. Specialization: Experimental Surgery, Ophthalmology, Otolaryngology Address: 5-C, Lavelle Cross Road, Bengaluru ...

  16. Amarjit Singh, Dr

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amarjit Singh, Dr Ph.D. (Harvard). Date of birth: 19 November 1924. Specialization: Millimeter Wave Tubes, Microwave Tubes and Microwave Electronics Address: 12, Auburn Court, Vernon Hills, IL 60061, USA Contact: Residence: (+1-847) 247 9260. Email: amarjitsingh@ieee.org. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  17. Agnihothrudu, Dr Vengala

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Agnihothrudu, Dr Vengala Ph.D. (Madras). Date of birth: 15 May 1930. Date of death: 5 April 1999. Specialization: Microbiology, Plant Pathology, Agrochemicals, Plantation Crops and Environmental Hygiene Last known address: 18/1, First Cross, First Main, Jayamahal Extension, Bengaluru 560 016. YouTube; Twitter ...

  18. David, Dr Joy Caesarina

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1982 Section: Medicine. David, Dr Joy Caesarina M.B.B.S., M.S. (Madras). Date of birth: 3 May 1927. Date of death: 20 April 2004. Specialization: Neuropharmacology Last known address: 292, 4th Main, 1st Block, Koramangala, Bengaluru 560 034. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook ...

  19. Arankalle, Dr Vidya Avinash

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2010 Section: Medicine. Arankalle, Dr Vidya Avinash Ph.D. (Bombay), FNA. Date of birth: 2 February 1952. Specialization: Virology, Molecular Biology, Vaccine, Hepatitis Viruses, Emerging-Reemerging Viruses Address: IRSHA, Bharati Vidyapeeth University, Katraj, Pune 411 043, Maharashtra Contact:

  20. Chattopadhyay, Dr Dhrubajyoti

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 2004 Section: General Biology. Chattopadhyay, Dr Dhrubajyoti Ph.D. (Calcutta), FNASc. Date of birth: 11 May 1954. Specialization: Enzyme Biotechnology, Transcription, Molecular Virology and Oxidative Stress Response Address: Vice Chancellor, Amity University, New Town, Kolkata 700 135, W.B.

  1. Datta, Dr Alok Kumar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1996 Section: General Biology. Datta, Dr Alok Kumar Ph.D. (Calcutta), FNA. Date of birth: 10 November 1946. Specialization: Nucleic Acid Enzymology, Protein Chemistry, Parasitology and Recombinant DNA Technology Address: INSA Senior Scientist, Indian Institute of Chemical Biology, 4, Raja SC Mullick Road, ...

  2. Chaudhuri, Dr Swetaprovo

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship; Associateship. Associate Profile. Period: 2016–2019. Chaudhuri, Dr Swetaprovo Ph.D. (Connecticut). Date of birth: 1 September 1983. Specialization: Propulsion,Turbulent Combustion, Energy Address: Dept. of Aerospace Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru 560 012, Karnataka Contact:

  3. Arunachalam, Dr Vallampadugai Srinivasaraghavan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1979 Section: Engineering & Technology. Arunachalam, Dr Vallampadugai Srinivasaraghavan Ph.D. (Wales), F.R.Engg. (UK), FNA, FNASc, FNAE, D.Engg. (h.c.), D.Litt. (h.c.) Council Service: 1983-85. Date of birth: 10 November 1935. Specialization: Materials Science & Engineering, Energy Technologies, ...

  4. Mohan, Dr Viswanathan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ph.D. (Madras), FNASc, FNA, FRCP (London, Glasgow, Edinburgh, Ireland), FTWAS. Date of birth: 10 April 1954. Specialization: Diabetes and its Complications, Epidemiology, Genomic Studies Address: Dr Mohan's Diabetes Specialities Centre, No. 6B, Conran Smith Road, Gopalapuram, Chennai 600 086, T.N.. Contact:

  5. Gore, Dr Anil Purushottam

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1997 Section: Animal Sciences. Gore, Dr Anil Purushottam Ph.D. (Kentucky). Date of birth: 10 August 1947. Specialization: Analysis of Clinical Trials, Non-parametric Inference and Statistical Ecology Address: Bakul, 40, Empress Garden Society, Sopan Baug, Pune 411 001, Maharashtra Contact:

  6. Gurjar, Dr Mukund Keshao

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gurjar, Dr Mukund Keshao Ph.D. (Nagpur and London), FNASc. Date of birth: 28 August 1952. Specialization: Carbohydrate Chemistry and Synthetic Organic Chemistry Address: Director, R&D, Emcure Pharmaceuticals Limited, P2, ITBT Park Phase II, Hinjwadi, Pune 411 057, Maharashtra Contact: Office: (020) 3982 1350, ...

  7. Bhisey, Dr Rajani Avinash

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Workshops · Refresher Courses · Symposia · Live Streaming. Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1996 Section: Medicine. Bhisey, Dr Rajani Avinash Ph.D. (Mumbai), FNA. Date of birth: 20 January 1941. Specialization: Environmental Carcinogenesis and Molecular Epidemiology of Cancer, Occupational Hazards

  8. Mishra, Dr Gyan Chandra

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 2005 Section: General Biology. Mishra, Dr Gyan Chandra Ph.D. (Udaipur), FNASc, FNA. Date of birth: 15 August 1947. Specialization: Immunology and Cell Biology Address: NASI Senior Scientist, National Centre for Cell Science, NCCS Complex, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411 007, Maharashtra Contact:

  9. Khanna, Dr Navin Chandra

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2017 Section: Medicine. Khanna, Dr Navin Chandra Ph.D. (AIIMS), FNASc. Date of birth: 1 April 1956. Specialization: Dengue Subunit Vaccine, Dengue Botanical Drug, Recombinant Proteins of Medical Use Address: International Centre for Genetic Engineering, and Biotechnology, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi ...

  10. Mahalakshmi, Dr Radhakrishnan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mahalakshmi, Dr Radhakrishnan Ph.D. (IISc). Date of birth: 8 April 1980. Specialization: Membrane Protein Biophysics, Protein Folding, Spectroscopy Address during Associateship: MBL, Dept. of Biological Sci., Indian Institute of Science Edn. &, Research, Bhauri, Bhopal 462 066, M.P.. Contact: Office: (0755) 669 2562

  11. Dasgupta, Dr Somnath

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dasgupta, Dr Somnath Ph.D. (Jadavpur), FNA, FNASc, FTWAS. Date of birth: 13 October 1951. Specialization: Metamorphic Petrology, Geochemistry and Precambrian Geology Address: Chair Professor, Department of Geography, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Jamia Millia Islamia, Jamia Nagar, New Delhi 110 025, U.T.

  12. Sharma, Dr Surendra Kumar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2010 Section: Medicine. Sharma, Dr Surendra Kumar Ph.D. (AIIMS), MD (PGIMER, Chandigarh), FNASc, FNA. Date of birth: 22 February 1951. Specialization: Environmental Medicine, Infectious Diseases, Internal Medicine, Pulmonary & Critical Care and Sleep Medicine Address: B-5/3, B Block, Sector 13, RK ...

  13. Mukerji, Dr Mitali

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2014 Section: Medicine. Mukerji, Dr Mitali Ph.D. (IISc). Date of birth: 13 November 1967. Specialization: Functional Genomics, Population Genomics, Ayurgenomics Address: Sr Principal Scientist, Genomics & Molecualr Medicine, Institute of Genomics & Integrative Biology, Sukhdev Vihar, Mathura Road, New Delhi ...

  14. Ramaiah, Dr Danaboyina

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 2010 Section: Chemistry. Ramaiah, Dr Danaboyina Ph.D. (IIT, Kanpur), FNASc. Date of birth: 4 June 1958. Specialization: Bio-organic Chemistry, Photobiology, Biophysical Chemistry, Organic Photochemistry Address: Director, North East Institute of Science & Technology, Jorhat 785 006, Assam

  15. Venkateswara Rao, Dr Gundabathula

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 2003 Section: Engineering & Technology. Venkateswara Rao, Dr Gundabathula Ph.D. (IISc), FNAE. Date of birth: 9 November 1944. Specialization: Finite Element Methods, Structural Analysis (Linear & Nonlinear) and Smart Structures Address: No. 502, Reliance Mariam Villa, Street No. 6, Plot No.

  16. Ramachandran, Dr Sundaresan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1974 Section: Engineering & Technology. Ramachandran, Dr Sundaresan D.Sc. (MIT). Date of birth: 17 August 1930. Specialization: Alloy & Stainless Steel Making and Process Metallurgical Design & Development Address: 'Vidya Theertha Kripa', No. 1, Siva Sundar Avenue, Thiruvanmiyur, Chennai 600 041, T.N.

  17. Sirsat, Dr Satyavati Motiram

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sirsat, Dr Satyavati Motiram Ph.D. (Mumbai). Date of birth: 7 October 1925. Date of death: 10 July 2010. Specialization: Medical Research (Cancer) & Ultrastructural Pathology and Hospice Care of the Dying Last known address: Bhagirathi Sadan, 17th Road, Khar, Mumbai 400 052. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  18. Paranjape, Dr Aseem

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Associate Profile. Period: 2015–2018. Paranjape, Dr Aseem Ph.D. (TIFR). Date of birth: 26 January 1983. Specialization: Cosmology, Large Scale Structure, Gravitation Address: Inter-University Centre for, Astronomy & Astrophysics, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411 007, Maharashtra Contact: Office: (020) 2560 4100, 2560 4224

  19. Pal, Dr Gaya Prasad

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1994 Section: Medicine. Pal, Dr Gaya Prasad M.B.B.S. and M.S. (Indore), D.Sc. (S. Gujarat), FNASc, FAMS. Date of birth: 7 June 1950. Specialization: Human Anatomy, Clinical Anatomy and Biomechanics of Spine Address: FASI Director, Modern Institute of Medical Sciences, Kanadia, Near Bypass ...

  20. Mukhopadhyay, Dr Sangita

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2013 Section: Medicine. Mukhopadhyay, Dr Sangita Ph.D. (Utkal), FNASc. Date of birth: 1 January 1966. Specialization: Immunology, Cell Signalling, Communicable Diseases Address: Group Leader, Molecular Cell Biology, Centre for DNA Fingerprinting & Diagnostics, Nampally, Hyderabad 500 001, A.P.. Contact ...

  1. Nayak, Dr Tapan Kumar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nayak, Dr Tapan Kumar Ph.D. (Michigan State), FNASc. Date of birth: 18 June 1958. Specialization: Nuclear & High Energy Physics Experiment, QCD Phase Transition & Quark, Gluon Plasma, Phases of Nuclear Matter Address: Head, EHEP Division, Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, 1/AF, Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700 064, ...

  2. Jameel, Dr Shahid

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jameel, Dr Shahid Ph.D. (Washington State Univ.), FNASc, FNA. Date of birth: 8 August 1957. Specialization: Molecular Biology and Molecular Virology Address: Chief Executive Officer, The Wellcome Trust/DBT India Alliance, 8-2-684/3/K/19, Kaushik Society, Road NO. 12, Banjara Hills, Hyderabad 500 034, A.P.. Contact:

  3. Chopra, Dr Ishwar Chander

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1962 Section: Medicine. Chopra, Dr Ishwar Chander M.R.C.S.. Date of birth: 8 January 1911. Date of death: 18 October 1996. Specialization: Pharmacology, Toxicology and Indian Medicinal Plants Last known address: C-116, Defence Colony, New Delhi 110 024. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  4. Chakraborty, Dr Subhra

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chakraborty, Dr Subhra Ph.D. (JNU). Date of birth: 25 September 1964. Specialization: Nutritional & Stress Genomics, Plant proteomics, Molecular Biology, Biotechnology Address: Staff Scientist VII, National Institute of Plant Genome Research, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110 067, U.T.. Contact: Office: (011) 2673 5186

  5. Babu, Dr Cherukuri Raghavendra

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1990 Section: Plant Sciences. Babu, Dr Cherukuri Raghavendra D.Phil. (Calcutta). Date of birth: 30 June 1940. Specialization: Biosystematics, Ecology and Population Genetics Address: Professor Emeritus, CEMDE, School of Environmental Studies, University of Delhi, Delhi 110 007, U.T.. Contact:

  6. Nair, Dr Gopinath Balakrish

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nair, Dr Gopinath Balakrish Ph.D. (Annamalai), FNA, FNASc, FTWAS. Date of birth: 5 January 1954. Specialization: Clinical Microbiology, Molecular Epidemiology, Diarrhoeal Diseases Address: Ag. Regional Adviser, World Health Organisation, Mahatma Gandhi Marg, Indraprastha Estate, New Delhi 110 002, U.T.. Contact:

  7. Sethunathan, Dr Nambrattil

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1986 Section: Plant Sciences. Sethunathan, Dr Nambrattil Ph.D. (Madras), FNA, FNAAS, FNASc. Date of birth: 2 June 1937. Specialization: Environmental Microbiology Address: Flat No. 103, Ushodaya Apartments, Sri Venkateswara Officers' Colony, Ramakrishnapuram, Secunderabad 500 056, A.P.

  8. Ranade, Dr Vivek Vinayak

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ranade, Dr Vivek Vinayak Ph.D. (Mumbai), FNAE Council Service: 2016. Date of birth: 15 October 1963. Specialization: Multiphase Flows & Reactors, Computational Flow Modelling, Process Intensification Address: School of Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, Queen's University, David Keir Building, Stranmillis Road, ...

  9. Bhattacharyya, Dr Suvendra Nath

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2017 Section: General Biology. Bhattacharyya, Dr Suvendra Nath Ph.D. (Jadavpur), FNASc. Date of birth: 4 October 1975. Specialization: Molecular Biology, Cell Biology, RNA Biology Address: Molecular & Human Genetics Division, Indian Institute of Chemical Biology, 4, Raja SC Mullick Road, Kolkata 700 032, ...

  10. Chandrasekharan, Dr Komaravolu

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1959 Section: Mathematical Sciences. Chandrasekharan, Dr Komaravolu Ph.D. (Madras), FNA. Date of birth: 21 November 1920. Date of death: 13 April 2017. Specialization: Analysis and Theory of Numbers Last known address: Professor Emertius, Eidg. Technische Hochschule, Mathematik, ETH Zentrum, 8092 ...

  11. Mandal, Dr Asit Baran

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mandal, Dr Asit Baran Ph.D. (Jadavpur), FRSC. Date of birth: 13 January 1952. Specialization: Electrochemistry, Thermodynamics, Ionic Liquids, Biophysical Chemistry, Organised Self-Assemblies and Nanomaterials Address: Central Glass & Ceramic Research Institute, 196, Raja SC Mullick Road, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700 ...

  12. Bhakuni, Dr Vinod

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bhakuni, Dr Vinod Ph.D. (Lucknow), FNASc, FNA. Date of birth: 24 May 1962. Date of death: 15 July 2011. Specialization: Protein Folding and Molecular Biophysics Last known address: Division of Molecular & Structural Biology, Central Drug Research Institute, P.B. No. 173, Lucknow 226 001. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook ...

  13. Das, Dr Amitava

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2010 Section: Chemistry. Das, Dr Amitava Ph.D. (Jadavpur), FNASc, FNA. Date of birth: 24 December 1959. Specialization: Molecular Reactions, Supramolecular Chemistry, Assembly Photo-included Processes Address: Director, Central Salt & Marine Chemicals Research Institute, GB Marg, Bhavnagar 364 002, ...

  14. Gangal, Dr Sharad Vishwanath

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gangal, Dr Sharad Vishwanath Ph.D. (Mumbai), FNASc. Date of birth: 2 May 1937. Specialization: Allergy, Immunology and Biochemistry Address: Lakshmi Niwas, Opp. Santoshi Mata Temple (B Cabin), Sane Guruji Path, Naupada, Thane 400 602, Maharashtra Contact: Residence: (022) 2537 6961. Mobile: 93249 24307

  15. Brahm Prakash, Dr

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1972 Section: Engineering & Technology. Brahm Prakash, Dr Ph.D. (Panjab), FNA 1974-76. Date of birth: 21 August 1912. Date of death: 3 January 1984. Specialization: Metallurgy. YouTube · Twitter · Facebook · Blog ...

  16. Chakraborti, Dr Pradip K

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2010 Section: General Biology. Chakraborti, Dr Pradip K Ph.D. (Visva Bharati), FNASc, FNA. Date of birth: 7 November 1956. Specialization: Biochemistry and Molecular Microbiology, Prokaryotic Signal Transduction. Address: Chief Scientist, Institute of Microbial Technology, Sector 39A, Chandigarh 160 036, U.T.

  17. Rao, Dr Pendyala Balarama

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1996 Section: Earth & Planetary Sciences. Rao, Dr Pendyala Balarama Ph.D. (Andhra). Date of birth: 15 February 1938. Specialization: Space Physics, Radiowave Propagation and Radar Systems Address: Member, ADCOS-DOS, National Remote Sensing Centre, Bldg No. 10, Balanagar, Hyderabad 500 037, A.P.

  18. Mishra, Dr Rakesh K

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mishra, Dr Rakesh K Ph.D. (Allahabad), FNASc, FNA. Date of birth: 14 April 1961. Specialization: Genomics, Chromatin, Epigenetics Address: Director, Centre for Cellular & Molecular Biology, Uppal Road, Hyderabad 500 007, A.P.. Contact: Office: (040) 2719 2600. Residence: (040) 2720 6400. Mobile: 94419 02188

  19. Varadarajan, Dr Srinivasan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1972 Section: Chemistry. Varadarajan, Dr Srinivasan Ph.D. (Delhi and Cantab), D.Sc. (h.c.), D.Litt. (h.c.), FNA, FNAE, FTWAS Council Service:1974-88; Vice-President: 1977-79; President: 1980-82. Date of birth: 31 March 1928. Specialization: Organic & Biological Chemistry, Molecular Biology, Engineering Design ...

  20. Gharda, Dr Keki Hormusji

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1976 Section: Chemistry. Gharda, Dr Keki Hormusji Ph.D. (Michigan). Date of birth: 25 September 1929. Specialization: Process Design of Organic Chemical Plants Address: Chairman and Managing Director, Gharda Chemical Limited, Jer Mansion, W.P. Warde Road, Off Turner Road, Bandra, Mumbai 400 050, ...

  1. Jana, Dr Subhra

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Associate Profile. Period: 2015–2018. Jana, Dr Subhra Ph.D. (IIT, Kharagpur). Date of birth: 22 March 1981. Specialization: Catalysis, Spectroscopy, Experimental Materials Science Address: Dept. of CBM Sciences, SN Bose Natl. Centre for, Basic Sciences, Block JD, Sector III, Salt Lake, Kolkata 700 106, W.B.. Contact:

  2. Ghosh, Dr Amit

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2000 Section: Medicine. Ghosh, Dr Amit Ph.D. (Calcutta), D.Sc. (h.c.), FNASc, FNA. Date of birth: 24 November 1944. Specialization: Molecular Biology of V.cholerae and Recombinant DNA Technology Address: National Institute of Cholera and Enteric Diseases, JICA Building, CIT Scheme XM, Beliaghata, Kolkata ...

  3. Santhanam, Dr Vaidyanathaswamy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1974 Section: Plant Sciences. Santhanam, Dr Vaidyanathaswamy Ph.D. (Madras). Date of birth: 31 July 1925. Specialization: Plant Breeding & Genetics, Research Management and Cotton Development Address: 'Shri Abhirami', 107, Venkataswamy Road West, R S Puram Post, Coimbatore 641 002, T.N.. Contact:

  4. Rai, Dr Shyam Sundar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Date of birth: 16 March 1954. Specialization: Geophysics, Data Analysis & Modelling Deep Earth Exploration Address: Chair, Earth & Climate Science, Indian Institute of Science Education & Research, Dr Homi Bhabha Road, Pashan, Pune 411 008, Maharasdhtra Contact: Office: (020) 2590 8255. Mobile: 98903 22705

  5. Purnachandra Rao, Dr Venigalla

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Purnachandra Rao, Dr Venigalla Ph.D. (Andhra), FNA. Date of birth: 10 October 1955. Specialization: Marine Geology, Authigenic Minerals and Palaeoclimate, Palaeo-sea-levels. Address: Emeritus Scientist, Department of Civil Engineering, Vignan's University, Vadlamudi 522 213, A.P.. Contact: Office: (0863) 234 4761

  6. Ganguly, Dr Chaitanyamoy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1994 Section: Engineering & Technology. Ganguly, Dr Chaitanyamoy Ph.D. (Calcutta), FNA, FNAE, FNASc. Date of birth: 31 December 1946. Specialization: Fuel Cycle, Advanced Ceramics, Powder Metallurgy and Uranium, Thorium & Plutonium Fuels Address: Caladia 703, The Botanika, Kondapur, ...

  7. Asundi, Dr Moodalagiri Kushalrao

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Asundi, Dr Moodalagiri Kushalrao Ph.D. (London). Date of birth: 1 May 1930. Date of death: 1 December 2003. Specialization: Physical Metallurgy and Structural & Mechanical Properties of Materials Last known address: Consulting Metallurgist, No. 44, 'VIBHA', Ramakrishna Paramahamsa Marg, Bandra East, Mumbai 400 ...

  8. Adyalkar, Dr Pandurang Ganpatrao

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1974 Section: Earth & Planetary Sciences. Adyalkar, Dr Pandurang Ganpatrao Ph.D. (Nagpur), FNASc. Date of birth: 3 December 1927. Date of death: 13 November 2007. Specialization: Geology, Hydrogeology, Seismology and Mining & Environment Last known address: Millennium Shopping Mall, ...

  9. Nageswara Rao, Dr Gullapalli

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nageswara Rao, Dr Gullapalli M.D. (Opthal.) (AIIMS), FAMS, FACS, FRCS, FNASc. Date of birth: 1 September 1945. Specialization: Cornea, Community Eye Health and Eye Care Policy & Planning Address: Distinguished Chair of Eye Health, LV Prasad Eye Institute, LV Prasad Marg, Banjara Hills, Hyderabad 500 034, A.P.

  10. Bhakuni, Dr Dewan Singh

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1983 Section: Chemistry. Bhakuni, Dr Dewan Singh Ph.D. and D.Sc. (London), FNA, FNASc. Date of birth: 30 December 1930. Specialization: Natural Products, Bio-organic, Biosynthesis, Nucleosides and Medicinal Chemistry Address: C-132, Nirala Nagar, Lucknow 226 020, U.P.

  11. Anand, Dr Nitya

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1974 Section: Chemistry. Anand, Dr Nitya Ph.D. (Mumbai and Cantab), FNA, FNASc. Council Service: 1980-82. Date of birth: 1 January 1925. Specialization: Medicinal Chemistry Address: Lumbini, B-62, Nirala Nagar, Lucknow 226 020, U.P.. Contact: Residence: (0522) 278 8587, (0522) 404 3229

  12. Kumar, Dr Praveen

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Period: 2016–2019. Kumar, Dr Praveen Ph.D. (Uni. South Calif.) Date of birth: 14 September 1982. Specialization: Mechanical Behaviour of Materials, Electromigration, Microelectronic packages. Address: Dept. of Materials Engg., Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru 560 012, Karnataka Contact: Office: (080) 2293 3369

  13. Bapat, Dr Sharmila Avadhut

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2015 Section: Medicine. Bapat, Dr Sharmila Avadhut Ph.D. (Pune), FNASc. Date of birth: 20 November 1965. Specialization: Cancer Biology & Stem Cells Address: National Centre for Cell Science, NCCS Complex, University Campus, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411 007, Maharashtra Contact: Office: (020) 2570 8089

  14. Chitnis, Dr Chetan Eknath

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 2009 Section: Medicine. Chitnis, Dr Chetan Eknath Ph.D. (UC, Berkeley), FNA. Date of birth: 3 April 1961. Specialization: Molecular Parasitology, Vaccine Development for Malaria and Molecular & Cell Biology Address: Head, Malaria Parasite Biology & Vaccine, Institut Pasteur, 28, ...

  15. Gahalaut, Dr Vineet Kumar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2018 Section: Earth & Planetary Sciences. Gahalaut, Dr Vineet Kumar Ph.D. (Roorkee). Date of birth: 26 September 1966. Specialization: Seismology, Tectonic Geodesy, Geodynamics Address: National Centre for Seismology, Ministry of Earth Sciences, IMD Complex, Lodi Road, New Delhi 110 003, U.T.. Contact:

  16. Agrewala, Dr Javed Naim

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Agrewala, Dr Javed Naim Ph.D. (Agra), FNA, FNASc. Date of birth: 14 May 1961. Specialization: Immunology, Vaccine, Drug Discovery Address: Chief Scientist, Immunology Laboratory, Institute of Microbial Technology, Sector 39A, Chandigarh 160 036, U.T.. Contact: Office: (0172) 666 5261. Residence: (0172) 666 5514

  17. Chandy, Dr Jacob

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1961 Section: Medicine. Chandy, Dr Jacob MBBS (Madras), FRCS (c) Council Service: 1962-70. Date of birth: 23 January 1910. Date of death: 23 June 2007. Specialization: Neurology, Neurosurgery and Medical Education Address: Paarra, Matteethra, Kottayam 686 004.

  18. Thakur, Dr Vikram Chandra

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1991 Section: Earth & Planetary Sciences. Thakur, Dr Vikram Chandra Ph.D. (London). Date of birth: 15 January 1940. Specialization: Structural Geology, Tectonics of Himalayan Geology and Active Tectonics Address: 9/12 (Lane 9), Ashirwad Eclave, Dehra Dun 248 001, Uttarakhand Contact:

  19. Dastidar, Dr Pranab Rebatiranjan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1975 Section: Engineering & Technology. Dastidar, Dr Pranab Rebatiranjan B.E., Ph.D. (Manchester). Date of birth: 10 July 1933. Specialization: Electronics, Controls and Nuclear Power Address: F-3, Rajkunj Co-op. Housing Society, Wadhavli, Chembur, Mumbai 400 074., Maharashtra Contact:

  20. Chandrashekar, Dr Tavarekere Kalliah

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 2000 Section: Chemistry. Chandrashekar, Dr Tavarekere Kalliah Ph.D. (IISc), FNASc, FNA, FTWAS Council Service: 2013-15. Date of birth: 1 January 1956. Specialization: Bio-inorganic Chemistry, Synthetic Inorganic Chemistry and Catalysis Address: Senior Professor, School of Chemical Sciences, ...

  1. Grover, Dr Arun Kumar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1997 Section: Physics. Grover, Dr Arun Kumar Ph.D.(Mumbai), FNASc. Council Service: 2016-. Date of birth: 12 December 1951. Specialization: Magnetism & Superconductivity, Vortex State Studies in Superconductors, Strongly Correlated Systems Address: Vice Chancellor, Panjab University, Chandigarh 160 014 ...

  2. Budhani, Dr Ramesh Chandra

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Budhani, Dr Ramesh Chandra Ph.D. (IIT, Delhi), FNASc, FNA. Date of birth: 3 February 1955. Specialization: Renewable Energy, Nanoscale Systems, Experimental Condensed Matter Physics, Superconductivity and Magnetism Address: Department of Physics, Lasers & Photonics, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur 208 ...

  3. Anil Kumar, Dr

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 2001 Section: Chemistry. Anil Kumar, Dr Ph.D. (Pune), FNASc, FNA. Date of birth: 31 December 1955. Specialization: Chemical Thermodynamics, Physical Organic Chemistry and ... Office: (020) 2590 2278. Residence: (020) 2588 8712. Mobile: 98220 74509. Fax: (020) 2590 2636

  4. Vrati, Dr Sudhanshu

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vrati, Dr Sudhanshu Ph.D. (ANU, Canberra), FNASc. Date of birth: 19 March 1960. Specialization: Molecular Virology, Vaccinology and Biotechnology Address: Executive Director, Regional Centre for Biotechnology, NCR Biotech Science Cluster, III Mailstone, Fairadabad-Gurgaon Expressway, Faridabad 121 001, Haryana

  5. Majumdar, Dr Subeer Suhash

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 2014 Section: Animal Sciences. Majumdar, Dr Subeer Suhash Ph.D. (nagpur), FNA, FNASc. Date of birth: 21 May 1961. Specialization: Animal Biotechnology, Transgenic Animals, Endocrinology Address: Director, National Institute of Animal Biotechnology, Gopan Pally, Hyderabad 500 046, A.P.

  6. Anguli, Dr Vazhapat Chinnaswami

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1962 Section: Medicine. Anguli, Dr Vazhapat Chinnaswami M.D. (Madras), FRCP. Date of birth: 25 October 1919. Date of death: 22 July 2000. Specialization: Neuropathology, Experimental Pathology and Oncopathology Last known address: T36/2, 14, First Avenue, Besant Nagar, Chennai 600 090.

  7. Watve, Dr Milind Gajanan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ph.D. (IISc), FNA. Date of birth: 12 December 1957. Specialization: Wildlife Ecology & Animal Cognition, Evolutionary Biology, Computational Biology and Microbial Diversity Address: Professor, Biology, Indian Institute of Science Education & Research, Dr Homi Bhabha Road, Pashan, Pune 411 008, Maharashtra Contact:

  8. Ramadas, Dr Trivandrum Ramakrishnan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1998 Section: Mathematical Sciences. Ramadas, Dr Trivandrum Ramakrishnan Ph.D. (Mumbai). Date of birth: 30 March 1955. Specialization: Geometry and Mathematical Physics Address: Professor, Chennai Mathematical Institute, H-1, SIPCOT IT Park, Siruseri, Kelambakkam, Chennai 603 103

  9. Abrol, Dr Yash Pal

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abrol, Dr Yash Pal Ph.D. (Chicago), FNA, FNASc, FNAAS. Date of birth: 23 December 1935. Specialization: Agriculture: Crop Physiology, Environmental Sciences Address: Chief Patron, Society for Conservation of Nature, Room No. F4, A Block, NASC Complex, Dev Prakash Shastry Marg, P.O. Pusa, New Delhi 110 012, ...

  10. Dey, Dr Gautam Kumar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2008 Section: Engineering & Technology. Dey, Dr Gautam Kumar Ph.D. (BHU), FNAE. Date of birth: 8 June 1957. Specialization: Phase Transformations in Metals & Alloys, Electron Microscopy and Metallic Glasses & Nanocrystalline Materials Address: Head, Materials Science Division, Bhabha Atomic Research ...

  11. Salunke, Dr Dinakar Mashnu

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 2001 Section: General Biology. Salunke, Dr Dinakar Mashnu Ph.D. (IISc), FNASc, FNA, FTWAS. Date of birth: 1 July 1955. Specialization: Structural Biology, Macromolecular Crystallography and Immunology Address: Director, International Centre for Genetic Engineering, & Biotechnology, Aruna Asaf ...

  12. Coherent change detection and interferometric ISAR measurements in the folded compact range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorensen, K.W.

    1996-08-01

    A folded compact range configuration has been developed ant the Sandia National Laboratories` compact range antenna and radar-cross- section measurement facility as a means of performing indoor, environmentally-controlled, far-field simulations of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) measurements of distributed target samples (i.e. gravel, sand, etc.). The folded compact range configuration has previously been used to perform coherent-change-detection (CCD) measurements, which allow disturbances to distributed targets on the order of fractions of a wavelength to be detected. This report describes follow-on CCD measurements of other distributed target samples, and also investigates the sensitivity of the CCD measurement process to changes in the relative spatial location of the SAR sensor between observations of the target. Additionally, this report describes the theoretical and practical aspects of performing interferometric inverse-synthetic-aperture-radar (IFISAR) measurements in the folded compact range environment. IFISAR measurements provide resolution of the relative heights of targets with accuracies on the order of a wavelength. Several examples are given of digital height maps that have been generated from measurements performed at the folded compact range facility.

  13. Multipath error in range rate measurement by PLL-transponder/GRARR/TDRS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, S. J.

    1970-01-01

    Range rate errors due to specular and diffuse multipath are calculated for a tracking and data relay satellite (TDRS) using an S band Goddard range and range rate (GRARR) system modified with a phase-locked loop transponder. Carrier signal processing in the coherent turn-around transponder and the GRARR reciever is taken into account. The root-mean-square (rms) range rate error was computed for the GRARR Doppler extractor and N-cycle count range rate measurement. Curves of worst-case range rate error are presented as a function of grazing angle at the reflection point. At very low grazing angles specular scattering predominates over diffuse scattering as expected, whereas for grazing angles greater than approximately 15 deg, the diffuse multipath predominates. The range rate errors at different low orbit altutudes peaked between 5 and 10 deg grazing angles.

  14. Optimal frequency range for medical radar measurements of human heartbeats using body-contact radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brovoll, Sverre; Aardal, Øyvind; Paichard, Yoann; Berger, Tor; Lande, Tor Sverre; Hamran, Svein-Erik

    2013-01-01

    In this paper the optimal frequency range for heartbeat measurements using body-contact radar is experimentally evaluated. A Body-contact radar senses electromagnetic waves that have penetrated the human body, but the range of frequencies that can be used are limited by the electric properties of the human tissue. The optimal frequency range is an important property needed for the design of body-contact radar systems for heartbeat measurements. In this study heartbeats are measured using three different antennas at discrete frequencies from 0.1 - 10 GHz, and the strength of the received heartbeat signal is calculated. To characterize the antennas, when in contact with the body, two port S-parameters(†) are measured for the antennas using a pork rib as a phantom for the human body. The results shows that frequencies up to 2.5 GHz can be used for heartbeat measurements with body-contact radar.

  15. Measurement of dragging of inertial frames and gravitomagnetic field using laser-ranged satellites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciufolini, I.; Lucchesi, D.; Vespe, F.; Mandiello, A.

    1996-05-01

    By analysing the observations of the orbits of the laser-ranged satellites LAGEOS and LAGEOS II, using the program GEODYN, the authors have obtained the first direct measurement of the Lense-Thirring effect, or dragging of inertial frames and the first direct experimental evidence for the gravitomagnetic field. The accuracy of their measurement is of about 30%.

  16. Expanding the dynamic measurement range for polymeric nanoparticle pH sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Honghao; Almdal, Kristoffer; Andresen, Thomas Lars

    2011-01-01

    Conventional optical nanoparticle pH sensors that are designed for ratiometric measurements in cells have been based on utilizing one sensor fluorophore and one reference fluorophore in each nanoparticle, which results in a relatively narrow dynamic measurement range. This results in substantial...

  17. Variation in measurements of range of motion : a study in reflex sympathetic dystrophy patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geertzen, J.H.B.; Dijkstra, P.U.; Stewart, R.E; Groothoff, J.W.; ten Duis, H J; Eisma, W.H.

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To quantify the amount of variation attributed to different sources of variation in measurement results of upper extremity range of motion, and to estimate the smallest detectable difference (SDD) between measurements in reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD) patients. Design: Two observers

  18. Clinical measurement of range of motion. Review of goniometry emphasizing reliability and validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajdosik, R L; Bohannon, R W

    1987-12-01

    Clinical measurement of range of motion is a fundamental evaluation procedure with ubiquitous application in physical therapy. Objective measurements of ROM and correct interpretation of the measurement results can have a substantial impact on the development of the scientific basis of therapeutic interventions. The purpose of this article is to review the related literature on the reliability and validity of goniometric measurements of the extremities. Special emphasis is placed on how the reliability of goniometry is influenced by instrumentation and procedures, differences among joint actions and body regions, passive versus active measurements, intratester versus intertester measurements, and different patient types. Our discussion of validity encourages objective interpretation of the meaning of ROM measurements in light of the purposes and the limitations of goniometry. We conclude that clinicians should adopt standardized methods of testing and should interpret and report goniometric results as ROM measurements only, not as measurements of factors that may affect ROM.

  19. Simultaneous measurement of spectra at multiple ranges using a single spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lienert, Barry; Porter, John; Sharma, Shiv K

    2009-08-20

    We have designed and built an instrument having the capability to measure and display spectra at multiple ranges near simultaneously in real time. An excitation laser beam is oriented parallel to and offset from the axis of the light collection optics. The image of the laser beam is then displaced with range. Multiple optical fibers collect the displaced images at different ranges. The output ends of these fibers are positioned vertically along the input slit of a spectrometer that disperses the light from each fiber along different rows of the spectrometer's two-dimensional detector array. The detector array rows then give an immediate visual comparison of spectra at different ranges. A small prototype of this system covering a range from 3 to 13 m has been built. It has been successfully tested using containers holding two distinct fluorescent dyes. Numerical simulations indicate that the technique can be extended to longer-range systems.

  20. Near Field HF Antenna Pattern Measurement Method Using an Antenna Pattern Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    TECHNICAL REPORT 3006 December 2015 Near-Field HF Antenna Pattern Measurement Method Using an Antenna Pattern Range Ani Siripuram Michael Daly...link budget. This report focuses on computing absolute gain for HF antennas measured on the APR. Recent research efforts by SSC Pacific’s Applied...Electromagnetics Branch (Code 52250) show that the APR extends to accurate measurement of normalized far-field radiation patterns of HF antennas. The

  1. Accuracy and Reliability of Visual Inspection and Smartphone Applications for Measuring Finger Range of Motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hannah H; St Louis, Kwesi; Fowler, John R

    2018-01-08

    Measurement of finger range of motion is critical in clinical settings, especially for outcome analysis, clinical decision making, and rehabilitation/disability assessment. Although goniometer measurement is clinically considered the gold standard, its accuracy compared with the true radiographic measurements of the joint angles remains questionable. The authors compared 3 smartphone applications and visual inspection measurements of the finger joints with the radiographic measurements and determined interrater reliability for these measurement tools. A finger was held in place using an aluminum-alloy splint, and a fluoroscopic image was acquired by a mini C-arm. An independent observer measured each joint flexion angle of the fluoroscopic image using a universal handheld goniometer, and this was used as the reference. Finger joint flexion angles were then independently measured by 3 observers using 3 different smartphone applications. In addition, visual inspection was used to estimate the flexion angles of finger joints. The results of this study suggest that all 3 smartphone measurement tools, as well as visual inspection, agree and correlate well with the reference fluoroscopic image measurement. Average differences between the fluoroscopic image measurements with the measured angles using the tools studied ranged from 9.4° to 12.2°. The mean correlation coefficients for each smartphone application exceeded 0.7. Overall interrater reliabilities were similar, with the interclass correlation coefficient being greater than 0.9 for all of the measurement tools. These data suggest that new smartphone applications hold promise for providing accurate and reliable measures of range of motion. [Orthopedics. 201x; xx(x):xx-xx.]. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  2. DR og musikken

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Lars Ole

    1991-01-01

    Musikken i radioen er et af de mange underbelyste temaer inden for me- dieforskningen i Danmark. Forfatteren til den følgende artikel har gennem nogle år arbejdet som musik-medarbejder i Danmarks Radio - med base i Østjyllands Radio. I artiklen fokuserer han på produktionsaspektet. Hvilke funktio...... rejses spørgsmålet om musikkens rolle i DR som aktiverende eller registrerende i forhold til det musikliv, som findes uden for institutionen....

  3. An impedance bridge measuring the capacitance ratio in the high frequency range up to 1 MHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bee Kim, Dan; Kew Lee, Hyung; Kim, Wan-Seop

    2017-02-01

    This paper describes a 2-terminal-pair impedance bridge, measuring the capacitance ratio in the high frequency range up to 1 MHz. The bridge was configured with two voltage sources and a phase control unit which enabled the bridge balance by synchronizing the voltage sources with an enhanced phase resolution. Without employing the transformers such as inductive voltage divider, injection and detection transformers, etc, the bridge system is quite simple to set up, and the balance procedure is quick and easy. Using this dual-source coaxial bridge, the 1:1 and 10:1 capacitance ratios were measured with 1 pF-1 nF capacitors in the frequency range from 1 kHz to 1 MHz. The measurement values obtained by the dual-source bridge were then compared with reference values measured using a commercial precision capacitance bridge of AH2700A, the Z-matrix method developed by ourselves, and the 4-terminal-pair coaxial bridge by the Czech Metrological Institute. All the measurements agreed within the reference uncertainty range of an order of 10-6-10-5, proving the bridge ability as a trustworthy tool for measuring the capacitance ratio in the high frequency range.

  4. Propagation Loss Measurements at 400 Hertz in the BIFI Range Using a Towed Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1971-01-27

    series using the BIFI Range (Reference 1) located between Block Island, Rhode Island and Fishers Island, New York. Three types of acoustic tests were... Colossus theoretical predictions (Reference 7). The agreement is fairly good; it is apparent, howev er, that the Colossus predictions do not take into...given in reference 11. - Propagation loss was measured as a function of range and the results compared to the Colossus predictions’ (reference 7). The

  5. Dr. Faustus: Theist or Atheist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Shah Mohammad Sanaul; Fathema, Fawzia; Hakim, Abdul

    2015-01-01

    Dr. Faustus is the greatest but the most controversial of Marlowe's plays. Among the causes of controversy, whether Dr. Faustus is an atheist or theist deserves utmost attention. This paper is intended to deal with the issue. Though at various stages of the development of the action, Dr. Faustus abjures Trinity, resorts to necromancy, becomes…

  6. Varying the item format improved the range of measurement in patient-reported outcome measures assessing physical function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liegl, Gregor; Gandek, Barbara; Fischer, H. Felix

    2017-01-01

    Background: Physical function (PF) is a core patient-reported outcome domain in clinical trials in rheumatic diseases. Frequently used PF measures have ceiling effects, leading to large sample size requirements and low sensitivity to change. In most of these instruments, the response category...... easy, increases the range of precise measurement of self-reported PF. Methods: Three five-item PF short forms were constructed from the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS®) wave 1 data. All forms included the same physical activities but varied in item stem and response...... precision between the short forms using different item formats. Results: Sufficient unidimensionality of all short-form items and the original PF item bank was supported. Compared to formats A and B, format C increased the range of reliable measurement by about 0.5 standard deviations on the positive side...

  7. Long-Range Channel Measurements on Small Terminal Antennas Using Optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yanakiev, Boyan; Nielsen, Jesper Ødum; Christensen, Morten

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, details are given on a novel measurement device for radio propagation-channel measurements. To avoid measurement errors due to the conductive cables on small terminal antennas, as well as to improve the handling of the prototypes under investigation, an optical measurement device has...... been developed. It utilizes thin, light, and flexible glass fibers as opposed to heavy, stiff, and conductive coaxial cables. This paper looks at the various system parameters such as overall gain, noise figure, and dynamic range and compares the solution to other methods. An estimate of the device...

  8. FOREWORD: Dr Trevor J Hicks Dr Trevor J Hicks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goossens, Darren

    2009-03-01

    This issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter has been assembled to recognize the valuable contribution of Dr Trevor J Hicks to the field of neutron scattering and magnetism. Trevor began his study of magnetism as a PhD student at Monash University in Melbourne in the early 1960s, working with Professor Jack Smith. From the very beginning magnetism in alloys, and disordered systems in general, became a key aspect of his career. After a postdoctoral position at Harwell working with Dr Graeme Low Trevor returned to Australia and took up a position with Monash. He soon became a key figure in developing the capability for neutron scattering using the HIFAR reactor at the Australian Atomic Energy Commission, now the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, ANSTO. The instrumentation was always developed to further his studies of magnetism. The development of polarization analysis measurements of diffuse magnetic scattering, first using iron filters and then his own design of supermirror benders for beam polarization, took place through the 1970s, 1980s and into the 1990s. Throughout this time, Trevor mentored a series of PhD students and postdoctoral fellows, many of whom have contributed to this issue (and, indeed, guest edited it). As befits a scientist and university academic for whom teaching has always been important, Trevor has not only created a strong body of significant research, he has also made a major contribution to preparing several generations of neutron scattering scientists, and this issue reflects that. When I approached Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter with a proposal for an issue in honour of Trevor, the response was immediate and positive. It is with great pleasure that I present the result of that proposal. The great diversity of the content, all centred on neutron scattering and magnetism, reflects the breadth of Trevor's own career and of the scientists with whom he has interacted. Finally, I would like to make some

  9. Accurate Measurement of First Metatarsophalangeal Range of Motion in Patients With Hallux Rigidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulcano, Ettore; Tracey, Joseph A; Myerson, Mark S

    2016-05-01

    The reliability of range of motion (ROM) measurements has not been established for the hallux metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint in patients with hallux rigidus. The aim of the present study was to prospectively assess the clinical versus radiographic difference in ROM of the arthritic hallux MTP joint. One hundred consecutive patients who presented with any grade of hallux rigidus were included in this prospective study to determine the hallux MTP range of motion. Clinical range of motion using a goniometer and radiographic range of motion on dynamic x-rays was recorded. The mean difference between clinical and radiographic dorsiflexion was 13 degrees (P dorsiflexion was equal to or less than radiographically measured dorsiflexion. The difference was significantly greater in patients with a clinical dorsiflexion of less than 30 degrees than in patients with 30 degrees or more. Radiographic measurement of hallux dorsiflexion had an excellent intra- and interobserver reliability. We describe a reliable, reproducible, and straightforward method of measuring hallux MTP ROM that improved upon measuring clinical ROM. Level II, prospective comparative study. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Human-Induced Effects on RSS Ranging Measurements for Cooperative Positioning

    OpenAIRE

    Francescantonio Della Rosa; Mauro Pelosi; Jari Nurmi

    2012-01-01

    We present experimental evaluations of human-induced perturbations on received-signal-strength-(RSS-) based ranging measurements for cooperative mobile positioning. To the best of our knowledge, this work is the first attempt to gain insight and understand the impact of both body loss and hand grip on the RSS for enhancing proximity measurements among neighbouring devices in cooperative scenarios. Our main contribution is represented by experimental investigations. Analysis of the errors intr...

  11. Dr Math at your service

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Butgereit, L

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available in the fraction you have Pupil: 1 ova 15 Dr Math: so do the actual division what is one divided by 15 Pupil: is 15 Dr Math: no use a calcluator Pupil: 0,06 Dr Math: well it is 0,0666666 recurring right? Pupil: yes it is Dr Math...: now for a percentage, move the decimal 2 points to the right so it is 6.666% recurring then round to 6.67% MXit: drmath.sa Google Chat: dr.math.rsa (at) gmail.com More Info: http://drmath.meraka.csir.co.za/drmath Photographs...

  12. Intersatellite laser ranging with homodyne optical phase locking for Space Advanced Gravity Measurements mission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Hsien-Chi; Yan, Qi-Zhong; Liang, Yu-Rong; Wang, Ying; Luo, Jun

    2011-04-01

    In this paper, we present the scheme and the preliminary results of an intersatellite laser ranging system that is designed for the Earth's gravity recovery mission proposed in China, called Space Advanced Gravity Measurements (SAGM). The proposed intersatellite distance is about 100 km and the precision of inter-satellite range monitoring is 10 nm/Hz(1/2) at 0.1 Hz. To meet the needs, we designed a transponder-type intersatellite laser ranging system by using a homodyne optical phase locking technique, which is different from the heterodyne optical phase-locked loop used in GRACE follow-on mission. Since an ultrastable oscillator is unnecessary in the homodyne phase-locked loop, the measurement error caused by the frequency instability of the ultrastable oscillator need not be taken into account. In the preliminary study, a heterodyne interferometer with 10-m baseline (measurement arm-length) was built up to demonstrate the validity of the measurement scheme. The measurement results show that a resolution of displacement measurement of about 3.2 nm had been achieved. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  13. Evaluation of Soil Loss and Erosion Control Measures on Ranges and Range Structures at Installations in Temperate Climates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-01

    classified as discontinu- ous loess on bedrock and are finely textured silty clays and silty loams (Noble et al. 1990). The first visit to Camp...challenge as vegetation reestablishment is diffi- cult on the remaining eroded nutrient -poor soil. Investigations of newly constructed embankments as in...concentrations through range monitoring. Camp Atterbury Soils The soils in this area are classified as discontinuous loess on bedrock. Soil surveys completed

  14. Acoustic absorption measurement of human hair and skin within the audible frequency range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, B F

    2000-11-01

    Utilizing the two-microphone impedance tube method, the acoustic absorption of human skin and hair is measured in the frequency range 1-6 kHz. Various locations on a number of human subjects are measured to determine if the presence of bone or an air pocket affects the acoustic absorption of human skin. The absorption coefficient of human hair is also measured. Additional techniques are utilized to minimize errors due to sample mounting methods. Techniques are employed to minimize potential errors in sensor and sample locations. The results of these measurements are compared to relevant historical papers on similar investigations. Results for skin measurements compare well with previous work. Measured hair absorption data do not agree with previous work in the area but do coincide with expected trends, which previous works do not.

  15. An extended set-value observer for position estimation using single range measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marcal, Jose; Jouffroy, Jerome; Fossen, Thor I.

    of transponders. The knowledge of the bearing of the vehicle and the range measurements from a single location can provide a solution which is sensitive to the trajectory that the vehicle is following, since there is no complete constraint on the position estimate with a single beacon. In this paper...

  16. Polymeric pH nanosensor with extended measurement range bearing octaarginine as cell penetrating peptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ke, Peng; Sun, Honghao; Liu, Mingxing

    2016-01-01

    A synthetic peptide octaarginine which mimics human immunodeficiency virus-1, Tat protein is used as cell penetrating moiety for new pH nanosensors which demonstrate enhanced cellular uptake and expanded measurement range from pH 3.9 to pH 7.3 by simultaneously incorporating two complemental p...

  17. Spin motion determination of the Envisat satellite through laser ranging measurements from a single pass measured by a single station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittet, Jean-Noël; Šilha, Jiří; Schildknecht, Thomas

    2018-02-01

    The Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) technology is used to accurately determine the position of space objects equipped with so-called retro-reflectors or retro-reflector arrays (RRA). This type of measurement allows to measure the range to the spacecraft with high precision, which leads to determination of very accurate orbits for these targets. Non-active spacecraft, which are not attitude controlled any longer, tend to start to spin or tumble under influence of the external and internal torques and forces. If the return signal is measured for a non-spherical non-active rotating object, the signal in the range residuals with respect to the reference orbit is more complex. For rotating objects the return signal shows an oscillating pattern or patterns caused by the RRA moving around the satellite's centre of mass. This behaviour is projected onto the radial component measured by the SLR. In our work, we demonstrate how the SLR ranging technique from one sensor to a satellite equipped with a RRA can be used to precisely determine its spin motion during one passage. Multiple SLR measurements of one target over time allow to accurately monitor spin motion changes which can be further used for attitude predictions. We show our solutions of the spin motion determined for the non-active ESA satellite Envisat obtained from measurements acquired during years 2013-2015 by the Zimmerwald SLR station, Switzerland. All the necessary parameters are defined for our own so-called point-like model which describes the motion of a point in space around the satellite centre of mass.

  18. The value of forage measurement information in rangeland management. [implementation of satellite data in range management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lietzke, K. R.

    1975-01-01

    An economic model and simulation are developed to estimate the potential social benefit arising from the use of alternative measurement systems in rangeland management. In order to estimate these benefits, it was necessary to model three separate systems: the range environment, the rangeland manager, and the information system which links the two. The rancher's decision-making behavior is modeled according to sound economic principles. Results indicate substantial potential benefits, particularly when used in assisting management of government-operated ranges; possible annual benefits in this area range from $20 to $46 million, depending upon the system capabilities assumed. Possible annual benefit in privately-managed stocker operations range from $2.8 to $49.5 million, depending upon where actual rancher capabilities lie and what system capabilities are assumed.

  19. High-resolution and wide range displacement measurement based on planar grating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jie; Guan, Jian; Wen, Feng; Tan, Jiubin

    2017-12-01

    High/ultra-precision motion measurements for precision translation stages are highly desired in modern manufacturing systems and instruments. In this work, we introduce a wide range three-axis grating encoder with nanometric resolution, which can measure the x-, y- and z-axial translational motions of a stage simultaneously. The grating encoder is composed of a reflective-type planar scale grating with a period of 8 μm and an optical reading head. A planar reference grating, which is the same as the planar scale grating except the length and width, is employed in the optical reading head. The x- and y- directional ±1st order diffractive beams of the planar scale grating interfere with the corresponding diffractive beams of the planar reference grating, forming the measurement signals. The x- and y- directional ±1st order diffractive beams of the two planar gratings propagate against their original incident path, working as the autocollimatic diffractive beams. Therefore, the z-axial measurement range of the proposed grating encoder is greatly enhanced. The x- and y- axial measurement ranges depend on the size of the planar scale grating. To make the grating encoder more compact, a double grating beam-splitting (DGBS) unit and two diffractive optical elements (DOEs) are introduced. The experimental results indicate that the z-axial displacement resolution is as high as 4 nm with an electronic data division card of 80 segments developed by our lab.

  20. Improving the Dynamic Emissivity Measurement Above 1000 K by Extending the Spectral Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, D.; Krenek, S.; Anhalt, K.; Taubert, D. R.

    2018-01-01

    To improve the dynamic emissivity measurement, which is based on the laser-flash method, an array spectrometer is characterized regarding its spectral radiance responsivity for a spectrally resolved emissivity measurement above 1000 K in the wavelength range between 550 nm and 1100 nm. Influences like dark signals, the nonlinearity of the detector, the size-of-source effect, wavelength calibration and the spectral radiance responsivity of the system are investigated to obtain an uncertainty budget for the spectral radiance and emissivity measurements. Uncertainties for the spectral radiance of lower than a relative 2 % are achieved for wavelengths longer than 550 nm. Finally, the spectral emissivity of a graphite sample was determined in the temperature range between 1000 K and 1700 K, and the experimental data show a good repeatability and agreement with literature data.

  1. LUMOS - A Sensitive and Reliable Optode System for Measuring Dissolved Oxygen in the Nanomolar Range

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehner, Philipp; Larndorfer, Christoph; Garcia-Robledo, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Most commercially available optical oxygen sensors target the measuring range of 300 to 2 mu mol L-1. However these are not suitable for investigating the nanomolar range which is relevant for many important environmental situations. We therefore developed a miniaturized phase fluorimeter based...... measurement system called the LUMOS (Luminescence Measuring Oxygen Sensor). It consists of a readout device and specialized "sensing chemistry" that relies on commercially available components. The sensor material is based on palladium(II)-5,10,15,20-tetrakis-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorphenyl)-porphyrin embedded...... for read out of less sensitive optical oxygen sensors based on the same or similar indicator dyes, for example for monitoring oxygen at physiological conditions. The presented sensor system exhibits lower noise, higher resolution and higher sensitivity than the electrochemical STOX sensor previously used...

  2. LUMOS - A Sensitive and Reliable Optode System for Measuring Dissolved Oxygen in the Nanomolar Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehner, Philipp; Larndorfer, Christoph; Garcia-Robledo, Emilio; Larsen, Morten; Borisov, Sergey M.; Revsbech, Niels-Peter; Glud, Ronnie N.; Canfield, Donald E.; Klimant, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    Most commercially available optical oxygen sensors target the measuring range of 300 to 2 μmol L-1. However these are not suitable for investigating the nanomolar range which is relevant for many important environmental situations. We therefore developed a miniaturized phase fluorimeter based measurement system called the LUMOS (Luminescence Measuring Oxygen Sensor). It consists of a readout device and specialized “sensing chemistry” that relies on commercially available components. The sensor material is based on palladium(II)-5,10,15,20-tetrakis-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorphenyl)-porphyrin embedded in a Hyflon AD 60 polymer matrix and has a KSV of 6.25 x 10-3 ppmv-1. The applicable measurement range is from 1000 nM down to a detection limit of 0.5 nM. A second sensor material based on the platinum(II) analogue of the porphyrin is spectrally compatible with the readout device and has a measurement range of 20 μM down to 10 nM. The LUMOS device is a dedicated system optimized for a high signal to noise ratio, but in principle any phase flourimeter can be adapted to act as a readout device for the highly sensitive and robust sensing chemistry. Vise versa, the LUMOS fluorimeter can be used for read out of less sensitive optical oxygen sensors based on the same or similar indicator dyes, for example for monitoring oxygen at physiological conditions. The presented sensor system exhibits lower noise, higher resolution and higher sensitivity than the electrochemical STOX sensor previously used to measure nanomolar oxygen concentrations. Oxygen contamination in common sample containers has been investigated and microbial or enzymatic oxygen consumption at nanomolar concentrations is presented. PMID:26029920

  3. Comparing range data across the slow-time dimension to correct motion measurement errors beyond the range resolution of a synthetic aperture radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerry, Armin W.; Heard, Freddie E.; Cordaro, J. Thomas

    2010-08-17

    Motion measurement errors that extend beyond the range resolution of a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) can be corrected by effectively decreasing the range resolution of the SAR in order to permit measurement of the error. Range profiles can be compared across the slow-time dimension of the input data in order to estimate the error. Once the error has been determined, appropriate frequency and phase correction can be applied to the uncompressed input data, after which range and azimuth compression can be performed to produce a desired SAR image.

  4. Knee range of motion: reliability and agreement of 3 measurement methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Paul G; Herbenick, Michael A; Anloague, Philip A; Markert, Ronald J; Rubino, L Joseph

    2011-12-01

    We conducted a study to compare 3 methods of measuring knee range of motion: visual estimation by physicians, hand goniometry by physical therapists, and radiographic goniometry. We hypothesized that reliability would be high within and across all techniques. We found intrarater and interrater reliability to be satisfactory for visual estimation, hand goniometry, and radiographic goniometry. Interrater reliability across methods did not agree satisfactorily. Between-methods differences in estimating knee range of motion may result from variations in technique among physicians and physical therapists.

  5. Fluorescent Protein Based FRET Pairs with Improved Dynamic Range for Fluorescence Lifetime Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    George Abraham, Bobin; Sarkisyan, Karen S.; Mishin, Alexander S.; Santala, Ville; Tkachenko, Nikolai V.; Karp, Matti

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) using fluorescent protein variants is widely used to study biochemical processes in living cells. FRET detection by fluorescence lifetime measurements is the most direct and robust method to measure FRET. The traditional cyan-yellow fluorescent protein based FRET pairs are getting replaced by green-red fluorescent protein variants. The green-red pair enables excitation at a longer wavelength which reduces cellular autofluorescence and phototoxicity while monitoring FRET. Despite the advances in FRET based sensors, the low FRET efficiency and dynamic range still complicates their use in cell biology and high throughput screening. In this paper, we utilized the higher lifetime of NowGFP and screened red fluorescent protein variants to develop FRET pairs with high dynamic range and FRET efficiency. The FRET variations were analyzed by proteolytic activity and detected by steady-state and time-resolved measurements. Based on the results, NowGFP-tdTomato and NowGFP-mRuby2 have shown high potentials as FRET pairs with large fluorescence lifetime dynamic range. The in vitro measurements revealed that the NowGFP-tdTomato has the highest Förster radius for any fluorescent protein based FRET pairs yet used in biological studies. The developed FRET pairs will be useful for designing FRET based sensors and studies employing Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM). PMID:26237400

  6. Fluorescent Protein Based FRET Pairs with Improved Dynamic Range for Fluorescence Lifetime Measurements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobin George Abraham

    Full Text Available Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET using fluorescent protein variants is widely used to study biochemical processes in living cells. FRET detection by fluorescence lifetime measurements is the most direct and robust method to measure FRET. The traditional cyan-yellow fluorescent protein based FRET pairs are getting replaced by green-red fluorescent protein variants. The green-red pair enables excitation at a longer wavelength which reduces cellular autofluorescence and phototoxicity while monitoring FRET. Despite the advances in FRET based sensors, the low FRET efficiency and dynamic range still complicates their use in cell biology and high throughput screening. In this paper, we utilized the higher lifetime of NowGFP and screened red fluorescent protein variants to develop FRET pairs with high dynamic range and FRET efficiency. The FRET variations were analyzed by proteolytic activity and detected by steady-state and time-resolved measurements. Based on the results, NowGFP-tdTomato and NowGFP-mRuby2 have shown high potentials as FRET pairs with large fluorescence lifetime dynamic range. The in vitro measurements revealed that the NowGFP-tdTomato has the highest Förster radius for any fluorescent protein based FRET pairs yet used in biological studies. The developed FRET pairs will be useful for designing FRET based sensors and studies employing Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM.

  7. Fluorescent Protein Based FRET Pairs with Improved Dynamic Range for Fluorescence Lifetime Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George Abraham, Bobin; Sarkisyan, Karen S; Mishin, Alexander S; Santala, Ville; Tkachenko, Nikolai V; Karp, Matti

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) using fluorescent protein variants is widely used to study biochemical processes in living cells. FRET detection by fluorescence lifetime measurements is the most direct and robust method to measure FRET. The traditional cyan-yellow fluorescent protein based FRET pairs are getting replaced by green-red fluorescent protein variants. The green-red pair enables excitation at a longer wavelength which reduces cellular autofluorescence and phototoxicity while monitoring FRET. Despite the advances in FRET based sensors, the low FRET efficiency and dynamic range still complicates their use in cell biology and high throughput screening. In this paper, we utilized the higher lifetime of NowGFP and screened red fluorescent protein variants to develop FRET pairs with high dynamic range and FRET efficiency. The FRET variations were analyzed by proteolytic activity and detected by steady-state and time-resolved measurements. Based on the results, NowGFP-tdTomato and NowGFP-mRuby2 have shown high potentials as FRET pairs with large fluorescence lifetime dynamic range. The in vitro measurements revealed that the NowGFP-tdTomato has the highest Förster radius for any fluorescent protein based FRET pairs yet used in biological studies. The developed FRET pairs will be useful for designing FRET based sensors and studies employing Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM).

  8. Spatiotemporal treadmill gait measurements using a laser range scanner: feasibility study of the healthy young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, S; Ii, T; Koyama, S; Saitoh, E; Itoh, N; Ohtsuka, K; Katoh, Y; Shimizu, A; Tomita, Y

    2017-04-01

    Spatio-temporal parameters are typically used for gait analysis. Although these parameters are measured by sophisticated systems such as 3D motion capture system or optoelectronic bars, these systems cannot be deployed easily because of their high costs, large space requirements and elaborate set-up. The purpose of this study is to develope a system for measuring spatiotemporal gait parameters using a laser range scanner during treadmill gait. To calculate accurate spatiotemporal parameters, the differences between the laser range scanner measured values and the reference values obtained from a 3D motion capture system were investigated in thirty subjects. From measurements in time and position at foot contact/off, adjustments to compensate for the differences in time and position were derived. Then, to determine the validity of the proposed system, values from the proposed system and the reference system were compared in four additional subjects. The results indicate that the data from the laser range scanner demonstrate certain differences in time and position compared with reference values. However, when compensation values were introduced, each spatiotemporal parameter correlated well with the reference values. This newer system is smaller, is easier to deploy and requires less training than the 3D motion capture system.

  9. Is goniometry suitable for measuring ankle range of motion in female ballet dancers? An initial comparison with radiographic measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Jeffrey A; Shave, Ruth M; Kruse, David W; Nevill, Alan M; Koutedakis, Yiannis; Wyon, Matthew A

    2011-06-01

    Female ballet dancers require extreme ankle motion to attain the demi-plié (weight-bearing full dorsiflexion [DF]) and en pointe (weight-bearing full plantar flexion [PF]) positions of ballet. However, techniques for assessing this amount of motion have not yet received sufficient scientific scrutiny. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine possible differences between weight-bearing goniometric and radiographic ankle range of motion measurements in female ballet dancers. Ankle range of motion in 8 experienced female ballet dancers was assessed by goniometry and 2 radiographic measurement methods. The latter were performed on 3 mediolateral x-rays, in demi-plié, neutral, and en pointe positions; one of them used the same landmarks as goniometry. DF values were not significantly different among the methods, but PF values were (P ballet dancers and suggest that goniometry may not be ideal for assessing ankle range of motion in these individuals. Therefore, further research is needed to standardize how DF and PF are measured in ballet dancers. Diagnostic, Level I.

  10. Electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) measurement of thin-film thickness in the nanometre range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procop, M; Radtke, M; Krumrey, M; Hasche, K; Schädlich, S; Frank, W

    2002-10-01

    The thickness of thin films of platinum and nickel on fused silica and silicon substrates has been determined by EPMA using the commercial software STRATAGEM for calculation of film thickness. Film thickness ranged in the order 10 nm. An attempt was made to estimate the confidence range of the method by comparison with results from other methods of analysis. The data show that in addition to the uncertainty of the spectral intensity measurement and the complicated fitting routine, systematic deviation caused by the underlying model should be added. The scattering in the results from other methods does not enable specification of a range of uncertainty, but deviations from the real thickness are estimated to be less than 20%.

  11. A Non-Contact Measurement System for the Range of Motion of the Hand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trieu Pham

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available An accurate and standardised tool to measure the active range of motion (ROM of the hand is essential to any progressive assessment scenario in hand therapy practice. Goniometers are widely used in clinical settings for measuring the ROM of the hand. However, such measurements have limitations with regard to inter-rater and intra-rater reliability and involve direct physical contact with the hand, possibly increasing the risk of transmitting infections. The system proposed in this paper is the first non-contact measurement system utilising Intel Perceptual Technology and a Senz3D Camera for measuring phalangeal joint angles. To enhance the accuracy of the system, we developed a new approach to achieve the total active movement without measuring three joint angles individually. An equation between the actual spacial position and measurement value of the proximal inter-phalangeal joint was established through the measurement values of the total active movement, so that its actual position can be inferred. Verified by computer simulations, experimental results demonstrated a significant improvement in the calculation of the total active movement and successfully recovered the actual position of the proximal inter-phalangeal joint angles. A trial that was conducted to examine the clinical applicability of the system involving 40 healthy subjects confirmed the practicability and consistency in the proposed system. The time efficiency conveyed a stronger argument for this system to replace the current practice of using goniometers.

  12. Measuring finite-range phase coherence in an optical lattice using Talbot interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santra, Bodhaditya; Baals, Christian; Labouvie, Ralf; Bhattacherjee, Aranya B.; Pelster, Axel; Ott, Herwig

    2017-06-01

    One of the important goals of present research is to control and manipulate coherence in a broad variety of systems, such as semiconductor spintronics, biological photosynthetic systems, superconducting qubits and complex atomic networks. Over the past decades, interferometry of atoms and molecules has proven to be a powerful tool to explore coherence. Here we demonstrate a near-field interferometer based on the Talbot effect, which allows us to measure finite-range phase coherence of ultracold atoms in an optical lattice. We apply this interferometer to study the build-up of phase coherence after a quantum quench of a Bose-Einstein condensate residing in a one-dimensional optical lattice. Our technique of measuring finite-range phase coherence is generic, easy to adopt and can be applied in practically all lattice experiments without further modifications.

  13. Wide-range dynamic strain measurements based on K-BOTDA and frequency-agile technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Dengwang; Dong, Yongkang; Wang, Benzhang; Zhang, Hongying; Lu, Zhiwei

    2017-04-01

    We propose and demonstrate a novel fast Brillouin optical time-domain analysis system using the coefficient K spectrum which is defined as the ratio of phase-shift and gain of Brillouin amplification, where K features linear response, immune to the variation of pump power and a wide measure range. For a 30ns-square pump pulse, the frequency span of K spectrum can reach up to 200MHz. In dynamic strain experiment, a multi-slope assisted K-BOTDA with the measured strain of 5358.3μɛ and the vibration frequency of 6.01Hz and 12.05Hz are demonstrated.

  14. [Measurement of the knee range of motion: standard goniometer or smartphone?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rwakabayiza, Sylvia; Pereira, Luis Carlos; Lécureux, Estelle; Jolles-Haeberli, Brigitte

    2013-12-18

    Universal standard goniometer is an essential tool to measure articulations' range of motion (ROM). In this time of technological advances and increasing use of smartphones, new measurement's tools appear as specific smartphone applications. This article compares the iOS application "Knee Goniometer" with universal standard goniometer to assess knee ROM. To our knowledge, this is the first study that uses a goniometer application in a clinical context. The purpose of this study is to determine if this application could be used in clinical practice.

  15. Human-Induced Effects on RSS Ranging Measurements for Cooperative Positioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Della Rosa, Francescantonio; Pelosi, Mauro; Nurmi, Jari

    2012-01-01

    We present experimental evaluations of human-induced perturbations on received-signal-strength-(RSS-) based ranging measurements for cooperative mobile positioning. To the best of our knowledge, this work is the first attempt to gain insight and understand the impact of both body loss and hand grip...... on the RSS for enhancing proximity measurements among neighbouring devices in cooperative scenarios. Our main contribution is represented by experimental investigations. Analysis of the errors introduced in the distance estimation using path-loss-based methods has been carried out. Moreover, the exploitation...

  16. Repeatability of Contour Method Residual Stress Measurements for a Range of Material, Process, and Geometry (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-19

    titanium, and nickel, reflecting key industrial alloys . The set of conditions also includes a range of geometry, including plate, disk, and...for measurements. 2.2.3. Titanium Electron Beam Welded Plate Titanium alloy electron beam (EB) welded plate specimens were fabricated using one...right to use , modify, reproduce, release, perform, display, or disclose the work. 14. ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 words) This paper examines precision of

  17. Measurement of the short-range attractive force between Ge plates using a torsion balance

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, W. J.; Sushkov, A. O.; Dalvit, D. A. R.; Lamoreaux, S. K.

    2008-01-01

    We have measured the short-range attractive force between crystalline Ge plates, and found contributions from both the Casimir force and an electrical force possibly generated by surface patch potentials. Using a model of surface patch effects that generates an additional force due to a distance dependence of the apparent contact potential, the electrical force was parameterized using data at distances where the Casimir force is relatively small. Extrapolating this model, to provide a correct...

  18. Validity and reliability of using photography for measuring knee range of motion: a methodological study

    OpenAIRE

    Adie Sam; Ko Victoria; Naylor Justine M; Gaskin Clive; Walker Richard; Harris Ian A; Mittal Rajat

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The clinimetric properties of knee goniometry are essential to appreciate in light of its extensive use in the orthopaedic and rehabilitative communities. Intra-observer reliability is thought to be satisfactory, but the validity and inter-rater reliability of knee goniometry often demonstrate unacceptable levels of variation. This study tests the validity and reliability of measuring knee range of motion using goniometry and photographic records. Methods Design: Methodolo...

  19. Doctors and Dr. Seuss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlin, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    In 2012, Dartmouth College renamed its medical school, founded in 1797, the Audrey and Theodor Geisel School of Medicine. Using the renaming of the medical school of Dartmouth College as a foil, I offer in this article a vision of what it might mean to align Theodor Geisel, better known as Dr. Seuss, with doctors by examining Geisel's You're Only Old Once! A Book for Obsolete Children. In this article, I derive four critiques of modern medicine from the book and offer four strategies as to how these critiques could be explored in medical education. If You're Only Old Once! is read as a pathography, I argue that it can be used as a resource for medical education.

  20. Comparison of linear gain and wide dynamic range compression hearing aid circuits II: aided loudness measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenstad, L M; Pumford, J; Seewald, R C; Cornelisse, L E

    2000-02-01

    The goal of this study was to test the theoretical advantages of a single-channel wide dynamic range compression (WDRC) circuit fitted using the DSL method for increased dynamic range and normalized loudness growth. Ten adolescents and young adults with moderate to severe sensorineural hearing loss were fitted monaurally with the Siemens Viva 2 Pro behind-the-ear instrument set to DSL 4.0 targets for both linear gain and WDRC processing. Threshold, upper limit of comfort and loudness growth were measured in the unaided, linear gain and WDRC conditions for warble tones, environmental sounds and speech. Twelve adult listeners with normal hearing also were tested monaurally in the unaided condition to provide normative data for comparison purposes. The WDRC hearing aid provided a greater input dynamic range than the linear circuit for all stimuli. The dynamic range was normalized for more subjects with the WDRC than the linear hearing aid. In addition, exponential loudness growth functions fitted to the loudness growth data showed that, on average, loudness growth was more normalized with the WDRC hearing aid fitted to DSL[i/o] targets than the linear hearing aid fitted to DSL[i/o] targets. WDRC processing, fitted using the DSL[i/o] method, has potential applications in hearing aid fittings for listeners with moderate to severe hearing loss because it provides an audible, comfortable and tolerable amplified signal across a wider range of inputs than linear gain processing, without the need for volume control adjustments.

  1. Reliability of speaking and maximum voice range measures in screening for dysphonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Estella; Robertson, Jennie; Radford, Claire; Vagne, Sarah; El-Halabi, Ruba; Yiu, Edwin

    2007-07-01

    Speech range profile (SRP) is a graphical display of frequency-intensity occurring interactions during functional speech activity. Few studies have suggested the potential clinical applications of SRP. However, these studies are limited to qualitative case comparisons and vocally healthy participants. The present study aimed to examine the effects of voice disorders on speaking and maximum voice ranges in a group of vocally untrained women. It also aimed to examine whether voice limit measures derived from SRP were as sensitive as those derived from voice range profile (VRP) in distinguishing dysphonic from healthy voices. Ninety dysphonic women with laryngeal pathologies and 35 women with normal voices, who served as controls, participated in this study. Each subject recorded a VRP for her physiological vocal limits. In addition, each subject read aloud the "North Wind and the Sun" passage to record SRP. All the recordings were captured and analyzed by Soundswell's computerized real-time phonetogram Phog 1.0 (Hitech Development AB, Täby, Sweden). The SRPs and the VRPs were compared between the two groups of subjects. Univariate analysis results demonstrated that individual SRP measures were less sensitive than the corresponding VRP measures in discriminating dysphonic from normal voices. However, stepwise logistic regression analyses revealed that the combination of only two SRP measures was almost as effective as a combination of three VRP measures in predicting the presence of dysphonia (overall prediction accuracy: 93.6% for SRP vs 96.0% for VRP). These results suggest that in a busy clinic where quick voice screening results are desirable, SRP can be an acceptable alternate procedure to VRP.

  2. Measurement of soil water potential over an extended range by polymer tensiometers: comparison with other instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Ploeg, M. J.; Gooren, H. P.; Hoogendam, R. C.; Bakker, G.; Huiskes, C.; Koopal, L. K.; Kruidhof, H.; de Rooij, G. H.

    2007-12-01

    In water scarce areas, plant growth and productivity can be severely hampered by irregular precipitation and overall water shortage. Root water uptake is mainly driven by matric potential gradients, but measurement of soil water matric potential is limited by the measurement range of water-filled tensiometers (-0.085 MPa). Other measurement techniques indirectly measure soil water potential by converting soil water content with the use of the water retention curve. In dry soils, the water content measurements may become insensitive to small variations, and consequently this conversion may lead to large errors. We developed a polymer tensiometer (POT) that is able to measure matric potentials down to -2.0 MPa. The POT consists of a solid ceramic, a stainless steel cup and a pressure transducer. The ceramic consist of a support layer and a membrane with 2 nm pore-size to prevent polymer leakage. Between the ceramic membrane and the pressure transducer a tiny chamber is located, which contains the polymer solution. The polymer's osmotic potential strongly reduces the total water potential inside the polymer tensiometer, which causes build-up of osmotic pressure. Hence, the water in the polymer tensiometer will cavitate at a much lower matric potential than the nearly pure water in a conventional tensiometer. Direct observation of the potential of soil water at different locations in the root-system will yield knowledge about the ability of a plant to take up the water under conditions of water shortage or salinity stress. With this knowledge it will be possible to adjust existing unsaturated flow models accounting for root water uptake. We tested 8 POTs in an experimental setup, where we compared matric potential measurements to TDR water content measurements, matric potentials derived from measured water contents, and matric potentials measured by water-filled tensiometers. The experimental setup consisted of two evaporation boxes, one filled with sand (97.6% sand, 1

  3. Dynamic Data Filtering of Long-Range Doppler LiDAR Wind Speed Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hauke Beck

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Doppler LiDARs have become flexible and versatile remote sensing devices for wind energy applications. The possibility to measure radial wind speed components contemporaneously at multiple distances is an advantage with respect to meteorological masts. However, these measurements must be filtered due to the measurement geometry, hard targets and atmospheric conditions. To ensure a maximum data availability while producing low measurement errors, we introduce a dynamic data filter approach that conditionally decouples the dependency of data availability with increasing range. The new filter approach is based on the assumption of self-similarity, that has not been used so far for LiDAR data filtering. We tested the accuracy of the dynamic data filter approach together with other commonly used filter approaches, from research and industry applications. This has been done with data from a long-range pulsed LiDAR installed at the offshore wind farm ‘alpha ventus’. There, an ultrasonic anemometer located approximately 2.8 km from the LiDAR was used as reference. The analysis of around 1.5 weeks of data shows, that the error of mean radial velocity can be minimised for wake and free stream conditions.

  4. Average Neutron Total Cross Sections in the Unresolved Energy Range From ORELA High Resolutio Transmission Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derrien, H

    2004-05-27

    Average values of the neutron total cross sections of {sup 233}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, and {sup 239}Pu have been obtained in the unresolved resonance energy range from high-resolution transmission measurements performed at ORELA in the past two decades. The cross sections were generated by correcting the effective total cross sections for the self-shielding effects due to the resonance structure of the data. The self-shielding factors were found by calculating the effective and true cross sections with the computer code SAMMY for the same Doppler and resolution conditions as for the transmission measurements, using an appropriate set of resonance parameters. Our results are compared to results of previous measurements and to the current ENDF/B-VI data.

  5. Pressure loss tests for DR-BEP of fullsize 17 x 17 PWR fuel assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Moon Ki; Chun, Se Young; Chang, Seok Kyu; Won, Soon Youn; Cho, Young Rho; Kim, Bok Deuk; Min, Kyoung Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-01-01

    This report describes the conditions, procedure and results in the pressure loss tests carried out for a double grid type debris resistance bottom end piece (DR-BEP) designed by KAERI. In this test, the pressure loss coefficients of the full size 17 x 17 PWR simulated fuel assembly with DR-BET and with standard-BEP were measured respectively, and the pressure loss coefficients of DR-BEP were compared with the coefficients of STD-BET. The test conditions fall within the ranges of loop pressure from 5.2 to 45 bar, loop temperature from 27 to 221 deg C and Reynolds number in fuel bundle from 2.17 x 10{sup 4} to 3.85 x 10{sup 5}. (Author) 5 refs., 18 figs., 5 tabs.

  6. Measurements and correlations of turbulent burning velocities over wide ranges of fuels and elevated pressures

    KAUST Repository

    Bradley, Derek

    2013-01-01

    The implosion technique has been used to extend measurements of turbulent burning velocities over greater ranges of fuels and pressures. Measurements have been made up to 3.5 MPa and at strain rate Markstein numbers as low as 23. The implosion technique, with spark ignition at two opposite wall positions within a fan-stirred spherical bomb is capable of measuring turbulent burning velocities, at higher pressures than is possible with central ignition. Pressure records and schlieren high speed photography define the rate of burning and the smoothed area of the flame front. The first aim of the study was to extend the previous measurements with ethanol and propane-air, with further measurements over wider ranges of fuels and equivalence ratios with mixtures of hydrogen, methane, 10% hydrogen-90% methane, toluene, and i-octane, with air. The second aim was to study further the low turbulence regime in which turbulent burning co-exists with laminar flame instabilities. Correlations are presented of turbulent burning velocity normalised by the effective rms turbulent velocity acting on the flame front, ut=u0k , with the Karlovitz stretch factor, K, for different strain rate Markstein numbers, a decrease in which increases ut=u0k . Experimental correlations are presented for the present measurements, combined with previous ones. Different burning regimes are also identified, extending from that of mixed turbulence/laminar instability at low values of K to that at high values of K, in which ut=u0k is gradually reduced due to increasing localised flame extinctions. © 2012 The Combustion Institute.

  7. Feasibility of RACT for 3D dose measurement and range verification in a water phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsanea, Fahed; Moskvin, Vadim; Stantz, Keith M

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study is to establish the feasibility of using radiation-induced acoustics to measure the range and Bragg peak dose from a pulsed proton beam. Simulation studies implementing a prototype scanner design based on computed tomographic methods were performed to investigate the sensitivity to proton range and integral dose. Derived from thermodynamic wave equation, the pressure signals generated from the dose deposited from a pulsed proton beam with a 1 cm lateral beam width and a range of 16, 20, and 27 cm in water using Monte Carlo methods were simulated. The resulting dosimetric images were reconstructed implementing a 3D filtered backprojection algorithm and the pressure signals acquired from a 71-transducer array with a cylindrical geometry (30 × 40 cm) rotated over 2π about its central axis. Dependencies on the detector bandwidth and proton beam pulse width were performed, after which, different noise levels were added to the detector signals (using 1 μs pulse width and a 0.5 MHz cutoff frequency/hydrophone) to investigate the statistical and systematic errors in the proton range (at 20 cm) and Bragg peak dose (of 1 cGy). The reconstructed radioacoustic computed tomographic image intensity was shown to be linearly correlated to the dose within the Bragg peak. And, based on noise dependent studies, a detector sensitivity of 38 mPa was necessary to determine the proton range to within 1.0 mm (full-width at half-maximum) (systematic error ionizing radiation-induced acoustics can be used to verify dose distribution and proton range with centi-Gray sensitivity. Realizing this technology into the clinic has the potential to significantly impact beam commissioning, treatment verification during particle beam therapy and image guided techniques.

  8. Sensitivity of physiological emotional measures to odors depends on the product and the pleasantness ranges used

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Marie Pichon

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Emotions are characterized by synchronized changes in several components of an organism. Among them, physiological variations provide energy support for the expression of approach/avoid action tendencies induced by relevant stimuli, while self-reported subjective pleasantness feelings integrate all other emotional components and are plastic.Consequently, emotional responses evoked by odors should be highly differentiated when they are linked to different functions of olfaction (e.g., avoiding environmental hazards. As this differentiation has been observed for contrasted odors (very pleasant or unpleasant, we questioned whether subjective and physiological emotional response indicators could still disentangle subtle affective variations when no clear functional distinction is made (mildly pleasant or unpleasant fragrances. Here, we compared the sensitivity of behavioral and physiological (respiration, skin conductance, facial electromyography (EMG, and heart rate indicators in differentiating odor-elicited emotions in two situations: when a wide range of odor families was presented (e.g., fruity, animal, covering different functional meanings; or in response to a restricted range of products in one particular family (fragrances. Results show clear differences in physiological indicators to odors that display a wide range of reported pleasantness, but these differences almost entirely vanish when fragrances are used even though their subjective pleasantness still differed. Taken together, these results provide valuable information concerning the ability of classic verbal and psychophysiological measures to investigate subtle differences in emotional reactions to a restricted range of similar olfactory stimuli.

  9. Validation of a photography-based goniometry method for measuring joint range of motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blonna, Davide; Zarkadas, Peter C; Fitzsimmons, James S; O'Driscoll, Shawn W

    2012-01-01

    A critical component of evaluating the outcomes after surgery to restore lost elbow motion is the range of motion (ROM) of the elbow. This study examined if digital photography-based goniometry is as accurate and reliable as clinical goniometry for measuring elbow ROM. Instrument validity and reliability for photography-based goniometry were evaluated for a consecutive series of 50 elbow contractures by 4 observers with different levels of elbow experience. Goniometric ROM measurements were taken with the elbows in full extension and full flexion directly in the clinic (once) and from digital photographs (twice in a blinded random manner). Instrument validity for photography-based goniometry was extremely high (intraclass correlation coefficient: extension = 0.98, flexion = 0.96). For extension and flexion measurements by the expert surgeon, systematic error was negligible (0° and 1°, respectively). Limits of agreement were 7° (95% confidence interval [CI], 5° to 9°) and -7° (95% CI, -5° to -9°) for extension and 8° (95% CI, 6° to 10°) and -7° (95% CI, -5° to -9°) for flexion. Interobserver reliability for photography-based goniometry was better than that for clinical goniometry. The least experienced observer's photographic goniometry measurements were closer to the reference measurements than the clinical goniometry measurements. Photography-based goniometry is accurate and reliable for measuring elbow ROM. The photography-based method relied less on observer expertise than clinical goniometry. This validates an objective measure of patient outcome without requiring doctor-patient contact at a tertiary care center, where most contracture surgeries are done. Copyright © 2012 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. CFD comparison with centrifugal compressor measurements on a wide operating range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnou D.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Centrifugal compressors are widely used in industrial applications thanks to their high efficiency. They are able to provide a wide operating range before reaching the flow barrier or surge limits. Performances and range are described by compressor maps obtained experimentally. After a description of performance test rig, this article compares measured centrifugal compressor performances with computational fluid dynamics results. These computations are performed at steady conditions with R134a refrigerant as fluid. Navier-Stokes equations, coupled with k-ε turbulence model, are solved by the commercial software ANSYS-CFX by means of volume finite method. Input conditions are varied in order to calculate several speed lines. Theoretical isentropic efficiency and theoretical surge line are finally compared to experimental data.

  11. Calibration Standards for Surface Topography Measuring Systems down to Nanometric Range

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trumpold, H.; De Chiffre, Leonardo; Andreasen, Jan Lasson

    geometry of basic bodies for compression and injection moulding of plastic negatives with different step height, sinusoidal-, triangular and arcuate profiles covering Pt-values from 0.05 µm up to 100 µm and PSm values from 0.8 µm up to 800 µm. For active calibration in Z-direction a small size vertical...... and for the calibration of filters. Existing ISO standards on calibration specimens are inadequate and limited in that they only cover contacting instruments and only partially the measuring ranges for these instruments. The whole range of non-contacting instruments are not covered despite their increasing use...... compression and injection moulded plastic negatives and Ni-negatives have been made from which again Ni-positives were produced. The replication processes showed negligible deviations from the Pt and Pa values compared to the primary standards. An important prerequisite is the cleanliness of the surfaces...

  12. Range Resolved CO2 Atmospheric Backscattering Measurements Using Fiber Lasers and RZPN Code Modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burris, John

    2011-01-01

    We report the use of a return-to- zero (RZPN) pseudo noise modulation technique for making range resolved measurements of CO2 within the planetary boundary layer (PBL) using commercial, off-the-shelf, components. Conventional, range resolved, DIAL measurements require laser pulse widths that are significantly shorter than the desired spatial resolution and necessitate using pulses whose temporal spacing is such that scattered returns from only a single pulse are observed by the receiver at any one time (for the PBL pulse separations must be greater than approximately 20 microseconds). This imposes significant operational limitations when using currently available fiber lasers because of the resulting low duty cycle (less than approximately 0.0005) and consequent low average laser output power. The RZPN modulation technique enables a fiber laser to operate at much higher duty cycles (approaching 0.04) thereby more effectively utilizing the amplifier's output. This increases the counts received by approximately two orders of magnitude. Our approach involves employing two distributed feedback lasers (DFB), each modulated by a different RPZN code, whose outputs are then amplified by a CW fiber amplifier. One laser is tuned to a CO2 absorption line; the other operates offline thereby permitting the simultaneous acquisition of both on and offline signals using independent RZPN codes. This minimizes the impact of atmospheric turbulence on the measurement. The on and offline signals are retrieved by deconvolving the return signal using the appropriate kernels.

  13. Testing accuracy of long-range ultrasonic sensors for olive tree canopy measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamarra-Diezma, Juan Luis; Miranda-Fuentes, Antonio; Llorens, Jordi; Cuenca, Andrés; Blanco-Roldán, Gregorio L; Rodríguez-Lizana, Antonio

    2015-01-28

    Ultrasonic sensors are often used to adjust spray volume by allowing the calculation of the crown volume of tree crops. The special conditions of the olive tree require the use of long-range sensors, which are less accurate and faster than the most commonly used sensors. The main objectives of the study were to determine the suitability of the sensor in terms of sound cone determination, angle errors, crosstalk errors and field measurements. Different laboratory tests were performed to check the suitability of a commercial long-range ultrasonic sensor, as were the experimental determination of the sound cone diameter at several distances for several target materials, the determination of the influence of the angle of incidence of the sound wave on the target and distance on the accuracy of measurements for several materials and the determination of the importance of the errors due to interference between sensors for different sensor spacings and distances for two different materials. Furthermore, sensor accuracy was tested under real field conditions. The results show that the studied sensor is appropriate for olive trees because the sound cone is narrower for an olive tree than for the other studied materials, the olive tree canopy does not have a large influence on the sensor accuracy with respect to distance and angle, the interference errors are insignificant for high sensor spacings and the sensor's field distance measurements were deemed sufficiently accurate.

  14. Improving detection range, signal-to-noise ratio, and measurement time through hyperentanglement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, James F.

    2017-07-01

    An atmospheric imaging system based on quantum hyperentanglement has been developed. Hyper-entanglement can increase the maximum detection range of the system by more than a factor of 10, improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) by more than a factor of 10,000, and decrease measurement time. Hyperentanglement refers to entanglement in more than one degree of freedom. A design for creating states hyperentangled in the degrees of freedom polarization, energy-time, orbital angular momentum (OAM), and the radial quantum number is examined. The design helps reduce propagation loss. Figures of merit related to generation and detection efficiencies, the SNR, signal to interference ratio, the measurement time, and phase estimation are provided in closed form. A formula describing how hyperentanglement greatly improves the maximum detection range of the system is derived. Hermite-Gaussian modes, Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) modes, OAM dependence of the LG modes, and mode conversion are discussed. Bell state generation and Bell state measurement, i.e., the ability to distinguish the various Bell states, is discussed. Mathematical and circuit representations of Bell state generation and the Bell state analyzer are provided. Signatures for unique detection of the various Bell states are developed. The formalism permits random noise and entangled or nonentangled sources of interference to be modeled.

  15. Geophysical interpretation of satellite laser ranging measurements of crustal movement in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, S. C.

    1984-01-01

    As determined by satellite laser ranging the rate of contraction of a 900 kilometer baseline between sites located near Quincy in northern California and San Diego in southern California is about 61 to 65 mm/yr with a formal uncertainty of about 10 mm/yr. The measured changes in baseline length are a manifestation of the relative motion between the North America and Pacific tectonic plates. This long baseline result is compared to measurements made by more conventional means on shorter baselines. Additional information based on seismicity, geology, and theoretical modelling is also analyzed. Deformation lying within a few tens of kilometers about the major faults in southern California accounts for most, but not all of the observed motion. Further motion is attributable to a broader scale deformation in southern California. Data suggesting crustal movements north of the Garlock fault, in and near the southern Sierra Nevada and local motion at an observatory are also critically reviewed. The best estimates of overall motion indicated by ground observations lie between 40 and 60 mm/yr. This lies within one or two standard deviations of that deduced by satellite ranging but the possibility of some unresolved deficit cannot be dismissed. The long time scale RM2 plate tectonic model of Minster and Jordan predicts a contraction between 47 and 53 mm/yr depending on the extension rate of the Basin and Range. Thus the ground based observations, satellite laser ranging (SLR) results, and RM2 rates differ at about the 10 mm/yr level and are consistent with one another within the data and model uncertainties.

  16. Feasibility of RACT for 3D dose measurement and range verification in a water phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alsanea, Fahed [School of Health Sciences, Purdue University, 550 Stadium Mall Drive, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907-2051 (United States); Moskvin, Vadim [Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, 535 Barnhill Drive, RT 041, Indianapolis, Indiana 46202-5289 (United States); Stantz, Keith M., E-mail: kstantz@purdue.edu [School of Health Sciences, Purdue University, 550 Stadium Mall Drive, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907-2051 and Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Indiana University School of Medicine, 950 West Walnut Street, Indianapolis, Indiana 46202-5289 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: The objective of this study is to establish the feasibility of using radiation-induced acoustics to measure the range and Bragg peak dose from a pulsed proton beam. Simulation studies implementing a prototype scanner design based on computed tomographic methods were performed to investigate the sensitivity to proton range and integral dose. Methods: Derived from thermodynamic wave equation, the pressure signals generated from the dose deposited from a pulsed proton beam with a 1 cm lateral beam width and a range of 16, 20, and 27 cm in water using Monte Carlo methods were simulated. The resulting dosimetric images were reconstructed implementing a 3D filtered backprojection algorithm and the pressure signals acquired from a 71-transducer array with a cylindrical geometry (30 × 40 cm) rotated over 2π about its central axis. Dependencies on the detector bandwidth and proton beam pulse width were performed, after which, different noise levels were added to the detector signals (using 1 μs pulse width and a 0.5 MHz cutoff frequency/hydrophone) to investigate the statistical and systematic errors in the proton range (at 20 cm) and Bragg peak dose (of 1 cGy). Results: The reconstructed radioacoustic computed tomographic image intensity was shown to be linearly correlated to the dose within the Bragg peak. And, based on noise dependent studies, a detector sensitivity of 38 mPa was necessary to determine the proton range to within 1.0 mm (full-width at half-maximum) (systematic error < 150 μm) for a 1 cGy Bragg peak dose, where the integral dose within the Bragg peak was measured to within 2%. For existing hydrophone detector sensitivities, a Bragg peak dose of 1.6 cGy is possible. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that computed tomographic scanner based on ionizing radiation-induced acoustics can be used to verify dose distribution and proton range with centi-Gray sensitivity. Realizing this technology into the clinic has the potential to significantly

  17. From Mxit to Dr Math

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Botha, Adèle

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In 2007, Laurie Butgereit, a researcher at the CSIR Meraka Institute, started to use Mxit as a communication channel to tutor her son in mathematics. Her son and a number of his friends logged in, and Dr Math was born. At the inception of Dr Math...

  18. Teaching Peace with Dr. Seuss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, Rosemarie; Podesta, Andrea

    1999-01-01

    Educators seeking novel ways to instill conflict-resolution skills in young children should consider Dr. Seuss, whose books provide a synthesis of fantasy and reality that works for teaching values endemic to peace education. This paper discusses how students can learn peace and educators can teach peace using Dr. Seuss books, examining steps to…

  19. Measurement based scenario analysis of short-range distribution system planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Peiyuan; Bak-Jensen, Birgitte; Chen, Zhe

    2009-01-01

    feasible scenarios are performed based on a local distribution system at Støvring in Denmark. Simulation results provide more accurate and insightful information for the decision-maker when using the probabilistic analysis than using the worst-case analysis, so that a better planning can be achieved.......This paper focuses on short-range distribution system planning using a probabilistic approach. Empirical probabilistic distributions of load demand and distributed generations are derived from the historical measurement data and incorporated into the system planning. Simulations with various...

  20. Frequency Comb Driven Raman Transitions in the THz Range: High Precision Isotope Shift Measurements in Ca+

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    to picoseconds in the previous experiments. For the broad spectrum, the additional effect of group delay dispersion (GDD) has to be taken into account, since the Raman process relies on the coherent interaction of all frequency components of the spectrum, with GDD influencing the relative phase which leads......This thesis presents for the first time the experimental implementation of coherent Raman oscillations with a femtosecond frequency comb for transition frequencies in the THz range. The technique has been successfully demonstrated before to drive Raman transitions between hyperfine structure states...... to destructive interference. Therefore, GDD is compensated using a prism compressor and it is shown quantitatively that the measured GDD matches the theoretically predicted effect on the total Raman Rabi frequency. For the measurements and compensation of GDD, the techniques of interferometric autocorrelation...

  1. Human-Induced Effects on RSS Ranging Measurements for Cooperative Positioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francescantonio Della Rosa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present experimental evaluations of human-induced perturbations on received-signal-strength-(RSS- based ranging measurements for cooperative mobile positioning. To the best of our knowledge, this work is the first attempt to gain insight and understand the impact of both body loss and hand grip on the RSS for enhancing proximity measurements among neighbouring devices in cooperative scenarios. Our main contribution is represented by experimental investigations. Analysis of the errors introduced in the distance estimation using path-loss-based methods has been carried out. Moreover, the exploitation of human-induced perturbations for enhancing the final positioning accuracy through cooperative schemes has been assessed. It has been proved that the effect of cooperation is very limited if human factors are not taken into account when performing experimental activities.

  2. The validity and reliability of a new instrumented device for measuring ankle dorsiflexion range of motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calatayud, Joaquin; Martin, Fernando; Gargallo, Pedro; García-Redondo, Jessica; Colado, Juan Carlos; Marín, Pedro J

    2015-04-01

    A restriction in ankle dorsiflexion range of motion (ROM) has been linked to several clinical manifestations such as metatarsalgia, heel pain, nerve entrapment, ankle joint equinus, patellar and ankle injuries. The purpose of the present study was to examine the validity and reliability of the Leg Motion system for measuring ankle dorsiflexion ROM. Descriptive repeated-measures study. Twenty-six healthy male university students were recruited to test the reliability of the Leg Motion system, which is a portable tool used for assessment of ankle dorsiflexion during the weight-bearing lunge test. The participants were tested two times separated by two weeks and measurements were performed at the same time of the day by the same single rater. To test the validity of the Leg Motion system, other maximal ankle dorsiflexion ROM assessments (goniometer, inclinometer and measuring tape) were measured in a single session (i.e., the first test session) during the weight-bearing lunge position using a standard goniometer, a digital inclinometer and a measuring tape measure with the ability to measure to the nearest 0.1 cm. Paired t-tests showed the absence of significant differences between right and left limb measurements of dorsiflexion in all tests. Mean values ± standard deviations were as follows: Leg Motion test (left 11.6cm±3.9; right 11.9cm ±4.0), tape measure (left 11.6cm±4.0; right 11.8cm±4.2), goniometer (left 40.6º±5.2; right 40.6º±5.2), and digital inclinometer (left 40.0º±5.8; right 39.9º±5.6). The Leg Motion composite values (i.e., average of the two legs) showed a significant (pMotion system as a valid, portable, and easy to use alternative to the weight-bearing lunge test to assess ankle dorsiflexion ROM in healthy participants. 2b.

  3. The 1995-99 measurements of the Lense-Thirring effect using laser-ranged satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciufolini, Ignazio

    2000-06-01

    In general relativity a current of mass-energy, such as a spinning body, gives rise to peculiar phenomena on bodies, particles and clocks in its vicinity, which are not predicted by the Newtonian gravitational theory; one of these phenomena is the Lense-Thirring effect on particles orbiting a spinning central body. In this paper we first review the method used to measure the Lense-Thirring effect, by analysing the orbits of the two laser-ranged satellites LAGEOS and LAGEOS II, that has provided a direct measurements of this effect; we then report on these detections of the Lense-Thirring effect, obtained by analysing the nodes of LAGEOS and LAGEOS II and the perigee of LAGEOS II with the orbital programs GEODYN-SOLVE, using the Earth gravitational models JGM-3 and EGM-96 and this new method. The first detection was obtained in 1995, the most accurate measurements were obtained in 1998 using EGM-96, with about 20-30% accuracy. Finally, we briefly review the proposed LARES experiment to measure the Lense-Thirring effect with an accuracy of about 2-3% and to provide other basic tests of general relativity and gravitation.

  4. Development of a Coherent Differential Absorption Lidar for Range Resolved Atmospheric CO2 Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulgueta; Chen, Songsheng; Bai, Yingxin; Petzar, Paul J.; Trieu, Bo. C.; Koch, Grady J.; Beyon, Jeffery J.; Singh, Upendra N.

    2010-01-01

    A pulsed, 2-m coherent Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) / Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) transceiver, developed under the Laser Risk Reduction Program (LRRP) at NASA, is integrated into a fully functional lidar instrument. This instrument will measure atmospheric CO2 profiles (by DIAL) initially from a ground platform, and then be prepared for aircraft installation to measure the atmospheric CO2 column densities in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) and lower troposphere. The airborne prototype CO2 lidar can measure atmospheric CO2 column density in a range bin of 1km with better than 1.5% precision at horizontal resolution of less than 50km. It can provide the image of the pooling of CO2 in lowlying areas and performs nighttime mass balance measurements at landscape scale. This sensor is unique in its capability to study the vertical ABL-free troposphere exchange of CO2 directly. It will allow the investigators to pursue subsequent in science-driven deployments, and provides a unique tool for Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Night, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) validation that was strongly advocated in the recent ASCENDS Workshop.

  5. Measurement of peak impact loads differ between accelerometers - Effects of system operating range and sampling rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziebart, Christina; Giangregorio, Lora M; Gibbs, Jenna C; Levine, Iris C; Tung, James; Laing, Andrew C

    2017-06-14

    A wide variety of accelerometer systems, with differing sensor characteristics, are used to detect impact loading during physical activities. The study examined the effects of system characteristics on measured peak impact loading during a variety of activities by comparing outputs from three separate accelerometer systems, and by assessing the influence of simulated reductions in operating range and sampling rate. Twelve healthy young adults performed seven tasks (vertical jump, box drop, heel drop, and bilateral single leg and lateral jumps) while simultaneously wearing three tri-axial accelerometers including a criterion standard laboratory-grade unit (Endevco 7267A) and two systems primarily used for activity-monitoring (ActiGraph GT3X+, GCDC X6-2mini). Peak acceleration (gmax) was compared across accelerometers, and errors resulting from down-sampling (from 640 to 100Hz) and range-limiting (to ±6g) the criterion standard output were characterized. The Actigraph activity-monitoring accelerometer underestimated gmax by an average of 30.2%; underestimation by the X6-2mini was not significant. Underestimation error was greater for tasks with greater impact magnitudes. gmax was underestimated when the criterion standard signal was down-sampled (by an average of 11%), range limited (by 11%), and by combined down-sampling and range-limiting (by 18%). These effects explained 89% of the variance in gmax error for the Actigraph system. This study illustrates that both the type and intensity of activity should be considered when selecting an accelerometer for characterizing impact events. In addition, caution may be warranted when comparing impact magnitudes from studies that use different accelerometers, and when comparing accelerometer outputs to osteogenic impact thresholds proposed in literature. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Measurements of pulse rate using long-range imaging photoplethysmography and sunlight illumination outdoors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackford, Ethan B.; Estepp, Justin R.

    2017-02-01

    Imaging photoplethysmography, a method using imagers to record absorption variations caused by microvascular blood volume pulsations, shows promise as a non-contact cardiovascular sensing technology. The first long-range imaging photoplethysmography measurements at distances of 25, 50, and 100 meters from the participant was recently demonstrated. Degraded signal quality was observed with increasing imager-to-subject distances. The degradation in signal quality was hypothesized to be largely attributable to inadequate light return to the image sensor with increasing lens focal length. To test this hypothesis, a follow-up evaluation with 27 participants was conducted outdoors with natural sunlight illumination resulting in 5-33 times the illumination intensity. Video was recorded from cameras equipped with ultra-telephoto lenses and positioned at distances of 25, 50, 100, and 150 meters. The brighter illumination allowed high-definition video recordings at increased frame rates of 60fps, shorter exposure times, and lower ISO settings, leading to higher quality image formation than the previous indoor evaluation. Results were compared to simultaneous reference measurements from electrocardiography. Compared to the previous indoor study, we observed lower overall error in pulse rate measurement with the same pattern of degradation in signal quality with respect to increasing distance. This effect was corroborated by the signal-to-noise ratio of the blood volume pulse signal which also showed decreasing quality with respect to increasing distance. Finally, a popular chrominance-based method was compared to a blind source separation approach; while comparable in measurement of signal-to-noise ratio, we observed higher overall error in pulse rate measurement using the chrominance method in this data.

  7. At Home Photography-Based Method for Measuring Wrist Range of Motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trehan, Samir K; Rancy, Schneider K; Johnsen, Parker H; Hillstrom, Howard J; Lee, Steve K; Wolfe, Scott W

    2017-11-01

    Purpose  To determine the reliability of wrist range of motion (WROM) measurements based on digital photographs taken by patients at home compared with traditional measurements done in the office with a goniometer. Methods  Sixty-nine postoperative patients were enrolled in this study at least 3 months postoperatively. Active and passive wrist flexion/extension and radial/ulnar deviation were recorded by one of the two attending surgeons with a 1-degree resolution goniometer at the last postoperative office visit. Patients were provided an illustrated instruction sheet detailing how to take digital photographic images at home in six wrist positions (active and passive flexion/extension, and radial/ulnar deviation). Wrist position was measured from digital images by both the attending surgeons in a randomized, blinded fashion on two separate occasions greater than 2 weeks apart using the same goniometer. Reliability analysis was performed using the intraclass correlation coefficient to assess agreement between clinical and photography-based goniometry, as well as intra- and interobserver agreement. Results  Out of 69 enrolled patients, 30 (43%) patients sent digital images. Of the 180 digital photographs, only 9 (5%) were missing or deemed inadequate for WROM measurements. Agreement between clinical and photography-based measurements was "almost perfect" for passive wrist flexion/extension and "substantial" for active wrist flexion/extension and radial/ulnar deviation. Inter- and intraobserver agreement for the attending surgeons was "almost perfect" for all measurements. Discussion  This study validates a photography-based goniometry protocol allowing accurate and reliable WROM measurements without direct physician contact. Passive WROM was more accurately measured from photographs than active WROM. This study builds on previous photography-based goniometry literature by validating a protocol in which patients or their families take and submit their own

  8. Measurement of the extreme ankle range of motion required by female ballet dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Jeffrey A; Kruse, David W; Nevill, Alan M; Koutedakis, Yiannis; Wyon, Matthew A

    2010-12-01

    Female ballet dancers require extreme ankle motion, especially plantar flexion, but research about measuring such motion is lacking. The purposes of this study were to determine in a sample of ballet dancers whether non-weight-bearing ankle range of motion is significantly different from the weight-bearing equivalent and whether inclinometric plantar flexion measurement is a suitable substitute for standard plantar flexion goniometry. Fifteen female ballet dancers (5 university, 5 vocational, and 5 professional dancers; age 21 ± 3.0 years) volunteered. Subjects received 5 assessments on 1 ankle: non-weight-bearing goniometry dorsiflexion (NDF) and plantar flexion (NPF), weight-bearing goniometry in the ballet positions demi-plié (WDF) and en pointe (WPF), and non-weight-bearing plantar flexion inclinometry (IPF). Mean NDF was significantly lower than WDF (17° ± 1.3° vs 30° ± 1.8°, P ballet proficiency. The authors conclude that assessment of extreme ankle motion in female ballet dancers is challenging, and goniometry and inclinometry appear to measure plantar flexion differently.

  9. Accelerated ice-sheet mass loss in Antarctica from 18-year satellite laser ranging measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuanggen Jin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Accurate estimate of the ice-sheet mass balance in Antarctic is very difficult due to complex ice sheet condition and sparse in situ measurements. In this paper, the low-degree gravity field coefficients of up to degree and order 5 derived from Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR measurements are used to determine the ice mass variations in Antarctica for the period 1993–2011. Results show that the ice mass is losing with -36±13 Gt/y in Antarctica, -42±11 Gt/y in the West Antarctica and 6±10 Gt/y in the East Antarctica from 1993 to 2011. The ice mass variations from the SLR 5×5 have a good agreement with the GRACE 5×5, GRACE 5×5 (1&2 and GRACE (60×60 for the entire continent since 2003, but degree 5 from SLR is not sufficient to quantify ice losses in West and East Antarctica, respectively. The rate of ice loss in Antarctica is -28±17 Gt/y for 1993-2002 and -55±17 Gt/y for 2003-2011, indicating significant accelerated ice mass losses since 2003. Furthermore, the results from SLR are comparable with GRACE measurements.

  10. Accurate Measurements of Aerosol Hygroscopic Growth over a Wide Range in Relative Humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovelli, Grazia; Miles, Rachael E H; Reid, Jonathan P; Clegg, Simon L

    2016-06-30

    Using a comparative evaporation kinetics approach, we describe a new and accurate method for determining the equilibrium hygroscopic growth of aerosol droplets. The time-evolving size of an aqueous droplet, as it evaporates to a steady size and composition that is in equilibrium with the gas phase relative humidity, is used to determine the time-dependent mass flux of water, yielding information on the vapor pressure of water above the droplet surface at every instant in time. Accurate characterization of the gas phase relative humidity is provided from a control measurement of the evaporation profile of a droplet of know equilibrium properties, either a pure water droplet or a sodium chloride droplet. In combination, and by comparison with simulations that account for both the heat and mass transport governing the droplet evaporation kinetics, these measurements allow accurate retrieval of the equilibrium properties of the solution droplet (i.e., the variations with water activity in the mass fraction of solute, diameter growth factor, osmotic coefficient or number of water molecules per solute molecule). Hygroscopicity measurements can be made over a wide range in water activity (from >0.99 to, in principle, 0.9 and ∼±1% below 80% RH, and maximum uncertainties in diameter growth factor of ±0.7%. For all of the inorganic systems examined, the time-dependent data are consistent with large values of the mass accommodation (or evaporation) coefficient (>0.1).

  11. Realization of High Dynamic Range Imaging in the GLORIA Network and Its Effect on Astronomical Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislav Vítek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Citizen science project GLORIA (GLObal Robotic-telescopes Intelligent Array is a first free- and open-access network of robotic telescopes in the world. It provides a web-based environment where users can do research in astronomy by observing with robotic telescopes and/or by analyzing data that other users have acquired with GLORIA or from other free-access databases. Network of 17 telescopes allows users to control selected telescopes in real time or schedule any more demanding observation. This paper deals with new opportunity that GLORIA project provides to teachers and students of various levels of education. At the moment, there are prepared educational materials related to events like Sun eclipse (measuring local atmosphere changes, Aurora Borealis (calculation of Northern Lights height, or transit of Venus (measurement of the Earth-Sun distance. Student should be able to learn principles of CCD imaging, spectral analysis, basic calibration like dark frames subtraction, or advanced methods of noise suppression. Every user of the network can design his own experiment. We propose advanced experiment aimed at obtaining astronomical image data with high dynamic range. We also introduce methods of objective image quality evaluation in order to discover how HDR methods are affecting astronomical measurements.

  12. Respiration rate of stream insects measured in situ along a large altitude range

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostgaard, S.; Jacobsen, D.

    2005-01-01

    conditions in streams from 400 to 3800 m above sea level in tropical Ecuador. Mean active respiration rates of the animals at 3800 m were approximately half of those at 400 m. Trichoptera showed a slightly larger difference in respiration with altitude than Ephemeroptera. Comparative respiration measurements...... at 100 and 50% oxygen saturation indicated that highland animals reduced their oxygen uptake more than their counterparts in the lowland when oxygen availability decreased. The temperature response of respiration calculated between the insect assemblages at different altitudes showed a mean assemblage Q...... to temperature in tropical streams is probably due to full acclimatization of the component species to stable and narrow temperature ranges. Adaptations to the low oxygen availability at high altitude probably consist of a suite of genetic physiological and behavioural features....

  13. OPO DIAL lidar for remote measurements of atmospheric gases in the IR range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanovskii, O. A.; Kharchenko, O. V.; Shumskii, V. K.; Sadovnikov, S. A.; Yakovlev, S. V.

    2016-05-01

    Applicability of a KTA crystal-based laser system with optical parametric oscillators (OPO) generation to lidar sounding of the atmosphere in the spectral range 3-4 μm is studied in this work. A technique developed for lidar sounding of trace atmospheric gases (TAG) is based on differential absorption lidar (DIAL) method and differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS). The new technique uses broadband radiation and a CCD detector, which ensures measurement of backscattering signals with simultaneous altitude and wavelength resolution. The DIAL-DOAS technique is tested to estimate its efficiency for lidar sounding of atmospheric trace gases. The numerical simulation performed shows that a KTA-based OPO laser is a promising source of radiation for remote DIAL-DOAS sounding of the TAGs under study along surface tropospheric paths. The laser system design provides a possibility of narrowing the laser line within the 0.01-5 cm-1 limits. This possible improvement along with a small step of laser line tuning and the presence of absorption lines of other atmospheric gases, including atmospheric pollutants, in the spectral range under study make this laser a unique instrument for atmospheric sounding.

  14. Design Optimization for the Measurement Accuracy Improvement of a Large Range Nanopositioning Stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Torralba

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Both an accurate machine design and an adequate metrology loop definition are critical factors when precision positioning represents a key issue for the final system performance. This article discusses the error budget methodology as an advantageous technique to improve the measurement accuracy of a 2D-long range stage during its design phase. The nanopositioning platform NanoPla is here presented. Its specifications, e.g., XY-travel range of 50 mm × 50 mm and sub-micrometric accuracy; and some novel designed solutions, e.g., a three-layer and two-stage architecture are described. Once defined the prototype, an error analysis is performed to propose improvement design features. Then, the metrology loop of the system is mathematically modelled to define the propagation of the different sources. Several simplifications and design hypothesis are justified and validated, including the assumption of rigid body behavior, which is demonstrated after a finite element analysis verification. The different error sources and their estimated contributions are enumerated in order to conclude with the final error values obtained from the error budget. The measurement deviations obtained demonstrate the important influence of the working environmental conditions, the flatness error of the plane mirror reflectors and the accurate manufacture and assembly of the components forming the metrological loop. Thus, a temperature control of ±0.1 °C results in an acceptable maximum positioning error for the developed NanoPla stage, i.e., 41 nm, 36 nm and 48 nm in X-, Y- and Z-axis, respectively.

  15. Volume of sputum to detect acid-fast bacilli as a measure of quality for the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis at the Dr George Mukhari Hospital, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iqbal Rashid

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Optimum sputum results for acid-fast bacilli (AFB microscopy are linked to a sputum quantity of at least 5.0 mL. This study was aimed at establishing the effect of sputum quantity in the pick-up rate of AFB microscopy by comparing sputum samples of 5.0 mL and 2.0 mL.Methods: An analytical cross-sectional study was carried out at the Dr George Mukhari Hospital (DGMH in Pretoria, South Africa, from 05 January 2007 to 04 January 2008.Two sputum samples, 5.0 mL and 2.0 mL, were collected from each of the 330 adult PTB (pulmonary tuberculosis suspects. Fluorescence microscopy was used in the sputum analysis. The yield through microscopy of the 2.0 mL specimen versus the 5.0 mL specimen was compared and analysed, using culture results as the gold standard.Results: From a sample of 330 specimens, 77 tested AFB positive on microscopy. In the 5.0 mL samples, the sensitivity was 76.6% (95% CI, 66.0% – 84.7%, specificity 99.6% (95% CI 97.8% – 99.9%, positive predictive value (PV+ 98.3% (95% CI 91.1% – 99.7%, negative predictive value (PV- 93.3% (95% CI 89.7% – 95.7%, the likelihood ratio (LR for a positive microscopy 192 and the LR for a negative test was 0.23. In the 2.0 mL specimens, the sensitivity was 75.3% (95% CI 64.6% – 83.6%, specificity 99.2% (95% CI 97.1% – 99.8%, positive predictive value (PV+ 96.7% (95% CI 88.6% – 99.1%, negative predictive value (PV- 93.0% (95% CI 89.3% – 95.4%, the LR for a positive microscopy was 94 and 0.25 for a negative microscopy. There was a statistically significant association (p-value < 0.001 between the microscopy and culture tests in both the 5.0 mL and the 2.0 mL specimen categories. The strength of association between the microscopy and culture, as indicated by the kappa test was 0.83 and 0.81 in the 5.0 mL and 2.0 mL categories, respectively.Conclusion: Compared to the 2.0 mL specimen category, the yield for AFB microscopy in the 5.0 mL specimen category was consistently superior, as

  16. Gaia and VLT astrometry of faint stars: Precision of Gaia DR1 positions and updated VLT parallaxes of ultracool dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazorenko, P. F.; Sahlmann, J.

    2017-10-01

    Aims: We compared positions of the Gaia first data release (DR1) secondary data set at its faint limit with CCD positions of stars in 20 fields observed with the Very Large Telescope (VLT) FORS2. We aim at an independent verification of the DR1 astrometric precision taking advantage of the FORS2 position uncertainties which are smaller than one milli-arcsecond (mas). Methods: In the fields that we observed with FORS2, we projected the Gaia DR1 positions into the CCD plane, performed a polynomial fit between the two sets of matching stars, and carried out statistical analyses of the residuals in positions. Results: The residual root mean square (rms) roughly matches the expectations given by the Gaia DR1 uncertainties, where we identified three regimes in terms of Gaia DR1 precision: for G ≃ 17-20 stars we found that the formal DR1 position uncertainties of stars with DR1 precisions in the range of 0.5-5 mas are underestimated by 63 ± 5%, whereas the DR1 uncertainties of stars in the range 7-10 mas are overestimated by a factor of two. For the best-measured and generally brighter G ≃ 16-18 stars with DR1 positional uncertainties of mas, we detected 0.44 ± 0.13 mas excess noise in the residual rms, whose origin could be in both FORS2 and Gaia DR1. By adopting Gaia DR1 as the absolute reference frame, we refined the pixel scale determination of FORS2,leading to minor updates to the parallaxes of 20 ultracool dwarfs that we published previously. We also updated the FORS2 absolute parallax of the Luhman 16 binary brown dwarf system to 501.42 ± 0.11 mas. Based on observations made with ESO telescopes at the La Silla Paranal Observatory under programme IDs 086.C-0680, 087.C-0567, 088.C-0679, 089.C-0397, and 090.C-0786.

  17. Higher measured than modeled ozone production at increased NOx levels in the Colorado Front Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baier, Bianca C.; Brune, William H.; Miller, David O.; Blake, Donald; Long, Russell; Wisthaler, Armin; Cantrell, Christopher; Fried, Alan; Heikes, Brian; Brown, Steven; McDuffie, Erin; Flocke, Frank; Apel, Eric; Kaser, Lisa; Weinheimer, Andrew

    2017-09-01

    Chemical models must correctly calculate the ozone formation rate, P(O3), to accurately predict ozone levels and to test mitigation strategies. However, air quality models can have large uncertainties in P(O3) calculations, which can create uncertainties in ozone forecasts, especially during the summertime when P(O3) is high. One way to test mechanisms is to compare modeled P(O3) to direct measurements. During summer 2014, the Measurement of Ozone Production Sensor (MOPS) directly measured net P(O3) in Golden, CO, approximately 25 km west of Denver along the Colorado Front Range. Net P(O3) was compared to rates calculated by a photochemical box model that was constrained by measurements of other chemical species and that used a lumped chemical mechanism and a more explicit one. Median observed P(O3) was up to a factor of 2 higher than that modeled during early morning hours when nitric oxide (NO) levels were high and was similar to modeled P(O3) for the rest of the day. While all interferences and offsets in this new method are not fully understood, simulations of these possible uncertainties cannot explain the observed P(O3) behavior. Modeled and measured P(O3) and peroxy radical (HO2 and RO2) discrepancies observed here are similar to those presented in prior studies. While a missing atmospheric organic peroxy radical source from volatile organic compounds co-emitted with NO could be one plausible solution to the P(O3) discrepancy, such a source has not been identified and does not fully explain the peroxy radical model-data mismatch. If the MOPS accurately depicts atmospheric P(O3), then these results would imply that P(O3) in Golden, CO, would be NOx-sensitive for more of the day than what is calculated by models, extending the NOx-sensitive P(O3) regime from the afternoon further into the morning. These results could affect ozone reduction strategies for the region surrounding Golden and possibly other areas that do not comply with national ozone regulations

  18. Higher measured than modeled ozone production at increased NOx levels in the Colorado Front Range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. C. Baier

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Chemical models must correctly calculate the ozone formation rate, P(O3, to accurately predict ozone levels and to test mitigation strategies. However, air quality models can have large uncertainties in P(O3 calculations, which can create uncertainties in ozone forecasts, especially during the summertime when P(O3 is high. One way to test mechanisms is to compare modeled P(O3 to direct measurements. During summer 2014, the Measurement of Ozone Production Sensor (MOPS directly measured net P(O3 in Golden, CO, approximately 25 km west of Denver along the Colorado Front Range. Net P(O3 was compared to rates calculated by a photochemical box model that was constrained by measurements of other chemical species and that used a lumped chemical mechanism and a more explicit one. Median observed P(O3 was up to a factor of 2 higher than that modeled during early morning hours when nitric oxide (NO levels were high and was similar to modeled P(O3 for the rest of the day. While all interferences and offsets in this new method are not fully understood, simulations of these possible uncertainties cannot explain the observed P(O3 behavior. Modeled and measured P(O3 and peroxy radical (HO2 and RO2 discrepancies observed here are similar to those presented in prior studies. While a missing atmospheric organic peroxy radical source from volatile organic compounds co-emitted with NO could be one plausible solution to the P(O3 discrepancy, such a source has not been identified and does not fully explain the peroxy radical model–data mismatch. If the MOPS accurately depicts atmospheric P(O3, then these results would imply that P(O3 in Golden, CO, would be NOx-sensitive for more of the day than what is calculated by models, extending the NOx-sensitive P(O3 regime from the afternoon further into the morning. These results could affect ozone reduction strategies for the region surrounding Golden and possibly other areas that do not comply with national ozone

  19. Dr Stanislaw Huskowski, Mayor of Wroclaw, Poland

    CERN Document Server

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    Dr Stanislaw Huskowski, Mayor of Wroclaw, Poland visiting the ATLAS magnet assembly hall, building 180 with Mr Carlo Lamprecht, State Councillor, Dr Stanislaw Huskowski and Dr Peter Jenni, ATLAS Spokesperson

  20. Dr Stanislaw Huskowski, Mayor of Wroclaw, Poland

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    Dr Stanislaw Huskowski, Mayor of Wroclaw, Poland visiting the ATLAS magnet assembly hall, building 180. From l to r: Mr Carlo Lamprecht, State Councillor, Dr Stanislaw Huskowski and Dr Peter Jenni, ATLAS Spokesperson

  1. Objective Measurement of Fusional Vergence Ranges and Heterophoria in Infants and Preschool Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreenivasan, Vidhyapriya; Babinsky, Erin E.; Wu, Yifei; Candy, T. Rowan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Binocular alignment typically includes motor fusion compensating for heterophoria. This study evaluated heterophoria and then accommodation and vergence responses during measurement of fusional ranges in infants and preschoolers. Methods Purkinje image eye tracking and eccentric photorefraction (MCS PowerRefractor) were used to record the eye alignment and accommodation of uncorrected infants (n = 17; 3–5 months old), preschoolers (n = 19; 2.5–5 years), and naïve functionally emmetropic adults (n = 14; 20–32 years; spherical equivalent [SE], +1 to −1 diopters [D]). Heterophoria was derived from the difference between monocular and binocular alignments while participants viewed naturalistic images at 80 cm. The presence or absence of fusion was then assessed after base-in (BI) and base-out (BO) prisms (2–40 prism diopters [pd]) were introduced. Results Mean (±SD) SE refractions were hyperopic in infants (+2.4 ± 1.2 D) and preschoolers (+1.1 ± 0.6 D). The average exophoria was similar (P = 0.11) across groups (Infants, −0.79 ± 2.5 pd; Preschool, −2.43 ± 2.0 pd; Adults, −1.0 ± 2.7 pd). Mean fusional vergence range also was similar (P = 0.1) for BI (Infants, 11.2 ± 2.5 pd; Preschool, 8.8 ± 2.8 pd; Adults, 11.8 ± 5.2 pd) and BO (Infants, 14 ± 6.6 pd; Preschool, 15.3 ± 8.3 pd; Adults, 20 ± 9.2 pd). Maximum change in accommodation to the highest fusible prism was positive (increased accommodation) for BO (Infants, 1.69 ± 1.4 D; Preschool, 1.35 ± 1.6 D; Adults, 1.22 ± 1.0 D) and negative for BI (Infants, −0.96 ± 1.0 D; Preschool, −0.78 ± 0.6 D; Adults, −0.62 ± 0.3 D), with a similar magnitude across groups (BO, P = 0.6; BI, P = 0.4). Conclusions Despite typical uncorrected hyperopia, infants and preschoolers exhibited small exophorias at 80 cm, similar to adults. All participants demonstrated substantial fusional ranges, providing evidence that even 3- to 5-month-old infants can respond to a large range of image disparities

  2. Outlier Detection in GNSS Pseudo-Range/Doppler Measurements for Robust Localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zair, Salim; Le Hégarat-Mascle, Sylvie; Seignez, Emmanuel

    2016-04-22

    In urban areas or space-constrained environments with obstacles, vehicle localization using Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) data is hindered by Non-Line Of Sight (NLOS) and multipath receptions. These phenomena induce faulty data that disrupt the precise localization of the GNSS receiver. In this study, we detect the outliers among the observations, Pseudo-Range (PR) and/or Doppler measurements, and we evaluate how discarding them improves the localization. We specify a contrario modeling for GNSS raw data to derive an algorithm that partitions the dataset between inliers and outliers. Then, only the inlier data are considered in the localization process performed either through a classical Particle Filter (PF) or a Rao-Blackwellization (RB) approach. Both localization algorithms exclusively use GNSS data, but they differ by the way Doppler measurements are processed. An experiment has been performed with a GPS receiver aboard a vehicle. Results show that the proposed algorithms are able to detect the 'outliers' in the raw data while being robust to non-Gaussian noise and to intermittent satellite blockage. We compare the performance results achieved either estimating only PR outliers or estimating both PR and Doppler outliers. The best localization is achieved using the RB approach coupled with PR-Doppler outlier estimation.

  3. Reliability assessment of measuring active wrist pronation and supination range of motion with a smartphone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, C; Pauchard, N; Guilloteau, A

    2017-10-01

    This study aimed to improve clinical examination techniques by determining the reliability of different methods to evaluate forearm movements. Two methods using the iPhone™ 5 and its gyroscope application (alone [I5] or attached to a selfie stick [ISS]) were compared with two conventional measurement devices (a plastic goniometer with a hand-held pencil [HHP] and a bubble goniometer [BG]) to evaluate the active range of movement (AROM) of the wrist during pronation and supination. Two independent groups of subjects took part in this prospective single-center diagnostic study: 20 healthy subjects and 20 patients. The four evaluation methods had high intra-observer consistency after three measurements (intra-class correlation coefficient [ICC] [3, 1] of 0.916 for the HHP; 0.944 for ISS; 0.925 for BG; 0.933 for I5) and excellent inter-observer reliability (ICC [2, k] of 0.926 for HHP; 0.934 for ISS; 0.899 for BG; 0.894 for I5), with an agreement of plus or minus 2°. When these devices are used with rigorous methodology, they are reliable for the goniometric evaluation of AROM of wrist pronation and supination. Copyright © 2017 SFCM. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Outlier Detection in GNSS Pseudo-Range/Doppler Measurements for Robust Localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salim Zair

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In urban areas or space-constrained environments with obstacles, vehicle localization using Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS data is hindered by Non-Line Of Sight (NLOS and multipath receptions. These phenomena induce faulty data that disrupt the precise localization of the GNSS receiver. In this study, we detect the outliers among the observations, Pseudo-Range (PR and/or Doppler measurements, and we evaluate how discarding them improves the localization. We specify a contrario modeling for GNSS raw data to derive an algorithm that partitions the dataset between inliers and outliers. Then, only the inlier data are considered in the localization process performed either through a classical Particle Filter (PF or a Rao-Blackwellization (RB approach. Both localization algorithms exclusively use GNSS data, but they differ by the way Doppler measurements are processed. An experiment has been performed with a GPS receiver aboard a vehicle. Results show that the proposed algorithms are able to detect the ‘outliers’ in the raw data while being robust to non-Gaussian noise and to intermittent satellite blockage. We compare the performance results achieved either estimating only PR outliers or estimating both PR and Doppler outliers. The best localization is achieved using the RB approach coupled with PR-Doppler outlier estimation.

  5. Prototype system for proton beam range measurement based on gamma electron vertex imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Han Rim [Neutron Utilization Technology Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 111, Daedeok-daero 989beon-gil, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Hun; Park, Jong Hoon [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Hanyang University, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 04763 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Won Gyun [Heavy-ion Clinical Research Division, Korean Institute of Radiological & Medical Sciences, Seoul 01812 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Hansang [Department of Electronics Convergence Engineering, Kwangwoon University, Seoul 01897 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chan Hyeong, E-mail: chkim@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Hanyang University, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 04763 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-11

    In proton therapy, for both therapeutic effectiveness and patient safety, it is very important to accurately measure the proton dose distribution, especially the range of the proton beam. For this purpose, recently we proposed a new imaging method named gamma electron vertex imaging (GEVI), in which the prompt gammas emitting from the nuclear reactions of the proton beam in the patient are converted to electrons, and then the converted electrons are tracked to determine the vertices of the prompt gammas, thereby producing a 2D image of the vertices. In the present study, we developed a prototype GEVI system, including dedicated signal processing and data acquisition systems, which consists of a beryllium plate (= electron converter) to convert the prompt gammas to electrons, two double-sided silicon strip detectors (= hodoscopes) to determine the trajectories of those converted electrons, and a plastic scintillation detector (= calorimeter) to measure their kinetic energies. The system uses triple coincidence logic and multiple energy windows to select only the events from prompt gammas. The detectors of the prototype GEVI system were evaluated for electronic noise level, energy resolution, and time resolution. Finally, the imaging capability of the GEVI system was tested by imaging a {sup 90}Sr beta source, a {sup 60}Co gamma source, and a 45-MeV proton beam in a PMMA phantom. The overall results of the present study generally show that the prototype GEVI system can image the vertices of the prompt gammas produced by the proton nuclear interactions.

  6. How Dr. Pierce Promoted Himself

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of the Interior — This article is about Dr. Raymond V Pierce who owned St. Vincent Island before it became a refuge. The doctor painted advertisements for his famous “Woman’s Tonic”...

  7. Validity and reliability of using photography for measuring knee range of motion: a methodological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, Justine M; Ko, Victoria; Adie, Sam; Gaskin, Clive; Walker, Richard; Harris, Ian A; Mittal, Rajat

    2011-04-18

    The clinimetric properties of knee goniometry are essential to appreciate in light of its extensive use in the orthopaedic and rehabilitative communities. Intra-observer reliability is thought to be satisfactory, but the validity and inter-rater reliability of knee goniometry often demonstrate unacceptable levels of variation. This study tests the validity and reliability of measuring knee range of motion using goniometry and photographic records. Methodology study assessing the validity and reliability of one method ('Marker Method') which uses a skin marker over the greater trochanter and another method ('Line of Femur Method') which requires estimation of the line of femur. Radiology and orthopaedic departments of two teaching hospitals. 31 volunteers (13 arthritic and 18 healthy subjects). Knee range of motion was measured radiographically and photographically using a goniometer. Three assessors were assessed for reliability and validity. Agreement between methods and within raters was assessed using concordance correlation coefficient (CCCs). Agreement between raters was assessed using intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs). 95% limits of agreement for the mean difference for all paired comparisons were computed. Validity (referenced to radiographs): Each method for all 3 raters yielded very high CCCs for flexion (0.975 to 0.988), and moderate to substantial CCCs for extension angles (0.478 to 0.678). The mean differences and 95% limits of agreement were narrower for flexion than they were for extension. Intra-rater reliability: For flexion and extension, very high CCCs were attained for all 3 raters for both methods with slightly greater CCCs seen for flexion (CCCs varied from 0.981 to 0.998). Inter-rater reliability: For both methods, very high ICCs (min to max: 0.891 to 0.995) were obtained for flexion and extension. Slightly higher coefficients were obtained for flexion compared to extension, and with the Marker compared to the Line of Femur Method

  8. Cloud cover detection combining high dynamic range sky images and ceilometer measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Román, R.; Cazorla, A.; Toledano, C.; Olmo, F. J.; Cachorro, V. E.; de Frutos, A.; Alados-Arboledas, L.

    2017-11-01

    This paper presents a new algorithm for cloud detection based on high dynamic range images from a sky camera and ceilometer measurements. The algorithm is also able to detect the obstruction of the sun. This algorithm, called CPC (Camera Plus Ceilometer), is based on the assumption that under cloud-free conditions the sky field must show symmetry. The symmetry criteria are applied depending on ceilometer measurements of the cloud base height. CPC algorithm is applied in two Spanish locations (Granada and Valladolid). The performance of CPC retrieving the sun conditions (obstructed or unobstructed) is analyzed in detail using as reference pyranometer measurements at Granada. CPC retrievals are in agreement with those derived from the reference pyranometer in 85% of the cases (it seems that this agreement does not depend on aerosol size or optical depth). The agreement percentage goes down to only 48% when another algorithm, based on Red-Blue Ratio (RBR), is applied to the sky camera images. The retrieved cloud cover at Granada and Valladolid is compared with that registered by trained meteorological observers. CPC cloud cover is in agreement with the reference showing a slight overestimation and a mean absolute error around 1 okta. A major advantage of the CPC algorithm with respect to the RBR method is that the determined cloud cover is independent of aerosol properties. The RBR algorithm overestimates cloud cover for coarse aerosols and high loads. Cloud cover obtained only from ceilometer shows similar results than CPC algorithm; but the horizontal distribution cannot be obtained. In addition, it has been observed that under quick and strong changes on cloud cover ceilometers retrieve a cloud cover fitting worse with the real cloud cover.

  9. Decommissioning of DR 1, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauridsen, Kurt

    2006-01-15

    The report describes the decommissioning activities carried out at the 2kW homogeneous reactor DR 1 at Risoe National Laboratory. The decommissioning work took place from summer 2004 until late autumn 2005. The components with the highest activity, the core vessel the recombiner and the piping and valves connected to these, were dismantled first by Danish Decommissioning's own technicians. Demolition of the control rod house and the biological shield as well as the removal of the floor in the reactor hall was carried out by an external demolition contractor. The building was emptied and left for other use. Clearance measurements of the building showed that radionuclide concentrations were everywhere below the clearance limit set by the Danish nuclear regulatory authorities. Furthermore, measurements on the surrounding area showed that there was no contamination that could be attributed to the operation and decommissioning of DR 1. (au)

  10. Comparison of linear gain and wide dynamic range compression hearing aid circuits: aided speech perception measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenstad, L M; Seewald, R C; Cornelisse, L E; Shantz, J

    1999-04-01

    The goal of this study was to test the theoretical advantages of a single-channel wide dynamic range compression (WDRC) circuit for speech intelligibility and loudness comfort for five speech spectra. Twelve adolescents and young adults with moderate to severe hearing loss were fitted with the Siemens Viva 2 Pro behind-the-ear instrument set to DSL 4.0 targets for both linear gain and WDRC processing. Speech intelligibility was measured in the unaided, linear gain and WDRC conditions using two tasks in quiet: nonsense words and sentences. The items were digitally filtered to represent five speech spectra: average speech at 4 m, average speech at 1 m, own voice at ear level, classroom at 1 m, and shouted speech at 1 m. The subjects also rated the loudness of each hearing aid/speech spectrum combination using a categorical rating scale. Both the linear gain and WDRC settings provided improved speech recognition relative to the unaided condition, and the two circuits resulted in equivalent performance for average speech input levels. On average, the WDRC aid resulted in high and uniform speech recognition scores across the five spectra. In contrast, the linear gain aid resulted in a lower recognition score for soft speech and shouted speech relative to that obtained with an average speech level. Analysis of individual speech recognition benefit scores revealed that 11 out of 12 subjects had equal or greater performance with the WDRC processing than the linear processing. Subjective loudness ratings in the linear gain condition were compatible with decreased sensation level for soft speech and loudness discomfort for shouted speech. WDRC processing has potential applications in hearing aid fittings for listeners with moderate to severe hearing loss because it provides a consistently audible and comfortable signal across a wide range of listening conditions in quiet without the need for volume control adjustments.

  11. 40 CFR Table C-1 to Subpart C of... - Test Concentration Ranges, Number of Measurements Required, and Maximum Discrepancy Specification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Test Concentration Ranges, Number of... Reference Methods Pt. 53, Subpt. C, Table C-1 Table C-1 to Subpart C of Part 53—Test Concentration Ranges, Number of Measurements Required, and Maximum Discrepancy Specification Pollutant Concentration range...

  12. MeV-range velocity-space tomography from gamma-ray and neutron emission spectrometry measurements at JET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salewski, Mirko; Nocente, M.; Jacobsen, Asger Schou

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate the measurement of a 2D MeV-range ion velocity distribution function by velocity-space tomography at JET. Deuterium ions were accelerated into the MeV-range by third harmonic ion cyclotron resonance heating. We made measurements with three neutron emission spectrometers and a high-...

  13. Mobile Robot Self-Localization by Matching Range Maps Using a Hausdorff Measure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, C. F.

    1997-01-01

    This paper examines techniques for a mobile robot to perform self-localization in natural terrain by comparing a dense range map computed from stereo imagery to a range map in a known frame of reference.

  14. An intercomparison of POLARIS measurement results from the DTU-ESA Facility and from the ESTEC Near-Field Range

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pivnenko, Sergey; Breinbjerg, Olav

    This report documents an intercomparison of measurement results of the POLARIS antenna from measurement at the DTU-ESA Spherical Near-Field Antenna Test Facility in August 2011 and from measurement at the ESTEC Near-Field Range in the fall 2012. The comparison was carried out at the DTU-ESA Facil......This report documents an intercomparison of measurement results of the POLARIS antenna from measurement at the DTU-ESA Spherical Near-Field Antenna Test Facility in August 2011 and from measurement at the ESTEC Near-Field Range in the fall 2012. The comparison was carried out at the DTU...

  15. Measurement of a wide-range of X-ray doses using specialty doped silica fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Sani, S. F.; Hammond, R.; Jafari, S. M.; Wahab, Norfadira; Amouzad Mahdiraji, G.; Siti Shafiqah, A. S.; Abdul Rashid, H. A.; Maah, M. J.; Aldousari, H.; Alkhorayef, M.; Alzimami, M.; Bradley, D. A.

    2017-08-01

    Using six types of tailor-made doped optical fibres, we carry out thermoluminescent (TL) studies of X-rays, investigating the TL yield for doses from 20 mGy through to 50 Gy. Dosimetric parameters were investigated for nominal 8 wt% Ge doped fibres that in two cases were co-doped, using B in one case and Br in the other. A comparative measurement of surface analysis has also been made for non-annealed and annealed capillary fibres, use being made of X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. Comparison was made with the conventional TL phosphor LiF in the form of the proprietary product TLD-100, including dose response and glow curves investigated for X-rays generated at 60 kVp over a dose range from 2 cGy to 50 Gy. The energy response of the fibres was also performed for X-rays generated at peak accelerating potentials of 80 kVp, 140 kVp, 250 kVp and 6 MV photons for an absorbed dose of 2 Gy. Present results show the samples to be suitable for use as TL dosimeters, with good linearity of response and a simple glow curve (simple trap) distribution. It has been established that the TL performance of an irradiated fibre is not only influenced by radiation parameters such as energy, dose-rate and total dose but also the type of fibre.

  16. Airborne Dust Cloud Measurements at the INL National Security Test Range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael L. Abbott; Norm Stanley; Larry Radke; Charles Smeltzer

    2007-09-01

    On July 11, 2007, a surface, high-explosive test (<20,000 lb TNT-equivalent) was carried out at the National Security Test Range (NSTR) on the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site. Aircraft-mounted rapid response (1-sec) particulate monitors were used to measure airborne PM-10 concentrations directly in the dust cloud and to develop a PM-10 emission factor that could be used for subsequent tests at the NSTR. The blast produced a mushroom-like dust cloud that rose approximately 2,500–3,000 ft above ground level, which quickly dissipated (within 5 miles of the source). In general, the cloud was smaller and less persistence than expected, or that might occur in other areas, likely due to the coarse sand and subsurface conditions that characterize the immediate NSTR area. Maximum short time-averaged (1-sec) PM-10 concentrations at the center of the cloud immediately after the event reached 421 µg m-3 but were rapidly reduced (by atmospheric dispersion and fallout) to near background levels (~10 µg m-3) after about 15 minutes. This occurred well within the INL Site boundary, about 8 km (5 miles) from the NSTR source. These findings demonstrate that maximum concentrations in ambient air beyond the INL Site boundary (closest is 11.2 km from NSTR) from these types of tests would be well within the 150 µg m-3 24-hour National Ambient Air Quality Standards for PM-10. Aircraft measurements and geostatistical techniques were used to successfully quantify the initial volume (1.64E+9 m3 or 1.64 km3) and mass (250 kg) of the PM-10 dust cloud, and a PM-10 emission factor (20 kg m-3 crater soil volume) was developed for this specific type of event at NSTR. The 250 kg of PM-10 mass estimated from this experiment is almost seven-times higher than the 36 kg estimated for the environmental assessment (DOE-ID 2007) using available Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 1995) emission factors. This experiment demonstrated that advanced aircraft-mounted instruments operated by

  17. Validity and reliability of using photography for measuring knee range of motion: a methodological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adie Sam

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The clinimetric properties of knee goniometry are essential to appreciate in light of its extensive use in the orthopaedic and rehabilitative communities. Intra-observer reliability is thought to be satisfactory, but the validity and inter-rater reliability of knee goniometry often demonstrate unacceptable levels of variation. This study tests the validity and reliability of measuring knee range of motion using goniometry and photographic records. Methods Design: Methodology study assessing the validity and reliability of one method ('Marker Method' which uses a skin marker over the greater trochanter and another method ('Line of Femur Method' which requires estimation of the line of femur. Setting: Radiology and orthopaedic departments of two teaching hospitals. Participants: 31 volunteers (13 arthritic and 18 healthy subjects. Knee range of motion was measured radiographically and photographically using a goniometer. Three assessors were assessed for reliability and validity. Main outcomes: Agreement between methods and within raters was assessed using concordance correlation coefficient (CCCs. Agreement between raters was assessed using intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs. 95% limits of agreement for the mean difference for all paired comparisons were computed. Results Validity (referenced to radiographs: Each method for all 3 raters yielded very high CCCs for flexion (0.975 to 0.988, and moderate to substantial CCCs for extension angles (0.478 to 0.678. The mean differences and 95% limits of agreement were narrower for flexion than they were for extension. Intra-rater reliability: For flexion and extension, very high CCCs were attained for all 3 raters for both methods with slightly greater CCCs seen for flexion (CCCs varied from 0.981 to 0.998. Inter-rater reliability: For both methods, very high ICCs (min to max: 0.891 to 0.995 were obtained for flexion and extension. Slightly higher coefficients were obtained

  18. Drake Antarctic Agile Meteor Radar (DrAAMER) First Results: Configuration and Comparison of Mean and Tidal Wind and Gravity Wave Momentum Flux Measurements with SAAMER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritts, D. C.; Janches, D.; Iimura, H.; Hocking, W. K.; Bageston, J. V.; Pene, N. M.

    2011-01-01

    A new-generation meteor radar was installed at the Brazilian Antarctic Comandante Ferraz Base (62.1degS) in March 2010. This paper describes the motivations for the radar location, its measurement capabilities, and comparisons of measured mean winds, tides, and gravity wave momentum fluxes from April to June of 2010 and 2011 with those by a similar radar on Tierra del Fuego (53.8degS). Motivations for the radars include the "hotspot" of small-scale gravity wave activity extending from the troposphere into the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) centered over the Drake Passage, the maximum of the semidiurnal tide at these latitudes, and the lack of other MLT wind measurements in this latitude band. Mean winds are seen to be strongly modulated at planetary wave and longer periods and to exhibit strong coherence over the two radars at shorter time scales as well as systematic seasonal variations. The semidiurnal tide contribute most to the large-scale winds over both radars, with maximum tidal amplitudes during May and maxima at the highest altitudes varying from approx.20 to >70 m/s. In contrast, the diurnal tide and various planetary waves achieve maximum winds of approx.10 to 20 m/s. Monthly-mean gravity wave momentum fluxes appear to reflect the occurrence of significant sources at lower altitudes, with relatively small zonal fluxes over both radars, but with significant, and opposite, meridional momentum fluxes below approx.85 km. These suggest gravity waves propagating away from the Drake Passage at both sites, and may indicate an important source region accounting in part for this "hotspot".

  19. Photon Pressure Force on Space Debris TOPEX/Poseidon Measured by Satellite Laser Ranging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucharski, D.; Kirchner, G.; Bennett, J. C.; Lachut, M.; Sośnica, K.; Koshkin, N.; Shakun, L.; Koidl, F.; Steindorfer, M.; Wang, P.; Fan, C.; Han, X.; Grunwaldt, L.; Wilkinson, M.; Rodríguez, J.; Bianco, G.; Vespe, F.; Catalán, M.; Salmins, K.; del Pino, J. R.; Lim, H.-C.; Park, E.; Moore, C.; Lejba, P.; Suchodolski, T.

    2017-10-01

    The (TOPography EXperiment) TOPEX/Poseidon (T/P) altimetry mission operated for 13 years before the satellite was decommissioned in January 2006, becoming a large space debris object at an altitude of 1,340 km. Since the end of the mission, the interaction of T/P with the space environment has driven the satellite's spin dynamics. Satellite laser ranging (SLR) measurements collected from June 2014 to October 2016 allow for the satellite spin axis orientation to be determined with an accuracy of 1.7°. The spin axis coincides with the platform yaw axis (formerly pointing in the nadir direction) about which the body rotates in a counterclockwise direction. The combined photometric and SLR data collected over the 11 year time span indicates that T/P has continuously gained rotational energy at an average rate of 2.87 J/d and spins with a period of 10.73 s as of 19 October 2016. The satellite attitude model shows a variation of the cross-sectional area in the Sun direction between 8.2 m2 and 34 m2. The direct solar radiation pressure is the main factor responsible for the spin-up of the body, and the exerted photon force varies from 65 μN to 228 μN around the mean value of 138.6 μN. Including realistic surface force modeling in orbit propagation algorithms will improve the prediction accuracy, giving better conjunction warnings for scenarios like the recent close approach reported by the ILRS Space Debris Study Group—an approximate 400 m flyby between T/P and Jason-2 on 20 June 2017.

  20. Inflammatory challenge increases measures of oxidative stress in a free-ranging, long-lived mammal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneeberger, Karin; Czirják, Gábor Á; Voigt, Christian C

    2013-12-15

    Oxidative stress - the imbalance between reactive oxygen species (ROS) and neutralising antioxidants - has been under debate as the main cause of ageing in aerobial organisms. The level of ROS should increase during infection as part of the activation of an immune response, leading to oxidative damage to proteins, lipids and DNA. Yet, it is unknown how long-lived organisms, especially mammals, cope with oxidative stress. Bats are known to carry a variety of zoonotic pathogens and at the same time are, despite their high mass-specific basal metabolic rate, unusually long lived, which may be partly the result of low oxidative damage of organs. Here, we asked whether an immune challenge causes oxidative stress in free-ranging bats, measuring two oxidative stress markers. We injected 20 short-tailed fruit bats (Carollia perspicillata) with bacterially derived lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and 20 individuals with phosphate-buffered saline solution (PBS) as a control. Individuals injected with LPS showed an immune reaction by increased white blood cell count after 24 h, whereas there was no significant change in leukocyte count in control animals. The biological antioxidant potential (BAP) remained the same in both groups, but reactive oxygen metabolites (ROMs) increased after treatment with LPS, indicating a significant increase in oxidative stress in animals when mounting an immune reaction toward the inflammatory challenge. Control individuals did not show a change in oxidative stress markers. We conclude that in a long-lived mammal, even high concentrations of antioxidants do not immediately neutralise free radicals produced during a cellular immune response. Thus, fighting an infection may lead to oxidative stress in bats.

  1. Tribute to Dr Jacques Rogge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bourgois, Jan G; Dumortier, Jasmien; Callewaert, Margot

    2017-01-01

    'A tribute to Dr J. Rogge' aims to systematically review muscle activity and muscle fatigue during sustained submaximal quasi-isometric knee extension exercise (hiking) related to Olympic dinghy sailing as a tribute to Dr Rogge's merits in the world of sports. Dr Jacques Rogge is not only the for...... muscle. Since maximal strength is an important determinant of neuromuscular fatigue during hiking, combined strength and endurance training should be incorporated in the training program of dinghy sailors.......% predicted by a higher maximal isometric quadriceps strength. Although useful in exercise testing, prediction of hiking endurance capacity based on the changes in surface EMG in thigh and trunk muscles during a hiking maintenance task is not reliable. This could probably be explained by the varying exercise...

  2. Wildlife speed cameras: measuring animal travel speed and day range using camera traps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rowcliffe, J.M.; Jansen, P.A.; Kays, R.; Kranstauber, B.; Carbone, C.

    2016-01-01

    Travel speed (average speed of travel while active) and day range (average speed over the daily activity cycle) are behavioural metrics that influence processes including energy use, foraging success, disease transmission and human-wildlife interactions, and which can therefore be applied to a range

  3. Investigation of hopped frequency waveforms for range and velocity measurements of radar targets

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kathree, U

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In the field of radar, High Range Resolution (HRR) profiles are often used to improve target tracking accuracy in range and to allow the radar system to produce an image of an object using techniques such as inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR...

  4. Determination of plant growth rate and growth temperature range from measurement of physiological parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. S. Criddle; B. N. Smith; L. D. Hansen; J. N. Church

    2001-01-01

    Many factors influence species range and diversity, but temperature and temperature variability are always major global determinants, irrespective of local constraints. On a global scale, the ranges of many taxa have been observed to increase and their diversity decrease with increasing latitude. On a local scale, gradients in species distribution are observable with...

  5. Dr. von Braun With Management Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    1961-01-01

    Dr. von Braun is shown in this photograph, which was probably taken in the early 1960s, with members of his management team. Pictured from left to right are, Werner Kuers, Director of the Manufacturing Engineering Division; Dr. Walter Haeussermarn, Director of the Astrionics Division; Dr. William Mrazek, Propulsion and Vehicle Engineering Division; Dr. von Braun; Dieter Grau, Director of the Quality Assurance Division; Dr. Oswald Lange, Director of the Saturn Systems Office; and Erich Neubert , Associate Deputy Director for Research and Development.

  6. Evaluation of knee range of motion: Correlation between measurements using a universal goniometer and a smartphone goniometric application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Rafael Aparecido; Derhon, Viviane; Brandalize, Michelle; Brandalize, Danielle; Rossi, Luciano Pavan

    2017-07-01

    Goniometers are commonly used to measure range of motion in the musculoskeletal system. Recently smartphone goniometry applications have become available to clinicians. Compare angular measures using a universal goniometer and a smartphone application. Thirty four healthy women with at least 20° of limited range of motion regarding knee extension were recruited. Knee flexion angles of the dominant limb were measured with a universal goniometer and the ROM(©) goniometric application for the smartphone. Three trained examiners compared the two assessment tools. Strong correlations were found between the measures of the universal goniometer and smartphone application (Pearson's correlation and interclass correlation coefficient > 0.93). The measurements with both devices demonstrated low dispersion and little variation. Measurements obtained using the smartphone goniometric application analyzed are as reliable as those of a universal goniometer. This application is therefore a useful tool for the evaluation of knee range of motion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Precise Gravity Measurements for Lunar Laser Ranging at Apache Point Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossley, D. J.; Murphy, T.; Boy, J.; De Linage, C.; Wheeler, R. D.; Krauterbluth, K.

    2012-12-01

    Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) at Apache Point Observatory began in 2006 under the APOLLO project using a 3.5 m telescope on a 2780 m summit in New Mexico. Recent improvements in the technical operations are producing uncertainties at the few-mm level in the 1.5 x 10^13 cm separation of the solar orbits of the Earth and Moon. This level of sensitivity permits a number of important aspects of gravitational theory to be tested. Among these is the Equivalence Principle that determines the universality of free fall, tests of the time variation of the Gravitational Constant G, deviations from the inverse square law, and preferred frame effects. In 2009 APOLLO installed a superconducting gravimeter (SG) on the concrete pier under the main telescope to further constrain the deformation of the site as part of an initiative to improve all aspects of the modeling process. We have analyzed more than 3 years of high quality SG data that provides unmatched accuracy in determining the local tidal gravimetric factors for the solid Earth and ocean tide loading. With on-site gravity we have direct measurements of signals such as polar motion, and can compute global atmospheric and hydrological loading for the site using GLDAS and local hydrology models that are compared with the SG observations. We also compare the SG residuals with satellite estimates of seasonal ground gravity variations from the GRACE mission. Apache Point is visited regularly by a team from the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency to provide absolute gravity values for the calibration of the SG and to determine secular gravity changes. Nearby GPS location P027 provides continuous position information from the Plate Boundary Observatory of Earthscope that is used to correlate gravity/height variations at the site. Unusual aspects of the data processing include corrections for the telescope azimuth that appear as small offsets at the 1 μGal level and can be removed by correlating the azimuth data with the SG

  8. A hydrogel based nanosensor with an unprecedented broad sensitivity range for pH measurements in cellular compartments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, M.; Søndergaard, Rikke Vicki; Ek, Pramod Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Optical pH nanosensors have been applied for monitoring intracellular pH in real-time for about two decades. However, the pH sensitivity range of most nanosensors is too narrow, and measurements that are on the borderline of this range may not be correct. Furthermore, ratiometric measurements...... of acidic intracellular pH (pH nanosensors. In this paper we successfully developed a multiple sensor, a fluorophore based nanosensor, with an unprecedented broad measurement range from pH 1.4 to 7.0. In this nanosensor, three p......H-sensitive fluorophores (difluoro-Oregon Green, Oregon Green 488, and fluorescein) and one pH-insensitive fluorophore (Alexa 568) were covalently incorporated into a nanoparticle hydrogel matrix. With this broad range quadruple-labelled nanosensor all physiological relevant pH levels in living cells can be measured...

  9. Submillimeter-Wave Polarimetric Compact Ranges for Scale-Model Radar Measurements

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Coulombe, Michael J; Waldman, Jerry; Giles, R. H; Gatesman, Andrew J; Goyette, Thomas M; Nixon, William

    2002-01-01

    .... A dielectric material fabrication and characterization capability has also been developed to fabricate custom anechoic materials for the ranges as well as scaled dielectric parts for the models and clutter scenes...

  10. DR. MIKA MAJALE MEMORIAL LECTURE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    tuberculosis and polio. The first indigenous orthopaedic surgeon was. Dr. Mika Majale. ... but was posted to Kisii then Mombasa where he spent all his orthopaedic life. The other orthopaedic surgeons were in .... dissertations done by some of the post graduate students are excellent, but they are simply left in the hard cover.

  11. Anand Kumar, Dr Trichnopoly Chelvaraj

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1981 Section: Animal Sciences. Anand Kumar, Dr Trichnopoly Chelvaraj Ph.D. (Rajasthan), D.Sc. (Mumbai). Date of birth: 18 June 1936. Date of death: 26 January 2010. Specialization: Human Reproduction Last known address: Chairman, Hope Infertility Clinic & Research Foundation, 33/1, Aga Abbas Ali Road, ...

  12. Anandavardhanan, Dr U.K.

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship; Associateship. Associate Profile. Period: 2007–2010. Anandavardhanan, Dr U.K.. Date of birth: 25 May 1976. Address during Associateship: Department of Mathematics, Indian Institute of Technology, Powai, Mumbai - 400 076. Contact: Email: anand@math.iitb.ac.in. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  13. Dr. John Marburger visits DESY

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Dr. John Marburger, Director of the United States Office of Science and Technology Policy, visited the research center DESY in Hamburg. The American physicist wanted to inform himself about the status of the TESLA X-ray laser and the TESLA linear collider as well as the international collaboration at DESY (1/2 page).

  14. Shastry, Dr Sishta Venkata Seetharama

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1975 Section: Plant Sciences. Shastry, Dr Sishta Venkata Seetharama Ph.D. (Wisconsin), FNA. Date of birth: 4 November 1928. Specialization: Cytogenetics, Taxonomy, Plant Breeding and Rice Development Address: 'Ashoka', 204, Gautami Apartments, Barkatpura, Hyderabad 500 027, A.P.

  15. Beig, Dr Gufran-Ullah

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 2009 Section: Earth & Planetary Sciences. Beig, Dr Gufran-Ullah Ph.D. Ahmedabad. Date of birth: 24 May 1961. Specialization: Atmospheric Sciences, Global Change & Atmospheric Environment, Urban Air Pollution & Chemical-Climate Change, 2-D & 3-D Atmospheric Chemical Transport Modelling

  16. Ali, Dr Moizuddin Abdul Salim

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1975 Section: Animal Sciences. Ali, Dr Moizuddin Abdul Salim D.Sc. (Andhra), D.Sc. (h.c.), FNA. Date of birth: 12 November 1896. Date of death: 20 June 1987. Specialization: Ecology, Zoogeography, Nature Conservation, Ornithology Last known address: No. 46, Pali Hill, Bombay 400 050.

  17. Murty, Dr Thutupalli Gopala Krishna

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2002 Section: Engineering & Technology. Murty, Dr Thutupalli Gopala Krishna Ph.D. (Adelaide). Date of birth: 11 February 1944. Specialization: Optical Engineering, Thin Film Technology, Electro-Optical Instrumentation and Atmospheric Science Technologies Address: 848, 8th B Main, 17th Cross, ISRO Layout, ...

  18. In Memoriam Dr. M. Jacobs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalkman, C.

    1983-01-01

    Dr. Marius Jacobs, a senior staff member of the Rijksherbarium, died suddenly on 28 April 1983, following a heart attack some days earlier. He was only 53 years old and his death came as a great shock, not only to his colleagues at our institute. Jacobs was a many-sided man with interests in many

  19. Rao, Dr Kanury Venkata Subba

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rao, Dr Kanury Venkata Subba Ph.D. (Baroda), FNA, FNASc. Date of birth: 27 September 1958. Specialization: Synthetic Peptides, Cell Signalling, Biology of Tuberculosis Infection, Systems Biology Address: Head, DDRC, Translational Health Science & Technbology Institute, NCR Biotech, Science Cluster, Faridabad 121 ...

  20. Raghava, Dr Gajendra Pal Singh

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Raghava, Dr Gajendra Pal Singh Ph.D. (Chandigarh), FNASc. Date of birth: 25 May 1963. Specialization: Bioinformatics, Cancer Genomics, Immunoinformatics, Drug Design, Subunit Vaccine Design Address: Head, Centre for Computational Biology, Indraprastha Institute of Information Technology, Okhla, Phase 3, New ...

  1. Volume celebrating the 60th birthday of Professor Dr. Franz Fie; Professor Dr. Franz Fiedler zum 60. Geburtstag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beheng, K.D. [ed.

    1998-01-01

    This report was compiled in honor of Professor Dr. Franz Fiedler on the occasion of his 60th birthday on 7 January 1998. Its contributions deal with mesoscale modelling, the propagation of air pollutants, measurements of precipitation using radar, and prediction models. (orig./KW) [Deutsch] Dieser Bericht wurde aus Anlass des 60. Geburtstags von Herrn Prof. Dr. Franz Fiedler am 7. Januar 1998 zusammengestellt. Die Beitraege behandeln mesoskalige Modellierung, Ausbreitung von Luftschadstoffen, Niederschlagsmessung mit Radar und Vorhersagemodelle. (orig.)

  2. Validation of an in-vivo proton beam range check method in an anthropomorphic pelvic phantom using dose measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentefour, El H; Tang, Shikui; Cascio, Ethan W; Testa, Mauro; Samuel, Deepak; Prieels, Damien; Gottschalk, Bernard; Lu, Hsiao-Ming

    2015-04-01

    In-vivo dosimetry and beam range verification in proton therapy could play significant role in proton treatment validation and improvements. In-vivo beam range verification, in particular, could enable new treatment techniques one of which could be the use of anterior fields for prostate treatment instead of opposed lateral fields as in current practice. This paper reports validation study of an in-vivo range verification method which can reduce the range uncertainty to submillimeter levels and potentially allow for in-vivo dosimetry. An anthropomorphic pelvic phantom is used to validate the clinical potential of the time-resolved dose method for range verification in the case of prostrate treatment using range modulated anterior proton beams. The method uses a 3 × 4 matrix of 1 mm diodes mounted in water balloon which are read by an ADC system at 100 kHz. The method is first validated against beam range measurements by dose extinction measurements. The validation is first completed in water phantom and then in pelvic phantom for both open field and treatment field configurations. Later, the beam range results are compared with the water equivalent path length (WEPL) values computed from the treatment planning system XIO. Beam range measurements from both time-resolved dose method and the dose extinction method agree with submillimeter precision in water phantom. For the pelvic phantom, when discarding two of the diodes that show sign of significant range mixing, the two methods agree with ±1 mm. Only a dose of 7 mGy is sufficient to achieve this result. The comparison to the computed WEPL by the treatment planning system (XIO) shows that XIO underestimates the protons beam range. Quantifying the exact XIO range underestimation depends on the strategy used to evaluate the WEPL results. To our best evaluation, XIO underestimates the treatment beam range between a minimum of 1.7% and maximum of 4.1%. Time-resolved dose measurement method satisfies the two basic

  3. Light detection and ranging measurements of wake dynamics. Part II: two-dimensional scanning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trujillo, Juan-José; Bingöl, Ferhat; Larsen, Gunner Chr.

    2011-01-01

    A nacelle-mounted lidar system pointing downstream has been used to measure wind turbine wake dynamics. The new measurement and data analysis techniques allow estimation of quasi-instantaneous wind fields in planes perpendicular to the rotor axis. A newly developed wake tracking procedure deliver...

  4. Inter and intra-rater reliability of mobile device goniometer in measuring lumbar flexion range of motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedekar, Nilima; Suryawanshi, Mayuri; Rairikar, Savita; Sancheti, Parag; Shyam, Ashok

    2014-01-01

    Evaluation of range of motion (ROM) is integral part of assessment of musculoskeletal system. This is required in health fitness and pathological conditions; also it is used as an objective outcome measure. Several methods are described to check spinal flexion range of motion. Different methods for measuring spine ranges have their advantages and disadvantages. Hence, a new device was introduced in this study using the method of dual inclinometer to measure lumbar spine flexion range of motion (ROM). To determine Intra and Inter-rater reliability of mobile device goniometer in measuring lumbar flexion range of motion. iPod mobile device with goniometer software was used. The part being measure i.e the back of the subject was suitably exposed. Subject was standing with feet shoulder width apart. Spinous process of second sacral vertebra S2 and T12 were located, these were used as the reference points and readings were taken. Three readings were taken for each: inter-rater reliability as well as the intra-rater reliability. Sufficient rest was given between each flexion movement. Intra-rater reliability using ICC was r=0.920 and inter-rater r=0.812 at CI 95%. Validity r=0.95. Mobile device goniometer has high intra-rater reliability. The inter-rater reliability was moderate. This device can be used to assess range of motion of spine flexion, representing uni-planar movement.

  5. Sensitivity analysis of nacelle lidar free stream wind speed measurements to wind-induction reconstruction model and lidar range configuration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Elin; Borraccino, Antoine; Meyer Forsting, Alexander Raul

    The sensitivity of nacelle lidar wind speed measurements to wind-induction models and lidar range configurations is studied using experimental data from the Nørrekær Enge (NKE) measurement campaign and simulated lidar data from Reynold-Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) aerodynamic computational fluid...

  6. Aerial low-frequency hearing in captive and free-ranging harbour seals (Phoca vitulina) measured using auditory brainstem responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lucke, K.; Hastie, Gordon D.; Ternes, Kerstin; McConnell, Bernie; Moss, Simon; Russell, Deborah J.F.; Weber, Heike; Janik, Vincent M.

    2016-01-01

    The hearing sensitivity of 18 free-ranging and 10 captive harbour seals (Phoca vitulina) to aerial sounds was measured in the presence of typical environmental noise through auditory brainstem response measurements. A focus was put on the comparative hearing sensitivity at low frequencies. Low-

  7. High dynamic range isotope ratio measurements using an analog electron multiplier

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Williams, P.; Lorinčík, Jan; Franzreb, K.; Herwig, R.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 1 (2013), s. 549-552 ISSN 0142-2421 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME 894 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : Isotope ratios * electron multiplier * dynamic range Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.393, year: 2013

  8. Reliability and Validity of Electro-Goniometric Range of Motion Measurements in Patients with Hand and Wrist Limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashardoust Tajali, Siamak; MacDermid, Joy C; Grewal, Ruby; Young, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Cross-sectional reliability and validity study. 1. To determine intrarater, interrater and inter instrument reliabilities and validity of two digital electro goniometry to measure active wrist/finger range of motions (ROMs) in patients with limited motion. 2. To determine intrarater and interrater reliabilities of digital goniometry to measure torques of PIP passive flexion of the index finger in patients with limited motion. The study was designed in a randomized block plan on 44 patients (24 women, 20 men) with limited wrist or hand motions. Two experienced raters measured active wrist ROMs, and active and passive index PIP flexion using two digital goniometers. All measures were repeated by one rater 2-5 days after the initial measurements. The reliability measures were analyzed using Intraclass Correlation Coefficients (ICCs) and the construct validity was determined by correlation coefficients analysis between sub measures of scores; patient rated pain and function (PRWE) and quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (quick DASH) scores. The intrarater, interrater and inter instrument reliabilities were high in most ROM measures (range 0.64-0.97) for both types of electro-goniometers. The 95% limit of agreements and Bland and Altman plots did not show progressive changes. There was a significant difference in force application between the raters when performing passive ROM measures for PIP index, but the same rater produced consistent force. Most of the NK and J-Tech ROM measures were moderately correlated with the patient rated pain and function scores (range 0.32-0.63).

  9. Ultrasonic Measurement of Body Fat as a Means of Assessing Body Condition in Free-Ranging Raccoons (Procyon lotor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth M. Stringer

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Assessment of body condition of free-ranging animals is important when evaluating population health and fitness. The following study used body condition scoring, ultrasound, and dissected physical measurement to assess fat stores in free-ranging raccoons (Procyon lotor. Measurements were taken of subcutaneous fat at interscapular, thoracolumbar, and lumbosacral paraspinal and ventral midline sites. These measurements were examined in relationship to body condition scores and body weight. The ultrasound technique accurately measured the subcutaneous fat of raccoons when compared to dissected physical measurement and yielded data that strongly correlated with both body condition score and body weight, with the ventral midline measurement most strongly correlated. This noninvasive method may be useful in conjunction with body condition score and body weight when assessing the nutritional status of raccoons and potentially other small carnivore species.

  10. Comparison of the measurement of heart rate in adult free-range chickens (Gallus domesticus) by auscultation and electrocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, C F; Gavaghan, B J; McSweeney, D; Powell, V; Lisle, A

    2014-12-01

    To compare the heart rates of adult free-range chickens (Gallus domesticus) measured by auscultation with a stethoscope with those measured simultaneously using electrocardiography (ECG). With each bird in a standing position, estimation of the heart rate was performed by placing a mark on paper for every 4 beats for roosters and 8 beats for hens as detected by auscultation over 30 s, while simultaneous ECG was performed. Heart rates measured by auscultation showed a high correlation (r = 0.97) with those measured by ECG. There was a high correlation between the heart rates of adult free-range chickens measured by auscultation with a stethoscope and those measured simultaneously using ECG. © 2014 Australian Veterinary Association.

  11. Microwave-range shielding effectiveness measurements using a dual vibrating intrinsic reverberation chamber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leferink, Frank Bernardus Johannes; Serra, Ramiro; Schipper, H.

    2012-01-01

    Reverberation chambers create a statistical uniformly distributed field which is very useful for reliable electromagnetic interference measurements. Another advantage of these chambers is the high field strength which can be generated compared to conventional test setups. A reverberation chamber

  12. Assessment of health status by molecular measures in adults ranging from middle-aged to old

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waaijer, M. E. C.; Westendorp, R. G. J.; Goldeck, D.

    2017-01-01

    substitution test and 15-picture learning test) with age and with cardiovascular or metabolic disease as a measure of the health status. These associations with age and health status were also tested for molecular measures (C reactive protein (CRP), numbers of senescent p16INK4a positive cells in the epidermis...... disease, as was epidermal p16INK4a positivity. All associations with cardiovascular or metabolic disease attenuated when adjusting for age. In conclusion, in middle-aged to old persons, the molecular measures tested here were more weakly associated with age and health status than functional capacity...... and dermis and putative immunosenescence (presence of CD57+ T cells)). All functional capacity measures were associated with age. CRP and epidermal p16INK4a positivity were also associated with age, but with smaller estimates. Grip strength and the Stroop test were associated with cardiovascular or metabolic...

  13. Validity and reliability of range of motion measured on smartphone (mROM)

    OpenAIRE

    Cuesta-Vargas, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Background: Nowadays, as internet-based communication is advancing rapidly, it is getting more and more interesting to adapt clinical examination of patients to remote communication. The use of smartphone photographic is presented as a method for studying the measurement of shoulders joint ROM. Objective: To investigate the reliability of smartphone photographic measurements of upper limbs abduction angle through mRom app compared to inertial sensors as the criterion standard. Methods: ...

  14. Fluorescent Protein Based FRET Pairs with Improved Dynamic Range for Fluorescence Lifetime Measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Bobin George Abraham; Karen S Sarkisyan; Mishin, Alexander S.; Ville Santala; Tkachenko, Nikolai V.; Matti Karp

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) using fluorescent protein variants is widely used to study biochemical processes in living cells. FRET detection by fluorescence lifetime measurements is the most direct and robust method to measure FRET. The traditional cyan-yellow fluorescent protein based FRET pairs are getting replaced by green-red fluorescent protein variants. The green-red pair enables excitation at a longer wavelength which reduces cellular autofluorescence and phototoxicit...

  15. Close Range Photogrammetry for Direct Multiple Feature Positioning Measurement without Targets

    OpenAIRE

    Gorka Kortaberria; Aitor Olarra; Alberto Tellaeche; Rikardo Minguez

    2017-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to present a new method to carry out measurements so as to improve the positioning verification step in the wind hub part dimensional validation process. This enhancement will speed up the measuring procedures for these types of parts. An industrial photogrammetry based system was applied to take advantage of its results, and new functions were added to existing capabilities. In addition to a new development based on photogrammetry modelling and image proce...

  16. New measurements of high-momentum nucleons and short-range structures in nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Fomin, N; Asaturyan, R; Benmokhtar, F; Boeglin, W; Bosted, P; Bruell, A; Bukhari, M H S; Chudakov, E; Clasie, B; Connell, S H; Dalton, M M; Daniel, A; Day, D B; Dutta, D; Ent, R; Fassi, L El; Fenker, H; Filippone, B W; Garrow, K; Gaskell, D; Hill, C; Holt, R J; Horn, T; Jones, M K; Jourdan, J; Kalantarians, N; Keppel, C E; Kiselev, D; Kotulla, M; Lindgren, R; Lung, A F; Malace, S; Markowitz, P; McKee, P; Meekins, D G; Mkrtchyan, H; Navasardyan, T; Niculescu, G; Opper, A K; Perdrisat, C; Potterveld, D H; Punjabi, V; Qian, X; Reimer, P E; Roche, J; Rodriguez, V M; Rondon, O; Schulte, E; Seely, J; Segbefia, E; Slifer, K; Smith, G R; Solvignon, P; Tadevosyan, V; Tajima, S; Tang, L; Testa, G; Trojer, R; Tvaskis, V; Vulcan, W F; Wasko, C; Wesselmann, F R; Wood, S A; Wright, J; Zheng, X

    2011-01-01

    We present new, high-Q^2 measurements of inclusive electron scattering from high-momentum nucleons in nuclei. This yields an improved extraction of the strength of two-nucleon correlations for several nuclei, including light nuclei where clustering effects can, for the first time, be examined. The data extend to the kinematic regime where three-nucleon correlations are expected to dominate and we observe significantly greater strength in this region than previous measurements.

  17. Measured electric field intensities near electric cloud discharges detected by the Kennedy Space Center's Lightning Detection and Ranging System, LDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poehler, H. A.

    1977-01-01

    For a summer thunderstorm, for which simultaneous, airborne electric field measurements and Lightning Detection and Ranging (LDAR) System data was available, measurements were coordinated to present a picture of the electric field intensity near cloud electrical discharges detected by the LDAR System. Radar precipitation echos from NOAA's 10 cm weather radar and measured airborne electric field intensities were superimposed on LDAR PPI plots to present a coordinated data picture of thunderstorm activity.

  18. Direct measurement of additional Ar-H2O vibration-rotation-tunneling bands in the millimeter-submillimeter range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Luyao; Widicus Weaver, Susanna L.

    2016-06-01

    Three new weak bands of the Ar-H2O vibration-rotation-tunneling spectrum have been measured in the millimeter wavelength range. These bands were predicted from combination differences based on previously measured bands in the submillimeter region. Two previously reported submillimeter bands were also remeasured with higher frequency resolution. These new measurements allow us to obtain accurate information on the Coriolis interaction between the 101 and 110 states. Here we report these results and the associated improved molecular constants.

  19. What range of trait levels can the Autism-Spectrum Quotient (AQ) measure reliably? An item response theory analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Aja Louise; Booth, Tom; McKenzie, Karen; Kuenssberg, Renate

    2016-06-01

    It has previously been noted that inventories measuring traits that originated in a psychopathological paradigm can often reliably measure only a very narrow range of trait levels that are near and above clinical cutoffs. Much recent work has, however, suggested that autism spectrum disorder traits are on a continuum of severity that extends well into the nonclinical range. This implies a need for inventories that can capture individual differences in autistic traits from very high levels all the way to the opposite end of the continuum. The Autism-Spectrum Quotient (AQ) was developed based on a closely related rationale, but there has, to date, been no direct test of the range of trait levels that the AQ can reliably measure. To assess this, we fit a bifactor item response theory model to the AQ. Results suggested that AQ measures moderately low to moderately high levels of a general autistic trait with good measurement precision. The reliable range of measurement was significantly improved by scoring the instrument using its 4-point response scale, rather than dichotomizing responses. These results support the use of the AQ in nonclinical samples, but suggest that items measuring very low and very high levels of autistic traits would be beneficial additions to the inventory. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  20. A hydrogel based nanosensor with an unprecedented broad sensitivity range for pH measurements in cellular compartments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, M; Søndergaard, R V; Kumar, E K P; Henriksen, J R; Cui, D; Hammershøj, P; Clausen, M H; Andresen, T L

    2015-11-07

    Optical pH nanosensors have been applied for monitoring intracellular pH in real-time for about two decades. However, the pH sensitivity range of most nanosensors is too narrow, and measurements that are on the borderline of this range may not be correct. Furthermore, ratiometric measurements of acidic intracellular pH (pH pH 1.4 to 7.0. In this nanosensor, three pH-sensitive fluorophores (difluoro-Oregon Green, Oregon Green 488, and fluorescein) and one pH-insensitive fluorophore (Alexa 568) were covalently incorporated into a nanoparticle hydrogel matrix. With this broad range quadruple-labelled nanosensor all physiological relevant pH levels in living cells can be measured without being too close to the limits of its pH-range. The nanosensor exhibits no susceptibility to interference by other intracellular ions at physiological concentrations. Due to its positive surface charge it is spontaneously internalized by HeLa cells and localizes to the lysosomes where the mean pH was measured at 4.6. This quadruple-labelled nanosensor performs accurate measurements of fluctuations of lysosomal pH in both directions, which was shown by treatment with the V-ATPase inhibitor bafilomycin A1 or its substrate ATP in HeLa cells. These measurements indicate that this novel quadruple-labelled nanosensor is a promising new tool for measuring the pH of acidic compartments in living cells.

  1. Methane emission from free-ranging sheep: a comparison of two measurement methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuning, R.; Baker, S. K.; Jamie, I. M.; Hsu, C. H.; Klein, L.; Denmead, O. T.; Griffith, D. W. T.

    Methane emissions from a flock of 14, 1-year old sheep grazing on a grass and legume pasture were measured using a micrometeorological mass-balance method and a sulphur hexaflouride (SF 6) tracer technique. The former measured the mean emission, over 45 min intervals, from all the sheep within a fenced 24 m×24 m enclosure, from the enrichment of methane (CH 4) in air as it passed over the sheep. The tracer technique measured emissions from a subset of 7 individual animals over 24 h periods from measurements of CH 4 and SF 6 concentrations in air exhaled by the sheep, and from the known rate of release of SF 6 from small permeation tubes placed in the animals' rumens. Both methods gave highly similar results for 4 out of 5 days. When the species composition of dietary intake was steady during the last two days of measurement, the mean emission rate from the mass-balance method was 11.9±1.5 (SEM) g CH 4 sheep -1 d -1, while the rate from the tracer technique was 11.7±0.4 (SEM) g CH 4 sheep -1 d -1. These rates are for sheep with mean live mass of 27 kg, with a measured dry matter intake of 508 g sheep -1 d -1 and pasture dry matter digestibility of 69.5%. There was close agreement between these measurements and estimates from algorithms used to predict methane emissions from sheep for the Australian National Greenhouse Gas Inventory.

  2. Measurement of Ion Motional Heating Rates over a Range of Trap Frequencies and Temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Bruzewicz, C D; Chiaverini, J

    2014-01-01

    We present measurements of the motional heating rate of a trapped ion at different trap frequencies and temperatures between $\\sim$0.6 and 1.5 MHz and $\\sim$4 and 295 K. Additionally, we examine the possible effect of adsorbed surface contaminants with boiling points below $\\sim$105$^{\\circ}$C by measuring the ion heating rate before and after locally baking our ion trap chip under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. We compare the heating rates presented here to those calculated from available electric-field noise models. We can tightly constrain a subset of these models based on their expected frequency and temperature scaling interdependence. Discrepancies between the measured results and predicted values point to the need for refinement of theoretical noise models in order to more fully understand the mechanisms behind motional trapped-ion heating.

  3. Close Range Photogrammetry for Direct Multiple Feature Positioning Measurement without Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorka Kortaberria

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study is to present a new method to carry out measurements so as to improve the positioning verification step in the wind hub part dimensional validation process. This enhancement will speed up the measuring procedures for these types of parts. An industrial photogrammetry based system was applied to take advantage of its results, and new functions were added to existing capabilities. In addition to a new development based on photogrammetry modelling and image processing, a measuring procedure was defined based on optical and vision system considerations. A validation against a certified procedure by means of a laser-tracker has also been established obtaining deviations of ±0.125 μm/m.

  4. Comparison of repeated measurements of methane production in sheep over 5 years and a range of measurement protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, D L; Goopy, J P; Hegarty, R S; Oddy, V H

    2015-10-01

    Emissions of 710 ewes at pasture were measured for 1 h (between 09:00-16:30 h) in batches of 15 sheep in portable accumulation chambers (PAC) after an overnight fast continuing until 2 h before measurement, when the sheep had access to baled hay for 1 h. The test was used to identify a group of 104 low emitters (I-Low) and a group of 103 high emitters (I-Hi) for methane emissions adjusted for liveweight (CHawt). The 207 ewes selected at the initial study were remeasured in 5 repeat tests from 2009 through 2014 at another location. The first repeat used the original measurement protocol. Two modified protocols, each used in 2 yr, drafted unfasted sheep on the morning of the test into a yard or holding paddock until measurement. Emissions of the I-Hi sheep were higher (102-112%) than I-Low sheep in all subsequent PAC tests, with statistical significance ( sheep were measured in respiration chambers (RC); 10 high (Hi-10) and 10 low (Low-10) sheep were chosen, representing extremes (top and bottom 6.25%) for methane yield (MY; g CH/kg DMI). The Hi-10 group emitted 14% more methane (adjusted for feed intake) in a follow-up RC test, but Low-10 and Hi-10 sheep differed in only 1 of the 5 PAC tests, when Hi-10 sheep emitted less CHawt than Low-10 sheep ( = 0.002) and tended to eat less in the feeding opportunity ( = 0.085). Compared with their weight on good pasture, Low-10 sheep were proportionately lighter than Hi-10 sheep in the relatively poor pasture conditions of the initial test. Sheep identified as low emitters by PAC tests using the initial protocol did not produce less CH (mg/min) when fed a fixed level of intake in RC. Correlations between estimates of an animal's CHawt measured in PAC and CH adjusted for feed intake in RC were quite low ( = 0-19%) and significant ( sheep. With moderate repeatability over the 5 yr, PAC tests of CHawt could be a viable way to select for reduced emissions of grazing sheep. As well as exploiting any variation in MY, selecting for

  5. High resolution kilometric range optical telemetry in air by radio frequency phase measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillory, Joffray; García-Márquez, Jorge; Truong, Daniel; Wallerand, Jean-Pierre [Laboratoire Commun de Métrologie LNE-Cnam (LCM), LNE, 1 rue Gaston Boissier, 75015 Paris (France); Šmíd, Radek [Laboratoire Commun de Métrologie LNE-Cnam (LCM), LNE, 1 rue Gaston Boissier, 75015 Paris (France); Institute of Scientific Instruments of the CAS, Kralovopolska 147, 612 64 Brno (Czech Republic); Alexandre, Christophe [Centre d’Études et de Recherche en Informatique et Communications (CEDRIC), Cnam, 292 rue St-Martin, 75003 Paris (France)

    2016-07-15

    We have developed an optical Absolute Distance Meter (ADM) based on the measurement of the phase accumulated by a Radio Frequency wave during its propagation in the air by a laser beam. In this article, the ADM principle will be described and the main results will be presented. In particular, we will emphasize how the choice of an appropriate photodetector can significantly improve the telemeter performances by minimizing the amplitude to phase conversion. Our prototype, tested in the field, has proven its efficiency with a resolution better than 15 μm for a measurement time of 10 ms and distances up to 1.2 km.

  6. Characterization of short-pulse oscillators by means of a high-dynamic-range autocorrelation measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, A; Rudd, J V; Cheng, H; Mourou, G; Kopf, D; Jung, I D; Weingarten, K J; Keller, U

    1995-09-15

    A high-dynamic-range autocorrelation technique was used to characterize the temporal pulse shape of ultrashort laser pulses produced from four separate oscillators. These lasers included two Kerr-lens mode-locked Ti:sapphire oscillators as well as a Nd:glass and a Ti:sapphire oscillator, each passively mode locked by an antiresonant Fabry-Perot semiconductor saturable absorber. It was shown that the Nd:glass oscillator supported a pulse that was temporally clean over 8 orders of magnitude.

  7. A measurement of auroral electrons in the 1–10 MeV range

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gils, J.N. van; Beek, H.F. van; Fetter, L.D. de; Hendrickx, R.V.

    Particle fluxes have been measured by means of shielded Geiger-Müller telescopes mounted m a rocket, which was launched from ESRANGE(Kiruna) into a diffuse aurora. The analysis of the dependence of the counting rates on altitude indicates that a weak flux of energetic electrons, 1–10 MeV, has been

  8. Quantifying uncertainty of measuring gully morphological evolution with close-range digital photogrammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Measurement of geomorphic change may be of interest to researchers and practitioners in a variety of fields including geology, geomorphology, hydrology, engineering, and soil science. Landscapes are often represented by digital elevation models. Surface models generated of the same landscape over a ...

  9. Isomerization and optical bistability of DR1 doped organic-inorganic sol-gel thin film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Tianxi; Que, Wenxiu; Shao, Jinyou

    2015-10-01

    To investigate the isomerization process of the disperse red 1 (DR1) doped TiO2/ormosil thin film, both the photo-isomerization and the thermal isomerization of the thin films were observed as a change of the absorption spectrum. Under a real-time heat treatment, the change of the linear refractive index shows a thermal stable working temperature range below Tg. The optical bistability (OB) effect of the DR1 doped thin films based on different matrices was studied and measured at a wavelength of 532 nm. Results indicate that the TiO2/ormosils based thin film presents a better OB-gain than that of the poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) based thin film due to its more rigid network structure. Moreover, it is also noted that higher titanium content is helpful for enhancing the OB-gain of the as-prepared hybrid thin films.

  10. Sproglige drømmerier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farø, Ken Joensen

    2015-01-01

    blev tidligere brugt i Danmarks Radio som pausesignal, afspillet på en spilledåse. Ak ja, det var dengang. Gå ind på nettet og lyt til den, hvis du ikke kender melodien. Det er national kulturarv. Mange bevingede ord indeholder en form af ”drøm(me)”, fx Martin Luther Kings ”I have a Dream”. Eller...

  11. Non-destructive testing principles and accurate evaluation of the hydraulic measure impact range using the DC method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Liming; Shen, Rongxi; Song, Dazhao; Wang, Enyuan; Liu, Zhentang; Niu, Yue; Jia, Haishan; Xia, Shankui; Zheng, Xiangxin

    2017-12-01

    An accurate and non-destructive evaluation method for the hydraulic measure impact range in coal seams is urgently needed. Aiming at the application demands, a theoretical study and field test are presented using the direct current (DC) method to evaluate the impact range of coal seam hydraulic measures. We firstly analyzed the law of the apparent resistivity response of an abnormal conductive zone in a coal seam, and then investigated the principle of non-destructive testing of the coal seam hydraulic measure impact range using the DC method, and used an accurate evaluation method based on the apparent resistivity cloud chart. Finally, taking hydraulic fracturing and hydraulic flushing as examples, field experiments were carried out in coal mines to evaluate the impact ranges. The results showed that: (1) in the process of hydraulic fracturing, coal conductivity was enhanced by high-pressure water in the coal seam, and after hydraulic fracturing, the boundary of the apparent resistivity decrease area was the boundary impact range. (2) In the process of hydraulic flushing, coal conductivity was reduced by holes and cracks in the coal seam, and after hydraulic flushing, the boundary of the apparent resistivity increase area was the boundary impact range. (3) After the implementation of the hydraulic measures, there may be some blind zones in the coal seam; in hydraulic fracturing blind zones, the apparent resistivity increased or stayed constant, while in hydraulic flushing blind zones, the apparent resistivity decreased or stayed constant. The DC method realized a comprehensive and non-destructive evaluation of the impact range of the hydraulic measures, and greatly reduced the time and cost of evaluation.

  12. Dr. Francis Collins Is New NIH Director

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Dr. Francis Collins Is New NIH Director Past Issues / ... for NIH and for science in this country." "Dr. Collins is one of our generation's great scientific ...

  13. Reliability of two goniometric methods of measuring active inversion and eversion range of motion at the ankle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Refshauge Kathryn M

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Active inversion and eversion ankle range of motion (ROM is widely used to evaluate treatment effect, however the error associated with the available measurement protocols is unknown. This study aimed to establish the reliability of goniometry as used in clinical practice. Methods 30 subjects (60 ankles with a wide variety of ankle conditions participated in this study. Three observers, with different skill levels, measured active inversion and eversion ankle ROM three times on each of two days. Measurements were performed with subjects positioned (a sitting and (b prone. Intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC[2,1] were calculated to determine intra- and inter-observer reliability. Results Within session intra-observer reliability ranged from ICC[2,1] 0.82 to 0.96 and between session intra-observer reliability ranged from ICC[2,1] 0.42 to 0.80. Reliability was similar for the sitting and the prone positions, however, between sessions, inversion measurements were more reliable than eversion measurements. Within session inter-observer measurements in sitting were more reliable than in prone and inversion measurements were more reliable than eversion measurements. Conclusion Our findings show that ankle inversion and eversion ROM can be measured with high to very high reliability by the same observer within sessions and with low to moderate reliability by different observers within a session. The reliability of measures made by the same observer between sessions varies depending on the direction, being low to moderate for eversion measurements and moderate to high for inversion measurements in both positions.

  14. Reliability of two goniometric methods of measuring active inversion and eversion range of motion at the ankle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menadue, Collette; Raymond, Jacqueline; Kilbreath, Sharon L; Refshauge, Kathryn M; Adams, Roger

    2006-07-28

    Active inversion and eversion ankle range of motion (ROM) is widely used to evaluate treatment effect, however the error associated with the available measurement protocols is unknown. This study aimed to establish the reliability of goniometry as used in clinical practice. 30 subjects (60 ankles) with a wide variety of ankle conditions participated in this study. Three observers, with different skill levels, measured active inversion and eversion ankle ROM three times on each of two days. Measurements were performed with subjects positioned (a) sitting and (b) prone. Intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC[2,1]) were calculated to determine intra- and inter-observer reliability. Within session intra-observer reliability ranged from ICC[2,1] 0.82 to 0.96 and between session intra-observer reliability ranged from ICC[2,1] 0.42 to 0.80. Reliability was similar for the sitting and the prone positions, however, between sessions, inversion measurements were more reliable than eversion measurements. Within session inter-observer measurements in sitting were more reliable than in prone and inversion measurements were more reliable than eversion measurements. Our findings show that ankle inversion and eversion ROM can be measured with high to very high reliability by the same observer within sessions and with low to moderate reliability by different observers within a session. The reliability of measures made by the same observer between sessions varies depending on the direction, being low to moderate for eversion measurements and moderate to high for inversion measurements in both positions.

  15. Measuring Pulse Rate Variability using Long-Range, Non-Contact Imaging Photoplethysmography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-20

    Photoplethysmography (PPG), first pioneered in the 1930’s, is a low cost , noninvasive method of detecting changes in blood volume using variations in...glasses, piercings, and use of skin or beauty products were recorded but not otherwise used for analysis or screening purposes. C. Experimental Design...and Lei Wang. A review of non-contact, low- cost physiological information measurement based on photoplethysmographic imaging. Annu. Int. Conf. IEEE

  16. Measurement of long-range particle correlations in small systems with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Milov, Alexander; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Study of particle correlations is an important instrument to understand the nature of relativistic heavy ion collisions. Using a wealth of new data available from the recent heavy ion runs of Large Hadron Collider at CERN it becomes possible to study particle correlations in different collisions systems under the same conditions. The results of several recent measurement performed by the ATLAS experiment are reviewed in this proceeding. Measurements are performed in various techniques in $pp$, $p+$Pb and PbPb collisions at the energies $\\sqrt{s_{_{\\rm{NN}}}}$, $\\sqrt{s}$ from 2.76 to 13 TeV. The results are compared between the systems having the same charged particle multiplicities in the final state, but different initial geometries. Results for multiplicity correlations, two-particle and muti-particle correlations measured in different techniques are presented and discussed. The goal of these comparison is to make further steps in understanding the nature of fluctuations observed in the small collisions sy...

  17. Angstrom-range optical path-length measurement with a high-speed scanning heterodyne optical interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riza, Nabeel A; Arain, Muzammil A

    2003-05-01

    A highly accurate method of optical path-length measurement is introduced by use of a scanning heterodyne optical interferometer with no moving parts. The instrument has demonstrated the potential to measure optical path length at angstrom resolution over continuous thickness in the micrometer range. This optical path length can be used to calculate the thickness of any material if the refractive index is known or to measure the refractive index of the material if the thickness is known. The instrument uses a single acousto-optic device in an in-line ultra-stable reflective geometry to implement rapid scanning in the microsecond domain for thickness measurements of the test medium.

  18. Radar measurements of surface deformation in the sub mm-range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Gerhard; Hort, Matthias; Gerst, Alexander; Scharff, Lea

    2016-04-01

    A portable low power Doppler radar at 24 GHz is used for volcano eruption observations since more than a decade (e.g. Hort and Seyfried, 1998, doi: 10.1029/97GL03482; Seyfried and Hort, 1999, doi: 10.1007/s004450050256; Vöge et al., 2005, doi: 10.1029/2005 EO510001, Vöge and Hort, 2009, doi: 10.1109/TGRS. 2008.2002693, Gerst et al., 2013, doi: 10.1002/jgrb.50234; Scharff et al, 2015, doi: 10.1130/G36705.1) The typical radar products are range resolved Doppler spectra containing information on the reflectivity, radial velocity and its distribution of ejected particles. Here we present the analysis of the phase of radar signals for the detection of comparably slow and small deformations of the solid surface which may occur for example prior to an eruption [Hort et al., 2010, AGU Fall meeting, Abstract V32B-03]. While the phase analysis of weather radar echoes from ground targets is established for estimating the atmospheric refractivity [Besson and du Châtelet, 2013, http://dx.doi.org/ 10.1175/ JTECH-D-12-00167.1], we consider here the variability of the atmosphere as a source of uncertainty. We describe the implementation of this technique in a dedicated compact low power FMCW system. Observations at Stromboli suggest an expansion of the vent prior to the eruption on the order of millimeter which is on the same oder as reported by [Noferini et al., 2009, doi: 10.1109/IGARSS. 2009. 5416901] and in case of Santiaguito volcano we were able to observe the post eruptive subsidence of the volcanic dome. We suggest further to resolve the range/refractivity ambiguity by using a dual frequency radar with sufficient frequency separation for utilizing the frequency dependence of refractivity.

  19. A simple and wide-range refractive index measuring approach by using a sub-micron grating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chun-Wei; Wu, Chun-Che; Lin, Shih-Chieh [Department of Power Mechanical Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, 101 Section 2, Kuang-Fu Road, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2015-04-13

    This paper presents the design and simulation results of a high-precision low-cost refractometer that demonstrates the main advantage of a wide measurement range (1 ≤ n ≤ 2). The proposed design is based on the diffractive properties of sub-micron gratings and Snell's Law. The precision and uncertainty factors of the proposed system were tested and analyzed, revealing that the proposed refractometer demonstrates a wide measurement range with sensitivity of 10{sup −4}.

  20. Light detection and ranging measurements of wake dynamics Part I: One-dimensional Scanning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bingöl, Ferhat; Mann, Jakob; Larsen, Gunner Chr.

    2010-01-01

    of the wake meandering, as well as the instantaneous wake expansion expressed in a meandering frame of reference. The experiment was conducted primarily to test the simple hypothesis that the wake deficit is advected passively by the larger-than-rotor-size eddies in the atmospheric flow, and that the wake...... at the same time widens gradually, primarily because of mixing caused by small-scale atmospheric eddies. In this first paper, we focus on our new measurement technique, and test if the wake meandering follows the wind direction fluctuations, i.e. if it is advected passively in the lateral direction...

  1. Shock initiation of nano-Al/Teflon: High dynamic range pyrometry measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jue; Bassett, Will P.; Dlott, Dana D.

    2017-02-01

    Laser-launched flyer plates (25 μm thick Cu) were used to impact-initiate reactive materials consisting of 40 nm Al particles embedded in TeflonAF polymer (Al/Teflon) on sapphire substrates at a stoichiometric concentration (2.3:1 Teflon:Al), as well as one-half and one-fourth that concentration. A high dynamic range emission spectrometer was used to time and spectrally resolve the emitted light and to determine graybody temperature histories with nanosecond time resolution. At 0.5 km s-1, first light emission was observed from Teflon, but at 0.6 km s-1, the emission from Al/Teflon became much more intense, so we assigned the impact threshold for Al/Teflon reactions to be 0.6 (±0.1) km s-1. The flyer plates produced a 7 ns duration steady shock drive. Emission from shocked Al/Teflon above threshold consisted of two bursts. At the higher impact velocities, the first burst started 15 ns after impact, peaked at 25 ns, and persisted for 75 ns. The second burst started at a few hundred nanoseconds and lasted until 2 μs. The 15 ns start time was exactly the time the flyer plate velocity dropped to zero after impact with sapphire. The first burst was associated with shock-triggered reactions and the second, occurring at ambient pressure, was associated with combustion of leftover material that did not react during shock. The emission spectrum was found to be a good fit to a graybody at all times, allowing temperature histories to be extracted. At 25 ns, the temperature at 0.7 km s-1 and the one-fourth Al load was 3800 K. Those temperatures increased significantly with impact velocity, up to 4600 K, but did not increase as much with Al load. A steady combustion process at 2800 (±100) K was observed in the microsecond range. The minimal dependence on Al loading indicates that these peak temperatures arise primarily from Al nanoparticles reacting almost independently, since the presence of nearby heat sources had little influence on the peak temperatures.

  2. Measurements of cnidae from sea anemones (Cnidaria: Actiniaria, III: ranges and other measures of statistical dispersion, their interrelations and taxonomic relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. B. Williams

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available This is the third of a series of papers examining the taxonomic relevance of some statistical treatments of measurements of cnidae from sea anemones (Actiniaria. Some cnida lengths from fresh tissue samples (column ectoderm, tentacles or acontia from Nematostella vectensis, Haliplanella lineata, Sagartia elegans, Metridium senile, Cereus pedunculatus, Sagartia troglodytes, Anthopleura thallia, Urticina eques and Sagartiogeton lacerates were measured. Five measures of statistical dispersion (sample standard deviation, coefficient of variation, observed sample range, standard range, and 99% probable maximum value of the standard range were calculated, and their interrelations and potential applications were appraised. It has long been the convention to use the largest and smallest cnida sizes (observed sample range from tissue samples in attempts to establish differences between actiniarian taxa. However, such data do not reflect the true extremes of a population range. In the present study, the 99% probable maximum value of the standard range for a standard abundance of 1,000 gave the greatest and, therefore, the most cautious estimate of a population range of cnida sizes for a species. This maximum standard range is the only measure of dispersion of cnida sizes that may be used validly to demonstrate that anemone specimens are of different species, and then only if there is no overlap between the extreme cnida sizes being compared. However, partial or complete overlaps of cnida size extremes do not necessarily indicate that specimens are conspecific; other taxonomic characters must also be considered. Coefficients of variation may provide valuable clues as to the homogeneity or heterogeneity of samples of cnida measurements. This paper should be read in conjunction with the first two in this series, which address the taxonomic relevance of differences between mean cnida sizes (Williams, 1996, Sci. Mar., 60: 339-351; 1998, Sci. Mar., 62: 361-372.

  3. Design, Manufacture and Testing of Capacitive Pressure Sensors for Low-Pressure Measurement Ranges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasileios Mitrakos

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the design, manufacture and testing of a capacitive pressure sensor with a high, tunable performance to low compressive loads (<10 kPa and a resolution of less than 0.5 kPa. Such a performance is required for the monitoring of treatment efficacy delivered by compression garments to treat or prevent medical conditions such as deep vein thrombosis, leg ulcers, varicose veins or hypertrophic scars. Current commercial sensors used in such medical applications have been found to be either impractical, costly or of insufficient resolution. A microstructured elastomer film of a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS blend with a tunable Young’s modulus was used as the force-sensing dielectric medium. The resulting 18 mm × 18 mm parallel-plate capacitive pressure sensor was characterised in the range of 0.8 to 6.5 kPa. The microstructuring of the surface morphology of the elastomer film combined with the tuning of the Young’s modulus of the PDMS blend is demonstrated to enhance the sensor performance achieving a 0.25 kPa pressure resolution and a 10 pF capacitive change under 6.5 kPa compressive load. The resulting sensor holds good potential for the targeted medical application.

  4. Analysis of the properties of targets used in digital close-range photogrammetric measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Timothy A.

    1994-10-01

    It is common to use some form of targeting in close range photogrammetry as there are seldom enough points on the surface of an object with sufficient contrast. Targets which have been used include: light emitting diodes; black circles on a white background; retro-reflective film; projected laser beams; projected `white light' slides; feature encoded targets; and color targets. This paper discusses the characteristics of targets. In particular the established retro- reflective target and the promising projected laser target are considered as they both offer high signal-to-noise ratios together with optimum target sizes. The performance of the targets are analyzed by use of laboratory tests, for example: (1) a retro-reflective target was placed on a rotating mount with the center of the target located on the axis of rotation and the target monitored by a CCD camera under varying conditions; and (2) a laser target was analyzed by experiments which were designed to indicate the effect of speckle by moving a flat object in a direction perpendicular to the laser beam.

  5. Nanocomposite-Based Microstructured Piezoresistive Pressure Sensors for Low-Pressure Measurement Range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasileios Mitrakos

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Piezoresistive pressure sensors capable of detecting ranges of low compressive stresses have been successfully fabricated and characterised. The 5.5 × 5 × 1.6 mm3 sensors consist of a planar aluminium top electrode and a microstructured bottom electrode containing a two-by-two array of truncated pyramids with a piezoresistive composite layer sandwiched in-between. The responses of two different piezocomposite materials, a Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube (MWCNT-elastomer composite and a Quantum Tunneling Composite (QTC, have been characterised as a function of applied pressure and effective contact area. The MWCNT piezoresistive composite-based sensor was able to detect pressures as low as 200 kPa. The QTC-based sensor was capable of detecting pressures as low as 50 kPa depending on the contact area of the bottom electrode. Such sensors could find useful applications requiring the detection of small compressive loads such as those encountered in haptic sensing or robotics.

  6. The concurrent validity and reliability of the Leg Motion system for measuring ankle dorsiflexion range of motion in older adults

    OpenAIRE

    Romero Morales, Carlos; Calvo Lobo, C?sar; Rodr?guez Sanz, David; Sanz Corbal?n, Irene; Ruiz Ruiz, Beatriz; L?pez L?pez, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Background New reliable devices for range of motion (ROM) measures in older adults are necessary to improve knowledge about the functional capability in this population. Dorsiflexion ROM limitation is associated with ankle injuries, foot pain, lower limb disorders, loss of balance, gait control disorders and fall risk in older adults. The aim of the present study was to assess the validity and reliability of the Leg Motion device for measuring ankle dorsiflexion ROM in older adults. Methods A...

  7. Reliability and Validity of Electro-Goniometric Range of Motion Measurements in Patients with Hand and Wrist Limitations

    OpenAIRE

    Bashardoust Tajali, Siamak; MacDermid, Joy C.; Grewal, Ruby; Young, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Study Design: Cross-sectional reliability and validity study. Purpose: 1. To determine intrarater, interrater and inter instrument reliabilities and validity of two digital electro goniometry to measure active wrist/finger range of motions (ROMs) in patients with limited motion. 2. To determine intrarater and interrater reliabilities of digital goniometry to measure torques of PIP passive flexion of the index finger in patients with limited motion. Methods: The study was designed in a randomi...

  8. Systematic Study of Acquisition Electronics with a High Dynamic Range for a Beam Loss Measurement System

    CERN Document Server

    Venturini, G G; Effinger, E; Emery, J; Zamantzas, C

    2009-01-01

    A discrete components design for a current digitizer based on the current-to-frequency converter (CFC) principle is currently under development at CERN. The design targets at higher current inputs than similar designs, with a maximum equal to 100mA and a minimum of 1nA, as required by the ionization chamber that will be employed in the Proton Synchrotron and Booster accelerators as well as in the LINAC 4. It allows the acquisition of currents of both polarities without requiring any configuration and provides fractional counts through an ADC to increase resolution. Several architectural choices are considered for the front-end circuit, including charge balance integrators, dual-integrator input stages, integrators with switchable-capacitor. Design approach and measurements are discussed in this article.

  9. Reliability and validity of a weight-bearing measure of ankle dorsiflexion range of motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisholm, Martin D; Birmingham, Trevor B; Brown, Janet; Macdermid, Joy; Chesworth, Bert M

    2012-01-01

    To examine reliability and validity of the Lunge Test (LT) of dorsiflexion range of motion and determine the impact of different approaches to obtain a score on these parameters. Fifty-three patients with ankle injury/dysfunction provided initial assessment data for cross-sectional convergent and known-groups validity analysis with the Pearson coefficient (r) and paired t-test, respectively; data after 4-8 weeks of treatment for longitudinal validity analysis with coefficient r; and data 3 days later for test-retest reliability using the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) and minimal detectable change (MDC). LT scores were determined for the affected leg only (LTAff) and for the difference between the two limbs (LTDiff). Two strategies were used to calculate LT scores: a single series and the mean of three series of lunges. LTs were correlated with the Lower Extremity Functional Scale and Global Foot and Ankle Scale. Reliability coefficients were high (ICC=0.93-0.99). The MDC=1.0/1.5 cm, LTAff/LTDiff, respectively. Cross-sectional validity was confirmed for LTDiff (r=-0.40 to -0.50). Between-limb differences (p<0.05) supported known-groups validity. Longitudinal validity was supported for both LT change scores (r=0.39-0.63). The number of series of lunges used did not impact results. A single series of lunges produces a reliable LT score. From a validity perspective, clinicians should use LTDiff on initial assessment and either LT to assess change.

  10. Dual sightline measurements of MeV range deuterons with neutron and gamma-ray spectroscopy at JET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, J.; Nocente, M.; Binda, F.

    2015-01-01

    Observations made in a JET experiment aimed at accelerating deuterons to the MeV range by third harmonic radio-frequency (RF) heating coupled into a deuterium beam are reported. Measurements are based on a set of advanced neutron and gamma-ray spectrometers that, for the first time, observe the p...

  11. Reliability of the spin-T cervical goniometer in measuring cervical range of motion in an asymptomatic Indian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Shabnam; Allison, Garry T; Singer, Kevin P

    2005-09-01

    To examine the intratester reliability of the Spin-T goniometer, a cervical range of motion device, in a normal Indian population. Subjects comprised 30 healthy adults with mean age of 34 years (range, 18-65 years). The subjects were stabilized in the sitting position and the Spin-T goniometer mounted on the head of the subject. The study design was a within-subject repeated intratester reliability trial conducted for cervical range of motion in 6 directions of movement. Three measurements were taken in each direction (flexion, extension lateral flexion, and lateral rotation) per participant. Reliability coefficients, intraclass correlation coefficients, and 95% confidence interval were derived from repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA). Where differences in ANOVA were detected, a paired t test was conducted and the typical error values and coefficient of variance were calculated. All repeated measures showed high intraclass correlation coefficients (all >0.96, P goniometer proved to be a reliable measuring instrument for cervical range of movement in an Indian population. The use of a laser pointer fixed to the instrument ensured a consistent neutral start position.

  12. Synthesis and Characterization of a Micelle-Based pH Nanosensor with an Unprecedented Broad Measurement Range

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ek, Pramod Kumar; Feldborg, Lise N.; Almdal, Kristoffer

    2013-01-01

    ) carboxyfluorescein and a reference fluorophore Alexa 633 to the PAEMA shell region of the micelles. Fluorescence measurements show that these pH nanosensors are sensitive in a surprisingly broad pH range of 3.4–8.0, which is hypothesized to be due to small differences in the individual fluorophores’ local...

  13. Reproducibility of range of motion and muscle strength measurements in patients with hip osteoarthritis – an interrater study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Erik; Christensen, Henrik Wulff; Penny, Jeannette Østergaard

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Assessment of range of motion (ROM) and muscle strength is fundamental in the clinical diagnosis of hip osteoarthritis (OA) but reproducibility of these measurements has mostly involved clinicians from secondary care and has rarely reported agreement parameters. Therefore, t...

  14. Linear viscoelasticity of emulsions : II. Measurements of the linear viscoelastic behavior of emulsions in the kilohertz range

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterbroek, M.; Mellema, J.; Lopulissa, J.S.

    1981-01-01

    Linear viscoelasticity of emulsions in shear deformation in the kilohertz range is demonstrated experimentally. In order to avoid complications due to inertia effects, emulsions with small droplet sizes are studied. The preliminary measurements are interpreted as being the result of droplet

  15. Relative Orbital Element Estimation and Observability Analysis for Formation Flying Satellites using Inter-Satellite Range Measurements Only

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maessen, D.C.; Gill, E.K.A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates to what extent the relative orbital elements of two satellites flying in formation can be estimated making use of inter-satellite range measurements only. Since the determination of relative orbital elements does not require the orientation of the relative orbit with respect

  16. Muon momentum measurement in ICARUS-T600 LAr-TPC via multiple scattering in few-GeV range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonello, M.; Baibussinov, B.; Bellini, V.; Benetti, P.; Boffelli, F.; Bubak, A.; Calligarich, E.; Centro, S.; Cervi, T.; Cesana, A.; Cieslik, K.; Cocco, A. G.; Dabrowska, A.; Dermenev, A.; Falcone, A.; Farnese, C.; Fava, A.; Ferrari, A.; Gibin, D.; Gninenko, S.; Guglielmi, A.; Haranczyk, M.; Holeczek, J.; Janik, M.; Kirsanov, M.; Kisiel, J.; Kochanek, I.; Lagoda, J.; Menegolli, A.; Meng, G.; Montanari, C.; Otwinowski, S.; Picchi, P.; Pietropaolo, F.; Plonski, P.; Rappoldi, A.; Raselli, G. L.; Rossella, M.; Rubbia, C.; Sala, P.; Scaramelli, A.; Sergiampietri, F.; Spanu, M.; Stefan, D.; Sulej, R.; Szarska, M.; Terrani, M.; Torti, M.; Tortorici, F.; Varanini, F.; Ventura, S.; Vignoli, C.; Wang, H.; Yang, X.; Zalewska, A.; Zani, A.; Zaremba, K.

    2017-04-01

    The measurement of muon momentum by Multiple Coulomb Scattering is a crucial ingredient to the reconstruction of νμ CC events in the ICARUS-T600 liquid argon TPC in absence of magnetic field, as in the search for sterile neutrinos at Fermilab where ICARUS will be exposed to ~ 1 GeV Booster neutrino beam. A sample of ~ 1000 stopping muons produced by charged current interactions of CNGS νμ in the surrounding rock at the INFN Gran Sasso underground Laboratory provides an ideal benchmark in the few-GeV range since their momentum can be directly and independently obtained by the calorimetric measurement. Stopping muon momentum in the 0.5-4.5 GeV/c range has been reconstructed via Multiple Coulomb Scattering with resolution ranging from 10 to 25% depending on muon energy, track length and uniformity of the electric field in the drift volume.

  17. Long Range Weather Prediction III: Miniaturized Distributed Sensors for Global Atmospheric Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teller, E; Leith, C; Canavan, G; Wood, L

    2001-11-13

    impacts of weather involve continuing costs of the order of 1% of GDP, a large fraction of which could be retrieved if high-fidelity predictions of two weeks forward applicability were available. These {approx}$10{sup 2} B annual savings dwarf the <$1 B costs of operating a rational, long-range weather prediction system of the type proposed.

  18. Pose and Shape Reconstruction of a Noncooperative Spacecraft Using Camera and Range Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Volpe

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent interest in on-orbit proximity operations has pushed towards the development of autonomous GNC strategies. In this sense, optical navigation enables a wide variety of possibilities as it can provide information not only about the kinematic state but also about the shape of the observed object. Various mission architectures have been either tested in space or studied on Earth. The present study deals with on-orbit relative pose and shape estimation with the use of a monocular camera and a distance sensor. The goal is to develop a filter which estimates an observed satellite’s relative position, velocity, attitude, and angular velocity, along with its shape, with the measurements obtained by a camera and a distance sensor mounted on board a chaser which is on a relative trajectory around the target. The filter’s efficiency is proved with a simulation on a virtual target object. The results of the simulation, even though relevant to a simplified scenario, show that the estimation process is successful and can be considered a promising strategy for a correct and safe docking maneuver.

  19. Unlikely reformer: Dr Henry Calvert Barnett (1832-1897).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martyr, Philippa

    2017-10-01

    To provide a brief biography of Western Australian colonial lunacy superintendent Dr Henry Calvert Barnett. A range of primary sources were consulted. Barnett was a complex man: a caring and forward-thinking practitioner who had a colourful and turbulent private life. Barnett's contribution to mental health service development in Western Australia was genuine and worthwhile, and should be recognised.

  20. Signal processing and analysis for copper layer thickness measurement within a large variation range in the CMP process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongkai; Zhao, Qian; Lu, Xinchun; Luo, Jianbin

    2017-11-01

    In the copper (Cu) chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) process, accurate determination of a process reaching the end point is of great importance. Based on the eddy current technology, the in situ thickness measurement of the Cu layer is feasible. Previous research studies focus on the application of the eddy current method to the metal layer thickness measurement or endpoint detection. In this paper, an in situ measurement system, which is independently developed by using the eddy current method, is applied to the actual Cu CMP process. A series of experiments are done for further analyzing the dynamic response characteristic of the output signal within different thickness variation ranges. In this study, the voltage difference of the output signal is used to represent the thickness of the Cu layer, and we can extract the voltage difference variations from the output signal fast by using the proposed data processing algorithm. The results show that the voltage difference decreases as thickness decreases in the conventional measurement range and the sensitivity increases at the same time. However, it is also found that there exists a thickness threshold, and the correlation is negative, when the thickness is more than the threshold. Furthermore, it is possible that the in situ measurement system can be used within a larger Cu layer thickness variation range by creating two calibration tables.

  1. Neck range of motion measurements using a new three-dimensional motion analysis system: validity and repeatability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inokuchi, Haruhi; Tojima, Michio; Mano, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Yuki; Ogata, Naoshi; Haga, Nobuhiko

    2015-12-01

    Neck movement is important for many activities of daily living (ADL). Neck disorders, such as cervical spondylosis and whiplash can limit neck movement and ADL. The cervical range of motion (CROM) device has been recently used to measure neck range of motion (ROM); however, this measurement includes trunk motion, and therefore does not represent a pure neck ROM measurement. The authors aimed to develop a new method to establish pure neck ROM measurements during flexion, extension, lateral bending, and rotation using a three-dimensional motion analysis system, VICON. Twelve healthy participants were recruited and neck ROMs during flexion, extension, lateral bending, and rotation were measured using VICON and the CROM device. Test-retest repeatability was assessed using interclass correlation coefficients (ICCs), standard error of measurement (SEM), and minimal detectable change (MDC). Validity between two measurements was evaluated using a determination coefficient and Pearson's correlation coefficient. ICCs of neck ROM measured using VICON and the CROM device were all at substantial or almost perfect levels [VICON: ICC(1,2) = 0.786-0.962, the CROM device: ICC(1,2) = 0.736-0.950]. Both SEMs and MDCs were low in all measurement directions (VICON: SEM = 1.3°-4.5°, MDC = 3.6°-12.5°; the CROM device: SEM = 2.2°-3.9°, MDC = 6.1°-10.7°). Determination coefficients (R(2)s) and Pearson's correlation coefficients (rs) between the two measurement methods were high (R(2) = 0.607-0.745, r = 0.779-0.863). VICON is a useful system to measure neck ROMs and evaluate the efficacy of interventions, such as surgery or physiotherapeutic exercise.

  2. Interview with Dr Anna Matamala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucinea Marcelino Villela

    2016-09-01

    In this interview, which took place in June 2016, Dr Anna Matamala described some details about her long professional experience in Audiovisual Translation, especially in dubbing from English into Catalan, and we talked about many other things like her interest in lexicography, her point of view on some contemporary topics in Audiovisual Translation Studies: the use of technology, the relation between AVT and Accessibility Studies, AVT and Filmmaking fields, the importance of keeping in touch with other countries and even continents outside Europe, and she also gave some advice to the new generation of Translation students.

  3. Interview with Dr Anna Matamala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucinea Marcelino Villela

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this interview, which took place in June 2016, Dr Anna Matamala described some details about her long professional experience in Audiovisual Translation, especially in dubbing from English into Catalan, and we talked about many other things like her interest in lexicography, her point of view on some contemporary topics in Audiovisual Translation Studies: the use of technology, the relation between AVT and Accessibility Studies, AVT and Filmmaking fields, the importance of keeping in touch with other countries and even continents outside Europe, and she also gave some advice to the new generation of Translation students.

  4. Interview with Dr. Damian Milton

    OpenAIRE

    Milton, Damian

    2016-01-01

    Dr Damian Milton is one of the pre-eminent thinkers and presenters in the autism field in the UK and is gaining an increasing reputation internationally. He is a member of the scientific and advisory committee of Research Autism and is Head of Autism Knowledge and Expertise at the National Autistic Society. Damian is also a researcher for London South Bank University. He has worked on a number of projects for the Autism Education Trust, as well as autistic-led ventures such as the Theorising ...

  5. A Multi-hop Topology Control Based on Inter-node Range Measurement for Wireless Sensor Networks Node Localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Husein ALASIRY

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In centralized range-based localization techniques, sufficiency of inter-node range information received by the base station strongly affects node position estimation results. Successful data aggregation is influenced by link stability of each connection of routes, especially in a multi-hop topology model. In general, measuring the inter-node range is only performed for position determination purposes. This research introduces the use of inter-node range measurement information for link selection in a multi-hop route composition in order to increase the rate of data aggregation. Due to irregularity problems of wireless media, two areas of node communication have been considered. The regular communication area is the area in which other nodes are able to perform symmetrical communication to the node without failure. The irregular area is the area in which other nodes are seldom able to communicate. Due to its instability, some existing methods tried to avoid the irregular area completely. The proposed method, named Virtual Boundaries (VBs prioritizes these areas. The regular communication area’s nodes have high priority to be selected as link vertices; however, when there is no link candidate inside this area, nodes within the irregular area will be selected with respect to their range to the parent node. This technique resulted in a more robust multi-hop topology that can reduce isolated node numbers and increase the percentage of data collected by the base station accordingly.

  6. Polymeric nanosensors for measuring the full dynamic pH range of endosomes and lysosomes in mammalian cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Honghao; Andresen, Thomas Lars; Benjaminsen, Rikke Vicki

    2009-01-01

    as pH sensitive dyes, which gave a dynamic pH measurement range from 4.1-7.5. Thus, the sensors cover the pH range of almost all intracellular compartments in mammalian cells. Both neutral and cationic polyacrylamide particles were synthesized where (3-acrylamidopropyl) trimethylammonium chloride...... was used to introduce a net positive charge in the cationic particles. It was found that the positively charged particle sensors were internalized spontaneously by HepG2 cancer cells. These new pH nanosensors are potential tools in time resolved quantification of pH in the endocytic pathway of living cells....

  7. SU-F-T-184: 3D Range-Modulator for Scanned Particle Therapy: Development, Monte Carlo Simulations and Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simeonov, Y; Penchev, P; Ringbaek, T Printz [University of Applied Sciences, Institute of Medical Physics and Radiation Protection, Giessen (Germany); Brons, S [Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT), Heidelberg (Germany); Weber, U [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Zink, K [University of Applied Sciences, Institute of Medical Physics and Radiation Protection, Giessen (Germany); University Hospital Giessen-Marburg, Marburg (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Active raster scanning in particle therapy results in highly conformal dose distributions. Treatment time, however, is relatively high due to the large number of different iso-energy layers used. By using only one energy and the so called 3D range-modulator irradiation times of a few seconds only can be achieved, thus making delivery of homogeneous dose to moving targets (e.g. lung cancer) more reliable. Methods: A 3D range-modulator consisting of many pins with base area of 2.25 mm2 and different lengths was developed and manufactured with rapid prototyping technique. The form of the 3D range-modulator was optimised for a spherical target volume with 5 cm diameter placed at 25 cm in a water phantom. Monte Carlo simulations using the FLUKA package were carried out to evaluate the modulating effect of the 3D range-modulator and simulate the resulting dose distribution. The fine and complicated contour form of the 3D range-modulator was taken into account by a specially programmed user routine. Additionally FLUKA was extended with the capability of intensity modulated scanning. To verify the simulation results dose measurements were carried out at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center (HIT) with a 400.41 MeV 12C beam. Results: The high resolution measurements show that the 3D range-modulator is capable of producing homogeneous 3D conformal dose distributions, simultaneously reducing significantly irradiation time. Measured dose is in very good agreement with the previously conducted FLUKA simulations, where slight differences were traced back to minor manufacturing deviations from the perfect optimised form. Conclusion: Combined with the advantages of very short treatment time the 3D range-modulator could be an alternative to treat small to medium sized tumours (e.g. lung metastasis) with the same conformity as full raster-scanning treatment. Further simulations and measurements of more complex cases will be conducted to investigate the full potential of the 3D

  8. A Proposal for an Out-of-Range Glycemic Population Health Safety Measure for Older Adults With Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogach, Leonard; Tseng, Chin-Lin; Soroka, Orysya; Maney, Miriam; Aron, David

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate patient-level glycemic control and facility variation of a proposed out-of-range (OOR) measure (overtreatment [OT] [HbA1c 9% (75 mmol/mol)]) compared with the standard measure (SM) (HbA1c 75 years. The 47.4% of patients 65-75 years met the OOR measure (33.4% OT, 14% UT), and 65.7% met the SM. For patients aged >75 years, rates were 48.1% for OOR (39.2% OT; 8.9% UT) and 73.2% for SM. Facility-level rates for OOR for patients aged 65-75 years ranged from 33.7 to 60.4% (median 47.4%), with a strong inverse correlation (ρ = -0.41) between SM and OOR performance rankings. Among the best-performing 20% facilities on the SM, 14 of 28 ranked in the worst-performing 20% on the OOR measure; 12 of 27 of the worst-performing 20% facilities on the SM ranked in the best-performing 20% on the OOR measure. Facility rankings that are based on an SM (potential benefits) and OOR measure (potential risks) differ substantially. An OOR for high-risk populations can focus quality improvement on individual patient evaluation to reduce the risk for short-term harms. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  9. Tilted Magnetic Levitation Enables Measurement of the Complete Range of Densities of Materials with Low Magnetic Permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemiroski, Alex; Soh, Siowling; Kwok, Sen Wai; Yu, Hai-Dong; Whitesides, George M

    2016-02-03

    Magnetic levitation (MagLev) of diamagnetic or weakly paramagnetic materials suspended in a paramagnetic solution in a magnetic field gradient provides a simple method to measure the density of small samples of solids or liquids. One major limitation of this method, thus far, has been an inability to measure or manipulate materials outside of a narrow range of densities (0.8 g/cm(3) levitated magnetically. Tilting the MagLev device relative to the gravitational vector enables the magnetic force to be decreased (relative to the magnetic force) along the axis of measurement. This approach enables many practical measurements over the entire range of densities observed in matter at ambient conditions-from air bubbles (ρ ≈ 0) to osmium and iridium (ρ ≈ 23 g/cm(3)). The ability to levitate, simultaneously, objects with a broad range of different densities provides an operationally simple method that may find application to forensic science (e.g., for identifying the composition of miscellaneous objects or powders), industrial manufacturing (e.g., for quality control of parts), or resource-limited settings (e.g., for identifying and separating small particles of metals and alloys).

  10. UV/X-Ray Diffraction Radiation for non-intercepting Micron-Scale Beam Size Measurement

    CERN Document Server

    -; Lefevre, T; Karataev, P; Billing, M

    2012-01-01

    Diffraction radiation (DR) is produced when a relativistic charged particle moves in the vicinity of a medium. The electric field of the charged particle polarizes the target atoms which then oscillate, emitting radiation with a very broad spectrum. The spatial-spectral properties of DR are sensitive to a range of electron beam parameters. Furthermore, the energy loss due to DR is so small that the electron beam parameters are unchanged. Therefore DR can be used to develop non-invasive diagnostic tools. The aim of this project is to measure the transverse (vertical) beam size using incoherent DR. To achieve the micron-scale resolution required by CLIC, DR in UV and X-ray spectral-range must be investigated. During the next few years, experimental validation of such a scheme will be conducted on the CesrTA at Cornell University, USA. Here we present the current status of the experiment preparation.

  11. S3 HMBC hetero: Spin-State-Selective HMBC for accurate measurement of long-range heteronuclear coupling constants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeck, Casper; Gotfredsen, Charlotte H.; Sørensen, Ole W.

    2017-02-01

    A novel method, Spin-State-Selective (S3) HMBC hetero, for accurate measurement of heteronuclear coupling constants is introduced. The method extends the S3 HMBC technique for measurement of homonuclear coupling constants by appending a pulse sequence element that interchanges the polarization in 13C-1H methine pairs. This amounts to converting the spin-state selectivity from 1H spin states to 13C spin states in the spectra of long-range coupled 1H spins, allowing convenient measurement of heteronuclear coupling constants similar to other S3 or E.COSY-type methods. As usual in this type of techniques, the accuracy of coupling constant measurement is independent of the size of the coupling constant of interest. The merits of the new method are demonstrated by application to vinyl acetate, the alkaloid strychnine, and the carbohydrate methyl β-maltoside.

  12. Measuring Relativistic effects in the field of the Earth with Laser Ranged Satellites and the LARASE research program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucchesi, David; Anselmo, Luciano; Bassan, Massimo; Magnafico, Carmelo; Pardini, Carmen; Peron, Roberto; Pucacco, Giuseppe; Stanga, Ruggero; Visco, Massimo

    2017-04-01

    The main goal of the LARASE (LAser RAnged Satellites Experiment) research program is to obtain refined tests of Einstein's theory of General Relativity (GR) by means of very precise measurements of the round-trip time among a number of ground stations of the International Laser Ranging Service (ILRS) network and a set of geodetic satellites. These measurements are guaranteed by means of the powerful and precise Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) technique. In particular, a big effort of LARASE is dedicated to improve the dynamical models of the LAGEOS, LAGEOS II and LARES satellites, with the objective to obtain a more precise and accurate determination of their orbit. These activities contribute to reach a final error budget that should be robust and reliable in the evaluation of the main systematic errors sources that come to play a major role in masking the relativistic precession on the orbit of these laser-ranged satellites. These error sources may be of gravitational and non-gravitational origin. It is important to stress that a more accurate and precise orbit determination, based on more reliable dynamical models, represents a fundamental prerequisite in order to reach a sub-mm precision in the root-mean-square of the SLR range residuals and, consequently, to gather benefits in the fields of geophysics and space geodesy, such as stations coordinates knowledge, geocenter determination and the realization of the Earth's reference frame. The results reached over the last year will be presented in terms of the improvements achieved in the dynamical model, in the orbit determination and, finally, in the measurement of the relativistic precessions that act on the orbit of the satellites considered.

  13. Comparative study on three highly sensitive absorption measurement techniques characterizing lithium niobate over its entire transparent spectral range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leidinger, M; Fieberg, S; Waasem, N; Kühnemann, F; Buse, K; Breunig, I

    2015-08-24

    We employ three highly sensitive spectrometers: a photoacoustic spectrometer, a photothermal common-path interferometer and a whispering-gallery-resonator-based absorption spectrometer, for a comparative study of measuring the absorption coefficient of nominally transparent undoped, congruently grown lithium niobate for ordinarily and extraordinarily polarized light in the wavelength range from 390 to 3800 nm. The absorption coefficient ranges from below 10(-4) cm(-1) up to 2 cm(-1). Furthermore, we measure the absorption at the Urbach tail as well as the multiphonon edge of the material by a standard grating spectrometer and a Fourier-transform infrared spectrometer, providing for the first time an absorption spectrum of the whole transparency window of lithium niobate. The absorption coefficients obtained by the three highly sensitive and independent methods show good agreement.

  14. Measurement of cervical range of motion (CROM) by electronic CROM goniometer: a test of reliability and validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Ellis Yuk Hung; Chiu, Thomas Tai-Wing

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the reliability and validity of the Electronic Cervical Range of Motion (CROM) Goniometer in measurement of cervical spine mobility in adults with and without neck pain. A cross-sectional reliability study was conducted on 54 subjects (26 neck pain and 26 non-neck pain) aged from 20-70 years old. The Numerical Pain Rating Scale and Chinese version of Northwick Park Neck Pain Questionnaire were used to assess neck pain severity and disability respectively. The CROM was measured in sitting position except left to right rotation was measured in supine lying. All the cervical active movements were measured by using the Electronic CROM Goniometer from ARCON TM Functional Capacity Evaluation (FCE) systems. The intra-tester and inter-tester reliability were high in both normal and chronic neck pain groups with ICC coefficients ranged from 0.75-*0.92. There was significant difference in the total CROM between the normal (374.7°) and chronic neck pain group (292.6°). The ACRON cervical goniometer was found to be reliable for measuring cervical mobility in 3 planes for both normal and patient subjects. Construct validity of the goniometer was supported as the test's result documented significant difference in CROM between the control and the neck pain groups.

  15. Reliability and responsiveness of a goniometric device for measuring the range of motion in the dart-throwing motion plane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasubuchi, Kenji; Dohi, Yoshihiro; Fujita, Hiroyuki; Fukumoto, Takahiko

    2018-02-26

    Dart-throwing motion (DTM) is an important component of wrist function and, consequently, has the potential to become an evaluation tool in rehabilitation. However, no measurement method is currently available to reliably measure range of motion (ROM) of the wrist in the DTM plane. To determine the reliability and responsiveness of a goniometric device to measure wrist ROM in the DTM plane. ROM of the wrist in the DTM plane was measured in 70 healthy participants. The intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to evaluate the relative reliability of measurement, and a Bland-Altman analysis conducted to establish its absolute reliability, including the 95% limits of agreement (95% LOA). The standard error of the measurement (SEM) and minimal detectable change at the 95% confidence level (MDC 95 ) were calculated as measures of responsiveness. The intra-rater ICC was 0.87, and an inter-rater ICC of 0.71. There was no evidence of a fixed or proportional bias. For intra- and inter-rater reliability, 95% LOA ranged from -13.83 to 11.12 and from -17.75 to 16.19, respectively. The SEM and MDC 95 were 4.5° and 12.4°, respectively, for intra-rater reliability, and 6.0° and 16.6°, respectively, for inter-rater reliability. The ROM of the wrist in the DTM plane was measured with fair-to-good reliability and responsiveness and, therefore, has the potential to become an evaluation tool for rehabilitation.

  16. Airborne Measurements of CO2 Column Concentration and Range Using a Pulsed Direct-Detection IPDA Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abshire, James B.; Ramanathan, Anand; Riris, Haris; Mao, Jianping; Allan, Graham R.; Hasselbrack, William E.; Weaver, Clark J.; Browell, Edward V.

    2013-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated a pulsed direct detection IPDA lidar to measure range and the column concentration of atmospheric CO2. The lidar measures the atmospheric backscatter profiles and samples the shape of the 1,572.33 nm CO2 absorption line. We participated in the ASCENDS science flights on the NASA DC-8 aircraft during August 2011 and report here lidar measurements made on four flights over a variety of surface and cloud conditions near the US. These included over a stratus cloud deck over the Pacific Ocean, to a dry lake bed surrounded by mountains in Nevada, to a desert area with a coal-fired power plant, and from the Rocky Mountains to Iowa, with segments with both cumulus and cirrus clouds. Most flights were to altitudes >12 km and had 5-6 altitude steps. Analyses show the retrievals of lidar range, CO2 column absorption, and CO2 mixing ratio worked well when measuring over topography with rapidly changing height and reflectivity, through thin clouds, between cumulus clouds, and to stratus cloud tops. The retrievals shows the decrease in column CO2 due to growing vegetation when flying over Iowa cropland as well as a sudden increase in CO2 concentration near a coal-fired power plant. For regions where the CO2 concentration was relatively constant, the measured CO2 absorption lineshape (averaged for 50 s) matched the predicted shapes to better than 1% RMS error. For 10 s averaging, the scatter in the retrievals was typically 2-3 ppm and was limited by the received signal photon count. Retrievals were made using atmospheric parameters from both an atmospheric model and from in situ temperature and pressure from the aircraft. The retrievals had no free parameters and did not use empirical adjustments, and >70% of the measurements passed screening and were used in analysis. The differences between the lidar-measured retrievals and in situ measured average CO2 column concentrations were 6 km.

  17. A Comparison of Antenna Measurements in a Near-Field Range and a Newly Renovated Short-Tapered Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Research Laboratory’s (ARL) near-field range (NFR) and tapered anechoic chamber, which has been newly renovated with absorber material . ARL would like...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT This study was undertaken to quantify and compare electromagnetic device (i.e., antenna) measurements using the US Army...to know the performance levels with the NFR and the newly renovated, slightly different absorber layout configuration laid out and designed by the

  18. Mathematical Model and Calibration Experiment of a Large Measurement Range Flexible Joints 6-UPUR Six-Axis Force Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanzhi Zhao

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays improving the accuracy and enlarging the measuring range of six-axis force sensors for wider applications in aircraft landing, rocket thrust, and spacecraft docking testing experiments has become an urgent objective. However, it is still difficult to achieve high accuracy and large measuring range with traditional parallel six-axis force sensors due to the influence of the gap and friction of the joints. Therefore, to overcome the mentioned limitations, this paper proposed a 6-Universal-Prismatic-Universal-Revolute (UPUR joints parallel mechanism with flexible joints to develop a large measurement range six-axis force sensor. The structural characteristics of the sensor are analyzed in comparison with traditional parallel sensor based on the Stewart platform. The force transfer relation of the sensor is deduced, and the force Jacobian matrix is obtained using screw theory in two cases of the ideal state and the state of flexibility of each flexible joint is considered. The prototype and loading calibration system are designed and developed. The K value method and least squares method are used to process experimental data, and in errors of kind Ι and kind II linearity are obtained. The experimental results show that the calibration error of the K value method is more than 13.4%, and the calibration error of the least squares method is 2.67%. The experimental results prove the feasibility of the sensor and the correctness of the theoretical analysis which are expected to be adopted in practical applications.

  19. Performance Analysis of ToA-Based Positioning Algorithms for Static and Dynamic Targets with Low Ranging Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, André G; Fernandes, Duarte; Catarino, André P; Monteiro, João L

    2017-08-19

    Indoor Positioning Systems (IPSs) for emergency responders is a challenging field attracting researchers worldwide. When compared with traditional indoor positioning solutions, the IPSs for emergency responders stand out as they have to operate in harsh and unstructured environments. From the various technologies available for the localization process, ultra-wide band (UWB) is a promising technology for such systems due to its robust signaling in harsh environments, through-wall propagation and high-resolution ranging. However, during emergency responders' missions, the availability of UWB signals is generally low (the nodes have to be deployed as the emergency responders enter a building) and can be affected by the non-line-of-sight (NLOS) conditions. In this paper, the performance of four typical distance-based positioning algorithms (Analytical, Least Squares, Taylor Series, and Extended Kalman Filter methods) with only three ranging measurements is assessed based on a COTS UWB transceiver. These algorithms are compared based on accuracy, precision and root mean square error (RMSE). The algorithms were evaluated under two environments with different propagation conditions (an atrium and a lab), for static and mobile devices, and under the human body's influence. A NLOS identification and error mitigation algorithm was also used to improve the ranging measurements. The results show that the Extended Kalman Filter outperforms the other algorithms in almost every scenario, but it is affected by the low measurement rate of the UWB system.

  20. The Value of Motion: Patient-Reported Outcome Measures Are Correlated With Range of Motion in Total Ankle Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekker, Travis J; Hamid, Kamran S; Federer, Andrew E; Steele, John R; Easley, Mark E; Nunley, James A; Adams, Samuel B

    2017-12-01

    The proposed benefit of total ankle replacement (TAR) over ankle fusion is preserved ankle motion, thus we hypothesized that an increase in range of motion (ROM) is positively correlated with validated patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) in individuals receiving TAR. Patients undergoing TAR at a single academic medical center between 2007 and 2013 were evaluated in this study. In addition to a minimum of 2-year follow-up, complete preoperative and postoperative outcome measures for the Foot and Ankle Disability Index (FADI), Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment (SMFA) Bother and Function Indices, Visual Analog Scale (VAS), and 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) were requisite for inclusion. Standardized weightbearing maximum dorsiflexion and plantarflexion sagittal radiographs were obtained and previously described ankle and foot measurements were performed to determine ankle ROM. Eighty-eight patients met inclusion criteria (33 INBONE, 18 Salto-Talaris, 37 STAR). Mean time to final ROM radiographs was 43.8 months (range 24-89 months). All aforementioned PROMs improved between preoperative evaluation and most recent follow-up (  P dorsiflexion was positively associated with FADI, SF-36 MCS, and SMFA Function (  P motion was positively correlated with multiple PROMs. Disease-specific and generic health-related quality of life PROMs demonstrated improvement postoperatively in all domains when evaluating final total range of motion. Patients who undergo TAR for end-stage osteoarthritis with improvement in ROM demonstrate a direct correlation with improved patient-centric metrics and outcome scores. Level III: Retrospective comparative study.

  1. A wide-frequency range AC magnetometer to measure the specific absorption rate in nanoparticles for magnetic hyperthermia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garaio, E., E-mail: eneko.garayo@ehu.es [Elektrizitatea eta Elektronika Saila, UPV/EHU, P.K. 644, Bilbao (Spain); Collantes, J.M. [Elektrizitatea eta Elektronika Saila, UPV/EHU, P.K. 644, Bilbao (Spain); Garcia, J.A. [Fisika Aplikatua II Saila, UPV/EHU, P.K. 644, Bilbao (Spain); Plazaola, F. [Elektrizitatea eta Elektronika Saila, UPV/EHU, P.K. 644, Bilbao (Spain); Mornet, S. [Institut de Chimie de la Matière Condensée de Bordeaux, UPR 9048 CNRS / Université de Bordeaux, Bordeaux (France); Couillaud, F. [Résonance Magnétique des Systèmes Biologiques, UMR 5536 CNRS / Université de Bordeaux, Bordeaux (France); Sandre, O., E-mail: olivier.sandre@enscbp.fr [Laboratoire de Chimie des Polymères Organiques, UMR 5629 CNRS / Université de Bordeaux, Bordeaux (France)

    2014-11-15

    Measurement of specific absorption rate (SAR) of magnetic nanoparticles is crucial to assert their potential for magnetic hyperthermia. To perform this task, calorimetric methods are widely used. However, those methods are not very accurate and are difficult to standardize. In this paper, we present AC magnetometry results performed with a lab-made magnetometer that is able to obtain dynamic hysteresis-loops in the AC magnetic field frequency range from 50 kHz to 1 MHz and intensities up to 24 kA m{sup −1}. In this work, SAR values of maghemite nanoparticles dispersed in water are measured by AC magnetometry. The so-obtained values are compared with the SAR measured by calorimetric methods. Both measurements, by calorimetry and magnetometry, are in good agreement. Therefore, the presented AC magnetometer is a suitable way to obtain SAR values of magnetic nanoparticles. - Highlights: • We propose AC magnetometry as a method to measure the specific absorption rate (SAR) of magnetic nanoparticles suitable for magnetic hyperthermia therapy. • We have built a lab-made AC magnetometer, which is able to measure magnetic dynamic hysteresis-loops of nanoparticle dispersions. • The device works with AC magnetic field intensities up to 24 kA m{sup −1} in a frequency range from 75 kHz to 1 MHz. • The SAR values of maghemite nanoparticles around 12 nm in magnetic diameter dispersed in water are measured by the lab-made magnetometer and different calorimetric methods. • Although all methods are in good agreement, several factors (probe location, thermal inertia, losses, etc.) make calorimetric method less accurate than AC magnetometry.

  2. Dr House, TV, and reality...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapostolle, Frédéric; Montois, Sylvie; Alhéritière, Armelle; De Stefano, Carla; Le Toumelin, Philippe; Adnet, Frédéric

    2013-02-01

    Medical practice in the media is usually far from reality. Thus, the viewer may be led astray. The world-famous fictional Dr House has to face a difficult diagnosis every week. His practice does not seem to reflect reality. The aim of this study was to assess the diagnosis strategy involved in this television program. An observer has previewed the 2011 season. The episode running time, the patient's age and sex, the list of all investigations and interventions, the final diagnosis, and the patient's outcome were collected. Number and proportion of French viewers for each episode were recorded. We analyzed 18 episodes. The median running time was 42.5 (42.1-43.2) minutes. Main patient characters were 12 men (66%) and 6 women (33%); the average age was 31 (22-38) years. There were 225 investigations or interventions reported, averaging 14 (9-15) per episode, representing one examination every 3.1 (2.9-4.8) minutes. The most frequently prescribed investigations were magnetic resonance imaging (MRI; 13; 72%), blood sample (11; 61%), and biopsy (10; 56%). The most frequent interventions were surgery, anti-infectious treatments, and steroid treatments (9 each; 50%). Two patients (11%) died. The median number of spectators was 8.4 (8.1-8.7) million, corresponding to 33% (33%-34%) of the French national audience. The population and the examination strategies used by Dr House were unrealistic. Because of this distortion, patients may not understand, nor accept the delay, the investigation choices, the intervention costs, risks, nor failures of a daily medical practice. Physicians should be aware of this "information bias." Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Dr. von Braun Briefing Walt Disney

    Science.gov (United States)

    1965-01-01

    Dr. von Braun began his association with Walt Disney in the 1950s when the rocket scientist appeared in three Disney television productions related to the exploration of space. Years later, Dr. von Braun invited Disney and his associates to tour the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama. This photograph is dated April 13, 1965. From left are R.J. Schwinghamer from the MSFC, Disney, B.J. Bernight, and Dr. von Braun.

  4. In Memoriam: Dr. Frank John Fenner

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-04-22

    This podcast reflects on one of the greatest pioneers in virology, Dr. Frank John Fenner. Dr. Frederick Murphy, a member of EID's editorial board and the Institute of Medicine, and professor of Pathology at the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston, shares professional and personal stories of Dr. Frank Fenner.  Created: 4/22/2011 by National Center for Emerging Zoonotic and Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 4/26/2011.

  5. Short-range lidar measurement of top fruit tree canopies for pesticide applications research in the United Kingdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walklate, Peter J.; Richardson, G. M.; Baker, D. E.; Richards, P. A.; Cross, J. V.

    1997-07-01

    This paper presents the measurements of dwarf and semi-dwarf Cox apple trees with a tractor-mounted LIDAR (light detecting and ranging). An analysis is presented which derives structural parameters of the canopy for use in pesticide spraying research by considering the number flux of LIDAR scans intercepted by the crop in a known spatial segment. LIDAR measurements of the crop area normalized by the horizontal projected area of the crop are compared with measurements derived from a destructive sampling method. The distributions of local crop area density and crop interception probability are also presented. Crop area density distribution can be used to estimate the deposition distribution of spray by utilizing a suitable transport and deposition model. Alternatively, crop interception probability distribution can be used as a first order estimate of the spray deposition distribution by making an analogy between light and spray transmission.

  6. [Research on the range of motion measurement system for spine based on LabVIEW image processing technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaofang; Deng, Linhong; Lu, Hu; He, Bin

    2014-08-01

    A measurement system based on the image processing technology and developed by LabVIEW was designed to quickly obtain the range of motion (ROM) of spine. NI-Vision module was used to pre-process the original images and calculate the angles of marked needles in order to get ROM data. Six human cadaveric thoracic spine segments T7-T10 were selected to carry out 6 kinds of loads, including left/right lateral bending, flexion, extension, cis/counterclockwise torsion. The system was used to measure the ROM of segment T8-T9 under the loads from 1 Nm to 5 Nm. The experimental results showed that the system is able to measure the ROM of the spine accurately and quickly, which provides a simple and reliable tool for spine biomechanics investigators.

  7. Earth gravity field modeling and relativistic measurements with laser-ranged satellites and the LARASE research program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pucacco, Giuseppe; Lucchesi, David; Anselmo, Luciano; Bassan, Massimo; Magnafico, Carmelo; Pardini, Carmen; Peron, Roberto; Stanga, Ruggero; Visco, Massimo

    2017-04-01

    The importance of General Relativity (GR) for space geodesy — and for geodesy in general — is well known since several decades and it has been confirmed by a number of very significant results. For instance, GR plays a fundamental role for the following very notable techniques: Satellite-and-Lunar Laser Ranging (SLR/LLR), Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI), Doppler Orbitography and Radio-positioning Integrated by Satellite (DORIS), and Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS). Each of these techniques is intimately and closely related with both GR and geodesy, i.e. they are linked in a loop where benefits in one field provide positive improvements in the other ones. A common ingredient for a suitable and reliable use of each of these techniques is represented by the knowledge of the Earth's gravitational field, both in its static and temporal dependence. Spaceborne gravimetry, with the inclusion of accelerometers and gradiometers on board dedicated satellites, together with microwave links between satellites and GPS measurements, have allowed a huge improvement in the determination of the Earth's geopotential during the last 15 years. In the near future, further improvements are expected in this knowledge thanks to the inclusion of laser inter-satellite link and the possibility to compare frequency and atomic standards by a direct use of atomic clocks, both on the Earth's surface and in space. Such results will be also important for the possibility to further improve the GR tests and measurements in the field of the Earth with laser-ranged satellites in order to compare the predictions of Einstein's theory with those of other (proposed) relativistic theories for the interpretation of the gravitational interaction. Within the present paper we describe the state of the art of such measurements with geodetic satellites, as the two LAGEOS and LARES, and we discuss the effective impact of the systematic errors of gravitational origin on the measurement of

  8. Entropy measures, entropy estimators, and their performance in quantifying complex dynamics: Effects of artifacts, nonstationarity, and long-range correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Wanting; Faes, Luca; Ivanov, Plamen Ch.

    2017-06-01

    Entropy measures are widely applied to quantify the complexity of dynamical systems in diverse fields. However, the practical application of entropy methods is challenging, due to the variety of entropy measures and estimators and the complexity of real-world time series, including nonstationarities and long-range correlations (LRC). We conduct a systematic study on the performance, bias, and limitations of three basic measures (entropy, conditional entropy, information storage) and three traditionally used estimators (linear, kernel, nearest neighbor). We investigate the dependence of entropy measures on estimator- and process-specific parameters, and we show the effects of three types of nonstationarities due to artifacts (trends, spikes, local variance change) in simulations of stochastic autoregressive processes. We also analyze the impact of LRC on the theoretical and estimated values of entropy measures. Finally, we apply entropy methods on heart rate variability data from subjects in different physiological states and clinical conditions. We find that entropy measures can only differentiate changes of specific types in cardiac dynamics and that appropriate preprocessing is vital for correct estimation and interpretation. Demonstrating the limitations of entropy methods and shedding light on how to mitigate bias and provide correct interpretations of results, this work can serve as a comprehensive reference for the application of entropy methods and the evaluation of existing studies.

  9. Critical current measurements of high-temperature superconducting short samples at a wide range of temperatures and magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hongjun; Liu, Huajun; Liu, Fang; Zhang, Huahui; Ci, Lu; Shi, Yi; Lei, Lei

    2018-01-01

    High-Temperature Superconductors (HTS) are potential materials for high-field magnets, low-loss transmission cables, and Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) due to their high upper critical magnetic field (H c2 ) and critical temperature (T c ). The critical current (I c ) of HTS, which is one of the most important parameters for superconductor application, depends strongly on the magnetic fields and temperatures. A new I c measurement system that can carry out accurate I c measurement for HTS short samples with various temperatures (4.2-80 K), magnetic fields (0-14 T), and angles of the magnetic field (0°-90°) has been developed. The I c measurement system mainly consists of a measurement holder, temperature-control system, background magnet, test cryostat, data acquisition system, and DC power supply. The accuracy of temperature control is better than ±0.1 K over the 20-80 K range and ±0.05 K when measured below 20 K. The maximum current is over 1000 A with a measurement uncertainty of 1%. The system had been successfully used for YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x (YBCO) tapes I c determination with different temperatures and magnetic fields.

  10. Current Practices of Measuring and Reference Range Reporting of Free and Total Testosterone in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Margaret; Flores, David; May, Danica; Gourley, Eric; Nangia, Ajay K

    2016-05-01

    The evaluation and management of male hypogonadism should be based on symptoms and on serum testosterone levels. Diagnostically this relies on accurate testing and reference values. Our objective was to define the distribution of reference values and assays for free and total testosterone by clinical laboratories in the United States. Upper and lower reference values, assay methodology and source of published reference ranges were obtained from laboratories across the country. A standardized survey was reviewed with laboratory staff via telephone. Descriptive statistics were used to tabulate results. We surveyed a total of 120 laboratories in 47 states. Total testosterone was measured in house at 73% of laboratories. At the remaining laboratories studies were sent to larger centralized reference facilities. The mean ± SD lower reference value of total testosterone was 231 ± 46 ng/dl (range 160 to 300) and the mean upper limit was 850 ± 141 ng/dl (range 726 to 1,130). Only 9% of laboratories where in-house total testosterone testing was performed created a reference range unique to their region. Others validated the instrument recommended reference values in a small number of internal test samples. For free testosterone 82% of laboratories sent testing to larger centralized reference laboratories where equilibrium dialysis and/or liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry was done. The remaining laboratories used published algorithms to calculate serum free testosterone. Reference ranges for testosterone assays vary significantly among laboratories. The ranges are predominantly defined by limited population studies of men with unknown medical and reproductive histories. These poorly defined and variable reference values, especially the lower limit, affect how clinicians determine treatment. Copyright © 2016 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Long-range weight functions in fundamental measure theory of the non-uniform hard-sphere fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen-Goos, Hendrik

    2016-06-22

    We introduce long-range weight functions to the framework of fundamental measure theory (FMT) of the non-uniform, single-component hard-sphere fluid. While the range of the usual weight functions is equal to the hard-sphere radius R, the modified weight functions have range 3R. Based on the augmented FMT, we calculate the radial distribution function g(r) up to second order in the density within Percus' test particle theory. Consistency of the compressibility and virial routes on this level allows us to determine the free parameter γ of the theory. As a side result, we obtain a value for the fourth virial coefficient B 4 which deviates by only 0.01% from the exact result. The augmented FMT is tested for the dense fluid by comparing results for g(r) calculated via the test particle route to existing results from molecular dynamics simulations. The agreement at large distances (r  >  6R) is significantly improved when the FMT with long-range weight functions is used. In order to improve agreement close to contact (r  =  2R) we construct a free energy which is based on the accurate Carnahan-Starling equation of state, rather than the Percus-Yevick compressibility equation underlying standard FMT.

  12. Airborne Measurements of CO2 Column Concentration and Range Using a Pulsed Direct-Detection IPDA Lidar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James B. Abshire

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We have previously demonstrated a pulsed direct detection IPDA lidar to measure range and the column concentration of atmospheric CO2. The lidar measures the atmospheric backscatter profiles and samples the shape of the 1,572.33 nm CO2 absorption line. We participated in the ASCENDS science flights on the NASA DC-8 aircraft during August 2011 and report here lidar measurements made on four flights over a variety of surface and cloud conditions near the US. These included over a stratus cloud deck over the Pacific Ocean, to a dry lake bed surrounded by mountains in Nevada, to a desert area with a coal-fired power plant, and from the Rocky Mountains to Iowa, with segments with both cumulus and cirrus clouds. Most flights were to altitudes >12 km and had 5–6 altitude steps. Analyses show the retrievals of lidar range, CO2 column absorption, and CO2 mixing ratio worked well when measuring over topography with rapidly changing height and reflectivity, through thin clouds, between cumulus clouds, and to stratus cloud tops. The retrievals shows the decrease in column CO2 due to growing vegetation when flying over Iowa cropland as well as a sudden increase in CO2 concentration near a coal-fired power plant. For regions where the CO2 concentration was relatively constant, the measured CO2 absorption lineshape (averaged for 50 s matched the predicted shapes to better than 1% RMS error. For 10 s averaging, the scatter in the retrievals was typically 2–3 ppm and was limited by the received signal photon count. Retrievals were made using atmospheric parameters from both an atmospheric model and from in situ temperature and pressure from the aircraft. The retrievals had no free parameters and did not use empirical adjustments, and >70% of the measurements passed screening and were used in analysis. The differences between the lidar-measured retrievals and in situ measured average CO2 column concentrations were <1.4 ppm for flight measurement altitudes >6

  13. The concurrent validity and reliability of the Leg Motion system for measuring ankle dorsiflexion range of motion in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero Morales, Carlos; Calvo Lobo, César; Rodríguez Sanz, David; Sanz Corbalán, Irene; Ruiz Ruiz, Beatriz; López López, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    New reliable devices for range of motion (ROM) measures in older adults are necessary to improve knowledge about the functional capability in this population. Dorsiflexion ROM limitation is associated with ankle injuries, foot pain, lower limb disorders, loss of balance, gait control disorders and fall risk in older adults. The aim of the present study was to assess the validity and reliability of the Leg Motion device for measuring ankle dorsiflexion ROM in older adults. Adescriptive repeated-measures study was designed to test the reliability of Leg Motion in thirty-three healthy elderly patients older than 65 years. The subjects had to meet the following inclusion and exclusion criteria in their medical records: older than 65 years; no lower extremity injury for at least one year prior to evaluation (meniscopathy, or fractures) and any chronic injuries (e.g., osteoarthritis); no previous hip, knee or ankle surgery; no neuropathic alterations and no cognitive conditions (e.g., Alzheimer's disease or dementia). Participants were recruited through the person responsible for the physiotherapist area from a nursing center. The subjects were evaluated in two different sessions at the same time of day, and there was a break of two weeks between sessions. To test the validity of the Leg Motion system, the participants were measured in a weight-bearing lunge position using a classic goniometer with 1° increments, a smartphone with an inclinometer standard app (iPhone 5S®) with 1° increments and a measuring tape that could measure 0.1 cm. All testing was performed while the patients were barefoot. The researcher had ten years of experience as a physiotherapist using goniometer, tape measure and inclinometer devices. Mean values and standard deviations were as follows: Leg Motion (right 5.15 ± 3.08; left 5.19 ± 2.98), tape measure (right 5.12 ± 3.08; left 5.12 ± 2.80), goniometer (right 45.87° ± 4.98; left 44.50° ± 5.54) and inclinometer app (right

  14. The concurrent validity and reliability of the Leg Motion system for measuring ankle dorsiflexion range of motion in older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Romero Morales

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background New reliable devices for range of motion (ROM measures in older adults are necessary to improve knowledge about the functional capability in this population. Dorsiflexion ROM limitation is associated with ankle injuries, foot pain, lower limb disorders, loss of balance, gait control disorders and fall risk in older adults. The aim of the present study was to assess the validity and reliability of the Leg Motion device for measuring ankle dorsiflexion ROM in older adults. Methods Adescriptive repeated-measures study was designed to test the reliability of Leg Motion in thirty-three healthy elderly patients older than 65 years. The subjects had to meet the following inclusion and exclusion criteria in their medical records: older than 65 years; no lower extremity injury for at least one year prior to evaluation (meniscopathy, or fractures and any chronic injuries (e.g., osteoarthritis; no previous hip, knee or ankle surgery; no neuropathic alterations and no cognitive conditions (e.g., Alzheimer’s disease or dementia. Participants were recruited through the person responsible for the physiotherapist area from a nursing center. The subjects were evaluated in two different sessions at the same time of day, and there was a break of two weeks between sessions. To test the validity of the Leg Motion system, the participants were measured in a weight-bearing lunge position using a classic goniometer with 1° increments, a smartphone with an inclinometer standard app (iPhone 5S® with 1° increments and a measuring tape that could measure 0.1 cm. All testing was performed while the patients were barefoot. The researcher had ten years of experience as a physiotherapist using goniometer, tape measure and inclinometer devices. Results Mean values and standard deviations were as follows: Leg Motion (right 5.15 ± 3.08; left 5.19 ± 2.98, tape measure (right 5.12 ± 3.08; left 5.12 ± 2.80, goniometer (right 45.87° ± 4.98; left 44

  15. Validity and intra-rater reliability of an android phone application to measure cervical range-of-motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quek, June; Brauer, Sandra G; Treleaven, Julia; Pua, Yong-Hao; Mentiplay, Benjamin; Clark, Ross Allan

    2014-04-17

    Concurrent validity and intra-rater reliability using a customized Android phone application to measure cervical-spine range-of-motion (ROM) has not been previously validated against a gold-standard three-dimensional motion analysis (3DMA) system. Twenty-one healthy individuals (age:31 ± 9.1 years, male:11) participated, with 16 re-examined for intra-rater reliability 1-7 days later. An Android phone was fixed on a helmet, which was then securely fastened on the participant's head. Cervical-spine ROM in flexion, extension, lateral flexion and rotation were performed in sitting with concurrent measurements obtained from both a 3DMA system and the phone.The phone demonstrated moderate to excellent (ICC = 0.53-0.98, Spearman ρ = 0.52-0.98) concurrent validity for ROM measurements in cervical flexion, extension, lateral-flexion and rotation. However, cervical rotation demonstrated both proportional and fixed bias. Excellent intra-rater reliability was demonstrated for cervical flexion, extension and lateral flexion (ICC = 0.82-0.90), but poor for right- and left-rotation (ICC = 0.05-0.33) using the phone. Possible reasons for the outcome are that flexion, extension and lateral-flexion measurements are detected by gravity-dependent accelerometers while rotation measurements are detected by the magnetometer which can be adversely affected by surrounding magnetic fields. The results of this study demonstrate that the tested Android phone application is valid and reliable to measure ROM of the cervical-spine in flexion, extension and lateral-flexion but not in rotation likely due to magnetic interference. The clinical implication of this study is that therapists should be mindful of the plane of measurement when using the Android phone to measure ROM of the cervical-spine.

  16. Beam-based measurements of long-range transverse wakefields in the Compact Linear Collider main-linac accelerating structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Zha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The baseline design of CLIC (Compact Linear Collider uses X-band accelerating structures for its main linacs. In order to maintain beam stability in multibunch operation, long-range transverse wakefields must be suppressed by 2 orders of magnitude between successive bunches, which are separated in time by 0.5 ns. Such strong wakefield suppression is achieved by equipping every accelerating structure cell with four damping waveguides terminated with individual rf loads. A beam-based experiment to directly measure the effectiveness of this long-range transverse wakefield and benchmark simulations was made in the FACET test facility at SLAC using a prototype CLIC accelerating structure. The experiment showed good agreement with the simulations and a strong suppression of the wakefields with an unprecedented minimum resolution of 0.1  V/(pC mm m.

  17. Measurement of the Range Component Directional Signature in a DRIFT-II Detector using 252Cf Neutrons

    CERN Document Server

    Burgos, S; Forbes, J; Ghag, C; Gold, M; Hagemann, C; Kudryavtsev, V A; Lawson, T B; Loomba, D; Majewski, P; Muna, D; Murphy, A St J; Nicklin, G G; Paling, S M; Petkov, A; Plank, S J S; Robinson, M; Sanghi, N; Snowden-Ifft, D P; Spooner, N J C; Turk, J; Tziaferi, E

    2008-01-01

    The DRIFT collaboration utilizes low pressure gaseous detectors to search for WIMP dark matter with directional signatures. A 252Cf neutron source was placed on each of the principal axes of a DRIFT detector in order to test its ability to measure directional signatures from the three components of very low energy (~keV/amu) recoil ranges. A high trigger threshold and the event selection procedure ensured that only sulfur recoils were analyzed. Sulfur recoils produced in the CS2 target gas by the 252Cf source closely match those expected from massive WIMP induced sulfur recoils. For each orientation of the source a directional signal from the range components was observed, indicating that the detector is directional along all 3 axes. An analysis of these results yields an optimal orientation for DRIFT detectors when searching for a directional signature from WIMPs. Additional energy dependent information is provided to aid in understanding this effect.

  18. Measurements of the conduction of heat in water vapor, nitrogen and mixtures of these gases in an extended temperature range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frohn, A.; Westerdorf, M.

    Experimental and analytical results are presented from trials with heat conduction in water vapor, nitrogen, and mixtures of the two in a cylindrical heat transfer cell. The pressures examined ranged from 100-0.01 mbar, corresponding to Knudsen numbers of 0.01-100. Formulations are defined for the continuum conditions, the free molecule conditions, the transition region, and the momentum equation solution. Experimentation with an instrumented configuration of an inner and outer cylinder over the temperature range 300-725 K is described, noting the use of a vacuum around the inner, gas-filled container in order to measure the radiative heat losses. The results are useful for predicting heat transfer in high altitude flight or among small droplets in natural fogs, cooling towers, and combustion chambers.

  19. Validity and test-retest reliability of manual goniometers for measuring passive hip range of motion in femoroacetabular impingement patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nussbaumer Silvio

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aims of this study were to evaluate the construct validity (known group, concurrent validity (criterion based and test-retest (intra-rater reliability of manual goniometers to measure passive hip range of motion (ROM in femoroacetabular impingement patients and healthy controls. Methods Passive hip flexion, abduction, adduction, internal and external rotation ROMs were simultaneously measured with a conventional goniometer and an electromagnetic tracking system (ETS on two different testing sessions. A total of 15 patients and 15 sex- and age-matched healthy controls participated in the study. Results The goniometer provided greater hip ROM values compared to the ETS (range 2.0-18.9 degrees; P P Conclusions The present study suggests that goniometer-based assessments considerably overestimate hip joint ROM by measuring intersegmental angles (e.g., thigh flexion on trunk for hip flexion rather than true hip ROM. It is likely that uncontrolled pelvic rotation and tilt due to difficulties in placing the goniometer properly and in performing the anatomically correct ROM contribute to the overrating of the arc of these motions. Nevertheless, conventional manual goniometers can be used with confidence for longitudinal assessments in the clinic.

  20. Intra-examiner reliability of measurements of ankle range of motion using a modified inclinometer: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, Patricia; Landsman, Victoria; Wiltshire, Leslie

    2017-01-01

    A modified inclinometer was designed for measuring total ankle range of motion (ROM) in the standing position for a large future study. The purpose of this pilot study was to assess the intra-examiner reliability of this new device in order to see if the examiner would be able to produce equally reliable measurements with this instrument as with a routinely used goniometer. Nineteen young healthy individuals took part in the pilot. The same examiner took the ROM measurements using both devices twice on the same day and one further time 2 or 3 days later. Test-retest reliability was measured using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). The ICC values were 0.86 (95% CI=[0.67; 0.94]) and 0.83 (95% CI=[0.61; 0.93]) for the measurements taken with the goniometer on the same day and for those on two different days. The corresponding values for the modified inclinometer were 0.88 (95% CI=[0.72;0.95]) and 0.81 (95% CI=[0.57; 0.92]). Both instruments were found to have very good test-retest reliability. PMID:28928495

  1. Validity of an Alternate Hand Behind Back Shoulder Range of Motion Measurement in Patients With Shoulder Pain and Movement Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satpute, Kiran H; Hall, Toby; Adanani, Aditi

    2018-02-23

    The purpose of this study was to determine the criterion-related validity of a novel method of measuring hand behind back (HBB) shoulder range of motion (ROM) for evaluating pain and disability in people with shoulder pain and movement impairment. This cross-sectional study design evaluated shoulder ROM, pain, fear-avoidance beliefs, and disability in 60 people (aged 35-70 years, 31 male) with chronic unilateral shoulder dysfunction (mean duration 15.73 weeks). Shoulder HBB ROM was measured with a bubble inclinometer in a manner that did not require the patient to disrobe. Correlations were sought between HBB ROM and other shoulder movements, as well as scores recorded on the Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI), visual analogue scale for pain, Fear Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire (FABQ), and duration of symptoms. Restriction of HBB movement was significantly correlated with SPADI total disability score (r = 0.39, P shoulder movements. These findings suggest that this novel method of measuring HBB ROM could be used as a functional outcome measure in the evaluation of patients with shoulder disorders. This method could be considered as an additional or alternative where there are challenges in measuring HBB because of restrictions in undressing a patient, such as for cultural reasons. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Micro-Viscometer for Measuring Shear-Varying Blood Viscosity over a Wide-Ranging Shear Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byung Jun; Lee, Seung Yeob; Jee, Solkeun; Atajanov, Arslan; Yang, Sung

    2017-01-01

    In this study, a micro-viscometer is developed for measuring shear-varying blood viscosity over a wide-ranging shear rate. The micro-viscometer consists of 10 microfluidic channel arrays, each of which has a different micro-channel width. The proposed design enables the retrieval of 10 different shear rates from a single flow rate, thereby enabling the measurement of shear-varying blood viscosity with a fixed flow rate condition. For this purpose, an optimal design that guarantees accurate viscosity measurement is selected from a parametric study. The functionality of the micro-viscometer is verified by both numerical and experimental studies. The proposed micro-viscometer shows 6.8% (numerical) and 5.3% (experimental) in relative error when compared to the result from a standard rotational viscometer. Moreover, a reliability test is performed by repeated measurement (N = 7), and the result shows 2.69 ± 2.19% for the mean relative error. Accurate viscosity measurements are performed on blood samples with variations in the hematocrit (35%, 45%, and 55%), which significantly influences blood viscosity. Since the blood viscosity correlated with various physical parameters of the blood, the micro-viscometer is anticipated to be a significant advancement for realization of blood on a chip. PMID:28632151

  3. Measures of range of motion and strength among healthy women with differing quality of lower extremity movement during the lateral step-down test

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rabin, Alon; Kozol, Zvi

    2010-01-01

    Cross-sectional. To determine the association between hip and ankle range-of-motion measures, as well as measures of hip muscle strength, with measures of quality of lower extremity movement, as assessed visually...

  4. Impact of blood volume changes within the human skin on the diffuse reflectance measurements in visible and NIR spectral ranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zherebtsov, Evgeny; Bykov, Alexander; Popov, Alexey; Doronin, Alexander; Meglinski, Igor

    2017-03-01

    We consider changes in the volume of blood and oxygen saturation caused by a pulse wave and their influence on the diffuse reflectance spectra in the visible/NIR spectral range. CUDA-based Monte-Carlo model was used for routine simulation of detector depth sensitivity (sampling volume) and skin spectra, and their variations associated with physiological changes in the human skin. The results presented in the form of animated graphs of sampling volume changes for scaling of the parameters of the main human skin layers related to the results of experimental measurements are of particular interest for pulse oximetry, photoplethysmography, Doppler flowmetry, reflectance spectroscopy.

  5. Upper limit on a stochastic background of gravitational waves from seismic measurements in the range 0.05-1 Hz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, Michael; Harms, Jan

    2014-03-14

    In this Letter, we present an upper limit of ΩGWgravitational-wave (GW) background integrated over a year in the frequency range 0.05-1 Hz, which improves current upper limits from high-precision laboratory experiments by about 9 orders of magnitude. The limit is obtained using the response of Earth itself to GWs via a free-surface effect described more than 40 years ago by Dyson. The response was measured by a global network of broadband seismometers selected to maximize the sensitivity.

  6. Excited state absorption measurement in the 900-1250 nm wavelength range for bismuth-doped silicate fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Seongwoo; Kalita, Mridu P; Nilsson, Johan; Sahu, Jayanta

    2009-02-15

    The feasibility of direct laser diode pumping of Bi-doped fiber lasers at the wavelengths of 915 and 975 nm was examined by measuring excited state absorption in Bi-doped silicate fibers for the wavelength range of 900-1250 nm. When the Bi-doped fibers were pumped at 1047 nm a strong excited state absorption was found at 915 and 975 nm, whereas no significant excited state absorption was observed in the 1080 nm pumping band nor in the emission band, approximately 1160 nm, of Bi-doped fiber lasers.

  7. Validity of clinical outcome measures to evaluate ankle range of motion during the weight-bearing lunge test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Emily A; Docherty, Carrie L

    2017-07-01

    To determine the concurrent validity of standard clinical outcome measures compared to laboratory outcome measure while performing the weight-bearing lunge test (WBLT). Cross-sectional study. Fifty participants performed the WBLT to determine dorsiflexion ROM using four different measurement techniques: dorsiflexion angle with digital inclinometer at 15cm distal to the tibial tuberosity (°), dorsiflexion angle with inclinometer at tibial tuberosity (°), maximum lunge distance (cm), and dorsiflexion angle using a 2D motion capture system (°). Outcome measures were recorded concurrently during each trial. To establish concurrent validity, Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients (r) were conducted, comparing each dependent variable to the 2D motion capture analysis (identified as the reference standard). A higher correlation indicates strong concurrent validity. There was a high correlation between each measurement technique and the reference standard. Specifically the correlation between the inclinometer placement at 15cm below the tibial tuberosity (44.9°±5.5°) and the motion capture angle (27.0°±6.0°) was r=0.76 (p=0.001), between the inclinometer placement at the tibial tuberosity angle (39.0°±4.6°) and the motion capture angle was r=0.71 (p=0.001), and between the distance from the wall clinical measure (10.3±3.0cm) to the motion capture angle was r=0.74 (p=0.001). This study determined that the clinical measures used during the WBLT have a high correlation with the reference standard for assessing dorsiflexion range of motion. Therefore, obtaining maximum lunge distance and inclinometer angles are both valid assessments during the weight-bearing lunge test. Copyright © 2016 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Diffraction Radiation test at CesrTA for Non-Intercepting Micron-scale Beam Size Measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Bobb, L; Lefevre, T; Mazzoni, S; Aumeyr, T; Karataev, P; Billing, M; Conway, J

    2013-01-01

    Diffraction radiation (DR) is produced when a relativistic charged particle moves in the vicinity of a medium. The electric field of the charged particle polarises the target atoms which then oscillate, emitting radiation with a very broad spectrum. The spatial-spectral properties of DR are sensitive to a range of electron beam parameters. Furthermore, the energy loss due to DR is so small that the electron beam parameters are unchanged. DR can therefore be used to develop non-invasive diagnostic tools. To achieve the micron-scale resolution required to measure the transverse (vertical) beam size using incoherent DR in CLIC, DR in UV and X-ray spectral-range must be investigated. Experimental validation of such a scheme is ongoing at CesrTA at Cornell University, USA. Here we report on the test using 0.5 mm and 1 mm target apertures on a 2.1 GeV electron beam and 400 nm wavelength.

  9. Reliability of knee joint range of motion and circumference measurements after total knee arthroplasty: does tester experience matter?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Thomas Linding; Christensen, Malene; Christensen, Stine Sommer

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Two of the most utilized outcome measures to assess knee joint range of motion (ROM) and intra-articular effusion are goniometry and circumference, respectively. Neither goniometry nor circumference of the knee joint have been examined for both intra-tester and inter......-tester in patients with total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The purpose of this study was to determine the intra-tester and inter-tester reliability of active and passive knee joint ROM and circumference in patients with TKA when administered by physiotherapists (testers) with different clinical experience. METHOD......: The design was an intra-tester, inter-tester and intra-day reliability study. Nineteen outpatients (10 females) having received a TKA were examined by an inexperienced and an experienced physiotherapist. Following a standardized protocol, active and passive knee joint ROM and circumference measurements were...

  10. A study on the measurement of wrist motion range using the iPhone 4 gyroscope application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Seob; Park, David Dae Hwan; Lee, Young Bae; Han, Dong Gil; Shim, Jeong Su; Lee, Young Jig; Kim, Peter Chan Woo

    2014-08-01

    Measuring the range of motion (ROM) of the wrist is an important physical examination conducted in the Department of Hand Surgery for the purpose of evaluation, diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of patients. The most common method for performing this task is by using a universal goniometer. This study was performed using 52 healthy participants to compare wrist ROM measurement using a universal goniometer and the iPhone 4 Gyroscope application. Participants did not have previous wrist illnesses and their measured values for wrist motion were compared in each direction. Normal values for wrist ROM are 73 degrees of flexion, 71 degrees of extension, 19 degrees of radial deviation, 33 degrees of ulnar deviation, 140 degrees of supination, and 60 degrees of pronation.The average measurement values obtained using the goniometer were 74.2 (5.1) degrees for flexion, 71.1 (4.9) degrees for extension, 19.7 (3.0) degrees for radial deviation, 34.0 (3.7) degrees for ulnar deviation, 140.8 (5.6) degrees for supination, and 61.1 (4.7) degrees for pronation. The average measurement values obtained using the iPhone 4 Gyroscope application were 73.7 (5.5) degrees for flexion, 70.8 (5.1) degrees for extension, 19.5 (3.0) degrees for radial deviation, 33.7 (3.9) degrees for ulnar deviation, 140.4 (5.7) degrees for supination, and 60.8 (4.9) degrees for pronation. The differences between the measurement values by the Gyroscope application and average value were 0.7 degrees for flexion, -0.2 degrees for extension, 0.5 degrees for radial deviation, 0.7 degrees for ulnar deviation, 0.4 degrees for supination, and 0.8 degrees for pronation. The differences in average value were not statistically significant. The authors introduced a new method of measuring the range of wrist motion using the iPhone 4 Gyroscope application that is simpler to use and can be performed by the patient outside a clinical setting.

  11. dr. andries albertus odendaal snr., evangeliedraer in

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sy tesis wat na Nederland gepos word nie. Deur middel van 'n vriend is by Dr. Bergema navraag gedoen hieroor. Dit blyk dat Dr. Bergema ewe ontsteld was omdat A.A. nie reageer op sy briewe en aanbevelings nie. Dringende navraag by die plaaslike poskantoor en hulle ondersoek het aan die lig gebring dat die.

  12. Dr Andrea Granelli, Vice President, Telecom Italia

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    Photo 06: Dr Andrea Granelli, Chief Executive Officer, Telecom Italia Lab (second from right) visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with (from left to right) M. Cecchi , F. Gagliardi and G. Cavallari. Photo 15: Dr Andrea Granelli, Chief Executive Officer, Telecom Italia Lab (left) visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with (from left to right) M. Cecchi and G. Cavallari.

  13. Dr. Zakir Husain on Education and Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Deepak; Radha Gayathri, Ch.

    2017-01-01

    Dr. Zakir Husain is known as a self-less nationalist leader and also as an educationist "par excellence." Taking a cue from his educational ideas like the "Nai Talim," this article brings into focus his views on the medium-conundrum. Dr. Husain was very clear about the role of Indian languages and the relevance of mother…

  14. A comparison of two stretching modalities on lower-limb range of motion measurements in recreational dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyon, Matthew; Felton, Lee; Galloway, Shaun

    2009-10-01

    Most stretching techniques are designed to place a "stress" on the musculoskeletal unit that will increase its resting length and range of motion (ROM). Twenty-four adolescent dancers participated in a 6-week intervention program that compared low-intensity stretching (Microstretching) with moderate-intensity static stretching on active and passive ranges of motion. Microstretching is a new modality that reduces the possibility of the parasympathetic system being activated. Repeated measures analysis indicated changes in ROM over the intervention period (p active ROM than the static stretch group (p stretching increases the compliance of any given muscle and therefore increases the range of motion. One main finding of the present study was that throughout a 6-week training program very-low-intensity stretching had a greater positive effect on lower-limb ROM than moderate-intensity static stretching. The most interesting aspect of the study was the greater increase in active ROM compared to passive ROM by the Microstretching group. This suggests that adaptation has occurred within the muscle itself to a greater extent than in structures of the hip joint. Practical application for this technique suggests it is beneficial as a postexercise modality that potentially has a restorative component.

  15. Precise Measurement of the $\\bar{p}p$ Total Cross-Section in the ISR Energy Range

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The major aim of this experiment is the precise measurement of the antiproton-proton total cross-section in the ISR energy range, using the total-rate method. The proton-proton total cross-section is remeasured with the same method and the same apparatus, and a precision of 0.5\\% is expected for both cross-sections. The total-rate method consists in the simultaneous measurement of the total interaction rate and the ISR luminosity. This is done with a set of scintillation-counter hodoscopes covering over 99.99\\% of the solid angle, which are sensitive to over 95\\% of all interactions. In addition to these detectors, small-angle drift-tube hodoscopes are used to measure the differential elastic cross-section as a function of the momentum transfert t. The total cross-section can be measured independently by extrapolating this differential cross-section to the forward direction and invoking the optical theorem. A study of the general features of charged-particle production is performed using finely divided scinti...

  16. Interview with Dr. Claudio Rama

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Rama

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Trayendo un breve curriculum vitae del Prof. Dr. Claudio Rama, destacaremos su formación académica, su trayectoria académico-profesional y su producción bibliográfica. Nuestro entrevistado se graduó en Economía por la Universidad Central de Venezuela en 1982. En 2003 concluyó el máster en Administración Educacional en la Universidad José María Vargas, Venezuela. Terminó el Doctorado en Ciencias de la Educación en la Universidad Nacional Experimental Simón Rodríguez, Venezuela en 2006 y el Doctorado en Derecho, en la Universidad de Buenos Aires, en 2009. Claudio Rama hizo pos-doctorado: en el Centro de Postgrados de la Universidad Nacional Experimental Simón Rodríguez, en 2009-2010; en el Programa de Posgrado de la Faculdade de Educação da UNICAMP, en 2009-2010; en el Programa de Posgrado de la Universidade Federal Fluminense, en 2011-2012; y en el Programa de Postdoctorado de la Facultad de Derecho, de la Universidad de Buenos Aires, en 2013-2015. Nuestro entrevistado recibió también el título de Doctor “honoris causa” de cuatro universidades peruanas.

  17. Optimal Sensor Placement for Multiple Target Positioning with Range-Only Measurements in Two-Dimensional Scenarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquin Aranda

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The problem of determining the optimal geometric configuration of a sensor network that will maximize the range-related information available for multiple target positioning is of key importance in a multitude of application scenarios. In this paper, a set of sensors that measures the distances between the targets and each of the receivers is considered, assuming that the range measurements are corrupted by white Gaussian noise, in order to search for the formation that maximizes the accuracy of the target estimates. Using tools from estimation theory and convex optimization, the problem is converted into that of maximizing, by proper choice of the sensor positions, a convex combination of the logarithms of the determinants of the Fisher Information Matrices corresponding to each of the targets in order to determine the sensor configuration that yields the minimum possible covariance of any unbiased target estimator. Analytical and numerical solutions are well defined and it is shown that the optimal configuration of the sensors depends explicitly on the constraints imposed on the sensor configuration, the target positions, and the probabilistic distributions that define the prior uncertainty in each of the target positions. Simulation examples illustrate the key results derived.

  18. Multispectral measurement of contrast in tissue-mimicking phantoms in near-infrared spectral range of 650 to 1600 nm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salo, Daniel; Zhang, Hairong; Kim, David M; Berezin, Mikhail Y

    2014-08-01

    In order to identify the optimal imaging conditions for the highest spatial contrast in biological tissue, we explored the properties of a tissue-mimicking phantom as a function of the wavelengths in a broad range of near-infrared spectra (650 to 1600 nm). Our customized multispectral hardware, which featured a scanning transmission microscope and imaging spectrographs equipped with silicon and InGaAs charge-coupled diode array detectors, allowed for direct comparison of the Michelson contrast obtained from a phantom composed of a honeycomb grid, Intralipid, and India ink. The measured contrast depended on the size of the grid, luminance, and the wavelength of measurements. We demonstrated that at low thickness of the phantom, a reasonable contrast of the objects can be achieved at any wavelength between 700 and 1400 nm and between 1500 and 1600 nm. At larger thicknesses, such contrast can be achieved mostly between 1200 and 1350 nm. These results suggest that distinguishing biological features in deep tissue and developing contrast agents for in vivo may benefit from imaging in this spectral range.

  19. Evaluation of EIT systems and algorithms for handling full void fraction range in two-phase flow measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Jiabin; Wang, Mi; Faraj, Yousef

    2015-01-01

    In the aqueous-based two-phase flow, if the void fraction of dispersed phase exceeds 0.25, conventional electrical impedance tomography (EIT) produces a considerable error due to the linear approximation of the sensitivity back-projection (SBP) method, which limits the EIT’s wider application in the process industry. In this paper, an EIT sensing system which is able to handle full void fraction range in two-phase flow is reported. This EIT system employs a voltage source, conducts true mutual impedance measurement and reconstructs an online image with the modified sensitivity back-projection (MSBP) algorithm. The capability of the Maxwell relationship to convey full void fraction is investigated. The limitation of the linear sensitivity back-projection method is analysed. The MSBP algorithm is used to derive relative conductivity change in the evaluation. A series of static and dynamic experiments demonstrating the mean void fraction obtained using this EIT system has a good agreement with reference void fractions over the range from 0 to 1. The combination of the new EIT system and MSBP algorithm would significantly extend the applications of EIT in industrial process measurement.

  20. Association between HLA-DR1 and -DR3 antigens and unexplained repeated miscarriage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, O B; Ring, Mette; Rosgaard, A

    1999-01-01

    Few, mostly small, studies have investigated the distribution of HLA class II antigens among women with unexplained recurrent miscarriage. Although some studies have reported statistically significant associations between this syndrome and certain HLA-DR antigens--especially the -DR1 and -DR3...... antigens--other studies have been unable to demonstrate such associations. For the present meta-analysis, 18 cross-sectional or case-control studies (published or unpublished) reporting on frequencies of HLA-DR1 and -DR3 antigens among Caucasian women with unexplained repeated miscarriage were identified...

  1. Radiological Assessment of the Sacrofemoral Angle: A Novel Method to Measure the Range of Hip Joint Flexion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xian-Zhao; Xu, Xi-Ming; Wang, Fei; Li, Ming; Wang, Zi-Min

    2015-09-05

    A quantitative and accurate measurement of the range of hip joint flexion (RHF) is necessarily required in the evaluation of disordered or artificial hip joint function. This study aimed to assess a novel method to measure RHF more accurately and objectively. Lateral radiographs were taken of 31 supine men with hip joints extended or flexed. Relevant angles were measured directly from the radiographs. The change in the sacrofemoral angle (SFA) (the angle formed between the axis of the femur and the line tangent to the upper endplate of S1) from hip joint extension to hip joint flexion, was proposed as the RHF. The validity of this method was assessed via concomitant measurements of changes in the femur-horizontal angle (between the axis of the femur and the horizontal line) and the sacrum-horizontal angle (SHA) (between the line tangent to the upper endplate of S1 and the horizontal line), the difference of which should equal the change in the SFA. The mean change in the SFA was 112.5 ± 7.4°, and was independent of participant age, height, weight, or body mass index. The mean changes in the femur-horizontal and SHAs were 123.0 ± 6.4° and 11.4 ± 3.0°, respectively. This confirmed that the change of SFA between hip joint extension and hip joint flexion was equal to the difference between the changes in the femur-horizontal and SHAs. Using the SFA, to evaluate RHF could prevent compromised measurements due to the movements of pelvis and lumbar spine during hip flexion, and is, therefore, a more accurate and objective method with reasonable reliability and validity.

  2. Reliability of knee joint range of motion and circumference measurements after total knee arthroplasty: does tester experience matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsen, Thomas Linding; Christensen, Malene; Christensen, Stine Sommer; Olsen, Marie; Bandholm, Thomas

    2010-09-01

    Two of the most utilized outcome measures to assess knee joint range of motion (ROM) and intra-articular effusion are goniometry and circumference, respectively. Neither goniometry nor circumference of the knee joint have been examined for both intra-tester and inter-tester in patients with total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The purpose of this study was to determine the intra-tester and inter-tester reliability of active and passive knee joint ROM and circumference in patients with TKA when administered by physiotherapists (testers) with different clinical experience. The design was an intra-tester, inter-tester and intra-day reliability study. Nineteen outpatients (10 females) having received a TKA were examined by an inexperienced and an experienced physiotherapist. Following a standardized protocol, active and passive knee joint ROM and circumference measurements were obtained using a universal goniometer and a tape measure, respectively. To establish reliability, intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC(2,1)) and smallest real difference (SRD) were calculated. The knee joint ROM and circumference measurements were generally reliable (ICC > 0.8) within and between physiotherapists (except passive knee extension). Changes in knee joint ROM of more than 6.6 degrees and 10 degrees (except active knee flexion) and knee joint circumference of more than 1.0 cm and 1.63 cm represent a real clinical improvement (SRD) or deterioration for a single individual within and between physiotherapists, respectively. Generally, the experienced tester recorded larger knee joint ROM and lower circumference values than that of the inexperienced tester. In clinical practice, we suggest that repeated knee goniometric and circumferential measurements should be recorded by the same physiotherapist in individual patients with TKA. Tester experience appears not to influence the degree of reliability. (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Wide range instantaneous temperature measurements of convective fluid flows by using a schlieren system based in color images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-González, A.; Moreno-Hernández, D.; Monzón-Hernández, D.; León-Rodríguez, M.

    2017-06-01

    In the schlieren method, the deflection of light by the presence of an inhomogeneous medium is proportional to the gradient of its refractive index. Such deflection, in a schlieren system, is represented by light intensity variations on the observation plane. Then, for a digital camera, the intensity level registered by each pixel depends mainly on the variation of the medium refractive index and the status of the digital camera settings. Therefore, in this study, we regulate the intensity value of each pixel by controlling the camera settings such as exposure time, gamma and gain values in order to calibrate the image obtained to the actual temperature values of a particular medium. In our approach, we use a color digital camera. The images obtained with a color digital camera can be separated on three different color-channels. Each channel corresponds to red, green, and blue color, moreover, each one has its own sensitivity. The differences in sensitivity allow us to obtain a range of temperature values for each color channel. Thus, high, medium and low sensitivity correspond to green, blue, and red color channel respectively. Therefore, by adding up the temperature contribution of each color channel we obtain a wide range of temperature values. Hence, the basic idea in our approach to measure temperature, using a schlieren system, is to relate the intensity level of each pixel in a schlieren image to the corresponding knife-edge position measured at the exit focal plane of the system. Our approach was applied to the measurement of instantaneous temperature fields of the air convection caused by a heated rectangular metal plate and a candle flame. We found that for the metal plate temperature measurements only the green and blue color-channels were required to sense the entire phenomena. On the other hand, for the candle case, the three color-channels were needed to obtain a complete measurement of temperature. In our study, the candle temperature was took as

  4. Association between HLA-DR1 and -DR3 antigens and unexplained repeated miscarriage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, O B; Ring, Mette; Rosgaard, A

    1999-01-01

    Few, mostly small, studies have investigated the distribution of HLA class II antigens among women with unexplained recurrent miscarriage. Although some studies have reported statistically significant associations between this syndrome and certain HLA-DR antigens--especially the -DR1 and -DR3...... antigens--other studies have been unable to demonstrate such associations. For the present meta-analysis, 18 cross-sectional or case-control studies (published or unpublished) reporting on frequencies of HLA-DR1 and -DR3 antigens among Caucasian women with unexplained repeated miscarriage were identified...... and because patients with only two miscarriages were included in many studies; this is defined as repeated miscarriage. The odds ratios of repeated miscarriage for the HLA-DR1 and -DR3 antigens were calculated for the individual studies and subsequently the pooled odds ratios for the studies were calculated...

  5. Letter to Dr. Felix Bronner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, John E.; Dalton, Bonnie (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Dear Dr. Bronner: I have been reading in The Physiologist the letters from senior physiologists for many years with great interest. It is impressive that many of the respondents are still pursuing scientific endeavours in their 70's and some even in their 80's. The interesting task is to ponder the relative causative proportions of heredity and environment responsible. One wonders whether knowing something about physiology engenders longer and more productive lives? I suspect so because of the accompanying self-discipline. But another factor would seem to be the pervasive joy of working in this profession. I have been fortunate to be able to acquire the joy of physiology during my graduate studies at Illinois, and to have been able to carry it over here at NASA, Ames Research Center for the past 40 years. A truly academic style research environment at a federal research center is rare. The trick to a joyous research career is to overcome those ever-present slings and arrows of outrageous fortune with dignity whenever possible. To that end I have found solace and guidance in reading the history of warfare and its leaders, especially Sun Tsu's The Art of War and Clauswitz's On War. I became eligible for retirement in 1993, but to insure domestic tranquility and also the joy of pursuing my research hobby have continued working in the laboratory on human research. It is troubling to see that funding for individual scientists conducting human research is declining rapidly, along with their new ideas; perhaps the old ones are more comfortable. Hopefully I can provide a similar response when I'm 80! Thanks for your interest. Sincerely, John Greenleaf

  6. Measurement of changes in glacier extent in the Rimo glacier, a sub-range of the Karakoram Range, determined from Landsat imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate estimation of the spatiotemporal surface dynamics is very important for natural resource planning. This paper discusses a novel approach for the study of the surface patterns of a particular glacier Rimo located at 35°21′21″N77°22′05″E, about 20 km northeast of the snout of Siachen. Change detection in multiple images of the same location taken at different time intervals are of widely circulated use due to a large number of applications in various disciplines such as climate change, remote sensing and so on. The proposed technique uses image processing to derive regression models of selected glacier segments, these models are then used to measure area under the curve to estimate the surface area changes of the glacier. The surface area changes thus obtained have also been validated by standard method of pixel counting. With the rise in the global warming, the net change in the surface area of the concerned glacier is estimated using statistical analysis from 1998 to 2011. The results obtained show a fair degree of accuracy as compared to the standard method of pixel counting. We also discuss important pre-processing methods used in extracting the final concerned region of interest from a large satellite imagery of fairly average resolution.

  7. Normal ranges of right ventricular systolic and diastolic strain measures in children: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Philip T; Sanchez Mejia, Aura A; Machefsky, Aliza; Fowler, Susan; Holland, Mark R; Singh, Gautam K

    2014-05-01

    Establishment of the range of normal values and associated variations of two-dimensional (2D) speckle-tracking echocardiography (STE)-derived right ventricular (RV) strain is a prerequisite for its routine clinical application in children. The objectives of this study were to perform a meta-analysis of normal ranges of RV longitudinal strain measurements derived by 2D STE in children and to identify confounders that may contribute to differences in reported measures. A systematic review was conducted in PubMed, Embase, Scopus, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and ClinicalTrials.gov. Search hedges were created to cover the concepts of pediatrics, STE, and the right heart ventricle. Two investigators independently identified and included studies if they reported the 2D STE-derived RV strain measure RV peak global longitudinal strain, peak global longitudinal systolic strain rate, peak global longitudinal early diastolic strain rate, peak global longitudinal late diastolic strain rate, or segmental longitudinal strain at the apical, middle, and basal ventricular levels in healthy children. Quality and reporting of the studies were assessed. The weighted mean was estimated using random effects with 95% confidence intervals (CIs), heterogeneity was assessed using Cochran's Q statistic and the inconsistency index (I(2)), and publication bias was evaluated using funnel plots and Egger's test. Effects of demographic, clinical, equipment, and software variables were assessed in a metaregression. The search identified 226 children from 10 studies. The reported normal mean values of peak global longitudinal strain among the studies varied from -20.80% to -34.10% (mean, -29.03%; 95% CI, -31.52% to -26.54%), peak global longitudinal systolic strain rate varied from -1.30 to -2.40 sec(-1) (mean, -1.88 sec(-1); 95% CI, -2.10 to -1.59 sec(-1)), peak global longitudinal early diastolic strain rate ranged from 1.7 to 2.69 sec(-1) (mean, 2.34 sec(-1); 95% CI, 2

  8. A new faces scale in pain measurement: a test of bias from current mood, trait affectivity, and scale range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfering, Achim; Grebner, Simone

    2012-01-01

    Faces pain rating scales used among children have been criticized to confound affective states with pain when smiling faces are included. This experimental study is an attempt to examine the possible confounding of affective states with pain when smiling faces are used as part of a faces scale. The meaning of the faces was tested to depend on current mood, current pain, trait affectivity, and inclusion versus exclusion of smiling faces. Sixty-four participants made 6,720 two-categorical pain judgments on faces with different mouth curvature. In multilevel regression analysis, current level of pain and negative trait affectivity biased faces' meaning only when the smiling faces were excluded from the scale. In adults, the new full range faces pain scale including a midpoint neutral face and smiling faces was more robust than the restricted scale. The faces scale that was tested in this study is not applicable for patient measurement but it is an interesting tool for psychological research.

  9. Measurement of performance of thermoacoustic heat pump in a -3 to 160 °C temperature range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Ryo; Tsuda, Kenichiro; Bassem, Mohamed Mehdi; Ueda, Yuki

    2015-11-01

    A thermoacoustic heat pump was constructed and tested. It was composed of a looped tube, a straight tube, and a regenerator. The looped tube contained the regenerator and was connected to the straight tube. The tubes were filled with nitrogen. When an acoustic wave was input to the tubes, a temperature difference formed along the regenerator. Our experiments showed that this heat pump could work as both a cooler and a heater. This heat pump achieved -39 °C as a cooler and 270 °C as a heater. Using antifreeze liquid and oil as heat media, the cooling and heating performance of the heat pump was measured within the temperature range from -3 to 160 °C.

  10. Blackbody Sources for the Range 100 K to 3500 K for Precision Measurements in Radiometry and Radiation Thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapritsky, V. I.; Khlevnoy, B. B.; Khromchenko, V. B.; Ogarev, S. A.; Morozova, S. P.; Lisiansky, B. E.; Samoylov, M. L.; Shapoval, V. I.; Sudarev, K. A.

    2003-09-01

    The paper presents a detailed review of precision blackbodies that are low-, medium-, and high-temperature range sources developed at VNIIOFI during the past 30 years. Low-temperature blackbodies were developed for calibration facilities of spaceborne instruments. Medium-temperature blackbodies are used for radiance temperature and IR radiometric measurements. The high-temperature pyrolitic graphite blackbodies BB3200 and BB3500 were developed for world-leading metrology centers as NIST (USA), PTB (Germany), NPL (Great Britain), VNIIOFI (Russia), CNAM (France) and others for the realization and dissemination of radiometric and radiation temperature scales. The latest modification of the high-temperature blackbody BB3500MP, the large-aperture version (with an opening of up to 16 mm) of the famous BB3500, suitable for holding large fixed-point cells with high-temperature TiC-C and ZrC-C eutectics, is under development.

  11. Application of the Two-Step Filter to Process Ranging Measurements for Relative Navigation in an Elliptical Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, James L.; Axelrad, Penina

    1997-01-01

    This estimator breaks a nonlinear estimation problem into a set of over determined 'first step' states which are linear in the observations and 'second step' states which are ultimately the states of interest. Linear estimation methods are applied to filter the observations and produce the optimal first step state estimate. The 'second step' states are obtained through iterative nonlinear parameter estimation considering the first step states as observations. It has been shown that this process exactly minimizes the least squares cost function for static problems and provides a better solution than the iterated extended Kalman filter (EKF) for dynamic problems. The two step filter is applied in this paper to process range and range rate measurements between the two spacecraft. Details of the application of the two step estimator to this problem will be given, highlighting the use of a test for ill-conditioned covariance estimates that can result from the first order covariance propagation. A comparison will be made between the performance of the two step filter and the IEKF.

  12. Ultrahigh-resolution CT and DR scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiBianca, Frank A.; Gupta, Vivek; Zou, Ping; Jordan, Lawrence M.; Laughter, Joseph S.; Zeman, Herbert D.; Sebes, Jeno I.

    1999-05-01

    A new technique called Variable-Resolution X-ray (VRX) detection that dramatically increases the spatial resolution in computed tomography (CT) and digital radiography (DR) is presented. The technique is based on a principle called 'projective compression' that allows the resolution element of a CT detector to scale with the subject or field size. For very large (40 - 50 cm) field sizes, resolution exceeding 2 cy/mm is possible and for very small fields, microscopy is attainable with resolution exceeding 100 cy/mm. Several effects that could limit the performance of VRX detectors are considered. Experimental measurements on a 16-channel, CdWO4 scintillator + photodiode test array yield a limiting MTF of 64 cy/mm (8(mu) ) in the highest-resolution configuration reported. Preliminary CT images have been made of small anatomical specimens and small animals using a storage phosphor screen in the VRX mode. Measured detector resolution of the CT projection data exceeds 20 cy/mm (less than 25 (mu) ); however, the final, reconstructed CT images produced thus far exhibit 10 cy/mm (50 (mu) ) resolution because of non-flatness of the storage phosphor plates, focal spot effects and the use of a rudimentary CT reconstruction algorithm. A 576-channel solid-state detector is being fabricated that is expected to achieve CT image resolution in excess of that of the 26-channel test array.

  13. Measurements and Monte Carlo calculations with the extended-range Bonner sphere spectrometer at high-energy mixed fields

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00406842; Bay, Aurelio; Silari, Marco; Aroua, Abbas

    The use of spectrometry to provide information for neutron radiation protection has become an increasingly important activity over recent years. The need for spectral data arises because neither area survey instruments nor personal dosimeters give the correct dose equivalent results at all neutron energies. It is important therefore to know the spectra of the fields in which these devices are used. One of the systems most commonly employed in neutron spectrometry and dosimetry is the Bonner Sphere Spectrometers (BSS). The extended- range BSS that was used for this work, consists of 7 spheres with an overall response to neutrons up to 2 GeV. A 3He detector is used as a thermal counter in the centre of each sphere. In the context of this thesis the BSS was calibrated in monoenergetic neutron fields at low and intermediate energies. It was also used for measurements in several high energy mixed fields. These measurements have led to the calculation of neutron yields and spectral fluences from unshielded targets....

  14. Measurement and Modeling of Short and Medium Range Order in Amorphous Ta2O5 Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyam, Badri; Stone, Kevin H.; Bassiri, Riccardo; Fejer, Martin M.; Toney, Michael F.; Mehta, Apurva

    2016-08-01

    Amorphous films and coatings are rapidly growing in importance. Yet, there is a dearth of high-quality structural data on sub-micron films. Not understanding how these materials assemble at atomic scale limits fundamental insights needed to improve their performance. Here, we use grazing-incidence x-ray total scattering measurements to examine the atomic structure of the top 50-100 nm of Ta2O5 films; mirror coatings that show high promise to significantly improve the sensitivity of the next generation of gravitational-wave detectors. Our measurements show noticeable changes well into medium range, not only between crystalline and amorphous, but also between as-deposited, annealed and doped amorphous films. It is a further challenge to quickly translate the structural information into insights into mechanisms of packing and disorder. Here, we illustrate a modeling approach that allows translation of observed structural features to a physically intuitive packing of a primary structural unit based on a kinked Ta-O-Ta backbone. Our modeling illustrates how Ta-O-Ta units link to form longer 1D chains and even 2D ribbons, and how doping and annealing influences formation of 2D order. We also find that all the amorphousTa2O5 films studied in here are not just poorly crystalline but appear to lack true 3D order.

  15. Airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR for Individual Tree Stem Location, Height, and Biomass Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael G. Wing

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR remote sensing has demonstrated potential in measuring forest biomass. We assessed the ability of LiDAR to accurately estimate forest total above ground biomass (TAGB on an individual stem basis in a conifer forest in the US Pacific Northwest region using three different computer software programs and compared results to field measurements. Software programs included FUSION, TreeVaW, and watershed segmentation. To assess the accuracy of LiDAR TAGB estimation, stem counts and heights were analyzed. Differences between actual tree locations and LiDAR-derived tree locations using FUSION, TreeVaW, and watershed segmentation were 2.05 m (SD 1.67, 2.19 m (SD 1.83, and 2.31 m (SD 1.94, respectively, in forested plots. Tree height differences from field measured heights for FUSION, TreeVaW, and watershed segmentation were −0.09 m (SD 2.43, 0.28 m (SD 1.86, and 0.22 m (2.45 in forested plots; and 0.56 m (SD 1.07 m, 0.28 m (SD 1.69 m, and 1.17 m (SD 0.68 m, respectively, in a plot containing young conifers. The TAGB comparisons included feature totals per plot, mean biomass per feature by plot, and total biomass by plot for each extraction method. Overall, LiDAR TAGB estimations resulted in FUSION and TreeVaW underestimating by 25 and 31% respectively, and watershed segmentation overestimating by approximately 10%. LiDAR TAGB underestimation occurred in 66% and overestimation occurred in 34% of the plot comparisons.

  16. DR HAGIS-a fundus image database for the automatic extraction of retinal surface vessels from diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Sven; Russell, Greg; Nourrit, Vincent; McLoughlin, Niall

    2017-01-01

    A database of retinal fundus images, the DR HAGIS database, is presented. This database consists of 39 high-resolution color fundus images obtained from a diabetic retinopathy screening program in the UK. The NHS screening program uses service providers that employ different fundus and digital cameras. This results in a range of different image sizes and resolutions. Furthermore, patients enrolled in such programs often display other comorbidities in addition to diabetes. Therefore, in an effort to replicate the normal range of images examined by grading experts during screening, the DR HAGIS database consists of images of varying image sizes and resolutions and four comorbidity subgroups: collectively defined as the diabetic retinopathy, hypertension, age-related macular degeneration, and Glaucoma image set (DR HAGIS). For each image, the vasculature has been manually segmented to provide a realistic set of images on which to test automatic vessel extraction algorithms. Modified versions of two previously published vessel extraction algorithms were applied to this database to provide some baseline measurements. A method based purely on the intensity of images pixels resulted in a mean segmentation accuracy of 95.83% ([Formula: see text]), whereas an algorithm based on Gabor filters generated an accuracy of 95.71% ([Formula: see text]).

  17. But Dr. Meisels Is Not Convinced.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisels, Samuel J.

    1987-01-01

    Commenting on the Gesell Institute's response to his original article concerning the Gesell assessments, Dr. Meisels continues to maintain that the Gesell readiness tests lack sufficient proof of validity. (BB)

  18. Dr. Irvin Yalom Discusses Group Psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forester-Miller, Holly

    1989-01-01

    In this interview, Dr. Irvin Yalom, director of the Adult Psychiatry Clinic at Stanford University School of Medicine, discusses his beginnings as a group psychotherapist, current issues in group work, and the future of group work. (Author/TE)

  19. Raghavarao, Dr Karumanchi Srisaila Mallikarjuna S

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2014 Section: Engineering & Technology. Raghavarao, Dr Karumanchi Srisaila Mallikarjuna S Ph.D. (Mumbai), FNAE, FNAAS. Specialization: Food Engineering, Biotechnology Address: Chief Scientist, Department of Food Engineering, Central Food Technological Research Institute, Mysore 570 020, Karnataka

  20. Dr. von Braun With German Rocket Experimenters

    Science.gov (United States)

    1930-01-01

    Dr. von Braun was among a famous group of rocket experimenters in Germany in the 1930s. This photograph is believed to be made on the occasion of Herman Oberth's Kegelduese liquid rocket engine being certified as to performance during firing. From left to right are R. Nebel, Dr. Ritter, Mr. Baermueller, Kurt Heinish, Herman Oberth, Klaus Riedel, Wernher von Braun, and an unidentified person.

  1. Wide Dynamic Range Multiband Infrared Radiometer for In-Fire Measurements of Wildland Fire Radiant Flux Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremens, R.; Dickinson, M. B.; Hardy, C.; Skowronski, N.; Ellicott, E. A.; Schroeder, W.

    2016-12-01

    We have developed a wide dynamic range (24-bit) data acquisition system for collection of radiant flux density (FRFD) data from wildland fires. The data collection subsystem was designed as an Arduino `shield' and incorporates a 24-bit analog-to-digital converter, precision voltage reference, real time clock, microSD card interface, audible annuciator and interface for various digital communication interfaces (RS232, I2C, SPI, etc.). The complete radiometer system consists of our custom-designed `shield', a commercially available Arduino MEGA computer circuit board and a thermopile sensor -amplifier daughter board. Software design and development is greatly assisted by the availability of a library of public-domain, user-implemented software. The daughter board houses a 5-band radiometer using thermopiles designed for this experiment (Dexter Research Corp., Dexter, MI) to allow determination of the total FRFD from the fire (using a wide band thermopile with a KRS-5 window, 0.1 - 30 um), the FRFD as would be received by an orbital asset like MODIS (3.95 um center wavelength (CWL) and 10.95 CWL, corresponding to MODIS bands 21/22 and 31, respectively) and wider bandpass (0.1-5.5 um and 8-14 um) corresponding to the FRFD recorded by `MWIR' and `LWIR' imaging systems. We required a very wide dynamic range system in order to be able to record the flux density from `cold' ground before the fire, through the `hot' flaming combustion stage, to the `cool' phase after passage of the fire front. The recording dynamic range required (with reasonable resolution at the lowest temperatures) is on the order of 106, which is not currently available in commercial instrumentation at a price point, size or feature set that is suitable for wildland fire investigations. The entire unit, along with rechargeable battery power supply is housed in a fireproof aluminum chassis box, which is then mounted on a mast at a height of 5 - 7 m above the fireground floor. We will report initial

  2. Evaluation of long-range transport potential of selected brominated flame retardants with measured 1-octanol-air partition coefficients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyun Jeong; Kwon, Jung Hwan [Div. of Environmental Science and Ecological Engineering, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Various alternative flame retardants are used in many countries since polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) were classified as persistent organic pollutants (POPs). However, difficulties in the evaluation of the long-range transport potential (LRTP) of the alternatives are related to the lack of information on their physicochemical properties, which govern their environmental fates and transport. Based on the simulation of LRTP using OECD P{sub OV} and LRTP Screening Tool, five alternative brominated flame retardants (BFRs) (hexabromobenzene [HBB], 2,3,4,5,6-pentabromotoluene [PBT], 2,3,4,5,6-pentabromoethylbenzene [PBEB], 2-ethylhexyl 2,3,4,5-tetrabromobenzoate [TBB], and 1,2,4,5-tetrabromo-3,6-dimethylbenzene [TBX]), and 3 PBDEs (BDE-28, BDE-47, and BDE-99) were chosen to perform a refined assessment. This was done using an experimentally measured 1-octanol–air partition coefficient (K{sub OA}) for the calculation of the air–water partition coefficient (K{sub AW}) required for the model. The four selected alternative BFRs (HBB, PBT, PBEB, TBX) have K{sub OA} values close to the in silico estimation used in the screening evaluation. On the other hand, the measured K{sub OA} value for TBB was two orders of magnitude lower than the estimated value used in the screening simulation. The refined simulation showed that characteristic travel distance (CTD) and transfer efficiency (TE) for HBB, PBT, PBEB, and TBX were greater than those for BDE-28, whereas CTD and TE for TBB were lower than those for BDE-28. This suggested that TBB has a lower LRTP than BDE-28, considering the refined partition coefficients.

  3. Prolonged suppression of monocytic human leukocyte antigen-DR expression correlates with mortality in pediatric septic patients in a pediatric tertiary Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoli, Talita Freitas; Troster, Eduardo Juan; Ferranti, Juliana Ferreira; Sales, Maria Mirtes

    2016-06-01

    Immunoparalysis is a syndrome with no clinical symptoms that occurs in some septic patients. Monocytic human leukocyte antigen-DR (mHLA-DR) expression has been used to identify patients in immunoparalysis and prolonged periods of reduced mHLA-DR expression have been correlated with a poor prognosis in sepsis. However, there is a lack of studies investigating mHLA-DR expression in pediatric septic patients. To determine if mHLA-DR expression correlates with mortality in pediatric septic patients using the QuantiBRITE Anti HLA-DR/Anti-Monocyte,a Bechton Dickinson novel reagent that standardizes flow cytometry values. We determined mHLA-DR expression in 30 patients with severe sepsis or septic shock admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit at Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil, between January 2013 and February 2015. mHLA-DR expression was quantified between days 3 to 5 and 5 to 7 after the onset of sepsis and the ΔmHLA-DR (mHLA-DR2 - mHLA-DR1) was calculated. We also measured mHLA-DR levels in 21 healthy control patients. Mean mHLA-DR expression was significantly lower in septic patients than in controls (P = .0001). Mortality was 46% in patients with negative ΔHLA-DR or 1000 mAb/cell. Mean ΔmHLA-DR levels were significantly different between survivors and non-survivors (P = .023). ΔHLA-DR correlates with mortality in pediatric patients with septic shock or severe sepsis. This is the first study to have used the QuantiBRITE Anti HLA-DR/Anti-Monocyte reagent to quantify monocyte HLA-DR expression in pediatric septic patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Evaluation of Spatial Resolution for Heavy Ion CT System Based on the Measurement of Residual Range Distribution With HIMAC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraishi, H.; Nishimura, K.; Abe, S.; Satoh, H.; Hara, S.; Hara, H.; Takahashi, Y.; Mogaki, T.; Kawai, R.; Yokoyama, K.; Yasuda, N.; Tomida, T.; Ohno, Y.; Kanai, T.

    2009-10-01

    We report experimental results from a heavy ion CT system based on the measurement of residual range distribution using an X-ray intensifying screen and a charged coupled device (CCD) camera system. This technique was first investigated by Zygmanski (2000) for proton beams, and they reported that the spatial resolution was significantly degraded by multiple Coulomb scattering (MCS) effects in the irradiated medium. Experiments were done on the spatial resolution phantom by using helium and carbon beams accelerated up to 120 MeV/u and 230 MeV/u by the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC), installed in the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) in Japan, using a high performance intensified CCD (ICCD) camera. We show that the MCS blurring effect can be significantly reduced in the reconstructed image by using a carbon beam with this technique. Our results suggest that heavier particles such as carbon would be more useful if this technique is envisioned as a clinical tool to obtain data that would aid proton and/or heavy ion treatment planning.

  5. Uncertainties in forces extracted from non-contact atomic force microscopy measurements by fitting of long-range background forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Sweetman

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In principle, non-contact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM now readily allows for the measurement of forces with sub-nanonewton precision on the atomic scale. In practice, however, the extraction of the often desired ‘short-range’ force from the experimental observable (frequency shift is often far from trivial. In most cases there is a significant contribution to the total tip–sample force due to non-site-specific van der Waals and electrostatic forces. Typically, the contribution from these forces must be removed before the results of the experiment can be successfully interpreted, often by comparison to density functional theory calculations. In this paper we compare the ‘on-minus-off’ method for extracting site-specific forces to a commonly used extrapolation method modelling the long-range forces using a simple power law. By examining the behaviour of the fitting method in the case of two radically different interaction potentials we show that significant uncertainties in the final extracted forces may result from use of the extrapolation method.

  6. Structural basis of LaDR5, a novel agonistic anti-death receptor 5 (DR5 monoclonal antibody, to inhibit DR5/TRAIL complex formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiao Chunxia

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As a member of the TNF superfamily, TRAIL could induce human tumor cell apoptosis through its cognate death receptors DR4 or DR5, which can induce formation of the death inducing signaling complex (DISC and activation of the membrane proximal caspases (caspase-8 or caspase-10 and mitochondrial pathway. Some monoclonal antibodies against DR4 or DR5 have been reported to have anti-tumor activity. Results In this study, we reported a novel mouse anti-human DR5 monoclonal antibody, named as LaDR5, which could compete with TRAIL to bind DR5 and induce the apoptosis of Jurkat cells in the absence of second cross-linking in vitro. Using computer-guided molecular modeling method, the 3-D structure of LaDR5 Fv fragment was constructed. According to the crystal structure of DR5, the 3-D complex structure of DR5 and LaDR5 was modeled using molecular docking method. Based on distance geometry method and intermolecular hydrogen bonding analysis, the key functional domain in DR5 was predicted and the DR5 mutants were designed. And then, three mutants of DR5 was expressed in prokaryotic system and purified by affinity chromatograph to determine the epitope of DR5 identified by LaDR5, which was consistent with the theoretical results of computer-aided analysis. Conclusions Our results demonstrated the specific epitope located in DR5 that plays a crucial role in antibody binding and even antineoplastic bioactivity. Meanwhile, revealed structural features of DR5 may be important to design or screen novel drugs agonist DR5.

  7. Ozone sonde measurements aboard long-range boundary-layer pressurized balloons over the western Mediterranean basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheusi, François; Barret, Brice; Verdier, Nicolas; Dulac, François; Durand, Pierre; Jambert, Corinne

    ChArMEx (http://charmex.lsce.ipsl.fr), including TRAQA in 2012 (launch base at Martigues, France) and ADRIMED (launch base at Sant Lluís, Minorca Island, Spain) and SAFMED (launch base at Levant Island off Hyères, France) in 2013. Complementary radiosoundings -- including ozone -- were also launched from these sites. BLPB drifting altitudes were in the range 0.25-3.2 km. The longest flight lasted more than 32 hours and covered more than 1000 km between Minorca and the limit of the authorized area south of Malta. Those quasi-Lagrangian measurements allow an evaluation of the ozone production/destruction rate as a function of the solar radiation (also measured onboard, as well as standard weather variables) that will be helpful to test chemistry-transport models.

  8. CD8+HLA-DR+ T cells are increased in patients with severe aplastic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Limin; Liu, Chunyan; Fu, Rong; Wang, Huaquan; Wang, Jun; Liu, Xiao; Feng, Le; Li, Lijuan; Liu, Hui; Wang, Honglei; Zhang, Tian; Shao, Zonghong

    2014-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the number and function of CD8+HLA-DR+ cells, which are considered to be activated cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), in peripheral blood to further examine the pathogenesis of severe aplastic anemia (SAA). Thirty-eight patients with SAA were included in the present study. Patients were screened for paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria by flow cytometry using anti-CD55 and anti-CD59 antibodies. The number of CD8+HLA-DR+ T cells was measured by three-color flow cytometry using anti-CD8-peridinin chlorophyll, anti-CD3-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) and anti-HLA-DR-FITC antibodies. The expression of perforin, granzyme B, tumor necrosis factor-β (TNF-β) and FasL in CD8+HLA-DR+ T cells was detected by flow cytometry with the appropriate monoclonal antibodies. Total RNA was prepared from purified CD8+HLA-DR+ cells of healthy controls and SAA patients, and then polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed. Apoptosis of CD8+HLA-DR+ cells was detected by flow cytometry following staining with Annexin V. The proportion of CD8+HLA-DR+ T cells was analyzed by flow cytometry in peripheral blood and was identified to be significantly higher in untreated SAA than in remission patients and in the controls. The expression of perforin, granzyme B, TNF-β and FasL in CD8+HLA-DR+ T cells was analyzed by flow cytometry and PCR, which revealed increased expression in the untreated SAA group compared with that in the control group. Furthermore, the apoptosis of CD3- bone marrow cells from normal individuals was enhanced following co-culture with CD8+HLA-DR+ T cells from untreated SAA patients. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that CD8+HLA-DR+ T cells may contribute to bone marrow failure in SAA.

  9. Soluble HLA-DR serum levels are associated with smoking but not with acute coronary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolva, Johanna; Paakkanen, Riitta; Jarva, Hanna; Pussinen, Pirkko; Havulinna, Aki S; Salomaa, Veikko; Sinisalo, Juha; Lokki, Marja-Liisa

    2017-09-21

    Elevated soluble HLA-DR (sHLA-DR) serum levels have been reported in HLA class II-associated inflammatory disorders. We have previously shown that the HLA class II allele HLA-DRB1*01 may predispose to acute coronary syndromes (ACS). To our knowledge, sHLA-DR serum levels have not been studied in ACS. sHLA-DR serum levels were measured in 477 ACS patients as cases and 475 area- and sex-matched controls by sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Binary logistic regression and ordinal logistic regression analyses adjusted for clinical parameters were conducted to evaluate the associations of sHLA-DR levels. ACS patients had lower sHLA-DR serum levels compared to controls (OR = 0.837; 95% CI = 0.704-0.994; p = 0.043). After adjustment for smoking status, this association was no longer significant. This was explained by the notion that current smoking was inversely associated with sHLA-DR levels both in cases (OR = 0.592; 95% CI = 0.553-0.908; p = 0.016) and in controls (OR = 0.356; 95% CI = 0.226-0.563; p = 0.000010). A similar effect was not seen with other cardiovascular risk factors. The results indicate, for the first time, that lower sHLA-DR levels are associated with smoking, but not with ACS. This is an important finding because previous studies of sHLA-DR have not accounted for the possible associations between smoking and sHLA-DR levels. Further studies are required to confirm these novel results and explore the mechanisms behind the observed associations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. A low-power tool for measuring acceleration, pressure, and temperature (APT) with wide dynamic range and bandwidth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heesemann, Martin; Davis, Earl E.; Paros, Jerome; Johnson, Greg; Meldrum, Robert; Scherwath, Martin; Mihaly, Steven

    2017-04-01

    We present a new tool that facilitates the study of inter-related geodetic, geodynamic, seismic, and oceanographic phenomena. It incorporates a temperature compensated tri-axial accelerometer developed by Quartz Seismic Sensors, Inc., a pressure sensor built by Paroscientific Inc., and a low-power, high-precision frequency counter developed by Bennest Enterprises Ltd. and built by RBR, Ltd. The sensors are housed in a 7 cm o.d. titanium pressure case designed for use to full ocean depths (withstands more than 20 km of water pressure). Sampling intervals are programmable from 0.08 s to 1 hr; standard memory can store up to 130 million samples; total power consumption is roughly 115 mW when operating continuously and proportionately lower when operating intermittently (e.g., 2 mW average at 1 sample per min). Serial and USB communications protocols allow a variety of autonomous and cable-connection options. Measurement precision of the order of 10-8 of full scale (e.g., pressure equivalent to 4000 m water depth, acceleration = +/- 3 g) allows observations of pressure and acceleration variations of 0.4 Pa and 0.3 μm s-2. Long-term variations in vertical acceleration are sensitive to displacement through the gravity gradient down to a level of roughly 2 cm, and variations in horizontal acceleration are sensitive to tilt down to a level of 0.03 μrad. With the large dynamic ranges, high sensitivities and broad bandwidth (6 Hz to DC), ground motion associated with microseisms, strong and weak seismic ground motion, tidal loading, and slow and rapid geodynamic deformation - all normally studied using disparate instruments - can be observed with a single tool. Installation in the marine environment is accomplished by pushing the tool roughly 1 m vertically below the seafloor with a submersible or remotely operated vehicle, with no profile remaining above the seafloor to cause current-induced noise. The weight of the tool is designed to match the sediment it displaces to

  11. Fibular taping does not influence ankle dorsiflexion range of motion or balance measures in individuals with chronic ankle instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Todd J; Basnett, Curtis R; Hanish, Michael J; Miriovsky, Daniel J; Danielson, Erin L; Barr, J B; Threlkeld, A Joseph; Grindstaff, Terry L

    2013-11-01

    To determine the effects of fibular taping on ankle dorsiflexion range of motion (ROM) and dynamic balance in individuals with chronic ankle instability (CAI). Single-blind, randomized crossover. Twenty-three individuals (age=23.4 ± 2.5 years, height=171.6 ± 12.4 cm, mass=71.5±13.1 kg) with CAI were allocated to either a fibular taping intervention or sham taping intervention (tape applied without tension) over the course of two visits. Weight-bearing ankle dorsiflexion ROM and components of the Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT) were measured before and after intervention. There was not a significant change in ankle dorsiflexion ROM when comparing the taping interventions (F1,43=1.03, P=.32), but both interventions resulted in a small increase (F1,43=8.07, P=.007) in dorsiflexion ROM (pre=36.7° ± 6.9°, post=37.7° ± 6.2°). This increase in ROM did not exceed the established minimal detectable change for dorsiflexion ROM. Fibular taping with tension produced an increase (F1,41=5.84, P=.02) (pre=69.0 ± 9.1%, post=70.6±8.6%) in posterolateral reach distance when compared to taping without tension (pre=72.7 ± 11.0%, post=71.4 ± 9.6%), but this increase did not exceed the established minimal detectable change. There was not a significant change in dynamic balance between groups for the anterior (F1,41=2.33, P=.14) and posteromedial (F1,41=.41, P=.53) reach directions. Although small changes in ankle dorsiflexion ROM and posterolateral reach distances were observed, these changes did not exceed established minimal detectable change values for these measures. These results suggest that the benefits of fibular taping are not related to an increase in ankle dorsiflexion ROM or dynamic balance. Copyright © 2013 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Wide range of body composition measures are associated with cognitive function in community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Huiloo; Abdul Manaf, Zahara; Mat Ludin, Arimi Fitri; Shahar, Suzana

    2017-04-01

    Studies of the association between body composition, both body fat and body muscle, and cognitive function are rarely reported. The aim of the present study was to determine the association between a wide range of body composition measures with cognitive function in older adults. A total of 2322 Malaysian older adults aged 60 years and older were recruited using multistage random sampling in a population-based cross-sectional study. Out of 2322 older adults recruited, 2309 (48% men) completed assessments on cognitive function and body composition. Cognitive functions were assessed using the Malay version of the Mini-Mental State Examination, the Bahasa Malaysia version of Montreal Cognitive Assessment, Digit Span Test, Digit Symbol Test and Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test. Body composition included body mass index, mid-upper arm circumference, waist circumference, calf circumference, waist-to-hip ratio, percentage body fat and skeletal muscle mass. The association between body composition and cognitive functions was analyzed using multiple linear regression. After adjustment for age, education years, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes mellitus, depression, smoking status and alcohol consumption, we found that calf circumference appeared as a significant predictor for all cognitive tests among both men and women (P < 0.05), except for the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test. Waist-to-hip ratio was detected as a significant predictor for all cognitive tests among women (P < 0.05), but was only a significant predictor for the Bahasa Malaysia version of Montreal Cognitive Assessment among men (P < 0.05). These results suggest that there is a need to maintain muscle mass and lower adipose tissue among older adults for optimal cognitive function. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; 17: 554-560. © 2016 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  13. Dræb, dræb, dræb! Nej ... liiiige et øjeblik: De machiavelliske følelser i Game of Thrones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schubart, Rikke

    2013-01-01

    Blogindlæg om Machiavelliske følelser i HBO tv-serien Game of Thrones: "Dræb, dræb, dræb! Nej ... liiiige et øjeblik: De machiavelliske følelser i Game of Thrones"......Blogindlæg om Machiavelliske følelser i HBO tv-serien Game of Thrones: "Dræb, dræb, dræb! Nej ... liiiige et øjeblik: De machiavelliske følelser i Game of Thrones"...

  14. Dynamic Range for Speech Materials in Korean, English, and Mandarin: A Cross-Language Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, In-Ki; Kates, James M.; Arehart, Kathryn H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify whether differences in dynamic range (DR) are evident across the spoken languages of Korean, English, and Mandarin. Method: Recorded sentence-level speech materials were used as stimuli. DR was quantified using different definitions of DR (defined as the range in decibels from the highest to the…

  15. Modulation of TRAIL resistance in colon carcinoma cells : Different contributions of DR4 and DR5

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Geelen, Caroline M. M.; Pennarun, Bodvael; Le, Phuong T. K.; de Vries, Elisabeth G. E.; de Jong, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Background: rhTRAIL is a therapeutic agent, derived from the TRAIL cytokine, which induces apoptosis in cancer cells by activating the membrane death receptors 4 and 5 (DR4 and DR5). Here, we investigated each receptor's contribution to rhTRAIL sensitivity and rhTRAIL resistance. We assessed whether

  16. Dr. David Syz, State Secretary for Economic Affairs, Switzerland

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2003-01-01

    Photo 01: Dr. David Syz (left) with Professor Roger Cashmore, Research Director for Collider Programmes.Photo 02: Dr. David Syz signing the VIP visitors' book, with Prof. Roger Cashmore.Photo 03: Dr. David Syz signing the VIP visitors' book.Photo 04: Handshake between Dr. David Syz (left) and Prof. Roger Cashmore.

  17. A Tribute to Dr. Willy Lens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten Vansteenkiste

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Dr. Willy Lens, born on December 10th, 1943, passed away on August 29th, 2014. With his passing, the motivation community has lost a seminal member, a mentor, and a friend. Dr. Lens – a Fellow of the Association for Psychological Science and Founding Fellow of the American Educational Research Association – made fundamental contributions to the study of motivation both through his own work and through his caring and thoughtful mentorship of a large community of scholars. With this tribute, we want to honor Dr. Willy Lens’ significance to psychology and education as well as his positive influence, both personally and professionally, on the lives of dozens of scholars. With his contagious enthusiasm and caring mentorship, Willy was an example for our academic community and with this tribute we express our gratitude for the privilege to have collaborated with him.

  18. Enso-like cyclicity In Late Pleistocene varve thickness measurements from two alpine lakes, Wind River Range, Wyoming, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahms, D. E.; Noren, A. J.; Geiss, C. E.; Dorale, J. A.; Myrbo, A.

    2011-12-01

    Spectral analyses of varve thickness measurements in sediment cores from two moraine-dammed lakes in the Wind River Range of Wyoming, USA, reveal a 2.8-to-8-yr cyclicity consistent with that expressed by ENSO. The lakes [Louis Lake (42.596°N,108.846°W, 2610 m and nearby Fiddlers Lake 42.6312°N, 108.8786°W, 2868 m] and hold the possibility of longer records of mid-continental climate change even into the last interglacial. Nine macrofossil-based 14C ages (AMS) combined with varve thicknesses indicate the lakes were deep enough during the LGM to form and preserve varves and that the minimum age for the lacustrine sediments here is ~20 kyrs. The ENSO signal is most robust in the Louis Lake varves, displaying high spectral power across the entire band of frequencies associated with ENSO. Analysis of the Fiddlers Lake varves yield predictably less significant results, a consequence of the different geomorphic settings of these two lakes. Specifically, (1) Louis Lake has a large catchment and receives surface water input from a stream, which has delivered a large quantity of sediment to the lake margin and deposited a substantial delta. In this setting, variations in precipitation appear closely linked to sediment delivery to the lake, and are reflected in sediment distributions, while (2) Fiddlers Lake is located in a small re-entrant basin with a relatively insignificant catchment area and fed almost entirely by groundwater and direct rain/snow events, with little surface runoff; (3) the deeper water of Louis Lake aids in the formation and preservation of varves, while (4) lake level fluctuations in the shallower Fiddlers Lake directly affect varve creation and preservation (the onset of glaciation in the Fiddlers Lake core is represented by thick sediment packages that eventually thin to varves by ~1m up-core). The significant ENSO-like periodicities in the the varved sediments in these lakes suggests that the effects of ENSO forcing were felt far into the western

  19. Fluorescent sensors for the basic metabolic panel enable measurement with a smart phone device over the physiological range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awqatty, Becker; Samaddar, Shayak; Cash, Kevin J; Clark, Heather A; Dubach, J Matthew

    2014-10-21

    The advanced functionality of portable devices such as smart phones provides the necessary hardware to potentially perform complex diagnostic measurements in any setting. Recent research and development have utilized cameras and data acquisition properties of smart phones to create diagnostic approaches for a variety of diseases or pollutants. However, in concentration measurements, such as blood glucose, the performance of handheld diagnostic devices depends largely on the sensing mechanism. To expand measurements to multiple components, often necessary in medical tests, with a single diagnostic device, robust platform based sensors are needed. Here, we developed a suite of dual wavelength fluorescent sensors with response characteristics necessary to measure each component of a basic metabolic panel, a common clinical measurement. Furthermore, the response of these sensors could be measured with a simple optical setup to convert a smart phone into a fluorescence measurement instrument. This approach could be used as a mobile basic metabolic panel measurement system for point of care diagnostics.

  20. Close Range Photogrammetry in Space - Measuring the On-Orbit Clearance between Hardware on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddle, Donn

    2017-01-01

    When photogrammetrists read an article entitled "Photogrammetry in Space" they immediately think of terrestrial mapping using satellite imagery. However in the last 19 years the roll of close range photogrammetry in support of the manned space flight program has grown exponentially. Management and engineers have repeatedly entrusted the safety of the vehicles and their crews to the results of photogrammetric analysis. In February 2010, the Node 3 module was attached to the port side Common Berthing Mechanism (CBM) of the International Space Station (ISS). Since this was not the location at which the module was originally designed to be located on the ISS, coolant lines containing liquid ammonia, were installed externally from the US Lab to Node 3 during a spacewalk. During mission preparation I had developed a plan and a set of procedures to have the astronauts acquire stereo imagery of these coolant lines at the conclusion of the spacewalk to enable us to map their as-installed location relative to the rest of the space station. Unfortunately, the actual installation of the coolant lines took longer than expected and in an effort to wrap up the spacewalk on time, the mission director made a real-time call to drop the photography. My efforts to reschedule the photography on a later spacewalk never materialized, so rather than having an as-installed model for the location of coolant lines, the master ISS CAD database continued to display an as-designed model of the coolant lines. Fast forward to the summer of 2015, the ISS program planned to berth a Japanese cargo module to the nadir Common Berthing Mechanism (CBM), immediately adjacent to the Node 3 module. A CAD based clearance analysis revealed a negative four inch clearance between the ammonia lines and a thruster nozzle on the port side of the cargo vehicle. Recognizing that the model of the ammonia line used in the clearance analysis was "as-designed" rather than "as-installed", I was asked to determine the

  1. A meta-analysis of echocardiographic measurements of the left heart for the development of normative reference ranges in a large international cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møgelvang, Rasmus

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To develop age-, sex-, and ethnic-appropriate normative reference ranges for standard echocardiographic measurements of the left heart by combining echocardiographic measurements obtained from adult volunteers without clinical cardiovascular disease or significant cardiovascular risk factors......, from multiple studies around the world. METHODS AND RESULTS: The Echocardiographic Normal Ranges Meta-Analysis of the Left heart (EchoNoRMAL) collaboration was established and population-based data sets of echocardiographic measurements combined to perform an individual person data meta-analysis. Data...... and 95th centile of each measurement against age. CONCLUSION: This unique data set represents a large, multi-ethnic cohort of subjects resident in a wide range of countries. The resultant reference ranges will have wide applicability for normative data based on age, sex, and ethnicity....

  2. Biography of Dr. Simao Nascimento de Sousa

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarkar, A.^red.

    International 32 (2006) 148 www.elsevier.com/locate/envint The International workshop on marine pollution and ecotoxicology (2004) was organized to felicitate our colleague Dr. Sima˜o Nascimento de Sousa, Deputy Director, NIO who superannuated on 29th February..., 2004. Dr. de Sousa was born on the 26th of February, 1944 at Corlim, Ilhas, Goa. He graduated with BSc (Hons.) in 1969 and MSc with Physical Chemistry in 1971 from the University of Bombay (Mumbai), India. He began his career with studies in the Mandovi...

  3. IgD serum levels are influenced by HLA-DR phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lio, D; Candore, G; Colucci, A T; Modica, M A; Caruso, C

    1992-01-01

    In the present paper we have evaluated IgD serum levels of 84 randomly selected HLA-typed healthy Sicilians. The values were analysed according to age, sex and HLA-DR phenotypes. No correlation between age and IgD serum levels was found in our population since all subjects were in a narrow age range. Furthermore, no significant association was found between IgD serum levels and gender of studied subjects. The evaluation of IgD serum levels according to HLA-DR phenotypes revealed that HLA-DR1 positive subjects displayed significantly higher values. These results are in agreement with previous reports showing that HLA phenotypes may be involved in the control of serum immunoglobulin levels. Furthermore, present data strengthen our suggestion that HLA-DR1 phenotype is related to the 'high responder' immunological profile.

  4. Characteristics and reference ranges of Insulin-Like Growth Factor-I measured with a commercially available immunoassay in 724 healthy adult Caucasians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Mikkel; Nielsen, Kaspar Renÿ; Kristensen, Lars Østergaard

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Measurements of Insulin-Like Growth Factor-I (IGF-I) play a pivotal role in the evaluation of the growth hormone-IGF-I axis. Due to assay variation IGF-I reference ranges are assay specific. We provide serum IGF-I reference ranges for adult men and women obtained...

  5. An HPLC method associated with a thermodynamic analysis to compare the binding of TRAIL and its nanovectorized form to death receptors DR4 and DR5 and their relationship to cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillaume, Yves Claude; Lethier, Lydie; André, Claire

    2016-11-15

    TRAIL is a member of the TNF family of cytokines which induces apoptosis of cancer cells via its binding to its cognate receptors, DR5 a high affinity site and DR4 a site of low affinity. Our working group has recently demonstrated that nanovectorization of TRAIL with single wall carbon nanotubes (abbreviated NPT) enhanced TRAIL affinity to the high affinity site DR5 and increased pro apoptotic potential in different human tumor cell lines. In this paper, the DR4 low affinity site was immobilized on a chromatographic support and the effect of temperature on a wide temperature range 1°C-50°C was studied to calculate the thermodynamic parameters of the binding of TRAIL and NPT to DR4 and DR5 receptors. For the first time the heat capacity changes for the different binding processes were determined. At a physiological pH (7.4) the heat capacity changes for the binding of NPT to DR4 and DR5 were respectively equal to -0.91kJ/molK and -0.28kJ/molK and those obtained for the binding of TRAIL to DR4 and DR5 were respectively equal to -1.54kJ/molK and -1.05kJ/molK. By the use of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), a phase transition (∼12°C for DR5, ∼4°C for DR4) between a disordered (low temperature) and an ordered (high temperature) solid like state visualized in the receptor structure confirmed the temperature dependence of binding affinity enthalpy ΔH for soluble TRAIL and its nanovectorized form to its cognate receptors. In the low temperature domain, the positive ΔH values contribute non-favourably to the free energy of binding, TRAIL and NPT described similar affinities for DR4 and DR5. For the high temperature domain, negative ΔH values indicated that van der Waals interactions and hydrogen bonding are engaged favourably at the ligand - receptor interface. Above 30°C, their rank-ordered affinities were thus strongly different in the sequence: TRAILDR4DR4 and DR5

  6. Measurements of the Complex Permittivity of Liquid Helium-4 in the Millimeter Wave Range by a Whispering Gallery Mode Resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smorodin, A. V.; Rybalko, A. S.; Konstantinov, D.

    2017-06-01

    We report an experimental study of the electrical properties of liquid helium-4 in the temperature range 1.2-3 K. The experiment is carried out in the millimeter wave range using a whispering gallery mode dielectric resonator, and the complex permittivity of liquid helium is extracted from the data using the resonant perturbation method. The results for the temperature dependence of the dielectric constant are consistent with the previous studies. In addition, we find strong enhancement of the loss tangent around the superfluid transition temperature.

  7. Prasada Rao, Dr Turaga Sundara Rama

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1994 Section: Engineering & Technology. Prasada Rao, Dr Turaga Sundara Rama Ph.D. (Andhra), FNAE. Date of birth: 20 January 1939. Specialization: Petroleum Refining and Heterogeneous Catalysis Address: SFS Flat No. 600, DDA/HIG Flats, Sector 13, Phase 2, Pocket B, Dwaraka, New Delhi 110 045, U.T.

  8. The Contributions of Dr. Alfred Gysi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phoenix, Rodney D; Engelmeier, Robert L

    2016-11-24

    This article is a historical overview of Dr. Alfred Gysi's contributions to the profession in the areas of denture tooth and articulator design. His understanding of occlusion and mandibular movement resulted in denture tooth designs and occlusal concepts still in widespread use. © 2016 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  9. The Years of Dr. Robert Eugene Marshak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Luke W.

    I am honored and privileged to make a brief statement in memory of Dr. Marshak's distinguished achievement in science, his kindness and great humanity. I will concentrate on the part of his career at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University …

  10. Prof Dr.Farida Habib Shah

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ranjeetha

    Women in Leadership Roles in Science. dR h Pl i th L k Pi li ... Employment – job entry. M i th l dd. • Moving up the ladder. • Decision making committees. • Leadership Positions. • Women in Technopreneurship- corporate level .... Organize more training programmes for communication and presentation skills for their ...

  11. Dr Tedros Adhanom: New WHO Director General

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-08-03

    Aug 3, 2017 ... five other candidates to the post. His accomplishments both in Ethiopia and the global stage catapult him to this remarkable success. ... Dr Tedros is a change agent, and a reformist in the health sector. His election as the Director General of WHO brings along a lot of expectations for a better health agenda ...

  12. In Memoriam- Prof. Dr. Andries Willem Lategan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P. Ligthelm

    1965-03-01

    Full Text Available Hierdie Curriculum Vitae sou voorgelees gewees het met die inougurele rede van wyle prof. dr. A. W. Lategan met die aanvaarding van 'n ereprofessoraat aan die P.U. vir C.H.O. op 29 Oktober 1965. Prof. Lategan is op 23 Oktober 1965 oor- lcde. Sy inougurele rede verskyn as ’n bylaag in hierdie uit- gawe.

  13. Stop words for “Dr Math”

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Butgereit, L

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available “Dr Math” is a facility where primary and secondary school pupils can use MXit on their cell phones to get help with their mathematics homework. Pupils use an abbreviated “MXit lingo” leaving out most vowels and substituting various numerals...

  14. The great neurosis of Dr. Joseph Gerard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefrère, Jean-Jacques; Rouillon, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    The Great Neurosis, of Dr. Joseph Gerard, was published in 1889 in Paris. The book, intended for the general public, shows the different varieties of neuroses through picturesque and instructive examples. Its scientific and medical value is poor, but provides us with the various meanings of the word 'neurosis' in the late nineteenth century. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Confessions of a Dr Math tutor

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Butgereit, L

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Mathematics look different on a small 3-inch screen of an inexpensive cell phone when compared to a 3-meter whiteboard in a mathematics classroom. Dr Math uses cell phone or mobile data "chat" technologies to assist primary and secondary school...

  16. Calorimetry for dose measurement at electron accelerators in the 80-120 keV energy range

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helt-Hansen, J.; Miller, A.; Duane, S.

    2005-01-01

    Calorimeters for dose measurement at low-energy electron accelerator energies (80-120 keV) are described. Three calorimeters with different characteristics were designed and their dose response and measurement uncertainties were characterized. The heated air between the beam exit window and the c...

  17. Associations of self-report measures with gait, range of motion and proprioception in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Bryan P; Shokat, Maximilian S; Abbasi, Abdullah Z; Vincent, Heather K; Seay, Amanda; Kennedy, David J

    2013-09-01

    Spinal stenosis is defined as neurogenic claudication due to narrowing of the spinal canal lumen diameter. As the disease progresses, ambulation and gait may be impaired. Self-report measures are routinely used in the clinical setting to capture data related to lumbar pain symptoms, function and perceived disability. The associations between self-report measures and objective measures of physical function in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis are not well characterized. The purpose of this study was to determine the correlation between self-reported assessments of function with objective biomechanical measures of function. 25 subjects were enrolled in this study. Subjects completed self-report questionnaires and biomechanical assessments of gait analysis, lumbar 3D ROM and lumbar proprioception. Correlations were determined between self-report measures and biomechanical data. The Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) was strongly correlated with stride length and gait velocity and weakly correlated with base of support. ODI was also weakly correlated with left lateral bending proprioception but not right lateral bending. The SF12 was not significantly correlated with any of the biomechanical measurements. Pain scores were weakly correlated with velocity, and base of support, and had no correlation any of the other biomechanical measures. There is a strong correlation between gait parameters and functional disability as measured with the ODI. Quantified gait analysis can be a useful tool to evaluate patients with lumbar spinal stenosis and to assess the outcomes of treatments on this group of patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Coherent detection of spontaneous Brillouin scattering combined with Raman amplification for long range distributed temperature and strain measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alahbabi, M. N.; Cho, Y. T.; Newson, T. P.

    2005-05-01

    Brillouin intensity and frequency measurements achieved temperature and strain to be unambiguously resolved with resolutions of 3.5°C and 85 μɛ at 50km. Frequency only measurements, achieved temperature or strain resolution of 1.7°C and 35 μɛ at 100km.

  19. A low volume method for the analysis of dioxins and dioxin-like compounds in serum and whole blood using BDS' DR CALUX {sup registered} bioassay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brouwer, B.; Sonneveld, E.; Botschuijver, S.; Besselink, H.; Burg, B. van der [BioDetection Systems BV (BDS), Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2004-09-15

    Biodetection Systems BV's (BDS) DR CALUX {sup registered} bioassay is a cost-effective and rapid method to measure low levels of dioxins and dioxin-like compounds in various matrices. For the analysis of human serum/plasma samples, existing methods for extraction, clean-up and DR CALUX {sup registered} bioanalysis require 10 ml of serum/plasma to obtain a limit of quantitation (LOQ) of 20 pg DR CALUX {sup registered} TEQ/g fat. This low LOQ value is necessary to be able to measure the lower concentration range of the dioxin and dioxin-like compounds found in human serum and plasma. In many epidemiological studies however, the amount of serum/plasma available for dioxin analysis is limited. Therefore, it is desirable to develop an analysis method that requires a lower volume of serum/plasma for dioxins and dioxin-like compounds determination. In some cases only whole blood is available for analysis. Extraction procedures for whole-blood have been described. However these have been reported to result in an overestimation of dioxin content, most likely due to the co-extraction of AhR interacting compounds like porphyrins that contribute to the detected DR CALUX {sup registered} TEQs. To tackle both problems we developed improved extraction procedures for both matrices. To ensure continued reliability of the new extract methods in the DR CALUX {sup registered} bioassay, extraction and clean-up methods for reduced serum volumes and whole-blood were evaluated, selected and validated. In this paper we present method development and validation set-up of this validation study.

  20. Acoustic and Perceptual Measurement of Expressive Prosody in High-Functioning Autism: Increased Pitch Range and What it Means to Listeners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadig, Aparna; Shaw, Holly

    2012-01-01

    Are there consistent markers of atypical prosody in speakers with high functioning autism (HFA) compared to typically-developing speakers? We examined: (1) acoustic measurements of pitch range, mean pitch and speech rate in conversation, (2) perceptual ratings of conversation for these features and overall prosody, and (3) acoustic measurements of…

  1. Final Environmental Assessment for the Bridge Replacement and Scour Protection Measures at Avon Park Air Force Range, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    documented at the site or are known to occur at or near the project locations: Eastern indigo snake, (Drymarchon corais Avon Park Air Force Range...Eastem indigo snake (D1ymarchon corais couperi) The threatened eastem indigo snake (indigo snake) is a large snake which can reach lengths of up to

  2. Ankle joint range of motion measurements in spastic cerebral palsy children: intraobserver and interobserver reliability and reproducibility of goniometry and visual estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allington, Nanni J; Leroy, Nathalie; Doneux, Carole

    2002-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the intra- and interobserver reliability and reproducibility of goniometry and visual estimation of ankle joint range of motion measurements in children with spastic cerebral palsy. Forty-six ankles of 24 spastic cerebral palsy children were measured under a strict protocol. The global mean measurement error was 5 degrees (SD, 5 degrees) for intra- and interobserver measurements and 3 degrees (SD, 3 degrees) for goniometry versus visual estimation. Statistical analysis showed a high reliability for intra- and interobserver measurements (r>0.75), between visual estimation and goniometry (correlation coefficient, r>0.967; concordance coefficient, r>0.957). Both visual estimation and goniometry ankle range-of-motion measurements are reliable and reproducible in spastic cerebral palsy children if a strict but simple protocol is applied.

  3. Radiological Assessment of the Sacrofemoral Angle: A Novel Method to Measure the Range of Hip Joint Flexion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian-Zhao Wei

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Using the SFA, to evaluate RHF could prevent compromised measurements due to the movements of pelvis and lumbar spine during hip flexion, and is, therefore, a more accurate and objective method with reasonable reliability and validity.

  4. Ultrasound settings significantly alter arterial lumen and wall thickness measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Green Daniel J

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Flow-mediated dilation (FMD and carotid intima-medial thickness (CIMT, measured by ultrasound, are widely used to test the efficacy of cardioprotective interventions. Although assessment methods vary, automated edge-detecting image analysis software is routinely used to measure changes in FMD and CIMT. We aimed to quantify the effect that commonly adjusted ultrasound settings have on arterial lumen and wall thickness measurements made with CIMT measurement software. Methods We constructed phantom arteries from a tissue-mimicking agar compound and scanned them in a water bath with a 10 MHz multi-frequency linear-array probe attached to a high-resolution ultrasound machine. B-mode images of the phantoms were recorded with dynamic range (DR and gain set at five decibel (dB increments from 40 dB to 60 dB and -10 dB to +10 dB respectively. Lumen diameter and wall-thickness were measured off-line using CIMT measurement software. Results Lumen measurements: there was a strong linear relationship between DR and gain and measured lumen diameter. For a given gain level, a 5 dB increase in DR reduced the measured lumen diameter by 0.02 ± 0.004 mm (p CIMT measurements: For a fixed gain level, a 5 dB increase in DR increased measured wall thickness by 0.003 ± 0.002 mm (p Conclusion DR, gain and probe distance significantly alter lumen diameter and CIMT measurements made using image analysis software. When CIMT and FMD are used to test the efficacy of cardioprotective interventions, the DR, gain and probe position used to record baseline scans should be documented and replicated in post-treatment scans in individual trial subjects. If more than one sonographer or imaging centre is used to collect data, the study protocol should document specific DR and gain settings to be used in all subjects.

  5. Listening for bats: the hearing range of the bushcricket Phaneroptera falcata for bat echolocation calls measured in the field.

    OpenAIRE

    Schul, J.; Matt, F; von Helversen, O

    2000-01-01

    The hearing range of the tettigoniid Phaneropterafalcata for the echolocation calls of freely flying mouseeared bats (Myotis myotis) was determined in the field. The hearing of the insect was monitored using hook electrode recordings from an auditory interneuron, which is as sensitive as the hearing organ for frequencies above 16 kHz. The flight path of the bat relative to the insect's position was tracked by recording the echolocation calls with two microphone arrays, and calculating the bat...

  6. A benchmark for protein dynamics: Ribonuclease A measured by neutron scattering in a large wavevector-energy transfer range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Kathleen [Institut Laue Langevin, BP 156, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Department of Membrane Biochemistry, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Am Klopferspitz 18, D-82152 Martinsried (Germany); Caronna, Chiara [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, B.P. 220, 38043 Grenoble (France); Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche ed Astronomiche, Universita di Palermo, Via Archirafi 36, 90123, Palermo (Italy); Fouquet, Peter [Institut Laue Langevin, BP 156, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Haussler, Wolfgang [Forschungsneutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM II), 85747 Garching (Germany); Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Department E21, Lichtenbergstrasse 1, 85747 Garching (Germany); Natali, Francesca [INFM-CNR OGG and CRS-SOFT, c/o ILL, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, BP 156-38042, Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Ollivier, Jacques [Institut Laue Langevin, BP 156, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Orecchini, Andrea [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Perugia, Via Pascoli, 06123 Perugia (Italy); CNR-INFM CRS SOFT c/o Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita La Sapienza, p.le Aldo Moro 4, 00185 Roma (Italy); Plazanet, Marie [European Laboratory for Non-Linear Spectroscopy, University of Florence, Via N. Carrara 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); CNR-INFM CRS SOFT c/o Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita La Sapienza, p.le Aldo Moro 4, 00185 Roma (Italy); Zaccai, Giuseppe [Institut Laue Langevin, BP 156, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)], E-mail: zaccai@ill.fr

    2008-04-18

    The dynamics of Ribonuclease A was explored in the full range of time and length-scales accessible by neutron spectroscopy, on time-of-flight, backscattering and spin-echo spectrometers. Samples were examined in dry and hydrated powder forms and in concentrated and dilute solutions. The aim of the study was an experimental characterisation of the full variety of protein dynamics arising from stabilisation forces. The results provide a benchmark against which other sample dynamics can be compared.

  7. Validation of Attitude and Heading Reference System and Microsoft Kinect for Continuous Measurement of Cervical Range of Motion Compared to the Optical Motion Capture System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Young Seop; Yang, Kyung Yong; Youn, Kibum; Yoon, Chiyul; Yeom, Jiwoon; Hwang, Hyeoncheol; Lee, Jehee; Kim, Keewon

    2016-08-01

    To compare optical motion capture system (MoCap), attitude and heading reference system (AHRS) sensor, and Microsoft Kinect for the continuous measurement of cervical range of motion (ROM). Fifteen healthy adult subjects were asked to sit in front of the Kinect camera with optical markers and AHRS sensors attached to the body in a room equipped with optical motion capture camera. Subjects were instructed to independently perform axial rotation followed by flexion/extension and lateral bending. Each movement was repeated 5 times while being measured simultaneously with 3 devices. Using the MoCap system as the gold standard, the validity of AHRS and Kinect for measurement of cervical ROM was assessed by calculating correlation coefficient and Bland-Altman plot with 95% limits of agreement (LoA). MoCap and ARHS showed fair agreement (95% LoA10°) for measuring ROM in all directions. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) values between MoCap and AHRS in -40° to 40° range were excellent for flexion/extension and lateral bending (ICC>0.9). ICC values were also fair for axial rotation (ICC>0.8). ICC values between MoCap and Kinect system in -40° to 40° range were fair for all motions. Our study showed feasibility of using AHRS to measure cervical ROM during continuous motion with an acceptable range of error. AHRS and Kinect system can also be used for continuous monitoring of flexion/extension and lateral bending in ordinary range.

  8. Areal-averaged trace gas emission rates from long-range open-path measurements in stable boundary layer conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Schäfer

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of land-surface emission rates of greenhouse and other gases at large spatial scales (10 000 m2 are needed to assess the spatial distribution of emissions. This can be readily done using spatial-integrating micro-meteorological methods like flux-gradient methods which were evaluated for determining land-surface emission rates of trace gases under stable boundary layers. Non-intrusive path-integrating measurements are utilized. Successful application of a flux-gradient method requires confidence in the gradients of trace gas concentration and wind, and in the applicability of boundary-layer turbulence theory; consequently the procedures to qualify measurements that can be used to determine the flux is critical. While there is relatively high confidence in flux measurements made under unstable atmospheres with mean winds greater than 1 m s−1, there is greater uncertainty in flux measurements made under free convective or stable conditions. The study of N2O emissions of flat grassland and NH3 emissions from a cattle lagoon involves quality-assured determinations of fluxes under low wind, stable or night-time atmospheric conditions when the continuous "steady-state" turbulence of the surface boundary layer breaks down and the layer has intermittent turbulence. Results indicate that following the Monin-Obukhov similarity theory (MOST flux-gradient methods that assume a log-linear profile of the wind speed and concentration gradient incorrectly determine vertical profiles and thus flux in the stable boundary layer. An alternative approach is considered on the basis of turbulent diffusivity, i.e. the measured friction velocity as well as height gradients of horizontal wind speeds and concentrations without MOST correction for stability. It is shown that this is the most accurate of the flux-gradient methods under stable conditions.

  9. Measures of range of motion and strength among healthy women with differing quality of lower extremity movement during the lateral step-down test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabin, Alon; Kozol, Zvi

    2010-12-01

    Cross-sectional. To determine the association between hip and ankle range-of-motion measures, as well as measures of hip muscle strength, with measures of quality of lower extremity movement, as assessed visually during the lateral step-down test in healthy women. Altered lower extremity movement pattern consisting of excessive femoral adduction and internal rotation, leading to excessive knee valgus alignment, is associated with increased risk of knee ligament injury, as well as patellofemoral pain syndrome. Previous investigations of lower extremity kinematics, using 3-dimensional motion analysis systems, document an inconsistent association between hip muscle strength and lower extremity movement pattern. Currently, it is unknown whether differences in hip muscle strength or other physical measures exist among women with differing quality of lower extremity movement as assessed by visual observation. Two physical therapists assessed the quality of movement during the lateral step-down among 29 healthy women (mean ± SD age, 24.3 ± 3.2 years). Subjects were instructed on the optimal movement pattern prior to performing the test. The quality of movement was categorized as "good" or "moderate," based on a previously established 6-point scale. Several measures of hip strength (handheld dynamometer) and hip and ankle range of motion (fluid-filled inclinometer and universal goniometer) were also assessed. Differences in strength and range-of-motion measures between women with good and women with moderate quality of movement were assessed with a Mann-Whitney U test. Both examiners found decreased ankle dorsiflexion range of motion, as measured with the knee bent (Pdorsiflexion range of motion compared to women with a good quality of movement. Clinicians should consider evaluating ankle dorsiflexion range of motion when observing an altered lower extremity movement pattern during the lateral step-down test.

  10. Proton clouds to measure long-range contacts between nonexchangeable side chain protons in solid-state NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinnige, Tessa; Daniëls, Mark; Baldus, Marc; Weingarth, Markus

    2014-03-26

    We show that selective labeling of proteins with protonated amino acids embedded in a perdeuterated matrix, dubbed 'proton clouds', provides general access to long-range contacts between nonexchangeable side chain protons in proton-detected solid-state NMR, which is important to study protein tertiary structure. Proton-cloud labeling significantly improves spectral resolution by simultaneously reducing proton line width and spectral crowding despite a high local proton density in clouds. The approach is amenable to almost all canonical amino acids. Our method is demonstrated on ubiquitin and the β-barrel membrane protein BamA.

  11. A system to measure isomeric state half-lives in the 10 ns to 10 μs range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toufen, D. L., E-mail: dennis@if.usp.br [Institute of Physics, University of São Paulo, C.P. 66318, 05315-970 São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil); Federal Institute of Education, Science and Technology of São Paulo - IFSP, 07115-000 Guarulhos, São Paulo (Brazil); Allegro, P. R. P.; Medina, N. H.; Oliveira, J. R. B.; Cybulska, E. W.; Seale, W. A.; Ribas, R. V. [Institute of Physics, University of São Paulo, C.P. 66318, 05315-970 São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil); Linares, R. [Fluminense Federal University, 24220-900 Niterói, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Silveira, M. A. G. [Universitary Center of FEI, 09850-901 São Bernardo do Campo, São Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-07-15

    The Isomeric State Measurement System (SISMEI) was developed to search for isomeric nuclear states produced by fusion-evaporation reactions. The SISMEI consists of 10 plastic phoswich telescopes, two lead shields, one NaI(Tl) scintillation detector, two Compton suppressed HPGe γ-ray detectors, and a cone with a recoil product catcher. The new system was tested at the 8 UD Pelletron tandem accelerator of the University of São Paulo with the measurement of two known isomeric states: {sup 54}Fe, 10{sup +} state (E = 6527.1 (11) keV, T{sub 1/2} = 364(7) ns) and the 5/2{sup +} state of {sup 19}F (E = 197.143 (4) keV, T{sub 1/2} = 89.3 (10) ns). The results indicate that the system is capable of identifying delayed transitions, of measuring isomeric state lifetimes, and of identifying the feeding transitions of the isomeric state through the delayed γ-γ coincidence method. The measured half-life for the 10{sup +} state was T{sub 1/2} = 365(14) ns and for the 5/2{sup +} state, 100(36) ns.

  12. Thermoregulation of the bovine scrotum 1: measurements of free-range animals in a paddock and pen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallage, Andrea L.; Johnston, S. D.; Lisle, A. T.; Beard, L.; Lees, A. M.; Collins, C. W.; Gaughan, J. B.

    2017-08-01

    The bull's scrotum and scrotal cord vasculature has traditionally been regarded as a thermoregulatory device for maintaining optimal testicular temperature for normal spermatogenesis. This assumption has mostly been derived from discrete measurements using thermocouples with limited data correlating continuous scrotal temperature (ST) to body temperature (BT). From mid-summer to early autumn, four Wagyu bulls (9-18 months) were surgically implanted with two data loggers (DL) logging at 30 min intervals: one on the right hand side flank and the other was attached to the visceral vaginal tunic of the mid-testis. Bulls were firstly housed in a paddock (PK) for 13 days and then moved to individual pens (IP), again for 13 days. Repeated measures analysis modelled the long-term and diurnal trends in BT and ST. While both day and time of day (TOD) were significant effects for ST at both housing locations ( P thermoregulation capacity.

  13. [Magnetic resonance imaging versus DR for whole spine imaging in patients with degenerative spinal disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shao-Yong; Cui, Yun-Neng; Zhao, Yin-Xia; Lu, Ming; Li, Shao-Lin

    2017-09-20

    To assess the quality of whole spine images obtained by DR and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and analyze the whole spinal imaging sagittal parameters for standing DR and supine MRI. Sixty-one patients aged 49.9∓17.6 years with degenerative spinal disease underwent both standing DR and supine MRI of the whole spine from November, 2010 to March, 2016. The image quality was retrospectively reviewed, and the cervical lordosis (CL), thoracic kyphosis (TK), lumbar lordosis (LL), sacral slope (SS), and sagittal vertical axis (SVA) were measured on the whole spinal lateral DR and middle sagittal MR images. Both the DR and MR whole spine images had a high quality (100%). The CL, TK, LL, SS, and SVA measured were 28.37mnplus;10.91 °, 29.98mnplus;8.96 °, 45.61mnplus;12.46 °, 34.38mnplus;9.05 °, and 17.20mnplus;26.39 mm on DR images and were 24.34mnplus;9.01 °, 21.22mnplus;8.13 °, 41.45mnplus;12.17 °, 37.45mnplus;8.19 °, and 36.51mnplus;12.44mm on MR images, respectively, showing significant differences in the measurements between the two modalities (P=0.000, 0.000, 0.000, 0.001, and 0.007, respectively). The correlation coefficient between DR and MR images for CL, TK, LL, SS, and SVA were 0.69, 0.68, 0.72, 0.51, and 0.27 (P=0.000, 0.000, 0.000, 0.000, and 0.034, respectively). Both standing DR and supine MR whole spine imaging can provide high-quality images. The CL, TK, LL, SS, and SVA measured on supine MR whole spine images are correlated with those on standing DR images but differ obviously. Supine MR imaging can not substitute standing DR examinations, and comprehensive assessment of degenerative spinal disease needs the combination of the two imaging techniques.

  14. 10 CFR Appendix I to Subpart B of... - Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Conventional Ranges, Conventional...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... (228.6±1.3 mm) in diameter, approximately 3.0 inches (76 mm) high and shall weigh 19±0.1 lbs (8.62±0.05... measuring the electrical energy consumption of conventional ovens and cooking tops shall have a resolution... microwave ovens shall have a resolution of 0.1 watt-hour (0.36 kJ) or less and a maximum error no greater...

  15. Polarization Diversity Image-Reject Homodyne Receiver for Directional Radial Velocity Measurements in Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) Instruments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to an improved method and a LIDAR system comprising an emitter for emission of a coherent electromagnetic EM signal and a transmitting optical arrangement configured to transmit the electromagnetic signal towards a measurement area. By the method and system, detectio...... of both the polarized and depolarized backscattered EM signal is obtained, whereby an improved signal-to-noise ratio is obtained....

  16. Prof dr FJ van Zyl as sendingteoloog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. J.C. vanWyk

    1989-01-01

    Full Text Available Prof Dr FJ van Zyl as mission theologian In this article, the theology of mission of Prof dr FJ van Zyl is being explored. This is done by way of his lectures in the Science of Mission at the University of Pretoria during 1960-1978 and also from articles in the magazines of the Nederduitsch Hervormde Kerk dating back approximately forty years. It is found that almost none of his dictions is outdated. The radical cataclysm in the theology of mission, especially after 1961, he sharply detected and exposed. His theology of mission is built on a very broad theological base which can be described as theology of the Word. To him mission is proclamation.

  17. Quantitative methanol-burning lung model for validating gas-exchange measurements over wide ranges of FIO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miodownik, S; Melendez, J; Carlon, V A; Burda, B

    1998-06-01

    The methanol-burning lung model has been used as a technique for generating a predictable ratio of carbon dioxide production (VCO2) to oxygen consumption (VO2) or respiratory quotient (RQ). Although an accurate RQ can be generated, quantitatively predictable and adjustable VO2 and VCO2 cannot be generated. We describe a new burner device in which the combustion rate of methanol is always equal to the infusion rate of fuel over an extended range of O2 concentrations. This permits the assembly of a methanol-burning lung model that is usable with O2 concentrations up to 100% and provides continuously adjustable and quantitative VO2 (69-1,525 ml/min) and VCO2 (46-1,016 ml/min) at a RQ of 0.667.

  18. DEIMOS: a beamline dedicated to dichroism measurements in the 350-2500 eV energy range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohresser, P; Otero, E; Choueikani, F; Chen, K; Stanescu, S; Deschamps, F; Moreno, T; Polack, F; Lagarde, B; Daguerre, J-P; Marteau, F; Scheurer, F; Joly, L; Kappler, J-P; Muller, B; Bunau, O; Sainctavit, Ph

    2014-01-01

    The DEIMOS (Dichroism Experimental Installation for Magneto-Optical Spectroscopy) beamline was part of the second phase of the beamline development at French Synchrotron SOLEIL (Source Optimisée de Lumière à Energie Intermédiaire du LURE) and opened to users in March 2011. It delivers polarized soft x-rays to perform x-ray absorption spectroscopy, x-ray magnetic circular dichroism, and x-ray linear dichroism in the energy range 350-2500 eV. The beamline has been optimized for stability and reproducibility in terms of photon flux and photon energy. The main end-station consists in a cryo-magnet with 2 split coils providing a 7 T magnetic field along the beam or 2 T perpendicular to the beam with a controllable temperature on the sample from 370 K down to 1.5 K.

  19. On the trail of Dr. Fifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asche, G

    1996-05-01

    A gift from a patient drew Hope, BC, family physician Gerd Asche irrevocably into the local medical history of the 1858 Fraser River Gold Rush. Because of his interest in Dr. Max William Fifer, Asche undertook research missions in British Columbia, England and the US, converted his computer room to a research and writing centre, and wrote a biography of his predecessor and colleague. He recounts his experience and the growing satisfaction provided by his interest in medical history.

  20. On the trail of Dr. Fifer.

    OpenAIRE

    Asche, G

    1996-01-01

    A gift from a patient drew Hope, BC, family physician Gerd Asche irrevocably into the local medical history of the 1858 Fraser River Gold Rush. Because of his interest in Dr. Max William Fifer, Asche undertook research missions in British Columbia, England and the US, converted his computer room to a research and writing centre, and wrote a biography of his predecessor and colleague. He recounts his experience and the growing satisfaction provided by his interest in medical history.