WorldWideScience

Sample records for range direct imaging

  1. Long range image enhancement

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Duvenhage, B

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available and Vision Computing, Auckland, New Zealand, 23-24 November 2015 Long Range Image Enhancement Bernardt Duvenhage Council for Scientific and Industrial Research South Africa Email: bduvenhage@csir.co.za Abstract Turbulent pockets of air...

  2. Direct imaging of exoplanets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagrange, Anne-Marie

    2014-04-28

    Most of the exoplanets known today have been discovered by indirect techniques, based on the study of the host star radial velocity or photometric temporal variations. These detections allowed the study of the planet populations in the first 5-8 AU from the central stars and have provided precious information on the way planets form and evolve at such separations. Direct imaging on 8-10 m class telescopes allows the detection of giant planets at larger separations (currently typically more than 5-10 AU) complementing the indirect techniques. So far, only a few planets have been imaged around young stars, but each of them provides an opportunity for unique dedicated studies of their orbital, physical and atmospheric properties and sometimes also on the interaction with the 'second-generation', debris discs. These few detections already challenge formation theories. In this paper, I present the results of direct imaging surveys obtained so far, and what they already tell us about giant planet (GP) formation and evolution. Individual and emblematic cases are detailed; they illustrate what future instruments will routinely deliver for a much larger number of stars. I also point out the limitations of this approach, as well as the needs for further work in terms of planet formation modelling. I finally present the progress expected in direct imaging in the near future, thanks in particular to forthcoming planet imagers on 8-10 m class telescopes.

  3. Sampling Number Effects in 2D and Range Imaging of Range-gated Acquisition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Seong-Ouk; Park, Seung-Kyu; Baik, Sung-Hoon; Cho, Jai-Wan; Jeong, Kyung-Min [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In this paper, we analyzed the number effects of sampling images for making a 2D image and a range image from acquired RGI images. We analyzed the number effects of RGI images for making a 2D image and a range image using a RGI vision system. As the results, 2D image quality was not much depended on the number of sampling images but on how much well extract efficient RGI images. But, the number of RGI images was important for making a range image because range image quality was proportional to the number of RGI images. Image acquiring in a monitoring area of nuclear industry is an important function for safety inspection and preparing appropriate control plans. To overcome the non-visualization problem caused by airborne obstacle particles, vision systems should have extra-functions, such as active illumination lightening through disturbance airborne particles. One of these powerful active vision systems is a range-gated imaging system. The vision system based on the range-gated imaging system can acquire image data from raining or smoking environments. Range-gated imaging (RGI) is a direct active visualization technique using a highly sensitive image sensor and a high intensity illuminant. Currently, the range-gated imaging technique providing 2D and 3D images is one of emerging active vision technologies. The range-gated imaging system gets vision information by summing time sliced vision images. In the RGI system, a high intensity illuminant illuminates for ultra-short time and a highly sensitive image sensor is gated by ultra-short exposure time to only get the illumination light. Here, the illuminant illuminates objects by flashing strong light through airborne disturbance particles. Thus, in contrast to passive conventional vision systems, the RGI active vision technology robust for low-visibility environments.

  4. Directed Graph Based Image Registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Hongjun; Wu, Guorong; Wang, Qian; Wang, Yaping; Kim, Minjeong; Shen, Dinggang

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a novel image registration method is proposed to achieve accurate registration between images having large shape differences with the help of a set of appropriate intermediate templates. We first demonstrate that directionality is a key factor in both pairwise image registration and groupwise registration, which is defined in this paper to describe the influence of the registration direction and paths on the registration performance. In our solution, the intermediate template selection and intermediate template guided registration are two coherent steps with directionality being considered. To take advantage of the directionality, a directed graph is built based on the asymmetric distance defined on all ordered image pairs in the image population, which is fundamentally different from the undirected graph with symmetric distance metrics in all previous methods, and the shortest distance between template and subject on the directed graph is calculated. The allocated directed path can be thus utilized to better guide the registration by successively registering the subject through the intermediate templates one by one on the path towards the template. The proposed directed graph based solution can also be used in groupwise registration. Specifically, by building a minimum spanning arborescence (MSA) on the directed graph, the population center, i.e., a selected template, as well as the directed registration paths from all the rest of images to the population center, is determined simultaneously. The performance of directed graph based registration algorithm is demonstrated by the spatial normalization on both synthetic dataset and real brain MR images. It is shown that our method can achieve more accurate registration results than both the undirected graph based solution and the direct pairwise registration. PMID:22014476

  5. Enhanced dynamic range x-ray imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haidekker, Mark A; Morrison, Logan Dain-Kelley; Sharma, Ajay; Burke, Emily

    2017-03-01

    X-ray images can suffer from excess contrast. Often, image exposure is chosen to visually optimize the region of interest, but at the expense of over- and underexposed regions elsewhere in the image. When image values are interpreted quantitatively as projected absorption, both over- and underexposure leads to the loss of quantitative information. We propose to combine multiple exposures into a composite that uses only pixels from those exposures in which they are neither under- nor overexposed. The composite image is created in analogy to visible-light high dynamic range photography. We present the mathematical framework for the recovery of absorbance from such composite images and demonstrate the method with biological and non-biological samples. We also show with an aluminum step-wedge that accurate recovery of step thickness from the absorbance values is possible, thereby highlighting the quantitative nature of the presented method. Due to the higher amount of detail encoded in an enhanced dynamic range x-ray image, we expect that the number of retaken images can be reduced, and patient exposure overall reduced. We also envision that the method can improve dual energy absorptiometry and even computed tomography by reducing the number of low-exposure ("photon-starved") projections. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. High dynamic range imaging sensors and architectures

    CERN Document Server

    Darmont, Arnaud

    2013-01-01

    Illumination is a crucial element in many applications, matching the luminance of the scene with the operational range of a camera. When luminance cannot be adequately controlled, a high dynamic range (HDR) imaging system may be necessary. These systems are being increasingly used in automotive on-board systems, road traffic monitoring, and other industrial, security, and military applications. This book provides readers with an intermediate discussion of HDR image sensors and techniques for industrial and non-industrial applications. It describes various sensor and pixel architectures capable

  7. Direct Imaging of Giant Exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Motohide

    Since the first detection of exoplanets around a Sun-like star 51 Peg in 1995, their detection and characterization are mainly led by indirect methods such as radial velocity and transit methods. However, recent progresses of observational techniques have finally enabled the direct imaging observations of giant planets of solar-system-scale orbit (with their semi-major axes less than about 50 AU) around A-type stars (e.g., Marois et al. 2008, 2010) and G-type stars (e.g., Kuzuhara et al. 2013). Direct imaging is useful to obtain the physical and atmospheric parameters of exoplanets. In fact not only colors but also a medium-resolution spectroscopy of such planets has been successfully obtained for their atmospheric characterization (Barman et al. 2013). Their masses are typically a few to ~10 Jupiter masses and they orbit at a Saturn- to-Pluto distance. Therefore, like hot-Jupiters and super-Earths they are unlike any solar-system planets, and called wide-orbit giant planets. A recent large search for planets and disk on the Subaru 8.2-m telescope (SEEDS project) has detected a 3-5 Jupiter-masses planet around a Sun-like star GJ 504 (Kuzuhara et al. 2013). It is the coolest planetary companion so far directly imaged and its near-infrared color is “bluer” than that of other directly imaged planets. In this contribution, I will review the recent progresses on direct imaging of exoplanets, highlight the results of the SEEDS project, and discuss the future developments.

  8. Introduction to sensors for ranging and imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Brooker, Graham

    2009-01-01

    ""This comprehensive text-reference provides a solid background in active sensing technology. It is concerned with active sensing, starting with the basics of time-of-flight sensors (operational principles, components), and going through the derivation of the radar range equation and the detection of echo signals, both fundamental to the understanding of radar, sonar and lidar imaging. Several chapters cover signal propagation of both electromagnetic and acoustic energy, target characteristics, stealth, and clutter. The remainder of the book introduces the range measurement process, active ima

  9. High Resolution, Range/Range-Rate Imager Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Visidyne proposes to develop a design for a small, lightweight, high resolution, in x, y, and z Doppler imager to assist in the guidance, navigation and control...

  10. Disocclusion of 3d LIDAR Point Clouds Using Range Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biasutti, P.; Aujol, J.-F.; Brédif, M.; Bugeau, A.

    2017-05-01

    This paper proposes a novel framework for the disocclusion of mobile objects in 3D LiDAR scenes aquired via street-based Mobile Mapping Systems (MMS). Most of the existing lines of research tackle this problem directly in the 3D space. This work promotes an alternative approach by using a 2D range image representation of the 3D point cloud, taking advantage of the fact that the problem of disocclusion has been intensively studied in the 2D image processing community over the past decade. First, the point cloud is turned into a 2D range image by exploiting the sensor's topology. Using the range image, a semi-automatic segmentation procedure based on depth histograms is performed in order to select the occluding object to be removed. A variational image inpainting technique is then used to reconstruct the area occluded by that object. Finally, the range image is unprojected as a 3D point cloud. Experiments on real data prove the effectiveness of this procedure both in terms of accuracy and speed.

  11. DISOCCLUSION OF 3D LIDAR POINT CLOUDS USING RANGE IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Biasutti

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a novel framework for the disocclusion of mobile objects in 3D LiDAR scenes aquired via street-based Mobile Mapping Systems (MMS. Most of the existing lines of research tackle this problem directly in the 3D space. This work promotes an alternative approach by using a 2D range image representation of the 3D point cloud, taking advantage of the fact that the problem of disocclusion has been intensively studied in the 2D image processing community over the past decade. First, the point cloud is turned into a 2D range image by exploiting the sensor’s topology. Using the range image, a semi-automatic segmentation procedure based on depth histograms is performed in order to select the occluding object to be removed. A variational image inpainting technique is then used to reconstruct the area occluded by that object. Finally, the range image is unprojected as a 3D point cloud. Experiments on real data prove the effectiveness of this procedure both in terms of accuracy and speed.

  12. Exoplanet Community Report on Direct Optical Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soummer, Remi; Levine, M.; Exoplanet Forum Direct Optical Imaging Group

    2009-01-01

    Direct Optical Imaging is necessary to characterize exoplanets spectroscopically in most cases (non-transiting planets), and to address the habitability of terrestrial planets around sun like stars. The chapter studies the science objectives, observatory architectures, and needed technology developments as a function of mission scale. Possible architectures can be based on internal coronagraphs or external occulters. The Optical Imaging chapter details the association between Astrometry or RV and imaging in space, expanding on the ExoPTF recommendations for flagship and probe-scale missions. Indirect methods (astrometry or radial velocities) are necessary to obtain a direct measurement of the masses, orbital parameters, and planet "addresses". Careful Design Reference Mission (DRM) development over the next several years will articulate the tradeoffs in cost and performance between imaging missions with and without astrometric precursors. In the short term a probe-scale direct imaging mission can be combined with existing and future Radial Velocities and ground-based Astrometry for the characterization of mature giant planets, Neptunes, and super Earths. A probe scale will also detect and characterize exozodiacal disks, a problem ExoPTF identified as critical for future terrestrial planet imaging missions. This strategy is independent from a space astrometric mission both in terms of scientific goals and timing sequence. The chapter also identifies the critical technologies for the various imaging architectures, for which the maturity is linked to flight requirements ranging from probe-scale to flagship. The chapter provides a brief overview of each technology and its state-of the-art.

  13. Characteristics of different frequency ranges in scanning electron microscope images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sim, K. S., E-mail: kssim@mmu.edu.my; Nia, M. E.; Tan, T. L.; Tso, C. P.; Ee, C. S. [Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Multimedia University, 75450 Melaka (Malaysia)

    2015-07-22

    We demonstrate a new approach to characterize the frequency range in general scanning electron microscope (SEM) images. First, pure frequency images are generated from low frequency to high frequency, and then, the magnification of each type of frequency image is implemented. By comparing the edge percentage of the SEM image to the self-generated frequency images, we can define the frequency ranges of the SEM images. Characterization of frequency ranges of SEM images benefits further processing and analysis of those SEM images, such as in noise filtering and contrast enhancement.

  14. ISAR imaging using the instantaneous range instantaneous Doppler method

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Wazna, TM

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar (ISAR) imaging, the Range Instantaneous Doppler (RID) method is used to compensate for the nonuniform rotational motion of the target that degrades the Doppler resolution of the ISAR image. The Instantaneous Range...

  15. Scannerless laser range imaging using loss modulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandusky, John V [Albuquerque, NM

    2011-08-09

    A scannerless 3-D imaging apparatus is disclosed which utilizes an amplitude modulated cw light source to illuminate a field of view containing a target of interest. Backscattered light from the target is passed through one or more loss modulators which are modulated at the same frequency as the light source, but with a phase delay .delta. which can be fixed or variable. The backscattered light is demodulated by the loss modulator and detected with a CCD, CMOS or focal plane array (FPA) detector to construct a 3-D image of the target. The scannerless 3-D imaging apparatus, which can operate in the eye-safe wavelength region 1.4-1.7 .mu.m and which can be constructed as a flash LADAR, has applications for vehicle collision avoidance, autonomous rendezvous and docking, robotic vision, industrial inspection and measurement, 3-D cameras, and facial recognition.

  16. Pile volume measurement by range imaging camera in indoor environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Altuntas

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Range imaging (RIM camera is recent technology in 3D location measurement. The new study areas have been emerged in measurement and data processing together with RIM camera. It has low-cost and fast measurement technique compared to the current measurement techniques. However its measurement accuracy varies according to effects resulting from the device and the environment. The direct sunlight is affect measurement accuracy of the camera. Thus, RIM camera should be used for indoor measurement. In this study gravel pile volume was measured by SwissRanger SR4000 camera. The measured volume is acquired as different 8.13% from the known.

  17. Topology Design for Directional Range Extension Networks with Antenna Blockage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Topology Design for Directional Range Extension Networks with Antenna Blockage Thomas Shake MIT Lincoln Laboratory shake@ll.mit.edu Abstract...associated electronics into small aircraft to perform such range extension. In particular, the paper examines trade-offs in network topology design...aircraft, and the topology characteristics of the aerial relay network. The analysis suggests that low-degree air topologies such as rings and strings

  18. High Dynamic Range Digital Imaging of Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karr, Brian A.; Chalmers, Alan; Debattista, Kurt

    2014-01-01

    The ability to capture engineering imagery with a wide degree of dynamic range during rocket launches is critical for post launch processing and analysis [USC03, NNC86]. Rocket launches often present an extreme range of lightness, particularly during night launches. Night launches present a two-fold problem: capturing detail of the vehicle and scene that is masked by darkness, while also capturing detail in the engine plume.

  19. 3D imaging without range information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, J. D.; Myatt, D. R.

    2010-04-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) imaging technologies have considerable potential for aiding military operations in areas such as reconnaissance, mission planning and situational awareness through improved visualisation and user-interaction. This paper describes the development of fast 3D imaging capabilities from low-cost, passive sensors. The two systems discussed here are capable of passive depth perception and recovering 3D structure from a single electro-optic sensor attached to an aerial vehicle that is, for example, circling a target. Based on this example, the proposed method has been shown to produce high quality results when positional data of the sensor is known, and also in the more challenging case when the sensor geometry must be estimated from the input imagery alone. The methods described exploit prior knowledge concerning the type of sensor that is used to produce a more robust output.

  20. Visual Control of Robots Using Range Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Torres

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available In the last years, 3D-vision systems based on the time-of-flight (ToF principle have gained more importance in order to obtain 3D information from the workspace. In this paper, an analysis of the use of 3D ToF cameras to guide a robot arm is performed. To do so, an adaptive method to simultaneous visual servo control and camera calibration is presented. Using this method a robot arm is guided by using range information obtained from a ToF camera. Furthermore, the self-calibration method obtains the adequate integration time to be used by the range camera in order to precisely determine the depth information.

  1. Building accurate geometric models from abundant range imaging information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diegert, Carl F.; Sackos, John T.; Nellums, Robert O.

    1997-08-01

    We define two simple metrics for accuracy of models built from range imaging information. We apply the metric to a model built from a recent range image taken at the laser radar Development and Evaluation Facility, Eglin AFB, using a scannerless range imager (SRI) from Sandia National Laboratories. We also present graphical displays of the residual information produced as a byproduct of this measurement, and discuss mechanisms that these data suggest for further improvement in the performance of this already impressive SRI.

  2. The structure of DNA by direct imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Marini, Monica; Falqui, Andrea; Moretti, Manola; Limongi, Tania; Allione, Marco; Genovese, Alessandro; Lopatin, Sergei; Tirinato, Luca; Das, Gobind; Torre, Bruno; Giugni, Andrea; Gentile, Francesco; Candeloro, Patrizio; Di Fabrizio, Enzo

    2015-01-01

    The structure of DNA was determined in 1953 by x-ray fiber diffraction. Several attempts have been made to obtain a direct image of DNA with alternative techniques. The direct image is intended to allow a quantitative evaluation of all relevant characteristic lengths present in a molecule. A direct image of DNA, which is different from diffraction in the reciprocal space, is difficult to obtain for two main reasons: the intrinsic very low contrast of the elements that form the molecule and th...

  3. Directional synthetic aperture flow imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Nikolov, Svetoslav

    2004-01-01

    elements in each emission. A 20 us chirp was used during emission. The RF data were subsequently beamformed off-line and stationary echo canceling was performed. The 60 degrees flow with a peak velocity of 0.15 m/s was determined using 16 groups of 8 emissions and the relative standard deviation was 0.......36% (0.65 mm/s). Using the same set-up for the purely transverse flow gave a std. of 1.2% (2.1 mm/s). Variation of the different parameters has been done to reveal the sensitivity to number of lines, angle deviations, length of correlation interval, and sampling interval. An in-vivo image of the carotid...

  4. Image rejects in general direct digital radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosanowsky, Tine Blomberg; Jensen, Camilla; Wah, Kenneth Hong Ching

    2015-01-01

    Background The number of rejected images is an indicator of image quality and unnecessary imaging at a radiology department. Image reject analysis was frequent in the film era, but comparably few and small studies have been published after converting to digital radiography. One reason may be a belief that rejects have been eliminated with digitalization. Purpose To measure the extension of deleted images in direct digital radiography (DR), in order to assess the rates of rejects and unnecessary imaging and to analyze reasons for deletions, in order to improve the radiological services. Material and Methods All exposed images at two direct digital laboratories at a hospital in Norway were reviewed in January 2014. Type of examination, number of exposed images, and number of deleted images were registered. Each deleted image was analyzed separately and the reason for deleting the image was recorded. Results Out of 5417 exposed images, 596 were deleted, giving a deletion rate of 11%. A total of 51.3% were deleted due to positioning errors and 31.0% due to error in centering. The examinations with the highest percentage of deleted images were the knee, hip, and ankle, 20.6%, 18.5%, and 13.8% respectively. Conclusion The reject rate is at least as high as the deletion rate and is comparable with previous film-based imaging systems. The reasons for rejection are quite different in digital systems. This falsifies the hypothesis that digitalization would eliminates rejects. A deleted image does not contribute to diagnostics, and therefore is an unnecessary image. Hence, the high rates of deleted images have implications for management, training, education, as well as for quality. PMID:26500784

  5. Target Image Matching Algorithm Based on Binocular CCD Ranging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongming Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposed target image in a subpixel level matching algorithm for binocular CCD ranging, which is based on the principle of binocular CCD ranging. In the paper, firstly, we introduced the ranging principle of the binocular ranging system and deduced a binocular parallax formula. Secondly, we deduced the algorithm which was named improved cross-correlation matching algorithm and cubic surface fitting algorithm for target images matched, and it could achieve a subpixel level matching for binocular CCD ranging images. Lastly, through experiment we have analyzed and verified the actual CCD ranging images, then analyzed the errors of the experimental results and corrected the formula of calculating system errors. Experimental results showed that the actual measurement accuracy of a target within 3 km was higher than 0.52%, which meet the accuracy requirements of the high precision binocular ranging.

  6. Real-time extended dynamic range imaging in shearography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groves, Roger M; Pedrini, Giancarlo; Osten, Wolfgang

    2008-10-20

    Extended dynamic range (EDR) imaging is a postprocessing technique commonly associated with photography. Multiple images of a scene are recorded by the camera using different shutter settings and are merged into a single higher dynamic range image. Speckle interferometry and holography techniques require a well-modulated intensity signal to extract the phase information, and of these techniques shearography is most sensitive to different object surface reflectivities as it uses self-referencing from a sheared image. In this paper the authors demonstrate real-time EDR imaging in shearography and present experimental results from a difficult surface reflectivity sample: a wooden panel painting containing gold and dark earth color paint.

  7. The structure of DNA by direct imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Marini, Monica

    2015-08-28

    The structure of DNA was determined in 1953 by x-ray fiber diffraction. Several attempts have been made to obtain a direct image of DNA with alternative techniques. The direct image is intended to allow a quantitative evaluation of all relevant characteristic lengths present in a molecule. A direct image of DNA, which is different from diffraction in the reciprocal space, is difficult to obtain for two main reasons: the intrinsic very low contrast of the elements that form the molecule and the difficulty of preparing the sample while preserving its pristine shape and size. We show that through a preparation procedure compatible with the DNA physiological conditions, a direct image of a single suspended DNA molecule can be obtained. In the image, all relevant lengths of A-form DNA are measurable. A high-resolution transmission electron microscope that operates at 80 keV with an ultimate resolution of 1.5 Å was used for this experiment. Direct imaging of a single molecule can be used as a method to address biological problems that require knowledge at the single-molecule level, given that the average information obtained by x-ray diffraction of crystals or fibers is not sufficient for detailed structure determination, or when crystals cannot be obtained from biological molecules or are not sufficient in understanding multiple protein configurations.

  8. Joint focus stacking and high dynamic range imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Qinchun; Gunturk, Bahadir K.; Batur, Aziz U.

    2013-01-01

    Focus stacking and high dynamic range (HDR) imaging are two paradigms of computational photography. Focus stacking aims to produce an image with greater depth of field (DOF) from a set of images taken with different focus distances, whereas HDR imaging aims to produce an image with higher dynamic range from a set of images taken with different exposure settings. In this paper, we present an algorithm which combines focus stacking and HDR imaging in order to produce an image with both higher dynamic range and greater DOF than any of the input images. The proposed algorithm includes two main parts: (i) joint photometric and geometric registration and (ii) joint focus stacking and HDR image creation. In the first part, images are first photometrically registered using an algorithm that is insensitive to small geometric variations, and then geometrically registered using an optical flow algorithm. In the second part, images are merged through weighted averaging, where the weights depend on both local sharpness and exposure information. We provide experimental results with real data to illustrate the algorithm. The algorithm is also implemented on a smartphone with Android operating system.

  9. SEGMENTATION AND QUALITY ANALYSIS OF LONG RANGE CAPTURED IRIS IMAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Deshpande

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The iris segmentation plays a major role in an iris recognition system to increase the performance of the system. This paper proposes a novel method for segmentation of iris images to extract the iris part of long range captured eye image and an approach to select best iris frame from the iris polar image sequences by analyzing the quality of iris polar images. The quality of iris image is determined by the frequency components present in the iris polar images. The experiments are carried out on CASIA-long range captured iris image sequences. The proposed segmentation method is compared with Hough transform based segmentation and it has been determined that the proposed method gives higher accuracy for segmentation than Hough transform.

  10. Range image registration using a photometric metric under unknown lighting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Diego; Sugimoto, Akihiro

    2013-09-01

    Based on the spherical harmonics representation of image formation, we derive a new photometric metric for evaluating the correctness of a given rigid transformation aligning two overlapping range images captured under unknown, distant, and general illumination. We estimate the surrounding illumination and albedo values of points of the two range images from the point correspondences induced by the input transformation. We then synthesize the color of both range images using albedo values transferred using the point correspondences to compute the photometric reprojection error. This way allows us to accurately register two range images by finding the transformation that minimizes the photometric reprojection error. We also propose a practical method using the proposed photometric metric to register pairs of range images devoid of salient geometric features, captured under unknown lighting. Our method uses a hypothesize-and-test strategy to search for the transformation that minimizes our photometric metric. Transformation candidates are efficiently generated by employing the spherical representation of each range image. Experimental results using both synthetic and real data demonstrate the usefulness of the proposed metric.

  11. Directional Joint Bilateral Filter for Depth Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anh Vu Le

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Depth maps taken by the low cost Kinect sensor are often noisy and incomplete. Thus, post-processing for obtaining reliable depth maps is necessary for advanced image and video applications such as object recognition and multi-view rendering. In this paper, we propose adaptive directional filters that fill the holes and suppress the noise in depth maps. Specifically, novel filters whose window shapes are adaptively adjusted based on the edge direction of the color image are presented. Experimental results show that our method yields higher quality filtered depth maps than other existing methods, especially at the edge boundaries.

  12. Range image segmentation for tree detection in forest scans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bienert

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available To make a tree-wise analysis inside a forest stand, the trees have to be identified. An interactive segmentation is often labourintensive and time-consuming. Therefore, an automatic detection process will aspired using a range image. This paper presents a method for the segmentation of range images extracted from terrestrial laser scanner point clouds of forest stands. After range image generation the segmentation is carried out with a connectivity analysis using the differences of the range values as homogeneity criterion. Subsequently, the tree detection is performed interactively by analysing one horizontal image line. When passing objects with a specific width, the object indicates a potential tree. By using the edge points of a segmented pixel group the tree position and diameter is calculated. Results from one test site are presented to show the performance of the method.

  13. Range-Image Acquisition for Discriminated Objects in a Range-gated Robot Vision System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Seung-Kyu; Ahn, Yong-Jin; Park, Nak-Kyu; Baik, Sung-Hoon; Choi, Young-Soo; Jeong, Kyung-Min [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The imaging capability of a surveillance vision system from harsh low-visibility environments such as in fire and detonation areas is a key function to monitor the safety of the facilities. 2D and range image data acquired from low-visibility environment are important data to assess the safety and prepare appropriate countermeasures. Passive vision systems, such as conventional camera and binocular stereo vision systems usually cannot acquire image information when the reflected light is highly scattered and absorbed by airborne particles such as fog. In addition, the image resolution captured through low-density airborne particles is decreased because the image is blurred and dimmed by the scattering, emission and absorption. Active vision systems, such as structured light vision and projected stereo vision are usually more robust for harsh environment than passive vision systems. However, the performance is considerably decreased in proportion to the density of the particles. The RGI system provides 2D and range image data from several RGI images and it moreover provides clear images from low-visibility fog and smoke environment by using the sum of time-sliced images. Nowadays, the Range-gated (RG) imaging is an emerging technology in the field of surveillance for security applications, especially in the visualization of invisible night and fog environment. Although RGI viewing was discovered in the 1960's, this technology is, nowadays becoming more applicable by virtue of the rapid development of optical and sensor technologies. Especially, this system can be adopted in robot-vision system by virtue of its compact portable configuration. In contrast to passive vision systems, this technology enables operation even in harsh environments like fog and smoke. During the past decades, several applications of this technology have been applied in target recognition and in harsh environments, such as fog, underwater vision. Also, this technology has been

  14. Range imager performance comparison in homodyne and heterodyne operating modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conroy, Richard M.; Dorrington, Adrian A.; Künnemeyer, Rainer; Cree, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Range imaging cameras measure depth simultaneously for every pixel in a given field of view. In most implementations the basic operating principles are the same. A scene is illuminated with an intensity modulated light source and the reflected signal is sampled using a gain-modulated imager. Previously we presented a unique heterodyne range imaging system that employed a bulky and power hungry image intensifier as the high speed gain-modulation mechanism. In this paper we present a new range imager using an internally modulated image sensor that is designed to operate in heterodyne mode, but can also operate in homodyne mode. We discuss homodyne and heterodyne range imaging, and the merits of the various types of hardware used to implement these systems. Following this we describe in detail the hardware and firmware components of our new ranger. We experimentally compare the two operating modes and demonstrate that heterodyne operation is less sensitive to some of the limitations suffered in homodyne mode, resulting in better linearity and ranging precision characteristics. We conclude by showing various qualitative examples that demonstrate the system's three-dimensional measurement performance.

  15. POTENTIALS OF IMAGE BASED ACTIVE RANGING TO CAPTURE DYNAMIC SCENES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Jutzi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Obtaining a 3D description of man-made and natural environments is a basic task in Computer Vision and Remote Sensing. To this end, laser scanning is currently one of the dominating techniques to gather reliable 3D information. The scanning principle inherently needs a certain time interval to acquire the 3D point cloud. On the other hand, new active sensors provide the possibility of capturing range information by images with a single measurement. With this new technique image-based active ranging is possible which allows capturing dynamic scenes, e.g. like walking pedestrians in a yard or moving vehicles. Unfortunately most of these range imaging sensors have strong technical limitations and are not yet sufficient for airborne data acquisition. It can be seen from the recent development of highly specialized (far-range imaging sensors – so called flash-light lasers – that most of the limitations could be alleviated soon, so that future systems will be equipped with improved image size and potentially expanded operating range. The presented work is a first step towards the development of methods capable for application of range images in outdoor environments. To this end, an experimental setup was set up for investigating these proposed possibilities. With the experimental setup a measurement campaign was carried out and first results will be presented within this paper.

  16. Unsynchronized scanning with a low-cost laser range finder for real-time range imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatipoglu, Isa; Nakhmani, Arie

    2017-06-01

    Range imaging plays an essential role in many fields: 3D modeling, robotics, heritage, agriculture, forestry, reverse engineering. One of the most popular range-measuring technologies is laser scanner due to its several advantages: long range, high precision, real-time measurement capabilities, and no dependence on lighting conditions. However, laser scanners are very costly. Their high cost prevents widespread use in applications. Due to the latest developments in technology, now, low-cost, reliable, faster, and light-weight 1D laser range finders (LRFs) are available. A low-cost 1D LRF with a scanning mechanism, providing the ability of laser beam steering for additional dimensions, enables to capture a depth map. In this work, we present an unsynchronized scanning with a low-cost LRF to decrease scanning period and reduce vibrations caused by stop-scan in synchronized scanning. Moreover, we developed an algorithm for alignment of unsynchronized raw data and proposed range image post-processing framework. The proposed technique enables to have a range imaging system for a fraction of the price of its counterparts. The results prove that the proposed method can fulfill the need for a low-cost laser scanning for range imaging for static environments because the most significant limitation of the method is the scanning period which is about 2 minutes for 55,000 range points (resolution of 250x220 image). In contrast, scanning the same image takes around 4 minutes in synchronized scanning. Once faster, longer range, and narrow beam LRFs are available, the methods proposed in this work can produce better results.

  17. Color Sensitivity Multiple Exposure Fusion using High Dynamic Range Image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varsha Borole

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a high dynamic range imaging (HDRI method using a capturing camera image using normally exposure, over exposure and under exposure. We make three different images from a multiple input image using local histogram stretching. Because the proposed method generated three histogram-stretched images from a multiple input image, ghost artifacts that are the result of the relative motion between the camera and objects during exposure time, are inherently removed. Therefore, the proposed method can be applied to a consumer compact camera to provide the ghost artifacts free HDRI. Experiments with several sets of test images with different exposures show that the proposed method gives a better performance than existing methods in terms of visual results and computation time.

  18. Aerial Triangulation Close-range Images with Dual Quaternion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SHENG Qinghong

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A new method for the aerial triangulation of close-range images based on dual quaternion is presented. Using dual quaternion to represent the spiral screw motion of the beam in the space, the real part of dual quaternion represents the angular elements of all the beams in the close-range area networks, the real part and the dual part of dual quaternion represents the line elements corporately. Finally, an aerial triangulation adjustment model based on dual quaternion is established, and the elements of interior orientation and exterior orientation and the object coordinates of the ground points are calculated. Real images and large attitude angle simulated images are selected to run the experiments of aerial triangulation. The experimental results show that the new method for the aerial triangulation of close-range images based on dual quaternion can obtain higher accuracy.

  19. A novel track imaging system as a range counter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Z. [National Institute of Radiological Sciences (Japan); Matsufuji, N. [National Institute of Radiological Sciences (Japan); Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan); Kanayama, S. [Chiba University (Japan); Ishida, A. [National Institute of Radiological Sciences (Japan); Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan); Kohno, T. [Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan); Koba, Y.; Sekiguchi, M.; Kitagawa, A.; Murakami, T. [National Institute of Radiological Sciences (Japan)

    2016-05-01

    An image-intensified, camera-based track imaging system has been developed to measure the tracks of ions in a scintillator block. To study the performance of the detector unit in the system, two types of scintillators, a dosimetrically tissue-equivalent plastic scintillator EJ-240 and a CsI(Tl) scintillator, were separately irradiated with carbon ion ({sup 12}C) beams of therapeutic energy from HIMAC at NIRS. The images of individual ion tracks in the scintillators were acquired by the newly developed track imaging system. The ranges reconstructed from the images are reported here. The range resolution of the measurements is 1.8 mm for 290 MeV/u carbon ions, which is considered a significant improvement on the energy resolution of the conventional ΔE/E method. The detector is compact and easy to handle, and it can fit inside treatment rooms for in-situ studies, as well as satisfy clinical quality assurance purposes.

  20. Direct Sub-Angstrom Imaging of a Crystal Lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nellist, Peter D. [Nion Company, WA; Chisholm, Matthew F [ORNL; Dellby, N. [Nion Company, WA; Krivanek, O. L. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST); Murfitt, M. F. [Nion Company, WA; Szilagyi, Z. S. [Nion Company, WA; Lupini, Andrew R [ORNL; Borisevich, Albina Y [ORNL; Sides, Jr., William H. [ORNL; Pennycook, Stephen J [ORNL

    2004-01-01

    Despite the use of electrons with wavelengths of just a few picometers, spatial resolution in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) has been limited by spherical aberration to typically around 0.15 nanometer. Individual atomic columns in a crystalline lattice can therefore only be imaged for a few low-order orientations, limiting the range of defects that can be imaged at atomic resolution. The recent development of spherical aberration correctors for transmission electron microscopy allows this limit to be overcome. We present direct images from an aberration-corrected scanning TEM that resolve a lattice in which the atomic columns are separated by less than 0.1 nanometer.

  1. DIRECTLY IMAGING TIDALLY POWERED MIGRATING JUPITERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong Subo; Katz, Boaz; Socrates, Aristotle [Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States)

    2013-01-10

    Upcoming direct-imaging experiments may detect a new class of long-period, highly luminous, tidally powered extrasolar gas giants. Even though they are hosted by {approx} Gyr-'old' main-sequence stars, they can be as 'hot' as young Jupiters at {approx}100 Myr, the prime targets of direct-imaging surveys. They are on years-long orbits and presently migrating to 'feed' the 'hot Jupiters'. They are expected from 'high-e' migration mechanisms, in which Jupiters are excited to highly eccentric orbits and then shrink semimajor axis by a factor of {approx}10-100 due to tidal dissipation at close periastron passages. The dissipated orbital energy is converted to heat, and if it is deposited deep enough into the atmosphere, the planet likely radiates steadily at luminosity L {approx} 100-1000 L{sub Jup}(2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7}-2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} L{sub Sun }) during a typical {approx} Gyr migration timescale. Their large orbital separations and expected high planet-to-star flux ratios in IR make them potentially accessible to high-contrast imaging instruments on 10 m class telescopes. {approx}10 such planets are expected to exist around FGK dwarfs within {approx}50 pc. Long-period radial velocity planets are viable candidates, and the highly eccentric planet HD 20782b at maximum angular separation {approx}0.''08 is a promising candidate. Directly imaging these tidally powered Jupiters would enable a direct test of high-e migration mechanisms. Once detected, the luminosity would provide a direct measurement of the migration rate, and together with mass (and possibly radius) estimate, they would serve as a laboratory to study planetary spectral formation and tidal physics.

  2. Direct imaging of extra-solar planets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olivier, S.S.; Max, V.E.; Brase, J.M.; Caffano, C.J.; Gavel, D.T.; Macintosh, B.A.

    1997-03-01

    Direct imaging of extra-solar planets may be possible with the new generation of large ground-based telescopes equipped with state- of- the-art adaptive optics (AO) systems to compensate for the blurring effect of the Earth`s atmosphere. The first of these systems is scheduled to begin operation in 1998 on the 10 in Keck II telescope. In this paper, general formulas for high-contrast imaging with AO systems are presented and used to calculate the sensitivity of the Keck AO system. The results of these calculations show that the Keck AO system should achieve the sensitivity necessary to detect giant planets around several nearby bright stars.

  3. Calibration and control for range imaging in mobile robot navigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorum, O.H. [Norges Tekniske Hoegskole, Trondheim (Norway). Div. of Computer Systems and Telematics; Hoover, A. [University of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States). Dept. of Computer Science and Engineering; Jones, J.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1994-06-01

    This paper addresses some issues in the development of sensor-based systems for mobile robot navigation which use range imaging sensors as the primary source for geometric information about the environment. In particular, we describe a model of scanning laser range cameras which takes into account the properties of the mechanical system responsible for image formation and a calibration procedure which yields improved accuracy over previous models. In addition, we describe an algorithm which takes the limitations of these sensors into account in path planning and path execution. In particular, range imaging sensors are characterized by a limited field of view and a standoff distance -- a minimum distance nearer than which surfaces cannot be sensed. These limitations can be addressed by enriching the concept of configuration space to include information about what can be sensed from a given configuration, and using this information to guide path planning and path following.

  4. In-Vivo High Dynamic Range Vector Flow Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villagómez Hoyos, Carlos Armando; Stuart, Matthias Bo; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2015-01-01

    Current vector flow systems are limited in their detectable range of blood flow velocities. Previous work on phantoms has shown that the velocity range can be extended using synthetic aperture directional beamforming combined with an adaptive multi-lag approach. This paper presents a first invivo...

  5. Ladar range image denoising by a nonlocal probability statistics algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Zhi-Wei; Li, Qi; Xiong, Zhi-Peng; Wang, Qi

    2013-01-01

    According to the characteristic of range images of coherent ladar and the basis of nonlocal means (NLM), a nonlocal probability statistics (NLPS) algorithm is proposed in this paper. The difference is that NLM performs denoising using the mean of the conditional probability distribution function (PDF) while NLPS using the maximum of the marginal PDF. In the algorithm, similar blocks are found out by the operation of block matching and form a group. Pixels in the group are analyzed by probability statistics and the gray value with maximum probability is used as the estimated value of the current pixel. The simulated range images of coherent ladar with different carrier-to-noise ratio and real range image of coherent ladar with 8 gray-scales are denoised by this algorithm, and the results are compared with those of median filter, multitemplate order mean filter, NLM, median nonlocal mean filter and its incorporation of anatomical side information, and unsupervised information-theoretic adaptive filter. The range abnormality noise and Gaussian noise in range image of coherent ladar are effectively suppressed by NLPS.

  6. Medical imaging at risk from European directive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keevil, Stephen

    2009-09-01

    The recent Forum article by Denis Le Bihan ("Threats to ultra-high-field MRI" August pp16-17) is a valuable addition to the ongoing debate about the impact on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the European Commission's Physical Agents (EMF) directive. When this directive was introduced in 2004, exposure limits for static magnetic fields were excluded, because it was known that guidance published by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) in 1994 was being revised. It is likely that the new ICNIRP guidelines, to which Le Bihan refers, will now be incorporated into the directive. If so, this could indeed impact on ultra-highfield MRI, in which Europe has a worldleading position.

  7. Passive millimeter-wave imaging at short and medium range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essen, H.; Fuchs, H.-H.; Nötel, D.; Klöppel, F.; Pergande, P.; Stanko, S.

    2005-11-01

    During recent year's research on radiometric signatures, non-imaging, of the exhaust jet of missiles and imaging, on small vehicles in critical background scenarios were conducted by the mmW/submmW-group at FGAN-FHR. The equipment used for these investigations was of low technological status using simple single channel radiometers on a scanning pedestal. Meanwhile components of improved performance are available on a cooperative basis with the Institute for Applied Solid State Physics (Fraunhofer-IAF). Using such components a considerable progress concerning the temperature resolution and image generation time could be achieved. Emphasis has been put on the development of a demonstrator for CWD applications and on an imaging system for medium range applications, up to 200 m. The short range demonstrator is a scanning system operating alternatively at 35 GHz or 94 GHz to detect hidden materials as explosives, guns, knifes beneath the clothing. The demonstrator uses a focal plane array approach using 4 channels in azimuth, while mechanical scanning is used for the elevation. The medium range demonstrator currently employs a single channel radiometer on a pedestal for elevation over azimuth scanning. To improve the image quality, methods have been implemented using a Lorentzian algorithm with Wiener filtering.

  8. Directional couplers using long-range surface plasmon polariton waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boltasseva, Alexandra; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    2006-01-01

    We present an experimental study of guiding and routing of electromagnetic radiation along the nanometer-thin and micrometer-wide gold stripes embedded in a polymer via excitation of long-range surface plasmon polaritons (LR-SPPs) in a very broad wavelength range from 1000 to 1650 mn. For straight...

  9. Shadow correction in high dynamic range images for generating orthophotos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Hideo; Chikatsu, Hirofumi

    2011-07-01

    High dynamic range imagery is widely used in remote sensing. With the widespread use of aerial digital cameras such as the DMC, ADS40, RMK-D, and UltraCamD, high dynamic range imaging is generally expected for generating minuteness orthophotos in digital aerial photogrammetry. However, high dynamic range images (12-bit, 4,096 gray levels) are generally compressed into an 8-bit depth digital image (256 gray levels) owing to huge amount of data and interface with peripherals such as monitors and printers. This means that a great deal of image data is eliminated from the original image, and this introduces a new shadow problem. In particular, the influence of shadows in urban areas causes serious problems when generating minuteness orthophotos and performing house detection. Therefore, shadow problems can be solved by addressing the image compression problems. There is a large body of literature on image compression techniques such as logarithmic compression and tone mapping algorithms. However, logarithmic compression tends to cause loss of details in dark and/or light areas. Furthermore, the logarithmic method intends to operate on the full scene. This means that high-resolution luminance information can not be obtained. Even though tone mapping algorithms have the ability to operate over both full scene and local scene, background knowledge is required. To resolve the shadow problem in digital aerial photogrammetry, shadow areas should be recognized and corrected automatically without the loss of luminance information. To this end, a practical shadow correction method using 12-bit real data acquired by DMC is investigated in this paper.

  10. Range-gated imaging for near-field target identification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yates, G.J.; Gallegos, R.A.; McDonald, T.E. [and others

    1996-12-01

    The combination of two complementary technologies developed independently at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) has demonstrated feasibility of target detection and image capture in a highly light-scattering, medium. The technique uses a compact SNL developed Photoconductive Semiconductor Switch/Laser Diode Array (PCSS/LDA) for short-range (distances of 8 to 10 m) large Field-Of-View (FOV) target illumination. Generation of a time-correlated echo signal is accomplished using a photodiode. The return image signal is recorded with a high-speed shuttered Micro-Channel-Plate Image Intensifier (MCPII), declined by LANL and manufactured by Philips Photonics. The MCPII is rated using a high-frequency impedance-matching microstrip design to produce 150 to 200 ps duration optical exposures. The ultra first shuttering producer depth resolution of a few inches along the optic axis between the MCPII and the target, producing enhanced target images effectively deconvolved from noise components from the scattering medium in the FOV. The images from the MCPII are recorded with an RS-170 Charge-Coupled-Device camera and a Big Sky, Beam Code, PC-based digitizer frame grabber and analysis package. Laser pulse data were obtained by the but jitter problems and spectral mismatches between diode spectral emission wavelength and MCPII photocathode spectral sensitivity prevented the capture of fast gating imaging with this demonstration system. Continued development of the system is underway.

  11. Stereo Vision-Based High Dynamic Range Imaging Using Differently-Exposed Image Pair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Won-Jae; Ji, Seo-Won; Kang, Seok-Jae; Jung, Seung-Won; Ko, Sung-Jea

    2017-06-22

    In this paper, a high dynamic range (HDR) imaging method based on the stereo vision system is presented. The proposed method uses differently exposed low dynamic range (LDR) images captured from a stereo camera. The stereo LDR images are first converted to initial stereo HDR images using the inverse camera response function estimated from the LDR images. However, due to the limited dynamic range of the stereo LDR camera, the radiance values in under/over-exposed regions of the initial main-view (MV) HDR image can be lost. To restore these radiance values, the proposed stereo matching and hole-filling algorithms are applied to the stereo HDR images. Specifically, the auxiliary-view (AV) HDR image is warped by using the estimated disparity between initial the stereo HDR images and then effective hole-filling is applied to the warped AV HDR image. To reconstruct the final MV HDR, the warped and hole-filled AV HDR image is fused with the initial MV HDR image using the weight map. The experimental results demonstrate objectively and subjectively that the proposed stereo HDR imaging method provides better performance compared to the conventional method.

  12. Stereo Vision-Based High Dynamic Range Imaging Using Differently-Exposed Image Pair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won-Jae Park

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a high dynamic range (HDR imaging method based on the stereo vision system is presented. The proposed method uses differently exposed low dynamic range (LDR images captured from a stereo camera. The stereo LDR images are first converted to initial stereo HDR images using the inverse camera response function estimated from the LDR images. However, due to the limited dynamic range of the stereo LDR camera, the radiance values in under/over-exposed regions of the initial main-view (MV HDR image can be lost. To restore these radiance values, the proposed stereo matching and hole-filling algorithms are applied to the stereo HDR images. Specifically, the auxiliary-view (AV HDR image is warped by using the estimated disparity between initial the stereo HDR images and then effective hole-filling is applied to the warped AV HDR image. To reconstruct the final MV HDR, the warped and hole-filled AV HDR image is fused with the initial MV HDR image using the weight map. The experimental results demonstrate objectively and subjectively that the proposed stereo HDR imaging method provides better performance compared to the conventional method.

  13. The emerging versatility of a scannerless range imager

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sackos, J.; Bradley, B.; Nellums, B.; Diegert, C.

    1996-04-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is nearing the completion of the initial development of a unique type of range imaging sensor. This innovative imaging optical radar is based on an active flood-light scene illuminator and an image intensified CCD camera receiver. It is an all solid-state device (no moving parts) and offers significant size, performance, reliability, simplicity, and affordability advantages over other types of 3-D sensor technologies, including: scanned laser radar, stereo vision, and structured lighting. The sensor is based on low cost, commercially available hardware, and is very well suited for affordable application to a wide variety of military and commercial uses, including: munition guidance, target recognition, robotic vision, automated inspection, driver enhanced vision, collision avoidance, site security and monitoring, terrain mapping, and facility surveying. This paper reviews the sensor technology and its development for the advanced conventional munition guidance application, and discusses a few of the many other emerging applications for this new innovative sensor technology.

  14. Close-range imaging and research priorities in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Patias

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Since 1984, the European Union’s Framework Program for Research and Innovation has been the main instrument for funding research. Specific priorities, objectives and types of funded activities vary between funding periods. Horizon 2020 is the biggest EU Research and Innovation programme ever with nearly € 80 billion of funding available over 7 years (2014–2020. H2020 is based on three pillars: (i Excellent science, (ii Industrial leadership, (iii Societal challenges. The current economic crisis in Europe and elsewhere leads to extended shortage of research budgets in national levels, which in turn leads researchers to search funds in the highly competitive transnational research instruments, as H2020. This paper : - draws the overall picture of Horizon 2020 - investigates the position of close-range imaging technologies, applications and research areas - presents the research challenges in H2020 that offer funding opportunities in close-range imaging

  15. Adaptive Optics for Satellite Imaging and Space Debris Ranging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennet, F.; D'Orgeville, C.; Price, I.; Rigaut, F.; Ritchie, I.; Smith, C.

    Earth's space environment is becoming crowded and at risk of a Kessler syndrome, and will require careful management for the future. Modern low noise high speed detectors allow for wavefront sensing and adaptive optics (AO) in extreme circumstances such as imaging small orbiting bodies in Low Earth Orbit (LEO). The Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics (RSAA) at the Australian National University have been developing AO systems for telescopes between 1 and 2.5m diameter to image and range orbiting satellites and space debris. Strehl ratios in excess of 30% can be achieved for targets in LEO with an AO loop running at 2kHz, allowing the resolution of small features (system developed at RSAA consists of a high speed EMCCD Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor, a deformable mirror (DM), and realtime computer (RTC), and an imaging camera. The system works best as a laser guide star system but will also function as a natural guide star AO system, with the target itself being the guide star. In both circumstances tip-tilt is provided by the target on the imaging camera. The fast tip-tilt modes are not corrected optically, and are instead removed by taking images at a moderate speed (>30Hz) and using a shift and add algorithm. This algorithm can also incorporate lucky imaging to further improve the final image quality. A similar AO system for space debris ranging is also in development in collaboration with Electro Optic Systems (EOS) and the Space Environment Management Cooperative Research Centre (SERC), at the Mount Stromlo Observatory in Canberra, Australia. The system is designed for an AO corrected upward propagated 1064nm pulsed laser beam, from which time of flight information is used to precisely range the target. A 1.8m telescope is used for both propagation and collection of laser light. A laser guide star, Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor, and DM are used for high order correction, and tip-tilt correction provided by reflected sunlight from the target. The

  16. Imaging using long range dipolar field effects Nuclear magnetic resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Gutteridge, S

    2002-01-01

    The work in this thesis has been undertaken by the except where indicated in reference, within the Magnetic Resonance Centre, at the University of Nottingham during the period from October 1998 to March 2001. This thesis details the different characteristics of the long range dipolar field and its application to magnetic resonance imaging. The long range dipolar field is usually neglected in nuclear magnetic resonance experiments, as molecular tumbling decouples its effect at short distances. However, in highly polarised samples residual long range components have a significant effect on the evolution of the magnetisation, giving rise to multiple spin echoes and unexpected quantum coherences. Three applications utilising these dipolar field effects are documented in this thesis. The first demonstrates the spatial sensitivity of the signal generated via dipolar field effects in structured liquid state samples. The second utilises the signal produced by the dipolar field to create proton spin density maps. Thes...

  17. Dynamic range compression and detail enhancement algorithm for infrared image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Gang; Liu, Songlin; Wang, Weihua; Chen, Zengping

    2014-09-10

    For infrared imaging systems with high sampling width applying to the traditional display device or real-time processing system with 8-bit data width, this paper presents a new high dynamic range compression and detail enhancement (DRCDDE) algorithm for infrared images. First, a bilateral filter is adopted to separate the original image into two parts: the base component that contains large-scale signal variations, and the detail component that contains high-frequency information. Then, the operator model for DRC with local-contrast preservation is established, along with a new proposed nonlinear intensity transfer function (ITF) to implement adaptive DRC of the base component. For the detail component, depending on the local statistical characteristics, we set up suitable intensity level extension criteria to enhance the low-contrast details and suppress noise. Finally, the results of the two components are recombined with a weighted coefficient. Experiment results by real infrared data, and quantitative comparison with other well-established methods, show the better performance of the proposed algorithm. Furthermore, the technique could effectively project a dim target while suppressing noise, which is beneficial to image display and target detection.

  18. Active resonant subwavelength grating for scannerless range imaging sensors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kemme, Shanalyn A.; Nellums, Robert O.; Boye, Robert R.; Peters, David William

    2006-11-01

    In this late-start LDRD, we will present a design for a wavelength-agile, high-speed modulator that enables a long-term vision for the THz Scannerless Range Imaging (SRI) sensor. It takes the place of the currently-utilized SRI micro-channel plate which is limited to photocathode sensitive wavelengths (primarily in the visible and near-IR regimes). Two of Sandia's successful technologies--subwavelength diffractive optics and THz sources and detectors--are poised to extend the capabilities of the SRI sensor. The goal is to drastically broaden the SRI's sensing waveband--all the way to the THz regime--so the sensor can see through image-obscuring, scattering environments like smoke and dust. Surface properties, such as reflectivity, emissivity, and scattering roughness, vary greatly with the illuminating wavelength. Thus, objects that are difficult to image at the SRI sensor's present near-IR wavelengths may be imaged more easily at the considerably longer THz wavelengths (0.1 to 1mm). The proposed component is an active Resonant Subwavelength Grating (RSG). Sandia invested considerable effort on a passive RSG two years ago, which resulted in a highly-efficient (reflectivity greater than gold), wavelength-specific reflector. For this late-start LDRD proposal, we will transform the passive RSG design into an active laser-line reflector.

  19. Computational estimation of the gain image of Direct Electron Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez Gimenez, E.; Peredo Robinson, V.; Sorzano, C.O.S.; Vargas, J.; Oton, J.; Vilas, J.L.; Rosa-Trevin, J.L. de la; Melero, R.; Gomez-Blanco, J.; Cuenca, J.; Cano, L. del; Conesa, P.; Marabini, R.; Carazo, J.M.

    2016-07-01

    The introduction of Direct Electron Detectors (DED) in the Electron Microscope field has boosted Single Particle Analysis to a point in which it is currently considered to be a key player technique in Structural Biology. In this article we address the issues of increasing the quality of current DED images as well as their ease of use. In this way, we introduce an algorithm to estimate the camera gain at each pixel from the movies themselves, so that the recorded movies can be compensated for differences amongst the detection capability of the camera sensors. This compensation is needed to set the recorded frames in a coherent gray level range, homogeneous over the whole image. The algorithm does not need any other input than the DED movie itself and it is able of estimating the camera gain image, identifying dead pixels and incorrectly calibrated cameras. We show the results for the three current DED camera models (DE, Falcon and K2). (Author)

  20. In Vivo Vector Flow Imaging Using Improved Directional Beamforming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henze, Lasse; Holfort, Iben Kraglund; Kortbek, Jacob

    2007-01-01

    Directional beamforming has shown promising results for creating vector flow images. The method measures both the flow angle and the magnitude of the velocity. The flow angle is estimated by focusing lines in a range of angles from 0 to 180 degrees. The true angle is identified as the angle...... determination fails, the correct velocity can no longer be found. The purpose of this work is to improve the robustness of the directional beamforming method, making precise in vivo measurement possible. A more robust angle estimator is proposed. Spatial averaging in the axial direction is applied over a depth...... on all human volunteers as a gold standard. For the phantom measurement 76.30 % of the angle estimates are within +- 5 degrees of the actual angle, when using the traditional setup. Using our new approach 98.32 % of the angle estimates are within +-5 degrees from the true angle. The comparison between...

  1. Direct Imaging of Warm Extrasolar Planets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macintosh, B

    2005-04-11

    One of the most exciting scientific discoveries in the last decade of the twentieth century was the first detection of planets orbiting a star other than our own. By now more than 130 extrasolar planets have been discovered indirectly, by observing the gravitational effects of the planet on the radial velocity of its parent star. This technique has fundamental limitations: it is most sensitive to planets close to their star, and it determines only a planet's orbital period and a lower limit on the planet's mass. As a result, all the planetary systems found so far are very different from our own--they have giant Jupiter-sized planets orbiting close to their star, where the terrestrial planets are found in our solar system. Such systems have overturned the conventional paradigm of planet formation, but have no room in them for habitable Earth-like planets. A powerful complement to radial velocity detections of extrasolar planets will be direct imaging--seeing photons from the planet itself. Such a detection would allow photometric measurements to determine the temperature and radius of a planet. Also, direct detection is most sensitive to planets in wide orbits, and hence more capable of seeing solar systems resembling our own, since a giant planet in a wide orbit does not preclude the presence of an Earth-like planet closer to the star. Direct detection, however, is extremely challenging. Jupiter is roughly a billion times fainter than our sun. Two techniques allowed us to overcome this formidable contrast and attempt to see giant planets directly. The first is adaptive optics (AO) which allows giant earth-based telescopes, such as the 10 meter W.M. Keck telescope, to partially overcome the blurring effects of atmospheric turbulence. The second is looking for young planets: by searching in the infrared for companions to young stars, we can see thermal emission from planets that are still warm with the heat of their formation. Together with a UCLA team that

  2. Range imaging results from polar mesosphere summer echoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zecha, Marius; Hoffmann, Peter; Rapp, Markus; Chen, Jenn-Shyong

    The range resolution of pulsed radars is usually limited by the transmitting pulse length and the sampling time. The so-called range imaging (RIM) has been developed to reduce these lim-itations. To apply this method the radar operates alternately over a set of distinct frequencies. Then the phase differences of the receiving signals can be used for optimization methods to generate high-resolution maps of reflections as function of range insight the pulse length. The technique has been implemented on the ALWIN VHF radar in Andenes (69) and the OSWIN VHF radar in Kühlungsborn (54N). Here we present results of the RIM method from measurements in polar mesosphere summer echoes -PMSE. These strong radar echoes are linked to ice particle clouds in the mesopause region. The dynamic of the PMSE can be reflected very well by RIM. The movement of PMSE and the edges of the extension can be tracked with a high altitude resolution. Comparisons between simultaneous measurements by RIM and by standard radar techniques demonstrate the advan-tages of RIM. Wave structures can be identified with RIM whereas they are not detectable with the lesser resolution of the standard measurements. Gravity wave parameter associated with these variations are estimated using the simultaneous measured velocity field.

  3. Strategies for registering range images from unknown camera positions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardini, Fausto; Rushmeier, Holly E.

    2000-03-01

    We describe a project to construct a 3D numerical model of Michelangelo's Florentine Pieta to be used in a study of the sculpture. Here we focus on the registration of the range images used to construct the model. The major challenge was the range of length scales involved. A resolution of 1 mm or less required for the 2.25 m tall piece. To achieve this resolution, we could only acquire an area of 20 by 20 cm per scan. A total of approximately 700 images were required. Ideally, a tracker would be attached to the scanner to record position and pose. The use of a tracker was not possible in the field. Instead, we used a crude-to-fine approach to registering the meshes to one another. The crudest level consisted of pairwise manual registration, aided by texture maps containing laser dots that were projected onto the sculpture. This crude alignment was refined by an automatic registration of laser dot centers. In this phase, we found that consistency constraints on dot matches were essential to obtaining accurate results. The laser dot alignment was refined by an automatic registration of laser dot centers. In this phase, we found that consistency constraints on dot matches were essential to obtaining accurate results. The laser dot alignment was further refined using a variation of the ICP algorithm developed by Besl and McKay. In the application of ICP to global registration, we developed a method to avoid one class of local minima by finding a set of points, rather than the single point, that matches each candidate point.

  4. Quantitative analysis of velopharyngeal movement using a stereoendoscope: accuracy and reliability of range images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Asuka; Mishima, Katsuaki; Shiraishi, Ruriko; Ueyama, Yoshiya

    2015-01-01

    We developed a novel method of producing accurate range images of the velopharynx using a three-dimensional (3D) endoscope to obtain detailed measurements of velopharyngeal movements. The purpose of the present study was to determine the relationship between the distance from the endoscope to an object, elucidate the measurement accuracy along the temporal axes, and determine the degree of blurring when using a jig to fix the endoscope. An endoscopic measuring system was developed in which a pattern projection system was incorporated into a commercially available 3D endoscope. After correcting the distortion of the camera images, range images were produced using pattern projection to achieve stereo matching. Graph paper was used to measure the appropriate distance from the camera to an object, the mesial buccal cusp of the right maxillary first molar was measured to clarify the range image stability, and an electric actuator was used to evaluate the measurement accuracy along the temporal axes. The measurement error was substantial when the distance from the camera to the subject was >6.5 cm. The standard error of the 3D coordinate value produced from 30 frames was within 0.1 mm (range, 0.01-0.08 mm). The measurement error of the temporal axes was 9.16% in the horizontal direction and 9.27% in the vertical direction. The optimal distance from the camera to an object is <6.5 cm. The present endoscopic measuring system can provide stable range images of the velopharynx when using an appropriate fixation method and enables quantitative analysis of velopharyngeal movements.

  5. Polarized Imaging Lidar Using Underwater Range Gating in a Multifunctional Remote Sensing System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, G.; Trees, C.

    2016-02-01

    This work describes the design of a compact imaging underwater polarized LIDAR system using a new modular laser beam shaping technology, which ensures eye safe operation at significant optical power levels that were previously unattainable in such an eye safe mode. The system is based on an existing battery powered high efficiency compact range-gated system which can be operated from a variety of underwater vehicles including AUV's. A detailed analysis is presented of the procedure required to successfully extract information on the depth distribution of the inherent optical properties along with the shape of the phase function in the near forward direction. The effect of polarization in helping to constrain and improve the retrieval of these fundamental optical properties of the water column is also discussed. The LIDAR mode is shown to be only one of the many functionalities useful to oceanographic research, which can be implemented using the beam shaping technology described above. Beyond the improvement in range and image quality of gated imaging over conventional imaging in turbid waters, the application of gated-structured imaging can be shown to significantly improve range and precision of 3D bottom mapping near the turbid seabed environment. We will show that the spatial precision that is available is sufficient for seabed habitat mapping and litter identification required for an environmental impact evaluation.

  6. Automatic face segmentation and facial landmark detection in range images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamplona Segundo, Maurício; Silva, Luciano; Bellon, Olga Regina Pereira; Queirolo, Chauã C

    2010-10-01

    We present a methodology for face segmentation and facial landmark detection in range images. Our goal was to develop an automatic process to be embedded in a face recognition system using only depth information as input. To this end, our segmentation approach combines edge detection, region clustering, and shape analysis to extract the face region, and our landmark detection approach combines surface curvature information and depth relief curves to find the nose and eye landmarks. The experiments were performed using the two available versions of the Face Recognition Grand Challenge database and the BU-3DFE database, in order to validate our proposed methodology and its advantages for 3-D face recognition purposes. We present an analysis regarding the accuracy of our segmentation and landmark detection approaches. Our results were better compared to state-of-the-art works published in the literature. We also performed an evaluation regarding the influence of the segmentation process in our 3-D face recognition system and analyzed the improvements obtained when applying landmark-based techniques to deal with facial expressions.

  7. Multiple-wavelength range-gated active imaging principle in the accumulation mode for three-dimensional imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matwyschuk, Alexis

    2017-01-20

    Having laid the foundations of the multiple-wavelength range-gated active imaging principle in flash mode in a previous paper, we have been studying its use in accumulation mode. Whatever the mode, the principle consists of restoring the 3D scene directly in a single image at the moment of recording with a camera. Each emitted light pulse with a different wavelength corresponds to a visualized zone with a different distance in the scene. So each of these visualized zones is identified by a different wavelength. In flash mode, the camera shutter opens just once during the emission of light pulses with the different wavelengths. However, the energy constraints to restore scenes in three dimensions can lead to a change in the recording mode when moving from the flash mode to the accumulation mode. In this mode, the cycle, including a series of light pulses with the used wavelengths and an aperture of the camera shutter, is repeated several times for a given image recorded with the intensified camera. Each wavelength always corresponds to a visualized slice with a different distance in the scene. So, the accumulation enables increasing the illumination of every visualized slice. The modeling conducted in the previous paper must be completed to adapt it to this mode. The tests with a multiple-wavelength laser source confirmed the quality improvement of the recorded images for more remote scenes and validated the principle of restoring, directly in a color image, the three dimensions of a scene.

  8. Restoring DIC microscopy images from multiple shear directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Zhaozheng; Ker, Dai Fei Elmer; Kanade, Takeo

    2011-01-01

    Differential Interference Contrast (DIC) microscopy is a nondestructive imaging modality that has been widely used by biologists to capture microscopy images of live biological specimens. However, as a qualitative technique, DIC microscopy records specimen's physical properties in an indirect way by mapping the gradient of specimen's optical path length (OPL) into the image intensity. In this paper, we propose to restore DIC microscopy images by quantitatively estimating specimen's OPL from a collection of DIC images captured from multiple shear directions. We acquire the DIC images by rotating the specimen dish on the microscope stage and design an Iterative Closest Point algorithm to register the images. The shear directions of the image dataset are automatically estimated by our coarse-to-fine grid search algorithm. We develop a direct solver on a regularized quadratic cost function to restore DIC microscopy images. The restoration from multiple shear directions decreases the ambiguity among different individual restorations. The restored DIC images are directly proportional to specimen's physical measurements, which is very amenable for microscopy image analysis such as cell segmentation.

  9. Depth maps and high-dynamic range image generation from alternating exposure multiview images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Yong Seok; Lee, Kyoung Mu; Lee, Sang Uk

    2017-07-01

    For stereo matching, it is hard to find accurate correspondence for saturated regions, such as too dark or too bright regions, because there is rarely reliable information to match. In this situation, conventional high-dynamic range (HDR) imaging techniques combining multiple exposures for each viewpoint can be adopted to generate well-exposed stereo images. This approach is, however, time-consuming and needs much memory to store multiple exposures for each viewpoint. We propose an efficient method to generate HDR multiview images as well as corresponding accurate depth maps. First, we take a single exposure for each viewpoint with alternating exposure setting, such as short and long exposure, as functions of viewpoint changes. Then, we compute an initial depth map for each view only using neighboring images that have the same exposure. To reduce the error of the initial depth maps for the saturated regions, we adopt the fusion move algorithm fusing neighboring depth maps that have different error regions. Finally, using the enhanced depth maps, we generate artifact-free and sharp HDR images using the joint bilateral filtering and a detail-transfer technique. Experimental results show that our method produces both consistent HDR images and accurate depth maps for various indoor and outdoor multiview images.

  10. Maximizing Interconnectedness and Availability in Directional Airborne RangeExtension Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-25

    surveyed advances in directional networking , noting much work in topology management , medium access control algorithms, aircraft-based directional... networks . Other issues, such as topology management and spectrum management , also require further research and development to enable high-quality...Maximizing Interconnectedness and Availability in Directional Airborne Range Extension Networks Thomas Shake, Rahul Amin MIT Lincoln Laboratory

  11. Rotation Periods and Cloud Dynamics of Directly Imaged Exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowler, Brendan

    2017-08-01

    Precision photometric monitoring of brown dwarfs has shown that variability spanning a broad range of amplitudes (0.1-30%) is extremely common in the infrared. These periodic changes are likely caused by rotationally-modulated features produced by heterogeneous coverage of condensate clouds. Time series spectroscopy is an especially informative tool; by simultaneously probing a range of wavelengths, pressure levels, and evolving phases, this method has opened a new window into the atmospheric structure and dynamics of ultracool atmospheres. Recent observations of young brown dwarfs and planetary-mass objects indicate that high-amplitude ( 10%) variability may be even more common at low surface gravities. We propose to obtain the first-ever rotational phase maps for three directly imaged exoplanets with time series WFC3/IR spectroscopy to measure the rotation, cloud structure, and atmospheric dynamics of young (2-300 Myr) giant planets. In addition, by combining projected rotational velocities from high-resolution near-infrared spectroscopy of these planets, these spectroscopic light curves will also be used to determine the first obliquity angle of an imaged exoplanet.

  12. CLOSE RANGE HYPERSPECTRAL IMAGING INTEGRATED WITH TERRESTRIAL LIDAR SCANNING APPLIED TO ROCK CHARACTERISATION AT CENTIMETRE SCALE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. H. Kurz

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Compact and lightweight hyperspectral imagers allow the application of close range hyperspectral imaging with a ground based scanning setup for geological fieldwork. Using such a scanning setup, steep cliff sections and quarry walls can be scanned with a more appropriate viewing direction and a higher image resolution than from airborne and spaceborne platforms. Integration of the hyperspectral imagery with terrestrial lidar scanning provides the hyperspectral information in a georeferenced framework and enables measurement at centimetre scale. In this paper, three geological case studies are used to demonstrate the potential of this method for rock characterisation. Two case studies are applied to carbonate quarries where mapping of different limestone and dolomite types was required, as well as measurements of faults and layer thicknesses from inaccessible parts of the quarries. The third case study demonstrates the method using artificial lighting, applied in a subsurface scanning scenario where solar radiation cannot be utilised.

  13. Processor for Real-Time Atmospheric Compensation in Long-Range Imaging Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Long-range imaging is a critical component to many NASA applications including range surveillance, launch tracking, and astronomical observation. However,...

  14. Edge-detect interpolation for direct digital periapical images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Nam Kyu; Koh, Kwang Joon [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, College of Dentistry, Chonbuk National University, Chonju (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to aid in the use of the digital images by edge-detect interpolation for direct digital periapical images using edge-deted interpolation. This study was performed by image processing of 20 digital periapical images; pixel replication, linear non-interpolation, linear interpolation, and edge-sensitive interpolation. The obtained results were as follows: 1. Pixel replication showed blocking artifact and serious image distortion. 2. Linear interpolation showed smoothing effect on the edge. 3. Edge-sensitive interpolation overcame the smoothing effect on the edge and showed better image.

  15. Long-Range Reconnaissance Imager on New Horizons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, A. F.; Weaver, H. A.; Conard, S. J.; Hayes, J. R.; Morgan, M. F.; Noble, M.; Taylor, H. W.; Barnouin, O.; Boldt, J. D.; Darlington, E. H.; Grey, M. P.; Magee, T.; Rossano, E.; Schlemm, C.; Kosakowski, K. E.; Sampath, D.

    2012-10-01

    LORRI is the highest resolution imager on the New Horizons (NH) mission to Pluto and the Kuiper belt. LORRI produced superb images of Jupiter and its satellites even though those bodies are ~35 times brighter than bodies in the Pluto system.

  16. Direct Imaging of Frenkel Exciton Transport by Ultrafast Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Tong; Wan, Yan; Huang, Libai

    2017-07-18

    Long-range transport of Frenkel excitons is crucial for achieving efficient molecular-based solar energy harvesting. Understanding of exciton transport mechanisms is important for designing materials for solar energy applications. One major bottleneck in unraveling of exciton transport mechanisms is the lack of direct measurements to provide information in both spatial and temporal domains, imposed by the combination of fast energy transfer (typically ≤1 ps) and short exciton diffusion lengths (typically ≤100 nm). This challenge requires developing experimental tools to directly characterize excitation energy transport, and thus facilitate the elucidation of mechanisms. To address this challenge, we have employed ultrafast transient absorption microscopy (TAM) as a means to directly image exciton transport with ∼200 fs time resolution and ∼50 nm spatial precision. By mapping population in spatial and temporal domains, such approach has unraveled otherwise obscured information and provided important parameters for testing exciton transport models. In this Account, we discuss the recent progress in imaging Frenkel exciton migration in molecular crystals and aggregates by ultrafast microscopy. First, we establish the validity of the TAM methods by imaging singlet and triplet exciton transport in a series of polyacene single crystals that undergo singlet fission. A new singlet-mediated triplet transport pathway has been revealed by TAM, resulting from the equilibrium between triplet and singlet exciton populations. Such enhancement of triplet exciton transport enables triplet excitons to migrate as singlet excitons and leads to orders of magnitude faster apparent triplet exciton diffusion rate in the picosecond and nanosecond time scales, favorable for solar cell applications. Next we discuss how information obtained by ultrafast microscopy can evaluate coherent effects in exciton transport. We use tubular molecular aggregates that could support large exciton

  17. Direct identification of fungi using image analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dørge, Thorsten Carlheim; Carstensen, Jens Michael; Frisvad, Jens Christian

    1999-01-01

    Filamentous fungi have often been characterized, classified or identified with a major emphasis on macromorphological characters, i.e. the size, texture and color of fungal colonies grown on one or more identification media. This approach has been rejcted by several taxonomists because of the sub......Filamentous fungi have often been characterized, classified or identified with a major emphasis on macromorphological characters, i.e. the size, texture and color of fungal colonies grown on one or more identification media. This approach has been rejcted by several taxonomists because...... of the subjectivity in the visual evaluation and quantification (if any)of such characters and the apparent large variability of the features. We present an image analysis approach for objective identification and classification of fungi. The approach is exemplified by several isolates of nine different species...... of the genus Penicillium, known to be very difficult to identify correctly. The fungi were incubated on YES and CYA for one week at 25 C (3 point inoculation) in 9 cm Petri dishes. The cultures are placed under a camera where a digital image of the front of the colonies is acquired under optimal illumination...

  18. Multiple-image shearography: a direct method to determine curvatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, C J; Toh, S L; Shang, H M; Lin, Q Y

    1995-05-01

    We present a modified method of shearography, known herein as multiple-image shearography, whereby the curvatures of an object can be measured directly from the resulting fringes. It employs an image-shearing camera that produces three sheared images simultaneously to interfere with each other in the image plane. When film is doubly exposed before and after an object is deformed, three sets of fringes are observed of which one set would depict the second-order derivatives of surface displacement.The theory of the multiple-image shearography technique and its application to curvature measurements in plate bending are presented.

  19. Confocal direct imaging Raman microscope: Design and applications in biology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijtsema, N M; Wouters, S D; Grauw, C J De; Otto, C; Greve, J

    1998-01-01

    A confocal direct imaging Raman microscope (CDIRM) based on two synchronized scanning mirrors, a monochromator, and two charge-coupled device (CCD) cameras has been developed. With this system it is possible to make both Raman spectra of a small measurement volume and images of a larger sample area

  20. Adaptive optics instrument for long-range imaging. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, T.M.

    1998-06-01

    The science and history of imaging through a turbulent atmosphere is reviewed in detail. Traditional methods for reducing the effects of turbulence are presented. A simplified method for turbulence reduction called the Sheared Coherent Interferometric Photography (SCIP) method is presented. Implementation of SCIP is discussed along with experimental results. Limitations in the use of this method are discussed along with recommendations for future improvements.

  1. 3D FACE RECOGNITION FROM RANGE IMAGES BASED ON CURVATURE ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suranjan Ganguly

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a novel approach for three-dimensional face recognition by extracting the curvature maps from range images. There are four types of curvature maps: Gaussian, Mean, Maximum and Minimum curvature maps. These curvature maps are used as a feature for 3D face recognition purpose. The dimension of these feature vectors is reduced using Singular Value Decomposition (SVD technique. Now from calculated three components of SVD, the non-negative values of ‘S’ part of SVD is ranked and used as feature vector. In this proposed method, two pair-wise curvature computations are done. One is Mean, and Maximum curvature pair and another is Gaussian and Mean curvature pair. These are used to compare the result for better recognition rate. This automated 3D face recognition system is focused in different directions like, frontal pose with expression and illumination variation, frontal face along with registered face, only registered face and registered face from different pose orientation across X, Y and Z axes. 3D face images used for this research work are taken from FRAV3D database. The pose variation of 3D facial image is being registered to frontal pose by applying one to all registration technique then curvature mapping is applied on registered face images along with remaining frontal face images. For the classification and recognition purpose five layer feed-forward back propagation neural network classifiers is used, and the corresponding result is discussed in section 4.

  2. Preserving spatial perception in rooms using direct-sound driven dynamic range compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassager, Henrik Gert; May, Tobias; Wiinberg, Alan; Dau, Torsten

    2017-06-01

    Fast-acting hearing-aid compression systems typically distort the auditory cues involved in the spatial perception of sounds in rooms by enhancing low-level reverberant energy portions of the sound relative to the direct sound. The present study investigated the benefit of a direct-sound driven compression system that adaptively selects appropriate time constants to preserve the listener's spatial impression. Specifically, fast-acting compression was maintained for time-frequency units dominated by the direct sound while the processing of the compressor was linearized for time-frequency units dominated by reverberation. This compression scheme was evaluated with normal-hearing listeners who indicated their perceived location and distribution of sound images in the horizontal plane for virtualized speech. The experimental results confirmed that both independent compression at each ear and linked compression across ears resulted in broader, sometimes internalized, sound images as well as image splits. In contrast, the linked direct-sound driven compression system provided the listeners with a spatial perception similar to that obtained with linear processing that served as the reference condition. The independent direct-sound driven compressor created a sense of movement of the sound between the two ears, suggesting that preserving the interaural level differences via linked compression is advantageous with the proposed direct-sound driven compression scheme.

  3. A Long-Range Directional Wake-Up Radio for Wireless Mobile Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Chan Shih

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a long-range directional wake-up radio (LDWuR for wireless mobile networks. In contrast to most wake-up radios (WuR to date, which are short range, ours is applicable to long-range deployments. Existing studies achieve long distance by using modulation and coding schemes or by directional antennas, though the latter require exploring the direction of the transmitter. To address this issue, our LDWuR adopts both static and dynamic antennas, where the static ones are directional, while the dynamic ones are omnidirectional for beamforming. We present our LDWuR prototype and design principle. Simulation results show that our LDWuR and event-driven MAC protocol suppress the idle-listening of Wi-Fi stations in a wireless network, thereby enhancing the Wi-Fi power savings.

  4. Compact Local Directional Texture Pattern for Local Image Description

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Zeng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an effective local image feature region descriptor, called CLDTP descriptor (Compact Local Directional Texture Pattern, and its application in image matching and object recognition. The CLDTP descriptor encodes the directional and contrast information in a local region, so it contains the gradient orientation information and the gradient magnitude information. As the dimension of the CLDTP histogram is much lower than the dimension of the LDTP histogram, the CLDTP descriptor has higher computational efficiency and it is suitable for image matching. Extensive experiments have validated the effectiveness of the designed CLDTP descriptor.

  5. Directional bilateral filters for smoothing fluorescence microscopy images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesh, Manasij; Mohan, Kavya; Seelamantula, Chandra Sekhar

    2015-08-01

    Images obtained through fluorescence microscopy at low numerical aperture (NA) are noisy and have poor resolution. Images of specimens such as F-actin filaments obtained using confocal or widefield fluorescence microscopes contain directional information and it is important that an image smoothing or filtering technique preserve the directionality. F-actin filaments are widely studied in pathology because the abnormalities in actin dynamics play a key role in diagnosis of cancer, cardiac diseases, vascular diseases, myofibrillar myopathies, neurological disorders, etc. We develop the directional bilateral filter as a means of filtering out the noise in the image without significantly altering the directionality of the F-actin filaments. The bilateral filter is anisotropic to start with, but we add an additional degree of anisotropy by employing an oriented domain kernel for smoothing. The orientation is locally adapted using a structure tensor and the parameters of the bilateral filter are optimized for within the framework of statistical risk minimization. We show that the directional bilateral filter has better denoising performance than the traditional Gaussian bilateral filter and other denoising techniques such as SURE-LET, non-local means, and guided image filtering at various noise levels in terms of peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR). We also show quantitative improvements in low NA images of F-actin filaments.

  6. Directional bilateral filters for smoothing fluorescence microscopy images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manasij Venkatesh

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Images obtained through fluorescence microscopy at low numerical aperture (NA are noisy and have poor resolution. Images of specimens such as F-actin filaments obtained using confocal or widefield fluorescence microscopes contain directional information and it is important that an image smoothing or filtering technique preserve the directionality. F-actin filaments are widely studied in pathology because the abnormalities in actin dynamics play a key role in diagnosis of cancer, cardiac diseases, vascular diseases, myofibrillar myopathies, neurological disorders, etc. We develop the directional bilateral filter as a means of filtering out the noise in the image without significantly altering the directionality of the F-actin filaments. The bilateral filter is anisotropic to start with, but we add an additional degree of anisotropy by employing an oriented domain kernel for smoothing. The orientation is locally adapted using a structure tensor and the parameters of the bilateral filter are optimized for within the framework of statistical risk minimization. We show that the directional bilateral filter has better denoising performance than the traditional Gaussian bilateral filter and other denoising techniques such as SURE-LET, non-local means, and guided image filtering at various noise levels in terms of peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR. We also show quantitative improvements in low NA images of F-actin filaments.

  7. Direct Ranging in Multi-path Channels Using OFDM Pilot Signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jing, Lishuai; Pedersen, Troels; Fleury, Bernard Henri

    2014-01-01

    on which the range is then inferred. In multi-path conditions, two-step range estimators which employ the correlator-based estimator or the energy detector lead to poor ranging accuracy when applied in non-ultra-wideband scenarios due to bias. More advanced ranging schemes that estimate all multi......-path components using a multidimensional search procedure provide higher ranging accuracy but have a prohibitive complexity. In this work, we propose a novel direct ranging technique that uses a point process formulated channel model. Based on this model, we derive an approximate maximum likelihood estimator...... of the range. In contrast to the estimator which requires a multidimensional search procedure, the proposed estimator does not demand the knowledge of the exact number of multi-path components and these components are separable. If the power delay spectrum of the multi-path channel and the signal...

  8. Lookup Table Hough Transform for Real Time Range Image Segmentation and Featureless Co-Registration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorte, B.G.H.; Sithole, G.

    2012-01-01

    The paper addresses range image segmentation, particularly of data recorded by range cameras, such as the Microsoft Kinect and the Mesa Swissranger SR4000. These devices record range images at video frame rates and allow for acqui-sition of 3-dimensional measurement sequences that can be used for 3D

  9. A photoacoustic imaging reconstruction method based on directional total variation with adaptive directivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin; Zhang, Chen; Wang, Yuanyuan

    2017-05-30

    In photoacoustic tomography (PAT), total variation (TV) based iteration algorithm is reported to have a good performance in PAT image reconstruction. However, classical TV based algorithm fails to preserve the edges and texture details of the image because it is not sensitive to the direction of the image. Therefore, it is of great significance to develop a new PAT reconstruction algorithm to effectively solve the drawback of TV. In this paper, a directional total variation with adaptive directivity (DDTV) model-based PAT image reconstruction algorithm, which weightedly sums the image gradients based on the spatially varying directivity pattern of the image is proposed to overcome the shortcomings of TV. The orientation field of the image is adaptively estimated through a gradient-based approach. The image gradients are weighted at every pixel based on both its anisotropic direction and another parameter, which evaluates the estimated orientation field reliability. An efficient algorithm is derived to solve the iteration problem associated with DDTV and possessing directivity of the image adaptively updated for each iteration step. Several texture images with various directivity patterns are chosen as the phantoms for the numerical simulations. The 180-, 90- and 30-view circular scans are conducted. Results obtained show that the DDTV-based PAT reconstructed algorithm outperforms the filtered back-projection method (FBP) and TV algorithms in the quality of reconstructed images with the peak signal-to-noise rations (PSNR) exceeding those of TV and FBP by about 10 and 18 dB, respectively, for all cases. The Shepp-Logan phantom is studied with further discussion of multimode scanning, convergence speed, robustness and universality aspects. In-vitro experiments are performed for both the sparse-view circular scanning and linear scanning. The results further prove the effectiveness of the DDTV, which shows better results than that of the TV with sharper image edges and

  10. Design and implementation of range-gated underwater laser imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Wei-long; Zhang, Xiao-hui

    2014-02-01

    A range-gated underwater laser imaging system is designed and implemented in this article, which is made up of laser illumination subsystem, photoelectric imaging subsystem and control subsystem. The experiment of underwater target drone detection has been done, the target of distance 40m far from the range-gated underwater laser imaging system can be imaged in the pool which water attenuation coefficient is 0.159m-1. Experimental results show that the range-gated underwater laser imaging system can detect underwater objects effectively.

  11. Can quantum gas microscopes directly image exotic glassy phases?

    OpenAIRE

    Thomson, Steven John; Walker, Liam S.; Harte, Tiffany L.; Bruce, Graham David

    2016-01-01

    With the advent of spatially resolved fluorescence imaging in quantum gas microscopes (see e.g. [1]), it is now possible to directly image glassy phases and probe the local effects of disorder in a highly controllable setup. Here we present numerical calculations using a spatially resolved local mean-field theory, show that it captures the essential physics of the disordered system, and use it to simulate the density distributions seen in single-shot fluorescence microscopy [2]. From these si...

  12. Laser range scanning for image-guided neurosurgery: investigation of image-to-physical space registrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Aize; Thompson, R C; Dumpuri, P; Dawant, B M; Galloway, R L; Ding, S; Miga, M I

    2008-04-01

    In this article a comprehensive set of registration methods is utilized to provide image-to-physical space registration for image-guided neurosurgery in a clinical study. Central to all methods is the use of textured point clouds as provided by laser range scanning technology. The objective is to perform a systematic comparison of registration methods that include both extracranial (skin marker point-based registration (PBR), and face-based surface registration) and intracranial methods (feature PBR, cortical vessel-contour registration, a combined geometry/intensity surface registration method, and a constrained form of that method to improve robustness). The platform facilitates the selection of discrete soft-tissue landmarks that appear on the patient's intraoperative cortical surface and the preoperative gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) image volume, i.e., true corresponding novel targets. In an 11 patient study, data were taken to allow statistical comparison among registration methods within the context of registration error. The results indicate that intraoperative face-based surface registration is statistically equivalent to traditional skin marker registration. The four intracranial registration methods were investigated and the results demonstrated a target registration error of 1.6 +/- 0.5 mm, 1.7 +/- 0.5 mm, 3.9 +/- 3.4 mm, and 2.0 +/- 0.9 mm, for feature PBR, cortical vessel-contour registration, unconstrained geometric/intensity registration, and constrained geometric/intensity registration, respectively. When analyzing the results on a per case basis, the constrained geometric/intensity registration performed best, followed by feature PBR, and finally cortical vessel-contour registration. Interestingly, the best target registration errors are similar to targeting errors reported using bone-implanted markers within the context of rigid targets. The experience in this study as with others is that brain shift can compromise extracranial

  13. PROCESSING OF UAV BASED RANGE IMAGING DATA TO GENERATE DETAILED ELEVATION MODELS OF COMPLEX NATURAL STRUCTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. K. Kohoutek

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs are more and more used in civil areas like geomatics. Autonomous navigated platforms have a great flexibility in flying and manoeuvring in complex environments to collect remote sensing data. In contrast to standard technologies such as aerial manned platforms (airplanes and helicopters UAVs are able to fly closer to the object and in small-scale areas of high-risk situations such as landslides, volcano and earthquake areas and floodplains. Thus, UAVs are sometimes the only practical alternative in areas where access is difficult and where no manned aircraft is available or even no flight permission is given. Furthermore, compared to terrestrial platforms, UAVs are not limited to specific view directions and could overcome occlusions from trees, houses and terrain structures. Equipped with image sensors and/or laser scanners they are able to provide elevation models, rectified images, textured 3D-models and maps. In this paper we will describe a UAV platform, which can carry a range imaging (RIM camera including power supply and data storage for the detailed mapping and monitoring of complex structures, such as alpine riverbed areas. The UAV platform NEO from Swiss UAV was equipped with the RIM camera CamCube 2.0 by PMD Technologies GmbH to capture the surface structures. Its navigation system includes an autopilot. To validate the UAV-trajectory a 360° prism was installed and tracked by a total station. Within the paper a workflow for the processing of UAV-RIM data is proposed, which is based on the processing of differential GNSS data in combination with the acquired range images. Subsequently, the obtained results for the trajectory are compared and verified with a track of a UAV (Falcon 8, Ascending Technologies carried out with a total station simultaneously to the GNSS data acquisition. The results showed that the UAV's position using differential GNSS could be determined in the centimetre to the decimetre

  14. Dosimetry and image quality assessment in a direct radiography system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Bruno Beraldo; Paixao, Lucas; Nogueira, Maria do Socorro, E-mail: boliveira.mg@gmail.com [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Oliveira, Marcio Alves de [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina. Dept. de Anatomia e Imagem; Teixeira, Maria Helena Araujo [Clinica Dra. Maria Helena Araujo Teixeira, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2014-11-15

    Objective: to evaluate the mean glandular dose with a solid state detector and the image quality in a direct radiography system, utilizing phantoms. Materials and methods: Irradiations were performed with automatic exposure control and polymethyl methacrylate slabs with different thicknesses to calculate glandular dose values. The image quality was evaluated by means of the structures visualized on the images of the phantoms. Results: considering the uncertainty of the measurements, the mean glandular dose results are in agreement with the values provided by the equipment and with internationally adopted reference levels. Results obtained from images of the phantoms were in agreement with the reference values. Conclusion: the present study contributes to verify the equipment conformity as regards dose values and image quality. (author)

  15. Portal imaging with a direct-detection active matrix flat panel imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachaine, Martin Emile

    2001-07-01

    The problem of charge creation by x-rays in amorphous selenium (a-Se) is studied. A quantitative theory is developed which includes collective and single electron-hole pair excitations by a passing electron. This theory is incorporated into a Monte Carlo code to calculate track structures in a-Se. The initial positions of the electron-hole pairs along these tracks are used to study the fraction of pairs which recombine versus incident x-ray energy and applied electric field. The experimentally-observed energy dependence of recombination is attributed to a spur size which is dependent on the velocity of the ionizing electrons. The theory and simulations agree with available experimental data in the energy range from 20 keV to 10 MeV. The use of an a-Se based direct-detection active matrix flat-panel imager (AMFPI) is explored at megavoltage energies for use in the verification of radiotherapy treatments. As with most other megavoltage detectors, a metal front plate is used to reduce patient scatter and to act as a buildup layer. The Modulation Transfer Function (MTF), Noise Power Spectrum (NPS), and Detective Quantum Efficiency (DQE) are measured. The DQE for the direct detection AMFPI is compared with the published DQE of an indirect detection AMFPI for portal imaging. The direct detector has a lower DQE at zero frequency, but there is a cross-over at approximately 0.3 cycles/mm after which it has a higher DQE. A theoretical expression for the DQE of medical imaging detectors with non-elementary cascade stages is derived. This formalism can be used in conjunction with Monte Carlo techniques to evaluate the DQE of megavoltage imaging detectors. The predictions of the theory agree with the experimental DQE results for the direct-detection AMFPI and also for published results for the DQE of both a metal/phosphor detector and an indirect-detection AMFPI. The effect of scatter on image quality is modeled in terms of the scatter fraction (SF) and scatter-to-primary ratio

  16. Fingerprint Image Enhancement Based on Second Directional Derivative of the Digital Image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onnia Vesa

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel approach of fingerprint image enhancement that relies on detecting the fingerprint ridges as image regions where the second directional derivative of the digital image is positive. A facet model is used in order to approximate the derivatives at each image pixel based on the intensity values of pixels located in a certain neighborhood. We note that the size of this neighborhood has a critical role in achieving accurate enhancement results. Using neighborhoods of various sizes, the proposed algorithm determines several candidate binary representations of the input fingerprint pattern. Subsequently, an output binary ridge-map image is created by selecting image zones, from the available binary image candidates, according to a MAP selection rule. Two public domain collections of fingerprint images are used in order to objectively assess the performance of the proposed fingerprint image enhancement approach.

  17. Full Waveform Analysis for Long-Range 3D Imaging Laser Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wallace AndrewM

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The new generation of 3D imaging systems based on laser radar (ladar offers significant advantages in defense and security applications. In particular, it is possible to retrieve 3D shape information directly from the scene and separate a target from background or foreground clutter by extracting a narrow depth range from the field of view by range gating, either in the sensor or by postprocessing. We discuss and demonstrate the applicability of full-waveform ladar to produce multilayer 3D imagery, in which each pixel produces a complex temporal response that describes the scene structure. Such complexity caused by multiple and distributed reflection arises in many relevant scenarios, for example in viewing partially occluded targets, through semitransparent materials (e.g., windows and through distributed reflective media such as foliage. We demonstrate our methodology on 3D image data acquired by a scanning time-of-flight system, developed in our own laboratories, which uses the time-correlated single-photon counting technique.

  18. Improved Feature Detection in Fused Intensity-Range Images with Complex SIFT (ℂSIFT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Jutzi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The real and imaginary parts are proposed as an alternative to the usual Polar representation of complex-valued images. It is proven that the transformation from Polar to Cartesian representation contributes to decreased mutual information, and hence to greater distinctiveness. The Complex Scale-Invariant Feature Transform (ℂSIFT detects distinctive features in complex-valued images. An evaluation method for estimating the uniformity of feature distributions in complex-valued images derived from intensity-range images is proposed. In order to experimentally evaluate the proposed methodology on intensity-range images, three different kinds of active sensing systems were used: Range Imaging, Laser Scanning, and Structured Light Projection devices (PMD CamCube 2.0, Z+F IMAGER 5003, Microsoft Kinect.

  19. Illumination normalization of face image based on illuminant direction estimation and improved Retinex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jizheng Yi

    Full Text Available Illumination normalization of face image for face recognition and facial expression recognition is one of the most frequent and difficult problems in image processing. In order to obtain a face image with normal illumination, our method firstly divides the input face image into sixteen local regions and calculates the edge level percentage in each of them. Secondly, three local regions, which meet the requirements of lower complexity and larger average gray value, are selected to calculate the final illuminant direction according to the error function between the measured intensity and the calculated intensity, and the constraint function for an infinite light source model. After knowing the final illuminant direction of the input face image, the Retinex algorithm is improved from two aspects: (1 we optimize the surround function; (2 we intercept the values in both ends of histogram of face image, determine the range of gray levels, and stretch the range of gray levels into the dynamic range of display device. Finally, we achieve illumination normalization and get the final face image. Unlike previous illumination normalization approaches, the method proposed in this paper does not require any training step or any knowledge of 3D face and reflective surface model. The experimental results using extended Yale face database B and CMU-PIE show that our method achieves better normalization effect comparing with the existing techniques.

  20. Bi-Directional Brillouin Optical Time Domain Analyzer System for Long Range Distributed Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Nan; Wang, Liang; Wang, Jie; Jin, Chao; Tam, Hwa-Yaw; Zhang, A Ping; Lu, Chao

    2016-12-16

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a novel scheme of bi-directional Brillouin time domain analyzer (BD-BOTDA) to extend the sensing range. By deploying two pump-probe pairs at two different wavelengths, the Brillouin frequency shift (BFS) distribution over each half of the whole fiber can be obtained with the simultaneous detection of Brillouin signals in both channels. Compared to the conventional unidirectional BOTDA system of the same sensing range, the proposed BD-BOTDA scheme enables distributed sensing with a performance level comparable to the conventional one with half of the sensing range and a spatial resolution of 2 m, while maintaining the Brillouin signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the BFS uncertainty. Based on this technique, we have achieved distributed temperature sensing with a measurement range of 81.9 km fiber at a spatial resolution of 2 m and BFS uncertainty of ~0.44 MHz without introducing any complicated components or schemes.

  1. Study of CT-based positron range correction in high resolution 3D PET imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cal-Gonzalez, J., E-mail: jacobo@nuclear.fis.ucm.es [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear, Dpto. Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Herraiz, J.L. [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear, Dpto. Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Espana, S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Vicente, E. [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear, Dpto. Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Madrid (Spain); Herranz, E. [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear, Dpto. Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Desco, M. [Unidad de Medicina y Cirugia Experimental, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Madrid (Spain); Vaquero, J.J. [Dpto. de Bioingenieria e Ingenieria Espacial, Universidad Carlos III, Madrid (Spain); Udias, J.M. [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear, Dpto. Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain)

    2011-08-21

    Positron range limits the spatial resolution of PET images and has a different effect for different isotopes and positron propagation materials. Therefore it is important to consider it during image reconstruction, in order to obtain optimal image quality. Positron range distributions for most common isotopes used in PET in different materials were computed using the Monte Carlo simulations with PeneloPET. The range profiles were introduced into the 3D OSEM image reconstruction software FIRST and employed to blur the image either in the forward projection or in the forward and backward projection. The blurring introduced takes into account the different materials in which the positron propagates. Information on these materials may be obtained, for instance, from a segmentation of a CT image. The results of introducing positron blurring in both forward and backward projection operations was compared to using it only during forward projection. Further, the effect of different shapes of positron range profile in the quality of the reconstructed images with positron range correction was studied. For high positron energy isotopes, the reconstructed images show significant improvement in spatial resolution when positron range is taken into account during reconstruction, compared to reconstructions without positron range modeling.

  2. Direct imaging of multiple planets orbiting the star HR 8799

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marois, C; Macintosh, B; Barman, T; Zuckerman, B; Song, I; Patience, J; Lafreniere, D; Doyon, R

    2008-10-14

    Direct imaging of exoplanetary systems is a powerful technique that can reveal Jupiter-like planets in wide orbits, can enable detailed characterization of planetary atmospheres, and is a key step towards imaging Earth-like planets. Imaging detections are challenging due to the combined effect of small angular separation and large luminosity contrast between a planet and its host star. High-contrast observations with the Keck and Gemini telescopes have revealed three planets orbiting the star HR 8799, with projected separations of 24, 38, and 68 astronomical units. Multi-epoch data show counter-clockwise orbital motion for all three imaged planets. The low luminosity of the companions and the estimated age of the system imply planetary masses between 5 and 13 times that of Jupiter. This system resembles a scaled-up version of the outer portion of our Solar System.

  3. Imaging diagnosis of dural and direct cavernous carotid fistulae*

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Daniela; Monsignore, Lucas Moretti; Nakiri, Guilherme Seizem; Cruz, Antonio Augusto Velasco e; Colli, Benedicto Oscar; Abud, Daniel Giansante

    2014-01-01

    Arteriovenous fistulae of the cavernous sinus are rare and difficult to diagnose. They are classified into dural cavernous sinus fistulae or direct carotid-cavernous fistulae. Despite the similarity of symptoms between both types, a precise diagnosis is essential since the treatment is specific for each type of fistula. Imaging findings are remarkably similar in both dural cavernous sinus fistulae and carotid-cavernous fistulae, but it is possible to differentiate one type from the other. Amongst the available imaging methods (Doppler ultrasonography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and digital subtraction angiography), angiography is considered the gold standard for the diagnosis and classification of cavernous sinus arteriovenous fistulae. The present essay is aimed at didactically presenting the classification and imaging findings of cavernous sinus arteriovenous fistulae. PMID:25741093

  4. Imaging diagnosis of dural and direct cavernous carotid fistulae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Daniela; Monsignore, Lucas Moretti; Nakiri, Guilherme Seizem; Cruz, Antonio Augusto Velasco E; Colli, Benedicto Oscar; Abud, Daniel Giansante

    2014-01-01

    Arteriovenous fistulae of the cavernous sinus are rare and difficult to diagnose. They are classified into dural cavernous sinus fistulae or direct carotid-cavernous fistulae. Despite the similarity of symptoms between both types, a precise diagnosis is essential since the treatment is specific for each type of fistula. Imaging findings are remarkably similar in both dural cavernous sinus fistulae and carotid-cavernous fistulae, but it is possible to differentiate one type from the other. Amongst the available imaging methods (Doppler ultrasonography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and digital subtraction angiography), angiography is considered the gold standard for the diagnosis and classification of cavernous sinus arteriovenous fistulae. The present essay is aimed at didactically presenting the classification and imaging findings of cavernous sinus arteriovenous fistulae.

  5. Imaging diagnosis of dural and direct cavernous carotid fistulae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Daniela dos; Monsignore, Lucas Moretti; Nakiri, Guilherme Seizem; Cruz, Antonio Augusto Velasco e; Colli, Benedicto Oscar; Abud, Daniel Giansante, E-mail: danisantos2404@gmail.com [Universidade de Sao Paulo (HCFMRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Hospital das Clinicas

    2014-07-15

    Arteriovenous fistulae of the cavernous sinus are rare and difficult to diagnose. They are classified into dural cavernous sinus fistulae or direct carotid-cavernous fistulae. Despite the similarity of symptoms between both types, a precise diagnosis is essential since the treatment is specific for each type of fistula. Imaging findings are remarkably similar in both dural cavernous sinus fistulae and carotid-cavernous fistulae, but it is possible to differentiate one type from the other. Amongst the available imaging methods (Doppler ultrasonography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and digital subtraction angiography), angiography is considered the gold standard for the diagnosis and classification of cavernous sinus arteriovenous fistulae. The present essay is aimed at didactically presenting the classification and imaging findings of cavernous sinus arteriovenous fistulae. (author)

  6. Assessing positive body image: Contemporary approaches and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Jennifer B; Wood-Barcalow, Nichole L; Tylka, Tracy L

    2015-06-01

    Empirical and clinical interest in positive body image has burgeoned in recent years. This focused attention is generating various measures and methods for researchers and psychotherapists to assess an array of positive body image constructs in populations of interest. No resource to date has integrated the available measures and methods for easy accessibility and comparison. Therefore, this article reviews contemporary scales for the following positive body image constructs: body appreciation, positive rational acceptance, body image flexibility, body functionality, attunement (body responsiveness, mindful self-care), positive/self-accepting body talk, body pride, body sanctification, broad conceptualization of beauty, and self-perceived body acceptance by others. Guidelines for the qualitative assessment of positive body image and recommendations for integrating positive body image assessment within psychotherapy and applied research settings are also offered. The article concludes with articulating broad future directions for positive body image assessment, including ideas for expanding its available measures, methods, and dynamic expressions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Study on enhancing dynamic range of CCD imaging based on digital micro-mirror device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wang

    2009-05-01

    DMD used as SLM modulation area array CCD design is proposed in the paper. It can Solve a problem in exposing high-contrast scenes by ordinary CCD camera, with images appearing over-exposure or under exposure, bringing a loss of the details of the photo. The method adoptes a forecast imaging scene, CCD is purposely designed by way of more exposure regions and exposure times. Through modulation function of DMD micro-mirror, CCD is exposed with sub-region and time-sharing, at the same time a purposely designed structure of image data enhances the area CCD dynamic range. Experiments shows: This method not only improves visible quality of an image and clear details in the backlighting or highlight, but also enhances the dynamic range of image data. The high-quality image and high dynamic range data are real-time captured, the "fused" software is no longer required.

  8. The application of camera calibration in range-gated 3D imaging technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-quan; Wang, Xian-wei; Zhou, Yan

    2013-09-01

    Range-gated laser imaging technology was proposed in 1966 by LF Gillespiethe in U.S. Army Night Vision Laboratory(NVL). Using pulse laser and intensified charge-coupled device(ICCD) as light source and detector respectively, range-gated laser imaging technology can realize space-slice imaging while restraining the atmospheric backs-catter, and in turn detect the target effectively, by controlling the delay between the laser pulse and strobe. Owing to the constraints of the development of key components such as narrow pulse laser and gated imaging devices, the research has been progressed slowly in the next few decades. Until the beginning of this century, as the hardware technology continues to mature, this technology has developed rapidly in fields such as night vision, underwater imaging, biomedical imaging, three-dimensional imaging, especially range-gated three-dimensional(3-D) laser imaging field purposing of access to target spatial information. 3-D reconstruction is the processing of restoration of 3-D objects visible surface geometric structure from three-dimensional(2-D) image. Range-gated laser imaging technology can achieve gated imaging of slice space to form a slice image, and in turn provide the distance information corresponding to the slice image. But to inverse the information of 3-D space, we need to obtain the imaging visual field of system, that is, the focal length of the system. Then based on the distance information of the space slice, the spatial information of each unit space corresponding to each pixel can be inversed. Camera calibration is an indispensable step in 3-D reconstruction, including analysis of the internal structure of camera parameters and the external parameters . In order to meet the technical requirements of the range-gated 3-D imaging, this paper intends to study the calibration of the zoom lens system. After summarizing the camera calibration technique comprehensively, a classic calibration method based on line is

  9. ESTIMATING FIBRE DIRECTION DISTRIBUTIONS OF REINFORCED COMPOSITES FROM TOMOGRAPHIC IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Wirjadi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Fibre reinforced composites constitute a relevant class of materials used chiefly in lightweight constructions for example in fuselages or car bodies. The spatial arrangement of the fibres and in particular their direction distribution have huge impact on macroscopic properties and, thus, its determination is an important topic of material characterisation. The fibre direction distribution is defined on the unit sphere, and it is therefore preferable to work with fully three-dimensional images of the microstructure as obtained, e.g., by computed micro-tomography. A number of recent image analysis algorithms exploit local grey value variations to estimate a preferred direction in each fibre point. Averaging these local results leads estimates of the volume-weighted fibre direction distribution. We show how the thus derived fibre direction distribution is related to quantities commonly used in engineering applications. Furthermore, we discuss four algorithms for local orientation analysis, namely those based on the response of anisotropic Gaussian filters, moments and axes of inertia derived from directed distance transforms, the structure tensor, or the Hessian matrix. Finally, the feasibility of these algorithms is demonstrated for application examples and some advantages and disadvantages of the underlying methods are pointed out.

  10. Bearing splitting and near-surface source ranging in the direct zone of deep water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jun-Nan; Zhou, Shi-Hong; Peng, Zhao-Hui; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Ren-He

    2016-12-01

    Sound multipath propagation is very important for target localization and identification in different acoustical zones of deep water. In order to distinguish the multipath characteristics in deep water, the Northwest Pacific Acoustic Experiment was conducted in 2015. A low-frequency horizontal line array towed at the depth of around 150 m on a receiving ship was used to receive the noise radiated by the source ship. During this experiment, a bearing-splitting phenomenon in the direct zone was observed through conventional beamforming of the horizontal line array within the frequency band 160 Hz-360 Hz. In this paper, this phenomenon is explained based on ray theory. In principle, the received signal in the direct zone of deep water arrives from two general paths including a direct one and bottom bounced one, which vary considerably in arrival angles. The split bearings correspond to the contributions of these two paths. The bearing-splitting phenomenon is demonstrated by numerical simulations of the bearing-time records and experimental results, and they are well consistent with each other. Then a near-surface source ranging approach based on the arrival angles of direct path and bottom bounced path in the direct zone is presented as an application of bearing splitting and is verified by experimental results. Finally, the applicability of the proposed ranging approach for an underwater source within several hundred meters in depth in the direct zone is also analyzed and demonstrated by simulations. Project supported by the Program of One Hundred Talented People of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11434012 and 41561144006).

  11. ON THE DIRECT IMAGING OF TIDALLY HEATED EXOMOONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, Mary Anne; Turner, Edwin L., E-mail: mapeters@princeton.edu [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2013-06-01

    We demonstrate the ability of existing and planned telescopes, on the ground and in space, to directly image tidally heated exomoons orbiting gas-giant exoplanets. Tidally heated exomoons can plausibly be far more luminous than their host exoplanet and as much as 0.1% as bright as the system's stellar primary if it is a low mass star. Because emission from exomoons can be powered by tidal forces, they can shine brightly at arbitrarily large separations from the system's stellar primary with temperatures of several hundreds degrees Kelvin or even higher in extreme cases. Furthermore, these high temperatures can occur in systems that are billions of years old. Tidally heated exomoons may thus be far easier targets for direct imaging studies than giant exoplanets which must be both young and at a large projected separation (typically at least tens of AU) from their primary to be accessible to current generation direct imaging studies. For example, the (warm) Spitzer Space Telescope and the next generation of ground based instruments could detect an exomoon roughly the size of the Earth at a temperature Almost-Equal-To 600 K and a distance Almost-Equal-To 5 pc in the K, L, and M bands at the 5{sigma} confidence level with a one hour exposure; in more favorable but still plausible cases, detection at distances of tens of parsecs is feasible. Future mid-infrared space telescopes, such as James Webb Space Telescope and SPICA, will be capable of directly imaging tidally heated exomoons around the nearest two dozen stars with a brightness temperature {>=}300 K and R {>=} 1 R{sub Circled-Plus} orbiting at {>=}12 AU from the primary star at a 5{sigma} confidence level in a 10{sup 4} s integration. In addition it is possible that some of the exoplanets which have already been directly imaged are actually tidally heated exomoons or blends of such objects with hot young planets. If such exomoons exist and are sufficiently common (i.e., nearby), it may well be far

  12. Pilot Signal Design and Direct Ranging Methods for Radio Localization Using OFDM Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jing, Lishuai

    Having accurate localization capability is becoming important for existing and future terrestrial wireless communication systems, in particular for orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) systems, such as WiMAX, wireless local area network, long-term evolution (LTE) and its extension LTE......-Advanced. To obtain accurate position estimates, not only advanced estimation algorithms are needed but also the transmitted signals should be scrutinized. In this dissertation, we investigate how to design OFDM pilot signals and propose and evaluate high accuracy ranging techniques with tractable computational....... For scenarios where the number of path components is unknown and these components are not necessary separable, we propose a direct ranging technique using the received frequency-domain OFDM pilot signals. Compared to conventional (two-step) ranging methods, which estimate intermediate parameters...

  13. Nuclear Breast Imaging: Clinical Results and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Wendie A

    2016-02-01

    Interest in nuclear breast imaging is increasing because of technical improvements in dedicated devices that allow the use of relatively low doses of radiotracers with high sensitivity for even small breast cancers. For women with newly diagnosed cancer, primary chemotherapy is often recommended, and improved methods of assessing treatment response are of interest. With widespread breast density notification, functional rather than anatomic methods of screening are of increasing interest as well. For a cancer imaging technology to be adopted, several criteria must be met that will be discussed: evidence of clinical benefit with minimal harm, standardized interpretive criteria, direct biopsy guidance, and acceptable cost-effectiveness. © 2016 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  14. [Evaluation of direct digital radiography image quality in dentistry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng-Qiong; Huang, Wen; Qin, Yan-Ling; Qin, Xiao-Dan; Jiang, Yi-Fang; Tu, Xiao-Ning; Chang, Xiao-Jie

    2008-10-01

    To evaluate the quality of direct digital radiograph according to its application in dentistry. 1195 patients with dental caries, periodontal diseases, periapical diseases, trauma of teeth or hypodontia were tested with Trophy elitys Radio Visio Graphy(RVG) and the quality of the tests was evaluated at four levels. It was convenient to operate RVG and easy to save the images, which reduced the amount of X-rays. 1587 pictures were taken, among which 92.3% was at level I, 6.3% was at level II,1.14% was at level III and level IV. The quality of the images at different positions is good, which can meet the requirement for clinical diagnosis. However, the radiography receptor should be improved for better images.

  15. Electro-optic modulation methods in range-gated active imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhen; Liu, Bo; Liu, Enhai; Peng, Zhangxian

    2016-01-20

    A time-resolved imaging method based on electro-optic modulation is proposed in this paper. To implement range resolution, two kinds of polarization-modulated methods are designed, and high spatial and range resolution can be achieved by the active imaging system. In the system, with polarization beam splitting the incident light is split into two parts, one of which is modulated with cos(2) function and the other is modulated with sin(2) function. Afterward, a depth map can be obtained from two simultaneously received images by dual electron multiplying charge-coupled devices. Furthermore, an intensity image can also be obtained from the two images. Comparisons of the two polarization-modulated methods indicate that range accuracy will be promoted when the polarized light is modulated before beam splitting.

  16. The CAOS camera platform: ushering in a paradigm change in extreme dynamic range imager design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riza, Nabeel A.

    2017-02-01

    Multi-pixel imaging devices such as CCD, CMOS and Focal Plane Array (FPA) photo-sensors dominate the imaging world. These Photo-Detector Array (PDA) devices certainly have their merits including increasingly high pixel counts and shrinking pixel sizes, nevertheless, they are also being hampered by limitations in instantaneous dynamic range, inter-pixel crosstalk, quantum full well capacity, signal-to-noise ratio, sensitivity, spectral flexibility, and in some cases, imager response time. Recently invented is the Coded Access Optical Sensor (CAOS) Camera platform that works in unison with current Photo-Detector Array (PDA) technology to counter fundamental limitations of PDA-based imagers while providing high enough imaging spatial resolution and pixel counts. Using for example the Texas Instruments (TI) Digital Micromirror Device (DMD) to engineer the CAOS camera platform, ushered in is a paradigm change in advanced imager design, particularly for extreme dynamic range applications.

  17. PROVE GOES-8 Images of Jornada Experimental Range, New Mexico, 1997

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — As part of the Prototype Validation Experiment (PROVE) at the Jornada Experimental Range, GOES-8 images were collected every 30 minutes for 15 days overlapping the...

  18. Registration of partially overlapping surfaces for range image based augmented reality on mobile devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgus, T.; Franz, A. M.; Seitel, A.; Marz, K.; Bartha, L.; Fangerau, M.; Mersmann, S.; Groch, A.; Meinzer, H.-P.; Maier-Hein, L.

    2012-02-01

    Visualization of anatomical data for disease diagnosis, surgical planning, or orientation during interventional therapy is an integral part of modern health care. However, as anatomical information is typically shown on monitors provided by a radiological work station, the physician has to mentally transfer internal structures shown on the screen to the patient. To address this issue, we recently presented a new approach to on-patient visualization of 3D medical images, which combines the concept of augmented reality (AR) with an intuitive interaction scheme. Our method requires mounting a range imaging device, such as a Time-of-Flight (ToF) camera, to a portable display (e.g. a tablet PC). During the visualization process, the pose of the camera and thus the viewing direction of the user is continuously determined with a surface matching algorithm. By moving the device along the body of the patient, the physician is given the impression of looking directly into the human body. In this paper, we present and evaluate a new method for camera pose estimation based on an anisotropic trimmed variant of the well-known iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm. According to in-silico and in-vivo experiments performed with computed tomography (CT) and ToF data of human faces, knees and abdomens, our new method is better suited for surface registration with ToF data than the established trimmed variant of the ICP, reducing the target registration error (TRE) by more than 60%. The TRE obtained (approx. 4-5 mm) is promising for AR visualization, but clinical applications require maximization of robustness and run-time.

  19. Fusing range and intensity images for generating dense models of three-dimensional environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellekilde, Lars-Peter; Miró, Jaime Valls; Dissanayake., Gamini

    This paper presents a novel strategy for the construction of dense three-dimensional environment models by combining images from a conventional camera and a range imager. Ro- bust data association is ?rst accomplished by exploiting the Scale Invariant Feature Transformation (SIFT) technique on th...

  20. Fast Hue and Range Preserving Histogram: Specification: Theory and New Algorithms for Color Image Enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolova, Mila; Steidl, Gabriele

    2014-07-16

    Color image enhancement is a complex and challenging task in digital imaging with abundant applications. Preserving the hue of the input image is crucial in a wide range of situations. We propose simple image enhancement algorithms which conserve the hue and preserve the range (gamut) of the R, G, B channels in an optimal way. In our setup, the intensity input image is transformed into a target intensity image whose histogram matches a specified, well-behaved histogram. We derive a new color assignment methodology where the resulting enhanced image fits the target intensity image. We analyse the obtained algorithms in terms of chromaticity improvement and compare them with the unique and quite popular histogram based hue and range preserving algorithm of Naik and Murthy. Numerical tests confirm our theoretical results and show that our algorithms perform much better than the Naik-Murthy algorithm. In spite of their simplicity, they compete with well-established alternative methods for images where hue-preservation is desired.

  1. Joint 2D Direction-of-Arrival and Range Estimation for Nonstationary Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Passive localization of nonstationary sources in the spherical coordinates (azimuth, elevation, and range is considered, and a parallel factor analysis based method is addressed for the near-field parameter estimation problem. In this scheme, a parallel factor analysis model is firstly constructed by computing five time-frequency distribution matrices of the properly chosen observation data. In addition, the uniqueness of the constructed model is proved, and both the two-dimensional (2D direction-of-arrival (DOA and range can be jointly obtained via trilinear alternating least squares regression (TALS. The investigated algorithm is well suitable for near-field nonstationary source localization and does not require parameter-pairing or multidimensional search. Several simulation examples confirm the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  2. Luminescence imaging of water during proton-beam irradiation for range estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi, E-mail: s-yama@met.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Okumura, Satoshi; Komori, Masataka [Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya 461-8673 (Japan); Toshito, Toshiyuki [Department of Proton Therapy Physics, Nagoya Proton Therapy Center, Nagoya City West Medical Center, Nagoya 462-8508 (Japan)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Proton therapy has the ability to selectively deliver a dose to the target tumor, so the dose distribution should be accurately measured by a precise and efficient method. The authors found that luminescence was emitted from water during proton irradiation and conjectured that this phenomenon could be used for estimating the dose distribution. Methods: To achieve more accurate dose distribution, the authors set water phantoms on a table with a spot scanning proton therapy system and measured the luminescence images of these phantoms with a high-sensitivity, cooled charge coupled device camera during proton-beam irradiation. The authors imaged the phantoms of pure water, fluorescein solution, and an acrylic block. Results: The luminescence images of water phantoms taken during proton-beam irradiation showed clear Bragg peaks, and the measured proton ranges from the images were almost the same as those obtained with an ionization chamber. Furthermore, the image of the pure-water phantom showed almost the same distribution as the tap-water phantom, indicating that the luminescence image was not related to impurities in the water. The luminescence image of the fluorescein solution had ∼3 times higher intensity than water, with the same proton range as that of water. The luminescence image of the acrylic phantom had a 14.5% shorter proton range than that of water; the proton range in the acrylic phantom generally matched the calculated value. The luminescence images of the tap-water phantom during proton irradiation could be obtained in less than 2 s. Conclusions: Luminescence imaging during proton-beam irradiation is promising as an effective method for range estimation in proton therapy.

  3. Luminescence imaging of water during carbon-ion irradiation for range estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi, E-mail: s-yama@met.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Komori, Masataka; Koyama, Shuji; Morishita, Yuki; Sekihara, Eri [Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Higashi-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 461-8673 (Japan); Akagi, Takashi; Yamashita, Tomohiro [Hygo Ion Beam Medical Center, Hyogo 679-5165 (Japan); Toshito, Toshiyuki [Department of Proton Therapy Physics, Nagoya Proton Therapy Center, Nagoya City West Medical Center, Aichi 462-8508 (Japan)

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: The authors previously reported successful luminescence imaging of water during proton irradiation and its application to range estimation. However, since the feasibility of this approach for carbon-ion irradiation remained unclear, the authors conducted luminescence imaging during carbon-ion irradiation and estimated the ranges. Methods: The authors placed a pure-water phantom on the patient couch of a carbon-ion therapy system and measured the luminescence images with a high-sensitivity, cooled charge-coupled device camera during carbon-ion irradiation. The authors also carried out imaging of three types of phantoms (tap-water, an acrylic block, and a plastic scintillator) and compared their intensities and distributions with those of a phantom containing pure-water. Results: The luminescence images of pure-water phantoms during carbon-ion irradiation showed clear Bragg peaks, and the measured carbon-ion ranges from the images were almost the same as those obtained by simulation. The image of the tap-water phantom showed almost the same distribution as that of the pure-water phantom. The acrylic block phantom’s luminescence image produced seven times higher luminescence and had a 13% shorter range than that of the water phantoms; the range with the acrylic phantom generally matched the calculated value. The plastic scintillator showed ∼15 000 times higher light than that of water. Conclusions: Luminescence imaging during carbon-ion irradiation of water is not only possible but also a promising method for range estimation in carbon-ion therapy.

  4. Beyond Kepler: Direct Imaging of Earth-like Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belikov, Ruslan

    2012-01-01

    Is there another Earth out there? Is there life on it? People have been asking these questions for over two thousand years, and we finally stand on the verge of answering them. The Kepler space telescope is NASA's first mission designed to study Earthlike exoplanets (exo-Earths), and it will soon tell us how often exo-Earths occur in the habitable zones of their stars. The next natural step after Kepler is spectroscopic characterization of exo-Earths, which would tell us whether they possess an atmosphere, oxygen, liquid water, as well as other biomarkers. In order to do this, directly imaging an exo-Earth may be necessary (at least for Sun-like stars). Directly imaging an exo-Earth is challenging and likely requires a flagship-size optical space telescope with an unprecedented imaging system capable of achieving contrasts of 1(exp 10) very close to the diffraction limit. Several coronagraphs and external occulters have been proposed to meet this challenge and are in development. After first overviewing the history and current state of the field, my talk will focus on the work proceeding at the Ames Coronagraph Experiment (ACE) at the NASA Ames Research Center, where we are developing the Phase Induced Amplitude Apodization (PIAA) coronagraph in a collaboration with JPL. PIAA is a powerful technique with demonstrated aggressive performance that defines the state of the art at small inner working angles. At ACE, we have achieved contrasts of 2(exp -8) with an inner working angle of 2 lambda/D and 1(exp -6) at 1.4 lambda/D. On the path to exo-Earth imaging, we are also pursuing a smaller telescope concept called EXCEDE (EXoplanetary Circumstellar Environments and Disk Explorer), which was recently selected for technology development (Category III) by NASA's Explorer program. EXCEDE will do fundamental science on debris disks as well as serve as a technological and scientific pathfinder for an exo-Earth imaging mission.

  5. First Human Experience with Directly Image-able Iodinated Embolization Microbeads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, Elliot B., E-mail: levyeb@cc.nih.gov; Krishnasamy, Venkatesh P. [National Institutes of Health, Center for Interventional Oncology (United States); Lewis, Andrew L.; Willis, Sean; Macfarlane, Chelsea [Biocompatibles, UK Ltd, A BTG International Group Company (United Kingdom); Anderson, Victoria [National Institutes of Health, Center for Interventional Oncology (United States); Bom, Imramsjah MJ van der [Clinical Science IGT Systems North & Latin America, Philips, Philips, Image Guided Interventions (United States); Radaelli, Alessandro [Image-Guided Therapy Systems, Philips, Philips, Image Guided Interventions (Netherlands); Dreher, Matthew R. [Biocompatibles, UK Ltd, A BTG International Group Company (United Kingdom); Sharma, Karun V. [Children’s National Medical Center (United States); Negussie, Ayele; Mikhail, Andrew S. [National Institutes of Health, Center for Interventional Oncology (United States); Geschwind, Jean-Francois H. [Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging (United States); Wood, Bradford J. [National Institutes of Health, Center for Interventional Oncology (United States)

    2016-08-15

    PurposeTo describe first clinical experience with a directly image-able, inherently radio-opaque microspherical embolic agent for transarterial embolization of liver tumors.MethodologyLC Bead LUMI™ is a new product based upon sulfonate-modified polyvinyl alcohol hydrogel microbeads with covalently bound iodine (~260 mg I/ml). 70–150 μ LC Bead LUMI™ iodinated microbeads were injected selectively via a 2.8 Fr microcatheter to near complete flow stasis into hepatic arteries in three patients with hepatocellular carcinoma, carcinoid, or neuroendocrine tumor. A custom imaging platform tuned for LC LUMI™ microbead conspicuity using a cone beam CT (CBCT)/angiographic C-arm system (Allura Clarity FD20, Philips) was used along with CBCT embolization treatment planning software (EmboGuide, Philips).ResultsLC Bead LUMI™ image-able microbeads were easily delivered and monitored during the procedure using fluoroscopy, single-shot radiography (SSD), digital subtraction angiography (DSA), dual-phase enhanced and unenhanced CBCT, and unenhanced conventional CT obtained 48 h after the procedure. Intra-procedural imaging demonstrated tumor at risk for potential under-treatment, defined as paucity of image-able microbeads within a portion of the tumor which was confirmed at 48 h CT imaging. Fusion of pre- and post-embolization CBCT identified vessels without beads that corresponded to enhancing tumor tissue in the same location on follow-up imaging (48 h post).ConclusionLC Bead LUMI™ image-able microbeads provide real-time feedback and geographic localization of treatment in real time during treatment. The distribution and density of image-able beads within a tumor need further evaluation as an additional endpoint for embolization.

  6. Weighted Model Components for Gradient Direction Matching in Overhead Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant, C W; Nikolaev, S; Paglieroni, D W

    2006-03-17

    Gradient direction matching (GDM) is the main target identification algorithm used in the Image Content Engine project at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. GDM is a 3D solid model-based edge-matching algorithm which does not require explicit edge extraction from the source image. The GDM algorithm is presented, identifying areas where performance enhancement seems possible. Improving the process of producing model gradient directions from the solid model by assigning different weights to different parts of the model is an extension tested in the current study. Given a simple geometric model, we attempt to determine, without obvious semantic clues, if different weight values produce significantly better matching accuracy, and how those weights should be assigned to produce the best matching accuracy. Two simple candidate strategies for assigning weights are proposed--pixel-weighted and edge-weighted. We adjust the weights of the components in a simple model of a tractor/semi-trailer using relevance feedback to produce an optimal set of weights for this model and a particular test image. The optimal weights are then compared with pixel and edge-weighting strategies to determine which is most suitable and under what circumstances.

  7. Diffusion imaging quality control via entropy of principal direction distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzinfar, Mahshid; Oguz, Ipek; Smith, Rachel G; Verde, Audrey R; Dietrich, Cheryl; Gupta, Aditya; Escolar, Maria L; Piven, Joseph; Pujol, Sonia; Vachet, Clement; Gouttard, Sylvain; Gerig, Guido; Dager, Stephen; McKinstry, Robert C; Paterson, Sarah; Evans, Alan C; Styner, Martin A

    2013-11-15

    Diffusion MR imaging has received increasing attention in the neuroimaging community, as it yields new insights into the microstructural organization of white matter that are not available with conventional MRI techniques. While the technology has enormous potential, diffusion MRI suffers from a unique and complex set of image quality problems, limiting the sensitivity of studies and reducing the accuracy of findings. Furthermore, the acquisition time for diffusion MRI is longer than conventional MRI due to the need for multiple acquisitions to obtain directionally encoded Diffusion Weighted Images (DWI). This leads to increased motion artifacts, reduced signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and increased proneness to a wide variety of artifacts, including eddy-current and motion artifacts, "venetian blind" artifacts, as well as slice-wise and gradient-wise inconsistencies. Such artifacts mandate stringent Quality Control (QC) schemes in the processing of diffusion MRI data. Most existing QC procedures are conducted in the DWI domain and/or on a voxel level, but our own experiments show that these methods often do not fully detect and eliminate certain types of artifacts, often only visible when investigating groups of DWI's or a derived diffusion model, such as the most-employed diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Here, we propose a novel regional QC measure in the DTI domain that employs the entropy of the regional distribution of the principal directions (PD). The PD entropy quantifies the scattering and spread of the principal diffusion directions and is invariant to the patient's position in the scanner. High entropy value indicates that the PDs are distributed relatively uniformly, while low entropy value indicates the presence of clusters in the PD distribution. The novel QC measure is intended to complement the existing set of QC procedures by detecting and correcting residual artifacts. Such residual artifacts cause directional bias in the measured PD and here called

  8. Three-dimensional near-field MIMO array imaging using range migration techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuge, Xiaodong; Yarovoy, Alexander G

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents a 3-D near-field imaging algorithm that is formulated for 2-D wideband multiple-input-multiple-output (MIMO) imaging array topology. The proposed MIMO range migration technique performs the image reconstruction procedure in the frequency-wavenumber domain. The algorithm is able to completely compensate the curvature of the wavefront in the near-field through a specifically defined interpolation process and provides extremely high computational efficiency by the application of the fast Fourier transform. The implementation aspects of the algorithm and the sampling criteria of a MIMO aperture are discussed. The image reconstruction performance and computational efficiency of the algorithm are demonstrated both with numerical simulations and measurements using 2-D MIMO arrays. Real-time 3-D near-field imaging can be achieved with a real-aperture array by applying the proposed MIMO range migration techniques.

  9. Direct Neural Imaging using Ultra-Low Field Magnetic Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maskaly, Karlene; Espy, Michelle; Flynn, Mark; Gomez, John; Kraus, Robert; Matlashov, Andrei; Mosher, John; Newman, Shaun; Owens, Tuba; Peters, Mark; Sandin, J.; Schultz, Larry; Urbaitis, Algis; Volegov, Petr; Zotev, Vadim

    2009-03-01

    An enduring challenge in neuroscience is the accurate in vivo mapping of neural activity with high spatial and temporal resolution. A method being developed by our group tries to meet this challenge by using Ultra-Low Field (ULF) MRI. Other groups have attempted direct neural imaging (DNI) using high field MRI. However, the use of ULF presents two advantages. First, the susceptibility artifact at high fields, which masks the DNI signal, is negligible at low fields. Second, the reduced Larmor frequency at ULF may overlap with the frequency spectrum of the neural magnetic field, resonantly enhancing the MRI signal. In this presentation, I will first show our custom-built ULF MRI setups that have successfully produced ULF anatomical images. I will then highlight the numerous studies we have done to investigate the feasibility of DNI with these systems, including both experimental and theoretical studies.

  10. A Missing Data Approach to Correct for Direct and Indirect Range Restrictions with a Dichotomous Criterion: A Simulation Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pfaffel, Andreas; Kollmayer, Marlene; Schober, Barbara; Spiel, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    ... only. This so-called range restriction problem causes biased population estimates. Correction methods for direct and indirect range restriction scenarios have widely studied for continuous criterion variables but not for dichotomous ones...

  11. Colors of Alien Worlds from Direct Imaging Exoplanet Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Renyu

    2016-01-01

    Future direct-imaging exoplanet missions such as WFIRST will measure the reflectivity of exoplanets at visible wavelengths. Most of the exoplanets to be observed will be located further away from their parent stars than is Earth from the Sun. These "cold" exoplanets have atmospheric environments conducive for the formation of water and/or ammonia clouds, like Jupiter in the Solar System. I find the mixing ratio of methane and the pressure level of the uppermost cloud deck on these planets can be uniquely determined from their reflection spectra, with moderate spectral resolution, if the cloud deck is between 0.6 and 1.5 bars. The existence of this unique solution is useful for exoplanet direct imaging missions for several reasons. First, the weak bands and strong bands of methane enable the measurement of the methane mixing ratio and the cloud pressure, although an overlying haze layer can bias the estimate of the latter. Second, the cloud pressure, once derived, yields an important constraint on the internal heat flux from the planet, and thus indicating its thermal evolution. Third, water worlds having H2O-dominated atmospheres are likely to have water clouds located higher than the 10-3 bar pressure level, and muted spectral absorption features. These planets would occupy a confined phase space in the color-color diagrams, likely distinguishable from H2-rich giant exoplanets by broadband observations. Therefore, direct-imaging exoplanet missions may offer the capability to broadly distinguish H2-rich giant exoplanets versus H2O-rich super-Earth exoplanets, and to detect ammonia and/or water clouds and methane gas in their atmospheres.

  12. Adapting range migration techniques for imaging with metasurface antennas: analysis and limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulido Mancera, Laura; Fromenteze, Thomas; Sleasman, Timothy; Boyarsky, Michael; Imani, Mohammadreza F.; Reynolds, Matthew S.; Smith, David R.

    2017-04-01

    Dynamic metasurface antennas are planar structures that exhibit remarkable capabilities in controlling electromagnetic wave-fronts, advantages which are particularly attractive for microwave imaging. These antennas exhibit strong frequency dispersion and produce diverse radiation patterns. Such behavior presents unique challenges for integration with conventional imaging algorithms. We analyze an adapted version of the range migration algorithm (RMA) for use with dynamic metasurfaces in image reconstruction. Focusing on the the proposed pre-processing step, that ultimately allows a fast processing of the backscattered signal in the spatial frequency domain from which the fast Fourier transform can efficiently reconstruct the scene. Numerical studies illustrate imaging performance using both conventional methods and the adapted RMA, demonstrating that the RMA can reconstruct images with comparable quality in a fraction of the time. In this paper, we demonstrate the capabilities of the algorithm as a fast reconstruction tool, and we analyze the limitations of the presented technique in terms of image quality.

  13. Supplementary Golay pair for range side lobe suppression in dual-frequency tissue harmonic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Che-Chou; Wu, Chi; Peng, Jun-Kai

    2015-02-01

    In dual-frequency (DF) harmonic imaging, the second harmonic signal at second harmonic (2f0) frequency and the inter-modulation harmonic signal at fundamental (f0) frequency are simultaneously imaged for spectral compounding. When the phase-encoded Golay pair is utilized to improve the harmonic signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), however, the DF imaging suffers from range side lobe artifacts due to spectral cross-talk with other harmonic components at DC and third harmonic (3f0) frequency. In this study, a supplementary Golay pair is developed to suppress the range side lobes in combination with the original Golay pair. Since the phase code of the DC interference cannot be manipulated, the supplementary Golay is designed to reverse the polarity of the 3f0 interference and the f0 signal while keeping the 2f0 signal unchanged. For 2f0 imaging, the echo summation of the supplementary and the original Golay can cancel the 3f0 interference. On the contrary, the echo difference between the two Golay pairs can eliminate the DC interference for f0 imaging. Hydrophone measurements indicate that the range side lobe level (RSLL) increases with the signal bandwidth of DF harmonic imaging. By using the combination of the two Golay pairs, the achievable suppression of RSLL can be 3 and 14 dB, respectively for the f0 and 2f0 harmonic signal. B-mode phantom imaging also verifies the presence of range side lobe artifacts when only the original Golay pair is utilized. In combination with the supplementary Golay pair, the artifacts are effectively suppressed. The corresponding range side lobe magnitude reduces by about 8 dB in 2f0 imaging but remains unchanged in f0 imaging. Meanwhile, the harmonic SNR improves by 8-10 dB and the contrast-to-noise ratio of harmonic image increases from about 1 to 1.2 by spectral compounding. For DF tissue harmonic imaging, the spectral cross-talk in Golay excitation results in severe range side lobe artifacts. To restore the image quality, two particular

  14. Determination of visual range during fog and mist using digital camera images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, John R; Moogan, Jamie C, E-mail: j.taylor@adfa.edu.a [School of Physical, Environmental and Mathematical Sciences, UNSW-ADFA, Canberra ACT, 2600 (Australia)

    2010-08-15

    During the winter of 2008, daily time series of images of five 'unit-cell chequerboard' targets were acquired using a digital camera. The camera and targets were located in the Majura Valley approximately 3 km from Canberra airport. We show how the contrast between the black and white sections of the targets is related to the meteorological range (or standard visual range), and compare estimates of this quantity derived from images acquired during fog and mist conditions with those from the Vaisala FD-12 visibility meter operated by the Bureau of Meteorology at Canberra Airport. The two sets of ranges are consistent but show the variability of visibility in the patchy fog conditions that often prevail in the Majura Valley. Significant spatial variations of the light extinction coefficient were found to occur over the longest 570 m optical path sampled by the imaging system. Visual ranges could be estimated out to ten times the distance to the furthest target, or approximately 6 km, in these experiments. Image saturation of the white sections of the targets was the major limitation on the quantitative interpretation of the images. In the future, the camera images will be processed in real time so that the camera exposure can be adjusted to avoid saturation.

  15. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE CAPTURES FIRST DIRECT IMAGE OF A STAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    This is the first direct image of a star other than the Sun, made with NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. Called Alpha Orionis, or Betelgeuse, it is a red supergiant star marking the shoulder of the winter constellation Orion the Hunter (diagram at right). The Hubble image reveals a huge ultraviolet atmosphere with a mysterious hot spot on the stellar behemoth's surface. The enormous bright spot, more than ten times the diameter of Earth, is at least 2,000 Kelvin degrees hotter than the surface of the star. The image suggests that a totally new physical phenomenon may be affecting the atmospheres of some stars. Follow-up observations will be needed to help astronomers understand whether the spot is linked to oscillations previously detected in the giant star, or whether it moves systematically across the star's surface under the grip of powerful magnetic fields. The observations were made by Andrea Dupree of the Harvard- Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, MA, and Ronald Gilliland of the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, MD, who announced their discovery today at the 187th meeting of the American Astronomical Society in San Antonio, Texas. The image was taken in ultraviolet light with the Faint Object Camera on March 3, 1995. Hubble can resolve the star even though the apparent size is 20,000 times smaller than the width of the full Moon -- roughly equivalent to being able to resolve a car's headlights at a distance of 6,000 miles. Betelgeuse is so huge that, if it replaced the Sun at the center of our Solar System, its outer atmosphere would extend past the orbit of Jupiter (scale at lower left). Credit: Andrea Dupree (Harvard-Smithsonian CfA), Ronald Gilliland (STScI), NASA and ESA Image files in GIF and JPEG format and captions may be accessed on Internet via anonymous ftp from oposite.stsci.edu in /pubinfo.

  16. A new compact, cost-efficient concept for underwater range-gated imaging: the UTOFIA project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Patrizio; Quincoces, Iñaki; Galparsoro, Ibon; Bald, Juan; Gabiña, Gorka; Visser, Andy; Jónasdóttir, Sigrun; Haugholt, Karl Henrik; Thorstensen, Jostein; Risholm, Petter; Thielemann, Jens

    2017-04-01

    Underwater Time Of Flight Image Acquisition system (UTOFIA) is a recently launched H2020 project (H2020 - 633098) to develop a compact and cost-effective underwater imaging system especially suited for observations in turbid environments. The UTOFIA project targets technology that can overcome the limitations created by scattering, by introducing cost-efficient range-gated imaging for underwater applications. This technology relies on a image acquisition principle that can extends the imaging range of the cameras 2-3 times respect to other cameras. Moreover, the system will simultaneously capture 3D information of the observed objects. Today range-gated imaging is not widely used, as it relies on specialised optical components making systems large and costly. Recent technology developments have made it possible a significant (2-3 times) reduction in size, complexity and cost of underwater imaging systems, whilst addressing the scattering issues at the same time. By acquiring simultaneous 3D data, the system allows to accurately measure the absolute size of marine life and their spatial relationship to their habitat, enhancing the precision of fish stock monitoring and ecology assessment, hence supporting proper management of marine resources. Additionally, the larger observed volume and the improved image quality make the system suitable for cost-effective underwater surveillance operations in e.g. fish farms, underwater infrastructures. The system can be integrated into existing ocean observatories for real time acquisition and can greatly advance present efforts in developing species recognition algorithms, given the additional features provided, the improved image quality and the independent illumination source based on laser. First applications of the most recent prototype of the imaging system will be provided including inspection of underwater infrastructures and observations of marine life under different environmental conditions.

  17. Context-dependent JPEG backward-compatible high-dynamic range image compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korshunov, Pavel; Ebrahimi, Touradj

    2013-10-01

    High-dynamic range (HDR) imaging is expected, together with ultrahigh definition and high-frame rate video, to become a technology that may change photo, TV, and film industries. Many cameras and displays capable of capturing and rendering both HDR images and video are already available in the market. The popularity and full-public adoption of HDR content is, however, hindered by the lack of standards in evaluation of quality, file formats, and compression, as well as large legacy base of low-dynamic range (LDR) displays that are unable to render HDR. To facilitate the wide spread of HDR usage, the backward compatibility of HDR with commonly used legacy technologies for storage, rendering, and compression of video and images are necessary. Although many tone-mapping algorithms are developed for generating viewable LDR content from HDR, there is no consensus of which algorithm to use and under which conditions. We, via a series of subjective evaluations, demonstrate the dependency of the perceptual quality of the tone-mapped LDR images on the context: environmental factors, display parameters, and image content itself. Based on the results of subjective tests, it proposes to extend JPEG file format, the most popular image format, in a backward compatible manner to deal with HDR images also. An architecture to achieve such backward compatibility with JPEG is proposed. A simple implementation of lossy compression demonstrates the efficiency of the proposed architecture compared with the state-of-the-art HDR image compression.

  18. A comparative analysis of dynamic range compression techniques in IR images for maritime applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Alessandro; Acito, Nicola; Diani, Marco; Luison, Cristian; Olivieri, Monica; Barani, Gianni

    2013-05-01

    Modern thermal cameras acquire IR images with a high dynamic range because they have to sense with high thermal resolution the great temperature changes of monitored scenarios in specific surveillance applications. Initially developed for visible light images and recently extended for display of IR images, high dynamic range compression (HDRC) techniques aim at furnishing plain images to human operators for a first intuitive comprehension of the sensed scenario without altering the features of IR images. In this context, the maritime scenario represents a challenging case to test and develop HDRC strategies since images collected for surveillance at sea are typically characterized by high thermal gradients among the background scene and classes of objects at different temperatures. In the development of a new IRST system, Selex ES assembled a demonstrator equipped with modern thermal cameras and planned a measurement campaign on a maritime scenario so as to collect IR sequences in different operating conditions. This has led to build up a case record of situations suitable to test HDRC techniques. In this work, a survey of HDRC approaches is introduced pointing out advantages and drawbacks with focus on strategies specifically designed to display IR images. A detailed analysis of the performance is discussed in order to address the task of visualization with reference to typical issues of IR maritime images, such as robustness to the horizon effect and displaying of very warm objects and flat areas.

  19. Analysis on vertical directional couplers with long range surface plasmons for multilayer optical routing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam, B., E-mail: badrul.alam@uniroma1.it; Veroli, A.; Benedetti, A. [Department of Information Engineering, Electronics and Telecommunications (DIET), University of Rome “La Sapienza,” Rome (Italy)

    2016-08-28

    A structure featuring vertical directional coupling of long-range surface plasmon polaritons between strip waveguides at λ = 1.55 μm is investigated with the aim of producing efficient elements that enable optical multilayer routing for 3D photonics. We have introduced a practical computational method to calculate the interaction on the bent part. This method allows us both to assess the importance of the interaction in the bent part and to control it by a suitable choice of the fabrication parameters that helps also to restrain effects due to fabrication issues. The scheme adopted here allows to reduce the insertion losses compared with other planar and multilayer devices.

  20. Waveguide piezoelectric micromachined ultrasonic transducer array for short-range pulse-echo imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Y.; Tang, H.; Wang, Q.; Fung, S.; Tsai, J. M.; Daneman, M.; Boser, B. E.; Horsley, D. A.

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents an 8 × 24 element, 100 μm-pitch, 20 MHz ultrasound imager based on a piezoelectric micromachined ultrasonic transducer (PMUT) array having integrated acoustic waveguides. The 70 μm diameter, 220 μm long waveguides function both to direct acoustic waves and to confine acoustic energy, and also to provide mechanical protection for the PMUT array used for surface-imaging applications such as an ultrasonic fingerprint sensor. The imager consists of a PMUT array bonded with a CMOS ASIC using wafer-level conductive eutectic bonding. This construction allows each PMUT in the array to have a dedicated front-end receive amplifier, which together with on-chip analog multiplexing enables individual pixel read-out with high signal-to-noise ratio through minimized parasitic capacitance between the PMUT and the front-end amplifier. Finite element method simulations demonstrate that the waveguides preserve the pressure amplitude of acoustic pulses over distances of 600 μm. Moreover, the waveguide design demonstrated here enables pixel-by-pixel readout of the ultrasound image due to improved directivity of the PMUT by directing acoustic waves and creating a pressure field with greater spatial uniformity at the end of the waveguide. Pulse-echo imaging experiments conducted using a one-dimensional steel grating demonstrate the array's ability to form a two-dimensional image of a target.

  1. Thioarsenides: A case for long-range Lewis acid-base-directed van der Waals interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibbs, Gerald V.; Wallace, Adam F.; Downs, R. T.; Ross, Nancy L.; Cox, David F.; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2011-04-01

    Electron density distributions, bond paths, Laplacian and local energy density properties have been calculated for a number of As4Sn (n = 3,4,5) thioarsenide molecular crystals. On the basis of the distributions, the intramolecular As-S and As-As interactions classify as shared bonded interactions and the intermolecular As-S, As-As and S-S interactions classify as closed-shell van der Waals bonded interactions. The bulk of the intermolecular As-S bond paths link regions of locally concentrated electron density (Lewis base regions) with aligned regions of locally depleted electron density (Lewis acid regions) on adjacent molecules. The paths are comparable with intermolecular paths reported for several other molecular crystals that link aligned Lewis base and acid regions in a key-lock fashion, interactions that classified as long range Lewis acid-base directed van der Waals interactions. As the bulk of the intermolecular As-S bond paths (~70%) link Lewis acid-base regions on adjacent molecules, it appears that molecules adopt an arrangement that maximizes the number of As-S Lewis acid-base intermolecular bonded interactions. The maximization of the number of Lewis acid-base interactions appears to be connected with the close-packed array adopted by molecules: distorted cubic close-packed arrays are adopted for alacránite, pararealgar, uzonite, realgar and β-AsS and the distorted hexagonal close-packed arrays adopted by α- and β-dimorphite. A growth mechanism is proposed for thioarsenide molecular crystals from aqueous species that maximizes the number of long range Lewis acid-base vdW As-S bonded interactions with the resulting directed bond paths structuralizing the molecules as a molecular crystal.

  2. Thioarsenides: a case for long-range Lewis acid-base-directed van der Waals interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, G. V.; Wallace, A. F.; Downs, R. T.; Ross, N. L.; Cox, D. F.; Rosso, K. M.

    2011-04-01

    Electron density distributions, bond paths, Laplacian and local-energy density properties have been calculated for a number of As4S n ( n = 3, 4 and 5) thioarsenide molecular crystals. On the basis of the distributions, the intramolecular As-S and As-As interactions classify as shared bonded interactions, and the intermolecular As-S, As-As and S-S interactions classify as closed-shell van der Waals (vdW) bonded interactions. The bulk of the intermolecular As-S bond paths link regions of locally concentrated electron density (Lewis-base regions) with aligned regions of locally depleted electron density (Lewis-acid regions) on adjacent molecules. The paths are comparable with intermolecular paths reported for several other molecular crystals that link aligned Lewis base and acid regions in a key-lock fashion, interactions that classified as long-range Lewis acid-base-directed vdW interactions. As the bulk of the intermolecular As-S bond paths (~70%) link Lewis acid-base regions on adjacent molecules, it appears that molecules adopt an arrangement that maximizes the number of As-S Lewis acid-base intermolecular bonded interactions. The maximization of the number of Lewis acid-base interactions appears to be connected with the close-packed array adopted by molecules: distorted cubic close-packed arrays are adopted for alacránite, pararealgar, uzonite, realgar and β-AsS and the distorted hexagonal close-packed arrays adopted by α- and β-dimorphite. A growth mechanism is proposed for thioarsenide molecular crystals from aqueous species that maximizes the number of long-range Lewis acid-base vdW As-S bonded interactions with the resulting directed bond paths structuralizing the molecules as a molecular crystal.

  3. Advances in Focal Plane Wavefront Estimation for Directly Imaging Exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldorado Riggs, A. J.; Kasdin, N. Jeremy; Groff, Tyler Dean

    2015-01-01

    To image cold exoplanets directly in visible light, an instrument on a telescope needs to suppress starlight by about 9 orders of magnitude at small separations from the star. A coronagraph changes the point spread function to create regions of high contrast where exoplanets or disks can be seen. Aberrations on the optics degrade the contrast by several orders of magnitude, so all high-contrast imaging systems incorporate one or more deformable mirrors (DMs) to recover regions of high contrast. With a coronagraphic instrument planned for the WFIRST-AFTA space telescope, there is a pressing need for faster, more robust estimation and control schemes for the DMs. Non-common path aberrations limit conventional phase conjugation schemes to medium star-to-planet contrast ratios of about 1e-6. High-contrast imaging requires estimation and control of both phase and amplitude in the same beam path as the science camera. Field estimation is a challenge since only intensity is measured; the most common approach, including that planned for WFIRST-AFTA, is to use DMs to create diversity, via pairs of small probe shapes, thereby allowing disambiguation of the electric field. Most implementations of DM Diversity require at least five images per electric field estimate and require narrowband measurements. This paper describes our new estimation algorithms that improve the speed (by using fewer images) and bandwidth of focal plane wavefront estimation. For narrowband estimation, we are testing nonlinear, recursive algorithms such as an iterative extended Kalman filter (IEKF) to use three images each iteration and build better, more robust estimates. We are also exploring the use of broadband estimation without the need for narrowband sub-filters and measurements. Here we present simulations of these algorithms with realistic noise and small signals to show how they might perform for WFIRST-AFTA. Once validated in simulations, we will test these algorithms experimentally in

  4. Direct Atom Imaging by Chemical-Sensitive Holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lühr, Tobias; Winkelmann, Aimo; Nolze, Gert; Krull, Dominique; Westphal, Carsten

    2016-05-11

    In order to understand the physical and chemical properties of advanced materials, functional molecular adsorbates, and protein structures, a detailed knowledge of the atomic arrangement is essential. Up to now, if subsurface structures are under investigation, only indirect methods revealed reliable results of the atoms' spatial arrangement. An alternative and direct method is three-dimensional imaging by means of holography. Holography was in fact proposed for electron waves, because of the electrons' short wavelength at easily accessible energies. Further, electron waves are ideal structure probes on an atomic length scale, because electrons have a high scattering probability even for light elements. However, holographic reconstructions of electron diffraction patterns have in the past contained severe image artifacts and were limited to at most a few tens of atoms. Here, we present a general reconstruction algorithm that leads to high-quality atomic images showing thousands of atoms. Additionally, we show that different elements can be identified by electron holography for the example of FeS2.

  5. Analysis on expressible depth range of integral imaging based on degree of voxel overlap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Min; Choi, Ki-Hong; Min, Sung-Wook

    2017-02-01

    This paper proposes a practical method to analyze the expressible depth range of an integral imaging system based on image blur at defocused depths, which is one of the most noticeable image degradations, caused by overlaps among voxels in both the real and focused mode. In order to obtain the preferably precise area of overlaps among voxels at each depth, display pixels are regarded as surface light sources in the process of voxel size calculation. As a criterion for determining the range, we determine the tolerable limit of the overlaps among voxels to be at least resolved from each other. Based on this principle, several mathematical expressions about the expressible depth range can be derived in both the real mode and focused mode, and their feasibilities are demonstrated by several experiments. The analyses are processed based on both wave optics and ray optics.

  6. Improvement of range spatial resolution of medical ultrasound imaging by element-domain signal processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Hideyuki

    2017-07-01

    The range spatial resolution is an important factor determining the image quality in ultrasonic imaging. The range spatial resolution in ultrasonic imaging depends on the ultrasonic pulse length, which is determined by the mechanical response of the piezoelectric element in an ultrasonic probe. To improve the range spatial resolution without replacing the transducer element, in the present study, methods based on maximum likelihood (ML) estimation and multiple signal classification (MUSIC) were proposed. The proposed methods were applied to echo signals received by individual transducer elements in an ultrasonic probe. The basic experimental results showed that the axial half maximum of the echo from a string phantom was improved from 0.21 mm (conventional method) to 0.086 mm (ML) and 0.094 mm (MUSIC).

  7. Computational ghost imaging of hot objects in long-wave infrared range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hong-Chao; Zhang, Shuang

    2017-07-01

    Ghost imaging (GI) is an intriguing imaging modality to obtain the object information from the correlation calculations of spatial intensity fluctuations. In this letter, we report the computational GI of hot objects in the long-wave infrared range both in experiment and simulation. Without employing an independent light source, we reconstruct thermal images of objects only based on the intensity correlations of their thermal radiation at room temperature. By comparing different GI reconstruction algorithms, we demonstrate that GI with compressive sensing can efficiently obtain the thermal object information only with a single-pixel infrared camera, which might be applied to night-vision, environmental sensing, military detection, etc.

  8. [Influence of human body target's spectral characteristics on visual range of low light level image intensifiers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun-Ju; Yang, Wen-Bin; Xu, Hui; Liu, Lei; Tao, Yuan-Yaun

    2013-11-01

    To study the effect of different human target's spectral reflective characteristic on low light level (LLL) image intensifier's distance, based on the spectral characteristics of the night-sky radiation and the spectral reflective coefficients of common clothes, we established a equation of human body target's spectral reflective distribution, and analyzed the spectral reflective characteristics of different human targets wearing the clothes of different color and different material, and from the actual detection equation of LLL image intensifier distance, discussed the detection capability of LLL image intensifier for different human target. The study shows that the effect of different human target's spectral reflective characteristic on LLL image intensifier distance is mainly reflected in the average reflectivity rho(-) and the initial contrast of the target and the background C0. Reflective coefficient and spectral reflection intensity of cotton clothes are higher than polyester clothes, and detection capability of LLL image intensifier is stronger for the human target wearing cotton clothes. Experimental results show that the LLL image intensifiers have longer visual ranges for targets who wear cotton clothes than targets who wear same color but polyester clothes, and have longer visual ranges for targets who wear light-colored clothes than targets who wear dark-colored clothes. And in the full moon illumination conditions, LLL image intensifiers are more sensitive to the clothes' material.

  9. Numerical GPR Imaging through Directional Antenna Systems in Complex Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comite, Davide; Murgia, Federica; Barbara, Martina; Catapano, Ilaria; Soldovieri, Francesco; Galli, Alessandro

    2017-04-01

    The capability of imaging hidden targets and interfaces in non-accessible and complex scenarios is a topic of increasing interest for several practical applications, such as civil engineering, geophysics, and planetary explorations [1]. In this frame, Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) has been proven as an efficient and reliable technique, also thanks to the development of effective imaging procedures based on linear modeling of the scattering phenomenon, which is usually considered as activated by ideal sources [1],[2]. Actually, such modeling simplifications are rarely verified in typical operative scenarios, when a number of heterogeneous targets can interact each other and with the surrounding environment, producing undesired contributions such as clutter and ghosts targets. From a physical viewpoint, these phenomena are mainly due to multipath contributions at the receiving antenna system, and different solutions have been proposed to mitigate these effects on the final image reconstruction (see, e.g., [2] and references therein). In this work we investigate on the possible improvements achievable when the directional features of the transmitting antenna system are taken into account in the imaging algorithm. Following and extending the recent investigations illustrated in [2] and [3], we consider in particular arrays of antennas, made by arbitrary types of elements, as activating the scattering phenomenon: hence, the effects of neglecting or accounting for the inherent directional radiation of the considered array are investigated as regards the accuracy of the final reconstruction of targets. Taking into account the resolution losses linked to the relevant synthetic aperture, we analyze the possibility of improving the quality of imaging, mitigating the presence of spurious contributions. By implementing a 'synthetic setup' that analyzes the scenarios under test through different electromagnetic CAD tools (mainly CST Microwave Studio and gprMax), it has been

  10. ATCOM: accelerated image processing for terrestrial long-range imaging through atmospheric effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curt, Petersen F.; Paolini, Aaron

    2013-05-01

    Long-range video surveillance performance is often severely diminished due to atmospheric turbulence. The larger apertures typically used for video-rate operation at long-range are particularly susceptible to scintillation and blurring effects that limit the overall diffraction efficiency and resolution. In this paper, we present research progress made toward a digital signal processing technique which aims to mitigate the effects of turbulence in real-time. Our previous work in this area focused on an embedded implementation for portable applications. Our more recent research has focused on functional enhancements to the same algorithm using general-purpose hardware. We present some techniques that were successfully employed to accelerate processing of high-definition color video streams and study performance under nonideal conditions involving moving objects and panning cameras. Finally, we compare the real-time performance of two implementations using a CPU and a GPU.

  11. Challenges in Discerning Atmospheric Composition in Directly Imaged Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marley, Mark S.

    2017-01-01

    One of the justifications motivating efforts to detect and characterize young extrasolar giant planets has been to measure atmospheric composition for comparison with that of the primary star. If the enhancement of heavy elements in the atmospheres of extrasolar giant planets, like it is for their solar system analogs, is inversely proportional to mass, then it is likely that these worlds formed by core accretion. However in practice it has been very difficult to constrain metallicity because of the complex effect of clouds. Cloud opacity varies both vertically and, in some cases, horizontally through the atmosphere. Particle size and composition, both of which impact opacity, are difficult challenges both for forward modeling and retrieval studies. In my presentation I will discuss systematic efforts to improve cloud studies to enable more reliable determinations of atmospheric composition. These efforts are relevant both to discerning composition of directly imaged young planets from ground based telescopes and future space based missions, such as WFIRST and LUVOIR.

  12. Exoplanet Community Report on Direct Infrared Imaging of Exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danchi, William C.; Lawson, Peter R.

    2009-01-01

    Direct infrared imaging and spectroscopy of exoplanets will allow for detailed characterization of the atmospheric constituents of more than 200 nearby Earth-like planets, more than is possible with any other method under consideration. A flagship mission based on larger passively cooled infrared telescopes and formation flying technologies would have the highest angular resolution of any concept under consideration. The 2008 Exoplanet Forum committee on Direct Infrared Imaging of Exoplanets recommends: (1) a vigorous technology program including component development, integrated testbeds, and end-to-end modeling in the areas of formation flying and mid-infrared nulling; (2) a probe-scale mission based on a passively cooled structurally connected interferometer to be started within the next two to five years, for exoplanetary system characterization that is not accessible from the ground, and which would provide transformative science and lay the engineering groundwork for the flagship mission with formation flying elements. Such a mission would enable a complete exozodiacal dust survey (<1 solar system zodi) in the habitable zone of all nearby stars. This information will allow for a more efficient strategy of spectral characterization of Earth-sized planets for the flagship missions, and also will allow for optimization of the search strategy of an astrometric mission if such a mission were delayed due to cost or technology reasons. (3) Both the flagship and probe missions should be pursued with international partners if possible. Fruitful collaboration with international partners on mission concepts and relevant technology should be continued. (4) Research and Analysis (R&A) should be supported for the development of preliminary science and mission designs. Ongoing efforts to characterize the the typical level of exozodiacal light around Sun-like stars with ground-based nulling technology should be continued.

  13. Investigation of the impact of water absorption on retinal OCT imaging in the 1060 nm range

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marschall, Sebastian; Pedersen, Christian; Andersen, Peter E.

    2012-01-01

    Recently, the wavelength range around 1060 nm has become attractive for retinal imaging with optical coherence tomography (OCT), promising deep penetration into the retina and the choroid. The adjacent water absorption bands limit the useful bandwidth of broadband light sources, but until now...... sources for OCT....

  14. Short-Range Ultra-Wideband Imaging with Multiple-Input Multiple-Output Arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhuge, X.

    2010-01-01

    Compact, cost-efficient and high-resolution imaging sensors are especially desirable in the field of short-range observation and surveillance. Such sensors are of great value in fields of security, rescue and medical applications. Systems can be formed for various practical purposes, such as

  15. Moving target detection in flash mode against stroboscopic mode by active range-gated laser imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuanyu; Wang, Xinwei; Sun, Liang; Fan, Songtao; Lei, Pingshun; Zhou, Yan; Liu, Yuliang

    2018-01-01

    Moving target detection is important for the application of target tracking and remote surveillance in active range-gated laser imaging. This technique has two operation modes based on the difference of the number of pulses per frame: stroboscopic mode with the accumulation of multiple laser pulses per frame and flash mode with a single shot of laser pulse per frame. In this paper, we have established a range-gated laser imaging system. In the system, two types of lasers with different frequency were chosen for the two modes. Electric fan and horizontal sliding track were selected as the moving targets to compare the moving blurring between two modes. Consequently, the system working in flash mode shows more excellent performance in motion blurring against stroboscopic mode. Furthermore, based on experiments and theoretical analysis, we presented the higher signal-to-noise ratio of image acquired by stroboscopic mode than flash mode in indoor and underwater environment.

  16. A comparison of interest point and region detectors on structured, range and texture images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kazmi, Wajahat; Andersen, Hans Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    )) and corner based detectors (such as Hessian and Harris with both Affine/Laplace variants, SURF with determinant of Hessian based corners and SIFT with difference of Gaussians) acquired more than 90% mean average precision, whereas on range images, homogeneous region detector did not work well. TLR offered...... and textured images. It is also shown that in a bi-channel approach, combining surface and edge regions (MSER and TLR) boosts the overall performance. Among the descriptors, SIFT and SURF generally offer higher performance but low dimensional descriptors such as Steerable Filters follow closely.......This article presents an evaluation of the image retrieval and classification potential of local features. Several affine invariant region and scale invariant interest point detectors in combination with well known descriptors were evaluated. Tests on building, range and texture databases were...

  17. COSMIC: A Multiobject Spectrograph and Direct Imaging Camera for the 5 Meter Hale Telescope Prime Focus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kells, W.; Dressler, A.; Sivaramakrishnan, A.; Carr, D.; Koch, E.; Epps, H.; Hilyard, D.; Pardeilhan, G.

    1998-12-01

    We describe the design, construction, and operation of the Carnegie Observatories Spectroscopic Multislit and Imaging Camera (COSMIC) for the prime focus of the Hale 5 m telescope at Palomar Observatory. COSMIC is a reimaging grism spectrograph with a 13.65 arcmin square field of view, which can also be used as a direct imaging camera with a 9.75 arcmin square field of view. The wavelength coverage extends from 350 nm to almost 1 μm the detector is a thinned, back-illuminated SITe 2048x2048 CCD with high quantum efficiency and excellent cosmetics. Multislit aperture masks are produced photographically, with spectra of up to ~50 objects fitted on a single row of a slit mask. The instrument exhibits very little flexure and uses an active thermal control to maintain focus over a wide range of ambient temperature. In direct mode COSMIC is typically used with Kron-Cousins, Gunn, and narrow bandpass filters. The instrument achieves throughputs of greater than 50% for direct imaging and, in spectroscopic mode, a peak efficiency at 5500 Å of slightly better than 24% of light falling on the 5 m mirror. COSMIC is optimized for faint-object imaging, down to Gunn r=26 mag, and multiobject spectroscopy, down to r=23 mag, with typically 30 objects per spectroscopic exposure.

  18. New segmentation-based tone mapping algorithm for high dynamic range image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Weiwei; Guo, Huinan; Zhou, Zuofeng; Huang, Huimin; Cao, Jianzhong

    2017-07-01

    The traditional tone mapping algorithm for the display of high dynamic range (HDR) image has the drawback of losing the impression of brightness, contrast and color information. To overcome this phenomenon, we propose a new tone mapping algorithm based on dividing the image into different exposure regions in this paper. Firstly, the over-exposure region is determined using the Local Binary Pattern information of HDR image. Then, based on the peak and average gray of the histogram, the under-exposure and normal-exposure region of HDR image are selected separately. Finally, the different exposure regions are mapped by differentiated tone mapping methods to get the final result. The experiment results show that the proposed algorithm achieve the better performance both in visual quality and objective contrast criterion than other algorithms.

  19. The New Approach of Using Image and Range Based Methods for Quality Control of Dimension Stone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levytskyi, Volodymyr

    2017-06-01

    The basis for the quality control of commodity dimension stone blocks for mining industry is the study of fracturing. The identification of fracturing in rock masses is one of the most important aspects in rock mass modelling. Traditional methods for determination properties of fracturing are difficult and hazardous. This paper describes a new approach of fracturing identification, based on image and range data, which realized by image processing and special software. In this article describes a method using new computer algorithms that allow for automated identification and calculation of fracturing parameters. Different digital filters for image processing and mathematical dependences are analyzed. The digital imaging technique has the potential for being used in real time applications. The purpose of this paper is the accurate and fast mapping of fracturing in some walls of the Bukinsky gabbro deposit.

  20. Image seeker simulation for short-range surface-to-surface missile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Sang-Hun; Kang, Ho-Gyun

    2007-04-01

    This paper presents an image seeker simulation including image processing, servo control, target model, and missile trajectory. We propose a software architecture for a seeker embedded computer. It makes core processing algorithms including image processing reusable at the source level through multiple platforms. The embedded software simulator implemented in C/C++, the servo control simulator implemented in Matlab, and the integrated simulator combined the both simulators based on Windows Component Object Module (COM) technology is presented. The integrated simulation enables developers to practice an interactive study between image processing and servo control about missions including lock-on and target tracking. The implemented simulator can be operated in low cost computer systems. This can be used to algorithm development and analysis at the design, implementation, and evaluation. Simulation examples for a short range ground-to-ground missile seeker are presented.

  1. Polymer-free optode nanosensors for dynamic, reversible, and ratiometric sodium imaging in the physiological range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruckh, Timothy T; Mehta, Ankeeta A; Dubach, J Matthew; Clark, Heather A

    2013-11-28

    This work introduces a polymer-free optode nanosensor for ratiometric sodium imaging. Transmembrane ion dynamics are often captured by electrophysiology and calcium imaging, but sodium dyes suffer from short excitation wavelengths and poor selectivity. Optodes, optical sensors composed of a polymer matrix with embedded sensing chemistry, have been translated into nanosensors that selectively image ion concentrations. Polymer-free nanosensors were fabricated by emulsification and were stable by diameter and sensitivity for at least one week. Ratiometric fluorescent measurements demonstrated that the nanosensors are selective for sodium over potassium by ~1.4 orders of magnitude, have a dynamic range centered at 20 mM, and are fully reversible. The ratiometric signal changes by 70% between 10 and 100 mM sodium, showing that they are sensitive to changes in sodium concentration. These nanosensors will provide a new tool for sensitive and quantitative ion imaging.

  2. Direct imaging of reptation for semiflexible actin filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Käs, J; Strey, H; Sackmann, E

    1994-03-17

    According to the reptation model of polymer diffusion, a polymer chain exhibits snake-like motion through the entangled mesh of surrounding molecules, in which the undulations of the chain are restricted to a tube-like region. The reptation model can account for many of the dynamic properties of entangled polymer solutions and melts, and has received support from observations of block copolymer diffusion across an interface; but reptative motion has not previously been imaged directly. Here we report such a direct observation of reptation, obtained by video microscopy of fluorescently labelled single, semiflexible filaments of actin in a solution of unlabelled actin filaments. From the restricted thermal undulations of these filaments we can measure the diameter of the confining tube, and we also observe the characteristic thermally excited sliding of the filament out of the end of the tube. We find that the chain self-diffusion coefficient decreases approximately linearly as the filament length increases, in agreement with the reptation model.

  3. Positron range in PET imaging: an alternative approach for assessing and correcting the blurring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jødal, Lars; Le Loirec, Cindy; Champion, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    Background: Positron range impairs resolution in PET imaging, especially for high-energy emitters and for small-animal PET. De-blurring in image reconstruction is possible if the blurring distribution is known. Further, the percentage of annihilation events within a given distance from the point...... of positron emission is relevant for assessing statistical noise. Aims: The paper aims to determine positron range distribution relevant for blurring for seven medically relevant PET isotopes, 18F, 11C, 13N, 15O, 68Ga, 62Cu, and 82Rb, and derive empirical formulas for the distributions. The paper focuses...... on allowed-decay isotopes. Methods: It is argued that blurring at the detection level should not be described by positron range r, but instead the 2D-projected distance δ (equal to the closest distance between decay and line-of-response). To determine these 2D distributions, results from a dedicated positron...

  4. Stochastic calculus analysis of optical time-of-flight range imaging and estimation of radial motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streeter, Lee

    2017-07-01

    Time-of-flight range imaging is analyzed using stochastic calculus. Through a series of interpretations and simplifications, the stochastic model leads to two methods for estimating linear radial velocity: maximum likelihood estimation on the transition probability distribution between measurements, and a new method based on analyzing the measured correlation waveform and its first derivative. The methods are tested in a simulated motion experiment from (-40)-(+40)  m/s, with data from a camera imaging an object on a translation stage. In tests maximum likelihood is slow and unreliable, but when it works it estimates the linear velocity with standard deviation of 1 m/s or better. In comparison the new method is fast and reliable but works in a reduced velocity range of (-20)-(+20)  m/s with standard deviation ranging from 3.5 m/s to 10 m/s.

  5. Image simulation and a model of noise power spectra across a range of mammographic beam qualities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Alistair; Dance, David R; Diaz, Oliver; Young, Kenneth C

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this work is to create a model to predict the noise power spectra (NPS) for a range of mammographic radiographic factors. The noise model was necessary to degrade images acquired on one system to match the image quality of different systems for a range of beam qualities. Five detectors and x-ray systems [Hologic Selenia (ASEh), Carestream computed radiography CR900 (CRc), GE Essential (CSI), Carestream NIP (NIPc), and Siemens Inspiration (ASEs)] were characterized for this study. The signal transfer property was measured as the pixel value against absorbed energy per unit area (E) at a reference beam quality of 28 kV, Mo/Mo or 29 kV, W/Rh with 45 mm polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) at the tube head. The contributions of the three noise sources (electronic, quantum, and structure) to the NPS were calculated by fitting a quadratic at each spatial frequency of the NPS against E. A quantum noise correction factor which was dependent on beam quality was quantified using a set of images acquired over a range of radiographic factors with different thicknesses of PMMA. The noise model was tested for images acquired at 26 kV, Mo/Mo with 20 mm PMMA and 34 kV, Mo/Rh with 70 mm PMMA for three detectors (ASEh, CRc, and CSI) over a range of exposures. The NPS were modeled with and without the noise correction factor and compared with the measured NPS. A previous method for adapting an image to appear as if acquired on a different system was modified to allow the reference beam quality to be different from the beam quality of the image. The method was validated by adapting the ASEh flat field images with two thicknesses of PMMA (20 and 70 mm) to appear with the imaging characteristics of the CSI and CRc systems. The quantum noise correction factor rises with higher beam qualities, except for CR systems at high spatial frequencies, where a flat response was found against mean photon energy. This is due to the dominance of secondary quantum noise in CR. The use of the

  6. Image simulation and a model of noise power spectra across a range of mammographic beam qualities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackenzie, Alistair, E-mail: alistairmackenzie@nhs.net; Dance, David R.; Young, Kenneth C. [National Coordinating Centre for the Physics of Mammography, Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guildford GU2 7XX, United Kingdom and Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Diaz, Oliver [Centre for Vision, Speech and Signal Processing, Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH, United Kingdom and Computer Vision and Robotics Research Institute, University of Girona, Girona 17071 (Spain)

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: The aim of this work is to create a model to predict the noise power spectra (NPS) for a range of mammographic radiographic factors. The noise model was necessary to degrade images acquired on one system to match the image quality of different systems for a range of beam qualities. Methods: Five detectors and x-ray systems [Hologic Selenia (ASEh), Carestream computed radiography CR900 (CRc), GE Essential (CSI), Carestream NIP (NIPc), and Siemens Inspiration (ASEs)] were characterized for this study. The signal transfer property was measured as the pixel value against absorbed energy per unit area (E) at a reference beam quality of 28 kV, Mo/Mo or 29 kV, W/Rh with 45 mm polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) at the tube head. The contributions of the three noise sources (electronic, quantum, and structure) to the NPS were calculated by fitting a quadratic at each spatial frequency of the NPS against E. A quantum noise correction factor which was dependent on beam quality was quantified using a set of images acquired over a range of radiographic factors with different thicknesses of PMMA. The noise model was tested for images acquired at 26 kV, Mo/Mo with 20 mm PMMA and 34 kV, Mo/Rh with 70 mm PMMA for three detectors (ASEh, CRc, and CSI) over a range of exposures. The NPS were modeled with and without the noise correction factor and compared with the measured NPS. A previous method for adapting an image to appear as if acquired on a different system was modified to allow the reference beam quality to be different from the beam quality of the image. The method was validated by adapting the ASEh flat field images with two thicknesses of PMMA (20 and 70 mm) to appear with the imaging characteristics of the CSI and CRc systems. Results: The quantum noise correction factor rises with higher beam qualities, except for CR systems at high spatial frequencies, where a flat response was found against mean photon energy. This is due to the dominance of secondary quantum noise

  7. Forward and backward tone mapping of high dynamic range images based on subband architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzidi, Ines; Ouled Zaid, Azza

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a novel High Dynamic Range (HDR) tone mapping (TM) system based on sub-band architecture. Standard wavelet filters of Daubechies, Symlets, Coiflets and Biorthogonal were used to estimate the proposed system performance in terms of Low Dynamic Range (LDR) image quality and reconstructed HDR image fidelity. During TM stage, the HDR image is firstly decomposed in sub-bands using symmetrical analysis-synthesis filter bank. The transform coefficients are then rescaled using a predefined gain map. The inverse Tone Mapping (iTM) stage is straightforward. Indeed, the LDR image passes through the same sub-band architecture. But, instead of reducing the dynamic range, the LDR content is boosted to an HDR representation. Moreover, in our TM sheme, we included an optimization module to select the gain map components that minimize the reconstruction error, and consequently resulting in high fidelity HDR content. Comparisons with recent state-of-the-art methods have shown that our method provides better results in terms of visual quality and HDR reconstruction fidelity using objective and subjective evaluations.

  8. High-dynamic range compressive spectral imaging by grayscale coded aperture adaptive filtering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Eduardo Diaz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The coded aperture snapshot spectral imaging system (CASSI is an imaging architecture which senses the three dimensional informa-tion of a scene with two dimensional (2D focal plane array (FPA coded projection measurements. A reconstruction algorithm takes advantage of the compressive measurements sparsity to recover the underlying 3D data cube. Traditionally, CASSI uses block-un-block coded apertures (BCA to spatially modulate the light. In CASSI the quality of the reconstructed images depends on the design of these coded apertures and the FPA dynamic range. This work presents a new CASSI architecture based on grayscaled coded apertu-res (GCA which reduce the FPA saturation and increase the dynamic range of the reconstructed images. The set of GCA is calculated in a real-time adaptive manner exploiting the information from the FPA compressive measurements. Extensive simulations show the attained improvement in the quality of the reconstructed images when GCA are employed.  In addition, a comparison between traditional coded apertures and GCA is realized with respect to noise tolerance.

  9. Direct tissue oxygen monitoring by in vivo photoacoustic lifetime imaging (PALI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Qi; Morgounova, Ekaterina; Ashkenazi, Shai

    2014-03-01

    Tissue oxygen plays a critical role in maintaining tissue viability and in various diseases, including response to therapy. Images of oxygen distribution provide the history of tissue hypoxia and evidence of oxygen availability in the circulatory system. Currently available methods of direct measuring or imaging tissue oxygen all have significant limitations. Previously, we have reported a non-invasive in vivo imaging modality based on photoacoustic lifetime. The technique maps the excited triplet state of oxygen-sensitive dye, thus reflects the spatial and temporal distribution of tissue oxygen. We have applied PALI on tumor hypoxia in small animals, and the hypoxic region imaged by PALI is consistent with the site of the tumor imaged by ultrasound. Here, we present two studies of applying PALI to monitor changes of tissue oxygen by modulations. The first study involves an acute ischemia model using a thin thread tied around the hind limb of a normal mouse to reduce the blood flow. PALI images were acquired before, during, and after the restriction. The drop of muscle pO2 and recovery from hypoxia due to reperfusion were observed by PALI tracking the same region. The second study modulates tissue oxygen by controlling the percentage of oxygen the mouse inhales. We demonstrate that PALI is able to reflect the change of oxygen level with respect to both hyperbaric and hypobaric conditions. We expect this technique to be very attractive for a range of clinical applications in which tissue oxygen mapping would improve therapy decision making and treatment planning.

  10. Influence of the particle size on polarization-based range-gated imaging in turbid media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng Tian

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The influence of size of the scatterer on the image contrast for polarization-based range-gated imaging in turbid media is investigated here by Monte Carlo method. Circularly polarized light would be more efficient to eliminate the noise photons for both the isotropic medium as well as the anisotropic medium, as compared with linearly polarized light. The improvement in contrast is pronounced for isotropic medium using either linear or circular polarization. The plausible explanations for these observations are also presented.

  11. Prototype system for proton beam range measurement based on gamma electron vertex imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Han Rim [Neutron Utilization Technology Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 111, Daedeok-daero 989beon-gil, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Hun; Park, Jong Hoon [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Hanyang University, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 04763 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Won Gyun [Heavy-ion Clinical Research Division, Korean Institute of Radiological & Medical Sciences, Seoul 01812 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Hansang [Department of Electronics Convergence Engineering, Kwangwoon University, Seoul 01897 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chan Hyeong, E-mail: chkim@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Hanyang University, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 04763 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-11

    In proton therapy, for both therapeutic effectiveness and patient safety, it is very important to accurately measure the proton dose distribution, especially the range of the proton beam. For this purpose, recently we proposed a new imaging method named gamma electron vertex imaging (GEVI), in which the prompt gammas emitting from the nuclear reactions of the proton beam in the patient are converted to electrons, and then the converted electrons are tracked to determine the vertices of the prompt gammas, thereby producing a 2D image of the vertices. In the present study, we developed a prototype GEVI system, including dedicated signal processing and data acquisition systems, which consists of a beryllium plate (= electron converter) to convert the prompt gammas to electrons, two double-sided silicon strip detectors (= hodoscopes) to determine the trajectories of those converted electrons, and a plastic scintillation detector (= calorimeter) to measure their kinetic energies. The system uses triple coincidence logic and multiple energy windows to select only the events from prompt gammas. The detectors of the prototype GEVI system were evaluated for electronic noise level, energy resolution, and time resolution. Finally, the imaging capability of the GEVI system was tested by imaging a {sup 90}Sr beta source, a {sup 60}Co gamma source, and a 45-MeV proton beam in a PMMA phantom. The overall results of the present study generally show that the prototype GEVI system can image the vertices of the prompt gammas produced by the proton nuclear interactions.

  12. On the Composition of Young, Directly Imaged Giant Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, J. I.; Marley, M. S.; Zahnle, K.; Line, M. R.; Fortney, J. J.; Barman, T. S.; Visscher, C.; Lewis, N. K.; Wolff, M. J.

    2016-01-01

    The past decade has seen significant progress on the direct detection and characterization of young, self-luminous giant planets at wide orbital separations from their host stars. Some of these planets show evidence for disequilibrium processes like transport-induced quenching in their atmospheres; photochemistry may also be important, despite the typically large orbital distances. Disequilibrium chemical processes such as these can alter the expected composition, spectral behavior, thermal structure, and cooling history of the planets, and can potentially confuse determinations of bulk elemental ratios, which provide important insights into planet-formation mechanisms. Using a thermo/photochemical kinetics and transport model, we investigate the extent to which disequilibrium chemical processes affect the composition and spectra of directly imaged giant exoplanets. Results for specific "young Jupiters" such as HR 8799 b and c and 51 Eri b are presented, as are general trends as a function of planetary effective temperature, surface gravity, incident ultraviolet flux, and strength of deep atmospheric convection. We find that quenching is very important on young Jupiters, leading to CO/CH4 and N2/NH3 ratios much greater than; and H2O mixing ratios a factor of a few less than chemical equilibrium predictions. Photochemistry can also be important on such planets, with CO2 and HCN being key photochemical products. Carbon dioxide becomes a particularly major constituent when stratospheric temperatures are low and recycling of water following H2O photolysis becomes stifled. Young Jupiters with effective temperatures less than 700 degrees Kelvin are in a particularly interesting photochemical regime that differs from both transiting hot Jupiters and our own solar-system giant planets.

  13. Long-range non-contact imaging photoplethysmography: cardiac pulse wave sensing at a distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackford, Ethan B.; Estepp, Justin R.; Piasecki, Alyssa M.; Bowers, Margaret A.; Klosterman, Samantha L.

    2016-03-01

    Non-contact, imaging photoplethysmography uses photo-optical sensors to measure variations in light absorption, caused by blood volume pulsations, to assess cardiopulmonary parameters including pulse rate, pulse rate variability, and respiration rate. Recently, researchers have studied the applications and methodology of imaging photoplethysmography. Basic research has examined some of the variables affecting data quality and accuracy of imaging photoplethysmography including signal processing, imager parameters (e.g. frame rate and resolution), lighting conditions, subject motion, and subject skin tone. This technology may be beneficial for long term or continuous monitoring where contact measurements may be harmful (e.g. skin sensitivities) or where imperceptible or unobtrusive measurements are desirable. Using previously validated signal processing methods, we examined the effects of imager-to-subject distance on one-minute, windowed estimates of pulse rate. High-resolution video of 22, stationary participants was collected using an enthusiast-grade, mirrorless, digital camera equipped with a fully-manual, super-telephoto lens at distances of 25, 50, and 100 meters with simultaneous contact measurements of electrocardiography, and fingertip photoplethysmography. By comparison, previous studies have usually been conducted with imager-to-subject distances of up to only a few meters. Mean absolute error for one-minute, windowed, pulse rate estimates (compared to those derived from gold-standard electrocardiography) were 2.0, 4.1, and 10.9 beats per minute at distances of 25, 50, and 100 meters, respectively. Long-range imaging presents several unique challenges among which include decreased, observed light reflectance and smaller regions of interest. Nevertheless, these results demonstrate that accurate pulse rate measurements can be obtained from over long imager-to-participant distances given these constraints.

  14. A new approach towards image based virtual 3D city modeling by using close range photogrammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, S. P.; Jain, K.; Mandla, V. R.

    2014-05-01

    3D city model is a digital representation of the Earth's surface and it's related objects such as building, tree, vegetation, and some manmade feature belonging to urban area. The demand of 3D city modeling is increasing day to day for various engineering and non-engineering applications. Generally three main image based approaches are using for virtual 3D city models generation. In first approach, researchers used Sketch based modeling, second method is Procedural grammar based modeling and third approach is Close range photogrammetry based modeling. Literature study shows that till date, there is no complete solution available to create complete 3D city model by using images. These image based methods also have limitations This paper gives a new approach towards image based virtual 3D city modeling by using close range photogrammetry. This approach is divided into three sections. First, data acquisition process, second is 3D data processing, and third is data combination process. In data acquisition process, a multi-camera setup developed and used for video recording of an area. Image frames created from video data. Minimum required and suitable video image frame selected for 3D processing. In second section, based on close range photogrammetric principles and computer vision techniques, 3D model of area created. In third section, this 3D model exported to adding and merging of other pieces of large area. Scaling and alignment of 3D model was done. After applying the texturing and rendering on this model, a final photo-realistic textured 3D model created. This 3D model transferred into walk-through model or in movie form. Most of the processing steps are automatic. So this method is cost effective and less laborious. Accuracy of this model is good. For this research work, study area is the campus of department of civil engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee. This campus acts as a prototype for city. Aerial photography is restricted in many country

  15. SINGLE IMAGE CAMERA CALIBRATION IN CLOSE RANGE PHOTOGRAMMETRY FOR SOLDER JOINT ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Heinemann

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Printed Circuit Boards (PCB play an important role in the manufacturing of electronic devices. To ensure a correct function of the PCBs a certain amount of solder paste is needed during the placement of components. The aim of the current research is to develop an real-time, closed-loop solution for the analysis of the printing process where solder is printed onto PCBs. Close range photogrammetry allows for determination of the solder volume and a subsequent correction if necessary. Photogrammetry is an image based method for three dimensional reconstruction from two dimensional image data of an object. A precise camera calibration is indispensable for an accurate reconstruction. In our certain application it is not possible to use calibration methods with two dimensional calibration targets. Therefore a special calibration target was developed and manufactured, which allows for single image camera calibration.

  16. Range image segmentation using Zernike moment-based generalized edge detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosal, S.; Mehrotra, R.

    1992-01-01

    The authors proposed a novel Zernike moment-based generalized step edge detection method which can be used for segmenting range and intensity images. A generalized step edge detector is developed to identify different kinds of edges in range images. These edge maps are thinned and linked to provide final segmentation. A generalized edge is modeled in terms of five parameters: orientation, two slopes, one step jump at the location of the edge, and the background gray level. Two complex and two real Zernike moment-based masks are required to determine all these parameters of the edge model. Theoretical noise analysis is performed to show that these operators are quite noise tolerant. Experimental results are included to demonstrate edge-based segmentation technique.

  17. High throughput holographic imaging-in-flow for the analysis of a wide plankton size range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yourassowsky, Catherine; Dubois, Frank

    2014-03-24

    We developed a Digital Holographic Microscope (DHM) working with a partial coherent source specifically adapted to perform high throughput recording of holograms of plankton organisms in-flow, in a size range of 3 µm-300 µm, which is of importance for this kind of applications. This wide size range is achieved with the same flow cell and with the same microscope magnification. The DHM configuration combines a high magnification with a large field of view and provides high-resolution intensity and quantitative phase images refocusing on high sample flow rate. Specific algorithms were developed to detect and extract automatically the particles and organisms present in the samples in order to build holograms of each one that are used for holographic refocusing and quantitative phase contrast imaging. Experimental results are shown and discussed.

  18. Fusion of Building Information and Range Imaging for Autonomous Location Estimation in Indoor Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias K. Kohoutek

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel approach for autonomous location estimation and navigation in indoor environments using range images and prior scene knowledge from a GIS database (CityGML. What makes this task challenging is the arbitrary relative spatial relation between GIS and Time-of-Flight (ToF range camera further complicated by a markerless configuration. We propose to estimate the camera’s pose solely based on matching of GIS objects and their detected location in image sequences. We develop a coarse-to-fine matching strategy that is able to match point clouds without any initial parameters. Experiments with a state-of-the-art ToF point cloud show that our proposed method delivers an absolute camera position with decimeter accuracy, which is sufficient for many real-world applications (e.g., collision avoidance.

  19. Image analysis of gunshot residue on entry wounds. II--A statistical estimation of firing range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, H; Cauchi, D M; Holden, J L; Allen, F C; Cordner, S; Thatcher, P

    1999-03-29

    A statistical investigation of the relationship between firing range and the amount and distribution of gunshot residue (GSR), used automated image analysis (IA) to quantify GSR deposit resulting from firings into pig skin, from distances ranging between contact and 45 cm. Overall, for a Ruger .22 semi-automatic rifle using CCI solid point, high velocity ammunition, the total area of GSR deposit on the skin sections decreased in a non-linear fashion with firing range. More specifically there were significant differences in the amount of GSR deposited from shots fired at contact compared with shots fired from distances between 2.5 and 45 cm; and between shots fired from a distance of 20 cm or less, with shots fired at a distance of 30 cm or more. In addition, GSR particles were heavily concentrated in the wound tract only for contact and close range shots at 2.5 cm, while the particle distribution was more uniform between the wound tract and the skin surfaces for shots fired from distances greater than 2.5 cm. Consequently, for future scientific investigations of gunshot fatalities, once standards have been established for the weapon and ammunition type in question, image analysis quantification of GSR deposited in and around the gunshot wound may be capable of providing a reliable, statistical basis for estimating firing range.

  20. Sub-Surface Microwave Imaging Using Four-Slot Vivaldi Antenna with Improved Directivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhter, Zubair; Kumar, Pankaj; Akhtar, M. Jaleel

    2017-01-01

    The conventional tapered slot Vivaldi antenna is well known for its ultra-wide band characteristics with low directivity. To improve the directivity of the conventional Vivaldi antenna, a four-slot Vivaldi antenna (FSVA) is proposed here to operate in the frequency range of 2-11 GHz. For feeding the FSVA, a binomial three-section V-shaped even mode power divider with progressing T-junctions is also designed and tested here, which is then integrated with the antenna. The proposed antenna prototype is designed and fabricated on a 1-mm thick FR-4 substrate (ɛr=4.3, tanδ=0.025), and the return loss and radiation characteristics are investigated in the anechoic environment. The measured result shows a good agreement with the numerical simulation performed using the EM Simulator i. e. CST MWS-2015. It is found that the directivity of FSVA is approximately doubled as compared to that of the conventional Vivaldi antenna having the same dimensions. From the application point of view, the fabricated antenna is used to image various metallic objects hidden inside the sand using a vector network analyzer and associated RF components. The obtained 2D microwave images of the test media successfully show that the hidden objects can effectively be located and detected using the proposed FSVA in conjunction with a simple imaging scheme.

  1. TRM4: Range performance model for electro-optical imaging systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keßler, Stefan; Gal, Raanan; Wittenstein, Wolfgang

    2017-05-01

    TRM4 is a commonly used model for assessing device and range performance of electro-optical imagers. The latest version, TRM4.v2, has been released by Fraunhofer IOSB of Germany in June 2016. While its predecessor, TRM3, was developed for thermal imagers, assuming blackbody targets and backgrounds, TRM4 extends the TRM approach to assess three imager categories: imagers that exploit emitted radiation (TRM4 category Thermal), reflected radiation (TRM4 category Visible/NIR/SWIR), and both emitted and reflected radiation (TRM4 category General). Performance assessment in TRM3 and TRM4 is based on the perception of standard four-bar test patterns, whether distorted by under-sampling or not. Spatial and sampling characteristics are taken into account by the Average Modulation at Optimum Phase (AMOP), which replaces the system MTF used in previous models. The Minimum Temperature Difference Perceived (MTDP) figure of merit was introduced in TRM3 for assessing the range performance of thermal imagers. In TRM4, this concept is generalized to the MDSP (Minimum Difference Signal Perceived), which can be applied to all imager categories. In this paper, we outline and discuss the TRM approach and pinpoint differences between TRM4 and TRM3. In addition, an overview of the TRM4 software and its functionality is given. Features newly introduced in TRM4, such as atmospheric turbulence, irradiation sources, and libraries are addressed. We conclude with an outlook on future work and the new module for intensified CCD cameras that is currently under development

  2. Subinteger Range-Bin Alignment Method for ISAR Imaging of Noncooperative Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Pérez-Martínez

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar (ISAR is a coherent radar technique capable of generating images of noncooperative targets. ISAR may have better performance in adverse meteorological conditions than traditional imaging sensors. Unfortunately, ISAR images are usually blurred because of the relative motion between radar and target. To improve the quality of ISAR products, motion compensation is necessary. In this context, range-bin alignment is the first step for translational motion compensation. In this paper, we propose a subinteger range-bin alignment method based on envelope correlation and reference profiles. The technique, which makes use of a carefully designed optimization stage, is robust against noise, clutter, target scintillation, and error accumulation. It provides us with very fine translational motion compensation. Comparisons with state-of-the-art range-bin alignment methods are included and advantages of the proposal are highlighted. Simulated and live data from a high-resolution linear-frequency-modulated continuous-wave radar are included to perform the pertinent comparisons.

  3. Imaging the male reproductive tract: current trends and future directions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Futterer, J.J.; Heijmink, S.W.T.P.J.; Spermon, J.R.

    2008-01-01

    The male reproductive system encompasses several organs: the testes, ejaculatory ducts, seminal vesicles, prostate, and penis. The function of this system is to accomplish reproduction. Diagnostic imaging modalities, such as ultrasound, CT, MR imaging, and positron emission tomography (PET), are

  4. A theoretical study on directivity control of multiple-loudspeaker system with a quadrupole radiation pattern in low frequency range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwansyah, Kuse, Naoyuki; Usagawa, Tsuyoshi

    2017-08-01

    Directivity pattern of an ordinary loudspeaker becomes more directive at higher frequencies. However, because a single loudspeaker tends to radiate uniformly in all directions at low frequencies, reverberation from surrounding building walls may affect speech intelligibility when installing a multiple-loudspeaker system at crossroads. As an alternative, a sharply directive sound source is recommended to be used, but in many cases the directivity of an ordinary loudspeaker is less sharp at lower frequencies. Therefore, in order to overcome such a limitation, this paper discusses the possibility of using four loudspeakers under active control to realize a quadrupole radiation pattern in low frequency range. In this study, the radiation pattern of a primary loudspeaker and three secondary loudspeakers has been modelled. By placing the loudspeakers close together in the direction of 0°, 90°, 180°, and 270°, it was theoretically demonstrated that a quadrupole radiation pattern can be shaped in the target frequency range up to 600 Hz by simply controlling the directivity in three of four directions which are 45°, 135°, 225°, and 315°. Although, the radiation pattern model is far from realistic configurations and conditions, it is possible to realize a quadrupole radiation pattern in the low frequency range.

  5. Measurement of the Range Component Directional Signature in a DRIFT-II Detector using 252Cf Neutrons

    CERN Document Server

    Burgos, S; Forbes, J; Ghag, C; Gold, M; Hagemann, C; Kudryavtsev, V A; Lawson, T B; Loomba, D; Majewski, P; Muna, D; Murphy, A St J; Nicklin, G G; Paling, S M; Petkov, A; Plank, S J S; Robinson, M; Sanghi, N; Snowden-Ifft, D P; Spooner, N J C; Turk, J; Tziaferi, E

    2008-01-01

    The DRIFT collaboration utilizes low pressure gaseous detectors to search for WIMP dark matter with directional signatures. A 252Cf neutron source was placed on each of the principal axes of a DRIFT detector in order to test its ability to measure directional signatures from the three components of very low energy (~keV/amu) recoil ranges. A high trigger threshold and the event selection procedure ensured that only sulfur recoils were analyzed. Sulfur recoils produced in the CS2 target gas by the 252Cf source closely match those expected from massive WIMP induced sulfur recoils. For each orientation of the source a directional signal from the range components was observed, indicating that the detector is directional along all 3 axes. An analysis of these results yields an optimal orientation for DRIFT detectors when searching for a directional signature from WIMPs. Additional energy dependent information is provided to aid in understanding this effect.

  6. The Courts’ Public Image – The Desired Direction of Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylwia Morawska

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes to scientifically explore notions of court identity, principles of shaping a court system’s image, and best practices in positive court image development relating to the courts in Poland.  It discusses the roles and responsibilities of inter-organizational networks in harmonizing diverse efforts to build a more positive court image.  It presents the results of a pilot project on court image development that considered the level of “maturity of courts” or how much forward progress various courts have made toward achieving an enhanced court image.  The paper uses several methods of scientific exploration including scholarly research to collect information about court image; empirical analysis of such research; personal examinations and observations of courts; and when best practices have been implemented in Polish courts, case studies to determine whether improved court images result from those practices.

  7. Inflammatory bowel disease imaging: Current practice and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilcoyne, Aoife; Kaplan, Jess L; Gee, Michael S

    2016-01-21

    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the role of imaging in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including detection of extraluminal complications and extraintestinal manifestations of IBD, assessment of disease activity and treatment response, and discrimination of inflammatory from fibrotic strictures. IBD is a chronic idiopathic disease affecting the gastrointestinal tract that is comprised of two separate, but related intestinal disorders; Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. The paper discusses, in detail the pros and cons of the different IBD imaging modalities that need to be considered in order to optimize the imaging and clinical evaluation of patients with IBD. Historically, IBD evaluation of the bowel has included imaging to assess the portions of the small bowel that are inaccessible to optical endoscopic visualization. This traditionally was performed using barium fluoroscopic techniques; however, cross-sectional imaging techniques (computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging) are being increasingly utilized for IBD evaluation because they can simultaneously assess mural and extramural IBD manifestations. Recent advances in imaging technology, that continue to improve the ability of imaging to noninvasively follow disease activity and treatment response, are also discussed. This review article summarizes the current imaging approach in inflammatory bowel disease as well as the role of emerging imaging modalities.

  8. Close Range Photogrammetry for Direct Multiple Feature Positioning Measurement without Targets

    OpenAIRE

    Gorka Kortaberria; Aitor Olarra; Alberto Tellaeche; Rikardo Minguez

    2017-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to present a new method to carry out measurements so as to improve the positioning verification step in the wind hub part dimensional validation process. This enhancement will speed up the measuring procedures for these types of parts. An industrial photogrammetry based system was applied to take advantage of its results, and new functions were added to existing capabilities. In addition to a new development based on photogrammetry modelling and image proce...

  9. Fluorescence imaging of viscous materials in the ultraviolet-visible wavelength range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murr, Patrik J., E-mail: patrik.murr@tum.de; Rauscher, Markus S.; Tremmel, Anton; Schardt, Michael; Koch, Alexander W. [Institute for Measurement Systems and Sensor Technology, Technische Universität München, Theresienstraße 90, 80333 München (Germany)

    2014-08-15

    This paper presents an approach of an innovative measurement principle for the quality control of viscous materials during a manufacturing process based on fluorescence imaging. The main contribution to the state of the art provided by this measurement system is that three equal fluorescence images of a static or moving viscous object are available in different optical paths. The independent images are obtained by two beam splitters which are connected in series. Based on these images, it is possible to evaluate each image separately. In our case, three optical bandpass filters with different center wavelengths of 405 nm, 420 nm, and 440 nm were used to filter the separate fluorescence images. The developed system is useable for the detection of impurities in the micrometer range. Further, incorrect mixing ratios of particular components and wrong single components in the viscous materials can be detected with the setup. Moreover, it is possible to realize static and dynamic measurements. In this case the maximum speed of the objects was 0.2 m/s for the dynamic measurements. Advantages of this measurement setup are the universality due to the use of optical standard components, the small dimension and the opportunity to integrate it easily into ongoing processes. In addition, the measurement system works on a non-contact basis. Thus, the expense for maintenance is at a very low level compared to currently available measurement setups for the investigated application. Furthermore, the setup provides for the first time a simultaneous analysis of more than one component and the detection of impurities concerning their nature and size in a manufacturing process.

  10. Measurements of pulse rate using long-range imaging photoplethysmography and sunlight illumination outdoors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackford, Ethan B.; Estepp, Justin R.

    2017-02-01

    Imaging photoplethysmography, a method using imagers to record absorption variations caused by microvascular blood volume pulsations, shows promise as a non-contact cardiovascular sensing technology. The first long-range imaging photoplethysmography measurements at distances of 25, 50, and 100 meters from the participant was recently demonstrated. Degraded signal quality was observed with increasing imager-to-subject distances. The degradation in signal quality was hypothesized to be largely attributable to inadequate light return to the image sensor with increasing lens focal length. To test this hypothesis, a follow-up evaluation with 27 participants was conducted outdoors with natural sunlight illumination resulting in 5-33 times the illumination intensity. Video was recorded from cameras equipped with ultra-telephoto lenses and positioned at distances of 25, 50, 100, and 150 meters. The brighter illumination allowed high-definition video recordings at increased frame rates of 60fps, shorter exposure times, and lower ISO settings, leading to higher quality image formation than the previous indoor evaluation. Results were compared to simultaneous reference measurements from electrocardiography. Compared to the previous indoor study, we observed lower overall error in pulse rate measurement with the same pattern of degradation in signal quality with respect to increasing distance. This effect was corroborated by the signal-to-noise ratio of the blood volume pulse signal which also showed decreasing quality with respect to increasing distance. Finally, a popular chrominance-based method was compared to a blind source separation approach; while comparable in measurement of signal-to-noise ratio, we observed higher overall error in pulse rate measurement using the chrominance method in this data.

  11. Advanced Spectroscopic and Thermal Imaging Instrumentation for Shock Tube and Ballistic Range Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinstead, Jay H.; Wilder, Michael C.; Reda, Daniel C.; Cruden, Brett A.; Bogdanoff, David W.

    2010-01-01

    The Electric Arc Shock Tube (EAST) facility and Hypervelocity Free Flight Aerodynamic Facility (HFFAF, an aeroballistic range) at NASA Ames support basic research in aerothermodynamic phenomena of atmospheric entry, specifically shock layer radiation spectroscopy, convective and radiative heat transfer, and transition to turbulence. Innovative optical instrumentation has been developed and implemented to meet the challenges posed from obtaining such data in these impulse facilities. Spatially and spectrally resolved measurements of absolute radiance of a travelling shock wave in EAST are acquired using multiplexed, time-gated imaging spectrographs. Nearly complete spectral coverage from the vacuum ultraviolet to the near infrared is possible in a single experiment. Time-gated thermal imaging of ballistic range models in flight enables quantitative, global measurements of surface temperature. These images can be interpreted to determine convective heat transfer rates and reveal transition to turbulence due to isolated and distributed surface roughness at hypersonic velocities. The focus of this paper is a detailed description of the optical instrumentation currently in use in the EAST and HFFAF.

  12. A low-noise wide dynamic range CMOS image sensor with low and high temperatures resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizobuchi, Koichi; Adachi, Satoru; Tejada, Jose; Oshikubo, Hiromichi; Akahane, Nana; Sugawa, Shigetoshi

    2008-02-01

    A temperature-resistant 1/3 inch SVGA (800×600 pixels) 5.6 μm pixel pitch wide-dynamic-range (WDR) CMOS image sensor has been developed using a lateral-over-flow-integration-capacitor (LOFIC) in a pixel. The sensor chips are fabricated through 0.18 μm 2P3M process with totally optimized front-end-of-line (FEOL) & back-end-of-line (BEOL) for a lower dark current. By implementing a low electrical field potential design for photodiodes, reducing damages, recovering crystal defects and terminating interface states in the FEOL+BEOL, the dark current is improved to 12 e - /pixel-sec at 60 deg.C with 50% reduction from the previous very-low-dark-current (VLDC) FEOL and its contribution to the temporal noise is improved. Furthermore, design optimizations of the readout circuits, especially a signal-and noise-hold circuit and a programmable-gain-amplifier (PGA) are also implemented. The measured temporal noise is 2.4 e -rms at 60 fps (:36 MHz operation). The dynamic-range (DR) is extended to 100 dB with 237 ke - full well capacity. In order to secure the temperature-resistance, the sensor chip also receives both an inorganic cap onto micro lens and a metal hermetic seal package assembly. Image samples at low & high temperatures show significant improvement in image qualities.

  13. On the simulation and mitigation of anisoplanatic optical turbulence for long range imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardie, Russell C.; LeMaster, Daniel A.

    2017-05-01

    We describe a numerical wave propagation method for simulating long range imaging of an extended scene under anisoplanatic conditions. Our approach computes an array of point spread functions (PSFs) for a 2D grid on the object plane. The PSFs are then used in a spatially varying weighted sum operation, with an ideal image, to produce a simulated image with realistic optical turbulence degradation. To validate the simulation we compare simulated outputs with the theoretical anisoplanatic tilt correlation and differential tilt variance. This is in addition to comparing the long- and short-exposure PSFs, and isoplanatic angle. Our validation analysis shows an excellent match between the simulation statistics and the theoretical predictions. The simulation tool is also used here to quantitatively evaluate a recently proposed block- matching and Wiener filtering (BMWF) method for turbulence mitigation. In this method block-matching registration algorithm is used to provide geometric correction for each of the individual input frames. The registered frames are then averaged and processed with a Wiener filter for restoration. A novel aspect of the proposed BMWF method is that the PSF model used for restoration takes into account the level of geometric correction achieved during image registration. This way, the Wiener filter is able fully exploit the reduced blurring achieved by registration. The BMWF method is relatively simple computationally, and yet, has excellent performance in comparison to state-of-the-art benchmark methods.

  14. Preserving spatial perception in rooms using direct-sound driven dynamic range compression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassager, Henrik Gert; May, Tobias; Wiinberg, Alan

    2017-01-01

    compression system that adaptively selects appropriate time constants to preserve the listener’s spatial impression. Specifically, fast-acting compression was maintained for timefrequency units dominated by the direct sound while the processing of the compressor was linearized for time-frequency units...

  15. Synthesis and characterization of Cu-MFI catalyst for the direct medium temperature range NO decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valkaj Karolina Maduna

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study the physico-chemical and catalytic properties of copper bearing MFI zeolites (Cu-MFI with different Si/Al and Si/Cu ratios were investigated. Two different methods for incorporation of metal ions into the zeolite framework were used: the ion exchange from the solution of copper acetate and the direct hydrothermal synthesis. Direct synthesis of a zeolite in the presence of copper-phosphate complexes was expected to generate more active copper species necessary for the desired reaction than the conventional ion exchange method. Direct decomposition of NO was used as a model reaction, because this reaction still offers a very attractive approach to NOX removal. The catalytic properties of zeolite samples were studied using techniques, such as XRD, SEM, EPR and nitrogen adsorption/desorption measurements at 77 K. Results of the kinetic investigation revealed that both methods are applicable for the preparation of the catalysts with active sites capable of catalyzing the NO decomposition. It was found out that Cu-MFI zeolites obtained through direct synthesis are promising catalysts for NO decomposition, especially at lower reaction temperatures. The efficiency of the catalysts prepared by both methods is compared and discussed.

  16. Automatic grading of appearance retention of carpets using intensity and range images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orjuela Vargas, Sergio Alejandro; Ortiz-Jaramillo, Benhur; Vansteenkiste, Ewout; Rooms, Filip; De Meulemeester, Simon; de Keyser, Robain; Van Langenhove, Lieva; Philips, Wilfried

    2012-04-01

    Textiles are mainly used for decoration and protection. In both cases, their original appearance and its retention are important factors for customers. Therefore, evaluation of appearance parameters are critical for quality assurance purposes, during and after manufacturing, to determine the lifetime and/or beauty of textile products. In particular, appearance retention of textile products is commonly certified with grades, which are currently assigned by human experts. However, manufacturers would prefer a more objective system. We present an objective system for grading appearance retention, particularly, for textile floor coverings. Changes in appearance are quantified by using linear regression models on texture features extracted from intensity and range images. Range images are obtained by our own laser scanner, reconstructing the carpet surface using two methods that have been previously presented. We extract texture features using a variant of the local binary pattern technique based on detecting those patterns whose frequencies are related to the appearance retention grades. We test models for eight types of carpets. Results show that the proposed approach describes the degree of wear with a precision within the range allowed to human inspectors by international standards. The methodology followed in this experiment has been designed to be general for evaluating global deviation of texture in other types of textiles, as well as other surface materials.

  17. An Analog Gamma Correction Scheme for High Dynamic Range CMOS Logarithmic Image Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yuan; Pan, Xiaofang; Zhao, Xiaojin; Wu, Huisi

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a novel analog gamma correction scheme with a logarithmic image sensor dedicated to minimize the quantization noise of the high dynamic applications is presented. The proposed implementation exploits a non-linear voltage-controlled-oscillator (VCO) based analog-to-digital converter (ADC) to perform the gamma correction during the analog-to-digital conversion. As a result, the quantization noise does not increase while the same high dynamic range of logarithmic image sensor is preserved. Moreover, by combining the gamma correction with the analog-to-digital conversion, the silicon area and overall power consumption can be greatly reduced. The proposed gamma correction scheme is validated by the reported simulation results and the experimental results measured for our designed test structure, which is fabricated with 0.35 μm standard complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process. PMID:25517692

  18. Fluid–fluid coexistence in colloidal systems with short-ranged strongly directional attraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kern, N.; Frenkel, D.

    2003-01-01

    We present a systematic numerical study of the phase behavior of square-well fluids with a "patchy" short-ranged attraction. In particular, we study the effect of the size and number of attractive patches on the fluid–fluid coexistence. The model that we use is a generalization of the hard sphere

  19. Direct identification of pure penicillium species using image analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dørge, Thorsten Carlheim; Carstensen, Jens Michael; Frisvad, Jens Christian

    2000-01-01

    recording. Isolates of nine different species of the genus Penicillium have been selected for the purpose. After incubation for 7 days, the fungal colonies are digitized using a very accurate digital camera. Prior to the image analysis each image is corrected for self-illumination, thereby gaining a set...

  20. THz Imaging Using Uncooled Wideband Direct Detection Focal Plane Arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Berkel, S.L.; Yurduseven, O.; Freni, Angelo; Neto, A.; Llombart Juan, N.

    2017-01-01

    In millimeter and submillimeter-wave radiometric imaging systems, a persistent goal is the increase in the speed of acquisition of the image while maintaining a high sensitivity. Typically, the highest sensitivity is achieved by cryogenically cooling the detectors, specifically in astronomical

  1. Nanomedicine: Perspective and promises with ligand-directed molecular imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan Dipanjan [Department of Medicine, Washington University Medical School, St. Louis, MO (United States)], E-mail: dipanjan@wustl.edu; Lanza, Gregory M.; Wickline, Samuel A. [Department of Medicine, Washington University Medical School, St. Louis, MO (United States); Caruthers, Shelton D. [Department of Medicine, Washington University Medical School, St. Louis, MO (United States); Philips Healthcare, Andover, MA (United States)], E-mail: scaruthers@cmrl.wustl.edu

    2009-05-15

    Molecular imaging and targeted drug delivery play an important role toward personalized medicine, which is the future of patient management. Of late, nanoparticle-based molecular imaging has emerged as an interdisciplinary area, which shows promises to understand the components, processes, dynamics and therapies of a disease at a molecular level. The unprecedented potential of nanoplatforms for early detection, diagnosis and personalized treatment of diseases, have found application in every biomedical imaging modality. Biological and biophysical barriers are overcome by the integration of targeting ligands, imaging agents and therapeutics into the nanoplatform which allow for theranostic applications. In this article, we have discussed the opportunities and potential of targeted molecular imaging with various modalities putting a particular emphasis on perfluorocarbon nanoemulsion-based platform technology.

  2. CT scan range estimation using multiple body parts detection: let PACS learn the CT image content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunliang; Lundström, Claes

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an efficient CT scan range estimation method that is based on the analysis of image data itself instead of metadata analysis. This makes it possible to quantitatively compare the scan range of two studies. In our study, 3D stacks are first projected to 2D coronal images via a ray casting-like process. Trained 2D body part classifiers are then used to recognize different body parts in the projected image. The detected candidate regions go into a structure grouping process to eliminate false-positive detections. Finally, the scale and position of the patient relative to the projected figure are estimated based on the detected body parts via a structural voting. The start and end lines of the CT scan are projected to a standard human figure. The position readout is normalized so that the bottom of the feet represents 0.0, and the top of the head is 1.0. Classifiers for 18 body parts were trained using 184 CT scans. The final application was tested on 136 randomly selected heterogeneous CT scans. Ground truth was generated by asking two human observers to mark the start and end positions of each scan on the standard human figure. When compared with the human observers, the mean absolute error of the proposed method is 1.2% (max: 3.5%) and 1.6% (max: 5.4%) for the start and end positions, respectively. We proposed a scan range estimation method using multiple body parts detection and relative structure position analysis. In our preliminary tests, the proposed method delivered promising results.

  3. A compact, short-pulse laser for near-field, range-gated imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zutavern, F.J.; Helgeson, W.D.; Loubriel, G.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Yates, G.J.; Gallegos, R.A.; McDonald, T.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes a compact laser, which produces high power, wide-angle emission for a near-field, range-gated, imaging system. The optical pulses are produced by a 100 element laser diode array (LDA) which is pulsed with a GaAs, photoconductive semiconductor switch (PCSS). The LDA generates 100 ps long, gain-switched, optical pulses at 904 nm when it is driven with 3 ns, 400 A, electrical pulses from a high gain PCSS. Gain switching is facilitated with this many lasers by using a low impedance circuit to drive an array of lasers, which are connected electrically in series. The total optical energy produced per pulse is 10 microjoules corresponding to a total peak power of 100 kW. The entire laser system, including prime power (a nine volt battery), pulse charging, PCSS, and LDA, is the size of a small, hand-held flashlight. System lifetime, which is presently limited by the high gain PCSS, is an active area of research and development. Present limitations and potential improvements will be discussed. The complete range-gated imaging system is based on complementary technologies: high speed optical gating with intensified charge coupled devices (ICCD) developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and high gain, PCSS-driven LDAs developed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The system is designed for use in highly scattering media such as turbid water or extremely dense fog or smoke. The short optical pulses from the laser and high speed gating of the ICCD are synchronized to eliminate the back-scattered light from outside the depth of the field of view (FOV) which may be as short as a few centimeters. A high speed photodiode can be used to trigger the intensifier gate and set the range-gated FOV precisely on the target. The ICCD and other aspects of the imaging system are discussed in a separate paper.

  4. CMOS radio frequency circuits for short-range direct-conversion receivers

    OpenAIRE

    Kaukovuori, Jouni

    2008-01-01

    The research described in this thesis is focused on the design and implementation of radio frequency (RF) circuits for direct-conversion receivers. The main interest is in RF front-end circuits, which contain low-noise amplifiers, downconversion mixers, and quadrature local oscillator signal generation circuits. Three RF front-end circuits were fabricated in a short-channel CMOS process and experimental results are presented. A low-noise amplifier (LNA) is typically the first amplifying b...

  5. 3D imaging by fast deconvolution algorithm in short-range UWB radar for concealed weapon detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Savelyev, T.; Yarovoy, A.

    2013-01-01

    A fast imaging algorithm for real-time use in short-range (ultra-wideband) radar with synthetic or real-array aperture is proposed. The reflected field is presented here as a convolution of the target reflectivity and point spread function (PSF) of the imaging system. To obtain a focused 3D image,

  6. A directly converting high-resolution intra-oral X-ray imaging sensor

    CERN Document Server

    Spartiotis, K; Schulman, T; Puhakka, K; Muukkonen, K

    2003-01-01

    A digital intra-oral X-ray imaging sensor with an active area of 3.6x2.9 cm sup 2 and consisting of six charge-integrating CMOS signal readout circuits bump bonded to one high-resistivity silicon pixel detector has been developed and tested. The pixel size is 35 mu m. The X-rays entering the sensor window are converted directly to electrical charge in the depleted detector material yielding minimum lateral signal spread and maximum image sharpness. The signal charge is collected on the gates of the input field effect transistors of the CMOS signal readout circuits. The analog signal readout is performed by multiplexing in the current mode independent of the signal charge collection enabling multiple readout cycles with negligible dead time and thus imaging with wide dynamic range. Since no intermediate conversion material of X-rays to visible light is needed, the sensor structure is very compact. The analog image signals are guided from the sensor output through a thin cable to signal processing, AD conversio...

  7. Molecular Imaging of Breast Cancer: Present and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eAlcantara

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Medical imaging technologies have undergone explosive growth over the past few decades and now play a central role in clinical oncology. But the truly transformative power of imaging in the clinical management of cancer patients lies ahead. Today, imaging is at a crossroads, with molecularly targeted imaging agents expected to broadly expand the capabilities of conventional anatomical imaging methods. Molecular imaging will allow clinicians to not only see where a tumour is located in the body, but also to visualize the expression and activity of specific molecules (e.g. proteases and protein kinases and biological processes (e.g. apoptosis, angiogenesis, and metastasis that influence tumour behavior and/or response to therapy. Breast cancer, the most common cancer among women and a research area where our group is actively involved, is a very heterogeneous disease with diverse patterns of development and response to treatment. Hence, molecular imaging is expected to have a major impact on this type of cancer, leading to important improvements in diagnosis, individualized treatment, and drug development, as well as our understanding of how breast cancer arises.

  8. Direct Penguin Counting Using Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, C. U.; Kim, H. C.; Kim, J. H.; Hong, S. G.

    2015-12-01

    This study presents an application of unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) images to monitor penguin colony in Baton Peninsula, King George Island, Antarctica. The area around Narębski Point located on the southeast coast of Barton Peninsula was designated as Antarctic Specially Protected Area No. 171 (ASPA 171), and Chinstrap and Gentoo penguins inhabit in this area. The UAV images were acquired in a part of ASPA 171 from four flights in a single day, Jan 18, 2014. About 360 images were mosaicked as an image of about 3 cm spatial resolution and then a subset including representative penguin rookeries was selected. The subset image was segmented based on gradient map of pixel values, and spectral and spatial attributes were assigned to each segment. The object based image analysis (OBIA) was conducted with consideration of spectral attributes including mean and minimum values of each segment and various shape attributes such as area, length, compactness and roundness to detect individual penguin. The segments indicating individual penguin were effectively detected on rookeries with high contrasts in the spectral and shape attributes. The importance of periodic and precise monitoring of penguins has been recognized because variations of their populations reflect environmental changes and disturbance from human activities. Utilization of very high resolution imaging method shown in this study can be applied to other penguin habitats in Antarctica, and the results will be able to support establishing effective environmental management plans.

  9. Close Range Photogrammetry for Direct Multiple Feature Positioning Measurement without Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorka Kortaberria

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study is to present a new method to carry out measurements so as to improve the positioning verification step in the wind hub part dimensional validation process. This enhancement will speed up the measuring procedures for these types of parts. An industrial photogrammetry based system was applied to take advantage of its results, and new functions were added to existing capabilities. In addition to a new development based on photogrammetry modelling and image processing, a measuring procedure was defined based on optical and vision system considerations. A validation against a certified procedure by means of a laser-tracker has also been established obtaining deviations of ±0.125 μm/m.

  10. Directly Imaging Planets with SCExAO: First Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Thayne M.; Guyon, Olivier; Jovanovic, Nemanja; Lozi, Julien; Tamura, Motohide; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Uyama, Taichi; Garcia, Eugenio

    2017-01-01

    We present the first science results from the newly commissioned Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme Adaptive Optics project, an experimental system dedicated to image faint jovian planets around nearby stars. SCExAO is now achieving true extreme AO capability. We describe the typical performance of SCExAO, the first images of benchmark exoplanets and planet-forming disks, and SCExAO’s first science results. Finally, we briefly chart the path forward for SCExAO to achieve its full scientific capability, including imaging mature planets in reflected light.

  11. Hemicellulose block copolymers made from woods for wide-range directed self-assembly lithography enabling wider range of applicable patterning size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Kazuyo; Yamamoto, Kimiko

    2017-03-01

    Xylan, one of hemicellulose family, block copolymer was newly developed for wide-range directed self-assembly lithography (DSA). Xylan is higher hydrophilic material because of having many hydroxy groups in one molecule. It means that xylan block copolymer has a possibility of high-chi block copolymer. Generally, DSA is focused on microphase separation for smaller size with high-chi block copolymer and not well known for larger size. In this study, xylan block copolymer was confirmed enabling wider range of patterning size, from smaller size to larger size. The key of xylan block copolymer is a new molecular structure of block copolymer and sugar chain control technology. Sugar content is the important parameter for not only micro-phase separation property but also line edge roughness (LER) and defects. Based on the sugar control technology, wide-range (hp 8.3nm to 26nm L/S and CD 10nm to 51nm hole) DSA patterning was demonstrated. Additionally it was confirmed that xylan block copolymer is suitable for sequential infiltration synthesis (SIS) process.

  12. Range estimation techniques in single-station thunderstorm warning sensors based upon gated, wideband, magnetic direction finder technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pifer, Alburt E.; Hiscox, William L.; Cummins, Kenneth L.; Neumann, William T.

    1991-01-01

    Gated, wideband, magnetic direction finders (DFs) were originally designed to measure the bearing of cloud-to-ground lightning relative to the sensor. A recent addition to this device uses proprietary waveform discrimination logic to select return stroke signatures and certain range dependent features in the waveform to provide an estimate of range of flashes within 50 kms. The enhanced ranging techniques are discussed which were designed and developed for use in single station thunderstorm warning sensor. Included are the results of on-going evaluations being conducted under a variety of meteorological and geographic conditions.

  13. A low-power high dynamic range front-end ASIC for imaging calorimeters

    CERN Document Server

    Bagliesi, M G; Marrocchesi, P S; Meucci, M; Millucci, V; Morsani, F; Paoletti, R; Pilo, F; Scribano, A; Turini, N; Valle, G D

    2002-01-01

    High granularity calorimeters with shower imaging capabilities require dedicated front-end electronics. The ICON 4CH and VA4 PMT chip-set is suitable for very high dynamic range systems with strict noise requirements. The ICON 4CH is a 4 channel input, 12 channel output ASIC designed for use in a multi-anode photomultiplier system with very large dynamic range and low-noise requirements. Each of the four input signals to the ASIC is split equally into three branches by a current conveyor. Each of the three branches is scaled differently: 1:1, 1:8 and 1:80. The signal is read out by a 12 channel low noise/low power high dynamic range charge sensitive preamplifier-shaper circuit (VA4-PMT chip), with simultaneous sample- and-hold, multiplexed analog read-out, calibration facilities. Tests performed in our lab with a PMT are reported in terms of linearity, dynamic range and cross-talk of the system. (5 refs).

  14. Application of lidar techniques to time-of-flight range imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whyte, Refael; Streeter, Lee; Cree, Michael J; Dorrington, Adrian A

    2015-11-20

    Amplitude-modulated continuous wave (AMCW) time-of-flight (ToF) range imaging cameras measure distance by illuminating the scene with amplitude-modulated light and measuring the phase difference between the transmitted and reflected modulation envelope. This method of optical range measurement suffers from errors caused by multiple propagation paths, motion, phase wrapping, and nonideal amplitude modulation. In this paper a ToF camera is modified to operate in modes analogous to continuous wave (CW) and stepped frequency continuous wave (SFCW) lidar. In CW operation the velocity of objects can be measured. CW measurement of velocity was linear with true velocity (R2=0.9969). Qualitative analysis of a complex scene confirms that range measured by SFCW is resilient to errors caused by multiple propagation paths, phase wrapping, and nonideal amplitude modulation which plague AMCW operation. In viewing a complicated scene through a translucent sheet, quantitative comparison of AMCW with SFCW demonstrated a reduction in the median error from -1.3  m to -0.06  m with interquartile range of error reduced from 4.0 m to 0.18 m.

  15. Research Investigation Directed Toward Extending the Useful Range of the Electromagnetic Spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-03-31

    in the semiconductor at a distance x from the surface, E is the dielectric constant of the semiconductor, and (x) = q(nno - Pno + Pn - n ) (4) is the... acid (HF). The samples were dried in N2 gas, and oxidized in dry 02 at 12000C in the presence of hydrogen chloride (HCl). High-tempera- 22ture (1200°C...hydrogen containing molecules. We are currently studying the vibrational relaxation of SO 2over the temperature range 210 K to 500 K. Sulphur dioxide has

  16. Research Investigation Directed Toward Extending the Useful Range of the Electromagnetic Spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-12-31

    1818 (1975). (14) D.R. Hardin, K.B. Woodall and R~. Grice , Mol. Phys. 26, 1057 (1973). (15) W.S. Struve, T. Kitigawa and D.R. Herschbach, J. Chem...cross sections until the maxima are reached. Because 4Tra n is 0the quantum mechanical result for a hard-sphere collisional cross section, the...intermediate n range, Li cross sections reach their maximum values slightly lower than Na by a difference of 1 to 3 in n; Li’s maxima are - . smaller

  17. Surface wave effects on long range IR imaging in the marine surface layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francius, M. J.; Kunz, G. J.; van Eijk, A. M. J.

    2005-08-01

    The quality of long range infrared (IR) imaging depends on the effects of atmospheric refraction and other pathintegrated effects (e.g., transmission losses, scintillation and blurring), which are strongly related to the prevailing meteorological conditions. EOSTAR is a PC based computer program to quantify these strong nonlinear effects in the marine atmospheric surface layer and to present a spectrally resolved target image influenced by atmospheric effects using ray tracing techniques for the individual camera pixels. Presently, the propagation is predicted with bulk atmospheric models and the sea surface is idealized by steady regular periodic Stokes' waves. Dynamical wind-waves interactions are not taken into account in this approach, although they may strongly modify the refractive index in the near-surface layer. Nonetheless, the inclusion of the sea surface in the ray tracer module already has a great impact on the near-surface grazing rays and thus influences the images especially in situations of super refraction and mirage. This work aims at improving the description of the sea surface in EOSTAR taking into account the non-uniformity of spatially resolved wind-generated waves and swell. A new surface module is developed to model surface wind-waves and swell in EOSTAR on the basis of meteorological observations and spectral wave modeling. Effects due to these new surfaces will be analyzed and presented.

  18. Range imaging observations of PMSE using the EISCAT VHF radar: Phase calibration and first results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. R. Fernandez

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel phase calibration technique for use with the multiple-frequency Range IMaging (RIM technique is introduced based on genetic algorithms. The method is used on data collected with the European Incoherent SCATter (EISCAT VHF radar during a 2002 experiment with the goal of characterizing the vertical structure of Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes (PMSE over northern Norway. For typical Doppler measurements, the initial phases of the transmitter and receiver are not required to be the same. The EISCAT receiver systems exploit this fact, allowing a multi-static configuration. However, the RIM method relies on the small phase differences between closely spaced frequencies. As a result, the high-resolution images produced by the RIM method can be significantly degraded if not properly calibrated. Using an enhanced numerical radar simulator, in which data from multiple sampling volumes are simultaneously generated, the proposed calibration method is validated. Subsequently, the method is applied to preliminary data from the EISCAT radar, providing first results of RIM images of PMSE. Data using conventional analysis techniques, and confirmed by RIM, reveal an often-observed double-layer structure with higher stability in the lower layer. Moreover, vertical velocity oscillations exhibit a clear correlation with the apparent motion of the layers shown in the echo power plots.

  19. Realization of High Dynamic Range Imaging in the GLORIA Network and Its Effect on Astronomical Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislav Vítek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Citizen science project GLORIA (GLObal Robotic-telescopes Intelligent Array is a first free- and open-access network of robotic telescopes in the world. It provides a web-based environment where users can do research in astronomy by observing with robotic telescopes and/or by analyzing data that other users have acquired with GLORIA or from other free-access databases. Network of 17 telescopes allows users to control selected telescopes in real time or schedule any more demanding observation. This paper deals with new opportunity that GLORIA project provides to teachers and students of various levels of education. At the moment, there are prepared educational materials related to events like Sun eclipse (measuring local atmosphere changes, Aurora Borealis (calculation of Northern Lights height, or transit of Venus (measurement of the Earth-Sun distance. Student should be able to learn principles of CCD imaging, spectral analysis, basic calibration like dark frames subtraction, or advanced methods of noise suppression. Every user of the network can design his own experiment. We propose advanced experiment aimed at obtaining astronomical image data with high dynamic range. We also introduce methods of objective image quality evaluation in order to discover how HDR methods are affecting astronomical measurements.

  20. Monitoring glacier variations in the Urubamba and Vilcabamba Mountain Ranges, Peru, using "Landsat 5" images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, Wilson; Cerna, Marcos; Ordoñez, Julio; Frey, Holger; Giráldez, Claudia; Huggel, Christian

    2013-04-01

    The Urubamba and Vilcabamba mountain ranges are two geological structures belonging to the Andes in the southern part of Peru, which is located in the tropical region. These mountain ranges are especially located within the transition area between the Amazon region (altitudes close to 1'000 m a.s.l.) and the Andes. These mountains, with a maximum height of 6'280 m a.s.l. (Salkantay Snow Peak in the Vilcabamba range), are characterized by glaciers mainly higher than 5000 m a.s.l. Here we present a study on the evolution of the ice cover based on "Landsat 5" images from 1991 and 2011 is presented in this paper. These data are freely available from the USGS in a georeferenced format and cover a time span of more than 25 years. The glacier mapping is based on the Normalized Difference Snow Index (NDSI). In 1991 the Vilcabamba mountain range had 221 km2 of glacier cover, being reduced to 116.4 km2 in 2011, which represents a loss of 48%. In the Urubamba mountain range, the total glacier area was 64.9 km2 in 1991 and 29.4 km2 in 2011, representing a loss of 54.7%. It means that the glacier area was halved during the past two decades although precipitation patterns show an increase in recent years (the wet season lasts from September to April with precipitation peaks in February and March). Glacier changes in these two tropical mountain ranges also impact from an economic point of view due to small local farming common in this region (use of water from the melting glacier). Furthermore, potential glacier related hazards can pose a threat to people and infrastructure in the valleys below these glaciers, where the access routes to Machu Picchu Inca City, Peru's main tourist destination, are located too.

  1. Anisotropic Margin Expansions in 6 Anatomic Directions for Oropharyngeal Image Guided Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yock, Adam D. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas (United States); Garden, Adam S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Court, Laurence E. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas (United States); Beadle, Beth M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zhang, Lifei [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Dong, Lei, E-mail: dong.lei@scrippshealth.org [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to determine the expansions in 6 anatomic directions that produced optimal margins considering nonrigid setup errors and tissue deformation for patients receiving image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) of the oropharynx. Methods and Materials: For 20 patients who had received IGRT to the head and neck, we deformably registered each patient's daily images acquired with a computed tomography (CT)-on-rails system to his or her planning CT. By use of the resulting vector fields, the positions of volume elements within the clinical target volume (CTV) (target voxels) or within a 1-cm shell surrounding the CTV (normal tissue voxels) on the planning CT were identified on each daily CT. We generated a total of 15,625 margins by dilating the CTV by 1, 2, 3, 4, or 5 mm in the posterior, anterior, lateral, medial, inferior, and superior directions. The optimal margins were those that minimized the relative volume of normal tissue voxels positioned within the margin while satisfying 1 of 4 geometric target coverage criteria and 1 of 3 population criteria. Results: Each pair of geometric target coverage and population criteria resulted in a unique, anisotropic, optimal margin. The optimal margin expansions ranged in magnitude from 1 to 5 mm depending on the anatomic direction of the expansion and on the geometric target coverage and population criteria. Typically, the expansions were largest in the medial direction, were smallest in the lateral direction, and increased with the demand of the criteria. The anisotropic margin resulting from the optimal set of expansions always included less normal tissue than did any isotropic margin that satisfied the same pair of criteria. Conclusions: We demonstrated the potential of anisotropic margins to reduce normal tissue exposure without compromising target coverage in IGRT to the head and neck.

  2. Anisotropic Margin Expansions in 6 Anatomic Directions for Oropharyngeal Image Guided Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yock, Adam D.; Garden, Adam S.; Court, Laurence E.; Beadle, Beth M.; Zhang, Lifei; Dong, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this work was to determine the expansions in 6 anatomic directions that produced optimal margins considering nonrigid setup errors and tissue deformation for patients receiving image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) of the oropharynx. Methods and Materials For 20 patients who had received IGRT to the head and neck, we deformably registered each patient's daily images acquired with a computed tomography (CT)-on-rails system to his or her planning CT. By use of the resulting vector fields, the positions of volume elements within the clinical target volume (CTV) (target voxels) or within a 1-cm shell surrounding the CTV (normal tissue voxels) on the planning CT were identified on each daily CT. We generated a total of 15,625 margins by dilating the CTV by 1, 2, 3, 4, or 5 mm in the posterior, anterior, lateral, medial, inferior, and superior directions. The optimal margins were those that minimized the relative volume of normal tissue voxels positioned within the margin while satisfying 1 of 4 geometric target coverage criteria and 1 of 3 population criteria. Results Each pair of geometric target coverage and population criteria resulted in a unique, anisotropic, optimal margin. The optimal margin expansions ranged in magnitude from 1 to 5 mm depending on the anatomic direction of the expansion and on the geometric target coverage and population criteria. Typically, the expansions were largest in the medial direction, were smallest in the lateral direction, and increased with the demand of the criteria. The anisotropic margin resulting from the optimal set of expansions always included less normal tissue than did any isotropic margin that satisfied the same pair of criteria. Conclusions We demonstrated the potential of anisotropic margins to reduce normal tissue exposure without compromising target coverage in IGRT to the head and neck. PMID:23906931

  3. Direct milling and casting of polymer-based optical waveguides for improved transparency in the visible range

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snakenborg, Detlef; Perozziello, Gerardo; Klank, Henning

    2006-01-01

    properties. Direct micromilling enabled us to fabricate 100 mu m wide optical waveguides. Propagation losses of less than 1 dB cm(-1) could be achieved throughout the entire visual range down to a wavelength of 400 nm. A casting process amenable to high number production of such devices was furthermore...

  4. Transverse flow imaging using synthetic aperture directional beamforming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Nikolov, Svetoslav

    2002-01-01

    Current ultrasound scanners only determine the velocity along the ultrasound beam, since data is only focused along the emitted beam. Synthetic aperture ultrasound systems have the capability of focusing simultaneously in all directions. This is used here to focus along the flow direction and the...

  5. Direct Parametric Image Reconstruction in Reduced Parameter Space for Rapid Multi-Tracer PET Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiaoyin; Li, Zhoulei; Liu, Zhen; Navab, Nassir; Huang, Sung-Cheng; Keller, Ulrich; Ziegler, Sibylle; Shi, Kuangyu

    2015-02-12

    The separation of multiple PET tracers within an overlapping scan based on intrinsic differences of tracer pharmacokinetics is challenging, due to limited signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of PET measurements and high complexity of fitting models. In this study, we developed a direct parametric image reconstruction (DPIR) method for estimating kinetic parameters and recovering single tracer information from rapid multi-tracer PET measurements. This is achieved by integrating a multi-tracer model in a reduced parameter space (RPS) into dynamic image reconstruction. This new RPS model is reformulated from an existing multi-tracer model and contains fewer parameters for kinetic fitting. Ordered-subsets expectation-maximization (OSEM) was employed to approximate log-likelihood function with respect to kinetic parameters. To incorporate the multi-tracer model, an iterative weighted nonlinear least square (WNLS) method was employed. The proposed multi-tracer DPIR (MTDPIR) algorithm was evaluated on dual-tracer PET simulations ([18F]FDG and [11C]MET) as well as on preclinical PET measurements ([18F]FLT and [18F]FDG). The performance of the proposed algorithm was compared to the indirect parameter estimation method with the original dual-tracer model. The respective contributions of the RPS technique and the DPIR method to the performance of the new algorithm were analyzed in detail. For the preclinical evaluation, the tracer separation results were compared with single [18F]FDG scans of the same subjects measured 2 days before the dual-tracer scan. The results of the simulation and preclinical studies demonstrate that the proposed MT-DPIR method can improve the separation of multiple tracers for PET image quantification and kinetic parameter estimations.

  6. Applications of the Integrated High-Performance CMOS Image Sensor to Range Finders - from Optical Triangulation to the Automotive Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jih-Huah; Pen, Cheng-Chung; Jiang, Joe-Air

    2008-03-13

    With their significant features, the applications of complementary metal-oxidesemiconductor (CMOS) image sensors covers a very extensive range, from industrialautomation to traffic applications such as aiming systems, blind guidance, active/passiverange finders, etc. In this paper CMOS image sensor-based active and passive rangefinders are presented. The measurement scheme of the proposed active/passive rangefinders is based on a simple triangulation method. The designed range finders chieflyconsist of a CMOS image sensor and some light sources such as lasers or LEDs. Theimplementation cost of our range finders is quite low. Image processing software to adjustthe exposure time (ET) of the CMOS image sensor to enhance the performance oftriangulation-based range finders was also developed. An extensive series of experimentswere conducted to evaluate the performance of the designed range finders. From theexperimental results, the distance measurement resolutions achieved by the active rangefinder and the passive range finder can be better than 0.6% and 0.25% within themeasurement ranges of 1 to 8 m and 5 to 45 m, respectively. Feasibility tests onapplications of the developed CMOS image sensor-based range finders to the automotivefield were also conducted. The experimental results demonstrated that our range finders arewell-suited for distance measurements in this field.

  7. Direct imaging Raman microscope based on tunable wavelength excitation and narrow band emission detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Puppels, G.J.; Puppels, G.J.; Grond, M.; Grond, M.; Greve, Jan

    1993-01-01

    A new type of imaging Raman microscope is described. First the advantages and disadvantages of the two possible approaches to Raman microscopy based on signal detection by means of a charge-coupled-device camera (i.e., direct imaging and image reconstruction) are discussed. Arguments are given to

  8. Direct observation of ultrafast long-range charge separation at polymer–fullerene heterojunctions

    KAUST Repository

    Provencher, Françoise

    2014-07-01

    In polymeric semiconductors, charge carriers are polarons, which means that the excess charge deforms the molecular structure of the polymer chain that hosts it. This results in distinctive signatures in the vibrational modes of the polymer. Here, we probe polaron photogeneration dynamics at polymer:fullerene heterojunctions by monitoring its time-resolved resonance-Raman spectrum following ultrafast photoexcitation. We conclude that polarons emerge within 300 fs. Surprisingly, further structural evolution on ≤50-ps timescales is modest, indicating that the polymer conformation hosting nascent polarons is not significantly different from that near equilibrium. We interpret this as suggestive that charges are free from their mutual Coulomb potential because we would expect rich vibrational dynamics associated with charge-pair relaxation. We address current debates on the photocarrier generation mechanism at molecular heterojunctions, and our work is, to our knowledge, the first direct probe of molecular conformation dynamics during this fundamentally important process in these materials. © 2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  9. Speciation and extinction drive the appearance of directional range size evolution in phylogenies and the fossil record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigot, Alex L; Owens, Ian P F; Orme, C David L

    2012-01-01

    While the geographic range of a species is a fundamental unit of macroecology and a leading predictor of extinction risk, the evolutionary dynamics of species' ranges remain poorly understood. Based on statistical associations between range size and species age, many studies have claimed support for general models of range evolution in which the area occupied by a species varies predictably over the course of its life. Such claims have been made using both paleontological data and molecular estimates of the age of extant species. However, using a stochastic model, we show that the appearance of trends in range size with species' age can arise even when range sizes have evolved at random through time. This occurs because the samples of species used in existing studies are likely to be biased with respect to range size: for example, only those species that happened to have large or expanding ranges are likely to survive to the present, while extinct species will tend to be those whose ranges, by chance, declined through time. We compared the relationship between the age and range size of species arising under our stochastic model to those observed across 1,269 species of extant birds and mammals and 140 species of extinct Cenozoic marine mollusks. We find that the stochastic model is able to generate the full spectrum of empirical age-area relationships, implying that such trends cannot be simply interpreted as evidence for models of directional range size evolution. Our results therefore challenge the theory that species undergo predictable phases of geographic expansion and contraction through time.

  10. Speciation and Extinction Drive the Appearance of Directional Range Size Evolution in Phylogenies and the Fossil Record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigot, Alex L.; Owens, Ian P. F.; Orme, C. David L.

    2012-01-01

    While the geographic range of a species is a fundamental unit of macroecology and a leading predictor of extinction risk, the evolutionary dynamics of species' ranges remain poorly understood. Based on statistical associations between range size and species age, many studies have claimed support for general models of range evolution in which the area occupied by a species varies predictably over the course of its life. Such claims have been made using both paleontological data and molecular estimates of the age of extant species. However, using a stochastic model, we show that the appearance of trends in range size with species' age can arise even when range sizes have evolved at random through time. This occurs because the samples of species used in existing studies are likely to be biased with respect to range size: for example, only those species that happened to have large or expanding ranges are likely to survive to the present, while extinct species will tend to be those whose ranges, by chance, declined through time. We compared the relationship between the age and range size of species arising under our stochastic model to those observed across 1,269 species of extant birds and mammals and 140 species of extinct Cenozoic marine mollusks. We find that the stochastic model is able to generate the full spectrum of empirical age–area relationships, implying that such trends cannot be simply interpreted as evidence for models of directional range size evolution. Our results therefore challenge the theory that species undergo predictable phases of geographic expansion and contraction through time. PMID:22371689

  11. Speciation and extinction drive the appearance of directional range size evolution in phylogenies and the fossil record.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex L Pigot

    Full Text Available While the geographic range of a species is a fundamental unit of macroecology and a leading predictor of extinction risk, the evolutionary dynamics of species' ranges remain poorly understood. Based on statistical associations between range size and species age, many studies have claimed support for general models of range evolution in which the area occupied by a species varies predictably over the course of its life. Such claims have been made using both paleontological data and molecular estimates of the age of extant species. However, using a stochastic model, we show that the appearance of trends in range size with species' age can arise even when range sizes have evolved at random through time. This occurs because the samples of species used in existing studies are likely to be biased with respect to range size: for example, only those species that happened to have large or expanding ranges are likely to survive to the present, while extinct species will tend to be those whose ranges, by chance, declined through time. We compared the relationship between the age and range size of species arising under our stochastic model to those observed across 1,269 species of extant birds and mammals and 140 species of extinct Cenozoic marine mollusks. We find that the stochastic model is able to generate the full spectrum of empirical age-area relationships, implying that such trends cannot be simply interpreted as evidence for models of directional range size evolution. Our results therefore challenge the theory that species undergo predictable phases of geographic expansion and contraction through time.

  12. Half-time Tc-99m sestamibi imaging with a direct conversion molecular breast imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hruska, Carrie B; Conners, Amy Lynn; Jones, Katie N; Weinmann, Amanda L; Lingineni, Ravi K; Carter, Rickey E; Rhodes, Deborah J; O'Connor, Michael K

    2014-01-15

    In an effort to reduce necessary acquisition time to perform molecular breast imaging (MBI), we compared diagnostic performance of MBI performed with standard 10-min-per-view acquisitions and half-time 5-min-per-view acquisitions, with and without wide beam reconstruction (WBR) processing. Eighty-two bilateral, two-view MBI studies were reviewed. Studies were performed with 300 MBq Tc-99 m sestamibi and a direct conversion molecular breast imaging (DC-MBI) system. Acquisitions were 10 min-per-view; the first half of each was extracted to create 5-min-per-view datasets, and WBR processing was applied.The 10-min-, 5-min-, and 5-min-per-view WBR studies were independently interpreted in a randomized, blinded fashion by two radiologists. Assessments of 1 to 5 were assigned; 4 and 5 were considered test positive. Background parenchymal uptake, lesion type, distribution of non-mass lesions, lesion intensity, and image quality were described. Considering detection of all malignant and benign lesions, 5 min-per-view MBI had lower sensitivity (mean of 70% vs. 85% (p ≤ 0.04) for two readers) and lower area under curve (AUC) (mean of 92.7 vs. 99.6, p ≤ 0.01) but had similar specificity (p = 1.0). WBR processing did not alter sensitivity, specificity, or AUC obtained at 5 min-per-view.Overall agreement in final assessment between 5-min-per-view and 10-min-per-view acquisition types was near perfect (κ = 0.82 to 0.89); however, fair to moderate agreement was observed for assessment category 3 (probably benign) (κ = 0.24 to 0.48). Of 33 malignant lesions, 6 (18%) were changed from assessment of 4 or 5 with 10-min-per-view MBI to assessment of 3 with 5-min-per-view MBI. Image quality of 5-min-per-view studies was reduced compared to 10-min-per-view studies for both readers (3.24 vs. 3.98, p < 0.0001 and 3.60 vs. 3.91, p < 0.0001). WBR processing improved image quality for one reader (3.85 vs. 3.24, p < 0.0001). Although similar

  13. High-Performance Anti-Retransmission Deception Jamming Utilizing Range Direction Multiple Input and Multiple Output (MIMO) Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruijia; Chen, Jie; Wang, Xing; Sun, Bing

    2017-01-09

    Retransmission deception jamming seriously degrades the Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) detection efficiency and can mislead SAR image interpretation by forming false targets. In order to suppress retransmission deception jamming, this paper proposes a novel multiple input and multiple output (MIMO) SAR structure range direction MIMO SAR, whose multiple channel antennas are vertical to the azimuth. First, based on the multiple channels of range direction MIMO SAR, the orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) linear frequency modulation (LFM) signal was adopted as the transmission signal of each channel, which is defined as a sub-band signal. This sub-band signal corresponds to the transmission channel. Then, all of the sub-band signals are modulated with random initial phases and concurrently transmitted. The signal form is more complex and difficult to intercept. Next, the echoes of the sub-band signal are utilized to synthesize a wide band signal after preprocessing. The proposed method will increase the signal to interference ratio and peak amplitude ratio of the signal to resist retransmission deception jamming. Finally, well-focused SAR imagery is obtained using a conventional imaging method where the retransmission deception jamming strength is degraded and defocused. Simulations demonstrated the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  14. Initial Comparison of the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) with Lightning Detection and Ranging (LDAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushio, Tomoo; Driscoll, Kevin; Heckman, Stan; Boccippio, Dennis; Koshak, William; Christian, Hugh

    1999-01-01

    The mapping of the lightning optical pulses detected by the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) is compared with the radiation sources by Lightning Detection and Ranging (LDAR) and the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) for three thunderstorms observed during and overpasses on 15 August 1998. The comparison involves 122 flashes including 42 ground and 80 cloud flashes. For ground flash, the LIS recorded the subsequent strokes and changes inside the cloud. For cloud flashes, LIS recorded those with higher sources in altitude and larger number of sources. The discrepancies between the LIS and LDAR flash locations are about 4.3 km for cloud flashes and 12.2 km for ground flashes. The reason for these differences remain a mystery.

  15. Design and fabrication of the New Horizons Long-Range Reconnaissance Imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conard, S. J.; Azad, F.; Boldt, J. D.; Cheng, A.; Cooper, K. A.; Darlington, E. H.; Grey, M. P.; Hayes, J. R.; Hogue, P.; Kosakowski, K. E.; Magee, T.; Morgan, M. F.; Rossano, E.; Sampath, D.; Schlemm, C.; Weaver, H. A.

    2005-09-01

    The LOng-Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) is an instrument that was designed, fabricated, and qualified for the New Horizons mission to the outermost planet Pluto, its giant satellite Charon, and the Kuiper Belt, which is the vast belt of icy bodies extending roughly from Neptune's orbit out to 50 astronomical units (AU). New Horizons is being prepared for launch in January 2006 as the inaugural mission in NASA's New Frontiers program. This paper provides an overview of the efforts to produce LORRI. LORRI is a narrow angle (field of view=0.29°), high resolution (instantaneous field of view = 4.94 μrad), Ritchey-Chretien telescope with a 20.8 cm diameter primary mirror, a focal length of 263 cm, and a three lens field-flattening assembly. A 1024 x 1024 pixel (optically active region), back-thinned, backside-illuminated charge-coupled device (CCD) detector (model CCD 47-20 from E2V Technologies) is located at the telescope focal plane and is operated in standard frame-transfer mode. LORRI does not have any color filters; it provides panchromatic imaging over a wide bandpass that extends approximately from 350 nm to 850 nm. A unique aspect of LORRI is the extreme thermal environment, as the instrument is situated inside a near room temperature spacecraft, while pointing primarily at cold space. This environment forced the use of a silicon carbide optical system, which is designed to maintain focus over the operating temperature range without a focus adjustment mechanism. Another challenging aspect of the design is that the spacecraft will be thruster stabilized (no reaction wheels), which places stringent limits on the available exposure time and the optical throughput needed to accomplish the high-resolution observations required. LORRI was designed and fabricated by a combined effort of The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) and SSG Precision Optronics Incorporated (SSG).

  16. Cardiac MR imaging: current status and future direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van, Tu Anh; Krug, Roland; Hetts, Steven W.; Wilson, Mark W.

    2015-01-01

    Coronary artery disease is currently a worldwide epidemic with increasing impact on healthcare systems. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences give complementary information on LV function, regional perfusion, angiogenesis, myocardial viability and orientations of myocytes. T2-weighted short-tau inversion recovery (T2-STIR), fat suppression and black blood sequences have been frequently used for detecting edematous area at risk (AAR) of infarction. T2 mapping, however, indicated that the edematous reaction in acute myocardial infarct (AMI) is not stable and warranted the use of edematous area in evaluating therapies. On the other hand, cine MRI demonstrated reproducible data on LV function in healthy volunteers and LV remodeling in patients. Noninvasive first pass perfusion, using exogenous tracer (gadolinium-based contrast media) and arterial spin labeling MRI, using endogenous tracer (water), are sensitive and useful techniques for evaluating myocardial perfusion and angiogenesis. Recently, new strategies have been developed to quantify myocardial viability using T1-mapping and equilibrium contrast enhanced MR techniques because existing delayed contrast enhancement MRI (DE-MRI) sequences are limited in detecting patchy microinfarct and diffuse fibrosis. These new techniques were successfully used for characterizing diffuse myocardial fibrosis associated with myocarditis, amyloidosis, sarcoidosis heart failure, aortic hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, congenital heart disease, restrictive cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia and hypertension). Diffusion MRI provides information regarding microscopic tissue structure, while diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) helps to characterize the myocardium and monitor the process of LV remodeling after AMI. Novel trends in hybrid imaging, such as cardiac positron emission tomography (PET)/MRI and optical imaging/MRI, are recently under intensive investigation. With the promise of higher spatial

  17. Cardiac MR imaging: current status and future direction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Maythem; Van, Tu Anh; Krug, Roland; Hetts, Steven W; Wilson, Mark W

    2015-08-01

    Coronary artery disease is currently a worldwide epidemic with increasing impact on healthcare systems. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences give complementary information on LV function, regional perfusion, angiogenesis, myocardial viability and orientations of myocytes. T2-weighted short-tau inversion recovery (T2-STIR), fat suppression and black blood sequences have been frequently used for detecting edematous area at risk (AAR) of infarction. T2 mapping, however, indicated that the edematous reaction in acute myocardial infarct (AMI) is not stable and warranted the use of edematous area in evaluating therapies. On the other hand, cine MRI demonstrated reproducible data on LV function in healthy volunteers and LV remodeling in patients. Noninvasive first pass perfusion, using exogenous tracer (gadolinium-based contrast media) and arterial spin labeling MRI, using endogenous tracer (water), are sensitive and useful techniques for evaluating myocardial perfusion and angiogenesis. Recently, new strategies have been developed to quantify myocardial viability using T1-mapping and equilibrium contrast enhanced MR techniques because existing delayed contrast enhancement MRI (DE-MRI) sequences are limited in detecting patchy microinfarct and diffuse fibrosis. These new techniques were successfully used for characterizing diffuse myocardial fibrosis associated with myocarditis, amyloidosis, sarcoidosis heart failure, aortic hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, congenital heart disease, restrictive cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia and hypertension). Diffusion MRI provides information regarding microscopic tissue structure, while diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) helps to characterize the myocardium and monitor the process of LV remodeling after AMI. Novel trends in hybrid imaging, such as cardiac positron emission tomography (PET)/MRI and optical imaging/MRI, are recently under intensive investigation. With the promise of higher spatial

  18. Low-complexity Compression of High Dynamic Range Infrared Images with JPEG compatibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belyaev, Evgeny; Mantel, Claire; Forchhammer, Søren

    2017-01-01

    data size, then we include the raw residual image instead. If the residual image contains only zero values or the quality factor for it is 0 then we do not include the residual image into the header. Experimental results show that compared with JPEG-XT Part 6 with ’global Reinhard’ tone-mapping....... Then we compress each image by a JPEG baseline encoder and include the residual image bit stream into the application part of JPEG header of the base image. As a result, the base image can be reconstructed by JPEG baseline decoder. If the JPEG bit stream size of the residual image is higher than the raw...

  19. A clutter-calibrated Hough transform for the estimation of directional structure and dominant directions in grey-level images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fathi Hamed

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Increasing amounts of image data are being routinely collected as part of the big-data revolution, with applications as diverse as automated security surveillance and dynamic medical imaging. To make best use of the data, the analyses must be automatic and rapid.  Simple image properties can be used to highlight specific features in an initial screening or form input to elaborate classification techniques. A key stage in any image analysis is the identification of structure amongst the noise. It is important to realise that noise can be localized, independent and random, or it could contain small-scale structure which, in some ways, resembles the important features---this is called clutter. This paper uses the concept of the Hough transform to convert grey-level images into a more useful feature space representation. This space is searched for high density regions to identify dominant structure whilst taking into account micro-line clutter. Further, a directional distribution is introduced and a resulting dominant direct is proposed as a single structural summary.Many examples of simulated and real data images are used to illustrate the proposed techniques.

  20. Discrimination between Sedimentary Rocks from Close-Range Visible and Very-Near-Infrared Images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Del Pozo

    Full Text Available Variation in the mineral composition of rocks results in a change of their spectral response capable of being studied by imaging spectroscopy. This paper proposes the use of a low-cost handy sensor, a calibrated visible-very near infrared (VIS-VNIR multispectral camera for the recognition of different geological formations. The spectral data was recorded by a Tetracam Mini-MCA-6 camera mounted on a field-based platform covering six bands in the spectral range of 0.530-0.801 µm. Twelve sedimentary formations were selected in the Rhône-Alpes region (France to analyse the discrimination potential of this camera for rock types and close-range mapping applications. After proper corrections and data processing, a supervised classification of the multispectral data was performed trying to distinguish four classes: limestones, marlstones, vegetation and shadows. After a maximum-likelihood classification, results confirmed that this camera can be efficiently exploited to map limestone-marlstone alternations in geological formations with this mineral composition.

  1. Study for online range monitoring with the interaction vertex imaging method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finck, Ch; Karakaya, Y.; Reithinger, V.; Rescigno, R.; Baudot, J.; Constanzo, J.; Juliani, D.; Krimmer, J.; Rinaldi, I.; Rousseau, M.; Testa, E.; Vanstalle, M.; Ray, C.

    2017-12-01

    Ion beam therapy enables a highly accurate dose conformation delivery to the tumor due to the finite range of charged ions in matter (i.e. Bragg peak (BP)). Consequently, the dose profile is very sensitive to patients anatomical changes as well as minor mispositioning, and so it requires improved dose control techniques. Proton interaction vertex imaging (IVI) could offer an online range control in carbon ion therapy. In this paper, a statistical method was used to study the sensitivity of the IVI technique on experimental data obtained from the Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center. The vertices of secondary protons were reconstructed with pixelized silicon detectors. The statistical study used the χ2 test of the reconstructed vertex distributions for a given displacement of the BP position as a function of the impinging carbon ions. Different phantom configurations were used with or without bone equivalent tissue and air inserts. The inflection points in the fall-off region of the longitudinal vertex distribution were computed using different methods, while the relation with the BP position was established. In the present setup, the resolution of the BP position was about 4–5 mm in the homogeneous phantom under clinical conditions (106 incident carbon ions). Our results show that the IVI method could therefore monitor the BP position with a promising resolution in clinical conditions.

  2. Discrimination between Sedimentary Rocks from Close-Range Visible and Very-Near-Infrared Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Pozo, Susana; Lindenbergh, Roderik; Rodríguez-Gonzálvez, Pablo; Kees Blom, Jan; González-Aguilera, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Variation in the mineral composition of rocks results in a change of their spectral response capable of being studied by imaging spectroscopy. This paper proposes the use of a low-cost handy sensor, a calibrated visible-very near infrared (VIS-VNIR) multispectral camera for the recognition of different geological formations. The spectral data was recorded by a Tetracam Mini-MCA-6 camera mounted on a field-based platform covering six bands in the spectral range of 0.530-0.801 µm. Twelve sedimentary formations were selected in the Rhône-Alpes region (France) to analyse the discrimination potential of this camera for rock types and close-range mapping applications. After proper corrections and data processing, a supervised classification of the multispectral data was performed trying to distinguish four classes: limestones, marlstones, vegetation and shadows. After a maximum-likelihood classification, results confirmed that this camera can be efficiently exploited to map limestone-marlstone alternations in geological formations with this mineral composition.

  3. Fusion of range-based data and image-based datasets for efficient documentation of cultural heritage objects and sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerma, J. L.; Cabrelles, M.; Navarro, S.

    2015-08-01

    Nowadays it is possible to measure accurately dense point clouds either with aerial/terrestrial laser scanning systems or with imagebased solutions (namely based on photogrammetric computer vision algorithms such as structure-from-motion (SfM)), from which highly detailed 3D models can be achieved. Besides, direct tools in the form of simple devices such as rulers, compass and plumblines are usually required in simple metric surveys, as well as high-end surveying and geodetic instruments such as robotized imagebased total stations and GNSS (probably to a lesser degree but still required) to set the archaeological/architectural recording project in a global reference frame. With all this gamut of image-based and range-based sensors and datasets (in the form of coordinates, point clouds or 3D models), in different coordinate systems (most of the times local for each device), lack of uniform scale, orientation and levelling, the fusion of data tends to be cumbersome. This paper presents an efficient way to fuse and merge different datasets in the form of point clouds/3D models and geodetic/UTM coordinates. The new developed 3DVEM - Register GEO software is able to handle datasets coming from both direct and indirect methods in order to provide unified and precise deliverables.

  4. NETWORK DESIGN IN CLOSE-RANGE PHOTOGRAMMETRY WITH SHORT BASELINE IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Barazzetti

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The avaibility of automated software for image-based 3D modelling has changed the way people acquire images for photogrammetric applications. Short baseline images are required to match image points with SIFT-like algorithms, obtaining more images than those necessary for “old fashioned” photogrammetric projects based on manual measurements. This paper describes some considerations on network design for short baseline image sequences, especially on precision and reliability of bundle adjustment. Simulated results reveal that the large number of 3D points used for image orientation has very limited impact on network precision.

  5. Network Design in Close-Range Photogrammetry with Short Baseline Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barazzetti, L.

    2017-08-01

    The avaibility of automated software for image-based 3D modelling has changed the way people acquire images for photogrammetric applications. Short baseline images are required to match image points with SIFT-like algorithms, obtaining more images than those necessary for "old fashioned" photogrammetric projects based on manual measurements. This paper describes some considerations on network design for short baseline image sequences, especially on precision and reliability of bundle adjustment. Simulated results reveal that the large number of 3D points used for image orientation has very limited impact on network precision.

  6. Band-Limited Masks and Direct Imaging of Exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchner, Marc J.

    2009-01-01

    Band-limited masks have become the baseline design for what is now called "classical TPF" and also the N|RCamcomnagraphonJW8 .This technology remains one of the most promising paths for direct detection ofmxop|anedm and disks. I'll describe some of the latest progress in the implementation of this technique and what we have learned about where it can and can not be effectively applied.

  7. Crosswell Imaging Technology & Advanced DSR Navigation for Horizontal Directional Drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larry Stolarczyk

    2008-08-08

    The objective of Phase II is to develop and demonstrate real-time measurement-while-drilling (MWD) for guidance and navigation of drill strings during horizontal drilling operations applicable to both short and long holes. The end product of Phase II is a functional drill-string assembly outfitted with a commercial version of Drill String Radar (DSR). Project Objectives Develop and demonstrate a dual-phase methodology of in-seam drilling, imaging, and structure confirmation. This methodology, illustrated in Figure 1, includes: (1) Using RIM to image between drill holes for seam thickness estimates and in-seam structures detection. Completed, February 2005; and (2) Using DSR for real-time MWD guidance and navigation of drillstrings during horizontal drilling operations. Completed, November 2008. As of November 2008, the Phase II portion of Contract DE-FC26-04NT42085 is about 99% complete, including milestones and tasks original outlined as Phase II work. The one percent deficiency results from MSHA-related approvals which have yet to be granted (at the time of reporting). These approvals are pending and are do not negatively impact the scope of work or project objectives.

  8. Indexing and retrieving Web documents as direct manipulation of images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, Fernando; Grifoni, Patrizia; Mussio, Piero; Padula, Marco

    2000-12-01

    The rapid growth of network communication through the World Wide Web has encouraged a large diffusion of connections to Internet, due to the heavily interactive services which are offered for accessing, using and producing the incredible mass of information and more general resources which is now available. People communicating in this environment are usually end users whom are not skilled in computer science and are experienced in a specific area; they are generally interested in search, producing information, and accessibility. The phenomenon of the World Wide Web is producing a significant change in the concept of document, which is becoming strongly visual and dynamically arranged. A document is an image, and an image is a document. This change requires a new approach in presenting, authoring, indexing and querying a web document. In the paper we propose visual language defined to reach the previously introduced goals, discussing the case of an Information Base containing clinical data. Notwithstanding the amount and the heterogeneity of the data available, it is quite difficult to access truly interesting information and to suitably exploit it; this is due to the poor usability of tools which offer and interaction style still limited with respect to the interfaces WIMP (Window, Icons, Menu, Pointers) and to the indexing techniques usually adopted to organize the web pages by means of robots and search engines.

  9. Imaging of thoracic tuberculosis in children: current and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodhi, Kushaljit Singh; Bhalla, Ashu S; Mahomed, Nasreen; Laya, Bernard F

    2017-09-01

    Tuberculosis continues to be an important cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. It is the leading cause of infection-related deaths worldwide. Children are amongst the high-risk groups for developing tuberculosis and often pose a challenge to the clinicians in making a definitive diagnosis. The newly released global tuberculosis report from World Health Organization reveals a 50% increase in fatality from tuberculosis in children. Significantly, diagnostic and treatment algorithms of tuberculosis for children differ from those of adults. Bacteriologic confirmation of the disease is often difficult in children; hence radiologists have an important role to play in early diagnosis of this disease. Despite advancing technology, the key diagnostic imaging modalities for primary care and emergency services, especially in rural and low-resource areas, are chest radiography and ultrasonography. In this article, we discuss various diagnostic imaging modalities used in diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis and their indications. We highlight the use of US as point-of-care service along with mediastinal US and rapid MRI protocols, especially in mediastinal lymphadenopathy and thoracic complications. MRI is the ideal modality in high-resource areas when adequate infrastructure is available. Because the prevalence of tuberculosis is highest in lower-resource countries, we also discuss global initiatives in low-resource settings.

  10. Imaging of thoracic tuberculosis in children: current and future directions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sodhi, Kushaljit Singh [Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Department of Radiodiagnosis and Imaging, Chandigarh (India); Bhalla, Ashu S. [All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), Department of Radiodiagnosis, New Delhi (India); Mahomed, Nasreen [University of Witwatersrand, Department of Radiology, Rahima Moosa Mother and Child Hospital, Johannesburg (South Africa); Laya, Bernard F. [St. Luke' s Medical Center-Global City, Institute of Radiology, Taguig City (Philippines)

    2017-09-15

    Tuberculosis continues to be an important cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. It is the leading cause of infection-related deaths worldwide. Children are amongst the high-risk groups for developing tuberculosis and often pose a challenge to the clinicians in making a definitive diagnosis. The newly released global tuberculosis report from World Health Organization reveals a 50% increase in fatality from tuberculosis in children. Significantly, diagnostic and treatment algorithms of tuberculosis for children differ from those of adults. Bacteriologic confirmation of the disease is often difficult in children; hence radiologists have an important role to play in early diagnosis of this disease. Despite advancing technology, the key diagnostic imaging modalities for primary care and emergency services, especially in rural and low-resource areas, are chest radiography and ultrasonography. In this article, we discuss various diagnostic imaging modalities used in diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis and their indications. We highlight the use of US as point-of-care service along with mediastinal US and rapid MRI protocols, especially in mediastinal lymphadenopathy and thoracic complications. MRI is the ideal modality in high-resource areas when adequate infrastructure is available. Because the prevalence of tuberculosis is highest in lower-resource countries, we also discuss global initiatives in low-resource settings. (orig.)

  11. Cloud cover detection combining high dynamic range sky images and ceilometer measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Román, R.; Cazorla, A.; Toledano, C.; Olmo, F. J.; Cachorro, V. E.; de Frutos, A.; Alados-Arboledas, L.

    2017-11-01

    This paper presents a new algorithm for cloud detection based on high dynamic range images from a sky camera and ceilometer measurements. The algorithm is also able to detect the obstruction of the sun. This algorithm, called CPC (Camera Plus Ceilometer), is based on the assumption that under cloud-free conditions the sky field must show symmetry. The symmetry criteria are applied depending on ceilometer measurements of the cloud base height. CPC algorithm is applied in two Spanish locations (Granada and Valladolid). The performance of CPC retrieving the sun conditions (obstructed or unobstructed) is analyzed in detail using as reference pyranometer measurements at Granada. CPC retrievals are in agreement with those derived from the reference pyranometer in 85% of the cases (it seems that this agreement does not depend on aerosol size or optical depth). The agreement percentage goes down to only 48% when another algorithm, based on Red-Blue Ratio (RBR), is applied to the sky camera images. The retrieved cloud cover at Granada and Valladolid is compared with that registered by trained meteorological observers. CPC cloud cover is in agreement with the reference showing a slight overestimation and a mean absolute error around 1 okta. A major advantage of the CPC algorithm with respect to the RBR method is that the determined cloud cover is independent of aerosol properties. The RBR algorithm overestimates cloud cover for coarse aerosols and high loads. Cloud cover obtained only from ceilometer shows similar results than CPC algorithm; but the horizontal distribution cannot be obtained. In addition, it has been observed that under quick and strong changes on cloud cover ceilometers retrieve a cloud cover fitting worse with the real cloud cover.

  12. THE LEECH EXOPLANET IMAGING SURVEY: CHARACTERIZATION OF THE COLDEST DIRECTLY IMAGED EXOPLANET, GJ 504 b, AND EVIDENCE FOR SUPERSTELLAR METALLICITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skemer, Andrew J.; Leisenring, Jarron; Bailey, Vanessa; Hinz, Philip; Defrére, Denis; Apai, Dániel; Close, Laird; Eisner, Josh [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Ave. Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Morley, Caroline V.; Fortney, Jonathan [University of California, Santa Cruz, 1156 High St. Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Zimmerman, Neil T.; Buenzli, Esther; Bonnefoy, Mickael; Biller, Beth; Brandner, Wolfgang [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Skrutskie, Michael F. [University of Virginia, 530 McCormick Rd., Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Esposito, Simone [Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica-Arcetri Astrophysical Observatory, Largo Enrico Fermi 5, 50125, Florence (Italy); Crepp, Justin R. [Notre Dame University, 225 Nieuwland Science Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); De Rosa, Robert J. [Arizona State University, 781 South Terrace Rd, Tempe, AZ 85281 (United States); Desidera, Silvano [Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica-Padova Astronomical Observatory, Vicolo dell’Osservatorio 5, 35122 Padova (Italy); and others

    2016-02-01

    As gas giant planets and brown dwarfs radiate away the residual heat from their formation, they cool through a spectral type transition from L to T, which encompasses the dissipation of cloud opacity and the appearance of strong methane absorption. While there are hundreds of known T-type brown dwarfs, the first generation of directly imaged exoplanets were all L type. Recently, Kuzuhara et al. announced the discovery of GJ 504 b, the first T dwarf exoplanet. GJ 504 b provides a unique opportunity to study the atmosphere of a new type of exoplanet with a ∼500 K temperature that bridges the gap between the first directly imaged planets (∼1000 K) and our own solar system's Jupiter (∼130 K). We observed GJ 504 b in three narrow L-band filters (3.71, 3.88, and 4.00 μm), spanning the red end of the broad methane fundamental absorption feature (3.3 μm) as part of the LBTI Exozodi Exoplanet Common Hunt (LEECH) exoplanet imaging survey. By comparing our new photometry and literature photometry with a grid of custom model atmospheres, we were able to fit GJ 504 b's unusual spectral energy distribution for the first time. We find that GJ 504 b is well fit by models with the following parameters: T{sub eff} = 544 ± 10 K, g < 600 m s{sup −2}, [M/H] = 0.60 ± 0.12, cloud opacity parameter of f{sub sed} = 2–5, R = 0.96 ± 0.07 R{sub Jup}, and log(L) = −6.13 ± 0.03 L{sub ⊙}, implying a hot start mass of 3–30 M{sub jup} for a conservative age range of 0.1–6.5 Gyr. Of particular interest, our model fits suggest that GJ 504 b has a superstellar metallicity. Since planet formation can create objects with nonstellar metallicities, while binary star formation cannot, this result suggests that GJ 504 b formed like a planet, not like a binary companion.

  13. High performance coronagraphy for direct imaging of exoplanets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guyon O.

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Coronagraphy has recently been an extremely active field of research, with several high performance concepts proposed, and several new coronagraphs tested in laboratories and telescopes. Coronagraph concepts can be grouped in a few broad categories: Lyot-type coronagraphs, pupil apodization and nulling interferometers. Among existing coronagraph concepts, several approach the fundamental performance limit imposed by the physical nature of light. To achieve their full potential, coronagraphs require exquisite wavefront control and calibration. This has been, and still is, the main bottleneck for the scientifically productive use of coronagraphs on ground-based telescopes. New and promising wavefront sensing techniques suitable for high contrast imaging have however been developed in the last few years and are started to be realized in laboratories. I will review some of these enabling technologies, and show that coronagraphs are now ready for “prime time” on existing and future telescopes.

  14. Direct imaging of macrophage activation during PDT treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Sheng; Zhou, Feifan; Chen, Wei R.; Xing, Da

    2012-03-01

    Mounting evidence describes a more complex progress of macrophage activation during photodynamic therapy (PDT), which performing distinct immunological functions and different physiologies on surrounding cells and tissues. Macrophage-targeted PDT has been applied in the selective killing of cells involved in inflammation and tumor. We have previously shown that PDT-mediated tumor cells apoptosis can induce a higher level immune response than necrosis, and enhance the macrophage activation. However, the molecular mechanism of macrophage activation during PDT-induced apoptotic cells (AC) still unclear. Here, we use confocal microscopy to image the phagocytosis of tumor cells by macrophages. We also observed that PDT-treated AC can activate Toll-like receptors (TLRs) which are present on macrophages surface. Besides, the increase in nitric oxide (NO) formation in macrophages was detected in real time by a laser scanning microscopy. This study provided more details for understanding the molecular mechanism of the immune response induced by PDT-treated AC.

  15. Direct myocardial perfusion imaging in valvular heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soto, R.C.; Durante, M.L.; Villacorta, E.V.; Torres, J.F.; Monzon, O.P.

    1981-02-01

    Twenty two patients with rheumatic valvular heart disease - 21 having a history of heart failure - were studied using direct coronary injection of /sup 99m/Tc labelled MAA particles during the course of hemodynamic and arteriographic studies. Myocardial perfusion deficit patterns have been shown to be consistent or indicative of either patchy, regional or gross ischemia. In patients with history of documented heart failure 90% (18 cases) had ischemic perfusion deficit in the involved ventricle. We conclude that diminished myocardial blood flow is an important mechanism contributing to the development of heart failure.

  16. Three-dimensional imaging of direct-written photonic structures

    CERN Document Server

    Marshall, Graham D; Thayil, Anisha; Withford, Michael J; Booth, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Third harmonic generation microscopy has been used to analyze the morphology of photonic structures created using the femtosecond laser direct-write technique. Three dimensional waveguide arrays and waveguide-Bragg gratings written in fused-silica and doped phosphate glass were investigated. A sensorless adaptive optical system was used to correct the optical aberrations occurring in the sample and microscope system, which had a lateral resolution of less than 500 nm. This non-destructive testing method creates volume reconstructions of photonic devices and reveals details invisible to other linear microscopy and index profilometry techniques.

  17. Direct Imaging of a Cold Jovian Exoplanet in Orbit around the Sun-Like Star GJ 504

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzuhara, M.; Tamura, M.; Kudo, T.; Janson, M; Kandori, R.; Brandt, T. D.; Thalmann, C.; Spiegel, D.; Biller, B.; Carson, J.; hide

    2013-01-01

    Several exoplanets have recently been imaged at wide separations of >10 AU from their parent stars. These span a limited range of ages ( 0.5 mag), implying thick cloud covers. Furthermore, substantial model uncertainties exist at these young ages due to the unknown initial conditions at formation, which can lead to an order of magnitude of uncertainty in the modeled planet mass. Here, we report the direct imaging discovery of a Jovian exoplanet around the Sun-like star GJ 504, detected as part of the SEEDS survey. The system is older than all other known directly-imaged planets; as a result, its estimated mass remains in the planetary regime independent of uncertainties related to choices of initial conditions in the exoplanet modeling. Using the most common exoplanet cooling model, and given the system age of 160(+350/-60) Myr, GJ 504 b has an estimated mass of 4(+4.5/-1.0) Jupiter masses, among the lowest of directly imaged planets. Its projected separation of 43.5 AU exceeds the typical outer boundary of approx.. 30 AU predicted for the core accretion mechanism. GJ 504 b is also significantly cooler (510(+30/-20) K)) and has a bluer color (J - H = -0.23 mag) than previously imaged exoplanets, suggesting a largely cloud-free atmosphere accessible to spectroscopic characterization. Thus, it has the potential of providing novel insights into the origins of giant planets, as well as their atmospheric properties.

  18. Image Inpainting Algorithm Based on Low-Rank Approximation and Texture Direction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinjiang Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Existing image inpainting algorithm based on low-rank matrix approximation cannot be suitable for complex, large-scale, damaged texture image. An inpainting algorithm based on low-rank approximation and texture direction is proposed in the paper. At first, we decompose the image using low-rank approximation method. Then the area to be repaired is interpolated by level set algorithm, and we can reconstruct a new image by the boundary values of level set. In order to obtain a better restoration effect, we make iteration for low-rank decomposition and level set interpolation. Taking into account the impact of texture direction, we segment the texture and make low-rank decomposition at texture direction. Experimental results show that the new algorithm is suitable for texture recovery and maintaining the overall consistency of the structure, which can be used to repair large-scale damaged image.

  19. A line rate calculation method for arbitrary directional imaging of an Earth observing satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Moon-Jin; Kim, Eunghyun; Lim, Seong-Bin; Choi, Seok-Weon

    2016-10-01

    For an earth observing satellite, a line rate is the number of lines which the CCD of push broom type camera scans in a second. It can be easily calculated by ground velocity divided by ground sample distance. Accurate calculation of line rate is necessary to obtain high quality image using TDI CCD. The earth observing satellite has four types of imaging missions which are strip imaging, stereo imaging, multi-point imaging, and arbitrary directional imaging. For the first three types of imaging, ground scanning direction is aligned with satellite velocity direction. Therefore, if the orbit propagation and spacecraft attitude information are available, the ground velocity and ground sample distance could be easily calculated. However, the calculation method might not be applicable to the arbitrary directional imaging. In the arbitrary directional imaging mode, the ground velocity is not fixed value which could be directly derived by orbit information. Furthermore, the ground sample distance might not be easily calculated by simple trigonometry which is possible for the other types of imaging. In this paper, we proposed a line rate calculation method for the arbitrary directional imaging. We applied spherical geometry to derive the equation of ground point which is the intersection between the line of sight vector of the camera and earth surface. The derivative of this equation for time is the ground velocity except the factor of earth rotation. By adding this equation and earth rotation factor, the true ground velocity vector could be derived. For the ground sample distance, we applied the equation of circle and ellipse for yaw angle difference. The equation of circle is used for the yaw angle representation on the plane which is orthogonal to the line of sight vector. The equation of ellipse is used for the yaw angle representation on the ground surface. We applied the proposed method to the KOMPSAT-3A (Korea Multi-Purpose Satellite 3A) mission which is the first

  20. Direct Imaging of the Nearest Planetary Systems with NASA's WFIRST Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, M. C.; Macintosh, B.; Kasdin, J.; Seager, S.; Roberge, A.; Marley, M.; Mandell, A.; Lupu, R.; Hildebrandt, S.; Lewis, N.; Shaklan, S.; Stark, C.

    2017-11-01

    Using the Coronagraph Instrument (CGI), WFIRST will enable our generation, for the first time in human history, to directly image and characterize planets similar to those in our solar system. We will review the purpose and status of the mission.

  1. Simulating Precursor Radial Velocity Surveys for Future Exoplanet Direct Imaging Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Patrick; Plavchan, Peter; Crepp, Justin; Dulz, Shannon; Stark, Chris; Kane, Steven

    2018-01-01

    Future direct imaging missions such as WFIRST, HabEx, and LUVOIR aim to catalog and characterize Earth-analogs around nearby stars. The observing strategy and science yield and are strongly dependent on the frequency of Earth-like planets, and precursor knowledge of which stars specifically host suitable planetary systems. Ground-based radial velocity surveys can potentially identify targets and optimal observations times at a fraction of the cost of blind direct imaging surveys. We present the first phases of simulations of such a survey. We consider multiple telescopes, including their locations, weather conditions, observation time limitations, and instrument sensitivities. Multiple target selection optimization algorithms are considered. We calculate realistic radial velocity uncertainties based upon the known stellar properties of nearby direct imaging targets including effective temperature, metallicity, and surface gravity. We next inject and recover the masses and orbital parameters of real and simulated planets, estimating the effectiveness of a precursor radial velocity survey for direct imaging yield optimization.

  2. Simultaneous magnetically directed drug convection and MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yathindranath, V; Hegmann, T [Department of Chemistry, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 2N2 (Canada); Van Lierop, J [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 2N2 (Canada); Potter, K; Fowler, C B [DVBIC/DCoE AFIP, Traumatic Brain Injury Research Center, Department of Biophysics, Rockville, MD 20850 (United States); Moore, D F, E-mail: johan@physics.umanitoba.c [Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, DC 20307 (United States)

    2009-10-07

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IO NPs) are of interest for their usefulness in biomedical applications. In this work, we have synthesized iron oxide nanocomposites surface-modified with different biocompatible polymers. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) was physisorbed onto these IO NPs along with an excipient during freeze-drying. The mass transport of the protein attached to the iron oxide core-shell nanoparticles (IO cs-NPs) under a gradient magnetic field of an MRI instrument was observed in vitro and in an egg as a model system for a biological fluid. From the in vitro experiments in agarose gels, it was observed that the protein gets separated from the core during mass transport for some cs-IO, but co-migration was observed for PEG-modified IO cs-NPs. These experiments demonstrated proof-of-concept for the use of IO cs-NPs in magnetically directed drug convection.

  3. Alternating Direction Total Variation Image Reconstruction and Practical Decomposition for Dual-energy Computed Tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Lei; Wang, Linyuan; Yan, Bin; Zhang, Hanming; Zheng, Zhizhong; Zhang, Wenkun; Lu, Wanli; Hu, Guoen

    2016-01-01

    Dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) has shown great potential and promising applications in advanced imaging fields for its capabilities of material decomposition. However, image reconstructions and decompositions under sparse views dataset suffers severely from multi factors, such as insufficiencies of data, appearances of noise, and inconsistencies of observations. Under sparse views, conventional filtered back-projection type reconstruction methods fails to provide CT images with satisfying quality. Moreover, direct image decomposition is unstable and meet with noise boost even with full views dataset. This paper proposes an iterative image reconstruction algorithm and a practical image domain decomposition method for DECT. On one hand, the reconstruction algorithm is formulated as an optimization problem, which containing total variation regularization term and data fidelity term. The alternating direction method is utilized to design the corresponding algorithm which shows faster convergence speed com...

  4. Preliminary evaluation of second harmonic direct detection scheme for low-dose range in alanine/EPR dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Felipe [Departamento de Fisica e Matematica, FFCLRP, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Naturales, Exactas y Tecnologia, Universidad de Panama (Panama); Departamento de Salud Radiologica, Caja de Seguro Social (Panama); Graeff, Carlos F.O.; Baffa, Oswaldo [Departamento de Fisica e Matematica, FFCLRP, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: baffa@ffclrp.usp.br

    2002-04-21

    The usefulness of a direct detection scheme of the second harmonic (2h) overmodulated signal from irradiated alanine in EPR dosimetry was studied. For this purpose, a group of DL-alanine/paraffin cylindrical pellets was produced. The dosimeters were irradiated with a {sup 60}Co radiotherapy gamma source with doses of 0.05, 0.1, 0.5, 1 and 5 Gy. The EPR measurements were carried out in a VARIAN-E4 spectrometer operating in X-band with optimized parameters to obtain highest amplitude signals of both harmonics. The 2h signal was detected directly at twice the modulation frequency. In preliminary results, the 2h showed some advantages over the 1h such as better resolution for doses below 1 Gy, better repeatability results and better linear behaviour in the dose range indicated. (author)

  5. Image Super-Resolution Based on Sparse Representation via Direction and Edge Dictionaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Zhu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sparse representation has recently attracted enormous interests in the field of image super-resolution. The sparsity-based methods usually train a pair of global dictionaries. However, only a pair of global dictionaries cannot best sparsely represent different kinds of image patches, as it neglects two most important image features: edge and direction. In this paper, we propose to train two novel pairs of Direction and Edge dictionaries for super-resolution. For single-image super-resolution, the training image patches are, respectively, divided into two clusters by two new templates representing direction and edge features. For each cluster, a pair of Direction and Edge dictionaries is learned. Sparse coding is combined with the Direction and Edge dictionaries to realize super-resolution. The above single-image super-resolution can restore the faithful high-frequency details, and the POCS is convenient for incorporating any kind of constraints or priors. Therefore, we combine the two methods to realize multiframe super-resolution. Extensive experiments on image super-resolution are carried out to validate the generality, effectiveness, and robustness of the proposed method. Experimental results demonstrate that our method can recover better edge structure and details.

  6. Imaging cardiac stem cell transplantation using radionuclide labeling techniques: clinical applications and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lezaic, Luka; Haddad, François; Vrtovec, Bojan; Wu, Joseph C

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell therapy is emerging as a potential new therapy for patients with advanced heart failure. In recent years, advances in molecular imaging have allowed monitoring of stem cell homing and survival. In this review article, we will discuss the clinical application and future directions of stem cell imaging in advanced heart failure.

  7. Application of adaptive kinetic modelling for bias propagation reduction in direct 4D image reconstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kotasidis, F. A.; Matthews, J. C.; Reader, A. J.; Angelis, G. I.; Zaidi, H.

    2014-01-01

    Parametric imaging in thoracic and abdominal PET can provide additional parameters more relevant to the pathophysiology of the system under study. However, dynamic data in the body are noisy due to the limiting counting statistics leading to suboptimal kinetic parameter estimates. Direct 4D image

  8. Combined Flux Observer With Signal Injection Enhancement for Wide Speed Range Sensorless Direct Torque Control of IPMSM Drives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Frede; Andreescu, G.-D.; Pitic, C.I.

    2008-01-01

    This paper proposes a motion-sensorless control system using direct torque control with space vector modulation for interior permanent magnet synchronous motor (IPMSM) drives, for wide speed range operation, including standstill. A novel stator flux observer with variable structure uses a combined...... correction depending on estimated torque, is proposed and tested. Extensive simulation results and significant experimental results provided good performance for the proposed IPMSM sensorless system in more than 1:1000 speed range, under full-load operation, from very low speeds (1 r/min experimental) up...... voltage-current model with PI compensator for low-speed operations. As speed increases, the observer switches gradually to a PI compensated closed-loop voltage model, which is solely used at high speeds. High-frequency rotating-voltage injection with a single D-module bandpass vector filter and a phase...

  9. Influence of high range of mass transfer coefficient and convection heat transfer on direct contact membrane distillation performance

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Jung Gil

    2017-11-03

    In order to improve water production of membrane distillation (MD), the development of high performance membrane having better mass transfer and enhancement of convection heat transfer in MD module have been continuously investigated. This paper presents the relationship between the heat and mass transfer resistance across the membrane and the performance improvement. Various ranges of mass transfer coefficient (MTC) from normal (0.3×10−6 to 2.1×10−6kg/m2sPa: currently available membranes) to high (>2.1×10−6kg/m2sPa: membranes under development) were simulated using an experimentally validated model at different ranges of convection heat transfer by varying the inlet flow rates and spacer enhancement factor. The effect of mass transfer and convection heat transfer on the MD performance parameters including temperature polarization coefficient (TPC), mean permeate flux, and specific energy consumption were investigated in a direct contact MD (DCMD) configuration. Results showed that improving the MTC at the low ranges is more important than that at the high ranges where the heat transfer resistance becomes dominant and hence the convection heat transfer coefficient must be increased. Therefore, an effort on designing MD modules using feed and permeate spacers and controlling the membrane surface roughness to increase the convection heat transfer and TPC in the channel aiming to enhance the flux is required because the currently developed mass transfer has almost reached the critical point.

  10. Robust tracking of respiratory rate in high-dynamic range scenes using mobile thermal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Youngjun; Julier, Simon J.; Marquardt, Nicolai; Bianchi-Berthouze, Nadia

    2017-01-01

    The ability to monitor the respiratory rate, one of the vital signs, is extremely important for the medical treatment, healthcare and fitness sectors. In many situations, mobile methods, which allow users to undertake everyday activities, are required. However, current monitoring systems can be obtrusive, requiring users to wear respiration belts or nasal probes. Alternatively, contactless digital image sensor based remote-photoplethysmography (PPG) can be used. However, remote PPG requires an ambient source of light, and does not work properly in dark places or under varying lighting conditions. Recent advances in thermographic systems have shrunk their size, weight and cost, to the point where it is possible to create smart-phone based respiration rate monitoring devices that are not affected by lighting conditions. However, mobile thermal imaging is challenged in scenes with high thermal dynamic ranges (e.g. due to the different environmental temperature distributions indoors and outdoors). This challenge is further amplified by general problems such as motion artifacts and low spatial resolution, leading to unreliable breathing signals. In this paper, we propose a novel and robust approach for respiration tracking which compensates for the negative effects of variations in the ambient temperature and motion artifacts and can accurately extract breathing rates in highly dynamic thermal scenes. The approach is based on tracking the nostril of the user and using local temperature variations to infer inhalation and exhalation cycles. It has three main contributions. The first is a novel Optimal Quantization technique which adaptively constructs a color mapping of absolute temperature to improve segmentation, classification and tracking. The second is the Thermal Gradient Flow method that computes thermal gradient magnitude maps to enhance the accuracy of the nostril region tracking. Finally, we introduce the Thermal Voxel method to increase the reliability of the

  11. Robust tracking of respiratory rate in high-dynamic range scenes using mobile thermal imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Youngjun; Julier, Simon J; Marquardt, Nicolai; Bianchi-Berthouze, Nadia

    2017-10-01

    The ability to monitor the respiratory rate, one of the vital signs, is extremely important for the medical treatment, healthcare and fitness sectors. In many situations, mobile methods, which allow users to undertake everyday activities, are required. However, current monitoring systems can be obtrusive, requiring users to wear respiration belts or nasal probes. Alternatively, contactless digital image sensor based remote-photoplethysmography (PPG) can be used. However, remote PPG requires an ambient source of light, and does not work properly in dark places or under varying lighting conditions. Recent advances in thermographic systems have shrunk their size, weight and cost, to the point where it is possible to create smart-phone based respiration rate monitoring devices that are not affected by lighting conditions. However, mobile thermal imaging is challenged in scenes with high thermal dynamic ranges (e.g. due to the different environmental temperature distributions indoors and outdoors). This challenge is further amplified by general problems such as motion artifacts and low spatial resolution, leading to unreliable breathing signals. In this paper, we propose a novel and robust approach for respiration tracking which compensates for the negative effects of variations in the ambient temperature and motion artifacts and can accurately extract breathing rates in highly dynamic thermal scenes. The approach is based on tracking the nostril of the user and using local temperature variations to infer inhalation and exhalation cycles. It has three main contributions. The first is a novel Optimal Quantization technique which adaptively constructs a color mapping of absolute temperature to improve segmentation, classification and tracking. The second is the Thermal Gradient Flow method that computes thermal gradient magnitude maps to enhance the accuracy of the nostril region tracking. Finally, we introduce the Thermal Voxel method to increase the reliability of the

  12. Metabolic Profiling Directly from the Petri Dish Using Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watrous, Jeramie D.; Roach, Patrick J.; Heath, Brandi S.; Alexandrov, Theodore; Laskin, Julia; Dorrestein, Pieter C.

    2013-11-05

    Understanding molecular interaction pathways in complex biological systems constitutes a treasure trove of knowledge that might facilitate the specific, chemical manipulation of the countless microbiological systems that occur throughout our world. However, there is a lack of methodologies that allow the direct investigation of chemical gradients and interactions in living biological systems, in real time. Here, we report the use of nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nanoDESI) imaging mass spectrometry for in vivo metabolic profiling of living bacterial colonies directly from the Petri dish with absolutely no sample preparation needed. Using this technique, we investigated single colonies of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, Bacillus subtilis 3610, and Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) as well as a mixed biofilm of S. oneidensis MR-1 and B. subtilis 3610. Data from B. subtilis 3610 and S. coelicolor A3(2) provided a means of validation for the method while data from S. oneidensis MR-1 and the mixed biofilm showed a wide range of compounds that this bacterium uses for the dissimilatory reduction of extracellular metal oxides, including riboflavin, iron-bound heme and heme biosynthetic intermediates, and the siderophore putrebactin.

  13. Image Quality Enhancement Using the Direction and Thickness of Vein Lines for Finger-Vein Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Ho Park

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of the increased emphasis placed on the protection of privacy, biometric recognition systems using physical or behavioural characteristics such as fingerprints, facial characteristics, iris and finger-vein patterns or the voice have been introduced in applications including door access control, personal certification, Internet banking and ATM machines. Among these, finger-vein recognition is advantageous in that it involves the use of inexpensive and small devices that are difficult to counterfeit. In general, finger-vein recognition systems capture images by using near infrared (NIR illumination in conjunction with a camera. However, such systems can face operational difficulties, since the scattering of light from the skin can make capturing a clear image difficult. To solve this problem, we proposed new image quality enhancement method that measures the direction and thickness of vein lines. This effort represents novel research in four respects. First, since vein lines are detected in input images based on eight directional profiles of a grey image instead of binarized images, the detection error owing to the non-uniform illumination of the finger area can be reduced. Second, our method adaptively determines a Gabor filter for the optimal direction and width on the basis of the estimated direction and thickness of a detected vein line. Third, by applying this optimized Gabor filter, a clear vein image can be obtained. Finally, the further processing of the morphological operation is applied in the Gabor filtered image and the resulting image is combined with the original one, through which finger-vein image of a higher quality is obtained. Experimental results from application of our proposed image enhancement method show that the equal error rate (EER of finger-vein recognition decreases to approximately 0.4% in the case of a local binary pattern-based recognition and to approximately 0.3% in the case of a wavelet transform

  14. Contrasting accounts of direction and shape perception in short-range motion: Counterchange compared with motion energy detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Joseph; Hock, Howard; Schöner, Gregor

    2014-07-01

    It has long been thought (e.g., Cavanagh & Mather, 1989) that first-order motion-energy extraction via space-time comparator-type models (e.g., the elaborated Reichardt detector) is sufficient to account for human performance in the short-range motion paradigm (Braddick, 1974), including the perception of reverse-phi motion when the luminance polarity of the visual elements is inverted during successive frames. Human observers' ability to discriminate motion direction and use coherent motion information to segregate a region of a random cinematogram and determine its shape was tested; they performed better in the same-, as compared with the inverted-, polarity condition. Computational analyses of short-range motion perception based on the elaborated Reichardt motion energy detector (van Santen & Sperling, 1985) predict, incorrectly, that symmetrical results will be obtained for the same- and inverted-polarity conditions. In contrast, the counterchange detector (Hock, Schöner, & Gilroy, 2009) predicts an asymmetry quite similar to that of human observers in both motion direction and shape discrimination. The further advantage of counterchange, as compared with motion energy, detection for the perception of spatial shape- and depth-from-motion is discussed.

  15. Multiple Constraints Based Robust Matching of Poor-Texture Close-Range Images for Monitoring a Simulated Landslide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Qiao

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Landslides are one of the most destructive geo-hazards that can bring about great threats to both human lives and infrastructures. Landslide monitoring has been always a research hotspot. In particular, landslide simulation experimentation is an effective tool in landslide research to obtain critical parameters that help understand the mechanism and evaluate the triggering and controlling factors of slope failure. Compared with other traditional geotechnical monitoring approaches, the close-range photogrammetry technique shows potential in tracking and recording the 3D surface deformation and failure processes. In such cases, image matching usually plays a critical role in stereo image processing for the 3D geometric reconstruction. However, the complex imaging conditions such as rainfall, mass movement, illumination, and ponding will reduce the texture quality of the stereo images, bringing about difficulties in the image matching process and resulting in very sparse matches. To address this problem, this paper presents a multiple-constraints based robust image matching approach for poor-texture close-range images particularly useful in monitoring a simulated landslide. The Scale Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT algorithm was first applied to the stereo images for generation of scale-invariate feature points, followed by a two-step matching process: feature-based image matching and area-based image matching. In the first feature-based matching step, the triangulation process was performed based on the SIFT matches filtered by the Fundamental Matrix (FM and a robust checking procedure, to serve as the basic constraints for feature-based iterated matching of all the non-matched SIFT-derived feature points inside each triangle. In the following area-based image-matching step, the corresponding points of the non-matched features in each triangle of the master image were predicted in the homologous triangle of the searching image by using geometric

  16. Direct imaging of plant metabolites in leaves and petals by Desorption Electrospray Ionization mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Bin; Hansen, Steen Honore'; Janfelt, Christian

    2013-01-01

    and demonstrated on leaves and petals of Hypericum perforatum. The direct imaging approaches are in contrast to previous DESI imaging studies where indirect analysis via imprints were used in order to overcome the morphological barrier presented by the layer of cuticular waxes covering the surface of a leaf...... of very long chain fatty acids (VLCFAs), a significant class of metabolites located in the cuticle layer in leaves and petals, as well as other plant metabolites. In the case of the petals of H. perforatum, all common metabolites could be imaged directly using the ternary solvent, whereas in the case...... of leaves from the same plant, only some of the metabolites were accessible, even with the ternary solvent system. For these samples, the leaves could be imaged with direct DESI after chloroform had been used to remove most of the cuticle, thus exposing lower layers in the leaf structure. A number...

  17. Satellite image resolution enhancement using discrete wavelet transform and new edge-directed interpolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witwit, Wasnaa; Zhao, Yifan; Jenkins, Karl; Zhao, Yitian

    2017-03-01

    An image resolution enhancement approach based on discrete wavelet transform (DWT) and new edge-directed interpolation (NEDI) for degraded satellite images by geometric distortion to correct the errors in image geometry and recover the edge details of directional high-frequency subbands is proposed. The observed image is decomposed into four frequency subbands through DWT, and then the three high-frequency subbands and the observed image are processed with NEDI. To better preserve the edges and remove potential noise in the estimated high-frequency subbands, an adaptive threshold is applied to process the estimated wavelet coefficients. Finally, the enhanced image is reconstructed by applying inverse DWT. Four criteria are introduced, aiming to better assess the overall performance of the proposed approach for different types of satellite images. A public satellite images data set is selected for the validation purpose. The visual and quantitative results show the superiority of the proposed approach over the conventional and state-of-the-art image resolution enhancement techniques.

  18. Prediction of object detection, recognition, and identification [DRI] ranges at color scene images based on quantifying human color contrast perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinsky, Ephi; Levin, Ilia; Yaron, Ofer

    2016-10-01

    We propose a novel approach to predict, for specified color imaging system and for objects with known characteristics, their detection, recognition, identification (DRI) ranges in a colored dynamic scene, based on quantifying the human color contrast perception. The method refers to the well established L*a*b*, 3D color space. The nonlinear relations of this space are intended to mimic the nonlinear response of the human eye. The metrics of L*a*b* color space is such that the Euclidian distance between any two colors in this space is approximately proportional to the color contrast as perceived by the human eye/brain. The result of this metrics leads to the outcome that color contrast of any two points is always greater (or equal) than their equivalent grey scale contrast. This meets our sense that looking on a colored image, contrast is superior to the gray scale contrast of the same image. Yet, color loss by scattering at very long ranges should be considered as well. The color contrast derived from the distance between the colored object pixels and to the nearby colored background pixels, as derived from the L*a*b* color space metrics, is expressed in terms of gray scale contrast. This contrast replaces the original standard gray scale contrast component of that image. As expected, the resulted DRI ranges are, in most cases, larger than those predicted by the standard gray scale image. Upon further elaboration and validation of this method, it may be combined with the next versions of the well accepted TRM codes for DRI predictions. Consistent prediction of DRI ranges implies a careful evaluation of the object and background color contrast reduction along the range. Clearly, additional processing for reconstructing the objects and background true colors and hence the color contrast along the range, will further increase the DRI ranges.

  19. SIM Grid Star Observations: Astrometry With a New High Dynamic Range Imaging Device

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Winter, L

    2000-01-01

    ... (developed by the Institut fur Mikroelek-tronik Stuttgart, IMS, Germany) are presented. To test the HDRC4 imager at the telescope, a cooled camera had to be constructed by modifying a camera designed by IMS...

  20. Broad-Range Detection of Microorganisms Directly from Bronchoalveolar Lavage Specimens by PCR/Electrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullberg, Måns; Lüthje, Petra; Mölling, Paula; Strålin, Kristoffer

    2017-01-01

    The clinical demand on rapid microbiological diagnostic is constantly increasing. PCR coupled to electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry, PCR/ESI-MS, offers detection and identification of over 750 bacteria and Candida species directly from clinical specimens within 6 hours. In this study, we investigated the clinical performance of the IRIDICA BAC LRT Assay for detection of bacterial pathogens in 121 bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples that were received consecutively at our bacterial laboratory for BAL culture. Commensal or pathogenic microorganisms were detected in 118/121 (98%) BAL samples by PCR/ESI-MS, while in 104/121 (86%) samples by routine culture (PPCR/ESI-MS was evaluated in comparison with conventional culture-based or molecular methods. The agreement between positive findings was overall good. Most Staphylococcus aureus-positive PCR/ESI-MS results were confirmed by culture or species-specific PCR (27/33, 82%). The identity of Streptococcus pneumoniae could however be confirmed for only 6/17 (35%) PCR/ESI-MS-positive samples. Non-cultivable and fastidious pathogens, which were not covered by standard culture procedures were readily detected by PCR/ESI-MS, including Legionella pneumophila, Bordetella pertussis, Norcadia species and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. In conclusion, PCR/ESI-MS detected a broad range of potential pathogens with equal or superior sensitivity compared to conventional methods within few hours directly from BAL samples. This novel method might thus provide a relevant tool for diagnostics in critically ill patients. PMID:28085931

  1. Octave-spanning hyperspectral coherent diffractive imaging in the extreme ultraviolet range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Yijian; Zhang, Chunmei; Marceau, Claude; Naumov, A Yu; Corkum, P B; Villeneuve, D M

    2015-11-02

    Soft x-ray microscopy is a powerful imaging technique that provides sub-micron spatial resolution, as well as chemical specificity using core-level near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS). Near the carbon K-edge (280-300 eV) biological samples exhibit high contrast, and the detailed spectrum contains information about the local chemical environment of the atoms. Most soft x-ray imaging takes place on dedicated beamlines at synchrotron facilities or at x-ray free electron laser facilities. Tabletop femtosecond laser systems are now able to produce coherent radiation at the carbon K-edge and beyond through the process of high harmonic generation (HHG). The broad bandwidth of HHG is seemingly a limitation to imaging, since x-ray optical elements such as Fresnel zone plates require monochromatic sources. Counter-intuitively, the broad bandwidth of HHG sources can be beneficial as it permits chemically-specific hyperspectral imaging. We apply two separate techniques - Fourier transform spectroscopy, and lensless holographic imaging - to obtain images of an object simultaneously at multiple wavelengths using an octave-spanning high harmonic source with photon energies up to 30 eV. We use an interferometric delay reference to correct for nanometer-scale fluctuations between the two HHG sources.

  2. A new type of remote sensors which allow directly forming certain statistical estimates of images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podlaskin, Boris; Guk, Elena; Karpenko, Andrey

    2010-10-01

    A new approach to the problems of statistical and structural pattern recognition, a signal processing and image analysis techniques has been considered. These problems are extremely important for tasks being solved by airborne and space borne remote sensing systems. Development of new remote sensors for image and signal processing is inherently connected with a possibility of statistical processing of images. Fundamentally new optoelectronic sensors "Multiscan" have been suggested in the present paper. Such sensors make it possible to form directly certain statistical estimates, which describe completely enough the different types of images. The sensors under discussion perform the Lebesgue-Stieltjes signal integration rather than the Cauchy-Riemann one. That permits to create integral functionals for determining statistical features of images. The use of the integral functionals for image processing provides a good agreement of obtained statistical estimates with required image information features. The Multiscan remote sensors allows to create a set of integral moments of an input image right up to high-order integral moments, to form a quantile representation of an input image, which provides a count number limited texture, to form a median, which provides a localisation of a low-contrast horizon line in fog, localisation of water flow boundary etc. This work presents both the description of the design concept of the new remote sensor and mathematical apparatus providing the possibility to create input image statistical features and integral functionals.

  3. Direct functional consequences of ZRS enhancer mutation combine with secondary long range SHH signalling effects to cause preaxial polydactyly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Edward J; Neely, David M; Dunn, Ian C; Davey, Megan G

    2014-08-15

    Sonic hedgehog (SHH) plays a central role in patterning numerous embryonic tissues including, classically, the developing limb bud where it controls digit number and identity. This study utilises the polydactylous Silkie (Slk) chicken breed, which carries a mutation in the long range limb-specific regulatory element of SHH, the ZRS. Using allele specific SHH expression analysis combined with quantitative protein analysis, we measure allele specific changes in SHH mRNA and concentration of SHH protein over time. This confirms that the Slk ZRS enhancer mutation causes increased SHH expression in the posterior leg mesenchyme. Secondary consequences of this increased SHH signalling include increased FGF pathway signalling and growth as predicted by the SHH/GREM1/FGF feedback loop and the Growth/Morphogen models. Manipulation of Hedgehog, FGF signalling and growth demonstrate that anterior-ectopic expression of SHH and induction of preaxial polydactyly is induced secondary to increased SHH signalling and Hedgehog-dependent growth directed from the posterior limb. We predict that increased long range SHH signalling acts in combination with changes in activation of SHH transcription from the Slk ZRS allele. Through analysis of the temporal dynamics of anterior SHH induction we predict a gene regulatory network which may contribute to activation of anterior SHH expression from the Slk ZRS. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Test of the Practicality and Feasibility of EDoF-Empowered Image Sensors for Long-Range Biometrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Hsun Hsieh

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available For many practical applications of image sensors, how to extend the depth-of-field (DoF is an important research topic; if successfully implemented, it could be beneficial in various applications, from photography to biometrics. In this work, we want to examine the feasibility and practicability of a well-known “extended DoF” (EDoF technique, or “wavefront coding,” by building real-time long-range iris recognition and performing large-scale iris recognition. The key to the success of long-range iris recognition includes long DoF and image quality invariance toward various object distance, which is strict and harsh enough to test the practicality and feasibility of EDoF-empowered image sensors. Besides image sensor modification, we also explored the possibility of varying enrollment/testing pairs. With 512 iris images from 32 Asian people as the database, 400-mm focal length and F/6.3 optics over 3 m working distance, our results prove that a sophisticated coding design scheme plus homogeneous enrollment/testing setups can effectively overcome the blurring caused by phase modulation and omit Wiener-based restoration. In our experiments, which are based on 3328 iris images in total, the EDoF factor can achieve a result 3.71 times better than the original system without a loss of recognition accuracy.

  5. Time-of-flight neutron rejection to improve prompt gamma imaging for proton range verification : a simulation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biegun, Aleksandra K.; Seravalli, Enrica; Lopes, Patricia Cambraia; Rinaldi, Ilaria; Pinto, Marco; Oxley, David C.; Dendooven, Peter; Verhaegen, Frank; Parodi, Katia; Crespo, Paulo; Schaart, Dennis R.

    2012-01-01

    Therapeutic proton and heavier ion beams generate prompt gamma photons that may escape from the patient. In principle, this allows for real-time, in situ monitoring of the treatment delivery, in particular, the hadron range within the patient, by imaging the emitted prompt gamma rays. Unfortunately,

  6. Direct imaging of extrasolar planets: overview of ground and space programs

    OpenAIRE

    Anthony, Boccaletti

    2009-01-01

    With the ever-growing number of exoplanets detected, the issue of characterization is becoming more and more relevant. Direct imaging is certainly the most efficient but the most challenging tool to probe the atmosphere of exoplanets and hence in turns determine the physical properties and refine models of exoplanets. A number of instruments optimized for exoplanets imaging are now operating or planned for the short and long term both on the ground and in space. This paper reviews these instr...

  7. VIP: Vortex Image Processing Package for High-contrast Direct Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez Gonzalez, Carlos Alberto; Wertz, Olivier; Absil, Olivier; Christiaens, Valentin; Defrère, Denis; Mawet, Dimitri; Milli, Julien; Absil, Pierre-Antoine; Van Droogenbroeck, Marc; Cantalloube, Faustine; Hinz, Philip M.; Skemer, Andrew J.; Karlsson, Mikael; Surdej, Jean

    2017-07-01

    We present the Vortex Image Processing (VIP) library, a python package dedicated to astronomical high-contrast imaging. Our package relies on the extensive python stack of scientific libraries and aims to provide a flexible framework for high-contrast data and image processing. In this paper, we describe the capabilities of VIP related to processing image sequences acquired using the angular differential imaging (ADI) observing technique. VIP implements functionalities for building high-contrast data processing pipelines, encompassing pre- and post-processing algorithms, potential source position and flux estimation, and sensitivity curve generation. Among the reference point-spread function subtraction techniques for ADI post-processing, VIP includes several flavors of principal component analysis (PCA) based algorithms, such as annular PCA and incremental PCA algorithms capable of processing big datacubes (of several gigabytes) on a computer with limited memory. Also, we present a novel ADI algorithm based on non-negative matrix factorization, which comes from the same family of low-rank matrix approximations as PCA and provides fairly similar results. We showcase the ADI capabilities of the VIP library using a deep sequence on HR 8799 taken with the LBTI/LMIRCam and its recently commissioned L-band vortex coronagraph. Using VIP, we investigated the presence of additional companions around HR 8799 and did not find any significant additional point source beyond the four known planets. VIP is available at http://github.com/vortex-exoplanet/VIP and is accompanied with Jupyter notebook tutorials illustrating the main functionalities of the library.

  8. 3D range-gated super-resolution imaging based on stereo matching for moving platforms and targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Liang; Wang, Xinwei; Zhou, Yan

    2017-11-01

    3D range-gated superresolution imaging is a novel 3D reconstruction technique for target detection and recognition with good real-time performance. However, for moving targets or platforms such as airborne, shipborne, remote operated vehicle and autonomous vehicle, 3D reconstruction has a large error or failure. In order to overcome this drawback, we propose a method of stereo matching for 3D range-gated superresolution reconstruction algorithm. In experiment, the target is a doll of Mario with a height of 38cm at the location of 34m, and we obtain two successive frame images of the Mario. To confirm our method is effective, we transform the original images with translation, rotation, scale and perspective, respectively. The experimental result shows that our method has a good result of 3D reconstruction for moving targets or platforms.

  9. The Effect of a Pre-Lens Aperture on the Temperature Range and Image Uniformity of Microbolometer Infrared Cameras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton [ORNL; Parris, Larkin S. [Wichita State University; Lindal, John M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Kunc, Vlastimil [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores the temperature range extension of long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) cameras by placing an aperture in front of the lens. An aperture smaller than the lens will reduce the radiance to the sensor, allowing the camera to image targets much hotter than typically allowable. These higher temperatures were accurately determined after developing a correction factor which was applied to the built-in temperature calibration. The relationship between aperture diameter and temperature range is linear. The effect of pre-lens apertures on the image uniformity is a form of anti-vignetting, meaning the corners appear brighter (hotter) than the rest of the image. An example of using this technique to measure temperatures of high melting point polymers during 3D printing provide valuable information of the time required for the weld-line temperature to fall below the glass transition temperature.

  10. Artifact reduction of compressed images and video combining adaptive fuzzy filtering and directional anisotropic diffusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nadernejad, Ehsan; Forchhammer, Søren; Korhonen, Jari

    2011-01-01

    and ringing artifacts, we have applied directional anisotropic diffusion. Besides that, the selection of the adaptive threshold parameter for the diffusion coefficient has also improved the performance of the algorithm. Experimental results on JPEG compressed images as well as MJPEG and H.264 compressed......Fuzzy filtering is one of the recently developed methods for reducing distortion in compressed images and video. In this paper, we combine the powerful anisotropic diffusion equations with fuzzy filtering in order to reduce the impact of artifacts. Based on the directional nature of the blocking...

  11. Wind direction over the ocean determined by an airborne, imaging, polarimetric radiometer system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Brian; Skou, Niels

    2001-01-01

    The speed and direction of winds over the ocean can be determined by polarimetric radiometers. This has been established by theoretical work and demonstrated experimentally using airborne radiometers carrying out circle flights and thus measuring the full 360° azimuthal response from the sea...... surface. An airborne experiment, with the aim of measuring wind direction over the ocean using an imaging polarimetric radiometer, is described. A polarimetric radiometer system of the correlation type, measuring all four Stokes brightness parameters, is used. Imaging is achieved using a 1-m aperture...... in the radiometer imagery....

  12. Time and direction of arrival detection and filtering for imaging in strongly scattering random media

    CERN Document Server

    Borcea, Liliana; Tsogka, Chrysoula

    2016-01-01

    We study detection and imaging of small reflectors in heavy clutter, using an array of transducers that emits and receives sound waves. Heavy clutter means that multiple scattering of the waves in the heterogeneous host medium is strong and overwhelms the arrivals from the small reflectors. Building on the adaptive time-frequency filter of [1], we propose a robust method for detecting the direction of arrival of the direct echoes from the small reflectors, and suppressing the unwanted clutter backscatter. This improves the resolution of imaging. We illustrate the performance of the method with realistic numerical simulations in a non-destructive testing setup.

  13. Counting and integrating microelectronics development for direct conversion X-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraft, E.

    2008-02-15

    A novel signal processing concept for X-ray imaging with directly converting pixelated semiconductor sensors is presented. The novelty of this approach compared to existing concepts is the combination of charge integration and photon counting in every single pixel. Simultaneous operation of both signal processing chains extends the dynamic range beyond the limits of the individual schemes and allows determination of the mean photon energy. Medical applications such as X-ray computed tomography can benefit from this additional spectral information through improved contrast and the ability to determine the hardening of the tube spectrum due to attenuation by the scanned object. A prototype chip in 0.35-micrometer technology has been successfully tested. The pixel electronics are designed using a low-swing differential current mode logic. Key element is a configurable feedback circuit for the charge sensitive amplifier which provides continuous reset, leakage current compensation and replicates the input signal for the integrator. The thesis focusses on the electronic characterization of a second generation prototype chip and gives a detailed discussion of the circuit design. (orig.)

  14. Diagnostic Accuracy of Image Enhancement in Intra-Oral Direct Digital Radiography in the Assessment of Interproximal Caries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzad Esmaeili

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background The first commercial system for digital radiography was introduced in 1987, and it has evolved a great deal since then. Currently, it is possible to enhance images in digital radiography. Objectives The aim of this study is to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of image enhancement in direct digital radiography as it relates to interproximal carries assessment. Materials and Methods Following extraction, 50 human teeth were kept in acidic gel (methyl cellulose + acetate buffer PH = 4.8 for 42 days at 37°C to cause caries before mounting. Direct digital radiography was then taken. Two filters were used: sharpen and emboss. Three radiologists evaluated the images with two weeks interval. The histologic assessments were gold standard. Additionally, SPSS 20 was used to draw an ROC curve and calculate AUC. Cohen’s kappa and interclass correlation coefficient (ICC were used to measure intra- and inter-observer reliability. Results For the emboss filter, sensitivity was 95%, specificity was 100%, and accuracy was 96%. For the sharpen filter, sensitivity was 88%, specificity was 100%, and accuracy was 90%. Also, the AUC for the emboss filter was 0.97, and it was 0.94 for the sharpen filter. Cohen’s simple kappa was in the range of excellent. Conclusions Using these filters in intra-oral direct digital radiography (especially the emboss filter can help some clinicians to increase diagnostic accuracy in the assessment of inter proximal caries of posterior teeth.

  15. Multisensor Super Resolution Using Directionally-Adaptive Regularization for UAV Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wonseok Kang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In various unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV imaging applications, the multisensor super-resolution (SR technique has become a chronic problem and attracted increasing attention. Multisensor SR algorithms utilize multispectral low-resolution (LR images to make a higher resolution (HR image to improve the performance of the UAV imaging system. The primary objective of the paper is to develop a multisensor SR method based on the existing multispectral imaging framework instead of using additional sensors. In order to restore image details without noise amplification or unnatural post-processing artifacts, this paper presents an improved regularized SR algorithm by combining the directionally-adaptive constraints and multiscale non-local means (NLM filter. As a result, the proposed method can overcome the physical limitation of multispectral sensors by estimating the color HR image from a set of multispectral LR images using intensity-hue-saturation (IHS image fusion. Experimental results show that the proposed method provides better SR results than existing state-of-the-art SR methods in the sense of objective measures.

  16. Multisensor Super Resolution Using Directionally-Adaptive Regularization for UAV Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Wonseok; Yu, Soohwan; Ko, Seungyong; Paik, Joonki

    2015-01-01

    In various unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) imaging applications, the multisensor super-resolution (SR) technique has become a chronic problem and attracted increasing attention. Multisensor SR algorithms utilize multispectral low-resolution (LR) images to make a higher resolution (HR) image to improve the performance of the UAV imaging system. The primary objective of the paper is to develop a multisensor SR method based on the existing multispectral imaging framework instead of using additional sensors. In order to restore image details without noise amplification or unnatural post-processing artifacts, this paper presents an improved regularized SR algorithm by combining the directionally-adaptive constraints and multiscale non-local means (NLM) filter. As a result, the proposed method can overcome the physical limitation of multispectral sensors by estimating the color HR image from a set of multispectral LR images using intensity-hue-saturation (IHS) image fusion. Experimental results show that the proposed method provides better SR results than existing state-of-the-art SR methods in the sense of objective measures. PMID:26007744

  17. Fluorescence guided lymph node biopsy in large animals using direct image projection device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringhausen, Elizabeth; Wang, Tylon; Pitts, Jonathan; Akers, Walter J.

    2016-03-01

    The use of fluorescence imaging for aiding oncologic surgery is a fast growing field in biomedical imaging, revolutionizing open and minimally invasive surgery practices. We have designed, constructed, and tested a system for fluorescence image acquisition and direct display on the surgical field for fluorescence guided surgery. The system uses a near-infrared sensitive CMOS camera for image acquisition, a near-infra LED light source for excitation, and DLP digital projector for projection of fluorescence image data onto the operating field in real time. Instrument control was implemented in Matlab for image capture, processing of acquired data and alignment of image parameters with the projected pattern. Accuracy of alignment was evaluated statistically to demonstrate sensitivity to small objects and alignment throughout the imaging field. After verification of accurate alignment, feasibility for clinical application was demonstrated in large animal models of sentinel lymph node biopsy. Indocyanine green was injected subcutaneously in Yorkshire pigs at various locations to model sentinel lymph node biopsy in gynecologic cancers, head and neck cancer, and melanoma. Fluorescence was detected by the camera system during operations and projected onto the imaging field, accurately identifying tissues containing the fluorescent tracer at up to 15 frames per second. Fluorescence information was projected as binary green regions after thresholding and denoising raw intensity data. Promising results with this initial clinical scale prototype provided encouraging results for the feasibility of optical projection of acquired luminescence during open oncologic surgeries.

  18. Multisensor Super Resolution Using Directionally-Adaptive Regularization for UAV Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Wonseok; Yu, Soohwan; Ko, Seungyong; Paik, Joonki

    2015-05-22

    In various unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) imaging applications, the multisensor super-resolution (SR) technique has become a chronic problem and attracted increasing attention. Multisensor SR algorithms utilize multispectral low-resolution (LR) images to make a higher resolution (HR) image to improve the performance of the UAV imaging system. The primary objective of the paper is to develop a multisensor SR method based on the existing multispectral imaging framework instead of using additional sensors. In order to restore image details without noise amplification or unnatural post-processing artifacts, this paper presents an improved regularized SR algorithm by combining the directionally-adaptive constraints and multiscale non-local means (NLM) filter. As a result, the proposed method can overcome the physical limitation of multispectral sensors by estimating the color HR image from a set of multispectral LR images using intensity-hue-saturation (IHS) image fusion. Experimental results show that the proposed method provides better SR results than existing state-of-the-art SR methods in the sense of objective measures.

  19. Full-direct method for imaging pharmacokinetic parameters in dynamic fluorescence molecular tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Guanglei, E-mail: guangleizhang@bjtu.edu.cn [Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Computer and Information Technology, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Pu, Huangsheng; Liu, Fei; Bai, Jing [Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); He, Wei [China Institute of Sport Science, Beijing 100061 (China); Luo, Jianwen, E-mail: luo-jianwen@tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Center for Biomedical Imaging Research, School of Medicine, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2015-02-23

    Images of pharmacokinetic parameters (also known as parametric images) in dynamic fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) can provide three-dimensional metabolic information for biological studies and drug development. However, the ill-posed nature of FMT and the high temporal variation of fluorophore concentration together make it difficult to obtain accurate parametric images in small animals in vivo. In this letter, we present a method to directly reconstruct the parametric images from the boundary measurements based on hybrid FMT/X-ray computed tomography (XCT) system. This method can not only utilize structural priors obtained from the XCT system to mitigate the ill-posedness of FMT but also make full use of the temporal correlations of boundary measurements to model the high temporal variation of fluorophore concentration. The results of numerical simulation and mouse experiment demonstrate that the proposed method leads to significant improvements in the reconstruction quality of parametric images.

  20. Experimental Study of High-Range-Resolution Medical Acoustic Imaging for Multiple Target Detection by Frequency Domain Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Tomoki; Taki, Hirofumi; Sakamoto, Takuya; Sato, Toru

    2009-07-01

    We employed frequency domain interferometry (FDI) for use as a medical acoustic imager to detect multiple targets with high range resolution. The phase of each frequency component of an echo varies with the frequency, and target intervals can be estimated from the phase variance. This processing technique is generally used in radar imaging. When the interference within a range gate is coherent, the cross correlation between the desired signal and the coherent interference signal is nonzero. The Capon method works under the guiding principle that output power minimization cancels the desired signal with a coherent interference signal. Therefore, we utilize frequency averaging to suppress the correlation of the coherent interference. The results of computational simulations using a pseudoecho signal show that the Capon method with adaptive frequency averaging (AFA) provides a higher range resolution than a conventional method. These techniques were experimentally investigated and we confirmed the effectiveness of the proposed method of processing by FDI.

  1. Broad-Range Detection of Microorganisms Directly from Bronchoalveolar Lavage Specimens by PCR/Electrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Måns Ullberg

    Full Text Available The clinical demand on rapid microbiological diagnostic is constantly increasing. PCR coupled to electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry, PCR/ESI-MS, offers detection and identification of over 750 bacteria and Candida species directly from clinical specimens within 6 hours. In this study, we investigated the clinical performance of the IRIDICA BAC LRT Assay for detection of bacterial pathogens in 121 bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL samples that were received consecutively at our bacterial laboratory for BAL culture. Commensal or pathogenic microorganisms were detected in 118/121 (98% BAL samples by PCR/ESI-MS, while in 104/121 (86% samples by routine culture (P<0.01. Detection of potentially pathogenic microorganisms by PCR/ESI-MS was evaluated in comparison with conventional culture-based or molecular methods. The agreement between positive findings was overall good. Most Staphylococcus aureus-positive PCR/ESI-MS results were confirmed by culture or species-specific PCR (27/33, 82%. The identity of Streptococcus pneumoniae could however be confirmed for only 6/17 (35% PCR/ESI-MS-positive samples. Non-cultivable and fastidious pathogens, which were not covered by standard culture procedures were readily detected by PCR/ESI-MS, including Legionella pneumophila, Bordetella pertussis, Norcadia species and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. In conclusion, PCR/ESI-MS detected a broad range of potential pathogens with equal or superior sensitivity compared to conventional methods within few hours directly from BAL samples. This novel method might thus provide a relevant tool for diagnostics in critically ill patients.

  2. Discrimination between sedimentary rocks from close-range visible and very-near-infrared images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pozo, Susana Del; Lindenbergh, R.C.; Rodríguez-Gonzálvez, Pablo; Blom, J.C.; González-Aguilera, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Variation in the mineral composition of rocks results in a change of their spectral response capable of being studied by imaging spectroscopy. This paper proposes the use of a low-cost handy sensor, a calibrated visible-very near infrared (VIS-VNIR) multispectral camera for the recognition of

  3. Single-Chip Fully Integrated Direct-Modulation CMOS RF Transmitters for Short-Range Wireless Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Jamal Deen

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Ultra-low power radio frequency (RF transceivers used in short-range application such as wireless sensor networks (WSNs require efficient, reliable and fully integrated transmitter architectures with minimal building blocks. This paper presents the design, implementation and performance evaluation of single-chip, fully integrated 2.4 GHz and 433 MHz RF transmitters using direct-modulation power voltage-controlled oscillators (PVCOs in addition to a 2.0 GHz phase-locked loop (PLL based transmitter. All three RF transmitters have been fabricated in a standard mixed-signal CMOS 0.18 µm technology. Measurement results of the 2.4 GHz transmitter show an improvement in drain efficiency from 27% to 36%. The 2.4 GHz and 433 MHz transmitters deliver an output power of 8 dBm with a phase noise of −122 dBc/Hz at 1 MHz offset, while drawing 15.4 mA of current and an output power of 6.5 dBm with a phase noise of −120 dBc/Hz at 1 MHz offset, while drawing 20.8 mA of current from 1.5 V power supplies, respectively. The PLL transmitter delivers an output power of 9 mW with a locking range of 128 MHz and consumes 26 mA from 1.8 V power supply. The experimental results demonstrate that the RF transmitters can be efficiently used in low power WSN applications.

  4. Airborne Measurements of CO2 Column Concentration and Range Using a Pulsed Direct-Detection IPDA Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abshire, James B.; Ramanathan, Anand; Riris, Haris; Mao, Jianping; Allan, Graham R.; Hasselbrack, William E.; Weaver, Clark J.; Browell, Edward V.

    2013-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated a pulsed direct detection IPDA lidar to measure range and the column concentration of atmospheric CO2. The lidar measures the atmospheric backscatter profiles and samples the shape of the 1,572.33 nm CO2 absorption line. We participated in the ASCENDS science flights on the NASA DC-8 aircraft during August 2011 and report here lidar measurements made on four flights over a variety of surface and cloud conditions near the US. These included over a stratus cloud deck over the Pacific Ocean, to a dry lake bed surrounded by mountains in Nevada, to a desert area with a coal-fired power plant, and from the Rocky Mountains to Iowa, with segments with both cumulus and cirrus clouds. Most flights were to altitudes >12 km and had 5-6 altitude steps. Analyses show the retrievals of lidar range, CO2 column absorption, and CO2 mixing ratio worked well when measuring over topography with rapidly changing height and reflectivity, through thin clouds, between cumulus clouds, and to stratus cloud tops. The retrievals shows the decrease in column CO2 due to growing vegetation when flying over Iowa cropland as well as a sudden increase in CO2 concentration near a coal-fired power plant. For regions where the CO2 concentration was relatively constant, the measured CO2 absorption lineshape (averaged for 50 s) matched the predicted shapes to better than 1% RMS error. For 10 s averaging, the scatter in the retrievals was typically 2-3 ppm and was limited by the received signal photon count. Retrievals were made using atmospheric parameters from both an atmospheric model and from in situ temperature and pressure from the aircraft. The retrievals had no free parameters and did not use empirical adjustments, and >70% of the measurements passed screening and were used in analysis. The differences between the lidar-measured retrievals and in situ measured average CO2 column concentrations were 6 km.

  5. WE-EF-303-03: A New Aperture-Based Imaging System for Prompt-Gamma Range Verification of Proton Beam Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ready, J; Pak, R [UC Berkeley, Berkeley, CA (United States); Mihailescu, L [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Vetter, K [UC Berkeley, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop and characterize a novel aperture-based imaging system for high-energy gamma-rays. This collimated system will provide 2-dimensional imaging capability for verification of proton beam range and Bragg peak dose via prompt-gamma detection. Methods: A multi-knife-edge slit collimator has been designed, constructed, and characterized via simulations and experimental measurements. The 20×20×7.5 cm{sup 3} tungsten collimator and accompanying LSO scintillation detector were simulated using the TOPAS Geant4 -based Monte Carlo package. Iterative reconstruction methods were combined with point response functions to characterize the imaging performance of the system. The response of the system has begun to be characterized experimentally as well, using 2.6 MeV gamma-rays from Th-228. Results: Both simulation and experimental results indicate that this collimated system provides 2-D imaging capability in the energy range of interest for prompt-gamma dose verification. In the current configuration, with collimator to source distance of 13 cm, image reconstruction of point sources resulted in spatial resolution (FWHM) of approximately 4 mm in both x-and y-directions in the imaging plane. The accuracy of positioning the point sources is less than 1 mm. Conclusion: This work has characterized, via simulation and measurements, a novel multi-knife-edge slit collimator in front of a more conventional position-sensitive LSO scintillator detector. The multi-slit pattern is designed to increase detection efficiency and provide spatial information in 2-dimensions -- an improvement over a single-slit collimator design. The thickness and density of the collimator will allow this detection system to perform well in an environment with high gamma flux, while ultimately providing peak determination accuracy on the order of 1 mm. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number: DE-NA0000979

  6. Processor for Real-Time Atmospheric Compensation in Long-Range Imaging Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Range surveillance is a critical component of space exploration because of its implications on safety, cost, and overall mission timeline. However, launch delays,...

  7. Signal-to-noise ratio improvements in laser flow diagnostics using time-resolved image averaging and high dynamic range imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giassi, Davide; Long, Marshall B.

    2016-08-01

    Two alternative image readout approaches are demonstrated to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in temporally resolved laser-based imaging experiments of turbulent phenomena. The first method exploits the temporal decay characteristics of the phosphor screens of image intensifiers when coupled to an interline-transfer CCD camera operated in double-frame mode. Specifically, the light emitted by the phosphor screen, which has a finite decay constant, is equally distributed and recorded over the two sequential frames of the detector so that an averaged image can be reconstructed. The characterization of both detector and image intensifier showed that the technique preserves the correct quantitative information, and its applicability to reactive flows was verified using planar Rayleigh scattering and tested with the acquisition of images of both steady and turbulent partially premixed methane/air flames. The comparison between conventional Rayleigh results and the averaged ones showed that the SNR of the averaged image is higher than the conventional one; with the setup used in this work, the gain in SNR was seen to approach 30 %, for both the steady and turbulent cases. The second technique uses the two-frame readout of an interline-transfer CCD to increase the image SNR based on high dynamic range imaging, and it was tested in an unsteady non-reactive flow of Freon-12 injected in air. The result showed a 15 % increase in the SNR of the low-pixel-count regions of an image, when compared to the pixels of a conventionally averaged one.

  8. A high dynamic range method for the direct readout of a dynamic phase change in homodyne interferometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marçal, L. A. P.; Kitano, C.; Higuti, R. T.; Nader, G.; Silva, E. C. N.

    2012-12-01

    Piezoelectric flextensional actuators (PFAs) are an efficient alternative to systems that demand nano-positioning of devices, such as in nanotechnology. Optical techniques constitute an excellent choice for contactless measurement of nano-displacements. In particular, optical interferometry constitutes an adequate choice for characterizing PFAs. There are several types of interferometers, as well as optical phase demodulation methods, used in practice. One interesting class of demodulation methods uses the spectrum of the photo-detected signal and its intrinsic properties when there is a harmonically varying time-domain modulating signal. In this work, a low cost homodyne Michelson interferometer, associated with simple electronic circuits for signal conditioning and acquisition, is used. A novel dynamic phase demodulation method, named Jm&Jm + 2, is proposed, which uses only the magnitude spectrum of the photo-detected signal, without the need to know its phase spectrum. The method is passive, direct, self-consistent, without problems of phase ambiguity and immune to fading, and presents a dynamic range from 0.45 to 100 rad displacements (between 22.6 nm and 5 µm, for λ = 632.8 nm). When applied to the measurement of half-wave voltage in a proof-of-concept Pockels cell, it presents errors smaller than 0.9% when compared to theory. For the estimation of PFA displacement, it allows the measurement of linearity and frequency response curves, with excellent results.

  9. High-content analysis of single cells directly assembled on CMOS sensor based on color imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Tsuyoshi; Saeki, Tatsuya; Sunaga, Yoshihiko; Matsunaga, Tadashi

    2010-12-15

    A complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image sensor was applied to high-content analysis of single cells which were assembled closely or directly onto the CMOS sensor surface. The direct assembling of cell groups on CMOS sensor surface allows large-field (6.66 mm×5.32 mm in entire active area of CMOS sensor) imaging within a second. Trypan blue-stained and non-stained cells in the same field area on the CMOS sensor were successfully distinguished as white- and blue-colored images under white LED light irradiation. Furthermore, the chemiluminescent signals of each cell were successfully visualized as blue-colored images on CMOS sensor only when HeLa cells were placed directly on the micro-lens array of the CMOS sensor. Our proposed approach will be a promising technique for real-time and high-content analysis of single cells in a large-field area based on color imaging. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluation of DNA aptamers directed to thrombin as potential thrombus imaging agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dougan, Hayes E-mail: dougan@triumf.ca; Weitz, Jeffrey I.; Stafford, Alan R.; Gillespie, Kris D.; Klement, Petr; Hobbs, John B.; Lyster, Donald M

    2003-01-01

    Two DNA aptamers directed against two separate exosites on human {alpha}-thrombin were evaluated for thrombus-imaging potential. Aptamer ODN 1 is directed to the thrombin substrate binding site (exosite 1). Our finding that ODN 1 competes with fibrin for binding to exosite 1 on thrombin suggests that ODN 1 will not be useful for thrombus imaging. Aptamer ODN 2 is directed against the thrombin heparin binding site (exosite 2). ODN 2 bound to model thrombi that were formed either by clotting purified fibrinogen with thrombin, or by recalcifying citrated plasma. As the thrombin content of thrombi was increased the rate of ODN 2 uptake into preformed thrombi increased, whereas the rate of release of ODN 2 out of preformed thrombi decreased. This in vitro data suggested that ODN 2 might be useful for thrombus imaging because it can bind to exosite 2 on fibrin-bound thrombin. However, in a rabbit jugular vein model using thrombus supplemented with human thrombin, ODN 2 uptake was equal to the ovalbumin control, and did not reflect thrombin content. While the in vitro results with ODN 2 were consistent with thrombus imaging, the rapid clearance of ODN 2 from circulation, combined with slow mass transfer in the clot, seem to work against in vivo thrombin-dependent imaging or washout analysis.

  11. Body image disturbance in children and adolescents with eating disorders. Current evidence and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legenbauer, Tanja; Thiemann, Pia; Vocks, Silja

    2014-01-01

    Body image is multifaceted and incorporates perceptual, affective, and cognitive components as well as behavioral features. Only few studies have examined the character of body-image disturbance in children/adolescents with eating disorders. It is unknown whether body-image disturbances in children/adolescent with eating disturbances are comparable to those of adult patients with eating disorders. Body-image disturbance might differ quantitatively and qualitatively according to the cognitive developmental status and the age of the individual. This paper provides an overview of the current evidence for body-image disturbance in children/adolescents with eating disorders, and how they compare with those adults with eating disorders. Current evidence indicates that older adolescent patients show similar deficits as adult patients with eating disorders, in particular for the attitudinal body-image component. However, evidence for a perceptual body-image disturbance in adolescent patients, in particular anorexia nervosa, is not conclusive. Reliable statements for childhood can hardly be made because clinical studies are not available. Investigations of body-image disturbance in children have focused on the predictive value for eating disorders. Limitations of the current evidence are discussed, and future directions for research and therapy are indicated.

  12. Comparison of the diagnostic accuracy of direct digital radiography system, filtered images, and subtraction radiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilton Mitsunari Takeshita

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To compare the diagnostic accuracy of three different imaging systems: Direct digital radiography system (DDR-CMOS, four types of filtered images, and a priori and a posteriori registration of digital subtraction radiography (DSR in the diagnosis of proximal defects. Materials and Methods: The teeth were arranged in pairs in 10 blocks of vinyl polysiloxane, and proximal defects were performed with drills of 0.25, 0.5, and 1 mm diameter. Kodak RVG 6100 sensor was used to capture the images. A posteriori DSR registrations were done with Regeemy 0.2.43 and subtraction with Image Tool 3.0. Filtered images were obtained with Kodak Dental Imaging 6.1 software. Images (n = 360 were evaluated by three raters, all experts in dental radiology. Results: Sensitivity and specificity of the area under the receiver operator characteristic (ROC curve (Az were higher for DSR images with all three drills (Az = 0.896, 0.979, and 1.000 for drills 0.25, 0.5, and 1 mm, respectively. The highest values were found for 1-mm drills and the lowest for 0.25-mm drills, with negative filter having the lowest values of all (Az = 0.631. Conclusion: The best method of diagnosis was by using a DSR. The negative filter obtained the worst results. Larger drills showed the highest sensitivity and specificity values of the area under the ROC curve.

  13. Effective Alternating Direction Optimization Methods for Sparsity-Constrained Blind Image Deblurring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naixue Xiong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Single-image blind deblurring for imaging sensors in the Internet of Things (IoT is a challenging ill-conditioned inverse problem, which requires regularization techniques to stabilize the image restoration process. The purpose is to recover the underlying blur kernel and latent sharp image from only one blurred image. Under many degraded imaging conditions, the blur kernel could be considered not only spatially sparse, but also piecewise smooth with the support of a continuous curve. By taking advantage of the hybrid sparse properties of the blur kernel, a hybrid regularization method is proposed in this paper to robustly and accurately estimate the blur kernel. The effectiveness of the proposed blur kernel estimation method is enhanced by incorporating both the L 1 -norm of kernel intensity and the squared L 2 -norm of the intensity derivative. Once the accurate estimation of the blur kernel is obtained, the original blind deblurring can be simplified to the direct deconvolution of blurred images. To guarantee robust non-blind deconvolution, a variational image restoration model is presented based on the L 1 -norm data-fidelity term and the total generalized variation (TGV regularizer of second-order. All non-smooth optimization problems related to blur kernel estimation and non-blind deconvolution are effectively handled by using the alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMM-based numerical methods. Comprehensive experiments on both synthetic and realistic datasets have been implemented to compare the proposed method with several state-of-the-art methods. The experimental comparisons have illustrated the satisfactory imaging performance of the proposed method in terms of quantitative and qualitative evaluations.

  14. Effective Alternating Direction Optimization Methods for Sparsity-Constrained Blind Image Deblurring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Naixue; Liu, Ryan Wen; Liang, Maohan; Wu, Di; Liu, Zhao; Wu, Huisi

    2017-01-18

    Single-image blind deblurring for imaging sensors in the Internet of Things (IoT) is a challenging ill-conditioned inverse problem, which requires regularization techniques to stabilize the image restoration process. The purpose is to recover the underlying blur kernel and latent sharp image from only one blurred image. Under many degraded imaging conditions, the blur kernel could be considered not only spatially sparse, but also piecewise smooth with the support of a continuous curve. By taking advantage of the hybrid sparse properties of the blur kernel, a hybrid regularization method is proposed in this paper to robustly and accurately estimate the blur kernel. The effectiveness of the proposed blur kernel estimation method is enhanced by incorporating both the L 1 -norm of kernel intensity and the squared L 2 -norm of the intensity derivative. Once the accurate estimation of the blur kernel is obtained, the original blind deblurring can be simplified to the direct deconvolution of blurred images. To guarantee robust non-blind deconvolution, a variational image restoration model is presented based on the L 1 -norm data-fidelity term and the total generalized variation (TGV) regularizer of second-order. All non-smooth optimization problems related to blur kernel estimation and non-blind deconvolution are effectively handled by using the alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMM)-based numerical methods. Comprehensive experiments on both synthetic and realistic datasets have been implemented to compare the proposed method with several state-of-the-art methods. The experimental comparisons have illustrated the satisfactory imaging performance of the proposed method in terms of quantitative and qualitative evaluations.

  15. Measuring Pulse Rate Variability using Long-Range, Non-Contact Imaging Photoplethysmography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-20

    Photoplethysmography (PPG), first pioneered in the 1930’s, is a low cost , noninvasive method of detecting changes in blood volume using variations in...glasses, piercings, and use of skin or beauty products were recorded but not otherwise used for analysis or screening purposes. C. Experimental Design...and Lei Wang. A review of non-contact, low- cost physiological information measurement based on photoplethysmographic imaging. Annu. Int. Conf. IEEE

  16. Performance evaluation of compounding and directional beamforming techniques for carotid strain imaging using plane wave transmissions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Hendrik H.G.; Stuart, Matthias Bo; Villagómez Hoyos, Carlos Armando

    2014-01-01

    techniques have been developed to cope with the low off - axis image quality when performing 2D (and in future 3D) motion estimation: cross correlation with directional beamforming (with or without RF (coherent) compounding) and displacement compounding. This study compares the precision of these techniques...

  17. Suppressing a Sea of Starlight : enabling technology for the direct imaging of exoplanets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otten, G.P.P.L.

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis we present multiple techniques to suppress starlight in order to better directly image planets around other stars. We propose a laboratory setup to test a new focal-plane wavefront sensing technique. We also show an optical device that suppresses starlight using liquid crystals (the

  18. Optimization of pH and direct imaging conditions of complexed ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Poly(vinyl chloride); methylene blue; pH; direct imaging; diffraction efficiency. ... Diffraction efficiency measurements were also carried out on this material. ... Department of Polymer Science and Rubber Technology, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Cochin 682 022, India; Department of Physics, St. Xaviers ...

  19. Patient-directed Internet-based Medical Image Exchange: Experience from an Initial Multicenter Implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Giampaolo; Patel, Anand S; Lewis, Sara C; Shi, Wei; Rasul, Rehana; Torosyan, Mary; Erickson, Bradley J; Hiremath, Atheeth; Moskowitz, Alan J; Tellis, Wyatt M; Siegel, Eliot L; Arenson, Ronald L; Mendelson, David S

    2016-02-01

    Inefficient transfer of personal health records among providers negatively impacts quality of health care and increases cost. This multicenter study evaluates the implementation of the first Internet-based image-sharing system that gives patients ownership and control of their imaging exams, including assessment of patient satisfaction. Patients receiving any medical imaging exams in four academic centers were eligible to have images uploaded into an online, Internet-based personal health record. Satisfaction surveys were provided during recruitment with questions on ease of use, privacy and security, and timeliness of access to images. Responses were rated on a five-point scale and compared using logistic regression and McNemar's test. A total of 2562 patients enrolled from July 2012 to August 2013. The median number of imaging exams uploaded per patient was 5. Most commonly, exams were plain X-rays (34.7%), computed tomography (25.7%), and magnetic resonance imaging (16.1%). Of 502 (19.6%) patient surveys returned, 448 indicated the method of image sharing (Internet, compact discs [CDs], both, other). Nearly all patients (96.5%) responded favorably to having direct access to images, and 78% reported viewing their medical images independently. There was no difference between Internet and CD users in satisfaction with privacy and security and timeliness of access to medical images. A greater percentage of Internet users compared to CD users reported access without difficulty (88.3% vs. 77.5%, P privacy. Copyright © 2015 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Four-directional fractional-order total variation regularization for image denoising

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Linna; Chen, Yingpin; Jin, Jiaquan; Du, Hongwei; Qiu, Bensheng

    2017-09-01

    Noise removal is a fundamental problem in image processing. Among many approaches, total variation (TV) has attracted great attention because of its advantage in preserving edges. However, it tends to exhibit some undesired staircase artifacts. Fractional-order TV (FTV) can overcome the drawback mentioned above, yet it does not take enough neighborhood information into account. An extension of FTV, four-directional FTV (FTV4) is put forward to explore more directional information of an image. We solve this FTV4 model by adopting the split Bregman algorithm and fast Fourier transform theory. An accelerated step is added in the algorithm to make it converge faster. To decrease the computation time, we introduce the convolution theory and calculate the matrix difference in the frequency domain instead of space domain. Experimental results show that the proposed image denoising model performs better than other state-of-the-art models in most cases.

  1. Diagnostic Accuracy of Image Enhancement in Intra-Oral Direct Digital Radiography in the Assessment of Interproximal Caries

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Farzad Esmaeili; Teymour Abbasi; Nazli Rabienejad; Shabnam Seyedzadeh Sabounchi

    2016-01-01

    ... since then. Currently, it is possible to enhance images in digital radiography. Objectives The aim of this study is to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of image enhancement in direct digital radiography as it relates to interproximal carries assessment...

  2. Direct reconstruction of cardiac PET kinetic parametric images using a preconditioned conjugate gradient approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakvongthai, Yothin; Ouyang, Jinsong; Guerin, Bastien; Li, Quanzheng; Alpert, Nathaniel M; El Fakhri, Georges

    2013-10-01

    Our research goal is to develop an algorithm to reconstruct cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) kinetic parametric images directly from sinograms and compare its performance with the conventional indirect approach. Time activity curves of a NCAT phantom were computed according to a one-tissue compartmental kinetic model with realistic kinetic parameters. The sinograms at each time frame were simulated using the activity distribution for the time frame. The authors reconstructed the parametric images directly from the sinograms by optimizing a cost function, which included the Poisson log-likelihood and a spatial regularization terms, using the preconditioned conjugate gradient (PCG) algorithm with the proposed preconditioner. The proposed preconditioner is a diagonal matrix whose diagonal entries are the ratio of the parameter and the sensitivity of the radioactivity associated with parameter. The authors compared the reconstructed parametric images using the direct approach with those reconstructed using the conventional indirect approach. At the same bias, the direct approach yielded significant relative reduction in standard deviation by 12%-29% and 32%-70% for 50 × 10(6) and 10 × 10(6) detected coincidences counts, respectively. Also, the PCG method effectively reached a constant value after only 10 iterations (with numerical convergence achieved after 40-50 iterations), while more than 500 iterations were needed for CG. The authors have developed a novel approach based on the PCG algorithm to directly reconstruct cardiac PET parametric images from sinograms, and yield better estimation of kinetic parameters than the conventional indirect approach, i.e., curve fitting of reconstructed images. The PCG method increases the convergence rate of reconstruction significantly as compared to the conventional CG method.

  3. Isotropic high resolution optoacoustic imaging with linear detector arrays in bi-directional scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Mathias; Buehler, Andreas; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2015-01-01

    Optoacoustic (photoacoustic) imaging is often performed with one-dimensional transducer arrays, in analogy to ultrasound imaging. Optoacoustic imaging using linear arrays offers ease of implementation but comes with several performance drawbacks, in particular poor elevation resolution, i.e. the resolution along the axis perpendicular to the focal plane. Herein, we introduce and investigate a bi-directional scanning approach using linear arrays that can improve the imaging performance to quasi-isotropic transverse resolution. We study the approach theoretically and perform numerical simulations and phantom measurements to evaluate its performance under defined conditions. Finally, we discuss the features and the limitations of the proposed method. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. A contest of sensors in close range 3D imaging: performance evaluation with a new metric test object

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hess

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available An independent means of 3D image quality assessment is introduced, addressing non-professional users of sensors and freeware, which is largely characterized as closed-sourced and by the absence of quality metrics for processing steps, such as alignment. A performance evaluation of commercially available, state-of-the-art close range 3D imaging technologies is demonstrated with the help of a newly developed Portable Metric Test Artefact. The use of this test object provides quality control by a quantitative assessment of 3D imaging sensors. It will enable users to give precise specifications which spatial resolution and geometry recording they expect as outcome from their 3D digitizing process. This will lead to the creation of high-quality 3D digital surrogates and 3D digital assets. The paper is presented in the form of a competition of teams, and a possible winner will emerge.

  5. High-dynamic-range microscope imaging based on exposure bracketing in full-field optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong-Hoi, Audrey; Montgomery, Paul C; Serio, Bruno; Twardowski, Patrice; Uhring, Wilfried

    2016-04-01

    By applying the proposed high-dynamic-range (HDR) technique based on exposure bracketing, we demonstrate a meaningful reduction in the spatial noise in image frames acquired with a CCD camera so as to improve the fringe contrast in full-field optical coherence tomography (FF-OCT). This new signal processing method thus allows improved probing within transparent or semitransparent samples. The proposed method is demonstrated on 3 μm thick transparent polymer films of Mylar, which, due to their transparency, produce low contrast fringe patterns in white-light interference microscopy. High-resolution tomographic analysis is performed using the technique. After performing appropriate signal processing, resulting XZ sections are observed. Submicrometer-sized defects can be lost in the noise that is present in the CCD images. With the proposed method, we show that by increasing the signal-to-noise ratio of the images, submicrometer-sized defect structures can thus be detected.

  6. A Fast Component-Tree Algorithm for High Dynamic-Range Images and Second Generation Connectivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilkinson, Michael H. F.

    2011-01-01

    Component trees are important data structures for computation of connected attribute filters. Though some of the available algorithms are suitable for high-dynamic range, and in particular floating point data, none are suitable for computation of component trees for so-called second-generation, and

  7. Airborne Measurements of CO2 Column Concentration and Range Using a Pulsed Direct-Detection IPDA Lidar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James B. Abshire

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We have previously demonstrated a pulsed direct detection IPDA lidar to measure range and the column concentration of atmospheric CO2. The lidar measures the atmospheric backscatter profiles and samples the shape of the 1,572.33 nm CO2 absorption line. We participated in the ASCENDS science flights on the NASA DC-8 aircraft during August 2011 and report here lidar measurements made on four flights over a variety of surface and cloud conditions near the US. These included over a stratus cloud deck over the Pacific Ocean, to a dry lake bed surrounded by mountains in Nevada, to a desert area with a coal-fired power plant, and from the Rocky Mountains to Iowa, with segments with both cumulus and cirrus clouds. Most flights were to altitudes >12 km and had 5–6 altitude steps. Analyses show the retrievals of lidar range, CO2 column absorption, and CO2 mixing ratio worked well when measuring over topography with rapidly changing height and reflectivity, through thin clouds, between cumulus clouds, and to stratus cloud tops. The retrievals shows the decrease in column CO2 due to growing vegetation when flying over Iowa cropland as well as a sudden increase in CO2 concentration near a coal-fired power plant. For regions where the CO2 concentration was relatively constant, the measured CO2 absorption lineshape (averaged for 50 s matched the predicted shapes to better than 1% RMS error. For 10 s averaging, the scatter in the retrievals was typically 2–3 ppm and was limited by the received signal photon count. Retrievals were made using atmospheric parameters from both an atmospheric model and from in situ temperature and pressure from the aircraft. The retrievals had no free parameters and did not use empirical adjustments, and >70% of the measurements passed screening and were used in analysis. The differences between the lidar-measured retrievals and in situ measured average CO2 column concentrations were <1.4 ppm for flight measurement altitudes >6

  8. Direct-Conversion Molecular Breast Imaging of Invasive Breast Cancer: Imaging Features, Extent of Invasive Disease, and Comparison Between Invasive Ductal and Lobular Histology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conners, Amy Lynn; Jones, Katie N; Hruska, Carrie B; Geske, Jennifer R; Boughey, Judy C; Rhodes, Deborah J

    2015-09-01

    The purposes of this study were to compare the tumor appearance of invasive breast cancer on direct-conversion molecular breast imaging using a standardized lexicon and to determine how often direct-conversion molecular breast imaging identifies all known invasive tumor foci in the breast, and whether this differs for invasive ductal versus lobular histologic profiles. Patients with prior invasive breast cancer and concurrent direct-conversion molecular breast imaging examinations were retrospectively reviewed. Blinded review of direct-conversion molecular breast imaging examinations was performed by one of two radiologists, according to a validated lexicon. Direct-conversion molecular breast imaging findings were matched with lesions described on the pathology report to exclude benign reasons for direct-conversion molecular breast imaging findings and to document direct-conversion molecular breast imaging-occult tumor foci. Associations between direct-conversion molecular breast imaging findings and tumor histologic profiles were examined using chi-square tests. In 286 patients, 390 invasive tumor foci were present in 294 breasts. A corresponding direct-conversion molecular breast imaging finding was present for 341 of 390 (87%) tumor foci described on the pathology report. Invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) tumor foci were more likely to be a mass (40% IDC vs 15% invasive lobular carcinoma [ILC]; p invasive disease in 79.8% of cases and was more likely to do so for IDC than for ILC (86.1% vs 56.7%; p invasive foci in 249 of 286 (87%) patients. Direct-conversion molecular breast imaging features of invasive cancer, including lesion type and intensity, differ by histologic subtype. Direct-conversion molecular breast imaging is less likely to show all foci of ILC compared with IDC.

  9. A Very Low Dark Current Temperature-Resistant, Wide Dynamic Range, Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor Image Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizobuchi, Koichi; Adachi, Satoru; Tejada, Jose; Oshikubo, Hiromichi; Akahane, Nana; Sugawa, Shigetoshi

    2008-07-01

    A very low dark current (VLDC) temperature-resistant approach which best suits a wide dynamic range (WDR) complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image sensor with a lateral over-flow integration capacitor (LOFIC) has been developed. By implementing a low electric field photodiode without a trade-off of full well-capacity, reduced plasma damage, re-crystallization, and termination of silicon-silicon dioxide interface states in the front end of line and back end of line (FEOL and BEOL) in a 0.18 µm, two polycrystalline silicon, three metal (2P3M) process, the dark current is reduced to 11 e-/s/pixel (0.35 e-/s/µm2: pixel area normalized) at 60 °C, which is the lowest value ever reported. For further robustness at low and high temperatures, 1/3-in., 5.6-µm pitch, 800×600 pixel sensor chips with low noise readout circuits designed for a signal and noise hold circuit and a programmable gain amplifier (PGA) have also been deposited with an inorganic cap layer on a micro-lens and covered with a metal hermetically sealed package assembly. Image sensing performance results in 2.4 e-rms temporal noise and 100 dB dynamic range (DR) with 237 ke- full well-capacity. The operating temperature range is extended from -40 to 85 °C while retaining good image quality.

  10. A comparison of optical architectures for constrained long-range imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, S. Craig; Goodman, Timothy D.; Sparks, Andrew W.; Wheeler, Craig S.

    2017-05-01

    Long-range airborne full-motion-video systems require large apertures to maximize multiple aspects of system performance, including spatial resolution and sensitivity. As systems push to larger apertures for increased resolution and standoff range, both mounting constraints and atmospheric effects limit their effectiveness. This paper considers two questions: first, under what atmospheric and spectral conditions does it make sense to have a larger aperture; second, what types of optical systems can best exploit movement-constrained mounting? We briefly explore high-level atmospheric considerations in determining sensor aperture size for various spectral bands, following with a comparison of the swept-volume-to-aperture ratio of Ritchey-Chrétien and three-mirror-anastigmat optical systems.

  11. Native reading direction and corresponding preferences for left- or right-lit images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Austen K; Elias, Lorin J

    2013-04-01

    The first language an individual learns has been shown to influence performance on cognitive tasks. Individuals who first learn to read and write in a left-to-right direction (native left-to-right readers) tend to bisect lines left of centre and draw counterclockwise circles, whereas those who learn to read and write from right-to-left (native right-to-left readers) will bisect lines closer to the objective centre and draw circles in a clockwise direction. The aim of the current study was to assess group differences in image preferences and eye movements when participants are simultaneously presented with an original and mirror image with an obvious illumination difference. Twenty native left-to-right readers (4 men, 16 women) and 25 native right-to-left readers (13 men, 12 women) participated. Left-to-right readers made more fixations on the left side of images and exhibited a significantly different left-lit image bias than right-to-left readers' choices. These results draw attention to the influence that reading direction has on scanning distributions and lighting preferences, and question previous results finding no difference between groups.

  12. Predicted image quality of a CMOS APS X-ray detector across a range of mammographic beam qualities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinidis, A.

    2015-09-01

    Digital X-ray detectors based on Complementary Metal-Oxide- Semiconductor (CMOS) Active Pixel Sensor (APS) technology have been introduced in the early 2000s in medical imaging applications. In a previous study the X-ray performance (i.e. presampling Modulation Transfer Function (pMTF), Normalized Noise Power Spectrum (NNPS), Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) and Detective Quantum Efficiency (DQE)) of the Dexela 2923MAM CMOS APS X-ray detector was evaluated within the mammographic energy range using monochromatic synchrotron radiation (i.e. 17-35 keV). In this study image simulation was used to predict how the mammographic beam quality affects image quality. In particular, the experimentally measured monochromatic pMTF, NNPS and SNR parameters were combined with various mammographic spectral shapes (i.e. Molybdenum/Molybdenum (Mo/Mo), Rhodium/Rhodium (Rh/Rh), Tungsten/Aluminium (W/Al) and Tungsten/Rhodium (W/Rh) anode/filtration combinations at 28 kV). The image quality was measured in terms of Contrast-to-Noise Ratio (CNR) using a synthetic breast phantom (4 cm thick with 50% glandularity). The results can be used to optimize the imaging conditions in order to minimize patient's Mean Glandular Dose (MGD).

  13. Design and control of multi-actuated atomic force microscope for large-range and high-speed imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soltani Bozchalooi, I.; Careaga Houck, A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); AlGhamdi, J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Department of Chemistry, College of Science, University of Dammam, Dammam (Saudi Arabia); Youcef-Toumi, K. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    This paper presents the design and control of a high-speed and large-range atomic force microscopy (AFM). A multi-actuation scheme is proposed where several nano-positioners cooperate to achieve the range and speed requirements. A simple data-based control design methodology is presented to effectively operate the AFM scanner components. The proposed controllers compensate for the coupled dynamics and divide the positioning responsibilities between the scanner components. As a result, the multi-actuated scanner behavior is equivalent to that of a single X–Y–Z positioner with large range and high speed. The scanner of the designed AFM is composed of five nano-positioners, features 6 μm out-of-plane and 120 μm lateral ranges and is capable of high-speed operation. The presented AFM has a modular design with laser spot size of 3.5 μm suitable for small cantilever, an optical view of the sample and probe, a conveniently large waterproof sample stage and a 20 MHz data throughput for high resolution image acquisition at high imaging speeds. This AFM is used to visualize etching of calcite in a solution of sulfuric acid. Layer-by-layer dissolution and pit formation along the crystalline lines in a low pH environment is observed in real time. - Highlights: • High-speed AFM imaging is extended to large lateral and vertical scan ranges. • A general multi-actuation approach to atomic force microscopy is presented. • A high-speed AFM is designed and implemented based on the proposed method. • Multi-actuator control is designed auxiliary to a PID unit to maintain flexibility. • Influence of calcite crystal structure on dissolution is visualized in video form.

  14. Directional synthetic aperture flow imaging using a dual stage beamformer approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Ye; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2011-01-01

    A new method for directional synthetic aperture flow imaging using a dual stage beamformer approach is presented. The velocity estimation is angle independent and the amount of calculations is reduced compared to full synthetic aperture, but still maintains all the advantages at the same time.......3% and bias of 6.4% at 65 were achieved in the simulations, and 4.3% and 4.2% for the experimental measurements. A color flow map image was made in 48 emissions corresponding to a frame rate of 83 frames/s....

  15. Inorganic chemistry in nuclear imaging and radiotherapy: current and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Valerie; Demoin, Dustin W; Hoffman, Timothy J; Jurisson, Silvia S

    2012-08-01

    Radiometals play an important role in diagnostic and therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals. This field of radiochemistry is multidisciplinary, involving radiometal production, separation of the radiometal from its target, chelate design for complexing the radiometal in a biologically stable environment, specific targeting of the radiometal to its in vivo site, and nuclear imaging and/or radiotherapy applications of the resultant radiopharmaceutical. The critical importance of inorganic chemistry in the design and application of radiometal-containing imaging and therapy agents is described from a historical perspective to future directions.

  16. Direct parametric reconstruction in dynamic PET myocardial perfusion imaging: in vivo studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petibon, Yoann; Rakvongthai, Yothin; El Fakhri, Georges; Ouyang, Jinsong

    2017-05-01

    Dynamic PET myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) used in conjunction with tracer kinetic modeling enables the quantification of absolute myocardial blood flow (MBF). However, MBF maps computed using the traditional indirect method (i.e. post-reconstruction voxel-wise fitting of kinetic model to PET time-activity-curves-TACs) suffer from poor signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Direct reconstruction of kinetic parameters from raw PET projection data has been shown to offer parametric images with higher SNR compared to the indirect method. The aim of this study was to extend and evaluate the performance of a direct parametric reconstruction method using in vivo dynamic PET MPI data for the purpose of quantifying MBF. Dynamic PET MPI studies were performed on two healthy pigs using a Siemens Biograph mMR scanner. List-mode PET data for each animal were acquired following a bolus injection of ~7-8 mCi of 18F-flurpiridaz, a myocardial perfusion agent. Fully-3D dynamic PET sinograms were obtained by sorting the coincidence events into 16 temporal frames covering ~5 min after radiotracer administration. Additionally, eight independent noise realizations of both scans—each containing 1/8th of the total number of events—were generated from the original list-mode data. Dynamic sinograms were then used to compute parametric maps using the conventional indirect method and the proposed direct method. For both methods, a one-tissue compartment model accounting for spillover from the left and right ventricle blood-pools was used to describe the kinetics of 18F-flurpiridaz. An image-derived arterial input function obtained from a TAC taken in the left ventricle cavity was used for tracer kinetic analysis. For the indirect method, frame-by-frame images were estimated using two fully-3D reconstruction techniques: the standard ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) reconstruction algorithm on one side, and the one-step late maximum a posteriori (OSL-MAP) algorithm on the other

  17. Direct parametric reconstruction in dynamic PET myocardial perfusion imaging: in vivo studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petibon, Yoann; Rakvongthai, Yothin; El Fakhri, Georges; Ouyang, Jinsong

    2017-05-07

    Dynamic PET myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) used in conjunction with tracer kinetic modeling enables the quantification of absolute myocardial blood flow (MBF). However, MBF maps computed using the traditional indirect method (i.e. post-reconstruction voxel-wise fitting of kinetic model to PET time-activity-curves-TACs) suffer from poor signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Direct reconstruction of kinetic parameters from raw PET projection data has been shown to offer parametric images with higher SNR compared to the indirect method. The aim of this study was to extend and evaluate the performance of a direct parametric reconstruction method using in vivo dynamic PET MPI data for the purpose of quantifying MBF. Dynamic PET MPI studies were performed on two healthy pigs using a Siemens Biograph mMR scanner. List-mode PET data for each animal were acquired following a bolus injection of ~7-8 mCi of 18 F-flurpiridaz, a myocardial perfusion agent. Fully-3D dynamic PET sinograms were obtained by sorting the coincidence events into 16 temporal frames covering ~5 min after radiotracer administration. Additionally, eight independent noise realizations of both scans-each containing 1/8th of the total number of events-were generated from the original list-mode data. Dynamic sinograms were then used to compute parametric maps using the conventional indirect method and the proposed direct method. For both methods, a one-tissue compartment model accounting for spillover from the left and right ventricle blood-pools was used to describe the kinetics of 18 F-flurpiridaz. An image-derived arterial input function obtained from a TAC taken in the left ventricle cavity was used for tracer kinetic analysis. For the indirect method, frame-by-frame images were estimated using two fully-3D reconstruction techniques: the standard ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) reconstruction algorithm on one side, and the one-step late maximum a posteriori (OSL-MAP) algorithm on the other

  18. Tilt-pair analysis of images from a range of different specimens in single-particle electron cryomicroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Richard; Chen, Shaoxia; Chen, James Z; Grigorieff, Nikolaus; Passmore, Lori A; Ciccarelli, Luciano; Rubinstein, John L; Crowther, R Anthony; Stewart, Phoebe L; Rosenthal, Peter B

    2011-11-11

    The comparison of a pair of electron microscope images recorded at different specimen tilt angles provides a powerful approach for evaluating the quality of images, image-processing procedures, or three-dimensional structures. Here, we analyze tilt-pair images recorded from a range of specimens with different symmetries and molecular masses and show how the analysis can produce valuable information not easily obtained otherwise. We show that the accuracy of orientation determination of individual single particles depends on molecular mass, as expected theoretically since the information in each particle image increases with molecular mass. The angular uncertainty is less than 1° for particles of high molecular mass (~50 MDa), several degrees for particles in the range 1-5 MDa, and tens of degrees for particles below 1 MDa. Orientational uncertainty may be the major contributor to the effective temperature factor (B-factor) describing contrast loss and therefore the maximum resolution of a structure determination. We also made two unexpected observations. Single particles that are known to be flexible showed a wider spread in orientation accuracy, and the orientations of the largest particles examined changed by several degrees during typical low-dose exposures. Smaller particles presumably also reorient during the exposure; hence, specimen movement is a second major factor that limits resolution. Tilt pairs thus enable assessment of orientation accuracy, map quality, specimen motion, and conformational heterogeneity. A convincing tilt-pair parameter plot, where 60% of the particles show a single cluster around the expected tilt axis and tilt angle, provides confidence in a structure determined using electron cryomicroscopy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Range-Gated LADAR Coherent Imaging Using Parametric Up-Conversion of IR and NIR Light for Imaging with a Visible-Range Fast-Shuttered Intensified Digital CCD Camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    YATES,GEORGE J.; MCDONALD,THOMAS E. JR.; BLISS,DAVID E.; CAMERON,STEWART M.; ZUTAVERN,FRED J.

    2000-12-20

    Research is presented on infrared (IR) and near infrared (NIR) sensitive sensor technologies for use in a high speed shuttered/intensified digital video camera system for range-gated imaging at ''eye-safe'' wavelengths in the region of 1.5 microns. The study is based upon nonlinear crystals used for second harmonic generation (SHG) in optical parametric oscillators (OPOS) for conversion of NIR and IR laser light to visible range light for detection with generic S-20 photocathodes. The intensifiers are ''stripline'' geometry 18-mm diameter microchannel plate intensifiers (MCPIIS), designed by Los Alamos National Laboratory and manufactured by Philips Photonics. The MCPIIS are designed for fast optical shattering with exposures in the 100-200 ps range, and are coupled to a fast readout CCD camera. Conversion efficiency and resolution for the wavelength conversion process are reported. Experimental set-ups for the wavelength shifting and the optical configurations for producing and transporting laser reflectance images are discussed.

  20. Direct imaging of phase objects enables conventional deconvolution in bright field light microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández Candia, Carmen Noemí; Gutiérrez-Medina, Braulio

    2014-01-01

    In transmitted optical microscopy, absorption structure and phase structure of the specimen determine the three-dimensional intensity distribution of the image. The elementary impulse responses of the bright field microscope therefore consist of separate absorptive and phase components, precluding general application of linear, conventional deconvolution processing methods to improve image contrast and resolution. However, conventional deconvolution can be applied in the case of pure phase (or pure absorptive) objects if the corresponding phase (or absorptive) impulse responses of the microscope are known. In this work, we present direct measurements of the phase point- and line-spread functions of a high-aperture microscope operating in transmitted bright field. Polystyrene nanoparticles and microtubules (biological polymer filaments) serve as the pure phase point and line objects, respectively, that are imaged with high contrast and low noise using standard microscopy plus digital image processing. Our experimental results agree with a proposed model for the response functions, and confirm previous theoretical predictions. Finally, we use the measured phase point-spread function to apply conventional deconvolution on the bright field images of living, unstained bacteria, resulting in improved definition of cell boundaries and sub-cellular features. These developments demonstrate practical application of standard restoration methods to improve imaging of phase objects such as cells in transmitted light microscopy.

  1. Direct imaging of phase objects enables conventional deconvolution in bright field light microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Noemí Hernández Candia

    Full Text Available In transmitted optical microscopy, absorption structure and phase structure of the specimen determine the three-dimensional intensity distribution of the image. The elementary impulse responses of the bright field microscope therefore consist of separate absorptive and phase components, precluding general application of linear, conventional deconvolution processing methods to improve image contrast and resolution. However, conventional deconvolution can be applied in the case of pure phase (or pure absorptive objects if the corresponding phase (or absorptive impulse responses of the microscope are known. In this work, we present direct measurements of the phase point- and line-spread functions of a high-aperture microscope operating in transmitted bright field. Polystyrene nanoparticles and microtubules (biological polymer filaments serve as the pure phase point and line objects, respectively, that are imaged with high contrast and low noise using standard microscopy plus digital image processing. Our experimental results agree with a proposed model for the response functions, and confirm previous theoretical predictions. Finally, we use the measured phase point-spread function to apply conventional deconvolution on the bright field images of living, unstained bacteria, resulting in improved definition of cell boundaries and sub-cellular features. These developments demonstrate practical application of standard restoration methods to improve imaging of phase objects such as cells in transmitted light microscopy.

  2. Efficient completion for corrupted low-rank images via alternating direction method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Zhao, Lei; Xu, Duanqing; Lu, Dongming

    2014-05-01

    We propose an efficient and easy-to-implement method to settle the inpainting problem for low-rank images following the recent studies about low-rank matrix completion. In general, our method has three steps: first, corresponding to the three channels of RGB color space, an incomplete image is split into three incomplete matrices; second, each matrix is restored by solving a convex problem derived from the nuclear norm relaxation; at last, the three recovered matrices are merged to produce the final output. During the process, in order to efficiently solve the nuclear norm minimization problem, we employ the alternating direction method. Except for the basic image inpainting problem, we also enable our method to handle cases where corrupted images not only have missing values but also have noisy entries. Our experiments show that our method outperforms the existing inpainting techniques both quantitatively and qualitatively. We also demonstrate that our method is capable of processing many other situations, including block-wise low-rank image completion, large-scale image restoration, and object removal.

  3. The dynamic effect of reading direction habit on spatial asymmetry of image perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afsari, Zaeinab; Ossandón, José P; König, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Exploration of images after stimulus onset is initially biased to the left. Here, we studied the causes of such an asymmetry and investigated effects of reading habits, text primes, and priming by systematically biased eye movements on this spatial bias in visual exploration. Bilinguals first read text primes with right-to-left (RTL) or left-to-right (LTR) reading directions and subsequently explored natural images. In Experiment 1, native RTL speakers showed a leftward free-viewing shift after reading LTR primes but a weaker rightward bias after reading RTL primes. This demonstrates that reading direction dynamically influences the spatial bias. However, native LTR speakers who learned an RTL language late in life showed a leftward bias after reading either LTR or RTL primes, which suggests the role of habit formation in the production of the spatial bias. In Experiment 2, LTR bilinguals showed a slightly enhanced leftward bias after reading LTR text primes in their second language. This might contribute to the differences of native RTL and LTR speakers observed in Experiment 1. In Experiment 3, LTR bilinguals read normal (LTR, habitual reading) and mirrored left-to-right (mLTR, nonhabitual reading) texts. We observed a strong leftward bias in both cases, indicating that the bias direction is influenced by habitual reading direction and is not secondary to the actual reading direction. This is confirmed in Experiment 4, in which LTR participants were asked to follow RTL and LTR moving dots in prior image presentation and showed no change in the normal spatial bias. In conclusion, the horizontal bias is a dynamic property and is modulated by habitual reading direction.

  4. Future space-based direct imaging platforms: high fidelity simulations and instrument testbed development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Brian A.; Eberhardt, Andrew; SAINT, VNC, LUVOIR

    2017-06-01

    The direct detection and characterization of habitable zone (HZ) Earth-like exoplanets is predicated on light gathering power of a large telescope operating with tens of millicarcsecond angular resolution, and at contrast scales on the order of 0.1 ppb. Accessing a statistically significant sample of planets to search for habitable worlds will likely build on the knowledge and insfrastructure gained through JWST, later advancing to assembly in space or formation flying approaches that may eventually be used to achieve even greater photometric sensitivity or resolution. in order to address contrast, a means of starlight suppression is needed that contends with complex aperture diffraction. The Visible Nulling Coronagraph (VNC) is one such approach that destructively interferes starlight to enable detection and characterization of extrasolar objects.The VNC is being incorporated into an end-to-end telescope-coronagraph system demonstrator called the Segmented Aperture Interferometric Nulling Testbed (SAINT). Development of the VNC has a rich legacy, and successfully demonstrating its capability with SAINT will mark milestones towards meeting the high-contrast direct imaging needs of future large space telescopes. SAINT merges the VNC with an actively-controlled segmented aperture telescope via a fine pointing system and aims to demonstrate 1e-8 contrast nulling of a segmented aperture at an inner working angle of four diffraction radii over a 20 nm visible bandpass. The system comprises four detectors for wavefront sensing, one of which is the high-contrast focal plane. The detectors provide feedback to control the segmented telescope primary mirror, a fast steering mirror, a segmented deformable mirror, and a delay stage. All of these components must work in concert with passive optical elements that are designed, fabricated, and aligned pairwise to achieve the requisite wavefront symmetry needed to push the state of the art in broadband destructive interferometric

  5. Fast Plane Wave 2-D Vector Flow Imaging Using Transverse Oscillation and Directional Beamforming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Jonas; Villagomez Hoyos, Carlos Armando; Stuart, Matthias Bo; Ewertsen, Caroline; Nielsen, Michael Bachmann; Jensen, Jorgen Arendt

    2017-07-01

    Several techniques can estimate the 2-D velocity vector in ultrasound. Directional beamforming (DB) estimates blood flow velocities with a higher precision and accuracy than transverse oscillation (TO), but at the cost of a high beamforming load when estimating the flow angle. In this paper, it is proposed to use TO to estimate an initial flow angle, which is then refined in a DB step. Velocity magnitude is estimated along the flow direction using cross correlation. It is shown that the suggested TO-DB method can improve the performance of velocity estimates compared with TO, and with a beamforming load, which is 4.6 times larger than for TO and seven times smaller than for conventional DB. Steered plane wave transmissions are employed for high frame rate imaging, and parabolic flow with a peak velocity of 0.5 m/s is simulated in straight vessels at beam-to-flow angles from 45° to 90°. The TO-DB method estimates the angle with a bias and standard deviation (SD) less than 2°, and the SD of the velocity magnitude is less than 2%. When using only TO, the SD of the angle ranges from 2° to 17° and for the velocity magnitude up to 7%. Bias of the velocity magnitude is within 2% for TO and slightly larger but within 4% for TO-DB. The same trends are observed in measurements although with a slightly larger bias. Simulations of realistic flow in a carotid bifurcation model provide visualization of complex flow, and the spread of velocity magnitude estimates is 7.1 cm/s for TO-DB, while it is 11.8 cm/s using only TO. However, velocities for TO-DB are underestimated at peak systole as indicated by a regression value of 0.97 for TO and 0.85 for TO-DB. An in vivo scanning of the carotid bifurcation is used for vector velocity estimations using TO and TO-DB. The SD of the velocity profile over a cardiac cycle is 4.2% for TO and 3.2% for TO-DB.

  6. Image-Guided Hydrodynamic Gene Delivery: Current Status and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenya Kamimura

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Hydrodynamics-based delivery has been used as an experimental tool to express transgene in small animals. This in vivo gene transfer method is useful for functional analysis of genetic elements, therapeutic effect of oligonucleotides, and cancer cells to establish the metastatic cancer animal model for experimental research. Recent progress in the development of image-guided procedure for hydrodynamics-based gene delivery in large animals directly supports the clinical applicability of this technique. This review summarizes the current status and recent progress in the development of hydrodynamics-based gene delivery and discusses the future directions for its clinical application.

  7. Characterization and optimization of a thin direct electron detector for fast imaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dourki, I.; Westermeier, F.; Schopper, F.; Richter, R. H.; Andricek, L.; Ninkovic, J.; Treis, J.; Koffmane, C.; Wassatsch, A.; Peric, I.; Epp, S. W.; Miller, R. J. D.

    2017-03-01

    Direct electron detectors are increasingly used to explore the dynamics of macromolecules in real space and real time using transmission electron microscopy. The purpose of this work is to optimize the most suitable detector configuration of a thin silicon detector by Monte Carlo Simulations. Several simulations were performed to achieve an advanced detector geometry that reduces significantly the background signal due to backscattered electrons resulting in an enhanced imaging performance of the detector. Utilizing DEPFET (DEpleted P-channel Field Effect Transistor) technology and the novel ideas for the optimized detector geometry, a unique direct hit electron detector is currently being produced.

  8. Image-Guided Hydrodynamic Gene Delivery: Current Status and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamimura, Kenya; Yokoo, Takeshi; Abe, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Yuji; Ogawa, Kohei; Shinagawa, Yoko; Inoue, Ryosuke; Terai, Shuji

    2015-01-01

    Hydrodynamics-based delivery has been used as an experimental tool to express transgene in small animals. This in vivo gene transfer method is useful for functional analysis of genetic elements, therapeutic effect of oligonucleotides, and cancer cells to establish the metastatic cancer animal model for experimental research. Recent progress in the development of image-guided procedure for hydrodynamics-based gene delivery in large animals directly supports the clinical applicability of this technique. This review summarizes the current status and recent progress in the development of hydrodynamics-based gene delivery and discusses the future directions for its clinical application. PMID:26308044

  9. Resolving the Crab Nebula with Direct Hard X-Ray Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, Douglas A.; Ramsey, Brian D.; Tennant, Allyn F.; Dietz, Kurtis L.; Apple, Jeff A.; Gaskin, Jessica A.; Weisskopf, Martin

    2008-01-01

    We report the first direct hard (25--60 keV) X-ray imaging observation of the Crab Nebula that resolves structure to approximately 0.25 pc. The observation was performed over a 1.4 hour period during a balloon flight from Ft. Sumner, NM, on 2007 May 27. The source was detected in the energy band above the atmospheric cutoff at approx.25 keV and below the mirror graze angle cutoff at approx.60 keV. The image shows elongation about 25 degrees E of N in the direction along the plane of the torus (and perpendicular to the jet axis) with a slight surface-brightness enhancement NE of the pulsar. The spectrum within a 1.7 arcminute radius region centered on the Crab pulsar can be fitted with a Gamma=2 power law absorbed by an atmospheric column consistent with the balloon altitude at the time of observation.

  10. Direct Imaging of Dynamic Glassy Behavior in a Strained Manganite Film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundhikanjana, Worasom; Sheng, Zhigao; Yang, Yongliang; Lai, Keji; Ma, Eric Yue; Cui, Yong-Tao; Kelly, Michael A.; Nakamura, Masao; Kawasaki, Masashi; Tokura, Yoshinori; Tang, Qiaochu; Zhang, Kun; Li, Xinxin; Shen, Zhi-Xun

    2015-12-01

    Complex many-body interaction in perovskite manganites gives rise to a strong competition between ferromagnetic metallic and charge-ordered phases with nanoscale electronic inhomogeneity and glassy behaviors. Investigating this glassy state requires high-resolution imaging techniques with sufficient sensitivity and stability. Here, we present the results of a near-field microwave microscope imaging on the strain-driven glassy state in a manganite film. The high contrast between the two electrically distinct phases allows direct visualization of the phase separation. The low-temperature microscopic configurations differ upon cooling with different thermal histories. At sufficiently high temperatures, we observe switching between the two phases in either direction. The dynamic switching, however, stops below the glass transition temperature. Compared with the magnetization data, the phase separation was microscopically frozen, while spin relaxation was found in a short period of time.

  11. Real-time ultrasound image classification for spine anesthesia using local directional Hadamard features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesteie, Mehran; Abolmaesumi, Purang; Ashab, Hussam Al-Deen; Lessoway, Victoria A; Massey, Simon; Gunka, Vit; Rohling, Robert N

    2015-06-01

    Injection therapy is a commonly used solution for back pain management. This procedure typically involves percutaneous insertion of a needle between or around the vertebrae, to deliver anesthetics near nerve bundles. Most frequently, spinal injections are performed either blindly using palpation or under the guidance of fluoroscopy or computed tomography. Recently, due to the drawbacks of the ionizing radiation of such imaging modalities, there has been a growing interest in using ultrasound imaging as an alternative. However, the complex spinal anatomy with different wave-like structures, affected by speckle noise, makes the accurate identification of the appropriate injection plane difficult. The aim of this study was to propose an automated system that can identify the optimal plane for epidural steroid injections and facet joint injections. A multi-scale and multi-directional feature extraction system to provide automated identification of the appropriate plane is proposed. Local Hadamard coefficients are obtained using the sequency-ordered Hadamard transform at multiple scales. Directional features are extracted from local coefficients which correspond to different regions in the ultrasound images. An artificial neural network is trained based on the local directional Hadamard features for classification. The proposed method yields distinctive features for classification which successfully classified 1032 images out of 1090 for epidural steroid injection and 990 images out of 1052 for facet joint injection. In order to validate the proposed method, a leave-one-out cross-validation was performed. The average classification accuracy for leave-one-out validation was 94 % for epidural and 90 % for facet joint targets. Also, the feature extraction time for the proposed method was 20 ms for a native 2D ultrasound image. A real-time machine learning system based on the local directional Hadamard features extracted by the sequency-ordered Hadamard transform for

  12. Applications of the Integrated High-Performance CMOS Image Sensor to Range Finders — from Optical Triangulation to the Automotive Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jih-Huah; Pen, Cheng-Chung; Jiang, Joe-Air

    2008-01-01

    With their significant features, the applications of complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image sensors covers a very extensive range, from industrial automation to traffic applications such as aiming systems, blind guidance, active/passive range finders, etc. In this paper CMOS image sensor-based active and passive range finders are presented. The measurement scheme of the proposed active/passive range finders is based on a simple triangulation method. The designed range finders chiefly consist of a CMOS image sensor and some light sources such as lasers or LEDs. The implementation cost of our range finders is quite low. Image processing software to adjust the exposure time (ET) of the CMOS image sensor to enhance the performance of triangulation-based range finders was also developed. An extensive series of experiments were conducted to evaluate the performance of the designed range finders. From the experimental results, the distance measurement resolutions achieved by the active range finder and the passive range finder can be better than 0.6% and 0.25% within the measurement ranges of 1 to 8 m and 5 to 45 m, respectively. Feasibility tests on applications of the developed CMOS image sensor-based range finders to the automotive field were also conducted. The experimental results demonstrated that our range finders are well-suited for distance measurements in this field. PMID:27879789

  13. Proposed NRC portable target case for short-range triangulation-based 3D imaging systems characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrier, Benjamin; MacKinnon, David; Cournoyer, Luc; Beraldin, J.-Angelo

    2011-03-01

    The National Research Council of Canada (NRC) is currently evaluating and designing artifacts and methods to completely characterize 3-D imaging systems. We have gathered a set of artifacts to form a low-cost portable case and provide a clearly-defined set of procedures for generating characteristic values using these artifacts. In its current version, this case is specifically designed for the characterization of short-range (standoff distance of 1 centimeter to 3 meters) triangulation-based 3-D imaging systems. The case is known as the "NRC Portable Target Case for Short-Range Triangulation-based 3-D Imaging Systems" (NRC-PTC). The artifacts in the case have been carefully chosen for their geometric, thermal, and optical properties. A set of characterization procedures are provided with these artifacts based on procedures either already in use or are based on knowledge acquired from various tests carried out by the NRC. Geometric dimensioning and tolerancing (GD&T), a well-known terminology in the industrial field, was used to define the set of tests. The following parameters of a system are characterized: dimensional properties, form properties, orientation properties, localization properties, profile properties, repeatability, intermediate precision, and reproducibility. A number of tests were performed in a special dimensional metrology laboratory to validate the capability of the NRC-PTC. The NRC-PTC will soon be subjected to reproducibility testing using an intercomparison evaluation to validate its use in different laboratories.

  14. Direct imaging of neural currents using ultra-low field magnetic resonance techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volegov, Petr L [Los Alamos, NM; Matlashov, Andrei N [Los Alamos, NM; Mosher, John C [Los Alamos, NM; Espy, Michelle A [Los Alamos, NM; Kraus, Jr., Robert H.

    2009-08-11

    Using resonant interactions to directly and tomographically image neural activity in the human brain using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques at ultra-low field (ULF), the present inventors have established an approach that is sensitive to magnetic field distributions local to the spin population in cortex at the Larmor frequency of the measurement field. Because the Larmor frequency can be readily manipulated (through varying B.sub.m), one can also envision using ULF-DNI to image the frequency distribution of the local fields in cortex. Such information, taken together with simultaneous acquisition of MEG and ULF-NMR signals, enables non-invasive exploration of the correlation between local fields induced by neural activity in cortex and more `distant` measures of brain activity such as MEG and EEG.

  15. A Directional Antenna in a Matching Liquid for Microwave Radar Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed I. Latif

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The detailed design equations and antenna parameters for a directional antenna for breast imaging are presented in this paper. The antenna was designed so that it could be immersed in canola oil to achieve efficient coupling of the electromagnetic energy to the breast tissue. Ridges were used in the horn antenna to increase the operating bandwidth. The antenna has an exponentially tapered section for impedance matching. The double-ridged horn antenna has a wideband performance from 1.5 GHz to 5 GHz (3.75 GHz or 110% of impedance bandwidth, which is suitable for breast microwave radar imaging. The fabricated antenna was tested and compared with simulated results, and similar bandwidths were obtained. Experiments were conducted on breast phantoms using these antennas, to detect a simulated breast lesion. The reconstructed image from the experiments shows distinguishable tumor responses indicating promising results for successful breast cancer detection.

  16. Modeling an Optical and Infrared Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence Survey with Exoplanet Direct Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vides, Christina; Macintosh, Bruce; Ruffio, Jean-Baptiste; Nielsen, Eric; Povich, Matthew Samuel

    2018-01-01

    Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) is a direct high contrast imaging instrument coupled to the Gemini South Telescope. Its purpose is to image extrasolar planets around young (~Intelligence), we modeled GPI’s capabilities to detect an extraterrestrial continuous wave (CW) laser broadcasted within the H-band have been modeled. By using sensitivity evaluated for actual GPI observations of young target stars, we produced models of the CW laser power as a function of distance from the star that could be detected if GPI were to observe nearby (~ 3-5 pc) planet-hosting G-type stars. We took a variety of transmitters into consideration in producing these modeled values. GPI is known to be sensitive to both pulsed and CW coherent electromagnetic radiation. The results were compared to similar studies and it was found that these values are competitive to other optical and infrared observations.

  17. Ultrasonic Imaging and Theoretical Prediction of Orthotropic Plate Stiffness in all Planar Directions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Telschow, Kenneth Louis; Deason, Vance Albert; Mukdadi, O.; Datta, S. K.

    2000-07-01

    Exact and approximate theoretical analysis of the wavelengths of plate wave mode propagation in all planar directions for the dispersive antisymmetric Lamb wave mode are compared with measurements from a laser ultrasonic imaging approach that records the out of plane ultrasonic motion over a large area in a single frame without scanning. Good agreement is demonstrated, based on independent determination of the elastic constants, for two different types of paper.

  18. Carotid artery B-mode ultrasound image segmentation based on morphology, geometry and gradient direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunarya, I. Made Gede; Yuniarno, Eko Mulyanto; Purnomo, Mauridhi Hery; Sardjono, Tri Arief; Sunu, Ismoyo; Purnama, I. Ketut Eddy

    2017-06-01

    Carotid Artery (CA) is one of the vital organs in the human body. CA features that can be used are position, size and volume. Position feature can used to determine the preliminary initialization of the tracking. Examination of the CA features can use Ultrasound. Ultrasound imaging can be operated dependently by an skilled operator, hence there could be some differences in the images result obtained by two or more different operators. This can affect the process of determining of CA. To reduce the level of subjectivity among operators, it can determine the position of the CA automatically. In this study, the proposed method is to segment CA in B-Mode Ultrasound Image based on morphology, geometry and gradient direction. This study consists of three steps, the data collection, preprocessing and artery segmentation. The data used in this study were taken directly by the researchers and taken from the Brno university's signal processing lab database. Each data set contains 100 carotid artery B-Mode ultrasound image. Artery is modeled using ellipse with center c, major axis a and minor axis b. The proposed method has a high value on each data set, 97% (data set 1), 73 % (data set 2), 87% (data set 3). This segmentation results will then be used in the process of tracking the CA.

  19. A new direct pixel-based focusing method for medical ultrasound imaging: preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, YuHwa; Piao, Chunsheng; Kim, TaeWan; Chang, Jin Ho; Song, Tai-Kyong; Yoo, Yangmo

    2011-03-01

    In medical ultrasound imaging, scan conversion is used to geometrically transform polar coordinate ultrasound data into Cartesian raster data for display. In scan conversion, Moiré undersampling artifacts can be avoided by using various interpolation techniques such as nearest neighbor and bilinear. However, this interpolation-based scan conversion introduces blurring of fine details in ultrasound images. In this paper, a new beamforming technique, named compounded direct pixel beamforming (CDPB), is proposed to remove blurring artifacts from scan conversion. In CDPB, receive focusing is performed directly on each display pixel in Cartesian coordinates with raw radio-frequency (RF) data from two adjacent transmit firings so that artifacts from scan conversion can be substantially removed. To evaluate the proposed CDPB method, 64-channel pre-beamformed RF data were captured by a commercial ultrasound machine (SA-9900, Medison Corp., Seoul, Korea) from a tissue mimicking phantom (ATS Laboratories, Bridgeport, CT, USA). To quantify the performance of the proposed method, the information entropy contrast (IEC) value was measured. From the experiments, the proposed method provided IEC improvement by 2.8 over the conventional scan conversion method. These results indicate that the proposed new beamforming method could be used for enhancing the image quality in medical ultrasound imaging.

  20. Lightness perception in high dynamic range images: local and remote luminance effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allred, Sarah R; Radonjic, Ana; Gilchrist, Alan L; Brainard, David H

    2012-02-08

    We measured the perceived lightness of target patches embedded in high dynamic range checkerboards. We independently varied the luminance of checks immediately surrounding the test and those remote from it. The data establish context transfer functions (CTFs) that characterize perceptual matches across checkerboard contexts. Several features of the CTFs are broadly consistent with previous research: Matched luminance decreases when overall context luminance decreases; matched luminance increases when overall context luminance increases; manipulating context locations near the target has a greater effect than manipulating locations far from the target patch. The measured CTFs are not well described, however, by changes with context in multiplicative gain alone or by changes in both multiplicative and subtractive adaptation parameters. We were able to fit the data with a three-parameter model of adaptation. This allowed us to characterize the CTFs by specifying the luminances that appeared white, black, and gray (white point, black point, and gray point, respectively). The white and black points depended additively on the local and remote contrasts, but accounting for the gray point required an interaction term. Analysis of this effect suggests that the target patch itself must be included in a description of the visual context.

  1. TU-F-18C-02: Increasing Amorphous Selenium Thickness in Direct Conversion Flat-Panel Imagers for Contrast-Enhanced Dual-Energy Breast Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scaduto, DA; Hu, Y-H; Zhao, W [Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Contrast-enhanced (CE) breast imaging using iodinated contrast agents requires imaging with x-ray spectra at energies greater than those used in mammography. Optimizing amorphous selenium (a-Se) flat panel imagers (FPI) for this higher energy range may increase lesion conspicuity. Methods: We compare imaging performance of a conventional FPI with 200 μm a-Se conversion layer to a prototype FPI with 300 μm a-Se layer. Both detectors are evaluated in a Siemens MAMMOMAT Inspiration prototype digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) system using low-energy (W/Rh 28 kVp) and high-energy (W/Cu 49 kVp) x-ray spectra. Detectability of iodinated lesions in dual-energy images is evaluated using an iodine contrast phantom. Effects of beam obliquity are investigated in projection and reconstructed images using different reconstruction methods. The ideal observer signal-to-noise ratio is used as a figure-of-merit to predict the optimal a-Se thickness for CE lesion detectability without compromising conventional full-field digital mammography (FFDM) and DBT performance. Results: Increasing a-Se thickness from 200 μm to 300 μm preserves imaging performance at typical mammographic energies (e.g. W/Rh 28 kVp), and improves the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) for high energy (W/Cu 49 kVp) by 30%. While the more penetrating high-energy x-ray photons increase geometric blur due to beam obliquity in the FPI with thicker a-Se layer, the effect on lesion detectability in FBP reconstructions is negligible due to the reconstruction filters employed. Ideal observer SNR for CE objects shows improvements in in-plane detectability with increasing a-Se thicknesses, though small lesion detectability begins to degrade in oblique projections for a-Se thickness above 500 μm. Conclusion: Increasing a-Se thickness in direct conversion FPI from 200 μm to 300 μm improves lesion detectability in CE breast imaging with virtually no cost to conventional FFDM and DBT. This work was partially

  2. A Dynamic Range Enhanced Readout Technique with a Two-Step TDC for High Speed Linear CMOS Image Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyuan Gao

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a dynamic range (DR enhanced readout technique with a two-step time-to-digital converter (TDC for high speed linear CMOS image sensors. A multi-capacitor and self-regulated capacitive trans-impedance amplifier (CTIA structure is employed to extend the dynamic range. The gain of the CTIA is auto adjusted by switching different capacitors to the integration node asynchronously according to the output voltage. A column-parallel ADC based on a two-step TDC is utilized to improve the conversion rate. The conversion is divided into coarse phase and fine phase. An error calibration scheme is also proposed to correct quantization errors caused by propagation delay skew within −Tclk~+Tclk. A linear CMOS image sensor pixel array is designed in the 0.13 μm CMOS process to verify this DR-enhanced high speed readout technique. The post simulation results indicate that the dynamic range of readout circuit is 99.02 dB and the ADC achieves 60.22 dB SNDR and 9.71 bit ENOB at a conversion rate of 2 MS/s after calibration, with 14.04 dB and 2.4 bit improvement, compared with SNDR and ENOB of that without calibration.

  3. [Research on the range of motion measurement system for spine based on LabVIEW image processing technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaofang; Deng, Linhong; Lu, Hu; He, Bin

    2014-08-01

    A measurement system based on the image processing technology and developed by LabVIEW was designed to quickly obtain the range of motion (ROM) of spine. NI-Vision module was used to pre-process the original images and calculate the angles of marked needles in order to get ROM data. Six human cadaveric thoracic spine segments T7-T10 were selected to carry out 6 kinds of loads, including left/right lateral bending, flexion, extension, cis/counterclockwise torsion. The system was used to measure the ROM of segment T8-T9 under the loads from 1 Nm to 5 Nm. The experimental results showed that the system is able to measure the ROM of the spine accurately and quickly, which provides a simple and reliable tool for spine biomechanics investigators.

  4. Determining the orientation angle of directional leads for deep brain stimulation using computed tomography and digital x-ray imaging: A phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitz, Alexander; Hoevels, Mauritius; Hellerbach, Alexandra; Gierich, Andreas; Luyken, Klaus; Dembek, Till A; Klehr, Martin; Wirths, Jochen; Visser-Vandewalle, Veerle; Treuer, Harald

    2017-09-01

    Orientating the angle of directional leads for deep brain stimulation (DBS) in an axial plane introduces a new degree of freedom that is indicated by embedded anisotropic directional markers. Our aim was to develop algorithms to determine lead orientation angles from computed tomography (CT) and stereotactic x-ray imaging using standard clinical protocols, and subsequently assess the accuracy of both methods. In CT the anisotropic marker artifact was taken as a signature of the lead orientation angle and analyzed using discrete Fourier transform of circular intensity profiles. The orientation angle was determined from phase angles at a frequency 2/360° and corrected for aberrations at oblique leads. In x-ray imaging, frontal and lateral images were registered to stereotactic space and sub-images containing directional markers were extracted. These images were compared with projection images of an identically located virtual marker at different orientation angles. A similarity index was calculated and used to determine the lead orientation angle. Both methods were tested using epoxy phantoms containing directional leads (Cartesia™, Boston Scientific, Marlborough, USA) with known orientation. Anthropomorphic phantoms were used to compare both methods for DBS cases. Mean deviation between CT and x-ray was 1.5° ± 3.6° (range: -2.3° to 7.9°) for epoxy phantoms and 3.6° ± 7.1° (range: -5.6° to 14.6°) for anthropomorphic phantoms. After correction for imperfections in the epoxy phantoms, the mean deviation from ground truth was 0.0° ± 5.0° (range: -12° to 14°) for x-ray. For CT the results depended on the polar angle of the lead in the scanner. Mean deviation was -0.3° ± 1.9° (range: -4.6° to 6.6°) or 1.6° ± 8.9° (range: -23° to 34°) for polar angles ≤ 40° or > 40°. The results show that both imaging modalities can be used to determine lead orientation angles with high accuracy. CT is superior to x-ray imaging, but oblique leads (polar

  5. Quantitative in vivo 23Na MR imaging of the healthy human kidney: determination of physiological ranges at 3.0T with comparison to DWI and BOLD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haneder, Stefan; Kettnaker, Paul; Konstandin, Simon; Morelli, John N; Schad, Lothar R; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Michaely, Henrik J

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this prospective study was to assess the normal physiologic ranges of the renal corticomedullary 23Na-concentration ([23Na]) gradient at 3.0T in healthy volunteers. The corticomedullary [23Na] gradient was correlated with other functional MR imaging parameters--blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI)--and to individual and physiologic parameters--age, gender, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), body mass index (BMI), and blood serum sodium concentration ([23Na]serum). 50 healthy volunteers (30 m, 20 w; mean age: 29.2 years) were included in this IRB-approved study, without a specific a priori preparation in regard to water or food intake. For 23Na-imaging a 3D density adapted, radial gradient echo (GRE)-sequence (spatial resolution=5×5×5 mm3) was used in combination with a dedicated 23Na-coil and 23Na-reference phantoms. [23Na] values of the corticomedullary [23Na] gradient were measured by placement of a linear region of interest (20×1 mm2) from the renal cortex in the direction of the renal medulla. By using external standard reference phantoms, [23Na] was calculated in mmol/L of wet tissue volume (mmol/l WTV). Axial diffusion-weighted images (spatial resolution=1.7×1.7×5.0 mm3) and 2D GRE BOLD images (spatial resolution=1.2×1.2×4.0 mm3) were acquired. Mean values±standard deviations for [23Na], apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values, and R2* values were computed for each volunteer. The corticomedullary 23Na-concentration gradient (in mmol/l/mm) was calculated along the area of linear concentration increase from the cortex in the direction of the medulla. Correlations between the [23Na] and DWI, BOLD, and the physiologic parameters were assessed with Pearson correlation coefficients. The mean corticomedullary [23Na] for all healthy volunteers increased from the renal cortex (58±17 mmol/l WTV) in the direction of the medulla (99±18 mmol/l WTV). The inter-individual differences ranged from

  6. Towards a comprehensive eye model for zebrafish retinal imaging using full range spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaertner, Maria; Weber, Anke; Cimalla, Peter; Köttig, Felix; Brand, Michael; Koch, Edmund

    2014-03-01

    In regenerative medicine, the zebrafish is a prominent animal model for studying degeneration and regeneration processes, e.g. of photoreceptor cells in the retina. By means of optical coherence tomography (OCT), these studies can be conducted over weeks using the same individual and hence reducing the variability of the results. To allow an improvement of zebrafish retinal OCT imaging by suitable optics, we developed a zebrafish eye model using geometrical data obtained by in vivo dispersion encoded full range OCT as well as a dispersion comprising gradient index (GRIN) lens model based on refractive index data found in the literature. Using non-sequential ray tracing, the focal length of the spherical GRIN lens (diameter of 0.96 mm) was determined to be 1.22 mm at 800 nm wavelength giving a Matheissen's ratio (ratio of focal length to radius of the lens) of 2.54, which fits well into the range between 2.19 and 2.82, found for various fish lenses. Additionally, a mean refractive index of 1.64 at 800 nm could be retrieved for the lens to yield the same focal position as found for the GRIN condition. With the aid of the zebrafish eye model, the optics of the OCT scanner head were adjusted to provide high-resolution retinal images with a field of view of 30° x 30°. The introduced model therefore provides the basis for improved retinal imaging with OCT and can be further used to study the image formation within the zebrafish eye.

  7. Multi-wave and hybrid imaging techniques: a new direction for nondestructive testing and structural health monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yuhua; Deng, Yiming; Cao, Jing; Xiong, Xin; Bai, Libing; Li, Zhaojun

    2013-11-27

    In this article, the state-of-the-art multi-wave and hybrid imaging techniques in the field of nondestructive evaluation and structural health monitoring were comprehensively reviewed. A new direction for assessment and health monitoring of various structures by capitalizing the advantages of those imaging methods was discussed. Although sharing similar system configurations, the imaging physics and principles of multi-wave phenomena and hybrid imaging methods are inherently different. After a brief introduction of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) , structure health monitoring (SHM) and their related challenges, several recent advances that have significantly extended imaging methods from laboratory development into practical applications were summarized, followed by conclusions and discussion on future directions.

  8. Direct Imaging of Nanoscale Conductance Evolution in Ion-Gel-Gated Oxide Transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yuan; Yuan, Hongtao; Wu, Xiaoyu; Chen, Zhuoyu; Iwasa, Yoshihiro; Cui, Yi; Hwang, Harold Y; Lai, Keji

    2015-07-08

    Electrostatic modification of functional materials by electrolytic gating has demonstrated a remarkably wide range of density modulation, a condition crucial for developing novel electronic phases in systems ranging from complex oxides to layered chalcogenides. Yet little is known microscopically when carriers are modulated in electrolyte-gated electric double-layer transistors (EDLTs) due to the technical challenge of imaging the buried electrolyte-semiconductor interface. Here, we demonstrate the real-space mapping of the channel conductance in ZnO EDLTs using a cryogenic microwave impedance microscope. A spin-coated ionic gel layer with typical thicknesses below 50 nm allows us to perform high resolution (on the order of 100 nm) subsurface imaging, while maintaining the capability of inducing the metal-insulator transition under a gate bias. The microwave images vividly show the spatial evolution of channel conductance and its local fluctuations through the transition as well as the uneven conductance distribution established by a large source-drain bias. The unique combination of ultrathin ion-gel gating and microwave imaging offers a new opportunity to study the local transport and mesoscopic electronic properties in EDLTs.

  9. Improved Coastal Precipitation Forecasts with Direct Assimilation of GOES-11/12 Imager Radiances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, X.; Qin, Z.; Weng, F.

    2011-12-01

    Our previous study showed that assimilation of GOES imager radiance with conventional observations could lead to a significant improvement in the quantitative precipitation forecasts (QPFs) near Gulf of Mexico (Zou et al., 2011). In our continual studies, impacts of GOES imager radiances on coastal QPFs are examined in the presence of other satellite observations (e.g., AMSU-A, AIRS, HIRS3/4, MHS, GOES Sounder etc.) which have been assimilated in Gridded Statistical Interpolation (GSI) system. Numerical experiments show that direct assimilation of GOES imager radiances in clear-sky conditions can result in a large positive impact on QPFs, compared to all other types of observations. It is also shown that the impact of the AMSU-A data on this coastal QPF ranks the highest among all the experiments while that of the GOES imager radiance is the second. It is clearly demonstrated that adding MHS and/or GOES sounder data to the AMSU-A experiment significantly degraded the forecast skill and the GOES imager radiances can further improve the forecast skill. The reasons that MHS and GOES sounder radiances produce such a negative impact are still not very clear. Perhaps, the quality control and bias correction schemes of MHS and GOES sounder data in GSI are poor and need to be further optimized.

  10. Long-range laser scanning and 3D imaging for the Gneiss quarries survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenker, Filippo Luca; Spataro, Alessio; Pozzoni, Maurizio; Ambrosi, Christian; Cannata, Massimiliano; Günther, Felix; Corboud, Federico

    2016-04-01

    In Canton Ticino (Southern Switzerland), the exploitation of natural stone, mostly gneisses, is an important activity of valley's economies. Nowadays, these economic activities are menaced by (i) the exploitation costs related to geological phenomena such as fractures, faults and heterogeneous rocks that hinder the processing of the stone product, (ii) continuously changing demand because of the evolving natural stone fashion and (iii) increasing administrative limits and rules acting to protect the environment. Therefore, the sustainable development of the sector for the next decades needs new and effective strategies to regulate and plan the quarries. A fundamental step in this process is the building of a 3D geological model of the quarries to constrain the volume of commercial natural stone and the volume of waste. In this context, we conducted Terrestrial Laser Scanning surveys of the quarries in the Maggia Valley to obtain a detailed 3D topography onto which the geological units were mapped. The topographic 3D model was obtained with a long-range laser scanning Riegl VZ4000 that can measure from up to 4 km of distance with a speed of 147,000 points per second. It operates with the new V-line technology, which defines the surface relief by sensing differentiated signals (echoes), even in the presence of obstacles such as vegetation. Depending on the esthetics of the gneisses, we defined seven types of natural stones that, together with faults and joints, were mapped onto the 3D models of the exploitation sites. According to the orientation of the geological limits and structures, we projected the different rock units and fractures into the excavation front. This way, we obtained a 3D geological model from which we can quantitatively estimate the volume of the seven different natural stones (with different commercial value) and waste (with low commercial value). To verify the 3D geological models and to quantify exploited rock and waste volumes the same

  11. High-resolution observation of field-aligned irregularities in the ionosphere using multi-frequency range imaging of VHF atmospheric radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jenn-Shyong; Furumoto, Jun-ichi; Su, Ching-Lun; Chu, Yen-Hsyang

    Field-aligned irregularity (FAI) in the ionosphere is a topic of interest to atmospheric radar community. In addition to the field-aligned characteristic, quasi-periodic (QP) appearance of FAI echoes has been observed frequently by very-high-frequency (VHF) atmospheric radar. The occurrence range of QP FAI echoes changes with time, and the slope of range versus time can be positive or negative, depending on occurrence time of the echoes. Several mechanisms responsible for the QP FAI echoes have been proposed, e.g., modulation in altitude by a passing atmospheric gravity wave, semidiurnal neutral-wind variation, and so on. Owing to the finite pulse length of radar in observation, the range resolution of measurement is limited within hundreds of meters. In view of this, the range imaging (RIM) using multiple frequencies has been employed to improve the range resolution of measurement. The multi-frequency technique transmits a set of slightly different frequencies sequentially during each radar pulse, and the radar returns at different transmitting frequencies are received, respectively. With adaptive retrieval algorithms for these radar returns, it is capable of resolving the echo structures at meter scale in the range direction. RIM has been employed in the lower atmosphere successfully. In this study, the performance of RIM for FAI was first carried out with the Middle and Upper atmosphere Radar (46 MHz; 34.85(°) N, 136.10(°) N; Japan) and the Chung-Li VHF radar (52 MHz; 24.9(°) N, 121.1(°) E; Taiwan). Some initial results of high-resolution FAI echoes within the range gate will be shown.

  12. Flexible cross-correlated (C2) imaging method for the modal content characterization in a broad range of wavelengths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muliar, Olena; Usuga Castaneda, Mario A.; Michieletto, Mattia

    2017-01-01

    as the phase distribution are extracted by the alternative method of 2D FT filtering. Being exceptionally tunable the flexible C2 method gives an ability to adapt the system’s parameters in a desired manner satisfying even measurements of very specific fiber designs opening up new possibilities for advanced......We demonstrate a flexible cross-correlated (C2) imaging method in the time domain by application of a tunable and highly flexible light source. An advantage of the flexible C2method is shown by characterization of the step-index fiber (SMF28) over a broad range of wavelengths from 870nm to 1090nm...

  13. Physical model SOLARMET for determining total and direct solar radiation by meteosat satellite images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cogliani, E.; Maccari, A. [ENEA, Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Environment, C.R. Casaccia, Solterm-Svil, P.O. Box 117, Via Anguillarese 301-00123, S. Maria di Galeria, Rome (Italy); Ricchiazzi, P. [ICESS, Institute for Computational Earth System Science, University of California at Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-3060 (United States)

    2007-06-15

    A vigorous R and D program on solar concentrating power plants has been recently funded in Italy in order to demonstrate the feasibility of these technologies. Maps of direct normal radiation (DNI) are needed for the selection of construction sites for demonstration plants. This paper describes SOLARMET, a physical model that simulates the atmospheric effect on solar radiation. The SOLARMET model may be used to determine the solar radiation, total and direct, reaching the ground, based on information provided by satellite images. Atmosphere transmissivity, ground reflection coefficient, and other essential parameters in the model were determined from SBDART, a radiative transfer model, developed at University of California. Validation of the model have been carried out at Casaccia (Rome-Italy) ENEA centre. The results obtained in the 2002 year are encouraging. The difference between measured and calculated data, during this year, either for direct or global radiation, are lower than 6% on monthly basis. (author)

  14. Analysis of image versus position, scale and direction reveals pattern texture anisotropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland eLehoucq

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pattern heterogeneities and anisotropies often carry significant physical information. We provide a toolbox which: (i cumulates analysis in terms of position, direction and scale; (ii is as general as possible; (iii is simple and fast to understand, implement, execute and exploit.It consists in dividing the image into analysis boxes at a chosen scale; in each box an ellipse (the inertia tensor is fitted to the signal and thus determines the direction in which the signal is more present. This tensor can be averaged in position and/or be used to study the dependence with scale. This choice is formally linked with Leray transforms and anisotropic wavelet analysis. Such protocol is intutively interpreted and consistent with what the eye detects: relevant scales, local variations in space, priviledged directions. It is fast and parallelizable.Its several variants are adaptable to the user's data and needs. It is useful to statistically characterize anisotropies of 2D or 3D patterns in which individual objects are not easily distinguished, with only minimal pre-processing of the raw image, and more generally applies to data in higher dimensions.It is less sensitive to edge effects, and thus better adapted for a multiscale analysis down to small scale boxes, than pair correlation function or Fourier transform.Easy to understand and implement,it complements more sophisticated methods such as Hough transform or diffusion tensor imaging.We use it on various fracture patterns (sea ice cover, thin sections of granite, granular materials, to pinpoint the maximal anisotropy scales. The results are robust to noise and to user choices. This toolbox could turn also useful for granular materials, hard condensed matter, geophysics, thin films, statistical mechanics, characterisation of networks, fluctuating amorphous systems, inhomogeneous and disordered systems, or medical imaging, among others.

  15. Evolution of Satellite Imagers and Sounders for Low Earth Orbit and Technology Directions at NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, Thomas S.; McClain, Charles R.

    2010-01-01

    Imagers and Sounders for Low Earth Orbit (LEO) provide fundamental global daily observations of the Earth System for scientists, researchers, and operational weather agencies. The imager provides the nominal 1-2 km spatial resolution images with global coverage in multiple spectral bands for a wide range of uses including ocean color, vegetation indices, aerosol, snow and cloud properties, and sea surface temperature. The sounder provides vertical profiles of atmospheric temperature, water vapor cloud properties, and trace gases including ozone, carbon monoxide, methane and carbon dioxide. Performance capabilities of these systems has evolved with the optical and sensing technologies of the decade. Individual detectors were incorporated on some of the first imagers and sounders that evolved to linear array technology in the '80's. Signal-to-noise constraints limited these systems to either broad spectral resolution as in the case of the imager, or low spatial resolution as in the case of the sounder. Today's area 2-dimensional large format array technology enables high spatial and high spectral resolution to be incorporated into a single instrument. This places new constraints on the design of these systems and enables new capabilities for scientists to examine the complex processes governing the Earth System.

  16. Direct measurement of Lubberts effect in CsI:Tl scintillators using single x-ray photon imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howansky, Adrian; Lubinsky, A. R.; Ghose, S. K.; Suzuki, Katsuhiko; Zhao, Wei

    2017-03-01

    The imaging performance of an indirect flat panel detector (I-FPD) is fundamentally limited by that of its scintillator. The scintillator's modulation transfer function (MTF) varies as a function of the depth of x-ray interaction in the layer, due to differences in the lateral spread of light before detection by the optical sensor. This variation degrades the spatial frequency-dependent detective quantum efficiency (DQE(f)) of I-FPDs, and is quantified by the Lubberts effect. The depth-dependent MTFs of various scintillators used in I-FPDs have been estimated using Monte Carlo simulations, but have never been measured directly. This work presents the first experimental measurements of the depth-dependent MTF of thallium-doped cesium iodide (CsI) and terbium-doped Gd2O2S (GOS) scintillators with thickness ranging from 200 - 1000 μm. Light bursts from individual x-ray interactions occurring at known, fixed depths within a scintillator are imaged using an ultra-high-sensitivity II-EMCCD (image-intensifier, electron multiplying charge coupled device) camera. X-ray interaction depth in the scintillator is localized using a micro-slit beam of parallel synchrotron radiation (32 keV), and varied by translation in 50 +/- 1 µm depth intervals. Fourier analysis of the imaged light bursts is used to deduce the MTF versus x-ray interaction depth z. Measurements of MTF(z,f) are used to calculate presampling MTF(f) with RQA-M3, RQA5 and RQA9 beam qualities and compared with conventional slanted edge measurements. Images of the depth-varying light bursts are used to derive each scintillator's Lubberts function for a 32 keV beam.

  17. A laboratory-based Laue X-ray diffraction system for enhanced imaging range and surface grain mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitley, William; Stock, Chris; Huxley, Andrew D

    2015-08-01

    Although CCD X-ray detectors can be faster to use, their large-area versions can be much more expensive than similarly sized photographic plate detectors. When indexing X-ray diffraction patterns, large-area detectors can prove very advantageous as they provide more spots, which makes fitting an orientation easier. On the other hand, when looking for single crystals in a polycrystalline sample, the speed of CCD detectors is more useful. A new setup is described here which overcomes some of the limitations of limited-range CCD detectors to make them more useful for indexing, whilst at the same time making it much quicker to find single crystals within a larger polycrystalline structure. This was done by combining a CCD detector with a six-axis goniometer, allowing the compilation of images from different angles into a wide-angled image. Automated scans along the sample were coupled with image processing techniques to produce grain maps, which can then be used to provide a strategy to extract single crystals from a polycrystal.

  18. Short range shooting distance estimation using variable pressure SEM images of the surroundings of bullet holes in textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinrichs, Ruth; Frank, Paulo Ricardo Ost; Vasconcellos, M A Z

    2017-03-01

    Modifications of cotton and polyester textiles due to shots fired at short range were analyzed with a variable pressure scanning electron microscope (VP-SEM). Different mechanisms of fiber rupture as a function of fiber type and shooting distance were detected, namely fusing, melting, scorching, and mechanical breakage. To estimate the firing distance, the approximately exponential decay of GSR coverage as a function of radial distance from the entrance hole was determined from image analysis, instead of relying on chemical analysis with EDX, which is problematic in the VP-SEM. A set of backscattered electron images, with sufficient magnification to discriminate micrometer wide GSR particles, was acquired at different radial distances from the entrance hole. The atomic number contrast between the GSR particles and the organic fibers allowed to find a robust procedure to segment the micrographs into binary images, in which the white pixel count was attributed to GSR coverage. The decrease of the white pixel count followed an exponential decay, and it was found that the reciprocal of the decay constant, obtained from the least-square fitting of the coverage data, showed a linear dependence on the shooting distance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Wide range local resistance imaging on fragile materials by conducting probe atomic force microscopy in intermittent contact mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vecchiola, Aymeric [Laboratoire de Génie électrique et électronique de Paris (GeePs), UMR 8507 CNRS-CentraleSupélec, Paris-Sud and UPMC Universities, 11 rue Joliot-Curie, Plateau de Moulon, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Concept Scientific Instruments, ZA de Courtaboeuf, 2 rue de la Terre de Feu, 91940 Les Ulis (France); Unité Mixte de Physique CNRS-Thales UMR 137, 1 avenue Augustin Fresnel, 91767 Palaiseau (France); Chrétien, Pascal; Schneegans, Olivier; Mencaraglia, Denis; Houzé, Frédéric, E-mail: frederic.houze@geeps.centralesupelec.fr [Laboratoire de Génie électrique et électronique de Paris (GeePs), UMR 8507 CNRS-CentraleSupélec, Paris-Sud and UPMC Universities, 11 rue Joliot-Curie, Plateau de Moulon, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Delprat, Sophie [Unité Mixte de Physique CNRS-Thales UMR 137, 1 avenue Augustin Fresnel, 91767 Palaiseau (France); UPMC, Université Paris 06, 4 place Jussieu, 75005 Paris (France); Bouzehouane, Karim; Seneor, Pierre; Mattana, Richard [Unité Mixte de Physique CNRS-Thales UMR 137, 1 avenue Augustin Fresnel, 91767 Palaiseau (France); Tatay, Sergio [Molecular Science Institute, University of Valencia, 46980 Paterna (Spain); Geffroy, Bernard [Lab. Physique des Interfaces et Couches minces (PICM), UMR 7647 CNRS-École polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Lab. d' Innovation en Chimie des Surfaces et Nanosciences (LICSEN), NIMBE UMR 3685 CNRS-CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); and others

    2016-06-13

    An imaging technique associating a slowly intermittent contact mode of atomic force microscopy (AFM) with a home-made multi-purpose resistance sensing device is presented. It aims at extending the widespread resistance measurements classically operated in contact mode AFM to broaden their application fields to soft materials (molecular electronics, biology) and fragile or weakly anchored nano-objects, for which nanoscale electrical characterization is highly demanded and often proves to be a challenging task in contact mode. Compared with the state of the art concerning less aggressive solutions for AFM electrical imaging, our technique brings a significantly wider range of resistance measurement (over 10 decades) without any manual switching, which is a major advantage for the characterization of materials with large on-sample resistance variations. After describing the basics of the set-up, we report on preliminary investigations focused on academic samples of self-assembled monolayers with various thicknesses as a demonstrator of the imaging capabilities of our instrument, from qualitative and semi-quantitative viewpoints. Then two application examples are presented, regarding an organic photovoltaic thin film and an array of individual vertical carbon nanotubes. Both attest the relevance of the technique for the control and optimization of technological processes.

  20. Direct imaging of the magnetization reversal in microwires using all-MOKE microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stupakiewicz, A; Chizhik, A; Tekielak, M; Zhukov, A; Gonzalez, J; Maziewski, A

    2014-10-01

    We report a method of imaging of the magnetization reversal process using analysis of real-time images of magnetic domain structures in cylindrically shaped microwires. This method uses wide-field polarizing optical microscopy and is based on the magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE). The aperture diaphragm in MOKE microscope was used to control the incident angles of the light rays that reached the non-planar surface of the microwire and also determined the MOKE geometries. The movement of the non-central position of the hole in this diaphragm leads to a change in the orientation of the plane of incidence of the light along the perpendicular or the parallel direction to the axial direction of the wire. The visualization of the surface magnetic domain structures is obtained using polar and longitudinal MOKE geometries. The hysteresis loops were obtained by plotting the averaged image contrast as a function of the external magnetic field. The separation of the all-magnetization components is performed using different MOKE geometries in a microscope. We demonstrate the use of vector magnetometry to analyze the orientation of the magnetization in a cylindrically shaped microwire under the influence of an external magnetic field.

  1. Directly reconstructing principal components of heterogeneous particles from cryo-EM images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagare, Hemant D; Kucukelbir, Alp; Sigworth, Fred J; Wang, Hongwei; Rao, Murali

    2015-08-01

    Structural heterogeneity of particles can be investigated by their three-dimensional principal components. This paper addresses the question of whether, and with what algorithm, the three-dimensional principal components can be directly recovered from cryo-EM images. The first part of the paper extends the Fourier slice theorem to covariance functions showing that the three-dimensional covariance, and hence the principal components, of a heterogeneous particle can indeed be recovered from two-dimensional cryo-EM images. The second part of the paper proposes a practical algorithm for reconstructing the principal components directly from cryo-EM images without the intermediate step of calculating covariances. This algorithm is based on maximizing the posterior likelihood using the Expectation-Maximization algorithm. The last part of the paper applies this algorithm to simulated data and to two real cryo-EM data sets: a data set of the 70S ribosome with and without Elongation Factor-G (EF-G), and a data set of the influenza virus RNA dependent RNA Polymerase (RdRP). The first principal component of the 70S ribosome data set reveals the expected conformational changes of the ribosome as the EF-G binds and unbinds. The first principal component of the RdRP data set reveals a conformational change in the two dimers of the RdRP. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Direct extraction of coherent mode properties from imaging measurements in a linear plasma column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Light, Adam; Thakur, Saikat; Brandt, Christian; Sechrest, Yancey; Tynan, George; Munsat, Tobin

    2013-10-01

    We present imaging measurements of coherent waves in the Controlled Shear Decorrelation Experiment (CSDX). CSDX is a well-characterized linear machine producing dense plasmas relevant to the tokamak edge (Te ~ 3 eV, ne ~1013 /cc). Visible light from ArII line emission is collected at high frame rates using an intensified digital camera. A cross-spectral phase technique allows direct visualization of dominant phase structures as a function of frequency, as well as identification of azimuthal asymmetries present in the system. Experimental dispersion estimates are constructed from imaging data alone. Drift-like waves are identified by comparison with theoretical dispersion curves, and a tentative match of a low-frequency spectral feature to Kelvin-Helmholtz-driven waves is presented. Imaging measurements are consistent with previous results, and provide non-invasive, single-shot measurements across the entire plasma cross-section. Relationships between imaging and electrostatic measurements are explored, including limitations of both techniques. The authors acknowledge support from the Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  3. Image reconstruction from partial pseudo polar Fourier sampling based on alternating direction total variation minimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiu-hong; Shu, Fan; Zhang, Wen-kun; Cai, Ai-long; Li, Lei; Yan, Bin

    2013-08-01

    Linear scan Computed Tomography (LCT) has emerged as a promising technique in fields like industrial scanning and security inspection due to its straight-line source trajectory and high scanning speed. However, in practical applications of LCT, the ordinary algorithms suffer from serious artifacts owing to the limited-angle and insufficient data. In this paper, a new method which reconstructs image from partial Fourier data sampled in pseudo polar grid based on alternating direction anisometric total variation minimization has been proposed. The main idea is to reform the image reconstruction problem into solving an under-determined linear equation, and then reconstruct image by applying the popular total variation (TV) minimization to reform an unconstraint optimization by means of augmented Lagrange method and using the alternating minimization method of multiplier (ADMM) which contributes to the fast convergence. The proposed method is practical in the large-scale task of reconstruction due to its algorithmic simplicity and computational efficiency and reconstructs better images. The results of the numerical simulations and pseudo real data reconstructions from the linear scan validate that the proposed method is both efficient and accurate.

  4. Overlooked diseases of the vagina: a directed anatomic-pathologic approach for imaging assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Daphne K; Salibian, Raffi A; Salibian, Allison D; Belen, Kristin M; Palmer, Suzanne L

    2011-10-01

    The vagina can easily be overlooked at ultrasonography (US), computed tomography (CT), or magnetic resonance (MR) imaging performed for nongynecologic indications. Even when gynecologic disease is suspected, the vagina may be underevaluated at routine pelvic US due to probe positioning and at CT due to poor vaginal tissue characterization. Although MR imaging offers excellent tissue characterization, radiologists must focus on the vaginal area to recognize any incidental findings. A directed anatomic-pathologic approach to assessing the vagina at US, CT, and MR imaging is recommended so that pertinent findings are not missed. This approach requires a knowledge of the anatomy and embryologic development of the vagina, as well as an understanding of congenital, developmental, and postoperative vaginal disease entities. In addition, it is important to understand the strengths and limitations of each imaging modality with respect to vaginal assessment. By remembering to "look beyond" the uterus and cervix to the vagina, radiologists can improve their perception and interpretation of vaginal anatomy and disease. © RSNA, 2011.

  5. Site-Specific Direct Labeling of Neurotrophins and Their Receptors: From Biochemistry to Advanced Imaging Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobbo, Francesco; Bonsignore, Fulvio; Amodeo, Rosy; Cattaneo, Antonino; Marchetti, Laura

    2018-01-01

    We describe here a versatile methodological platform to achieve site-directed and stoichiometry-controlled labeling of neurotrophins and their receptors with various probes, ranging from biotin to small organic dyes. This labeling method works in vitro on purified neurotrophins as well as in a living cell context, where it achieves selective labeling of surface-exposed neurotrophin receptors. Here, we list all experimental details of our labeling protocols, along with examples of the wide range of applications in which these can be used.

  6. Characterizing a discrete-to-discrete X-ray transform for iterative image reconstruction with limited angular-range scanning in CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sidky, Emil; Jørgensen, Jakob Heide; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2012-01-01

    Iterative image reconstruction in computed tomography often employs a discrete-to-discrete (DD) linear data model, and many of the aspects of the image recovery relate directly to the properties of this linear model. While much is known about the properties of the continuous X-ray, the correspond......Iterative image reconstruction in computed tomography often employs a discrete-to-discrete (DD) linear data model, and many of the aspects of the image recovery relate directly to the properties of this linear model. While much is known about the properties of the continuous X...

  7. Direct visualization of Parkinson's disease by in vivo human brain imaging using 7.0T magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Zang-Hee; Oh, Se-Hong; Kim, Jong-Min; Park, Sung-Yeon; Kwon, Dae-Hyuk; Jeong, Hye-Jin; Kim, Young-Bo; Chi, Je-Geun; Park, Chan-Woong; Huston, John; Lee, Kendall H; Jeon, Beom S

    2011-03-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder resulting from progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (SN) pars compacta. Therefore, imaging of the SN has been regarded to hold greatest potential for use in the diagnosis of PD. At the 7.0T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), it is now possible to delineate clearly the shapes and boundaries of the SN. We scanned eight early and two advanced PD patients, along with nine age-matched control subjects, using a 7.0T MRI in an attempt to directly visualize the SN and quantify the differences in shape and boundaries of SN between PD subjects in comparison with the normal control subjects. In the normal controls, the boundaries between the SN and crus cerebri appear smooth, and clean "arch" shapes that stretch ventrally from posterior to anterior. In contrast, these smooth and clean arch-like boundaries were lost in PD subjects. The measured correlation analyses show that, in PD patients, there is age-dependent correlation and substantially stronger UPDRS motor score-dependent correlation. These results suggest that, by using 7.0T MRI, it appears possible to use these visible and distinctive changes in morphology as a diagnostic marker of PD. Copyright © 2011 Movement Disorder Society.

  8. IMPLEMENTATION AND EVALUATION OF A MOBILE MAPPING SYSTEM BASED ON INTEGRATED RANGE AND INTENSITY IMAGES FOR TRAFFIC SIGNS LOCALIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Shahbazi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in positioning techniques have made it possible to develop Mobile Mapping Systems (MMS for detection and 3D localization of various objects from a moving platform. On the other hand, automatic traffic sign recognition from an equipped mobile platform has recently been a challenging issue for both intelligent transportation and municipal database collection. However, there are several inevitable problems coherent to all the recognition methods completely relying on passive chromatic or grayscale images. This paper presents the implementation and evaluation of an operational MMS. Being distinct from the others, the developed MMS comprises one range camera based on Photonic Mixer Device (PMD technology and one standard 2D digital camera. The system benefits from certain algorithms to detect, recognize and localize the traffic signs by fusing the shape, color and object information from both range and intensity images. As the calibrating stage, a self-calibration method based on integrated bundle adjustment via joint setup with the digital camera is applied in this study for PMD camera calibration. As the result, an improvement of 83 % in RMS of range error and 72 % in RMS of coordinates residuals for PMD camera, over that achieved with basic calibration is realized in independent accuracy assessments. Furthermore, conventional photogrammetric techniques based on controlled network adjustment are utilized for platform calibration. Likewise, the well-known Extended Kalman Filtering (EKF is applied to integrate the navigation sensors, namely GPS and INS. The overall acquisition system along with the proposed techniques leads to 90 % true positive recognition and the average of 12 centimetres 3D positioning accuracy.

  9. IMPLEMENTATION AND EVALUATION OF A MOBILE MAPPING SYSTEM BASED ON INTEGRATED RANGE AND INTENSITY IMAGES FOR TRAFFIC SIGNS LOCALIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Shahbazi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in positioning techniques have made it possible to develop Mobile Mapping Systems (MMS for detection and 3D localization of various objects from a moving platform. On the other hand, automatic traffic sign recognition from an equipped mobile platform has recently been a challenging issue for both intelligent transportation and municipal database collection. However, there are several inevitable problems coherent to all the recognition methods completely relying on passive chromatic or grayscale images. This paper presents the implementation and evaluation of an operational MMS. Being distinct from the others, the developed MMS comprises one range camera based on Photonic Mixer Device (PMD technology and one standard 2D digital camera. The system benefits from certain algorithms to detect, recognize and localize the traffic signs by fusing the shape, color and object information from both range and intensity images. As the calibrating stage, a self-calibration method based on integrated bundle adjustment via joint setup with the digital camera is applied in this study for PMD camera calibration. As the result, an improvement of 83% in RMS of range error and 72% in RMS of coordinates residuals for PMD camera, over that achieved with basic calibration is realized in independent accuracy assessments. Furthermore, conventional photogrammetric techniques based on controlled network adjustment are utilized for platform calibration. Likewise, the well-known Extended Kalman Filtering (EKF is applied to integrate the navigation sensors, namely GPS and INS. The overall acquisition system along with the proposed techniques leads to 90% true positive recognition and the average of 12 centimetres 3D positioning accuracy.

  10. Direct Reconstruction of CT-Based Attenuation Correction Images for PET With Cluster-Based Penalties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo Mee; Alessio, Adam M.; De Man, Bruno; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2017-03-01

    Extremely low-dose (LD) CT acquisitions used for PET attenuation correction have high levels of noise and potential bias artifacts due to photon starvation. This paper explores the use of a priori knowledge for iterative image reconstruction of the CT-based attenuation map. We investigate a maximum a posteriori framework with cluster-based multinomial penalty for direct iterative coordinate decent (dICD) reconstruction of the PET attenuation map. The objective function for direct iterative attenuation map reconstruction used a Poisson log-likelihood data fit term and evaluated two image penalty terms of spatial and mixture distributions. The spatial regularization is based on a quadratic penalty. For the mixture penalty, we assumed that the attenuation map may consist of four material clusters: air + background, lung, soft tissue, and bone. Using simulated noisy sinogram data, dICD reconstruction was performed with different strengths of the spatial and mixture penalties. The combined spatial and mixture penalties reduced the root mean squared error (RMSE) by roughly two times compared with a weighted least square and filtered backprojection reconstruction of CT images. The combined spatial and mixture penalties resulted in only slightly lower RMSE compared with a spatial quadratic penalty alone. For direct PET attenuation map reconstruction from ultra-LD CT acquisitions, the combination of spatial and mixture penalties offers regularization of both variance and bias and is a potential method to reconstruct attenuation maps with negligible patient dose. The presented results, using a best-case histogram suggest that the mixture penalty does not offer a substantive benefit over conventional quadratic regularization and diminishes enthusiasm for exploring future application of the mixture penalty.

  11. Direct measurement of additional Ar-H2O vibration-rotation-tunneling bands in the millimeter-submillimeter range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Luyao; Widicus Weaver, Susanna L.

    2016-06-01

    Three new weak bands of the Ar-H2O vibration-rotation-tunneling spectrum have been measured in the millimeter wavelength range. These bands were predicted from combination differences based on previously measured bands in the submillimeter region. Two previously reported submillimeter bands were also remeasured with higher frequency resolution. These new measurements allow us to obtain accurate information on the Coriolis interaction between the 101 and 110 states. Here we report these results and the associated improved molecular constants.

  12. Image-guided focused ultrasound ablation of breast cancer: current status, challenges, and future directions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitz, A.C.; Mali, W.P.T.M. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Gianfelice, D. [University Health Network C/O Toronto General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Toronto (Canada); Daniel, B.L. [Stanford University, Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States); Bosch, M.A.A.J. van den [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Stanford University, Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States); Lucas MR Imaging Center, Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2008-07-15

    Image-guided focussed ultrasound (FUS) ablation is a non-invasive procedure that has been used for treatment of benign or malignant breast tumours. Image-guidance during ablation is achieved either by using real-time ultrasound (US) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The past decade phase I studies have proven MRI-guided and US-guided FUS ablation of breast cancer to be technically feasible and safe. We provide an overview of studies assessing the efficacy of FUS for breast tumour ablation as measured by percentages of complete tumour necrosis. Successful ablation ranged from 20% to 100%, depending on FUS system type, imaging technique, ablation protocol, and patient selection. Specific issues related to FUS ablation of breast cancer, such as increased treatment time for larger tumours, size of ablation margins, methods used for margin assessment and residual tumour detection after FUS ablation, and impact of FUS ablation on sentinel node procedure are presented. Finally, potential future applications of FUS for breast cancer treatment such as FUS-induced anti-tumour immune response, FUS-mediated gene transfer, and enhanced drug delivery are discussed. Currently, breast-conserving surgery remains the gold standard for breast cancer treatment. (orig.)

  13. Alternating Direction Implicit (ADI) schemes for a PDE-based image osmosis model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calatroni, L.; Estatico, C.; Garibaldi, N.; Parisotto, S.

    2017-10-01

    We consider Alternating Direction Implicit (ADI) splitting schemes to compute efficiently the numerical solution of the PDE osmosis model considered by Weickert et al. in [10] for several imaging applications. The discretised scheme is shown to preserve analogous properties to the continuous model. The dimensional splitting strategy traduces numerically into the solution of simple tridiagonal systems for which standard matrix factorisation techniques can be used to improve upon the performance of classical implicit methods, even for large time steps. Applications to the shadow removal problem are presented.

  14. In Vivo High Frame Rate Vector Flow Imaging Using Plane Waves and Directional Beamforming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jonas; Villagómez Hoyos, Carlos Armando; Stuart, Matthias Bo

    2016-01-01

    oscillation (TO) estimators and only 3 directional beamformed lines. The suggested DB vector flow estimator is employed with steered plane wave transmissions for high frame rate imaging.Two distinct plane wave sequences are used: a short sequence(3 angles) for fast flow and an interleaved long sequence (21....... The long sequence has a higher sensitivity, and when used forestimation of slow flow with a peak velocity of 0.04 m/s, the SDis 2.5 % and bias is 0.1 %. This is a factor of 4 better than ifthe short sequence is used. The carotid bifurcation was scanned on a healthy volunteer, and the short sequence...

  15. Direct Imaging of Deformation and Disorder in Extended-Chain Polymer Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-03-01

    Lenhert, T. J. Resch, and W. W. Adams, "Molecular Packing and Crystalline Order in Polybenzobisoxazole and Polybenzobisthiazole Fibers ", in...WL-TR-91-4011 AiAh 1A0 DIRECT IMAGING OF DEFORMATION AND DISORDER IN EXTENDED-CHAIN POLYMER FIBERS David C. Martin Department of Polymer Science and...Deformation and Disorder in Extended-Chain Polymer Fibers 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) David C. Martin 13a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED 14. DATE OF REPORT (Year

  16. Investigation of Range Profiles from a Simplified Ship on Rough Sea Surface and Its Multipath Imaging Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siyuan He

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The range profiles of a two-dimension (2 D perfect electric conductor (PEC ship on a wind-driven rough sea surface are derived by performing an inverse discrete Fourier transform (IDFT on the wide band backscattered field. The rough sea surface is assuming to be a PEC surface. The back scattered field is computed based on EM numerical simulation when the frequencies are sampled between 100 MHz and 700 MHz. Considering the strong coupling interactions between the ship and sea, the complicated multipath effect to the range profile characteristics is fully analyzed based on the multipath imaging mechanisms. The coupling mechanisms could be explained by means of ray theory prediction and numerical extraction of the coupling currents. The comparison of the range profile locations between ray theory prediction and surface current simulation is implemented and analyzed in this paper. Finally, the influence of different sea states on the radar target signatures has been examined and discussed.

  17. Fast Plane Wave 2-D Vector Flow Imaging Using Transverse Oscillation and Directional Beamforming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jonas; Villagómez Hoyos, Carlos Armando; Stuart, Matthias Bo

    2017-01-01

    Several techniques can estimate the 2-D velocity vector in ultrasound. Directional beamforming (DB) estimates blood flow velocities with a higher precision and accuracy than transverse oscillation (TO), but at the cost of a high beamforming load when estimating the flow angle. In this paper......, it is proposed to use TO to estimate an initial flow angle, which is then refined in a DB step. Velocity magnitude is estimated along the flow direction using cross-correlation. It is shown that the suggested TO-DB method can improve the performance of velocity estimates compared to TO, and with a beamforming...... load, which is 4.6 times larger than for TO and seven times smaller than for conventional DB. Steered plane wave transmissions are employed for high frame rate imaging, and parabolic flow with a peak velocity of 0.5 m/s is simulated in straight vessels at beamto- flow angles from 45 to 90. The TO...

  18. TU-FG-BRB-09: Thermoacoustic Range Verification with Perfect Co-Registered Overlay of Bragg Peak onto Ultrasound Image

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patch, S; Kireeff Covo, M; Jackson, A; Qadadha, Y; Campbell, K; Albright, R; Bloemhard, P; Donoghue, A; Siero, C; Gimpel, T; Small, S; Ninemire, B; Johnson, M; Phair, L [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The potential of particle therapy has not yet been fully realized due to inaccuracies in range verification. The purpose of this work was to correlate the Bragg peak location with target structure, by overlaying thermoacoustic localization of the Bragg peak onto an ultrasound image. Methods: Pulsed delivery of 50 MeV protons was accomplished by a fast chopper installed between the ion source and the inflector of the 88″ cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. 2 Gy were delivered in 2 µs by a beam with peak current of 2 µA. Thermoacoustic emissions were detected by a cardiac array and Verasonics V1 ultrasound system, which also generated a grayscale ultrasound image. 1024 thermoacoustic pulses were averaged before filtering and one-way beamforming focused signal onto the Bragg peak location with perfect co-registration to the ultrasound images. Data was collected in a room temperature water bath and gelatin phantom with a cavity designed to mimic the intestine, in which gas pockets can displace the Bragg peak. Experiments were performed with the cavity both empty and filled with olive oil. Results: In the waterbath overlays of the Bragg peak agreed with Monte Carlo simulations to within 800±170 µm. Agreement within 1.3 ± 0.2 mm was achieved in the gelatin phantom, although relative stopping powers were estimated only to first order from CT scans. Protoacoustic signals were detected after travel from the Bragg peak through 29 mm and 65 mm of phantom material when the cavity was empty and full of olive oil, respectively. Conclusion: Protoacoustic range verification is feasible with a commercial clinical ultrasound array, but at doses exceeding the clinical realm. Further optimization of both transducer array and injection line chopper is required to enable range verification within a 2 Gy dose limit, which would enable online adaptive treatment. This work was supported in part by a UWM Intramural Instrumentation Grant and by the Director, Office

  19. Projection imaging with directional electron and proton beams emitted from an ultrashort intense laser-driven thin foil target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiuchi, M.; Choi, I. W.; Daido, H.; Nakamura, T.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Yogo, A.; Ogura, K.; Sagisaka, A.; Orimo, S.; Daito, I.; Bulanov, S. V.; Sung, J. H.; Lee, S. K.; Yu, T. J.; Jeong, T. M.; Kim, I. J.; Kim, C. M.; Kang, S. W.; Pae, K. H.; Oishi, Y.; Lee, J.

    2015-02-01

    Projection images of a metal mesh produced by directional MeV electron beam together with directional proton beam, emitted simultaneously from a thin foil target irradiated by an ultrashort intense laser, are recorded on an imaging plate for the electron imaging and on a CR-39 nuclear track detector for the proton imaging. The directional electron beam means the portion of the electron beam which is emitted along the same direction (i.e., target normal direction) as the proton beam. The mesh patterns are projected to each detector by the electron beam and the proton beam originated from tiny virtual sources of ~20 µm and ~10 µm diameters, respectively. Based on the observed quality and magnification of the projection images, we estimate sizes and locations of the virtual sources for both beams and characterize their directionalities. To carry out physical interpretation of the directional electron beam qualitatively, we perform 2D particle-in-cell simulation which reproduces a directional escaping electron component, together with a non-directional dragged-back electron component, the latter mainly contributes to building a sheath electric field for proton acceleration. The experimental and simulation results reveal various possible applications of the simultaneous, synchronized electron and proton sources to radiography and pump-probe measurements with temporal resolution of ~ps and spatial resolution of a few tens of µm.

  20. Image based weighted center of proximity versus directly measured knee contact location during simulated gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongsheng; Chen, Tony; Koff, Matthew F; Hutchinson, Ian D; Gilbert, Susannah; Choi, Dan; Warren, Russell F; Rodeo, Scott A; Maher, Suzanne A

    2014-07-18

    To understand the mechanical consequences of knee injury requires a detailed analysis of the effect of that injury on joint contact mechanics during activities of daily living. Three-dimensional (3D) knee joint geometric models have been combined with knee joint kinematics to dynamically estimate the location of joint contact during physiological activities-using a weighted center of proximity (WCoP) method. However, the relationship between the estimated WCoP and the actual location of contact has not been defined. The objective of this study was to assess the relationship between knee joint contact location as estimated using the image-based WCoP method, and a directly measured weighted center of contact (WCoC) method during simulated walking. To achieve this goal, we created knee specific models of six human cadaveric knees from magnetic resonance imaging. All knees were then subjected to physiological loads on a knee simulator intended to mimic gait. Knee joint motion was captured using a motion capture system. Knee joint contact stresses were synchronously recorded using a thin electronic sensor throughout gait, and used to compute WCoC for the medial and lateral plateaus of each knee. WCoP was calculated by combining knee kinematics with the MRI-based knee specific model. Both metrics were compared throughout gait using linear regression. The anteroposterior (AP) location of WCoP was significantly correlated with that of WCoC on both tibial plateaus in all specimens (p0), but the correlation was not significant in the mediolateral (ML) direction for 4/6 knees (p>0.05). Our study demonstrates that while the location of joint contact obtained from 3D knee joint contact model, using the WCoP method, is significantly correlated with the location of actual contact stresses in the AP direction, that relationship is less certain in the ML direction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Multipotent Basal Stem Cells, Maintained in Localized Proximal Niches, Support Directed Long-Ranging Epithelial Flows in Human Prostates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Moad

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Sporadic mitochondrial DNA mutations serve as clonal marks providing access to the identity and lineage potential of stem cells within human tissues. By combining quantitative clonal mapping with 3D reconstruction of adult human prostates, we show that multipotent basal stem cells, confined to discrete niches in juxta-urethral ducts, generate bipotent basal progenitors in directed epithelial migration streams. Basal progenitors are then dispersed throughout the entire glandular network, dividing and differentiating to replenish the loss of apoptotic luminal cells. Rare lineage-restricted luminal stem cells, and their progeny, are confined to proximal ducts and provide only minor contribution to epithelial homeostasis. In situ cell capture from clonal maps identified delta homolog 1 (DLK1 enrichment of basal stem cells, which was validated in functional spheroid assays. This study establishes significant insights into niche organization and function of prostate stem and progenitor cells, with implications for disease.

  2. In vitro accuracy evaluation of image-guided robot system for direct cochlear access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Brett; Gerber, Nicolas; Williamson, Tom; Gavaghan, Kate; Wimmer, Wilhelm; Caversaccio, Marco; Weber, Stefan

    2013-09-01

    A previously developed image-guided robot system can safely drill a tunnel from the lateral mastoid surface, through the facial recess, to the middle ear, as a viable alternative to conventional mastoidectomy for cochlear electrode insertion. Direct cochlear access (DCA) provides a minimally invasive tunnel from the lateral surface of the mastoid through the facial recess to the middle ear for cochlear electrode insertion. A safe and effective tunnel drilled through the narrow facial recess requires a highly accurate image-guided surgical system. Previous attempts have relied on patient-specific templates and robotic systems to guide drilling tools. In this study, we report on improvements made to an image-guided surgical robot system developed specifically for this purpose and the resulting accuracy achieved in vitro. The proposed image-guided robotic DCA procedure was carried out bilaterally on 4 whole head cadaver specimens. Specimens were implanted with titanium fiducial markers and imaged with cone-beam CT. A preoperative plan was created using a custom software package wherein relevant anatomical structures of the facial recess were segmented, and a drill trajectory targeting the round window was defined. Patient-to-image registration was performed with the custom robot system to reference the preoperative plan, and the DCA tunnel was drilled in 3 stages with progressively longer drill bits. The position of the drilled tunnel was defined as a line fitted to a point cloud of the segmented tunnel using principle component analysis (PCA function in MatLab). The accuracy of the DCA was then assessed by coregistering preoperative and postoperative image data and measuring the deviation of the drilled tunnel from the plan. The final step of electrode insertion was also performed through the DCA tunnel after manual removal of the promontory through the external auditory canal. Drilling error was defined as the lateral deviation of the tool in the plane perpendicular

  3. First-order convex feasibility algorithms for iterative image reconstruction in limited angular-range X-ray CT

    CERN Document Server

    Sidky, Emil Y; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2012-01-01

    Iterative image reconstruction (IIR) algorithms in Computed Tomography (CT) are based on algorithms for solving a particular optimization problem. Design of the IIR algorithm, therefore, is aided by knowledge of the solution to the optimization problem on which it is based. Often times, however, it is impractical to achieve accurate solution to the optimization of interest, which complicates design of IIR algorithms. This issue is particularly acute for CT with a limited angular-range scan, which leads to poorly conditioned system matrices and difficult to solve optimization problems. In this article, we develop IIR algorithms which solve a certain type of optimization called convex feasibility. The convex feasibility approach can provide alternatives to unconstrained optimization approaches and at the same time allow for efficient algorithms for their solution -- thereby facilitating the IIR algorithm design process. An accelerated version of the Chambolle-Pock (CP) algorithm is adapted to various convex fea...

  4. Image quality, meteorological optical range, and fog particulate number evaluation using the Sandia National Laboratories fog chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, Gabriel C.; Woo, Bryana L.; Sanchez, Andres L.; Knapp, Haley

    2017-08-01

    The evaluation of optical system performance in fog conditions typically requires field testing. This can be challenging due to the unpredictable nature of fog generation and the temporal and spatial nonuniformity of the phenomenon itself. We describe the Sandia National Laboratories fog chamber, a new test facility that enables the repeatable generation of fog within a 55 m×3 m×3 m (L×W×H) environment, and demonstrate the fog chamber through a series of optical tests. These tests are performed to evaluate system image quality, determine meteorological optical range (MOR), and measure the number of particles in the atmosphere. Relationships between typical optical quality metrics, MOR values, and total number of fog particles are described using the data obtained from the fog chamber and repeated over a series of three tests.

  5. Imaging angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnley, Natalie; Donaldson, Stephanie; Price, Pat

    2009-01-01

    There is a need for direct imaging of effects on tumor vasculature in assessment of response to antiangiogenic drugs and vascular disrupting agents. Imaging tumor vasculature depends on differences in permeability of vasculature of tumor and normal tissue, which cause changes in penetration of contrast agents. Angiogenesis imaging may be defined in terms of measurement of tumor perfusion and direct imaging of the molecules involved in angiogenesis. In addition, assessment of tumor hypoxia will give an indication of tumor vasculature. The range of imaging techniques available for these processes includes positron emission tomography (PET), dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI), perfusion computed tomography (CT), and ultrasound (US).

  6. Mid-callosal plane determination using preferred directions from diffusion tensor images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, André L.; Rittner, Letícia; Lotufo, Roberto A.; Appenzeller, Simone

    2015-03-01

    The corpus callosum is the major brain structure responsible for inter{hemispheric communication between neurons. Many studies seek to relate corpus callosum attributes to patient characteristics, cerebral diseases and psychological disorders. Most of those studies rely on 2D analysis of the corpus callosum in the mid-sagittal plane. However, it is common to find conflicting results among studies, once many ignore methodological issues and define the mid-sagittal plane based on precary or invalid criteria with respect to the corpus callosum. In this work we propose a novel method to determine the mid-callosal plane using the corpus callosum internal preferred diffusion directions obtained from diffusion tensor images. This plane is analogous to the mid-sagittal plane, but intended to serve exclusively as the corpus callosum reference. Our method elucidates the great potential the directional information of the corpus callosum fibers have to indicate its own referential. Results from experiments with five image pairs from distinct subjects, obtained under the same conditions, demonstrate the method effectiveness to find the corpus callosum symmetric axis relative to the axial plane.

  7. A Possible Technology Development Path to Direct Imaging of Exo-Earths from Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegler, Nicholas

    2018-01-01

    We describe a possible roadmap to achieving the technological capability to search for biosignatures on an Earth-like exoplanet from a future space telescope. The detection of Earth-like exoplanets in the habitable zone of their stars, and their spectroscopic characterization in a search for biosignatures, requires starlight suppression that exceeds the current best ground-based performance by orders of magnitude. The required planet/star brightness ratio of order 1e-10 at visible wavelengths can be obtained by blocking stellar photons with an occulter, either externally (a starshade) or internally (a coronagraph) to the telescope system, and managing diffracted starlight, so as to directly image the exoplanet in reflected starlight. Coronagraph instruments require advancement in telescope aperture (either monolithic or segmented), aperture obscurations (obscured by secondary mirror and its support struts), and wavefront error sensitivity (e.g. line-of-sight jitter, telescope vibration, polarization). The starshade, which has never been used in a science application, benefits a mission by being decoupled from the telescope, allowing a loosening of telescope stability requirements. In doing so, it transfers the difficult technology from the telescope system to a large deployable structure (tens of meters to greater than ~ 100 m in diameter) that must be positioned precisely at a distance of tens of thousands of kilometers from the telescope. Two ongoing mission concept studies, HabEx and LUVOIR, include the direct imaging of Earth-sized habitable exoplanets as a central science theme.

  8. Testing and Comparison of Imaging Detectors for Electrons in the Energy Range 10–20 keV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheson, J.; Moldovan, G.; Kirkland, A.; Allinson, N.; Abrahams, J. P.

    2017-11-01

    Interest in direct detectors for low-energy electrons has increased markedly in recent years. Detection of electrons in the energy range up to low tens of keV is important in techniques such as photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) on scanning electron microscopes (SEMs). The PEEM technique is used both in the laboratory and on synchrotron light sources worldwide. The ubiquity of SEMs means that there is a very large market for EBSD detectors for materials studies. Currently, the most widely used detectors in these applications are based on indirect detection of incident electrons. Examples include scintillators or microchannel plates (MCPs), coupled to CCD cameras. Such approaches result in blurring in scintillators/phosphors, distortions in optical systems, and inefficiencies due the limited active area of MCPs. In principle, these difficulties can be overcome using direct detection in a semiconductor device. Growing out of a feasibility study into the use of a direct detector for use on an XPEEM, we have built at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory a system to illuminate detectors with an electron beam of energy up to 20 keV . We describe this system in detail. It has been used to measure the performance of a custom back-thinned monolithic active pixel sensor (MAPS), a detector based on the Medipix2 chip, and a commercial detector based on MCPs. We present a selection of the results from these measurements and compare and contrast different detector types.

  9. Tree demography suggests multiple directions and drivers for species range shifts in mountains of Northeastern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wason, Jay W; Dovciak, Martin

    2017-08-01

    Climate change is expected to lead to upslope shifts in tree species distributions, but the evidence is mixed partly due to land-use effects and individualistic species responses to climate. We examined how individual tree species demography varies along elevational climatic gradients across four states in the northeastern United States to determine whether species elevational distributions and their potential upslope (or downslope) shifts were controlled by climate, land-use legacies (past logging), or soils. We characterized tree demography, microclimate, land-use legacies, and soils at 83 sites stratified by elevation (~500 to ~1200 m above sea level) across 12 mountains containing the transition from northern hardwood to spruce-fir forests. We modeled elevational distributions of tree species saplings and adults using logistic regression to test whether sapling distributions suggest ongoing species range expansion upslope (or contraction downslope) relative to adults, and we used linear mixed models to determine the extent to which climate, land use, and soil variables explain these distributions. Tree demography varied with elevation by species, suggesting a potential upslope shift only for American beech, downslope shifts for red spruce (more so in cool regions) and sugar maple, and no change with elevation for balsam fir. While soils had relatively minor effects, climate was the dominant predictor for most species and more so for saplings than adults of red spruce, sugar maple, yellow birch, cordate birch, and striped maple. On the other hand, logging legacies were positively associated with American beech, sugar maple, and yellow birch, and negatively with red spruce and balsam fir - generally more so for adults than saplings. All species exhibited individualistic rather than synchronous demographic responses to climate and land use, and the return of red spruce to lower elevations where past logging originally benefited northern hardwood species indicates

  10. Micro-CT image reconstruction based on alternating direction augmented Lagrangian method and total variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopi, Varun P; Palanisamy, P; Wahid, Khan A; Babyn, Paul; Cooper, David

    2013-01-01

    Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) plays an important role in pre-clinical imaging. The radiation from micro-CT can result in excess radiation exposure to the specimen under test, hence the reduction of radiation from micro-CT is essential. The proposed research focused on analyzing and testing an alternating direction augmented Lagrangian (ADAL) algorithm to recover images from random projections using total variation (TV) regularization. The use of TV regularization in compressed sensing problems makes the recovered image quality sharper by preserving the edges or boundaries more accurately. In this work TV regularization problem is addressed by ADAL which is a variant of the classic augmented Lagrangian method for structured optimization. The per-iteration computational complexity of the algorithm is two fast Fourier transforms, two matrix vector multiplications and a linear time shrinkage operation. Comparison of experimental results indicate that the proposed algorithm is stable, efficient and competitive with the existing algorithms for solving TV regularization problems. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Particle sizing of pharmaceutical aerosols via direct imaging of particle settling velocities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishler, Rami; Verhoeven, Frank; de Kruijf, Wilbur; Sznitman, Josué

    2018-02-15

    We present a novel method for characterizing in near real-time the aerodynamic particle size distributions from pharmaceutical inhalers. The proposed method is based on direct imaging of airborne particles followed by a particle-by-particle measurement of settling velocities using image analysis and particle tracking algorithms. Due to the simplicity of the principle of operation, this method has the potential of circumventing potential biases of current real-time particle analyzers (e.g. Time of Flight analysis), while offering a cost effective solution. The simple device can also be constructed in laboratory settings from off-the-shelf materials for research purposes. To demonstrate the feasibility and robustness of the measurement technique, we have conducted benchmark experiments whereby aerodynamic particle size distributions are obtained from several commercially-available dry powder inhalers (DPIs). Our measurements yield size distributions (i.e. MMAD and GSD) that are closely in line with those obtained from Time of Flight analysis and cascade impactors suggesting that our imaging-based method may embody an attractive methodology for rapid inhaler testing and characterization. In a final step, we discuss some of the ongoing limitations of the current prototype and conceivable routes for improving the technique. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. High resolution biomedical imaging system with direct detection of x-rays via a charge coupled device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atac, Muzaffer; McKay, Timothy A.

    1998-01-01

    An imaging system is provided for direct detection of x-rays from an irradiated biological tissue. The imaging system includes an energy source for emitting x-rays toward the biological tissue and a charge coupled device (CCD) located immediately adjacent the biological tissue and arranged transverse to the direction of irradiation along which the x-rays travel. The CCD directly receives and detects the x-rays after passing through the biological tissue. The CCD is divided into a matrix of cells, each of which individually stores a count of x-rays directly detected by the cell. The imaging system further includes a pattern generator electrically coupled to the CCD for reading a count from each cell. A display device is provided for displaying an image representative of the count read by the pattern generator from the cells of the CCD.

  13. Clinical evaluation of a novel CT image reconstruction algorithm for direct dose calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brent van der Heyden

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: Computed tomography (CT imaging is frequently used in radiation oncology to calculate radiation dose distributions. In order to calculate doses, the CT numbers must be converted into densities by an energy dependent conversion curve. A recently developed algorithm directly reconstructs CT projection data into relative electron densities which eliminates the use of separate conversion curves for different X-ray tube potentials. Our work evaluates this algorithm for various cancer sites and shows its applicability in a clinical workflow. Materials and methods: The Gammex phantom with tissue mimicking inserts was scanned to characterize the CT number to density conversion curves. In total, 33 patients with various cancer sites were scanned using multiple tube potentials. All CT acquisitions were reconstructed with the standard filtered back-projection (FBP and the new developed DirectDensity™ (DD algorithm. The mean tumor doses and the volume percentage that receives more than 95% of the prescribed dose were calculated for the planning target volume. Relevant parameters for the organs at risk for each tumor site were also calculated. Results: The relative mean dose differences between the standard 120 kVp FBP CT scan workflow and the DD CT scans (80, 100, 120 and 140 kVp were in general less than 1% for the planned target volume and organs at risk. Conclusion: The energy independent DD algorithm allows for accurate dose calculations over a variety of body sites. This novel algorithm eliminates the tube potential specific calibration procedure and thereby simplifies the clinical radiotherapy workflow. Keywords: CT imaging, Image reconstruction, Dose calculations, Electron density reconstruction

  14. Wide range instantaneous temperature measurements of convective fluid flows by using a schlieren system based in color images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-González, A.; Moreno-Hernández, D.; Monzón-Hernández, D.; León-Rodríguez, M.

    2017-06-01

    In the schlieren method, the deflection of light by the presence of an inhomogeneous medium is proportional to the gradient of its refractive index. Such deflection, in a schlieren system, is represented by light intensity variations on the observation plane. Then, for a digital camera, the intensity level registered by each pixel depends mainly on the variation of the medium refractive index and the status of the digital camera settings. Therefore, in this study, we regulate the intensity value of each pixel by controlling the camera settings such as exposure time, gamma and gain values in order to calibrate the image obtained to the actual temperature values of a particular medium. In our approach, we use a color digital camera. The images obtained with a color digital camera can be separated on three different color-channels. Each channel corresponds to red, green, and blue color, moreover, each one has its own sensitivity. The differences in sensitivity allow us to obtain a range of temperature values for each color channel. Thus, high, medium and low sensitivity correspond to green, blue, and red color channel respectively. Therefore, by adding up the temperature contribution of each color channel we obtain a wide range of temperature values. Hence, the basic idea in our approach to measure temperature, using a schlieren system, is to relate the intensity level of each pixel in a schlieren image to the corresponding knife-edge position measured at the exit focal plane of the system. Our approach was applied to the measurement of instantaneous temperature fields of the air convection caused by a heated rectangular metal plate and a candle flame. We found that for the metal plate temperature measurements only the green and blue color-channels were required to sense the entire phenomena. On the other hand, for the candle case, the three color-channels were needed to obtain a complete measurement of temperature. In our study, the candle temperature was took as

  15. Comparison of manual direct and automated indirect measurement of hippocampus using magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giesel, Frederik L. [Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (Germany); MRI Unit, Department of Radiology, Sheffield (United Kingdom)], E-mail: f.giesel@dkfz.de; Thomann, Philipp A. [Section of Geriatric Psychiatry, University of Heidelberg (Germany); Hahn, Horst K. [MeVis, Bremen (Germany); Politi, Maria [Neuroradiology, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Stieltjes, Bram; Weber, Marc-Andre [Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (Germany); Pantel, Johannes [Department of Psychiatry, University of Frankfurt (Germany); Wilkinson, I.D.; Griffiths, Paul D. [MRI Unit, Department of Radiology, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Schroeder, Johannes [Section of Geriatric Psychiatry, University of Heidelberg (Germany); Essig, Marco [Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (Germany)

    2008-05-15

    Purpose: Objective quantification of brain structure can aid diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring in several neuropsychiatric disorders. In this study, we aimed to compare direct and indirect quantification approaches for hippocampal formation changes in patients with mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Methods and materials: Twenty-one healthy volunteers (mean age: 66.2), 21 patients with mild cognitive impairment (mean age: 66.6), and 10 patients with AD (mean age: 65.1) were enrolled. All subjects underwent extensive neuropsychological testing and were imaged at 1.5 T (Vision, Siemens, Germany; T1w coronal TR = 4 ms, Flip = 13 deg., FOV = 250 mm, Matrix = 256 x 256, 128 contiguous slices, 1.8 mm). Direct measurement of the hippocampal formation was performed on coronal slices using a standardized protocol, while indirect temporal horn volume (THV) was calculated using a watershed algorithm-based software package (MeVis, Germany). Manual tracing took about 30 min, semi-automated measurement less than 3 min time. Results: Successful direct and indirect quantification was performed in all subjects. A significant volume difference was found between controls and AD patients (p < 0.001) with both the manual and the semi-automated approach. Group analysis showed a slight but not significant decrease of hippocampal volume and increase in temporal horn volume (THV) for subjects with mild cognitive impairment compared to volunteers (p < 0.07). A significant correlation (p < 0.001) of direct and indirect measurement was found. Conclusion: The presented indirect approach for hippocampus volumetry is equivalent to the direct approach and offers the advantages of observer independency, time reduction and thus usefulness for clinical routine.

  16. Calibration of imaging plate detectors to mono-energetic protons in the range 1-200 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabhi, N.; Batani, D.; Boutoux, G.; Ducret, J.-E.; Jakubowska, K.; Lantuejoul-Thfoin, I.; Nauraye, C.; Patriarca, A.; Saïd, A.; Semsoum, A.; Serani, L.; Thomas, B.; Vauzour, B.

    2017-11-01

    Responses of Fuji Imaging Plates (IPs) to proton have been measured in the range 1-200 MeV. Mono-energetic protons were produced with the 15 MV ALTO-Tandem accelerator of the Institute of Nuclear Physics (Orsay, France) and, at higher energies, with the 200-MeV isochronous cyclotron of the Institut Curie—Centre de Protonthérapie d'Orsay (Orsay, France). The experimental setups are described and the measured photo-stimulated luminescence responses for MS, SR, and TR IPs are presented and compared to existing data. For the interpretation of the results, a sensitivity model based on the Monte Carlo GEANT4 code has been developed. It enables the calculation of the response functions in a large energy range, from 0.1 to 200 MeV. Finally, we show that our model reproduces accurately the response of more complex detectors, i.e., stack of high-Z filters and IPs, which could be of great interest for diagnostics of Petawatt laser accelerated particles.

  17. Comprehensive analysis of proton range uncertainties related to stopping-power-ratio estimation using dual-energy CT imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, B.; Lee, H. C.; Duan, X.; Shen, C.; Zhou, L.; Jia, X.; Yang, M.

    2017-09-01

    The dual-energy CT-based (DECT) approach holds promise in reducing the overall uncertainty in proton stopping-power-ratio (SPR) estimation as compared to the conventional stoichiometric calibration approach. The objective of this study was to analyze the factors contributing to uncertainty in SPR estimation using the DECT-based approach and to derive a comprehensive estimate of the range uncertainty associated with SPR estimation in treatment planning. Two state-of-the-art DECT-based methods were selected and implemented on a Siemens SOMATOM Force DECT scanner. The uncertainties were first divided into five independent categories. The uncertainty associated with each category was estimated for lung, soft and bone tissues separately. A single composite uncertainty estimate was eventually determined for three tumor sites (lung, prostate and head-and-neck) by weighting the relative proportion of each tissue group for that specific site. The uncertainties associated with the two selected DECT methods were found to be similar, therefore the following results applied to both methods. The overall uncertainty (1σ) in SPR estimation with the DECT-based approach was estimated to be 3.8%, 1.2% and 2.0% for lung, soft and bone tissues, respectively. The dominant factor contributing to uncertainty in the DECT approach was the imaging uncertainties, followed by the DECT modeling uncertainties. Our study showed that the DECT approach can reduce the overall range uncertainty to approximately 2.2% (2σ) in clinical scenarios, in contrast to the previously reported 1%.

  18. Amorphous selenium direct detection CMOS digital x-ray imager with 25 micron pixel pitch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Christopher C.; Abbaszadeh, Shiva; Ghanbarzadeh, Sina; Allan, Gary; Farrier, Michael; Cunningham, Ian A.; Karim, Karim S.

    2014-03-01

    We have developed a high resolution amorphous selenium (a-Se) direct detection imager using a large-area compatible back-end fabrication process on top of a CMOS active pixel sensor having 25 micron pixel pitch. Integration of a-Se with CMOS technology requires overcoming CMOS/a-Se interfacial strain, which initiates nucleation of crystalline selenium and results in high detector dark currents. A CMOS-compatible polyimide buffer layer was used to planarize the backplane and provide a low stress and thermally stable surface for a-Se. The buffer layer inhibits crystallization and provides detector stability that is not only a performance factor but also critical for favorable long term cost-benefit considerations in the application of CMOS digital x-ray imagers in medical practice. The detector structure is comprised of a polyimide (PI) buffer layer, the a-Se layer, and a gold (Au) top electrode. The PI layer is applied by spin-coating and is patterned using dry etching to open the backplane bond pads for wire bonding. Thermal evaporation is used to deposit the a-Se and Au layers, and the detector is operated in hole collection mode (i.e. a positive bias on the Au top electrode). High resolution a-Se diagnostic systems typically use 70 to 100 μm pixel pitch and have a pre-sampling modulation transfer function (MTF) that is significantly limited by the pixel aperture. Our results confirm that, for a densely integrated 25 μm pixel pitch CMOS array, the MTF approaches the fundamental material limit, i.e. where the MTF begins to be limited by the a-Se material properties and not the pixel aperture. Preliminary images demonstrating high spatial resolution have been obtained from a frst prototype imager.

  19. Low Dose PET Image Reconstruction with Total Variation Using Alternating Direction Method.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingjian Yu

    Full Text Available In this paper, a total variation (TV minimization strategy is proposed to overcome the problem of sparse spatial resolution and large amounts of noise in low dose positron emission tomography (PET imaging reconstruction. Two types of objective function were established based on two statistical models of measured PET data, least-square (LS TV for the Gaussian distribution and Poisson-TV for the Poisson distribution. To efficiently obtain high quality reconstructed images, the alternating direction method (ADM is used to solve these objective functions. As compared with the iterative shrinkage/thresholding (IST based algorithms, the proposed ADM can make full use of the TV constraint and its convergence rate is faster. The performance of the proposed approach is validated through comparisons with the expectation-maximization (EM method using synthetic and experimental biological data. In the comparisons, the results of both LS-TV and Poisson-TV are taken into consideration to find which models are more suitable for PET imaging, in particular low-dose PET. To evaluate the results quantitatively, we computed bias, variance, and the contrast recovery coefficient (CRC and drew profiles of the reconstructed images produced by the different methods. The results show that both Poisson-TV and LS-TV can provide a high visual quality at a low dose level. The bias and variance of the proposed LS-TV and Poisson-TV methods are 20% to 74% less at all counting levels than those of the EM method. Poisson-TV gives the best performance in terms of high-accuracy reconstruction with the lowest bias and variance as compared to the ground truth (14.3% less bias and 21.9% less variance. In contrast, LS-TV gives the best performance in terms of the high contrast of the reconstruction with the highest CRC.

  20. Direct Imaging of the Water Snow Line at the Time of Planet Formation using Two ALMA Continuum Bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banzatti, A.; Pinilla, P.; Ricci, L.; Pontoppidan, K. M.; Birnstiel, T.; Ciesla, F.

    2015-12-01

    Molecular snow lines in protoplanetary disks have been studied theoretically for decades because of their importance in shaping planetary architectures and compositions. The water snow line lies in the planet formation region at ≲10 AU, and so far its location has been estimated only indirectly from spatially unresolved spectroscopy. This work presents a proof-of-concept method to directly image the water snow line in protoplanetary disks through its physical and chemical imprint on the local dust properties. We adopt a physical disk model that includes dust coagulation, fragmentation, drift, and a change in fragmentation velocities of a factor of 10 between dry silicates and icy grains as found by laboratory work. We find that the presence of a water snow line leads to a sharp discontinuity in the radial profile of the dust emission spectral index αmm due to replenishment of small grains through fragmentation. We use the ALMA simulator to demonstrate that this effect can be observed in protoplanetary disks using spatially resolved ALMA images in two continuum bands. We explore the model dependence on the disk viscosity and find that the spectral index reveals the water snow line for a wide range of conditions, with opposite trends when the emission is optically thin rather than thick. If the disk viscosity is low (αvisc structure with a minimum at αmm ˜ 2 in the optically thick regime, possibly similar to what has been measured with ALMA in the innermost region of the HL Tau disk.

  1. Improving signal-to-noise in the direct imaging of exoplanets and circumstellar disks with MLOCI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahhaj, Zahed; Cieza, Lucas A.; Mawet, Dimitri; Yang, Bin; Canovas, Hector; de Boer, Jozua; Casassus, Simon; Ménard, François; Schreiber, Matthias R.; Liu, Michael C.; Biller, Beth A.; Nielsen, Eric L.; Hayward, Thomas L.

    2015-09-01

    We present a new algorithm designed to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of point and extended source detections around bright stars in direct imaging data.One of our innovations is that we insert simulated point sources into the science images, which we then try to recover with maximum S/N. This improves the S/N of real point sources elsewhere in the field. The algorithm, based on the locally optimized combination of images (LOCI) method, is called Matched LOCI or MLOCI. We show with Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) data on HD 135344 B and Near-Infrared Coronagraphic Imager (NICI) data on several stars that the new algorithm can improve the S/N of point source detections by 30-400% over past methods. We also find no increase in false detections rates. No prior knowledge of candidate companion locations is required to use MLOCI. On the other hand, while non-blind applications may yield linear combinations of science images that seem to increase the S/N of true sources by a factor >2, they can also yield false detections at high rates. This is a potential pitfall when trying to confirm marginal detections or to redetect point sources found in previous epochs. These findings are relevant to any method where the coefficients of the linear combination are considered tunable, e.g., LOCI and principal component analysis (PCA). Thus we recommend that false detection rates be analyzed when using these techniques. Based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (USA), the Science and Technology Facilities Council (UK), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), Ministério da Ciência e Tecnologia (Brazil) and Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva (Argentina).

  2. Preliminary study of a new gamma imager for on-line proton range monitoring during proton radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennati, P.; Dasu, A.; Colarieti-Tosti, M.; Lönn, G.; Larsson, D.; Fabbri, A.; Galasso, M.; Cinti, M. N.; Pellegrini, R.; Pani, R.

    2017-05-01

    We designed and tested new concept imaging devices, based on a thin scintillating crystal, aimed at the online monitoring of the range of protons in tissue during proton radiotherapy. The proposed crystal can guarantee better spatial resolution and lower sensitivity with respect to a thicker one, at the cost of a coarser energy resolution. Two different samples of thin crystals were coupled to a position sensitive photo multiplier tube read out by 64 independent channels electronics. The detector was equipped with a knife-edge Lead collimator that defined a reasonable field of view of about 10 cm in the target. Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations were used to optimize the design of the experimental setup and assess the accuracy of the results. Experimental measurements were carried out at the Skandion Clinic, the recently opened proton beam facility in Uppsala, Sweden. PMMA and water phantoms studies were performed with a first prototype based on a round 6.0 mm thick Cry019 crystal and with a second detector based on a thinner 5 × 5 cm2, 2.0 mm thick LFS crystal. Phantoms were irradiated with mono-energetic proton beams whose energy was in the range between 110 and 160 MeV. According with the simulations and the experimental data, the detector based on LFS crystal seems able to identify the peak of prompt-gamma radiation and its results are in fair agreement with the expected shift of the proton range as a function of energy. The count rate remains one of the most critical limitations of our system, which was able to cope with only about 20% of the clinical dose rate. Nevertheless, we are confident that our study might provide the basis for developing a new full-functional system.

  3. Effect of Cu pad morphology on direct-Cu pillar formation in CMOS image sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Eunmi; Kim, Areum; Cui, Eunwha; Lee, Ukjae; Son, Hyung Bin; Hahn, Sang June; Pyo, Sung Gyu

    2014-09-01

    We report the feasibility of forming Ni bumps directly on Cu pads in CMOS image sensor (CIS) logic elements formed by Cu wires with diameters of less than 65 nm. The direct Ni bump process proposed in this study simplifies the fabrication process and reduces costs by eliminating the need for Al pad process. In addition, this process can secure the margin of the final layer, enabling the realization of thin camera modules. In this study, we evaluated the effect of pad annealing on the direct formation of Ni bumps over Cu pads. The results suggest that the morphology of the Cu pad varies depending on the annealing sequence, and post-passivation annealing resulted in fewer defects than pad etch annealing. The shear stress of the Ni bumps was 57.77 mgf/m2, which is six times greater than the corresponding reference value. Furthermore, we evaluated the reliability of a chip with an anisotropic conductive film (ACF) and a non-conducting paste (NCP) by using high-temperature storage (HTS), thermal cycling (TC), and wet high-temperature storage (WHTS) reliability tests. The evaluation results suggest the absence of abnormalities in all samples. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  4. Subaru/SCExAO First-light Direct Imaging of a Young Debris Disk around HD 36546

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Currie, Thayne; Guyon, Olivier; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Jovanovic, Nemanja; Lozi, Julien [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Subaru Telescope, National Institutes of Natural Sciences, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Tamura, Motohide; Kuzuhara, Masayuki [Astrobiology Center, National Institutes of Natural Sciences, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan); Schlieder, Joshua E. [IPAC-NExScI, Mail Code 100-22, Caltech, 1200 E. California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Brandt, Timothy D. [Astrophysics Department, Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ (United States); Kuhn, Jonas [Institute for Astronomy, ETH-Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Str. 27, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Serabyn, Eugene; Singh, Garima [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA (United States); Janson, Markus [Department of Astronomy, Stockholm University, AlbaNova University Center, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Carson, Joseph [Department of Physics and Astronomy, College of Charleston, 66 George Street, Charleston, SC (United States); Groff, Tyler; Kasdin, N. Jeremy [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ (United States); McElwain, Michael W.; Grady, Carol [Exoplanets and Stellar Astrophysics Laboratory, Code 667, NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States); Uyama, Taichi [Department of Astronomy, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Akiyama, Eiji [Chile Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan); and others

    2017-02-10

    We present H -band scattered light imaging of a bright debris disk around the A0 star HD 36546 obtained from the Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme Adaptive Optics (SCExAO) system with data recorded by the HiCIAO camera using the vector vortex coronagraph. SCExAO traces the disk from r ∼ 0.″3 to r ∼1″ (34–114 au). The disk is oriented in a near east–west direction (PA ∼ 75°), is inclined by i ∼ 70°–75°, and is strongly forward-scattering (g > 0.5). It is an extended disk rather than a sharp ring; a second, diffuse dust population extends from the disk’s eastern side. While HD 36546 intrinsic properties are consistent with a wide age range (t ∼ 1–250 Myr), its kinematics and analysis of coeval stars suggest a young age (3–10 Myr) and a possible connection to Taurus-Auriga’s star formation history. SCExAO’s planet-to-star contrast ratios are comparable to the first-light Gemini Planet Imager contrasts; for an age of 10 Myr, we rule out planets with masses comparable to HR 8799 b beyond a projected separation of 23 au. A massive icy planetesimal disk or an unseen super-Jovian planet at r > 20 au may explain the disk’s visibility. The HD 36546 debris disk may be the youngest debris disk yet imaged, is the first newly identified object from the now-operational SCExAO extreme AO system, is ideally suited for spectroscopic follow-up with SCExAO/CHARIS in 2017, and may be a key probe of icy planet formation and planet–disk interactions.

  5. Subaru/SCExAO First-light Direct Imaging of a Young Debris Disk around HD 36546

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Thayne; Guyon, Olivier; Tamura, Motohide; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Jovanovic, Nemanja; Lozi, Julien; Schlieder, Joshua E.; Brandt, Timothy D.; Kuhn, Jonas; Serabyn, Eugene; Janson, Markus; Carson, Joseph; Groff, Tyler; Kasdin, N. Jeremy; McElwain, Michael W.; Singh, Garima; Uyama, Taichi; Kuzuhara, Masayuki; Akiyama, Eiji; Grady, Carol; Hayashi, Saeko; Knapp, Gillian; Kwon, Jung-mi; Oh, Daehyeon; Wisniewski, John; Sitko, Michael; Yang, Yi

    2017-02-01

    We present H-band scattered light imaging of a bright debris disk around the A0 star HD 36546 obtained from the Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme Adaptive Optics (SCExAO) system with data recorded by the HiCIAO camera using the vector vortex coronagraph. SCExAO traces the disk from r ˜ 0.″3 to r ˜ 1″ (34-114 au). The disk is oriented in a near east-west direction (PA ˜ 75°), is inclined by I ˜ 70°-75°, and is strongly forward-scattering (g > 0.5). It is an extended disk rather than a sharp ring; a second, diffuse dust population extends from the disk’s eastern side. While HD 36546 intrinsic properties are consistent with a wide age range (t ˜ 1-250 Myr), its kinematics and analysis of coeval stars suggest a young age (3-10 Myr) and a possible connection to Taurus-Auriga’s star formation history. SCExAO’s planet-to-star contrast ratios are comparable to the first-light Gemini Planet Imager contrasts; for an age of 10 Myr, we rule out planets with masses comparable to HR 8799 b beyond a projected separation of 23 au. A massive icy planetesimal disk or an unseen super-Jovian planet at r > 20 au may explain the disk’s visibility. The HD 36546 debris disk may be the youngest debris disk yet imaged, is the first newly identified object from the now-operational SCExAO extreme AO system, is ideally suited for spectroscopic follow-up with SCExAO/CHARIS in 2017, and may be a key probe of icy planet formation and planet-disk interactions.

  6. Subaru SCExAO First-Light Direct Imaging of a Young Debris Disk around HD 36546

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Thayne; Guyon, Olivier; Tamura, Motohide; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Jovanovic, Nemanja; Lozi, Julien; Schlieder, Joshua E.; Brandt, TImothy D.; Kuhn, Jonasa; Serabyn, Eugene; hide

    2017-01-01

    We present H-band scattered light imaging of a bright debris disk around the A0 star HD 36546 obtained from the Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme Adaptive Optics (SCExAO) system with data recorded by the HiCIAO camera using the vector vortex coronagraph. SCExAO traces the disk from r approximately 0 3 to r approximately 0".3 to r approximately 1" (34-114 au). The disk is oriented in a near east west direction (PA approximately 75deg), is inclined by I approximately 70deg-75deg, and is strongly forward-scattering(g greater than 0.5). It is an extended disk rather than a sharp ring; a second, diffuse dust population extends from the disks eastern side. While HD 36546 intrinsic properties are consistent with a wide age range (t approximately 1-250 Myr), its kinematics and analysis of coeval stars suggest a young age (310 Myr) and a possible connection to Taurus-Aurigas star formation history. SCExAOs planet-to-star contrast ratios are comparable to the first-light Gemini Planet Imager contrasts; for an age of 10 Myr, we rule out planets with masses comparable to HR 8799 b beyond a projected separation of 23 au. A massive icy planetesimal disk or an unseen super-Jovian planet at r greater than 20 au may explain the disks visibility. The HD 36546 debris disk may be the youngest debris disk yet imaged, is the first newly identified object from the now-operational SCExAO extreme AO system, is ideally suited for spectroscopic follow-up with SCExAO/CHARIS in 2017, and may be a key probe of icy planet formation and planet disk interactions.

  7. Perception of illumination direction in images of 3-D convex objects : Influence of surface materials and light fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khang, Byung Geun; Koenderink, Jan J.; Kappers, A. M L

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the perception of illumination direction in images of 3-D convex objects under variations of light field and surface material properties. In a first experiment, we used an illumination-matching procedure in order to measure observers' ability to estimate the direction of illumination

  8. Solving total-variation image super-resolution problems via proximal symmetric alternating direction methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Gao

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The single image super-resolution (SISR problem represents a class of efficient models appealing in many computer vision applications. In this paper, we focus on designing a proximal symmetric alternating direction method of multipliers (SADMM for the SISR problem. By taking full exploitation of the special structure, the method enjoys the advantage of being easily implementable by linearizing the quadratic term of subproblems in the SISR problem. With this linearization, the resulting subproblems easily achieve closed-form solutions. A global convergence result is established for the proposed method. Preliminary numerical results demonstrate that the proposed method is efficient and the computing time is saved by nearly 40% compared with several state-of-the-art methods.

  9. Multi-Wave and Hybrid Imaging Techniques: A New Direction for Nondestructive Testing and Structural Health Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhua Cheng

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the state-of-the-art multi-wave and hybrid imaging techniques in the field of nondestructive evaluation and structural health monitoring were comprehensively reviewed. A new direction for assessment and health monitoring of various structures by capitalizing the advantages of those imaging methods was discussed. Although sharing similar system configurations, the imaging physics and principles of multi-wave phenomena and hybrid imaging methods are inherently different. After a brief introduction of nondestructive evaluation (NDE , structure health monitoring (SHM and their related challenges, several recent advances that have significantly extended imaging methods from laboratory development into practical applications were summarized, followed by conclusions and discussion on future directions.

  10. Direct Observation of THF Hydrate Formation in Porous Microstructure Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Liu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The porous microstructure of hydrates governs the mechanical strength of the hydrate-bearing sediment. To investigate the growth law and microstructure of hydrates in porous media, the growth process of tetrahydrofuran (THF hydrate under different concentration of THF solution is directly observed using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI. The images show that the THF hydrate grows as different models under different concentration of THF solution (19%, 11.4% and 5.7% by weight at 1 °C. When the concentration is 19% (stoichiometric molar ratio of THF/H2O = 1:17, the THF hydrate grows as cementing model. However, with the decreasing concentration of THF, the growth model transfers from cementing model to floating model. The results show that the growth of the THF hydrate was influenced by the dissolved quantity of THF in the water. The extension of the observed behavior to methane hydrate could have implications in understanding their role in seafloor and permafrost stability.

  11. Direct visualization of polarization reversal of organic ferroelectric memory transistor by using charge modulated reflectance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Takako; Taguchi, Dai; Manaka, Takaaki; Iwamoto, Mitsumasa

    2017-11-01

    By using the charge modulated reflectance (CMR) imaging technique, charge distribution in the pentacene organic field-effect transistor (OFET) with a ferroelectric gate insulator [P(VDF-TrFE)] was investigated in terms of polarization reversal of the P(VDF-TrFE) layer. We studied the polarization reversal process and the carrier spreading process in the OFET channel. The I-V measurement showed a hysteresis behavior caused by the spontaneous polarization of P(VDF-TrFE), but the hysteresis I-V curve changes depending on the applied drain bias, possibly due to the gradual shift of the polarization reversal position in the OFET channel. CMR imaging visualized the gradual shift of the polarization reversal position and showed that the electrostatic field formed by the polarization of P(VDF-TrFE) contributes to hole and electron injection into the pentacene layer and the carrier distribution is significantly dependent on the direction of the polarization. The polarization reversal position in the channel region is governed by the electrostatic potential, and it happens where the potential reaches the coercive voltage of P(VDF-TrFE). The transmission line model developed on the basis of the Maxwell-Wagner effect element analysis well accounts for this polarization reversal process in the OFET channel.

  12. Deconvolving images with unknown boundaries using the alternating direction method of multipliers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Mariana S C; Figueiredo, Mario

    2013-08-01

    The alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMM) has recently sparked interest as a flexible and efficient optimization tool for inverse problems, namely, image deconvolution and reconstruction under non-smooth convex regularization. ADMM achieves state-of-the-art speed by adopting a divide and conquer strategy, wherein a hard problem is split into simpler, efficiently solvable sub-problems (e.g., using fast Fourier or wavelet transforms, or simple proximity operators). In deconvolution, one of these sub-problems involves a matrix inversion (i.e., solving a linear system), which can be done efficiently (in the discrete Fourier domain) if the observation operator is circulant, i.e., under periodic boundary conditions. This paper extends ADMM-based image deconvolution to the more realistic scenario of unknown boundary, where the observation operator is modeled as the composition of a convolution (with arbitrary boundary conditions) with a spatial mask that keeps only pixels that do not depend on the unknown boundary. The proposed approach also handles, at no extra cost, problems that combine the recovery of missing pixels (i.e., inpainting) with deconvolution. We show that the resulting algorithms inherit the convergence guarantees of ADMM and illustrate its performance on non-periodic deblurring (with and without inpainting of interior pixels) under total-variation and frame-based regularization.

  13. Scintigraphic images of bacterial infection using aptamers directly labeled with {sup 99m}Tc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, S.R.; Correa, C.R.; Andrade, A.S.R., E-mail: sararoberta7@hotmail.com, E-mail: crisrcorrea@gmail.com, E-mail: antero@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Barros, A.L.B.; Diniz, S.O.F.; Cardoso, V.N., E-mail: brancodebarros@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: valbertcardoso@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: simoneodilia@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Faculdade de Farmacia. Departamento de Analises Clinicas e Toxicologicas

    2015-07-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is specie of great medical importance and is the most commonly agent found in infections of soft tissues, bone infections and bone prostheses. In this study, aptamers selected to S. aureus were labeled by the direct method with {sup 99m}Tc and used for bacterial infection identification by scintigraphy. The radiolabeled aptamers radiochemical purity and stability were assessed by thin-layer chromatography (TLC). Three groups of Swiss mice (n=6) were used for the scintigraphic imaging studies. The first group was infected intramuscularly in the right thigh with S. aureus, the second group with C. albicans and the third group received zymosan to induce aseptic inflammation. After 24 h, radiolabeled aptamers (18 MBq) were injected by the tail vein. Scintigraphic images were acquired at 1 h and 4 h postinjection. The radiolabeling yield with {sup 99m}Tc was over 90%. The radiolabeled aptamers were stable in 0.9% saline, plasma and cysteine excess. The scintigraphic image profiles showed high uptake in the kidneys and bladder in all groups, indicating a main renal excretion consistent with the hydrophilic nature of the molecule. No accumulation of radioactivity was observed in the thyroid, stomach, liver and spleen, indicating acceptable levels of radiochemical impurities. The group infected with S. aureus showed a visible uptake in the infected right thigh at 1 h post-injection. For the control groups (C. albicans and zymosan) visible differences between the right and left thighs were not observed. The radiolabeled aptamers were able to distinguish aseptic inflammation from bacterial infection and bacterial from fungal infection. (author)

  14. Imaging X-ray detector front-end with high dynamic range: IDeF-X HD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevin, O.; Lemaire, O.; Lugiez, F.; Michalowska, A.; Baron, P.; Limousin, O.; Delagnes, E.

    2012-12-01

    Presented circuit, IDeF-X HD (Imaging Detector Front-end) is a member of the IDeF-X ASICs family for space applications. It has been optimized for a half millimeter pitch CdTe or CdZnTe pixelated detector arranged in 16×16 array. It is aimed to operate in the hard X-ray range from few keV up to 250 keV or more. The ASIC has been realized in AMS 0.35 μm CMOS process. The IDeF-X HD is a 32 channel analog front-end with self-triggering capability. The architecture of the analog channel includes a chain of charge sensitive amplifier with continuous reset system and non-stationary noise suppressor, adjustable gain stage, pole-zero cancellation stage, adjustable shaping time low pass filter, baseline holder and peak detector with discriminator. The power consumption of the IDeF-X HD is 800 μW per channel. With the in-channel variable gain stage the nominal 250 keV dynamic range of the ASIC can be extended up to 1 MeV anticipating future applications using thick sensors. Measuring the noise performance without a detector at the input with minimized leakage current (programmable) at the input, we achieved ENC of 33 electrons rms at 10.7 μs peak time. Measurements with CdTe detector show good energy resolution FWHM of 1.1 keV at 60 keV and 4.3 keV at 662 keV with detection threshold below 4 keV. In addition, an absolute temperature sensor has been integrated with resolution of 1.5 °C.

  15. Image quality of direct conversion detectors for mammography and radiography: a theoretical comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainprize, James G.; Yaffe, Martin J.

    2003-06-01

    Direct conversion detectors have the potential to provide very high resolution and high detective quantum efficiency (DQE). Selection of a material that is appropriate for the task is dictated by the material properties. A linear cascaded systems analysis of DQE is used to predict the performance of several detector materials such as amorphous Se, CdZnTe, and PbI2. A model is used to predict the spatial frequency-dependent DQE(f) for each material. This model includes: (1) x-ray absorption, (2) K fluorescence, (3) conversion gain, and (4) incomplete charge collection. A depth-dependent approach is used to account for gain variations and charge transport characteristics that change throughout the detector. In the model a parallel cascade, and non-elementary stages are used to model the effect of K-fluorescence reabsorption followed by incomplete charge collection. The DQE(f) is determined across an x-ray energy range of 10 to 100 keV for each material under typical bias conditions ranging from 0.1 V/μm to 10 V/μm. K-fluorescence escape and reabsorption blurring can cause marked reductions in the DQE(f). It is further reduced by incomplete charge collection which can theoretically decrease the DQE(f) by as much as 50% in extreme situations. This model will help determine key factors that will influence material selection for direct conversion x-ray systems.

  16. Polarization Diversity Image-Reject Homodyne Receiver for Directional Radial Velocity Measurements in Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) Instruments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to an improved method and a LIDAR system comprising an emitter for emission of a coherent electromagnetic EM signal and a transmitting optical arrangement configured to transmit the electromagnetic signal towards a measurement area. By the method and system, detectio...... of both the polarized and depolarized backscattered EM signal is obtained, whereby an improved signal-to-noise ratio is obtained....

  17. A semi-automatic image-based close range 3D modeling pipeline using a multi-camera configuration

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rau, Jiann-Yeou; Yeh, Po-Chia

    2012-01-01

    .... This study proposes an image-based 3D modeling pipeline which takes advantage of a multi-camera configuration and multi-image matching technique that does not require any markers on or around the object...

  18. Time-resolved imaging of prompt-gamma rays for proton range verification using a knife-edge slit camera based on digital photon counters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cambraia Lopes, P.; Clementel, E.; Crespo, P.; Henrotin, S.; Huizenga, J.; Janssens, G.; Parodi, K.; Prieels, D.; Roellinghoff, F.; Smeets, J.; Stichelbaut, F.; Schaart, D.R.

    2015-01-01

    Proton range monitoring may facilitate online adaptive proton therapy and improve treatment outcomes. Imaging of proton-induced prompt gamma (PG) rays using a knife-edge slit collimator is currently under investigation as a potential tool for real-time proton range monitoring. A major challenge in

  19. Ultrahigh polarimetric image contrast enhancement for skin cancer diagnosis using InN plasmonic nanoparticles in the terahertz range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ney, Michael; Abdulhalim, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    Mueller matrix imaging sensitivity, to delicate water content changes in tissue associated with early stages of skin cancer, is demonstrated by numerical modeling to be enhanced by localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) effects at the terahertz (THz) range when InN nanoparticles (NPs) coated with Parylene-C are introduced into the skin. A skin tissue model tailored for THz wavelengths is established for a Monte Carlo simulation of polarized light propagation and scattering, and a comparative study based on simulated Mueller matrices is presented considering different NPs’ parameters and insertion into the skin methods. The insertion of NPs presenting LSPR in the THz is demonstrated to enable the application of polarization-based sample characterization techniques adopted from the scattering dominated visible wavelengths domain for the, otherwise, relatively low scattering THz domain, where such approach is irrelevant without the NPs. Through these Mueller polarimetry techniques, the detection of water content variations in the tissue is made possible and with high sensitivity. This study yields a limit of detection down to 0.0018% for relative changes in the water content based on linear degree of polarization--an improvement of an order of magnitude relative to the limit of detection without NPs calculated in a previous ellipsometric study.

  20. Organic Analysis in the Miller Range 090657 CR2 Chondrite: Part 3 C and N Isotopic Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messenger, S.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Elsila, J. E.; Berger, E. L.; Burton, A. S.; Clemett, S. J.; Cao, T.

    2016-01-01

    Primitive carbonaceous chondrites contain a wide variety of organic material, ranging from soluble discrete molecules to insoluble nanoglobules of macro-molecular carbon. The relationship between the soluble organic molecules, macromolecular organic material, and host minerals are poorly understood. Large H, C and N isotopic anomalies suggest some organic components formed in low-T interstellar or outer Solar System environments. The highest isotope anomalies occur in m-scale inclusions in the most primitive materials, such as cometary dust and the least altered carbonaceous chondrites. Often, the hosts of these isotopically anomalous 'hotspots' are discrete organic nanoglobules that probably formed in the outermost reaches of the protosolar disk or cold molecular cloud. Molecular and isotopic studies of meteoritic organic matter are aimed at identifying the chemical properties and formation processes of interstellar organic materials and the subsequent chemical evolutionary pathways in various Solar System environments. The combination of soluble and insoluble analyses with in situ and bulk studies provides powerful constraints on the origin and evolution of organic matter in the Solar System. Using macroscale extraction and analysis techniques as well as microscale in situ observations we have been studying both insoluble and soluble organic material in primitive astromaterial samples. Here, we present results of bulk C and N isotopic measurements and coordinated in situ C and N isotopic imaging and mineralogical and textural studies of carbonaceous materials in a Cr2 carbonaceous chondrite. In accompanying abstracts we discuss the morphology and distribution of carbonaceous components and soluble organic species of this meteorite.

  1. Force-activatable biosensor enables single platelet force mapping directly by fluorescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongliang; LeVine, Dana N; Gannon, Margaret; Zhao, Yuanchang; Sarkar, Anwesha; Hoch, Bailey; Wang, Xuefeng

    2018-02-15

    Integrin-transmitted cellular forces are critical for platelet adhesion, activation, aggregation and contraction during hemostasis and thrombosis. Measuring and mapping single platelet forces are desired in both research and clinical applications. Conventional force-to-strain based cell traction force microscopies have low resolution which is not ideal for cellular force mapping in small platelets. To enable platelet force mapping with submicron resolution, we developed a force-activatable biosensor named integrative tension sensor (ITS) which directly converts molecular tensions to fluorescent signals, therefore enabling cellular force mapping directly by fluorescence imaging. With ITS, we mapped cellular forces in single platelets at 0.4µm resolution. We found that platelet force distribution has strong polarization which is sensitive to treatment with the anti-platelet drug tirofiban, suggesting that the ITS force map can report anti-platelet drug efficacy. The ITS also calibrated integrin molecular tensions in platelets and revealed two distinct tension levels: 12-54 piconewton (nominal values) tensions generated during platelet adhesion and tensions above 54 piconewton generated during platelet contraction. Overall, the ITS is a powerful biosensor for the study of platelet mechanobiology, and holds great potential in antithrombotic drug development and assessing platelet activity in health and disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Direct Imaging of Kinetic Pathways of Atomic Diffusion in Monolayer Molybdenum Disulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jinhua; Pan, Yuhao; Hu, Zhixin; Lv, Danhui; Jin, Chuanhong; Ji, Wei; Yuan, Jun; Zhang, Ze

    2017-06-14

    Direct observation of atomic migration both on and below surfaces is a long-standing but important challenge in materials science as diffusion is one of the most elementary processes essential to many vital material behaviors. Probing the kinetic pathways, including metastable or even transition states involved down to atomic scale, holds the key to the underlying physical mechanisms. Here, we applied aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to demonstrate direct atomic-scale imaging and quasi-real-time tracking of diffusion of Mo adatoms and vacancies in monolayer MoS2, an important two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) system. Preferred kinetic pathways and the migration potential-energy landscape are determined experimentally and confirmed theoretically. The resulting three-dimensional knowledge of the atomic configuration evolution reveals the different microscopic mechanisms responsible for the contrasting intrinsic diffusion rates for Mo adatoms and vacancies. The new insight will benefit our understanding of material processes such as phase transformation and heterogeneous catalysis.

  3. Non-convex optimization for self-calibration of direction-dependent effects in radio interferometric imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repetti, Audrey; Birdi, Jasleen; Dabbech, Arwa; Wiaux, Yves

    2017-10-01

    Radio interferometric imaging aims to estimate an unknown sky intensity image from degraded observations, acquired through an antenna array. In the theoretical case of a perfectly calibrated array, it has been shown that solving the corresponding imaging problem by iterative algorithms based on convex optimization and compressive sensing theory can be competitive with classical algorithms such as clean. However, in practice, antenna-based gains are unknown and have to be calibrated. Future radio telescopes, such as the Square Kilometre Array, aim at improving imaging resolution and sensitivity by orders of magnitude. At this precision level, the direction-dependency of the gains must be accounted for, and radio interferometric imaging can be understood as a blind deconvolution problem. In this context, the underlying minimization problem is non-convex, and adapted techniques have to be designed. In this work, leveraging recent developments in non-convex optimization, we propose the first joint calibration and imaging method in radio interferometry, with proven convergence guarantees. Our approach, based on a block-coordinate forward-backward algorithm, jointly accounts for visibilities and suitable priors on both the image and the direction-dependent effects (DDEs). As demonstrated in recent works, sparsity remains the prior of choice for the image, while DDEs are modelled as smooth functions of the sky, I.e. spatially band-limited. Finally, we show through simulations the efficiency of our method, for the reconstruction of both images of point sources and complex extended sources. matlab code is available on GitHub.

  4. Smart-pixel for 3D ranging imagers based on single-photon avalanche diode and time-to-digital converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markovic, Bojan; Tisa, Simone; Tosi, Alberto; Zappa, Franco

    2011-05-01

    We present a "smart-pixel" suitable for implementation of monolithic single-photon imaging arrays aimed at 3D ranging applications by means of the direct time-of-flight detection (like LIDAR systems), but also for photon timing applications (like FLIM, FCS, FRET). The pixel includes a Single-Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) and a Time-to-Digital Converter (TDC) monolithically designed and manufactured in the same chip, and it is able to detect single photons and to measure in-pixel the time delay between a START signal (e.g. laser excitation, LIDAR flash) and a photon detection (e.g. back reflection from a target object). In order to provide both wide dynamic range, high time resolution and very high linearity, we devised a TDC architecture based on an interpolation technique. A "coarse" counter counts the number of reference-clock rising-edges between START and STOP, while high resolution is achieved by means of two interpolators, which measure the time elapsed between START (and STOP) signal and a successive clock edge. In an array with many pixels, multiple STOP channels are needed while just one START channel is necessary if the START event is common to all channels. We report on the design and characterization of prototype circuits, fabricated in a 0.35 μm standard CMOS technology containing complete conversion channels (i.e. 20-μm active-area diameter SPAD, quenching circuitry, and TDC). With a 100 MHz reference clock, the TDC provides a time resolution of 10 ps, a dynamic range of 160 ns and DNL < 1% LSB rms.

  5. Three-dimensional anterior segment imaging in patients with type 1 Boston Keratoprosthesis with switchable full depth range swept source optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poddar, Raju; Cortés, Dennis E.; Werner, John S.; Mannis, Mark J.; Zawadzki, Robert J.

    2013-08-01

    A high-speed (100 kHz A-scans/s) complex conjugate resolved 1 μm swept source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) system using coherence revival of the light source is suitable for dense three-dimensional (3-D) imaging of the anterior segment. The short acquisition time helps to minimize the influence of motion artifacts. The extended depth range of the SS-OCT system allows topographic analysis of clinically relevant images of the entire depth of the anterior segment of the eye. Patients with the type 1 Boston Keratoprosthesis (KPro) require evaluation of the full anterior segment depth. Current commercially available OCT systems are not suitable for this application due to limited acquisition speed, resolution, and axial imaging range. Moreover, most commonly used research grade and some clinical OCT systems implement a commercially available SS (Axsun) that offers only 3.7 mm imaging range (in air) in its standard configuration. We describe implementation of a common swept laser with built-in k-clock to allow phase stable imaging in both low range and high range, 3.7 and 11.5 mm in air, respectively, without the need to build an external MZI k-clock. As a result, 3-D morphology of the KPro position with respect to the surrounding tissue could be investigated in vivo both at high resolution and with large depth range to achieve noninvasive and precise evaluation of success of the surgical procedure.

  6. Cardiac-gated parametric images from82Rb PET from dynamic frames and direct 4D reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germino, Mary; Carson, Richard E

    2018-02-01

    Cardiac perfusion PET data can be reconstructed as a dynamic sequence and kinetic modeling performed to quantify myocardial blood flow, or reconstructed as static gated images to quantify function. Parametric images from dynamic PET are conventionally not gated, to allow use of all events with lower noise. An alternative method for dynamic PET is to incorporate the kinetic model into the reconstruction algorithm itself, bypassing the generation of a time series of emission images and directly producing parametric images. So-called "direct reconstruction" can produce parametric images with lower noise than the conventional method because the noise distribution is more easily modeled in projection space than in image space. In this work, we develop direct reconstruction of cardiac-gated parametric images for 82 Rb PET with an extension of the Parametric Motion compensation OSEM List mode Algorithm for Resolution-recovery reconstruction for the one tissue model (PMOLAR-1T). PMOLAR-1T was extended to accommodate model terms to account for spillover from the left and right ventricles into the myocardium. The algorithm was evaluated on a 4D simulated 82 Rb dataset, including a perfusion defect, as well as a human 82 Rb list mode acquisition. The simulated list mode was subsampled into replicates, each with counts comparable to one gate of a gated acquisition. Parametric images were produced by the indirect (separate reconstructions and modeling) and direct methods for each of eight low-count and eight normal-count replicates of the simulated data, and each of eight cardiac gates for the human data. For the direct method, two initialization schemes were tested: uniform initialization, and initialization with the filtered iteration 1 result of the indirect method. For the human dataset, event-by-event respiratory motion compensation was included. The indirect and direct methods were compared for the simulated dataset in terms of bias and coefficient of variation as a

  7. Spherical Panoramas, and non Metric Images for Long Range Survey, the San Barnaba Spire, Sagrada Familia, Barcelona, Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Cingolani

    2011-12-01

    consist basically in the difficulty given by its height above the street level, about 100 meters. Long focal lenses have to be used to get a suitable resolution and accuracy. We wanted to repeat now the survey using a different photogrammetric technique from the old one, that was DLT algorithm for non-metric images. The new technique is the Spherical Photogrammetry. Multi-image Spherical Photogrammetry makes use as sensor of a pseudo-image that is the spherical panorama, composed by the images taken from the same station point. For details of Spherical Photogrammetry see (Fangi, 2,3,4,9. A particular procedure appropriate for the orientation of very narrow field of view lenses panorama has been already set up and used for the orientation and plotting of the three minarets of the Great Mosque of Omayyad’s in Damascus, Syria. Their heights range from 60 to 80 meters above the courtyard pavement of the mosque. The technique consists in taking different focal lengths panorama from the same station point (Fangi, New Castle, 2010, one with WA wide angle and another one with NA Narrow Angle, adding to the stability of WA panorama the resolution of NA panorama. The same approach has been used in the Sagrada Familia, for the survey of San Barnaba’s spire. In 1990 the A. made a survey of the same spire. But in comparison to the years 90, there is one difficulty more: now the rear of the spire is not visible because of the construction of the roof of the church, while it was visible in 1990. The solution has been then to use the original images taken in the years 90 for the rear of the spire and the spherical panoramas for the rest, i.e. the part toward the façade, using the original control points. Then we had to make a combined adjustment of non metric images using DLT approach and spherical photogrammetry algorithms. The restitution has been indeed carried out using both type of imagery, spherical panorama and non metric images. The results are satisfactory in the sense that

  8. Is preoperative functional magnetic resonance imaging reliable for language areas mapping in brain tumor surgery? Review of language functional magnetic resonance imaging and direct cortical stimulation correlation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giussani, Carlo; Roux, Frank-Emmanuel; Ojemann, Jeffrey; Sganzerla, Erik Pietro; Pirillo, David; Papagno, Costanza

    2010-01-01

    Language functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has been used extensively in the past decade for both clinical and research purposes. Its integration in the preoperative imaging assessment of brain lesions involving eloquent areas is progressively more diffused in neurosurgical practice. Nevertheless, the reliability of language fMRI is unclear. To understand the reliability of preoperative language fMRI in patients operated on for brain tumors, the surgical studies that compared language fMRI with direct cortical stimulation (DCS) were reviewed. Articles comparing language fMRI with DCS of language areas were reviewed with attention to the lesion pathology, the magnetic field, the language tasks used pre- and intraoperatively, and the validation modalities adopted to establish the reliability of language fMRI. We tried to explore the effectiveness of language fMRI in gliomas. Nine language brain mapping studies compared the findings of fMRI with those of DCS. The studies are not homogeneous for tumor types, magnetic fields, pre- and intraoperative language tasks, intraoperative matching criteria, and results. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated in 5 studies (respectively ranging from 59% to 100% and from 0% to 97%). The contradictory results of these studies do not allow consideration of language fMRI as an alternative tool to DCS in brain lesions located in language areas, especially in gliomas because of the pattern of growth of these tumors. However, language fMRI conducted with high magnet fields is a promising brain mapping tool that must be validated by DCS in methodological robust studies.

  9. Linear-array-based photoacoustic imaging of human microcirculation with a range of high frequency transducer probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar, Haroon; Breathnach, Aedán; Subhash, Hrebesh M; Leahy, Martin J

    2015-05-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) with a linear-array-based probe can provide a convenient means of imaging the human microcirculation within its native structural context and adds functional information. PAI using a multielement linear transducer array combined with multichannel collecting system was used for in vivo volumetric imaging of the blood microcirculation, the total concentration of hemoglobin (HbT), and the hemoglobin oxygen saturation (sO₂) within human tissue. Three-dimensional (3-D) PA and ultrasound (US) volumetric scans were acquired from the forearm skin by linearly translating the transducer with a stepper motor over a region of interest, while capturing two-dimensional images using 15, 21, and 40 MHz frequency transducer probes. For the microvasculature imaging, PA images were acquired at 800- and 1064-nm wavelengths. For the HbT and sO₂ estimates, PA images were collected at 750- and 850-nm wavelengths. 3-D microcirculation, HbT, and sO₂ maps of the forearm skin were obtained from normal subjects. The linear-array-based PAI has been found promising in terms of resolution, imaging depth, and imaging speed for in vivo microcirculation imaging within human skin. We believe that a reflection type probe, similar to existing clinical US probes, is most likely to succeed in real clinical applications. Its advantages include ease of use, speed, and familiarity for radiographers and clinicians.

  10. Optical imaging of human cone photoreceptors directly following the capture of light.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip Bedggood

    Full Text Available Capture of light in the photoreceptor outer segment initiates a cascade of chemical events that inhibit neurotransmitter release, ultimately resulting in vision. The massed response of the photoreceptor population can be measured non-invasively by electrical recordings, but responses from individual cells cannot be measured without dissecting the retina. Here we used optical imaging to observe individual human cones in the living eye as they underwent bleaching of photopigment and associated phototransduction. The retina was simultaneously stimulated and observed with high intensity visible light at 1 kHz, using adaptive optics. There was marked variability between individual cones in both photosensitivity and pigment optical density, challenging the conventional assumption that photoreceptors act as identical subunits (coefficient of variation in rate of photoisomerization = 23%. There was also a pronounced inverse correlation between these two parameters (p<10(-7; the temporal evolution of image statistics revealed this to be a dynamic relationship, with cone waveguiding efficiency beginning a dramatic increase within 3 ms of light onset. Beginning as early as 2 ms after light onset and including half of cells by ∼7 ms, cone intensity showed reversals characteristic of interference phenomena, with greater delays in reversal corresponding to cones with more photopigment (p<10(-3. The timing of these changes is argued to best correspond with either the cessation of dark current, or to related events such as changes in intracellular cGMP. Cone intensity also showed fluctuations of high frequency (332±25 Hz and low amplitude (3.0±0.85%. Other groups have shown similar fluctuations that were directly evoked by light; if this corresponds to the same phenomenon, we propose that the amplitude of fluctuation may be increased by the use of a bright flash followed by a brief pause, to allow recovery of cone circulating current.

  11. Recording multiple spatially-heterodyned direct to digital holograms in one digital image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Gregory R [Clinton, TN; Bingham, Philip R [Knoxville, TN

    2008-03-25

    Systems and methods are described for recording multiple spatially-heterodyned direct to digital holograms in one digital image. A method includes digitally recording, at a first reference beam-object beam angle, a first spatially-heterodyned hologram including spatial heterodyne fringes for Fourier analysis; Fourier analyzing the recorded first spatially-heterodyned hologram by shifting a first original origin of the recorded first spatially-heterodyned hologram to sit on top of a first spatial-heterodyne carrier frequency defined by the first reference beam-object beam angle; digitally recording, at a second reference beam-object beam angle, a second spatially-heterodyned hologram including spatial heterodyne fringes for Fourier analysis; Fourier analyzing the recorded second spatially-heterodyned hologram by shifting a second original origin of the recorded second spatially-heterodyned hologram to sit on top of a second spatial-heterodyne carrier frequency defined by the second reference beam-object beam angle; applying a first digital filter to cut off signals around the first original origin and define a first result; performing a first inverse Fourier transform on the first result; applying a second digital filter to cut off signals around the second original origin and define a second result; and performing a second inverse Fourier transform on the second result, wherein the first reference beam-object beam angle is not equal to the second reference beam-object beam angle and a single digital image includes both the first spatially-heterodyned hologram and the second spatially-heterodyned hologram.

  12. Validation of full-wave simulations for mode conversion of waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies with phase contrast imaging in Alcator C-Mod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujii, N.; Porkolab, M.; Bonoli, P. T.; Edlund, E. M.; Ennever, P. C.; Lin, Y.; Wright, J. C.; Wukitch, S. J.; Jaeger, E. F.; Green, D. L.; Harvey, R. W.

    2015-08-01

    Mode conversion of fast waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) is known to result in current drive and flow drive under optimised conditions, which may be utilized to control plasma profiles and improve fusion plasma performance. To describe these processes accurately in a realistic toroidal geometry, numerical simulations are essential. Quantitative comparison of these simulations and the actual experimental measurements is important to validate their predictions and to evaluate their limitations. The phase contrast imaging (PCI) diagnostic has been used to directly detect the ICRF waves in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. The measurements have been compared with full-wave simulations through a synthetic diagnostic technique. Recently, the frequency response of the PCI detector array on Alcator C-Mod was recalibrated, which greatly improved the comparison between the measurements and the simulations. In this study, mode converted waves for D-3He and D-H plasmas with various ion species compositions were re-analyzed with the new calibration. For the minority heating cases, self-consistent electric fields and a minority ion distribution function were simulated by iterating a full-wave code and a Fokker-Planck code. The simulated mode converted wave intensity was in quite reasonable agreement with the measurements close to the antenna, but discrepancies remain for comparison at larger distances.

  13. Validation of full-wave simulations for mode conversion of waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies with phase contrast imaging in Alcator C-Mod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsujii, N., E-mail: tsujii@k.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Chiba 277-8561 (Japan); Porkolab, M.; Bonoli, P. T.; Edlund, E. M.; Ennever, P. C.; Lin, Y.; Wright, J. C.; Wukitch, S. J. [MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Jaeger, E. F. [XCEL Engineering, Inc., Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 (United States); Green, D. L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Harvey, R. W. [CompX, Del Mar, California 92014 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Mode conversion of fast waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) is known to result in current drive and flow drive under optimised conditions, which may be utilized to control plasma profiles and improve fusion plasma performance. To describe these processes accurately in a realistic toroidal geometry, numerical simulations are essential. Quantitative comparison of these simulations and the actual experimental measurements is important to validate their predictions and to evaluate their limitations. The phase contrast imaging (PCI) diagnostic has been used to directly detect the ICRF waves in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. The measurements have been compared with full-wave simulations through a synthetic diagnostic technique. Recently, the frequency response of the PCI detector array on Alcator C-Mod was recalibrated, which greatly improved the comparison between the measurements and the simulations. In this study, mode converted waves for D-{sup 3}He and D-H plasmas with various ion species compositions were re-analyzed with the new calibration. For the minority heating cases, self-consistent electric fields and a minority ion distribution function were simulated by iterating a full-wave code and a Fokker-Planck code. The simulated mode converted wave intensity was in quite reasonable agreement with the measurements close to the antenna, but discrepancies remain for comparison at larger distances.

  14. Digital direct electron imaging of energy-filtered electron backscatter diffraction patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vespucci, S.; Winkelmann, A.; Naresh-Kumar, G.; Mingard, K. P.; Maneuski, D.; Edwards, P. R.; Day, A. P.; O'Shea, V.; Trager-Cowan, C.

    2015-11-01

    Electron backscatter diffraction is a scanning electron microscopy technique used to obtain crystallographic information on materials. It allows the nondestructive mapping of crystal structure, texture, and strain with a lateral and depth resolution on the order of tens of nanometers. Electron backscatter diffraction patterns (EBSPs) are presently acquired using a detector comprising a scintillator coupled to a digital camera, and the crystallographic information obtainable is limited by the conversion of electrons to photons and then back to electrons again. In this article we will report the direct acquisition of energy-filtered EBSPs using a digital complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor hybrid pixel detector, Timepix. We show results from a range of samples with different mass and density, namely diamond, silicon, and GaN. Direct electron detection allows the acquisition of EBSPs at lower (≤5 keV) electron beam energies. This results in a reduction in the depth and lateral extension of the volume of the specimen contributing to the pattern and will lead to a significant improvement in lateral and depth resolution. Direct electron detection together with energy filtering (electrons having energy below a specific value are excluded) also leads to an improvement in spatial resolution but in addition provides an unprecedented increase in the detail in the acquired EBSPs. An increase in contrast and higher-order diffraction features are observed. In addition, excess-deficiency effects appear to be suppressed on energy filtering. This allows the fundamental physics of pattern formation to be interrogated and will enable a step change in the use of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) for crystal phase identification and the mapping of strain. The enhancement in the contrast in high-pass energy-filtered EBSD patterns is found to be stronger for lighter, less dense materials. The improved contrast for such materials will enable the application of the EBSD

  15. BinCat: a Catalog of Nearby Binary Stars with Tools for Calculating Light-Leakage for Direct Imaging Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holte, Elias Peter; Sirbu, Dan; Belikov, Ruslan

    2018-01-01

    Binary stars have been largely left out of direct imaging surveys for exoplanets, specifically for earth-sized planets in their star's habitable zone. Utilizing new direct imaging techniques brings us closer to being able to detect earth-like exoplanets around binary stars. In preparation for the upcoming WFIRST mission and other direct imaging-capable missions (HabEx, LUVIOR) it is important to understand the expected science yield resulting from the implementation of these imaging techniques. BinCat is a catalog of binary systems within 30 parsecs to be used as a target list for future direct imaging missions. There is a non-static component along with BinCat that allows researchers to predict the expected light-leakage between a binary component and its off-axis companion (a value critical to the aforementioned techniques) at any epoch. This is accomplished by using orbital elements from the Sixth Orbital Catalog to model the orbits of the binaries. The software was validated against the historical data used to generate the orbital parameters. When orbital information is unknown or the binaries are purely optical the proper motion of the pair taken from the Washington Double Star catalog is integrated in time to estimate expected light-leakage.

  16. Multilayer optics for monochromatic high-resolution X-ray imaging diagnostic in a broad photon energy range from 2 keV to 22 keV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troussel, Ph., E-mail: philippe.troussel@cea.fr [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Dennetiere, D. [Synchrotron Soleil, L’orme des Merisiers, 91190 Saint-Aubin (France); Maroni, R. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Høghøj, P.; Hedacq, S. [Xenocs SA, 19, rue François Blumet, F-38360 Sassenage (France); Cibik, L.; Krumrey, M. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Abbestr. 2-12, 10587 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-12-11

    The “Commissariat à l’énergie atomique et aux énergies alternatives” (CEA) studies and designs advanced X-ray diagnostics to probe dense plasmas produced at the future Laser MegaJoule (LMJ) facility. Mainly for X-ray imaging with high spatial resolution, different types of multilayer mirrors were developed to provide broadband X-ray reflectance at grazing incidence. These coatings are deposited on two toroidal mirror substrates that are then mounted into a Wolter-type geometry (working at a grazing angle of 0.45°) to realize an X-ray microscope. Non-periodic (depth graded) W/Si multilayer can be used in the broad photon energy range from 2 keV to 22 keV. A third flat mirror can be added for the spectral selection of the microscope. This mirror is coated with a Mo/Si multilayer for which the d-spacing varies in the longitudinal direction to satisfy the Bragg condition within the angular acceptance of the microscope and also to compensate the angular dispersion due to the field of the microscope. We present a study of such a so-called Göbel mirror which was optimized for photon energy of 10.35 keV. The three mirrors were coated using magnetron sputtering technology by Xenocs SA. The reflectance in the entire photon energy range was determined in the laboratory of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) at the synchrotron radiation facility BESSY II in Berlin.

  17. Cost-Effectiveness Comparison of Imaging-Guided Prostate Biopsy Techniques: Systematic Transrectal Ultrasound, Direct In-Bore MRI, and Image Fusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venderink, W.; Govers, T.M.; Rooij, M. de; Futterer, J.J.; Sedelaar, J.P.M.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Three commonly used prostate biopsy approaches are systematic transrectal ultrasound guided, direct in-bore MRI guided, and image fusion guided. The aim of this study was to calculate which strategy is most cost-effective. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A decision tree and Markov model were

  18. Signal restoration method for restraining the range walk error of Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode lidar in acquiring a merged three-dimensional image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lu; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Yong; Wu, Long; Yang, Chenghua; Yang, Xu; Zhang, Zijing; Zhao, Yuan

    2017-04-10

    The fluctuation in the number of signal photoelectrons will cause a range walk error in a Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode (Gm-APD) lidar, which significantly depends on the target intensity. For a nanosecond-pulsed laser, the range walk error of traditional time-of-flight will cause deterioration. A new signal restoration method, based on the Poisson probability response model and the center-of-mass algorithm, is proposed to restrain the range walk error. We obtain a high-precision depth and intensity merged 3D image using this method. The range accuracy is 0.6 cm, and the intensity error is less than 3%.

  19. Magnetic resonance image reconstruction using trained geometric directions in 2D redundant wavelets domain and non-convex optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Bende; Qu, Xiaobo; Guo, Di; Hu, Changwei; Chen, Zhong

    2013-11-01

    Reducing scanning time is significantly important for MRI. Compressed sensing has shown promising results by undersampling the k-space data to speed up imaging. Sparsity of an image plays an important role in compressed sensing MRI to reduce the image artifacts. Recently, the method of patch-based directional wavelets (PBDW) which trains geometric directions from undersampled data has been proposed. It has better performance in preserving image edges than conventional sparsifying transforms. However, obvious artifacts are presented in the smooth region when the data are highly undersampled. In addition, the original PBDW-based method does not hold obvious improvement for radial and fully 2D random sampling patterns. In this paper, the PBDW-based MRI reconstruction is improved from two aspects: 1) An efficient non-convex minimization algorithm is modified to enhance image quality; 2) PBDW are extended into shift-invariant discrete wavelet domain to enhance the ability of transform on sparsifying piecewise smooth image features. Numerical simulation results on vivo magnetic resonance images demonstrate that the proposed method outperforms the original PBDW in terms of removing artifacts and preserving edges. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Research on the Directing Techniques of Image Expression with Digitalization in the Case of Japan's Commercial Animation Production

    OpenAIRE

    渡部, 英雄

    2014-01-01

    In the second half of the 1990s, the analog technology changed to the digital technology in the creation of Japanese animation. In this research the Japanese animation directing techniques of image expression are examined, and how the animation directing techniques have changed is discussed. Around the end of the 1990s, many digital animation movies were born in the world. Many Japanese animation directors were inspired by them, and as a result, Japanese animation developed. In this paper alo...

  1. lop-DWI: A Novel Scheme for Pre-Processing of Diffusion Weighted Images in the Gradient Direction Domain

    OpenAIRE

    Farshid eSepehrband; Jeiran eChoupan; Emmanuel eCaruyer; Nyoman Dana Kurniawan; Yaniv eGal; Tieng, Quang M.; Katie eMcMahon; Viktor eVegh; Reutens, David C.; Zhengyi eYang

    2015-01-01

    International audience; We describe and evaluate a pre-processing method based on a periodic spiral sampling of diffusion-gradient directions for high angular resolution diffusion magnetic resonance imaging. Our pre-processing method incorporates prior knowledge about the acquired diffusion-weighted signal, facilitating noise reduction. Periodic spiral sampling of gradient direction encodings results in an acquired signal in each voxel that is pseudo-periodic with characteristics that allow s...

  2. Electronic intraoral dental x-ray imaging system employing a direct sensing CCD array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, J.D.; Langford, D.S.; Williams, D.W. [General Imaging Corp., Gainesville, FL (United States)

    1993-12-31

    A commercial prototype intraoral radiography system has been developed that can provide digital x-ray images for diagnosis. The system consists of an intraoral detector head, an intermediate drive electronics package, a main drive electronics package and a PC-based digital image management system. The system has the potential to replace the use of dental film in intraoral radiographic examinations. High-resolution images are acquired, then displayed on a CRT within seconds of image acquisition.

  3. Electronic intraoral dental x-ray imaging system employing a direct-sensing CCD array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, John D.; Langford, D. S.; Williams, Donald W.

    1993-12-01

    A commercial prototype intraoral radiography system has been developed that can provide digital x-ray images for diagnosis. The system consists of an intraoral detector head, an intermediate drive electronics package, a main drive electronics package, and a PC-based digital image management system. The system has the potential to replace the use of dental film in intraoral radiographic examinations. High-resolution images are acquired, then displayed on a CRT within seconds of image acquisition.

  4. Image-guided focused ultrasound ablation of breast cancer: current status, challenges, and future directions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmitz, A.C.; Gianfelice, D.; Daniel, B.L.; Mali, W.P.T.M.; Bosch, M.A.A.J. van den

    2008-01-01

    Image-guided focussed ultrasound (FUS) ablation is a noninvasive procedure that has been used for treatment of benign or malignant breast tumours. Image-guidance during ablation is achieved either by using real-time ultrasound (US) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The past decade phase I

  5. Determination of mean ionization potential using magnetic resonance imaging for the reduction of proton beam range uncertainties: theory and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhyadhom, Atchar

    2017-11-01

    The accurate determination of mean ionization potential (I m) has the potential to reduce range uncertainty based margins and therefore allow for more focal treatments in proton radiotherapy. Many methods have been proposed to reduce uncertainty in I m and stopping power ratios (SPR), each with varying degrees of accuracy and issues. In this work, we present a simple parameterized model to determine I m in human biological tissue, allowing for the computation of patient-specific I m at the voxel level using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The model requires the measurement of three parameters by MRI, with only two parameters, mass percent water content and mass percent hydrogen content in organic molecules, required for the special case of soft tissues. The accuracy of this I m determination method was evaluated in available ‘standard’ (ICRU Report #44, (ICRU 1989 Tissue Substitutes in Radiation Dosimetry and Measurement (Bethesda, MD: International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements))) human tissues. The sensitivity of this I m determination method to in vivo perturbations was also tested by calculating the effect of 10% variations in the experimentally measurable parameters on I m and SPR. For the human tissues modeled in this work, a high level of accuracy with low susceptibility to perturbations in measurement error was achieved in the prediction of I m. Root-mean-square errors in I m were within 0.77% and 1.8% for both soft and bony tissues, and were 0.09% and 0.2% for the SPR of soft and bony tissues, respectively, assuming knowledge of electron density. Proof of principle MR measurements and model-based computations of I m and SPR were taken in phantom for a series of hydrogenous solutions and compared against expected I m and SPR calculations from known elemental composition. MR determined I m and SPR values in a known composition solution were determined to within 5% and 0.52%, respectively. We present a novel model to accurately

  6. A Comparative Study on Diagnostic Accuracy of Colour Coded Digital Images, Direct Digital Images and Conventional Radiographs for Periapical Lesions – An In Vitro Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mubeen; K.R., Vijayalakshmi; Bhuyan, Sanat Kumar; Panigrahi, Rajat G; Priyadarshini, Smita R; Misra, Satyaranjan; Singh, Chandravir

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The identification and radiographic interpretation of periapical bone lesions is important for accurate diagnosis and treatment. The present study was undertaken to study the feasibility and diagnostic accuracy of colour coded digital radiographs in terms of presence and size of lesion and to compare the diagnostic accuracy of colour coded digital images with direct digital images and conventional radiographs for assessing periapical lesions. Materials and Methods: Sixty human dry cadaver hemimandibles were obtained and periapical lesions were created in first and second premolar teeth at the junction of cancellous and cortical bone using a micromotor handpiece and carbide burs of sizes 2, 4 and 6. After each successive use of round burs, a conventional, RVG and colour coded image was taken for each specimen. All the images were evaluated by three observers. The diagnostic accuracy for each bur and image mode was calculated statistically. Results: Our results showed good interobserver (kappa > 0.61) agreement for the different radiographic techniques and for the different bur sizes. Conventional Radiography outperformed Digital Radiography in diagnosing periapical lesions made with Size two bur. Both were equally diagnostic for lesions made with larger bur sizes. Colour coding method was least accurate among all the techniques. Conclusion: Conventional radiography traditionally forms the backbone in the diagnosis, treatment planning and follow-up of periapical lesions. Direct digital imaging is an efficient technique, in diagnostic sense. Colour coding of digital radiography was feasible but less accurate however, this imaging technique, like any other, needs to be studied continuously with the emphasis on safety of patients and diagnostic quality of images. PMID:25584318

  7. Three-Dimensional ISAR Imaging Method for High-Speed Targets in Short-Range Using Impulse Radar Based on SIMO Array

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Xinpeng; Wei, Guohua; Wu, Siliang; Wang, Dawei

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a three-dimensional inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) imaging method for high-speed targets in short-range using an impulse radar. According to the requirements for high-speed target measurement in short-range, this paper establishes the single-input multiple-output (SIMO) antenna array, and further proposes a missile motion parameter estimation method based on impulse radar. By analyzing the motion geometry relationship of the warhead scattering center after transla...

  8. Fluctuating and Directional Asymmetry of the Blue Mussel (Mytilus edulis: Improving Methods of Morphological Analysis to Explore Species Performance at the Northern Border of Its Range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry Lajus

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work we examined morphological variation at different levels to study performance and population structuring of the blue mussel Mytilus edulis. Our objectives were: (i to develop an integrated technique for analyzing morphological variation in blue mussels and, based on this technique; (ii to perform a morphometric description of mussels from the northern part of their range; and (iii to verify the hypothesis that populations at the outer range of their distribution have reduced performance due to harsh climatic conditions. Means, directional asymmetry (i.e., systematic differences between left and right structures, fluctuating asymmetry (random deviations from perfect symmetry, a measure of developmental instability, factorial variation (difference between total variance and variance of fluctuating asymmetry, an indirect index of genotypic variation, and measurement error were examined for 14 bilateral characters of muscle scars on mussel shells. Also, we analyzed one non-bilateral character. For the first time directional asymmetry—approaching 13% of the right:left ratio—was described in blue mussels. Measurement error, often ignored in morphometric studies, contributed 26% of total variance. Accurately addressing these methodical challenges is key to further and improved ecological interpretations. Morphological differences were found between (i samples from estuarine areas in the White and Pechora Seas and (ii samples from Barents Sea areas with oceanic salinity. Samples from the first group exhibited lower fluctuating asymmetry, indicating higher developmental stability likely due to better feeding conditions and lower factorial variation, which may result from lower genotypic variation. Absence of correlation between fluctuating asymmetry and temperature suggests that low temperatures in the northern border of their range do not degrade the performance of adult blue mussels in this region.

  9. Direct-Imaging-Based Quantification of Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579 Population Heterogeneity at a Low Incubation Temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Besten, den H.M.W.; Garcia, D.; Moezelaar, R.; Zwietering, M.H.; Abee, T.

    2010-01-01

    Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579 was cultured in microcolonies on Anopore strips near its minimum growth temperature to directly image and quantify its population heterogeneity at an abusive refrigeration temperature. Eleven percent of the microcolonies failed to grow during low-temperature incubation,

  10. Computed radiography versus mobile direct radiography for bedside chest radiographs: impact of dose on image quality and reader agreement.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boo, D.W. De; Weber, M.; Deurloo, E.E.; Streekstra, G.J.; Freling, N.J.; Dongelmans, D.A.; Schaefer-Prokop, C.M.

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To asses the image quality and potential for dose reduction of mobile direct detector (DR) chest radiography as compared with computed radiography (CR) for intensive care unit (ICU) chest radiographs (CXR). METHODS AND MATERIALS: Three groups of age-, weight- and disease-matched ICU patients

  11. Long-range and depth-selective imaging of macroscopic targets using low-coherence and wide-field interferometry (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Sungsoo; Kang, Sungsam; Yoon, Changhyeong; Choi, Wonshik

    2016-03-01

    With the advancement of 3D display technology, 3D imaging of macroscopic objects has drawn much attention as they provide the contents to display. The most widely used imaging methods include a depth camera, which measures time of flight for the depth discrimination, and various structured illumination techniques. However, these existing methods have poor depth resolution, which makes imaging complicated structures a difficult task. In order to resolve this issue, we propose an imaging system based upon low-coherence interferometry and off-axis digital holographic imaging. By using light source with coherence length of 200 micro, we achieved the depth resolution of 100 micro. In order to map the macroscopic objects with this high axial resolution, we installed a pair of prisms in the reference beam path for the long-range scanning of the optical path length. Specifically, one prism was fixed in position, and the other prism was mounted on a translation stage and translated in parallel to the first prism. Due to the multiple internal reflections between the two prisms, the overall path length was elongated by a factor of 50. In this way, we could cover a depth range more than 1 meter. In addition, we employed multiple speckle illuminations and incoherent averaging of the acquired holographic images for reducing the specular reflections from the target surface. Using this newly developed system, we performed imaging targets with multiple different layers and demonstrated imaging targets hidden behind the scattering layers. The method was also applied to imaging targets located around the corner.

  12. UV-visible digital imaging of split injection in a Gasoline Direct Injection engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merola Simona Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ever tighter limits on pollutant emissions and the need to improve energy conversion efficiency have made the application of gasoline direct injection (GDI feasible for a much wider scale of spark ignition engines. Changing the way fuel is delivered to the engine has thus provided increased flexibility but also challenges, such as higher particulate emissions. Therefore, alternative injection control strategies need to be investigated in order to obtain optimum performance and reduced environmental impact. In this study, experiments were carried out on a single-cylinder GDI optical engine fuelled with commercial gasoline in lean-burn conditions. The single-cylinder was equipped with the head of a commercial turbocharged engine with similar geometrical specifications (bore, stroke, compression ratio and wall guided fuel injection. Optical accessibility was ensured through a conventional elongated hollow Bowditch piston and an optical crown, accommodating a fused-silica window. Experimental tests were performed at fixed engine speed and injection pressure, whereas the injection timing and the number of injections were adjusted to investigate their influence on combustion and emissions. UV-visible digital imaging was applied in order to follow the combustion process, from ignition to the late combustion phase. All the optical data were correlated with thermodynamic analysis and measurements of exhaust emissions. Split injection strategies (i.e. two injections per cycle with respect to single injection increased combustion efficiency and stability thanks to an improvement of fuel air mixing. As a consequence, significant reduction in soot formation and exhaust emission with acceptable penalty in terms of HC and NOx were measured.

  13. Daytime Variation of Shortwave Direct Radiative Forcing of Biomass Burning Aerosols from GOES-8 Imager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher, Sundar A.; Zhang, Jianglong

    2002-02-01

    Hourly Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-8 (GOES-8) imager data (1344-1944 UTC) from 20 July-31 August 1998 were used to study the daytime variation of shortwave direct radiative forcing (SWARF) of smoke aerosols over biomass burning regions in South America (4°-16°S, 51°-65°W). Vicarious calibration procedures were used to adjust the GOES visible channel reflectance values for the degradation in signal response. Using Mie theory and discrete ordinate radiative transfer (DISORT) calculations, smoke aerosol optical thickness (AOT) was estimated at 0.67 m. The GOES-retrieved AOT was then compared against ground-based AOT retrieved values. Using the retrieved GOES-8 AOT, a four-stream broadband radiative transfer model was used to compute shortwave fluxes for smoke aerosols at the top of the atmosphere (TOA). The daytime variation of smoke AOT and SWARF was examined for the study area. For selected days, the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) TOA shortwave (SW) fluxes are compared against the model-derived SW fluxes.Results of this study show that the GOES-derived AOT is in excellent agreement with Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET)-derived AOT values with linear correlation coefficient of 0.97. The TOA CERES-estimated SW fluxes compare well with the model-calculated SW fluxes with linear correlation coefficient of 0.94. For August 1998 the daytime diurnally averaged AOT and SWARF for the study area is 0.63 ± 0.39 and 45.8 ± 18.8 W m2, respectively. This is among the first studies to estimate the daytime diurnal variation of SWARF of smoke aerosols using satellite data.

  14. Direction-Specific Impairments in Cervical Range of Motion in Women with Chronic Neck Pain: Influence of Head Posture and Gravitationally Induced Torque.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Rudolfsson

    Full Text Available Cervical range of motion (ROM is commonly assessed in clinical practice and research. In a previous study we decomposed active cervical sagittal ROM into contributions from lower and upper levels of the cervical spine and found level- and direction-specific impairments in women with chronic non-specific neck pain. The present study aimed to validate these results and investigate if the specific impairments can be explained by the neutral posture (defining zero flexion/extension or a movement strategy to avoid large gravitationally induced torques on the cervical spine.Kinematics of the head and thorax was assessed in sitting during maximal sagittal cervical flexion/extension (high torque condition and maximal protraction (low torque condition in 120 women with chronic non-specific neck pain and 40 controls. We derived the lower and upper cervical angles, and the head centre of mass (HCM, from a 3-segment kinematic model. Neutral head posture was assessed using a standardized procedure.Previous findings of level- and direction-specific impairments in neck pain were confirmed. Neutral head posture was equal between groups and did not explain the direction-specific impairments. The relative magnitude of group difference in HCM migration did not differ between high and low torques conditions, lending no support for our hypothesis that impairments in sagittal ROM are due to torque avoidance behaviour.The direction- and level-specific impairments in cervical sagittal ROM can be generalised to the population of women with non-specific neck pain. Further research is necessary to clarify if torque avoidance behaviour can explain the impairments.

  15. PET/MR and SPECT/MR multimodal imaging constructs: Direct radiolabelling of silica shell iron oxide nanorods for use in liver imaging and potential for hyperthermia therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bignell, Haylay [University of Hull (United Kingdom)

    2015-05-18

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are used as T2 magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agents. Nanorods (NRs) offer an interesting alternative to the more widely used nanospheres as they have shown to offer enhanced T2 relaxivities. The combination of MRI with nuclear imaging modalities such as positron emission tomography (PET) or single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) increases the data available from a single diagnostic scan (e.g. quantification, multiple image overlay). Radiolabelling of SPIONs allows high sensitivity nanoparticle biodistribution data which can both aid in future construct design and be used directly for precise liver lesion imaging. In this work we report the synthesis and characterisation of silica shell iron oxide NRs functionalised with varying ratios of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and the tetraazamacrocyclic chelator, DO3A. Direct and facile radiolabelling of the constructs with the radioisotope gallium-68 (t1/2 = 68 min) proceeded with quantitative radiochemical yields in 15 min and no evidence of radioisotope dissociation was observed after 3 h in both serum and in competition with apo-transferrin. Interestingly, it was observed that neither the radiolabelling process nor stability in vitro or in vivo was compromised by the absence of the bifunctional chelating moiety. Consequently silica shell NRs with 100 % PEG coating were evaluated for potential use as SPECT/MR imaging agents; direct radiolabelling with technetium-99m (t1/2 = 6.02 h) proceeded with analogous radiochemical yields and stabilities. In vivo imaging studies showed rapid liver uptake with high T2 contrast, demonstrating the application of silica shell iron oxide NRs as bimodal PET/MR and SPECT/MR liver imaging agents. Preliminary magnetic hyperthermia evaluation indicates the potential future use of the constructs developed as multimodal theranostic agents.

  16. PET/MR Imaging in Head and Neck Cancer: Current Applications and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galgano, Samuel J; Marshall, Ryan V; Middlebrooks, Erik H; McConathy, Jonathan E; Bhambhvani, Pradeep

    2018-02-01

    Clinical PET/MR imaging is being implemented at institutions worldwide as part of the standard-of-care imaging for select oncology patients. This article focuses on oncologic applications of PET/MR imaging in cancers of the head and neck. Although current published literature is relatively sparse, the potential benefits of a hybrid modality of PET/MR imaging are discussed along with several possible areas of research. With the increasing number of PET/MR imaging scanners in clinical use and ongoing research, the role of PET/MR imaging in the management of head and neck cancer is likely to become more evident in the near future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Direct 4D parametric imaging for linearized models of reversibly binding PET tracers using generalized AB-EM reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmim, Arman; Zhou, Yun; Tang, Jing; Lu, Lijun; Sossi, Vesna; Wong, Dean F.

    2012-01-01

    Due to high noise levels in the voxel kinetics, development of reliable parametric imaging algorithms remains as one of most active areas in dynamic brain PET imaging, which in the vast majority of cases involves receptor/transporter studies with reversibly binding tracers. As such, the focus of this work has been to develop a novel direct 4D parametric image reconstruction scheme for such tracers. Based on a relative equilibrium (RE) graphical analysis formulation (Zhou et al., 2009b), we developed a closed-form 4D EM algorithm to directly reconstruct distribution volume (DV) parametric images within a plasma input model, as well as DV ratio (DVR) images within a reference tissue model scheme (wherein an initial reconstruction was used to estimate the reference tissue time-activity-curves). A particular challenge with the direct 4D EM formulation is that the intercept parameters in graphical (linearized) analysis of reversible tracers (e.g. Logan or RE analysis) are commonly negative (unlike for irreversible tracers; e.g. using Patlak analysis). Subsequently, we focused our attention on the AB-EM algorithm, derived by Byrne (1998) to allow inclusion of prior information about the lower (A) and upper (B) bounds for image values. We then generalized this algorithm to the 4D EM framework thus allowing negative intercept parameters. Furthermore, our 4D AB-EM algorithm incorporated, and emphasized the use of spatially varying lower bounds to achieve enhanced performance. As validation, the means of parameters estimated from 55 human 11C-raclopride dynamic PET studies were used for extensive simulations using a mathematical brain phantom. Images were reconstructed using conventional indirect as well as proposed direct parametric imaging methods. Noise vs. bias quantitative measurements were performed in various regions of the brain. Direct 4D EM reconstruction resulted in notable qualitative and quantitative accuracy improvements (over 35% noise reduction, with matched

  18. Direct 4D parametric imaging for linearized models of reversibly binding PET tracers using generalized AB-EM reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmim, Arman; Zhou, Yun; Tang, Jing; Lu, Lijun; Sossi, Vesna; Wong, Dean F.

    2012-02-01

    Due to high noise levels in the voxel kinetics, development of reliable parametric imaging algorithms remains one of most active areas in dynamic brain PET imaging, which in the vast majority of cases involves receptor/transporter studies with reversibly binding tracers. As such, the focus of this work has been to