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Sample records for randomly selected homes

  1. Psychotropic medication in a randomly selected group of citizens receiving residential or home care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Futtrup, Tina Bergmann; Helnæs, Ann Kathrine; Schultz, Hanne

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Treatment with one or more psychotropic medications (PMs), especially in the elderly, is associated with risk, and the effects of treatment are poorly validated. The aim of this article was to describe the use of PM in a population of citizens receiving either residential care or home...... care with focus on the prevalence of drug use, the combination of different PMs and doses in relation to current recommendations. METHODS: The medication lists of 214 citizens receiving residential care (122) and home care (92) were collected together with information on age, gender and residential...

  2. The Home Office and Random Allocation Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuttall, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    Describes the history of the random experiment in the Home Office in the United Kingdom and demonstrates that research and the conduct of research is not an altogether rational process and that fashion, personality, and politics play a role in research policy and methodology choice. (SLD)

  3. Blocked Randomization with Randomly Selected Block Sizes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimmy Efird

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available When planning a randomized clinical trial, careful consideration must be given to how participants are selected for various arms of a study. Selection and accidental bias may occur when participants are not assigned to study groups with equal probability. A simple random allocation scheme is a process by which each participant has equal likelihood of being assigned to treatment versus referent groups. However, by chance an unequal number of individuals may be assigned to each arm of the study and thus decrease the power to detect statistically significant differences between groups. Block randomization is a commonly used technique in clinical trial design to reduce bias and achieve balance in the allocation of participants to treatment arms, especially when the sample size is small. This method increases the probability that each arm will contain an equal number of individuals by sequencing participant assignments by block. Yet still, the allocation process may be predictable, for example, when the investigator is not blind and the block size is fixed. This paper provides an overview of blocked randomization and illustrates how to avoid selection bias by using random block sizes.

  4. Blocked randomization with randomly selected block sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efird, Jimmy

    2011-01-01

    When planning a randomized clinical trial, careful consideration must be given to how participants are selected for various arms of a study. Selection and accidental bias may occur when participants are not assigned to study groups with equal probability. A simple random allocation scheme is a process by which each participant has equal likelihood of being assigned to treatment versus referent groups. However, by chance an unequal number of individuals may be assigned to each arm of the study and thus decrease the power to detect statistically significant differences between groups. Block randomization is a commonly used technique in clinical trial design to reduce bias and achieve balance in the allocation of participants to treatment arms, especially when the sample size is small. This method increases the probability that each arm will contain an equal number of individuals by sequencing participant assignments by block. Yet still, the allocation process may be predictable, for example, when the investigator is not blind and the block size is fixed. This paper provides an overview of blocked randomization and illustrates how to avoid selection bias by using random block sizes.

  5. Adverse Selection in China's Home Mortgage Policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Cixiu

    2016-01-01

    The Chinese home buyers are liquidity constrained with limited access to refinance, dissatisfactory social insurance and high home prices. The government requires all borrowers to make a substantial down payment, normally 20% to 50% of the home price, depending on non-risk-related qualifications....... vulnerable to negative shocks. The model is estimated using individual mortgage data provided by a major commercial bank of southeast China. We then provide forecasts on long-run default probabilities, as well as quantitative evidence for future adverse selection....

  6. Randomized selection on the GPU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monroe, Laura Marie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wendelberger, Joanne R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Michalak, Sarah E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-13

    We implement here a fast and memory-sparing probabilistic top N selection algorithm on the GPU. To our knowledge, this is the first direct selection in the literature for the GPU. The algorithm proceeds via a probabilistic-guess-and-chcck process searching for the Nth element. It always gives a correct result and always terminates. The use of randomization reduces the amount of data that needs heavy processing, and so reduces the average time required for the algorithm. Probabilistic Las Vegas algorithms of this kind are a form of stochastic optimization and can be well suited to more general parallel processors with limited amounts of fast memory.

  7. Random selection of Borel sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernd Günther

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A theory of random Borel sets is presented, based on dyadic resolutions of compact metric spaces. The conditional expectation of the intersection of two independent random Borel sets is investigated. An example based on an embedding of Sierpinski’s universal curve into the space of Borel sets is given.

  8. Measure Guideline: Selecting Ventilation Systems for Existing Homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldrich, Robb [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2014-02-01

    This document addresses adding -or improving - mechanical ventilation systems to existing homes. The purpose of ventilation is to remove contaminants from homes, and this report discusses where, when, and how much ventilation is appropriate in a home, including some discussion of relevant codes and standards. Advantages, disadvantages, and approximate costs of various system types are presented along with general guidelines for implementing the systems in homes. CARB intends for this document to be useful to decision makers and contractors implementing ventilation systems in homes. Choosing the "best" system is not always straightforward; selecting a system involves balancing performance, efficiency, cost, required maintenance, and several other factors. It is the intent of this document to assist contractors in making more informed decisions when selecting systems. Ventilation is an integral part of a high-performance home. With more air-sealed envelopes, a mechanical means of removing contaminants is critical for indoor environmental quality and building durability.

  9. Measure Guideline: Selecting Ventilation Systems for Existing Homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldrich, R. [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), Norwalk, CT (United States)

    2014-02-01

    This report, developed by Building America research team CARB, addresses adding or improving mechanical ventilation systems to existing homes. The goal of this report is to assist decision makers and contractors in making informed decisions when selecting ventilation systems for homes. With more air-sealed envelopes, a mechanical means of removing contaminants is critical for indoor environmental quality and building durability. The purpose of ventilation is to remove contaminants from homes, and this report discusses where, when, and how much ventilation is appropriate in a home, including examination of relevant codes and standards. Choosing the "best" system is not always straightforward; selecting a system involves balancing performance, efficiency, cost, required maintenance, and several other factors.

  10. Species selection and random drift in macroevolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevin, Luis-Miguel

    2016-03-01

    Species selection resulting from trait-dependent speciation and extinction is increasingly recognized as an important mechanism of phenotypic macroevolution. However, the recent bloom in statistical methods quantifying this process faces a scarcity of dynamical theory for their interpretation, notably regarding the relative contributions of deterministic versus stochastic evolutionary forces. I use simple diffusion approximations of birth-death processes to investigate how the expected and random components of macroevolutionary change depend on phenotype-dependent speciation and extinction rates, as can be estimated empirically. I show that the species selection coefficient for a binary trait, and selection differential for a quantitative trait, depend not only on differences in net diversification rates (speciation minus extinction), but also on differences in species turnover rates (speciation plus extinction), especially in small clades. The randomness in speciation and extinction events also produces a species-level equivalent to random genetic drift, which is stronger for higher turnover rates. I then show how microevolutionary processes including mutation, organismic selection, and random genetic drift cause state transitions at the species level, allowing comparison of evolutionary forces across levels. A key parameter that would be needed to apply this theory is the distribution and rate of origination of new optimum phenotypes along a phylogeny. © 2016 The Author(s). Evolution © 2016 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  11. PRagmatic trial Of Video Education in Nursing homes: The design and rationale for a pragmatic cluster randomized trial in the nursing home setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mor, Vincent; Volandes, Angelo E; Gutman, Roee; Gatsonis, Constantine; Mitchell, Susan L

    2017-04-01

    Background/Aims Nursing homes are complex healthcare systems serving an increasingly sick population. Nursing homes must engage patients in advance care planning, but do so inconsistently. Video decision support tools improved advance care planning in small randomized controlled trials. Pragmatic trials are increasingly employed in health services research, although not commonly in the nursing home setting to which they are well-suited. This report presents the design and rationale for a pragmatic cluster randomized controlled trial that evaluated the "real world" application of an Advance Care Planning Video Program in two large US nursing home healthcare systems. Methods PRagmatic trial Of Video Education in Nursing homes was conducted in 360 nursing homes (N = 119 intervention/N = 241 control) owned by two healthcare systems. Over an 18-month implementation period, intervention facilities were instructed to offer the Advance Care Planning Video Program to all patients. Control facilities employed usual advance care planning practices. Patient characteristics and outcomes were ascertained from Medicare Claims, Minimum Data Set assessments, and facility electronic medical record data. Intervention adherence was measured using a Video Status Report embedded into electronic medical record systems. The primary outcome was the number of hospitalizations/person-day alive among long-stay patients with advanced dementia or cardiopulmonary disease. The rationale for the approaches to facility randomization and recruitment, intervention implementation, population selection, data acquisition, regulatory issues, and statistical analyses are discussed. Results The large number of well-characterized candidate facilities enabled several unique design features including stratification on historical hospitalization rates, randomization prior to recruitment, and 2:1 control to intervention facilities ratio. Strong endorsement from corporate leadership made randomization

  12. Improving randomness characterization through Bayesian model selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz Hernández Rojas, Rafael; Solís, Aldo; Angulo Martínez, Alí M; U'Ren, Alfred B; Hirsch, Jorge G; Marsili, Matteo; Pérez Castillo, Isaac

    2017-06-08

    Random number generation plays an essential role in technology with important applications in areas ranging from cryptography to Monte Carlo methods, and other probabilistic algorithms. All such applications require high-quality sources of random numbers, yet effective methods for assessing whether a source produce truly random sequences are still missing. Current methods either do not rely on a formal description of randomness (NIST test suite) on the one hand, or are inapplicable in principle (the characterization derived from the Algorithmic Theory of Information), on the other, for they require testing all the possible computer programs that could produce the sequence to be analysed. Here we present a rigorous method that overcomes these problems based on Bayesian model selection. We derive analytic expressions for a model's likelihood which is then used to compute its posterior distribution. Our method proves to be more rigorous than NIST's suite and Borel-Normality criterion and its implementation is straightforward. We applied our method to an experimental device based on the process of spontaneous parametric downconversion to confirm it behaves as a genuine quantum random number generator. As our approach relies on Bayesian inference our scheme transcends individual sequence analysis, leading to a characterization of the source itself.

  13. Microhabitat selection, demography, and correlates of home range size for the King Rail (Rallus elegans)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickens, Bradley A.; King, Sammy L.

    2013-01-01

    Animal movements and habitat selection within the home range, or microhabitat selection, can provide insights into habitat requirements, such as foraging and area requirements. The King Rail (Rallus elegans) is a wetland bird of high conservation concern in the United States, but little is known about its movements, habitats, or demography. King Rails (n = 34) were captured during the 2010–2011 breeding seasons in the coastal marshes of southwest Louisiana and southeast Texas. Radio telemetry and direct habitat surveys of King Rail locations were conducted to estimate home ranges and microhabitat selection. Within home ranges, King Rails selected for greater plant species richness and comparatively greater coverage of Phragmites australis, Typha spp., and Schoenoplectus robustus. King Rails were found closer to open water compared to random locations placed 50 m from King Rail locations. Home ranges (n = 22) varied from 0.8–32.8 ha and differed greatly among sites. Home range size did not vary by year or sex; however, increased open water, with a maximum of 29% observed in the study, was correlated with smaller home ranges. Breeding season cumulative survivorship was 89% ± 22% in 2010 and 61% ± 43% in 2011, which coincided with a drought. With an equal search effort, King Rail chicks and juveniles observed in May-June decreased from 110 in 2010 to only 16 in the drier year of 2011. The findings show King Rail used marsh with ≤ 29% open water and had smaller home ranges when open water was more abundant.

  14. 32 CFR 1624.1 - Random selection procedures for induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Random selection procedures for induction. 1624... SYSTEM INDUCTIONS § 1624.1 Random selection procedures for induction. (a) The Director of Selective Service shall from time to time establish a random selection sequence for induction by a drawing to be...

  15. A randomized controlled trial of home tooth-whitening products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Edward C M; Wong, Anthony H H; McGrath, Colman

    2007-10-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of two marketed home tooth-whitening products. A randomized controlled clinical trial involving 87 adults who were randomly allocated into one of three groups: (1) 6% hydrogen peroxide whitening strips, (2) 18% carbamide peroxide whitening gel, and (3) a placebo (fluoride toothpaste) control group. Subjects were instructed individually and then used the given product daily for 2 consecutive weeks. Color was determined in brightness (L*), yellowness (b*) and redness (a*) [color space] at baseline and 8 weeks after dispensing the product by employing a high resolution digital camera (Fuji HC1000 CCD) to image the subject's anterior maxillary teeth under standard polarized lighting conditions. The subjects also completed a questionnaire on self-satisfaction with the treatment outcome. One-way ANOVA (Bonferroni test) demonstrated significant differences in color between the three groups with changes in brightness (L*, Pwhitening strips. Subjects in the whitening strip group also rated that product significantly (P whitening satisfaction and overall impression while there is no significant difference between the whitening gel and the placebo groups.

  16. cluster randomIzed trIal of the uptake of a take-home Infant dose of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-07-07

    Jul 7, 2010 ... cluster randomIzed trIal of the uptake of a take-home Infant dose of nevIrapIne In kenya. H. W. ReynOldS, O. GACHunO, J. kAyITA, m. A. HAyS and J. RAkWAR, abstract. Objective: to test whether a single take home dose of infant nevirapine increased infant uptake without decreasing institutional deliveries.

  17. Home visits reduce the number of hazards for childhood home injuries in Karachi, Pakistan: a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Rehmani, Rifat; LeBlanc, John C

    2010-01-01

    Background Although unintentional injuries are major causes of morbidity and mortality in less developed countries, they have received scant attention, and injury prevention policies and programs have just begun to be addressed systemically. Aims To reduce hazards associated with home injuries due to falls and ingestions through an injury prevention program administered by home visitors. Methods Non-blinded randomized controlled trial design of two interventions where one branch of the study ...

  18. Multidisciplinary nutritional support for undernutrition in nursing home and home-care: A cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Anne Marie; Christensen, Annette Gøgsig; Hansen, Birthe Stenbæk; Damsbo-Svendsen, Signe; Møller, Tina Kreinfeldt Skovgaard

    2016-02-01

    To assess the effect of multidisciplinary nutritional support for undernutrition in older adults in nursing home and home-care identified with the validated Eating Validation Scheme (EVS). An 11 wk cluster randomized trial with a home-care (3 clusters) or nursing home (3 clusters) setting as the unit of randomization. Before starting the study, a train-the-trainer course was performed to educate the nutrition coordinators. In addition to the nutrition coordinator, the participants assigned to the intervention group strategy received multidisciplinary nutrition support. Focus was on treatment of the potentially modifiable nutritional risk factors identified with the EVS, by involving the physiotherapist, registered dietitian, and occupational therapist, as relevant and independent of the municipality's ordinary assessment and referral system. Outcome parameters were quality of life (by means of EuroQol-5D-3L), physical performance (30-seconds chair stand), nutritional status (weight and hand-grip strength), oral care, fall incidents, hospital admissions, rehabilitation stay, moving to nursing homes (participants from home-care), and mortality. Respectively, 55 (46 from 2 home-care clusters) and 40 (18 from 1 home-care cluster) were identified with the EVS and comprised the intervention and control group. A difference after 11 wk in quality of life (0.758 [0.222] versus 0.534 [0.355], P = 0.001), 30-seconds chair stand (47% versus 17% improved, P = 0.005) and oral care (1.1 [0.3] versus 1.3 [0.5], P = 0.021) was observed. There was a almost significant difference in mortality (2% versus 13%, P = 0.079). Multidisciplinary nutritional support in older adults in nursing home and home-care could have a positive effect on quality of life, muscle strength, and oral care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The first multicenter, randomized, controlled trial of home telemonitoring for Japanese patients with heart failure: home telemonitoring study for patients with heart failure (HOMES-HF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotooka, Norihiko; Kitakaze, Masafumi; Nagashima, Kengo; Asaka, Machiko; Kinugasa, Yoshiharu; Nochioka, Kotaro; Mizuno, Atsushi; Nagatomo, Daisuke; Mine, Daigo; Yamada, Yoko; Kuratomi, Akiko; Okada, Norihiro; Fujimatsu, Daisuke; Kuwahata, So; Toyoda, Shigeru; Hirotani, Shin-Ichi; Komori, Takahiro; Eguchi, Kazuo; Kario, Kazuomi; Inomata, Takayuki; Sugi, Kaoru; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki; Masuyama, Tohru; Shimokawa, Hiroaki; Momomura, Shin-Ichi; Seino, Yoshihiko; Sato, Yasunori; Inoue, Teruo; Node, Koichi

    2018-02-15

    Home telemonitoring is becoming more important to home medical care for patients with heart failure. Since there are no data on home telemonitoring for Japanese patients with heart failure, we investigated its effect on cardiovascular outcomes. The HOMES-HF study was the first multicenter, open-label, randomized, controlled trial (RCT) to elucidate the effectiveness of home telemonitoring of physiological data, such as body weight, blood pressure, and pulse rate, for Japanese patients with heart failure (UMIN Clinical Trials Registry 000006839). The primary end-point was a composite of all-cause death or rehospitalization due to worsening heart failure. We analyzed 181 recently hospitalized patients with heart failure who were randomly assigned to a telemonitoring group (n = 90) or a usual care group (n = 91). The mean follow-up period was 15 (range 0-31) months. There was no statistically significant difference in the primary end-point between groups [hazard ratio (HR), 0.95; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.548-1.648; p = 0.572]. Home telemonitoring for Japanese patients with heart failure was feasible; however, beneficial effects in addition to those of usual care were not demonstrated. Further investigation of more patients with severe heart failure, participation of home medical care providers, and use of a more integrated home telemonitoring system emphasizing communication as well as monitoring of symptoms and physiological data are required.

  20. Paraprofessional home visitation program to prevent childhood unintentional injuries in low-income communities: a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swart, L; van Niekerk, A; Seedat, M; Jordaan, E

    2008-06-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of a paraprofessional home visitation program (HVP) to improve home safety and prevent injuries among children living in low-income settings. The HVP was implemented in two low-income communities in South Africa. In each community, approximately 200 households were randomly selected for the trial. Eligible households were those with children aged < or = 10 years. Intervention households received four visits, one every two weeks, by trained paraprofessionals that focused on a specific injury topic and consisted of: information dissemination about specific injury prevention practices; home inspection accompanied by information about home hazards; and the supply of safety devices. The key outcomes to measure the presence of home hazards were scores for burns (safety practices, paraffin, and electrical), poisoning, and falls. Significant reductions were found for injury risks related to burn safety practices. For injury risks related to electrical burns, paraffin burns, and poisoning, a decline was also noted although this was not statistically significant. No decline was noted for fall-related risks. Subject to further replication and evaluation, home visits by paraprofessionals providing safety education, home inspection, and safety devices be considered for integration into a comprehensive child injury prevention strategy in low-income communities.

  1. Results of artificial insemination at home by the partner with cryopreserved donor semen: a randomized study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogerzeil, H. V.; Hamerlynck, J. V.; van Amstel, N.; Nagelkerke, N. J.; Lammes, F. B.

    1988-01-01

    The use of cryopreserved semen offers the possibility of home insemination by the instructed partner. A comparative study was designed whereby participants were randomly allocated to use home or clinic insemination for six cycles. If no pregnancy had occurred after six cycles, the site of

  2. Randomized Controlled Trial of Problem-Solving Therapy for Minor Depression in Home Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellis, Zvi D.; McGinty, Jean; Tierney, Lynda; Jordan, Cindy; Burton, Jean; Misener, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Data are presented from a pilot research program initiated to develop, refine, and test the outcomes of problem-solving therapy that targets the needs of older adults with minor depression in home care settings. Method: A pilot randomized clinical trial compares the impact of problem-solving therapy for home care to treatment as usual…

  3. Home-Based Versus Laboratory-Based Robotic Ankle Training for Children With Cerebral Palsy: A Pilot Randomized Comparative Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kai; Wu, Yi-Ning; Ren, Yupeng; Liu, Lin; Gaebler-Spira, Deborah; Tankard, Kelly; Lee, Julia; Song, Weiqun; Wang, Maobin; Zhang, Li-Qun

    2016-08-01

    To examine the outcomes of home-based robot-guided therapy and compare it to laboratory-based robot-guided therapy for the treatment of impaired ankles in children with cerebral palsy. A randomized comparative trial design comparing a home-based training group and a laboratory-based training group. Home versus laboratory within a research hospital. Children (N=41) with cerebral palsy who were at Gross Motor Function Classification System level I, II, or III were randomly assigned to 2 groups. Children in home-based and laboratory-based groups were 8.7±2.8 (n=23) and 10.7±6.0 (n=18) years old, respectively. Six-week combined passive stretching and active movement intervention of impaired ankle in a laboratory or home environment using a portable rehabilitation robot. Active dorsiflexion range of motion (as the primary outcome), mobility (6-minute walk test and timed Up and Go test), balance (Pediatric Balance Scale), Selective Motor Control Assessment of the Lower Extremity, Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) for spasticity, passive range of motion (PROM), strength, and joint stiffness. Significant improvements were found for the home-based group in all biomechanical outcome measures except for PROM and all clinical outcome measures except the MAS. The laboratory-based group also showed significant improvements in all the biomechanical outcome measures and all clinical outcome measures except the MAS. There were no significant differences in the outcome measures between the 2 groups. These findings suggest that the translation of repetitive, goal-directed, biofeedback training through motivating games from the laboratory to the home environment is feasible. The benefits of home-based robot-guided therapy were similar to those of laboratory-based robot-guided therapy. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Assessment of pharmaceutical waste management at selected hospitals and homes in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasu, Samuel; Kümmerer, Klaus; Kranert, Martin

    2012-06-01

    The practice of use and disposal of waste from pharmaceuticals compromises the safety of the environment as well as representing a serious health risk, as they may accumulate and stay active for a long time in the aquatic environment. This article therefore presents the outcome of a study on pharmaceutical waste management practices at homes and hospitals in Ghana. The study was conducted at five healthcare institutions randomly selected in Ghana, namely two teaching hospitals (hospital A, hospital B), one regional hospital (hospital C), one district hospital (hospital D) and one quasi-governmental hospital (hospital E). Apart from hospital E which currently has a pharmaceutical waste separation programmr as well as drug return programme called DUMP (Disposal of Unused Medicines Program), all other hospitals visited do not have any separate collection and disposal programme for pharmaceutical waste. A survey was also carried out among the general public, involving the questioning of randomly selected participants in order to investigate the household disposal of unused and expired pharmaceuticals. The results from the survey showed that more than half of the respondents confirmed having unused, left-over or expired medicines at home and over 75% disposed of pharmaceutical waste through the normal waste bins which end up in the landfills or dump sites.

  5. Hospital-Level Care at Home for Acutely Ill Adults: a Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, David M; Ouchi, Kei; Blanchfield, Bonnie; Diamond, Keren; Licurse, Adam; Pu, Charles T; Schnipper, Jeffrey L

    2018-02-06

    Hospitals are standard of care for acute illness, but hospitals can be unsafe, uncomfortable, and expensive. Providing substitutive hospital-level care in a patient's home potentially reduces cost while maintaining or improving quality, safety, and patient experience, although evidence from randomized controlled trials in the US is lacking. Determine if home hospital care reduces cost while maintaining quality, safety, and patient experience. Randomized controlled trial. Adults admitted via the emergency department with any infection or exacerbation of heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or asthma. Home hospital care, including nurse and physician home visits, intravenous medications, continuous monitoring, video communication, and point-of-care testing. Primary outcome was direct cost of the acute care episode. Secondary outcomes included utilization, 30-day cost, physical activity, and patient experience. Nine patients were randomized to home, 11 to usual care. Median direct cost of the acute care episode for home patients was 52% (IQR, 28%; p = 0.05) lower than for control patients. During the care episode, home patients had fewer laboratory orders (median per admission: 6 vs. 19; p Home patients were more physically active (median minutes, 209 vs. 78; p home patients, one occurred in control patients. Median direct cost for the acute care plus 30-day post-discharge period for home patients was 67% (IQR, 77%; p home-care services (22% vs. 55%; p = 0.08) and fewer readmissions (11% vs. 36%; p = 0.32). Patient experience was similar in both groups. The use of substitutive home-hospitalization compared to in-hospital usual care reduced cost and utilization and improved physical activity. No significant differences in quality, safety, and patient experience were noted, with more definitive results awaiting a larger trial. Trial Registration NCT02864420.

  6. Home range, den selection and habitat use of Carolina northern flying squirrels (Glaucomys sabrinus coloratus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diggins, Corinne A.; Silvis, Alexander; Kelly, Christine A.; Ford, W. Mark

    2017-01-01

    Context: Understanding habitat selection is important for determining conservation and management strategies for endangered species. The Carolina northern flying squirrel (CNFS; Glaucomys sabrinus coloratus) is an endangered subspecies found in the high-elevation montane forests of the southern Appalachians, USA. The primary use of nest boxes to monitor CNFS has provided biased information on habitat use for this subspecies, as nest boxes are typically placed in suitable denning habitat.Aims: We conducted a radio-telemetry study on CNFS to determine home range, den site selection and habitat use at multiple spatial scales.Methods: We radio-collared 21 CNFS in 2012 and 2014–15. We tracked squirrels to diurnal den sites and during night-time activity.Key results: The MCP (minimum convex polygon) home range at 95% for males was 5.2 ± 1.2 ha and for females was 4.0 ± 0.7. The BRB (biased random bridge) home range at 95% for males was 10.8 ± 3.8 ha and for females was 8.3 ± 2.1. Den site (n = 81) selection occurred more frequently in montane conifer dominate forests (81.4%) vs northern hardwood forests or conifer–northern hardwood forests (9.9% and 8.7%, respectively). We assessed habitat selection using Euclidean distance-based analysis at the 2nd order and 3rd order scale. We found that squirrels were non-randomly selecting for habitat at both 2nd and 3rd order scales.Conclusions: At both spatial scales, CNFS preferentially selected for montane conifer forests more than expected based on availability on the landscape. Squirrels selected neither for nor against northern hardwood forests, regardless of availability on the landscape. Additionally, CNFS denned in montane conifer forests more than other habitat types.Implications: Our results highlight the importance of montane conifer to CNFS in the southern Appalachians. Management and restoration activities that increase the quality, connectivity and extent of this naturally rare forest type may be

  7. Using ArcMap, Google Earth, and Global Positioning Systems to select and locate random households in rural Haiti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wampler Peter J

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A remote sensing technique was developed which combines a Geographic Information System (GIS; Google Earth, and Microsoft Excel to identify home locations for a random sample of households in rural Haiti. The method was used to select homes for ethnographic and water quality research in a region of rural Haiti located within 9 km of a local hospital and source of health education in Deschapelles, Haiti. The technique does not require access to governmental records or ground based surveys to collect household location data and can be performed in a rapid, cost-effective manner. Methods The random selection of households and the location of these households during field surveys were accomplished using GIS, Google Earth, Microsoft Excel, and handheld Garmin GPSmap 76CSx GPS units. Homes were identified and mapped in Google Earth, exported to ArcMap 10.0, and a random list of homes was generated using Microsoft Excel which was then loaded onto handheld GPS units for field location. The development and use of a remote sensing method was essential to the selection and location of random households. Results A total of 537 homes initially were mapped and a randomized subset of 96 was identified as potential survey locations. Over 96% of the homes mapped using Google Earth imagery were correctly identified as occupied dwellings. Only 3.6% of the occupants of mapped homes visited declined to be interviewed. 16.4% of the homes visited were not occupied at the time of the visit due to work away from the home or market days. A total of 55 households were located using this method during the 10 days of fieldwork in May and June of 2012. Conclusions The method used to generate and field locate random homes for surveys and water sampling was an effective means of selecting random households in a rural environment lacking geolocation infrastructure. The success rate for locating households using a handheld GPS was excellent and only

  8. Using ArcMap, Google Earth, and Global Positioning Systems to select and locate random households in rural Haiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wampler, Peter J; Rediske, Richard R; Molla, Azizur R

    2013-01-18

    A remote sensing technique was developed which combines a Geographic Information System (GIS); Google Earth, and Microsoft Excel to identify home locations for a random sample of households in rural Haiti. The method was used to select homes for ethnographic and water quality research in a region of rural Haiti located within 9 km of a local hospital and source of health education in Deschapelles, Haiti. The technique does not require access to governmental records or ground based surveys to collect household location data and can be performed in a rapid, cost-effective manner. The random selection of households and the location of these households during field surveys were accomplished using GIS, Google Earth, Microsoft Excel, and handheld Garmin GPSmap 76CSx GPS units. Homes were identified and mapped in Google Earth, exported to ArcMap 10.0, and a random list of homes was generated using Microsoft Excel which was then loaded onto handheld GPS units for field location. The development and use of a remote sensing method was essential to the selection and location of random households. A total of 537 homes initially were mapped and a randomized subset of 96 was identified as potential survey locations. Over 96% of the homes mapped using Google Earth imagery were correctly identified as occupied dwellings. Only 3.6% of the occupants of mapped homes visited declined to be interviewed. 16.4% of the homes visited were not occupied at the time of the visit due to work away from the home or market days. A total of 55 households were located using this method during the 10 days of fieldwork in May and June of 2012. The method used to generate and field locate random homes for surveys and water sampling was an effective means of selecting random households in a rural environment lacking geolocation infrastructure. The success rate for locating households using a handheld GPS was excellent and only rarely was local knowledge required to identify and locate households. This

  9. Linking seasonal home range size with habitat selection and movement in a mountain ungulate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana, Duarte S; Granados, José Enrique; Fandos, Paulino; Pérez, Jesús M; Cano-Manuel, Francisco Javier; Burón, Daniel; Fandos, Guillermo; Aguado, María Ángeles Párraga; Figuerola, Jordi; Soriguer, Ramón C

    2018-01-01

    Space use by animals is determined by the interplay between movement and the environment, and is thus mediated by habitat selection, biotic interactions and intrinsic factors of moving individuals. These processes ultimately determine home range size, but their relative contributions and dynamic nature remain less explored. We investigated the role of habitat selection, movement unrelated to habitat selection and intrinsic factors related to sex in driving space use and home range size in Iberian ibex, Capra pyrenaica . We used GPS collars to track ibex across the year in two different geographical areas of Sierra Nevada, Spain, and measured habitat variables related to forage and roost availability. By using integrated step selection analysis (iSSA), we show that habitat selection was important to explain space use by ibex. As a consequence, movement was constrained by habitat selection, as observed displacement rate was shorter than expected under null selection. Selection-independent movement, selection strength and resource availability were important drivers of seasonal home range size. Both displacement rate and directional persistence had a positive relationship with home range size while accounting for habitat selection, suggesting that individual characteristics and state may also affect home range size. Ibex living at higher altitudes, where resource availability shows stronger altitudinal gradients across the year, had larger home ranges. Home range size was larger in spring and autumn, when ibex ascend and descend back, and smaller in summer and winter, when resources are more stable. Therefore, home range size decreased with resource availability. Finally, males had larger home ranges than females, which might be explained by differences in body size and reproductive behaviour. Movement, selection strength, resource availability and intrinsic factors related to sex determined home range size of Iberian ibex. Our results highlight the need to integrate

  10. In-Place Randomized Slope Selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blunck, Henrik; Vahrenhold, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Slope selection is a well-known algorithmic tool used in the context of computing robust estimators for fitting a line to a collection P of n points in the plane. We demonstrate that it is possible to perform slope selection in expected O(nlogn) time using only constant extra space in addition to...

  11. Random effect selection in generalised linear models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Denwood, Matt; Houe, Hans; Forkman, Björn

    We analysed abattoir recordings of meat inspection codes with possible relevance to onfarm animal welfare in cattle. Random effects logistic regression models were used to describe individual-level data obtained from 461,406 cattle slaughtered in Denmark. Our results demonstrate that the largest ...

  12. iPad technology for home rehabilitation after stroke (iHOME): a proof-of-concept randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saposnik, Gustavo; Chow, Chi-Ming; Gladstone, David; Cheung, Donna; Brawer, Edward; Thorpe, Kevin E; Saldanha, Avon; Dang, Alice; Bayley, Mark; Schweizer, Tom A

    2014-10-01

    Tablets are a novel line of computers controlled by a multitouch screen. Fine motor movements are captured on the tablet computer through electrical fields and can be qualitatively and quantitatively assessed. Evidence is limited on tablet use for stroke rehabilitation. iHOME is an investigator-initiated randomized controlled pilot trial with a single-blinded outcome assessment. The intervention consists of iPad use (investigational group) vs. usual care (control group) among patients receiving conventional outpatient rehabilitation. Eligibility includes aged 18-85 years who experienced a mild ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke (as diagnosed on neuroimaging and determined by the Chedoke-McMaster score ≥3. The STROKE REHAB® software for the iPad was specifically designed for patients with fine motor weakness and/or neglect. Of the total 30 patients, 20 will be in iHOME Acute (enrolled within three-months of stroke onset) and 10 patients in iHOME Chronic (enrolled more than six-months from onset). The primary feasibility outcome is the proportion of the scheduled iPad time used (more than 70% (≥140 mins) of the total 'dose' of intervention intended will be considered successful). Efficacy in fine motor movements will be assessed using the nine-hole peg test; time to magnify and pop the balloons in the iPad software application, and improvement in Wolf Motor Function Test. iHOME is a randomized controlled trial assessing the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of tablet technology for home use in stroke rehabilitation. The results of this study will serve as the basis for a larger multicenter trial. © 2014 World Stroke Organization.

  13. Preventive home visits to older people in Denmark: methodology of a randomized controlled study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vass, Mikkel; Avlund, Kirsten; Hendriksen, Carsten

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Preventive home visits were introduced by legislation in Denmark in 1998. This ongoing randomized controlled intervention study introduces a model where preventive home visits to elderly people are carried out in a standardized way, focusing on early signs of disability...... a preventive program completely on their own. RESULTS: Baseline characteristics were similar in the intervention and control communities with regard to size, rural and urban characteristics and geriatric services, and the individual characteristics of participating persons living in these communities were also...... comparable. The intervention was well accepted and feasible. CONCLUSIONS: When results become available, the study should reveal the most important factors for preventive home visits to elderly people....

  14. Home or office etonogestrel implant insertion after pregnancy: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhm, Suji; Pope, Rachel; Schmidt, Amy; Bazella, Corinne; Perriera, Lisa

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate whether home visits for contraceptive implant insertion result in an increase in postpartum uptake compared to clinic insertion and to assess the feasibility of home insertions. We randomized women within 10 weeks of a birth or dilation and curettage (D&C) for abortion or miscarriage to home or standard office insertion. The primary outcome was successful insertion of the implant. To achieve 80% power to detect a 40% difference in visit attendance, 20 women were assigned to each group. The secondary outcome was attendance of the 4-week postpartum visit. From June 2013 through February 2014, we screened 45 women and 40 were randomly assigned to home and office insertion visits. We enrolled 37 postpartum women and 3 women post-D&C. Because of the significant under enrollment of the latter, we chose to report results of only the postpartum women. The results were similar whether we included or excluded post-abortion women. A majority of women desired a home visit for their implant insertion appointment at time of enrollment. Postpartum appointment attendance rates were similar between home and office visits at 53% and 50% (p=1.00), respectively. Home visits resulted in a trend toward increased implant uptake [12/19 (63%) vs 6/18 (33%), p=.10]. Home insertion of the contraceptive implant may be a feasible option. Future studies that examine the feasibility and uptake in both postpartum and post-D&C women are warranted. Women reported preference for home insertion visits in this pilot study. We also showed that a greater proportion of women received the etonogestrel implant at a home visit compared to the current standard of care, which may warrant larger studies that would have sufficient power to evaluate smaller differences. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Cultivating teacher mindfulness: Effects of a randomized controlled trial on work, home, and sleep outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crain, Tori L; Schonert-Reichl, Kimberly A; Roeser, Robert W

    2017-04-01

    The effects of randomization to a workplace mindfulness training (WMT) or a waitlist control condition on teachers' well-being (moods and satisfaction at work and home), quantity of sleep, quality of sleep, and sleepiness during the day were examined in 2 randomized, waitlist controlled trials (RCTs). The combined sample of the 2 RCTs, conducted in Canada and the United States, included 113 elementary and secondary school teachers (89% female). Measures were collected at baseline, postprogram, and 3-month follow-up; teachers were randomly assigned to condition after baseline assessment. Results showed that teachers randomized to WMT reported less frequent bad moods at work and home, greater satisfaction at work and home, more sleep on weekday nights, better quality sleep, and decreased insomnia symptoms and daytime sleepiness. Training-related group differences in mindfulness and rumination on work at home at postprogram partially mediated the reductions in negative moods at home and increases in sleep quality at follow-up. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. Sequential selection of random vectors under a sum constraint

    OpenAIRE

    Stanke, Mario

    2004-01-01

    We observe a sequence X1,X2,...,Xn of independent and identically distributed coordinatewise nonnegative d-dimensional random vectors. When a vector is observed it can either be selected or rejected but once made this decision is final. In each coordinate the sum of the selected vectors must not exceed a given constant. The problem is to find a selection policy that maximizes the expected number of selected vectors. For a general absolutely continuous distribution of t...

  17. Cluster Randomized Trail of the uptake of a take-home Infant dose ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To test whether a single take home dose of infant nevirapine increased infant uptake without decreasing institutional deliveries. Design: Cluster randomized post-test only study with control group. Setting: Ten hospitals in urban areas of Coast, Rift Valley, and Western provinces, Kenya. Participants: Pregnant ...

  18. Occupational Therapy Home Program for Children with Intellectual Disabilities: A Randomized, Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuang, Yee-Pay; Ho, Guang-Sheng; Su, Chwen-Yng

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of a proposed occupational therapy home program (OTHP) for children with intellectual disabilities (ID). Children with ID were randomly and equally assigned to OTHP or to no OTHP groups. The primary outcome measures were Canadian Occupational Performance, Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor…

  19. Behavioral and pharmacological evaluation of a selectively bred mouse model of home cage hyperactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majdak, Petra; Bucko, Paula J.; Holloway, Ashley L.; Bhattacharya, Tushar K.; DeYoung, Erin K.; Kilby, Chessa N.; Zombeck, Jonathan A.; Rhodes, Justin S.

    2014-01-01

    Daily levels of physical activity vary greatly across individuals and are strongly influenced by genetic background. While moderate levels of physical activity are associated with improved physical and mental health, extremely high levels of physical activity are associated with behavioral disorders such as Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). However, the genetic and neurobiological mechanisms relating hyperactivity to ADHD or other behavioral disorders remain unclear. Therefore, we conducted a selective breeding experiment for increased home cage activity starting with a highly genetically variable population of house mice and evaluated the line for correlated responses in other relevant phenotypes. Here we report results through Generation 10. Relative to the Control line, the High-Active line traveled approximately 4 times as far in the home cage (on days 5 and 6 of a 6-day test), displayed reduced body mass at maturity, reduced reproductive success, increased wheel running and open field behavior, decreased performance on the rotarod, decreased performance on the Morris water maze that was not rescued by acute administration of d-amphetamine, reduced hyperactivity from chronically administered low clinical doses of d-amphetamine, and increased numbers of new cells and neuronal activation of the dentate gyrus. Standardized phenotypic differences between the lines were compared to estimates expected from genetic drift to evaluate whether the line differences could have resulted from random effects as opposed to correlated responses to selection. Results indicated line differences in body mass and locomotor responses to low doses of amphetamine were more likely due to selection than drift. The efficacy of low doses of d-amphetamine in ameliorating hyperactivity support the High-Active line as a useful model for exploring the etiology of hyperactivity-associated comorbid behavioral disorders. PMID:25108455

  20. Study protocol: home-based telehealth stroke care: a randomized trial for veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chumbler, Neale R; Rose, Dorian K; Griffiths, Patricia; Quigley, Patricia; McGee-Hernandez, Nancy; Carlson, Katherine A; Vandenberg, Phyllis; Morey, Miriam C; Sanford, Jon; Hoenig, Helen

    2010-06-30

    Stroke is one of the most disabling and costly impairments of adulthood in the United States. Stroke patients clearly benefit from intensive inpatient care, but due to the high cost, there is considerable interest in implementing interventions to reduce hospital lengths of stay. Early discharge rehabilitation programs require coordinated, well-organized home-based rehabilitation, yet lack of sufficient information about the home setting impedes successful rehabilitation. This trial examines a multifaceted telerehabilitation (TR) intervention that uses telehealth technology to simultaneously evaluate the home environment, assess the patient's mobility skills, initiate rehabilitative treatment, prescribe exercises tailored for stroke patients and provide periodic goal oriented reassessment, feedback and encouragement. We describe an ongoing Phase II, 2-arm, 3-site randomized controlled trial (RCT) that determines primarily the effect of TR on physical function and secondarily the effect on disability, falls-related self-efficacy, and patient satisfaction. Fifty participants with a diagnosis of ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke will be randomly assigned to one of two groups: (a) TR; or (b) Usual Care. The TR intervention uses a combination of three videotaped visits and five telephone calls, an in-home messaging device, and additional telephonic contact as needed over a 3-month study period, to provide a progressive rehabilitative intervention with a treatment goal of safe functional mobility of the individual within an accessible home environment. Dependent variables will be measured at baseline, 3-, and 6-months and analyzed with a linear mixed-effects model across all time points. For patients recovering from stroke, the use of TR to provide home assessments and follow-up training in prescribed equipment has the potential to effectively supplement existing home health services, assist transition to home and increase efficiency. This may be particularly relevant when

  1. Study protocol: home-based telehealth stroke care: a randomized trial for veterans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGee-Hernandez Nancy

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stroke is one of the most disabling and costly impairments of adulthood in the United States. Stroke patients clearly benefit from intensive inpatient care, but due to the high cost, there is considerable interest in implementing interventions to reduce hospital lengths of stay. Early discharge rehabilitation programs require coordinated, well-organized home-based rehabilitation, yet lack of sufficient information about the home setting impedes successful rehabilitation. This trial examines a multifaceted telerehabilitation (TR intervention that uses telehealth technology to simultaneously evaluate the home environment, assess the patient's mobility skills, initiate rehabilitative treatment, prescribe exercises tailored for stroke patients and provide periodic goal oriented reassessment, feedback and encouragement. Methods We describe an ongoing Phase II, 2-arm, 3-site randomized controlled trial (RCT that determines primarily the effect of TR on physical function and secondarily the effect on disability, falls-related self-efficacy, and patient satisfaction. Fifty participants with a diagnosis of ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke will be randomly assigned to one of two groups: (a TR; or (b Usual Care. The TR intervention uses a combination of three videotaped visits and five telephone calls, an in-home messaging device, and additional telephonic contact as needed over a 3-month study period, to provide a progressive rehabilitative intervention with a treatment goal of safe functional mobility of the individual within an accessible home environment. Dependent variables will be measured at baseline, 3-, and 6-months and analyzed with a linear mixed-effects model across all time points. Discussion For patients recovering from stroke, the use of TR to provide home assessments and follow-up training in prescribed equipment has the potential to effectively supplement existing home health services, assist transition to home and

  2. How predictability of feeding patches affects home range and foraging habitat selection in avian social scavengers?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Monsarrat

    Full Text Available Feeding stations are commonly used to sustain conservation programs of scavengers but their impact on behaviour is still debated. They increase the temporal and spatial predictability of food resources while scavengers have supposedly evolved to search for unpredictable resources. In the Grands Causses (France, a reintroduced population of Griffon vultures Gyps fulvus can find carcasses at three types of sites: 1. "light feeding stations", where farmers can drop carcasses at their farm (spatially predictable, 2. "heavy feeding stations", where carcasses from nearby farms are concentrated (spatially and temporally predictable and 3. open grasslands, where resources are randomly distributed (unpredictable. The impact of feeding stations on vulture's foraging behaviour was investigated using 28 GPS-tracked vultures. The average home range size was maximal in spring (1272 ± 752 km(2 and minimal in winter (473 ± 237 km(2 and was highly variable among individuals. Analyses of home range characteristics and feeding habitat selection via compositional analysis showed that feeding stations were always preferred compared to the rest of the habitat where vultures can find unpredictable resources. Feeding stations were particularly used when resources were scarce (summer or when flight conditions were poor (winter, limiting long-ranging movements. However, when flight conditions were optimal, home ranges also encompassed large areas of grassland where vultures could find unpredictable resources, suggesting that vultures did not lose their natural ability to forage on unpredictable resources, even when feeding stations were available. However during seasons when food abundance and flight conditions were not limited, vultures seemed to favour light over heavy feeding stations, probably because of the reduced intraspecific competition and a pattern closer to the natural dispersion of resources in the landscape. Light feeding stations are interesting tools

  3. Selectivity and sparseness in randomly connected balanced networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cengiz Pehlevan

    Full Text Available Neurons in sensory cortex show stimulus selectivity and sparse population response, even in cases where no strong functionally specific structure in connectivity can be detected. This raises the question whether selectivity and sparseness can be generated and maintained in randomly connected networks. We consider a recurrent network of excitatory and inhibitory spiking neurons with random connectivity, driven by random projections from an input layer of stimulus selective neurons. In this architecture, the stimulus-to-stimulus and neuron-to-neuron modulation of total synaptic input is weak compared to the mean input. Surprisingly, we show that in the balanced state the network can still support high stimulus selectivity and sparse population response. In the balanced state, strong synapses amplify the variation in synaptic input and recurrent inhibition cancels the mean. Functional specificity in connectivity emerges due to the inhomogeneity caused by the generative statistical rule used to build the network. We further elucidate the mechanism behind and evaluate the effects of model parameters on population sparseness and stimulus selectivity. Network response to mixtures of stimuli is investigated. It is shown that a balanced state with unselective inhibition can be achieved with densely connected input to inhibitory population. Balanced networks exhibit the "paradoxical" effect: an increase in excitatory drive to inhibition leads to decreased inhibitory population firing rate. We compare and contrast selectivity and sparseness generated by the balanced network to randomly connected unbalanced networks. Finally, we discuss our results in light of experiments.

  4. Randomized trial of a warfarin communication protocol for nursing homes: an SBAR-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Terry S; Tjia, Jennifer; Mazor, Kathleen M; Donovan, Jennifer L; Kanaan, Abir O; Harrold, Leslie R; Reed, George; Doherty, Peter; Spenard, Ann; Gurwitz, Jerry H

    2011-02-01

    More than 1.6 million Americans currently reside in nursing homes. As many as 12% of them receive long-term anticoagulant therapy with warfarin. Prior research has demonstrated compelling evidence of safety problems with warfarin therapy in this setting, often associated with suboptimal communication between nursing home staff and prescribing physicians. We conducted a randomized trial of a warfarin management protocol using facilitated telephone communication between nurses and physicians in 26 nursing homes in Connecticut in 2007-2008. Intervention facilities received a warfarin management communication protocol using the approach "Situation, Background, Assessment, and Recommendation" (SBAR). The protocol included an SBAR template to standardize telephone communication about residents on warfarin by requiring information about the situation triggering the call, the background, the nurse's assessment, and recommendations. There were 435 residents who received warfarin therapy during the study period for 55,167 resident days in the intervention homes and 53,601 in control homes. In intervention homes, residents' international normalized ratio (INR) values were in the therapeutic range a statistically significant 4.50% more time than in control homes (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.31%-8.69%). There was no difference in obtaining a follow-up INR within 3 days after an INR value ≥4.5 (odds ratio 1.02; 95% CI, 0.44-2.4). Rates of preventable adverse warfarin-related events were lower in intervention homes, although this result was not statistically significant: the incident rate ratio for any preventable adverse warfarin-related event was .87 (95% CI, .54-1.4). Facilitated telephone communication between nurses and physicians using the SBAR approach modestly improves the quality of warfarin management for nursing home residents. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Preventing falls in community-dwelling frail older people using a home intervention team (HIT): results from the randomized Falls-HIT trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaus, Thorsten; Bach, Matthias

    2003-03-01

    To evaluate the effect of an intervention by a multidisciplinary team to reduce falls in older people's homes. Randomized, controlled trial with follow-up of subjects for 1 year. University-affiliated geriatric hospital and older patients' homes. Three hundred sixty subjects (mean age +/- standard deviation = 81.5 +/- 6.4) admitted from home to a geriatric hospital and showing functional decline, especially in mobility. The participants were randomly assigned to receive a comprehensive geriatric assessment followed by a diagnostic home visit and home intervention or a comprehensive geriatric assessment with recommendations and usual care at home. The home intervention included a diagnostic home visit, assessing the home for environmental hazards, advice about possible changes, offer of facilities for any necessary home modifications, and training in the use of technical and mobility aids. An additional home visit was made after 3 months to reinforce the recommendations. After 12 months of follow-up, a home visit was made to all study participants. Number of falls, type of recommended home modifications, and compliance with recommendations. After 1 year, there were 163 falls in the intervention group and 204 falls in the control group. The intervention group had 31% fewer falls than the control group (incidence rate ratio (IRR) = 0.69, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.51-0.97). The intervention was most effective in a subgroup of participants who reported having had two or more falls during the year before recruitment into the study. In this subgroup, the proportion of frequent fallers and the rate of falls was significantly reduced for the intervention group compared with the control group (21 vs 36 subjects with recurrent falls, P =.009; IRR = 0.63, 95% CI = 0.43-0.94). The compliance rate varied with the type of change recommended from 83% to 33% after 12 months of follow-up. Home intervention based on home visits to assess the home for environmental hazards

  6. Home Visiting and Use of Infant Health Care: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilburn, M Rebecca; Cannon, Jill S

    2017-01-01

    Evaluations of home visiting models have shown that they can reduce children's health care use in the first year of life. Models that exclusively use nurses as home visitors may cost more and be infeasible given nursing shortages in some locations. The goal of this study was to test whether a universal home visiting model employing a nurse-parent educator team as home visitors reduces health care use in the first year of life. This study was a randomized controlled clinical trial of an intensive home visiting program delivered in homes of primary caregivers and their first-born children in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Intention-to-treat and contamination-adjusted intention-to-treat models were estimated, and 244 primary caregivers participated in the survey. In their first year of life, treatment group children were one-third less likely to visit the emergency department (control group mean, MC = 0.42, treatment group mean, MT = 0.28, P = .02) and were also 41% less likely to have visited a primary care provider ≥9 times (MC = 0.49, MT = 0.29, P educator team can reduce infant health care use. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  7. Fast, Randomized Join-Order Selection - Why Use Transformations?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.A. Galindo-Legaria; A.J. Pellenkoft (Jan); M.L. Kersten (Martin)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractWe study the effectiveness of probabilistic selection of join-query evaluation plans, without reliance on tree transformation rules. Instead, each candidate plan is chosen uniformly at random from the space of valid evaluation orders. This leads to a transformation-free strategy where a

  8. The reliability of randomly selected final year pharmacy students in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Employing ANOVA, factorial experimental analysis, and the theory of error, reliability studies were conducted on the assessment of the drug product chloroquine phosphate tablets. The G–Study employed equal numbers of the factors for uniform control, and involved three analysts (randomly selected final year Pharmacy ...

  9. Local randomization in neighbor selection improves PRM roadmap quality

    KAUST Repository

    McMahon, Troy

    2012-10-01

    Probabilistic Roadmap Methods (PRMs) are one of the most used classes of motion planning methods. These sampling-based methods generate robot configurations (nodes) and then connect them to form a graph (roadmap) containing representative feasible pathways. A key step in PRM roadmap construction involves identifying a set of candidate neighbors for each node. Traditionally, these candidates are chosen to be the k-closest nodes based on a given distance metric. In this paper, we propose a new neighbor selection policy called LocalRand(k,K\\'), that first computes the K\\' closest nodes to a specified node and then selects k of those nodes at random. Intuitively, LocalRand attempts to benefit from random sampling while maintaining the higher levels of local planner success inherent to selecting more local neighbors. We provide a methodology for selecting the parameters k and K\\'. We perform an experimental comparison which shows that for both rigid and articulated robots, LocalRand results in roadmaps that are better connected than the traditional k-closest policy or a purely random neighbor selection policy. The cost required to achieve these results is shown to be comparable to k-closest. © 2012 IEEE.

  10. Outpatient vs. home-based pulmonary rehabilitation in COPD: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mendes de Oliveira Júlio C

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a common cause of morbidity and mortality affecting a large number of individuals in both developed and developing countries and it represents a significant financial burden for patients, families and society. Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR is a multidisciplinary program that integrates components of exercise training, education, nutritional support, psychological support and self-care, resulting in an improvement in dyspnea, fatigue and quality of life. Despite its proven effectiveness and the strong scientific recommendations for its routine use in the care of COPD, PR is generally underutilized and strategies for increasing access to PR are needed. Home-based self-monitored pulmonary rehabilitation is an alternative to outpatient rehabilitation. In the present study, patients with mild, moderate and severe COPD submitted to either an outpatient or at-home PR program for 12 weeks were analyzed. Methods Patients who fulfilled the inclusion criteria were randomized into three distinct groups: an outpatient group who performed all activities at the clinic, a home-based group who performed the activities at home and a control group. PR consisted of a combination of aerobic exercises and strengthening of upper and lower limbs 3 times a week for 12 weeks. Results There was a significant difference in the distance covered on the six-minute walk test (p Conclusion A home-based self-monitoring pulmonary rehabilitation program is as effective as outpatient pulmonary rehabilitation and is a valid alternative for the management of patients with COPD.

  11. Pure random search for ambient sensor distribution optimisation in a smart home environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poland, Michael P; Nugent, Chris D; Wang, Hui; Chen, Liming

    2011-01-01

    Smart homes are living spaces facilitated with technology to allow individuals to remain in their own homes for longer, rather than be institutionalised. Sensors are the fundamental physical layer with any smart home, as the data they generate is used to inform decision support systems, facilitating appropriate actuator actions. Positioning of sensors is therefore a fundamental characteristic of a smart home. Contemporary smart home sensor distribution is aligned to either a) a total coverage approach; b) a human assessment approach. These methods for sensor arrangement are not data driven strategies, are unempirical and frequently irrational. This Study hypothesised that sensor deployment directed by an optimisation method that utilises inhabitants' spatial frequency data as the search space, would produce more optimal sensor distributions vs. the current method of sensor deployment by engineers. Seven human engineers were tasked to create sensor distributions based on perceived utility for 9 deployment scenarios. A Pure Random Search (PRS) algorithm was then tasked to create matched sensor distributions. The PRS method produced superior distributions in 98.4% of test cases (n=64) against human engineer instructed deployments when the engineers had no access to the spatial frequency data, and in 92.0% of test cases (n=64) when engineers had full access to these data. These results thus confirmed the hypothesis.

  12. Occupational Therapy Predischarge Home Visits in Acute Hospital Care: A Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemson, Lindy; Lannin, Natasha A; Wales, Kylie; Salkeld, Glenn; Rubenstein, Laurence; Gitlin, Laura; Barris, Sarah; Mackenzie, Lynette; Cameron, Ian D

    2016-10-01

    To determine whether an enhanced occupational therapy discharge planning intervention that involved pre- and postdischarge home visits, goal setting, and follow-up (the HOME program) would be superior to a usual care intervention in which an occupational therapy in-hospital consultation for planning and supporting discharge to home is provided to individuals receiving acute care. Randomized controlled trial. Acute and medical wards. Individuals aged 70 and older (N = 400). Primary outcomes: activities daily living (ADLs; Nottingham Extended Activities of Daily Living) and participation in life roles and activities (Late Life Disability Index (LLDI)). Occupational therapist recommendations differed significantly between groups (P occupational therapy recommendations as the in-hospital only consultation, which had a greater emphasis on equipment provision, but HOME did not demonstrate greater benefit in global measures of ADLs or participation in life tasks than in-hospital consultation alone. It is not recommended that home visits be conducted routinely as part of discharge planning for acutely hospitalized medical patients. Further work should develop guidelines for quality in-hospital consultation. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  13. Optimizing antibiotics in residents of nursing homes: protocol of a randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simor Andrew

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antibiotics are frequently prescribed for older adults who reside in long-term care facilities. A substantial proportion of antibiotic use in this setting is inappropriate. Antibiotics are often prescribed for asymptomatic bacteriuria, a condition for which randomized trials of antibiotic therapy indicate no benefit and in fact harm. This proposal describes a randomized trial of diagnostic and therapeutic algorithms to reduce the use of antibiotics in residents of long-term care facilities. Methods In this on-going study, 22 nursing homes have been randomized to either use of algorithms (11 nursing homes or to usual practise (11 nursing homes. The algorithms describe signs and symptoms for which it would be appropriate to send urine cultures or to prescribe antibiotics. The algorithms are introduced by inservicing nursing staff and by conducting one-on-one sessions for physicians using case-scenarios. The primary outcome of the study is courses of antibiotics per 1000 resident days. Secondary outcomes include urine cultures sent and antibiotic courses for urinary indications. Focus groups and semi-structured interviews with key informants will be used to assess the process of implementation and to identify key factors for sustainability.

  14. Productivity and fruit quality of Jonagold clones of home selection

    OpenAIRE

    К. П. Тарнавська

    2014-01-01

    New results of the clonal selection of apple tree (Malus domestica Borkh) conducted at Podillya Research Station of Horticultural Institute NAAS by method of state variety testing have been presented. By the results of the 6-year studying (2007 - 2012) of 20 new Jonagold clones of domestic selection their estimation was carried out according to the complex of such qualities as productivity, early ripening, marketability, taste qualities and durability of fruits. The following clones are defin...

  15. Selecting a phoneme-to-grapheme mapping: Random or weighted selection?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binna Lee

    2015-05-01

    Our findings demonstrate that random selection underestimates MOA’s PG correspondences whereas weighted selection predicts higher PG correspondences than he produces. To explain his intermediate spelling performance on PPEs, we will test additional approaches to weighing the relative probability of PG mappings, including using log frequencies, separating consonant and vowel status, and considering the number of grapheme options in each phoneme.

  16. Selection for altruism through random drift in variable size populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houchmandzadeh, Bahram; Vallade, Marcel

    2012-05-10

    Altruistic behavior is defined as helping others at a cost to oneself and a lowered fitness. The lower fitness implies that altruists should be selected against, which is in contradiction with their widespread presence is nature. Present models of selection for altruism (kin or multilevel) show that altruistic behaviors can have 'hidden' advantages if the 'common good' produced by altruists is restricted to some related or unrelated groups. These models are mostly deterministic, or assume a frequency dependent fitness. Evolutionary dynamics is a competition between deterministic selection pressure and stochastic events due to random sampling from one generation to the next. We show here that an altruistic allele extending the carrying capacity of the habitat can win by increasing the random drift of "selfish" alleles. In other terms, the fixation probability of altruistic genes can be higher than those of a selfish ones, even though altruists have a smaller fitness. Moreover when populations are geographically structured, the altruists advantage can be highly amplified and the fixation probability of selfish genes can tend toward zero. The above results are obtained both by numerical and analytical calculations. Analytical results are obtained in the limit of large populations. The theory we present does not involve kin or multilevel selection, but is based on the existence of random drift in variable size populations. The model is a generalization of the original Fisher-Wright and Moran models where the carrying capacity depends on the number of altruists.

  17. Selection for altruism through random drift in variable size populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houchmandzadeh Bahram

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Altruistic behavior is defined as helping others at a cost to oneself and a lowered fitness. The lower fitness implies that altruists should be selected against, which is in contradiction with their widespread presence is nature. Present models of selection for altruism (kin or multilevel show that altruistic behaviors can have ‘hidden’ advantages if the ‘common good’ produced by altruists is restricted to some related or unrelated groups. These models are mostly deterministic, or assume a frequency dependent fitness. Results Evolutionary dynamics is a competition between deterministic selection pressure and stochastic events due to random sampling from one generation to the next. We show here that an altruistic allele extending the carrying capacity of the habitat can win by increasing the random drift of “selfish” alleles. In other terms, the fixation probability of altruistic genes can be higher than those of a selfish ones, even though altruists have a smaller fitness. Moreover when populations are geographically structured, the altruists advantage can be highly amplified and the fixation probability of selfish genes can tend toward zero. The above results are obtained both by numerical and analytical calculations. Analytical results are obtained in the limit of large populations. Conclusions The theory we present does not involve kin or multilevel selection, but is based on the existence of random drift in variable size populations. The model is a generalization of the original Fisher-Wright and Moran models where the carrying capacity depends on the number of altruists.

  18. Outpatient vs. home-based pulmonary rehabilitation in COPD: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes de Oliveira, Júlio C; Studart Leitão Filho, Fernando S; Malosa Sampaio, Luciana M; Negrinho de Oliveira, Ana C; Hirata, Raquel Pastrello; Costa, Dirceu; Donner, Claudio F; de Oliveira, Luís Vf

    2010-12-20

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common cause of morbidity and mortality affecting a large number of individuals in both developed and developing countries and it represents a significant financial burden for patients, families and society. Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) is a multidisciplinary program that integrates components of exercise training, education, nutritional support, psychological support and self-care, resulting in an improvement in dyspnea, fatigue and quality of life. Despite its proven effectiveness and the strong scientific recommendations for its routine use in the care of COPD, PR is generally underutilized and strategies for increasing access to PR are needed. Home-based self-monitored pulmonary rehabilitation is an alternative to outpatient rehabilitation. In the present study, patients with mild, moderate and severe COPD submitted to either an outpatient or at-home PR program for 12 weeks were analyzed. Patients who fulfilled the inclusion criteria were randomized into three distinct groups: an outpatient group who performed all activities at the clinic, a home-based group who performed the activities at home and a control group. PR consisted of a combination of aerobic exercises and strengthening of upper and lower limbs 3 times a week for 12 weeks. There was a significant difference in the distance covered on the six-minute walk test (p home groups after participating in the rehabilitation program compared to baseline. A home-based self-monitoring pulmonary rehabilitation program is as effective as outpatient pulmonary rehabilitation and is a valid alternative for the management of patients with COPD.

  19. Integrative psychotherapeutic nursing home program to reduce multiple psychiatric symptoms of cognitively impaired patients and caregiver burden: randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, T.J.; Duivenvoorden, H.J.; Lee, J. van der; Olde Rikkert, M.G.M.; Beekman, A.T.; Ribbe, M.W.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test the effectiveness of an integrative psychotherapeutic nursing home program (integrative reactivation and rehabilitation [IRR]) to reduce multiple neuropsychiatry symptoms (MNPS) of cognitively impaired patients and caregiver burden (CB). DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial.

  20. Productivity and fruit quality of Jonagold clones of home selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    К. П. Тарнавська

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available New results of the clonal selection of apple tree (Malus domestica Borkh conducted at Podillya Research Station of Horticultural Institute NAAS by method of state variety testing have been presented. By the results of the 6-year studying (2007 - 2012 of 20 new Jonagold clones of domestic selection their estimation was carried out according to the complex of such qualities as productivity, early ripening, marketability, taste qualities and durability of fruits. The following clones are defined to be the best: DP-16, DP-17, DP-18, DP-20. They start fruiting in the age of 2 or 3 years, productivity of the 5- or 6-year-old trees reaches 8,3–25,5 tons per hectare, quantity of the fruits of the highest and first grade is about 57–76% (in 2010–2012. Fruits of the mentioned clones are bigger than medium size (DP-16, big (DP-17, DP-18 and very big (DP-20; they have average similarity, excellent and very harmonious sour-sweet taste (8,3–8,7 points. Fruits of the best clones kept their quality for 202 – 220 days.

  1. Randomized Trial of Interventions to Improve Childhood Asthma in Homes with Wood-burning Stoves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noonan, Curtis W; Semmens, Erin O; Smith, Paul; Harrar, Solomon W; Montrose, Luke; Weiler, Emily; McNamara, Marcy; Ward, Tony J

    2017-09-13

    Household air pollution due to biomass combustion for residential heating adversely affects vulnerable populations. Randomized controlled trials to improve indoor air quality in homes of children with asthma are limited, and no such studies have been conducted in homes using wood for heating. Our aims were to test the hypothesis that household-level interventions, specifically improved-technology wood-burning appliances or air-filtration devices, would improve health measures, in particular Pediatric Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (PAQLQ) scores, relative to placebo, among children living with asthma in homes with wood-burning stoves. A three-arm placebo-controlled randomized trial was conducted in homes with wood-burning stoves among children with asthma. Multiple preintervention and postintervention data included PAQLQ (primary outcome), peak expiratory flow (PEF) monitoring, diurnal peak flow variability (dPFV, an indicator of airway hyperreactivity) and indoor particulate matter (PM) PM2.5. Relative to placebo, neither the air filter nor the woodstove intervention showed improvement in quality-of-life measures. Among the secondary outcomes, dPFV showed a 4.1 percentage point decrease in variability [95% confidence interval (CI)=-7.8 to -0.4] for air-filtration use in comparison with placebo. The air-filter intervention showed a 67% (95% CI: 50% to 77%) reduction in indoor PM2.5, but no change was observed with the improved-technology woodstove intervention. Among children with asthma and chronic exposure to woodsmoke, an air-filter intervention that improved indoor air quality did not affect quality-of-life measures. Intent-to-treat analysis did show an improvement in the secondary measure of dPFV. ClincialTrials.gov NCT00807183. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP849.

  2. Implementing a Pain Self-Management Protocol in Home Care: A Cluster-Randomized Pragmatic Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, M Carrington; Henderson, Charles R; Trachtenberg, Melissa A; Beissner, Katherine L; Bach, Eileen; Barrón, Yolanda; Sridharan, Sridevi; Murtaugh, Christopher M

    2017-08-01

    To determine the effectiveness of a cognitive-behavioral pain self-management (CBPSM) protocol delivered by physical therapists (PTs) for use by older adults with activity-limiting pain receiving home care. A randomized pragmatic trial comparing delivery of the intervention plus usual care with usual care alone. Community. Individuals aged 55 and older admitted with orders for physical therapy who endorsed activity-limiting pain and reported pain scores of 3 or greater on a scale from 0 to 10 (N = 588). A CBPSM protocol delivered by PTs. Primary outcomes were assessed at 60 days using validated measures of pain-related disability, pain intensity, gait speed, and number of activity of daily living (ADL) deficits. Of 588 participants, 285 received care from a PT randomized to the intervention and 303 from a PT randomized to the usual care group. Both groups had significant reductions in pain-related disability, pain intensity, and ADL limitations and improved gait speed. No significant treatment differences were identified. There were no consistent treatment differences when interactions and subgroups were examined. This real-world pragmatic trial found no effect of implementation of a pain self-management intervention in a home care setting. Despite the lack of positive findings, future studies are indicated to determine how similar protocols that have been found to be effective in efficacy studies can be successfully implemented in routine clinical care. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  3. A Novel Vascular Homing Peptide Strategy to Selectively Enhance Pulmonary Drug Efficacy in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toba, Michie; Alzoubi, Abdallah; O’Neill, Kealan; Abe, Kohtaro; Urakami, Takeo; Komatsu, Masanobu; Alvarez, Diego; Järvinen, Tero A.H.; Mann, David; Ruoslahti, Erkki; McMurtry, Ivan F.; Oka, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    A major limitation in the pharmacological treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is the lack of pulmonary vascular selectivity. Recent studies have identified a tissue-penetrating homing peptide, CARSKNKDC (CAR), which specifically homes to hypertensive pulmonary arteries but not to normal pulmonary vessels or other tissues. Some tissue-penetrating vascular homing peptides have a unique ability to facilitate transport of co-administered drugs into the targeted cells/tissues without requiring physical conjugation of the drug to the peptide (bystander effect). We tested the hypothesis that co-administered CAR would selectively enhance the pulmonary vascular effects of i.v. vasodilators in Sugen5416/hypoxia/normoxia-exposed PAH rats. Systemically administered CAR was predominantly detected in cells of remodeled pulmonary arteries. Intravenously co-administered CAR enhanced pulmonary, but not systemic, effects of the vasodilators, fasudil and imatinib, in PAH rats. CAR increased lung tissue imatinib concentration in isolated PAH lungs without increasing pulmonary vascular permeability. Sublingual CAR was also effective in selectively enhancing the pulmonary vasodilation by imatinib and sildenafil. Our results suggest a new paradigm in the treatment of PAH, using an i.v./sublingual tissue-penetrating homing peptide to selectively augment pulmonary vascular effects of nonselective drugs without the potentially problematic conjugation process. CAR may be particularly useful as an add-on therapy to selectively enhance the pulmonary vascular efficacy of any ongoing drug treatment in patients with PAH. PMID:24401613

  4. The Falls In Care Home study: a feasibility randomized controlled trial of the use of a risk assessment and decision support tool to prevent falls in care homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Gemma M; Armstrong, Sarah; Gordon, Adam L; Gladman, John; Robertson, Kate; Ward, Marie; Conroy, Simon; Arnold, Gail; Darby, Janet; Frowd, Nadia; Williams, Wynne; Knowles, Sue; Logan, Pip A

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To explore the feasibility of implementing and evaluating the Guide to Action Care Home fall prevention intervention. Design: Two-centre, cluster feasibility randomized controlled trial and process evaluation. Setting: Purposive sample of six diverse old age/learning disability, long stay care homes in Nottinghamshire, UK. Subjects: Residents aged over 50 years, who had fallen at least once in the past year, not bed-bound, hoist-dependent or terminally ill. Interventions: Intervention homes (n = 3) received Guide to Action Care Home fall prevention intervention training and support. Control homes (n = 3) received usual care. Outcomes: Recruitment, attrition, baseline and six-month outcome completion, contamination and intervention fidelity, compliance, tolerability, acceptance and impact. Results: A total of 81 of 145 (56%) care homes expressed participatory interest. Six of 22 letter respondent homes (27%) participated. The expected resident recruitment target was achieved by 76% (52/68). Ten (19%) residents did not complete follow-up (seven died, three moved). In intervention homes 36/114 (32%) staff attended training. Two of three (75%) care homes received protocol compliant training. Staff valued the training, but advised greater management involvement to improve intervention implementation. Fall risks were assessed, actioned and recorded in care records. Of 115 recorded falls, 533/570 (93%) of details were complete. Six-month resident fall rates were 1.9 and 4.0 per year for intervention and control homes, respectively. Conclusions: The Guide to Action Care Home is implementable under trial conditions. Recruitment and follow-up rates indicate that a definitive trial can be completed. Falls (primary outcome) can be ascertained reliably from care records. PMID:26385358

  5. Selections from 2017: Computers Help Us Map Our Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-12-01

    Editors note:In these last two weeks of 2017, well be looking at a few selections that we havent yet discussed on AAS Nova from among the most-downloaded paperspublished in AAS journals this year. The usual posting schedule will resume in January.Machine-Learned Identification of RR Lyrae Stars from Sparse, Multi-Band Data: The PS1 SamplePublished April2017Main takeaway:A sample of RR Lyrae variable stars was built from thePan-STARRS1 (PS1) survey by a team led byBranimir Sesar (Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Germany). The sample of45,000 starsrepresentsthe widest (three-fourthsof the sky) and deepest (reaching 120 kpc) sample of RR Lyrae stars to date.Why its interesting:Its challengingto understand the overall shape and behaviorof our galaxy because were stuck on the inside of it. RR Lyrae stars are a useful tool for this purpose: they can be used as tracers to map out the Milky Ways halo. The authors large sample of RR Lyrae stars from PS1 combined withproper-motion measurements from Gaia and radial-velocity measurements from multi-object spectroscopic surveys could become thepremier source for studying the structure, kinematics, and the gravitational potential of our galaxys outskirts.How they were found:The black dots show the distribution of the 45,000 probable RR Lyrae stars in the authors sample. [Sesar et al. 2017]The 45,000 stars in this sample were selected not by humans, but by computer.The authors used machine-learning algorithms to examine the light curvesin the Pan-STARRS1 sample and identify the characteristic brightness variations of RR Lyrae stars lying in the galactic halo. These techniques resulted in a very pure and complete sample, and the authors suggest that this approachmay translate well to othersparse,multi-band data sets such asthat from the upcomingLarge Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) galactic plane sub-survey.CitationBranimir Sesar et al 2017 AJ 153 204. doi:10.3847/1538-3881/aa661b

  6. Effects of Group, Individual, and Home Exercise in Persons With Parkinson Disease: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Laurie A; Wilhelm, Jennifer; Chen, Yiyi; Blehm, Ron; Nutt, John; Chen, Zunqiu; Serdar, Andrea; Horak, Fay B

    2015-10-01

    Comparative studies of exercise interventions for people with Parkinson disease (PD) rarely considered how one should deliver the intervention. The objective of this study was to compare the success of exercise when administered by (1) home exercise program, (2) individualized physical therapy, or (3) a group class. We examined if common comorbidities associated with PD impacted success of each intervention. Fifty-eight people (age = 63.9 ± 8 years) with PD participated. People were randomized into (1) home exercise program, (2) individual physical therapy, or (3) group class intervention. All arms were standardized and based on the Agility Boot Camp exercise program for PD, 3 times per week for 4 weeks. The primary outcome measure was the 7-item Physical Performance Test. Other measures of balance, gait, mobility, quality of life, balance confidence, depressions, apathy, self-efficacy and UPDRS-Motor, and activity of daily living scores were included. Only the individual group significantly improved in the Physical Performance Test. The individual exercise showed the most improvements in functional and balance measures, whereas the group class showed the most improvements in gait. The home exercise program improved the least across all outcomes. Several factors effected success, particularly for the home group. An unsupervised, home exercise program is the least effective way to deliver exercise to people with PD, and individual and group exercises have differing benefits. Furthermore, people with PD who also have other comorbidities did better in a program directly supervised by a physical therapist.Video Abstract available for additional insights from the authors (see Video, Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/JNPT/A112).

  7. Domestic Violence Enhanced Perinatal Home Visits: The DOVE Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharps, Phyllis W; Bullock, Linda F; Campbell, Jacquelyn C; Alhusen, Jeanne L; Ghazarian, Sharon R; Bhandari, Shreya S; Schminkey, Donna L

    2016-11-01

    Perinatal intimate partner violence (IPV) is common and has significant negative health outcomes for mothers and infants. This study evaluated the effectiveness of an IPV intervention in reducing violence among abused women in perinatal home visiting programs. This assessor-blinded multisite randomized control trial of 239 women experiencing perinatal IPV was conducted from 2006 to 2012 in U.S. urban and rural settings. The Domestic Violence Enhanced Home Visitation Program (DOVE) intervention group (n = 124) received a structured abuse assessment and six home visitor-delivered empowerment sessions integrated into home visits. All participants were screened for IPV and referred appropriately. IPV was measured by the Conflicts Tactics Scale2 at baseline through 24 months postpartum. There was a significant decrease in IPV over time (F = 114.23; p < 0.001) from baseline to 1, 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months postpartum (all p < 0.001). Additional models examining change in IPV from baseline indicated a significant treatment effect (F = 6.45; p < 0.01). Women in the DOVE treatment group reported a larger mean decrease in IPV scores from baseline compared to women in the usual care group (mean decline 40.82 vs. 35.87). All models accounted for age and maternal depression as covariates. The DOVE intervention was effective in decreasing IPV and is brief, thereby facilitating its incorporation within well-woman and well-child care visits, as well as home visiting programs, while satisfying recommendations set forth in the Affordable Care Act for IPV screening and brief counseling.

  8. Discontinuing Inappropriate Medication Use in Nursing Home Residents: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wouters, Hans; Scheper, Jessica; Koning, Hedi; Brouwer, Chris; Twisk, Jos W; van der Meer, Helene; Boersma, Froukje; Zuidema, Sytse U; Taxis, Katja

    2017-11-07

    Inappropriate prescribing is a well-known clinical problem in nursing home residents, but few interventions have focused on reducing inappropriate medication use. To examine successful discontinuation of inappropriate medication use and to improve prescribing in nursing home residents. Pragmatic cluster randomized controlled trial, with clustering by elder care physicians and their wards. (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01876095). 59 Dutch nursing home wards for long-term care. Residents with a life expectancy greater than 4 weeks who consented to treatment with medication. Multidisciplinary Multistep Medication Review (3MR) consisting of an assessment of the patient perspective, medical history, critical appraisal of medications, a meeting between the treating elder care physician and the pharmacist, and implementation of medication changes. Successful discontinuation of use of at least 1 inappropriate drug (that is, without relapse or severe withdrawal symptoms) and clinical outcomes (neuropsychiatric symptoms, cognitive function, and quality of life) after 4 months of follow-up. Nineteen elder care physicians (33 wards) performed the 3MR, and 16 elder care physicians (26 wards) followed standard procedures. A total of 426 nursing home residents (233 in the intervention group and 193 in the control group) were followed for an average of 144 days (SD, 21). In an analysis of all participants, use of at least 1 inappropriate medication was successfully discontinued for 91 (39.1%) residents in the intervention group versus 57 (29.5%) in the control group (adjusted relative risk, 1.37 [95% CI, 1.02 to 1.75]). Clinical outcomes did not deteriorate between baseline and follow-up. The 3MR was done only once. Some withdrawal symptoms or relapses may have been missed. The 3MR is effective in discontinuing inappropriate medication use in frail nursing home residents without a decline in their well-being. Netherlands Organisation for Health Research and Development.

  9. Interference-aware random beam selection for spectrum sharing systems

    KAUST Repository

    Abdallah, Mohamed M.

    2012-09-01

    Spectrum sharing systems have been introduced to alleviate the problem of spectrum scarcity by allowing secondary unlicensed networks to share the spectrum with primary licensed networks under acceptable interference levels to the primary users. In this paper, we develop interference-aware random beam selection schemes that provide enhanced throughput for the secondary link under the condition that the interference observed at the primary link is within a predetermined acceptable value. For a secondary transmitter equipped with multiple antennas, our schemes select a random beam, among a set of power- optimized orthogonal random beams, that maximizes the capacity of the secondary link while satisfying the interference constraint at the primary receiver for different levels of feedback information describing the interference level at the primary receiver. For the proposed schemes, we develop a statistical analysis for the signal-to-noise and interference ratio (SINR) statistics as well as the capacity of the secondary link. Finally, we present numerical results that study the effect of system parameters including number of beams and the maximum transmission power on the capacity of the secondary link attained using the proposed schemes. © 2012 IEEE.

  10. Home medicines reviews following acute coronary syndrome: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernal Daniel DL

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite continual improvements in the management of acute coronary syndromes, adherence to guideline-based medications remains suboptimal. We aim to improve adherence with guideline-based therapy following acute coronary syndrome using an existing service that is provided by specifically trained pharmacists, called a Home Medicines Review. We have made two minor adjustments to target the focus of the existing service including an acute coronary syndrome specific referral letter and a training package for the pharmacists providing the service. Methods/Design We will be conducting a randomized controlled trial to compare the directed home medicines review service to usual care following acute coronary syndromes. All patients aged 18 to 80 years and with a working diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome, who are admitted to two public, acute care hospitals, will be screened for enrolment into the trial. Exclusion criteria will include: not being discharged home, documented cognitive decline, non-Medicare eligibility, and presence of a terminal malignancy. Randomization concealment and sequence generation will occur through a centrally-monitored computer program. Patients randomized to the control group will receive usual post-discharge care. Patients randomized to receive the intervention will be offered usual post-discharge care and a directed home medicines review at two months post-discharge. The study endpoints will be six and twelve months post-discharge. The primary outcome will be the proportion of patients who are adherent to a complete, guideline-based medication regimen. Secondary outcomes will include hospital readmission rates, length of hospital stays, changes in quality of life, smoking cessation rates, cardiac rehabilitation completion rates, and mortality. Discussion As the trial is closely based on an existing service, any improvements observed should be highly translatable into regular practice. Possible

  11. Vancouver At Home: pragmatic randomized trials investigating Housing First for homeless and mentally ill adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    and HN groups had high rates of substance dependence, suicidality, and physical illness. Randomization resulted in no meaningful detectable differences between study arms. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials: ISRCTN57595077 (Vancouver at Home study: Housing First plus Assertive Community Treatment versus congregate housing plus supports versus treatment as usual) and ISRCTN66721740 (Vancouver At Home study: Housing First plus Intensive Case Management versus treatment as usual). PMID:24176253

  12. Physical abuse of older adults in nursing homes: a random sample survey of adults with an elderly family member in a nursing home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiamberg, Lawrence B; Oehmke, James; Zhang, Zhenmei; Barboza, Gia E; Griffore, Robert J; Von Heydrich, Levente; Post, Lori A; Weatherill, Robin P; Mastin, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    Few empirical studies have focused on elder abuse in nursing home settings. The present study investigated the prevalence and risk factors of staff physical abuse among elderly individuals receiving nursing home care in Michigan. A random sample of 452 adults with elderly relatives, older than 65 years, and in nursing home care completed a telephone survey regarding elder abuse and neglect experienced by this elder family member in the care setting. Some 24.3% of respondents reported at least one incident of physical abuse by nursing home staff. A logistic regression model was used to estimate the importance of various risk factors in nursing home abuse. Limitations in activities of daily living (ADLs), older adult behavioral difficulties, and previous victimization by nonstaff perpetrators were associated with a greater likelihood of physical abuse. Interventions that address these risk factors may be effective in reducing older adult physical abuse in nursing homes. Attention to the contextual or ecological character of nursing home abuse is essential, particularly in light of the findings of this study.

  13. Evaluation of home disinfection protocols for acrylic baseplates of removable orthodontic appliances: A randomized clinical investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peixoto, Iza Teixeira Alves; Enoki, Carla; Ito, Izabel Yoko; Matsumoto, Mirian Aiko Nakane; Nelson-Filho, Paulo

    2011-07-01

    In this randomized clinical trial, we investigated, using the microbial culture technique and scanning electron microscopy, the contamination of acrylic baseplates of removable orthodontic appliances by mutans streptococci (MS) and evaluated the efficacy of different home disinfection protocols with a 0.12% chlorhexidine gluconate spray (Periogard, Colgate-Palmolive, São Bernardo do Campo, Brazil). Fifteen dental students were randomly enrolled in a 3-stage changeover system with a 1-week interval between each stage. The acrylic baseplates were worn full time except at meals to simulate the routine use of removable appliances under clinical conditions. Three 1-week home disinfection protocols were tested in all stages by a different group of students: protocol I, toothbrushing + baseplate brushing + sterile tap water spraying once a day; protocol II, toothbrushing + baseplate brushing + Periogard spraying on the seventh day after appliance placement; and protocol III, toothbrushing + baseplate brushing + Periogard spraying on the fourth and seventh days after appliance placement. After the first week, the volunteers received new baseplates, toothbrushes, and dentifrices, and the regimens were repeated 2 more times. At the end of each week, the baseplates had a randomized disinfection protocol and were sent for microbiologic analysis. A scanning electron microscope was used to examine 3 acrylic baseplates representing each home protocol. The Friedman test (α = 0.05) compared the home protocols for the formation of MS colonies or biofilms on the acrylic surfaces. MS colonies or biofilms were found on all acrylic baseplates after protocol I. Protocols II and III reduced significantly (P 0.05) was observed between protocols II and III. The scanning electron microscope analysis confirmed the results of the microbiologic cultures. Disinfection of baseplates of removable orthodontic appliances by using 0.12% chlorhexidine spray once or twice a week reduced the

  14. Unbiased split variable selection for random survival forests using maximally selected rank statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Marvin N; Dankowski, Theresa; Ziegler, Andreas

    2017-04-15

    The most popular approach for analyzing survival data is the Cox regression model. The Cox model may, however, be misspecified, and its proportionality assumption may not always be fulfilled. An alternative approach for survival prediction is random forests for survival outcomes. The standard split criterion for random survival forests is the log-rank test statistic, which favors splitting variables with many possible split points. Conditional inference forests avoid this split variable selection bias. However, linear rank statistics are utilized by default in conditional inference forests to select the optimal splitting variable, which cannot detect non-linear effects in the independent variables. An alternative is to use maximally selected rank statistics for the split point selection. As in conditional inference forests, splitting variables are compared on the p-value scale. However, instead of the conditional Monte-Carlo approach used in conditional inference forests, p-value approximations are employed. We describe several p-value approximations and the implementation of the proposed random forest approach. A simulation study demonstrates that unbiased split variable selection is possible. However, there is a trade-off between unbiased split variable selection and runtime. In benchmark studies of prediction performance on simulated and real datasets, the new method performs better than random survival forests if informative dichotomous variables are combined with uninformative variables with more categories and better than conditional inference forests if non-linear covariate effects are included. In a runtime comparison, the method proves to be computationally faster than both alternatives, if a simple p-value approximation is used. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Exercise rehabilitation on home-dwelling patients with Alzheimer's disease - a randomized, controlled trial. Study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilvis Reijo S

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Besides cognitive decline, Alzheimer's disease (AD leads to physical disability, need for help and permanent institutional care. The trials investigating effects of exercise rehabilitation on physical functioning of home-dwelling older dementia patients are still scarce. The aim of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of intensive exercise rehabilitation lasting for one year on mobility and physical functioning of home-dwelling patients with AD. Methods During years 2008-2010, patients with AD (n = 210 living with their spousal caregiver in community are recruited using central AD registers in Finland, and they are offered exercise rehabilitation lasting for one year. The patients are randomized into three arms: 1 tailored home-based exercise twice weekly 2 group-based exercise twice weekly in rehabilitation center 3 control group with usual care and information of exercise and nutrition. Main outcome measures will be Guralnik's mobility and balance tests and FIM-test to assess physical functioning. Secondary measures will be cognition, neuropsychiatric symptoms according to the Neuropsychiatric Inventory, caregivers' burden, depression and health-related quality of life (RAND-36. Data concerning admissions to institutional care and the use and costs of health and social services will be collected during a two year follow-up. Discussion To our knowledge this is the first large scale trial exploring whether home-dwelling patients with AD will benefit from intense and long-lasting exercise rehabilitation in respect to their mobility and physical functioning. It will also provide data on cost-effectiveness of the intervention. Trial registration ACTRN12608000037303

  16. Randomized Controlled Trial of Home-Based Hormonal Contraceptive Dispensing for Women At Risk of Unintended Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnick, Alan L; Rdesinski, Rebecca E; Marino, Miguel; Jacob-Files, Elizabeth; Gipson, Teresa; Kuyl, Marni; Dexter, Eve; Olds, David

    2016-06-01

    Women frequently experience barriers to obtaining effective contraceptives from clinic-based providers. Allowing nurses to dispense hormonal methods during home visits may be a way to reduce barriers and improve -effective contraceptive use. Between 2009 and 2013, a sample of 337 low-income, pregnant clients of a nurse home-visit program in Washington State were randomly selected to receive either usual care or enhanced care in which nurses were permitted to provide hormonal contraceptives postpartum. Participants were surveyed at baseline and every three months postpartum for up to two years. Longitudinal Poisson mixed-effects regression analysis was used to examine group differences in gaps in effective contraceptive use, and survival analysis was used to examine time until a subsequent pregnancy. Compared with usual care participants, enhanced care participants had an average of 9.6 fewer days not covered by effective contraceptive use during the 90 days following a first birth (52.6 vs. 62.2). By six months postpartum, 50% of usual care participants and 39% of enhanced care participants were using a long-acting reversible contraceptive (LARC). In analyses excluding LARC use, enhanced care participants had an average of 14.2 fewer days not covered by effective contraceptive use 0-3 months postpartum (65.0 vs. 79.2) and 15.7 fewer uncovered days 4-6 months postpartum (39.2 vs. 54.9). Home dispensing of hormonal contraceptives may improve women's postpartum contraceptive use and should be explored as an intervention in communities where contraceptives are not easily accessible. Copyright © 2016 by the Guttmacher Institute.

  17. Randomized trial comparing the velocities of the antihypertensive effects on home blood pressure of candesartan and candesartan with hydrochlorothiazide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosaka, Miki; Metoki, Hirohito; Satoh, Michihiro; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Asayama, Kei; Kikuya, Masahiro; Inoue, Ryusuke; Obara, Taku; Hirose, Takuo; Imai, Yutaka

    2015-10-01

    We aimed to evaluate the hypotensive effect and the time to attain the maximal antihypertensive effect (stabilization time) of 8 mg candesartan/6.25 mg hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ) combination therapy (combination regimen) and therapy with an increased candesartan dose (12 mg; maximum dose regimen) using home blood pressure (BP) measurements. A prospective, multicenter, open-label, randomized, comparative trial was conducted. Essential hypertensive patients who failed to achieve adequate BP control (systolic BP (SBP) ⩽ 135 mm Hg) on 8 mg candesartan alone were randomized to two groups: the combination regimen (n=103) and the maximum dose regimen (n=103). Home morning SBP reduction at 8 weeks after randomization was 11.4 ± 1.3 mm Hg in the combination regimen and 7.8 ± 1 .2 mm Hg in the maximum dose regimen. The combination regimen provided additional reduction of 4.0 mm Hg (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.8-7.2 mm Hg, P=0.01) in home morning SBP over the maximum dose regimen at 8 weeks after randomization. The maximal antihypertensive effect and stabilization time for home SBP were 9.4 mm Hg and 37.1 days (P0.2). The rate of achieving target BP (home morning SBP candesartan to combination therapy was more effective in reducing home SBP and achieving goal BP more rapidly than increasing the candesartan dose.

  18. The signature of positive selection at randomly chosen loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przeworski, Molly

    2002-03-01

    In Drosophila and humans, there are accumulating examples of loci with a significant excess of high-frequency-derived alleles or high levels of linkage disequilibrium, relative to a neutral model of a random-mating population of constant size. These are features expected after a recent selective sweep. Their prevalence suggests that positive directional selection may be widespread in both species. However, as I show here, these features do not persist long after the sweep ends: The high-frequency alleles drift to fixation and no longer contribute to polymorphism, while linkage disequilibrium is broken down by recombination. As a result, loci chosen without independent evidence of recent selection are not expected to exhibit either of these features, even if they have been affected by numerous sweeps in their genealogical history. How then can we explain the patterns in the data? One possibility is population structure, with unequal sampling from different subpopulations. Alternatively, positive selection may not operate as is commonly modeled. In particular, the rate of fixation of advantageous mutations may have increased in the recent past.

  19. Home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rokeya Sakhawat Hossain

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A fiery feminist piece that argues that Indian women are all homeless; animals have homes but Indian women have none, because they have to depend on the mercy of their "keepers"; therefore, Indian women live a life worse than animals.

  20. Clinic and Home-Based Behavioral Intervention for Obesity in Preschoolers: A Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Lori J; Spear Filigno, Stephanie; Bolling, Christopher; Ratcliff, Megan B; Kichler, Jessica C; Robson, Shannon M; Simon, Stacey L; McCullough, Mary Beth; Clifford, Lisa M; Odar Stough, Cathleen; Zion, Cynthia; Ittenbach, Richard F

    2018-01-01

    To test the hypotheses that an innovative skills-based behavioral family clinic and home-based intervention (LAUNCH) would reduce body mass index z score (BMIz) compared with motivational interviewing and to standard care in preschool-aged children with obesity. Randomized controlled trial with children between the ages of 2 and 5 years above the 95th percentile for body mass index for age and sex recruited from 27 pediatrician offices across 10 recruitment cycles between March 12, 2012 and June 8, 2015. Children were randomized to LAUNCH (an 18-session clinic and home-based behavioral intervention), motivational interviewing (delivered at the same frequency as LAUNCH), or standard care (no formal intervention). Weight and height were measured by assessors blinded to participant assignment. The primary outcome, BMIz at month 6 after adjusting for baseline BMIz, was tested separately comparing LAUNCH with motivational interviewing and LAUNCH with standard care using regression-based analysis of covariance models. A total of 151 of the 167 children randomized met intent-to-treat criteria and 92% completed the study. Children were 76% White and 57% female, with an average age of 55 months and BMI percentile of 98.57, with no demographic differences between the groups. LAUNCH participants demonstrated a significantly greater decrease in BMIz (mean = -0.32, SD = ±0.33) compared with motivational interviewing (mean = -0.05, SD = ±0.27), P behavioral skills-based intervention is necessary to reduce obesity. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01546727. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Tree Alignment Based on Needleman-Wunsch Algorithm for Sensor Selection in Smart Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Sook-Ling; Foo, Lee Kien

    2017-08-18

    Activity recognition in smart homes aims to infer the particular activities of the inhabitant, the aim being to monitor their activities and identify any abnormalities, especially for those living alone. In order for a smart home to support its inhabitant, the recognition system needs to learn from observations acquired through sensors. One question that often arises is which sensors are useful and how many sensors are required to accurately recognise the inhabitant's activities? Many wrapper methods have been proposed and remain one of the popular evaluators for sensor selection due to its superior accuracy performance. However, they are prohibitively slow during the evaluation process and may run into the risk of overfitting due to the extent of the search. Motivated by this characteristic, this paper attempts to reduce the cost of the evaluation process and overfitting through tree alignment. The performance of our method is evaluated on two public datasets obtained in two distinct smart home environments.

  2. Growing old at home – A randomized controlled trial to investigate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of preventive home visits to reduce nursing home admissions: study protocol [NCT00644826

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riedel-Heller Steffi G

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regarding demographic changes in Germany it can be assumed that the number of elderly and the resulting need for long term care is increasing in the near future. It is not only an individual's interest but also of public concern to avoid a nursing home admission. Current evidence indicates that preventive home visits can be an effective way to reduce the admission rate in this way making it possible for elderly people to stay longer at home than without home visits. As the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of preventive home visits strongly depends on existing services in the social and health system existing international results cannot be merely transferred to Germany. Therefore it is necessary to investigate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of such an intervention in Germany by a randomized controlled trial. Methods The trial is designed as a prospective multi-center randomized controlled trial in the cities of Halle and Leipzig. The trial includes an intervention and a control group. The control group receives usual care. The intervention group receives three additional home visits by non-physician health professionals (1 geriatric assessment, (2 consultation, (3 booster session. The nursing home admission rate after 18 months will be defined as the primary outcome. An absolute risk reduction from a 20% in the control-group to a 7% admission rate in the intervention group including an assumed drop out rate of 30% resulted in a required sample size of N = 320 (n = 160 vs. n = 160. Parallel to the clinical outcome measurement the intervention will be evaluated economically. The economic evaluation will be performed from a society perspective. Discussion To the authors' knowledge for the first time a trial will investigate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of preventive home visits for people aged 80 and over in Germany using the design of a randomized controlled trial. Thus, the trial will contribute to

  3. Blind Measurement Selection: A Random Matrix Theory Approach

    KAUST Repository

    Elkhalil, Khalil

    2016-12-14

    This paper considers the problem of selecting a set of $k$ measurements from $n$ available sensor observations. The selected measurements should minimize a certain error function assessing the error in estimating a certain $m$ dimensional parameter vector. The exhaustive search inspecting each of the $n\\\\choose k$ possible choices would require a very high computational complexity and as such is not practical for large $n$ and $k$. Alternative methods with low complexity have recently been investigated but their main drawbacks are that 1) they require perfect knowledge of the measurement matrix and 2) they need to be applied at the pace of change of the measurement matrix. To overcome these issues, we consider the asymptotic regime in which $k$, $n$ and $m$ grow large at the same pace. Tools from random matrix theory are then used to approximate in closed-form the most important error measures that are commonly used. The asymptotic approximations are then leveraged to select properly $k$ measurements exhibiting low values for the asymptotic error measures. Two heuristic algorithms are proposed: the first one merely consists in applying the convex optimization artifice to the asymptotic error measure. The second algorithm is a low-complexity greedy algorithm that attempts to look for a sufficiently good solution for the original minimization problem. The greedy algorithm can be applied to both the exact and the asymptotic error measures and can be thus implemented in blind and channel-aware fashions. We present two potential applications where the proposed algorithms can be used, namely antenna selection for uplink transmissions in large scale multi-user systems and sensor selection for wireless sensor networks. Numerical results are also presented and sustain the efficiency of the proposed blind methods in reaching the performances of channel-aware algorithms.

  4. Screen-Time Weight-loss Intervention Targeting Children at Home (SWITCH): a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddison, Ralph; Marsh, Samantha; Foley, Louise; Epstein, Leonard H; Olds, Timothy; Dewes, Ofa; Heke, Ihirangi; Carter, Karen; Jiang, Yannan; Mhurchu, Cliona Ni

    2014-09-10

    Screen-based activities, such as watching television (TV), playing video games, and using computers, are common sedentary behaviors among young people and have been linked with increased energy intake and overweight. Previous home-based sedentary behaviour interventions have been limited by focusing primarily on the child, small sample sizes, and short follow-up periods. The SWITCH (Screen-Time Weight-loss Intervention Targeting Children at Home) study aimed to determine the effect of a home-based, family-delivered intervention to reduce screen-based sedentary behaviour on body composition, sedentary behaviour, physical activity, and diet over 24 weeks in overweight and obese children. A two-arm, parallel, randomized controlled trial was conducted. Children and their primary caregiver living in Auckland, New Zealand were recruited via schools, community centres, and word of mouth. The intervention, delivered over 20 weeks, consisted of a face-to-face meeting with the parent/caregiver and the child to deliver intervention content, which focused on training and educating them to use a wide range of strategies designed to reduce their child's screen time. Families were given Time Machine TV monitoring devices to assist with allocating screen time, activity packages to promote alternative activities, online support via a website, and monthly newsletters. Control participants were given the intervention material on completion of follow-up. The primary outcome was change in children's BMI z-score from baseline to 24 weeks. Children (n = 251) aged 9-12 years and their primary caregiver were randomized to receive the SWITCH intervention (n = 127) or no intervention (controls; n = 124). There was no significant difference in change of zBMI between the intervention and control groups, although a favorable trend was observed (-0.016; 95% CI: -0.084, 0.051; p = 0.64). There were also no significant differences on secondary outcomes, except for a trend towards

  5. Pediatric selective mutism therapy: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Maria; Gimigliano, Francesca; Barillari, Maria R; Precenzano, Francesco; Ruberto, Maria; Sepe, Joseph; Barillari, Umberto; Gimigliano, Raffaele; Militerni, Roberto; Messina, Giovanni; Carotenuto, Marco

    2017-10-01

    Selective mutism (SM) is a rare disease in children coded by DSM-5 as an anxiety disorder. Despite the disabling nature of the disease, there is still no specific treatment. The aims of this study were to verify the efficacy of six-month standard psychomotor treatment and the positive changes in lifestyle, in a population of children affected by SM. Randomized controlled trial registered in the European Clinical Trials Registry (EuDract 2015-001161-36). University third level Centre (Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatry Clinic). Study population was composed by 67 children in group A (psychomotricity treatment) (35 M, mean age 7.84±1.15) and 71 children in group B (behavioral and educational counseling) (37 M, mean age 7.75±1.36). Psychomotor treatment was administered by trained child therapists in residential settings three times per week. Each child was treated for the whole period by the same therapist and all the therapists shared the same protocol. The standard psychomotor session length is of 45 minutes. At T0 and after 6 months (T1) of treatments, patients underwent a behavioral and SM severity assessment. To verify the effects of the psychomotor management, the Child Behavior Checklist questionnaire (CBCL) and Selective Mutism Questionnaire (SMQ) were administered to the parents. After 6 months of psychomotor treatment SM children showed a significant reduction among CBCL scores such as in social relations, anxious/depressed, social problems and total problems (Ppsychomotricity a safe and efficacy therapy for pediatric selective mutism.

  6. Staff distress improves by treating pain in nursing home patients with dementia: results from a cluster-randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Aasmul, Irene; Husebo, Bettina Sandgathe; Flo, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Context. Most people with dementia develop neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPSs), which are distressing for their carers. Untreated pain may increase the prevalence and severity of NPSs and thereby staff burden. Objectives. We investigated the association between NPSs and the impact of individual pain treatment on distress in nursing home staff. Methods. Nursing home (NH) units were cluster-randomized to an intervention group (33 NH units; n ¼ 175) or control group (27 NH units; n &fr...

  7. Study protocol: cost-effectiveness of multidisciplinary nutritional support for undernutrition in older adults in nursing home and home-care: cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Anne Marie; Gøgsig Christensen, Annette; Stenbæk Hansen, Birthe; Damsbo-Svendsen, Signe; Kreinfeldt Skovgaard Møller, Tina; Boll Hansen, Eigil; Keiding, Hans

    2014-08-28

    Older adults in nursing home and home-care are a particularly high-risk population for weight loss or poor nutrition. One negative consequence of undernutrition is increased health care costs. Several potentially modifiable nutritional risk factors increase the likelihood of weight loss or poor nutrition. Hence a structured and multidisciplinary approach, focusing on the nutritional risk factors and involving e.g. dieticians, occupational therapists, and physiotherapist, may be necessary to achieve benefits. Up till now a few studies have been done evaluating the cost-effectiveness of nutritional support among undernourished older adults and none of these have used such a multidisciplinary approach. An 11 week cluster randomized trial to assess the cost-effectiveness of multidisciplinary nutritional support for undernutrition in older adults in nursing home and home-care, identified by screening with the Eating validation Scheme. Before start of the study there will be performed a train-the-trainer intervention involving educated nutrition coordinators.In addition to the nutrition coordinator, the participants assigned to the intervention group strategy will receive multidisciplinary nutrition support. Focus will be on treatment of the potentially modifiable nutritional risk factors identified by screening, by involving physiotherapist, registered dietician, and occupational therapist, as relevant and independent of the municipality's ordinary assessment and referral system.The primary outcome parameter will be change in quality of life (by means of Euroquol-5D-3L). Secondary outcomes will be: physical performance (chair stand), nutritional status (weight, Body Mass Index and hand-grip strength), oral care, fall incidents, hospital admissions, rehabilitation stay, moving to nursing homes (for participants from home-care), use of social services and mortality.An economic evaluation will be conducted to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of the multidisciplinary

  8. Optimizing Event Selection with the Random Grid Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhat, Pushpalatha C. [Fermilab; Prosper, Harrison B. [Florida State U.; Sekmen, Sezen [Kyungpook Natl. U.; Stewart, Chip [Broad Inst., Cambridge

    2017-06-29

    The random grid search (RGS) is a simple, but efficient, stochastic algorithm to find optimal cuts that was developed in the context of the search for the top quark at Fermilab in the mid-1990s. The algorithm, and associated code, have been enhanced recently with the introduction of two new cut types, one of which has been successfully used in searches for supersymmetry at the Large Hadron Collider. The RGS optimization algorithm is described along with the recent developments, which are illustrated with two examples from particle physics. One explores the optimization of the selection of vector boson fusion events in the four-lepton decay mode of the Higgs boson and the other optimizes SUSY searches using boosted objects and the razor variables.

  9. Home-based exercise for middle-aged Chinese at diabetic risk: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ying-Tai; Hwang, Chueh-Lung; Chen, Chiao-Nan; Chuang, Lee-Ming

    2011-05-01

    To evaluate short- (3 months) and long-term (9 months) effects of home-based exercise on adiponectin, exercise behavior and metabolic risk factors in middle-aged adults at diabetic risk. One hundred and thirty-five middle-aged adults (38 men, 97 women) with at least one diabetic risk factor were randomly assigned to either a home-based exercise group (Ex-group) or a usual care group (C-group). Outcome measures included plasma adiponectin, exercise self-efficacy, physical activity, and metabolic risk factors, as follows: insulin levels, insulin resistance by homeostasis model assessment (HOMA-IR), physical fitness, and components of metabolic syndrome. This study was conducted in metropolitan Taipei from 2004 to 2005. The Ex-group had improvements in exercise self-efficacy (+2.5, p = 0.01), body mass index (BMI) (-0.6 kg/m2, p < 0.001) and flexibility (+2.4 cm, p < 0.001) at 3-month follow-up and maintained BMI and flexibility at 9-month follow-up. The Ex-group exhibited significantly increased physical activity while the C-group exhibited decreased physical activity at 9-month follow-up (p < 0.001). No intervention effect was found on adiponectin (p = 0.64) or other outcome measures over time. Home-based exercise did not improve adiponectin levels, but significantly improved exercise behavior, and certain metabolic risk factors, with the effects maintained for 9-months in subjects with type 2 diabetic risk. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Hidden State Conditional Random Field for Abnormal Activity Recognition in Smart Homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Tong

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available As the number of elderly people has increased worldwide, there has been a surge of research into assistive technologies to provide them with better care by recognizing their normal and abnormal activities. However, existing abnormal activity recognition (AAR algorithms rarely consider sub-activity relations when recognizing abnormal activities. This paper presents an application of the Hidden State Conditional Random Field (HCRF method to detect and assess abnormal activities that often occur in elderly persons’ homes. Based on HCRF, this paper designs two AAR algorithms, and validates them by comparing them with a feature vector distance based algorithm in two experiments. The results demonstrate that the proposed algorithms favorably outperform the competitor, especially when abnormal activities have same sensor type and sensor number as normal activities.

  11. Home exercise improves the quality of sleep and daytime sleepiness of elderlies: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandão, Glauber Sá; Gomes, Glaucia Sá Brandão Freitas; Brandão, Glaudson Sá; Callou Sampaio, Antônia A; Donner, Claudio F; Oliveira, Luis V F; Camelier, Aquiles Assunção

    2018-01-01

    Aging causes physiological changes which affect the quality of sleep. Supervised physical exercise is an important therapeutic resource to improve the sleep of the elderlies, however there is a low adherence to those type of programs, so it is necessary to implement an exercise program which is feasible and effective. The study aimed to test the hypothesis that a semi-supervised home exercise program, improves sleep quality and daytime sleepiness of elderlies of the community who present poor sleep quality. This was a randomized controlled trial study, conducted from May to September 2017, in Northeastern Brazil, with elderlies of the community aging 60 years old or older, sedentary, with lower scores or equal to 5 at the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and without cognitive decline. From one hundred ninety-one potential participants twenty-eight refused to participate, therefore, one hundred thirty-one (mean age 68 ± 7 years), and 88% female, were randomly assigned to an intervention group - IG (home exercise and sleep hygiene, n = 65) and a control group - CG (sleep hygiene only, n = 66). Sleep assessment tools were used: PSQI, Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS) and clinical questionnaire of Berlin. The level of physical activity has been assessed by means of International Physical Activity Questionnaire adapted for the elderly (IPAQ) and Mini-Mental State Examination for cognitive decline. All participants were assessed before and after the 12-week intervention period and, also, the assessors were blind. The IG showed significant improvement in quality of sleep with a mean reduction of 4.9 ± 2.7 points in the overall PSQI (p exercise is effective in improving the quality of sleep and self-referred daytime sleepiness of sedentary elderlies of the community who presented sleep disorders. Ensaiosclinicos.gov.br process number: RBR-3cqzfy.

  12. Improving the use of hospice services in nursing homes: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casarett, David; Karlawish, Jason; Morales, Knashawn; Crowley, Roxane; Mirsch, Terre; Asch, David A

    2005-07-13

    Hospice care may improve the quality of end-of-life care for nursing home residents, but hospice is underutilized by this population, at least in part because physicians are not aware of their patients' preferences. To determine whether it is possible to increase hospice utilization and improve the quality of end-of-life care by identifying residents whose goals and preferences are consistent with hospice care. Randomized controlled trial (December 2003-December 2004) of nursing home residents and their surrogate decision makers (N=205) in 3 US nursing homes. A structured interview identified residents whose goals for care, treatment preferences, and palliative care needs made them appropriate for hospice care. These residents' physicians were notified and asked to authorize a hospice informational visit. The primary outcome measures were (1) hospice enrollment within 30 days of the intervention and (2) families' ratings of the quality of care for residents who died during the 6-month follow-up period. Of the 205 residents in the study sample, 107 were randomly assigned to receive the intervention, and 98 received usual care. Intervention residents were more likely than usual care residents to enroll in hospice within 30 days (21/107 [20%] vs 1/98 [1%]; P<.001 [Fisher exact test]) and to enroll in hospice during the follow-up period (27/207 [25%] vs 6/98 [6%]; P<.001). Intervention residents had fewer acute care admissions (mean: 0.28 vs 0.49; P = .04 [Wilcoxon rank sum test]) and spent fewer days in an acute care setting (mean: 1.2 vs 3.0; P = .03 [Wilcoxon rank sum test]). Families of intervention residents rated the resident's care more highly than did families of usual care residents (mean on a scale of 1-5: 4.1 vs 2.5; P = .04 [Wilcoxon rank sum test]). A simple communication intervention can increase rates of hospice referrals and families' ratings of end-of-life care and may also decrease utilization of acute care resources.

  13. Enhancing the self-esteem of selected male nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, D E; Kelbley, T J; Durham, L; James, J S

    1992-08-01

    This study investigated treatment procedures for enhancing the self-esteem of older adult male nursing home residents. Twenty-one subjects were assigned randomly to either a control group meeting to discuss current news events or an experimental group receiving the intervention. Self-esteem significantly increased for the experimental subjects but not before they experienced a significant decrease in feelings of self-worth. The midtreatment observation of the dependent variable was a vital factor in determining the curvilinear relationship between time and the protocol.

  14. Selection of Novel Peptides Homing the 4T1 CELL Line: Exploring Alternative Targets for Triple Negative Breast Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera L Silva

    Full Text Available The use of bacteriophages to select novel ligands has been widely explored for cancer therapy. Their application is most warranted in cancer subtypes lacking knowledge on how to target the cancer cells in question, such as the triple negative breast cancer, eventually leading to the development of alternative nanomedicines for cancer therapeutics. Therefore, the following study aimed to select and characterize novel peptides for a triple negative breast cancer murine mammary carcinoma cell line- 4T1. Using phage display, 7 and 12 amino acid random peptide libraries were screened against the 4T1 cell line. A total of four rounds, plus a counter-selection round using the 3T3 murine fibroblast cell line, was performed. The enriched selective peptides were characterized and their binding capacity towards 4T1 tissue samples was confirmed by immunofluorescence and flow cytometry analysis. The selected peptides (4T1pep1 -CPTASNTSC and 4T1pep2-EVQSSKFPAHVS were enriched over few rounds of selection and exhibited specific binding to the 4T1 cell line. Interestingly, affinity to the human MDA-MB-231 cell line was also observed for both peptides, promoting the translational application of these novel ligands between species. Additionally, bioinformatics analysis suggested that both peptides target human Mucin-16. This protein has been implicated in different types of cancer, as it is involved in many important cellular functions. This study strongly supports the need of finding alternative targeting systems for TNBC and the peptides herein selected exhibit promising future application as novel homing peptides for breast cancer therapy.

  15. Interpersonal relationships of elderly in selected old age homes in urban India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duvvuru Jamuna

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Never before have there been so many old people in India. According the 2001 Census of India data, the projected figure for 2031 is 179 million seniors. Dual-career families, changing values, and nuclear family dynamics have altered the social landscape of India. An emerging phenomenon in urban India is the emergence of “pay and stay” homes as a late life living arrangement for middle and higher-income groups. This study focused on selected ‘pay and stay’ homes in the four cities of Hyderabad, Bangalore, Chennai, and Tiruvananthapuram. Personal interviews were conducted with 150 seniors to understand the relocation experience, the extent and nature of self-reported social networks, and evaluation by seniors of this late life arrangement. Majority of respondents were female (65%. More than half of the respondents (58% reported being currently widowed. Results show that childlessness and strained intergenerational relationships were important considerations in the decision to relocate. Majority of the seniors had never conceived that they would be spending their autumn years away from family. Occupants frequently conceived of their living space as their “home.” Living amidst non-family members, the reported network sizes were small. The absence of family members was frequently cited as a source of dissatisfaction when evaluating these homes.

  16. Apathy in nursing home residents with dementia: results from a cluster-randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treusch, Y; Majic, T; Page, J; Gutzmann, H; Heinz, A; Rapp, M A

    2015-02-01

    Here we evaluate an interdisciplinary occupational and sport therapy intervention for dementia patients suffering from apathy. A prospective, controlled, rater-blinded, clinical trial with two follow-ups was conducted as part of a larger cluster-randomized trial in 18 nursing homes in Berlin. n=117 dementia patients with apathy, defined as a score of 40 or more on the apathy evaluation scale (AES) or presence of apathy on the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI), were randomly assigned to intervention or control group. The intervention included 10 months of brief activities, provided once a week. The primary outcome measure was the total score on the AES scale measured directly after the intervention period and again after 12 months. We found significant group differences with respect to apathy during the 10 month intervention period (F2,82=7.79, Papathy in the control group, but not in the intervention group. Within one year after the intervention was ceased, the treatment group worsened and no longer differed significantly from the control group (P=0.55). Our intervention was effective for the therapy of apathy in dementia, when applied, but not one year after cessation of therapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. A pilot randomized, controlled trial of an in-home drinking water intervention among HIV + persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colford, John M; Saha, Sona R; Wade, Timothy J; Wright, Catherine C; Vu, Mai; Charles, Sandra; Jensen, Peter; Hubbard, Alan; Levy, Deborah A; Eisenberg, Joseph N S

    2005-06-01

    Although immunocompromised persons may be at increased risk for gastrointestinal illnesses, no trials investigating drinking water treatment and gastrointestinal illness in such patients have been published. Earlier results from San Francisco suggested an association (OR 6.76) between tap water and cryptosporidiosis among HIV + persons. The authors conducted a randomized, triple-blinded intervention trial of home water treatment in San Francisco, California, from April 2000 to May 2001. Fifty HIV-positive patients were randomized to externally identical active (N = 24) or sham (N = 26) treatment devices. The active device contained a filter and UV light; the sham provided no treatment. Forty-five (90%) of the participants completed the study and were successfully blinded. Illness was measured using 'highly credible gastrointestinal illness' (HCGI), a previously published measure. There were 31 episodes of HCGI during 1,797 person-days in the sham group and 16 episodes during 1,478 person-days in the active group. The adjusted relative risk was 3.34 (95% CI: 0.99-11.21) times greater in those with the sham device. The magnitude of the point estimate of the risk, its consistency with recently published observational data, and its relevance for drinking water choices by immunocompromised individuals support the need for larger trials.

  18. Study protocol: optimization of complex palliative care at home via telemedicine. A cluster randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasselaar Jeroen

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Due to the growing number of elderly with advanced chronic conditions, healthcare services will come under increasing pressure. Teleconsultation is an innovative approach to deliver quality of care for palliative patients at home. Quantitative studies assessing the effect of teleconsultation on clinical outcomes are scarce. The aim of this present study is to investigate the effectiveness of teleconsultation in complex palliative homecare. Methods/Design During a 2-year recruitment period, GPs are invited to participate in this cluster randomized controlled trial. When a GP refers an eligible patient for the study, the GP is randomized to the intervention group or the control group. Patients in the intervention group have a weekly teleconsultation with a nurse practitioner and/or a physician of the palliative consultation team. The nurse practitioner, in cooperation with the palliative care specialist of the palliative consultation team, advises the GP on treatment policy of the patient. The primary outcome of patient symptom burden is assessed at baseline and weekly using the Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale (ESAS and at baseline and every four weeks using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS. Secondary outcomes are self-perceived burden from informal care (EDIZ, patient experienced continuity of medical care (NCQ, patient and caregiver satisfaction with the teleconsultation (PSQ, the experienced problems and needs in palliative care (PNPC-sv and the number of hospital admissions. Discussion This is one of the first randomized controlled trials in palliative telecare. Our data will verify whether telemedicine positively affects palliative homecare. Trial registration The Netherlands National Trial Register NTR2817

  19. Contradictory effects for prevention of depression and anxiety in residents in homes for the elderly: a pragmatic randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dozeman, E.; van Marwijk, H.W.J.; van Schaik, D.J.F.; Smit, H.F.E.; Stek, M.L.; van der Horst, H.E.; Bohlmeijer, E.T.; Beekman, A.T.F.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a stepped-care program to prevent the onset of depression and anxiety disorders in elderly people living in residential homes. Methods: A pragmatic randomized controlled trial was conducted to compare the intervention with usual

  20. Contradictory effects for prevention of depression and anxiety in residents in home for the elderly: a pragmatic randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dozeman, Els; van Marwijk, Harm; van Schaik, Digna J.F.; Smit, Filip; Stek, Max; van der Horst, Henriëtte E.; Bohlmeijer, Ernst Thomas; Beekman, Aartjan T.F.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a stepped-care program to prevent the onset of depression and anxiety disorders in elderly people living in residential homes. Methods: A pragmatic randomized controlled trial was conducted to compare the intervention with usual

  1. Effect of physical training on urinary incontinence: a randomized parallel group trial in nursing homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinsnes AG

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Anne G Vinsnes1, Jorunn L Helbostad2, Signe Nyrønning3, Gene E Harkless1,4, Randi Granbo5, Arnfinn Seim61Faculty of Nursing, Sør-Trøndelag University College, 2Department of Neuroscience, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 3Søbstad Community Hospital and Teaching Nursing Home, Trondheim, Norway; 4University of New Hampshire, College of Health and Social Services, Nursing Faculty, Durham, New Hampshire, USA; 5Department of Physiotherapy, Sør-Trøndelag University College, 6Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, NorwayBackground: Residents in nursing homes (NHs are often frail older persons who have impaired physical activity. Urinary incontinence (UI is a common complaint for residents in NHs. Reduced functional ability and residence in NHs are documented to be risk factors for UI.Objective: To investigate if an individualized training program designed to improve activity of daily living (ADL and physical capacity among residents in nursing homes has any impact on UI.Materials and methods: This randomized controlled trial was a substudy of a Nordic multicenter study. Participants had to be >65 years, have stayed in the NH for more than 3 months and in need of assistance in at least one ADL. A total of 98 residents were randomly allocated to either a training group (n = 48 or a control group (n = 50 after baseline registrations. The training program lasted for 3 months and included accommodated physical activity and ADL training. Personal treatment goals were elicited for each subject. The control group received their usual care. The main outcome measure was UI as measured by a 24-hour pad-weighing test. There was no statistically significant difference between the groups on this measure at baseline (P = 0.15. Changes were calculated from baseline to 3 months after the end of the intervention.Results: Altogether, 68 participants were included in the analysis

  2. Exercise program for nursing home residents with Alzheimer's disease: a 1-year randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolland, Yves; Pillard, Fabien; Klapouszczak, Adrian; Reynish, Emma; Thomas, David; Andrieu, Sandrine; Rivière, Daniel; Vellas, Bruno

    2007-02-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of an exercise program in improving ability to perform activities of daily living (ADLs), physical performance, and nutritional status and decreasing behavioral disturbance and depression in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Randomized, controlled trial. Five nursing homes. One hundred thirty-four ambulatory patients with mild to severe AD. Collective exercise program (1 hour, twice weekly of walk, strength, balance, and flexibility training) or routine medical care for 12 months. ADLs were assessed using the Katz Index of ADLs. Physical performance was evaluated using 6-meter walking speed, the get-up-and-go test, and the one-leg-balance test. Behavioral disturbance, depression, and nutritional status were evaluated using the Neuropsychiatric Inventory, the Montgomery and Asberg Depression Rating Scale, and the Mini-Nutritional Assessment. For each outcome measure, the mean change from baseline to 12 months was calculated using intention-to-treat analysis. ADL mean change from baseline score for exercise program patients showed a slower decline than in patients receiving routine medical care (12-month mean treatment differences: ADL=0.39, P=.02). A significant difference between the groups in favor of the exercise program was observed for 6-meter walking speed at 12 months. No effect was observed for behavioral disturbance, depression, or nutritional assessment scores. In the intervention group, adherence to the program sessions in exploratory analysis predicted change in ability to perform ADLs. No adverse effects of exercise occurred. A simple exercise program, 1 hour twice a week, led to significantly slower decline in ADL score in patients with AD living in a nursing home than routine medical care.

  3. Cost-consequence analysis of "washing without water" for nursing home residents: a cluster randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoonhoven, Lisette; van Gaal, Betsie G I; Teerenstra, Steven; Adang, Eddy; van der Vleuten, Carine; van Achterberg, Theo

    2015-01-01

    No-rinse disposable wash gloves are increasingly implemented in health care to replace traditional soap and water bed baths without proper evaluation of (cost) effectiveness. To compare bed baths for effects on skin integrity and resistance against bathing and costs. Cluster randomized trial. Fifty six nursing home wards in the Netherlands. Participants: Five hundred adult care-dependent residents and 275 nurses from nursing home wards. The experimental condition 'washing without water' consists of a bed bath with disposable wash gloves made of non-woven waffled fibers, saturated with a no-rinse, quickly vaporizing skin cleaning and caring lotion. The control condition is a traditional bed bath using soap, water, washcloths and towels. Both conditions were continued for 6 weeks. Outcome measures were prevalence of skin damage distinguished in two levels of severity: any skin abnormality/lesion and significant skin lesions. Additional outcomes: resistance during bed baths, costs. Any skin abnormalities/lesions over time decreased slightly in the experimental group, and increased slightly in the control group, resulting in 72.7% vs 77.6% of residents having any skin abnormalities/lesions after 6 weeks, respectively (p=0.04). There were no differences in significant skin lesions or resistance after 6 weeks. Mean costs for bed baths during 6 weeks per resident were estimated at €218.30 (95%CI 150.52-286.08) in the experimental group and €232.20 (95%CI: 203.80-260.60) in the control group (difference €13.90 (95%CI: -25.61-53.42). Washing without water mildly protects from skin abnormalities/lesions, costs for preparing and performing bed baths do not differ from costs for traditional bed bathing. Thus, washing without water can be considered the more efficient alternative. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Applying the principles of organizational psychology to improve the selection of home health aides and homemakers: Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katcher, B L; Buhler-Wilkerson, K

    1989-01-01

    The authors present an employment selection system specifically developed for the home health care industry that is designed to maximize the quality of care by providing capable, committed caregivers to clients.

  5. Effect of physical training on urinary incontinence: a randomized parallel group trial in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinsnes, Anne G; Helbostad, Jorunn L; Nyrønning, Signe; Harkless, Gene E; Granbo, Randi; Seim, Arnfinn

    2012-01-01

    Residents in nursing homes (NHs) are often frail older persons who have impaired physical activity. Urinary incontinence (UI) is a common complaint for residents in NHs. Reduced functional ability and residence in NHs are documented to be risk factors for UI. To investigate if an individualized training program designed to improve activity of daily living (ADL) and physical capacity among residents in nursing homes has any impact on UI. This randomized controlled trial was a substudy of a Nordic multicenter study. Participants had to be >65 years, have stayed in the NH for more than 3 months and in need of assistance in at least one ADL. A total of 98 residents were randomly allocated to either a training group (n = 48) or a control group (n = 50) after baseline registrations. The training program lasted for 3 months and included accommodated physical activity and ADL training. Personal treatment goals were elicited for each subject. The control group received their usual care. The main outcome measure was UI as measured by a 24-hour pad-weighing test. There was no statistically significant difference between the groups on this measure at baseline (P = 0.15). Changes were calculated from baseline to 3 months after the end of the intervention. Altogether, 68 participants were included in the analysis, 35 in the intervention group and 33 in the control group. The average age was 84.3 years. The 3 months' postintervention adjusted mean difference between groups according to amount of leakage was 191 g (P = 0.03). This result was statistically significant after adjusting for baseline level, age, sex, and functional status. The leakage increased in residents not receiving the experimental intervention, while UI in the training group showed improvement. The intervention group had significant better results compared with the control group after an individualized training program designed to improve ADL and physical capacity. Further studies are needed to evaluate the

  6. Supporting Heart Failure Patient Transitions From Acute to Community Care With Home Telemonitoring Technology: A Protocol for a Provincial Randomized Controlled Trial (TEC4Home).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-18

    Seniors with chronic diseases such as heart failure have complex care needs. They are vulnerable to their condition deteriorating and, without timely intervention, may require multiple emergency department visits and/or repeated hospitalizations. Upon discharge, the transition from the emergency department to home can be a vulnerable time for recovering patients with disruptions in the continuity of care. Remote monitoring of heart failure patients using home telemonitoring, coupled with clear communication protocols between health care professionals, can be effective in increasing the safety and quality of care for seniors with heart failure discharged from the emergency department. The aim of the Telehealth for Emergency-Community Continuity of Care Connectivity via Home Telemonitoring (TEC4Home) study is to generate evidence through a programmatic evaluation and a clinical trial to determine how home telemonitoring may improve care and increase patient safety during the transition of care and determine how it is best implemented to support patients with heart failure within this context. This 4-year project consists of 3 studies to comprehensively evaluate the outcomes and effectiveness of TEC4Home. Study 1 is a feasibility study with 90 patients recruited from 2 emergency department sites to test implementation and evaluation procedures. Findings from the feasibility study will be used to refine protocols for the larger trial. Study 2 is a cluster randomized controlled trial that will include 30 emergency department sites and 900 patients across British Columbia. The primary outcome of the randomized controlled trial will be emergency department revisits and hospital readmission rates. Secondary outcomes include health care resource utilization/costs, communication between members of the care team, and patient quality of life. Study 3 will run concurrently to study 2 and test the effectiveness of predictive analytic software to detect patient deterioration

  7. Supervised versus non-supervised implementation of an oral health care guideline in (residential) care homes: a cluster randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Putten, Gert-Jan; De Visschere, Luc; Schols, Jos; de Baat, Cees; Vanobbergen, Jacques

    2010-07-02

    The increase of the proportion of elderly people has implications for health care services. Advances in oral health care and treatment have resulted in a reduced number of edentulous individuals. An increasing number of dentate elderly people have tooth wear, periodontal disease, oral implants, and sophisticated restorations and prostheses. Hence, they are in need of both preventive and curative oral health care continuously. Weakened oral health due to neglect of self care and professional care and due to reduced oral health care utilization is already present when elderly people are still community-dwelling. At the moment of (residential) care home admittance, many elderly people are in need of oral health care urgently. The key factor in realizing and maintaining good oral health is daily oral hygiene care. For proper daily oral hygiene care, many residents are dependent on nurses and nurse aides. In 2007, the Dutch guideline "Oral health care in (residential) care homes for elderly people" was developed. Previous implementation research studies have revealed that implementation of a guideline is very complicated. The overall aim of this study is to compare a supervised versus a non-supervised implementation of the guideline in The Netherlands and Flanders (Belgium). The study is a cluster randomized intervention trial with an institution as unit of randomization. A random sample of 12 (residential) care homes accommodating somatic as well as psycho-geriatric residents in The Netherlands as well as in Flanders (Belgium) are randomly allocated to an intervention or control group. Representative samples of 30 residents in each of the 24 (residential) care homes are monitored during a 6-months period. The intervention consists of supervised implementation of the guideline and a daily oral health care protocol. Primary outcome variable is the oral hygiene level of the participating residents. To determine the stimulating or inhibiting factors of the implementation

  8. Home-based aerobic interval training improves peak oxygen uptake equal to residential cardiac rehabilitation: a randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moholdt, Trine; Bekken Vold, Mona; Grimsmo, Jostein; Slørdahl, Stig Arild; Wisløff, Ulrik

    2012-01-01

    Aerobic capacity, measured as the peak oxygen uptake, is a strong predictor of survival in cardiac patients. Aerobic interval training (AIT), walking/running four times four minutes at 85-95% of peak heart rate, has proven to be effective in increasing peak oxygen uptake in coronary heart disease patients. As some patients do not attend organized rehabilitation programs, home-based exercise should be an alternative. We investigated whether AIT could be performed effectively at home, and compared the effects on peak oxygen uptake with that observed after a standard care, four-week residential rehabilitation. Thirty patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery were randomized to residential rehabilitation or home-based AIT. At six months follow-up, peak oxygen uptake increased 4.6 (±2.7) and 3.9 (±3.6) mL·kg(-1) min(-1) (both peffect between patients randomized to home-based AIT compared to patients attending organized rehabilitation (95% confidence interval -1.8, 3.5). AIT patients reported good adherence to exercise training. Even though these first data indicate positive effects of home-based AIT in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery, more studies are needed to provide supporting evidence for the application of this rehabilitation strategy. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00363922.

  9. Exercise or Social Intervention for Nursing Home Residents with Dementia: A Pilot Randomized, Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souto Barreto, Philipe; Cesari, Matteo; Denormandie, Philippe; Armaingaud, Didier; Vellas, Bruno; Rolland, Yves

    2017-09-01

    To compare the effects of exercise with those of a structured nonphysical intervention on ability to perform activities of daily living (ADLs) and physical and cognitive function of persons with dementia (PWDs) living in nursing homes (NH). Cluster-randomized pilot-controlled trial. Seven French NHs. PWDs living in NHs. NHs were randomized to an exercise group (4 NHs, n = 47) or structured social activity group (3 NHs, n = 50) for a 24-week intervention performed twice per week for 60 minutes per session. The main endpoint was ADL performance (Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study Activities of Daily Living Inventory for Severe Alzheimer's Disease Scale (ADCS-ADL-sev); range 0-54, higher is better); secondary endpoints were overall cognitive function (Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE)) and performance-based tests of physical function (Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB), usual gait speed). Ninety-one participants with at least one postbaseline ADL assessment were included in efficacy analysis. Groups differed at baseline in terms of sex, neuropsychiatric symptoms, and nutritional status. Multilevel analysis adjusted for baseline differences between groups found no significant difference between effects of exercise and social activity (group-by-time interaction), with adjusted mean differences at 6 months of 1.9 points for ADCS-ADL-sev and 0.55 points for MMSE favoring social activity and 0.6 points for SPPB and 0.05 m/s favoring exercise. Adverse events did not differ between groups, except that the social activity group had more falls than the exercise group. A larger, longer trial is required to determine whether exercise has greater health benefits than nonphysical interventions for institutionalized PWDs. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  10. Spiritual history taking in palliative home care: A cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermandere, Mieke; Warmenhoven, Franca; Van Severen, Evie; De Lepeleire, Jan; Aertgeerts, Bert

    2016-04-01

    Many health-care providers experience barriers to addressing spiritual needs, such as not having the right vocabulary. The ars moriendi model might be a feasible tool for spiritual history taking in palliative care. To investigate the effect of a structured spiritual history taking on the spiritual well-being of palliative patients in home care. Cluster randomized controlled trial, conducted between February and October 2013. Registered nurses and general practitioners approached eligible patients with an incurable, life-threatening disease for study participation. Health-care providers allocated to the intervention arm of the study took a spiritual history on the basis of the ars moriendi model. Health-care providers in the control arm provided care as usual. Patient-reported outcomes on spiritual well-being, quality of life, pain, and patient-provider trust were assessed at two points in time. A total of 245 health-care providers participated in the study (204 nurses and 41 physicians). In all, 49 patient-provider dyads completed the entire study protocol. The median age of the patients was 75 years (range: 41-95 years), and 55% of the patients were female. There were no significant differences at any point in time in the scores on spiritual well-being, quality of life, pain, or patient-provider trust between the intervention and the control group. This cluster randomized controlled trial showed no demonstrable effect of spiritual history taking on patient scores for spiritual well-being, quality of life, health-care relationship trust, or pain. Further research is needed to develop instruments that accurately assess the effectiveness of spiritual interventions in palliative care populations. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. Study protocol: cost-effectiveness of multidisciplinary nutritional support for undernutrition in older adults in nursing home and home-care: cluster randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Anne Marie; Gøgsig Christensen, Annette; Stenbæk Hansen, Birthe

    2014-01-01

    -care, identified by screening with the Eating validation Scheme. Before start of the study there will be performed a train-the-trainer intervention involving educated nutrition coordinators.In addition to the nutrition coordinator, the participants assigned to the intervention group strategy will receive...... in both the control and intervention groups, participants in the intervention group and the involved multidisciplinary team will be performed. CONCLUSION: In this study we will evaluate in a randomized controlled trial whether multidisciplinary nutritional support is cost-effective, in undernourished......BACKGROUND: Older adults in nursing home and home-care are a particularly high-risk population for weight loss or poor nutrition. One negative consequence of undernutrition is increased health care costs. Several potentially modifiable nutritional risk factors increase the likelihood of weight loss...

  12. Selection bias in family reports on end of life with dementia in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Steen, Jenny T; Deliens, Luc; Ribbe, Miel W; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, Bregje D

    2012-12-01

    Selective participation in retrospective studies of families recruited after the patient's death may threaten generalizability of reports on end-of-life experiences. To assess possible selection bias in retrospective study of dementia at the end of life using family reports. Two physician teams covering six nursing home facilities in the Netherlands reported on 117 of 119 consecutive decedents within two weeks after death unaware of after-death family participation in the study. They reported on characteristics; treatment and care; overall patient outcomes such as comfort, nursing care, and outcomes; and their own perspectives on the experience. We compared results between decedents with and without family participation. The family response rate was 55%. There were no significant differences based on participation versus nonparticipation in demographics and other nursing home resident characteristics, treatment and care, or overall resident outcome. However, among participating families, physicians perceived higher-quality aspects of nursing care and outcome, better consensus between staff and family on treatment, and a more peaceful death. Participation was less likely with involvement of a new family member in the last month. Families may be more likely to participate in research with more harmonious teamwork in end-of-life caregiving. Where family participation is an enrollment criterion, comparing demographics alone may not capture possible selection bias, especially in more subjective measures. Selection bias toward more positive experiences, which may include the physician's and probably also the family's experiences, should be considered if representativeness is aimed for. Future work should address selection bias in other palliative settings and countries, and with prospective recruitment.

  13. Effectiveness of home visit falls prevention strategy for Taiwanese community-dwelling elders: randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tzu-Ting; Acton, Gayle J

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to examine the effect of a multifactorial intervention to prevent falls by increasing self-efficacy to prevent falls, improving the knowledge of medication safety, and decreasing the number of environmental risks in older persons dwelling in the community. A sample of 120 cognitively intact residents of this community who were 65 years of age and older were recruited into a two-group pretest-post-test experimental design and randomly assigned to an experimental group and a comparison group (60 in each group). The intervention was delivered, and data were collected during three home visits in a 4-month period. (1) Experimental subjects improved their fall self-efficacy, environmental safety, and knowledge of medication safety significantly (p falls was reduced at post-test in both groups compared to pretest scores, and the falling was more serious in the comparison group at post-test compared to that in the experimental group. The results can help community health professionals to individualize their interventions to the specific needs of the elderly, thus helping to prevent falls among community-dwelling elders.

  14. A randomized, controlled trial of in-home drinking water intervention to reduce gastrointestinal illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colford, John M; Wade, Timothy J; Sandhu, Sukhminder K; Wright, Catherine C; Lee, Sherline; Shaw, Susan; Fox, Kim; Burns, Susan; Benker, Anne; Brookhart, M Alan; van der Laan, Mark; Levy, Deborah A

    2005-03-01

    Trials have provided conflicting estimates of the risk of gastrointestinal illness attributable to tap water. To estimate this risk in an Iowa community with a well-run water utility with microbiologically challenged source water, the authors of this 2000-2002 study randomly assigned blinded volunteers to use externally identical devices (active device: 227 households with 646 persons; sham device: 229 households with 650 persons) for 6 months (cycle A). Each group then switched to the opposite device for 6 months (cycle B). The active device contained a 1-microm absolute ceramic filter and used ultraviolet light. Episodes of "highly credible gastrointestinal illness," a published measure of diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, and abdominal cramps, were recorded. Water usage was recorded with personal diaries and an electronic totalizer. The numbers of episodes in cycle A among the active and sham device groups were 707 and 672, respectively; in cycle B, the numbers of episodes were 516 and 476, respectively. In a log-linear generalized estimating equations model using intention-to-treat analysis, the relative rate of highly credible gastrointestinal illness (sham vs. active) for the entire trial was 0.98 (95% confidence interval: 0.86, 1.10). No reduction in gastrointestinal illness was detected after in-home use of a device designed to be highly effective in removing microorganisms from water.

  15. Clinical Effectiveness of Integrating Depression Care Management into Medicare Home Health: The Depression CAREPATH Cluster-Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Martha L.; Raue, Patrick J.; Reilly, Catherine F.; Greenberg, Rebecca L.; Meyers, Barnett S.; Banerjee, Samprit; Pickett, Yolonda R.; Sheeran, Thomas F.; Ghesquiere, Angela; Zukowski, Diane; Rosas, Vianca H.; McLaughlin, Jeanne; Pledger, Lori; Doyle, Joan; Joachim, Pamela; Leon, Andrew C.

    2015-01-01

    Importance Depression is highly prevalent, inadequately treated, and contributes to hospitalization and other poor outcomes in older home healthcare patients. Feasible and effective interventions are needed to reduce this burden of depression. Objective To determine whether among older Medicare home health recipients who screen positive for depression, patients of nurses randomized to intervention have greater improvement in depressive symptoms over one year compared to patients receiving enhanced usual care. Design The cluster-randomized effectiveness trial randomized nurse-teams to Intervention (12 teams) or enhanced usual care (9 teams). Patients were recruited 2009–2012, assessed, and followed at 3, 6, and 12-months by research staff blind to intervention status. Setting Conducted at six home healthcare agencies nationwide. Patients interviewed at home and by telephone. Participants Medicare home health patients age ≥65 who screened positive for depression on routine nurse assessments. Of 502 eligible patients, 306 enrolled. Intervention Depression CAREPATH (CARE for PATients at Home) requires nurses to manage depression during routine home visits by weekly symptom assessment, medication management, care coordination, education, goal setting. Training totaled 7 hours (4 on-site, 3 web). Researchers telephoned supervisors every other week. Main Outcome and Measure Depression severity, assessed by 24-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS). Results 306 participants were predominately female (69.6%), diverse (18.0% Black, 16.0% Hispanic), average age 76.5 (SD=8.0) years. In full sample, the intervention had no effect (treatment × time interaction: P=0.13). Adjusted HDRS scores (CAREPATH vs control) did not differ at three (10.5 vs 11.4; P=0.26) or six months (9.3 vs 10.5; P=0.12), barely reaching significance at twelve months (8.7 vs 10.6; P=0.05). In subsample with mild depression (HDRS<10), the intervention had no effect (P=.90) and HDRS did not differ

  16. Can typical US home visits affect infant attachment? Preliminary findings from a randomized trial of Healthy Families Durham.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlin, Lisa J; Martoccio, Tiffany L; Appleyard Carmody, Karen; Goodman, W Benjamin; O'Donnell, Karen; Williams, Janis; Murphy, Robert A; Dodge, Kenneth A

    2017-12-01

    US government-funded early home visiting services are expanding significantly. The most widely implemented home visiting models target at-risk new mothers and their infants. Such home visiting programs typically aim to support infant-parent relationships; yet, such programs' effects on infant attachment quality per se are as yet untested. Given these programs' aims, and the crucial role of early attachments in human development, it is important to understand attachment processes in home visited families. The current, preliminary study examined 94 high-risk mother-infant dyads participating in a randomized evaluation of the Healthy Families Durham (HFD) home visiting program. We tested (a) infant attachment security and disorganization as predictors of toddler behavior problems and (b) program effects on attachment security and disorganization. We found that (a) infant attachment disorganization (but not security) predicted toddler behavior problems and (b) participation in HFD did not significantly affect infant attachment security or disorganization. Findings are discussed in terms of the potential for attachment-specific interventions to enhance the typical array of home visiting services.

  17. Event selection with a Random Forest in IceCube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruhe, Tim [TU, Dortmund (Germany); Collaboration: IceCube-Collaboration

    2011-07-01

    The Random Forest method is a multivariate algorithm that can be used for classification and regression respectively. The Random Forest implemented in the RapidMiner learning environment has been used for training and validation on data and Monte Carlo simulations of the IceCube neutrino telescope. Latest results are presented.

  18. Human activity recognition based on feature selection in smart home using back-propagation algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Hongqing; He, Lei; Si, Hao; Liu, Peng; Xie, Xiaolei

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, Back-propagation(BP) algorithm has been used to train the feed forward neural network for human activity recognition in smart home environments, and inter-class distance method for feature selection of observed motion sensor events is discussed and tested. And then, the human activity recognition performances of neural network using BP algorithm have been evaluated and compared with other probabilistic algorithms: Naïve Bayes(NB) classifier and Hidden Markov Model(HMM). The results show that different feature datasets yield different activity recognition accuracy. The selection of unsuitable feature datasets increases the computational complexity and degrades the activity recognition accuracy. Furthermore, neural network using BP algorithm has relatively better human activity recognition performances than NB classifier and HMM. Copyright © 2014 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Staff Perceptions of Key Factors Guiding Nursing Home Search and Selection Within the Veterans Health Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Edward Alan; Gidmark, Stefanie; Gadbois, Emily; Rudolph, James L; Intrator, Orna

    2017-06-21

    Veterans enter nursing homes (NHs) for short-term postacute, rehabilitation, respite, or end-of-life care. They also enter NHs on a long-term basis due to frailty, disability, functional deficits, and cognitive impairment. Little is known about how a particular NH is chosen once the decision to enter a NH has been made. This study identified VA staff perceptions of the key factors influencing the search and selection of NHs within the Veterans Health Administration (VHA). Data derived from 35 semistructured interviews with discharge planning and contracting staff from 12 Veterans Affairs Medical Centers (VAMCs). VA staff placed a premium on Veteran and family preferences in the NH selection process, though VA staff knowledge and familiarity with placement options established the general parameters within which NH placement decisions were made. Geographic proximity to Veterans' homes and families was a major factor in NH choice. Other key considerations included Veterans' specialty care needs (psychiatric, postacute, ventilator) and Veteran/facility demographics (age, race/ethnicity, Veteran status). VA staff tried to remain neutral in NH selection, thus instructing families to visit facilities and review publicly available quality data. VA staff report that amenities (private rooms, activities, smoking) and aesthetics (cleanliness, smell, layout, décor) often outweighed objective quality indicators in Veteran and family decision making. Findings suggest that VAMCs facilitate Veteran and family decision making around NH selection. They also suggest that VAMCs endeavor to identify and recruit a broader array of higher quality NHs to better match the specific needs of Veterans and families to the choice set available.

  20. Effect of integrated yoga module on personality of home guards in Bengaluru: A randomized control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaranath, B; Nagendra, H R; Deshpande, Sudheer

    2016-03-01

    Home Guards Organization is an independent disciplined and uniformed body of volunteers. All categories of home guards (HGs), who work in the field, experience varied emotions and are required to cope with varied situations. Yoga practices may be helpful to master such emotions and should lead to improvement in personality. To study the efficacy of integrated yoga module (IYM) on personality (Gunās) (yogic personality measure) of HGs. Of 500 HGs who attended introductory lectures, 148 HGs of either gender, who satisfied the inclusion and exclusion criteria and who consented to participate in the study were randomly allocated to two groups. The yoga group (YG) practiced an IYM for 1 h daily, 6 days a week for 8 weeks along with their routine work. The control group (CG) remained on routine work. Personality was assessed before and after 8 weeks using the self-administered Vedic Personality Inventory. Baseline scores for all domains for both groups did not differ significantly (P > 0.05, Shapiro Wilk's test). Sattva score in YG significantly increased from 39.87 ± 2.02 to 47.14 ± 7.22, where as it decreased significantly from 43.66 ± 4.39 to 37.74 ± 10.26 in CG. Rajas score in YG significantly decreased from 29.15 ± 0.98 to 27.46 ± 4.38, where as it increased significantly from 28.60 ± 3.55 to 32.74 ± 5.37 in CG. Tamas score in YG significantly decreased from 30.98 ± 1.04 to 25.40 ± 5.11, where as it significantly increased from 27.74 ± 4.43 to 30.51 ± 5.50 in CG. Results indicate that IYM can profitably be suggested for HGs as a cost-effective means to help them cope with stressful situations. Copyright © 2016 Transdisciplinary University, Bangalore and World Ayurveda Foundation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Using Robots at Home to Support Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadbent, Elizabeth; Garrett, Jeff; Jepsen, Nicola; Li Ogilvie, Vickie; Ahn, Ho Seok; Robinson, Hayley; Peri, Kathryn; Kerse, Ngaire; Rouse, Paul; Pillai, Avinesh; MacDonald, Bruce

    2018-02-13

    Socially assistive robots are being developed for patients to help manage chronic health conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Adherence to medication and availability of rehabilitation are suboptimal in this patient group, which increases the risk of hospitalization. This pilot study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of a robot delivering telehealth care to increase adherence to medication and home rehabilitation, improve quality of life, and reduce hospital readmission compared with a standard care control group. At discharge from hospital for a COPD admission, 60 patients were randomized to receive a robot at home for 4 months or to a control group. Number of hospitalization days for respiratory admissions over the 4-month study period was the primary outcome. Medication adherence, frequency of rehabilitation exercise, and quality of life were also assessed. Implementation interviews as well as benefit-cost analysis were conducted. Intention-to-treat and per protocol analyses showed no significant differences in the number of respiratory-related hospitalizations between groups. The intervention group was more adherent to their long-acting inhalers (mean number of prescribed puffs taken per day=48.5%) than the control group (mean 29.5%, P=.03, d=0.68) assessed via electronic recording. Self-reported adherence was also higher in the intervention group after controlling for covariates (P=.04). The intervention group increased their rehabilitation exercise frequency compared with the control group (mean difference -4.53, 95% CI -7.16 to -1.92). There were no significant differences in quality of life. Of the 25 patients who had the robot, 19 had favorable attitudes. This pilot study suggests that a homecare robot can improve adherence to medication and increase exercise. Further research is needed with a larger sample size to further investigate effects on hospitalizations after improvements are made to the robots. The robots could be

  2. Home parenteral nutrition increases fat free mass in patients with incurable gastrointestinal cancer. Results of a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obling, Sine Roelsgaard; Wilson, Benedicte Vibjerg; Pfeiffer, Per

    2018-01-01

    Objective: Preventing loss of muscle mass and function is an enduring challenge in malnourished patients with incurable cancer. The benefit of supplemental home parenteral nutrition has not been firmly established. Our aim was to evaluate the effects of supplemental home parenteral nutrition......, the primary endpoint being fat free mass (FFM) and secondary: muscle function, quality of life and overall survival. Design and methods: In a single centre open-label randomised controlled trial, patients with incurable gastrointestinal cancer, nutritionally at risk, were randomly assigned to either; a) best...... practice nutritional care and dietetic counselling (non-sHPN) or b) dietetic counselling and supplemental home parenteral nutrition (sHPN group). Treatment duration was 24 weeks with visits every six weeks for five scheduled visits.Main outcome was gain in bioelectrical impedance analyses (BIA) estimated...

  3. Home-based telebehavioral health for U.S. military personnel and veterans with depression: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luxton, David D; Pruitt, Larry D; Wagner, Amy; Smolenski, Derek J; Jenkins-Guarnieri, Michael A; Gahm, Gregory

    2016-11-01

    Evidence of feasibility, safety, and effectiveness of home-based telebehavioral health (HBTBH) needs to be established before adoption of HBTBH in the military health system can occur. The purpose of this randomized controlled noninferiority trial was to compare the safety, feasibility, and effectiveness of HBTBH to care provided in the traditional in-office setting among military personnel and veterans. One hundred and twenty-one U.S. military service members and veterans were recruited at a military treatment facility and a Veterans Health Administration hospital. Participants were randomized to receive 8 sessions of behavioral activation treatment for depression (BATD) either in the home via videoconferencing (VC) or in a traditional in-office (same room) setting. Participants were assessed at baseline, midtreatment (4 weeks), posttreatment (8 weeks), and 3 months posttreatment. Mixed-effects modeling results with Beck Hopelessness Scale and Beck Depression Inventory II scores suggested relatively strong and similar reductions in hopelessness and depressive symptoms for both groups; however, noninferiority analyses failed to reject the null hypothesis that in-home care was no worse than in-office treatment based on these measures. There were not any differences found between treatment groups in regards to treatment satisfaction. Safety procedures were successfully implemented, supporting the feasibility of home-based care. BATD can be feasibly delivered to the homes of active duty service members and veterans via VC. Small-group differences suggest a slight benefit of in-person care over in-home telehealth on some clinical outcomes. Reasons for this are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. Improving the outcome of infants born at <30 weeks' gestation - a randomized controlled trial of preventative care at home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orton Jane

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early developmental interventions to prevent the high rate of neurodevelopmental problems in very preterm children, including cognitive, motor and behavioral impairments, are urgently needed. These interventions should be multi-faceted and include modules for caregivers given their high rates of mental health problems. Methods/Design We have designed a randomized controlled trial to assess the effectiveness of a preventative care program delivered at home over the first 12 months of life for infants born very preterm ( Discussion This paper presents the background, study design and protocol for a randomized controlled trial in very preterm infants utilizing a preventative care program in the first year after discharge home designed to improve cognitive, motor and behavioral outcomes of very preterm children and caregiver mental health at two-years' corrected age. Clinical Trial Registration Number ACTRN12605000492651

  5. Arthroscopy and manipulation versus home therapy program in treatment of adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder: a prospective randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smitherman, James Adam; Struk, Aimee M; Cricchio, Mike; McFadden, Ginny; Dell, Ruth B; Horodyski, MaryBeth; Wright, Thomas W

    2015-01-01

    This study determined in a prospective manner if arthroscopic shoulder capsular release can decrease the duration of adhesive capsulitis symptoms when compared with a nonoperative home therapy program. Patients randomized to the operative group underwent arthroscopic capsular release and manipulation of the shoulder. Immediately after surgery they began the same stretching program as the nonoperative group, which consisted of terminal range of motion low-grade stretches twice daily for at least 15 minutes per session for 3 months. Twenty-six patients granted consent for the study (final analyses included 10 operative and 7 nonoperative). There were no statistical differences between the groups regarding gender, age (operative mean age, 51.5 ± 11.1 years; nonoperative mean age, 52.0 ± 6.8 years) or treatment outcome. This prospective, randomized study, which compared arthroscopic capsular release to a gentle home stretching program, demonstrated both treatment options to be effective treatment modalities.

  6. The "Don't smoke in our home" randomized controlled trial to protect children from second-hand smoke exposure at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chellini, Elisabetta; Gorini, Giuseppe; Carreras, Giulia

    2013-01-01

    Increasing smoke-free homes is an important public health goal, but only few interventions have yielded positive results. The aim of the "Don't smoke in our home" trial was to evaluate a counseling intervention focused on promoting totally smoke-free homes and cars (TSFHC) delivered to women with children resident in four Tuscan towns. We used a two-group randomized controlled trial design. Participants were asked about their smoking habits and about restrictions on smoking in their homes and cars. All women received a self-help booklet promoting TSFHC, and 110 women randomized to the intervention also attended brief counseling on second-hand smoke exposure protection and received three gifts to remember the commitment to TSFHC. Follow-up was conducted by phone after four months. We recruited 218 women, 64 of whom had a university degree and 131 of whom were smokers; 62% reported smoking indoors and 58% in cars. Before the intervention, nonsmokers were more likely to report totally smoke-free homes (TSFH, 52%) and cars (TSFC, 53%) than smokers (26% and 17% respectively; P <0.001). Participants of the experimental arm had similar odds as controls of having implemented TSFH after the intervention, and nonsignificantly increased odds of having introduced TSFC (odds ratio [OR] 1.47; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.69-3.11), particularly among smokers (OR 2.24, 95%CI 0.69-7.26). All participants independently of the study arm recorded significant increases of 12 and 15 percentage points in TSFH and TSFC, respectively. Few smokers quit smoking (7%), stopped smoking indoors (5%), and stopped smoking in cars (7%), with no differences between the intervention and control groups. Adding brief counseling to written materials did not significantly increase TSFHC. However, delivering written materials only may produce modest but noteworthy TSFHC increases at the population level, even though the participants in the study did not represent a population-based sample, given the

  7. Vitamin E and respiratory tract infections in elderly nursing home residents: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meydani, Simin Nikbin; Leka, Lynette S; Fine, Basil C; Dallal, Gerard E; Keusch, Gerald T; Singh, Maria Fiatarone; Hamer, Davidson H

    2004-08-18

    Respiratory tract infections are prevalent in elderly individuals, resulting in increased morbidity, mortality, and use of health care services. Vitamin E supplementation has been shown to improve immune response in elderly persons. However, the clinical importance of these findings has not been determined. To determine the effect of 1 year of vitamin E supplementation on respiratory tract infections in elderly nursing home residents. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted from April 1998 to August 2001 at 33 long-term care facilities in the Boston, Mass, area. A total of 617 persons aged at least 65 years and who met the study's eligibility criteria were enrolled; 451 (73%) completed the study. Vitamin E (200 IU) or placebo capsule administered daily; all participants received a capsule containing half the recommended daily allowance of essential vitamins and minerals. Incidence of respiratory tract infections, number of persons and number of days with respiratory tract infections (upper and lower), and number of new antibiotic prescriptions for respiratory tract infections among all participants randomized and those who completed the study. Vitamin E had no significant effect on incidence or number of days with infection for all, upper, or lower respiratory tract infections. However, fewer participants receiving vitamin E acquired 1 or more respiratory tract infections (60% vs 68%; risk ratio [RR], 0.88; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.76-1.00; P =.048 for all participants; and 65% vs 74%; RR, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.75-0.99; P =.04 for completing participants), or upper respiratory tract infections (44% vs 52%; RR, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.69-1.00; P =.05 for all participants; and 50% vs 62%; RR, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.66-0.96; P =.01 for completing participants). When common colds were analyzed in a post hoc subgroup analysis, the vitamin E group had a lower incidence of common cold (0.67 vs 0.81 per person-year; RR, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.68-1.01; P =.06 for all

  8. A Home Visiting Parenting Program and Child Obesity: A Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordway, Monica Roosa; Sadler, Lois S; Holland, Margaret L; Slade, Arietta; Close, Nancy; Mayes, Linda C

    2018-01-16

    Young children living in historically marginalized families are at risk for becoming adolescents with obesity and subsequently adults with increased obesity-related morbidities. These risks are particularly acute for Hispanic children. We hypothesized that the prevention-focused, socioecological approach of the "Minding the Baby" (MTB) home visiting program might decrease the rate of childhood overweight and obesity early in life. This study is a prospective longitudinal cohort study in which we include data collected during 2 phases of the MTB randomized controlled trial. First-time, young mothers who lived in medically underserved communities were invited to participate in the MTB program. Data were collected on demographics, maternal mental health, and anthropometrics of 158 children from birth to 2 years. More children in the intervention group had a healthy BMI at 2 years. The rate of obesity was significantly higher (P < .01) in the control group (19.7%) compared with the intervention group (3.3%) at this age. Among Hispanic families, children in the MTB intervention were less likely to have overweight or obesity (odds ratio = 0.32; 95% confidence interval: 0.13-0.78). Using the MTB program, we significantly lowered the rate of obesity among 2-year-old children living in low-socioeconomic-status communities. In addition, children of Hispanic mothers were less likely to have overweight or obesity at 2 years. Given the high and disproportionate national prevalence of Hispanic young children with overweight and obesity and the increased costs of obesity-related morbidities, these findings have important clinical, research, and policy implications. Copyright © 2018 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  9. Caring for the Elderly at Work and Home: Can a Randomized Organizational Intervention Improve Psychological Health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossek, Ellen Ernst; Thompson, Rebecca J; Lawson, Katie M; Bodner, Todd; Perrigino, Matthew B; Hammer, Leslie B; Buxton, Orfeu M; Almeida, David M; Moen, Phyllis; Hurtado, David A; Wipfli, Brad; Berkman, Lisa F; Bray, Jeremy W

    2017-12-07

    Although job stress models suggest that changing the work social environment to increase job resources improves psychological health, many intervention studies have weak designs and overlook influences of family caregiving demands. We tested the effects of an organizational intervention designed to increase supervisor social support for work and nonwork roles, and job control in a results-oriented work environment on the stress and psychological distress of health care employees who care for the elderly, while simultaneously considering their own family caregiving responsibilities. Using a group-randomized organizational field trial with an intent-to-treat design, 420 caregivers in 15 intervention extended-care nursing facilities were compared with 511 caregivers in 15 control facilities at 4 measurement times: preintervention and 6, 12, and 18 months. There were no main intervention effects showing improvements in stress and psychological distress when comparing intervention with control sites. Moderation analyses indicate that the intervention was more effective in reducing stress and psychological distress for caregivers who were also caring for other family members off the job (those with elders and those "sandwiched" with both child and elder caregiving responsibilities) compared with employees without caregiving demands. These findings extend previous studies by showing that the effect of organizational interventions designed to increase job resources to improve psychological health varies according to differences in nonwork caregiving demands. This research suggests that caregivers, especially those with "double-duty" elder caregiving at home and work and "triple-duty" responsibilities, including child care, may benefit from interventions designed to increase work-nonwork social support and job control. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. Study on MAX-MIN Ant System with Random Selection in Quadratic Assignment Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iimura, Ichiro; Yoshida, Kenji; Ishibashi, Ken; Nakayama, Shigeru

    Ant Colony Optimization (ACO), which is a type of swarm intelligence inspired by ants' foraging behavior, has been studied extensively and its effectiveness has been shown by many researchers. The previous studies have reported that MAX-MIN Ant System (MMAS) is one of effective ACO algorithms. The MMAS maintains the balance of intensification and diversification concerning pheromone by limiting the quantity of pheromone to the range of minimum and maximum values. In this paper, we propose MAX-MIN Ant System with Random Selection (MMASRS) for improving the search performance even further. The MMASRS is a new ACO algorithm that is MMAS into which random selection was newly introduced. The random selection is one of the edgechoosing methods by agents (ants). In our experimental evaluation using ten quadratic assignment problems, we have proved that the proposed MMASRS with the random selection is superior to the conventional MMAS without the random selection in the viewpoint of the search performance.

  11. Potential usefulness of olive oil-based lipid emulsions in selected situations of home parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimund, Jean-Marie; Arondel, Yves; Joly, Francisca; Messing, Bernard; Duclos, Bernard; Baumann, Rene

    2004-12-01

    Long-term (i.e. home) parenteral nutrition has been advocated to be responsible for several metabolic complications among which hepatic disorders have long been the most relevant in view of patients' prognosis. The increased knowledge of the pathophysiologic factors associated to parenteral nutrition-related liver disease as well as the regular improvement of the components and the techniques used for parenteral nutrition leaded progressively to a better prevention of these side effects. This case report focuses on the potential interest of olive oil-based lipid emulsions in home parenteral nutrition patients, in selected situations of home parenteral nutrition-associated metabolic liver disease.

  12. Integrative psychotherapeutic nursing home program to reduce multiple psychiatric symptoms of cognitively impaired patients and caregiver burden: randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Ton J E M; Duivenvoorden, Hugo J; van der Lee, Jacqueline; Olde Rikkert, Marcel G M; Beekman, Aartjan T F; Ribbe, Miel W

    2011-06-01

    To test the effectiveness of an integrative psychotherapeutic nursing home program (integrative reactivation and rehabilitation [IRR]) to reduce multiple neuropsychiatry symptoms (MNPS) of cognitively impaired patients and caregiver burden (CB). Randomized controlled trial. Psychiatric-skilled nursing home (IRR) and usual care (UC), consisting of different types of nursing home care at home or in an institution. N = 168 (81 IRR and 87 UC). Patients had to meet classification of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition for dementia, amnestic disorders, or other cognitive disorders. Further inclusion criteria: Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI) ≥3; Mini-Mental State Examination ≥18 and ≤27; and Barthel Index (BI) ≥5 and ≤19. IRR consisted of a person-oriented integrative psychotherapeutic nursing home program to reduce MNPS of the patient and CB. UC consisted of different types of nursing home care at home or in an institution, mostly emotion oriented. Primary outcome variable was MNPS (number and sum-severity of NPI). Furthermore, burden and competence of caregiver were also measured. T1 (inclusion), T2 (end of treatment), T3 (after 6 months of follow-up). Cohen's d (Cd) was calculated for mean differences (intention to treat). For confounding, repeated measurement modeling (random regression modeling [RRM]) was applied. In the short term from the perspective of the caregiver, IRR showed up to 34% surplus effects on MNPS of the patients; NPI symptoms: 1.31 lower (Cd, -0.53); and NPI sum- severity: 11.16 lower (Cd, -0.53). In follow-up, the effects were sustained. However, from the perspective of the nursing team, these effects were insignificant, although the trend was in the same direction and correlated significantly with the caregiver results over time (at T3: r = 0.48). In addition, IRR showed surplus effects (up to 36%) on burden and competence of caregiver: NPI emotional distress: 3.78 (Cd, -0.44); CB: 17.69 (Cd, -0

  13. Tradeoffs between homing and habitat quality for spawning site selection by hatchery-origin Chinook salmon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cram, Jeremy M.; Torgersen, Christian E.; Klett, Ryan S.; Pess, George R.; May, Darran; Pearsons, Todd N.; Dittman, Andrew H.

    2013-01-01

    Spawning site selection by female salmon is based on complex and poorly understood tradeoffs between the homing instinct and the availability of appropriate habitat for successful reproduction. Previous studies have shown that hatchery-origin Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) released from different acclimation sites return with varying degrees of fidelity to these areas. To investigate the possibility that homing fidelity is associated with aquatic habitat conditions, we quantified physical habitat throughout 165 km in the upper Yakima River basin (Washington, USA) and mapped redd and carcass locations from 2004 to 2008. Principal components analysis identified differences in substrate, cover, stream width, and gradient among reaches surrounding acclimation sites, and canonical correspondence analysis revealed that these differences in habitat characteristics were associated with spatial patterns of spawning (p < 0.01). These analyses indicated that female salmon may forego spawning near their acclimation area if the surrounding habitat is unsuitable. Evaluating the spatial context of acclimation areas in relation to surrounding habitat may provide essential information for effectively managing supplementation programs and prioritizing restoration actions.

  14. A randomized controlled study about the use of eHealth in the home health care of premature infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gund Anna

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One area where the use of information and communication technology (ICT, or eHealth, could be developed is the home health care of premature infants. The aim of this randomized controlled study was to investigate whether the use of video conferencing or a web application improves parents’ satisfaction in taking care of a premature infant at home and decreases the need of home visits. In addition, nurses’ attitudes regarding the use of these tools were examined. Method Thirty-four families were randomized to one of three groups before their premature infant was discharged from the hospital to home health care: a control group receiving standard home health care (13 families; a web group receiving home health care supplemented with the use of a web application (12 families; a video group with home health care supplemented with video conferencing using Skype (9 families. Families and nursing staff answered questionnaires about the usefulness of ICT. In addition, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 16 families. Results All the parents in the web group found the web application easy to use. 83% of the families thought it was good to have access to their child’s data through the application. All the families in the video group found Skype easy to use and were satisfied with the video calls. 88% of the families thought that video calls were better than ordinary phone calls. 33% of the families in the web group and 75% of those in the video group thought the need for home visits was decreased by the web application or Skype. 50% of the families in the web group and 100% of those in the video group thought the web application or the video calls had helped them feel more confident in caring for their child. Most of the nurses were motivated to use ICT but some were reluctant and avoided using the web application and video conferencing. Conclusion The families were satisfied with both the web application and video

  15. Consumer Preferences for Selection of Solar Home Systems in Urban Areas of Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamran Gohar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Consumer preferences can lay foundation for determining key product attributes essential for the success of a product in the market, enabling the manufacturers optimally allocate resources towards imparting these critical attributes. However identification of consumer preferences especially for new products is a challenging task. This research investigated the consumer preference factors for solar home systems in Rawalpindi/Islamabad (Pakistan; applying MCDM (Multi Criteria Decision Making approach, AHP (Analytical Hierarchy Process survey and analysis method is used for prioritization of the factors and comparison of decision alternatives. Fourteen factors grouped into five categories are selected. It has been found that the manufacturers have to emphasize on performance and functional attributes of these systems at this stage, the cost factors are comparatively lower in importance. Make and warranty, Environmental and Physical features are also lesser important to the early adopters.

  16. Warm and homely or cold and beautiful? Sex differences in trading off traits in mate selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Garth J O; Tither, Jacqueline M; O'Loughlin, Claire; Friesen, Myron; Overall, Nickola

    2004-06-01

    Prior research and theory suggest that people use three main sets of criteria in mate selection: warmth/trustworthiness, attractiveness/vitality, and status/resources. In two studies, men and women made mating choices between pairs of hypothetical potential partners and were forced to make trade-offs among these three criteria (e.g., warm and homely vs. cold and attractive). As predicted, women (relative to men) placed greater importance on warmth/trustworthiness and status/resources in a potential mate but less importance on attractiveness/vitality. In addition, as expected (a) ratings of ideal standards partly mediated the link between sex and mate choices, (b) ideal standards declined in importance from long-term to short-term relationships, with the exception of attractiveness/vitality, and unexpectedly, (c) sex differences were higher for long-term (compared to short-term) mate choice. Explanations and implications are discussed.

  17. Home-based aerobic interval training improves peak oxygen uptake equal to residential cardiac rehabilitation: a randomized, controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trine Moholdt

    Full Text Available Aerobic capacity, measured as the peak oxygen uptake, is a strong predictor of survival in cardiac patients. Aerobic interval training (AIT, walking/running four times four minutes at 85-95% of peak heart rate, has proven to be effective in increasing peak oxygen uptake in coronary heart disease patients. As some patients do not attend organized rehabilitation programs, home-based exercise should be an alternative. We investigated whether AIT could be performed effectively at home, and compared the effects on peak oxygen uptake with that observed after a standard care, four-week residential rehabilitation. Thirty patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery were randomized to residential rehabilitation or home-based AIT. At six months follow-up, peak oxygen uptake increased 4.6 (±2.7 and 3.9 (±3.6 mL·kg(-1 min(-1 (both p<0.005, non-significant between-group difference after residential rehabilitation and AIT, respectively. Quality of life increased significantly in both groups, with no statistical significant difference between groups. We found no evidence for a different treatment effect between patients randomized to home-based AIT compared to patients attending organized rehabilitation (95% confidence interval -1.8, 3.5. AIT patients reported good adherence to exercise training. Even though these first data indicate positive effects of home-based AIT in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery, more studies are needed to provide supporting evidence for the application of this rehabilitation strategy.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00363922.

  18. Supporting Parents of Premature Infants Transitioning from the NICU to Home: A Pilot Randomized Control Trial of a Smartphone Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garfield, Craig F; Lee, Young Seok; Kim, Hyung Nam; Rutsohn, Joshua; Kahn, Janine Yasmin; Mustanski, Brian; Mohr, David C

    2016-05-01

    To determine whether parents of Very Low Birth Weight (VLBW) infants in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) transitioning home with the NICU-2-Home smartphone application have greater parenting self-efficacy, are better prepared for discharge and have shorter length of stay (LOS) than control parents. A four-week pilot randomized controlled trial during the transition home with 90 VLBW parents randomized to usual care (n=44) or usual care plus NICU-2-Home (n=46), a smartphone application designed for VLBW parents. Parenting Sense of Competence Scale (PSOC) was assessed at baseline, day after discharge, and two weeks post-discharge. Preparedness for discharge and length of stay (LOS) were secondary outcomes. Analyses by usage were also included. While parents of VLBW infants in the intervention group did not show an improvement in PSOC during the transition when compared directly to controls, after accounting for actual mean app usage, PSOC improved 7% (2.71 points/time greater; 95%CI = 1.45, 6.27) for intervention versus controls. Compared to controls, above-average users increased their PSOC score by 14% (6.84 points/time; 95%CL = 5.02, 8.67), average users by 11% (4.58 points/time; 95%CL = 2.89, 6.27) and below-average users by 6% (2.41 points/time; 95%CL = 0.04, 4.79). Moderate evidence showed LOS was shorter for above-average users compared to the control group (β = 12.2. SE = 6.9, p = 0.085). A smartphone application used by parents of VLBW infants during the transition home from the NICU can improve parenting self-efficacy, discharge preparedness, and LOS with improved benefits based on usage.

  19. Effectiveness of a lifestyle exercise program for older people receiving a restorative home care service: a pragmatic randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burton E

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Elissa Burton,1,2 Gill Lewin,1,2 Lindy Clemson,3 Duncan Boldy41Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia; 2Research Department, Silver Chain, Perth, WA, Australia; 3Health and Work Research Unit, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 4School of Nursing and Midwifery, Curtin University, Perth, WA, AustraliaBackground: Restorative home care services are short-term and aimed at maximizing a person’s ability to live independently. They are multidimensional and often include an exercise program to improve strength, mobility, and balance. The aim of this study was to determine whether a lifestyle exercise program would be undertaken more often and result in greater functional gains than the current structured exercise program delivered as part of a restorative home care service for older adults.Methods: A pragmatic randomized controlled trial was conducted in an organization with an established restorative home care service. Individuals who were to have an exercise program as part of their service were randomized to receive either a lifestyle and functional exercise program called LiFE (as this was a new program, the intervention or the structured exercise program currently being used in the service (control. Exercise data collected by the individuals throughout and pre and post intervention testing was used to measure balance, strength, mobility, falls efficacy, vitality, function, and disability.Results: There was no difference between the groups in the amounts of exercise undertaken during the 8-week intervention period. Outcome measurement indicated that the LiFE program was as effective, and on 40% of the measures, more effective, than the structured exercise program.Conclusion: Organizations delivering restorative home care services that include an exercise component should consider whether LiFE rather than the exercise program they are currently using could help their clients achieve better outcomes

  20. Home-based neurologic music therapy for arm hemiparesis following stroke: results from a pilot, feasibility randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Alexander J; Magee, Wendy L; Bateman, Andrew; Parker, Michael; Odell-Miller, Helen; Fachner, Jorg

    2018-01-01

    To assess the feasibility of a randomized controlled trial to evaluate music therapy as a home-based intervention for arm hemiparesis in stroke. A pilot feasibility randomized controlled trial, with cross-over design. Randomization by statistician using computer-generated, random numbers concealed in opaque envelopes. Participants' homes across Cambridgeshire, UK. Eleven people with stroke and arm hemiparesis, 3-60 months post stroke, following discharge from community rehabilitation. Each participant engaged in therapeutic instrumental music performance in 12 individual clinical contacts, twice weekly for six weeks. Feasibility was estimated by recruitment from three community stroke teams over a 12-month period, attrition rates, completion of treatment and successful data collection. Structured interviews were conducted pre and post intervention to establish participant tolerance and preference. Action Research Arm Test and Nine-hole Peg Test data were collected at weeks 1, 6, 9, 15 and 18, pre and post intervention by a blinded assessor. A total of 11 of 14 invited participants were recruited (intervention n = 6, waitlist n = 5). In total, 10 completed treatment and data collection. It cannot be concluded whether a larger trial would be feasible due to unavailable data regarding a number of eligible patients screened. Adherence to treatment, retention and interview responses might suggest that the intervention was motivating for participants. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT 02310438.

  1. Antihypertensive treatment based on blood pressure measurement at home or in the physician's office: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staessen, Jan A; Den Hond, Elly; Celis, Hilde; Fagard, Robert; Keary, Louis; Vandenhoven, Guy; O'Brien, Eoin T

    2004-02-25

    Self-measurement of blood pressure is increasingly used in clinical practice, but how it affects the treatment of hypertension requires further study. To compare use of blood pressure (BP) measurements taken in physicians' offices and at home in the treatment of patients with hypertension. Blinded randomized controlled trial conducted from March 1997 to April 2002 at 56 primary care practices and 3 hospital-based outpatient clinics in Belgium and 1 specialized hypertension clinic in Dublin, Ireland. Four hundred participants with a diastolic BP (DBP) of 95 mm Hg or more as measured at physicians' offices were enrolled and followed up for 1 year. Antihypertensive drug treatment was adjusted in a stepwise fashion based on either the self-measured DBP at home (average of 6 measurements per day during 1 week; n = 203) or the average of 3 sitting DBP readings at the physician's office (n = 197). If the DBP guiding treatment was above (>89 mm Hg), at (80-89 mm Hg), or below (Office and home BP levels, 24-hour ambulatory BP, intensity of drug treatment, electrocardiographic and echocardiographic left ventricular mass, symptoms reported by questionnaire, and costs of treatment. At the end of the study (median follow-up, 350 days; interquartile range, 326-409 days), more home BP than office BP patients had stopped antihypertensive drug treatment (25.6% vs 11.3%; Poffice, home, and 24-hour ambulatory BP measurements were higher (Phome BP group than in the office BP group. The mean baseline-adjusted systolic/diastolic differences between the home and office BP groups averaged 6.8/3.5 mm Hg, 4.9/2.9 mm Hg, and 4.9/2.9 mm Hg, respectively. Left ventricular mass and reported symptoms were similar in the 2 groups. Costs per 100 patients followed up for 1 month were only slightly lower in the home BP group (3875 vs 3522 [4921 dollars vs 4473 dollars]; P =.04). Adjustment of antihypertensive treatment based on home BP instead of office BP led to less intensive drug treatment and

  2. CONNECT for quality: protocol of a cluster randomized controlled trial to improve fall prevention in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Ruth A; Corazzini, Kirsten; Porter, Kristie; Daily, Kathryn; McDaniel, Reuben R; Colón-Emeric, Cathleen

    2012-02-29

    Quality improvement (QI) programs focused on mastery of content by individual staff members are the current standard to improve resident outcomes in nursing homes. However, complexity science suggests that learning is a social process that occurs within the context of relationships and interactions among individuals. Thus, QI programs will not result in optimal changes in staff behavior unless the context for social learning is present. Accordingly, we developed CONNECT, an intervention to foster systematic use of management practices, which we propose will enhance effectiveness of a nursing home Falls QI program by strengthening the staff-to-staff interactions necessary for clinical problem-solving about complex problems such as falls. The study aims are to compare the impact of the CONNECT intervention, plus a falls reduction QI intervention (CONNECT + FALLS), to the falls reduction QI intervention alone (FALLS), on fall-related process measures, fall rates, and staff interaction measures. Sixteen nursing homes will be randomized to one of two study arms, CONNECT + FALLS or FALLS alone. Subjects (staff and residents) are clustered within nursing homes because the intervention addresses social processes and thus must be delivered within the social context, rather than to individuals. Nursing homes randomized to CONNECT + FALLS will receive three months of CONNECT first, followed by three months of FALLS. Nursing homes randomized to FALLS alone receive three months of FALLs QI and are offered CONNECT after data collection is completed. Complexity science measures, which reflect staff perceptions of communication, safety climate, and care quality, will be collected from staff at baseline, three months after, and six months after baseline to evaluate immediate and sustained impacts. FALLS measures including quality indicators (process measures) and fall rates will be collected for the six months prior to baseline and the six months after the end of the intervention

  3. CONNECT for quality: protocol of a cluster randomized controlled trial to improve fall prevention in nursing homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson Ruth A

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quality improvement (QI programs focused on mastery of content by individual staff members are the current standard to improve resident outcomes in nursing homes. However, complexity science suggests that learning is a social process that occurs within the context of relationships and interactions among individuals. Thus, QI programs will not result in optimal changes in staff behavior unless the context for social learning is present. Accordingly, we developed CONNECT, an intervention to foster systematic use of management practices, which we propose will enhance effectiveness of a nursing home Falls QI program by strengthening the staff-to-staff interactions necessary for clinical problem-solving about complex problems such as falls. The study aims are to compare the impact of the CONNECT intervention, plus a falls reduction QI intervention (CONNECT + FALLS, to the falls reduction QI intervention alone (FALLS, on fall-related process measures, fall rates, and staff interaction measures. Methods/design Sixteen nursing homes will be randomized to one of two study arms, CONNECT + FALLS or FALLS alone. Subjects (staff and residents are clustered within nursing homes because the intervention addresses social processes and thus must be delivered within the social context, rather than to individuals. Nursing homes randomized to CONNECT + FALLS will receive three months of CONNECT first, followed by three months of FALLS. Nursing homes randomized to FALLS alone receive three months of FALLs QI and are offered CONNECT after data collection is completed. Complexity science measures, which reflect staff perceptions of communication, safety climate, and care quality, will be collected from staff at baseline, three months after, and six months after baseline to evaluate immediate and sustained impacts. FALLS measures including quality indicators (process measures and fall rates will be collected for the six months prior to baseline and

  4. CONNECT for quality: protocol of a cluster randomized controlled trial to improve fall prevention in nursing homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Quality improvement (QI) programs focused on mastery of content by individual staff members are the current standard to improve resident outcomes in nursing homes. However, complexity science suggests that learning is a social process that occurs within the context of relationships and interactions among individuals. Thus, QI programs will not result in optimal changes in staff behavior unless the context for social learning is present. Accordingly, we developed CONNECT, an intervention to foster systematic use of management practices, which we propose will enhance effectiveness of a nursing home Falls QI program by strengthening the staff-to-staff interactions necessary for clinical problem-solving about complex problems such as falls. The study aims are to compare the impact of the CONNECT intervention, plus a falls reduction QI intervention (CONNECT + FALLS), to the falls reduction QI intervention alone (FALLS), on fall-related process measures, fall rates, and staff interaction measures. Methods/design Sixteen nursing homes will be randomized to one of two study arms, CONNECT + FALLS or FALLS alone. Subjects (staff and residents) are clustered within nursing homes because the intervention addresses social processes and thus must be delivered within the social context, rather than to individuals. Nursing homes randomized to CONNECT + FALLS will receive three months of CONNECT first, followed by three months of FALLS. Nursing homes randomized to FALLS alone receive three months of FALLs QI and are offered CONNECT after data collection is completed. Complexity science measures, which reflect staff perceptions of communication, safety climate, and care quality, will be collected from staff at baseline, three months after, and six months after baseline to evaluate immediate and sustained impacts. FALLS measures including quality indicators (process measures) and fall rates will be collected for the six months prior to baseline and the six months after the

  5. Village-Randomized Clinical Trial of Home Distribution of Zinc for Treatment of Childhood Diarrhea in Rural Western Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feikin, Daniel R.; Bigogo, Godfrey; Audi, Allan; Pals, Sherri L.; Aol, George; Mbakaya, Charles; Williamson, John; Breiman, Robert F.; Larson, Charles P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Zinc treatment shortens diarrhea episodes and can prevent future episodes. In rural Africa, most children with diarrhea are not brought to health facilities. In a village-randomized trial in rural Kenya, we assessed if zinc treatment might have a community-level preventive effect on diarrhea incidence if available at home versus only at health facilities. Methods We randomized 16 Kenyan villages (1,903 eligible children) to receive a 10-day course of zinc and two oral rehydration solution (ORS) sachets every two months at home and 17 villages (2,241 eligible children) to receive ORS at home, but zinc at the health–facility only. Children’s caretakers were educated in zinc/ORS use by village workers, both unblinded to intervention arm. We evaluated whether incidence of diarrhea and acute lower respiratory illness (ALRI) reported at biweekly home visits and presenting to clinic were lower in zinc villages, using poisson regression adjusting for baseline disease rates, distance to clinic, and children’s age. Results There were no differences between village groups in diarrhea incidence either reported at the home or presenting to clinic. In zinc villages (1,440 children analyzed), 61.2% of diarrheal episodes were treated with zinc, compared to 5.4% in comparison villages (1,584 children analyzed, p<0.0001). There were no differences in ORS use between zinc (59.6%) and comparison villages (58.8%). Among children with fever or cough without diarrhea, zinc use was low (<0.5%). There was a lower incidence of reported ALRI in zinc villages (adjusted RR 0.68, 95% CI 0.46–0.99), but not presenting at clinic. Conclusions In this study, home zinc use to treat diarrhea did not decrease disease rates in the community. However, with proper training, availability of zinc at home could lead to more episodes of pediatric diarrhea being treated with zinc in parts of rural Africa where healthcare utilization is low. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00530829

  6. Village-randomized clinical trial of home distribution of zinc for treatment of childhood diarrhea in rural Western kenya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel R Feikin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Zinc treatment shortens diarrhea episodes and can prevent future episodes. In rural Africa, most children with diarrhea are not brought to health facilities. In a village-randomized trial in rural Kenya, we assessed if zinc treatment might have a community-level preventive effect on diarrhea incidence if available at home versus only at health facilities. METHODS: We randomized 16 Kenyan villages (1,903 eligible children to receive a 10-day course of zinc and two oral rehydration solution (ORS sachets every two months at home and 17 villages (2,241 eligible children to receive ORS at home, but zinc at the health-facility only. Children's caretakers were educated in zinc/ORS use by village workers, both unblinded to intervention arm. We evaluated whether incidence of diarrhea and acute lower respiratory illness (ALRI reported at biweekly home visits and presenting to clinic were lower in zinc villages, using poisson regression adjusting for baseline disease rates, distance to clinic, and children's age. RESULTS: There were no differences between village groups in diarrhea incidence either reported at the home or presenting to clinic. In zinc villages (1,440 children analyzed, 61.2% of diarrheal episodes were treated with zinc, compared to 5.4% in comparison villages (1,584 children analyzed, p<0.0001. There were no differences in ORS use between zinc (59.6% and comparison villages (58.8%. Among children with fever or cough without diarrhea, zinc use was low (<0.5%. There was a lower incidence of reported ALRI in zinc villages (adjusted RR 0.68, 95% CI 0.46-0.99, but not presenting at clinic. CONCLUSIONS: In this study, home zinc use to treat diarrhea did not decrease disease rates in the community. However, with proper training, availability of zinc at home could lead to more episodes of pediatric diarrhea being treated with zinc in parts of rural Africa where healthcare utilization is low. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT

  7. Impact of home blood pressure monitoring on blood pressure control in older individuals: a French randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzourio, Christophe; Hanon, Olivier; Godin, Ophélia; Soumaré, Aicha; Dufouil, Carole

    2017-03-01

    Home blood pressure (BP) monitoring is one of the tools recommended in hypertension management. However, its influence in older adults is seldom investigated. We aimed to assess whether regular home BP monitoring leads to a reduction of BP and an improvement in hypertension control in older adults. In a 24-month trial, individuals aged 73-97 years were randomized in a control (office and home BP measured at 0, 12, and 24 months) or an intervention (office measured at 0, 12, and 24 months; home BP measured every 3 months) group. The primary outcome was the difference in means office BP over 24 months in hypertensive patients. Secondary outcomes included differences in mean home BP over follow-up in hypertensive patients, and frequency of hypertension and of drug use at 24 months in the total sample. Intention-to-treat analyses comprised 1733 persons, among which 1043 were hypertensive. Hypertensive patients in the intervention group experienced a significantly greater fall in office systolic BP (SBP) [mean between-group difference -2.1 mmHg, 95% confidence interval (CI) -4.1; -0.2, P = 0.03], home SBP (mean between-group difference -3.4, 95% CI -4.8; -2.1, P home diastolic BP (mean between-group difference -1.1, 95% CI -1.8; -0.4, P = 0.002) than those in the control group, in the main model. No overall differences were observed for office diastolic BP (P = 0.74), frequency of hypertension (P = 0.92), or drug use (P = 0.51) over time. Similar results were observed after adjustment for known predictors of BP though attenuated for office SBP (P = 0.07). Regular home BP monitoring every 3 months without co-intervention results in small but greater reductions of BP over time. Further research in large trials focused on older adults is needed to confirm the effectiveness of this intervention in a variety of settings.

  8. In vivo selection of randomly mutated retroviral genomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhout, B.; Klaver, B.

    1993-01-01

    Darwinian evolution, that is the outgrowth of the fittest variants in a population, usually applies to living organisms over long periods of time. Recently, in vitro selection/amplification techniques have been developed that allow for the rapid evolution of functionally active nucleic acids from a

  9. Family Home Food Environment and Nutrition-Related Parent and Child Personal and Behavioral Outcomes of the Healthy Home Offerings via the Mealtime Environment (HOME) Plus Program: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulkerson, Jayne A; Friend, Sarah; Horning, Melissa; Flattum, Colleen; Draxten, Michelle; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne; Gurvich, Olga; Garwick, Ann; Story, Mary; Kubik, Martha Y

    2018-02-01

    Research has demonstrated a significant positive association between frequent family meals and children's dietary intake; however, the promotion of healthful family meals has not been rigorously tested for key food environment and nutrition-related behavioral outcomes in a randomized trial. To describe family home food environment and nutrition-related parent and child personal and behavioral outcomes of the Healthy Home Offerings via the Mealtime Environment Plus program, the first rigorously tested family meals intervention targeting childhood obesity prevention. Randomized controlled trial. Baseline, postintervention (12 months, 93% retention), and follow-up (21 months, 89% retention) data (surveys and dietary recalls) were collected. Children aged 8 to 12 years (N=160) and their parents were randomized to intervention (n=81) or control (n=79) groups. The intervention included five parent goal-setting calls and 10 monthly sessions delivered to families in community settings that focused on experiential nutrition activities and education, meal planning, cooking skill development, and reducing screen time. Family home food environment outcomes and nutrition-related child and parent personal and behavioral outcomes. Analyses used generalized linear mixed models. Primary comparisons were contrasts between intervention and control groups at postintervention and follow-up, with adjustments for child age and parent education. Compared with control parents, intervention parents showed greater improvement over time in scores of self-efficacy for identifying appropriate portion sizes, with significant differences in adjusted means at both post-intervention (P=0.002) and follow-up (P=0.01). Intervention children were less likely to consume at least one sugar-sweetened beverage daily at post-intervention than control children (P=0.04). The Healthy Home Offerings via the Mealtime Environment Plus program involved the entire family and targeted personal, behavioral, and

  10. Home hemodialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agar, John W; Perkins, Anthony; Heaf, James G

    2015-01-01

    We describe the infrastructure that is necessary for hemodialysis in the home focusing on physical requirements, the organization of plumbing and water, and the key features that should guide the selection of machines that are suitable for home use.......We describe the infrastructure that is necessary for hemodialysis in the home focusing on physical requirements, the organization of plumbing and water, and the key features that should guide the selection of machines that are suitable for home use....

  11. Effect of home-based exercise intervention on fasting insulin and Adipocytokines in colorectal cancer survivors: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mi Kyung; Kim, Ji-Young; Kim, Dong-Il; Kang, Dong-Woo; Park, Ji-Hye; Ahn, Ki-Yong; In Yang, Hyuk; Lee, Dong Hoon; Roh, Yun Ho; Lee, Ji-Won; Chu, Sang-Hui; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A; Jones, Lee W; Kim, Nam-Kyu; Jeon, Justin Y

    2017-11-01

    Elevated circulating insulin is associated with increased risk of recurrence and cancer mortality in early-stage colorectal cancer (CRC). We conducted a randomized controlled trial to determine the effect of a 12-week home-based exercise program on fasting insulin, adipocytokines, and physical function in CRC survivors. One hundred and twenty-three stage II-III CRC patients were randomly assigned to either a home-based exercise (n=62) or standard care control group (n=61) for 12weeks. Home-based exercise consisted of aerobic and resistance training, with a goal of obtaining ≥18 metabolic equivalent task (MET)-h/wk. Participants in the exercise group were instructed to participate in >18MET-h/wk. of aerobic and resistance exercise while the participants in the control group were asked to maintain their usual daily activity. The primary outcome was fasting insulin levels. Secondary outcomes were adiponectin, TNF-α levels and 6min walk distance from baseline to post-intervention. After the 12-weeks, moderate-vigorous physical activity participation increased from 9.1±14.7MET-h/wk. to 26.6±21.7MET-h/wk. in the exercise group, with no change in the control group (pexercise group with no change in the control group (p=0.022 for group and time interaction). A similar trend was observed in TNF-α (p=0.030 for group and time interaction). Six minute walk distance increased by 25.2m in the exercise group with no change in the control group (p=0.061 for group and time interaction). The 12week home-based exercise program increased level of physical activity and decreased circulating insulin levels in CRC survivors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Internet-based home training is capable to improve balance in multiple sclerosis: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frevel, D; Mäurer, M

    2015-02-01

    Balance disorders are common in multiple sclerosis. Aim of the study is to investigate the effectiveness of an Internet-based home training program (e-Training) to improve balance in patients with multiple sclerosis. A randomized, controlled study. Academic teaching hospital in cooperation with the therapeutic riding center Gut Üttingshof, Bad Mergentheim. Eighteen multiple sclerosis patients (mean EDSS 3,5) took part in the trial. Outcome of patients using e-Training (N.=9) was compared to the outcome of patients receiving hippotherapy (N.=9), which can be considered as an advanced concept for the improvement of balance and postural control in multiple sclerosis. After simple random allocation patients received hippotherapy or Internet-based home training (balance, postural control and strength training) twice a week for 12 weeks. Assessments were done before and after the intervention and included static and dynamic balance (primary outcome). Isometric muscle strength of the knee and trunk extension/flexion (dynamometer), walking capacity, fatigue and quality of life served as secondary outcome parameters. Both intervention groups showed comparable and highly significant improvement in static and dynamic balance capacity, no difference was seen between the both intervention groups. However looking at fatigue and quality of life only the group receiving hippotherapy improved significantly. Since e-Training shows even comparable effects to hippotherapy to improve balance, we believe that the established Internet-based home training program, specialized on balance and postural control training, is feasible for a balance and strength training in persons with multiple sclerosis. We demonstrated that Internet-based home training is possible in patients with multiple sclerosis.

  13. Home-based balance training using the Wii balance board: a randomized, crossover pilot study in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosperini, Luca; Fortuna, Deborah; Giannì, Costanza; Leonardi, Laura; Marchetti, Maria Rita; Pozzilli, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of a home-based rehabilitation of balance using the Nintendo Wii Balance Board System (WBBS) in patients affected by multiple sclerosis (MS). In this 24-week, randomized, 2-period crossover pilot study, 36 patients having an objective balance disorder were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to 2 counterbalanced arms. Group A started a 12-week period of home-based WBBS training followed by a 12-week period without any intervention; group B received the treatment in reverse order. As endpoints, we considered the mean difference (compared with baseline) in force platform measures (i.e., the displacement of body center of pressure in 30 seconds), 4-step square test (FSST), 25-foot timed walking test (25-FWT), and 29-item MS Impact Scale (MSIS-29), as evaluated after 12 weeks and at the end of the 24-week study period. The 2 groups did not differ in baseline characteristics. Repeated-measures analyses of variance showed significant time × treatment effects, indicating that WBBS was effective in ameliorating force platform measures (F = 4.608, P = .016), FSST (F = 3.745, P = .034), 25-FWT (F = 3.339, P = .048), and MSIS-29 (F = 4.282, P = .023). Five adverse events attributable to the WBSS training (knee or low back pain) were recorded, but only 1 patient had to retire from the study. A home-based WBBS training might potentially provide an effective, engaging, balance rehabilitation solution for people with MS. However, the risk of WBBS training-related injuries should be carefully balanced with benefits. Further studies, including cost-effectiveness analyses, are warranted to establish whether WBBS may be useful in the home setting.

  14. Cost-effectiveness of multidisciplinary wound care in nursing homes: a pseudo-randomized pragmatic cluster trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Trang; Harris, Anthony; Duncan, Gregg; Sussman, Geoff

    2007-09-01

    To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of a multidisciplinary wound care team in the nursing home setting from a health system perspective. Pseudo-randomized pragmatic cluster trial with 20-week follow-up involving 342 uncomplicated leg and pressure ulcers in 176 residents located in 44 high-care nursing homes in Melbourne, Australia in 1999-2000. Twenty-one nursing homes (180 wounds in 94 residents) were assigned to the intervention arm and 23 to the control arm (162 wounds in 82 residents). Residents in the intervention arm received standardized treatment from a wound care team comprising of trained community pharmacists and nurses. Residents in the control arm received usual care. More wounds healed during the trial in the intervention arm than in the control arm (61.7% versus 52.5%, P = 0.07). A Cox regression with shared frailty predicted that the chances of healing increased 73% for intervention wounds [95% confidence interval (CI) 20-150%, P = 0.003]. The mean treatment cost was $A616.4 for intervention and $A977.9 for control patients (P = 0.006). Most cost reduction was obtained from decreases in nursing time and waste disposal. The mean cost saving per wound, adjusted for baseline wound severity and random censoring, was $A277.9 (95% CI $A21.6-$A534.1). Standardized treatment provided by a multidisciplinary wound care team saved costs and improved chronic wound healing in nursing homes. The main source of saving was in the cost of nursing time in applying traditional dressings and in the cost of their disposal.

  15. Assessing the accuracy and stability of variable selection methods for random forest modeling in ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Random forest (RF) modeling has emerged as an important statistical learning method in ecology due to its exceptional predictive performance. However, for large and complex ecological datasets there is limited guidance on variable selection methods for RF modeling. Typically, e...

  16. The frequency of drugs in randomly selected drivers in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Kirsten Wiese; Steentoft, Anni; Hels, Tove

    Introduction Driving under the influence of alcohol and drugs is a global problem. In Denmark as well as in other countries there is an increasing focus on impaired driving. Little is known about the occurrence of psychoactive drugs in the general traffic. Therefore the European commission...... initiated the DRUID project. This roadside study is the Danish part of the EU-project DRUID (Driving under the Influence of Drugs, Alcohol, and Medicines) and included three representative regions in Denmark. Methods Oral fluid samples (n = 3002) were collected randomly from drivers using a sampling scheme...... stratified by time, season, and road type. The oral fluid samples were screened for 29 illegal and legal psychoactive substances and metabolites as well as ethanol. Results Fourteen (0.5%) drivers were positive for ethanol (alone or in combination with drugs) at concentrations above 0.53 g/l, which...

  17. Sample Selection in Randomized Experiments: A New Method Using Propensity Score Stratified Sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipton, Elizabeth; Hedges, Larry; Vaden-Kiernan, Michael; Borman, Geoffrey; Sullivan, Kate; Caverly, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Randomized experiments are often seen as the "gold standard" for causal research. Despite the fact that experiments use random assignment to treatment conditions, units are seldom selected into the experiment using probability sampling. Very little research on experimental design has focused on how to make generalizations to well-defined…

  18. Pseudo cluster randomization dealt with selection bias and contamination in clinical trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teerenstra, S.; Melis, R.J.F.; Peer, P.G.M.; Borm, G.F.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: When contamination is present, randomization on a patient level leads to dilution of the treatment effect. The usual solution is to randomize on a cluster level, but at the cost of efficiency and more importantly, this may introduce selection bias. Furthermore, it may slow

  19. Improving Nursing Home Care through Feedback On PerfoRMance Data (INFORM): Protocol for a cluster-randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoben, Matthias; Norton, Peter G; Ginsburg, Liane R; Anderson, Ruth A; Cummings, Greta G; Lanham, Holly J; Squires, Janet E; Taylor, Deanne; Wagg, Adrian S; Estabrooks, Carole A

    2017-01-10

    Audit and feedback is effective in improving the quality of care. However, methods and results of international studies are heterogeneous, and studies have been criticized for a lack of systematic use of theory. In TREC (Translating Research in Elder Care), a longitudinal health services research program, we collect comprehensive data from care providers and residents in Canadian nursing homes to improve quality of care and life of residents, and quality of worklife of caregivers. The study aims are to a) systematically feed back TREC research data to nursing home care units, and b) compare the effectiveness of three different theory-based feedback strategies in improving performance within care units. INFORM (Improving Nursing Home Care through Feedback On PerfoRMance Data) is a 3.5-year pragmatic, three-arm, parallel, cluster-randomized trial. We will randomize 67 Western Canadian nursing homes with 203 care units to the three study arms, a standard feedback strategy and two assisted and goal-directed feedback strategies. Interventions will target care unit managerial teams. They are based on theory and evidence related to audit and feedback, goal setting, complex adaptive systems, and empirical work on feeding back research results. The primary outcome is the increased number of formal interactions (e.g., resident rounds or family conferences) involving care aides - non-registered caregivers providing up to 80% of direct care. Secondary outcomes are a) other modifiable features of care unit context (improved feedback, social capital, slack time) b) care aides' quality of worklife (improved psychological empowerment, job satisfaction), c) more use of best practices, and d) resident outcomes based on the Resident Assessment Instrument - Minimum Data Set 2.0. Outcomes will be assessed at baseline, immediately after the 12-month intervention period, and 18 months post intervention. INFORM is the first study to systematically assess the effectiveness of different

  20. Home-based psychoeducational and mailed information programs for stroke-caregiving dyads post-discharge: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostwald, Sharon K; Godwin, Kyler M; Cron, Stanley G; Kelley, Carolyn P; Hersch, Gayle; Davis, Sally

    2014-01-01

    This randomized trial compared 6- and 12-month outcomes of a home-based psychoeducational program to mailed information provided to 159 survivors of stroke (SS) and their spousal caregivers (CG). SS (age 50+) and CG were recruited as dyads post-discharge from inpatient rehabilitation. All dyads received mailed information for 12 months. Dyads randomized to the home-based group received an average of 36.7 h of psychoeducation over 6 months. Health status, depression, stress, burden, coping, support, mutuality and function were obtained on all dyads. Repeated measures analysis with linear mixed models was used to compare the groups for change over time in the outcome variables. Both groups demonstrated less depression and stress over time. Compared to the mailed information group, SS in the home-based group demonstrated significantly improved self-reported health and cognitive function; CG demonstrated significantly improved self-reported health and coping strategies. Mutuality and social support decreased in both groups. The home-based intervention was effective in improving self-reported health, coping skills in CG and cognitive functioning in SS. However, the finding that dyads in both groups demonstrated decreased depression and stress suggests that providing repeated doses of relevant, personalized information by mail may result in positive changes. A stroke affects both the stroke survivor and the spousal caregiver, so nurses and therapists should use multicomponent strategies to provide education, support, counseling and linkages to community resources to ease the transition from hospital to home. Stroke may have a negative impact on the dyad's relationship with each other and also on the availability of support people in their lives during the 12 months after hospital discharge. Comprehensive stroke programs should encourage dyads to attend support groups and to seek individual and group counseling, as needed. Establishing an ongoing relationship with

  1. Long-term risk of mortality associated with selective and combined elevation in office, home, and ambulatory blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancia, Giuseppe; Facchetti, Rita; Bombelli, Michele; Grassi, Guido; Sega, Roberto

    2006-05-01

    In the Pressioni Arteriose Monitorate e Loro Associazioni (PAMELA) study, office, home, and ambulatory blood pressure (BP) values were measured contemporaneously between 1990 and 1993 in a large population sample (n=2051). Cardiovascular (CV) and non-CV death certificates were collected over the next 148 months, which allowed us to assess the prognostic value of selective and combined elevation in these 3 BPs over a long follow-up. There were 69 CV and 233 all-cause deaths. Compared with subjects with normal office and 24-hour BP, the hazard ratio for CV death showed a progressive increase in those with a selective office BP elevation (white-coat hypertension), a selective 24-hour BP elevation (masked hypertension), and elevation in both office and 24-hour BP. This was the case also when the above conditions were identified by office versus home BP values. Selective elevation in home versus ambulatory BP or vice versa also carried an increased risk. There was indeed a progressive increase in both CV and all-cause mortality risk from subjects in whom office, home, and ambulatory BP were all normal to those in whom 1, 2, or all 3 BPs were elevated, regardless of which BP was considered. The trends remained significant after adjustment for age and gender, as well as, in most instances, after further adjustment for other cardiovascular risk factors. Thus, white-coat hypertension and masked hypertension, both when identified by office and ambulatory or by office and home BPs, are not prognostically innocent. Indeed, each BP elevation (office, home, or ambulatory) carries an increase in risk mortality that adds to that of the other BP elevations.

  2. Estimating the "Impact" of Out-of-Home Placement on Child Well-Being: Approaching the Problem of Selection Bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Lawrence M.; Bruch, Sarah K.; Johnson, Elizabeth I.; James, Sigrid; Rubin, David

    2009-01-01

    This study used data on 2,453 children aged 4-17 from the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being and 5 analytic methods that adjust for selection factors to estimate the impact of out-of-home placement on children's cognitive skills and behavior problems. Methods included ordinary least squares (OLS) regressions and residualized…

  3. Perceived autonomy and activity choices among physically disabled older people in nursing home settings: a randomized trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Mette; Runge, Ulla; Hoff, Morten

    2009-01-01

    the correspondence between the individual wishes for activities and the concrete content of the programs was not obvious, results indicate potential for enabling the perception of autonomy among physically disabled older nursing home residents. The clinical consequences may suggest a focus on existing traditions......OBJECTIVE. To evaluate the effect of individually tailored programs on perceived autonomy in institutionalized physically disabled older people and to describe participants' activity wishes and content of the programs. METHOD. This blinded randomized trial with follow up included a total of nine...

  4. Home telemonitoring for patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vianello, Andrea; Fusello, Massimo; Gubian, Lorenzo; Rinaldo, Claudia; Dario, Claudio; Concas, Alessandra; Saccavini, Claudio; Battistella, Laura; Pellizzon, Giulia; Zanardi, Giuseppe; Mancin, Silvia

    2016-11-22

    Although a number of studies have suggested that the use of Telemonitoring (TM) in patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) can be useful and efficacious, its real utility in detecting Acute Exacerbation (AE) signaling the need for prompt treatment is not entirely clear. The current study aimed to investigate the benefits of a TM system in managing AE in advanced-stage COPD patients to improve their Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQL) and to reduce utilization of healthcare services. A 12-month Randomised Controlled Trial (RCT) was conducted in the Veneto region (Italy). Adult patients diagnosed with Class III-IV COPD in accordance with the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) classification were recruited and provided a TM system to alert the clinical staff via a trained operator whenever variations in respiratory parameters fell beyond the individual's normal range. The study's primary endpoint was HRQL, measured by the Italian version of the two Short Form 36-item Health Survey (SF36v2). Its secondary endpoints were: scores on the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS); the number and duration of hospitalizations; the number of readmissions; the number of appointments with a pulmonary specialist; the number of visits to the emergency department; and the number of deaths. Three hundred thirty-four patients were enrolled and randomized into two groups for a 1 year period. At its conclusion, changes in the SF36 Physical and Mental Component Summary scores did not significantly differ between the TM and control groups [(-2.07 (8.98) vs -1.91 (7.75); p = 0.889 and -1.08 (11.30) vs -1.92 (10.92); p = 0.5754, respectively]. Variations in HADS were not significantly different between the two groups [0.85 (3.68) vs 0.62 (3.6); p = 0.65 and 0.50 (4.3) vs 0.72 (4.5); p = 0.71]. The hospitalization rate for AECOPD and/or for any cause was not significantly different in the two groups [IRR = 0.89 (95% CI

  5. Acceptance sampling using judgmental and randomly selected samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sego, Landon H.; Shulman, Stanley A.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Wilson, John E.; Pulsipher, Brent A.; Sieber, W. Karl

    2010-09-01

    We present a Bayesian model for acceptance sampling where the population consists of two groups, each with different levels of risk of containing unacceptable items. Expert opinion, or judgment, may be required to distinguish between the high and low-risk groups. Hence, high-risk items are likely to be identifed (and sampled) using expert judgment, while the remaining low-risk items are sampled randomly. We focus on the situation where all observed samples must be acceptable. Consequently, the objective of the statistical inference is to quantify the probability that a large percentage of the unsampled items in the population are also acceptable. We demonstrate that traditional (frequentist) acceptance sampling and simpler Bayesian formulations of the problem are essentially special cases of the proposed model. We explore the properties of the model in detail, and discuss the conditions necessary to ensure that required samples sizes are non-decreasing function of the population size. The method is applicable to a variety of acceptance sampling problems, and, in particular, to environmental sampling where the objective is to demonstrate the safety of reoccupying a remediated facility that has been contaminated with a lethal agent.

  6. Home-based alcohol prevention program for parents and children: A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mares, S.H.W.; Lichtwarck-Aschoff, A.; Verdurmen, J.E.E.; Schulten, I.G.H.; Engels, R.C.M.E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of a home-based alcohol prevention program to delay initiation of alcohol use in children. Methods: In 2011, a total of 1349 sixth-grade children (M = 12.15, SD = 0.47) and their mothers who could read and write Dutch were recruited from primary schools in

  7. Feasibility of a home-based exercise intervention with remote guidance for patients with stable grade II and III gliomas : A pilot randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gehring, K.; Kloek, C.J.J.; Aaronson, Neil K; Janssen, K.; Jones, Lee; Sitskoorn, M.M.; Stuiver, M.

    2018-01-01

    Objective: In this pilot study, we investigated the feasibility of a home-based, remotely guided exercise intervention for patients with gliomas. Design: Pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT) with randomization (2:1) to exercise or control group. Subjects: Patients with stable grade II and III

  8. Exercise intervention in childhood obesity: a randomized controlled trial comparing hospital-versus home-based groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisón, Juan Francisco; Real-Montes, José María; Torró, Isabel; Arguisuelas, María Dolores; Alvarez-Pitti, Julio; Martínez-Gramage, J; Aguilar, Francisco; Lurbe, Empar

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effect of a hospital clinic group- versus home-based combined exercise-diet program for the treatment of childhood obesity. One hundred ten overweight/obese Spanish children and adolescents (6-16 years) in 2 intervention groups (hospital clinic group-based [n = 45] and home-based [n = 41]) and a sex-age-matched control group (n = 24) were randomly assigned to participate in a 6-month combined exercise (aerobic and resistance training) and Mediterranean diet program. Anthropometric values (including body weight, height, body mass index, BMI-Z score, and waist circumference) were measured pre- and postintervention for all the participants. Percentage body fat was also determined with a body fat analyzer (TANITA TBF-410 M). Our study showed a significant reduction in percentage body fat and body mass index Z-score among both intervention-group participants (4%, 0.16, hospital clinic group-based; 4.4%, 0.23, home-based; P exercise and Mediterranean diet program may be effective among overweight and obese children and adolescents, because it improves body composition, is feasible and can be adopted on a large scale without substantial expenses. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Computer-based animations and static graphics as medical student aids in learning home safety assessment: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunuguntla, Renuka; Rodriguez, Osvaldo; Ruiz, Jorge G; Qadri, Syeda S; Mintzer, Michael J; Van Zuilen, Maria H; Roos, Bernard A

    2008-01-01

    Although animations may intuitively seem more effective than static graphics for teaching, there is no clear-cut evidence for the superiority of simple computer-based animations in medical education. We investigated whether simple animations are better than static graphics as an aid to medical students in learning home safety assessment, an important part of geriatric curriculum. We used two versions of an interactive online module, one that depicted common home safety issues in static graphics and the other in animations. We randomized first-year medical students who agreed to participate into two groups. After the module, students completed a cognitive burden scale and a standardized competency assessment test in which they had to identify the salient home safety issues and give recommendations based on the hazards. We also captured time spent on task. We found no significant differences between the groups in the cognitive burden level, competency assessment scores, and time spent on task. The much cheaper-to-produce static graphics were equally effective as simple animations in this medical education scenario.

  10. Multisystemic engagement & nephrology based educational intervention: a randomized controlled trial protocol on the kidney team at home-study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail Sohal Y

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Living donor kidney transplantation (LDKT is the most successful form of renal replacement therapy in terms of wait time and survival rates. However, we observed a significant inequality in the number of LDKT performed between the Dutch and the non-Dutch patients. The objective of this study is to adapt, implement and test an educational home-based intervention to contribute to the reduction of this inequality. Our aim is to establish this through guided communication together with the social network of the patients in an attempt that well-informed decisions regarding renal replacement therapy can be made: Multisystemic Engagement & Nephrology. This manuscript is a detailed description of the Kidney Team At Home-study protocol. Methods and design All patients (>18 yrs that are referred to the pre-transplantation outpatient clinic are eligible to participate in the study. Patients will be randomly assigned to either an experimental or a control group. The control group will continue to receive standard care. The experimental group will receive standard care plus a home-based educational intervention. The intervention consists of two sessions at the patient’s home, an initial session with the patient and a second session for which individuals from their social network are invited to take part. Based on the literature and behavioural change theories we hypothesize that reducing hurdles in knowledge, risk perception, subjective norm, self-efficacy, and communication contribute to well-informed decision making and reducing inequality in accessing LDKT programs. A change in these factors is consequently our primary outcome-measure. Based on power calculations, we aim to include 160 patients over a period of two years. Discussion If we are able to show that this home-based group educational intervention contributes to 1 achieving well-informed decision regarding treatment and 2 reducing the inequality in LDKT, the quality of life

  11. Randomized, controlled trial of a nonpharmacological intervention to improve abnormal sleep/wake patterns in nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alessi, Cathy A; Martin, Jennifer L; Webber, Adam P; Cynthia Kim, E; Harker, Judith O; Josephson, Karen R

    2005-05-01

    Abnormal sleep/wake patterns are common in nursing home residents. Lifestyle and environmental factors likely contribute to these poor sleep patterns. The objective of this study was to test a multidimensional, nonpharmacological intervention to improve abnormal sleep/wake patterns in nursing home residents. Randomized, controlled trial. Four nursing homes in the Los Angeles area. Residents were screened for excessive daytime sleeping (asleep > or = 15% of daytime observations) and nighttime sleep disruption (asleep sleeping. Of these, 133 had nighttime sleep disruption and consented to participate; 120 completed baseline assessments, and 118 (77% female, mean age 86.9, 90% non-Hispanic white) were randomized to intervention versus usual care. Five consecutive days and nights of efforts to decrease daytime in-bed time, 30 minutes or more of daily sunlight exposure, increased physical activity, structured bedtime routine, and efforts to decrease nighttime noise and light. Seventy-two consecutive hours of wrist actigraphy (nighttime sleep) and structured behavioral observations (daytime sleep and participation in social and physical activities and social conversation) at baseline and repeated at follow-up while the intervention or usual care condition was in place. The only effect on nighttime sleep was a modest decrease in mean duration of nighttime awakenings in intervention participants (10.6 minutes at baseline, 9.8 minutes at follow-up) versus an increase in controls (9.8 minutes at baseline, 13.8 minutes at follow-up) (F=4.27, P=.04). There were no significant effects on percentage of nighttime sleep or number of nighttime awakenings. There was a significant decrease in daytime sleeping in intervention participants (32% of daytime observations asleep at baseline, 21% at follow-up), with no change in controls (32% at baseline, 30% at follow-up; F=20.68, Psleep/wake patterns in nursing home residents resulted in decreased daytime sleeping and increased

  12. RANDOM FORESTS-BASED FEATURE SELECTION FOR LAND-USE CLASSIFICATION USING LIDAR DATA AND ORTHOIMAGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Guan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The development of lidar system, especially incorporated with high-resolution camera components, has shown great potential for urban classification. However, how to automatically select the best features for land-use classification is challenging. Random Forests, a newly developed machine learning algorithm, is receiving considerable attention in the field of image classification and pattern recognition. Especially, it can provide the measure of variable importance. Thus, in this study the performance of the Random Forests-based feature selection for urban areas was explored. First, we extract features from lidar data, including height-based, intensity-based GLCM measures; other spectral features can be obtained from imagery, such as Red, Blue and Green three bands, and GLCM-based measures. Finally, Random Forests is used to automatically select the optimal and uncorrelated features for landuse classification. 0.5-meter resolution lidar data and aerial imagery are used to assess the feature selection performance of Random Forests in the study area located in Mannheim, Germany. The results clearly demonstrate that the use of Random Forests-based feature selection can improve the classification performance by the selected features.

  13. Effects of the Resident Assessment Instrument in home care settings: results of a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolle, C; Wolter, A; Roth, G; Rothgang, H

    2012-06-01

    Deficits in quality, a lack of professional process management and, most importantly, neglect of outcome quality are criticized in long-term care. A cluster randomized, controlled trial was conducted to assess whether the Resident Assessment Instrument (RAI) can help to improve or stabilize functional abilities (ADL, IADL) and cognitive skills (MMST), improve quality of life (EQ-5D), and reduce institutionalization, thereby, increasing outcome quality. A total of 69 home care services throughout Germany were included and randomized. The treatment group (n = 36) received training in RAI and was supported by the research team during the study (13 months). Comparison of mean differences between the treatment and control groups (n = 33) showed no significant effect. Although the multilevel regression results show that clients in the treatment group fared better in terms of ADLs and IADLs (smaller decline) and were less likely to move to nursing homes and be hospitalized, none of these effects is significant. The lack of significance might result from the small number of clients included in the study. Moreover, RAI was not fully implemented and even partial implementation required more time than expected.

  14. Notice of release of Mountain Home germplasm Sandberg bluegrass (selected germplasm, natural track)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott M. Lambert; Stephen B. Monsen; Nancy Shaw

    2011-01-01

    Mountain Home germplasm Sandberg bluegrass is a small, densely tufted short-lived perennial bunchgrass adapted to low elevation, semi-arid sites with long, hot growing seasons. Mountain Home's drought tolerance, competitive nature, and ease of establishment make it an excellent choice for post-fire restoration of cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum L.) dominated...

  15. Pre-Service Home Economics Teachers' Attitudes on Selected Aspects of Practical Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozina, Francka Lovšin

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study conducted among pre-service home economics teachers from the Faculty of Education of the University of Ljubljana with different levels of practical experience in teaching. The pre-service Home Economics teachers in the 3rd year of their studies had just completed their first class of teaching experience…

  16. A randomized controlled trial of a home hospital intervention for frail elderly demented patients: behavioral disturbances and caregiver's stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibaldi, V; Aimonino, N; Ponzetto, M; Stasi, M F; Amati, D; Raspo, S; Roglia, D; Molaschi, M; Fabris, F

    2004-01-01

    A Geriatric Home Hospitalization Service (GHHS) has been operating in Torino at S. Giovanni Battista Hospital since 1985. GHHS allows us to perform diagnostic and therapeutic interventions, which are usually made in hospital, also at home. GHHS team includes geriatricians, nurses, physiotherapists, social workers and counselors. Between February 1999 and April 2002, the GHH Service conducted a randomized controlled trial on 109 elderly, demented patients requiring admission to the Hospital Emergency Department (ED)for acute illnesses. Objective of the study was to identify the benefits of the care in a GHHScompared to a general medical ward (GMW) in reducing behavioral disturbances in elderly patients with advanced dementia and in lowering caregiver's stress. Patients were randomly assigned to GHHS (56 patients) or to GMW (53 patients). Both groups were examined using the same protocol and were evaluated on admission and on discharge. All patients had a severe form of dementia as shown by the clinical dementia rating (CDR) scale mean value (3.7 +/- 0.9) with an important functional impairment and a relevant degree of comorbidity.The main reasons for hospitalization were infections, cerebrovascular accidents and malnutrition. Mortality of total sample was 19.3 %, without significant differences in the two settings of care. On discharge, in GHHS patients there was a significant reduction of behavioral disturbances. The use of anti-psychotic drugs was significantly lower in GHHS patients compared to the GMW group (p < 0.001). The stress of caregivers on discharge was reduced only in GHHS group and not in the control ones. In conclusion, we can say that a GHHS continuous support allows us to reduce the family caregiver's stress. When treated at home, demented patients do not have to change their environment or routine and it is possible to have a better control on behavioral disturbances.

  17. Effect of home visit training program on growth and development of preterm infants: a double blind randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edraki, Mitra; Moravej, Hossian; Rambod, Masoume

    2015-01-01

    Home visit program can be effective in infants' growth and development. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of home visit program on preterm infants' growth and development within 6 months. It was a double-blind clinical trial study. The study was conducted in Hafez, Hazrat-e-Zeinab, and Namazee Hospitals affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran from 2010 to 2011. Preterm infants were divided into intervention (n=30) and control groups (n=30) through blocked randomization. The intervention group received home visit training program for 6 months, while the control group only received the hospital's routine care. Then, the infants' growth indexes, including weight, height, and head circumference, and development criteria were compared on the first day of admission in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, and then first, second, third, and sixth months. The data were analyzed using Chi-square, independent t-test, and repeated measures ANCOVA. The mean weight of the intervention and control group infants was 7207.3±1129.74 and 6366.7±922.26 gr in the sixth month. Besides, the intervention group infants' mean weight was higher compared to the control group after six months (t=-3.05, P=0.03). Also, a significant difference was found between the two groups regarding development indexes, such as following moving objects with the head, keeping the head stable when changing the position from lying to sitting,  producing "Agha" sound, and taking objects by hand (Ppreterm infants' weight gain and some development indexes at the sixth month. Considering the importance of infants' growth and development, healthcare staff is recommended to incorporate home visit training into their programs, so that steps can be taken towards improvement of preterm infants' health. IRCT2014082013690N3 

  18. A randomized controlled trial to assess effectiveness of a nurse-led home-based heart failure management program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamata Rai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The burden of cardiovascular disease is increasing in India. It is a chronic condition, and poor management can increase the risk and frequency of acute episodes resulting in poor quality of life (QOL, frequent hospital admissions, and mortality. Disease management programs can improve medication adherence and patient's QOL. Objective: The aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness of nurse-led home-based heart failure management program (HOME-N. Materials and Methods: This randomized controlled trial was conducted among fifty outpatient heart failure (HF patients visiting a tertiary care hospital. The control group received usual routine care, whereas the experimental group received HOME-N, which included formal health teaching, a HF checklist (Hriday card, telemonitoring of vital parameters (blood pressure, heart rate, and weight weekly through a mobile application named as “Dhadkan” and telephonic follow-up for 3 months. Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire (KCCQ and adherence to refills and medications scale were used to assess QOL and drug adherence, respectively, in the study patients. The outcome measures were the QOL, drug compliance, hospitalization, and mortality rate. Results: At baseline, the demographic and morbidity profile, and QOL and drug compliance scores of both groups were comparable. After intervention, the QOL domain score of KCCQ as well as drug compliance improved significantly both within the experimental group (P = 0.001, P = 0.001 and as compared to control group (P = 0.001, P = 0.004, respectively. Conclusion: The HOME-N was significantly effective in improving QOL and drug compliance in HF patients.

  19. A randomized controlled trial comparing home-based isometric handgrip exercise versus endurance training for blood pressure management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goessler, Karla Fabiana; Buys, Roselien; VanderTrappen, Dieter; Vanhumbeeck, Lise; Cornelissen, Veronique Ann

    2018-02-02

    Aerobic endurance exercise (AEX) is an effective treatment in the prevention and management of high blood pressure (BP). Growing evidence suggests potential benefits from isometric handgrip (IHG) exercise, which may promote similar or even larger reductions in BP than AEX. We compared the effects of home-based AEX and home-based IHG on BP. Sixty healthy individuals (31 men; mean age, 33.1 years; mean BP, 126.9 ± 1.6/84.7 ± 1.1 mm Hg) were randomized to IHG, AEX, or a control group. Both exercise interventions were performed in the home environment. The IHG group performed daily 4 × 2 minutes sustained grips at 30% of maximal volitional contraction. Participants in the AEX group were advised to perform at least 150 min/wk of aerobic exercise at moderate intensity. Outcome measurements were assessed at baseline and 8 weeks of follow-up. Compared with the control group, AEX resulted in a larger reduction in ambulatory BP; both AEX and IHG exercise tended to induce larger reductions in office systolic BP, and office diastolic BP was significantly more reduced after AEX but not IHG exercise. Responses to training were not significantly different between both the exercise interventions. Eight weeks of home-based AEX results in significant reductions in both ambulatory BP and office BP in healthy adults, whereas IHG reduces only office BP. Copyright © 2018 American Society of Hypertension. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Controlled-Release Oxycodone Versus Naproxen at Home After Ambulatory Surgery: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn Stessel, MD

    2014-12-01

    Conclusions: Paracetamol/CR oxycodone and paracetamol/naproxen are equally effective in treatment of acute postoperative pain at home after ambulatory surgery with comparable patient satisfaction level. We suggest paracetamol/CR oxycodone to be a valuable alternative for the current paracetamol/naproxen gold standard, particularly in patients with a contraindication for nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02152592.

  1. A randomized controlled trial of hospital versus home based therapy with oral amoxicillin for severe pneumonia in children aged 3 - 59 months: The IndiaCLEN Severe Pneumonia Oral Therapy (ISPOT) Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Patel, Archana B; Bang, Akash; Singh, Meenu; Dhande, Leena; Chelliah, Luke Ravi; Malik, Ashraf; Khadse, Sandhya

    2015-01-01

    ... with the first 48 h of treatment given in the hospital (hospital group) or at home (home group). We conducted an open-label, multi-center, two-arm randomized clinical trial at six tertiary hospitals in India...

  2. Effect of a Home-Based Exercise Program on Functional Recovery Following Rehabilitation After Hip Fracture A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latham, Nancy K.; Harris, Bette Ann; Bean, Jonathan F.; Heeren, Timothy; Goodyear, Christine; Zawacki, Stacey; Heislein, Diane M.; Mustafa, Jabed; Pardasaney, Poonam; Giorgetti, Marie; Holt, Nicole; Goehring, Lori; Jette, Alan M.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE For many older people, long-term functional limitations persist after a hip fracture. The efficacy of a home exercise program with minimal supervision after formal hip fracture rehabilitation ends has not been established. OBJECTIVE To determine whether a home exercise program with minimal contact with a physical therapist improved function after formal hip fracture rehabilitation ended. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Randomized clinical trial conducted from September 2008 to October 2012 in the homes of 232 functionally limited older adults who had completed traditional rehabilitation after a hip fracture. INTERVENTIONS The intervention group (n = 120) received functionally oriented exercises (such as standing from a chair, climbing a step) taught by a physical therapist and performed independently by the participants in their homes for 6 months. The attention control group (n = 112) received in-home and telephone-based cardiovascular nutrition education. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Physical function assessed at baseline, 6 months (ie, at completion of the intervention), and 9 months by blinded assessors. The primary outcome was change in function at 6 months measured by the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB; range 0-12, higher score indicates better function) and the Activity Measure for Post-Acute Care (AM-PAC) mobility and daily activity (range, 23-85 and 9-101, higher score indicates better function). RESULTS Among the 232 randomized patients, 195 were followed up at 6 months and included in the primary analysis. The intervention group (n=100) showed significant improvement relative to the control group (n=95) in functional mobility (mean SPPB scores for intervention group: 6.2 [SD, 2.7] at baseline, 7.2 [SD, 3] at 6 months; control group: 6.0 [SD, 2.8] at baseline, 6.2 [SD, 3] at 6 months; and between-group differences: 0.8 [95% CI, 0.4 to 1.2], P < .001; mean AM-PAC mobility scores for intervention group: 56.2 [SD, 7.3] at baseline, 58

  3. Effect of a home-based exercise program on functional recovery following rehabilitation after hip fracture: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latham, Nancy K; Harris, Bette Ann; Bean, Jonathan F; Heeren, Timothy; Goodyear, Christine; Zawacki, Stacey; Heislein, Diane M; Mustafa, Jabed; Pardasaney, Poonam; Giorgetti, Marie; Holt, Nicole; Goehring, Lori; Jette, Alan M

    2014-02-19

    For many older people, long-term functional limitations persist after a hip fracture. The efficacy of a home exercise program with minimal supervision after formal hip fracture rehabilitation ends has not been established. To determine whether a home exercise program with minimal contact with a physical therapist improved function after formal hip fracture rehabilitation ended. Randomized clinical trial conducted from September 2008 to October 2012 in the homes of 232 functionally limited older adults who had completed traditional rehabilitation after a hip fracture. The intervention group (n = 120) received functionally oriented exercises (such as standing from a chair, climbing a step) taught by a physical therapist and performed independently by the participants in their homes for 6 months. The attention control group (n = 112) received in-home and telephone-based cardiovascular nutrition education. Physical function assessed at baseline, 6 months (ie, at completion of the intervention), and 9 months by blinded assessors. The primary outcome was change in function at 6 months measured by the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB; range 0-12, higher score indicates better function) and the Activity Measure for Post-Acute Care (AM-PAC) mobility and daily activity (range, 23-85 and 9-101, higher score indicates better function). Among the 232 randomized patients, 195 were followed up at 6 months and included in the primary analysis. The intervention group (n=100) showed significant improvement relative to the control group (n=95) in functional mobility (mean SPPB scores for intervention group: 6.2 [SD, 2.7] at baseline, 7.2 [SD, 3] at 6 months; control group: 6.0 [SD, 2.8] at baseline, 6.2 [SD, 3] at 6 months; and between-group differences: 0.8 [95% CI, 0.4 to 1.2], P < .001; mean AM-PAC mobility scores for intervention group: 56.2 [SD, 7.3] at baseline, 58.1 [SD, 7.9] at 6 months; control group: 56 [SD, 7.1] at baseline, 56.6 [SD, 8.1] at 6 months

  4. Feasibility and effects of preventive home visits for at-risk older people: Design of a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catellier Diane

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The search for preventive methods to mitigate functional decline and unwanted relocation by older adults living in the community is important. Preventive home visit (PHV models use infrequent but regular visits to older adults by trained practitioners with the goal of maintaining function and quality of life. Evidence about PHV efficacy is mixed but generally supportive. Yet interventions have rarely combined a comprehensive (biopsychosocial occupational therapy intervention protocol with a home visit to older adults. There is a particular need in the USA to create and examine such a protocol. Methods/Design The study is a single-blind randomized controlled pilot trial designed to assess the feasibility, and to obtain preliminary efficacy estimates, of an intervention consisting of preventive home visits to community-dwelling older adults. An occupational therapy-based preventive home visit (PHV intervention was developed and is being implemented and evaluated using a repeated measures design. We recruited a sample of 110 from a population of older adults (75+ who were screened and found to be at-risk for functional decline. Participants are currently living in the community (not in assisted living or a skilled nursing facility in one of three central North Carolina counties. After consent, participants were randomly assigned into experimental and comparison groups. The experimental group receives the intervention 4 times over a 12 month follow-up period while the comparison group receives a minimal intervention of mailed printed materials. Pre- and post-intervention measures are being gathered by questionnaires administered face-to-face by a treatment-blinded research associate. Key outcome measures include functional ability, participation, life satisfaction, self-rated health, and depression. Additional information is collected from participants in the experimental group during the intervention to assess the feasibility of

  5. Divergent selection on home pen locomotor activity in a chicken model: Selection program, genetic parameters and direct response on activity and body weight

    OpenAIRE

    Kjaer, Joergen B.

    2017-01-01

    General locomotor activity (GLA) in poultry has attracted attention, as it negatively influences production costs (energy expenditure and feed consumption) and welfare parameters (bone strength, litter quality, feather pecking and cannibalism). Laying hen lines diverging in the average level of spontaneous locomotor activity in the home pen were developed by genetic selection using the founder New Hampshire line. Activity was recorded using RFID technology at around five weeks of age during f...

  6. Pre-service home economics teachers' attitudes on selected aspects of practical teaching

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lovsin Kozina, Francka

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study conducted among pre-service home economics teachers from the Faculty of Education of the University of Ljubljana with different levels of practical experience in teaching...

  7. SNP selection and classification of genome-wide SNP data using stratified sampling random forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qingyao; Ye, Yunming; Liu, Yang; Ng, Michael K

    2012-09-01

    For high dimensional genome-wide association (GWA) case-control data of complex disease, there are usually a large portion of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are irrelevant with the disease. A simple random sampling method in random forest using default mtry parameter to choose feature subspace, will select too many subspaces without informative SNPs. Exhaustive searching an optimal mtry is often required in order to include useful and relevant SNPs and get rid of vast of non-informative SNPs. However, it is too time-consuming and not favorable in GWA for high-dimensional data. The main aim of this paper is to propose a stratified sampling method for feature subspace selection to generate decision trees in a random forest for GWA high-dimensional data. Our idea is to design an equal-width discretization scheme for informativeness to divide SNPs into multiple groups. In feature subspace selection, we randomly select the same number of SNPs from each group and combine them to form a subspace to generate a decision tree. The advantage of this stratified sampling procedure can make sure each subspace contains enough useful SNPs, but can avoid a very high computational cost of exhaustive search of an optimal mtry, and maintain the randomness of a random forest. We employ two genome-wide SNP data sets (Parkinson case-control data comprised of 408 803 SNPs and Alzheimer case-control data comprised of 380 157 SNPs) to demonstrate that the proposed stratified sampling method is effective, and it can generate better random forest with higher accuracy and lower error bound than those by Breiman's random forest generation method. For Parkinson data, we also show some interesting genes identified by the method, which may be associated with neurological disorders for further biological investigations.

  8. An efficient method of wavelength interval selection based on random frog for multivariate spectral calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Yong-Huan; Li, Hong-Dong; Wood, Leslie R. E.; Fan, Wei; Wang, Jia-Jun; Cao, Dong-Sheng; Xu, Qing-Song; Liang, Yi-Zeng

    2013-07-01

    Wavelength selection is a critical step for producing better prediction performance when applied to spectral data. Considering the fact that the vibrational and rotational spectra have continuous features of spectral bands, we propose a novel method of wavelength interval selection based on random frog, called interval random frog (iRF). To obtain all the possible continuous intervals, spectra are first divided into intervals by moving window of a fix width over the whole spectra. These overlapping intervals are ranked applying random frog coupled with PLS and the optimal ones are chosen. This method has been applied to two near-infrared spectral datasets displaying higher efficiency in wavelength interval selection than others. The source code of iRF can be freely downloaded for academy research at the website: http://code.google.com/p/multivariate-calibration/downloads/list.

  9. Estimating the "impact" of out-of-home placement on child well-being: approaching the problem of selection bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Lawrence M; Bruch, Sarah K; Johnson, Elizabeth I; James, Sigrid; Rubin, David

    2009-01-01

    This study used data on 2,453 children aged 4-17 from the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being and 5 analytic methods that adjust for selection factors to estimate the impact of out-of-home placement on children's cognitive skills and behavior problems. Methods included ordinary least squares (OLS) regressions and residualized change, simple change, difference-in-difference, and fixed effects models. Models were estimated using the full sample and a matched sample generated by propensity scoring. Although results from the unmatched OLS and residualized change models suggested that out-of-home placement is associated with increased child behavior problems, estimates from models that more rigorously adjust for selection bias indicated that placement has little effect on children's cognitive skills or behavior problems.

  10. Delay line length selection in generating fast random numbers with a chaotic laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianzhong; Wang, Yuncai; Xue, Lugang; Hou, Jiayin; Zhang, Beibei; Wang, Anbang; Zhang, Mingjiang

    2012-04-10

    The chaotic light signals generated by an external cavity semiconductor laser have been experimentally demonstrated to extract fast random numbers. However, the photon round-trip time in the external cavity can cause the occurrence of the periodicity in random sequences. To overcome it, the exclusive-or operation on corresponding random bits in samples of the chaotic signal and its time-delay signal from a chaotic laser is required. In this scheme, the proper selection of delay length is a key issue. By doing a large number of experiments and theoretically analyzing the interplay between the Runs test and the threshold value of the autocorrelation function, we find when the corresponding delay time of autocorrelation trace with the correlation coefficient of less than 0.007 is considered as the delay time between the chaotic signal and its time-delay signal, streams of random numbers can be generated with verified randomness.

  11. The cost-effectiveness of a new disease management model for frail elderly living in homes for the elderly, design of a cluster randomized controlled clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Ribbe Miel W; Frijters Dinnus H; van Hout Hein PJ; Boorsma Marijke; Nijpels Giel

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background The objective of this article is to describe the design of a study to evaluate the clinical and economic effects of a Disease Management model on functional health, quality of care and quality of life of persons living in homes for the elderly. Methods This study concerns a cluster randomized controlled clinical trial among five intervention homes and five usual care homes in the North-West of the Netherlands with a total of over 500 residents. All persons who are not term...

  12. "Right from the Start": Randomized Trial Comparing an Attachment Group Intervention to Supportive Home Visiting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niccols, Alison

    2008-01-01

    Background: Infant attachment security is a protective factor for future mental health, and may be promoted by individual interventions. Given service demands, it is important to determine if a group-based intervention for parents could be used to enhance infant attachment security. Methods: In a randomized trial involving 76 mothers, an 8-session…

  13. PLAY Project Home Consultation intervention program for young children with autism spectrum disorders: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Richard; Van Egeren, Laurie A; Mahoney, Gerald; Quon Huber, Melissa S; Zimmerman, Perri

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of the Play and Language for Autistic Youngsters (PLAY) Project Home Consultation model, in combination with usual community services (CS), to improve parent-child interaction, child development, and autism symptomatology in young children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) compared with CS only. Children (N = 128) with autism or PDD-NOS (DSM-4 criteria) aged 2 years 8 months to 5 years 11 months and recruited from 5 disability agencies in 4 US states were randomized in two 1-year cohorts. Using videotape and written feedback within a developmental framework, PLAY consultants coached caregivers monthly for 12 months to improve caregiver-child interaction. CS included speech/language and occupational therapy and public education services. Primary outcomes included change in parent-child interactions, language and development, and autism-related diagnostic category/symptoms. Secondary outcomes included parent stress and depression and home consultant fidelity. Data were collected pre- and post-intervention. Using intent-to-treat analysis (ITT), large treatment effects were evident for parent and child interactional behaviors on the Maternal and Child Behavior Rating Scales. Child language and developmental quotient did not differ over time by group, although functional development improved significantly. PLAY children improved in diagnostic categories on the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS). PLAY caregivers' stress did not increase, and depressive symptomatology decreased. Home consultants administered the intervention with fidelity. PLAY intervention demonstrated substantial changes in parent-child interaction without increasing parents' stress/depression. ADOS findings must be interpreted cautiously because results do not align with clinical experience. PLAY offers communities a relatively inexpensive effective intervention for children with ASD and their parents.

  14. Home-based video exercise intervention for community-dwelling frail older women: a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Sonja; Kronborg, Christian; Puggaard, Lis

    2008-01-01

    , handgrip, biceps strength, chair rise, and 10-m maximal walking-speed in the training group, and for walking-speed and self-rated health in the control group. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that homebased training for frail older women using an exercise video induces lasting health-related quality...... and health-related quality of life. METHODS: Communitydwelling frail women >/=75 yrs, receiving public home care, were randomized into a training group (n=30) and a control group (n=31). Participants exercised for 26 minutes, three times per week for five months. Both groups received a bi-weekly telephone...... call. The effect of intervention was evaluated by the physical performance test, mobility-tiredness score, maximal isometric handgrip and biceps strength, lower limb explosive power, repeated chair rise (5 times), 10-m maximal walking-speed, semi-tandem balance, and health-related quality of life...

  15. Impact of Nursing Home Palliative Care Teams on End-of-Life Outcomes: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temkin-Greener, Helena; Mukamel, Dana B; Ladd, Heather; Ladwig, Susan; Caprio, Thomas V; Norton, Sally A; Quill, Timothy E; Olsan, Tobie H; Cai, Xueya

    2018-01-01

    Deficits in end-of-life care in nursing homes (NHs) are reported, but the impact of palliative care teams (PCTeams) on resident outcomes remains largely untested. Test the impact of PCTeams on end-of-life outcomes. Multicomponent strategy employing a randomized, 2-arm controlled trial with a difference-in-difference analysis, and a nonrandomized second control group to assess the intervention's placebo effect. In all, 25 New York State NHs completed the trial (5830 decedent residents) and 609 NHs were in the nonrandomized group (119,486 decedents). Four risk-adjusted outcome measures: place of death, number of hospitalizations, self-reported moderate-to-severe pain, and depressive symptoms. The Minimum Data Set, vital status files, staff surveys, and in-depth interviews were employed. For each outcome, a difference-in-difference model compared the pre-post intervention periods using logistic and Poisson regressions. Overall, we found no statistically significant effect of the intervention. However, independent analysis of the interview data found that only 6 of the 14 treatment facilities had continuously working PCTeams throughout the study period. Decedents in homes with working teams had significant reductions in the odds of in-hospital death compared to the other treatment [odds ratio (OR), 0.400; Phomes vary in their ability to adopt new care practices, and in their capacity to sustain them, reforms to create the environment in which effective palliative care can become broadly implemented are needed.

  16. Does 6-Month Home Caregiver-Supervised Physiotherapy Improve Post-Critical Care Outcomes?: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitacca, Michele; Barbano, Luca; Vanoglio, Fabio; Luisa, Alberto; Bernocchi, Palmira; Giordano, Amerigo; Paneroni, Mara

    2016-08-01

    This study aims to determine whether a 6-month home physiotherapy program can improve outcomes in critical care survivors. Forty-eight consecutive patients were randomized. The treatment group underwent 2 sessions/day of breathing retraining and bronchial hygiene, physical activity (mobilization, sit-to-stand gait, limb strengthening), and exercise re-conditioning whereas controls underwent standard care. Maximum inspiratory/expiratory pressures (MIP/MEP), forced volumes, blood gases, dyspnea, respiratory rate, disability, peripheral force measurements, perceived health status (Euroquol-5D), patient adherence/satisfaction, safety, and costs were assessed. Outcomes of treatment versus controls: MIP 14 ± 17 vs. -0.2 ± 14 cm H2O, MEP 27 ± 27 vs. 6 ± 21 cm H2O both P respiratory rate (P = 0.009) were significantly improved for treated cardiorespiratory patients only. Eighty-three percent of the treated patients were decannulated versus 14% of controls (P = 0.01). Compliance was high (74 ± 25%) and there were no side effects. The majority (87.4%) expressed satisfaction with the program. Treatment cost was 459&OV0556;/patient/month. Carrying over regular bronchial hygiene techniques, physical activity, and exercise into the home after long critical care stays is safe and has a beneficial effect on respiratory muscles, decannulation, pulmonary function, and quality of life.

  17. Healthy Habits, Happy Homes: methods and baseline data of a randomized controlled trial to improve household routines for obesity prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taveras, Elsie M; McDonald, Julia; O'Brien, Ashley; Haines, Jess; Sherry, Bettylou; Bottino, Clement J; Troncoso, Karen; Schmidt, Marie Evans; Koziol, Renata

    2012-11-01

    To develop a home-based intervention for parents of 2-5 year old children to promote household routines to prevent overweight/obesity. We recruited 121 children from health centers in Boston between 2011 and 2012 and randomized 62 to intervention and 59 to the control condition. The 6-month intervention included 1) motivational coaching at home and by phone with a health educator, 2) mailed educational materials, and 3) weekly text messages. The intervention promoted three household routines: eating meals as a family, obtaining adequate sleep, and limiting screen time. Of the 121 children, mean (SD) age was 4.0 (1.1) years; 52% were Hispanic, 34% Black, and 14% White/Other. Nearly 60% of the sample had annual household incomes ≤ $20,000. Approximately 64% of families reported eating together ≥ 7 times per week, however, many meals were eaten in front of a TV. Over half of the children slept less than the recommended 11h/night and 78% viewed ≥ 2 h/day of screen time. Household routines that increase obesity risk were prevalent among low-income families in this study. If proven to be effective, promotion of household routines related to family meals, sleep, and screen time may prevent young children from becoming overweight/obese. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A randomized trial of two home-based exercise programmes to improve functional walking post-stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Nancy E; MacKay-Lyons, Marilyn J; Scott, Susan C; Moriello, Carolina; Brophy, James

    2013-07-01

    To estimate the relative effectiveness in improving walking ability and other mobility and health outcomes post-stroke of two home-based exercise programmes - stationary cycling and an exercise and walking programme. An observer-blinded, randomized, pragmatic, trial with repeated measures. Hospital centers in two Canadian cities. People within 12 months of acute stroke who were able to walk >10 meters independently and healthy enough to engage in exercise. Two dose-equivalent interventions, one involving stationary cycling and the other disability-targeted interventions were tested. Both protocols required daily moderate intensity exercise at home building up to 30 minutes per day. One group exercised on a stationary bicycle, the second group carried out mobility exercises and brisk walking. The primary outcome was walking capacity as measured by the six-minute walk test (6MWT). Secondary outcomes were physical function, role participation, health-related quality of life exercise adherence, and adverse events. The study failed to meet recruitment targets: 87 participants (cycle group, n = 43; exercise group, n = 44) participated. No significant effects of group or time were revealed for the 6MWT, which was approximately 320 m at randomization. A significant effect for role participation was found in favor of the exercise group (global odds ratio (OR) for cycling vs. exercise was 0.51; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.27-0.95). Change in the 6MWT between highest and lowest adherence categories was statistically significant (p = 0.022). Both programmes were equally effective in maintaining walking capacity after discharge from stroke rehabilitation; or were equally ineffective in improving walking capacity. Clinical Trials Gov number: NCT00786045.

  19. Feasibility of a cluster-randomized influenza vaccination trial in U.S. nursing homes: Lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravenstein, Stefan; Davidson, H Edward; Han, Lisa F; Ogarek, Jessica A; Dahal, Roshani; Gozalo, Pedro L; Taljaard, Monica; Mor, Vincent

    2017-11-01

    Influenza severity increases and vaccine effectiveness decreases with age. High-Dose influenza vaccine (HD) with quadruple the antigen of standard-dose (SD) vaccine is more efficacious in community-dwelling persons 65 years and older. We evaluated the feasibility of recruiting and randomizing Medicare-care certified nursing homes (NHs) for a pragmatic cluster-randomized trial comparing HD vs. SD (NCT1720277). Residents were long-stay and at least 65 years old. NH leadership agreed to standard of care random assignment with HD (Fluzone® High-Dose) or SD (Fluzone®) influenza vaccine for their facility for the 2012-2013 influenza season. We used Minimum Data Set (MDS) 3.0 and Vital Status records for pre-specified clinical outcomes: 1) all-cause hospitalization, 2) NH mortality, and 3) functional decline. Intent-to-treat analyses were performed at the resident-level using Cox proportional hazards, multivariable Poisson, and logistic regression models accounting for clustering by facility. We randomized 39 NHs (19 SD and 20 HD), coordinated vaccine delivery, implemented web-based data collection, and accessed MDS data, demonstrating feasibility. There were 2,957 eligible residents (SD 1496; HD 1461); characteristics were similar between groups. A total of 301 (20.1%) of SD and 197 (13.5%) of HD allocated residents were ever hospitalized, (adjusted relative risk 0.680; 95% CI: 0.537, 0.862; p = 0.001). NH mortality was 274 (18.3%) SD vs 249 (17.1%) HD, adjusted relative risk 0.834; 95% CI: 0.678, 1.027; p = 0.087). There were no differences in decline in functional status (13.4 vs 13.8%, adjusted relative risk 0.994; 95% CI: 0.774,1.278; p = 0.965). We demonstrate that a pragmatic large-scale trial is feasible in a NH setting.

  20. Randomization to nutritional intervention at home did not improve postoperative function, fatigue or well-being

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Martin Bach; Hessov, Ib

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Postoperative fatigue and deterioration in functional capacity have been correlated to postoperative weight loss. This suggested that nutritional support to enhance the regain of weight might improve upon the convalescence. METHODS: Patients were allocated randomly at discharge...... to standard management or to dietary advice and protein-rich supplements for 4 months. The convalescence of 32 patients admitted electively for colorectal surgery and of 21 operated on for acute obstruction or severe peritonitis was studied. RESULTS: The intervention substantially increased protein intake...

  1. Psychotropic medication in a randomly selected group of citizens receiving residential or home care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Futtrup, Tina Bergmann; Schultz, Hanne; Jensen, Margit Bak

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Treatment with one or more psychotropic medications (PMs), especially in the elderly, is associated with risk, and the effects of treatment are poorly validated. The aim of this article was to describe the use of PM in a population of citizens receiving either residential care or ho...

  2. Psychotropic medication in a randomly selected group of citizens receiving residential or home care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Futtrup, Tina Bergmann; Schultz, Hanne; Jensen, Margit Bak

    2014-01-01

    -dementia drugs (20.9%). Citizens treated with anti-dementia drugs were also prescribed antipsychotics (20.0%) and antidepressants (54.3%). Doses over 20 mg and 10 mg of citalopram and escitalopram, respectively, were given to 28.0% of the citizens treated with these antidepressants. CONCLUSION: Compared...

  3. Two-year Randomized Clinical Trial Of Self-etching Adhesives And Selective Enamel Etching

    OpenAIRE

    Pena, MR; Rodrigues CE; JA; Ely; Giannini, C.; Reis, M; AF

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this randomized, controlled prospective clinical trial was to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of restoring noncarious cervical lesions with two self-etching adhesive systems applied with or without selective enamel etching. Methods: A one-step self-etching adhesive (Xeno V+) and a two-step self-etching system (Clearfil SE Bond) were used. The effectiveness of phosphoric acid selective etching of enamel margins was also evaluated. Fifty-six cavities were restored with...

  4. HomeStyles, A Web-Based Childhood Obesity Prevention Program for Families With Preschool Children: Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd-Bredbenner, Carol; Martin-Biggers, Jennifer; Koenings, Mallory; Quick, Virginia; Hongu, Nobuko; Worobey, John

    2017-04-25

    The home environment is where young children spend most of their time, and is critically important to supporting behaviors that promote health and prevent obesity. However, the home environment and lifestyle patterns remain understudied, and few interventions have investigated parent-led makeovers designed to create home environments that are supportive of optimal child health and healthy child weights. The aim of the HomeStyles randomized controlled trial (RCT) is to determine whether the Web-based HomeStyles intervention enables and motivates parents to shape the weight-related aspects of their home environments and lifestyle behavioral practices (diet, exercise, and sleep) to be more supportive of their preschool children's optimal health and weight. A rigorous RCT utilizing an experimental group and an attention control group, receiving a bona fide contemporaneous treatment equal in nonspecific treatment effects and differing only in subject matter content, will test the effect of HomeStyles on a diverse sample of families with preschool children. This intervention is based on social cognitive theory and uses a social ecological framework, and will assess: intrapersonal characteristics (dietary intake, physical activity level, and sleep) of parents and children; family interpersonal or social characteristics related to diet, physical activity, media use, and parental values and self-efficacy for obesity-preventive practices; and home environment food availability, physical activity space and supports in and near the home, and media availability and controls in the home. Enrollment for this study has been completed and statistical data analyses are currently underway. This paper describes the HomeStyles intervention with regards to: rationale, the intervention's logic model, sample eligibility criteria and recruitment, experimental group and attention control intervention content, study design, instruments, data management, and planned analyses.

  5. A randomized controlled trial of telephone-mentoring with home-based walking preceding rehabilitation in COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron-Tucker HL

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Helen Laura Cameron-Tucker,1 Richard Wood-Baker,1 Lyn Joseph,1 Julia A Walters,1 Natalie Schüz,2 E Haydn Walters1 1Centre of Research Excellence for Chronic Respiratory Disease and Lung Aging, School of Medicine, 2School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia Purpose: With the limited reach of pulmonary rehabilitation (PR and low levels of daily physical activity in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, a need exists to increase daily exercise. This study evaluated telephone health-mentoring targeting home-based walking (tele-rehab compared to usual waiting time (usual care followed by group PR. Patients and methods: People with COPD were randomized to tele-rehab (intervention or usual care (controls. Tele-rehab delivered by trained nurse health-mentors supported participants’ home-based walking over 8–12 weeks. PR, delivered to both groups simultaneously, included 8 weeks of once-weekly education and self-management skills, with separate supervised exercise. Data were collected at three time-points: baseline (TP1, before (TP2, and after (TP3 PR. The primary outcome was change in physical capacity measured by 6-minute walk distance (6MWD with two tests performed at each time-point. Secondary outcomes included changes in self-reported home-based walking, health-related quality of life, and health behaviors. Results: Of 65 recruits, 25 withdrew before completing PR. Forty attended a median of 6 (4 education sessions. Seventeen attended supervised exercise (5±2 sessions. Between TP1 and TP2, there was a statistically significant increase in the median 6MWD of 12 (39.1 m in controls, but no change in the tele-rehab group. There were no significant changes in 6MWD between other time-points or groups, or significant change in any secondary outcomes. Participants attending supervised exercise showed a nonsignificant improvement in 6MWD, 12.3 (71 m, while others showed no change, 0 (33 m

  6. Hebbian Learning in a Random Network Captures Selectivity Properties of the Prefrontal Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Grace W; Rigotti, Mattia; Warden, Melissa R; Miller, Earl K; Fusi, Stefano

    2017-11-08

    Complex cognitive behaviors, such as context-switching and rule-following, are thought to be supported by the prefrontal cortex (PFC). Neural activity in the PFC must thus be specialized to specific tasks while retaining flexibility. Nonlinear "mixed" selectivity is an important neurophysiological trait for enabling complex and context-dependent behaviors. Here we investigate (1) the extent to which the PFC exhibits computationally relevant properties, such as mixed selectivity, and (2) how such properties could arise via circuit mechanisms. We show that PFC cells recorded from male and female rhesus macaques during a complex task show a moderate level of specialization and structure that is not replicated by a model wherein cells receive random feedforward inputs. While random connectivity can be effective at generating mixed selectivity, the data show significantly more mixed selectivity than predicted by a model with otherwise matched parameters. A simple Hebbian learning rule applied to the random connectivity, however, increases mixed selectivity and enables the model to match the data more accurately. To explain how learning achieves this, we provide analysis along with a clear geometric interpretation of the impact of learning on selectivity. After learning, the model also matches the data on measures of noise, response density, clustering, and the distribution of selectivities. Of two styles of Hebbian learning tested, the simpler and more biologically plausible option better matches the data. These modeling results provide clues about how neural properties important for cognition can arise in a circuit and make clear experimental predictions regarding how various measures of selectivity would evolve during animal training. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The prefrontal cortex is a brain region believed to support the ability of animals to engage in complex behavior. How neurons in this area respond to stimuli-and in particular, to combinations of stimuli ("mixed

  7. Effects of nurse home visitation on cigarette smoking, pregnancy outcomes and breastfeeding: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejdoubi, Jamila; van den Heijkant, Silvia C C M; van Leerdam, Frank J M; Crone, Matty; Crijnen, Alfons; HiraSing, Remy A

    2014-06-01

    antenatal smoking is more prevalent among young women with low socio-economic status. The aim of our study is to assess whether the VoorZorg programme, compared to usual care, is effective in reducing cigarette smoking among young high risk pregnant women. Furthermore, the effect of VoorZorg on pregnancy outcomes and on breast feeding will be described. a randomised controlled trial of VoorZorg, a nurse home visitation intervention, was undertaken over a 2½ year period from 2007 to 2009. Data were collected between 16 and 28 weeks gestation, 32 weeks gestation and at two months post partum on cigarette smoking status plus six months post partum for breastfeeding prevalence. Neonatal birth weight and gestation at birth were also collected. participants living in 20 municipalities in the Netherlands. 460 pregnant women were recruited by different professionals. Inclusion criteria were age intervention group received, in addition to usual care, the VoorZorg programme which consisted of 40-60 home visits by specialised nurses from pregnancy until two years after birth. the percentage of smokers was significantly lower in the intervention group (40%) compared to the control group (48%) during pregnancy (p=0.03) and at two months post birth (49% and 62%; p=0.02). During pregnancy the number of daily cigarettes smoked was reduced in both groups. After birth, the intervention group smoked 50% less cigarettes compared to the control group (C: 8±10; I: 4±7 (mean±standard deviation (SD)), p=0.01). Furthermore, women in the intervention group did not smoke near the baby (C: 2±5; I: 0±0 (mean±SD) p=0.03). Birth weight and gestational age were similar in both groups (C: 3147g, 40 weeks; I: 3144g, 39 weeks (p=0.94, p=0.17)). Significantly more women in the intervention group were still breast feeding their baby at six months post -birth (C: 6%; I: 13%, p=0.04). VoorZorg seemed to be effective in reducing cigarette smoking and in increasing breastfeeding duration. No effect

  8. Selecting Optimal Parameters of Random Linear Network Coding for Wireless Sensor Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heide, Janus; Zhang, Qi; Fitzek, Frank

    2013-01-01

    This work studies how to select optimal code parameters of Random Linear Network Coding (RLNC) in Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs). With Rateless Deluge [1] the authors proposed to apply Network Coding (NC) for Over-the-Air Programming (OAP) in WSNs, and demonstrated that with NC a significant...

  9. Prospective randomized double-blind trial of racecadotril compared with loperamide in elderly people with gastroenteritis living in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallelli, Luca; Colosimo, Manuela; Tolotta, Grazia A; Falcone, Daniella; Luberto, Laura; Curto, Lucia S; Rende, Pierandrea; Mazzei, Francesca; Marigliano, Norma M; De Sarro, Giovambattista; Cucchiara, Salvatore

    2010-02-01

    Our aim was to compare the efficacy and tolerability of loperamide and racecadotril in elderly patients with acute diarrhea. We performed a randomized, prospective, double-blind, and parallel group design implemented in geriatric nursing homes in Catanzaro, Italy, from February 2008 to March 2009. Patients of both sexes were randomly allocated to receive either one tablet of racecadotril 100 mg every 8 h or two tablets of loperamide 2.0 mg followed by one tablet after each unformed stool, up to four tablets in any 24-h period. Patients were treated until recovery, defined as the production of two consecutive normal stools or no stool production for a period of 12 h. Normal stools were collected 36 +/- 4 h after the beginning of racecadotril and in 63 +/- 6 h from the beginning of loperamide administration (P racecadotril and 28 h for loperamide. In the per-protocol (PP) population, the median time of abdominal pain was 14 h for racecadotril and 32 h for loperamide (P racecadotril group and 60% in the loperamide group. The most frequently occurring adverse events were nausea and constipation. Genetic analysis did not report the presence of rapid or poor metabolizers. Pharmacoeconomic analysis performed at the end of our study documented an increase in costs in the loperamide group with respect to the racecadotril group (P Racecadotril is more effective than loperamide-probably due to drug interaction with loperamide-and it is not related to pharmacogenetic susceptibility. Racecadotril is also more cost effective than loperamide.

  10. Brief intervention to preteens and adolescents to create smoke-free homes and cotinine results: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Gonca; Caylan, Nilgün; Karacan, Can Demir

    2013-10-01

    Little research has focused on brief and practical strategies for addressing environmental tobacco smoke exposure through interventions focused explicitly on creating a smoke-free home. We used a two-group (intervention and control groups) repeated-measures randomized controlled trial design. Families were randomized to the intervention (n = 176) or control (n = 176) condition after the baseline interview, with outcome assessments for reported and urine cotinine measures at 2 (post-intervention), 6 (follow-up) and 12 (follow-up) months. Baseline urinary cotinine levels of both groups were not statistically significantly different (P > 0.05); however, post-intervention urinary cotinine levels were significantly different at 2, 6 and 12 months after start of the study (P < 0.001). As a physician-based brief intervention, our intervention was effective. Clinical providers might offer feedback and brief interventions to preteens and adolescents. Because of the ease of intervention on delivery, this intervention has the potential to have significant impact if widely disseminated.

  11. The effect of community health nurse home visit on self-care self-efficacy of the elderly living in selected Falavarjan villages in Iran in 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Habibollah; Torkani, Sara; Tavakol, Khosrow

    2013-01-01

    Perceived self-efficacy is a strong predictor for behavior. Considering the importance of health-promoting self-care behaviors in increasing quality of life in the elderly, this study was aimed at defining the effect of nurse home visits on self-care self-efficacy of the elderly in rural areas. This is a pre and post quasi-experimental study conducted on 33 older adults randomly selected from five villages in Falavarjan province in Iran. Intervention program was in the direction of self-care self-efficacy in four domains including nutrition, health practice, physical activity, and well-being in the form of five home visit programs and one group session by a nurse during 6 weeks, and included two different sections of education and nursing interventions administered based on needs assessment and determination of the tasks for the clients and their families. Theoretical framework of this study was supported by Bandura's self-efficacy, Orem's self-care theory, and Pender's revised health promotion model. The data were collected by self-care self-efficacy and demographic information questionnaire before and after the intervention. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics and paired t-test. The mean elderly score in the four aforementioned domains increased after the home visit program. A significant difference was seen in the mean total scores of self-care self-efficacy and its subscales by paired t-test before and after intervention (P theories, had a positive influence on improving self-care self-efficacy of the elderly, and was supported by Bandura's theory of self-efficacy suggesting four sources of performance accomplishment, vicarious experience, verbal persuasion, and emotional arousal. With regard to the importance of self-care behavior in health promotion of the elderly, multifaceted low-cost interventions with the highest effect seem essential.

  12. Selection and spatial Arrangement of rest sites within Northern tamandua (Tamandua mexicana) home ranges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brown, D.D.; Montgomery, R.A.; Millspaugh, J.J.; Jansen, P.A.; Garzon-Lopez, C.X.; Kays, R.

    2014-01-01

    The distribution of suitable rest sites is considered to be a key determinant of spatial patterns in animal activity. However, it is not immediately evident which landscape features satisfy rest site requirements or how these sites are configured within the home range. We used Global Positioning

  13. Selection and spatial arrangement of rest sites within northern tamandua home ranges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brown, D. D.; Montgomery, R. A.; Millspaugh, J. J.; Jansen, P. A.; Garzon-Lopez, C. X.; Kays, R.

    The distribution of suitable rest sites is considered to be a key determinant of spatial patterns in animal activity. However, it is not immediately evident which landscape features satisfy rest site requirements or how these sites are configured within the home range. We used Global Positioning

  14. 75 FR 16463 - Federal Home Loan Bank Members Selected for Community Support Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    .... Community State Bank Paton Iowa. The First National Bank of Primghar...... Primghar Iowa. Bank Iowa Red Oak.... Association. First State Bank of Red Wing (The)....... Red Wing Minnesota. HomeTown Bank Redwood Falls.... First State Bank of De Queen De Queen Arkansas. Bank of Fayetteville (The) Fayetteville Arkansas...

  15. Trust Level and Routing Selection for Mobile Agents in a Smart Home (Extended version)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nasution, S.; Hartel, Pieter H.; Suryana, N.; Azman, N.; Shahib, S.

    The central security concern for systems where agents roam is how to establish trust in the agent. We present a Fuzzy Logic mechanism to calculate a level of trust and an optimal route for a mobile agent system in a smart home. The mechanism consists of two parts. The first part calculates a trust

  16. Trust Level and Routing Selection for Mobile Agents in a Smart Home

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nasution, Sandy; Hartel, Pieter H.; Suryana, Nanna; Azman, Nur; Shahib, Shahrin

    The central security concern for systems where agents roam is how to establish trust in the agent. We present a Fuzzy Logic mechanism to calculate a level of trust and an optimal route for a mobile agent system in a smart home. The mechanism consists of two parts. The first part calculates a trust

  17. Knowledge and Attitudes of Selected Home Economists toward Irradiation in Food Preservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Faye C. Stucy

    1990-01-01

    A survey of the knowledge and attitudes of 485 California home economists toward the use of irradiation to preserve food revealed that they lacked the knowledge although they had a positive attitude toward it. An interactive teleconference on irradiation increased positive attitudes and improved knowledge. (JOW)

  18. Effect of home blood pressure telemonitoring and pharmacist management on blood pressure control: a cluster randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Karen L; Asche, Stephen E; Bergdall, Anna R; Dehmer, Steven P; Groen, Sarah E; Kadrmas, Holly M; Kerby, Tessa J; Klotzle, Krissa J; Maciosek, Michael V; Michels, Ryan D; O'Connor, Patrick J; Pritchard, Rachel A; Sekenski, Jaime L; Sperl-Hillen, JoAnn M; Trower, Nicole K

    2013-07-03

    Only about half of patients with high blood pressure (BP) in the United States have their BP controlled. Practical, robust, and sustainable models are needed to improve BP control in patients with uncontrolled hypertension. To determine whether an intervention combining home BP telemonitoring with pharmacist case management improves BP control compared with usual care and to determine whether BP control is maintained after the intervention is stopped. A cluster randomized clinical trial of 450 adults with uncontrolled BP recruited from 14,692 patients with electronic medical records across 16 primary care clinics in an integrated health system in Minneapolis-St Paul, Minnesota, with 12 months of intervention and 6 months of postintervention follow-up. Eight clinics were randomized to provide usual care to patients (n = 222) and 8 clinics were randomized to provide a telemonitoring intervention (n = 228). Intervention patients received home BP telemonitors and transmitted BP data to pharmacists who adjusted antihypertensive therapy accordingly. Control of systolic BP to less than 140 mm Hg and diastolic BP to less than 90 mm Hg (patients with diabetes or chronic kidney disease) at 6 and 12 months. Secondary outcomes were change in BP, patient satisfaction, and BP control at 18 months (6 months after intervention stopped). At baseline, enrollees were 45% women, 82% white, mean (SD) age was 61.1 (12.0) years, and mean systolic BP was 148 mm Hg and diastolic BP was 85 mm Hg. Blood pressure was controlled at both 6 and 12 months in 57.2% (95% CI, 44.8% to 68.7%) of patients in the telemonitoring intervention group vs 30.0% (95% CI, 23.2% to 37.8%) of patients in the usual care group (P = .001). At 18 months (6 months of postintervention follow-up), BP was controlled in 71.8% (95% CI, 65.0% to 77.8%) of patients in the telemonitoring intervention group vs 57.1% (95% CI, 51.5% to 62.6%) of patients in the usual care group (P = .003). Compared with the

  19. Effectiveness of a home hazard modification program for reducing falls in urban community-dwelling older adults: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamei, Tomoko; Kajii, Fumiko; Yamamoto, Yuko; Irie, Yukako; Kozakai, Rumi; Sugimoto, Tomoko; Chigira, Ayako; Niino, Naoakira

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate the potential improvement of fall prevention awareness and home modification behaviors and to decrease indoor falls by applying a home hazard modification program (HHMP) in community-dwelling older adults followed up to 1 year in this randomized controlled trial. The present authors randomly assigned 130 older adults living in the Tokyo metropolitan region to either the HHMP intervention group (n = 67) or the control group (n = 63). Both groups received four, 2 h fall prevention multifactorial programs including education regarding fall risk factors, food and nutrition, foot self-care, and exercise sessions. However, only the HHMP group received education and practice regarding home safety by using a model mock-up of a typical Japanese home. The mean age of the HHMP group was 75.7 years and the control group 75.8. The HHMP group showed a 10.9% reduction in overall falls, and falls indoors showed an 11.7% reduction at 52 weeks. Those aged 75 years and over showed a significant reduction in both overall falls and indoor falls at 12 weeks. Fall prevention awareness and home modifications were significantly improved in the HHMP group. HHMP has the potential to improve fall prevention awareness and home modification behaviors, and specifically decreased overall and indoor falls in 12 weeks in those aged 75 years and older in community-dwelling older adults. © 2014 The Authors. Japan Journal of Nursing Science © 2014 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  20. The Israeli Long-Term Care Insurance Law: selected issues in providing home care services to the frail elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Hillel

    2005-05-01

    The paper describes and analyses selected issues related to the provision of home care services to frail elderly people following the Israeli Long-Term Care Insurance Law (1988). The goals and principles of the Law, which mandates the provision of home care services to frail elderly people, are presented. The paper also evaluates its contribution toward enhancing the well-being of elderly clients. Several major dilemmas that arose following implementation of the Law are analysed and evaluated in comparison with other countries that have enacted and implemented similar laws. These dilemmas are community vs institutional care; services in kind vs monetary allowances; service provision through contracting out with nongovernmental agencies; unstable and unskilled labour force; and service quality. Finally, policy implications are discussed, mainly in the following areas: investment in human resources as a condition for achieving high service quality, and the need for coordination between the agencies that provide long-term care services to elderly people.

  1. Tehran Air Pollutants Prediction Based on Random Forest Feature Selection Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsoddini, A.; Aboodi, M. R.; Karami, J.

    2017-09-01

    Air pollution as one of the most serious forms of environmental pollutions poses huge threat to human life. Air pollution leads to environmental instability, and has harmful and undesirable effects on the environment. Modern prediction methods of the pollutant concentration are able to improve decision making and provide appropriate solutions. This study examines the performance of the Random Forest feature selection in combination with multiple-linear regression and Multilayer Perceptron Artificial Neural Networks methods, in order to achieve an efficient model to estimate carbon monoxide and nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide and PM2.5 contents in the air. The results indicated that Artificial Neural Networks fed by the attributes selected by Random Forest feature selection method performed more accurate than other models for the modeling of all pollutants. The estimation accuracy of sulfur dioxide emissions was lower than the other air contaminants whereas the nitrogen dioxide was predicted more accurate than the other pollutants.

  2. TEHRAN AIR POLLUTANTS PREDICTION BASED ON RANDOM FOREST FEATURE SELECTION METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Shamsoddini

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Air pollution as one of the most serious forms of environmental pollutions poses huge threat to human life. Air pollution leads to environmental instability, and has harmful and undesirable effects on the environment. Modern prediction methods of the pollutant concentration are able to improve decision making and provide appropriate solutions. This study examines the performance of the Random Forest feature selection in combination with multiple-linear regression and Multilayer Perceptron Artificial Neural Networks methods, in order to achieve an efficient model to estimate carbon monoxide and nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide and PM2.5 contents in the air. The results indicated that Artificial Neural Networks fed by the attributes selected by Random Forest feature selection method performed more accurate than other models for the modeling of all pollutants. The estimation accuracy of sulfur dioxide emissions was lower than the other air contaminants whereas the nitrogen dioxide was predicted more accurate than the other pollutants.

  3. Home-based diabetes self-management coaching delivered by paraprofessionals: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauley, Tim; Gargaro, Judith; Chenard, Glen; Cavanagh, Helen; McKay, Sandra M

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated paraprofessional-led diabetes self-management coaching (DSMC) among 94 clients with type 2 diabetes recruited from a Community Care Access Centre in Ontario, Canada. Subjects were randomized to standard care or standard care plus coaching. Measures included the Diabetes Self-Efficacy Scale (DSES), Insulin Management Diabetes Self-Efficacy Scale (IMDSES), and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Both groups showed improvement in DSES (6.6 + 1.5 vs. 7.2 + 1.5, p  .05 for all) or depression scores (p > .05 for all), or anxiety (p > .05 for all) or depression (p > .05 for all) categories at baseline, postintervention, or follow-up. While all subjects demonstrated significant improvements in self-efficacy measures, there is no evidence to support paraprofessional-led DSMC as an intervention which conveys additional benefits over standard care.

  4. Short-Term Effects of a Home-Based Smoking Prevention Program on Antismoking Socialization and Smoking-Related Cognitions: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hiemstra, J.M.; Ringlever, L.; Otten, R.; Schayck, O.C.P. van; Engels, R.C.M.E.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to evaluate the short-term effects of a home-based smoking prevention program called 'Smoke-free Kids' on antismoking socialization and smoking-related cognitions and the moderating role of parental smoking. Participants and Methods: A cluster randomized controlled trial

  5. The effect of integrated emotion-oriented care versus usual care on elderly persons with dementia in the nursing home and on nursing assistants: a randomized clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Finnema, E.J.; Dr�es, R.M.; Ettema, T.P.; Ooms, M.E.; Adèr, H.J.; Ribbe, M.W.; van Tilburg, W.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the effect of integrated emotion-oriented care on nursing home residents with dementia and nursing assistants. Design: A multi-site randomized clinical trial with matched groups, and measurements at baseline and after seven months. Setting: Sixteen psychogeriatric wards in

  6. The effect of integrated emotion-oriented care versus usual care on elderly persons with dementia in the nursing home and on nursing assistants: a randomized clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Finnema, E.J.; Dr�es, R.M.; Ettema, T.P.; Ooms, M.E.; Adèr, H.J.; Ribbe, M.W.; Tilburg, van W.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To examine the effect of integrated emotion-oriented care on nursing home residents with dementia and nursing assistants. DESIGN: A multi-site randomized clinical trial with matched groups, and measurements at baseline and after seven months. SETTING: Sixteen psychogeriatric wards in

  7. Classification of epileptic EEG signals based on simple random sampling and sequential feature selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghayab, Hadi Ratham Al; Li, Yan; Abdulla, Shahab; Diykh, Mohammed; Wan, Xiangkui

    2016-06-01

    Electroencephalogram (EEG) signals are used broadly in the medical fields. The main applications of EEG signals are the diagnosis and treatment of diseases such as epilepsy, Alzheimer, sleep problems and so on. This paper presents a new method which extracts and selects features from multi-channel EEG signals. This research focuses on three main points. Firstly, simple random sampling (SRS) technique is used to extract features from the time domain of EEG signals. Secondly, the sequential feature selection (SFS) algorithm is applied to select the key features and to reduce the dimensionality of the data. Finally, the selected features are forwarded to a least square support vector machine (LS_SVM) classifier to classify the EEG signals. The LS_SVM classifier classified the features which are extracted and selected from the SRS and the SFS. The experimental results show that the method achieves 99.90, 99.80 and 100 % for classification accuracy, sensitivity and specificity, respectively.

  8. Personal name in Igbo Culture: A dataset on randomly selected personal names and their statistical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okagbue, Hilary I; Opanuga, Abiodun A; Adamu, Muminu O; Ugwoke, Paulinus O; Obasi, Emmanuela C M; Eze, Grace A

    2017-12-01

    This data article contains the statistical analysis of Igbo personal names and a sample of randomly selected of such names. This was presented as the following: 1). A simple random sampling of some Igbo personal names and their respective gender associated with each name. 2). The distribution of the vowels, consonants and letters of alphabets of the personal names. 3). The distribution of name length. 4). The distribution of initial and terminal letters of Igbo personal names. The significance of the data was discussed.

  9. An international randomized study of a home-based self-management program for severe COPD: the COMET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bourbeau J

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Jean Bourbeau,1 Pere Casan,2 Silvia Tognella,3 Peter Haidl,4 Joëlle B Texereau,5,6 Romain Kessler7 On behalf of the COMET investigators 1Respiratory Epidemiology and Clinical Research Unit, Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada; 2Hospital Universitario Central de Asturias, Facultad de Medicina, Oviedo, Spain; 3Lung Department, Ospedale Orlandi, Bussolengo VR, Italy; 4Krankenhaus Kloster Grafschaft, Schmallenberg, Germany; 5Air Liquide Healthcare, Medical Research and Development, Jouy-en-Josas, 6Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Service de Physiologie Clinique, Hôpital Cochin, Paris, 7Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Translational Medicine Federation of Strasbourg, University Hospital of Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France Introduction: Most hospitalizations and costs related to COPD are due to exacerbations and insufficient disease management. The COPD patient Management European Trial (COMET is investigating a home-based multicomponent COPD self-management program designed to reduce exacerbations and hospital admissions.Design: Multicenter parallel randomized controlled, open-label superiority trial.Setting: Thirty-three hospitals in four European countries.Participants: A total of 345 patients with Global initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease III/IV COPD.Intervention: The program includes extensive patient coaching by health care professionals to improve self-management (eg, develop skills to better manage their disease, an e-health platform for reporting frequent health status updates, rapid intervention when necessary, and oxygen therapy monitoring. Comparator is the usual management as per the center’s routine practice.Main outcome measures: Yearly number of hospital days for acute care, exacerbation number, quality of life, deaths, and costs. Keywords: COPD, disease management, exacerbations, hospitalization, home care, clinical trial

  10. Oral morphine versus ibuprofen administered at home for postoperative orthopedic pain in children: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poonai, Naveen; Datoo, Natasha; Ali, Samina; Cashin, Megan; Drendel, Amy L; Zhu, Rongbo; Lepore, Natasha; Greff, Michael; Rieder, Michael; Bartley, Debra

    2017-10-10

    Oral morphine for postoperative pain after minor pediatric surgery, while increasingly popular, is not supported by evidence. We evaluated whether oral morphine was superior to ibuprofen for at-home management of children's postoperative pain. We conducted a randomized superiority trial comparing oral morphine (0.5 mg/kg) with ibuprofen (10 mg/kg) in children 5 to 17 years of age who had undergone minor outpatient orthopedic surgery (June 2013 to September 2016). Participants took up to 8 doses of the intervention drug every 6 hours as needed for pain at home. The primary outcome was pain, according to the Faces Pain Scale - Revised, for the first dose. Secondary outcomes included additional analgesic requirements, adverse effects, unplanned health care visits and pain scores for doses 2 to 8. We analyzed data for 77 participants in each of the morphine and ibuprofen groups. Both interventions decreased pain scores with no difference in efficacy. The median difference in pain score before and after the first dose of medication was 1 (interquartile range 0-1) for both morphine and ibuprofen (p = 0.2). For doses 2 to 8, the median differences in pain score before and after the dose were not significantly different between groups. Significantly more participants taking morphine reported adverse effects (45/65 [69%] v. 26/67 [39%], p pain with no apparent difference in efficacy. Morphine was associated with significantly more adverse effects, which suggests that ibuprofen is a better first-line option after minor surgery. ClinicalTrials.gov, no. NCT01686802. © 2017 Canadian Medical Association or its licensors.

  11. Nurse home visits with or without alert buttons versus usual care in the frail elderly: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Favela J

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Jesús Favela,1 Luis A Castro,2 Francisco Franco-Marina,3 Sergio Sánchez-García,4 Teresa Juárez-Cedillo,4 Claudia Espinel Bermudez,4 Julia Mora-Altamirano,4 Marcela D Rodriguez,5 Carmen García-Peña41Center for Scientific Research and Higher Education of Ensenada, Ensenada, Baja California, Mexico; 2Sonora Institute of Technology, Ciudad Obregon, Mexico; 3National Institute of Respiratory Diseases, Mexican Ministry of Health, Mexico City, Mexico; 4Epidemiologic and Health Service Research Unit, Aging Area, XXI Century National Medical Center, Mexican Institute of Social Security, Mexico City, Mexico; 5School of Engineering, MyDCI, Autonomous University of Baja California, Mexicali, MexicoObjective: To assess whether an intervention based on nurse home visits including alert buttons (NV+AB is effective in reducing frailty compared to nurse home visits alone (NV-only and usual care (control group for older adults.Design: Unblinded, randomized, controlled trial.Setting: Insured population covered by the Mexican Social Security Institute living in the city of Ensenada, Baja California, Mexico.Participants: Patients were aged over 60 years with a frailty index score higher than 0.14.Intervention: After screening and informed consent, participants were allocated randomly to the control, NV+AB, or NV-only groups.Measurements: The primary outcome was the frailty score 9 months later. Quality of life, depression, comorbidities, health status, and health service utilization were also considered.Results: The framing sample included 819 patients. Of those, 591 were not located because they did not have a landline/telephone (341 patients, they had died (107, they were ill (50, or they were not currently living in the city (28. A screening interview was applied to 228 participants, and 57 had a score ≤0.14, 171 had ≥0.14, and 16 refused to complete the baseline questionnaire. A home visit was scheduled for 155 patients. However, 22 did not complete

  12. A group randomized controlled trial integrating obesity prevention and control for postpartum adolescents in a home visiting program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haire-Joshu, Debra L; Schwarz, Cynthia D; Peskoe, Sarah B; Budd, Elizabeth L; Brownson, Ross C; Joshu, Corinne E

    2015-06-26

    Adolescence represents a critical period for the development of overweight that tracks into adulthood. This risk is significantly heightened for adolescents that become pregnant, many of whom experience postpartum weight retention. The aim of this study was to evaluate Balance Adolescent Lifestyle Activities and Nutrition Choices for Energy (BALANCE), a multicomponent obesity prevention intervention targeting postpartum adolescents participating in a national home visiting child development-parent education program. A group randomized, nested cohort design was used with 1325 adolescents, 694 intervention and 490 control, (mean age = 17.8 years, 52 % underrepresented minorities) located across 30 states. Participatory methods were used to integrate lifestyle behavior change strategies within standard parent education practice. Content targeted replacement of high-risk obesogenic patterns (e.g. sweetened drink and high fat snack consumption, sedentary activity) with positive behaviors (e.g. water intake, fruit and vegetables, increased walking). Parent educators delivered BALANCE through home visits, school based classroom-group meetings, and website activities. Control adolescents received standard child development information. Phase I included baseline to posttest (12 months); Phase II included baseline to follow-up (24 months). When compared to the control group, BALANCE adolescents who were ≥12 weeks postpartum were 89 % more likely (p = 0.02) to maintain a normal BMI or improve an overweight/obese BMI by 12 months; this change was not sustained at 24 months. When compared to the control group, BALANCE adolescents significantly improved fruit and vegetable intake (p = .03). In stratified analyses, water intake improved among younger BALANCE teens (p = .001) and overweight/obese BALANCE teens (p = .05) when compared to control counterparts. There were no significant differences between groups in sweetened drink and snack consumption

  13. Effect of Promoting High-Quality Staff Interactions on Fall Prevention in Nursing Homes: A Cluster-Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colón-Emeric, Cathleen S; Corazzini, Kirsten; McConnell, Eleanor S; Pan, Wei; Toles, Mark; Hall, Rasheeda; Cary, Michael P; Batchelor-Murphy, Melissa; Yap, Tracey; Anderson, Amber L; Burd, Andrew; Amarasekara, Sathya; Anderson, Ruth A

    2017-11-01

    New approaches are needed to enhance implementation of complex interventions for geriatric syndromes such as falls. To test whether a complexity science-based staff training intervention (CONNECT) promoting high-quality staff interactions improves the impact of an evidence-based falls quality improvement program (FALLS). Cluster-randomized trial in 24 nursing homes receiving either CONNECT followed by FALLS (intervention), or FALLS alone (control). Nursing home staff in all positions were asked to complete surveys at baseline, 3, 6, and 9 months. Medical records of residents with at least 1 fall in the 6-month pre- and postintervention windows (n = 1794) were abstracted for fall risk reduction measures, falls, and injurious falls. CONNECT taught staff to improve their connections with coworkers, increase information flow, and use cognitive diversity in problem solving. Intervention components included 2 classroom sessions, relationship mapping, and self-monitoring. FALLS provided instruction in the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality's Falls Management Program. Primary outcomes were (1) mean number of fall risk reduction activities documented within 30 days of falls and (2) median fall rates among residents with at least 1 fall during the study period. In addition, validated scales measured staff communication quality, frequency, timeliness, and safety climate. Surveys were completed by 1545 staff members, representing 734 (37%) and 811 (44%) of eligible staff in intervention and control facilities, respectively; 511 (33%) respondents were hands-on care workers. Neither the CONNECT nor the FALLS-only facilities improved the mean count of fall risk reduction activities following FALLS (3.3 [1.6] vs 3.2 [1.5] of 10); furthermore, adjusted median recurrent fall rates did not differ between the groups (4.06 [interquartile range {IQR}, 2.03-8.11] vs 4.06 [IQR, 2.04-8.11] falls/resident/y). A modest improvement in staff communication measures was observed

  14. Healthy Habits, Happy Homes: randomized trial to improve household routines for obesity prevention among preschool-aged children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Jess; McDonald, Julia; O'Brien, Ashley; Sherry, Bettylou; Bottino, Clement J; Schmidt, Marie Evans; Taveras, Elsie M

    2013-11-01

    Racial/ethnic and socioeconomic disparities exist across risk factors for childhood obesity. To examine the effectiveness of a home-based intervention to improve household routines known to be associated with childhood obesity among a sample of low-income, racial/ethnic minority families with young children. Randomized trial. The intervention was delivered in the families' homes. The study involved 121 families with children aged 2 to 5 years who had a television (TV) in the room where he or she slept; 111 (92%) had 6-month outcome data (55 intervention and 56 control). The mean (SD) age of the children was 4.0 (1.1) years; 45% were overweight/obese. Fifty-two percent of the children were Hispanic, 34% were black, and 14% were white/other. Nearly 60% of the families had household incomes of $20,000 or less. The 6-month intervention promoted 4 household routines, family meals, adequate sleep, limiting TV time, and removing the TV from the child's bedroom, using (1) motivational coaching at home and by phone, (2) mailed educational materials, and (3) text messages. Control subjects were mailed materials focused on child development. Change in parent report of frequency of family meals (times/wk), child sleep duration (hours/d), child weekday and weekend day TV viewing (hours/d), and the presence of a TV in the room where the child slept from baseline to 6 months. A secondary outcome was change in age- and sex-adjusted body mass index (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared). Compared with control subjects, intervention participants had increased sleep duration (0.75 hours/d; 95% CI, 0.06 to 1.44; P = .03), greater decreases in TV viewing on weekend days (-1.06 hours/d; 95% CI, -1.97 to -0.15; P = .02), and decreased body mass index (-0.40; 95% CI, -0.79 to 0.00; P = .05). No significant intervention effect was found for the presence of a TV in the room where the child slept or family meal frequency. Our results suggest that promoting

  15. Effects of Standardized Home Training in Patients with Cognitive Impairment following Geriatric Rehabilitation: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauer, Klaus; Ullrich, Phoebe; Dutzi, Ilona; Beurskens, Rainer; Kern, Sylvia; Bauer, Jürgen; Schwenk, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Post-ward geriatric rehabilitation programs have hardly been developed and validated, which leaves a substantial gap in rehabilitative care in older adults and hinders full exploitation of maintained, but often unrecognized rehabilitation potentials. Geriatric rehabilitation patients with cognitive impairment represent a highly vulnerable population which is often affected by a lack of an ongoing support at the intersection between ward-based and post-ward rehabilitation. To determine the effect of a standardized home-based training program in geriatric patients with cognitive impairment following ward-based rehabilitation. A randomized controlled, single-blinded intervention trial (RCT) with wait list control design was used. Geriatric patients (n = 34; age: 81.9 ± 5.7 years) with cognitive impairment (MMSE: 18.8 ± 4.7), identified by predefined in- and exclusion criteria, were consecutively recruited from a geriatric rehab ward. Patients in the intervention group (IG, n = 17) performed a 6-week strength and functional home training. The control group (CG, n = 17) started an identical training 6 weeks later with an initial usual care period during the intervention for the IG. Functional performance (Short Physical Performance Battery; SPPB), clinically relevant functional deficits (Performance Oriented Assessment; POMA), and physical activity (Assessment of Physical Activity For Older Persons questionnaire; APAFOP) represented primary outcome measurements complemented by additional secondary outcome parameters. The IG significantly increased functional performances in SPPB (total score: p = 0.012; chair rise: p = 0.007, balance: p = 0.066), reduced gait and balance deficits in POMA (total score: p = 0.006; balance: p = 0.034; gait: p = 0.019), and increased physical activity (APAFOP; p = 0.05) compared to the CG. Effect sizes showed medium to large effects for significant parameters (eta2 = 0.14-0.45). Training benefits and adherence were more pronounced

  16. Effectiveness of the home-based alcohol prevention program "In control: No alcohol!": study protocol of a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verdurmen Jacqueline EE

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the Netherlands, children start to drink at an early age; of the Dutch 12-year olds, 40% reports lifetime alcohol use, while 9.7% reports last-month drinking. Starting to drink at an early age puts youth at risk of developing several alcohol-related problems later in life. Recently, a home-based prevention program called "In control: No alcohol!" was developed to delay the age of alcohol onset in children. The main aim of this project is to conduct a Randomized Controlled Trial (RCT to evaluate the effectiveness of the program. Methods/Design The prevention program will be tested with an RCT among mothers and their 6 grade primary school children (11-12 years old, randomly assigned to the prevention or control condition. The program consists of five printed magazines and an activity book designed to improve parental alcohol-specific socialization. Parent-child dyads in the control group receive a factsheet information brochure, which is the standard alcohol brochure of the Trimbos Institute (the Netherlands Institute for Mental Health and Addiction. Outcome measures are initiation of alcohol use (have been drinking at least one glass of alcohol, alcohol-specific parenting, susceptibility to drinking alcohol, alcohol expectancies, self-efficacy, and frequency and intensity of child alcohol use. Questionnaires will be administered online on secured Internet webpages, with personal login codes for both mothers and children. Mothers and children in both the experimental and control condition will be surveyed at baseline and after 6, 12, and 18 months (follow-ups. Discussion The present study protocol presents the design of an RCT evaluating the effectiveness of the home-based "In control: No alcohol!" program for 6 grade primary school children (11-12 years old. It is hypothesized that children in the prevention condition will be less likely to have their first glass of alcohol, compared to the control condition. When the

  17. Effectiveness of a home care nursing program in the symptom management of patients with colorectal and breast cancer receiving oral chemotherapy: a randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molassiotis, Alex; Brearley, Sarah; Saunders, Mark; Craven, Olive; Wardley, Andrew; Farrell, Carole; Swindell, Ric; Todd, Chris; Luker, Karen

    2009-12-20

    To assess the effectiveness of a symptom-focused home care program in patients with cancer who were receiving oral chemotherapy in relation to toxicity levels, anxiety, depression, quality of life, and service utilization. A randomized, controlled trial was carried out with 164 patients with a diagnosis of colorectal (n = 110) and breast (n = 54) cancers who were receiving oral capecitabine. Patients were randomly assigned to receive either a home care program by a nurse or standard care for 18 weeks (ie, six cycles of chemotherapy). Toxicity assessments were carried out weekly for the duration of the patients' participation in the trial, and validated self-report tools assessed anxiety, depression, and quality of life. Significant improvements were observed in the home care group in relation to the symptoms of oral mucositis, diarrhea, constipation, nausea, pain, fatigue (first four cycles), and insomnia (all P < .05). This improvement was most significant during the initial two cycles. Unplanned service utilization, particularly the number of inpatient days (57 v 167 days; P = .02), also was lower in the home care group. A symptom-focused home care program was able to assist patients to manage their treatment adverse effects more effectively than standard care. It is imperative that patients receiving oral chemotherapy are supported with such programs, particularly during initial treatment cycles, to improve their treatment and symptom experiences.

  18. Preventing Pressure Ulcers: A Multisite Randomized Controlled Trial in Nursing Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergstrom, Nancy; Horn, Susan D; Rapp, Mary; Stern, Anita; Barrett, Ryan; Watkiss, Michael; Krahn, Murray

    2014-01-01

    Pressure at the interface between bony prominences and support surfaces, sufficient to occlude or reduce blood flow, is thought to cause pressure ulcers (PrUs). Pressure ulcers are prevented by providing support surfaces that redistribute pressure and by turning residents to reduce length of exposure. We aim to determine optimal frequency of repositioning in long-term care (LTC) facilities of residents at risk for PrUs who are cared for on high-density foam mattresses. We recruited residents from 20 United States and 7 Canadian LTC facilities. Participants were randomly allocated to 1 of 3 turning schedules (2-, 3-, or 4-hour intervals). The study continued for 3 weeks with weekly risk and skin assessment completed by assessors blinded to group allocation. The primary outcome measure was PrU on the coccyx or sacrum, greater trochanter, or heels. Participants were mostly female (731/942, 77.6%) and white (758/942, 80.5%), and had a mean age of 85.1 (standard deviation [SD] ± 7.66) years. The most common comorbidities were cardiovascular disease (713/942, 75.7%) and dementia (672/942, 71.3%). Nineteen of 942 (2.02%) participants developed one superficial Stage 1 (n = 1) or Stage 2 (n = 19) ulcer; no full-thickness ulcers developed. Overall, there was no significant difference in PrU incidence (P = 0.68) between groups (2-hour, 8/321 [2.49%] ulcers/group; 3-hour, 2/326 [0.61%]; 4-hour, 9/295 [3.05%]. Pressure ulcers among high-risk (6/325, 1.85%) versus moderate-risk (13/617, 2.11%) participants were not significantly different (P = 0.79), nor was there a difference between moderate-risk (P = 0.68) or high-risk allocation groups (P = 0.90). Results support turning moderate- and high-risk residents at intervals of 2, 3, or 4 hours when they are cared for on high-density foam replacement mattresses. Turning at 3-hour and at 4-hour intervals is no worse than the current practice of turning every 2 hours. Less frequent turning might increase sleep, improve quality of

  19. Simulated Performance Evaluation of a Selective Tracker Through Random Scenario Generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hussain, Dil Muhammad Akbar

    2006-01-01

      The paper presents a simulation study on the performance of a target tracker using selective track splitting filter algorithm through a random scenario implemented on a digital signal processor.  In a typical track splitting filter all the observation which fall inside a likelihood ellipse...... are used for update, however, in our proposed selective track splitting filter less number of observations are used for track update.  Much of the previous performance work [1] has been done on specific (deterministic) scenarios. One of the reasons for considering the specific scenarios, which were...

  20. Impact of a multicomponent hand hygiene-related intervention on the infectious risk in nursing homes: A cluster randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temime, Laura; Cohen, Nadia; Ait-Bouziad, Karim; Denormandie, Philippe; Dab, William; Hocine, Mounia N

    2017-10-05

    The aim of this study was to assess the impact of a multifaceted hand hygiene (HH) program on the infectious risk in nursing homes (NHs). This was a 2-arm cluster randomized trial; French NHs were allocated randomly to the intervention (13 NHs) or control (13 NHs) groups. The intervention consisted of implementing a bundle of HH-related measures over 1 year, including increased availability of alcohol-based handrub, HH promotion, staff education, and local work groups. The primary end point was the incidence rate of acute respiratory infections and gastroenteritis reported in the context of clustered cases episodes. Secondary end points were mortality, hospitalization, and antibiotic prescription rates. Baseline characteristics did not differ between groups. The overall handrub consumption was higher in the intervention group over the 1-year intervention period. Because of underreporting, data on the primary end points were of insufficient quality for analysis. Hospitalizations did not differ between the 2 groups. However, the intervention group showed significantly lower mortality (2.10 vs 2.65 per 100 residents per month, respectively; P = .003) and antibiotic prescriptions (5.0 vs 5.8 defined daily doses per 100 resident days, respectively; P < .001). These results were confirmed by the longitudinal multivariate analysis adjusted for NH and resident characteristics and for seasonality (mortality rate ratio, 0.76). A multifaceted HH intervention may have a short-term impact on mortality in NHs. Nevertheless, other strategies may remain necessary to reduce morbidity. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Screen-time Weight-loss Intervention Targeting Children at Home (SWITCH: A randomized controlled trial study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsai Midi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Approximately one third of New Zealand children and young people are overweight or obese. A similar proportion (33% do not meet recommendations for physical activity, and 70% do not meet recommendations for screen time. Increased time being sedentary is positively associated with being overweight. There are few family-based interventions aimed at reducing sedentary behavior in children. The aim of this trial is to determine the effects of a 24 week home-based, family oriented intervention to reduce sedentary screen time on children's body composition, sedentary behavior, physical activity, and diet. Methods/Design The study design is a pragmatic two-arm parallel randomized controlled trial. Two hundred and seventy overweight children aged 9-12 years and primary caregivers are being recruited. Participants are randomized to intervention (family-based screen time intervention or control (no change. At the end of the study, the control group is offered the intervention content. Data collection is undertaken at baseline and 24 weeks. The primary trial outcome is child body mass index (BMI and standardized body mass index (zBMI. Secondary outcomes are change from baseline to 24 weeks in child percentage body fat; waist circumference; self-reported average daily time spent in physical and sedentary activities; dietary intake; and enjoyment of physical activity and sedentary behavior. Secondary outcomes for the primary caregiver include change in BMI and self-reported physical activity. Discussion This study provides an excellent example of a theory-based, pragmatic, community-based trial targeting sedentary behavior in overweight children. The study has been specifically designed to allow for estimation of the consistency of effects on body composition for Māori (indigenous, Pacific and non-Māori/non-Pacific ethnic groups. If effective, this intervention is imminently scalable and could be integrated within existing weight

  2. Spinal manipulation, medication, or home exercise with advice for acute and subacute neck pain: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronfort, Gert; Evans, Roni; Anderson, Alfred V; Svendsen, Kenneth H; Bracha, Yiscah; Grimm, Richard H

    2012-01-03

    Mechanical neck pain is a common condition that affects an estimated 70% of persons at some point in their lives. Little research exists to guide the choice of therapy for acute and subacute neck pain. To determine the relative efficacy of spinal manipulation therapy (SMT), medication, and home exercise with advice (HEA) for acute and subacute neck pain in both the short and long term. Randomized, controlled trial. (ClinicalTrials.gov registration number: NCT00029770) 1 university research center and 1 pain management clinic in Minnesota. 272 persons aged 18 to 65 years who had nonspecific neck pain for 2 to 12 weeks. 12 weeks of SMT, medication, or HEA. The primary outcome was participant-rated pain, measured at 2, 4, 8, 12, 26, and 52 weeks after randomization. Secondary measures were self-reported disability, global improvement, medication use, satisfaction, general health status (Short Form-36 Health Survey physical and mental health scales), and adverse events. Blinded evaluation of neck motion was performed at 4 and 12 weeks. For pain, SMT had a statistically significant advantage over medication after 8, 12, 26, and 52 weeks (P ≤ 0.010), and HEA was superior to medication at 26 weeks (P = 0.02). No important differences in pain were found between SMT and HEA at any time point. Results for most of the secondary outcomes were similar to those of the primary outcome. Participants and providers could not be blinded. No specific criteria for defining clinically important group differences were prespecified or available from the literature. For participants with acute and subacute neck pain, SMT was more effective than medication in both the short and long term. However, a few instructional sessions of HEA resulted in similar outcomes at most time points. National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, National Institutes of Health.

  3. Evaluation of the making sense of brain tumor program: a randomized controlled trial of a home-based psychosocial intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ownsworth, Tamara; Chambers, Suzanne; Damborg, Ea; Casey, Leanne; Walker, David G; Shum, David H K

    2015-05-01

    Despite significant psychosocial morbidity, there are few controlled trials of psychological support for people with brain tumor. This study evaluated the efficacy of the Making Sense of Brain Tumor (MSoBT) program, a home-based psychosocial intervention. A randomized controlled trial with a wait list condition Fifty participants aged 17-82 years with brain tumor (54% benign) were randomly allocated to immediate treatment (n = 27) or a waitlist (n = 23). Measures included Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS), McGill Quality of Life (MQOL) Questionnaire, Depression Anxiety Stress Scales (DASS) and Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Brain (FACT-Br). The immediate treatment group received the 10-session MSoBT program, while the waitlist group received usual care for 10 weeks and were then re-assessed before receiving the MSoBT program. A 6-month post-intervention follow-up was conducted. Analysis of covariance adjusting for baseline functioning identified that the immediate treatment group reported significantly lower levels of depression on the MADRS (η(p)(2)  = .19) and higher levels of existential well-being on the MQOL (η(p)(2)  = .13) and functional well-being (η(p)(2)  = .21) and global quality of life on the FACT-Br (η(p)(2)  = .12) at post-assessment than the waitlist group. At 6-month follow-up participants reported significantly lower levels of depression and stress and higher existential well-being and quality of life relative to pre-intervention. The MSoBT program appears to have efficacy for enhancing psychological well-being and quality of life after brain tumor. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Ultraviolet radiation after exposure to a low-fluence IPL home-use device: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaysen-Petersen, Daniel; Erlendsson, Andres M; Nash, J F; Beerwerth, Frank; Philipsen, Peter A; Wulf, Hans C; Haedersdal, Merete

    2015-11-01

    The prevailing advice is to avoid sun exposure after intense pulsed light (IPL) hair removal. However, no systematic evaluation of ultraviolet radiation (UVR) after IPL hair removal exits. Therefore, we investigated the occurrence of side effects in subjects receiving solar-simulated UVR after a low-fluence IPL treatment with a home-use device. Sixteen subjects with Fitzpatrick skin types (FST) II-V were enrolled. Three constitutive buttock blocks (4.4 × 6.4 cm) were each subdivided into four sites, randomized to one IPL exposure of 0, 7, 8, or 10 J/cm2 (spectral output 530-1100 nm). Blocks were randomized to no UVR or three standard erythema doses (SEDs) UVR either 30 min or 24 h after IPL. Follow-up visits were 48 h, 1 week, and 4 weeks after IPL. Outcome measures were (i) clinical skin reactions, (ii) reflectance measurements of erythema and pigmentation, and (iii) pain. Subjects with FST II-IV experienced no skin reactions up to 4 weeks after IPL, neither erythema, edema, blisters, crusting, textual, nor pigment changes. Reflectance confirmed no change in erythema and pigmentation (p ≥ 0.090). UVR exposure induced erythema and increased pigmentation. The combination of IPL and UVR induced skin reactions not different to responses from UVR (IPL-UVR vs. UVR, p ≥ 0.164). Pain was generally low (median 1, range 0-4) and correlated positively with fluence and pigmentation (Spearman's rho ≥ 0.394, p IPL and slightly more intense when exposed to UVR. A single UVR exposure of three SEDs either shortly or 1 day after low-fluence IPL causes no amplification of skin responses in constitutive skin of individuals with FST II-IV.

  5. Divergent selection on home pen locomotor activity in a chicken model: Selection program, genetic parameters and direct response on activity and body weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjaer, Joergen B

    2017-01-01

    General locomotor activity (GLA) in poultry has attracted attention, as it negatively influences production costs (energy expenditure and feed consumption) and welfare parameters (bone strength, litter quality, feather pecking and cannibalism). Laying hen lines diverging in the average level of spontaneous locomotor activity in the home pen were developed by genetic selection using the founder New Hampshire line. Activity was recorded using RFID technology at around five weeks of age during four to five days in the home pen. After initial phenotyping, the least active birds were selected for the low activity line and the most active for the high activity line, with no gene transfer between lines. In each of six generations, approximately ten sires were mated to twenty dams producing 158 to 334 offspring per line per generation. The response to selection was rapid and of a considerable magnitude. In sixth generation, the level of GLA was approximately halved in the low and doubled in the high line compared to the control (7.2, 14.9 and 28.7 recordings/h). Estimated heritability of locomotor activity in the low and high line was 0.38 and 0.33, respectively. Males, in general, were more active than females. High line birds were significantly heavier than low line birds. In fourth, fifth, and sixth generation, low as well as high line birds were lighter than control line birds. This selection experiment demonstrates variation in heritability for GLA and, as a result, genetically diverged lines have been developed. These lines can be used as models for further studies of underlying physiological, neural and molecular genetic mechanisms of spontaneous locomotor activity.

  6. Divergent selection on home pen locomotor activity in a chicken model: Selection program, genetic parameters and direct response on activity and body weight.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joergen B Kjaer

    Full Text Available General locomotor activity (GLA in poultry has attracted attention, as it negatively influences production costs (energy expenditure and feed consumption and welfare parameters (bone strength, litter quality, feather pecking and cannibalism. Laying hen lines diverging in the average level of spontaneous locomotor activity in the home pen were developed by genetic selection using the founder New Hampshire line. Activity was recorded using RFID technology at around five weeks of age during four to five days in the home pen. After initial phenotyping, the least active birds were selected for the low activity line and the most active for the high activity line, with no gene transfer between lines. In each of six generations, approximately ten sires were mated to twenty dams producing 158 to 334 offspring per line per generation. The response to selection was rapid and of a considerable magnitude. In sixth generation, the level of GLA was approximately halved in the low and doubled in the high line compared to the control (7.2, 14.9 and 28.7 recordings/h. Estimated heritability of locomotor activity in the low and high line was 0.38 and 0.33, respectively. Males, in general, were more active than females. High line birds were significantly heavier than low line birds. In fourth, fifth, and sixth generation, low as well as high line birds were lighter than control line birds. This selection experiment demonstrates variation in heritability for GLA and, as a result, genetically diverged lines have been developed. These lines can be used as models for further studies of underlying physiological, neural and molecular genetic mechanisms of spontaneous locomotor activity.

  7. Classification of epileptic EEG signals based on simple random sampling and sequential feature selection

    OpenAIRE

    Ghayab, Hadi Ratham Al; Li, Yan; Abdulla, Shahab; Diykh, Mohammed; Wan, Xiangkui

    2016-01-01

    Electroencephalogram (EEG) signals are used broadly in the medical fields. The main applications of EEG signals are the diagnosis and treatment of diseases such as epilepsy, Alzheimer, sleep problems and so on. This paper presents a new method which extracts and selects features from multi-channel EEG signals. This research focuses on three main points. Firstly, simple random sampling (SRS) technique is used to extract features from the time domain of EEG signals. Secondly, the sequential fea...

  8. COSMOS--improving the quality of life in nursing home patients: protocol for an effectiveness-implementation cluster randomized clinical hybrid trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husebo, Bettina S; Flo, Elisabeth; Aarsland, Dag; Selbaek, Geir; Testad, Ingelin; Gulla, Christine; Aasmul, Irene; Ballard, Clive

    2015-09-15

    Nursing home patients have complex mental and physical health problems, disabilities and social needs, combined with widespread prescription of psychotropic drugs. Preservation of their quality of life is an important goal. This can only be achieved within nursing homes that offer competent clinical conditions of treatment and care. COmmunication, Systematic assessment and treatment of pain, Medication review, Occupational therapy, Safety (COSMOS) is an effectiveness-implementation hybrid trial that combines and implements organization of activities evidence-based interventions to improve staff competence and thereby the patients' quality of life, mental health and safety. The aim of this paper is to describe the development, content and implementation process of the COSMOS trial. COSMOS includes a 2-month pilot study with 128 participants distributed among nine Norwegian nursing homes, and a 4-month multicenter, cluster randomized effectiveness-implementation clinical hybrid trial with follow-up at month 9, including 571 patients from 67 nursing home units (one unit defined as one cluster). Clusters are randomized to COSMOS intervention or current best practice (control group). The intervention group will receive a 2-day education program including written guidelines, repeated theoretical and practical training (credited education of caregivers, physicians and nursing home managers), case discussions and role play. The 1-day midway evaluation, information and interviews of nursing staff and a telephone hotline all support the implementation process. Outcome measures include quality of life in late-stage dementia, neuropsychiatric symptoms, activities of daily living, pain, depression, sleep, medication, cost-utility analysis, hospital admission and mortality. Despite complex medical and psychosocial challenges, nursing home patients are often treated by staff possessing low level skills, lacking education and in facilities with a high staff turnover

  9. Effects of home-based resistance training and neuromuscular electrical stimulation in knee osteoarthritis: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce-Brand, Robert A; Walls, Raymond J; Ong, Joshua C; Emerson, Barry S; O'Byrne, John M; Moyna, Niall M

    2012-07-03

    Quadriceps femoris muscle (QFM) weakness is a feature of knee osteoarthritis (OA) and exercise programs that strengthen this muscle group can improve function, disability and pain. Traditional supervised resistance exercise is however resource intensive and dependent on good adherence which can be challenging to achieve in patients with significant knee OA. Because of the limitations of traditional exercise programs, interest has been shown in the use of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) to strengthen the QFM. We conducted a single-blind, prospective randomized controlled study to compare the effects of home-based resistance training (RT) and NMES on patients with moderate to severe knee OA. 41 patients aged 55 to 75 years were randomised to 6 week programs of RT, NMES or a control group receiving standard care. The primary outcome was functional capacity measured using a walk test, stair climb test and chair rise test. Additional outcomes were self-reported disability, quadriceps strength and cross-sectional area. Outcomes were assessed pre- and post-intervention and at 6 weeks post-intervention (weeks 1, 8 and 14 respectively). There were similar, significant improvements in functional capacity for the RT and NMES groups at week 8 compared to week 1 (p ≤ 0.001) and compared to the control group (p knee OA, producing similar improvements in functional capacity. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN85231954.

  10. Long-term effects of a home-based smoking prevention program on smoking initiation: a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiemstra, Marieke; Ringlever, Linda; Otten, Roy; van Schayck, Onno C P; Jackson, Christine; Engels, Rutger C M E

    2014-03-01

    The aims of the study were to evaluate the long-term effects of a home-based smoking prevention program 'Smoke-free Kids' during preadolescence on smoking initiation during adolescence and to test the potential moderating role of parental smoking, socioeconomic status, and asthma. In 2008, 1478 9-11year old children and their mothers were recruited from 418 elementary schools in the Netherlands. An independent statistician randomly allocated schools to one of the two conditions using a 1:1 ratio (single blind): 728 children in the intervention and 750 in the control condition. The intervention condition received five activity modules, including a communication sheet for mothers, by mail at four-week intervals and one booster module one year after baseline. The control condition received a fact-based intervention only. Intention-to-treat analysis was performed on 1398 non-smoking children at baseline. In the intervention 10.8% of the children started smoking compared to 12% in the control condition. This difference was non-significant (odds ratio=0.90, 95% confidence interval=0.63-1.27). No moderating effects were found. No effects on smoking initiation after 36months were found. Perhaps, the program was implemented with children that were too young. Programs closer to the age of smoking onset should be tested. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Pyrethroids in chicken eggs from commercial farms and home production in Rio de Janeiro: Estimated daily intake and diastereomeric selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parente, Cláudio E T; Lestayo, Julliana; Guida, Yago S; Azevedo-Silva, Claudio E; Torres, João Paulo M; Meire, Rodrigo O; Malm, Olaf

    2017-10-01

    In this study, pyrethroids were determined in chicken eggs from commercial farm (n = 60) and home egg production (n = 30). These pyrethroids were investigated: bifenthrin, phenothrin, permethrin, cyfluthrin, cypermethrin and fenvalerate, including most diastereomers. Quantification was done using GC-MS in a negative chemical ionization mode. Pyrethroids residues were found in 79% of the analyzed samples. Cypermethrin presented the highest occurrence, being quantified in 62 samples (69%) in concentrations (lipid weight - l w.) varying between 0.29 and 6408 ng g-1, followed by phenothrin (24%), 21-3910 ng g-1, permethrin (14%), 2.96-328 ng g-1, and bifenthrin (11%), 3.77-16.7 ng g-1. Cyfluthrin and fenvalerate were not detected. Home-produced eggs had a higher occurrence of pyrethroids (97%), with a greater predominance of phenothrin. In commercial production, 70% of the samples presented pyrethroid residues (predominantly cypermethrin). This is the first report about the presence of pyrethroids in home-produced eggs and the first description of a selectivity pattern with the predominance of cis diastereomers in chicken eggs. In general, estimated daily intake does not present a risk to human consumption, according to Brazilian and international standards (FAO/WHO). However, one third of the samples (30 eggs) had concentrations above the maximum residue limits (MRLs). The maximum cypermethrin concentration was 66 times the MRL, while the maximum phenothrin concentration was 11 times the limit. Further studies about transfer dynamics, bioaccumulation and metabolic degradation of stereoisomers are required, as well as determining if this selectivity pattern in food can increase consumer's health risk. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Computer modeling with randomized-controlled trial data informs the development of person-centered aged care homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenoweth, Lynn; Vickland, Victor; Stein-Parbury, Jane; Jeon, Yun-Hee; Kenny, Patricia; Brodaty, Henry

    2015-10-01

    To answer questions on the essential components (services, operations and resources) of a person-centered aged care home (iHome) using computer simulation. iHome was developed with AnyLogic software using extant study data obtained from 60 Australian aged care homes, 900+ clients and 700+ aged care staff. Bayesian analysis of simulated trial data will determine the influence of different iHome characteristics on care service quality and client outcomes. Interim results: A person-centered aged care home (socio-cultural context) and care/lifestyle services (interactional environment) can produce positive outcomes for aged care clients (subjective experiences) in the simulated environment. Further testing will define essential characteristics of a person-centered care home.

  13. Selection bias in family reports on end of life with dementia in nursing homes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Steen, J.T.; Deliens, L.; Ribbe, M.W.; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, B.D.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Selective participation in retrospective studies of families recruited after the patient's death may threaten generalizability of reports on end-of-life experiences. Objectives: To assess possible selection bias in retrospective study of dementia at the end of life using family reports.

  14. Statistical inference of selection and divergence from a time-dependent Poisson random field model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amei Amei

    Full Text Available We apply a recently developed time-dependent Poisson random field model to aligned DNA sequences from two related biological species to estimate selection coefficients and divergence time. We use Markov chain Monte Carlo methods to estimate species divergence time and selection coefficients for each locus. The model assumes that the selective effects of non-synonymous mutations are normally distributed across genetic loci but constant within loci, and synonymous mutations are selectively neutral. In contrast with previous models, we do not assume that the individual species are at population equilibrium after divergence. Using a data set of 91 genes in two Drosophila species, D. melanogaster and D. simulans, we estimate the species divergence time t(div = 2.16 N(e (or 1.68 million years, assuming the haploid effective population size N(e = 6.45 x 10(5 years and a mean selection coefficient per generation μ(γ = 1.98/N(e. Although the average selection coefficient is positive, the magnitude of the selection is quite small. Results from numerical simulations are also presented as an accuracy check for the time-dependent model.

  15. Effect of Home Blood Pressure Telemonitoring and Pharmacist Management On Blood Pressure Control: The HyperLink Cluster Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Karen L.; Asche, Stephen E.; Bergdall, Anna R.; Dehmer, Steven P.; Groen, Sarah E.; Kadrmas, Holly M.; Kerby, Tessa J.; Klotzle, Krissa J.; Maciosek, Michael V.; Michels, Ryan D.; O'Connor, Patrick J.; Pritchard, Rachel A.; Sekenski, Jaime L.; Sperl-Hillen, JoAnn M.; Trower, Nicole K.

    2015-01-01

    Context Patients with high blood pressure (BP) visit a physician 4 times or more per year on average in the U.S., yet BP is controlled in only about half. Practical, robust and sustainable models are needed to improve BP control in patients with uncontrolled hypertension. Objectives To determine whether an intervention combining home BP telemonitoring with pharmacist case management improves BP control compared with usual care and to determine whether BP control is maintained after the intervention stops. Design A clinic-randomized trial with 12 months of intervention and 6 months of post-intervention follow-up. Patients and Setting 450 adults with uncontrolled BP recruited from 14,692 patients with electronic medical records across sixteen primary care clinics in an integrated health system in Minneapolis-St. Paul, MN. Interventions Eight clinics were randomized to provide usual care to their patients (n = 222) and 8 were randomized to provide the telemonitoring intervention (n = 228). Intervention patients received home BP telemonitors and transmitted BP data to pharmacists who adjusted antihypertensive therapy accordingly. Main Outcome Measures BP control to patients with diabetes or kidney disease) at 6 and 12 months. Secondary outcomes were change in BP, patient satisfaction, and BP control at 18 months. Results At baseline, enrollees were 45% female, 82% non-Hispanic white, mean age was 61 (sd 12.0) years and mean BP was 148/85 mm Hg. BP was controlled at both 6 and 12 months in 57.2% (95% CI, 44.8% - 68.7%) of Telemonitoring Intervention patients and 30.0% (95% CI, 23.2% - 37.8%) of Usual Care patients, P=0.001. At 6 months, BP was controlled in 71.8 % (95% CI, 65.6% - 77.3%) of Telemonitoring Intervention patients and 45.2% (95% CI, 39.2% - 51.3%) of Usual Care patients, PTelemonitoring Intervention patients and 52.8% (95% CI, 45.4% - 60.2%) of Usual Care patients, P=0.005; and at 18 months BP was controlled in 71.8% (95% CI, 65.0% - 77.8%) of

  16. Selection bias and subject refusal in a cluster-randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rochelle Yang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Selection bias and non-participation bias are major methodological concerns which impact external validity. Cluster-randomized controlled trials are especially prone to selection bias as it is impractical to blind clusters to their allocation into intervention or control. This study assessed the impact of selection bias in a large cluster-randomized controlled trial. Methods The Improved Cardiovascular Risk Reduction to Enhance Rural Primary Care (ICARE study examined the impact of a remote pharmacist-led intervention in twelve medical offices. To assess eligibility, a standardized form containing patient demographics and medical information was completed for each screened patient. Eligible patients were approached by the study coordinator for recruitment. Both the study coordinator and the patient were aware of the site’s allocation prior to consent. Patients who consented or declined to participate were compared across control and intervention arms for differing characteristics. Statistical significance was determined using a two-tailed, equal variance t-test and a chi-square test with adjusted Bonferroni p-values. Results were adjusted for random cluster variation. Results There were 2749 completed screening forms returned to research staff with 461 subjects who had either consented or declined participation. Patients with poorly controlled diabetes were found to be significantly more likely to decline participation in intervention sites compared to those in control sites. A higher mean diastolic blood pressure was seen in patients with uncontrolled hypertension who declined in the control sites compared to those who declined in the intervention sites. However, these findings were no longer significant after adjustment for random variation among the sites. After this adjustment, females were now found to be significantly more likely to consent than males (odds ratio = 1.41; 95% confidence interval = 1.03, 1

  17. The cost-effectiveness of a new disease management model for frail elderly living in homes for the elderly, design of a cluster randomized controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ribbe Miel W

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of this article is to describe the design of a study to evaluate the clinical and economic effects of a Disease Management model on functional health, quality of care and quality of life of persons living in homes for the elderly. Methods This study concerns a cluster randomized controlled clinical trial among five intervention homes and five usual care homes in the North-West of the Netherlands with a total of over 500 residents. All persons who are not terminally ill, are able to be interviewed and sign informed consent are included. For cognitively impaired persons family proxies will be approached to provide outcome information. The Disease Management Model consists of several elements: (1 Trained staff carries out a multidimensional assessment of the patients functional health and care needs with the interRAI Long Term Care Facilities instrument (LTCF. Computerization of the LTCF produces immediate identification of problem areas and thereby guides individualized care planning. (2 The assessment outcomes are discussed in a Multidisciplinary Meeting (MM with the nurse, primary care physician, nursing home physician and Psychotherapist and if necessary other members of the care team. The MM presents individualized care plans to manage or treat modifiable disabilities and risk factors. (3 Consultation by an nursing home physician and psychotherapist is offered to the frailest residents at risk for nursing home admission (according to the interRAI LTCF. Outcome measures are Quality of Care indicators (LTCF based, Quality Adjusted Life Years (Euroqol, Functional health (SF12, COOP-WONCA, Disability (GARS, Patients care satisfaction (QUOTE, hospital and nursing home days and mortality, health care utilization and costs. Discussion This design is unique because no earlier studies were performed to evaluate the effects and costs of this Disease Management Model for disabled persons in homes for the elderly on

  18. The cost-effectiveness of a new disease management model for frail elderly living in homes for the elderly, design of a cluster randomized controlled clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boorsma, Marijke; van Hout, Hein PJ; Frijters, Dinnus H; Ribbe, Miel W; Nijpels, Giel

    2008-01-01

    Background The objective of this article is to describe the design of a study to evaluate the clinical and economic effects of a Disease Management model on functional health, quality of care and quality of life of persons living in homes for the elderly. Methods This study concerns a cluster randomized controlled clinical trial among five intervention homes and five usual care homes in the North-West of the Netherlands with a total of over 500 residents. All persons who are not terminally ill, are able to be interviewed and sign informed consent are included. For cognitively impaired persons family proxies will be approached to provide outcome information. The Disease Management Model consists of several elements: (1) Trained staff carries out a multidimensional assessment of the patients functional health and care needs with the interRAI Long Term Care Facilities instrument (LTCF). Computerization of the LTCF produces immediate identification of problem areas and thereby guides individualized care planning. (2) The assessment outcomes are discussed in a Multidisciplinary Meeting (MM) with the nurse, primary care physician, nursing home physician and Psychotherapist and if necessary other members of the care team. The MM presents individualized care plans to manage or treat modifiable disabilities and risk factors. (3) Consultation by an nursing home physician and psychotherapist is offered to the frailest residents at risk for nursing home admission (according to the interRAI LTCF). Outcome measures are Quality of Care indicators (LTCF based), Quality Adjusted Life Years (Euroqol), Functional health (SF12, COOP-WONCA), Disability (GARS), Patients care satisfaction (QUOTE), hospital and nursing home days and mortality, health care utilization and costs. Discussion This design is unique because no earlier studies were performed to evaluate the effects and costs of this Disease Management Model for disabled persons in homes for the elderly on functional health and

  19. The cost-effectiveness of a new disease management model for frail elderly living in homes for the elderly, design of a cluster randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boorsma, Marijke; van Hout, Hein P J; Frijters, Dinnus H; Ribbe, Miel W; Nijpels, Giel

    2008-07-07

    The objective of this article is to describe the design of a study to evaluate the clinical and economic effects of a Disease Management model on functional health, quality of care and quality of life of persons living in homes for the elderly. This study concerns a cluster randomized controlled clinical trial among five intervention homes and five usual care homes in the North-West of the Netherlands with a total of over 500 residents. All persons who are not terminally ill, are able to be interviewed and sign informed consent are included. For cognitively impaired persons family proxies will be approached to provide outcome information. The Disease Management Model consists of several elements: (1) Trained staff carries out a multidimensional assessment of the patients functional health and care needs with the interRAI Long Term Care Facilities instrument (LTCF). Computerization of the LTCF produces immediate identification of problem areas and thereby guides individualized care planning. (2) The assessment outcomes are discussed in a Multidisciplinary Meeting (MM) with the nurse, primary care physician, nursing home physician and Psychotherapist and if necessary other members of the care team. The MM presents individualized care plans to manage or treat modifiable disabilities and risk factors. (3) Consultation by an nursing home physician and psychotherapist is offered to the frailest residents at risk for nursing home admission (according to the interRAI LTCF). Outcome measures are Quality of Care indicators (LTCF based), Quality Adjusted Life Years (Euroqol), Functional health (SF12, COOP-WONCA), Disability (GARS), Patients care satisfaction (QUOTE), hospital and nursing home days and mortality, health care utilization and costs. This design is unique because no earlier studies were performed to evaluate the effects and costs of this Disease Management Model for disabled persons in homes for the elderly on functional health and quality of care. TRAIL

  20. Measurements of Selected Air Pollutants in Danish Homes and Ozone Interaction with Floor Dust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vibenholt, Anni

    dust samples collected in Danish homes and offices. This high concentration was necessary in order to measure and determine the consumption of ozone in the outlet air from the FLEC. Measurements were corrected for FLEC wall effects by subtraction of the steady state reaction rate between ozone...... in the Field and Laboratory Emission Cell (FLEC) at different ozone concentrations and relative humidities (0, 25, and 50 % RH). One gram of dust was spread on a clean stainless steel plate which was placed in the FLEC. Steady state reaction rate (kDust) at 2.2 ppm ozone was determined for four different floor...... and a FLEC on a stainless steel plate without dust (kFLEC). The composition of organic compounds in the dust was analyzed by pressurized liquid extraction and thermal desorption GC-MS before and after ozone exposure. KFLEC was independent of the ozone concentration and the reaction was treated as first order...

  1. Use of home telemonitoring to support multidisciplinary care of heart failure patients in Finland: randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuorinen, Anna-Leena; Leppänen, Juha; Kaijanranta, Hannu; Kulju, Minna; Heliö, Tiina; van Gils, Mark; Lähteenmäki, Jaakko

    2014-12-11

    Heart failure (HF) patients suffer from frequent and repeated hospitalizations, causing a substantial economic burden on society. Hospitalizations can be reduced considerably by better compliance with self-care. Home telemonitoring has the potential to boost patients' compliance with self-care, although the results are still contradictory. A randomized controlled trial was conducted in order to study whether the multidisciplinary care of heart failure patients promoted with telemonitoring leads to decreased HF-related hospitalization. HF patients were eligible whose left ventricular ejection fraction was lower than 35%, NYHA functional class ≥2, and who needed regular follow-up. Patients in the telemonitoring group (n=47) measured their body weight, blood pressure, and pulse and answered symptom-related questions on a weekly basis, reporting their values to the heart failure nurse using a mobile phone app. The heart failure nurse followed the status of patients weekly and if necessary contacted the patient. The primary outcome was the number of HF-related hospital days. Control patients (n=47) received multidisciplinary treatment according to standard practices. Patients' clinical status, use of health care resources, adherence, and user experience from the patients' and the health care professionals' perspective were studied. Adherence, calculated as a proportion of weekly submitted self-measurements, was close to 90%. No difference was found in the number of HF-related hospital days (incidence rate ratio [IRR]=0.812, P=.351), which was the primary outcome. The intervention group used more health care resources: they paid an increased number of visits to the nurse (IRR=1.73, Ppatients (IRR=3.82, Ppatient-induced contacts). There were no statistically significant differences in patients' clinical health status or in their self-care behavior. The technology received excellent feedback from the patient and professional side with a high adherence rate throughout the

  2. A randomized controlled pilot study of home-based step training in older people using videogame technology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Schoene

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Stepping impairments are associated with physical and cognitive decline in older adults and increased fall risk. Exercise interventions can reduce fall risk, but adherence is often low. A new exergame involving step training may provide an enjoyable exercise alternative for preventing falls in older people. PURPOSE: To assess the feasibility and safety of unsupervised, home-based step pad training and determine the effectiveness of this intervention on stepping performance and associated fall risk in older people. DESIGN: Single-blinded two-arm randomized controlled trial comparing step pad training with control (no-intervention. SETTING/PARTICIPANTS: Thirty-seven older adults residing in independent-living units of a retirement village in Sydney, Australia. INTERVENTION: Intervention group (IG participants were provided with a computerized step pad system connected to their TVs and played a step game as often as they liked (with a recommended dose of 2-3 sessions per week for 15-20 minutes each for eight weeks. In addition, IG participants were asked to complete a choice stepping reaction time (CSRT task once each week. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: CSRT, the Physiological Profile Assessment (PPA, neuropsychological and functional mobility measures were assessed at baseline and eight week follow-up. RESULTS: Thirty-two participants completed the study (86.5%. IG participants played a median 2.75 sessions/week and no adverse events were reported. Compared to the control group, the IG significantly improved their CSRT (F31,1 = 18.203, p<.001, PPA composite scores (F31,1 = 12.706, p = 0.001, as well as the postural sway (F31,1 = 4.226, p = 0.049 and contrast sensitivity (F31,1 = 4.415, p = 0.044 PPA sub-component scores. In addition, the IG improved significantly in their dual-task ability as assessed by a timed up and go test/verbal fluency task (F31,1 = 4.226, p = 0.049. CONCLUSIONS: Step pad training can

  3. Effects on office and home blood pressure of the lercanidipine-enalapril combination in patients with Stage 2 hypertension: a European randomized, controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancia, Giuseppe; Coca, Antonio; Chazova, Irina; Girerd, Xavier; Haller, Hermann; Pauletto, Paolo; Pupek-Musialik, Danuta; Svyshchenko, Yevgeniya

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of combinations of lercanidipine (L) and enalapril (E) at different doses on office and home blood pressure (BP) in patients with Stage 2 hypertension. This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, factorial study conducted in 100 centres from seven countries. Patients with office DBP 100-109 mmHg and home DBP at least 85 mmHg at the end of a 2-week placebo run-in period were randomized to a 10-week treatment with placebo, L (10 or 20 mg), E (10 or 20 mg) or the four L-E combinations. The efficacy parameters were office DBP at trough (primary), SBP at trough and home SBP and DBP. Office BP was measured at each visit in both the sitting and the standing position, while home BP was measured twice in the morning and twice in the evening for at least 3 days before treatment and at study end. Safety parameters included adverse events, laboratory tests and 12-lead ECG. A total of 1039 patients were randomized (48% men, mean age 54 years, mean BMI 30 kg/m, 40% obese patients). Baseline BP was similar in all groups and lower for home than for office values (149/95 and 159/103 mmHg, respectively). A marked placebo effect was observed on office but not on home BP. Combination therapy was superior to placebo at all doses for both office and home BP. The greatest effect was observed in the L20/E20 group, in which the SBP/DBP fall amounted to -19.2/-15.2 and -13.2/-7.5 mmHg for sitting office and home BP, respectively. Similar reductions were observed on standing office BP. The L20/E20 combination was associated with less cough, palpitations and leg oedema than monotherapies, with no increased rate of dizziness or hypotension. In Stage 2 hypertension, a fixed-dose combination of L and E ensures a control of both office and out-of-office BP, with a favourable tolerability profile.

  4. Effect of non-random mating on genomic and BLUP selection schemes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirea Kahsay G

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The risk of long-term unequal contribution of mating pairs to the gene pool is that deleterious recessive genes can be expressed. Such consequences could be alleviated by appropriately designing and optimizing breeding schemes i.e. by improving selection and mating procedures. Methods We studied the effect of mating designs, random, minimum coancestry and minimum covariance of ancestral contributions on rate of inbreeding and genetic gain for schemes with different information sources, i.e. sib test or own performance records, different genetic evaluation methods, i.e. BLUP or genomic selection, and different family structures, i.e. factorial or pair-wise. Results Results showed that substantial differences in rates of inbreeding due to mating design were present under schemes with a pair-wise family structure, for which minimum coancestry turned out to be more effective to generate lower rates of inbreeding. Specifically, substantial reductions in rates of inbreeding were observed in schemes using sib test records and BLUP evaluation. However, with a factorial family structure, differences in rates of inbreeding due mating designs were minor. Moreover, non-random mating had only a small effect in breeding schemes that used genomic evaluation, regardless of the information source. Conclusions It was concluded that minimum coancestry remains an efficient mating design when BLUP is used for genetic evaluation or when the size of the population is small, whereas the effect of non-random mating is smaller in schemes using genomic evaluation.

  5. The COMmunity of Practice And Safety Support (COMPASS) Total Worker Health™ study among home care workers: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Ryan; Elliot, Diane; Hess, Jennifer; Thompson, Sharon; Luther, Kristy; Wipfli, Brad; Wright, Robert; Buckmaster, Annie Mancini

    2014-10-27

    Home care workers are a high-risk group for injury and illness. Their unique work structure presents challenges to delivering a program to enhance their health and safety. No randomized controlled trials have assessed the impact of a Total Worker Health™ program designed for their needs. The COMPASS (COMmunity of Practice And Safety Support) study is a cluster randomized trial being implemented among Oregon's unionized home care workers. Partnering with the Oregon Home Care Commission allowed recruiting 10 pairs of home care worker groups with 8 participants per group (n = 160) for balanced randomization of groups to intervention and control conditions. Physiologic and survey evaluation of all participants will be at enrollment, 6 months and 12 months. Primary outcomes are to increase health promoting (for example, healthy nutrition and regular physical activity) and health protecting (that is, safety) behaviors. In addition to assessing outcomes adjusted for the hierarchical design, mediation analyses will be used to deconstruct and confirm the program's theoretical underpinnings and intervention processes. Intervention groups will participate in a series of monthly 2-hour meetings designed as ritualized, scripted peer-led sessions to increase knowledge, practice skills and build support for healthy actions. Self-monitoring and individual and team level goals are included to augment change. Because generalizability, reach and achieving dissemination are priorities, following initial wave findings, a second wave of COMPASS groups will be recruited and enrolled with tailoring of the program to align with existing Home Care Commission educational offerings. Outcomes, process and mediation of those tailored groups will be compared with the original wave's findings. The COMPASS trial will assess a novel program to enhance the safety and health of a vulnerable, rapidly expanding group of isolated caregivers, whose critical work allows independent living of frail

  6. A cost-effectiveness study of person-centered integrated heart failure and palliative home care: Based on a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahlen, Klas-Göran; Boman, Kurt; Brännström, Margareta

    2016-03-01

    Previous economic studies of person-centered palliative home care have been conducted mainly among patients with cancer. Studies on cost-effectiveness of advanced home care for patients with severe heart failure are lacking when a diagnosis of heart failure is the only main disease as the inclusion criterion. To assess the cost-effectiveness of a new concept of care called person-centered integrated heart failure and palliative home care. A randomized controlled trial was conducted from January 2011 to 2013 at a center in Sweden. Data collection included cost estimates for health care and the patients' responses to the EQ-5D quality of life instrument. Patients with chronic and severe heart failure were randomly assigned to an intervention (n = 36) or control (n = 36) group. The intervention group received the Palliative Advanced Home Care and Heart Failure Care intervention over 6 months. The control group received the same care that is usually provided by a primary health care center or heart failure clinic at the hospital. EQ-5D data indicated that the intervention resulted in a gain of 0.25 quality-adjusted life years, and cost analysis showed a significant cost reduction with the Palliative Advanced Home Care and Heart Failure Care intervention. Even if costs for staffing are higher than usual care, this is more than made up for by the reduced need for hospital-based care. This intervention made it possible for the county council to use €50,000 for other needs. The Palliative Advanced Home Care and Heart Failure Care working mode saves financial resources and should be regarded as very cost-effective. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Effects of Home Access to Active Videogames on Child Self-Esteem, Enjoyment of Physical Activity, and Anxiety Related to Electronic Games: Results from a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Rebecca A; Smith, Anne J; Howie, Erin K; Pollock, Clare; Straker, Leon

    2014-08-01

    Active-input videogames could provide a useful conduit for increasing physical activity by improving a child's self-confidence, physical activity enjoyment, and reducing anxiety. Therefore this study evaluated the impact of (a) the removal of home access to traditional electronic games or (b) their replacement with active-input videogames, on child self-perception, enjoyment of physical activity, and electronic game use anxiety. This was a crossover, randomized controlled trial, conducted over a 6-month period in participants' family homes in metropolitan Perth, Australia, from 2007 to 2010. Children 10-12 years old were recruited through school and community media. Of 210 children who were eligible, 74 met inclusion criteria, and 8 withdrew, leaving 66 children (33 girls) for analysis. A counterbalanced randomized order of three conditions sustained for 8 weeks each: No home access to electronic games, home access to traditional electronic games, and home access to active-input electronic games. Perception of self-esteem (Harter's Self Perception Profile for Children), enjoyment of physical activity (Physical Activity Enjoyment Scale questionnaire), and anxiety toward electronic game use (modified Loyd and Gressard Computer Anxiety Subscale) were assessed. Compared with home access to traditional electronic games, neither removal of all electronic games nor replacement with active-input games resulted in any significant change to child self-esteem, enjoyment of physical activity, or anxiety related to electronic games. Although active-input videogames have been shown to be enjoyable in the short term, their ability to impact on psychological outcomes is yet to be established.

  8. A Canadian, Multicentre, Randomized Clinical Trial of Home-Based Pulmonary Rehabilitation in Copd: Rationale and Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Maltais

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pulmonary rehabilitation remains largely underused. Self-monitored, home-based rehabilitation is a promising approach to improving the availability of pulmonary rehabilitation.

  9. Apathy and Its Response to Antipsychotic Review and Nonpharmacological Interventions in People With Dementia Living in Nursing Homes: WHELD, a Factorial Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajkumar, Anto P; Ballard, Clive; Fossey, Jane; Corbett, Anne; Woods, Bob; Orrell, Martin; Prakash, Rohan; Moniz-Cook, Esme; Testad, Ingelin

    2016-08-01

    Apathy is common, impactful, and difficult to manage in people with dementia. We evaluated the efficacy of nonpharmacological interventions, exercise, and social interaction, in combination with antipsychotic review, to reduce apathy in people with dementia living in nursing homes in a cluster randomized controlled trial (RCT). Well-being and health for people with dementia (WHELD) program included a 2 × 2 × 2 factorial cluster RCT involving people with dementia living in 16 nursing homes in the United Kingdom. All homes received training in person-centered care, and were randomized to receive antipsychotic review, social interaction, and exercise, either alone or in combinations. Apathy was one of the secondary outcomes of the WHELD trial, and it was measured by the Neuropsychiatric Inventory-nursing home version at baseline and 9 months (n = 273). We used multilevel mixed effects linear regression models to assess the impact of the interventions on apathy. Prevalence of apathy was 44.0% (n = 120; 95% confidence interval [CI] 38.1%-49.9%) at baseline. Severity of apathy had significant positive correlations with dementia severity, neuropsychiatric symptoms, depressive symptoms, agitation, and the needs of the people with dementia (P interventions such as social interaction and exercise. Guidance must be adapted to reflect this subtlety in care. Copyright © 2016 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. More Than A Meal? A Randomized Control Trial Comparing the Effects of Home-Delivered Meals Programs on Participants' Feelings of Loneliness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Kali S; Akobundu, Ucheoma; Dosa, David

    2016-11-01

    Nutrition service providers are seeking alternative delivery models to control costs and meet the growing need for home-delivered meals. The objective of this study was to evaluate the extent to which the home-delivered meals program, and the type of delivery model, reduces homebound older adults' feelings of loneliness. This project utilizes data from a three-arm, fixed randomized control study conducted with 626 seniors on waiting lists at eight Meals on Wheels programs across the United States. Seniors were randomly assigned to either (i) receive daily meal delivery; (ii) receive once-weekly meal delivery; or (iii) remain on the waiting list. Participants were surveyed at baseline and again at 15 weeks. Analysis of covariance was used to test for differences in loneliness between groups, over time and logistic regression was used to assess differences in self-rated improvement in loneliness. Participants receiving meals had lower adjusted loneliness scores at follow-up compared with the control group. Individuals who received daily-delivered meals were more likely to self-report that home-delivered meals improved their loneliness than the group receiving once-weekly delivered meals. This article includes important implications for organizations that provide home-delivered meals in terms of cost, delivery modality, and potential recipient benefits. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Gerontological Society of America 2015. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  11. A randomized controlled trial for an individualized positive psychosocial intervention for the affective and behavioral symptoms of dementia in nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Haitsma, Kimberly S; Curyto, Kimberly; Abbott, Katherine M; Towsley, Gail L; Spector, Abby; Kleban, Morton

    2015-01-01

    This randomized controlled study tested the effectiveness of individualized activities, led by certified nursing assistants (CNAs), to increase positive and reduce negative affect and behavior among nursing home residents with dementia. Nursing home residents with mild to advanced dementia (N = 180) were randomly assigned to usual care (UC, n = 93) or 1 of 2 experimental conditions. Residents in the attention control group (AC, N = 43) participated in standardized one-to-one activities with their CNAs. Individualized Positive Psychosocial Intervention (IPPI) participants (n = 44) received a CNA-led activity matched to their interests and ability. Outcomes were residents' positive and negative affect and verbal and nonverbal behavior. The IPPI and AC groups experienced similar benefits-more pleasure, alertness, engagement, positive touch, and positive verbal behavior-compared with UC. The AC group displayed more anger, uncooperativeness, and very negative verbal behavior than UC or IPPI. This study demonstrates the value of individualized activities for nursing home residents with dementia. In a stringent test, residents were happier and less angry during a customized intervention compared with a standardized intervention. Even brief individualized CNA-led activities bring pleasure to nursing home residents and constitute an effective strategy to enhance positive affect and engagement in persons with dementia. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. A Feasibility Randomized Controlled Crossover Trial of Home-Based Warm Footbath to Improve Sleep in the Chronic Phase of Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Hsiao-Yean; Lin, En-Yuan; Chiu, Hsiao-Ting; Chen, Pin-Yuan

    2017-12-01

    Sleep disturbance is a common complaint after traumatic brain injury (TBI). The aim of this study was to examine the effects of a home-based warm footbath intervention on sleep in patients with TBI. This was a randomized controlled crossover study, and 23 adults with TBI were recruited and randomized to receive first a 30-minute, 41°C warm footbath and then a usual care, or vice versa, with each lasting 3 days and separated by a 3-day washout. Sleep efficiency, sleep onset latency (SOL), total sleep time, and wake after sleep onset (WASO) were assessed by actigraphy. We found that home-based warm footbath significantly had a reduced SOL (difference, -5.11 minutes) and a suppressed WASO (difference, -2.57 minutes) compared with those of usual care, but not in sleep efficiency and total sleep time. No adverse effect was reported. This study suggested that home-based warm footbath is practical and effective in relieving post-TBI sleep disturbances, particular in SOL and WASO. Nurses can use home-based warm footbath as an effective intervention for management of sleep disturbances after TBI.

  13. Implementing a Pilot Trial of an Infection Control Program in Nursing Homes: Results of a Matched Cluster Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConeghy, Kevin W; Baier, Rosa; McGrath, Kevin P; Baer, Christof J; Mor, Vincent

    2017-08-01

    Hand hygiene is the single-most important nursing home (NH) infection control measure. We piloted a multifaceted hand-washing/surface cleaning intervention in 5 NHs. Our aims were to assess the feasibility of implementing this intervention by assessing staff participation, satisfaction, hand-washing compliance, and whether the intervention was associated with reductions in infection rates, new antimicrobial orders, or overall hospitalization rates. We conducted a randomized, pair-matched pilot intervention in 10 Colorado NHs to reduce infections for all NH residents from October 1, 2015 through May 31, 2016. To evaluate process, we determined online education participation rates, recorded intervention fidelity through weekly reporting measures on microbial surface counts, hand-washing, and infection reporting, and conducted a survey of participating employees. To evaluate potential impacts on clinical outcomes, we collected information on monthly infection log data, new antibiotic orders, and hospitalizations. Three of 5 sites had education participation rates >90%, the other 2 were poor (13% and 23%). The majority of participation survey respondents (58%) were promoters of the intervention. Directors of nursing reported hygiene hand-washing data for 19.6/24 (81.8%) weeks and microbial surface count data for 20.4/24 (85.1%) weeks. For the first 4 weeks of the study, the bacterial counts averaged 351.4 ± 497.5 relative light units, the mean value for the last 4 weeks was 127.7 ± 85.1 (P value = .12). The number of hand-washing occasions per NH resident was steady over time but differed by treatment facility (P = .03). We observed nonsignificant reductions for total infections (6.7%) and lower respiratory tract infections (19.9%) vs control NHs. There were no significant differences in antimicrobial orders or hospitalization rates pre-post intervention. This multifaceted hand-washing and surface cleaning intervention was designed to reduce infection rates

  14. Home-based versus hospital-based high-intensity interval training in cardiac rehabilitation: a randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aamot, Inger-Lise; Forbord, Siv Hege; Gustad, Kjersti; Løckra, Vibeke; Stensen, Andreas; Berg, Astrid Tarlebø; Dalen, Håvard; Karlsen, Trine; Støylen, Asbjørn

    2014-09-01

    High-intensity interval training (HIT) as exercise therapy is gradually implemented in cardiac rehabilitation as the cardiovascular benefits from exercise is intensity dependent. However, in previous studies, HIT has been performed with strict supervision. The aim of the study was to assess the feasibility and effectiveness of different modes of HIT in cardiac rehabilitation. a randomized clinical study. Ninety participants with coronary artery disease (80 men/10 women, mean age 57 ± 8 years) were randomly assigned to one of three exercise modes: group exercise (GE), treadmill exercise (TE), or home-based exercise (HE). HIT was performed twice a week for 12 weeks with an exercise intensity of 85-95% of peak heart rate. The primary outcome measure was change in peak oxygen uptake (peak VO2). Eighty-three participants (92%) completed the intervention without any severe adverse events. Peak VO2 increased from 34.7 ± 7.3 to 39.0 ± 8.0 ml/kg/min, 32.7 ± 6.5 to 36.0 ± 6.2 ml/kg/min, and 34.4 ± 4.8 to 37.2 ± 5.2 ml/kg/min in TE, GE, and HE, respectively. Mean group difference for TE vs. HE was 1.6 ml/kg/min (95% confidence interval, CI, 0.7 to 3.1, p = 0.02), TE vs. GE 1.1 ml/kg/min (95% CI-0.5 to 2.5, p = 0.27), and GE vs. HE 0.6 ml/kg/min (95% CI -1.0 to 2.1, p = 1). However, on-treatment analysis showed no significant difference between groups. HIT was efficiently performed in three settings of cardiac rehabilitation, with respect to target exercise intensity, exercise attendance, and increase in peak VO2. Exercise mode was not essential for exercise capacity. © The Author(s) 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  15. Taurolidine lock in home parenteral nutrition in adults: results from an open-label randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klek, Stanislaw; Szczepanek, Kinga; Hermanowicz, Adam; Galas, Aleksander

    2015-03-01

    Many techniques have been tested to reduce the incidence of catheter-relater bloodstream infections (CRBSIs) during home parenteral nutrition (HPN). One of these methods, taurolidine lock, has shown some potential in several studies, but it has been studied primarily in patients with a relatively high CRBSI rate. Therefore, the aim of this study was to analyze the clinical value of taurolidine in patients receiving HPN who have a low infection rate. The CRBSI ratio at the Skawina HPN center has remained at 0.3-0.4 episodes/patient/y for the past 7 years. In November 2012, 30 patients (17 men, 13 women, mean age 52.3 years) were randomized to 1 of 3 groups: 2% taurolidine lock (group A), 1.35% taurolidine + citrate lock (B), and control-saline flush (C). Patients were observed for 12 consecutive months for catheter-related complications. Blood cultures were collected in each case in which an infection was suspected. The total number of catheter days reached 10,968, with the following number of days per group: group A, 3658; group B, 3650; and group C, 3660. No complications were observed in the control group, while patients in the study groups had 1 catheter infection (group A) and 1 occlusion (group B). The CRBSIs were treated successfully with antibiotics. The cost of treatment in groups A and B was significantly higher than that in group C (P clinical value of taurolidine in patients receiving HPN who have a low infection rate and found low cost-effectiveness. Taurolidine should most likely be used only in patients with a high CRBSI rate. © 2014 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  16. Predicting nursing home adherence to a clinical trial intervention: lessons for the conduct of cluster randomized trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjia, Jennifer; Mazor, Kathleen M; Field, Terry; Doherty, Peter; Spenard, Ann; Gurwitz, Jerry H

    2011-12-01

    To describe factors predictive of nursing home (NH) adherence to a clinical trial intervention. Post hoc analysis of a cluster randomized trial (CRT) evaluating a structured communication intervention to improve nurse-physician telephone communication in NHs. NH. All eligible licensed nursing staff in all participating NHs. Adherence was defined as active participation for at least 3 months of the 12-month trial. NH characteristics hypothesized to affect trial outcomes (profit status, bed size, nursing staff time, NH quality, and leadership turnover) were measured a priori. The association between intervention adherence, NH characteristics and preintervention questionnaire response rate was examined. Of 13 intervention NHs, seven adhered to the intervention. Three factors differentiated adherent from nonadherent NHs: director of nursing turnover (nonadherent NHs 50% vs adherent NHs 0%, P = .03); Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) nurse staffing rating (range: 1-5) (nonadherent NHs mean 3.7 ± 0.5 vs adherent NHs mean 4.3 ± 0.5), P = .048); and questionnaire response rate (nonadherent NHs 15.6 ± 10.0% vs adherent NHs 34.2 ± 12.1%, P = .02). Profit status, bed size, and number of NH deficiencies on state surveys were not significantly associated with intervention adherence. CMS nurse staffing rating, leadership turnover, and questionnaire response rate are associated with adherence to a CRT intervention. Pretrial evaluation of NH staffing rating by CMS and of response to a questionnaire can help investigators improve trial efficiency by screening for NHs likely to adhere to a CRT intervention. © 2011, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2011, The American Geriatrics Society.

  17. Home-based activity program for older people with depressive symptoms: DeLLITE--a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerse, Ngaire; Hayman, Karen J; Moyes, Simon A; Peri, Kathy; Robinson, Elizabeth; Dowell, Anthony; Kolt, Gregory S; Elley, C Raina; Hatcher, Simon; Kiata, Liz; Wiles, Janine; Keeling, Sally; Parsons, John; Arroll, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    We wanted to assess the effectiveness of a home-based physical activity program, the Depression in Late Life Intervention Trial of Exercise (DeLLITE), in improving function, quality of life, and mood in older people with depressive symptoms. We undertook a randomized controlled trial involving 193 people aged 75 years and older with depressive symptoms at enrollment who were recruited from primary health care practices in Auckland, New Zealand. Participants received either an individualized physical activity program or social visits to control for the contact time of the activity intervention delivered over 6 months. Primary outcome measures were function, a short physical performance battery comprising balance and mobility, and the Nottingham Extended Activities of Daily Living scale. Secondary outcome measures were quality of life, the Medical Outcomes Study 36-item short form, mood, Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-15), physical activity, Auckland Heart Study Physical Activity Questionnaire, and self-report of falls. Repeated measures analyses tested the differential impact on outcomes over 12 months' follow-up. The mean age of the participants was 81 years, and 59% were women. All participants scored in the at-risk category on the depression screen, 53% had a Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders or International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision diagnosis of major depression or scored more than 4 on the GDS-15 at baseline, indicating moderate or severe depression. Almost all participants, 187 (97%), completed the trial. Overall there were no differences in the impact of the 2 interventions on outcomes. Mood and mental health related quality of life improved for both groups. The DeLLITE activity program improved mood and quality of life for older people with depressive symptoms as much as the effect of social visits. Future social and activity interventions should be tested against a true usual care control.

  18. Randomized clinical trial on the efficacy and safety of four professional at-home tooth whitening gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso de la Peña, V; López Ratón, M

    2014-01-01

    This randomized clinical trial evaluated the efficacy and safety of four gels of differing concentrations used for at-home vital bleaching. Ninety-six volunteers participated in the study and were divided into four groups of 24 individuals. A gel of differing concentration was used for each group: 10% and 15% carbamide peroxide and 7.5% and 9.5% hydrogen peroxide. The patients used the whitening agent in a tray without reservoirs for one hour per day for two weeks. The measurement of the change in tooth color was made by two observers in the maxillary right central incisor and with a colorimeter in both upper central incisors and canines, using the CIE L*a*b* and CIE L*C*h* values. Sensitivity was evaluated by the participants on a scale with values as follows: 0 = absent, 1 = minor, 2 = moderate, 3 = considerable, 4 = severe. At the baseline, the observers noted darker colors than the colorimeter (pL*a*b* and CIE L*C*h* values (pL*a*b* and CIE L*C*h* parameters, there were color changes in the assessments made in the four maxillary teeth after treatment (p<0.001). There were no differences in ΔL* and ΔE* between the groups. The number of patients who experienced sensitivity and the intensity of the sensitivity were not significant. There were no differences in the degree of whitening among the different products. With all of the products there was an increase in L*, a decrease in chromatic intensity (C*), and an increase in the value (tone) or hue (h*).

  19. Emulsion PCR: a high efficient way of PCR amplification of random DNA libraries in aptamer selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keke Shao

    Full Text Available Aptamers are short RNA or DNA oligonucleotides which can bind with different targets. Typically, they are selected from a large number of random DNA sequence libraries. The main strategy to obtain aptamers is systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX. Low efficiency is one of the limitations for conventional PCR amplification of random DNA sequence library in aptamer selection because of relative low products and high by-products formation efficiency. Here, we developed emulsion PCR for aptamer selection. With this method, the by-products formation decreased tremendously to an undetectable level, while the products formation increased significantly. Our results indicated that by-products in conventional PCR amplification were from primer-product and product-product hybridization. In emulsion PCR, we can completely avoid the product-product hybridization and avoid the most of primer-product hybridization if the conditions were optimized. In addition, it also showed that the molecule ratio of template to compartment was crucial to by-product formation efficiency in emulsion PCR amplification. Furthermore, the concentration of the Taq DNA polymerase in the emulsion PCR mixture had a significant impact on product formation efficiency. So, the results of our study indicated that emulsion PCR could improve the efficiency of SELEX.

  20. Home uroflowmetry biofeedback in behavioral training for dysfunctional voiding in school-age children: a randomized controlled study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klijn, Aart J.; Uiterwaal, Cuno S. P. M.; Vijverberg, Marianne A. W.; Winkler, Pauline L. H.; Dik, Pieter; de Jong, Tom P. V. M.

    2006-01-01

    We studied the added value of home uroflowmetry for biofeedback training compared to added attention and standard therapy in a multicomponent behavioral training program for voiding disorders in school-age children. Little is known about the role of biofeedback by home uroflowmetry for dysfunctional

  1. Home-based virtual reality balance training and conventional balance training in Parkinson's disease: A randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Chieh Yang

    2016-09-01

    Conclusion: This study did not find any difference between the effects of the home-based virtual reality balance training and conventional home balance training. The two training options were equally effective in improving balance, walking, and quality of life among community-dwelling patients with PD.

  2. Novel Zn2+-chelating peptides selected from a fimbria-displayed random peptide library

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Kristian; Schembri, Mark; Klemm, Per

    2001-01-01

    H adhesin. FimH is a component of the fimbrial organelle that can accommodate and display a diverse range of peptide sequences on the E. coli cell surface. In this study we have constructed a random peptide library in FimH. The library, consisting of similar to 40 million individual clones, was screened...... for peptide sequences that conferred on recombinant cells the ability to bind Zn2+. By serial selection, sequences that exhibited various degrees of binding affinity and specificity toward Zn2+ were enriched. None of the isolated sequences showed similarity to known Zn2+-binding proteins, indicating...

  3. Assessing the accuracy and stability of variable selection methods for random forest modeling in ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Eric W; Hill, Ryan A; Leibowitz, Scott G; Olsen, Anthony R; Thornbrugh, Darren J; Weber, Marc H

    2017-07-01

    Random forest (RF) modeling has emerged as an important statistical learning method in ecology due to its exceptional predictive performance. However, for large and complex ecological data sets, there is limited guidance on variable selection methods for RF modeling. Typically, either a preselected set of predictor variables are used or stepwise procedures are employed which iteratively remove variables according to their importance measures. This paper investigates the application of variable selection methods to RF models for predicting probable biological stream condition. Our motivating data set consists of the good/poor condition of n = 1365 stream survey sites from the 2008/2009 National Rivers and Stream Assessment, and a large set (p = 212) of landscape features from the StreamCat data set as potential predictors. We compare two types of RF models: a full variable set model with all 212 predictors and a reduced variable set model selected using a backward elimination approach. We assess model accuracy using RF's internal out-of-bag estimate, and a cross-validation procedure with validation folds external to the variable selection process. We also assess the stability of the spatial predictions generated by the RF models to changes in the number of predictors and argue that model selection needs to consider both accuracy and stability. The results suggest that RF modeling is robust to the inclusion of many variables of moderate to low importance. We found no substantial improvement in cross-validated accuracy as a result of variable reduction. Moreover, the backward elimination procedure tended to select too few variables and exhibited numerous issues such as upwardly biased out-of-bag accuracy estimates and instabilities in the spatial predictions. We use simulations to further support and generalize results from the analysis of real data. A main purpose of this work is to elucidate issues of model selection bias and instability to ecologists interested in

  4. Predicting animal home-range structure and transitions using a multistate Ornstein-Uhlenbeck biased random walk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breed, Greg A; Golson, Emily A.; Tinker, M. Tim

    2017-01-01

    The home-range concept is central in animal ecology and behavior, and numerous mechanistic models have been developed to understand home range formation and maintenance. These mechanistic models usually assume a single, contiguous home range. Here we describe and implement a simple home-range model that can accommodate multiple home-range centers, form complex shapes, allow discontinuities in use patterns, and infer how external and internal variables affect movement and use patterns. The model assumes individuals associate with two or more home-range centers and move among them with some estimable probability. Movement in and around home-range centers is governed by a two-dimensional Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process, while transitions between centers are modeled as a stochastic state-switching process. We augmented this base model by introducing environmental and demographic covariates that modify transition probabilities between home-range centers and can be estimated to provide insight into the movement process. We demonstrate the model using telemetry data from sea otters (Enhydra lutris) in California. The model was fit using a Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo method, which estimated transition probabilities, as well as unique Ornstein-Uhlenbeck diffusion and centralizing tendency parameters. Estimated parameters could then be used to simulate movement and space use that was virtually indistinguishable from real data. We used Deviance Information Criterion (DIC) scores to assess model fit and determined that both wind and reproductive status were predictive of transitions between home-range centers. Females were less likely to move between home-range centers on windy days, less likely to move between centers when tending pups, and much more likely to move between centers just after weaning a pup. These tendencies are predicted by theoretical movement rules but were not previously known and show that our model can extract meaningful behavioral insight from complex

  5. PReFerSim: fast simulation of demography and selection under the Poisson Random Field model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Del Vecchyo, Diego; Marsden, Clare D; Lohmueller, Kirk E

    2016-11-15

    The Poisson Random Field (PRF) model has become an important tool in population genetics to study weakly deleterious genetic variation under complicated demographic scenarios. Currently, there are no freely available software applications that allow simulation of genetic variation data under this model. Here we present PReFerSim, an ANSI C program that performs forward simulations under the PRF model. PReFerSim models changes in population size, arbitrary amounts of inbreeding, dominance and distributions of selective effects. Users can track summaries of genetic variation over time and output trajectories of selected alleles. PReFerSim is freely available at: https://github.com/LohmuellerLab/PReFerSim CONTACT: klohmueller@ucla.eduSupplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Design and pilot results of a single blind randomized controlled trial of systematic demand-led home visits by nurses to frail elderly persons in primary care [ISRCTN05358495

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tybout Willemijn

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of this article is to describe the design of an evaluation of the cost-effectiveness of systematic home visits by nurses to frail elderly primary care patients. Pilot objectives were: 1. To determine the feasibility of postal multidimensional frailty screening instruments; 2. to identify the need for home visits to elderly. Methods Main study: The main study concerns a randomized controlled in primary care practices (PCP with 18 months follow-up and blinded PCPs. Frail persons aged 75 years or older and living at home but neither terminally ill nor demented from 33 PCPs were eligible. Trained community nurses (1 visit patients at home and assess the care needs with the Resident Assessment Instrument-Home Care, a multidimensional computerized geriatric assessment instrument, enabling direct identification of problem areas; (2 determine the care priorities together with the patient; (3 design and execute interventions according to protocols; (4 and visit patients at least five times during a year in order to execute and monitor the care-plan. Controls receive usual care. Outcome measures are Quality of life, and Quality Adjusted Life Years; time to nursing home admission; mortality; hospital admissions; health care utilization. Pilot 1: Three brief postal multidimensional screening measures to identify frail health among elderly persons were tested on percentage complete item response (selected after a literature search: 1 Vulnerable Elders Screen, 2 Strawbridge's frailty screen, and 3 COOP-WONCA charts. Pilot 2: Three nurses visited elderly frail patients as identified by PCPs in a health center of 5400 patients and used an assessment protocol to identify psychosocial and medical problems. The needs and experiences of all participants were gathered by semi-structured interviews. Discussion The design holds several unique elements such as early identification of frail persons combined with case-management by

  7. Selective oropharyngeal decontamination versus selective digestive decontamination in critically ill patients: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao D

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Di Zhao,1,* Jian Song,2,* Xuan Gao,3 Fei Gao,4 Yupeng Wu,2 Yingying Lu,5 Kai Hou1 1Department of Neurosurgery, The First Hospital of Hebei Medical University, 2Department of Neurosurgery, 3Department of Neurology, The Second Hospital of Hebei Medical University, 4Hebei Provincial Procurement Centers for Medical Drugs and Devices, 5Department of Neurosurgery, The Second Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Selective digestive decontamination (SDD and selective oropharyngeal decontamination (SOD are associated with reduced mortality and infection rates among patients in intensive care units (ICUs; however, whether SOD has a superior effect than SDD remains uncertain. Hence, we conducted a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs to compare SOD with SDD in terms of clinical outcomes and antimicrobial resistance rates in patients who were critically ill. Methods: RCTs published in PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science were systematically reviewed to compare the effects of SOD and SDD in patients who were critically ill. Outcomes included day-28 mortality, length of ICU stay, length of hospital stay, duration of mechanical ventilation, ICU-acquired bacteremia, and prevalence of antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Results were expressed as risk ratio (RR with 95% confidence intervals (CIs, and weighted mean differences (WMDs with 95% CIs. Pooled estimates were performed using a fixed-effects model or random-effects model, depending on the heterogeneity among studies. Results: A total of four RCTs involving 23,822 patients met the inclusion criteria and were included in this meta-analysis. Among patients whose admitting specialty was surgery, cardiothoracic surgery (57.3% and neurosurgery (29.7% were the two main types of surgery being performed. Pooled results showed that SOD had similar effects as SDD in day-28 mortality (RR =1

  8. Effect of a high-intensity exercise program on physical function and mental health in nursing home residents with dementia: an assessor blinded randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telenius, Elisabeth Wiken; Engedal, Knut; Bergland, Astrid

    2015-01-01

    Dementia is among the leading causes of functional loss and disability in older adults. Research has demonstrated that nursing home patients without dementia can improve their function in activities of daily living, strength, balance and mental well being by physical exercise. The evidence on effect of physical exercise among nursing home patients with dementia is scarce and ambiguous. Thus, the primary objective of this study was to investigate the effect of a high intensity functional exercise program on the performance of balance in nursing home residents with dementia. The secondary objective was to examine the effect of this exercise on muscle strength, mobility, activities of daily living, quality of life and neuropsychiatric symptoms. This single blinded randomized controlled trial was conducted among 170 persons with dementia living in nursing homes. Mean age was 86.7 years (SD = 7.4) and 74% were women. The participants were randomly allocated to an intervention (n = 87) or a control group (n = 83). The intervention consisted of intensive strengthening and balance exercises in small groups twice a week for 12 weeks. The control condition was leisure activities. The intervention group improved the score on Bergs Balance Scale by 2.9 points, which was significantly more than the control group who improved by 1.2 points (p = 0.02). Having exercised 12 times or more was significantly associated with improved strength after intervention (pexercise group after the intervention, compared to the control group (p = 0.048). The results from our study indicate that a high intensity functional exercise program improved balance and muscle strength as well as reduced apathy in nursing home patients with dementia. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02262104.

  9. Effects of a low-volume, nutrient- and energy-dense oral nutritional supplement on nutritional and functional status: a randomized, controlled trial in nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stange, Inken; Bartram, Matthias; Liao, Yuye; Poeschl, Karin; Kolpatzik, Sarah; Uter, Wolfgang; Sieber, Cornel C; Stehle, Peter; Volkert, Dorothee

    2013-08-01

    Although oral nutritional supplements (ONS) are known to be effective to treat malnutrition in the elderly, evidence from nursing home populations, including individuals with dementia, is rare, especially with regard to functionality and well-being. A known barrier for ONS use among elderly is the volume that needs to be consumed, resulting in low compliance and thus reduced effectiveness. This study aimed to investigate the effects of a low-volume, energy- and nutrient-dense ONS on nutritional status, functionality, and quality of life (QoL) of nursing home residents. Randomized controlled intervention trial. Six nursing homes in Nürnberg and Fuerth, Germany. Nursing home residents affected by malnutrition or at risk of malnutrition. Random assignment to intervention (IG) and control group (CG), receiving 2 × 125 mL ONS (600 kcal, 24 g protein) per day and routine care, respectively, for 12 weeks. Nutritional (weight, body mass index [BMI], upper arm and calf circumferences, MNA-SF) and functional parameters (handgrip strength, gait speed, depressive mood [GDS], cognition [MMSE], activities of daily living [Barthel ADL]) as well as QoL (QUALIDEM) were assessed at baseline (T1) and after 12 weeks (T2). ONS intake was registered daily and compliance calculated. A total of 77 residents (87 ± 6 y, 91% female) completed the study; 78% had dementia (MMSE home residents with high functional impairment and resulted in significant improvements of nutritional status and, thus, were effective to support treatment of malnutrition. Assessment of function was hampered by dementia and immobility, limiting the assessment of functionality, and highlighting the need for better tools for elderly with functional impairments. ONS may positively affect QoL but this requires further research. Copyright © 2013 American Medical Directors Association, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A randomized controlled trial comparing 2 instructional approaches to home exercise instruction following arthroscopic full-thickness rotator cuff repair surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roddey, Toni S; Olson, Sharon L; Gartsman, Gary M; Hanten, William P; Cook, Karon F

    2002-11-01

    A prospective unblinded randomized clinical trial. To compare the effectiveness of 2 types of home program instruction, videotape versus personal instruction by a physical therapist, on subjective outcomes and exercise compliance following arthroscopic repair of a full-thickness rotator cuff tear. Advances in orthopedic surgery and rehabilitation have placed increased emphasis on home exercise programs. Therefore, assessing the effectiveness of different methods of home program instruction is important. Patients who consented to undergo surgical repair were randomly assigned to either a videotape or personal instruction group. A self-reported compliance log categorized subjects as fully compliant, partially compliant, or noncompliant. The Shoulder Pain and Disability Index and the University of Pennsylvania Shoulder Scale scores were obtained from subjects preoperatively and at 12, 24, and 52 weeks postoperatively. The null hypotheses that neither group would have better outcomes as measured by 2 shoulder outcome scales at any level of compliance over 4 levels of time, were assessed by 2 separate 2x3x4 multiple analyses of variances (MANOVAs), 1 for each outcome measure (alpha = 0.025). Neither MANOVA was significant and the null hypotheses were not rejected. The main effect of time (number of weeks postsurgery) was significant across all time intervals for both outcome measures (P < 0.0005). With a therapist available for questions, patients who utilized the videotape method for their home program instruction had self-reported outcomes equal to patients instructed in their home program personally by a physical therapist. Self-reported compliance with the rehabilitation program had little effect on the outcomes.

  11. Effect of a high-intensity exercise program on physical function and mental health in nursing home residents with dementia: an assessor blinded randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Wiken Telenius

    Full Text Available Dementia is among the leading causes of functional loss and disability in older adults. Research has demonstrated that nursing home patients without dementia can improve their function in activities of daily living, strength, balance and mental well being by physical exercise. The evidence on effect of physical exercise among nursing home patients with dementia is scarce and ambiguous. Thus, the primary objective of this study was to investigate the effect of a high intensity functional exercise program on the performance of balance in nursing home residents with dementia. The secondary objective was to examine the effect of this exercise on muscle strength, mobility, activities of daily living, quality of life and neuropsychiatric symptoms.This single blinded randomized controlled trial was conducted among 170 persons with dementia living in nursing homes. Mean age was 86.7 years (SD = 7.4 and 74% were women. The participants were randomly allocated to an intervention (n = 87 or a control group (n = 83. The intervention consisted of intensive strengthening and balance exercises in small groups twice a week for 12 weeks. The control condition was leisure activities.The intervention group improved the score on Bergs Balance Scale by 2.9 points, which was significantly more than the control group who improved by 1.2 points (p = 0.02. Having exercised 12 times or more was significantly associated with improved strength after intervention (p<0.05. The level of apathy was lower in the exercise group after the intervention, compared to the control group (p = 0.048.The results from our study indicate that a high intensity functional exercise program improved balance and muscle strength as well as reduced apathy in nursing home patients with dementia.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02262104.

  12. Ethnopharmacological versus random plant selection methods for the evaluation of the antimycobacterial activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo R. Oliveira

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The municipality of Oriximiná, Brazil, has 33 quilombola communities in remote areas, endowed with wide experience in the use of medicinal plants. An ethnobotanical survey was carried out in five of these communities. A free-listing method directed for the survey of species locally indicated against Tuberculosis and lung problems was also applied. Data were analyzed by quantitative techniques: saliency index and major use agreement. Thirty four informants related 254 ethnospecies. Among these, 43 were surveyed for possible antimycobacterial activity. As a result of those informations, ten species obtained from the ethnodirected approach (ETHNO and eighteen species obtained from the random approach (RANDOM were assayed against Mycobacterium tuberculosis by the microdilution method, using resazurin as an indicator of cell viability. The best results for antimycobacterial activity were obtained of some plants selected by the ethnopharmacological approach (50% ETHNO x 16,7% RANDOM. These results can be even more significant if we consider that the therapeutic success obtained among the quilombola practice is complex, being the use of some plants acting as fortifying agents, depurative, vomitory, purgative and bitter remedy, especially to infectious diseases, of great importance to the communities in the curing or recovering of health as a whole.

  13. Random forest variable selection in spatial malaria transmission modelling in Mpumalanga Province, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapwata, Thandi; Gebreslasie, Michael T

    2016-11-16

    Malaria is an environmentally driven disease. In order to quantify the spatial variability of malaria transmission, it is imperative to understand the interactions between environmental variables and malaria epidemiology at a micro-geographic level using a novel statistical approach. The random forest (RF) statistical learning method, a relatively new variable-importance ranking method, measures the variable importance of potentially influential parameters through the percent increase of the mean squared error. As this value increases, so does the relative importance of the associated variable. The principal aim of this study was to create predictive malaria maps generated using the selected variables based on the RF algorithm in the Ehlanzeni District of Mpumalanga Province, South Africa. From the seven environmental variables used [temperature, lag temperature, rainfall, lag rainfall, humidity, altitude, and the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI)], altitude was identified as the most influential predictor variable due its high selection frequency. It was selected as the top predictor for 4 out of 12 months of the year, followed by NDVI, temperature and lag rainfall, which were each selected twice. The combination of climatic variables that produced the highest prediction accuracy was altitude, NDVI, and temperature. This suggests that these three variables have high predictive capabilities in relation to malaria transmission. Furthermore, it is anticipated that the predictive maps generated from predictions made by the RF algorithm could be used to monitor the progression of malaria and assist in intervention and prevention efforts with respect to malaria.

  14. Random forest variable selection in spatial malaria transmission modelling in Mpumalanga Province, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thandi Kapwata

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is an environmentally driven disease. In order to quantify the spatial variability of malaria transmission, it is imperative to understand the interactions between environmental variables and malaria epidemiology at a micro-geographic level using a novel statistical approach. The random forest (RF statistical learning method, a relatively new variable-importance ranking method, measures the variable importance of potentially influential parameters through the percent increase of the mean squared error. As this value increases, so does the relative importance of the associated variable. The principal aim of this study was to create predictive malaria maps generated using the selected variables based on the RF algorithm in the Ehlanzeni District of Mpumalanga Province, South Africa. From the seven environmental variables used [temperature, lag temperature, rainfall, lag rainfall, humidity, altitude, and the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI], altitude was identified as the most influential predictor variable due its high selection frequency. It was selected as the top predictor for 4 out of 12 months of the year, followed by NDVI, temperature and lag rainfall, which were each selected twice. The combination of climatic variables that produced the highest prediction accuracy was altitude, NDVI, and temperature. This suggests that these three variables have high predictive capabilities in relation to malaria transmission. Furthermore, it is anticipated that the predictive maps generated from predictions made by the RF algorithm could be used to monitor the progression of malaria and assist in intervention and prevention efforts with respect to malaria.

  15. Selecting the appropriate pacing mode for patients with sick sinus syndrome: evidence from randomized clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertsen, A E; Nielsen, J C

    2003-12-01

    Several observational studies have indicated that selection of pacing mode may be important for the clinical outcome in patients with symptomatic bradycardia, affecting the development of atrial fibrillation (AF), thromboembolism, congestive heart failure, mortality and quality of life. In this paper we present and discuss the most recent data from six randomized trials on mode selection in patients with sick sinus syndrome (SSS). In pacing mode selection, VVI(R) pacing is the least attractive solution, increasing the incidence of AF and-as compared with AAI(R) pacing, also the incidence of heart failure, thromboembolism and death. VVI(R) pacing should not be used as the primary pacing mode in patients with SSS, who haven't chronic AF. AAIR pacing is superior to DDDR pacing, reducing AF and preserving left ventricular function. Single site right ventricular pacing-VVI(R) or DDD(R) mode-causes an abnormal ventricular activation and contraction (called ventricular desynchronization), which results in a reduced left ventricular function. Despite the risk of AV block, we consider AAIR pacing to be the optimal pacing mode for isolated SSS today and an algorithm to select patients for AAIR pacing is suggested. Trials on new pacemaker algorithms minimizing right ventricular pacing as well as trials testing alternative pacing sites and multisite pacing to reduce ventricular desynchronization can be expected within the next years.

  16. Geography and genography: prediction of continental origin using randomly selected single nucleotide polymorphisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramoni Marco F

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies have shown that when individuals are grouped on the basis of genetic similarity, group membership corresponds closely to continental origin. There has been considerable debate about the implications of these findings in the context of larger debates about race and the extent of genetic variation between groups. Some have argued that clustering according to continental origin demonstrates the existence of significant genetic differences between groups and that these differences may have important implications for differences in health and disease. Others argue that clustering according to continental origin requires the use of large amounts of genetic data or specifically chosen markers and is indicative only of very subtle genetic differences that are unlikely to have biomedical significance. Results We used small numbers of randomly selected single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs from the International HapMap Project to train naïve Bayes classifiers for prediction of ancestral continent of origin. Predictive accuracy was tested on two independent data sets. Genetically similar groups should be difficult to distinguish, especially if only a small number of genetic markers are used. The genetic differences between continentally defined groups are sufficiently large that one can accurately predict ancestral continent of origin using only a minute, randomly selected fraction of the genetic variation present in the human genome. Genotype data from only 50 random SNPs was sufficient to predict ancestral continent of origin in our primary test data set with an average accuracy of 95%. Genetic variations informative about ancestry were common and widely distributed throughout the genome. Conclusion Accurate characterization of ancestry is possible using small numbers of randomly selected SNPs. The results presented here show how investigators conducting genetic association studies can use small numbers of arbitrarily

  17. Joint random beam and spectrum selection for spectrum sharing systems with partial channel state information

    KAUST Repository

    Abdallah, Mohamed M.

    2013-11-01

    In this work, we develop joint interference-aware random beam and spectrum selection scheme that provide enhanced performance for the secondary network under the condition that the interference observed at the primary receiver is below a predetermined acceptable value. We consider a secondary link composed of a transmitter equipped with multiple antennas and a single-antenna receiver sharing the same spectrum with a set of primary links composed of a single-antenna transmitter and a single-antenna receiver. The proposed schemes jointly select a beam, among a set of power-optimized random beams, as well as the primary spectrum that maximizes the signal-to-interference-plus-noise ratio (SINR) of the secondary link while satisfying the primary interference constraint. In particular, we consider the case where the interference level is described by a q-bit description of its magnitude, whereby we propose a technique to find the optimal quantizer thresholds in a mean square error (MSE) sense. © 2013 IEEE.

  18. Interference-aware random beam selection schemes for spectrum sharing systems

    KAUST Repository

    Abdallah, Mohamed

    2012-10-19

    Spectrum sharing systems have been recently introduced to alleviate the problem of spectrum scarcity by allowing secondary unlicensed networks to share the spectrum with primary licensed networks under acceptable interference levels to the primary users. In this work, we develop interference-aware random beam selection schemes that provide enhanced performance for the secondary network under the condition that the interference observed by the receivers of the primary network is below a predetermined/acceptable value. We consider a secondary link composed of a transmitter equipped with multiple antennas and a single-antenna receiver sharing the same spectrum with a primary link composed of a single-antenna transmitter and a single-antenna receiver. The proposed schemes select a beam, among a set of power-optimized random beams, that maximizes the signal-to-interference-plus-noise ratio (SINR) of the secondary link while satisfying the primary interference constraint for different levels of feedback information describing the interference level at the primary receiver. For the proposed schemes, we develop a statistical analysis for the SINR statistics as well as the capacity and bit error rate (BER) of the secondary link.

  19. Feature selection for outcome prediction in oesophageal cancer using genetic algorithm and random forest classifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Desbordes; Su, Ruan; Romain, Modzelewski; Sébastien, Vauclin; Pierre, Vera; Isabelle, Gardin

    2017-09-01

    The outcome prediction of patients can greatly help to personalize cancer treatment. A large amount of quantitative features (clinical exams, imaging, …) are potentially useful to assess the patient outcome. The challenge is to choose the most predictive subset of features. In this paper, we propose a new feature selection strategy called GARF (genetic algorithm based on random forest) extracted from positron emission tomography (PET) images and clinical data. The most relevant features, predictive of the therapeutic response or which are prognoses of the patient survival 3 years after the end of treatment, were selected using GARF on a cohort of 65 patients with a local advanced oesophageal cancer eligible for chemo-radiation therapy. The most relevant predictive results were obtained with a subset of 9 features leading to a random forest misclassification rate of 18±4% and an areas under the of receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves (AUC) of 0.823±0.032. The most relevant prognostic results were obtained with 8 features leading to an error rate of 20±7% and an AUC of 0.750±0.108. Both predictive and prognostic results show better performances using GARF than using 4 other studied methods. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Nurse-led health promotion interventions improve quality of life in frail older home care clients: lessons learned from three randomized trials in Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markle-Reid, Maureen; Browne, Gina; Gafni, Amiram

    2013-02-01

    This paper explores the lessons learned from a series of three randomized controlled trials that included 498 community-living frail older adults (≥65 years) using home care services in Southern Ontario, Canada. Each study was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of different multi-component nurse-led health promotion and disease prevention (HPDP) interventions. The nurse-led HPDP interventions were 6- or 12-month multi-component and evidence-based strategies targeting known risk factors for functional decline and frailty. Across the three studies, a common approach was used to measure the change in health-related quality of life (HRQOL) (SF-36) and the costs of use of health services (Health and Social Services Utilization Inventory) from baseline to the end of the intervention. The main lesson learned from the three studies is that nurse-led HPDP interventions for frail older home care clients provide greater improvements in HRQOL compared with usual home care. Such approaches are highly acceptable to this population and can be implemented using existing home care resources. Nurse-led HPDP interventions should include multiple home visits, multidimensional screening and assessment, multi-component evidence-based HPDP strategies, intensive case management, inter-professional collaboration, providers with geriatric training and experience, referral to and coordination of community services, and theory use. The results of the three trials underscore the need to reinvest in nurse-led HPDP interventions in home care to optimize HRQOL and promote ageing in place in the target population of frail older adults. More studies are needed to evaluate the effectiveness of additional nurse-led HPDP interventions in other contexts and settings. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Effects of individually tailored physical and daily activities in nursing home residents on activities of daily living, physical performance and physical activity level: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grönstedt, Helena; Frändin, Kerstin; Bergland, Astrid; Helbostad, Jorunn L; Granbo, Randi; Puggaard, Lis; Andresen, Mette; Hellström, Karin

    2013-01-01

    Nursing home residents are extremely inactive and deterioration in health and an increasing dependence in activities of daily living (ADL) are common. Physical activity and exercise play a major role in the preservation of physical function and quality of life late in life. However, evidence for the benefit of rehabilitation in nursing home residents is conflicting and inconclusive. To evaluate the effect of an individually tailored intervention program of 3 months, for nursing home residents, on ADL, balance, physical activity level, mobility and muscle strength. In this single-blind randomized clinical trial with parallel groups, nursing home residents >64 years of age from three Nordic countries were included. The intervention group (IG) was assigned to individually tailored physical and daily activities, while the control group (CG) received ordinary care. Primary outcomes were ADL and balance, and secondary outcomes physical activity level, mobility and muscle strength. At baseline, 322 nursing home residents were included, of whom 266 were assessed after 3 months of intervention. Following the intervention, a significant difference was found between participants in the IG and CG on measures of balance, physical activity and transfers. The IG significantly improved walking/wheelchair speed and functional leg muscle strength. The CG had significantly deteriorated in ADL, balance and transfers. Persons who had taken part in the intervention for more than 150 min/week significantly improved their balance and physical activity level. Participation in more than 10 weeks of intervention significantly improved physical activity and walking/wheelchair speed, while a deterioration was seen in those who had participated less. Individually tailored intervention in nursing home residents focusing on physical and daily activities is effective in improving transfers, balance and physical activity level compared to usual care. The effect of the intervention is dependent on

  2. Effects of an Intervention to Reduce Hospitalizations From Nursing Homes: A Randomized Implementation Trial of the INTERACT Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Robert L; Huckfeldt, Peter; Tappen, Ruth; Engstrom, Gabriella; Rojido, Carolina; Newman, David; Yang, Zhiyou; Ouslander, Joseph G

    2017-09-01

    Medicare payment initiatives are spurring efforts to reduce potentially avoidable hospitalizations. To determine whether training and support for implementation of a nursing home (NH) quality improvement program (Interventions to Reduce Acute Care Transfers [INTERACT]) reduced hospital admissions and emergency department (ED) visits. This analysis compared changes in hospitalization and ED visit rates between the preintervention and postintervention periods for NHs randomly assigned to receive training and implementation support on INTERACT to changes in control NHs. The analysis focused on 85 NHs (36 717 NH residents) that reported no use of INTERACT during the preintervention period. The study team provided training and support for implementing INTERACT, which included tools that help NH staff identify and evaluate acute changes in NH resident condition and document communication between physicians; care paths to avoid hospitalization when safe and feasible; and advance care planning and quality improvement tools. All-cause hospitalizations, hospitalizations considered potentially avoidable, 30-day hospital readmissions, and ED visits without admission. All-cause hospitalization rates were calculated for all resident-days, high-risk days (0-30 days after NH admission), and lower-risk days (≥31 days after NH admission). We found that of 85 NHs, those that received implementation training and support exhibited statistically nonsignificant reductions in hospitalization rates compared with control NHs (net difference, -0.13 per 1000 resident-days; P = .25), hospitalizations during the first 30 days after NH admission (net difference, -0.37 per 1000 resident-days; P = .48), hospitalizations during periods more than 30 days after NH admission (net difference, -0.09 per 1000 resident-days; P = .39), 30-day readmission rates (net change in rate among hospital discharges, -0.01; P = .36), and ED visits without admission (net difference, 0.02 per 1000

  3. Improving psychotropic drug prescription in nursing home patients with dementia: design of a cluster randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, C.H.; Smalbrugge, M.; Gerritsen, D.L.; Nelissen-Vrancken, M.H.; Wetzels, R.B.; van der Spek, K.; Zuidema, S.U.; Koopmans, R.T.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Neuropsychiatric symptoms are highly prevalent in nursing home patients with dementia. Despite modest effectiveness and considerable side effects, psychotropic drugs are frequently prescribed for these neuropsychiatric symptoms. This raises questions whether psychotropic drugs are

  4. Improving psychotropic drug prescription in nursing home patients with dementia : design of a cluster randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, Claudia H. W.; Smalbrugge, Martin; Gerritsen, Debby L.; Nelissen-Vrancken, Marjorie H. J. M. G.; Wetzels, Roland B.; van der Spek, Klaas; Zuidema, Sytse U.; Koopmans, Raymond T. C. M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Neuropsychiatric symptoms are highly prevalent in nursing home patients with dementia. Despite modest effectiveness and considerable side effects, psychotropic drugs are frequently prescribed for these neuropsychiatric symptoms. This raises questions whether psychotropic drugs are

  5. Supporting parents of premature infants transitioning from the NICU to home: A pilot randomized control trial of a smartphone application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig F. Garfield

    2016-05-01

    Conclusion: A smartphone application used by parents of VLBW infants during the transition home from the NICU can improve parenting self-efficacy, discharge preparedness, and LOS with improved benefits based on usage.

  6. Effects of Two Physiotherapy Booster Sessions on Outcomes With Home Exercise in People With Knee Osteoarthritis: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bennell, Kim L; Kyriakides, Mary; Hodges, Paul W; Hinman, Rana S

    2014-01-01

    ...). Following an initial period of more intensive exercise supervision, this study investigated whether 2 additional physiotherapy visits improved outcomes with continued home exercise over a subsequent 24-week period...

  7. Impact on postpartum hemorrhage of prophylactic administration of oxytocin 10 IU via UnijectTM by peripheral health care providers at home births: design of a community-based cluster-randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanton Cynthia K

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hemorrhage is the leading direct cause of maternal death globally. While oxytocin is the drug of choice for postpartum hemorrhage prevention, its use has generally been limited to health facilities. This trial assesses the effectiveness, safety, and feasibility of expanding the use of prophylactic intramuscular oxytocin to peripheral health care providers at home births in four predominantly rural districts in central Ghana. Methods This study is designed as a community-based cluster-randomized trial in which Community Health Officers are randomized to provide (or not provide an injection of oxytocin 10 IU via the UnijectTM injection system within one minute of delivery of the baby to women who request their presence at home at the onset of labor. The primary aim is to determine if administration of prophylactic oxytocin via Uniject™ by this cadre will reduce the risk of postpartum hemorrhage by 50 % relative to deliveries which do not receive the prophylactic intervention. Postpartum hemorrhage is examined under three sequential definitions: 1 blood loss ≥500 ml (BL; 2 treatment for bleeding (TX and/or BL; 3 hospital referral for bleeding and/or TX and/or BL. Secondary outcomes address safety and feasibility of the intervention and include adverse maternal and fetal outcomes and logistical concerns regarding assistance at home births and the storage and handling of oxytocin, respectively. Discussion Results from this trial will build evidence for the effectiveness of expanding the delivery of this established prophylactic intervention to peripheral settings. Complementary data on safety and logistical issues related to this intervention will assist policymakers in low-income countries in selecting both the best uterotonic and service delivery strategy for postpartum hemorrhage prevention. Results of this trial are expected in mid-2013. The trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01108289.

  8. Impact on postpartum hemorrhage of prophylactic administration of oxytocin 10 IU via Uniject™ by peripheral health care providers at home births: design of a community-based cluster-randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Cynthia K; Newton, Samuel; Mullany, Luke C; Cofie, Patience; Agyemang, Charlotte Tawiah; Adiibokah, Edward; Darcy, Niamh; Khan, Sadaf; Levisay, Alice; Gyapong, John; Armbruster, Deborah; Owusu-Agyei, Seth

    2012-06-07

    Hemorrhage is the leading direct cause of maternal death globally. While oxytocin is the drug of choice for postpartum hemorrhage prevention, its use has generally been limited to health facilities. This trial assesses the effectiveness, safety, and feasibility of expanding the use of prophylactic intramuscular oxytocin to peripheral health care providers at home births in four predominantly rural districts in central Ghana. This study is designed as a community-based cluster-randomized trial in which Community Health Officers are randomized to provide (or not provide) an injection of oxytocin 10 IU via the Uniject™ injection system within one minute of delivery of the baby to women who request their presence at home at the onset of labor. The primary aim is to determine if administration of prophylactic oxytocin via Uniject™ by this cadre will reduce the risk of postpartum hemorrhage by 50 % relative to deliveries which do not receive the prophylactic intervention. Postpartum hemorrhage is examined under three sequential definitions: 1) blood loss ≥500 ml (BL); 2) treatment for bleeding (TX) and/or BL; 3) hospital referral for bleeding and/or TX and/or BL. Secondary outcomes address safety and feasibility of the intervention and include adverse maternal and fetal outcomes and logistical concerns regarding assistance at home births and the storage and handling of oxytocin, respectively. Results from this trial will build evidence for the effectiveness of expanding the delivery of this established prophylactic intervention to peripheral settings. Complementary data on safety and logistical issues related to this intervention will assist policymakers in low-income countries in selecting both the best uterotonic and service delivery strategy for postpartum hemorrhage prevention. Results of this trial are expected in mid-2013. The trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01108289.

  9. Effect of Workplace- versus Home-Based Physical Exercise on Muscle Response to Sudden Trunk Perturbation among Healthcare Workers: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus D. Jakobsen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The present study investigates the effect of workplace- versus home-based physical exercise on muscle reflex response to sudden trunk perturbation among healthcare workers. Methods. Two hundred female healthcare workers (age: 42 [SD 11], BMI: 24 [SD 4], and pain intensity: 3.1 [SD 2.2] on a scale of 0–10 from 18 departments at three hospitals were randomized at the cluster level to 10 weeks of (1 workplace physical exercise (WORK performed in groups during working hours for 5 × 10 minutes per week and up to 5 group-based coaching sessions on motivation for regular physical exercise, or (2 home-based physical exercise (HOME performed during leisure time for 5 × 10 minutes per week. Mechanical and neuromuscular (EMG response to randomly assigned unloading and loading trunk perturbations and questions of fear avoidance were assessed at baseline and 10-week follow-up. Results. No group by time interaction for the mechanical trunk response and EMG latency time was seen following the ten weeks (P = 0.17–0.75. However, both groups demonstrated within-group changes (P<0.05 in stopping time during the loading and unloading perturbation and in stopping distance during the loading perturbation. Furthermore, EMG preactivation of the erector spinae and fear avoidance were reduced more following WORK than HOME (95% CI −2.7–−0.7 (P<0.05 and −0.14 (−0.30 to 0.02 (P=0.09, respectively. WORK and HOME performed 2.2 (SD: 1.1 and 1.0 (SD: 1.2 training sessions per week, respectively. Conclusions. Although training adherence was higher following WORK compared to HOME this additional training volume did not lead to significant between-group differences in the responses to sudden trunk perturbations. However, WORK led to reduced fear avoidance and reduced muscle preactivity prior to the perturbation onset, compared with HOME. This trial is registered with Clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01921764.

  10. Prolonged impact of home versus clinic-based management of chronic heart failure: extended follow-up of a pragmatic, multicentre randomized trial cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Simon; Carrington, Melinda J; Horowitz, John D; Marwick, Thomas H; Newton, Phillip J; Davidson, Patricia M; Macdonald, Peter; Thompson, David R; Chan, Yih-Kai; Krum, Henry; Reid, Christopher; Scuffham, Paul A

    2014-07-01

    We compared the longer-term impact of the two most commonly applied forms of post-discharge management designed to minimize recurrent hospitalization and prolong survival in typically older patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). We followed a multi-center randomized controlled trial cohort of Australian patients hospitalized with CHF and initially allocated to home-based or specialized CHF clinic-based intervention for 1368 ± 216 days. Blinded endpoints included event-free survival from all-cause emergency hospitalization or death, all-cause mortality and rate of all-cause hospitalization and stay. 280 patients (73% male, aged 71 ± 14 years and 73% left ventricular systolic dysfunction) were initially randomized to home-based (n=143) or clinic-based (n=137) intervention. During extended follow-up (complete for 274 patients), 1139 all-cause hospitalizations (7477 days of hospital stay) and 121 (43.2%) deaths occurred. There was no difference in the primary endpoint; 20 (14.0%) home-based versus 13 (7.4%) clinic-based patients remained event-free (adjusted HR 0.89, 95% CI 0.70 to 1.15; p=0.378). Significantly fewer home-based (51/143, 35.7%) than clinic-based intervention (71/137, 51.8%) patients died (adjusted HR 0.62, 95% CI 0.42 to 0.90: p=0.012). Home-based versus clinic-based intervention patients accumulated 592 and 547 all-cause hospitalizations (p=0.087) associated with 3067 (median 4.0, IQR 2.0 to 6.8) versus 4410 (6.0, IQR 3.0 to 12.0) days of hospital stay (p<0.01 for rate and duration of hospital stay). Relative to clinic-based intervention, home-based intervention was not associated with prolonged event-free survival. Home-based intervention was, however, associated with significantly fewer all-cause deaths and significantly fewer days of hospital stay in the longer-term. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry number 12607000069459 (http://www.anzctr.org.au/Trial/Registration/TrialReview.aspx?id=81803). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland

  11. The IVAIRE project--a randomized controlled study of the impact of ventilation on indoor air quality and the respiratory symptoms of asthmatic children in single family homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lajoie, P; Aubin, D; Gingras, V; Daigneault, P; Ducharme, F; Gauvin, D; Fugler, D; Leclerc, J-M; Won, D; Courteau, M; Gingras, S; Héroux, M-È; Yang, W; Schleibinger, H

    2015-12-01

    A randomized controlled trial was carried out to measure the impact of an intervention on ventilation, indoor air contaminants, and asthma symptoms of children. Eighty-three asthmatic children living in low-ventilated homes were followed over 2 years. Several environmental parameters were measured during the summer, fall, and winter. The children were randomized after Year 1 (43 Intervention; 40 Control). The intervention included the installation of either a Heat Recovery Ventilator (HRV) or Energy Recovery Ventilator (ERV). During the fall and winter seasons, there was a significant increase in the mean ventilation rate in the homes of the intervention group. A statistically significant reduction in mean formaldehyde, airborne mold spores, toluene, styrene, limonene, and α-pinene concentrations was observed in the intervention group. There was no significant group difference in change in the number of days with symptoms per 14 days. However, there was a significant decrease in the proportion of children who experienced any wheezing (≥1 episode) and those with ≥4 episodes in the 12-month period in the intervention group. This study indicates that improved ventilation reduces air contaminants and may prevent wheezing. Due to lack of power, a bigger study is needed. Positive findings from this study include the fact that, upon recruitment, most of the single family homes with asthmatic children were already equipped with a mechanical ventilation system and had relatively good indoor air quality. However, the 8-h indoor guideline for formaldehyde (50 μg/m3) was frequently exceeded and the ventilation rates were low in most of the homes, even those with a ventilation system. Both ERVs and HRVs were equally effective at increasing air exchange rates above 0.30 ACH and at preventing formaldehyde concentrations from exceeding the 50 μg/m3 guideline during the fall and winter seasons. Furthermore, the ERVs were effective at preventing excessively low relative

  12. Nutritional treatment of aged individuals with Alzheimer disease living at home with their spouses: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jyvakorpi, Satu K; Puranen, Taija; Pitkala, Kaisu H; Suominen, Merja H

    2012-05-24

    Nutritional status often deteriorates in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Less is known about whether nutritional care reverses malnutrition and its harmful consequences in AD. The aim of this study is to examine whether individualized nutritional care has an effect on weight, nutrition, health, physical functioning, and quality of life in older individuals with AD and their spouses living at home. AD patients and their spouses (aged > 65 years) living at home (n = 202, 102 AD patients) were recruited using central AD registers in Finland. The couples were randomized into intervention and control groups. A trained nutritionist visited intervention couples 4-8 times at their homes and the couples received tailored nutritional care. When necessary, the couples were given protein and nutrient-enriched complementary drinks. All intervention couples were advised to take vitamin D 20 μg/day. The intervention lasted for one year. The couples of the control group received a written guide on nutrition of older people. Participants in the intervention group were assessed every three months. The primary outcome measure is weight change. Secondary measures are the intake of energy, protein, and other nutrients, nutritional status, cognition, caregiver's burden, depression, health related quality of life and grip strength. This study provides data on whether tailored nutritional care is beneficial to home-dwelling AD patients and their spouses. ACTRN 12611000018910.

  13. The effectiveness of a life style modification and peer support home blood pressure monitoring in control of hypertension: protocol for a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Tin Tin; Majid, Hazreen Abdul; Nahar, Azmi Mohamed; Azizan, Nurul Ain; Hairi, Farizah Mohd; Thangiah, Nithiah; Dahlui, Maznah; Bulgiba, Awang; Murray, Liam J

    2014-01-01

    Death rates due to hypertension in low and middle income countries are higher compared to high income countries. The present study is designed to combine life style modification and home blood pressure monitoring for control of hypertension in the context of low and middle income countries. The study is a two armed, parallel group, un-blinded, cluster randomized controlled trial undertaken within lower income areas in Kuala Lumpur. Two housing complexes will be assigned to the intervention group and the other two housing complexes will be allocated in the control group. Based on power analysis, 320 participants will be recruited. The participants in the intervention group (n = 160) will undergo three main components in the intervention which are the peer support for home blood pressure monitoring, face to face health coaching on healthy diet and demonstration and training for indoor home based exercise activities while the control group will receive a pamphlet containing information on hypertension. The primary outcomes are systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Secondary outcome measures include practice of self-blood pressure monitoring, dietary intake, level of physical activity and physical fitness. The present study will evaluate the effect of lifestyle modification and peer support home blood pressure monitoring on blood pressure control, during a 6 month intervention period. Moreover, the study aims to assess whether these effects can be sustainable more than six months after the intervention has ended.

  14. Nutritional treatment of aged individuals with Alzheimer disease living at home with their spouses: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyvakorpi Satu K

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nutritional status often deteriorates in Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Less is known about whether nutritional care reverses malnutrition and its harmful consequences in AD. The aim of this study is to examine whether individualized nutritional care has an effect on weight, nutrition, health, physical functioning, and quality of life in older individuals with AD and their spouses living at home. Methods AD patients and their spouses (aged >65 years living at home (n = 202, 102 AD patients were recruited using central AD registers in Finland. The couples were randomized into intervention and control groups. A trained nutritionist visited intervention couples 4–8 times at their homes and the couples received tailored nutritional care. When necessary, the couples were given protein and nutrient-enriched complementary drinks. All intervention couples were advised to take vitamin D 20 μg/day. The intervention lasted for one year. The couples of the control group received a written guide on nutrition of older people. Participants in the intervention group were assessed every three months. The primary outcome measure is weight change. Secondary measures are the intake of energy, protein, and other nutrients, nutritional status, cognition, caregiver’s burden, depression, health related quality of life and grip strength. Discussion This study provides data on whether tailored nutritional care is beneficial to home-dwelling AD patients and their spouses. Trial registration ACTRN 12611000018910

  15. Physical changes in the home environment to reduce television viewing and sugar-sweetened beverage consumption among 5- to 12-year-old children: a randomized pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, S A; Sherwood, N E; JaKa, M M; Haapala, J L; Ebbeling, C B; Ludwig, D S

    2016-10-01

    This study evaluated the feasibility of a home-based intervention to reduce sugar-sweetened beverage intake and television viewing among children. Lower income parents of overweight children aged 5-12 years (n = 40) were randomized to a home environment intervention to reduce television viewing with locking devices and displace availability of sugar-sweetened beverages with home delivery of non-caloric beverages (n = 25), or to a no-intervention control group (n = 15) for 6 months. Data were collected at baseline and 6 months. After 6 months, television viewing hours per day was significantly lower in the intervention group compared with the control group (1.7 [SE = .02] vs. 2.6 [SE = .25] hours/day, respectively, P children (0.21 [SE = .09] vs. 0.45 [SE = .10], respectively, P children. Among a lower income sample of children, a home-based intervention reduced television viewing, but not sugar-sweetened beverage intake or BMI z-score. © 2015 World Obesity.

  16. Combined transcranial direct current stimulation and home-based occupational therapy for upper limb motor impairment following intracerebral hemorrhage: a double-blind randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, Jesper; Figlewski, Krystian; Andersen, Henning

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the combined effect of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and home-based occupational therapy on activities of daily living (ADL) and grip strength, in patients with upper limb motor impairment following intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). A double-blind randomized controlled trial with one-week follow-up. Patients received five consecutive days of occupational therapy at home, combined with either anodal (n = 8) or sham (n = 7) tDCS. The primary outcome was ADL performance, which was assessed with the Jebsen-Taylor test (JTT). Both groups improved JTT over time (p occupational therapy provided greater improvements in grip strength compared with occupational therapy alone. tDCS is a promising add-on intervention regarding training of upper limb motor impairment. It is well tolerated by patients and can easily be applied for home-based training. Larger studies with long-term follow-up are needed to further explore possible effects of tDCS in patients with ICH. Five consecutive days of tDCS combined with occupational therapy provided greater improvements in grip strength compared with occupational therapy alone. tDCS is well tolerated by patients and can easily be applied for home-based rehabilitation.

  17. Does the Use of a Decision Aid Improve Decision Making in Prosthetic Heart Valve Selection? A Multicenter Randomized Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korteland, Nelleke M.; Ahmed, Yunus; Koolbergen, David R.; Brouwer, Marjan; de Heer, Frederiek; Kluin, Jolanda; Bruggemans, Eline F.; Klautz, Robert J. M.; Stiggelbout, Anne M.; Bucx, Jeroen J. J.; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W.; Polak, Peter; Markou, Thanasie; van den Broek, Inge; Ligthart, Rene; Bogers, Ad J. J. C.; Takkenberg, Johanna J. M.

    2017-01-01

    A Dutch online patient decision aid to support prosthetic heart valve selection was recently developed. A multicenter randomized controlled trial was conducted to assess whether use of the patient decision aid results in optimization of shared decision making in prosthetic heart valve selection. In

  18. Factors associated with home deliveries in a low income rural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To determine the proportion of and factors associated with home deliveries in Nchelenge district, Zambia. Design: A population-based cross sectional study survey using simple random sampling was carried out among women (n=499) who attended immunization posts that were randomly selected.

  19. Selective outcome reporting and sponsorship in randomized controlled trials in IVF and ICSI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braakhekke, M; Scholten, I; Mol, F; Limpens, J; Mol, B W; van der Veen, F

    2017-10-01

    Are randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on IVF and ICSI subject to selective outcome reporting and is this related to sponsorship? There are inconsistencies, independent from sponsorship, in the reporting of primary outcome measures in the majority of IVF and ICSI trials, indicating selective outcome reporting. RCTs are subject to bias at various levels. Of these biases, selective outcome reporting is particularly relevant to IVF and ICSI trials since there is a wide variety of outcome measures to choose from. An established cause of reporting bias is sponsorship. It is, at present, unknown whether RCTs in IVF/ICSI are subject to selective outcome reporting and whether this is related with sponsorship. We systematically searched RCTs on IVF and ICSI published between January 2009 and March 2016 in MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and the publisher subset of PubMed. We analysed 415 RCTs. Per included RCT, we extracted data on impact factor of the journal, sample size, power calculation, and trial registry and thereafter data on primary outcome measure, the direction of trial results and sponsorship. Of the 415 identified RCTs, 235 were excluded for our primary analysis, because the sponsorship was not reported. Of the 180 RCTs included in our analysis, 7 trials did not report on any primary outcome measure and 107 of the remaining 173 trials (62%) reported on surrogate primary outcome measures. Of the 114 registered trials, 21 trials (18%) provided primary outcomes in their manuscript that were different from those in the trial registry. This indicates selective outcome reporting. We found no association between selective outcome reporting and sponsorship. We ran additional analyses to include the trials that had not reported sponsorship and found no outcomes that differed from our primary analysis. Since the majority of the trials did not report on sponsorship, there is a risk on sampling bias. IVF and ICSI trials are subject, to

  20. Parental Involvement and Home Environment in Music: Current and Former Students from Selected Community Music Programs in Brazil and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Gail V.; DeFreitas, Aureo; Grego, John

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether individuals' perceptions of parental involvement and home environment in music vary with nationality (Brazil/United States) and time frame (past/current). Past and current students from selected community music programs in the United States and Brazil completed the PI-HEM (Parental Involvement and…

  1. Predictors of Study Attrition in a Randomized Controlled Trial Evaluating a Perinatal Home-Visiting Program with Mothers with Psychosocial Vulnerabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulon, Stéphanie; Greacen, Tim; Pasquet, Blandine; Dugravier, Romain; Saïas, Thomas; Guedeney, Nicole; Guedeney, Antoine; Tubach, Florence

    2015-01-01

    Objective Randomised controlled trials evaluating perinatal home-visiting programs are frequently confronted with the problem of high attrition rates. The aim of the present study is to identify predictors of study attrition in a trial evaluating a perinatal home-visiting program in France. Materials and Methods CAPEDP is a French randomized trial comparing a perinatal home-visiting program using psychologists versus usual care (N = 440). The first assessment was at inclusion into the trial at the 27th week of pregnancy and the final assessment when the child reached the age of two. Attrition rates were calculated at 3 and 24 months postpartum. Stepwise logistic regression was used to identify predictors of early (between inclusion and 3 months postpartum) and later (between 3 and 24 months postpartum) attrition among social, psychological and parenting factors. Results Attrition rates were 17% and 63% at 3 and 24 months respectively. At 24 months, there was significantly more attrition in the control arm (70.6%) compared to the intervention arm (55.2%). Five independent predictors of early attrition were identified: having already had an abortion; having greater attachment insecurity as measured with the Vulnerable Attachment Style Questionnaire (VASQ); having lower global severity of psychiatric symptoms as assessed with the Symptom Check-List (SCL-90) at inclusion, being neither currently employed nor studying; and declaring no tobacco consumption during pregnancy. Being randomized into the control arm, having undergone early parental loss before age 11 and having lower global severity of psychiatric symptoms (SCL-90) at 3 months postpartum were the only variables associated with later attrition. Conclusion This study provides key information for identifying mothers who may require specific support to avoid study attrition in trials evaluating a home-visiting program. PMID:26554839

  2. Maximizing post-stroke upper limb rehabilitation using a novel telerehabilitation interactive virtual reality system in the patient's home: study protocol of a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kairy, Dahlia; Veras, Mirella; Archambault, Philippe; Hernandez, Alejandro; Higgins, Johanne; Levin, Mindy F; Poissant, Lise; Raz, Amir; Kaizer, Franceen

    2016-03-01

    Telerehabilitation (TR), or the provision of rehabilitation services from a distance using telecommunication tools such as the Internet, can contribute to ensure that patients receive the best care at the right time. This study aims to assess the effect of an interactive virtual reality (VR) system that allows ongoing rehabilitation of the upper extremity (UE) following a stroke, while the person is in their own home, with offline monitoring and feedback from a therapist at a distance. A single-blind (evaluator is blind to group assignment) two-arm randomized controlled trial is proposed, with participants who have had a stroke and are no longer receiving rehabilitation services randomly allocated to: (1) 4-week written home exercise program, i.e. usual care discharge home program or (2) a 4-week home-based TR exercise program using VR in addition to usual care i.e. treatment group. Motor recovery of the UE will be assessed using the Fugl-Meyer Assessment-UE and the Box and Block tests. To determine the efficacy of the system in terms of functional recovery, the Motor Activity Log, a self-reported measure of UE use will be used. Impact on quality of life will be determined using the Stroke Impact Scale-16. Lastly, a preliminary cost-effectiveness analysis will be conducted using costs and outcomes for all groups. Findings will contribute to evidence regarding the use of TR and VR to provide stroke rehabilitation services from a distance. This approach can enhance continuity of care once patients are discharged from rehabilitation, in order to maximize their recovery beyond the current available services. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Predictors of Study Attrition in a Randomized Controlled Trial Evaluating a Perinatal Home-Visiting Program with Mothers with Psychosocial Vulnerabilities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie Foulon

    Full Text Available Randomised controlled trials evaluating perinatal home-visiting programs are frequently confronted with the problem of high attrition rates. The aim of the present study is to identify predictors of study attrition in a trial evaluating a perinatal home-visiting program in France.CAPEDP is a French randomized trial comparing a perinatal home-visiting program using psychologists versus usual care (N = 440. The first assessment was at inclusion into the trial at the 27th week of pregnancy and the final assessment when the child reached the age of two. Attrition rates were calculated at 3 and 24 months postpartum. Stepwise logistic regression was used to identify predictors of early (between inclusion and 3 months postpartum and later (between 3 and 24 months postpartum attrition among social, psychological and parenting factors.Attrition rates were 17% and 63% at 3 and 24 months respectively. At 24 months, there was significantly more attrition in the control arm (70.6% compared to the intervention arm (55.2%. Five independent predictors of early attrition were identified: having already had an abortion; having greater attachment insecurity as measured with the Vulnerable Attachment Style Questionnaire (VASQ; having lower global severity of psychiatric symptoms as assessed with the Symptom Check-List (SCL-90 at inclusion, being neither currently employed nor studying; and declaring no tobacco consumption during pregnancy. Being randomized into the control arm, having undergone early parental loss before age 11 and having lower global severity of psychiatric symptoms (SCL-90 at 3 months postpartum were the only variables associated with later attrition.This study provides key information for identifying mothers who may require specific support to avoid study attrition in trials evaluating a home-visiting program.

  4. Active classifier selection for RGB-D object categorization using a Markov random field ensemble method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durner, Maximilian; Márton, Zoltán.; Hillenbrand, Ulrich; Ali, Haider; Kleinsteuber, Martin

    2017-03-01

    In this work, a new ensemble method for the task of category recognition in different environments is presented. The focus is on service robotic perception in an open environment, where the robot's task is to recognize previously unseen objects of predefined categories, based on training on a public dataset. We propose an ensemble learning approach to be able to flexibly combine complementary sources of information (different state-of-the-art descriptors computed on color and depth images), based on a Markov Random Field (MRF). By exploiting its specific characteristics, the MRF ensemble method can also be executed as a Dynamic Classifier Selection (DCS) system. In the experiments, the committee- and topology-dependent performance boost of our ensemble is shown. Despite reduced computational costs and using less information, our strategy performs on the same level as common ensemble approaches. Finally, the impact of large differences between datasets is analyzed.

  5. Implications of structural genomics target selection strategies: Pfam5000, whole genome, and random approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandonia, John-Marc; Brenner, Steven E.

    2004-07-14

    The structural genomics project is an international effort to determine the three-dimensional shapes of all important biological macromolecules, with a primary focus on proteins. Target proteins should be selected according to a strategy which is medically and biologically relevant, of good value, and tractable. As an option to consider, we present the Pfam5000 strategy, which involves selecting the 5000 most important families from the Pfam database as sources for targets. We compare the Pfam5000 strategy to several other proposed strategies that would require similar numbers of targets. These include including complete solution of several small to moderately sized bacterial proteomes, partial coverage of the human proteome, and random selection of approximately 5000 targets from sequenced genomes. We measure the impact that successful implementation of these strategies would have upon structural interpretation of the proteins in Swiss-Prot, TrEMBL, and 131 complete proteomes (including 10 of eukaryotes) from the Proteome Analysis database at EBI. Solving the structures of proteins from the 5000 largest Pfam families would allow accurate fold assignment for approximately 68 percent of all prokaryotic proteins (covering 59 percent of residues) and 61 percent of eukaryotic proteins (40 percent of residues). More fine-grained coverage which would allow accurate modeling of these proteins would require an order of magnitude more targets. The Pfam5000 strategy may be modified in several ways, for example to focus on larger families, bacterial sequences, or eukaryotic sequences; as long as secondary consideration is given to large families within Pfam, coverage results vary only slightly. In contrast, focusing structural genomics on a single tractable genome would have only a limited impact in structural knowledge of other proteomes: a significant fraction (about 30-40 percent of the proteins, and 40-60 percent of the residues) of each proteome is classified in small

  6. Clinical outcome of intracytoplasmic injection of spermatozoa morphologically selected under high magnification: a prospective randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaban, Basak; Yakin, Kayhan; Alatas, Cengiz; Oktem, Ozgur; Isiklar, Aycan; Urman, Bulent

    2011-05-01

    Recent evidence shows that the selection of spermatozoa based on the analysis of morphology under high magnification (×6000) may have a positive impact on embryo development in cases with severe male factor infertility and/or previous implantation failures. The objective of this prospective randomized study was to compare the clinical outcome of 87 intracytoplasmic morphologically selected sperm injection (IMSI) cycles with 81 conventional intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) cycles in an unselected infertile population. IMSI did not provide a significant improvement in the clinical outcome compared with ICSI although there were trends for higher implantation (28.9% versus 19.5%), clinical pregnancy (54.0% versus 44.4%) and live birth rates (43.7% versus 38.3%) in the IMSI group. However, severe male factor patients benefited from the IMSI procedure as shown by significantly higher implantation rates compared with their counterparts in the ICSI group (29.6% versus 15.2%, P=0.01). These results suggest that IMSI may improve IVF success rates in a selected group of patients with male factor infertility. New technological developments enable the real time examination of motile spermatozoa with an inverted light microscope equipped with high-power differential interference contrast optics, enhanced by digital imaging. High magnification (over ×6000) provides the identification of spermatozoa with a normal nucleus and nuclear content. Intracytoplasmic injection of spermatozoa selected according to fine nuclear morphology under high magnification may improve the clinical outcome in cases with severe male factor infertility. Copyright © 2010 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A Comparison of Dietary Habits between Recreational Runners and a Randomly Selected Adult Population in Slovenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Škof, Branko; Rotovnik Kozjek, Nada

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the dietary habits of recreational runners with those of a random sample of the general population. We also wanted to determine the influence of gender, age and sports performance of recreational runners on their basic diet and compliance with recommendations in sports nutrition. The study population consisted of 1,212 adult Slovenian recreational runners and 774 randomly selected residents of Slovenia between the ages of 18 and 65 years. The data on the dietary habits of our subjects was gathered by means of two questionnaires. The following parameters were evaluated: the type of diet, a food pattern, and the frequency of consumption of individual food groups, the use of dietary supplements, fluid intake, and alcohol consumption. Recreational runners had better compliance with recommendations for healthy nutrition than the general population. This pattern increased with the runner's age and performance level. Compared to male runners, female runners ate more regularly and had a more frequent consumption of food groups associated with a healthy diet (fruit, vegetables, whole grain foods, and low-fat dairy products). The consumption of simple sugars and use of nutritional supplements by well-trained runners was inadequate with values recommended for physically active individuals. Recreational runners are an exemplary population group that actively seeks to adopt a healthier lifestyle.

  8. Radiographic methods used before removal of mandibular third molars among randomly selected general dental clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzen, Louise H; Petersen, Lars B; Wenzel, Ann

    2016-01-01

    To assess radiographic methods and diagnostically sufficient images used before removal of mandibular third molars among randomly selected general dental clinics. Furthermore, to assess factors predisposing for an additional radiographic examination. 2 observers visited 18 randomly selected clinics in Denmark and studied patient files, including radiographs of patients who had their mandibular third molar(s) removed. The radiographic unit and type of receptor were registered. A diagnostically sufficient image was defined as the whole tooth and mandibular canal were displayed in the radiograph (yes/no). Overprojection between the tooth and mandibular canal (yes/no) and patient-reported inferior alveolar nerve sensory disturbances (yes/no) were recorded. Regression analyses tested if overprojection between the third molar and the mandibular canal and an insufficient intraoral image predisposed for additional radiographic examination(s). 1500 mandibular third molars had been removed; 1090 had intraoral, 468 had panoramic and 67 had CBCT examination. 1000 teeth were removed after an intraoral examination alone, 433 after panoramic examination and 67 after CBCT examination. 90 teeth had an additional examination after intraoral. Overprojection between the tooth and mandibular canal was a significant factor (p < 0.001, odds ratio = 3.56) for an additional examination. 63.7% of the intraoral images were sufficient and 36.3% were insufficient, with no significant difference between images performed with phosphor plates and solid-state sensors (p = 0.6). An insufficient image predisposed for an additional examination (p = 0.008, odds ratio = 1.8) but was only performed in 11% of the cases. Most mandibular third molars were removed based on an intraoral examination although 36.3% were insufficient.

  9. Effect of workplace- versus home-based physical exercise on pain in healthcare workers: study protocol for a single blinded cluster randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The prevalence and consequences of musculoskeletal pain is considerable among healthcare workers, allegedly due to high physical work demands of healthcare work. Previous investigations have shown promising results of physical exercise for relieving pain among different occupational groups, but the question remains whether such physical exercise should be performed at the workplace or conducted as home-based exercise. Performing physical exercise at the workplace together with colleagues may be more motivating for some employees and thus increase adherence. On the other hand, physical exercise performed during working hours at the workplace may be costly for the employers in terms of time spend. Thus, it seems relevant to compare the efficacy of workplace- versus home-based training on musculoskeletal pain. This study is intended to investigate the effect of workplace-based versus home-based physical exercise on musculoskeletal pain among healthcare workers. Methods/Design This study was designed as a cluster randomized controlled trial performed at 3 hospitals in Copenhagen, Denmark. Clusters are hospital departments and hospital units. Cluster randomization was chosen to increase adherence and avoid contamination between interventions. Two hundred healthcare workers from 18 departments located at three different hospitals is allocated to 10 weeks of 1) workplace based physical exercise performed during working hours (using kettlebells, elastic bands and exercise balls) for 5 × 10 minutes per week and up to 5 group-based coaching sessions, or 2) home based physical exercise performed during leisure time (using elastic bands and body weight exercises) for 5 × 10 minutes per week. Both intervention groups will also receive ergonomic instructions on patient handling and use of lifting aides etc. Inclusion criteria are female healthcare workers working at a hospital. Average pain intensity (VAS scale 0-10) of the back, neck and shoulder

  10. The effects of therapeutic exercises on pain, muscle strength, functional capacity, balance and hemodynamic parameters in knee osteoarthritis patients: a randomized controlled study of supervised versus home exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuru Çolak, Tuğba; Kavlak, Bahar; Aydoğdu, Onur; Şahin, Emir; Acar, Gönül; Demirbüken, İlkşan; Sarı, Zübeyir; Çolak, İlker; Bulut, Güven; Polat, M Gülden

    2017-03-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the effects of low-intensity exercise programs for lower extremities, either supervised or at home, on pain, muscle strength, balance and the hemodynamic parameters of knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients. This randomized study included 78 patients with knee OA in 2 groups of supervised and home-based exercise program. Exercises were applied to the first group in the clinic as a group exercise program and were demonstrated to the second group to be performed at home. Before and after the 6-week exercise program, assessment was made of pain, quadriceps and hamstring muscle strengths, 6-min walk test (6MWT), and non-invasive hemodynamic parameters. Results of the 78 patients, 56 completed the study. Pain, muscle strength, and 6MWT scores showed significant improvements in both groups. There were also significant differences in the amount of change in pain and muscle strength (pain: p = 0.041, Rqdc: 0.009, Lqdc: 0.013, Rhms: 0.04) which indicated greater improvements in the supervised group. The balance scores of supervised group showed a significant improvement (p = 0.009). No significant change was determined in hemodynamic parameters of either group. Conclusion according to the results of this study showed that low-intensity lower extremity exercises conducted in a clinic under the supervision of a physiotherapist were more effective than home-based exercises in reducing post-activity pain levels and improving quadriceps and right hamstring muscle strength. Both the supervised and home exercise programs were seen to be effective in reducing rest pain and increasing 6 MW distance in knee osteoarthritis patients.

  11. Home-based versus mobile clinic HIV testing and counseling in rural Lesotho: a cluster-randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labhardt, Niklaus Daniel; Motlomelo, Masetsibi; Cerutti, Bernard; Pfeiffer, Karolin; Kamele, Mashaete; Hobbins, Michael A; Ehmer, Jochen

    2014-12-01

    The success of HIV programs relies on widely accessible HIV testing and counseling (HTC) services at health facilities as well as in the community. Home-based HTC (HB-HTC) is a popular community-based approach to reach persons who do not test at health facilities. Data comparing HB-HTC to other community-based HTC approaches are very limited. This trial compares HB-HTC to mobile clinic HTC (MC-HTC). The trial was powered to test the hypothesis of higher HTC uptake in HB-HTC campaigns than in MC-HTC campaigns. Twelve clusters were randomly allocated to HB-HTC or MC-HTC. The six clusters in the HB-HTC group received 30 1-d multi-disease campaigns (five villages per cluster) that delivered services by going door-to-door, whereas the six clusters in MC-HTC group received campaigns involving community gatherings in the 30 villages with subsequent service provision in mobile clinics. Time allocation and human resources were standardized and equal in both groups. All individuals accessing the campaigns with unknown HIV status or whose last HIV test was >12 wk ago and was negative were eligible. All outcomes were assessed at the individual level. Statistical analysis used multivariable logistic regression. Odds ratios and p-values were adjusted for gender, age, and cluster effect. Out of 3,197 participants from the 12 clusters, 2,563 (80.2%) were eligible (HB-HTC: 1,171; MC-HTC: 1,392). The results for the primary outcomes were as follows. Overall HTC uptake was higher in the HB-HTC group than in the MC-HTC group (92.5% versus 86.7%; adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 2.06; 95% CI: 1.18-3.60; p = 0. 011). Among adolescents and adults ≥ 12 y, HTC uptake did not differ significantly between the two groups; however, in children HTC uptake was higher in the HB-HTC arm (87.5% versus 58.7%; aOR: 4.91; 95% CI: 2.41-10.0; pHTC, 114 (4.9%) tested HIV-positive, 39 (3.6%) in the HB-HTC arm and 75 (6.2%) in the MC-HTC arm (aOR: 0.64; 95% CI: 0.48-0.86; p = 0.002). Ten (25.6%) and 19 (25

  12. The Einstein@Home Gamma-ray Pulsar Survey. II. Source Selection, Spectral Analysis, and Multiwavelength Follow-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J.; Clark, C. J.; Pletsch, H. J.; Guillemot, L.; Johnson, T. J.; Torne, P.; Champion, D. J.; Deneva, J.; Ray, P. S.; Salvetti, D.; Kramer, M.; Aulbert, C.; Beer, C.; Bhattacharyya, B.; Bock, O.; Camilo, F.; Cognard, I.; Cuéllar, A.; Eggenstein, H. B.; Fehrmann, H.; Ferrara, E. C.; Kerr, M.; Machenschalk, B.; Ransom, S. M.; Sanpa-Arsa, S.; Wood, K.

    2018-02-01

    We report on the analysis of 13 gamma-ray pulsars discovered in the Einstein@Home blind search survey using Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) Pass 8 data. The 13 new gamma-ray pulsars were discovered by searching 118 unassociated LAT sources from the third LAT source catalog (3FGL), selected using the Gaussian Mixture Model machine-learning algorithm on the basis of their gamma-ray emission properties being suggestive of pulsar magnetospheric emission. The new gamma-ray pulsars have pulse profiles and spectral properties similar to those of previously detected young gamma-ray pulsars. Follow-up radio observations have revealed faint radio pulsations from two of the newly discovered pulsars and enabled us to derive upper limits on the radio emission from the others, demonstrating that they are likely radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsars. We also present results from modeling the gamma-ray pulse profiles and radio profiles, if available, using different geometric emission models of pulsars. The high discovery rate of this survey, despite the increasing difficulty of blind pulsar searches in gamma rays, suggests that new systematic surveys such as presented in this article should be continued when new LAT source catalogs become available.

  13. Enhancement of select foods at breakfast and lunch increases energy intakes of nursing home residents with low meal intakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos, Victoria H; Marra, Melissa Ventura; Johnson, Paulette

    2009-03-01

    Nursing facilities often provide enhanced or fortified foods as part of a "food-first" approach to increasing nutrient intakes in residents with inadequate intakes or who are experiencing weight loss. The study objective was to determine whether energy and protein enhancement of a small number of menu items would result in increased three-meal (breakfast, lunch, and supper) calorie and protein intakes in long-term care residents. A randomized cross-over design was used to compare investigator-weighed food intakes under three menu conditions: control (no meals enhanced); lunch only enhanced; and both breakfast and lunch enhanced. Two breakfast foods (juice and hot cereal) and two lunch foods (soup and potato side dish) were chosen for enhancement. Participants were 33 nursing home residents from a facility in South Florida (average age=87.3 years). Repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to test the effects of the within-subjects factor (control, lunch enhanced, breakfast and lunch enhanced conditions), the between-subjects factor (smaller vs bigger eater), and the interaction on intakes (gram, kilocalories, and protein). Results revealed that bigger eaters consumed considerably more calories when breakfast foods, but not lunch foods, were enhanced. Smaller eaters achieved an increase in energy intake when either breakfast or lunch was enhanced. Overall daily protein intakes were not substantially increased by food enhancement. These data suggest that for an enhanced food program to be most effective for smaller eaters, who are at greatest risk for undernutrition and weight loss, it should include several enhanced foods at more than one meal.

  14. Long-term effects of a home-based smoking prevention program on smoking initiation: A cluster randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hiemstra, J.M.; Ringlever, L.; Otten, R.; Schayck, C.P. van; Jackson, C.; Engels, R.C.M.E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The aims of the study were to evaluate the long-term effects of a home-based smoking prevention program 'Smoke-free Kids' during preadolescence on smoking initiation during adolescence and to test the potential moderating role of parental smoking, socioeconomic status, and asthma. Method.

  15. No effect on survival of home psychosocial intervention in a randomized study of Danish colorectal cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ross, Lone; Frederiksen, Kirsten; Boesen, Sidsel H

    2009-01-01

    (all p>/=0.078) or natural killer cell activity (all p>/=0.33) and no consistent effect on the number of specific subsets of cells (phenotypes) during follow-up.Conclusion: The study failed to provide evidence that the psychosocial intervention provided as home visits significantly affected...

  16. New insights on the rarity of the vulnerable Cinereous Warbling-finch (Aves, Emberizidae based on density, home range, and habitat selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Marques-Santos

    Full Text Available The Cinereous Warbling-finch Poospiza cinerea (Emberizidae is a Neotropical grassland bird considered rare, with population declining due to habitat loss and classified as vulnerable. However, the species conspicuously remains in several degraded areas, suggesting that it may be favored by these environments. Studies which focus on this species were inexistent until 2012, making questionable any statement about its threaten status. Here we analyzed population density, home range, and habitat selection of two groups of P. cinerea at independent sites that differ in human impact levels. Density was estimated by counting and mapping birds. Kernel density and minimum convex polygon were used to estimate home ranges. Habitat selection was inferred from use and availability of every habitat identified within the home range boundaries. One group positively selected urban tree vegetation, despite the availability of natural habitats in its home range. Based on a review on the literature and our findings, we assume that it is unlikely that P. cinerea is rare owing to habitat degradation, as previously thought. Nevertheless, this species was always recorded around native Cerrado vegetation and thus habitat modification may still threaten this species at some level. It is suggested that this species might be a woodland edge species, but future studies are necessary to confirm this assumption.

  17. Control group selection in critical care randomized controlled trials evaluating interventional strategies: An ethical assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Henry J; Miller, Franklin G

    2004-03-01

    Ethical concern has been raised with critical care randomized controlled trials in which the standard of care reflects a broad range of clinical practices. Commentators have argued that trials without an unrestricted control group, in which standard practices are implemented at the discretion of the attending physician, lack the ability to redefine the standard of care and might expose subjects to excessive harms due to an inability to stop early. To develop a framework for analyzing control group selection for critical care trials. Ethical analysis. A key ethical variable in trial design is the extent with which the control group adequately reflects standard care practices. Such a control group might incorporate either the "unrestricted" practices of physicians or a protocol that specifies and restricts the parameters of standard practices. Control group selection should be determined with respect to the following ethical objectives of trial design: 1) clinical value, 2) scientific validity, 3) efficiency and feasibility, and 4) protection of human subjects. Because these objectives may conflict, control group selection will involve trade-offs and compromises. Trials using a protocolized rather than an unrestricted standard care control group will likely have enhanced validity. However, if the protocolized control group lacks representativeness to standard care practices, then trials that use such groups will offer less clinical value and could provide less assurance of protecting subjects compared with trials that use unrestricted control groups. For trials evaluating contrasting strategies that do not adequately represent standard practices, use of a third group that is more representative of standard practices will enhance clinical value and increase the ability to stop early if needed to protect subjects. These advantages might come at the expense of efficiency and feasibility. Weighing and balancing the competing ethical objectives of trial design should be

  18. A Preliminary Randomized Clinical Trial on the Effect of Cervicothoracic Manipulation Plus Supervised Exercises vs a Home Exercise Program for the Treatment of Shoulder Impingement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinuesa-Montoya, Sergio; Aguilar-Ferrándiz, María Encarnación; Matarán-Peñarrocha, Guillermo A; Fernández-Sánchez, Manuel; Fernández-Espinar, Elena María; Castro-Sánchez, Adelaida María

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate changes in pain, disability, and range of movement after cervicothoracic manipulation plus exercise therapy in individuals with unilateral shoulder impingement syndrome. Forty-one patients (30 men, 11 women; aged 47 ± 9) diagnosed with unilateral shoulder impingement syndrome attended 10 sessions for 5 weeks (2 sessions/wk). Eligible patients were randomly allocated to 2 study groups: cervicothoracic manipulation plus exercise therapy (n = 21) or home exercise program (n = 20). The outcomes measures included the visual analog scale (VAS); the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand score; Shoulder Disability Questionnaire; subacromial impingement syndrome (Hawkins-Kennedy Test and Neer Test); and shoulder active range of motion (movements of flexion, extension, rotation, adduction, and abduction). Assessments were applied at baseline and 24 hours after completing 5 weeks of related interventions. After 5 weeks of treatment significant between-group differences were observed in the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand score (P = .012); however, no statistically significant differences were achieved for Shoulder Disability Questionnaire (P = .061) and pain intensity (P = .859). Both groups improved with regard to disability and clinical tests for detecting subacromial impingement syndrome. This clinical trial suggests that cervicothoracic manipulative treatment with mobilization plus exercise therapy may improve intensity of pain and range of motion compared with the home exercise group alone; the home exercise group had significant changes for flexion, extension, adduction, and abduction, but not for external and internal rotation movement in patients with shoulder impingement.

  19. Home-based functional exercises aimed at managing kinesiophobia contribute to improving disability and quality of life of patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monticone, Marco; Ferrante, Simona; Rocca, Barbara; Salvaderi, Stefano; Fiorentini, Roberta; Restelli, Maddalena; Foti, Calogero

    2013-02-01

    To compare the improvement in disability, kinesiophobia, pain, and quality of life obtained by means of home-based functional exercises aimed at managing kinesiophobia with that obtained by giving subjects undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA) advice to stay active after discharge from a rehabilitation unit. Randomized controlled trial with 6-months' follow-up. Patients' homes. Patients (N=110; 40 men; mean age, 67y) at the end of a 15-day period of in-hospital rehabilitation after undergoing primary TKA. In the experimental group, before returning home, the patients were asked to continue the functional exercises learned during hospitalization in twice-weekly 60-minute sessions for 6 months, and were given a book containing theoretical information about the management of kinesiophobia. In the control group, the patients were advised to stay active and gradually recover their usual activities. Repeated-measures analysis of covariance with baseline values as the covariates (Pkinesiophobia was useful in changing the course of disability, fear-avoidance beliefs, pain, and the quality of life in patients with TKA. Copyright © 2013 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Development of a home-based training program for post-ward geriatric rehabilitation patients with cognitive impairment: study protocol of a randomized-controlled trail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongartz, Martin; Kiss, Rainer; Ullrich, Phoebe; Eckert, Tobias; Bauer, Jürgen; Hauer, Klaus

    2017-09-12

    Geriatric patients with cognitive impairment (CI) show an increased risk for a negative rehabilitation outcome and reduced functional recovery following inpatient rehabilitation. Despite this obvious demand, evidence-based training programs at the transition from rehabilitation to the home environments are lacking. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of a feasible and cost-effective home-based training program to improve motor performance and to promote physical activity, specifically-tailored for post-ward geriatric patients with CI. A sample of 101 geriatric patients with mild to moderate stage CI following ward-based rehabilitation will be recruited for a blinded, randomized controlled trial with two arms. The intervention group will conduct a 12 week home-based training, consisting of (1) Exercises to improve strength/power, and postural control; (2) Individual walking trails to enhance physical activity; (3) Implementation of patient-specific motivational strategies to promote behavioral changes. The control group will conduct 12 weeks of unspecific flexibility exercise. Both groups will complete a baseline measurement before starting the program, at the end of the intervention, and after 24 weeks for follow-up. Sensor-based as well as questionnaire-based measures will be applied to comprehensively assess intervention effects. Primary outcomes document motor performance, assessed by the Short Physical Performance Battery, and level of physical activity (PA), as assessed by duration of active episodes (i.e., sum of standing and walking). Secondary outcomes include various medical, psycho-social, various PA and motor outcomes, including sensor-based assessment as well as cost effectiveness. Our study is among the first to provide home-based training in geriatric patients with CI at the transition from a rehabilitation unit to the home environment. The program offers several unique approaches, e.g., a comprehensive and innovative assessment

  1. Take-home emergency naloxone to prevent heroin overdose deaths after prison release: rationale and practicalities for the N-ALIVE randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strang, John; Bird, Sheila M; Parmar, Mahesh K B

    2013-10-01

    The naloxone investigation (N-ALIVE) randomized trial commenced in the UK in May 2012, with the preliminary phase involving 5,600 prisoners on release. The trial is investigating whether heroin overdose deaths post-prison release can be prevented by prior provision of a take-home emergency supply of naloxone. Heroin contributes disproportionately to drug deaths through opiate-induced respiratory depression. Take-home emergency naloxone is a novel preventive measure for which there have been encouraging preliminary reports from community schemes. Overdoses are usually witnessed, and drug users themselves and also family members are a vast intervention workforce who are willing to intervene, but whose responses are currently often inefficient or wrong. Approximately 10% of provided emergency naloxone is thought to be used in subsequent emergency resuscitation but, as yet, there have been no definitive studies. The period following release from prison is a time of extraordinarily high mortality, with heroin overdose deaths increased more than sevenfold in the first fortnight after release. Of prisoners with a previous history of heroin injecting who are released from prison, 1 in 200 will die of a heroin overdose within the first 4 weeks. There are major scientific and logistical challenges to assessing the impact of take-home naloxone. Even in recently released prisoners, heroin overdose death is a relatively rare event: hence, large numbers of prisoners need to enter the trial to assess whether take-home naloxone significantly reduces the overdose death rate. The commencement of pilot phase of the N-ALIVE trial is a significant step forward, with prisoners being randomly assigned either to treatment-as-usual or to treatment-as-usual plus a supply of take-home emergency naloxone. The subsequent full N-ALIVE trial (contingent on a successful pilot) will involve 56,000 prisoners on release, and will give a definitive conclusion on lives saved in real-world application

  2. [Occurrence of head pediculosis and its control in children's homes in selected provinces of Poland in the years 2007-2009].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawicka, Bozena; Mikulak, Ewa; Gliniewicz, Aleksandra

    2011-01-01

    Despite civilisation development and the easy access to pediculicides, head pediculosis remains still the social, hygienic and medical problem. In the years 2007 - 2009 in children's homes in selected provinces of Poland the questionnaire survey on the occurrence of head pediculosis and its control have been conducted. From 127 orphanages 61 (48.03%) sent back fulfilled questionnaire. The infestation level ranged from 4.63% (Swietokrzyskie Province, 2009) until 17.63% (Mazowieckie Province 2007) in the surveyed children's homes. The most head pediculosis cases were observed among girls 6 - 12 years old in children's homes from all regions investigated. The profile of pediculicides used had been changed during our study: in the first year the most often pediculicides with the insecticide permethrin were used. In the next years their use decreased, but the use of herbal and silicone pediculicides increased. The efficacy of anti-louse product was the most important factor for the respondents when they choose an pediculicide.

  3. The adverse effect of selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor on random skin flap survival in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyong Ren

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cyclooxygenase-2(COX-2 inhibitors provide desired analgesic effects after injury or surgery, but evidences suggested they also attenuate wound healing. The study is to investigate the effect of COX-2 inhibitor on random skin flap survival. METHODS: The McFarlane flap model was established in 40 rats and evaluated within two groups, each group gave the same volume of Parecoxib and saline injection for 7 days. The necrotic area of the flap was measured, the specimens of the flap were stained with haematoxylin-eosin(HE for histologic analysis. Immunohistochemical staining was performed to analyse the level of VEGF and COX-2 . RESULTS: 7 days after operation, the flap necrotic area ratio in study group (66.65 ± 2.81% was significantly enlarged than that of the control group(48.81 ± 2.33%(P <0.01. Histological analysis demonstrated angiogenesis with mean vessel density per mm(2 being lower in study group (15.4 ± 4.4 than in control group (27.2 ± 4.1 (P <0.05. To evaluate the expression of COX-2 and VEGF protein in the intermediate area II in the two groups by immunohistochemistry test .The expression of COX-2 in study group was (1022.45 ± 153.1, and in control group was (2638.05 ± 132.2 (P <0.01. The expression of VEGF in the study and control groups were (2779.45 ± 472.0 vs (4938.05 ± 123.6(P <0.01.In the COX-2 inhibitor group, the expressions of COX-2 and VEGF protein were remarkably down-regulated as compared with the control group. CONCLUSION: Selective COX-2 inhibitor had adverse effect on random skin flap survival. Suppression of neovascularization induced by low level of VEGF was supposed to be the biological mechanism.

  4. Rapid selection of accessible and cleavable sites in RNA by Escherichia coli RNase P and random external guide sequences

    OpenAIRE

    Lundblad, Eirik W.; Xiao, Gaoping; Ko, Jae-hyeong; Altman, Sidney

    2008-01-01

    A method of inhibiting the expression of particular genes by using external guide sequences (EGSs) has been improved in its rapidity and specificity. Random EGSs that have 14-nt random sequences are used in the selection procedure for an EGS that attacks the mRNA for a gene in a particular location. A mixture of the random EGSs, the particular target RNA, and RNase P is used in the diagnostic procedure, which, after completion, is analyzed in a gel with suitable control lanes. Within a few ho...

  5. Randomized Controlled Trial of a Computer-Based Education Program in the Home for Solid Organ Transplant Recipients: Impact on Medication Knowledge, Satisfaction, and Adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Jennifer J; Badr, Souzi; Hamandi, Bassem; Kim, Sang Joseph

    2017-06-01

    De novo solid organ transplant recipients (SOTR) have a steep learning curve to acquire medication knowledge. Without adequate knowledge, SOTR are at risk of nonadherence and poor transplant outcomes. In this nonblinded, randomized controlled trial, de novo SOTR received standard teaching with or without postdischarge computer-based education (CBE) at home. Primary outcomes were change in knowledge (quiz and recall) and satisfaction, assessed by questionnaires at baseline and 3 months. Adherence was evaluated via self-report and immunosuppressant levels. Two hundred forty-six patients were randomized and 209 completed the 3-month analysis. In the intervention arm, 73 (57.9%) used the CBE program. Change in knowledge quiz score did not differ between groups (4.9% vs 0.6%; P = 0.084), despite a significant increase within the intervention (72.4% vs 77.3%, P = 0.007) but not the control (76.0% vs 76.6%, P = 0.726) arms. Both groups had a significant improvement in recall (intervention, 56.7% vs 82.1%, P home and to develop effective strategies for posttransplant education.

  6. Is home-based pelvic floor muscle training effective in treatment of urinary incontinence after birth in primiparous women? A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlund, Susanne; Nordgren, Birgitta; Wilander, Eva-Lotta; Wiklund, Ingela; Fridén, Cecilia

    2013-08-01

    To assess the effect of pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) on pelvic floor muscle strength and urinary incontinence (UI) in primiparous women who underwent a home training program between three and 9 months after delivery. Randomized controlled trial. One hundred primiparous women were consecutively recruited from four different antenatal clinics in the urban area of Stockholm, Sweden. Women with UI who had undergone normal term singleton vaginal delivery, 10-16 weeks postpartum were randomly allocated to either intervention or control group. Maximally voluntary contraction (MVC) and endurance were measured with a perionometer. The Oxford grading scale was used to manually estimate the strength of the pelvic floor muscle and self-reported symptoms of UI was registered through the Bristol Female Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms Module (ICIQ FLUTS) questionnaire. Maximally voluntary contraction of the pelvic floor muscle measured with a perionometer. Maximally voluntary contraction increased significantly in both groups between baseline and follow up (p Pelvic floor muscle strength measured with the Oxford Scale increased significantly in both groups between baseline and follow up (p training instructions were as efficient as home-based training with follow up visits every sixth week. © 2013 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  7. Effect of therapist-based constraint-induced therapy at home on motor control, motor performance and daily function in children with cerebral palsy: a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chia-ling; Kang, Lin-ju; Hong, Wei-Hsien; Chen, Fei-Chuan; Chen, Hsieh-Ching; Wu, Ching-yi

    2013-03-01

    To determine the effect of therapist-based constraint-induced therapy at home on motor performance, daily function and reaching control for children with cerebral palsy. A single-blinded, randomized controlled trial. Forty-seven children (23 boys; 24 girls) with unilateral cerebral palsy, aged 6-12 years, were randomized to constraint-induced therapy (n = 24) or traditional rehabilitation (n = 23). Constraint-induced therapy involved intensive functional training of the more affected arm while the less affected arm was restrained. Traditional rehabilitation involved functional unilateral and bilateral arm training. Both groups received individualized therapist-based interventions at home for 3.5-4 hours/day, two days a week for four weeks. Motor performance and daily function were measured by the Peabody Developmental Motor Scale, Second Edition and the Pediatric Motor Activity Log. Reaching control was assessed by the kinematics of reaction time, movement time, movement unit and peak velocity. There were larger effects in favour of constraint-induced therapy on motor performance, daily function, and some aspects of reaching control compared with traditional rehabilitation. Children receiving constraint-induced therapy demonstrated higher scores for Peabody Developmental Motor Scale, Second Edition - Grasping (pretest mean ± SD, 39.9 ± 3.1; posttest, 44.1 ± 2.8; P Motor Activity Log (pretest, 1.8 ± 0.3; posttest, 2.5 ± 0.3; P control of reaching in children with unilateral cerebral palsy than traditional rehabilitation.

  8. Short-term effects of manipulative treatment versus a therapeutic home exercise protocol for chronic cervical pain: A randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindez-Ibarbengoetxea, Xabier; Setuain, Igor; Ramírez-Velez, Robinson; Andersen, Lars L; González-Izal, Miriam; Jauregi, Andoni; Izquierdo, Mikel

    2018-02-06

    While both manipulative treatment and physical exercises are used to treat cervical pain, it remains unclear which is most effective. To compare the short-term effects of high-velocity, low-amplitude manipulation techniques (MT) with those of home-exercise (HE) with stretching and low-intensity (10% of max) isometric contractions on pain and function. Single-blind randomized clinical trial was performed. A total of 27 asymptomatic subjects were randomly assigned to 2 groups: manipulation techniques (MT, n= 13) and home exercise (HE, n= 14). The visual analogue scale (VAS); neck disability index (NDI); pressure pain thresholds; cervical spine range of motion and electromyography during the cranio-cervical flexion test was measured before and one week after the intervention. After the intervention, both groups showed improved (P< 0.05) NDI and VAS scores and flexion in both rotation ranges compared with the pre-intervention values. For the NDI, pain intensity, and neck flexion, the effects sizes were large; for the majority of the other measurements, the effect sizes were small to moderate. The MT group showed significantly better results than the HE group for 2 out of 17 tests. Both interventions improved function and pain after one week, with only marginal between-group differences in favor of MT.

  9. Effectiveness of the 'Home-but not Alone' mobile health application educational programme on parental outcomes: a randomized controlled trial, study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorey, Shefaly; Ng, Yvonne Peng Mei; Danbjørg, Dorthe Boe; Dennis, Cindy-Lee; Morelius, Evalotte

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe a study protocol that evaluates the effectiveness of the 'Home-but not Alone' educational programme delivered via a mobile health application in improving parenting outcomes. The development in mobile-based technology gives us the opportunity to develop an accessible educational programme that can be potentially beneficial to new parents. However, there is a scarcity of theory-based educational programmes that have incorporated technology such as a mobile health application in the early postpartum period. A randomized controlled trial with a two-group pre-test and post-test design. The data will be collected from 118 couples. Eligible parents will be randomly allocated to either a control group (receiving routine care) or an intervention group (routine care plus access to the 'Home-but not Alone' mobile health application. Outcome measures comprise of parenting self-efficacy, social support, parenting satisfaction and postnatal depression. Data will be collected at the baseline (on the day of discharge) and at four weeks postpartum. This will be an empirical study that evaluates a theory-based educational programme delivered via an innovative mobile health application on parental outcomes. Results from this study will enhance parenting self-efficacy, social support and parenting satisfaction, which may then reduce parental risks of postnatal depression. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Effects of an Updated Preventive Home Visit Program Based on a Systematic Structured Assessment of Care Needs for Ambulatory Frail Older Adults in Japan: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Ayumi; Izumi, Kyoko; Yoshiyuki, Noriko; Kanaya, Yukiko; Rubenstein, Laurence Z

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this randomized controlled trial was to determine the effects on functional parameters of an updated preventive home visit program for frail older adults in the Japanese Long-term Care Insurance (LTCI) system. The program included home visits by nurses or care managers every 3 months for 24 months, with a systematic assessment of care needs to prevent functional decline. Eligible participants (N = 360) were randomly assigned to the visit (VG: n = 179) or control group (CG: n = 181). Functional parameters were gathered via mail questionnaires at baseline and at 12- and 24-month follow-ups. Care-need levels in the LTCI were obtained at 12-, 24-, and 36-month follow-ups and the utilization of the LTCI service through 36 months. Participants in VG were significantly more likely to maintain their activities of daily living (ADL) functioning (p = .0113) and less likely to increase care-needs level, compared with CG participants, over 24 months. A generalized linear model showed that the estimate of the effect on increase in care-needs level (ie, functional decline) was -0.53 (p = .042) over 36 months. These results suggest that the updated preventive home visit program could be effective for the prevention of ADL and care-needs deterioration, and these effects could continue up to 1 year after program completion. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. A multi-component exercise regimen to prevent functional decline and bone fragility in home-dwelling elderly women: randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karinkanta, S; Heinonen, A; Sievänen, H; Uusi-Rasi, K; Pasanen, M; Ojala, K; Fogelholm, M; Kannus, P

    2007-04-01

    This study showed that combination of strength, balance, agility and jumping training prevented functional decline and bone fragility in home-dwelling elderly women. The finding supports the idea that it is possible to maintain good physical functioning by multi-component exercise program and thus postpone the age-related functional problems. This 1-year randomized, controlled exercise intervention trial assessed the effects of two different training programs and their combination on physical functioning and bone in home-dwelling elderly women. One hundred and forty-nine healthy women aged 70-78 years were randomly assigned into: group 1-resistance training (RES), group 2-balance-jumping training (BAL), group 3-combination of resistance and balance-jumping training (COMB), and group 4-controls (CON). Self-rated physical functioning, leg extensor force, dynamic balance, and bone mass and structure were measured. Self-rated physical functioning improved in the COMB group, but was reduced in the CON group; the mean inter-group difference was 10% (95% CI: 0-22%). Mean increase in the leg extensor force was higher in the RES (14%; 4-25%) and COMB (13%; 3-25%) compared with the CON groups. Dynamic balance improved in the BAL (6%; 1-11%) and in the COMB (8%; 3-12%) groups. There were no inter-group differences in BMC at the proximal femur. In those COMB women who trained at least twice a week, the tibial shaft structure weakened 2% (0-4%) less than those in the CON group. Strength, balance, agility, and jumping training (especially in combination) prevented functional decline in home-dwelling elderly women. In addition, positive effects seen in the structure of the loaded tibia indicated that exercise may also play a role in preventing bone fragility.

  12. Psychometric performance and responsiveness of the functional outcomes of sleep questionnaire and sleep apnea quality of life instrument in a randomized trial: the HomePAP study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billings, Martha E; Rosen, Carol L; Auckley, Dennis; Benca, Ruth; Foldvary-Schaefer, Nancy; Iber, Conrad; Zee, Phyllis C; Redline, Susan; Kapur, Vishesh K

    2014-12-01

    Measures of health-related quality of life (HRQL) specific for sleep disorders have had limited psychometric evaluation in the context of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). We investigated the psychometric properties of the Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire (FOSQ) and Sleep Apnea Quality of Life Instrument (SAQLI). We evaluated the FOSQ and SAQLI construct and criterion validity, determined a minimally important difference, and assessed for associations of responsiveness to baseline subject characteristics and continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) adherence in a RCT population. Secondary analysis of data collected in a multisite RCT of home versus laboratory-based diagnosis and treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (HomePAP trial). Individuals enrolled in the HomePAP trial (n = 335). N/A. The FOSQ and SAQLI subscores demonstrated high reliability and criterion validity, correlating with Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form Survey domains. Correlations were weaker with the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS). Both the FOSQ and SAQLI scores improved after 3 mo with CPAP therapy. Averaging 4 h or more of CPAP use was associated with an increase in the FOSQ beyond the minimally important difference. Baseline depressive symptoms and sleepiness predicted FOSQ and SAQLI responsiveness; demographic, objective obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) severity and sleep habits were not predictive in linear regression. The FOSQ and SAQLI are responsive to CPAP intervention, with the FOSQ being more sensitive to differences in CPAP adherence than the SAQLI. These instruments provide unique information about health outcomes beyond that provided by changes in physiological measures of OSA severity (apnea-hypopnea index). Portable Monitoring for Diagnosis and Management of Sleep Apnea (HomePAP) URL: http://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT00642486. NIH clinical trials registry number: NCT00642486. © 2014 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  13. The effect of staff training on agitation and use of restraint in nursing home residents with dementia: a single-blind, randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testad, Ingelin; Ballard, Clive; Brønnick, Kolbjørn; Aarsland, Dag

    2010-01-01

    Agitation is common in dementia and is associated with use of restraints and use of psychotropic drugs. The aim of this study was to determine whether an education and supervision intervention could reduce agitation and the use of restraints and antipsychotic drugs in nursing homes. Four Norwegian nursing homes were randomly allocated to receive either treatment as usual or an intervention consisting of a 2-day educational seminar and monthly group guidance for 6 months. One hundred forty-five residents with dementia (based on medical records and corroborated with a Functional Assessment Staging score >or= 4) completed baseline and 6-month intervention assessments and were included in the analyses. The co-primary outcome measures were the proportion of residents subject to interactional restraint and the severity of agitation using the Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory (CMAI). Patients were assessed at baseline, immediately after completion of the intervention at 6 months, and 12 months after baseline. Comparison of change in the 2 groups was made using repeated-measures analysis of variance (CMAI) and Mann-Whitney test (restraints). The study was conducted from 2003 to 2004. The proportion of residents starting new restraint was lower in the intervention than in the control group at 6-month evaluation (P = .02), but no statistically significant differences were found at 12-month assessment (P = .57). The total CMAI score declined from baseline to 6 and 12 months' follow-up in the intervention homes compared to a small increase in the control homes (F2,176 = 3.46, P = .034). There were no statistically significant differences in use of antipsychotic drugs. A brief 2-day staff education program followed by continued monthly guidance was able both to improve quality of care by reducing the frequency of interactional restraints and to reduce severity of agitation. ©Copyright 2010 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  14. A randomized clinical trial comparing at-home and in-office tooth whitening techniques: A nine-month follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giachetti, Luca; Bertini, Fabio; Bambi, Claudia; Nieri, Michele; Scaminaci Russo, Daniele

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this split-mouth, randomized controlled trial was to compare the whitening results of at-home and in-office tooth bleaching techniques and the longevity of their effects at nine months after teeth had been bleached. The authors conducted a study involving a 14-day bleaching period, during which the first maxillary premolars of 17 participants, who were 20 to 25 years of age, were bleached by means of either an at-home technique involving 10 percent carbamide peroxide or an in-office technique involving 38 percent hydrogen peroxide. The authors recorded color variables as proposed by the Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage-lightness (L*), redness (a*) and yellowness (b*)-by using a spectrophotometer at baseline and at one week, one month and nine months after bleaching. They also calculated a whiteness (W) index that was based on the distance of the color value in the color space from a nominal white point. At the nine-month recall visit, comparison between the at-home and the in-office techniques did not show significantly different values for L* (P = .448), a* (P = .350), b* (P = .144) and W (P = .151) color variables. None of the participants experienced any adverse events related to the bleaching during the treatment period. The study results showed no clinically significant difference in bleaching efficacy. Both techniques produced satisfactory and long-lasting bleaching results. In young adults, either the at-home or the in-office technique can be used effectively.

  15. A Randomized Controlled Trial of In-Home Tele-behavioral Health Care Utilizing Behavioral Activation for Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    31) Key Words: suicide risk, patient safety, risk management, telehealth , telemedicine *This project is partially supported by the Department of the...KJ, Acierno, R. Managing suicidality in home-based telehealth . Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare 2011;17:332-335. doi: 10.1258/jtt.2011.101207 20...this trial alone. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Depression, Behavioral Activation, Telehealth 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18

  16. Home-based virtual reality balance training and conventional balance training in Parkinson's disease: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wen-Chieh; Wang, Hsing-Kuo; Wu, Ruey-Meei; Lo, Chien-Shun; Lin, Kwan-Hwa

    2016-09-01

    Virtual reality has the advantage to provide rich sensory feedbacks for training balance function. This study tested if the home-based virtual reality balance training is more effective than the conventional home balance training in improving balance, walking, and quality of life in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Twenty-three patients with idiopathic PD were recruited and underwent twelve 50-minute training sessions during the 6-week training period. The experimental group (n = 11) was trained with a custom-made virtual reality balance training system, and the control group (n = 12) was trained by a licensed physical therapist. Outcomes were measured at Week 0 (pretest), Week 6 (posttest), and Week 8 (follow-up). The primary outcome was the Berg Balance Scale. The secondary outcomes included the Dynamic Gait Index, timed Up-and-Go test, Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire, and the motor score of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale. The experimental and control groups were comparable at pretest. After training, both groups performed better in the Berg Balance Scale, Dynamic Gait Index, timed Up-and-Go test, and Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire at posttest and follow-up than at pretest. However, no significant differences were found between these two groups at posttest and follow-up. This study did not find any difference between the effects of the home-based virtual reality balance training and conventional home balance training. The two training options were equally effective in improving balance, walking, and quality of life among community-dwelling patients with PD. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. PLAY Project Home Consultation Intervention Program for Young Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Solomon, Richard; Van Egeren, Laurie A.; Mahoney, Gerald; Quon Huber, Melissa S.; Zimmerman, Perri

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of the Play and Language for Autistic Youngsters (PLAY) Project Home Consultation model, in combination with usual community services (CS), to improve parent-child interaction, child development, and autism symptomatology in young children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) compared with CS only. Methods: Children (N = 128) with autism or PDD-NOS (DSM-4 criteria) aged 2 years 8 months to 5 years 11 months and recruited from 5 disability ag...

  18. Exploring the concurrent validity of the nationwide assessment of permanent nursing home residence in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bebe, Anna; Nielsen, Anni Brit Sternhagen; Willadsen, Tora Grauers

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many register studies make use of information about permanent nursing home residents. Statistics Denmark (StatD) identifies nursing home residents by two different indirect methods, one based on reports from the municipalities regarding home care in taken place in a nursing home......, and the other based on an algorithm created by StatD. The aim of the present study was to validate StatD's nursing home register using dedicated administrative municipality records on individual nursing home residents as gold standard. METHODS: In total, ten Danish municipalities were selected. Within each...... Danish Region, we randomly selected one municipality reporting to Stat D (Method 1) and one not reporting where instead an algorithm created by StatD was used to discover nursing home residents (Method 2). Method 1 means that municipalities reported to Stat D whether home care has taken place...

  19. Random genetic drift, natural selection, and noise in human cranial evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roseman, Charles C

    2016-08-01

    This study assesses the extent to which relationships among groups complicate comparative studies of adaptation in recent human cranial variation and the extent to which departures from neutral additive models of evolution hinder the reconstruction of population relationships among groups using cranial morphology. Using a maximum likelihood evolutionary model fitting approach and a mixed population genomic and cranial data set, I evaluate the relative fits of several widely used models of human cranial evolution. Moreover, I compare the goodness of fit of models of cranial evolution constrained by genomic variation to test hypotheses about population specific departures from neutrality. Models from population genomics are much better fits to cranial variation than are traditional models from comparative human biology. There is not enough evolutionary information in the cranium to reconstruct much of recent human evolution but the influence of population history on cranial variation is strong enough to cause comparative studies of adaptation serious difficulties. Deviations from a model of random genetic drift along a tree-like population history show the importance of environmental effects, gene flow, and/or natural selection on human cranial variation. Moreover, there is a strong signal of the effect of natural selection or an environmental factor on a group of humans from Siberia. The evolution of the human cranium is complex and no one evolutionary process has prevailed at the expense of all others. A holistic unification of phenome, genome, and environmental context, gives us a strong point of purchase on these problems, which is unavailable to any one traditional approach alone. Am J Phys Anthropol 160:582-592, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. CURE-SMOTE algorithm and hybrid algorithm for feature selection and parameter optimization based on random forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Li; Fan, Suohai

    2017-03-14

    The random forests algorithm is a type of classifier with prominent universality, a wide application range, and robustness for avoiding overfitting. But there are still some drawbacks to random forests. Therefore, to improve the performance of random forests, this paper seeks to improve imbalanced data processing, feature selection and parameter optimization. We propose the CURE-SMOTE algorithm for the imbalanced data classification problem. Experiments on imbalanced UCI data reveal that the combination of Clustering Using Representatives (CURE) enhances the original synthetic minority oversampling technique (SMOTE) algorithms effectively compared with the classification results on the original data using random sampling, Borderline-SMOTE1, safe-level SMOTE, C-SMOTE, and k-means-SMOTE. Additionally, the hybrid RF (random forests) algorithm has been proposed for feature selection and parameter optimization, which uses the minimum out of bag (OOB) data error as its objective function. Simulation results on binary and higher-dimensional data indicate that the proposed hybrid RF algorithms, hybrid genetic-random forests algorithm, hybrid particle swarm-random forests algorithm and hybrid fish swarm-random forests algorithm can achieve the minimum OOB error and show the best generalization ability. The training set produced from the proposed CURE-SMOTE algorithm is closer to the original data distribution because it contains minimal noise. Thus, better classification results are produced from this feasible and effective algorithm. Moreover, the hybrid algorithm's F-value, G-mean, AUC and OOB scores demonstrate that they surpass the performance of the original RF algorithm. Hence, this hybrid algorithm provides a new way to perform feature selection and parameter optimization.

  1. Noise-induced hearing loss in randomly selected New York dairy farmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, J J; Marvel, M; Regan, M; Marvel, L H; Pratt, D S

    1990-01-01

    To understand better the effects of noise levels associated with dairy farming, we randomly selected 49 full-time dairy farmers from an established cohort. Medical and occupational histories were taken and standard audiometric testing was done. Forty-six males (94%) and three females (6%) with a mean age of 43.5 (+/- 13) years and an average of 29.4 (+/- 14) years in farming were tested. Pure Tone Average thresholds (PTA4) at 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0 kHz plus High Frequency Average thresholds (HFA3) at 3.0, 4.0, and 6.0 kHz were calculated. Subjects with a loss of greater than or equal to 20 db in either ear were considered abnormal. Eighteen subjects (37%) had abnormal PTA4S and 32 (65%) abnormal HFA3S. The left ear was more severely affected in both groups (p less than or equal to .05, t-test). Significant associations were found between hearing loss and years worked (odds ratio 4.1, r = .53) and age (odds ratio 4.1, r = .59). No association could be found between hearing loss and measles; mumps; previous ear infections; or use of power tools, guns, motorcycles, snowmobiles, or stereo headphones. Our data suggest that among farmers, substantial hearing loss occurs especially in the high-frequency ranges. Presbycusis is an important confounding variable.

  2. Modeling Slotted Aloha as a Stochastic Game with Random Discrete Power Selection Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachid El-Azouzi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the uplink case of a cellular system where bufferless mobiles transmit over a common channel to a base station, using the slotted aloha medium access protocol. We study the performance of this system under several power differentiation schemes. Indeed, we consider a random set of selectable transmission powers and further study the impact of priorities given either to new arrival packets or to the backlogged ones. Later, we address a general capture model where a mobile transmits successfully a packet if its instantaneous SINR (signal to interferences plus noise ratio is lager than some fixed threshold. Under this capture model, we analyze both the cooperative team in which a common goal is jointly optimized as well as the noncooperative game problem where mobiles reach to optimize their own objectives. Furthermore, we derive the throughput and the expected delay and use them as the objectives to optimize and provide a stability analysis as alternative study. Exhaustive performance evaluations were carried out, we show that schemes with power differentiation improve significantly the individual as well as global performances, and could eliminate in some cases the bi-stable nature of slotted aloha.

  3. Examining the effectiveness of home-based parent aide services to reduce risk for physical child abuse and neglect: six-month findings from a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guterman, Neil B; Tabone, Jiyoung K; Bryan, George M; Taylor, Catherine A; Napoleon-Hanger, Cynthia; Banman, Aaron

    2013-08-01

    This study set out to carry out a feasible, real-world, randomized clinical trial to examine the benefits of home-based paraprofessional parent aide services in reducing physical abuse and neglect risk in high-risk parents. Families were randomly assigned to receive either parent aide plus case management services (n = 73) or case management services only (n = 65), collecting in-home data on physical child abuse and neglect and proximal risk and protective factors, just prior to service initiation, and again after six months of services. Mothers receiving parent aide and case management services reported significant improvements from baseline to six-month follow-up in self-reported indicators of physical child abuse risk, as well as improvements on parental stress, mastery, depression, and anxiety, whereas mothers receiving only case management services did not. The slopes of such observed changes across groups, however, were not found to be statistically significantly different. No discernable improvements were found with regard to indicators of risk for child neglect. As the first randomized clinical trial examining the effectiveness of parent aide services, this study provides the first controlled evidence examining the potential benefits of this service modality. This study suggests promising trends regarding the benefit of parent aide services with respect to physical child abuse risk reduction and related predictors, but evidence does not appear to suggest that such services, as they are presently delivered, reduce child neglect. These findings support the continued use of parent aide services in cases of physical child abuse and also suggest careful consideration of the ways such services may be better configured to extend their impact, particularly with respect to child neglect risk. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The Effectiveness and Cost-Effectiveness of Web-Based and Home-Based Postnatal Psychoeducational Interventions for First-Time Mothers: Randomized Controlled Trial Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Honggu; Zhu, Lixia; Chan, Sally Wai Chi; Chong, Yap-Seng; Jiao, Nana; Chan, Yiong Huak; Luo, Nan; Shorey, Shefaly

    2018-01-31

    In addition to recuperating from the physical and emotional demands of childbirth, first-time mothers are met with demands of adapting to their social roles while picking up new skills to take care of their newborn. Mothers may not feel adequately prepared for parenthood if they are situated in an unsupported environment. Postnatal psychoeducational interventions have been shown to be useful and can offer a cost-effective solution for improving maternal outcomes. The objective of this study was to examine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of Web-based and home-based postnatal psychoeducational programs for first-time mothers on maternal outcomes. A randomized controlled three-group pre- and posttests experimental design is proposed. This study plans to recruit 204 first-time mothers on their day of discharge from a public tertiary hospital in Singapore. Eligible first-time mothers will be randomly allocated to either a Web-based psychoeducation group, a home-based psychoeducation group, or a control group receiving standard care. The outcomes include maternal parental self-efficacy, social support, psychological well-being (anxiety and postnatal depression), and cost evaluation. Data will be collected at baseline, 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months post-delivery. The recruitment (n=204) commenced in October 2016 and was completed in February 2017, with 68 mothers in each group. The 6-month follow-up data collection was completed in August 2017. This study may identify an effective and cost-effective Web-based postnatal psychoeducational program to improve first-time mothers' health outcomes. The provision of a widely-accessed Web-based postnatal psychoeducational program will eventually lead to more positive postnatal experiences for first-time mothers and positively influence their future birth plans. International Standard Randomized Controlled Trial Number (ISRCTN): 45202278; http://www.isrctn.com/ISRCTN45202278 (Archived by WebCite at http

  5. Snails home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunstan, D. J.; Hodgson, D. J.

    2014-06-01

    Many gardeners and horticulturalists seek non-chemical methods to control populations of snails. It has frequently been reported that snails that are marked and removed from a garden are later found in the garden again. This phenomenon is often cited as evidence for a homing instinct. We report a systematic study of the snail population in a small suburban garden, in which large numbers of snails were marked and removed over a period of about 6 months. While many returned, inferring a homing instinct from this evidence requires statistical modelling. Monte Carlo techniques demonstrate that movements of snails are better explained by drift under the influence of a homing instinct than by random diffusion. Maximum likelihood techniques infer the existence of two groups of snails in the garden: members of a larger population that show little affinity to the garden itself, and core members of a local garden population that regularly return to their home if removed. The data are strongly suggestive of a homing instinct, but also reveal that snail-throwing can work as a pest management strategy.

  6. Estimating the “Impact” of Out-of-Home Placement on Child Well-Being: Approaching the Problem of Selection Bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Lawrence M.; Bruch, Sarah K.; Johnson, Elizabeth I.; James, Sigrid; Rubin, David

    2010-01-01

    This study used data on 2,453 children age 4 to 17 from the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being and 5 analytic methods that adjust for selection factors to estimate the impact of out-of-home placement on children's cognitive skills and behavior problems. Methods included ordinary least squares (OLS) regressions and residualized change, simple change, difference-in-difference, and fixed effects models. Models were estimated using the full sample and a matched sample generated by propensity scoring. Although results from the unmatched OLS and residualized change models suggested that out-of-home placement is associated with increased child behavior problems, estimates from models that more rigorously adjust for selection bias indicated that placement has little effect on children's cognitive skills or behavior problems. PMID:19930356

  7. Stroke and Nursing Home care: a national survey of nursing homes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cowman, Seamus

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although stroke is recognised as a major factor in admission to nursing home care, data is lacking on the extent and nature of the disabilities and dependency in nursing homes arising from stroke. A national study conducted in nursing homes can quantify the number of residents with stroke in nursing homes, their disability and levels of dependency. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey research design was used. A total of 572 public and private nursing homes were identified nationally and a stratified random selection of 60 nursing homes with 3,239 residents was made. In half of the nursing homes (n = 30) efforts were made to interview all residents with stroke Survey instruments were used to collect data from residents with stroke and nursing home managers on demography, patient disability, and treatment. RESULTS: Across all nursing homes (n = 60), 18% (n = 570) of the residents had previously had a stroke. In homes (n = 30), where interviews with residents with stroke (n = 257), only 7% (n = 18) residents were capable of answering for themselves and were interviewed. Data on the remaining 93% (n = 239) residents were provided by the nursing home manager. Nurse Managers reported that 73% of residents with stroke had a high level of dependency. One in two residents with stroke was prescribed antidepressants or sedative medication. Only 21% of stroke residents were prescribed anticoagulants, 42% antiplatelets, and 36% cholesterol lowering medications. Stroke rehabilitation guidelines were lacking and 68% reported that there was no formal review process in place. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides seminal findings on stroke and nursing home services in Ireland. We now know that one in six nursing home residents in a national survey are residents with a stroke, and have a wide range of disabilities. There is currently little or no structured care (beyond generic care) for stroke survivors who reside in nursing homes in Ireland.

  8. Stroke and Nursing Home care: a national survey of nursing homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGee Hannah

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although stroke is recognised as a major factor in admission to nursing home care, data is lacking on the extent and nature of the disabilities and dependency in nursing homes arising from stroke. A national study conducted in nursing homes can quantify the number of residents with stroke in nursing homes, their disability and levels of dependency. Methods A cross-sectional survey research design was used. A total of 572 public and private nursing homes were identified nationally and a stratified random selection of 60 nursing homes with 3,239 residents was made. In half of the nursing homes (n = 30 efforts were made to interview all residents with stroke Survey instruments were used to collect data from residents with stroke and nursing home managers on demography, patient disability, and treatment. Results Across all nursing homes (n = 60, 18% (n = 570 of the residents had previously had a stroke. In homes (n = 30, where interviews with residents with stroke (n = 257, only 7% (n = 18 residents were capable of answering for themselves and were interviewed. Data on the remaining 93% (n = 239 residents were provided by the nursing home manager. Nurse Managers reported that 73% of residents with stroke had a high level of dependency. One in two residents with stroke was prescribed antidepressants or sedative medication. Only 21% of stroke residents were prescribed anticoagulants, 42% antiplatelets, and 36% cholesterol lowering medications. Stroke rehabilitation guidelines were lacking and 68% reported that there was no formal review process in place. Conclusions This study provides seminal findings on stroke and nursing home services in Ireland. We now know that one in six nursing home residents in a national survey are residents with a stroke, and have a wide range of disabilities. There is currently little or no structured care (beyond generic care for stroke survivors who reside in nursing homes in Ireland.

  9. Outcome of an education and home-based exercise programme for patients with ankylosing spondylitis: a nationwide randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Lozano, Carlos; Juanola, Xavier; Cruz-Martínez, Juan; Peña-Arrébola, Andrés; Mulero, Juan; Gratacós, Jordi; Collantes, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to assess the impact of a structured education and home exercise programme in daily practice patients with ankylosing spondylitis. A total of 756 patients with ankylosing spondylitis (72% males, mean age 45 years) participated in a 6-month prospective multicentre controlled study, 381 of whom were randomised to an education intervention (a 2-hour informative session about the disease and the implementation of a non-supervised physical activity programme at home) and 375 to standard care (controls). Main outcome measures included Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity and Functional Index (BASDAI, BASFI). Secondary outcome measures were 0-10 cm visual analog scale (VAS) for total pain, nocturnal pain and global disease activity and quality of life (ASQoL), knowledge of disease (self-evaluation ordinal scale) and daily exercise (diary card). At 6 months, the adjusted mean difference between control and educational groups for BASDAI was 0.32, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.10-0.54, p=0.005, and for BASFI 0.31, 95%CI 0.12-0.51, p=0.002. Significant differences were found also in VAS for total pain, patient´s global assessment and in ASQoL. Patients in the education group increased their knowledge about the disease and its treatments significantly (p<0.001) and practised more regular exercise than controls (p<0.001). A structured education and home exercise programme for patients with ankylosing spondylitis in daily practice was feasible and helped to increase knowledge and exercise. Although statistically significant, the magnitudes of the clinical benefits in terms of disease activity and physical function were poor.

  10. The prevalence of symptoms associated with pulmonary tuberculosis in randomly selected children from a high burden community

    OpenAIRE

    Marais, B.; Obihara, C; Gie, R.; Schaaf, H; Hesseling, A.; Lombard, C.; Enarson, D; Bateman, E; Beyers, N

    2005-01-01

    Background: Diagnosis of childhood tuberculosis is problematic and symptom based diagnostic approaches are often promoted in high burden settings. This study aimed (i) to document the prevalence of symptoms associated with tuberculosis among randomly selected children living in a high burden community, and (ii) to compare the prevalence of these symptoms in children without tuberculosis to those in children with newly diagnosed tuberculosis.

  11. A home-visiting intervention targeting determinants of infant mental health: the study protocol for the CAPEDP randomized controlled trial in France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tubach Florence

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several studies suggest that the number of risk factors rather than their nature is key to mental health disorders in childhood. Method and design The objective of this multicentre randomized controlled parallel trial (PROBE methodology is to assess the impact in a multi-risk French urban sample of a home-visiting program targeting child mental health and its major determinants. This paper describes the protocol of this study. In the study, pregnant women were eligible if they were: living in the intervention area; able to speak French, less than 26 years old; having their first child; less than 27 weeks of amenorrhea; and if at least one of the following criteria were true: less than twelve years of education, intending to bring up their child without the presence of the child’s father, and 3 low income. Participants were randomized into either the intervention or the control group. All had access to usual care in mother-child centres and community mental health services free of charge in every neighbourhood. Psychologists conducted all home visits, which were planned on a weekly basis from the 7th month of pregnancy and progressively decreasing in frequency until the child’s second birthday. Principle outcome measures included child mental health at 24 months and two major mediating variables for infant mental health: postnatal maternal depression and the quality of the caring environment. A total of 440 families were recruited, of which a subsample of 120 families received specific attachment and caregiver behaviour assessment. Assessment was conducted by an independent assessment team during home visits and, for the attachment study, in a specifically created Attachment Assessment laboratory. Discussion The CAPEDP study is the first large-scale randomised, controlled infant mental health promotion programme to take place in France. A major specificity of the program was that all home visits were conducted by

  12. Clinical impact of pharmacogenetic profiling with a clinical decision support tool in polypharmacy home health patients: A prospective pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Lindsay S; Henderson, John C; Neradilek, Moni B; Moyer, Nicolas A; Ashcraft, Kristine C; Thirumaran, Ranjit K

    2017-01-01

    In polypharmacy patients under home health management, pharmacogenetic testing coupled with guidance from a clinical decision support tool (CDST) on reducing drug, gene, and cumulative interaction risk may provide valuable insights in prescription drug treatment, reducing re-hospitalization and emergency department (ED) visits. We assessed the clinical impact of pharmacogenetic profiling integrating binary and cumulative drug and gene interaction warnings on home health polypharmacy patients. This prospective, open-label, randomized controlled trial was conducted at one hospital-based home health agency between February 2015 and February 2016. Recruitment came from patient referrals to home health at hospital discharge. Eligible patients were aged 50 years and older and taking or initiating treatment with medications with potential or significant drug-gene-based interactions. Subjects (n = 110) were randomized to pharmacogenetic profiling (n = 57). The study pharmacist reviewed drug-drug, drug-gene, and cumulative drug and/or gene interactions using the YouScript® CDST to provide drug therapy recommendations to clinicians. The control group (n = 53) received treatment as usual including pharmacist guided medication management using a standard drug information resource. The primary outcome measure was the number of re-hospitalizations and ED visits at 30 and 60 days after discharge from the hospital. The mean number of re-hospitalizations per patient in the tested vs. untested group was 0.25 vs. 0.38 at 30 days (relative risk (RR), 0.65; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.32-1.28; P = 0.21) and 0.33 vs. 0.70 at 60 days following enrollment (RR, 0.48; 95% CI, 0.27-0.82; P = 0.007). The mean number of ED visits per patient in the tested vs. untested group was 0.25 vs. 0.40 at 30 days (RR, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.31-1.21; P = 0.16) and 0.39 vs. 0.66 at 60 days (RR, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.34-0.99; P = 0.045). Differences in composite outcomes at 60 days (exploratory endpoints) were also

  13. Effects of a Home-Based and Volunteer-Administered Physical Training, Nutritional, and Social Support Program on Malnutrition and Frailty in Older Persons: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luger, Eva; Dorner, Thomas Ernst; Haider, Sandra; Kapan, Ali; Lackinger, Christian; Schindler, Karin

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of a home-based and volunteer-administered physical training and nutritional intervention program compared with social support intervention on nutritional and frailty status in prefrail and frail community-dwelling older persons. This was a randomized controlled trial in which community-dwelling persons (mean age = 83 years) were recruited and randomly assigned to the physical training and nutritional intervention group (PTN, n = 39) and the social support group (SoSu, n = 41). The study was conducted by trained lay nonprofessionals. The community-dwelling older persons in both groups were visited twice a week by trained nonprofessional volunteers (buddies) in Vienna, Austria. Eighty prefrail and frail adults aged 65 years or older. In the PTN group, both the buddies and older persons performed 6 strength exercises within a circuit training session and discussed nutrition-related aspects. The active control group (SoSu) had the opportunity to perform cognitive training in addition to the social contact. Outcome measures as nutritional (Mini Nutritional Assessment long form [MNA-LF]) and frailty status (Frailty Instrument for Primary Care of the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe [SHARE-FI]) were obtained at baseline and after 12 weeks. Significant improvements in the MNA-LF score (1.54 points, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.51-2.56; P = .004) and the SHARE-FI score (-0.71 discrete factor score values, 95% CI -1.07, -0.35; P home-based physical training, nutritional, and social support intervention conducted by nonprofessionals is feasible and can help to tackle malnutrition and frailty in older persons living at home. Furthermore, social support alone also can result in improvement. In particular, older adults with impaired nutritional status at baseline can benefit more from the intervention. Such a home visit program might also have the potential to prevent future health risks and could

  14. Employment Opportunities in Which Knowledge and Skill in Home Economics are Needed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, Anna M.

    To give direction to future program planning, this study was conducted to determine employment opportunities, analyze data to predict job trends, and analyze requirements for jobs in the home economics area. Structured interviews were conducted at 250 randomly selected businesses, industries and homes in seven major population centers of Kentucky.…

  15. Effect of Home Video on the Reading Habit of Literate Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study investigated the effects of home-video on the reading habit of a hundred (100) randomly selected literate house-wives in one of the 752 local government areas of Nigeria. The descriptive survey method was used to field the views of the respondents on the use of home made video with reference to their reading ...

  16. Rapid selection of accessible and cleavable sites in RNA by Escherichia coli RNase P and random external guide sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundblad, Eirik W; Xiao, Gaoping; Ko, Jae-Hyeong; Altman, Sidney

    2008-02-19

    A method of inhibiting the expression of particular genes by using external guide sequences (EGSs) has been improved in its rapidity and specificity. Random EGSs that have 14-nt random sequences are used in the selection procedure for an EGS that attacks the mRNA for a gene in a particular location. A mixture of the random EGSs, the particular target RNA, and RNase P is used in the diagnostic procedure, which, after completion, is analyzed in a gel with suitable control lanes. Within a few hours, the procedure is complete. The action of EGSs designed by an older method is compared with EGSs designed by the random EGS method on mRNAs from two bacterial pathogens.

  17. Long-Term Effects of Individually Tailored Physical Training and Activity on Physical Function, Well-Being and Cognition in Scandinavian Nursing Home Residents: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frändin, Kerstin; Grönstedt, Helena; Helbostad, Jorunn L; Bergland, Astrid; Andresen, Mette; Puggaard, Lis; Harms-Ringdahl, Karin; Granbo, Randi; Hellström, Karin

    2016-01-01

    The preservation of physical functions such as muscle strength, balance and mobility is fundamental to maintaining independence in activities of daily living (ADL). The physical activity level of most nursing home residents is very low, which implies that they are often subject to a decline in health, mobility, autonomy and social contacts and are also at risk of suffering a decline in mental well-being. In a previous study, we demonstrated that transfers, balance and physical activity level improved after 3 months of individually tailored intervention in nursing home residents. To evaluate the long-term effects on ADL, balance function, physical activity level, physical performance, falls-related self-efficacy, well-being and cognitive function 3 months after the completion of our intervention in nursing home residents. The study was a multicenter randomized, controlled clinical trial with a parallel-group design. It was conducted in nursing homes in Sweden, Norway and Denmark, with an intervention period lasting 3 months and a follow-up at 6 months. Initially, 322 nursing home residents with a mean age of 85 years were included; 85 from Sweden, 171 from Norway and 66 from Denmark. Of these, 241 [129 intervention group (IG), 112 control group (CG)] were eligible for the 6-month follow-up tests. The level of dependence in ADL, physical activity level, several dimensions of physical function, well-being, falls-related self-efficacy and cognitive function were assessed with reliable and valid instruments at baseline, immediately after 3 months of intervention and 3 months later at the 6-month follow-up. After 3 months of intervention and an additional period of 3 months without intervention, only the following 2 variables demonstrated significant group differences: social and cognitive function, measured by the Functional Independence Measure n-r, where the IG deteriorated while the CG was almost stable. However, regarding transfers, the IG deteriorated significantly

  18. First outline and baseline data of a randomized, controlled multicenter trial to evaluate the health economic impact of home telemonitoring in chronic heart failure - CardioBBEAT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Reiner; Völler, Heinz; Nagels, Klaus; Bindl, Dominik; Vettorazzi, Eik; Dittmar, Ronny; Wohlgemuth, Walter; Neumann, Till; Störk, Stefan; Bruder, Oliver; Wegscheider, Karl; Nagel, Eckhard; Fleck, Eckart

    2015-08-11

    Evidence that home telemonitoring for patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) offers clinical benefit over usual care is controversial as is evidence of a health economic advantage. Between January 2010 and June 2013, patients with a confirmed diagnosis of CHF were enrolled and randomly assigned to 2 study groups comprising usual care with and without an interactive bi-directional remote monitoring system (Motiva®). The primary endpoint in CardioBBEAT is the Incremental Cost-Effectiveness Ratio (ICER) established by the groups' difference in total cost and in the combined clinical endpoint "days alive and not in hospital nor inpatient care per potential days in study" within the follow-up of 12 months. A total of 621 predominantly male patients were enrolled, whereof 302 patients were assigned to the intervention group and 319 to the control group. Ischemic cardiomyopathy was the leading cause of heart failure. Despite randomization, subjects of the control group were more often in NYHA functional class III-IV, and exhibited peripheral edema and renal dysfunction more often. Additionally, the control and intervention groups differed in heart rhythm disorders. No differences existed regarding risk factor profile, comorbidities, echocardiographic parameters, especially left ventricular and diastolic diameter and ejection fraction, as well as functional test results, medication and quality of life. While the observed baseline differences may well be a play of chance, they are of clinical relevance. Therefore, the statistical analysis plan was extended to include adjusted analyses with respect to the baseline imbalances. CardioBBEAT provides prospective outcome data on both, clinical and health economic impact of home telemonitoring in CHF. The study differs by the use of a high evidence level randomized controlled trial (RCT) design along with actual cost data obtained from health insurance companies. Its results are conducive to informed political and economic

  19. Physical activity and nutrition behavioural outcomes of a home-based intervention program for seniors: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burke Linda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This intervention aimed to ascertain whether a low-cost, accessible, physical activity and nutrition program could improve physical activity and nutrition behaviours of insufficiently active 60–70 year olds residing in Perth, Australia. Methods A 6-month home-based randomised controlled trial was conducted on 478 older adults (intervention, n = 248; control, n = 230 of low to medium socioeconomic status. Both intervention and control groups completed postal questionnaires at baseline and post-program, but only the intervention participants received project materials. A modified fat and fibre questionnaire measured nutritional behaviours, whereas physical activity was measured using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. Generalised estimating equation models were used to assess the repeated outcomes over both time points. Results The final sample consisted of 176 intervention participants and 199 controls (response rate 78.5% with complete data. After controlling for demographic and other confounding factors, the intervention group demonstrated increased participation in strength exercise (p Conclusions A minimal contact, low-cost and home-based physical activity program can positively influence seniors’ physical activity and nutrition behaviours. Trial registration anzctr.org.au Identifier: ACTRN12609000735257

  20. Differential privacy-based evaporative cooling feature selection and classification with relief-F and random forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Trang T; Simmons, W Kyle; Misaki, Masaya; Bodurka, Jerzy; White, Bill C; Savitz, Jonathan; McKinney, Brett A

    2017-09-15

    Classification of individuals into disease or clinical categories from high-dimensional biological data with low prediction error is an important challenge of statistical learning in bioinformatics. Feature selection can improve classification accuracy but must be incorporated carefully into cross-validation to avoid overfitting. Recently, feature selection methods based on differential privacy, such as differentially private random forests and reusable holdout sets, have been proposed. However, for domains such as bioinformatics, where the number of features is much larger than the number of observations p≫n , these differential privacy methods are susceptible to overfitting. We introduce private Evaporative Cooling, a stochastic privacy-preserving machine learning algorithm that uses Relief-F for feature selection and random forest for privacy preserving classification that also prevents overfitting. We relate the privacy-preserving threshold mechanism to a thermodynamic Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution, where the temperature represents the privacy threshold. We use the thermal statistical physics concept of Evaporative Cooling of atomic gases to perform backward stepwise privacy-preserving feature selection. On simulated data with main effects and statistical interactions, we compare accuracies on holdout and validation sets for three privacy-preserving methods: the reusable holdout, reusable holdout with random forest, and private Evaporative Cooling, which uses Relief-F feature selection and random forest classification. In simulations where interactions exist between attributes, private Evaporative Cooling provides higher classification accuracy without overfitting based on an independent validation set. In simulations without interactions, thresholdout with random forest and private Evaporative Cooling give comparable accuracies. We also apply these privacy methods to human brain resting-state fMRI data from a study of major depressive disorder. Code

  1. Virtual reality exercise on a home-based phase III cardiac rehabilitation program, effect on executive function, quality of life and depression, anxiety and stress: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Ágata; Melo, Cristina; Machado, Jorge; Gabriel, Joaquim

    2018-02-01

    To analyse the effect of a six-month home-based phase III cardiac rehabilitation (CR) specific exercise program, performed in a virtual reality (Kinect) or conventional (booklet) environment, on executive function, quality of life and depression, anxiety and stress of subjects with coronary artery disease. A randomized controlled trial was conducted with subjects, who had completed phase II, randomly assigned to intervention group 1 (IG1), whose program encompassed the use of Kinect (n = 11); or intervention group 2 (IG2), a paper booklet (n = 11); or a control group (CG), only subjected to the usual care (n = 11). The three groups received education on cardiovascular risk factors. The assessed parameters, at baseline (M0), 3 (M1) and 6 months (M2), were executive function, control and integration in the implementation of an adequate behaviour in relation to a certain objective, specifically the ability to switch information (Trail Making Test), working memory (Verbal Digit Span test), and selective attention and conflict resolution ability (Stroop test), quality of life (MacNew questionnaire) and depression, anxiety and stress (Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale 21). Descriptive and inferential statistical measures were used, significance level was set at .05. The IG1 revealed significant improvements, in the selective attention and conflict resolution ability, in comparison with the CG in the variable difference M0 - M2 (p = .021) and in comparison with the IG2 in the variable difference M1 - M2 and M0 - M2 (p = .001 and p = .002, respectively). No significant differences were found in the quality of life, and depression, anxiety and stress. The virtual reality format had improved selective attention and conflict resolution ability, revealing the potential of CR, specifically with virtual reality exercise, on executive function. Implications for Rehabilitation In cardiac rehabilitation, especially in phase III, it is

  2. Bayesian dose selection design for a binary outcome using restricted response adaptive randomization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinzer, Caitlyn; Martin, Renee; Suarez, Jose I

    2017-09-08

    In phase II trials, the most efficacious dose is usually not known. Moreover, given limited resources, it is difficult to robustly identify a dose while also testing for a signal of efficacy that would support a phase III trial. Recent designs have sought to be more efficient by exploring multiple doses through the use of adaptive strategies. However, the added flexibility may potentially increase the risk of making incorrect assumptions and reduce the total amount of information available across the dose range as a function of imbalanced sample size. To balance these challenges, a novel placebo-controlled design is presented in which a restricted Bayesian response adaptive randomization (RAR) is used to allocate a majority of subjects to the optimal dose of active drug, defined as the dose with the lowest probability of poor outcome. However, the allocation between subjects who receive active drug or placebo is held constant to retain the maximum possible power for a hypothesis test of overall efficacy comparing the optimal dose to placebo. The design properties and optimization of the design are presented in the context of a phase II trial for subarachnoid hemorrhage. For a fixed total sample size, a trade-off exists between the ability to select the optimal dose and the probability of rejecting the null hypothesis. This relationship is modified by the allocation ratio between active and control subjects, the choice of RAR algorithm, and the number of subjects allocated to an initial fixed allocation period. While a responsive RAR algorithm improves the ability to select the correct dose, there is an increased risk of assigning more subjects to a worse arm as a function of ephemeral trends in the data. A subarachnoid treatment trial is used to illustrate how this design can be customized for specific objectives and available data. Bayesian adaptive designs are a flexible approach to addressing multiple questions surrounding the optimal dose for treatment efficacy

  3. A randomized clinical trial of the anti-caries efficacy of 5,000 compared to 1,450 ppm fluoridated toothpaste on root caries lesions in elderly disabled nursing home residents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekstrand, K.R.; Poulsen, J.E.; Hede, B.

    2013-01-01

    months. Elderly disabled residents (n = 176) in 6 nursing homes in the Copenhagen area consented to take part in the study. They were randomly assigned to use one of the two toothpastes. Both groups had their teeth brushed twice a day by the nursing staff. A total of 125 residents completed the study......Root caries is prevalent in elderly disabled nursing home residents in Denmark. This study aimed to compare the effectiveness of tooth brushing with 5,000 versus 1,450 ppm of fluoridated toothpaste (F-toothpaste) for controlling root caries in nursing home residents. The duration of the study was 8...

  4. A home-based, nurse-led health program for postoperative patients with early-stage cervical cancer: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jue; Huang, Jiliang; Zhang, Jun; Li, Yajie

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the effect of a home-based, nurse-led health program on quality of life and family function for postoperative patients with early-stage cervical cancer. 226 cervical cancer patients, from two hospitals between December 2012 and April 2014, were randomly divided into intervention and control groups. Patients in the intervention group received an individual home-based, nurse-led health program (family-care team provision, physiological rehabilitation, emotion-release management, informal social support system, and follow-up monitoring), in addition to conventional nursing education. Patients in the control group only received conventional nursing education. The Functional Assessment Cancer Therapy-Cervix, Female Sexual Function Index, and the Family Adaptability and Cohesion Scale were used for assessment before and after the intervention. After the intervention, significant improvements were found for the quality of life total scores (t=-7.650, p=0.000), sexual function scores (t=-6.465, p=0.000), cohesion scores (t=-8.417, p=0.001) and adaptability scores (t=-10.735, p=0.000) in the intervention group. Moreover, proportions of family types were also improved (χ2 = 17.77, p=0.000). However, for the control group, no significant differences were found except for a decrease in sexual function scores (t = -4.035, p=0.000). Significant differences in change scores between groups were also found for quality of life (F=41.980, p=0.000), Sexual function (F=37.380, p=0.000), cohesion (F=15.268, p=0.000) and adaptability (F=16.998, p=0.000). A home-based, nurse-led health promotion program improves the quality of life, sexual function and family function in postoperative patients with early-stage cervical cancer. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Early home-based group education to support informed decision-making among patients with end-stage renal disease: a multi-centre randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Emma K; Gregoor, Peter J H Smak; Nette, Robert W; van den Dorpel, Marinus A; van Kooij, Anthony; Zietse, Robert; Zuidema, Willij C; Timman, Reinier; Busschbach, Jan J; Weimar, Willem

    2016-05-01

    The aim was to test the effectiveness of early home-based group education on knowledge and communication about renal replacement therapy (RRT). We conducted a randomized controlled trial using a cross-over design among 80 end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. Between T0 and T1 (weeks 1-4) Group 1 received the intervention and Group 2 received standard care. Between T1 and T2 (weeks 5-8) Group 1 received standard care and Group 2 received the intervention. The intervention was a group education session on RRT options held in the patient's home given by social workers. Patients invited members from their social network to attend. Self-report questionnaires were used at T0, T1 and T2 to measure patients' knowledge and communication, and concepts from the Theory of Planned Behaviour such as attitude. Comparable questionnaires were completed pre-post intervention by 229 attendees. Primary RRT was registered up to 2 years post-intervention. Multilevel linear modelling was used to analyse patient data and paired t-tests for attendee data. Statistically significant increases in the primary targets knowledge and communication were found among patients and attendees after receiving the intervention. The intervention also had a significant effect in increasing positive attitude toward living donation and haemodialysis. Of the 80 participants, 49 underwent RRT during follow-up. Of these, 34 underwent a living donor kidney transplant, of which 22 were pre-emptive. Early home-based group education supports informed decision-making regarding primary RRT for ESRD patients and their social networks and may remove barriers to pre-emptive transplantation. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  6. The efficacy of a nutrition education intervention to prevent risk of malnutrition for dependent elderly patients receiving Home Care: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Barrés, Sílvia; García-Barco, Montse; Basora, Josep; Martínez, Teresa; Pedret, Roser; Arija, Victoria

    2017-05-01

    To assess the effect of a nutrition education intervention included in the Home Care Program for caregivers to prevent the increasing risk of malnutrition of dependent patients at risk of malnutrition. Randomized controlled multicenter trial of 6 months of duration and 12 months follow-up. 10 Primary Care Centers, Spain. Patients enrolled in the Home Care Program between January 2010 and March 2012, who were dependent and at risk of malnutrition, older than 65, and had caregivers (n=190). The nurses conducted initial educational intervention sessions for caregivers and then monitored at home every month for 6 months. The nutritional status was assessed using the Mini Nutritional Assessment test (primary outcome), diet, anthropometry, and biochemical parameters (albumin, prealbumin, hemoglobin and cholesterol). Other descriptive and outcome measures were recorded: current medical history, Activities of daily living (Barthel test), cognitive state (Pfeiffer test), and mood status (Yesavage test). All the measures were recorded in a schedule of 0-6-12 months. 173 individuals participated after exclusions (intervention n=101; control n=72). Mean age was 87.8±8.9years, 68.2% were women. Difference were found between the groups for Mini Nutritional Assessment test score change (repeated measures ANOVA, F=10.1; Pintervention improved the Mini Nutritional Assessment test score of the participants in the intervention group. The egg consumption (F=4.1; P=0.018), protein intake (F=3.0; P=0.050), polyunsaturated fatty acid intake (F=5.3; P=0.006), folate (F=3.3; P=0.041) and vitamin E (F=6.4; P=0.002) showed significant group×time interactions. A nutrition education intervention for caregivers halted the tendency of nutritional decline, and reduced the risk of malnutrition of older dependent patients. Clinical Trial Registration-URL: www.clinicaltrials.gov. Identifier: NCT01360775. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Blood transfusion strategy and risk of postoperative delirium in nursing homes residents with hip fracture. A post hoc analysis based on the TRIFE randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blandfort, Sif; Gregersen, Merete; Borris, Lars Carl; Damsgaard, Else Marie

    2017-06-01

    To investigate whether a liberal blood transfusion strategy [Hb levels ≥11.3 g/dL (7 mmol/L)] reduces the risk of postoperative delirium (POD) on day 10, among nursing home residents with hip fracture, compared to a restrictive transfusion strategy [Hb levels ≥9.7 g/dL (6 mmol/L)]. Furthermore, to investigate whether POD influences mortality within 90 days after hip surgery. This is a post hoc analysis based on The TRIFE - a randomized controlled trial. Frail anemic patients from the Orthopedic Surgical Ward at Aarhus University Hospital were enrolled consecutively between January 18, 2010 and June 6, 2013. These patients (aged ≥65 years) had been admitted from nursing homes for unilateral hip fracture surgery. After surgery, 179 patients were included in this study. On the first day of hospitalization, all enrolled patients were examined for cognitive impairment (assessed by MMSE) and delirium (assessed by CAM). Delirium was also assessed on the tenth postoperative day. The prevalence of delirium was 10 % in patients allocated to a liberal blood transfusion strategy (LB) and 21 % in the group with a restrictive blood transfusion strategy (RB). LB prevents development of delirium on day 10, compared to RB, odds ratio 0.41 (95 % CI 0.17-0.96), p = 0.04. Development of POD on day 10 increased the risk of 90-day death, hazard ratio 3.14 (95 % CI 1.72-5.78), p < 0.001. In nursing home residents undergoing surgery for hip fracture, maintaining hemoglobin level above 11.3 g/dL reduces the rate of POD on day 10 compared to a RB. Development of POD is associated with increased mortality.

  8. Generation of Aptamers from A Primer-Free Randomized ssDNA Library Using Magnetic-Assisted Rapid Aptamer Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Shih-Ming; Lai, Ji-Ching; Horng, Horng-Er; Liu, Tu-Chen; Hong, Chin-Yih

    2017-04-01

    Aptamers are oligonucleotides that can bind to specific target molecules. Most aptamers are generated using random libraries in the standard systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX). Each random library contains oligonucleotides with a randomized central region and two fixed primer regions at both ends. The fixed primer regions are necessary for amplifying target-bound sequences by PCR. However, these extra-sequences may cause non-specific bindings, which potentially interfere with good binding for random sequences. The Magnetic-Assisted Rapid Aptamer Selection (MARAS) is a newly developed protocol for generating single-strand DNA aptamers. No repeat selection cycle is required in the protocol. This study proposes and demonstrates a method to isolate aptamers for C-reactive proteins (CRP) from a randomized ssDNA library containing no fixed sequences at 5‧ and 3‧ termini using the MARAS platform. Furthermore, the isolated primer-free aptamer was sequenced and binding affinity for CRP was analyzed. The specificity of the obtained aptamer was validated using blind serum samples. The result was consistent with monoclonal antibody-based nephelometry analysis, which indicated that a primer-free aptamer has high specificity toward targets. MARAS is a feasible platform for efficiently generating primer-free aptamers for clinical diagnoses.

  9. The effect of music therapy on depression and physiological parameters in elderly people living in a Turkish nursing home: a randomized-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gök Ugur, Hacer; Yaman Aktaş, Yeşim; Orak, Oya Sevcan; Saglambilen, Okan; Aydin Avci, İlknur

    2017-12-01

    This study was carried out in an effort to determine the effect of music therapy on depression and physiological parameters in elderly people who were living in a nursing home. The study was a randomized controlled trial. The study sample consisted of 64 elderly people who complied with the criteria of inclusion for the study. The data were collected using the 'Elderly Information Form' and 'Geriatric Depression Scale'. The music group listened to music three days in a week during 8 weeks. The depression levels were assessed at baseline (week 0) and follow-up in the eight week. It was found that the difference between post-test depression scores of the two groups was found to be statistically significant (t = -2.86, p <.01). The mean scores of post-test systolic blood pressure in the music group were found to be significantly lower than those of the control group (t = -3.11, p < .05). It was concluded that music therapy decreased the depression level and systolic blood pressure in elderly people. The study results implies that music therapy can be an effective practice for public health and home care nurses attempting to reduce depression and control physiological parameters of elderly people.

  10. Effectiveness of educational nursing home visits on quality of life, functional status and care dependency in older adults with mobility impairments: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buss, Arne; Wolf-Ostermann, Karin; Dassen, Theo; Lahmann, Nils; Strupeit, Steve

    2016-04-01

    Facilitating and maintaining functional status (FS) and quality of life (QoL) and avoiding care dependency (CD) are and will increasingly become major tasks of nursing. Educational nursing home visits may have positive effects on FS and QoL in older adults. The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of educational home visits on FS, QoL and CD in older adults with mobility impairments. We performed a randomized controlled trial. The study was conducted in the living environments of 123 participants with functional impairments living in Hamburg, Germany. The intervention group received an additional nursing education intervention on mobility and QoL; the control group received care as usual. Data were collected from August 2011 to December 2012 at baseline, 6 months and 12 months of follow-up. The main outcomes were FS (Barthel Index), QoL (WHOQOL-BREF) and CD (Care Dependency Scale). Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and generalized linear models. In total, 113 participants (57 in the intervention and 56 in the control group) were included in the study. The intervention had no statistical significant effect on FS, QoL and CD. The intervention did not show the benefits that we assumed. Further studies on the effects of educational nursing interventions should be performed using different concepts and rigorous research methods. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Great Taste, Less Waste: a cluster-randomized trial using a communications campaign to improve the quality of foods brought from home to school by elementary school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Jeanne P; Folta, Sara C; Eliasziw, Misha; Koch-Weser, Susan; Economos, Christina D; Hubbard, Kristie L; Tanskey, Lindsay A; Wright, Catherine M; Must, Aviva

    2015-05-01

    Great Taste, Less Waste (GTLW), a communications campaign, capitalized on the synergy between healthy eating and eco-friendly behaviors to motivate children to bring more fruits and vegetables and fewer sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) to school. A cluster-randomized trial in Eastern Massachusetts elementary schools in 2011-2012 tested the hypothesis that GTLW would improve the quality of foods from home more than a nutrition-only campaign--Foods 2 Choose (F2C)--or control. Lunch and snack items from home were measured at baseline and 7 months later using digital photography. Mixed linear models compared change in mean servings of fruits, vegetables, and SSBs among groups, and change in mean prevalence of packaging type. Change in prevalence of food items of interest was compared among groups using generalized linear models. Five hundred and eighty-two third and fourth graders from 82 classrooms in 12 schools participated. At follow-up, no significant differences were observed between groups in change in mean servings or change in prevalence of items of interest. No packaging differences were observed. GTLW was well received, but no significant changes were observed in the quality of food brought to school. Whether classrooms are an effective environment for change remains to be explored. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT0157384. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A new multidisciplinary home care telemedicine system to monitor stable chronic human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients: a randomized study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agathe León

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Antiretroviral therapy has changed the natural history of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection in developed countries, where it has become a chronic disease. This clinical scenario requires a new approach to simplify follow-up appointments and facilitate access to healthcare professionals.We developed a new internet-based home care model covering the entire management of chronic HIV-infected patients. This was called Virtual Hospital. We report the results of a prospective randomised study performed over two years, comparing standard care received by HIV-infected patients with Virtual Hospital care. HIV-infected patients with access to a computer and broadband were randomised to be monitored either through Virtual Hospital (Arm I or through standard care at the day hospital (Arm II. After one year of follow up, patients switched their care to the other arm. Virtual Hospital offered four main services: Virtual Consultations, Telepharmacy, Virtual Library and Virtual Community. A technical and clinical evaluation of Virtual Hospital was carried out.Of the 83 randomised patients, 42 were monitored during the first year through Virtual Hospital (Arm I and 41 through standard care (Arm II. Baseline characteristics of patients were similar in the two arms. The level of technical satisfaction with the virtual system was high: 85% of patients considered that Virtual Hospital improved their access to clinical data and they felt comfortable with the videoconference system. Neither clinical parameters [level of CD4+ T lymphocytes, proportion of patients with an undetectable level of viral load (p = 0.21 and compliance levels >90% (p = 0.58] nor the evaluation of quality of life or psychological questionnaires changed significantly between the two types of care.Virtual Hospital is a feasible and safe tool for the multidisciplinary home care of chronic HIV patients. Telemedicine should be considered as an appropriate support service for the management

  13. Effects of a mobility monitoring system on the cost of care in relation to reimbursement at Swiss nursing homes: learnings from a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Mario; Tietz, Rigo; Gattinger, Heidrun; Hantikainen, Virpi; Ott, Stefan

    2017-12-01

    Nursing homes in Switzerland are under pressure to efficiently coordinate staff activities to cover their personnel costs under the care financing system. In this study, the use of a mobility monitoring system accompanied with case conferences was investigated in order to improve sleep quality and estimate the cost benefit of this intervention. In an open two-phase randomized controlled trial at three nursing homes, residents with cognitive impairment were randomly assigned to an intervention group and a control group. In the intervention group, a 10-week period of intensive use of the monitoring system and case conferences led by an advanced nurse practitioner (Phase I) was followed by 3 months of reduced use of the monitoring system and case conferences led by an internal registered nurse (Phase II). In the control group, the monitoring system was only used for data acquisition. Nurses reported the activities with a specifically developed tool. Based on the recorded activities, the cost of care was calculated. The correlating reimbursement per patient was calculated from the care levels in the Swiss reimbursement system. Data from 44 residents was included in the analysis with a linear mixed model. Although analysis revealed no statistically significant effects, results indicate that the use of a monitoring system can guide nurses in organizing their tasks to increase effectiveness. Information systems such as the mobility monitor can help to identify single outliers that do not correspond with the overall situation. In the health care system, problematic individual cases can account for a disproportionally high cost levels. It was shown that information systems can have a significant economic impact in the long run. The study is registered at the German Clinical Trials Register under the Nr. DRKS00006829 .

  14. Effectiveness of home-based cupping massage compared to progressive muscle relaxation in patients with chronic neck pain--a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauche, Romy; Materdey, Svitlana; Cramer, Holger; Haller, Heidemarie; Stange, Rainer; Dobos, Gustav; Rampp, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Chronic neck pain is a major public health problem with very few evidence-based complementary treatment options. This study aimed to test the efficacy of 12 weeks of a partner-delivered home-based cupping massage, compared to the same period of progressive muscle relaxation in patients with chronic non-specific neck pain. Patients were randomly assigned to self-directed cupping massage or progressive muscle relaxation. They were trained and asked to undertake the assigned treatment twice weekly for 12 weeks. Primary outcome measure was the current neck pain intensity (0-100 mm visual analog scale; VAS) after 12 weeks. Secondary outcome measures included pain on motion, affective pain perception, functional disability, psychological distress, wellbeing, health-related quality of life, pressure pain thresholds and adverse events. Sixty one patients (54.1±12.7 years; 73.8%female) were randomized to cupping massage (n = 30) or progressive muscle relaxation (n = 31). After treatment, both groups showed significantly less pain compared to baseline however without significant group differences. Significant effects in favor of cupping massage were only found for wellbeing and pressure pain thresholds. In conclusion, cupping massage is no more effective than progressive muscle relaxation in reducing chronic non-specific neck pain. Both therapies can be easily used at home and can reduce pain to a minimal clinically relevant extent. Cupping massage may however be better than PMR in improving well-being and decreasing pressure pain sensitivity but more studies with larger samples and longer follow-up periods are needed to confirm these results. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01500330.

  15. Effectiveness of Home-Based Cupping Massage Compared to Progressive Muscle Relaxation in Patients with Chronic Neck Pain—A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauche, Romy; Materdey, Svitlana; Cramer, Holger; Haller, Heidemarie; Stange, Rainer; Dobos, Gustav; Rampp, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Chronic neck pain is a major public health problem with very few evidence-based complementary treatment options. This study aimed to test the efficacy of 12 weeks of a partner-delivered home-based cupping massage, compared to the same period of progressive muscle relaxation in patients with chronic non-specific neck pain. Patients were randomly assigned to self-directed cupping massage or progressive muscle relaxation. They were trained and asked to undertake the assigned treatment twice weekly for 12 weeks. Primary outcome measure was the current neck pain intensity (0–100 mm visual analog scale; VAS) after 12 weeks. Secondary outcome measures included pain on motion, affective pain perception, functional disability, psychological distress, wellbeing, health-related quality of life, pressure pain thresholds and adverse events. Sixty one patients (54.1±12.7 years; 73.8%female) were randomized to cupping massage (n = 30) or progressive muscle relaxation (n = 31). After treatment, both groups showed significantly less pain compared to baseline however without significant group differences. Significant effects in favor of cupping massage were only found for wellbeing and pressure pain thresholds. In conclusion, cupping massage is no more effective than progressive muscle relaxation in reducing chronic non-specific neck pain. Both therapies can be easily used at home and can reduce pain to a minimal clinically relevant extent. Cupping massage may however be better than PMR in improving well-being and decreasing pressure pain sensitivity but more studies with larger samples and longer follow-up periods are needed to confirm these results. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01500330 PMID:23762355

  16. Effectiveness of postoperative home-exercise compared with usual care on kinesiophobia and physical activity in spondylolisthesis: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilves, Outi; Häkkinen, Arja; Dekker, Joost; Wahlman, Marko; Tarnanen, Sami; Pekkanen, Liisa; Ylinen, Jari; Kautiainen, Hannu; Neva, Marko

    2017-11-21

    To study the effectiveness of a 12-month exercise therapy on kinesiophobia and physical activity in patients with spondylolisthesis after lumbar spine fusion. Randomized controlled trial. Patients (n = 98) with spondylolisthesis who had undergone lumbar spine fusion. All patients (mean age 59 years) had received lumbar spine fusion surgery and identical postoperative instructions. Three months postoperatively, they were randomized into an exercise group (n = 48) or usual care group (n = 50). The exercise group received 12-month progressive home-based training with regular booster sessions, and the usual care group a single session of physiotherapy instruction. Kinesiophobia was assessed with the Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia (TSK) and physical activity by the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) preoperatively, 3 months after lumbar spine fusion, and at the end of the 12-month intervention. Before the intervention, the median (first quartile; third quartile) of TSK was 32.5 (29.0; 37.0) in the exercise group and 30.0 (25.8; 36.0) in the usual care group, changing to 30.0 (25; 36) in the exercise group and to 30.5 (24; 36.3) in the usual care group (between-group p = 0.17). IPAQ metabolic equivalent minutes per week increased from 1,863 (1,040; 3,042) to 3,190 (1,634; 6,485) in the exercise group and from 2,569 (1,501; 4,075) to 3,590 (1,634; 6,484) in the usual care group (between-group p = 0.92). Progressive 12-month home-exercise starting 3 months postoperatively was not superior to usual care in decreasing kinesiophobia or increasing physical activity in spondylolisthesis.

  17. Feasibility, acceptability and potential effectiveness of Dignity Therapy for older people in care homes: a phase II randomized controlled trial of a brief palliative care psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Sue; Goddard, Cassie; Opio, Diana; Speck, Peter; Higginson, Irene J

    2012-07-01

    A pilot study of Dignity Therapy conducted with hospice patients reported high levels of self-reported benefits of the psychotherapy. To assess the feasibility, acceptability and potential effectiveness of Dignity Therapy to reduce distress in older people in care homes. A randomized controlled open-label trial (ISRCTN37589515). 60 residents aged 65+ with no major cognitive impairment living in care homes in London, UK. Dignity Therapy, a brief palliative care psychotherapy. Potential effectiveness (dignity-related distress, depression, hopefulness, quality of life at baseline and 1 and 8-week follow-up); acceptability (residents' views on self-reported benefits of Dignity Therapy/the Dignity Therapy study); and feasibility (time taken to deliver the intervention). We randomized 60/755 (8%) residents: 29 - control, 31 - intervention. We found no significant differences between groups on measures of potential effectiveness at any time. There was a reduction in dignity-related distress across both groups (p = 0.026). The intervention group outperformed the control group on all the acceptability items at both follow-ups. Effect sizes (Cohen's d) ranged from small (0.25) to large (0.85). These were significant for feeling that Dignity Therapy/the Dignity Therapy study had made their life more meaningful at 2-week follow-up (p = 0.04), and that it would help their families at both follow-ups (p = 0.02 and p = 0.01, respectively). Although it was feasible to deliver the intervention in this setting, it took longer to complete than anticipated. Although Dignity Therapy took longer to deliver than expected, this intervention may be a way of enhancing the end-of-life experiences of residents.

  18. Effectiveness of home-based cupping massage compared to progressive muscle relaxation in patients with chronic neck pain--a randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romy Lauche

    Full Text Available Chronic neck pain is a major public health problem with very few evidence-based complementary treatment options. This study aimed to test the efficacy of 12 weeks of a partner-delivered home-based cupping massage, compared to the same period of progressive muscle relaxation in patients with chronic non-specific neck pain. Patients were randomly assigned to self-directed cupping massage or progressive muscle relaxation. They were trained and asked to undertake the assigned treatment twice weekly for 12 weeks. Primary outcome measure was the current neck pain intensity (0-100 mm visual analog scale; VAS after 12 weeks. Secondary outcome measures included pain on motion, affective pain perception, functional disability, psychological distress, wellbeing, health-related quality of life, pressure pain thresholds and adverse events. Sixty one patients (54.1±12.7 years; 73.8%female were randomized to cupping massage (n = 30 or progressive muscle relaxation (n = 31. After treatment, both groups showed significantly less pain compared to baseline however without significant group differences. Significant effects in favor of cupping massage were only found for wellbeing and pressure pain thresholds. In conclusion, cupping massage is no more effective than progressive muscle relaxation in reducing chronic non-specific neck pain. Both therapies can be easily used at home and can reduce pain to a minimal clinically relevant extent. Cupping massage may however be better than PMR in improving well-being and decreasing pressure pain sensitivity but more studies with larger samples and longer follow-up periods are needed to confirm these results.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01500330.

  19. Assessing the quality of evidence from randomized, controlled drug and nutritional supplement trials conducted among nursing home residents between 1968 and 2004: what can we learn?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Huai Yong

    2009-01-01

    An estimated 1.5 million residents of nursing homes (NH) in the United States were prescribed an average of 7 to 8 medications each month. However, it is unknown which of these prescribed drugs and nutritional supplements have been tested for use among NH residents who often have distinct and complex needs compared with other geriatric patients. This pilot study addresses the quantity and quality of randomized, controlled drug and nutritional supplement trials that have been conducted among NH residents. Using multiple search strategies and review protocol, I assessed the quality of evidence from randomized, controlled drug and nutritional supplement trials that had a parallel-group design, were conducted among NH residents, and were published in English between 1968 and October 2004. Internal validity of the trials was examined by assessing adequately reporting power calculation, drop-outs (completion fraction), randomization and allocation concealment, blind status, and intention-to-treat analysis. External validity of the trials was examined by assessing adequately reporting the sample description, the inclusion and exclusion criteria, the recruitment process, and comorbidities and harm. Relatively few drug and nutritional supplements have been tested among NH residents by well-designed and executed randomized controlled trials (N = 42). The total number of participants (N = 7941) is small. The quality of many trials is poor. Given the limited number and poor quality of existing trials conducted among NH residents in this pilot study, I conclude that there is a limited body of evidence that could be used to establish quality of care standards or pay for performance criteria for drug therapy and nutritional supplements in NH. Long-term care providers face a great challenge in practicing evidence-based medicine in prescribing drugs and nutritional supplements.

  20. Effect of nurse home visits vs. usual care on reducing intimate partner violence in young high-risk pregnant women: a randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamila Mejdoubi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Expectant mothers and mothers of young children are especially vulnerable to intimate partner violence (IPV. The nurse-family partnership (NFP is a home visitation program in the United States effective for the prevention of adverse child health outcomes. Evidence regarding the effect of nurse home visiting on IPV is inconsistent. This study aims to study the effect of VoorZorg, the Dutch NFP, on IPV. METHODS: A random sample of 460 eligible disadvantaged women <26 years, with no previous live births, was randomized. Women in the control group (C; n=223 received usual care; women in the intervention group (I; n=237 received usual care plus nurse home visits periodically during pregnancy and until the child's second birthday. RESULTS: At 32 weeks of pregnancy, women in the intervention group self-reported significantly less IPV victimization than women in the control group in: level 2 psychological aggression (C: 56% vs. I: 39%, physical assault level 1 (C: 58% vs. I: 40% and level 2 (C: 31% vs. I: 20%, and level 1 sexual coercion (C: 16% vs. I: 8%. Furthermore, women in the intervention group reported significantly less IPV perpetration in: level 2 psychological aggression (C: 60% vs. I: 46%, level 1 physical assault (C: 65% vs. I: 52%, and level 1 injury (C: 27% vs. I: 17%. At 24 months after birth, IPV victimization was significantly lower in the intervention group for level 1 physical assault (C: 44% vs. I: 26%, and IPV perpetration was significantly lower for level 1 sexual assault (C: 18% vs. I: 3%. Multilevel analyses showed a significant improvement in IPV victimization and perpetration among women in the intervention group at 24 months after birth. CONCLUSION: VoorZorg, compared with the usual care, is effective in reducing IPV during pregnancy and in the two years after birth among young high-risk women. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Dutch Trial Register NTR854 http://www.trialregister.nl/trialreg/admin/rctview.asp?TC=854.

  1. Need-based nutritional intervention is effective in improving handgrip strength and Barthel Index scores of older people living in a nursing home: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Li-Chin; Tsai, Alan C; Wang, Jiun-Yi

    2015-05-01

    Nutritional status is associated with physical functioning in older people. Protein-energy malnutrition can limit functional performance. This study examined the effectiveness of a "need-based intervention" on improving the physical functioning of older adults living in nursing homes. A 24-week randomized, double-blind, controlled trial. A privately managed geriatric nursing home in Taiwan. Ninety-two persons who were ≥65 years old, ≤25 kg/m(2), >1 month residence, non-bed-ridden, without acute infection, and able to self-feed or receive oral feeding. Qualified participants were stratified by gender and then randomly assigned to either the control group (n=45) or the intervention group (n=47). Each participant in the intervention group would receive a 50 g/day soy-protein-based nutritional supplement when he/she was rated as undernourished, defined as Mini Nutritional Assessment score ≤24 and body mass index ≤24 kg/m(2). The supplement contained 9.5 g protein, 250 kcal energy, and all essential micronutrients. The supplementation would be suspended if either one of the two "at risk" conditions was not met at the next measurement (every 4 weeks). Handgrip strength and Barthel Index were measured at baseline, mid-point (week 12), and end-point (week 24) of the trial. Results were analyzed with Student's t-test and by the Generalized Estimating Equations controlled for nutritional status. The intervention significantly improved (a) handgrip strength of the older adults at weeks 12 and 24, and (b) the overall Barthel Index at week 24 (all pintervention" can be an effective and useful strategy for improving the physical functioning of older adults living in nursing homes, without adverse effects. The results probably are the indirect results of the improved nutritional status. The study highlights the importance of routine screening and timely intervention in geriatric care. The applicability of this need-based strategy to community-living older adults is an

  2. Need-based intervention is an effective strategy for improving the nutritional status of older people living in a nursing home: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Li-Chin; Tsai, Alan C; Wang, Jiun-Yi; Hurng, Baai-Shyun; Hsu, Hui-Chuan; Tsai, Hsin-Jen

    2013-12-01

    Nutrition is a key element in geriatric health. Protein-energy malnutrition is common in institutionalized persons. This study examined the effectiveness of a need-based "routine screening and timely intervention" strategy in improving the nutritional status of persons living in nursing homes. A 24-week randomized, double-blind, controlled trial. A privately managed geriatric nursing home in Taiwan. Ninety-two ≥65-year old persons who were ≤25kg/m(2), >1 month residence, able to self-feed or receive oral feeding, without acute infection and non-bed-ridden. Prospective participants were stratified by gender and then randomly assigned to either the control group (n=45) or the intervention group (n=47). Each subject in the intervention group was given a 50g/day soy-protein-based nutritional supplement if he/she was rated as undernourished according to the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA, score ≤24) and BMI ≤24kg/m(2). The supplement contained 9.5g protein, 250kcal energy and all essential micro-nutrients. The supplementation would be suspended once either one of the "at risk" condition was corrected. Nutritional rating with the MNA took place at baseline and every 4 weeks during the trial. Biochemical indicators were measured at baseline, mid-point (week-12) and end-point (week-24). Results were analyzed with the two-sample t-test, and the generalized estimating equations (GEE) controlled for demographic and health-related variables. Of the 92 subjects, 82 completed the trial; 7 withdrew and 3 died during the trial. Results showed that the need-based intervention was an effective and appropriate strategy for improving the nutritional status of persons at risk of undernourishment. The intervention significantly improved body weight, BMI, mid-arm circumference, calf circumference, and serum albumin and cholesterol concentrations at all intervals (all pintervention did not significantly improve hematocrit, hemoglobin or lymphocyte count status. Results suggest

  3. Testing feedback message framing and comparators to address prescribing of high-risk medications in nursing homes: protocol for a pragmatic, factorial, cluster-randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivers, Noah M; Desveaux, Laura; Presseau, Justin; Reis, Catherine; Witteman, Holly O; Taljaard, Monica K; McCleary, Nicola; Thavorn, Kednapa; Grimshaw, Jeremy M

    2017-07-14

    Audit and feedback (AF) interventions that leverage routine administrative data offer a scalable and relatively low-cost method to improve processes of care. AF interventions are usually designed to highlight discrepancies between desired and actual performance and to encourage recipients to act to address such discrepancies. Comparing to a regional average is a common approach, but more recipients would have a discrepancy if compared to a higher-than-average level of performance. In addition, how recipients perceive and respond to discrepancies may depend on how the feedback itself is framed. We aim to evaluate the effectiveness of different comparators and framing in feedback on high-risk prescribing in nursing homes. This is a pragmatic, 2 × 2 factorial, cluster-randomized controlled trial testing variations in the comparator and framing on the effectiveness of quarterly AF in changing high-risk prescribing in nursing homes in Ontario, Canada. We grouped homes that share physicians into clusters and randomized these clusters into the four experimental conditions. Outcomes will be assessed after 6 months; all primary analyses will be by intention-to-treat. The primary outcome (monthly number of high-risk medications received by each patient) will be analysed using a general linear mixed effects regression model. We will present both four-arm and factorial analyses. With 160 clusters and an average of 350 beds per cluster, assuming no interaction and similar effects for each intervention, we anticipate 90% power to detect an absolute mean difference of 0.3 high-risk medications prescribed. A mixed-methods process evaluation will explore potential mechanisms underlying the observed effects, exploring targeted constructs including intention, self-efficacy, outcome expectations, descriptive norms, and goal prioritization. An economic analysis will examine cost-effectiveness analysis from the perspective of the publicly funded health care system. This protocol

  4. A community-integrated home based depression intervention for older African Americans: descripton of the Beat the Blues randomized trial and intervention costs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gitlin Laura N

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary care is the principle setting for depression treatment; yet many older African Americans in the United States fail to report depressive symptoms or receive the recommended standard of care. Older African Americans are at high risk for depression due to elevated rates of chronic illness, disability and socioeconomic distress. There is an urgent need to develop and test new depression treatments that resonate with minority populations that are hard-to-reach and underserved and to evaluate their cost and cost-effectiveness. Methods/Design Beat the Blues (BTB is a single-blind parallel randomized trial to assess efficacy of a non-pharmacological intervention to reduce depressive symptoms and improve quality of life in 208 African Americans 55+ years old. It involves a collaboration with a senior center whose care management staff screen for depressive symptoms (telephone or in-person using the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9. Individuals screened positive (PHQ-9 ≥ 5 on two separate occasions over 2 weeks are referred to local mental health resources and BTB. Interested and eligible participants who consent receive a baseline home interview and then are randomly assigned to receive BTB immediately or 4 months later (wait-list control. All participants are interviewed at 4 (main study endpoint and 8 months at home by assessors masked to study assignment. Licensed senior center social workers trained in BTB meet with participants at home for up to 10 sessions over 4 months to assess care needs, make referrals/linkages, provide depression education, instruct in stress reduction techniques, and use behavioral activation to identify goals and steps to achieve them. Key outcomes include reduced depressive symptoms (primary, reduced anxiety and functional disability, improved quality of life, and enhanced depression knowledge and behavioral activation (secondary. Fidelity is enhanced through procedure manuals and staff

  5. Effectiveness of Physio Acoustic Sound (PAS therapy in demented nursing home residents with nocturnal restlessness: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Os Arnoldien J

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many older people with neuropsychiatric disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal dementia suffer from sleeping problems and often show nocturnal restlessness. Professionals and informal carers face considerable problems in solving these problems. Attempts to diminish these problems with medication in a safe and responsible manner have proven hardly effective or not effective at all. Therefore, nowadays the focus lies more on non-pharmacological solutions, for example by influencing environmental factors. There are indications that treatment with low-frequency acoustic vibrations, that is Physio Acoustic Sound (PAS therapy, has a positive effect on sleeping problems. Therefore we study the effectiveness of PAS therapy in demented patients with nocturnal restlessness. Methods In a randomized clinical trial, 66 nursing home patients will be divided into two groups: an intervention group and a control group. For both groups nocturnal restlessness will be measured with actiwatches during a period of six weeks. In addition, a sleep diary will be filled in. For the intervention group the baseline will be assessed, in the first two weeks, reflecting the existing situation regarding nocturnal restlessness. In the next two weeks, this group will sleep on a bed identical to their own, but with a mattress containing an in-built PAS device. As soon as the patient is lying in bed, the computer programme inducing the vibrations will be switched on for the duration of 30 min. In the last two weeks, the wash-out period, the measurements of the intervention group are continued, without the PAS intervention. During the total study period, other relevant data of all the implied patients will be recorded systematically and continuously, for example patient characteristics (data from patient files, the type and seriousness of the dementia, occurrence of neuropsychiatric symptoms during the research period, and the occurrence of

  6. Physical activity and nutrition behavioural outcomes of a home-based intervention program for seniors: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Linda; Lee, Andy H; Jancey, Jonine; Xiang, Liming; Kerr, Deborah A; Howat, Peter A; Hills, Andrew P; Anderson, Annie S

    2013-01-31

    This intervention aimed to ascertain whether a low-cost, accessible, physical activity and nutrition program could improve physical activity and nutrition behaviours of insufficiently active 60-70 year olds residing in Perth, Australia. A 6-month home-based randomised controlled trial was conducted on 478 older adults (intervention, n = 248; control, n = 230) of low to medium socioeconomic status. Both intervention and control groups completed postal questionnaires at baseline and post-program, but only the intervention participants received project materials. A modified fat and fibre questionnaire measured nutritional behaviours, whereas physical activity was measured using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. Generalised estimating equation models were used to assess the repeated outcomes over both time points. The final sample consisted of 176 intervention participants and 199 controls (response rate 78.5%) with complete data. After controlling for demographic and other confounding factors, the intervention group demonstrated increased participation in strength exercise (p nutritional behaviours for the intervention group were also evident in terms of fat avoidance (p seniors' physical activity and nutrition behaviours. anzctr.org.au Identifier: ACTRN12609000735257.

  7. A randomized-controlled trial to examine the effectiveness of the 'Home-but not Alone' mobile-health application educational programme on parental outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorey, Shefaly; Lau, Ying/Y; Dennis, Cindy-Lee; Chan, Yah Shih; Tam, Wilson W S; Chan, Yiong Huak

    2017-09-01

    To examine the effectiveness of Home-but not Alone, a postnatal psychoeducational programme delivered via a mobile-health application for parents during the early postpartum period to improve parenting outcomes. The early postpartum period is often a challenging but crucial period for new parents. Supportive educational programmes delivered via mobile-health applications are needed to improve parenting outcomes. A randomized-controlled two-group pre-test and post-test design was adopted. Data were collected over 6 months (December 2015-May 2016) from 250 participants in a tertiary teaching hospital. They were randomly assigned to the intervention (n = 126) or control (n = 124) groups. Parental self-efficacy, social support, postnatal depression and parenting satisfaction were measured using reliable and valid instruments. A linear mixed method analysis was used to compare the percentage change of all outcome variables. The intervention group had statistically significant improvements for parental self-efficacy, social support and parenting satisfaction at 4 weeks postpartum compared with the control group. Postnatal depression scores did not show any significant improvement compared with the control group. The mobile-health application was effective in improving parental self-efficacy, social support and parenting satisfaction. Hence, it should be introduced and carried out in routine care by nurses. Further studies should focus on evaluating the effects of this programme in reducing postnatal depression amongst parents. ISRCTN99092313. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Pilot Study Comparing 2 Oral Rehydration Solutions in Patients With Short Bowel Syndrome Receiving Home Parenteral Nutrition: A Prospective Double-Blind Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurt, Ryan T; Vallumsetla, Nishanth; Edakkanambeth Varayil, Jithinraj; Bonnes, Sara L; Nanda, Sanjeev; Nadeau, Joseph; Mundi, Manpreet S

    2017-12-01

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is a common indication for home parenteral nutrition (HPN). Oral rehydration solutions (ORSs) have the ability to supplement or reduce HPN dependence. However, ORSs have suffered from poor taste profiles, making long-term consumption and compliance unlikely. The goal of the current study was to assess the taste and compliance of 2 ORSs among patients with SBS requiring HPN. All participants with SBS receiving HPN with anticipated duration >3 months were offered enrollment: 31 participants met inclusion criteria; 3 declined enrollment; and 28 were randomized to receive a modified World Health Organization ORS (group A) or a commercially available ORS (DripDrop; group B). Six participants dropped out shortly after randomization (3 in each group) due to poor taste or intolerance. An additional 3 (1 in group A and 2 in group B) discontinued the ORS before the end of the study at 6 months. At the end of the study, 19 remained. The mean taste rating given by the participants was, on a scale of 1-10, 7.3 ± 1.9 for group A and 7.6 ± 1.6 for group B ( P = .61). The mean number of days that ORSs were consumed each week was 6.0 ± 1.3 for group A and 6.6 ± 1 days for group B ( P = .06). Taste rating was not different for both ORSs; however, a significant number of participants did not complete the study.

  9. Intensive client-centred occupational therapy in the home improves older adults' occupational performance. Results from a Danish randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Tove Lise; Andersen, Niels Trolle; Petersen, Kirsten Schultz; Polatajko, Helene; Nielsen, Claus Vinther

    2018-01-12

    There is growing interest in enabling older adults' occupational performance. We tested whether 11 weeks of intensive client-centred occupational therapy (ICC-OT) was superior to usual practice in improving the occupational performance of home-dwelling older adults. An assessor-masked randomized controlled trial among adults 60 + with chronic health issues, who received or applied for homecare services. Recruitment took place September 2012 to April 2014. All participants received practical and personal assistance and meal delivery as needed. In addition, they were randomized to receive either a maximum 22 sessions of occupation-based ICC-OT (N = 59) or to receive usual practice with a maximum three sessions of occupational therapy (N = 60). The primary outcome was self-rated occupational performance assessed with the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM). No important adverse events occurred. ICC-OT was accepted by 46 participants (88%), usual practice by 60 (100%). After 3 months, the ICC-OT-group had improved 1.86 points on COPM performance; the Usual-Practice group had improved 0.61 points. The between-group difference was statistically significant (95% confidence interval 0.50 to 2.02), t-test: p = 0.001. ICC-OT improved older adults' occupational performance more effectively than usual practice. This result may benefit older adults and support programmatic changes.

  10. Long-term efficacy of in-office and at-home bleaching: a 2-year double-blind randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Lidia Yileng; Kose, Carlos; Herrera, Daniel Rodrigo; Reis, Alessandra; Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado

    2012-08-01

    This parallel, double-blind randomized clinical trial evaluated the 2-year bleaching efficacy and sensitivity produced by at-home (AH) and in-office (IO) bleaching therapies. 60 participants with tooth color darker than C2, without restorations in the anterior dentition and older than 18 years old, were randomly allocated into two groups to receive either IO with 35% hydrogen peroxide or AH with 16% carbamide peroxide. Color was recorded at baseline (BA); 1-week (1W); end of the treatment (ET); and 2 years (2Y) after bleaching, using the Vita Classical shade guide. The perception of TS was recorded on a 0-4 scale during and 2Y after bleaching. The variation in shade guide units (deltaSGU) from BA vs. 1W was compared to deltaSGU from BA vs. 2Y using paired t-test. The percentage of subjects who reported TS was evaluated by Fisher's exact test. The intensity of TS was evaluated by a Mann-Whitney test (alpha=0.05). Both bleaching techniques demonstrated equivalent and significant tooth color shade lightening. No significant color rebound occurred after 2Y for both techniques (P= 0.77 and 0.87, for AH and IO respectively). The absolute risk of TS was similar for IO and AH (P= 0.12), however the intensity of TS was significantly higher for IO (P= 0.001). No subjects reported sensitivity after 2Y.

  11. The basic science and mathematics of random mutation and natural selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinman, Alan

    2014-12-20

    The mutation and natural selection phenomenon can and often does cause the failure of antimicrobial, herbicidal, pesticide and cancer treatments selection pressures. This phenomenon operates in a mathematically predictable behavior, which when understood leads to approaches to reduce and prevent the failure of the use of these selection pressures. The mathematical behavior of mutation and selection is derived using the principles given by probability theory. The derivation of the equations describing the mutation and selection phenomenon is carried out in the context of an empirical example. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Long-Term Pain Treatment Did Not Improve Sleep in Nursing Home Patients with Comorbid Dementia and Depression: A 13-Week Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kjersti M. Blytt

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Previous research indicates that pain treatment may improve sleep among nursing home patients. We aimed to investigate the long-term effect of pain treatment on 24-h sleep patterns in patients with comorbid depression and dementia.Design: A 13-week, multicenter, parallel-group, double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial conducted between August 2014 and September 2016.Setting: Long-term patients from 47 nursing homes in Norway.Participants: We included 106 patients with comorbid dementia and depression according to the Mini Mental Status Examination (MMSE and the Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia (CSDD.Intervention: Patients who were not using analgesics were randomized to receive either paracetamol (3 g/day or placebo tablets. Those who already received pain treatment were randomized to buprenorphine transdermal system (maximum 10 μg/h/7 days or placebo transdermal patches.Measurements: Sleep was assessed continuously for 7 days by actigraphy, at baseline and in week 13. Total sleep time (TST, sleep efficiency (SE, sleep onset latency (SOL, wake after sleep onset (WASO, early morning awakening (EMA, and number of wake bouts (NoW were evaluated. In addition, daytime total sleep time (DTS was estimated. Pain was assessed with Mobilization-Observation-Behavior-Intensity-Dementia-2 Pain Scale (MOBID-2.Results: The linear mixed model analyses for TST, SE, SOL, WASO, EMA, NoW and DTS showed no statistically significant differences between patients who received active pain treatment and those who received placebo. Post hoc subgroup analyses showed that there were no statistically significant differences between active treatment and placebo from baseline to week 13 in patients who were in pain (MOBID-2 ≥ 3 at baseline, or in patients who had poor sleep (defined as SE < 85% at baseline. Patients who received active buprenorphine showed an increase in TST and SE compared to those who received active paracetamol

  13. Relationship between selected indoor volatile organic compounds, so-called microbial VOC, and the prevalence of mucous membrane symptoms in single family homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araki, Atsuko [Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Public Health Sciences, Kita 15, Nishi 7, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8638 (Japan); Kawai, Toshio; Eitaki, Yoko; Kanazawa, Ayako [Osaka Occupational Health Service Center, Japan Industrial Safety and Health Association, 2-3-8 Tosahori, Nishi-ku, Osaka 550-0001 (Japan); Morimoto, Kanehisa; Nakayama, Kunio [Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita 565-0871 (Japan); Shibata, Eiji [Aichi Medical University School of Medicine, 21 Yazakokarimata, Nagakute, Aichi 480-1195 (Japan); Tanaka, Masatoshi [Fukushima College, 1 Miyashiro Chigoike, Fukushima 960-0181 (Japan); Takigawa, Tomoko [Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2-5-1 Shikata-cho, Kita-ku, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan); Yoshimura, Takesumi; Chikara, Hisao [Fukuoka Institute of Health and Environmental Sciences, 39 Mukaizano, Dazaifu 818-0135 (Japan); Saijo, Yasuaki [Asahikawa Medical College, 1-1-1 Midorigaoka Higashi 2 jo, Asahikawa 078-8510 (Japan); Kishi, Reiko, E-mail: rkishi@med.hokudai.ac.jp [Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Public Health Sciences, Kita 15, Nishi 7, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8638 (Japan)

    2010-04-15

    Microorganisms are known to produce a range of volatile organic compounds, so-called microbial VOC (MVOC). Chamber studies where humans were exposed to MVOC addressed the acute effects of objective and/or subjective signs of mucosal irritation. However, the effect of MVOC on inhabitants due to household exposure is still unclear. The purpose of this epidemiological study was to measure indoor MVOC levels in single family homes and to evaluate the relationship between exposure to them and sick building syndrome (SBS). All inhabitants of the dwellings were given a self-administered questionnaire with standardized questions to assess their symptoms. Air samples were collected and the concentrations of eight selected compounds in indoor air were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry - selective ion monitoring mode (GC/MS-SIM). The most frequently detected MVOC was 1-pentanol at a detection rate of 78.6% and geometric mean of 0.60 {mu}g/m{sup 3}. Among 620 participants, 120 (19.4%) reported one or more mucous symptoms; irritation of the eyes, nose, airway, or coughing every week (weekly symptoms), and 30 (4.8%) reported that the symptoms were home-related (home-related symptoms). Weekly symptoms were not associated with any of MVOC, whereas significant associations between home-related mucous symptoms and 1-octen-3-ol (per log{sub 10}-unit: odds ratio (OR) 5.6, 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.1 to 14.8) and 2-pentanol (per log{sub 10}-unit: OR 2.3, 95% CI: 1.0 to 4.9) were obtained after adjustment for gender, age, and smoking. Associations between home-related symptoms and 1-octen-3-ol remained after mutual adjustment. However, concentrations of the selected compounds in indoors were lower than the estimated safety level in animal studies. Thus, the statistically significant association between 1-octen-3-ol may be due to a direct effect of the compounds or the associations may be being associated with other offending compounds. Additional studies are needed

  14. Effects of a Psychosocial Intervention on Caregivers of Recently Placed Nursing Home Residents: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    SCHULZ, RICHARD; ROSEN, JULES; KLINGER, JULIE; MUSA, DONALD; CASTLE, NICHOLAS G.; KANE, APRIL; LUSTIG, AMY

    2014-01-01

    Many caregivers continue to provide care and support to their care recipients after institutional placement. A two-group randomized controlled trial was carried out to test the efficacy of a psychosocial intervention for informal caregivers whose care recipients resided in a long-term care facility. The intervention was delivered during the 6 month period following baseline assessment. Follow-up assessments were carried out at 6, 12, and 18 months. Primary outcomes were caregiver depression, anxiety, burden, and complicated grief. Significant time effects were found for all three primary outcomes showing that caregiver depression, anxiety, and burden improved over time. No treatment effects were found for these outcomes. However, complicated grief was significantly lower for caregivers in the treatment condition. PMID:25071302

  15. Novel random peptide libraries displayed on AAV serotype 9 for selection of endothelial cell-directed gene transfer vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varadi, K; Michelfelder, S; Korff, T; Hecker, M; Trepel, M; Katus, H A; Kleinschmidt, J A; Müller, O J

    2012-08-01

    We have demonstrated the potential of random peptide libraries displayed on adeno-associated virus (AAV)2 to select for AAV2 vectors with improved efficiency for cell type-directed gene transfer. AAV9, however, may have advantages over AAV2 because of a lower prevalence of neutralizing antibodies in humans and more efficient gene transfer in vivo. Here we provide evidence that random peptide libraries can be displayed on AAV9 and can be utilized to select for AAV9 capsids redirected to the cell type of interest. We generated an AAV9 peptide display library, which ensures that the displayed peptides correspond to the packaged genomes and performed four consecutive selection rounds on human coronary artery endothelial cells in vitro. This screening yielded AAV9 library capsids with distinct peptide motifs enabling up to 40-fold improved transduction efficiencies compared with wild-type (wt) AAV9 vectors. Incorporating sequences selected from AAV9 libraries into AAV2 capsids could not increase transduction as efficiently as in the AAV9 context. To analyze the potential on endothelial cells in the intact natural vascular context, human umbilical veins were incubated with the selected AAV in situ and endothelial cells were isolated. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis revealed a 200-fold improved transduction efficiency compared with wt AAV9 vectors. Furthermore, AAV9 vectors with targeting sequences selected from AAV9 libraries revealed an increased transduction efficiency in the presence of human intravenous immunoglobulins, suggesting a reduced immunogenicity. We conclude that our novel AAV9 peptide library is functional and can be used to select for vectors for future preclinical and clinical gene transfer applications.

  16. Short-term and long-term effects of a psycho-educational group intervention for family caregivers in palliative home care - results from a randomized control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Maja; Årestedt, Kristofer; Carlander, Ida; Fürst, Carl-Johan; Wengström, Yvonne; Öhlen, Joakim; Alvariza, Anette

    2016-07-01

    Family caregivers in cancer and palliative care often face heavy responsibilities and feel insufficiently prepared for the situation as caregivers. This study evaluates short-term and long-term effects of a psycho-educational group intervention aiming to increase preparedness for family caregiving in specialized palliative home care. The study design was a randomized control trial where family caregivers were allocated either to an intervention or control group. The intervention was delivered as a program including three sessions by health professionals (physician, nurse, and social worker/priest). Family caregivers from 10 specialized palliative home care settings were included. Questionnaires with validated instruments at baseline, upon completion, and 2 months following the intervention were used to measure effects of the intervention. The primary outcome was preparedness for caregiving in family caregivers. In total, 21 intervention programs were delivered, and 119 family caregivers completed all three measurements. The intervention group had significantly increased their preparedness for caregiving in both the short-term and long-term follow-up compared with the control group. The intervention group also reported significantly increased competence for caregiving in short-term but not long. No effects of the intervention were found on rewards for caregiving, caregiver burden, health, anxiety, or depression. The psycho-educational intervention has the potential to be used by health professionals to improve preparedness for caregiving among family caregivers in palliative care both in short and long terms. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Effects of home-based interval walking training on thigh muscle strength and aerobic capacity in female total hip arthroplasty patients: a randomized, controlled pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yutaka Morishima

    Full Text Available Due to the reduced physical activity of patients who have undergone total hip arthroplasty (THA, there are no home-based exercise training regimens for preventing muscle atrophy and aerobic capacity impairment in these patients. We examined whether interval walking training (IWT could prevented these issues. Twenty-eight female patients (∼60 years of age who had undergone THA more than 2 months prior were randomly divided into IWT (n = 14 and control (CNT, n = 14 groups. The IWT subjects trained at a target of 60 min of fast walking at >70% peak aerobic capacity for walking (VO₂peak per wk for 12 wk, while those in the CNT maintained their previous sedentary life during the same period. We measured the energy expenditure of the daily physical activity, except during sleeping and bathing, every minute and every day during the intervention. We also measured the isometric knee extension (FEXT and flexion (FFLX forces, VO₂peak, and anaerobic threshold during the graded cycling exercise (VO₂AT before and after the intervention. All subjects, except for one in IWT, completed the protocol. FFLX increased by 23% on the operated side (P = 0.003 and 14% on the non-operated side of IWT (P = 0.006, while it only increased on the operated side of CNT (P = 0.03. The VO₂peak and VO₂AT in IWT increased by 8% (P = 0.08 and 13% (P = 0.002, respectively, and these changes were significantly higher in the IWT than in CNT group (both, P<0.05. In conclusion, IWT might be an effective home-based training regimen for preventing the muscle atrophy from reduced daily physical activity in THA patients.UMIN-CTR UMIN000013172.

  18. Linking clinic and home: a randomized, controlled clinical effectiveness trial of real-time, wireless blood pressure monitoring for older patients with kidney disease and hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rifkin, Dena E; Abdelmalek, Joseph A; Miracle, Cynthia M; Low, Chai; Barsotti, Ryan; Rios, Phil; Stepnowsky, Carl; Agha, Zia

    2013-02-01

    Older adults with chronic kidney disease have a high rate of uncontrolled hypertension. Home monitoring of blood pressure (BP) is an integral part of management, but requires that patients bring records to clinic visits. Telemonitoring interventions, however, have not targeted older, less technologically-skilled populations. Veterans with stage 3 or greater chronic kidney disease and uncontrolled hypertension were randomized to a novel telemonitoring device pairing a Bluetooth-enabled BP cuff with an Internet-enabled hub, which wirelessly transmitted readings (n=28), or usual care (n=15). Home recordings were reviewed weekly and telemonitoring participants were contacted if BP was above goal. The prespecified primary endpoints were improved data exchange and device acceptability. Secondary endpoint was BP change. Forty-three participants (average age 68 years, 75% white) completed the 6-month study. Average start-of-study BP was 147/78 mmHg. Those in the intervention arm had a median of 29 (IQR 22, 53) transmitted BP readings per month, with 78% continuing to use the device regularly, whereas only 20% of those in the usual care group brought readings to in-person visits. The median number of telephone contacts triggered by the wireless monitoring was 2 (IQR 1, 4) per patient. Both groups had a significant improvement in systolic BP (P<0.05, for both changes); systolic BP fell a median of 13 mmHg in monitored participants compared with 8.5 mmHg in usual care participants (P for comparison 0.31). This low-cost wireless monitoring strategy led to greater sharing of data between patients and clinic and produced a trend toward improvements in BP control over usual care at 6 months.

  19. Effects of aerobic exercise on home-based sleep among overweight and obese men with chronic insomnia symptoms: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xiao; Alén, Markku; Wiklund, Petri; Partinen, Markku; Cheng, Sulin

    2016-09-01

    To determine the effect of a six-month aerobic exercise program on home-based sleep quality among overweight and obese men with chronic insomnia symptoms. Participants were 45 Finnish men (93% had body mass index ≥25) aged 30-65 years, with chronic (≥3 months) insomnia symptoms as classified by the DSM-IV criteria. Participants were randomized into an exercise (n = 24) or control group (n = 21). The exercise group received six-month aerobic exercise intervention with one to five sessions per week of 30-60 minutes duration. The control group was instructed to maintain habitual lifestyle behaviors during the study period. Seven-night home sleep was measured with a piezoelectric bed sensor and sleep diary. Other assessments included the modified Basic Nordic Sleep Questionnaire, a health and behavior questionnaire, physical activity and diet diaries, anthropometry, fat mass, and physical fitness. Analysis of covariance controlling for baseline values, and repeated-measures analysis of variance were implemented for time-by-group comparisons and within-group comparisons, respectively. At six months, the exercise group showed reduced objective sleep onset latency (p = 0.010) and lowered frequency of difficulty initiating sleep (p = 0.021) than controls. Although a time-by-group difference was not significant, exercisers showed shorter objective wake after sleep onset (p = 0.004), reduced subjective nocturnal awakenings (p = 0.010), improved objective sleep efficiency (p sleep quality (p = 0.042) at six months than baseline. A six-month aerobic exercise can improve sleep, mainly by mitigating difficulty of initiating sleep among overweight and obese men with chronic insomnia symptoms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of triple combination therapy with azilsartan/amlodipine/hydrochlorothiazide on office/home blood pressure: a randomized-controlled trial in Japanese essential hypertensive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakugi, Hiromi; Shimizu, Kohei; Sano, Yuhei; Nishiyama, Yuya; Kinugawa, Yoshinobu; Terashio, Souhei

    2017-12-12

    The efficacy and safety of triple therapy with azilsartan (AZI), amlodipine besylate (AML), and hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ) compared with dual therapy with AZI/AML or HCTZ monotherapy were evaluated in Japanese essential hypertensive patients in a double-blinded manner. A total of 353 patients with office blood pressure (BP) of at least 150/95 mmHg were randomized to a 10-week treatment with AZI/AML/HCTZ 20/5/12.5 mg, AZI/AML/HCTZ 20/5/6.25 mg, AZI/AML 20/5 mg, HCTZ 12.5 mg, or HCTZ 6.25 mg. The mean change from baseline in office diastolic/systolic BPs at week 10 was -25.9/-41.4, -24.9/-38.6, and -22.4/-34.5 mmHg in the AZI/AML/HCTZ 20/5/12.5 mg, AZI/AML/HCTZ 20/5/6.25 mg, and AZI/AML 20/5 mg groups, respectively. AZI/AML/HCTZ 20/5/12.5 mg led to a significantly greater reduction in diastolic and systolic BP than the dual therapy. In addition, the change in home diastolic BP measured with telemetry devices showed a significant difference between the two triple therapy groups. The incidences of adverse events except dizziness postural were similar among the treatment groups in the triple therapy groups. Triple therapy with AZI/AML/HCTZ 20/5/12.5 mg shows a greater antihypertensive effect than the dual therapy and has acceptable safety profiles for Japanese essential hypertensive patients. It was also observed that home BP measurement by automated telemetry could detect changes in BP that were not detected in office BP measurement, although further investigation is needed.

  1. [Multicentric prospective randomized and controlled study assessing effectiveness of intravaginal electrostimulation at home compared to usual care in female patients with urinary incontinence and prior perineal reeducation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopès, P; Rimbault, F; Scheffler, M; André, C; Cappelletti, M-C; Marès, P

    2014-11-01

    In order to maintain the benefits of perineal reeducation, patients with stress urinary incontinence need to perform self-retraining exercises of the perineal muscles at home. The aim of this randomized prospective multicentric study is to assess the effectiveness of GYNEFFIK(®), a perineal electrostimulator, during this home-care phase. Two parallel groups of women with stress urinary incontinence (UI) or with mixed UI (composed predominantly of stress UI), improved by physiotherapy, have followed a self-reeducation program, either with electrostimulation sessions (GYNEFFIK(®) or home perineal electrostimulation [HPES] arm) or with usual care (UC) only, without electrostimulation. The comparison of the two groups was based on the rate of women in which the benefit of the initial perineal reeducation was maintained (defined as the ICIQ and Ditrovie scales' score not worsening) at 2, 4 and 6 months. A total of 161 patients were analyzed (76 in the HPES arm and 85 in the UC arm). The therapeutic benefit of the initial perineal reeducation at the last available measure (6 months for a wide majority of patients) was maintained in 81.6% in the HPES arm versus 62.4% in the UC arm (P=0.007). This significant difference reflects a significant improvement both in clinical symptomatology and in quality of life. ICIQ score was improved in 44% of patients of HPES arm while it was improved in 14% of patients of UC arm (P<0.001) and daily number of urine leakage decreased of 1.2 leakage in the HPES arm versus 0.1 leakage in UC arm (P<0.05). Likewise, improvement of quality of life was superior in the HPES arm (48% improvement of Ditrovie score versus 19% in the UC group ; P<0.05). Investigator global impression was more favorable in the HPES arm (clinical improvement in 83% of patients versus 68% in the UC arm). At the last measure (i.e. endpoint), the benefit of initial physiotherapy was considered maintained or improved in all patients of the HPES arm while it was reported

  2. The Jackprot Simulation Couples Mutation Rate with Natural Selection to Illustrate How Protein Evolution Is Not Random

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, Avelina; Bai, Chunyan Y.

    2016-01-01

    Protein evolution is not a random process. Views which attribute randomness to molecular change, deleterious nature to single-gene mutations, insufficient geological time, or population size for molecular improvements to occur, or invoke “design creationism” to account for complexity in molecular structures and biological processes, are unfounded. Scientific evidence suggests that natural selection tinkers with molecular improvements by retaining adaptive peptide sequence. We used slot-machine probabilities and ion channels to show biological directionality on molecular change. Because ion channels reside in the lipid bilayer of cell membranes, their residue location must be in balance with the membrane's hydrophobic/philic nature; a selective “pore” for ion passage is located within the hydrophobic region. We contrasted the random generation of DNA sequence for KcsA, a bacterial two-transmembrane-domain (2TM) potassium channel, from Streptomyces lividans, with an under-selection scenario, the “jackprot,” which predicted much faster evolution than by chance. We wrote a computer program in JAVA APPLET version 1.0 and designed an online interface, The Jackprot Simulation http://faculty.rwu.edu/cbai/JackprotSimulation.htm, to model a numerical interaction between mutation rate and natural selection during a scenario of polypeptide evolution. Winning the “jackprot,” or highest-fitness complete-peptide sequence, required cumulative smaller “wins” (rewarded by selection) at the first, second, and third positions in each of the 161 KcsA codons (“jackdons” that led to “jackacids” that led to the “jackprot”). The “jackprot” is a didactic tool to demonstrate how mutation rate coupled with natural selection suffices to explain the evolution of specialized proteins, such as the complex six-transmembrane (6TM) domain potassium, sodium, or calcium channels. Ancestral DNA sequences coding for 2TM-like proteins underwent nucleotide

  3. The Jackprot Simulation Couples Mutation Rate with Natural Selection to Illustrate How Protein Evolution Is Not Random.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz-Y-Miño C, Guillermo; Espinosa, Avelina; Bai, Chunyan Y

    2011-09-01

    Protein evolution is not a random process. Views which attribute randomness to molecular change, deleterious nature to single-gene mutations, insufficient geological time, or population size for molecular improvements to occur, or invoke "design creationism" to account for complexity in molecular structures and biological processes, are unfounded. Scientific evidence suggests that natural selection tinkers with molecular improvements by retaining adaptive peptide sequence. We used slot-machine probabilities and ion channels to show biological directionality on molecular change. Because ion channels reside in the lipid bilayer of cell membranes, their residue location must be in balance with the membrane's hydrophobic/philic nature; a selective "pore" for ion passage is located within the hydrophobic region. We contrasted the random generation of DNA sequence for KcsA, a bacterial two-transmembrane-domain (2TM) potassium channel, from Streptomyces lividans, with an under-selection scenario, the "jackprot," which predicted much faster evolution than by chance. We wrote a computer program in JAVA APPLET version 1.0 and designed an online interface, The Jackprot Simulation http://faculty.rwu.edu/cbai/JackprotSimulation.htm, to model a numerical interaction between mutation rate and natural selection during a scenario of polypeptide evolution. Winning the "jackprot," or highest-fitness complete-peptide sequence, required cumulative smaller "wins" (rewarded by selection) at the first, second, and third positions in each of the 161 KcsA codons ("jackdons" that led to "jackacids" that led to the "jackprot"). The "jackprot" is a didactic tool to demonstrate how mutation rate coupled with natural selection suffices to explain the evolution of specialized proteins, such as the complex six-transmembrane (6TM) domain potassium, sodium, or calcium channels. Ancestral DNA sequences coding for 2TM-like proteins underwent nucleotide "edition" and gene duplications to generate the 6

  4. Relationship between Staff-Reported Culture Change and Occupancy Rate and Organizational Commitment among Nursing Homes in South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Minhong; Choi, Jae-Sung; Lim, Jinseop; Kim, Young Sun

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to examine culture change in nursing homes in South Korea and to identify the outcomes of culture change implementation. Design and Methods: Data were taken from survey responses from 223 top- or mid-level staff among nursing homes in South Korea that were selected through a proportionate random-stratified sampling method…

  5. Pseudo cluster randomization: a treatment allocation method to minimize contamination and selection bias.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borm, G.F.; Melis, R.J.F.; Teerenstra, S.; Peer, P.G.M.

    2005-01-01

    In some clinical trials, treatment allocation on a patient level is not feasible, and whole groups or clusters of patients are allocated to the same treatment. If, for example, a clinical trial is investigating the efficacy of various patient coaching methods and randomization is done on a patient

  6. The Effect of a Home Delivery Meal Service of Energy- and Protein-Rich Meals on Quality of Life in Malnourished Outpatients Suffering from Lung Cancer: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leedo, Eva; Gade, Josephine; Granov, Sabrina; Mellemgaard, Anders; Klausen, Tobias Wirenfeldt; Rask, Katrine; Astrup, Arne

    2017-04-01

    Undernutrition is prevalent in cancer patients and associated with increased incidence of complications and mortality. We investigated the effects of a home delivery meal service, providing a selection of energy-dense, protein-rich meals, on quality of life (QoL) in malnourished lung cancer patients. Forty lung cancer patients with nutritional risk score ≥3 (NRS-2002) were randomized to control or intervention. The intervention group was offered energy- and protein-rich main meals and snacks, delivered 3 times per week. The control group continued their habitual diet. Primary endpoint, QoL, and secondary endpoints were assessed at baseline, and after 6 and 12 wk. Data on unplanned readmissions, length of hospital stay, and mortality were collected 3 and 6 mo post-intervention. Intervention group improved standard Chair Stand Test (30-s CST) after 6 and 12 wk (P Food delivery service with energy- and protein-rich main meals and snacks can improve lower body strength and performance status in malnourished lung cancer patients.

  7. Classroom Teacher's Adherence to Philosophy and Ethics of Home ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study analyzed and discussed the philosophy and goals of education, evaluating them on how classroom teachers adhere to the ethics of home economics for sustainable development in Anambra state, Nigeria. A descriptive survey design was used and the sample, randomly selected, was made up of two hundred ...

  8. Extramarital affair as correlate of reproductive health and home ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study examined extramarital affair as correlate of reproductive health and home instability among couples in Ibadan, Nigeria. Descriptive survey research design was adopted for the study. Two hundred (200) couples were randomly selected for the study. A self-structured questionnaire was used to collect data for the ...

  9. Home Management and Prevention of Malaria among Under-Five ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The ravaging effect of malaria on children is of concern due to its high mortality and morbidity rates. This study assessed the practices of mothers of under-five children in home management and prevention of malaria. Multistage random sampling technique was used for selection of 837mothers of under-five. The instruments ...

  10. The effectiveness of standardized skin care regimens on skin dryness in nursing home residents: A randomized controlled parallel-group pragmatic trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahnel, Elisabeth; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Trojahn, Carina; Dobos, Gabor; Stroux, Andrea; Garcia Bartels, Natalie; Jahnke, Irina; Lichterfeld-Kottner, Andrea; Neels-Herzmann, Heike; Klasen, Anja; Kottner, Jan

    2017-05-01

    Aged residents of institutional long-term care facilities are at high risk for developing skin and tissue diseases. Besides various common skin problems, dry skin (xerosis cutis) is one of the most frequent skin conditions in this setting. To investigate the effectiveness of two structured skin care regimens in comparison to routine skin care on xerosis cutis in nursing home residents. A multi-center, pragmatic, randomized, controlled, investigator blinded study with three parallel groups. The study was conducted in a random sample of ten out of 291 institutional long-term care facilities of the federal state of Berlin, Germany. Long-term care residents being 65+ years affected by dry skin were included. The residents were allocated into one of three study groups. Two interventional groups used standardized skin care regimens, consisting of a body wash and twice daily applications of leave-on products for eight weeks. The third control group performed skin care as usual. All participating residents were examined at baseline and after 4 and 8 weeks. Xerosis cutis was measured with the Overall Dry Skin score. Instrumental skin barrier measurements were performed at baseline and after 8 weeks. Diaries were used to document washing and skin care frequencies. In total, 133 residents were included and allocated to one of the three groups. Mean age was 83.8 (SD 8.3) years, 65.4% were female and most residents had care levels I (42.9%) or II (42.9%) according to the German Social Code Book XI. Mean Barthel score was 46.8 (SD 24.2) and mean Braden score was 17.6 (SD 3.7). Leg skin areas were drier compared to arms and trunk areas. At the end of the study the Overall Dry Skin scores in the intervention groups were lower compared to the control group. There were statistically significant improvements of skin dryness in both intervention groups compared to the control group over time. The results of this pragmatic trial indicate that structured skin care regimens are effective

  11. Build Better Bones With Exercise: Protocol for a Feasibility Study of a Multicenter Randomized Controlled Trial of 12 Months of Home Exercise in Women With a Vertebral Fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thabane, Lehana; Adachi, Jonathan D.; Ashe, Maureen C.; Bleakney, Robert R.; Braun, E. Anne; Cheung, Angela M.; Fraser, Lisa-Ann; Gibbs, Jenna C.; Hill, Keith D.; Hodsman, Anthony B.; Kendler, David L.; Mittmann, Nicole; Prasad, Sadhana; Scherer, Samuel C.; Wark, John D.; Papaioannou, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    Background Our goal is to conduct a multicenter randomized controlled trial (RCT) to investigate whether exercise can reduce incident fractures compared with no intervention among women aged ≥65 years with a vertebral fracture. Objectives This pilot study will determine the feasibility of recruitment, retention, and adherence for the proposed trial. Design The proposed RCT will be a pilot feasibility study with 1:1 randomization to exercise or attentional control groups. Setting Five Canadian sites (1 community hospital partnered with an academic center and 4 academic hospitals or centers affiliated with an academic center) and 2 Australian centers (1 academic hospital and 1 center for community primary care, geriatric, and rehabilitation services). Participants One hundred sixty women aged ≥65 years with vertebral fracture at 5 Canadian and 2 Australian centers will be recruited. Intervention The Build Better Bones With Exercise (B3E) intervention includes exercise and behavioral counseling, delivered by a physical therapist in 6 home visits over 8 months, and monthly calls; participants are to exercise ≥3 times weekly. Controls will receive equal attention. Measurements Primary outcomes will include recruitment, retention, and adherence. Adherence to exercise will be assessed via calendar diary. Secondary outcomes will include physical function (lower extremity strength, mobility, and balance), posture, and falls. Additional secondary outcomes will include quality of life, pain, fall self-efficacy, behavior change variables, intervention cost, fractures, and adverse events. Analyses of feasibility objectives will be descriptive or based on estimates with 95% confidence intervals, where feasibility will be assessed relative to a priori criteria. Differences in secondary outcomes will be evaluated in intention-to-treat analyses via independent Student t tests, chi-square tests, or logistic regression. The Bonferroni method will be used to adjust the level of

  12. Randomized trial assessing home use of two pregnancy tests for determining early medical abortion outcomes at 3, 7 and 14days after mifepristone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Jennifer; Sheldon, Wendy R; Ngoc, Nguyen Thi Nhu; Winikoff, Beverly; Nga, Nguyen Thi Bach; Martin, Roxanne; Van Thanh, Le; Blumenthal, Paul D

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate the accuracy, feasibility and acceptability of two urine pregnancy tests in assessing abortion outcomes at three time points after mifepristone administration. This randomized trial enrolled women seeking early medical abortion at two hospitals in Vietnam. Investigators randomly allocated participants to at-home administration of a multilevel urine pregnancy test (MLPT) or a high sensitivity urine pregnancy test (HSPT) to assess their abortion outcomes. A baseline test was administered on the same day as mifepristone. Participants performed and interpreted results of pregnancy tests taken 3, 7 and 14days after mifepristone. Ultrasound exam determined continuing pregnancy. Six hundred women enrolled, and 300 received each test. A percentage of 97.4 (584) had follow-up, of whom 13 women had continuing pregnancies. The specificity of MLPT at detecting absence of continuing pregnancy was 63.9%, 90.4% and 97.1% at study day 3, 7 and 14. The specificity of HSPT was 6.0%, 19.8% and 62.2%, respectively. The positive predictive value (PPV) of MLPT at detecting continuing pregnancy was 6.4% at day 3 and rose to 46.7% at day 14. In contrast, the PPV for HSPT was 2.2% at day 3 and rose to 6.5% at day 14. At all three time points, the sensitivity and negative predictive values for both tests were 100.0%. Most women found their assigned tests easy to use and would prefer future home follow-up with a pregnancy test. The MLPT enables women to assess their abortion outcomes more reliably than with HSPT. With MLPT, women can know their outcomes as early as 3 days after mifepristone. Medical abortion service delivery with an MLPT to obtain a baseline (preabortion) human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) estimate and a second follow-up MLPT 1 to 2 weeks later can establish whether there has been a drop in hCG, signifying absence of a continuing pregnancy. Used this way, MLPTs can enable women to assess their abortion status outside of a clinic setting and without serum h

  13. Build better bones with exercise: protocol for a feasibility study of a multicenter randomized controlled trial of 12 months of home exercise in women with a vertebral fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giangregorio, Lora M; Thabane, Lehana; Adachi, Jonathan D; Ashe, Maureen C; Bleakney, Robert R; Braun, E Anne; Cheung, Angela M; Fraser, Lisa-Ann; Gibbs, Jenna C; Hill, Keith D; Hodsman, Anthony B; Kendler, David L; Mittmann, Nicole; Prasad, Sadhana; Scherer, Samuel C; Wark, John D; Papaioannou, Alexandra

    2014-09-01

    Our goal is to conduct a multicenter randomized controlled trial (RCT) to investigate whether exercise can reduce incident fractures compared with no intervention among women aged ≥65 years with a vertebral fracture. This pilot study will determine the feasibility of recruitment, retention, and adherence for the proposed trial. The proposed RCT will be a pilot feasibility study with 1:1 randomization to exercise or attentional control groups. Five Canadian sites (1 community hospital partnered with an academic center and 4 academic hospitals or centers affiliated with an academic center) and 2 Australian centers (1 academic hospital and 1 center for community primary care, geriatric, and rehabilitation services). One hundred sixty women aged ≥65 years with vertebral fracture at 5 Canadian and 2 Australian centers will be recruited. The Build Better Bones With Exercise (B3E) intervention includes exercise and behavioral counseling, delivered by a physical therapist in 6 home visits over 8 months, and monthly calls; participants are to exercise ≥3 times weekly. Controls will receive equal attention. Primary outcomes will include recruitment, retention, and adherence. Adherence to exercise will be assessed via calendar diary. Secondary outcomes will include physical function (lower extremity strength, mobility, and balance), posture, and falls. Additional secondary outcomes will include quality of life, pain, fall self-efficacy, behavior change variables, intervention cost, fractures, and adverse events. Analyses of feasibility objectives will be descriptive or based on estimates with 95% confidence intervals, where feasibility will be assessed relative to a priori criteria. Differences in secondary outcomes will be evaluated in intention-to-treat analyses via independent Student t tests, chi-square tests, or logistic regression. The Bonferroni method will be used to adjust the level of significance for secondary outcomes so the overall alpha level is .05. No

  14. Home-Based Intervention Program to Reduce Food Insecurity in Elderly Populations Using a TV App: Study Protocol of the Randomized Controlled Trial Saúde.Come Senior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Ana Maria; Gregório, Maria João; Gein, Pierre; Eusébio, Mónica; Santos, Maria José; de Sousa, Rute Dinis; Coelho, Pedro S; Mendes, Jorge M; Graça, Pedro; Oliveira, Pedro; Branco, Jaime C; Canhão, Helena

    2017-03-13

    considering that 50% of the target individuals are food insecure (based on INFOFAMÍLIA Survey) (567) and about 50% of those will adhere to the study (282). The randomized controlled trial with the 12-week home-based intervention with a comprehensive program on healthy eating and physical activity delivery is planned to start recruiting participants at the end of 2017. This study will assess the efficacy of this innovative tool (Saúde.Come Senior) for disseminating relevant health information, modifying behaviors, and decreasing food insecurity in an easy, low-cost, and massive way.

  15. Effect of yoga program on executive functions of adolescents dwelling in an orphan home: A randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purohit, Satya Prakash; Pradhan, Balaram

    2017-01-01

    Executive function (EF) is important for physical and mental health of children. Studies have shown that children with poverty and early life stress have reduced EF. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of Yoga program on the EF of orphan adolescents. Seventy two apparently healthy orphan adolescents randomized and allocated into two groups as Yoga group (n = 40; 14 girls, age = 12.69 ± 1.35 yrs) and Wait List Control (WLC) group (n = 32, 13 girls, age = 12.58 ± 1.52 yrs). Yoga group underwent three months of Yoga program in a schedule of 90 min per day, four days per week whereas the WLC group followed the routine activities. They were assessed by Stroop Color-Word Task, Digit Symbol Substitution Test (DSST), Digits Span Test and Trial Making Test (TMT) at the beginning and end of the program. The repeated measures ANOVA showed significant difference in time and group interactions (p < 0.05) for all subtests of Stroop Color-Word Task and Digit Span Test and part-A of TMT whereas there were no significant difference found in DSST and TMT (part-B). The post-hoc test with Bonferroni adjustment also showed significant improvements (p < 0.001) within the Yoga group in all test scores while in wrong score of DSST did not exhibit significant reduction. Whereas the WLC group, showed significant improvement (p < 0.05) in Stroop Color, Color-Word score, net score of DSST, Digit Span forward and Digit Span Total. Three months Yoga program was found useful for the young orphan adolescents in improving their executive functions.

  16. Impact of specialist home-based palliative care services in a tertiary oncology set up: a prospective non-randomized observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhiliwal, Sunil R; Muckaden, Maryann

    2015-01-01

    Home-based specialist palliative care services are developed to meet the needs of the patients in advanced stage of cancer at home with physical symptoms and distress. Specialist home care services are intended to improve symptom control and quality of life, enable patients to stay at home, and avoid unnecessary hospital admission. Total 690 new cases registered under home-based palliative care service in the year 2012 were prospectively studied to assess the impact of specialist home-based services using Edmonton symptom assessment scale (ESAS) and other parameters. Out of the 690 registered cases, 506 patients received home-based palliative care. 50.98% patients were cared for at home, 28.85% patients needed hospice referral and 20.15% patients needed brief period of hospitalization. All patients receiving specialist home care had good relief of physical symptoms (P care (OOH) through liaising with local general practitioners; 42.68% received home based bereavement care and 91.66% had good bereavement outcomes. Specialist home-based palliative care improved symptom control, health-related communication and psychosocial support. It promoted increased number of home-based death, appropriate and early hospice referral, and averted needless hospitalization. It improved bereavement outcomes, and caregiver satisfaction.

  17. Impact of specialist home-based palliative care services in a tertiary oncology set up: A prospective non-randomized observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil R Dhiliwal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Home-based specialist palliative care services are developed to meet the needs of the patients in advanced stage of cancer at home with physical symptoms and distress. Specialist home care services are intended to improve symptom control and quality of life, enable patients to stay at home, and avoid unnecessary hospital admission. Materials and Methods: Total 690 new cases registered under home-based palliative care service in the year 2012 were prospectively studied to assess the impact of specialist home-based services using Edmonton symptom assessment scale (ESAS and other parameters. Results: Out of the 690 registered cases, 506 patients received home-based palliative care. 50.98% patients were cared for at home, 28.85% patients needed hospice referral and 20.15% patients needed brief period of hospitalization. All patients receiving specialist home care had good relief of physical symptoms ( P < 0.005. 83.2% patients received out of hours care (OOH through liaising with local general practitioners; 42.68% received home based bereavement care and 91.66% had good bereavement outcomes. Conclusion: Specialist home-based palliative care improved symptom control, health-related communication and psychosocial support. It promoted increased number of home-based death, appropriate and early hospice referral, and averted needless hospitalization. It improved bereavement outcomes, and caregiver satisfaction.

  18. A Comparison Between the Level of Happiness Among the Elderly Living at Home and That of Senior Home Residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The present study was designed to compare the level of happiness among the elderly population living at home with that of senior home residents. Methods & Materials: This was a causative-comparative study. The statistical population consisted of all 60 plus men and women residing at home and senior homes in the city of Tabriz, from whom 100 samples were selected in two groups of 50 individuals (25 females and 25 males using an availability non-random sampling method. The oxford happiness questionnaire was used in order to collect data, which were then analyzed using an independent t-test. Results: Results showed that the level of happiness among the elderly living at home was significantly higher than that of senior home residents. Furthermore, among indicators of happiness, life satisfaction levels, psychological health, positive mood, and efficiency were significantly higher among the elderly living at home. However, there was no significant difference between the two in terms of self-esteem. Conclusion: Findings indicate that, due to better social and family support, the level of happiness among the elderly living at home is significantly higher than that of senior home residents. Conversely, residing at senior homes consequent to financial and family conditions, for those who would otherwise live with family, leads to depressed mood, dissatisfaction with life, and ultimately lack of happiness.

  19. Home Health Compare: Find a Home Health Agency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with " ... widget - Select to show Back to top Footer Home A federal government website managed and paid for ...

  20. Presence of psychoactive substances in oral fluid from randomly selected drivers in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, K. Wiese; Steentoft, A.; Hels, Tove

    2012-01-01

    This roadside study is the Danish part of the EU-project DRUID (Driving under the Influence of Drugs, Alcohol, and Medicines) and included three representative regions in Denmark. Oral fluid samples (n = 3002) were collected randomly from drivers using a sampling scheme stratified by time, season...... of narcotic drugs. It can be concluded that driving under the influence of drugs is as serious a road safety problem as drunk driving.......This roadside study is the Danish part of the EU-project DRUID (Driving under the Influence of Drugs, Alcohol, and Medicines) and included three representative regions in Denmark. Oral fluid samples (n = 3002) were collected randomly from drivers using a sampling scheme stratified by time, season...

  1. Presence of psychoactive substances in oral fluid from randomly selected drivers in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Kirsten Wiese; Steentoft, Anni; Hels, Tove

    2012-01-01

    This roadside study is the Danish part of the EU-project DRUID (Driving under the Influence of Drugs, Alcohol, and Medicines) and included three representative regions in Denmark. Oral fluid samples (n = 3002) were collected randomly from drivers using a sampling scheme stratified by time, season....... It can be concluded that driving under the influence of drugs is as serious a road safety problem as drunk driving.......This roadside study is the Danish part of the EU-project DRUID (Driving under the Influence of Drugs, Alcohol, and Medicines) and included three representative regions in Denmark. Oral fluid samples (n = 3002) were collected randomly from drivers using a sampling scheme stratified by time, season...

  2. Feature selection and classification of mechanical fault of an induction motor using random forest classifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raj Kumar Patel

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Fault detection and diagnosis is the most important technology in condition-based maintenance (CBM system for rotating machinery. This paper experimentally explores the development of a random forest (RF classifier, a recently emerged machine learning technique, for multi-class mechanical fault diagnosis in bearing of an induction motor. Firstly, the vibration signals are collected from the bearing using accelerometer sensor. Parameters from the vibration signal are extracted in the form of statistical features and used as input feature for the classification problem. These features are classified through RF classifiers for four cla