WorldWideScience

Sample records for randomly assigned group

  1. A Search for Alternatives to Random Assignment to Treatment Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halasa, Ofelia

    In a public school setting administrators are frequently under local pressure to make a new project service available to all eligible children. However, comparable control groups for project evaluation are often absent, and although random assignment to treatment groups remains the most systematic method of providing controls, this is not often…

  2. Random Cell Identifiers Assignment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Bestak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite integration of advanced functions that enable Femto Access Points (FAPs to be deployed in a plug-and-play manner, the femtocell concept still cause several opened issues to be resolved. One of them represents an assignment of Physical Cell Identifiers (PCIs to FAPs. This paper analyses a random based assignment algorithm in LTE systems operating in diverse femtocell scenarios. The performance of the algorithm is evaluated by comparing the number of confusions for various femtocell densities, PCI ranges and knowledge of vicinity. Simulation results show that better knowledge of vicinity can significantly reduce the number of confusions events.

  3. Random Assignment of Schools to Groups in the Drug Resistance Strategies Rural Project: Some New Methodological Twists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettigrew, Jonathan; Miller-Day, Michelle; Krieger, Janice L.; Zhou, Jiangxiu; Hecht, Michael L.

    2014-01-01

    Random assignment to groups is the foundation for scientifically rigorous clinical trials. But assignment is challenging in group randomized trials when only a few units (schools) are assigned to each condition. In the DRSR project, we assigned 39 rural Pennsylvania and Ohio schools to three conditions (rural, classic, control). But even with 13 schools per condition, achieving pretest equivalence on important variables is not guaranteed. We collected data on six important school-level variables: rurality, number of grades in the school, enrollment per grade, percent white, percent receiving free/assisted lunch, and test scores. Key to our procedure was the inclusion of school-level drug use data, available for a subset of the schools. Also, key was that we handled the partial data with modern missing data techniques. We chose to create one composite stratifying variable based on the seven school-level variables available. Principal components analysis with the seven variables yielded two factors, which were averaged to form the composite inflate-suppress (CIS) score which was the basis of stratification. The CIS score was broken into three strata within each state; schools were assigned at random to the three program conditions from within each stratum, within each state. Results showed that program group membership was unrelated to the CIS score, the two factors making up the CIS score, and the seven items making up the factors. Program group membership was not significantly related to pretest measures of drug use (alcohol, cigarettes, marijuana, chewing tobacco; smallest p>.15), thus verifying that pretest equivalence was achieved. PMID:23722619

  4. The Random Quadratic Assignment Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Gerald; Shao, Jia; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2011-11-01

    The quadratic assignment problem, QAP, is one of the most difficult of all combinatorial optimization problems. Here, we use an abbreviated application of the statistical mechanics replica method to study the asymptotic behavior of instances in which the entries of at least one of the two matrices that specify the problem are chosen from a random distribution P. Surprisingly, the QAP has not been studied before using the replica method despite the fact that the QAP was first proposed over 50 years ago and the replica method was developed over 30 years ago. We find simple forms for C min and C max , the costs of the minimal and maximum solutions respectively. Notable features of our results are the symmetry of the results for C min and C max and their dependence on P only through its mean and standard deviation, independent of the details of P.

  5. Predicting Satisfaction with Group Work Assignments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdett, Jane; Hastie, Brianne

    2009-01-01

    Universities are increasingly using group based assessment tasks; however, as with work-place teams, such tasks often elicit mixed feelings from participants. This study investigated factors that may predict student satisfaction with group work at university. Final-year business students completed a questionnaire addressing experiences of group…

  6. Sequential multiple assignment randomization trials with enrichment design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Wang, Yuanjia; Zeng, Donglin

    2017-06-01

    Sequential multiple assignment randomization trial (SMART) is a powerful design to study Dynamic Treatment Regimes (DTRs) and allows causal comparisons of DTRs. To handle practical challenges of SMART, we propose a SMART with Enrichment (SMARTER) design, which performs stage-wise enrichment for SMART. SMARTER can improve design efficiency, shorten the recruitment period, and partially reduce trial duration to make SMART more practical with limited time and resource. Specifically, at each subsequent stage of a SMART, we enrich the study sample with new patients who have received previous stages' treatments in a naturalistic fashion without randomization, and only randomize them among the current stage treatment options. One extreme case of the SMARTER is to synthesize separate independent single-stage randomized trials with patients who have received previous stage treatments. We show data from SMARTER allows for unbiased estimation of DTRs as SMART does under certain assumptions. Furthermore, we show analytically that the efficiency gain of the new design over SMART can be significant especially when the dropout rate is high. Lastly, extensive simulation studies are performed to demonstrate performance of SMARTER design, and sample size estimation in a scenario informed by real data from a SMART study is presented. © 2016, The International Biometric Society.

  7. A Bi-Level Optimization Model for Grouping Constrained Storage Location Assignment Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jing; Mei, Yi; Ernst, Andreas T; Li, Xiaodong; Song, Andy

    2016-12-23

    In this paper, a novel bi-level grouping optimization (BIGO) model is proposed for solving the storage location assignment problem with grouping constraint (SLAP-GC). A major challenge in this problem is the grouping constraint which restricts the number of groups each product can have and the locations of items in the same group. In SLAP-GC, the problem consists of two subproblems, one is how to group the items, and the other one is how to assign the groups to locations. It is an arduous task to solve the two subproblems simultaneously. To overcome this difficulty, we propose a BIGO. BIGO optimizes item grouping in the upper level, and uses the lower-level optimization to evaluate each item grouping. Sophisticated fitness evaluation and search operators are designed for both upper and lower level optimization so that the feasibility of solutions can be guaranteed, and the search can focus on promising areas in the search space. Based on the BIGO model, a multistart random search method and a tabu algorithm are proposed. The experimental results on the real-world dataset validate the efficacy of the BIGO model and the advantage of the tabu method over the random search method.

  8. Random walks on reductive groups

    CERN Document Server

    Benoist, Yves

    2016-01-01

    The classical theory of Random Walks describes the asymptotic behavior of sums of independent identically distributed random real variables. This book explains the generalization of this theory to products of independent identically distributed random matrices with real coefficients. Under the assumption that the action of the matrices is semisimple – or, equivalently, that the Zariski closure of the group generated by these matrices is reductive - and under suitable moment assumptions, it is shown that the norm of the products of such random matrices satisfies a number of classical probabilistic laws. This book includes necessary background on the theory of reductive algebraic groups, probability theory and operator theory, thereby providing a modern introduction to the topic.

  9. Groups, graphs and random walks

    CERN Document Server

    Salvatori, Maura; Sava-Huss, Ecaterina

    2017-01-01

    An accessible and panoramic account of the theory of random walks on groups and graphs, stressing the strong connections of the theory with other branches of mathematics, including geometric and combinatorial group theory, potential analysis, and theoretical computer science. This volume brings together original surveys and research-expository papers from renowned and leading experts, many of whom spoke at the workshop 'Groups, Graphs and Random Walks' celebrating the sixtieth birthday of Wolfgang Woess in Cortona, Italy. Topics include: growth and amenability of groups; Schrödinger operators and symbolic dynamics; ergodic theorems; Thompson's group F; Poisson boundaries; probability theory on buildings and groups of Lie type; structure trees for edge cuts in networks; and mathematical crystallography. In what is currently a fast-growing area of mathematics, this book provides an up-to-date and valuable reference for both researchers and graduate students, from which future research activities will undoubted...

  10. Methods and analysis of realizing randomized grouping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Liang-Ping; Bao, Xiao-Lei; Wang, Qi

    2011-07-01

    Randomization is one of the four basic principles of research design. The meaning of randomization includes two aspects: one is to randomly select samples from the population, which is known as random sampling; the other is to randomly group all the samples, which is called randomized grouping. Randomized grouping can be subdivided into three categories: completely, stratified and dynamically randomized grouping. This article mainly introduces the steps of complete randomization, the definition of dynamic randomization and the realization of random sampling and grouping by SAS software.

  11. Effects and cost of glycyrrhizin in the treatment of upper respiratory tract infections in members of the Japanese maritime self-defense force: Preliminary report of a prospective, randomized, double-blind, controlled, parallel-group, alternate-day treatment assignment clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagawa, Youichi; Ogura, Masatsune; Fujimoto, Eita; Shono, Satoshi; Okuda, Eriya

    2004-01-01

    Upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs) account for at least half of all acute illnesses. Specific antiviral therapy has not been developed against most respiratory viruses thought to cause URTIs. The pharmacologic action of glycyrrhizin has been shown to produce anti-inflammatory activity, modulation of the immune system, inhibition of virus growth, and inactivation of viruses. The aim of this study was to assess the tolerability, efficacy, and cost of glycyrrhizin in improving the severity and duration of signs and symptoms of URTIs. The primary end point was tolerability, and the secondary and points included improvement in signs and symptoms of URTI and cost. Members of the Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force (SDF) treated for URTIs from January 2002 to May 2002 in the SDF Etajima Hospital (Hiroshima, Japan) were eligible for this prospective, randomized, double-blind, controlled, parallel-group, alternate-day treatment assignment study. All patients in this study fulfilled the following enrollment criteria: admitted to the hospital on the first arrival day as an outpatient; fever (body temperature women; mean [SD] age, 25.2 [1.5] years) were assigned to the glycyrrhizin group and 269 patients (24 men, 2 women; mean [SD] age, 22.6 [0.9] years) were assigned to the control group. The 2 groups were similar in terms of baseline characteristics. The mean duration of hospitalization was shorter (P = 0.01), the mean maximum body temperature 24 to 48 hours after admission was less (P = 0.05), and the cost of therapy (P = 0.03) was less in the glycyrrhizin group than the control group. No AEs were reported. In this study of hospitalized patients with URTIs, glycyrrhizin therapy was associated with a shorter hospitalization, lower-grade fever, and lower cost of therapy compared with controls, showing that it may be beneficial to patients with URTIs without acute bacterial infections.

  12. Randomized Assignments for Barter Exchanges: Fairness vs Efficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fang, Wenyi; Filos-Ratsikas, Aris; Frederiksen, Søren Kristoffer Stiil

    2015-01-01

    often restrict the maximum allowed cycle-length of the exchange and for randomized algorithms, this imposes constraints of the cycle-length of every realized exchange in their decomposition. We prove that standard fairness properties such as envy-freeness or symmetry are incompatible with even...... the weakest notion of economic efficiency in this setting. On the plus side, we adapt some well-known matching mechanisms to incorporate the restricted cycle constraint and evaluate their performance experimentally on instances of the kidney exchange problem, showing tradeoffs between fairness and efficiency....

  13. Grouped to Achieve: Are There Benefits to Assigning Students to Heterogeneous Cooperative Learning Groups Based on Pre-Test Scores?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werth, Arman Karl

    Cooperative learning has been one of the most widely used instructional practices around the world since the early 1980's. Small learning groups have been in existence since the beginning of the human race. These groups have grown in their variance and complexity overtime. Classrooms are getting more diverse every year and instructors need a way to take advantage of this diversity to improve learning. The purpose of this study was to see if heterogeneous cooperative learning groups based on student achievement can be used as a differentiated instructional strategy to increase students' ability to demonstrate knowledge of science concepts and ability to do engineering design. This study includes two different groups made up of two different middle school science classrooms of 25-30 students. These students were given an engineering design problem to solve within cooperative learning groups. One class was put into heterogeneous cooperative learning groups based on student's pre-test scores. The other class was grouped based on random assignment. The study measured the difference between each class's pre-post gains, student's responses to a group interaction form and interview questions addressing their perceptions of the makeup of their groups. The findings of the study were that there was no significant difference between learning gains for the treatment and comparison groups. There was a significant difference between the treatment and comparison groups in student perceptions of their group's ability to stay on task and manage their time efficiently. Both the comparison and treatment groups had a positive perception of the composition of their cooperative learning groups.

  14. 77 FR 70484 - Preoperational Testing of Onsite Electric Power Systems To Verify Proper Load Group Assignments...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-26

    ... COMMISSION Preoperational Testing of Onsite Electric Power Systems To Verify Proper Load Group Assignments... Power Systems to Verify Proper Load Group Assignments, Electrical Separation, and Redundancy.'' DG-1294... encompass preoperational testing of electrical power systems used to meet current Station Blackout...

  15. Algorithm for generation pseudo-random series with arbitrarily assigned distribution law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    В.С. Єременко

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available  Method for generation pseudo-random series with arbitrarily assigned distribution law has been proposed. The praxis of using proposed method for generation pseudo-random series with anti-modal and approximate to Gaussian distribution law has been investigated.

  16. Heuristic Scheme for Home Circuit Grouping andWavelength Assignment in LOBS-HC Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ximin; Yi, Bo; Tang, Wan; Li, Jingcong

    2014-09-01

    Grouping the Home Circuits (HCs) with the same source is a critical issue of Labeled Optical Burst Switching with Home Circuit (LOBS-HC). To maximize the wavelength utilization in LOBS-HC ring networks, an HC grouping and wavelength assignment scheme, called Longest Path Matching and Graph Coloring (LPMGC), is proposed. LPMGC consists of two phases: grouping and wavelength assignment. First, a heuristic algorithm, named Longest Path Matching (LPM), is proposed to group the HCs according to the longest common path matching between HCs and to make each group as large as possible. And then, Graph Coloring (GC) is introduced to assign wavelengths for HC groups. The numerical results show that the proposed scheme performances better than Complementary HC Assignment (CHA) and some other heuristics in both unidirectional and bidirectional LOBS-HC ring networks in terms of wavelength utilization.

  17. Collaborative group work: effects of group size and assignment structure on learning gain, student satisfaction and perceived participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooloos, Jan G M; Klaassen, Tim; Vereijken, Mayke; Van Kuppeveld, Sascha; Bolhuis, Sanneke; Vorstenbosch, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Collaborative group sessions in Nijmegen include 15 students who work all together on a group assignment. Sometimes, the group is split-up in three and every subgroup elaborates a part of the assignment. At the end, they peer-teach each other. It is believed that the split-up enhances participation and therefore learning gain. To establish the effect of group size and structure of the assignment on the perceived participation, the satisfaction and learning gain of collaborative group sessions. In this study, 27 groups of 15 students were equally divided into: A-group: all 15 students working on the complete assignment. B-group: subgroups of 5 students working on the complete assignment. C-group: subgroups of 5 students working on a smaller part, and peer-teaching each other at the end of the group session. All students took a pre-test, a post-test and a follow-up test and completed a questionnaire. Questionnaires were analyzed with a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post hoc by multiple comparisons. Learning gain was analyzed using a repeated measures ANOVA. A group size effect is observed in favor of working in subgroups. Perceived participation of the students differs between A and B (p ≤ 0.001) and between A and C (p ≤ 0.001), but not between B and C. Also, an assignment effect is found in favor of the smaller assignment combined with peer-teaching. The students' satisfaction differs between A and C (p ≤ 0.003) and between B and C (p ≤ 0.001), but not between A and B. The C-group also shows higher test results (p ≤ 0.043). The students prefer smaller groups as well as smaller assignments including peer-teaching. A possible larger learning gain of this format needs to be re-investigated.

  18. Assignment of grouped exposure levels for trend estimation in a regression analysis of summarized data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kunihiko; Tango, Toshiro

    2010-11-10

    For performing regression analysis of summarized response data containing grouped intervals of exposure, many researchers use pre-assigned doses such as the median values of each interval. However, the trend estimate is considerably sensitive to the choice of the assigned values. In this paper, we propose a method to assign the values to obtain a more accurate regression coefficient applying the likelihood approach. Numerical illustrations and comparisons through simulations showed that the proposed dose assignment can yield better estimates of trend in the regression analysis of two variants than that obtained by the conventional assignment methods such as those that use median values. In particular, for the data of a case-control study, the proposed dose improved the accuracy of the procedures such as that developed by Greenland and Longnecker (1992) compared with the conventional pre-assigned dose. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Dynamic online peer evaluations to improve group assignments in nursing e-learning environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adwan, Jehad

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate the use of online peer evaluation forms for online group activities in improving group project outcomes. The investigator developed and used a web-based Google Forms® self and peer evaluation form of 2 group assignments' rubric for junior and senior nursing students. The form covered elements of the assignments including: research activity, analysis of the literature, writing of report, participation in making of presentation, overall contribution to the project, and participation in the weekly group discussions. Items were rated from 1 (did not contribute) to 5 (outstanding contribution) in addition to NA when one activity did not apply. The self and peer evaluation process was conducted twice: once after group assignment 1 and once after group assignment 2. The group assignments final products were done in the form of VoiceThread online presentations that were shared with the rest of the class reflecting the groups' work on a health informatics topic of interest. Data collected as the students completed self and peer evaluations for group assignments 1 and 2. Also, optional comments regarding member performance were collected to add contextual information in addition to ratings. Students received credit for completing the peer evaluations and the grade for the particular assignment was affected by their performance based on peer evaluations of their contributions. Students' peer evaluations showed in a color-coded spreadsheet which enabled the course faculty to view real time results of students' ratings after each assignment. The faculty provided timely and tailored feedback to groups or individuals as needed, using positive feedback and commending high performance while urging struggling individual students and groups to improve lower ratings in specific areas. Comparing evaluations of both assignments, there were statistically significant improvements among all students. The mean scores of the entire sample were

  20. Study on MAX-MIN Ant System with Random Selection in Quadratic Assignment Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iimura, Ichiro; Yoshida, Kenji; Ishibashi, Ken; Nakayama, Shigeru

    Ant Colony Optimization (ACO), which is a type of swarm intelligence inspired by ants' foraging behavior, has been studied extensively and its effectiveness has been shown by many researchers. The previous studies have reported that MAX-MIN Ant System (MMAS) is one of effective ACO algorithms. The MMAS maintains the balance of intensification and diversification concerning pheromone by limiting the quantity of pheromone to the range of minimum and maximum values. In this paper, we propose MAX-MIN Ant System with Random Selection (MMASRS) for improving the search performance even further. The MMASRS is a new ACO algorithm that is MMAS into which random selection was newly introduced. The random selection is one of the edgechoosing methods by agents (ants). In our experimental evaluation using ten quadratic assignment problems, we have proved that the proposed MMASRS with the random selection is superior to the conventional MMAS without the random selection in the viewpoint of the search performance.

  1. Net Based Examination: Small Group Tutoring, Home Assignments, and Large Group Automatic and Peer Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Karlsson

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with net based examination,tutoring and scaffolding of groups of different sizes: Firstfor very small groups, then for normal sized groups around100 students and finally for very large groups. The threedifferent methods can be applied to internationally basedcourses. Methods which support deep learning throughtutoring, scaffolding, project work and peer learning arealso mentioned.

  2. The utility of empirically assigning ancestry groups in cross-population genetic studies of addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Roseann E; Edwards, Alexis C; Bacanu, Silviu-Alin; Dick, Danielle M; Kendler, Kenneth S; Webb, Bradley T

    2017-08-01

    Given moderate heritability and significant heterogeneity among addiction phenotypes, successful genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are expected to need very large samples. As sample sizes grow, so can genetic diversity leading to challenges in analyzing these data. Methods for empirically assigning individuals to genetically informed ancestry groups are needed. We describe a strategy for empirically assigning ancestry groups in ethnically diverse GWAS data including extensions of principal component analysis (PCA) and population matching through minimum Mahalanobis distance. We apply these methods to data from Spit for Science (S4S): the University Student Survey, a study following college students longitudinally that includes genetic and environmental data on substance use and mental health (n = 7,603). The genetic-based population assignments for S4S were 48.7% European, 22.5% African, 10.4% Americas, 9.2% East Asian, and 9.2% South Asian descent. Self-reported census categories "More than one race" and "Unknown"as well as "Hawaiian/Pacific Islander" and "American-Indian/Native Alaskan" were empirically assigned representing a +9% sample retention over conventional methods. Although there was high concordance between self-reported race and empirical population-match (+.924), there was reduction in variance for most ancestry PCs for genetic-based population assignments. We were able to create more genetically homogenous groups and reduce sample and marker loss through cross-ancestry meta-analysis, potentially increasing power to detect etiologically relevant variation. Our approach provides a framework for empirically assigning genetic ancestry groups which can be applied to other ethnically diverse genetic studies. Given the important public health impact and demonstrable gains in statistical power from studying diverse populations, empirically sound practices for genetic studies are needed. (Am J Addict 2017;26:494-501). © 2017 American Academy of

  3. Lurking on the Internet: A Small-Group Assignment that Puts a Human Face on Psychopathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowman, Joseph; Judge, Abigail M.; Wiss, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Lurking on the Internet aims to put a human face on psychopathology for the abnormal psychology course. Student groups are assigned major diagnostic categories and instructed to search the Internet for discussion forums, individual blogs, or YouTube videos where affected individuals discuss their symptoms and lives. After discussing the ethics of…

  4. Teacher-Child Interaction Training: A Pilot Study With Random Assignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Melanie A; Adelstein, Jonathan S; Miller, Samantha P; Areizaga, Margaret J; Gold, Dylann C; Sanchez, Amanda L; Rothschild, Sara A; Hirsch, Emily; Gudiño, Omar G

    2015-07-01

    Teacher-Child Interaction Training (TCIT), adapted from Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT), is a classroom-based program designed to provide teachers with behavior management skills that foster positive teacher-student relationships and to improve student behavior by creating a more constructive classroom environment. The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate TCIT in more classrooms than previously reported in the literature, with older children than previously reported, using random assignment of classrooms to TCIT or to a no-TCIT control condition and conducting all but two sessions within the classroom to enhance feasibility. Participants included 11 kindergarten and first grade classroom teachers and their 118 students from three urban, public schools in Manhattan, with five classrooms randomly assigned to receive TCIT and six to the no-TCIT control condition. Observations of teacher skill acquisition were conducted before, during, and after TCIT for all 11 teachers, and teacher reports of student behavior were obtained at these same time points. Teacher satisfaction with TCIT was assessed following training. Results suggested that after receiving TCIT, teachers increased rates of positive attention to students' appropriate behavior, decreased rates of negative attention to misbehavior, reported significantly less distress related to student disruptive behavior, and reported high satisfaction with the training program. Our study supports the growing evidence-base suggesting that TCIT is a promising approach for training teachers in positive behavior management strategies and for improving student disruptive behavior in the classroom. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Comparing cluster-level dynamic treatment regimens using sequential, multiple assignment, randomized trials: Regression estimation and sample size considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    NeCamp, Timothy; Kilbourne, Amy; Almirall, Daniel

    2017-08-01

    Cluster-level dynamic treatment regimens can be used to guide sequential treatment decision-making at the cluster level in order to improve outcomes at the individual or patient-level. In a cluster-level dynamic treatment regimen, the treatment is potentially adapted and re-adapted over time based on changes in the cluster that could be impacted by prior intervention, including aggregate measures of the individuals or patients that compose it. Cluster-randomized sequential multiple assignment randomized trials can be used to answer multiple open questions preventing scientists from developing high-quality cluster-level dynamic treatment regimens. In a cluster-randomized sequential multiple assignment randomized trial, sequential randomizations occur at the cluster level and outcomes are observed at the individual level. This manuscript makes two contributions to the design and analysis of cluster-randomized sequential multiple assignment randomized trials. First, a weighted least squares regression approach is proposed for comparing the mean of a patient-level outcome between the cluster-level dynamic treatment regimens embedded in a sequential multiple assignment randomized trial. The regression approach facilitates the use of baseline covariates which is often critical in the analysis of cluster-level trials. Second, sample size calculators are derived for two common cluster-randomized sequential multiple assignment randomized trial designs for use when the primary aim is a between-dynamic treatment regimen comparison of the mean of a continuous patient-level outcome. The methods are motivated by the Adaptive Implementation of Effective Programs Trial which is, to our knowledge, the first-ever cluster-randomized sequential multiple assignment randomized trial in psychiatry.

  6. Causal Effects of Single-Sex Schools on College Entrance Exams and College Attendance: Random Assignment in Seoul High Schools

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Hyunjoon; Behrman, Jere R.; Choi, Jaesung

    2013-01-01

    Despite the voluminous literature on the potentials of single-sex schools, there is no consensus on the effects of single-sex schools because of student selection of school types. We exploit a unique feature of schooling in Seoul—the random assignment of students into single-sex versus coeducational high schools—to assess causal effects of single-sex schools on college entrance exam scores and college attendance. Our validation of the random assignment shows comparable socioeconomic backgroun...

  7. Medical Students' Empathy for Vulnerable Groups: Results From a Survey and Reflective Writing Assignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellbery, Caroline; Saunders, Pamela A; Kureshi, Sarah; Visconti, Adam

    2017-12-01

    As medical education curricula increasingly acknowledge the contributions of the social determinants of health to individual health, new methods of engaging students in the care of vulnerable groups are needed. Empathy is one way to connect students with patients, but little is known about how to nurture students' empathy on behalf of populations. This study examined the relationship between individual and social empathy as groundwork for cultivating students' empathy for vulnerable groups. In 2014-2015, first-year medical students completed the Social Empathy Index at the start and end of a two-semester population health course, and they completed a reflective writing assignment exploring the challenges of caring for vulnerable patients. Pre- and posttest mean survey scores were compared, and reflective writing assignments were analyzed for themes concerning social empathy. Data from 130 students were analyzed. Scores for the contextual understanding of systemic barriers domain increased significantly. There was a trend toward increased cumulative social empathy scores that did not reach statistical significance. Students' essays revealed three themes relating to individual empathy as the foundation for social empathy; civic and moral obligations; and the role of institutional practices in caring for vulnerable groups. This study extends understanding of empathy beyond care for the individual to include care for vulnerable groups. Thus, social empathy may function as a valuable concept in developing curricula to support students' commitment to care for the underserved. Educators first need to address the many barriers students cited that impede both individual and social empathy.

  8. Randomized trial of group musi therapy with Chinese prisoners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Xi Jing; Hannibal, Niels; Gold, Christian

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of group music therapy on improving anxiety, depression, and self-esteem in Chinese prisoners. Two hundred male prisoners were randomly assigned to music therapy (n = 100) or standard care (n = 100). The music therapy had 20 sessions of group therapy compared...... to standard care. Anxiety (STAI), depression (BDI) and self-esteem (TSBI, RSI) were measured by standardized scales at baseline, mid-program and post-program. Data were analyzed based on the intention to treat principle. Compared to standard care, anxiety and depression in the music therapy condition...... decreased significantly at mid-test and post-test; self-esteem improved significantly at mid-test (TSBI) and at post-test (TSBI, RSI). Improvements were greater in younger participants (STAI-Trait, RSI) and/or those with a lower level of education (STAI-State, STAI-Trait). Group music therapy seems...

  9. A Genetic Map of Peromyscus with Chromosomal Assignment of Linkage Groups (A Peromyscus Genetic Map)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney-Hunt, Jane; Lewandowski, Adrienne; Glenn, Travis C.; Glenn, Julie L.; Tsyusko, Olga V.; O’Neill, Rachel J.; Brown, Judy; Ramsdell, Clifton M.; Nguyen, Quang; Phan, Tony; Shorter, Kimberly S.; Dewey, Michael J.; Szalai, Gabor; Vrana, Paul B.; Felder, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    The rodent genus Peromyscus is the most numerous and species rich mammalian group in North America. The naturally occurring diversity within this genus allows opportunities to investigate the genetic basis of adaptation, monogamy, behavioral and physiological phenotypes, growth control, genomic imprinting, and disease processes. Increased genomic resources including a high quality genetic map are needed to capitalize on these opportunities. We produced interspecific hybrids between the prairie deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus bairdii) and the oldfield mouse (Peromyscus polionotus) and scored meiotic recombination events in backcross progeny. A genetic map was contructed by genotyping of backcross progeny at 185 gene-based and 155 microsatellite markers representing all autosomes and the X chromosome. Comparison of the constructed genetic map with the molecular maps of Mus and Rattus and consideration of previous results from interspecific reciprocal whole chromosome painting allowed most linkage groups to be unambiguously assigned to specific Peromyscus chromosomes. Based on genomic comparisons, this Peromyscus genetic map covers approximately 83% of the Rattus genome and 79% of the Mus genome. This map supports previous results that the Peromyscus genome is more similar to Rattus than Mus. For example, coverage of the 20 Rattus autosomes and the X chromosome is accomplished with only 28 segments of the Peromyscus map, but coverage of the 19 Mus autosomes and the X chromosome requires 40 chromosomal segments of the Peromyscus map. Furthermore, a single Peromyscus linkage group corresponds to about 91% of the rat and only 76% of the mouse X chromosomes. PMID:24445420

  10. Evaluation of alternative approaches to assign nutrient values to food groups in food frequency questionnaires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subar, A F; Midthune, D; Kulldorff, M; Brown, C C; Thompson, F E; Kipnis, V; Schatzkin, A

    2000-08-01

    Although every food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) requires a nutrient database to produce nutrient intake estimates, it is often unclear how a particular database has been generated. Moreover, alternative methods for constructing a database have not been rigorously evaluated. Using 24-hour recalls from the 1994-1996 Continuing Survey of Food Intake by Individuals, the authors categorized 5,261 individual foods reported by 10,019 adults into 170 food groups consistent with line items on an FFQ. These food groups were used to generate 10 potential nutrient databases for a FFQ that varied by whether the authors 1) used means or medians, 2) did or did not consider age, 3) incorporated collapsing strategies for small age-gender-portion size cells, 4) excluded outliers in a regression, and 5) used weighted median nutrient density x age-gender-portion size-specific median gram weights (Block method). Mean error, mean squared error, and mean absolute error were calculated and compared across methods, with error being the difference in total observed (from recalls for each individual) and total estimated intake (from each of the 10 methods) for seven nutrients. Mean methods for assigning nutrients to food groups were superior to median approaches for all measurements. Among the mean methods, no single variation was consistently better.

  11. The Influence of Randomly Allocated Group Membership when Developing Student Task Work and Team Work Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, Giles Peter

    2012-01-01

    This study explores whether randomly assigning group membership enhances the student learning experience. The paper starts with a critical analysis of the approaches to student learning within higher education and how these approaches conflict with findings from applied psychology on group behaviour. The study adopts a serendipitous qualitative…

  12. Efficacy of meaning-centered group psychotherapy for cancer survivors : a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Spek, N; Vos, J; van Uden-Kraan, C F; Breitbart, W.; Cuijpers, P; Holtmaat, K; Witte, B I; Tollenaar, R.A.E.M.; Verdonck-de Leeuw, I M

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of meaning-centered group psychotherapy for cancer survivors (MCGP-CS) to improve personal meaning, compared with supportive group psychotherapy (SGP) and care as usual (CAU). METHOD: A total of 170 cancer survivors were randomly assigned

  13. Teaching reading to children with neurofibromatosis type 1: a clinical trial with random assignment to different approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barquero, Laura A; Sefcik, Angela M; Cutting, Laurie E; Rimrodt, Sheryl L

    2015-12-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a genetic disorder with a cognitive profile that includes visual-spatial perception deficits and a high incidence of reading disability. There is a paucity of information about how this cognitively complex population responds to mainstream reading interventions. The clinical trial goals were to determine whether children and adolescents with NF1 and reading deficits (NF+RD) benefit from mainstream remedial reading programs and whether responsiveness varies with differences in program-related visual-spatial demands. Forty-nine participants (28 males, 21 females; aged 8-14y) with either NF+RD (n=17, 11 males, six females) or idiopathic reading deficit (IRD) (n=32, 17 males, 15 females) were randomly assigned to intensive remedial teaching using one of two multisensory reading programs: one with greater kinesthetic demands and the other with greater visual-spatial demands. Two control groups - wait-list IRD (n=14, 11 males, three females) and typically developing readers (n=26, 13 males, 13 females) - received no treatment. Repeated measures and multivariate ANOVA analyses compared each group's growth in reading achievement from pre- to post-testing. Treated groups showed significant growth whereas untreated groups did not. Comparing treated groups, the IRD group responded equally well to both interventions, whereas the NF+RD group showed a better response to the more kinesthetic approach. Results suggest that multisensory remedial reading teaching that emphasizes kinesthetic demands more than visual-spatial demands is suitable for students with NF+RD. © 2015 Mac Keith Press.

  14. FLAMEnGO: a fuzzy logic approach for methyl group assignment using NOESY and paramagnetic relaxation enhancement data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Fa-An; Shi, Lei; Masterson, Larry R; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2012-01-01

    Building on a recent method by Matthews and co-workers [1], we developed a new and efficient algorithm to assign methyl resonances from sparse and ambiguous NMR data. The new algorithm (FLAMEnGO: Fuzzy Logic Assignment of MEthyl GrOups) uses Monte Carlo sampling in conjunction with fuzzy logic to obtain the assignment of methyl resonances at high fidelity. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the inclusion of paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) data in the assignment strategy increases the percentage of correct assignments with sparse NOE data. Using synthetic tests and experimental data we show that this new approach provides up to ∼80% correct assignments with only 30% of methyl-methyl NOE data. In the experimental case of ubiquitin, PRE data from two spin labeled sites improve the percentage of assigned methyl groups up to ∼91%. This new strategy promises to further expand methyl group NMR spectroscopy to very large macromolecular systems. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Does Family Group Decision Making Affect Child Welfare Outcomes? Findings from a Randomized Control Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berzin, Stephanie Cosner; Cohen, Ed; Thomas, Karen; Dawson, William C.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the evaluation of two family group decision-making programs administered under the California Title IV-E Waiver Demonstration Project. This is the only evaluation using random assignment to examine FGDM. Overall, results did not indicate more positive outcomes for children receiving the intervention, but did indicate that…

  16. Trajectories of Change in University Students' General Views of Group Work Following One Single Group Assignment: Significance of Instructional Context and Multidimensional Aspects of Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wosnitza, Marold; Volet, Simone

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines how distinct trajectories of change in students' general views of group work over the duration of one single group assignment could be explained by multidimensional aspects of their experience and the overall instructional context. Science (336) and Education (377) students involved in a semester-long group assignment…

  17. FLAMEnGO 2.0: an enhanced fuzzy logic algorithm for structure-based assignment of methyl group resonances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Fa-An; Kim, Jonggul; Xia, Youlin; Milligan, Michael; Rowe, Nancy; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2014-08-01

    We present an enhanced version of the FLAMEnGO (Fuzzy Logic Assignment of Methyl Group) software, a structure-based method to assign methyl group resonances in large proteins. FLAMEnGO utilizes a fuzzy logic algorithm coupled with Monte Carlo sampling to obtain a probability-based assignment of the methyl group resonances. As an input, FLAMEnGO requires either the protein X-ray structure or an NMR structural ensemble including data such as methyl-methyl NOESY, paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE), methine-methyl TOCSY data. Version 2.0 of this software (FLAMEnGO 2.0) has a user-friendly graphic interface and presents improved modules that enable the input of partial assignments and additional NMR restraints. We tested the performance of FLAMEnGO 2.0 on maltose binding protein (MBP) as well as the C-subunit of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA-C). FLAMEnGO 2.0 can be used as a standalone method or to assist in the completion of partial resonance assignments and can be downloaded at www.chem.umn.edu/groups/veglia/forms/flamengo2-form.html. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. NMR resonance assignments of the human high mobility group protein HMGA1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchko, Garry W.; Ni, Shuisong; Lourette, Natacha M.; Reeves, Raymond C.; Kennedy, Michael A.

    2007-06-01

    Human HMGA1 is a 107-residue, non-histone chromatin nuclear factor with a wide sphere of influence including embryogenesis, apoptosis, differentiation, cell proliferation, and cancer development (Reeves, 2001). Because of the repetitive nature of the three DNA-binding domains, strings of glutamic acid residues at the C-terminus, and its unstructured nature in the absence of A-T rich regions of DNA and/or other proteins, backbone assignment for HMGA1 was challenging. Especially useful was the HNN experiment (Planchal et al., 2001), a set of truncated HMGA1 constructs, and some high resolution data collected at a ¹H resonance frequency of 900 MHz. Except for absolute assignment of R60 and R86, all 82 amide were assigned to cross peaks in the ¹H-¹⁵N HSQC spectrum and many of the side chain ¹³C and ¹H resonances were assigned (BMRB code xxxx). The intensity of the amide cross peaks for residues E3 – S9 and S64 – K67 were much weaker than the other amide cross peaks in the ¹H-¹⁵N HSQC spectrum suggesting that even in this unstructured protein there are regions experiencing motion different from the molecule as a whole.

  19. It Takes Two Shining Lights to Brighten the Room: Peer Effects with Random Roommate Assignments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liang; Pu, Shi

    2017-01-01

    We used housing assignment data from a college in China to investigate peer effects on college grades. Study results provided some evidence for peer effects in college housing units. First, peer effects through means occurred during both fall and spring semester of the first year in college, with estimated effect much larger than that in previous…

  20. Randomized clinical trial: group counseling based on tinnitus retraining therapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Henry, James A; Loovis, Carl; Montero, Melissa; Kaelin, Christine; Anselmi, Kathryn-Anne; Coombs, Rebecca; Hensley, June; James, Kenneth E

    2007-01-01

    .... We conducted a randomized clinical trial to test the hypothesis that group educational counseling based on TRT principles would effectively treat veterans who have clinically significant tinnitus...

  1. An assessment of health behavior peer effects in Peking University dormitories: a randomized cluster-assignment design for interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Changzheng; Lv, Jun; VanderWeele, Tyler J

    2013-01-01

    Relatively little is known about the peer influence in health behaviors within university dormitory rooms. Moreover, in China, the problem of unhealthy behaviors among university students has not yet been sufficiently recognized. We thus investigated health behavior peer influence in Peking University dormitories utilizing a randomized cluster-assignment design. Cross-sectional in-dormitory survey. Current students from Peking University Health Science Center from April to June, 2009. Self-reported questionnaire on health behaviors: physical activity (including bicycling), dietary intake and tobacco use. Use of bicycle, moderate-intensity exercise, frequency of sweet food and soybean milk intake, frequency of roasted/baked/toasted food intake were behaviors significantly or marginally significantly affected by peer influence. Health behavior peer effects exist within dormitory rooms among university students. This could provide guidance on room assignment, or inform intervention programs. Examining these may demand attention from university administrators and policy makers.

  2. Group theory for embedded random matrix ensembles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kota, V. K. B.

    2015-04-01

    Embedded random matrix ensembles are generic models for describing statistical properties of finite isolated quantum many-particle systems. For the simplest spinless fermion (or boson) systems with say m fermions (or bosons) in N single particle states and interacting with say k-body interactions, we have EGUE(k) [embedded GUE of k-body interactions) with GUE embedding and the embedding algebra is U(N). In this paper, using EGUE(k) representation for a Hamiltonian that is fc-body and an independent EGUE(t) representation for a transition operator that is t-body and employing the embedding U(N) algebra, finite-N formulas for moments up to order four are derived, for the first time, for the transition strength densities (transition strengths multiplied by the density of states at the initial and final energies). In the asymptotic limit, these formulas reduce to those derived for the EGOE version and establish that in general bivariate transition strength densities take bivariate Gaussian form for isolated finite quantum systems. Extension of these results for other types of transition operators and EGUE ensembles with further symmetries are discussed.

  3. Outcome of systemic and analytic group psychotherapy for adult women with history of intrafamilial childhood sexual abuse: a randomized controlled study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lau, M; Kristensen, Ellids

    2007-01-01

    Research suggests that group psychotherapy for adults with a history of child sexual abuse (CSA) is generally beneficial. Only few studies have included random assignment. This study compared the effects of analytic (A) and systemic group psychotherapy (S) on CSA.......Research suggests that group psychotherapy for adults with a history of child sexual abuse (CSA) is generally beneficial. Only few studies have included random assignment. This study compared the effects of analytic (A) and systemic group psychotherapy (S) on CSA....

  4. METHODOLOGY AND CALCULATIONS FOR THE ASSIGNMENT OF WASTE GROUPS FOR THE LARGE UNDERGROUND WASTE STORAGE TANKS AT THE HANFORD SITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WEBER RA

    2009-01-16

    The Hanford Site contains 177 large underground radioactive waste storage tanks (28 double-shell tanks and 149 single-shell tanks). These tanks are categorized into one of three waste groups (A, B, and C) based on their waste and tank characteristics. These waste group assignments reflect a tank's propensity to retain a significant volume of flammable gases and the potential of the waste to release retained gas by a buoyant displacement gas release event. Assignments of waste groups to the 177 double-shell tanks and single-shell tanks, as reported in this document, are based on a Monte Carlo analysis of three criteria. The first criterion is the headspace flammable gas concentration following release of retained gas. This criterion determines whether the tank contains sufficient retained gas such that the well-mixed headspace flammable gas concentration would reach 100% of the lower flammability limit if the entire tank's retained gas were released. If the volume of retained gas is not sufficient to reach 100% of the lower flammability limit, then flammable conditions cannot be reached and the tank is classified as a waste group C tank independent of the method the gas is released. The second criterion is the energy ratio and considers whether there is sufficient supernatant on top of the saturated solids such that gas-bearing solids have the potential energy required to break up the material and release gas. Tanks that are not waste group C tanks and that have an energy ratio < 3.0 do not have sufficient potential energy to break up material and release gas and are assigned to waste group B. These tanks are considered to represent a potential induced flammable gas release hazard, but no spontaneous buoyant displacement flammable gas release hazard. Tanks that are not waste group C tanks and have an energy ratio {ge} 3.0, but that pass the third criterion (buoyancy ratio < 1.0, see below) are also assigned to waste group B. Even though the designation as

  5. METHODOLOGY AND CALCULATIONS FOR THE ASSIGNMENT OF WASTE GROUPS FOR THE LARGE UNDERGROUND WASTE STORAGE TANKS AT THE HANFORD SITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FOWLER KD

    2007-12-27

    This document categorizes each of the large waste storage tanks into one of several categories based on each tank's waste characteristics. These waste group assignments reflect a tank's propensity to retain a significant volume of flammable gases and the potential of the waste to release retained gas by a buoyant displacement event. Revision 7 is the annual update of the calculations of the flammable gas Waste Groups for DSTs and SSTs. The Hanford Site contains 177 large underground radioactive waste storage tanks (28 double-shell tanks and 149 single-shell tanks). These tanks are categorized into one of three waste groups (A, B, and C) based on their waste and tank characteristics. These waste group assignments reflect a tank's propensity to retain a significant volume of flammable gases and the potential of the waste to release retained gas by a buoyant displacement gas release event. Assignments of waste groups to the 177 double-shell tanks and single-shell tanks, as reported in this document, are based on a Monte Carlo analysis of three criteria. The first criterion is the headspace flammable gas concentration following release of retained gas. This criterion determines whether the tank contains sufficient retained gas such that the well-mixed headspace flammable gas concentration would reach 100% of the lower flammability limit if the entire tank's retained gas were released. If the volume of retained gas is not sufficient to reach 100% of the lower flammability limit, then flammable conditions cannot be reached and the tank is classified as a waste group C tank independent of the method the gas is released. The second criterion is the energy ratio and considers whether there is sufficient supernatant on top of the saturated solids such that gas-bearing solids have the potential energy required to break up the material and release gas. Tanks that are not waste group C tanks and that have an energy ratio < 3.0 do not have sufficient

  6. Causal effects of single-sex schools on college entrance exams and college attendance: random assignment in Seoul high schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyunjoon; Behrman, Jere R; Choi, Jaesung

    2013-04-01

    Despite the voluminous literature on the potentials of single-sex schools, there is no consensus on the effects of single-sex schools because of student selection of school types. We exploit a unique feature of schooling in Seoul-the random assignment of students into single-sex versus coeducational high schools-to assess causal effects of single-sex schools on college entrance exam scores and college attendance. Our validation of the random assignment shows comparable socioeconomic backgrounds and prior academic achievement of students attending single-sex schools and coeducational schools, which increases the credibility of our causal estimates of single-sex school effects. The three-level hierarchical model shows that attending all-boys schools or all-girls schools, rather than coeducational schools, is significantly associated with higher average scores on Korean and English test scores. Applying the school district fixed-effects models, we find that single-sex schools produce a higher percentage of graduates who attended four-year colleges and a lower percentage of graduates who attended two-year junior colleges than do coeducational schools. The positive effects of single-sex schools remain substantial, even after we take into account various school-level variables, such as teacher quality, the student-teacher ratio, the proportion of students receiving lunch support, and whether the schools are public or private.

  7. Causal Effects of Single-Sex Schools on College Entrance Exams and College Attendance: Random Assignment in Seoul High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyunjoon; Behrman, Jere R.; Choi, Jaesung

    2012-01-01

    Despite the voluminous literature on the potentials of single-sex schools, there is no consensus on the effects of single-sex schools because of student selection of school types. We exploit a unique feature of schooling in Seoul—the random assignment of students into single-sex versus coeducational high schools—to assess causal effects of single-sex schools on college entrance exam scores and college attendance. Our validation of the random assignment shows comparable socioeconomic backgrounds and prior academic achievement of students attending single-sex schools and coeducational schools, which increases the credibility of our causal estimates of single-sex school effects. The three-level hierarchical model shows that attending all-boys schools or all-girls schools, rather than coeducational schools, is significantly associated with higher average scores on Korean and English test scores. Applying the school district fixed-effects models, we find that single-sex schools produce a higher percentage of graduates who attended four-year colleges and a lower percentage of graduates who attended two-year junior colleges than do coeducational schools. The positive effects of single-sex schools remain substantial, even after we take into account various school-level variables, such as teacher quality, the student-teacher ratio, the proportion of students receiving lunch support, and whether the schools are public or private. PMID:23073751

  8. Learning in the Laboratory: How Group Assignments Affect Motivation and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belanger, John R.

    2016-01-01

    Team projects can optimize educational resources in a laboratory, but also create the potential for social loafing. Allowing students to choose their own groups could increase their motivation to learn and improve academic performance. To test this hypothesis, final grades and feedback from students were compared for the same course in two…

  9. A method for assigning species into groups based on generalized Mahalanobis distance between habitat model coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, C.J.; Heglund, P.J.

    2009-01-01

    Habitat association models are commonly developed for individual animal species using generalized linear modeling methods such as logistic regression. We considered the issue of grouping species based on their habitat use so that management decisions can be based on sets of species rather than individual species. This research was motivated by a study of western landbirds in northern Idaho forests. The method we examined was to separately fit models to each species and to use a generalized Mahalanobis distance between coefficient vectors to create a distance matrix among species. Clustering methods were used to group species from the distance matrix, and multidimensional scaling methods were used to visualize the relations among species groups. Methods were also discussed for evaluating the sensitivity of the conclusions because of outliers or influential data points. We illustrate these methods with data from the landbird study conducted in northern Idaho. Simulation results are presented to compare the success of this method to alternative methods using Euclidean distance between coefficient vectors and to methods that do not use habitat association models. These simulations demonstrate that our Mahalanobis-distance- based method was nearly always better than Euclidean-distance-based methods or methods not based on habitat association models. The methods used to develop candidate species groups are easily explained to other scientists and resource managers since they mainly rely on classical multivariate statistical methods. ?? 2008 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  10. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy and Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy as Treatments for Academic Procrastination: A Randomized Controlled Group Session

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuo; Zhou, Ya; Yu, Shi; Ran, Li-Wen; Liu, Xiang-Ping; Chen, Yu-Fei

    2017-01-01

    Objective: This study tested the efficacy of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), compared with Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT), in alleviating academic procrastination. Method: A total of 60 (53.3% male) undergraduates suffering from academic procrastination were randomly assigned to two treatment groups (ACT and CBT) and a control group.…

  11. Assignment of Colletotrichum coccodes isolates into vegetative compatibility groups using infrared spectroscopy: a step towards practical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman, A; Shufan, E; Lapidot, I; Tsror, L; Moreh, R; Mordechai, S; Huleihel, M

    2015-05-07

    Colletotrichum coccodes (C. coccodes) is a pathogenic fungus that causes anthracnose on tomatoes and black dot disease in potatoes. It is considered as a seed tuber and soil-borne pathogen that is difficult to control. C. coccodes isolates are classified into Vegetative Compatibility Groups (VCGs). Early classification of isolates into VCGs is of great importance for a better understanding of the epidemiology of the disease and improving its control. Moreover, the differentiation among these isolates and the assignment of newly-discovered isolates enable control of the disease at its early stages. Distinguishing between isolates using microbiological or genetic methods is time-consuming and not readily available. Our results show that it is possible to assign the isolates into their VCGs and to classify them at the isolate level with a high success rate using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA).

  12. The effect of device number and role assignment on social group dynamics in location-based learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bianca Clavio; Giakalis, Alexandros Panagiotis; Jørgensen, Nicolai Melgaard

    2016-01-01

    The behavior of being disengaged in group work is commonly defined as social loafing. This disengagement can be reduced by various factors, such as group members having individual accountability in the form of unique tasks. This paper examines social loafing in a collaborative mobile game in groups...... of three users. The game promotes individual accountability in role differentiation on a shared tablet, and these roles are compared to a condition without roles. Another condition tested if a shared tablet would reduce social loafing, compared to individual tablets for each group member. The game...... was tested on 41 students from 7th to 8th grade. Using a tablet each showed significantly more instances of social loafing compared to sharing one. The results show no significant difference for role assignment....

  13. Communication interventions for minimally verbal children with autism: a sequential multiple assignment randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasari, Connie; Kaiser, Ann; Goods, Kelly; Nietfeld, Jennifer; Mathy, Pamela; Landa, Rebecca; Murphy, Susan; Almirall, Daniel

    2014-06-01

    This study tested the effect of beginning treatment with a speech-generating device (SGD) in the context of a blended, adaptive treatment design for improving spontaneous, communicative utterances in school-aged, minimally verbal children with autism. A total of 61 minimally verbal children with autism, aged 5 to 8 years, were randomized to a blended developmental/behavioral intervention (JASP+EMT) with or without the augmentation of a SGD for 6 months with a 3-month follow-up. The intervention consisted of 2 stages. In stage 1, all children received 2 sessions per week for 3 months. Stage 2 intervention was adapted (by increased sessions or adding the SGD) based on the child's early response. The primary outcome was the total number of spontaneous communicative utterances; secondary measures were the total number of novel words and total comments from a natural language sample. Primary aim results found improvements in spontaneous communicative utterances, novel words, and comments that all favored the blended behavioral intervention that began by including an SGD (JASP+EMT+SGD) as opposed to spoken words alone (JASP+EMT). Secondary aim results suggest that the adaptive intervention beginning with JASP+EMT+SGD and intensifying JASP+EMT+SGD for children who were slow responders led to better posttreatment outcomes. Minimally verbal school-aged children can make significant and rapid gains in spoken spontaneous language with a novel, blended intervention that focuses on joint engagement and play skills and incorporates an SGD. Future studies should further explore the tailoring design used in this study to better understand children's response to treatment. Clinical trial registration information-Developmental and Augmented Intervention for Facilitating Expressive Language (CCNIA); http://clinicaltrials.gov/; NCT01013545. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Communication Interventions for Minimally Verbal Children With Autism: Sequential Multiple Assignment Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasari, Connie; Kaiser, Ann; Goods, Kelly; Nietfeld, Jennifer; Mathy, Pamela; Landa, Rebecca; Murphy, Susan; Almirall, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study tested the effect of beginning treatment with a speech-generating device in the context of a blended, adaptive treatment design for improving spontaneous, communicative utterances in school-aged, minimally verbal children with autism. Method Sixty-one minimally verbal children with autism, aged 5 to 8 years, were randomized to a blended developmental/behavioral intervention (JASP+EMT) with or without the augmentation of a speech-generating device (SGD) for 6 months with a 3-month follow-up. The intervention consisted of two stages. In Stage 1 all children received two sessions per week for 3 months. Stage 2 intervention was adapted (increased sessions or adding the SGD) based on the child’s early response. The primary outcome was the total number of spontaneous communicative utterances; secondary measures were total number of novel words and total comments from a natural language sample. Results Primary aim results found improvements in spontaneous communicative utterances, novel words, and comments that all favored the blended behavioral intervention that began by including an SGD (JASP+EMT+SGD) as opposed to spoken words alone (JASP+EMT). Secondary aim results suggest that the adaptive intervention beginning with JASP+EMT+SGD and intensifying JASP+EMT+SGD for children who were slow responders led to better post-treatment outcomes. Conclusion Minimally verbal school-aged children can make significant and rapid gains in spoken spontaneous language with a novel, blended intervention that focuses on joint engagement and play skills and incorporates an SGD. Future studies should further explore the tailoring design used in this study to better understand children’s response to treatment. Clinical trial registration information—Developmental and Augmented Intervention for Facilitating Expressive Language (CCNIA); http://clinicaltrials.gov/; NCT01013545. PMID:24839882

  15. The porcine M blood group system: evidence to suggest assignment of its M1 factor to a new system (P).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojný, J; Schröffel, J; Geldermann, H; Cepica, S

    1994-06-01

    A new allele Maejm and a more precise genetic analysis of the Ml factor previously assigned to the M system are described after screening three generation families (Wild Boar x Pietrain, Meishan x Pietrain) for the M blood group system using a complete set of 13 M reagents. From informative families with proven parental M genotypes it was shown that the Ml antigen is controlled by an allele from another system. We propose to designate this new system P and to change the factor designation from Ml to Pa.

  16. Stereospecific assignments of the isopropyl methyl groups of the membrane protein OmpX in DHPC micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilty, Christian; Wider, Gerhard; Fernández, César; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2003-12-01

    In NMR studies of large molecular structures, the number of conformational constraints based on NOE measurements is typically limited due to the need for partial deuteration. As a consequence, when using selective protonation of peripheral methyl groups on a perdeuterated background, stereospecific assignments of the diastereotopic methyl groups of Val and Leu can have a particularly large impact on the quality of the NMR structure determination. For example, 3D 15N- and 13C-resolved [1H,1H]-NOESY spectra of the E. Coli membrane protein OmpX in mixed micelles with DHPC, which have an overall molecular weight of about 60 kDa, showed that about 50% of all obtainable NOEs involve the diastereotopic methyl groups of Val and Leu. In this paper, we used biosynthetically-directed fractional 13C labeling of OmpX and [13C,1H]-HSQC spectroscopy to obtain stereospecific methyl assignments of Val and Leu in OmpX/DHPC. For practical purposes it is of interest that this data could be obtained without use of a deuterated background, and that combinations of NMR experiments have been found for obtaining the desired information either at a 1H frequency of 500 MHz, or with significantly reduced measuring time on a high-frequency instrument.

  17. Stereospecific assignments of the isopropyl methyl groups of the membrane protein OmpX in DHPC micelles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilty, Christian; Wider, Gerhard; Fernandez, Cesar; Wuethrich, Kurt [Institut fuer Molekularbiologie und Biophysik, Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule Zuerich (Switzerland)], E-mail: wuthrich@mol.biol.ethz.ch

    2003-12-15

    In NMR studies of large molecular structures, the number of conformational constraints based on NOE measurements is typically limited due to the need for partial deuteration. As a consequence, when using selective protonation of peripheral methyl groups on a perdeuterated background, stereospecific assignments of the diastereotopic methyl groups of Val and Leu can have a particularly large impact on the quality of the NMR structure determination. For example, 3D {sup 15}N- and {sup 13}C-resolved [{sup 1}H,{sup 1}H]-NOESY spectra of the E. Coli membrane protein OmpX in mixed micelles with DHPC, which have an overall molecular weight of about 60 kDa, showed that about 50% of all obtainable NOEs involve the diastereotopic methyl groups of Val and Leu. In this paper, we used biosynthetically-directed fractional {sup 13}C labeling of OmpX and [{sup 13}C,{sup 1}H]-HSQC spectroscopy to obtain stereospecific methyl assignments of Val and Leu in OmpX/DHPC. For practical purposes it is of interest that this data could be obtained without use of a deuterated background, and that combinations of NMR experiments have been found for obtaining the desired information either at a {sup 1}H frequency of 500 MHz, or with significantly reduced measuring time on a high-frequency instrument.

  18. Peer Influence on Aggressive Behavior, Smoking, and Sexual Behavior: A Study of Randomly-assigned College Roommates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi; Guo, Guang

    2016-09-01

    Identifying casual peer influence is a long-standing challenge to social scientists. Using data from a natural experiment of randomly-assigned college roommates (N = 2,059), which removes the threat of friend selection, we investigate peer effects on aggressive behavior, smoking, and concurrent sexual partnering. The findings suggest that the magnitude and direction of peer influence depend on predisposition, gender, and the nature of the behavior. Peer effects on individuals predisposed toward a given behavior tend to be larger than peer effects on individuals without such a predisposition. We find that the influence of roommates on aggressive behavior is more pronounced among male students than among female students; roommate effects on smoking are negative among female students and male students who did not smoke before college. For concurrent sexual partnering, a highly private behavior, we find no evidence of peer effects. © American Sociological Association 2016.

  19. Separating boys and girls and increasing weight? Assessing the impacts of single-sex schools through random assignment in Seoul.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jaesung; Park, Hyunjoon; Behrman, Jere R

    2015-06-01

    A growing body of research reports associations of school contexts with adolescents' weight and weight-related behaviors. One interesting, but under-researched, dimension of school context that potentially matters for adolescents' weight is the gender composition. If boys and girls are separated into single-sex schools, they might be less concerned about physical appearance, which may result in increased weight. Utilizing a unique setting in Seoul, Korea where students are randomly assigned to single-sex and coeducational schools within school districts, we estimate causal effects of single-sex schools on weight and weight-related behaviors. Our results show that students attending single-sex schools are more likely to be overweight, and that the effects are more pronounced for girls. We also find that girls in single-sex schools are less likely to engage in strenuous activities than their coeducational counterparts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Specific labeling and assignment strategies of valine methyl groups for NMR studies of high molecular weight proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mas, Guillaume; Crublet, Elodie [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, Institut de Biologie Structurale (IBS) (France); Hamelin, Olivier [CNRS (France); Gans, Pierre; Boisbouvier, Jérôme, E-mail: jerome.boisbouvier@ibs.fr [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, Institut de Biologie Structurale (IBS) (France)

    2013-09-28

    The specific protonation of valine and leucine methyl groups in proteins is typically achieved by overexpressing proteins in M9/D{sub 2}O medium supplemented with either labeled α-ketoisovalerate for the labeling of the four prochiral methyl groups or with 2-acetolactate for the stereospecific labeling of the valine and leucine side chains. However, when these labeling schemes are applied to large protein assemblies, significant overlap between the correlations of the valine and leucine methyl groups occurs, hampering the analysis of 2D methyl-TROSY spectra. Analysis of the leucine and valine biosynthesis pathways revealed that the incorporation of labeled precursors in the leucine pathway can be inhibited by the addition of exogenous l-leucine-d{sub 10}. We exploited this property to label stereospecifically the pro-R and pro-S methyl groups of valine with minimal scrambling to the leucine residues. This new labeling protocol was applied to the 468 kDa homododecameric peptidase TET2 to decrease the complexity of its NMR spectra. All of the pro-S valine methyl resonances of TET2 were assigned by combining mutagenesis with this innovative labeling approach. The assignments were transferred to the pro-R groups using an optimally labeled sample and a set of triple resonance experiments. This improved labeling scheme enables us to overcome the main limitation of overcrowding in the NMR spectra of prochiral methyl groups, which is a prerequisite for the site-specific measurement of the structural and dynamic parameters or for the study of interactions in very large protein assemblies.

  1. Random search for shared chromosomal regions in four affected individuals: the assignment of a new hereditary ataxia locus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikali, K.; Suomalainen, A.; Koskinen, T.; Peltonen, L. [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Terwilliger, J. [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom); Weissenbach, J. [Genethon, Evry (France)

    1995-05-01

    Infantile-onset spinocerebellar ataxia (IOSCA) is an autosomal recessively inherited progressive neurological disorder of unknown etiology. This ataxia, identified so far only in the genetically isolated Finnish population, does not share gene locus with any of the previously identified hereditary ataxias, and a random mapping approach was adopted to assign the IOSCA locus. Based on the assumption of one founder mutation, a primary screening of the genome was performed using samples from just four affected individuals in two consanguineous pedigrees. The identification of a shared chromosomal region in these four patients provided the first evidence that the IOSCA gene locus is on chromosome 10q23.3-q24.1, which was confirmed by conventional linkage analysis in the complete family material. Strong linkage disequilibrium observed between IOSCA and the linked markers was utilized to define accurately the critical chromosomal region. The results showed the power of linkage disequilibrium in the locus assignment of diseases with very limited family materials. 30 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. An assessment of health behavior peer effects in Peking University dormitories: a randomized cluster-assignment design for interference.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changzheng Yuan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Relatively little is known about the peer influence in health behaviors within university dormitory rooms. Moreover, in China, the problem of unhealthy behaviors among university students has not yet been sufficiently recognized. We thus investigated health behavior peer influence in Peking University dormitories utilizing a randomized cluster-assignment design. METHODS: STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional in-dormitory survey. STUDY POPULATION: Current students from Peking University Health Science Center from April to June, 2009. MEASUREMENT: Self-reported questionnaire on health behaviors: physical activity (including bicycling, dietary intake and tobacco use. RESULTS: Use of bicycle, moderate-intensity exercise, frequency of sweet food and soybean milk intake, frequency of roasted/baked/toasted food intake were behaviors significantly or marginally significantly affected by peer influence. CONCLUSION: Health behavior peer effects exist within dormitory rooms among university students. This could provide guidance on room assignment, or inform intervention programs. Examining these may demand attention from university administrators and policy makers.

  3. A single blind randomized control trial on support groups for Chinese persons with mild dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Daniel K W; Kwok, Timothy C Y; Ng, Petrus Y N

    2014-01-01

    Persons with mild dementia experience multiple losses and manifest depressive symptoms. This research study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of a support group led by a social worker for Chinese persons with mild dementia. Participants were randomly assigned to either a ten-session support group or a control group. Standardized assessment tools were used for data collection at pretreatment and post-treatment periods by a research assistant who was kept blind to the group assignment of the participants. Upon completion of the study, 20 treatment group participants and 16 control group participants completed all assessments. At baseline, the treatment and control groups did not show any significant difference on all demographic variables, as well as on all baseline measures; over one-half (59%) of all the participants reported having depression, as assessed by a Chinese Geriatric Depression Scale score ≥8. After completing the support group, the depressive mood of the treatment group participants reduced from 8.83 (standard deviation =2.48) to 7.35 (standard deviation =2.18), which was significant (Wilcoxon signed-rank test; P=0.017, Pcontrol group's participants did not show any significant change. This present study supports the efficacy and effectiveness of the support group for persons with mild dementia in Chinese society. In particular, this present study shows that a support group can reduce depressive symptoms for participants.

  4. Cognitive-behavioral group therapy versus group psychotherapy for social anxiety disorder among college students: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjornsson, Andri S; Bidwell, L Cinnamon; Brosse, Alisha L; Carey, Gregory; Hauser, Monika; Mackiewicz Seghete, Kristen L; Schulz-Heik, R Jay; Weatherley, Donald; Erwin, Brigette A; Craighead, W Edward

    2011-11-01

    In this randomized controlled trial, cognitive-behavioral group therapy (CBGT) for social anxiety disorder (SAD) was compared to group psychotherapy (GPT), a credible, structurally equivalent control condition that included only nonspecific factors of group treatment (such as group dynamics). Participants were 45 college students at the University of Colorado with a primary diagnosis of SAD. Each treatment condition comprised eight group sessions lasting 2 hr each. Independent assessors (blind to treatment assignment) assessed participants at baseline and posttreatment with the Clinical Global Impression Scale (CGI) and the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (LSAS). Both treatments were found to be equally credible. There were five noncompleters in the CBGT condition (21.7%) and only one in the GPT condition (4.3%). There were no statistically significant differences posttreatment (controlling for pretreatment scores) between the two treatment conditions, and both treatments were found to be efficacious. Effect sizes for CBGT were similar to earlier studies, and adherence ratings revealed excellent adherence. Treatment of SAD appears to be moving toward individual CBT, partly because of high attrition rates and underutilization of group dynamics in group CBT. However, group therapy has unique therapeutic ingredients, and it may be too early to give up on group treatment altogether. Discussion of these findings included future directions with this treatment modality, especially whether these two types of group treatment could be combined and whether such combination might serve to decrease attrition, enhance efficacy, and facilitate dissemination. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Comparison of Collaboration and Performance in Groups of Learners Assembled Randomly or Based on Learners' Topic Preferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cela, Karina L.; Sicilia, Miguel Ángel; Sánchez, Salvador

    2015-01-01

    Teachers and instructional designers frequently incorporate collaborative learning approaches into their e-learning environments. A key factor of collaborative learning that may affect learner outcomes is whether the collaborative groups are assigned project topics randomly or based on a shared interest in the topic. This is a particularly…

  6. Comparison of Methods for Adjusting Incorrect Assignments of Items to Subtests Oblique Multiple Group Method Versus Confirmatory Common Factor Method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stuive, Ilse; Kiers, Henk A.L.; Timmerman, Marieke E.

    2009-01-01

    A common question in test evaluation is whether an a priori assignment of items to subtests is supported by empirical data. If the analysis results indicate the assignment of items to subtests under study is not supported by data, the assignment is often adjusted. In this study the authors compare

  7. Modeling fiber type grouping by a binary Markov random field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venema, H. W.

    1992-01-01

    A new approach to the quantification of fiber type grouping is presented, in which the distribution of histochemical type in a muscle cross section is regarded as a realization of a binary Markov random field (BMRF). Methods for the estimation of the parameters of this model are discussed. The first

  8. METHODOLOGY & CALCULATIONS FOR THE ASSIGNMENT OF WASTE GROUPS FOR THE LARGE UNDERGROUND WASTE STORAGE TANKS AT THE HANFORD SITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BARKER, S.A.

    2006-07-27

    Waste stored within tank farm double-shell tanks (DST) and single-shell tanks (SST) generates flammable gas (principally hydrogen) to varying degrees depending on the type, amount, geometry, and condition of the waste. The waste generates hydrogen through the radiolysis of water and organic compounds, thermolytic decomposition of organic compounds, and corrosion of a tank's carbon steel walls. Radiolysis and thermolytic decomposition also generates ammonia. Nonflammable gases, which act as dilutents (such as nitrous oxide), are also produced. Additional flammable gases (e.g., methane) are generated by chemical reactions between various degradation products of organic chemicals present in the tanks. Volatile and semi-volatile organic chemicals in tanks also produce organic vapors. The generated gases in tank waste are either released continuously to the tank headspace or are retained in the waste matrix. Retained gas may be released in a spontaneous or induced gas release event (GRE) that can significantly increase the flammable gas concentration in the tank headspace as described in RPP-7771. The document categorizes each of the large waste storage tanks into one of several categories based on each tank's waste characteristics. These waste group assignments reflect a tank's propensity to retain a significant volume of flammable gases and the potential of the waste to release retained gas by a buoyant displacement event. Revision 5 is the annual update of the methodology and calculations of the flammable gas Waste Groups for DSTs and SSTs.

  9. Community-based group exercise for persons with Parkinson disease: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combs, Stephanie A; Diehl, M Dyer; Chrzastowski, Casey; Didrick, Nora; McCoin, Brittany; Mox, Nicholas; Staples, William H; Wayman, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare group boxing training to traditional group exercise on function and quality of life in persons with Parkinson disease (PD). A convenience sample of adults with PD (n = 31) were randomly assigned to boxing training or traditional exercise for 24-36 sessions, each lasting 90 minutes, over 12 weeks. Boxing training included: stretching, boxing (e.g. lateral foot work, punching bags), resistance exercises, and aerobic training. Traditional exercise included: stretching, resistance exercises, aerobic training, and balance activities. Participants were tested before and after completion of training on balance, balance confidence, mobility, gait velocity, gait endurance, and quality of life. The traditional exercise group demonstrated significantly greater gains in balance confidence than the boxing group (p exercise for persons with PD will be an important future consideration for rehabilitation professionals.

  10. Group cognitive behavior therapy for chronic posttraumatic stress disorder: an initial randomized pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, J Gayle; Coffey, Scott F; Foy, David W; Keane, Terence M; Blanchard, Edward B

    2009-03-01

    Individuals with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) related to a serious motor vehicle accident were randomly assigned to either group cognitive behavioral treatment(GCBT) or a minimum contact comparison group (MCC).Compared to the MCC participants (n=16), individuals who completed GCBT (n=17) showed significant reductions in PTSD symptoms, whether assessed using clinical interview or a self-report measure. Among treatment completers, 88.3% of GCBT participants did not satisfy criteria for PTSD at posttreatment assessment, relative to31.3% of the MCC participants. Examination of anxiety,depression, and pain measures did not show a unique advantage of GCBT. Treatment-related gains were maintained over a 3-month follow-up interval. Patients reported satisfaction with GCBT, and attrition from this treatment was comparable with individually administered CBTs.Results are discussed in light of modifications necessitated by the group treatment format, with suggestions for future study of this group intervention.

  11. Peripheral Defocus and Myopia Progression in Myopic Children Randomly Assigned to Wear Single Vision and Progressive Addition Lenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berntsen, David A.; Barr, Christopher D.; Mutti, Donald O.; Zadnik, Karla

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the effect of progressive addition lenses (PALs) and single vision lenses (SVLs) on peripheral defocus in myopic children, and to compare the effect of myopic versus hyperopic peripheral defocus on foveal myopia progression. Methods. Eighty-four myopic children aged 6 to 11 years with spherical equivalent (SE) cycloplegic autorefraction between −0.75 diopters (D) and −4.50 D were randomly assigned to wear SVLs or PALs. Aberrometry measurements of the eye and spectacles were made centrally, 30° nasally, temporally, and superiorly, and 20° inferiorly on the retina using a Complete Ophthalmic Analysis System for Vision Research (COAS-VR). The association between peripheral defocus and the 1-year change in central myopia was investigated. Results. SVLs caused a hyperopic shift in peripheral defocus at all locations (all P ≤ 0.0003). PALs caused a myopic shift in peripheral defocus in three of four locations measured (all P ≤ 0.01) with the greatest shift superiorly due to the PAL addition (−1.04 ± 0.30 D). Superior retinal defocus when wearing either SVLs or PALs was associated with the 1-year change in central myopia. The adjusted 1-year change in central SE myopia was −0.38 D for children with absolute superior myopic defocus (n = 67) and −0.65 D for children with absolute superior hyperopic defocus (n = 17; difference = 0.27 D; P = 0.002). Conclusions. PALs caused a myopic shift in peripheral defocus. Superior myopic defocus was associated with less central myopia progression. These data support the continued investigation of optical designs that result in peripheral myopic defocus as a potential way to slow myopia progression. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00335049.) PMID:23838771

  12. A single blind randomized control trial on support groups for Chinese persons with mild dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young DKW

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Daniel KW Young,1 Timothy CY Kwok,2 Petrus YN Ng1 1Department of Social Work, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong; 2Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong Purpose: Persons with mild dementia experience multiple losses and manifest depressive symptoms. This research study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of a support group led by a social worker for Chinese persons with mild dementia. Research methods: Participants were randomly assigned to either a ten-session support group or a control group. Standardized assessment tools were used for data collection at pretreatment and post-treatment periods by a research assistant who was kept blind to the group assignment of the participants. Upon completion of the study, 20 treatment group participants and 16 control group participants completed all assessments. Results: At baseline, the treatment and control groups did not show any significant difference on all demographic variables, as well as on all baseline measures; over one-half (59% of all the participants reported having depression, as assessed by a Chinese Geriatric Depression Scale score ≥8. After completing the support group, the depressive mood of the treatment group participants reduced from 8.83 (standard deviation =2.48 to 7.35 (standard deviation =2.18, which was significant (Wilcoxon signed-rank test; P=0.017, P<0.05, while the control group’s participants did not show any significant change. Conclusion: This present study supports the efficacy and effectiveness of the support group for persons with mild dementia in Chinese society. In particular, this present study shows that a support group can reduce depressive symptoms for participants. Keywords: support group, mild dementia, Chinese, depression

  13. The Effects of Therapist Competence in Assigning Homework in Cognitive Therapy with Cluster C Personality Disorders: Results from a Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryum, Truls; Stiles, Tore C.; Svartberg, Martin; McCullough, Leigh

    2010-01-01

    Therapist competence in assigning homework was used to predict mid- and posttreatment outcome for patients with Cluster C personality disorders in cognitive therapy (CT). Twenty-five patients that underwent 40 sessions of CT were taken from a randomized controlled trial (Svartberg, Stiles, & Seltzer, 2004). Therapist competence in assigning…

  14. Behavioral and cognitive group treatment for fear of flying: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gerwen, Lucas J; Spinhoven, Philip; Van Dyck, Richard

    2006-12-01

    In a long-standing fear-of-flying program, persons with fear of flying (N=150) were after a diagnostic assessment and individual preparation phase randomly assigned to either a 1-day behavioral group treatment (BGT) program, a 2-day cognitive-behavioral group treatment (CBGT) program or a waiting list (WL) control group. A post-treatment flight on a commercial airline measured participants' ability to fly. Different self-report flight anxiety questionnaires were completed before, during and after treatment at 3-, 6- and 12-month follow-up. Results indicated that both treatments were superior to the WL, and equally effective on the flying test and later independent flying, but also that the 2-day CBGT program was significantly more effective than the 1-day BGT program on subjective measures of fear and self-efficacy.

  15. Group cognitive remediation therapy for chronic schizophrenia: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Shuping; Zou, Yizhuang; Wykes, Til; Reeder, Clare; Zhu, Xiaolin; Yang, Fude; Zhao, Yanli; Tan, Yunlong; Fan, Fengmei; Zhou, Dongfeng

    2016-07-28

    Individual-level cognitive remediation therapy (CRT) has been shown to be effective for cognitive improvement and social function amelioration. Here, we aimed to test the efficacy of group-based CRT in Chinese subjects with schizophrenia. One-hundred and four inpatients were randomly assigned to either 40 sessions of small-group CRT therapy or therapeutic contact-matched Musical and Dancing Therapy (MDT). Cognitive and social functioning, as well as clinical symptoms, were evaluated over the course of treatment. Specifically, cognitive function was evaluated using a battery of cognitive measurements, clinical symptoms were evaluated using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, and social function was evaluated using the Nurse's Observation Scale for Inpatient Evaluation-30. All patients were evaluated pre- and post-treatment. Forty-four individuals in the CRT group and 46 in the MDT group completed all of the planned treatments and analyses. Cognitive functions, especially cognitive flexibility and memory, showed significant improvement in the CRT group over the course of the study. The MDT group also showed improvement in several cognitive flexibility assessments, but the degree of improvement was significantly greater in the CRT group. Several social-function factors exhibited a significant improvement in the CRT group, but not in the MDT group. Cognitive function improvement correlated positively with social function without predicting social function change. We conclude that group-based CRT is an effective and promising therapy. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  16. Using optimal combination of teaching-learning methods (open book assignment and group tutorials) as revision exercises to improve learning outcome in low achievers in biochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajappa, Medha; Bobby, Zachariah; Nandeesha, H; Suryapriya, R; Ragul, Anithasri; Yuvaraj, B; Revathy, G; Priyadarssini, M

    2016-07-08

    Graduate medical students of India are taught Biochemistry by didactic lectures and they hardly get any opportunity to clarify their doubts and reinforce the concepts which they learn in these lectures. We used a combination of teaching-learning (T-L) methods (open book assignment followed by group tutorials) to study their efficacy in improving the learning outcome. About 143 graduate medical students were classified into low (75%: group 3, n = 46) achievers, based on their internal assessment marks. After the regular teaching module on the topics "Vitamins and Enzymology", all the students attempted an open book assignment without peer consultation. Then all the students participated in group tutorials. The effects on the groups were evaluated by pre and posttests at the end of each phase, with the same set of MCQs. Gain from group tutorials and overall gain was significantly higher in the low achievers, compared to other groups. High and medium achievers obtained more gain from open book assignment, than group tutorials. The overall gain was significantly higher than the gain obtained from open book assignment or group tutorials, in all three groups. All the three groups retained the gain even after 1 week of the exercise. Hence, optimal use of novel T-L methods (open book assignment followed by group tutorials) as revision exercises help in strengthening concepts in Biochemistry in this oft neglected group of low achievers in graduate medical education. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 44(4):321-325, 2016. © 2016 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  17. Comparing groups randomization and bootstrap methods using R

    CERN Document Server

    Zieffler, Andrew S; Long, Jeffrey D

    2011-01-01

    A hands-on guide to using R to carry out key statistical practices in educational and behavioral sciences research Computing has become an essential part of the day-to-day practice of statistical work, broadening the types of questions that can now be addressed by research scientists applying newly derived data analytic techniques. Comparing Groups: Randomization and Bootstrap Methods Using R emphasizes the direct link between scientific research questions and data analysis. Rather than relying on mathematical calculations, this book focus on conceptual explanations and

  18. Brief Group Intervention Using Emotional Freedom Techniques for Depression in College Students: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawson Church

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Two hundred thirty-eight first-year college students were assessed using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. Thirty students meeting the BDI criteria for moderate to severe depression were randomly assigned to either a treatment or control group. The treatment group received four 90-minute group sessions of EFT (Emotional Freedom Techniques, a novel treatment that combines exposure, cognitive reprocessing, and somatic stimulation. The control group received no treatment. Posttests were conducted 3 weeks later on those that completed all requirements (N=18. The EFT group (n=9 had significantly more depression at baseline than the control group (n=9 (EFT BDI mean=23.44, SD=2.1 versus control BDI mean=20.33, SD=2.1. After controlling for baseline BDI score, the EFT group had significantly less depression than the control group at posttest, with a mean score in the “nondepressed” range (P=.001; EFT BDI mean=6.08, SE=1.8 versus control BDI mean=18.04, SE=1.8. Cohen's d was 2.28, indicating a very strong effect size. These results are consistent with those noted in other studies of EFT that included an assessment for depression and indicate the clinical usefulness of EFT as a brief, cost-effective, and efficacious treatment.

  19. 40 CFR 86.1826-01 - Assigned deterioration factors for small volume manufacturers and small volume test groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Pollution From New and In-Use Light-Duty Vehicles, Light-Duty Trucks, and Complete Otto-Cycle Heavy-Duty... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Assigned deterioration factors for... Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW...

  20. Effectiveness of interactive discussion group in suicide risk assessment among general nurses in Taiwan: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chia-Yi; Lin, Yi-Yin; Yeh, Mei Chang; Huang, Lian-Hua; Chen, Shaw-Ji; Liao, Shih-Cheng; Lee, Ming-Been

    2014-11-01

    The evidence of suicide prevention training for nurses is scarce. Strategies to enhance general nurses' ability in suicide risk assessment are critical to develop effective training programs in general medical settings. This study was aimed to examine the effectiveness of an interactive discussion group in a suicide prevention training program for general nurses. In this randomized study with two groups of pre-post study design, the sample was recruited from the Medical, Surgical, and Emergency/Intensive Care Sectors of a 2000-bed general hospital via stratified randomization. Among the 111 nurses, 57 participants randomly assigned to the control group received a two-hour baseline suicide gatekeeper lecture, and 54 participants assigning to the experimental group received an additional five-hour group discussion about suicide risk assessment skills. Using a case vignette, the nurses discussed and assessed suicide risk factors specified in a 10-item Chinese SAD PERSONS Scale during a group discussion intervention. The findings revealed that the nurses achieved significant and consistent improvements of risk identification and assessment after the intervention without influencing their mental health status for assessing suicide risks. The result suggested an effective approach of interactive group discussion for facilitating critical thinking and learning suicide risk assessment skills among general nurses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Effectiveness of an online group course for depression in adolescents and young adults: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Zanden, Rianne; Kramer, Jeannet; Gerrits, Rob; Cuijpers, Pim

    2012-06-07

    Depression is a serious mental health problem, whose first onset is usually in adolescence. Online treatment may offer a solution for the current undertreatment of depression in youth. For adults with depressive symptoms, the effectiveness of Internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy has been demonstrated. This study is one of the first randomized controlled trials to investigate the effectiveness online depression treatment for young people with depressive complaints and the first to focus on an online group course. To evaluate and discuss the effectiveness of a guided Web-based group course called Grip op Je Dip (Master Your Mood [MYM]), designed for young people aged 16 to 25 years with depressive symptoms, in comparison with a wait-listed control group. We randomly assigned 244 young people with depressive symptoms to the online MYM course or to a waiting-list control condition. The primary outcome measure was treatment outcome after 3 months on the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale. Secondary outcomes were anxiety (measured by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale) and mastery (Mastery Scale). We studied the maintenance of effects in the MYM group 6 months after baseline. Missing data were imputed. The MYM group (n = 121) showed significantly greater improvement in depressive symptoms at 3 months than the control group (n = 123) (t(187 )= 6.62, P limitation is the infeasibility of comparing the 6-month outcomes of the MYM and control groups, as the controls had access to MYM after 3 months. The online group course MYM was effective in reducing depressive symptoms and anxiety and in increasing mastery in young people. These effects persisted in the MYM group at 6 months.

  2. Assignment refusal and its relation to outcome in a randomized controlled trial comparing Cognitive Therapy and Fluvoxamine in treatment-resistant patients with obsessive compulsive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landsheer, Johannes A; Smit, Johannes H; van Oppen, Patricia; van Balkom, Anton J L M

    2015-03-30

    The effectiveness of Fluvoxamine was compared to that of Cognitive Therapy (CT) in a 12-week randomized controlled trial (RCT) in 48 patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), who were treatment-resistant to a previous behavior therapy (BT). A considerable amount of patients did not comply with the assigned treatment and switched treatments. The aim of this study was to identify patient characteristics predictive of assignment compliance and to study whether these characteristics were related to outcome. A logistic model, based on psychological and social patient characteristics, in addition to or in interaction with the assignment, was used for the explanation of compliance with treatment assignment. Especially patients who have a higher score on the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS) tend to comply with the effective Fluvoxamine treatment. The same set of variables was related to both compliance and outcome of therapy received. Therefore, the logistic model of compliance could be used to reduce the positive bias of As-Treated analysis (AT). The difference between the results of Fluvoxamine and Cognitive Therapy remained statistically significant after correcting for the positive bias as the result of assignment refusal and after applying the assumption that two drop-out patients needed imputation of lesser results. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Complete {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR structural assignments for a group of four goyazensolide-type furanoheliangolides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Ana Carolina Ferreira; Silva, Aline Nazare; Matos, Priscilla Mendonca; Silva, Eder Henrique da; Heleno, Vladimir Constantino Gomes [Universidade de Franca, Franca, SP (Brazil). Nucleo de Pesquisas em Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologicas; Lopes, Norberto Peporine; Lopes, Joao Luis Callegari [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FCFRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Ciencias Farmaceuticas de Ribeirao Preto. Dept. de Quimica e Fisica; Sass, Daiane Cristina, E-mail: vheleno_05@yahoo.com.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FFCLRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras de Ribeirao Preto. Dept. de Quimica

    2012-07-01

    Four goyazensolide-type sesquiterpene lactones - lychnofolide, centratherin, goyazensolide and goyazensolide acetate - were thoroughly studied by NMR experimental techniques. {sup 1}H NMR, {sup 13}C NMR {l_brace}{sup 1}H{r_brace}, COSY, HMQC, HMBC, J-res. and NOE experiments were performed to provide the needed structural information. Complete and unequivocal assignment, including the determination of all multiplicities, was obtained for each structure and the data collections are presented in tables (author)

  4. Complete ¹H and 13C NMR structural assignments for a group of four goyazensolide-type furanoheliangolides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina Ferreira Soares

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Four goyazensolide-type sesquiterpene lactones - lychnofolide, centratherin, goyazensolide and goyazensolide acetate - were thoroughly studied by NMR experimental techniques. ¹H NMR, 13C NMR {¹H}, COSY, HMQC, HMBC, J-res. and NOE experiments were performed to provide the needed structural information. Complete and unequivocal assignment, including the determination of all multiplicities, was obtained for each structure and the data collections are presented in tables.

  5. Using Optimal Combination of Teaching-Learning Methods (Open Book Assignment and Group Tutorials) as Revision Exercises to Improve Learning Outcome in Low Achievers in Biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajappa, Medha; Bobby, Zachariah; Nandeesha, H.; Suryapriya, R.; Ragul, Anithasri; Yuvaraj, B.; Revathy, G.; Priyadarssini, M.

    2016-01-01

    Graduate medical students of India are taught Biochemistry by didactic lectures and they hardly get any opportunity to clarify their doubts and reinforce the concepts which they learn in these lectures. We used a combination of teaching-learning (T-L) methods (open book assignment followed by group tutorials) to study their efficacy in improving…

  6. Direct correlation of consecutive C Prime -N groups in proteins: a method for the assignment of intrinsically disordered proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pantoja-Uceda, David; Santoro, Jorge, E-mail: jsantoro@iqfr.csic.es [CSIC, Instituto de Quimica Fisica Rocasolano (Spain)

    2013-09-15

    Two novel 3D {sup 13}C-detected experiments, hNcocaNCO and hnCOcaNCO, are proposed to facilitate the resonance assignment of intrinsically disordered proteins. The experiments correlate the {sup 15}N and {sup 13}C Prime chemical shifts of two consecutive amide moieties without involving other nuclei, thus taking advantage of the good dispersion shown by the {sup 15}N-{sup 13}C Prime correlations, even for proteins that lack a well defined tertiary structure. The new pulse sequences were successfully tested using Nupr1, an intrinsically disordered protein of 93 residues.

  7. Random Vector and Matrix Theories: A Renormalization Group Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinn-Justin, Jean

    2014-09-01

    Random matrices in the large N expansion and the so-called double scaling limit can be used as toy models for quantum gravity: 2D quantum gravity coupled to conformal matter. This has generated a tremendous expansion of random matrix theory, tackled with increasingly sophisticated mathematical methods and number of matrix models have been solved exactly. However, the somewhat paradoxical situation is that either models can be solved exactly or little can be said. Since the solved models display critical points and universal properties, it is tempting to use renormalization group ideas to determine universal properties, without solving models explicitly. Initiated by Br\\'ezin and Zinn-Justin, the approach has led to encouraging results, first for matrix integrals and then quantum mechanics with matrices, but has not yet become a universal tool as initially hoped. In particular, general quantum field theories with matrix fields require more detailed investigations. To better understand some of the encountered difficulties, we first apply analogous ideas to the simpler O(N) symmetric vector models, models that can be solved quite generally in the large N limit. Unlike other attempts, our method is a close extension of Br\\'ezin and Zinn-Justin. Discussing vector and matrix models with similar approximation scheme, we notice that in all cases (vector and matrix integrals, vector and matrix path integrals in the local approximation), at leading order, non-trivial fixed points satisfy the same universal algebraic equation, and this is the main result of this work. However, its precise meaning and role have still to be better understood.

  8. A randomized trial of group parent training: reducing child conduct problems in real-world settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjøbli, John; Hukkelberg, Silje; Ogden, Terje

    2013-03-01

    Group-based Parent Management Training, the Oregon model (PMTO, 12 sessions) was delivered by the regular staff of municipal child and family services. PMTO is based on social interaction learning theory and promotes positive parenting skills in parents of children with conduct problems. This study examined the effectiveness of the group-based training intervention in real world settings both immediately following and six months after termination of the intervention. One hundred thirty-seven children (3-12 years) and their parents participated in this study. The families were randomly assigned to group-based training or a comparison group. Data were collected from parents and teachers. The caregiver assessments of parenting practices and child conduct problems and caregiver and teacher reported social competence revealed immediate and significant intervention effects. Short- and long-term beneficial effects were reported from parents, although no follow-up effects were evident on teacher reports. These effectiveness findings and the potential for increasing the number of families served to support the further dissemination and implementation of group-based parent training. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Reading group rehabilitation for patients with psychosis: a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpe, Umberto; Torre, Fabiana; De Santis, Valeria; Perris, Francesco; Catapano, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Group reading activities are often reported to be helpful in a variety of psychiatric conditions. However, data on the effects of structured reading rehabilitation activities, in both hospital and community settings for patients with psychosis, are still scarce. Our aim was to investigate the effects on clinical status, disability, psychosocial functioning and cognitive functioning of a structured group reading activity, in a sample of hospitalized patients with psychosis. We enrolled 41 consecutive patients with psychosis and randomly assigned them to a structured group reading programme. For all included patients, we psychometrically evaluated clinical symptomatology, psychosocial functioning and disability, as well as cognitive functioning. All evaluations were repeated at a 6-month follow-up. Repeated-measure multiple analyses of variance were used to test the effect of the group reading activities on the clinical, psychosocial and cognitive measures. We found that, after 6 months from discharge, structured group reading activities induced a statistically significant improvement of cognitive (p < 0.007) and psychosocial (p < 0.008) functioning in patients with psychosis and reduced their disability (p < 0.005), with respect to the control group. Furthermore, such programmes are easy to implement and were perceived as extremely 'interesting' and 'useful' by patients with psychosis. Rehabilitation programmes focusing on group reading activities should be regarded as a valid psychosocial rehabilitation tool for psychotic patients with severe mental disability. A structured group reading programme induced a significant symptomatological cognitive and psychosocial amelioration in hospitalized patients with psychosis. The improvement was sustained also at the 6-month follow-up, with respect to the control group. Structured group reading activities are perceived, by severely ill psychiatric patients, as highly useful, interesting and pleasant, while they are

  10. Bortezomib consolidation after autologous stem cell transplantation in multiple myeloma: a Nordic Myeloma Study Group randomized phase 3 trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimsing, Peter; Hjertner, Oyvind; Lenhoff, Stig; Laane, Edward; Remes, Kari; Steingrimsdottir, Hlif; Abildgaard, Niels; Ahlberg, Lucia; Blimark, Cecilie; Dahl, Inger Marie; Forsberg, Karin; Gedde-Dahl, Tobias; Gregersen, Henrik; Gruber, Astrid; Guldbrandsen, Nina; Haukås, Einar; Carlson, Kristina; Kvam, Ann Kristin; Nahi, Hareth; Lindås, Roald; Andersen, Niels Frost; Turesson, Ingemar; Waage, Anders; Westin, Jan; Gregersen, Henrik; Frost Andersen, Niels; Gimsing, Peter; Toffner-Clausen, Nilsaage; Abildgaard, Niels; Laane, Edward; Silvennoinen, Raija; Remes, Kari; Steingrimsdottir, Hlif; Lindås, Roald; Gedde-Dahl, Tobias; Guldbrandsen, Nina; Kristin Kvam, Ann; Haukås, Einar; Marie Dahl, Inger; Hjertner, Oyvind; Waage, Anders; Blimark, Cecilie; Mellqvist, Ulf-Henrik; Westin, Jan; Ahlberg, Lucia; Lenhoff, Stig; Turesson, Ingemar; Linder, Olle; Gruber, Astrid; Nahi, Hareth; Forsberg, Karin; Carlson, Kristina

    2013-01-01

    The Nordic Myeloma Study Group conducted an open randomized trial to compare bortezomib as consolidation therapy given after high-dose therapy and autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) with no consolidation in bortezomib-naive patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma. Overall, 370 patients were centrally randomly assigned 3 months after ASCT to receive 20 doses of bortezomib given during 21 weeks or no consolidation. The hypothesis was that consolidation therapy would prolong progression-free survival (PFS). The PFS after randomization was 27 months for the bortezomib group compared with 20 months for the control group (P = .05). Fifty-one of 90 patients in the treatment group compared with 32 of 90 controls improved their response after randomization (P = .007). No difference in overall survival was seen. Fatigue was reported more commonly by the bortezomib-treated patients in self-reported quality-of-life (QOL) questionnaires, whereas no other major differences in QOL were recorded between the groups. Consolidation therapy seemed to be beneficial for patients not achieving at least a very good partial response (VGPR) but not for patients in the ≥ VGPR category at randomization. Consolidation with bortezomib after ASCT in bortezomib-naive patients improves PFS without interfering with QOL. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00417911. PMID:23616624

  11. A Comparison of the Effects of Group Dynamics on Individuals Assigned to Integral and Non-Integral Aircrews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-09-01

    communications ( Hellriegel and Slocum, 1974), group confidence (Nieva et al, 1985), group norms (Henderson, 1985), leadership roles (Nieva et al, 1985), ano...finally, crew preference in combat (Nieva et al, 1985; Henderson, 1985; Hellriegel and Slocum, 1974). The research questions and hypotheses posed earlier...and intensity of communications are generally higher in high cohesive groups and lower in low cohesive groups (Golembiewski, 1962:165). Hellriegel

  12. MSW Foundation Students in the Field: Reflections on the Nature and Quality of Group Work Assignments and Supervision

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaPorte, Heidi Heft; Sweifach, Jay

    2011-01-01

    Commentators find that education in social group work has diminished over the past three decades, creating a shortage in group work-trained field instructors. The role of instructing group work students may appear relatively easy; however, quality instruction requires careful planning, time, energy, and specialized knowledge. Without knowledge and…

  13. Soft-assignment random-forest with an application to discriminative representation of human actions in videos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burghouts, G.J.

    2013-01-01

    The bag-of-features model is a distinctive and robust approach to detect human actions in videos. The discriminative power of this model relies heavily on the quantization of the video features into visual words. The quantization determines how well the visual words describe the human action. Random

  14. Comparing cluster-level dynamic treatment regimens using sequential, multiple assignment, randomized trials: Regression estimation and sample size considerations

    OpenAIRE

    NeCamp, Timothy; Kilbourne, Amy; Almirall, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Cluster-level dynamic treatment regimens can be used to guide sequential, intervention or treatment decision-making at the cluster level in order to improve outcomes at the individual or patient-level. In a cluster-level DTR, the intervention or treatment is potentially adapted and re-adapted over time based on changes in the cluster that could be impacted by prior intervention, including based on aggregate measures of the individuals or patients that comprise it. Cluster-randomized sequentia...

  15. Group music therapy for severe mental illness: a randomized embedded-experimental mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grocke, D; Bloch, S; Castle, D; Thompson, G; Newton, R; Stewart, S; Gold, C

    2014-08-01

    Music therapy is an innovative approach to support people with severe mental illness (SMI). The aim of the study was to determine whether group music therapy (GMT) positively impacted on quality of life (QoL), social enrichment, self-esteem, spirituality and psychiatric symptoms of participants with SMI and how they experienced the intervention. The primary outcome was QoL; secondary measures assessed social enrichment, self-esteem, spirituality and psychiatric symptoms. The 13-week intervention comprised singing familiar songs and composing original songs recorded in a professional studio. Qualitative data were generated from focus group interviews and song lyric analysis. Ninety-nine adults (57 female) were recruited, with an initial cohort (n = 75) randomized to either: weekly GMT followed by standard care (SC) or SC followed by GMT. Crossover occurred after 13 weeks. Measures were conducted at baseline, 13, 26 and 39 weeks. A second cohort (n = 24) could not be randomized and were assigned to GMT followed by SC. Intention-to-treat analysis showed a significant difference between GMT and SC on QoL and spirituality. This was robust to different assumptions about missing data (listwise deletion, last observation carried forward or multiple imputation). Per-protocol analysis suggested greater benefit for those receiving more sessions. Focus group interview and song lyric analyses suggested that GMT was enjoyable; self-esteem was enhanced; participants appreciated therapists and peers; and although challenges were experienced, the programme was recommended to others. Group music therapy may enhance QoL and spirituality of persons with SMI. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Improving teacher perceptions of parent involvement patterns: Findings from a group randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Keith C; Reinke, Wendy M

    2017-03-01

    For children with the most serious and persistent academic and behavior problems, parent involvement in education, particularly teacher perceptions of involvement, is essential to avert their expected long-term negative outcomes. Despite the widespread interest in and perceived importance of parent involvement in education, however, few experimental studies have evaluated programs and practices to promote it. In this group randomized trial, we examined the effects of the Incredible Years Teacher Classroom Management program (IY TCM) on teacher perceptions of contact and comfort with parents. One hundred five classrooms with 1818 students were randomly assigned to an IY TCM or to a control, business as usual condition. Measures of key constructs included teacher ratings of parent and student behaviors, direct observations in the classroom, and a standardized academic achievement test. Latent transition analysis (LTA) was used to identify patterns of involvement over time and to determine if intervention condition predicted postintervention patterns and transitions. Four patterns of involvement were identified at baseline and at follow-up; parents of students with academic and behavior problems were most likely to be in classes with the least adaptive involvement patterns. Intervention status predicted group membership at follow-up. Specifically, intervention classroom parents were significantly more likely to transition to more adaptive teacher-rated parenting profiles at follow-up compared to control classroom parents. This is the first randomized trial we are aware of that has found that teacher training can alter teacher perceptions of parent involvement patterns. Clinical implications for students with behavior and academic problems are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. A Randomized Trial to Measure the Efficacy of Applying Task Oriented Role Assignment to Improve Neonatal Resuscitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-06

    DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE 59TH MEDICAL W ING (AETC) JOINT BASE SAN ANTONIO - LACKLAND TEXAS MEMORANOUMFORSGVT ATTN: MAJ CARRIE LITKE-WAGER...Author Litke· Wager, Carrie 0-4/Major 959/CSPS/ 59MDW/SGVT b. Mu, Thornton 0-5/LTC MCH E-ZDP-N SA MMC c. Delaney, Heather 0-4/ MAJ MCHE-ZDP-N SA MMC d...78234-2715 15 June 2016 Maj Carrie Litke-Wager, MD Brooke Army Medical Center Institutional Review Board A Randomized Trial to Measure the

  18. The impact of group music therapy on depression and cognition in elderly persons with dementia: a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Hsin; Yang, Chyn-Yng; Lin, Yu; Ou, Keng-Liang; Lee, Tso-Ying; O'Brien, Anthony Paul; Chou, Kuei-Ru

    2014-04-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the effectiveness of group music therapy for improving depression and delaying the deterioration of cognitive functions in elderly persons with dementia. The study had a prospective, parallel-group design with permuted-block randomization. Older persons with dementia (N = 104) were randomly assigned to the experimental or control group. The experimental group received 12 sessions of group music therapy (two 30-min sessions per week for 6 weeks), and the control group received usual care. Data were collected 4 times: (1) 1 week before the intervention, (2) the 6th session of the intervention, (3) the 12th session of the intervention, and (4) 1 month after the final session. Group music therapy reduced depression in persons with dementia. Improvements in depression occurred immediately after music therapy and were apparent throughout the course of therapy. The cortisol level did not significantly decrease after the group music therapy. Cognitive function significantly improved slightly at the 6th session, the 12th session, and 1 month after the sessions ended; in particular, short-term recall function improved. The group music therapy intervention had the greatest impact in subjects with mild and moderate dementia. The group music intervention is a noninvasive and inexpensive therapy that appeared to reduce elders' depression. It also delayed the deterioration of cognitive functions, particularly short-term recall function. Group music therapy may be an appropriate intervention among elderly persons with mild and moderate dementia.

  19. The use of multiparametric quantitative magnetic resonance imaging for evaluating visually assigned lesion groups in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaler, Christian; Faizy, Tobias D; Sedlacik, Jan; Bester, Maxim; Stellmann, Jan-Patrick; Heesen, Christoph; Fiehler, Jens; Siemonsen, Susanne

    2018-01-01

    In multiple sclerosis (MS), inflammatory lesions present a broad spectrum of histopathologic processes. For a better discrimination, lesions are visually defined into different lesion groups according to their appearance on conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The aim of this study was to investigate the properties of different MS lesion groups using multiparametric quantitative MRI. 35 patients diagnosed with relapsing-remitting MS received 3 Tesla MRI including magnetization-prepared 2 rapid acquisition gradient echo, diffusion tensor imaging and magnetization transfer imaging. Lesion segmentation was performed for T2 lesions, black holes and contrast-enhancing lesions. A subtraction mask was created including only T2 lesions that did not correspond to a black hole or contrast-enhancing lesion. T1 relaxation time (T1-RT), magnetization transfer ratio (MTR), mean diffusivity (MD) and fractional anisotropy (FA) were determined for every lesion and in normal-appearing white matter. Only MD differed significantly between all lesion groups and NAWM (p lesion groups but not NAWM. T1-RT and MTR were not useful imaging biomarkers to distinguish between lesion groups. A lack of sensitivity and specificity and unproportional alterations of quantitative MRI measures, due to heterogenous histopathologic processes within lesions, may be a possible explanation for missing discrimination. Thus, not only interpretation of visually defined MS lesion but also interpretation of quantitative MRI measures remains challenging and should be conducted carefully.

  20. Random Group Problem-Based Learning in Engineering Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Fleischfresser, Luciano

    2014-01-01

    Dynamics problem solving is highly specific to the problem at hand and to develop the general mind framework to become an effective problem solver requires ingenuity and creativity on top of a solid grounding on theoretical and conceptual knowledge. A blended approach with prototype demo, problem-based learning, and an opinion questionnaire was used during first semester of 2013. Students working in randomly selected teams had to interact with classmates while solving a randomly selected problem. The approach helps improve awareness of what is important to learn in this class while reducing grading load. It also provides a more rewarding contact time for both pupils and instructor.

  1. Group Versus Individual Physical Therapy for Veterans With Knee Osteoarthritis: Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Kelli D; Bongiorni, Dennis; Bosworth, Hayden B; Coffman, Cynthia J; Datta, Santanu K; Edelman, David; Hall, Katherine S; Lindquist, Jennifer H; Oddone, Eugene Z; Hoenig, Helen

    2016-05-01

    Efficient approaches are needed for delivering nonpharmacological interventions for management of knee osteoarthritis (OA). This trial compared group-based versus individual physical therapy interventions for management of knee OA. Three hundred twenty patients with knee OA at the VA Medical Center in Durham, North Carolina, (mean age=60 years, 88% male, 58% nonwhite) were randomly assigned to receive either the group intervention (group physical therapy; six 1-hour sessions, typically 8 participants per group) or the individual intervention (individual physical therapy; two 1-hour sessions). Both programs included instruction in home exercise, joint protection techniques, and individual physical therapist evaluation. The primary outcome measure was the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC; range=0-96, higher scores indicate worse symptoms), measured at baseline, 12 weeks, and 24 weeks. The secondary outcome measure was the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB; range=0-12, higher scores indicate better performance), measured at baseline and 12 weeks. Linear mixed models assessed the difference in WOMAC scores between arms. At 12 weeks, WOMAC scores were 2.7 points lower in the group physical therapy arm compared with the individual physical therapy arm (95% confidence interval [CI]=-5.9, 0.5; P=.10), indicating no between-group difference. At 24 weeks, WOMAC scores were 1.3 points lower in the group physical therapy arm compared with the individual physical therapy arm (95% CI=-4.6, 2.0; P=.44), indicating no significant between-group difference. At 12 weeks, SPPB scores were 0.1 points lower in the group physical therapy arm compared with the individual physical therapy arm (95% CI=-0.5, 0.2; P=.53), indicating no difference between groups. This study was conducted in one VA medical center. Outcome assessors were blinded, but participants and physical therapists were not blinded. Group physical therapy was not more effective

  2. Meaning-centered group psychotherapy for patients with advanced cancer: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitbart, William; Rosenfeld, Barry; Gibson, Christopher; Pessin, Hayley; Poppito, Shannon; Nelson, Christian; Tomarken, Alexis; Timm, Anne Kosinski; Berg, Amy; Jacobson, Colleen; Sorger, Brooke; Abbey, Jennifer; Olden, Megan

    2010-01-01

    An increasingly important concern for clinicians who care for patients at the end of life is their spiritual well-being and sense of meaning and purpose in life. In response to the need for short-term interventions to address spiritual well-being, we developed Meaning Centered Group Psychotherapy (MCGP) to help patients with advanced cancer sustain or enhance a sense of meaning, peace and purpose in their lives, even as they approach the end of life. Patients with advanced (stage III or IV) solid tumor cancers (N=90) were randomly assigned to either MCGP or a supportive group psychotherapy (SGP). Patients were assessed before and after completing the 8-week intervention, and again 2 months after completion. Outcome assessment included measures of spiritual well-being, meaning, hopelessness, desire for death, optimism/pessimism, anxiety, depression and overall quality of life. MCGP resulted in significantly greater improvements in spiritual well-being and a sense of meaning. Treatment gains were even more substantial (based on effect size estimates) at the second follow-up assessment. Improvements in anxiety and desire for death were also significant (and increased over time). There was no significant improvement on any of these variables for patients participating in SGP. MCGP appears to be a potentially beneficial intervention for patients' emotional and spiritual suffering at the end of life. Further research, with larger samples, is clearly needed to better understand the potential benefits of this novel intervention. (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. A randomized clinical trial comparing general exercise, McKenzie treatment and a control group in patients with neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjellman, Görel; Oberg, Birgitta

    2002-07-01

    Seventy-seven patients with neck pain in the primary health care were included in a prospective, randomized clinical trial and randomly assigned to general exercise, McKenzie treatment, or a control group. Seventy patients completed the treatment; response rate 93% at 12-month follow-up. All three groups showed significant improvement regarding the main outcomes, pain intensity and Neck Disability Index, even at 12-month follow-up, but there was no significant difference between the groups. In all, 79% reported that they were better or completely restored after treatment, although 51% reported constant/daily pain. In the McKenzie group compared with the control group, a tendency toward greater improvement was noted for pain intensity at 3 weeks and at 6-month follow-up, and for post-treatment Neck Disability Index. Significant improvement in Distress and Risk Assessment Method scores was shown in the McKenzie group only. The three groups had similar recurrence rates, although after 12 months the McKenzie group showed a tendency toward fewer visits for additional health care. The study did not provide a definite evidence of treatment efficacy in patients with neck pain, however, there was a tendency toward a better outcome with the two active alternatives compared with the control group.

  4. Mindfulness Training Improves Attentional Task Performance in Incarcerated Youth: A Group Randomized Controlled Intervention Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noelle R Leonard

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the impact of cognitive behavioral therapy and mindfulness training (CBT/MT on attentional task performance in incarcerated adolescents. Attention is a cognitive system necessary for managing cognitive demands and regulating emotions. Yet persistent and intensive demands, such as those experienced during high-stress intervals like incarceration and the events leading to incarceration, may deplete attention resulting in cognitive failures, emotional disturbances, and impulsive behavior. We hypothesized that CBT/MT may mitigate these deleterious effects of high stress and protect against degradation in attention over the high-stress interval of incarceration. Using a group randomized controlled trial design, we randomly assigned dormitories of incarcerated youth, ages 16 to 18, to a CBT/MT intervention (youth n = 147 or an active control intervention (youth n = 117. Both arms received approximately 750 minutes of intervention in a small-group setting over a 3-5 week period. Youth in the CBT/MT arm also logged the amount of out-of-session time spent practicing MT exercises. The Attention Network Test was used to index attentional task performance at baseline and 4 months post-baseline. Overall, task performance degraded over time in all participants. The magnitude of performance degradation was significantly less in the CBT/MT vs. control arm. Further, within the CBT/MT arm, performance degraded over time in those with no outside-of-class practice time, but remained stable over time in those who practiced mindfulness exercises outside of the session meetings. Thus, these findings suggest that sufficient CBT/MT practice may protect against functional attentional impairments associated with high-stress intervals. Keywords: adolescent development, incarcerated adolescents, detained adolescents, stress, attention, mindfulness meditation.

  5. Student Perception on Group Work and Group Assignments in Classroom Teaching: The Case of Bule Hora University Second Year Biology Students, South Ethiopia--An Action Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daba, Tolessa Muleta; Ejersa, Sorale Jilo; Aliyi, Sultan

    2017-01-01

    Group learning has become a common practice in schools and tertiary institutions. It provides more comfortable and supportive learning environment than solitary work. It fosters critical thinking skills, develops individual accountability, increases levels of reasoning and positive interdependence, improves problem-solving strategies and…

  6. The Effect of Group Psychoeducation Program on Medication Adherence in Patients with Bipolar Mood Disorders: a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmani, Farnaz; Ebrahimi, Hossein; Ranjbar, Fatemeh; Razavi, Seyed Sajjad; Asghari, Elnaz

    2016-12-01

    Introduction: Medication nonadherence is highly prevalent in patients with bipolar disorders and often results in worsening disease prognosis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of group psychoeducation on medication adherence in female patients with bipolar mood disorder type I. Methods: This randomized controlled trial was conducted on 76 patients with bipolar mood disorder admitted in female psychiatric wards of Razi teaching hospital, Tabriz, Iran. The participants were selected by convenience sampling method and were randomly assigned to experimental and control groups. Patients in experimental group received 10 continuous 90 minutes sessions of psychoeducation, two times a week. Medication adherence was measured using the medicine check list and medication adherence rating scale (MARS) before and after intervention. Data analysis was performed with SPSS ver.13. Results: There was no significant difference between two groups regarding medication adherence before the intervention. After the study intervention, the mean scores of medication adherence check list and medication adherence rating scale in the experimental group were significantly higher than the control group. Conclusion: Since group psychoeducation was effective in improving patients' medication adherence, it could be recommended for psychiatric nurses to apply this intervention in the clinical setting.

  7. The Effect of Group Psychoeducation Program on Medication Adherence in Patients with Bipolar Mood Disorders: a Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farnaz Rahmani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Medication nonadherence is highly prevalent in patients with bipolar disorders and often results in worsening disease prognosis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of group psychoeducation on medication adherence in female patients with bipolar mood disorder type I. Methods: This randomized controlled trial was conducted on 76 patients with bipolar mood disorder admitted in female psychiatric wards of Razi teaching hospital, Tabriz, Iran. The participants were selected by convenience sampling method and were randomly assigned to experimental and control groups. Patients in experimental group received 10 continuous 90 minutes sessions of psychoeducation, two times a week. Medication adherence was measured using the medicine check list and medication adherence rating scale (MARS before and after intervention. Data analysis was performed with SPSS ver.13. Results: There was no significant difference between two groups regarding medication adherence before the intervention. After the study intervention, the mean scores of medication adherence check list and medication adherence rating scale in the experimental group were significantly higher than the control group. Conclusion: Since group psychoeducation was effective in improving patients' medication adherence, it could be recommended for psychiatric nurses to apply this intervention in the clinical setting.

  8. A randomized, controlled clinical trial of standard, group and brief cognitive-behavioral therapy for panic disorder with agoraphobia: a two-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand, André; Roberge, Pasquale; Primiano, Sandra; Germain, Vanessa

    2009-12-01

    A randomized controlled clinical trial with a wait-list control group was conducted to examine the effectiveness of three modalities (brief, group, and standard) of cognitive-behavioral treatment (CBT) for panic disorder with agoraphobia. A total of 100 participants meeting DSM-IV criteria were randomly assigned to each treatment condition: a 14-session standard CBT (n=33), a 14-session group CBT (n=35) and a 7-session brief CBT (n=32). Participants received a self-study manual and were assigned weekly readings and exercises. The results indicate that regardless of the treatment condition, CBT for moderate to severe PDA is beneficial in medium and long term. To this effect, all three-treatment conditions significantly reduced the intensity of symptoms, increased participants' quality of life, offered high effect sizes, superior maintenance of gains over time, and lower rates of relapse, compared to the wait-list control.

  9. Utilizing Joint Routing and Capacity Assignment Algorithms to Achieve Inter- and Intra-Group Delay Fairness in Multi-Rate Multicast Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yean-Fu Wen

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent advance in wireless sensor network (WSN applications such as the Internet of Things (IoT have attracted a lot of attention. Sensor nodes have to monitor and cooperatively pass their data, such as temperature, sound, pressure, etc. through the network under constrained physical or environmental conditions. The Quality of Service (QoS is very sensitive to network delays. When resources are constrained and when the number of receivers increases rapidly, how the sensor network can provide good QoS (measured as end-to-end delay becomes a very critical problem. In this paper; a solution to the wireless sensor network multicasting problem is proposed in which a mathematical model that provides services to accommodate delay fairness for each subscriber is constructed. Granting equal consideration to both network link capacity assignment and routing strategies for each multicast group guarantees the intra-group and inter-group delay fairness of end-to-end delay. Minimizing delay and achieving fairness is ultimately achieved through the Lagrangean Relaxation method and Subgradient Optimization Technique. Test results indicate that the new system runs with greater effectiveness and efficiency.

  10. Utilizing joint routing and capacity assignment algorithms to achieve inter- and intra-group delay fairness in multi-rate multicast wireless sensor networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Frank Yeong-Sung; Hsiao, Chiu-Han; Lin, Leo Shih-Chang; Wen, Yean-Fu

    2013-03-14

    Recent advance in wireless sensor network (WSN) applications such as the Internet of Things (IoT) have attracted a lot of attention. Sensor nodes have to monitor and cooperatively pass their data, such as temperature, sound, pressure, etc. through the network under constrained physical or environmental conditions. The Quality of Service (QoS) is very sensitive to network delays. When resources are constrained and when the number of receivers increases rapidly, how the sensor network can provide good QoS (measured as end-to-end delay) becomes a very critical problem. In this paper; a solution to the wireless sensor network multicasting problem is proposed in which a mathematical model that provides services to accommodate delay fairness for each subscriber is constructed. Granting equal consideration to both network link capacity assignment and routing strategies for each multicast group guarantees the intra-group and inter-group delay fairness of end-to-end delay. Minimizing delay and achieving fairness is ultimately achieved through the Lagrangean Relaxation method and Subgradient Optimization Technique. Test results indicate that the new system runs with greater effectiveness and efficiency.

  11. Utilizing Joint Routing and Capacity Assignment Algorithms to Achieve Inter- and Intra-Group Delay Fairness in Multi-Rate Multicast Wireless Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Frank Yeong-Sung; Hsiao, Chiu-Han; Lin, Leo Shih-Chang; Wen, Yean-Fu

    2013-01-01

    Recent advance in wireless sensor network (WSN) applications such as the Internet of Things (IoT) have attracted a lot of attention. Sensor nodes have to monitor and cooperatively pass their data, such as temperature, sound, pressure, etc. through the network under constrained physical or environmental conditions. The Quality of Service (QoS) is very sensitive to network delays. When resources are constrained and when the number of receivers increases rapidly, how the sensor network can provide good QoS (measured as end-to-end delay) becomes a very critical problem. In this paper; a solution to the wireless sensor network multicasting problem is proposed in which a mathematical model that provides services to accommodate delay fairness for each subscriber is constructed. Granting equal consideration to both network link capacity assignment and routing strategies for each multicast group guarantees the intra-group and inter-group delay fairness of end-to-end delay. Minimizing delay and achieving fairness is ultimately achieved through the Lagrangean Relaxation method and Subgradient Optimization Technique. Test results indicate that the new system runs with greater effectiveness and efficiency. PMID:23493123

  12. Increasing adherence to obstructive sleep apnea treatment with a group social cognitive therapy treatment intervention: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Delwyn; Wong, Keith; Richards, Dianne; Moy, Emma; Espie, Colin A; Cistulli, Peter A; Grunstein, Ronald

    2013-11-01

    To examine whether a social cognitive therapy (SCT) intervention increases continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) use compared to equivalent social interaction (SI) time. Individuals with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) referred for CPAP therapy. Participants received a 30-min group education session regarding OSA and CPAP. Groups of three to four participants were then randomly assigned to an SCT session or social interaction. CPAP usage was assessed at 7 nights, then 1, 3, and 6 months. The two primary outcomes were adherence, usage ≥ 4 h per night at 6 months, and uptake of CPAP. Questionnaires were given pretreatment and posttreatment. Two hundred six individuals were randomized to SI (n = 97) or SCT (n = 109). CPAP uptake was not different between groups (82% in SI, 88% in SCT groups, P = 0.35). There were no differences between groups in adherence: 63-66% at 1 week, and at 6 months 55-47% (P = 0.36). Higher pretreatment apnea-hypopnea index, higher baseline self-efficacy, and use of CPAP (≥ 4 h) at 1 week were independent predictors of CPAP adherence at 6 months. CPAP adherence increased by a factor of 1.8 (odds ratio = 1.8, 95% confidence interval 1.1-3.0) for every one-unit increase in self-efficacy. There was no difference between groups postintervention in self-efficacy scores, sleepiness, mood, or sleep quality. In this randomized trial, a single SCT application did not increase adherence when compared with SI time. Although self-efficacy scores prior to CPAP predicted adherence, self-efficacy was not increased by the interventions. Increasing intensity and understanding of SCT interventions may be needed to improve CPAP adherence. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry, ACTRN12607000424404.

  13. A Randomized Clinical Trial of an Integrative Group Therapy for Children With Severe Mood Dysregulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waxmonsky, James G.; Waschbusch, Daniel A.; Belin, Peter; Li, Tan; Babocsai, Lysett; Humphrey, Hugh; Pariseau, Meaghan E.; Babinski, Dara E.; Hoffman, Martin T.; Haak, Jenifer L.; Mazzant, Jessica A.; Fabiano, Gregory A.; Pettit, Jeremy W.; Fallahazad, Negar; Pelham, William E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Non-episodic irritability is a common and impairing problem, leading to the development of the diagnoses severe mood dysregulation (SMD) and disruptive mood dysregulation disorder (DMDD). No psychosocial therapies have been formally evaluated for either, with medication being the most common treatment. This study examined the feasibility and efficacy of a joint parent–child intervention for SMD. Method Sixty-eight particpants ages 7–12 with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and SMD were randomly assigned to the 11-week therapy or community-based psychosocial treatment. All participants were first stabilized on psychostimulant medication by study physicians. Fifty-six still manifested impairing SMD symptoms and entered the therapy phase. Masked evaluators assessed participants at baseline, midpoint, and endpoint, with therapy participants reassessed 6 weeks later. Results All but two therapy participants attended the majority of sessions (n=29), with families reporting high levels of satisfaction. The primary outcome of change in mood symptoms using the Mood Severity Index (MSI) did not reach significance except in the subset attending the majority of sessions (effect size [ES]=0.53). Therapy was associated with significantly greater improvement in parent-rated irritability (ES=0.63). Treatment effects for irritability but not MSI diminished after therapy stopped. Little impact on ADHD symptoms was seen. Results may not be generalizable to youth with SMD and different comorbidities than seen in this sample of children with ADHD and are limited by the lack of a gold standard for measuring change in SMD symptoms. Conclusion While failing to significantly improve mood symptoms versus community treatment, the integrative therapy was found to be a feasible and efficacious treatment for irritability in participants with SMD and ADHD. Clinical trial registration information Group-Based Behavioral Therapy Combined With Stimulant Medication for

  14. Group Cognitive Behavioural Therapy and Group Recreational Activity for Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Preliminary Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesselmark, Eva; Plenty, Stephanie; Bejerot, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Although adults with autism spectrum disorder are an increasingly identified patient population, few treatment options are available. This "preliminary" randomized controlled open trial with a parallel design developed two group interventions for adults with autism spectrum disorders and intelligence within the normal range: cognitive…

  15. Assignment of Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Linkage Groups to Specific Chromosomes Reveals a Karyotype with Multiple Rearrangements of the Chromosome Arms of Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Ruth B.; Park, Linda K.; Naish, Kerry A.

    2013-01-01

    The Chinook salmon genetic linkage groups have been assigned to specific chromosomes using fluorescence in situ hybridization with bacterial artificial chromosome probes containing genetic markers mapped to each linkage group in Chinook salmon and rainbow trout. Comparison of the Chinook salmon chromosome map with that of rainbow trout provides strong evidence for conservation of large syntenic blocks in these species, corresponding to entire chromosome arms in the rainbow trout as expected. In almost every case, the markers were found at approximately the same location on the chromosome arm in each species, suggesting conservation of marker order on the chromosome arms of the two species in most cases. Although theoretically a few centric fissions could convert the karyotype of rainbow trout (2N = 58–64) into that of Chinook salmon (2N = 68) or vice versa, our data suggest that chromosome arms underwent multiple centric fissions and subsequent new centric fusions to form the current karyotypes. The morphology of only approximately one-third of the chromosome pairs have been conserved between the two species. PMID:24170739

  16. Assignment of adverse event indexing terms in randomized clinical trials involving spinal manipulative therapy: an audit of records in MEDLINE and EMBASE databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorrell, Lindsay M; Engel, Roger M; Lystad, Reidar P; Brown, Benjamin T

    2017-03-14

    Reporting of adverse events in randomized clinical trials (RCTs) is encouraged by the authors of The Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) statement. With robust methodological design and adequate reporting, RCTs have the potential to provide useful evidence on the incidence of adverse events associated with spinal manipulative therapy (SMT). During a previous investigation, it became apparent that comprehensive search strategies combining text words with indexing terms was not sufficiently sensitive for retrieving records that were known to contain reports on adverse events. The aim of this analysis was to compare the proportion of articles containing data on adverse events associated with SMT that were indexed in MEDLINE and/or EMBASE and the proportion of those that included adverse event-related words in their title or abstract. A sample of 140 RCT articles previously identified as containing data on adverse events associated with SMT was used. Articles were checked to determine if: (1) they had been indexed with relevant terms describing adverse events in the MEDLINE and EMBASE databases; and (2) they mentioned adverse events (or any related terms) in the title or abstract. Of the 140 papers, 91% were MEDLINE records, 85% were EMBASE records, 81% were found in both MEDLINE and EMBASE records, and 4% were not in either database. Only 19% mentioned adverse event-related text words in the title or abstract. There was no significant difference between MEDLINE and EMBASE records in the proportion of available papers (p = 0.078). Of the 113 papers that were found in both MEDLINE and EMBASE records, only 3% had adverse event-related indexing terms assigned to them in both databases, while 81% were not assigned an adverse event-related indexing term in either database. While there was effective indexing of RCTs involving SMT in the MEDLINE and EMBASE databases, there was a failure of allocation of adverse event indexing terms in both databases. We

  17. Assignment of adverse event indexing terms in randomized clinical trials involving spinal manipulative therapy: an audit of records in MEDLINE and EMBASE databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay M. Gorrell

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reporting of adverse events in randomized clinical trials (RCTs is encouraged by the authors of The Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT statement. With robust methodological design and adequate reporting, RCTs have the potential to provide useful evidence on the incidence of adverse events associated with spinal manipulative therapy (SMT. During a previous investigation, it became apparent that comprehensive search strategies combining text words with indexing terms was not sufficiently sensitive for retrieving records that were known to contain reports on adverse events. The aim of this analysis was to compare the proportion of articles containing data on adverse events associated with SMT that were indexed in MEDLINE and/or EMBASE and the proportion of those that included adverse event-related words in their title or abstract. Methods A sample of 140 RCT articles previously identified as containing data on adverse events associated with SMT was used. Articles were checked to determine if: (1 they had been indexed with relevant terms describing adverse events in the MEDLINE and EMBASE databases; and (2 they mentioned adverse events (or any related terms in the title or abstract. Results Of the 140 papers, 91% were MEDLINE records, 85% were EMBASE records, 81% were found in both MEDLINE and EMBASE records, and 4% were not in either database. Only 19% mentioned adverse event-related text words in the title or abstract. There was no significant difference between MEDLINE and EMBASE records in the proportion of available papers (p = 0.078. Of the 113 papers that were found in both MEDLINE and EMBASE records, only 3% had adverse event-related indexing terms assigned to them in both databases, while 81% were not assigned an adverse event-related indexing term in either database. Conclusions While there was effective indexing of RCTs involving SMT in the MEDLINE and EMBASE databases, there was a failure of

  18. The effects of a group-based cognitive behavioral therapy on people with multiple sclerosis: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziano, Federica; Calandri, Emanuela; Borghi, Martina; Bonino, Silvia

    2014-03-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of a cognitive behavioral group-based intervention aimed at reducing depression and fostering quality of life and psychological well-being of multiple sclerosis patients through the promotion of identity redefinition, sense of coherence, and self-efficacy. A randomized controlled trial. Non-medical setting, external to the Multiple Sclerosis Clinic Centre. Eighty-two patients: 64% women; mean age 40.5, SD = 9.4; 95% with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis; Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) between 1 and 5.5 were included in the study. Patients were randomly assigned to an intervention group (five cognitive behavioral group-based sessions, n = 41) or to a control group (three informative sessions, n = 41). Depression (CES-D), Quality of life (MSQOL revised), Psychological well-being (PANAS), Identity Motives Scale, Sense of Coherence (SOC), and Self Efficacy in Multiple Sclerosis. Quality of life increased in the intervention group compared with the control at 6-months follow-up (mean change 0.72 vs. -1.76, p < 0.05). Well-being in the intervention group increased for males and slightly decreased for females at 6-months follow-up (mean change 6.58 vs. -0.82, p < 0.05). Contrasts revealed an increase in self-efficacy in the intervention group at posttreatment compared with the control (mean change 2.95 vs. -0.11, p < 0.05). Depression tended to lower, while identity and coherence increased in the intervention group compared with the control, though the differences were not significant. Preliminary evidence suggests that intervention promotes patients' quality of life and has an effect on psychological well-being and self-efficacy.

  19. Testing the Efficacy of OurSpace, a Brief, Group Dynamics-Based Physical Activity Intervention: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Brandon; Kurz, Daniel; Chalin, Patrice; Thompson, Nicholas

    2016-05-06

    Emerging technologies (ie, mobile phones, Internet) may be effective tools for promoting physical activity (PA). However, few interventions have provided effective means to enhance social support through these platforms. Face-to-face programs that use group dynamics-based principles of behavior change have been shown to be highly effective in enhancing social support through promoting group cohesion and PA, but to date, no studies have examined their effects in Web-based programs. The aim was to explore proof of concept and test the efficacy of a brief, online group dynamics-based intervention on PA in a controlled experiment. We expected that the impact of the intervention on PA would be moderated by perceptions of cohesion and the partner's degree of presence in the online media. Participants (n=135) were randomized into same-sex dyads and randomly assigned to one of four experimental conditions: standard social support (standard), group dynamics-based-high presence, group dynamics-based-low presence, or individual control. Participants performed two sets of planking exercises (pre-post). Between sets, participants in partnered conditions interacted with a virtual partner using either a standard social support app or a group dynamics-based app (group dynamics-based-low presence and group dynamics-based-high presence), the latter of which they participated in a series of online team-building exercises. Individual participants were given an equivalent rest period between sets. To increase presence during the second set, participants in the group dynamics-based-high presence group saw a live video stream of their partner exercising. Perceptions of cohesion were measured using a modified PA Group Environment Questionnaire. Physical activity was calculated as the time persisted during set 2 after controlling for persistence in set 1. Perceptions of cohesion were higher in the group dynamics-based-low presence (overall mean 5.81, SD 1.04) condition compared to the

  20. A Discrete Group Search Optimizer for Hybrid Flowshop Scheduling Problem with Random Breakdown

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cui, Zhe; Gu, Xingsheng

    2014-01-01

    ...) together with a discrete group search optimizer algorithm (DGSO). In particular, two different working cases, preempt-resume case, and preempt-repeat case are considered under random breakdown...

  1. Usual and unusual care: existing practice control groups in randomized controlled trials of behavioral interventions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Freedland, Kenneth E; Mohr, David C; Davidson, Karina W; Schwartz, Joseph E

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the use of existing practice control groups in randomized controlled trials of behavioral interventions and the role of extrinsic health care services in the design and conduct of behavioral trials...

  2. Strategy-Proof Stochastic Assignment

    OpenAIRE

    Erdil, A.

    2013-01-01

    I study strategy-proof assignment mechanisms where the agents reveal their preference rankings over the available objects. A stochastic mechanism returns lotteries over deterministic assignments, and mechanisms are compared according to first-order stochastic dominance. I show that non-wasteful strategy-proof mechanisms are not dominated by strategy-proof mechanisms, however nonwastefulness is highly restrictive when the mechanism involves randomization. In fact, the Random Priority mechanism...

  3. Exercise intervention in childhood obesity: a randomized controlled trial comparing hospital-versus home-based groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisón, Juan Francisco; Real-Montes, José María; Torró, Isabel; Arguisuelas, María Dolores; Alvarez-Pitti, Julio; Martínez-Gramage, J; Aguilar, Francisco; Lurbe, Empar

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effect of a hospital clinic group- versus home-based combined exercise-diet program for the treatment of childhood obesity. One hundred ten overweight/obese Spanish children and adolescents (6-16 years) in 2 intervention groups (hospital clinic group-based [n = 45] and home-based [n = 41]) and a sex-age-matched control group (n = 24) were randomly assigned to participate in a 6-month combined exercise (aerobic and resistance training) and Mediterranean diet program. Anthropometric values (including body weight, height, body mass index, BMI-Z score, and waist circumference) were measured pre- and postintervention for all the participants. Percentage body fat was also determined with a body fat analyzer (TANITA TBF-410 M). Our study showed a significant reduction in percentage body fat and body mass index Z-score among both intervention-group participants (4%, 0.16, hospital clinic group-based; 4.4%, 0.23, home-based; P exercise and Mediterranean diet program may be effective among overweight and obese children and adolescents, because it improves body composition, is feasible and can be adopted on a large scale without substantial expenses. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The Empirical Verification of an Assignment of Items to Subtests : The Oblique Multiple Group Method Versus the Confirmatory Common Factor Method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stuive, Ilse; Kiers, Henk A.L.; Timmerman, Marieke E.; ten Berge, Jos M.F.

    2008-01-01

    This study compares two confirmatory factor analysis methods on their ability to verify whether correct assignments of items to subtests are supported by the data. The confirmatory common factor (CCF) method is used most often and defines nonzero loadings so that they correspond to the assignment of

  5. Measles virus antibody responses in children randomly assigned to receive standard-titer edmonston-zagreb measles vaccine at 4.5 and 9 months of age, 9 months of age, or 9 and 18 months of age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martins, Cesario; Garly, May-Lill; Bale, Carlitos

    2014-01-01

    The World Health Organization recommends administration of measles vaccine (MV) at age 9 months in low-income countries. We tested the measles virus antibody response at 4.5, 9, 18, and 24 months of age for children randomly assigned to receive standard-titer Edmonston-Zagreb MV at 4.5 and 9 months...

  6. Adolescent Substance Use in the Multimodal Treatment Study of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) (MTA) as a Function of Childhood ADHD, Random Assignment to Childhood Treatments, and Subsequent Medication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Brooke S. G.; Hinshaw, Stephen P.; Arnold, L. Eugene; Swanson, James M.; Pelham, William E.; Hechtman, Lily; Hoza, Betsy; Epstein, Jeffery N.; Wigal, Timothy; Abikoff, Howard B.; Greenhill, Laurence L.; Jensen, Peter S.; Wells, Karen C.; Vitiello, Benedetto; Gibbons, Robert D.; Howard, Andrea; Houck, Patricia R.; Hur, Kwan; Lu, Bo; Marcus, Sue

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine long-term effects on substance use and substance use disorder (SUD), up to 8 years after childhood enrollment, of the randomly assigned 14-month treatments in the multisite Multimodal Treatment Study of Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (MTA; n = 436); to test whether medication at follow-up, cumulative…

  7. What Makes Group MET Work? A Randomized Controlled Trial of College Student Drinkers in Mandated Alcohol Diversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaChance, Heather; Feldstein Ewing, Sarah W.; Bryan, Angela D.; Hutchison, Kent E.

    2009-01-01

    Nationally, college drinkers exhibit the highest rates of alcohol consumption and represent the largest percentage of problem drinkers. Group motivational enhancement therapy (GMET) has been found to catalyze problem drinking reductions among college student samples. While research supporting the use of single-session GMET in college samples (general and mandated) is emergent, no studies have evaluated a comprehensive model of the potential active ingredients of this group intervention. College students (N = 206; 88% Caucasian; 63% male; M age = 18.6) mandated to a university alcohol diversion program were randomly assigned to one of three conditions: the standard-of-care two-session ‘Focus on Alcohol Concerns’ education group (FAC), a single group motivational enhancement therapy (GMET), or a single Alcohol Information-only control group (AI) to evaluate the role of five putative mediators: readiness to change, self-efficacy, perceived risk, norm estimates, and positive drinking expectancies. At three and six month follow-ups, GMET students demonstrated greater reductions in problem drinking outcomes (drinks per drinking day, hazardous drinking symptoms, and alcohol-related problems). Of the five mediators proposed, only self-efficacy emerged as a significant mediator. PMID:20025366

  8. Treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder in postwar Kosovar adolescents using mind-body skills groups: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, James S; Staples, Julie K; Blyta, Afrim; Bytyqi, Murat; Wilson, Amy T

    2008-09-01

    To determine whether participation in a mind-body skills group program based on psychological self-care, mind-body techniques, and self-expression decreases symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Eighty-two adolescents meeting criteria for PTSD according to the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire (which corresponds with 16 of the 17 diagnostic criteria for PTSD in DSM-IV) were randomly assigned to a 12-session mind-body group program or a wait-list control group. The program was conducted by high school teachers in consultation with psychiatrists and psychologists and included meditation, guided imagery, and breathing techniques; self-expression through words, drawings, and movement; autogenic training and biofeedback; and genograms. Changes in PTSD symptoms were measured using the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire. The study was conducted from September 2004 to May 2005 by The Center for Mind-Body Medicine at a high school in the Suhareka region of Kosovo. Students in the immediate intervention group had significantly lower PTSD symptom scores following the intervention than those in the wait-list control group (F = 29.8, df = 1,76; p < .001). Preintervention and postintervention scores (mean [SD]) for the intervention group were 2.5 (0.3) and 2.0 (0.3), respectively, and for the control group, 2.5 (0.3) and 2.4 (0.4), respectively. The decreased PTSD symptom scores were maintained in the initial intervention group at 3-month follow-up. After the wait-list control group received the intervention, there was a significant decrease (p < .001) in PTSD symptom scores compared to the preintervention scores. Mind-body skills groups can reduce PTSD symptoms in war-traumatized high school students and can be effectively led by trained and supervised schoolteachers. Copyright 2008 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  9. Effect of mental imagery on performance elite athletes’ in youth and adult age groups: a randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tohid Seif-Barghi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Athletes are usually skilled in physical aspects of sports; they are widely involved in physical conditioning, technical and tactical training. However they usually ignore the psychological and cognitive skills linked to their performance. Sport imagery is a well known fundamental skill that has a critical role in how a player performs and shows his/her competency during a real world game. On the other hand football as a complex team sport includes several skills linked to physical and psychological properties. We aimed to study the effect of cognitive imagery on elite football players through league competitions in two separate studies.Methods: Twenty two youth players and Twenty two adult players randomly assigned to imagery and control groups. Players in intervention group received 12 weeks training program for specific cognitive imagery and general cognitive imagery. Imagery training program focused on an important component of football performance as “successful passing”. Players in control group were assigned to a waiting list with no intervention. In order to evaluate outcome variable we assessed successful passing in real compete-tions as player performance in both pre and post test occasions.Results: Findings of study in youth participants showed that young players in interven-tion group improved the performance of passing compared to control players (OR=1.41, P0.05, CI 95%: 0.82, 1.4(.Conclusion: These results showed that cognitive imagery intervention can affect elite soccer players’ performance. This effect is more prominent in youth age football players.

  10. Programming a randomized dependent group contingency and common stimuli to promote durable behavior change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cariveau, Tom; Kodak, Tiffany

    2017-01-01

    Low levels of academic engagement may impede students' acquisition of skills. Intervening on student behavior using group contingencies may be a feasible way to increase academic engagement during group instruction. The current study examined the effect of a randomized dependent group contingency on levels of academic engagement for second-grade participants receiving small-group reading and writing instruction. The results showed that a randomized dependent group contingency increased the academic engagement of primary participants and several of the other participants during small-group instruction. The findings also showed that high levels of academic engagement were maintained when common stimuli were present and the dependent group contingency was withdrawn. © 2016 Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.

  11. Habitual cocoa intake reduces arterial stiffness in postmenopausal women regardless of intake frequency: a randomized parallel-group study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okamoto T

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Takanobu Okamoto,1 Ryota Kobayashi,1 Midori Natsume,2 Koichi Nakazato1 1Department of Exercise Physiology, Nippon Sport Science University, Tokyo, Japan; 2Food Sciences Research Laboratories, Meiji Co Ltd, Kanagawa, Japan Abstract: Arterial stiffness is substantially higher in postmenopausal than in premenopausal women. Daily cocoa intake has been shown to reduce central arterial stiffness in health adults, regardless of age; however, the effect of cocoa-intake frequency on arterial stiffness in postmenopausal women remains unclear. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of cocoa-intake frequency on arterial stiffness in postmenopausal women. A total of 26 postmenopausal women (mean age ± standard deviation 64±12 years were randomly assigned to two groups with different cocoa-intake frequencies: one group ingested 17 g of cocoa once daily except on Sundays (every-day group, n=13, and the other ingested 17 g of cocoa twice daily every other day (every-other-day group, n=13. These intake regimens were maintained in both groups for 12 weeks. Carotid–femoral pulse-wave velocity and femoral–ankle pulse-wave velocity were measured in both groups at baseline and again at the end of the 12-week study period. Compared to baseline, both pulse-wave velocities had significantly decreased after the 12-week study period in both groups (P<0.05. However, no significant difference in degree of change was observed between the two groups. Although this study did not include a sedentary control group, these results suggest that regardless of frequency, habitual cocoa intake reduces central and peripheral arterial stiffness in postmenopausal women. Keywords: flavanol-enriched cocoa, pulse-wave velocity, intake frequency, endothelin 1

  12. Randomized Trial of Group Music Therapy With Chinese Prisoners: Impact on Anxiety, Depression, and Self-Esteem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi-Jing; Hannibal, Niels; Gold, Christian

    2016-07-01

    This study investigated the effects of group music therapy on improving anxiety, depression, and self-esteem in Chinese prisoners. Two-hundred male prisoners were randomly assigned to music therapy (n = 100) or standard care (n = 100). The music therapy had 20 sessions of group therapy compared with standard care. Anxiety (State and Trait Anxiety Inventory [STAI]), depression (Beck Depression Inventory [BDI]), and self-esteem (Texas Social Behavior Inventory [TSBI], Rosenberg Self-Esteem Inventory [RSI]) were measured by standardized scales at baseline, mid-program, and post-program. Data were analyzed based on the intention to treat principle. Compared with standard care, anxiety and depression in the music therapy condition decreased significantly at mid-test and post-test; self-esteem improved significantly at mid-test (TSBI) and at post-test (TSBI, RSI). Improvements were greater in younger participants (STAI-Trait, RSI) and/or in those with a lower level of education (STAI-State, STAI-Trait). Group music therapy seems to be effective in improving anxiety, depression, and self-esteem and was shown to be most beneficial for prisoners of younger age or with lower education level. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. Coping and health-related quality of life in men with prostate cancer randomly assigned to hormonal medication or close monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Heather J; Pakenham, Kenneth I; Headley, Betty C; Gardiner, Robert A

    2002-01-01

    Prostatic carcinoma and its treatment have been associated with adverse effects on health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Individual differences in appraisal and coping have been suggested to mediate these HRQoL outcomes. A randomized trial of 65 men with non-localized prostate cancer compared several treatments and tested associations between appraisal, coping, and HRQoL. These patients, and 16 community volunteers matched for age and general health, undertook psychosocial assessments before treatment and after 6 months of treatment. Compared with baseline assessments, men on hormonal treatments reported impaired sexual function. Groups did not differ on emotional distress, existential satisfaction, subjective cognitive function, physical symptoms, or social and role functioning. For individuals, hormonal treatments were more frequently associated with decreased sexual, social and role functioning, but were also associated with improved physical symptoms. In hierarchical regression analysis, HRQoL was lower for men who had more comorbid illnesses, a history of neurological dysfunction, higher threat appraisals, or higher use of coping strategies at baseline. These results showed that pharmacological hormonal ablation for prostate cancer can improve or decrease HRQoL in different domains. HRQoL in men with prostate cancer was associated more strongly with appraisal and coping than with medical variables. Copyright 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. "Right from the Start": Randomized Trial Comparing an Attachment Group Intervention to Supportive Home Visiting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niccols, Alison

    2008-01-01

    Background: Infant attachment security is a protective factor for future mental health, and may be promoted by individual interventions. Given service demands, it is important to determine if a group-based intervention for parents could be used to enhance infant attachment security. Methods: In a randomized trial involving 76 mothers, an 8-session…

  15. Pilot randomized controlled trial of dialectical behavior therapy group skills training for ADHD among college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Andrew P; McMahon, Robert J; Moran, Lyndsey R; Peterson, A Paige; Dreessen, Anthony

    2015-03-01

    ADHD affects between 2% and 8% of college students and is associated with broad functional impairment. No prior randomized controlled trials with this population have been published. The present study is a pilot randomized controlled trial evaluating dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) group skills training adapted for college students with ADHD. Thirty-three undergraduates with ADHD between ages 18 and 24 were randomized to receive either DBT group skills training or skills handouts during an 8-week intervention phase. ADHD symptoms, executive functioning (EF), and related outcomes were assessed at baseline, post-treatment, and 3-month follow-up. Participants receiving DBT group skills training showed greater treatment response rates (59-65% vs. 19-25%) and clinical recovery rates (53-59% vs. 6-13%) on ADHD symptoms and EF, and greater improvements in quality of life. DBT group skills training may be efficacious, acceptable, and feasible for treating ADHD among college students. A larger randomized trial is needed for further evaluation. © 2014 SAGE Publications.

  16. Group support for patients with metastatic cancer. A randomized outcome study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegel, D; Bloom, J R; Yalom, I

    1981-05-01

    The effects of weekly supportive group meetings for women with metastatic carcinoma of the breast were systematically evaluated in a one-year, randomized, prospective outcome study. The groups focused on the problems of terminal illness, including improving relationships with family, friends, and physicians and living as fully as possible in the face of death. We hypothesized that this invention would lead to improved mood, coping strategies, and self-esteem among those in the treatment group. Eighty-six patients were tested at four-month intervals. The treatment group had significantly lower mood-disturbance scores on the Profile of Mood States scale, had fewer maladaptive coping responses, and were less phobic than the control group. This study provides objective evidence that a supportive group intervention for patients with metastatic cancer results in psychological benefit. Mechanisms underlying the effectiveness of this group intervention are explored.

  17. Random-effects regression analysis of correlated grouped-time survival data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedeker, D; Siddiqui, O; Hu, F B

    2000-04-01

    Random-effects regression modelling is proposed for analysis of correlated grouped-time survival data. Two analysis approaches are considered. The first treats survival time as an ordinal outcome, which is either right-censored or not. The second approach treats survival time as a set of dichotomous indicators of whether the event occurred for time periods up to the period of the event or censor. For either approach both proportional hazards and proportional odds versions of the random-effects model are developed, while partial proportional hazards and odds generalizations are described for the latter approach. For estimation, a full-information maximum marginal likelihood solution is implemented using numerical quadrature to integrate over the distribution of multiple random effects. The quadrature solution allows some flexibility in the choice of distributions for the random effects; both normal and rectangular distributions are considered in this article. An analysis of a dataset where students are clustered within schools is used to illustrate features of random-effects analysis of clustered grouped-time survival data.

  18. Adhesives: Test Method, Group Assignment, and Categorization Guide for High-Loading-Rate Applications Preparation and Testing of Single Lap Joints (Ver. 2.2, Unlimited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    a starting point, the operator should refer to the manufacturer’s technical data sheet (TDS) and MSDS for preliminary guidance. Operator safety is...Step 4 Place the bottom lap-joint coupon panel opposite to the bottom shim on top of the release sheet , tabs facing inward, with the prepared tab...Assignment, and Categorization Guide for High-Loading- Rate Applications – Preparation and Testing of Single Lap Joints (Ver. 2.2, Unlimited) by

  19. The Japan Statin Treatment Against Recurrent Stroke (J-STARS): A Multicenter, Randomized, Open-label, Parallel-group Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosomi, Naohisa; Nagai, Yoji; Kohriyama, Tatsuo; Ohtsuki, Toshiho; Aoki, Shiro; Nezu, Tomohisa; Maruyama, Hirofumi; Sunami, Norio; Yokota, Chiaki; Kitagawa, Kazuo; Terayama, Yasuo; Takagi, Makoto; Ibayashi, Setsuro; Nakamura, Masakazu; Origasa, Hideki; Fukushima, Masanori; Mori, Etsuro; Minematsu, Kazuo; Uchiyama, Shinichiro; Shinohara, Yukito; Yamaguchi, Takenori; Matsumoto, Masayasu

    2015-01-01

    Background Although statin therapy is beneficial for the prevention of initial stroke, the benefit for recurrent stroke and its subtypes remains to be determined in Asian, in whom stroke profiles are different from Caucasian. This study examined whether treatment with low-dose pravastatin prevents stroke recurrence in ischemic stroke patients. Methods This is a multicenter, randomized, open-label, blinded-endpoint, parallel-group study of patients who experienced non-cardioembolic ischemic stroke. All patients had a total cholesterol level between 4.65 and 6.21 mmol/L at enrollment, without the use of statins. The pravastatin group patients received 10 mg of pravastatin/day; the control group patients received no statins. The primary endpoint was the occurrence of stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA), with the onset of each stroke subtype set to be one of the secondary endpoints. Finding Although 3000 patients were targeted, 1578 patients (491 female, age 66.2 years) were recruited and randomly assigned to pravastatin group or control group. During the follow-up of 4.9 ± 1.4 years, although total stroke and TIA similarly occurred in both groups (2.56 vs. 2.65%/year), onset of atherothrombotic infarction was less frequent in pravastatin group (0.21 vs. 0.64%/year, p = 0.0047, adjusted hazard ratio 0.33 [95%CI 0.15 to 0.74]). No significant intergroup difference was found for the onset of other stroke subtypes, and for the occurrence of adverse events. Interpretation Although whether low-dose pravastatin prevents recurrence of total stroke or TIA still needs to be examined in Asian, this study has generated a hypothesis that it may reduce occurrence of stroke due to larger artery atherosclerosis. Funding This study was initially supported by a grant from the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, Japan. After the governmental support expired, it was conducted in collaboration between Hiroshima University and the Foundation for Biomedical Research and

  20. Special quasirandom structures for binary/ternary group IV random alloys

    KAUST Repository

    Chroneos, Alexander I.

    2010-06-01

    Simulation of defect interactions in binary/ternary group IV semiconductor alloys at the density functional theory level is difficult due to the random distribution of the constituent atoms. The special quasirandom structures approach is a computationally efficient way to describe the random nature. We systematically study the efficacy of the methodology and generate a number of special quasirandom cells for future use. In order to demonstrate the applicability of the technique, the electronic structures of E centers in Si1-xGex and Si1-x -yGexSny alloys are discussed for a range of nearest neighbor environments. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Usual and unusual care: existing practice control groups in randomized controlled trials of behavioral interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedland, Kenneth E; Mohr, David C; Davidson, Karina W; Schwartz, Joseph E

    2011-05-01

    To evaluate the use of existing practice control groups in randomized controlled trials of behavioral interventions and the role of extrinsic health care services in the design and conduct of behavioral trials. Selective qualitative review. Extrinsic health care services, also known as nonstudy care, have important but under-recognized effects on the design and conduct of behavioral trials. Usual care, treatment-as-usual, standard of care, and other existing practice control groups pose a variety of methodological and ethical challenges, but they play a vital role in behavioral intervention research. This review highlights the need for a scientific consensus statement on control groups in behavioral trials.

  2. A phylogenetic analysis of Schistosoma haematobium group species based on randomly amplified polymorphic DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaukas, A; Dias Neto, E; Simpson, A J; Southgate, V R; Rollinson, D

    1994-04-01

    Randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) profiles were produced using four oligonucleotide primers with genomic DNA from 15 isolates of schistosome. Both inter- and intraspecific variation were noted. Intraspecific variation was greater for two species of the S. haematobium group (S. haematobium and S. intercalatum) than for S. mansoni. The inferred phylogeny placed S. curassoni and S. bovis as sister groups to S. mansoni-S. rodhaini group. S. mattheei and S. leiperi formed a separate lineage. The results confirm that RAPD profiles may be used for both strain and species differentiation and for the generation of phylogenetic trees.

  3. Does group training during pregnancy prevent lumbopelvic pain? A randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mørkved, Siv; Salvesen, Kjell Asmund; Schei, Berit; Lydersen, Stian; Bø, Kari

    2007-01-01

    Prevention of lumbopelvic pain in pregnancy has been sparsely studied. One aim of this study was to assess if a 12-week training program during pregnancy can prevent and/or treat lumbopelvic pain. A randomized controlled trial was conducted at Trondheim University Hospital and three outpatient physiotherapy clinics. Three hundred and one healthy nulliparous women were included at 20 weeks of pregnancy and randomly allocated to a training group (148) or a control group (153). The outcome measures were self-reported symptoms of lumbopelvic pain (once per week or more), sick leave, and functional status. Pain drawing was used to document the painful area of the body. The intervention included daily pelvic floor muscle training at home, and weekly group training over 12 weeks including aerobic exercises, pelvic floor muscle and additional exercises, and information related to pregnancy. At 36 weeks of gestation women in the training group were significantly less likely to report lumbopelvic pain: 65/148 (44%) versus 86/153 (56%) (p=0.03). Three months after delivery the difference was 39/148 (26%) in the training group versus 56/153 (37%) in the control group (p=0.06). There was no difference in sick leave during pregnancy, but women in the training group had significantly (p=0.01) higher scores on functional status. A 12-week specially designed training program during pregnancy was effective in preventing lumbopelvic pain in pregnancy.

  4. Group cognitive behavioural therapy and group recreational activity for adults with autism spectrum disorders: a preliminary randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesselmark, Eva; Plenty, Stephanie; Bejerot, Susanne

    2014-08-01

    Although adults with autism spectrum disorder are an increasingly identified patient population, few treatment options are available. This preliminary randomized controlled open trial with a parallel design developed two group interventions for adults with autism spectrum disorders and intelligence within the normal range: cognitive behavioural therapy and recreational activity. Both interventions comprised 36 weekly 3-h sessions led by two therapists in groups of 6-8 patients. A total of 68 psychiatric patients with autism spectrum disorders participated in the study. Outcome measures were Quality of Life Inventory, Sense of Coherence Scale, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and an exploratory analysis on measures of psychiatric health. Participants in both treatment conditions reported an increased quality of life at post-treatment (d = 0.39, p autism spectrum disorder. The interventions' similar efficacy may be due to the common elements, structure and group setting. Cognitive behavioural therapy may be additionally beneficial in terms of increasing specific skills and minimizing dropout. © The Author(s) 2013.

  5. Single- versus two-visit pulpectomy treatment in primary teeth with apical periodontitis: A double-blind, parallel group, randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharuka, Sneha Bharatkumar; Mandroli, Praveenkumar S

    2016-01-01

    Reduction of the bacterial populations to levels compatible with periradicular tissue healing is the primary microbiological goal of the endodontic treatment of teeth with apical periodontitis. The number of visits required to treat teeth with apical periodontitis represents one of the most debatable issues in endodontics. The objective of this study was to compare and evaluate the clinical and radiographic outcome of single- versus two-visit pulpectomy treatment in primary teeth with apical periodontitis at the end of 6-month healing period. A parallel group, double-blind, randomized controlled trial was carried out in 64 children aged 4-8 years. Nonvital primary teeth with apical periodontitis with enough coronal structure were selected. Sixty-four children were assigned randomly into two groups (32 children each) by block randomization, and allocation concealment was done with closed envelop method. Group I underwent single-visit pulpectomy followed by obturation with zinc oxide eugenol (ZOE). Group II underwent conventional two-visit pulpectomy with intracanal calcium hydroxide, followed by obturation with ZOE. Postoperative clinical and radiographic evaluation was carried out at 1, 3, and 6 months after the end of the treatment. The data were analyzed by Wilcoxon's signed rank test, Mann-Whitney U-test, and Friedman test. There was no statistically significant difference in clinical and radiographic outcomes in both the groups at the end of 6-month healing period. Single-visit pulpectomy can be considered as a viable option for the treatment of primary teeth with apical periodontitis.

  6. An Evaluation of a Behaviorally Based Social Skills Group for Individuals Diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leaf, Justin B.; Leaf, Jeremy A.; Milne, Christine; Taubman, Mitchell; Oppenheim-Leaf, Misty; Torres, Norma; Townley-Cochran, Donna; Leaf, Ronald; McEachin, John; Yoder, Paul

    2017-01-01

    In this study we evaluated a social skills group which employed a progressive applied behavior analysis model for individuals diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. A randomized control trial was utilized; eight participants were randomly assigned to a treatment group and seven participants were randomly assigned to a waitlist control group. The…

  7. Effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of meaning-centered group psychotherapy in cancer survivors: protocol of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Spek, Nadia; Vos, Joël; van Uden-Kraan, Cornelia F; Breitbart, William; Cuijpers, Pim; Knipscheer-Kuipers, Kitty; Willemsen, Vincent; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; van Asperen, Christi J; Verdonck-de Leeuw, Irma M

    2014-01-28

    Meaning-focused coping may be at the core of adequate adjustment to life after cancer. Cancer survivors who experience their life as meaningful are better adjusted, have better quality of life and psychological functioning. Meaning-Centered Group Psychotherapy for Cancer Survivors (MCGP-CS) was designed to help patients to sustain or enhance a sense of meaning and purpose in their lives. The aim of the proposed study is to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of MCGP-CS. Survivors diagnosed with cancer in the last 5 years and treated with curative intent, are recruited via several hospitals in the Netherlands. After screening, 168 survivors are randomly assigned to one of the three study arms: 1. Meaning-Centered Group Psychotherapy (MCGP-CS) 2. Supportive group psychotherapy (SGP) 3. Care as usual (CAU). Baseline assessment takes place before randomisation, with follow up assessments post-intervention and at 3, 6 and 12 months follow-up. Primary outcome is meaning making (PMP, PTGI, SPWB). Secondary outcome measures address quality of life (EORTC-30), anxiety and depression (HADS), hopelessness (BHS), optimism (LOT-R), adjustment to cancer (MAC), and costs (TIC-P, EQ-5D, PRODISQ). Meaning-focused coping is key to adjustment to life after cancer, however, there is a lack of evidence based psychological interventions in this area. Many cancer survivors experience feelings of loneliness and alienation, and have a need for peer support, therefore a group method in particular, can be beneficial for sustaining or enhancing a sense of meaning. If this MCGP-CS is effective for cancer survivors, it can be implemented in the practice of psycho-oncology care. Netherlands Trial Register, NTR3571.

  8. Four-year follow-up of a randomized controlled trial of triple p group for parent and child outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrichs, Nina; Kliem, Sören; Hahlweg, Kurt

    2014-04-01

    Approximately 15-20% of children experience behavioral and/or emotional difficulties. Evidence-based treatment will likely not be sufficient to reduce the prevalence of these difficulties in children and adolescents. Effective prevention programs are therefore also needed to enable families access to support at multiple points across the lifecourse. The aim of the current investigation was to evaluate the 4-year efficacy of the group-based Triple P (Positive Parenting Program) as a prevention program administered universally. Seventeen preschools were randomly assigned to Triple P (n = 11 preschools, 186 families) or a no parenting intervention control group (n = 6 preschools, 94 families). Long-term efficacy was analyzed with hierarchical linear models using maternal and paternal self-report measures. Mothers and fathers from the intervention preschool group reported significant reductions in dysfunctional parenting behavior (d = 0.24 and 0.19, respectively). Mothers also reported a less steep decline from pre- to post-intervention in positive parenting behavior, which was maintained 4 years later (d = 0.38). Fathers from intervention preschools reported a delayed less steep decline in positive parenting during the follow-up (d = 0.33). In addition, mothers from intervention preschools reported immediate improvement in child behavior problems during the program while mothers from control preschools did not report this immediate change. However, with mothers from intervention preschools reporting more child behavior problems at baseline, the effect disappeared by the fourth year (d = 0.19). The results support the long-term efficacy of the Triple P-group program as a universal prevention intervention for changing parenting behavior while there was little evidence for maintenance of change in behavior problems.

  9. The effectiveness of a Housing First adaptation for ethnic minority groups: findings of a pragmatic randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicky Stergiopoulos

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about the effectiveness of Housing First (HF among ethnic minority groups, despite its growing popularity for homeless adults experiencing mental illness. This randomized controlled trial tests the effectiveness of a HF program using rent supplements and intensive case management, enhanced by anti-racism and anti-oppression practices for homeless adults with mental illness from diverse ethnic minority backgrounds. Methods This unblinded pragmatic field trial was carried out in community settings in Toronto, Canada. Participants were 237 adults from ethnic minority groups experiencing mental illness and homelessness, who met study criteria for moderate needs for mental health services. Participants were randomized to either adapted HF (n = 135 or usual care (n = 102 and followed every 3 months for 24 months. The primary study outcome was housing stability; secondary outcomes included physical and mental health, social functioning, quality of life, arrests and health service use. Intention to treat statistical analyses examined the effectiveness of the intervention compared to usual care. Results During the 24-month study period, HF participants were stably housed a significantly greater proportion of time compared to usual care participants, 75 % (95 % CI 70 to 81 vs. 41 % (95 % CI 35 to 48, respectively, for a difference of 34 %, 95 % CI 25 to 43. HF also led to improvements in community integration over the course of the study: the change in the mean difference between treatment groups from baseline to 24-months was significantly greater among HF participants compared to those in usual care (change in mean difference = 2.2, 95 % CI 0.06 to 4.3. Baseline diagnosis of psychosis was associated with reduced likelihood of being housed ≥ 50 % of the study period (OR = 0.37, 95 % CI 0.18 to 0.72. Conclusion Housing First enhanced with anti-racism and anti-oppression practices can

  10. German Acupuncture Trials (GERAC) for chronic low back pain: randomized, multicenter, blinded, parallel-group trial with 3 groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haake, Michael; Müller, Hans-Helge; Schade-Brittinger, Carmen; Basler, Heinz D; Schäfer, Helmut; Maier, Christoph; Endres, Heinz G; Trampisch, Hans J; Molsberger, Albrecht

    2007-09-24

    To our knowledge, verum acupuncture has never been directly compared with sham acupuncture and guideline-based conventional therapy in patients with chronic low back pain. A patient- and observer-blinded randomized controlled trial conducted in Germany involving 340 outpatient practices, including 1162 patients aged 18 to 86 years (mean +/- SD age, 50 +/- 15 years) with a history of chronic low back pain for a mean of 8 years. Patients underwent ten 30-minute sessions, generally 2 sessions per week, of verum acupuncture (n = 387) according to principles of traditional Chinese medicine; sham acupuncture (n = 387) consisting of superficial needling at nonacupuncture points; or conventional therapy, a combination of drugs, physical therapy, and exercise (n = 388). Five additional sessions were offered to patients who had a partial response to treatment (10%-50% reduction in pain intensity). Primary outcome was response after 6 months, defined as 33% improvement or better on 3 pain-related items on the Von Korff Chronic Pain Grade Scale questionnaire or 12% improvement or better on the back-specific Hanover Functional Ability Questionnaire. Patients who were unblinded or had recourse to other than permitted concomitant therapies during follow-up were classified as nonresponders regardless of symptom improvement. At 6 months, response rate was 47.6% in the verum acupuncture group, 44.2% in the sham acupuncture group, and 27.4% in the conventional therapy group. Differences among groups were as follows: verum vs sham, 3.4% (95% confidence interval, -3.7% to 10.3%; P = .39); verum vs conventional therapy, 20.2% (95% confidence interval, 13.4% to 26.7%; P vs conventional therapy, 16.8% (95% confidence interval, 10.1% to 23.4%; P acupuncture treatment for at least 6 months. Effectiveness of acupuncture, either verum or sham, was almost twice that of conventional therapy.

  11. Calculation of the mean differential group delay of periodically spun, randomly birefringent fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galtarossa, Andrea; Griggio, Paola; Pizzinat, Anna; Palmieri, Luca

    2002-05-01

    Spinning is one of the most effective and well-known ways to reduce polarization mode dispersion of optical fibers. In spite of the popularity of spinning, a detailed theory of spin effects is still lacking. We report an analytical expression for the mean differential group delay of a randomly birefringent spun fiber. The result holds for any periodic spin function with a period shorter than the fiber's beat length.

  12. Assigning agents to a line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Jens Leth; Moreno-Ternero, Juan D.; Østerdal, Lars Peter Raahave

    2014-01-01

    minimizing modification of the classic random priority method to solve this class of problems. We also provide some logical relations in our setting among standard axioms in the literature on assignment problems, and explore the robustness of our results to several extensions of our setting....

  13. A Group-Based Yoga Therapy Intervention for Urinary Incontinence in Women: A Pilot Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Alison J.; Jenny, Hillary E.; Chesney, Margaret A.; Schembri, Michael; Subak, Leslee L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the feasibility, efficacy, and safety of a group-based yoga therapy intervention for middle-aged and older women with urinary incontinence. Methods We conducted a pilot randomized trial of ambulatory women aged 40 years and older with stress, urgency, or mixed-type incontinence. Women were randomized to a 6-week yoga therapy program (N=10) consisting of twice weekly group classes and once weekly home practice or a waitlist control group (N=9). All participants also received written pamphlets about standard behavioral self-management strategies for incontinence. Changes in incontinence were assessed by 7-day voiding diaries. Results Mean (±SD) age was 61.4 (±8.2) years, and mean baseline frequency of incontinence was 2.5 (±1.3) episodes/day. After 6 weeks, total incontinence frequency decreased by 66% (1.8 [±0.9] fewer episodes/day) in the yoga therapy versus 13% (0.3 [±1.7] fewer episodes/day) in the control group (P=0.049). Participants in the yoga therapy group also reported an average 85% decrease in stress incontinence frequency (0.7 [±0.8] fewer episodes/day) compared to a 25% increase in controls (0.2 [± 1.1] more episodes/day) (P=0.039). No significant differences in reduction in urgency incontinence were detected between the yoga therapy versus control groups (1.0 [±1.0] versus 0.5 [±0.5] fewer episodes/day, P=0.20). All women starting the yoga therapy program completed at least 90% of group classes and practice sessions. Two participants in each group reported adverse events unrelated to the intervention. Conclusions Findings provide preliminary evidence to support the feasibility, efficacy, and safety of a group-based yoga therapy intervention to improve urinary incontinence in women. PMID:24763156

  14. A prospective randomized trial of content expertise versus process expertise in small group teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peets, Adam D; Cooke, Lara; Wright, Bruce; Coderre, Sylvain; McLaughlin, Kevin

    2010-10-14

    Effective teaching requires an understanding of both what (content knowledge) and how (process knowledge) to teach. While previous studies involving medical students have compared preceptors with greater or lesser content knowledge, it is unclear whether process expertise can compensate for deficient content expertise. Therefore, the objective of our study was to compare the effect of preceptors with process expertise to those with content expertise on medical students' learning outcomes in a structured small group environment. One hundred and fifty-one first year medical students were randomized to 11 groups for the small group component of the Cardiovascular-Respiratory course at the University of Calgary. Each group was then block randomized to one of three streams for the entire course: tutoring exclusively by physicians with content expertise (n = 5), tutoring exclusively by physicians with process expertise (n = 3), and tutoring by content experts for 11 sessions and process experts for 10 sessions (n = 3). After each of the 21 small group sessions, students evaluated their preceptors' teaching with a standardized instrument. Students' knowledge acquisition was assessed by an end-of-course multiple choice (EOC-MCQ) examination. Students rated the process experts significantly higher on each of the instrument's 15 items, including the overall rating. Students' mean score (±SD) on the EOC-MCQ exam was 76.1% (8.1) for groups taught by content experts, 78.2% (7.8) for the combination group and 79.5% (9.2) for process expert groups (p = 0.11). By linear regression student performance was higher if they had been taught by process experts (regression coefficient 2.7 [0.1, 5.4], p teach first year medical students within a structured small group environment; preceptors with process expertise result in at least equivalent, if not superior, student outcomes in this setting.

  15. Pilot study of the Korean Parent Training Program using a partial group randomized experimental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eunjung; Cain, Kevin; Boutain, Doris; Chun, Jin-Joo; Kim, Sangho; Im, Hyesang

    2017-01-01

    Problems Korean American (KA) children experience mental health problems due to difficulties in parenting dysfunction complicated by living in two cultures. Methods Korean Parent Training Program (KPTP) was pilot tested with 48 KA mothers of children (ages 3–8) using partial group randomized controlled experimental study design. Self-report survey and observation data were gathered. Findings Analyses using generalized estimating equation indicated the intervention group mothers increased effective parenting and their children decreased behavior problems and reported less acculturation conflict with mothers. Conclusions The KPTP is a promising way to promote effective parenting and increase positive child mental health in KA families. PMID:24645901

  16. One-Year Follow-Up of the Effectiveness of Cognitive Behavioral Group Therapy for Patients’ Depression: A Randomized, Single-Blinded, Controlled Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai-Jo Chiang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to investigate the long-term (one year effectiveness of a 12-session weekly cognitive behavior group therapy (CBGT on patients with depression. This was a single-blind randomized controlled study with a 2-arm parallel group design. Eighty-one subjects were randomly assigned to 12 sessions intervention group (CBGT or control group (usual outpatient psychiatric care group and 62 completed the study. The primary outcome was depression measured with Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II and Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD. The secondary outcomes were automatic thoughts measured by automatic thoughts questionnaire (ATQ. Both groups were evaluated at the pretest (before 2 weeks, posttest (after 12 therapy sessions, and short- (3 months, medium- (6 months, and long-term (12 months follow-up. After receiving CBGT, the experimental group had a statistically significant reduction in the BDI-II from 40.30 at baseline to 17.82 points at session eight and to 10.17 points at postintervention (P<0.001. Similar effects were seen on the HRSD. ATQ significantly decreased at the 12th session, 6 months after sessions, and 1 year after the sessions ended (P<0.001. We concluded that CBGT is effective for reducing depression and continued to be effective at 1 year of follow-up.

  17. The effects of teachers' homework follow-up practices on students' EFL performance: a randomized-group design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosário, Pedro; Núñez, José C; Vallejo, Guillermo; Cunha, Jennifer; Nunes, Tânia; Suárez, Natalia; Fuentes, Sonia; Moreira, Tânia

    2015-01-01

    This study analyzed the effects of five types of homework follow-up practices (i.e., checking homework completion; answering questions about homework; checking homework orally; checking homework on the board; and collecting and grading homework) used in class by 26 teachers of English as a Foreign Language (EFL) using a randomized-group design. Once a week, for 6 weeks, the EFL teachers used a particular type of homework follow-up practice they had previously been assigned to. At the end of the 6 weeks students completed an EFL exam as an outcome measure. The results showed that three types of homework follow-up practices (i.e., checking homework orally; checking homework on the board; and collecting and grading homework) had a positive impact on students' performance, thus highlighting the role of EFL teachers in the homework process. The effect of EFL teachers' homework follow-up practices on students' performance was affected by students' prior knowledge, but not by the number of homework follow-up sessions.

  18. Assignment refusal and its relation to outcome in a randomized controlled trial comparing Cognitive Therapy and Fluvoxamine in treatment-resistant patients with obsessive compulsive disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Landsheer, J.A.; Smit, J.H.; van Oppen, P.C.; van Balkom, A.J.L.M.

    2015-01-01

    The effectiveness of Fluvoxamine was compared to that of Cognitive Therapy (CT) in a 12-week randomized controlled trial (RCT) in 48 patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), who were treatment-resistant to a previous behavior therapy (BT). A considerable amount of patients did not comply

  19. Internet-based self-help with therapist feedback and in vivo group exposure for social phobia: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Gerhard; Carlbring, Per; Holmström, Annelie; Sparthan, Elisabeth; Furmark, Tomas; Nilsson-Ihrfelt, Elisabeth; Buhrman, Monica; Ekselius, Lisa

    2006-08-01

    Sixty-four individuals with social phobia (social anxiety disorder) were assigned to a multimodal cognitive-behavioral treatment package or to a waiting list control group. Treatment consisted of a 9-week, Internet-delivered, self-help program that was combined with 2 group exposure sessions in real life and minimal therapist contact via e-mail. Results were analyzed on an intention-to-treat basis, including all randomized participants. From pre- to posttest, treated participants in contrast to controls showed significant improvement on most measured dimensions (social anxiety scales, general anxiety and depression levels, quality of life). The overall within- and between-groups effect sizes were Cohen's d = 0.87 and 0.70, respectively. Treatment gains were maintained at 1-year follow-up. The results from this study support the continued use and development of Internet-distributed, self-help programs for people diagnosed with social phobia.

  20. Random matrix theory, the exceptional Lie groups and L-functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keating, J P [School of Mathematics, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TW, UK (United Kingdom); Linden, N [School of Mathematics, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TW, UK (United Kingdom); Rudnick, Z [Raymond and Beverly Sackler School of Mathematical Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel)

    2003-03-28

    There has recently been interest in relating properties of matrices drawn at random from the classical compact groups to statistical characteristics of number-theoretical L-functions. One example is the relationship conjectured to hold between the value distributions of the characteristic polynomials of such matrices and value distributions within families of L-functions. These connections are extended here to non-classical groups. We focus on an explicit example: the exceptional Lie group G{sub 2}. The value distributions for characteristic polynomials associated with the 7- and 14-dimensional representations of G{sub 2}, defined with respect to the uniform invariant (Haar) measure, are calculated using two of the Macdonald constant term identities. A one-parameter family of L-functions over a finite field is described whose value distribution in the limit as the size of the finite field grows is related to that of the characteristic polynomials associated with the seven-dimensional representation of G{sub 2}. The random matrix calculations extend to all exceptional Lie groups.

  1. A randomized controlled trial of Pivotal Response Treatment Group for parents of children with autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardan, Antonio Y; Gengoux, Grace W; Berquist, Kari L; Libove, Robin A; Ardel, Christina M; Phillips, Jennifer; Frazier, Thomas W; Minjarez, Mendy B

    2015-08-01

    With rates of autism diagnosis continuing to rise, there is an urgent need for effective and efficient service delivery models. Pivotal Response Treatment (PRT) is considered an established treatment for autism spectrum disorder (ASD); however, there have been few well-controlled studies with adequate sample size. The aim of this study was to conduct a randomized controlled trial to evaluate PRT parent training group (PRTG) for targeting language deficits in young children with ASD. Fifty-three children with autism and significant language delay between 2 and 6 years old were randomized to PRTG (N = 27) or psychoeducation group (PEG; N = 26) for 12 weeks. The PRTG taught parents behavioral techniques to facilitate language development. The PEG taught general information about ASD (clinical trial NCT01881750; http://www.clinicaltrials.gov). Analysis of child utterances during the structured laboratory observation (primary outcome) indicated that, compared with children in the PEG, children in the PRTG demonstrated greater improvement in frequency of utterances (F(2, 43) = 3.53, p = .038, d = 0.42). Results indicated that parents were able to learn PRT in a group format, as the majority of parents in the PRTG (84%) met fidelity of implementation criteria after 12 weeks. Children also demonstrated greater improvement in adaptive communication skills (Vineland-II) following PRTG and baseline Mullen visual reception scores predicted treatment response to PRTG. This is the first randomized controlled trial of group-delivered PRT and one of the largest experimental investigations of the PRT model to date. The findings suggest that specific instruction in PRT results in greater skill acquisition for both parents and children, especially in functional and adaptive communication skills. Further research in PRT is warranted to replicate the observed results and address other core ASD symptoms. © 2014 Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health.

  2. Heterogenic control groups in randomized, controlled, analgesic trials of total hip- and knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsen, Anders P; Mathiesen, Ole; Dahl, Jørgen B

    2017-11-17

    Postoperative analgesic interventions are often tested adjunct to basic non- opioid analgesics in randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Consequently, treatment in control groups, and assay sensitivity, differs between trials. We hypothesized that postoperative opioid requirements and pain intensities varies between different control groups in analgesic trials. Control groups from RCTs investigating analgesic interventions after total hip and knee arthroplasty were categorized based on standardized basic analgesic treatment. Morphine consumption 0-24h postoperatively, and resting pain scores at 6 and 24 hours for subgroups of basic treatments, were compared with ANOVA. In an additional analysis, we compared pain and opioid requirements in trials where NSAID was administered as an intervention with trial where NSAID was administered in a control group. We included 171 RCTs employing 28 different control groups with large variability in pain scores and opioid requirements. Four types of control groups (comprising 78 trials) were eligi- ble for subgroup comparisons. These subgroups received: 'opioid', 'NSAID+opioid', 'acetamino- phen+opioid', or 'NSAID+acetaminophen+opioid'. Morphine consumption and pain scores varied substantially between these groups, with no consistent superior efficacy in any subgroup. Addi- tionally, trials administering NSAID as an intervention demonstrated lower pain scores and opioid requirements than trials where NSAID was administered in a control group. Analgesic treatment in RCT control groups varies considerably. Control groups receiving various combinations of opioid, NSAID and acetaminophen did not differ consistently in pain and opioid requirements. Pain and opioid requirements were lower in trials administering NSAID as an intervention compared with trials administering NSAID in a control group.

  3. Control group selection in critical care randomized controlled trials evaluating interventional strategies: An ethical assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Henry J; Miller, Franklin G

    2004-03-01

    Ethical concern has been raised with critical care randomized controlled trials in which the standard of care reflects a broad range of clinical practices. Commentators have argued that trials without an unrestricted control group, in which standard practices are implemented at the discretion of the attending physician, lack the ability to redefine the standard of care and might expose subjects to excessive harms due to an inability to stop early. To develop a framework for analyzing control group selection for critical care trials. Ethical analysis. A key ethical variable in trial design is the extent with which the control group adequately reflects standard care practices. Such a control group might incorporate either the "unrestricted" practices of physicians or a protocol that specifies and restricts the parameters of standard practices. Control group selection should be determined with respect to the following ethical objectives of trial design: 1) clinical value, 2) scientific validity, 3) efficiency and feasibility, and 4) protection of human subjects. Because these objectives may conflict, control group selection will involve trade-offs and compromises. Trials using a protocolized rather than an unrestricted standard care control group will likely have enhanced validity. However, if the protocolized control group lacks representativeness to standard care practices, then trials that use such groups will offer less clinical value and could provide less assurance of protecting subjects compared with trials that use unrestricted control groups. For trials evaluating contrasting strategies that do not adequately represent standard practices, use of a third group that is more representative of standard practices will enhance clinical value and increase the ability to stop early if needed to protect subjects. These advantages might come at the expense of efficiency and feasibility. Weighing and balancing the competing ethical objectives of trial design should be

  4. A Discrete Group Search Optimizer for Hybrid Flowshop Scheduling Problem with Random Breakdown

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Cui

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The scheduling problems have been discussed in the literature extensively under the assumption that the machines are permanently available without any breakdown. However, in the real manufacturing environments, the machines could be unavailable inevitably for many reasons. In this paper, the authors introduce the hybrid flowshop scheduling problem with random breakdown (RBHFS together with a discrete group search optimizer algorithm (DGSO. In particular, two different working cases, preempt-resume case, and preempt-repeat case are considered under random breakdown. The proposed DGSO algorithm adopts the vector representation and several discrete operators, such as insert, swap, differential evolution, destruction, and construction in the producers, scroungers, and rangers phases. In addition, an orthogonal test is applied to configure the adjustable parameters in the DGSO algorithm. The computational results in both cases indicate that the proposed algorithm significantly improves the performances compared with other high performing algorithms in the literature.

  5. A national study of the psychological impact of bank robbery with a randomized control group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Maj; Armour, Cherie; Shevlin, Mark

    Despite, numerous annual bank robberies worldwide, research on the psychological sequelae of bank robberies is limited. We studied the prevalence of Acute Stress Disorder (ASD) (N = 458) and the prevalence of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) (n = 378) in a Danish national questionnaire survey...... of bank employees exposed to robbery (response rate: 73.6 %). Several related factors were also investigated including prior traumatic exposure, anxiety, and general traumatic symptoms. The results were compared to a randomized control group of bank employees never exposed to robbery (N= 303......). The estimated ASD rate was 11.1 % (n = 41), and the estimated PTSD rate was 6.2 % (n = 23). Both prevalence rates were limited by the avoidance diagnostic criteria. Preliminary results indicated that the control group scored significantly lower than the acute robbery group on general traumatization and anxiety...

  6. Creating groups with similar expected behavioural response in randomized controlled trials: a fuzzy cognitive map approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giabbanelli, Philippe J; Crutzen, Rik

    2014-12-12

    Controlling bias is key to successful randomized controlled trials for behaviour change. Bias can be generated at multiple points during a study, for example, when participants are allocated to different groups. Several methods of allocations exist to randomly distribute participants over the groups such that their prognostic factors (e.g., socio-demographic variables) are similar, in an effort to keep participants' outcomes comparable at baseline. Since it is challenging to create such groups when all prognostic factors are taken together, these factors are often balanced in isolation or only the ones deemed most relevant are balanced. However, the complex interactions among prognostic factors may lead to a poor estimate of behaviour, causing unbalanced groups at baseline, which may introduce accidental bias. We present a novel computational approach for allocating participants to different groups. Our approach automatically uses participants' experiences to model (the interactions among) their prognostic factors and infer how their behaviour is expected to change under a given intervention. Participants are then allocated based on their inferred behaviour rather than on selected prognostic factors. In order to assess the potential of our approach, we collected two datasets regarding the behaviour of participants (n = 430 and n = 187). The potential of the approach on larger sample sizes was examined using synthetic data. All three datasets highlighted that our approach could lead to groups with similar expected behavioural changes. The computational approach proposed here can complement existing statistical approaches when behaviours involve numerous complex relationships, and quantitative data is not readily available to model these relationships. The software implementing our approach and commonly used alternatives is provided at no charge to assist practitioners in the design of their own studies and to compare participants' allocations.

  7. Selective 'unlabeling' of amino acids in fractionally 13C labeled proteins: An approach for stereospecific NMR assignments of CH3 groups in Val and Leu residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atreya, H.S.; Chary, K.V.R. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Department of Chemical Sciences (India)

    2001-03-15

    A novel methodology for stereospecific NMR assignments of methyl (CH{sub 3}) groups of Val and Leu residues in fractionally {sup 13}C-labeled proteins is presented. The approach is based on selective 'unlabeling' of specific amino acids in proteins while fractionally {sup 13}C-labeling the rest. A 2D [{sup 13}C-{sup 1}H] HSQC spectrum recorded on such a sample is devoid of peaks belonging to the 'unlabeled' amino acid residues. Such spectral simplification aids in unambiguous stereospecific assignment of diastereotopic CH{sub 3} groups in Val and Leu residues in large proteins. This methodology has been demonstrated on a 15 kDa calcium binding protein from Entamoeba histolytica (Eh-CaBP)

  8. Improving insomnia in primary care patients: A randomized controlled trial of nurse-led group treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandlund, Christina; Hetta, Jerker; Nilsson, Gunnar H; Ekstedt, Mirjam; Westman, Jeanette

    2017-07-01

    Insomnia is a common health problem, and most people who seek help for insomnia consult primary care. In primary care, insomnia treatment typically consists of hypnotic drugs, although cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia is the recommended treatment. However, such treatment is currently available to few primary care patients. To evaluate the effects of a group treatment program for insomnia led by nurses in primary care. were the Insomnia Severity Index, a 2-week sleep diary, and a questionnaire on frequency of hypnotic drug use. A randomized controlled trial with pre- and post-treatment assessment and a 1-year post-treatment follow-up of the intervention group. Routine primary health care; 7 primary care centers in Stockholm, Sweden. Patients consulting primary care for insomnia were assessed for eligibility. To be included, patients had to have insomnia disorder and be 18 years or older. Patients were excluded if they if they worked night shifts or had severe untreated somatic and/or mental illness, bipolar disorder, or untreated sleep disorder other than insomnia. One-hundred and sixty-five patients 20 to 90 years were included. Most were women, and many had co-existing somatic and/or mental health problems. The post-treatment dropout rate was 20%. The intervention was a nurse-led group treatment for insomnia based on the techniques of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia. The nurses had 2days of training in how to deliver the program. Ninety patients were randomized to the intervention and 75 to the control group (treatment as usual). Data from 82 in the intervention and 71 in the control group were analyzed in accordance with intention-to-treat principles. Fifty-four of the 72 in the intervention group who participated in the group treatment program were followed up after 1year. Mean Insomnia Severity Index score decreased significantly from 18.4 to 10.7 after group treatment but remained unchanged after treatment as usual (17.0 to 16.6). The effect

  9. Effect of physical training on urinary incontinence: a randomized parallel group trial in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinsnes, Anne G; Helbostad, Jorunn L; Nyrønning, Signe; Harkless, Gene E; Granbo, Randi; Seim, Arnfinn

    2012-01-01

    Residents in nursing homes (NHs) are often frail older persons who have impaired physical activity. Urinary incontinence (UI) is a common complaint for residents in NHs. Reduced functional ability and residence in NHs are documented to be risk factors for UI. To investigate if an individualized training program designed to improve activity of daily living (ADL) and physical capacity among residents in nursing homes has any impact on UI. This randomized controlled trial was a substudy of a Nordic multicenter study. Participants had to be >65 years, have stayed in the NH for more than 3 months and in need of assistance in at least one ADL. A total of 98 residents were randomly allocated to either a training group (n = 48) or a control group (n = 50) after baseline registrations. The training program lasted for 3 months and included accommodated physical activity and ADL training. Personal treatment goals were elicited for each subject. The control group received their usual care. The main outcome measure was UI as measured by a 24-hour pad-weighing test. There was no statistically significant difference between the groups on this measure at baseline (P = 0.15). Changes were calculated from baseline to 3 months after the end of the intervention. Altogether, 68 participants were included in the analysis, 35 in the intervention group and 33 in the control group. The average age was 84.3 years. The 3 months' postintervention adjusted mean difference between groups according to amount of leakage was 191 g (P = 0.03). This result was statistically significant after adjusting for baseline level, age, sex, and functional status. The leakage increased in residents not receiving the experimental intervention, while UI in the training group showed improvement. The intervention group had significant better results compared with the control group after an individualized training program designed to improve ADL and physical capacity. Further studies are needed to evaluate the

  10. Effectiveness of group acceptance and commitment therapy for fibromyalgia: a 6-month randomized controlled trial (EFFIGACT study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luciano, Juan V; Guallar, José A; Aguado, Jaume; López-Del-Hoyo, Yolanda; Olivan, Bárbara; Magallón, Rosa; Alda, Marta; Serrano-Blanco, Antoni; Gili, Margalida; Garcia-Campayo, Javier

    2014-04-01

    In the last decade, there has been burgeoning interest in the effectiveness of third-generation psychological therapies for managing fibromyalgia (FM) symptoms. The present study examined the effectiveness of acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) on functional status as well as the role of pain acceptance as a mediator of treatment outcomes in FM patients. A total of 156 patients with FM were enrolled at primary health care centers in Zaragoza, Spain. The patients were randomly assigned to a group-based form of ACT (GACT), recommended pharmacological treatment (RPT; pregabalin + duloxetine), or wait list (WL). The primary end point was functional status (measured with the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire, FIQ). Secondary end points included pain catastrophizing, pain acceptance, pain, anxiety, depression, and health-related quality of life. The differences between groups were calculated by linear mixed-effects (intention-to-treat approach) and mediational models through path analyses. Overall, GACT was statistically superior to both RPT and WL immediately after treatment, and improvements were maintained at 6months with medium effect sizes in most cases. Immediately after treatment, the number needed to treat for 20% improvement compared to RPT was 2 (95% confidence interval 1.2-2.0), for 50% improvement 46, and for achieving a status of no worse than mild impaired function (FIQ total score acceptance only mediated the relationship between study condition and health-related quality of life. These findings are discussed in relation to previous psychological research on FM treatment. Copyright © 2013 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Group Triple P With Chinese Parents in Mainland China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Mingchun; Morawska, Alina; Sanders, Matthew R

    2016-11-01

    This study evaluated the effects of Group Triple P with Chinese parents on parenting and child outcomes as well as outcomes relating to child academic learning in Mainland China. Participants were 81 Chinese parents and their children in Shanghai, who were randomly allocated to an intervention group or wait-list control group. Parents in the intervention condition received Group Triple P training, and parents and children were assessed at three/two time points. Compared with the control group, parents in the intervention group reported significant improvements in child adjustment problems, parenting practices, parental adjustment, and parenting self-efficacy at post-assessment. Moreover, there was a significant increase in parents' satisfaction with children's academic achievement and a reduction in children's academic problem behaviors at post-intervention. All these effects were maintained at 6-month follow-up. There was also a significant increase in the child report of positive parenting at post-intervention. © The Author(s) 2016.

  12. Do randomized clinical trials with inadequate blinding report enhanced placebo effects for intervention groups and nocebo effects for placebo groups?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feys, Frederik; Bekkering, Geertruida E; Singh, Kavita; Devroey, Dirk

    2014-02-21

    Studies suggest that expectations powerfully shape clinical outcomes. For subjective outcomes in adequately blinded trials, health improvements are substantial and largely explained by non-specific factors.The objective of this study was to investigate if unblinding in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) is associated with enhanced placebo effects for intervention groups and nocebo effects for placebo groups. For these effects, a secondary objective was to explore potential moderating factors. We included RCTs that investigated the efficacy of phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE-5) inhibitors for male erectile dysfunction by comparing one PDE-5 inhibitor to placebo. In addition, to be included studies must have reported scores for change from baseline, or baseline and final International Index of Erectile Functioning-Erectile Functioning domain score (IIEF-EF), and be published in either English, French, Dutch, or German.We searched for both published and unpublished relevant trials using PUBMED, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, a clinical trials register (clinicaltrials.gov) and the Food and Drug Administration clinical reviews through March 2012.We evaluated the blinding status of trials with the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool, using the domains of allocation sequence concealment, blinding of participants, healthcare providers and outcome assessors. Across these four domains, studies that scored low risk of bias were judged to be adequately blinded and studies that scored unclear or high risk of bias were judged to be inadequately blinded. We included 110 studies (205 journal publications and 2 unpublished sources) that involved 23,877 participants; 93 (85%), 51 (46%), 93 (85%) and 93 (85%) studies were assessed with an unclear risk of bias for allocation concealment, blinding of participant, blinding of caregiver and blinding of outcome assessor, respectively. None of the studies reported testing of blinding.None of the 205 journal publications

  13. Dose-response efficacy of a new estradiol transdermal matrix patch for 7-day application: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Italian Menopause Research Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovati, L C; Setnikar, I; Genazzani, A R

    2000-08-01

    New estradiol (E2) transdermal matrix patches developed for once-a-week application, releasing 25 micrograms E2 (7D-25) or 50 micrograms E2 (7D-50) daily, were investigated in comparison with a placebo patch and the twice-weekly parent patch releasing 50 micrograms E2 (Derm-50) daily. Three hundred and eleven postmenopausal patients suffering at least seven hot flushes daily were randomly assigned to the four parallel groups and treated continuously for 12 weeks without progestin opposition. The daily number of hot flushes significantly decreased in all groups. At the 12th week the decrease from a base-line average of eight to nine episodes per day was 78% with 7D-25, 93% and 97% respectively with 7D-50 and Derm-50, and significantly (p fashion and all were well tolerated.

  14. A Multicenter, Randomized, Open-Labeled, Parallel Group Trial of Sildenafil in Alcohol-Associated Erectile Dysfunction: The Impact on Psychosocial Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Grinshpoon

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available To examine the effect of sildenafil on erectile dysfunction (ED and psychosocial outcomes in alcohol-dependent (AD men, 108 men with these diagnoses were randomly assigned to either take sildenafil (50 mg as add-on to standard treatment for AD, or the same treatment without sildenafil, for 12 weeks. Only 50 patients in sildenafil group and 51 in control group twice completed the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF and a battery of self-report questionnaires. IIEF scores and psychosocial functioning, self-esteem and support from friends improved only for sildenafil-treated patients (P < 0.001. The high effect sizes suggest that the observed benefits are unlikely to be a placebo effect, although their unspecific nature could not be ruled out. In men with ED associated with AD, sildenafil improves both ED and psychosocial outcomes. Further placebo-controlled clinical trial is warranted.

  15. Group behavioral activation for patients with severe obesity and binge eating disorder: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonsson, Sven; Parling, Thomas; Ghaderi, Ata

    2015-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess whether behavioral activation (BA) is an efficacious treatment for decreasing eating disorder symptoms in patients with obesity and binge eating disorder (BED). Ninety-six patients with severe obesity and BED were randomized to either 10 sessions of group BA or wait-list control. The study was conducted at an obesity clinic in a regular hospital setting. The treatment improved some aspects of disordered eating and had a positive effect on depressive symptoms but there was no significant difference between the groups regarding binge eating and most other symptoms. Improved mood but lack of effect on binge eating suggests that dysfunctional eating (including BED) is maintained by other mechanisms than low activation and negative mood. However, future studies need to investigate whether effects of BA on binge eating might emerge later than at post-assessment, as in interpersonal psychotherapy for bulimia nervosa. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. Exercises and Dry Needling for Subacromial Pain Syndrome: A Randomized Parallel-Group Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias-Buría, José L; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Palacios-Ceña, María; Koppenhaver, Shane L; Salom-Moreno, Jaime

    2017-01-01

    This randomized clinical trial investigated the effectiveness of exercise versus exercise plus trigger point (TrP) dry needling (TrP-DN) in subacromial pain syndrome. A randomized parallel-group trial, with 1-year follow-up was conducted. Fifty subjects with subacromial pain syndrome were randomly allocated to receive exercise alone or exercise plus TrP-DN. Participants in both groups were asked to perform an exercise program of the rotator cuff muscles twice daily for 5 weeks. Further, patients allocated to the exercise plus TrP-DN group also received dry needling to active TrPs in the muscles reproducing shoulder symptoms during the second and fourth sessions. The primary outcome was pain-related disability assessed using the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire. Secondary outcomes included mean current pain and the worst pain experienced in the shoulder during the previous week. They were assessed at baseline, 1 week, and 3, 6, and 12 months after the end of treatment. Analysis was according to intention to treat with mixed analysis of covariance adjusted for baseline outcomes. At 12 months, 47 patients (94%) completed follow-up. Statistically larger improvements (all, P < .01) in shoulder disability was found for the exercise plus TrP-DN group at all follow-up periods (post: Δ -20.6 [95% confidence interval (CI) -23.8 to -17.4]; 3 months: Δ -23.2 [95% CI -28.3 to -18.1)]; 6 months: Δ -23.6 [95% CI -28.9 to -18.3]; 12 months: Δ -13.9 [95% CI -17.5 to -10.3]). Both groups exhibited similar improvements in shoulder pain outcomes at all follow-up periods. The inclusion of TrP-DN with an exercise program was effective for improving disability in subacromial pain syndrome. No greater improvements in shoulder pain were observed. This study found that the inclusion of 2 sessions of TrP-DN into an exercise program was effective for improving shoulder pain-related disability at short-, medium-, and long-term; however, no greater

  17. Ties That Work: The Interaction between Group Assignment Method and a Culturally-Relevant Curriculum in the Context of Middle School Anti-Tobacco Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carolan, Brian V.; Unger, Jennifer B.; Johnson, C. Anderson; Valente, Thomas W.

    2007-01-01

    Peer-led programs that employ classroom-based group exercises have been shown to be the most effective in preventing adolescent tobacco use. In addition, health promotion programs that include cultural referents have also been shown to be advantageous. The purpose of this study was to test the interaction between the method by which leaders and…

  18. Brick tunnel randomization for unequal allocation to two or more treatment groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, Olga M; Tymofyeyev, Yevgen

    2011-04-15

    Studies with unequal allocation to two or more treatment groups often require a large block size for permuted block allocation. This could present a problem in small studies, multi-center studies, or adaptive design dose-finding studies. In this paper, an allocation procedure, which generalizes the maximal procedure by Berger, Ivanova, and Knoll to the case of K≥2 treatment groups and any allocation ratio, is offered. Brick tunnel (BT) randomization requires the allocation path drawn in the k-dimensional space to stay close to the allocation ray that corresponds to the targeted allocation ratio. Specifically, it requires the allocation path to be confined to the set of the k-dimensional unitary cubes that are pierced by the allocation ray (the 'brick tunnel'). The important property of the BT randomization is that the transition probabilities at each node within the tunnel are defined in such a way that the unconditional allocation ratio is the same for every allocation step. This property is not necessarily met by other allocation procedures that implement unequal allocation. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Control of Blood Pressure and Risk Attenuation: Post Trial Follow-Up of Randomized Groups.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tazeen H Jafar

    Full Text Available Evidence on long term effectiveness of public health strategies for lowering blood pressure (BP is scarce. In the Control of Blood Pressure and Risk Attenuation (COBRA Trial, a 2 x 2 factorial, cluster randomized controlled trial, the combined home health education (HHE and trained general practitioner (GP intervention delivered over 2 years was more effective than no intervention (usual care in lowering systolic BP among adults with hypertension in urban Pakistan. However, it was not clear whether the effect would be sustained after the cessation of intervention. We conducted 7 years follow-up inclusive of 5 years of post intervention period of COBRA trial participants to assess the effectiveness of the interventions on BP during extended follow-up.A total of 1341 individuals 40 years or older with hypertension (systolic BP 140 mm Hg or greater, diastolic BP 90 mm Hg or greater, or already receiving treatment were followed by trained research staff masked to randomization status. BP was measured thrice with a calibrated automated device (Omron HEM-737 IntelliSense in the sitting position after 5 minutes of rest. BP measurements were repeated after two weeks. Generalized estimating equations (GEE were used to analyze the primary outcome of change in systolic BP from baseline to 7- year follow-up. The multivariable model was adjusted for clustering, age at baseline, sex, baseline systolic and diastolic BP, and presence of diabetes.After 7 years of follow-up, systolic BP levels among those randomised to combined HHE plus trained GP intervention were significantly lower (2.1 [4.1-0.1] mm Hg compared to those randomised to usual care, (P = 0.04. Participants receiving the combined intervention compared to usual care had a greater reduction in LDL-cholesterol (2.7 [4.8 to 0.6] mg/dl.The benefit in systolic BP reduction observed in the original cohort assigned to the combined intervention was attenuated but still evident at 7- year follow-up. These

  20. Prediction of physico-chemical properties for PCs/DFs using the UNIFAC model with an alternative approximation for group assignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuramochi, Hidetoshi; Ohsako, Masahiro; Maeda, Kouji; Sakai, Shinichi

    2002-10-01

    The original-type UNIFAC model was used to predict the environmentally important physico-chemical properties of PCDDs/DFs, such as aqueous solubility, Henry's law constant, and 1-octanol/water partition coefficient, through the UNIFAC-derived infinite dilution activity coefficient. In this application, we suggest an alternative approximation that the aromatic ether group AC-O in PCDD/DF molecules is replaced with the aliphatic ether group CH-O, because the AC-O group is not available in the conventional UNIFAC model. With this approximation, the ability of the UNIFAC model to predict those properties was examined by comparing with experimental data. The UNIFAC model provided comparatively good estimation results. From these results, it is shown that the alternative approximation is useful for the UNIFAC estimation of physico-chemical properties for PCDDs/DFs. Furthermore, the predicted solubilities of 2,3,7,8-T4CDD and O8CDD in organic solvents and the co-solvency effect on solubility of PCDDs in methanol/water mixture indicate that the UNIFAC calculation presented here could well predict the physico-chemical properties of PCDDs/DFs in various solution conditions.

  1. Effects of music therapy on self- and experienced stigma in patients on an acute care psychiatric unit: a randomized three group effectiveness study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Michael J

    2013-10-01

    Stigma is a major social barrier that can restrict access to and willingness to seek psychiatric care. Psychiatric consumers may use secrecy and withdrawal in an attempt to cope with stigma. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of music therapy on self- and experienced stigma in acute care psychiatric inpatients using a randomized design with wait-list control. Participants (N=83) were randomly assigned by cluster to one of three single-session group-based conditions: music therapy, education, or wait-list control. Participants in the music therapy and education conditions completed only posttests while participants in the wait-list control condition completed only pretests. The music therapy condition was a group songwriting intervention wherein participants composed lyrics for "the stigma blues." Results indicated significant differences in measures of discrimination (experienced stigma), disclosure (self-stigma), and total stigma between participants in the music therapy condition and participants in the wait-list control condition. From the results of this randomized controlled investigation, music therapy may be an engaging and effective psychosocial technique to treat stigma. Limitations, suggestions for future research, and implications for clinical practice and psychiatric music therapy research are provided. © 2013.

  2. A failure to confirm the effectiveness of a brief group psychoeducational program for mothers of children with high-functioning pervasive developmental disorders: a randomized controlled pilot trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Masako; Yamada, Atsurou; Watanabe, Norio; Akechi, Tatsuo; Katsuki, Fujika; Nishiyama, Takeshi; Imaeda, Masayuki; Miyachi, Taishi; Otaki, Kazuo; Mitsuda, Yumiko; Ota, Akino; Furukawa, Toshi A

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of group psychoeducation to relieve the psychological distress of mothers of children with high-functioning pervasive developmental disorders (HFPDD) and to improve the behaviors of the children. Methods Seventy-two mothers of preschool outpatients with HFPDD were randomly assigned to a four-session brief group psychoeducational program (GP). The sessions were held every second week in addition to the usual treatment (GP + treatment as usual [TAU] group), or to a TAU-alone group. The primary outcome was self-reported symptoms of maternal mental health as assessed using the 28-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28) at 21 weeks post-randomization (week 21). The GHQ-28 at the end of the intervention (week 7), Aberrant Behavior Checklist (ABC) for the behavior of the children, the Zarit Burden Interview (ZBI), and the Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) were carried out at weeks 7 and 21. We tested the group effects with the interaction between the intervention and the evaluation points. Results The GHQ-28 score at week 21 was significantly higher in the GP + TAU group as compared to that in the TAU-alone group, indicating a greater improvement in the TAU-alone group. There was no evidence that GP + TAU led to a greater improvement of maternal mental health than TAU-alone at week 7. Similarly, no evidence was obtained to indicate that GP + TAU led to a reduction in the ABC or ZBI scores by week 7 or 21. The adjusted scores for the RF (role emotional) and MH (mental health) subscales of the SF-36 at week 21 were also significantly lower in the GP + TAU group, indicating a similar tendency to that of the change of the GHQ-28 score at week 21. Conclusion The psychoeducational program did not alleviate maternal distress, aberrant behaviors of the children, or caregiver burden. PMID:25061301

  3. Multidisciplinary group rehabilitation versus individual physiotherapy for chronic nonspecific low back pain: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kääpä, Eeva Helena; Frantsi, Kirsi; Sarna, Seppo; Malmivaara, Antti

    2006-02-15

    A randomized trial. To evaluate the effectiveness of a semi-intensive multidisciplinary rehabilitation for patients with chronic low back pain in an outpatient setting. Systematic reviews have shown that there is strong evidence that intensive multidisciplinary treatment (>100 hours), which includes functional restoration, improves function among chronic patients with low back pain, and moderate evidence that it reduces pain but contradictory evidence regarding improvement of working ability. However, there is paucity of data whether semi-intensive outpatient multidisciplinary rehabilitation in groups is more effective than individual physiotherapy. A total of 120 women employed as healthcare and social care professionals with nonspecific chronic low back pain were recruited from two occupational healthcare centers. The patients were randomized into two intervention programs. Multidisciplinary rehabilitation (n = 59) was conducted in groups and comprised of physical training, workplace interventions, back school, relaxation training, and cognitive-behavioral stress management methods for 70 hours. The individual physiotherapy (n = 61) included physical exercise and passive treatment methods administered for 10 hours. Main outcome measures were: back pain and sciatic pain intensity, disability, sick leaves, healthcare consumption, symptoms of depression, and beliefs of working ability after 2 years. There were no statistically significant differences between the two treatment groups in main outcome measures just after rehabilitation, at 6-, at 12-, or 24-month follow-up. In both intervention arms, however, the before-and-after comparison showed favorable effects, and the effects were still maintained at 2 years follow-up. The results of this study indicate that semilight outpatient multidisciplinary rehabilitation program for female chronic low back pain patients does not offer incremental benefits when compared with rehabilitation carried out by a physiotherapist

  4. Effects of Group, Individual, and Home Exercise in Persons With Parkinson Disease: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Laurie A; Wilhelm, Jennifer; Chen, Yiyi; Blehm, Ron; Nutt, John; Chen, Zunqiu; Serdar, Andrea; Horak, Fay B

    2015-10-01

    Comparative studies of exercise interventions for people with Parkinson disease (PD) rarely considered how one should deliver the intervention. The objective of this study was to compare the success of exercise when administered by (1) home exercise program, (2) individualized physical therapy, or (3) a group class. We examined if common comorbidities associated with PD impacted success of each intervention. Fifty-eight people (age = 63.9 ± 8 years) with PD participated. People were randomized into (1) home exercise program, (2) individual physical therapy, or (3) group class intervention. All arms were standardized and based on the Agility Boot Camp exercise program for PD, 3 times per week for 4 weeks. The primary outcome measure was the 7-item Physical Performance Test. Other measures of balance, gait, mobility, quality of life, balance confidence, depressions, apathy, self-efficacy and UPDRS-Motor, and activity of daily living scores were included. Only the individual group significantly improved in the Physical Performance Test. The individual exercise showed the most improvements in functional and balance measures, whereas the group class showed the most improvements in gait. The home exercise program improved the least across all outcomes. Several factors effected success, particularly for the home group. An unsupervised, home exercise program is the least effective way to deliver exercise to people with PD, and individual and group exercises have differing benefits. Furthermore, people with PD who also have other comorbidities did better in a program directly supervised by a physical therapist.Video Abstract available for additional insights from the authors (see Video, Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/JNPT/A112).

  5. Randomized, parallel-group, double-blind, controlled study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of carbohydrate-derived fulvic acid in topical treatment of eczema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandy, Justin J; Snyman, Jacques R; van Rensburg, Constance Ej

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of carbohydratederived fulvic acid (CHD-FA) in the treatment of eczema in patients two years and older. In this single-center, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group comparative study, 36 volunteers with predetermined eczema were randomly assigned to receive either the study drug or placebo twice daily for four weeks. All safety parameters remained within normal limits, with no significant differences in either group. Significant differences were observed for both severity and erythema in the placebo and CHD-FA treated groups, and a significant difference was observed for scaling in the placebo-treated group. With regard to the investigator assessment of global response to treatment, a significant improvement was observed in the CHD-FA group when compared with the placebo group. A statistically significant decrease in visual analog scale score was observed in both groups, when comparing the baseline with the final results. CHD-FA was well tolerated, with no difference in reported side effects other than a short-lived burning sensation on application. CHD-FA significantly improved some aspects of eczema. Investigator assessment of global response to treatment with CHD-FA was significantly better than that with emollient therapy alone. The results of this small exploratory study suggest that CHD-FA warrants further investigation in the treatment of eczema.

  6. Long-term results of RTOG trial 8911 (USA Intergroup 113): a random assignment trial comparison of chemotherapy followed by surgery compared with surgery alone for esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsen, David P; Winter, Katryn A; Gunderson, Leonard L; Mortimer, Joanne; Estes, Norman C; Haller, Daniel G; Ajani, Jaffer A; Kocha, Walter; Minsky, Bruce D; Roth, Jack A; Willett, Christopher G

    2007-08-20

    We update Radiation Therapy Oncology Group trial 8911 (USA Intergroup 113), a comparison of chemotherapy plus surgery versus surgery alone for patients with localized esophageal cancer. The relationship between resection type and between tumor response and outcome were also analyzed. The chemotherapy group received preoperative cisplatin plus fluorouracil. Outcome based on the type of resection (R0, R1, R2, or no resection) was evaluated. The main end point was overall survival. Disease-free survival, relapse pattern, the influence of postoperative treatment, and the relationship between response to preoperative chemotherapy and outcome were also evaluated. Two hundred sixteen patients received preoperative chemotherapy, 227 underwent immediate surgery. Fifty-nine percent of surgery only and 63% of chemotherapy plus surgery patients underwent R0 resections (P = .5137). Patients undergoing less than an R0 resection had an ominous prognosis; 32% of patients with R0 resections were alive and free of disease at 5 years, only 5% of patients undergoing an R1 resection survived for longer than 5 years. The median survival rates for patients with R1, R2, or no resections were not significantly different. While, as initially reported, there was no difference in overall survival for patients receiving perioperative chemotherapy compared with the surgery only group, patients with objective tumor regression after preoperative chemotherapy had improved survival. For patients with localized esophageal cancer, whether or not preoperative chemotherapy is administered, only an R0 resection results in substantial long-term survival. Even microscopically positive margins are an ominous prognostic factor. After a R1 resection, postoperative chemoradiotherapy therapy offers the possibility of long-term disease-free survival to a small percentage of patients.

  7. Adjuvant chemotherapy for rectal cancer patients treated with preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy and total mesorectal excision: a Dutch Colorectal Cancer Group (DCCG) randomized phase III trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breugom, A J; van Gijn, W; Muller, E W; Berglund, Å; van den Broek, C B M; Fokstuen, T; Gelderblom, H; Kapiteijn, E; Leer, J W H; Marijnen, C A M; Martijn, H; Meershoek-Klein Kranenbarg, E; Nagtegaal, I D; Påhlman, L; Punt, C J A; Putter, H; Roodvoets, A G H; Rutten, H J T; Steup, W H; Glimelius, B; van de Velde, C J H

    2015-04-01

    The discussion on the role of adjuvant chemotherapy for rectal cancer patients treated according to current guidelines is still ongoing. A multicentre, randomized phase III trial, PROCTOR-SCRIPT, was conducted to compare adjuvant chemotherapy with observation for rectal cancer patients treated with preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy and total mesorectal excision (TME). The PROCTOR-SCRIPT trial recruited patients from 52 hospitals. Patients with histologically proven stage II or III rectal adenocarcinoma were randomly assigned (1:1) to observation or adjuvant chemotherapy after preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy and TME. Radiotherapy consisted of 5 × 5 Gy. Chemoradiotherapy consisted of 25 × 1.8-2 Gy combined with 5-FU-based chemotherapy. Adjuvant chemotherapy consisted of 5-FU/LV (PROCTOR) or eight courses capecitabine (SCRIPT). Randomization was based on permuted blocks of six, stratified according to centre, residual tumour, time between last irradiation and surgery, and preoperative treatment. The primary end point was overall survival. Of 470 enrolled patients, 437 were eligible. The trial closed prematurely because of slow patient accrual. Patients were randomly assigned to observation (n = 221) or adjuvant chemotherapy (n = 216). After a median follow-up of 5.0 years, 5-year overall survival was 79.2% in the observation group and 80.4% in the chemotherapy group [hazard ratio (HR) 0.93, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.62-1.39; P = 0.73]. The HR for disease-free survival was 0.80 (95% CI 0.60-1.07; P = 0.13). Five-year cumulative incidence for locoregional recurrences was 7.8% in both groups. Five-year cumulative incidence for distant recurrences was 38.5% and 34.7%, respectively (P = 0.39). The PROCTOR-SCRIPT trial could not demonstrate a significant benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy with fluoropyrimidine monotherapy after preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy and TME on overall survival, disease-free survival, and recurrence rate. However, this trial did not complete

  8. Group music therapy for patients with persistent post-traumatic stress disorder--an exploratory randomized controlled trial with mixed methods evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Catherine; d'Ardenne, Patricia; Sloboda, Ann; Scott, Carleen; Wang, Duolao; Priebe, Stefan

    2012-06-01

    Not all patients with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) respond to cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT). Literature suggests group music therapy might be beneficial in treating PTSD. However, feasibility and effectiveness have not been assessed. The study objectives were to assess whether group music therapy was feasible for patients who did not respond to CBT, and whether it has an effect on PTSD symptoms and depression. The study employed mixed methods comprising of an exploratory randomized controlled trial, qualitative content analysis of therapy, and patient interviews. Patients with significant PTSD symptoms (n = 17) following completion of CBT were randomly assigned to treatment (n = 9) or control groups (n = 8). The treatment group received 10 weeks of group music therapy after which exit interviews were conducted. Control group patients were offered the intervention at the end of the study. Symptoms were assessed on the Impact of Events Scale-Revised and Beck Depression Inventory II at the beginning and end of treatment. Treatment-group patients experienced a significant reduction in severity of PTSD symptoms (-20.18; 95% confidence interval [CI]: [-31.23, -9.12]) and a marginally significant reduction in depression (-11.92; 95%CI: [-24.05, 0.21]) at 10 weeks from baseline compared to the control. Patients viewed music therapy as helpful and reported experiences concur with current literature. Group music therapy appears feasible and effective for PTSD patients who have not sufficiently responded to CBT. Limitations include the small sample size and lack of blinding. Further research should address these limitations, test sustainability, and identify specific factors that address symptoms in treatment. ©2011 The British Psychological Society.

  9. Effect of physical training on urinary incontinence: a randomized parallel group trial in nursing homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinsnes AG

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Anne G Vinsnes1, Jorunn L Helbostad2, Signe Nyrønning3, Gene E Harkless1,4, Randi Granbo5, Arnfinn Seim61Faculty of Nursing, Sør-Trøndelag University College, 2Department of Neuroscience, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 3Søbstad Community Hospital and Teaching Nursing Home, Trondheim, Norway; 4University of New Hampshire, College of Health and Social Services, Nursing Faculty, Durham, New Hampshire, USA; 5Department of Physiotherapy, Sør-Trøndelag University College, 6Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, NorwayBackground: Residents in nursing homes (NHs are often frail older persons who have impaired physical activity. Urinary incontinence (UI is a common complaint for residents in NHs. Reduced functional ability and residence in NHs are documented to be risk factors for UI.Objective: To investigate if an individualized training program designed to improve activity of daily living (ADL and physical capacity among residents in nursing homes has any impact on UI.Materials and methods: This randomized controlled trial was a substudy of a Nordic multicenter study. Participants had to be >65 years, have stayed in the NH for more than 3 months and in need of assistance in at least one ADL. A total of 98 residents were randomly allocated to either a training group (n = 48 or a control group (n = 50 after baseline registrations. The training program lasted for 3 months and included accommodated physical activity and ADL training. Personal treatment goals were elicited for each subject. The control group received their usual care. The main outcome measure was UI as measured by a 24-hour pad-weighing test. There was no statistically significant difference between the groups on this measure at baseline (P = 0.15. Changes were calculated from baseline to 3 months after the end of the intervention.Results: Altogether, 68 participants were included in the analysis

  10. Transdermal Buprenorphine Relieves Neuropathic Pain: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Parallel-Group, Placebo-Controlled Trial in Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Richard W; Wlodarczyk, John H

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of transdermal buprenorphine in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain (DPNP). This multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group trial enrolled patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes and stable glycemic control who had been experiencing moderate to severe DPNP for at least 6 months on maximal tolerated conventional therapy. Patients were randomly assigned to receive buprenorphine (5 μg/h) or placebo patches. The dose was titrated to effect to a maximum of 40 μg/h. Paracetamol was available as rescue analgesia. The severity of pain and other symptoms of DPNP were assessed daily in a patient diary and at clinic visits. One hundred eight-six patients were enrolled, with 93 randomized to either buprenorphine or placebo. A high proportion of patients did not complete the study (buprenorphine 37 of 93, placebo 24 of 93). The main reason for premature withdrawal in the buprenorphine group was adverse events commonly due to untreated nausea and/or vomiting. Among the per-protocol population, more patients in the buprenorphine group (86.3%) experienced a 30% reduction in average versus baseline pain at week 12 than those in the placebo group (56.6%, P buprenorphine group within the intention-to-treat analysis of the same end point (51.7% vs. 41.3%, P = 0.175). Transdermal buprenorphine, when tolerated, is an effective therapy for DPNP and provides another option to manage this challenging painful condition. Nausea and constipation need to be managed proactively to optimize treatment outcomes. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association.

  11. Single- versus two-visit pulpectomy treatment in primary teeth with apical periodontitis: A double-blind, parallel group, randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sneha Bharatkumar Bharuka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Reduction of the bacterial populations to levels compatible with periradicular tissue healing is the primary microbiological goal of the endodontic treatment of teeth with apical periodontitis. The number of visits required to treat teeth with apical periodontitis represents one of the most debatable issues in endodontics. Objectives: The objective of this study was to compare and evaluate the clinical and radiographic outcome of single- versus two-visit pulpectomy treatment in primary teeth with apical periodontitis at the end of 6-month healing period. Settings and Design: A parallel group, double-blind, randomized controlled trial was carried out in 64 children aged 4-8 years. Nonvital primary teeth with apical periodontitis with enough coronal structure were selected. Sixty-four children were assigned randomly into two groups (32 children each by block randomization, and allocation concealment was done with closed envelop method. Methods and Materials: Group I underwent single-visit pulpectomy followed by obturation with zinc oxide eugenol (ZOE. Group II underwent conventional two-visit pulpectomy with intracanal calcium hydroxide, followed by obturation with ZOE. Postoperative clinical and radiographic evaluation was carried out at 1, 3, and 6 months after the end of the treatment. Statistical Analysis Used: The data were analyzed by Wilcoxon′s signed rank test, Mann-Whitney U-test, and Friedman test. Results: There was no statistically significant difference in clinical and radiographic outcomes in both the groups at the end of 6-month healing period. Conclusion: Single-visit pulpectomy can be considered as a viable option for the treatment of primary teeth with apical periodontitis.

  12. Griffiths singularities in the random quantum Ising antiferromagnet: A tree tensor network renormalization group study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Ping; Kao, Ying-Jer; Chen, Pochung; Lin, Yu-Cheng

    2017-08-01

    The antiferromagnetic Ising chain in both transverse and longitudinal magnetic fields is one of the paradigmatic models of a quantum phase transition. The antiferromagnetic system exhibits a zero-temperature critical line separating an antiferromagnetic phase and a paramagnetic phase; the critical line connects an integrable quantum critical point at zero longitudinal field and a classical first-order transition point at zero transverse field. Using a strong-disorder renormalization group method formulated as a tree tensor network, we study the zero-temperature phase of the quantum Ising chain with bond randomness. We introduce a new matrix product operator representation of high-order moments, which provides an efficient and accurate tool for determining quantum phase transitions via the Binder cumulant of the order parameter. Our results demonstrate an infinite-randomness quantum critical point in zero longitudinal field accompanied by pronounced quantum Griffiths singularities, arising from rare ordered regions with anomalously slow fluctuations inside the paramagnetic phase. The strong Griffiths effects are signaled by a large dynamical exponent z >1 , which characterizes a power-law density of low-energy states of the localized rare regions and becomes infinite at the quantum critical point. Upon application of a longitudinal field, the quantum phase transition between the paramagnetic phase and the antiferromagnetic phase is completely destroyed. Furthermore, quantum Griffiths effects are suppressed, showing z <1 , when the dynamics of the rare regions is hampered by the longitudinal field.

  13. Acceptance and commitment group therapy (ACT-G) for health anxiety: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilenberg, T; Fink, P; Jensen, J S; Rief, W; Frostholm, L

    2016-01-01

    Severe health anxiety is frequent and costly, yet rarely diagnosed or treated. Earlier treatment studies show problems with recruitment, dropout and recovery. In the current study, the authors aimed to test the effect of acceptance and commitment group therapy (ACT-G) compared to waitlist in patients with severe health anxiety. During March 2010 to April 2012, 126 consecutively referred patients meeting research criteria for severe health anxiety were block-randomized (1:1) to ACT-G or a 10 months' waitlist (Clinicaltrials.gov, no. NCT01158430). Patients allocated to ACT-G were treated in seven groups of nine patients between December 2010 and October 2012 and received nine weekly 3-h group sessions and a booster session consisting of ACT techniques. The primary outcome was decided a priori as the mean change in self-reported illness worry on the Whiteley-7 Index (WI) from baseline to 10 months' follow-up. Secondary outcomes were improvement in emotional distress and health-related quality of life at 10 months' follow-up. Intention-to-treat analysis showed a statistically significant mean difference of 20.5 points [95% confidence interval (CI) 11.7-29.4, p accepted by the patients. ACT-G seems feasible, acceptable and effective in treating severe health anxiety.

  14. Randomized comparative trial of a social cognitive skills group for children with autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soorya, Latha V; Siper, Paige M; Beck, Todd; Soffes, Sarah; Halpern, Danielle; Gorenstein, Michelle; Kolevzon, Alexander; Buxbaum, Joseph; Wang, A Ting

    2015-03-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of a targeted social skills training group in school-aged children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The intervention, Seaver-NETT (Nonverbal communication, Emotion recognition, and Theory of mind Training), is a 12-session cognitive-behavioral intervention (CBI) for verbal, school-aged children targeting ASD-specific social behavioral impairments. Sixty-nine children with ASD, 8 to 11 years of age, with verbal IQs greater than 70, participated in a randomized comparative trial to examine the efficacy of NETT relative to a facilitated play group. Treatment outcomes included caregiver reports of social behavior and neuropsychological assessments of social cognition conducted by blinded raters. Outcomes were collected at baseline, endpoint, and 3 months posttreatment. Significant improvements were found on social behavior outcomes such as nonverbal communication, empathic responding, and social relations in the NETT condition relative to the active control at endpoint. Verbal IQ moderated the interaction effect on social behavior, with higher verbal IQ associated with improvements in the CBI condition. No significant improvements were found on social cognitive outcomes. No significant group differences were found at 3-month follow-up conducted with approximately half the sample (n = 34). These data indicate that targeted CBI social skills groups such as NETT improve social communication deficits in verbal, school-aged children with ASD. The moderating effects of high verbal IQ suggest a need to consider participant and treatment characteristics associated with outcomes in future studies. Clinical trial registration information-Neural and Behavioral Outcomes of Social Skills Groups in Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder; https://clinicaltrials.gov; NCT01190917. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Reflecting peer-support groups in the prevention of stress and burnout: randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Ulla; Bergström, Gunnar; Samuelsson, Mats; Asberg, Marie; Nygren, Ake

    2008-09-01

    This paper is a report of a study to test the effect of participating in a reflecting peer-support group on self-reported health, burnout and on perceived changes in work conditions. Stress-related conditions are one of the most common causes for long-term sick-leave. There is limited evidence for the effectiveness of person-directed interventions aimed at reducing stress levels in healthcare workers. Prior research in the relationship between support and burnout show somewhat inconsistent results. A randomized controlled trial with peer-support groups as the intervention was conducted with 660 healthcare workers scoring above the 75th percentile on the exhaustion dimension of the Oldenburg Burnout Inventory. One hundred and fifty-one (22.9%) agreed to participate. The intervention started in 2002 with 51 participants (96.1% were women), 80 of whom constituted the control group. Potential differences in outcome measures 12 months after the intervention were compared using ancova, and data collected was completed in 2004. Qualitative content analyses were used to analyse reported experiences from group participation. Statistically significant intervention effects were found for general health, perceived quantitative demands at work, participation and development opportunities at work and in support at work. Seven categories of experiences from participating were identified: talking to others in a similar situation, knowledge, sense of belonging, self-confidence, structure, relief of symptoms and behavioural change. Peer-support groups using a problem-based method could be a useful and comparatively inexpensive tool in alleviating work-related stress and burnout.

  16. Studies with staggered starts: multiple baseline designs and group-randomized trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoda, Dale A; Murray, David M; Andridge, Rebecca R; Pennell, Michael L; Hade, Erinn M

    2011-11-01

    Multiple baseline designs (MBDs) have been suggested as alternatives to group-randomized trials (GRT). We reviewed structural features of MBDs and considered their potential effectiveness in public health research. We also reviewed the effect of staggered starts on statistical power. We reviewed the MBD literature to identify key structural features, recent suggestions that MBDs be adopted in public health research, and the literature on power in GRTs with staggered starts. We also computed power for MBDs and GRTs. The features that have contributed to the success of small MBDs in some fields are not likely to translate well to public health research. MBDs can be more powerful than GRTs under some conditions, but those conditions involve assumptions that require careful evaluation in practice. MBDs will often serve better as a complement of rather than as an alternative to GRTs. GRTs may employ staggered starts for logistical or ethical reasons, but this will always increase their duration and will often increase their cost.

  17. Blocked Randomization with Randomly Selected Block Sizes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimmy Efird

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available When planning a randomized clinical trial, careful consideration must be given to how participants are selected for various arms of a study. Selection and accidental bias may occur when participants are not assigned to study groups with equal probability. A simple random allocation scheme is a process by which each participant has equal likelihood of being assigned to treatment versus referent groups. However, by chance an unequal number of individuals may be assigned to each arm of the study and thus decrease the power to detect statistically significant differences between groups. Block randomization is a commonly used technique in clinical trial design to reduce bias and achieve balance in the allocation of participants to treatment arms, especially when the sample size is small. This method increases the probability that each arm will contain an equal number of individuals by sequencing participant assignments by block. Yet still, the allocation process may be predictable, for example, when the investigator is not blind and the block size is fixed. This paper provides an overview of blocked randomization and illustrates how to avoid selection bias by using random block sizes.

  18. Blocked randomization with randomly selected block sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efird, Jimmy

    2011-01-01

    When planning a randomized clinical trial, careful consideration must be given to how participants are selected for various arms of a study. Selection and accidental bias may occur when participants are not assigned to study groups with equal probability. A simple random allocation scheme is a process by which each participant has equal likelihood of being assigned to treatment versus referent groups. However, by chance an unequal number of individuals may be assigned to each arm of the study and thus decrease the power to detect statistically significant differences between groups. Block randomization is a commonly used technique in clinical trial design to reduce bias and achieve balance in the allocation of participants to treatment arms, especially when the sample size is small. This method increases the probability that each arm will contain an equal number of individuals by sequencing participant assignments by block. Yet still, the allocation process may be predictable, for example, when the investigator is not blind and the block size is fixed. This paper provides an overview of blocked randomization and illustrates how to avoid selection bias by using random block sizes.

  19. Informed consent in rhinoplasty: prospective randomized study of risk recall in patients who are given written disclosure of risks versus traditional oral discussion groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Paul; Makdessian, Ara Samuel; Ellis, David A F; Taylor, S Mark

    2009-06-01

    To determine the effectiveness of providing written information in enhancing patient understanding and retention. A multicentre prospective randomized study was conducted in university-affiliated ambulatory surgical centres. One hundred consecutive patients seen for rhinoplasty consultation were included. Patients were randomly assigned to (1) those receiving traditional oral dialogue of the surgical risks or (2) those receiving an oral discussion and a written pamphlet outlining the risks of the procedure. Fourteen to 18 days after the consultation, each patient was contacted for an assessment of risk recall. Overall risk recall was higher in the group that received written information (2.3 vs 1.3 of 5 risks; p group that received a pamphlet, patients with university and postgraduate levels of education had a better rate of recall (p groups reported higher risk recall (p < .01). Patient risk recall of rhinoplasty is improved with the addition of written information during the informed consent process. As the process of informed consent plays a very decisive role in facial plastic surgery, enhanced postoperative satisfaction may result from the use of supplemental educational materials.

  20. The effectiveness of a psycho-educational group after early-stage breast cancer treatment: results of a randomized French study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolbeault, S; Cayrou, S; Brédart, A; Viala, A L; Desclaux, B; Saltel, P; Gauvain-Piquard, A; Hardy, P; Dickes, P

    2009-06-01

    Many women with breast cancer need psychological help to cope more effectively after treatment. Cognitive and behavioural techniques are not yet well established in France. A multi-site randomized study was conducted to evaluate the effects of a psycho-educational group intervention in this population. Two hundred and three patients, recruited after primary treatment, were randomly assigned either to a treatment group (psycho-educational intervention) or to a waiting-list control group. The 8-week programme of 2 h sessions comprised of thematic discussions, information and training in stress management techniques. Evaluation at baseline, after 8 sessions, and 1 month after programme completion, included evaluations using the STAI, POMS, MAC, EORTC QLQ-C30 and EORTC QLQ-BR23 breast module scales. We observed a significant reduction in anxiety (STAI, POMS) among group participants, a reduction in anger, depression and fatigue (POMS), a significant improvement in vigor and interpersonal relationships (POMS), in emotional and role functioning, in health status and fatigue level (EORTC QLQ-C30). In contrast, coping strategies (MAC) were not significantly different between groups. No group-related negative effects were observed and the global satisfaction levels were very high. This study demonstrates the feasibility and effectiveness of a psycho-educational intervention, which can accelerate the reduction of those negative affects which are present at the end of treatment. It represents an excellent complement or an alternative to individual psycho-oncologic therapeutic support, widely proposed in France, and should now be tested in groups with other types of cancer and at other disease phases.

  1. Integrative group-based cognitive rehabilitation efficacy in multiple sclerosis: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rilo, Oiane; Peña, Javier; Ojeda, Natalia; Rodríguez-Antigüedad, Alfredo; Mendibe-Bilbao, Mar; Gómez-Gastiasoro, Ainara; DeLuca, John; Chiaravalloti, Nancy; Ibarretxe-Bilbao, Naroa

    2018-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the efficacy of the integrative group-based cognitive rehabilitation programme, REHACOP, on improving cognitive functions in multiple sclerosis (MS). Fourty-two MS patients were randomized to the treatment programme REHACOP (n = 21) or waiting list control condition (n = 21). The REHACOP group received cognitive rehabilitation in group format for three months focused on attention, processing speed, learning and memory, language, executive functioning, and social cognition. Patients completed a neuropsychological assessment at baseline and follow-up, which included tests of attention, processing speed, working memory, verbal memory, verbal fluency, and executive functioning. Repeated measures multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA) was used to determine the efficacy of the cognitive rehabilitation programme. Group × Time interactions revealed significant improvements in the REHACOP group as compared with the control group for processing speed (p = 0.011, np2 = 0.16), working memory (p = 0.014, np2 = 0.15), verbal memory (p = 0.025, np2 = 0.13), and executive functioning (p = 0.024, np2 = 0.13), showing medium-large effect sizes. Patients receiving REHACOP showed improvements in several cognitive domains. This preliminary study thus provides evidence supporting the efficacy of this integrative group-based cognitive rehabilitation intervention in MS. Future research should confirm these findings, examine the impact of the treatment on everyday life functioning and explore the presence of brain changes associated with cognitive rehabilitation. Implications for rehabilitation This study provides initial evidence for integrative group-based cognitive rehabilitation efficacy in MS patients through the implementation of the REHACOP cognitive rehabilitation programme. Patients received cognitive rehabilitation for three months (3 one-hour-sessions per week) focused on training attention

  2. Contributions of the European trials (European randomized screening group) in computed tomography lung cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuvelmans, Marjolein A; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; Oudkerk, Matthijs

    2015-03-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. In 2011, the largest lung cancer screening trial worldwide, the US National Lung Screening Trial, published a 20% decrease in lung cancer-specific mortality in the computed tomography (CT)-screened group, compared with the group screened by chest x-ray. On the basis of this trial, different US guidelines recently have recommended CT lung cancer screening. However, several questions regarding the implementation of lung cancer screening need to be answered. In Europe, several lung cancer screening trials are ongoing. It is planned to pool the results of the lung cancer screening trials in European randomized lung cancer CT screening (EUCT). By pooling of the data, EUCT hopes to be able to provide additional information for the discussion of some important issues regarding the implementation of lung cancer screening by low-dose CT, including: the determination of the optimal screen population, the comparison between a volume-based and diameter-based nodule management protocol, and the determination of optimal screen intervals.

  3. Myofascial Release Therapy in the Treatment of Occupational Mechanical Neck Pain: A Randomized Parallel Group Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Fuentes, Iván; De Toro, Francisco Javier; Rodríguez-Fuentes, Gustavo; de Oliveira, Iris Machado; Meijide-Faílde, Rosa; Fuentes-Boquete, Isaac Manuel

    2016-07-01

    As myofascial release therapy is currently under development, the objective of this study was to compare the effectiveness of myofascial release therapy with manual therapy for treating occupational mechanical neck pain. A randomized, single-blind parallel group study was developed. The sample (n = 59) was divided into GI, treated with manual therapy, and GII, treated with myofascial release therapy. Variables studied were intensity of neck pain, cervical disability, quality of life, craniovertebral angle, and ranges of cervical motion. At five sessions, clinical significance was observed in both groups for all the variables studied, except for flexion in GI. At this time point, an intergroup statistical difference was observed, which showed that GII had better craniovertebral angle (P = 0.014), flexion (P = 0.021), extension (P = 0.003), right side bending (P = 0.001), and right rotation (P = 0.031). A comparative analysis between therapies after intervention showed statistical differences indicating that GII had better craniovertebral angle (P = 0.000), right (P = 0.000) and left (P = 0.009) side bending, right (P = 0.024) and left (P = 0.046) rotations, and quality of life. The treatment of occupational mechanical neck pain by myofascial release therapy seems to be more effective than manual therapy for correcting the advanced position of the head, recovering range of motion in side bending and rotation, and improving quality of life.

  4. Group Music Therapy as a Preventive Intervention for Young People at Risk: Cluster-Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Christian; Saarikallio, Suvi; Crooke, Alexander Hew Dale; McFerran, Katrina Skewes

    2017-07-01

    Music forms an important part of the lives and identities of adolescents and may have positive or negative mental health implications. Music therapy can be effective for mental disorders such as depression, but its preventive potential is unknown. The aim of this study was to examine whether group music therapy (GMT) is an effective intervention for young people who may be at risk of developing mental health problems, as indicated via unhealthy music use. The main question was whether GMT can reduce unhealthy uses of music and increase potentials for healthy uses of music, compared to self-directed music listening (SDML). We were also interested in effects of GMT on depressive symptoms, psychosocial well-being, rumination, and reflection. In an exploratory cluster-randomized trial in Australian schools, 100 students with self-reported unhealthy music use were invited to GMT (weekly sessions over 8 weeks) or SDML. Changes in the Healthy-Unhealthy Music Scale (HUMS) and mental health outcomes were measured over 3 months. Both interventions were well accepted. No effects were found between GMT and SDML (all p > 0.05); both groups tended to show small improvements over time. Younger participants benefited more from GMT, and older ones more from SDML (p = 0.018). GMT was associated with similar changes as SDML. Further research is needed to improve the processes of selecting participants for targeted interventions; to determine optimal dosage; and to provide more reliable evidence of effects of music-based interventions for adolescents.

  5. A randomized controlled trial of a brief versus standard group parenting program for toddler aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tully, Lucy A; Hunt, Caroline

    2017-05-01

    Physical aggression (PA) in the toddler years is common and developmentally normal, however, longitudinal research shows that frequent PA is highly stable and associated with long-term negative outcomes. Significant research has demonstrated the efficacy of parenting interventions for reducing externalizing behavior in children yet their typical length may overburden families, leading to low participation rates and high attrition rates. To increase the reach of parenting interventions and impact on the prevalence of externalizing behavior problems, brief interventions are needed. This RCT compared a standard (8 session) group Triple P to a brief (3 session) discussion group and a waitlist control for reducing toddler PA, dysfunctional parenting and related aspects of parent functioning. Sixty-nine self-referred families of toddlers with PA were randomized to the respective conditions. At post-assessment, families in the standard intervention had significantly lower levels of observed child aversive behavior, mother reports of PA and dysfunctional parenting, and higher levels of mother- and partner-rated behavioral self-efficacy than the waitlist control. Families in the standard intervention also had significantly lower levels mother-rated dysfunctional parenting than the brief intervention, and the brief intervention had significantly lower levels of mother-rated dysfunctional parenting than waitlist. There were no significant group differences at post-assessment for measures of parental negative affect or satisfaction with the partner relationship. By 6 month follow-up, families in the brief and standard intervention did not differ significantly on any measure. The implications of the findings to delivery of brief parenting interventions are discussed. Aggr. Behav. 43:291-303, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Music Activities as a Meaningful Context for Teaching Elementary Students Mathematics: A Quasi-Experiment Time Series Design with Random Assigned Control Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Song A.; Tillman, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the current research was to examine the effects of a sequence of classroom activities that integrated mathematics content with music elements aimed at providing teachers an alternative approach for teaching mathematics. Two classes of third grade students (n = 56) from an elementary school in the west coast of the United States…

  7. Scaffolding students’ assignments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slot, Marie Falkesgaard

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses scaffolding in typical student assignments in mother tongue learning materials in upper secondary education in Denmark and the United Kingdom. It has been determined that assignments do not have sufficient scaffolding end features to help pupils understand concepts and build...

  8. Comparison of tutored group with tutorless group in problem-based mixed learning sessions: a randomized cross-matched study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Problem-based learning (PBL) involves discussions among students who resolve loosely-structured problems to facilitate learning. In the PBL curriculum, faculty tutors are employed as facilitators for small groups of students. Because of lack of time and staff shortage, the effectiveness of tutorless PBL has been discussed as an alternate option. Methods Sessions in which tutored and tutorless PBL groups are mixed were presented by 1st-year medical students, who experienced both tutored and tutorless groups alternately in the two sessions of a year. To examine the effectiveness of tutored and tutorless PBL, written examination scores (WES) and self-contentment scores (SCS) were statistically analysed. Results WES averages did not significantly differ between the tutored and tutorless groups; however, a significantly greater variation was observed in WES in the tutorless group. SCS averages tended to be higher in the tutored PBL than in tutorless PBL groups. Conclusions Students in these tutorless PBL groups performed well in their written examinations, whereas those in the tutored PBL groups, achieved this and reported better self-contentment with their learning experience. Tutorless PBL sessions were considered to be comparable to tutored PBL sessions at least in the early stages. PMID:24289490

  9. Assessing Internal Group Processes in Collaborative Assignments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Trudi J.

    2011-01-01

    As teachers consider ethics, they find that it may often look like a student issue. It may be discussions of plagiarism, social justice, honesty, bullying, privacy, child labor, free speech, inequity. However, even as teachers struggle with ways to model ethics or "teach" ethics, they find that their teaching practices may warrant reflection. One…

  10. Communication Factors of Group Leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Sanford; And Others

    In order to determine the communication factors of group leadership, 500 undergraduates enrolled in an introductory communication theory course at a large New England university were randomly assigned to laboratory sections of 25 students each. Over an eight week period the students in each group redistributed into different groups varying in size…

  11. A group intervention to reduce intimate partner violence among female drug users. Results from a randomized controlled pilot trial in a community substance-abuse center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirado-Muñoz, Judit; Gilchrist, Gail; Lligoña, Eva; Gilbert, Louisa; Torrens, Marta

    2015-09-15

    A greater proportion of drug dependent women are victims of intimate partner violence (IPV) than women in the general population; however, few interventions have been developed to reduce IPV among drug dependent women. An adapted version of the Women's Wellness Treatment, to address IPV and depressive symptoms, was piloted in a randomized controlled trial conducted in outpatient treatment program in Barcelona, Spain among 14 women receiving outpatient treatment for a drug use disorder who screened positive for IPV in the previous month. Participants were randomly assigned to receive the 10 session cognitive behavioral therapy (IPaViT-CBT) group intervention or treatment as usual. The frequency of IPV, depressive symptoms, substance use, quality of life and health status were assessed at baseline and 1, 3 and 12 months post intervention. Intention to treat analysis was performed. Moderate effects for the intervention were found in reducing psychological maltreatment, increasing assertiveness of IPV and reducing aggressiveness in the partner relationship, and in reducing the frequency of drinking up to 3 months post intervention. The intervention did not significantly reduce the likelihood of any IPV, depressive symptoms, quality of life or self-reported health status, up to 12-months post intervention. This pilot trial suggests some initial support for the 10-session CBT group intervention among IPV victims who received treatment for drug use. Study findings indicate that it is feasible to deliver the intervention in a community substance abuse center. An adequately powered trial is required to replicate these results.

  12. Randomized controlled trial of traditional Chinese medicine (acupuncture and tuina) in cerebral palsy: part 1--any increase in seizure in integrated acupuncture and rehabilitation group versus rehabilitation group?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yun; Zou, Li-Ping; Han, Tong-Li; Zheng, Hua; Caspi, Opher; Wong, Virginia; Su, Yani; Shen, Kun-Ling

    2008-10-01

    The objective of this study was to observe for any change in baseline seizure frequency with acupuncture in children with cerebral palsy. A randomized controlled study was conducted: Group I consisted of integrated acupuncture, tuina, and rehabilitation (physiotherapy, occupational therapy, and hydrotherapy) for 12 weeks; and Group II consisted of rehabilitation (physiotherapy, occupational therapy, and hydrotherapy) for 12 weeks. After a washout period of 4 weeks, Group II then received acupuncture and tuina for 12 weeks. Each subject received 5 daily acupuncture sessions per week for 12 weeks (total = 60 sessions). All children were assessed for any change in seizure frequency during treatment. One hundred and sixteen (116) children were recruited and randomized into Group I (N = 58) and Group II (N = 58). Thirty-three (33) children withdrew (9 from Group I and 24 from Group II). Of the remaining 83 children, Group I consisted of 49 and Group II of 34 children. For baseline, 5 children (6%; 5/83) had seizures. During phase 1 (12 weeks) of integrative treatment and subsequent 4-week follow-up, 3 children in Group I had seizures. Among those 3 children with seizures, 1 child with prior history of recurrent febrile seizure had 3 more recurrent febrile seizures during acupuncture treatment and 2 children without any prior history of seizures had new-onset seizures (1 with 3 recurrent febrile seizures and 1 with afebrile seizure). For Group I, 2 children with epilepsy had no increase in seizure frequency during acupuncture treatment. For Group II during the phase 2 acupuncture period, none had increase in seizure frequency. In both groups, 4 of 5 children (80%; 2 in Group I and 2 in Group II) with seizures had no increase in seizure frequency during acupuncture treatment and follow-up. The risk of increasing seizure is not increased with acupuncture treatment for cerebral palsy.

  13. Physical localization of molecular markers and assignment of the 15th linkage group to chromosome 11 of the karyotype in cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) by primed in situ labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y; Wang, J F; Yin, H; Gao, H Q; Zhuang, N S; Liu, J P

    2015-07-28

    Physical localization of molecular markers and assignment of the 15th linkage group to chromosome 11 of the karyotype in cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) were achieved using primed in situ labeling. Amplified signals for both the EST507-1 and SSRY13-5 markers were consistently observed in different stages of cell division. A comparison of the length, arm ratio, and other morphological characteristics of somatic metaphase chromosomes in karyotype analysis indicated that the EST507-1 and SSRY13-5 markers were localized on the short and long arm of cassava chromosome 11 with the relative map positions of 41.67 and 23.07, respectively. The physical localization of the 2 markers on chromosome 11 of the karyotype corresponds to their positions on the 15th linkage group in cassava.

  14. Estimates of Intraclass Correlation Coefficients from Longitudinal Group-Randomized Trials of Adolescent HIV/STI/Pregnancy Prevention Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassman, Jill R.; Potter, Susan C.; Baumler, Elizabeth R.; Coyle, Karin K.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Group-randomized trials (GRTs) are one of the most rigorous methods for evaluating the effectiveness of group-based health risk prevention programs. Efficiently designing GRTs with a sample size that is sufficient for meeting the trial's power and precision goals while not wasting resources exceeding them requires estimates of the…

  15. Manage at work: a randomized, controlled trial of a self-management group intervention to overcome workplace challenges associated with chronic physical health conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, William S; Besen, Elyssa; Pransky, Glenn; Boot, Cécile R L; Nicholas, Michael K; McLellan, Robert K; Tveito, Torill H

    2014-05-28

    The percentage of older and chronically ill workers is increasing rapidly in the US and in many other countries, but few interventions are available to help employees overcome the workplace challenges of chronic pain and other physical health conditions. While most workers are eligible for job accommodation and disability compensation benefits, other workplace strategies might improve individual-level coping and problem solving to prevent work disability. In this study, we hypothesize that an employer-sponsored group intervention program employing self-management principles may improve worker engagement and reduce functional limitation associated with chronic disorders. In a randomized controlled trial (RCT), workers participating in an employer-sponsored self-management group intervention will be compared with a no-treatment (wait list) control condition. Volunteer employees (n = 300) will be recruited from five participating employers and randomly assigned to intervention or control. Participants in the intervention arm will attend facilitated group workshop sessions at work (10 hours total) to explore methods for improving comfort, adjusting work habits, communicating needs effectively, applying systematic problem solving, and dealing with negative thoughts and emotions about work. Work engagement and work limitation are the principal outcomes. Secondary outcomes include fatigue, job satisfaction, self-efficacy, turnover intention, sickness absence, and health care utilization. Measurements will be taken at baseline, 6-, and 12-month follow-up. A process evaluation will be performed alongside the randomized trial. This study will be most relevant for organizations and occupational settings where some degree of job flexibility, leeway, and decision-making autonomy can be afforded to affected workers. The study design will provide initial assessment of a novel workplace approach and to understand factors affecting its feasibility and effectiveness

  16. Postgraduate diploma collaborative assignment: Implications for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Business groups remained intact across various diplomas and large focus areas, which would act as a pivot for the major group assignments, were forged using scenarios from three core courses. Each general topic thus included at least three separate yet complementary portfolio assignments that differed in genre, ...

  17. Manual Physical Therapy Versus Surgery for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: A Randomized Parallel-Group Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-de-Las Peñas, César; Ortega-Santiago, Ricardo; de la Llave-Rincón, Ana I; Martínez-Perez, Almudena; Fahandezh-Saddi Díaz, Homid; Martínez-Martín, Javier; Pareja, Juan A; Cuadrado-Pérez, Maria L

    2015-11-01

    This randomized clinical trial investigated the effectiveness of surgery compared with physical therapy consisting of manual therapies including desensitization maneuvers in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). The setting was a public hospital and 2 physical therapy practices in Madrid, Spain. One hundred twenty women with CTS were enrolled between February 2013 and January 2014, with 1-year follow-up completed in January 2015. Interventions consisted of 3 sessions of manual therapies including desensitization maneuvers of the central nervous system (physical therapy group, n = 60) or decompression/release of the carpal tunnel (surgical group, n = 60). The primary outcome was pain intensity (mean pain and the worst pain), and secondary outcomes included functional status and symptoms severity subscales of the Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire and the self-perceived improvement. They were assessed at baseline and 1, 3, 6, and 12 months by a blinded assessor. Analysis was by intention to treat. At 12 months, 111 (92%) women completed the follow-up (55/60 physical therapy, 56/60 surgery). Adjusted analyses showed an advantage (all, P physical therapy at 1 and 3 months in mean pain (Δ -2.0 [95% confidence interval (CI) -2.8 to -1.2]/-1.3 [95% CI -2.1 to -.6]), the worst pain (Δ -2.9 [-4.0 to -2.0]/-2.0 [-3.0 to -.9]), and function (Δ -.8 [-1.0 to -.6]/-.3 [-.5 to -.1]), respectively. Changes in pain and function were similar between the groups at 6 and 12 months. The 2 groups had similar improvements in the symptoms severity subscale of the Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire at all follow-ups. In women with CTS, physical therapy may result in similar outcomes on pain and function to surgery. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov, ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01789645. This study found that surgery and physical manual therapies including desensitization maneuvers of the central nervous system were similarly effective at medium-term and long-term follow-ups for improving pain and

  18. School-based prevention of acute rheumatic fever: a group randomized trial in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennon, Diana; Stewart, Joanna; Farrell, Elizabeth; Palmer, Anne; Mason, Henare

    2009-09-01

    Acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and its sequela, rheumatic heart disease is the commonest cause of childhood cardiac morbidity globally. The current approach to the prevention of a primary attack of rheumatic fever in children using oral medication for streptococcal pharyngitis is poorly supported. The efficacy of injectable penicillin, in high rheumatic fever incidence military environments is indisputable. To evaluate school-based control of rheumatic fever in an endemic area. Fifty-three schools ( approximately 22,000 students) from a rheumatic fever high incidence setting ( approximately 60/100,000) in Auckland, New Zealand were randomized. The control group received routine general practice care. The intervention was a school-based sore throat clinic program with free nurse-observed oral penicillin treatment of group A streptococcal pharyngitis. The outcome measure was ARF in any child attending a study school. Analysis A defined ARF cases using criteria derived from Jones Criteria 1965 (definite) and 1956 (probable) with more precise definitions. Analysis B was based on 1992 Jones criteria but also included echocardiography to determine definite cases. In Analysis A, 24 (55/100,000) cases occurred in clinic schools and 29 (67/100,000) in nonclinic schools, a 21% reduction when adjusted for demography and study design (P = 0.47). Analysis B revealed a 28% reduction 26 (59/100,000) and 33 (77/100,000) cases, respectively (P = 0.27). This study involving 86,874 person-years showed a nonsignificant reduction in the school-based sore throat clinic programs.

  19. Effect of cognitive behavioral group therapy for recovery of self-esteem on community-living individuals with mental illness: Non-randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunikata, Hiroko; Yoshinaga, Naoki; Nakajima, Kazuo

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine over a 12-month post-intervention period whether the participation of community-living individuals with mental illness in cognitive behavioral group therapy for recovery of self-esteem (CBGTRS) resulted in improved outcomes. This was a non-randomized controlled trial. The participants were persons with mental illness who resided in communities in the Chugoku region of Japan. In total, 41 were assigned to an experimental group (CBGTRS intervention, 12 group sessions), and 21 to a control group. Outcome indices (self-esteem, moods, cognition, subjective well-being, psychiatric symptoms) were measured for the experimental group prior to intervention (T0), immediately post-intervention (T1), and at 3 (T2) and 12 (T3) months post-intervention. The control group was measured at the same intervals. For the experimental group, self-esteem scores at T1, T2, and T3 were significantly higher than at T0. Moods and cognition scores remained significantly low until T2. Scores for Inadequate Mental Mastery in the subjective well-being index had not decreased by T3. Confidence in Coping remained significantly high until T2. Psychiatric symptoms scores at T0, T1, T2, and T3 were significantly lower than at T0. The means and standard errors for self-esteem and Inadequate Mental Mastery increased until T3, and those for Tension-Anxiety, Depression-Dejection, and Confusion decreased until T2. From within-group trends and between-group differences in self-esteem, we conclude that CBGTRS may have a relatively long-term effect on self-esteem recovery. T2 is the turning point for moods and cognition; thus, follow-up is needed 3 months following the initial program. © 2016 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2016 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  20. Historical WBAN ID Assignments

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — 4"x6" index cards represent the first written assignments of Weather Bureau Army Navy (WBAN) station identifier numbers by the National Climatic Data Center....

  1. My Favorite Assignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Robert E.; Johnson, Jack E.

    1982-01-01

    Presents two assignments that show (1) how George Orwell's "Politics and the English Language" can be applied to business writing and (2) how structured student-teacher conferences can generate enthusiasm for oral expression in a business communication course. (AEA)

  2. Weight change among people randomized to minimal intervention control groups in weight loss trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, David J; Hartmann-Boyce, Jamie; Jebb, Susan A; Aveyard, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Evidence on the effectiveness of behavioral weight management programs often comes from uncontrolled program evaluations. These frequently make the assumption that, without intervention, people will gain weight. The aim of this study was to use data from minimal intervention control groups in randomized controlled trials to examine the evidence for this assumption and the effect of frequency of weighing on weight change. Data were extracted from minimal intervention control arms in a systematic review of multicomponent behavioral weight management programs. Two reviewers classified control arms into three categories based on intensity of minimal intervention and calculated 12-month mean weight change using baseline observation carried forward. Meta-regression was conducted in STATA v12. Thirty studies met the inclusion criteria, twenty-nine of which had usable data, representing 5,963 participants allocated to control arms. Control arms were categorized according to intensity, as offering leaflets only, a single session of advice, or more than one session of advice from someone without specialist skills in supporting weight loss. Mean weight change at 12 months across all categories was -0.8 kg (95% CI -1.1 to -0.4). In an unadjusted model, increasing intensity by moving up a category was associated with an additional weight loss of -0.53 kg (95% CI -0.96 to -0.09). Also in an unadjusted model, each additional weigh-in was associated with a weight change of -0.42 kg (95% CI -0.81 to -0.03). However, when both variables were placed in the same model, neither intervention category nor number of weigh-ins was associated with weight change. Uncontrolled evaluations of weight loss programs should assume that, in the absence of intervention, their population would weigh up to a kilogram on average less than baseline at the end of the first year of follow-up. © 2016 The Authors Obesity published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Obesity Society (TOS).

  3. Group CBT versus MBSR for social anxiety disorder: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldin, Philippe R; Morrison, Amanda; Jazaieri, Hooria; Brozovich, Faith; Heimberg, Richard; Gross, James J

    2016-05-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate treatment outcome and mediators of cognitive-behavioral group therapy (CBGT) versus mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) versus waitlist (WL) in patients with generalized social anxiety disorder (SAD). One hundred eight unmedicated patients (55.6% female; mean age = 32.7 years, SD = 8.0; 43.5% Caucasian, 39% Asian, 9.3% Hispanic, 8.3% other) were randomized to CBGT versus MBSR versus WL and completed assessments at baseline, posttreatment/WL, and at 1-year follow-up, including the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale-Self-Report (primary outcome; Liebowitz, 1987) as well as measures of treatment-related processes. Linear mixed model analysis showed that CBGT and MBSR both produced greater improvements on most measures compared with WL. Both treatments yielded similar improvements in social anxiety symptoms, cognitive reappraisal frequency and self-efficacy, cognitive distortions, mindfulness skills, attention focusing, and rumination. There were greater decreases in subtle avoidance behaviors following CBGT than MBSR. Mediation analyses revealed that increases in reappraisal frequency, mindfulness skills, attention focusing, and attention shifting, and decreases in subtle avoidance behaviors and cognitive distortions, mediated the impact of both CBGT and MBSR on social anxiety symptoms. However, increases in reappraisal self-efficacy and decreases in avoidance behaviors mediated the impact of CBGT (vs. MBSR) on social anxiety symptoms. CBGT and MBSR both appear to be efficacious for SAD. However, their effects may be a result of both shared and unique changes in underlying psychological processes. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. New moves-preventing weight-related problems in adolescent girls a group-randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne R; Friend, Sarah E; Flattum, Colleen F; Hannan, Peter J; Story, Mary T; Bauer, Katherine W; Feldman, Shira B; Petrich, Christine A

    2010-11-01

    Weight-related problems are prevalent in adolescent girls. To evaluate New Moves, a school-based program aimed at preventing weight-related problems in adolescent girls. School-based group-randomized controlled design. 356 girls (mean age=15.8±1.2 years) from six intervention and six control high schools. More than 75% of the girls were racial/ethnic minorities and 46% were overweight or obese. Data were collected in 2007-2009 and analyzed in 2009-2010. An all-girls physical education class, supplemented with nutrition and self-empowerment components, individual sessions using motivational interviewing, lunch meetings, and parent outreach. Percentage body fat, BMI, physical activity, sedentary activity, dietary intake, eating patterns, unhealthy weight control behaviors, and body/self-image. New Moves did not lead to significant changes in the girls' percentage body fat or BMI but improvements were seen for sedentary activity, eating patterns, unhealthy weight control behaviors, and body/self-image. For example, in comparison to control girls, at 9-month follow-up, intervention girls decreased their sedentary behaviors by approximately one 30-minute block a day (p=0.050); girls increased their portion control behaviors (p=0.014); the percentage of girls using unhealthy weight control behaviors decreased by 13.7% (p=0.021); and improvements were seen in body image (p=0.045) and self-worth (p=0.031). Additionally, intervention girls reported more support by friends, teachers, and families for healthy eating and physical activity. New Moves provides a model for addressing the broad spectrum of weight-related problems among adolescent girls. Further work is needed to enhance the effectiveness of interventions to improve weight status of youth. Copyright © 2010 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Promoting physical activity among adolescent girls: the Girls in Sport group randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okely, Anthony D; Lubans, David R; Morgan, Philip J; Cotton, Wayne; Peralta, Louisa; Miller, Judith; Batterham, Marijka; Janssen, Xanne

    2017-06-21

    Slowing the decline in participation in physical activity among adolescent girls is a public health priority. This study reports the outcomes from a multi-component school-based intervention (Girls in Sport), focused on promoting physical activity among adolescent girls. Group randomized controlled trial in 24 secondary schools (12 intervention and 12 control). Assessments were conducted at baseline (2009) and at 18 months post-baseline (2010). The setting was secondary schools in urban, regional and rural areas of New South Wales, Australia. All girls in Grade 8 in 2009 who attended these schools were invited to participate in the study (N = 1769). Using a Health Promoting Schools and Action Learning Frameworks, each school formed a committee and developed an action plan for promoting physical activity among Grade 8 girls. The action plan incorporated strategies in three main areas - i) the formal curriculum, ii) school environment, and iii) home/school/community links - based on the results of formative data from target girls and staff and on individual needs of the school. A member of the research team supported each school throughout the intervention. The main outcome measure was accelerometer-derived total physical activity (TPA) spent in physical activity. Data were analyzed from December 2011 to March 2012. 1518 girls (mean age 13.6y ±0.02) were assessed at baseline. There was a significant decline in TPA from baseline to 18-month follow-up with no differences between girls in the intervention and control schools. Only one-third of schools (4/12) implemented the intervention as per their action plan. Per-protocol analyses on these schools revealed a smaller decline in percentage of time spent in MVPA among girls in the intervention group (adjusted difference 0.5%, 95% CI = -0.01, 0.99, P = 0.05). The Girls in Sport intervention was not effective in reducing the decline in physical activity among adolescent girls. Lack of implementation by most

  6. Randomized controlled trial of two forms of self-management group education in Japanese people with impaired glucose tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Saeko; Kozai, Hana; Naruse, Yuko; Watanabe, Kanji; Fukui, Michiaki; Hasegawa, Goji; Obayashi, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Naoto; Naito, Yuji; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu; Kajiyama, Shizuo

    2008-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of education on diabetes prevention in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance. A total of 100 subjects of impaired glucose tolerance with hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels >/=5.5 to education in 8 sessions over a 6-month period. The support group consisted of 10 members collaborating with a dietitian or a nurse who learned coping skills by employing a participant-centered approach. Participants in the support group were required to keep a diary that monitored weight, food intake and blood glucose levels, while the control group attended several lectures. Subjects assigned to the support group had a reduction in mean HbA1c levels from 5.77 +/- 0.36% at baseline to 5.39 +/- 0.24% at the endpoint (peducation can be effective for improving glycemic control in participants when carried out in collaboration with educators and other team members.

  7. Randomized, parallel-group, double-blind, controlled study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of carbohydrate-derived fulvic acid in topical treatment of eczema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gandy JJ

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Justin J Gandy, Jacques R Snyman, Constance EJ van RensburgDepartment of Pharmacology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South AfricaBackground: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of carbohydrate-derived fulvic acid (CHD-FA in the treatment of eczema in patients two years and older.Methods: In this single-center, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group comparative study, 36 volunteers with predetermined eczema were randomly assigned to receive either the study drug or placebo twice daily for four weeks.Results: All safety parameters remained within normal limits, with no significant differences in either group. Significant differences were observed for both severity and erythema in the placebo and CHD-FA treated groups, and a significant difference was observed for scaling in the placebo-treated group. With regard to the investigator assessment of global response to treatment, a significant improvement was observed in the CHD-FA group when compared with the placebo group. A statistically significant decrease in visual analog scale score was observed in both groups, when comparing the baseline with the final results.Conclusion: CHD-FA was well tolerated, with no difference in reported side effects other than a short-lived burning sensation on application. CHD-FA significantly improved some aspects of eczema. Investigator assessment of global response to treatment with CHD-FA was significantly better than that with emollient therapy alone. The results of this small exploratory study suggest that CHD-FA warrants further investigation in the treatment of eczema.Keywords: fulvic acid, eczema, anti-inflammatory, efficacy, safety

  8. Use of participant focus groups to identify barriers and facilitators to worksite exercise therapy adherence in randomized controlled trials involving firefighters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayer JM

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available John M Mayer,1 James L Nuzzo,1 Simon Dagenais2 1School of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Sciences, College of Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, 2Palladian Health, West Seneca, NY, USA Background: Firefighters are at increased risk for back injuries, which may be mitigated through exercise therapy to increase trunk muscle endurance. However, long-term adherence to exercise therapy is generally poor, limiting its potential benefits. Focus groups can be used to identify key barriers and facilitators to exercise adherence among study participants. Objective: To explore barriers and facilitators to worksite exercise therapy adherence among firefighters to inform future randomized controlled trials (RCTs. Methods: Participants enrolled in a previous RCT requiring twice-weekly worksite exercise therapy for 24 weeks were asked to take part in moderated focus group discussions centered on eight open-ended questions related to exercise adherence. Responses were analyzed qualitatively using a social ecological framework to identify key intrapersonal, interpersonal, and institutional barriers and potential facilitators to exercise adherence. Results: A total of 27 participants were included in the four focus group discussions, representing 50% of those assigned to a worksite exercise therapy group in the previous RCT, in which only 67% of scheduled exercise therapy sessions were completed. Lack of self-motivation was cited as the key intrapersonal barrier to adherence, while lack of peer support was the key interpersonal barrier reported, and lack of time to exercise during work shifts was the key institutional barrier identified. Conclusion: Focus group discussions identified both key barriers and potential facilitators to increase worksite exercise therapy adherence among firefighters. Future studies should consider educating and reminding participants about the benefits of exercise, providing individual and group incentives based on

  9. FLEET ASSIGNMENT MODELLING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the airline scheduling process and methods of its modeling. This article describes the main stages of airline scheduling process (scheduling, fleet assignment, revenue management, operations, their features and interactions. The main part of scheduling process is fleet assignment. The optimal solution of the fleet assignment problem enables airlines to increase their incomes up to 3 % due to quality improving of connections and execution of the planned number of flights operated by less number of aircraft than usual or planned earlier. Fleet assignment of scheduling process is examined and Conventional Leg-Based Fleet Assignment Model is analyzed. Finally strong and weak aspects of the model (SWOT are released and applied. The article gives a critical analysis of FAM model, with the purpose of identi- fying possible options and constraints of its use (for example, in cases of short-term and long-term planning, changing the schedule or replacing the aircraft, as well as possible ways to improve the model.

  10. Attention bias modification augments cognitive-behavioral group therapy for social anxiety disorder: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarov, Amit; Marom, Sofi; Yahalom, Naomi; Pine, Daniel S; Hermesh, Haggai; Bar-Haim, Yair

    2017-12-20

    Cognitive-behavioral group therapy (CBGT) is a first-line treatment for social anxiety disorder (SAD). However, since many patients remain symptomatic post-treatment, there is a need for augmenting procedures. This randomized controlled trial (RCT) examined the potential augmentation effect of attention bias modification (ABM) for CBGT. Fifty patients with SAD from three therapy groups were randomized to receive an 18-week standard CBGT with either ABM designed to shift attention away from threat (CBGT + ABM), or a placebo protocol not designed to modify threat-related attention (CBGT + placebo). Therapy groups took place in a large mental health center. Clinician and self-report measures of social anxiety and depression were acquired pre-treatment, post-treatment, and at 3-month follow-up. Attention bias was assessed at pre- and post-treatment. Patients randomized to the CBGT + ABM group, relative to those randomized to the CBGT + placebo group, showed greater reductions in clinician-rated SAD symptoms post-treatment, with effects maintained at 3-month follow-up. Group differences were not evident for self-report or attention-bias measures, with similar reductions in both groups. Finally, reduction in attention bias did not mediate the association between group and reduction in Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale Structured Interview (LSAS) scores. This is the first RCT to examine the possible augmenting effect of ABM added to group-based cognitive-behavioral therapy for adult SAD. Training patients' attention away from threat might augment the treatment response to standard CBGT in SAD, a possibility that could be further evaluated in large-scale RCTs.

  11. Face-to-face individual counseling and online group motivational interviewing in improving oral health: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiaoli; Lo, Edward Chin-Man; McGrath, Colman; Ho, Samuel Mun-Yin

    2015-09-18

    Motivational interviewing (MI) has great potential in changing health-related behaviors. In addition to delivery in face-to-face individual counseling, MI can be delivered through online groups, a method that is particularly appealing to adolescents and may offer several benefits. This randomized controlled trial compares the effectiveness of prevailing health education (HE), face-to-face individual MI and online group MI in improving adolescents' oral health behaviors (diet and toothbrushing) and in preventing dental caries and periodontal diseases. In each of Hong Kong's main districts (Hong Kong Island, Kowloon and the New Territories), three secondary schools will be recruited and randomly assigned to three groups (HE, face-to-face individual MI, and online group MI). A total of 495 adolescents (aged 12 to 13 years) with unfavorable oral health behaviors ("snacking twice or more a day" and/or "brushing teeth less than twice a day") will be recruited: 165 in each group. Two dental hygienists will be trained to deliver the interventions. HE will be provided through an oral health talk. Participants in the "face-to-face individual MI" group will join a one-on-one counseling session. For "online group MI," participants will form groups of 6 to 8 and join a synchronous text-based online counseling session. At baseline and after 6, 12 and 24 months, clinical outcomes (caries increment and gingival health) and oral health self-efficacy and behaviors (toothbrushing and snacking) will be recorded through an oral examination and a questionnaire, respectively. Effectiveness of the interventions will be evaluated and compared. The primary outcomes will be the "number of new carious surfaces" and "gingival bleeding score" (% of surfaces with gingival bleeding). The secondary outcomes will be changes in oral health self-efficacy and behaviors (toothbrushing and snacking frequencies). A preliminary economic evaluation and a process evaluation will be included to analyze the

  12. An intervention for reducing secondary traumatization and improving professional self-efficacy in well baby clinic nurses following war and terror: a random control group trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Rony; Gelkopf, Marc

    2011-05-01

    Due to the terror and war-related situation in Israel, well baby clinic nurses dealing with a large number of traumatized and highly distressed infants, toddlers and their parents have become overwhelmed. (1) Assess the level of secondary traumatization, including lack of compassion satisfaction, burnout and compassion fatigue of well baby clinic nurses living under chronic threat of war and terror. (2) Assess the efficacy of an intervention aimed at providing well baby clinic nurses with psycho-educational knowledge pertaining to stress and trauma in infants, young children and parents. This intervention provides the nurses with screening tools for identifying children and parents at risk of developing stress-related problems and equips them with stress management techniques. Quasi-random control trial. The intervention took place in Israel, in war (North) and terror (South) affected areas. Ninety well baby clinic nurses from the most war and terror affected areas in Israel were approached, 42 were randomly assigned the experimental intervention and 38 served as a waiting list group. The intervention was comprised of 12 weekly 6-h sessions. Each session included theoretical knowledge, experiential exercises based on the nurses' work or personal life experience, and the learning of skills accompanied by homework assignments. Participants were assessed on self-report measures of secondary traumatization, professional self-efficacy, hope, sense of mastery and self-esteem before and after the intervention. (1) Well baby clinic nurses were found to have elevated secondary traumatization levels. (2) Compared to the waiting list group, the intervention group improved significantly on the professional self-efficacy measure as well as reducing the level of secondary traumatization. Furthermore, improvement on all secondary traumatization measures covaried with the improvement on the professional self-efficacy assessments. Based on additional informal reports, the

  13. Headache : The placebo effects in the control groups in randomized clinical trials; An analysis of systematic reviews

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, Femke M.; Voogt-Bode, Annieke; Passchier, Jan; Berger, Marjolein Y.; Koes, Bart W.; Verhagen, Arianne P.

    Objective: The purpose of this study is to describe the effects in the placebo and "no treatment" arms in trials with headache patients. Method: This is a secondary analysis of randomized controlled trials from 8 systematic reviews and selected trials with a "no treatment" or placebo control group.

  14. Randomized Trial of Group Interventions to Reduce HIV/STD Risk and Change Theoretical Mediators among Detained Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmiege, Sarah J.; Broaddus, Michelle R.; Levin, Michael; Bryan, Angela D.

    2009-01-01

    Criminally involved adolescents engage in high levels of risky sexual behavior and alcohol use, and alcohol use may contribute to lack of condom use. Detained adolescents (n = 484) were randomized to (1) a theory-based sexual risk reduction intervention (GPI), (2) the GPI condition with a group-based alcohol risk reduction motivational enhancement…

  15. Improving the Design of Science Intervention Studies: An Empirical Investigation of Design Parameters for Planning Group Randomized Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westine, Carl; Spybrook, Jessaca

    2013-01-01

    The capacity of the field to conduct power analyses for group randomized trials (GRTs) of educational interventions has improved over the past decade (Authors, 2009). However, a power analysis depends on estimates of design parameters. Hence it is critical to build the empirical base of design parameters for GRTs across a variety of outcomes and…

  16. Reducing Aggressive Behavior in Boys With a Social Cognitive Group Treatment: Results of a Randomized, Controlled Trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Manen, T.G.; Prins, P.J.M.; Emmelkamp, P.M.G.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of a social cognitive intervention program for Dutch aggressive boys and to compare it with a social skills training and a waitlist control group. Method: A randomized, controlled treatment outcome study with 97 aggressive boys (aged 9-13 years) was

  17. Effects of a comprehensive educational group intervention in older women with cognitive complaints: a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogenhout, Esther; De Groot, Renate; Van der Elst, Wim; Jolles, Jelle

    2012-01-01

    Hoogenhout, E. M., De Groot, R. H. M., Van der Elst, W., Jolles J. (2012). Effects of a comprehensive educational group intervention in older women with cognitive complaints: a randomized controlled trial. Aging & Mental Health, 16, 135-144. doi:10.1080/13607863.2011.598846

  18. Improving the Transition Behavior of High School Students with Emotional Behavioral Disorders Using a Randomized Interdependent Group Contingency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Renee O.; Haydon, Todd; Denune, Hilary; Larkin, Wallace; Fite, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    The current study evaluated the effects of an interdependent group contingency with randomized components on student behavior during the transition from lunch to class. The study was conducted in three high school classrooms in an alternative school setting for students with emotional and behavioral disorders and used an ABAB withdrawal design.…

  19. A randomized, controlled trial of group cognitive-behavioral therapy for compulsive buying disorder: posttreatment and 6-month follow-up results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Astrid; Mueller, Ulrike; Silbermann, Andrea; Reinecker, Hans; Bleich, Stefan; Mitchell, James E; de Zwaan, Martina

    2008-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct a randomized trial comparing the efficacy of a group cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) intervention designed for the treatment of compulsive buying disorder to a waiting list control (WLC) group. Thirty-one patients with compulsive buying problems according to the criteria developed by McElroy et al. were assigned to receive active treatment (12 weekly sessions and 6-month follow-up) and 29 to the WLC group. The treatment was specifically aimed at interrupting and controlling the problematic buying behavior, establishing healthy purchasing patterns, restructuring maladaptive thoughts and negative feelings associated with shopping and buying, and developing healthy coping skills. Primary outcome measures were the Compulsive Buying Scale (CBS), the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale-Shopping Version (YBOCS-SV), and the German Compulsive Buying Scale (G-CBS). Secondary outcome measures were the Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (SCL-90-R), the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11), and the Saving Inventory-Revised (SI-R). The study was completed between November 2003 and May 2007 at the University Hospital of Erlangen, Bavaria, Germany. Multivariate analysis revealed significant differences between the CBT and the WLC groups on the primary outcome variables (outcome-by-time-by-group effect, Pillai's trace, F = 6.960, df = 1, p = .002). The improvement was maintained during the 6-month follow-up. The treatment did not affect other psychopathology, e.g., compulsive hoarding, impulsivity, or SCL-90-R scores. We found that lower numbers of visited group therapy sessions and higher pretreatment hoarding traits as measured with the SI-R total score were significant predictors for nonresponse. The results suggest that a disorder-specific cognitive-behavioral intervention can significantly impact compulsive buying behavior.

  20. Effective group training for patients with unexplained physical symptoms: a randomized controlled trial with a non-randomized one-year follow-up.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyonne N L Zonneveld

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although cognitive-behavioral therapy for Unexplained Physical Symptoms (UPS is effective in secondary care, studies done in primary care produced implementation problems and conflicting results. We evaluated the effectiveness of a cognitive-behavioral group training tailored to primary care patients and provided by a secondary community mental-health service reaching out into primary care. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The effectiveness of this training was explored in a randomized controlled trial. In this trial, 162 patients with UPS classified as undifferentiated somatoform disorder or as chronic pain disorder were randomized either to the training or a waiting list. Both lasted 13 weeks. The preservation of the training's effect was analyzed in non-randomized follow-ups, for which the waiting group started the training after the waiting period. All patients attended the training were followed-up after three months and again after one year. The primary outcomes were the physical and the mental summary scales of the SF-36. Secondary outcomes were the other SF-36-scales and the SCL-90-R. The courses of the training's effects in the randomized controlled trial and the follow-ups were analyzed with linear mixed modeling. In the randomized controlled trial, the training had a significantly positive effect on the quality of life in the physical domain (Cohen's d = 0.38;p = .002, but this overall effect was not found in the mental domain. Regarding the secondary outcomes, the training resulted in reporting an improved physical (Cohen's d = 0.43;p = 0.01, emotional (Cohen's d = 0.44;p = 0.01, and social (Cohen's d = 0.36;p = 0.01 functioning, less pain and better functioning despite pain (Cohen's d = 0.51;p =

  1. Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction and Group Support Decrease Stress in Adolescents with Cardiac Diagnoses: A Randomized Two-Group Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedenberg, Vicki A; Hinds, Pamela S; Friedmann, Erika

    2017-10-01

    Adolescents with cardiac diagnoses face unique challenges that can cause psychosocial distress. This study compares a Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) program to a video online support group for adolescents with cardiac diagnoses. MBSR is a structured psycho-educational program which includes yoga, meditation, cognitive restructuring, and group support. A published feasibility study by our group showed significant reduction in anxiety following this intervention. Participants were randomized to MBSR or video online support group, and completed measures of anxiety, depression, illness-related stress, and coping pre- and post-6-session interventions. Qualitative data were obtained from post-intervention interviews. A total of 46 teens participated (mean 14.8 years; 63% female). Participants had congenital heart disease and/or cardiac device (52%), or postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (48%). Illness-related stress significantly decreased in both groups. Greater use of coping skills predicted lower levels of depression in both groups post-study completion. Higher baseline anxiety/depression scores predicted improved anxiety/depression scores in both groups. Each group reported the benefits of social support. The MBSR group further expressed benefits of learning specific techniques, strategies, and skills that they applied in real-life situations to relieve distress. Both the MBSR intervention and video support group were effective in reducing distress in this sample. Qualitative data elucidated the added benefits of using MBSR techniques to manage stress and symptoms. The video group format is useful for teens that cannot meet in person but can benefit from group support. Psychosocial interventions with stress management techniques and/or group support can reduce distress in adolescents with cardiac diagnoses.

  2. Effects of Group Training on Depression and Anxiety among Patients with Type I Diabetes: a Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanaz Rostami

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Depression and anxiety can have a significant impact on prognosis in diabetic patients. In this study we evaluate how the effect of group learning on anxiety and depression in adolescents with type 1 diabetes at clinics of Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Science. Materials and Methods  This study was carried out via a pretest- posttest design on the adolescent 11-21 ages with type I diabetes. 74 patients were randomized in education group (n=37 either to the control group (n=37. Data collection tools included demographic and clinical status questionnaires, and the Beck anxiety and depression inventory. Group training intervention was done for intervention group and three months after study two groups filled questionnaires and inventories. Data analyzed using chi-square test and t-test using SPSS- 22 software. Results  Findings showed that there was a significant difference between patients mean of depression in intervention group before and after intervention (P

  3. Task assignment and coaching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dominguez-Martinez, S.

    2009-01-01

    An important task of a manager is to motivate her subordinates. One way in which a manager can give incentives to junior employees is through the assignment of tasks. How a manager allocates tasks in an organization, provides information to the junior employees about his ability. Without coaching

  4. Comparing the effect of auditory-only and auditory-visual modes in two groups of Persian children using cochlear implants: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oryadi Zanjani, Mohammad Majid; Hasanzadeh, Saeid; Rahgozar, Mehdi; Shemshadi, Hashem; Purdy, Suzanne C; Mahmudi Bakhtiari, Behrooz; Vahab, Maryam

    2013-09-01

    Since the introduction of cochlear implantation, researchers have considered children's communication and educational success before and after implantation. Therefore, the present study aimed to compare auditory, speech, and language development scores following one-sided cochlear implantation between two groups of prelingual deaf children educated through either auditory-only (unisensory) or auditory-visual (bisensory) modes. A randomized controlled trial with a single-factor experimental design was used. The study was conducted in the Instruction and Rehabilitation Private Centre of Hearing Impaired Children and their Family, called Soroosh in Shiraz, Iran. We assessed 30 Persian deaf children for eligibility and 22 children qualified to enter the study. They were aged between 27 and 66 months old and had been implanted between the ages of 15 and 63 months. The sample of 22 children was randomly assigned to two groups: auditory-only mode and auditory-visual mode; 11 participants in each group were analyzed. In both groups, the development of auditory perception, receptive language, expressive language, speech, and speech intelligibility was assessed pre- and post-intervention by means of instruments which were validated and standardized in the Persian population. No significant differences were found between the two groups. The children with cochlear implants who had been instructed using either the auditory-only or auditory-visual modes acquired auditory, receptive language, expressive language, and speech skills at the same rate. Overall, spoken language significantly developed in both the unisensory group and the bisensory group. Thus, both the auditory-only mode and the auditory-visual mode were effective. Therefore, it is not essential to limit access to the visual modality and to rely solely on the auditory modality when instructing hearing, language, and speech in children with cochlear implants who are exposed to spoken language both at home and at school

  5. Comparison of group counseling with individual counseling in the comprehension of informed consent: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bose Anuradha

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies on different methods to supplement the traditional informed consent process have generated conflicting results. This study was designed to evaluate whether participants who received group counseling prior to administration of informed consent understood the key components of the study and the consent better than those who received individual counseling, based on the hypothesis that group counseling would foster discussion among potential participants and enhance their understanding of the informed consent. Methods Parents of children participating in a trial of nutritional supplementation were randomized to receive either group counseling or individual counseling prior to administration of the informed consent. To assess the participant's comprehension, a structured questionnaire was administered approximately 48-72 hours afterwards by interviewers who were blinded to the allocation group of the respondents. Results A total of 128 parents were recruited and follow up was established with 118 (90.2% for the study. All respondents were aware of their child's participation in a research study and the details of sample collection. However, their understanding of study purpose, randomization and withdrawal was poor. There was no difference in comprehension of key elements of the informed consent between the intervention and control arm. Conclusions The results suggest that the group counseling might not influence the overall comprehension of the informed consent process. Further research is required to devise better ways of improving participants' understanding of randomization in clinical trials. Trial Registration Clinical Trial Registry - India (CTRI: CTRI/2009/091/000612

  6. Random walks on three-strand braids and on related hyperbolic groups 05.40.-a Fluctuation phenomena, random processes, noise, and Brownian motion; 02.50.-r Probability theory, stochastic processes, and statistics; 02.40.Ky Riemannian geometries;

    CERN Document Server

    Nechaev, S

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the statistical properties of random walks on the simplest nontrivial braid group B sub 3 , and on related hyperbolic groups. We provide a method using Cayley graphs of groups allowing us to compute explicitly the probability distribution of the basic statistical characteristics of random trajectories - the drift and the return probability. The action of the groups under consideration in the hyperbolic plane is investigated, and the distribution of a geometric invariant - the hyperbolic distance - is analysed. It is shown that a random walk on B sub 3 can be viewed as a 'magnetic random walk' on the group PSL(2, Z).

  7. Random walks on three-strand braids and on related hyperbolic groups[05.40.-a Fluctuation phenomena, random processes, noise, and Brownian motion; 02.50.-r Probability theory, stochastic processes, and statistics; 02.40.Ky Riemannian geometries;

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nechaev, Sergei [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique et Modeles Statistiques, Universite Paris Sud, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Voituriez, Raphael [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique et Modeles Statistiques, Universite Paris Sud, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France)

    2003-01-10

    We investigate the statistical properties of random walks on the simplest nontrivial braid group B{sub 3}, and on related hyperbolic groups. We provide a method using Cayley graphs of groups allowing us to compute explicitly the probability distribution of the basic statistical characteristics of random trajectories - the drift and the return probability. The action of the groups under consideration in the hyperbolic plane is investigated, and the distribution of a geometric invariant - the hyperbolic distance - is analysed. It is shown that a random walk on B{sub 3} can be viewed as a 'magnetic random walk' on the group PSL(2, Z)

  8. A Randomized Controlled Trial to Decrease Job Burnout in First-Year Internal Medicine Residents Using a Facilitated Discussion Group Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripp, Jonathan A; Fallar, Robert; Korenstein, Deborah

    2016-05-01

    Background Burnout is common in internal medicine (IM) trainees and is associated with depression and suboptimal patient care. Facilitated group discussion reduces burnout among practicing clinicians. Objective We hypothesized that this type of intervention would reduce incident burnout among first-year IM residents. Methods Between June 2013 and May 2014, participants from a convenience sample of 51 incoming IM residents were randomly assigned (in groups of 3) to the intervention or a control. Twice-monthly theme-based discussion sessions (18 total) led by expert facilitators were held for intervention groups. Surveys were administered at study onset and completion. Demographic and personal characteristics were collected. Burnout and burnout domains were the primary outcomes. Following convention, we defined burnout as a high emotional exhaustion or depersonalization score on the Maslach Burnout Inventory. Results All 51 eligible residents participated; 39 (76%) completed both surveys. Initial burnout prevalence (10 of 21 [48%] versus 7 of 17 [41%], P = .69), incidence of burnout at year end (9 of 11 [82%] versus 5 of 10 [50%], P = .18), and secondary outcomes were similar in intervention and control arms. More residents in the intervention group had high year-end depersonalization scores (18 of 21 [86%] versus 9 of 17 [53%], P = .04). Many intervention residents revealed that sessions did not truly free them from clinical or educational responsibilities. Conclusions A facilitated group discussion intervention did not decrease burnout in resident physicians. Future discussion-based interventions for reducing resident burnout should be voluntary and effectively free participants from clinical duties.

  9. A randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of a cognitive behavioural group approach to improve patient adherence to peritoneal dialysis fluid restrictions: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare, Jennifer; Clark-Carter, David; Forshaw, Mark

    2014-03-01

    Peritoneal dialysis (PD) requires patients to take an active role in their adherence to fluid restrictions. Although fluid non-adherence had been identified among this patient group, no specific interventions have been researched or published with in the PD population. The current study sought to investigate whether an applied cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT-based intervention) used among haemodialysis patients would improve fluid adherence among PD patients; utilizing clinical indicators used in practice. Fifteen PD patients identified as fluid non-adherent were randomly assigned to an intervention group (IG) or a deferred-entry control group (CG). The study ran for a total of 21 weeks, with five data collection points; at baseline, post-intervention and at three follow-up points; providing a RCT phase and a combined longitudinal analysis phase. The content of the group intervention encompassed educational, cognitive and behavioural components, aimed to assist patients' self-management of fluid. No significant differences in weight (kg) reduction were found in either phase and undesirable changes in blood pressure (BP) were observed. However, in the longitudinal phase, a statistically significant difference in oedematous status was observed at 6-week follow-up; which may be indicative of fluid adherence. Positive and significant differences were observed in the desired direction for measures of psychological well-being, quality of life and health beliefs; areas correlated with enhanced fluid adherence in other research. This study reveals encouraging and significant changes in predictors of fluid adherence. Although there were no significant changes in weight as a crude clinical measure of fluid intake, significant reductions in oedematous status were observed as a consequence of this CBT-based group intervention.

  10. Post-discharge management following hip fracture - get you back to B4: A parallel group, randomized controlled trial study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown Roy A

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fall-related hip fractures result in significant personal and societal consequences; importantly, up to half of older adults with hip fracture never regain their previous level of mobility. Strategies of follow-up care for older adults after fracture have improved investigation for osteoporosis; but managing bone health alone is not enough. Prevention of fractures requires management of both bone health and falls risk factors (including the contributing role of cognition, balance and continence to improve outcomes. Methods/Design This is a parallel group, pragmatic randomized controlled trial to test the effectiveness of a post-fracture clinic compared with usual care on mobility for older adults following their hospitalization for hip fracture. Participants randomized to the intervention will attend a fracture follow-up clinic where a geriatrician and physiotherapist will assess and manage their mobility and other health issues. Depending on needs identified at the clinical assessment, participants may receive individualized and group-based outpatient physiotherapy, and a home exercise program. Our primary objective is to assess the effectiveness of a novel post-discharge fracture management strategy on the mobility of older adults after hip fracture. We will enrol 130 older adults (65 years+ who have sustained a hip fracture in the previous three months, and were admitted to hospital from home and are expected to be discharged home. We will exclude older adults who prior to the fracture were: unable to walk 10 meters; diagnosed with dementia and/or significant comorbidities that would preclude their participation in the clinical service. Eligible participants will be randomly assigned to the Intervention or Usual Care groups by remote allocation. Treatment allocation will be concealed; investigators, measurement team and primary data analysts will be blinded to group allocation. Our primary outcome is mobility

  11. Effects of Group Psychotherapy, Individual Counseling, Methylphenidate, and Placebo in the Treatment of Adult Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philipsen, Alexandra; Jans, Thomas; Graf, Erika; Matthies, Swantje; Borel, Patricia; Colla, Michael; Gentschow, Laura; Langner, Daina; Jacob, Christian; Groß-Lesch, Silke; Sobanski, Esther; Alm, Barbara; Schumacher-Stien, Martina; Roesler, Michael; Retz, Wolfgang; Retz-Junginger, Petra; Kis, Bernhard; Abdel-Hamid, Mona; Heinrich, Viola; Huss, Michael; Kornmann, Catherine; Bürger, Arne; Perlov, Evgeniy; Ihorst, Gabriele; Schlander, Michael; Berger, Mathias; Tebartz van Elst, Ludger

    2015-12-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder with high prevalence in adulthood. There is a recognized need to assess the efficacy of psychotherapy in adult ADHD. To evaluate the efficacy of cognitive behavioral group psychotherapy (GPT) compared with individual clinical management (CM) and that of methylphenidate hydrochloride compared with placebo. Prospective, multicenter, randomized clinical trial of 18- to 58-year-old outpatients with ADHD from 7 German study centers. Patients were recruited between January 2007 and August 2010, treatment was finalized in August 2011, and final follow-up assessments occurred in March 2013. Sessions of GPT and CM were held weekly for the first 12 weeks and monthly thereafter (9 months). Patients received either methylphenidate or placebo for 1 year. The primary outcome was the change in the ADHD Index of the Conners Adult ADHD Rating Scale from baseline to the end of the 3-month intensive treatment (blinded observer ratings). Secondary outcomes included ADHD ratings after 1 year, blinded observer ratings using the Clinical Global Impression Scale, and self-ratings of depression. Among 1480 prescreened patients, 518 were assessed for eligibility, 433 were centrally randomized, and 419 were analyzed as randomized. After 3 months, the ADHD Index all-group baseline mean of 20.6 improved to adjusted means of 17.6 for GPT and 16.5 for CM, with no significant difference between groups. Methylphenidate (adjusted mean, 16.2) was superior to placebo (adjusted mean, 17.9) (difference, -1.7; 97.5% CI, -3.0 to -0.4; P = .003). After 1 year, treatment effects remained essentially stable. Descriptive analyses showed that methylphenidate was superior to placebo in patients assigned to GPT (difference, -1.7; 95% CI, -3.2 to -0.1; P = .04) or CM (difference, -1.7; 95% CI, -3.3 to -0.2; P = .03). Regarding depression, no significant differences were found. In contrast, GPT was superior to CM for all

  12. Programming a randomized dependent group contingency and common stimuli to promote durable behavior change

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cariveau, Tom; Kodak, Tiffany

    2017-01-01

    Low levels of academic engagement may impede students’ acquisition of skills. Intervening on student behavior using group contingencies may be a feasible way to increase academic engagement during group instruction...

  13. Vildagliptin vs liraglutide as a second-line therapy switched from sitagliptin-based regimens in patients with type 2 diabetes: A randomized, parallel-group study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshita, Yumie; Takamura, Toshinari; Kita, Yuki; Otoda, Toshiki; Kato, Ken-ichiro; Wakakuri, Hitomi; Yamada, Masayuki; Misu, Hirofumi; Matsushima, Yukiko; Kaneko, Shuichi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction A step-up strategy for dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP)-4 inhibitor-based regimens has not yet been established. In addition, similarities and differences between DPP-4 inhibitors and glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 receptor agonists remain to be elucidated in humans. We investigated the pleiotropic effects of vildagliptin vs liraglutide in patients with type 2 diabetes on sitagliptin-based regimens in an open-label, randomized, clinical trial. Materials and Methods A total of 122 patients with type 2 diabetes that was inadequately controlled by sitagliptin-based regimens were randomly assigned to either vildagliptin (50 mg, twice daily) or liraglutide treatment (0.9 mg, once daily) for 12 weeks. The primary outcomes were glycated hemoglobin and body mass index. Results Both vildagliptin and liraglutide significantly lowered glycated hemoglobin within 12 weeks after switching from sitagliptin, but liraglutide produced a greater reduction (−0.67 ± 0.12% vs −0.36 ± 0.53%). Liraglutide lowered body mass index, whereas vildagliptin did not affect body mass index. Vildagliptin lowered fasting C-peptide immunoreactivity, but liraglutide did not. Vildagliptin increased serum levels of adiponectin, arachidonic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid, whereas liraglutide had no effect on these levels. Quality of life, assessed using the diabetes treatment satisfaction questionnaire, was not impaired in either group. The most common adverse events were gastrointestinal symptoms, which occurred with similar frequencies in both groups. Conclusions Vildagliptin-mediated improvements in glycemic control did not correlate with indices for insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity. Switching from sitagliptin to liraglutide is useful in managing hyperglycemia and weight. Each agent exerts unique pleiotropic effects. This trial was registered with the University Hospital Medical Information Network Clinical Trials Registry (no. 000004953). PMID

  14. Group exercise training for balance, functional status, spasticity, fatigue and quality of life in multiple sclerosis: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarakci, Ela; Yeldan, Ipek; Huseyinsinoglu, Burcu E; Zenginler, Yonca; Eraksoy, Mefkure

    2013-09-01

    To determine the effectiveness of group exercise training on balance, functional status, spasticity, fatigue and quality of life in patients with multiple sclerosis. A randomized single-blind controlled study. University hospital, outpatient physical therapy department. Ambulatory patients with multiple sclerosis. Exercise group completed a 12-week group exercise programme under the physical therapists' supervision. Control group was included in the waiting list. The primary outcome measures were the Berg Balance Scale, 10-metre walk test, 10-steps climbing test and secondary outcome measures were the Modified Ashworth Scale, Fatigue Severity Scale and Multiple Sclerosis International Quality of Life. Ninety-nine patients completed the study. There were statistically significant improvements for all outcome measures in the group exercise group (n = 51) (p exercise group, while a decreased of 2.33 in control group. The 10-metre walk test duration (second) was decreased 2.72 in exercise group, while increased 1.44 in control group. In comparing inter-groups changes, both primary and secondary outcome mesures showed significant improvements in favour of the exercise group after the training (p exercise training is effective in improving balance, functional status, spasticity, fatigue and quality of life in moderately affected people with multiple sclerosis, with no worsening of their clinical status.

  15. Effects of online group exercises for older adults on physical, psychological and social wellbeing: a randomized pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baez, Marcos; Khaghani Far, Iman; Ibarra, Francisco; Ferron, Michela; Didino, Daniele; Casati, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    Intervention programs to promote physical activity in older adults, either in group or home settings, have shown equivalent health outcomes but different results when considering adherence. Group-based interventions seem to achieve higher participation in the long-term. However, there are many factors that can make of group exercises a challenging setting for older adults. A major one, due to the heterogeneity of this particular population, is the difference in the level of skills. In this paper we report on the physical, psychological and social wellbeing outcomes of a technology-based intervention that enable online group exercises in older adults with different levels of skills. A total of 37 older adults between 65 and 87 years old followed a personalized exercise program based on the OTAGO program for fall prevention, for a period of eight weeks. Participants could join online group exercises using a tablet-based application. Participants were assigned either to the Control group, representing the traditional individual home-based training program, or the Social group, representing the online group exercising. Pre- and post- measurements were taken to analyze the physical, psychological and social wellbeing outcomes. After the eight-weeks training program there were improvements in both the Social and Control groups in terms of physical outcomes, given the high level of adherence of both groups. Considering the baseline measures, however, the results suggest that while in the Control group fitter individuals tended to adhere more to the training, this was not the case for the Social group, where the initial level had no effect on adherence. For psychological outcomes there were improvements on both groups, regardless of the application used. There was no significant difference between groups in social wellbeing outcomes, both groups seeing a decrease in loneliness despite the presence of social features in the Social group. However, online social interactions

  16. Effects of online group exercises for older adults on physical, psychological and social wellbeing: a randomized pilot trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Baez

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Intervention programs to promote physical activity in older adults, either in group or home settings, have shown equivalent health outcomes but different results when considering adherence. Group-based interventions seem to achieve higher participation in the long-term. However, there are many factors that can make of group exercises a challenging setting for older adults. A major one, due to the heterogeneity of this particular population, is the difference in the level of skills. In this paper we report on the physical, psychological and social wellbeing outcomes of a technology-based intervention that enable online group exercises in older adults with different levels of skills. Methods A total of 37 older adults between 65 and 87 years old followed a personalized exercise program based on the OTAGO program for fall prevention, for a period of eight weeks. Participants could join online group exercises using a tablet-based application. Participants were assigned either to the Control group, representing the traditional individual home-based training program, or the Social group, representing the online group exercising. Pre- and post- measurements were taken to analyze the physical, psychological and social wellbeing outcomes. Results After the eight-weeks training program there were improvements in both the Social and Control groups in terms of physical outcomes, given the high level of adherence of both groups. Considering the baseline measures, however, the results suggest that while in the Control group fitter individuals tended to adhere more to the training, this was not the case for the Social group, where the initial level had no effect on adherence. For psychological outcomes there were improvements on both groups, regardless of the application used. There was no significant difference between groups in social wellbeing outcomes, both groups seeing a decrease in loneliness despite the presence of social features in the

  17. Efficacy and safety of eslicarbazepine acetate versus controlled-release carbamazepine monotherapy in newly diagnosed epilepsy: A phase III double-blind, randomized, parallel-group, multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinka, Eugen; Ben-Menachem, Elinor; Kowacs, Pedro A; Elger, Christian; Keller, Birgit; Löffler, Kurt; Rocha, José Francisco; Soares-da-Silva, Patrício

    2018-01-25

    We assessed the efficacy and safety of once-daily eslicarbazepine acetate in comparison with twice-daily (BID) controlled-release carbamazepine (carbamazepine-CR) monotherapy in newly diagnosed focal epilepsy patients. This randomized, double-blind, noninferiority trial (NCT01162460) utilized a stepwise design with 3 dose levels. Patients who remained seizure-free for the 26-week evaluation period (level A: eslicarbazepine acetate 800 mg/carbamazepine-CR 200 mg BID) entered a 6-month maintenance period. If a seizure occurred during the evaluation period, patients were titrated to the next target level (level B: eslicarbazepine acetate 1200 mg/carbamazepine-CR 400 mg BID, level C: eslicarbazepine acetate 1600 mg/carbamazepine-CR 600 mg BID) and the evaluation period began again. The primary endpoint was the proportion of seizure-free patients for 6 months after stabilization in the per protocol set. The predefined noninferiority criteria were -12% absolute and -20% relative difference between treatment groups. Eight hundred fifteen patients were randomly assigned; 785 (388 in the eslicarbazepine acetate group and 397 in the carbamazepine-CR group) were included in the per protocol set, and 813 (401 in the eslicarbazepine acetate group and 412 in the carbamazepine-CR group) were included in the full analysis set for the primary analysis. Overall, 71.1% of eslicarbazepine acetate-treated patients and 75.6% of carbamazepine-CR-treated patients were seizure-free for ≥6 months at the last evaluated dose (average risk difference = -4.28%, 95% confidence interval [CI] = -10.30 to 1.74; relative risk difference = -5.87%, 95% CI = -13.50 to 2.44) in the per protocol set. Rates of treatment-emergent adverse events were similar between groups for patients in the safety set. Noninferiority was also demonstrated in the full analysis set, as 70.8% of patients with eslicarbazepine acetate and 74.0% with carbamazepine-CR were seizure-free at the last evaluated dose

  18. Internet-based individually versus group guided self-help treatment for social anxiety disorder: protocol of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Ava; Stolz, Timo; Berger, Thomas

    2014-04-15

    Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is one of the most common mental disorders and causes subjective suffering and economic burden worldwide. Although effective treatments are available, a lot of cases go untreated. Internet-based self-help is a low-threshold and flexible treatment alternative for SAD. Various studies have already shown that internet-based self-help can be effective to reduce social phobic symptoms significantly. Most of the interventions tested include therapist support, whereas the role of peer support within internet-based self-help has not yet been fully understood. There is evidence suggesting that patients' mutual exchange via integrated discussion forums can increase the efficacy of internet-based treatments. This study aims at investigating the added value of therapist-guided group support on the treatment outcome of internet-based self-help for SAD. The study is conducted as a randomized controlled trial. A total of 150 adults with a diagnosis of SAD are randomly assigned to either a waiting-list control group or one of the active conditions. The participants in the two active conditions use the same internet-based self-help program, either with individual support by a psychologist or therapist-guided group support. In the group guided condition, participants can communicate with each other via an integrated, protected discussion forum. Subjects are recruited via topic related websites and links; diagnostic status will be assessed with a telephone interview. The primary outcome variables are symptoms of SAD and diagnostic status after the intervention. Secondary endpoints are general symptomology, depression, quality of life, as well as the primary outcome variables 6 months later. Furthermore, process variables such as group processes, the change in symptoms and working alliance will be studied. The results of this study should indicate whether group-guided support could enhance the efficacy of an internet-based self-help treatment for SAD

  19. Gain weighted eigenspace assignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, John B.; Andrisani, Dominick, II

    1994-01-01

    This report presents the development of the gain weighted eigenspace assignment methodology. This provides a designer with a systematic methodology for trading off eigenvector placement versus gain magnitudes, while still maintaining desired closed-loop eigenvalue locations. This is accomplished by forming a cost function composed of a scalar measure of error between desired and achievable eigenvectors and a scalar measure of gain magnitude, determining analytical expressions for the gradients, and solving for the optimal solution by numerical iteration. For this development the scalar measure of gain magnitude is chosen to be a weighted sum of the squares of all the individual elements of the feedback gain matrix. An example is presented to demonstrate the method. In this example, solutions yielding achievable eigenvectors close to the desired eigenvectors are obtained with significant reductions in gain magnitude compared to a solution obtained using a previously developed eigenspace (eigenstructure) assignment method.

  20. Assignment Tracking Android Application

    OpenAIRE

    Akanni, Feranmi Timothy

    2016-01-01

    One of the common ways of checking that knowledge is impacted into students at every level of education is by giving various tasks to students and part of the responsibilities of the teacher is to give assignments to students and check the solution provided by the students. Increase in technology development involves a number of mobile applications that are being developed and released on a daily basis, out of which Android operating application is one of the dominant mobile application. T...

  1. Task assignment and coaching

    OpenAIRE

    Dominguez-Martinez, S.

    2009-01-01

    An important task of a manager is to motivate her subordinates. One way in which a manager can give incentives to junior employees is through the assignment of tasks. How a manager allocates tasks in an organization, provides information to the junior employees about his ability. Without coaching from a manager, the junior employee only has information about his past performance. Based on his past performance, a talented junior who has performed a difficult task sometimes decides to leave the...

  2. Randomized controlled trial of a cognitive-behavioral motivational intervention in a group versus individual format for substance use disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobell, Linda Carter; Sobell, Mark B; Agrawal, Sangeeta

    2009-12-01

    Although group therapy is widely used for individuals with substance use disorders (SUDs), randomized clinical trials (RCTs) comparing the same treatment in a group versus individual format are rare. This paper presents the results of a RCT comparing guided self-change (GSC) treatment, a cognitive-behavioral motivational intervention, conducted in a group versus individual format with 212 alcohol abusers and 52 drug abusers who voluntarily sought outpatient treatment. Treatment outcomes demonstrated significant and large reductions in clients' alcohol and drug use during treatment and at the 12-month follow-up, with no significant differences between the group and individual therapy conditions. A therapist time ratio analysis found that it took 41.4% less therapist time to treat clients using the group versus the individual format. Participants' end-of-treatment group cohesion scores characterized the groups as having high engagement, low levels of interpersonal conflict, and low avoidance of group work, all desirable group characteristics. These findings suggest that the GSC treatment model was effectively integrated into a brief group treatment format. Health care cost containment compels further evaluations of the efficacy of group treatments for SUDs. Copyright 2009 APA

  3. Randomized Controlled Trial of Acupuncture for Women with Fibromyalgia: Group Acupuncture with Traditional Chinese Medicine Diagnosis-Based Point Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mist, Scott D; Jones, Kim Dupree

    2018-02-13

    Group acupuncture is a growing and cost-effective method for delivering acupuncture in the United States and is the practice model in China. However, group acupuncture has not been tested in a research setting. To test the treatment effect of group acupuncture vs group education in persons with fibromyalgia. Random allocation two-group study with repeated measures. Group clinic in an academic health center in Portland, Oregon. Women with confirmed diagnosis of fibromyalgia (American College of Radiology 1990 criteria) and moderate to severe pain levels. Twenty treatments of a manualized acupuncture treatment based on Traditional Chinese Medicine diagnosis or group education over 10 weeks (both 900 minutes total). Weekly Revised Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQR) and Global Fatigue Index at baseline, five weeks, and 10 weeks and a four-week follow-up were assessed. Thirty women were recruited, with 78% reporting symptoms for longer than 10 years. The mean attendance was 810 minutes for acupuncture and 861 minutes for education. FIQR total, FIQR pain, and Global Fatigue Index all had clinically and statistically significant improvement in the group receiving acupuncture at end of treatment and four weeks post-treatment but not in participants receiving group education between groups. Compared with education, group acupuncture improved global symptom impact, pain, and fatigue. Furthermore, it was a safe and well-tolerated treatment option, improving a broader proportion of patients than current pharmaceutical options.

  4. Long-term risk of carotid restenosis in patients randomly assigned to endovascular treatment or endarterectomy in the Carotid and Vertebral Artery Transluminal Angioplasty Study (CAVATAS): long-term follow-up of a randomised trial.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bonati, Leo H

    2009-10-01

    In the Carotid and Vertebral Artery Transluminal Angioplasty Study (CAVATAS), early recurrent carotid stenosis was more common in patients assigned to endovascular treatment than it was in patients assigned to endarterectomy (CEA), raising concerns about the long-term effectiveness of endovascular treatment. We aimed to investigate the long-term risks of restenosis in patients included in CAVATAS.

  5. Fast Neutron Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer. Final Report of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laramore, G. E. [Washington U.; Krall, J. M. [Unlisted, US, PA; Thomas, F. J. [Unlisted, US, OH; Russell, K. J. [Washington U.; Maor, M. H. [Unlisted, US, TX; Hendrickson, F. R. [Fermilab; Martz, K. L. [Unlisted, US, PA; Griffin, T. W. [Washington U.

    1993-01-01

    Between June 1977 and April 1983 the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) sponsored a Phase III randomized trial investigating the use of fast neutron radiotherapy for patients with locally advanced (Stages C and D1) adenocarcinoma of the prostate gland. Patients were randomized to receive either conventional photon radiation or fast neutron radiation used in a mixed-beam (neutron/photon) treatment schedule. A total of 91 analyzable patients were entered into the study, and the two patient groups were balanced with respect to the major prognostic variables. Actuarial curves are presented for local/regional control and "overall" survival. Ten-year results for clinically assessed local control are 70% for the mixed-beam group versus 58% for the photon group (p = 0.03) and for survival are 46% for the mixed-beam group versus 29% for the photon group (p = 0.04). This study suggests that a regional method of treatment can influence both local tumor control and survival in patients with locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the prostate gland.

  6. Comparison between group and personal rehabilitation for dementia in a geriatric health service facility: single-blinded randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Shigeya; Honda, Shin; Nakano, Hajime; Sato, Yuko; Araya, Kazufumi; Yamaguchi, Haruyasu

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of rehabilitation involving group and personal sessions on demented participants. This single-blinded randomized controlled trial included 60 elderly participants with dementia in a geriatric health service facility, or R oken. Staff members, who did not participate in the intervention, examined cognitive function, mood, communication ability, severity of dementia, objective quality of life, vitality, and daily behaviour. After a baseline assessment, participants were randomly divided into three groups: (i) group intervention; (ii) personal intervention; and (iii) control. The 1-h group intervention (3-5 subjects) and 20-min personal intervention (one staff member per participant) were performed twice a week for 12 weeks (24 total sessions). The cognitive rehabilitation programme consisted of reminiscence, reality orientation, and physical exercise, and it was based on five principles of brain-activating rehabilitation; (i) pleasant atmosphere; (ii) communication; (iii) social roles; (iv) praising; and (v) errorless support. Data were analyzed after the second assessment. Outcome measures were analyzed in 43 participants-14 in the control group, 13 in group intervention, and 16 in personal intervention. Repeated measure ancova showed a significant interaction for cognitive function score (Mini-Mental State Examination) between group intervention and controls ( F  = 5.535, P = 0.029). In the post-hoc analysis, group intervention showed significant improvement (P = 0.016). Global severity of dementia tended to improve (P = 0.094) in group intervention compared to control (Mann-Whitney U -test). There were no significant interactions or improvements for other measurements. Group rehabilitation for dementia is more effective for improving cognitive function and global severity of dementia than personal rehabilitation in Roken. © 2016 Japanese Psychogeriatric Society.

  7. Comparing Acceptance and Commitment Group Therapy and 12-Steps Narcotics Anonymous in Addict's Rehabilitation Process: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azkhosh, Manoochehr; Farhoudianm, Ali; Saadati, Hemn; Shoaee, Fateme; Lashani, Leila

    2016-10-01

    Objective: Substance abuse is a socio-psychological disorder. The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of acceptance and commitment therapy with 12-steps Narcotics Anonymous on psychological well-being of opiate dependent individuals in addiction treatment centers in Shiraz, Iran. Method: This was a randomized controlled trial. Data were collected at entry into the study and at post-test and follow-up visits. The participants were selected from opiate addicted individuals who referred to addiction treatment centers in Shiraz. Sixty individuals were evaluated according to inclusion/ exclusion criteria and were divided into three equal groups randomly (20 participants per group). One group received acceptance and commitment group therapy (Twelve 90-minute sessions) and the other group was provided with the 12-steps Narcotics Anonymous program and the control group received the usual methadone maintenance treatment. During the treatment process, seven participants dropped out. Data were collected using the psychological well-being questionnaire and AAQ questionnaire in the three groups at pre-test, post-test and follow-up visits. Data were analyzed using repeated measure analysis of variance. Results: Repeated measure analysis of variance revealed that the mean difference between the three groups was significant (Pacceptance and commitment therapy group showed improvement relative to the NA and control groups on psychological well-being and psychological flexibility. Conclusion: The results of this study revealed that acceptance and commitment therapy can be helpful in enhancing positive emotions and increasing psychological well-being of addicts who seek treatment.

  8. Nutrient adequacy during weight loss interventions: a randomized study in women comparing the dietary intake in a meal replacement group with a traditional food group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bovee Vicki

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Safe and effective weight control strategies are needed to stem the current obesity epidemic. The objective of this one-year study was to document and compare the macronutrient and micronutrient levels in the foods chosen by women following two different weight reduction interventions. Methods Ninety-six generally healthy overweight or obese women (ages 25–50 years; BMI 25–35 kg/m2 were randomized into a Traditional Food group (TFG or a Meal Replacement Group (MRG incorporating 1–2 meal replacement drinks or bars per day. Both groups had an energy-restricted goal of 5400 kJ/day. Dietary intake data was obtained using 3-Day Food records kept by the subjects at baseline, 6 months and one-year. For more uniform comparisons between groups, each diet intervention consisted of 18 small group sessions led by the same Registered Dietitian. Results Weight loss for the 73% (n = 70 completing this one-year study was not significantly different between the groups, but was significantly different (p ≤ .05 within each group with a mean (± standard deviation weight loss of -6.1 ± 6.7 kg (TFG, n = 35 vs -5.0 ± 4.9 kg (MRG, n = 35. Both groups had macronutrient (Carbohydrate:Protein:Fat ratios that were within the ranges recommended (50:19:31, TFG vs 55:16:29, MRG. Their reported reduced energy intake was similar (5729 ± 1424 kJ, TFG vs 5993 ± 2016 kJ, MRG. There was an improved dietary intake pattern in both groups as indicated by decreased intake of saturated fat (≤ 10%, cholesterol ( Conclusion In this one-year university-based intervention, both dietitian-led groups successfully lost weight while improving overall dietary adequacy. The group incorporating fortified meal replacements tended to have a more adequate essential nutrient intake compared to the group following a more traditional food group diet. This study supports the need to incorporate fortified foods and/or dietary supplements while following an energy

  9. Contributions of the European trials (European randomized screening group) in computed tomography lung cancer screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuvelmans, Marjolein A; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; Oudkerk, Matthijs

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. In 2011, the largest lung cancer screening trial worldwide, the US National Lung Screening Trial, published a 20% decrease in lung cancer-specific mortality in the computed tomography (CT)-screened group, compared with the group

  10. Group-Based Randomized Trial of Contingencies for Health and Abstinence in HIV Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petry, Nancy M.; Weinstock, Jeremiah; Alessi, Sheila M.; Lewis, Marilyn W.; Dieckhaus, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Contingency management (CM) treatments are usually applied individually for drug abstinence, but CM can also be targeted toward health behaviors and implemented in groups. This study evaluated effects of a group-based CM intervention that focused on reinforcing health behaviors. Method: HIV-positive patients with cocaine or opioid use…

  11. Randomized controlled trial of group cognitive behavioral therapy compared to a discussion group for co-morbid anxiety and depression in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuthrich, V M; Rapee, R M; Kangas, M; Perini, S

    2016-03-01

    Co-morbid anxiety and depression in older adults is associated with worse physical and mental health outcomes and poorer response to psychological and pharmacological treatments in older adults. However, there is a paucity of research focused on testing the efficacy of the co-morbid treatment of anxiety and depression in older adults using psychological interventions. Accordingly, the primary objective of the current study was to test the effects of a group cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) program in treating co-morbid anxiety and depression in a sample of older age adults. A total of 133 community-dwelling participants aged ⩾60 years (mean age = 67.35, s.d. = 5.44, male = 59) with both an anxiety disorder and unipolar mood disorder, as assessed on the Anxiety Disorder Interview Schedule (ADIS), were randomly allocated to an 11-week CBT group or discussion group. Participants with Mini-Mental State Examination scores Depression Scale. Both conditions resulted in significant improvements over time on all diagnostic, symptom and wellbeing measures. Significant group × time interaction effects emerged at post-treatment only for diagnostic severity of the primary disorder, mean severity of all anxiety disorders, mood disorders, and all disorders, and recovery rates on primary disorder. Group CBT produced faster and sustained improvements in anxiety and depression on diagnostic severity and recovery rates compared to an active control in older adults.

  12. A Social Media Peer Group for Mothers To Prevent Obesity from Infancy: The Grow2Gether Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiks, Alexander G; Gruver, Rachel S; Bishop-Gilyard, Chanelle T; Shults, Justine; Virudachalam, Senbagam; Suh, Andrew W; Gerdes, Marsha; Kalra, Gurpreet K; DeRusso, Patricia A; Lieberman, Alexandra; Weng, Daniel; Elovitz, Michal A; Berkowitz, Robert I; Power, Thomas J

    2017-10-01

    Few studies have addressed obesity prevention among low-income families whose infants are at increased obesity risk. We tested a Facebook peer-group intervention for low-income mothers to foster behaviors promoting healthy infant growth. In this randomized controlled trial, 87 pregnant women (Medicaid insured, BMI ≥25 kg/m2) were randomized to the Grow2Gether intervention or text message appointment reminders. Grow2Gether participants joined a private Facebook group of 9-13 women from 2 months before delivery until infant age 9 months. A psychologist facilitated groups featuring a curriculum of weekly videos addressing feeding, sleep, parenting, and maternal well-being. Feasibility was assessed using the frequency and content of participation, and acceptability using surveys. Maternal beliefs and behaviors and infant growth were assessed at birth, 2, 4, 6, and 9 months. Differences in infant growth between study arms were explored. We conducted intention-to-treat analyses using quasi-least-squares regression. Eighty-eight percent (75/85) of intervention participants (42% (36/85) food insecure, 88% (75/85) black) reported the group was helpful. Participants posted 30 times/group/week on average. At 9 months, the intervention group had significant improvement in feeding behaviors (Infant Feeding Style Questionnaire) compared to the control group (p = 0.01, effect size = 0.45). Intervention group mothers were significantly less likely to pressure infants to finish food and, at age 6 months, give cereal in the bottle. Differences were not observed for other outcomes, including maternal feeding beliefs or infant weight-for-length. A social media peer-group intervention was engaging and significantly impacted certain feeding behaviors in families with infants at high risk of obesity.

  13. Metacognitive group training for schizophrenia spectrum patients with delusions : a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oosterhout, B.; Krabbendam, L.; de Boer, K.; Ferwerda, J.; van der Helm, M.; Stant, A. D.; van der Gaag, M.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Metacognitive training (MCT) for patients with psychosis is a psychological group intervention that aims to educate patients about common cognitive biases underlying delusion formation and maintenance, and to highlight their negative consequences in daily functioning. Method. In this

  14. Can supervised group exercises including ergonomic advice reduce the prevalence and severity of low back pain and pelvic girdle pain in pregnancy? A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggen, Marit Horst; Stuge, Britt; Mowinckel, Petter; Jensen, Kjersti Smee; Hagen, Kåre Birger

    2012-06-01

    Many women have low back pain (LBP) or pelvic girdle pain (PGP) during pregnancy, but there is limited evidence of effective primary and secondary preventive strategies. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether a group-based exercise program can reduce the prevalence and severity of LBP and PGP in pregnant women. An observer-blinded randomized controlled trial with equal assignments to a training group and a control group was conducted. The study was conducted in primary care maternity units in 2 suburban municipalities in the southeastern part of Norway. The participants were 257 pregnant women who were healthy and between 18 and 40 years of age before gestation week 20. The training group received supervised exercises in groups once a week, and the control group received standard care. The main outcome measures were self-reported LBP and self-reported PGP. Secondary outcome measures were pain intensity in the morning and evening, disability, and 8-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-8) Physical Component Summary (PCS) and Mental Component Summary (MCS) scores. Follow-up measurements were performed at gestation weeks 24, 28, 32, and 36. Overall, there was no effect of the program on the prevalence of PGP (odds ratio = 1.03, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.66 to 1.59) or LBP (odds ratio = 0.77, 95% CI = 0.50 to 1.19). For the secondary outcomes, the estimated mean differences between the groups were -0.4 (95% CI = -0.8 to 0.1) for pain intensity in the morning, -0.4 (95% CI = -1.0 to 0.2) for pain intensity in the evening, -1.0 (95% CI = -2.2 to 0.0) for disability, 1.8 (95% CI = 0.0 to 3.7) for the SF-8 PCS, and -0.6 (95% CI = -2.2 to 1.4) for the SF-8 MCS. Due to low statistical power, the estimates for the primary outcomes are imprecise. Supervised group exercise did not reduce the prevalence of LBP or PGP in pregnancy.

  15. A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial of the ACCESS Program: A Group Intervention to Improve Social, Adaptive Functioning, Stress Coping, and Self-Determination Outcomes in Young Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswald, Tasha M; Winder-Patel, Breanna; Ruder, Steven; Xing, Guibo; Stahmer, Aubyn; Solomon, Marjorie

    2017-12-12

    The purpose of this pilot randomized controlled trial was to investigate the acceptability and efficacy of the Acquiring Career, Coping, Executive control, Social Skills (ACCESS) Program, a group intervention tailored for young adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) to enhance critical skills and beliefs that promote adult functioning, including social and adaptive skills, self-determination skills, and coping self-efficacy. Forty-four adults with ASD (ages 18-38; 13 females) and their caregivers were randomly assigned to treatment or waitlist control. Compared to controls, adults in treatment significantly improved in adaptive and self-determination skills, per caregiver report, and self-reported greater belief in their ability to access social support to cope with stressors. Results provide evidence for the acceptability and efficacy of the ACCESS Program.

  16. Effects of the oriental herbal medicine Bofu-tsusho-san in obesity hypertension: a multicenter, randomized, parallel-group controlled trial (ATH-D-14-01021.R2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azushima, Kengo; Tamura, Kouichi; Haku, Sona; Wakui, Hiromichi; Kanaoka, Tomohiko; Ohsawa, Masato; Uneda, Kazushi; Kobayashi, Ryu; Ohki, Kohji; Dejima, Toru; Maeda, Akinobu; Hashimoto, Tatsuo; Oshikawa, Jin; Kobayashi, Yusuke; Nomura, Koichiro; Azushima, Chieko; Takeshita, Yasuyo; Fujino, Ryota; Uchida, Ken; Shibuya, Ken; Ando, Daisaku; Tokita, Yasuo; Fujikawa, Tetsuya; Toya, Yoshiyuki; Umemura, Satoshi

    2015-05-01

    There is no clinical evidence that supports the benefit of integrative medicine, defined as combination therapy of oriental and western medicine, on obesity-related hypertension. This study evaluates the efficacy of Bofu-tsusho-san (BOF), an oriental herbal medicine, on the ambulatory blood pressure (BP) profile in hypertensive patients with obesity. The study design was a multicenter, randomized, open-label, parallel-group controlled trial in 107 hypertensive patients with obesity. Participants were randomly assigned to receive either the conventional control therapy or BOF add-on therapy. In both groups antihypertensive therapy was aimed at achieving the target clinic BP. The primary outcome was change in the ambulatory BP profile from baseline to 24 weeks after randomization. Daytime systolic BP variability, an important parameter of ambulatory BP profile, was decreased in the BOF group, and the difference in the changes in daytime systolic BP variability was significant between the BOF and control group (Control vs BOF; the change from baseline in daytime systolic BP variability, 1.0±3.3 vs -1.0±3.3%; p=0.006). The BOF add-on therapy effectively improved the ambulatory BP variability. This is the first report suggesting that an integrative medicine approach may exert favorable effects on obesity-related hypertension compared with conventional pharmaceutical treatment. UMIN000003878. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Using ecological momentary assessment in testing the effectiveness of an alcohol intervention: a two-arm parallel group randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voogt, Carmen V; Kuntsche, Emmanuel; Kleinjan, Marloes; Poelen, Evelien A P; Lemmers, Lex A C J; Engels, Rutger C M E

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol consumption of college students has a fluctuating nature, which might impact the measurement of intervention effects. By using 25 follow-up time-points, this study tested whether intervention effects are robust or might vary over time. Data were used from a two-arm parallel group randomized controlled trial applying ecological momentary assessment (EMA) with 30 data time-points in total. Students between 18 and 24 years old who reported heavy drinking in the past six months and who were ready to change their alcohol consumption were randomly assigned to the experimental (n = 456: web-based brief alcohol intervention) and control condition (n = 451: no intervention). Outcome measures were weekly alcohol consumption, frequency of binge drinking, and heavy drinking status. According to the intention-to-treat principle, regression analyses revealed that intervention effects on alcohol consumption varied when exploring multiple follow-up time-points. Intervention effects were found for a) weekly alcohol consumption at 1, 2, 3, 4, and 7 weeks follow-up, b) frequency of binge drinking at 1, 2, 7, and 12 weeks follow-up, and c) heavy drinking status at 1, 2, 7, and 16 weeks follow-up. This research showed that the commonly used one and six month follow-up time-points are relatively arbitrary and not using EMA might bring forth erroneous conclusions on the effectiveness of interventions. Therefore, future trials in alcohol prevention research and beyond are encouraged to apply EMA when assessing outcome measures and intervention effectiveness. Netherlands Trial Register NTR2665.

  18. Using ecological momentary assessment in testing the effectiveness of an alcohol intervention: a two-arm parallel group randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen V Voogt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Alcohol consumption of college students has a fluctuating nature, which might impact the measurement of intervention effects. By using 25 follow-up time-points, this study tested whether intervention effects are robust or might vary over time. METHODS: Data were used from a two-arm parallel group randomized controlled trial applying ecological momentary assessment (EMA with 30 data time-points in total. Students between 18 and 24 years old who reported heavy drinking in the past six months and who were ready to change their alcohol consumption were randomly assigned to the experimental (n = 456: web-based brief alcohol intervention and control condition (n = 451: no intervention. Outcome measures were weekly alcohol consumption, frequency of binge drinking, and heavy drinking status. RESULTS: According to the intention-to-treat principle, regression analyses revealed that intervention effects on alcohol consumption varied when exploring multiple follow-up time-points. Intervention effects were found for a weekly alcohol consumption at 1, 2, 3, 4, and 7 weeks follow-up, b frequency of binge drinking at 1, 2, 7, and 12 weeks follow-up, and c heavy drinking status at 1, 2, 7, and 16 weeks follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: This research showed that the commonly used one and six month follow-up time-points are relatively arbitrary and not using EMA might bring forth erroneous conclusions on the effectiveness of interventions. Therefore, future trials in alcohol prevention research and beyond are encouraged to apply EMA when assessing outcome measures and intervention effectiveness. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Netherlands Trial Register NTR2665.

  19. Reducing Delusional Conviction through a Cognitive-Based Group Training Game: A Multicentre Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazaal, Yasser; Chatton, Anne; Dieben, Karen; Huguelet, Philippe; Boucherie, Maria; Monney, Gregoire; Lecardeur, Laurent; Salamin, Virginie; Bretel, Fethi; Azoulay, Silke; Pesenti, Elodie; Krychowski, Raoul; Costa Prata, Andreia; Bartolomei, Javier; Brazo, Perrine; Traian, Alexei; Charpeaud, Thomas; Murys, Elodie; Poupart, Florent; Rouvière, Serge; Zullino, Daniele; Parabiaghi, Alberto; Saoud, Mohamed; Favrod, Jérôme

    2015-01-01

    "Michael's game" (MG) is a card game targeting the ability to generate alternative hypotheses to explain a given experience. The main objective was to evaluate the effect of MG on delusional conviction as measured by the primary study outcome: the change in scores on the conviction subscale of the Peters delusions inventory (PDI-21). Other variables of interest were the change in scores on the distress and preoccupation subscales of the PDI-21, the brief psychiatric rating scale, the Beck cognitive insight scale, and belief flexibility assessed with the Maudsley assessment of delusions schedule (MADS). We performed a parallel, assessor-blinded, randomized controlled superiority trial comparing treatment as usual plus participation in MG with treatment as usual plus being on a waiting list (TAU) in a sample of adult outpatients with psychotic disorders and persistent positive psychotic symptoms at inclusion. The 172 participants were randomized, with 86 included in each study arm. Assessments were performed at inclusion (T1: baseline), at 3 months (T2: post-treatment), and at 6 months after the second assessment (T3: follow-up). At T2, a positive treatment effect was observed on the primary outcome, the PDI-21 conviction subscale (p = 0.005). At T3, a sustained effect was observed for the conviction subscale (p = 0.002). Further effects were also observed at T3 on the PDI-21 distress (p = 0.002) and preoccupation subscales (p = 0.001), as well as on one of the MADS measures of belief flexibility ("anything against the belief") (p = 0.001). The study demonstrated some significant beneficial effect of MG.

  20. Multicomponent interdisciplinary group intervention for self-management of fibromyalgia: a mixed-methods randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Bourgault

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the efficacy of the PASSAGE Program, a structured multicomponent interdisciplinary group intervention for the self-management of FMS.A mixed-methods randomized controlled trial (intervention (INT vs. waitlist (WL was conducted with patients suffering from FMS. Data were collected at baseline (T0, at the end of the intervention (T1, and 3 months later (T2. The primary outcome was change in pain intensity (0-10. Secondary outcomes were fibromyalgia severity, pain interference, sleep quality, pain coping strategies, depression, health-related quality of life, patient global impression of change (PGIC, and perceived pain relief. Qualitative group interviews with a subset of patients were also conducted. Complete data from T0 to T2 were available for 43 patients.The intervention had a statistically significant impact on the three PGIC measures. At the end of the PASSAGE Program, the percentages of patients who perceived overall improvement in their pain levels, functioning and quality of life were significantly higher in the INT Group (73%, 55%, 77% respectively than in the WL Group (8%, 12%, 20%. The same differences were observed 3 months post-intervention (Intervention group: 62%, 43%, 38% vs Waitlist Group: 13%, 13%, 9%. The proportion of patients who reported ≥ 50% pain relief was also significantly higher in the INT Group at the end of the intervention (36% vs 12% and 3 months post-intervention (33% vs 4%. Results of the qualitative analysis were in line with the quantitative findings regarding the efficacy of the intervention. The improvement, however, was not reflected in the primary outcome and other secondary outcome measures.The PASSAGE Program was effective in helping FMS patients gain a sense of control over their symptoms. We suggest including PGIC in future clinical trials on FMS as they appear to capture important aspects of the patients' experience.International Standard Randomized Controlled Trial Number

  1. Short-term intensive psychodynamic group therapy versus cognitive-behavioral group therapy in day treatment of anxiety disorders and comorbid depressive or personality disorders: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suszek, Hubert; Holas, Paweł; Wyrzykowski, Tomasz; Lorentzen, Steinar; Kokoszka, Andrzej

    2015-07-29

    Psychodynamic and cognitive-behavioral group therapies are frequently applied in day hospitals for the treatment of anxiety disorders and comorbid depressive or personality disorders in Poland and other Eastern European countries. Yet there is not enough evidence as to their effectiveness in this environment; this study addresses this gap. The aim of the study is to determine the effectiveness of these two kinds of day treatment care consisting of intensive, short-term group psychodynamic and cognitive-behavioral therapy, for patients with anxiety disorders and/or comorbid depressive or personality disorders. Our objectives are to: 1) show the effectiveness of each treatment in a day-care setting relative to the wait-list control group; 2) demonstrate the relative short- and long-term effectiveness of the two active treatments; 3) carry out a preliminary examination of the predictors and moderators of treatment response; 4) carry out a preliminary examination of the mediators of therapeutic change; and 5) compare the impact of both methods of treatment on the outcome of the measures used in this study. In this randomized controlled trial, a total of 199 patients with anxiety disorders and comorbid depressive and/or personality disorders will be assigned to one of three conditions: 1) psychodynamic group therapy; 2) cognitive-behavioral group therapy; or 3) wait-list control group. The therapy will last 12 weeks. Both treatments will be manualized (the manuals will address comorbidity). Primary outcome measures will include self-reported symptoms of anxiety, observer-rated symptoms of anxiety, global improvement, and recovery rate. Secondary outcome measures will include the number of pathological personality traits, depression, self-esteem, defense mechanisms, beliefs about self and others, interpersonal problems, object relations, parental bonding, meta-cognition, and quality of life. Measures will be taken at baseline, post-treatment, and at six months following

  2. A parallel-group randomized clinical trial of individually tailored, multidisciplinary, palliative rehabilitation for patients with newly diagnosed advanced cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nottelmann, Lise; Groenvold, Mogens; Vejlgaard, Tove Bahn

    2017-01-01

    is the primary outcome measure of the study. Secondary outcome measures include survival and economic consequences. DISCUSSION: To our knowledge the Pal-Rehab study is the first randomized, controlled, phase III trial to evaluate individually tailored, palliative rehabilitation in standard oncology care......BACKGROUND: The effect of early palliative care and rehabilitation on the quality of life of patients with advanced cancer has been only sparsely described and needs further investigation. In the present trial we combine elements of early, specialized palliative care with cancer rehabilitation....... The patients are randomized to a specialized palliative rehabilitation intervention integrated in standard oncology care or to standard oncology care alone. The intervention consists of a multidisciplinary group program, individual consultations, or a combination of both. At baseline and after six and 12 weeks...

  3. Neck collar, "act-as-usual" or active mobilization for whiplash injury? A randomized parallel-group trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsted, Alice; Montvilas, Erisela Qerama; Kasch, Helge

    2007-01-01

    practitioners within 10 days after a whiplash injury and randomized to: 1) immobilization of the cervical spine in a rigid collar followed by active mobilization, 2) advice to "act-as-usual," or 3) an active mobilization program (Mechanical Diagnosis and Therapy). Follow-up was carried out after 3, 6, and 12......-extension trauma to the cervical spine. It is unclear whether this, in some cases disabling, condition can be prevented by early intervention. Active interventions have been recommended but have not been compared with information only. Methods. Participants were recruited from emergency units and general......Study Design. Randomized, parallel-group trial. Objective. To compare the effect of 3 early intervention strategies following whiplash injury. Summary of Background Data. Long-lasting pain and disability, known as chronic whiplash-associated disorder (WAD), may develop after a forced flexion...

  4. Analyzing indirect effects in cluster randomized trials. The effect of estimation method, number of groups and group sizes on accuracy and power.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joop eHox

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Cluster randomized trials assess the effect of an intervention that is carried out at the group or cluster level. Ajzen’s theory of planned behaviour is often used to model the effect of the intervention as an indirect effect mediated in turn by attitude, norms and behavioural intention. Structural equation modelling (SEM is the technique of choice to estimate indirect effects and their significance. However, this is a large sample technique, and its application in a cluster randomized trial assumes a relatively large number of clusters. In practice, the number of clusters in these studies tends to be relatively small, e.g. much less than fifty. This study uses simulation methods to find the lowest number of clusters needed when multilevel SEM is used to estimate the indirect effect. Maximum likelihood estimation is compared to Bayesian analysis, with the central quality criteria being accuracy of the point estimate and the confidence interval. We also investigate the power of the test for the indirect effect. We conclude that Bayes estimation works well with much smaller cluster level sample sizes such as 20 cases than maximum likelihood estimation; although the bias is larger the coverage is much better. When only 5 to 10 clusters are available per treatment condition even with Bayesian estimation problems occur.

  5. Association of intervention outcomes with practice capacity for change: subgroup analysis from a group randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litaker, David; Ruhe, Mary; Weyer, Sharon; Stange, Kurt C

    2008-05-16

    The relationship between health care practices' capacity for change and the results and sustainability of interventions to improve health care delivery is unclear. In the setting of an intervention to increase preventive service delivery (PSD), we assessed practice capacity for change by rating motivation to change and instrumental ability to change on a one to four scale. After combining these ratings into a single score, random effects models tested its association with change in PSD rates from baseline to immediately after intervention completion and 12 months later. Our measure of practices' capacity for change varied widely at baseline (range 2-8; mean 4.8 +/- 1.6). Practices with greater capacity for change delivered preventive services to eligible patients at higher rates after completion of the intervention (2.7% per unit increase in the combined effort score, p sustain desired outcomes. Future work to refine measures of this practice characteristic may be useful in planning and implementing interventions that result in sustained, evidence-based improvements in health care delivery.

  6. Association of intervention outcomes with practice capacity for change: Subgroup analysis from a group randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weyer Sharon

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The relationship between health care practices' capacity for change and the results and sustainability of interventions to improve health care delivery is unclear. Methods In the setting of an intervention to increase preventive service delivery (PSD, we assessed practice capacity for change by rating motivation to change and instrumental ability to change on a one to four scale. After combining these ratings into a single score, random effects models tested its association with change in PSD rates from baseline to immediately after intervention completion and 12 months later. Results Our measure of practices' capacity for change varied widely at baseline (range 2–8; mean 4.8 ± 1.6. Practices with greater capacity for change delivered preventive services to eligible patients at higher rates after completion of the intervention (2.7% per unit increase in the combined effort score, p Conclusion Greater capacity for change is associated with a higher probability that a practice will attain and sustain desired outcomes. Future work to refine measures of this practice characteristic may be useful in planning and implementing interventions that result in sustained, evidence-based improvements in health care delivery.

  7. Comparing physical exercise in groups to group cognitive behaviour therapy for the treatment of panic disorder in a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovland, Anders; Nordhus, Inger Hilde; Sjøbø, Trond; Gjestad, Bente A; Birknes, Birthe; Martinsen, Egil W; Torsheim, Torbjørn; Pallesen, Ståle

    2013-07-01

    Previous studies have suggested that physical exercise can reduce symptoms for subjects suffering from panic disorder (PD). The efficacy of this intervention has so far not been compared to an established psychotherapy, such as cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT). Assessment of controlled long-term effects and the clinical significance of the treatment are also lacking. To compare physical exercise to CBT as treatment for PD, and assess controlled long-term and clinically significant effects. PD-patients were randomized to either three weekly sessions of physical exercise (n = 17), or one weekly session of CBT (n = 19). Both treatments ran for 12 weeks, were manualized and administered in groups. Patients were assessed twice before the start of treatment, at post-treatment and at 6 and 12 months thereafter. Primary outcome-measures consisted of the Mobility Inventory (MI), the Agoraphobia Cognitions Questionnaire (ACQ) and the Body Sensations Questionnaire (BSQ). A two-way repeated measures MANOVA of these measures demonstrated a significant effect of time, F(16, 544) = 7.28, p < .01, as well as a significant interaction effect, F(16, 544) = 1.71, p < .05, in favour of CBT. This finding was supported by the assessment of clinically significant changes of avoidant behaviour and of treatment-seeking one year later. Group CBT is more effective than group physical exercise as treatment of panic disorder, both immediately following treatment and at follow-up assessments.

  8. Efficacy of aliskiren and valsartan in hypertensive patients with albuminuria: a randomized parallel-group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanos, Georgios; Kalaitzidis, Rigas; Karasavvidou, Despina; Pappas, Kosmas; Siamopoulos, Kostas C

    2013-12-01

    Blockade of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is a critical approach to the management of hypertension, especially in proteinuric patients. It is well proven that the direct renin inhibitor aliskiren shows comparable clinical efficacy to the angiotensin II receptor blocker valsartan on blood pressure control and albuminuria. However, there is only limited data on the hand-to-hand effectiveness of these two RAS blockers in improving arterial stiffness. We tested whether aliskiren or valsartan would improve arterial stiffness in hypertensive patients with albuminuria who are already on antihypertensive therapy. Thirty-four patients with hypertension and albuminuria Albuminuria was significantly reduced in both groups (56% for the aliskiren group, p < 0.05, and 38% for the valsartan group, p < 0.05). Only valsartan but not aliskiren significantly reduced carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (-1.1 ± 0.8 m/s (p = 0.02) for valsartan and +0.1 ± 0.7 m/s (ns) for aliskiren). The results of our study showed that valsartan improves arterial stiffness to a significantly greater extent than aliskiren, despite a similar antihypertensive and antiproteinuric effect.

  9. The efficacy of lymphatic drainage and traditional massage in the prophylaxis of migraine: a randomized, controlled parallel group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happe, Svenja; Peikert, Andreas; Siegert, Rudolf; Evers, Stefan

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed at examining the efficacy of lymphatic drainage (LD) and traditional massage (TM) in the prophylactic treatment of migraine using controlled prospective randomized clinical trial of 64 patients (57 women, 45 ± 10 years) with migraine with and without aura. Patients were randomized into three groups: LD (n = 21); TM (n = 21); waiting group (WG, n = 22). After a 4-week-baseline, a treatment period of 8 weeks was applied followed by a 4-week observation period. The patients filled in a headache diary continuously; every 4 weeks they filled in the German version of the CES-D and the German version of the Headache Disability Inventory. The main outcome measure was migraine frequency per month. At the end of the observation period, the number of migraine attacks and days decreased in the LD group by 1.8 and 3.1, respectively, in the TM group by 1.3 and 2.4, and in the WG by 0.4 and 0.2, respectively. The differences between LD and WG were significant (p = 0.006 and p = 0.015, respectively) as well as the differences between TM und WG (p = 0.042 and p = 0.016, respectively). There was a significant decrease in the amount of analgesic intake in the LD group compared to the two other groups (p = 0.004). TM and LD resulted in a reduction of migraine attack frequency. The analgesic intake only decreased significantly during LD intervention. Useful effects were identified for LD and TM as compared to WG for the prophylaxis of migraine. LD was more efficacious in some parameters than TM.

  10. Group cognitive behavioral therapy targeting intolerance of uncertainty: a randomized trial for older Chinese adults with generalized anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Chen; Zhihui, Yang

    2017-12-01

    China has entered the aging society, but the social support systems for the elderly are underdeveloped, which may make the elderly feel anxiety about their health and life quality. Given the prevalence of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) in the elderly, it is very important to pay more attention to the treatment for old adults. Although cognitive behavioral therapy targeting intolerance of uncertainty (CBT-IU) has been applied to different groups of patients with GAD, few studies have been performed to date. In addition, the effects of CBT-IU are not well understood, especially when applied to older adults with GAD. Sixty-three Chinese older adults with a principal diagnosis of GAD were enrolled. Of these, 32 were randomized to receive group CBT-IU (intervention group) and 31 were untreated (control group). GAD and related symptoms were assessed using the Penn State Worry Questionnaire, Intolerance of Uncertainty Scale-Chinese Version, Beck Anxiety Inventory, Beck Depression Inventory, Why Worry-II scale, Cognitive Avoidance Questionnaire, Generalized Anxiety Disorder Questionnaire-IV, and Generalized Anxiety Disorder Severity Scale across the intervention. The changes between pre and after the intervention were collected, as well as the six-month follow-up. F test and repeated-measures ANOVA were conducted to analyze the data. Compared to control group, the measures' scores of experimental group decreased significantly after the intervention and six-month follow-up. Besides the main effects for time and group were significant, the interaction effect for group × time was also significant. These results indicated the improvement of the CBT-IU group and the persistence of effect after six months. Group CBT-IU is effective in Chinese older adults with GAD. The effects of CBT-IU on GAD symptoms persist for at least six months after treatment.

  11. Effectiveness of a mobile cooperation intervention during the clinical practicum of nursing students: a parallel group randomized controlled trial protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strandell-Laine, Camilla; Saarikoski, Mikko; Löyttyniemi, Eliisa; Salminen, Leena; Suomi, Reima; Leino-Kilpi, Helena

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to describe a study protocol for a study evaluating the effectiveness of a mobile cooperation intervention to improve students' competence level, self-efficacy in clinical performance and satisfaction with the clinical learning environment. Nursing student-nurse teacher cooperation during the clinical practicum has a vital role in promoting the learning of students. Despite an increasing interest in using mobile technologies to improve the clinical practicum of students, there is limited robust evidence regarding their effectiveness. A multicentre, parallel group, randomized, controlled, pragmatic, superiority trial. Second-year pre-registration nursing students who are beginning a clinical practicum will be recruited from one university of applied sciences. Eligible students will be randomly allocated to either a control group (engaging in standard cooperation) or an intervention group (engaging in mobile cooperation) for the 5-week the clinical practicum. The complex mobile cooperation intervention comprises of a mobile application-assisted, nursing student-nurse teacher cooperation and a training in the functions of the mobile application. The primary outcome is competence. The secondary outcomes include self-efficacy in clinical performance and satisfaction with the clinical learning environment. Moreover, a process evaluation will be undertaken. The ethical approval for this study was obtained in December 2014 and the study received funding in 2015. The results of this study will provide robust evidence on mobile cooperation during the clinical practicum, a research topic that has not been consistently studied to date. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Effectiveness of a group-based self-management program for people with chronic fatigue syndrome: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinxsterhuis, Irma; Sandvik, Leiv; Strand, Elin Bolle; Bautz-Holter, Erik; Sveen, Unni

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of a group-based self-management program for people with chronic fatigue syndrome. A randomized controlled trial. Four mid-sized towns in southern Norway and two suburbs of Oslo. A total of 137 adults with chronic fatigue syndrome. A self-management program including eight biweekly meetings of 2.5 hours duration. The control group received usual care. Primary outcome measure: Medical Outcomes Study-Short Form-36 physical functioning subscale. Fatigue severity scale, self-efficacy scale, physical and mental component summary of the Short Form-36, and the illness cognition questionnaire (acceptance subscale). Assessments were performed at baseline, and at six-month and one-year follow-ups. At the six-month follow-up, a significant difference between the two groups was found concerning fatigue severity ( p = 0.039) in favor of the control group, and concerning self-efficacy in favor of the intervention group ( p = 0.039). These significant differences were not sustained at the one-year follow-up. No significant differences were found between the groups concerning physical functioning, acceptance, and health status at any of the measure points. The drop-out rate was 13.9% and the median number of sessions attended was seven (out of eight). The evaluated self-management program did not have any sustained effect, as compared with receiving usual care.

  13. A failure to confirm the effectiveness of a brief group psychoeducational program for mothers of children with high-functioning pervasive developmental disorders: a randomized controlled pilot trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzuki M

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Masako Suzuki,1 Atsurou Yamada,1 Norio Watanabe,1 Tatsuo Akechi,1 Fujika Katsuki,2 Takeshi Nishiyama,3 Masayuki Imaeda,4 Taishi Miyachi,4 Kazuo Otaki,5 Yumiko Mitsuda,6 Akino Ota,6 Toshi A Furukawa7 1Department of Psychiatry and Cognitive-Behavioral Medicine, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya, Japan; 2Department of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, Nagoya City University School of Nursing, Nagoya, Japan; 3Clinical Trial Management Center, Nagoya City University Hospital, Nagoya, Japan; 4Department of Neonatology and Pediatrics, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya, Japan; 5Kazuo Mental Clinic, Toyohashi, Japan; 6Toyokawa Sakura Hospital, Toyokawa Japan; 7Department of Health Promotion and Human Behavior, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine/School of Public Health, Kyoto, Japan Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of group psychoeducation to relieve the psychological distress of mothers of children with high-functioning pervasive developmental disorders (HFPDD and to improve the behaviors of the children. Methods: Seventy-two mothers of preschool outpatients with HFPDD were randomly assigned to a four-session brief group psychoeducational program (GP. The sessions were held every second week in addition to the usual treatment (GP + treatment as usual [TAU] group, or to a TAU-alone group. The primary outcome was self-reported symptoms of maternal mental health as assessed using the 28-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28 at 21 weeks post-randomization (week 21. The GHQ-28 at the end of the intervention (week 7, Aberrant Behavior Checklist (ABC for the behavior of the children, the Zarit Burden Interview (ZBI, and the Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36 were carried out at weeks 7 and 21. We tested the group effects with the interaction between the intervention and the evaluation points. Results: The GHQ-28

  14. Adjuvant chemotherapy with sequential or concurrent anthracycline and docetaxel: Breast International Group 02-98 randomized trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Francis, P.; Crown, J.; Di, Leo A.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Docetaxel is more effective than doxorubicin for patients with advanced breast cancer. The Breast International Group 02-98 randomized trial tested the effect of incorporating docetaxel into anthracycline-based adjuvant chemotherapy and compared sequential vs concurrent administration...... of doxorubicin at 50 mg/m2 plus docetaxel at 75 mg/m2, followed by three cycles of CMF). The primary comparison evaluated the efficacy of including docetaxel regardless of schedule and was planned after 1215 disease-free survival (DFS) events (ie, relapse, second primary cancer, or death from any cause...

  15. A randomized controlled trial of a manual-based psychosocial group intervention for young people with epilepsy [PIE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorris, Liam; Broome, Helen; Wilson, Margaret; Grant, Cathy; Young, David; Baker, Gus; Balloo, Selina; Bruce, Susan; Campbell, Jo; Concannon, Bernie; Conway, Nadia; Cook, Lisa; Davis, Cheryl; Downey, Bruce; Evans, Jon; Flower, Diane; Garlovsky, Jack; Kearney, Shauna; Lewis, Susan; Stephens, Victoria; Turton, Stuart; Wright, Ingram

    2017-07-01

    We conducted an exploratory RCT to examine feasibility and preliminary efficacy for a manual-based psychosocial group intervention aimed at improving epilepsy knowledge, self-management skills, and quality of life in young people with epilepsy. Eighty-three participants (33:50m/f; age range 12-17years) were randomized to either the treatment or control group in seven tertiary paediatric neuroscience centres in the UK, using a wait-list control design. Participants were excluded if they reported suicidal ideation and/or scored above the cut off on mental health screening measures, or if they had a learning disability or other neurological disorder. The intervention consisted of six weekly 2-hour sessions using guided discussion, group exercises and role-plays facilitated by an epilepsy nurse and a clinical psychologist. At three month follow up the treatment group (n=40) was compared with a wait-list control group (n=43) on a range of standardized measures. There was a significant increase in epilepsy knowledge in the treatment group (p=0.02). Participants receiving the intervention were also significantly more confident in speaking to others about their epilepsy (p=0.04). Quality of life measures did not show significant change. Participants reported the greatest value of attending the group was: Learning about their epilepsy (46%); Learning to cope with difficult feelings (29%); and Meeting others with epilepsy (22%). Caregiver and facilitator feedback was positive, and 92% of participants would recommend the group to others. This brief psychosocial group intervention was effective in increasing participants' knowledge of epilepsy and improved confidence in discussing their epilepsy with others. We discuss the qualitative feedback, feasibility, strengths and limitations of the PIE trial. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A cognitive behavioral based group intervention for children with a chronic illness and their parents: a multicentre randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schuengel Carlo

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coping with a chronic illness (CI challenges children's psychosocial functioning and wellbeing. Cognitive-behavioral intervention programs that focus on teaching the active use of coping strategies may prevent children with CI from developing psychosocial problems. Involvement of parents in the intervention program may enhance the use of learned coping strategies in daily life, especially on the long-term. The primary aim of the present study is to examine the effectiveness of a cognitive behavioral based group intervention (called 'Op Koers' 1 for children with CI and of a parallel intervention for their parents. A secondary objective is to investigate why and for whom this intervention works, in order to understand the underlying mechanisms of the intervention effect. Methods/design This study is a multicentre randomized controlled trial. Participants are children (8 to 18 years of age with a chronic illness, and their parents, recruited from seven participating hospitals in the Netherlands. Participants are randomly allocated to two intervention groups (the child intervention group and the child intervention combined with a parent program and a wait-list control group. Primary outcomes are child psychosocial functioning, wellbeing and child disease related coping skills. Secondary outcomes are child quality of life, child general coping skills, child self-perception, parental stress, quality of parent-child interaction, and parental perceived vulnerability. Outcomes are evaluated at baseline, after 6 weeks of treatment, and at a 6 and 12-month follow-up period. The analyses will be performed on the basis of an intention-to-treat population. Discussion This study evaluates the effectiveness of a group intervention improving psychosocial functioning in children with CI and their parents. If proven effective, the intervention will be implemented in clinical practice. Strengths and limitations of the study design are discussed

  17. Group parent-child interaction therapy: A randomized control trial for the treatment of conduct problems in young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niec, Larissa N; Barnett, Miya L; Prewett, Matthew S; Shanley Chatham, Jenelle R

    2016-08-01

    Although efficacious interventions exist for childhood conduct problems, a majority of families in need of services do not receive them. To address problems of treatment access and adherence, innovative adaptations of current interventions are needed. This randomized control trial investigated the relative efficacy of a novel format of parent-child interaction therapy (PCIT), a treatment for young children with conduct problems. Eighty-one families with 3- to 6-year-old children (71.6% boys, 85.2% White) with diagnoses of oppositional defiant or conduct disorder were randomized to individual PCIT (n = 42) or the novel format, Group PCIT. Parents completed standardized measures of children's conduct problems, parenting stress, and social support at intake, posttreatment, and 6-month follow-up. Therapist ratings, parent attendance, and homework completion provided measures of treatment adherence. Throughout treatment, parenting skills were assessed using the Dyadic Parent-Child Interaction Coding System. Parents in both group and individual PCIT reported significant improvements from intake to posttreatment and follow-up in their children's conduct problems and adaptive functioning, as well as significant decreases in parenting stress. Parents in both treatment conditions also showed significant improvements in their parenting skills. There were no interactions between time and treatment format. Contrary to expectation, parents in Group PCIT did not experience greater social support or treatment adherence. Group PCIT was not inferior to individual PCIT and may be a valuable format to reach more families in need of services. Future work should explore the efficiency and sustainability of Group PCIT in community settings. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. Effectiveness of a psycho-educational group program for major depression in primary care: a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Studies show the effectiveness of group psychoeducation in reducing symptoms in people with depression. However, few controlled studies that have included aspects of personal care and healthy lifestyle (diet, physical exercise, sleep) together with cognitive-behavioral techniques in psychoeducation are proven to be effective. The objective of this study is to assess the effectiveness of a psychoeducational program, which includes aspects of personal care and healthy lifestyle, in patients with mild/moderate depression symptoms in Primary Care (PC). Methods In a randomized, controlled trial, 246 participants over 20 years old with ICD-10 major depression were recruited through nurses/general practitioners at 12 urban Primary Care Centers (PCCs) in Barcelona. The intervention group (IG) (n=119) received a group psychoeducational program (12 weekly, 1.5 h sessions led by two nurses) and the control group (CG) (n=112) received usual care. Patients were assessed at baseline and at, 3, 6 and 9 months. The main outcome measures were the BDI, EQ-5D and remission based upon the BDI. Results 231 randomized patients were included, of whom 85 had mild depression and 146 moderate depression. The analyses showed significant differences between groups in relation to remission of symptoms, especially in the mild depression group with a high rate of 57% (p=0.009) at post-treatment and 65% (p=0.006) at 9 month follow up, and only showed significant differences on the BDI at post-treatment (p=0.016; effect size Cohen’s d’=.51) and at 6 and 9 month follow-up (p= 0.048; d’=.44). In the overall and moderate sample, the analyses only showed significant differences between groups on the BDI at post-treatment, p=0.02 (d’=.29) and p=0.010 (d’=.47), respectively. The psychoeducation group improved significantly on the EQ-5D at short and long-term. Conclusions This psychoeducational intervention is a short and long-term effective treatment for patients with mild

  19. Students' Perceptions of Classroom Group Work as a Function of Group Member Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Scott A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this assessment was to examine whether differences exist between students who self-select their classroom work group members and students who are randomly assigned to their classroom work groups in terms of their use of organizational citizenship behaviors with their work group members; their commitment to, trust in, and relational…

  20. Job Assignments under Moral Hazard

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Alexander; Nafziger, Julia

    Inefficient job assignments are usually explained with incomplete information about employees' abilities or contractual imperfections. We show that inefficient assignments arise even without uncertainty about the employee's ability and with complete contracts. Building on this result we provide...

  1. Indoor rock climbing (bouldering) as a new treatment for depression: study design of a waitlist-controlled randomized group pilot study and the first results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luttenberger, Katharina; Stelzer, Eva-Maria; Först, Stefan; Schopper, Matthias; Kornhuber, Johannes; Book, Stephanie

    2015-08-25

    Depression is one of the most common diseases in industrialised nations. Physical activity is regarded as an important part of therapeutic intervention. Rock climbing or bouldering (rock climbing to moderate heights without rope) comprises many aspects that are considered useful, but until now, there has been hardly any research on the effects of a bouldering group intervention on people with depression. The purpose of this controlled pilot study was twofold: first, to develop a manual for an eight-week interventional program that integrates psychotherapeutic interventions in a bouldering group setting and second, to assess the effects of a bouldering intervention on people with depression. The intervention took place once a week for three hours across a period of eight weeks. Participants were randomly assigned to the two groups (intervention vs. waitlist). The intervention group began the bouldering therapy immediately after a baseline measurement was taken; the waitlist participants began after an eight-week period of treatment as usual. On four measurement dates at eight-week intervals, participants completed the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II), the symptom checklist-90-R (SCL-90), the questionnaire on resources and self-management skills (FERUS), and the attention test d2-R. A total of 47 participants completed the study, and the data were analysed with descriptive statistics. Cohen's d was calculated as a measure of the effect size. For the primary hypothesis, a regression analysis and the Number Needed to Treat (NNT) (improvement of at least 6 points on the BDI-II) were calculated. After eight weeks of intervention, results indicated positive effects on the measures of depression (primary hypothesis: BDI-II: Cohen's d = 0.77), this was supported by the regression analysis with "group" as the only significant predictor of a change in depression (p = .007). The NNT was four. These findings provide the first evidence that therapeutic bouldering may

  2. Prognostic factors from a randomized phase III trial of paclitaxel and carboplatin versus paclitaxel and cisplatin in metastatic or recurrent cervical cancer: Japan Clinical Oncology Group (JCOG) trial: JCOG0505-S1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishio, Shin; Kitagawa, Ryo; Shibata, Taro; Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki; Konishi, Ikuo; Ushijima, Kimio; Kamura, Toshiharu

    2016-10-01

    The Japan Clinical Oncology Group (JCOG) trial JCOG0505 demonstrated the statistically significant non-inferiority of paclitaxel plus carboplatin (TC) to paclitaxel plus cisplatin (TP) in terms of overall survival (OS) in metastatic or recurrent cervical cancer. In that trial, patients were randomly assigned, adjusting for institution and known prognostic factors. The objective of this ancillary study was to evaluate the appropriateness of the adjustment factors used to have randomly assigned treatments and to investigate new potentially useful prognostic factors of paclitaxel plus platinum for future randomized trials in metastatic or recurrent cervical cancer. The study subjects comprised 244 eligible patients in the JCOG0505 who were merged to have received either TC or TP. The effects of the following factors on OS were investigated using a Cox regression model taking into consideration the adjustment factors used in randomization in this trial (e.g., performance status [PS]) and other baseline factors, including platinum-free interval (PFI), pretreatment hemoglobin levels (PHLs), and pretreatment platelet counts (PPCs). The median follow-up was 17.6 months, and median OS was 18.0 months. The hazard ratio was 1.83 in patients with a PS of 1 or 2 (vs. 0; P = 0.0004; 95 % confidence interval [CI] 1.31-2.55), 2.92 in patients with a PFI of cervical cancer. These new prognostic factors should be validated in future prospective trials. UMIN-CTR[ http://www.umin.ac.jp/ctr/ ] ID: C000000335.

  3. DVD training for depression identification and treatment in older adults: a two-group, randomized, wait-list control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysack, Cathy; Leach, Carrie; Russo, Theresa; Paulson, Daniel; Lichtenberg, Peter A

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. To test the effectiveness of an educational intervention aimed at improving mental health knowledge and skills in occupational therapists working with older rehabilitation patients. METHOD. The DVD-format educational intervention was evaluated using a two-group randomized wait-list control design. Occupational therapists (n = 75) completed a 32-item knowledge questionnaire at three time points. Patient charts were reviewed (n = 960) at 3 months before and 3 and 6 months after DVD training to evaluate clinical practice change. RESULTS. A two-way analysis of variance showed knowledge scores increased significantly for both groups after DVD training. A significant Group × Time interaction and significant main effects for time and group were found. Chart review data also showed significant increases in desired clinical behaviors in both groups after training. The greatest single item of clinical practice change was use of a standardized depression screen. CONCLUSION. DVD-based training can significantly improve mental health practice. Copyright © 2013 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  4. The effectiveness of group positive psychotherapy on depression and happiness in breast cancer patients: A randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowlatabadi, Mohammad Mehdi; Ahmadi, Seyed Mojtaba; Sorbi, Mohammad Hossein; Beiki, Omid; Razavi, Tayebeh Khademeh; Bidaki, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background Breast cancer is one of the most prevalent cancers in women in the world. It causes fear, despair, and takes a tremendous toll on psychological status. Objective To determine the effectiveness of group positive psychotherapy on the depression and happiness of breast cancer patients. Methods This randomized controlled trial was conducted with 42 breast cancer patients in The Oncology Center at Kermanshah, Iran in 2015. The Data were gathered before intervention and ten weeks afterwards. The data were collected using Beck’s Depression Inventory (BDI-II) and Oxford’s happiness Inventory (OHI). The data were analyzed by SPSS-16, Kolmogorov-Smirnov (K-S), chi-squared, and multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA). Results The results showed a significant reduction in the depression of the group on positive psychotherapy compared with the control group. Also the positive psychotherapy group experienced a significant increase in the patients’ happiness, while there was no significant increase in the control group. Conclusion The results of this research showed the effectiveness of positive psychotherapy on the reduction of mental pressure and the improvement of the mental status of breast cancer patients. This economical therapy can be used to increase patients’ psychological health. Clinical Trial Registration The trial was registered at the Iranian Registry of Clinical Trials (IRST) with the identification number IRCT2013101410063N4. Funding The authors received financial support for the research from Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences. PMID:27123227

  5. Mindfulness-and body-psychotherapy-based group treatment of chronic tinnitus: a randomized controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreuzer, Peter M; Goetz, Monika; Holl, Maria; Schecklmann, Martin; Landgrebe, Michael; Staudinger, Susanne; Langguth, Berthold

    2012-11-28

    Tinnitus, the perception of sound in absence of an external acoustic source, impairs the quality of life in 2% of the population. Since in most cases causal treatment is not possible, the majority of therapeutic attempts aim at developing and strengthening individual coping and habituation strategies. Therapeutic interventions that incorporate training in mindfulness meditation have become increasingly popular in the treatment of stress-related disorders. Here we conducted a randomized, controlled clinical study to investigate the efficacy of a specific mindfulness- and body-psychotherapy based program in patients suffering from chronic tinnitus. Thirty-six patients were enrolled in this pilot study. The treatment was specifically developed for tinnitus patients and is based on mindfulness and body psychotherapy. Treatment was performed as group therapy at two training weekends that were separated by an interval of 7 weeks (eleven hours/weekend) and in four further two-hour sessions (week 2, 9, 18 and 22). Patients were randomized to receive treatment either immediately or after waiting time, which served as a control condition. The primary study outcome was the change in tinnitus complaints as measured by the German Version of the Tinnitus Questionnaire (TQ). ANOVA testing for the primary outcome showed a significant interaction effect time by group (F = 7.4; df = 1,33; p = 0.010). Post hoc t-tests indicated an amelioration of TQ scores from baseline to week 9 in both groups (intervention group: t = 6.2; df = 17; p < 0.001; control group: t = 2.5; df = 16; p = 0.023), but the intervention group improved more than the control group. Groups differed at week 7 and 9, but not at week 24 as far as the TQ score was concerned. Our results suggest that this mindfulness- and body-psychotherapy-based approach is feasible in the treatment of tinnitus and merits further evaluation in clinical studies with larger sample sizes.The study is

  6. A Comprehensive Lifestyle Peer Group-Based Intervention on Cardiovascular Risk Factors: The Randomized Controlled Fifty-Fifty Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Pardo, Emilia; Fernández-Alvira, Juan Miguel; Vilanova, Marta; Haro, Domingo; Martínez, Ramona; Carvajal, Isabel; Carral, Vanesa; Rodríguez, Carla; de Miguel, Mercedes; Bodega, Patricia; Santos-Beneit, Gloria; Peñalvo, Jose Luis; Marina, Iñaki; Pérez-Farinós, Napoleón; Dal Re, Marian; Villar, Carmen; Robledo, Teresa; Vedanthan, Rajesh; Bansilal, Sameer; Fuster, Valentin

    2016-02-09

    Cardiovascular diseases stem from modifiable risk factors. Peer support is a proven strategy for many chronic illnesses. Randomized trials assessing the efficacy of this strategy for global cardiovascular risk factor modification are lacking. This study assessed the hypothesis that a peer group strategy would help improve healthy behaviors in individuals with cardiovascular risk factors. A total of 543 adults 25 to 50 years of age with at least 1 risk factor were recruited; risk factors included hypertension (20%), overweight (82%), smoking (31%), and physical inactivity (81%). Subjects were randomized 1:1 to a peer group-based intervention group (IG) or a self-management control group (CG) for 12 months. Peer-elected leaders moderated monthly meetings involving role-play, brainstorming, and activities to address emotions, diet, and exercise. The primary outcome was mean change in a composite score related to blood pressure, exercise, weight, alimentation, and tobacco (Fuster-BEWAT score, 0 to 15). Multilevel models with municipality as a cluster variable were applied to assess differences between groups. Participants' mean age was 42 ± 6 years, 71% were female, and they had a mean baseline Fuster-BEWAT score of 8.42 ± 2.35. After 1 year, the mean scores were significantly higher in the IG (n = 277) than in the CG (n = 266) (IG mean score: 8.84; 95% confidence interval (CI): 8.37 to 9.32; CG mean score: 8.17; 95% CI: 7.55 to 8.79; p = 0.02). The increase in the overall score was significantly larger in the IG compared with the CG (difference: 0.75; 95% CI: 0.32 to 1.18; p = 0.02). The mean improvement in the individual components was uniformly greater in the IG, with a significant difference for the tobacco component. The peer group intervention had beneficial effects on cardiovascular risk factors, with significant improvements in the overall score and specifically on tobacco cessation. A follow-up assessment will be performed 1 year after the final assessment

  7. Discrimination of the Bacillus cereus group members by pattern analysis of random amplified polymorphic DNA-PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwana, Ritsuko; Imamura, Daisuke; Takamatsu, Hiromu; Watabe, Kazuhito

    2012-06-01

    We tried to discriminate 16 strains of the Bacillus cereus group including B. cereus, B. thuringiensis, B. mycoides, B. pseudomycoides, and B. weihenstephanensis strains by the pattern analysis of Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) -PCR. Eight oligonucleotides primers were prepared and the polymorphic patterns of the DNA of each strain were compared with those of others. The primers E and F gave different patterns of RAPD-PCR products in all strains of the B. cereus group, so these primers are effective tools for the discrimination of closely related strains. All eight primers showed different polymorphic patterns of DNA for the four strains of B. cereus isolated from the kitchen of a private home, which verifies the advantage of the RAPD-PCR analysis for the discrimination of isolated strains of B. cereus from the environment.

  8. A group-delivered self-management program reduces spasticity in people with multiple sclerosis: A randomized, controlled pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugos, Cinda L; Bourdette, Dennis; Chen, Yiyi; Chen, Zunqiu; Cameron, Michelle

    2017-01-01

    Spasticity affects more than 80% of people with multiple sclerosis (MS), affecting activity, participation, and quality of life. Based on an international guideline, an MS spasticity group education and stretching program, MS Spasticity: Take Control (STC), has been developed. The objective of this paper is to determine whether STC with home stretching is associated with greater changes in spasticity than usual care (UC), consisting of an illustrated stretching booklet and home stretching but without group instruction or support, in people with MS. Ambulatory MS patients with self-reported spasticity interfering with daily activities were randomized to STC or UC. Individuals completed questionnaires regarding MS, spasticity, walking, fatigue and mood, and physical measures of spasticity and walking. Thirty-eight of 40 participants completed both assessments. Mean total score and scores on two subscales of the MS Spasticity Scale-88 improved more with STC than with UC (p spasticity more than UC and provided encouraging improvements in other measures.

  9. Effect of Facilitation of Local Maternal-and-Newborn Stakeholder Groups on Neonatal Mortality: Cluster-Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Åke Persson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Facilitation of local women's groups may reportedly reduce neonatal mortality. It is not known whether facilitation of groups composed of local health care staff and politicians can improve perinatal outcomes. We hypothesised that facilitation of local stakeholder groups would reduce neonatal mortality (primary outcome and improve maternal, delivery, and newborn care indicators (secondary outcomes in Quang Ninh province, Vietnam. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In a cluster-randomized design 44 communes were allocated to intervention and 46 to control. Laywomen facilitated monthly meetings during 3 years in groups composed of health care staff and key persons in the communes. A problem-solving approach was employed. Births and neonatal deaths were monitored, and interviews were performed in households of neonatal deaths and of randomly selected surviving infants. A latent period before effect is expected in this type of intervention, but this timeframe was not pre-specified. Neonatal mortality rate (NMR from July 2008 to June 2011 was 16.5/1,000 (195 deaths per 11,818 live births in the intervention communes and 18.4/1,000 (194 per 10,559 live births in control communes (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 0.96 [95% CI 0.73-1.25]. There was a significant downward time trend of NMR in intervention communes (p = 0.003 but not in control communes (p = 0.184. No significant difference in NMR was observed during the first two years (July 2008 to June 2010 while the third year (July 2010 to June 2011 had significantly lower NMR in intervention arm: adjusted OR 0.51 (95% CI 0.30-0.89. Women in intervention communes more frequently attended antenatal care (adjusted OR 2.27 [95% CI 1.07-4.8]. CONCLUSIONS: A randomized facilitation intervention with local stakeholder groups composed of primary care staff and local politicians working for three years with a perinatal problem-solving approach resulted in increased attendance to antenatal care and reduced

  10. Mindfulness-and body-psychotherapy-based group treatment of chronic tinnitus: a randomized controlled pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kreuzer Peter M

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tinnitus, the perception of sound in absence of an external acoustic source, impairs the quality of life in 2% of the population. Since in most cases causal treatment is not possible, the majority of therapeutic attempts aim at developing and strengthening individual coping and habituation strategies. Therapeutic interventions that incorporate training in mindfulness meditation have become increasingly popular in the treatment of stress-related disorders. Here we conducted a randomized, controlled clinical study to investigate the efficacy of a specific mindfulness- and body-psychotherapy based program in patients suffering from chronic tinnitus. Methods Thirty-six patients were enrolled in this pilot study. The treatment was specifically developed for tinnitus patients and is based on mindfulness and body psychotherapy. Treatment was performed as group therapy at two training weekends that were separated by an interval of 7 weeks (eleven hours/weekend and in four further two-hour sessions (week 2, 9, 18 and 22. Patients were randomized to receive treatment either immediately or after waiting time, which served as a control condition. The primary study outcome was the change in tinnitus complaints as measured by the German Version of the Tinnitus Questionnaire (TQ. Results ANOVA testing for the primary outcome showed a significant interaction effect time by group (F = 7.4; df = 1,33; p = 0.010. Post hoc t-tests indicated an amelioration of TQ scores from baseline to week 9 in both groups (intervention group: t = 6.2; df = 17; p  Conclusions Our results suggest that this mindfulness- and body-psychotherapy-based approach is feasible in the treatment of tinnitus and merits further evaluation in clinical studies with larger sample sizes. The study is registered with clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01540357.

  11. Future oriented group training for suicidal patients: a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerkhof Ad

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In routine psychiatric treatment most clinicians inquire about indicators of suicide risk, but once the risk is assessed not many clinicians systematically focus on suicidal thoughts. This may reflect a commonly held opinion that once the depressive or anxious symptoms are effectively treated the suicidal symptoms will wane. Consequently, many clients with suicidal thoughts do not receive systematic treatment of their suicidal thinking. There are many indications that specific attention to suicidal thinking is necessary to effectively decrease the intensity and recurrence of suicidal thinking. We therefore developed a group training for patients with suicidal thoughts that is easy to apply in clinical settings as an addition to regular treatment and that explicitly focuses on suicidal thinking. We hypothesize that such an additional training will decrease the frequency and intensity of suicidal thinking. We based the training on cognitive behavioural approaches of hopelessness, worrying, and future perspectives, given the theories of Beck, McLeod and others, concerning the lack of positive expectations characteristic for many suicidal patients. In collaboration with each participant in the training individual positive future possibilities and goals were challenged. Methods/Design We evaluate the effects of our program on suicide ideation (primary outcome measure. The study is conducted in a regular treatment setting with regular inpatients and outpatients representative for Dutch psychiatric treatment settings. The design is a RCT with two arms: TAU (Treatment as Usual versus TAU plus the training. Follow up measurements are taken 12 months after the first assessment. Discussion There is a need for research on the effectiveness of interventions in suicidology, especially RCT's. In our treatment program we combine aspects and interventions that have been proven to be useful in the treatment of suicidal thinking and behavior

  12. Competitive Traffic Assignment in Road Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krylatov Alexander Y.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Recently in-vehicle route guidance and information systems are rapidly developing. Such systems are expected to reduce congestion in an urban traffic area. This social benefit is believed to be reached by imposing the route choices on the network users that lead to the system optimum traffic assignment. However, guidance service could be offered by different competitive business companies. Then route choices of different mutually independent groups of users may reject traffic assignment from the system optimum state. In this paper, a game theoretic approach is shown to be very efficient to formalize competitive traffic assignment problem with various groups of users in the form of non-cooperative network game with the Nash equilibrium search. The relationships between the Wardrop’s system optimum associated with the traffic assignment problem and the Nash equilibrium associated with the competitive traffic assignment problem are investigated. Moreover, some related aspects of the Nash equilibrium and the Wardrop’s user equilibrium assignments are also discussed.

  13. Group schema therapy versus group cognitive behavioral therapy for social anxiety disorder with comorbid avoidant personality disorder: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baljé, Astrid; Greeven, Anja; van Giezen, Anne; Korrelboom, Kees; Arntz, Arnoud; Spinhoven, Philip

    2016-10-08

    Social anxiety disorder (SAD) with comorbid avoidant personality disorder (APD) has a high prevalence and is associated with serious psychosocial problems and high societal costs. When patients suffer from both SAD and APD, the Dutch multidisciplinary guidelines for personality disorders advise offering prolonged cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). Recently there is increasing evidence for the effectiveness of schema therapy (ST) for personality disorders such as borderline personality disorder and cluster C personality disorders. Since ST addresses underlying personality characteristics and maladaptive coping strategies developed in childhood, this treatment might be particularly effective for patients with SAD and comorbid APD. To our knowledge, there are no studies comparing CBT with ST in this particular group of patients. This superiority trial aims at comparing the effectiveness of these treatments. As an additional goal, predictors and underlying mechanisms of change will be explored. The design of the study is a multicentre two-group randomized controlled trial (RCT) in which the treatment effect of group cognitive behavioral therapy (GCBT) will be compared to that of group schema therapy (GST) in a semi-open group format. A total of 128 patients aged 18-65 years old will be enrolled. Patients will receive 30 sessions of GCBT or GST during a period of approximately 9 months. Primary outcome measures are the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale Self-Report (LSAS-SR) for social anxiety disorder and the newly developed Avoidant Personality Disorder Severity Index (AVPDSI) for avoidant personality disorder. Secondary outcome measures are the MINI section SAD, the SCID-II section APD, the Schema Mode Inventory (SMI-2), the Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology Self-Report (IDS-SR), the World Health Organization Quality of Life-BREF (WHOQOL-BREF), the Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale (DERS), the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES) and the Acceptance and Action

  14. Can a Back Pain E-mail Discussion Group improve health status and lower health care costs?: A randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorig, Kate R; Laurent, Diana D; Deyo, Richard A; Marnell, Margaret E; Minor, Marian A; Ritter, Philip L

    2002-04-08

    Given the high health care utilization, limited evidence for the effectiveness of back pain interventions, and the proliferation of e-mail health discussion groups, this study seeks to determine if the Internet can be used to improve health status and health care utilization for people with chronic back pain. Randomized controlled trial. Participants included 580 people from 49 states with chronic back pain having at least 1 outpatient visit in the past year, no "red-flag" symptoms, and access to e-mail. Major exclusion criteria included continuous back pain for more than 90 days causing major activity intolerance and/or receiving disability payments. Closed, moderated, e-mail discussion group. Participants also received a book and videotape about back pain. Controls received a subscription to a non-health-related magazine of their choice. Pain, disability, role function, health distress, and health care utilization. At 1-year treatment, subjects compared with controls demonstrated improvements in pain (P =.045), disability (P =.02), role function (P =.007), and health distress (P =.001). Physician visits for the past 6 months declined by 1.5 visits for the treatment group and by 0.65 visits for the control group (P =.07). Mean hospital days declined nearly 0.20 days for the treated group vs and increased 0.04 days for the control group (P =.24). An e-mail discussion group can positively affect health status and possibly health care utilization. It may have a place in the treatment of chronic recurrent back pain.

  15. GrOup based physical Activity for oLder adults (GOAL) randomized controlled trial: study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauchamp, Mark R; Harden, Samantha M; Wolf, Svenja A; Rhodes, Ryan E; Liu, Yan; Dunlop, William L; Schmader, Toni; Sheel, Andrew W; Zumbo, Bruno D; Estabrooks, Paul A

    2015-06-27

    Physical activity has health benefits across the lifespan, yet only 13 % of Canadian older adults are sufficiently active. Results from a number of observational studies indicate that adults display positive preferences for exercising with others of a similar age and same gender, and that intra-group age- and gender-similarity are associated with elevated exercise adherence. However, research has yet to experimentally examine the extent to which intra-group age- and gender-related similarity affect exercise adherence behaviors. The GrOup-based physical Activity for oLder adults (GOAL) trial is a three-arm randomized control trial that will examine the efficacy of two different group-based exercise programs for older adults (informed by the tenets of self-categorization theory) in relation to a standard group-based exercise program. Within this manuscript we outline the design and proposed evaluation of the GOAL trial. The first arm is comprised of exercise groups made up of participants of a similar-age and of the same gender; the second arm consists of groups with similar-aged mixed gender participants; the control arm is comprised of mixed-aged mixed gender participants. We aim to compare the adherence rates of participants across conditions, as well as potential moderation effects and mediating mechanisms. Results from this trial will inform intervention designs to improve the exercise adherence behaviors of older adult. At a systems-level, should support be derived for the efficacy of the interventions tested in this trial, changing group composition (i.e., age, gender) represents a feasible program adaptation for physical activity centers. ClinicalTrials.gov # NCT02023632 . Registered December 13, 2013.

  16. CBT4BN: A Randomized Controlled Trial of Online Chat and Face-to-Face Group Therapy for Bulimia Nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerwas, Stephanie C.; Watson, Hunna J.; Hofmeier, Sara M.; Levine, Michele D.; Hamer, Robert M.; Crosby, Ross D.; Runfola, Cristin D.; Peat, Christine M.; Shapiro, Jennifer R.; Zimmer, Benjamin; Moessner, Markus; Kordy, Hans; Marcus, Marsha D.; Bulik, Cynthia M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Although cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) represents the first-line evidence-based psychotherapy for bulimia nervosa (BN), most individuals seeking treatment do not have access to this specialized intervention. We compared an Internet-based manualized version of CBT group therapy for BN conducted via a therapeutic chat group (CBT4BN) to the same treatment conducted via a traditional face-to-face group therapy (CBTF2F). Method In a two-site, randomized, controlled non-inferiority trial, we tested the hypothesis that CBT4BN would not be inferior to CBTF2F. One hundred forty-nine adult patients with BN (2.6% males) received up to 16 sessions of group CBT over 20 weeks in either CBT4BN or CBTF2F and outcomes were compared at the end of treatment and 12-month follow-up. Results At the end of treatment, CBT4BN was inferior to CBTF2F in producing abstinence from binge eating and purging and in leading to reductions in the frequency of binge eating and purging. However, by 12-month follow-up, CBT4BN was mostly not inferior to CBTF2F. Participants in the CBT4BN condition, but not CBTF2F, continued to reduce their binge-eating and purging frequency from end of treatment to 12-month follow-up. Conclusions CBT delivered online in a group chat format appears to be an efficacious treatment for BN although the trajectory of recovery may be slower than face-to-face group therapy. Online chat groups may increase accessibility of treatment and represent a cost-effective approach to service delivery. However, barriers in service delivery such as state-specific license and ethical guidelines for online therapists need to be addressed. PMID:27883997

  17. Interactive Assignments for Online Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pam Lowry

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Students can experience first hand through interactive assignments what is involved in teaching an online course. Most students develop a whole new appreciation for the student learning process. Faculty are beginning to realize that online instruction is more than a series of readings posted to a course management system. This paper summarizes the faculty member's instructional strategies involved when creating student interaction assignments. The paper also summarizes the assignments, discussion board, and trends in education from the student's perspective. In summary, it concludes with the faculty's overall perspective concerning these assignments and how the assignments could be more effective for the student.

  18. Comparative Evaluation of the Safety and Efficacy of Long-Term Use of Imidafenacin and Solifenacin in Patients with Overactive Bladder: A Prospective, Open, Randomized, Parallel-Group Trial (the LIST Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayoshi Zaitsu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Overactive bladder (OAB is a chronic disease, but comparative trials of anticholinergics, which are commonly used for treatment of OAB, have generally been performed for up to 12 weeks only. There is no comparative study of a long-term intervention. Methods. We conducted a 52-week prospective randomized comparative study to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of two anticholinergics. Results. Forty-one Japanese patients with untreated OAB were randomly assigned to imidafenacin and solifenacin groups. There was no difference in OABSS and KHQ scores between the two groups, but the severity and incidence of adverse events caused by the anticholinergics showed increased differences between the groups with time. The severity of dry mouth and the incidence of constipation were significantly lower in the imidafenacin group (=0.0092 and =0.0013, resp.. Conclusions. This study is the first long-term trial to show differences in the properties of anticholinergics that were not detected in short-term studies. Since OAB is a chronic disease, we conclude that imidafenacin is preferable to solifenacin from a perspective of safety.

  19. Can the Onset of Type 2 Diabetes Be Delayed by a Group-Based Lifestyle Intervention in Women with Prediabetes following Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM? Findings from a Randomized Control Mixed Methods Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela O’Dea

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate a 12-week group-based lifestyle intervention programme for women with prediabetes following gestational diabetes (GDM. Design. A two-group, mixed methods randomized controlled trial in which 50 women with a history of GDM and abnormal glucose tolerance postpartum were randomly assigned to intervention (n=24 or wait control (n=26 and postintervention qualitative interviews with participants. Main Outcome Measures. Modifiable biochemical, anthropometric, behavioural, and psychosocial risk factors associated with the development of type 2 diabetes. The primary outcome variable was the change in fasting plasma glucose (FPG from study entry to one-year follow-up. Results. At one-year follow-up, the intervention group showed significant improvements over the wait control group on stress, diet self-efficacy, and quality of life. There was no evidence of an effect of the intervention on measures of biochemistry or anthropometry; the effect on one health behaviour, diet adherence, was close to significance. Conclusions. Prevention programmes must tackle the barriers to participation faced by this population; home-based interventions should be investigated. Strategies for promoting long-term health self-management need to be developed and tested.

  20. Personality disorder moderates outcome in short- and long-term group analytic psychotherapy: A randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorentzen, Steinar; Ruud, Torleif; Fjeldstad, Anette; Høglend, Per A

    2015-06-01

    In a randomized clinical trial, short- and long-term psychodynamic group psychotherapy (STG and LTG, respectively) schedules were equally effective for the 'typical' patient during a 3-year study period. Although several studies have reported good effects for patients with personality disorders (PD) in diverse forms of psychotherapy, the significance of treatment duration is unclear. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that PD patients would improve more during and after LTG than STG. A randomized, longitudinal, prospective study contrasting the outcomes during and after short- and long-term dynamic group psychotherapies. One hundred and sixty-seven outpatients with mood disorders, anxiety disorders, or PD were randomized to STG or LTG (respectively, 20 or 80 weekly sessions of 90 min each). Outcome measures are as follows: symptoms (SCL-90-R), interpersonal problems (IIP-C), and psychosocial functioning (GAF split version: GAF-Symptom and GAF-Function). PD pathology (number of PD criteria items) was selected a priori as a putative moderator of treatment effects. Change during the 3-year study period was assessed using linear mixed models. The study was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov as NCT 00021417. Our hypothesis was supported, as patients with PD improved significantly more regarding all outcome variables in LTG than STG. For patients without PD, the rate of change was similar across 3 years; however, the rate of change in symptoms and interpersonal problems was higher in STG during the first 6 months. The effectiveness of LTG is higher for patients with co-morbid PD. Patients without PD do not appear to experience additional gain from LTG. Clinical implications: LTG demonstrates better effectiveness than STG for patients with personality disorder co-morbidity (PD). Patients without PD do not appear to experience additional gain from attending LTG. Correct initial allocation to treatment duration may prevent disruptive breaks in relationships and lead to both

  1. Headache: the placebo effects in the control groups in randomized clinical trials; an analysis of systematic reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, Femke M; Voogt-Bode, Annieke; Passchier, Jan; Berger, Marjolein Y; Koes, Bart W; Verhagen, Arianne P

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the effects in the placebo and "no treatment" arms in trials with headache patients. This is a secondary analysis of randomized controlled trials from 8 systematic reviews and selected trials with a "no treatment" or placebo control group. The different types of "no treatment" and placebo interventions were assessed and classified into 6 subgroups. The analyses were carried out according to type of outcome variable. In total, 119 studies were included (7119 participants). The mean recovery rate in all control groups was 35.7%. Significantly more participants recovered in control groups of pharmacological studies than in nonpharmacological studies: 38.5% vs 15.0%, respectively. Adults were more likely to recover in nonpharmacological studies and children in pharmacological studies. The mean recovery rate in the control groups was 36%. The recovery rate varied substantially between type of intervention and patients. Copyright © 2011 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of Group Pressure on Memory Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martichuski, Diane; And Others

    Many studies have examined group pressure and its effect on an individual. A study was undertaken to investigate the influence of a majority upon subjects and its effect upon long term memory. Undergraduate students (N=18) were selected and randomly assigned to either a treatment or control group. Each subject watched a 10-minute segment from a…

  3. Group versus Internet-based cognitive-behavioral therapy for procrastination: Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Rozental

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Procrastination is defined as a voluntarily delay of an intended course of action despite expecting to be worse-off for the delay, and is considered a persistent behavior pattern that can result in major psychological suffering. About one-fifth of the adult population and half of the student population are presumed having substantial difficulties due to recurrent procrastination in their everyday lives. However, chronic and severe procrastinators seldom receive adequate care due to preconceptions and the lack of understanding regarding procrastination and the treatment interventions that are assumed beneficial. Cognitive-behavioral therapy is often deemed a treatment of choice, although the evidence supporting its use is scarce, and only one randomized controlled trial has been performed. The primary aim of the proposed study is therefore to test the efficacy of cognitive-behavioral therapy delivered as either a group intervention or via the Internet. Participants will consist of students recruited through the Student Health Centre at Karolinska Institutet. A randomized controlled trial with a sample size of 100 participants divided into blocks of thirty will be used, comparing an eight-week Internet-based cognitive-behavioral therapy intervention, and an eight-week group cognitive-behavioral therapy based intervention. It is believed that the proposed study will result in two important findings. First, different treatment interventions in cognitive-behavioral therapy are assumed to be helpful for people suffering from problems caused by procrastination. Second, both an Internet-based cognitive-behavioral therapy intervention and a group intervention are presumed suitable for administering treatment for procrastination, which is considered important as the availability of adequate care is limited, particularly among students. The proposed study will increase the knowledge regarding the efficacy of different treatments of procrastination, as well

  4. Group medical visits in the follow-up of women with a BRCA mutation: design of a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoogerbrugge Nicoline

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background BRCA mutation carriers have a 40-80% life-time risk of developing breast cancer. They may opt for yearly breast cancer surveillance or for prophylactic mastectomy. Both options show increased survival rates. It is a complex choice to be made between these two options. As a result most women experience high levels of distress and high needs for information. To fulfill the needs for psychosocial support and information we have introduced group medical consultations (GMCs. A GMC provides individual medical visits conducted within a group. This 90 minute group-visit with 8-12 patients gives patients the opportunity to spend more time with their clinician and a behavioral health professional and learn from other patients experiencing similar topics. However, it should be noted that group sessions may increase fear in some patients or influence their decision making. Methods/design In this randomized controlled trial, 160 BRCA mutation carriers diagnosed maximally 2 years ago are recruited from the Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre. Participants are randomized in a 1:1 ratio to either the GMC intervention group (onetime participation in a GMC instead of a standard individual visit or to a usual care control group. Primary outcome measures are empowerment and psychological distress (SCL 90. Secondary outcome measures are fear of cancer, information needs before the consultation and the received information, self-examination of the breasts, patient satisfaction, quality of life and cost-effectiveness. Data are collected via self-reported questionnaires 1 week before the visit, and at 1 week and at 3 months follow-up. A pilot study was conducted to test all procedures and questionnaires. Discussion The possibility for interaction with other BRCA mutation carriers within a medical visit is unique. This study will assess the effectiveness of GMCs for BRCA mutation carriers to improve empowerment and decrease distress compared

  5. Internet-vs. group-delivered cognitive behavior therapy for insomnia: A randomized controlled non-inferiority trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, Kerstin; Tarkian Tillgren, Hanna; Wiklund, Tobias; Danlycke, Ewa; Forssén, Mattias; Söderström, Alexandra; Johansson, Robert; Hesser, Hugo; Jernelöv, Susanna; Lindefors, Nils; Andersson, Gerhard; Kaldo, Viktor

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare guided Internet-delivered to group-delivered cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for insomnia. We conducted an 8-week randomized controlled non-inferiority trial with 6-months follow-up. Participants were forty-eight adults with insomnia, recruited via media. Interventions were guided Internet-delivered CBT (ICBT) and group-delivered CBT (GCBT) for insomnia. Primary outcome measure was the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI), secondary outcome measures were sleep diary data, depressive symptoms, response- and remission rates. Both treatment groups showed significant improvements and large effect sizes for ISI (Within Cohen's d: ICBT post = 1.8, 6-months follow-up = 2.1; GCBT post = 2.1, 6-months follow-up = 2.2). Confidence interval of the difference between groups post-treatment and at FU6 indicated non-inferiority of ICBT compared to GCBT. At post-treatment, two thirds of patients in both groups were considered responders (ISI-reduction > 7p). Using diagnostic criteria, 63% (ICBT) and 75% (GCBT) were in remission. Sleep diary data showed moderate to large effect sizes. We conclude that both guided Internet-CBT and group-CBT in this study were efficacious with regard to insomnia severity, sleep parameters and depressive symptoms. The results are in line with previous research, and strengthen the evidence for guided Internet-CBT for insomnia. The study protocol was approved by, and registered with, the regional ethics review board in Linköping, Sweden, registration number 2010/385-31. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Children with autism spectrum disorder and social skills groups at school: a randomized trial comparing intervention approach and peer composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasari, Connie; Dean, Michelle; Kretzmann, Mark; Shih, Wendy; Orlich, Felice; Whitney, Rondalyn; Landa, Rebecca; Lord, Catherine; King, Bryan

    2016-02-01

    Peer relationships improve for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in clinic-based social skills groups but rarely generalize to real world contexts. This study compares child outcomes of two social skills interventions conducted in schools with children in Kindergarten through fifth grade. Children with ASD were randomized to one of two interventions that varied on group composition (mixed typical and ASD vs. all ASD or social difficulties) and intervention approach (didactic SKILLS based vs. activity-based ENGAGE groups). Interventions were implemented at school for 8 weeks (16 sessions) with an 8-week follow-up. Innovative measures of peer nomination and playground peer engagement, as well as teacher reports of child behavior problems and teacher-child relationship were analyzed for 137 children with ASD across four sites. On the primary outcome of social network connections from the peer nomination measure, there was no main effect of treatment, but there were moderator effects. Children with low teacher-child closeness or high conflict improved more in their social connections if they received the SKILLS intervention, whereas children with higher teacher-child closeness improved more if they received the ENGAGE intervention. Only two secondary outcome measures yielded significant effects of treatment. Children in the SKILLS groups increased peer engagement and decreased isolation during recess. Child behavior problems and teacher-child closeness moderated peer engagement such that children with higher behavior problems and lower closeness benefitted more from SKILLS groups. These findings suggest that social skills groups conducted at school can affect both peer engagement during recess as well as peer acceptability. Child characteristics and teacher-child relationship prior to intervention yield important information on who might benefit from a specific social skills intervention. © 2015 Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health.

  7. Pediatric Online Evidence-Based Medicine Assignment Is a Novel Effective Enjoyable Undergraduate Medical Teaching Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotb, Magd A.; Elmahdy, Hesham Nabeh; Khalifa, Nour El Deen Mahmoud; El-Deen, Mohamed Hamed Nasr; Lotfi, Mohamed Amr N.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is delivered through a didactic, blended learning, and mixed models. Students are supposed to construct an answerable question in PICO (patient, intervention, comparison, and outcome) framework, acquire evidence through search of literature, appraise evidence, apply it to the clinical case scenario, and assess the evidence in relation to clinical context. Yet these teaching models have limitations especially those related to group work, for example, handling uncooperative students, students who fail to contribute, students who domineer, students who have personal conflict, their impact upon progress of their groups, and inconsistent individual acquisition of required skills. At Pediatrics Department, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, we designed a novel undergraduate pediatric EBM assignment online system to overcome shortcomings of previous didactic method and aimed to assess its effectiveness by prospective follow-up during academic years 2012 to 2013 and 2013 to 2014. The novel web-based online interactive system was tailored to provide sequential single and group assignments for each student. Single assignment addressed a specific case scenario question, while group assignment was teamwork that addressed different questions of same case scenario. Assignment comprised scholar content and skills. We objectively analyzed students’ performance by criterion-based assessment and subjectively by anonymous student questionnaire. A total of 2879 were enrolled in 5th year Pediatrics Course consecutively, of them 2779 (96.5%) logged in and 2554 (88.7%) submitted their work. They were randomly assigned to 292 groups. A total of 2277 (89.15%) achieved ≥80% of total mark (4/5), of them 717 (28.1%) achieved a full mark. A total of 2178 (85.27%) and 2359 (92.36%) made evidence-based conclusions and recommendations in single and group assignment, respectively (P < 0.001). A total of 1102 (43.1%) answered student questionnaire

  8. Design and rationale of the medical students learning weight management counseling skills (MSWeight) group randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ockene, Judith K; Ashe, Karen M; Hayes, Rashelle B; Churchill, Linda C; Crawford, Sybil L; Geller, Alan C; Jolicoeur, Denise; Olendzki, Barbara C; Basco, Maria Theresa; Pendharkar, Jyothi A; Ferguson, Kristi J; Guck, Thomas P; Margo, Katherine L; Okuliar, Catherine A; Shaw, Monica A; Soleymani, Taraneh; Stadler, Diane D; Warrier, Sarita S; Pbert, Lori

    2018-01-01

    Physicians have an important role addressing the obesity epidemic. Lack of adequate teaching to provide weight management counseling (WMC) is cited as a reason for limited treatment. National guidelines have not been translated into an evidence-supported, competency-based curriculum in medical schools. Weight Management Counseling in Medical Schools: A Randomized Controlled Trial (MSWeight) is designed to determine if a multi-modal theoretically-guided WMC educational intervention improves observed counseling skills and secondarily improve perceived skills and self-efficacy among medical students compared to traditional education (TE). Eight U.S. medical schools were pair-matched and randomized in a group randomized controlled trial to evaluate whether a multi-modal education (MME) intervention compared to traditional education (TE) improves observed WMC skills. The MME intervention includes innovative components in years 1-3: a structured web-course; a role play exercise, WebPatientEncounter, and an enhanced outpatient internal medicine or family medicine clerkship. This evidence-supported curriculum uses the 5As framework to guide treatment and incorporates patient-centered counseling to engage the patient. The primary outcome is a comparison of scores on an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) WMC case among third year medical students. The secondary outcome compares changes in scores of medical students from their first to third year on an assessment of perceived WMC skills and self-efficacy. MSWeight is the first RCT in medical schools to evaluate whether interventions integrated into the curriculum improve medical students' WMC skills. If this educational approach for teaching WMC is effective, feasible and acceptable it can affect how medical schools integrate WMC teaching into their curriculum. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Multiproject team assignments

    OpenAIRE

    Katerina Sherstyuk

    1999-01-01

    We consider expected profit maximizing mechanisms for a principal who has to allocate a group of agents among a number of projects, assuming that the principal has incomplete information about each agent's ability type, and the agents follow the Bayes-Nash or the dominant strategy equilibrium behavior. We find that while expected profit maximizing mechanisms are similar to the optimal auction (Myerson, 1981), the incentive compatibility constraints are much more restrictive. Interestingly, th...

  10. Cost-Effectiveness of Group and Internet Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia in Adolescents: Results from a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bruin, Eduard J; van Steensel, Francisca J A; Meijer, Anne Marie

    2016-08-01

    To investigate cost-effectiveness of adolescent cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBTI) in group- and Internet-delivered formats, from a societal perspective with a time horizon of 1 y. Costs and effects data up to 1-y follow-up were obtained from a randomized controlled trial (RCT) comparing Internet CBTI to face-to-face group CBTI. The study was conducted at the laboratory of the Research Institute of Child Development and Education at the University of Amsterdam, and the academic youth mental health care center UvAMinds in Amsterdam. Sixty-two participants meeting Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision criteria for insomnia were randomized to face-to-face group CBTI (GT; n = 31, age = 15.6 y ± 1.8, 71.0% girls) or individual Internet CBTI (IT; n = 31, age = 15.4 y ± 1.5, 83.9% girls). The intervention consisted of six weekly sessions and a 2-mo follow up booster-session of CBTI, consisting of psychoeducation, sleep hygiene, restriction of time in bed, stimulus control, cognitive therapy, and relaxation techniques. GT sessions were held in groups of six to eight adolescents guided by two trained sleep therapists. IT consisted of individual Internet therapy with preprogrammed content similar to GT, and guided by trained sleep therapists. Outcome measures were subjective sleep efficiency (SE) ≥ 85%, and quality-adjusted life-years (QALY). Analyses were conducted from a societal perspective. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) were calculated using bootstrap sampling, and presented in cost-effectiveness planes. Primary analysis showed costs over 1 y were higher for GT but effects were similar for IT and GT. Bootstrapped ICERs demonstrated there is a high probability of IT being cost-effective compared to GT. Secondary analyses confirmed robustness of results. Internet CBTI is a cost-effective treatment compared to group CBTI for adolescents, although effects were largely similar for both formats

  11. Effectiveness of Inclusion of Dry Needling in a Multimodal Therapy Program for Patellofemoral Pain: A Randomized Parallel-Group Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espí-López, Gemma V; Serra-Añó, Pilar; Vicent-Ferrando, Juan; Sánchez-Moreno-Giner, Miguel; Arias-Buría, Jose L; Cleland, Joshua; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César

    2017-06-01

    Study Design Randomized controlled trial. Background Evidence suggests that multimodal interventions that include exercise therapy may be effective for patellofemoral pain (PFP); however, no study has investigated the effects of trigger point (TrP) dry needling (DN) in people with PFP. Objectives To compare the effects of adding TrP DN to a manual therapy and exercise program on pain, function, and disability in individuals with PFP. Methods Individuals with PFP (n = 60) recruited from a public hospital in Valencia, Spain were randomly allocated to manual therapy and exercises (n = 30) or manual therapy and exercise plus TrP DN (n = 30). Both groups received the same manual therapy and strengthening exercise program for 3 sessions (once a week for 3 weeks), and 1 group also received TrP DN to active TrPs within the vastus medialis and vastus lateralis muscles. The pain subscale of the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS; 0-100 scale) was used as the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes included other subscales of the KOOS, the Knee Society Score, the International Knee Documentation Committee Subjective Knee Evaluation Form (IKDC), and the numeric pain-rating scale. Patients were assessed at baseline and at 15-day (posttreatment) and 3-month follow-ups. Analysis was conducted with mixed analyses of covariance, adjusted for baseline scores. Results At 3 months, 58 subjects (97%) completed the follow-up. No significant between-group differences (all, P>.391) were observed for any outcome: KOOS pain subscale mean difference, -2.1 (95% confidence interval [CI]: -4.6, 0.4); IKDC mean difference, 2.3 (95% CI: -0.1, 4.7); knee pain intensity mean difference, 0.3 (95% CI: -0.2, 0.8). Both groups experienced similar moderate-to-large within-group improvements in all outcomes (standardized mean differences of 0.6 to 1.1); however, only the KOOS function in sport and recreation subscale surpassed the prespecified minimum important change. Conclusion The current

  12. The Effectiveness of a Group Triple P with Chinese Parents Who Have a Child with Developmental Disabilities: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Cynthia; Fan, Angel; Sanders, Matthew R.

    2013-01-01

    The study examined the effectiveness of Group Triple P, a Level 4 variant of the Triple P multilevel system of parenting support, with Chinese parents who had a preschool aged child with a developmental disability, using randomized controlled trial design. Participants (Intervention group: 42; Waitlist Control group: 39) completed measures on…

  13. The healthy options for nutrition environments in schools (Healthy ONES group randomized trial: using implementation models to change nutrition policy and environments in low income schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coleman Karen J

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Healthy Options for Nutrition Environments in Schools (Healthy ONES study was an evidence-based public health (EBPH randomized group trial that adapted the Institute for Healthcare Improvement’s (IHI rapid improvement process model to implement school nutrition policy and environmental change. Methods A low-income school district volunteered for participation in the study. All schools in the district agreed to participate (elementary = 6, middle school = 2 and were randomly assigned within school type to intervention (n = 4 and control (n =4 conditions following a baseline environmental audit year. Intervention goals were to 1 eliminate unhealthy foods and beverages on campus, 2 develop nutrition services as the main source on campus for healthful eating (HE, and 3 promote school staff modeling of HE. Schools were followed across a baseline year and two intervention years. Longitudinal assessment of height and weight was conducted with second, third, and sixth grade children. Behavioral observation of the nutrition environment was used to index the amount of outside foods and beverages on campuses. Observations were made monthly in each targeted school environment and findings were presented as items per child per week. Results From an eligible 827 second, third, and sixth grade students, baseline height and weight were collected for 444 second and third grade and 135 sixth grade students (51% reach. Data were available for 73% of these enrolled students at the end of three years. Intervention school outside food and beverage items per child per week decreased over time and control school outside food and beverage items increased over time. The effects were especially pronounced for unhealthy foods and beverage items. Changes in rates of obesity for intervention school (28% baseline, 27% year 1, 30% year 2 were similar to those seen for control school (22% baseline, 22% year 1, 25% year 2 children

  14. Detection of random responding on the MMPI-A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baer, R A; Ballenger, J; Berry, D T; Wetter, M W

    1997-02-01

    We examined random responding on the MMPI-A in 106 adolescents from the general population. Participants were asked to report on the frequency, location, and reasons for any random responses occurring during a standard administration of the MMPI-A. Relationships between self-reported random responding and validity indices (F1, F2, F, and Variable Response Inconsistency [VRIN] scale) were examined. In addition, each participant was randomly assigned to 1 of 5 groups, with each group completing an assigned portion (0, 25%, 50%, 75%, or 100%) of an MMPI-A answer sheet without access to the test booklet, and the utility of the validity scales in discriminating standard protocols from all or partially random protocols was investigated. Most adolescents acknowledged one or more random responses correlated significantly with F but not VRIN. Validity scales were sensitive to all or partially random protocols, and produced high classification rates when discriminating among groups.

  15. Intranasal Midazolam versus Rectal Diazepam for the Management of Canine Status Epilepticus: A Multicenter Randomized Parallel-Group Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charalambous, M; Bhatti, S F M; Van Ham, L; Platt, S; Jeffery, N D; Tipold, A; Siedenburg, J; Volk, H A; Hasegawa, D; Gallucci, A; Gandini, G; Musteata, M; Ives, E; Vanhaesebrouck, A E

    2017-07-01

    Intranasal administration of benzodiazepines has shown superiority over rectal administration for terminating emergency epileptic seizures in human trials. No such clinical trials have been performed in dogs. To evaluate the clinical efficacy of intranasal midazolam (IN-MDZ), via a mucosal atomization device, as a first-line management option for canine status epilepticus and compare it to rectal administration of diazepam (R-DZP) for controlling status epilepticus before intravenous access is available. Client-owned dogs with idiopathic or structural epilepsy manifesting status epilepticus within a hospital environment were used. Dogs were randomly allocated to treatment with IN-MDZ (n = 20) or R-DZP (n = 15). Randomized parallel-group clinical trial. Seizure cessation time and adverse effects were recorded. For each dog, treatment was considered successful if the seizure ceased within 5 minutes and did not recur within 10 minutes after administration. The 95% confidence interval was used to detect the true population of dogs that were successfully treated. The Fisher's 2-tailed exact test was used to compare the 2 groups, and the results were considered statistically significant if P < .05. IN-MDZ and R-DZP terminated status epilepticus in 70% (14/20) and 20% (3/15) of cases, respectively (P = .0059). All dogs showed sedation and ataxia. IN-MDZ is a quick, safe and effective first-line medication for controlling status epilepticus in dogs and appears superior to R-DZP. IN-MDZ might be a valuable treatment option when intravenous access is not available and for treatment of status epilepticus in dogs at home. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  16. Comparison of the clinical effects of carbomer-based lipid-containing gel and hydroxypropyl-guar gel artificial tear formulations in patients with dry eye syndrome: a 4-week, prospective, open-label, randomized, parallel-group, noninferiority study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tsung-Jen; Wang, I-Jong; Ho, Jau-Der; Chou, Hsiu-Chu; Lin, Szu-Yuan; Huang, Man-Ching

    2010-01-01

    Most marketed artificial tears are substitutes for the aqueous layers of the tear film; therefore, frequent instillation of artificial tears is necessary. Newer gel-, cellulose-, and mineral oil-based formulations have been designed to overcome the disadvantages of current aqueous tear substitutes by offering prolonged retention times. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy, safety, and local tolerance of artificial tears containing carbomer-based lipids or hydroxypropyl (HP)-guar gel in patients with dry eye syndrome. A 4-week, prospective, randomized, parallel-group, comparative, noninferiority study was conducted at the Taipei Medical University Hospital (Taipei, Taiwan) in patients with dry eye syndrome who were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 treatment groups: the carbomer-based lipid-containing (CBLC) gel group and the HP-guar gel group. The primary end point was global assessment of study treatment by the patients at weeks 2 and 4. All patients met the diagnostic criteria of impaired tear function and ocular surface abnormalities. Outcomes measured at baseline and 2 and 4 weeks included Schirmer's test values, tear breakup time (TBUT), and a patient subjective assessment of symptoms. Safety and tolerability were assessed by clinically significant changes in terms of incidence of adverse events and conducted by unmasked investigators. A total of 30 Taiwanese patients with dry eye syndrome were included and randomly assigned to the 2 treatment groups: the mean (SD) age was 40.37 (14.96) years in the CBLC gel group and 49.49 (12.20) years in the HP-guar gel group. At baseline, the mean (SD) Schirmer's test value was 4.53 (2.28) mm in the right eye and 5.13 (2.42) mm in the left eye in the CBLC gel group; 4.40 (2.16) mm in the right eye and 4.20 (1.78) mm in the left eye for the HP-guar gel group. The mean (SD) for both eyes was 4.83 (2.36) mm in the CBLC gel group and 4.30 (2.08) mm in the HP-guar gel group. There was no statistically significant

  17. Comparison of efficacy, safety, and cost-effectiveness of rupatadine and olopatadine in patients of allergic rhinitis: A prospective, randomized, double-blind, parallel group study

    OpenAIRE

    Ganesh Dakhale; Yogesh Tathod; Seema Patel; Sonali Pimpalkhute; Latesh Raghute; Ajita Khamkar

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare the efficacy, safety, and cost-effectiveness of rupatadine and olopatadine in patients of allergic rhinitis (AR). Materials and Methods: A 2-week, single-centered, randomized, double-blind, parallel group comparative clinical study was conducted on patients with AR. Following inclusion and exclusion criteria, 67 patients were recruited and randomized to two treatment groups and received the respective drugs for 2 weeks. At follow-up, parameters assessed were total nasal ...

  18. The bicriterion multimodal assignment problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Christian Roed; Nielsen, Lars Relund; Andersen, Kim Allan

    2008-01-01

    We consider the bicriterion multimodal assignment problem, which is a new generalization of the classical linear assignment problem. A two-phase solution method using an effective ranking scheme is presented. The algorithm is valid for generating all nondominated criterion points or an approximat......We consider the bicriterion multimodal assignment problem, which is a new generalization of the classical linear assignment problem. A two-phase solution method using an effective ranking scheme is presented. The algorithm is valid for generating all nondominated criterion points...

  19. Ant Colony Algorithm and Simulation for Robust Airport Gate Assignment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Airport gate assignment is core task for airport ground operations. Due to the fact that the departure and arrival time of flights may be influenced by many random factors, the airport gate assignment scheme may encounter gate conflict and many other problems. This paper aims at finding a robust solution for airport gate assignment problem. A mixed integer model is proposed to formulate the problem, and colony algorithm is designed to solve this model. Simulation result shows that, in consideration of robustness, the ability of antidisturbance for airport gate assignment scheme has much improved.

  20. Improving anxiety regulation in patients with breast cancer at the beginning of the survivorship period: a randomized clinical trial comparing the benefits of single-component and multiple-component group interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merckaert, Isabelle; Lewis, Florence; Delevallez, France; Herman, Sophie; Caillier, Marie; Delvaux, Nicole; Libert, Yves; Liénard, Aurore; Nogaret, Jean-Marie; Ogez, David; Scalliet, Pierre; Slachmuylder, Jean-Louis; Van Houtte, Paul; Razavi, Darius

    2017-08-01

    To compare in a multicenter randomized controlled trial the benefits in terms of anxiety regulation of a 15-session single-component group intervention (SGI) based on support with those of a 15-session multiple-component structured manualized group intervention (MGI) combining support with cognitive-behavioral and hypnosis components. Patients with nonmetastatic breast cancer were randomly assigned at the beginning of the survivorship period to the SGI (n = 83) or MGI (n = 87). Anxiety regulation was assessed, before and after group interventions, through an anxiety regulation task designed to assess their ability to regulate anxiety psychologically (anxiety levels) and physiologically (heart rates). Questionnaires were used to assess psychological distress, everyday anxiety regulation, and fear of recurrence. Group allocation was computer generated and concealed till baseline completion. Compared with patients in the SGI group (n = 77), patients attending the MGI group (n = 82) showed significantly reduced anxiety after a self-relaxation exercise (P = .006) and after exposure to anxiety triggers (P = .013) and reduced heart rates at different time points throughout the task (P = .001 to P = .047). The MGI participants also reported better everyday anxiety regulation (P = .005), greater use of fear of recurrence-related coping strategies (P = .022), and greater reduction in fear of recurrence-related psychological distress (P = .017) compared with the SGI group. This study shows that an MGI combining support with cognitive-behavioral techniques and hypnosis is more effective than an SGI based only on support in improving anxiety regulation in patients with breast cancer. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Breastfeeding preterm infants - a randomized controlled trial of the effectiveness of an Internet-based peer-support group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niela-Vilén, Hannakaisa; Axelin, Anna; Melender, Hanna-Leena; Löyttyniemi, Eliisa; Salanterä, Sanna

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether an Internet-based peer-support intervention has an effect on the duration of breastfeeding or breast milk expression or maternal breastfeeding attitude compared with routine care in the mothers of preterm infants. In addition, the feasibility of the intervention was examined. A few peer-support interventions conducted face-to-face or by telephone have given promising results in promoting breastfeeding in preterm infants. A randomized controlled trial with a 1-year follow-up was conducted in one hospital in Finland in 2011-2015. Altogether 124 mothers of preterm (group. The intervention was a closed peer-support group in social media. Data were collected by structured questionnaires. Neonatal and breastfeeding data were collected from patient records. The duration of overall breastfeeding was on average 3·0 and 4·3 months, in the experimental and control groups respectively. The intervention had no effect on breastfeeding or expressing the breast milk or maternal breastfeeding attitude. A breastfeeding-favourable attitude and at least two previous children predicted longer duration of breastfeeding. Attitude-score decreased during the follow-up. The mothers in the experimental group enjoyed peer support, but only a few reported it as having some impact on breastfeeding. Although the Internet-based peer-support intervention had no effect, the importance of breastfeeding attitude for the duration of breastfeeding in mothers of preterm infants was shown. In future, interventions in social media should be studied more and attitude-focused interventions be developed. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Training the American Businessman for Foreign Assignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Philip R.; Harris, Dorothy L.

    1972-01-01

    Describes a program in cross cultural training for the American businessman about to go on foreign assignment which should increase employee effectiveness when serving outside one's own country or when working with minority groups within the United States." (Author/DR)

  3. A code reviewer assignment model incorporating the competence differences and participant preferences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Yanqing

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A good assignment of code reviewers can effectively utilize the intellectual resources, assure code quality and improve programmers’ skills in software development. However, little research on reviewer assignment of code review has been found. In this study, a code reviewer assignment model is created based on participants’ preference to reviewing assignment. With a constraint of the smallest size of a review group, the model is optimized to maximize review outcomes and avoid the negative impact of “mutual admiration society”. This study shows that the reviewer assignment strategies incorporating either the reviewers’ preferences or the authors’ preferences get much improvement than a random assignment. The strategy incorporating authors’ preference makes higher improvement than that incorporating reviewers’ preference. However, when the reviewers’ and authors’ preference matrixes are merged, the improvement becomes moderate. The study indicates that the majority of the participants have a strong wish to work with reviewers and authors having highest competence. If we want to satisfy the preference of both reviewers and authors at the same time, the overall improvement of learning outcomes may be not the best.

  4. A group-delivered self-management program reduces spasticity in people with multiple sclerosis: A randomized, controlled pilot trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdette, Dennis; Chen, Yiyi; Chen, Zunqiu; Cameron, Michelle

    2017-01-01

    Background Spasticity affects more than 80% of people with multiple sclerosis (MS), affecting activity, participation, and quality of life. Based on an international guideline, an MS spasticity group education and stretching program, MS Spasticity: Take Control (STC), has been developed. Objective The objective of this paper is to determine whether STC with home stretching is associated with greater changes in spasticity than usual care (UC), consisting of an illustrated stretching booklet and home stretching but without group instruction or support, in people with MS. Methods Ambulatory MS patients with self-reported spasticity interfering with daily activities were randomized to STC or UC. Individuals completed questionnaires regarding MS, spasticity, walking, fatigue and mood, and physical measures of spasticity and walking. Results Thirty-eight of 40 participants completed both assessments. Mean total score and scores on two subscales of the MS Spasticity Scale-88 improved more with STC than with UC (p spasticity more than UC and provided encouraging improvements in other measures. PMID:28607753

  5. A randomized trial assessing the impact of written information on outpatients' knowledge about and attitude toward randomized clinical trials. The Info Trial Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, A Y; Kjaergard, L L; Krogsgaard, K

    2000-01-01

    To improve the patient education process in clinical research, three information materials describing general aspects of design and conduct of randomized clinical trials were developed. The materials varied in length, reading ability level, and reader appeal. Their influence on knowledge about...... the total attitude score (4.8 points) and the randomized clinical trials attitude subscale score (1.8 points). In conclusion, written information significantly improved outpatients' knowledge about and attitude toward randomized clinical trials. Detailed rather than brief information was more effective...

  6. The pursuit of balance: An overview of covariate-adaptive randomization techniques in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yunzhi; Zhu, Ming; Su, Zheng

    2015-11-01

    Randomization is fundamental to the design and conduct of clinical trials. Simple randomization ensures independence among subject treatment assignments and prevents potential selection biases, yet it does not guarantee balance in covariate distributions across treatment groups. Ensuring balance in important prognostic covariates across treatment groups is desirable for many reasons. A broad class of randomization methods for achieving balance are reviewed in this paper; these include block randomization, stratified randomization, minimization, and dynamic hierarchical randomization. Practical considerations arising from experience with using the techniques are described. A review of randomization methods used in practice in recent randomized clinical trials is also provided. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. HealthWorks: results of a multi-component group-randomized worksite environmental intervention trial for weight gain prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linde Jennifer A

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background U.S. adults are at unprecedented risk of becoming overweight or obese, and most scientists believe the primary cause is an obesogenic environment. Worksites provide an opportunity to shape the environments of adults to reduce obesity risk. The goal of this group-randomized trial was to implement a four-component environmental intervention at the worksite level to positively influence weight gain among employees over a two-year period. Environmental components focused on food availability and price, physical activity promotion, scale access, and media enhancements. Methods Six worksites in a U.S. metropolitan area were recruited and randomized in pairs at the worksite level to either a two-year intervention or a no-contact control. Evaluations at baseline and two years included: 1 measured height and weight; 2 online surveys of individual dietary intake and physical activity behaviors; and 3 detailed worksite environment assessment. Results Mean participant age was 42.9 years (range 18-75, 62.6% were women, 68.5% were married or cohabiting, 88.6% were white, 2.1% Hispanic. Mean baseline BMI was 28.5 kg/m2 (range 16.9-61.2 kg/m2. A majority of intervention components were successfully implemented. However, there were no differences between sites in the key outcome of weight change over the two-year study period (p = .36. Conclusions Body mass was not significantly affected by environmental changes implemented for the trial. Results raise questions about whether environmental change at worksites is sufficient for population weight gain prevention. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00708461

  8. Alendronate prevents postmenopausal bone loss in women without osteoporosis. A double-blind, randomized, controlled trial. Alendronate Osteoporosis Prevention Study Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McClung, M; Clemmesen, B; Daifotis, A

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Preventing bone loss associated with menopause and aging and maintaining the normal micro-architecture of bone provide important opportunities for the prevention of osteoporosis and fractures. OBJECTIVE: To determine the safety and efficacy of alendronate, an aminobisphosphonate......, for preventing postmenopausal bone loss. DESIGN: 3-year double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial. SETTING: 15 osteoporosis centers throughout the world. PARTICIPANTS: 447 women who had recently experienced menopause (6 to 36 months before study entry). INTERVENTION: Participants were randomly assigned...... with biochemical markers and bone histomorphometry. RESULTS: Alendronate at 5, 10, and 20/0 mg/d increased bone mineral density from baseline at the lumbar spine, femoral neck, and trochanter by 1% to 4% and in the total body by 0.3% to 1.0%; placebo led to losses of 2% to 4% at these sites. Alendronate, 1 mg...

  9. First steps: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial of the effectiveness of the Group Family Nurse Partnership (gFNP) program compared to routine care in improving outcomes for high-risk mothers and their children and preventing abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Jacqueline; Aistrop, Dipti; Allen, Elizabeth; Barlow, Jane; Elbourne, Diana; Macdonald, Geraldine; Melhuish, Edward; Petrou, Stavros; Pink, Joshua; Snowdon, Claire; Spiby, Helen; Stuart, Jane; Sturgess, Joanna

    2013-09-08

    Evidence from the USA suggests that the home-based Family Nurse Partnership program (FNP), extending from early pregnancy until infants are 24 months, can reduce the risk of child abuse and neglect throughout childhood. FNP is now widely available in the UK. A new variant, Group Family Nurse Partnership (gFNP) offers similar content but in a group context and for a shorter time, until infants are 12 months old. Each group comprises 8 to 12 women with similar expected delivery dates and their partners. Its implementation has been established but there is no evidence of its effectiveness. The study comprises a multi-site randomized controlled trial designed to identify the benefits of gFNP compared to standard care. Participants (not eligible for FNP) must be either aged FNP and, in either age group, severe psychotic mental illness or not able to communicate in English. Consenting women are randomly allocated (minimized by site and maternal age group) when between 10 and 16 weeks pregnant to either to the 44 session gFNP program or to standard care after the collection of baseline information. Researchers are blind to group assignment.The primary outcomes at 12 months are child abuse potential based on the revised Adult-Adolescent Parenting Inventory and parent/infant interaction coded using the CARE Index based on a video-taped interaction. Secondary outcomes are maternal depression, parenting stress, health related quality of life, social support, and use of services. This is the first study of the effectiveness of gFNP in the UK. Results should inform decision-making about its delivery alongside universal services, potentially enabling a wider range of families to benefit from the FNP curriculum and approach to supporting parenting. ISRCTN78814904.

  10. Twelve-week, multicenter, placebo-controlled, randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, comparative phase II/III study of benzoyl peroxide gel in patients with acne vulgaris: A secondary publication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashima, Makoto; Sato, Shinichi; Furukawa, Fukumi; Matsunaga, Kayoko; Akamatsu, Hirohiko; Igarashi, Atsuyuki; Tsunemi, Yuichiro; Hayashi, Nobukazu; Yamamoto, Yuki; Nagare, Toshitaka; Katsuramaki, Tsuneo

    2017-07-01

    A placebo-controlled, randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, comparative, multicenter study was conducted to investigate the efficacy and safety of benzoyl peroxide (BPO) gel, administrated once daily for 12 weeks to Japanese patients with acne vulgaris. Efficacy was evaluated by counting all inflammatory and non-inflammatory lesions. Safety was evaluated based on adverse events, local skin tolerability scores and laboratory test values. All 609 subjects were randomly assigned to receive the study products (2.5% and 5% BPO and placebo), and 607 subjects were included in the full analysis set, 544 in the per protocol set and 609 in the safety analyses. The median rates of reduction from baseline to the last evaluation of the inflammatory lesion counts, the primary end-point, in the 2.5% and 5% BPO groups were 72.7% and 75.0%, respectively, and were significantly higher than that in the placebo group (41.7%). No deaths or other serious adverse events were observed. The incidences of adverse events in the 2.5% and 5% BPO groups were 56.4% and 58.8%, respectively; a higher incidence than in the placebo group, but there was no obvious difference between the 2.5% and 5% BPO groups. All adverse events were mild or moderate in severity. Most adverse events did not lead to study product discontinuation. The results suggested that both 2.5% and 5% BPO are useful for the treatment of acne vulgaris. © 2017 The Authors. The Journal of Dermatology published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  11. The Effects of Group-Based versus Individual-Based Tai Chi Training on Nonmotor Symptoms in Patients with Mild to Moderate Parkinson’s Disease: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Hui Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To compare the effects of group-based and individual-based Tai Chi training on nonmotor symptoms in patients with mild to moderate Parkinson’s disease. Design. Randomized controlled pilot study. Methods. 36 community-dwelling patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD were randomly assigned to either group-based training group (n=19 or individual-based group (n=17. Both groups received same content of Tai Chi training 3 times a week for 13 weeks. Participants were also asked to perform home exercises daily. The Non-Motor Symptoms Scale was used to assess global nonmotor symptoms change. Sleep quality, depression, and cognition were evaluated by Parkinson’s Disease Sleep Scale, Hamilton Depression Scale, and Beijing version-Montreal Cognitive Assessment, respectively. Home exercise compliance was recorded. Results. There was no significant difference between two groups at baseline. After 13 weeks, there were no statistical significance between two groups. However, the within-group effect was different. Participants in group-based and individual-based groups showed a significant improvement on global nonmotor symptoms (P<0.001, P=0.004 and sleep (P<0.001, P<0.001. But only group-based training patients presented a significant improvement in cognitive impairment compared with baseline (P=0.002, P-0.116. For depression, no group gained a significant improvement(P=0.123, P=0.170. Group-based participants had a higher home-exercise compliance rate (HeCR than individual-based participants did (P=0.019, and HeCR showed a moderate correlation with MoCA-BJ and NMSS scores changes in this study. Conclusion. Group-based Tai Chi training is considered to be a more effective and a more labor-saving method in the clinical settings, and patients tend to have a higher compliance rate in their home exercise program. This study is registered with ChiCTR-IPR-17010388.

  12. A group randomized controlled trial integrating obesity prevention and control for postpartum adolescents in a home visiting program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haire-Joshu, Debra L; Schwarz, Cynthia D; Peskoe, Sarah B; Budd, Elizabeth L; Brownson, Ross C; Joshu, Corinne E

    2015-06-26

    Adolescence represents a critical period for the development of overweight that tracks into adulthood. This risk is significantly heightened for adolescents that become pregnant, many of whom experience postpartum weight retention. The aim of this study was to evaluate Balance Adolescent Lifestyle Activities and Nutrition Choices for Energy (BALANCE), a multicomponent obesity prevention intervention targeting postpartum adolescents participating in a national home visiting child development-parent education program. A group randomized, nested cohort design was used with 1325 adolescents, 694 intervention and 490 control, (mean age = 17.8 years, 52 % underrepresented minorities) located across 30 states. Participatory methods were used to integrate lifestyle behavior change strategies within standard parent education practice. Content targeted replacement of high-risk obesogenic patterns (e.g. sweetened drink and high fat snack consumption, sedentary activity) with positive behaviors (e.g. water intake, fruit and vegetables, increased walking). Parent educators delivered BALANCE through home visits, school based classroom-group meetings, and website activities. Control adolescents received standard child development information. Phase I included baseline to posttest (12 months); Phase II included baseline to follow-up (24 months). When compared to the control group, BALANCE adolescents who were ≥12 weeks postpartum were 89 % more likely (p = 0.02) to maintain a normal BMI or improve an overweight/obese BMI by 12 months; this change was not sustained at 24 months. When compared to the control group, BALANCE adolescents significantly improved fruit and vegetable intake (p = .03). In stratified analyses, water intake improved among younger BALANCE teens (p = .001) and overweight/obese BALANCE teens (p = .05) when compared to control counterparts. There were no significant differences between groups in sweetened drink and snack consumption

  13. The Effect of the Posture of the “Hermit Doing Body Contortion” on Relief of Shoulder and Scapular Pain Caused by Chronic Myofascial Pain Syndrome: A Randomized, Parallel Group, Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peamruetai Butdapan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the ability of the posture of the “Hermit Doing Body Contortion” (HDBC to relieve shoulder and scapular pain in patients with chronic myofascial pain syndrome (MPS. Methods: One hundred and thirty-six out-patients with chronic MPS were randomly assigned to one of two groups. The experimental group was advised to perform a posture of the HDBC named “posture for relieving abdominal pain, pain of the scapular blade” (PRASP every day for two months. Both groups received Thai traditional massage treatment and hot herbal compresses once a week for four weeks. Using a numeric rating scale and dolorimeter, outcomes were assessed prior to commencing the intervention (M0 , and one and two months after commencing the intervention (M1 and M2 . Results: The mean change in pain intensity between M1 and M2 differed significantly between the groups (1.32±1.45 in the experimental group and 0.47±2.26 in the control group; p = 0.039. Similarly, the mean change in pressure pain threshold between M0 and M2 also differed significantly between the groups (1.39±1.76 in the experimental group and 0.53±1.90 in the control group; p =0.027. In both cases, the experimental group achieved greater pain relief. Conclusion: In patients with chronic MPS, the posture of the HDBC combined with standard Thai traditional medicine treatments provided better ongoing relief of shoulder and scapular pain than did standard Thai traditional medicine treatments alone. Clinical trial registration no.: TCTR20151230002

  14. Factors Affecting the Attractiveness of a Group Leader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Jay; Loganbill, Carol R.

    1983-01-01

    Studied the effects of a leader's self-disclosure and nonverbal behaviors on student group members' (N=40) perceptions of leader attractiveness. Students participated in one of four randomly assigned groups and rated a videotaped group leader. Results showed that high levels of self-disclosure had a significant positive effect on leader…

  15. Scaffolding learners in designing investigation assignments for a computer simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vreman-de Olde, Cornelise; de Jong, Anthonius J.M.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the effect of scaffolding students who learned by designing assignments for a computer simulation on the physics topic of alternating circuits. We compared the students' assignments and the knowledge acquired in a scaffolded group (N=23) and a non-scaffolded group (N=19). The

  16. Integrated assignment and path planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphey, Robert A.

    2005-11-01

    A surge of interest in unmanned systems has exposed many new and challenging research problems across many fields of engineering and mathematics. These systems have the potential of transforming our society by replacing dangerous and dirty jobs with networks of moving machines. This vision is fundamentally separate from the modern view of robotics in that sophisticated behavior is realizable not by increasing individual vehicle complexity, but instead through collaborative teaming that relies on collective perception, abstraction, decision making, and manipulation. Obvious examples where collective robotics will make an impact include planetary exploration, space structure assembly, remote and undersea mining, hazardous material handling and clean-up, and search and rescue. Nonetheless, the phenomenon driving this technology trend is the increasing reliance of the US military on unmanned vehicles, specifically, aircraft. Only a few years ago, following years of resistance to the use of unmanned systems, the military and civilian leadership in the United States reversed itself and have recently demonstrated surprisingly broad acceptance of increasingly pervasive use of unmanned platforms in defense surveillance, and even attack. However, as rapidly as unmanned systems have gained acceptance, the defense research community has discovered the technical pitfalls that lie ahead, especially for operating collective groups of unmanned platforms. A great deal of talent and energy has been devoted to solving these technical problems, which tend to fall into two categories: resource allocation of vehicles to objectives, and path planning of vehicle trajectories. An extensive amount of research has been conducted in each direction, yet, surprisingly, very little work has considered the integrated problem of assignment and path planning. This dissertation presents a framework for studying integrated assignment and path planning and then moves on to suggest an exact

  17. Peer support and additional information in group medical consultations (GMCs) for BRCA1/2 mutation carriers: A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Annemiek; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W. M.; Woldringh, Gwendolyn H.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Prins, Judith B.

    2016-01-01

    Group medical consultations (GMCs) provide individual medical visits in the presence of ≤ 7 peer- patients. This study evaluated the efficacy of GMCs in the yearly breast cancer surveillance of BRCA mutation carriers. This randomized controlled trial compared GMCs (intervention group, n = 63) with

  18. Group and Individual Treatment of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Using Cognitive Therapy and Exposure Plus Response Prevention: A 2-Year Follow-Up of Two Randomized Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittal, Maureen L.; Robichaud, Melisa; Thordarson, Dana S.; McLean, Peter D.

    2008-01-01

    Relatively little is known about the long-term durability of group treatments for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and contemporary cognitive treatments. The current study investigated the 2-year follow-up results for participants who completed randomized trials of group or individual treatment and received either cognitive therapy (CT) or…

  19. Feedback versus no feedback to improve patient outcome in group psychotherapy for eating disorders (F-EAT): A randomized clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Annika Helgadóttir; Waaddegaard, Mette; Poulsen, Stig Bernt

    Background: A high rate of dropout in the treatment of eating disorders calls for ways to improve treatment attendance. Research indicates that continuous feedback on patient improvement and the therapeutic alliance reduces the number of dropouts and increases patient outcome. There are, however......, only three published randomized trials on the effect of feedback on the treatment of eating disorders showing inconclusive results, and there are no randomized trials on the effect of feedback in group therapy. Objective: The current randomized clinical trial aims to investigate the impact......: Standard treatment (systemic and narrative group psychotherapy) with feedback intervention using the Outcome Rating Scale (ORS) and Group Session Rating Scale (GSRS), or the control group: Standard treatment only. The primary outcome is rate of attendance. Secondary outcome is severity of eating disorder...

  20. The Family Startup Program: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial of a universal group-based parenting support program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trillingsgaard, Tea; Maimburg, Rikke Damkjær; Simonsen, Marianne

    2015-04-21

    Inadequate parenting is an important public health problem with possible severe and long-term consequences related to child development. We have solid theoretical and political arguments in favor of efforts enhancing the quality of the early family environment in the population at large. However, little is known about effect of universal approaches to parenting support during the transition to parenthood. This protocol describes an experimental evaluation of group based parenting support, the Family Startup Program (FSP), currently implemented large scale in Denmark. Participants will be approximately 2500 pregnant women and partners. Inclusion criteria are parental age above 18 and the mother expecting first child. Families are recruited when attending routine pregnancy scans provided as a part of the publicly available prenatal care program at Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby. Families are randomized within four geographically defined strata to one of two conditions a) participation in FSP or b) Treatment As Usual (TAU). FSP aims to prepare new families for their roles as parents and enhance parental access to informal sources of support, i.e. social network and community resources. The program consists of twelve group sessions, with nine families in each group, continuing from pregnancy until the child is 15 months old. TAU is the publicly available pre- and postnatal care available to families in both conditions. Analyses will employ survey data, administrative data from health visitors, and administrative register based data from Statistics Denmark. All data sources will be linked via the unique Danish Civil Registration Register (CPR) identifier. Data will be obtained at four time points, during pregnancy, when the child is nine months, 18 months and seven years. The primary study outcome is measured by the Parenting Sense of Competence scale (PSOC) J Clin Child Psychol 18:167-75, 1989. Other outcomes include parenting and couple relationship quality

  1. Addressing behavioral impacts of childhood leukemia: A feasibility pilot randomized controlled trial of a group videoconferencing parenting intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Lauren K; McCarthy, Maria C; Burke, Kylie; Anderson, Vicki; Rinehart, Nicole

    2016-10-01

    Child emotional and behavioral problems constitute significant sequelae of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) treatment. The aims of this study were to a) examine the feasibility, acceptability and satisfaction of a parenting intervention amongst parents of children with ALL and b) explore whether participation in a parenting intervention shows promise for improvements in child behavior. 12 parents with a child aged between 2 and 8 years receiving maintenance phase treatment for ALL participated in a phase 2 randomized controlled trial comparing eight weeks of group online participation in Triple P: Positive Parenting Program with no intervention. The number of eligible parents who completed the intervention was low (31.6%). Main reasons for non-consent or dropout were program time commitment too high or content not relevant. For parents who completed the intervention, satisfaction and acceptability was high. Parents reported the intervention as highly relevant and topical, feasible, helpful and a positive experience. Results indicated a non-significant trend towards improved total child behavioral and emotional difficulties following the intervention. Qualitative results indicated that intervention group parents reported improvements in parenting skills and competence, and decreased child behavioral problems. These pilot data highlight the difficulties of engaging and retaining parents in an 8-week parenting intervention in this context. For parents who completed the intervention, results indicated high feasibility, acceptability and satisfaction. Suggestions for further research and intervention modifications are provided to enhance uptake and strengthen efforts to assist parents in addressing child behavioral and emotional challenges during ALL treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Culturally appropriate health education for Type 2 diabetes in ethnic minority groups: an updated Cochrane Review of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creamer, J; Attridge, M; Ramsden, M; Cannings-John, R; Hawthorne, K

    2016-02-01

    To give an updated perspective of interventions from additional data collected since our first review, conducted in 2008. This updated Cochrane Review incorporates new information from recent randomized controlled trials on culturally appropriate diabetes health education interventions. An electronic literature search of six databases was repeated, with databases of ongoing trials checked and three journals hand-searched. Meta-analysis was carried out for sufficiently homogeneous outcomes, and common themes among trials were highlighted. A total of 22 new trials were added to the original 11. Meta-analysis of 28 trials containing suitable data showed significant improvements in glycaemic control (HbA1c ) and diabetes knowledge over a period of 24 months, after the delivery of culturally appropriate education to participants, compared with those receiving 'conventional' care. There were no consistent benefits over the control group in other selected outcome measures, and lack of data continued to make analysis of several outcome measures difficult. Research activity in this field has increased considerably over the past 6 years, with culturally appropriate diabetes education showing consistent benefits over conventional care in terms of glycaemic control and diabetes knowledge, sustained in the short- to mid-term. Further research is needed to determine the clinical significance of these improvements and their cost-effectiveness. © 2015 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2015 Diabetes UK.

  3. Improving Nutrition and Physical Activity Policies in Afterschool Programs: Results from a Group-Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, Erica L.; Giles, Catherine M.; deBlois, Madeleine E.; Gortmaker, Steven L.; Chinfatt, Sherene; Cradock, Angie L.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Afterschool programs can be health-promoting environments for children. Written policies positively influence nutrition and physical activity (PA) environments, but effective strategies for building staff capacity to write such policies have not been evaluated. This study measures the comprehensiveness of written nutrition, PA, and screen time policies in afterschool programs and assesses impact of the Out of School Nutrition and Physical Activity (OSNAP) intervention on key policies. METHODS Twenty afterschool programs in Boston, MA participated in a group-randomized, controlled trial from September 2010 to June 2011. Intervention program staff attended learning collaboratives focused on practice and policy change. The Out-of-School Time (OST) Policy Assessment Index evaluated written policies. Inter-rater reliability and construct validity of the measure and impact of the intervention on written policies were assessed. RESULTS The measure demonstrated moderate to excellent inter-rater reliability (Spearman’s r=0.53 to 0.97) and construct validity. OSNAP was associated with significant increases in standards-based policy statements surrounding snacks (+2.6, p=0.003), beverages (+2.3, p=0.008), screen time (+0.8, p=0.046), family communication (+2.2, p=0.002), and a summary index of OSNAP goals (+3.3, p=0.02). CONCLUSIONS OSNAP demonstrated success in building staff capacity to write health-promoting policy statements. Future research should focus on determining policy change impact on practices. PMID:24941286

  4. Intraocular pressure-lowering effects of latanoprost monotherapy versus latanoprost or pilocarpine in combination with timolol: a randomized, observer-masked multicenter study in patients with open-angle glaucoma. Italian Latanoprost Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucci, M G

    1999-02-01

    To compare intraocular pressure (IOP) after adding either latanoprost or pilocarpine to timolol treatment or switching to latanoprost monotherapy in glaucomatous eyes in which IOP was inadequately controlled with timolol. This 6-month randomized study comprised 148 patients with primary open-angle or pseudoexfoliation glaucoma, which was inadequately controlled with topical beta-adrenergic antagonists. After a 2- to 4-week run-in period with timolol 0.5% twice daily, patients were assigned in randomized fashion to three study groups: one group received add-on therapy of latanoprost 0.005% once daily, the second group received add-on therapy of pilocarpine 2% three times daily, and the third group switched to latanoprost 0.005% once daily. Mean diurnal IOP was measured at baseline and after 3 and 6 months of treatment. At 6 months, 128 patients had completed the study. Diurnal IOP was significantly reduced from baseline in all groups. Adding latanoprost to timolol treatment reduced diurnal IOP by 6.1+/-0.3 mmHg (-28%), adding pilocarpine to timolol treatment reduced diurnal IOP by 4.2+/-0.3 mmHg (-19%), and switching from timolol to latanoprost monotherapy reduced diurnal IOP by 5.5+/-0.3 mmHg (-25%). A significantly greater reduction in diurnal IOP was achieved after addition of latanoprost than after addition of pilocarpine in patients in whom IOP was not adequately controlled with timolol alone. Further, the results of this study indicate that a switch to latanoprost monotherapy can be attempted before combination treatment is initiated.

  5. The Effect of Group Discussion-based Education on Self-management of Adults with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Compared with Usual Care: A Randomized Control Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibzadeh, Hosein; Sofiani, Akbar; Alilu, Leyla; Gillespie, Mark

    2017-11-01

    We sought to determine the effect of group discussion-based education on the self-management capability of patients with type 2 diabetes in Iran. This randomized control trial was conducted on 90 patients with type 2 diabetes. Participants were allocated randomly into one of two groups; intervention and control. The intervention group received the group discussion-based education while the control group received routine care only. The Lin's self-management questionnaire was completed at baseline and three months post-intervention. Statistical analysis, including the use of independent t-test, identified that in comparison to the control group, significant increases were observed in the scores of self-organization (t =11.24, p self-adjustment (t = 7.53, p self-monitoring (t = 6.42, p self-management (t = 10.82, p self-manage diabetes.

  6. Game theory and traffic assignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Traffic assignment is used to determine the number of users on roadway links in a network. While this problem has : been widely studied in transportation literature, its use of the concept of equilibrium has attracted considerable interest : in the f...

  7. An Assignment Sequence for Underprepared Writers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimmo, Kristi

    2000-01-01

    Presents a sequenced writing assignment on shopping to aid basic writers. Describes a writing assignment focused around online and mail-order shopping. Notes steps in preparing for the assignment, the sequence, and discusses responses to the assignments. (SC)

  8. Do Reported Effects of Acute Aerobic Exercise on Subsequent Higher Cognitive Performances Remain if Tested against an Instructed Self-Myofascial Release Training Control Group? A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max Oberste

    Full Text Available A substantial body of evidence suggests positive effects of acute aerobic exercise (AAE on subsequent higher cognitive functions in healthy young adults. These effects are widely understood as a result of the ongoing physiological adaptation processes induced by the preceding AAE. However, designs of published studies do not control for placebo, Hawthorne and subject expectancy effects. Therefore, these studies do not, at a high degree of validity, allow attributing effects of AEE on subsequent cognitive performance to exercise induced physical arousal. In the present study, we applied a randomized controlled blinded experiment to provide robust evidence for a physiological basis of exercise induced cognitive facilitation. Beyond that, the dose response relationship between AAE`s intensity and subsequent cognitive performances as well as a potentially mediating role of peripheral lactate in AAE induced cognitive facilitation was investigated. The 121 healthy young subjects who participated in this study were assigned randomly into 3 exercise groups and a self-myofascial release training control group. Exercise groups comprised a low, moderate and high intensity condition in which participants cycled on an ergometer at a heart rate corresponding to 45-50%, 65-70% and 85-90% of their individual maximum heart rate, respectively, for 35 minutes. Participants assigned to the control group completed a 35 minute instructed self-massage intervention using a foam roll. Before and after treatment, participants completed computer based versions of the Stroop task and the Trail Making Test as well as a free recall task. None of the applied exercise regimes exerted a significant effect on participants`performance at any of the applied cognitive testing procedure if compared to self-myofascial release training control group. Post hoc power analyses revealed no effect in the population of f = .2 or larger at a risk of type II error (β ≤.183 for all measured

  9. Do Reported Effects of Acute Aerobic Exercise on Subsequent Higher Cognitive Performances Remain if Tested against an Instructed Self-Myofascial Release Training Control Group? A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberste, Max; Bloch, Wilhelm; Hübner, Sven T; Zimmer, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    A substantial body of evidence suggests positive effects of acute aerobic exercise (AAE) on subsequent higher cognitive functions in healthy young adults. These effects are widely understood as a result of the ongoing physiological adaptation processes induced by the preceding AAE. However, designs of published studies do not control for placebo, Hawthorne and subject expectancy effects. Therefore, these studies do not, at a high degree of validity, allow attributing effects of AEE on subsequent cognitive performance to exercise induced physical arousal. In the present study, we applied a randomized controlled blinded experiment to provide robust evidence for a physiological basis of exercise induced cognitive facilitation. Beyond that, the dose response relationship between AAE`s intensity and subsequent cognitive performances as well as a potentially mediating role of peripheral lactate in AAE induced cognitive facilitation was investigated. The 121 healthy young subjects who participated in this study were assigned randomly into 3 exercise groups and a self-myofascial release training control group. Exercise groups comprised a low, moderate and high intensity condition in which participants cycled on an ergometer at a heart rate corresponding to 45-50%, 65-70% and 85-90% of their individual maximum heart rate, respectively, for 35 minutes. Participants assigned to the control group completed a 35 minute instructed self-massage intervention using a foam roll. Before and after treatment, participants completed computer based versions of the Stroop task and the Trail Making Test as well as a free recall task. None of the applied exercise regimes exerted a significant effect on participants`performance at any of the applied cognitive testing procedure if compared to self-myofascial release training control group. Post hoc power analyses revealed no effect in the population of f = .2 or larger at a risk of type II error (β) ≤.183 for all measured variables. Our

  10. Whole body and local cryotherapy in restless legs syndrome: A randomized, single-blind, controlled parallel group pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happe, Svenja; Evers, Stefan; Thiedemann, Christian; Bunten, Sabine; Siegert, Rudolf

    2016-11-15

    Treatment of restless legs syndrome (RLS) is primarily based on drugs. Since many patients report improvement of symptoms due to cooling their legs, we examined the efficacy of cryotherapy in RLS. 35 patients (28 women, 60.9±12.5years) with idiopathic RLS and symptoms starting not later than 6pm were randomized into three groups: cold air chamber at -60°C (n=12); cold air chamber at -10°C (n=12); local cryotherapy at -17°C (n=11). After a two week baseline, the different therapies were applied three minutes daily at 6pm over two weeks, followed by a four week observation period. The patients completed several questionnaires regarding RLS symptoms, sleep, and quality of life on a weekly basis (IRLS, ESS), VAS and sleep/morning protocol were completed daily, MOSS/RLS-QLI were completed once in each period. Additionally, the PLM index was measured by a mobile device at the end of baseline, intervention, and follow-up. The IRLS score was chosen as primary efficacy parameter. At the end of follow-up, significant improvement of RLS symptoms and quality of life could be observed only in the -60°C group as compared to baseline (IRLS: p=0.009; RLS-QLI: p=0.006; ESS: p=0.020). Local cryotherapy led to improvement in quality of life (VAS4: p=0.028; RLS-QLI: p=0.014) and sleep quality (MOSS: p=0.020; MOSS2: p=0.022) but not in IRLS and ESS. In the -10°C group, the only significant effect was shortening of number of wake phases per night. Serious side-effects were not reported. Whole body cryotherapy at -60°C and, to a less extent, local cryotherapy seem to be a treatment option for RLS in addition to conventional pharmacological treatment. However, the exact mode of cryotherapy needs to be established. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Sleep improvement for restless legs syndrome patients. Part III: effect of treatment assignment belief on sleep improvement in restless legs syndrome patients. A mediation analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burbank F

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Fred Burbank Director, Salt Creek International Women's Health Foundation, San Clemente, CA, USA Purpose: Two parallel-design, randomized, sham-controlled clinical trials were conducted to study the safety and efficacy of vibratory stimulation (VS on restless legs syndrome (RLS patients (Part I of this series of articles. Pooled data from the two studies was retroactively analyzed to compare the relative effects of actual pad assignment with therapeutic pad assignment belief on sleep improvement for patients with RLS. Patients and methods: One hundred fifty-eight patients with at least moderately severe RLS, as measured by a score of 15 points or greater on the International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group rating scale (IRLS, were enrolled in the study. Patients were randomly assigned to treatment (patient-controlled vibration or sham (patient-controlled sound or light-emitting pads. Patients and clinicians were blinded to pad assignment. The pad was placed under the patient's legs while in bed at night and activated during an RLS episode. Improvements in Medical Outcomes Study Sleep Problems Index II (MOS-II scores from baseline to week 4 were examined as a function of pad assignment (independent variable and therapeutic pad assignment belief held by each patient (mediator variable through mediation analysis. Results: Therapeutic pad assignment belief influenced change in MOS-II scores more than actual pad assignment. Patients who believed they had been assigned a therapeutic pad had substantially greater sleep improvement than those who concluded the opposite. When a patient believed that a therapeutic pad had been assigned, sleep improvement was comparable in magnitude, independent of the type of pad assigned (vibrating or sham. Patients assigned vibrating pads believed that they had been assigned a therapeutic pad 2.6 times more frequently than patients assigned sham pads. Consequently, vibrating pads were more efficient at improving

  12. Cardioprotection and Safety of Dexrazoxane in Patients Treated for Newly Diagnosed T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Advanced-Stage Lymphoblastic Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: A Report of the Children’s Oncology Group Randomized Trial Pediatric Oncology Group 9404

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devidas, Meenakshi; Chen, Lu; Franco, Vivian I.; Pullen, Jeanette; Borowitz, Michael J.; Hutchison, Robert E.; Ravindranath, Yaddanapudi; Armenian, Saro H.; Camitta, Bruce M.; Lipshultz, Steven E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine the oncologic efficacy, cardioprotective effectiveness, and safety of dexrazoxane added to chemotherapy that included a cumulative doxorubicin dose of 360 mg/m2 to treat children and adolescents with newly diagnosed T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) or lymphoblastic non-Hodgkin lymphoma (L-NHL). Patients and Methods Patients were treated on Pediatric Oncology Group Protocol POG 9404, which included random assignment to treatment with or without dexrazoxane given as a bolus infusion immediately before every dose of doxorubicin. Cardiac effects were assessed by echocardiographic measurements of left ventricular function and structure. Results Of 573 enrolled patients, 537 were eligible, evaluable, and randomly assigned to an arm with or without dexrazoxane. The 5-year event-free survival (with standard error) did not differ between groups: 76.7% (2.7%) for the dexrazoxane group versus 76.0% (2.7%) for the doxorubicin-only group (P = .9). The frequencies of severe grade 3 or 4 hematologic toxicity, infection, CNS events, and toxic deaths were similar in both groups (P ranged from .26 to .64). Of 11 second malignancies, eight occurred in patients who received dexrazoxane (P = .17). The mean left ventricular fractional shortening, wall thickness, and thickness-to-dimension ratio z scores measured 3 years after diagnosis were worse in the doxorubicin-alone group (n = 55 per group; P ≤ .01 for all comparisons). Mean fractional shortening z scores measured 3.5 to 6.4 years after diagnosis remained diminished and were lower in the 21 patients who received doxorubicin alone than in the 31 patients who received dexrazoxane (−2.03 v −0.24; P ≤ .001). Conclusion Dexrazoxane was cardioprotective and did not compromise antitumor efficacy, did not increase the frequencies of toxicities, and was not associated with a significant increase in second malignancies with this doxorubicin-containing chemotherapy regimen. We recommend dexrazoxane as a

  13. Game-Based Learning as a Vehicle to Teach First Aid Content: A Randomized Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlier, Nathalie; De Fraine, Bieke

    2013-01-01

    Background: Knowledge of first aid (FA), which constitutes lifesaving treatments for injuries or illnesses, is important for every individual. In this study, we have set up a group-randomized controlled trial to assess the effectiveness of a board game for learning FA. Methods: Four class groups (120 students) were randomly assigned to 2…

  14. Adverse prognostic value of peritumoral vascular invasion: is it abrogated by adequate endocrine adjuvant therapy? Results from two International Breast Cancer Study Group randomized trials of chemoendocrine adjuvant therapy for early breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viale, G.; Giobbie-Hurder, A.; Gusterson, B. A.; Maiorano, E.; Mastropasqua, M. G.; Sonzogni, A.; Mallon, E.; Colleoni, M.; Castiglione-Gertsch, M.; Regan, M. M.; Brown, R. W.; Golouh, R.; Crivellari, D.; Karlsson, P.; Öhlschlegel, C.; Gelber, R. D.; Goldhirsch, A.; Coates, A. S.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Peritumoral vascular invasion (PVI) may assist in assigning optimal adjuvant systemic therapy for women with early breast cancer. Patients and methods: Patients participated in two International Breast Cancer Study Group randomized trials testing chemoendocrine adjuvant therapies in premenopausal (trial VIII) or postmenopausal (trial IX) node-negative breast cancer. PVI was assessed by institutional pathologists and/or central review on hematoxylin–eosin-stained slides in 99% of patients (analysis cohort 2754 patients, median follow-up >9 years). Results: PVI, present in 23% of the tumors, was associated with higher grade tumors and larger tumor size (trial IX only). Presence of PVI increased locoregional and distant recurrence and was significantly associated with poorer disease-free survival. The adverse prognostic impact of PVI in trial VIII was limited to premenopausal patients with endocrine-responsive tumors randomized to therapies not containing goserelin, and conversely the beneficial effect of goserelin was limited to patients whose tumors showed PVI. In trial IX, all patients received tamoxifen: the adverse prognostic impact of PVI was limited to patients with receptor-negative tumors regardless of chemotherapy. Conclusion: Adequate endocrine adjuvant therapy appears to abrogate the adverse impact of PVI in node-negative disease, while PVI may identify patients who will benefit particularly from adjuvant therapy. PMID:19633051

  15. Random forest estimation of genomic breeding values for disease susceptibility over different disease incidences and genomic architectures in simulated cow calibration groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naderi, S; Yin, T; König, S

    2016-09-01

    A simulation study was conducted to investigate the performance of random forest (RF) and genomic BLUP (GBLUP) for genomic predictions of binary disease traits based on cow calibration groups. Training and testing sets were modified in different scenarios according to disease incidence, the quantitative-genetic background of the trait (h(2)=0.30 and h(2)=0.10), and the genomic architecture [725 quantitative trait loci (QTL) and 290 QTL, populations with high and low levels of linkage disequilibrium (LD)]. For all scenarios, 10,005 SNP (depicting a low-density 10K SNP chip) and 50,025 SNP (depicting a 50K SNP chip) were evenly spaced along 29 chromosomes. Training and testing sets included 20,000 cows (4,000 sick, 16,000 healthy, disease incidence 20%) from the last 2 generations. Initially, 4,000 sick cows were assigned to the testing set, and the remaining 16,000 healthy cows represented the training set. In the ongoing allocation schemes, the number of sick cows in the training set increased stepwise by moving 10% of the sick animals from the testing set to the training set, and vice versa. The size of the training and testing sets was kept constant. Evaluation criteria for both GBLUP and RF were the correlations between genomic breeding values and true breeding values (prediction accuracy), and the area under the receiving operating characteristic curve (AUROC). Prediction accuracy and AUROC increased for both methods and all scenarios as increasing percentages of sick cows were allocated to the training set. Highest prediction accuracies were observed for disease incidences in training sets that reflected the population disease incidence of 0.20. For this allocation scheme, the largest prediction accuracies of 0.53 for RF and of 0.51 for GBLUP, and the largest AUROC of 0.66 for RF and of 0.64 for GBLUP, were achieved using 50,025 SNP, a heritability of 0.30, and 725 QTL. Heritability decreases from 0.30 to 0.10 and QTL reduction from 725 to 290 were associated

  16. Effect of bright light and melatonin on cognitive and noncognitive function in elderly residents of group care facilities: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riemersma-van der Lek, Rixt F; Swaab, Dick F; Twisk, Jos; Hol, Elly M; Hoogendijk, Witte J G; Van Someren, Eus J W

    2008-06-11

    Cognitive decline, mood, behavioral and sleep disturbances, and limitations of activities of daily living commonly burden elderly patients with dementia and their caregivers. Circadian rhythm disturbances have been associated with these symptoms. To determine whether the progression of cognitive and noncognitive symptoms may be ameliorated by individual or combined long-term application of the 2 major synchronizers of the circadian timing system: bright light and melatonin. A long-term, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 2 x 2 factorial randomized trial performed from 1999 to 2004 with 189 residents of 12 group care facilities in the Netherlands; mean (SD) age, 85.8 (5.5) years; 90% were female and 87% had dementia. Random assignment by facility to long-term daily treatment with whole-day bright (+/- 1000 lux) or dim (+/- 300 lux) light and by participant to evening melatonin (2.5 mg) or placebo for a mean (SD) of 15 (12) months (maximum period of 3.5 years). Standardized scales for cognitive and noncognitive symptoms, limitations of activities of daily living, and adverse effects assessed every 6 months. Light attenuated cognitive deterioration by a mean of 0.9 points (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.04-1.71) on the Mini-Mental State Examination or a relative 5%. Light also ameliorated depressive symptoms by 1.5 points (95% CI, 0.24-2.70) on the Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia or a relative 19%, and attenuated the increase in functional limitations over time by 1.8 points per year (95% CI, 0.61-2.92) on the nurse-informant activities of daily living scale or a relative 53% difference. Melatonin shortened sleep onset latency by 8.2 minutes (95% CI, 1.08-15.38) or 19% and increased sleep duration by 27 minutes (95% CI, 9-46) or 6%. However, melatonin adversely affected scores on the Philadelphia Geriatric Centre Affect Rating Scale, both for positive affect (-0.5 points; 95% CI, -0.10 to -1.00) and negative affect (0.8 points; 95% CI, 0.20-1.44). Melatonin

  17. A tracked approach for automated NMR assignments in proteins (TATAPRO)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atreya, H.S.; Sahu, S.C.; Chary, K.V.R.; Govil, Girjesh [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Department of Chemical Sciences (India)

    2000-06-15

    A novel automated approach for the sequence specific NMR assignments of {sup 1}H{sup N}, {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}}, {sup 13}C{sup {beta}}, {sup 13}C'/{sup 1}H{sup {alpha}} and {sup 15}N spins in proteins, using triple resonance experimental data, is presented. The algorithm, TATAPRO (Tracked AuTomated Assignments in Proteins) utilizes the protein primary sequence and peak lists from a set of triple resonance spectra which correlate {sup 1}H{sup N} and {sup 15}N chemical shifts with those of {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}}, {sup 13}C{sup {beta}} and {sup 13}C'/{sup 1}H{sup {alpha}}. The information derived from such correlations is used to create a 'master{sub l}ist' consisting of all possible sets of {sup 1}H{sup N}{sub i}, {sup 15}N{sub i}, {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}}{sub i}, {sup 13}C{sup {beta}}{sub i}, {sup 13}C'{sub i}/{sup 1}H{sup {alpha}}{sub i}, {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}}{sub i-1}, {sup 13}C{sup {beta}}{sub i-1} and {sup 13}C'{sub i-1}/ {sup 1}H{sup {alpha}}{sub i-1} chemical shifts. On the basis of an extensive statistical analysis of {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} and {sup 13}C{sup {beta}} chemical shift data of proteins derived from the BioMagResBank (BMRB), it is shown that the 20 amino acid residues can be grouped into eight distinct categories, each of which is assigned a unique two-digit code. Such a code is used to tag individual sets of chemical shifts in the master{sub l}ist and also to translate the protein primary sequence into an array called pps{sub a}rray. The program then uses the master{sub l}ist to search for neighbouring partners of a given amino acid residue along the polypeptide chain and sequentially assigns a maximum possible stretch of residues on either side. While doing so, each assigned residue is tracked in an array called assig{sub a}rray, with the two-digit code assigned earlier. The assig{sub a}rray is then mapped onto the pps{sub a}rray for sequence specific resonance assignment. The program has been tested using

  18. Protein Side-Chain Resonance Assignment and NOE Assignment Using RDC-Defined Backbones without TOCSY Data3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jianyang; Zhou, Pei; Donald, Bruce Randall

    2011-01-01

    One bottleneck in NMR structure determination lies in the laborious and time-consuming process of side-chain resonance and NOE assignments. Compared to the well-studied backbone resonance assignment problem, automated side-chain resonance and NOE assignments are relatively less explored. Most NOE assignment algorithms require nearly complete side-chain resonance assignments from a series of through-bond experiments such as HCCH-TOCSY or HCCCONH. Unfortunately, these TOCSY experiments perform poorly on large proteins. To overcome this deficiency, we present a novel algorithm, called NASCA (NOE Assignment and Side-Chain Assignment), to automate both side-chain resonance and NOE assignments and to perform high-resolution protein structure determination in the absence of any explicit through-bond experiment to facilitate side-chain resonance assignment, such as HCCH-TOCSY. After casting the assignment problem into a Markov Random Field (MRF), NASCA extends and applies combinatorial protein design algorithms to compute optimal assignments that best interpret the NMR data. The MRF captures the contact map information of the protein derived from NOESY spectra, exploits the backbone structural information determined by RDCs, and considers all possible side-chain rotamers. The complexity of the combinatorial search is reduced by using a dead-end elimination (DEE) algorithm, which prunes side-chain resonance assignments that are provably not part of the optimal solution. Then an A* search algorithm is employed to find a set of optimal side-chain resonance assignments that best fit the NMR data. These side-chain resonance assignments are then used to resolve the NOE assignment ambiguity and compute high-resolution protein structures. Tests on five proteins show that NASCA assigns resonances for more than 90% of side-chain protons, and achieves about 80% correct assignments. The final structures computed using the NOE distance restraints assigned by NASCA have backbone RMSD 0

  19. Active learning in pre-class assignments: Exploring the use of interactive simulations to enhance reading assignments

    CERN Document Server

    Stang, Jared B; Perez, Sarah; Ives, Joss; Roll, Ido

    2016-01-01

    Pre-class reading assignments help prepare students for active classes by providing a first exposure to the terms and concepts to be used during class. We investigate if the use of inquiry-oriented PhET-based activities in conjunction with pre-class reading assignments can improve both the preparation of students for in-class learning and student attitudes towards and engagement with pre-class assignments. Over three course modules covering different topics, students were assigned randomly to complete either a textbook-only pre-class assignment or both a textbook pre-class assignment and a PhET-based activity. The assignments helped prepare students for class, as measured by performance on the pre-class quiz relative to a beginning-of-semester pre-test, but no evidence for increased learning due the PhET activity was observed. Students rated the assignments which included PhET as more enjoyable and, for the topic latest in the semester, reported engaging more with the assignments when PhET was included.

  20. Quality of life and standard of living in a randomly selected group of psychiatrically disabled people in Sweden 2 years after a psychiatry reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, I; Frederiksen, S-O; Gottfries, C-G

    2002-07-01

    In Sweden, a psychiatry reform, aimed at improving the living conditions of the psychiatrically disabled, came into force in 1995. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of the reform by investigating quality of life and standard of living 2 years later in a randomly selected group of people with longstanding psychiatric disability. Self-ratings and interviews were conducted in a study group and a control group. The study group consisted of 19 women and 18 men (mean age 46.1 years) diagnosed with neurosis, schizophrenia or affective disorder. The control group consisted of 19 women and 17 men (mean age 48.7 years). Self-rated quality of life was significantly poorer in the study group (P standard of living in either group but a significant negative correlation in the control group (P standard of living.

  1. Alternative Assignment Incentive Pay Formats

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-06-01

    300 dollars there was a 52% increase in applications and a 115 % increase in fill rates. This is extremely important to the Navy because it “suggest...Congress.” E-mail to Michael.T.Jones@navy.mil. 01 April 2005. 7. Nimon , W. R. and Hall, D. R. “An Experimental Analysis of the Relative Efficiency of...Scores (60 + 55 = 115 ). Accordingly, Bidder 1 is assigned to Job 1, Bidder 2 is unassigned, and Bidder 3 is assigned to Job 2. Payout in the

  2. The prevalence and classification of chronic kidney disease in cats randomly selected within four age groups and in cats recruited for degenerative joint disease studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Christina L; Lascelles, B Duncan X; Vaden, Shelly L; Gruen, Margaret E; Marks, Steven L

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and degenerative joint disease are both considered common in older cats. Information on the co-prevalence of these two diseases is lacking. This retrospective study was designed to determine the prevalence of CKD in two cohorts of cats: cats randomly selected from four evenly distributed age groups (RS group) and cats recruited for degenerative joint disease studies (DJD group), and to evaluate the concurrence of CKD and DJD in these cohorts. The RS group was randomly selected from four age groups from 6 months to 20 years, and the DJD group comprised cats recruited to four previous DJD studies, with the DJD group excluding cats with a blood urea nitrogen and/or serum creatinine concentration >20% (the upper end of normal) for two studies and cats with CKD stages 3 and 4 for the other two studies. The prevalence of CKD in the RS and DJD groups was higher than expected at 50% and 68.8%, respectively. CKD was common in cats between 1 and 15 years of age, with a similar prevalence of CKD stages 1 and 2 across age groups in both the RS and DJD cats, respectively. We found significant concurrence between CKD and DJD in cats of all ages, indicating the need for increased screening for CKD when selecting DJD treatments. Additionally, this study offers the idea of a relationship and causal commonality between CKD and DJD owing to the striking concurrence across age groups and life stages. PMID:24217707

  3. Prevalence and classification of chronic kidney disease in cats randomly selected from four age groups and in cats recruited for degenerative joint disease studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Christina L; Lascelles, B Duncan X; Vaden, Shelly L; Gruen, Margaret E; Marks, Steven L

    2014-06-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and degenerative joint disease are both considered common in older cats. Information on the co-prevalence of these two diseases is lacking. This retrospective study was designed to determine the prevalence of CKD in two cohorts of cats: cats randomly selected from four evenly distributed age groups (RS group) and cats recruited for degenerative joint disease studies (DJD group), and to evaluate the concurrence of CKD and DJD in these cohorts. The RS group was randomly selected from four age groups from 6 months to 20 years, and the DJD group comprised cats recruited to four previous DJD studies, with the DJD group excluding cats with a blood urea nitrogen and/or serum creatinine concentration >20% (the upper end of normal) for two studies and cats with CKD stages 3 and 4 for the other two studies. The prevalence of CKD in the RS and DJD groups was higher than expected at 50% and 68.8%, respectively. CKD was common in cats between 1 and 15 years of age, with a similar prevalence of CKD stages 1 and 2 across age groups in both the RS and DJD cats, respectively. We found significant concurrence between CKD and DJD in cats of all ages, indicating the need for increased screening for CKD when selecting DJD treatments. Additionally, this study offers the idea of a relationship and causal commonality between CKD and DJD owing to the striking concurrence across age groups and life stages. © ISFM and AAFP 2013.

  4. Effects of a Topical Saffron (Crocus sativus L) Gel on Erectile Dysfunction in Diabetics: A Randomized, Parallel-Group, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadzadeh-Moghadam, Hossein; Nazari, Seyed Mohammad; Shamsa, Ali; Kamalinejad, Mohammad; Esmaeeli, Habibollah; Asadpour, Amir Abbas; Khajavi, Abdoljavad

    2015-10-01

    Erectile dysfunction is a man's persistent or recurrent inability to achieve and maintain erection for a satisfactory sexual relationship. As diabetes is a major risk factor for erectile dysfunction, the prevalence of erectile dysfunction among diabetic men has been reported as 35% to 90%. This randomized, parallel-group, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial investigated the effects of a topical saffron (Crocus sativus L) gel on erectile dysfunction in diabetic men. Patients were randomly allocated to 2 equal groups (with 25 patients each). The intervention group was treated with topical saffron, and the control received a similar treatment with placebo. The 2 groups were assessed using the International Index of Erectile Function Questionnaire before the intervention and 1 month after the intervention. Compared to placebo, the prepared saffron gel could significantly improve erectile dysfunction in diabetic patients (P saffron can be considered as a treatment option for diabetic men with erectile dysfunction. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. Comparison of efficacy, safety, and cost-effectiveness of rupatadine and olopatadine in patients of allergic rhinitis: A prospective, randomized, double-blind, parallel group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dakhale, Ganesh; Tathod, Yogesh; Patel, Seema; Pimpalkhute, Sonali; Raghute, Latesh; Khamkar, Ajita

    2016-01-01

    To compare the efficacy, safety, and cost-effectiveness of rupatadine and olopatadine in patients of allergic rhinitis (AR). A 2-week, single-centered, randomized, double-blind, parallel group comparative clinical study was conducted on patients with AR. Following inclusion and exclusion criteria, 67 patients were recruited and randomized to two treatment groups and received the respective drugs for 2 weeks. At follow-up, parameters assessed were total nasal symptom score (TNSS), change in total and differential count of eosinophil. In olopatadine group, there was a significantly higher reduction in TNSS (P rupatadine. Both the drugs significantly reduced the absolute eosinophil count, but olopatadine (P rupatadine group. Olopatadine is a better choice in AR in comparison to rupatadine due to its better efficacy and safety profile.

  6. Effect on injuries of assigning shoes based on foot shape in air force basic training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapik, Joseph J; Brosch, Lorie C; Venuto, Margaret; Swedler, David I; Bullock, Steven H; Gaines, Lorraine S; Murphy, Ryan J; Tchandja, Juste; Jones, Bruce H

    2010-01-01

    This study examined whether assigning running shoes based on the shape of the bottom of the foot (plantar surface) influenced injury risk in Air Force Basic Military Training (BMT) and examined risk factors for injury in BMT. Data were collected from BMT recruits during 2007; analysis took place during 2008. After foot examinations, recruits were randomly consigned to either an experimental group (E, n=1042 men, 375 women) or a control group (C, n=913 men, 346 women). Experimental group recruits were assigned motion control, stability, or cushioned shoes for plantar shapes indicative of low, medium, or high arches, respectively. Control group recruits received a stability shoe regardless of plantar shape. Injuries during BMT were determined from outpatient visits provided from the Defense Medical Surveillance System. Other injury risk factors (fitness, smoking, physical activity, prior injury, menstrual history, and demographics) were obtained from a questionnaire, existing databases, or BMT units. Multivariate Cox regression controlling for other risk factors showed little difference in injury risk between the groups among men (hazard ratio [E/C]=1.11, 95% CI=0.89-1.38) or women (hazard ratio [E/C]=1.20, 95% CI= 0.90-1.60). Independent injury risk factors among both men and women included low aerobic fitness and cigarette smoking. This prospective study demonstrated that assigning running shoes based on the shape of the plantar surface had little influence on injury risk in BMT even after controlling for other injury risk factors. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. From Planning to Implementation: An Examination of Changes in the Research Design, Sample Size, and Precision of Group Randomized Trials Launched by the Institute of Education Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spybrook, Jessaca; Puente, Anne Cullen; Lininger, Monica

    2013-01-01

    This article examines changes in the research design, sample size, and precision between the planning phase and implementation phase of group randomized trials (GRTs) funded by the Institute of Education Sciences. Thirty-eight GRTs funded between 2002 and 2006 were examined. Three studies revealed changes in the experimental design. Ten studies…

  8. The effect of adding group-based counselling to individual lifestyle counselling on changes in dietary intake. The Inter99 study--a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Ulla; Kristoffersen, Lis; Ladelund, Steen

    2008-01-01

    Few studies have investigated the specific effect of single intervention components in randomized controlled trials. The purpose was to investigate the effect of adding group-based diet and exercise counselling to individual life-style counselling on long-term changes in dietary habits....

  9. Evaluating a community-based early childhood education and development program in Indonesia: study protocol for a pragmatic cluster randomized controlled trial with supplementary matched control group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pradhan, M.; Brinkman, S.A.; Beatty, A.; Maika, A.; Satriawan, E.; de Ree, J.; Hasan, A.

    2013-01-01

    Background This paper presents the study protocol for a pragmatic cluster randomized controlled trial (RCT) with a supplementary matched control group. The aim of the trial is to evaluate a community-based early education and development program launched by the Government of Indonesia. The program

  10. Efficacy of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for insomnia in adolescents: A randomized controlled trial with internet therapy, group therapy and a waiting list condition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruin, E.J.; Bögels, S.M.; Oort, F.J.; Meijer, A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: To investigate the efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBTI) in adolescents. Design: A randomized controlled trial of CBTI in group therapy (GT), guided internet therapy (IT), and a waiting list (WL), with assessments at baseline, directly after treatment

  11. Characterization of geometrical random uncertainty distribution for a group of patients in radiotherapy; Caracterizacion de la distribucion de incertidumbres geometricas aleatorias para un grupo de pacientes en radioterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz Montplet, C.; Jurado Bruggeman, D.

    2010-07-01

    Geometrical random uncertainty in radiotherapy is usually characterized by a unique value in each group of patients. We propose a novel approach based on a statistically accurate characterization of the uncertainty distribution, thus reducing the risk of obtaining potentially unsafe results in CT V-Pt margins or in the selection of correction protocols.

  12. The effects of adding group-based lifestyle counselling to individual counselling on changes in plasma glucose levels in a randomized controlled trial: The Inter99 study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lau, C.; Vistisen, D.; Toft, U.

    2011-01-01

    participants, 4053 were determined to be at high risk based on a risk estimate of ischaemic heart disease or the presence of risk factors (smoking, hypertension, hypercholesterolaemia, obesity, impaired glucose tolerance). Of these subjects, 90% were randomized to high-intensity intervention (group A) and 10...

  13. L-Carnitine Supplementation for the Management of Fatigue in Patients With Cancer: An Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Phase III, Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruciani, Ricardo A.; Zhang, Jenny J.; Manola, Judith; Cella, David; Ansari, Bilal; Fisch, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose L-carnitine, a popular complementary and alternative medicine product, is used by patients with cancer for the treatment of fatigue, the most commonly reported symptom in this patient population. The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of L-carnitine supplementation as a treatment for fatigue in patients with cancer. Patients and Methods In this double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, patients with invasive malignancies and fatigue were randomly assigned to either 2 g/d of L-carnitine oral supplementation or matching placebo. The primary end point was the change in average daily fatigue from baseline to week 4 using the Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI). Results Three hundred seventy-six patients were randomly assigned to treatment with L-carnitine supplementation or placebo. L-carnitine supplementation resulted in significant carnitine plasma level increase by week 4. The primary outcome, fatigue, measured using the BFI, improved in both arms compared with baseline (L-carnitine: −0.96, 95% CI, −1.32 to −0.60; placebo: −1.11, 95% CI −1.44 to −0.78). There were no statistically significant differences between arms (P = .57). Secondary outcomes, including fatigue measured by the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy–Fatigue instrument, depression, and pain, did not show significant difference between arms. A separate analysis of patients who were carnitine-deficient at baseline did not show statistically significant improvement in fatigue or other outcomes after L-carnitine supplementation. Conclusion Four weeks of 2 g of L-carnitine supplementation did not improve fatigue in patients with invasive malignancies and good performance status. PMID:22987089

  14. A note on Harold S. Diehl, randomization, and clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, L A

    1997-04-01

    Harold S. Diehl and coworkers published results from a remarkable trial on the efficacy of vaccines for the common cold in 1938. The original report states that patients were assigned to treatment and control groups "at random." Diehl's study has been referred to as one of the first instances of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. No description of a formal randomization scheme is given in the 1938 report and an unpublished paper of Diehl's suggests the use of alternate assignment in the study.

  15. The Effect of Participation in Support Groups on Depression, Anxiety and Stress in Family Caregivers of People with Alzheimers: Randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahimeh Taati

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This study sought to determine the effect of participation in support groups on the depression, anxiety and stress level of caregivers of patients with Alzheimer. This study was a single blind randomized clinical controlled trial (RCT with 80 family caregivers of people with Alzheimer’s (per group=40. The intervention group participated in eight sessions 1.5- 2 hours in support groups. The tool used in this study was the DASS-21 questionnaire for measuring depression, anxiety and stress level of the caregivers, analysis of parametric data, using SPSS version 21. Findings showed, participation in support groups showed no significant difference on depression, anxiety and stress in family caregivers of Alzheimer patients in the control group and the intervention group. Given that caring for these patients by their family members are very sensitive and costly issues for policy makers and health service providers, community and families of these patients.

  16. Group cognitive behavior therapy or social skills training for individuals with a recent onset of psychosis? Results of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecomte, Tania; Leclerc, Claude; Corbière, Marc; Wykes, Til; Wallace, Charles J; Spidel, Alicia

    2008-12-01

    This study aimed at determining the effectiveness of group cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for recent onset psychosis in comparison with a recognized intervention for individuals with severe mental illness-social skills training. One hundred twenty-nine participants took part in a single-blind randomized controlled trial with repeated measures (baseline, 3 months, and 9 months). Participants were randomized to 1 of 3 conditions: group CBT, group social skills training for symptom management, or a wait-list control group. Both interventions were delivered by mental health staff with minimal training. Both treatments resulted in improvements on positive and negative symptoms compared with the wait-list control group, with the CBT group having significant effects over time on overall symptoms, and post-treatment effects on self-esteem, and active coping skills compared with the wait-list control group and lower drop-out rates than the skills training group. Therapist fidelity was adequate for both treatment conditions. Group CBT for psychosis is a promising intervention for individuals with recent onset of psychosis and their mental health professionals.

  17. Pediatric Online Evidence-Based Medicine Assignment Is a Novel Effective Enjoyable Undergraduate Medical Teaching Tool: A SQUIRE Compliant Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotb, Magd A; Elmahdy, Hesham Nabeh; Khalifa, Nour El Deen Mahmoud; El-Deen, Mohamed Hamed Nasr; Lotfi, Mohamed Amr N

    2015-07-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is delivered through a didactic, blended learning, and mixed models. Students are supposed to construct an answerable question in PICO (patient, intervention, comparison, and outcome) framework, acquire evidence through search of literature, appraise evidence, apply it to the clinical case scenario, and assess the evidence in relation to clinical context. Yet these teaching models have limitations especially those related to group work, for example, handling uncooperative students, students who fail to contribute, students who domineer, students who have personal conflict, their impact upon progress of their groups, and inconsistent individual acquisition of required skills. At Pediatrics Department, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, we designed a novel undergraduate pediatric EBM assignment online system to overcome shortcomings of previous didactic method and aimed to assess its effectiveness by prospective follow-up during academic years 2012 to 2013 and 2013 to 2014. The novel web-based online interactive system was tailored to provide sequential single and group assignments for each student. Single assignment addressed a specific case scenario question, while group assignment was teamwork that addressed different questions of same case scenario. Assignment comprised scholar content and skills. We objectively analyzed students' performance by criterion-based assessment and subjectively by anonymous student questionnaire. A total of 2879 were enrolled in 5th year Pediatrics Course consecutively, of them 2779 (96.5%) logged in and 2554 (88.7%) submitted their work. They were randomly assigned to 292 groups. A total of 2277 (89.15%) achieved ≥ 80% of total mark (4/5), of them 717 (28.1%) achieved a full mark. A total of 2178 (85.27%) and 2359 (92.36%) made evidence-based conclusions and recommendations in single and group assignment, respectively (P < 0.001). A total of 1102 (43.1%) answered student questionnaire, of them 898

  18. The effect of adding group-based counselling to individual lifestyle counselling on changes in dietary intake. The Inter99 study – a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Lisa

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few studies have investigated the specific effect of single intervention components in randomized controlled trials. The purpose was to investigate the effect of adding group-based diet and exercise counselling to individual life-style counselling on long-term changes in dietary habits. Methods The study was a randomized controlled intervention study. From a general Danish population, aged 30 to 60 years (n = 61,301, two random sample were drawn (group A, n = 11,708; group B, n = 1,308. Subjects were invited for a health screening program. Participation rate was 52.5%. All participants received individual life-style counselling. Individuals at high risk of ischemic heart disease in group A were furthermore offered group-based life-style counselling. The intervention was repeated for high-risk individuals after one and three years. At five-year follow-up all participants were invited for a health examination. High risk individuals were included in this study (n = 2 356 and changes in dietary intake were analyzed using multilevel linear regression analyses. Results At one-year follow-up group A had significantly increased the unsaturated/saturated fat ratio compared to group B and in men a significantly greater decrease in saturated fat intake was found in group A compared to group B (net change: -1.13 E%; P = 0.003. No differences were found between group A and B at three-year follow-up. At five-year follow-up group A had significantly increased the unsaturated/saturated fat ratio (net change: 0.09; P = 0.01 and the fish intake compared to group B (net change: 5.4 g/day; P = 0.05. Further, in men a non-significant tendency of a greater decrease was found at five year follow-up in group A compared to group B (net change: -0.68 E%; P = 0.10. The intake of fibre and vegetables increased in both groups, however, no significant difference was found between the groups. No differences between groups were found for saturated fat

  19. Assigning cause for sudden unexpected infant death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Carl E; Darnall, Robert A; McEntire, Betty L; Hyma, Bruce A

    2015-06-01

    We have reached a conundrum in assigning cause of death for sudden unexpected infant deaths. We summarize the discordant perspectives and approaches and how they have occurred, and recommend a pathway toward improved consistency. This lack of consistency affects pediatricians and other health care professionals, scientific investigators, medical examiners and coroners, law enforcement agencies, families, and support or advocacy groups. We recommend that an interdisciplinary international committee be organized to review current approaches for assigning cause of death, and to identify a consensus strategy for improving consistency. This effort will need to encompass intrinsic risk factors or infant vulnerability in addition to known environmental risk factors including unsafe sleep settings, and must be sufficiently flexible to accommodate a progressively expanding knowledge base.

  20. Positive benefits of theophylline in a randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, placebo-controlled study of low-dose, slow-release theophylline in the treatment of COPD for 1 year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yumin; Wang, Xiaoping; Zeng, Xiangyi; Qiu, Rong; Xie, Junfeng; Liu, Shengming; Zheng, Jingping; Zhong, Nanshan; Ran, Pixin

    2006-09-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that low-dose theophylline has anti-inflammatory benefits and is safe in the treatment of COPD. This study aims to evaluate the efficacy and safety of low-dose, slow-release oral theophylline administered over a 1-year period in patients with COPD. A randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, placebo-controlled trial was carried out. In total, 110 participants with COPD were randomly assigned to receive slow-release theophylline (100 mg b.i.d.) or placebo for 1 year. Use of medicine and symptoms recorded by diary cards; pulmonary function, exacerbations of COPD, quality of life and the use of rescue medicine were evaluated. Superiority test was used to estimate the efficacy. Of 110 participants, 85 (77.3%) complied with the protocol, with 42 subjects in theophylline and 43 subjects on placebo. In both intention-to-treat and per-protocol population analysis, greater improvement in pre-bronchodilator FEV(1) (P = 0.038 and P = 0.070, respectively), lower frequency of COPD exacerbations (P = 0.047 and P = 0.035, respectively), fewer days of COPD exacerbations (P = 0.045 and P = 0.046, respectively), lower frequency of clinical visits (P = 0.017 and P = 0.039, respectively), greater improvement in satisfaction with treatment (P = 0.014 and P = 0.004, respectively) were found in the theophylline group than in the placebo group. In per-protocol population, greater improvements in quality of life (P = 0.047) were also observed in the theophylline group and the mean time to the first exacerbation was delayed in theophylline group in comparison with placebo group (P = 0.047). Drug-related adverse events such as stomach discomfort (3.51%), headache (3.51%), insomnia (1.75%) and palpitation (1.75%) were found in the theophylline group. Low-dose, slow-release oral theophylline is effective and well-tolerated in the long term treatment of stable COPD, although it does not improve post-bronchodilator lung function.

  1. The Effect of Group Discussion-based Education on Self-management of Adults with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Compared with Usual Care: A Randomized Control Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosein Habibzadeh

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: We sought to determine the effect of group discussion-based education on the self-management capability of patients with type 2 diabetes in Iran. Methods: This randomized control trial was conducted on 90 patients with type 2 diabetes. Participants were allocated randomly into one of two groups; intervention and control. The intervention group received the group discussion-based education while the control group received routine care only. The Lin’s self-management questionnaire was completed at baseline and three months post-intervention. Results: Statistical analysis, including the use of independent t-test, identified that in comparison to the control group, significant increases were observed in the scores of self-organization (t =11.24, p < 0.001, self-adjustment (t = 7.53, p < 0.001, interaction with health experts (t = 7.31, p < 0.001, blood sugar self-monitoring (t = 6.42, p < 0.001, adherence to the proposed diet (t = 5.22, p < 0.001, and total self-management (t = 10.82, p < 0.001 in the intervention group. Conclusions: Sharing experiences through group discussions and receiving instructive feedback can improve the ability to self-manage diabetes.

  2. Individual and Group Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment for Work-Related Stress Complaints and Sickness Absence: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vente, W.de; Kamphuis, J.H.; Emmelkamp, P.M.G.; Blonk, R.W.B.

    2008-01-01

    Work-related stress is widespread and can lead to long-term absenteeism and work disability. Cognitive-behavioral treatment (CBT) has demonstrated effectiveness in treating psychopathology but has only rarely been tested in clinical samples with work-related stress. A randomized controlled trial was

  3. Extended lymph node dissection for gastric cancer: who may benefit? Final results of the randomized Dutch gastric cancer group trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartgrink, H.H.; Velde, C.J. van de; Putter, H.; Bonenkamp, J.J.; Meershoek-Klein Kranenbarg, E.; Songun, I.; Welvaart, K.; Krieken, J.H.J.M. van; Meijer, S.; Plukker, J.T.; Elk, P.J. van; Obertop, H.; Gouma, D.J.; Lanschot, J.J.B. van; Taat, C.W.; Graaf, P.W. de; Meyenfeldt, M.F. von; Tilanus, H.W.; Sasako, M.

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE: The extent of lymph node dissection appropriate for gastric cancer is still under debate. We have conducted a randomized trial to compare the results of a limited (D1) and extended (D2) lymph node dissection in terms of morbidity, mortality, long-term survival and cumulative risk of

  4. Extended lymph node dissection for gastric cancer : Who may benefit? Final results of the randomized Dutch Gastric Cancer Group Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartgrink, HH; van de Velde, CJH; Putter, H; Bonenkamp, JJ; Kranenbarg, EK; Songun, [No Value; Welvaart, K; van Krieken, JHJM; Meijer, S; Plukker, JTM; van Elk, PJ; Obertop, H; Gouma, DJ; van Lanschot, JJB; Taat, CW; de Graaf, PW; von Meyenfeldt, MF; Tilanus, H; Sasako, M

    2004-01-01

    Purpose. The extent of lymph node dissection appropriate for gastric cancer is still under debate. We have conducted a randomized trial to compare the results of a limited (D1) and extended (D2) lymph node dissection in terms of morbidity, mortality, long-term survival and cumulative risk of

  5. Assigning strains to bacterial species via the internet

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bishop, Cynthia J; Aanensen, David M; Jordan, Gregory E; Kilian, Mogens; Hanage, William P; Spratt, Brian G

    2009-01-01

    .... The advantage of this approach (multilocus sequence analysis; MLSA) is that, for any group of related species, a strain database can be produced and combined with software that allows query strains to be assigned to species via the internet...

  6. Effects of quality improvement in health facilities and community mobilization through women's groups on maternal, neonatal and perinatal mortality in three districts of Malawi: MaiKhanda, a cluster randomized controlled effectiveness trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colbourn, Tim; Nambiar, Bejoy; Bondo, Austin; Makwenda, Charles; Tsetekani, Eric; Makonda-Ridley, Agnes; Msukwa, Martin; Barker, Pierre; Kotagal, Uma; Williams, Cassie; Davies, Ros; Webb, Dale; Flatman, Dorothy; Lewycka, Sonia; Rosato, Mikey; Kachale, Fannie; Mwansambo, Charles; Costello, Anthony

    2013-09-01

    Maternal, perinatal and neonatal mortality remains high in low-income countries. We evaluated community and facility-based interventions to reduce deaths in three districts of Malawi. We evaluated a rural participatory women's group community intervention (CI) and a quality improvement intervention at health centres (FI) via a two-by-two factorial cluster randomized controlled trial. Consenting pregnant women were followed-up to 2 months after birth using key informants. Primary outcomes were maternal, perinatal and neonatal mortality. Clusters were health centre catchment areas assigned using stratified computer-generated randomization. Following exclusions, including non-birthing facilities, 61 clusters were analysed: control (17 clusters, 4912 births), FI (15, 5335), CI (15, 5080) and FI + CI (14, 5249). This trial was registered as International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial [ISRCTN18073903]. Outcomes for 14,576 and 20,576 births were recorded during baseline (June 2007-September 2008) and intervention (October 2008-December 2010) periods. For control, FI, CI and FI + CI clusters neonatal mortality rates were 34.0, 28.3, 29.9 and 27.0 neonatal deaths per 1000 live births and perinatal mortality rates were 56.2, 55.1, 48.0 and 48.4 per 1000 births, during the intervention period. Adjusting for clustering and stratification, the neonatal mortality rate was 22% lower in FI + CI than control clusters (OR = 0.78, 95% CI 0.60-1.01), and the perinatal mortality rate was 16% lower in CI clusters (OR = 0.84, 95% CI 0.72-0.97). We did not observe any intervention effects on maternal mortality. Despite implementation problems, a combined community and facility approach using participatory women's groups and quality improvement at health centres reduced newborn mortality in rural Malawi.

  7. Effect of Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei, L. casei 431 on immune response to influenza vaccination and upper respiratory tract infections in healthy adult volunteers: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jespersen, Lillian; Tarnow, Inge; Eskesen, Dorte; Morberg, Cathrine Melsaether; Michelsen, Birgit; Bügel, Susanne; Dragsted, Lars Ove; Rijkers, Ger T; Calder, Philip C

    2015-06-01

    Probiotics can modulate the immune system in healthy individuals and may help reduce symptoms related to respiratory infections. The objective of the study was to investigate the effect of the probiotic strain Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei, L. casei 431 (Chr. Hansen A/S) (hereafter, L. casei 431) on immune response to influenza vaccination and respiratory symptoms in healthy adults. A randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted in 1104 healthy subjects aged 18-60 y at 2 centers in Germany and Denmark. Subjects were randomly assigned to receive an acidified milk drink containing ≥10(9) colony-forming units of L. casei 431 (n = 553) or placebo (n = 551) for 42 d. After 21 d, subjects received the seasonal influenza vaccination. The primary outcome was seroprotection rate (anti-influenza antibody titers by hemagglutination inhibition) 21 d after vaccination. Other outcomes were seroconversion rate and mean titers, influenza A-specific antibodies and incidence, and duration and severity of upper respiratory symptoms. Antibiotic use and use of health care resources were recorded. There was no effect of L. casei 431 on immune responses to influenza vaccination. Generalized linear mixed modeling showed a shorter duration of upper respiratory symptoms in the probiotic group than in the placebo group (mean ± SD: 6.4 ± 6.1 vs. 7.3 ± 9.7 d, P = 0.0059) in the last 3 wk of the intervention period. No statistically significant differences were found for incidence or severity. Daily consumption of L. casei 431 resulted in no observable effect on the components of the immune response to influenza vaccination but reduced the duration of upper respiratory symptoms. The trial was registered at www.isrctn.com as ISRCTN08280229. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  8. Desensitization to a whole egg by rush oral immunotherapy improves the quality of life of guardians: A multicenter, randomized, parallel-group, delayed-start design study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh-Nagato, Naoka; Inoue, Yuzaburo; Nagao, Mizuho; Fujisawa, Takao; Shimojo, Naoki; Iwata, Tsutomu

    2017-08-01

    Patients with food allergies and their families have a significantly reduced health-related quality of life (QOL). We performed a multicenter, randomized, parallel-group, delayed-start design study to clarify the efficacy and safety of rush oral immunotherapy (rOIT) and its impact on the participants' daily life and their guardians (UMIN000003943). Forty-five participants were randomly divided into an early-start group and a late-start group. The early-start group received rOIT for 3 months, while the late-start group continued the egg elimination diet (control). In the next stage, both groups received OIT until all participants had finished 12 months of maintenance OIT. The ratio of the participants in whom an increase of the TD was achieved in the first stage was significantly higher in the early-start group (87.0%), than in the late-start group (22.7%). The QOL of the guardians in the early-start group significantly improved after the first stage (65.2%), in comparison to the late-start group (31.8%). During 12 months of rOIT, the serum ovomucoid-specific IgE levels, the percentage of CD203c + basophils upon stimulation with egg white, and the wheal size to egg white were decreased, while the serum ovomucoid-specific IgG4 levels were increased. However, approximately 80% of the participants in the early-start group showed an allergic reaction during the first stage of the study, whereas none of the patients in the late-start group experienced an allergic reaction. rOIT induced desensitization to egg and thus improved the QOL of guardians; however, the participants experienced frequent allergic reactions due to the treatment. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society of Allergology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Fleet Assignment Using Collective Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoine, Nicolas E.; Bieniawski, Stefan R.; Kroo, Ilan M.; Wolpert, David H.

    2004-01-01

    Product distribution theory is a new collective intelligence-based framework for analyzing and controlling distributed systems. Its usefulness in distributed stochastic optimization is illustrated here through an airline fleet assignment problem. This problem involves the allocation of aircraft to a set of flights legs in order to meet passenger demand, while satisfying a variety of linear and non-linear constraints. Over the course of the day, the routing of each aircraft is determined in order to minimize the number of required flights for a given fleet. The associated flow continuity and aircraft count constraints have led researchers to focus on obtaining quasi-optimal solutions, especially at larger scales. In this paper, the authors propose the application of this new stochastic optimization algorithm to a non-linear objective cold start fleet assignment problem. Results show that the optimizer can successfully solve such highly-constrained problems (130 variables, 184 constraints).

  10. Who benefits from homework assignments?

    OpenAIRE

    Rønning, Marte

    2008-01-01

    Abstract: Using Dutch data on pupils in elementary school this paper is the first empirical study that analyzes whether assigning homework has an heterogeneous impact on pupil achievement. Addressing potential biases that arise from unobserved school quality, pupil selection by exploiting different methods, I find that the test score gap is larger in classes where everybody gets homework than in classes where nobody gets homework. More precisely pupils belonging to the upper part of the so...

  11. Comparison of efficacy, safety and cost-effectiveness of rupatadine and olopatadine in patients of chronic spontaneous urticaria: A randomized, double-blind, comparative, parallel group trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganesh N Dakhale

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare efficacy, safety and cost-effectiveness of rupatadine and olopatadine in patients of chronic spontaneous urticaria. Materials and Methods: A 6-week, single-centered, randomized, double blind, parallel group comparative clinical study was conducted on patients with chronic spontaneous urticaria. Following inclusion and exclusion criteria, 60 patients were recruited and were randomized to two treatment groups and received the respective drugs for 6 weeks. At follow-up, parameters assessed were mean total symptom score (MTSS calculated by adding the mean number of wheals (MNW and the mean pruritus score (MPS, number of wheals, size of wheal, scale for interference of wheals with sleep (SIWS. Results: Both the drugs significantly reduced the MTSS, number of wheals, size of wheal, scale for interference of wheals with sleep, but olopatadine was found to be superior. In olopatadine group, there was significantly higher reduction in MTSS (p = 0.01, Number of wheals (P < 0.05, Size of wheals (p < 0.05, Scale for intensity of erythema (p < 0.05 and change in eosinopils count (p = 0.015 than that of rupatadine. Incidence of adverse effects was found to be less in olopatadine group when compared with rupatadine group. Cost effectiveness ratio was less in olopatadine group as compared to rupatadine group throughout the treatment. Conclusions: Olopatadine is a better choice in chronic spontaneous urticaria in comparison to rupatadine due to its better efficacy, safety and cost effectiveness profile.

  12. Comparison of Efficacy, Safety and Cost-effectiveness of Rupatadine and Olopatadine in Patients of Chronic Spontaneous Urticaria: A Randomized, Double-blind, Comparative, Parallel Group Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dakhale, Ganesh N; Wankhede, Sumit S; Mahatme, Mohini S; Hiware, Sachin K; Mishra, Dharmendra B; Dudhgaonkar, Sujata S

    2016-01-01

    To compare efficacy, safety and cost-effectiveness of rupatadine and olopatadine in patients of chronic spontaneous urticaria. A 6-week, single-centered, randomized, double blind, parallel group comparative clinical study was conducted on patients with chronic spontaneous urticaria. Following inclusion and exclusion criteria, 60 patients were recruited and were randomized to two treatment groups and received the respective drugs for 6 weeks. At follow-up, parameters assessed were mean total symptom score (MTSS) calculated by adding the mean number of wheals (MNW) and the mean pruritus score (MPS), number of wheals, size of wheal, scale for interference of wheals with sleep (SIWS). Both the drugs significantly reduced the MTSS, number of wheals, size of wheal, scale for interference of wheals with sleep, but olopatadine was found to be superior. In olopatadine group, there was significantly higher reduction in MTSS (p = 0.01), Number of wheals (P rupatadine. Incidence of adverse effects was found to be less in olopatadine group when compared with rupatadine group. Cost effectiveness ratio was less in olopatadine group as compared to rupatadine group throughout the treatment. Olopatadine is a better choice in chronic spontaneous urticaria in comparison to rupatadine due to its better efficacy, safety and cost effectiveness profile.

  13. Dry cupping for plantar fasciitis: a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Ge, Weiqing; Leson, Chelsea; Vukovic, Corey

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of dry cupping on pain and function of patients with plantar fasciitis. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-nine subjects (age 15 to 59?years old, 20 females and 9 males), randomly assigned into the two groups (dry cupping therapy and electrical stimulation therapy groups), participated in this study. The research design was a randomized controlled trial (RCT). Treatments were provided to the subjects twice a week for 4 weeks. Outcome...

  14. The effect of peer-group size on the delivery of feedback in basic life support refresher training: a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Youngsuk; Je, Sangmo; Yoon, Yoo Sang; Roh, Hye Rin; Chang, Chulho; Kang, Hyunggoo; Lim, Taeho

    2016-07-04

    Students are largely providing feedback to one another when instructor facilitates peer feedback rather than teaching in group training. The number of students in a group affect the learning of students in the group training. We aimed to investigate whether a larger group size increases students' test scores on a post-training test with peer feedback facilitated by instructor after video-guided basic life support (BLS) refresher training. Students' one-rescuer adult BLS skills were assessed by a 2-min checklist-based test 1 year after the initial training. A cluster randomized controlled trial was conducted to evaluate the effect of student number in a group on BLS refresher training. Participants included 115 final-year medical students undergoing their emergency medicine clerkship. The median number of students was 8 in the large groups and 4 in the standard group. The primary outcome was to examine group differences in post-training test scores after video-guided BLS training. Secondary outcomes included the feedback time, number of feedback topics, and results of end-of-training evaluation questionnaires. Scores on the post-training test increased over three consecutive tests with instructor-led peer feedback, but not differ between large and standard groups. The feedback time was longer and number of feedback topics generated by students were higher in standard groups compared to large groups on the first and second tests. The end-of-training questionnaire revealed that the students in large groups preferred the smaller group size compared to their actual group size. In this BLS refresher training, the instructor-led group feedback increased the test score after tutorial video-guided BLS learning, irrespective of the group size. A smaller group size allowed more participations in peer feedback.

  15. Efficacy and safety profile of a topical methyl salicylate and menthol patch in adult patients with mild to moderate muscle strain: a randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, placebo-controlled, multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi, Yoshinobu; Kiuchi, Takehito; Furuta, Kenichi

    2010-01-01

    An occlusive patch formulation containing 10% methyl salicylate and 3% l-menthol was recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of mild to moderate pain. Despite widespread use of counterirritants, including methyl salicylate and menthol, for topical pain relief, published efficacy and safety data regarding the use of the agents alone or in combination are limited. The goal of this study was to determine the efficacy and safety profile of a patch containing 10% methyl salicylate and 3% l-menthol compared with a placebo patch in adult patients with mild to moderate muscle strain. Eligible patients were men or women aged >or=18 years with a clinical diagnosis of mild to moderate muscle strain. Patients were randomly assigned to receive either 1 active patch or 1 placebo patch applied to the skin at the affected area (ie, shoulder, upper back, upper arm, neck, calf, thigh, forearm, abdomen). Pain intensity was assessed on a 100-mm visual analog scale while at rest and with movement for 12 hours after patch application. The primary efficacy end point was the summed pain intensity difference score through 8 hours (SPID8) with movement. Analyses included use of descriptive statistics and an ANOVA model. Safety data, including adverse events, and secondary efficacy end points were also evaluated. A total of 208 patients (104 men, 104 women; age range, 18-78 years) were randomized to 1 of 2 study groups (105 in the active-patch group [mean age, 37.3 years], 103 in the placebo-patch group [mean age, 38.1 years]). The primary efficacy analysis (SPID8 with movement) indicated that patients receiving the active patch experienced significantly greater pain relief (approximately 40%) than those patients receiving a placebo patch (mean [SD], 182.6 [131.2] vs 130.1 [144.1]; P = 0.005). Analysis of the per-protocol population also found significantly more relief (P = 0.024) in the active-patch group (176.2 [131.4]; n = 92) versus the placebo

  16. Study protocol for a group randomized controlled trial of a classroom-based intervention aimed at preventing early risk factors for drug abuse: integrating effectiveness and implementation research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keegan Natalie

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While a number of preventive interventions delivered within schools have shown both short-term and long-term impact in epidemiologically based randomized field trials, programs are not often sustained with high-quality implementation over time. This study was designed to support two purposes. The first purpose was to test the effectiveness of a universal classroom-based intervention, the Whole Day First Grade Program (WD, aimed at two early antecedents to drug abuse and other problem behaviors, namely, aggressive, disruptive behavior and poor academic achievement. The second purpose--the focus of this paper--was to examine the utility of a multilevel structure to support high levels of implementation during the effectiveness trial, to sustain WD practices across additional years, and to train additional teachers in WD practices. Methods The WD intervention integrated three components, each previously tested separately: classroom behavior management; instruction, specifically reading; and family-classroom partnerships around behavior and learning. Teachers and students in 12 schools were randomly assigned to receive either the WD intervention or the standard first-grade program of the school system (SC. Three consecutive cohorts of first graders were randomized within schools to WD or SC classrooms and followed through the end of third grade to test the effectiveness of the WD intervention. Teacher practices were assessed over three years to examine the utility of the multilevel structure to support sustainability and scaling-up. Discussion The design employed in this trial appears to have considerable utility to provide data on WD effectiveness and to inform the field with regard to structures required to move evidence-based programs into practice. Trial Registration Clinical Trials Registration Number: NCT00257088

  17. Group Parent-Child Interaction Therapy: A Randomized Control Trial for the Treatment of Conduct Problems in Young Children

    OpenAIRE

    Niec, LN; Barnett, ML; Prewett, MS; Chatham, JRS

    2016-01-01

    Although efficacious interventions exist for childhood conduct problems, a majority of families in need of services do not receive them. To address problems of treatment access and adherence, innovative adaptations of current interventions are needed. This randomized control trial investigated the relative efficacy of a novel format of parent-child interaction therapy (PCIT), a treatment for young children with conduct problems.Eighty-one families with 3- to 6-year-old children (71.6% boys, 8...

  18. Feedback versus no feedback in improving patient outcome in group psychotherapy for eating disorders (F-EAT): protocol for a randomized clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Continuous feedback on patient improvement and the therapeutic alliance may reduce the number of dropouts and increase patient outcome. There are, however, only three published randomized trials on the effect of feedback on the treatment of eating disorders, showing inconclusive results, and there are no randomized trials on the effect of feedback in group therapy. Accordingly the current randomized clinical trial, initiated in September 2012 at the outpatient clinic for eating disorders at Stolpegaard Psychotherapy Centre, aims to investigate the impact of continuous feedback on attendance and outcome in group psychotherapy. Methods/design The hypothesis is that continuous feedback to both patient and therapist on treatment progress and alliance will increase attendance and treatment outcome. The trial is set up using a randomized design with a minimum of 128 patients allocated to either an experimental or control group at a ratio of 1:1. The experimental group will receive standard treatment (systemic and narrative group psychotherapy) with feedback intervention, whereas the control group will receive standard treatment only. The participants are diagnosed with bulimia nervosa, binge eating disorder, or an eating disorder not otherwise specified, according to the DSM-IV. In the experimental group feedback to the participants, based on the Outcome Rating Scale (ORS) and the Group Session Rating Scale (GSRS), is actively added to standard treatment. The ORS assesses areas of life functioning known to change as a result of therapeutic intervention. The GSRS assesses key dimensions of effective therapeutic relationships. In the control group, the patients fill out the Outcome Rating Scale only, and feedback is not provided. The primary outcome is the rate of attendance to treatment sessions. The secondary outcome is the severity of eating disorder symptoms. Exploratory outcomes are the level of psychological and social functioning, and suicide or self

  19. Feedback versus no feedback in improving patient outcome in group psychotherapy for eating disorders (F-EAT): protocol for a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidsen, Annika Helgadóttir; Poulsen, Stig; Waaddegaard, Mette; Lindschou, Jane; Lau, Marianne

    2014-04-23

    Continuous feedback on patient improvement and the therapeutic alliance may reduce the number of dropouts and increase patient outcome. There are, however, only three published randomized trials on the effect of feedback on the treatment of eating disorders, showing inconclusive results, and there are no randomized trials on the effect of feedback in group therapy. Accordingly the current randomized clinical trial, initiated in September 2012 at the outpatient clinic for eating disorders at Stolpegaard Psychotherapy Centre, aims to investigate the impact of continuous feedback on attendance and outcome in group psychotherapy. The hypothesis is that continuous feedback to both patient and therapist on treatment progress and alliance will increase attendance and treatment outcome. The trial is set up using a randomized design with a minimum of 128 patients allocated to either an experimental or control group at a ratio of 1:1. The experimental group will receive standard treatment (systemic and narrative group psychotherapy) with feedback intervention, whereas the control group will receive standard treatment only. The participants are diagnosed with bulimia nervosa, binge eating disorder, or an eating disorder not otherwise specified, according to the DSM-IV. In the experimental group feedback to the participants, based on the Outcome Rating Scale (ORS) and the Group Session Rating Scale (GSRS), is actively added to standard treatment. The ORS assesses areas of life functioning known to change as a result of therapeutic intervention. The GSRS assesses key dimensions of effective therapeutic relationships. In the control group, the patients fill out the Outcome Rating Scale only, and feedback is not provided.The primary outcome is the rate of attendance to treatment sessions. The secondary outcome is the severity of eating disorder symptoms. Exploratory outcomes are the level of psychological and social functioning, and suicide or self-harm. This is measured with the

  20. Effect of Educational Package on Lifestyle of Primiparous Mothers during Postpartum Period: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodabandeh, Farzaneh; Mirghafourvand, Mojgan; KamaliFard, Mahin; Mohammad-Alizadeh-Charandabi, Sakineh; Asghari Jafarabadi, Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    A healthy lifestyle is important for mothers during the postpartum period. This study was conducted to determine the effects of a lifestyle educational package in primiparous women. This randomized clinical trial was conducted on 220 mothers assigned to two groups using block randomization. In the intervention group, the mothers received…

  1. A cluster randomized controlled trial for child and parent weight management: children and parents randomized to the intervention group have correlated changes in adiposity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Diane C; McMurray, Robert G; Schwartz, Todd A; Hall, Emily G; Neal, Madeline N; Adatorwover, Reuben

    2017-01-01

    Studies have suggested that obesity is linked within families and that successful interventions involve both the parent and child with obesity. However little information exists regarding similarities in adiposity and weight loss between the parent and child, especially in low socio-economic ethnically diverse households. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between the changes from baseline over time in adiposity, weight, health behaviors, and self-efficacy in children (n = 184) and parents (n = 184) participating in an 18-month weight loss program. Within the intervention group only and for each post-baseline time point, Pearson correlation coefficients were computed for children's changes (from baseline) in adiposity, weight, health behaviors, and self-efficacy, with their parents' corresponding changes from baseline, to determine how strongly the dyads were correlated. At the completion of 18 months, the intervention group parents demonstrated strong positive correlations between parent and child change in waist circumference (r = 0.409, p parents and their children with obesity are strongly correlated. NCT01378806 Retrospectively Registered on June 22, 2011.

  2. Polyphenon E, non-futile at neuroprotection in multiple sclerosis but unpredictably hepatotoxic: Phase I single group and phase II randomized placebo-controlled studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovera, Jesus; Ramos, Alexander; Devier, Deidre; Garrison, Virginia; Kovner, Blake; Reza, Tara; Koop, Dennis; Rooney, William; Foundas, Anne; Bourdette, Dennis

    2015-11-15

    Phase I (PhI): assess the safety of Polyphenon E in people with multiple sclerosis (MS) and determine the futility of Polyphenon E as a neuroprotective agent. Correlate plasma levels of EGCG with neuroprotective effects. Phase II (PhII): Further assess safety and confirm the neuroprotective effects of Polyphenon E. PhI: single group futility study. PhII: parallel group randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study. Recruitment area (both studies): LSU MS Center, New Orleans, LA and general public from surrounding areas. Inclusion criteria (both studies): 1) MS per 2005 McDonald criteria; 2) relapsing remitting or secondary progressive MS; 3) stable for six months prior to enrollment on either no therapy or glatiramer acetate (GA) for the PhI study and on either on GA or Interferon β for the PhII study. Exclusion criteria (both studies): 1) complete bone marrow ablation or alentuzumab use at any time; 2) mitoxantrone, cyclophosphamide, natalizumab or fingolimod use in the prior nine months; 3) liver problems or significant medical problems. PhI: Polyphenon E, a green tea extract containing 50% of the antioxidant Epigallocatechin-gallate (EGCG), two capsules twice daily (200mg of EGCG per capsule; total daily dose 800mg) for six months. PhII: Polyphenon E or matching placebo capsules, same dose for one year. Only the research pharmacist knew treatment assignment and she randomized participants (one-to-one, stratified by GA or Interferon β, blocks of 4 or 6). Outcome evaluators did not discuss side effects with participants. PhI: 1) adverse events (AE); 2) futility: decrease in N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) from baseline to six months of 10% or more; 3) association between EGCG plasma levels and change in NAA. PhII: 1) AEs; 2) difference in the rate of change of NAA-levels over twelve months.We measured NAA using a point resolved magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging sequence (TE30/TR2000) on a 10cm×10cm×1cm volume of interest (VOI) located just superior to the

  3. A JASTRO study group report. A randomized phase III trial of hyperthermia in combination with radiotherapy for superficial tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiraoka, Masahiro; Nishimura, Yasumasa; Mitsumori, Michihide [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine] [and others

    1998-06-01

    Result of study about local effect of hyperthermia in combination with radiotherapy for superficial tumors was reported. The irradiation was more than 90% isodose for lesion, and total dose was 60 Gy in cases with anamnesis and 40-50 Gy and without anamnesis at a rate of five times a week and 2 Gy at one time. Hyperthermia was carried out four times; once a week, at 42.5 degrees on tumor side edge, and for 40 minutes. Total 53 cases (neck lymph node metastasis 30 cases, relapse breast cancer 11, advanced breast cancer 1, other superficial tumor 11) were divided into 2 groups. Radiotherapy without hyperthermia (group R) was 27 cases, radiotherapy with hyperthermia (group H) was 26 cases. CR and CR+PR within 2 months after treatment were as follows: Group R: 50%, 85%, Group H: 64%, 100%. The CR+PR was superior in group H (p=0.0497). The CR at maximum effect after treatment was 65% of group R and 86% of group H (p=0.17). The local control rate after CR was not different in both groups. (K.H.)

  4. Comparing Acceptance and Commitment Group Therapy and 12-Steps Narcotics Anonymous in Addict’s Rehabilitation Process: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoochehr Azkhosh

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Substance abuse is a socio-psychological disorder. The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of acceptance and commitment therapy with 12-steps Narcotics Anonymous on psychological well-being of opiate dependent individuals in addiction treatment centers in Shiraz, Iran.Method: This was a randomized controlled trial. Data were collected at entry into the study and at post-test and follow-up visits. The participants were selected from opiate addicted individuals who referred to addiction treatment centers in Shiraz. Sixty individuals were evaluated according to inclusion/ exclusion criteria and were divided into three equal groups randomly (20 participants per group. One group received acceptance and commitment group therapy (Twelve 90-minute sessions and the other group was provided with the 12-steps Narcotics Anonymous program and the control group received the usual methadone maintenance treatment. During the treatment process, seven participants dropped out. Data were collected using the psychological well-being questionnaire and AAQ questionnaire in the three groups at pre-test, post-test and follow-up visits. Data were analyzed using repeated measure analysis of variance.Results: Repeated measure analysis of variance revealed that the mean difference between the three groups was significant (P<0.05 and that acceptance and commitment therapy group showed improvement relative to the NA and control groups on psychological well-being and psychological flexibility.Conclusion: The results of this study revealed that acceptance and commitment therapy can be helpful in enhancing positive emotions and increasing psychological well-being of addicts who seek treatment.

  5. Comparing Acceptance and Commitment Group Therapy and 12-Steps Narcotics Anonymous in Addict’s Rehabilitation Process: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azkhosh, Manoochehr; Farhoudianm, Ali; Saadati, Hemn; Shoaee, Fateme; Lashani, Leila

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Substance abuse is a socio-psychological disorder. The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of acceptance and commitment therapy with 12-steps Narcotics Anonymous on psychological well-being of opiate dependent individuals in addiction treatment centers in Shiraz, Iran. Method: This was a randomized controlled trial. Data were collected at entry into the study and at post-test and follow-up visits. The participants were selected from opiate addicted individuals who referred to addiction treatment centers in Shiraz. Sixty individuals were evaluated according to inclusion/ exclusion criteria and were divided into three equal groups randomly (20 participants per group). One group received acceptance and commitment group therapy (Twelve 90-minute sessions) and the other group was provided with the 12-steps Narcotics Anonymous program and the control group received the usual methadone maintenance treatment. During the treatment process, seven participants dropped out. Data were collected using the psychological well-being questionnaire and AAQ questionnaire in the three groups at pre-test, post-test and follow-up visits. Data were analyzed using repeated measure analysis of variance. Results: Repeated measure analysis of variance revealed that the mean difference between the three groups was significant (Pacceptance and commitment therapy group showed improvement relative to the NA and control groups on psychological well-being and psychological flexibility. Conclusion: The results of this study revealed that acceptance and commitment therapy can be helpful in enhancing positive emotions and increasing psychological well-being of addicts who seek treatment. PMID:28050185

  6. Group Contingencies, Randomization of Reinforcers, and Criteria for Reinforcement, Self-Monitoring, and Peer Feedback on Reducing Inappropriate Classroom Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coogan, Brenda Anne; Kehle, Thomas J.; Bray, Melissa A.; Chafouleas, Sandra M.

    2007-01-01

    Considerable research has demonstrated the effectiveness of interdependent and unknown dependent group contingencies on reducing inappropriate classroom behavior. Several investigators have focused on the addition of self-monitoring and peer feedback to these interdependent and unknown dependent group contingencies in order to further improve…

  7. A group randomized trial using an appointment system to improve adherence to ART at reproductive and child health clinics implementing Option B+ in Tanzania.

    OpenAIRE

    Ross-Degnan, Dennis; Chalker, John; Liana, Jafary; Kajoka, Mwikemo Deborah; Valimba, Richard; Kimatta, Suleiman; Dillip, Angel; Vialle-Valentin, Catherine; Embrey, Martha; Lieber, Rachel; Johnson, Keith

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: In October 2013, Tanzania adopted Option B+ under which HIV-positive pregnant women are initiated on antiretroviral therapy in reproductive and child health clinics at diagnosis. Studies have shown that adherence and retention to antiretroviral treatment can be problematic. Methods: We implemented a group randomized controlled trial in 24 reproductive and child health clinics in eight districts in Mbeya region. The trial tested the impact of implementing paper-based appointment ...

  8. Efficacy and safety of bilastine in Japanese patients with perennial allergic rhinitis: A multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group phase III study

    OpenAIRE

    Okubo, Kimihiro; Gotoh, Minoru; Asako, Mikiya; Nomura, Yasuyuki; Togawa, Michinori; Saito, Akihiro; Honda, Takayuki; Ohashi, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Background: Bilastine, a novel non-sedating second-generation H1 antihistamine, has been approved in most European countries since 2010. This study aimed to evaluate the superiority of bilastine over placebo in Japanese patients with perennial allergic rhinitis (PAR). Methods: This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, phase III study (trial registration number JapicCTI-142600) evaluated the effect of a 2-week treatment period with bilastine (20 mg once daily), fexo...

  9. A Statistical Programme Assignment Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosholm, Michael; Staghøj, Jonas; Svarer, Michael

    When treatment effects of active labour market programmes are heterogeneous in an observable way  across the population, the allocation of the unemployed into different programmes becomes a particularly  important issue. In this paper, we present a statistical model designed to improve the present...... duration of unemployment spells may result if a statistical programme assignment model is introduced. We discuss several issues regarding the  plementation of such a system, especially the interplay between the statistical model and  case workers....

  10. An algorithm for ranking assignments using reoptimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Christian Roed; Nielsen, Lars Relund; Andersen, Kim Allan

    2008-01-01

    We consider the problem of ranking assignments according to cost in the classical linear assignment problem. An algorithm partitioning the set of possible assignments, as suggested by Murty, is presented where, for each partition, the optimal assignment is calculated using a new reoptimization...... technique. Computational results for the new algorithm are presented...

  11. HPV self-sampling or the Pap-smear: a randomized study among cervical screening nonattenders from lower socioeconomic groups in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancho-Garnier, H; Tamalet, C; Halfon, P; Leandri, F X; Le Retraite, L; Djoufelkit, K; Heid, P; Davies, P; Piana, L

    2013-12-01

    Today in France, low attendance to cervical screening by Papanicolaou cytology (Pap-smear) is a major contributor to the 3,000 new cervical cancer cases and 1,000 deaths that occur from this disease every year. Nonattenders are mostly from lower socioeconomic groups and testing of self-obtained samples for high-risk Human Papilloma virus (HPV) types has been proposed as a method to increase screening participation in these groups. In 2011, we conducted a randomized study of women aged 35-69 from very low-income populations around Marseille who had not responded to an initial invitation for a free Pap-smear. After randomization, one group received a second invitation for a free Pap-smear and the other group was offered a free self-sampling kit for HPV testing. Participation rates were significantly different between the two groups with only 2.0% of women attending for a Pap-smear while 18.3% of women returned a self-sample for HPV testing (p ≤ 0.001). The detection rate of high-grade lesions (≥CIN2) was 0.2‰ in the Pap-smear group and 1.25‰ in the self-sampling group (p = 0.01). Offering self-sampling increased participation rates while the use of HPV testing increased the detection of cervical lesions (≥CIN2) in comparison to the group of women receiving a second invitation for a Pap-smear. However, low compliance to follow-up in the self-sampling group reduces the effectiveness of this screening approach in nonattenders women and must be carefully managed. Copyright © 2013 UICC.

  12. The Effect of Spiritual and Religious Group Psychotherapy on Suicidal Ideation in Depressed Patients: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Ebrahimi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Suicide is a great economical, social and public health problem. It is prevalent worldwide and has a lot of negative effects on individuals, families and society. Depression is often prelude to Suicide. An important part of the treatment of the mentally ill patients is spiritual-religious psychotherapy which should be done after physical treatment. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of spiritual and religious group psychotherapy on suicidal ideation in depressed patients. Methods: 51 depressed patients with suicidal ideation from Razi hospital (Tabriz, Iran participated in this clinical trial. To collect Data questionnaire was used which included demographic and Beck Suicide Scale Ideation. Experimental group participated in 10 sessions of group psychotherapy. Each section lasted 1 hour. Two weeks after the last section post test was done. Statistical software SPSS ver 13 was used for data analysis. Results: Results of independent t-test revealed no difference between two groups in terms of suicidal ideation before intervention but after study there is a statistical difference. Also the results of ANCOVA test showed a significant relationship between spiritual group therapy and decrease in suicidal ideation, so that this intervention can make 57% of variance in suicidal ideation of experimental group.Conclusion: Regarding positive effect of spiritual and religious group psychotherapy on decreasing suicidal ideation of depressed patients, we suggest this intervention to be held in Psychiatric Wards and also more study on depression and other psychiatric patients with greater sample size would be helpful.

  13. Effects of Video Game Training on Measures of Selective Attention and Working Memory in Older Adults: Results from a Randomized Controlled Trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reales, Jos? M; Mayas, Julia; Ruiz-Marquez, Elo?Sa; Ballesteros, Soledad; Prieto, Antonio; Toril, Pilar

    2017-01-01

    .... Seventy-five older volunteers were randomly assigned to the experimental group trained for 16 sessions with non-action video games from Lumosity, a commercial platform (http://www.lumosity.com...

  14. Do Treatment Improvements in PTSD Severity Affect Substance Use Outcomes? A Secondary Analysis From a Randomized Clinical Trial in NIDA's Clinical Trials Network

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hien, Denise A; Jiang, Huiping; Campbell, Aimee N.C; Hu, Mei-Chen; Miele, Gloria M; Cohen, Lisa R; Brigham, Gregory S; Capstick, Carrie; Kulaga, Agatha; Robinson, James; Suarez-Morales, Lourdes; Nunes, Edward V

    2010-01-01

    ...) and substance use disorder among women in outpatient substance abuse treatment. MethodParticipants were 353 women randomly assigned to 12 sessions of either trauma-focused or health education group treatment...

  15. High prevalence of multidrug resistance and random distribution of mobile genetic elements among uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) of the four major phylogenetic groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijavec, Matija; Starcic Erjavec, Marjanca; Ambrozic Avgustin, Jerneja; Reissbrodt, Rolf; Fruth, Angelika; Krizan-Hergouth, Veronika; Zgur-Bertok, Darja

    2006-08-01

    One hundred and ten UTI Escherichia coli strains, from Ljubljana, Slovenia, were analyzed for antibiotic resistances, mobile DNA elements, serotype, and phylogenetic origin. A high prevalence of drug resistance and multidrug resistance was found. Twenty-six percent of the isolates harbored a class 1 integron, while a majority of the strains (56%) harbored rep sequences characteristic of F-like plasmids. int as well as rep sequences were found to be distributed in a random manner among strains of the four major phylogenetic groups indicating that all groups have a similar tendency to acquire and maintain mobile genetic elements frequently associated with resistance determinants.

  16. A comparison of bibliotherapy and face-to-face group therapy for children with anxiety disorders: Results of a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendt, Kristian Bech; Thastum, Mikael

    (James, James, Cowdrey, Soler & Choke, 2015), more studies of less intensive treatment formats are still warranted. Bibliotherapy is a low cost therapy with minimal therapist assistance, which in a few studies have been shown to result in favorable outcomes compared to waitlist and outcomes comparable...... to face-to-face treatment (e.g. Lyneham & Rapee, 2006, Cobham, 2012). The aim of the current study was to examine the efficacy of therapist supported group bibliotherapy compared to face-to-face group treatment using a randomized controlled design....

  17. Effects of music therapy on drug avoidance self-efficacy in patients on a detoxification unit: a three-group randomized effectiveness study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Self-efficacy is a component of Bandura's social cognitive theory and can lead to abstinence and a reduction of relapse potential for people who have substance abuse disorders. To date, no music therapy researcher has utilized this theoretical model to address abstinence and reduce the likelihood of relapse in people who have addictions. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of music therapy on drug avoidance self-efficacy in a randomized three-group wait-list control design with patients on a detoxification unit. Participants (N = 131) were cluster randomized to one of three single-session conditions: music therapy, verbal therapy, or wait-list control. Music therapy participants received a group lyric analysis intervention, verbal therapy participants received a group talk therapy session, and wait-list control participants eventually received a group recreational music therapy intervention. Although there was no significant between-group difference in drug avoidance self-efficacy, participants in the music therapy condition tended to have the highest mean drug avoidance self-efficacy scores. Posttest written comments supported the use of both music therapy and verbal therapy sessions. Two music therapy participants specifically noted that their initial skepticism had dissipated after receiving music therapy. Despite a lack of significant differences, the theoretical support of self-efficacy for substance abuse rehabilitation suggests that this may be an area of continued clinical focus and empirical investigation. Clinical anecdotes, limitations of the study, and suggestions for future research are provided.

  18. Effects of supportive-expressive discussion groups on loneliness, hope and quality of life in breast cancer survivors: a randomized control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabrizi, Fatemeh Moghaddam; Radfar, Moloud; Taei, Zeynab

    2016-09-01

    Evaluation of the effect of supportive expressive discussion groups on loneliness, hope and quality of life in breast cancer survivors. A randomized control trial including breast cancer patients who had completed chemotherapy and randomly allocated into two groups: intervention (n = 41) and control (n = 40). The intervention consisted of twelve weekly 90-min sessions for groups of six to eight breast cancer survivors. Data were obtained pre-to -post the intervention and at 8-week follow-up. The data were analyzed using a repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA). The findings revealed a significant reduction in loneliness scores (F = 69.85, p group, while scores of control participants did not show this pattern during the study. The strongest effects were found for global quality of life (effect size) = 0.59), for future perspectives (effect size = 0.51), emotional functioning (effect size = 0.35) and social functioning (effect size = 0.31). The intervention was effective on loneliness, hope and quality of life in the intervention group. The intervention needs further evaluation in a larger study and with other cancer types. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Group Therapy for Repeated Deliberate Self-Harm in Adolescents: Failure of Replication of a Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazell, Philip L.; Martin, Graham; McGill, Katherine; Kay, Tracey; Wood, Alison; Trainor, Gemma; Harrington, Richard

    2009-01-01

    A study revealing the superiority of group therapy to routine care in preventing the recurrence of self-harming behavior among adolescents is unsuccessfully replicated. The study's findings contradicted those of the original study.

  20. Efficacy of the Group Music and Imagery method (GrpMI) for women suffering from fibromyalgia: A randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Inge Nygaard

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Background: Fibromyalgia (FM) affects about 2-4% of the world population. Patients, mostly women, experience chronic widespread pain, fatigue, stiffness, sleep disturbances, and psychological disorders, especially depression and anxiety. Objective: The aim of this study was to assess...... the efficacy of Group Music and Imagery (GrpMI), including relaxation, music listening and spontaneous imagery, for subjective psychological wellbeing, functional capacity and health, pain perception, anxiety and depression in women with FM. Methods: Fifty-six women aged 35 to 65 (M = 51.3) diagnosed with FM...... groups found a significant increase in psychological wellbeing and a reduction in the rest of the variables, whereas the control groups only showed decreases in trait anxiety and trait depression. No significant differences were observed in the control groups at the follow-up, while the experimental...

  1. The DEMO trial: a randomized, parallel-group, observer-blinded clinical trial of strength versus aerobic versus relaxation training for patients with mild to moderate depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Jesper; Saltin, Bengt; Gluud, Christian

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the benefit and harm of exercise training in adults with clinical depression. METHOD: The DEMO trial is a randomized pragmatic trial for patients with unipolar depression conducted from January 2005 through July 2007. Patients were referred from general practitioners...... or psychiatrists and were eligible if they fulfilled the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision, criteria for unipolar depression and were aged between 18 and 55 years. Patients (N = 165) were allocated to supervised strength, aerobic, or relaxation training during a 4-month period. The primary...... repetition maximum for chest press increased by a mean (95% CI) of 4.0 kg (0.8 to 7.2; p = .014) in the strength training group versus the relaxation group, and maximal oxygen uptake increased by 2.7 mL/kg/min (1.2 to 4.3; p = .001) in the aerobic group versus the relaxation group. At 4 months, the mean...

  2. A two-site, two-arm, 34-week, double-blind, parallel-group, randomized controlled trial of reduced nicotine cigarettes in smokers with mood and/or anxiety disorders: trial design and protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia I. Allen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The U.S. Food and Drug Administration can set standards for cigarettes that could include reducing their nicotine content. Such a standard should improve public health without causing unintended serious consequences for sub-populations. This study evaluates the effect of progressive nicotine reduction in cigarettes on smoking behavior, toxicant exposure, and psychiatric symptoms in smokers with comorbid mood and/or anxiety disorders using a two-site, two-arm, double-blind, parallel group, randomized controlled trial (RCT in four phases over 34 weeks. Methods Adult smokers (N = 200 of 5 or more cigarettes per day will be randomized across two sites (Penn State and Massachusetts General. Participants must have not had a quit attempt in the prior month, nor be planning to quit in the next 6 months, meet criteria for a current or lifetime unipolar mood and/or anxiety disorder based on the structured Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview, and must not have an unstable medical or psychiatric condition. After a week of smoking their own cigarettes, participants receive two weeks of Spectrum research cigarettes with usual nicotine content (11.6 mg. After this baseline period, participants will be randomly assigned to continue smoking Spectrum research cigarettes that contain either (a Usual Nicotine Content (11.6 mg; or (b Reduced Nicotine Content: the nicotine content per cigarette is progressively reduced from approximately 11.6 mg to 0.2 mg in five steps over 18 weeks. At the end of the randomization phase, participants will be offered the choice to either (a quit smoking with assistance, (b continue smoking free research cigarettes, or (c return to purchasing their own cigarettes, for the final 12 weeks of the study. The primary outcome measure is blood cotinine; key secondary outcomes are: exhaled carbon monoxide, urinary total NNAL- 4-(methylnitrosamino-1-(3-pyridyl-1-butanol and 1-hydroxypyrene, oxidative

  3. Effects of within-class ability grouping on social interaction, achievement and motivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saleh, M.; Lazonder, Adrianus W.; de Jong, Anthonius J.M.

    2005-01-01

    This study examined how grouping arrangements affect students achievement, social interaction, and motivation. Students of high, average and low ability were randomly assigned to homogeneous or heterogeneous ability groups. All groups attended the same plant biology course. The main results indicate

  4. Humor, Self-Attitude, Emotions, and Cognitions in Group Art Therapy with War Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopytin, Alexander; Lebedev, Alexey

    2013-01-01

    This article presents findings from a study of the therapeutic effects of group art therapy in a psychotherapy unit of a Russian hospital for war veterans. The researchers randomly assigned 112 veterans being treated for stress-related disorders to an experimental group (art therapy) and a control group. The emphasis was on the use of humor in the…

  5. Tagclouds and Group Cognition: Effect of Tagging Support on Students' Reflective Learning in Team Blogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Ying; Lin, Shu-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effects of supported tagging (a prompting mechanism for students to stop and think about their writing) for team blogging on undergraduate students' reflective learning and the relationship between tagclouds and group cognition. Thirty-nine students were randomly assigned to six groups and blogged for 5 weeks. Three groups were…

  6. The effect of group counseling based on self-awareness skill on sexual risk-taking among girl students in Gorgan, Iran: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabiri, Golnoosh; Ziaei, Tayebe; Aval, Masumeh Rezaei; Vakili, Mohammad Ali

    2017-09-15

    Background Sexual puberty in adolescents occurs before their mental and emotional maturity and exposes them to high-risk sexual behaviors. Because sexual risk-taking occurs before adolescents become involved in a sexual relationship, this study was conducted to identify the effect of group counseling based on self-awareness skill on sexual risk-taking among female high school students in Gorgan in order to suggest some preventative measures. Methods The present parallel study is a randomized field trial conducted on 96 girl students who were studying in grades 10, 11 and 12 of high school with an age range of 14-18 years old. Sampling was done based on a multi-stage process. In the first stage, through the randomized clustering approach, four centers among six health centers were selected. In the second stage, 96 samples were collected through consecutive sampling. Finally, the samples were divided into two intervention and control groups (each one having 48 subjects) through the simple randomized approach. It has to be noted that no blinding was done in the present study. The data were collected using a demographic specifications form and the Iranian Adolescents Risk-Taking Scale (IARS). The consultation sessions based on self-awareness skill were explained to an intervention group through 60-min sessions over 7 weeks. The pretest was conducted for both groups and the posttest was completed 1 week and 1 month after the intervention by the intervention and control groups. Finally, after the loss of follow-up/drop out, a total of 80 subjects remained in the study; 42 subjects in the intervention group and 38 subjects in the control group. Data analyses were done using SPSS v.16 along with the Freidman non-parametric test and the Mann-Whitney and Wilcoxon tests. Results The results showed that the sexual risk-taking mean scores in the intervention group (10.54 ± 15.64) were reduced by applying 1-week (8.03 ± 12.82) and 1-month (4.91 ± 10.10) follow-ups after the

  7. Three nested randomized controlled trials of peer-only or multiple stakeholder group feedback within Delphi surveys during core outcome and information set development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookes, Sara T; Macefield, Rhiannon C; Williamson, Paula R; McNair, Angus G; Potter, Shelley; Blencowe, Natalie S; Strong, Sean; Blazeby, Jane M

    2016-08-17

    Methods for developing a core outcome or information set require involvement of key stakeholders to prioritise many items and achieve agreement as to the core set. The Delphi technique requires participants to rate the importance of items in sequential questionnaires (or rounds) with feedback provided in each subsequent round such that participants are able to consider the views of others. This study examines the impact of receiving feedback from different stakeholder groups, on the subsequent rating of items and the level of agreement between stakeholders. Randomized controlled trials were nested within the development of three core sets each including a Delphi process with two rounds of questionnaires, completed by patients and health professionals. Participants rated items from 1 (not essential) to 9 (absolutely essential). For round 2, participants were randomized to receive feedback from their peer stakeholder group only (peer) or both stakeholder groups separately (multiple). Decisions as to which items to retain following each round were determined by pre-specified criteria. Whilst type of feedback did not impact on the percentage of items for which a participant subsequently changed their rating, or the magnitude of change, it did impact on items retained at the end of round 2. Each core set contained discordant items retained by one feedback group but not the other (3-22 % discordant items). Consensus between patients and professionals in items to retain was greater amongst those receiving multiple group feedback in each core set (65-82 % agreement for peer-only feedback versus 74-94 % for multiple feedback). In addition, differences in round 2 scores were smaller between stakeholder groups receiving multiple feedback than between those receiving peer group feedback only. Variability in item scores across stakeholders was reduced following any feedback but this reduction was consistently greater amongst the multiple feedback group. In the development of

  8. Direct versus indirect and individual versus group modes of language therapy for children with primary language impairment: principal outcomes from a randomized controlled trial and economic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, James M; McCartney, Elspeth; O'Hare, Anne; Forbes, John

    2009-01-01

    Many school-age children with language impairments are enrolled in mainstream schools and receive indirect language therapy, but there have been, to the authors' knowledge, no previous controlled studies comparing the outcomes and costs of direct and indirect intervention delivered by qualified therapists and therapy assistants, and each delivery mode offered to children individually or in groups. To investigate the relative effectiveness of indirect and direct intervention therapy modes delivered individually or in groups for children with primary language impairment. A multi-centre randomized controlled trial investigated 161 children with primary language impairment aged 6-11 years randomized to a usual-therapy control group or to direct individual, indirect individual, direct group or indirect group therapy modes. Intervention was delivered three times a week for 30-40-min sessions in mainstream schools over 15 weeks. Language performance was assessed at baseline, post-therapy and at 12 months. Cost analysis was based on salary and travel costs for intervention modes and usual therapy. Compared with controls, children receiving project therapy made short-term improvements in expressive (p = 0.031), but not receptive, language immediately following intervention. Children with specific expressive language delay were more likely to show improvement than those with mixed receptive-expressive difficulties. The four project therapy modes did not differ on primary language outcomes (all p-values>0.392) and there were no further improvements evident at follow-up. Indirect group therapy was the least costly mode, with direct individual therapy the most costly. Intervention in this age group can be effective for expressive language and can be delivered equally effectively though speech and language therapy assistants and to children in groups.

  9. Video-games used in a group setting is feasible and effective to improve indicators of physical activity in individuals with chronic stroke: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Givon, Noa; Zeilig, Gabi; Weingarden, Harold; Rand, Debbie

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the feasibility of using video-games in a group setting and to compare the effectiveness of video-games as a group intervention to a traditional group intervention for improving physical activity in individuals with chronic stroke. A single-blind randomized controlled trial with evaluations pre and post a 3-month intervention, and at 3-month follow-up. Compliance (session attendance), satisfaction and adverse effects were feasibility measures. Grip strength and gait speed were measures of physical activity. Hip accelerometers quantified steps/day and the Action Research Arm Test assessed the functional ability of the upper extremity. Forty-seven community-dwelling individuals with chronic stroke (29-78 years) were randomly allocated to receive video-game (N=24) or traditional therapy (N=23) in a group setting. There was high treatment compliance for both interventions (video-games-78%, traditional therapy-66%), but satisfaction was rated higher for the video-game (93%) than the traditional therapy (71%) (χ(2)=4.98, P=0.026). Adverse effects were not reported in either group. Significant improvements were demonstrated in both groups for gait speed (F=3.9, P=0.02), grip strength of the weaker (F=6.67, P=0.002) and stronger hands (F=7.5, P=0.001). Daily steps and functional ability of the weaker hand did not increase in either group. Using video-games in a small group setting is feasible, safe and satisfying. Video-games improve indicators of physical activity of individuals with chronic stroke. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Variations of high frequency parameter of heart rate variability following osteopathic manipulative treatment in healthy subjects compared to control group and sham therapy: randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffini, Nuria; D'Alessandro, Giandomenico; Mariani, Nicolò; Pollastrelli, Alberto; Cardinali, Lucia; Cerritelli, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Heart Rate Variability (HRV) indicates how heart rate changes in response to inner and external stimuli. HRV is linked to health status and it is an indirect marker of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) function. To investigate the influence of osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT) on cardiac autonomic modulation in healthy subjects, compared with sham therapy and control group. Sixty-six healthy subjects, both male and female, were included in the present 3-armed randomized placebo controlled within subject cross-over single blinded study. Participants were asymptomatic adults (26.7 ± 8.4 y, 51% male, BMI 18.5 ± 4.8), both smokers and non-smokers and not on medications. At enrollment subjects were randomized in three groups: A, B, C. Standardized structural evaluation followed by a patient need-based osteopathic treatment was performed in the first session of group A and in the second session of group B. Standardized evaluation followed by a protocoled sham treatment was provided in the second session of group A and in the first session of group B. No intervention was performed in the two sessions of group C, acting as a time-control. The trial was registered on clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01908920. HRV was calculated from electrocardiography before, during and after the intervention, for a total amount time of 25 min and considering frequency domain as well as linear and non-linear methods as outcome measures. OMT engendered a statistically significant increase of parasympathetic activity, as shown by High Frequency power (p ANS activity increasing parasympathetic function and decreasing sympathetic activity, compared to sham therapy and control group.

  11. Variations of high frequency parameter of heart rate variability following osteopathic manipulative treatment in healthy subjects compared to control group and sham therapy: randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuria eRuffini

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Context: Heart Rate Variability (HRV indicates how heart rate changes in response to inner and external stimuli. HRV is linked to health status and it is an indirect marker of the autonomic nervous system (ANS function. Objective: To investigate the influence of osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT on ANS activity through changes of High Frequency, a heart rate variability index indicating the parasympathetic activity, in healthy subjects, compared with sham therapy and control group.Methods: Sixty-six healthy subjects, both male and female, were included in the present 3-armed randomized placebo controlled within subject cross-over single blinded study. Participants were asymptomatic adults, both smokers and non-smokers and not on medications. At enrollment subjects were randomized in 3 groups: A, B, C. Standardized structural evaluation followed by a patient need-based osteopathic treatment was performed in the first session of group A and in the second session of group B. Standardized evaluation followed by a protocoled sham treatment was provided in the second session of group A and in the first session of group B. No intervention was performed in the two sessions of group C, acting as a time-control. The trial was registered on clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01908920.Main Outcomes Measures: HRV was calculated from electrocardiography before, during and after the intervention, for a total amount time of 25 minutes.Results: OMT engendered a statistically significant increase of parasympathetic activity, as shown by High Frequency rate (p<0.001, and decrease of sympathetic activity, as revealed by Low Frequency rate (p<0.01; results also showed a reduction of Low Frequency/High Frequency ratio (p<0.001 and Detrended fluctuation scaling exponent (p<0.05. Conclusions: Findings suggested that OMT can influence ANS activity increasing parasympathetic function and decreasing sympathetic activity, compared to sham therapy and control group.

  12. Efficacy and safety of valproic acid versus haloperidol in patients with acute agitation: results of a randomized, double-blind, parallel-group trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadollahi, Shadi; Heidari, Kamran; Hatamabadi, Hamidreza; Vafaee, Reza; Yunesian, Somayeh; Azadbakht, Alireza; Mirmohseni, Ladan

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy of valproate versus haloperidol in decreasing the agitation level in affected patients in the emergency department. We assigned 80 acutely agitated patients to receive either intravenous sodium valproate (20 mg/kg) or intramuscular haloperidol (5 mg/1 ml). Agitation was measured at baseline and 30 min after the first injection using the Agitation-Calmness Evaluation Scale (ACES), the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale-Excited Component subscale, and the Agitated Behavior Scale. For 80 patients treated with sodium valproate, the mean ± SD dosage was 1541.5 ± 286 mg (range 940-2400). The mean postintervention ACES scores from baseline to 30 min after drug injection were 4.73 (SD = 1.93) for the valproate group and 5.45 (SD = 2.09) for the haloperidol group (P = 0.028). No significant differences were observed in terms of the mean changes 30 min after the intervention for two additional agitation scales. A larger proportion of patients in the haloperidol group experienced intense sedation (36.2%, P valproate group (2.5% for intense sedation, no patient for extrapyramidal symptoms). The findings suggest that in the clinical practice setting of emergency psychiatry, intravenous valproate is as effective as haloperidol in reducing agitation, with a better safety profile.

  13. Radiation Therapy Did Not Induce Long-Term Changes in Rectal Mucosa: Results From the Randomized Scandinavian Prostate Cancer Group 7 Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slagsvold, Jens Erik, E-mail: Jens.Erik.Slagsvold@stolav.no [Cancer Clinic, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim (Norway); Viset, Trond [Department of Pathology, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim (Norway); Wibe, Arne [Institute of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway); Department of Surgery, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim (Norway); Kaasa, Stein [Cancer Clinic, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim (Norway); European Palliative Care Research Center, Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway); Widmark, Anders [Department of Radiation Sciences, Cancercentrum, Umeå (Sweden); Lund, Jo-Åsmund [Cancer Clinic, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim (Norway); European Palliative Care Research Center, Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway)

    2016-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate long-term changes in the rectal mucosa after curative external beam radiation therapy in the treatment of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: In the Scandinavian Prostate Cancer Group 7 trial, 880 men with locally advanced prostate cancer were randomized to hormonal therapy alone versus hormonal therapy plus radiation therapy to 70 Gy. A subcohort from this trial being randomized at our center (n=178) was invited to a study on late anorectal side effects during 2003-2005, approximately 5 years after treatment, including measuring health-reported quality of life and physician-assessed toxicity score by the Late Effects Normal Tissue Task Force/Subjective, Objective, Management, Analytic (LENT/SOMA) and European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer/Radiation Therapy Oncology Group score. Sixty-seven patients had a rectal mucosa biopsy. Sixty-four biopsies were included in the final analysis, of which 33 patients were randomized to hormonal treatment and 31 to hormonal treatment plus radiation therapy. The presence of fibrosis, number of capillaries, and lymphocyte infiltration was then evaluated by light microscopy. Results: The group receiving radiation therapy had significantly higher LENT/SOMA and function/bother scale scores than the group that only received hormonal treatment, but there was no significant difference in the presence of fibrosis, ectasia, number of capillaries in the lamina propria, or lymphocyte infiltration between the groups. Conclusion: Radiation therapy to 70 Gy to the prostate does not induce long-term microscopic mucosal changes in the rectum 5 years after treatment. This is in contrast to the general assumption that structural changes, including fibrosis, seen after radiation therapy include the mucosa. We speculate that the main late effects of radiation therapy on the structure of the rectum are located in the deeper layers of the rectal wall than the mucosa.

  14. A parallel-group randomized clinical trial of individually tailored, multidisciplinary, palliative rehabilitation for patients with newly diagnosed advanced cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nottelmann, Lise; Groenvold, Mogens; Vejlgaard, Tove Bahn

    2017-01-01

    in a 12-week individually tailored, palliative rehabilitation program initiated shortly after a diagnosis of advanced cancer. METHODS: This single center, randomized, controlled trial will include 300 patients with newly diagnosed advanced cancer recruited from the Department of Oncology, Vejle Hospital...... initiated shortly after an advanced cancer diagnosis. The study will contribute with evidence on the effectiveness of implementing early palliative care in standard oncology treatment and hopefully offer new knowledge and future directions as to the content of palliative rehabilitation programs. TRIAL......BACKGROUND: The effect of early palliative care and rehabilitation on the quality of life of patients with advanced cancer has been only sparsely described and needs further investigation. In the present trial we combine elements of early, specialized palliative care with cancer rehabilitation...

  15. Effects of risedronate treatment on vertebral and nonvertebral fractures in women with postmenopausal osteoporosis: a randomized controlled trial. Vertebral Efficacy With Risedronate Therapy (VERT) Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, S T; Watts, N B; Genant, H K; McKeever, C D; Hangartner, T; Keller, M; Chesnut, C H; Brown, J; Eriksen, E F; Hoseyni, M S; Axelrod, D W; Miller, P D

    1999-10-13

    Risedronate, a potent bisphosphonate, has been shown to be effective in the treatment of Paget disease of bone and other metabolic bone diseases but, to our knowledge, it has not been evaluated in the treatment of established postmenopausal osteoporosis. To test the efficacy and safety of daily treatment with risedronate to reduce the risk of vertebral and other fractures in postmenopausal women with established osteoporosis. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of 2458 ambulatory postmenopausal women younger than 85 years with at least 1 vertebral fracture at baseline who were enrolled at 1 of 110 centers in North America conducted between December 1993 and January 1998. Subjects were randomly assigned to receive oral treatment for 3 years with risedronate (2.5 or 5 mg/d) or placebo. All subjects received calcium, 1000 mg/d. Vitamin D (cholecalciferol, up to 500 IU/d) was provided if baseline levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D were low. Incidence of new vertebral fractures as detected by quantitative and semiquantitative assessments of radiographs; incidence of radiographically confirmed nonvertebral fractures and change from baseline in bone mineral density as determined by dual x-ray absorptiometry. The 2.5 mg/d of risedronate arm was discontinued after 1 year; in the placebo and 5 mg/d of risedronate arms, 450 and 489 subjects, respectively, completed all 3 years of the trial. Treatment with 5 mg/d of risedronate, compared with placebo, decreased the cumulative incidence of new vertebral fractures by 41 % (95% confidence interval [CI], 18%-58%) over 3 years (11.3 % vs 16.3%; P= .003). A fracture reduction of 65% (95% CI, 38%-81 %) was observed after the first year (2.4% vs 6.4%; Posteoporosis.

  16. Access to a simulator is not enough: the benefits of virtual reality training based on peer-group-derived benchmarks--a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Websky, Martin W; Raptis, Dimitri A; Vitz, Martina; Rosenthal, Rachel; Clavien, P A; Hahnloser, Dieter

    2013-11-01

    Virtual reality (VR) simulators are widely used to familiarize surgical novices with laparoscopy, but VR training methods differ in efficacy. In the present trial, self-controlled basic VR training (SC-training) was tested against training based on peer-group-derived benchmarks (PGD-training). First, novice laparoscopic residents were randomized into a SC group (n = 34), and a group using PGD-benchmarks (n = 34) for basic laparoscopic training. After completing basic training, both groups performed 60 VR laparoscopic cholecystectomies for performance analysis. Primary endpoints were simulator metrics; secondary endpoints were program adherence, trainee motivation, and training efficacy. Altogether, 66 residents completed basic training, and 3,837 of 3,960 (96.8 %) cholecystectomies were available for analysis. Course adherence was good, with only two dropouts, both in the SC-group. The PGD-group spent more time and repetitions in basic training until the benchmarks were reached and subsequently showed better performance in the readout cholecystectomies: Median time (gallbladder extraction) showed significant differences of 520 s (IQR 354-738 s) in SC-training versus 390 s (IQR 278-536 s) in the PGD-group (p group being more efficient. Basic VR laparoscopic training based on PGD benchmarks with external assessment is superior to SC training, resulting in higher trainee motivation and better performance in simulated laparoscopic cholecystectomies. We recommend such a basic course based on PGD benchmarks before advancing to more elaborate VR training.

  17. Effectiveness and safety of 0.15% ganciclovir in situ ophthalmic gel for herpes simplex keratitis - a multicenter, randomized, investigator-masked, parallel group study in Chinese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tong; Gong, Lan; Sun, Xing-Huai; Zhao, Nai-Qing; Chen, Wei; Yuan, Hui-Ping; Shao, Yan; Gao, Ming-Hong; Tang, Hai

    2013-01-01

    Parallel comparison with 0.15% ganciclovir (GCV) ophthalmic gel to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of 0.15% GCV in situ ophthalmic gel for the treatment of herpes simplex keratitis (HSK). This was a multicenter, randomized, investigator-masked, parallel group study. HSK patients were randomly divided into two groups, with the corresponding treatment of 0.15% GCV ophthalmic gel or 0.15% GCV in situ ophthalmic gel. Symptoms and signs were observed before administration, and 3 (±1), 7 (±1), 14 (±2), and 21 (±3) days after the administration. The clinical effective rate was considered as the primary outcome. The safety profile was evaluated by AEs, visual acuity, and ocular tolerance. The clinical effective rate in the per-protocol (PP) dataset for the treatment group and the control group were 95.10% and 93.00%, respectively (P = 0.5282). The noninferiority test showed significant differences (P = 0.000305, P < 0.025), indicating that the tested drug was noninferior to the control. Patients in the PP dataset of both groups experienced decreases in the total scores of clinical indicators. Ocular AEs were few but similar between the two groups. There were no significant differences between patients' visions between the two groups before and after administration in the safety analysis set. In terms of drug tolerance, the rates of patients without transient blurred vision during all the visits in the treatment group were higher than those for the control group (P < 0.05). During the third and fourth visits, the rates of patients with eye itching were 4.08% and 1.22% in the treatment group, and 13.59% and 8.14% in the control group, respectively (P < 0.05). During the second visit, the rates of patients with eye irritation were 14.42% in the treatment group and 25.71% in the control group (P < 0.05). The 0.15% GCV in situ ophthalmic gel was effective and safe for the treatment of HSK, and was not inferior to 0.15% GCV ophthalmic gel. The 0.15% GCV in situ

  18. Group psychotherapy for eating disorders: A randomized clinical trial and a pre-treatment moderator and mediator analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Annika Helgadóttir

    English summary The aim of this thesis was twofold. First, I wanted to examine the effect of client feedback on treatment attendance and outcome in group psychotherapy for eating disorders. Second, I wanted to contribute to the relatively scarce body of research on the consequences of an eating...... disorder on functionality. Group psychotherapy of various types is widely used to treat individuals with eating disorders. Dropout is, however, an important problem in the treatment of these patients, and it is therefore important to find ways to increase attendance. One of the means to address...... the Outcome Rating Scale and the Group Session Rating Scale. The primary outcome was rate of attendance at treatment sessions; the secondary outcome was the severity of eating disorder symptoms measured with the Eating Disorder Examination interview. Exploratory outcomes were psychological distress measured...

  19. Teaching medical students exposure therapy for phobia/panic - randomized, controlled comparison of face-to-face tutorial in small groups vs. solo computer instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonough, Michael; Marks, Isaac M

    2002-05-01

    To compare the teaching value of one session of computer-guided solo instruction in exposure therapy for phobias with that of one face-to-face small-group tutorial. Non-blind, randomized, controlled study. King's College Hospital Medical School, London. Thirty-seven third-year medical students and 11 behaviour therapists. Seventy-five true/false multiple choice questions relating to (b) below answered at pre- and post-teaching by students and just once by behaviour therapists to obtain 'expert' scores; pre- and post-teaching ratings of interest in behaviour therapy and post-teaching ratings of educational and enjoyment value. EDUCATIONAL INTERVENTIONS: (a) All students had a 20-minute group lecture on basic concepts and historical aspects just before randomization to: (b) 90 min of either solo computer or group face-to-face tutorial teaching. Computer instruction used a short version of 'FearFighter'- a self-help computer system for people suffering from phobias. Solo computer instruction taught exposure therapy principles effectively but improved multiple choice question scores marginally less than did small-group tutorial teaching. Tutorial teaching required 5 times more teacher time but led to knowledge scores that did not differ significantly from those of behaviour therapists. Students clearly rated face-to-face small-group tutorial teaching as more enjoyable. The knowledge gain from a solo computer session resembled that from a small-group face-to-face tutorial, and required far less teacher time, but was less enjoyable. Enjoyment might rise if the computer session was group-oriented and aimed at students rather than patients. In general computer teaching might be best used to complement rather than replace conventional teaching.

  20. A phase 2a randomized, parallel group, dose-ranging study of molindone in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and persistent, serious conduct problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocks, Jennifer Dugan; Taneja, Baldeo K; Baroldi, Paolo; Findling, Robert L

    2012-04-01

    To evaluate safety and tolerability of four doses of immediate-release molindone hydrochloride in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and serious conduct problems. This open-label, parallel-group, dose-ranging, multicenter trial randomized children, aged 6-12 years, with ADHD and persistent, serious conduct problems to receive oral molindone thrice daily for 9-12 weeks in four treatment groups: Group 1-10 mg (5 mg if weight children with ADHD and serious conduct problems. Secondary outcome measures included change in Nisonger Child Behavior Rating Form-Typical Intelligence Quotient (NCBRF-TIQ) Conduct Problem subscale scores, change in Clinical Global Impressions-Severity (CGI-S) and -Improvement (CGI-I) subscale scores from baseline to end point, and Swanson, Nolan, and Pelham rating scale-revised (SNAP-IV) ADHD-related subscale scores. The study randomized 78 children; 55 completed the study. Treatment with molindone was generally well tolerated, with no clinically meaningful changes in laboratory or physical examination findings. The most common treatment-related adverse events (AEs) included somnolence