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Sample records for rafts regulate cellular

  1. Lipid Raft, Regulator of Plasmodesmal Callose Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iswanto, Arya Bagus Boedi; Kim, Jae-Yean

    2017-04-03

    A bstract: The specialized plasma membrane microdomains known as lipid rafts are enriched by sterols and sphingolipids. Lipid rafts facilitate cellular signal transduction by controlling the assembly of signaling molecules and membrane protein trafficking. Another specialized compartment of plant cells, the plasmodesmata (PD), which regulates the symplasmic intercellular movement of certain molecules between adjacent cells, also contains a phospholipid bilayer membrane. The dynamic permeability of plasmodesmata (PDs) is highly controlled by plasmodesmata callose (PDC), which is synthesized by callose synthases (CalS) and degraded by β-1,3-glucanases (BGs). In recent studies, remarkable observations regarding the correlation between lipid raft formation and symplasmic intracellular trafficking have been reported, and the PDC has been suggested to be the regulator of the size exclusion limit of PDs. It has been suggested that the alteration of lipid raft substances impairs PDC homeostasis, subsequently affecting PD functions. In this review, we discuss the substantial role of membrane lipid rafts in PDC homeostasis and provide avenues for understanding the fundamental behavior of the lipid raft-processed PDC.

  2. Regulation of AMPA receptor localization in lipid rafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Qingming; Huang, Yunfei; Amato, Stephen; Snyder, Solomon H.; Huganir, Richard L.; Man, Heng-Ye

    2009-01-01

    Lipid rafts are special microdomains enriched in cholesterol, sphingolipids and certain proteins, and play important roles in a variety of cellular functions including signal transduction and protein trafficking. We report that in cultured cortical and hippocampal neurons the distribution of lipid rafts is development-dependent. Lipid rafts in mature neurons exist on the entire cell-surface and display a high degree of mobility. AMPA receptors co-localize and associate with lipid rafts in the plasma membrane. The association of AMPARs with rafts is under regulation; through the NOS–NO pathway, NMDA receptor activity increases AMPAR localization in rafts. During membrane targeting, AMPARs insert into or at close proximity of the surface raft domains. Perturbation of lipid rafts dramatically suppresses AMPA receptor exocytosis, resulting in significant reduction in AMPAR cell-surface expression. PMID:18411055

  3. Lipid Raft, Regulator of Plasmodesmal Callose Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arya Bagus Boedi Iswanto

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The specialized plasma membrane microdomains known as lipid rafts are enriched by sterols and sphingolipids. Lipid rafts facilitate cellular signal transduction by controlling the assembly of signaling molecules and membrane protein trafficking. Another specialized compartment of plant cells, the plasmodesmata (PD, which regulates the symplasmic intercellular movement of certain molecules between adjacent cells, also contains a phospholipid bilayer membrane. The dynamic permeability of plasmodesmata (PDs is highly controlled by plasmodesmata callose (PDC, which is synthesized by callose synthases (CalS and degraded by β-1,3-glucanases (BGs. In recent studies, remarkable observations regarding the correlation between lipid raft formation and symplasmic intracellular trafficking have been reported, and the PDC has been suggested to be the regulator of the size exclusion limit of PDs. It has been suggested that the alteration of lipid raft substances impairs PDC homeostasis, subsequently affecting PD functions. In this review, we discuss the substantial role of membrane lipid rafts in PDC homeostasis and provide avenues for understanding the fundamental behavior of the lipid raft–processed PDC.

  4. Regulation of AMPA receptor localization in lipid rafts

    OpenAIRE

    Hou, Qingming; Huang, Yunfei; Amato, Stephen; Snyder, Solomon H.; Huganir, Richard L.; Man, Heng-Ye

    2008-01-01

    Lipid rafts are special microdomains enriched in cholesterol, sphingolipids and certain proteins, and play important roles in a variety of cellular functions including signal transduction and protein trafficking. We report that in cultured cortical and hippocampal neurons the distribution of lipid rafts is development-dependent. Lipid rafts in mature neurons exist on the entire cell-surface and display a high degree of mobility. AMPA receptors co-localize and associate with lipid rafts in the...

  5. Na/K-ATPase regulates bovine sperm capacitation through raft- and non-raft-mediated signaling mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajamanickam, Gayathri D; Kastelic, John P; Thundathil, Jacob C

    2017-11-01

    Highly dynamic lipid microdomains (rafts) in the sperm plasma membrane contain several signaling proteins that regulate sperm capacitation. Na/K-ATPase isoforms (testis-specific isoform ATP1A4 and ubiquitous isoform ATP1A1) are abundant in bovine sperm plasma membrane. We previously reported that incubation of bovine sperm with ouabain, a specific Na/K-ATPase ligand, induced tyrosine phosphorylation of several sperm proteins during capacitation. The objective of this study was to investigate the roles of lipid rafts and non-rafts in Na/K-ATPase enzyme activity and signaling during bovine sperm capacitation. Content of ATP1A4 and, to a lesser extent, ATP1A1 was increased in raft and non-raft fractions of capacitated sperm, although non-raft enzyme activities of both isoforms were higher than the corresponding activities in rafts from capacitated sperm. Yet, ATP1A4 was the predominant isoform responsible for total Na/K-ATPase activity in both rafts and non-rafts. A comparative increase in phosphorylation of signaling molecules was observed in both raft (CAV1) and non-raft (EGFR and ERK1/2) membrane fractions during capacitation. Although SRC was phosphorylated in both membrane fractions, the non-raft fraction possessed more of this activated form. We also inferred, by immunoprecipitation, that ATP1A4 interacted with CAV1 and EGFR in the raft fraction, whereas interactions of ATP1A4 with SRC, EGFR, and ERK1/2 occurred in the non-raft fraction of ouabain-capacitated sperm; conversely, ATP1A1 interacted only with CAV1 in both fractions of uncapacitated and capacitated sperm. In conclusion, both raft and non-raft cohorts of Na/K-ATPase isoforms contributed to phosphorylation of signaling molecules during bovine sperm capacitation. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. 78 FR 17087 - Special Local Regulation; New River Raft Race, New River; Fort Lauderdale, FL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-20

    ...-AA08 Special Local Regulation; New River Raft Race, New River; Fort Lauderdale, FL AGENCY: Coast Guard... on the New River in Fort Lauderdale, Florida during the Rotary Club of Fort Lauderdale New River Raft... States during the Rotary Club of Fort Lauderdale New River Raft Race. On March 23, 2013, Fort Lauderdale...

  7. RaftProt: mammalian lipid raft proteome database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Anup; Chen, David; Boda, Akash R; Foster, Leonard J; Davis, Melissa J; Hill, Michelle M

    2015-01-01

    RaftProt (http://lipid-raft-database.di.uq.edu.au/) is a database of mammalian lipid raft-associated proteins as reported in high-throughput mass spectrometry studies. Lipid rafts are specialized membrane microdomains enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids thought to act as dynamic signalling and sorting platforms. Given their fundamental roles in cellular regulation, there is a plethora of information on the size, composition and regulation of these membrane microdomains, including a large number of proteomics studies. To facilitate the mining and analysis of published lipid raft proteomics studies, we have developed a searchable database RaftProt. In addition to browsing the studies, performing basic queries by protein and gene names, searching experiments by cell, tissue and organisms; we have implemented several advanced features to facilitate data mining. To address the issue of potential bias due to biochemical preparation procedures used, we have captured the lipid raft preparation methods and implemented advanced search option for methodology and sample treatment conditions, such as cholesterol depletion. Furthermore, we have identified a list of high confidence proteins, and enabled searching only from this list of likely bona fide lipid raft proteins. Given the apparent biological importance of lipid raft and their associated proteins, this database would constitute a key resource for the scientific community. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  8. Myo1c regulates lipid raft recycling to control cell spreading, migration and Salmonella invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandstaetter, Hemma; Kendrick-Jones, John; Buss, Folma

    2012-04-15

    A balance between endocytosis and membrane recycling regulates the composition and dynamics of the plasma membrane. Internalization and recycling of cholesterol- and sphingolipid-enriched lipid rafts is an actin-dependent process that is mediated by a specialized Arf6-dependent recycling pathway. Here, we identify myosin1c (Myo1c) as the first motor protein that drives the formation of recycling tubules emanating from the perinuclear recycling compartment. We demonstrate that the single-headed Myo1c is a lipid-raft-associated motor protein that is specifically involved in recycling of lipid-raft-associated glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-linked cargo proteins and their delivery to the cell surface. Whereas Myo1c overexpression increases the levels of these raft proteins at the cell surface, in cells depleted of Myo1c function through RNA interference or overexpression of a dominant-negative mutant, these tubular transport carriers of the recycling pathway are lost and GPI-linked raft markers are trapped in the perinuclear recycling compartment. Intriguingly, Myo1c only selectively promotes delivery of lipid raft membranes back to the cell surface and is not required for recycling of cargo, such as the transferrin receptor, which is mediated by parallel pathways. The profound defect in lipid raft trafficking in Myo1c-knockdown cells has a dramatic impact on cell spreading, cell migration and cholesterol-dependent Salmonella invasion; processes that require lipid raft transport to the cell surface to deliver signaling components and the extra membrane essential for cell surface expansion and remodeling. Thus, Myo1c plays a crucial role in the recycling of lipid raft membrane and proteins that regulate plasma membrane plasticity, cell motility and pathogen entry.

  9. Association between tetrodotoxin resistant channels and lipid rafts regulates sensory neuron excitability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Pristerà

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs play a key role in the initiation and propagation of action potentials in neurons. Na(V1.8 is a tetrodotoxin (TTX resistant VGSC expressed in nociceptors, peripheral small-diameter neurons able to detect noxious stimuli. Na(V1.8 underlies the vast majority of sodium currents during action potentials. Many studies have highlighted a key role for Na(V1.8 in inflammatory and chronic pain models. Lipid rafts are microdomains of the plasma membrane highly enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids. Lipid rafts tune the spatial and temporal organisation of proteins and lipids on the plasma membrane. They are thought to act as platforms on the membrane where proteins and lipids can be trafficked, compartmentalised and functionally clustered. In the present study we investigated Na(V1.8 sub-cellular localisation and explored the idea that it is associated with lipid rafts in nociceptors. We found that Na(V1.8 is distributed in clusters along the axons of DRG neurons in vitro and ex vivo. We also demonstrated, by biochemical and imaging studies, that Na(V1.8 is associated with lipid rafts along the sciatic nerve ex vivo and in DRG neurons in vitro. Moreover, treatments with methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD and 7-ketocholesterol (7KC led to the dissociation between rafts and Na(V1.8. By calcium imaging we demonstrated that the lack of association between rafts and Na(V1.8 correlated with impaired neuronal excitability, highlighted by a reduction in the number of neurons able to conduct mechanically- and chemically-evoked depolarisations. These findings reveal the sub-cellular localisation of Na(V1.8 in nociceptors and highlight the importance of the association between Na(V1.8 and lipid rafts in the control of nociceptor excitability.

  10. Transcriptional Regulation of T-Cell Lipid Metabolism: Implications for Plasma Membrane Lipid Rafts and T-Cell Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George A. Robinson

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that cholesterol and glycosphingolipids are enriched in the plasma membrane (PM and form signaling platforms called lipid rafts, essential for T-cell activation and function. Moreover, changes in PM lipid composition affect the biophysical properties of lipid rafts and have a role in defining functional T-cell phenotypes. Here, we review the role of transcriptional regulators of lipid metabolism including liver X receptors α/β, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, estrogen receptors α/β (ERα/β, and sterol regulatory element-binding proteins in T-cells. These receptors lie at the interface between lipid metabolism and immune cell function and are endogenously activated by lipids and/or hormones. Importantly, they regulate cellular cholesterol, fatty acid, glycosphingolipid, and phospholipid levels but are also known to modulate a broad spectrum of immune responses. The current evidence supporting a role for lipid metabolism pathways in controlling immune cell activation by influencing PM lipid raft composition in health and disease, and the potential for targeting lipid biosynthesis pathways to control unwanted T-cell activation in autoimmunity is reviewed.

  11. Lipid raft regulates the initial spreading of melanoma A375 cells by modulating β1 integrin clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruifei; Bi, Jiajia; Ampah, Khamal Kwesi; Zhang, Chunmei; Li, Ziyi; Jiao, Yang; Wang, Xiaoru; Ba, Xueqing; Zeng, Xianlu

    2013-08-01

    Cell adhesion and spreading require integrins-mediated cell-extracellular matrix interaction. Integrins function through binding to extracellular matrix and subsequent clustering to initiate focal adhesion formation and actin cytoskeleton rearrangement. Lipid raft, a liquid ordered plasma membrane microdomain, has been reported to play major roles in membrane motility by regulating cell surface receptor function. Here, we identified that lipid raft integrity was required for β1 integrin-mediated initial spreading of melanoma A375 cells on fibronectin. We found that lipid raft disruption with methyl-β-cyclodextrin led to the inability of focal adhesion formation and actin cytoskeleton rearrangement by preventing β1 integrin clustering. Furthermore, we explored the possible mechanism by which lipid raft regulates β1 integrin clustering and demonstrated that intact lipid raft could recruit and modify some adaptor proteins, such as talin, α-actinin, vinculin, paxillin and FAK. Lipid raft could regulate the location of these proteins in lipid raft fractions and facilitate their binding to β1 integrin, which may be crucial for β1 integrin clustering. We also showed that lipid raft disruption impaired A375 cell migration in both transwell and wound healing models. Together, these findings provide a new insight for the relationship between lipid raft and the regulation of integrins. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Ethanol alters cellular activation and CD14 partitioning in lipid rafts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai Qun; Zhang Jun; Pruett, Stephen B.

    2005-01-01

    Alcohol consumption interferes with innate immunity. In vivo EtOH administration suppresses cytokine responses induced through Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and inhibits TLR4 signaling. Actually, EtOH exhibits a generalized suppressive effect on signaling and cytokine responses induced by through most TLRs. However, the underlying mechanism remains unknown. RAW264.7 cells were treated with LPS or co-treated with EtOH or with lipid raft-disrupting drugs. TNF-α production, IRAK-1 activation, and CD14 partition were evaluated. EtOH or nystatin, a lipid raft-disrupting drug, suppressed LPS-induced production of TNF-α. The suppressive effect of EtOH on LPS-induced TNF-α production was additive with that of methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MCD), another lipid raft-disrupting drug. EtOH interfered with IRAK-1 activation, an early TLR4 intracellular signaling event. Cell fractionation analyses show that acute EtOH altered LPS-related partition of CD14, a critical component of the LPS receptor complex. These results suggest a novel mechanism of EtOH action that involves interference with lipid raft clustering induced by LPS. This membrane action of EtOH might be one of the mechanisms by which EtOH acts as a generalized suppressor for TLR signaling

  13. Roles of Raft-Anchored Adaptor Cbp/PAG1 in Spatial Regulation of c-Src Kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oneyama, Chitose; Suzuki, Takashi; Okada, Masato

    2014-01-01

    The tyrosine kinase c-Src is upregulated in numerous human cancers, implying a role for c-Src in cancer progression. Previously, we have shown that sequestration of activated c-Src into lipid rafts via a transmembrane adaptor, Cbp/PAG1, efficiently suppresses c-Src-induced cell transformation in Csk-deficient cells, suggesting that the transforming activity of c-Src is spatially regulated via Cbp in lipid rafts. To dissect the molecular mechanisms of the Cbp-mediated regulation of c-Src, a combined analysis was performed that included mathematical modeling and in vitro experiments in a c-Src- or Cbp-inducible system. c-Src activity was first determined as a function of c-Src or Cbp levels, using focal adhesion kinase (FAK) as a crucial c-Src substrate. Based on these experimental data, two mathematical models were constructed, the sequestration model and the ternary model. The computational analysis showed that both models supported our proposal that raft localization of Cbp is crucial for the suppression of c-Src function, but the ternary model, which includes a ternary complex consisting of Cbp, c-Src, and FAK, also predicted that c-Src function is dependent on the lipid-raft volume. Experimental analysis revealed that c-Src activity is elevated when lipid rafts are disrupted and the ternary complex forms in non-raft membranes, indicating that the ternary model accurately represents the system. Moreover, the ternary model predicted that, if Cbp enhances the interaction between c-Src and FAK, Cbp could promote c-Src function when lipid rafts are disrupted. These findings underscore the crucial role of lipid rafts in the Cbp-mediated negative regulation of c-Src-transforming activity, and explain the positive role of Cbp in c-Src regulation under particular conditions where lipid rafts are perturbed. PMID:24675741

  14. Lipid raft involvement in yeast cell growth and death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mollinedo, Faustino, E-mail: fmollin@usal.es [Instituto de Biología Molecular y Celular del Cáncer, Centro de Investigación del Cáncer, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas - Universidad de Salamanca, Salamanca (Spain)

    2012-10-10

    The notion that cellular membranes contain distinct microdomains, acting as scaffolds for signal transduction processes, has gained considerable momentum. In particular, a class of such domains that is rich in sphingolipids and cholesterol, termed as lipid rafts, is thought to compartmentalize the plasma membrane, and to have important roles in survival and cell death signaling in mammalian cells. Likewise, yeast lipid rafts are membrane domains enriched in sphingolipids and ergosterol, the yeast counterpart of mammalian cholesterol. Sterol-rich membrane domains have been identified in several fungal species, including the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe as well as the pathogens Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans. Yeast rafts have been mainly involved in membrane trafficking, but increasing evidence implicates rafts in a wide range of additional cellular processes. Yeast lipid rafts house biologically important proteins involved in the proper function of yeast, such as proteins that control Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, and pH homeostasis, which influence many cellular processes, including cell growth and death. Membrane raft constituents affect drug susceptibility, and drugs interacting with sterols alter raft composition and membrane integrity, leading to yeast cell death. Because of the genetic tractability of yeast, analysis of yeast rafts could be an excellent model to approach unanswered questions of mammalian raft biology, and to understand the role of lipid rafts in the regulation of cell death and survival in human cells. A better insight in raft biology might lead to envisage new raft-mediated approaches to the treatment of human diseases where regulation of cell death and survival is critical, such as cancer and neurodegenerative diseases.

  15. Lipid raft involvement in yeast cell growth and death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mollinedo, Faustino

    2012-01-01

    The notion that cellular membranes contain distinct microdomains, acting as scaffolds for signal transduction processes, has gained considerable momentum. In particular, a class of such domains that is rich in sphingolipids and cholesterol, termed as lipid rafts, is thought to compartmentalize the plasma membrane, and to have important roles in survival and cell death signaling in mammalian cells. Likewise, yeast lipid rafts are membrane domains enriched in sphingolipids and ergosterol, the yeast counterpart of mammalian cholesterol. Sterol-rich membrane domains have been identified in several fungal species, including the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe as well as the pathogens Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans. Yeast rafts have been mainly involved in membrane trafficking, but increasing evidence implicates rafts in a wide range of additional cellular processes. Yeast lipid rafts house biologically important proteins involved in the proper function of yeast, such as proteins that control Na + , K + , and pH homeostasis, which influence many cellular processes, including cell growth and death. Membrane raft constituents affect drug susceptibility, and drugs interacting with sterols alter raft composition and membrane integrity, leading to yeast cell death. Because of the genetic tractability of yeast, analysis of yeast rafts could be an excellent model to approach unanswered questions of mammalian raft biology, and to understand the role of lipid rafts in the regulation of cell death and survival in human cells. A better insight in raft biology might lead to envisage new raft-mediated approaches to the treatment of human diseases where regulation of cell death and survival is critical, such as cancer and neurodegenerative diseases.

  16. Assessing the nature of lipid raft membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemelä, Perttu S; Ollila, Samuli; Hyvönen, Marja T

    2007-01-01

    of highly ordered lateral domains rich in sphingomyelin and cholesterol (CHOL). These domains, called functional lipid rafts, have been suggested to take part in a variety of dynamic cellular processes such as membrane trafficking, signal transduction, and regulation of the activity of membrane proteins......-scale simulations to elucidate the properties of ternary raft mixtures with CHOL, palmitoylsphingomyelin (PSM), and palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylcholine. We simulate two bilayers of 1,024 lipids for 100 ns in the liquid-ordered phase and one system of the same size in the liquid-disordered phase. The studies provide...... heterogeneity more difficult. The findings reveal aspects of the role of favored (specific) lipid-lipid interactions within rafts and clarify the prominent role of CHOL in altering the properties of the membrane locally in its neighborhood. Also, we show that the presence of PSM and CHOL in rafts leads...

  17. A novel mechanism of regulating breast cancer cell migration via palmitoylation-dependent alterations in the lipid raft affiliation of CD44.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babina, Irina S; McSherry, Elaine A; Donatello, Simona; Hill, Arnold D K; Hopkins, Ann M

    2014-02-10

    Most breast cancer-related deaths result from metastasis, a process involving dynamic regulation of tumour cell adhesion and migration. The adhesion protein CD44, a key regulator of cell migration, is enriched in cholesterol-enriched membrane microdomains termed lipid rafts. We recently reported that raft affiliation of CD44 negatively regulates interactions with its migratory binding partner ezrin. Since raft affiliation is regulated by post-translational modifications including palmitoylation, we sought to establish the contribution of CD44 palmitoylation and lipid raft affiliation to cell migration. Recovery of CD44 and its binding partners from raft versus non-raft membrane microdomains was profiled in non-migrating and migrating breast cancer cell lines. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to introduce single or double point mutations into both CD44 palmitoylation sites (Cys286 and Cys295), whereupon the implications for lipid raft recovery, phenotype, ezrin co-precipitation and migratory behaviour was assessed. Finally CD44 palmitoylation status and lipid raft affiliation was assessed in primary cultures from a small panel of breast cancer patients. CD44 raft affiliation was increased during migration of non-invasive breast cell lines, but decreased during migration of highly-invasive breast cells. The latter was paralleled by increased CD44 recovery in non-raft fractions, and exclusive non-raft recovery of its binding partners. Point mutation of CD44 palmitoylation sites reduced CD44 raft affiliation in invasive MDA-MB-231 cells, increased CD44-ezrin co-precipitation and accordingly enhanced cell migration. Expression of palmitoylation-impaired (raft-excluded) CD44 mutants in non-invasive MCF-10a cells was sufficient to reversibly induce the phenotypic appearance of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and to increase cell motility. Interestingly, cell migration was associated with temporal reductions in CD44 palmitoylation in wild-type breast cells. Finally

  18. Down-regulation of lipid raft-associated onco-proteins via cholesterol-dependent lipid raft internalization in docosahexaenoic acid-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun Jeong; Yun, Un-Jung; Koo, Kyung Hee; Sung, Jee Young; Shim, Jaegal; Ye, Sang-Kyu; Hong, Kyeong-Man; Kim, Yong-Nyun

    2014-01-01

    Lipid rafts, plasma membrane microdomains, are important for cell survival signaling and cholesterol is a critical lipid component for lipid raft integrity and function. DHA is known to have poor affinity for cholesterol and it influences lipid rafts. Here, we investigated a mechanism underlying the anti-cancer effects of DHA using a human breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-231. We found that DHA decreased cell surface levels of lipid rafts via their internalization, which was partially reversed by cholesterol addition. With DHA treatment, caveolin-1, a marker for rafts, and EGFR were colocalized with LAMP-1, a lysosomal marker, in a cholesterol-dependent manner, indicating that DHA induces raft fusion with lysosomes. DHA not only displaced several raft-associated onco-proteins, including EGFR, Hsp90, Akt, and Src, from the rafts but also decreased total levels of those proteins via multiple pathways, including the proteasomal and lysosomal pathways, thereby decreasing their activities. Hsp90 overexpression maintained its client proteins, EGFR and Akt, and attenuated DHA-induced cell death. In addition, overexpression of Akt or constitutively active Akt attenuated DHA-induced apoptosis. All these data indicate that the anti-proliferative effect of DHA is mediated by targeting of lipid rafts via decreasing cell surface lipid rafts by their internalization, thereby decreasing raft-associated onco-proteins via proteasomal and lysosomal pathways and decreasing Hsp90 chaperone function. © 2013.

  19. Lenalidomide induces lipid raft assembly to enhance erythropoietin receptor signaling in myelodysplastic syndrome progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGraw, Kathy L; Basiorka, Ashley A; Johnson, Joseph O; Clark, Justine; Caceres, Gisela; Padron, Eric; Heaton, Ruth; Ozawa, Yukiyasu; Wei, Sheng; Sokol, Lubomir; List, Alan F

    2014-01-01

    Anemia remains the principal management challenge for patients with lower risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS). Despite appropriate cytokine production and cellular receptor display, erythropoietin receptor (EpoR) signaling is impaired. We reported that EpoR signaling is dependent upon receptor localization within lipid raft microdomains, and that disruption of raft integrity abolishes signaling capacity. Here, we show that MDS erythroid progenitors display markedly diminished raft assembly and smaller raft aggregates compared to normal controls (p = 0.005, raft number; p = 0.023, raft size). Because lenalidomide triggers raft coalescence in T-lymphocytes promoting immune synapse formation, we assessed effects of lenalidomide on raft assembly in MDS erythroid precursors and UT7 cells. Lenalidomide treatment rapidly induced lipid raft formation accompanied by EpoR recruitment into raft fractions together with STAT5, JAK2, and Lyn kinase. The JAK2 phosphatase, CD45, a key negative regulator of EpoR signaling, was displaced from raft fractions. Lenalidomide treatment prior to Epo stimulation enhanced both JAK2 and STAT5 phosphorylation in UT7 and primary MDS erythroid progenitors, accompanied by increased STAT5 DNA binding in UT7 cells, and increased erythroid colony forming capacity in both UT7 and primary cells. Raft induction was associated with F-actin polymerization, which was blocked by Rho kinase inhibition. These data indicate that deficient raft integrity impairs EpoR signaling, and provides a novel strategy to enhance EpoR signal fidelity in non-del(5q) MDS.

  20. Self Righting Life Raft

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    The Givens Buoy Raft was designed and manufactured for inventor Jim Givens of Givens Marine Survival Co. Inc., by RPR Industries, Inc. The Raft consists of a canopied topside and an underwater hemispheric ballast chamber. It has a heavy ballast stabilization system, adopted from NASA technology, which negates the capsizing problem. A "flapper valve" admits large amounts of water to the hemisphere chamber providing ballast to keep the center of gravity constant; stabilization system compensates for changes in wave angle and weight shifting of raft occupants. Mr. Givens has an exclusive patent license for use of the NASA technology. Produced in various sizes, capacities range from six to 20 persons. Raft is housed in a canister, available in several configurations. A pull on a line triggers the automatic inflation process, which takes 12 seconds. The raft has been credited with saving 230 lives in the last five years. It has found wide acceptance with operators of fishing boats, pleasure craft and other vessels. The Coast Guard is purchasing the rafts for use on its rescue helicopters and the Navy has a development program to adapt the system. The Coast Guard last year announced a proposed amendment of its regulations that would require large ballast chambers on inflatable life rafts.

  1. The role of lipid raft translocation of prohibitin in regulation of Akt and Raf-protected apoptosis of HaCaT cells upon ultraviolet B irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qiong; Wu, Shiyong

    2017-07-01

    Prohibitin (PHB) plays a role in regulation of ultraviolet B light (UVB)-induced apoptosis of human keratinocytes, HaCaT cells. The regulatory function of PHB appears to be associated with its lipid raft translocation. However, the detailed mechanism for PHB-mediated apoptosis of these keratinocytes upon UVB irradiation is not clear. In this report, we determined the role of lipid raft translocation of PHB in regulation of UVB-induced apoptosis. Our data show that upon UVB irradiation PHB is translocated from the non-raft membrane to the lipid rafts, which is correlated with a release of both Akt and Raf from membrane. Overexpression of Akt and/or Raf impedes UVB-induced lipid raft translocation of PHB. Immunoprecipitation analysis indicates that UVB alters the interactions among PHB, Akt, and Raf. Reduced expression of PHB leads to a decreased phosphorylation of Akt and ERK, as well as a decreased activity of Akt, and increased apoptosis of the cells upon UVB irradiation. These results suggest that PHB regulates UVB-induced apoptosis of keratinocytes via a mechanism that involves detachment from Akt and Raf on the plasma membrane, and sequential lipid raft translocation. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Keratin impact on PKCδ- and ASMase-mediated regulation of hepatocyte lipid raft size – implication for FasR-associated apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Stéphane; Loranger, Anne; Omary, M. Bishr

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Keratins are epithelial cell intermediate filament (IF) proteins that are expressed as pairs in a cell-differentiation-regulated manner. Hepatocytes express the keratin 8 and 18 pair (denoted K8/K18) of IFs, and a loss of K8 or K18, as in K8-null mice, leads to degradation of the keratin partner. We have previously reported that a K8/K18 loss in hepatocytes leads to altered cell surface lipid raft distribution and more efficient Fas receptor (FasR, also known as TNFRSF6)-mediated apoptosis. We demonstrate here that the absence of K8 or transgenic expression of the K8 G62C mutant in mouse hepatocytes reduces lipid raft size. Mechanistically, we find that the lipid raft size is dependent on acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase, also known as SMPD1) enzyme activity, which is reduced in absence of K8/K18. Notably, the reduction of ASMase activity appears to be caused by a less efficient redistribution of surface membrane PKCδ toward lysosomes. Moreover, we delineate the lipid raft volume range that is required for an optimal FasR-mediated apoptosis. Hence, K8/K18-dependent PKCδ- and ASMase-mediated modulation of lipid raft size can explain the more prominent FasR-mediated signaling resulting from K8/K18 loss. The fine-tuning of ASMase-mediated regulation of lipid rafts might provide a therapeutic target for death-receptor-related liver diseases. PMID:27422101

  3. Lipid rafts regulate PCB153-induced disruption of occludin and brain endothelial barrier function through protein phosphatase 2A and matrix metalloproteinase-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eum, Sung Yong, E-mail: seum@miami.edu; Jaraki, Dima; András, Ibolya E.; Toborek, Michal

    2015-09-15

    Occludin is an essential integral transmembrane protein regulating tight junction (TJ) integrity in brain endothelial cells. Phosphorylation of occludin is associated with its localization to TJ sites and incorporation into intact TJ assembly. The present study is focused on the role of lipid rafts in polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-induced disruption of occludin and endothelial barrier function. Exposure of human brain endothelial cells to 2,2′,4,4′,5,5′-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB153) induced dephosphorylation of threonine residues of occludin and displacement of occludin from detergent-resistant membrane (DRM)/lipid raft fractions within 1 h. Moreover, lipid rafts modulated the reduction of occludin level through activation of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) after 24 h PCB153 treatment. Inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity by okadaic acid or fostriecin markedly protected against PCB153-induced displacement of occludin and increased permeability of endothelial cells. The implication of lipid rafts and PP2A signaling in these processes was further defined by co-immunoprecipitation of occludin with PP2A and caveolin-1, a marker protein of lipid rafts. Indeed, a significant MMP-2 activity was observed in lipid rafts and was increased by exposure to PCB153. The pretreatment of MMP-2 inhibitors protected against PCB153-induced loss of occludin and disruption of lipid raft structure prevented the increase of endothelial permeability. Overall, these results indicate that lipid raft-associated processes, such as PP2A and MMP-2 activation, participate in PCB153-induced disruption of occludin function in brain endothelial barrier. This study contributes to a better understanding of the mechanisms leading to brain endothelial barrier dysfunction in response to exposure to environmental pollutants, such as ortho-substituted PCBs. - Highlights: • PCB153 disturbed human brain endothelial barrier through disruption of occludin. • Lipid raft-associated PP

  4. Characterization of the functions and proteomes associated with membrane rafts in chicken sperm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ai Ushiyama

    Full Text Available Cellular membranes are heterogeneous, and this has a great impact on cellular function. Despite the central role of membrane functions in multiple cellular processes in sperm, their molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. Membrane rafts are specific membrane domains enriched in cholesterol, ganglioside GM1, and functional proteins, and they are involved in the regulation of a variety of cellular functions. Studies of the functional characterization of membrane rafts in mammalian sperm have demonstrated roles in sperm-egg binding and the acrosomal reaction. Recently, our biochemical and cell biological studies showed that membrane rafts are present and might play functional roles in chicken sperm. In this study, we isolated membrane rafts from chicken sperm as a detergent-resistant membranes (DRM floating on a density gradient in the presence of 1% Triton X-100, and characterized the function and proteomes associated with these domains. Biochemical comparison of the DRM between fresh and cryopreserved sperm demonstrated that cryopreservation induces cholesterol loss specifically from membrane rafts, indicating the functional connection with reduced post-thaw fertility in chicken sperm. Furthermore, using an avidin-biotin system, we found that sperm DRM is highly enriched in a 60 KDa single protein able to bind to the inner perivitelline layer. To identify possible roles of membrane rafts, quantitative proteomics, combined with a stable isotope dimethyl labeling approach, identified 82 proteins exclusively or relatively more associated with membrane rafts. Our results demonstrate the functional distinctions between membrane domains and provide compelling evidence that membrane rafts are involved in various cellular pathways inherent to chicken sperm.

  5. Analysis of detergent-free lipid rafts isolated from CD4+ T cell line: interaction with antigen presenting cells promotes coalescing of lipid rafts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kennedy Colleen

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lipid rafts present on the plasma membrane play an important role in spatiotemporal regulation of cell signaling. Physical and chemical characterization of lipid raft size and assessment of their composition before, and after cell stimulation will aid in developing a clear understanding of their regulatory role in cell signaling. We have used visual and biochemical methods and approaches for examining individual and lipid raft sub-populations isolated from a mouse CD4+ T cell line in the absence of detergents. Results Detergent-free rafts were analyzed before and after their interaction with antigen presenting cells. We provide evidence that the average diameter of lipid rafts isolated from un-stimulated T cells, in the absence of detergents, is less than 100 nm. Lipid rafts on CD4+ T cell membranes coalesce to form larger structures, after interacting with antigen presenting cells even in the absence of a foreign antigen. Conclusions Findings presented here indicate that lipid raft coalescence occurs during cellular interactions prior to sensing a foreign antigen.

  6. Involvement of glycosphingolipid-enriched lipid rafts in inflammatory responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwabuchi, Kazuhisa

    2015-01-01

    Glycosphingolipids (GSLs) are membrane components consisting of hydrophobic ceramide and hydrophilic sugar moieties. GSLs cluster with cholesterol in cell membranes to form GSL-enriched lipid rafts. Biochemical analyses have demonstrated that GSL-enriched lipid rafts contain several kinds of transducer molecules, including Src family kinases. Among the GSLs, lactosylceramide (LacCer, CDw17) can bind to various microorganisms, is highly expressed on the plasma membranes of human phagocytes, and forms lipid rafts containing the Src family tyrosine kinase Lyn. LacCer-enriched lipid rafts mediate immunological and inflammatory reactions, including superoxide generation, chemotaxis, and non-opsonic phagocytosis. Therefore, LacCer-enriched membrane microdomains are thought to function as pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), which recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) expressed on microorganisms. LacCer also serves as a signal transduction molecule for functions mediated by CD11b/CD18-integrin (αM/β2-integrin, CR3, Mac-1), as well as being associated with several key cellular processes. LacCer recruits PCKα/ε and phospholipase A2 to stimulate PECAM-1 expression in human monocytes and their adhesion to endothelial cells, as well as regulating β1-integrin clustering and endocytosis on cell surfaces. This review describes the organizational and inflammation-related functions of LacCer-enriched lipid rafts.

  7. R7-binding protein targets the G protein β5/R7-regulator of G protein signaling complex to lipid rafts in neuronal cells and brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Jian-Hua

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (G proteins, composed of Gα, Gβ, and Gγ subunits, are positioned at the inner face of the plasma membrane and relay signals from activated G protein-coupled cell surface receptors to various signaling pathways. Gβ5 is the most structurally divergent Gβ isoform and forms tight heterodimers with regulator of G protein signalling (RGS proteins of the R7 subfamily (R7-RGS. The subcellular localization of Gβ 5/R7-RGS protein complexes is regulated by the palmitoylation status of the associated R7-binding protein (R7BP, a recently discovered SNARE-like protein. We investigate here whether R7BP controls the targeting of Gβ5/R7-RGS complexes to lipid rafts, cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains where conventional heterotrimeric G proteins and some effector proteins are concentrated in neurons and brain. Results We show that endogenous Gβ5/R7-RGS/R7BP protein complexes are present in native neuron-like PC12 cells and that a fraction is targeted to low-density, detergent-resistant membrane lipid rafts. The buoyant density of endogenous raft-associated Gβ5/R7-RGS protein complexes in PC12 cells was similar to that of lipid rafts containing the palmitoylated marker proteins PSD-95 and LAT, but distinct from that of the membrane microdomain where flotillin was localized. Overexpression of wild-type R7BP, but not its palmitoylation-deficient mutant, greatly enriched the fraction of endogenous Gβ5/R7-RGS protein complexes in the lipid rafts. In HEK-293 cells the palmitoylation status of R7BP also regulated the lipid raft targeting of co-expressed Gβ5/R7-RGS/R7BP proteins. A fraction of endogenous Gβ5/R7-RGS/R7BP complexes was also present in lipid rafts in mouse brain. Conclusion A fraction of Gβ5/R7-RGS/R7BP protein complexes is targeted to low-density, detergent-resistant membrane lipid rafts in PC12 cells and brain. In cultured cells, the palmitoylation status of

  8. Analysis of the interaction between respiratory syncytial virus and lipid-rafts in Hep2 cells during infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Gaie; Jeffree, Chris E.; McDonald, Terence; McL Rixon, Helen W.; Aitken, James D.; Sugrue, Richard J.

    2004-01-01

    The assembly of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in lipid-rafts was examined in Hep2 cells. Confocal and electron microscopy showed that during RSV assembly, the cellular distribution of the complement regulatory proteins, decay accelerating factor (CD55) and CD59, changes and high levels of these cellular proteins are incorporated into mature virus filaments. The detergent-solubility properties of CD55, CD59, and the RSV fusion (F) protein were found to be consistent with each protein being located predominantly within lipid-raft structures. The levels of these proteins in cell-released virus were examined by immunoelectronmicroscopy and found to account for between 5% and 15% of the virus attachment (G) glycoprotein levels. Collectively, our findings suggest that an intimate association exists between RSV and lipid-raft membranes and that significant levels of these host-derived raft proteins, such as those regulating complement activation, are subsequently incorporated into the envelope of mature virus particles

  9. Exosome uptake depends on ERK1/2-heat shock protein 27 signaling and lipid Raft-mediated endocytosis negatively regulated by caveolin-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Katrin J; Christianson, Helena C; Wittrup, Anders; Bourseau-Guilmain, Erika; Lindqvist, Eva; Svensson, Lena M; Mörgelin, Matthias; Belting, Mattias

    2013-06-14

    The role of exosomes in cancer can be inferred from the observation that they transfer tumor cell derived genetic material and signaling proteins, resulting in e.g. increased tumor angiogenesis and metastasis. However, the membrane transport mechanisms and the signaling events involved in the uptake of these virus-like particles remain ill-defined. We now report that internalization of exosomes derived from glioblastoma (GBM) cells involves nonclassical, lipid raft-dependent endocytosis. Importantly, we show that the lipid raft-associated protein caveolin-1 (CAV1), in analogy with its previously described role in virus uptake, negatively regulates the uptake of exosomes. We find that exosomes induce the phosphorylation of several downstream targets known to associate with lipid rafts as signaling and sorting platforms, such as extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1/2 (ERK1/2) and heat shock protein 27 (HSP27). Interestingly, exosome uptake appears dependent on unperturbed ERK1/2-HSP27 signaling, and ERK1/2 phosphorylation is under negative influence by CAV1 during internalization of exosomes. These findings significantly advance our general understanding of exosome-mediated uptake and offer potential strategies for how this pathway may be targeted through modulation of CAV1 expression and ERK1/2 signaling.

  10. Activation and Regulation of Cellular Eicosanoid Biosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas G. Brock

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing appreciation for the wide variety of physiological responses that are regulated by lipid messengers. One particular group of lipid messengers, the eicosanoids, plays a central role in regulating immune and inflammatory responses in a receptor-mediated fashion. These mediators are related in that they are all derived from one polyunsaturated fatty acid, arachidonic acid. However, the various eicosanoids are synthesized by a wide variety of cell types by distinct enzymatic pathways, and have diverse roles in immunity and inflammation. In this review, the major pathways involved in the synthesis of eicosanoids, as well as key points of regulation, are presented.

  11. Regulation of ARE-mRNA Stability by Cellular Signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Christian Kroun; Lykke-Andersen, Jens

    2013-01-01

    but as a response to different cellular cues they can become either stabilized, allowing expression of a given gene, or further destabilized to silence their expression. These tightly regulated mRNAs include many that encode growth factors, proto-oncogenes, cytokines, and cell cycle regulators. Failure to properly...

  12. Complement component 1, q subcomponent binding protein (C1QBP) in lipid rafts mediates hepatic metastasis of pancreatic cancer by regulating IGF-1/IGF-1R signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Haojun; Fang, Winston; Liu, Minda; Fu, Deliang

    2017-10-01

    Pancreatic cancer shows a remarkable predilection for hepatic metastasis. Complement component 1, q subcomponent binding protein (C1QBP) can mediate growth factor-induced cancer cell chemotaxis and distant metastasis by activation of receptor tyrosine kinases. Coincidentally, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) derived from the liver and cancer cells itself has been recognized as a critical inducer of hepatic metastasis. However, the mechanism underlying IGF-1-dependent hepatic metastasis of pancreatic cancer, in which C1QBP may be involved, remains unknown. In the study, we demonstrated a significant association between C1QBP expression and hepatic metastasis in patients with pancreatic cancer. IGF-1 induced the translocation of C1QBP from cytoplasm to lipid rafts and further drove the formation of CD44 variant 6 (CD44v6)/C1QBP complex in pancreatic cancer cells. C1QBP interacting with CD44v6 in lipid rafts promoted phosphorylation of IGF-1R and thus activated downstream PI3K and MAPK signaling pathways which mediated metastatic potential of pancreatic cancer cells including proliferation, apoptosis, invasion, adhesion and energy metabolism. Furthermore, C1QBP knockdown suppressed hepatic metastasis of pancreatic cancer cells in nude mice. We therefore conclude that C1QBP in lipid rafts serves a key regulator of IGF-1/IGF-1R-induced hepatic metastasis from pancreatic cancer. Our findings about C1QBP in lipid rafts provide a novel strategy to block IGF-1/IGF-1R signaling in pancreatic cancer and a reliable premise for more efficient combined modality therapies. © 2017 UICC.

  13. Piezo proteins: regulators of mechanosensation and other cellular processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagriantsev, Sviatoslav N; Gracheva, Elena O; Gallagher, Patrick G

    2014-11-14

    Piezo proteins have recently been identified as ion channels mediating mechanosensory transduction in mammalian cells. Characterization of these channels has yielded important insights into mechanisms of somatosensation, as well as other mechano-associated biologic processes such as sensing of shear stress, particularly in the vasculature, and regulation of urine flow and bladder distention. Other roles for Piezo proteins have emerged, some unexpected, including participation in cellular development, volume regulation, cellular migration, proliferation, and elongation. Mutations in human Piezo proteins have been associated with a variety of disorders including hereditary xerocytosis and several syndromes with muscular contracture as a prominent feature. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Piezo Proteins: Regulators of Mechanosensation and Other Cellular Processes*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagriantsev, Sviatoslav N.; Gracheva, Elena O.; Gallagher, Patrick G.

    2014-01-01

    Piezo proteins have recently been identified as ion channels mediating mechanosensory transduction in mammalian cells. Characterization of these channels has yielded important insights into mechanisms of somatosensation, as well as other mechano-associated biologic processes such as sensing of shear stress, particularly in the vasculature, and regulation of urine flow and bladder distention. Other roles for Piezo proteins have emerged, some unexpected, including participation in cellular development, volume regulation, cellular migration, proliferation, and elongation. Mutations in human Piezo proteins have been associated with a variety of disorders including hereditary xerocytosis and several syndromes with muscular contracture as a prominent feature. PMID:25305018

  15. Inhibition of VEGF-dependent angiogenesis by the anti-CD82 monoclonal antibody 4F9 through regulation of lipid raft microdomains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Sayaka; Iwata, Satoshi; Hatano, Ryo; Komiya, Eriko; Dang, Nam H.; Iwao, Noriaki; Ohnuma, Kei; Morimoto, Chikao

    2016-01-01

    CD82 (also known as KAI1) belongs to the tetraspanin superfamily of type III transmembrane proteins, and is involved in regulating cell adhesion, migration and proliferation. In contrast to these well-established roles of CD82 in tumor biology, its function in endothelial cell (EC) activity and tumor angiogenesis is yet to be determined. In this study, we show that suppression of CD82 negatively regulates vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced angiogenesis. Moreover, we demonstrate that the anti-CD82 mAb 4F9 effectively inhibits phosphorylation of VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2), which is the principal mediator of the VEGF-induced angiogenic signaling process in tumor angiogenesis, by regulating the organization of the lipid raft microdomain signaling platform in human EC. Our present work therefore suggests that CD82 on EC is a potential target for anti-angiogenic therapy in VEGFR2-dependent tumor angiogenesis. -- Highlights: •Knockdown of CD82 decreases EC migration, proliferation and angiogenesis. •Anti-CD82 mAb 4F9 inhibits EC migration, proliferation and angiogenesis. •4F9 inhibits VEGFR2 phosphorylation via control of CD82 distribution in lipid rafts.

  16. Inhibition of VEGF-dependent angiogenesis by the anti-CD82 monoclonal antibody 4F9 through regulation of lipid raft microdomains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nomura, Sayaka; Iwata, Satoshi; Hatano, Ryo [Division of Clinical Immunology, Advanced Clinical Research Center, The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo, 108-8639 (Japan); Komiya, Eriko [Department of Therapy Development and Innovation for Immune Disorders and Cancers, Graduate School of Medicine, Juntendo University, 2-1-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8421 (Japan); Dang, Nam H. [Division of Hematology/Oncology, University of Florida, 1600 SW Archer Road- Box 100278, Room MSB M410A, Gainesville, FL, 32610 (United States); Iwao, Noriaki [Department of Hematology, School of Medicine, Juntendo University, 2-1-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8421 (Japan); Ohnuma, Kei, E-mail: kohnuma@juntendo.ac.jp [Department of Rheumatology and Allergy, IMSUT Hospital, The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo, 108-8639 (Japan); Morimoto, Chikao [Division of Clinical Immunology, Advanced Clinical Research Center, The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo, 108-8639 (Japan); Department of Rheumatology and Allergy, IMSUT Hospital, The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo, 108-8639 (Japan)

    2016-05-20

    CD82 (also known as KAI1) belongs to the tetraspanin superfamily of type III transmembrane proteins, and is involved in regulating cell adhesion, migration and proliferation. In contrast to these well-established roles of CD82 in tumor biology, its function in endothelial cell (EC) activity and tumor angiogenesis is yet to be determined. In this study, we show that suppression of CD82 negatively regulates vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced angiogenesis. Moreover, we demonstrate that the anti-CD82 mAb 4F9 effectively inhibits phosphorylation of VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2), which is the principal mediator of the VEGF-induced angiogenic signaling process in tumor angiogenesis, by regulating the organization of the lipid raft microdomain signaling platform in human EC. Our present work therefore suggests that CD82 on EC is a potential target for anti-angiogenic therapy in VEGFR2-dependent tumor angiogenesis. -- Highlights: •Knockdown of CD82 decreases EC migration, proliferation and angiogenesis. •Anti-CD82 mAb 4F9 inhibits EC migration, proliferation and angiogenesis. •4F9 inhibits VEGFR2 phosphorylation via control of CD82 distribution in lipid rafts.

  17. Down-regulation of Connexin43 expression reveals the involvement of caveolin-1 containing lipid rafts in human U251 glioblastoma cell invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strale, Pierre-Olivier; Clarhaut, Jonathan; Lamiche, Coralie; Cronier, Laurent; Mesnil, Marc; Defamie, Norah

    2012-11-01

    Glioblastoma cells are characterized by high proliferation and invasive capacities. Tumor development has been associated with a decrease of gap-junctional intercellular communication, but the concrete involvement of gap junction proteins, connexins, remains elusive since they are also suspected to promote cell invasion. In order to better understand how connexins control the glioma cell phenotype, we studied the consequences of inhibiting the intrinsic expression of the major astrocytic connexin, Connexin43, in human U251 glioblastoma cells by the shRNA strategy. The induced down-regulation of Cx43 expression has various effects on the U251 cells such as increased clonogenicity, angiogenesis and decreased adhesion on specific extracellular matrix proteins. We demonstrate that the invasion capacity measured in vitro and ex vivo correlates with Cx43 expression level. For the first time in a cancer cell context, our work demonstrates that Cx43 cofractionates, colocalizes and coimmunoprecipitates with a lipid raft marker, caveolin-1 and that this interaction is inversely correlated to the level of Cx43. This localization of Cx43 in these lipid raft microdomains regulates both homo- and heterocellular gap junctional communications (respectively between U251 cells, or between U251 cells and astrocytes). Moreover, the adhesive and invasive capacities are not dependent, in our model, on Cav-1 expression level. Our results tend to show that heterocellular gap junctional communication between cancer and stroma cells may affect the behavior of the tumor cells. Altogether, our data demonstrate that Cx43 controls the tumor phenotype of glioblastoma U251 cells and in particular, invasion capacity, through its localization in lipid rafts containing Cav-1. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Osmosensory mechanisms in cellular and systemic volume regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Stine Helene Falsig; Kapus, András; Hoffmann, Else K

    2011-01-01

    Perturbations of cellular and systemic osmolarity severely challenge the function of all organisms and are consequently regulated very tightly. Here we outline current evidence on how cells sense volume perturbations, with particular focus on mechanisms relevant to the kidneys and to extracellular...

  19. Cellular regulation of the structure and function of aortic valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail El-Hamamsy

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aortic valve was long considered a passive structure that opens and closes in response to changes in transvalvular pressure. Recent evidence suggests that the aortic valve performs highly sophisticated functions as a result of its unique microscopic structure. These functions allow it to adapt to its hemodynamic and mechanical environment. Understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in normal valve physiology is essential to elucidate the mechanisms behind valve disease. We here review the structure and developmental biology of aortic valves; we examine the role of its cellular parts in regulating its function and describe potential pathophysiological and clinical implications.

  20. Lipid raft-mediated miR-3908 inhibition of migration of breast cancer cell line MCF-7 by regulating the interactions between AdipoR1 and Flotillin-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuan; Shan, Fei; Chen, Jinglong

    2017-03-21

    The mechanisms of lipid raft regulation by microRNAs in breast cancer are not fully understood. This work focused on the evaluation and identification of miR-3908, which may be a potential biomarker related to the migration of breast cancer cells, and elucidates lipid-raft-regulating cell migration in breast cancer. To confirm the prediction that miR-3908 is matched with AdipoR1, we used 3'-UTR luciferase activity of AdipoR1 to assess this. Then, human breast cancer cell line MCF-7 was cultured in the absence or presence of the mimics or inhibitors of miR-3908, after which the biological functions of MCF-7 cells were analyzed. The protein expression of AdipoR1, AMPK, and SIRT-1 were examined. The interaction between AdipoR1 and Flotillin-1, or its effects on lipid rafts on regulating cell migration of MCF-7, was also investigated. AdipoR1 is a direct target of miR-3908. miR-3908 suppresses the expression of AdipoR1 and its downstream pathway genes, including AMPK, p-AMPK, and SIRT-1. miR-3908 enhances the process of breast cancer cell clonogenicity. miR-3908 exerts its effects on the proliferation and migration of MCF-7 cells, which are mediated by lipid rafts regulating AdipoR1's ability to bind Flotillin-1. miR-3908 is a crucial mediator of the migration process in breast cancer cells. Lipid rafts regulate the interactions between AdipoR1 and Flotillin-1 and then the migration process associated with miR-3908 in MCF-7 cells. Our findings suggest that targeting miR-3908 and the lipid raft, may be a promising strategy for the treatment and prevention of breast cancer.

  1. Piezo Proteins: Regulators of Mechanosensation and Other Cellular Processes*

    OpenAIRE

    Bagriantsev, Sviatoslav N.; Gracheva, Elena O.; Gallagher, Patrick G.

    2014-01-01

    Piezo proteins have recently been identified as ion channels mediating mechanosensory transduction in mammalian cells. Characterization of these channels has yielded important insights into mechanisms of somatosensation, as well as other mechano-associated biologic processes such as sensing of shear stress, particularly in the vasculature, and regulation of urine flow and bladder distention. Other roles for Piezo proteins have emerged, some unexpected, including participation in cellular deve...

  2. Involvement of Sib Proteins in the Regulation of Cellular Adhesion in Dictyostelium discoideum▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Cornillon, Sophie; Froquet, Romain; Cosson, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms ensuring cellular adhesion have been studied in detail in Dictyostelium amoebae, but little is known about the regulation of cellular adhesion in these cells. Here, we show that cellular adhesion is regulated in Dictyostelium, notably by the concentration of a cellular secreted factor accumulating in the medium. This constitutes a quorum-sensing mechanism allowing coordinated regulation of cellular adhesion in a Dictyostelium population. In order to understand the mechani...

  3. Life raft stabilizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radnofsky, M. I.; Barnett, J. H., Jr.; Harrison, F. L.; Marak, R. J. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An improved life raft stabilizer for reducing rocking and substantially precluding capsizing is discussed. The stabilizer may be removably attached to the raft and is defined by flexible side walls which extend a considerable depth downwardly to one another in the water. The side walls, in conjunction with the floor of the raft, form a ballast enclosure. A weight is placed in the bottom of the enclosure and water port means are provided in the walls. Placement of the stabilizer in the water allows the weighted bottom to sink, producing submerged deployment thereof and permitting water to enter the enclosure through the port means, thus forming a ballast for the raft.

  4. Inhibition of Akt signaling by exclusion from lipid rafts in normal and transformed epidermal keratinocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calay, Damien; Vind-Kezunovic, Dina; Frankart, Aurelie

    2010-01-01

    Lipid rafts are cholesterol-rich plasma membrane domains that regulate signal transduction. Because our earlier work indicated that raft disruption inhibited proliferation and caused cell death, we investigated here the role of membrane cholesterol, the crucial raft constituent, in the regulation...

  5. ApoER2 expression increases Aβ production while decreasing Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP endocytosis: Possible role in the partitioning of APP into lipid rafts and in the regulation of γ-secretase activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bu Guojun

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The generation of the amyloid-β peptide (Aβ through the proteolytic processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP is a central event in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Recent studies highlight APP endocytosis and localization to lipid rafts as important events favoring amyloidogenic processing. However, the precise mechanisms underlying these events are poorly understood. ApoER2 is a member of the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R family exhibiting slow endocytosis rate and a significant association with lipid rafts. Despite the important neurophysiological roles described for ApoER2, little is known regarding how ApoER2 regulates APP trafficking and processing. Results Here, we demonstrate that ApoER2 physically interacts and co-localizes with APP. Remarkably, we found that ApoER2 increases cell surface APP levels and APP association with lipid rafts. The increase of cell surface APP requires the presence of ApoER2 cytoplasmic domain and is a result of decreased APP internalization rate. Unexpectedly, ApoER2 expression correlated with a significant increase in Aβ production and reduced levels of APP-CTFs. The increased Aβ production was dependent on the integrity of the NPxY endocytosis motif of ApoER2. We also found that expression of ApoER2 increased APP association with lipid rafts and increased γ-secretase activity, both of which might contribute to increased Aβ production. Conclusion These findings show that ApoER2 negatively affects APP internalization. However, ApoER2 expression stimulates Aβ production by shifting the proportion of APP from the non-rafts to the raft membrane domains, thereby promoting β-secretase and γ-secretase mediated amyloidogenic processing and also by incrementing the activity of γ-secretase.

  6. Identification of Novel Raft Marker Protein, FlotP in Bacillus anthracis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somani, Vikas K; Aggarwal, Somya; Singh, Damini; Prasad, Tulika; Bhatnagar, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Lipid rafts are dynamic, nanoscale assemblies of specific proteins and lipids, distributed heterogeneously on eukaryotic membrane. Flotillin-1, a conserved eukaryotic raft marker protein (RMP) harbor SPFH (Stomatin, Prohibitin, Flotillin, and HflK/C) and oligomerization domains to regulate various cellular processes through its interactions with other signaling or transport proteins. Rafts were thought to be absent in prokaryotes hitherto, but recent report of its presence and significance in physiology of Bacillus subtilis prompted us to investigate the same in pathogenic bacteria (PB) also. In prokaryotes, proteins of SPFH2a subfamily show highest identity to SPFH domain of Flotillin-1. Moreover, bacterial genome organization revealed that Flotillin homolog harboring SPFH2a domain exists in an operon with an upstream gene containing NFeD domain. Here, presence of RMP in PB was initially investigated in silico by analyzing the presence of SPFH2a, oligomerization domains in the concerned gene and NfeD domain in the adjacent upstream gene. After investigating 300 PB, four were found to harbor RMP. Among them, domains of Bas0525 (FlotP) of Bacillus anthracis (BA) showed highest identity with characteristic domains of RMP. Considering the global threat of BA as the bioterror agent, it was selected as a model for further in vitro characterization of rafts in PB. In silico and in vitro analysis showed significant similarity of FlotP with numerous attributes of Flotillin-1. Its punctate distribution on membrane with exclusive localization in detergent resistant membrane fraction; strongly favors presence of raft with RMP FlotP in BA. Furthermore, significant effect of Zaragozic acid (ZA), a raft associated lipid biosynthesis inhibitor, on several patho-physiological attributes of BA such as growth, morphology, membrane rigidity etc., were also observed. Specifically, a considerable decrease in membrane rigidity, strongly recommended presence of an unknown raft associated

  7. Synaptic membrane rafts: traffic lights for local neurotrophin signaling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zonta, Barbara; Minichiello, Liliana

    2013-10-18

    Lipid rafts, cholesterol and lipid rich microdomains, are believed to play important roles as platforms for the partitioning of transmembrane and synaptic proteins involved in synaptic signaling, plasticity, and maintenance. There is increasing evidence of a physical interaction between post-synaptic densities and post-synaptic lipid rafts. Localization of proteins within lipid rafts is highly regulated, and therefore lipid rafts may function as traffic lights modulating and fine-tuning neuronal signaling. The tyrosine kinase neurotrophin receptors (Trk) and the low-affinity p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75(NTR)) are enriched in neuronal lipid rafts together with the intermediates of downstream signaling pathways, suggesting a possible role of rafts in neurotrophin signaling. Moreover, neurotrophins and their receptors are involved in the regulation of cholesterol metabolism. Cholesterol is an important component of lipid rafts and its depletion leads to gradual loss of synapses, underscoring the importance of lipid rafts for proper neuronal function. Here, we review and discuss the idea that translocation of neurotrophin receptors in synaptic rafts may account for the selectivity of their transduced signals.

  8. Synaptic membrane rafts: traffic lights for local neurotrophin signalling?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara eZonta

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Lipid rafts, cholesterol and lipid rich microdomains, are believed to play important roles as platforms for the partitioning of transmembrane and synaptic proteins involved in synaptic signalling, plasticity and maintenance. There is increasing evidence of a physical interaction between post-synaptic densities and post-synaptic lipid rafts. Localization of proteins within lipid rafts is highly regulated, and therefore lipid rafts may function as traffic lights modulating and fine-tuning neuronal signalling. The tyrosine kinase neurotrophin receptors (Trk and the low-affinity p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR are enriched in neuronal lipid rafts together with the intermediates of downstream signalling pathways, suggesting a possible role of rafts in neurotrophin signalling. Moreover, neurotrophins and their receptors are involved in the regulation of cholesterol metabolism. Cholesterol is an important component of lipid rafts and its depletion leads to gradual loss of synapses, underscoring the importance of lipid rafts for proper neuronal function. Here, we review and discuss the idea that translocation of neurotrophin receptors in synaptic rafts may account for the selectivity of their transduced signals.

  9. Localization of the placental BCRP/ABCG2 transporter to lipid rafts: Role for cholesterol in mediating efflux activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szilagyi, John T; Vetrano, Anna M; Laskin, Jeffrey D; Aleksunes, Lauren M

    2017-07-01

    The breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) is an efflux transporter in the placental barrier. By transporting chemicals from the fetal to the maternal circulation, BCRP limits fetal exposure to a range of drugs, toxicants, and endobiotics such as bile acids and hormones. The purpose of the present studies was to 1) determine whether BCRP localizes to highly-ordered, cholesterol-rich lipid raft microdomains in placenta microvillous membranes, and 2) determine the impact of cholesterol on BCRP-mediated placental transport in vitro. BCRP expression was analyzed in lipid rafts isolated from placentas from healthy, term pregnancies and BeWo trophoblasts by density gradient ultracentrifugation. BeWo cells were also tested for their ability to efflux BCRP substrates after treatment with the cholesterol sequestrant methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD, 5 mM, 1 h) or the cholesterol synthesis inhibitor pravastatin (200 μM, 48 h). BCRP was found to co-localize with lipid raft proteins in detergent-resistant, lipid raft-containing fractions from placental microvillous membranes and BeWo cells. Treatment of BeWo cells with MβCD redistributed BCRP protein into higher density non-lipid raft fractions. Repletion of the cells with cholesterol restored BCRP localization to lipid raft-containing fractions. Treatment of BeWo cells with MβCD or pravastatin increased cellular retention of two BCRP substrates, the fluorescent dye Hoechst 33342 and the mycotoxin zearalenone. Repletion with cholesterol restored BCRP transporter activity. Taken together, these data demonstrate that cholesterol may play a critical role in the post-translational regulation of BCRP in placental lipid rafts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Sinking a Granular Raft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protière, Suzie; Josserand, Christophe; Aristoff, Jeffrey M.; Stone, Howard A.; Abkarian, Manouk

    2017-03-01

    We report experiments that yield new insights on the behavior of granular rafts at an oil-water interface. We show that these particle aggregates can float or sink depending on dimensionless parameters taking into account the particle densities and size and the densities of the two fluids. We characterize the raft shape and stability and propose a model to predict its shape and maximum length to remain afloat. Finally we find that wrinkles and folds appear along the raft due to compression by its own weight, which can trigger destabilization. These features are characteristics of an elastic instability, which we discuss, including the limitations of our model.

  11. ATM-mediated Snail Serine 100 phosphorylation regulates cellular radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boohaker, Rebecca J.; Cui, Xiaoli; Stackhouse, Murray; Xu, Bo

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Activation of the DNA damage responsive protein kinase ATM is a critical step for cellular survival in response to ionizing irradiation (IR). Direct targets of ATM regulating radiosensitivity remain to be fully investigated. We have recently reported that ATM phosphorylates the transcriptional repressor Snail on Serine 100. We aimed to further study the functional significance of ATM-mediated Snail phosphorylation in response to IR. Material and methods: We transfected vector-only, wild-type, the Serine 100 to alanine (S100A) or to glutamic acid (S100E) substitution of Snail into various cell lines. We assessed colony formation, γ-H2AX focus formation and the invasion index in the cells treated with or without IR. Results: We found that over-expression of the S100A mutant Snail in HeLa cells significantly increased radiosensitivity. Meanwhile the expression of S100E, a phospho-mimicking mutation, resulted in enhanced radio-resistance. Interestingly, S100E could rescue the radiosensitive phenotype in ATM-deficient cells. We also found that expression of S100E increased γ-H2AX focus formation and compromised inhibition of invasion in response to IR independent of cell survival. Conclusion: ATM-mediated Snail Serine 100 phosphorylation in response to IR plays an important part in the regulation of radiosensitivity

  12. Membrane raft association is a determinant of plasma membrane localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Rohrer, Blanca B; Levental, Kandice R; Simons, Kai; Levental, Ilya

    2014-06-10

    The lipid raft hypothesis proposes lateral domains driven by preferential interactions between sterols, sphingolipids, and specific proteins as a central mechanism for the regulation of membrane structure and function; however, experimental limitations in defining raft composition and properties have prevented unequivocal demonstration of their functional relevance. Here, we establish a quantitative, functional relationship between raft association and subcellular protein sorting. By systematic mutation of the transmembrane and juxtamembrane domains of a model transmembrane protein, linker for activation of T-cells (LAT), we generated a panel of variants possessing a range of raft affinities. These mutations revealed palmitoylation, transmembrane domain length, and transmembrane sequence to be critical determinants of membrane raft association. Moreover, plasma membrane (PM) localization was strictly dependent on raft partitioning across the entire panel of unrelated mutants, suggesting that raft association is necessary and sufficient for PM sorting of LAT. Abrogation of raft partitioning led to mistargeting to late endosomes/lysosomes because of a failure to recycle from early endosomes. These findings identify structural determinants of raft association and validate lipid-driven domain formation as a mechanism for endosomal protein sorting.

  13. Desmosome Assembly and Disassembly Are Membrane Raft-Dependent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faundez, Victor; Koval, Michael; Mattheyses, Alexa L.; Kowalczyk, Andrew P.

    2014-01-01

    Strong intercellular adhesion is critical for tissues that experience mechanical stress, such as the skin and heart. Desmosomes provide adhesive strength to tissues by anchoring desmosomal cadherins of neighboring cells to the intermediate filament cytoskeleton. Alterations in assembly and disassembly compromise desmosome function and may contribute to human diseases, such as the autoimmune skin blistering disease pemphigus vulgaris (PV). We previously demonstrated that PV auto-antibodies directed against the desmosomal cadherin desmoglein 3 (Dsg3) cause loss of adhesion by triggering membrane raft-mediated Dsg3 endocytosis. We hypothesized that raft membrane microdomains play a broader role in desmosome homeostasis by regulating the dynamics of desmosome assembly and disassembly. In human keratinocytes, Dsg3 is raft associated as determined by biochemical and super resolution immunofluorescence microscopy methods. Cholesterol depletion, which disrupts rafts, prevented desmosome assembly and adhesion, thus functionally linking rafts to desmosome formation. Interestingly, Dsg3 did not associate with rafts in cells lacking desmosomal proteins. Additionally, PV IgG-induced desmosome disassembly occurred by redistribution of Dsg3 into raft-containing endocytic membrane domains, resulting in cholesterol-dependent loss of adhesion. These findings demonstrate that membrane rafts are required for desmosome assembly and disassembly dynamics, suggesting therapeutic potential for raft targeting agents in desmosomal diseases such as PV. PMID:24498201

  14. CD4 down regulation and raft dissociation by the non-depleting YTS177 antibody hinder murine T helper cell activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Cheng-Jang [Graduate Institute of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan (China); Division of Biological Sciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, 92093 (United States); Lu, Chun-Hao [Graduate Institute of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan (China); Chen, Li-Chen [Division of Allergy, Asthma, and Rheumatology, Department of Pediatrics, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan (China); Nguyen, Duc T. [Division of Biological Sciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, 92093 (United States); Huang, Yi-Shu [Graduate Institute of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan (China); Lin, Hsi-Hsien [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Graduate Institute of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan (China); Chang Gung Immunology Consortium, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan (China); Department of Anatomic Pathology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chun-Yen [Graduate Institute of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan (China); Chang Gung Immunology Consortium, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan (China); Department of Hepatogastroenterology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan (China); Kuo, Ming-Ling, E-mail: mingling@mail.cgu.edu.tw [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Graduate Institute of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan (China); Division of Allergy, Asthma, and Rheumatology, Department of Pediatrics, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan (China); Chang Gung Immunology Consortium, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan (China)

    2016-05-13

    Non-depleting YTS177 anti-CD4 monoclonal antibody (MoAb) has been reported to lead to antigen-specific immunotolerance in allograft transplantation and autoimmune diabetes, as well as possibly to inhibition of allergic inflammation in mice. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying hyporesponsive T cell responses induced by YTS177 MoAb remain elusive. Herein, we demonstrate that the YTS177 MoAb increases the levels of anergy factors p27{sup kip1} and Cbl-b, inhibits IL-2 production, and impairs calcium mobilization in activated T cells in vitro. YTS177 MoAb suppresses OVA-driven proliferation of DO11.10 CD4{sup +} T cells in vivo as well. Mechanistically, YTS177 MoAb induces tolerance by causing CD4 down-regulation through clathrin-dependent and raft dissociation. The results obtained in this study lead us to propose novel protective or curative approaches to CD4 T cell-mediated diseases.

  15. CD4 down regulation and raft dissociation by the non-depleting YTS177 antibody hinder murine T helper cell activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Cheng-Jang; Lu, Chun-Hao; Chen, Li-Chen; Nguyen, Duc T.; Huang, Yi-Shu; Lin, Hsi-Hsien; Lin, Chun-Yen; Kuo, Ming-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Non-depleting YTS177 anti-CD4 monoclonal antibody (MoAb) has been reported to lead to antigen-specific immunotolerance in allograft transplantation and autoimmune diabetes, as well as possibly to inhibition of allergic inflammation in mice. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying hyporesponsive T cell responses induced by YTS177 MoAb remain elusive. Herein, we demonstrate that the YTS177 MoAb increases the levels of anergy factors p27"k"i"p"1 and Cbl-b, inhibits IL-2 production, and impairs calcium mobilization in activated T cells in vitro. YTS177 MoAb suppresses OVA-driven proliferation of DO11.10 CD4"+ T cells in vivo as well. Mechanistically, YTS177 MoAb induces tolerance by causing CD4 down-regulation through clathrin-dependent and raft dissociation. The results obtained in this study lead us to propose novel protective or curative approaches to CD4 T cell-mediated diseases.

  16. Erythropoietin Receptor Signaling Is Membrane Raft Dependent

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGraw, Kathy L.; Fuhler, Gwenny M.; Johnson, Joseph O.; Clark, Justine A.; Caceres, Gisela C.; Sokol, Lubomir; List, Alan F.

    2012-01-01

    Upon erythropoietin (Epo) engagement, Epo-receptor (R) homodimerizes to activate JAK2 and Lyn, which phosphorylate STAT5. Although recent investigations have identified key negative regulators of Epo-R signaling, little is known about the role of membrane localization in controlling receptor signal fidelity. Here we show a critical role for membrane raft (MR) microdomains in creation of discrete signaling platforms essential for Epo-R signaling. Treatment of UT7 cells with Epo induced MR assembly and coalescence. Confocal microscopy showed that raft aggregates significantly increased after Epo stimulation (mean, 4.3±1.4(SE) vs. 25.6±3.2 aggregates/cell; p≤0.001), accompanied by a >3-fold increase in cluster size (p≤0.001). Raft fraction immunoblotting showed Epo-R translocation to MR after Epo stimulation and was confirmed by fluorescence microscopy in Epo stimulated UT7 cells and primary erythroid bursts. Receptor recruitment into MR was accompanied by incorporation of JAK2, Lyn, and STAT5 and their activated forms. Raft disruption by cholesterol depletion extinguished Epo induced Jak2, STAT5, Akt and MAPK phosphorylation in UT7 cells and erythroid progenitors. Furthermore, inhibition of the Rho GTPases Rac1 or RhoA blocked receptor recruitment into raft fractions, indicating a role for these GTPases in receptor trafficking. These data establish a critical role for MR in recruitment and assembly of Epo-R and signal intermediates into discrete membrane signaling units. PMID:22509308

  17. Regulation of cellular pH: From molecules to membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabe, Michael David

    The vacuolar H+-ATPase (V-ATPase) is a universal class of proton pumps responsible for creating and maintaining acidic milieus in both intracellular and extracellular spaces. In the first chapter, I develop a mechanochemical model of this enzyme based upon the counter-rotation of adjacent subunits. The mathematical approach details a general integrated method for describing the mechanical and chemical reactions that occur in motor systems. A novel escapement is proposed for how the protons cross the protein-bilayer interface, and it is shown how this movement couples to ATP hydrolysis. This model reproduces a variety of experimental data while providing a framework for understanding the function of the enzyme's subunits. Specifically, it explains how ATP hydrolysis can uncouple from proton movement, which has important consequences for cellular energetics and pH regulation. Until now only an equilibrium theory of organelle acidification has been proposed; however, recent experiments show that large proton leaks prevent many cellular compartments from reaching thermodynamic equilibrium. The characterization of the V-ATPase is used in the second chapter in order to develop a unified model of organelle acidification based on the interplay of ion pumps and channels and the physical characteristics of the organelle. This model successfully describes the time dependent acidification of many different organelle systems. It accurately predicts both the electrical and concentration dependent terms of the chemical potential. In conjunction with fluorescence experiments, I determined the first measurements of the proton permeability of organelles along the secretory pathway. These measurements allowed me to make the first estimates of the number of V-ATPases in each compartment by analyzing the resting pH's of the respective organelles. I found a decrease in permeability from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) (51 x 10-4 cm/s) to the Golgi (21 x 10-4 cm/s) to the mature secretory

  18. Cellular metabolism regulates contact sites between vacuoles and mitochondria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hönscher, Carina; Mari, Muriel; Auffarth, Kathrin; Bohnert, Maria; Griffith, Janice; Geerts, Willie; van der Laan, Martin; Cabrera, Margarita; Reggiori, Fulvio; Ungermann, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that contact sites between different organelles form central hubs in the coordination of cellular physiology. Although recent work has emphasized the crucial role of the endoplasmic reticulum in interorganellar crosstalk, the cooperative behavior of other organelles is

  19. Are lipid rafts involved in ABC transporter-mediated drug resistance of tumor cells?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, Jan Willem; Klappe, Karin; Hummel, Ina; Kroesen, Bart-Jan; Sietsma, Hannie; Meszaros, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Since their discovery, lipid rafts have been implicated in several cellular functions, including protein transport in polarized cells and signal transduction. Also in multidrug resistance lipid rafts may be important with regard to the localization of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters in these

  20. Detergent-Based Isolation of Yeast Membrane Rafts: An Inquiry-Based Laboratory Series for the Undergraduate Cell Biology or Biochemistry Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willhite, D. Grant; Wright, Stephen E.

    2009-01-01

    Lipid rafts have been implicated in numerous cellular processes including cell signaling, endocytosis, and even viral infection. Isolation of these lipid rafts often involves detergent treatment of the membrane to dissolve nonraft components followed by separation of raft regions in a density gradient. We present here an inquiry-based lab series…

  1. Regulation of Cellular and Molecular Functions by Protein ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... a high-energy linkage. The free energy of hydrolysis 1 of protein bound tyrosine phosphate ... protein kinases, cdc2 kinase (which regulates cell division cycle) and related cdc ... residues in response to extracellular signals such as hormones or growth factors. ... involved in regulating glycogen metabolism. The activity of.

  2. Lipid raft association restricts CD44-ezrin interaction and promotion of breast cancer cell migration.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Donatello, Simona

    2012-12-01

    Cancer cell migration is an early event in metastasis, the main cause of breast cancer-related deaths. Cholesterol-enriched membrane domains called lipid rafts influence the function of many molecules, including the raft-associated protein CD44. We describe a novel mechanism whereby rafts regulate interactions between CD44 and its binding partner ezrin in migrating breast cancer cells. Specifically, in nonmigrating cells, CD44 and ezrin localized to different membranous compartments: CD44 predominantly in rafts, and ezrin in nonraft compartments. After the induction of migration (either nonspecific or CD44-driven), CD44 affiliation with lipid rafts was decreased. This was accompanied by increased coprecipitation of CD44 and active (threonine-phosphorylated) ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM) proteins in nonraft compartments and increased colocalization of CD44 with the nonraft protein, transferrin receptor. Pharmacological raft disruption using methyl-β-cyclodextrin also increased CD44-ezrin coprecipitation and colocalization, further suggesting that CD44 interacts with ezrin outside rafts during migration. Conversely, promoting CD44 retention inside lipid rafts by pharmacological inhibition of depalmitoylation virtually abolished CD44-ezrin interactions. However, transient single or double knockdown of flotillin-1 or caveolin-1 was not sufficient to increase cell migration over a short time course, suggesting complex crosstalk mechanisms. We propose a new model for CD44-dependent breast cancer cell migration, where CD44 must relocalize outside lipid rafts to drive cell migration. This could have implications for rafts as pharmacological targets to down-regulate cancer cell migration.

  3. Inhibition of Akt signaling by exclusion from lipid rafts in normal and transformed epidermal keratinocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calay, Damien; Vind-Kezunovic, Dina; Frankart, Aurelie

    2010-01-01

    Lipid rafts are cholesterol-rich plasma membrane domains that regulate signal transduction. Because our earlier work indicated that raft disruption inhibited proliferation and caused cell death, we investigated here the role of membrane cholesterol, the crucial raft constituent, in the regulation...... of the phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway. Raft disruption was achieved in normal human keratinocytes and precancerous (HaCaT) or transformed (A431) keratinocytes by cholesterol extraction or inactivation with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin, filipin III, or 5-cholestene-5-beta-ol. Lipid raft disruption did not affect...... in deactivation of mammalian target of rapamycin, activation of FoxO3a, and increased sensitivity to apoptosis stimuli. Lipid raft disruption abrogated the binding of Akt and the major Akt kinase, phosphatidylinositol-dependent kinase 1, to the membrane by pleckstrin-homology domains. Thus, the integrity of lipid...

  4. Cellular growth in plants requires regulation of cell wall biochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chebli, Youssef; Geitmann, Anja

    2017-02-01

    Cell and organ morphogenesis in plants are regulated by the chemical structure and mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix, the cell wall. The two primary load bearing components in the plant cell wall, the pectin matrix and the cellulose/xyloglucan network, are constantly remodelled to generate the morphological changes required during plant development. This remodelling is regulated by a plethora of loosening and stiffening agents such as pectin methyl-esterases, calcium ions, expansins, and glucanases. The tight spatio-temporal regulation of the activities of these agents is a sine qua non condition for proper morphogenesis at cell and tissue levels. The pectin matrix and the cellulose-xyloglucan network operate in concert and their behaviour is mutually dependent on their chemical, structural and mechanical modifications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Matriptase autoactivation is tightly regulated by the cellular chemical environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jehng-Kang Wang

    Full Text Available The ability of cells to rapidly detect and react to alterations in their chemical environment, such as pH, ionic strength and redox potential, is essential for cell function and survival. We present here evidence that cells can respond to such environmental alterations by rapid induction of matriptase autoactivation. Specifically, we show that matriptase autoactivation can occur spontaneously at physiological pH, and is significantly enhanced by acidic pH, both in a cell-free system and in living cells. The acid-accelerated autoactivation can be attenuated by chloride, a property that may be part of a safety mechanism to prevent unregulated matriptase autoactivation. Additionally, the thio-redox balance of the environment also modulates matriptase autoactivation. Using the cell-free system, we show that matriptase autoactivation is suppressed by cytosolic reductive factors, with this cytosolic suppression being reverted by the addition of oxidizing agents. In living cells, we observed rapid induction of matriptase autoactivation upon exposure to toxic metal ions known to induce oxidative stress, including CoCl2 and CdCl2. The metal-induced matriptase autoactivation is suppressed by N-acetylcysteine, supporting the putative role of altered cellular redox state in metal induced matriptase autoactivation. Furthermore, matriptase knockdown rendered cells more susceptible to CdCl2-induced cell death compared to control cells. This observation implies that the metal-induced matriptase autoactivation confers cells with the ability to survive exposure to toxic metals and/or oxidative stress. Our results suggest that matriptase can act as a cellular sensor of the chemical environment of the cell that allows the cell to respond to and protect itself from changes in the chemical milieu.

  6. The cell cycle regulator protein P16 and the cellular senescence of dental follicle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morsczeck, Christian; Hullmann, Markus; Reck, Anja; Reichert, Torsten E

    2018-02-01

    Cellular senescence is a restricting factor for regenerative therapies with somatic stem cells. We showed previously that the onset of cellular senescence inhibits the osteogenic differentiation in stem cells of the dental follicle (DFCs), although the mechanism remains elusive. Two different pathways are involved in the induction of the cellular senescence, which are driven either by the cell cycle protein P21 or by the cell cycle protein P16. In this study, we investigated the expression of cell cycle proteins in DFCs after the induction of cellular senescence. The induction of cellular senescence was proved by an increased expression of β-galactosidase and an increased population doubling time after a prolonged cell culture. Cellular senescence regulated the expression of cell cycle proteins. The expression of cell cycle protein P16 was up-regulated, which correlates with the induction of cellular senescence markers in DFCs. However, the expression of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK)2 and 4 and the expression of the cell cycle protein P21 were successively decreased in DFCs. In conclusion, our data suggest that a P16-dependent pathway drives the induction of cellular senescence in DFCs.

  7. Metabolic regulation of cellular plasticity in the pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninov, Nikolay; Hesselson, Daniel; Gut, Philipp; Zhou, Amy; Fidelin, Kevin; Stainier, Didier Y R

    2013-07-08

    Obese individuals exhibit an increase in pancreatic β cell mass; conversely, scarce nutrition during pregnancy has been linked to β cell insufficiency in the offspring [reviewed in 1, 2]. These phenomena are thought to be mediated mainly through effects on β cell proliferation, given that a nutrient-sensitive β cell progenitor population in the pancreas has not been identified. Here, we employed the fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell-cycle indicator system to investigate β cell replication in real time and found that high nutrient concentrations induce rapid β cell proliferation. Importantly, we found that high nutrient concentrations also stimulate β cell differentiation from progenitors in the intrapancreatic duct (IPD). Furthermore, using a new zebrafish line where β cells are constitutively ablated, we show that β cell loss and high nutrient intake synergistically activate these progenitors. At the cellular level, this activation process causes ductal cell reorganization as it stimulates their proliferation and differentiation. Notably, we link the nutrient-dependent activation of these progenitors to a downregulation of Notch signaling specifically within the IPD. Furthermore, we show that the nutrient sensor mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) is required for endocrine differentiation from the IPD under physiological conditions as well as in the diabetic state. Thus, this study reveals critical insights into how cells modulate their plasticity in response to metabolic cues and identifies nutrient-sensitive progenitors in the mature pancreas. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Diphtheria toxin translocation across cellular membranes is regulated by sphingolipids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spilsberg, Bjorn; Hanada, Kentaro; Sandvig, Kirsten

    2005-01-01

    Diphtheria toxin is translocated across cellular membranes when receptor-bound toxin is exposed to low pH. To study the role of sphingolipids for toxin translocation, both a mutant cell line lacking the first enzyme in de novo sphingolipid synthesis, serine palmitoyltransferase, and a specific inhibitor of the same enzyme, myriocin, were used. The serine palmitoyltransferase-deficient cell line (LY-B) was found to be 10-15 times more sensitive to diphtheria toxin than the genetically complemented cell line (LY-B/cLCB1) and the wild-type cell line (CHO-K1), both when toxin translocation directly across the plasma membrane was induced by exposing cells with surface-bound toxin to low pH, and when the toxin followed its normal route via acidified endosomes into the cytosol. Toxin binding was similar in these three cell lines. Furthermore, inhibition of serine palmitoyltransferase activity by addition of myriocin sensitized the two control cell lines (LY-B/cLCB1 and CHO-K1) to diphtheria toxin, whereas, as expected, no effect was observed in cells lacking serine palmitoyltransferase (LY-B). In conclusion, diphtheria toxin translocation is facilitated by depletion of membrane sphingolipids

  9. The PTEN protein: cellular localization and post-translational regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, Nick R; Kriplani, Nisha; Hermida, Miguel A; Alvarez-Garcia, Virginia; Wise, Helen M

    2016-02-01

    The phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) phosphatase dephosphorylates PIP3, the lipid product of the class I PI 3-kinases, and suppresses the growth and proliferation of many cell types. It has been heavily studied, in large part due to its status as a tumour suppressor, the loss of function of which is observed through diverse mechanisms in many tumour types. Here we present a concise review of our understanding of the PTEN protein and highlight recent advances, particularly in our understanding of its localization and regulation by ubiquitination and SUMOylation. © 2016 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  10. RAFT polymerization mediated bioconjugation strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Bulmuş, Volga

    2011-01-01

    This review aims to highlight the use of RAFT polymerization in the synthesis of polymer bioconjugates. It covers two main bioconjugation strategies using the RAFT process: (i) post-polymerization bioconjugations using pre-synthesized reactive polymers, and (ii) bioconjugations via in situ polymerization using biomolecule-modified monomers or chain transfer agents. © 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  11. Matrix rigidity regulates cancer cell growth and cellular phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert W Tilghman

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix have an important role in cell growth and differentiation. However, it is unclear as to what extent cancer cells respond to changes in the mechanical properties (rigidity/stiffness of the microenvironment and how this response varies among cancer cell lines.In this study we used a recently developed 96-well plate system that arrays extracellular matrix-conjugated polyacrylamide gels that increase in stiffness by at least 50-fold across the plate. This plate was used to determine how changes in the rigidity of the extracellular matrix modulate the biological properties of tumor cells. The cell lines tested fall into one of two categories based on their proliferation on substrates of differing stiffness: "rigidity dependent" (those which show an increase in cell growth as extracellular rigidity is increased, and "rigidity independent" (those which grow equally on both soft and stiff substrates. Cells which grew poorly on soft gels also showed decreased spreading and migration under these conditions. More importantly, seeding the cell lines into the lungs of nude mice revealed that the ability of cells to grow on soft gels in vitro correlated with their ability to grow in a soft tissue environment in vivo. The lung carcinoma line A549 responded to culture on soft gels by expressing the differentiated epithelial marker E-cadherin and decreasing the expression of the mesenchymal transcription factor Slug.These observations suggest that the mechanical properties of the matrix environment play a significant role in regulating the proliferation and the morphological properties of cancer cells. Further, the multiwell format of the soft-plate assay is a useful and effective adjunct to established 3-dimensional cell culture models.

  12. Matrix Rigidity Regulates Cancer Cell Growth and Cellular Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilghman, Robert W.; Cowan, Catharine R.; Mih, Justin D.; Koryakina, Yulia; Gioeli, Daniel; Slack-Davis, Jill K.; Blackman, Brett R.; Tschumperlin, Daniel J.; Parsons, J. Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Background The mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix have an important role in cell growth and differentiation. However, it is unclear as to what extent cancer cells respond to changes in the mechanical properties (rigidity/stiffness) of the microenvironment and how this response varies among cancer cell lines. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study we used a recently developed 96-well plate system that arrays extracellular matrix-conjugated polyacrylamide gels that increase in stiffness by at least 50-fold across the plate. This plate was used to determine how changes in the rigidity of the extracellular matrix modulate the biological properties of tumor cells. The cell lines tested fall into one of two categories based on their proliferation on substrates of differing stiffness: “rigidity dependent” (those which show an increase in cell growth as extracellular rigidity is increased), and “rigidity independent” (those which grow equally on both soft and stiff substrates). Cells which grew poorly on soft gels also showed decreased spreading and migration under these conditions. More importantly, seeding the cell lines into the lungs of nude mice revealed that the ability of cells to grow on soft gels in vitro correlated with their ability to grow in a soft tissue environment in vivo. The lung carcinoma line A549 responded to culture on soft gels by expressing the differentiated epithelial marker E-cadherin and decreasing the expression of the mesenchymal transcription factor Slug. Conclusions/Significance These observations suggest that the mechanical properties of the matrix environment play a significant role in regulating the proliferation and the morphological properties of cancer cells. Further, the multiwell format of the soft-plate assay is a useful and effective adjunct to established 3-dimensional cell culture models. PMID:20886123

  13. The role of focal adhesion kinase in the regulation of cellular mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mierke, Claudia Tanja

    2013-01-01

    The regulation of mechanical properties is necessary for cell invasion into connective tissue or intra- and extravasation through the endothelium of blood or lymph vessels. Cell invasion is important for the regulation of many healthy processes such as immune response reactions and wound healing. In addition, cell invasion plays a role in disease-related processes such as tumor metastasis and autoimmune responses. Until now the role of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in regulating mechanical properties of cells and its impact on cell invasion efficiency is still not well known. Thus, this review focuses on mechanical properties regulated by FAK in comparison to the mechano-regulating protein vinculin. Moreover, it points out the connection between cancer cell invasion and metastasis and FAK by showing that FAK regulates cellular mechanical properties required for cellular motility. Furthermore, it sheds light on the indirect interaction of FAK with vinculin by binding to paxillin, which then impairs the binding of paxillin to vinculin. In addition, this review emphasizes whether FAK fulfills regulatory functions similar to vinculin. In particular, it discusses the differences and the similarities between FAK and vinculin in regulating the biomechanical properties of cells. Finally, this paper highlights that both focal adhesion proteins, vinculin and FAK, synergize their functions to regulate the mechanical properties of cells such as stiffness and contractile forces. Subsequently, these mechanical properties determine cellular invasiveness into tissues and provide a source sink for future drug developments to inhibit excessive cell invasion and hence, metastases formation. (paper)

  14. The role of focal adhesion kinase in the regulation of cellular mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mierke, Claudia Tanja

    2013-12-01

    The regulation of mechanical properties is necessary for cell invasion into connective tissue or intra- and extravasation through the endothelium of blood or lymph vessels. Cell invasion is important for the regulation of many healthy processes such as immune response reactions and wound healing. In addition, cell invasion plays a role in disease-related processes such as tumor metastasis and autoimmune responses. Until now the role of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in regulating mechanical properties of cells and its impact on cell invasion efficiency is still not well known. Thus, this review focuses on mechanical properties regulated by FAK in comparison to the mechano-regulating protein vinculin. Moreover, it points out the connection between cancer cell invasion and metastasis and FAK by showing that FAK regulates cellular mechanical properties required for cellular motility. Furthermore, it sheds light on the indirect interaction of FAK with vinculin by binding to paxillin, which then impairs the binding of paxillin to vinculin. In addition, this review emphasizes whether FAK fulfills regulatory functions similar to vinculin. In particular, it discusses the differences and the similarities between FAK and vinculin in regulating the biomechanical properties of cells. Finally, this paper highlights that both focal adhesion proteins, vinculin and FAK, synergize their functions to regulate the mechanical properties of cells such as stiffness and contractile forces. Subsequently, these mechanical properties determine cellular invasiveness into tissues and provide a source sink for future drug developments to inhibit excessive cell invasion and hence, metastases formation.

  15. Compartmentalized cAMP Signaling Associated With Lipid Raft and Non-raft Membrane Domains in Adult Ventricular Myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Shailesh R; Gratwohl, Jackson; Cozad, Mia; Yang, Pei-Chi; Clancy, Colleen E; Harvey, Robert D

    2018-01-01

    Aim: Confining cAMP production to discrete subcellular locations makes it possible for this ubiquitous second messenger to elicit unique functional responses. Yet, factors that determine how and where the production of this diffusible signaling molecule occurs are incompletely understood. The fluid mosaic model originally proposed that signal transduction occurs through random interactions between proteins diffusing freely throughout the plasma membrane. However, it is now known that the movement of membrane proteins is restricted, suggesting that the plasma membrane is segregated into distinct microdomains where different signaling proteins can be concentrated. In this study, we examined what role lipid raft and non-raft membrane domains play in compartmentation of cAMP signaling in adult ventricular myocytes. Methods and Results: The freely diffusible fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based biosensor Epac2-camps was used to measure global cytosolic cAMP responses, while versions of the probe targeted to lipid raft (Epac2-MyrPalm) and non-raft (Epac2-CAAX) domains were used to monitor local cAMP production near the plasma membrane. We found that β-adrenergic receptors, which are expressed in lipid raft and non-raft domains, produce cAMP responses near the plasma membrane that are distinctly different from those produced by E-type prostaglandin receptors, which are expressed exclusively in non-raft domains. We also found that there are differences in basal cAMP levels associated with lipid raft and non-raft domains, and that this can be explained by differences in basal adenylyl cyclase activity associated with each of these membrane environments. In addition, we found evidence that phosphodiesterases 2, 3, and 4 work together in regulating cAMP activity associated with both lipid raft and non-raft domains, while phosphodiesterase 3 plays a more prominent role in the bulk cytoplasmic compartment. Conclusion: These results suggest that different membrane

  16. Separation of actin-dependent and actin-independent lipid rafts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klappe, Karin; Hummel, Ina; Kok, Jan Willem

    2013-01-01

    Lipid rafts have been isolated on the basis of their resistance to various detergents and more recently by using detergent-free procedures. The actin cytoskeleton is now recognized as a dynamic regulator of lipid raft stability. We carefully analyzed the effects of the cortical actin-disrupting

  17. 33 CFR 100.102 - Great Connecticut River Raft Race, Middletown, CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Great Connecticut River Raft Race, Middletown, CT. 100.102 Section 100.102 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Raft Race, Middletown, CT. (a) Regulated Area. That section of the Connecticut River between Dart...

  18. Differential association of the Na+/H+ Exchanger Regulatory Factor (NHERF) family of adaptor proteins with the raft- and the non-raft brush border membrane fractions of NHE3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultan, Ayesha; Luo, Min; Yu, Qin; Riederer, Brigitte; Xia, Weiliang; Chen, Mingmin; Lissner, Simone; Gessner, Johannes E; Donowitz, Mark; Yun, C Chris; deJonge, Hugo; Lamprecht, Georg; Seidler, Ursula

    2013-01-01

    Trafficking, brush border membrane (BBM) retention, and signal-specific regulation of the Na+/H+ exchanger NHE3 is regulated by the Na+/H+ Exchanger Regulatory Factor (NHERF) family of PDZ-adaptor proteins, which enable the formation of multiprotein complexes. It is unclear, however, what determines signal specificity of these NHERFs. Thus, we studied the association of NHE3, NHERF1 (EBP50), NHERF2 (E3KARP), and NHERF3 (PDZK1) with lipid rafts in murine small intestinal BBM. Detergent resistant membranes ("lipid rafts") were isolated by floatation of Triton X-incubated small intestinal BBM from a variety of knockout mouse strains in an Optiprep step gradient. Acid-activated NHE3 activity was measured fluorometrically in BCECF-loaded microdissected villi, or by assessment of CO2/HCO3(-) mediated increase in fluid absorption in perfused jejunal loops of anethetized mice. NHE3 was found to partially associate with lipid rafts in the native BBM, and NHE3 raft association had an impact on NHE3 transport activity and regulation in vivo. NHERF1, 2 and 3 were differentially distributed to rafts and non-rafts, with NHERF2 being most raft-associated and NHERF3 entirely non-raft associated. NHERF2 expression enhanced the localization of NHE3 to membrane rafts. The use of acid sphingomyelinase-deficient mice, which have altered membrane lipid as well as lipid raft composition, allowed us to test the validity of the lipid raft concept in vivo. The differential association of the NHERFs with the raft-associated and the non-raft fraction of NHE3 in the brush border membrane is one component of the differential and signal-specific NHE3 regulation by the different NHERFs. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Tissue organization by cadherin adhesion molecules: dynamic molecular and cellular mechanisms of morphogenetic regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niessen, Carien M.; Leckband, Deborah; Yap, Alpha S.

    2013-01-01

    This review addresses the cellular and molecular mechanisms of cadherin-based tissue morphogenesis. Tissue physiology is profoundly influenced by the distinctive organizations of cells in organs and tissues. In metazoa, adhesion receptors of the classical cadherin family play important roles in establishing and maintaining such tissue organization. Indeed, it is apparent that cadherins participate in a range of morphogenetic events that range from support of tissue integrity to dynamic cellular rearrangements. A comprehensive understanding of cadherin-based morphogenesis must then define the molecular and cellular mechanisms that support these distinct cadherin biologies. Here we focus on four key mechanistic elements: the molecular basis for adhesion through cadherin ectodomains; the regulation of cadherin expression at the cell surface; cooperation between cadherins and the actin cytoskeleton; and regulation by cell signaling. We discuss current progress and outline issues for further research in these fields. PMID:21527735

  20. Integrative Analysis of Subcellular Quantitative Proteomics Studies Reveals Functional Cytoskeleton Membrane-Lipid Raft Interactions in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Anup D; Inder, Kerry L; Shah, Alok K; Cristino, Alexandre S; McKie, Arthur B; Gabra, Hani; Davis, Melissa J; Hill, Michelle M

    2016-10-07

    Lipid rafts are dynamic membrane microdomains that orchestrate molecular interactions and are implicated in cancer development. To understand the functions of lipid rafts in cancer, we performed an integrated analysis of quantitative lipid raft proteomics data sets modeling progression in breast cancer, melanoma, and renal cell carcinoma. This analysis revealed that cancer development is associated with increased membrane raft-cytoskeleton interactions, with ∼40% of elevated lipid raft proteins being cytoskeletal components. Previous studies suggest a potential functional role for the raft-cytoskeleton in the action of the putative tumor suppressors PTRF/Cavin-1 and Merlin. To extend the observation, we examined lipid raft proteome modulation by an unrelated tumor suppressor opioid binding protein cell-adhesion molecule (OPCML) in ovarian cancer SKOV3 cells. In agreement with the other model systems, quantitative proteomics revealed that 39% of OPCML-depleted lipid raft proteins are cytoskeletal components, with microfilaments and intermediate filaments specifically down-regulated. Furthermore, protein-protein interaction network and simulation analysis showed significantly higher interactions among cancer raft proteins compared with general human raft proteins. Collectively, these results suggest increased cytoskeleton-mediated stabilization of lipid raft domains with greater molecular interactions as a common, functional, and reversible feature of cancer cells.

  1. BICD2, dynactin, and LIS1 cooperate in regulating dynein recruitment to cellular structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Splinter (Daniël); D.S. Razafsky (David); M.A. Schlager (Max); A. Serra-Marques (Andrea); I. Grigoriev (Ilya); J.A.A. Demmers (Jeroen); N. Keijzer (Nanda); K. Jiang (Kai); S. Poser; A. Hyman (Anthony); C.C. Hoogenraad (Casper); S.J. King (Stephen); A.S. Akhmanova (Anna)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractCytoplasmic dynein is the major microtubule minus-end-directed cellular motor. Most dynein activities require dynactin, but the mechanisms regulating cargo-dependent dynein-dynactin interaction are poorly understood. In this study, we focus on dynein-dynactin recruitment to cargo by the

  2. Regulation of cellular communication by signaling microdomains in the blood vessel wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billaud, Marie; Lohman, Alexander W; Johnstone, Scott R; Biwer, Lauren A; Mutchler, Stephanie; Isakson, Brant E

    2014-01-01

    It has become increasingly clear that the accumulation of proteins in specific regions of the plasma membrane can facilitate cellular communication. These regions, termed signaling microdomains, are found throughout the blood vessel wall where cellular communication, both within and between cell types, must be tightly regulated to maintain proper vascular function. We will define a cellular signaling microdomain and apply this definition to the plethora of means by which cellular communication has been hypothesized to occur in the blood vessel wall. To that end, we make a case for three broad areas of cellular communication where signaling microdomains could play an important role: 1) paracrine release of free radicals and gaseous molecules such as nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species; 2) role of ion channels including gap junctions and potassium channels, especially those associated with the endothelium-derived hyperpolarization mediated signaling, and lastly, 3) mechanism of exocytosis that has considerable oversight by signaling microdomains, especially those associated with the release of von Willebrand factor. When summed, we believe that it is clear that the organization and regulation of signaling microdomains is an essential component to vessel wall function.

  3. Regulation of Cellular Communication by Signaling Microdomains in the Blood Vessel Wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billaud, Marie; Lohman, Alexander W.; Johnstone, Scott R.; Biwer, Lauren A.; Mutchler, Stephanie; Isakson, Brant E.

    2014-01-01

    It has become increasingly clear that the accumulation of proteins in specific regions of the plasma membrane can facilitate cellular communication. These regions, termed signaling microdomains, are found throughout the blood vessel wall where cellular communication, both within and between cell types, must be tightly regulated to maintain proper vascular function. We will define a cellular signaling microdomain and apply this definition to the plethora of means by which cellular communication has been hypothesized to occur in the blood vessel wall. To that end, we make a case for three broad areas of cellular communication where signaling microdomains could play an important role: 1) paracrine release of free radicals and gaseous molecules such as nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species; 2) role of ion channels including gap junctions and potassium channels, especially those associated with the endothelium-derived hyperpolarization mediated signaling, and lastly, 3) mechanism of exocytosis that has considerable oversight by signaling microdomains, especially those associated with the release of von Willebrand factor. When summed, we believe that it is clear that the organization and regulation of signaling microdomains is an essential component to vessel wall function. PMID:24671377

  4. HJURP regulates cellular senescence in human fibroblasts and endothelial cells via a p53-dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Jong-Ik; Cho, Jung Hee; Kim, Jae-Ryong

    2013-08-01

    Holliday junction recognition protein (HJURP), a centromere protein-A (CENP-A) histone chaperone, mediates centromere-specific assembly of CENP-A nucleosome, contributing to high-fidelity chromosome segregation during cell division. However, the role of HJURP in cellular senescence of human primary cells remains unclear. We found that the expression levels of HJURP decreased in human dermal fibroblasts and umbilical vein endothelial cells in replicative or premature senescence. Ectopic expression of HJURP in senescent cells partially overcame cell senescence. Conversely, downregulation of HJURP in young cells led to premature senescence. p53 knockdown, but not p16 knockdown, abolished senescence phenotypes caused by HJURP reduction. These data suggest that HJURP plays an important role in the regulation of cellular senescence through a p53-dependent pathway and might contribute to tissue or organismal aging and protection of cellular transformation.

  5. Cellular volume regulation and substrate stiffness modulate the detachment dynamics of adherent cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuehua; Jiang, Hongyuan

    2018-03-01

    Quantitative characterizations of cell detachment are vital for understanding the fundamental mechanisms of cell adhesion. Experiments have found that cell detachment shows strong rate dependence, which is mostly attributed to the binding-unbinding kinetics of receptor-ligand bond. However, our recent study showed that the cellular volume regulation can significantly regulate the dynamics of adherent cell and cell detachment. How this cellular volume regulation contributes to the rate dependence of cell detachment remains elusive. Here, we systematically study the role of cellular volume regulation in the rate dependence of cell detachment by investigating the cell detachments of nonspecific adhesion and specific adhesion. We find that the cellular volume regulation and the bond kinetics dominate the rate dependence of cell detachment at different time scales. We further test the validity of the traditional Johnson-Kendall-Roberts (JKR) contact model and the detachment model developed by Wyart and Gennes et al (W-G model). When the cell volume is changeable, the JKR model is not appropriate for both the detachments of convex cells and concave cells. The W-G model is valid for the detachment of convex cells but is no longer applicable for the detachment of concave cells. Finally, we show that the rupture force of adherent cells is also highly sensitive to substrate stiffness, since an increase in substrate stiffness will lead to more associated bonds. These findings can provide insight into the critical role of cell volume in cell detachment and might have profound implications for other adhesion-related physiological processes.

  6. Tunable, Quantitative Fenton-RAFT Polymerization via Metered Reagent Addition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nothling, Mitchell D; McKenzie, Thomas G; Reyhani, Amin; Qiao, Greg G

    2018-05-10

    A continuous supply of radical species is a key requirement for activating chain growth and accessing quantitative monomer conversions in reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization. In Fenton-RAFT, activation is provided by hydroxyl radicals, whose indiscriminate reactivity and short-lived nature poses a challenge to accessing extended polymerization times and quantitative monomer conversions. Here, an alternative Fenton-RAFT procedure is presented, whereby radical generation can be finely controlled via metered dosing of a component of the Fenton redox reaction (H 2 O 2 ) using an external pumping system. By limiting the instantaneous flux of radicals and ensuring sustained radical generation over tunable time periods, metered reagent addition reduces unwanted radical "wasting" reactions and provides access to consistent quantitative monomer conversions with high chain-end fidelity. Fine tuning of radical concentration during polymerization is achieved simply via adjustment of reagent dose rate, offering significant potential for automation. This modular strategy holds promise for extending traditional RAFT initiation toward more tightly regulated radical concentration profiles and affords excellent prospects for the automation of Fenton-RAFT polymerization. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Glypican-1 mediates both prion protein lipid raft association and disease isoform formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R Taylor

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In prion diseases, the cellular form of the prion protein, PrP(C, undergoes a conformational conversion to the infectious isoform, PrP(Sc. PrP(C associates with lipid rafts through its glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI anchor and a region in its N-terminal domain which also binds to heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs. We show that heparin displaces PrP(C from rafts and promotes its endocytosis, suggesting that heparin competes with an endogenous raft-resident HSPG for binding to PrP(C. We then utilised a transmembrane-anchored form of PrP (PrP-TM, which is targeted to rafts solely by its N-terminal domain, to show that both heparin and phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C can inhibit its association with detergent-resistant rafts, implying that a GPI-anchored HSPG targets PrP(C to rafts. Depletion of the major neuronal GPI-anchored HSPG, glypican-1, significantly reduced the raft association of PrP-TM and displaced PrP(C from rafts, promoting its endocytosis. Glypican-1 and PrP(C colocalised on the cell surface and both PrP(C and PrP(Sc co-immunoprecipitated with glypican-1. Critically, treatment of scrapie-infected N2a cells with glypican-1 siRNA significantly reduced PrP(Sc formation. In contrast, depletion of glypican-1 did not alter the inhibitory effect of PrP(C on the beta-secretase cleavage of the Alzheimer's amyloid precursor protein. These data indicate that glypican-1 is a novel cellular cofactor for prion conversion and we propose that it acts as a scaffold facilitating the interaction of PrP(C and PrP(Sc in lipid rafts.

  8. FIH Regulates Cellular Metabolism through Hydroxylation of the Deubiquitinase OTUB1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carsten C Scholz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The asparagine hydroxylase, factor inhibiting HIF (FIH, confers oxygen-dependence upon the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF, a master regulator of the cellular adaptive response to hypoxia. Studies investigating whether asparagine hydroxylation is a general regulatory oxygen-dependent modification have identified multiple non-HIF targets for FIH. However, the functional consequences of this outside of the HIF pathway remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate that the deubiquitinase ovarian tumor domain containing ubiquitin aldehyde binding protein 1 (OTUB1 is a substrate for hydroxylation by FIH on N22. Mutation of N22 leads to a profound change in the interaction of OTUB1 with proteins important in cellular metabolism. Furthermore, in cultured cells, overexpression of N22A mutant OTUB1 impairs cellular metabolic processes when compared to wild type. Based on these data, we hypothesize that OTUB1 is a target for functional hydroxylation by FIH. Additionally, we propose that our results provide new insight into the regulation of cellular energy metabolism during hypoxic stress and the potential for targeting hydroxylases for therapeutic benefit.

  9. Lysine acetylation targets protein complexes and co-regulates major cellular functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choudhary, Chuna Ram; Kumar, Chanchal; Gnad, Florian

    2009-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a reversible posttranslational modification of proteins and plays a key role in regulating gene expression. Technological limitations have so far prevented a global analysis of lysine acetylation's cellular roles. We used high-resolution mass spectrometry to identify 3600......, cell cycle, splicing, nuclear transport, and actin nucleation. Acetylation impaired phosphorylation-dependent interactions of 14-3-3 and regulated the yeast cyclin-dependent kinase Cdc28. Our data demonstrate that the regulatory scope of lysine acetylation is broad and comparable with that of other...

  10. Dynamic clustering and dispersion of lipid rafts contribute to fusion competence of myogenic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukai, Atsushi [Department of Regenerative Medicine, National Institute for Longevity Sciences, National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology, 36-3 Gengo, Morioka, Oobu, Aichi 474-8522 (Japan); Kurisaki, Tomohiro [Department of Growth Regulation, Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, 53 Shogoin-Kawahara-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Sato, Satoshi B. [Research Center for Low Temperature and Material Sciences, Kyoto University, Yoshida-honmachi, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Kobayashi, Toshihide [Lipid Biology Laboratory, Discovery Research Institute, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Kondoh, Gen [Laboratory of Animal Experiments for Regeneration, Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, 53 Shogoin-Kawahara-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Hashimoto, Naohiro, E-mail: nao@nils.go.jp [Department of Regenerative Medicine, National Institute for Longevity Sciences, National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology, 36-3 Gengo, Morioka, Oobu, Aichi 474-8522 (Japan)

    2009-10-15

    Recent research indicates that the leading edge of lamellipodia of myogenic cells (myoblasts and myotubes) contains presumptive fusion sites, yet the mechanisms that render the plasma membrane fusion-competent remain largely unknown. Here we show that dynamic clustering and dispersion of lipid rafts contribute to both cell adhesion and plasma membrane union during myogenic cell fusion. Adhesion-complex proteins including M-cadherin, {beta}-catenin, and p120-catenin accumulated at the leading edge of lamellipodia, which contains the presumptive fusion sites of the plasma membrane, in a lipid raft-dependent fashion prior to cell contact. In addition, disruption of lipid rafts by cholesterol depletion directly prevented the membrane union of myogenic cell fusion. Time-lapse recording showed that lipid rafts were laterally dispersed from the center of the lamellipodia prior to membrane fusion. Adhesion proteins that had accumulated at lipid rafts were also removed from the presumptive fusion sites when lipid rafts were laterally dispersed. The resultant lipid raft- and adhesion complex-free area at the leading edge fused with the opposing plasma membrane. These results demonstrate a key role for dynamic clustering/dispersion of lipid rafts in establishing fusion-competent sites of the myogenic cell membrane, providing a novel mechanistic insight into the regulation of myogenic cell fusion.

  11. Dynamic clustering and dispersion of lipid rafts contribute to fusion competence of myogenic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukai, Atsushi; Kurisaki, Tomohiro; Sato, Satoshi B.; Kobayashi, Toshihide; Kondoh, Gen; Hashimoto, Naohiro

    2009-01-01

    Recent research indicates that the leading edge of lamellipodia of myogenic cells (myoblasts and myotubes) contains presumptive fusion sites, yet the mechanisms that render the plasma membrane fusion-competent remain largely unknown. Here we show that dynamic clustering and dispersion of lipid rafts contribute to both cell adhesion and plasma membrane union during myogenic cell fusion. Adhesion-complex proteins including M-cadherin, β-catenin, and p120-catenin accumulated at the leading edge of lamellipodia, which contains the presumptive fusion sites of the plasma membrane, in a lipid raft-dependent fashion prior to cell contact. In addition, disruption of lipid rafts by cholesterol depletion directly prevented the membrane union of myogenic cell fusion. Time-lapse recording showed that lipid rafts were laterally dispersed from the center of the lamellipodia prior to membrane fusion. Adhesion proteins that had accumulated at lipid rafts were also removed from the presumptive fusion sites when lipid rafts were laterally dispersed. The resultant lipid raft- and adhesion complex-free area at the leading edge fused with the opposing plasma membrane. These results demonstrate a key role for dynamic clustering/dispersion of lipid rafts in establishing fusion-competent sites of the myogenic cell membrane, providing a novel mechanistic insight into the regulation of myogenic cell fusion.

  12. Lipid Raft Association Restricts CD44-Ezrin Interaction and Promotion of Breast Cancer Cell Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donatello, Simona; Babina, Irina S.; Hazelwood, Lee D.; Hill, Arnold D.K.; Nabi, Ivan R.; Hopkins, Ann M.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer cell migration is an early event in metastasis, the main cause of breast cancer-related deaths. Cholesterol-enriched membrane domains called lipid rafts influence the function of many molecules, including the raft-associated protein CD44. We describe a novel mechanism whereby rafts regulate interactions between CD44 and its binding partner ezrin in migrating breast cancer cells. Specifically, in nonmigrating cells, CD44 and ezrin localized to different membranous compartments: CD44 predominantly in rafts, and ezrin in nonraft compartments. After the induction of migration (either nonspecific or CD44-driven), CD44 affiliation with lipid rafts was decreased. This was accompanied by increased coprecipitation of CD44 and active (threonine-phosphorylated) ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM) proteins in nonraft compartments and increased colocalization of CD44 with the nonraft protein, transferrin receptor. Pharmacological raft disruption using methyl-β-cyclodextrin also increased CD44-ezrin coprecipitation and colocalization, further suggesting that CD44 interacts with ezrin outside rafts during migration. Conversely, promoting CD44 retention inside lipid rafts by pharmacological inhibition of depalmitoylation virtually abolished CD44-ezrin interactions. However, transient single or double knockdown of flotillin-1 or caveolin-1 was not sufficient to increase cell migration over a short time course, suggesting complex crosstalk mechanisms. We propose a new model for CD44-dependent breast cancer cell migration, where CD44 must relocalize outside lipid rafts to drive cell migration. This could have implications for rafts as pharmacological targets to down-regulate cancer cell migration. PMID:23031255

  13. Recent progress on lipid lateral heterogeneity in plasma membranes: from rafts to submicrometric domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carquin, Mélanie; D'Auria, Ludovic; Pollet, Hélène; Bongarzone, Ernesto R.; Tyteca, Donatienne

    2016-01-01

    The concept of transient nanometric domains known as lipid rafts has brought interest to reassess the validity of the Singer-Nicholson model of a fluid bilayer for cell membranes. However, this new view is still insufficient to explain the cellular control of surface lipid diversity or membrane deformability. During the past decade, the hypothesis that some lipids form large (submicrometric/mesoscale vs nanometric rafts) and stable (> min vs sec) membrane domains has emerged, largely based on indirect methods. Morphological evidence for stable submicrometric lipid domains, well-accepted for artificial and highly specialized biological membranes, was further reported for a variety of living cells from prokaryotes to yeast and mammalian cells. However, results remained questioned based on limitations of available fluorescent tools, use of poor lipid fixatives, and imaging artifacts due to non-resolved membrane projections. In this review, we will discuss recent evidence generated using powerful and innovative approaches such as lipid-specific toxin fragments that support the existence of submicrometric domains. We will integrate documented mechanisms involved in the formation and maintenance of these domains, and provide a perspective on their relevance on membrane deformability and regulation of membrane protein distribution. PMID:26738447

  14. Disruption of a cystine transporter downregulates expression of genes involved in sulfur regulation and cellular respiration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica A. Simpkins

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cystine and cysteine are important molecules for pathways such as redox signaling and regulation, and thus identifying cellular deficits upon deletion of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cystine transporter Ers1p allows for a further understanding of cystine homeostasis. Previous complementation studies using the human ortholog suggest yeast Ers1p is a cystine transporter. Human CTNS encodes the protein Cystinosin, a cystine transporter that is embedded in the lysosomal membrane and facilitates the export of cystine from the lysosome. When CTNS is mutated, cystine transport is disrupted, leading to cystine accumulation, the diagnostic hallmark of the lysosomal storage disorder cystinosis. Here, we provide biochemical evidence for Ers1p-dependent cystine transport. However, the accumulation of intracellular cystine is not observed when the ERS1 gene is deleted from ers1-Δ yeast, supporting the existence of modifier genes that provide a mechanism in ers1-Δ yeast that prevents or corrects cystine accumulation. Upon comparison of the transcriptomes of isogenic ERS1+ and ers1-Δ strains of S. cerevisiae by DNA microarray followed by targeted qPCR, sixteen genes were identified as being differentially expressed between the two genotypes. Genes that encode proteins functioning in sulfur regulation, cellular respiration, and general transport were enriched in our screen, demonstrating pleiotropic effects of ers1-Δ. These results give insight into yeast cystine regulation and the multiple, seemingly distal, pathways that involve proper cystine recycling.

  15. Proteomic Analysis of ABCA1-Null Macrophages Reveals a Role for Stomatin-Like Protein-2 in Raft Composition and Toll-Like Receptor Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Saiful M; Zhu, Xuewei; Aloor, Jim J; Azzam, Kathleen M; Gabor, Kristin A; Ge, William; Addo, Kezia A; Tomer, Kenneth B; Parks, John S; Fessler, Michael B

    2015-07-01

    Lipid raft membrane microdomains organize signaling by many prototypical receptors, including the Toll-like receptors (TLRs) of the innate immune system. Raft-localization of proteins is widely thought to be regulated by raft cholesterol levels, but this is largely on the basis of studies that have manipulated cell cholesterol using crude and poorly specific chemical tools, such as β-cyclodextrins. To date, there has been no proteome-scale investigation of whether endogenous regulators of intracellular cholesterol trafficking, such as the ATP binding cassette (ABC)A1 lipid efflux transporter, regulate targeting of proteins to rafts. Abca1(-/-) macrophages have cholesterol-laden rafts that have been reported to contain increased levels of select proteins, including TLR4, the lipopolysaccharide receptor. Here, using quantitative proteomic profiling, we identified 383 proteins in raft isolates from Abca1(+/+) and Abca1(-/-) macrophages. ABCA1 deletion induced wide-ranging changes to the raft proteome. Remarkably, many of these changes were similar to those seen in Abca1(+/+) macrophages after lipopolysaccharide exposure. Stomatin-like protein (SLP)-2, a member of the stomatin-prohibitin-flotillin-HflK/C family of membrane scaffolding proteins, was robustly and specifically increased in Abca1(-/-) rafts. Pursuing SLP-2 function, we found that rafts of SLP-2-silenced macrophages had markedly abnormal composition. SLP-2 silencing did not compromise ABCA1-dependent cholesterol efflux but reduced macrophage responsiveness to multiple TLR ligands. This was associated with reduced raft levels of the TLR co-receptor, CD14, and defective lipopolysaccharide-induced recruitment of the common TLR adaptor, MyD88, to rafts. Taken together, we show that the lipid transporter ABCA1 regulates the protein repertoire of rafts and identify SLP-2 as an ABCA1-dependent regulator of raft composition and of the innate immune response. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and

  16. Proteomic Analysis of ABCA1-Null Macrophages Reveals a Role for Stomatin-Like Protein-2 in Raft Composition and Toll-Like Receptor Signaling*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Saiful M.; Zhu, Xuewei; Aloor, Jim J.; Azzam, Kathleen M.; Gabor, Kristin A.; Ge, William; Addo, Kezia A.; Tomer, Kenneth B.; Parks, John S.; Fessler, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    Lipid raft membrane microdomains organize signaling by many prototypical receptors, including the Toll-like receptors (TLRs) of the innate immune system. Raft-localization of proteins is widely thought to be regulated by raft cholesterol levels, but this is largely on the basis of studies that have manipulated cell cholesterol using crude and poorly specific chemical tools, such as β-cyclodextrins. To date, there has been no proteome-scale investigation of whether endogenous regulators of intracellular cholesterol trafficking, such as the ATP binding cassette (ABC)A1 lipid efflux transporter, regulate targeting of proteins to rafts. Abca1−/− macrophages have cholesterol-laden rafts that have been reported to contain increased levels of select proteins, including TLR4, the lipopolysaccharide receptor. Here, using quantitative proteomic profiling, we identified 383 proteins in raft isolates from Abca1+/+ and Abca1−/− macrophages. ABCA1 deletion induced wide-ranging changes to the raft proteome. Remarkably, many of these changes were similar to those seen in Abca1+/+ macrophages after lipopolysaccharide exposure. Stomatin-like protein (SLP)-2, a member of the stomatin-prohibitin-flotillin-HflK/C family of membrane scaffolding proteins, was robustly and specifically increased in Abca1−/− rafts. Pursuing SLP-2 function, we found that rafts of SLP-2-silenced macrophages had markedly abnormal composition. SLP-2 silencing did not compromise ABCA1-dependent cholesterol efflux but reduced macrophage responsiveness to multiple TLR ligands. This was associated with reduced raft levels of the TLR co-receptor, CD14, and defective lipopolysaccharide-induced recruitment of the common TLR adaptor, MyD88, to rafts. Taken together, we show that the lipid transporter ABCA1 regulates the protein repertoire of rafts and identify SLP-2 as an ABCA1-dependent regulator of raft composition and of the innate immune response. PMID:25910759

  17. Cellular zinc fluxes and the regulation of apoptosis/gene-directed cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong-Tran, A Q; Ho, L H; Chai, F; Zalewski, P D

    2000-05-01

    The maintenance of discrete subcellular pools of zinc (Zn) is critical for the functional and structural integrity of cells. Among the important biological processes influenced by Zn is apoptosis, a process that is important in cellular homeostasis (an important cellular homeostatic process). It has also been identified as a major mechanism contributing to cell death in response to toxins and in disease, offering hope that novel therapies that target apoptotic pathways may be developed. Because Zn levels in the body can be increased in a relatively nontoxic manner, it may be possible to prevent or ameliorate degenerative disorders that are associated with high rates of apoptotic cell death. This review begins with brief introductions that address, first, the cellular biology of Zn, especially the critical labile Zn pools, and, second, the phenomenon of apoptosis. We then review the evidence relating Zn to apoptosis and address three major hypotheses: (1) that a specific pool or pools of intracellular labile Zn regulates apoptosis; (2) that systemic changes in Zn levels in the body, due to dietary factors, altered physiological states or disease, can influence cell susceptibility to apoptosis, and (3) that this altered susceptibility to apoptosis contributes to pathophysiological changes in the body. Other key issues are the identity of the molecular targets of Zn in the apoptotic cascade, the types of cells and tissues most susceptible to Zn-regulated apoptosis, the role of Zn as a coordinate regulator of mitosis and apoptosis and the apparent release of tightly bound intracellular pools of Zn during the later stages of apoptosis. This review concludes with a section highlighting areas of priority for future studies.

  18. Matrix rigidity regulates cancer cell growth by modulating cellular metabolism and protein synthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert W Tilghman

    Full Text Available Tumor cells in vivo encounter diverse types of microenvironments both at the site of the primary tumor and at sites of distant metastases. Understanding how the various mechanical properties of these microenvironments affect the biology of tumor cells during disease progression is critical in identifying molecular targets for cancer therapy.This study uses flexible polyacrylamide gels as substrates for cell growth in conjunction with a novel proteomic approach to identify the properties of rigidity-dependent cancer cell lines that contribute to their differential growth on soft and rigid substrates. Compared to cells growing on more rigid/stiff substrates (>10,000 Pa, cells on soft substrates (150-300 Pa exhibited a longer cell cycle, due predominantly to an extension of the G1 phase of the cell cycle, and were metabolically less active, showing decreased levels of intracellular ATP and a marked reduction in protein synthesis. Using stable isotope labeling of amino acids in culture (SILAC and mass spectrometry, we measured the rates of protein synthesis of over 1200 cellular proteins under growth conditions on soft and rigid/stiff substrates. We identified cellular proteins whose syntheses were either preferentially inhibited or preserved on soft matrices. The former category included proteins that regulate cytoskeletal structures (e.g., tubulins and glycolysis (e.g., phosphofructokinase-1, whereas the latter category included proteins that regulate key metabolic pathways required for survival, e.g., nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, a regulator of the NAD salvage pathway.The cellular properties of rigidity-dependent cancer cells growing on soft matrices are reminiscent of the properties of dormant cancer cells, e.g., slow growth rate and reduced metabolism. We suggest that the use of relatively soft gels as cell culture substrates would allow molecular pathways to be studied under conditions that reflect the different mechanical

  19. Active cell-matrix coupling regulates cellular force landscapes of cohesive epithelial monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Tiankai; Zhang, Yao; Wei, Qiong; Shi, Xuechen; Zhao, Peng; Chen, Long-Qing; Zhang, Sulin

    2018-03-01

    Epithelial cells can assemble into cohesive monolayers with rich morphologies on substrates due to competition between elastic, edge, and interfacial effects. Here we present a molecularly based thermodynamic model, integrating monolayer and substrate elasticity, and force-mediated focal adhesion formation, to elucidate the active biochemical regulation over the cellular force landscapes in cohesive epithelial monolayers, corroborated by microscopy and immunofluorescence studies. The predicted extracellular traction and intercellular tension are both monolayer size and substrate stiffness dependent, suggestive of cross-talks between intercellular and extracellular activities. Our model sets a firm ground toward a versatile computational framework to uncover the molecular origins of morphogenesis and disease in multicellular epithelia.

  20. Anterior gradient protein-2 is a regulator of cellular adhesion in prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diptiman Chanda

    Full Text Available Anterior Gradient Protein (AGR-2 is reported to be over-expressed in many epithelial cancers and promotes metastasis. A clear-cut mechanism for its observed function(s has not been previously identified. We found significant upregulation of AGR-2 expression in a bone metastatic prostate cancer cell line, PC3, following culturing in bone marrow-conditioned medium. Substantial AGR-2 expression was also confirmed in prostate cancer tissue specimens in patients with bone lesions. By developing stable clones of PC3 cells with varying levels of AGR-2 expression, we identified that abrogation of AGR-2 significantly reduced cellular attachment to fibronectin, collagen I, collagen IV, laminin I and fibrinogen. Loss of cellular adhesion was associated with sharp decrease in the expression of α4, α5, αV, β3 and β4 integrins. Failure to undergo apoptosis following detachment is a hallmark of epithelial cancer metastasis. The AGR-2-silenced PC3 cells showed higher resistance to Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis- inducing ligand (TRAIL induced apoptosis in vitro. This observation was also supported by significantly reduced Caspase-3 expression in AGR-2-silenced PC3 cells, which is a key effector of both extrinsic and intrinsic death signaling pathways. These data suggest that AGR-2 influence prostate cancer metastasis by regulation of cellular adhesion and apoptosis.

  1. Kinetic and Thermodynamic Aspects of Cellular Thiol-Disulfide Redox Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kristine Steen; Hansen, Rosa Erritzøe; Winther, Jakob R

    2009-01-01

    . In the cytosol regulatory disulfide bonds are typically formed in spite of the prevailing reducing conditions and may thereby function as redox switches. Such disulfide bonds are protected from enzymatic reduction by kinetic barriers and are thus allowed to exist long enough to elicit the signal. Factors......Regulation of intracellular thiol-disulfide redox status is an essential part of cellular homeostasis. This involves the regulation of both oxidative and reductive pathways, production of oxidant scavengers and, importantly, the ability of cells to respond to changes in the redox environment...... that affect the rate of thiol-disulfide exchange and stability of disulfide bonds are discussed within the framework of the underlying chemical foundations. This includes the effect of thiol acidity (pKa), the local electrostatic environment, molecular strain and entropy. Even though a thiol-disulfide...

  2. Intracellular cholesterol level regulates sensitivity of glioblastoma cells against temozolomide-induced cell death by modulation of caspase-8 activation via death receptor 5-accumulation and activation in the plasma membrane lipid raft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Yutaro; Tomiyama, Arata; Sasaki, Nobuyoshi; Yamaguchi, Hideki; Shirakihara, Takuya; Nakashima, Katsuhiko; Kumagai, Kosuke; Takeuchi, Satoru; Toyooka, Terushige; Otani, Naoki; Wada, Kojiro; Narita, Yoshitaka; Ichimura, Koichi; Sakai, Ryuichi; Namba, Hiroki; Mori, Kentaro

    2018-01-01

    Development of resistance against temozolomide (TMZ) in glioblastoma (GBM) after continuous treatment with TMZ is one of the critical problems in clinical GBM therapy. Intracellular cholesterol regulates cancer cell biology, but whether intracellular cholesterol is involved in TMZ resistance of GBM cells remains unclear. The involvement of intracellular cholesterol in acquired resistance against TMZ in GBM cells was investigated. Intracellular cholesterol levels were measured in human U251 MG cells with acquired TMZ resistance (U251-R cells) and TMZ-sensitive control U251 MG cells (U251-Con cells), and found that the intracellular cholesterol level was significantly lower in U251-R cells than in U251-Con cells. In addition, treatment by intracellular cholesterol remover, methyl-beta cyclodextrin (MβCD), or intracellular cholesterol inducer, soluble cholesterol (Chol), regulated TMZ-induced U251-Con cell death in line with changes in intracellular cholesterol level. Involvement of death receptor 5 (DR5), a death receptor localized in the plasma membrane, was evaluated. TMZ without or with MβCD and/or Chol caused accumulation of DR5 into the plasma membrane lipid raft and formed a complex with caspase-8, an extrinsic caspase cascade inducer, reflected in the induction of cell death. In addition, treatment with caspase-8 inhibitor or knockdown of DR5 dramatically suppressed U251-Con cell death induced by combination treatment with TMZ, MβCD, and Chol. Combined treatment of Chol with TMZ reversed the TMZ resistance of U251-R cells and another GBM cell model with acquired TMZ resistance, whereas clinical antihypercholesterolemia agents at physiological concentrations suppressed TMZ-induced cell death of U251-Con cells. These findings suggest that intracellular cholesterol level affects TMZ treatment of GBM mediated via a DR5-caspase-8 mechanism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Membrane plasmalogen composition and cellular cholesterol regulation: a structure activity study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-Myat Khine K

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Disrupted cholesterol regulation leading to increased circulating and membrane cholesterol levels is implicated in many age-related chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease (CVD, Alzheimer's disease (AD, and cancer. In vitro and ex vivo cellular plasmalogen deficiency models have been shown to exhibit impaired intra- and extra-cellular processing of cholesterol. Furthermore, depleted brain plasmalogens have been implicated in AD and serum plasmalogen deficiencies have been linked to AD, CVD, and cancer. Results Using plasmalogen deficient (NRel-4 and plasmalogen sufficient (HEK293 cells we investigated the effect of species-dependent plasmalogen restoration/augmentation on membrane cholesterol processing. The results of these studies indicate that the esterification of cholesterol is dependent upon the amount of polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA-containing ethanolamine plasmalogen (PlsEtn present in the membrane. We further elucidate that the concentration-dependent increase in esterified cholesterol observed with PUFA-PlsEtn was due to a concentration-dependent increase in sterol-O-acyltransferase-1 (SOAT1 levels, an observation not reproduced by 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA reductase inhibition. Conclusion The present study describes a novel mechanism of cholesterol regulation that is consistent with clinical and epidemiological studies of cholesterol, aging and disease. Specifically, the present study describes how selective membrane PUFA-PlsEtn enhancement can be achieved using 1-alkyl-2-PUFA glycerols and through this action reduce levels of total and free cholesterol in cells.

  4. Cellular prion protein expression is not regulated by the Alzheimer's amyloid precursor protein intracellular domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Lewis

    Full Text Available There is increasing evidence of molecular and cellular links between Alzheimer's disease (AD and prion diseases. The cellular prion protein, PrP(C, modulates the post-translational processing of the AD amyloid precursor protein (APP, through its inhibition of the β-secretase BACE1, and oligomers of amyloid-β bind to PrP(C which may mediate amyloid-β neurotoxicity. In addition, the APP intracellular domain (AICD, which acts as a transcriptional regulator, has been reported to control the expression of PrP(C. Through the use of transgenic mice, cell culture models and manipulation of APP expression and processing, this study aimed to clarify the role of AICD in regulating PrP(C. Over-expression of the three major isoforms of human APP (APP(695, APP(751 and APP(770 in cultured neuronal and non-neuronal cells had no effect on the level of endogenous PrP(C. Furthermore, analysis of brain tissue from transgenic mice over-expressing either wild type or familial AD associated mutant human APP revealed unaltered PrP(C levels. Knockdown of endogenous APP expression in cells by siRNA or inhibition of γ-secretase activity also had no effect on PrP(C levels. Overall, we did not detect any significant difference in the expression of PrP(C in any of the cell or animal-based paradigms considered, indicating that the control of cellular PrP(C levels by AICD is not as straightforward as previously suggested.

  5. HTLV Tax: a fascinating multifunctional co-regulator of viral and cellular pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert eCurrer

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1 has been identified as the causative agent of adult T cell leukemia (ATL and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP. The virus infects between 15 and 20 million people worldwide of which approximately 2 to 5% develop ATL. The past 35 years of research have yielded significant insight into the pathogenesis of HTLV-1, including the molecular characterization of Tax, the viral transactivator and oncoprotein. In spite of these efforts, the mechanisms of oncogenesis of this pleiotropic protein remain to be fully elucidated. In this review, we illustrate the multiple oncogenic roles of Tax by summarizing a recent body of literature that refines our understanding of cellular transformation. A focused range of topics are discussed in this review including Tax-mediated regulation of the viral promoter and other cellular pathways, particularly the connection of the NF-κB pathway to both post-translational modifications of Tax and sub-cellular localization. Specifically, recent research on polyubiquitination of Tax as it relates to the activation of the IkappaB kinase (IKK complex is highlighted. Regulation of the cell cycle and DNA damage responses due to Tax are also discussed, including Tax interaction with minichromosome maintenance proteins and the role of Tax in chromatin remodeling. The recent identification of HTLV-3 has amplified the importance of the characterization of emerging viral pathogens. The challenge of the molecular determination of pathogenicity and malignant disease of this virus lies in the comparison of the viral transactivators of HTLV-1, -2, and -3 in terms of transformation and immortalization. Consequently, differences between the three proteins are currently being studied to determine what factors are required for the differences in tumorogenesis.

  6. The Relationship between fenestrations, sieve plates and rafts in liver sinusoidal endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitri Svistounov

    Full Text Available Fenestrations are transcellular pores in endothelial cells that facilitate transfer of substrates between blood and the extravascular compartment. In order to understand the regulation and formation of fenestrations, the relationship between membrane rafts and fenestrations was investigated in liver sinusoidal endothelial cells where fenestrations are grouped into sieve plates. Three dimensional structured illumination microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, internal reflectance fluorescence microscopy and two-photon fluorescence microscopy were used to study liver sinusoidal endothelial cells isolated from mice. There was an inverse distribution between sieve plates and membrane rafts visualized by structured illumination microscopy and the fluorescent raft stain, Bodipy FL C5 ganglioside GM1. 7-ketocholesterol and/or cytochalasin D increased both fenestrations and lipid-disordered membrane, while Triton X-100 decreased both fenestrations and lipid-disordered membrane. The effects of cytochalasin D on fenestrations were abrogated by co-administration of Triton X-100, suggesting that actin disruption increases fenestrations by its effects on membrane rafts. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF depleted lipid-ordered membrane and increased fenestrations. The results are consistent with a sieve-raft interaction, where fenestrations form in non-raft lipid-disordered regions of endothelial cells once the membrane-stabilizing effects of actin cytoskeleton and membrane rafts are diminished.

  7. Integrin Beta 3 Regulates Cellular Senescence by Activating the TGF-β Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Rapisarda

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Cellular senescence is an important in vivo mechanism that prevents the propagation of damaged cells. However, the precise mechanisms regulating senescence are not well characterized. Here, we find that ITGB3 (integrin beta 3 or β3 is regulated by the Polycomb protein CBX7. β3 expression accelerates the onset of senescence in human primary fibroblasts by activating the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β pathway in a cell-autonomous and non-cell-autonomous manner. β3 levels are dynamically increased during oncogene-induced senescence (OIS through CBX7 Polycomb regulation, and downregulation of β3 levels overrides OIS and therapy-induced senescence (TIS, independently of its ligand-binding activity. Moreover, cilengitide, an αvβ3 antagonist, has the ability to block the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP without affecting proliferation. Finally, we show an increase in β3 levels in a subset of tissues during aging. Altogether, our data show that integrin β3 subunit is a marker and regulator of senescence.

  8. Nrf2 regulates cellular behaviors and Notch signaling in oral squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hong; Paiboonrungruan, Chorlada; Zhang, Xinyan; Prigge, Justin R; Schmidt, Edward E; Sun, Zheng; Chen, Xiaoxin

    2017-11-04

    Oxidative stress is known to play a pivotal role in the development of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). We have demonstrated that activation of the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) signaling pathway has chemopreventive effects against oxidative stress-associated OSCC. However, Nrf2 have dual roles in cancer development; while it prevents carcinogenesis of normal cells, hyperactive Nrf2 also promotes the survival of cancer cells. This study is aimed to understand the function of Nrf2 in regulating cellular behaviors of OSCC cells, and the potential mechanisms through which Nrf2 facilitates OSCC. We established the Nrf2-overexpressing and Nrf2-knockdown OSCC cell lines, and examined the function of Nrf2 in regulating cell proliferation, migration, invasion, cell cycle and colony formation. Our data showed that Nrf2 overexpression promoted cancer phenotypes in OSCC cells, whereas Nrf2 silencing inhibited these phenotypes. In addition, Nrf2 positively regulated Notch signaling pathway in OSCC cells in vitro. Consistent with this observation, Nrf2 activation in Keap1 -/- mice resulted in not only hyperproliferation of squamous epithelial cells in mouse tongue as evidenced by increased expression of PCNA, but also activation of Notch signaling in these cells as evidenced by increased expression of NICD1 and Hes1. In conclusion, Nrf2 regulates cancer behaviors and Notch signaling in OSCC cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The shedding activity of ADAM17 is sequestered in lipid rafts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tellier, Edwige; Canault, Matthias; Rebsomen, Laure; Bonardo, Bernadette; Juhan-Vague, Irene; Nalbone, Gilles; Peiretti, Franck

    2006-01-01

    The tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) converting enzyme (ADAM17) is a metalloprotease-disintegrin responsible for the cleavage of several biologically active transmembrane proteins. However, the substrate specificity of ADAM17 and the regulation of its shedding activity are still poorly understood. Here, we report that during its transport through the Golgi apparatus, ADAM17 is included in cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains (lipid rafts) where its prodomain is cleaved by furin. Consequently, ADAM17 shedding activity is sequestered in lipid rafts, which is confirmed by the fact that metalloproteinase inhibition increases the proportion of ADAM17 substrates (TNF and its receptors TNFR1 and TNFR2) in lipid rafts. Membrane cholesterol depletion increases the ADAM17-dependent shedding of these substrates demonstrating the importance of lipid rafts in the control of this process. Furthermore, ADAM17 substrates are present in different proportions in lipid rafts, suggesting that the entry of each of these substrates in these particular membrane microdomains is specifically regulated. Our data support the idea that one of the mechanisms regulating ADAM17 substrate cleavage involves protein partitioning in lipid rafts

  10. Cholesterol, sphingolipids, and glycolipids: What do we know about their role in raft-like membranes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rog, T.; Vattulainen, I.

    2014-01-01

    Lipids rafts are considered to be functional nanoscale membrane domains enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids, characteristic in particular of the external leaflet of cell membranes. Lipids, together with membrane-associated proteins, are therefore considered to form nanoscale units with pote......Lipids rafts are considered to be functional nanoscale membrane domains enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids, characteristic in particular of the external leaflet of cell membranes. Lipids, together with membrane-associated proteins, are therefore considered to form nanoscale units...... with potential specific functions. Although the understanding of the structure of rafts in living cells is quite limited, the possible functions of rafts are widely discussed in the literature, highlighting their importance in cellular functions. In this review, we discuss the understanding of rafts that has...... emerged based on recent atomistic and coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation studies on the key lipid raft components, which include cholesterol, sphingolipids, glycolipids, and the proteins interacting with these classes of lipids. The simulation results are compared to experiments when possible...

  11. Early vertebrate origin and diversification of small transmembrane regulators of cellular ion transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirkmajer, Sergej; Kirchner, Henriette; Lundell, Leonidas S; Zelenin, Pavel V; Zierath, Juleen R; Makarova, Kira S; Wolf, Yuri I; Chibalin, Alexander V

    2017-07-15

    Small transmembrane proteins such as FXYDs, which interact with Na + ,K + -ATPase, and the micropeptides that interact with sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca 2+ -ATPase play fundamental roles in regulation of ion transport in vertebrates. Uncertain evolutionary origins and phylogenetic relationships among these regulators of ion transport have led to inconsistencies in their classification across vertebrate species, thus hampering comparative studies of their functions. We discovered the first FXYD homologue in sea lamprey, a basal jawless vertebrate, which suggests small transmembrane regulators of ion transport emerged early in the vertebrate lineage. We also identified 13 gene subfamilies of FXYDs and propose a revised, phylogeny-based FXYD classification that is consistent across vertebrate species. These findings provide an improved framework for investigating physiological and pathophysiological functions of small transmembrane regulators of ion transport. Small transmembrane proteins are important for regulation of cellular ion transport. The most prominent among these are members of the FXYD family (FXYD1-12), which regulate Na + ,K + -ATPase, and phospholamban, sarcolipin, myoregulin and DWORF, which regulate the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca 2+ -ATPase (SERCA). FXYDs and regulators of SERCA are present in fishes, as well as terrestrial vertebrates; however, their evolutionary origins and phylogenetic relationships are obscure, thus hampering comparative physiological studies. Here we discovered that sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus), a representative of extant jawless vertebrates (Cyclostomata), expresses an FXYD homologue, which strongly suggests that FXYDs predate the emergence of fishes and other jawed vertebrates (Gnathostomata). Using a combination of sequence-based phylogenetic analysis and conservation of local chromosome context, we determined that FXYDs markedly diversified in the lineages leading to cartilaginous fishes (Chondrichthyes) and bony

  12. Proteomic analysis of BmN cell lipid rafts reveals roles in Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaolong; Zhu, Min; Liang, Zi; Kumar, Dhiraj; Chen, Fei; Zhu, Liyuan; Kuang, Sulan; Xue, Renyu; Cao, Guangli; Gong, Chengliang

    2017-04-01

    The mechanism of how Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) enters cells is unknown. The primary components of membrane lipid rafts are proteins and cholesterol, and membrane lipid rafts are thought to be an active region for host-viral interactions. However, whether they contribute to the entry of BmNPV into silkworm cells remains unclear. In this study, we explored the membrane protein components of lipid rafts from BmN cells with mass spectrometry (MS). Proteins and cholesterol were investigated after establishing infection with BmNPV in BmN cells. In total, 222 proteins were identified in the lipid rafts, and Gene Ontology (GO) annotation analysis showed that more than 10% of these proteins had binding and catalytic functions. We then identified proteins that potentially interact between lipid rafts and BmNPV virions using the Virus Overlay Protein Blot Assay (VOPBA). A total of 65 proteins were analyzed with MS, and 7 were predicted to be binding proteins involved in BmNPV cellular invasion, including actin, kinesin light chain-like isoform X2, annexin B13, heat-shock protein 90, barrier-to-autointegration factor B-like and serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 1 A-like. When the cholesterol of the lipid rafts from the membrane was depleted by methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD), BmNPV entry into BmN cells was blocked. However, supplying cholesterol into the medium rescued the BmNPV infection ability. These results show that membrane lipid rafts may be the active regions for the entry of BmNPV into cells, and the components of membrane lipid rafts may be candidate targets for improving the resistance of the silkworm to BmNPV.

  13. BICD2, dynactin, and LIS1 cooperate in regulating dynein recruitment to cellular structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Splinter, Daniël; Razafsky, David S.; Schlager, Max A.; Serra-Marques, Andrea; Grigoriev, Ilya; Demmers, Jeroen; Keijzer, Nanda; Jiang, Kai; Poser, Ina; Hyman, Anthony A.; Hoogenraad, Casper C.; King, Stephen J.; Akhmanova, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Cytoplasmic dynein is the major microtubule minus-end–directed cellular motor. Most dynein activities require dynactin, but the mechanisms regulating cargo-dependent dynein–dynactin interaction are poorly understood. In this study, we focus on dynein–dynactin recruitment to cargo by the conserved motor adaptor Bicaudal D2 (BICD2). We show that dynein and dynactin depend on each other for BICD2-mediated targeting to cargo and that BICD2 N-terminus (BICD2-N) strongly promotes stable interaction between dynein and dynactin both in vitro and in vivo. Direct visualization of dynein in live cells indicates that by itself the triple BICD2-N–dynein–dynactin complex is unable to interact with either cargo or microtubules. However, tethering of BICD2-N to different membranes promotes their microtubule minus-end–directed motility. We further show that LIS1 is required for dynein-mediated transport induced by membrane tethering of BICD2-N and that LIS1 contributes to dynein accumulation at microtubule plus ends and BICD2-positive cellular structures. Our results demonstrate that dynein recruitment to cargo requires concerted action of multiple dynein cofactors. PMID:22956769

  14. CRF2 signaling is a novel regulator of cellular adhesion and migration in colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducarouge, Benjamin; Pelissier-Rota, Marjolaine; Lainé, Michèle; Cristina, Nadine; Vachez, Yvan; Scoazec, Jean-Yves; Bonaz, Bruno; Jacquier-Sarlin, Muriel

    2013-01-01

    Stress has been proposed to be a tumor promoting factor through the secretion of specific neuromediators, such as Urocortin2 and 3 (Ucn2/3), however its role in colorectal cancer (CRC) remains elusive. We observed that Ucn2/3 and their receptor the Corticotropin Releasing Factor receptor 2 (CRF2) were up-regulated in high grade and poorly differentiated CRC. This suggests a role for CRF2 in the loss of cellular organization and tumor progression. Using HT-29 and SW620 cells, two CRC cell lines differing in their abilities to perform cell-cell contacts, we found that CRF2 signals through Src/ERK pathway to induce the alteration of cell-cell junctions and the shuttle of p120ctn and Kaiso in the nucleus. In HT-29 cells, this signaling pathway also leads to the remodeling of cell adhesion by i) the phosphorylation of Focal Adhesion Kinase and ii) a modification of actin cytoskeleton and focal adhesion complexes. These events stimulate cell migration and invasion. In conclusion, our findings indicate that CRF2 signaling controls cellular organization and may promote metastatic potential of human CRC cells through an epithelial-mesenchymal transition like process. This contributes to the comprehension of the tumor-promoting effects of stress molecules and designates Ucn2/3-CRF2 tandem as a target to prevent CRC progression and aggressiveness.

  15. Ionizing Radiation Induces Cellular Senescence of Articular Chondrocytes via Negative Regulation of SIRT1 by p38 Kinase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Eun Hee; Hwang, Sang Gu [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-05-15

    Senescent cells exhibit irreversible growth arrest, large flat morphology, and up-regulated senescence-associated {beta}-galactosidase activity at pH 6.0. Several conditions, including oncogenic stress, oxidative stress, and DNA damage are associated with cellular senescence. Massive acute DNA double-strand breaks occurring as a result of mechanical and chemical stress can be repaired, but some DNA damage persists, eventually triggering premature senescence. Since ionizing radiation directly induces DBS, it is possible that cellular senescence is activated under these conditions. The biological events in chondrocytes following irradiation are poorly understood, and limited information is available on the molecular signal transduction mechanisms of cellular senescence at present. In this study, we identify SIRT1 as a target molecule of p38 kinase and demonstrate that the interactions between p38 kinase and SIRT1 protein play an important role in the regulation of cellular senescence in response to IR.

  16. HTLV Tax: A Fascinating Multifunctional Co-Regulator of Viral and Cellular Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currer, Robert; Van Duyne, Rachel; Jaworski, Elizabeth; Guendel, Irene; Sampey, Gavin; Das, Ravi; Narayanan, Aarthi; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2012-01-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) has been identified as the causative agent of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). The virus infects between 15 and 20 million people worldwide of which approximately 2–5% develop ATL. The past 35 years of research have yielded significant insight into the pathogenesis of HTLV-1, including the molecular characterization of Tax, the viral transactivator, and oncoprotein. In spite of these efforts, the mechanisms of oncogenesis of this pleiotropic protein remain to be fully elucidated. In this review, we illustrate the multiple oncogenic roles of Tax by summarizing a recent body of literature that refines our understanding of cellular transformation. A focused range of topics are discussed in this review including Tax-mediated regulation of the viral promoter and other cellular pathways, particularly the connection of the NF-κB pathway to both post-translational modifications (PTMs) of Tax and subcellular localization. Specifically, recent research on polyubiquitination of Tax as it relates to the activation of the IkappaB kinase (IKK) complex is highlighted. Regulation of the cell cycle and DNA damage responses due to Tax are also discussed, including Tax interaction with minichromosome maintenance proteins and the role of Tax in chromatin remodeling. The recent identification of HTLV-3 has amplified the importance of the characterization of emerging viral pathogens. The challenge of the molecular determination of pathogenicity and malignant disease of this virus lies in the comparison of the viral transactivators of HTLV-1, -2, and -3 in terms of transformation and immortalization. Consequently, differences between the three proteins are currently being studied to determine what factors are required for the differences in tumorogenesis. PMID:23226145

  17. Juvenile-onset loss of lipid-raft domains in attractin-deficient mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azouz, Abdallah; Gunn, Teresa M.; Duke-Cohan, Jonathan S.

    2007-01-01

    Mutations at the attractin (Atrn) locus in mice result in altered pigmentation on an agouti background, higher basal metabolic rate and juvenile-onset hypomyelination leading to neurodegeneration, while studies on human immune cells indicate a chemotaxis regulatory function. The underlying biochemical defect remains elusive. In this report we identify a role for attractin in plasma membrane maintenance. In attractin's absence there is a decline in plasma membrane glycolipid-enriched rafts from normal levels at 8 weeks to a complete absence by 24 weeks. The structural integrity of lipid rafts depends upon cholesterol and sphingomyelin, and can be identified by partitioning within of ganglioside GM 1 . Despite a significant fall in cellular cholesterol with maturity, and a lesser fall in both membrane and total cellular GM 1 , these parameters lag behind raft loss, and are normal when hypomyelination/neurodegeneration has already begun thus supporting consequence rather than cause. These findings can be recapitulated in Atrn-deficient cell lines propagated in vitro. Further, signal transduction through complex membrane receptor assemblies is not grossly disturbed despite the complete absence of lipid rafts. We find these results compatible with a role for attractin in plasma membrane maintenance and consistent with the proposal that the juvenile-onset hypomyelination and neurodegeneration represent a defect in attractin-mediated raft-dependent myelin biogenesis

  18. Lysophosphatidic acid receptor-5 negatively regulates cellular responses in mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Yan; Hirane, Miku; Araki, Mutsumi [Division of Cancer Biology and Bioinformatics, Department of Life Science, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Kinki University, 3-4-1, Kowakae, Higashiosaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Fukushima, Nobuyuki [Division of Molecular Neurobiology, Department of Life Science, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Kinki University, 3-4-1, Kowakae, Higashiosaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi, E-mail: ttujiuch@life.kindai.ac.jp [Division of Cancer Biology and Bioinformatics, Department of Life Science, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Kinki University, 3-4-1, Kowakae, Higashiosaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan)

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • LPA{sub 5} inhibits the cell growth and motile activities of 3T3 cells. • LPA{sub 5} suppresses the cell motile activities stimulated by hydrogen peroxide in 3T3 cells. • Enhancement of LPA{sub 5} on the cell motile activities inhibited by LPA{sub 1} in 3T3 cells. • The expression and activation of Mmp-9 were inhibited by LPA{sub 5} in 3T3 cells. • LPA signaling via LPA{sub 5} acts as a negative regulator of cellular responses in 3T3 cells. - Abstract: Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling via G protein-coupled LPA receptors (LPA{sub 1}–LPA{sub 6}) mediates a variety of biological functions, including cell migration. Recently, we have reported that LPA{sub 1} inhibited the cell motile activities of mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells. In the present study, to evaluate a role of LPA{sub 5} in cellular responses, Lpar5 knockdown (3T3-L5) cells were generated from 3T3 cells. In cell proliferation assays, LPA markedly stimulated the cell proliferation activities of 3T3-L5 cells, compared with control cells. In cell motility assays with Cell Culture Inserts, the cell motile activities of 3T3-L5 cells were significantly higher than those of control cells. The activity levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were measured by gelatin zymography. 3T3-L5 cells stimulated the activation of Mmp-2, correlating with the expression levels of Mmp-2 gene. Moreover, to assess the co-effects of LPA{sub 1} and LPA{sub 5} on cell motile activities, Lpar5 knockdown (3T3a1-L5) cells were also established from Lpar1 over-expressing (3T3a1) cells. 3T3a1-L5 cells increased the cell motile activities of 3T3a1 cells, while the cell motile activities of 3T3a1 cells were significantly lower than those of control cells. These results suggest that LPA{sub 5} may act as a negative regulator of cellular responses in mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells, similar to the case for LPA{sub 1}.

  19. Lysophosphatidic acid receptor-5 negatively regulates cellular responses in mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Yan; Hirane, Miku; Araki, Mutsumi; Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • LPA 5 inhibits the cell growth and motile activities of 3T3 cells. • LPA 5 suppresses the cell motile activities stimulated by hydrogen peroxide in 3T3 cells. • Enhancement of LPA 5 on the cell motile activities inhibited by LPA 1 in 3T3 cells. • The expression and activation of Mmp-9 were inhibited by LPA 5 in 3T3 cells. • LPA signaling via LPA 5 acts as a negative regulator of cellular responses in 3T3 cells. - Abstract: Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling via G protein-coupled LPA receptors (LPA 1 –LPA 6 ) mediates a variety of biological functions, including cell migration. Recently, we have reported that LPA 1 inhibited the cell motile activities of mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells. In the present study, to evaluate a role of LPA 5 in cellular responses, Lpar5 knockdown (3T3-L5) cells were generated from 3T3 cells. In cell proliferation assays, LPA markedly stimulated the cell proliferation activities of 3T3-L5 cells, compared with control cells. In cell motility assays with Cell Culture Inserts, the cell motile activities of 3T3-L5 cells were significantly higher than those of control cells. The activity levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were measured by gelatin zymography. 3T3-L5 cells stimulated the activation of Mmp-2, correlating with the expression levels of Mmp-2 gene. Moreover, to assess the co-effects of LPA 1 and LPA 5 on cell motile activities, Lpar5 knockdown (3T3a1-L5) cells were also established from Lpar1 over-expressing (3T3a1) cells. 3T3a1-L5 cells increased the cell motile activities of 3T3a1 cells, while the cell motile activities of 3T3a1 cells were significantly lower than those of control cells. These results suggest that LPA 5 may act as a negative regulator of cellular responses in mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells, similar to the case for LPA 1

  20. Regulation of Cellular Redox Signaling by Matricellular Proteins in Vascular Biology, Immunology, and Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, David D; Kaur, Sukhbir; Isenberg, Jeffrey S

    2017-10-20

    In contrast to structural elements of the extracellular matrix, matricellular proteins appear transiently during development and injury responses, but their sustained expression can contribute to chronic disease. Through interactions with other matrix components and specific cell surface receptors, matricellular proteins regulate multiple signaling pathways, including those mediated by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and H 2 S. Dysregulation of matricellular proteins contributes to the pathogenesis of vascular diseases and cancer. Defining the molecular mechanisms and receptors involved is revealing new therapeutic opportunities. Recent Advances: Thrombospondin-1 (TSP1) regulates NO, H 2 S, and superoxide production and signaling in several cell types. The TSP1 receptor CD47 plays a central role in inhibition of NO signaling, but other TSP1 receptors also modulate redox signaling. The matricellular protein CCN1 engages some of the same receptors to regulate redox signaling, and ADAMTS1 regulates NO signaling in Marfan syndrome. In addition to mediating matricellular protein signaling, redox signaling is emerging as an important pathway that controls the expression of several matricellular proteins. Redox signaling remains unexplored for many matricellular proteins. Their interactions with multiple cellular receptors remains an obstacle to defining signaling mechanisms, but improved transgenic models could overcome this barrier. Therapeutics targeting the TSP1 receptor CD47 may have beneficial effects for treating cardiovascular disease and cancer and have recently entered clinical trials. Biomarkers are needed to assess their effects on redox signaling in patients and to evaluate how these contribute to their therapeutic efficacy and potential side effects. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 27, 874-911.

  1. A comparative study on the raft chemical properties of various alginate antacid raft-forming products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettmar, Peter W; Gil-Gonzalez, Diana; Fisher, Jeanine; Flint, Lucy; Rainforth, Daniel; Moreno-Herrera, Antonio; Potts, Mark

    2018-01-01

    Research to measure the chemical characterization of alginate rafts for good raft performance and ascertain how formulation can affect chemical parameters. A selection of alginate formulations was investigated all claiming to be proficient raft formers with significance between products established and ranked. Procedures were selected which demonstrated the chemical characterization allowing rafts to effectively impede the reflux into the esophagus or in severe cases to be refluxed preferentially into the esophagus and exert a demulcent effect, with focus of current research on methods which complement previous studies centered on physical properties. The alginate content was analyzed by a newly developed HPLC method. Methods were used to determine the neutralization profile and the acid neutralization within the raft determined along with how raft structure affects neutralization. Alginate content of Gaviscon Double Action (GDA) within the raft was significantly superior (p raft acid neutralization capacity were GDA and Rennie Duo, the latter product not being a raft former. Raft structure was key and GDA had the right level of porosity to allow for longer duration of neutralization. Alginate formulations require three chemical reactions to take place simultaneously: transformation to alginic acid, sodium carbonate reacting to form carbon dioxide, calcium releasing free calcium ions to bind with alginic acid providing strength to raft formation. GDA was significantly superior (p <.0001) to all other comparators.

  2. Chemical driving force for rafting in superalloys

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Nabarro, FRN

    1997-08-15

    Full Text Available The author provides a brief overview of the chemical driving forces for rafting in superalloys. Until recently, all theories of the driving force for rafting have considered the compositions of the two phases to be fixed, although accepting...

  3. RAFT polymerization and some of its applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moad, Graeme; Rizzardo, Ezio; Thang, San H

    2013-08-01

    Reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) is one of the most robust and versatile methods for controlling radical polymerization. With appropriate selection of the RAFT agent for the monomers and reaction conditions, it is applicable to the majority of monomers subject to radical polymerization. The process can be used in the synthesis of well-defined homo-, gradient, diblock, triblock, and star polymers and more complex architectures, which include microgels and polymer brushes. In this Focus Review we describe how the development of RAFT and RAFT application has been facilitated by the adoption of continuous flow techniques using tubular reactors and through the use of high-throughput methodology. Applications described include the use of RAFT in the preparation of polymers for optoelectronics, block copolymer therapeutics, and star polymer rheology control agents. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Cellular chloride and bicarbonate retention alters intracellular pH regulation in Cftr KO crypt epithelium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Nancy M.; Liu, Jinghua; Stein, Sydney R.; Stefanski, Casey D.; Strubberg, Ashlee M.

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), an anion channel providing a major pathway for Cl− and HCO3− efflux across the apical membrane of the epithelium. In the intestine, CF manifests as obstructive syndromes, dysbiosis, inflammation, and an increased risk for gastrointestinal cancer. Cftr knockout (KO) mice recapitulate CF intestinal disease, including intestinal hyperproliferation. Previous studies using Cftr KO intestinal organoids (enteroids) indicate that crypt epithelium maintains an alkaline intracellular pH (pHi). We hypothesized that Cftr has a cell-autonomous role in downregulating pHi that is incompletely compensated by acid-base regulation in its absence. Here, 2′,7′-bis(2-carboxyethyl)-5(6)-carboxyfluorescein microfluorimetry of enteroids showed that Cftr KO crypt epithelium sustains an alkaline pHi and resistance to cell acidification relative to wild-type. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that Cftr KO enteroids exhibit downregulated transcription of base (HCO3−)-loading proteins and upregulation of the basolateral membrane HCO3−-unloader anion exchanger 2 (Ae2). Although Cftr KO crypt epithelium had increased Ae2 expression and Ae2-mediated Cl−/HCO3− exchange with maximized gradients, it also had increased intracellular Cl− concentration relative to wild-type. Pharmacological reduction of intracellular Cl− concentration in Cftr KO crypt epithelium normalized pHi, which was largely Ae2-dependent. We conclude that Cftr KO crypt epithelium maintains an alkaline pHi as a consequence of losing both Cl− and HCO3− efflux, which impairs pHi regulation by Ae2. Retention of Cl− and an alkaline pHi in crypt epithelium may alter several cellular processes in the proliferative compartment of Cftr KO intestine. PMID:26542396

  5. Cellular chloride and bicarbonate retention alters intracellular pH regulation in Cftr KO crypt epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Nancy M; Liu, Jinghua; Stein, Sydney R; Stefanski, Casey D; Strubberg, Ashlee M; Clarke, Lane L

    2016-01-15

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), an anion channel providing a major pathway for Cl(-) and HCO3 (-) efflux across the apical membrane of the epithelium. In the intestine, CF manifests as obstructive syndromes, dysbiosis, inflammation, and an increased risk for gastrointestinal cancer. Cftr knockout (KO) mice recapitulate CF intestinal disease, including intestinal hyperproliferation. Previous studies using Cftr KO intestinal organoids (enteroids) indicate that crypt epithelium maintains an alkaline intracellular pH (pHi). We hypothesized that Cftr has a cell-autonomous role in downregulating pHi that is incompletely compensated by acid-base regulation in its absence. Here, 2',7'-bis(2-carboxyethyl)-5(6)-carboxyfluorescein microfluorimetry of enteroids showed that Cftr KO crypt epithelium sustains an alkaline pHi and resistance to cell acidification relative to wild-type. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that Cftr KO enteroids exhibit downregulated transcription of base (HCO3 (-))-loading proteins and upregulation of the basolateral membrane HCO3 (-)-unloader anion exchanger 2 (Ae2). Although Cftr KO crypt epithelium had increased Ae2 expression and Ae2-mediated Cl(-)/HCO3 (-) exchange with maximized gradients, it also had increased intracellular Cl(-) concentration relative to wild-type. Pharmacological reduction of intracellular Cl(-) concentration in Cftr KO crypt epithelium normalized pHi, which was largely Ae2-dependent. We conclude that Cftr KO crypt epithelium maintains an alkaline pHi as a consequence of losing both Cl(-) and HCO3 (-) efflux, which impairs pHi regulation by Ae2. Retention of Cl(-) and an alkaline pHi in crypt epithelium may alter several cellular processes in the proliferative compartment of Cftr KO intestine. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  6. Nitric Oxide and ERK mediates regulation of cellular processes by Ecdysterone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omanakuttan, Athira; Bose, Chinchu; Pandurangan, Nanjan; Kumar, Geetha B.; Banerji, Asoke; Nair, Bipin G., E-mail: bipin@amrita.edu

    2016-08-15

    The complex process of wound healing is a major problem associated with diabetes, venous or arterial disease, old age and infection. A wide range of pharmacological effects including anabolic, anti-diabetic and hepato-protective activities have been attributed to Ecdysterone. In earlier studies, Ecdysterone has been shown to modulate eNOS and iNOS expression in diabetic animals and activate osteogenic differentiation through the Extracellular-signal-Regulated Kinase (ERK) pathway in periodontal ligament stem cells. However, in the wound healing process, Ecdysterone has only been shown to enhance granulation tissue formation in rabbits. There have been no studies to date, which elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying the complex cellular process involved in wound healing. The present study, demonstrates a novel interaction between the phytosteroid Ecdysterone and Nitric Oxide Synthase (NOS), in an Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR)-dependent manner, thereby promoting cell proliferation, cell spreading and cell migration. These observations were further supported by the 4-amino-5-methylamino- 2′ ,7′ -difluorofluorescein diacetate (DAF FM) fluorescence assay which indicated that Ecdysterone activates NOS resulting in increased Nitric Oxide (NO) production. Additionally, studies with inhibitors of both the EGFR and ERK, demonstrated that Ecdysterone activates NOS through modulation of EGFR and ERK. These results clearly demonstrate, for the first time, that Ecdysterone enhances Nitric Oxide production and modulates complex cellular processes by activating ERK1/2 through the EGF pathway. - Highlights: • Ecdysterone significantly enhances cell migration in a dose dependent manner. • Ecdysterone augments cell spreading during the initial phase of cell migration through actin cytoskeletal rearrangement. • Ecdysterone enhances cell proliferation in a nitric oxide dependent manner. • Ecdysterone enhances nitric oxide production via activation of EGFR

  7. Nitric Oxide and ERK mediates regulation of cellular processes by Ecdysterone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omanakuttan, Athira; Bose, Chinchu; Pandurangan, Nanjan; Kumar, Geetha B.; Banerji, Asoke; Nair, Bipin G.

    2016-01-01

    The complex process of wound healing is a major problem associated with diabetes, venous or arterial disease, old age and infection. A wide range of pharmacological effects including anabolic, anti-diabetic and hepato-protective activities have been attributed to Ecdysterone. In earlier studies, Ecdysterone has been shown to modulate eNOS and iNOS expression in diabetic animals and activate osteogenic differentiation through the Extracellular-signal-Regulated Kinase (ERK) pathway in periodontal ligament stem cells. However, in the wound healing process, Ecdysterone has only been shown to enhance granulation tissue formation in rabbits. There have been no studies to date, which elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying the complex cellular process involved in wound healing. The present study, demonstrates a novel interaction between the phytosteroid Ecdysterone and Nitric Oxide Synthase (NOS), in an Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR)-dependent manner, thereby promoting cell proliferation, cell spreading and cell migration. These observations were further supported by the 4-amino-5-methylamino- 2′ ,7′ -difluorofluorescein diacetate (DAF FM) fluorescence assay which indicated that Ecdysterone activates NOS resulting in increased Nitric Oxide (NO) production. Additionally, studies with inhibitors of both the EGFR and ERK, demonstrated that Ecdysterone activates NOS through modulation of EGFR and ERK. These results clearly demonstrate, for the first time, that Ecdysterone enhances Nitric Oxide production and modulates complex cellular processes by activating ERK1/2 through the EGF pathway. - Highlights: • Ecdysterone significantly enhances cell migration in a dose dependent manner. • Ecdysterone augments cell spreading during the initial phase of cell migration through actin cytoskeletal rearrangement. • Ecdysterone enhances cell proliferation in a nitric oxide dependent manner. • Ecdysterone enhances nitric oxide production via activation of EGFR

  8. PI3K/AKT and ERK regulate retinoic acid-induced neuroblastoma cellular differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiao, Jingbo [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Paul, Pritha; Lee, Sora [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Department of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Qiao, Lan; Josifi, Erlena; Tiao, Joshua R. [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Chung, Dai H., E-mail: dai.chung@vanderbilt.edu [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Department of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States)

    2012-08-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Retinoic acid (RA) induces neuroblastoma cells differentiation, which is accompanied by G0/G1 cell cycle arrest. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RA resulted in neuroblastoma cell survival and inhibition of DNA fragmentation; this is regulated by PI3K pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RA activates PI3K and ERK1/2 pathway; PI3K pathway mediates RA-induced neuroblastoma cell differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Upregulation of p21 is necessary for RA-induced neuroblastoma cell differentiation. -- Abstract: Neuroblastoma, the most common extra-cranial solid tumor in infants and children, is characterized by a high rate of spontaneous remissions in infancy. Retinoic acid (RA) has been known to induce neuroblastoma differentiation; however, the molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways that are responsible for RA-mediated neuroblastoma cell differentiation remain unclear. Here, we sought to determine the cell signaling processes involved in RA-induced cellular differentiation. Upon RA administration, human neuroblastoma cell lines, SK-N-SH and BE(2)-C, demonstrated neurite extensions, which is an indicator of neuronal cell differentiation. Moreover, cell cycle arrest occurred in G1/G0 phase. The protein levels of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, p21 and p27{sup Kip}, which inhibit cell proliferation by blocking cell cycle progression at G1/S phase, increased after RA treatment. Interestingly, RA promoted cell survival during the differentiation process, hence suggesting a potential mechanism for neuroblastoma resistance to RA therapy. Importantly, we found that the PI3K/AKT pathway is required for RA-induced neuroblastoma cell differentiation. Our results elucidated the molecular mechanism of RA-induced neuroblastoma cellular differentiation, which may be important for developing novel therapeutic strategy against poorly differentiated neuroblastoma.

  9. Eukaryotic Cell Cycle as a Test Case for Modeling Cellular Regulation in a Collaborative Problem-Solving Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    computer models of cell cycle regulation in a variety of organisms, including yeast cells, amphibian embryos, bacterial cells and human cells. These...and meiosis ), but they do not nullify the central role played by irreversible, alternating START and FINISH transitions in the cell cycle. 32...AFRL-IF-RS-TR-2007-69 Final Technical Report March 2007 EUKARYOTIC CELL CYCLE AS A TEST CASE FOR MODELING CELLULAR REGULATION IN A

  10. Viral and cellular SOS-regulated motor proteins: dsDNA translocation mechanisms with divergent functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Annie; Phipps, Kara; Weitao, Tao

    2014-01-01

    DNA damage attacks on bacterial cells have been known to activate the SOS response, a transcriptional response affecting chromosome replication, DNA recombination and repair, cell division and prophage induction. All these functions require double-stranded (ds) DNA translocation by ASCE hexameric motors. This review seeks to delineate the structural and functional characteristics of the SOS response and the SOS-regulated DNA translocases FtsK and RuvB with the phi29 bacteriophage packaging motor gp16 ATPase as a prototype to study bacterial motors. While gp16 ATPase, cellular FtsK and RuvB are similarly comprised of hexameric rings encircling dsDNA and functioning as ATP-driven DNA translocases, they utilize different mechanisms to accomplish separate functions, suggesting a convergent evolution of these motors. The gp16 ATPase and FtsK use a novel revolution mechanism, generating a power stroke between subunits through an entropy-DNA affinity switch and pushing dsDNA inward without rotation of DNA and the motor, whereas RuvB seems to employ a rotation mechanism that remains to be further characterized. While FtsK and RuvB perform essential tasks during the SOS response, their roles may be far more significant as SOS response is involved in antibiotic-inducible bacterial vesiculation and biofilm formation as well as the perspective of the bacteria-cancer evolutionary interaction.

  11. Snail regulates cell survival and inhibits cellular senescence in human metastatic prostate cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emadi Baygi, Modjtaba; Soheili, Zahra Soheila; Schmitz, Ingo; Sameie, Shahram; Schulz, Wolfgang A

    2010-12-01

    The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is regarded as an important step in cancer metastasis. Snail, a master regulator of EMT, has been recently proposed to act additionally as a cell survival factor and inducer of motility. We have investigated the function of Snail (SNAI1) in prostate cancer cells by downregulating its expression via short (21-mer) interfering RNA (siRNA) and measuring the consequences on EMT markers, cell viability, death, cell cycle, senescence, attachment, and invasivity. Of eight carcinoma cell lines, the prostate carcinoma cell lines LNCaP and PC-3 showed the highest and moderate expression of SNAI1 mRNA, respectively, as measured by quantitative RT-PCR. Long-term knockdown of Snail induced a severe decline in cell numbers in LNCaP and PC-3 and caspase activity was accordingly enhanced in both cell lines. In addition, suppression of Snail expression induced senescence in LNCaP cells. SNAI1-siRNA-treated cells did not tolerate detachment from the extracellular matrix, probably due to downregulation of integrin α6. Expression of E-cadherin, vimentin, and fibronectin was also affected. Invasiveness of PC-3 cells was not significantly diminished by Snail knockdown. Our data suggest that Snail acts primarily as a survival factor and inhibitor of cellular senescence in prostate cancer cell lines. We therefore propose that Snail can act as early driver of prostate cancer progression.

  12. Clathrin to Lipid Raft-Endocytosis via Controlled Surface Chemistry and Efficient Perinuclear Targeting of Nanoparticle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Atanu; Jana, Nikhil R

    2015-09-17

    Nanoparticle interacts with live cells depending on their surface chemistry, enters into cell via endocytosis, and is commonly trafficked to an endosome/lysozome that restricts subcellular targeting options. Here we show that nanoparticle surface chemistry can be tuned to alter their cell uptake mechanism and subcellular trafficking. Quantum dot based nanoprobes of 20-30 nm hydrodynamic diameters have been synthesized with tunable surface charge (between +15 mV to -25 mV) and lipophilicity to influence their cellular uptake processes and subcellular trafficking. It is observed that cationic nanoprobe electrostatically interacts with cell membrane and enters into cell via clathrin-mediated endocytosis. At lower surface charge (between +10 mV to -10 mV), the electrostatic interaction with cell membrane becomes weaker, and additional lipid raft endocytosis is initiated. If a lipophilic functional group is introduced on a weakly anionic nanoparticle surface, the uptake mechanism shifts to predominant lipid raft-mediated endocytosis. In particular, the zwitterionic-lipophilic nanoprobe has the unique advantage as it weakly interacts with anionic cell membrane, migrates toward lipid rafts for interaction through lipophilic functional group, and induces lipid raft-mediated endocytosis. While predominate or partial clathrin-mediated entry traffics most of the nanoprobes to lysozome, predominate lipid raft-mediated entry traffics them to perinuclear region, particularly to the Golgi apparatus. This finding would guide in designing appropriate nanoprobe for subcellular targeting and delivery.

  13. Raft River Geothermal Aquaculture Experiment. Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, D.K.; Rose, F.L.; Kent, J.C.; Watson, L.R.; Sullivan, J.F.

    1979-08-01

    Channel catfish, tilapia and Malaysian prawns were cultured directly in geothermal water for approximately seven months at the Department of Energy, Raft River Geothermal Site, to evaluate the organisms throughout a grow-out cycle. Parameters evaluated included survival, growth, bioaccumulation of metals and fluoride, collagen synthesis, and bone calcium levels. Growth at Raft River was slightly lower than at a companion commercial facility at Buhl, Idaho, but was attributed to facility differences rather than an adverse impact of geothermal water. No significant differences were recorded between Raft River and Buhl fish for bone calcium or collagen concentrations. No significant accumulation of heavy metals by fish or prawns was recorded.

  14. SEPTIN2 and STATHMIN Regulate CD99-Mediated Cellular Differentiation in Hodgkin's Lymphoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjing Jian

    Full Text Available Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL is a lymphoid neoplasm characterized by Hodgkin's and Reed-Sternberg (H/RS cells, which is regulated by CD99. We previously reported that CD99 downregulation led to the transformation of murine B lymphoma cells (A20 into cells with an H/RS phenotype, while CD99 upregulation induced differentiation of classical Hodgkin's lymphoma (cHL cells (L428 into terminal B-cells. However, the molecular mechanism remains unclear. In this study, using fluorescence two-dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS, we have analyzed the alteration of protein expression following CD99 upregulation in L428 cells as well as downregulation of mouse CD99 antigen-like 2 (mCD99L2 in A20 cells. Bioinformatics analysis showed that SEPTIN2 and STATHMIN, which are cytoskeleton proteins, were significantly differentially expressed, and chosen for further validation and functional analysis. Differential expression of SEPTIN2 was found in both models and was inversely correlated with CD99 expression. STATHMIN was identified in the A20 cell line model and its expression was positively correlated with that of CD99. Importantly, silencing of SEPTIN2 with siRNA substantially altered the cellular cytoskeleton in L428 cells. The downregulation of STATHMIN by siRNA promoted the differentiation of H/RS cells toward terminal B-cells. These results suggest that SEPTIN2-mediated cytoskeletal rearrangement and STATHMIN-mediated differentiation may contribute to changes in cell morphology and differentiation of H/RS cells with CD99 upregulation in HL.

  15. HC-130 Wing Life Raft Replacement Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Scher, Bob

    1997-01-01

    The U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) uses HC-130 aircraft for search and rescue (SAR) and other missions. The aircraft are presently equipped with two to four 20 person inflatable life rafts, stowed in cells in the wings...

  16. Cholesterol accumulation in Niemann Pick type C (NPC) model cells causes a shift in APP localization to lipid rafts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosicek, Marko; Malnar, Martina; Goate, Alison; Hecimovic, Silva

    2010-01-01

    It has been suggested that cholesterol may modulate amyloid-β (Aβ) formation, a causative factor of Alzheimer's disease (AD), by regulating distribution of the three key proteins in the pathogenesis of AD (β-amyloid precursor protein (APP), β-secretase (BACE1) and/or presenilin 1 (PS1)) within lipid rafts. In this work we tested whether cholesterol accumulation upon NPC1 dysfunction, which causes Niemann Pick type C disease (NPC), causes increased partitioning of APP into lipid rafts leading to increased CTF/Aβ formation in these cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains. To test this we used CHO NPC1 -/- cells (NPC cells) and parental CHOwt cells. By sucrose density gradient centrifugation we observed a shift in fl-APP/CTF compartmentalization into lipid raft fractions upon cholesterol accumulation in NPC vs. wt cells. Furthermore, γ-secretase inhibitor treatment significantly increased fl-APP/CTF distribution in raft fractions in NPC vs. wt cells, suggesting that upon cholesterol accumulation in NPC1-null cells increased formation of APP-CTF and its increased processing towards Aβ occurs in lipid rafts. Our results support that cholesterol overload, such as in NPC disease, leads to increased partitioning of APP/CTF into lipid rafts resulting in increased amyloidogenic processing of APP in these cholesterol-rich membranes. This work adds to the mechanism of the cholesterol-effect on APP processing and the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease and supports the role of lipid rafts in these processes.

  17. The Emerging Role of Skeletal Muscle Metabolism as a Biological Target and Cellular Regulator of Cancer-Induced Muscle Wasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, James A.; Hardee, Justin P.; VanderVeen, Brandon N.

    2015-01-01

    While skeletal muscle mass is an established primary outcome related to understanding cancer cachexia mechanisms, considerable gaps exist in our understanding of muscle biochemical and functional properties that have recognized roles in systemic health. Skeletal muscle quality is a classification beyond mass, and is aligned with muscle’s metabolic capacity and substrate utilization flexibility. This supplies an additional role for the mitochondria in cancer-induced muscle wasting. While the historical assessment of mitochondria content and function during cancer-induced muscle loss was closely aligned with energy flux and wasting susceptibility, this understanding has expanded to link mitochondria dysfunction to cellular processes regulating myofiber wasting. The primary objective of this article is to highlight muscle mitochondria and oxidative metabolism as a biological target of cancer cachexia and also as a cellular regulator of cancer-induced muscle wasting. Initially, we examine the role of muscle metabolic phenotype and mitochondria content in cancer-induced wasting susceptibility. We then assess the evidence for cancer-induced regulation of skeletal muscle mitochondrial biogenesis, dynamics, mitophagy, and oxidative stress. In addition, we discuss environments associated with cancer cachexia that can impact the regulation of skeletal muscle oxidative metabolism. The article also examines the role of cytokine-mediated regulation of mitochondria function regulation, followed by the potential role of cancer-induced hypogonadism. Lastly, a role for decreased muscle use in cancer-induced mitochondrial dysfunction is reviewed. PMID:26593326

  18. The induction and regulation of radiogenic transformation in vitro: Cellular and molecular mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borek, C.

    1987-01-01

    Rodent and human cells in culture, transformed in vitro by ionizing radiation, ultraviolet light, or chemicals into malignant cells afford us the opportunity to probe into early and late events in the neoplastic process at a cellular and molecular level. Transformation can be regarded as an abnormal expression of cellular genes. The initiating agents disrupt the integrity of the genetic apparatus altering DNA in ways that result in the activation of cellular transforming genes (oncogenes) during some stage of the neoplastic process. Events associated with initiation and promotion may overlap to some degree, but in order for them to occur, cellular permissive conditions must prevail. Permissive factors include thyroid and steroid hormones, specific states of differentiation, certain stages in the cell cycle, specific genetic impairment, and inadequate antioxidants. Genetically susceptible cells require physiological states conducive to transformation. These may differ with age, tissue, and species and in part may be responsible for the observed lower sensitivity of human cells to transformation

  19. Isolation and characterization of lipid rafts in Emiliania huxleyi: a role for membrane microdomains in host-virus interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Suzanne L; Fulton, James M; Brown, Christopher M; Natale, Frank; Van Mooy, Benjamin A S; Bidle, Kay D

    2014-04-01

    Coccolithoviruses employ a suite of glycosphingolipids (GSLs) to successfully infect the globally important coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi. Lipid rafts, chemically distinct membrane lipid microdomains that are enriched in GSLs and are involved in sensing extracellular stimuli and activating signalling cascades through protein-protein interactions, likely play a fundamental role in host-virus interactions. Using combined lipidomics, proteomics and bioinformatics, we isolated and characterized the lipid and protein content of lipid rafts from control E. huxleyi cells and those infected with EhV86, the type strain for Coccolithovirus. Lipid raft-enriched fractions were isolated and purified as buoyant, detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs) in OptiPrep density gradients. Transmission electron microscopy of vesicle morphology, polymerase chain reaction amplification of the EhV major capsid protein gene and immunoreactivity to flotillin antisera served as respective physical, molecular and biochemical markers. Subsequent lipid characterization of DRMs via high performance liquid chromatography-triple quadrapole mass spectrometry revealed four distinct GSL classes. Parallel proteomic analysis confirmed flotillin as a major lipid raft protein, along with a variety of proteins affiliated with host defence, programmed cell death and innate immunity pathways. The detection of an EhV86-encoded C-type lectin-containing protein confirmed that infection occurs at the interface between lipid rafts and cellular stress/death pathways via specific GSLs and raft-associated proteins. © 2013 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. The Settlement Behavior of Piled Raft Interaction in Undrained Soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghalesari, Abbasali Taghavi; Barari, Amin; Amini, Pedram Fardad

    2013-01-01

    Offshore piled raft foundations are one of the most commonly used foundations in offshore structures. When a raft foundation alone does not satisfy the design requirements, the addition of piles may improve both the ultimate load capacity and the settlement performance of the raft. In this paper......, the behavior of a piled raft on undrained soil is studied based on a series of parametric studies on the average and differential settlement of piled raft using three-dimensional finite element analysis. The settlement behavior is found to be dependent on the number of piles and raft thickness....

  1. Caveolae/lipid rafts in fibroblast-like synoviocytes: ectopeptidase-rich membrane microdomains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riemann, D; Hansen, Gert Helge; Niels-Christiansen, L

    2001-01-01

    in the regulation of intra-articular levels of neuropeptides and chemotactic mediators as well as in adhesion and cell-cell interactions. Here, we report these peptidases in synoviocytes to be localized predominantly in glycolipid- and cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains known as 'rafts'. At the ultrastructural...... from about 60 to 160 nm. Cholesterol depletion of synoviocytes by methyl-beta-cyclodextrin disrupted >90% of the caveolae and reduced the raft localization of aminopeptidase N/CD13 without affecting Ala-p-nitroanilide-cleaving activity of confluent cell cultures. In co-culture experiments with T......-lymphocytes, cholesterol depletion of synoviocytes greatly reduced their capability to induce an early lymphocytic expression of aminopeptidase N/CD13. We propose caveolae/rafts to be peptidase-rich 'hot-spot' regions of the synoviocyte plasma membrane required for functional cell-cell interactions with lymphocytes...

  2. Docosahexaenoic acid modifies the clustering and size of lipid rafts and the lateral organization and surface expression of MHC class I of EL4 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Saame Raza; Rockett, Benjamin Drew; Salameh, Muhammad; Carraway, Kristen

    2009-09-01

    An emerging molecular mechanism by which docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) exerts its effects is modification of lipid raft organization. The biophysical model, based on studies with liposomes, shows that DHA avoids lipid rafts because of steric incompatibility between DHA and cholesterol. The model predicts that DHA does not directly modify rafts; rather, it incorporates into nonrafts to modify the lateral organization and/or conformation of membrane proteins, such as the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I. Here, we tested predictions of the model at a cellular level by incorporating oleic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and DHA, compared with a bovine serum albumin (BSA) control, into the membranes of EL4 cells. Quantitative microscopy showed that DHA, but not EPA, treatment, relative to the BSA control diminished lipid raft clustering and increased their size. Approximately 30% of DHA was incorporated directly into rafts without changing the distribution of cholesterol between rafts and nonrafts. Quantification of fluorescence colocalization images showed that DHA selectively altered MHC class I lateral organization by increasing the fraction of the nonraft protein into rafts compared with BSA. Both DHA and EPA treatments increased antibody binding to MHC class I compared with BSA. Antibody titration showed that DHA and EPA did not change MHC I conformation but increased total surface levels relative to BSA. Taken together, our findings are not in agreement with the biophysical model. Therefore, we propose a model that reconciles contradictory viewpoints from biophysical and cellular studies to explain how DHA modifies lipid rafts on several length scales. Our study supports the notion that rafts are an important target of DHA's mode of action.

  3. Fluorescent Labeling and Biodistribution of Latex Nanoparticles Formed by Surfactant-Free RAFT Emulsion Polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Cheuk Ka; Tang, Owen; Chen, Xin-Ming; Kim, Byung; Hartlieb, Matthias; Pollock, Carol A; Hawkett, Brian S; Perrier, Sébastien

    2017-10-01

    The authors report the preparation of a novel range of functional polyacrylamide stabilized polystyrene nanoparticles, obtained by surfactant-free reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) emulsion polymerization, their fluorescent tagging, cellular uptake, and biodistribution. The authors show the versatility of the RAFT emulsion process for the design of functional nanoparticles of well-defined size that can be used as drug delivery vectors. Functionalization with a fluorescent tag offers a useful visualization tool for tracing, localization, and clearance studies of these carriers in biological models. The studies are carried out by labeling the sterically stabilized latex particles chemically with rhodamine B. The fluorescent particles are incubated in a healthy human renal proximal tubular cell line model, and intravenously injected into a mouse model. Cellular localization and biodistribution of these particles on the biological models are explored. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Lipid Raft: A Floating Island Of Death or Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Kimberly S.; Wu, Shiyong

    2012-01-01

    Lipid rafts are microdomains of the plasma membrane enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids, and play an important role in the initiation of many pharmacological agent-induced signaling pathways and toxicological effects. The structure of lipid rafts is dynamic, resulting in an ever-changing content of both lipids and proteins. Cholesterol, as a major component of lipid rafts, is critical for the formation and configuration of lipid rafts microdomains, which provide signaling platforms capable of activating both pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic signaling pathways. A change of cholesterol level can result in lipid rafts disruption and activate or deactivate raft-associated proteins, such as death receptor proteins, protein kinases, and calcium channels. Several anti-cancer drugs are able to suppress growth and induce apoptosis of tumor cells through alteration of lipid raft contents via disrupting lipid raft integrity. PMID:22289360

  5. Multiblock copolymers synthesized in aqueous dispersions using multifunctional RAFT agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bussels, R.; Bergman-Göttgens, C.M.; Meuldijk, J.; Koning, C.E.

    2005-01-01

    Triblock copolymers were synthesized in aqueous dispersions in two polymerization steps using a low molar mass difunctional dithiocarbamate-based RAFT agent, and in merely one polymerization step using a macromolecular difunctional dithiocarbamate-based RAFT agent. Segmented block copolymers

  6. Evolution and regulation of cellular periodic processes: a role for paralogues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trachana, Kalliopi; Jensen, Lars Juhl; Bork, Peer

    2010-01-01

    performed the first systematic comparison in three organisms (Homo sapiens, Arabidopsis thaliana and Saccharomyces cerevisiae) by using public microarray data. We observed that although diurnal-regulated and ultradian-regulated genes are not generally cell-cycle-regulated, they tend to have cell...

  7. Oceanic rafting by a coastal community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Ceridwen I; Nikula, Raisa; Waters, Jonathan M

    2011-03-07

    Oceanic rafting is thought to play a fundamental role in assembling the biological communities of isolated coastal ecosystems. Direct observations of this key ecological and evolutionary process are, however, critically lacking. The importance of macroalgal rafting as a dispersal mechanism has remained uncertain, largely owing to lack of knowledge about the capacity of fauna to survive long voyages at sea and successfully make landfall and establish. Here, we directly document the rafting of a diverse assemblage of intertidal organisms across several hundred kilometres of open ocean, from the subantarctic to mainland New Zealand. Multispecies analyses using phylogeographic and ecological data indicate that 10 epifaunal invertebrate species rafted on six large bull kelp specimens for several weeks from the subantarctic Auckland and/or Snares Islands to the Otago coast of New Zealand, a minimum distance of some 400-600 km. These genetic data are the first to demonstrate that passive rafting can enable simultaneous trans-oceanic transport and landfall of numerous coastal taxa.

  8. Differential and Cooperative Cell Adhesion Regulates Cellular Pattern in Sensory Epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togashi, Hideru

    2016-01-01

    Animal tissues are composed of multiple cell types arranged in complex and elaborate patterns. In sensory epithelia, including the auditory epithelium and olfactory epithelium, different types of cells are arranged in unique mosaic patterns. These mosaic patterns are evolutionarily conserved, and are thought to be important for hearing and olfaction. Recent progress has provided accumulating evidence that the cellular pattern formation in epithelia involves cell rearrangements, movements, and shape changes. These morphogenetic processes are largely mediated by intercellular adhesion systems. Differential adhesion and cortical tension have been proposed to promote cell rearrangements. Many different types of cells in tissues express various types of cell adhesion molecules. Although cooperative mechanisms between multiple adhesive systems are likely to contribute to the production of complex cell patterns, our current understanding of the cooperative roles between multiple adhesion systems is insufficient to entirely explain the complex mechanisms underlying cellular patterning. Recent studies have revealed that nectins, in cooperation with cadherins, are crucial for the mosaic cellular patterning in sensory organs. The nectin and cadherin systems are interacted with one another, and these interactions provide cells with differential adhesive affinities for complex cellular pattern formations in sensory epithelia, which cannot be achieved by a single mechanism.

  9. Mechanisms and Regulation of Intestinal Absorption of Water-soluble Vitamins: Cellular and Molecular Aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nexø, Ebba; Said, Hamid M

    2012-01-01

    The water-soluble vitamins represent a group of structurally and functionally unrelated compounds that share the common feature of being essential for normal cellular functions, growth, and development. With the exception of some endogenous production of niacin, human cells cannot synthesize...

  10. p53-Dependent Nestin Regulation Links Tumor Suppression to Cellular Plasticity in Liver Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tschaharganeh, Darjus F; Xue, Wen; Calvisi, Diego F

    2014-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor coordinates a series of antiproliferative responses that restrict the expansion of malignant cells, and as a consequence, p53 is lost or mutated in the majority of human cancers. Here, we show that p53 restricts expression of the stem and progenitor-cell-associated protei...... by p53 restricts cellular plasticity and tumorigenesis in liver cancer....

  11. A chemical biology approach to interrogate quorum-sensing regulated behaviors at the molecular and cellular level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowery, Colin A; Matamouros, Susana; Niessen, Sherry; Zhu, Jie; Scolnick, Jonathan; Lively, Jenny M; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Miller, Samuel I; Kaufmann, Gunnar F; Janda, Kim D

    2013-07-25

    Small molecule probes have been used extensively to explore biologic systems and elucidate cellular signaling pathways. In this study, we use an inhibitor of bacterial communication to monitor changes in the proteome of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium with the aim of discovering unrecognized processes regulated by AI-2-based quorum-sensing (QS), a mechanism of bacterial intercellular communication that allows for the coordination of gene expression in a cell density-dependent manner. In S. typhimurium, this system regulates the uptake and catabolism of intercellular signals and has been implicated in pathogenesis, including the invasion of host epithelial cells. We demonstrate that our QS antagonist is capable of selectively inhibiting the expression of known QS-regulated proteins in S. typhimurium, thus attesting that QS inhibitors may be used to confirm proposed and elucidate previously unidentified QS pathways without relying on genetic manipulation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Mitochondrial uncoupling proteins regulate angiotensin-converting enzyme expression: crosstalk between cellular and endocrine metabolic regulators suggested by RNA interference and genetic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhamrait, Sukhbir S; Maubaret, Cecilia; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Ulrik; Brull, David J; Gohlke, Peter; Payne, John R; World, Michael; Thorsteinsson, Birger; Humphries, Steve E; Montgomery, Hugh E

    2016-07-01

    Uncoupling proteins (UCPs) regulate mitochondrial function, and thus cellular metabolism. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) is the central component of endocrine and local tissue renin-angiotensin systems (RAS), which also regulate diverse aspects of whole-body metabolism and mitochondrial function (partly through altering mitochondrial UCP expression). We show that ACE expression also appears to be regulated by mitochondrial UCPs. In genetic analysis of two unrelated populations (healthy young UK men and Scandinavian diabetic patients) serum ACE (sACE) activity was significantly higher amongst UCP3-55C (rather than T) and UCP2 I (rather than D) allele carriers. RNA interference against UCP2 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells reduced UCP2 mRNA sixfold (P sACE suggests a novel means of crosstalk between (and mutual regulation of) cellular and endocrine metabolism. This might partly explain the reduced risk of developing diabetes and metabolic syndrome with RAS antagonists and offer insight into the origins of cardiovascular disease in which UCPs and ACE both play a role. © 2016 The Authors. BioEssays published by WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Mitochondrial uncoupling proteins regulate angiotensin‐converting enzyme expression: crosstalk between cellular and endocrine metabolic regulators suggested by RNA interference and genetic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maubaret, Cecilia; Pedersen‐Bjergaard, Ulrik; Brull, David J.; Gohlke, Peter; Payne, John R.; World, Michael; Thorsteinsson, Birger; Humphries, Steve E.; Montgomery, Hugh E.

    2015-01-01

    Uncoupling proteins (UCPs) regulate mitochondrial function, and thus cellular metabolism. Angiotensin‐converting enzyme (ACE) is the central component of endocrine and local tissue renin–angiotensin systems (RAS), which also regulate diverse aspects of whole‐body metabolism and mitochondrial function (partly through altering mitochondrial UCP expression). We show that ACE expression also appears to be regulated by mitochondrial UCPs. In genetic analysis of two unrelated populations (healthy young UK men and Scandinavian diabetic patients) serum ACE (sACE) activity was significantly higher amongst UCP3‐55C (rather than T) and UCP2 I (rather than D) allele carriers. RNA interference against UCP2 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells reduced UCP2 mRNA sixfold (P sACE suggests a novel means of crosstalk between (and mutual regulation of) cellular and endocrine metabolism. This might partly explain the reduced risk of developing diabetes and metabolic syndrome with RAS antagonists and offer insight into the origins of cardiovascular disease in which UCPs and ACE both play a role. PMID:27347560

  14. Sodium Glucose Cotransporter 2 (SGLT2 Plays as a Physiological Glucose Sensor and Regulates Cellular Contractility in Rat Mesangial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanori Wakisaka

    Full Text Available Mesangial cells play an important role in regulating glomerular filtration by altering their cellular tone. We report the presence of a sodium glucose cotransporter (SGLT in rat mesangial cells. This study in rat mesangial cells aimed to evaluate the expression and role of SGLT2.The SGLT2 expression in rat mesangial cells was assessed by Western blotting and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Changes in the mesangial cell surface area at different glucose concentrations and the effects of extracellular Na+ and Ca2+ and of SGLT and Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (NCX inhibitors on cellular size were determined. The cellular sizes and the contractile response were examined during a 6-day incubation with high glucose with or without phlorizin, an SGLT inhibitor.Western blotting revealed an SGLT2 band, and RT-PCR analysis of SGLT2 revealed the predicted 422-bp band in both rat mesangial and renal proximal tubular epithelial cells. The cell surface area changed according to the extracellular glucose concentration. The glucose-induced contraction was abolished by the absence of either extracellular Na+ or Ca2+ and by SGLT and NCX inhibitors. Under the high glucose condition, the cell size decreased for 2 days and increased afterwards; these cells did not contract in response to angiotensin II, and the SGLT inhibitor restored the abolished contraction.These data suggest that SGLT2 is expressed in rat mesangial cells, acts as a normal physiological glucose sensor and regulates cellular contractility in rat mesangial cells.

  15. Cystic Fibrosis, Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator and Drugs: Insights from Cellular Trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, Robert J; Bradbury, Neil A

    2018-01-01

    The eukaryotic cell is organized into membrane-delineated compartments that are characterized by specific cadres of proteins sustaining biochemically distinct cellular processes. The appropriate subcellular localization of proteins is key to proper organelle function and provides a physiological context for cellular processes. Disruption of normal trafficking pathways for proteins is seen in several genetic diseases, where a protein's absence for a specific subcellular compartment leads to organelle disruption, and in the context of an individual, a disruption of normal physiology. Importantly, several drug therapies can also alter protein trafficking, causing unwanted side effects. Thus, a deeper understanding of trafficking pathways needs to be appreciated as novel therapeutic modalities are proposed. Despite the promising efficacy of novel therapeutic agents, the intracellular bioavailability of these compounds has proved to be a potential barrier, leading to failures in treatments for various diseases and disorders. While endocytosis of drug moieties provides an efficient means of getting material into cells, the subsequent release and endosomal escape of materials into the cytosol where they need to act has been a barrier. An understanding of cellular protein/lipid trafficking pathways has opened up strategies for increasing drug bioavailability. Approaches to enhance endosomal exit have greatly increased the cytosolic bioavailability of drugs and will provide a means of investigating previous drugs that may have been shelved due to their low cytosolic concentration.

  16. Negative Regulation of STAT3 Protein-mediated Cellular Respiration by SIRT1 Protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernier, Michel; Paul, Rajib K; Martin-Montalvo, Alejandro

    2011-01-01

    those of wild-type controls. Comparison of profiles of phospho-antibody array data indicated that the deletion of SirT1 was accompanied by constitutive activation of the pro-inflammatory NF-¿B pathway, which is key for STAT3 induction and increased cellular respiration in Sirt1-KO cells. Thus, SIRT1...... cells exhibited higher mitochondrial respiration as compared with wild-type MEFs. Two independent approaches, including ectopic expression of SIRT1 and siRNA-mediated knockdown of STAT3, led to reduction in intracellular ATP levels and increased lactate production in Sirt1-KO cells that were approaching...

  17. Adamantyl Glycosphingolipids Provide a New Approach to the Selective Regulation of Cellular Glycosphingolipid Metabolism*

    OpenAIRE

    Kamani, Mustafa; Mylvaganam, Murugesapillai; Tian, Robert; Rigat, Brigitte; Binnington, Beth; Lingwood, Clifford

    2011-01-01

    Mammalian glycosphingolipid (GSL) precursor monohexosylceramides are either glucosyl- or galactosylceramide (GlcCer or GalCer). Most GSLs derive from GlcCer. Substitution of the GSL fatty acid with adamantane generates amphipathic mimics of increased water solubility, retaining receptor function. We have synthesized adamantyl GlcCer (adaGlcCer) and adamantyl GalCer (adaGalCer). AdaGlcCer and adaGalCer partition into cells to alter GSL metabolism. At low dose, adaGlcCer increased cellular GSLs...

  18. The assembly of GM1 glycolipid- and cholesterol-enriched raft-like membrane microdomains is important for giardial encystation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Chatterjee, Atasi; Mendez, Tavis L; Roychowdhury, Sukla; Das, Siddhartha

    2015-05-01

    Although encystation (or cyst formation) is an important step of the life cycle of Giardia, the cellular events that trigger encystation are poorly understood. Because membrane microdomains are involved in inducing growth and differentiation in many eukaryotes, we wondered if these raft-like domains are assembled by this parasite and participate in the encystation process. Since the GM1 ganglioside is a major constituent of mammalian lipid rafts (LRs) and known to react with cholera toxin B (CTXB), we used Alexa Fluor-conjugated CTXB and GM1 antibodies to detect giardial LRs. Raft-like structures in trophozoites are located in the plasma membranes and on the periphery of ventral discs. In cysts, however, they are localized in the membranes beneath the cyst wall. Nystatin and filipin III, two cholesterol-binding agents, and oseltamivir (Tamiflu), a viral neuraminidase inhibitor, disassembled the microdomains, as evidenced by reduced staining of trophozoites with CTXB and GM1 antibodies. GM1- and cholesterol-enriched LRs were isolated from Giardia by density gradient centrifugation and found to be sensitive to nystatin and oseltamivir. The involvement of LRs in encystation could be supported by the observation that raft inhibitors interrupted the biogenesis of encystation-specific vesicles and cyst production. Furthermore, culturing of trophozoites in dialyzed medium containing fetal bovine serum (which is low in cholesterol) reduced raft assembly and encystation, which could be rescued by adding cholesterol from the outside. Our results suggest that Giardia is able to form GM1- and cholesterol-enriched lipid rafts and these raft domains are important for encystation. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Tumor exosomes induce tunneling nanotubes in lipid raft-enriched regions of human mesothelioma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thayanithy, Venugopal [Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology, Oncology and Transplantation, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Babatunde, Victor [Moore Laboratory, Department of Cell Biology, Sloan-Kettering Institute, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10021 (United States); Dickson, Elizabeth L. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Gynecologic Oncology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Wong, Phillip [Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology, Oncology and Transplantation, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Oh, Sanghoon; Ke, Xu; Barlas, Afsar; Fujisawa, Sho; Romin, Yevgeniy [Molecular Cytology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10021 (United States); Moreira, André L. [Department of Pathology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10021 (United States); Downey, Robert J. [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10021 (United States); Steer, Clifford J. [Departments of Medicine and Genetics, Cell Biology and Development, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Subramanian, Subbaya [Department of Surgery, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Manova-Todorova, Katia [Molecular Cytology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10021 (United States); Moore, Malcolm A.S. [Moore Laboratory, Department of Cell Biology, Sloan-Kettering Institute, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10021 (United States); Lou, Emil, E-mail: emil-lou@umn.edu [Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology, Oncology and Transplantation, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

    2014-04-15

    Tunneling nanotubes (TnTs) are long, non-adherent, actin-based cellular extensions that act as conduits for transport of cellular cargo between connected cells. The mechanisms of nanotube formation and the effects of the tumor microenvironment and cellular signals on TnT formation are unknown. In the present study, we explored exosomes as potential mediators of TnT formation in mesothelioma and the potential relationship of lipid rafts to TnT formation. Mesothelioma cells co-cultured with exogenous mesothelioma-derived exosomes formed more TnTs than cells cultured without exosomes within 24–48 h; and this effect was most prominent in media conditions (low-serum, hyperglycemic medium) that support TnT formation (1.3–1.9-fold difference). Fluorescence and electron microscopy confirmed the purity of isolated exosomes and revealed that they localized predominantly at the base of and within TnTs, in addition to the extracellular environment. Time-lapse microscopic imaging demonstrated uptake of tumor exosomes by TnTs, which facilitated intercellular transfer of these exosomes between connected cells. Mesothelioma cells connected via TnTs were also significantly enriched for lipid rafts at nearly a 2-fold higher number compared with cells not connected by TnTs. Our findings provide supportive evidence of exosomes as potential chemotactic stimuli for TnT formation, and also lipid raft formation as a potential biomarker for TnT-forming cells. - Highlights: • Exosomes derived from malignant cells can stimulate an increased rate in the formation of tunneling nanotubes. • Tunneling nanotubes can serve as conduits for intercellular transfer of these exosomes. • Most notably, exosomes derived from benign mesothelial cells had no effect on nanotube formation. • Cells forming nanotubes were enriched in lipid rafts at a greater number compared with cells not forming nanotubes. • Our findings suggest causal and potentially synergistic association of exosomes and

  20. Tumor exosomes induce tunneling nanotubes in lipid raft-enriched regions of human mesothelioma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thayanithy, Venugopal; Babatunde, Victor; Dickson, Elizabeth L.; Wong, Phillip; Oh, Sanghoon; Ke, Xu; Barlas, Afsar; Fujisawa, Sho; Romin, Yevgeniy; Moreira, André L.; Downey, Robert J.; Steer, Clifford J.; Subramanian, Subbaya; Manova-Todorova, Katia; Moore, Malcolm A.S.; Lou, Emil

    2014-01-01

    Tunneling nanotubes (TnTs) are long, non-adherent, actin-based cellular extensions that act as conduits for transport of cellular cargo between connected cells. The mechanisms of nanotube formation and the effects of the tumor microenvironment and cellular signals on TnT formation are unknown. In the present study, we explored exosomes as potential mediators of TnT formation in mesothelioma and the potential relationship of lipid rafts to TnT formation. Mesothelioma cells co-cultured with exogenous mesothelioma-derived exosomes formed more TnTs than cells cultured without exosomes within 24–48 h; and this effect was most prominent in media conditions (low-serum, hyperglycemic medium) that support TnT formation (1.3–1.9-fold difference). Fluorescence and electron microscopy confirmed the purity of isolated exosomes and revealed that they localized predominantly at the base of and within TnTs, in addition to the extracellular environment. Time-lapse microscopic imaging demonstrated uptake of tumor exosomes by TnTs, which facilitated intercellular transfer of these exosomes between connected cells. Mesothelioma cells connected via TnTs were also significantly enriched for lipid rafts at nearly a 2-fold higher number compared with cells not connected by TnTs. Our findings provide supportive evidence of exosomes as potential chemotactic stimuli for TnT formation, and also lipid raft formation as a potential biomarker for TnT-forming cells. - Highlights: • Exosomes derived from malignant cells can stimulate an increased rate in the formation of tunneling nanotubes. • Tunneling nanotubes can serve as conduits for intercellular transfer of these exosomes. • Most notably, exosomes derived from benign mesothelial cells had no effect on nanotube formation. • Cells forming nanotubes were enriched in lipid rafts at a greater number compared with cells not forming nanotubes. • Our findings suggest causal and potentially synergistic association of exosomes and

  1. A biphasic endothelial stress-survival mechanism regulates the cellular response to vascular endothelial growth factor A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latham, Antony M.; Odell, Adam F.; Mughal, Nadeem A.; Issitt, Theo; Ulyatt, Clare; Walker, John H.; Homer-Vanniasinkam, Shervanthi; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan

    2012-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) is an essential cytokine that regulates endothelial function and angiogenesis. VEGF-A binding to endothelial receptor tyrosine kinases such as VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 triggers cellular responses including survival, proliferation and new blood vessel sprouting. Increased levels of a soluble VEGFR1 splice variant (sFlt-1) correlate with endothelial dysfunction in pathologies such as pre-eclampsia; however the cellular mechanism(s) underlying the regulation and function of sFlt-1 are unclear. Here, we demonstrate the existence of a biphasic stress response in endothelial cells, using serum deprivation as a model of endothelial dysfunction. The early phase is characterized by a high VEGFR2:sFlt-1 ratio, which is reversed in the late phase. A functional consequence is a short-term increase in VEGF-A-stimulated intracellular signaling. In the late phase, sFlt-1 is secreted and deposited at the extracellular matrix. We hypothesized that under stress, increased endothelial sFlt-1 levels reduce VEGF-A bioavailability: VEGF-A treatment induces sFlt-1 expression at the cell surface and VEGF-A silencing inhibits sFlt-1 anchorage to the extracellular matrix. Treatment with recombinant sFlt-1 inhibits VEGF-A-stimulated in vitro angiogenesis and sFlt-1 silencing enhances this process. In this response, increased VEGFR2 levels are regulated by the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase and PKB/Akt signaling pathways and increased sFlt-1 levels by the ERK1/2 signaling pathway. We conclude that during serum withdrawal, cellular sensing of environmental stress modulates sFlt-1 and VEGFR2 levels, regulating VEGF-A bioavailability and ensuring cell survival takes precedence over cell proliferation and migration. These findings may underpin an important mechanism contributing to endothelial dysfunction in pathological states. -- Highlights: ► Endothelial cells mount a stress response under conditions of low serum. ► Endothelial VEGFR levels are

  2. SaeRS Is Responsive to Cellular Respiratory Status and Regulates Fermentative Biofilm Formation in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashruwala, Ameya A; Gries, Casey M; Scherr, Tyler D; Kielian, Tammy; Boyd, Jeffrey M

    2017-08-01

    Biofilms are multicellular communities of microorganisms living as a quorum rather than as individual cells. The bacterial human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus uses oxygen as a terminal electron acceptor during respiration. Infected human tissues are hypoxic or anoxic. We recently reported that impaired respiration elicits a p rogrammed c ell l ysis (PCL) phenomenon in S. aureus leading to the release of cellular polymers that are utilized to form biofilms. PCL is dependent upon the AtlA murein hydrolase and is regulated, in part, by the SrrAB two-component regulatory system (TCRS). In the current study, we report that the SaeRS TCRS also governs fermentative biofilm formation by positively influencing AtlA activity. The SaeRS-modulated factor fibronectin-binding protein A (FnBPA) also contributed to the fermentative biofilm formation phenotype. SaeRS-dependent biofilm formation occurred in response to changes in cellular respiratory status. Genetic evidence presented suggests that a high cellular titer of phosphorylated SaeR is required for biofilm formation. Epistasis analyses found that SaeRS and SrrAB influence biofilm formation independently of one another. Analyses using a mouse model of orthopedic implant-associated biofilm formation found that both SaeRS and SrrAB govern host colonization. Of these two TCRSs, SrrAB was the dominant system driving biofilm formation in vivo We propose a model wherein impaired cellular respiration stimulates SaeRS via an as yet undefined signal molecule(s), resulting in increasing expression of AtlA and FnBPA and biofilm formation. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  3. Wrinkles, folds, and plasticity in granular rafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jambon-Puillet, Etienne; Josserand, Christophe; Protière, Suzie

    2017-09-01

    We investigate the mechanical response of a compressed monolayer of large and dense particles at a liquid-fluid interface: a granular raft. Upon compression, rafts first wrinkle; then, as the confinement increases, the deformation localizes in a unique fold. This characteristic buckling pattern is usually associated with floating elastic sheets, and as a result, particle laden interfaces are often modeled as such. Here, we push this analogy to its limits by comparing quantitative measurements of the raft morphology to a theoretical continuous elastic model of the interface. We show that, although powerful to describe the wrinkle wavelength, the wrinkle-to-fold transition, and the fold shape, this elastic description does not capture the finer details of the experiment. We describe an unpredicted secondary wavelength, a compression discrepancy with the model, and a hysteretic behavior during compression cycles, all of which are a signature of the intrinsic discrete and frictional nature of granular rafts. It suggests also that these composite materials exhibit both plastic transition and jamming dynamics.

  4. Lysophosphatidic acid signaling via LPA_1 and LPA_3 regulates cellular functions during tumor progression in pancreatic cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukushima, Kaori; Takahashi, Kaede; Yamasaki, Eri; Onishi, Yuka; Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Honoki, Kanya; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi

    2017-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling via G protein-coupled LPA receptors exhibits a variety of biological effects, such as cell proliferation, motility and differentiation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the roles of LPA_1 and LPA_3 in cellular functions during tumor progression in pancreatic cancer cells. LPA_1 and LPA_3 knockdown cells were generated from PANC-1 cells. The cell motile and invasive activities of PANC-1 cells were inhibited by LPA_1 and LPA_3 knockdown. In gelatin zymography, LPA_1 and LPA_3 knockdown cells indicated the low activation of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) in the presence of LPA. Next, to assess whether LPA_1 and LPA_3 regulate cellular functions induced by anticancer drug, PANC-1 cells were treated with cisplatin (CDDP) for approximately 6 months. The cell motile and invasive activities of long-term CDDP treated cells were markedly higher than those of PANC-1 cells, correlating with the expression levels of LPAR1 and LPAR3 genes. In soft agar assay, the long-term CDDP treated cells formed markedly large sized colonies. In addition, the cell motile and invasive activities enhanced by CDDP were significantly suppressed by LPA_1 and LPA_3 knockdown as well as colony formation. These results suggest that LPA signaling via LPA_1 and LPA_3 play an important role in the regulation of cellular functions during tumor progression in PANC-1 cells. - Highlights: • The cell motile and invasive activities of PANC-1 cells were stimulated by LPA_1 and LPA_3. • LPA_1 and LPA_3 enhanced MMP-2 activation in PANC-1 cells. • The expressions of LPAR1 and LPAR3 genes were elevated in PANC-1 cells treated with cisplatin. • The cell motile and invasive activities of PANC-1 cells treated with cisplatin were suppressed by LPA_1 and LPA_3 knockdown. • LPA_1 and LPA_3 are involved in the regulation of cellular functions during tumor progression in PANC-1 cells.

  5. The Rho GTPase Cdc42 regulates hair cell planar polarity and cellular patterning in the developing cochlea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kirjavainen

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hair cells of the organ of Corti (OC of the cochlea exhibit distinct planar polarity, both at the tissue and cellular level. Planar polarity at tissue level is manifested as uniform orientation of the hair cell stereociliary bundles. Hair cell intrinsic polarity is defined as structural hair bundle asymmetry; positioning of the kinocilium/basal body complex at the vertex of the V-shaped bundle. Consistent with strong apical polarity, the hair cell apex displays prominent actin and microtubule cytoskeletons. The Rho GTPase Cdc42 regulates cytoskeletal dynamics and polarization of various cell types, and, thus, serves as a candidate regulator of hair cell polarity. We have here induced Cdc42 inactivation in the late-embryonic OC. We show the role of Cdc42 in the establishment of planar polarity of hair cells and in cellular patterning. Abnormal planar polarity was displayed as disturbances in hair bundle orientation and morphology and in kinocilium/basal body positioning. These defects were accompanied by a disorganized cell-surface microtubule network. Atypical protein kinase C (aPKC, a putative Cdc42 effector, colocalized with Cdc42 at the hair cell apex, and aPKC expression was altered upon Cdc42 depletion. Our data suggest that Cdc42 together with aPKC is part of the machinery establishing hair cell planar polarity and that Cdc42 acts on polarity through the cell-surface microtubule network. The data also suggest that defects in apical polarization are influenced by disturbed cellular patterning in the OC. In addition, our data demonstrates that Cdc42 is required for stereociliogenesis in the immature cochlea.

  6. Effect of glycyrrhetinic acid on lipid raft model at the air/water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Seiichi; Uto, Takuhiro; Shoyama, Yukihiro

    2015-02-01

    To investigate an interfacial behavior of the aglycon of glycyrrhizin (GC), glycyrrhetinic acid (GA), with a lipid raft model consisting of equimolar ternary mixtures of N-palmitoyl sphingomyelin (PSM), dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC), and cholesterol (CHOL), Langmuir monolayer techniques were systematically conducted. Surface pressure (π)-molecular area (A) and surface potential (ΔV)-A isotherms showed that the adsorbed GA at the air/water interface was desorbed into the bulk upon compression of the lipid monolayer. In situ morphological analysis by Brewster angle microscopy and fluorescence microscopy revealed that the raft domains became smaller as the concentrations of GA in the subphase (CGA) increased, suggesting that GA promotes the formation of fluid networks related to various cellular processes via lipid rafts. In addition, ex situ morphological analysis by atomic force microscopy revealed that GA interacts with lipid raft by lying down at the surface. Interestingly, the distinctive striped regions were formed at CGA=5.0 μM. This phenomenon was observed to be induced by the interaction of CHOL with adsorbed GA and is involved in the membrane-disrupting activity of saponin and its aglycon. A quantitative comparison of GA with GC (Sakamoto et al., 2013) revealed that GA interacts more strongly with the raft model than GC in the monolayer state. Various biological activities of GA are known to be stronger than those of GC. This fact allows us to hypothesize that differences in the interactions of GA/GC with the model monolayer correlate to their degree of exertion for numerous activities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. UV laser-ablated surface textures as potential regulator of cellular response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Prafulla; Lai, Karen; Sung, Hak-Joon; Murthy, N Sanjeeva; Kohn, Joachim

    2010-06-01

    Textured surfaces obtained by UV laser ablation of poly(ethylene terephthalate) films were used to study the effect of shape and spacing of surface features on cellular response. Two distinct patterns, cones and ripples with spacing from 2 to 25 μm, were produced. Surface features with different shapes and spacings were produced by varying pulse repetition rate, laser fluence, and exposure time. The effects of the surface texture parameters, i.e., shape and spacing, on cell attachment, proliferation, and morphology of neonatal human dermal fibroblasts and mouse fibroblasts were studied. Cell attachment was the highest in the regions with cones at ∼4 μm spacing. As feature spacing increased, cell spreading decreased, and the fibroblasts became more circular, indicating a stress-mediated cell shrinkage. This study shows that UV laser ablation is a useful alternative to lithographic techniques to produce surface patterns for controlling cell attachment and growth on biomaterial surfaces.

  8. Lipids in the cell: organisation regulates function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Ana L; Preta, Giulio

    2018-06-01

    Lipids are fundamental building blocks of all cells and play important roles in the pathogenesis of different diseases, including inflammation, autoimmune disease, cancer, and neurodegeneration. The lipid composition of different organelles can vary substantially from cell to cell, but increasing evidence demonstrates that lipids become organised specifically in each compartment, and this organisation is essential for regulating cell function. For example, lipid microdomains in the plasma membrane, known as lipid rafts, are platforms for concentrating protein receptors and can influence intra-cellular signalling. Lipid organisation is tightly regulated and can be observed across different model organisms, including bacteria, yeast, Drosophila, and Caenorhabditis elegans, suggesting that lipid organisation is evolutionarily conserved. In this review, we summarise the importance and function of specific lipid domains in main cellular organelles and discuss recent advances that investigate how these specific and highly regulated structures contribute to diverse biological processes.

  9. Rac1 Regulates the Activity of mTORC1 and mTORC2 and Controls Cellular Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saci, Abdelhafid; Cantley, Lewis C.; Carpenter, Christopher L.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a serine/threonine kinase that exists in two separate complexes, mTORC1 and mTORC2, that function to control cell size and growth in response to growth factors, nutrients, and cellular energy levels. Low molecular weight GTP-binding proteins of the Rheb and Rag families are key regulators of the mTORC1 complex, but regulation of mTORC2 is poorly understood. Here, we report that Rac1, a member of the Rho family of GTPases, is a critical regulator of both mTORC1 and mTORC2 in response to growth-factor stimulation. Deletion of Rac1 in primary cells using an inducible-Cre/Lox approach inhibits basal and growth-factor activation of both mTORC1 and mTORC2. Rac1 appears to bind directly to mTOR and to mediate mTORC1 and mTORC2 localization at specific membranes. Binding of Rac1 to mTOR does not depend on the GTP-bound state of Rac1, but on the integrity of its C-terminal domain. This function of Rac1 provides a means to regulate mTORC1 and mTORC2 simultaneously. PMID:21474067

  10. Differential regulation of striatal motor behavior and related cellular responses by dopamine D2L and D2S isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radl, Daniela; Chiacchiaretta, Martina; Lewis, Robert G; Brami-Cherrier, Karen; Arcuri, Ludovico; Borrelli, Emiliana

    2018-01-02

    The dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) is a major component of the dopamine system. D2R-mediated signaling in dopamine neurons is involved in the presynaptic regulation of dopamine levels. Postsynaptically, i.e., in striatal neurons, D2R signaling controls complex functions such as motor activity through regulation of cell firing and heterologous neurotransmitter release. The presence of two isoforms, D2L and D2S, which are generated by a mechanism of alternative splicing of the Drd2 gene, raises the question of whether both isoforms may equally control presynaptic and postsynaptic events. Here, we addressed this question by comparing behavioral and cellular responses of mice with the selective ablation of either D2L or D2S isoform. We establish that the presence of either D2L or D2S can support postsynaptic functions related to the control of motor activity in basal conditions. On the contrary, absence of D2S but not D2L prevents the inhibition of tyrosine hydroxylase phosphorylation and, thereby, of dopamine synthesis, supporting a major presynaptic role for D2S. Interestingly, boosting dopamine signaling in the striatum by acute cocaine administration reveals that absence of D2L, but not of D2S, strongly impairs the motor and cellular response to the drug, in a manner similar to the ablation of both isoforms. These results suggest that when the dopamine system is challenged, D2L signaling is required for the control of striatal circuits regulating motor activity. Thus, our findings show that D2L and D2S share similar functions in basal conditions but not in response to stimulation of the dopamine system.

  11. Expression of Arabidopsis FCS-Like Zinc finger genes is differentially regulated by sugars, cellular energy level, and abiotic stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammed eJamsheer K

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cellular energy status is an important regulator of plant growth, development, and stress mitigation. Environmental stresses ultimately lead to energy deficit in the cell which activates the SNF1-RELATED KINASE 1 (SnRK1 signaling cascade which eventually triggering a massive reprogramming of transcription to enable the plant to survive under low-energy conditions. The role of Arabidopsis thaliana FCS-Like Zinc finger (FLZ gene family in energy and stress signaling is recently come to highlight after their interaction with kinase subunits of SnRK1 were identified. In a detailed expression analysis in different sugars, energy starvation, and replenishment series, we identified that the expression of most of the FLZ genes is differentially modulated by cellular energy level. It was found that FLZ gene family contains genes which are both positively and negatively regulated by energy deficit as well as energy-rich conditions. Genetic and pharmacological studies identified the role of HEXOKINASE 1- dependent and energy signaling pathways in the sugar-induced expression of FLZ genes. Further, these genes were also found to be highly responsive to different stresses as well as abscisic acid. In over-expression of kinase subunit of SnRK1, FLZ genes were found to be differentially regulated in accordance with their response towards energy fluctuation suggesting that these genes may work downstream to the established SnRK1 signaling under low-energy stress. Taken together, the present study provides a conceptual framework for further studies related to SnRK1-FLZ interaction in relation to sugar and energy signaling and stress response.

  12. Involvement of FFA1 and FFA4 in the regulation of cellular functions during tumor progression in colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kaede; Fukushima, Kaori; Onishi, Yuka; Minami, Kanako; Otagaki, Shiho; Ishimoto, Kaichi; Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Honoki, Kanya; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi

    2018-08-01

    Free fatty acid receptor 1 (FFA1) and FFA4 mediate a variety of biological responses through binding of medium- and long-chain free fatty acids. The aim of this study was to investigate an involvement of FFA1 and FFA4 in the regulation of cellular functions during tumor progression in colon cancer cells. The long-term fluorouracil (5-FU) and cisplatin (CDDP) treated cells were generated from DLD1 cells (DLD-5FU and DLD-CDDP cells, respectively). FFAR1 expressions were lower in DLD-5FU and DLD-CDDP cells than in DLD1 cells. In contrast, DLD-5FU and DLD-CDDP cells showed the high FFAR4 expressions, compared with DLD1 cells. The cell motile activities of DLD-5FU and DLD-CDDP cells were reduced by GW9508 which is an agonist of FFA1 and FFA4. Moreover, GW1100, an antagonist of FFA1, inhibited the cell motile activities of DLD-5FU and DLD-CDDP cells. To evaluate whether FFA1 and FFA4 regulate the enhancement of cell motility, invasion and colony formation, highly migratory (hmDLD1) cells were established from DLD1 cells. FFAR1 expression was significantly higher in hmDLD1 cells than in DLD1 cells, but no change of FFAR4 expression was observed. The elevated cell motile and invasive activities and colony formation of hmDLD1 cells were suppressed by FFA1 inhibition. These results suggest that FFA1 and FFA4 are involved in the regulation of cellular functions during tumor progression in colon cancer DLD1 cells. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. An epidermal microRNA regulates neuronal migration through control of the cellular glycosylation state

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mikael Egebjerg; Snieckute, Goda; Kagias, Konstantinos

    2013-01-01

    An appropriate balance in glycosylation of proteoglycans is crucial for their ability to regulate animal development. Here, we report that the Caenorhabditis elegans microRNA mir-79, an ortholog of mammalian miR-9, controls sugar-chain homeostasis by targeting two proteins in the proteoglycan bio...... that impinges on a LON-2/glypican pathway and disrupts neuronal migration. Our results identify a regulatory axis controlled by a conserved microRNA that maintains proteoglycan homeostasis in cells....

  14. Cell Cycle Regulates Nuclear Stability of AID and Determines the Cellular Response to AID.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quy Le

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available AID (Activation Induced Deaminase deaminates cytosines in DNA to initiate immunoglobulin gene diversification and to reprogram CpG methylation in early development. AID is potentially highly mutagenic, and it causes genomic instability evident as translocations in B cell malignancies. Here we show that AID is cell cycle regulated. By high content screening microscopy, we demonstrate that AID undergoes nuclear degradation more slowly in G1 phase than in S or G2-M phase, and that mutations that affect regulatory phosphorylation or catalytic activity can alter AID stability and abundance. We directly test the role of cell cycle regulation by fusing AID to tags that destabilize nuclear protein outside of G1 or S-G2/M phases. We show that enforced nuclear localization of AID in G1 phase accelerates somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination, and is well-tolerated; while nuclear AID compromises viability in S-G2/M phase cells. We identify AID derivatives that accelerate somatic hypermutation with minimal impact on viability, which will be useful tools for engineering genes and proteins by iterative mutagenesis and selection. Our results further suggest that use of cell cycle tags to regulate nuclear stability may be generally applicable to studying DNA repair and to engineering the genome.

  15. Cellular localization of steroid hormone-regulated proteins during sexual development in achlya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunt, S.A.; Silver, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    In the fungus Achlya ambisexualis sexual development in the male strain E87 is controlled by the steroid hormone antheridiol. To investigate the effects of antheridiol on the synthesis and/or accumulation of specific cellular proteins we have analyzed [ 35 S]methionine-labeled proteins from control and hormone-treated cells using both one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) PAGE. The addition of the hormone antheridiol to vegetatively growing cells of Achlya E87 was found to result in changes in the synthesis and/or accumulation of at least 16 specific proteins, which could be localized to the cytoplasmic, nuclear or cell was/cell membrane fractions. The most prominent changes observed in the hormone-treated cells included the appearance in the cytoplasmic fraction of labeled proteins at 28.4 and 24.3kD which were not detectable in control cells, and a significant enrichment in the labeling of a 24.3kD protein in the cell wall/cell membrane fraction. Quantitative changes in the [ 35 S]methionine labeling of several other proteins were noted in all three cell fractions

  16. Regulation of adeno-associated virus DNA replication by the cellular TAF-I/set complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegoraro, Gianluca; Marcello, Alessandro; Myers, Michael P; Giacca, Mauro

    2006-07-01

    The Rep proteins of the adeno-associated virus (AAV) are required for viral replication in the presence of adenovirus helper functions and as yet poorly characterized cellular factors. In an attempt to identify such factors, we purified Flag-Rep68-interacting proteins from human cell lysates. Several polypeptides were identified by mass spectrometry, among which was ANP32B, a member of the acidic nuclear protein 32 family which takes part in the formation of the template-activating factor I/Set oncoprotein (TAF-I/Set) complex. The N terminus of Rep was found to specifically bind the acidic domain of ANP32B; through this interaction, Rep was also able to recruit other members of the TAF-I/Set complex, including the ANP32A protein and the histone chaperone TAF-I/Set. Further experiments revealed that silencing of ANP32A and ANP32B inhibited AAV replication, while overexpression of all of the components of the TAF-I/Set complex increased de novo AAV DNA synthesis in permissive cells. Besides being the first indication that the TAF-I/Set complex participates in wild-type AAV replication, these findings have important implications for the generation of recombinant AAV vectors since overexpression of the TAF-I/Set components was found to markedly increase viral vector production.

  17. New perspectives on the regulation of iron absorption via cellular zinc concentrations in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knez, Marija; Graham, Robin D; Welch, Ross M; Stangoulis, James C R

    2017-07-03

    Iron deficiency is the most prevalent nutritional deficiency, affecting more than 30% of the total world's population. It is a major public health problem in many countries around the world. Over the years various methods have been used with an effort to try and control iron-deficiency anemia. However, there has only been a marginal reduction in the global prevalence of anemia. Why is this so? Iron and zinc are essential trace elements for humans. These metals influence the transport and absorption of one another across the enterocytes and hepatocytes, due to similar ionic properties. This paper describes the structure and roles of major iron and zinc transport proteins, clarifies iron-zinc interactions at these sites, and provides a model for the mechanism of these interactions both at the local and systemic level. This review provides evidence that much of the massive extent of iron deficiency anemia in the world may be due to an underlying deficiency of zinc. It explains the reasons for predominance of cellular zinc status in determination of iron/zinc interactions and for the first time thoroughly explains mechanisms by which zinc brings about these changes.

  18. Diurnal Regulation of Cellular Processes in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803: Insights from Transcriptomic, Fluxomic, and Physiological Analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajib Saha

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 is the most widely studied model cyanobacterium, with a well-developed omics level knowledgebase. Like the lifestyles of other cyanobacteria, that of Synechocystis PCC 6803 is tuned to diurnal changes in light intensity. In this study, we analyzed the expression patterns of all of the genes of this cyanobacterium over two consecutive diurnal periods. Using stringent criteria, we determined that the transcript levels of nearly 40% of the genes in Synechocystis PCC 6803 show robust diurnal oscillating behavior, with a majority of the transcripts being upregulated during the early light period. Such transcripts corresponded to a wide array of cellular processes, such as light harvesting, photosynthetic light and dark reactions, and central carbon metabolism. In contrast, transcripts of membrane transporters for transition metals involved in the photosynthetic electron transport chain (e.g., iron, manganese, and copper were significantly upregulated during the late dark period. Thus, the pattern of global gene expression led to the development of two distinct transcriptional networks of coregulated oscillatory genes. These networks help describe how Synechocystis PCC 6803 regulates its metabolism toward the end of the dark period in anticipation of efficient photosynthesis during the early light period. Furthermore, in silico flux prediction of important cellular processes and experimental measurements of cellular ATP, NADP(H, and glycogen levels showed how this diurnal behavior influences its metabolic characteristics. In particular, NADPH/NADP+ showed a strong correlation with the majority of the genes whose expression peaks in the light. We conclude that this ratio is a key endogenous determinant of the diurnal behavior of this cyanobacterium.

  19. Prion protein accumulation in lipid rafts of mouse aging brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Agostini

    Full Text Available The cellular form of the prion protein (PrP(C is a normal constituent of neuronal cell membranes. The protein misfolding causes rare neurodegenerative disorders known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies or prion diseases. These maladies can be sporadic, genetic or infectious. Sporadic prion diseases are the most common form mainly affecting aging people. In this work, we investigate the biochemical environment in which sporadic prion diseases may develop, focusing our attention on the cell membrane of neurons in the aging brain. It is well established that with aging the ratio between the most abundant lipid components of rafts undergoes a major change: while cholesterol decreases, sphingomyelin content rises. Our results indicate that the aging process modifies the compartmentalization of PrP(C. In old mice, this change favors PrP(C accumulation in detergent-resistant membranes, particularly in hippocampi. To confirm the relationship between lipid content changes and PrP(C translocation into detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs, we looked at PrP(C compartmentalization in hippocampi from acid sphingomyelinase (ASM knockout (KO mice and synaptosomes enriched in sphingomyelin. In the presence of high sphingomyelin content, we observed a significant increase of PrP(C in DRMS. This process is not due to higher levels of total protein and it could, in turn, favor the onset of sporadic prion diseases during aging as it increases the PrP intermolecular contacts into lipid rafts. We observed that lowering sphingomyelin in scrapie-infected cells by using fumonisin B1 led to a 50% decrease in protease-resistant PrP formation. This may suggest an involvement of PrP lipid environment in prion formation and consequently it may play a role in the onset or development of sporadic forms of prion diseases.

  20. Regulation of invadopodia formation and activity by CD147

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grass, G. Daniel; Bratoeva, Momka; Toole, Bryan P.

    2012-01-01

    A defining feature of malignant tumor progression is cellular penetration through the basement membrane and interstitial matrices that separate various cellular compartments. Accumulating evidence supports the notion that invasive cells employ specialized structures termed invadopodia to breach these structural barriers. Invadopodia are actin-based, lipid-raft-enriched membrane protrusions containing membrane-type-1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP; also known as matrix metalloproteinase 14; MMP14) and several signaling proteins. CD147 (emmprin, basigin), an immunoglobulin superfamily protein that is associated with tumor invasion and metastasis, induces the synthesis of various matrix metalloproteinases in many systems. In this study we show that upregulation of CD147 is sufficient to induce MT1-MMP expression, invasiveness and formation of invadopodia-like structures in non-transformed, non-invasive, breast epithelial cells. We also demonstrate that CD147 and MT1-MMP are in close proximity within these invadopodia-like structures and co-fractionate in membrane compartments with the properties of lipid rafts. Moreover, manipulation of CD147 levels in invasive breast carcinoma cells causes corresponding changes in MT1-MMP expression, invasiveness and invadopodia formation and activity. These findings indicate that CD147 regulates invadopodia formation and activity, probably through assembly of MT1-MMP-containing complexes within lipid-raft domains of the invadopodia. PMID:22389410

  1. Syk Tyrosine Kinase Acts as a Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Tumor Suppressor by Regulating Cellular Growth and Invasion

    OpenAIRE

    Layton, Tracy; Stalens, Cristel; Gunderson, Felizza; Goodison, Steve; Silletti, Steve

    2009-01-01

    We have identified the nonreceptor tyrosine kinase syk as a marker of differentiation/tumor suppressor in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Syk expression is lost in poorly differentiated PDAC cells in vitro and in situ, and stable reexpression of syk in endogenously syk-negative Panc1 (Panc1/syk) cells retarded their growth in vitro and in vivo and reduced anchorage-independent growth in vitro. Panc1/syk cells exhibited a more differentiated morphology and down-regulated cyclin D1, ak...

  2. Extracellular Matrix components regulate cellular polarity and tissue structure in the developing and mature Retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweta Varshney

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available While genetic networks and other intrinsic mechanisms regulate much of retinal development, interactions with the extracellular environment shape these networks and modify their output. The present review has focused on the role of one family of extracellular matrix molecules and their signaling pathways in retinal development. In addition to their effects on the developing retina, laminins play a role in maintaining Müller cell polarity and compartmentalization, thereby contributing to retinal homeostasis. This article which is intended for the clinical audience, reviews the fundamentals of retinal development, extracellular matrix organization and the role of laminins in retinal development. The role of laminin in cortical development is also briefly discussed.

  3. OCT4B1 Regulates the Cellular Stress Response of Human Dental Pulp Cells with Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Infection and apoptosis are combined triggers for inflammation in dental tissues. Octamer-binding transcription factor 4-B1 (OCT4B1, a novel spliced variant of OCT4 family, could respond to the cellular stress and possess antiapoptotic property. However, its specific role in dental pulpitis remains unknown. Methods. To investigate the effect of OCT4B1 on inflammation of dental pulp cells (DPCs, its expression in inflamed dental pulp tissues and DPCs was examined by in situ hybridization, real-time PCR, and FISH assay. OCT4B1 overexpressed DPCs model was established, confirmed by western blot and immunofluorescence staining, and then stimulated with Lipopolysaccharide (LPS. Apoptotic rate was determined by Hoechst/PI staining and FACS. Cell survival rate was calculated by CCK8 assay. Results. In situ hybridization, real-time PCR, and FISH assay revealed that OCT4B1 was extensively expressed in inflamed dental pulp tissues and DPCs with LPS stimulation. Western blot and immunofluorescence staining showed the expression of OCT4B1 and OCT4B increased after OCT4B1 transfection. Hoechst/PI staining and FACS demonstrated that less red/blue fluorescence was detected and apoptotic percentage decreased (3.45% after transfection. CCK8 demonstrated that the survival rate of pCDH-OCT4B1-flag cells increased. Conclusions. OCT4B1 plays an essential role in inflammation and apoptosis of DPCs. OCT4B might operate synergistically with OCT4B1 to reduce apoptosis.

  4. Sub-cellular mRNA localization modulates the regulation of gene expression by small RNAs in bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teimouri, Hamid; Korkmazhan, Elgin; Stavans, Joel; Levine, Erel

    2017-10-01

    Small non-coding RNAs can exert significant regulatory activity on gene expression in bacteria. In recent years, substantial progress has been made in understanding bacterial gene expression by sRNAs. However, recent findings that demonstrate that families of mRNAs show non-trivial sub-cellular distributions raise the question of how localization may affect the regulatory activity of sRNAs. Here we address this question within a simple mathematical model. We show that the non-uniform spatial distributions of mRNA can alter the threshold-linear response that characterizes sRNAs that act stoichiometrically, and modulate the hierarchy among targets co-regulated by the same sRNA. We also identify conditions where the sub-cellular organization of cofactors in the sRNA pathway can induce spatial heterogeneity on sRNA targets. Our results suggest that under certain conditions, interpretation and modeling of natural and synthetic gene regulatory circuits need to take into account the spatial organization of the transcripts of participating genes.

  5. Cellular Cholesterol Regulates Ubiquitination and Degradation of the Cholesterol Export Proteins ABCA1 and ABCG1*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Victar; Kim, Mi-Jurng; Gelissen, Ingrid C.; Brown, Andrew J.; Sandoval, Cecilia; Hallab, Jeannette C.; Kockx, Maaike; Traini, Mathew; Jessup, Wendy; Kritharides, Leonard

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the influence of cholesterol in post-translational control of ABCA1 and ABCG1 protein expression. Using CHO cell lines stably expressing human ABCA1 or ABCG1, we observed that the abundance of these proteins is increased by cell cholesterol loading. The response to increased cholesterol is rapid, is independent of transcription, and appears to be specific for these membrane proteins. The effect is mediated through cholesterol-dependent inhibition of transporter protein degradation. Cell cholesterol loading similarly regulates degradation of endogenously expressed ABCA1 and ABCG1 in human THP-1 macrophages. Turnover of ABCA1 and ABCG1 is strongly inhibited by proteasomal inhibitors and is unresponsive to inhibitors of lysosomal proteolysis. Furthermore, cell cholesterol loading inhibits ubiquitination of ABCA1 and ABCG1. Our findings provide evidence for a rapid, cholesterol-dependent, post-translational control of ABCA1 and ABCG1 protein levels, mediated through a specific and sterol-sensitive mechanism for suppression of transporter protein ubiquitination, which in turn decreases proteasomal degradation. This provides a mechanism for acute fine-tuning of cholesterol transporter activity in response to fluctuations in cell cholesterol levels, in addition to the longer term cholesterol-dependent transcriptional regulation of these genes. PMID:24500716

  6. E2F1 regulates cellular growth by mTORC1 signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Real

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available During cell proliferation, growth must occur to maintain homeostatic cell size. Here we show that E2F1 is capable of inducing growth by regulating mTORC1 activity. The activation of cell growth and mTORC1 by E2F1 is dependent on both E2F1's ability to bind DNA and to regulate gene transcription, demonstrating that a gene induction expression program is required in this process. Unlike E2F1, E2F3 is unable to activate mTORC1, suggesting that growth activity could be restricted to individual E2F members. The effect of E2F1 on the activation of mTORC1 does not depend on Akt. Furthermore, over-expression of TSC2 does not interfere with the effect of E2F1, indicating that the E2F1-induced signal pathway can compensate for the inhibitory effect of TSC2 on Rheb. Immunolocalization studies demonstrate that E2F1 induces the translocation of mTORC1 to the late endosome vesicles, in a mechanism dependent of leucine. E2F1 and leucine, or insulin, together affect the activation of S6K stronger than alone suggesting that they are complementary in activating the signal pathway. From these studies, E2F1 emerges as a key protein that integrates cell division and growth, both of which are essential for cell proliferation.

  7. El nucléolo como un regulador del envejecimiento celular The nucleolus as a regulator of cellular senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Rosete

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available El nucléolo, considerado únicamente como el sitio de síntesis de los ribosomas, actualmente representa una estructura nuclear dinámica que participa en la regulación de importantes procesos celulares. Numerosas evidencias han demostrado que el envejecimiento celular es una de las diversas funciones que son controladas por el nucléolo. Las mutaciones en las proteínas de localización nucleolar promueven el envejecimiento prematuro en levaduras y humanos. La carencia de represión en la transcripción de genes que codifican para el ARNr que se encuentran dañados, y las mutaciones en las helicasas del ADN encargadas de minimizar la formación de círculos extra-cromosómicos del ADN que codifica para el ARNr, provocan modificaciones en la estructura del nucléolo e inducen envejecimiento prematuro en levaduras. De igual manera, en los humanos la carencia de las helicasas del ADN localizadas en el nucléolo y que participan en el mantenimiento de la integridad genómica, favorecen el desarrollo de aquellas enfermedades asociadas con el envejecimiento acelerado. Además, la presencia de algunos componentes de la telomerasa en el nucléolo, indica que parte de la biosíntesis de esta enzima se realiza en esta estructura nuclear, sugiriendo una conexión entre el nucléolo y la síntesis de los telómeros en la regulación del envejecimiento celular. Por otra parte, el nucléolo secuestra proteínas para regular su actividad biológica durante el inicio o término de la vida replicativa celular.The nucleolus has been considered originally only as the site for the ribosome synthesis, but now it is well known that it represents a dynamic nuclear structure involved in important cellular processes. Several evidences have demonstrated that the nucleolus regulates the cellular senescence. Specific mutations on the DNAs codifying for nucleolar proteins induced premature senescence from yeast to human. The failure to repress the genes transcription

  8. Methylglyoxal synthase regulates cell elongation via alterations of cellular methylglyoxal and spermidine content in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sang-Min; Song, Sung-Hyun; Lee, Jin-Woo; Kwak, Min-Kyu; Kang, Sa-Ouk

    2017-10-01

    Methylglyoxal regulates cell division and differentiation through its interaction with polyamines. Loss of their biosynthesizing enzyme causes physiological impairment and cell elongation in eukaryotes. However, the reciprocal effects of methylglyoxal and polyamine production and its regulatory metabolic switches on morphological changes in prokaryotes have not been addressed. Here, Bacillus subtilis methylglyoxal synthase (mgsA) and polyamine biosynthesizing genes encoding arginine decarboxylase (SpeA), agmatinase (SpeB), and spermidine synthase (SpeE), were disrupted or overexpressed. Treatment of 0.2mM methylglyoxal and 1mM spermidine led to the elongation and shortening of B. subtilis wild-type cells to 12.38±3.21μm (P<0.05) and 3.24±0.73μm (P<0.01), respectively, compared to untreated cells (5.72±0.68μm). mgsA-deficient (mgsA - ) and -overexpressing (mgsA OE ) mutants also demonstrated cell shortening and elongation, similar to speB- and speE-deficient (speB - and speE - ) and -overexpressing (speB OE and speE OE ) mutants. Importantly, both mgsA-depleted speB OE and speE OE mutants (speB OE /mgsA - and speE OE /mgsA - ) were drastically shortened to 24.5% and 23.8% of parental speB OE and speE OE mutants, respectively. These phenotypes were associated with reciprocal alterations of mgsA and polyamine transcripts governed by the contents of methylglyoxal and spermidine, which are involved in enzymatic or genetic metabolite-control mechanisms. Additionally, biophysically detected methylglyoxal-spermidine Schiff bases did not affect morphogenesis. Taken together, the findings indicate that methylglyoxal triggers cell elongation. Furthermore, cells with methylglyoxal accumulation commonly exhibit an elongated rod-shaped morphology through upregulation of mgsA, polyamine genes, and the global regulator spx, as well as repression of the cell division and shape regulator, FtsZ. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Induction of stress responses by polluting agents which dis-regulate cellular homeostasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mothersill, Carmel

    2001-01-01

    There is growing concern both in the scientific community and among the general public about the effects of exposure to low levels of radiation and environmental chemicals. The increased incidence of cancer, reproduction disorders and allergies have been associated with ambient environmental exposure to these pollutants. The pollution burden is generally made up of a mixture of agents, occurring at concentrations of the individual compounds which are not considered harmful and which are below the action level. Individual pollutants can act through a variety of primary toxicity mechanisms. However the resulting secondary and tertiary toxicity mechanisms which affect cellular homeostasis might be more common. These resulting stress responses, including oxidative stress, have been associated with effects that include increased level of death during cell division, increased levels of mutation and increased tolerance of mutations in cell populations, increased levels of cytogenetic abnormalities and many other symptoms. These effects are linked to a persistent increase in (oxidative) stress and are particularly evident in the haematopoietic system (possibly due to the high rate self of renewal in that system). Therefore prolonged exposure to mixtures of chemicals and radiation might result in additive and synergistic stress responses which can induce long-term delayed effects, often in progeny or in cells not directly exposed to the agent/s. The existence of a common (oxidative) stress mechanism means that the effects of individual pollutants may not be considered in isolation. Rather the total pollution burden may need to be measured using a response rather than a dose based scoring or ranking system. Improved understanding of toxicity mechanisms and effects underpins improved risk assessment and identification of biomarkers. The immune system plays a pivotal role in maintaining health status, and disruption of immune functions can lead to increased susceptibility to

  10. Lipid rafts and B cell signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Neetu; DeFranco, Anthony L

    2007-10-01

    B cells comprise an essential component of the humoral immune system. They are equipped with the unique ability to synthesize and secrete pathogen-neutralizing antibodies, and share with professional antigen presenting cells the ability to internalize foreign antigens, and process them for presentation to helper T cells. Recent evidence indicates that specialized cholesterol- and glycosphingolipid-rich microdomains in the plasma membrane commonly referred to as lipid rafts, serve to compartmentalize key signaling molecules during the different stages of B cell activation including B cell antigen receptor (BCR)-initiated signal transduction, endocytosis of BCR-antigen complexes, loading of antigenic peptides onto MHC class II molecules, MHC-II associated antigen presentation to helper T cells, and receipt of helper signals via the CD40 receptor. Here we review the recent literature arguing for a role of lipid rafts in the spatial organization of B cell function.

  11. Humoral and cellular immune responses to glucose regulated protein 78 - a novel Leishmania donovani antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anja T R; Ismail, Ahmed; Gaafar, Ameera

    2002-01-01

    The recently cloned glucose regulated protein 78 (GRP78) of Leishmania donovani has been suggested as a new and promising Leishmania vaccine candidate. We assessed antibody and T-cell reactivity to GRP78 in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and in lymphoproliferative assays. Serological...... with a positive leishmanin skin test showed antibody reactivity to recombinant GRP78 (rGRP78). In lymphoproliferative assays, 9 of 13 isolates of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from individuals previously infected with L. donovani and one of three individuals previously infected with L. major showed...... in an area endemic for malaria but free of leishmaniasis and plasma from healthy Danes was negative in the assay. GRP78 antibody was detected in 10% and 5% of plasma samples from Sudanese and Ghanaian malaria patients, respectively, whereas 35% of plasma samples from otherwise healthy Sudanese individuals...

  12. Differential regulation of the cellular response to DNA double-strand breaks in G1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barlow, Jacqueline H; Lisby, Michael; Rothstein, Rodney

    2008-01-01

    -induced breaks are recognized by Rfa1 only after the cell enters S phase. This difference is dependent on the DNA end-binding Yku70/Yku80 complex. Cell-cycle regulation is also observed in the DNA damage checkpoint response. Specifically, the 9-1-1 complex is required in G1 cells to recruit the Ddc2 checkpoint...... protein to damaged DNA, while, upon entry into S phase, the cyclin-dependent kinase Cdc28 and the 9-1-1 complex both serve to recruit Ddc2 to foci. Together, these results demonstrate that the DNA repair machinery distinguishes between different types of damage in G1, which translates into different modes...

  13. Zinc in Cellular Regulation: The Nature and Significance of "Zinc Signals".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maret, Wolfgang

    2017-10-31

    In the last decade, we witnessed discoveries that established Zn 2+ as a second major signalling metal ion in the transmission of information within cells and in communication between cells. Together with Ca 2+ and Mg 2+ , Zn 2+ covers biological regulation with redox-inert metal ions over many orders of magnitude in concentrations. The regulatory functions of zinc ions, together with their functions as a cofactor in about three thousand zinc metalloproteins, impact virtually all aspects of cell biology. This article attempts to define the regulatory functions of zinc ions, and focuses on the nature of zinc signals and zinc signalling in pathways where zinc ions are either extracellular stimuli or intracellular messengers. These pathways interact with Ca 2+ , redox, and phosphorylation signalling. The regulatory functions of zinc require a complex system of precise homeostatic control for transients, subcellular distribution and traffic, organellar homeostasis, and vesicular storage and exocytosis of zinc ions.

  14. "Lipid raft aging" in the human frontal cortex during nonpathological aging: gender influences and potential implications in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Mario; Fabelo, Noemí; Ferrer, Isidre; Marín, Raquel

    2018-07-01

    Lipid rafts are highly dynamic membrane domains featured by distinctive biochemical composition and physicochemical properties compared with the surrounding plasma membrane. These microstructures are associated not only with cellular signaling and communication in normal nerve cells but also with pathological processing of amyloid precursor protein in Alzheimer's disease. Using lipid rafts isolated from human frontal cortex in nondemented subjects aging 24 to 85 years, we demonstrate here that lipid structure of lipid rafts undergo significant alterations of specific lipid classes and phospholipid-bound fatty acids as brain cortex correlating with aging. Main changes affect levels of plasmalogens, polyunsaturated fatty acids (especially docosahexaenoic acid and arachidonic acid), total polar lipids (mainly phosphatidylinositol, sphingomyelin, sulfatides, and cerebrosides), and total neutral lipids (particularly cholesterol and sterol esters). Besides, relevant relationships between main fatty acids and/or lipid classes were altered in an age-related manner. This "lipid raft aging" exhibits clear gender differences and appear to be more pronounced in women than in men, especially in older (postmenopausal) women. The outcomes led us to conclude that human cortical lipid rafts are modified by aging in a gender-dependent fashion. Given the central role of bilayer lipid matrix in lipid rafts functionality and neuronal signaling, we hypothesize that these findings might underlie the higher prevalence of cognitive decline evolving toward Alzheimer's disease in postmenopausal women. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Acetyl-CoA carboxylase in Reuber hepatoma cells: variation in enzyme activity, insulin regulation, and cellular lipid content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, A; Evans, J L; Nordlund, A C; Watts, T D; Witters, L A

    1992-01-01

    Reuber hepatoma cells are useful cultured lines for the study of insulin action, lipid and lipoprotein metabolism, and the regulation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), the rate-limiting enzyme of fatty acid biosynthesis. During investigations in different clonal lines of these cells, we have uncovered marked intercellular variability in the activity, enzyme content, and insulin regulation of ACC paralleled by differences in cellular neutral lipid (triglyceride) content. Two contrasting clonal lines, Fao and H356A-1, have been studied in detail. Several features distinguish these two lines, including differences in ACC activity and enzyme kinetics, the content of the two major hepatic ACC isozymes (Mr 280,000 and 265,000 Da) and their heteroisozymic complex, the extent of ACC phosphorylation, and the ability of ACC to be activated on stimulation by insulin and insulinomimetic agonists. As studied by Nile Red staining and fluorescence-activated cell sorting, these two lines also display marked differences in neutral lipid content, which correlates with both basal levels of ACC activity and inhibition of ACC by the fatty acid analog, 5-(tetradecyloxy)-2-furoic acid (TOFA). These results emphasize the importance of characterization of any particular clonal line of Reuber cells for studies of enzyme regulation, substrate metabolism, and hormone action. With respect to ACC, studies in contrasting clonal lines of Reuber cells could provide valuable clues to understanding both the complex mechanisms of intracellular ACC regulation in the absence and presence of hormones and its regulatory role(s) in overall hepatic lipid metabolism.

  16. Molecularly Imprinted Polymer Synthesis Using RAFT Polymerisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cormack, P.A.G.; Faizatul Shimal Mehamod; Faizatul Shimal Mehamod

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the synthesis and characterisation of caffeine-imprinted polymers are described. The polymers were prepared in monolithic form via both reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer (RAFT) polymerisation and conventional free radical polymerisation, using methacrylic acid and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as the functional monomer and crosslinking agent, respectively. The potential benefits in applying RAFT polymerisation techniques towards the synthesis of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) are explored and elucidated. The pore structures of the polymers produced were characterised by nitrogen sorption porosimetry and the molecular recognition properties of representative products were evaluated in high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) mode. Molecular imprinting effects were confirmed by analysing the relative retentions of analytes on imprinted and non-imprinted HPLC stationary phases. It was found that a caffeine-imprinted polymer synthesised by RAFT polymerisation was superior to a polymer prepared using a conventional synthetic approach; the imprinting factor and column efficiency were found to be higher for the former material. (author)

  17. Raft river geoscience case study, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolenc, M. R.; Hull, L. C.; Mizell, S. A.; Russell, B. F.; Skiba, P. A.; Strawn, J. A.; Tullis, J. A.; Garber, R.

    1981-11-01

    The Raft River Geothermal Site has been evaluated over the past eight years by the United States Geological Survey and the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory as a moderate-temperature geothermal resource. The geoscience data gathered in the drilling and testing of seven geothermal wells suggest that the Raft River thermal reservoir is: (1) produced from fractures found at the contact metamorphic zone apparently the base of detached normal faulting from the Bridge and Horse Well Fault zones of the Jim Sage Mountains; (2) anisotropic, with the major axis of hydraulic conductivity coincident to the Bridge Fault Zone; (3) hydraulically connected to the shallow thermal fluid of the Crook and BLM wells based upon both geochemistry and pressure response; (4) controlled by a mixture of diluted meteoric water recharging from the northwest and a saline sodium chloride water entering from the southwest. Although the hydrogeologic environment of the Raft River geothermal area is very complex and unique, it is typical of many Basin and Range systems.

  18. Chitinase 3-like 1 Regulates Cellular and Tissue Responses via IL-13 Receptor α2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan Hua He

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Members of the 18 glycosyl hydrolase (GH 18 gene family have been conserved over species and time and are dysregulated in inflammatory, infectious, remodeling, and neoplastic disorders. This is particularly striking for the prototypic chitinase-like protein chitinase 3-like 1 (Chi3l1, which plays a critical role in antipathogen responses where it augments bacterial killing while stimulating disease tolerance by controlling cell death, inflammation, and remodeling. However, receptors that mediate the effects of GH 18 moieties have not been defined. Here, we demonstrate that Chi3l1 binds to interleukin-13 receptor α2 (IL-13Rα2 and that Chi3l1, IL-13Rα2, and IL-13 are in a multimeric complex. We also demonstrate that Chi3l1 activates macrophage mitogen-activated protein kinase, protein kinase B/AKT, and Wnt/β-catenin signaling and regulates oxidant injury, apoptosis, pyroptosis, inflammasome activation, antibacterial responses, melanoma metastasis, and TGF-β1 production via IL-13Rα2-dependent mechanisms. Thus, IL-13Rα2 is a GH 18 receptor that plays a critical role in Chi3l1 effector responses.

  19. Control of ADAM17 activity by regulation of its cellular localisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzen, Inken; Lokau, Juliane; Korpys, Yvonne; Oldefest, Mirja; Flynn, Charlotte M.; Künzel, Ulrike; Garbers, Christoph; Freeman, Matthew; Grötzinger, Joachim; Düsterhöft, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    An important, irreversible step in many signalling pathways is the shedding of membrane-anchored proteins. A Disintegrin And Metalloproteinase (ADAM) 17 is one of the major sheddases involved in a variety of physiological and pathophysiological processes including regeneration, differentiation, and cancer progression. This central role in signalling implies that ADAM17 activity has to be tightly regulated, including at the level of localisation. Most mature ADAM17 is localised intracellularly, with only a small amount at the cell surface. We found that ADAM17 is constitutively internalised by clathrin-coated pits and that physiological stimulators such as GPCR ligands induce ADAM17-mediated shedding, but do not alter the cell-surface abundance of the protease. In contrast, the PKC-activating phorbol ester PMA, often used as a strong inducer of ADAM17, causes not only proteolysis by ADAM17 but also a rapid increase of the mature protease at the cell surface. This is followed by internalisation and subsequent degradation of the protease. Eventually, this leads to a substantial downregulation of mature ADAM17. Our results therefore imply that physiological activation of ADAM17 does not rely on its relocalisation, but that PMA-induced PKC activity drastically dysregulates the localisation of ADAM17. PMID:27731361

  20. Two-dimensional Forster resonance energy transfer (2-D FRET) and the membrane raft hypothesis

    OpenAIRE

    Acasandrei, Maria; Dale, Robert; VAN DE VEN, Martin; AMELOOT, Marcel

    2006-01-01

    A model for analyzing Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET) data in relation to the cell plasma membrane raft hypothesis is developed to take into account: (a) the distribution of FRET donors and acceptors at the surface of probing antibody fragments specific for a putative raft component; (b) partitioning of the raft component between raft and non-raft areas of the membrane; and (c) the dependence of the raft partition on the expression level of the considered component. Analysis of relev...

  1. Cellular regulation of basal and FSH-stimulated cyclic AMP production in irradiated rat testes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kangasniemi, M.; Kaipia, A.; Toppari, J.; Mali, P.; Huhtaniemi, I.; Parvinen, M.

    1990-01-01

    Basal and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH)-stimulated cyclic AMP (cAMP) productions by seminiferous tubular segments from irradiated adult rats were investigated at defined stages of the epithelial cycle when specific spermatogenic cells were low in number. Seven days post-irradiation, depletion of spermatogonia did not influence the basal cAMP production, but FSH response increased in stages II-VIII. Seventeen days post-irradiation when spermatocytes were low in number, there was a small increase in basal cAMP level in stages VII-VIII and FSH-stimulated cAMP production increased in stages VII-XII and XIII-I. At 38 days when pachytene spermatocytes and round spermatids (steps 1-6) were low in number, a decreased basal cAMP production was measured in stages II-VI and IX-XII. FSH-stimulated cAMP output increased in stages VII-XII but decreased in stages II-VI. At 52 days when all spermatids were low in number, basal cAMP levels decreased in all stages of the cycle, whereas FSH response was elevated only in stages VII-XII. All spermatogenic cell types seem to have an effect on cAMP production by the seminiferous tubule in a stage-specific fashion. Germ cells appear to regulate Sertoli cell FSH response in a paracrine way, and a part of cAMP may originate from spermatids stimulated by an unknown FSH-dependent Sertoli cell factor. The FSH-dependent functions may control such phenomena as spermatogonial proliferation, final maturation of spermatids, and onset of meiosis

  2. Regulation of HTLV-1 Tax Stability, Cellular Trafficking and NF-κB Activation by the Ubiquitin-Proteasome Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavorgna, Alfonso; Harhaj, Edward William

    2014-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a complex retrovirus that infects CD4+ T cells and causes adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) in 3%–5% of infected individuals after a long latent period. HTLV-1 Tax is a trans-activating protein that regulates viral gene expression and also modulates cellular signaling pathways to enhance T-cell proliferation and cell survival. The Tax oncoprotein promotes T-cell transformation, in part via constitutive activation of the NF-κB transcription factor; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Ubiquitination is a type of post-translational modification that occurs in a three-step enzymatic cascade mediated by E1, E2 and E3 enzymes and regulates protein stability as well as signal transduction, protein trafficking and the DNA damage response. Emerging studies indicate that Tax hijacks the ubiquitin machinery to activate ubiquitin-dependent kinases and downstream NF-κB signaling. Tax interacts with the E2 conjugating enzyme Ubc13 and is conjugated on C-terminal lysine residues with lysine 63-linked polyubiquitin chains. Tax K63-linked polyubiquitination may serve as a platform for signaling complexes since this modification is critical for interactions with NEMO and IKK. In addition to NF-κB signaling, mono- and polyubiquitination of Tax also regulate its subcellular trafficking and stability. Here, we review recent advances in the diverse roles of ubiquitin in Tax function and how Tax usurps the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway to promote oncogenesis. PMID:25341660

  3. Involvement of the iron regulatory protein from Eisenia andrei earthworms in the regulation of cellular iron homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Procházková

    Full Text Available Iron homeostasis in cells is regulated by iron regulatory proteins (IRPs that exist in different organisms. IRPs are cytosolic proteins that bind to iron-responsive elements (IREs of the 5'- or 3'-untranslated regions (UTR of mRNAs that encode many proteins involved in iron metabolism. In this study, we have cloned and described a new regulatory protein belonging to the family of IRPs from the earthworm Eisenia andrei (EaIRP. The earthworm IRE site in 5'-UTR of ferritin mRNA most likely folds into a secondary structure that differs from the conventional IRE structures of ferritin due to the absence of a typically unpaired cytosine that participates in protein binding. Prepared recombinant EaIRP and proteins from mammalian liver extracts are able to bind both mammalian and Eisenia IRE structures of ferritin mRNA, although the affinity of the rEaIRP/Eisenia IRE structure is rather low. This result suggests the possible contribution of a conventional IRE structure. When IRP is supplemented with a Fe-S cluster, it can function as a cytosolic aconitase. Cellular cytosolic and mitochondrial fractions, as well as recombinant EaIRP, exhibit aconitase activity that can be abolished by the action of oxygen radicals. The highest expression of EaIRP was detected in parts of the digestive tract. We can assume that earthworms may possess an IRE/IRP regulatory network as a potential mechanism for maintaining cellular iron homeostasis, although the aconitase function of EaIRP is most likely more relevant.

  4. Involvement of the Iron Regulatory Protein from Eisenia andrei Earthworms in the Regulation of Cellular Iron Homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procházková, Petra; Škanta, František; Roubalová, Radka; Šilerová, Marcela; Dvořák, Jiří; Bilej, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Iron homeostasis in cells is regulated by iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) that exist in different organisms. IRPs are cytosolic proteins that bind to iron-responsive elements (IREs) of the 5′- or 3′-untranslated regions (UTR) of mRNAs that encode many proteins involved in iron metabolism. In this study, we have cloned and described a new regulatory protein belonging to the family of IRPs from the earthworm Eisenia andrei (EaIRP). The earthworm IRE site in 5′-UTR of ferritin mRNA most likely folds into a secondary structure that differs from the conventional IRE structures of ferritin due to the absence of a typically unpaired cytosine that participates in protein binding. Prepared recombinant EaIRP and proteins from mammalian liver extracts are able to bind both mammalian and Eisenia IRE structures of ferritin mRNA, although the affinity of the rEaIRP/Eisenia IRE structure is rather low. This result suggests the possible contribution of a conventional IRE structure. When IRP is supplemented with a Fe-S cluster, it can function as a cytosolic aconitase. Cellular cytosolic and mitochondrial fractions, as well as recombinant EaIRP, exhibit aconitase activity that can be abolished by the action of oxygen radicals. The highest expression of EaIRP was detected in parts of the digestive tract. We can assume that earthworms may possess an IRE/IRP regulatory network as a potential mechanism for maintaining cellular iron homeostasis, although the aconitase function of EaIRP is most likely more relevant. PMID:25279857

  5. Contribution of PIP-5 kinase Iα to raft-based FcγRIIA signaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szymanska, Ewelina; Korzeniowski, Marek; Raynal, Patrick; Sobota, Andrzej; Kwiatkowska, Katarzyna

    2009-01-01

    Receptor FcγIIA (FcγRIIA) associates with plasma membrane rafts upon activation to trigger signaling cascades leading to actin polymerization. We examined whether compartmentalization of PI(4,5)P 2 and PI(4,5)P 2 -synthesizing PIP5-kinase Iα to rafts contributes to FcγRIIA signaling. A fraction of PIP5-kinase Iα was detected in raft-originating detergent-resistant membranes (DRM) isolated from U937 monocytes and other cells. The DRM of U937 monocytes contained also a major fraction of PI(4,5)P 2 . PIP5-kinase Iα bound PI(4,5)P 2 , and depletion of the lipid displaced PIP5-kinase Iα from the DRM. Activation of FcγRIIA in BHK transfectants led to recruitment of the kinase to the plasma membrane and enrichment of DRM in PI(4,5)P 2 . Immunofluorescence studies revealed that in resting cells the kinase was associated with the plasma membrane, cytoplasmic vesicles and the nucleus. After FcγRIIA activation, PIP5-kinase Iα and PI(4,5)P 2 co-localized transiently with the activated receptor at distinct cellular locations. Immunoelectron microscopy studies revealed that PIP5-kinase Iα and PI(4,5)P 2 were present at the edges of electron-dense assemblies containing activated FcγRIIA in their core. The data suggest that activation of FcγRIIA leads to membrane rafts coalescing into signaling platforms containing PIP5-kinase Iα and PI(4,5)P 2

  6. BRD4 regulates cellular senescence in gastric cancer cells via E2F/miR-106b/p21 axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xingchen; Hu, Xiangming; Chen, Jinjing; Hu, Dan; Chen, Lin-Feng

    2018-02-12

    Small molecules targeting bromodomains of BET proteins possess strong anti-tumor activities and have emerged as potential therapeutics for cancer. However, the underlying mechanisms for the anti-proliferative activity of these inhibitors are still not fully characterized. In this study, we demonstrated that BET inhibitor JQ1 suppressed the proliferation and invasiveness of gastric cancer cells by inducing cellular senescence. Depletion of BRD4, which was overexpressed in gastric cancer tissues, but not other BET proteins recapitulated JQ1-induced cellular senescence with increased cellular SA-β-Gal activity and elevated p21 levels. In addition, we showed that the levels of p21 were regulated at the post-transcriptional level by BRD4-dependent expression of miR-106b-5p, which targets the 3'-UTR of p21 mRNA. Overexpression of miR-106b-5p prevented JQ1-induced p21 expression and BRD4 inhibition-associated cellular senescence, whereas miR-106b-5p inhibitor up-regulated p21 and induced cellular senescence. Finally, we demonstrated that inhibition of E2F suppressed the binding of BRD4 to the promoter of miR-106b-5p and inhibited its transcription, leading to the increased p21 levels and cellular senescence in gastric cancer cells. Our results reveal a novel mechanism by which BRD4 regulates cancer cell proliferation by modulating the cellular senescence through E2F/miR-106b-5p/p21 axis and provide new insights into using BET inhibitors as potential anticancer drugs.

  7. Synthesis and characterization of telechelic polymethacrylates via RAFT polymerization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lima, V.G.R.; Jiang, X.; Brokken-Zijp, J.C.M.; Schoenmakers, P.J.; Klumperman, B.; Linde, van der R.

    2005-01-01

    The reversible addn.-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymn. technique has been employed to synthesize linear a,w -telechelic polymers with either hydroxyl or carboxyl end groups. Me methacrylate, Bu methacrylate, and Bu acrylate were polymd. with RAFT polymn. The polymns. exhibited the usual

  8. Synthesis and characterization of telechelic polymers prepared by RAFT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lima, V.G.R.; Brokken-Zijp, J.C.M.; Klumperman, B.; Benthem - van Duuren, van A.M.G.; Linde, van der R.

    2003-01-01

    The reversible addn.-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymn. technique was employed to synthesize telechelic polymers. Me methacrylate, Bu methacrylate were polymd. using RAFT polymn. The polymns. exhibit the usual characteristics of living processes, and were followed by a two-step chain-end

  9. Hepatitis A virus cellular receptor 2 (HAVCR2) is decreased with viral infection and regulates pro-labour mediators OA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liong, Stella; Lim, Ratana; Barker, Gillian; Lappas, Martha

    2017-07-01

    Intrauterine infection caused by viral infection has been implicated to contribute to preterm birth. Hepatitis A virus cellular receptor 2 (HAVCR2) regulates inflammation in non-gestational tissues in response to viral infection. The aims of this study were to determine the effect of: (i) viral dsRNA analogue polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly(I:C)) on HAVCR2 expression; and (ii) HAVCR2 silencing by siRNA (siHAVCR2) in primary amnion and myometrial cells on poly(I:C)-induced inflammation. In human foetal membranes and myometrium, HAVCR2 mRNA and protein expression was decreased when exposed to poly(I:C). Treatment of primary amnion and myometrial cells with poly(I:C) significantly increased the expression and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF, IL1A, IL1B and IL6; the expression of chemokines CXCL8 and CCL2; the expression and secretion of adhesion molecules ICAM1 and VCAM1; and PTGS2 and PTGFR mRNA expression and the release of prostaglandin PGF 2α . This increase was significantly augmented in cells transfected with siHAVCR2. Furthermore, mRNA expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines IL4 and IL10 was significantly decreased. Collectively, our data suggest that HAVCR2 regulates cytokines, chemokines, prostaglandins and cell adhesion molecules in the presence of viral infection. This suggests a potential for HAVCR2 activators as therapeutics for the management of preterm birth associated with viral infections. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. TGF-β1 targets a microRNA network that regulates cellular adhesion and migration in renal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogusławska, Joanna; Rodzik, Katarzyna; Popławski, Piotr; Kędzierska, Hanna; Rybicka, Beata; Sokół, Elżbieta; Tański, Zbigniew; Piekiełko-Witkowska, Agnieszka

    2018-01-01

    In our previous study we found altered expression of 19 adhesion-related genes in renal tumors. In this study we hypothesized that disturbed expression of adhesion-related genes could be caused by microRNAs: short, non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression. Here, we found that expression of 24 microRNAs predicted to target adhesion-related genes was disturbed in renal tumors and correlated with expression of their predicted targets. miR-25-3p, miR-30a-5p, miR-328 and miR-363-3p directly targeted adhesion-related genes, including COL5A1, COL11A1, ITGA5, MMP16 and THBS2. miR-363-3p and miR-328 inhibited proliferation of renal cancer cells, while miR-25-3p inhibited adhesion, promoted proliferation and migration of renal cancer cells. TGF-β1 influenced the expression of miR-25-3p, miR-30a-5p, and miR-328. The analyzed microRNAs, their target genes and TGF-β1 formed a network of strong correlations in tissue samples from renal cancer patients. The expression signature of microRNAs linked with TGF-β1 levels correlated with poor survival of renal cancer patients. The results of our study suggest that TGF-β1 coordinates the expression of microRNA network that regulates cellular adhesion in cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. A Stochastic Model of the Yeast Cell Cycle Reveals Roles for Feedback Regulation in Limiting Cellular Variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barik, Debashis; Ball, David A; Peccoud, Jean; Tyson, John J

    2016-12-01

    The cell division cycle of eukaryotes is governed by a complex network of cyclin-dependent protein kinases (CDKs) and auxiliary proteins that govern CDK activities. The control system must function reliably in the context of molecular noise that is inevitable in tiny yeast cells, because mistakes in sequencing cell cycle events are detrimental or fatal to the cell or its progeny. To assess the effects of noise on cell cycle progression requires not only extensive, quantitative, experimental measurements of cellular heterogeneity but also comprehensive, accurate, mathematical models of stochastic fluctuations in the CDK control system. In this paper we provide a stochastic model of the budding yeast cell cycle that accurately accounts for the variable phenotypes of wild-type cells and more than 20 mutant yeast strains simulated in different growth conditions. We specifically tested the role of feedback regulations mediated by G1- and SG2M-phase cyclins to minimize the noise in cell cycle progression. Details of the model are informed and tested by quantitative measurements (by fluorescence in situ hybridization) of the joint distributions of mRNA populations in yeast cells. We use the model to predict the phenotypes of ~30 mutant yeast strains that have not yet been characterized experimentally.

  12. A Stochastic Model of the Yeast Cell Cycle Reveals Roles for Feedback Regulation in Limiting Cellular Variability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debashis Barik

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The cell division cycle of eukaryotes is governed by a complex network of cyclin-dependent protein kinases (CDKs and auxiliary proteins that govern CDK activities. The control system must function reliably in the context of molecular noise that is inevitable in tiny yeast cells, because mistakes in sequencing cell cycle events are detrimental or fatal to the cell or its progeny. To assess the effects of noise on cell cycle progression requires not only extensive, quantitative, experimental measurements of cellular heterogeneity but also comprehensive, accurate, mathematical models of stochastic fluctuations in the CDK control system. In this paper we provide a stochastic model of the budding yeast cell cycle that accurately accounts for the variable phenotypes of wild-type cells and more than 20 mutant yeast strains simulated in different growth conditions. We specifically tested the role of feedback regulations mediated by G1- and SG2M-phase cyclins to minimize the noise in cell cycle progression. Details of the model are informed and tested by quantitative measurements (by fluorescence in situ hybridization of the joint distributions of mRNA populations in yeast cells. We use the model to predict the phenotypes of ~30 mutant yeast strains that have not yet been characterized experimentally.

  13. BRD4 Phosphorylation Regulates HPV E2-Mediated Viral Transcription, Origin Replication, and Cellular MMP-9 Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shwu-Yuan Wu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Post-translational modification can modulate protein conformation and alter binding partner recruitment within gene regulatory regions. Here, we report that bromodomain-containing protein 4 (BRD4, a transcription co-factor and chromatin regulator, uses a phosphorylation-induced switch mechanism to recruit E2 protein encoded by cancer-associated human papillomavirus (HPV to viral early gene and cellular matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 promoters. Enhanced MMP-9 expression, induced upon keratinocyte differentiation, occurs via BRD4-dependent recruitment of active AP-1 and NF-κB to their target sequences. This is triggered by replacement of AP-1 family members JunB and JunD by c-Jun and by re-localization of NF-κB from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. In addition, BRD4 phosphorylation is critical for E2- and origin-dependent HPV DNA replication. A class of phospho-BRD4-targeting compounds, distinct from the BET bromodomain inhibitors, effectively blocks BRD4 phosphorylation-specific functions in transcription and factor recruitment.

  14. The cellular prion protein negatively regulates phagocytosis and cytokine expression in murine bone marrow-derived macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Wang

    Full Text Available The cellular prion protein (PrP(C is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI-anchored glycoprotein on the cell surface. Previous studies have demonstrated contradictory roles for PrP(C in connection with the phagocytic ability of macrophages. In the present work, we investigated the function of PrP(C in phagocytosis and cytokine expression in bone marrow-derived macrophages infected with Escherichia coli. E. coli infection induced an increase in the PRNP mRNA level. Knockout of PrP(C promoted bacterial uptake; upregulated Rab5, Rab7, and Eea1 mRNA expression; and increased the recruitment of lysosomal-associated membrane protein-2 to phagosomes, suggesting enhanced microbicidal activity. Remarkably, knockout of PrP(C suppressed the proliferation of internalized bacteria and increased the expression of cytokines such as interleukin-1β. Collectively, our data reveal an important role of PrP(C as a negative regulator for phagocytosis, phagosome maturation, cytokine expression, and macrophage microbicidal activity.

  15. Wig1 prevents cellular senescence by regulating p21 mRNA decay through control of RISC recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bong Cho; Lee, Hyung Chul; Lee, Je-Jung; Choi, Chang-Min; Kim, Dong-Kwan; Lee, Jae Cheol; Ko, Young-Gyu; Lee, Jae-Seon

    2012-11-14

    Premature senescence, a key strategy used to suppress carcinogenesis, can be driven by p53/p21 proteins in response to various stresses. Here, we demonstrate that Wig1 plays a critical role in this process through regulation of p21 mRNA stability. Wig1 controls the association of Argonaute2 (Ago2), a central component of the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC), with target p21 mRNA via binding of the stem-loop structure near the microRNA (miRNA) target site. Depletion of Wig1 prohibited miRNA-mediated p21 mRNA decay and resulted in premature senescence. Wig1 plays an essential role in cell proliferation, as demonstrated in tumour xenografts in mice, and Wig1 and p21 mRNA levels are inversely correlated in human normal and cancer tissues. Together, our data indicate a novel role of Wig1 in RISC target accessibility, which is a key step in RNA-mediated gene silencing. In addition, these findings indicate that fine-tuning of p21 levels by Wig1 is essential for the prevention of cellular senescence.

  16. An overview of recent projects to study thermal protection in life rafts, lifeboats and immersion suits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mak, L.; DuCharme, M. B.; Farnworth, B.; Wissler, E. H.; Brown, R.; Kuczora, A. [Maritime and Arctic Survival Scientific and Engineering Ressearch Team (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    Survival during a marine evacuation in cold regions is very challenging. However international regulations do not require specific thermal protection or ventilation performance criteria for lifeboats. In the same way, the testing methods for approval testing of immersion suits are not standardised. This paper investigated recent projects completed or on-going to study thermal protection in life rafts, lifeboats and immersion suits. An overview of several projects from the Maritime and Arctic Survival Scientific and Engineering Research Team (MASSERT) was conducted. This review provided the necessary knowledge to advance international standards and develop the thermal protection requirements for survival in the Arctic. The results showed the MASSERT correlated thermal insulation values between human subjects and thermal manikins in life rafts and in immersion suits. It was found that the manikins are a valuable evaluation tool, as well as the computerised models used as prediction tools.

  17. Raft tectonics in northern Campos Basin; Tectonica de jangada (raft tectonics) na area norte da Bacia de Campos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, Marilia R. de [Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense (UENF), Campos dos Goytacases, RJ (Brazil)]|[PETROBRAS, Macae, RJ (Brazil). Unidade de Negocio da Bacia de Campos; Fugita, Adhemar M. [Universidade do Estado, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Recursos Humanos da ANP

    2004-07-01

    In the northern area of Campos Basin salt gliding/spreading processes promoted the break-up and transport of Cretaceous and Tertiary rocks overlying the evaporites. This process is known as raft tectonics, and it represents the most extreme form of thin-skinned extension above the salt decollement surface. Three distinct geotectonic domains were recognized that formed in response to the raft tectonics. The first one, confined to the shallower shelf portion of the basin, is characterized by minor extension (pre-raft domain), probably because of small salt thickness and low gradient. In the second domain (or disorganized rafts domain), located in distal platformal and slope areas, seismic sections show the occurrence of blocks or rafts with angular shapes, sometimes imbricated and frequently discontinuous. In the third domain, or domain of organized rafts, located in bacinal region, seismic sections show a more continuous raft pattern, often folded because of salt compression in the distal portions of the basin. The main purposes of this work is to characterize these three tectonic domains distinguished by raft tectonics, as well as their importance in hydrocarbon accumulations in calcarenites. (author)

  18. Generation of stable lipid raft microdomains in the enterocyte brush border by selective endocytic removal of non-raft membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, E Michael; Hansen, Gert H

    2013-01-01

    The small intestinal brush border has an unusually high proportion of glycolipids which promote the formation of lipid raft microdomains, stabilized by various cross-linking lectins. This unique membrane organization acts to provide physical and chemical stability to the membrane that faces...... functions to enrich the contents of lipid raft components in the brush border. The lipophilic fluorescent marker FM, taken up into early endosomes in the terminal web region (TWEEs), was absent from detergent resistant membranes (DRMs), implying an association with non-raft membrane. Furthermore, neither...... major lipid raft-associated brush border enzymes nor glycolipids were detected by immunofluorescence microscopy in subapical punctae resembling TWEEs. Finally, two model raft lipids, BODIPY-lactosylceramide and BODIPY-GM1, were not endocytosed except when cholera toxin subunit B (CTB) was present...

  19. Regulation of Ras exchange factors and cellular localization of Ras activation by lipid messengers in T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse E. Jun

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The Ras-MAPK signaling pathway is highly conserved throughout evolution and is activated downstream of a wide range of receptor stimuli. Ras guanine nucleotide exchange factors (RasGEFs catalyze GTP loading of Ras and play a pivotal role in regulating receptor-ligand induced Ras activity. In T cells, three families of functionally important RasGEFs are expressed: RasGRF, RasGRP, and SOS-family GEFs.Early on it was recognized that Ras activation is critical for T cell development and that the RasGEFs play an important role herein. More recent work has revealed that nuances in Ras activation appear to significantly impact T cell development and selection. These nuances include distinct biochemical patterns of analog versus digital Ras activation, differences in cellular localization of Ras activation, and intricate interplays between the RasGEFs during distinct T cell developmental stages as revealed by various new mouse models. In many instances, the exact nature of these nuances in Ras activation or how these may result from fine-tuning of the RasGEFs is not understood.One large group of biomolecules critically involved in the control of Ras-GEFs´functions are lipid second messengers. Multiple, yet distinct lipid products are generated following T cell receptor (TCR stimulation and bind to different domains in the RasGRP and SOS RasGEFs to facilitate the activation of the membrane-anchored Ras GTPases. In this review we highlight how different lipid-based elements are generated by various enzymes downstream of the TCR and other receptors and how these dynamic and interrelated lipid products may fine-tune Ras activation by RasGEFs in developing T cells.

  20. C/EBPγ Is a Critical Regulator of Cellular Stress Response Networks through Heterodimerization with ATF4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggins, Christopher J.; Mayekar, Manasi K.; Martin, Nancy; Saylor, Karen L.; Gonit, Mesfin; Jailwala, Parthav; Kasoji, Manjula; Haines, Diana C.; Quiñones, Octavio A.

    2015-01-01

    The integrated stress response (ISR) controls cellular adaptations to nutrient deprivation, redox imbalances, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. ISR genes are upregulated in stressed cells, primarily by the bZIP transcription factor ATF4 through its recruitment to cis-regulatory C/EBP:ATF response elements (CAREs) together with a dimeric partner of uncertain identity. Here, we show that C/EBPγ:ATF4 heterodimers, but not C/EBPβ:ATF4 dimers, are the predominant CARE-binding species in stressed cells. C/EBPγ and ATF4 associate with genomic CAREs in a mutually dependent manner and coregulate many ISR genes. In contrast, the C/EBP family members C/EBPβ and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) were largely dispensable for induction of stress genes. Cebpg−/− mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) proliferate poorly and exhibit oxidative stress due to reduced glutathione levels and impaired expression of several glutathione biosynthesis pathway genes. Cebpg−/− mice (C57BL/6 background) display reduced body size and microphthalmia, similar to ATF4-null animals. In addition, C/EBPγ-deficient newborns die from atelectasis and respiratory failure, which can be mitigated by in utero exposure to the antioxidant, N-acetyl-cysteine. Cebpg−/− mice on a mixed strain background showed improved viability but, upon aging, developed significantly fewer malignant solid tumors than WT animals. Our findings identify C/EBPγ as a novel antioxidant regulator and an obligatory ATF4 partner that controls redox homeostasis in normal and cancerous cells. PMID:26667036

  1. Analysis of lipid raft molecules in the living brain slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotani, Norihiro; Nakano, Takanari; Ida, Yui; Ito, Rina; Hashizume, Miki; Yamaguchi, Arisa; Seo, Makoto; Araki, Tomoyuki; Hojo, Yasushi; Honke, Koichi; Murakoshi, Takayuki

    2017-08-24

    Neuronal plasma membrane has been thought to retain a lot of lipid raft components which play important roles in the neural function. Although the biochemical analyses of lipid raft using brain tissues have been extensively carried out in the past 20 years, many of their experimental conditions do not coincide with those of standard neuroscience researches such as neurophysiology and neuropharmacology. Hence, the physiological methods for lipid raft analysis that can be compatible with general neuroscience have been required. Herein, we developed a system to physiologically analyze ganglioside GM1-enriched lipid rafts in brain tissues using the "Enzyme-Mediated Activation of Radical Sources (EMARS)" method that we reported (Kotani N. et al. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U S A 105, 7405-7409 (2008)). The EMARS method was applied to acute brain slices prepared from mouse brains in aCSF solution using the EMARS probe, HRP-conjugated cholera toxin subunit B, which recognizes ganglioside GM1. The membrane molecules present in the GM1-enriched lipid rafts were then labeled with fluorescein under the physiological condition. The fluorescein-tagged lipid raft molecules called "EMARS products" distributed differentially among various parts of the brain. On the other hand, appreciable differences were not detected among segments along the longitudinal axis of the hippocampus. We further developed a device to label the lipid raft molecules in acute hippocampal slices under two different physiological conditions to detect dynamics of the lipid raft molecules during neural excitation. Using this device, several cell membrane molecules including Thy1, known as a lipid raft resident molecule in neurons, were confirmed by the EMARS method in living hippocampal slices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Cholesterol trafficking and raft-like membrane domain composition mediate scavenger receptor class B type 1-dependent lipid sensing in intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morel, Etienne; Ghezzal, Sara; Lucchi, Géraldine; Truntzer, Caroline; Pais de Barros, Jean-Paul; Simon-Plas, Françoise; Demignot, Sylvie; Mineo, Chieko; Shaul, Philip W; Leturque, Armelle; Rousset, Monique; Carrière, Véronique

    2018-02-01

    Scavenger receptor Class B type 1 (SR-B1) is a lipid transporter and sensor. In intestinal epithelial cells, SR-B1-dependent lipid sensing is associated with SR-B1 recruitment in raft-like/ detergent-resistant membrane domains and interaction of its C-terminal transmembrane domain with plasma membrane cholesterol. To clarify the initiating events occurring during lipid sensing by SR-B1, we analyzed cholesterol trafficking and raft-like domain composition in intestinal epithelial cells expressing wild-type SR-B1 or the mutated form SR-B1-Q445A, defective in membrane cholesterol binding and signal initiation. These features of SR-B1 were found to influence both apical cholesterol efflux and intracellular cholesterol trafficking from plasma membrane to lipid droplets, and the lipid composition of raft-like domains. Lipidomic analysis revealed likely participation of d18:0/16:0 sphingomyelin and 16:0/0:0 lysophosphatidylethanolamine in lipid sensing by SR-B1. Proteomic analysis identified proteins, whose abundance changed in raft-like domains during lipid sensing, and these included molecules linked to lipid raft dynamics and signal transduction. These findings provide new insights into the role of SR-B1 in cellular cholesterol homeostasis and suggest molecular links between SR-B1-dependent lipid sensing and cell cholesterol and lipid droplet dynamics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of RAFT Agent on the Selective Approach of Molecularly Imprinted Polymers

    OpenAIRE

    Asman, Saliza; Mohamad, Sharifah; Sarih, Norazilawati

    2015-01-01

    Two types of reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer molecularly imprinted polymers (RAFT-MIPs) were synthesized using different monomers, which were methacrylic acid functionalized β-cyclodextrin (MAA-β-CD) and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate functionalized β-cyclodextrin (HEMA-β-CD), via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization, and were represented as RAFT-MIP(MAA-β-CD) and RAFT-MIP(HEMA-β-CD), respectively. Both RAFT-MIPs were systematically characterize...

  4. Interdependence of laminin-mediated clustering of lipid rafts and the dystrophin complex in astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noël, Geoffroy; Tham, Daniel Kai Long; Moukhles, Hakima

    2009-07-17

    Astrocyte endfeet surrounding blood vessels are active domains involved in water and potassium ion transport crucial to the maintenance of water and potassium ion homeostasis in brain. A growing body of evidence points to a role for dystroglycan and its interaction with perivascular laminin in the targeting of the dystrophin complex and the water-permeable channel, aquaporin 4 (AQP4), at astrocyte endfeet. However, the mechanisms underlying such compartmentalization remain poorly understood. In the present study we found that AQP4 resided in Triton X-100-insoluble fraction, whereas dystroglycan was recovered in the soluble fraction in astrocytes. Cholesterol depletion resulted in the translocation of a pool of AQP4 to the soluble fraction indicating that its distribution is indeed associated with cholesterol-rich membrane domains. Upon laminin treatment AQP4 and the dystrophin complex, including dystroglycan, reorganized into laminin-associated clusters enriched for the lipid raft markers GM1 and flotillin-1 but not caveolin-1. Reduced diffusion rates of GM1 in the laminin-induced clusters were indicative of the reorganization of raft components in these domains. In addition, both cholesterol depletion and dystroglycan silencing reduced the number and area of laminin-induced clusters of GM1, AQP4, and dystroglycan. These findings demonstrate the interdependence between laminin binding to dystroglycan and GM1-containing lipid raft reorganization and provide novel insight into the dystrophin complex regulation of AQP4 polarization in astrocytes.

  5. Chiral twist drives raft formation and organization in membranes composed of rod-like particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubensky, Tom C.

    2017-01-01

    Lipid rafts are hypothesized to facilitate protein interaction, tension regulation, and trafficking in biological membranes, but the mechanisms responsible for their formation and maintenance are not clear. Insights into many other condensed matter phenomena have come from colloidal systems, whose micron-scale particles mimic basic properties of atoms and molecules but permit dynamic visualization with single-particle resolution. Recently, experiments showed that bidisperse mixtures of filamentous viruses can self-assemble into colloidal monolayers with thermodynamically stable rafts exhibiting chiral structure and repulsive interactions. We quantitatively explain these observations by modeling the membrane particles as chiral liquid crystals. Chiral twist promotes the formation of finite-sized rafts and mediates a repulsion that distributes them evenly throughout the membrane. Although this system is composed of filamentous viruses whose aggregation is entropically driven by dextran depletants instead of phospholipids and cholesterol with prominent electrostatic interactions, colloidal and biological membranes share many of the same physical symmetries. Chiral twist can contribute to the behavior of both systems and may account for certain stereospecific effects observed in molecular membranes. PMID:27999184

  6. Effect of Dialkyl Ammonium Cationic Surfactants on the Microfluidity of Membranes Containing Raft Domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uyama, Makoto; Inoue, Kaori; Kinoshita, Koichi; Miyahara, Reiji; Yokoyama, Hirokazu; Nakano, Minoru

    2018-01-01

    It has been reported that a lot of receptors localize in lipid raft domains and that the microfluidity of these domains regulates the activation of these receptors. In this study, we focused on the lipid raft and in order to evaluate the physicochemical effects of surfactants on microfluidity of lipid membranes, we used liposomes comprising of egg-yolk L-α-phosphatidylcholine, egg-yolk sphingomyelin, and cholesterol as a model of cell membranes containing raft domains. The microfluidity of the domains was characterized by fluorescence spectrometry using 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene and 2-dimethylamino-6-lauroylnaphthalene. Among several surfactants, dialkylammonium-type cationic surfactants most efficiently increased the microfluidity. It is therefore concluded that (1) the electrostatic interaction between the cationic surfactant and eggPC/eggSM/cholesterol liposome could be important, (2) surfactants with alkyl chains more effectively inserted into membranes than those with acyl chains, and (3) cationic surfactants with lower T m values have a greater ability to increase the fluidity.

  7. Functional Proteomic Analysis of Lipid Raft Kinase Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    0.0 623 + + + + + IPI00219425 PVR Isoform Beta of Poliovirus receptor precursor Non-raft 9 86/372 + + + + + 19.0 1.5 12.7 17 3 5.7 21 0 70.0 1st EXP...Counts No. Prob. Both Acc.Number Gene Symbol Description Fraction Uni. Pep. IPI00219425 PVR Isoform Beta of Poliovirus receptor precursor Raft 2 25...372 + + 1.0 0.0 3.3 1 0 3.3 1 0 3.3 624 + + + + + IPI00022661 PVRL2 Isoform Delta of Poliovirus receptor-related protein 2 precursor Non-raft 7 92/538

  8. Generation of stable lipid raft microdomains in the enterocyte brush border by selective endocytic removal of non-raft membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Michael Danielsen

    Full Text Available The small intestinal brush border has an unusually high proportion of glycolipids which promote the formation of lipid raft microdomains, stabilized by various cross-linking lectins. This unique membrane organization acts to provide physical and chemical stability to the membrane that faces multiple deleterious agents present in the gut lumen, such as bile salts, digestive enzymes of the pancreas, and a plethora of pathogens. In the present work, we studied the constitutive endocytosis from the brush border of cultured jejunal explants of the pig, and the results indicate that this process functions to enrich the contents of lipid raft components in the brush border. The lipophilic fluorescent marker FM, taken up into early endosomes in the terminal web region (TWEEs, was absent from detergent resistant membranes (DRMs, implying an association with non-raft membrane. Furthermore, neither major lipid raft-associated brush border enzymes nor glycolipids were detected by immunofluorescence microscopy in subapical punctae resembling TWEEs. Finally, two model raft lipids, BODIPY-lactosylceramide and BODIPY-GM1, were not endocytosed except when cholera toxin subunit B (CTB was present. In conclusion, we propose that constitutive, selective endocytic removal of non-raft membrane acts as a sorting mechanism to enrich the brush border contents of lipid raft components, such as glycolipids and the major digestive enzymes. This sorting may be energetically driven by changes in membrane curvature when molecules move from a microvillar surface to an endocytic invagination.

  9. Generation of stable lipid raft microdomains in the enterocyte brush border by selective endocytic removal of non-raft membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielsen, E Michael; Hansen, Gert H

    2013-01-01

    The small intestinal brush border has an unusually high proportion of glycolipids which promote the formation of lipid raft microdomains, stabilized by various cross-linking lectins. This unique membrane organization acts to provide physical and chemical stability to the membrane that faces multiple deleterious agents present in the gut lumen, such as bile salts, digestive enzymes of the pancreas, and a plethora of pathogens. In the present work, we studied the constitutive endocytosis from the brush border of cultured jejunal explants of the pig, and the results indicate that this process functions to enrich the contents of lipid raft components in the brush border. The lipophilic fluorescent marker FM, taken up into early endosomes in the terminal web region (TWEEs), was absent from detergent resistant membranes (DRMs), implying an association with non-raft membrane. Furthermore, neither major lipid raft-associated brush border enzymes nor glycolipids were detected by immunofluorescence microscopy in subapical punctae resembling TWEEs. Finally, two model raft lipids, BODIPY-lactosylceramide and BODIPY-GM1, were not endocytosed except when cholera toxin subunit B (CTB) was present. In conclusion, we propose that constitutive, selective endocytic removal of non-raft membrane acts as a sorting mechanism to enrich the brush border contents of lipid raft components, such as glycolipids and the major digestive enzymes. This sorting may be energetically driven by changes in membrane curvature when molecules move from a microvillar surface to an endocytic invagination.

  10. Proposal to regulate human exposure limits to electromagnetic fields produced by cellular telephony systems in Costa Rica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez Lizano, Cristian; Calvo Horth, Gustavo; Dompe Gamboa, Pablo; Ramirez Rodriguez, David; Retana Duran, Elias; Gutierrez Chinchilla, Jose Alcides

    2008-01-01

    Modern society has presented an epic technology development in recent years, driven strongly by communications networks: from micro environments such as personal area networks passing by cell phone to the global Internet network. The communications established in real-time are increasingly, a necessary input. However, the growing demand for communications services and in particularly mobile phone, has meant that the environment is altered by the large number of signals generated by electromagnetic fields that transmit high volumes of energy, which saturate the electromagnetic spectrum, these waves of energy called no ionizing energy. The World Health Organization, through the International Energy Agency Nonionizing (ICNIRP for its acronym in English), has conducted in recent years researches on the effects of the health of people exposed to nonionizing energy; also, have existed proposals regulating these exposure levels. Nonionizing electromagnetic fields are investigated, focusing on transmitting equipment for mobile phone systems in Costa Rica and electromagnetic safety criteria of exposure, both occupational as of general public. The electromagnetism basic concepts and parameters related with nonionizing radiations research are referenced, among them can be mentioned the relationship between the electric field E, the magnetic field H and the power density S. Other concepts such as near-field region, far-field region, exposure zones and specified absorption rate SAR, are also defined. A mathematical fundament is presented showing the relationships between the concepts explained. Guidelines for calculating the power density are provided by means of a theoretical estimate from parameters of transmitting equipment. Also, the procedures for calculating the spatial and temporal averaging are set out and a brief overview is made of epidemiological and biological effects caused by radio frequency radiation. The existing rules at the international level are analyzed to

  11. Alternative oxidase pathway optimizes photosynthesis during osmotic and temperature stress by regulating cellular ROS, malate valve and antioxidative systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DINAKAR eCHALLABATHULA

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study reveals the importance of alternative oxidase (AOX pathway in optimizing photosynthesis under osmotic and temperature stress conditions in the mesophyll protoplasts of Pisum sativum. The responses of photosynthesis and respiration were monitored at saturating light intensity of 1000 µmoles m-2 s-1 at 25 oC under a range of sorbitol concentrations from 0.4 M to 1.0M to induce hyper-osmotic stress and by varying the temperature of the thermo-jacketed pre-incubation chamber from 25 oC to 10 oC to impose sub-optimal temperature stress. Compared to controls (0.4 M sorbitol and 25 OC, the mesophyll protoplasts showed remarkable decrease in NaHCO3-dependent O2 evolution (indicator of photosynthetic carbon assimilation, under both hyper-osmotic (1.0 M sorbitol and sub-optimal temperature stress conditions (10 OC, while the decrease in rates of respiratory O2 uptake were marginal. The capacity of AOX pathway increased significantly in parallel to increase in intracellular pyruvate and reactive oxygen species (ROS levels under both hyper-osmotic stress and sub-optimal temperature stress under the background of saturating light. The ratio of redox couple (Malate/OAA related to malate valve increased in contrast to the ratio of redox couple (GSH/GSSG related to antioxidative system during hyper-osmotic stress. Nevertheless, the ratio of GSH/GSSG decreased in the presence of sub-optimal temperature, while the ratio of Malate/OAA showed no visible changes. Also, the redox ratios of pyridine nucleotides increased under hyper-osmotic (NADH/NAD and sub-optimal temperature (NADPH/NADP stresses, respectively. However, upon restriction of AOX pathway by using salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM, the observed changes in NaHCO3 dependent O2 evolution, cellular ROS, redox ratios of Malate/OAA, NAD(PH/NAD(P and GSH/GSSG were further aggravated under stress conditions with concomitant modulations in NADP-MDH and antioxidant enzymes. Taken together, the

  12. CK2 phosphorylation of Schistosoma mansoni HMGB1 protein regulates its cellular traffic and secretion but not its DNA transactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Abreu da Silva, Isabel Caetano; Carneiro, Vitor Coutinho; Maciel, Renata de Moraes; da Costa, Rodrigo Furtado Madeiro; Furtado, Daniel Rodrigues; de Oliveira, Francisco Meirelles Bastos; da Silva-Neto, Mário Alberto Cardoso; Rumjanek, Franklin David; Fantappié, Marcelo Rosado

    2011-01-01

    The helminth Schistosoma mansoni parasite resides in mesenteric veins where fecundated female worms lay hundred of eggs daily. Some of the egg antigens are trapped in the liver and induce a vigorous granulomatous response. High Mobility Group Box 1 (HMGB1), a nuclear factor, can also be secreted and act as a cytokine. Schistosome HMGB1 (SmHMGB1) is secreted by the eggs and stimulate the production of key cytokines involved in the pathology of schistosomiasis. Thus, understanding the mechanism of SmHMGB1 release becomes mandatory. Here, we addressed the question of how the nuclear SmHMGB1 can reach the extracellular space. We showed in vitro and in vivo that CK2 phosphorylation was involved in the nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of SmHMGB1. By site-directed mutagenesis we mapped the two serine residues of SmHMGB1 that were phosphorylated by CK2. By DNA bending and supercoiling assays we showed that CK2 phosphorylation of SmHMGB1 had no effect in the DNA binding activities of the protein. We showed by electron microscopy, as well as by cell transfection and fluorescence microscopy that SmHMGB1 was present in the nucleus and cytoplasm of adult schistosomes and mammalian cells. In addition, we showed that treatments of the cells with either a phosphatase or a CK2 inhibitor were able to enhance or block, respectively, the cellular traffic of SmHMGB1. Importantly, we showed by confocal microscopy and biochemically that SmHMGB1 is significantly secreted by S. mansoni eggs of infected animals and that SmHMGB1 that were localized in the periovular schistosomotic granuloma were phosphorylated. We showed that secretion of SmHMGB1 is regulated by phosphorylation. Moreover, our results suggest that egg-secreted SmHMGB1 may represent a new egg antigen. Therefore, the identification of drugs that specifically target phosphorylation of SmHMGB1 might block its secretion and interfere with the pathogenesis of schistosomiasis.

  13. CK2 phosphorylation of Schistosoma mansoni HMGB1 protein regulates its cellular traffic and secretion but not its DNA transactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Caetano de Abreu da Silva

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The helminth Schistosoma mansoni parasite resides in mesenteric veins where fecundated female worms lay hundred of eggs daily. Some of the egg antigens are trapped in the liver and induce a vigorous granulomatous response. High Mobility Group Box 1 (HMGB1, a nuclear factor, can also be secreted and act as a cytokine. Schistosome HMGB1 (SmHMGB1 is secreted by the eggs and stimulate the production of key cytokines involved in the pathology of schistosomiasis. Thus, understanding the mechanism of SmHMGB1 release becomes mandatory. Here, we addressed the question of how the nuclear SmHMGB1 can reach the extracellular space. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We showed in vitro and in vivo that CK2 phosphorylation was involved in the nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of SmHMGB1. By site-directed mutagenesis we mapped the two serine residues of SmHMGB1 that were phosphorylated by CK2. By DNA bending and supercoiling assays we showed that CK2 phosphorylation of SmHMGB1 had no effect in the DNA binding activities of the protein. We showed by electron microscopy, as well as by cell transfection and fluorescence microscopy that SmHMGB1 was present in the nucleus and cytoplasm of adult schistosomes and mammalian cells. In addition, we showed that treatments of the cells with either a phosphatase or a CK2 inhibitor were able to enhance or block, respectively, the cellular traffic of SmHMGB1. Importantly, we showed by confocal microscopy and biochemically that SmHMGB1 is significantly secreted by S. mansoni eggs of infected animals and that SmHMGB1 that were localized in the periovular schistosomotic granuloma were phosphorylated. CONCLUSIONS: We showed that secretion of SmHMGB1 is regulated by phosphorylation. Moreover, our results suggest that egg-secreted SmHMGB1 may represent a new egg antigen. Therefore, the identification of drugs that specifically target phosphorylation of SmHMGB1 might block its secretion and interfere with the pathogenesis of schistosomiasis.

  14. optimizing conventional des concrete raft ng conventional design

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    concrete cross section area of raft slab foundation ... accurately modeling boundary cond never be ... the design of reinforced concrete flat ... undation and soil layer configuration adopted for the finite element analy .... After the application of.

  15. The emergence of extracellular matrix mechanics and cell traction forces as important regulators of cellular self-organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checa, Sara; Rausch, Manuel K; Petersen, Ansgar; Kuhl, Ellen; Duda, Georg N

    2015-01-01

    Physical cues play a fundamental role in a wide range of biological processes, such as embryogenesis, wound healing, tumour invasion and connective tissue morphogenesis. Although it is well known that during these processes, cells continuously interact with the local extracellular matrix (ECM) through cell traction forces, the role of these mechanical interactions on large scale cellular and matrix organization remains largely unknown. In this study, we use a simple theoretical model to investigate cellular and matrix organization as a result of mechanical feedback signals between cells and the surrounding ECM. The model includes bi-directional coupling through cellular traction forces to deform the ECM and through matrix deformation to trigger cellular migration. In addition, we incorporate the mechanical contribution of matrix fibres and their reorganization by the cells. We show that a group of contractile cells will self-polarize at a large scale, even in homogeneous environments. In addition, our simulations mimic the experimentally observed alignment of cells in the direction of maximum stiffness and the building up of tension as a consequence of cell and fibre reorganization. Moreover, we demonstrate that cellular organization is tightly linked to the mechanical feedback loop between cells and matrix. Cells with a preference for stiff environments have a tendency to form chains, while cells with a tendency for soft environments tend to form clusters. The model presented here illustrates the potential of simple physical cues and their impact on cellular self-organization. It can be used in applications where cell-matrix interactions play a key role, such as in the design of tissue engineering scaffolds and to gain a basic understanding of pattern formation in organogenesis or tissue regeneration.

  16. Rac1-mediated membrane raft localization of PI3K/p110β is required for its activation by GPCRs or PTEN loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cizmecioglu, Onur; Ni, Jing; Xie, Shaozhen; Zhao, Jean J; Roberts, Thomas M

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to understand how spatial compartmentalization in the plasma membrane might contribute to the functions of the ubiquitous class IA phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) isoforms, p110α and p110β. We found that p110β localizes to membrane rafts in a Rac1-dependent manner. This localization potentiates Akt activation by G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Thus genetic targeting of a Rac1 binding-deficient allele of p110β to rafts alleviated the requirement for p110β-Rac1 association for GPCR signaling, cell growth and migration. In contrast, p110α, which does not play a physiological role in GPCR signaling, is found to reside in nonraft regions of the plasma membrane. Raft targeting of p110α allowed its EGFR-mediated activation by GPCRs. Notably, p110β dependent, PTEN null tumor cells critically rely upon raft-associated PI3K activity. Collectively, our findings provide a mechanistic account of how membrane raft localization regulates differential activation of distinct PI3K isoforms and offer insight into why PTEN-deficient cancers depend on p110β. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17635.001 PMID:27700986

  17. The human ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Cdc34 controls cellular proliferation through regulation of p27Kip1 protein levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butz, Nicole; Ruetz, Stephan; Natt, Francois; Hall, Jonathan; Weiler, Jan; Mestan, Juergen; Ducarre, Monique; Grossenbacher, Rita; Hauser, Patrick; Kempf, Dominique; Hofmann, Francesco

    2005-01-01

    Ubiquitin-mediated degradation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27 Kip1 was shown to be required for the activation of key cyclin-dependent kinases, thereby triggering the onset of DNA replication and cell cycle progression. Although the SCF Skp2 ubiquitin ligase has been reported to mediate p27 Kip1 degradation, the nature of the human ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme involved in this process has not yet been determined at the cellular level. Here, we show that antisense oligonucleotides targeting the human ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Cdc34 downregulate its expression, inhibit the degradation of p27 Kip1 , and prevent cellular proliferation. Elevation of p27 Kip1 protein level is found to be the sole requirement for the inhibition of cellular proliferation induced upon downregulation of Cdc34. Indeed, reducing the expression of p27 Kip1 with a specific antisense oligonucleotide is sufficient to reverse the anti-proliferative phenotype elicited by the Cdc34 antisense. Furthermore, downregulation of Cdc34 is found to specifically increase the abundance of the SCF Skp2 ubiquitin ligase substrate p27 Kip1 , but has no concomitant effect on the level of IkBα and β-catenin, which are known substrates of a closely related SCF ligase

  18. Curcumin exhibits anti-tumor effect and attenuates cellular migration via Slit-2 mediated down-regulation of SDF-1 and CXCR4 in endometrial adenocarcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirohi, Vijay Kumar; Popli, Pooja; Sankhwar, Pushplata; Kaushal, Jyoti Bala; Gupta, Kanchan; Manohar, Murli; Dwivedi, Anila

    2017-06-01

    Although curcumin shows anti-proliferative and anti-inflammatory activities in various cancers, the effect of curcumin on cellular migration in endometrial adenocarcinoma cells remains to be understood. The current investigation was aimed to explore the anti-proliferative and anti-migratory effects of curcumin and its mechanism of action in endometrial cancer cells. Our in-vitro and in-vivo experimental studies showed that curcumin inhibited the proliferation of endometrial cancer cells and suppressed the tumor growth in Ishikawa xenograft mouse model. Curcumin induced ROS-mediated apoptosis in endometrial cancer cells. Curcumin suppressed the migration rate of Ishikawa and Hec-1B cells as analyzed by scratch wound assay. In transwell migration studies, knock down of Slit-2 reversed the anti-migratory effect of curcumin in these cell lines. Curcumin significantly up-regulated the expression of Slit-2 in Ishikawa, Hec-1B and primary endometrial cancer cells while it down-regulated the expression of stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) and CXCR4 which in turn, suppressed the expression of matrix metallopeptidases (MMP) 2 and 9, thus attenuating the migration of endometrial cancer cells. In summary, we have demonstrated that curcumin has inhibitory effect on cellular migration via Slit-2 mediated down-regulation of CXCR4, SDF-1, and MMP2/MMP9 in endometrial carcinoma cells. These findings helped explore the role of Slit-2 in endometrial cancer cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Generation of organotypic raft cultures from primary human keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anacker, Daniel; Moody, Cary

    2012-02-22

    The development of organotypic epithelial raft cultures has provided researchers with an efficient in vitro system that faithfully recapitulates epithelial differentiation. There are many uses for this system. For instance, the ability to grow three-dimensional organotypic raft cultures of keratinocytes has been an important milestone in the study of human papillomavirus (HPV)(1). The life cycle of HPV is tightly linked to the differentiation of squamous epithelium(2). Organotypic epithelial raft cultures as demonstrated here reproduce the entire papillomavirus life cycle, including virus production(3,4,5). In addition, these raft cultures exhibit dysplastic lesions similar to those observed upon in vivo infection with HPV. Hence this system can also be used to study epithelial cell cancers, as well as the effect of drugs on epithelial cell differentiation in general. Originally developed by Asselineau and Prunieras(6) and modified by Kopan et al.(7), the organotypic epithelial raft culture system has matured into a general, relatively easy culture model, which involves the growth of cells on collagen plugs maintained at an air-liquid interface (Figure 1A). Over the course of 10-14 days, the cells stratify and differentiate, forming a full thickness epithelium that produces differentiation-specific cytokeratins. Harvested rafts can be examined histologically, as well as by standard molecular and biochemical techniques. In this article, we describe a method for the generation of raft cultures from primary human keratinocytes. The same technique can be used with established epithelial cell lines, and can easily be adapted for use with epithelial tissue from normal or diseased biopsies(8). Many viruses target either the cutaneous or mucosal epithelium as part of their replicative life cycle. Over the past several years, the feasibility of using organotypic raft cultures as a method of studying virus-host cell interactions has been shown for several herpesviruses, as

  20. High temperature initiator-free RAFT polymerization of methyl methacrylate in a microwave reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paulus, R.M.; Becer, C.R.; Hoogenboom, R.; Schubert, U.S.

    2009-01-01

    The reversible additionfragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA) was investigated under microwave irradiation. At first, a comparison was made between microwave and thermal heating for the RAFT polymerization of MMA with azobis(isobutyronitrile) (AIBN) as

  1. Preparation of thermo-responsive graft copolymer by using a novel macro-RAFT agent and its application for drug delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Cunfeng; Yu, Shirong [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Materials, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Liu, Cheng; Deng, Yuanming; Xu, Yiting [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Materials, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Fujian Provincial Key Laboratory of Fire Retardant Materials, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Chen, Xiaoling, E-mail: tinachen0628@163.com [Department of Endodontics, Xiamen Stomatology Hospital, Teaching Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Xiamen 361003 (China); Dai, Lizong, E-mail: lzdai@xmu.edu.cn [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Materials, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Fujian Provincial Key Laboratory of Fire Retardant Materials, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China)

    2016-05-01

    A methodology to prepare thermo-responsive graft copolymer by using a novel macro-RAFT agent was proposed. The macro-RAFT agent with pendant dithioester (ZC(S)SR) was facilely prepared via the combination of RAFT polymerization and esterification reaction. By means of ZC(S)SR-initiated RAFT polymerization, the thermo-responsive graft copolymer consisting of poly(methyl methacrylate-co-hydroxylethyl methacrylate) (P(MMA-co-HEMA)) backbone and hydrophilic poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) side chains was constructed through the “grafting from” approach. The chemical compositions and molecular weight distributions of the synthesized polymers were respectively characterized by {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 1}H NMR) and gel permeation chromatography (GPC). Self-assembly behavior of the amphiphilic graft copolymers (P(MMA-co-HEMA)-g-PNIPAAm) was studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and spectrofluorimeter. The critical micelle concentration (CMC) value was 0.052 mg mL{sup −1}. These micelles have thermo-responsibility and a low critical solution temperature (LCST) of 33.5 °C. Further investigation indicated that the guest molecule release property of these micelles, which can be well described by a first-order kinetic model, was significantly affected by temperature. Besides, the micelles exhibited excellent biocompatibility and cellular uptake property. Hence, these micelles are considered to have potential application in controlled drug delivery. - Highlights: • A novel macro-RAFT agent with ZC(S)SR was used for preparing graft copolymer. • P(MMA-co-HEMA)-g-PNIPAAm was successful prepared via the “grafting from” approach. • Thermo-responsibility of the P(MMA-co-HEMA)-g-PNIPAAm micelles was investigated. • The drug release behavior of the P(MMA-co-HEMA)-g-PNIPAAm micelles was studied. • These micelles exhibited excellent biocompatibility and cellular uptake property.

  2. Preparation of thermo-responsive graft copolymer by using a novel macro-RAFT agent and its application for drug delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Cunfeng; Yu, Shirong; Liu, Cheng; Deng, Yuanming; Xu, Yiting; Chen, Xiaoling; Dai, Lizong

    2016-01-01

    A methodology to prepare thermo-responsive graft copolymer by using a novel macro-RAFT agent was proposed. The macro-RAFT agent with pendant dithioester (ZC(S)SR) was facilely prepared via the combination of RAFT polymerization and esterification reaction. By means of ZC(S)SR-initiated RAFT polymerization, the thermo-responsive graft copolymer consisting of poly(methyl methacrylate-co-hydroxylethyl methacrylate) (P(MMA-co-HEMA)) backbone and hydrophilic poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) side chains was constructed through the “grafting from” approach. The chemical compositions and molecular weight distributions of the synthesized polymers were respectively characterized by "1H nuclear magnetic resonance ("1H NMR) and gel permeation chromatography (GPC). Self-assembly behavior of the amphiphilic graft copolymers (P(MMA-co-HEMA)-g-PNIPAAm) was studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and spectrofluorimeter. The critical micelle concentration (CMC) value was 0.052 mg mL"−"1. These micelles have thermo-responsibility and a low critical solution temperature (LCST) of 33.5 °C. Further investigation indicated that the guest molecule release property of these micelles, which can be well described by a first-order kinetic model, was significantly affected by temperature. Besides, the micelles exhibited excellent biocompatibility and cellular uptake property. Hence, these micelles are considered to have potential application in controlled drug delivery. - Highlights: • A novel macro-RAFT agent with ZC(S)SR was used for preparing graft copolymer. • P(MMA-co-HEMA)-g-PNIPAAm was successful prepared via the “grafting from” approach. • Thermo-responsibility of the P(MMA-co-HEMA)-g-PNIPAAm micelles was investigated. • The drug release behavior of the P(MMA-co-HEMA)-g-PNIPAAm micelles was studied. • These micelles exhibited excellent biocompatibility and cellular uptake property.

  3. RAFT: a computer program for fault tree risk calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seybold, G.D.

    1977-11-01

    A description and user instructions are presented for RAFT, a FORTRAN computer code for calculation of a risk measure for fault tree cut sets. RAFT calculates release quantities and a risk measure based on the product of probability and release quantity for cut sets of fault trees modeling the accidental release of radioactive material from a nuclear fuel cycle facility. Cut sets and their probabilities are supplied as input to RAFT from an external fault tree analysis code. Using the total inventory available of radioactive material, along with release fractions for each event in a cut set, the release terms are calculated for each cut set. Each release term is multiplied by the cut set probability to yield the cut set risk measure. RAFT orders the dominant cut sets on the risk measure. The total risk measure of processed cut sets and their fractional contributions are supplied as output. Input options are available to eliminate redundant cut sets, apply threshold values on cut set probability and risk, and control the total number of cut sets output. Hash addressing is used to remove redundant cut sets from the analysis. Computer hardware and software restrictions are given along with a sample problem and cross-reference table of the code. Except for the use of file management utilities, RAFT is written exclusively in FORTRAN language and is operational on a Control Data, CYBER 74-18--series computer system. 4 figures

  4. Overexpression of FurA in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 reveals new targets for this regulator involved in photosynthesis, iron uptake and cellular morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Andrés; Bes, M Teresa; Barja, François; Peleato, M Luisa; Fillat, María F

    2010-11-01

    Previous genomic analyses of the filamentous nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 have identified three ferric uptake regulator (Fur) homologs with low sequence identities and probably different functions in the cell. FurA is a constitutive protein that shares the highest homology with Fur from heterotrophic bacteria and appears to be essential for in vitro growth. In this study, we have analysed the effects of FurA overexpression on the Anabaena sp. phenotype and investigated which of the observed alterations were directly operated by FurA. Overexpression of the regulator led to changes in cellular morphology, resulting in shorter filaments with rounded cells of different sizes. The furA-overexpressing strain showed a slower photoautotrophic growth and a marked decrease in the oxygen evolution rate. Overexpression of the regulator also decreased both catalase and superoxide dismutase activities, but did not lead to an increase in the levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species. By combining phenotypic studies, reverse transcription-PCR analyses and electrophoretic mobility shift assays, we identified three novel direct targets of FurA, including genes encoding a siderophore outer membrane transporter (schT), bacterial actins (mreBCD) and the PSII reaction center protein D1 (psbA). The affinity of FurA for these novel targets was markedly affected by the absence of divalent metal ions, confirming previous evidence of a critical role for the metal co-repressor in the function of the regulator in vivo. The results unravel new cellular processes modulated by FurA, supporting its role as a global transcriptional regulator in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120.

  5. Research status of wave energy conversion (WEC) device of raft structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jianguo; Gao, Jingwei; Tao, Liang; Zheng, Peng

    2017-10-01

    This paper has briefly described the concept of wave energy generation and six typical conversion devices. As for raft structure, detailed analysis is provided from its development process to typical devices. Taking the design process and working principle of Plamis as an example, the general principle of raft structure is briefly described. After that, a variety of raft structure models are introduced. Finally, the advantages and disadvantages, and development trend of raft structure are pointed out.

  6. The CPT1C 5'UTR contains a repressing upstream open reading frame that is regulated by cellular energy availability and AMPK.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Lohse

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Translational control is utilized as a means of regulating gene expression in many species. In most cases, posttranscriptional regulatory mechanisms play an important role in stress response pathways and can lead to dysfunctional physiology if blocked by mutations. Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase 1 C (CPT1C, the brain-specific member of the CPT 1 family, has previously been shown to be involved in regulating metabolism in situations of energy surplus. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Sequence analysis of the CPT1C mRNA revealed that it contains an upstream open reading frame (uORF in the 5' UTR of its mRNA. Using CPT1C 5' UTR/luciferase constructs, we investigated the role of the uORF in translational regulation. The results presented here show that translation from the CPT1C main open reading frame (mORF is repressed by the presence of the uORF, that this repression is relieved in response to specific stress stimuli, namely glucose deprivation and palmitate-BSA treatment, and that AMPK inhibition can relieve this uORF-dependent repression. SIGNIFICANCE: The fact that the mORF regulation is relieved in response to a specific set of stress stimuli rather than general stress response, hints at an involvement of CPT1C in cellular energy-sensing pathways and provides further evidence for a role of CPT1C in hypothalamic regulation of energy homeostasis.

  7. Radiation-induced controlled polymerization of acrylic acid by RAFT and RAFT-MADIX methods in protic solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sütekin, S. Duygu; Güven, Olgun

    2018-01-01

    The kinetic investigation of one-pot synthesis of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) prepared via gamma radiation induced controlled polymerization was reported. PAA homopolymers were prepared by Reversible Addition-Fragmentation Chain Transfer (RAFT) polymerization in the presence of trithiocarbonate-based chain transfer agent (CTA) 2-(Dodecylthiocarbonothioylthio)-2-methylpropionic acid (DDMAT) and also by Reversible Addition-Fragmentation/Macromolecular Design by Inter-change of Xanthates (RAFT/MADIX) polymerization in the presence of a xanthate based CTA O-ethyl-S-(1-methoxycarbonyl) ethyl dithiocarbonate (RA1). The polymerizations were performed at room temperature by the virtue of ionizing radiation. Protic solvents were used for the RAFT polymerization of AA considering environmental profits. The linear first-order kinetic plot, close control of molecular weight by the monomer/CTA molar ratio supported that the polymerization proceeds in a living fashion. The linear increase in molecular weight with conversion monitored by Size Exclusion Chromatography (SEC) is another proof of controlling of polymerization. [Monomer]/[RAFT] ratio and conversion was controlled to obtain PAA in the molecular weight range of 6900-35,800 with narrow molecular weight distributions. Reaction kinetics and effect of the amount of RAFT agent were investigated in detail. Between two different types of CTA, trithiocarbonate based DDMAT was found to be more efficient in terms of low dispersity (Đ) and linear first-order kinetic behavior for the radiation induced controlled synthesis of PAA homopolymers.

  8. Raft-like membrane domains in pathogenic microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnoud, Amir M; Toledo, Alvaro M; Konopka, James B; Del Poeta, Maurizio; London, Erwin

    2015-01-01

    The lipid bilayer of the plasma membrane is thought to be compartmentalized by the presence of lipid-protein microdomains. In eukaryotic cells, microdomains composed of sterols and sphingolipids, commonly known as lipid rafts, are believed to exist, and reports on the presence of sterol- or protein-mediated microdomains in bacterial cell membranes are also appearing. Despite increasing attention, little is known about microdomains in the plasma membrane of pathogenic microorganisms. This review attempts to provide an overview of the current state of knowledge of lipid rafts in pathogenic fungi and bacteria. The current literature on characterization of microdomains in pathogens is reviewed, and their potential role in growth, pathogenesis, and drug resistance is discussed. Better insight into the structure and function of membrane microdomains in pathogenic microorganisms might lead to a better understanding of their pathogenesis and development of raft-mediated approaches for therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Rapid, long-distance dispersal by pumice rafting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott E Bryan

    Full Text Available Pumice is an extremely effective rafting agent that can dramatically increase the dispersal range of a variety of marine organisms and connect isolated shallow marine and coastal ecosystems. Here we report on a significant recent pumice rafting and long-distance dispersal event that occurred across the southwest Pacific following the 2006 explosive eruption of Home Reef Volcano in Tonga. We have constrained the trajectory, and rate, biomass and biodiversity of transfer, discovering more than 80 species and a substantial biomass underwent a >5000 km journey in 7-8 months. Differing microenvironmental conditions on the pumice, caused by relative stability of clasts at the sea surface, promoted diversity in biotic recruitment. Our findings emphasise pumice rafting as an important process facilitating the distribution of marine life, which have implications for colonisation processes and success, the management of sensitive marine environments, and invasive pest species.

  10. With or without rafts? Alternative views on cell membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevcsik, Eva; Schütz, Gerhard J

    2016-02-01

    The fundamental mechanisms of protein and lipid organization at the plasma membrane have continued to engage researchers for decades. Among proposed models, one idea has been particularly successful which assumes that sterol-dependent nanoscopic phases of different lipid chain order compartmentalize proteins, thereby modulating protein functionality. This model of membrane rafts has sustainably sparked the fields of membrane biophysics and biology, and shifted membrane lipids into the spotlight of research; by now, rafts have become an integral part of our terminology to describe a variety of cell biological processes. But is the evidence clear enough to continue supporting a theoretical concept which has resisted direct proof by observation for nearly twenty years? In this essay, we revisit findings that gave rise to and substantiated the raft hypothesis, discuss its impact on recent studies, and present alternative mechanisms to account for plasma membrane heterogeneity. © 2015 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Preparation of thermo-responsive graft copolymer by using a novel macro-RAFT agent and its application for drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Cunfeng; Yu, Shirong; Liu, Cheng; Deng, Yuanming; Xu, Yiting; Chen, Xiaoling; Dai, Lizong

    2016-05-01

    A methodology to prepare thermo-responsive graft copolymer by using a novel macro-RAFT agent was proposed. The macro-RAFT agent with pendant dithioester (ZC(S)SR) was facilely prepared via the combination of RAFT polymerization and esterification reaction. By means of ZC(S)SR-initiated RAFT polymerization, the thermo-responsive graft copolymer consisting of poly(methyl methacrylate-co-hydroxylethyl methacrylate) (P(MMA-co-HEMA)) backbone and hydrophilic poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) side chains was constructed through the "grafting from" approach. The chemical compositions and molecular weight distributions of the synthesized polymers were respectively characterized by (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) and gel permeation chromatography (GPC). Self-assembly behavior of the amphiphilic graft copolymers (P(MMA-co-HEMA)-g-PNIPAAm) was studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and spectrofluorimeter. The critical micelle concentration (CMC) value was 0.052 mg mL(-1). These micelles have thermo-responsibility and a low critical solution temperature (LCST) of 33.5°C. Further investigation indicated that the guest molecule release property of these micelles, which can be well described by a first-order kinetic model, was significantly affected by temperature. Besides, the micelles exhibited excellent biocompatibility and cellular uptake property. Hence, these micelles are considered to have potential application in controlled drug delivery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Social stress engages opioid regulation of locus coeruleus norepinephrine neurons and induces a state of cellular and physical opiate dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaijale, Nayla N; Curtis, Andre L; Wood, Susan K; Zhang, Xiao-Yan; Bhatnagar, Seema; Reyes, Beverly As; Van Bockstaele, Elisabeth J; Valentino, Rita J

    2013-09-01

    Stress is implicated in diverse psychiatric disorders including substance abuse. The locus coeruleus-norepinephrine (LC-NE) system is a major stress response system that is also a point of intersection between stress neuromediators and endogenous opioids and so may be a site at which stress can influence drug-taking behaviors. As social stress is a common stressor for humans, this study characterized the enduring impact of repeated social stress on LC neuronal activity. Rats were exposed to five daily consecutive sessions of social stress using the resident-intruder model or control manipulation. LC discharge rate recorded 2 days after the last manipulation was decreased in stressed rats compared with controls. By 10 days after the last manipulation, LC rates were comparable between groups. Systemic administration of the opiate antagonist, naloxone, robustly increased LC discharge rate in a manner suggestive of opiate withdrawal, selectively in stressed rats when administered 2 or 10 days after the last manipulation. This was accompanied by behavioral signs of mild opiate withdrawal. Western blot and electron microscopic studies indicated that repeated social stress decreased corticotropin-releasing factor type 1 receptor and increased μ-opioid receptor levels in the LC. Together, the results suggest that repeated social stress engages endogenous opioid modulation of LC activity and induces signs of cellular and physical opiate dependence that endure after the stress. These cellular effects may predispose individuals with a history of repeated social stress to substance abuse behaviors.

  13. RAFT technology for the production of advanced photoresist polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Michael T.; Farnham, William B.; Okazaki, Hiroshi; Sounik, James R.; Clark, George

    2008-03-01

    Reversible Addition Fragmentation Chain Transfer (RAFT) technology has been developed for use in producing high yield low polydispersity (PD) polymers for many applications. RAFT technology is being used to produce low PD polymers and to allow control of the polymer architecture. A variety of polymers are being synthesized for use in advanced photoresists using this technique. By varying the RAFT reagent used we can modulate the system reactivity of the RAFT reagent and optimize it for use in acrylate or methacrylate monomer systems (193 and 193i photoresist polymers) or for use in styrenic monomer systems (248 nm photoresist polymers) to achieve PD as low as 1.05. RAFT polymerization technology also allows us to produce block copolymers using a wide variety of monomers. These block copolymers have been shown to be useful in self assembly polymer applications to produce unique and very small feature sizes. The mutual compatibilities of all the components within a single layer 193 photoresist are very important in order to achieve low LWR and low defect count. The advent of immersion imaging demands an additional element of protection at the solid/liquid interface. We have used RAFT technology to produce block copolymers comprising a random "resist" block with composition and size based on conventional dry photoresist materials, and a "low surface energy" block for use in 193i lithography. The relative block lengths and compositions may be varied to tune solution behavior, surface energy, contact angles, and solubility in developer. The use of this technique will be explored to produce polymers used in hydrophobic single layer resists as well as additives compatible with the main photoresist polymer.

  14. Lysophosphatidic acid signaling via LPA{sub 1} and LPA{sub 3} regulates cellular functions during tumor progression in pancreatic cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukushima, Kaori; Takahashi, Kaede; Yamasaki, Eri; Onishi, Yuka [Division of Molecular Oncology, Department of Life Science, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Kindai University, 3-4-1, Kowakae, Higashiosaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Fukushima, Nobuyuki [Division of Molecular Neurobiology, Department of Life Science, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Kindai University, 3-4-1, Kowakae, Higashiosaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Honoki, Kanya [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijo-cho, Kashihara, Nara 634-8521 (Japan); Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi, E-mail: ttujiuch@life.kindai.ac.jp [Division of Molecular Oncology, Department of Life Science, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Kindai University, 3-4-1, Kowakae, Higashiosaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan)

    2017-03-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling via G protein-coupled LPA receptors exhibits a variety of biological effects, such as cell proliferation, motility and differentiation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the roles of LPA{sub 1} and LPA{sub 3} in cellular functions during tumor progression in pancreatic cancer cells. LPA{sub 1} and LPA{sub 3} knockdown cells were generated from PANC-1 cells. The cell motile and invasive activities of PANC-1 cells were inhibited by LPA{sub 1} and LPA{sub 3} knockdown. In gelatin zymography, LPA{sub 1} and LPA{sub 3} knockdown cells indicated the low activation of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) in the presence of LPA. Next, to assess whether LPA{sub 1} and LPA{sub 3} regulate cellular functions induced by anticancer drug, PANC-1 cells were treated with cisplatin (CDDP) for approximately 6 months. The cell motile and invasive activities of long-term CDDP treated cells were markedly higher than those of PANC-1 cells, correlating with the expression levels of LPAR1 and LPAR3 genes. In soft agar assay, the long-term CDDP treated cells formed markedly large sized colonies. In addition, the cell motile and invasive activities enhanced by CDDP were significantly suppressed by LPA{sub 1} and LPA{sub 3} knockdown as well as colony formation. These results suggest that LPA signaling via LPA{sub 1} and LPA{sub 3} play an important role in the regulation of cellular functions during tumor progression in PANC-1 cells. - Highlights: • The cell motile and invasive activities of PANC-1 cells were stimulated by LPA{sub 1} and LPA{sub 3}. • LPA{sub 1} and LPA{sub 3} enhanced MMP-2 activation in PANC-1 cells. • The expressions of LPAR1 and LPAR3 genes were elevated in PANC-1 cells treated with cisplatin. • The cell motile and invasive activities of PANC-1 cells treated with cisplatin were suppressed by LPA{sub 1} and LPA{sub 3} knockdown. • LPA{sub 1} and LPA{sub 3} are involved in the regulation of cellular functions during tumor

  15. Compound C prevents Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α protein stabilization by regulating the cellular oxygen availability via interaction with Mitochondrial Complex I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagen Thilo

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The transcription factor Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α is a master regulator of the cellular response to low oxygen concentration. Compound C, an inhibitor of AMP-activated kinase, has been reported to inhibit hypoxia dependent Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α activation via a mechanism that is independent of AMP-activated kinase but dependent on its interaction with the mitochondrial electron transport chain. The objective of this study is to characterize the interaction of Compound C with the mitochondrial electron transport chain and to determine the mechanism through which the drug influences the stability of the Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α protein. We found that Compound C functions as an inhibitor of complex I of the mitochondrial electron transport chain as demonstrated by its effect on mitochondrial respiration. It also prevents hypoxia-induced Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α stabilization in a dose dependent manner. In addition, Compound C does not have significant effects on reactive oxygen species production from complex I via both forward and reverse electron flux. This study provides evidence that similar to other mitochondrial electron transport chain inhibitors, Compound C regulates Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α stability by controlling the cellular oxygen concentration.

  16. Yeast two-hybrid screens imply involvement of Fanconi anemia proteins in transcription regulation, cell signaling, oxidative metabolism, and cellular transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Tanja Y; Medhurst, Annette L; Waisfisz, Quinten; Zhi, Yu; Herterich, Sabine; Hoehn, Holger; Gross, Hans J; Joenje, Hans; Hoatlin, Maureen E; Mathew, Christopher G; Huber, Pia A J

    2003-10-01

    Mutations in one of at least eight different genes cause bone marrow failure, chromosome instability, and predisposition to cancer associated with the rare genetic syndrome Fanconi anemia (FA). The cloning of seven genes has provided the tools to study the molecular pathway disrupted in Fanconi anemia patients. The structure of the genes and their gene products provided few clues to their functional role. We report here the use of 3 FA proteins, FANCA, FANCC, and FANCG, as "baits" in the hunt for interactors to obtain clues for FA protein functions. Using five different human cDNA libraries we screened 36.5x10(6) clones with the technique of the yeast two-hybrid system. We identified 69 proteins which have not previously been linked to the FA pathway as direct interactors of FANCA, FANCC, or FANCG. Most of these proteins are associated with four functional classes including transcription regulation (21 proteins), signaling (13 proteins), oxidative metabolism (10 proteins), and intracellular transport (11 proteins). Interaction with 6 proteins, DAXX, Ran, IkappaBgamma, USP14, and the previously reported SNX5 and FAZF, was additionally confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation and/or colocalization studies. Taken together, our data strongly support the hypothesis that FA proteins are functionally involved in several complex cellular pathways including transcription regulation, cell signaling, oxidative metabolism, and cellular transport.

  17. The MAP kinase-activated protein kinase Rck2p regulates cellular responses to cell wall stresses, filamentation and virulence in the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xichuan; Du, Wei; Zhao, Jingwen; Zhang, Lilin; Zhu, Zhiyan; Jiang, Linghuo

    2010-06-01

    Rck2p is the Hog1p-MAP kinase-activated protein kinase required for the attenuation of protein synthesis in response to an osmotic challenge in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Rck2p also regulates rapamycin sensitivity in both S. cerevisiae and Candida albicans. In this study, we demonstrate that the deletion of CaRCK2 renders C. albicans cells sensitive to, and CaRck2p translocates from the cytosol to the nucleus in response to, cell wall stresses caused by Congo red, Calcoflor White, elevated heat and zymolyase. However, the kinase activity of CaRck2p is not required for the cellular response to these cell wall stresses. Furthermore, transcripts of cell wall protein-encoding genes CaBGL2, CaHWP1 and CaXOG1 are reduced in C. albicans cells lacking CaRCK2. The deletion of CaRCK2 also reduces the in vitro filamentation of C. albicans and its virulence in a mouse model of systemic candidasis. The kinase activity of CaRck2p is required for the virulence, but not for the in vitro filamentation, in C. albicans. Therefore, Rck2p regulates cellular responses to cell wall stresses, filamentation and virulence in the human fungal pathogen C. albicans.

  18. Generic sorting of raft lipids into secretory vesicles in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Surma, Michal A; Klose, Christian; Klemm, Robin W

    2011-01-01

    Previous work has showed that ergosterol and sphingolipids become sorted to secretory vesicles immunoisolated using a chimeric, artificial raft membrane protein as bait. In this study, we have extended this analysis to three populations of secretory vesicles isolated using natural yeast plasma...... a complete lipid overview of the yeast late secretory pathway. We could show that vesicles captured with different baits carry the same cargo and have almost identical lipid compositions; being highly enriched in ergosterol and sphingolipids. This finding indicates that lipid raft sorting is a generic...

  19. New features on the environmental regulation of metabolism revealed by modeling the cellular proteomic adaptations induced by light, carbon and inorganic nitrogen in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie Gérin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Microalgae are currently emerging to be very promising organisms for the production of biofuels and high-added value compounds. Understanding the influence of environmental alterations on their metabolism is a crucial issue. Light, carbon and nitrogen availability have been reported to induce important metabolic adaptations. So far, the influence of these variables has essentially been studied while varying only one or two environmental factors at the same time. The goal of the present work was to model the cellular proteomic adaptations of the green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii upon the simultaneous changes of light intensity, carbon concentrations (CO2 and acetate and inorganic nitrogen concentrations (nitrate and ammonium in the culture medium. Statistical design of experiments (DOE enabled to define 32 culture conditions to be tested experimentally. Relative protein abundance was quantified by two dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE. Additional assays for respiration, photosynthesis, and lipid and pigment concentrations were also carried out. A hierarchical clustering survey enabled to partition biological variables (proteins + assays into eight co-regulated clusters. In most cases, the biological variables partitioned in the same cluster had already been reported to participate to common biological functions (acetate assimilation, bioenergetic processes, light harvesting, Calvin cycle and protein metabolism. The environmental regulation within each cluster was further characterized by a series of multivariate methods including principal component analysis and multiple linear regressions. This metadata analysis enabled to highlight the existence of a clear regulatory pattern for every cluster and to mathematically simulate the effects of light, carbon and nitrogen. The influence of these environmental variables on cellular metabolism is described in details and thoroughly discussed. This work provides an overview

  20. HIV-1 infection induces changes in expression of cellular splicing factors that regulate alternative viral splicing and virus production in macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purcell Damian FJ

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Macrophages are important targets and long-lived reservoirs of HIV-1, which are not cleared of infection by currently available treatments. In the primary monocyte-derived macrophage model of infection, replication is initially productive followed by a decline in virion output over ensuing weeks, coincident with a decrease in the levels of the essential viral transactivator protein Tat. We investigated two possible mechanisms in macrophages for regulation of viral replication, which appears to be primarily regulated at the level of tat mRNA: 1 differential mRNA stability, used by cells and some viruses for the rapid regulation of gene expression and 2 control of HIV-1 alternative splicing, which is essential for optimal viral replication. Results Following termination of transcription at increasing times after infection in macrophages, we found that tat mRNA did indeed decay more rapidly than rev or nef mRNA, but with similar kinetics throughout infection. In addition, tat mRNA decayed at least as rapidly in peripheral blood lymphocytes. Expression of cellular splicing factors in uninfected and infected macrophage cultures from the same donor showed an inverse pattern over time between enhancing factors (members of the SR family of RNA binding proteins and inhibitory factors (members of the hnRNP family. While levels of the SR protein SC35 were greatly up-regulated in the first week or two after infection, hnRNPs of the A/B and H groups were down-regulated. Around the peak of virus production in each culture, SC35 expression declined to levels in uninfected cells or lower, while the hnRNPs increased to control levels or above. We also found evidence for increased cytoplasmic expression of SC35 following long-term infection. Conclusion While no evidence of differential regulation of tat mRNA decay was found in macrophages following HIV-1 infection, changes in the balance of cellular splicing factors which regulate alternative

  1. Using organotypic (raft) epithelial tissue cultures for the biosynthesis and isolation of infectious human papillomaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozbun, Michelle A; Patterson, Nicole A

    2014-08-01

    Papillomaviruses have a strict tropism for epithelial cells, and they are fully reliant on cellular differentiation for completion of their life cycles, resulting in the production of progeny virions. Thus, a permissive environment for full viral replication in vitro-wherein virion morphogenesis occurs under cooperative viral and cellular cues-requires the cultivation of epithelium. Presented in the first section of this unit is a protocol to grow differentiating epithelial tissues that mimic many important morphological and biochemical aspects of normal skin. The technique involves growing epidermal cells atop a dermal equivalent consisting of live fibroblasts and a collagen lattice. Epithelial stratification and differentiation ensues when the keratinocyte-dermal equivalent is placed at the air-liquid interface. The apparent floating nature of the cell-matrix in this method led to the nickname "raft" cultures. The general technique can be applied to normal low passage keratinocytes, to cells stably transfected with papillomavirus genes or genomes, or keratinocytes established from neoplastic lesions. However, infectious papillomavirus particles have only been isolated from organotypic epithelial cultures initiated with cells that maintain oncogenic human papillomavirus genomes in an extrachomosomal replicative form. The second section of this unit is dedicated to a virion isolation method that minimizes aerosol and skin exposure to these human carcinogens. Although the focus of the protocols is on the growth of tissues that yields infectious papillomavirus progeny, this culture system facilitates the investigation of these fastidious viruses during their complex replicative cycles, and raft tissues can be manipulated and harvested at any point during the process. Importantly, a single-step virus growth cycle is achieved in this process, as it is unlikely that progeny virions are released to initiate subsequent rounds of infection. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley

  2. Critical role of the lipid rafts in caprine herpesvirus type 1 infection in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratelli, Annamaria; Colao, Valeriana

    2016-01-04

    The fusion machinery for herpesvirus entry in the host cells involves the interactions of viral glycoproteins with cellular receptors, although additional viral and cellular domains are required. Extensive areas of the plasma membrane surface consist of lipid rafts organized into cholesterol-rich microdomains involved in signal transduction, protein sorting, membrane transport and in many processes of viruses infection. Because of the extraction of cholesterol leads to disorganization of lipid microdomains and to dissociation of proteins bound to the lipid rafts, we investigated the effect of cholesterol depletion by methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD) on caprine herpesvirus 1 (CpHV.1) in three important phases of virus infection such as binding, entry and post-entry. MβCD treatment did not prejudice virus binding to cells, while a dose-dependent reduction of the virus yield was observed at the virus entry stage, and 30 mM MβCD reduced infectivity evidently. Treatment of MDBK after virus entry revealed a moderate inhibitory effect suggesting that cholesterol is mainly required during virus entry rather than during the post-entry stage. Alteration of the envelope lipid composition affected virus entry and a noticeable reduction in virus infectivity was detected in the presence of 15 mM MβCD. Considering that the recognition of a host cell receptor is a crucial step in the start-up phase of infection, these data are essential for the study of CpHV.1 pathogenesis. To date virus receptors for CpHV.1 have not yet been identified and further investigations are required to state that MβCD treatment affects the expression of the viral receptors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Translocation of the B cell receptor to lipid rafts is inhibited in B cells from BLV-infected, persistent lymphocytosis cattle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, Valerie T.; Stone, Diana M.; Cantor, Glenn H.

    2003-01-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) infection causes a significant polyclonal expansion of CD5 + , IgM+ B lymphocytes known as persistent lymphocytosis (PL) in approximately 30% of infected cattle. There is evidence that this expanded B cell population has altered signaling, and resistance to apoptosis has been proposed as one mechanism of B cell expansion. In human and murine B cells, antigen binding initiates movement of the B cell receptor (BCR) into membrane microdomains enriched in sphingolipids and cholesterol, termed lipid rafts. Lipid rafts include members of the Src-family kinases and exclude certain phosphatases. Inclusion of the BCR into lipid rafts plays an important role in regulation of early signaling events and subsequent antigen internalization. Viral proteins may also influence signaling events in lipid rafts. Here we demonstrate that the largely CD5 + B cell population in PL cattle has different mobilization and internalization of the BCR when compared to the largely CD5-negative B cells in BLV-negative cattle. Unlike B cells from BLV-negative cattle, the BCR in B cells of BLV-infected, PL cattle resists movement into lipid rafts upon stimulation and is only weakly internalized. Expression of viral proteins as determined by detection of the BLV transmembrane (TM) envelope glycoprotein gp30 did not alter these events in cells from PL cattle. This exclusion of the BCR from lipid rafts may, in part, explain signaling differences seen between B cells of BLV-infected, PL, and BLV-negative cattle and the resistance to apoptosis speculated to contribute to persistent lymphocytosis

  4. Regulation of Mitochondrial Function and Cellular Energy Metabolism by Protein Kinase C-λ/ι: A Novel Mode of Balancing Pluripotency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahato, Biraj; Home, Pratik; Rajendran, Ganeshkumar; Paul, Arindam; Saha, Biswarup; Ganguly, Avishek; Ray, Soma; Roy, Nairita; Swerdlow, Russell H.; Paul, Soumen

    2014-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) contain functionally immature mitochondria and rely upon high rates of glycolysis for their energy requirements. Thus, altered mitochondrial function and promotion of aerobic glycolysis is key to maintain and induce pluripotency. However, signaling mechanisms that regulate mitochondrial function and reprogram metabolic preferences in self-renewing vs. differentiated PSC populations are poorly understood. Here, using murine embryonic stem cells (ESCs) as a model system, we demonstrate that atypical protein kinase C isoform, PKC lambda/iota (PKCλ/ι), is a key regulator of mitochondrial function in ESCs. Depletion of PKCλ/ι in ESCs maintains their pluripotent state as evident from germline offsprings. Interestingly, loss of PKCλ/ι in ESCs leads to impairment in mitochondrial maturation, organization and a metabolic shift toward glycolysis under differentiating condition. Our mechanistic analyses indicate that a PKCλ/ι-HIF1α-PGC1α axis regulates mitochondrial respiration and balances pluripotency in ESCs. We propose that PKCλ/ι could be a crucial regulator of mitochondrial function and energy metabolism in stem cells and other cellular contexts. PMID:25142417

  5. Harnessing cellular differentiation to improve ALA-based photodynamic therapy in an artificial skin model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maytin, Edward; Anand, Sanjay; Sato, Nobuyuki; Mack, Judith; Ortel, Bernhard

    2005-04-01

    During ALA-based photodynamic therapy (PDT), a pro-drug (aminolevulinic acid; ALA) is taken up by tumor cells and metabolically converted to a photosensitizing intermediate (protoporphyrin IX; PpIX). ALA-based PDT, while an emerging treatment modality, remains suboptimal for most cancers (e.g. squamous cell carcinoma of the skin). Many treatment failures may be largely due to insufficient conversion of ALA to PpIX within cells. We discovered a novel way to increase the conversion of ALA to PpIX, by administering agents that can drive terminal differentiation (i.e., accelerate cellular maturation). Terminally-differentiated epithelial cells show higher levels of intracellular PpIX, apparently via increased levels of a rate-limiting enzyme, coproporphyrinogen oxidase (CPO). To study these mechanisms in a three-dimensional tissue, we developed an organotypic model that mimics true epidermal physiology in a majority of respects. A line of rat epidermal keratinocytes (REKs), when grown in raft cultures, displays all the features of a fully-differentiated epidermis. Addition of ALA to the culture medium results in ALA uptake and PpIX synthesis, with subsequent death of keratinocytes upon exposure to blue light. Using this model, we can manipulate cellular differentiation via three different approaches. (1) Vitamin D, a hormone that enhances keratinocyte differentiation; (2) Hoxb13, a nuclear transcription factor that affects the genetically-controlled differentiation program of stratifying cells (3) Hyaluronan, an abundant extracellular matrix molecule that regulates epidermal differentiation. Because the raft cultures contain only a single cell type (no blood, fibroblasts, etc.) the effects of terminal differentiation upon CPO, PpIX, and keratinocyte cell death can be specifically defined.

  6. Development of optimum design from static response of pile–raft interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taghavi Ghalesari, A; Barari, Amin; Fardad Amini, P

    2015-01-01

    Piled raft foundations are among the most commonly used support structures for offshore projects. When a raft foundation alone does not satisfy the design requirements, piles may be added to improve the ultimate load capacity and the settlement performance of the raft. In this study, design...... for the piled raft were highly influenced by the number of piles and the raft thickness. Optimal design configurations of piles for cohesive soils are discussed. Increasing the pile spacing decreased the pile butt load ratio by allowing for a more uniform load distribution between the piles....

  7. Cellular stress-induced up-regulation of FMRP promotes cell survival by modulating PI3K-Akt phosphorylation cascades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wells David

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fragile X syndrome (FXS, the most commonly inherited mental retardation and single gene cause of autistic spectrum disorder, occurs when the Fmr1 gene is mutated. The product of Fmr1, fragile X linked mental retardation protein (FMRP is widely expressed in HeLa cells, however the roles of FMRP within HeLa cells were not elucidated, yet. Interacting with a diverse range of mRNAs related to cellular survival regulatory signals, understanding the functions of FMRP in cellular context would provide better insights into the role of this interesting protein in FXS. Using HeLa cells treated with etoposide as a model, we tried to determine whether FMRP could play a role in cell survival. Methods Apoptotic cell death was induced by etoposide treatment on Hela cells. After we transiently modulated FMRP expression (silencing or enhancing by using molecular biotechnological methods such as small hairpin RNA virus-induced knock down and overexpression using transfection with FMRP expression vectors, cellular viability was measured using propidium iodide staining, TUNEL staining, and FACS analysis along with the level of activation of PI3K-Akt pathway by Western blot. Expression level of FMRP and apoptotic regulator BcL-xL was analyzed by Western blot, RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry. Results An increased FMRP expression was measured in etoposide-treated HeLa cells, which was induced by PI3K-Akt activation. Without FMRP expression, cellular defence mechanism via PI3K-Akt-Bcl-xL was weakened and resulted in an augmented cell death by etoposide. In addition, FMRP over-expression lead to the activation of PI3K-Akt signalling pathway as well as increased FMRP and BcL-xL expression, which culminates with the increased cell survival in etoposide-treated HeLa cells. Conclusions Taken together, these results suggest that FMRP expression is an essential part of cellular survival mechanisms through the modulation of PI3K, Akt, and Bcl-xL signal

  8. Biomedical applications of polymers derived by reversible addition - fragmentation chain-transfer (RAFT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairbanks, Benjamin D; Gunatillake, Pathiraja A; Meagher, Laurence

    2015-08-30

    RAFT- mediated polymerization, providing control over polymer length and architecture as well as facilitating post polymerization modification of end groups, has been applied to virtually every facet of biomedical materials research. RAFT polymers have seen particularly extensive use in drug delivery research. Facile generation of functional and telechelic polymers permits straightforward conjugation to many therapeutic compounds while synthesis of amphiphilic block copolymers via RAFT allows for the generation of self-assembled structures capable of carrying therapeutic payloads. With the large and growing body of literature employing RAFT polymers as drug delivery aids and vehicles, concern over the potential toxicity of RAFT derived polymers has been raised. While literature exploring this complication is relatively limited, the emerging consensus may be summed up in three parts: toxicity of polymers generated with dithiobenzoate RAFT agents is observed at high concentrations but not with polymers generated with trithiocarbonate RAFT agents; even for polymers generated with dithiobenzoate RAFT agents, most reported applications call for concentrations well below the toxicity threshold; and RAFT end-groups may be easily removed via any of a variety of techniques that leave the polymer with no intrinsic toxicity attributable to the mechanism of polymerization. The low toxicity of RAFT-derived polymers and the ability to remove end groups via straightforward and scalable processes make RAFT technology a valuable tool for practically any application in which a polymer of defined molecular weight and architecture is desired. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. The Lipid Raft Proteome of African Trypanosomes Contains Many Flagellar Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Aabha I; Olson, Cheryl L; Engman, David M

    2017-08-24

    Lipid rafts are liquid-ordered membrane microdomains that form by preferential association of 3-β-hydroxysterols, sphingolipids and raft-associated proteins often having acyl modifications. We isolated lipid rafts of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei and determined the protein composition of lipid rafts in the cell. This analysis revealed a striking enrichment of flagellar proteins and several putative signaling proteins in the lipid raft proteome. Calpains and intraflagellar transport proteins, in particular, were found to be abundant in the lipid raft proteome. These findings provide additional evidence supporting the notion that the eukaryotic cilium/flagellum is a lipid raft-enriched specialized structure with high concentrations of sterols, sphingolipids and palmitoylated proteins involved in environmental sensing and cell signaling.

  10. Effectiveness of combinations of raft foundation with aprons as a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B A Vijayasree

    2018-03-10

    Mar 10, 2018 ... bridge projects vary from exposed hard rock to pure sand for a considerable .... arrangements were made to dissipate the energy during inletting of water .... This endorsed the fact that the use of raft foundation in Case 2 reduced the ... at the downstream side, which extended to the wake region of horseshoe ...

  11. Direct surface PEGylation of nanodiamond via RAFT polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Yingge; Liu, Meiying; Wang, Ke; Huang, Hongye; Wan, Qing; Tao, Lei; Fu, Lihua; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Wei, Yen

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: In this paper, we describe an efficient, practical and novel method to modify ND via direct immobilization of chain transfer agent for RAFT polymerization. - Highlights: • Surface PEGylation of ND via RAFT polymerization. • ND with high water dispersibility and excellent biocompatibility. • Controlled living polymerization. - Abstract: Nanodiamond (ND) is a novel class of carbon nanomaterials, which has been extensively investigated for biomedical applications because of its small size, high surface area and excellent biocompatibility. However, the biomedical applications of unmodified ND are still largely restricted because of their poor dispersibility in both aqueous and organic medium. In this work, we reported a novel strategy for the surface modification of ND via reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization. For preparation of the PEGylated ND (pPEGMA-ND), chain transfer agent (CTA) was immobilized onto ND through reaction between the hydroxyl group of ND and the carboxyl group of CTA, which was used as the initiator for surface-initiated RAFT polymerization. The successful preparation of pPEGMA-ND was characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectra and thermal gravimetric analysis in detail. Results demonstrated that pPEGMA-ND exhibited enhanced water dispersibility and desirable biocompatibility, making it promising for biomedical applications.

  12. Toward a Value for Guided Rafting on Southern Rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. Michael Bowker; Donald B.K. English; Jason A. Donovan

    1996-01-01

    This study examines per trip consumer surplus associated with guided whitewater rafting on two southern rivers. First, household recreation demand functions are estimated based on the individual travel cost model using truncated count data regression methods and alternative price specifications. Findings show mean per trip consumer surplus point estimates between $89...

  13. Research Applications for Teaching (RAFT) Project. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, James R., Jr.; Handley, Herbert M.

    A report is given of the development and progress of the Research Applications for Teaching (RAFT) project, developed at Mississippi State University. Based upon research findings relative to effective teaching and effective schooling, five curriculum modules were prepared and implemented in instruction. In the second year of the project the…

  14. NMR spectroscopy in the optimization and evaluation of RAFT agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klumperman, B.; McLeary, J.B.; van den Dungen, E.; Pound, G.

    2007-01-01

    The selection of a suitable mediating agent in Reversible Addition-Fragmentation Chain Transfer (RAFT) mediated polymerization is crucial to the degree of control that can be achieved. An overview of work from the Stellenbosch group is presented in which the use of NMR spectroscopy as a tool for

  15. Radical-induced oxidation of RAFT agents : a kinetic study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Changxi; He, Junpo; Zhou, Yanwu; Gu, Yuankai; Yang, Yuliang

    2011-01-01

    Radical-induced oxidn. of reversible addn.-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) agents is studied with respect to the effect of mol. structure on oxidn. rate. The radicals are generated by homolysis of either azobisisobutyronitrile or alkoxyamine and transformed in situ immediately into peroxy

  16. Direct surface PEGylation of nanodiamond via RAFT polymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Yingge [Department of Chemistry and Jiangxi Provincial Key Laboratory of New Energy Chemistry, Nanchang University, 999 Xuefu Avenue, Nanchang 330031 (China); School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004 (China); Liu, Meiying [Department of Chemistry and Jiangxi Provincial Key Laboratory of New Energy Chemistry, Nanchang University, 999 Xuefu Avenue, Nanchang 330031 (China); Wang, Ke [Department of Chemistry and the Tsinghua Center for Frontier Polymer Research, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Huang, Hongye; Wan, Qing [Department of Chemistry and Jiangxi Provincial Key Laboratory of New Energy Chemistry, Nanchang University, 999 Xuefu Avenue, Nanchang 330031 (China); Tao, Lei [Department of Chemistry and the Tsinghua Center for Frontier Polymer Research, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Fu, Lihua [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004 (China); Zhang, Xiaoyong, E-mail: xiaoyongzhang1980@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry and Jiangxi Provincial Key Laboratory of New Energy Chemistry, Nanchang University, 999 Xuefu Avenue, Nanchang 330031 (China); Wei, Yen, E-mail: weiyen@tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry and the Tsinghua Center for Frontier Polymer Research, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2015-12-01

    Graphical abstract: In this paper, we describe an efficient, practical and novel method to modify ND via direct immobilization of chain transfer agent for RAFT polymerization. - Highlights: • Surface PEGylation of ND via RAFT polymerization. • ND with high water dispersibility and excellent biocompatibility. • Controlled living polymerization. - Abstract: Nanodiamond (ND) is a novel class of carbon nanomaterials, which has been extensively investigated for biomedical applications because of its small size, high surface area and excellent biocompatibility. However, the biomedical applications of unmodified ND are still largely restricted because of their poor dispersibility in both aqueous and organic medium. In this work, we reported a novel strategy for the surface modification of ND via reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization. For preparation of the PEGylated ND (pPEGMA-ND), chain transfer agent (CTA) was immobilized onto ND through reaction between the hydroxyl group of ND and the carboxyl group of CTA, which was used as the initiator for surface-initiated RAFT polymerization. The successful preparation of pPEGMA-ND was characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectra and thermal gravimetric analysis in detail. Results demonstrated that pPEGMA-ND exhibited enhanced water dispersibility and desirable biocompatibility, making it promising for biomedical applications.

  17. Lipid rafts and their roles in T-cell activation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hořejší, Václav

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 2 (2005), s. 310-316 ISSN 1286-4579 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LN00A026 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : lipid rafts * T- cell * immunoreceptor signaling Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.154, year: 2005

  18. The roles of membrane microdomains (rafts) in T cell activation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hořejší, Václav

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 191, - (2003), s. 148-164 ISSN 0105-2896 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A026 Grant - others:Wellcome Trust(GB) J1116W24Z Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : membrane microdomain * raft * T cell Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 7.052, year: 2003

  19. Modifying Lipid Rafts Promotes Regeneration and Functional Recovery

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    Nardos G. Tassew

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Ideal strategies to ameliorate CNS damage should promote both neuronal survival and axon regeneration. The receptor Neogenin promotes neuronal apoptosis. Its ligand prevents death, but the resulting repulsive guidance molecule a (RGMa-Neogenin interaction also inhibits axonal growth, countering any prosurvival benefits. Here, we explore strategies to inhibit Neogenin, thus simultaneously enhancing survival and regeneration. We show that bone morphogenetic protein (BMP and RGMa-dependent recruitment of Neogenin into lipid rafts requires an interaction between RGMa and Neogenin subdomains. RGMa or Neogenin peptides that prevent this interaction, BMP inhibition by Noggin, or reduction of membrane cholesterol all block Neogenin raft localization, promote axon outgrowth, and prevent neuronal apoptosis. Blocking Neogenin raft association influences axonal pathfinding, enhances survival in the developing CNS, and promotes survival and regeneration in the injured adult optic nerve and spinal cord. Moreover, lowering cholesterol disrupts rafts and restores locomotor function after spinal cord injury. These data reveal a unified strategy to promote both survival and regeneration in the CNS.

  20. Astronaut Tamara Jernigan deploys life raft during WETF training

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Astronaut Tamara E. Jernigan, STS-67 payload commander, deploys a life raft during a session of emergency bailout training. The training took place in the 25-feet deep pool at JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF). Jernigan was joined by her crew mates for the training session. Several SCUBA-equipped divers who assisted in the training can be seen in this photograph.

  1. Notch and presenilin regulate cellular expansion and cytokine secretion but cannot instruct Th1/Th2 fate acquisition.

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    Chin-Tong Ong

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent reports suggested that Delta1, 4 and Jagged1, 2 possessed the ability to instruct CD4(+ T cell into selection of Th1 or Th2 fates, respectively, although the underlying mechanism endowing the cleaved Notch receptor with memory of ligand involved in its activation remains elusive. To examine this, we prepared artificial antigen-presenting cells expressing either DLL1 or Jag1. Although both ligands were efficient in inducing Notch2 cleavage and activation in CD4(+ T or reporter cells, the presence of Lunatic Fringe in CD4(+ T cells inhibited Jag1 activation of Notch1 receptor. Neither ligand could induce Th1 or Th2 fate choice independently of cytokines or redirect cytokine-driven Th1 or Th2 development. Instead, we find that Notch ligands only augment cytokine production during T cell differentiation in the presence of polarizing IL-12 and IL-4. Moreover, the differentiation choices of naïve CD4(+ T cells lacking gamma-secretase, RBP-J, or both in response to polarizing cytokines revealed that neither presenilin proteins nor RBP-J were required for cytokine-induced Th1/Th2 fate selection. However, presenilins facilitate cellular proliferation and cytokine secretion in an RBP-J (and thus, Notch independent manner. The controversies surrounding the role of Notch and presenilins in Th1/Th2 polarization may reflect their role as genetic modifiers of T-helper cells differentiation.

  2. Ebselen inhibits iron-induced tau phosphorylation by attenuating DMT1 up-regulation and cellular iron uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Ling; Zheng, Wei; Xin, Na; Xie, Jing-Wei; Wang, Tao; Wang, Zhan-You

    2012-08-01

    Dysregulation of iron homeostasis is involved in the pathological process of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We have recently reported that divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) is upregulated in an AD transgenic mouse brain, and that silencing of DMT1, which reduces cellular iron influx, results in inhibition of amyloidogenesis in vitro, suggesting a potential target of DMT1 for AD therapy. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that inhibition of DMT1 with ebselen, a DMT1 transport inhibitor, could affect tau phosphorylation. Human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells were pre-treated with ebselen and then treated with ferrous sulfate (dissolved in ascorbic acid), and the effects of ebselen on tau phosphorylation and the relative signaling pathways were examined. Our results showed that ebselen decreased iron influx, reduced iron-induced ROS production, inhibited the activities of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 and glycogen synthase kinase 3β, and ultimately attenuated the levels of tau phosphorylation at the sites of Thr205, Ser396 and Thr231. The present study indicates that the neuroprotective effect of ebselen on AD is not only related to its antioxidant activity as reported previously, but is also associated with a reduction in tau phosphorylation by inhibition of DMT1. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Down-regulation of cellular FLICE-inhibitory protein (Long Form contributes to apoptosis induced by Hsp90 inhibition in human lung cancer cells

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    Wang Qilin

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cellular FLICE-Inhibitory Protein (long form, c-FLIPL is a critical negative regulator of death receptor-mediated apoptosis. Overexpression of c-FLIPL has been reported in many cancer cell lines and is associated with chemoresistance. In contrast, down-regulation of c-FLIP may drive cancer cells into cellular apoptosis. This study aims to demonstrate that inhibition of the heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90 either by inhibitors geldanamycin/17-N-Allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (GA/17-AAG or siRNA technique in human lung cancer cells induces c-FLIPL degradation and cellular apoptosis through C-terminus of Hsp70-interacting protein (CHIP-mediated mechanisms. Methods Calu-1 and H157 cell lines (including H157-c-FLIPL overexpressing c-FLIPL and control cell H157-lacZ were treated with 17-AAG and the cell lysates were prepared to detect the given proteins by Western Blot and the cell survival was assayed by SRB assay. CHIP and Hsp90 α/β proteins were knocked down by siRNA technique. CHIP and c-FLIPL plasmids were transfected into cells and immunoprecipitation experiments were performed to testify the interactions between c-FLIPL, CHIP and Hsp90. Results c-FLIPL down-regulation induced by 17-AAG can be reversed with the proteasome inhibitor MG132, which suggested that c-FLIPL degradation is mediated by a ubiquitin-proteasome system. Inhibition of Hsp90α/β reduced c-FLIPL level, whereas knocking down CHIP expression with siRNA technique inhibited c-FLIPL degradation. Furthermore, c-FLIPL and CHIP were co-precipitated in the IP complexes. In addition, overexpression of c-FLIPL can rescue cancer cells from apoptosis. When 17-AAG was combined with an anti-cancer agent celecoxib(CCB, c-FLIPL level declined further and there was a higher degree of caspase activation. Conclusion We have elucidated c-FLIPL degradation contributes to apoptosis induced by Hsp90 inhibition, suggesting c-FLIP and Hsp90 may be the promising combined targets

  4. Expression of HIV-1 Vpu leads to loss of the viral restriction factor CD317/Tetherin from lipid rafts and its enhanced lysosomal degradation.

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    Ruth Rollason

    Full Text Available CD317/tetherin (aka BST2 or HM1.24 antigen is an interferon inducible membrane protein present in regions of the lipid bilayer enriched in sphingolipids and cholesterol (often termed lipid rafts. It has been implicated in an eclectic mix of cellular processes including, most notably, the retention of fully formed viral particles at the surface of cells infected with HIV and other enveloped viruses. Expression of the HIV viral accessory protein Vpu has been shown to lead to intracellular sequestration and degradation of tetherin, thereby counteracting the inhibition of viral release. There is evidence that tetherin interacts directly with Vpu, but it remains unclear where in the cell this interaction occurs or if Vpu expression affects the lipid raft localisation of tetherin. We have addressed these points using biochemical and cell imaging approaches focused on endogenous rather than ectopically over-expressed tetherin. We find i no evidence for an interaction between Vpu and endogenous tetherin at the cell surface, ii the vast majority of endogenous tetherin that is at the cell surface in control cells is in lipid rafts, iii internalised tetherin is present in non-raft fractions, iv expression of Vpu in cells expressing endogenous tetherin leads to the loss of tetherin from lipid rafts, v internalised tetherin enters early endosomes, and late endosomes, in both control cells and cells expressing Vpu, but the proportion of tetherin molecules destined for degradation rather than recycling is increased in cells expressing Vpu vi lysosomes are the primary site for degradation of endogenous tetherin in cells expressing Vpu. Our studies underlie the importance of studying endogenous tetherin and let us propose a model in which Vpu intercepts newly internalised tetherin and diverts it for lysosomal destruction rather than recycling to the cell surface.

  5. Nogo-receptor gene activity: cellular localization and developmental regulation of mRNA in mice and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josephson, Anna; Trifunovski, Alexandra; Widmer, Hans Ruedi; Widenfalk, Johan; Olson, Lars; Spenger, Christian

    2002-11-18

    Nogo (reticulon-4) is a myelin-associated protein that is expressed in three different splice variants, Nogo-A, Nogo-B, and Nogo-C. Nogo-A inhibits neurite regeneration in the central nervous system. Messenger RNA encoding Nogo is expressed in oligodendrocytes and central and peripheral neurons, but not in astrocytes or Schwann cells. Nogo is a transmembraneous protein; the extracellular domain is termed Nogo-66, and a Nogo-66-receptor (Nogo-R) has been identified. We performed in situ hybridization in human and mouse nervous tissues to map the cellular distribution of Nogo-R gene activity patterns in fetal and adult human spinal cord and sensory ganglia, adult human brain, and the nervous systems of developing and adult mice. In the human fetus Nogo-R was transcribed in the ventral horn of the spinal cord and in dorsal root ganglia. In adult human tissues Nogo-R gene activity was found in neocortex, hippocampus, amygdala, and a subset of large and medium-sized neurons of the dorsal root ganglia. Nogo-R mRNA was not expressed in the adult human spinal cord at detectable levels. In the fetal mouse, Nogo-R was diffusely expressed in brain, brainstem, trigeminal ganglion, spinal cord, and dorsal root ganglia at all stages. In the adult mouse strong Nogo-R mRNA expression was found in neurons in neocortex, hippocampus, amygdala, habenula, thalamic nuclei, brainstem, the granular cell layer of cerebellum, and the mitral cell layer of the olfactory bulb. Neurons in the adult mouse striatum, the medial septal nucleus, and spinal cord did not express Nogo-R mRNA at detectable levels. In summary, Nogo-66-R mRNA expression in humans and mice was observed in neurons of the developing nervous system Expression was downregulated in the adult spinal cord of both species, and specific expression patterns were seen in the adult brain. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Lipid rafts are required for signal transduction by angiotensin II receptor type 1 in neonatal glomerular mesangial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adebiyi, Adebowale, E-mail: aadebiyi@uthsc.edu; Soni, Hitesh; John, Theresa A.; Yang, Fen

    2014-05-15

    Angiotensin II (ANG-II) receptors (AGTRs) contribute to renal physiology and pathophysiology, but the underlying mechanisms that regulate AGTR function in glomerular mesangium are poorly understood. Here, we show that AGTR1 is the functional AGTR subtype expressed in neonatal pig glomerular mesangial cells (GMCs). Cyclodextrin (CDX)-mediated cholesterol depletion attenuated cell surface AGTR1 protein expression and ANG-II-induced intracellular Ca{sup 2+} ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) elevation in the cells. The COOH-terminus of porcine AGTR1 contains a caveolin (CAV)-binding motif. However, neonatal GMCs express CAV-1, but not CAV-2 and CAV-3. Colocalization and in situ proximity ligation assay detected an association between endogenous AGTR1 and CAV-1 in the cells. A synthetic peptide corresponding to the CAV-1 scaffolding domain (CSD) sequence also reduced ANG-II-induced [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} elevation in the cells. Real-time imaging of cell growth revealed that ANG-II stimulates neonatal GMC proliferation. ANG-II-induced GMC growth was attenuated by EMD 66684, an AGTR1 antagonist; BAPTA, a [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} chelator; KN-93, a Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II inhibitor; CDX; and a CSD peptide, but not PD 123319, a selective AGTR2 antagonist. Collectively, our data demonstrate [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}-dependent proliferative effect of ANG-II and highlight a critical role for lipid raft microdomains in AGTR1-mediated signal transduction in neonatal GMCs. - Highlights: • AGTR1 is the functional AGTR subtype expressed in neonatal mesangial cells. • Endogenous AGTR1 associates with CAV-1 in neonatal mesangial cells. • Lipid raft disruption attenuates cell surface AGTR1 protein expression. • Lipid raft disruption reduces ANG-II-induced [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} elevation in neonatal mesangial cells. • Lipid raft disruption inhibits ANG-II-induced neonatal mesangial cell growth.

  7. DRhoGEF2 regulates cellular tension and cell pulsations in the Amnioserosa during Drosophila dorsal closure.

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    Dulce Azevedo

    Full Text Available Coordination of apical constriction in epithelial sheets is a fundamental process during embryogenesis. Here, we show that DRhoGEF2 is a key regulator of apical pulsation and constriction of amnioserosal cells during Drosophila dorsal closure. Amnioserosal cells mutant for DRhoGEF2 exhibit a consistent decrease in amnioserosa pulsations whereas overexpression of DRhoGEF2 in this tissue leads to an increase in the contraction time of pulsations. We probed the physical properties of the amnioserosa to show that the average tension in DRhoGEF2 mutant cells is lower than wild-type and that overexpression of DRhoGEF2 results in a tissue that is more solid-like than wild-type. We also observe that in the DRhoGEF2 overexpressing cells there is a dramatic increase of apical actomyosin coalescence that can contribute to the generation of more contractile forces, leading to amnioserosal cells with smaller apical surface than wild-type. Conversely, in DRhoGEF2 mutants, the apical actomyosin coalescence is impaired. These results identify DRhoGEF2 as an upstream regulator of the actomyosin contractile machinery that drives amnioserosa cells pulsations and apical constriction.

  8. Function of mammalian genes regulation cellular growth; Saibo zoshoku wo seigyosuru dobutsu saibo idenshi no kino kaiseki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, K. [Nagoya University, Nagoya (Japan)

    1995-12-15

    Intracellular signaling from receptor tyrosine kindles in mammalian cells results in activation of a signal cascade that includes the guanine nucleotide binding protein Ras and the protein kinases Raf, MEK [Mitogen activated protein kindle (MAPK) or Extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) kinase] and MAPK. MAPK activation that is dependent on the coupling of Ras and Raf was reconstituted in yeast. Yeast genes were isolated that, when overexpressed, enhanced the function of Raf. One of them is identical to BMH 1, which encodes a protein similar to members of the mammalian 14-3-3 family. Bacterially synthesized mammalian 14-3-3 protein stimulated the activity of Raf prepared from yeast cells expressing c-Raf-1. Thus, the 14-3-3 protein may participate in or be required for activation of Raf. 9 refs., 2 figs.

  9. Up-regulation of leucocytes genes implicated in telomere dysfunction and cellular senescence correlates with depression and anxiety severity scores.

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    Jean-Raymond Teyssier

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Major depressive disorder (MDD is frequently associated with chronic medical illness responsible of increased disability and mortality. Inflammation and oxidative stress are considered to be the major mediators of the allostatic load, and has been shown to correlate with telomere erosion in the leucocytes of MDD patients, leading to the model of accelerated aging. However, the significance of telomere length as an exclusive biomarker of aging has been questioned on both methodological and biological grounds. Furthermore, telomeres significantly shorten only in patients with long lasting MDD. Sensitive and dynamic functional biomarkers of aging would be clinically useful to evaluate the somatic impact of MDD. METHODOLOGY: To address this issue we have measured in the blood leucocytes of MDD patients (N=17 and controls (N=16 the expression of two genes identified as robust biomarkers of human aging and telomere dysfunction: p16(INK4a and STMN1. We have also quantified the transcripts of genes involved in the repair of oxidative DNA damage at telomeres (OGG1, telomere regulation and elongation (TERT, and in the response to biopsychological stress (FOS and DUSP1. RESULTS: The OGG1, p16(INK4a, and STMN1 gene were significantly up-regulated (25 to 100% in the leucocytes of MDD patients. Expression of p16(INK4a and STMN1 was directly correlated with anxiety scores in the depression group, and that of p16(INK4a, STMN and TERT with the depression and anxiety scores in the combined sample (MDD plus controls. Furthermore, we identified a unique correlative pattern of gene expression in the leucocytes of MDD subjects. CONCLUSIONS: Expression of p16(INK4 and STMN1 is a promising biomarker for future epidemiological assessment of the somatic impact of depressive and anxious symptoms, at both clinical and subclinical level in both depressive patients and general population.

  10. S6K1 and 4E-BP1 are independent regulated and control cellular growth in bladder cancer.

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    Roman Nawroth

    Full Text Available Aberrant activation and mutation status of proteins in the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR and the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling pathways have been linked to tumorigenesis in various tumors including urothelial carcinoma (UC. However, anti-tumor therapy with small molecule inhibitors against mTOR turned out to be less successful than expected. We characterized the molecular mechanism of this pathway in urothelial carcinoma by interfering with different molecular components using small chemical inhibitors and siRNA technology and analyzed effects on the molecular activation status, cell growth, proliferation and apoptosis. In a majority of tested cell lines constitutive activation of the PI3K was observed. Manipulation of mTOR or Akt expression or activity only regulated phosphorylation of S6K1 but not 4E-BP1. Instead, we provide evidence for an alternative mTOR independent but PI3K dependent regulation of 4E-BP1. Only the simultaneous inhibition of both S6K1 and 4E-BP1 suppressed cell growth efficiently. Crosstalk between PI3K and the MAPK signaling pathway is mediated via PI3K and indirect by S6K1 activity. Inhibition of MEK1/2 results in activation of Akt but not mTOR/S6K1 or 4E-BP1. Our data suggest that 4E-BP1 is a potential new target molecule and stratification marker for anti cancer therapy in UC and support the consideration of a multi-targeting approach against PI3K, mTORC1/2 and MAPK.

  11. Protein kinase CK2 localizes to sites of DNA double-strand break regulating the cellular response to DNA damage

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    Olsen Birgitte B

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK is a nuclear complex composed of a large catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs and a heterodimeric DNA-targeting subunit Ku. DNA-PK is a major component of the non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ repair mechanism, which is activated in the presence of DNA double-strand breaks induced by ionizing radiation, reactive oxygen species and radiomimetic drugs. We have recently reported that down-regulation of protein kinase CK2 by siRNA interference results in enhanced cell death specifically in DNA-PKcs-proficient human glioblastoma cells, and this event is accompanied by decreased autophosphorylation of DNA-PKcs at S2056 and delayed repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Results In the present study, we show that CK2 co-localizes with phosphorylated histone H2AX to sites of DNA damage and while CK2 gene knockdown is associated with delayed DNA damage repair, its overexpression accelerates this process. We report for the first time evidence that lack of CK2 destabilizes the interaction of DNA-PKcs with DNA and with Ku80 at sites of genetic lesions. Furthermore, we show that CK2 regulates the phosphorylation levels of DNA-PKcs only in response to direct induction of DNA double-strand breaks. Conclusions Taken together, these results strongly indicate that CK2 plays a prominent role in NHEJ by facilitating and/or stabilizing the binding of DNA-PKcs and, possibly other repair proteins, to the DNA ends contributing to efficient DNA damage repair in mammalian cells.

  12. Regulator LdhR and d-Lactate Dehydrogenase LdhA of Burkholderia multivorans Play Roles in Carbon Overflow and in Planktonic Cellular Aggregate Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Inês N; Ramires, Marcelo J; Azevedo, Lisa A; Guerreiro, Ana R; Tavares, Andreia C; Becker, Jörg D; Moreira, Leonilde M

    2017-10-01

    LysR-type transcriptional regulators (LTTRs) are the most commonly found regulators in Burkholderia cepacia complex, comprising opportunistic pathogens causing chronic respiratory infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Despite LTTRs being global regulators of pathogenicity in several types of bacteria, few have been characterized in Burkholderia Here, we show that gene ldhR of B. multivorans encoding an LTTR is cotranscribed with ldhA encoding a d-lactate dehydrogenase and evaluate their implication in virulence traits such as exopolysaccharide (EPS) synthesis and biofilm formation. A comparison of the wild type (WT) and its isogenic Δ ldhR mutant grown in medium with 2% d-glucose revealed a negative impact on EPS biosynthesis and on cell viability in the presence of LdhR. The loss of viability in WT cells was caused by intracellular acidification as a consequence of the cumulative secretion of organic acids, including d-lactate, which was absent from the Δ ldhR mutant supernatant. Furthermore, LdhR is implicated in the formation of planktonic cellular aggregates. WT cell aggregates reached 1,000 μm in size after 24 h in liquid cultures, in contrast to Δ ldhR mutant aggregates that never grew more than 60 μm. The overexpression of d-lactate dehydrogenase LdhA in the Δ ldhR mutant partially restored the formed aggregate size, suggesting a role for fermentation inside aggregates. Similar results were obtained for surface-attached biofilms, with WT cells producing more biofilm. A systematic evaluation of planktonic aggregates in Burkholderia CF clinical isolates showed aggregates in 40 of 74. As CF patients' lung environments are microaerophilic and bacteria are found as free aggregates/biofilms, LdhR and LdhA might have central roles in adapting to this environment. IMPORTANCE Cystic fibrosis patients often suffer from chronic respiratory infections caused by several types of microorganisms. Among them are the Burkholderia cepacia complex bacteria, which

  13. Steroidogenesis and early response gene expression in MA-10 Leydig tumor cells following heterologous receptor down-regulation and cellular desensitization

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    Tsuey-Ming Chen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The Leydig tumor cell line, MA-10, expresses the luteinizing hormone receptor, a G protein-coupled receptor that, when activated with luteinizing hormone or chorionic gonadotropin (CG, stimulates cAMP production and subsequent steroidogenesis, notably progesterone. These cells also respond to epidermal growth factor (EGF and phorbol esters with increased steroid biosynthesis. In order to probe the intracellular pathways along with heterologous receptor down-regulation and cellular desensitization, cells were preincubated with EGF or phorbol esters and then challenged with CG, EGF, dibutryl-cyclic AMP, and a phorbol ester. Relative receptor numbers, steroid biosynthesis, and expression of the early response genes, JUNB and c-FOS, were measured. It was found that in all cases but one receptor down-regulation and decreased progesterone production were closely coupled under the conditions used; the exception involved preincubation of the cells with EGF followed by addition of CG where the CG-mediated stimulation of steroidogenesis was considerably lower than the level of receptor down-regulation. In a number of instances JUNB and c-FOS expression paralleled the decreases in receptor number and progesterone production, while in some cases these early response genes were affected little if at all by the changes in receptor number. This finding may indicate that even low levels of activated signaling kinases, e.g. protein kinase A, protein kinase C, or receptor tyrosine kinase, may suffice to yield good expression of JUNB and c-FOS, or it may suggest alternative pathways for regulating expression of these two early response genes.

  14. Campylobacter jejuni CsrA complements an Escherichia coli csrA mutation for the regulation of biofilm formation, motility and cellular morphology but not glycogen accumulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Although Campylobacter jejuni is consistently ranked as one of the leading causes of bacterial diarrhea worldwide, the mechanisms by which C. jejuni causes disease and how they are regulated have yet to be clearly defined. The global regulator, CsrA, has been well characterized in several bacterial genera and is known to regulate a number of independent pathways via a post transcriptional mechanism, but remains relatively uncharacterized in the genus Campylobacter. Previously, we reported data illustrating the requirement for CsrA in several virulence related phenotypes of C. jejuni strain 81–176, indicating that the Csr pathway is important for Campylobacter pathogenesis. Results We compared the Escherichia coli and C. jejuni orthologs of CsrA and characterized the ability of the C. jejuni CsrA protein to functionally complement an E. coli csrA mutant. Phylogenetic comparison of E. coli CsrA to orthologs from several pathogenic bacteria demonstrated variability in C. jejuni CsrA relative to the known RNA binding domains of E. coli CsrA and in several amino acids reported to be involved in E. coli CsrA-mediated gene regulation. When expressed in an E. coli csrA mutant, C. jejuni CsrA succeeded in recovering defects in motility, biofilm formation, and cellular morphology; however, it failed to return excess glycogen accumulation to wild type levels. Conclusions These findings suggest that C. jejuni CsrA is capable of efficiently binding some E. coli CsrA binding sites, but not others, and provide insight into the biochemistry of C. jejuni CsrA. PMID:23051923

  15. Extensive sphingolipid depletion does not affect lipid raft integrity or lipid raft localization and efflux function of the ABC transporter MRP1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klappe, Karin; Dijkhuis, Anne-Jan; Hummel, Ina; van Dam, Annie; Ivanova, Pavlina T.; Milne, Stephen B.; Myers, David S.; Brown, H. Alex; Permentier, Hjalmar; Kok, Jan W.

    2010-01-01

    We show that highly efficient depletion of sphingolipids in two different cell lines does not abrogate the ability to isolate Lubrol-based DRMs (detergent-resistant membranes) or detergent-free lipid rafts from these cells. Compared with control, DRM/detergent-free lipid raft fractions contain equal

  16. Myosin 1g Contributes to CD44 Adhesion Protein and Lipid Rafts Recycling and Controls CD44 Capping and Cell Migration in B Lymphocytes

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    Orestes López-Ortega

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Cell migration and adhesion are critical for immune system function and involve many proteins, which must be continuously transported and recycled in the cell. Recycling of adhesion molecules requires the participation of several proteins, including actin, tubulin, and GTPases, and of membrane components such as sphingolipids and cholesterol. However, roles of actin motor proteins in adhesion molecule recycling are poorly understood. In this study, we identified myosin 1g as one of the important motor proteins that drives recycling of the adhesion protein CD44 in B lymphocytes. We demonstrate that the lack of Myo1g decreases the cell-surface levels of CD44 and of the lipid raft surrogate GM1. In cells depleted of Myo1g, the recycling of CD44 was delayed, the delay seems to be caused at the level of formation of recycling complex and entry into recycling endosomes. Moreover, a defective lipid raft recycling in Myo1g-deficient cells had an impact both on the capping of CD44 and on cell migration. Both processes required the transportation of lipid rafts to the cell surface to deliver signaling components. Furthermore, the extramembrane was essential for cell expansion and remodeling of the plasma membrane topology. Therefore, Myo1g is important during the recycling of lipid rafts to the membrane and to the accompanied proteins that regulate plasma membrane plasticity. Thus, Myosin 1g contributes to cell adhesion and cell migration through CD44 recycling in B lymphocytes.

  17. Icariin Regulates Cellular Functions and Gene Expression of Osteoarthritis Patient-Derived Human Fibroblast-Like Synoviocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lianhong Pan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Synovial inflammation plays an important role in the pathogenesis and progress of osteoarthritis (OA. There is an urgent need to find safe and effective drugs that can reduce the inflammation and regulate the pathogenesis of cytokines of the OA disease. Here, we investigated the effect of icariin, the major pharmacological active component of herb Epimedium on human osteoarthritis fibroblast-like synoviocytes (OA–FLSs. The OA–FLSs were isolated from patients with osteoarthritis and cultured in vitro with different concentrations of icariin. Then, cell viability, proliferation, and migration were investigated; MMP14, GRP78, and IL-1β gene expression levels were detected via qRT-PCR. Icariin showed low cytotoxicity to OA–FLSs at a concentration of under 10 μM and decreased the proliferation of the cells at concentrations of 1 and 10 μM. Icariin inhibited cell migration with concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 1 μM. Also, the expression of three cytokines for the pathogenesis of OA which include IL-1β, MMP14 and GRP78 was decreased by the various concentrations of icariin. These preliminary results imply that icariin might be an effective compound for the treatment of OA disease.

  18. Pentoxifylline regulates the cellular adhesion and its allied receptors to extracellular matrix components in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Peeyush N; Gude, Rajiv P

    2014-02-01

    Pentoxifylline (PTX) is a methylxanthine derivative that improves blood flow by decreasing its viscosity. Being an inhibitor of platelet aggregation, it can thus reduce the adhesiveness of cancer cells prolonging their circulation time. This delay in forming secondary tumours makes them more prone to immunological surveillance. Recently, we have evaluated its anti-metastatic efficacy against breast cancer, using MDA-MB-231 model system. In view of this, we had ascertained the effect of PTX on adhesion of MDA-MB-231 cells to extracellular matrix components (ECM) and its allied receptors such as the integrins. PTX affected adhesion of breast cancer cells to matrigel, collagen type IV, fibronectin and laminin in a dose dependent manner. Further, PTX showed a differential effect on integrin expression profile. The experimental metastasis model using NOD-SCID mice showed lesser tumour island formation when treated with PTX compared to the control. These findings further substantiate the anti-adhesive potential of PTX in breast cancer and warrant further insights into the functional regulation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Modelling the structure of a ceRNA-theoretical, bipartite microRNA-mRNA interaction network regulating intestinal epithelial cellular pathways using R programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, J M; Henderson, W A

    2018-01-12

    We report a method using functional-molecular databases and network modelling to identify hypothetical mRNA-miRNA interaction networks regulating intestinal epithelial barrier function. The model forms a data-analysis component of our cell culture experiments, which produce RNA expression data from Nanostring Technologies nCounter ® system. The epithelial tight-junction (TJ) and actin cytoskeleton interact as molecular components of the intestinal epithelial barrier. Upstream regulation of TJ-cytoskeleton interaction is effected by the Rac/Rock/Rho signaling pathway and other associated pathways which may be activated or suppressed by extracellular signaling from growth factors, hormones, and immune receptors. Pathway activations affect epithelial homeostasis, contributing to degradation of the epithelial barrier associated with osmotic dysregulation, inflammation, and tumor development. The complexity underlying miRNA-mRNA interaction networks represents a roadblock for prediction and validation of competing-endogenous RNA network function. We developed a network model to identify hypothetical co-regulatory motifs in a miRNA-mRNA interaction network related to epithelial function. A mRNA-miRNA interaction list was generated using KEGG and miRWalk2.0 databases. R-code was developed to quantify and visualize inherent network structures. We identified a sub-network with a high number of shared, targeting miRNAs, of genes associated with cellular proliferation and cancer, including c-MYC and Cyclin D.

  20. The Rab GTPase Rab8 as a shared regulator of ciliogenesis and immune synapse assembly: From a conserved pathway to diverse cellular structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrussi, Laura; Baldari, Cosima T

    2016-01-01

    Rab GTPases, which form the largest branch of the Ras GTPase superfamily, regulate almost every step of vesicle-mediated trafficking. Among them, Rab8 is an essential participant in primary cilium formation. In a report recently published in the Journal of Cell Science, Finetti and colleagues identify Rab8 as a novel player in vesicular traffic in the non-ciliated T lymphocytes, which contributes to the assembly of the specialized signaling platform known as the immune synapse. By interacting with the v-SNARE VAMP-3, Rab8 is indeed responsible for the final docking/fusion step in T cell receptor (TCR) recycling to the immune synapse. A second important take-home message which comes to light from this work is that VAMP-3 also interacts with Rab8 at the base of the cilium in NIH-3T3 cells, where it regulates ciliary growth and targeting of Smoothened at the plasma membrane. Hence the data presented in this report, in addition to identifying Rab8 as a novel player in vesicular traffic to the immune synapse, reveal how both ciliated and non-ciliated cells take advantage of a conserved pathway to build highly specific cellular structures.

  1. LiZIP3 is a cellular zinc transporter that mediates the tightly regulated import of zinc in Leishmania infantum parasites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Sandra; da Silva, Rosa Barreira; Shawki, Ali; Castro, Helena; Lamy, Márcia; Eide, David; Costa, Vítor; Mackenzie, Bryan; Tomás, Ana M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Cellular zinc homeostasis ensures that the intracellular concentration of this element is kept within limits that enable its participation in critical physiological processes without exerting toxic effects. We report here the identification and characterization of the first mediator of zinc homeostasis in Leishmania infantum, LiZIP3, a member of the ZIP family of divalent metal-ion transporters. The zinc transporter activity of LiZIP3 was first disclosed by its capacity to rescue the growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains deficient in zinc acquisition. Subsequent expression of LiZIP3 in Xenopus laevis oocytes was shown to stimulate the uptake of a broad range of metal ions, among which Zn2+ was the preferred LiZIP3 substrate (K0.5 ≈ 0.1 μM). Evidence that LiZIP3 functions as a zinc importer in L. infantum came from the observations that the protein locates to the cell membrane and that its overexpression leads to augmented zinc internalization. Importantly, expression and cell-surface location of LiZIP3 are lost when parasites face high zinc bioavailability. LiZIP3 decline in response to zinc is regulated at the mRNA level in a process involving (a) short-lived protein(s). Collectively, our data reveal that LiZIP3 enables L. infantum to acquire zinc in a highly regulated manner, hence contributing to zinc homeostasis. PMID:25644708

  2. Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus Nucleocapsid Protein Interacts with Nsp9 and Cellular DHX9 To Regulate Viral RNA Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Long; Tian, Jiao; Nan, Hao; Tian, Mengmeng; Li, Yuan; Xu, Xiaodong; Huang, Baicheng; Zhou, Enmin; Hiscox, Julian A; Chen, Hongying

    2016-06-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) nucleocapsid (N) protein is the main component of the viral capsid to encapsulate viral RNA, and it is also a multifunctional protein involved in the regulation of host cell processes. Nonstructural protein 9 (Nsp9) is the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase that plays a critical role in viral RNA transcription and replication. In this study, we demonstrate that PRRSV N protein is bound to Nsp9 by protein-protein interaction and that the contacting surface on Nsp9 is located in the two predicted α-helixes formed by 48 residues at the C-terminal end of the protein. Mutagenesis analyses identified E646, E608, and E611 on Nsp9 and Q85 on the N protein as the pivotal residues participating in the N-Nsp9 interaction. By overexpressing the N protein binding fragment of Nsp9 in infected Marc-145 cells, the synthesis of viral RNAs, as well as the production of infectious progeny viruses, was dramatically inhibited, suggesting that Nsp9-N protein association is involved in the process of viral RNA production. In addition, we show that PRRSV N interacts with cellular RNA helicase DHX9 and redistributes the protein into the cytoplasm. Knockdown of DHX9 increased the ratio of short subgenomic mRNAs (sgmRNAs); in contrast, DHX9 overexpression benefited the synthesis of longer sgmRNAs and the viral genomic RNA (gRNA). These results imply that DHX9 is recruited by the N protein in PRRSV infection to regulate viral RNA synthesis. We postulate that N and DHX9 may act as antiattenuation factors for the continuous elongation of nascent transcript during negative-strand RNA synthesis. It is unclear whether the N protein of PRRSV is involved in regulation of the viral RNA production process. In this report, we demonstrate that the N protein of the arterivirus PRRSV participates in viral RNA replication and transcription through interacting with Nsp9 and its RdRp and recruiting cellular RNA helicase to promote the production of

  3. Cellular gravity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.C. Gruau; J.T. Tromp (John)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractWe consider the problem of establishing gravity in cellular automata. In particular, when cellular automata states can be partitioned into empty, particle, and wall types, with the latter enclosing rectangular areas, we desire rules that will make the particles fall down and pile up on

  4. The Cellular Distribution of RanGAP1 Is Regulated by CRM1-Mediated Nuclear Export in Mammalian Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith Cha

    Full Text Available The Ran GTPase activating protein RanGAP1 plays an essential role in nuclear transport by stimulating RanGTP hydrolysis in the cytoplasmic compartment. In mammalian cells, unmodified RanGAP1 is predominantly cytoplasmic, whereas modification by small ubiquitin-related modifier protein (SUMO targets RanGAP1 to the cytoplasmic filaments of nuclear pore complex (NPC. Although RanGAP1 contains nine putative nuclear export signals and a nuclear localization signal, little is known if RanGAP1 shuttles between the nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments and how its primary localization in the cytoplasm and at the NPC is regulated. Here we show that inhibition of CRM1-mediated nuclear export using RNAi-knockdown of CRM1 and inactivation of CRM1 by leptomycin B (LMB results in nuclear accumulation of RanGAP1. LMB treatment induced a more robust redistribution of RanGAP1 from the cytoplasm to the nucleoplasm compared to CRM1 RNAi and also uniquely triggered a decrease or loss of RanGAP1 localization at the NPC, suggesting that LMB treatment is more effective in inhibiting CRM1-mediated nuclear export of RanGAP1. Our time-course analysis of LMB treatment reveals that the NPC-associated RanGAP1 is much more slowly redistributed to the nucleoplasm than the cytoplasmic RanGAP1. Furthermore, LMB-induced nuclear accumulation of RanGAP1 is positively correlated with an increase in levels of SUMO-modified RanGAP1, suggesting that SUMOylation of RanGAP1 may mainly take place in the nucleoplasm. Lastly, we demonstrate that the nuclear localization signal at the C-terminus of RanGAP1 is required for its nuclear accumulation in cells treated with LMB. Taken together, our results elucidate that RanGAP1 is actively transported between the nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments, and that the cytoplasmic and NPC localization of RanGAP1 is dependent on CRM1-mediated nuclear export.

  5. Np9, a cellular protein of retroviral ancestry restricted to human, chimpanzee and gorilla, binds and regulates ubiquitin ligase MDM2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyne, Kristina; Kölsch, Kathrin; Bruand, Marine; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Grässer, Friedrich A; Mayer, Jens; Roemer, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Humans and primates are long-lived animals with long reproductive phases. One factor that appears to contribute to longevity and fertility in humans, as well as to cancer-free survival, is the transcription factor and tumor suppressor p53, controlled by its main negative regulator MDM2. However, p53 and MDM2 homologs are found throughout the metazoan kingdom from Trichoplacidae to Hominidae. Therefore the question arises, if p53/MDM2 contributes to the shaping of primate features, then through which mechanisms. Previous findings have indicated that the appearances of novel p53-regulated genes and wild-type p53 variants during primate evolution are important in this context. Here, we report on another mechanism of potential relevance. Human endogenous retrovirus K subgroup HML-2 (HERV-K(HML-2)) type 1 proviral sequences were formed in the genomes of the predecessors of contemporary Hominoidea and can be identified in the genomes of Nomascus leucogenys (gibbon) up to Homo sapiens. We previously reported on an alternative splicing event in HERV-K(HML-2) type 1 proviruses that can give rise to nuclear protein of 9 kDa (Np9). We document here the evolution of Np9-coding capacity in human, chimpanzee and gorilla, and show that the C-terminal half of Np9 binds directly to MDM2, through a domain of MDM2 that is known to be contacted by various cellular proteins in response to stress. Np9 can inhibit the MDM2 ubiquitin ligase activity toward p53 in the cell nucleus, and can support the transactivation of genes by p53. Our findings point to the possibility that endogenous retrovirus protein Np9 contributes to the regulation of the p53-MDM2 pathway specifically in humans, chimpanzees and gorillas. PMID:26103464

  6. Proteomic investigation of Vibrio alginolyticus challenged Caenorhabditis elegans revealed regulation of cellular homeostasis proteins and their role in supporting innate immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durai, Sellegounder; Singh, Nirpendra; Kundu, Suman; Balamurugan, Krishnaswamy

    2014-08-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans has been the preferred model system for many investigators to study pathogenesis. In the present investigation, regulation of C. elegans proteome was explored against V. alginolyticus infection using quantitative proteomics approach. Proteins were separated using 2D-DIGE and the differentially regulated proteins were identified using PMF and MALDI TOF/TOF analysis. The results thus obtained were validated using Western blotting for candidate proteins. The corresponding transcriptional regulation was quantified subsequently using real-time PCR. Interaction network for candidate proteins was predicted using search tool for the retrieval of interacting genes/proteins (STRING) and functional validation was performed using respective mutant strains. Out of the 25 proteins identified, 21 proteins appeared to be upregulated while four were downregulated. Upregulated proteins included those involved in stress-response (PDI-2, HSP-6), immune-response (protein kinase -18, GST-8) and energy-production (ATP-2) while proteins involved in structural maintenance (IFB-2) and lipid metabolism (SODH-1) were downregulated. The roles of these players in the host system during Vibrio infection was analyzed in vivo using wild type and mutant C. elegans. Survival assays using mutants lacking pdi-2, ire-1, and xbp-1 displayed enhanced susceptibility to V. alginolyticus. Cellular stress generated by V. alginolyticus was determined using ROS assay. This is the first report of proteome changes in C. elegans against V. alginolyticus challenge and highlights the significance of unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway during bacterial infection. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Study on design method and vibration reduction characteristic of floating raft with periodic structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yuanyuan; Zuo, Yanyan; Xia, Zhaowang

    2018-03-01

    The noise level is getting higher with the development of high-power marine power plant. Mechanical noise is one of the most obvious noise sources which not only affect equipment reliability, riding comfort and working environment, but also enlarge underwater noise. The periodic truss type device which is commonly applied in fields of aerospace and architectural is introduced to floating raft construction in ship. Four different raft frame structure are designed in the paper. The vibration transmissibility is taken as an evaluation index to measure vibration isolation effect. A design scheme with the best vibration isolation effect is found by numerical method. Plate type and the optimized periodic truss type raft frame structure are processed to experimental verify vibration isolation effect of the structure of the periodic raft. The experimental results demonstrate that the same quality of the periodic truss floating raft has better isolation effect than that of the plate type floating raft.

  8. Lipid rafts generate digital-like signal transduction in cell plasma membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Kenichi G N

    2012-06-01

    Lipid rafts are meso-scale (5-200 nm) cell membrane domains where signaling molecules assemble and function. However, due to their dynamic nature, it has been difficult to unravel the mechanism of signal transduction in lipid rafts. Recent advanced imaging techniques have revealed that signaling molecules are frequently, but transiently, recruited to rafts with the aid of protein-protein, protein-lipid, and/or lipid-lipid interactions. Individual signaling molecules within the raft are activated only for a short period of time. Immobilization of signaling molecules by cytoskeletal actin filaments and scaffold proteins may facilitate more efficient signal transmission from rafts. In this review, current opinions of how the transient nature of molecular interactions in rafts generates digital-like signal transduction in cell membranes, and the benefits this phenomenon provides, are discussed. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Effect analysis of geometric parameters of floating raft on isolation performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Shangda

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available [Objectives] This paper focuses on the effects of the geometric parameters of a floating raft on isolation performance.[Methods] Based on the idea that the weight of a floating raft remains constant, a parametric finite element model is established using geometric parameters, and the effects of the geometric parameters when isolation performance is measured by vibration level difference are discussed.[Results] The effects of the geometric parameters of a floating raft on isolation performance are mainly reflected in the middle and high frequency areas. The most important geometric parameters which have an impact on isolation performance are the raft's height, length to width ratio and number of ribs. Adjusting the geometric parameters of the raft is one effective way to avoid the vibration frequency of mechanical equipment.[Conclusions] This paper has some practical value for the engineering design of floating raft isolation systems.

  10. Tissue Engineering the Cornea: The Evolution of RAFT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levis, Hannah J.; Kureshi, Alvena K.; Massie, Isobel; Morgan, Louise; Vernon, Amanda J.; Daniels, Julie T.

    2015-01-01

    Corneal blindness affects over 10 million people worldwide and current treatment strategies often involve replacement of the defective layer with healthy tissue. Due to a worldwide donor cornea shortage and the absence of suitable biological scaffolds, recent research has focused on the development of tissue engineering techniques to create alternative therapies. This review will detail how we have refined the simple engineering technique of plastic compression of collagen to a process we now call Real Architecture for 3D Tissues (RAFT). The RAFT production process has been standardised, and steps have been taken to consider Good Manufacturing Practice compliance. The evolution of this process has allowed us to create biomimetic epithelial and endothelial tissue equivalents suitable for transplantation and ideal for studying cell-cell interactions in vitro. PMID:25809689

  11. Expression of human papilloma virus type 16 E5 protein in amelanotic melanoma cells regulates endo-cellular pH and restores tyrosinase activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coccia Raffaella

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Melanin synthesis, the elective trait of melanocytes, is regulated by tyrosinase activity. In tyrosinase-positive amelanotic melanomas this rate limiting enzyme is inactive because of acidic endo-melanosomal pH. The E5 oncogene of the Human Papillomavirus Type 16 is a small transmembrane protein with a weak transforming activity and a role during the early steps of viral infections. E5 has been shown to interact with 16 kDa subunit C of the trans-membrane Vacuolar ATPase proton pump ultimately resulting in its functional suppressions. However, the cellular effects of such an interaction are still under debate. With this work we intended to explore whether the HPV16 E5 oncoprotein does indeed interact with the vacuolar ATPase proton pump once expressed in intact human cells and whether this interaction has functional consequences on cell metabolism and phenotype. Methods The expression of the HPV16-E5 oncoproteins was induced in two Tyrosinase-positive amelanotic melanomas (the cell lines FRM and M14 by a retroviral expression construct. Modulation of the intracellular pH was measured with Acridine orange and fluorescence microscopy. Expression of tyrosinase and its activity was followed by RT-PCR, Western Blot and enzyme assay. The anchorage-independence growth and the metabolic activity of E5 expressing cells were also monitored. Results We provide evidence that in the E5 expressing cells interaction between E5 and V-ATPase determines an increase of endo-cellular pH. The cellular alkalinisation in turn leads to the post-translational activation of tyrosinase, melanin synthesis and phenotype modulation. These effects are associated with an increased activation of tyrosine analogue anti-blastic drugs. Conclusion Once expressed within intact human cells the HPV16-E5 oncoprotein does actually interact with the vacuolar V-ATPase proton pump and this interaction induces a number of functional effects. In amelanotic melanomas these

  12. Circular Raft Footings Strengthened by Stone Columns under Static Loads

    OpenAIRE

    R. Ziaie Moayed; B. Mohammadi-Haji

    2016-01-01

    Stone columns have been widely employed to improve the load-settlement characteristics of soft soils. The results of two small scale displacement control loading tests on stone columns were used in order to validate numerical finite element simulations. Additionally, a series of numerical calculations of static loading have been performed on strengthened raft footing to investigate the effects of using stone columns on bearing capacity of footings. The bearing capacity of single and group of ...

  13. The nucleolus: a raft adrift in the nuclear sea or the keystone in nuclear structure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Justin M; Pai, Dave A; Cridge, Andrew G; Engelke, David R; Ganley, Austen R D

    2013-06-01

    The nucleolus is a prominent nuclear structure that is the site of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) transcription, and hence ribosome biogenesis. Cellular demand for ribosomes, and hence rRNA, is tightly linked to cell growth and the rRNA makes up the majority of all the RNA within a cell. To fulfill the cellular demand for rRNA, the ribosomal RNA (rDNA) genes are amplified to high copy number and transcribed at very high rates. As such, understanding the rDNA has profound consequences for our comprehension of genome and transcriptional organization in cells. In this review, we address the question of whether the nucleolus is a raft adrift the sea of nuclear DNA, or actively contributes to genome organization. We present evidence supporting the idea that the nucleolus, and the rDNA contained therein, play more roles in the biology of the cell than simply ribosome biogenesis. We propose that the nucleolus and the rDNA are central factors in the spatial organization of the genome, and that rapid alterations in nucleolar structure in response to changing conditions manifest themselves in altered genomic structures that have functional consequences. Finally, we discuss some predictions that result from the nucleolus having a central role in nuclear organization.

  14. The foundation mass concrete construction technology of Hongyun Building B tower raft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Yin, Suhua; Wu, Yanli; Zhao, Ying

    2017-08-01

    The foundation of Hongyun building B tower is made of raft board foundation which is 3300mm in the thickness and 2800mm beside side of the core tube. It is researched that the raft foundation mass concrete construction technology is expatiated from temperature and cracks of the raft foundation and the temperature control and monitoring of the concrete base slab construction and concrete curing.

  15. Effect of modeling of super-structure on the behaviour of reactor building raft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondal, A.; Singh, A.K.; Roy, Raghupati; Verma, U.S.P.; Warudkar, A.S.

    2003-01-01

    The behaviour of the reactor building raft was studied when the stiffness of the super-structural elements is included in the analysis as compared to the results of conventional analysis ignoring the stiffness of the super-structural elements. The effect of the stiffness of the super-structures on the loss of contact of the raft under seismic environment was also investigated. In order to study the effect of horizontal springs on the behaviour of the raft particularly near the stressing gallery under seismic environment, a separate study has been carried out considering a 3D model consisting of solid elements supported on both horizontal and vertical springs. The model was analysed for all the forces applied at the top of the raft and the analysis results were compared with those of shell model. The following conclusions are drawn: (i) Idealisation of the reactor building raft using shell elements is adequate for estimating the design forces/moments on the raft. The design forces/moments obtained from FE model consisting of solid elements closely matches with those obtained from FE model with shell elements. Idealisation of the RB raft using shell elements will also reduce the problem size and the related computational efforts. (ii) The stiffness of the super-structure has significant effect on the behaviour of the raft. Consideration of the stiffness of the super structure reduces the design forces/moments significantly and hence, modelling of the stiffness of the super structure is necessary for economical design. (iii) Modelling of horizontal stiffness of the raft in terms of horizontal springs at the interface of the raft and the rock does not have significant effect on the behaviour of the raft and as such, is not required to be considered in the FE model. However, it is necessary to ensure adequate factor of safety against the overall stability of the raft

  16. Erythropoietin receptor signaling is membrane raft dependent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.L. McGraw (Kathy); G.M. Fuhler (Gwenny); J.O. Johnson (Joseph); J.A. Clark (Justine); G.C. Caceres (Gisela); L. Sokol (Lubomir); A.F. List (Alan)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractUpon erythropoietin (Epo) engagement, Epo-receptor (R) homodimerizes to activate JAK2 and Lyn, which phosphorylate STAT5. Although recent investigations have identified key negative regulators of Epo-R signaling, little is known about the role of membrane localization in controlling

  17. Lipid alterations in lipid rafts from Alzheimer's disease human brain cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Virginia; Fabelo, Noemí; Santpere, Gabriel; Puig, Berta; Marín, Raquel; Ferrer, Isidre; Díaz, Mario

    2010-01-01

    Lipid rafts are membrane microdomains intimately associated with cell signaling. These biochemical microstructures are characterized by their high contents of sphingolipids, cholesterol and saturated fatty acids and a reduced content of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). Here, we have purified lipid rafts of human frontal brain cortex from normal and Alzheimer's disease (AD) and characterized their biochemical lipid composition. The results revealed that lipid rafts from AD brains exhibit aberrant lipid profiles compared to healthy brains. In particular, lipid rafts from AD brains displayed abnormally low levels of n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA, mainly 22:6n-3, docosahexaenoic acid) and monoenes (mainly 18:1n-9, oleic acid), as well as reduced unsaturation and peroxidability indexes. Also, multiple relationships between phospholipids and fatty acids were altered in AD lipid rafts. Importantly, no changes were observed in the mole percentage of lipid classes and fatty acids in rafts from normal brains throughout the lifespan (24-85 years). These indications point to the existence of homeostatic mechanisms preserving lipid raft status in normal frontal cortex. The disruption of such mechanisms in AD brains leads to a considerable increase in lipid raft order and viscosity, which may explain the alterations in lipid raft signaling observed in AD.

  18. Formulation and optimisation of raft-forming chewable tablets containing H2 antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajapati, Shailesh T; Mehta, Anant P; Modhia, Ishan P; Patel, Chhagan N

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this research work was to formulate raft-forming chewable tablets of H2 antagonist (Famotidine) using a raft-forming agent along with an antacid- and gas-generating agent. Tablets were prepared by wet granulation and evaluated for raft strength, acid neutralisation capacity, weight variation, % drug content, thickness, hardness, friability and in vitro drug release. Various raft-forming agents were used in preliminary screening. A 2(3) full-factorial design was used in the present study for optimisation. The amount of sodium alginate, amount of calcium carbonate and amount sodium bicarbonate were selected as independent variables. Raft strength, acid neutralisation capacity and drug release at 30 min were selected as responses. Tablets containing sodium alginate were having maximum raft strength as compared with other raft-forming agents. Acid neutralisation capacity and in vitro drug release of all factorial batches were found to be satisfactory. The F5 batch was optimised based on maximum raft strength and good acid neutralisation capacity. Drug-excipient compatibility study showed no interaction between the drug and excipients. Stability study of the optimised formulation showed that the tablets were stable at accelerated environmental conditions. It was concluded that raft-forming chewable tablets prepared using an optimum amount of sodium alginate, calcium carbonate and sodium bicarbonate could be an efficient dosage form in the treatment of gastro oesophageal reflux disease.

  19. Surface chemistry of lipid raft and amyloid Aβ (1-40) Langmuir monolayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Garima; Pao, Christine; Micic, Miodrag; Johnson, Sheba; Leblanc, Roger M

    2011-10-15

    Lipid rafts being rich in cholesterol and sphingolipids are considered to provide ordered lipid environment in the neuronal membranes, where it is hypothesized that the cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) to Aβ (1-40) and Aβ (1-42) takes place. It is highly likely that the interaction of lipid raft components like cholesterol, sphingomylein or GM1 leads to nucleation of Aβ and results in aggregation or accumulation of amyloid plaques. One has investigated surface pressure-area isotherms of the lipid raft and Aβ (1-40) Langmuir monolayer. The compression-decompression cycles and the stability of the lipid raft Langmuir monolayer are crucial parameters for the investigation of interaction of Aβ (1-40) with the lipid raft Langmuir monolayer. It was revealed that GM1 provides instability to the lipid raft Langmuir monolayer. Adsorption of Aβ (1-40) onto the lipid raft Langmuir monolayer containing neutral (POPC) or negatively charged phospholipid (DPPG) was examined. The adsorption isotherms revealed that the concentration of cholesterol was important for adsorption of Aβ (1-40) onto the lipid raft Langmuir monolayer containing POPC whereas for the lipid raft Langmuir monolayer containing DPPG:cholesterol or GM1 did not play any role. In situ UV-vis absorption spectroscopy supported the interpretation of results for the adsorption isotherms. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Lipid raft integrity affects GABAA receptor, but not NMDA receptor modulation by psychopharmacological compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nothdurfter, Caroline; Tanasic, Sascha; Di Benedetto, Barbara; Uhr, Manfred; Wagner, Eva-Maria; Gilling, Kate E; Parsons, Chris G; Rein, Theo; Holsboer, Florian; Rupprecht, Rainer; Rammes, Gerhard

    2013-07-01

    Lipid rafts have been shown to play an important role for G-protein mediated signal transduction and the function of ligand-gated ion channels including their modulation by psychopharmacological compounds. In this study, we investigated the functional significance of the membrane distribution of NMDA and GABAA receptor subunits in relation to the accumulation of the tricyclic antidepressant desipramine (DMI) and the benzodiazepine diazepam (Diaz). In the presence of Triton X-100, which allowed proper separation of the lipid raft marker proteins caveolin-1 and flotillin-1 from the transferrin receptor, all receptor subunits were shifted to the non-raft fractions. In contrast, under detergent-free conditions, NMDA and GABAA receptor subunits were detected both in raft and non-raft fractions. Diaz was enriched in non-raft fractions without Triton X-100 in contrast to DMI, which preferentially accumulated in lipid rafts. Impairment of lipid raft integrity by methyl-β-cyclodextrine (MβCD)-induced cholesterol depletion did not change the inhibitory effect of DMI at the NMDA receptor, whereas it enhanced the potentiating effect of Diaz at the GABAA receptor at non-saturating concentrations of GABA. These results support the hypothesis that the interaction of benzodiazepines with the GABAA receptor likely occurs outside of lipid rafts while the antidepressant DMI acts on ionotropic receptors both within and outside these membrane microdomains.

  1. Sterol Regulation of Voltage-Gated K+ Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balajthy, Andras; Hajdu, Peter; Panyi, Gyorgy; Varga, Zoltan

    2017-01-01

    Cholesterol is an essential lipid building block of the cellular plasma membrane. In addition to its structural role, it regulates the fluidity and raft structure of the membrane and influences the course of numerous membrane-linked signaling pathways and the function of transmembrane proteins, including ion channels. This is supported by a vast body of scientific data, which demonstrates the modulation of ion channels with a great variety of ion selectivity, gating, and tissue distribution by changes in membrane cholesterol. Here, we review what is currently known about the modulation of voltage-gated K + (Kv) channels by changes in membrane cholesterol content, considering raft association of the channels, the roles of cholesterol recognition sites, and those of adaptor proteins in cholesterol-Kv channel interactions. We specifically focus on Kv1.3, the dominant K + channel of human T cells. Effects of cholesterol depletion and enrichment and 7-dehydrocholesterol enrichment on Kv1.3 gating are discussed in the context of the immunological synapse and the comparison of the in vitro effects of sterol modifications on Kv1.3 function with ex vivo effects on cells from hypercholesterolemic and Smith-Lemli-Opitz patients. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Dual acylation and lipid raft association of Src-family protein tyrosine kinases are required for SDF-1/CXCL12-mediated chemotaxis in the Jurkat human T cell lymphoma cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, Sabiha N; Resek, Mary E; Robbins, Stephen M

    2008-10-01

    Chemokines play pivotal roles in regulating a wide variety of biological processes by modulating cell migration and recruitment. Deregulation of chemokine signaling can alter cell recruitment, contributing to the pathogenic states associated with autoimmune disease, inflammatory disorders, and sepsis. During chemotaxis, lipid rafts and their resident signaling molecules have been demonstrated to partition to different parts of the cell. Herein, we investigated the role of lipid raft resident Src-family kinases (SFK) in stromal cell-derived factor 1/CXCL12-mediated chemotaxis. We have shown that Lck-deficient J.CaM 1.6 cells are defective in CXCL12-mediated chemotaxis in contrast to their parental counterpart, Jurkat cells. Ectopic expression of the SFK hematopoietic cell kinase (Hck) in J.CaM 1.6 cells reconstituted CXCL12 responsiveness. The requirement of lipid raft association of SFK was assessed using both isoforms of Hck: the dually acylated p59(Hck) isoform that is targeted to lipid rafts and the monoacylated p61(Hck) isoform that is nonraft-associated. We have shown using several gain and loss of acylation alleles that dual acylation of Hck was required for CXCL12-mediated chemotaxis in J.CaM 1.6 cells. These results highlight the importance of the unique microenvironment provided by lipid rafts and their specific contribution in providing specificity to CXCL12 signaling.

  3. Secreted glyceraldehye-3-phosphate dehydrogenase is a multifunctional autocrine transferrin receptor for cellular iron acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheokand, Navdeep; Kumar, Santosh; Malhotra, Himanshu; Tillu, Vikas; Raje, Chaaya Iyengar; Raje, Manoj

    2013-06-01

    The long held view is that mammalian cells obtain transferrin (Tf) bound iron utilizing specialized membrane anchored receptors. Here we report that, during increased iron demand, cells secrete the glycolytic enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) which enhances cellular uptake of Tf and iron. These observations could be mimicked by utilizing purified GAPDH injected into mice as well as when supplemented in culture medium of model cell lines and primary cell types that play a key role in iron metabolism. Transferrin and iron delivery was evaluated by biochemical, biophysical and imaging based assays. This mode of iron uptake is a saturable, energy dependent pathway, utilizing raft as well as non-raft domains of the cell membrane and also involves the membrane protein CD87 (uPAR). Tf internalized by this mode is also catabolized. Our research demonstrates that, even in cell types that express the known surface receptor based mechanism for transferrin uptake, more transferrin is delivered by this route which represents a hidden dimension of iron homeostasis. Iron is an essential trace metal for practically all living organisms however its acquisition presents major challenges. The current paradigm is that living organisms have developed well orchestrated and evolved mechanisms involving iron carrier molecules and their specific receptors to regulate its absorption, transport, storage and mobilization. Our research uncovers a hidden and primitive pathway of bulk iron trafficking involving a secreted receptor that is a multifunctional glycolytic enzyme that has implications in pathological conditions such as infectious diseases and cancer. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. A systems biology approach reveals that tissue tropism to West Nile virus is regulated by antiviral genes and innate immune cellular processes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehul S Suthar

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The actions of the RIG-I like receptor (RLR and type I interferon (IFN signaling pathways are essential for a protective innate immune response against the emerging flavivirus West Nile virus (WNV. In mice lacking RLR or IFN signaling pathways, WNV exhibits enhanced tissue tropism, indicating that specific host factors of innate immune defense restrict WNV infection and dissemination in peripheral tissues. However, the immune mechanisms by which the RLR and IFN pathways coordinate and function to impart restriction of WNV infection are not well defined. Using a systems biology approach, we defined the host innate immune response signature and actions that restrict WNV tissue tropism. Transcriptional profiling and pathway modeling to compare WNV-infected permissive (spleen and nonpermissive (liver tissues showed high enrichment for inflammatory responses, including pattern recognition receptors and IFN signaling pathways, that define restriction of WNV replication in the liver. Assessment of infected livers from Mavs(-/- × Ifnar(-/- mice revealed the loss of expression of several key components within the natural killer (NK cell signaling pathway, including genes associated with NK cell activation, inflammatory cytokine production, and NK cell receptor signaling. In vivo analysis of hepatic immune cell infiltrates from WT mice demonstrated that WNV infection leads to an increase in NK cell numbers with enhanced proliferation, maturation, and effector action. In contrast, livers from Mavs(-/- × Ifnar(-/- infected mice displayed reduced immune cell infiltration, including a significant reduction in NK cell numbers. Analysis of cocultures of dendritic and NK cells revealed both cell-intrinsic and -extrinsic roles for the RLR and IFN signaling pathways to regulate NK cell effector activity. Taken together, these observations reveal a complex innate immune signaling network, regulated by the RLR and IFN signaling pathways, that drives tissue

  5. Building synthetic cellular organization

    OpenAIRE

    Polka, Jessica K.; Silver, Pamela A.

    2013-01-01

    The elaborate spatial organization of cells enhances, restricts, and regulates protein–protein interactions. However, the biological significance of this organization has been difficult to study without ways of directly perturbing it. We highlight synthetic biology tools for engineering novel cellular organization, describing how they have been, and can be, used to advance cell biology.

  6. Reversible and Dynamic Fluorescence Imaging of Cellular Redox Self-Regulation Using Fast-Responsive Near-Infrared Ge-Pyronines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Hailiang; Jing, Jing; Tian, Yong; Yang, Wen; Zhang, Rubo; Zhang, Xiaoling

    2016-04-13

    Cellular self-regulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) stress via glutathione (GSH) antioxidant repair plays a crucial role in maintaining redox balance, which affects various physiological and pathological pathways. In this work, we developed a simple yet effective strategy for reversible, dynamic, and real-time fluorescence imaging of ROS stress and GSH repair, based on novel Ge-pyronine dyes (GePs). Unlike the current O-pyronine (OP) dye, the fluorescence of GePs can be quenched in GSH reduction and then greatly restored by ROS (e.g., ClO(-), ONOO(-), and HO(•)) oxidation because of their unique affinity toward thiols. The "on-off" and "off-on" fluorescence switch can complete in 10 and 20 s, respectively, and exhibit excellent reversibility in vitro and in cells. GePs also show excitation in the long wavelength from the deep-red to near-infrared (NIR) (621-662 nm) region, high fluorescence quantum yield (Φ(fl) = 0.32-0.44) in aqueous media, and excellent cell permeability. Our results demonstrated that GePs can be used for real-time monitoring of the reversible and dynamic interconversion between ROS oxidation and GSH reduction in living cells. GePs might be a useful tool for investigating various redox-related physiological and pathological pathways.

  7. Syndecan-1 Acts as an Important Regulator of CXCL1 Expression and Cellular Interaction of Human Endometrial Stromal and Trophoblast Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dunja Maria Baston-Buest

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Successful implantation of the embryo into the human receptive endometrium is substantial for the establishment of a healthy pregnancy. This study focusses on the role of Syndecan-1 at the embryo-maternal interface, the multitasking coreceptor influencing ligand concentration, release and receptor presentation, and cellular morphology. CXC motif ligand 1, being involved in chemotaxis and angiogenesis during implantation, is of special interest as a ligand of Syndecan-1. Human endometrial stromal cells with and without Syndecan-1 knock-down were decidualized and treated with specific inhibitors to evaluate signaling pathways regulating CXC ligand 1 expression. Western blot analyses of MAPK and Wnt members were performed, followed by analysis of spheroid interactions between human endometrial cells and extravillous trophoblast cells. By mimicking embryo contact using IL-1β, we showed less ERK and c-Jun activation by depletion of Syndecan-1 and less Frizzled 4 production as part of the canonical Wnt pathway. Additionally, more beta-catenin was phosphorylated and therefore degraded after depletion of Syndecan-1. Secretion of CXC motif ligand 1 depends on MEK-1 with respect to Syndecan-1. Regarding the interaction of endometrial and trophoblast cells, the spheroid center-to-center distances were smaller after depletion of Syndecan-1. Therefore, Syndecan-1 seems to affect signaling processes relevant to signaling and intercellular interaction at the trophoblast-decidual interface.

  8. Proteomic Analysis of Lipid Raft-Like Detergent-Resistant Membranes of Lens Fiber Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen; Schey, Kevin L

    2015-12-01

    Plasma membranes of lens fiber cells have high levels of long-chain saturated fatty acids, cholesterol, and sphingolipids-key components of lipid rafts. Thus, lipid rafts are expected to constitute a significant portion of fiber cell membranes and play important roles in lens biology. The purpose of this study was to characterize the lens lipid raft proteome. Quantitative proteomics, both label-free and iTRAQ methods, were used to characterize lens fiber cell lipid raft proteins. Detergent-resistant, lipid raft membrane (DRM) fractions were isolated by sucrose gradient centrifugation. To confirm protein localization to lipid rafts, protein sensitivity to cholesterol removal by methyl-β-cyclodextrin was quantified by iTRAQ analysis. A total of 506 proteins were identified in raft-like detergent-resistant membranes. Proteins identified support important functions of raft domains in fiber cells, including trafficking, signal transduction, and cytoskeletal organization. In cholesterol-sensitivity studies, 200 proteins were quantified and 71 proteins were strongly affected by cholesterol removal. Lipid raft markers flotillin-1 and flotillin-2 and a significant fraction of AQP0, MP20, and AQP5 were found in the DRM fraction and were highly sensitive to cholesterol removal. Connexins 46 and 50 were more abundant in nonraft fractions, but a small fraction of each was found in the DRM fraction and was strongly affected by cholesterol removal. Quantification of modified AQP0 confirmed that fatty acylation targeted this protein to membrane raft domains. These data represent the first comprehensive profile of the lipid raft proteome of lens fiber cells and provide information on membrane protein organization in these cells.

  9. MicroRNA-31 controls phenotypic modulation of human vascular smooth muscle cells by regulating its target gene cellular repressor of E1A-stimulated genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jie; Yan, Cheng-Hui; Li, Yang; Xu, Kai; Tian, Xiao-Xiang; Peng, Cheng-Fei; Tao, Jie; Sun, Ming-Yu; Han, Ya-Ling

    2013-01-01

    Phenotypic modulation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of a variety of proliferative vascular diseases. The cellular repressor of E1A-stimulated genes (CREG) has been shown to play an important role in phenotypic modulation of VSMCs. However, the mechanism regulating CREG upstream signaling remains unclear. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have recently been found to play a critical role in cell differentiation via target-gene regulation. This study aimed to identify a miRNA that binds directly to CREG, and may thus be involved in CREG-mediated VSMC phenotypic modulation. Computational analysis indicated that miR-31 bound to the CREG mRNA 3′ untranslated region (3′-UTR). miR-31 was upregulated in quiescent differentiated VSMCs and downregulated in proliferative cells stimulated by platelet-derived growth factor and serum starvation, demonstrating a negative relationship with the VSMC differentiation marker genes, smooth muscle α-actin, calponin and CREG. Using gain-of-function and loss-of-function approaches, CREG and VSMC differentiation marker gene expression levels were shown to be suppressed by a miR-31 mimic, but increased by a miR-31 inhibitor at both protein and mRNA levels. Notably, miR-31 overexpression or inhibition affected luciferase expression driven by the CREG 3′-UTR containing the miR-31 binding site. Furthermore, miR-31-mediated VSMC phenotypic modulation was inhibited in CREG-knockdown human VSMCs. We also determined miR-31 levels in the serum of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), with or without in stent restenosis and in healthy controls. miR-31 levels were higher in the serum of CAD patients with restenosis compared to CAD patients without restenosis and in healthy controls. In summary, these data demonstrate that miR-31 not only directly binds to its target gene CREG and modulates the VSMC phenotype through this interaction, but also can be an important biomarker in diseases involving VSMC

  10. Membrane raft organization is more sensitive to disruption by (n-3) PUFA than nonraft organization in EL4 and B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockett, Benjamin Drew; Franklin, Andrew; Harris, Mitchel; Teague, Heather; Rockett, Alexis; Shaikh, Saame Raza

    2011-06-01

    Model membrane and cellular detergent extraction studies show (n-3) PUFA predominately incorporate into nonrafts; thus, we hypothesized (n-3) PUFA could disrupt nonraft organization. The first objective of this study was to determine whether (n-3) PUFA disrupted nonrafts of EL4 cells, an extension of our previous work in which we discovered an (n-3) PUFA diminished raft clustering. EPA or DHA treatment of EL4 cells increased plasma membrane accumulation of the nonraft probe 1,1'-dilinoleyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate by ~50-70% relative to a BSA control. Förster resonance energy transfer imaging showed EPA and DHA also disrupted EL4 nanometer scale nonraft organization by increasing the distance between nonraft molecules by ~25% compared with BSA. However, changes in nonrafts were due to an increase in cell size; under conditions where EPA or DHA did not increase cell size, nonraft organization was unaffected. We next translated findings on EL4 cells by testing if (n-3) PUFA administered to mice disrupted nonrafts and rafts. Imaging of B cells isolated from mice fed low- or high-fat (HF) (n-3) PUFA diets showed no change in nonraft organization compared with a control diet (CD). However, confocal microscopy revealed the HF (n-3) PUFA diet disrupted lipid raft clustering and size by ~40% relative to CD. Taken together, our data from 2 different model systems suggest (n-3) PUFA have limited effects on nonrafts. The ex vivo data, which confirm previous studies with EL4 cells, provide evidence that (n-3) PUFA consumed through the diet disrupt B cell lipid raft clustering.

  11. Membrane Raft Organization Is More Sensitive to Disruption by (n-3) PUFA Than Nonraft Organization in EL4 and B Cells123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockett, Benjamin Drew; Franklin, Andrew; Harris, Mitchel; Teague, Heather; Rockett, Alexis; Shaikh, Saame Raza

    2011-01-01

    Model membrane and cellular detergent extraction studies show (n-3) PUFA predominately incorporate into nonrafts; thus, we hypothesized (n-3) PUFA could disrupt nonraft organization. The first objective of this study was to determine whether (n-3) PUFA disrupted nonrafts of EL4 cells, an extension of our previous work in which we discovered an (n-3) PUFA diminished raft clustering. EPA or DHA treatment of EL4 cells increased plasma membrane accumulation of the nonraft probe 1,1′-dilinoleyl-3,3,3′,3′-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate by ~50–70% relative to a BSA control. Förster resonance energy transfer imaging showed EPA and DHA also disrupted EL4 nanometer scale nonraft organization by increasing the distance between nonraft molecules by ~25% compared with BSA. However, changes in nonrafts were due to an increase in cell size; under conditions where EPA or DHA did not increase cell size, nonraft organization was unaffected. We next translated findings on EL4 cells by testing if (n-3) PUFA administered to mice disrupted nonrafts and rafts. Imaging of B cells isolated from mice fed low- or high-fat (HF) (n-3) PUFA diets showed no change in nonraft organization compared with a control diet (CD). However, confocal microscopy revealed the HF (n-3) PUFA diet disrupted lipid raft clustering and size by ~40% relative to CD. Taken together, our data from 2 different model systems suggest (n-3) PUFA have limited effects on nonrafts. The ex vivo data, which confirm previous studies with EL4 cells, provide evidence that (n-3) PUFA consumed through the diet disrupt B cell lipid raft clustering. PMID:21525263

  12. Lipid raft microdomains: key sites for Coxsackievirus A9 infectious cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triantafilou, Kathy; Triantafilou, Martha

    2003-01-01

    Lipid rafts have an important property to preferentially concentrate some proteins, while excluding others. Lipid rafts can also act as functional platforms for multiple signalling and trafficking processes. Several reports have shown that lipid rafts play a crucial role in the assembly of several enveloped viruses and possibly their cell entry. In this study we investigated the importance of lipid raft formation in Coxsackievirus A9 (CAV-9) entry and cell infection. Here by using a variety of biochemical and biophysical methods, we report that receptor molecules integrin αvβ3 and GRP78, which are implicated in CAV-9 infection as well as accessory molecules such as MHC class I, are accumulated in increased concentrations in lipid rafts following CAV-9 infection. In addition our studies revealed that raft integrity is essential for this virus since CAV-9 activates the Raf/MAPK signalling pathway within the raft and raft-disrupting drugs such as nystatin and MCD can successfully inhibit CAV-9 infection

  13. Lipid raft organization and function in the small intestinal brush border

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, E M; Hansen, Gert Helge

    2008-01-01

    proteinases, are protected from untimely release into the gut lumen. Finally, anti-glycosyl antibodies, synthesized by plasma cells locally in the gut, are deposited on the brush border glycolipid rafts, protecting the epithelium from lumenal pathogens that exploit lipid rafts as portals for entry...... to the organism....

  14. Characterization of Z-RAFT star polymerization of butyl acrylate by size-exclusion chromatography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boschmann, D.; Edam, R.; Schoenmakers, P.J.; Vana, P.

    2009-01-01

    Z-RAFT star polymerization of butyl acrylate using multifunctional trithiocarbonate-type RAFT agents carrying methyl propionate as the leaving group were used to form star polymers having 3, 4, and 6 arms. The polymerizations showed well controlled behavior up to high monomer conversions. By using a

  15. Probing the RAFT process using a model reaction between alkoxyamine and dithioester

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Y.

    2012-01-01

    A small-molecular model reaction was designed to probe the reversible addition–fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) process. In this reaction, alkoxyamine releases radicals that react in situ with dithioester through the RAFT process, generating new radicals through the fragmentation of the

  16. Research Note 2: Egg raft density and feeding preference of Culex ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... useful for estimating the number of eggs in a culicine egg raft, making a decision on larvae food preference and using the easily available table sugar instead of the more expensive sucrose in adult rearing. Keywords:mosquito eggs, mosquito larvae, culicine mosquito, egg raft density. Nigerian Journal of Parasitology Vol.

  17. Economic impacts of guided whitewater rafting: a study of five rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald B.K. English; J. Michael Bowker

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents estimates of the statewide economic impacts of guided whitewater rafting on five rivers in six states: the Nantahala (North Carolina), Gauley (West Virginia), Kennebec (Maine), Middle Fork of the Salmon (Idaho), and Chattooga (Georgia-South Carolina). Except for the Chattooga and Middle Fork, rafting is dependent on upstream dam releases. Guide fees...

  18. RAFTing with Raptors: Connecting Science, English Language Arts, and the Common Core State Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senn, Gary J.; McMurtrie, Deborah H.; Coleman, Bridget K.

    2013-01-01

    This article explores using the RAFT strategy (Role, Audience, Format, Topic) for writing in science classes. The framework of the RAFT strategy will be explained, and connections with Common Core State Standards (CCSS) for ELA/Literacy will be discussed. Finally, there will be a discussion of a professional learning experience for teachers in…

  19. Membrane Raft Organization Is More Sensitive to Disruption by (n-3) PUFA Than Nonraft Organization in EL4 and B Cells123

    OpenAIRE

    Rockett, Benjamin Drew; Franklin, Andrew; Harris, Mitchel; Teague, Heather; Rockett, Alexis; Shaikh, Saame Raza

    2011-01-01

    Model membrane and cellular detergent extraction studies show (n-3) PUFA predominately incorporate into nonrafts; thus, we hypothesized (n-3) PUFA could disrupt nonraft organization. The first objective of this study was to determine whether (n-3) PUFA disrupted nonrafts of EL4 cells, an extension of our previous work in which we discovered an (n-3) PUFA diminished raft clustering. EPA or DHA treatment of EL4 cells increased plasma membrane accumulation of the nonraft probe 1,1′-dilinoleyl-3,...

  20. Molecular nuclear imaging of tumoral angio genesis using a rgd-containing tracer, Raft-RGD, targeted at the neo vessel-specific integrin αvβ3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sancey, L.

    2006-06-01

    Tumoral neo-angio genesis targeting is currently a major field of research for the diagnostic and treatment of solid tumors. Endothelial cells from neo vessels over express several specific markers such as the α v β 3 integrin, which binds RGD (-Arg-Gly-Asp-)- containing peptides. We evaluated the potential of a novel radiotracer - RAFT-RGD - for the molecular nuclear imaging of neo vessels. In vitro, the coupling of 4 c(RGDfK) to the RAFT platform resulted in an increased cellular uptake of the tracer by α v β 3 positive cells when compared to c(RGDfK). Furthermore, RAFTRGD has a higher affinity than c(RGDfK) and similar properties for angio genesis inhibition. In vivo, both α v β 3 positive and negative tumors were visible by non invasive whole body planar and tomographic imaging from 30 min to 24 h post-injection, using a gamma camera dedicated to small animal imaging. Despite a lack of significant contrast improvement compare with c(RGDfK), RAFT-RGD could represent a promising tracer for tumoral angio genesis since it could provide invaluable information about tumor development and treatment efficacy in Nuclear Medicine departments. Furthermore, thanks to its chemical structure, RAFT-RGD can be labelled with a variety of radioisotopes including γ and β - emitters, allowing interesting therapeutical applications such as internal targeted radiotherapy. (author)

  1. The raft foundation reinforcement construction technology of Hongyun Building B tower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Yin, Suhua; Wu, Yanli; Zhao, Ying

    2017-08-01

    The foundation of Hongyun building B tower is made of raft board foundation which is 3300mm in the thickness include four kinds of reinforcement Φ32, Φ28, Φ12 and 12 steel grade two, in respective. It is researched that the raft foundation mass concrete construction technology is expatiated from temperature and cracks of the raft foundation and the temperature control and monitoring of the concrete base slab construction and concrete curing. According to the characteristics with large volume and thickness of the engineering of raft foundation, the construction of the reinforced force was calculated and the quality control measures were used to the reinforcement binding and connection, so it is success that Hongyun Building B tower raft foundation reinforced construction.

  2. Lipid rafts exist as stable cholesterol-independent microdomains in the brush border membrane of enterocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Gert Helge; Immerdal, Lissi; Thorsen, Evy

    2001-01-01

    Glycosphingolipid/cholesterol-rich membranes ("rafts")can be isolated from many types of cells, but their existence as stable microdomains in the cell membrane has been elusive. Addressing this problem, we studied the distribution of galectin-4, a raft marker, and lactase, a protein excluded from...... rafts, on microvillar vesicles from the enterocyte brush border membrane. Magnetic beads coated with either anti-galectin-4 or anti-lactase antibodies were used for immunoisolation of vesicles followed by double immunogold labeling of the two proteins. A morphometric analysis revealed subpopulations...... of raft-rich and raft-poor vesicles by the following criteria: 1) the lactase/galectin-4 labeling ratio/vesicle captured by the anti-lactase beads was significantly higher (p

  3. Aminopeptidase N/CD13 is associated with raft membrane microdomains in monocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Navarrete Santos, A; Roentsch, J; Danielsen, E M

    2000-01-01

    as in adhesion and cell-cell interactions. Here, we report for the first time that aminopeptidase N/CD13 in monocytes is partially localized in detergent-insoluble membrane microdomains enriched in cholesterol, glycolipids, and glycosylphosphoinositol-anchored proteins, referred to as "rafts." Raft fractions...... of monocytes were characterized by the presence of GM1 ganglioside as raft marker molecule and by the high level of tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins. Furthermore, similar to polarized cells, rafts in monocytic cells lack Na(+), K(+)-ATPase. Cholesterol depletion of monocytes by methyl-beta-cyclodextrin greatly...... reduces raft localization of aminopeptidase N/CD13 without affecting ala-p-nitroanilide cleaving activity of cells....

  4. Fluoxetine up-regulates expression of cellular FLICE-inhibitory protein and inhibits LPS-induced apoptosis in hippocampus-derived neural stem cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiou, S.-H.; Chen, S.-J.; Peng, C-H.; Chang, Y.-L.; Ku, H.-H.; Hsu, W.-M.; Ho, Larry L.-T.; Lee, C.-H.

    2006-01-01

    Fluoxetine is a widely used antidepressant compound which inhibits the reuptake of serotonin in the central nervous system. Recent studies have shown that fluoxetine can promote neurogenesis and improve the survival rate of neurons. However, whether fluoxetine modulates the proliferation or neuroprotection effects of neural stem cells (NSCs) needs to be elucidated. In this study, we demonstrated that 20 μM fluoxetine can increase the cell proliferation of NSCs derived from the hippocampus of adult rats by MTT test. The up-regulated expression of Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and the cellular FLICE-inhibitory protein (c-FLIP) in fluoxetine-treated NSCs was detected by real-time RT-PCR. Our results further showed that fluoxetine protects the lipopolysaccharide-induced apoptosis in NSCs, in part, by activating the expression of c-FLIP. Moreover, c-FLIP induction by fluoxetine requires the activation of the c-FLIP promoter region spanning nucleotides -414 to -133, including CREB and SP1 sites. This effect appeared to involve the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase-dependent pathway. Furthermore, fluoxetine treatment significantly inhibited the induction of proinflammatory factor IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α in the culture medium of LPS-treated NSCs (p < 0.01). The results of high performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrochemical detection further confirmed that fluoxentine increased the functional production of serotonin in NSCs. Together, these data demonstrate the specific activation of c-FLIP by fluoxetine and indicate the novel role of fluoxetine for neuroprotection in the treatment of depression

  5. Cellular uptake of lead in the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier: Novel roles of Connexin 43 hemichannel and its down-regulations via Erk phosphorylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Han; Zheng, Gang; Liu, Yang; Shen, Xue-Feng; Zhao, Zai-Hua [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health and the Ministry-of-Education' s Key Laboratory of Hazard Assessment and Control in Special Operational Environment, School of Public Health, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Aschner, Michael [Department of Molecular Pharmacology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Luo, Wen-Jing, E-mail: luowenj@fmmu.edu.cn [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health and the Ministry-of-Education' s Key Laboratory of Hazard Assessment and Control in Special Operational Environment, School of Public Health, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Chen, Jing-Yuan, E-mail: jy_chen@fmmu.edu.cn [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health and the Ministry-of-Education' s Key Laboratory of Hazard Assessment and Control in Special Operational Environment, School of Public Health, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China)

    2016-04-15

    As the structural basis of blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCB), epithelial cells in the choroid plexus (CP) are targets for lead (Pb). Pb is known to accumulate in the CP; however, the mechanism of Pb uptake in the choroidal epithelial cells remains unknown. Recently, hemichannels of Connexin 43 (Cx43), the most ubiquitously expressed gap junction proteins in the CP, were found to be important pathways for many substances. This study was designed to investigate the roles of Cx43 in Pb uptake in the epithelial cells. Autometallography was used to outline Pb's subcellular location, and the characteristics of Pb transport into CP cells, including concentration- and time-dependence were analyzed by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Knockdown/overexpression of Cx43 with transient siRNA/plasmids transfections before Pb exposure diminished/increased the Pb accumulation. In the Z310 cell-based doxycycline-inducible Cx43 expression cell line (iZCx43), doxycycline induced a significant increase (3-fold) in Pb uptake, corresponding to the increased Cx43 levels. Activation of Cx43 hemichannels by reduced serum conditions caused an increase of Pb concentrations. Cx43-induced Pb uptake was attenuated after blockage of Cx43 hemichannels with its inhibitor, carbenoxolone. Additionally, down-regulation of Cx43 protein levels by Pb exposure paralleled cellular Pb concentrations in the time study. Concomitantly, expressions of phosphor-Src and phosphor-Erk were both significantly increased by Pb. However, inactivation of Erk, not Src pathway, reversed Pb-induced downregulation of Cx43. Taken together, these data establish that Pb can accumulate in the BCB and validate the role of Cx43 hemichannel in Pb uptake and its regulations through Erk phosphorylation. - Highlights: • Pb is sequestrated in choroid plexus both in vivo and in vitro. • Cx43 knockdown/overexpression prevents/increases Pb accumulations. • Cx43 hemichannels are required for Pb uptake. • Pb-induced Erk

  6. Protein kinase A-alpha directly phosphorylates FoxO1 in vascular endothelial cells to regulate expression of vascular cellular adhesion molecule-1 mRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji-Won; Chen, Hui; Pullikotil, Philomena; Quon, Michael J

    2011-02-25

    FoxO1, a forkhead box O class transcription factor, is abundant in insulin-responsive tissues. Akt, downstream from phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase in insulin signaling, phosphorylates FoxO1 at Thr(24), Ser(256), and Ser(319), negatively regulating its function. We previously reported that dehydroepiandrosterone-stimulated phosphorylation of FoxO1 in endothelial cells requires cAMP-dependent protein kinase α (PKA-α). Therefore, we hypothesized that FoxO1 is a novel direct substrate for PKA-α. Using an immune complex kinase assay with [γ-(32)P]ATP, purified PKA-α directly phosphorylated wild-type FoxO1 but not FoxO1-AAA (mutant with alanine substitutions at known Akt phosphorylation sites). Phosphorylation of wild-type FoxO1 (but not FoxO1-AAA) was detectable using phospho-specific antibodies. Similar results were obtained using purified GST-FoxO1 protein as the substrate. Thus, FoxO1 is a direct substrate for PKA-α in vitro. In bovine aortic endothelial cells, interaction between endogenous PKA-α and endogenous FoxO1 was detected by co-immunoprecipitation. In human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC), pretreatment with H89 (PKA inhibitor) or siRNA knockdown of PKA-α decreased forskolin- or prostaglandin E(2)-stimulated phosphorylation of FoxO1. In HAEC transfected with a FoxO-promoter luciferase reporter, co-expression of the catalytic domain of PKA-α, catalytically inactive mutant PKA-α, or siRNA against PKA-α caused corresponding increases or decreases in transactivation of the FoxO promoter. Expression of vascular cellular adhesion molecule-1 mRNA, up-regulated by FoxO1 in endothelial cells, was enhanced by siRNA knockdown of PKA-α or treatment of HAEC with the PKA inhibitor H89. Adhesion of monocytes to endothelial cells was enhanced by H89 treatment or overexpression of FoxO1-AAA, similar to effects of TNF-α treatment. We conclude that FoxO1 is a novel physiological substrate for PKA-α in vascular endothelial cells.

  7. Cellular uptake of lead in the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier: Novel roles of Connexin 43 hemichannel and its down-regulations via Erk phosphorylation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Han; Zheng, Gang; Liu, Yang; Shen, Xue-Feng; Zhao, Zai-Hua; Aschner, Michael; Luo, Wen-Jing; Chen, Jing-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    As the structural basis of blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCB), epithelial cells in the choroid plexus (CP) are targets for lead (Pb). Pb is known to accumulate in the CP; however, the mechanism of Pb uptake in the choroidal epithelial cells remains unknown. Recently, hemichannels of Connexin 43 (Cx43), the most ubiquitously expressed gap junction proteins in the CP, were found to be important pathways for many substances. This study was designed to investigate the roles of Cx43 in Pb uptake in the epithelial cells. Autometallography was used to outline Pb's subcellular location, and the characteristics of Pb transport into CP cells, including concentration- and time-dependence were analyzed by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Knockdown/overexpression of Cx43 with transient siRNA/plasmids transfections before Pb exposure diminished/increased the Pb accumulation. In the Z310 cell-based doxycycline-inducible Cx43 expression cell line (iZCx43), doxycycline induced a significant increase (3-fold) in Pb uptake, corresponding to the increased Cx43 levels. Activation of Cx43 hemichannels by reduced serum conditions caused an increase of Pb concentrations. Cx43-induced Pb uptake was attenuated after blockage of Cx43 hemichannels with its inhibitor, carbenoxolone. Additionally, down-regulation of Cx43 protein levels by Pb exposure paralleled cellular Pb concentrations in the time study. Concomitantly, expressions of phosphor-Src and phosphor-Erk were both significantly increased by Pb. However, inactivation of Erk, not Src pathway, reversed Pb-induced downregulation of Cx43. Taken together, these data establish that Pb can accumulate in the BCB and validate the role of Cx43 hemichannel in Pb uptake and its regulations through Erk phosphorylation. - Highlights: • Pb is sequestrated in choroid plexus both in vivo and in vitro. • Cx43 knockdown/overexpression prevents/increases Pb accumulations. • Cx43 hemichannels are required for Pb uptake. • Pb-induced Erk

  8. MiRNA-205 modulates cellular invasion and migration via regulating zinc finger E-box binding homeobox 2 expression in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamashita Shunichi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC is often diagnosed at later stages until they are incurable. MicroRNA (miR is a small, non-coding RNA that negatively regulates gene expression mainly via translational repression. Accumulating evidence indicates that deregulation of miR is associated with human malignancies including ESCC. The aim of this study was to identify miR that could be specifically expressed and exert distinct biological actions in ESCC. Methods Total RNA was extracted from ESCC cell lines, OE21 and TE10, and a non-malignant human esophageal squamous cell line, Het-1A, and subjected to microarray analysis. Expression levels of miR that showed significant differences between the 2 ESCC and Het-1A cells based on the comprehensive analysis were analyzed by the quantitative reverse transcriptase (RT-PCR method. Then, functional analyses, including cellular proliferation, apoptosis and Matrigel invasion and the wound healing assay, for the specific miR were conducted. Using ESCC tumor samples and paired surrounding non-cancerous tissue obtained endoscopically, the association with histopathological differentiation was examined with quantitative RT-PCR. Results Based on the miR microarray analysis, there were 14 miRs that showed significant differences (more than 2-fold in expression between the 2 ESCC cells and non-malignant Het-1A. Among the significantly altered miRs, miR-205 expression levels were exclusively higher in 5 ESCC cell lines examined than any other types of malignant cell lines and Het-1A. Thus, miR-205 could be a specific miR in ESCC. Modulation of miR-205 expression by transfection with its precursor or anti-miR-205 inhibitor did not affect ESCC cell proliferation and apoptosis, but miR-205 was found to be involved in cell invasion and migration. Western blot revealed that knockdown of miR-205 expression in ESCC cells substantially enhanced expression of zinc finger E-box binding homeobox 2

  9. Docosahexaenoic acid alters Gsα localization in lipid raft and potentiates adenylate cyclase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhuoran; Tan, Zhoubin; Li, Yan; Luo, Hongyan; Hu, Xinwu; Tang, Ming; Hescheler, Jürgen; Mu, Yangling; Zhang, Lanqiu

    2015-01-01

    Supplementation with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), an ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA), recently has become popular for the amelioration of depression; however the molecular mechanism of DHA action remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanism underlying the antidepressant effect of DHA by evaluating Gsα localization in lipid raft and the activity of adenylate cyclase in an in vitro glioma cell model. Lipid raft fractions from C6 glioma cells treated chronically with DHA were isolated by sucrose gradient ultracentrifugation. The content of Gsα in lipid raft was analyzed by immunoblotting and colocalization of Gsα with lipid raft was subjected to confocal microscopic analysis. The intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) level was determined by cAMP immunoassay kit. DHA decreased the amount of Gsα in lipid raft, whereas whole cell lysate Gsα was not changed. Confocal microscopic analysis demonstrated that colocalization of Gsα with lipid raft was decreased, whereas DHA increased intracellular cAMP accumulation in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, we found that DHA increased the lipid raft level, instead of disrupting it. The results of this study suggest that DHA may exert its antidepressant effect by translocating Gsα from lipid raft and potentiating the activity of adenylate cyclase. Importantly, the reduced Gsα in lipid raft by DHA is independent of disruption of lipid raft. Overall, the study provides partial preclinical evidence supporting a safe and effective therapy using DHA for depression. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Molecular nuclear imaging of tumoral angio genesis using a rgd-containing tracer, Raft-RGD, targeted at the neo vessel-specific integrin {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3}; Evaluation d'un radioligand de l'integrine {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} (RAFT-RGD) pour l'imagerie moleculaire de l'angiogenese tumorale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sancey, L

    2006-06-15

    Tumoral neo-angio genesis targeting is currently a major field of research for the diagnostic and treatment of solid tumors. Endothelial cells from neo vessels over express several specific markers such as the {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} integrin, which binds RGD (-Arg-Gly-Asp-)- containing peptides. We evaluated the potential of a novel radiotracer - RAFT-RGD - for the molecular nuclear imaging of neo vessels. In vitro, the coupling of 4 c(RGDfK) to the RAFT platform resulted in an increased cellular uptake of the tracer by {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} positive cells when compared to c(RGDfK). Furthermore, RAFTRGD has a higher affinity than c(RGDfK) and similar properties for angio genesis inhibition. In vivo, both {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} positive and negative tumors were visible by non invasive whole body planar and tomographic imaging from 30 min to 24 h post-injection, using a gamma camera dedicated to small animal imaging. Despite a lack of significant contrast improvement compare with c(RGDfK), RAFT-RGD could represent a promising tracer for tumoral angio genesis since it could provide invaluable information about tumor development and treatment efficacy in Nuclear Medicine departments. Furthermore, thanks to its chemical structure, RAFT-RGD can be labelled with a variety of radioisotopes including {gamma} and {beta}{sup -} emitters, allowing interesting therapeutical applications such as internal targeted radiotherapy. (author)

  11. Epigenetics and Cellular Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenyi Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Living eukaryotic systems evolve delicate cellular mechanisms for responding to various environmental signals. Among them, epigenetic machinery (DNA methylation, histone modifications, microRNAs, etc. is the hub in transducing external stimuli into transcriptional response. Emerging evidence reveals the concept that epigenetic signatures are essential for the proper maintenance of cellular metabolism. On the other hand, the metabolite, a main environmental input, can also influence the processing of epigenetic memory. Here, we summarize the recent research progress in the epigenetic regulation of cellular metabolism and discuss how the dysfunction of epigenetic machineries influences the development of metabolic disorders such as diabetes and obesity; then, we focus on discussing the notion that manipulating metabolites, the fuel of cell metabolism, can function as a strategy for interfering epigenetic machinery and its related disease progression as well.

  12. Microvillar membrane microdomains exist at physiological temperature. Role of galectin-4 as lipid raft stabilizer revealed by "superrafts"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Braccia, Anita; Villani, Maristella; Immerdal, Lissi

    2003-01-01

    rafts prepared by the two protocols were morphologically different but had essentially similar profiles of protein- and lipid components, showing that raft microdomains do exist at 37 degrees C and are not "low temperature artifacts." We also employed a novel method of sequential detergent extraction...... and the transmembrane aminopeptidase N, whereas the peripheral lipid raft protein annexin 2 was essentially absent. In conclusion, in the microvillar membrane, galectin-4, functions as a core raft stabilizer/organizer for other, more loosely raft-associated proteins. The superraft analysis might be applicable to other...

  13. Lipid raft facilitated ligation of K-α1-tubulin by specific antibodies on epithelial cells: Role in pathogenesis of chronic rejection following human lung transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiriveedhi, Venkataswarup; Angaswamy, Nataraju; Weber, Joseph; Mohanakumar, T.

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Addition of KAT Abs (+) sera to NHBE culture causes upregulation of growth factors. → Cholesterol depletion causes down regulation of growth factor expression. → Cholesterol depletion is accompanied by loss of membrane bound caveolin. → Thus, we demonstrate lipid raft are critical for efficient ligation of the KAT Abs. -- Abstract: Long term function of human lung allografts is hindered by development of chronic rejection manifested as Bronchiolitis Obliterans Syndrome (BOS). We have previously identified the development of antibodies (Abs) following lung transplantation to K-α1-tubulin (KAT), an epithelial surface gap junction cytoskeletal protein, in patients who develop BOS. However, the biochemical and molecular basis of the interactions and signaling cascades mediated by KAT Abs are yet to be defined. In this report, we investigated the biophysical basis of the epithelial cell membrane surface interaction between KAT and its specific Abs. Towards this, we analyzed the role of the lipid raft-domains in the membrane interactions which lead to cell signaling and ultimately increased growth factor expression. Normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells, upon specific ligation with Abs to KAT obtained either from the serum of BOS(+) patients or monoclonal KAT Abs, resulted in upregulation of growth factors VEGF, PDGF, and bFGF (6.4 ± 1.1-, 3.2 ± 0.9-, and 3.4 ± 1.1-fold increase, respectively) all of which are important in the pathogenesis of BOS. To define the role for lipid raft in augmenting surface interactions, we analyzed the changes in the growth factor expression pattern upon depletion and enrichment with lipid raft following the ligation of the epithelial cell membranes with Abs specific for KAT. NHBE cells cultured in the presence of β-methyl cyclodextran (βMCD) had significantly reduced growth factor expression (1.3 ± 0.3, vs βMCD untreated being 6.4 ± 1.1-fold increase) upon stimulation with KAT Abs. Depletion

  14. Lipid raft facilitated ligation of K-{alpha}1-tubulin by specific antibodies on epithelial cells: Role in pathogenesis of chronic rejection following human lung transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiriveedhi, Venkataswarup; Angaswamy, Nataraju [Department of Surgery, Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Weber, Joseph [Department of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Mohanakumar, T., E-mail: kumart@wustl.edu [Department of Surgery, Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2010-08-20

    Research highlights: {yields} Addition of KAT Abs (+) sera to NHBE culture causes upregulation of growth factors. {yields} Cholesterol depletion causes down regulation of growth factor expression. {yields} Cholesterol depletion is accompanied by loss of membrane bound caveolin. {yields} Thus, we demonstrate lipid raft are critical for efficient ligation of the KAT Abs. -- Abstract: Long term function of human lung allografts is hindered by development of chronic rejection manifested as Bronchiolitis Obliterans Syndrome (BOS). We have previously identified the development of antibodies (Abs) following lung transplantation to K-{alpha}1-tubulin (KAT), an epithelial surface gap junction cytoskeletal protein, in patients who develop BOS. However, the biochemical and molecular basis of the interactions and signaling cascades mediated by KAT Abs are yet to be defined. In this report, we investigated the biophysical basis of the epithelial cell membrane surface interaction between KAT and its specific Abs. Towards this, we analyzed the role of the lipid raft-domains in the membrane interactions which lead to cell signaling and ultimately increased growth factor expression. Normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells, upon specific ligation with Abs to KAT obtained either from the serum of BOS(+) patients or monoclonal KAT Abs, resulted in upregulation of growth factors VEGF, PDGF, and bFGF (6.4 {+-} 1.1-, 3.2 {+-} 0.9-, and 3.4 {+-} 1.1-fold increase, respectively) all of which are important in the pathogenesis of BOS. To define the role for lipid raft in augmenting surface interactions, we analyzed the changes in the growth factor expression pattern upon depletion and enrichment with lipid raft following the ligation of the epithelial cell membranes with Abs specific for KAT. NHBE cells cultured in the presence of {beta}-methyl cyclodextran ({beta}MCD) had significantly reduced growth factor expression (1.3 {+-} 0.3, vs {beta}MCD untreated being 6.4 {+-} 1.1-fold

  15. Cellular metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hildebrand, C.E.; Walters, R.A.

    1977-01-01

    Progress is reported on the following research projects: chromatin structure; the use of circular synthetic polydeoxynucleotides as substrates for the study of DNA repair enzymes; human cellular kinetic response following exposure to DNA-interactive compounds; histone phosphorylation and chromatin structure in cell proliferation; photoaddition products induced in chromatin by uv light; pollutants and genetic information transfer; altered RNA metabolism as a function of cadmium accumulation and intracellular distribution in cultured cells; and thymidylate chromophore destruction by water free radicals

  16. Ripk3 regulates cardiac microvascular reperfusion injury: The role of IP3R-dependent calcium overload, XO-mediated oxidative stress and F-action/filopodia-based cellular migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hao; Wang, Jin; Zhu, Pingjun; Hu, Shunying; Ren, Jun

    2018-05-01

    Ripk3-mediated cellular apoptosis is a major contributor to the pathogenesis of myocardial ischemia reperfusion (IR) injury. However, the mechanisms by which Ripk3 influences microvascular homeostasis and endothelial apoptosis are not completely understood. In this study, loss of Ripk3 inhibited endothelial apoptosis, alleviated luminal swelling, maintained microvasculature patency, reduced the expression of adhesion molecules and limited the myocardial inflammatory response. In vitro, Ripk3 deficiency protected endothelial cells from apoptosis and migratory arrest induced by HR injury. Mechanistically, Ripk3 had the ability to migrate onto the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), leading to ER damage, as evidenced by increased IP3R and XO expression. The higher IP3R content was associated with cellular calcium overload, and increased XO expression was involved in cellular oxidative injury. Furthermore, IP3R-mediated calcium overload and XO-dependent oxidative damage were able to initiate cellular apoptosis. More importantly, IP3R and XO also caused F-actin degradation into G-actin via post-transcriptional modification of cofilin, impairing the formation of the filopodia and limiting the migratory response of endothelial cells. Altogether, our data confirmed that Ripk3 was involved in microvascular IR injury via regulation of IP3R-mediated calcium overload, XO-dependent oxidative damage and filopodia-related cellular migration, ultimately leading to endothelial apoptosis and migratory inhibition. These findings provide a potential target for treating cardiac microcirculatory IR injury. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Citrulline diet supplementation improves specific age-related raft changes in wild-type rodent hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquet-de Rougé, Perrine; Clamagirand, Christine; Facchinetti, Patricia; Rose, Christiane; Sargueil, Françoise; Guihenneuc-Jouyaux, Chantal; Cynober, Luc; Moinard, Christophe; Allinquant, Bernadette

    2013-10-01

    The levels of molecules crucial for signal transduction processing change in the brain with aging. Lipid rafts are membrane microdomains involved in cell signaling. We describe here substantial biophysical and biochemical changes occurring within the rafts in hippocampus neurons from aging wild-type rats and mice. Using continuous sucrose density gradients, we observed light-, medium-, and heavy raft subpopulations in young adult rodent hippocampus neurons containing very low levels of amyloid precursor protein (APP) and almost no caveolin-1 (CAV-1). By contrast, old rodents had a homogeneous age-specific high-density caveolar raft subpopulation containing significantly more cholesterol (CHOL), CAV-1, and APP. C99-APP-Cter fragment detection demonstrates that the first step of amyloidogenic APP processing takes place in this caveolar structure during physiological aging of the rat brain. In this age-specific caveolar raft subpopulation, levels of the C99-APP-Cter fragment are exponentially correlated with those of APP, suggesting that high APP concentrations may be associated with a risk of large increases in beta-amyloid peptide levels. Citrulline (an intermediate amino acid of the urea cycle) supplementation in the diet of aged rats for 3 months reduced these age-related hippocampus raft changes, resulting in raft patterns tightly close to those in young animals: CHOL, CAV-1, and APP concentrations were significantly lower and the C99-APP-Cter fragment was less abundant in the heavy raft subpopulation than in controls. Thus, we report substantial changes in raft structures during the aging of rodent hippocampus and describe new and promising areas of investigation concerning the possible protective effect of citrulline on brain function during aging.

  18. Lipid raft disarrangement as a result of neuropathological progresses: a novel strategy for early diagnosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, R; Rojo, J A; Fabelo, N; Fernandez, C E; Diaz, M

    2013-08-15

    Lipid rafts are the preferential site of numerous membrane signaling proteins which are involved in neuronal functioning and survival. These proteins are organized in multiprotein complexes, or signalosomes, in close contact with lipid classes particularly represented in lipid rafts (i.e. cholesterol, sphingolipids and saturated fatty acids), which may contribute to physiological responses leading to neuroprotection. Increasing evidence indicates that alteration of lipid composition in raft structures as a consequence of neuropathologies, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD), causes a dramatic increase in lipid raft order. These phenomena may correlate with perturbation of signalosome activities, likely contributing to neurodegenerative progression. Interestingly, significant disruption of stable raft microenvironments has been already observed in the first stages of either AD or PD, suggesting that these alterations may represent early events in the neuropathological development. In this regard, the search for biochemical markers, such as specific metabolic products altered in the brain at the first steps of the disease, presently represents an important challenge for early diagnostic strategies. Alterations of these biomarkers may be reflected in either plasma or cerebrospinal fluid, thus representing a potential strategy to predict an accurate diagnosis. We propose that pathologically-linked lipid raft markers may be interesting candidates to be explored at this level, although it has not been studied so far to what extent alteration of different signalosome components may be reflected in peripheral fluids. In this mini-review, we will discuss on relevant aspects of lipid rafts that contribute to the modulation of neuropathological events related to AD and PD. An interesting hypothesis is that anomalies on raft biomarkers measured at peripheral fluids might mirror the lipid raft pathology observed in early stages of AD and PD. Copyright

  19. Nitric oxide induces segregation of decay accelerating factor (DAF or CD55) from the membrane lipid-rafts and its internalization in human endometrial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banadakoppa, Manu; Goluszko, Pawel; Liebenthal, Daniel; Yallampalli, Chandra

    2012-10-01

    Recent studies suggest that DAF (decay accelerating factor), a complement regulatory protein, present in lipid rafts, is utilized by Dr fimbriated Escherichia coli for their binding and internalization. Previous studies in our laboratory have shown that NO (nitric oxide) can reduce the invasion of Dr(+) E. coli and the severity of uterine infection in pregnant rats. Also, the expression level of DAF both at the mRNA and protein levels has been shown to be reduced by NO. Therefore NO mediated down-regulation of DAF appears to be an important factor in reducing the susceptibility to E. coli infection. However, it is unclear if NO can actually modulate the membrane association of DAF and therefore initial bacterial binding to cells. We found that NO induces the delocalization of DAF from the G(M1)-rich lipid rafts. Using biochemical and cell biological approaches in a uterine epithelial cell model (Ishikawa cells), DAF accumulates in caveolae upon exposure to NO. Interaction of DAF with the caveolar protein, caveolin1, leads to their internalization by endosomes. NO-induced delocalization of DAF from the lipid raft and its accumulation in caveolae are mediated through a cGMP (cyclic guanosine monophosphate) pathway. The acute localized synthesis of NO and its influence on DAF localization may represent an important unrecognized phenomenon of host defence against Dr(+) E. coli bacteria, as well as many disease conditions that involve complement system.

  20. Identification of dynamic changes in proteins associated with the cellular cytoskeleton after exposure to okadaic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Opsahl, Jill A; Ljostveit, Sonja; Solstad, Therese

    2013-01-01

    be combined with control cells before the isolation of lipid rafts. Protein phosphorylation events and translocations induced by okadaic acid were identified by mass spectrometry. Okadaic acid was shown to regulate the phosphorylation status and location of proteins associated with the actin cytoskeleton...... of the cortical actin cytoskeleton and cell detachment....

  1. Selective association of outer surface lipoproteins with the lipid rafts of Borrelia burgdorferi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo, Alvaro; Crowley, Jameson T; Coleman, James L; LaRocca, Timothy J; Chiantia, Salvatore; London, Erwin; Benach, Jorge L

    2014-03-11

    Borrelia burgdorferi contains unique cholesterol-glycolipid-rich lipid rafts that are associated with lipoproteins. These complexes suggest the existence of macromolecular structures that have not been reported for prokaryotes. Outer surface lipoproteins OspA, OspB, and OspC were studied for their participation in the formation of lipid rafts. Single-gene deletion mutants with deletions of ospA, ospB, and ospC and a spontaneous gene mutant, strain B313, which does not express OspA and OspB, were used to establish their structural roles in the lipid rafts. All mutant strains used in this study produced detergent-resistant membranes, a common characteristic of lipid rafts, and had similar lipid and protein slot blot profiles. Lipoproteins OspA and OspB but not OspC were shown to be associated with lipid rafts by transmission electron microscopy. When the ability to form lipid rafts in live B. burgdorferi spirochetes was measured by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), strain B313 showed a statistically significant lower level of segregation into ordered and disordered membrane domains than did the wild-type and the other single-deletion mutants. The transformation of a B313 strain with a shuttle plasmid containing ospA restored the phenotype shared by the wild type and the single-deletion mutants, demonstrating that OspA and OspB have redundant functions. In contrast, a transformed B313 overexpressing OspC neither rescued the FRET nor colocalized with the lipid rafts. Because these lipoproteins are expressed at different stages of the life cycle of B. burgdorferi, their selective association is likely to have an important role in the structure of prokaryotic lipid rafts and in the organism's adaptation to changing environments. IMPORTANCE Lipid rafts are cholesterol-rich clusters within the membranes of cells. Lipid rafts contain proteins that have functions in sensing the cell environment and transmitting signals. Although selective proteins are present in

  2. The cellular prion protein interacts with the tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase in membrane microdomains of bioaminergic neuronal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myriam Ermonval

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The cellular prion protein, PrP(C, is GPI anchored and abundant in lipid rafts. The absolute requirement of PrP(C in neurodegeneration associated to prion diseases is well established. However, the function of this ubiquitous protein is still puzzling. Our previous work using the 1C11 neuronal model, provided evidence that PrP(C acts as a cell surface receptor. Besides a ubiquitous signaling function of PrP(C, we have described a neuronal specificity pointing to a role of PrP(C in neuronal homeostasis. 1C11 cells, upon appropriate induction, engage into neuronal differentiation programs, giving rise either to serotonergic (1C11(5-HT or noradrenergic (1C11(NE derivatives. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The neuronal specificity of PrP(C signaling prompted us to search for PrP(C partners in 1C11-derived bioaminergic neuronal cells. We show here by immunoprecipitation an association of PrP(C with an 80 kDa protein identified by mass spectrometry as the tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP. This interaction occurs in lipid rafts and is restricted to 1C11-derived neuronal progenies. Our data indicate that TNAP is implemented during the differentiation programs of 1C11(5-HT and 1C11(NE cells and is active at their cell surface. Noteworthy, TNAP may contribute to the regulation of serotonin or catecholamine synthesis in 1C11(5-HT and 1C11(NE bioaminergic cells by controlling pyridoxal phosphate levels. Finally, TNAP activity is shown to modulate the phosphorylation status of laminin and thereby its interaction with PrP. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The identification of a novel PrP(C partner in lipid rafts of neuronal cells favors the idea of a role of PrP in multiple functions. Because PrP(C and laminin functionally interact to support neuronal differentiation and memory consolidation, our findings introduce TNAP as a functional protagonist in the PrP(C-laminin interplay. The partnership between TNAP and PrP(C in neuronal cells may

  3. Accelerated Combinatorial High Throughput Star Polymer Synthesis via a Rapid One-Pot Sequential Aqueous RAFT (rosa-RAFT) Polymerization Scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosson, Steffen; Danial, Maarten; Saint-Amans, Julien Rosselgong; Cooper-White, Justin J

    2017-04-01

    Advanced polymerization methodologies, such as reversible addition-fragmentation transfer (RAFT), allow unprecedented control over star polymer composition, topology, and functionality. However, using RAFT to produce high throughput (HTP) combinatorial star polymer libraries remains, to date, impracticable due to several technical limitations. Herein, the methodology "rapid one-pot sequential aqueous RAFT" or "rosa-RAFT," in which well-defined homo-, copolymer, and mikto-arm star polymers can be prepared in very low to medium reaction volumes (50 µL to 2 mL) via an "arm-first" approach in air within minutes, is reported. Due to the high conversion of a variety of acrylamide/acrylate monomers achieved during each successive short reaction step (each taking 3 min), the requirement for intermediary purification is avoided, drastically facilitating and accelerating the star synthesis process. The presented methodology enables RAFT to be applied to HTP polymeric bio/nanomaterials discovery pipelines, in which hundreds of complex polymeric formulations can be rapidly produced, screened, and scaled up for assessment in a wide range of applications. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Atom-scale molecular interactions in lipid raft mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemelä, Perttu S; Hyvönen, Marja T; Vattulainen, Ilpo

    2009-01-01

    We review the relationship between molecular interactions and the properties of lipid environments. A specific focus is given on bilayers which contain sphingomyelin (SM) and sterols due to their essential role for the formation of lipid rafts. The discussion is based on recent atom-scale molecular...... dynamics simulations, complemented by extensive comparison to experimental data. The discussion is divided into four sections. The first part investigates the properties of one-component SM bilayers and compares them to bilayers with phosphatidylcholine (PC), the focus being on a detailed analysis...... examples of this issue. The third part concentrates on the specificity of intermolecular interactions in three-component mixtures of SM, PC and cholesterol (CHOL) under conditions where the concentrations of SM and CHOL are dilute with respect to that of PC. The results show how SM and CHOL favor one...

  5. Fault and joint geometry at Raft River Geothermal Area, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guth, L. R.; Bruhn, R. L.; Beck, S. L.

    1981-07-01

    Raft River geothermal reservoir is formed by fractures in sedimentary strata of the Miocene and Pliocene salt lake formation. The fracturing is most intense at the base of the salt lake formation, along a decollement that dips eastward at less than 50 on top of metamorphosed precambrian and lower paleozoic rocks. Core taken from less than 200 m above the decollement contains two sets of normal faults. The major set of faults dips between 500 and 700. These faults occur as conjugate pairs that are bisected by vertical extension fractures. The second set of faults dips 100 to 200 and may parallel part of the basal decollement or reflect the presence of listric normal faults in the upper plate. Surface joints form two suborthogonal sets that dip vertically. East-northeast-striking joints are most frequent on the limbs of the Jim Sage anticline, a large fold that is associated with the geothermal field.

  6. Mechanism and kinetics of dithiobenzoate-mediated RAFT polymerization. I. The current situation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barner-Kowollik, C.; Buback, M.; Charleux, B.; Coote, M.L.; Drache, M.; Fukuda, T.; Goto, A.; Klumperman, B.; Lowe, A.B.; McLeary, J.B.; Moad, G.; Monteiro, M.J.; Sanderson, R.D.; Tonge, M.P.; Vana, P.

    2006-01-01

    Investigations into the kinetics and mechanism of dithiobenzoate-mediated Reversible Addition-Fragmentation Chain Transfer (RAFT) polymerizations, which exhibit nonideal kinetic behavior, such as induction periods and rate retardation, are comprehensively reviewed. The appreciable uncertainty in the

  7. Lipid raft proteome reveals that oxidative phosphorylation system is associated with the plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bong-Woo; Lee, Chang Seok; Yi, Jae-Sung; Lee, Joo-Hyung; Lee, Joong-Won; Choo, Hyo-Jung; Jung, Soon-Young; Kim, Min-Sik; Lee, Sang-Won; Lee, Myung-Shik; Yoon, Gyesoon; Ko, Young-Gyu

    2010-12-01

    Although accumulating proteomic analyses have supported the fact that mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complexes are localized in lipid rafts, which mediate cell signaling, immune response and host-pathogen interactions, there has been no in-depth study of the physiological functions of lipid-raft OXPHOS complexes. Here, we show that many subunits of OXPHOS complexes were identified from the lipid rafts of human adipocytes, C2C12 myotubes, Jurkat cells and surface biotin-labeled Jurkat cells via shotgun proteomic analysis. We discuss the findings of OXPHOS complexes in lipid rafts, the role of the surface ATP synthase complex as a receptor for various ligands and extracellular superoxide generation by plasma membrane oxidative phosphorylation complexes.

  8. FEM analysis of foundation raft for 500 MWe pressurized heavy water reactor building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulkarni, N.N.; Goray, J.S.; Joshi, M.H.; Paramasivam, V.

    1989-01-01

    Foundation raft supports the containment structure and internals for 500 MWe PHW reactor building. It also serves as bottom envelop of the containment structure. In view of this, the design of foundation raft assumes great importance. The foundation raft is subjected to various load, most significant of them are dead load of structure, equipment loads transferred through a system of floors, walls and structural steel columns, pressure load during accident conditions, seismic loads, earth pressure, uplift due to buoyancy loads, foundation reaction etc. In order to achieve optimum design, the detailed structural analysis is required to be performed methodically and in most realistic manner. Finite element methods which have come in vogue with the developments in digital computers can be successfully applied in this area. The paper describes the above methods in detail for the analysis of foundation raft for the various load combinations required to be considered for safe and optimum design

  9. Intermediate Radical Termination Theory in Elucidation of RAFT Kinetics and Comparison to Experimental Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Baqeri-Jagharq

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available In current work a comprehensive mechanism based on intermediate radical termination theory is assumed for RAFT polymerization of styrene over cumyl dithiobenzoate as RAFT agent. Rate constants for addition (ka and fragmentation reactions (kf are set to 6×106 and 5×104 respectively, which lead to an equilibrium constant value of K = ka/kf = 1.2 x 102. Moment equations method was used to model this mechanism and the results were compared to experimental data to verify modeling. The effects of changing RAFT agent concentration on conversion, molecular weight and polydispersity index of the final product were investigated through the modeling. According to the results, the likelihood of living polymerization increases with raising RAFT agent concentration which leads to linearity of conversion and molecular weight curves and therefore lowering the polydispersity index and narrowing the molecular weight distribution.

  10. Phase diagrams of lipid mixtures relevant to the study of membrane rafts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goni, Felix; Alonso, Alicia; Bagatolli, Luis

    2008-01-01

    The present paper reviews the phase properties of phosphatidylcholine-sphingomyelin-cholesterol mixtures, that are often used as models for membrane "raft" microdomains. The available data based on X-ray, microscopic and spectroscopic observations, surface pressure and calorimetric measurements, ...

  11. Final Technical Resource Confirmation Testing at the Raft River Geothermal Project, Cassia County, Idaho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glaspey, Douglas J.

    2008-01-30

    Incorporates the results of flow tests for geothermal production and injection wells in the Raft River geothermal field in southern Idaho. Interference testing was also accomplished across the wellfield.

  12. Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Towing Resistance of the Innovative Pneumatic Life Raft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burciu Zbigniew

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the experimental and numerical investigations of a novel design of a pneumatic life raft in calm water conditions. Two main issues were considered: the life raft performance under tow and its resistance in calm water conditions. The experiment and CFD simulations were performed by using the full scale prototype to eliminate the scale effect. The towing tank tests confirmed the results of numerical computations. The compatibility of the results of numerical and experimental tests was high mainly because the new life raft does not deform under the hydrodynamic and aerodynamic loads. The characteristics similar to rigid body behaviour result mainly from a new construction and materials used for manufacturing the life raft.

  13. Well-Defined Macromolecules Using Horseradish Peroxidase as a RAFT Initiase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielson, Alex P; Bailey-Van Kuren, Dylan; Lucius, Melissa E; Makaroff, Katherine; Williams, Cameron; Page, Richard C; Berberich, Jason A; Konkolewicz, Dominik

    2016-02-01

    Enzymatic catalysis and control over macromolecular architectures from reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization (RAFT) are combined to give a new method of making polymers. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) is used to catalytically generate radicals using hydrogen peroxide and acetylacetone as a mediator. RAFT is used to control the polymer structure. HRP catalyzed RAFT polymerization gives acrylate and acrylamide polymers with relatively narrow molecular weight distributions. The polymerization is rapid, typically exceeding 90% monomer conversion in 30 min. Complex macromolecular architectures including a block copolymer and a protein-polymer conjugate are synthesized using HRP to catalytically initiate RAFT polymerization. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Application of a movable active vibration control system on a floating raft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen; Mak, Cheuk Ming

    2018-02-01

    This paper presents a theoretical study of an inertial actuator connected to an accelerometer by a local feedback loop for active vibration control on a floating raft. On the criterion of the minimum power transmission from the vibratory machines to the flexible foundation in the floating raft, the best mounting positions for the inertial actuator on the intermediate mass of the floating raft are investigated. Simulation results indicate that the best mounting positions for the inertial actuator vary with frequency. To control time-varying excitations of vibratory machines on a floating raft effectively, an automatic control system based on real-time measurement of a cost function and automatically searching the best mounting position of the inertial actuator is proposed. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first time that an automatic control system is proposed to move an actuator automatically for controlling a time-varying excitation.

  15. Surfactant-Free RAFT Emulsion Polymerization of Styrene Using Thermoresponsive macroRAFT Agents: Towards Smart Well-Defined Block Copolymers with High Molecular Weights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen Eggers

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The combination of reversible addition–fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT and emulsion polymerization has recently attracted much attention as a synthetic tool for high-molecular-weight block copolymers and their micellar nano-objects. Up to recently, though, the use of thermoresponsive polymers as both macroRAFT agents and latex stabilizers was impossible in aqueous media due to their hydrophobicity at the usually high polymerization temperatures. In this work, we present a straightforward surfactant-free RAFT emulsion polymerization to obtain thermoresponsive styrenic block copolymers with molecular weights of around 100 kDa and their well-defined latexes. The stability of the aqueous latexes is achieved by adding 20 vol % of the cosolvent 1,4-dioxane (DOX, increasing the phase transition temperature (PTT of the used thermoresponsive poly(N-acryloylpyrrolidine (PAPy macroRAFT agents above the polymerization temperature. Furthermore, this cosolvent approach is combined with the use of poly(N,N-dimethylacrylamide-block-poly(N-acryloylpiperidine-co-N-acryloylpyrrolidine (PDMA-b-P(APi-co-APy as the macroRAFT agent owning a short stabilizing PDMA end block and a widely adjustable PTT of the P(APi-co-APy block in between 4 and 47 °C. The temperature-induced collapse of the latter under emulsion polymerization conditions leads to the formation of RAFT nanoreactors, which allows for a very fast chain growth of the polystyrene (PS block. In dynamic light scattering (DLS, as well as cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryoTEM, moreover, all created latexes indeed reveal a high (temperature stability and a reversible collapse of the thermoresponsive coronal block upon heating. Hence, this paper pioneers a versatile way towards amphiphilic thermoresponsive high-molecular-weight block copolymers and their nano-objects with tailored corona switchability.

  16. Analysis of raft foundations for spent fuel pool in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subramanian, K.V.; Kashikar, A.V.; Nath, C.; Shintre, C.C.

    2005-01-01

    Foundation rafts are analysed as a plate on elastic foundation with the representation of the foundation media using the Winkler idealisation i.e. series of linear uncoupled springs. The elastic constant of the Winkler springs is derived using the sub-grade modulus. However, the Winkler approach has limitations due to incompatibility of the deflections at raft-soil interface. The deflection of the raft at the point of contact and the deformation of the foundation media at this point of contact are incompatible in this approach. This particularly influences flexible rafts and further if the foundation media is soil. This paper discusses the analysis of raft, in general, and the analysis of the foundation raft for a Spent Fuel pool facility using 'variable k approach' where deformations at a node and influencing nodes are computed using Boussinesq's theory. The limitations stated above are overcome in this approach. Some studies on the sensitivity of parameters were carried out in the form of variation of moduli of elasticity of concrete and deformation modulus of soil. Analysis is also performed with conventional method using 'Winkler' soil springs. It is concluded that the Winkler model does not correctly predict the behaviour of the mat both qualitatively and quantitatively and could lead to underestimation of soil pressures leading to unconservative design. The approach involving soil structure interaction like the one presented here is hence recommended for important structures like those involved in Nuclear facilities. (authors)

  17. Constitutive modeling of creep behavior in single crystal superalloys: Effects of rafting at high temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Ya-Nan, E-mail: fanyn12@mails.tsinghua.edu.cn; Shi, Hui-Ji, E-mail: shihj@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn; Qiu, Wen-Hui

    2015-09-17

    Rafting and creep modeling of single crystal superalloys at high temperatures are important for the safety assessment and life prediction in practice. In this research, a new model has been developed to describe the rafting evolution and incorporated into the Cailletaud single crystal plasticity model to simulate the creep behavior. The driving force of rafting is assumed to be the relaxation of the strain energy, and it is calculated with the local stress state, a superposition of the external and misfit stress tensors. In addition, the isotropic coarsening is introduced by the cube root dependence of the microstructure periodicity on creep time based on Ostwal ripening. Then the influence of rafting on creep deformation is taken into account as the Orowan stress in the single crystal plasticity model. The capability of the proposed model is validated with creep experiments of CMSX-4 at 950 °C and 1050 °C. It is able to predict the rafting direction at complex loading conditions and evaluate the channel width during rafting. For [001] tensile creep tests, good agreement has been shown between the model predictions and experimental results at different temperatures and stress levels. The creep acceleration can be captured with this model and is attributed to the microstructure degradation caused by the precipitate coarsening.

  18. Mesoscale organization of domains in the plasma membrane - beyond the lipid raft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Stella M; Fairn, Gregory D

    2018-04-01

    The plasma membrane is compartmentalized into several distinct regions or domains, which show a broad diversity in both size and lifetime. The segregation of lipids and membrane proteins is thought to be driven by the lipid composition itself, lipid-protein interactions and diffusional barriers. With regards to the lipid composition, the immiscibility of certain classes of lipids underlies the "lipid raft" concept of plasmalemmal compartmentalization. Historically, lipid rafts have been described as cholesterol and (glyco)sphingolipid-rich regions of the plasma membrane that exist as a liquid-ordered phase that are resistant to extraction with non-ionic detergents. Over the years the interest in lipid rafts grew as did the challenges with studying these nanodomains. The term lipid raft has fallen out of favor with many scientists and instead the terms "membrane raft" or "membrane nanodomain" are preferred as they connote the heterogeneity and dynamic nature of the lipid-protein assemblies. In this article, we will discuss the classical lipid raft hypothesis and its limitations. This review will also discuss alternative models of lipid-protein interactions, annular lipid shells, and larger membrane clusters. We will also discuss the mesoscale organization of plasmalemmal domains including visible structures such as clathrin-coated pits and caveolae.

  19. Direct access to dithiobenzoate RAFT agent fragmentation rate coefficients by ESR spin-trapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranieri, Kayte; Delaittre, Guillaume; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher; Junkers, Thomas

    2014-12-01

    The β-scission rate coefficient of tert-butyl radicals fragmenting off the intermediate resulting from their addition to tert-butyl dithiobenzoate-a reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) agent-is estimated via the recently introduced electron spin resonance (ESR)-trapping methodology as a function of temperature. The newly introduced ESR-trapping methodology is critically evaluated and found to be reliable. At 20 °C, a fragmentation rate coefficient of close to 0.042 s(-1) is observed, whereas the activation parameters for the fragmentation reaction-determined for the first time-read EA = 82 ± 13.3 kJ mol(-1) and A = (1.4 ± 0.25) × 10(13) s(-1) . The ESR spin-trapping methodology thus efficiently probes the stability of the RAFT adduct radical under conditions relevant for the pre-equilibrium of the RAFT process. It particularly indicates that stable RAFT adduct radicals are indeed formed in early stages of the RAFT poly-merization, at least when dithiobenzoates are employed as controlling agents as stipulated by the so-called slow fragmentation theory. By design of the methodology, the obtained fragmentation rate coefficients represent an upper limit. The ESR spin-trapping methodology is thus seen as a suitable tool for evaluating the fragmentation rate coefficients of a wide range of RAFT adduct radicals. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Requirement of transmembrane domain for CD154 association to lipid rafts and subsequent biological events.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadir Benslimane

    Full Text Available Interaction of CD40 with CD154 leads to recruitment of both molecules into lipid rafts, resulting in bi-directional cell activation. The precise mechanism by which CD154 is translocated into lipid rafts and its impact on CD154 signaling remain largely unknown. Our aim is to identify the domain of CD154 facilitating its association to lipid rafts and the impact of such association on signaling events and cytokine production. Thus, we generated Jurkat cell lines expressing truncated CD154 lacking the cytoplasmic domain or chimeric CD154 in which the transmembrane domain was replaced by that of transferrin receptor I, known to be excluded from lipid rafts. Our results show that cell stimulation with soluble CD40 leads to the association of CD154 wild-type and CD154-truncated, but not CD154-chimera, with lipid rafts. This is correlated with failure of CD154-chimera to activate Akt and p38 MAP kinases, known effectors of CD154 signaling. We also found that CD154-chimera lost the ability to promote IL-2 production upon T cell stimulation with anti-CD3/CD28 and soluble CD40. These results demonstrate the implication of the transmembrane domain of CD154 in lipid raft association, and that this association is necessary for CD154-mediated Akt and p38 activation with consequent enhancement of IL-2 production.

  1. Molecular and Cellular Signaling

    CERN Document Server

    Beckerman, Martin

    2005-01-01

    A small number of signaling pathways, no more than a dozen or so, form a control layer that is responsible for all signaling in and between cells of the human body. The signaling proteins belonging to the control layer determine what kinds of cells are made during development and how they function during adult life. Malfunctions in the proteins belonging to the control layer are responsible for a host of human diseases ranging from neurological disorders to cancers. Most drugs target components in the control layer, and difficulties in drug design are intimately related to the architecture of the control layer. Molecular and Cellular Signaling provides an introduction to molecular and cellular signaling in biological systems with an emphasis on the underlying physical principles. The text is aimed at upper-level undergraduates, graduate students and individuals in medicine and pharmacology interested in broadening their understanding of how cells regulate and coordinate their core activities and how diseases ...

  2. Intermolecular masking of the HIV-1 Rev NLS by the cellular protein HIC: novel insights into the regulation of Rev nuclear import.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gu, Lili

    2011-01-01

    The HIV-1 regulatory protein Rev, which is essential for viral replication, mediates the nuclear export of unspliced viral transcripts. Rev nuclear function requires active nucleocytoplasmic shuttling, and Rev nuclear import is mediated by the recognition of its Nuclear Localisation Signal (NLS) by multiple import factors, which include transportin and importin β. However, it remains unclear which nuclear import pathway(s) predominate in vivo, and the cellular environment that modulates Rev nucleocytoplasmic shuttling remains to be characterised.

  3. Genotype-induced changes in biophysical properties of frontal cortex lipid raft from APP/PS1 transgenic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario L Diaz

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Alterations in the lipid composition of lipid rafts have been demonstrated both in human brain and transgenic mouse models, and it has been postulated that aberrant lipid composition in lipid rafts is partly responsible for neuronal degeneration. In order to assess the impact of lipid changes on lipid raft functional properties, we have aimed at determining relevant physicochemical modifications in lipid rafts purified from frontal cortex of wild type (WT and APP/PS1 double transgenic mice. By means of steady-state fluorescence anisotropy analyses using two lipid soluble fluorescent probes, TMA-DPH (1-[(4-trimethyl-aminophenyl]-6-phenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene and DPH (1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene, we demonstrate that cortical lipid rafts from WT and APP/PS1 animals exhibit different biophysical behaviours, depending on genotype but also on age. Thus, aged APP/PS1 animals exhibited slightly more liquid-ordered lipid rafts than WT counterparts. Membrane microviscosity napp analyses demonstrate that WT lipid rafts are more fluid than APP/PS1 animals of similar age, both at the aqueous interface and hydrophobic core of the membrane. napp in APP/PS1 animals was higher for DPH than for TMA-DPH under similar experimental conditions, indicating that the internal core of the membrane is more viscous than the raft membrane at the aqueous interface. The most dramatic changes in biophysical properties of lipid rafts were observed when membrane cholesterol was depleted with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin. Overall, our results indicate that APP/PS1 genotype strongly affects physicochemical properties of lipid raft. Such alterations appear not to be homogeneous across the raft membrane axis, but rather are more prominent at the membrane plane. These changes correlate with aberrant proportions of sphingomyelin, cholesterol and saturated fatty acids, as well as polyunsaturated fatty acids, measured in lipid rafts from frontal cortex in this familial model of

  4. The AMPK enzyme-complex: From the regulation of cellular energy homeostasis to a possible new molecular target in the management of chronic inflammatory disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antonioli, Luca; Colucci, Rocchina; Pellegrini, Carolina; Giustarini, Giulio; Sacco, Deborah; Tirotta, Erika; Caputi, Valentina; Marsilio, Ilaria; Giron, Maria Cecilia; Németh, Zoltán H; Blandizzi, Corrado; Fornai, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), known as an enzymatic complex that regulates the energetic metabolism, is emerging as a pivotal enzyme and enzymatic pathway involved in the regulation of immune homeostatic networks. It is also involved in the molecular

  5. Cellular dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humm, J.L.; Chin, L.M.

    1989-01-01

    Radiation dose is a useful predictive parameter for describing radiation toxicity in conventional radiotherapy. Traditionally, in vitro radiation biology dose-effect relations are expressed in the form of cell survival curves, a semilog plot of cell survival versus dose. However, the characteristic linear or linear quadratic survival curve shape, for high- and low-LET radiations respectively, is only strictly valid when the radiation dose is uniform across the entire target population. With an external beam of 60 Co gamma rays or x-rays, a uniform field may be readily achievable. When radionuclides are incorporated into a cell milieu, several new problems emerge which can result in a departure from uniformity in energy deposition throughout a cell population. This nonuniformity can have very important consequences for the shape of the survival curve. Cases in which perturbations of source uniformity may arise include: 1. Elemental sources may equilibrate in the cell medium with partition coefficients between the extracellular, cytosol, and nuclear compartments. The effect of preferential cell internalization or binding to cell membrane of some radionuclides can increase or decrease the slope of the survival curve. 2. Radionuclides bound to antibodies, hormones, metabolite precursors, etc., may result in a source localization pattern characteristic of the carrier agent, i.e., the sources may bind to cell surface receptors or antigens, be internalized, bind to secreted antigen concentrated around a fraction of the cell population, or become directly incorporated into the cell DNA. We propose to relate the distribution of energy deposition in cell nuclei to biological correlates of cellular inactivation. The probability of each cell's survival is weighted by its individual radiation burden, and the summation of these probabilities for the cell population can be used to predict the number or fraction of cell survivors

  6. Antidepressants Accumulate in Lipid Rafts Independent of Monoamine Transporters to Modulate Redistribution of the G Protein, Gαs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erb, Samuel J; Schappi, Jeffrey M; Rasenick, Mark M

    2016-09-16

    Depression is a significant public health problem for which currently available medications, if effective, require weeks to months of treatment before patients respond. Previous studies have shown that the G protein responsible for increasing cAMP (Gαs) is increasingly localized to lipid rafts in depressed subjects and that chronic antidepressant treatment translocates Gαs from lipid rafts. Translocation of Gαs, which shows delayed onset after chronic antidepressant treatment of rats or of C6 glioma cells, tracks with the delayed onset of therapeutic action of antidepressants. Because antidepressants appear to specifically modify Gαs localized to lipid rafts, we sought to determine whether structurally diverse antidepressants accumulate in lipid rafts. Sustained treatment of C6 glioma cells, which lack 5-hydroxytryptamine transporters, showed marked concentration of several antidepressants in raft fractions, as revealed by increased absorbance and by mass fingerprint. Closely related molecules without antidepressant activity did not concentrate in raft fractions. Thus, at least two classes of antidepressants accumulate in lipid rafts and effect translocation of Gαs to the non-raft membrane fraction, where it activates the cAMP-signaling cascade. Analysis of the structural determinants of raft localization may both help to explain the hysteresis of antidepressant action and lead to design and development of novel substrates for depression therapeutics. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Rotavirus infectious particles use lipid rafts during replication for transport to the cell surface in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuadras, Mariela A.; Greenberg, Harry B.

    2003-01-01

    The pathway by which rotavirus is released from the cell is poorly understood but recent work has shown that, prior to cell lysis, rotavirus is released almost exclusively from the apical surface of the infected cell. By virtue of their unique biochemical and physical properties, viruses have exploited lipid rafts for host cell entry and/or assembly. Here we characterized the association of rhesus rotavirus (RRV) with lipid rafts during the rotavirus replication cycle. We found that newly synthesized infectious virus associates with rafts in vitro and in vivo. RRV proteins cosegregated with rafts on density gradients. Viral infectivity and genomic dsRNA also cosegregated with the raft fractions. Confocal microscopic analysis of raft and RRV virion proteins demonstrated colocalization within the cell. In addition, cholesterol depletion interfered with the association of RRV particles with rafts and reduced the release of infectious particles from the cell. Furthermore, murine rotavirus associates with lipid rafts in intestinal epithelial cells during a natural infection in vivo. Our results confirm the association of rotavirus infectious particles with rafts during replication in vitro and in vivo and strongly support the conclusion that this virus uses these microdomains for transport to the cell surface during replication

  8. Engineering Cellular Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens; Keasling, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic engineering is the science of rewiring the metabolism of cells to enhance production of native metabolites or to endow cells with the ability to produce new products. The potential applications of such efforts are wide ranging, including the generation of fuels, chemicals, foods, feeds...... of metabolic engineering and will discuss how new technologies can enable metabolic engineering to be scaled up to the industrial level, either by cutting off the lines of control for endogenous metabolism or by infiltrating the system with disruptive, heterologous pathways that overcome cellular regulation....

  9. Intermolecular masking of the HIV-1 Rev NLS by the cellular protein HIC: Novel insights into the regulation of Rev nuclear import.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gu, Lili

    2011-03-14

    Abstract Background The HIV-1 regulatory protein Rev, which is essential for viral replication, mediates the nuclear export of unspliced viral transcripts. Rev nuclear function requires active nucleocytoplasmic shuttling, and Rev nuclear import is mediated by the recognition of its Nuclear Localisation Signal (NLS) by multiple import factors, which include transportin and importin β. However, it remains unclear which nuclear import pathway(s) predominate in vivo, and the cellular environment that modulates Rev nucleocytoplasmic shuttling remains to be characterised. Results In our study, we have identified the cellular protein HIC (Human I-mfa domain-Containing protein) as a novel interactor of HIV-1 Rev. We demonstrate that HIC selectively interferes with Rev NLS interaction with importin β and impedes its nuclear import and function, but does not affect Rev nuclear import mediated by transportin. Hence, the molecular determinants mediating Rev-NLS recognition by importin β and transportin appear to be distinct. Furthermore, we have employed HIC and M9 M, a peptide specifically designed to inhibit the transportin-mediated nuclear import pathway, to characterise Rev nuclear import pathways within different cellular environments. Remarkably, we could show that in 293T, HeLa, COS7, Jurkat, U937, THP-1 and CEM cells, Rev nuclear import is cell type specific and alternatively mediated by transportin or importin β, in a mutually exclusive fashion. Conclusions Rev cytoplasmic sequestration by HIC may represent a novel mechanism for the control of Rev function. These studies highlight that the multivalent nature of the Rev NLS for different import receptors enables Rev to adapt its nuclear trafficking strategy.

  10. Intermolecular masking of the HIV-1 Rev NLS by the cellular protein HIC: Novel insights into the regulation of Rev nuclear import

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheehy Noreen

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The HIV-1 regulatory protein Rev, which is essential for viral replication, mediates the nuclear export of unspliced viral transcripts. Rev nuclear function requires active nucleocytoplasmic shuttling, and Rev nuclear import is mediated by the recognition of its Nuclear Localisation Signal (NLS by multiple import factors, which include transportin and importin β. However, it remains unclear which nuclear import pathway(s predominate in vivo, and the cellular environment that modulates Rev nucleocytoplasmic shuttling remains to be characterised. Results In our study, we have identified the cellular protein HIC (Human I-mfa domain-Containing protein as a novel interactor of HIV-1 Rev. We demonstrate that HIC selectively interferes with Rev NLS interaction with importin β and impedes its nuclear import and function, but does not affect Rev nuclear import mediated by transportin. Hence, the molecular determinants mediating Rev-NLS recognition by importin β and transportin appear to be distinct. Furthermore, we have employed HIC and M9 M, a peptide specifically designed to inhibit the transportin-mediated nuclear import pathway, to characterise Rev nuclear import pathways within different cellular environments. Remarkably, we could show that in 293T, HeLa, COS7, Jurkat, U937, THP-1 and CEM cells, Rev nuclear import is cell type specific and alternatively mediated by transportin or importin β, in a mutually exclusive fashion. Conclusions Rev cytoplasmic sequestration by HIC may represent a novel mechanism for the control of Rev function. These studies highlight that the multivalent nature of the Rev NLS for different import receptors enables Rev to adapt its nuclear trafficking strategy.

  11. A cellular stress response (CSR) that interacts with NADPH-P450 reductase (NPR) is a new regulator of hypoxic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguro, Ami; Koyama, Chika; Xu, Jing; Imaoka, Susumu

    2014-02-28

    NADPH-P450 reductase (NPR) was previously found to contribute to the hypoxic response of cells, but the mechanism was not clarified. In this study, we identified a cellular stress response (CSR) as a new factor interacting with NPR by a yeast two-hybrid system. Overexpression of CSR enhanced the induction of erythropoietin and hypoxia response element (HRE) activity under hypoxia in human hepatocarcinoma cell lines (Hep3B), while knockdown of CSR suppressed them. This new finding regarding the interaction of NPR with CSR provides insight into the function of NPR in hypoxic response. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Altered dynamics of a lipid raft associated protein in a kidney model of Fabry disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labilloy, Anatália; Youker, Robert T; Bruns, Jennifer R; Kukic, Ira; Kiselyov, Kirill; Halfter, Willi; Finegold, David; do Monte, Semiramis Jamil Hadad; Weisz, Ora A

    2014-02-01

    Accumulation of globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) and other neutral glycosphingolipids with galactosyl residues is the hallmark of Fabry disease, a lysosomal storage disorder caused by deficiency of the enzyme alpha-galactosidase A (α-gal A). These lipids are incorporated into the plasma membrane and intracellular membranes, with a preference for lipid rafts. Disruption of raft mediated cell processes is implicated in the pathogenesis of several human diseases, but little is known about the effects of the accumulation of glycosphingolipids on raft dynamics in the context of Fabry disease. Using siRNA technology, we have generated a polarized renal epithelial cell model of Fabry disease in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. These cells present increased levels of Gb3 and enlarged lysosomes, and progressively accumulate zebra bodies. The polarized delivery of both raft-associated and raft-independent proteins was unaffected by α-gal A knockdown, suggesting that accumulation of Gb3 does not disrupt biosynthetic trafficking pathways. To assess the effect of α-gal A silencing on lipid raft dynamics, we employed number and brightness (N&B) analysis to measure the oligomeric status and mobility of the model glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored protein GFP-GPI. We observed a significant increase in the oligomeric size of antibody-induced clusters of GFP-GPI at the plasma membrane of α-gal A silenced cells compared with control cells. Our results suggest that the interaction of GFP-GPI with lipid rafts may be altered in the presence of accumulated Gb3. The implications of our results with respect to the pathogenesis of Fabry disease are discussed. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. E2F1-Mediated Upregulation of p19INK4d Determines Its Periodic Expression during Cell Cycle and Regulates Cellular Proliferation

    OpenAIRE

    Carcagno, Abel L.; Marazita, Mariela C.; Ogara, María F.; Ceruti, Julieta M.; Sonzogni, Silvina V.; Scassa, María E.; Giono, Luciana E.; Cánepa, Eduardo T.

    2011-01-01

    Background: A central aspect of development and disease is the control of cell proliferation through regulation of the mitotic cycle. Cell cycle progression and directionality requires an appropriate balance of positive and negative regulators whose expression must fluctuate in a coordinated manner. p19INK4d, a member of the INK4 family of CDK inhibitors, has a unique feature that distinguishes it from the remaining INK4 and makes it a likely candidate for contributing to the directionality o...

  14. Plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase isoforms composition regulates cellular pH homeostasis in differentiating PC12 cells in a manner dependent on cytosolic Ca2+ elevations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boczek, Tomasz; Lisek, Malwina; Ferenc, Bozena

    2014-01-01

    isoforms (PMCA1-4) but only PMCA2 and PMCA3, due to their unique localization and features, perform more specialized function. Using differentiated PC12 cells we assessed the role of PMCA2 and PMCA3 in the regulation of intracellular pH in steady-state conditions and during Ca2+ overload evoked by 59 m....... In steady-state conditions, higher TMRE uptake in PMCA2-knockdown line was driven by plasma membrane potential (Ψp). Nonetheless, mitochondrial membrane potential (Ψm) in this line was dissipated during Ca2+ overload. Cyclosporin and bongkrekic acid prevented Ψm loss suggesting the involvement of Ca2......+-driven opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pore as putative underlying mechanism. The findings presented here demonstrate a crucial role of PMCA2 and PMCA3 in regulation of cellular pH and indicate PMCA membrane composition important for preservation of electrochemical gradient...

  15. Ethanol Enhances TGF-β Activity by Recruiting TGF-β Receptors From Intracellular Vesicles/Lipid Rafts/Caveolae to Non-Lipid Raft Microdomains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shuan Shian; Chen, Chun-Lin; Huang, Franklin W; Johnson, Frank E; Huang, Jung San

    2016-04-01

    Regular consumption of moderate amounts of ethanol has important health benefits on atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD). Overindulgence can cause many diseases, particularly alcoholic liver disease (ALD). The mechanisms by which ethanol causes both beneficial and harmful effects on human health are poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that ethanol enhances TGF-β-stimulated luciferase activity with a maximum of 0.5-1% (v/v) in Mv1Lu cells stably expressing a luciferase reporter gene containing Smad2-dependent elements. In Mv1Lu cells, 0.5% ethanol increases the level of P-Smad2, a canonical TGF-β signaling sensor, by ∼ 2-3-fold. Ethanol (0.5%) increases cell-surface expression of the type II TGF-β receptor (TβR-II) by ∼ 2-3-fold from its intracellular pool, as determined by I(125) -TGF-β-cross-linking/Western blot analysis. Sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation and indirect immunofluorescence staining analyses reveal that ethanol (0.5% and 1%) also displaces cell-surface TβR-I and TβR-II from lipid rafts/caveolae and facilitates translocation of these receptors to non-lipid raft microdomains where canonical signaling occurs. These results suggest that ethanol enhances canonical TGF-β signaling by increasing non-lipid raft microdomain localization of the TGF-β receptors. Since TGF-β plays a protective role in ASCVD but can also cause ALD, the TGF-β enhancer activity of ethanol at low and high doses appears to be responsible for both beneficial and harmful effects. Ethanol also disrupts the location of lipid raft/caveolae of other membrane proteins (e.g., neurotransmitter, growth factor/cytokine, and G protein-coupled receptors) which utilize lipid rafts/caveolae as signaling platforms. Displacement of these membrane proteins induced by ethanol may result in a variety of pathologies in nerve, heart and other tissues. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Development of a new anti-cancer agent for targeted radionuclide therapy: β- radiolabeled RAFT-RGD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petitprin, A.

    2013-01-01

    β-emitters radiolabeled RAFT-RGD as new agents for internal targeted radiotherapy. The αvβ3 integrin is known to play an important role in tumor-induced angiogenesis, tumor proliferation, survival and metastasis. Because of its overexpression on neo-endothelial cells such as those present in growing tumors, as well as on tumor cells of various origins, αvβ3 integrin is an attractive molecular target for diagnosis and therapy of the rapidly growing and metastatic tumors. A tetrameric RGD-based peptide, regioselectively addressable functionalized template-(cyclo-[RGDfK])4 (RAFT-RGD), specifically targets integrin αvβ3 in vitro and in vivo. RAFT-RGD has been used for tumor imaging and drug targeting. This study is the first to evaluate the therapeutic potential of the β-emitters radiolabeled tetrameric RGD peptide RAFT-RGD in a Nude mouse model of αvβ3 -expressing tumors. An injection of 37 MBq of 90 Y-RAFT-RGD or 177 Lu-RAFT-RGD in mice with αvβ3 -positive tumors caused a significant growth delay as compared with mice treated with 37 MBq of 90 Y-RAFT-RAD or 177 Lu-RAFT-RAD or untreated mice. In comparison, an injection of 30 MBq of 90 Y-RAFT-RGD had no efficacy for the treatment of αvβ3 -negative tumors. 90 Y-RAFT-RGD and 177 Lu-RAFT-RGD are potent αvβ3 -expressing tumor targeting agents for internal targeted radiotherapy. (author)

  17. Lipid composition of membrane rafts, isolated with and without detergent, from the spleen of a mouse model of Gaucher disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattersley, Kathryn J; Hein, Leanne K; Fuller, Maria

    2013-12-06

    Biological membranes are composed of functionally relevant liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered domains that coexist. Within the liquid-ordered domains are low-density microdomains known as rafts with a unique lipid composition that is crucial for their structure and function. Lipid raft composition is altered in sphingolipid storage disorders, and here we determined the lipid composition using a detergent and detergent-free method in spleen tissue, the primary site of pathology, in a mouse model of the sphingolipid storage disorder, Gaucher disease. The accumulating lipid, glucosylceramide, was 30- and 50-fold elevated in the rafts with the detergent and detergent-free method, respectively. Secondary accumulation of di- and trihexosylceramide resided primarily in the rafts with both methods. The phospholipids distributed differently with more than half residing in the rafts with the detergent-free method and less than 10% with the detergent method, with the exception of the fully saturated species that were primarily in the rafts. Individual isoforms of sphingomyelin correlated with detergent-free extraction and more than half resided in the raft fractions. However, this correlation was not seen with the detergent extraction method as sphingomyelin species were spread across both the raft and non-raft domains. Therefore caution must be exercised when interpreting phospholipid distribution in raft domains as it differs considerably depending on the method of isolation. Importantly, both methods revealed the same lipid alterations in the raft domains in the spleen of the Gaucher disease mouse model highlighting that either method is appropriate to determine membrane lipid changes in the diseased state. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. AFM of the ultrastructural and mechanical properties of lipid-raft-disrupted and/or cold-treated endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Li; Huang, Jie; Yu, Xiaoxue; Zhou, Xiaoqing; Gan, Chaoye; Li, Ming; Chen, Yong

    2014-02-01

    The nonionic detergent extraction at 4 °C and the cholesterol-depletion-induced lipid raft disruption are the two widely used experimental strategies for lipid raft research. However, the effects of raft disruption and/or cold treatment on the ultrastructural and mechanical properties of cells are still unclear. Here, we evaluated the effects of raft disruption and/or cold (4 °C) treatment on these properties of living human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). At first, the cholesterol-depletion-induced raft disruption was visualized by confocal microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) in combination with fluorescent quantum dots. Next, the cold-induced cell contraction and the formation of end-branched filopodia were observed by confocal microscopy and AFM. Then, the cell-surface ultrastructures were imaged by AFM, and the data showed that raft disruption and cold treatment induced opposite effects on cell-surface roughness (a significant decrease and a significant increase, respectively). Moreover, the cell-surface mechanical properties (stiffness and adhesion force) of raft-disrupted- and/or cold-treated HUVECs were measured by the force measurement function of AFM. We found that raft disruption and cold treatment induced parallel effects on cell stiffness (increase) or adhesion force (decrease) and that the combination of the two treatments caused dramatically strengthened effects. Finally, raft disruption was found to significantly impair cell migration as previously reported, whereas temporary cold treatment only caused a slight but nonsignificant decrease in cell migration performed at physiological temperature. Although the mechanisms for causing these results might be complicated and more in-depth studies will be needed, our data may provide important information for better understanding the effects of raft disruption or cold treatment on cells and the two strategies for lipid raft research.

  19. Improvement of Aconitum napellus micropropagation by liquid culture on floating membrane rafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watad, A A; Kochba, M; Nissim, A; Gaba, V

    1995-03-01

    An efficient method was developed using floating membrane rafts (Liferaft(™)) for the micropropagation of Aconitum napellus (Ranunculaceae), a cut flower crop with a low natural propagation rate. This was achieved by introducing shoot tips into culture on Murashige and Skoog's (1962) solid medium, or liquid medium-supported rafts, supplemented by different levels of benzyl adenine (BA). Optimum shoot proliferation on solid medium required 4mg/l BA, whereas for expiants supported on rafts optimal proliferation was achieved at 0.25mg/l BA. Maximum shoot proliferation was found using the floating rafts (propagation ratio of 4.2 per month), 45% higher than the maximum value on solid medium. A similar value could be obtained on solid medium after a period of 2 months. The optimal response to BA was similar for fresh weight gain and shoot length. Growth in a shallow layer of liquid in shake flasks gives a similar shoot multiplication rate to that on floating rafts; however, submerged leaves brown and die.

  20. Intercalation and structural aspects of macroRAFT agents into MgAl layered double hydroxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dessislava Kostadinova

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Increasing attention has been devoted to the design of layered double hydroxide (LDH-based hybrid materials. In this work, we demonstrate the intercalation by anion exchange process of poly(acrylic acid (PAA and three different hydrophilic random copolymers of acrylic acid (AA and n-butyl acrylate (BA with molar masses ranging from 2000 to 4200 g mol−1 synthesized by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT polymerization, into LDH containing magnesium(II and aluminium(III intralayer cations and nitrates as counterions (MgAl-NO3 LDH. At basic pH, the copolymer chains (macroRAFT agents carry negative charges which allowed the establishment of electrostatic interactions with the LDH interlayer and their intercalation. The resulting hybrid macroRAFT/LDH materials displayed an expanded interlamellar domain compared to pristine MgAl-NO3 LDH from 1.36 nm to 2.33 nm. Depending on the nature of the units involved into the macroRAFT copolymer (only AA or AA and BA, the intercalation led to monolayer or bilayer arrangements within the interlayer space. The macroRAFT intercalation and the molecular structure of the hybrid phases were further characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR and solid-state 13C, 1H and 27Al nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopies to get a better description of the local structure.

  1. A novel biotinylated lipid raft reporter for electron microscopic imaging of plasma membrane microdomains[S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krager, Kimberly J.; Sarkar, Mitul; Twait, Erik C.; Lill, Nancy L.; Koland, John G.

    2012-01-01

    The submicroscopic spatial organization of cell surface receptors and plasma membrane signaling molecules is readily characterized by electron microscopy (EM) via immunogold labeling of plasma membrane sheets. Although various signaling molecules have been seen to segregate within plasma membrane microdomains, the biochemical identity of these microdomains and the factors affecting their formation are largely unknown. Lipid rafts are envisioned as submicron membrane subdomains of liquid ordered structure with differing lipid and protein constituents that define their specific varieties. To facilitate EM investigation of inner leaflet lipid rafts and the localization of membrane proteins therein, a unique genetically encoded reporter with the dually acylated raft-targeting motif of the Lck kinase was developed. This reporter, designated Lck-BAP-GFP, incorporates green fluorescent protein (GFP) and biotin acceptor peptide (BAP) modules, with the latter allowing its single-step labeling with streptavidin-gold. Lck-BAP-GFP was metabolically biotinylated in mammalian cells, distributed into low-density detergent-resistant membrane fractions, and was readily detected with avidin-based reagents. In EM images of plasma membrane sheets, the streptavidin-gold-labeled reporter was clustered in 20–50 nm microdomains, presumably representative of inner leaflet lipid rafts. The utility of the reporter was demonstrated in an investigation of the potential lipid raft localization of the epidermal growth factor receptor. PMID:22822037

  2. Clomipramine counteracts lipid raft disturbance due to short-term muscle disuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryndina, Irina G; Shalagina, Maria N; Sekunov, Alexey V; Zefirov, Andrei L; Petrov, Alexey M

    2018-01-18

    Disuse-induced skeletal muscle dysfunction is a serious consequence of long-term spaceflight, numerous diseases and conditions for which treatment possibilities are still strictly limited. We have previously shown that acute hindlimb suspension (HS)-mediated disuse disrupts membrane lipid rafts in the unloaded muscle. Here, we investigated whether pretreatment of rats with the inhibitor of acid sphingomyelinase, clomipramine (1.25mg/g/day, intramuscularly, for 5days before HS), is able to hinder the loss in lipid raft integrity in response to 12h of HS. Clomipramine pretreatment significantly counteracted the decrease in labeling of the plasma membranes with lipid raft markers (fluorescent cholera toxin B subunit and bodipy-GM1-ganglioside) specifically in the junctional regions of the suspended soleus muscle. This was associated with: a) enhancing raft disrupting potential of exogenous sphingomyelinase in the junctional membranes; b) prevention of both ceramide accumulation and cholesterol loss; c) prevention of decline in nicotinic acetylcholine receptor labeling in the unloaded muscle. Our data suggest that sphingomyelinase-mediated raft disturbance serves as one of the earlier events in HS effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. BubR1 Acts as a Promoter in Cellular Motility of Human Oral Squamous Cancer Cells through Regulating MMP-2 and MMP-9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chou-Kit Chou

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available BubR1 is a critical component of spindle assembly checkpoint, ensuring proper chromatin segregation during mitosis. Recent studies showed that BubR1 was overexpressed in many cancer cells, including oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC. However, the effect of BubR1 on metastasis of OSCC remains unclear. This study aimed to unravel the role of BubR1 in the progression of OSCC and confirm the expression of BubR1 in a panel of malignant OSCC cell lines with different invasive abilities. The results of quantitative real-time PCR showed that the mRNA level of BubR1 was markedly increased in four OSCC cell lines, Ca9-22, HSC3, SCC9 and Cal-27 cells, compared to two normal cells, normal human oral keratinocytes (HOK and human gingival fibroblasts (HGF. Moreover, the expression of BubR1 in these four OSCC cell lines was positively correlated with their motility. Immunofluorescence revealed that BubR1 was mostly localized in the cytosol of human gingival carcinoma Ca9-22 cells. BubR1 knockdown significantly decreased cellular invasion but slightly affect cellular proliferation on both Ca9-22 and Cal-27 cells. Consistently, the activities of metastasis-associated metalloproteinases MMP-2 and MMP-9 were attenuated in BubR1 knockdown Ca9-22 cells, suggesting the role of BubR1 in promotion of OSCC migration. Our present study defines an alternative pathway in promoting metastasis of OSCC cells, and the expression of BubR1 could be a prognostic index in OSCC patients.

  4. Down-regulation of viral replication by adenoviral-mediated expression of siRNA against cellular cofactors for hepatitis C virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jing; Yamada, Osamu; Sakamoto, Takashi; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Iwai, Takahiro; Matsushita, Yoshihisa; Shimamura, Hideo; Araki, Hiromasa; Shimotohno, Kunitada

    2004-01-01

    Small interfering RNA (siRNA) is currently being evaluated not only as a powerful tool for functional genomics, but also as a potentially promising therapeutic agent for cancer and infectious diseases. Inhibitory effect of siRNA on viral replication has been demonstrated in multiple pathogenic viruses. However, because of the high sequence specificity of siRNA-mediated RNA degradation, antiviral efficacy of siRNA directed to viral genome will be largely limited by emergence of escape variants resistant to siRNA due to high mutation rates of virus, especially RNA viruses such as poliovirus and hepatitis C virus (HCV). To investigate the therapeutic feasibility of siRNAs specific for the putative cellular cofactors for HCV, we constructed adenovirus vectors expressing siRNAs against La, polypyrimidine tract-binding protein (PTB), subunit gamma of human eukaryotic initiation factors 2B (eIF2Bγ), and human VAMP-associated protein of 33 kDa (hVAP-33). Adenoviral-mediated expression of siRNAs markedly diminished expression of the endogenous genes, and silencing of La, PTB, and hVAP-33 by siRNAs substantially blocked HCV replication in Huh-7 cells. Thus, our studies demonstrate the feasibility and potential of adenoviral-delivered siRNAs specific for cellular cofactors in combating HCV infection, which can be used either alone or in combination with siRNA against viral genome to prevent the escape of mutant variants and provide additive or synergistic anti-HCV effects

  5. Repaglinide at a cellular level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsgaard Thomsen, M; Bokvist, K; Høy, M

    2002-01-01

    To investigate the hormonal and cellular selectivity of the prandial glucose regulators, we have undertaken a series of experiments, in which we characterised the effects of repaglinide and nateglinide on ATP-sensitive potassium ion (KATP) channel activity, membrane potential and exocytosis in ra...

  6. The human angiotensin AT(1) receptor supports G protein-independent extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 activation and cellular proliferation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Lerche; Aplin, Mark; Hansen, Jonas Tind

    2008-01-01

    The angiotensin AT(1) receptor is a key regulator of blood pressure and body fluid homeostasis, and it plays a key role in the pathophysiology of several cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension, cardiac hypertrophy, congestive heart failure, and arrhythmia. The importance of human angiotensi...

  7. Chloroplasts as source and target of cellular redox regulation: a discussion on chloroplast redox signals in the context of plant physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baier, Margarete; Dietz, Karl-Josef

    2005-06-01

    During the evolution of plants, chloroplasts have lost the exclusive genetic control over redox regulation and antioxidant gene expression. Together with many other genes, all genes encoding antioxidant enzymes and enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of low molecular weight antioxidants were transferred to the nucleus. On the other hand, photosynthesis bears a high risk for photo-oxidative damage. Concomitantly, an intricate network for mutual regulation by anthero- and retrograde signals has emerged to co-ordinate the activities of the different genetic and metabolic compartments. A major focus of recent research in chloroplast regulation addressed the mechanisms of redox sensing and signal transmission, the identification of regulatory targets, and the understanding of adaptation mechanisms. In addition to redox signals communicated through signalling cascades also used in pathogen and wounding responses, specific chloroplast signals control nuclear gene expression. Signalling pathways are triggered by the redox state of the plastoquinone pool, the thioredoxin system, and the acceptor availability at photosystem I, in addition to control by oxolipins, tetrapyrroles, carbohydrates, and abscisic acid. The signalling function is discussed in the context of regulatory circuitries that control the expression of antioxidant enzymes and redox modulators, demonstrating the principal role of chloroplasts as the source and target of redox regulation.

  8. Lipid Raft Size and Lipid Mobility in Non-raft Domains Increase during Aging and Are Exacerbated in APP/PS1 Mice Model of Alzheimer's Disease. Predictions from an Agent-Based Mathematical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Guido; Díaz, Mario; Torres, Néstor V.

    2016-01-01

    A connection between lipid rafts and Alzheimer's disease has been studied during the last decades. Mathematical modeling approaches have recently been used to correlate the effects of lipid composition changes in the physicochemical properties of raft-like membranes. Here we propose an agent based model to assess the effect of lipid changes in lipid rafts on the evolution and progression of Alzheimer's disease using lipid profile data obtained in an established model of familial Alzheimer's disease. We have observed that lipid raft size and lipid mobility in non-raft domains are two main factors that increase during age and are accelerated in the transgenic Alzheimer's disease mouse model. The consequences of these changes are discussed in the context of neurotoxic amyloid β production. Our agent based model predicts that increasing sterols (mainly cholesterol) and long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) (mainly DHA, docosahexaenoic acid) proportions in the membrane composition might delay the onset and progression of the disease. PMID:27014089

  9. Neuroinflammation, hyperphosphorylated tau, diffuse amyloid plaques, and down-regulation of the cellular prion protein in air pollution exposed children and young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; Kavanaugh, Michael; Block, Michelle; D'Angiulli, Amedeo; Delgado-Chávez, Ricardo; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; González-Maciel, Angelica; Reynoso-Robles, Rafael; Osnaya, Norma; Villarreal-Calderon, Rodolfo; Guo, Ruixin; Hua, Zhaowei; Zhu, Hongtu; Perry, George; Diaz, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Air pollution exposures have been linked to neuroinflammation and neuropathology. Autopsy samples of the frontal cortex from control (n = 8) and pollution-exposed (n = 35) children and young adults were analyzed by RT-PCR (n = 43) and microarray analysis (n = 12) for gene expression changes in oxidative stress, DNA damage signaling, NFκB signaling, inflammation, and neurodegeneration pathways. The effect of apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype on the presence of protein aggregates associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology was also explored. Exposed urbanites displayed differential (>2-fold) regulation of 134 genes. Forty percent exhibited tau hyperphosphorylation with pre-tangle material and 51% had amyloid-β (Aβ) diffuse plaques compared with 0% in controls. APOE4 carriers had greater hyperphosphorylated tau and diffuse Aβ plaques versus E3 carriers (Q = 7.82, p = 0.005). Upregulated gene network clusters included IL1, NFκB, TNF, IFN, and TLRs. A 15-fold frontal down-regulation of the prion-related protein (PrP(C)) was seen in highly exposed subjects. The down-regulation of the PrP(C) is critical given its important roles for neuroprotection, neurodegeneration, and mood disorder states. Elevation of indices of neuroinflammation and oxidative stress, down-regulation of the PrP(C) and AD-associated pathology are present in young megacity residents. The inducible regulation of gene expression suggests they are evolving different mechanisms in an attempt to cope with the constant state of inflammation and oxidative stress related to their environmental exposures. Together, these data support a role for air pollution in CNS damage and its impact upon the developing brain and the potential etiology of AD and mood disorders.

  10. Anti-glycosyl antibodies in lipid rafts of the enterocyte brush border: a possible host defense against pathogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Gert Helge; Pedersen, Esben D K; Immerdal, Lissi

    2005-01-01

    a major part of the immunoglobulins at the lumenal surface of the gut. The antibodies were associated with lipid rafts at the brush border, and they frequently (52%) coclustered with the raft marker galectin 4. A lactose wash increased the susceptibility of the brush border toward lectin peanut agglutin...

  11. Lipid raft-associated β-adducin is required for PSGL-1-mediated neutrophil rolling on P-selectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tingshuang; Liu, Wenai; Yang, Chen; Ba, Xueqing; Wang, Xiaoguang; Jiang, Yong; Zeng, Xianlu

    2015-02-01

    Lipid rafts, a liquid-ordered plasma membrane microdomain, are related to cell-surface receptor function. PSGL-1, a major surface receptor protein for leukocyte, also acts as a signaling receptor in leukocyte rolling. To investigate the role of lipid raft in PSGL-1 signaling in human neutrophils, we quantitatively analyzed lipid raft proteome of human promyelocytic leukemia cell line HL-60 cells and identified a lipid raft-associated protein β-adducin. PSGL-1 ligation induced dissociation of the raft-associated protein β-adducin from lipid rafts and actin, as well as phosphorylation of β-adducin, indicating a transient uncoupling of lipid rafts from the actin cytoskeleton. Knockdown of β-adducin greatly attenuated HL-60 cells rolling on P-selectin. We also showed that Src kinase is crucial for PSGL-1 ligation-induced β-adducin phosphorylation and relocation. Taken together, these results show that β-adducin is a pivotal lipid raft-associated protein in PSGL-1-mediated neutrophil rolling on P-selectin. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  12. Sulfonated macro-RAFT agents for the surfactant-free synthesis of cerium oxide-based hybrid latexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garnier, J.; Warnant, J.; Lacroix-Desmazes, P.; Dufils, P.E.; Vinas, J.; Herk, van A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Three types of amphiphatic macro-RAFT agents were employed as compatibilizers to promote the polymerization reaction at the surface of nanoceria for the synthesis of CeO2-based hybrid latexes. Macro-RAFT copolymers and terpolymers were first synthesized employing various combinations of butyl

  13. SAN-b-P4VP block copolymer synthesis by chain extension from RAFT-functional poly(4-vinylpyridine) in solution and in emulsion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bozovic, J.S.; Tello Manon, H.M; Meuldijk, J.; Koning, C.E.; Klumperman, B.

    2007-01-01

    Reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT)-mediated polymerization was successfully applied for the synthesis of poly(4-vinylpyridine) (P4VP) polymers of predetermined molar mass and of low polydispersity index. These RAFT end-functionalized polymers were then used as macro-RAFT agents

  14. Activation of c-Src and Fyn kinases by protein tyrosine phosphatase RPTPalpha is substrate-specific and compatible with lipid raft localization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vacaresse, Nathalie; Møller, Bente; Danielsen, Erik Michael

    2008-01-01

    and the lipid raft scaffolding protein Cbp/PAG. A significant fraction of RPTPa is present in lipid rafts, where its targets Fyn and Cbp/PAG reside, and growth factor-mediated SFK activation within this compartment is strictly dependent on RPTPa. Forced concentration of RPTPa into lipid rafts is compatible...

  15. Suppression of phospho-p85α-GTP-Rac1 lipid raft interaction by bichalcone analog attenuates cancer cell invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hui-Li; Chen, Shih-Shun; Hsu, Wen-Tung; Lu, Yao-Cheng; Lee, Chuan-Chun; Wu, Tian-Shung; Lin, Meng-Liang

    2016-12-01

    The p85α subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) acts as a key regulator of cell proliferation and motility, which mediates signals that confer chemoresistance to many human cancer cells. Using small interfering RNAs against matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and the MMP-2 promoter-driven luciferase assay, we showed that the new synthetic bichalcone analog TSWU-CD4 inhibits the invasion of human cancer cells by down-regulating MMP-2 expression. Treatment with TSWU-CD4 inhibited MMP-2 expression and cell invasion, which were restored by ectopic wild type (wt) p85α or a constitutively active form of MAPK kinase 3 (CA MKK3), CA MKK6, or CA p38α mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). The attenuated formation of lipid raft-associated phospho (p)-p85α-GTP-Rac1 complexes, protein kinase B (Akt) Ser 473 phosphorylation, and cell invasion by TSWU-CD4 was reversed by overexpression of wt p85α or the p85α Brc-homology (BH) domain. The ectopic expression of CA Rac1 L61 (but not wt Rac1) could overcome the suppression of Ser 473 phosphorylation, lipid raft association of Akt, the interaction between GTP-bound Rac1 and p85α in lipid rafts, and cell invasion by TSWU-CD4. The involvement of Akt activity in the functions of NF-κB-mediated MMP-2 was further confirmed through the attenuation of Akt phosphorylation signaling using the Akt-specific inhibitor MK-2206 and ectopic expression of NF-κB p65. Collectively, the inhibitory effect of TSWU-CD4 on cancer cell invasion was likely to suppress the p-p85α-GTP-Rac1 interaction in lipid rafts by targeting the p85α BH domain, which resulted in the suppression of MMP-2 expression via the PI3K-Akt-mediated ERK-MKK3/MKK6-p38 MAPK-NF-κB signaling pathway. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Progressive friction mobilization and enhanced Janssen's screening in confined granular rafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saavedra V., Oscar; Elettro, Hervé; Melo, Francisco

    2018-04-01

    Confined two-dimensional assemblies of floating particles, known as granular rafts, are prone to develop a highly nonlinear response under compression. Here we investigate the transition to the friction-dominated jammed state and map the gradual development of the internal stress profile with flexible pressure sensors distributed along the raft surface. Surprisingly, we observe that the surface stress screening builds up much more slowly than previously thought and that the typical screening distance later dramatically decreases. We explain this behavior in terms of progressive friction mobilization, where the full amplitude of the frictional forces is only reached after a macroscopic local displacement. At further stages of compression, rafts of large length-to-width aspect ratio experience much stronger screenings than the full mobilization limit described by the Janssen's model. We solve this paradox using a simple mathematical analysis and show that such enhanced screening can be attributed to a localized compaction front, essentially shielding the far field from compressive stresses.

  17. Tsunami-driven rafting: Transoceanic species dispersal and implications for marine biogeography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlton, James T; Chapman, John W; Geller, Jonathan B; Miller, Jessica A; Carlton, Deborah A; McCuller, Megan I; Treneman, Nancy C; Steves, Brian P; Ruiz, Gregory M

    2017-09-29

    The 2011 East Japan earthquake generated a massive tsunami that launched an extraordinary transoceanic biological rafting event with no known historical precedent. We document 289 living Japanese coastal marine species from 16 phyla transported over 6 years on objects that traveled thousands of kilometers across the Pacific Ocean to the shores of North America and Hawai'i. Most of this dispersal occurred on nonbiodegradable objects, resulting in the longest documented transoceanic survival and dispersal of coastal species by rafting. Expanding shoreline infrastructure has increased global sources of plastic materials available for biotic colonization and also interacts with climate change-induced storms of increasing severity to eject debris into the oceans. In turn, increased ocean rafting may intensify species invasions. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  18. Elucidation of the Key Role of [Ru(bpy)3 ](2+) in Photocatalyzed RAFT Polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christmann, Julien; Ibrahim, Ahmad; Charlot, Vincent; Croutxé-Barghorn, Céline; Ley, Christian; Allonas, Xavier

    2016-08-04

    Photocatalysis reactions using [Ru(II) (bpy)3 ](2+) were studied on the example of visible-light-sensitized reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization. Although both photoinduced electron- and energy-transfer mechanisms are able to describe this interaction, no definitive experimental proof has been presented so far. This paper investigates the actual mechanism governing this reaction. A set of RAFT agents was selected, their redox potentials measured by cyclic voltammetry, and relaxed triplet energies calculated by quantum mechanics. Gibbs free-energy values were calculated for both electron- and energy-transfer mechanisms. Quenching rate constants were determined by laser flash photolysis. The results undoubtedly evidence the involvement of a photoinduced energy-transfer reaction. Controlled photopolymerization experiments are discussed in the light of the primary photochemical process and photodissociation ability of RAFT agent triplet states. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Uptake of raft components into amyloid β-peptide aggregates and membrane damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasahara, Kenji; Morigaki, Kenichi; Mori, Yasuko

    2015-07-15

    Amyloid aggregation and deposition of amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) are pathologic characteristics of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent reports have shown that the association of Aβ with membranes containing ganglioside GM1 (GM1) plays a pivotal role in amyloid deposition and the pathogenesis of AD. However, the molecular interactions responsible for membrane damage associated with Aβ deposition are not fully understood. In this study, we microscopically observed amyloid aggregation of Aβ in the presence of lipid vesicles and on a substrate-supported planar membrane containing raft components and GM1. The experimental system enabled us to observe lipid-associated aggregation of Aβ, uptake of the raft components into Aβ aggregates, and relevant membrane damage. The results indicate that uptake of raft components from the membrane into Aβ deposits induces macroscopic heterogeneity of the membrane structure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Membrane microdomains, rafts, and detergent-resistant membranes in plants and fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinsky, Jan; Opekarová, Miroslava; Grossmann, Guido; Tanner, Widmar

    2013-01-01

    The existence of specialized microdomains in plasma membranes, postulated for almost 25 years, has been popularized by the concept of lipid or membrane rafts. The idea that detergent-resistant membranes are equivalent to lipid rafts, which was generally abandoned after a decade of vigorous data accumulation, contributed to intense discussions about the validity of the raft concept. The existence of membrane microdomains, meanwhile, has been verified by unequivocal independent evidence. This review summarizes the current state of research in plants and fungi with respect to common aspects of both kingdoms. In these organisms, principally immobile microdomains large enough for microscopic detection have been visualized. These microdomains are found in the context of cell-cell interactions (plant symbionts and pathogens), membrane transport, stress, and polarized growth, and the data corroborate at least three mechanisms of formation. As documented in this review, modern methods of visualization of lateral membrane compartments are also able to uncover the functional relevance of membrane microdomains.

  1. NADPH oxidase and lipid raft-associated redox signaling are required for PCB153-induced upregulation of cell adhesion molecules in human brain endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eum, Sung Yong; Andras, Ibolya; Hennig, Bernhard; Toborek, Michal

    2009-01-01

    Exposure to persistent organic pollutants, such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), can lead to chronic inflammation and the development of vascular diseases. Because cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) of the cerebrovascular endothelium regulate infiltration of inflammatory cells into the brain, we have explored the molecular mechanisms by which ortho-substituted polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), such as PCB153, can upregulate CAMs in brain endothelial cells. Exposure to PCB153 increased expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), as well as elevated adhesion of leukocytes to brain endothelial cells. These effects were impeded by inhibitors of EGFR, JAKs, or Src activity. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of NADPH oxidase or disruption of lipid rafts by cholesterol depleting agents blocked PCB153-induced phosphorylation of JAK and Src kinases and upregulation of CAMs. In contrast, silencing of caveolin-1 by siRNA interference did not affect upregulation of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 in brain endothelial cells stimulated by PCB153. Results of the present study indicate that lipid raft-dependent NADPH oxidase/JAK/EGFR signaling mechanisms regulate the expression of CAMs in brain endothelial cells and adhesion of leukocytes to endothelial monolayers. Due to its role in leukocyte infiltration, induction of CAMs may contribute to PCB-induced cerebrovascular disorders and neurotoxic effects in the CNS.

  2. Membrane rafts: a potential gateway for bacterial entry into host cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartlova, Anetta; Cerveny, Lukas; Hubalek, Martin; Krocova, Zuzana; Stulik, Jiri

    2010-04-01

    Pathogenic bacteria have developed various mechanisms to evade host immune defense systems. Invasion of pathogenic bacteria requires interaction of the pathogen with host receptors, followed by activation of signal transduction pathways and rearrangement of the cytoskeleton to facilitate bacterial entry. Numerous bacteria exploit specialized plasma membrane microdomains, commonly called membrane rafts, which are rich in cholesterol, sphingolipids and a special set of signaling molecules which allow entry to host cells and establishment of a protected niche within the host. This review focuses on the current understanding of the raft hypothesis and the means by which pathogenic bacteria subvert membrane microdomains to promote infection.

  3. Characterization of lipid rafts in human platelets using nuclear magnetic resonance: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua F. Ceñido

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Lipid microdomains (‘lipid rafts’ are plasma membrane subregions, enriched in cholesterol and glycosphingolipids, which participate dynamically in cell signaling and molecular trafficking operations. One strategy for the study of the physicochemical properties of lipid rafts in model membrane systems has been the use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR, but until now this spectroscopic method has not been considered a clinically relevant tool. We performed a proof-of-concept study to test the feasibility of using NMR to study lipid rafts in human tissues. Platelets were selected as a cost-effective and minimally invasive model system in which lipid rafts have previously been studied using other approaches. Platelets were isolated from plasma of medication-free adult research participants (n=13 and lysed with homogenization and sonication. Lipid-enriched fractions were obtained using a discontinuous sucrose gradient. Association of lipid fractions with GM1 ganglioside was tested using HRP-conjugated cholera toxin B subunit dot blot assays. 1H high resolution magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (HRMAS NMR spectra obtained with single-pulse Bloch decay experiments yielded spectral linewidths and intensities as a function of temperature. Rates of lipid lateral diffusion that reported on raft size were measured with a two-dimensional stimulated echo longitudinal encode-decode NMR experiment. We found that lipid fractions at 10–35% sucrose density associated with GM1 ganglioside, a marker for lipid rafts. NMR spectra of the membrane phospholipids featured a prominent ‘centerband’ peak associated with the hydrocarbon chain methylene resonance at 1.3 ppm; the linewidth (full width at half-maximum intensity of this ‘centerband’ peak, together with the ratio of intensities between the centerband and ‘spinning sideband’ peaks, agreed well with values reported previously for lipid rafts in model membranes. Decreasing

  4. The concrete technology of post pouring zone of raft foundation of Hongyun Building B tower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Suhua; Yu, Liu; Wu, Yanli; Zhao, Ying

    2017-08-01

    The foundation of Hongyun building B tower is made of raft board foundation which is 3300mm in the thickness concreted pouring amount of large and the late poured band in the pouring settlement formed. The temperature of the pouring settlement was controlled in order to prevent the crack of the construction of the late poured band. The steel of post pouring band was designed and monitorred. The quality of post pouring band quality is guaranteed in the raft concrete foundation of Hongyun Building B tower.

  5. Synthesis of click-reactive HPMA copolymers using RAFT polymerization for drug delivery applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbesen, Morten F; Schaffert, D.H.; Crowley, Michael L

    2013-01-01

    This study describes a versatile strategy combining reversible addition fragmentation transfer (RAFT) polymerization and click chemistry to synthesize well-defined, reactive copolymers of N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) for drug delivery applications. A novel azide containing monomer N-(3......-azidopropyl)methacrylamide (AzMA) was synthesized and copolymerized with HPMA using RAFT polymerization to provide p(HPMA-co-AzMA) copolymers with high control of molecular weight (∼10–54 kDa) and polydispersity (≤1.06). The utility of the side-chain azide functionality by Cu(I)-catalyzed azide...

  6. Gravity-induced encapsulation of liquids by destabilization of granular rafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abkarian, Manouk; Protière, Suzie; Aristoff, Jeffrey M.; Stone, Howard A.

    2013-05-01

    Droplets and bubbles coated by a protective armour of particles find numerous applications in encapsulation, stabilization of emulsions and foams, and flotation techniques. Here we study the role of a body force, such as in flotation, as a means of continuous encapsulation by particles. We use dense particles, which self-assemble into rafts, at oil-water interfaces. We show that these rafts can be spontaneously or controllably destabilized into armoured oil-in-water droplets, which highlights a possible role for common granular materials in environmental remediation. We further present a method for continuous production and discuss the generalization of our approach towards colloidal scales.

  7. On ripples and rafts: Curvature induced nanoscale structures in lipid membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmid, Friederike; Dolezel, Stefan; Meinhardt, Sebastian; Lenz, Olaf

    2014-01-01

    We develop an elastic theory that predicts the spontaneous formation of nanoscale structures in lipid bilayers which locally phase separate between two phases with different spontaneous monolayer curvature. The theory rationalizes in a unified manner the observation of a variety of nanoscale structures in lipid membranes: Rippled states in one-component membranes, lipid rafts in multicomponent membranes. Furthermore, we report on recent observations of rippled states and rafts in simulations of a simple coarse-grained model for lipid bilayers, which are compatible with experimental observations and with our elastic model

  8. Graft Copolymerization of Styrene from Poly(vinyl alcohol via RAFT Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholam Ali Koohmareh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Polystyrene, PS, was grafted from poly(vinyl alcohol, PVA, backbone by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT polymerization. The hydroxyl groups of the PVA were converted into aromatic dithioester RAFT agent and polymerization began in the presence of this agent. The structure of compounds was confirmed by FT-IR and 1HNMR spectroscopy. The graft copolymer was characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, X-ray diffraction (XRD, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Grafted polystyrene chains were cleaved from the PVA backbone by acidic hydrolysis of the PVA-g-PS, and its polydispersity index, PDI, was determined by gel permeation chromatography (GPC showing narrow molecular weight distribution.

  9. Telemedicina en Bolivia: proyecto RAFT-Altiplano, experiencias, perspectivas y recomendaciones

    OpenAIRE

    Vargas, Alejandro; Ugalde, Miguel; Vargas, Reynaldo; Narvaez, Ramiro; Geissbuhler, Antoine

    2014-01-01

    OBJETIVO: El objetivo del proyecto RAFT-Altiplano (RAFT, Red Africana Francófona de Telemedicina) es evaluar la viabilidad, potencialidad y riesgos de la implementación y el desarrollo de una red de telemedicina en el contexto de un país en desarrollo, como es el caso del Altiplano de Bolivia, para mejorar el acceso a la atención médica y la formación continua en el área rural. En este estudio se describe el desarrollo de dicho proyecto entre 2011 y 2013. MÉTODOS: Se donaron equipos de teleme...

  10. Sulforaphane restores cellular glutathione levels and reduces chronic periodontitis neutrophil hyperactivity in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irundika H K Dias

    Full Text Available The production of high levels of reactive oxygen species by neutrophils is associated with the local and systemic destructive phenotype found in the chronic inflammatory disease periodontitis. In the present study, we investigated the ability of sulforaphane (SFN to restore cellular glutathione levels and reduce the hyperactivity of circulating neutrophils associated with chronic periodontitis. Using differentiated HL60 cells as a neutrophil model, here we show that generation of extracellular O2 (. - by the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADPH oxidase complex is increased by intracellular glutathione depletion. This may be attributed to the upregulation of thiol regulated acid sphingomyelinase driven lipid raft formation. Intracellular glutathione was also lower in primary neutrophils from periodontitis patients and, consistent with our previous findings, patients neutrophils were hyper-reactive to stimuli. The activity of nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2, a master regulator of the antioxidant response, is impaired in circulating neutrophils from chronic periodontitis patients. Although patients' neutrophils exhibit a low reduced glutathione (GSH/oxidised glutathione (GSSG ratio and a higher total Nrf2 level, the DNA-binding activity of nuclear Nrf2 remained unchanged relative to healthy controls and had reduced expression of glutamate cysteine ligase catalytic (GCLC, and modifier (GCLM subunit mRNAs, compared to periodontally healthy subjects neutrophils. Pre-treatment with SFN increased expression of GCLC and GCM, improved intracellular GSH/GSSG ratios and reduced agonist-activated extracellular O2 (. - production in both dHL60 and primary neutrophils from patients with periodontitis and controls. These findings suggest that a deficiency in Nrf2-dependent pathways may underpin susceptibility to hyper-reactivity in circulating primary neutrophils during chronic periodontitis.

  11. Sulforaphane restores cellular glutathione levels and reduces chronic periodontitis neutrophil hyperactivity in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Irundika H K; Chapple, Ian L C; Milward, Mike; Grant, Melissa M; Hill, Eric; Brown, James; Griffiths, Helen R

    2013-01-01

    The production of high levels of reactive oxygen species by neutrophils is associated with the local and systemic destructive phenotype found in the chronic inflammatory disease periodontitis. In the present study, we investigated the ability of sulforaphane (SFN) to restore cellular glutathione levels and reduce the hyperactivity of circulating neutrophils associated with chronic periodontitis. Using differentiated HL60 cells as a neutrophil model, here we show that generation of extracellular O2 (. -) by the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADPH) oxidase complex is increased by intracellular glutathione depletion. This may be attributed to the upregulation of thiol regulated acid sphingomyelinase driven lipid raft formation. Intracellular glutathione was also lower in primary neutrophils from periodontitis patients and, consistent with our previous findings, patients neutrophils were hyper-reactive to stimuli. The activity of nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), a master regulator of the antioxidant response, is impaired in circulating neutrophils from chronic periodontitis patients. Although patients' neutrophils exhibit a low reduced glutathione (GSH)/oxidised glutathione (GSSG) ratio and a higher total Nrf2 level, the DNA-binding activity of nuclear Nrf2 remained unchanged relative to healthy controls and had reduced expression of glutamate cysteine ligase catalytic (GCLC), and modifier (GCLM) subunit mRNAs, compared to periodontally healthy subjects neutrophils. Pre-treatment with SFN increased expression of GCLC and GCM, improved intracellular GSH/GSSG ratios and reduced agonist-activated extracellular O2 (. -) production in both dHL60 and primary neutrophils from patients with periodontitis and controls. These findings suggest that a deficiency in Nrf2-dependent pathways may underpin susceptibility to hyper-reactivity in circulating primary neutrophils during chronic periodontitis.

  12. Association of membrane/lipid rafts with the platelet cytoskeleton and the caveolin PY14: participation in the adhesion process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerecedo, Doris; Martínez-Vieyra, Ivette; Maldonado-García, Deneb; Hernández-González, Enrique; Winder, Steve J

    2015-11-01

    Platelets are the most prominent elements of blood tissue involved in hemostasis at sites of blood vessel injury. Platelet cytoskeleton is responsible for their shape modifications observed during activation and adhesion to the substratum; therefore the interactions between cytoskeleton and plasma membrane are critical to modulate blood platelet functions. Several cytoskeletal components and binding partners, as well as enzymes that regulate the cytoskeleton, localize to membrane/lipid rafts (MLR) and regulate lateral diffusion of membrane proteins and lipids. Resting, thrombin-activated, and adherent human platelets were processed for biochemical studies including western-blot and immunprecipitation assays and confocal analysis were performed to characterize the interaction of MLR with the main cytoskeleton elements and β-dystroglycan as well as with the association of caveolin-1 PY14 with focal adhesion proteins. We transfected a megakaryoblast cell line (Meg-01) to deplete β-dystroglycan, subsequent to their differentiation to the platelet progenitors. Our data showed a direct interaction of the MLR with cytoskeleton to regulate platelet shape, while an association of caveolin-1 PY14 with vinculin is needed to establish focal adhesions, which are modulated for β-dystroglycan. In conclusion, caveolin-1 PY14 in association with platelet cytoskeleton participate in focal adhesions dynamics. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Inhibition of microRNA-153 protects neurons against ischemia/reperfusion injury in an oxygen-glucose deprivation and reoxygenation cellular model by regulating Nrf2/HO-1 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Qiong; Gao, Jianbo; Zheng, Yan; Liu, Xueli; Zhou, Qiangqiang; Shi, Canxia; Yao, Meng; Chen, Xia

    2017-07-01

    MicroRNAs are emerging as critical regulators in cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury; however, their exact roles remain poorly understood. miR-153 is reported to be a neuron-related miRNA involved in neuroprotection. In this study, we aimed to investigate the precise role of miR-153 in regulating neuron survival during cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury using an oxygen-glucose deprivation and reoxygenation (OGD/R) cellular model. We found that miR-153 was significantly upregulated in neurons subjected to OGD/R treatment. Inhibition of miR-153 significantly attenuated OGD/R-induced injury and oxidative stress in neurons. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) was identified as a target gene of miR-153. Inhibition of miR-153 significantly promoted the expression of Nrf2 and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). However, silencing of Nrf2 significantly blocked the protective effects of miR-153 inhibition. Our study indicates that the inhibition of miR-153 protects neurons against OGD/R-induced injury by regulating Nrf2/HO-1 signaling and suggests a potential therapeutic target for cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. E2F1-mediated upregulation of p19INK4d determines its periodic expression during cell cycle and regulates cellular proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcagno, Abel L; Marazita, Mariela C; Ogara, María F; Ceruti, Julieta M; Sonzogni, Silvina V; Scassa, María E; Giono, Luciana E; Cánepa, Eduardo T

    2011-01-01

    A central aspect of development and disease is the control of cell proliferation through regulation of the mitotic cycle. Cell cycle progression and directionality requires an appropriate balance of positive and negative regulators whose expression must fluctuate in a coordinated manner. p19INK4d, a member of the INK4 family of CDK inhibitors, has a unique feature that distinguishes it from the remaining INK4 and makes it a likely candidate for contributing to the directionality of the cell cycle. p19INK4d mRNA and protein levels accumulate periodically during the cell cycle under normal conditions, a feature reminiscent of cyclins. In this paper, we demonstrate that p19INK4d is transcriptionally regulated by E2F1 through two response elements present in the p19INK4d promoter. Ablation of this regulation reduced p19 levels and restricted its expression during the cell cycle, reflecting the contribution of a transcriptional effect of E2F1 on p19 periodicity. The induction of p19INK4d is delayed during the cell cycle compared to that of cyclin E, temporally separating the induction of these proliferative and antiproliferative target genes. Specific inhibition of the E2F1-p19INK4d pathway using triplex-forming oligonucleotides that block E2F1 binding on p19 promoter, stimulated cell proliferation and increased the fraction of cells in S phase. The results described here support a model of normal cell cycle progression in which, following phosphorylation of pRb, free E2F induces cyclin E, among other target genes. Once cyclinE/CDK2 takes over as the cell cycle driving kinase activity, the induction of p19 mediated by E2F1 leads to inhibition of the CDK4,6-containing complexes, bringing the G1 phase to an end. This regulatory mechanism constitutes a new negative feedback loop that terminates the G1 phase proliferative signal, contributing to the proper coordination of the cell cycle and provides an additional mechanism to limit E2F activity.

  15. E2F1-mediated upregulation of p19INK4d determines its periodic expression during cell cycle and regulates cellular proliferation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abel L Carcagno

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A central aspect of development and disease is the control of cell proliferation through regulation of the mitotic cycle. Cell cycle progression and directionality requires an appropriate balance of positive and negative regulators whose expression must fluctuate in a coordinated manner. p19INK4d, a member of the INK4 family of CDK inhibitors, has a unique feature that distinguishes it from the remaining INK4 and makes it a likely candidate for contributing to the directionality of the cell cycle. p19INK4d mRNA and protein levels accumulate periodically during the cell cycle under normal conditions, a feature reminiscent of cyclins. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this paper, we demonstrate that p19INK4d is transcriptionally regulated by E2F1 through two response elements present in the p19INK4d promoter. Ablation of this regulation reduced p19 levels and restricted its expression during the cell cycle, reflecting the contribution of a transcriptional effect of E2F1 on p19 periodicity. The induction of p19INK4d is delayed during the cell cycle compared to that of cyclin E, temporally separating the induction of these proliferative and antiproliferative target genes. Specific inhibition of the E2F1-p19INK4d pathway using triplex-forming oligonucleotides that block E2F1 binding on p19 promoter, stimulated cell proliferation and increased the fraction of cells in S phase. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results described here support a model of normal cell cycle progression in which, following phosphorylation of pRb, free E2F induces cyclin E, among other target genes. Once cyclinE/CDK2 takes over as the cell cycle driving kinase activity, the induction of p19 mediated by E2F1 leads to inhibition of the CDK4,6-containing complexes, bringing the G1 phase to an end. This regulatory mechanism constitutes a new negative feedback loop that terminates the G1 phase proliferative signal, contributing to the proper coordination of the cell

  16. Different associations of CD45 isoforms with STAT3, PKC and ERK regulate IL-6-induced proliferation in myeloma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Zheng

    Full Text Available In response to interleukin 6 (IL-6 stimulation, both CD45RO and CD45RB, but not CD45RA, translocate to lipid rafts. However, the significance of this distinct translocation and the downstream signals in CD45 isoforms-participated IL-6 signal are not well understood. Using sucrose fractionation, we found that phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT3 and STAT1 were mainly localized in lipid rafts in response to IL-6 stimulation, despite both STAT3 and STAT1 localizing in raft and non-raft fractions in the presence or absence of IL-6. On the other hand, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK, and phosphorylated ERK were localized in non-raft fractions regardless of the existence of IL-6. The rafts inhibitor significantly impeded the phosphorylation of STAT3 and STAT1 and nuclear translocation, but had little effect on (and only postponing the phosphorylation of ERK. This data suggests that lipid raft-dependent STAT3 and STAT1 pathways are dominant pathways of IL-6 signal in myeloma cells. Interestingly, the phosphorylation level of STAT3 but not STAT1 in CD45+ cells was significantly higher compared to that of CD45- cells, while the phosphorylation level of ERK in CD45+ myeloma cells was relatively low. Furthermore, exogenously expressed CD45RO/RB significantly enhanced STAT3, protein kinase C (PKC and downstream NF-κB activation; however, CD45RA/RB inhibited IL-6-induced ERK phosphorylation. CD45 also enhanced the nuclear localization of STAT3 but not that of STAT1. In response to IL-6 stimulation, CD45RO moved into raft compartments and formed a complex with STAT3 and PKC in raft fraction, while CD45RA remained outside of lipid rafts and formed a complex with ERK in non-raft fraction. This data suggests a different role of CD45 isoforms in IL-6-induced signaling, indicating that while CD45RA/RB seems inhibit the rafts-unrelated ERK pathway, CD45RO/RB may actually work to enhance the rafts-related STAT3 and PKC

  17. The AMPK enzyme-complex: from the regulation of cellular energy homeostasis to a possible new molecular target in the management of chronic inflammatory disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonioli, Luca; Colucci, Rocchina; Pellegrini, Carolina; Giustarini, Giulio; Sacco, Deborah; Tirotta, Erika; Caputi, Valentina; Marsilio, Ilaria; Giron, Maria Cecilia; Németh, Zoltán H; Blandizzi, Corrado; Fornai, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), known as an enzymatic complex that regulates the energetic metabolism, is emerging as a pivotal enzyme and enzymatic pathway involved in the regulation of immune homeostatic networks. It is also involved in the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of chronic inflammatory diseases. AMPK is expressed in several immune cell types including macrophages, lymphocytes, neutrophils and dendritic cells, and governs a broad array of cell functions, which include cytokine production, chemotaxis, cytotoxicity, apoptosis and proliferation. Based on its wide variety of immunoregulatory actions, the AMPK system has been targeted to reveal its impact on the course of immune-related diseases, such as atherosclerosis, psoriasis, joint inflammation and inflammatory bowel diseases. The identification of AMPK subunits responsible for specific anti-inflammatory actions and the understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms will promote the generation of novel AMPK activators, endowed with improved pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic profiles. These new tools will aid us to utilize AMPK pathway activation in the management of acute and chronic inflammatory diseases, while minimizing potential adverse reactions related to the effects of AMPK on metabolic energy.

  18. Regulation of cellular sphingosine-1-phosphate by sphingosine kinase 1 and sphingosine-1-phopshate lyase determines chemotherapy resistance in gastroesophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matula, Kasia; Collie-Duguid, Elaina; Murray, Graeme; Parikh, Khyati; Grabsch, Heike; Tan, Patrick; Lalwani, Salina; Garau, Roberta; Ong, Yuhan; Bain, Gillian; Smith, Asa-Dahle; Urquhart, Gordon; Bielawski, Jacek; Finnegan, Michael; Petty, Russell

    2015-01-01

    Resistance to chemotherapy is common in gastroesophageal cancer. Mechanisms of resistance are incompletely characterised and there are no predictive biomarkers in clinical practice for cytotoxic drugs. We used new cell line models to characterise novel chemotherapy resistance mechanisms and validated them in tumour specimens to identify new targets and biomarkers for gastroesophageal cancer. Cell lines were selected for resistance to oxaliplatin, cisplatin and docetaxel and gene expression examined using Affymetrix Exon 1.0 ST arrays. Leads were validated by qRT-PCR and HPLC of tumour metabolites. Protein expression and pharmacological inhibition of lead target SPHK1 was evaluated in independent cell lines, and by immunohistochemistry in gastroesophageal cancer patients. Genes with differential expression in drug resistant cell lines compared to the parental cell line they were derived from, were identified for each drug resistant cell line. Biological pathway analysis of these gene lists, identified over-represented pathways, and only 3 pathways - lysosome, sphingolipid metabolism and p53 signalling- were identified as over-represented in these lists for all three cytotoxic drugs investigated. The majority of genes differentially expressed in chemoresistant cell lines from these pathways, were involved in metabolism of glycosphingolipids and sphingolipids in lysosomal compartments suggesting that sphingolipids might be important mediators of cytotoxic drug resistance in gastroeosphageal cancers . On further investigation, we found that drug resistance (IC50) was correlated with increased sphingosine kinase 1(SPHK1) mRNA and also with decreased sphingosine-1-phosphate lysase 1(SGPL1) mRNA. SPHK1 and SGPL1 gene expression were inversely correlated. SPHK1:SGPL1 ratio correlated with increased cellular sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), and S1P correlated with drug resistance (IC50). High SPHK1 protein correlated with resistance to cisplatin (IC50) in an independent

  19. Shedding of Ebola Virus Surface Glycoprotein Is a Mechanism of Self-regulation of Cellular Cytotoxicity and Has a Direct Effect on Virus Infectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolnik, Olga; Volchkova, Valentina A; Escudero-Perez, Beatriz; Lawrence, Philip; Klenk, Hans-Dieter; Volchkov, Viktor E

    2015-10-01

    The surface glycoprotein (GP) is responsible for Ebola virus (EBOV) attachment and membrane fusion during virus entry. Surface expression of highly glycosylated GP causes marked cytotoxicity via masking of a wide range of cellular surface molecules, including integrins. Considerable amounts of surface GP are shed from virus-infected cells in a soluble truncated form by tumor necrosis factor α-converting enzyme. In this study, the role of GP shedding was investigated using a reverse genetics approach by comparing recombinant viruses possessing amino acid substitutions at the GP shedding site. Virus with an L635V substitution showed a substantial decrease in shedding, whereas a D637V substitution resulted in a striking increase in the release of shed GP. Variations in shedding efficacy correlated with observed differences in the amounts of shed GP in the medium, GP present in virus-infected cells, and GP present on virions. An increase in shedding appeared to be associated with a reduction in viral cytotoxicity, and, vice versa, the virus that shed less was more cytotoxic. An increase in shedding also resulted in a reduction in viral infectivity, whereas a decrease in shedding efficacy enhanced viral growth characteristics in vitro. Differences in shedding efficacy and, as a result, differences in the amount of mature GP available for incorporation into budding virions did not equate to differences in overall release of viral particles. Likewise, data suggest that the resulting differences in the amount of mature GP on the cell surface led to variations in the GP content of released particles and, as a consequence, in infectivity. In conclusion, fine-tuning of the levels of EBOV GP expressed at the surface of virus-infected cells via GP shedding plays an important role in EBOV replication by orchestrating the balance between optimal virion GP content and cytotoxicity caused by GP. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious

  20. SUN1 Regulates HIV-1 Nuclear Import in a Manner Dependent on the Interaction between the Viral Capsid and Cellular Cyclophilin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xinlong; Yang, Wei; Gao, Guangxia

    2018-07-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) can infect nondividing cells via passing through the nuclear pore complex. The nuclear membrane-imbedded protein SUN2 was recently reported to be involved in the nuclear import of HIV-1. Whether SUN1, which shares many functional similarities with SUN2, is involved in this process remained to be explored. Here we report that overexpression of SUN1 specifically inhibited infection by HIV-1 but not that by simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) or murine leukemia virus (MLV). Overexpression of SUN1 did not affect reverse transcription but led to reduced accumulation of the 2-long-terminal-repeat (2-LTR) circular DNA and integrated viral DNA, suggesting a block in the process of nuclear import. HIV-1 CA was mapped as a determinant for viral sensitivity to SUN1. Treatment of SUN1-expressing cells with cyclosporine (CsA) significantly reduced the sensitivity of the virus to SUN1, and an HIV-1 mutant containing CA-G89A, which does not interact with cyclophilin A (CypA), was resistant to SUN1 overexpression. Downregulation of endogenous SUN1 inhibited the nuclear entry of the wild-type virus but not that of the G89A mutant. These results indicate that SUN1 participates in the HIV-1 nuclear entry process in a manner dependent on the interaction of CA with CypA. IMPORTANCE HIV-1 infects both dividing and nondividing cells. The viral preintegration complex (PIC) can enter the nucleus through the nuclear pore complex. It has been well known that the viral protein CA plays an important role in determining the pathways by which the PIC enters the nucleus. In addition, the interaction between CA and the cellular protein CypA has been reported to be important in the selection of nuclear entry pathways, though the underlying mechanisms are not very clear. Here we show that both SUN1 overexpression and downregulation inhibited HIV-1 nuclear entry. CA played an important role in determining the sensitivity of the virus to SUN1: the regulatory

  1. Concerted diffusion of lipids in raft-like membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Apajalahti, Touko; Niemela, Perttu; Govindan, Praveen Nedumpully; Miettinen, Markus S.; Salonen, Emppu; Marrink, Siewert-Jan; Vattulainen, Ilpo

    2010-01-01

    Currently, there is no comprehensive model for the dynamics of cellular membranes. The understanding of even the basic dynamic processes, such as lateral diffusion of lipids, is still quite limited. Recent studies of one-component membrane systems have shown that instead of single-particle motions,

  2. Adsorption study of a macro-RAFT agent onto SiO2-coated Gd2O3:Eu3+ nanorods: Requirements and limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Hua; Melro, Liliana; de Camargo Chaparro, Thaissa; de Souza Filho, Isnaldi Rodrigues; Ananias, Duarte; Bourgeat-Lami, Elodie; dos Santos, Amilton Martins; Barros-Timmons, Ana

    2017-02-01

    The use of a macromolecular RAFT (macro-RAFT) agent to encapsulate anisotropic nano-objects via emulsion polymerization is an emerging route to prepare polymer/inorganic colloidal nanocomposites. However, a number of requirements have to be fulfilled. This work aims at highlighting the effects of the preparative procedure and dispersion method on the amount of macro-RAFT agent adsorbed onto SiO2-coated Gd2O3:Eu3+ nanorods. The adsorption of macro-RAFT agent was studied using the depletion method with UV-vis spectrophotometry. Measurements were performed at a fixed concentration of nanorods and varying concentrations of the macro-RAFT agent in aqueous dispersion at room temperature. The adsorption isotherms showed that for the same initial macro-RAFT agent concentration, the highest adsorption capacity of the macro-RAFT agent on nanorods was usually achieved for non-calcined thin SiO2-coated nanorods under mild bath sonication.

  3. Proximate biochemical composition and caloric potential in the raft-grown green mussel Perna viridis

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rivonker, C.U.; Parulekar, A.H.

    The biochemical components of the mussel tissue, cultured on the raft were estimated. The range of variation in the content of moisture, protein, carbohydrates, lipid, organic carbon and ash were 66.8-90.1; 46.2-67.4; 11.7-18.6; 2.9-7.4; 19...

  4. Effect of tamoxifen in RAFT miniemulsion polymerization during the synthesis of polymer nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tailane Sant'Anna Moreira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tamoxifen (TXF is currently the only hormonal agent used for treatment of breast cancer. Although very effective, TXF presents low solubility in water, which affects its absorption and bioavailability. A common strategy to overcome this barrier is the formulation of a drug delivery system (DDS in order to increase the drug stability and improve the treatment effectiveness. Reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT polymerization is the most versatile method of controlled/living radical polymerization (CLRP, allowing for synthesis of well-defined polymers and being adapted to a wide range of polymerization systems. Miniemulsion polymerization is a dispersed system that is commonly used to prepare nanoparticles (NP with 50 to 500 nm of diameter. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of the in situ incorporation of TXF during miniemulsion conventional and RAFT polymerizations, using methyl methacrylate (MMA as monomer. Although the in situ addition of TXF promoted a slight reduction of the reaction rate, it did not affect the final particle size distribution of the latex or the molecular weight control exerted by the RAFT agent. The obtained results suggest that in situ incorporation of TXF during the synthesis of polymer NP via RAFT polymerization allows for production of a polymer DDS for different uses, such as the breast cancer treatment.

  5. In Plant and Animal Cells, Detergent-Resistant Membranes Do Not Define Functional Membrane Rafts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tanner, W.; Malínský, Jan; Opekarová, Miroslava

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 4 (2011), s. 1191-1193 ISSN 1040-4651 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : plasma-membrane * lipod rafts * proteins Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 8.987, year: 2011

  6. A new type of membrane raft-like microdomains and their possible involvement in TCR signaling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Otáhal, Pavel; Angelisová, Pavla; Hrdinka, Matouš; Brdička, Tomáš; Novák, Petr; Drbal, Karel; Hořejší, Václav

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 184, č. 7 (2010), s. 3689-3696 ISSN 0022-1767 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : membrane rafts * LAT * T-receptor Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.745, year: 2010

  7. Designing materials for advanced microelectronic patterning applications using controlled polymerization RAFT technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Michael T.; Farnham, William B.; Chambers, Charles R.; Tran, Hoang V.; Okazaki, Hiroshi; Brun, Yefim; Romberger, Matthew L.; Sounik, James R.

    2011-04-01

    Reversible Addition Fragmentation Chain Transfer (RAFT) polymerization technology enables the production of polymers possessing low polydispersity (PD) in high yield for many applications. RAFT technology also enables control over polymer architecture. With synthetic control over these polymer characteristics, a variety of polymers can be designed and manufactured for use in advanced electronic applications. By matching the specific RAFT reagent and monomer combinations, we can accommodate monomer reactivity and optimize acrylate or methacrylate polymerizations (193 and 193i photoresist polymers) or optimize styrenic monomer systems (248 nm photoresist polymers) to yield polymers with PD as low as 1.05. For 193i lithography, we have used RAFT technology to produce block copolymers comprising of a random "resist" block with composition and size based on conventional dry photoresist materials and a "low surface energy" block The relative block lengths and compositions may be varied to tune solution migration behavior, surface energy, contact angles, and solubility in developer. Directed self assembly is proving to be an interesting and innovative method to make 2- and even 3-dimensional periodic, uniform patterns. Two keys to acceptable performance of directed self assembly from block copolymers are the uniformity and the purity of the materials will be discussed.

  8. Fabrication of cell outer membrane mimetic polymer brush on polysulfone surface via RAFT technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Qian; Zhang Hui; Zhao Jiang; Gong Yongkuan

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Cell membrane mimetic antifouling polymer brush was grown on polysulfone surface. ► Graft density and polymerization degree were calculated from XPS results. ► Water contact angle measurements showed an extremely hydrophilic surface. ► Platelet adhesion and protein adsorption results suggested excellent antifouling ability. - Abstract: Cell membrane mimetic antifouling polymer brush was grown on polysulfone (PSF) membrane by surface-induced reversible addition–fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization of 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC). The RAFT agent immobilized PSF substrate was prepared by successive chloromethylation, amination with ethylenediamine (EDA) and amidation of the amine group of grafted EDA with the carboxylic group of 4-cyanopentanoic acid dithiobenzoate (CPAD). The surface RAFT polymerization of MPC was initiated in aqueous solution by 4,4′-azobis-4-cyanopentanoic acid (ACPA). The formation of PMPC brush coating is evidenced by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and water contact angle measurements. The degree of polymerization of PMPC and the polymer grafting density were calculated from the high resolution XPS spectra. The platelet adhesion and protein adsorption results showed that the PMPC-grafted PSF surface has excellent antifouling ability to resist platelet adhesion completely and suppress protein adsorption significantly. This biomimetic and bio-friendly surface RAFT polymerization strategy could be promising for a variety of biomedical applications.

  9. Clinical and laboratory studies of the antacid and raft-forming properties of Rennie alginate suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tytgat, G N; Simoneau, G

    2006-03-15

    Acid pockets at the gastro-oesophageal junction escape buffering from meals in the stomach. Combining high-dose antacid with alginate may therefore be of benefit in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. To characterize the antacid and raft-forming properties of Rennie alginate suspension (containing high-dose antacid and alginate; Bayer Consumer Care, Bladel, the Netherlands). The in vitro acid-neutralizing capacity of Rennie algniate was compared with Gaviscon (Reckitt Benckiser, Slough, UK) by pH-recorded HCl titration. Alginate raft weight formed in vitro at different pH was used to evaluate the pH dependency of raft formation with each product. A double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized crossover study also compared the antacid activity of Rennie alginate vs. placebo in vivo using continuous intragastric pH monitoring in 12 healthy fasting volunteers. Compared with Gaviscon, Rennie alginate had a higher acid-neutralizing capacity, greater maximum pH and longer duration of antacid activity in vitro. However, the two products produced comparable alginate rafts at each pH evaluated. In vivo, Rennie alginate provided rapid, effective and long-lasting acid neutralization, with an onset of action of <5 min, and duration of action of almost 90 min. The dual mode of action of Rennie alginate offers an effective treatment option for mild symptomatic gastro-oesophageal reflux disease particularly considering recent findings regarding 'acid pockets'.

  10. Clinical and laboratory studies of the antacid and raft-forming properties of Rennie alginate suspension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tytgat, G. N.; Simoneau, G.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acid pockets at the gastro-oesophageal junction escape buffering from meals in the stomach. Combining high-dose antacid with alginate may therefore be of benefit in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. AIM: To characterize the antacid and raft-forming properties of Rennie alginate

  11. Influence of lipid rafts on CD1d presentation by dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Wei; Martaresche, Cecile; Escande-Beillard, Nathalie

    2011-01-01

    corresponding to lipid rafts and we describe that alpha-GalCer enhanced CD1d amount in the low density detergent insoluble fraction. We conclude that the membrane environment of CD1d can influence antigen presentation mainly when the endocytic pathway is required. Flow cytometry analysis can provide additional...

  12. Internal Technical Report, Safety Analysis Report 5 MW(e) Raft River Research and Development Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, E.S.; Homer, G.B.; Shaber, C.R.; Thurow, T.L.

    1981-11-17

    The Raft River Geothermal Site is located in Southern Idaho's Raft River Valley, southwest of Malta, Idaho, in Cassia County. EG and G idaho, Inc., is the DOE's prime contractor for development of the Raft River geothermal field. Contract work has been progressing for several years towards creating a fully integrated utilization of geothermal water. Developmental progress has resulted in the drilling of seven major DOE wells. Four are producing geothermal water from reservoir temperatures measured to approximately 149 C (approximately 300 F). Closed-in well head pressures range from 69 to 102 kPa (100 to 175 psi). Two wells are scheduled for geothermal cold 60 C (140 F) water reinjection. The prime development effort is for a power plant designed to generate electricity using the heat from the geothermal hot water. The plant is designated as the ''5 MW(e) Raft River Research and Development Plant'' project. General site management assigned to EG and G has resulted in planning and development of many parts of the 5 MW program. Support and development activities have included: (1) engineering design, procurement, and construction support; (2) fluid supply and injection facilities, their study, and control; (3) development and installation of transfer piping systems for geothermal water collection and disposal by injection; and (4) heat exchanger fouling tests.

  13. Internal Technical Report, Safety Analysis Report 5 MW(e) Raft River Pilot Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, E.S.; Homer, G.B.; Spencer, S.G.; Shaber, C.R.

    1980-05-30

    The Raft River Geothermal Site is located in Southern Idaho's Raft River Valley, southwest of Malta, Idaho, in Cassia County. EG and G idaho, Inc., is the DOE's prime contractor for development of the Raft River geothermal field. Contract work has been progressing for several years towards creating a fully integrated utilization of geothermal water. Developmental progress has resulted in the drilling of seven major DOE wells. Four are producing geothermal water from reservoir temperatures measured to approximately 149 C (approximately 300 F). Closed-in well head pressures range from 69 to 102 kPa (100 to 175 psi). Two wells are scheduled for geothermal cold 60 C (140 F) water reinjection. The prime development effort is for a power plant designed to generate electricity using the heat from the geothermal hot water. The plant is designated as the ''5 MW(e) Raft River Research and Development Plant'' project. General site management assigned to EG and G has resulted in planning and development of many parts of the 5 MW program. Support and development activities have included: (1) engineering design, procurement, and construction support; (2) fluid supply and injection facilities, their study, and control; (3) development and installation of transfer piping systems for geothermal water collection and disposal by injection; and (4) heat exchanger fouling tests.

  14. Multiblock Copolymers of Styrene and Butyl Acrylate via Polytrithiocarbonate-Mediated RAFT Polymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastian Ebeling

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available When linear polytrithiocarbonates as Reversible Addition-Fragmentation chain Transfer (RAFT agents are employed in a radical polymerization, the resulting macromolecules consist of several homogeneous polymer blocks, interconnected by the functional groups of the respective RAFT agent. Via a second polymerization with another monomer, multiblock copolymers—polymers with alternating segments of both monomers—can be prepared. This strategy was examined mechanistically in detail based on subsequent RAFT polymerizations of styrene and butyl acrylate. Size-exclusion chromatography (SEC of these polymers showed that the examined method yields low-disperse products. In some cases, resolved peaks for molecules with different numbers of blocks (polymer chains separated by the trithiocarbonate groups could be observed. Cleavage of the polymers at the trithiocarbonate groups and SEC analysis of the products showed that the blocks in the middle of the polymers are longer than those at the ends and that the number of blocks corresponds to the number of functional groups in the initial RAFT agent. Furthermore, the produced multiblock copolymers were analyzed via differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. This work underlines that the examined methodology is very well suited for the synthesis of well-defined multiblock copolymers.

  15. RAFT Miniemulsion Polymerization of MMA with Cumyl Dithiobenzoate as Chain Transfer Agent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tian Ying GUO; Dong Lin TANG; Jing Wei ZHU; Mou Dao SONG; Bang Hua ZHANG

    2006-01-01

    Reversible addition-fragmentation transfer (RAFT) miniemulsion polymerizations for PMMA with cumyl dithiobenzoate (CDB) as a chain transfer agent (CTA) has been carried out.Higher temperature made the polymerization much faster and the PDI remained below 1.20, when the temperature was upon 70 ℃.

  16. Incidence, predictors, and procedural results of upgrade to resynchronization therapy: the RAFT upgrade substudy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essebag, Vidal; Joza, Jacqueline; Birnie, David H; Sapp, John L; Sterns, Laurence D; Philippon, Francois; Yee, Raymond; Crystal, Eugene; Kus, Teresa; Rinne, Claus; Healey, Jeffrey S; Sami, Magdi; Thibault, Bernard; Exner, Derek V; Coutu, Benoit; Simpson, Chris S; Wulffhart, Zaev; Yetisir, Elizabeth; Wells, George; Tang, Anthony S L

    2015-02-01

    The resynchronization-defibrillation for ambulatory heart failure trial (RAFT) study demonstrated that adding cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) in selected patients requiring de novo implantable cardiac defibrillators (ICD) reduced mortality as compared with ICD therapy alone, despite an increase in procedure-related adverse events. Data are lacking regarding the management of patients with ICD therapy who develop an indication for CRT upgrade. Participating RAFT centers provided data regarding de novo CRT-D (CRT with ICD) implant, upgrade to CRT-D during RAFT (study upgrade), and upgrade within 6 months after presentation of study results (substudy). Substudy centers enrolled 1346 (74.9%) patients in RAFT, including 644 de novo, 80 study upgrade, and 60 substudy CRT attempts. The success rate (initial plus repeat attempts) was 95.2% for de novo versus 96.3% for study upgrade and 90.0% for substudy CRT attempts (P=0.402). Acute complications occurred among 26.2% of de novo versus 18.8% of study upgrade and 3.4% of substudy CRT implantation attempts (PRAFT study and other trials. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Controlled growth of protein resistant PHEMA brushes via S-RAFT polymerization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zamfir, M.; Rodriguez-Emmenegger, Cesar; Bauer, S.; Barner, L.; Rosenhahn, A.; Barner-Kowollik, C.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 44 (2013), s. 6027-6034 ISSN 2050-750X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/12/1702; GA ČR GAP106/12/1451 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : surface RAFT * polymer brushes * antifouling Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  18. Hydroperoxide Traces in Common Cyclic Ethers as Initiators for Controlled RAFT Polymerizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggers, Steffen; Abetz, Volker

    2018-04-01

    Herein, a reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization is introduced for reactive monomers like N-acryloylpyrrolidine or N,N-dimethylacrylamide working without a conventional radical initiator. As a very straightforward proof of principle, the method takes advantage of the usually inconvenient radical-generating hydroperoxide contaminations in cyclic ethers like tetrahydrofuran or 1,4-dioxane, which are very common solvents in polymer sciences. The polymerizations are surprisingly well controlled and the polymers can be extended with a second block, indicating their high livingness. "Solvent-initiated" RAFT polymerizations hence prove to be a feasible access to tailored materials with minimal experimental effort and standard laboratory equipment, only requiring the following ingredients: hydroperoxide-contaminated solvent, monomer, and RAFT agent. In other respects, however, the potential coinitiating ability of the used solvent is to be considered when investigating the kinetics of RAFT polymerizations or aiming for the synthesis of high-livingness polymers, e.g., multiblock copolymers. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Preparation for Instruction. A Module of Instruction in Teacher Education. Prepared for Project RAFT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handley, Herbert M., Ed.

    This module, developed by the Research Applications for Teaching (RAFT) project, was written to assist students to write lesson plans that are effective and interactive. Students are given directions for the preparation of behavioral objectives and for the selection of appropriate instructional methodologies to meet the widely varying needs of…

  20. MPP1 directly interacts with flotillins in erythrocyte membrane - Possible mechanism of raft domain formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biernatowska, Agnieszka; Augoff, Katarzyna; Podkalicka, Joanna; Tabaczar, Sabina; Gajdzik-Nowak, Weronika; Czogalla, Aleksander; Sikorski, Aleksander F

    2017-11-01

    Flotillins are prominent, oligomeric protein components of erythrocyte (RBC) membrane raft domains and are considered to play an important structural role in lateral organization of the plasma membrane. In our previous work on erythroid membranes and giant plasma membrane vesicles (GPMVs) derived from them we have shown that formation of functional domains (resting state rafts) depends on the presence of membrane palmitoylated protein 1 (MPP1/p55), pointing to its new physiological role. Exploration of the molecular mechanism of MPP1 function in organizing membrane domains described here, through searching for its molecular partners in RBC membrane by using different methods, led to the identification of the raft-marker proteins, flotillin 1 and flotillin 2, as hitherto unreported direct MPP1 binding-partners in the RBC membrane. These proteins are found in high molecular-weight complexes in native RBC membrane and, significantly, their presence was shown to be separate from the well-known protein 4.1-dependent interactions of MPP1 with membrane proteins. Furthermore, FLIM analysis revealed that loss of the endogenous MPP1-flotillins interactions resulted in significant changes in RBC membrane-fluidity, emphasizing the physiological importance of such interactions in vivo. Therefore, our data establish a new perspective on the role of MPP1 in erythroid cells and suggests that direct MPP1-flotillins interactions could be the major driving-force behind the formation of raft domains in RBC. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Cholera toxin entry into pig enterocytes occurs via a lipid raft- and clathrin-dependent mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Gert H; Dalskov, Stine-Mathilde; Rasmussen, Christina Rehné

    2005-01-01

    The small intestinal brush border is composed of lipid raft microdomains, but little is known about their role in the mechanism whereby cholera toxin gains entry into the enterocyte. The present work characterized the binding of cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) to the brush border and its internaliz......The small intestinal brush border is composed of lipid raft microdomains, but little is known about their role in the mechanism whereby cholera toxin gains entry into the enterocyte. The present work characterized the binding of cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) to the brush border and its...... accompanied the toxin internalization whereas no formation of caveolae was observed. CTB was strongly associated with the buoyant, detergent-insoluble fraction of microvillar membranes. Neither CTB's raft association nor uptake via clathrin-coated pits was affected by methyl-beta-cyclodextrin, indicating...... that membrane cholesterol is not required for toxin binding and entry. The ganglioside GM(1) is known as the receptor for CTB, but surprisingly the toxin also bound to sucrase-isomaltase and coclustered with this glycosidase in apical membrane pits. CTB binds to lipid rafts of the brush border...

  2. Sensitivity of whitewater rafting consumers surplus to pecuniary travel cost specifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald B.K. English; J. Michael Bowker

    1996-01-01

    Considerable research has examined how different ways of accounting for onsite and travel time affect surplus estimates from travel cost models. However, little has been done regarding different definitions of out-of-pocket costs. Estimates of per trip consumer surplus are developed for a zonal travel cost model for outfitted rafting on the Chattooga River. Nine price...

  3. Polymer@gold Nanoparticles Prepared via RAFT Polymerization for Opto-Biodetection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sónia O. Pereira

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Colloidal gold nanoparticles (Au NPs have been used in several biological applications, which include the exploitation of size- and shape-dependent Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance (LSPR in biosensing devices. In order to obtain functional and stable Au NPs in a physiological medium, surface modification and functionalization are crucial steps in these endeavors. Reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT polymerization meets this need offering the possibility of control over the composition and architecture of polymeric shells coating Au NPs. Furthermore, playing with a careful choice of monomers, RAFT polymerization allows the possibility to design a polymer shell with the desired functional groups aiming at Au based nanocomposites suitable for biorecognition and biotargeting. This review provides important aspects concerning the synthesis and optical properties of Au NPs as well as concepts of RAFT polymerization. Understanding these concepts is crucial to appreciate the chemical strategies available towards RAFT-polymer coated Au core-shell nanostructures, which are here reviewed. Finally, examples of applications in opto-biodetection devices are provided and the potential of responsive “smart” nanomaterials based on such structures can be applied to other biological applications.

  4. Astronaut Curtis L. Brown, Jr., pilot, works with his life raft during emergency bailout training

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    STS-77 TRAINING VIEW --- Astronaut Curtis L. Brown, Jr., pilot, works with his life raft during emergency bailout training for crew members in the Johnson Space Centers (JSC) Weightless Environment Training Facility (WET-F). Brown will join five other astronauts for nine days aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour next month.

  5. The Role of Lipid Rafts in the Early Stage of Enterovirus 71 Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Zhe Zhu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Although it has been widely accepted that Enterovirus 71 (EV71 enters permissive cells via receptor-mediated endocytosis, the details of entry mechanism for EV71 still need more exploration. This study aimed to investigate the role of lipid rafts in the early stage of EV71 Infection. Methods: The effect of cholesterol depletion or addition of exogenous cholesterol was detected by immunofluorescence assays and quantitative real-time PCR. Effects of cholesterol depletion on the association of EV71 with lipid rafts were determined by flow cytometry and co-immunoprecipitation assays. Localization and internalization of EV71 and its receptor were assayed by confocal microscpoy and sucrose gradient analysis. The impact of cholesterol on the activation of phosphoinositide 3'-kinase/Akt signaling pathway during initial virus infection was analyzed by Western-blotting. Results: Disruption of membrane cholesterol by a pharmacological agent resulted in a significant reduction in the infectivity of EV71. The inhibitory effect could be reversed by the addition of exogenous cholesterol. Cholesterol depletion post-infection did not affect EV71 infection. While virus bound equally to cholesterol-depleted cells, EV71 particles failed to be internalized by cholesterol-depleted cells. EV71 capsid protein co-localized with cholera toxin B, a lipid-raft-dependent internalization marker. Conclusion: Lipid rafts play a critical role in virus endocytosis and in the activation of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway in the early stage of EV71 infection.

  6. Recombinant VSV G proteins reveal a novel raft-dependent endocytic pathway in resorbing osteoclasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulari, Mika T.K.; Nars, Martin; Laitala-Leinonen, Tiina; Kaisto, Tuula; Metsikkoe, Kalervo; Sun Yi; Vaeaenaenen, H. Kalervo

    2008-01-01

    Transcytotic membrane flow delivers degraded bone fragments from the ruffled border to the functional secretory domain, FSD, in bone resorbing osteoclasts. Here we show that there is also a FSD-to-ruffled border trafficking pathway that compensates for the membrane loss during the matrix uptake process and that rafts are essential for this ruffled border-targeted endosomal pathway. Replacing the cytoplasmic tail of the vesicular stomatitis virus G protein with that of CD4 resulted in partial insolubility in Triton X-100 and retargeting from the peripheral non-bone facing plasma membrane to the FSD. Recombinant G proteins were subsequently endosytosed and delivered from the FSD to the peripheral fusion zone of the ruffled border, which were both rich in lipid rafts as suggested by viral protein transport analysis and visualizing the rafts with fluorescent recombinant cholera toxin. Cholesterol depletion by methyl-β-cyclodextrin impaired the ruffled border-targeted vesicle trafficking pathway and inhibited bone resorption dose-dependently as quantified by measuring the CTX and TRACP 5b secreted to the culture medium and by measuring the resorbed area visualized with a bi-phasic labeling method using sulpho-NHS-biotin and WGA-lectin. Thus, rafts are vital for membrane recycling from the FSD to the late endosomal/lysosomal ruffled border and bone resorption

  7. The cellular distribution of extracellular superoxide dismutase in macrophages is altered by cellular activation but unaffected by the natural occurring R213G substitution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottfredsen, Randi Heidemann; Goldstrohm, David; Hartney, John

    2014-01-01

    and associated with the cell surface via the extracellular matrix (ECM)-binding region. Upon cellular activation induced by lipopolysaccharide, EC-SOD is relocated and detected both in the cell culture medium and in lipid raft structures. Although the secreted material presented a significantly reduced ligand......-binding capacity, this could not be correlated to proteolytic removal of the ECM-binding region, because the integrity of the material recovered from the medium was comparable to that of the cell surface-associated protein. The naturally occurring R213G amino acid substitution located in the ECM-binding region...

  8. Binding of sFRP-3 to EGF in the extra-cellular space affects proliferation, differentiation and morphogenetic events regulated by the two molecules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaella Scardigli

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: sFRP-3 is a soluble antagonist of Wnts, widely expressed in developing embryos. The Wnt gene family comprises cysteine-rich secreted ligands that regulate cell proliferation, differentiation, organogenesis and oncogenesis of different organisms ranging from worms to mammals. In the canonical signal transduction pathway Wnt proteins bind to the extracellular domain of Frizzled receptors and consequently recruit Dishevelled (Dsh to the cell membrane. In addition to Wnt membrane receptors belonging to the Frizzled family, several other molecules have been described which share homology in the CRD domain and lack the putative trans-membrane domain, such as sFRP molecules (soluble Frizzled Related Protein. Among them, sFRP-3 was originally isolated from bovine articular cartilage and also as a component of the Spemann organizer. sFRP-3 blocks Wnt-8 induced axis duplication in Xenopus embryos and binds to the surface of cells expressing a membrane-anchored form of Wnt-1. Injection of sFRP-3 mRNA blocks expression of XMyoD mRNA and leads to embryos with enlarged heads and shortened trunks. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report that sFRP-3 specifically blocks EGF-induced fibroblast proliferation and foci formation. Over-expression of sFRP-3 reverts EGF-mediated inhibition of hair follicle development in the mouse ectoderm while its ablation in Xenopus maintains EGF-mediated inhibition of ectoderm differentiation. Conversely, over-expression of EGF reverts the inhibition of somitic myogenesis and axis truncation in Xenopus and mouse embryos caused by sFRP-3. In vitro experiments demonstrated a direct binding of EGF to sFRP-3 both on heparin and on the surface of CHO cells where the molecule had been membrane anchored. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: sFRP-3 and EGF reciprocally inhibit their effects on cell proliferation, differentiation and morphogenesis and indeed are expressed in contiguous domains of the embryo, suggesting that in

  9. Regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballereau, P.

    1999-01-01

    The different regulations relative to nuclear energy since the first of January 1999 are given here. Two points deserve to be noticed: the decree of the third august 1999 authorizing the national Agency for the radioactive waste management to install and exploit on the commune of Bures (Meuse) an underground laboratory destined to study the deep geological formations where could be stored the radioactive waste. The second point is about the uranium residues and the waste notion. The judgment of the administrative tribunal of Limoges ( 9. july 1998) forbidding the exploitation of a storage installation of depleted uranium considered as final waste and qualifying it as an industrial waste storage facility has been annulled bu the Court of Appeal. It stipulated that, according to the law number 75663 of the 15. july 1965, no criteria below can be applied to depleted uranium: production residue (possibility of an ulterior enrichment), abandonment of a personal property or simple intention to do it ( future use aimed in the authorization request made in the Prefecture). This judgment has devoted the primacy of the waste notion on this one of final waste. (N.C.)

  10. The Fruits of Wampee Inhibit H2O2-Induced Apoptosis in PC12 Cells via the NF-κB Pathway and Regulation of Cellular Redox Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaobin Zeng

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Wampee (Clausena lansium fruits (CLS, whose pulp can be used to prepare fruit cups, desserts, jam, or jelly, can be eaten along with the peel. In this study, a PC12 cell model was built to observe the protective effect of CLS against H2O2-induced oxidative stress. We found that pretreatment with CLS increased cell viability and inhibited cytotoxicity, caspase-3 activity and DNA condensation. CLS also attenuated the increase in ROS production and MMP reduction. Moreover, we attempted to determine whether CLS suppressed the expression and phosphorylation of NF-κB. Western blot and immunostaining assay revealed that CLS inhibited H2O2-induced up-regulation of NF-κB p65 and pNF-κB p65. And CLS significantly suppressed the translocation of NF-κB p65 and pNF-κB p65 from cytoplasm to nuclear. Also, seven major compounds including a new flavanoid, luteolin-4'-O-β-d-gluco-pyranoside (3 and six known compounds 1,2, 4–7 were isolated and identified from CLS. Their antioxidative and H2O2-induced PC12 cell apoptosis-reversing activity were determined. These findings suggest that CLS and its major constituents (flavanoids may be potential antioxidant agents and should encourage further research into their use as a functional food for neurodegenerative diseases.

  11. Cellular Hsp27 interacts with classical swine fever virus NS5A protein and negatively regulates viral replication by the NF-κB signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Shifeng; Luo, Mingyang; Jiang, Shengnan; Liu, Jiayu; Ding, Chunying; Zhang, Qinghuan; Guo, Huancheng; Gong, Wenjie; Tu, Changchun; Sun, Jinfu

    2018-05-01

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) nonstructural protein NS5A is a multifunctional protein functioning in regulation of viral genome replication, protein translation and assembly by interaction with viral or host proteins. Here, heat shock protein 27 (Hsp27) has been identified as a novel binding partner of NS5A by using His tag "pull down" coupled with shotgun LC-MS/MS, with interaction of both proteins further confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation and laser confocal assays. In PK-15 cells, silencing of Hsp27 expression by siRNA enhanced CSFV replication, and upregulation of Hsp27 inhibited viral proliferation. Additionally, we have shown that overexpression of Hsp27 increased NF-κB signaling induced by TNFα. Blocking NF-κB signaling in PK-15 cells overexpressing Hsp27 by ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (PDTC) eliminated the inhibition of CSFV replication by Hsp27. These findings clearly demonstrate that the inhibition of CSFV replication by Hsp27 is mediated via the NF-κB signaling pathway. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Casein Glycomacropeptide Hydrolysates Exert Cytoprotective Effect against Cellular Oxidative Stress by Up-Regulating HO-1 Expression in HepG2 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiange Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is considered as an important mediator in the progression of metabolic disorders. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential hepatoprotective effects and mechanisms of bovine casein glycomacropeptide hydrolysates (GHP on hydrogen peroxide (H2O2-induced oxidative damage in HepG2 cells. Results showed that GHP significantly blocked H2O2-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS generation and cell viability reduction in a dose-dependent manner. Further, GHP concentration-dependently induced heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 expression and increased nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2 nuclear translocation. Moreover, pretreatment of GHP increased the activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2, which were shown to contribute to Nrf2-mediated HO-1 expression. Taken together, GHP protected HepG2 cells from oxidative stress by activation of Nrf2 and HO-1 via p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 signaling pathways. Our findings indicate that bovine casein glycomacropeptide hydrolysates might be a potential ingredient in the treatment of oxidative stress-related disorders and further studies are needed to investigate the protective effects in vivo.

  13. The spatiotemporal pattern of Src activation at lipid rafts revealed by diffusion-corrected FRET imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaoying Lu

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Genetically encoded biosensors based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET have been widely applied to visualize the molecular activity in live cells with high spatiotemporal resolution. However, the rapid diffusion of biosensor proteins hinders a precise reconstruction of the actual molecular activation map. Based on fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP experiments, we have developed a finite element (FE method to analyze, simulate, and subtract the diffusion effect of mobile biosensors. This method has been applied to analyze the mobility of Src FRET biosensors engineered to reside at different subcompartments in live cells. The results indicate that the Src biosensor located in the cytoplasm moves 4-8 folds faster (0.93+/-0.06 microm(2/sec than those anchored on different compartments in plasma membrane (at lipid raft: 0.11+/-0.01 microm(2/sec and outside: 0.18+/-0.02 microm(2/sec. The mobility of biosensor at lipid rafts is slower than that outside of lipid rafts and is dominated by two-dimensional diffusion. When this diffusion effect was subtracted from the FRET ratio images, high Src activity at lipid rafts was observed at clustered regions proximal to the cell periphery, which remained relatively stationary upon epidermal growth factor (EGF stimulation. This result suggests that EGF induced a Src activation at lipid rafts with well-coordinated spatiotemporal patterns. Our FE-based method also provides an integrated platform of image analysis for studying molecular mobility and reconstructing the spatiotemporal activation maps of signaling molecules in live cells.

  14. Construction of Hierarchical Polymer Brushes on Upconversion Nanoparticles via NIR-Light-Initiated RAFT Polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhongxi; Deng, Xiaoran; Liu, Bei; Huang, Shanshan; Ma, Pingan; Hou, Zhiyao; Cheng, Ziyong; Lin, Jun; Luan, Shifang

    2017-09-13

    Photoinduced reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization generally adopts high-energy ultraviolet (UV) or blue light. In combination with photoredox catalyst, the excitation light wavelength was extended to the visible and even near-infrared (NIR) region for photoinduced electron transfer RAFT polymerization. In this report, we introduce for the first time a surface NIR-light-initiated RAFT polymerization on upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) without adding any photocatalyst and construct a functional inorganic core/polymer shell nanohybrid for application in cancer theranostics. The multilayer core-shell UCNPs (NaYF 4 :Yb/Tm@NaYbF 4 :Gd@NaNdF 4 :Yb@NaYF 4 ), with surface anchorings of chain transfer agents, can serve as efficient NIR-to-UV light transducers for initiating the RAFT polymerization. A hierarchical double block copolymer brush, consisting of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) and poly(oligo(ethylene oxide)methacrylate-co-2-(2-methoxy-ethoxy)ethyl methacrylate) (PEG for short), was grafted from the surface in sequence. The targeting arginine-glycine-aspartic (RGD) peptide was modified at the end of the copolymer through the trithiolcarbonate end group. After loading of doxorubicin, the UCNPs@PAA-b-PEG-RGD exhibited an enhanced U87MG cancer cell uptake efficiency and cytotoxicity. Besides, the unique upconversion luminescence of the nanohybrids was used for the autofluoresence-free cell imaging and labeling. Therefore, our strategy verified that UCNPs could efficiently activate RAFT polymerization by NIR photoirradiation and construct the complex nanohybrids, exhibiting prospective biomedical applications due to the low phototoxicity and deep penetration of NIR light.

  15. The Cellular DNA Helicase ChlR1 Regulates Chromatin and Nuclear Matrix Attachment of the Human Papillomavirus 1