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Sample records for radon activity measurements

  1. Activity measurements of radon from construction materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fior, L.; Nicolosi Correa, J. [Federal University of Technology - Parana, UTFPR, Av. Sete de Setembro, 3165, Curitiba, PR 80230-901 (Brazil); Paschuk, S.A., E-mail: spaschuk@gmail.com [Federal University of Technology - Parana, UTFPR, Av. Sete de Setembro, 3165, Curitiba, PR 80230-901 (Brazil); Denyak, V.V. [Federal University of Technology - Parana, UTFPR, Av. Sete de Setembro, 3165, Curitiba, PR 80230-901 (Brazil); Schelin, H.R. [Federal University of Technology - Parana, UTFPR, Av. Sete de Setembro, 3165, Curitiba, PR 80230-901 (Brazil); Pele Pequeno Principe Research Institute, Av. Silva Jardim, 1632, Curitiba, PR 80250-200 (Brazil); Soreanu Pecequilo, B.R. [Institute of Nuclear and Energetic Researches, IPEN, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2242-/05508-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Kappke, J. [Federal University of Technology - Parana, UTFPR, Av. Sete de Setembro, 3165, Curitiba, PR 80230-901 (Brazil)

    2012-07-15

    This work presents the results of radon concentration measurements of construction materials used in the Brazilian industry, such as clay (red) bricks and concrete blocks. The measurements focused on the detection of indoor radon activity during different construction stages and the analysis of radionuclides present in the construction materials. For this purpose, sealed chambers with internal dimensions of approximately 60 Multiplication-Sign 60 Multiplication-Sign 60 cm{sup 3} were built within a protected and isolated laboratory environment, and stable air humidity and temperature levels were maintained. These chambers were also used for radon emanation reduction tests. The chambers were built in four major stages: (1) assembly of the walls using clay (red) bricks, concrete blocks, and mortar; (2) installation of plaster; (3) finishing of wall surface using lime; and (4) insulation of wall surface and finishing using paint. Radon measurements were performed using polycarbonate etched track detectors. By comparing the three layers applied to the masonry walls, it was concluded that only the last step (wall painting using acrylic varnish) reduced the radon emanation, by a factor of approximately 2. Samples of the construction materials (clay bricks and concrete blocks) were ground, homogenized, and subjected to gamma-ray spectrometry analysis to evaluate the activity concentrations of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 232}Th and {sup 40}K. The values for the index of the activity concentration (I), radium equivalent activity (Ra{sub eq}), and external hazard index (H{sub ext}) showed that these construction materials could be used without restrictions or concern about the equivalent dose limit (1 mSv/year). - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Radon activity in air related to building materials was measured. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The index of activity concentration of building materials was evaluated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The radium equivalent activity of

  2. Activity measurements of radon from construction materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fior, L; Nicolosi Corrêa, J; Paschuk, S A; Denyak, V V; Schelin, H R; Soreanu Pecequilo, B R; Kappke, J

    2012-07-01

    This work presents the results of radon concentration measurements of construction materials used in the Brazilian industry, such as clay (red) bricks and concrete blocks. The measurements focused on the detection of indoor radon activity during different construction stages and the analysis of radionuclides present in the construction materials. For this purpose, sealed chambers with internal dimensions of approximately 60×60×60 cm3 were built within a protected and isolated laboratory environment, and stable air humidity and temperature levels were maintained. These chambers were also used for radon emanation reduction tests. The chambers were built in four major stages: (1) assembly of the walls using clay (red) bricks, concrete blocks, and mortar; (2) installation of plaster; (3) finishing of wall surface using lime; and (4) insulation of wall surface and finishing using paint. Radon measurements were performed using polycarbonate etched track detectors. By comparing the three layers applied to the masonry walls, it was concluded that only the last step (wall painting using acrylic varnish) reduced the radon emanation, by a factor of approximately 2. Samples of the construction materials (clay bricks and concrete blocks) were ground, homogenized, and subjected to gamma-ray spectrometry analysis to evaluate the activity concentrations of 226Ra, 232Th and 40K. The values for the index of the activity concentration (I), radium equivalent activity (Raeq), and external hazard index (Hext) showed that these construction materials could be used without restrictions or concern about the equivalent dose limit (1 mSv/year). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Measurement of radon activity concentration in buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godet, J.L.; Perrin, M.L.; Pineau, C.; Dechaux, E.

    2010-01-01

    Radon exposure, along with medical-related exposure, is the leading source of exposure to ionising radiation for the French population. Measurement campaigns are done in the action plan, drawn up by the French nuclear safety authority (ASN), in cooperation with the French directorate for housing, town planning and countryside (DHUP), the French radiation protection and nuclear safety institute (IRSN), the French health monitoring institute (InVS) and the French scientific and technical centre for construction (CSTB). The review of 2005-2008 measurement campaign shows that of the 7356 buildings screened, 84.8% had activity concentration levels below the 400 Bq/m 3 action level. For the other buildings (15.2%), action will be required to reduce human exposure to radon, possibly including building renovation/redevelopment work. In the 1999-2002 measurement campaign,12% of the 13,000 buildings screened had a radon activity concentration level higher than 400 Bq/m 3 . In addition, the ASN and the French general directorate of labour (DGT) are continuing to work on drawing up regulations for occupational risk management. The second national health and environment plan (PNSE 2) was published on 26 June 2009. It follows on from the actions initiated in PNSE 1, a document provided for under the Public Health Act dated 9 August 2004 and under the French 'Grenelle' environmental agreements. On the basis of guidelines laid out in PNSE 2, a radon action plan for 2009-2012 will be drawn up, enabling some of the actions to be continued, particularly in the fields of new building projects and dwellings. (author)

  4. Instruments to measure radon activity concentration or exposure to radon. Interlaboratory comparison 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foerster, Elisabeth; Beck, Thomas; Buchroeder, Helmut; Doering, Joachim; Schmidt, Volkmar

    2011-10-01

    According to the Directive 96/29/EURATOM the monitoring of occupational radiation exposures shall base on individual measurements carried out by an approved dosimetric service. Pursuant to the European Directive an approved dosimetric service is a body responsible for the calibration, reading or interpretation of individual monitoring devices.., whose capacity to act in this respect is recognized by the competent authorities. This concept will also be applied to radon services issuing passive radon measurement devices. Passive radon measurement devices 1 using solid state nuclear track detectors or electrets are recommended for individual monitoring of exposures to radon. German regulations lay down that radon measuring devices are appropriate for purposes of occupational radiation monitoring if the devices are issued by recognized radon measurement services, and the measurement service submits devices of the same type issued for radon monitoring to regular intercomparisons conducted by BfS. A radon measuring service is recognized by the competent authority if it proves its organizational and technical competence, e. g. by accreditation. These regulations have been introduced in the area of occupational radiation exposures. Nevertheless, it is recommended that radon measuring services which carry out radon measurements in other areas (e.g. dwellings) should subject themselves to these measures voluntarily. The interlaboratory comparisons comprise the organization, exposure, and evaluation of measurements of radon activity concentration or exposure to radon. The comparisons only concern radon-222; radon-220 is not in the scope. Radon services being interested can get further information from the website www.bfs.de/de/ion/radon/fachinfomessung/vergleichspruefungen.html and from the European Information System on Proficiency Testing Schemes (eptis) available in the internet. (orig.)

  5. Instruments to measure radon-222 activity concentration or exposure to radon-222. Intercomparison 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foerster, Elisabeth; Beck, Thomas; Buchroeder, Helmut; Doering, Joachim; Schmidt, Volkmar

    2014-10-01

    According to the Directive 96/29/EURATOM the monitoring of occupational radiation exposures shall base on individual measurements carried out by an approved dosimetric service. Pursuant to the European Directive an approved dosimetric service is a body responsible for the calibration, reading or interpretation of individual monitoring devices.., whose capacity to act in this respect is recognized by the competent authorities. This concept will also be applied to radon services issuing passive radon measurement devices. Passive radon measurement devices 1 using solid state nuclear track detectors or electrets are recommended for individual monitoring of exposures to radon. German regulations lay down that radon measuring devices are appropriate for purposes of occupational radiation monitoring if the devices are issued by recognized radon measurement services, and the measurement service submits devices of the same type issued for radon monitoring to regular intercomparisons conducted by the Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz (BfS). A radon measuring service is recognized by the competent authority if it proves its organisational and technical competence, e. g. by accreditation. These regulations have been introduced in the area of occupational radiation exposures. Nevertheless, it is recommended that radon measuring services which carry out radon measurements in other areas (e.g. dwellings) should subject themselves to these measures voluntarily. The interlaboratory comparisons comprise the organization, exposure, and evaluation of measurements of radon activity concentration or exposure to radon. The comparisons only concern radon-222; radon-220 is not in the scope. Radon services being interested can get further information from the European Information System on Proficiency Testing Schemes (EPTIS) and from the BfS websites.

  6. Technique and equipment for measuring volume activity of radon in the air of radon laboratories and clinics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorob'ev, I.B.; Krivokhatskij, A.S.; Nekrasov, E.V.; Nikolaev, V.A.; Potapov, V.G.; Terent'ev, M.V.

    1990-01-01

    Usability of a new equipment-technique combination for measuring radon activity in the air of radon laboratories and balneological clinics is studied. The complex includes nitrate-cellulose detector, radon chamber, Aist, Istra type spark counters and technique of spark counting. The method sensitivity is 50 Bqxm 3 , the error is 30%. Usability and advisability of track method in radon laboratories and balneological clinics for simultaneous measurement in several points of integral volumetric radon activities are confirmred. The method permits to carry out rapid and accurate bulk investigations. The results of determining mean volumetric radon activity in the air in different points of radon laboratory and radon clinics are presented

  7. Measurements of radon activity concentrations in air at Niska spa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adrovic, F.; Vuckovic, B.; Ninkovic, M.

    2004-01-01

    Radon activity concentrations in air were measured in the recreational-tourist center of Niska Banja. Alpha Guard PQ 2000/ MC50 instrumentation (Genitron instruments, Frankfurt) was used. The observed indoor radon concentrations in the air of the Radon Hotel pool lay within the range of 0.980-1.908 kBq/m 3 and were directly dependent on the exhalation of radon from thermomineral waters. Radon concentrations were also measured outdoors, at locations for capping thermomineral water, as well as at locations for draining used water from the Radon Hotel pool. Outdoor radon concentrations as high as over 500 Bq/m 3 were observed. Gamma dose rates were measured in parallel and found to lie within the range of 72-420 nSv/h. The gamma doses correlated well with the observed radon levels. The largest gamma dose rates in air were measured in the pool of Radon Hotel and at the site where this thermomineral water is being capped

  8. Measurement of radon activity concentrations in air of Tuzla city

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adrovic, F.; Fazlic, R.; Tresnjo, Z.

    2004-01-01

    The survey was conducted over one year in the area of Tuzla city and its surrounding. At the measuring locations there were registered Daily and seasonal variations in outdoor radon concentration were observed, with average values lying within the region of 9 - 30 Bq/m 3 . The results of the measurements will be included in the concentration map of radon activity in Bosnia and Herzegovina, which is under preparation. (P.A.)

  9. Study of properties of active charcoal used for measuring of low radon activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muellerova, M.; Holy, K.

    2011-01-01

    We used the German charcoal Silicarbon for adsorption of radon from the air. From the column with activated carbon arranged in a row, we obtain cut-off dependence of radon on activated carbon at various temperatures, cooling and also at different speeds, drawing radon air through activated charcoal. From information we have chosen the most appropriate combination of temperature and cooling flow in order to maximize capture efficiency of radon in the first column of active charcoal. To change active carbon and optimization of operation allows us to measure the radon exhalation rate from various materials up to the level of 3·10 -9 Bq/s. (authors)

  10. Radon determination by activated charcoal adsorption and liquid scintillation measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, F.O.; Canoba, A.C.

    1998-01-01

    A passive diffusion method for the determination of radon concentration has been optimised and calibrated. The device consists of a scintillation vial containing activated charcoal, a diffusion barrier and a desiccant agent. The response to diverse atmospheric humidity and variable exposure intervals was studied. The result is a detector, which is independent of atmospheric humidity for at least (up to) 7 days of exposure. The method was compared with electret detectors (US EPA) with very satisfactory results. The advantages of this method are its simplicity, low cost, low detection limit, the total automatization of the measurement and its total independence of humidity to measure in a wide range of radon concentrations. (author) [es

  11. Intercomparison of active, passive and continuous instruments for radon and radon progeny measurements in the EML chamber and test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, A.C.; Knutson, E.O.; Tu, K.W.; Fisenne, I.M.

    1995-12-01

    The results from the May 1995 Intercomparison of Active, Passive and Continuous Instruments for Radon and Radon Progeny Measurement conducted in the EML radon exposure and test facility are presented. Represented were 13 participants that measure radon with open faced and diffusion barrier activated carbon collectors, 10 with nuclear alpha track detectors, 9 with short-term and long-term electret/ionization chambers, and 13 with active and passive commercial electronic continuous monitors. For radon progeny, there were four participants that came in person to take part in the grab sampling methodology for measuring individual radon progeny and the potential alpha energy concentration (PAEC). There were 11 participants with continuous and integrating commercial electronic instruments that are used for measuring the PAEC. The results indicate that all the tested instruments that measure radon fulfill their intended purpose. All instruments and methods used for grab sampling for radon progeny did very well. However, most of the continuous and integrating electronic instruments used for measuring the PAEC or working level appear to underestimate the potential risk from radon progeny when the concentration of particles onto which the radon progeny are attached is -3

  12. Mathematical model of radon activity measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paschuk, Sergei A.; Correa, Janine N.; Kappke, Jaqueline; Zambianchi, Pedro, E-mail: sergei@utfpr.edu.br, E-mail: janine_nicolosi@hotmail.com [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Denyak, Valeriy, E-mail: denyak@gmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisa Pele Pequeno Principe, Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Present work describes a mathematical model that quantifies the time dependent amount of {sup 222}Rn and {sup 220}Rn altogether and their activities within an ionization chamber as, for example, AlphaGUARD, which is used to measure activity concentration of Rn in soil gas. The differential equations take into account tree main processes, namely: the injection of Rn into the cavity of detector by the air pump including the effect of the traveling time Rn takes to reach the chamber; Rn release by the air exiting the chamber; and radioactive decay of Rn within the chamber. Developed code quantifies the activity of {sup 222}Rn and {sup 220}Rn isotopes separately. Following the standard methodology to measure Rn activity in soil gas, the air pump usually is turned off over a period of time in order to avoid the influx of Rn into the chamber. Since {sup 220}Rn has a short half-life time, approximately 56s, the model shows that after 7 minutes the activity concentration of this isotope is null. Consequently, the measured activity refers to {sup 222}Rn, only. Furthermore, the model also addresses the activity of {sup 220}Rn and {sup 222}Rn progeny, which being metals represent potential risk of ionization chamber contamination that could increase the background of further measurements. Some preliminary comparison of experimental data and theoretical calculations is presented. Obtained transient and steady-state solutions could be used for planning of Rn in soil gas measurements as well as for accuracy assessment of obtained results together with efficiency evaluation of chosen measurements procedure. (author)

  13. Airborne radon-222 measurement by active sampling with charcoal adsorption and gamma-ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Wen, Xiao-qiong; Fukami, Kenji; Iwatani, Kazuo; Hamanaka, Shun-ichi

    1998-01-01

    A simple method for measuring radon concentration in air is presented. Airborne radon is adsorbed in a charcoal bed by an active air sampling. In time, the adsorbed radon comes to attain radioactive equilibrium with its short-lived progeny 214 Pb. Utilizing this fact, radon concentration is derived from γ-ray measurement of 214 Pb. This method is estimated to be capable of detecting radon concentration in air down to 0.79 Bq·m -3 . The adsorption coefficient obtained with the method is compared with what is obtainable with passive sampling. Applications of this method to indoor and outdoor radon measurements are described. (author)

  14. Radon Measurements in Vojvodina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bikit, I.; Bikit, K.; Forkapic, S.; Mrda, D.; Nikolov, J.; Todorovic, N.; Veskovic, M.

    2013-01-01

    Recent analyses of epidemiological studies of lung cancer risk from residential exposures demonstrate a statistically significant increase per unit of exposure below average annual concentrations of about 200 Bq/m 3 . Indoor radon measurements performed in Novi Sad in about 400 houses and flats are presented and discussed in this paper. By measuring gamma-activity of radon daughters, radon activity concentration was determined to be 50 Bq/m 3 . In Vojvodina region indoor radon levels were measured by alpha track detectors CR-39 on about 3000 locations during the winter seasons in the period of three years (2003-2005). The main aim of the present study was to explore the critical group of population for radon exposure and to estimate maximal annual doses. Existing radon maps which identify regions with elevated radon levels will improve data collection and analysis for the future radon campaigns. Collaboration on the JRC program of European indoor radon map and implementation of grid system are also discussed.(author)

  15. Standardization of radon measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matuszek, J.M.; Hutchinson, J.A.; Lance, B.H.; Virgil, M.G.; Mahoney, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    Radon escaping from soil into homes appears to present the single greatest source of radiation exposure that most people will ever face. Measurement protocols for the relatively inert gas inextricably link the method of collection with the counting of the specimen. The most commonly used methods depend on the measurement of dislocation sites on plastic α-track detectors or on the adsorption of radon onto activated charcoal for subsequent counting of the γ-rays produced by decay of the radon progeny. The uncertainties inherent to the radon-measurement methods used commercially in the United States are far greater than those for measurements of other environmental radionuclides. The results of this preliminary study raise doubts as to whether existing proficiency-testing programs can provide assurance that radon-measurement methods are representative of actual conditions in any dwelling. 17 refs., 1 figs., 4 tabs

  16. Measurements of radon progeny activity on typical indoor surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knutson, E.O.; Gogolak, C.V.; Klemic, G.

    1992-01-01

    A number of studies aimed at defining how well radon progeny on surfaces can be measured, information that is needed in order to test physical/mathematical models governing indoor radon progeny behaviour, are described. One experiment compared the decomposition on to different surfaces. Only relatively small differences were found among metal, filter paper, broadcloth, corduroy fabric, vinyl wallpaper, glass, and latex paint, but polyethylene film collected two to four times as much as the others, due most likely to electrostatic charge on the plastic surface. Another experiment compared the gamma and gross alpha count methods of measuring surface activity for metal, filter paper, broadcloth and corduroy surfaces. No difference for the surfaces tested was found from which it is concluded that, even for rougher surfaces, progeny atoms deposit mainly on the outer layers. A final experiment compared in situ and surrogate-surface methods for measuring surface deposition. For most tests, the two methods agreed within 30%, and the average ratio was not significantly different from unity. 210 Po is a complication in the in situ method. An unexpected location effect was found in the experiments conducted in houses with high radon concentrations: the deposition on the ceiling was higher than on the surfaces. (author)

  17. Performance tests for instruments measuring radon activity concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, T.R.; Buchroeder, H.; Schmidt, V.

    2009-01-01

    Performance tests of electronic instruments measuring the activity concentration of 222 Rn have been carried out with respect to the standard IEC 61577-2. In total, 9 types of instrument operating with ionization chambers or electrostatic collection have been tested for the influence of different climatic and radiological factors on the measurement characteristics. It is concluded that all types of instrument, which are commercially available, are suitable for indoor radon measurements. Because of the dependence on climatic conditions, the outdoor use is partly limited.

  18. Measurements of radon and radium activity in bottled mineral water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kappke, Jaqueline; Paschuk, Sergei A.; Correa, Janine N.; Reque, Marilson; Tabuchi, Camila Garcia; Del Claro, Flavia; Perna, Allan Felipe, E-mail: jaquelinekappke@gmail.com [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Deniak, Valeriy [Instituto de Pesquisa Pele Pequeno Principe, Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Current work presents the results of further development of optimized experimental protocol for RAD7 instant radon detector (Durridge Company Inc.) usage in low level radon in water measurements and the results concerning Ra-226 activity evaluation in bottled mineral water samples purchased at Brazilian market. With the purpose to achieve the statistically consistent results for the activity levels of 0.1Bq/L for radon (radium) activity in water, present study used modified experimental protocol which consists of: 1) water samples were stored in hermetically sealed glass vials of 250mL during 30 days to guarantee that Rn-222 will reach the secular equilibrium; 2) the measurements were performed using WAT250 protocol of RAD7 detector; 3) with an aim to decrease the background, the cleaning (activated carbon filter) and drying (DRIERITE desiccant) vessels, which have a function to retain the radioactive decay product of Rn-222 and humidity, were connected to a closed air loop of RAD7 permanently by means of valves and taps, which gave a possibility to repeat all sequence of measurements (including background evaluation) three or four times without to open the air loop and disconnect the sample vial with water. Each water sample was submitted to such measurements two or three times. Obtained results presented the level of Ra-226 activity in studied samples of bottled mineral water that varied from 0.007 ± 0.061 Bq/L to 0.145 ± 0.049 Bq/L, which is below the limit of 0,5 Bq/L established by the World Health Organization (WHO) in 2011 for drinking water. (author)

  19. Measurements of radon and radium activity in bottled mineral water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kappke, Jaqueline; Paschuk, Sergei A.; Correa, Janine N.; Reque, Marilson; Tabuchi, Camila Garcia; Del Claro, Flavia; Perna, Allan Felipe; Deniak, Valeriy

    2013-01-01

    Current work presents the results of further development of optimized experimental protocol for RAD7 instant radon detector (Durridge Company Inc.) usage in low level radon in water measurements and the results concerning Ra-226 activity evaluation in bottled mineral water samples purchased at Brazilian market. With the purpose to achieve the statistically consistent results for the activity levels of 0.1Bq/L for radon (radium) activity in water, present study used modified experimental protocol which consists of: 1) water samples were stored in hermetically sealed glass vials of 250mL during 30 days to guarantee that Rn-222 will reach the secular equilibrium; 2) the measurements were performed using WAT250 protocol of RAD7 detector; 3) with an aim to decrease the background, the cleaning (activated carbon filter) and drying (DRIERITE desiccant) vessels, which have a function to retain the radioactive decay product of Rn-222 and humidity, were connected to a closed air loop of RAD7 permanently by means of valves and taps, which gave a possibility to repeat all sequence of measurements (including background evaluation) three or four times without to open the air loop and disconnect the sample vial with water. Each water sample was submitted to such measurements two or three times. Obtained results presented the level of Ra-226 activity in studied samples of bottled mineral water that varied from 0.007 ± 0.061 Bq/L to 0.145 ± 0.049 Bq/L, which is below the limit of 0,5 Bq/L established by the World Health Organization (WHO) in 2011 for drinking water. (author)

  20. Device for measuring atmospheric radon activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deml, F.; Jansky, Z.; Smejkal, Z.

    1989-01-01

    The device consists of a lightproof case pivoted on a stand. Minimally two chambers are provided in the case for holding glass scintillation chambers, each with an opening in its bottom. The centers of the openings lie on a common circle with its center in the center of rotation of the case. An opening for the passage of light is provided in the stand. The opening also is on the common circle of the centres of the openings. A photomultiplier is placed below the opening. Measurement always proceeds with one scintillation chamber only. Thus, replacement of scintillation chambers can take place simultaneously with measurement and rapid and continuous measurement can be secured. Case rotation can be controlled automatically. The device can be used not only in monitoring air pollution but also in monitoring solid materials, aquifers, mine corridors, natural materials, etc. (J.B.). 1 fig

  1. Intercomparison of active, passive and continuous instruments for radon and radon progeny measurements in the EML chamber and test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarpitta, S.C.; Tu, K.W.; Fisenne, I.M.; Cavallo, A.; Perry, P.

    1996-10-01

    Results are presented from the Fifth Intercomparison of Active, Passive and Continuous Instruments for Radon and Radon Progeny Measurements conducted in the EML radon exposure and test facility in May 1996. In total, thirty-four government, private and academic facilities participated in the exercise with over 170 passive and electronic devices exposed in the EML test chamber. During the first week of the exercise, passive and continuous measuring devices were exposed (usually in quadruplicate) to about 1,280 Bq m -3 222 Rn for 1--7 days. Radon progeny measurements were made during the second week of the exercise. The results indicate that all of the tested devices that measure radon gas performed well and fulfill their intended purpose. The grand mean (GM) ratio of the participants' reported values to the EML values, for all four radon device categories, was 0.99 ± 0.08. Eighty-five percent of all the radon measuring devices that were exposed in the EML radon test chamber were within ±1 standard deviation (SD) of the EML reference values. For the most part, radon progeny measurements were also quite good as compared to the EML values. The GM ratio for the 10 continuous PAEC instruments was 0.90 ± 0.12 with 75% of the devices within 1 SD of the EML reference values. Most of the continuous and integrating electronic instruments used for measuring the PAEC underestimated the EML values by about 10--15% probably because the concentration of particles onto which the radon progeny were attached was low (1,200--3,800 particles cm -3 ). The equilibrium factor at that particle concentration level was 0.10--0.22

  2. The use of an empirical correlation between surface activity and integrated radon exposure in a retrospective radon measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cauwels, P.; Poffijn, A.

    1998-01-01

    Retrospective measurements of integrated radon concentration in dwellings over the past decades are dealt with, based on the fact that glass sheets act as a memory for the airborne radon activity due to the implanted 210 Po and 210 Bi activity. The room model established to this purpose by Jacobi in 1972 seems to need some modifications; calculated and measured data suggest the existence of a possible loss of implanted daughter products. (A.K.)

  3. Theoretical and experimental study of radon measurement with designing and calibration domestic canister with active charcoal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urosevic, V.; Nikezic, D.; Zekic, R.

    2005-01-01

    Radon concentration in air may change significantly large variation due to atmospheric variation. Measurement with active charcoal can be inaccurate because the variation in radon concentration. We made model to simulate radon measurements with active charcoal in order to optimize and improve integration characteristic. A numerical method and computer code based on the method of finite elements is developed for the case of variable radon concentration in air. This program simulates radon adsorption by the activated charcoal bed, enabling determination of sensitivity. The dependence of sensitivity on different parameters, such as temperature, thickness of the charcoal, etc. was studied using this program. Using results of theoretical investigation we designed and calibrated our canister with active charcoal for radon measurements. (author)

  4. Radon emanometry in active volcanoes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidel, J.L.; Monnin, M. (CNRS, IN2P3, BP45/F63170 Aubiere (France)); Cejudo, J. (Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Mexico City)

    1984-01-01

    Radon emission measurements from active volcanoes has, since 1981, been continuously measured at monitoring stations in Mexico and in Costa Rica. Counting of etched alpha tracks on cellulose nitrate LR-115 detectors give varying results at the several stations. Radon emanation at Chichon, where an explosive eruption occurred in 1982, fell down. Radon detection at the active volcano in Colima shows a pattern of very low emission. At the Costa Rica stations located at Poas, Arenal and Irazu, the radon emanation shows regularity.

  5. An Alpha spectrometer for measuring radon daughter individual activity concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berico, M.; Formignani, M.; Mariotti, F.

    2001-01-01

    In the frame of the program of the Institute for Radiation Protection of ENEA, related to the evaluation of dose from radon and thoron progeny, an alpha spectrometer for the continuous air monitoring (CAM type) of radon and thoron has been realized. The constructive characteristics of the device are here presented together with energy and efficiency calibration. The device allows, by means of a screen type diffusion battery and a filter, to determinate the single radioactivity of each radionuclide of the progeny selecting them in relation to their diffusive behaviour (dichotomous particle size selection). The three-count filter method has been employed to measure the concentrations of 218 Po, 214 Pb and 214 Bi in air. Radon and thoron effective doses using a dosimetric, instead of an epidemiologic approach, will be then evaluated [it

  6. Monitoring and measurement of radon activity in a new design of radon calibration chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heidary, S.; Setayeshi, S.; Ghannadi-Maragheh, M.; Negarestani, A.

    2011-01-01

    A new radon calibration chamber has been designed, constructed and tested to set various desired environmental parameters. The chamber is cubic with two trapezoid sides with a total volume size of 0.498 m 3 . The three parameters, temperature, humidity and flow are controlled in the range of 20-45 deg. C (±2 deg. C), 10-70% (±2.5%) and 0.2-10 m 3 /min (±0.1 m 3 /min) respectively. The chamber is equipped with a controllable speed centrifugal fan to achieve a desirably uniform radon flow rate. Many parts of this system are controlled and monitored with a PLC (Programmable Logic Control) and HMI (Human Monitoring Interface) software (Citect Scada). Finally a radon detector (Alpha-Guard) registers the activity parameter.

  7. BGS Radon Protective Measures GIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appleton, D.; Adlam, K.

    2000-01-01

    The British Geological Survey Radon Protective Measures Geographical Information System is described. The following issues are highlighted: Identification of development sites where radon protection is required in new dwellings; Mapping radon potential on the basis of house radon and geology; Radon Protective Measures GIS; Radon site reports; and Follow-up radon protective measures sire reports

  8. Radon Activity measurements in Drinking Water and in Indoors of Dwellings of Dwellings, using RAD7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehra, R.; Badhan, K.; Sonkawade, R.G.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the radon levels of groundwater being used for drinking and indoor radon levels in the environs of villages/towns of Hoshiarpur district of Punjab, India, to determine the health hazards. Radon concentrations in the collected water samples were measured with RAD7 an electronic radon detector connected to a RAD- H 2 O accessory (Durridge Co., USA). In the setup, the RAD7 detector was used for measuring radon in water by connecting it with a bubbling kit which enables to degas radon from a water sample into the air in a closed loop. A sample of water was taken in a radon-tight reagent bottle of 250 ml capacity connected in a close circuit with a zinc sulphide coated detection chamber which acts as scintillator to detect alpha activity and a glass bulb containing calcium chloride to absorb the moisture. Air was then circulated in a closed circuit for a period of 5-10 min until the radon was uniformly mixed with the air and the resulting alpha activity was recorded and it directly gives the radon concentration. The measured radon concentration in drinking water ranges from 2.03 BqL -1 to 6.65 BqL -1 with an average value of 4.27 BqL -1 . The measured values of radon concentration in drinking water are well within the range (4 to 40 BqL -1 ) suggested for radon concentration in water for human consumption by the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation. The measured values of indoor radon concentration in dwellings of the same area vary from 10 Bqm -3 to 28.2 Bqm -3 with an average value of 20.28 Bqm -3 . The measured values for drinking water and for indoor air for the study area suggest that the area is safe for residents and there is no significant threat to the population as per as radon concentration is concerned

  9. Measurements of indoor radon and radon progeny in Mexico City

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Y.S.; Rodriguez, G.P.

    1996-01-01

    Indoor radon has been a public concern associated with increased lung cancer risks. Radon decay products interact with indoor aerosols to form progeny with different size distributions, which may influence the lung dosimetry when the progeny are inhaled. Air pollution in Mexico City is a serious problems with high particulate concentrations, but there are few reports of indoor radon measurement. The purposes of this study were to measure the aerosol concentration, radon concentration, and radon activity size distribution in the living area of three houses in Mexico City. The radon concentration was monitored by a RGM-3 radon gas monitor (Eberline, Inc., Santa Fe, NM). A graded diffusion battery was used to determine the progeny concentration and activity size distribution. The concentration and size distribution of the indoor aerosols were monitored by a quartz, crystal microbalance cascade impactor. Our measurements showed high concentrations of indoor aerosols (20-180 gg m -3 ). However, the radon concentrations-were low ( -1 ), but showed a clear diurnal pattern with peak concentrations from 2-10 AM. The activity size distributions of radon progeny were trimodal, with peaks of 0.6 nm, 4-5 nm, and 100 rim. Most activities were associated with large particle sizes. Our results indicated that indoor radon concentration was not high, due in part to a relatively high air exchange with outdoor air. The high aerosol concentration may also play an important part in the activity size distribution of radon progeny

  10. Passive and active measurements of radon-related parameters inside ancient Egyptian tombs in Luxor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abo-Elmagd, M [Radiation Measurements Department, National Institute for Standard, Giza (Egypt); Metwally, S M [Faculty of Science, Department of Physics, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt); El-Fiki, S A [Faculty of Science, Department of Physics, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt); Eissa, H M [Radiation Measurements Department, National Institute for Standard, Giza (Egypt); Salama, E [Faculty of Science, Department of Physics, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt)

    2007-01-15

    Radon and its related parameters were measured using passive (CR-39) and active (Alpha-Guard analyzer) techniques inside seven ancient Egyptian tombs of the Valley of the Kings in Luxor. The measurements were performed throughout the winter and summer seasons. The average radon concentration inside the tombs ranges from 96.9+/-10.8 to 415+/-43Bqm{sup -3} in winter and from 86.4+/-13.8 to 6102.8+/-573.6 in summer. Because of the variations of tombs dimensions and their ventilation systems, the equilibrium factor between radon and its progeny ranges from 0.228+/-0.02 to 0.95+/-0.05. The effective doses for the tomb workers, the tour guide and visitors were calculated. Active measurements show that radon exhalation rates range from 0.68+/-0.30 to 1.47+/-0.27Bqm{sup -2}h{sup -1} and from 0.60+/-0.03 to 1.42+/-0.05Bqm{sup -2}h{sup -1} for passive measurements. The real radium content was determined for all examined tombs by HPGe detector, while the effective radium content was obtained by Alpha-Guard and sealed cup techniques. Radon exhalation rates were correlated with the real radium content. A good correlation was found between active and passive measurements of radon exhalation rate.

  11. Passive and active measurements of radon-related parameters inside ancient Egyptian tombs in Luxor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abo-Elmagd, M.; Metwally, S.M.; El-Fiki, S.A.; Eissa, H.M.; Salama, E.

    2007-01-01

    Radon and its related parameters were measured using passive (CR-39) and active (Alpha-Guard analyzer) techniques inside seven ancient Egyptian tombs of the Valley of the Kings in Luxor. The measurements were performed throughout the winter and summer seasons. The average radon concentration inside the tombs ranges from 96.9+/-10.8 to 415+/-43Bqm -3 in winter and from 86.4+/-13.8 to 6102.8+/-573.6 in summer. Because of the variations of tombs dimensions and their ventilation systems, the equilibrium factor between radon and its progeny ranges from 0.228+/-0.02 to 0.95+/-0.05. The effective doses for the tomb workers, the tour guide and visitors were calculated. Active measurements show that radon exhalation rates range from 0.68+/-0.30 to 1.47+/-0.27Bqm -2 h -1 and from 0.60+/-0.03 to 1.42+/-0.05Bqm -2 h -1 for passive measurements. The real radium content was determined for all examined tombs by HPGe detector, while the effective radium content was obtained by Alpha-Guard and sealed cup techniques. Radon exhalation rates were correlated with the real radium content. A good correlation was found between active and passive measurements of radon exhalation rate

  12. Radon activities in natural gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sajo, B.L.; Palfalvi, J.

    1995-01-01

    Radon activities have been measured in gas samples used for residential heading, in Venezuela and in Hungary. Gas bottles were selected randomly in different regions, and radon activities were monitored with ionization clambers and solid stoke track detections. Radon concentrations in household natural gas are presented for regions in Venezuela and in Budapest, Hungary. The latter was found to be in the range of 88-135 Bq/m 3 . (R.P.)

  13. Radon flux measurement methodologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielson, K.K.; Rogers, V.C.

    1984-01-01

    Five methods for measuring radon fluxes are evaluated: the accumulator can, a small charcoal sampler, a large-area charcoal sampler, the ''Big Louie'' charcoal sampler, and the charcoal tent sampler. An experimental comparison of the five flux measurement techniques was also conducted. Excellent agreement was obtained between the measured radon fluxes and fluxes predicted from radium and emanation measurements

  14. Measurement Testing of Radon Gas for Fault Activity Detection in Rahtawu Muria, Pati

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suntoko, Hadi; Hamzah, Imam

    2004-01-01

    The radon surface can be used to investigates not only for environment but also to be develop in an earth application. The investigation is carried out at the Rahtawu fault, that includes, to the Pati regency which is located 40 km South of ULA. The objective of study to measure the radon released from the fracture zone activities. RDA equipment is being used to measure the radon gas released. The result shown that the high value of radon is 311 cpm with the background of 18 cpm, whereas the low value falls at 0 cpm. The tattoo value are influenced by the soil condition, tattoo time, hardness, weather, soil/stone porosity and fault possession. (author)

  15. The field measurements of the activity-weighted size distributions of radon decay products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wasiolek, P.; Montassier, N.; Hopke, P.K.

    1991-01-01

    Because of the importance of particle size in the calculations of dose deposited in the respiratory tract by radon progeny, the determination of the size distribution of radon decay products in indoor air had increased in interest in recent years. A system for the measurement of the activity-weighted size distribution of radon decay products at environmental levels has been developed. The system (ASC-GSA) utilizes a combination of six multiple wire screens (Graded Screen Array) sampler detector units operated in parallel. The cut off points of the samplers and the data deconvolution procedure allow to obtain the activity fractions of radon progeny in the size range 0.5-500 mn. The computer control of sampling, alpha counting and data storage permits the operation of the system on the semi-continuous basis. The primary application of the ASC-GSA system has been to collect data of activity-weighted size distributions of radon progeny in real house environments. The results of field measurements in several houses with elevated radon levels are presented

  16. Quality assurance for radon measurements in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, T.R.; Buchroeder, H.; Foerster, E.; Schmidt, V.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Radiation protection regarding work activities at workplaces with naturally occurring radiation has been regulated in the German Radiation Protection Ordinance. Regulations refer only to workplaces where the presence of natural radiation leads to a significant increase in the exposure of workers. These workplaces were identified in the following working areas with enhanced exposures to radon-222: underground mines, including visitor mines and show caves; radon-spas and galleries; water supply and distribution industries. Presently, regulations are being initiated by the German government to limit the exposures to radon in homes. For radon measurements at workplaces passive radon devices for individual monitoring as well as active measuring systems for workplace monitoring can be used. However, passive radon devices are preferred for radon measurements in homes because of low costs and availability in large quantities. To assure the quality of radon measurements the German Federal Office for Radiation Protection (BfS) has established annual interlaboratory comparisons for passive radon devices. The comparisons are carried out in the BfS radon calibration laboratory accredited by the German Calibration Service. Passive radon devices which use solid state track detectors, electrets or activated charcoal can be submitted. Approved radon services which offer radon measurements to determine radon exposure in homes and at workplaces have to pass the comparisons successfully. (author)

  17. Measurement of the deposited activity of the short-lived radon progeny in the human respiratory tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vezzu, G.; Butterweck-Dempewolf, G.; Schuler, C.

    1998-01-01

    Volunteers were exposed in the radon chamber at Paul Scherrer Institut to an atmosphere enriched with highly unattached radon progeny. The deposited radon progeny activity in the respiratory tract of the volunteers was determined using a low level in-vivo counter. The detector arrangement and its calibration for the measurement of deposited radon progeny activity is described and the results for a mouth and a nose breathing volunteer are presented. For the nose breathing volunteer 55% of the deposited radon progeny activity was located in the head and the remaining 45% in the chest whereas for the mouth breathing volunteer 25% was located in the head and the remaining 75% in the chest. A mean clearance half-life for the deposited radon progeny from the respiratory tract of (2±1) h was obtained from the analyses of the temporal behaviour of the deposited radon progeny activity in the head. (orig.)

  18. Measured radon inside housings the Republic Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canoba, A.; Arnaud, M.; Lopez, F.; Oliveira, A.A.

    1998-01-01

    They have been measured the radon concentration in houses in different city's in Argentina Republic. For they were used it as method mensuration detectors appearances nuclear detecting electrets and detectors based on the adsorption radon in activated carbon

  19. Radon and its measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penzo, Silvia

    2006-03-01

    The work reviews the topics concerning the problem of the indoor radon and its measurement. The initial stage deals with the general features of radon, from the historical remarks about its discovery to the formation mechanisms in the soil, then passing to describe the transport processes that lead the radon to enter into the buildings. The mean radon concentration distribution among the Italian regions is reported and compared with the situation in the other countries of the world. A particular importance is given to present the national law concerning the radioprotection from the natural sources of ionizing radiations; a paragraph is completely devoted to this argument and to discuss the differences between the Italian approach and the regulations applied in the Test of Europe for both workplaces and dwellings. Chapter 3 describes the different detectors and methods to measure the radon and its short mean live decay products concentrations, together with the operative procedures and guides provided by the Italian law and by the international bodies. As an example of typical radon passive measurement device. the new ENEA detector developed at the Institute of Radioprotection is presented and discussed. Appendix 1 is entirely devoted to discuss the main remedial actions for decreasing the radon indoor concentration both for old and new buildings; appendix 2 reports the main quantities related to radon and radioprotection [it

  20. Calibration of a solid state nuclear track detector for the measurements of volumic activity of Radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HAKAM, O.K.; LFERDE, M.; BERRADA, M.

    1994-01-01

    Time - integrated measurements of environmental radiation activity are commonly carried out using solid state nuclear track detectors ( SSNTD ). These detectors should be calibrated of volumic activity of radon. This paper reports the results of experiments conducted to calibrate cellulose nitrate films LR - 115 type II used for measurements of volumic activity of radon in indoor air in dwellings and enclosed work areas in Morocco. Calibration measurements were made in laboratory using a calibration chamber and a radon source. The calibration chamber is a cylindric box ( 2613,6 cm sup 3)which we have manufactured of aluminium. The radon source is a natural sample rich of aluminium (17,29 + 0 ,12) Bq/g. The films are placed in detector holder with membrane and exposed inside the calibration chamber to varying concentrations of radon. Following the exposure, the films were chemically etched in sodium hydroxide (2,5 N) at 60 C for 120 minutes. The number of registered alpha particle tracks were counted with an optical microscope. In the used etching conditions, the removed mean thickness is in the order of 6 micro m. Therefore, we have normalized the track density to this value . We obtained a calibration factor of 0, 58 tracks . cm sup -2/ K Bq . h . m sup -3 . 1 tab.; 1 fig.; 2 refs. (author)

  1. Passive and Active Measurements of Radon related parameters inside ancient Egyptian Tombs in Luxor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abo-Elmagd, M.; Eissa, H.M.; Metwally, S.M.; Fiki, S.A.; Salama, E.

    2005-01-01

    Radon concentration and its exhalation rate were measured using active (Alpha-Guard analyzer) and passive (CR-39) techniques inside seven ancient Egyptian tombs of the Kings valley in Luxor. The measurements were performed during the winter season of tourism (15/10/2003 up to 09/02/2004). The real radium content was determine for all examined tombs by HPGe detector, while the effective radium content was obtained by Alpha-Guard and sealed cup techniques. The average radon concentration inside the tombs based on the active technique ranges from 116 42 to 362 115 Bq m-3 and the exhalation rate ranges from 0.68 to 1.47 Bq m-2 h-1. For passive measurements, the average radon concentrations inside the tombs vary from 88 5 to 517 8 Bq m-3 while the exhalation rate ranges from 0.60 to 1.42 0.05 Bq m-2 h-1. Because of the variations of tombs dimensions and their ventilation systems, the equilibrium factor between radon and its progeny ranges from 0.10 0.04 to 0.99 0.14 based on Can and Bare measurement method. The effective dose rate inside the tombs varies from 0.11 0.04 to 4.28 0.68 Sv/h, based on UNSCEAR 2000 dose conversion factors for radon and its progeny. Radon exhalation rate was correlated with the real radium content. Moreover, a good correlation was found between active and passive measurements. So it may be useful to use passive technique in large scale instead of the active one

  2. Passive and Active Measurements of Radon related parameters inside ancient Egyptian Tombs in Luxor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abo-Elmagd, M; Eissa, H M [National institute for standerd, radiation Measurements department, Giza (Egypt); Metwally, S M; Fiki, S A; Salama, E [Faculty of Science Department of physics, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt)

    2005-04-01

    Radon concentration and its exhalation rate were measured using active (Alpha-Guard analyzer) and passive (CR-39) techniques inside seven ancient Egyptian tombs of the Kings valley in Luxor. The measurements were performed during the winter season of tourism (15/10/2003 up to 09/02/2004). The real radium content was determine for all examined tombs by HPGe detector, while the effective radium content was obtained by Alpha-Guard and sealed cup techniques. The average radon concentration inside the tombs based on the active technique ranges from 116 42 to 362 115 Bq m-3 and the exhalation rate ranges from 0.68 to 1.47 Bq m-2 h-1. For passive measurements, the average radon concentrations inside the tombs vary from 88 5 to 517 8 Bq m-3 while the exhalation rate ranges from 0.60 to 1.42 0.05 Bq m-2 h-1. Because of the variations of tombs dimensions and their ventilation systems, the equilibrium factor between radon and its progeny ranges from 0.10 0.04 to 0.99 0.14 based on Can and Bare measurement method. The effective dose rate inside the tombs varies from 0.11 0.04 to 4.28 0.68 Sv/h, based on UNSCEAR 2000 dose conversion factors for radon and its progeny. Radon exhalation rate was correlated with the real radium content. Moreover, a good correlation was found between active and passive measurements. So it may be useful to use passive technique in large scale instead of the active one.

  3. Measuring your radon risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackmurdo, R.

    1994-01-01

    In its annual report for 1992/93, the NRPB has warned that tens of thousands of UK employees may be exposed to high levels of radon at work. In addition to those who work underground, employees at risk of radon-induced lung cancer are typically those who spend long periods indoors. This article reviews the implications for all employers especially those in low or unknown levels of radon who resist taking measurements in the belief that by not measuring, they are not liable. (UK)

  4. Comparison of passive and active radon measurement methods for personal occupational dose assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasanzadeh Elham

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To compare the performance of the active short-term and passive long-term radon measurement methods, a study was carried out in several closed spaces, including a uranium mine in Iran. For the passive method, solid-state nuclear track detectors based on Lexan polycarbonate were utilized, for the active method, AlphaGUARD. The study focused on the correlation between the results obtained for estimating the average indoor radon concentrations and consequent personal occupational doses in various working places. The repeatability of each method was investigated, too. In addition, it was shown that the radon concentrations in different stations of the continually ventilated uranium mine were comparable to the ground floor laboratories or storage rooms (without continual ventilation and lower than underground laboratories.

  5. Results of the third CEC intercomparison of active and passive detectors for the measurement of radon and radon decay products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miles, J.C.H.; Sinnaeve, J.

    1988-01-01

    In 1982 and 1984 the radiation protection research programme of the European Communities organized intercomparisons of radon and radon daughter measurement techniques, and the results were published (Miles et al., 1983; Miles and Sinnaeve, 1986. The second of these intercomparisons was carried out as part of a wider exercise sponsored jointly by the CEC and the OECD/NEA (OECD, 1983). The third CEC intercomparison, held at the National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB) in the United Kingdom in 1987, again constituted the European regional part of this wider exercise. The intercomparison on the European region was carried out in two stages, the first for passive integrating detectors and the second for active instruments, usually by spot measurements. Twenty-one laboratories participated in the intercomparison, of passive dosimetry and 17 in that for active dosimetry. Passive detectors have been used in many European countries to carry out surveys of exposure in homes and to monitor occupational exposure. The exposures for the intercomparison of passive detectors were carried out in June, July and August 1987 at NRPB. The intercomparison of active detectors was carried out over three days in October 1987, when scientists from the participating laboratories brought their equipment to NRPB

  6. Measurement of radon activity, exhalation rate and radiation dose in fly ash and coal samples from NTPC, Badarpur, Delhi, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Mamta; Verma, K.D.; Mahur, A.K.; Prasad, R.; Sonkawade, R.G.

    2013-01-01

    In the present study radon activities and exhalation rates from fly ash and coal samples from NTPC (National Thermal Power Corporation) situated at Badarpur, Delhi, India, have been measured. 'Sealed Can Technique' using LR-115 type II track detectors was employed. In fly ash samples, radon activity has been found to vary from 400.0 ± 34.7 to 483.9 ± 38.1Bqm -3 with an average value of 447.1 ± 36.6 Bqm -3 and in coal samples, radon activity has been found to vary from 504.0 ± 39.0 to 932.1 ± 52.9 Bqm -3 with an average value of 687.2 ± 45.2 Bqm -3 . Radon exhalation rate from coal is found to be higher than radon exhalation rate from its ash products, whereas the opposite is expected. Indoor inhalation exposure (radon) effective dose has also been estimated. (author)

  7. Application of underwater radon measurements in geology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varhegyi, A.; Baranyi, I.; Gerzson, I. (Mecsek Ore Mining Enterprise, Pecs (Hungary)); Somogyi, G.; Hakl, J.; Hunyadi, I. (Magyar Tudomanyos Akademia, Debrecen (Hungary). Atommag Kutato Intezete)

    1988-01-01

    Based on the observed phenomenon of geogas migration in microbubble form from deeper regions, the authors have developed a new model for the vertical transport of radon released from deeper sources. The physical properties of the rock relating to the upflow of microbubbles below the groundwater level are considered and the radon transport parameter of rocks is introduced. The vertical distribution of radon concentration in the case of a multi-layered geological model is given and the penetration depth of underwater radon measurements is examined. Aspects of underwater radon detection by the nuclear track detector technique are analyzed. The radon transport model gives a new theoretical basis for several applications of radon measurements in geology. The advantages of underwater radon detection have already been proved in uranium exploration. Further geological applications are proposed in earthquake prediction, in volcanology, in the survey of active faults and thermal waters. (author).

  8. The measurement of activity-weighted size distributions of radon progeny: methods and laboratory intercomparison studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopke, P.K.; Strydom, R.; Ramamurthi, M.; Knutson, E.O.; Tu, K.W.; Scofield, P.; Holub, R.F.; Cheng, Y.S.; Su, Y.F.; Winklmayr, W.

    1992-01-01

    Over the past 5 y, there have been significant improvements in measurement of activity-weighted size distributions of airborne radon decay products. The modification of screen diffusion batteries to incorporate multiple screens of differing mesh number, called graded screen arrays, have permitted improved size resolution below 10 nm such that the size distributions can now be determined down to molecular sized activities (0.5 nm). In order to ascertain the utility and reliability of such systems, several intercomparison tests have been performed in a 2.4 m3 radon chamber in which particles of varying size have been produced by introducing SO2 and H2O along with the radon to the chamber. In April 1988, intercomparison studies were performed between direct measurements of the activity-weighted size distributions as measured by graded screen arrays and an indirect measurement of the distribution obtained by measuring the number size distribution with a differential mobility analyzer and multiplying by the theoretical attachment rate. Good agreement was obtained in these measurements. A second set of intercomparison studies among a number of groups with graded screen array systems was made in April 1989 with the objective of resolving spectral structure below 10 nm. Again, generally good agreement among the various groups was obtained although some differences were noted. It is thus concluded that such systems can be constructed and can be useful in making routine measurements of activity-weighted size distributions with reasonable confidence in the results obtained

  9. Measurements of radon concentrations in dwelling houses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birkholz, W.; Klink, T.

    1993-01-01

    Radon and its daughter products gain in importance in health protection and radiation safety. Especially in the southern region of Saxony radon concentrations in dwellings may be high by former silver and uranium mines. We found radon contents of about 20.000 Bq/m 3 in dwellings. To redevelop such houses it is necessary to know intrude path of radon. In present work we studied different measuring systems, active and passive detectors, short and long term integrating devices. By means of investigation of radon sources several redeveloping methods are rates as well from radiological as from civil engineering point of view. (author)

  10. Measurement of volumic activities of radon in air in houses and in working rooms with solid state nuclear track detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakam, O.K.

    1993-01-01

    In this work, a new method of measuring volumic activity of radon has been developed. This method is based on using solid state nuclear track detectors LR-115 type II. It has been applied to measurement of volumic activities of radon in air in houses and in working rooms in different regions of Morocco. These measurements, carried out for the first time in the country, allowed to estimate the dose equivalents of radon received by the population of the studied regions. 59 refs., 38 figs., 38 tabs. (F.M.)

  11. Underground measurements of aerosol in radon and thoron progeny activity distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, A.; Bandi, F.; Phillips, C.R.; Duport, P.

    1990-01-01

    Aerosol and activity distributions of 218 Polonium, 214 Lead, 214 Bismuth, and 212 Lead were determined in two different underground mining environments by means of an optimized time-delay counting scheme and diffusion batteries. In one environment, diesel equipment was operating; and in the other, electrically powered equipment. The two environments differed significantly in total aerosol concentration. In the diesel environment, in particular, aerosol concentrations were unsteady, and fluctuated with vehicular traffic and mining activities. As measured by radon progeny disequilibrium, the age of the air ranged from about 25 to 60 minutes. Thoron working levels were of the same order as radon working levels. In this paper, comparisons are made between the aerosol and activity size distributions in both the diesel and electric mine

  12. Measurement of activity-weighted size distributions of radon decay products in a normally occupied home

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopke, P.K.; Wasiolek, P.; Montassier, N.; Cavallo, A.; Gadsby, K.; Socolow, R.

    1992-01-01

    In order to assess the exposure of individuals to the presence of indoor radioactivity arising from the decay of radon, an automated, semicontinuous graded screen array system was developed to permit the measurement of the activity-weighted size distributions of the radon progeny in homes. The system has been modified so that the electronics and sampling heads can be separated from the pump by approximately 15 m. The system was placed in the living room of a one-storey house with basement in Princeton, NJ and operated for 2 weeks while the house was occupied by the home owners in their normal manner. One of the house occupants was a cigarette smoker. Radon and potential alpha energy concentration (PAEC) measurements were also made, but condensation nuclei counts were not performed. PAEC values ranged from 23.4 to 461.6 mWL. In the measured activity size distributions, the amount of activity in the 0.5-1.5 nm size range can be considered to be the unattached fraction. The mean value for the 218 Po unattached fraction is 0.217 with a range of 0.054-0.549. The median value for the unattached fraction of PAEC is 0.077 with a range of 0.022-0.178. (author)

  13. Methods of radon measurement and devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miles, J.

    2004-01-01

    The following topics and instrumentation are discussed: The quantity to be measured; Active measurement methods (scintillation cells, ionisation chambers, electrostatic collection of decay products); Passive measurement methods (charcoal detectors; electret ion chambers; etched track detectors); and Detector considerations for large-scale surveys ('always on' or 'switchable' detectors?; response to radon-220; avoidance of electrostatic effects; quality assurance for passive radon detectors; quality control within the laboratory; external quality assurance; detectors need to be easily deliverable). It is concluded that the ideal detector for large scale surveys of radon in houses is a small, closed detector in a conducting holder which excludes radon-220, supported by rigorous quality assurance procedures. (P.A.)

  14. New devices for radon measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevostyanov, V.N.

    2004-01-01

    This work includes the description of two new devices for radon surveys developed by the authors and produced in Kazakhstan. The first appliance is 'Ramon-Radon-01' used to measure 222 Rn radon in various mediums such as air, water, soil, and radon exhalation. The major advantage of the appliance lies in the absence of radioactive pollution in it after measurements. The appliances widely used in the CIS such as 'RAA-01', 'Alpharad' (produced by 'MTM Zaschita', Russia) and 'Alphaguard' (Germany) take samples directly to the measuring camera. For instance, the activity concentration of samples after they are taken by 'RAA-01' and 'Alpharad' is measured by means of electrostatic precipitation of RaA ( 218 Po) atoms to the square of semiconductor detector with subsequent registration of RaA alpha decay. The obvious disadvantage is that the subsequent measurement of relatively small 222 Rn activity concentration values after great values of 222 Rn activity concentration have been obtained requires a considerable exposure of the appliance sometimes exceeding 10 hours. Therefore, appliances register a relatively low value of the top measurement range of 20 KBq/m 3 . 'Alphaguard' has similar limitation resulting from precipitation of radon daughter decay products on the walls of ionizing chamber where radon activity concentration is measured. The radioactive lag of 'RAA-01', 'Alpharad' and 'Alphaguard' makes them of little use as well for automatic monitoring in the conditions of abruptly time negative derivatives on change of radon activity concentration. The second advantage is that 'Ramon-Radon-01', as opposed to above described appliances, registers almost zero radioactive lag, thanks to its constructive peculiarities which enable an abrupt increase of top range of measured value up to 5x10 5 Bq/m 3 , only limited by velocity of electron units of the appliance. The third advantage is that measurement discontinuity is determined only by time of full measurement cycle

  15. Measurement of waterborne radon in the drinking water of the Dera Ismail Khan city using active and passive techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasir Tabassum

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Groundwater is considered to be the second largest contributor to the indoor radon concentration after soil. Therefore, measurement of waterborne radon has remained a point of interest for many researchers. The main objective of this study is to study waterborne radon activity in the city of Dera Ismail Khan. In this context, water samples were collected from different locations of the city and waterborne radon was measured using a pylon vacuum water degassing system and CR-39 based radon detectors. The pylon system measured waterborne radon activities in samples of hand pumps and motor driven pumps varying from 0.015 to 0.066 Bq/L and 0.021 to 0.145 Bq/L with average values of 0.041 ± 0.015 Bq/L and 0.076 ± 0.024 Bq/L, respectively. Whereas CR-39 based measured values ranged from 0.042 to 0.125 Bq/L and 0.075 to 0.158 Bq/L with average values of 0.081 ± 0.021 Bq/L and 0.120 ± 0.020 Bq/L, respectively. The estimated average annual effective dose due to ingestion of radon from drinking water using pylon and CR-39 based radon detectors for hand and motor pump samples was found to be 1.055×10-4 mSv and 1.947×10-4 mSv, and 2.067×10-4 mSv and 3.058×10-4 mSv, respectively. The waterborne radon concentrations and as a result the annual effective dose expected to be received from it are within the recommended safe limits.

  16. Measurements of volumic activity of radon in indoor air in dwellings and enclosed work areas in Morocco

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakam, O. K.; Lferde, M.

    1994-01-01

    The principal source of exposure to radiation for public in built-up areas is known to be the inhalation of radon and its short-lived daughters. Most of this exposure occurs inside homes, where many hours are spent each day and where the volumic activity of radon are usually higher than outdoors. For measure these volumic activity, cellulose nitrate films LR-115 type II already calibrated of volumic activity of radon are used. The measurements were performed in 30 dwellings and enclosed work areas in different regions of Morocco. The volumic mean activity obtained in dwellings is 64 +- 5 Bq/m sup 3 in Rabat, 59 +- 6 Bq/ m sup 3 in Kenitra, 124 +- 8 Bq/ m sup 3 in youssoufia and 136 +- 9 Bq/ m sup 3 in Khouribga. It was showed that the volumic activity of radon are more higher in two factory locals of moroccan ores treatment than in dwellings. The average volumic activity of radon in geophysical observatory cellar in Berchid was 1541 +- 64 Bq/ m sup 3. We also observed that the volumic activity of radon in indoor air is more higher in winter than in summer and it decrease with altitude and increase with depth. 4 tabs. 2 refs. (author)

  17. Design and construction of a cryogenic facility providing absolute measurements of radon 222 activity for developing a primary standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picolo, Jean-Louis

    1995-06-01

    Radon 222 metrology is required to obtain higher accuracy in assessing human health risks from exposure to natural radiation. This paper describes the development of a cryogenic facility that allows absolute measurements of radon 222 in order to obtain a primary standard. The method selected is the condensation of a radon 222 sample on a geometrically defined cold surface with a constant, well known and adjustable temperature and facing an alpha particles detector. Counting of the alpha particles reaching the detector and the precisely known detection geometry provide an absolute measurement of the source activity. After describing the cryogenic facility, the measurement accuracy and precision are discussed and a comparison made with other measurement systems. The relative uncertainty is below 1 pc (1 σ). The facility can also be used to improve our knowledge of the nuclear properties of radon 222 and to produce secondary standards. (author) [fr

  18. Study of radon dispersion in typical dwelling using CFD modeling combined with passive-active measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabi, R.; Oufni, L.

    2017-10-01

    Inhalation of radon (222Rn) and its decay products are a major source of natural radiation exposure. It is known from recent surveys in many countries that radon and its progeny contribute significantly to total inhalation dose and it is fairly established that radon when inhaled in large quantity causes lung disorder. Indoor air conditions and ventilation systems strongly influence the indoor radon concentration. This study focuses on investigating both numerically and experimentally the influence of environmental conditions on the indoor radon concentration and spatial distribution. The numerical results showed that ventilation rate, temperature and humidity have significant impacts on both radon content and distribution. The variations of radon concentration with the ventilation, temperature and relative humidity are discussed. The measurement results show the diurnal variations of the indoor radon concentration are found to exhibit a positive correlation with relative humidity and negatively correlate with the air temperature. The analytic solution is used to validate the numeric results. The comparison amongst analytical, numerical and measurement results shows close agreement.

  19. Result of the intercomparison exercise on radon measuring instruments and radon detectors 'bev- radon ring 2005'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumgartner, A.; Maringer, F.J.; Michai, P.; Kreuziger, M.

    2006-01-01

    In spring 2005 the Federal Office of Metrology and Surveying (B.E.V.) invited all in Austria working radon measuring institutes to an intercomparison exercise at the radon calibration laboratory in the Arsenal. The aim of this intercomparison was on the one hand an objective inquiry and documentation of the current metrological potential on the section of radon measurement in Austria - both quantitative and qualitative- and on the other hand an initiative for the participating laboratories to optimize and improve their applied calibration-, measurement and analyse technique. Ten contacted Austrian radon laboratories were prepared to participate on the radon intercomparison exercise. The intercomparison exercise was carried out from 14. till 29. June at the radon calibration laboratory in the Arsenal of the B.E.V.. As radon emanation source a five stepped arranged, at the Arsenal built radon source was used. The source ( A.D.O.T.T.O. 1 is filled with a certified Ra- 226-standard solution of the Czech Metrological Institute (C.M.I.), Prag. A simple statistic based model was used for the evaluation and assessment of the results from the participants, which consider the statistic nature of the radioactive decay combined uncertainty. Altogether 183 measuring instruments participated the intercomparison exercise. Two reference measuring instruments, 22 active and 159 passive measuring instruments. The active measuring instruments formed 6 types of instruments and as passive radon detectors were 7 different types used from the participants. The positioning of the radon measuring instruments and detectors in the radon calibration laboratory was executed in regard to statistic points of view. From the active measuring instruments 17 could qualify and from the passive methods six from eight participants were in compliance to the given criteria. Radon measurements, which could have financial and economics relating implications (e.g. architectural redevelopment or

  20. Radon measurements indoors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joensson, G.

    1983-02-01

    Measurements of Radon concentrations have been made using photographic film detectors in the communities of Uppsala, Soedertaelje and Tyresoe. The result from 6700 filmexposures in both one-family and apartment houses are reported. The fraction of dwellings with radon daughter concentrations exceeding 200 Bq/m 3 is between 3 and 14 percent for one-family houses and 0 to 5 percent for apartment buildings. 8 to 68 percent of the one-family houses and 57 to 83 percent of the apartment buildings had concentrations lower than 70 Bq/m 3 . The seasonal variations were recorded in one-family houses in Uppsala. In houses with low concentrations, the winter values were higher than the summer values. For houses with high concentrations the reversed variation was recorded. (Author)

  1. Developing a method for the retrospective estimation of radon exposure from in vivo measurements of 210Pb activity in bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKenzie, R.J.; Johnston, P.N.

    1999-01-01

    Radon is a naturally occurring radioactive gas which has been linked to lung cancer in occupationally exposed uranium mine workers. Where monitoring of an individual's exposure to radon and radon progeny has not occurred or is incomplete, it may be possible to determine this exposure retrospectively by the measurement of the long lived decay product 210 Pb which accumulates in the bones of exposed individuals. This paper describes a method being developed at the whole body monitor (WBM) facility of the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) to estimate the time integrated exposure to radon over a period of up to several decades from the in vivo measurements of 210 Pb activity in the knee of human subjects. Initial work has concentrated on characterising the WBM facility for this work using artificial bone phantoms. This project will serve as a test of the feasibility of the method before undertaking further studies on human subjects

  2. Radon measurements along active faults in the Langadas Basin, northern Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Papastefanou

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A network of three radon stations has been established in the Langadas Basin, northern Greece for radon monitoring by various techniques in earthquake prediction studies. Specially made devices with plastic tubes including Alpha Tracketch Detectors (ATD were installed for registering alpha particles from radon and radon decay products exhaled from the ground, every 2 weeks, by using LR-115, type II, non-strippable Kodak films, starting from December 1996. Simultaneous measurements started using Lucas cells alpha spectrometer for instantaneous radon measurements in soil gas, before and after setting ATDs at the radon stations. Continuous monitoring of radon gas exhaling from the ground started from the middle of August 1999 by using silicon diode detectors, which simultaneously register meteorological parameters, such as rainfall, temperature and barometric pressure. The obtained data were studied together with the data of seismic events, such as the magnitude, ML, of earthquakes that occurred at the Langadas Basin during the period of measurements, as registered by the Laboratory of Geophysics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, in order to find out any association between them.

  3. A Radon Chamber without Radium Source for Detector Calibration and Radon Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Azmi, D.; Karunakara, N.

    2008-01-01

    A radon chamber of volume 216 liters was designed and constructed for calibration of radon detectors and radon test measurements. The main feature of this chamber is that the active 226 Ra source, to generate the 222 Rn inside the chamber volume, is not required. Instead, 222 Rn from soil gas is utilized for this purpose. The supply of radon comes from the soil gas. Soil gas is drawn from the soil to fill the chamber with high radon concentration levels (∼ 80 kBq/m3). Desired radon concentration levels can be obtained by drawing the soil gas for different time durations and/or flow rate (author)

  4. Measuring radon in the workplace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, M.

    1990-01-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has issued guidance for testing for radon in homes and interim guidance for testing in schools. Information on testing for radon in the workplace is the next initiative and this paper describes the current status of this effort. The results of measurements made in several buildings in the Washington, DC area are discussed. In this paper a discussion of preliminary guidance on radon survey design that has been offered to Federal agencies is presented

  5. The Reference Laboratory for Radon Gas Activity Concentration Measurements at PSI; Das Referenzlabor fuer Radongas-Konzentrationsmessungen am PSI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuler, Christoph

    1998-09-01

    Active or passive radon gas measuring instruments are exposed during intercomparison exercises in the radon chamber of the Reference Laboratory for Radon Gas Concentration Measurements at Paul Scherrer Institut: The traceability of radon gas measurements to nationally and internationally acknowledged standards is inspected in the reference atmosphere of the chamber with calibrated {sup 222}Rn activity concentration. The use of secondary standards guarantees the traceability of the radon chamber reference atmosphere. Besides the principal secondary standard, a radon gas standard (secondary standard I), a {sup 226}Ra standard solution (secondary standard II) and a {sup 222}Rn emanation standard (secondary standard III) are used. The {sup 222}Rn activity delivered by one of these standards is quantitatively transferred into a reference volume and hence converted to an activity concentration serving for the calibration of a measuring instrument transfer standard consisting of scintillation cell and counter. By this way, the transfer standard calibration is related and traceable to the internationally acknowledged primary standard laboratories National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland (U.S.A.) or National Physical Laboratory, Teddington, Middlesex (UK). The calibrated transfer standard is then used to calibrate the radon gas activity concentration in the radon chamber. For a single grab sampling determination of the {sup 222}Rn activity concentration in the radon chamber with the transfer standard, the estimation of Type A and Type B uncertainties yields a relative expanded uncertainty (95% confidence level) of minimum 3% for high concentration levels (10 kBqm{sup -3}) and maximum 30% for low concentration levels (0.2 kBqm{sup -3}). Extended evaluations of the reproducibility of calibration factor measurements obtained by calibration of the transfer standard with the secondary standards I, II and III show a very good reproducibility quality

  6. MEASUREMENT OF RADON EXHALATION RATE, RADIUM ACTIVITY AND ANNUAL EFFECTIVE DOSE FROM BRICKS AND CEMENT SAMPLES COLLECTED FROM DERA ISMAIL KHAN

    OpenAIRE

    Nisar Ahmad; Mohamad Suhaimi Jaafar; Sohail Aziz Khan; Tabassum Nasir; Sajjad Ahmad; Muhammad Rahim

    2014-01-01

    Radon concentration, exhalation rate, radium activity and annual effective dose have been measured from baked and unbaked bricks and cement samples commonly used as construction material in the dwellings of Dera Ismail Khan City, Pakistan. CR-39 based NRPB radon dosimeters and RAD7 have been used as passive and active devises. The values of radon concentration for baked, unbaked bricks and cements obtained from passive and active techniques were found in good agreement. Average values of rado...

  7. Measurements of radon in soil gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paschuk, Sergei A.; Correa, Janine Nicolosi; Schelin, Hugo R.; Barbosa, Laercio; Sadula, Tatyana; Matsuzaki, Cristiana A.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: After the decades of systematic and numerous studies performed at different countries of the World, it has been concluded that radon as well as its progeny is the main cause of lung cancer. It is well known that more than 50% of the effective annual radiation dose received by a human being is related to the radon and its progenies. Among the principle mechanisms that bring the radon inside the dwelling is the soil exhalation as well as exhalation and release from the water. Radon concentration in the soil and its transport (emanation, diffusion, advection and adsorption) to the surface depends on different physical, geological and ambient parameters such as the geology of the area, geochemical composition of the soil, its porosity and permeability, grain size, soil humidity, bottom sediments and inputs from streams, temperature, atmospheric pressure, etc. Since the main part of indoor radon originates in the soil, the measurements of radon concentration in soil gas have to be considered as an important tool and indicator of probable high levels of radon inside the dwellings. Present work describes the radon in soil gas measurements performed during the last two years in cooperation between the Laboratory of Applied Nuclear Physics of the Federal University of Technology (UTFPR), the Nuclear Technology Development Center (CDTN) and the Institute of Radiation Protection and Dosimetry (IRD) from the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN). Following previously concluded measurements of radon concentration in dwellings and the measurements of 222 Rn activity in drinking water collected at artesian bores of Curitiba urban area, present step of activities has been dedicated to measurements of radon concentration in soil gas. Experimental setup was based on the Professional Radon Monitor (ALPHA GUARD) connected to specially developed for such measurements Soil Gas Probe through the air pump and filter system. The equipment was adjusted with air flow of 0

  8. Radon measurements in indoor workplaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokonami, S.; Matsumoto, M.; Furukawa, M.; Fujimoto, K.; Fujitaka, K.; Pan, J.; Kurosawa, R.

    1996-01-01

    Radon measurements in several office buildings located in Tokyo were carried out with two types of device to study the time-dependent radon concentration in indoor workplaces. Both types of device use the electrostatic field for the collection of 218 Po onto the electrode of the detector. One provides an average radon concentration throughout the day. The other, in which a weekly timer is installed in the circuit of the electrode of the device, provides an average radon concentration during working hours (9:00-17:00, Monday-Friday). Although radon concentrations in Japanese dwellings have been found to be generally low, relatively high concentrations were observed in the office buildings. No consistent seasonal variation was recognised in this study. Little difference of average radon concentrations between working hours and the whole day was found throughout the year in two offices. On the other hand, a significant difference was observed in other offices. The operation of an air conditioner might change the radon concentration during working hours. From the results of radon measurements the average effective dose in the workplace was estimated to be 0.23 mSv for 2000 working hours in a year. (Author)

  9. Radon measurements in hispaniola dwellings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutierrez, J.; Colgan, P.A.; Cancio, D.

    1996-01-01

    The results of a national radon survey and a number of regional surveys of radon in spanish dwelling are reviewed. The best estimate of the geometric mean of indoor radon concentrations is 41.1. Bq/m -3 and single-family dwellings have been shown to be more at risk than apartments. Results need to be interpreted with some caution due to differences in survey methodologies and measurement procedures. The risks from radon exposure are put in perspective by comparison with other voluntary risks. Finally, although a number of 'high risk' areas have already been identified, it is concluded that implementation of a national programme to reduce radon exposure may await a better definition of the problem extent. (authors). 20 refs., 1 tab

  10. Radon integral measurement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia H, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    The Radon Integral Measurement System (SMIR) is a device designed specially to detect, to count and to store the data of the acquisition of alpha particles emitted by Radon-222 coming from the underground. The system includes a detection chamber, a radiation detector, a digital system with bateries backup and an auxiliary photovoltaic cell. A personal computer fixes the mode in which the system works, transmitting the commands to the system by the serial port. The heart of the system is a microprocesor working with interrupts by hardware. Every external device to the microprocessor sends his own interrupt request and the microprocessor handles the interrupts with a defined priority. The system uses a real time clock, compatible with the microprocessor, to take care of the real timing and date of the acquisition. A non volatile RAM is used to store data of two bytes every 15 minutes along 41 days as a maximum. After the setting up to the system by the computer, it can operate in stand alone way for up 41 days in the working place without the lose of any data. If the memory is full the next data will be written in the first locations of the memory. The memory is divided in pages corresponding every one of this to a different day of the acquisition. The counting time for every acquisition can be programmed by the user from 15 minutes to 65535 minutes but it is recommended to use a small time not to reach the limit of 65535 counts in every acquisition period. We can take information of the system without affecting the acquisition process in the field by using a lap top computer, then the information can be stored in a file. There is a program in the computer that can show the information in a table of values or in a bar graph. (Author)

  11. Radon measurement studies in Kazakhstan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevost'yanov, V.N.

    2003-01-01

    Today, one has to admit that despite the important role and certain achievements in providing the radiation control in Kazakhstan, radon measurements still present some problems related to clear definition of physical quantities applied, correct use of methods, and application of adequate measuring devices to meet requirements of regulatory documents currently in effect, such as NRB-99. The paper provides some data on radon measurements, describes the problem status in Kazakhstan and proposes ways to solve it. (author)

  12. Radon measurement in Malaysia water samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, A.B.; Rosli Mahat; Yusof Md Amin

    1995-01-01

    This paper reported the results of the measurement of radon in local water. The water samples collected were rainwater, river water, seawater, well water or ground water at area of State of Selangor and Kuala Lumpur. The samples were collected in scintillation cell ZnS(Ag) through Radon Degassing Unit RDU 200. Alpha activity was counted with scintillation counters RD 200 at energy 5.5 MeV. (author)

  13. Measurement of exhalation rate of radon and radon concentration in air using open vial method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horiuchi, Kimiko; Ishii, Tadashi.

    1991-01-01

    It was recognized that more than half of total exposure dose on human subject is caused by radon and its decay products which originate from naturally occurring radioactive substances (1988 UNSCEAR). Since then the exhalation of radon from the ground surface has received increasing attention. The authors have developed a new method for the determination of radon in natural water using toluene extraction of radon and applying a liquid scintillation counter of an integral counting technique which is able to get the absolute counting of radon. During these studies, the authors found out that when a counting vial containing of Liquid scintillator (LS)-toluene solution, without a lid, is exposed to the atmosphere for a while, dissolution of radon clearly occurs due to high solubility of radon into toluene layer. To extend this finding for the determination of radon in the atmosphere, the authors devised a new method to actively collect the atmosphere containing radon in a glass bottle by discharging a definite amount of water in it, which is named as open-vial dynamic method. The radon concentration can be easily calculated after the necessary corrections such as the partition coefficient and others. Applying proposed method to measure the radon exhalation rate from the ground surface and radon concentration in air of the dwelling environment, radioactive mineral spring zone and various geological formation such as granitic or sedimentary rocks. (author)

  14. Radon in balneology - measurement of radon retention by patients and radiation protection for personell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Just, G.; Falkenbach, A.; Grunewald, W.A.; Philipsborn, H. von

    2001-01-01

    In radon balneology patients are exposed to radon either from water or air through the skin or through inhalation. Drinking radon water was not included in the study. Previously, the radon transfer has been determined for an estimate of the medically active amount of radon retained in the patient. A simpler approach of measuring radon in expiration under and after exposure has now been standardised and applied to probands under different conditions of exposure. In addition, radon decay products were measured in sweat, saliva and in the skin. Experimental parameters were evaluated for a comparison of different concentrations observed under different conditions. Results are likely to improve both therapy for patients and radiation protection for members of the personnel. (orig.) [de

  15. An active radon sampling device for high humidity places

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legarda, F. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Fluid Mechanics, University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU), Alameda Urquijo s/n 48013 Bilbao (Spain); Idoeta, R., E-mail: raquel.idoeta@ehu.e [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Fluid Mechanics, University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU), Alameda Urquijo s/n 48013 Bilbao (Spain); Alegria, N.; Herranz, M. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Fluid Mechanics, University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU), Alameda Urquijo s/n 48013 Bilbao (Spain)

    2010-01-15

    An active radon measurement device has been developed to be used in workplaces with a relative humidity of 100% for spot measurements of radon concentration. A mathematical model based on the convective-diffusive transport equation is used in the design of this system, which has been used to measure the radon concentration in the Pozalagua cave (Biscay, at Northern of Spain). From the obtained radon values the public and workers doses have been obtained.

  16. Express method and radon gas measurement detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khajdarov, R.A.; Khajdarov, R.R.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to improve the activated charcoal adsorption method. The detector consisted of an electronic unit (200 mm x 180 mm x 80 mm) and a scintillation cell (a tube 200 mm long, 60 mm diam.). The electronic unit contained a power supply, amplifier, discriminator, timer, counter and indicator. The scintillation cell contained a zinc sulfide scintillator, photomultiplier, preamplifier, high voltage power supply and a 200 ml chamber above the scintillator. This chamber was intended to situate activated carbon fibrous absorber and air compressor. In this method, air is drawn through a filter to remove radon decay products and then through the activated carbon cloth by using a compressor. Sampling takes between 5 and 15 minutes. After the sampling, the cloth is heated for 5-10 sec up to 200-250 deg C by electric current passing through the fiber. Radon gas evaporates from the cloth and the device detects scintillation pulses. Owing to a high radon preconcentration factor (by adsorption of radon on the activated carbon cloth from 50-150 L of air of and evaporation into the small volume of the chamber), the detection limit of the method is 2-4 Bq/m 3 . Since the distance between the filter, cloth and scintillator is over 80 mm, the detector only measures radiation from radon without interference from the radon decay products, remaining in the filter and cloth

  17. Radon measurements in Greece

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgiou, E.; Ntalles, K.; Molfetas, M.; Athanassiadis, A.; Proukakis, C.

    1988-01-01

    Studies of radon concentration in greek spas, in a cave, in constituents of the greek cement, in building materials in Greece and in greek mines have been published. Some preliminary studies of radon concentration in greek dwellings have been published. In order to get an idea of the problem in Greece we decided to carry out a national survey. Two different sites were selected: Athens, where domicile about 40% of the greek population and Domatia, a small village in northern Greece 600Km from Athens, located in an area known to have soil with increased uranium concentrations

  18. Radon gas measurement in Corum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uzbey, S.; Celebi, N.

    2009-01-01

    The existence of the natural radioactive sources in earth's crust which has long half-life and the degradation products of these in the environmental medium such as earth, rocks, foods, water, air, forms the basis of radiation which people are exposed to. Radon is the unique radioactive gas in the nature and it is made up of radium which is the result of uranium degradation. It is necessary to determine the radon concentration because of the difference in the concentration of uranium existence in different places. TAEK (Turkish Atomic Energy Authority) allows 400 Bq/m 3 of radon concentration at houses, 1000 Bq/m 3 at offices per year. In this attempt, government buildings, houses and offices were determined as the sampling places in Corum city center and towns to represent Corum. While disposing the radon measuring detectors, places which are close to the ground level were preferred. 74 radon detectors were left in those places for 60 days and in the end the detectors were collected while discontinuing the connection of environment and they were assessed. According to the results, the average radon gas concentration in 14 government buildings is 71,71 Bq/m 3 , in 15 offices 32,26 Bq/m 3 and at houses 42,34 Bq/m 3 .

  19. Comparative Measurements of Radon Concentration in Soil Using Passive and Active Methods in High Level Natural Radiation Area (HLNRA of Ramsar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanat B

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Radon and its daughters are amongst the most important sources of natural exposure in the world. Soil is one of the signifcant sources of radon/thoron due to both radium and thorium so that the emanated thoron from it may cause in creased uncertainties in radon measurements. Recently, a diffusion chamber has been designed and optimized for passive discriminative measurements of radon/thoron concentrations in soil. Objective: In order to evaluate the capability of the passive method, some com parative measurements (with active methods have been performed. Method: The method is based upon measurements by a diffusion chamber, includ ing two Lexan polycarbonate SSNTDs, which can discriminate the emanated radon/ thorn from the soil by delay method. The comparative measurements have been done in ten selected points of HLNRA of Ramsar in Iran. The linear regression and cor relation between the results of two methods have been studied. Results: The results show that the radon concentrations are within the range of 12.1 to 165 kBq/m3 values. The correlation between the results of active and passive methods was measured by 0.99 value. As well, the thoron concentrations have been measured between 1.9 to 29.5 kBq/m3 values at the points. Conclusion: The sensitivity as well as the strong correlation with active mea surements shows that the new low-cost passive method is appropriate for accurate seasonal measurements of radon and thoron concentration in soil.

  20. Measuring radon flux across active faults: Relevance of excavating and possibility of satellite discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richon, Patrick, E-mail: patrick.richon@cea.f [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, Equipe Geologie des Systemes Volcaniques, 4 place Jussieu, UMR-7154 CNRS, F-75005 Paris (France); Klinger, Yann; Tapponnier, Paul [Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, Equipe de Seismotectonique, 4 place Jussieu, UMR-7154 CNRS, F-75005 Paris (France); Li Chenxia [Institute of Geology, Chinese Earthquake Administration, P.O. Box 9803, 100029 Beijing (China); Van Der Woerd, Jerome [Institut de Physique du Globe de Strasbourg, CNRS, UMR-7516, INSU, Universite Louis Pasteur, Strasbourg I, 5 Rue Rene Descartes, F-67084 Strasbourg Cedex (France); Perrier, Frederic [Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, Equipe de Geomagnetisme, 4 place Jussieu, UMR-7154 CNRS et Universite Paris 7 Denis-Diderot, F-75005 Paris (France)

    2010-02-15

    Searching for gas exhalation around major tectonic contacts raises important methodological issues such as the role of the superficial soil and the possible long distance transport. These effects have been studied on the Xidatan segment of the Kunlun Fault, Qinghai Province, China, using measurement of the radon-222 and carbon dioxide exhalation flux. A significant radon flux, reaching up to 538 +- 33 mBq m{sup -2} s{sup -1} was observed in a 2-3 m deep trench excavated across the fault. On the soil surface, the radon flux varied from 7 to 38 mBq m{sup -2} s{sup -1}, including on the fault trace, with an average value of 14.1 +- 1.0 mBq m{sup -2} s{sup -1}, similar to the world average. The carbon dioxide flux on the soil surface, with an average value of 12.9 +- 3.3 g m{sup -2} day{sup -1}, also remained similar to regular background values. It showed no systematic spatial variation up to a distance of 1 km from the fault, and no clear enhancement in the trench. However, a high carbon dioxide flux of 421 +- 130 g m{sup -2} day{sup -1} was observed near subvertical fractured phyllite outcrops on a hill located about 3 km north of the fault, at the boundary of the large-scale pull-apart basin associated with the fault. This high carbon dioxide flux was associated with a high radon flux of 607 +- 35 mBq m{sup -2} s{sup -1}. These preliminary results indicate that, at the fault trace, it can be important to measure gas flux at the bottom of a trench to remove superficial soil layers. In addition, gas discharges need to be investigated also at some distance from the main fault, in zones where morphotectonics features support associated secondary fractures.

  1. Determination of air-loop volume and radon partition coefficient for measuring radon in water sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kil Yong; Burnett, William C

    A simple method for the direct determination of the air-loop volume in a RAD7 system as well as the radon partition coefficient was developed allowing for an accurate measurement of the radon activity in any type of water. The air-loop volume may be measured directly using an external radon source and an empty bottle with a precisely measured volume. The partition coefficient and activity of radon in the water sample may then be determined via the RAD7 using the determined air-loop volume. Activity ratios instead of absolute activities were used to measure the air-loop volume and the radon partition coefficient. In order to verify this approach, we measured the radon partition coefficient in deionized water in the temperature range of 10-30 °C and compared the values to those calculated from the well-known Weigel equation. The results were within 5 % variance throughout the temperature range. We also applied the approach for measurement of the radon partition coefficient in synthetic saline water (0-75 ppt salinity) as well as tap water. The radon activity of the tap water sample was determined by this method as well as the standard RAD-H 2 O and BigBottle RAD-H 2 O. The results have shown good agreement between this method and the standard methods.

  2. Determination of air-loop volume and radon partition coefficient for measuring radon in water sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kil Yong Lee; Burnett, W.C.

    2013-01-01

    A simple method for the direct determination of the air-loop volume in a RAD7 system as well as the radon partition coefficient was developed allowing for an accurate measurement of the radon activity in any type of water. The air-loop volume may be measured directly using an external radon source and an empty bottle with a precisely measured volume. The partition coefficient and activity of radon in the water sample may then be determined via the RAD7 using the determined air-loop volume. Activity ratios instead of absolute activities were used to measure the air-loop volume and the radon partition coefficient. In order to verify this approach, we measured the radon partition coefficient in deionized water in the temperature range of 10-30 deg C and compared the values to those calculated from the well-known Weigel equation. The results were within 5 % variance throughout the temperature range. We also applied the approach for measurement of the radon partition coefficient in synthetic saline water (0-75 ppt salinity) as well as tap water. The radon activity of the tap water sample was determined by this method as well as the standard RAD-H 2 O and BigBottle RAD-H 2 O. The results have shown good agreement between this method and the standard methods. (author)

  3. Application of the can technique and radon gas analyzer for radon exhalation measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fazal-ur-Rehman E-mail: fazalr@kfupm.edu.sa; Al-Jarallah, M.I.; Musazay, M.S.; Abu-Jarad, F

    2003-12-01

    A passive 'can technique' and an active radon gas analyzer with an emanation container were applied for radon exhalation rate measurements from different construction materials, viz. five marble seven ceramic and 100 granite tiles used in Saudi Arabia. The marble and ceramic tiles did not show detectable radon exhalation using the active radon gas analyzer system. However the granite tiles showed relatively high radon exhalations, indicating a relatively high uranium content. A comparison of the radon exhalation rates measured by the two techniques showed a linear correlation coefficient of 0.57. The radon exhalation rates from the granites varied from 0.02 to 6.58 Bq m{sup -2} h{sup -1} with an average of 1.35{+-}1.40 Bq m{sup -2} h{sup -1}. The geometric mean and the geometric standard deviation of the frequency distribution were found to be 0.80 and 3.1, respectively. The track density found on the nuclear track detectors in the can technique exposed to the granites, having high exhalation rates, varied linearly with exposure time with a linear correlation coefficient of 0.99. This experimental finding agrees with the theoretical prediction. The can technique showed sensitivity to low radon exhalation rates from ceramic, marble and some granite over a period of 2 months, which were not detectable by the active radon gas analyzer system. The reproducibility of data with both measuring techniques was found to be within a 7% deviation.

  4. Radon measurements at the FEMP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomczak, L.M.; Daniels, R.D.; Dennis, C.; Glassey, H.G.; Lohner, W.G.; Ray, E.C.; Selasky, J.A.

    1993-08-01

    Environmental radon monitoring activities at the DOE Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) have been conducted extensively since the early 1980's. Monitoring has been conducted at ambient concentration levels (< 1 pCi/L Rn-222), inside buildings, and at significantly elevated levels (hundreds of thousands pCi/L Rn-222) within the K-65 silo that store concentrated radium bearing wastes. The purpose of this paper/presentation is to present and discuss some of the difficulties encountered/solutions (e.g. reliability, detection limits, affects of environmental factors, data transfer, etc.) that have been discovered while taking measurements using both alpha track-etch passive integrating detectors and alpha scintillation real-time detectors. A short summary and conclusion section is provided following each topic presented

  5. Measurements of radon and chemical elements: Popocatepetl volcano; Mediciones de radon y elementos quimicos: Volcan Popocatepetl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pena, P.; Segovia, N.; Lopez, B.; Reyes, A.V. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Armienta, M.A.; Valdes, C.; Mena, M. [IGFUNAM, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Seidel, J.L.; Monnin, M. [UMR 5569 CNRS Hydrosciences, Montpellier (France)

    2002-07-01

    The Popocatepetl volcano is a higher risk volcano located at 60 Km from Mexico City. Radon measurements on soil in two fixed seasons located in the north slope of volcano were carried out. Moreover the radon content, major chemical elements and tracks in water samples of three springs was studied. The radon of soil was determined with solid detectors of nuclear tracks (DSTN). The radon in subterranean water was evaluated through the liquid scintillation method and it was corroborated with an Alpha Guard equipment. The major chemical elements were determined with conventional chemical methods and the track elements were measured using an Icp-Ms equipment. The radon on soil levels were lower, indicating a moderate diffusion of the gas across the slope of the volcano. The radon in subterranean water shown few changes in relation with the active scene of the volcano. The major chemical elements and tracks showed a stable behavior during the sampling period. (Author)

  6. QA/QC For Radon Concentration Measurement With Charcoal Canister

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pantelic, G.; Zivanovic, M.; Rajacic, M.; Krneta Nikolic, J.; Todorovic, D.

    2015-01-01

    The primary concern of any measuring of radon or radon progeny must be the quality of the results. A good quality assurance program, when properly designed and diligently followed, ensures that laboratory staff will be able to produce the type and quality of measurement results which is needed and expected. Active charcoal detectors are used for testing the concentration of radon in dwellings. The method of measurement is based on radon adsorption on coal and measurement of gamma radiation of radon daughters. Upon closing the detectors, the measurement was carried out after achieving the equilibrium between radon and its daughters (at least 3 hours) using NaI or HPGe detector. Radon concentrations as well as measurement uncertainties were calculated according to US EPA protocol 520/5-87-005. Detectors used for the measurements were calibrated by 226Ra standard of known activity in the same geometry. Standard and background canisters are used for QA and QC, as well as for the calibration of the measurement equipment. Standard canister is a sealed canister with the same matrix and geometry as the canisters used for measurements, but with the known activity of radon. Background canister is a regular radon measurement canister, which has never been exposed. The detector background and detector efficiency are measured to ascertain whether they are within the warning and acceptance limits. (author).

  7. Why measure radon decay products?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rolle, R.; Lettner, H.

    1997-01-01

    Combined development in spectrometry, instrumentation and ventilation modelling with its dependence on short- and long-term weather fluctuations renders possible a new, economical metrology for radon decay products. Short-term measurements can, with few restrictions, be converted to annual exposures of an accuracy superior to that from conventional medium-term Rn gas measurements. (orig.) [de

  8. Radon-222 measurements at Chester

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisenne, I.M.

    1982-01-01

    The Environmental Measurements Laboratory has compiled a five year record of continuous hourly radon-222 measurements at Chester, New Jersey. The data for the 1977-1978, 1978-1979, 1979-1980, and 1980-1981 have been reported previously

  9. Calibration of SSNDT detectors for radon measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Laura C.; Santos, Talita O.; Pinheiro, Rose Mary M.; Rocha, Zildete

    2017-01-01

    The methods and instrumentation used to measure the concentration of radon need to be calibrated to obtain accurate results. The Nuclear Track Detector is considered the main method of analysis of radon research. Thus, the Natural Radioactivity Laboratory of the Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG, Brazil) uses the detector CR-39 (Landauer) to measure the concentration of radon in homes, workplaces, underground mines, soils and in environment. Epidemiological studies reveal the strong relationship between lung cancer and radon exposure. Therefore, it is important to monitor this gas and its progeny in order to assess the radiological risk. The alpha particles emitted by radon and its progeny leave traces on CR-39 due to Coulombian interactions with the atoms of the material. The liquid density of traces is converted to radon concentration by means of a calibration factor obtained in calibrated systems. This work aims to determine the LRN / CDTN calibration factor. To do so, the CR-39 detectors were placed inside the calibration chambers, along with two AlphaGUARD (Saphymo GmbH) detectors and Ra-266 sources with activities of 3,379 kBq or 0.483 kBq, referenced by NIST. From this, six levels of exposure were obtained, which were: 44 kBq.d.m 3 , 4 kBq.d.m 3 , 3 kBq.d.m 3 , 15 kBq.d.m 3 , 30 kBq.d.m 3 , 26 kBq.d.m 3 . The conversion factor between the liquid density of traces and the total exposure time obtained was K = 52.028 ± 0.752 [(trace density.cm -2 ) / (kBq.d.m -3 )]. After the determination of the conversion factor, it was used to measure the concentration of radon in underground mines, obtaining concentration results between 122 ± 24 and 7384 ± 517 kBq.m -3

  10. Result of the intercomparison exercise on radon measuring instruments and radon detectors 'bev- radon ring 2005'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumgartner, A. [Vienna Univ. of Technology, Atominstitut, Wien (Austria); Maringer, F.J.; Michai, P.; Kreuziger, M. [BEV-Federal Office of Metrology and Surveying, Wien (Austria)

    2006-07-01

    In spring 2005 the Federal Office of Metrology and Surveying (B.E.V.) invited all in Austria working radon measuring institutes to an intercomparison exercise at the radon calibration laboratory in the Arsenal. The aim of this intercomparison was on the one hand an objective inquiry and documentation of the current metrological potential on the section of radon measurement in Austria - both quantitative and qualitative- and on the other hand an initiative for the participating laboratories to optimize and improve their applied calibration-, measurement and analyse technique. Ten contacted Austrian radon laboratories were prepared to participate on the radon intercomparison exercise. The intercomparison exercise was carried out from 14. till 29. June at the radon calibration laboratory in the Arsenal of the B.E.V.. As radon emanation source a five stepped arranged, at the Arsenal built radon source was used. The source ( A.D.O.T.T.O. 1 is filled with a certified Ra- 226-standard solution of the Czech Metrological Institute (C.M.I.), Prag. A simple statistic based model was used for the evaluation and assessment of the results from the participants, which consider the statistic nature of the radioactive decay combined uncertainty. Altogether 183 measuring instruments participated the intercomparison exercise. Two reference measuring instruments, 22 active and 159 passive measuring instruments. The active measuring instruments formed 6 types of instruments and as passive radon detectors were 7 different types used from the participants. The positioning of the radon measuring instruments and detectors in the radon calibration laboratory was executed in regard to statistic points of view. From the active measuring instruments 17 could qualify and from the passive methods six from eight participants were in compliance to the given criteria. Radon measurements, which could have financial and economics relating implications (e.g. architectural redevelopment or

  11. Study and development of an airborne instrument for collecting aerosols and for measuring radon 222 by its active deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filippi, Dominique

    2000-01-01

    The study and development of an airborne instrument designed to collect aerosols and measure radon 222 is detailed in this thesis. Having discussed the context of radon and introduced the methods of the measurement of radon 222 by its natural active deposition, the measurement of aerosols with the Sextant Avionique/LSCE dynamic iso-kinetic probe is quantified. These estimations of the efficiency of the probe were obtained during iso-axial simulations of the flow around the probe at different sub-sonic speeds, then by the calculation of trajectories of particles at the entrance to the probe for several debit coefficients. The effect of the attack angle is discussed along with the iso-kinetic criteria of pressure necessary for the functioning of this probe. To conclude this theoretical study, the author has estimated the deposits during aerosol transport in pipes. The instrument once constructed, (dubbed A VIRAD), is then itself presented, along with the technological aspects adopted for its use. The instrument was validated during an experimental aerial study STAAARTE 99. The measures obtained during these flights are presented in the conclusions. (author) [fr

  12. Radon/radon-daughter measurement methods and instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rock, R.L.

    1977-01-01

    Radon-daughter measurement equipment and techniques have been continuously improved over the last 25 years. Improvements have been in the areas of accuracy, time and convenience. We now have miniaturized scalers and detectors available for measuring the alpha particle count rates from aerosol samples collected on filter papers. We also have small lightweight efficient pumps for conveniently collecting samples and we have various counting methods which allow us to choose between making very precise measurements or nominal measurements. Radon-daughter measurement methods used in uranium mines and mills are discussed including a personal radon-daughter-exposure integrating device which can be worn by miners

  13. Radon measurements: the sources of uncertainties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhukovsky, Michael; Onischenko, Alexandra; Bastrikov, Vladislav

    2008-01-01

    uncertainties for retrospective measurements conducted by surface traps techniques can be divided in two groups: errors of surface 210 Pb ( 210 Po) activity measurements and uncertainties of transfer from 210 Pb surface activity in glass objects to average radon concentration during this object exposure. The sources of 210 Pb ( 210 Po) surface activity measurement uncertainties are: errors in the calibration of energy-angle dependence of alpha-particles registration efficiency; random Poisson errors during measurements, the influence of background alpha radiation from the glass; unknown U-Ra-Th activity ratio in the glass, nonuniform 210 Po distribution on the surface of glass object. Uncertainty factors of Jacobi model for connection of 210 Pb surface activity and average radon concentration are: unknown aerosol concentration, ventilation rate, surface/volume ratio in investigated room, long term radon variations, aerosol deposition rates and errors in the age estimation of glass object. It is shown that total measurement error of surface trap retrospective technique can be decreased to 35%. The analysis of errors for grab sampling measurements, charcoal canisters and track detectors are presented in the full paper

  14. Etched track radiometers in radon measurements: a review

    CERN Document Server

    Nikolaev, V A

    1999-01-01

    Passive radon radiometers, based on alpha particle etched track detectors, are very attractive for the assessment of radon exposure. The present review considers various devices used for measurement of the volume activity of radon isotopes and their daughters and determination of equilibrium coefficients. Such devices can be classified into 8 groups: (i) open or 'bare' detectors, (ii) open chambers, (iii) sup 2 sup 2 sup 2 Rn chambers with an inlet filter, (iv) advanced sup 2 sup 2 sup 2 Rn radiometers, (v) multipurpose radiometers, (vi) radiometers based on a combination of etched track detectors and an electrostatic field, (vii) radiometers based on etched track detectors and activated charcoal and (viii) devices for the measurement of radon isotopes and/or radon daughters by means of track parameter measurements. Some of them such as the open detector and the chamber with an inlet filter have a variety of modifications and are applied widely both in geophysical research and radon dosimetric surveys. At the...

  15. An Alpha spectrometer for measuring radon daughter individual activity concentration; Spettrometro Alfa per la misura delle concentrazioni individuali in attivita' della progenie del radon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berico, M.; Formignani, M. [ENEA, Div. Protezione dell' Uomo e degli Ecosistemi, Centro Ricerche E. Clementel, Bologna (Italy); Mariotti, F. [Bologna Univ., Bologna (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica

    2001-07-01

    In the frame of the program of the Institute for Radiation Protection of ENEA, related to the evaluation of dose from radon and thoron progeny, an alpha spectrometer for the continuous air monitoring (CAM type) of radon and thoron has been realized. The constructive characteristics of the device are here presented together with energy and efficiency calibration. The device allows, by means of a screen type diffusion battery and a filter, to determinate the single radioactivity of each radionuclide of the progeny selecting them in relation to their diffusive behaviour (dichotomous particle size selection). The three-count filter method has been employed to measure the concentrations of {sup 218}Po, {sup 214}Pb and {sup 214}Bi in air. Radon and thoron effective doses using a dosimetric, instead of an epidemiologic approach, will be then evaluated. [Italian] Presso l'Istituto per la Radioprotezione, nell'ambito del programma di valutazione di dose da radon e' stato progettato e realizzato uno spettrometro alfa per il monitoraggio continuo in aria (CAM) della progenie del radon e del toron. Le caratteristiche costruttive dello strumento permettono, tramite l'utilizzo di batterie a diffusione a reti, di determinare l'attivita' individuale della progenie per diverse dimensioni granulometriche in particolare per la frazione attaccata e non al particolato amosferico con un taglio granulometrico di qualche nanometro. E' stato inoltre applicato un metodo spettrometrico a tre conteggi per il calcolo delle concentrazioni individuali della progenie del radon, {sup 218}Po, {sup 214}Pb and {sup 214}Bi, effettuando un conteggio alfa di {sup 218}Po e due conteggi alfa di {sup 214}Po. Tale informazione consentira' una valutazione della dose di radon utilizzando il modello dosimetrico in alternativa a quello epidemiologico.

  16. Towards the use of small amounts of activated charcoal along with well-type NaI(Tl) detector for indoor radon measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Azmi, D.

    2006-01-01

    The feasibility of using small quantities of activated charcoal and a 7.6 cm x 7.6 cm NaI(Tl) well-type detector was investigated for indoor radon measurements. Vials, filled with 10 g of charcoal, were exposed for different indoor radon concentration levels typical of Kuwait dwellings. After exposure, the vials were sealed and kept for 3 h to allow radon to come into radioactive equilibrium with its progenies and were then analysed by gamma-ray spectrometry using the well-type NaI(Tl) detector. The variation of radon absorption by the vials filled with charcoal with exposure time was also studied. A comparative study of the present technique with the standard technique of using 70 g charcoal canisters and flat NaI detector was also performed. After establishing the suitability of the technique, the charcoal vials were then used to investigate the effect of air-ventilation on the concentration levels of the indoor radon. Results show that there is a reduction in the radon concentration level (up to 25%) when the air-ventilation system was switched on. The paper presents the results of the study on the feasibility of combining small amounts of activated charcoal with a well-type NaI(Tl) detector in the measurement of indoor radon concentrations. (authors)

  17. Comparing summer and winter indoor radon and radon daughters activity in Campinas, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guedes, O.S.; Hadler, N.J.C.; Iunes, P.J.; Neman, R.S.; Souza, W.F.; Tello, S.C.A.; Paulo, S.R.

    2002-01-01

    We developed a technique - based on alpha particle track detection using CR-39 - where the activity originated from indoor radon can be potentially separated into three fraction: (i) radon in the air, (ii) radon daughters (RD), 218 Po and 214 Po, in the air and (iii) RD plated-out on the detector surface during exposure. In this work only a partial separation was carried out, then our results are limited to radon plus RD in the air and RD attached to detector surface. These activities can be separated if size and gray level of the round tracks are measured using an automatic optical microscopy system.Our group carried out an indoor radon and radon daughters (RD) survey in Campinas made up by a summer (November, 96 to May, 97) and a winter (May, 97 to November, 97) exposure, where the detectors were placed in the same rooms of the same dwellings (approximately 100) in both cases. Comparing winter and summer alpha activity for the detectors analyzed up to now, approximately 45 dwellings, we observed that: i) it seems that the source of radon is the material (brick and concrete mainly) making up walls, floor and ceiling of the dwellings, ii) there is no clear relationship between intensity of aeration and the activities measured in this work, and iii) the average ratio between winter and summer activity in the air (radon plus RD) is approximately equal to similar ratios observed in other countries, but for radon only. (author)

  18. Thoron and radon measurements in houses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauthier, C.

    1980-01-01

    Studies were made to determine what effect thoron daughters have on radon working level measurements in occupied houses at Elliot Lake. The decay of radon daughters is faster than that of thoron daughters. Six hours after sampling radon daughters are no longer present on the filter, and essentially all alpha activity is due to thoron C in transient equilibrium with thoron B. The concentrations can be extrapolated back to the time of the Kuznetz count, and the WL overestimation due to the presence of thoron daughters calculated. It was found using this method that in 70 percent of the samples the thoron contribution was no more than one mWL equivalent, less than the statistical error in the estimation of working levels. Only in buildings with very low ventilation rates and large areas of exposed concrete may corrections for the presence of thoron be necessary

  19. Efficient measurement of radon daughters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rolle, R.

    1992-01-01

    In environmental control there is an increasing need for efficient measurement of radon and thoron daughters in air. Measuring instruments should be rugged and portable for field use, while also permitting unattended operation for several days. Simple operating procedures should permit evaluation of rapidly changing concentrations over extended periods. These requirements demand careful balance in the design of hardware and measuring procedures. The design principles for a continuous flow-through spectrometer, that has been developed for precision sequential measurement of radon and thoron daughters, are described. Because of the high precision of measurement, this type of instrument should find application in environments from technologically enhanced natural radiation to the very lowest natural background situations. (author)

  20. Radon measurements concerning engineering-geological problems in lignite mining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinicke, J

    1986-07-01

    Radon measurements have been carried out by the aid of solid-state track detectors at the highwall of a lignite mine in order to forecast the eventual course of a landslide. The measured radon distributions and their changes as a function of time indicated that the slope was geodynamically active, but it was not possible to forecast the rate of sliding.

  1. Proceedings of radon and radon progeny measurements in Australia symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akber, R.A.; Harris, F.

    1994-01-01

    This publication contain papers presented at a symposium on radon and radon progeny measurements in Australia, held in Canberra on 18 February 1994. The emphasis was on results of measurements in different exposure situations, however information on methodology and techniques was also included. The scope of the symposium expanded through participation by scientists from China, French Polynesia and New Zealand. A list of participants and their organizations is included at the end of the proceedings. refs., tabs., figs

  2. Indoor radon measurements in Adelaide, South Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paix, D.

    1989-01-01

    In 1986 a study of radon levels in homes in Melbourne was made, using activated charcoal to adsorb the gas from indoor air. Cups containing 25g of activated charcoal were exposed for periods of nominally 7 days. The cups were sealed and the accumulated activity was measured by gamma counting. Cup activity was related to ambient radon concentration by calibrations done in the Australian Radiation Laboratory's radon reference chamber. This work was continued in Adelaide, South Australia (S.A.) between July and November 1986 using the same methods. Cups were exposed in their homes by 213 volunteers from the staff of the S.A. Institute of Technology and the S.A. Health Commission. The median concentration of radon in air was 10 Bq/m 3 , with 90% of values below 35 Bq/m 3 , and 100% below 75 Bq/m 3 . The lower bound of the distribution is poorly defined because of inadequate counting statistics. 4 refs., 6 figs

  3. Ethanol as radon storage: applications for measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winter, I.; Philipsborn, H. von

    1997-01-01

    Ethanol as Radon Storage: Applications for Measurement Ethanol has a solubility for radon of 6 Bq/l per kBq/m 3 air, 24 times higher than water. On filtration of ethanol, radon decay products are completely adsorbed on glass fiber filters, as previously reported for water. Hence: 1. A new simple method for measuring radon in soil air, without expensive equipment. 2. The production of mailable radon calibration sources ('radonol') with 50-100 kBq/l in PET-bottles with 3.8 days half-life, using uraniferous rocks as primary source. (orig.) [de

  4. Measurements of radon and chemical elements: Popocatepetl volcano

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pena, P.; Segovia, N.; Lopez, B.; Reyes, A.V.; Armienta, M.A.; Valdes, C.; Mena, M.; Seidel, J.L.; Monnin, M.

    2002-01-01

    The Popocatepetl volcano is a higher risk volcano located at 60 Km from Mexico City. Radon measurements on soil in two fixed seasons located in the north slope of volcano were carried out. Moreover the radon content, major chemical elements and tracks in water samples of three springs was studied. The radon of soil was determined with solid detectors of nuclear tracks (DSTN). The radon in subterranean water was evaluated through the liquid scintillation method and it was corroborated with an Alpha Guard equipment. The major chemical elements were determined with conventional chemical methods and the track elements were measured using an Icp-Ms equipment. The radon on soil levels were lower, indicating a moderate diffusion of the gas across the slope of the volcano. The radon in subterranean water shown few changes in relation with the active scene of the volcano. The major chemical elements and tracks showed a stable behavior during the sampling period. (Author)

  5. Comparison of techniques active and passive in measurement of radon concentration ("2"2"2Ra) in the air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Evaldo Paulo de

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to perform a study comparing radon concentration measurements between two techniques used to measure radon gas in the air: one using LEXAN polycarbonate plastic detectors and the other the continuous monitor in AlphaGUARD passive mode. The concentrations of radon gas within radon emanation chambers were measured using calibrated / traceable sources generating "2"2"2Rn through "2"2"6Ra. In calibration the 'calibration factor' or 'sensitivity' was determined for the LEXAN plastic detector. The calibration work of the dosimeters was carried out at the Radon Laboratory of the Environmental Analysis Division - DIRAD IRD/CNEN and at the Natural Radioactivity Laboratory (LRN) of the Center for the Development of Nuclear Technology (CDTN/CNEN). The 'calibration factor' or 'sensitivity' was found to be 32.34 (traits.cm"-"2)/(kBq.d.m"-"3). This factor was used to determine the radon concentration measured by the LEXAN plastic detectors. Also in the calibration, the efficiencies for LEXAN (94.1% ± 9.7%) and AlphaGUARD (92.5% ± 7.2%) were determined. The statistical analysis used showed good parity in the results of the measurements. It was concluded that the results were satisfactory and will serve as a good reference for studies related to the radon air meters used in this work. (author)

  6. Integral measurement system for radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia H, J.M.; Pena E, R.

    1996-01-01

    The Integral measurement system for Radon is an equipment to detect, counting and storage data of alpha particles produced by Radon 222 which is emanated through the terrestrial peel surface. This equipment was designed in the Special Designs Department of the National Institute of Nuclear Research. It supplies information about the behavior at long time (41 days) on each type of alpha radiation that is present into the environment as well as into the terrestrial peel. The program is formed by an User program, where it is possible to determine the operation parameters of a portable probe that contains, a semiconductor detector, a microprocessor as a control central unit, a real time clock and calendar to determine the occurred events chronology, a non-volatile memory device for storage the acquired data and an interface to establish the serial communications with other personal computers. (Author)

  7. New apparatus for measuring radon adsorption on solid adsorbents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, N.M.; Hines, A.L.; Ghosh, T.K.; Loyalka, S.K.; Ketring, A.R.

    1991-01-01

    A new experimental system was designed to measure radon uptake by solid adsorbents from air or other carrier gases/vapors. The total amount of radon adsorbed corresponding to a specific gas-phase concentration was determined by simultaneously measuring the solid-phase and gas-phase concentrations. The system was used to measure radon adsorption isotherms on BPL activated carbon at 288, 298, and 308 K and on silica gel and molecular sieve 13X at 298 K. The isotherms were of type III according to Brunauer's classification. The heat of adsorption data indicated that the BPL activated carbon provided a heterogeneous surface for radon adsorption. The equilibrium data were correlated by the Freundlich equation. In this paper the possible adsorption mechanism and the use of the adsorption isotherms to measure indoor radon concentrations are discussed

  8. Adsorption of radon and water vapor on commercial activated carbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, N.M.; Ghosh, T.K.; Hines, A.L.; Loyalka, S.K.

    1995-01-01

    Equilibrium adsorption isotherms are reported for radon and water vapor on two commercial activated carbons: coconut shell Type PCB and hardwood Type BD. The isotherms of the water vapor were measured gravimetrically at 298 K. The isotherms of radon from dry nitrogen were obtained at 293, 298, and 308 K while the data for the mixture of radon and water vapor were measured at 298 K. The concentrations of radon in the gas and solid phases were measured simultaneously, once the adsorption equilibrium and the radioactive equilibrium between the radon and its daughter products were established. The shape of the isotherms was of Type III for the radon and Type V for the water vapor, according to Brunauer's classification. The adsorption mechanism was similar for both the radon and the water vapor, being physical adsorption on the macropore surface area in the low pressure region and micropore filling near saturation pressure. The uptake capacity of radon decreased both with increasing temperature and relative humidity. The heat of adsorption data indicated that the PCB- and the BD-activated carbons provided a heterogeneous surface for radon adsorption. The equilibrium data for radon were correlated with a modified Freundlich equation

  9. Application of CR-39 to radon measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyake, Hiroshi

    1988-01-01

    CR-39, an ally diglycol carbonate, has recently come into wider use as material for solid-state track detector. Etching with NaOH or KOH solution allow CR-39 to develop extremely clear etch pits attributed to alpha rays. The most widely used method for measuring radon concentration employs a plastic cup with a solid-state track detector mounted at its bottom to detect alpha rays resulting from radon or its daughters that disintegrate within or on the wall of the cup. Simple in mechanism and low in cost, this method is suitable for such a case where the radon concentration distribution over a wide area has to be measured by using a large number of devices. The concentration of radon alone can be measured with the aid of a filter attached to the mouth of the cup to remove the daughters of radon and thoron. The simplest and most effective way of improving the sensitivity of a solid-state track detector for radon concentration measurement is to electrostatically collect daughters resulting from decay of radon onto the surface of the detector. Another method widely used to determine the radon concentration is to measure the concentration of the radon daughters instead of direct measurement of the concentration of radon itself. (Nogami, K.)

  10. Improved thomas formula for radon measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji Changsong

    1991-06-01

    The FT 648 type portable absolute radon meter has been developed and the designing principle of this instrument is introduced. The absolute radon meter differs from relative radon meter. By using structure parameters, operating parameters and readout of this instrument, the radon content of measured gas is obtained directly without calibration in advance. Normally, the calibration is done by a standard radioactive gaseous source of which the radon concentration is known. The systematic error is removed by adding filter-efficiency Σ, α self-absorption correction β, energy spectrum correction S, geometric factor Ω of probe and gravity dropping correction factor G to the Thomas formula for radon measurement of two-filter method. The atmosphere radon content, which is given in hour-average, in Beijing area was measured by FT 648 type absolute radon meter. The measurement lasted continuously for several days and nights and a 'saddle shape' of radon content-time curve was observed. The day's average radon content was 8.5 Bq·m -3

  11. Intercomparison of active and passive instruments for radon and radon progeny in North America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, A.C.; Tu, Keng-Wu; Knutson, E.O.

    1995-02-01

    An intercomparison exercise for radon and radon progeny instruments and methods was held at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) from April 22--May 2, 1994. The exercise was conducted in the new EML radon test and calibration facility in which conditions of exposure are very well controlled. The detection systems of the intercompared instruments consisted of. (1) pulse ionization chambers, (2) electret ionization chambers, (3) scintillation detectors, (4) alpha particle spectrometers with silicon diodes, surface barrier or diffused junction detectors, (5) registration of nuclear tracks in solid-state materials, and (6) activated carbon collectors counted by gamma-ray spectrometry or by alpha- and beta-liquid scintillation counting. 23 private firms, government laboratories and universities participated with a 165 passive integrating devices consisting of: Activated carbon collectors, nuclear alpha track detectors and electret ionization chambers, and 11 active and passive continuous radon monitors. Five portable integrating and continuous instruments were intercompared for radon progeny. Forty grab samples for radon progeny were taken by five groups that participated in person to test and evaluate their primary instruments and methods that measure individual radon progeny and the potential alpha energy concentration (PAEC) in indoor air. Results indicate that more than 80% of the measurements for radon performed with a variety of instruments, are within ±10% of actual value. The majority of the instruments that measure individual radon progeny and the PAEC gave results that are in good agreement with the EML reference value. Radon progeny measurements made with continuous and integrating instruments are satisfactory with room for improvement

  12. Measurement of airborne concentrations of radon-220 daughter products by alpha-particle spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerr, G.D.; Ryan, M.T.; Perdue, P.T.

    1978-01-01

    The decay of naturally occurring uranium-238 and thorium-232 produces radon-222 and radon-220 isotopes which can escape into the atmosphere. If these radon gases become concentrated in air, their daughter products may present an inhalation hazard to man. The airborne concentrations of radon-222 can usually be measured very accurately in the presence of normal airborne concentrations of radon-220 and its daughters. In contrast, the measurements of the airborne concentrations of radon-220 daughters are usually complicated by the presence of radon-222 and its daughters even at normally occurring airborne concentrations. The complications involved in these measurements can be overcome in most situations by using an alpha particle spectrometer to distinguish the activity of radon-222 daughters from that due to radon-220 daughters collected on a filter. A practical spectrometer for field measurements of alpha particle activity on a filter is discussed

  13. The 2010 calibration campaign for radon gas measuring instruments at PSI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butterweck, G.; Schuler, Ch.; Mayer, S.

    2011-01-01

    Twenty radon measurement services or the respective analytical laboratories participated in the 2010 Radon Intercomparison Exercise performed at the Reference Laboratory for Radon Gas Activity Concentration Measurements at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) from August 27 th to August 31 st , 2010 on behalf of the Swiss Federal Office of Public Health (FOPH). Twelve of these laboratories were approved by the FOPH and their participation in the intercomparison exercise was a requirement to warrant quality of measurement. Radon gas dosemeters (track-etch, electronic and electret) and instruments (ionisation chambers) were exposed in the PSI Radon Chamber in a reference atmosphere with an average radon gas concentration of 595 Bq m -3 leading to a radon gas exposure of 57 kBq h m -3 . The exposure of 57 kBq h m -3 was close to the lower value of the measuring range defined in the Radon Measurement Ordinance ('Radon-Messmittelverordnung'). (authors)

  14. Intercomparison 2003 for Radon measurement services at PSI

    CERN Document Server

    Butterweck, G

    2003-01-01

    Twelve radon measurement services participated in the 2003 Radon Intercomparison Exercise performed at the Reference Laboratory for Radon Gas Activity Concentration Measurements at Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) during March 13th to 24th, 2003. Ten of these laboratories were approved by the Swiss Federal Office of Public Health and their participation in the intercomparison exercise was a requirement to warrant quality of measurement. Radon gas detectors (etched-track and electret ionisation chambers) and instruments (ionisation chambers and electrostatic precipitation) were exposed in the PSI Radon Chamber in a reference atmosphere with an average radon gas concentration of 1950 Bqm sup - sup 3 leading to a radon gas exposure of 517 kBqhm sup - sup 3. Additional five electret-detectors of an approved measuring service were purchased by the Swiss Federal Office of Public Health for a spot check. Two of these were exposed as described above, two had an exposure of 247 kBqhm sup - sup 3 at an average radon concen...

  15. Measure of exposure of short-lived radon products using an alpha spectrometer for measuring indoor aerosol activity concentration and dose evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berico, M.; Castellani, C. M.; Formignani, M.; Mariotti, F.

    2001-01-01

    A new italian law introduces the regulation of occupational exposure to radon. To evaluate the inhalation of radon daughters by the workers a sampling device has been assembled with the aim of evaluation of unattached and aerosol attached radon daughters' fractions. The instrument, based on selection of the aerosuspended particles by means of a wire screen type battery and subsequent collection on a total filter, allows to describe the behaviour of both fractions using defined temporal pattern of collecting particles and counting them by alpha spectroscopy. A measurement campaign to test the radon daughter dichotomous spectrometer in comparison with a commercial Radon Working Level meter, has been performed in a research laboratory of central Italy affected by high radon concentrations. The radon concentration during the measurement campaign has been also measured. The equilibrium factor F e q ad the attachment factor fp have been evaluated during 3 days campaign. Using the measured mean parameters (radon concentration, F e q, f p ) the dose evaluation for workers using dosimetric approach has been performed. A comparison between the epidemiologic approach, based on the radon concentration, and dosimetric approach is also presented [it

  16. Operating instructions for LBL radon measurement facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingersoll, J.G.

    1980-06-01

    This manual is intended for users of the radon-measuring facilities of the Radon Project of the Building Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality Program at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The manual comprises three parts. Part 1 sets out the steps involved in collecting, transferring, and counting radon. Part 2 describes the calibration of the transfer system and of the Lucas cells in the counting system. Part 3 outlines the maintenance procedures for the facility

  17. Determination of radon daughter activities of different aerosol fractions by gross-α and gross-β measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katona, T.; Kanyar, B.; Jobbagy, V.; Kavasi, N.; Molnar, A.; Imre, K.

    2004-01-01

    The aim was to determine the radioactivities of the radon progenies ( 218 Po, 214 Pb, 214 Bi and 214 Po) attached to the carrier aerosol particles with respect to the size distribution in order to improve the assessment of the inhalation dose. We derived the radionuclide-specific activity concentrations from gross alpha and gross beta measurements provided during 2 hours after sampling and model calculations including parameter estimation. For the aerosol sampling we used an electrical low pressure impactor, which is able to collect aerosol particles in 12 different diameter ranges. In our test investigations the aerosol particles were collected from a closed chamber in a common laboratory building. The chamber contained a relatively high radon concentration (60-90 kBq/m 3 ) in equilibrium with the short lived daughters generated previously without any additional aerosol sources. For the nuclear measurements of the aerosol samples ZnS/plastic sandwich detectors have been used. The time series data of gross alpha and gross beta activities were fitted simultaneously and the initial activities of the daughters were estimated. According to the results from two different fractions (0.06 and 0.7 μm) just followed the end of sampling they contain a higher 218 Po activity than the 214 Pb and 214 Bi ones. The preliminary assessments for the special air conditions show that the 214 Pb-to- 218 Po activity ratios are higher for the small aerosol particles than for the larger ones. The estimated errors of the initial activities were near to 50% in a large part of cases. (author)

  18. Indoor radon measurements in dwellings of Garhwal Himalaya, Northern India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramola, R.C.

    1996-01-01

    Measurement of indoor radon and daughters concentration were performed in several houses in Garhwal Himalaya during 1993-95 with solid state nuclear track detector films (LR-115 Type II). The detector films were exposed for a period of three month to one year. The films basically measured total airborne alpha activity but may be calibrated in unite of EEC RN (equilibrium equivalent concentration of radon with equilibrium factor F=0.45) in an environment with known radon and daughters concentrations. A numbers of dwelling in the area exhibited radon daughters concentrations (EEC RN ) exceeding the recommended level. The abnormal values are due to typical house construction (mud house) in the area. The houses are constructed with soil and local stone with a thin paste of mud. Behaviour and abnormality of radon in mud houses are discussed in details the corresponding annual effective dose has been calculated. (author)

  19. Radon measurements in 130 schools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peake, R.T.; Schmidt, A.; MacWaters, J.T.; Chmelynski, H.

    1990-01-01

    During the winter of 1989, Rn screening measurements were made in 130 schools distributed across the United States. The primary purpose of the paper is to identify schools suitable for a year-long follow-up study, the results of which will be used to update EPA's guidance for Rn testing in schools. The 130 schools were selected nonrandomly using school characteristics and accessibility in areas where there were known or suspected Rn problems in homes. Levels found in this screening study may indicate the potential for Rn problems in US schools. Over half of the 130 schools tested had at least one radon measurement ≥4 pCi/L, and nearly 20% of the 3028 rooms measured ≥4 pCi/L. The number of rooms ≥4 pCi/L is often three rooms or less. However, schools with more than five rooms ≥4 pCi/L are common in some areas. The data include schools that could be typical of much of the US school population as well as schools which exhibit extreme radon problems, such as those tested in Nashville, TN and Spokane, WA

  20. Measurement Techniques for Radon in Mines, Dwellings and the Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snihs, J.O.

    1983-06-01

    Definitions and units appropriate for radon and radon daughters are given. The principle methods of detection are ionization chamber, scintillation technique, nuclear track detector, thermoluminescent discs and alpha spectrometry. The activity concentration is determined by grab sampling and subsequent measurement, frequent or continuous grab sampling and measurement and continuous sampling and long time integrated measurement. Sampling and measurement strategies for mines, dwellings and the environment are discussed. (author)

  1. Ventilation measurements as an adjunct to radon measurements in buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knutson, E.O.; Franklin, H.

    1977-01-01

    The concentration of radon in a building is a function of the radon sources within the building and of the building's ventilation characteristics. To complement its radon measurement program, HASL is currently assessing apparatus and procedures for measuring building ventilation. Results are reported from ventilation measurements made in the laboratory and in a residential building

  2. Radon measurements in mines and dwellings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urban, M.

    1985-01-01

    Radon measurements using a time integrating passive radon dosemeter (MAKROFOL track etch detector) have been performed in Brazilian and German mines and dwellings. The present state of the measurement technique is summarized. The results are presented together with exposure calculations and dose estimations for occupational exposure in open pit and underground mines and for the general public in houses. (orig./HP) [de

  3. Indoor radon measurements in Athens, Greece

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proukakis, C.; Molfetas, M.; Ntalles, K.; Georgiou, E.; Serefoglou, A.

    1987-01-01

    A pilot study was carried out in order to measure air concentrations of radon 222 and 220 isotopes in Athenian houses, as a first step of a national survey in Greece. In this paper the authors deal with radon concentration in air and water and will rely on measurements conducted in Greece. (author)

  4. Radon measurements in some areas in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamid Khan, M.A.; Chowdhury, M.S.

    2008-01-01

    A survey of radon level measurements using CR-39 has been carried out in some of urban and rural residential areas and one gas explosion area in Bangladesh. The lowest level of radon concentration was found to be 49Bqm -3 inside a hospital in Cox's Bazar district and the highest level was found to be 835Bqm -3 inside a mud-made old residential house in Sylhet city. It was observed that old residential houses were found to have higher levels of radon concentrations compared to newly built houses. The radon level at the gas explosion area at Magurchara in Moulvibazar district was found to be 408±98Bqm -3

  5. Radon diagnostics and tracer gas measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jilek, K.; Brabec, M.

    2004-01-01

    An outline is presented of the tracer gas technique, which is used for continuous measurements of air ventilation rate (generally time-varying) and for simultaneous estimation of air ventilation rate and radon entry rate, and some of its limitations are discussed. The performance of this technique in the calculation of the air ventilation rate is demonstrated on real data from routine measurements. The potential for air ventilation rate estimation based on radon measurements only is discussed. A practical application is described of the tracer gas technique to a simultaneous estimation of the air ventilation rate and radon entry rate in a real house where the effectiveness of radon remedy was tested. The following main advantages of the CO tracer gas techniques are stressed: (i) The averaging method continuous determination of the ventilation rate with good accuracy (≤ 20 %). (ii) The newly presented and verified method based on simultaneous measurements of radon concentration and CO gas concentration enables separate continuous measurements of the radon entry rate and ventilation rate. The results of comparative measurements performed with the aim to estimate the inaccuracy in determination of radon entry rate showed acceptable and good agreement up to approximately 10 %. The results of comparative measurements performed with the aim to estimate the mutual commensuration of the method to the determination of the ventilation rate confirmed the expected unreliability the two parametric non-linear regression method, which is the most frequently used method in radon diagnostic in the Czech Republic

  6. Measurement of radon permeability through polyethylene membrane using scintillation detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashry, A.H.; Abou-Leila, M. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Education, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt); Abdalla, A.M., E-mail: aymanabdalla62@hotmail.co [Department of Physics, Faculty of Education, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt); Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences and Arts, Najran University, Najran, P.O. Box. 11001 (Saudi Arabia); Advanced Materials and Nano-Engineering Laboratory (AMNEL), Centre for Advanced Materials and Nano-Engineering (CAMNE), Najran University, Najran, P.O. Box. 11001 (Saudi Arabia)

    2011-01-15

    The permeability of Radon 222 through polyethylene membranes has been studied using activated charcoal technique. The permeability constant of Radon 222 through low-density polyethylene, linear low-density Polyethylene and high density polyethylene samples has been measured. There is a considerable agreement between the values obtained by our method and the method suggested by W. Arafa [2002. Permeability of radon 222 through some materials. Radiat. Meas. 35, 207-211], and SSNTD technique suggested by A. Hafez and G. Somogyi [1986. Determination of radon and thoron permeability through some plastics by track technique. Int. J. Radiat. Appl. Instrum. Nucl. Track Radiat. Meas. 12 (1-6), 697-700]. In this work Radon permeability through different polyethylene membranes has been measured using three different methods, i.e. solid state nuclear track technique, W. Arafa [2002. Permeability of radon 222 through some materials. Radiat. Meas. 35, 207-211]method and our proposed method. In addition to this, in this study, the diffusion coefficient of radon in charcoal as well as solubility of Radon in polyethylene membrane has been taken into consideration.

  7. Measurement of radon permeability through polyethylene membrane using scintillation detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashry, A.H.; Abou-Leila, M.; Abdalla, A.M.

    2011-01-01

    The permeability of Radon 222 through polyethylene membranes has been studied using activated charcoal technique. The permeability constant of Radon 222 through low-density polyethylene, linear low-density Polyethylene and high density polyethylene samples has been measured. There is a considerable agreement between the values obtained by our method and the method suggested by W. Arafa [2002. Permeability of radon 222 through some materials. Radiat. Meas. 35, 207-211], and SSNTD technique suggested by A. Hafez and G. Somogyi [1986. Determination of radon and thoron permeability through some plastics by track technique. Int. J. Radiat. Appl. Instrum. Nucl. Track Radiat. Meas. 12 (1-6), 697-700]. In this work Radon permeability through different polyethylene membranes has been measured using three different methods, i.e. solid state nuclear track technique, W. Arafa [2002. Permeability of radon 222 through some materials. Radiat. Meas. 35, 207-211] method and our proposed method. In addition to this, in this study, the diffusion coefficient of radon in charcoal as well as solubility of Radon in polyethylene membrane has been taken into consideration.

  8. Improved radon-flux-measurement system for uranium-tailings pile measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, H.D.

    1981-10-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is developing cover technology for uranium mill tailings that will inhibit the diffusion of radon to the atmosphere. As part of this cover program, an improved radon flux measurement system has been developed. The radon measurement system is a recirculating, pressure-balanced, flow-through system that uses activated carbon at ambient temperatures to collect the radon. With the system, an area of 0.93 m 2 is sampled for periods ranging from 1 to 12 h. The activated carbon is removed from the radon trap and the collected radon is determined by counting the 214 Bi daughter product. Development of the system included studies to determine the efficiency of activated carbon, relative calibration measurements and field measurements made during 1980 at the inactive tailings pile in Grand Junction, Colorado. Results of these studies are presented

  9. A brief overview on radon measurements in drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobbágy, Viktor; Altzitzoglou, Timotheos; Malo, Petya; Tanner, Vesa; Hult, Mikael

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to present information about currently used standard and routine methods for radon analysis in drinking waters. An overview is given about the current situation and the performance of different measurement methods based on literature data. The following parameters are compared and discussed: initial sample volume and sample preparation, detection systems, minimum detectable activity, counting efficiency, interferences, measurement uncertainty, sample capacity and overall turnaround time. Moreover, the parametric levels for radon in drinking water from the different legislations and directives/guidelines on radon are presented. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Order of the 15 July 2003 relative to accreditation conditions of organisms empowered to measure the radon volume activity in areas open to the public

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-08-01

    This order defines the compulsory conditions for organisms to be empowered to measure the radon volume activity in areas open to the public. It concerns general information, the internal organization, information relative to the equipment and the personnel competence. (A.L.B.)

  11. Radon emanation in tectonically active areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, C.Y.

    1980-01-01

    Subsurface radon emanation has been continuously monitored for up to three years by the Track Etch method in shallow dry holes at more than 60 sites along several tectonic faults in central California and at 9 sites near the Kilauea volcano in Hawaii. The measured emanation in these tectonically active areas shows large long-term variations that may be related mainly to crustal strain changes

  12. Radon measurements in underground and ground constructions in Tashkent city

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimov, V.A.; Yafasov, A.Y.; Vasidov, A.; En, Z.; Tillaev, T.; Tsipin, V.Z.

    2002-01-01

    More than half of the dose of the natural radioactivity received by population is related to radon and its progeny. Investigations of scientists all over the world have shown that excessive radon and its progeny exposure dose is associated with a risk of lung cancer. Short-lived radon daughters (Po-218 and Po-214) are considered to be of the most dangers. At a relaxation process resulting from an earthquake, the radon gas can release from the accumulators and get indoors, that enhances greatly the radon level there. According to seismologists data, as a result of the strong Tashkent earthquake in 1966, extensive breaks and faults have been formed along the city and its neighborhoods. The aim of our work was evaluation of radon concentration level and its variation in Tashkent subway stations and related underground offices and also in apartments of multi story buildings and detached houses. The measurements were conducted by two different techniques-with ionization chamber radiometer 'Alpha GUARD' and with solid state nuclear track detectors. The Alpha GUARD radiometer operates either in the mode of passive sampling, or by pumping air through the ionization camera being of 0.6 l in volume. The radiometer is capable of measuring a volumetric activity of radon-222 in air (Bq/m3), and it is equipped with the devices that measure some environmental parameters such as temperature, relative humidity and air pressure. The range of V A of 222 Rn in air the device is able to measure is 10 to 2x10 6 Bq/m 3 , sensitivity is 1 pulse/min for 20 Bq/m 3 , and its self-background is less than 1 Bq/m 3 . The radon measurements in Tashkent subway stations and underground offices have shown that daily mean radon values were in the range of 14-65 Bq/m 3 , except for the Pushkin Station, where the daily mean V A was 137 Bq/m3. Such a high radon level is connected with availability near the station of one of the numerous faults and fractures of the terrestrial crust responsible for the

  13. Sources and protective measures of indoor radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gou Quanlu; Wang Hengde

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents the relative contribution to indoor radon 222 Rn of various sources in twenty three rooms of three kinds in Taiyuan area. The results show that the major sources in this area are radon emanation from surfaces of soil and building materials and that from outdoor air, while the contribution of water and gas consumed in the rooms is less important. These results suggest a basis for taking suitable protective measures against indoor radon. Some materials are also recommended which are effective in restraining radon exhalation and low in price, by testing more than ten kinds of materials and comparing them using cost-effectiveness analysis technique, such as painting materials, polyvinyl alcohol (CH 2 :CHOH)n, etc. Their sealing effects on radon exhalation were examined with home-made REM-89 Radon Exhalation Monitor. The deposition effects of negative ion generator and humidifier on radon progeny were also tested. The maximum deposition may reach 70-90%, which proves they are also effective and economical in radon protection. (2 tabs., 3 figs.)

  14. Measurement of the concentration of radon in the air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aten, J.B.Th.; Bierhuizen, H.W.J.; Hoek, L.P. van; Ros, D.; Weber, J.

    1975-01-01

    A simple transportable air monitoring apparatus was developed for controlling the radon contamination of air in laboratory rooms. It is not highly accurate but is sufficient to register the order of magnitude of the radon concentration. Air is pumped through a filter for one or two hours and an alpha decay curve of the dust on the filter is determined. Scintillation counting forty minutes after sampling indicates the radon activity. The calibration method of measuring the equilibrium of daughter product concentrations is discussed extensively

  15. Measurement of radon concentration in air employing Lucas chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machaj, B.

    1997-01-01

    The results of investigations aimed to determine the main features of radon concentration gauge in air, employing 0.17 L Lucas chamber, and air sample forced by an air pump are presented. For two hour sampling and measuring cycle time the dynamic error in the worst case (first read out) equals 5 % relative to the step jump of radon concentration. This is due to the increase of activity of the decay products in the chamber. It was observed that the short lived radon decay products (Po-218, Pb-214, Bi-214) are depositing on the walls of the chamber and they are not removed by flushing the chamber with air. (author)

  16. Radon adsorption on present activated charcoals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazankin, Yu.N.; Trofimov, A.M.; Mikhajlova, L.K.

    1978-01-01

    Radon adsorption from helium and air has been studied on modern activated carbons of SKT-1, SKT-2a, SKT-3, SKT-2b, SKT-6, PAU-1 within the temperature range from 100 to 80 deg. It has been shown that PAU-1 carbon has the highest activity with respect to radon in the temperature range studied. With decreasing temperature the adsorption coefficients increase sharply. It has been found that for the case of radon adsorption from helium the logarythm of the Henry coefficient linearly depends on the inverse value of absolute temperature. Adsorption of radon from air is inhibited and the above-cited relationship is deviated from linear. The results of calculating differential heats of radon and air adsorption as well as coefficients of radon and air separation on carbons are presented

  17. Some reflections on radon and its measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, K.

    1991-01-01

    A brief editorial considers mainly two problems concerning radon measurement in residential buildings and its possible health effects. The first relates to the reporting in the literature of radon measurements to an accuracy which exceeds the accuracy of the measuring equipment. Secondly in radioepidemiological studies, care should be exercised in equating uranium miners and people living in houses since their working and living conditions are not comparable; this could sometimes explain an apparent lack of detectable negative health effects in residents. (UK)

  18. Radon programme: presence and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulka, J.

    2009-01-01

    In this presentation an overview of radon programme experiences is presented. The paper summarises national radon policy, national programmes, legislation, the role of preventive measures and interventions with respect to existing and future exposure and knowledge of radon risk, problems of remediation strategies, practical protection in dwellings, radon measurements strategies, progress in radon measurement of an individual house (radon diagnosis), radon mapping process and sense of delineation of radon prone areas, natural radioactivity of building materials and radioactivity in public water and their role in the radon programme, public awareness on radon issue and publicity campaign. Some research activities are proposed aiming at effective solutions of radon issues in future

  19. Absolute measurement of environmental radon content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji Changsong

    1987-01-01

    A transportable meter for environmental radon measurement with a 40 liter decay chamber is designed on the principle of Thomas two-filter radon content absolute measurement. The sensitivity is 0.37 Bq·m -3 with 95% confidence level. This paper describes the experimental method of measuremment and it's intrinsic uncertainty. The typical intrinsic uncertainty (for n x 3.7 Bq·m -3 radon concentration) is <10%. The parameter of exit filter effeciency is introduced into the formula, and the verification is done for the case when the diameter of the exit filter is much less than the inlet one

  20. Measuring radon source magnitude in residential buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazaroff, W.W.; Boegel, M.L.; Nero, A.V.

    1981-08-01

    A description is given of procedures used in residences for rapid grab-sample and time-dependent measurements of the air-exchange rate and radon concentration. The radon source magnitude is calculated from the results of simultaneous measurements of these parameters. Grab-sample measurements in three survey groups comprising 101 US houses showed the radon source magnitude to vary approximately log-normally with a geometric mean of 0.37 and a range of 0.01 to 6.0 pCi 1 -1 h -1 . Successive measurements in six houses in the northeastern United States showed considerable variability in source magnitude within a given house. In two of these houses the source magnitude showed a strong correlation with the air-exchange rate, suggesting that soil gas influx can be an important transport process for indoor radon

  1. Radon remedial measures in cold climate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birovljev, A.

    2004-01-01

    A view is taken that mitigation of an indoor radon problem is often more complex than usually assumed, and that additional factors should be considered to avoid situations in which after mitigation the radon problem may be solved, but other problems have been created. Emphasis is put on how the choice and design of radon remedial measures are influenced not only by effectiveness in reducing radon levels indoors, but also by climatic factors, energy-saving aspects, as well as economic and psycho-social factors. Climatic conditions give rise to several concerns when attempting to mitigate a radon problem in areas with large seasonal temperature variations. Problems with humidity, energy consumption and durability of sealing materials are probably the most prominent issues. Commonly used radon remedial measures and their effectiveness in Norway is reviewed. Discussion is focused on principles and technical solutions which produce good results, and those which don't perform so well in cold Norwegian climate. Innovative technical solutions which successfully resolve some of the main conflicting issues are discussed. Results of some preliminary tests showing performance of such solutions in reduction of radon levels are presented. Other aspects of mitigation systems, such as need and cost of maintenance, longevity, noise levels, 'additional benefits', etc., are briefly mentioned. Homeowners' perceptions and willingness to implement various mitigation solutions are briefly reviewed. Based on discussion, several guiding principles which may be adopted in search for optimal solutions are suggested. (author)

  2. Application of nuclear track detectors for radon related measurments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abu-Jarad, F.A.

    1988-01-01

    The application of nuclear track detectors for radon related measurements is discussed. The ''Can Technique'', used for measuring radon emanation from building materials, walls and soil; the ''Working Level Monitor'', used for measuring short period working levels of radon daughters in houses; and ''Passive Radon Dosimeters'', used to measure radon levels in houses for long term (few months) periods are described. Application of nuclear track detectors for measuring the radon daughters plate-out on the surface of mixing fan blades and walls are discussed. The uranium content of some wall papers was found to be 6 ppm. The variation of radon progeny concentration in the same room was measured and supported by another study through Gas Chromatograph measurements. The independence of radon concentration on room level in high-rise buildings was established. The effect of sub-floor radon emanation on radon concentration in houses is dependent on whether there is sub-floor ventilation or not. (author)

  3. Can radon gas measurements be used to predict earthquakes?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    After the tragic earthquake of April 6, 2009 in Aquila (Abruzzo), a debate has begun in Italy regarding the alleged prediction of this earthquake by a scientist working in the Gran Sasso National Laboratory, based on radon content measurements. Radon is a radioactive gas originating from the decay of natural radioactive elements present in the soil. IRSN specialists are actively involved in ongoing research projects on the impact of mechanical stresses on radon emissions from underground structures, and some of their results dating from several years ago are being brought up in this debate. These specialists are therefore currently presenting their perspective on the relationships between radon emissions and seismic activity, based on publications on the subject. (authors)

  4. Measurements of radon levels inside Mexican caves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borau, J.; Gonzalez, A.; Espinosa, G.; Golzarri, J.I.

    1993-01-01

    Living animal species on earth have been exposed to environmental radon from the very beginning of time. The effects of radiation, combined with other natural parameters such as temperature, humidity, salt contents, etc., have most likely influenced the evaluation of different species. Thus, it is important to know and to evaluate the radon levels, among other radioactive elements present in enclosed environments such as caves, especially since those caves were also the dwellings and refuge of the predecessor of man. In this work we present radon level measurements inside some caves with vestiges of ancient inhabitats and some recently discovered natural caves, using Nuclear Track Detectors. (author)

  5. Evaluation of radon measuring technique using passive detector activated carbon; Avaliacao da tecnica de medicao do radonio utilizando detector passivo com carvao ativado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Paulo Roberto Rocha; Lessa, Edmilson de Lima; Oliveira, Evaldo Paulo de, E-mail: epoliveira@aluno.ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria, (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Div. de Radioprotecao Ambiental e Ocupacional

    2014-07-01

    This study aims to evaluate the efficiency of measuring the radioactive gas Radon ({sup 222} Rn) with passive detector activated carbon. Alpha Guard, exposure chamber, air sampler, default font Radio, calibrator flow, flow adjuster, ducts drivers: For this, various equipment to make the measurement system as were used. An assembly of such equipment, with specific sequence was used allowing for more efficient exposure of passive detectors Radon gas. Twenty samples were heated to remove moisture and then stored in desiccator until the experiment were made. The exhibition was held passive dosimeters being removed from the chamber, and one hour after, subjected to analysis by gamma spectrometry in germanium (HPGe) for an hour. Subsequently, other measurements were made at scheduled times and sequential for one hour. The results were presented in report form and spectra, measures and graphs generated by Alpha Guard were also extracted. Finally we calculated the efficiency of the passive meter activated carbon. (author)

  6. Radon removal from gaseous xenon with activated charcoal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, K.; Hieda, K.; Hiraide, K.; Hirano, S.; Kishimoto, Y.; Kobayashi, K.; Koshio, Y. [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kamioka, Hida, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); Liu, J.; Martens, K. [Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Moriyama, S. [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kamioka, Hida, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); Nakahata, M. [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kamioka, Hida, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Nishiie, H.; Ogawa, H.; Sekiya, H.; Shinozaki, A. [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kamioka, Hida, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); Suzuki, Y. [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kamioka, Hida, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Takachio, O.; Takeda, A.; Ueshima, K.; Umemoto, D. [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kamioka, Hida, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); and others

    2012-01-01

    Many low background experiments using xenon need to remove radioactive radon to improve their sensitivities. However, no method of continually removing radon from xenon has been described in the literature. We studied a method to remove radon from xenon gas through an activated charcoal trap. From our measurements we infer a linear relationship between the mean propagation velocity v{sub Rn} of radon and v{sub Xe} of xenon in the trap with v{sub Rn}/v{sub Xe}=(0.96{+-}0.10) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} at -85 Degree-Sign C. As the mechanism for radon removal in this charcoal trap is its decay, knowledge of this parameter allows us to design an efficient radon removal system for the XMASS experiment. The verification of this system found that it reduces radon by a factor of 0.07, which is in line with its expected average retention time of 14.8 days for radon.

  7. Radon measurements in Rio de Janeiro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magalhaes, M.H.; Amaral, E.C.S.; Sachett, I.

    2002-01-01

    Few data are available on the dynamic of radon in the air for tropical climate conditions. The strong influence of the climatological characteristics on the transport of gases and particulates in air makes not adequate the use of data obtained at regions with different climate. Outdoor and indoor measurements of radon equilibrium equivalent concentrations (EEC) have been done for one-year period in Rio de Janeiro. Continuous measurements were performed using a radon monitor with an alpha spectrometry detector. Pluviometric index, temperature and humidity were registered. The paper presents the long term behaviour of outdoor radon equilibrium equivalent concentration results, their correlation with temperature and the influence of the pluviometric index. Maximum values were obtained during winter and minimum in summer, strongly influenced by the rain. A strong inverse correlation with temperature was found. (author)

  8. Systematic radon survey over active volcanoes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidel, J.L.; Monnin, M.; Garcia Vindas, J.R. [Centre National de la Recherche Cientifique, Montpellier (France). Lab. GBE; Ricard, L.P.; Staudacher, T. [Observatoire Volcanologique Du Pitou de la Fournaise, La Plaine des Cafres (France)

    1999-08-01

    Data obtained since 1993 on Costa Rica volcanos are presented and radon anomalies recorded before the eruption of the Irazu volcano (December 8, 1994) are discussed. The Piton de la Fournaise volcano is inactive since mid 1992. The influence of the external parameters on the radon behaviour is studied and the type of perturbations induced on short-term measurements are individuate.

  9. Indoor radon measurements in dwellings of Mizoram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lalramengzami, R.; Laldawngliana, C.; Sinha, D.; Ghosh, S.; Dwivedi, K.K.

    1995-01-01

    The concentration of indoor radon has been measured in some dwellings of Mizoram state by employing time integrated method using solid state nuclear track detector. This state is located in the north eastern region of India which has been identified as a high background area. The indoor radon levels determined in this work are compared with data obtained from other regions of India and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) prescribed safe limit. (author). 7 refs., 2 figs

  10. Radon soil gas measurements in a geological versatile region as basis to improve the prediction of areas with a high radon potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabrt, Franz; Rechberger, Fabian; Schuff, Michael; Seidel, Claudia; Baumgartner, Andreas; Friedmann, Harry; Maringer, Franz Josef

    2014-01-01

    With the aim to predict the radon potential by geological data, radon soil gas measurements were made in a selected region in Styria, Austria. This region is characterised by mean indoor radon potentials of 130-280 Bq m -3 and a high geological diversity. The distribution of the individual measuring sites was selected on the basis of geological aspects and the distribution of area settlements. In this work, the radon soil gas activity concentration and the soil permeability were measured at 100 sites, each with three single measurements. Furthermore, the local dose rate was determined and soil samples were taken at each site to determine the activity concentration of natural radionuclides. During two investigation periods, long-term soil gas radon measurements were made to study the time dependency of the radon activity concentration. All the results will be compared and investigated for correlation among each other to improve the prediction of areas with high radon potential. (authors)

  11. Measurement of radon concentration in water using the portable radon survey meter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, S; Mori, N; Shimo, M; Fukushi, M; Ohnuma, S

    2011-07-01

    A measurement method for measuring radon in water using the portable radon survey meter (RnSM) was developed. The container with propeller was used to stir the water samples and release radon from the water into the air in a sample box of the RnSM. In this method, the measurement of error would be water was >20 Bq l(-1).

  12. A continuous monitor for the measurement of environmental radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chittaporn, P.; Eisenbud, M.; Harley, N.H.

    1981-01-01

    Although inhaled short-lived 222 Rn daughters deliver the pertinent α dose for assessing human health effects, radon daughters do not of themselves exist in any atmosphere for more than 2-3 hr. Their long-lived parent (3.82 day) 222 Rn supports the daughter activity and it is the transport of 222 Rn which ultimately determines dose. Without an understanding of the long and short-term temporal patterns of indoor and outdoor 222 Rn it is impossible to understand the factors which are important in establishing any human health hazard from the daughters. This work describes a new continuous environmental radon monitor which measures radon alone without interference from radon daughters. The detector is a cylinder (13 cm diameter x 14 cm high), is lined with alpha scintillation phospor on a Mylar substrate and is portable and easily constructed from inexpensive and commercially available materials. (author)

  13. Radon measurement in the spa of Bizovac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faj, Z.; Radolic, V.; Suveljak, B.; Planinic, J.

    1996-01-01

    The spa of Bizovac is located 20 km on the west of Osijek in east Croatia. Radon concentrations in the air and water of the Bizovac spa were measured by the Radhome silicon detector and the average values were obtained as 70 Bq/m 3 in the indoor pool, 40 Bq/m 3 in the hotel room and 135 Bq/m 3 in the closed therapeutic bathroom. A special experiment was performed in a closed therapeutic bathroom by three bathtubes filled up with geothermal water as well as normal (potable) one from water-supply. Using measured radon concentrations in air by Radhome detector under the mentioned conditions in the closed bathroom, radon concentrations were assessed for the geothermal water as 25.3 Bq/m 3 and 2.7 Bq/m 3 for potable water. Radon in potable water, measured by the sampling glass ampoule and scintillation cell, had the concentration of 3.5 Bq/m 3 . The radon transfer factor from water to air in the indoor pool and therapeutic bathroom was 10 and 40 times higher than for normal dwelling factor (10 -4 ), respectively. The effective dose equivalent of inhaled radon for permanent personnel under the worst conditions in the spa (closed therapeutic bathroom) was 5.4 mSv/y, but visitors spending two weeks in the Bizovac spa could receive the dose of 77 μSv. (author)

  14. Indoor radon level measurements in Iran using AEOI passive dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohrabi, M.; Solaymanian, A.R.

    1988-01-01

    A passive radon diffusion dosimeter was developed at the RPD of AEOI for nationwide indoor radon level measurements. Several parameters of the dosimeter were studied. Radon levels were determined in about 250 houses in Ramsar (a high natural radiation area), Tehran, Babolsar and Gonabad. In this paper, the results of some dosimeter parameters as well as radon levels in indoor air are reported

  15. Regressionanalysis of radon measurements; Regressionsanalysen von Radonmessungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buermeyer, J.; Neugebauer, T.; Hingmann, H.; Grimm, V.; Breckow, J. [Technische Hochschule Mittelhessen (THM), Giessen (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Physik und Strahlenschutz (IMPS); Gundlach, M. [Technische Hochschule Mittelhessen (THM), Giessen (Germany). Fachbereich fuer Mathematik, Naturwissenschaften und Informatik

    2016-07-01

    In the course of the renewal of the Radiation Protection Guidelines for Germany, radon becomes a more prominent concern. Thus, it is important to gain more information on the temporal behaviour of radon and its measureable parameters. This work focuses on the determination on possible influencing factors using regression-analysis methods. So far the radon concentration has been analysed and it was revealed, that the most important impact comes from the gradient of the temperature and pressure as the difference of the values in and outside the building. The carbon dioxide, which was logged as an indicator for the influences of the inhabitant does not show the high influence on the Radon levels as expected.

  16. Radon measurements in some areas in Bangladesh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamid Khan, M.A. [Physics Division, Atomic Energy Centre, Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission, P.O. Box 164, Dhaka-1000 (Bangladesh)], E-mail: hamidkhan1950@yahoo.com; Chowdhury, M.S. [Physics Department, Dhaka University, Dhaka-1000 (Bangladesh)

    2008-08-15

    A survey of radon level measurements using CR-39 has been carried out in some of urban and rural residential areas and one gas explosion area in Bangladesh. The lowest level of radon concentration was found to be 49Bqm{sup -3} inside a hospital in Cox's Bazar district and the highest level was found to be 835Bqm{sup -3} inside a mud-made old residential house in Sylhet city. It was observed that old residential houses were found to have higher levels of radon concentrations compared to newly built houses. The radon level at the gas explosion area at Magurchara in Moulvibazar district was found to be 408{+-}98Bqm{sup -3}.

  17. Indoor and soil radon measurements in the Hyblean Foreland (South-East Sicily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Alessandro

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Indoor radon behavior in two sites of SE Sicily was studied as a function of the soil radon concentration. The chosen locations were Ragusa and Modica towns, placed in the Hyblean Plateau (northern margin of the African Plate. Soil samples were analysed by gamma spectrometry to determine the amount of radionuclides. Indoor air and soil gas radon measurements were simultaneously performed in both sites using active detectors. Radon in soil was measured one meter deep. A positive correlation was obtained between indoor radon concentration and the soil gas concentration.

  18. Measurement protocol for radon measurements in workplaces above ground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mjoenes, L.; Soederman, A.-L.

    2004-01-01

    The Swedish Radiation Protection Authority, SSI, has established a measurement protocol for measurements of radon in workplaces. The result from a measurement according to the protocol can be compared to the limit for indoor radon at workplaces, 400 Bq/m 3 issued by the Swedish Work Environment Authority and also to the action level for schools, preschools and public buildings, 400 Bq/m 3 , issued by the National Board of Health and Welfare. The protocol recommends measurements to be done in two steps. The first measurement, called the preliminary measurement, will be done with an integrating measurement method over a period of at least two months. Track etch detectors or electret devices can be used. Since the preliminary measurements often overestimates the radon levels the workers are actually exposed to during working hours, a follow-up measurement has to be done if the preliminary measurement gives a result that exceeds 400 Bq/m 3 . In case there is need for an annual mean for comparison to the action level for schools a long-term measurement has to be done. Otherwise a method for follow-up measurements can be used at once. The follow-up measurement has to show the radon level during working hours. Two measurement strategies can be used depending on the function of the ventilation system. With the ventilation system running constantly, measurements can be done with track etch detectors for ten days or electret devices for five days. If the ventilation system is closed down at night electrets can be used for five days if the devise is open only during working hours or a continuous measurement device can be used for two days. Measurements have to be performed during the heating season, i.e. when the 24-hour average temperature is below +10 deg C, usually between October 1 and April 31. Most importantly the difference between interior and exterior temperatures must be big enough to allow natural draught ventilation system to activate. The result from a

  19. Active and passive measurements of radon/thoron exhalation from coal and flyash samples collected from various thermal power plants of Delhi, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Lalit Mohan; Kumar, Rajesh; Sahoo, B.K.; Sapra, B.K.; Rajendra Prasad

    2013-01-01

    Measurement of radon ( 222 Rn) exhalation from coal, flyash and soil samples was carried out using active (Scintillation based Smart Radon Monitor) as well as passive technique (SSNTD based Can technique). In addition, thoron ( 220 Rn) exhalation measurements were also made for the above samples using Scintillation based Smart Thoron Monitor. To the best of our knowledge, thoron exhalation measurement is first of its kind in India. In this study, a total of 26 samples collected from Badarpur Thermal Power Station, Badarpur and Rajghat Power Station, Rajghat, Delhi were analysed. Thoron surface exhalation rate measured by Scintillation based Thoron Monitor for Badarpur Thermal Power Station varied from 327.8 Bq/m 2 /h to 874.2 Bq/m 2 /h and for Rajghat Thermal Power Station it varied from 176.0 Bq/m 2 /h to 781.1 Bq/m 2 /h. Similarly, the radon mass exhalation rate measured by active technique varied from 12.13 mBq/Kg/h to 118.08 mBq/Kg/h for the samples collected from Badarpur Thermal Power Station; while it varied from 15.00 Bq/Kg/h to 168.07 mBq/Kg/h for the samples collected from Rajghat Thermal Power station. On the other hand, result of measurements made by the conventional Can technique were significantly lower varying from 0.44 mBq/Kg/h to 2.34 mBq/Kg/h for Rajghat Thermal Power Station and from 0.78 mBq/Kg/h to 2.88 mBq/Kg/h for Badarpur Thermal Power Station. This vast variation in the results obtained by active and passive techniques is due to the fact that the active technique accounts for the effect of back-diffusion and possible leakage from the chamber in the process of least square fitting of exponential model while it is not so in the case of SSNTD based Can technique. In view of this, results of active technique are more reliable as compared to the passive technique. More importantly, there was no thoron interference in the radon measurement by the active technique. Further experiments are being carried out using controlled radon and thoron

  20. Absolute measurement method of environment radon content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji Changsong

    1989-11-01

    A portable environment radon content device with a 40 liter decay chamber based on the method of Thomas double filter radon content absolute measurement has been developed. The correctness of the method of Thomas double filter absolute measurement has been verified by the experiments to measure the sampling gas density of radon that the theoretical density has been known. In addition, the intrinsic uncertainty of this method is also determined in the experiments. The confidence of this device is about 95%, the sensitivity is better than 0.37 Bqm -3 and the intrinsic uncertainty is less than 10%. The results show that the selected measuring and structure parameters are reasonable and the experimental methods are acceptable. In this method, the influence on the measured values from the radioactive equilibrium of radon and its daughters, the ratio of combination daughters to the total daughters and the fraction of charged particles has been excluded in the theory and experimental methods. The formula of Thomas double filter absolute measuring radon is applicable to the cylinder decay chamber, and the applicability is also verified when the diameter of exit filter is much smaller than the diameter of inlet filter

  1. A study of radon activity inside some houses in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Islam, G.S.; Islam, M.A.; Farid, S.M.; Rahman, A.

    1988-01-01

    The solid state nuclear track detector CR-39 has been used for long term measurements of the radon-222 emanation from building materials and the resultant activity inside houses in Bangladesh. Particular attention is paid to a special type of house with thick walls made entirely of mud. The radon-exhalation rate of the walls of these mud-built houses is found to be consistently higher than that of brick-built houses. (author)

  2. Radon Measurements in underground metro stations in Cairo City, Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hafez, A.F.; Hussein, A.S.; Rasheed, N.M.

    2000-01-01

    Radon activity concentration were measured continuously during the year 1998-1999 at two different underground MERTO stations, namely, Mubarak and El-Sadat. The measurements were performed using the diffusion cups equipped with CR-39 and LR-115 polymeric nuclear track detectors. Using the experimentally measured calibration coefficients of the used detectors and the measured track densities (bare and filtered), the yearly mean radon concentration C=23 Bq m -3 , equilibrium factor F= 0,10 and effective dose E=0,06 mSv y -1 for the employed personal as well as E=5 mu Sv y -1 for the commuter were obtained

  3. Protective measures during construction against radon exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horn, W.

    1990-01-01

    Radon, thoron as well as their daughter products have an cancerogeneous effect on the human respiratory tracts. In this respect protective measures in the area of construction are of great importance. This article deals with constructional solutions which consist of different individual measures. Sources of radon are outside air, water, fuels, building materials as well as the building ground. Possible protective measures are divided into area-related (floor structure, intermediate floors, exterior walls of cellar, foundation slab, building ground), line-related (joints, cracks, wall ducts) as well as supplementary measures (tightly closing doors, arrangement of natural cross-ventilation and vertical ventilating shafts). (BWI) [de

  4. Radon Measurements in Egypt using passive etched track detectors. A Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomaa, M A [National Network of Radiation Physics. Atomic Energy Authority (Egypt); Hussein, A S [Radiation Protection Department, Nuclear Power Plants Authority, (Egypt); El-Arabi, A M [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, South Valley University, Qena, (Egypt)

    2005-04-01

    Radon and its progeny may cause serious radiation harm to human health such as lung cancer and other types. Radon measurements based on alpha particles etched track detectors (LR-115, CR-39) are very attractive for assessment of radon exposure. This is due to their high sensitivity, low cost, easy to handle and retain a permanent record of data. Also these detectors can incorporate the effects of seasonal and diurnal fluctuation of radon activity concentrations due to physical, geological and meteorological factors. The present review is based mainly on the topic of passive etched track detectors for the measurements of radon in Egypt in the recent years. Published papers includes the measurements of radon in dwellings, working places, Cairo Metro stations, ancient Pharaonic places and uranium exploration galleries as well as assessment of radon in drinking water.

  5. Radon Measurements in Egypt using passive etched track detectors. A Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomaa, M.A.; Hussein, A.S.; El-Arabi, A.M.

    2005-01-01

    Radon and its progeny may cause serious radiation harm to human health such as lung cancer and other types. Radon measurements based on alpha particles etched track detectors (LR-115, CR-39) are very attractive for assessment of radon exposure. This is due to their high sensitivity, low cost, easy to handle and retain a permanent record of data. Also these detectors can incorporate the effects of seasonal and diurnal fluctuation of radon activity concentrations due to physical, geological and meteorological factors. The present review is based mainly on the topic of passive etched track detectors for the measurements of radon in Egypt in the recent years. Published papers includes the measurements of radon in dwellings, working places, Cairo Metro stations, ancient Pharaonic places and uranium exploration galleries as well as assessment of radon in drinking water

  6. Experience from using plastic film in radon measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joensson, G.

    1999-01-01

    Plastic film is a useful detector of radon gas. The method of detection of the gas is used for several decades to measure radon concentrations both indoors and in soil. Experiences from radon measurements in Sweden indoors, in soil and in water using the plastic film Kodak LR 115-II are discussed in this report. Some examples are given from various projects. One example is taken from a large scale mapping of indoor radon levels in houses, where the building material is the main source of radon. In another example the measurements from a large scale soil radon mapping are discussed. The use of the plastic film for measurements of radon levels in water is also discussed. All the investigations are made in order to give the authorities concerned information of the radon situation and to study the connection between high indoor radon levels and various types of cancers

  7. Seasonal Variability in European Radon Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groves-Kirkby, C. J.; Denman, A. R.; Phillips, P. S.; Crockett, R. G. M.; Sinclair, J. M.

    2009-04-01

    In temperate climates, domestic radon concentration levels are generally seasonally dependent, the level in the home reflecting the convolution of two time-dependent functions. These are the source soil-gas radon concentration itself, and the principal force driving radon into the building from the soil, namely the pressure-difference between interior and exterior environment. While the meteorological influence can be regarded as relatively uniform on a European scale, its variability being defined largely by the influence of North-Atlantic weather systems, soil-gas radon is generally more variable as it is essentially geologically dependent. Seasonal variability of domestic radon concentration can therefore be expected to exhibit geographical variability, as is indeed the case. To compensate for the variability of domestic radon levels when assessing the long term radon health risks, the results of individual short-term measurements are generally converted to equivalent mean annual levels by application of a Seasonal Correction Factor (SCF). This is a multiplying factor, typically derived from measurements of a large number of homes, applied to the measured short-term radon concentration to provide a meaningful annual mean concentration for dose-estimation purposes. Following concern as to the universal applicability of a single SCF set, detailed studies in both the UK and France have reported location-specific SCF sets for different regions of each country. Further results indicate that SCFs applicable to the UK differ significantly from those applicable elsewhere in Europe and North America in both amplitude and phase, supporting the thesis that seasonal variability in indoor radon concentration cannot realistically be compensated for by a single national or international SCF scheme. Published data characterising the seasonal variability of European national domestic radon concentrations, has been collated and analysed, with the objective of identifying

  8. Concentration of Radon Progeny in Air by Alpha Spectrometry Measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acena, M. L.; Crespo, M. T.

    1989-01-01

    The concentration of radon progeny in air has been determined by alpha spectrometry measurement of 214 Po and 318 Po. A known volume of air was passed through a filter, then the alpha activity was directly measured on this filter. (Author) 15 refs

  9. Measurement of radon daughters in air samples by alpha spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acena, M.L.; Crespo, M.T.

    1989-01-01

    The concentration of radon progeny in air has been determined by alpha spectrometry measurement of polonium 214 and polonium 218. A known volume of air was passed through a filter, then the alpha activity was directly measured on this filter (Author)

  10. Measurement of concentration and size distribution of radon decay products in homes using air cleaners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montassier, N.; Hopke, P.K.; Shi, Y.; McCallum, B.

    1992-01-01

    By removing particles, air cleaners can also eliminate radon decay products. However, by removing the particles, the open-quotes unattachedclose quotes fraction of the radon progeny is increased leading to a higher dose per unit exposure. Thus, both the concentration and size distributions of the radon decay products are needed to evaluate air cleaners. Three types of room air cleaners, NO-RAD Radon Removal System, Electronic Air Cleaner and PUREFLOW Air Treatment System were tested in a single family home in Arnprior, Ontario (Canada). Semi-continuous measurements of radon gas concentration and radon decay product activity weighted size distribution were performed in the kitchen/dining room under real living conditions. The effects of air cleaners on both the concentration and size distribution of the radon decay products were measured, and their impact on the dose of radiation given to the lung tissue were examined

  11. The design and realization of calibration apparatus for measuring the concentration of radon in three models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huiping, Guo [The Second Artillery Engineering College, Xi' an (China)

    2007-06-15

    For satisfying calibration request of radon measure in the laboratory, the calibration apparatus for radon activity measure is designed and realized. The calibration apparatus can auto-control and auto-measure in three models. sequent mode, pulse mode and constant mode. The stability and reliability of the calibration apparatus was tested under the three models. The experimental result shows that the apparatus can provides an adjustable and steady radon activity concentration environment for the research of radon and its progeny and for the calibration of its measure. (authors)

  12. Intercomparison and intercalibration of passive/active radon and active radon progeny instruments and methods in North America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, A.C.; Tu, Keng W.

    1993-06-01

    An intercomparison and intercalibration exercise for radon and radon progeny measurements made with active and passive instruments was held at EML from October 22--30,1992. Twenty-five participants submitted 96 passive integrating devices, eight active devices for radon, and seven integrating devices for potential alpha energy concentration (PAEC). In addition, 40 grab samples for radon progeny analysis were taken by five groups that participated in person during the intercomparison. The results reported to EML indicate that the majority of the participants (70%) obtained mean results within 10% of the EML reference value. Although the instruments used in this exercise are based on different principles of collection and detection, they all appear reliable. However, in some instances there seemed to be some minor problems with quality control and calibration bias. Also, the large counting errors for the PAEC experienced by some of the participants can be minimized by using higher sampling air flow rates without sacrificing instrument portability

  13. The measure and control system of mini-type radon room based on PC104

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Shumin; East China Inst. of Technology, Fuzhou; Tang Bin; Sun Yamin

    2005-01-01

    Radon room is one of the standard equipment which demarcates radon measure instrument. The paper discusses the dynamic method and mathematic model which keeps the radon consistence stability in radon room. The system is developed on PC104. The system can monitor the radon consistence and replenishment radon according the radon control parameter. (authors)

  14. Measurements of indoor radon concentration in Libyan cities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elarabiy, S. F.; Khalifa, M.; Misrati, N.; Chahboune, N.; Ahmed, M.

    2012-12-01

    Studies confirm that the risk of exposure to indor radon is attributable to lung cancer worldwide. The relationship between radon exposure and cancer is a linear one which necessitates for need for measurements of indoor radon concentration. This paper presents the results of measurements of indoor radon in several libya cities using CR-39 plastic. The results showed that the average radon concentration in the cities of Tripoli, Al-harcha and Alrajaban were 48.8 Bg/m 3 , 51.4 Bg/m 3 and 55.5 Bg/m 3 respectively. The average indoor radon concentration in Libya is low comparing with other studies. (Author)

  15. Soil radon response around an active volcano

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segovia, N.; Valdes, C.; Pena, P.; Mena, M.; Tamez, E.

    2001-01-01

    Soil radon behavior related to the volcanic eruptive period 1997-1999 of Popocatepetl volcano has been studied as a function of the volcanic activity. Since the volcano is located 60 km from Mexico City, the risk associated with an explosive eruptive phase is high and an intense surveillance program has been implemented. Previous studies in this particular volcano showed soil radon pulses preceding the initial phase of the eruption. The radon survey was performed with LR-115 track detectors at a shallow depth and the effect of the soil moisture during the rainy season has been observed on the detectors response. In the present state of the volcanic activity the soil radon behavior has shown more stability than in previous eruptive stages

  16. Radon in indoor air. Health risk, measurement methods and remedial measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strand, T.

    1996-02-01

    Radon in indoor air is the main source of ionizing radiation in Norway. The booklet contains a presentation of radon sources, measurement methods, indoor radon concentrations, action levels, health risk and remedial measures

  17. Rehabilitation Measures against radon gas entry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frutos Vazquez, Borja; Olaya Adan, Manuel; Esteban Saiz, Jose Luis

    2011-01-01

    Radon gas is a pathological agent for inhabitants of buildings where it is present. Due to its origin in uranium decay chain, it bears radioactive effects that inside human body lead to higher risks of developing lung cancer. It comes from soils containing granite masses or other substrates containing uranium. It enters through common material used in constructions, such as concrete ground slabs, basement walls, etc. In order to avoid such gas immission into inhabited rooms, several measurements cab be considered for existing buildings. This study intends to show the results obtained for radon reductions by means of different constructive solutions, already designed and executed so as to stop radon gas immission into a prototype building constructed for this specific purpose

  18. Indoor radon measurements and radon prognosis for the province of Kymi, southeastern Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pennanen, M.; Maekelaeinen, I.; Voutilainen, A.

    1996-12-01

    The purpose of the regional radon prognosis is to classify areas with different levels of radon risk. The radon prognosis gives the percentages of future homes expected to have indoor radon concentrations exceeding the levels of 200 and 400 Bq/m 3 . It is assumed that no protection against the entry of radon is used in construction. In this study about 5900 indoor radon measurements made in single family houses, semi-detached houses and row houses were used. Data on the location, geology and construction of buildings were determined from maps and questionnaires. An empirical statistical model, the adjusted indoor radon measurements and geological data were used to assess the radon risk from soil and bedrock in different areas. The building sites of the province of Kymi were divided into thirteen sub-areas. The radon prognosis are calculated for the most radon-prone foundation types including 1) houses with a slab-on-grade and 2) houses with a basement or hillside houses with open stairwells between basement and first floor. The radon levels are generally greater in the western part of the area. The radon risk is highest in gravel-dominated esker areas in southwestern, western (in Pyhtaa, Kotka, Anjalankoski, litti, Valkeala) and central (Taipalsaari) parts of the area. The radon risk is also high in some bedrock and till areas, also in southwestern and western parts of the area. In these areas the level of 200 Bq/m 3 will be exceeded in 80 % of new houses. About half of the future houses in these areas will have indoor radon concentrations exceeding 400 Bq/m 3 . The radon risk is lowest in the eastern part of the province of Kymi in every soil type. In this area the level of 200 Bq/m 3 will be exceeded in 30 % of new houses. Below 10 % will exceed 400 Bq/m 3 . (orig.) (14 refs.)

  19. Primary evaluation of the radon situation in dwellings in Saxony by long-time integrating measurements, comparison of the results with short-time measurements and determination of the radon activity concentration in the ground of the land; Erstbewertung zur Radonsituation von Haeusern im Freistaat Sachsen mittels langzeitintegrierenden Messungen, Vergleich der Ergebnisse mit Kurzzeitmessungen und Erfassung der Radon-Aktivitaetskonzentration in der Bodenluft der Grundstuecke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alisch-Mark, M.; Keck, D.; Preusse, W.; Taube, A.; Busch, H.; Heinrich, T. [Staatliche Betriebsgesellschaft fuer Umwelt und Landwirtschaft, Sachsen (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    A measurement program was carried out for primary evaluation of dwellings in terms of radon situation. Short-time measurements were compared with annual averages and checked for their suitability for forecasting the annual averages. In 89% of the cases studied, the average annual values could be predicted by short-time measurements, differences were observed depending on the date of the short-time measure. In addition, radon activity concentrations were determined in the soil air in the ground and compared with the expected areas of forecasting map of Saxony. Discrepancies were found primarily in areas which are marked by a smallscale geology. The data obtained showed that the geogenic radon potential and the year of construction of the house represent factors influencing the probability of exceedance of the reference value of 300 Bq/m{sup 3}.

  20. Evaluation of experiences in long-term radon and radon-daughter measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, J.A.; Jackson, P.O.; Thomas, V.W.

    1982-12-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is performing side-by-side measurements of radon and radon daughter concentrations using several instruments and techniques, and is comparing these measurements with side-by-side measurements made by other investigators at other locations. The standard deviation of the differences between the (natural) logarithms of the Terradex Track Etch radon concentrations and the logarithms of the Radon Progency Integrating Sampling Units (RPISU) radon daughter concentrations (S.D.-ln) measured in 50 buildings in Edgemont, South Dakota, was 0.37. Using this S.D.-ln, it can be calculated that if the Track Etch radon daughter concentration is 0.010 WL there should be only a 14% probability that the RPISU average would be greater than 0.015 WL, and only a 3% probability tht the RPISU average would be greater than 0.020 WL. If buildings had been cleared from remedial action when the Track Etch averages were less than 0.10 WL, then about 61% of the buildings would have been cleared from remedial action, and only a few percent of these buildings would have actually had average RPISU concentrations greater than 0.015 WL. The S.D.-ln between the Track Etch radon measurements and the RPISU radon daughter measurements made by ALARA at Grand Junction, the PERM radon measurements and the MOD-225 radon daughter measurements made by Mound Facility at Canonsburg and Middlesex, and the PERM and Track Etch radon measurements made by Mound Facility at Salt Lake City were similar to the S.D.-ln between the Track Etch radon measurements and the RPISU radon daughter measurements at Edgemont

  1. Radon and radon daughter measurements at and near the former Middlesex Sampling Plant, Middlesex, New Jersey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haywood, F.F.; Perdue, P.T.; Christian, D.J.; Leggett, R.W.; Dickson, H.W.; Myrick, T.E.

    1980-03-01

    The results of the radon and radon daughter measurements made to date (1978) at the Middlesex Sampling Plant in Middlesex, New Jersey, are presented in this report. These measurements were one portion of a more comprehensive radiological survey conducted at this site and the surrounding area from 1976 to 1978. The surveyed property served as a uranium ore sampling plant during the 1940's and early 1950's and as a result contains elevated levels of surface an subsurface contamination. On-site indoor radon daughter and radon concentrations exceeded both the US Surgeon General Guidelines and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's maximum permissible concentration limits for radon (10 CFR Part 20) in all structures surveyed. Off-site structures showed concentrations of radon and radon daughters at or only slightly above background levels, except for one site where the radon levels were found to be above the 10 CFR Part 20 guidelines. Outdoor radon ad radon daughter concentrations, measured both on and off the site, were well below the guidelines, and the data give no indication of significant radon transport from the site

  2. A comparison of contemporary and retrospective radon gas measurements in high radon dwellings in Ireland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelleher, K.; McLaughlin, J.P.; Fenton, D.; Colgan, P.A.

    2006-01-01

    Little correlations has been found between contemporary radon gas measurements made in the past and retrospective radon gas measurements in Irish dwellings. This would suggest that these two techniques would result in two significantly different cumulative radon exposure estimates. Contemporary radon gas measurements made a few years apart in the same room of a dwelling were found to be significantly different. None of these differences could be explained by known changes to the rooms themselves., such ventilation or structural alterations to the room. This highlights the limitations of the contemporary radon gas measurements as a surrogate measurement for use in residential radon epidemiology. The contemporary radon gas measurements made by the Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland (R.P.I.I.) and University College of Dublin (U.C.D.) do not cover the same exposure period as the retrospective estimates and so the accuracy of the retrospective measurements cannot be demonstrated. A weak correlation can be seen between the retrospective radon gas estimates and a combination of the two contemporary radon gas estimates. It is not unreasonable to expect improvement in the correlation if further contemporary radon gas measurements were made in these rooms. (N.C.)

  3. Difficulties in radon measurements at workplaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kavasi, Norbert; Kovacs, Tibor; Nemeth, Csaba; Szabo, Tibor; Gorjanacz, Zoran; Varhegyi, Andras; Hakl, Jozsef; Somlai, Janos

    2006-01-01

    Different legislation systems can be found in the world concerning radon levels at workplaces. Following the European Union suggestion, a reference level for radon concentration in the air at workplaces was established in several European countries. In Hungary, the relevant legislation has come into effect on 1 January 2003. The determination of average radon concentration might present a problem, especially in places where the monthly average concentrations vary to a great extent. For example, the monthly averages measured in a hospital cave used for treating respiratory diseases showed a 24-fold difference depending on the chosen month. In such cases, attention should be paid when choosing the months and using the results of measurements for dose assessment. Another uncertainty emerges when estimating the annual dose, based on the data coming from long-term measurements, usually using integrated methods such as track detectors. There is a considerable difference between the averages measured during the working hours and over the total time (including nights and weekends), mostly in the cases of rooms with frequent air change like schools, kindergartens and ventilated workplaces. This can lead to a significant overestimation in dose calculation. Special attention needs to be paid to workplaces such as mines, tunnels and open air uranium tailings sites. This paper discusses the possible inaccuracies caused by the improper selection of time periods and methods in the measurements of the average radon concentration at workplaces

  4. Air radon equilibrium factor measurement in a Waste Water Pre-Treatment Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, J.E.; Juste, B.; Ortiz, J.; Martorell, S.; Verdu, G.

    2017-01-01

    We analyze in this paper a Waste Water Pre-Treatment Plant (WWTP) located at the Mediterranean coast with air radon concentration above Spanish action level (600 Bq per cubic meter). This paper presents a method for radon equilibrium determination by gamma spectrometry measuring of the radon progeny concentrations in the air, in order to estimate WWTP workers effective dose more exactly. The method is based on simultaneous sampling of air through a filter paper and alpha spectrometry measurement of radon activity concentration in the air. According to the measured radon activity concentration in the air of 368±45 Bq/m 3 the equilibrium factor between radon and progenies is estimated to be F=0.27, which is in good agreement with expected values. - Highlights: • High levels of Radon in a workplace can increase health risks in the employees. • Using the typical equilibrium factor 0.4 could lead to an error in the estimation of radon doses. • We present a method for radon equilibrium determination. • Equilibrium factor is calculated by gamma spectrometry measuring of radon progeny concentrations in the air.

  5. Radon remediation of a two-storey UK dwelling by active sub-slab depressurization: observations on hourly Radon concentration variations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denman, A.R.

    2008-01-01

    Radon concentration levels in a two-storey detached single-family dwelling in Northamptonshire, UK, were monitored at hourly intervals throughout a 5-week period during which sub-slab depressurization remediation measures, including an active sump system, were installed. Remediation of the property was accomplished successfully, with the mean radon levels upstairs and downstairs greatly reduced and the prominent diurnal variability in radon levels present prior to remediation almost completely removed. Following remediation, upstairs and downstairs radon concentrations were 32% and 16% of their pre-remediation values respectively. The mean downstairs radon concentration was lower than that upstairs, with pre-and post-remediation values of the upstairs/downstairs concentration ratio, R U/D , of 0.93 and 1.76 respectively. Cross-correlation between upstairs and downstairs radon concentration time-series indicates a time-lag of the order of 1 hour or less, suggesting that diffusion of soil-derived radon from downstairs to upstairs either occurs within that time frame or forms a relatively insignificant contribution to the upstairs radon level. Cross-correlation between radon concentration time-series and the corresponding time-series for local atmospheric parameters demonstrated correlation between radon concentrations and internal/external pressure-difference prior to remediation. This correlation disappears following remediation, confirming the effectiveness of the remediation procedure in mitigating radon ingress from the ground via the stack-effect. Overall, these observations provide further evidence that radon emanation from building materials makes a not insignificant contribution to radon concentration levels within the building. Furthermore, since this component remains essentially unaffected by sub-slab depressurization, its proportional contribution to the total radon levels in the home increases following remediation, leading to the conclusion that where

  6. Development of a radon chamber and measurement of the radon solubility in tissues; Entwicklung einer Radonkammer und Messung der Radonloeslichkeit in Gewebe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maier, Andreas

    2015-04-22

    Every year thousands of patients with inflammatory diseases of the musculoskeletal system undergo radon therapy, but the molecular mechanism and the risk of this therapy are not understood. To study the effects of radon exposure in vitro and in vivo we constructed a radon exposure chamber in the framework of the GREWIS project. With this device we are able to expose samples under controlled and reproducible conditions including the radon galleries in Austria and Germany. Adjustable parameters are radon activity-concentration, temperature, humidity and exposure time. These parameters are permanently monitored and controlled. During experiments with cell cultures it is also possible to adjust the CO{sub 2}-concentration. In addition, experiments with mice can be performed with this setup. To measure the radon kinetics in different types of tissue we exposed tissue samples like fat or muscle and mice in the radonchamber. Afterwards we measured the -spectra of the short living radon decay products lead-214 and bismuth-214 in the exposed samples with a HPGe-Detector. We recorded the spectra at different time points after exposure and calculated the initial amount of radon at the end of the exposure period in the sample and investigated the diffusion of the radon out of it. We compared the results from different types of tissue but also activated coal. In an activated coal sample the radon is bound to it via Van-der-Waals-force and the decay spectra are governed by the life time of the bound radon (3,8 days). In contrast in the biological samples the primary radon diffuses out of the samples in less than 20 minutes and the spectra follow the kinetics of the decay of the daughter products. These measurements where performed for the first time under therapy conditions like in radon galleries and also with higher radon concentration. In our experiments we could see an enhanced accumulation of radon and its decay products in fatty tissue compared to muscle tissue. Also in

  7. Indoor radon measurements in Mexico City

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinosa, G. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 20364, 01000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)], E-mail: espinosa@fisica.unam.mx; Golzarri, J.I. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 20364, 01000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Bogard, J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, PO Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6480 (United States); Gaso, I. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Apartado Postal 18-1027, 11801 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Ponciano, G. [Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Mena, M.; Segovia, N. [Instituto de Geofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2008-08-15

    Mexico City is one of the most populated cities in the world with almost 22 million inhabitants, located at an altitude of 2200 m. The old city was founded on an ancient lake and the zone is known by its high seismicity; indoor radon determination is an important public health issue. In this paper the data of indoor radon levels in Mexico City, measured independently by two research groups, both using Nuclear Track Detector systems but different methodologies, are correlated. The measurements were done during similar exposure periods of time, at family houses from the political administrative regions of the city. The results indicate a correlation coefficient between the two sets of data of R=0.886. Most of the differences between the two sets of data are inherent to houses having extreme (very high or very low indoor radon) included in the statistics of each group. The total average indoor radon found in Mexico City considering the two methods was 87Bqm{sup -3}.

  8. Radon and thoron progeny measurements using a portable radon sniffer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efendi, Z.; Jennings, P.

    1993-01-01

    A flexible version of the two-count method has been developed for use in rapid, inexpensive measurements of radon and thoron progeny working levels in residential and industrial premises in the Perth Metropolitan Area. The Method is adapted for use with a simple radon sniffer based on a low speed pump and an alpha counter. The flexibility of the method derives from the software, where some freedom is permitted in the selection of sampling times and post sampling analysis of the filters. This method has been tested on a variety of radioactive materials and it gives consistent, reliable results over a wide range of working levels. The results of a survey of Rn(222) and Rn(220) progeny levels in dwellings within the Perth Metropolitan Area are reported. This study shows that the mean concentration of indoor Rn(222) progeny was 4.7 mWL (17.4 Bq m -3 EEC) up to 23.3 mWL (86.4 Bq m -3 EEC). The mean thoron progeny concentration was 8.2 mWL (2.25 Bq m -3 EEC) with a range from 1 mWL (0.27 Bq m -3 EEC) to 64.5 mWL (17.74 Bq m -3 EEC). Using conversion factors of 0.061 mSv Bq -1 m -3 for Rn(222) progeny and 0.29 mSv Bq -1 m -3 for Rn(220) progeny respectively (UNSCEAR, 1982), it is estimated the average annual effective dose equivalent is 1.1 mSv for Rn(2220 and 0.6 mSv for Rn(220) respectively. 22 refs., 4 tabs., 1 fig

  9. Calibration of CR-39 plastic detectors in various modes and radon measurement in the north-western region of Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Islam, G.S.; Islam, M.A.; Haque, A.K.F.

    1998-04-01

    Solid State track detectors have been extensively used for the measurement of time integrated radon levels in dwellings under different conditions. The CR-39 plastic detectors were calibrated for bare as well as cup with membrane mode, along with a mono dispersal aerosol 0.2μm in size in an exposure chamber, to find the relationship between track densities and the radon concentration as well as potential alpha energy concentration (WL) of radon. Measurement of the indoor radon and radon daughter concentrations were performed in houses in the north-western region of Bangladesh. In total 163 detectors were placed for measurement of indoor radon activities and 230 detectors for measurement of radon daughter concentrations. To study the underground radon activity, 114 CR-39 detectors in cylinders were used. The indoor radon activity in Naogaon was, in general, found to be higher than that in Rajshahi. The working levels in the mud-built houses were greater than that in brick-built houses. The underground radon activity of Naogaon was found to be 6 times higher than that of Rajshahi. No direct correlation was observed between the underground and indoor radon activity. The average values of radon activity and the working level for the north-western zone of Bangladesh are found to be 91 Bq. m -3 and 16 mWL respectively. (author)

  10. Spatial radon anomalies on active faults in California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, C.-Y.; King, B.-S.; Evans, W.C.; Wei Zhang

    1996-01-01

    Radon emanation has been observed to be anomalously high along active faults in many parts of the world. We tested this relationship by conducting and repeating soil-air radon surveys with a portable radon meter across several faults in California. The results confirm the existence of fault-associated radon anomalies, which show characteristic features that may be related to fault structures but vary in time due to other environmental changes, such as rainfall. Across two creeping faults in San Juan Bautista and Hollister, the radon anomalies showed prominent double peaks straddling the fault-gouge zone during dry summers, but the peak-to-background ratios diminished after significant rain fall during winter. Across a locked segment of the San Andreas fault near Olema, the anomaly has a single peak located several meters southwest of the slip zone associated with the 1906 San Francisco earthquake. Across two fault segments that ruptured during the magnitude 7.5 Landers earthquake in 1992, anomalously high radon concentration was found in the fractures three weeks after the earthquake. We attribute the fault-related anomalies to a slow vertical gas flow in or near the fault zones. Radon generated locally in subsurface soil has a concentration profile that increases three orders of magnitude from the surface to a depth of several meters; thus an upward flow that brings up deeper and radon-richer soil air to the detection level can cause a significantly higher concentration reading. This explanation is consistent with concentrations of carbon dioxide and oxygen, measured in soil-air samples collected during one of the surveys. (Author)

  11. Soil radon concentration and volcanic activity of Mt. Etna before and after the 2002 eruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imme, G.; La Delfa, S.; Lo Nigro, S.; Morelli, D.; Patane, G.

    2006-01-01

    Soil radon investigation, using a continuous measurement device, has been performed on Mt. Etna in order to observe possible anomalies due to seismic and/or volcanic activity. In October 2002 an eruptive event occurred. Measurements, performed on the NE flank, have shown a possible correlation between eruptive activity of the volcano and soil radon concentration anomaly. The study of the seismic activity recorded in the same flank has, also, allowed to characterize the volcano dynamics and to correlate it with the variations of radon. The obtained results seem to indicate a possible dependence on volcanic activity of the radon concentration

  12. Radon measurements of groundwater in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinosa, G.; Golzarri, J.I.; Cortes, A.

    1991-01-01

    Radon measurement has important applications in hydrogeological studies. Specifically, radon measurement is used to determine the fluctuations of the piezometric levels in groundwater and, in some cases, the path of the water, which is one of the key parameters for evaluating hydrogeological resources. Water from springs and deep wells in the Basin of Mexico and the valley of San Luis Potosi were sampled, measured and analyzed by previous authors. In this work, a method for measuring 222 Rn in groundwater by using a passive detector is presented and the results are compared with a similar experiment performed at the same time, using a dynamic method. The aim of the work is to develop a method for detecting, evaluating and measuring the 222 Rn in groundwater by using SSNTD technology. (author)

  13. Moisture dependence of radon transport in concrete : Measurements and modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cozmuta, [No Value; van der Graaf, ER; de Meijer, RJ

    2003-01-01

    The moisture dependence of the radon-release rate of concrete was measured under well controlled conditions. It was found that the radon-release rate almost linearly increases up to moisture contents of 50 to 60%. At 70 to 80% a maximum was found and for higher moisture contents the radon-release

  14. Measurements of radon in drinking water (Curitiba, PR, Brazil)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa, Janine Nicolosi; Paschuk, Sergei A.; Schelin, Hugo R.; Barbosa, Laercio; Sadula, Tatyana; Matsuzaki, Cristiana A.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Among the principle mechanisms that bring the radon inside the dwelling is the exhalation and release from the water. It was evaluated that considering the latest mechanism, the exhalation of radon from the water represents about 89% of the cancer risk and the consumption of water with high concentration of radon is related to about 11% of risk cancer. Radon concentration in water could be subject of different factors such as the geology of the area, bottom sediments and inputs from streams, temperature, atmospheric pressure, etc. It is well known that the solubility of radon in water is about 510 cm 3 kg -1 at 0 deg C and decreases at higher temperatures. The 222 Rn concentration in various types of natural water in different countries usually is about few Bq/L and is the subject of the National legislation as well as International norms and recommendations. For example, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) established a limit of 11.1 Bq/L for the radon level in drinking water and this limit is considered as guideline in Canada and many countries of the European Union. Current work presents the results of more than 100 measurements of 222 Rn activity in drinking water collected at artesian bores at Curitiba region during the period of 2008 - 2009. The measurements were performed at the Laboratory of Applied Nuclear Physics of the Federal University of Technology in cooperation with the Nuclear Technology Development Center (CDTN) of Brazilian Nuclear Energy Committee (CNEN). Experimental setup was based on the Professional Radon Monitor (ALPHA GUARD) connected to specific kit of glass vessels Aqua KIT through the air pump. The equipment was adjusted with air flow of 0.5 L/min. The 222 Rn concentration levels were detected and analyzed by the computer using the software DataEXPERT by GENITRON Instruments. Collected average levels of 222 Rn concentration were processed taking into account the volume of water sample and its temperature

  15. Development of a standard for indoor radon measurements in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, R.S.; Solomon, S.B.

    1994-01-01

    A standard covering methodologies for the measurement of indoor radon and radon progeny concentrations in air in Australian buildings is currently under preparation as part of a set of standards covering total indoor air quality. This paper outlines the suggested methodology for radon and discusses some of the problems associated with the development of the standard. The draft standard recommends measurement of the radon concentration in air using scintillation cells, charcoal cups and solid state nuclear track detectors, and measurement of radon progeny concentration in air using the Rolle method or the Nazaroff method. 14 refs., 1 tab

  16. The Radon Book. Preventive measures in new buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clavensjoe, Bertil; Aakerblom, Gustav

    2004-01-01

    This book describes in text and picture how one can prevent that the radon concentrations in new buildings become to high. The book's centre of gravity lies on how to build in order to prevent that radon gas from the ground enters the building. The book contains extensive information about ground radon and how to examine the ground before constructing a new building. Release of radon from ground water and construction material is treated, as well as technology for measurement of radon and gamma radiation. The book presents current threshold values/recommended values for radon and the authorities' regulations and recommendations. The book is directed to persons who professionally need knowledge about radon and how to prevent that radon is accumulated in new buildings

  17. Comparative study of short- and long-term indoor radon measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Jarallah, M.I. [Department of Physics, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)], E-mail: mibrahim@kfupm.edu.sa; Fazal-ur-Rehman,; Abdalla, Khalid [Department of Physics, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)

    2008-08-15

    Short-term indoor radon measurements are used widely. Therefore, it is interesting to find out a correlation between these measurements and long-term measurements which reflect a better average radon concentration of individual measurement. To find the correlation between the two measurements of indoor radon concentrations at low radon levels, a study was carried out at 34 locations of King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals (KFUPM), Dhahran, Saudi Arabia using active and passive methods. In the short-term active method, a radon gas analyzer (AlphaGUARD) was used for a duration of 24 h in each measurement. In the long-term passive method, CR-39 based radon dosimeters were utilized for a period of 6 months, from January 2006 to June 2006. The short-term active measurements showed that the average, minimum and maximum radon concentrations were 19, 8 and 58Bqm{sup -3}, respectively, with a standard deviation of 8.6Bqm{sup -3}. The long-term passive measurements showed that the average, minimum and maximum radon concentrations were 25, 10 and 67Bqm{sup -3}, respectively, with a standard deviation of 12Bqm{sup -3}. The two measurements showed a poor correlation (R{sup 2}=0.38). The long-term measurements showed on the average higher concentrations by a factor of 1.3.

  18. Radon Measurements In Preschool And School Facilities In The Municipality Of Bank's Kapur

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadic, I.; Deljkic, D.; Ilic, Z.

    2015-01-01

    Radon is a radioactive noble gas, chemically inert and motile at room temperature. It is a colorless and odorless gas, but the characteristic of radioactivity enables us to detect it and measure it by two methods - the passive and the active one. The results of a research on concentration of radon activity in the air of preschool's and school's indoors in the area of the municipality of Bosanska Krupa in 2013 is shown in this work. To determine radon concentration, passive measuring method was used, canisters of radon with active carbon, with correction for the air humidity. The active carbon is placed into a canister that is opened during measurements and placed on the wanted location. Radon from the air arrives into the canister and is adsorbed on the active carbon which has high affinity towards few gases and steams, including 222Rn. Adsorbed radon in granules of active carbon is decomposed to short-living progeny: 218Po, 214Pb, 214Bi, 214Po and 210Pb. Radon's progeny 214Pb and 214Bi emit gamma-rays, it permits determination of the radon concentration via gamma-spectrometry through mentioned transitions, because three hours later the equilibrium between radon and its progeny in the carbon has already been established. The measurements have been conducted on high-resolution gamma spectrometer Ortec with 30 percent relative efficiency, integrated electronic system (Ortec) and GAMMA VISION (Ortec) software for spectra processing, analysis and evaluation of the results of measurements. The purpose of this work was to detect the levels of radon, targeting the protection of the youngest population in case of high radon concentrations in residential areas. (author).

  19. Indoor radon measurements and methodologies in Latin American countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canoba, A.; Lopez, F.O.; Arnaud, M.I.; Oliveira, A.A.; Neman, R.S.; Hadler, J.C.; Iunes, P.J.; Paulo, S.R.; Osorio, A.M.; Aparecido, R.; Rodriguez, C.; Moreno, V.; Vasquez, R.; Espinosa, G.; Golzarri, J.I.; Martinez, T.; Navarrete, M.; Cabrera, I.; Segovia, N.; Pena, P.; Tamez, E.; Pereyra, P.; Lopez-Herrera, M.E.; Sajo-Bohus, L.

    2001-01-01

    According to the current international guidelines concerning environmental problems, it is necessary to evaluate and to know the indoor radon levels, specially since most of the natural radiation dose to man comes from radon gas and its progeny. Several countries have established National Institutions and National Programs for the study of radon and its connection with lung cancer risk and public health. The aim of this work is to present the indoor radon measurements and the detection methods used for different regions of Latin America (LA) in countries such as Argentina, Brazil, Ecuador, Mexico, Peru and Venezuela. This study shows that the passive radon devices based on alpha particle nuclear track methodology (NTM) is one of the more generalized methods in LA for long term indoor radon measurements, CR-39, LR-115 and Makrofol being the more commonly used detector materials. The participating institutions and the radon level measurements in the different countries are presented in this contribution

  20. Indoor thoron and radon progeny measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tu, K.W.; George, A.C.; Lowder, W.M.; Gogolak, C.V.

    1992-01-01

    Measurements of indoor thoron ( 220 Rn) and radon ( 222 Rn) progeny activities were conducted in 40 homes and six public buildings in five states. A commercial alpha spectrometer system and four portable alpha integrating sampling monitors using diffused junction silicon detectors were used for sampling and recording of radionuclide data in particular the potential alpha energy concentrations (PAEC). The data were analysed for the ratios of PAEC- 220 Rn to PAEC- 222 Rn, and the correlations between the two quantities, and their estimated annual effective dose equivalent (AEDE). The results show that the PAEC ratios were 0.09, 0.6, 0.55, and 0.47, respectively, for all homes with the PAEC- 222 Rn > 400, between 100 and 400, -3 , and the total of all homes tested; the AEDE ratios were 0.03, 0.21, 0.19 and 0.16, respectively. No strong correlations were found between PAEC- 220 Rn and PAEC- 222 Rn, and between basement and ground floor data for PAEC- 220 Rn, but the PAEC- 222 Rn data showed a strong correlation between the basement and the ground floor values. Simultaneous measurements of PAEC- 220 Rn and PAEC- 222 Rn on the ground floor and in the basement of each of the 23 single-family houses tested suggests that 220 Rn entry from building materials may be as significant as from the underlying soil. (author)

  1. Measurement of the radon exhalation rate from the medium surface by tracing the radon concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanliang Tan; Detao Xiao

    2013-01-01

    The paper will present a method based on the accumulation chamber technique for measuring of radon exhalation from the medium surface. A radon monitor traces the change of radon concentration in the accumulation chamber, and then the radon exhalation can be obtained accurately through linear fit. Based on our recent experiments, the radon exhalation rate from the medium surface obtained from this method is in good agreement with the actual exhalation rate of our simulation facility. This method is superior to the competition method which obtains the radon exhalation through the exponential fit by an external PC-system. The calculation for the exponential fit is very easy by computer and related software. However, for portable instruments, the single chip microcomputer can't calculate the exponential fit rapidly. Thus, this method is usable for developing the new portable instrument to classify building materials, etc. (author)

  2. Radon

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... radon-resistant features. These features include gravel and plastic sheeting below the foundation, along with proper sealing ... lower the radon level. Detailed information about radon reduction in your home or building can be found ...

  3. Evaluation of the performance characteristics of radon and radon-daughter concentration measurement devices under controlled environmental conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearson, M.D.

    1989-04-01

    The Technical Measurements Center (TMC) conducted a study to expose 10 radon and 7 radon-daughter concentration measurement devices in the DOE/GJPO Radon/Radon-Daughter Environmental Chamber for a series of 24 controlled-environment tests. The tests evaluated the devices' response to temperature, relative humidity, dew point, condensation-nuclei concentration, radon-daughter/radon equilibrium ratio, and non-uniform radon and radon-daughter concentration. Devices were evaluated for linear response as a function of concentration. In addition to response to environmental parameters, the evaluation included determining the utility of the devices in providing reasonable assurance of compliance with the radon and radon-daughter concentration standards for DOE remedial action programs. This reasonable assurance criterion is based on a coefficient of variation of 25 percent for devices deployed for year-long measurements and a coefficient of variation of 18 percent for devices deployed for intermittent sampling. 39 refs., 65 figs., 33 tabs

  4. Continuous measurements of soil radon under regular field conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Font, LL

    1999-01-01

    Continuous soil radon measurements were performed in the frame of an European Community-radon network using the Clipperton II detector. It has been found that in some periods, soil radon levels obtained with one Clipperton II probe are very different from those obtained with another probe placed at the same depth but a short distance apart. It has been also found that the response of the probes to a sudden change of radon concentration is controlled by the diffusion process along the bottom tube of the probe. Therefore, this study shows that the experimental data can be attributed to the natural behaviour of soil radon

  5. Comparison of retrospective and contemporary indoor radon measurements in a high-radon area of Serbia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zunic, Z.S.; Yarmoshenko, I.V.; Kelleher, K.; Paridaens, J.; Mc Laughlin, J.P.; Celikovic, I.; Ujic, P.; Onischenko, A.D.; Jovanovic, S.; Demajo, A.; Birovljev, A.; Bochicchio, F.

    2007-01-01

    In Niska Banja, Serbia, which is a high-radon area, a comparison was made between two retrospective radon measuring methods and contemporary radon measurements. The two retrospective methods derive the radon concentrations that occurred in dwellings over longer periods in the past, based on the amount of trapped 210 Po on the surface of glass objects (surface traps, ST) or in the bulk of porous materials (volume traps, VT). Both surface implanted 210 Po in glass objects and contemporary radon in air were measured in 46 rooms, distributed in 32 houses of this radon spa-town, using a dual alpha track detector configuration (CR-39 and LR115) and CR-39 track etched detectors, respectively. In addition to the use of surface trap measurements, in 18 rooms (distributed in 15 houses) VT samples of suitable material were also collected, allowing to compare ST and VT retrospective radon concentration estimates. For each room, contemporary annual radon concentrations (CONT) were measured or estimated using seasonal correction factors. The distribution of the radon concentration in all data sets was found to be close to lognormal (Chi-square test > 0.05). Geometric means (GM) are similar, ranging from 1040 to 1380 Bq m -3 , whereas geometric standard deviations (GSD) for both the retrospective methods are greater than for the CONT method, showing reasonable agreement between VT, ST and CONT measurements. A regression analysis, with respect to the lognormal distribution of each data set, shows that for VT-ST the correlation coefficient r is 0.85, for VT-CONT r is 0.82 and for ST-CONT r is 0.73. Comparison of retrospective and contemporary radon concentrations with regard to supposed long-term indoor radon changes further supports the principal agreement between the retrospective and conventional methods

  6. In-field radon measurement in water: a novel approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talha, S.A.; Meijer, R.J. de; Lindsay, R.; Newman, R.T.; Maleka, P.P.; Hlatshwayo, I.N.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach of measuring radon in-water in the field by inserting a MEDUSA gamma-ray detector into a 210 L or 1000 L container. The experimental measurements include investigating the effect of ambient background gamma-rays on in-field radon measurement, calibrating the detector efficiency using several amounts of KCl salt dissolved in tap water, and measuring radon in borehole water. The results showed that there is fairly good agreement between the field and laboratory measurements of radon in water, based on measurements with Marinelli beakers on a HPGe detector. The MDA of the method is 0.5 Bq L -1 radon in-water. -- Research highlights: →Radon-in-water, large volume container, in-field measurements, MEDUSA gamma-ray detection system.

  7. Definition of correcting factors for absolute radon content measurement formula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji Changsong; Xiao Ziyun; Yang Jianfeng

    1992-01-01

    The absolute method of radio content measurement is based on thomas radon measurement formula. It was found in experiment that the systematic error existed in radon content measurement by means of thomas formula. By the analysis on the behaviour of radon daughter five factors including filter efficiency, detector construction factor, self-absorbance, energy spectrum factor, and gravity factor were introduced into the thomas formula, so that the systematic error was eliminated. The measuring methods of the five factors are given

  8. Accurate measurement of indoor radon concentration using a low-effective volume radon monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Aya; Minami, Nodoka; Mukai, Takahiro; Yasuoka, Yumi; Iimoto, Takeshi; Omori, Yasutaka; Nagahama, Hiroyuki; Muto, Jun

    2017-01-01

    AlphaGUARD is a low-effective volume detector and one of the most popular portable radon monitors which is currently available. This study investigated whether AlphaGUARD can accurately measure the variable indoor radon levels. The consistency of the radon-concentration data obtained by AlphaGUARD is evaluated against simultaneous measurements by two other monitors (each ∼10 times more sensitive than AlphaGUARD). When accurately measuring radon concentration with AlphaGUARD, we found that the net counts of the AlphaGUARD were required of at least 500 counts, <25% of the relative percent difference. AlphaGUARD can provide accurate measurements of radon concentration for the world average level (∼50 Bq m -3 ) and the reference level of workplace (1000 Bq m -3 ), using integrated data over at least 3 h and 10 min, respectively. (authors)

  9. Optimized collection, storage and measurement of radon and radon decay products - school experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philipsborn, H. von; Geipel, R.; Just, G.

    1998-01-01

    Schools are expected more than ever to teach in physics and chemistry an understanding of radioactivity in its many aspects. Simple experiments on the occurrence, the measurement and the properties of radionuclides are necessary for true understanding. Such experiments are now possible with novel methods of collection and storage of ubiquitous radon and radon decay products from air, water and solids. (orig.) [de

  10. Wind direction correlated measurements of radon and radon progeny in atmosphere: a method for radon source identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akber, R.A.; Pfitzner, J.; Johnston, A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the basic principles and methodology of a wind direction correlated measurement technique which is used to distinguish the mine-related and background components of radon and radon progeny concentrations in the vicinity of the ERA Ranger Uranium Mine. Simultaneous measurements of atmospheric radon and radon progeny concentrations and wind speed and direction were conducted using automatic sampling stations. The data were recorded as a time series of half hourly averages and grouped into sixteen 22.5 degrees wind sectors. The sampling interval and the wind sector width were chosen considering wind direction variability (σ θ ) over the sampling time interval. The data were then analysed for radon and radon progeny concentrations in each wind sector. Information about the wind frequency wind speed seasonal and diurnal variations in wind direction and radon concentrations was required for proper data analysis and interpretation of results. A comparison with model-based estimates for an identical time period shows agreement within about a factor of two between the two methods. 15 refs., 1 tab., 5 figs

  11. Reinforced natural radioactivity: the case of radon measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernhard, S.; Desray, M.

    2009-01-01

    Summarizing a presentation of radon measurement instruments, of their use and of the interpretation of their results, the authors briefly recall the origin of exposures to radon (geological or occupational), indicate the three types of control (detection of presence of radon, search for and characterization of sources and transfer ways, worker dosimetric follow-on) and the three types of measurement (selective, integrated or continuous), and evoke the range of measurement instruments

  12. Study of radon emanation variations in Morocco soil, correlations with seismic activities and atmospheric parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boukhal, H.; Cherkaoui, T.E.; Lferde, M.

    1994-01-01

    In order to verify the possibility of radon signal use in earthquake prediction, a study of radon emanation variation in soil was undertaken. Regular measurements have been carried out in five cities of Morocco ( Rabat, Tetouan, Ifrane, Khouribga, Berchid). The measuring method is based on the solid state nuclear track detectors technique. The good correlation between the different seismic activities and the variations of radon emanation rate in the five stations, have shown the interest of radon use in the earthquake prediction. 1 tab., 2 figs., 2 refs. (author)

  13. Measurement of radon concentration in water by means of {alpha}, {gamma} spectrometry. Radon concentration in ground and spring water in Hiroshima Prefecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shizuma, Kiyoshi [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan)

    1997-02-01

    Radon ({sup 222}Rn, T{sub 1/2}=3.8235{+-}0.0003d) is {alpha}-ray releasing nuclide, so that it can not be detected by {gamma}-ray measurement. But, the daughter nuclides {sup 214}Pb (T{sub 1/2}=26.8 min) and {sup 214}Bi (T{sub 1/2}=19.9 min) release {gamma}-ray, accordingly they are measured by Ge detector. Their radioactive equilibrium is kept in the closed vessel, because their half-lives are shorter than that of radon. We developed a measurement method of radon concentration by means of {gamma}-spectrometry. We applied this method to catch radon in the atmosphere by active carbon. The same principle can be applied to radon in water. Radon concentrations in the ground water were measured in 22 points in the Higashi-Hiroshima city and 82 points in the Hiroshima prefecture. The efficiencies of {gamma}-ray were determined. The radon concentration showed between 11 and 459 Bq/l and the average was 123 Bq/l. The high concentration of radon was distributed in the spring of granitic layer and higher concentration of radon were observed in the ground water of fault. (S.Y.)

  14. Effectiveness of ventilation improvements as a protective measure against radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoving, P.; Arvela, H.

    1993-01-01

    Radon reduction rates for ventilation improvement measures vary considerably. In 70% of the cases studied, further mitigation is needed to reach a level of 400 Bq/m 3 . Ventilation measures in crawl spaces and basements have resulted in reduction rates of up to 90%, though more typically 30-70%. Installing new mechanical systems in dwellings has resulted in 20-80% reduction rates. If fan use or fan efficiency is increased, radon levels can be reduced as much as when new systems are installed. Increasing fresh-air supply through vents or window gaps reduces radon concentrations 10-40%. Low ventilation rates, measured after mitigation using the passive per fluorocarbon tracer gas method, seem to be accompanied by also low radon reduction rates. Multiple zone tracer gas measurements were conducted in order to reveal radon entry from the soil and radon transport between zones. (orig.). (3 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.)

  15. In-situ performance evaluation of radon measurement techniques in Uranium mine exhausts of Jaduguda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patnaik, R.L.; Jha, V.N.; Singh, M.K.; Meena, J.S.; Rajesh Kumar; Srivastava, V.S.; Sethy, N.K.; Ravi, P.M.; Tripathi, R.M.

    2014-01-01

    Several techniques are used for the measurement of the activity concentration of radon in the work place and the environment. Devices like Scintillation cell, Alpha guard and Low Level Radon Detection System (LLRDS) are widely used for the estimation of radon. Some of the devices like scintillation cell is normally used in high activity concentration, whereas, device like LLRDS is used in low activity concentration range. All these above devices are used in ambient mode in which air sample is either collected in a cell or in a chamber and the alpha counts are recorded after a definite delay. In some device, air is allowed to be diffused through a filter and alpha activity is estimated using proper detection system. Passive radon dosimeters can effectively be used both in low and high activity concentration range. The cumulative radon exposure can be assessed using passive radon dosimeters. For in situ performance evaluation an area is required where both high and low level activity concentration of radon is anticipated. Uranium mines exhaust area is presumed to be an area where both these conditions can be found by mere variation in the placement of the device. Inter comparison exercise can also be done effectively at this location using various devices of radon estimation

  16. Measurement of radon exhalation rate and soil gas radon concentration in areas of southern Punjab (Pakistan)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mujahid, S. A.; Hussain, S.; Ramzan, M.

    2010-01-01

    Plastic track detectors were used to measure the radon concentration and exhalation rate from the soil samples. The samples were collected from areas of southern Punjab (Pakistan). In a laboratory experiment, passive alpha dosemeters were installed inside cylindrical bottles containing the soil samples. The radon concentrations and the radon exhalation rate were found in the ranges of 34±7 to 260±42 Bq m -3 and 38±8 to 288±46 mBq m -2 h -1 , respectively. The on-site measurements of radon in the soil gas were also carried out in these areas using a scintillation alpha counter. The concentration of radon in the soil gas was found in the range of 423±82-3565±438 Bq m -3 . (authors)

  17. Multivariate signal processing in measurements of radon and radon daughters in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urbanski, P.; Machaj, B.

    2000-01-01

    Extensive measurements of radon and radon daughters concentration gauge in a radon chamber were carried out. Count rate 'spectra' against time at the output of radiation detectors were measured and registered. The count rate spectra were then processed employing Principal Component Regression (PCR). A root mean square error of the count rate was estimated. It was found that PCR processing removes a great part of count rate random fluctuations originating from the radiation statistics that results in a decrease of count rate random error. The root mean square error of count rate in a radon daughter monitor is about 3 times lower, which is equivalent to the error of the gauge with a 9 times higher air flow rate if no PCR processing is used. In case of the radon concentration gauge the increase of sensitivity is even higher and amounts to 5 times. (author)

  18. Continuous measurements of outdoor radon concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iida, T.; Ikebe, Y.; Suzuki, K.; Ueno, K.; Komura, K.; Kato, I.; Jin Yihe

    1993-01-01

    The authors studied and developed an electrostatic 222 Rn monitor and have measured continuously outdoor radon ( 222 Rn) concentrations at Nagoya University since 1985. Four 222 Rn monitors were newly constructed to measure outdoor 222 Rn concentrations at other locations. The 222 Rn concentrations at Nagoya and Kasugai show a clear diurnal variation in autumn, and a seasonal pattern of a spring-summer minimum and a autumn-winter maximum. The results at Toki are the same pattern as that at Nagoya except spring. The concentrations at Kanazawa show a slight seasonal variation. A clear diurnal variation is observed in summer. (4 figs.)

  19. Measurement of gross alpha, gross beta, radon and radium activity concentrations in aqueous samples using liquid scintillation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaini Hamzah; Ahmad Saat; Masitah Alias; Siti Afiqah Abdul Rahman; Mohamed Kasim; Abdul Kadir Ishak

    2011-01-01

    Recently, Malaysia has taken a positive step toward providing a better water quality by introducing more water quality parameters into its Water Quality Standard. With regard to the natural radionuclides that may present in the water, 3 parameters were introduced that is gross alpha, gross beta and radium which need to be measured and cannot exceed 0.1, 1.0 and 1.0 Bq/ L respectively. This study was conducted to develop a more practical method in measuring these parameters in aqueous environmental samples. Besides having a lot of former tin mining areas, some part of Malaysia is located on the granitic rock which also contributes to a certain extent the amount of natural radionuclides such as uranium and thorium. For all we know these two radionuclides are the origin of other radionuclides being produced from their decay series. The State of Kelantan was chosen as the study area, where the water samples were collected from various part of the Kelantan River. 25 liters of samples were collected, acidify to pH 2 and filtered before the analysis. Measurement of these parameters was done using liquid scintillation counter (LSC). The LSC was set up to the optimum discriminator level and counting was done using alpha-beta mode. The results show that gross alpha and beta can be measured using scintillation cocktail and radium and radon using extraction method. The results for gross alpha, gross beta, 222 Ra and 226 Ra are 0.39-6.42, 0.66-16.18, 0.40-4.65 and 0.05-0.56 Bq/ L. MDA for gross alpha, gross beta and radium is 0.03, 0.08 and 0.00035 Bq/ L respectively. (Author)

  20. Nuclear tracks in solids and gas radon measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinosa, G.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: The Department of Energy (DOE), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in USA, and the European Community, have dedicated significant budget to the Radon study, its health effects and remedial actions for controlling and achieving lower levels, in these cases, nationwide research programs have been organized. With the aim to contribute on the radon levels knowledge in our country, the Applied Dosimetry Project at the Physics Institute of the University of Mexico has developed an indoor and outdoor radon measurement methodology. In this paper a passive radon detector device based on CR-39 polycarbonate for use in radon research and routine measurements is presented. As well the methodology for the track formation, automatic reading system, calibration procedure and measurements in a different location, are shown in this work. The results had been compared with dynamic detection systems, and another methodologies and research groups in order to have a high confidence in the radon levels reported. (Author)

  1. Radon in homes of the Portland, Oregon Area: Radon data from local radon testing companies collected by CRM (Continuous Radon Measurement) machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, H.; Lindsey, K.; Linde, T.; Burns, S. F.

    2013-12-01

    Students from the Department of Geology at Portland State University paired up with the Oregon Health Authority to better understand radon gas values in homes of the Portland metropolitan area. This study focuses on radon values collected by continuous radon measurement (CRM) machines, taken by local radon testing companies. The local companies participating in this study include Alpha Environmental Services, Inc., Cascade Radon, Environmental Works, The House Detectives, LLC, and Soil Solutions Environmental Services, Inc. In total, 2491 radon readings spanning across 77 zip codes were collected from local companies in the Portland metropolitan area. The maximum value, average value, percentage of homes greater than 4 pCi/L and total rank sum was calculated and used to determine the overall radon potential for each zip code (Burns et al., 1998). A list and four maps were produced showing the results from each category. Out of the total records, 24 zip codes resulted in high radon potential and the average reading for the entire Portland Metropolitan area was 3.7 pCi/L. High potential zip codes are thought to be a result of sand and gravel (Missoula Flood deposits) and faults present in the subsurface. The CRM data was compared with both long-term and short-term data provided by the Oregon Health Authority to validate radon potentials in each zip code. If a home is located in a zip code with high or moderate radon potential across two types of data sets, it is recommended that those homes be tested for radon gas.

  2. Radon in schools. An elevation measurement in schools in Baden-Wuerttemberg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fesenbeck, I.; Naber, C.; Frank, G.; Wilhelm, C.; Schaller, M.

    2016-01-01

    With an effective dose of about 1.1 mSv per year, radon and its secondary products have the biggest share in the population's natural radiation exposure. For implementation of the new EU directive 2013/59/EURATOM dated January 17, 2014, it is now planned to adapt the limit values of the Radiation Protection Ordinance and to extend the scope of validity in the EU member states. The ''Radon at Schools'' project is to cover an area-wide survey of radon concentrations in room air of schools in Baden-Wuerttemberg. Potential hazards caused by radon-222 and secondary products of radon are to be studied. For the project, 1600 schools were selected and requested to participate by an information letter. Half of the schools is distributed over the entire area of Baden-Wuerttemberg. The other half is located in areas of increased radon potential. Radon concentration in room air is determined passively by Karlsruhe radon exposimeters. Subsequently, active radon measurements will be made at conspicuous schools and information events will be offered for municipalities, teachers, interested parents, and pupils.

  3. Measurements of radon exhalation from building materials under model climate conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jann, O.; Schneider, U.; Koeppke, J.; Lehmann, R.

    2003-01-01

    The inhalation of 222 Rn (radon) is the most important reason for lung cancer as a result of smoking. The cause for enhanced radon concentration in the air of buildings is mostly the building ground. But also building products can lead to increased radon concentrations in indoor air when the products contain raw materials or residues with higher contents of 226 Ra (radium), especially in combination with low air exchange rates. For a realistic estimation of radon concentrations it is helpful to perform emission tests on the basis of emission test chambers. Emissions test chambers are already used successfully for the measurement of volatile organic compounds (VOC) emitted from different materials and products. The analysis of radon in air was performed with a test device based on the principle of ionisation chamber (ATMOS 12 D). It could be show that radon concentrations emitted from building materials can be determined reliably if certain boundary conditions such as temperature, relative humidity and especially area specific air flow rate are met. It was also shown that reduced area specific air flow rates or reduced air exchange rates lead to higher radon concentrations. It is remarkable that no conclusion can be drawn from the activity concentration of radium to the radon concentration in the air. Therefore in some cases much higher radon concentrations in air were determined that had been expected. Obviously diffusion within the material plays an important role. (orig.)

  4. Interim protocols for screening and follow-up radon and radon-decay product measurements. Interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magno, P.; Nyberg, P.; Ronca-Battista, M.

    1987-02-01

    This report outlines the recommended strategy for assessing indoor radon levels and provides guidance for interpreting measurement results. It recommends a two-step strategy for making the fewest measurements possible, while ensuring that radon concentrations are not seriously underestimated

  5. Measurement of mean radon concentrations in the Tokai districts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iida, Takao; Ikebe, Yukimasa; Yamanishi, Hirokuni

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes an electrostatic integrating radon monitor designed for the environmental radon monitoring and longterm measurements of mean radon concentrations in outdoor and indoor air. The position of the collecting electrode within the monitor was determined based on the calculation of the internal electric field. The radon exchange rate between the monitor and the outside air through the filter was 0.75 h -1 . The exchange rate can make the radon concentration inside the monitor to follow thoroughly the outside concentration. Since the electrostatic collection of RaA + ( 218 Po + ) atoms depends on the humidity of the air, the inside of the monitor was dehumidified with a diphosphorus pentaoxide (P 2 O 5 ) drying agent which is powerful and dose not absorb radon gas. From the relationship between track density and radon exposure, the calibration factor was derived to be 0.52 ± 0.002 tracks cm -2 (Bq m -3 h) -1 . The detection limit of mean radon level is 1.2 Bq m -3 for an exposure time fo 2 months. The mean radon concentrations in various environments were measured through the year using the monitors this developed. The annual mean outdoor radon level in the Tokai districts was 7.0 Bq m -3 . The mean radon concentrations was found to vary from 3.5 to 11.7 Bq m -3 depending upon the geographical conditions even in this relatively small region. The annual indoor radon concentrations at Nagoya and Sapporo ranged from 6.4 to 11.9 Bq m -3 and from 15.5 to 121.1 Bq m -3 , respectively, with the type of building material and the ventilation rate. The mean radon concentrations in tightly built houses selected at Sapporo are about 10 times as high as those in drafty houses at Nagoya. (author)

  6. Use of commercial radon monitors for low level radon measurements in dynamically operated VOC emission test chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, M.; Richter, M.; Jann, O.

    2017-01-01

    Compared to the intended EU reference level of 300 Bq m -3 for indoor radon concentrations, the contribution of building materials appears to be low. Considering the recommended limit of 100 Bq m -3 by WHO, their contribution is supposed to be relevant, especially at low air exchange rates. This study as part of a two-part research project investigated the suitability of direct low level 222 Rn measurement under simulated indoor conditions with commercial radon monitors and dynamically operated emission test chambers. Active measuring devices based on ionisation or scintillation chambers with 1-σ uncertainties below 8.6% at 20 Bq m -3 were found to be best suitable for a practical test procedure for the determination of radon exhalation rates of building materials. For the measurement of such low concentrations, the knowledge of the accurate device background level is essential. (authors)

  7. Current status of programmes to measure and reduce radon exposure in Irish workplaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colgan, P A; Madden, J S; Synnott, H; Fennell, S; Pollard, D; Fenton, D

    2004-01-01

    National legislation, which implements European Council Directive 96/29/EURATOM in Ireland, sets a reference level of 400 Bq m -3 averaged over any 3 month period for radon exposure in the workplace and also empowers the Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland to direct employers to have radon measurements carried out. This legislation came into effect in May 2000. Radon measurements have already been completed in show caves and other underground workplaces. Between 1998 and 2001, over 33 800 individual radon measurements were carried out in all ground floor offices and classrooms in 3444 schools nationwide as part of a programme undertaken jointly with the Department of Education and Science. Where the average indoor radon concentration in one or more rooms exceeded 200 Bq m -3 , remedial measures were implemented. For concentrations up to 400 Bq m -3 this involved increased ventilation while for higher concentrations an active sump was normally installed. The results of the survey, as well as the effectiveness of the different remedial strategies, are discussed. In the case of other above ground workplaces, different approaches have been adopted. As a first step, workplaces in two known high radon areas were directed to have radon measurements carried out. This programme had limited success because of problems in obtaining accurate workplace databases and a general lack of awareness on the part of employers of the issues involved. From a sample of 2610 employers directed to measure radon, only 408 actually completed measurements and 37 workplaces were identified as having average 3 month average radon concentrations above 400 Bq m -3 . A total of 1356 employers ignored all correspondence, some of which was sent by registered post and signed for on receipt. Current initiatives are focused on the provision of information and include newspaper advertising as well as publications aimed specifically at both employer and employee representative groups. The ability

  8. Study of radon 222 permeation through plastic membranes. Application to a measurement method of radon in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labed, V.; Rannou, A.; Robe, M.C.

    1990-01-01

    Gaseous permeation is a complex phenomenon of gas transfer through some polymers. Original in respect of conventional studies where permeation occurs between two gaseous phases, the present study concerns radon 222 transfer between water and air through a membrane. Polypropylene membranes are tested with an experimental device following time evolution of the phenomenon by measurement of volume activity in water and in air. An application of this study to a method for determination of radon concentration in water by measurement of concentration in air is discussed [fr

  9. Radon-222: tracer of geological systems dynamics. Methodology and signal processing, interpretation of radon-222 behaviour in active geological media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richon, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Gases, especially radon, have often been cited as indicators of large-scale geodynamic processes, or as precursors of earthquakes and volcanic eruptions. Measurable in the air, water and rocks, natural radon concentrations are generally extremely low, because 1 Bq m -3 corresponds to a mixing ratio of 1,77 * 10 -20 in air at normal temperature and pressure (NPT). Expressed in a usual unit in chemistry of air pollution, an usual activity concentration of 37 Bq m -3 is only a billion th of ppb by volume (ppbv) in the atmosphere. Yet such, concentrations of radon are very easy to measure, because the decay α is an energetic phenomenon: It makes it theoretically possible to detect a single atom of radon, which is an inaccessible performance by chemical analysis. This feature, combined with a half-life of 3.82 days, makes radon so interesting for tracing natural phenomena. But the major drawback is that radon becomes very sensitive to subsurface meteorological and hydrogeological processes especially if the measurement methodology is not perfectly controlled. These aspects are not addressed in the past and in recent literatures and are rarely taken into account when analyzing and interpreting radon signal. We review these issues by addressing problems related to instrumentation, to measurement methods, and to data processing. We show how to extract signatures of geodynamical processes dissimulated in radon data for very different sites with strong dynamic like volcanic sites (La Soufriere of Guadeloupe, FWI, Merapi, Indonesia), tectonic sites (Syabru-Bensi in Nepal and the Kunlun fault in Tibet) and underground laboratories (Roselend and Argentiere). For this, we had to develop signals processing tools that allow us to extract the effect of barometric and gravimetric tide waves from the radon signal. This is a very sensitive for a detailed survey of the transport processes of radon that are closely linked to geodynamic processes involved in different sites. The

  10. Radon measurements in the interior of the great pyramid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenawy, M A; Morsy, A A [Ain Shams Univ., Cairo (Egypt). College for Girls

    1991-01-01

    Radon concentration measurements were made in the interior of the great pyramid of ''Cheops'' at Giza. Measurements were carried out using CR-39 as a solid state nuclear track detector. The CR-39 sheets were placed inside the Queen's and King's chambers and along the ascending corridor leading to them. An evaluation of the radon concentration is presented and discussed. (author).

  11. Radon measurements in the interior of the great pyramid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenawy, M.A.; Morsy, A.A.

    1991-01-01

    Radon concentration measurements were made in the interior of the great pyramid of ''Cheops'' at Giza. Measurements were carried out using CR-39 as a solid state nuclear track detector. The CR-39 sheets were placed inside the Queen's and King's chambers and along the ascending corridor leading to them. An evaluation of the radon concentration is presented and discussed. (author)

  12. FOLLOW-UP RADON MEASUREMENTS IN 14 MITIGATED SCHOOLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of a determination of the long-term performance of radon mitigation systems installed in U. S. EPA research schools: radon measurements were conducted in 14 schools that had been mitigated between 1988 and 1991. The measurements were made between Februar...

  13. Study on the influence factors about the soil radon measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Zixiang; Liu Yanbin; Jia Yuxin; Mai Weiji; Liu Xiaolian; Yang Yuhua

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To explore relevant factors about the soil radon measurement and provide gist of formulating correct measure method by studying the way of the soil radon measurement. Methods: Deflation-ionization room standard is adopted. Results: The concentration of soil radon becomes higher with the sample's volume added, it also augmented with the measure depth increased in certain degree; The concentration of soil radon changes little when sample's depth is above 60 cm; The time of deflation has no obvious influence on the concentration of soil radon, but microwave show serious effect on it; The results will be lowered when the desiccant is humidified, raining has the same affection on it; Plant has some impact on it. Conclusion: The measured results will be affected by microwave, oscillate and plant. Sample's volume and depth, soil's humidity can influence it too. The result's veracity can be guaranteed by choosing appropriate sample and measure condition. (authors)

  14. Soil gas radon and thoron measurements in some Venezuelan oilfields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, Daniel Palacios; Yininber Avila; Teixeira, Diana; Sajo-Bohus, Laszlo; Greaves, Eduardo; Barros, Haydn; Fusella, Emidio; Salas, Johnny; Fernandez, Guillermo; Bolivar, Manuel; Regalado, Jimmy

    2016-01-01

    Radon and thoron concentrations in soil gas were studied in some Venezuelan oilfields using passive and active methods. In some cases, investigations indicated a strong correlation between oil production areas and the intensity of radon signals, while in others a decrease in radon concentration was observed. This behavior was explained on the basis of different geological structures of the associated reservoir traps. Geological faults associated with petroleum systems were well recognized by the radon and thoron anomalies. Possible conduits and sources responsible for the occurrence of natural gas in a river and in an aquifer were identified and localized. (author)

  15. Radon in schools. An elevation measurement in schools in Baden-Wuerttemberg; Radon in Schulen. Eine Erhebungsmessung in Baden-Wuerttemberg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fesenbeck, I.; Naber, C.; Frank, G.; Wilhelm, C.; Schaller, M. [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (Germany). Sicherheit und Umwelt

    2016-07-01

    With an effective dose of about 1.1 mSv per year, radon and its secondary products have the biggest share in the population's natural radiation exposure. For implementation of the new EU directive 2013/59/EURATOM dated January 17, 2014, it is now planned to adapt the limit values of the Radiation Protection Ordinance and to extend the scope of validity in the EU member states. The ''Radon at Schools'' project is to cover an area-wide survey of radon concentrations in room air of schools in Baden-Wuerttemberg. Potential hazards caused by radon-222 and secondary products of radon are to be studied. For the project, 1600 schools were selected and requested to participate by an information letter. Half of the schools is distributed over the entire area of Baden-Wuerttemberg. The other half is located in areas of increased radon potential. Radon concentration in room air is determined passively by Karlsruhe radon exposimeters. Subsequently, active radon measurements will be made at conspicuous schools and information events will be offered for municipalities, teachers, interested parents, and pupils.

  16. Radon in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Search Radon Contact Us Share Radon in Schools Related Information Managing Radon in Schools Radon Measurement ... Radon Could Be a Serious Threat to Your School Chances are you've already heard of radon - ...

  17. Evaluation of the open vial method in the radon measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez del Rio, H.; Davila R, J. I.; Mireles G, F.

    2014-10-01

    The open vial method is a simple technique, under-utilized but that take advantage of the great radon solubility in organic solvents, therefore applies in the measurement of the radon concentration exhaled in soil. The method consists on the exposition to the gas radon of an open vial with scintillating solution. An integral mathematical model for indoors that describes the emanation processes and gas radon exhalation was developed, as well as the radon dissolution in the scintillation liquid, besides obtaining the characteristic parameters of the experimental system proposed for the radon concentration calculation exhaled by soils. Two experimental arrangements were designed with exposition cameras of 12 and 6 L and quantity of different soil. The open vial was prepared with a mixture of 8 ml of deionized water and 12 ml of scintillation liquid OptiPhase Hi Safe 3 in polyethylene vials; the measurements of the dissolved radon were carried out in scintillation liquid equipment. As a result, on average 2.0% of the exhaled radon is dissolved in the open vial and the dissolved fraction is independent of the experimental arrangement. Also was observed that the exposition time does not affect the radon dissolution significantly, in correspondence with the reported in the literature. (Author)

  18. Effective dose to radon considering people's activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimo, M.; Seki, K.; Kikuchi, I.

    1992-01-01

    The tidal volume was estimated for evaluating the effective dose due to radon concentration in the atmosphere. In this study regional population was separated to vocation and non-vocation. The occupancy time and the breathing rate for both vocation and non-vocation groups were estimated, and the annual tidal volume for both groups were calculated. Human actions were separated to 18 activities in the process for estimating the breathing rate. It was clear that the breathing rate depended on human activity and that the human activity changed with its age, so the breathing rate varied with age. Finally the effective doses due to radon and radon progeny indoors and outdoors were evaluated. The maximum annual effective dose was estimated to be 1.2 mSv, minimum 0.2 mSv, and mean 0.51 mSv for vocation. For non-vocation, the male maximum value 0.43 mSv was obtained at the 16 age and the minimum 0.12 mSv at the 70 age, whereas female maximum 0.26 mSv was obtained at the 12 age and the minimum 0.11 mSv at the 70 age. In addition in this study objective areas are Aichi, Gifu, and Mie prefectures for vocation and only Aichi prefecture for non-vocation. (author)

  19. Radon gas measurements inside houses of the Argentine Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canoba, Analia C.; Arnaud, Marta I.; Lopez, Fabio O.; Oliveira, Antonio

    2001-01-01

    Indoor radon gas concentrations were measured in dwellings in various cities of Argentina. Solid-state nuclear track, electrets and activated charcoal detectors were the methods used for monitoring the radon concentration.A total of 2034 homes were monitored since the beginning of this project in 1983. The monitored homes are constructed of a variety of building materials but most of them are built predominantly of bricks and concrete. The mean values calculated for the different cities are below 50 Bq m -3 . Very few values above 200 Bq m -3 were found and none exceeded 300 Bq m -3 . The mean value for the whole country is 34.6 Bq m -3 with a geometric mean of 25.0 Bq m -3 and the corresponding annual effective dose is 0.86 mSv. (author)

  20. Measurements of radon gas in dwellings of Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canoba, A.C.; Arnaud, M.I.; Lopez, F.O.; Oliveira, A.A.

    1998-01-01

    The concentration of radon gas in dwellings of several cities of Argentina was measured. For this purpose, different kind of detectors were used such as passive solid state nuclear track detectors, electrets and detectors which use activated charcoal. Since 1983, a total of 1630 dwellings were analysed. The cases monitored were dwellings where the main construction materials are reinforced concrete and brick. The average values found in each city are below 50 Bq/m 3 . The values above 200-Bqm 3 are very few, and none of them is above 300 Bq/m 3 . The average value of radon gas in air dwellings in our country is 33 Bq/m 3 , with a geometric mean of 23 Bq/m 3 , corresponding to an annual effective dose of 0.83 mSv. (author) [es

  1. Radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This leaflet in the At-a-Glance Series, describes what radon is, where it is found, why it presents a risk to health, the official advice, and the remedies that are available to reduce radon levels. (author)

  2. Measurement of radon-222 concentration in environment sampled within short time using charcoal detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamasaki, Tadashi; Sekiyama, Shigenobu; Tokin, Mina; Nakayasu, Yumiko; Watanabe, Tamaki.

    1994-01-01

    The concentration of 222 Rn in air sampled within a very short period of time was measured using activated charcoal as the adsorber. The detector is the plastic canister containing mixture of the activated charcoal and the silica gel. The radon gas was adsorbed in the charcoal in the radon chamber at the temperature of 25degC. A little amount of liquid scintillation cocktail was added into the vial of liquid scintillation counter with the canister. The radon in the charcoal was extracted in the liquid scintillation cocktail. Alpha particles emitted from radon and its daughter nuclei in the cocktail were detected using the liquid scintillation counter. Present method has advantages of not only short sampling time of air but also adsorption of radon in charcoal under a constant temperature. The concentration of radon in air down to 2 Bq/m 3 could be detected. A kinetic model for adsorption of radon in the charcoal is also presented. The ratio of radon concentration in the charcoal to that in air under the equilibrium state of adsorption was estimated to be from 6.1 to 6.8 m 3 /kg at the temperature of 25degC. (author)

  3. Open charcoal chamber method for mass measurements of radon exhalation rate from soil surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsapalov, Andrey; Kovler, Konstantin; Miklyaev, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Radon exhalation rate from the soil surface can serve as an important criterion in the evaluation of radon hazard of the land. Recently published international standard ISO 11665-7 (2012) is based on the accumulation of radon gas in a closed container. At the same time since 1998 in Russia, as a part of engineering and environmental studies for the construction, radon flux measurements are made using an open charcoal chamber for a sampling duration of 3–5 h. This method has a well-defined metrological justification and was tested in both favorable and unfavorable conditions. The article describes the characteristics of the method, as well as the means of sampling and measurement of the activity of radon absorbed. The results of the metrological study suggest that regardless of the sampling conditions (weather, the mechanism and rate of radon transport in the soil, soil properties and conditions), uncertainty of method does not exceed 20%, while the combined standard uncertainty of radon exhalation rate measured from the soil surface does not exceed 30%. The results of the daily measurements of radon exhalation rate from the soil surface at the experimental site during one year are reported. - Highlights: • Radon exhalation rate from the soil surface area of 32 cm"2 can be measured at level of 10 mBq/(m"2s) at the uncertainty ≤30%. • The method has a metrological justification. • No need to consider climate conditions, soil properties and conditions, mechanism and rate of radon transport in the soil.

  4. Continuous monitoring systems for indoor radon measurement: construction and results of their testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muellerova, M.; Holy, K.; Bujnova, A.; Polaskova, A.; Hola, O.

    2007-01-01

    Two continuous radon monitoring systems were built on the basis of the scintillation chambers. The first system used the large volume scintillation chamber with the volume of 4.5 liters and the second one the commercial scintillation chamber with the volume of 1 liter as the detectors for radon concentration measurement. Both systems were calibrated by Ward-Borak method. The detection limits of monitoring systems are 2.9 Bq · m -3 and 5.1 Bq · m -3 respectively, at -2 hour counting period and 30 % statistical uncertainty. The radon monitoring systems and the professional radon monitor AlphaGUARD were tested in real conditions of working room. The testing showed that long-tenn courses of radon activity concentrations obtained by all three monitors are highly correlated (R 2 ∼0.95). Also the average values of radon activity concentrations calculated on the basis of measured data are identical in the scope of counting errors already at the measurement of the radon activity concentrations in the range of (10-120) Bq · m -3 . (authors)

  5. Project Radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekholm, S.

    1988-01-01

    The project started in March 1987. The objective is to perform radon monitoring in 2000 dwellings occupied by people employed by State Power Board and to continue to contribute to the development of radon filters. The project participates in developing methods for radon measurement and decontamination and in adapting the methods to large scale application. About 400 so called radon trace measurements (coarse measurement) and about 10 action measurements (decontamination measurement) have been made so far. Experience shows that methods are fully applicable and that the decontamination measures recommended give perfectly satisfactory results. It is also established that most of the houses with high radon levels have poor ventilation Many of them suffer from moisture and mould problems. The work planned for 1988 and 1989 will in addition to measurements be directed towards improvement of the measuring methods. An activity catalogue will be prepared in cooperation with ventilation enterprises. (O.S.)

  6. Radon: guidance on protective measures for new dwellings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This report gives guidance for reducing the presence of radon in new dwellings and hence reducing the risk to occupants of exposure to radon. This is a follow-up to the interim guidance of 1988. The report provides comprehensive practical details on the methods of protection including both primary and secondary measures. (UK)

  7. Intercomparison of different instruments for measuring radon concentration in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimo, Michikuni; Iida, Takao

    1990-01-01

    An intercomparison of different instruments for measurement of radon concentration was carried out. The instruments include an ionization chamber, the charcoal-trap method, a flow-type ionization chamber (pulse-counting method), a two-filter method, an electrostatic collection method and a passive integration radon monitor. All instruments except for the passive radon monitor have been calibrated independently. Measurements were performed over a concentration range from about 3.5 Bq·m -3 (in outdoor air) to 110 Bq·m -3 (in indoor air). The results obtained by these techniques, except the two-filter technique, are comparable. Radon daughter concentration measured using a filter-sampling method was about 52% of radon concentration. (author)

  8. Intercomparison of different instruments that measure radon concentration in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimo, M.; Iida, T.; Ikebe, Y.

    1987-01-01

    An intercomparison of different instruments for measurement of radon concentration was carried out. The instruments include an ionization chamber, the charcoal-trap technique, a flow-type ionization chamber (pulse-counting technique), a two-filter method, an electrostatic collection method and a passive integrating radon monitor. All instruments except for the passive radon monitor have been calibrated independently. Measurements were performed over a concentration range from about 3.5 Bq/m/sup 3/ (in outdoor air) to 110 Bq/m/sup 3/ (in indoor air). The results obtained from these techniques, except the two-filter technique, are comparable. Radon daughter concentration measured using a filter-sampling technique was about 52% of radon concentrations

  9. Gamma, radon, natural radioactivity measurements in Chile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuardo, E.

    1997-01-01

    Different natural radiation measurements, performed since 1983, are analysed and discussed regarding the average effective population dose. A decade of absorbed gamma dose measurements in air (1983-93), were carried out using compensated TLD detectors, during long periods of integration time and with a network of 11 stations, along the country, from Arica to the Antarctic territory. An indoor Rn -222 and gamma survey dwellings, in high background zones, underground mines and drinking water was started in 1988 using different kind of detectors, including electret radon chambers. The methods, dose assessments and results are presented and discussed in the frame of worldwide average effective population doses. None of the average effective doses found over the evaluated areas, exceed the comparison levels. (author)

  10. Contribution to the study of radon risk assessment - Use of Solid State Nuclear Tracks Detectors (SSNTD) for the measurement of radon in buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RALAIARISOA, H.L

    2004-01-01

    222 Rn is a natural radioactive gas, originating from the decay of 226 Ra. Both of these radionuclides are elements of 238 U series. Uranium is naturally present in the rocks and soils, therefore radon is always present too because it is a soil gas. Radon takes the most important part in man exposure to natural sources of ionizing radiations. Moreover, it causes lung cancer. It can accumulate in confined environments such as buildings, so that its inhalation is a potential risk for human health. Thus radon measurement is necessary for radiation protection. Integrated measurement using Solid State Nuclear Tracks Detector (SSNTD) is a very common method for radon measurement in buildings because of the low cost of the detectors and their easy application. The measurement technics are based on the interaction of alpha particles emitted by radon with a polymer. Alpha particles produce in the polymer latent tracks, which need chemical revelation to be observable with optical microscopy. The number of revealed tracks is proportionnal to the average volumic activity of 222 Rn corresponding to the time exposure of the detectors.The aim of this thesis work is the continuation of previous study on the preliminary investigations of radon levels in the city of Antananarivo, and to extend this study in Antsirabe, which has been shown as a region of interest. The levels of radon measured in buildings in Antananarivo and Antsirabe are typical values of indoor radon concentration. The average values of concentrations are inferior to 60 Bq.m - 3. The health risk is negligible but not nul. A typical protocol of radon level measurement in Malagasy buildings is suggested to allow the implementation of a risk management policy related to radon within the Malagasy context. [fr

  11. Method for radon measurement in the subsoil in geothermal prospectus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balcazar G, M.

    1991-02-01

    The present formless describe the technique for radon measurement in the underground, being able to be used as an additional study in the geothermal prospecting. This methodology has been developed in the National Institute of Nuclear Research of Mexico using a film of cellulose nitrate to detect those emanated alpha particles, by the Rn (222). By means of the trace account in this films its settle down the present radon levels in the underground. The present method thinks about as an alternating one to overcome in it leaves the limitations found in the development of the methodology using a radon emanometer ETR-1, of the trade mark SCINTREX. The radon detected by plastics is also an integral method of measuring in a geothermal field that avoids the problems of variations of radon to pluvial precipitations and barometric variations. These variations affect the results strongly when it is used the punctual sampler as it is the ETR-1. (Author)

  12. Low-level radon measurements by nuclear track detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koksal, E. M.; Goksel, S. A.; Alkan, H.

    1985-01-01

    In the work to be described here we have developed a passive nuclear track dosimeter to measure the integrated value of indoor radon (Rn-222) over a long period of time. Passive radon dosimeter which we have developed in our laboratories makes use of two small pieces of CR-39 plastic (Allyl diglycol carbonate) as detectors for registering tracks of alpha particles emitted by radon. These CR-39 plastic detectors are fixed on the inside bottom of a cup-shaped polystrene enclosure which is closed at the top by a tissue permeable for gases only. CR-39 detectors exposed to radon gas in the indoor air for a period of six months then are removed and chemically etched to make the alpha particle tracks visible under the microscope. The counts of tracks are evaluated to determine the radon concentration in the air in comparison with the number of tracks produced by a known concentration of radon gas. By using the passive dosimeters developed and the chemical etching procedure descriped here, measurements of indoor radon concentrations were carried out in 45 houses in different districts of the city of Istanbul. In this pilot experiment mean radon concentrations between 0.7 and 3.5 pCi/l have been found in these houses. In order to improve the counting of alpha tracks produced on the detectors a prototype electrochemical etching system in addition to chemical etching, is being developed. (author)

  13. Measurements of radon in dwellings with CR-39 track detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majborn, Benny

    1986-01-01

    A passive integrating dosemeter has been designed for measuring natural radiation in dwellings. The dosemeter contains one or two CR-39 track detectors to measure radon and three thermoluminescence dosemeters to measure external radiation. The dosemeter was investigated in a pilot study in 1983....../84, and it is now used in a nationwide survey of natural radiation in Danish dwellings. The characteristics of the dosemeter with respect to radon measurements are presented, and the radon monitoring results obtained in the pilot study are summarized...

  14. Radon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weigel, F [Muenchen Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Anorganische Chemie

    1978-09-01

    The noble gas radon, formerly called emanation, was discovered a few years after radium. /sup 222/Rn, the longest-lived isotope, has a half-life of 3,82 days. This half life is so short that the experimental techniques available at present (1978) are not sufficient for a characterization of defined radon compounds, even though there are definite indications for the existence of such compounds, and one may expect such radon compounds to be even more stable than the numerous known xenon compounds. - The radon isotopes /sup 219/Rn (Actinon), /sup 220/Rn (Thoron), and /sup 222/Rn (Radon) occur in nature despite their rather short half-lives, because they are continously generated from their mothers /sup 223/Ra, /sup 224/Ra, and /sup 226/Ra, which are in secular equilibrium with long-lived isotopes /sup 235/U, /sup 238/U, and /sup 232/Th, and are in turn continously formed from these long-lived isotopes. Since the radon isotopes are gases, they enter the atmosphere and are carried for long distances with air currents. - Because radon is so short-lived, its practical applications are rather limited. For medical applications, small sealed glass tubes filled with radon are used as radiation sources after the radon has decayed, because the whole series of Po-, Bi-, and Pb-isotopes of the radium decay chain are formed, whose penetrating radiation is useful for therapy. When solids are spiked with Ra isotopes, radon is evolved at a constant rate. On heating such solids, phase transitions show up by sudden increased radon evolution (Hahn's emanation method). - On the basis of nuclear theoretical calculations, there is hardly a chance for the discovery of a long-lived radon species. Therefore, major progress in radon chemistry is hardly to be expected in the near future.

  15. The history, development and the present status of the radon measurement programme in the United States of America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, A.C.

    2015-01-01

    The US radon measurement programme began in the late 1950's by the US Public Health Service in Colorado, New Mexico and Utah during the uranium frenzy. After the 1967 Congressional Hearings on the working conditions in uranium mines, the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) was asked to conduct studies in active uranium mines to assess the exposure of the miners on the Colorado Plateau and in New Mexico. From 1967 to 1972, the Health and Safety Laboratory of the US AEC in New York investigated more than 20 uranium mines for radon and radon decay product concentrations and particle size in 4 large uranium mines in New Mexico. In 1970, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was established and took over some of the AEC radon measurement activities. Between 1975 and 1978, the Environmental Measurements Laboratory of the US Department of Energy conducted the first detailed indoor radon survey in the USA. Later in 1984, the very high concentrations of radon found in Pennsylvania homes set the wheels in motion and gave birth to the US Radon Industry. The US EPA expanded its involvement in radon issues and assumed an active role by establishing the National Radon Proficiency Program to evaluate the effectiveness of radon measurement and mitigation methods. In 1998, due to limited resources EPA privatised the radon programme. This paper presents a personal perspective of past events and current status of the US radon programme. It will present an update on radon health effects, the incidence rate of lung cancer in the USA and the number of radon measurements made from 1988 to 2013 using short-term test methods. More than 23 million measurements were made in the last 25 y and as a result more than 1.24 million homes were mitigated successfully. It is estimated that <2 % of the radon measurements performed in the USA are made using long-term testing devices. The number of homes above the US action level of 148 Bq m -3 (4 pCi l -1 ) may be ∼8.5 million because ∼50

  16. First measurement of radon transfer. Water - skin - blood - air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philipsborn, H. von; Grunewald, W.A.

    2000-01-01

    While radon is disliked in uranium mines and homes, it is used medically in radon spas for the treatment of several ailments. The transfer of radon gas from water, through skin into blood and into expiratory air was studied completely for the first time for a person resting 20-30 min in radon water. For waterborne radon concentrations of 1500±100 Bq/L, 4±1 Bq/L were measured in the blood and 2.4±0.5 kBq/m 3 (Bq/L) in the expiratory air. The results can be understood according to the principles of physiology. The nature of the experiments excluded persons other than the authors. Hence the study has been radiometric (physical), not clinical (medical). (orig.)

  17. Indoor radon measurements in dwellings of four Saudi Arabian cities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Jarallah, M.I. E-mail: mibrahim@kfupm.edu.sa; Fazal-ur-Rehman; Abu-Jarad, F.; Al-Shukri, A

    2003-06-01

    An indoor radon survey of a total of 269 dwellings, with one dosimeter per house, distributed in four Saudi Arabian cities was carried out. The objective of this survey was to carry out indoor radon measurements of two cities in the Eastern Province, Khafji and Hafr Al-Batin and to compare this with two cities in the Western Province, Al-Madina and Taif. The survey provides additional information about indoor radon concentrations in Saudi Arabia. The results of the survey in these cities showed that the overall minimum, maximum and average radon concentration were 7,137 and 30 Bq m{sup -3}, respectively. The lowest average radon concentration (20 Bq m{sup -3}) was found in Hafr Al-Batin, while the highest average concentration was found in Khafji (40 Bq m{sup -3})

  18. Measurement of the radon concentration in an underground public facility and dose assessment. Fukuoka Tenjin Shopping Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narazaki, Yukinori; Tokonami, Shinji; Sanada, Tetsuya; Kanno, Nobuyuki; Yamada, Yuji

    2000-01-01

    Radon concentrations were measured with a passive radon detector from April 1998 through June 1999 in the Fukuoka Tenjin Underground Shopping Center to assess the dose affecting workers because of radon progeny inhalation. The radon concentration during the period was distributed from a range of 1.9 to 13.6 Bq/m 3 . The arithmetic average concentration was estimated to be 6.9±2.4 Bq/ 3 . The radon level was lower than that in dwellings in Japan and other countries. No spatial distribution of radon concentration was found in that area. From continuous measurement, the radon concentration was found to be high from midnight to noon and low in the afternoon. Little difference was noted between the daily average radon concentration and that during working hours. There was no seasonal variation. The equilibrium factor of 0.21±0.10 was obtained during working hours. The activity-weighted size distribution of radon progeny was evaluated by using the number distribution of ambient aerosols and the classical attachment theory. Consequently, the activity median diameter was 150 nm. The unattached fraction of radon progeny was estimated to be 0.025 with an empirical equation. The annual effective dose of workers at the Tenjin center was calculated with the dose conversion factor from the UNSCEAR 1993 report and estimated to be 0.024 mSv/y. (author)

  19. Radon measurements in well and spring water in Lebanon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdallah, Samer M.; Habib, Rima R.; Nuwayhid, Rida Y.; Chatila, Malek; Katul, Gabriel

    2007-01-01

    The variation of dissolved radon ( 222 Rn) levels in water supplies remains of interest because of the radiation-induced public health hazards. A large part of the Lebanese population relies on springs and wells for their drinking water. 222 Rn measurements in spring and well water sources were conducted using the E-PERM method at sites ranging from sea level to 1200m above sea level and across several geologic formations within Lebanon. The dissolved radon concentrations ranged from a low of 0.91BqL -1 in a coastal well source to a high of 49.6BqL -1 for a spring source in a mountainous region. Of the 20 sites sampled, only five had radon levels above 11BqL -1 and these mostly occurred in areas adjacent to well-known geological fault zones. A preliminary national average radon level was determined to be about 11.4BqL -1 . In general, as all determined concentrations were well below the 100 and 146BqL -1 revised reference levels proposed in the European Union and the United States, respectively, it is concluded that there is no reason to believe these water sources pose any radon-related hazard. On the other hand, at locations where water is collected directly from the springhead, it is advisable to have a settling/piping system installed allowing for further radon decay and radon loss into the air to alleviate any possible radon problem

  20. Influence of energy-saving measures on the radon concentration in some kindergartens in the Czech Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fojtikova, I.; Navratilova Rovenska, K.

    2014-01-01

    Due to the large number of subsidies for energy-saving reconstructions granted, and expecting a strong influence of reconstruction on the radon level in building, the long-term measurements of radon concentration are offered free of charge to kindergartens in the Czech Republic. Classrooms and playrooms where the radon levels exceeded the reference value for kindergartens, which is 400 Bq m -3 , are monitored continuously for at least a week to obtain the average activity concentration of radon when children are present. Some of the kindergartens were previously measured in the 1990's. These earlier measurements have provided an opportunity to compare the results. This paper presents some lessons learned from radon diagnosis carried out in particular cases and an analysis of the influence of reconstruction work on the radon level in the buildings. (authors)

  1. Metrology of the radon in air volume activity at the italian radon reference chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sciocchetti, G.; Cotellessa, G.; Soldano, E.; Pagliari, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Metrologia delle Radiazioni Ionizzanti, ENEA Centro Ricerche Casaccia Roma (Italy)

    2006-07-01

    The approach of the Italian National Institute of Ionising Radiations (I.N.M.R.I.-ENEA) on radon metrology has been based on a complete and integrated system which can be used to calibrate the main types of {sup 222}Rn in air measuring instruments with international traceability. The Italian radon reference chamber is a research and calibration facility developed at the Casaccia Research Center in Roma. This facility has an inner volume of one m{sup 3}. The wall is a cylindrical stainless steel vessel coupled with an automated climate apparatus operated both at steady and dynamic conditions. The control and data acquisition equipment is based on Radotron system, developed to automate the multitasking management of different sets of radon monitors and climatic sensors. A novel approach for testing passive radon monitors with an alpha track detector exposure standard has been developed. It is based on the direct measurement of radon exposure with a set of passive integrating monitors based on the new ENEA piston radon exposure meter. This paper describes the methodological approach on radon metrology, the status-of-art of experimental apparatus and the standardization procedures. (authors)

  2. Metrology of the radon in air volume activity at the italian radon reference chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sciocchetti, G.; Cotellessa, G.; Soldano, E.; Pagliari, M.

    2006-01-01

    The approach of the Italian National Institute of Ionising Radiations (I.N.M.R.I.-ENEA) on radon metrology has been based on a complete and integrated system which can be used to calibrate the main types of 222 Rn in air measuring instruments with international traceability. The Italian radon reference chamber is a research and calibration facility developed at the Casaccia Research Center in Roma. This facility has an inner volume of one m 3 . The wall is a cylindrical stainless steel vessel coupled with an automated climate apparatus operated both at steady and dynamic conditions. The control and data acquisition equipment is based on Radotron system, developed to automate the multitasking management of different sets of radon monitors and climatic sensors. A novel approach for testing passive radon monitors with an alpha track detector exposure standard has been developed. It is based on the direct measurement of radon exposure with a set of passive integrating monitors based on the new ENEA piston radon exposure meter. This paper describes the methodological approach on radon metrology, the status-of-art of experimental apparatus and the standardization procedures. (authors)

  3. Radon Measurement Proficiency (RMP) Program methods and devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, J.; Hoornbeek, J.; Jalbert, P.; Sensintaffar, E.; Hopper, R.

    1991-01-01

    The US EPA developed the voluntary Radon Measurement Proficiency Program in 1986 in response to a Federal and State need for measurement services firms to demonstrate their proficiency with radon measurement methods and devices. Since that time, the program has set basic standards for the radon measurement industry. The program has grown dramatically since its inception. In 1986, fewer than 50 companies participated in the program. By 1989, more than 5,000 companies were participating. Participants represent firms with an analytical capability as well as firms that rely upon another firm for analysis service. Since the beginning of the RMP Program, the Agency has learned a great deal about radon measurement methods and devices. This paper reviews the measurement devices used in the program and what the EPA has learned about them since the program's inception. Performance data from the RMP Program are used to highlight relevant findings

  4. Radon measurements-discussion of error estimates for selected methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhukovsky, Michael; Onischenko, Alexandra; Bastrikov, Vladislav

    2010-01-01

    The main sources of uncertainties for grab sampling, short-term (charcoal canisters) and long term (track detectors) measurements are: systematic bias of reference equipment; random Poisson and non-Poisson errors during calibration; random Poisson and non-Poisson errors during measurements. The origins of non-Poisson random errors during calibration are different for different kinds of instrumental measurements. The main sources of uncertainties for retrospective measurements conducted by surface traps techniques can be divided in two groups: errors of surface 210 Pb ( 210 Po) activity measurements and uncertainties of transfer from 210 Pb surface activity in glass objects to average radon concentration during this object exposure. It's shown that total measurement error of surface trap retrospective technique can be decreased to 35%.

  5. Radon measurement in the Architectonic Assembly of Guapulo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarrin Cornejo, Andrea

    2001-01-01

    The radon is a radioactive gas that does not have color nor scent. The radon comes from the natural decomposition of uranium, an element that is in almost all the types of ground, even on the rock and the water. In general, the radon moves upwards, through the ground, until the air that you breathe. The radon-222 is considered like the second cause of the pulmonary cancer soon of the cigarette, existing greater probability of that a person acquires the greater disease whichever is the exhibition that she is put under. The radon comes from the natural decay (radioactive) of the radio-226 in the ground, rocks and water entering to any type of construction. Any construction can have a problem of radon; therefore to examine is the only way to know such risk. Of it is in favor reason, has determined the concentration of Radon-222 in the interior of the Architectonic Assembly of Guapulo. For it, the System E P ERM was used like quantification method (System Environmental Monitor of Radon) that finds the measurement from a diminution of voltage in an electrical ion camera; which, goes has to be proportional to the amount of present gas in the room. The monitoring points are the different parts from the Convent, the University, and the Church in which the predominant materials of construction are the brick, block, stone, tile, plank and marinate. Of the results, the found values average do not surpass in the Architectonic Assembly of Guapulo, the 200 Bq/m3 (maximum limit established internationally for the concentration of Radon). On the other hand, for the different materials from construction the walls of adobe have greater amount of radon to be formed almost in their totality by elements of the ground, followed those of brick, block and concrete respectively. (The author)

  6. Measurements of radon concentrations at caves in Jeju

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Go, S. H.; Kang, D. H.; Jung, B. J. [Cheju National University, Cheju (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    Radon is a radioactive gas emitting {alpha} particles. It is chemically stable due to its inert characteristic. While its daughter products, {sup 218}Po, {sup 214}Bi, {sup 214}Pb and {sup 214}Po, attached with aerosol particles, is known to cause lung cancer. As radon is produced from uranium and thorium, it accumulates in poorly ventilative underground voids such as caves and mine. Radon concentrations at caves in Jeju were measured in this study. The measurements were made by setting three CR-39 detectors for 70 days at 2 {approx} 4 positions in Manjang, Hyupjae and Ssangyong caves. The radon levels of the caves spread 403.1 . 606.7 Bq/m{sup 3}. With these results, it is concluded that the Jeju caves have 6 times higher radon concentrations than ordinary house of 65.3 Bq/m{sup 3} and that they are higher than Seoul subway stations due to poor ventilation. While, the caves in Jeju have lower radon concentrations than limestone caves of Robin Hood. The radon concentration in the middle of Manjang cave is slightly higher than the action level in the work place of 500 Bq/m{sup 3} suggested by the ICRP. The measurement errors are estimated to be less than 5 % from its calibration factor.

  7. Measurements of radon concentrations at caves in Jeju

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Go, S. H.; Kang, D. H.; Jung, B. J.

    2004-01-01

    Radon is a radioactive gas emitting α particles. It is chemically stable due to its inert characteristic. While its daughter products, 218 Po, 214 Bi, 214 Pb and 214 Po, attached with aerosol particles, is known to cause lung cancer. As radon is produced from uranium and thorium, it accumulates in poorly ventilative underground voids such as caves and mine. Radon concentrations at caves in Jeju were measured in this study. The measurements were made by setting three CR-39 detectors for 70 days at 2 ∼ 4 positions in Manjang, Hyupjae and Ssangyong caves. The radon levels of the caves spread 403.1 . 606.7 Bq/m 3 . With these results, it is concluded that the Jeju caves have 6 times higher radon concentrations than ordinary house of 65.3 Bq/m 3 and that they are higher than Seoul subway stations due to poor ventilation. While, the caves in Jeju have lower radon concentrations than limestone caves of Robin Hood. The radon concentration in the middle of Manjang cave is slightly higher than the action level in the work place of 500 Bq/m 3 suggested by the ICRP. The measurement errors are estimated to be less than 5 % from its calibration factor

  8. Radon measurements and dose estimate of workers in a manganese ore mine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahrokhi, Amin; Vigh, Tamás; Németh, Csaba; Csordás, Anita; Kovács, Tibor

    2017-06-01

    In the new European Basic Safety Standard (EU-BSS), a new reference level for indoor radon concentration in workplaces has recommended that the annual average activity concentration of indoor radon shall not be higher than 300Bqm -3 . This paper describes the radon concentration level in an underground workplace (manganese ore mine) over long time intervals (4 years). Several common radon monitors devices - including NRPB and Raduet (as a passive method based on CR-39), AlphaGUARD PQ 2000Pro, SARAD EQF3220, TESLA and Pylon WLX (as active methods) - were used for continuous radon measurements. The output results were used, first, to comprised the result of each device, based on conditions present in underground mines; Second, to have comprehensive measurements about all factors that cause workers exposure to radiation (each monitoring device specified for a unique measurement). The results indicate that the mine's staff had successful efforts to reach the strict requirement of the new EU-BSS, and the average annual radon activity concentrations during the working hours were below 300Bqm -3 in the investigated period. The paper presents the effective dose calculations; applying different equilibrium factors suggested by the literature and calculated basing on our measurements at the site, concluding that the differences could be about threefold. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Method for measurement of radon diffusion and solubility in solid materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Andreas; Weber, Uli; Dickmann, Jannis; Breckow, Joachim; van Beek, Patrick; Schardt, Dieter; Kraft, Gerhard; Fournier, Claudia

    2018-02-01

    In order to study the permeation i.e. the diffusion and solubility of radon gas in biological material, a new setup was constructed and a novel analysis was applied to obtain diffusion and solubility coefficients. Thin slabs of solid materials were installed between detector housing and the surrounding radon exposure chamber of 50 Ls volume. In this setup radon can diffuse through thin test samples into a cylindrical volume of 5 mm height and 20 mm diameter and reach an α-particle detector. There the 5.49 MeV α-decay of the penetrating radon atoms is measured by a silicon surface barrier detector. The time dependent activities inside the small detector volume are recorded after injection of a known radon activity concentration into the outer chamber. Analyzing the time behavior of the integral α-activity from radon in the small vessel, both, the diffusion coefficient and solubility of the test material can be determined, based on a new mathematical model of the diffusion process concerning the special boundary conditions given by the experimental setup. These first measurements were intended as proof of concept for the detection system and the data analysis. Thin polyethylene foils (LDPE) were selected as material for the diffusion measurements and the results were in agreement with data from literature. In further measurements, we will concentrate on biological material like bone, fat and other tissues.

  10. National radon measurement-proficiency program: Individual proficiency report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-05-01

    In February 1986, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) established the Radon Measurement Proficiency (RMP) Program to assist the public in identifying organizations capable of providing reliable radon measurement services. In December 1991, EPA announced the new individual proficiency listing category in the RMP Program. Individuals applying for this new listing status must demonstrate knowledge of radon measurement fundamentals by passing a written proficiency examination, maintain affiliation with an RMP listed organization, and meet other program requirements. This report lists those individuals who have met the requirements of the RMP Program as of April 30, 1992. These requirements are designed to provide minimum proficiency criteria for individuals who provide radon measurement services on-site in a residential environment

  11. Development of measure methods of radon in indoor air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaginuma, L.T.; Pela, C.A.; Navas, E.A.; Ghilardi, A.J.P.

    1992-01-01

    The development of some conventional measuring methods, aiming obtain an estimation of radon concentration in air, mainly in indoor air is described, including the charcoal absorption collector, Lucas cell and thermoluminescent dosemeters. (C.G.C)

  12. Radon concentration measurements in the desert caves of Saudi Arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Mustafa, Hanan; Al-Jarallah, M.I.; Fazal-ur-Rehman; Abu-Jarad, F.

    2005-01-01

    Beneath the harsh deserts of Saudi Arabia lie dark chambers and complex mazes filled with strange shapes and wondrous beauty. Radon concentration measurements have been carried out in the desert caves of Al-Somman Plateau in the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia. Passive radon dosimeters, based on alpha particle etch track detectors with an inlet filter, were used in this study. A total of 59 dosimeters were placed in five caves for a period of six months. Out of 59 dosimeters, 37 could be collected for analysis. Measurements showed significant variations in radon concentrations in caves depending upon their natural ventilation. The results of the study show that the average radon concentration in the different caves ranges from 74 up to 451Bqm -3 . The average radon concentration in four of the caves was low in the range 74-114Bqm -3 . However, one cave showed an average radon concentration of 451Bqm -3 . Radon is not a problem for tourists in the majority of caves. However, sometimes it may imply some limitation to the working time of guides

  13. Radon concentration measurements in the desert caves of Saudi Arabia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Mustafa, Hanan [Women College, P. O. Box 838, Dammam 31113 (Saudi Arabia); Al-Jarallah, M.I. [Department of Physics, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)]. E-mail: mibrahim@kfupm.edu.sa; Fazal-ur-Rehman [Department of Physics, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Abu-Jarad, F. [Radiation Protection Unit, Environmental Protection Department, Saudi Aramco P.O. Box 13027, Dhahran 31311 (Saudi Arabia)

    2005-11-15

    Beneath the harsh deserts of Saudi Arabia lie dark chambers and complex mazes filled with strange shapes and wondrous beauty. Radon concentration measurements have been carried out in the desert caves of Al-Somman Plateau in the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia. Passive radon dosimeters, based on alpha particle etch track detectors with an inlet filter, were used in this study. A total of 59 dosimeters were placed in five caves for a period of six months. Out of 59 dosimeters, 37 could be collected for analysis. Measurements showed significant variations in radon concentrations in caves depending upon their natural ventilation. The results of the study show that the average radon concentration in the different caves ranges from 74 up to 451Bqm{sup -3}. The average radon concentration in four of the caves was low in the range 74-114Bqm{sup -3}. However, one cave showed an average radon concentration of 451Bqm{sup -3}. Radon is not a problem for tourists in the majority of caves. However, sometimes it may imply some limitation to the working time of guides.

  14. Instrumentation for radon measurement and diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whyte, N.; Ellacott, K.; Brabant, L.

    1990-01-01

    Knowledge of existing protocols and guidelines, coupled with equipment acumen can make for a successful endeavor in the radon field. But where do you collect a users perspective on radon equipment? Obtaining a first hand understanding of how radon detection equipment may be applied can be a lengthy and expensive process. In this paper first principals of progeny collection, and counting, are covered. Use of Thomson and Nielsen equipment to screen, and diagnose radon will e presented. Equipment performance in a wide variety of field applications and in calibration chambers will be brought to light. The distinctive nature and versatility of the equipment will e outlined with applications information, system performance, and unique configurations

  15. Ground-truthing predicted indoor radon concentrations by using soil-gas radon measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reimer, G.M.

    2001-01-01

    Predicting indoor radon potential has gained in importance even as the national radon programs began to wane. A cooperative study to produce radon potential maps was conducted by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Department of Energy (DOE), and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) with the latter taking the lead role. A county-wide predictive model based dominantly on the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) aerorad data and secondly on geology, both small-scale data bases was developed. However, that model breaks down in counties of complex geology and does not provide a means to evaluate the potential of an individual home or building site. Soil-gas radon measurements on a large scale are currently shown to provide information for estimating radon potential at individual sites sort out the complex geology so that the small-scale prediction index can be validated. An example from Frederick County, Maryland indicates a positive correlation between indoor measurements and soil-gas data. The method does not rely on a single measurement, but a series that incorporate seasonal and meteorological considerations. (author)

  16. Temperature calibration formula for activated charcoal radon collectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, Alexandre; Le, Thiem Ngoc; Iimoto, Takeshi; Kosako, Toshiso

    2011-01-01

    Radon adsorption by activated charcoal collectors such as PicoRad radon detectors is known to be largely affected by temperature and relative humidity. Quantitative models are, however, still needed for accurate radon estimation in a variable environment. Here we introduce a temperature calibration formula based on the gas adsorption theory to evaluate the radon concentration in air from the average temperature, collection time, and liquid scintillation count rate. On the basis of calibration experiments done by using the 25 m 3 radon chamber available at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences in Japan, we found that the radon adsorption efficiency may vary up to a factor of two for temperatures typical of indoor conditions. We expect our results to be useful for establishing standardized protocols for optimized radon assessment in dwellings and workplaces. - Research highlights: → The temperature effect on radon adsorption is proportional to αe β/T . → The calibration formula is CF(T,t)=3.1x10 -5 e (2887)/((T+273)) [1-e -0.080t ]. → The radon adsorption efficiency varies up to a factor of two for T = 8.5-31 o C. → The average temperature is suitable for estimating CF(T,t) in a fluctuating environment.

  17. Temperature calibration formula for activated charcoal radon collectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, Alexandre, E-mail: alexandre.cooper@gmail.co [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Le, Thiem Ngoc [Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, Vietnam Atomic Energy Commission, 59 Ly Thuong Kiet, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Iimoto, Takeshi; Kosako, Toshiso [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan)

    2011-01-15

    Radon adsorption by activated charcoal collectors such as PicoRad radon detectors is known to be largely affected by temperature and relative humidity. Quantitative models are, however, still needed for accurate radon estimation in a variable environment. Here we introduce a temperature calibration formula based on the gas adsorption theory to evaluate the radon concentration in air from the average temperature, collection time, and liquid scintillation count rate. On the basis of calibration experiments done by using the 25 m{sup 3} radon chamber available at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences in Japan, we found that the radon adsorption efficiency may vary up to a factor of two for temperatures typical of indoor conditions. We expect our results to be useful for establishing standardized protocols for optimized radon assessment in dwellings and workplaces. - Research highlights: {yields} The temperature effect on radon adsorption is proportional to {alpha}e{sup {beta}/T}. {yields} The calibration formula is CF(T,t)=3.1x10{sup -5}e{sup (2887)/((T+273))} [1-e{sup -0.080t}]. {yields} The radon adsorption efficiency varies up to a factor of two for T = 8.5-31 {sup o}C. {yields} The average temperature is suitable for estimating CF(T,t) in a fluctuating environment.

  18. The history, development and the present status of the radon measurement programme in the United States of America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, A C

    2015-11-01

    The US radon measurement programme began in the late 1950s by the US Public Health Service in Colorado, New Mexico and Utah during the uranium frenzy. After the 1967 Congressional Hearings on the working conditions in uranium mines, the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) was asked to conduct studies in active uranium mines to assess the exposure of the miners on the Colorado Plateau and in New Mexico. From 1967 to 1972, the Health and Safety Laboratory of the US AEC in New York investigated more than 20 uranium mines for radon and radon decay product concentrations and particle size in 4 large uranium mines in New Mexico. In 1970, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was established and took over some of the AEC radon measurement activities. Between 1975 and 1978, the Environmental Measurements Laboratory of the US Department of Energy conducted the first detailed indoor radon survey in the USA. Later in 1984, the very high concentrations of radon found in Pennsylvania homes set the wheels in motion and gave birth to the US Radon Industry. The US EPA expanded its involvement in radon issues and assumed an active role by establishing the National Radon Proficiency Program to evaluate the effectiveness of radon measurement and mitigation methods. In 1998, due to limited resources EPA privatised the radon programme. This paper presents a personal perspective of past events and current status of the US radon programme. It will present an update on radon health effects, the incidence rate of lung cancer in the USA and the number of radon measurements made from 1988 to 2013 using short-term test methods. More than 23 million measurements were made in the last 25 y and as a result more than 1.24 million homes were mitigated successfully. It is estimated that USA are made using long-term testing devices. The number of homes above the US action level of 148 Bq m(-3) (4 pCi l(-1)) may be ∼8.5 million because ∼50 million homes were added since 1990 to the home

  19. Determination of radon exhalation rates from tiles using active and passive techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Jarallah, M.I.; Abu-Jarad, F.; Fazal-ur-Rehman

    2001-01-01

    Measurements of radon exhalation rates for selected samples of tiles used in Saudi Arabia were carried out using active and passive measuring techniques. These samples were granite, marble and ceramic. In the active method, a PC-based radon gas analyzer with emanation container was used, while, in the passive method, PM-355 nuclear track detectors with the 'can technique' were applied for 180 days. A comparison of the exhalation rates measured by the two techniques showed a good linear correlation coefficient of 0.7. The granite samples showed an average radon exhalation rate of 0.7 Bq m -2 h -1 , which was higher than that of marble and ceramic by more than twofold. The radon exhalation rates measured by the 'can technique' showed a non-uniform exhalation from the surface of the same tile

  20. Determination of radon exhalation rates from tiles using active and passive techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Jarallah, M.I. E-mail: mibrahim@kfupm.edu.sa; Abu-Jarad, F.; Fazal-ur-Rehman

    2001-06-01

    Measurements of radon exhalation rates for selected samples of tiles used in Saudi Arabia were carried out using active and passive measuring techniques. These samples were granite, marble and ceramic. In the active method, a PC-based radon gas analyzer with emanation container was used, while, in the passive method, PM-355 nuclear track detectors with the 'can technique' were applied for 180 days. A comparison of the exhalation rates measured by the two techniques showed a good linear correlation coefficient of 0.7. The granite samples showed an average radon exhalation rate of 0.7 Bq m{sup -2} h{sup -1}, which was higher than that of marble and ceramic by more than twofold. The radon exhalation rates measured by the 'can technique' showed a non-uniform exhalation from the surface of the same tile.

  1. Variation of radon flux along active fault zones in association with earthquake occurrence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papastefanou, C.

    2010-01-01

    Radon flux measurements were carried out at three radon stations along an active fault zone in the Langadas basin, Northern Greece by various techniques for earthquake prediction studies. Specially made devices with alpha track-etch detectors (ATDs) were installed by using LR-115, type II, non-strippable cellulose nitrate films (integrating method of measurements). Continuous monitoring of radon gas exhaling from the ground was also performed by using silicon diode detectors, Barasol and Clipperton type, in association with various probes and sensors including simultaneously registration of the meteorological parameters, such as precipitation height (rainfall events), temperature and barometric pressure. The obtained radon data were studied in parallel with the data of seismic events, such as the magnitude, M L of earthquakes, the epicentral distance, the hypocentral distance and the energy released during the earthquake event occurred at the fault zone during the period of measurements to find out any association between the rad on flux and the meteorological and seismological parameters. Seismic events with magnitude M L ≥ 4.0 appeared to be preceded by large precursory signals produced a well-defined 'anomaly' (peak) of radon flux prior to the event. In the results, the radon peaks in the obtained spectra appeared to be sharp and narrow. The rise time of a radon peak, that is the time period from the onset of a radon peak until the time of radon flux maximum is about a week, while the after time, that is the time interval between the time of radon flux maximum and the time of a seismic event ranges from about 3 weeks or more.

  2. Measurement of radon and thoron progenies in Coimbatore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivakumar, R.; Selvasekarapandian, S.; Mahendraprasad, M.; Meenakshisundaram, V.; Santhanam, R.; Raghunath, V.M.

    2001-01-01

    The radon and thoron daughter concentrations have been measured in different dwellings of Coimbatore city by grab sampling method and two count. It has been found that the radon daughter concentration varies from 0.5 to 10.5 mWL with mean value of 2.9 mWL and that of thoron progeny is from 0.7 to 16.3 mWL with mean value of 3.8 mWL. The average annual effective dose equivalent due to radon daughters is found to be 1.3 mSv and that of thoron progeny is 3.8 mSv. (author)

  3. Development of a portable instantaneous soil radon measurement instrument

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yushuang; Ge Liangquan; Jiang Haijing; Lin Yanchang

    2007-01-01

    A dual-channel instantaneous soil radon measurement instrument based on the method of electrostatic collection is designed. It has the features of small size, low cost, and high sensitivity, etc. A single chip microcomputer is adopted as the data processing and control unit. The concentration of radon can be reported in field. The result is also corrected by the pressure sensing system. A double channel discriminator is used so that the detector can eliminate the interference from the progenies of radon except RaA. LCD and MCU based encoding keyboard are used to give users a friendly interface. Operating and function setting is easy. (authors)

  4. Study on absolute humidity influence of NRL-1 measuring apparatus for radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shan Jian; Xiao Detao; Zhao Guizhi; Zhou Qingzhi; Liu Yan; Qiu Shoukang; Meng Yecheng; Xiong Xinming; Liu Xiaosong; Ma Wenrong

    2014-01-01

    The absolute humidity and temperature's effects on the NRL-1 measuring apparatus for radon were studied in this paper. By controlling the radon activity concentration of the radon laboratory in University of South China and improving the temperature and humidity adjust strategy, different correction factor values under different absolute humidities were obtained. Moreover, a correction curve between 1.90 and 14.91 g/m"3 was also attained. The results show that in the case of absolute humidity, when it is less than 2.4 g/m"3, collection efficiency of the NRL-1 measuring apparatus for radon tends to be constant, and the correction factor of the absolute humidity closes to 1. However, the correction factor increases nonlinearly along with the absolute humidity. (authors)

  5. The feasible research with measuring radon for taking the soils sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Bing, Ge Liangquan; Liu Hefan; Li Yeqiang; Zhang Jinzhao; Song Xiao'an

    2010-01-01

    It explains the mechanism of the separation of soil's radon. Through the designed experiment, it confirms the feasibility of measuring radon for taking the soil's sample. It determines the content of the radon and its sub field with indoor and outside through ways of the activated charcoal adsorption, the initiative suction and the diameter mark etching, also the 226 Ra. The paper indicates: it is feasible with measuring radon for taking the soil's sample, and the stability of data is that indoor data are better than outside's. The temperature, the humidity, the rainfall amount, the intensity and so on are the serious influence of the data. If you want to take a soil's sample, you must avoid the rain as far as possible, and avoid the fault zone, the belt of folded strata and complex geologic structure region, and so on. (authors)

  6. Remedial measures in Swedish and Norwegian houses - application of radon and radon decay product measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Just, G.; Philipsborn, H. von; Matolin, M.; Molzahn, D.

    1998-01-01

    Houses and apartments in Sweden and Norway with excessive indoor radon concentrations were studied in detail with a variety of methods, standard and novel ones recently developed. For suitable remediation it is necessary to distinguish soil radon and exhalation from blue (porous) concrete. Our CARBOTEST-S is a simple, sensitive, in-situ method to quantify radon exhalation from existing walls, as well as radon permeability of different protective foils and final quality control of foils applied to existing walls. (orig.) [de

  7. Measure of exposure of short-lived radon products using an alpha spectrometer for measuring indoor aerosol activity concentration and dose evaluation; Misure di esposizione ai prodotti di decadimento del radon a breve vita tramite uno spettrometro alfa per la misura dell'attivita' del particolato atmosferico indoor e valutazioni dosimetriche

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berico, M.; Castellani, C.M.; Formignani, M. [ENEA, Divisione Protezione dell' Uomo e degli Ecosistemi, Centro Ricerche Ezio Clementel, Bologna (Italy); Mariotti, F. [Bologna Univ., Bologna (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica

    2001-07-01

    A new italian law introduces the regulation of occupational exposure to radon. To evaluate the inhalation of radon daughters by the workers a sampling device has been assembled with the aim of evaluation of unattached and aerosol attached radon daughters' fractions. The instrument, based on selection of the aerosuspended particles by means of a wire screen type battery and subsequent collection on a total filter, allows to describe the behaviour of both fractions using defined temporal pattern of collecting particles and counting them by alpha spectroscopy. A measurement campaign to test the radon daughter dichotomous spectrometer in comparison with a commercial Radon Working Level meter, has been performed in a research laboratory of central Italy affected by high radon concentrations. The radon concentration during the measurement campaign has been also measured. The equilibrium factor F{sub e}q ad the attachment factor fp have been evaluated during 3 days campaign. Using the measured mean parameters (radon concentration, F{sub e}q, f{sub p}) the dose evaluation for workers using dosimetric approach has been performed. A comparison between the epidemiologic approach, based on the radon concentration, and dosimetric approach is also presented. [Italian] L'esposizione a radon in ambiente lavorativo e la conseguente inalazione dei suoi prodotti di decadimento in forma particolata e' oggetto di una recente normativa italiana in materia di protezione dalle radiazioni ionizzanti. Per rispondere a questa necessita', presso l'Istituto per la Radioprotezione dell'ENEA di Bologna e' stato progettato e realizzato uno spettrometro alfa per la misura della progenie del radon con la finalita' di valutare, su brevi periodi di tempo, la concentrazione individuale dei suoi prodotti di decadimento e, con l'impiego di batterie a diffusione a reti, consentire inoltre la discriminazione della concentrazione della frazione attaccata e non

  8. Reconstruction of national distribution of indoor radon concentration in Russia using results of regional indoor radon measurement programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yarmoshenko, I.; Malinovsky, G.; Vasilyev, A.; Zhukovsky, M.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the paper is a reconstruction of the national distribution and estimation of the arithmetic average indoor radon concentration in Russia using the data of official annual 4-DOZ reports. Annual 4-DOZ reports summarize results of radiation measurements in 83 regions of Russian Federation. Information on more than 400 000 indoor radon measurements includes the average indoor radon isotopes equilibrium equivalent concentration (EEC) and number of measurements by regions and by three main types of houses: wooden, one-storey non-wooden, and multi-storey non-wooden houses. To reconstruct the national distribution, all-Russian model sample was generated by integration of sub-samples created using the results of each annual regional program of indoor radon measurements in each type of buildings. According to indoor radon concentration distribution reconstruction, all-Russian average indoor radon concentration is 48 Bq/m"3. Average indoor radon concentration by region ranges from 12 to 207 Bq/m"3. The 95-th percentile of the distribution is reached at indoor radon concentration 160 Bq/m"3. - Highlights: • Reconstruction of indoor radon concentration distribution in Russia was carried out. • Data of official annual 4-DOZ reports were used. • All-Russian average indoor radon concentration is 48 Bq/m"3. • The 95-th percentile is 160 Bq/m"3.

  9. Comparison of five-minute radon-daughter measurements with long-term radon and radon-daughter concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, J.A.; Jackson, P.O.; Thomas, V.W.

    1983-01-01

    Five-minute air filter radon daughter measurements were made in 84 buildings in Edgemont, South Dakota, in which annual average radon daughter concentrations have been determined from six 100-hour Radon Progeny Integrating Sampling Unit (RPISU) measurements. Averaging radon concentrations were also determined in 50 of these buildings using Terradex Track Etch detectors. The standard deviation of the difference between the (natural) logarithms of the RPISU annual averages and the logarithms of the air filter measurements (SD-ln) was found to be 0.52. This SD-ln is considerably smaller than the SD-ln of 0.71 between the RPISU annual averages and the air filter measurements reported by ALARA at Grand Junction, Colorado; presumably because a considerable number of air filter measurements in Edgemont were disregarded because of short turnover times or high wind speeds. Using the SD-ln of 0.52 it can be calculated that there would only be a 5% probability in Edgemont that the RPISU annual average would be greater than 0.015 WL if the five-minute measurement were equal to 0.010 WL. This indicates that the procedure used in Edgemont of clearing buildings from remedial action if the five-minute measurement were less than 0.010 WL was reasonable. There was about a 28% probability that the RPISU annual average would be less than 0.015 WL if the five-minute measurement were 0.033 WL, indicating that the procedure of performing an engineering assessment if the average of two five-minute measurements was greater than 0.033 WL was also reasonable. Comparison indicates that the average of two RPISU measurements taken six months apart would provide a dependable estimate of the annual average

  10. Development of model DTY-104 radon measuring meter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Zhixia; Zhang Aiming; Li Yachun; Wang Qingheng

    2000-01-01

    Model DTY-104 radon measuring meter is an improvement on Model DTY-103. 'Difference value method' is used, which has been strictly developed and makes the radon exhalation rate more accurate, instead of using 'simplified difference value method'. The electronic circuit is redesigned and 80C31 single chip processor is used, which makes the operation more convenient and the function strengthened. In a more reasonable manner, the humidity sensor is mounted in the collection chamber. The collection efficiency can be automatically corrected. The technique of exchanging the collection mylar reduces the waiting time and improves work efficiency. The apparatus is applied to the measurement of the radon concentration in the environment and the radon exhalation from the surface of the building materials, walls and ground. The lower detection limit is about 4Bq/m 3 for 222 Rn concentration and 5 x 10 -5 Bq/s/m 2 for 222 Rn exhalation rate

  11. Radon in water - fast, simple and sensitive measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philipsborn, H. von

    1996-01-01

    Glass fiber filters of a certain brand were found to be very efficient (retention >95%) for adsorption of short-lived radon decay products during filtration of water. Limit of detection is 2 Bq/L in 10 min total time if the dried filters are evaluated in the Living Level Monitor mab LLM 500. Locally high radon concentrations in drinking water have activated country-wide surveys and proposals for compulsory action levels. (orig.) [de

  12. Contribution to the relation between volume activity of soil and indoor radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mojzes, A.

    1999-01-01

    There were carried out some repeated manual measurements of volume activity of radon-222 (VAR) in both soil air of subsoil and also indoor air of buildings in two different areas in Bratislava. All measurements were done with a portable scintillation detector based on exchangeable Lucas cells. The measurements were repeated in different day and year intervals. There were repeated 259 measurements of volume activity of radon-222 in soil air with the average valuer 11.95 kBq/m 3 and the standard deviation 1.53 kBq/m 3 in the subsoil of the one-story house and 597 measurements of VAR in soil air of the subsoil of the second study building with the average 9.44 kBq/m 3 and the standard deviation 3.08 kBq/m 3 . Presented results of measurement of radon-222 volume activity in both soil and indoor air demonstrate that also in case of low radon concentrations in soil air of geological basement the level of radon in indoor air could be considerably high. It depends mainly on used technology of laying building foundations, on the distance from subsoil and on regime of ventilation. In case of older buildings the ventilation is very effective way to reduce the presence of radon in indoor air. (author)

  13. Radon measurements with a PIN photodiode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin-Martin, A.; Gutierrez-Villanueva, J.L.; Munoz, J.M.; Garcia-Talavera, M.; Adamiec, G.; Iniguez, M.P.

    2006-01-01

    Silicon photodiodes are well suited to detect alphas coming from different sources as neutron reactions or radon daughters. In this work a radon in air detecting device, using an 18x18 mm silicon PIN photodiode is studied. The ionized airborne decay products formed during radon diffusion were focused by an accelerating high voltage to the PIN surface. Several conducting rings were disposed inside a cylindrical PVC vessel in such a way that they reproduced the electric field created by a punctual charge located behind PIN position. Alpha spectra coming from the neutral and ionized species deposited on the PIN surface, dominated by 218 Po and 214 Po progeny peaks, were recorded for varying conditions. Those include radon concentration from a Pylon source, high voltage (thousands of volts) and PIN inverse bias voltage. Different parameters such as temperature and humidity were also registered during data acquisition. The increase in the particle collection efficiency with respect to zero electric field was compared with the corresponding to a parallel plates configuration. A discussion is made in terms of the most appropriate voltages for different radon concentrations

  14. Variation in radon exhalation from the ground on the active fault in Kobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasuoka, Y.; Shinogi, M. [Kobe Pharmaceutical Univ., Kobe, Hyogo (Japan)

    1998-12-31

    Since 27 January 1997, the measurements of radon (Rn-222) exhaled from the ground have been made continuously by the use of PICO-RAD detector (Packard instrument Co.) at monitoring stations on Ashiya active fault. The fault may have been slipped by the Kobe earthquake (magnitude 7.2, 17 January 1995). The variation of relative radon exhalation on the fault was large. We guessed the large variation of relative radon exhalation on the fault was caused by not only the influence of meteorology but also the influence of other factors. (author)

  15. Comparison of active and passive methods for radon exhalation from a high-exposure building material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbasi, A.; Mirekhtiary, F.

    2013-01-01

    The radon exhalation rates and radon concentrations in granite stones used in Iran were measured by means of a high-resolution high purity Germanium gamma-spectroscopy system (passive method) and an AlphaGUARD model PQ 2000 (active method). For standard rooms (4.0 x 35.0 m area x 32.8 height) where ground and walls have been covered by granite stones, the radon concentration and the radon exhalation rate by two methods were calculated. The activity concentrations of 226 Ra in the selected granite samples ranged from 3.8 to 94.2 Bq kg -1 . The radon exhalation rate from the calculation of the 226 Ra activity concentration was obtained. The radon exhalation rates were 1.31-7.86 Bq m -2 h -1 . The direction measurements using an AlphaGUARD were from 218 to 1306 Bq m -3 with a mean of 625 Bq m -3 . Also, the exhalation rates measured by the passive and active methods were compared and the results of this study were the same, with the active method being 22% higher than the passive method. (authors)

  16. Radon measurements by track detectors in Calabrian workplaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nastro, V.; Niceforo, G.; Vuono, D.; Luca, P. de; Nastro, A. [Calabria Univ., Dipt. di Pianificazione Territoriale, Arcavacata di Rende, CS (Italy)

    2006-07-01

    Indoor radon studies have been carried out in some workplaces of the South Calabria (Italy) by track detectors CR-39. This study has been undertaken for the purpose of safeguarding the public healthy: since the European population spends, in average, the most greater part of their time in confined environments(residences and offices) the risks of exposure can be elevated. This radon passive measurements are been effectuated according to the recommendations. The exposure time in the workplaces was two different cycle: three months, and six months. The obtained results indicate a radon concentration not only in an average of low level but also in the range of action level (>500 Bq/m{sup 3}). In this last case will be necessary to reduce the radon pollution by adequate land operation works, and a continuous monitoring is also necessary.

  17. Radon measurements by track detectors in Calabrian workplaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nastro, V.; Niceforo, G.; Vuono, D.; Luca, P. de; Nastro, A.

    2006-01-01

    Indoor radon studies have been carried out in some workplaces of the South Calabria (Italy) by track detectors CR-39. This study has been undertaken for the purpose of safeguarding the public healthy: since the European population spends, in average, the most greater part of their time in confined environments(residences and offices) the risks of exposure can be elevated. This radon passive measurements are been effectuated according to the recommendations. The exposure time in the workplaces was two different cycle: three months, and six months. The obtained results indicate a radon concentration not only in an average of low level but also in the range of action level (>500 Bq/m 3 ). In this last case will be necessary to reduce the radon pollution by adequate land operation works, and a continuous monitoring is also necessary

  18. Determination of groundwater flow velocity by radon measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hohn, E.; von Gunten, H.R.

    1990-01-01

    The groundwater resources of glacio-fluvial perialpine valleys are recharged significantly by the infiltration from rivers. The groundwater residence times between rivers and wells should be known in groundwater management problems. Short residence times can be estimated using radon. Radon concentrations in rivers are usually very low. Upon filtration and movement of the water in the ground, radon is picked up and its concentration increases by 2-3 orders of magnitude according to radioactive growth laws. Residence times and flow velocities can be estimated from the increasing radon concentrations measured in groundwater sampling tubes at different distances from the river. Results obtained with this method agree with the results from experiments with artificial tracers

  19. Turbidimetry for measurement of radon concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Huanqiang

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a turbidimetric technique counting the tracks registered on CR-39 foils exposed to radon. Instead of eyeview through microscope, by using the differential spectrophotometer, strong correlation between the radon cumulative concentration and track turbidence was observed(r=0.999). Under the etching condition of 7.07 mol·L -1 KOH water solution at 80 o C for 16 hr, linear regression showed that the ratio of track turbidence and cumulative concentration of radon exposure was 1.99 x 10 -1 turbidence (KBq m -1 h) -1 and the determination limit was 36 KBq m -3 h. The details of the experiments are represented in this paper. (Author)

  20. Radon decay product in-door behaviour - parameter, measurement method, and model review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scofield, P.

    1988-01-01

    This report reviews parameters used to characterize indoor radon daughter behavior and concentrations. Certain parameters that affect indoor radon daughter concentrations are described and the values obtained experimentally or theoretically are summarized. Radon daughter measurement methods are reviewed, such as, PAEC, unattached daughters, particle size distributions, and plateout measurement methods. In addition, certain radon pressure driven/diffusion models and indoor radon daughter models are briefly described. (orig.)

  1. The effectiveness of radon preventive and remedial measures in Irish homes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, S; Fenton, D; Cremin, M; Morgan, A

    2013-01-01

    It is estimated that approximately 100 000 Irish homes have radon concentrations above the reference level of 200 Bq m −3 . To minimise the number of new homes with this problem, building regulations require that all new homes built since July 1998 in high radon areas are installed with radon barriers during construction. Measurements on local authority homes in a number of high radon areas have allowed the impact of these new regulations to be assessed. In County Cork a reduction of up to 70% in the mean radon concentration was observed in homes built since 1998 relative to those built before this date. A reduction in both the number of homes exceeding the reference level and the maximum concentration measured in homes was also measured. Homes exceeding the reference level were remediated with the use of an active sump. The results of this remedial work are also presented and show that the mean reduction in radon concentration achieved was 92%. (paper)

  2. Long term and equilibrium factor indoor radon measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, T.; Lartigue, J.; Navarrete, M.; Cabrera, L.; Ramirez, A.; Elizarraras, V.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents the annual radon gas concentrations obtained during the 1994-1995 monitoring campaign using passive electret system (type E-PERM). Radon levels were measured in 154 single family dwellings, in normal occupancy conditions (open house condition) in the metropolitan zone of Mexico City. At the same time radon monitoring was performed outdoors. The results show the general log-normal distribution of integrated indoor radon concentration with an annual indoor mean of 3.8 pCi x l -1 . The seasonal variations show the minimum mean values in the summer season which are 39% lower than that in autumn. Equilibrium factors (F) were measured in 12 typical houses both in autumn and winter using a continuous working level monitor for short-lived radon decay products and H-chamber loaded with a short term electret (HST, E-PERM) for radon gas. The obtained total mean equilibrium factors are: F=0.41±0.17 and F=0.29±0.04 for indoor and outdoor, respectively. A quality program was also improved. (author)

  3. Study on radon concentration monitoring using activated charcoal canisters in high humidity environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yuexing; Wang Haijun; Yang Yifang; Qin Sichang; Wang Zhentao; Zhang Zhenjiang

    2009-01-01

    The effects of humidity on the sensitivity using activated charcoal canisters for measuring radon concentrations in high humidity environments were studied. Every canister filled with 80 g of activated charcoal, and they were exposed to 48 h or 72 h in the relative humidity of 68%, 80%, 88% and 96% (28 degree C), respectively. The amount of radon absorbed in the canisters was determined by counting the gamma rays from 214 Pb and 214 Bi (radon progeny). The results showed that counts decreased with the increase of relative humidity. There was a negative linear relationship between count and humidity. In the relative humidity range of 68%-96%, the sensitivity of radon absorption decreased about 2.4% for every 1% (degree)rise in humidity. The results also showed that the exposure time of the activated charcoal canisters should be less than 3 days. (authors)

  4. New SRDN-3 probes with a semi-conductor detector for measuring radon activity concentration in underground spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Przylibski, T.A.; Lidia Fijalkowska-Lichwa; Elzbieta Kochowska; Krzysztof Kozak; Jadwiga Mazur

    2010-01-01

    The article presents new Polish probes SRDN-3, developed at the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology in Warsaw, equipped with a semi-conductor detector used for continuous measurements of 222 Rn activity concentration. Due to a relatively high lower detection limit, the device is dedicated for use in underground spaces-caves, adits, mines, tourist routes in strongholds, pyramids, etc. Its structure allows for difficult conditions in which the device is transported to the measurement site, as well as hard operating conditions caused chiefly by large ambient relative humidity, reaching up to 100%. The authors present calibration results of these appliances, as well as the results of their work in a cave and an adit in the Sudetes (SW Poland). After almost 2 years of working in difficult conditions, the probes displayed high reliability. No defects of the semi-conductor detectors or the electronics were observed, which ensured problem-free communication of the probe-programmer-PC set. Thanks to this, the authors have a 2 year stock of data, recorded hourly by five probes, at their disposal. The only element that did not withstand the test of extreme operating conditions was one of the combined relative humidity and temperature sensors. No powering problems were observed either, and the batteries were replaced once a year, before the winter season. Also the programmer functioned faultlessly, enabling data transmission to a PC, which, being much more sensitive to operating conditions, had been placed away from the site of probe exposure. After using more sensitive temperature, relative humidity and pressure sensors, SRDN-3 probes will certainly prove an excellent tool for microclimate measurements (including measurement of air-atmosphere exchange) in caves and other underground sites. Even nowadays they are already a satisfactory tool for monitoring 222 Rn concentration in underground spaces. (author)

  5. Behaviour of waterborne radon in activated carbon filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haberer, K.; Akkermann-Kubillus, A.

    1999-01-01

    To investigate the behaviour of radon in adsorption/desorption processes in filter systems with different activated carbon types, measurements were focused on adsorption capacity, adsorption velocity, retain capability, interaction with ions (poisoning of active centers) and adsorption of radon daughters. Various activated carbon types derived from hard coal, brown coal, peat and wood, were used in adsorption tests runs with activated carbons which are frequently applied in water treatment facilities. In laboratory tests, water facility filter conditions were simulated using pilot plant columns filled with different carbon types. Finally, a small scale laboratory column was installed at a natural water source with elevated activity. Long-time filter runs were conducted under varying flow rates and with different amounts of the in waterworks wide-spread used activated carbon F-300. The main results observed were: 1. The amount of radioactivity adsorbed depends upon the type of carbon, its granular size and the contact time between the activated carbon and water. The decontamination capacity was between 19% and 94. 2. The DOC-levels of water influences the adsorbable radioactivity due to the poisoning of the active centres of the carbon. The adsorption velocity decreased down to 15%. 3. The maximum decontamination rate of the water under waterworks conditions was 60%. (orig.) [de

  6. Estimating the dynamics of groundwater input into the coastal zone via continuous radon-222 measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnett, William C.; Dulaiova, Henrieta

    2003-01-01

    Submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) into the coastal zone has received increased attention in the last few years as it is now recognized that this process represents an important pathway for material transport. Assessing these material fluxes is difficult, as there is no simple means to gauge the water flux. To meet this challenge, we have explored the use of a continuous radon monitor to measure radon concentrations in coastal zone waters over time periods from hours to days. Changes in the radon inventories over time can be converted to fluxes after one makes allowances for tidal effects, losses to the atmosphere, and mixing with offshore waters. If one assumes that advective flow of radon-enriched groundwater (pore waters) represent the main input of 222 Rn in the coastal zone, the calculated radon fluxes may be converted to water fluxes by dividing by the estimated or measured 222 Rn pore water activity. We have also used short-lived radium isotopes ( 223 Ra and 224 Ra) to assess mixing between near-shore and offshore waters in the manner pioneered by . During an experiment in the coastal Gulf of Mexico, we showed that the mixing loss derived from the 223 Ra gradient agreed very favorably to the estimated range based on the calculated radon fluxes. This allowed an independent constraint on the mixing loss of radon--an important parameter in the mass balance approach. Groundwater discharge was also estimated independently by the radium isotopic approach and was within a factor of two of that determined by the continuous radon measurements and an automated seepage meter deployed at the same site

  7. Measurements of environmental radon - 222 concentrations in indoors and outdoors in Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenawy, M.A.; Morsey, A.A.; Kotb, M.A.; Osman, A.; El-Haag, A.

    1990-01-01

    The major contribution to population exposure from natural radiation arises from the inhalation of the decay products of radon. Substantial surveys are being conducted by several investigators to estimate the indoor and outdoor exposure nationally and to discover regional variations. In this work, radon concentration in the indoors and outdoor air was determined using the can technique and employing CR-39 solid state nuclear track detector for lengthy exposures. The range of radon - 222 activity in this survey was 54 -299 PCi.m -3 in Cairo, 22 - 171 PCi.m -3 in Alexandria and 89 - 370 PCi.m -3 in Asiut. Measurements carried out in Aswan and Sinai ranged between 98 - 411 PCi.m -3 . Values of indoors and outdoors radon concentrations were found to vary with time of day, geographic location, season and height above ground. Further work is going on to study the different parameters affecting the levels of the environmental radon. The national survey and associated studies is expected to yield data that may correlate radon activity with some respiratory diseases, particularly lung cancer. (author). 7 refs, 5 figs

  8. Radon measurements over a natural-gas contaminated aquifer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palacios, D.; Fusella, E.; Avila, Y.; Salas, J.; Teixeira, D.; Fernández, G.; Salas, A.; Sajo-Bohus, L.; Greaves, E.; Barros, H.; Bolívar, M.; Regalado, J.

    2013-01-01

    Radon and thoron concentrations in soil pores in a gas production region of the Anzoategui State, Venezuela, were determined by active and passive methods. In this region, water wells are contaminated by natural gas and gas leaks exist in the nearby river. Based on soil gas Radon data surface hydrocarbon seeps were identified. Radon and thoron concentration maps show anomalously high values near the river gas leaks decreasing in the direction of water wells where natural gas is also detected. The area where the highest concentrations of 222 Rn were detected seems to indicate the surface projection of the aquifer contaminated with natural gas. The Radon/Thoron ratio revealed a micro-localized anomaly, indicating the area where the gas comes from deep layers of the subsoil. The radon map determined by the passive method showed a marked positive anomaly around abandoned gas wells. The high anomalous Radon concentration localized near the trails of ascending gas bubbles at the river indicates the zone trough where natural gases are ascending with greater ease, associated with a deep geological fault, being this the main source of methane penetration into the aquifer. It is suggested that the source of the natural gas may be due to leaks at deep sites along the structure of some of the abandoned wells located at the North-East of the studied area. - Highlights: ► High Radon/Thoron ratios were localized near the natural-gas emanations in a river. ► Natural gases are ascending trough a deep geological fault. ► Apparently, the radon anomaly shows the site where natural gas enters the aquifer. ► Natural gas source may be related to leaks in the structure of abandoned gas wells

  9. Measurements of thoron and radon progeny concentrations in Beijing, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Lei; Liu Cuihong; Guo Qiuju

    2008-01-01

    It has been reported that thoron levels in China are above the world average and may therefore make a significant contribution to the natural background radiation dose. We therefore conducted a pilot study of concentrations of both thoron and radon progeny during the spring of 2006 in the Beijing area, China. A new type of portable 24 h integrating monitor with a CR-39 detector was used during the survey. Seventy dwellings and eight outdoor sites were measured during the survey. For country houses built of red bricks and slurry, the average equilibrium equivalent concentrations (EEC) of thoron and radon were 1.02 ± 0.48 and 16.41 ± 9.02 Bq m -3 , respectively, whereas for city dwellings built of cement blocks and floor slabs, the results were 0.48 ± 0.47 and 11.50 ± 6.99 Bq m -3 for thoron and radon, respectively. For outdoor air, concentrations of thoron and radon progeny were 0.29 ± 0.28 and 7.05 ± 2.68 Bq m -3 , respectively. Radiation exposures from thoron and radon progeny were also evaluated; the ratio of dose contribution from thoron progeny to that of radon progeny was evaluated to be 28% and 17% in country houses and city dwellings, respectively. (note)

  10. Measurement of indoor and outdoor radon concentrations during Superstorm Sandy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotrappa, Payasada; Paul, Prateek; Stieff, Alex; Stieff, Frederick

    2013-12-01

    Superstorm Sandy affected much of the US East Coast extending over 1800 km. It passed over the test location in the State of Maryland on 29 October 2012. Being 350 km away from the regions of highest intensity the storm was of lower intensity at the test location. Continuous radon monitors and passive radon monitors were used for the measurement. The test location was the basement of a single family home representing the indoor concentration. A partially opened garage of the same test home represented the outdoor radon concentration. In 24 h, the atmospheric pressure dropped from 990 to 960 mbar and the indoor radon concentration increased from 70 to 1500 Bq m(-3) and returned to the normal of 70 Bq m(-3) at the end of the storm. Throughout the storm, the outdoor radon concentration was not significantly affected. Probable reasons for such surprisingly large changes are discussed. However, the outdoor temperature dropped from 13°C to 7°C during the radon peak.

  11. Current status of programmes to measure and reduce radon exposure in Irish workplaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colgan, P A; Madden, J S; Synnott, H; Fennell, S; Pollard, D; Fenton, D [Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland, 3 Clonskeagh Square, Dublin 14(Ireland)

    2004-06-01

    National legislation, which implements European Council Directive 96/29/EURATOM in Ireland, sets a reference level of 400 Bq m{sup -3} averaged over any 3 month period for radon exposure in the workplace and also empowers the Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland to direct employers to have radon measurements carried out. This legislation came into effect in May 2000. Radon measurements have already been completed in show caves and other underground workplaces. Between 1998 and 2001, over 33 800 individual radon measurements were carried out in all ground floor offices and classrooms in 3444 schools nationwide as part of a programme undertaken jointly with the Department of Education and Science. Where the average indoor radon concentration in one or more rooms exceeded 200 Bq m{sup -3}, remedial measures were implemented. For concentrations up to 400 Bq m{sup -3} this involved increased ventilation while for higher concentrations an active sump was normally installed. The results of the survey, as well as the effectiveness of the different remedial strategies, are discussed. In the case of other above ground workplaces, different approaches have been adopted. As a first step, workplaces in two known high radon areas were directed to have radon measurements carried out. This programme had limited success because of problems in obtaining accurate workplace databases and a general lack of awareness on the part of employers of the issues involved. From a sample of 2610 employers directed to measure radon, only 408 actually completed measurements and 37 workplaces were identified as having average 3 month average radon concentrations above 400 Bq m{sup -3}. A total of 1356 employers ignored all correspondence, some of which was sent by registered post and signed for on receipt. Current initiatives are focused on the provision of information and include newspaper advertising as well as publications aimed specifically at both employer and employee representative

  12. Error in measuring radon in soil gas by means of passive detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanner, A.B.

    1991-01-01

    Passive detection of radon isotopes depends on diffusion of radon atoms from the sites of their generation to the location of the detecting or collecting device. Because some radon decays en route to a passive detector in soil, the radon concentration measured by the detector must be less than the concentration in those soil pores where it is undiminished by diffusion to the detector cavity. The true radon concentration may be significantly underestimated in moist soils. (author)

  13. A study of radon 222 permeation through plastic membranes. Application to a method of radon measurement in water and saturated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labed, V.

    1991-04-01

    In order to improve the BARASOL R device and to use it in water-saturated soils and in pressure constraint conditions, we have studied radon 222 permeation through plastic membranes. While the permeation process usually takes place between two media being in the same state, most often gaseous, the present study describes the transfer of radon 222 from the water to the air via a membrane. Polypropylene membranes have been tested with an experimental set-up by monitoring the evolution of radon concentrations in water and in air. The permeation coefficient and the activation energy were calculated in various conditions. With a second experimental set-up, we have tested the polyethylene membrane which has been adapted on the BARASOL. In these conditions, we have shown that it is possible to measure radon in water at concentrations around 10 3 Bq.m -3 [fr

  14. Environmental radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majumdar, S.K.; Schmalz, R.F.; Miller, E.W.

    1990-01-01

    This book covers many aspects of environmental radon, including: historical perspectives; occurrence and properties; detection, measurement, and mitigation, radon and health; and political, economic, and legislative impacts

  15. Wire screens as a tool for survey measurements of the unattached radon progeny in mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janica, R.

    1996-07-01

    The radon hazard in mines is assessed by measuring the radioactivity accumulated on filters through which air is forced to flow. The filter collects both forms of the short-lived radon progeny, attached and unattached, and, therefore, the assessment is based on the measurement of the total radon progeny. Because of the special radiological significance of the unattached fraction of the short-lived radon progeny, the estimation of the radiation hazard to miners would be improved if the unattached fraction could be measured. This report describes two methods of measurement for the simultaneous determination of the unattached and the total radon progeny. The proposed methods comply with the criterion of practicality (imposed by the working conditions in the mine environment), that is, they are implemented using standard survey equipment and simple procedures. Both methods use wire screens to collect, preferentially, the unattached fraction. According to the first method, air is sampled through a wire screen and a backup filter, and the radioactivity accumulated on both the filter and the wire screen are measured separately using standard counting protocols (e.g. the Kusnetz protocol). The wire screen's efficiency for collecting the unattached radon progeny is determined, in advance, under laboratory conditions. The method assumes the validity of the collection efficiencies when the screens are used under field conditions. To avoid the uncertainty of the lab-determined collection efficiency, a new measuring method was proposed based on the sampling of air through two screens in series and a backup filter. The measurement of the ratio of the activities deposited on both screens allows an estimation of the screen collection efficiency under field conditions. Once this is done, the 'unattached fraction' and total radon progeny are determined by counting only one of the screens and the backup filter as described in the previous method. (author). 73 refs., 8 tabs., 21 figs

  16. The heightened activity of radon in water analysis from Lounovice area, Czech Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thinova, L.; Berka, Z.; Fridrichova, L.; Kaderova, J.; Cernohorska, E.; Pokorna, T.; Kosar, V.; Patak, M.; Kracmarova, I.

    2004-01-01

    The Lounovice area is located approximately 20 km south-east of Prague. Radon activity in fresh water from drilled-wells, used for village water supply, ranges between 700 and 900 Bq/l, which exceeds the standard for drinkable water by a factor higher than 100. Therefore, water is treated by aeration before use. Some residents, however, use drinking water from their own wells. A comprehensive radon and natural radioactivity survey was therefore conducted in this area. Secondary school students were engaged in this survey within the 'Physics Week' scientific program for young physicists, run by the Czech Technical University in Prague every year. in year 2004. The program included the following items: Laboratory gamma spectrometric measurement of the bedrock; Radon activity measurement in water before and after the aeration process; Radon monitoring at workplaces of the water company (the values provided by ionization chamber instruments and semiconductor detector instruments were compared); Radon daughters measurement at workplaces of the water company; In situ gamma spectrometry; In situ effective dose rate measurement; and Determination of a 'radon index' in the neighborhood of a drilled well

  17. Hourly indoor radon measurements in a research house.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sesana, Lucia; Begnini, Stefania

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports and discusses the behaviour of radon concentration with time in an uninhabited dwelling. The relationship between variations in radon concentrations and indoor-outdoor temperatures and wind intensity has also been discussed. Radon concentration was measured hourly in a house located at a height of 800 m in the Lombard Prealps, at the top of the Valassina valley. The wind velocity and indoor-outdoor temperatures were measured by means of a meteorological station located on the terrace of the house. The data were analysed using the LBL model for indoor-outdoor air exchange and the models for the indoor accumulation of radon due to exhalation from building materials and pressure-driven infiltrations located underground. The role of wind and indoor-outdoor temperatures were analysed. The agreement of measurements with modelling clearly demonstrates the importance of the different sources of indoor radon. As the investigation was conducted in an uninhabited house, the measurements were not affected by the behaviour of people, e.g. opening and closing of windows. Measurements of the outdoor atmospheric concentrations of (222)Rn provide an index of the atmospheric stability, the formation of thermal inversions and convective turbulence.

  18. Hourly indoor radon measurements in a research house

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sesana, L.; Begnini, S.

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports and discusses the behaviour of radon concentration with time in an uninhabited dwelling. The relationship between variations in radon concentrations and indoor-outdoor temperatures and wind intensity has also been discussed. Radon concentration was measured hourly in a house located at a height of 800 m in the Lombard Pre-alps, at the top of the Valassina valley. The wind velocity and indoor-outdoor temperatures were measured by means of a meteorological station located on the terrace of the house. The data were analysed using the LBL model for indoor-outdoor air exchange and the models for the indoor accumulation of radon due to exhalation from building materials and pressure-driven infiltrations located underground. The role of wind and indoor-outdoor temperatures were analysed. The agreement of measurements with modelling clearly demonstrates the importance of the different sources of indoor radon. As the investigation was conducted in an uninhabited house, the measurements were not affected by the behaviour of people, e.g. opening and closing of windows. Measurements of the outdoor atmospheric concentrations of 222 Rn provide an index of the atmospheric stability, the formation of thermal inversions and convective turbulence. (authors)

  19. Measurement of radon concentration in water with Lucas cell detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machaj, B.; Pienkos, J.P.

    2003-01-01

    A method for the measurement of radon concentration in water is presented based on flushing a water sample with air in a closed loop with the Lucas cell as alpha radiation detector. The main feature of the method is washing radon away from the larger sample of water (0.75 l) to a small volume of air, approximately 0.5 l, thanks to which a high radon concentration in air and a considerable sensitivity of measurement is achieved. Basic relations and results of measurements of a model of a gauge is given. The estimated measuring sensitivity (S) is 8.5 (cpm)/(Bq/l). The random error due to the statistical fluctuations of count rate at radon concentrations 1,10, 100, 1000, 10000 Bq/l is 11, 3.6, 1.1, 0.4, 0.1% correspondingly at a counting (measuring) time of 10 min. The minimum detectable radon concentration in water is 0.11 Bq/l. (author)

  20. The 2008 intercomparison exercise for radon gas measurement instruments at PSI; Die Vergleichsmessung 2008 fuer Radongasmessgeraete am PSI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butterweck, G.; Schuler, Ch.; Mayer, S.

    2010-09-15

    Sixteen radon measurement services participated in the 2008 Radon Intercomparison Exercise performed at the Reference Laboratory for Radon Gas Activity Concentration Measurements at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) during August 28{sup th} to September 7{sup th}, 2008 on behalf of the Swiss Federal Office of Public Health (FOPH). Twelve of these laboratories were approved by the FOPH and their participation in the intercomparison exercise was a requirement to warrant quality of measurement. Radon gas dosemeters (etched-track, electronic and electret ionisation chambers) and instruments (ionization chambers) were exposed in the PSI Radon Chamber in a reference atmosphere with an average radon gas concentration of 627 Bq m{sup -3} leading to a radon gas exposure of 155 kBq h m{sup -3}. One measuring instrument participating for testing purposes stored values for part of the exposure interval (30.8. - 7.9.2008). The exposure during this partial interval was 117 kBq h m{sup -3} at an average radon gas concentration of 624 Bq m{sup -3}. The exposure of 155 kBq h m{sup -3} was the lowest used at the PSI intercomparisons down to the present day. Especially the LLT electret ionisation chambers used by some of the laboratories reached the lower end of their measurement range with this exposure. Unexpected deviations of instruments of the same model seem to show a dependence on the serial number and thus production date. (authors)

  1. Indoor radon and radon daughters survey at Campinas-Brazil using CR-39: First results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guedes, S.; Hadler, J.C.N.; Iunes, P.J.; Navia, L.M.S.; Neman, R.S.; Paulo, S.R.; Rodrigues, V.C.; Souza, W.F.; Tello, C.A.S.; Zuniga, A.

    1999-01-01

    The first results of a radon and radon daughters (RD) survey performed at Campinas-SP, Brazil, are presented. We employed a technique that, potentially, makes possible to measure the radon and RD activity in the air and to separate from this result the activity of radon, alone. In this preliminary paper only the former activity is studied

  2. Indoor radon and radon daughters survey at Campinas-Brazil using CR-39: First results

    CERN Document Server

    Guedes, S; Iunes, P J; Navia, L M S; Neman, R S; Paulo, S R; Rodrigues, V C; Souza, W F; Tello, C A S; Zúñiga, A G

    1999-01-01

    The first results of a radon and radon daughters (RD) survey performed at Campinas-SP, Brazil, are presented. We employed a technique that, potentially, makes possible to measure the radon and RD activity in the air and to separate from this result the activity of radon, alone. In this preliminary paper only the former activity is studied.

  3. Indoor radon measurements in the dwellings of Punjab and Himachal Pradesh, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rani, A.; Singh, S.; Duggal, V.

    2013-01-01

    The measurement of indoor radon concentrations were performed in the dwellings of the Punjab and Himachal Pradesh, India by using LR-115 type II Solid-State Nuclear Track Detectors in the bare mode. The annual average indoor radon concentrations in the dwellings are found to vary from 114 to 400 Bq m -3 with an average of 194 Bq m -3 . In ∼22 % of the dwellings the indoor radon activity concentration values lies in the range of action level (200-300 Bq m -3 ) and in ∼11 % of the dwellings above the upper limit of action level recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). The annual effective dose (AED) varies from 2.88 to 10.08 mSv with an average of 4.88 mSv. In most of the villages, the AED lies in the range of action level (3-10 mSv) recommended by the ICRP. The seasonal variation in indoor radon reveals the maximum values in winter and minimum in summer. The winter/summer ratio of indoor radon ranges from 1.15 to 1.62 with an average of 1.31. Analysis of ventilation conditions reveal that the indoor radon concentration values are more in poorly ventilated dwellings compared with the well-ventilated ones. (authors)

  4. Comparison of predicted and measured variations of indoor radon concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arvela, H.; Voutilainen, A.; Maekelaeinen, I.; Castren, O.; Winqvist, K.

    1988-01-01

    Prediction of the variations of indoor radon concentration were calculated using a model relating indoor radon concentration to radon entry rate, air infiltration and meteorological factors. These calculated variations have been compared with seasonal variations of 33 houses during 1-4 years, with winter-summer concentration ratios of 300 houses and the measured diurnal variation. In houses with a slab in ground contact the measured seasonal variations are quite often in agreement with variations predicted for nearly pure pressure difference driven flow. The contribution of a diffusion source is significant in houses with large porous concrete walls against the ground. Air flow due to seasonally variable thermal convection within eskers strongly affects the seasonal variations within houses located thereon. Measured and predicted winter-summer concentration ratios demonstrate that, on average, the ratio is a function of radon concentration. The ratio increases with increasing winter concentration. According to the model the diurnal maximum caused by a pressure difference driven flow occurs in the morning, a finding which is in agreement with the measurements. The model presented can be used for differentiating between factors affecting radon entry into houses. (author)

  5. Relationship between short and long term radon measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, T.; Ramirez, D.; Navarrete, M.; Cabrera, L.; Ramirez, A.; Gonzalez, P.

    2000-01-01

    In this work the radon group of the Faculty of Chemistry at the National University of Mexico presents the results obtained in the establishment of a relation between the short and long term radon measures made with passive electret detectors E-PERM type LLT and HST. The measures were carried out inside single family dwellings (open house condition) located in the southeast of Mexico City (in Xochimilco) during the four seasons of the year 1997. A correlation was established between the short term measures (five days) and those of a long term for every season as well as an annual average, with an equation that relates them. The objective and advantage of this correlation are that with a short term measure it is possible to predict the annual mean radon concentration, that represents a saving of human and economic resources. (author)

  6. Radon and radon-daughter exposure measurements by through-etched track registration in cellulose nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knoefell, T.M.J.; Silva Estrada, J.J. da; Tavares, O.A.P.; Martins, J.B.

    1981-01-01

    The use of cellulose nitrate films LR-115 type II (Kodak-Pathe) as a practical, exposure integrating device to measure the level of exposure to alpha particles in atmospheres which contain radon and radon-daughter products is investigated. The analysis of a number of cellulose nitrate films that have been exposed to calibrated radon test-chamber atmospheres has indicated good correlations between through-etched track density p and integrated alpha-particle exposure Σa (Working-Level-Hour). It is shown that the response of the cellulose nitrate detector to radon-daughter alpha-particle exposures is linear, and that reliable conservative estimations of the Working-Level-Hour can be obtained from Σa = 3.0(p-b), where p is expressed in tracks/mm 2 (b is the background level). These results recommend the use of the special red cellulose nitrate films as a convenient dosimeter for monitoring radioactive contaminants in mine atmospheres. (Author) [pt

  7. Comparative study of different types of granular activated carbon in removing medium level radon from water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alabdula'aly, A.I.; Maghrawy, H.B.

    2011-01-01

    Granular activated carbon (GAC) has proven its effectiveness in removing radon from water supplies. Laboratory and pilot plant studies were carried out using three different types of activated carbons (F-300, F-400, and HD-4000) to remove radon from water supply. From the experimental kinetic study, the data indicated that at least 6 h are needed to attain equilibrium between radon activity adsorbed onto carbon and its concentration in the aqueous phase. Also, it showed that HD-4000 has higher capacity for removing radon than the other two investigated carbons F-300 and F-400. The adsorption isotherms were satisfactorily explained by Freundlich equation. In the pilot plant study, the performance of the three activated carbons in removing radon at medium concentration (∼111 Bq dm -3 ) was evaluated over 60 days of continuous water flow. Four empty-bed contact times (EBCTs) corresponding to four bed depths were continuously monitored and the corresponding steady state adsorption-decay constant values were calculated and the efficiency of each carbon was used to provide a facet for comparison. The γ-radiation exposure rate distribution throughout each GAC bed was measured and compared. This study, despite paucity of literature in this field, is useful for designing a GAC adsorption system for the removal of medium level radon concentration from water supplies. (author)

  8. Radon concentration measurements in therapeutic spring water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deak, N.; Horvath, A.; Sajo B, L.; Marx, G.

    1996-01-01

    It is believed that people undergoing a curative cycle in a given spa, may receive a dose in the range of 400 mSv/year which is many times the average annual dose so that their risk of lung cancer may increase by 3% or more. To determine the risk due to the natural radioactivity, of the most frequented spas in Budapest (H), we selected four and some others located on the country side being of particular interest. Results of the radon concentration in spring water are presented, with the evidence that some spas have a high radon concentration. We conclude that patients receiving treatment may be exposed to an additional dose in the range of 29-76 mSv/year that at the bronchia could be between 445-1182 mSv/year. (authors). 6 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  9. Radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmen, R.W.

    1987-01-01

    The discovery that radon enters into residential and commercial structures and produces adverse health consequences to occupants thereof has raised issues for the real estate profession in connection with transactions involving affected structures. The legal responsibilities of real estate professionals in relation to such structures have not yet been clearly defined. Moreover, consistent and reliable testing methods and results, clear identification of circumstances where testing is necessary, and consensus as to health risks suggested by various radon levels have yet to be achieved. When these legal and technical questions are clarified, real estate buyer and sellers as well as agents and brokers will be greatly benefited

  10. International intercalibration and intercomparison programme for radon, thoron and daughters measuring equipment. Part. 1: Radon measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knutson, E.O.; Solomon, S.B.

    1986-01-01

    The International Intercalibration and Intercomparison Programme for Radon, Thoron and Daughters Monitoring Equipment, abbreviated IIIP, is a program organized jointly by Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development and the Radiation Protection Research Programme of the Commission of European Communities. The broad purpose of the IIIP is to determine if the somewhat diverse calibration procedures used in different countries are equivalent. The general approach was to select four regional reference laboratories and entrust them with the details of project definition and execution. The four selected laboratories are: Australian Radiation Laboratory, US DOE Environmental Measurements Laboratory, UK National Radiation Protection Board, US DOI Bureau of Mines. The Organizing Committee that selected the four laboratories remained intact and served an oversight function in all work to date

  11. Measurement of average radon gas concentration at workplaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kavasi, N.; Somlai, J.; Kovacs, T.; Gorjanacz, Z.; Nemeth, Cs.; Szabo, T.; Varhegyi, A.; Hakl, J.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper results of measurement of average radon gas concentration at workplaces (the schools and kindergartens and the ventilated workplaces) are presented. t can be stated that the one month long measurements means very high variation (as it is obvious in the cases of the hospital cave and the uranium tailing pond). Consequently, in workplaces where the expectable changes of radon concentration considerable with the seasons should be measure for 12 months long. If it is not possible, the chosen six months period should contain summer and winter months as well. The average radon concentration during working hours can be differ considerable from the average of the whole time in the cases of frequent opening the doors and windows or using artificial ventilation. (authors)

  12. Theoretical calculation on CR-39 response for radon measurements and optimum diffusion chambers dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Askari, H.R.; Ghandi, Kh. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Vali-e-Asr University, Rafsanjan 7713936417 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rahimi, M. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Vali-e-Asr University, Rafsanjan 7713936417 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: rahimi_bam@yahoo.com; Negarestani, A. [International Center for Science and High Technology and Environmental Sciences, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2008-11-11

    One method to measure radon gas concentration in the air with a long time of radiation is trace chemical etching technique. There is a direct proportion between the number of traces on solid-state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs) and activity concentration of radon. In this paper, calibration constant for a cylindrical chamber with CR-39 detector has been measured analytically. Using this measurement, trace curves on the base of concentration for chambers with different heights and radii have been drawn. The results show that to measure radon gas concentration, the optimum chamber should have a height between 3.5 and 4 cm and a radius between 2.5 and 3.2 cm.

  13. Theoretical calculation on CR-39 response for radon measurements and optimum diffusion chambers dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Askari, H.R.; Ghandi, Kh.; Rahimi, M.; Negarestani, A.

    2008-01-01

    One method to measure radon gas concentration in the air with a long time of radiation is trace chemical etching technique. There is a direct proportion between the number of traces on solid-state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs) and activity concentration of radon. In this paper, calibration constant for a cylindrical chamber with CR-39 detector has been measured analytically. Using this measurement, trace curves on the base of concentration for chambers with different heights and radii have been drawn. The results show that to measure radon gas concentration, the optimum chamber should have a height between 3.5 and 4 cm and a radius between 2.5 and 3.2 cm.

  14. Dosimetry, measurement and properties of radon daughters and thoron daughters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, C.R.

    1982-03-01

    Various properties of radon and thoron daughter products are examined. Dosimeter methods and instrumentation (TLD and personal alpha dosimeters) are investigated as to performance under varying conditions such as humidity and pure or mixed atmospheric conditions. Optimized counting schemes are determined for the daughters of radon and thoron. An optimized counting scheme was experimentally examined under mine conditions. The optimization procedure takes into account the uncertainties associated with concentration, flow rate and radioactive decay. Measurements were made in two uranium mines at Elliot Lake, Ontario of the charged and unattached fractions of radon daughters in the mines. The physicochemical state of 218 Po in air was determined by measurement of rate of neutralization, diffusion coefficient and fraction born charge. Careful control of experimental conditions made it possible to obtain more precise and detailed quantitative data than previously possible

  15. A condensed water method for measuring the atmospheric radon

    CERN Document Server

    Wu Xin; Pan Xiao Qing; Yu Yi Ling

    1998-01-01

    The author summarizes the present situation of atmospheric Radon measurement, and introduces the working principle, working method and advantage and disadvantage of condensed water method in detail. The structure and function of the instrument used for this method, and the measuring result are discussed. The direction of further work is pointed out from now on

  16. Radon and thoron measurements at special underground circumstances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovacs, Tibor; Somlai, Janos; Szeiler, Gabor; Nemeth, Csaba; Tokonami, Shinji; Takahashi, Hiroyuki

    2008-01-01

    In this study a comparative integrating radon ( 222 Rn) and thoron ( 220 Rn) survey executed at underground workplaces are discussed. Two types of solid state nuclear track detectors (Radopot and Raduet) were applied for survey at four sites: a manganese mine, a bauxite mine, a tourist cave and a hospital cave. Several numbers of detecting points were chosen at each site and 1-1 Raduet and Radopot detector were placed at each point. Both detector types contains two polycarbonate (CR-39) foils in different holders in order to determinate the radon as well as the thoron levels. The detectors were changed in 30-60 days periods (approximately monthly) and the survey continued for a year. This study had two aims: 1) To gain information about the radon and thoron concentrations at the chosen places including the seasonal variations; 2) To compare the performance of the two types of detectors and check their response in the special circumstances indicates by these underground places. Concerning the first point the radon concentrations were found to be as the expected ones at the given underground places and were similar to our former measurements. In the case of thoron the results are very variable and significant part of the detectors provides no data or unrealistic data. Concerning the second point there was only a little difference (<10%) between the radon results provided by the two types of detectors. In the case of thoron the two detector types showed high inconsistency. The study suggests that both types of detectors are fit for the integrating radon measurement at these special circumstances but it cannot be stated the same for the thoron measurement. The reason of the unreliability of the thoron measurement could be the high humidity (especially in the caves), the high aerosol concentration (especially in the mines) and the air change rate variation. To find the reasons needs further study. (author)

  17. Airflow measurement techniques applied to radon mitigation problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrje, D.T.; Gadsby, K.J.

    1989-01-01

    During the past decade a multitude of diagnostic procedures associated with the evaluation of air infiltration and air leakage sites have been developed. The spirit of international cooperation and exchange of ideas within the AIC-AIVC conferences has greatly facilitated the adoption and use of these measurement techniques in the countries participating in Annex V. But wide application of such diagnostic methods are not limited to air infiltration alone. The subject of this paper concerns the ways to evaluate and improve radon reduction in buildings using diagnostic methods directly related to developments familiar to the AIVC. Radon problems are certainly not unique to the United States, and the methods described here have to a degree been applied by researchers of other countries faced with similar problems. The radon problem involves more than a harmful pollutant of the living spaces of our buildings -- it also involves energy to operate radon removal equipment and the loss of interior conditioned air as a direct result. The techniques used for air infiltration evaluation will be shown to be very useful in dealing with the radon mitigation challenge. 10 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  18. The suitability of short-term measurements of radon in the built environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denman, A.R.; Groves-Kirkby, C.J.; Phillips, P.S.; Crockett, R.G.M.; Woolridge, A.C.

    2008-01-01

    Although domestic and workplace radon concentration levels often show marked diurnal/short-term variation, overall health risk is determined by the long-term average level, and many national protocols advocate the use of long exposure periods, usually three months, to assess long-term risk. Simple passive measurement techniques, e.g. track-etch, activated charcoal and electret, can, however, provide reasonably accurate determinations with exposures as short as one week, and there is pressure from users and stake holders for assessments within this time period. We report evaluation of the effectiveness of one-week, one-month and three-month exposures over a period of one year in a designated Radon Affected Area in the United Kingdom (UK). Although short-term exposures did not compromise measurement accuracy, short-term radon variability rendered one-week measurements less reliable in predicting annual average radon levels via the conventional methodology. Analysis permitted estimation of the maximum and minimum short-term measured domestic radon concentrations at which there was 95% probability of the predicted annual average being below or above the UK Action Level of 200 Bq·m -3 respectively. Between these limits, the short-term result is equivocal, requiring repetition, and the 'equivocal range' for one-week measurements is significantly wider than for three-month exposures. In any geographical area, domestic radon concentrations are distributed log normally, with many properties having low average levels; a small number exhibit excessive levels, and this distribution must be considered when defining exposures for a radon measurement programme. In low-radon areas, where 1% of houses might exceed the Action Level, a one-week assessment will find that fewer outcomes are equivocal. For high-radon areas, with 20% or more houses over the Action Level, more than 50% of one-week outcomes will be equivocal, requiring repeats. The results of this work will be presented

  19. Preliminary Monitoring of Soil gas Radon in Potentially Active Faults, San Sai District, Chiang Mai Province, Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pondthai, P.; Udphuay, S.

    2013-05-01

    The magnitude of 5.1 Mw earthquake occurred in San Sai District, Chiang Mai Province, Thailand in December 2006 was considered an uncommon event due to the fact that there was no statistical record of such significant earthquake in the area. Therefore the earthquake might have been associated with a potentially active fault zone within the area. The objective of this study is to measure soil gas radon across this unknown fault zone within the Chiang Mai Basin, northern Thailand. Two profiles traversing the expected fault zone of soil gas radon measurements have been monitored, using TASTRAK solid state track nuclear detectors (SSNTDs). Radon signals from three periods of measurement show a distinctive consistent spatial distribution pattern. Anomalous radon areas along the profiles are connected to fault locations previously interpreted from other geophysical survey results. The increased radon signal changes from the radon background level with the signal-to-background ratio above 3 are considered anomalous. Such pattern of radon anomaly supports the existence of the faults. The radon measurement, therefore is a powerful technique in mapping active fault zone.

  20. Measurement of radon flux and tailings parameters for quantifying the source term due to radon exhalation from U tailings pile at Jaduguda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahoo, B.K.; Mayya, Y.S.; Sapra, B.K.; Gaware, J.J.; Khuswaha, H.S.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: The exposures from radon ( 222 Rn) and its decay products have been received considerable attention in the world community because of their adverse health effect. There are various natural and man-made sources of radon present in our environment. Among the man-made sources, the U tailings (waste product from U mining and milling facility) may be considered an important one because it contains significant amount of 226 Ra activity after the U extraction from the ore bodies. These tailings (slurry form) are being impounded into a repository site nearby the facility called 'Tailings Pile' (TP). Significant amount of radon emission takes place from this area by the process of emanation and exhalation. Hence, a study was taken up to quantify the source term arising due to radon emission from uranium tailings pile at Jaduguda in Jharkhand state. In-situ experiments were conducted at 40 locations of the uranium tailings pile in three seasons namely summer, rainy and winter to measure the radon fluxes. The measurements were carried out by deploying a cylindrical chamber, attached to a continuous radon monitor, on the surface of the tailings pile. The dimension of the chamber was selected by using a recently developed two dimensional theory of soil chamber, so that radon concentration growth will be in exponential fashion and the data generated within 2-3 hours of deployment period will be sufficient for accurately deriving the actual radon flux. After the data collection, the fluxes were derived by fitting an exponential growth function to the plot of radon concentration with time. The fluxes were also predicted by diffusion theory using the measured tailings parameters such as 226 Ra content, radon emanation factor, porosity, temperature and moisture. An excellent matching between the predicted and measured fluxes was observed. The validity of diffusion theory in the matrix of U tailings pile provides an alternate method for back-calculating the tailings

  1. Radon measurements using track detector in Wadi Sannur cave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahin, F.; Eissa, M.F.; Mostafa, R.M.

    2008-01-01

    The most important contributors to the committed effective dose received by population due to natural sources are the short-lived decay products of radon ( 222 Rn). In natural voids, such as caves, most radon will enter the system from diffusion across the rock-air interface. It is well known that factors such as air pressure and temperature control the distribution of radon. The radon concentration measurements in the Wadi Sannur cave in Beni-Suef governorate in the period from 14 th of July 2005 to 17 th of October 2005. The average radon concentrations in the right, left and whole first cave are 916.12 ± 179.09, 819.63 ± 54.72 and 873.90± 147.11 Bq m -3 respectively. The measurements were performed using track etch detector of type Cr-39. After exposure, all detectors were etched chemically in 6.25 M NaOH solution at 70 C degrees for 6 h. The tracks were counted with an optical microscope magnifying 400 times. The average temperature inside the first cave during the period of measurements is 25-26 C degrees. The annual effective doses for the workers and visitors in the cave have been calculated. The average radon concentration in the Wadi Sannur cave, was 873.90 ± 147.11 Bq m -3 . The annual effective doses for worker and visitor in the cave were 1.33 ± 0.24 and 0.041 ± 0.007 mSv respectively. The doses are within the international recommended dose of 1.15 mSv. (author)

  2. Decommissioning/closeout of Malargue site: measurement of radon daughter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avila Cadena, Guadalberto

    2000-01-01

    In Malargue complex there are about 700,000 mt of uranium tailings disposed off during 32 years of operation of the Malargue facility. The objective of the Malargue Site is to undertake the necessary actions to execute remediation programs. A summary of measurements of concentrations of radon daughter taken in different buildings of the city and in the field shows the influence of radon source. The results obtain for concentrations of radon daughter indicate that they do not differ significantly between each others. The environmental remediation of uranium mill tailings at Malargue Site is a requirement of Nuclear Regulatory Authority (NRA) and of the Mendoza province and a commitment to reduce the doses as low as reasonably achievable, social and economic factors being taken into account (ALARA concept). (author)

  3. Some measurements of radon and its daughters in houses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rundo, J.; Markun, F.; May, H.A.; Plondke, N.J.; Keefe, D.J.

    1979-01-01

    The bare soil in the unpaved crawl space of a house is the source of unusually high levels (greater than or equal to 185 Bq m -3 ) of radon in the air of some houses (46% of those investigated), although the radium content of the soil is normal (approx. 40 Bq kg -1 ). High concentrations can also be found in the air in the basement sump. Measurements made with an Environmental Working Level Monitor in two houses showed that the average annual concentration of radon daughters may be in the region of 0.01 WL

  4. The Innovative Design of Lucas Cell for Radon Gas Measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wanabongse, Paitoon; Rattanabussayaporn, Sakon; Sriya, Maitree; Sola, Banthom

    2007-08-01

    Full text: Lucas scintillation cell has been widely used for radon gas measurement. They are commercially available but usually with a rather high price, therefore, four cells were developed and built in house. The invented radon gas detector has a special feature; the circumference of the upper part of the cylindrical detector is larger than the lower part. The purpose of this is to allow the light sensing device coupled at the lower end can better detect the phosphorescence light occurred inside. The result is that the invented detector yields higher detection efficiency. This special feature also allows us to increase the volume of the detector which results in higher detection sensitivity

  5. Measurement of radon, radon daughters and thoron concentrations by multi-detector devices. No. E/12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somogyi, G.; Varga, Zs.

    1983-01-01

    There is a growing interest in collection of data concerning human exposures to naturally occurring alpha-emitting radionuclides (e.g. in mines, dwellings, building materials, industrial wastes, coal fuel cycle, water supply, soil, plants, etc.). Most of such studies are incomplete for the following reasons: in radon measurements the contribution of thoron is generally neglected, the determination of equilibrium factor is complicated or not possible at all, short- and long-term concentration fluctuations cause difficulties in obtaining representative mean values, the plate-out effect is generally not taken into account. A variety of simple methods were studied that could be used to overcome some of these difficulties by using cups equipped with two or more alpha-sensitive nuclear track detectors. A theoretical foundation of the quantitative measurements with such devices is presented. Experimental data are reported on radon, radon daughters and thoron concentrations measured by multi-detector devices in cave soil gas and in air of Hungarian dwellings. (author)

  6. Procedures for and results of testing instruments for measuring radon in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soukup, T.

    1998-01-01

    A measuring standard of radon dissolved in water was developed by the Inspectorate for Ionizing Radiation, Czech Metrological Institute, in 1995. The volume activity value is traceable to the national activity standard. The most frequent measuring procedures include Lukas chambers, spectrometric measurement of daughter products using NaI(Tl) detectors, electrets, liquid scintillators, ionization chambers, and Ge detectors. The results of comparison measurements match each other well

  7. Radon Progeny In Underground Phosphate Mines and Their Activity Distributions In Human Lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd El-Hady, M.; Mohammed, A.; El-Hussein, A.; Ali, A.E.; Ahmed, A.A.

    2001-01-01

    In addition to workers in uranium mines, the staff of other underground mines, such as worker in underground phosphate mines, Can be exposed to 222 Rn and its progeny. In this study the individual radon progeny concentrations were measured in three Egyptian underground phosphate mines to estimate the occupational exposure to the workers in those sites. Active techniques are employed to fulfill the objective of measuring individual radon progeny concentrations (C RaA , C RaB and C RaC ). The mean reported values of radon progeny concentrations exceed the action levels recommended by ICRP 65 (1993). Based on the physical properties of attached radon progeny aerosol and physiological parameters for heavy work activity which recommended by ICRP 66 (1994). the deposition fraction for each airway generation was calculated. From the measured individual radon progeny concentrations in these mines and the calculated values of deposition fractions, the surface activity distribution per generation were calculated in human respiratory system (BB and regions). The maximum values of these activities were found in the upper bronchial airway generations. According to the obtained results, some of the corrective actions were recommended in this study

  8. Measurement of indoor radon levels in Erbil capital by using solid state nuclear track detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansour, H.H.; Khdar, S. per; Abdulla, H.Y.; Muhamad, N.Q.; Othman, M.M.; Qader, S.

    2005-01-01

    Radon alpha activity concentration has been measured in 28 homes in the Erbil Capital-Iraqi Kurdistan region during the autumn season by using time-integrated passive radon dosimeters containing CR-39 solid state nuclear track detectors 'SSNTDs'. The radon activity concentrations in these homes range from (10.33-90.34) Bqm -3 with an average of 44+/-23Bqm -3 . The average absorption effective dose equivalent for a person living in homes for which the investigation were done was found to be 1.3+/-0.65mSvy -1 , obtained by using an equilibrium factor of 0.5 and an occupancy factor of 0.8. The average lung cancer cases per year per 10 6 person was found to be 23+/-12

  9. Concentration of Radon Progeny in Air by Alpha Spectrometry Measurement; Medida de los descendientes del radon en aire por Espectrometria Alfa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acena, M L; Crespo, M T

    1989-07-01

    The concentration of radon progeny in air has been determined by alpha spectrometry measurement of 214 Po and 318 Po. A known volume of air was passed through a filter, then the alpha activity was directly measured on this filter. (Author) 15 refs.

  10. Comparison of techniques active and passive in measurement of radon concentration ({sup 222}Ra) in the air; Comparacao de tecnicas ativa e passiva na medicao de concentracao de radonio ({sup 222}Rn) no ar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Evaldo Paulo de

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this work was to perform a study comparing radon concentration measurements between two techniques used to measure radon gas in the air: one using LEXAN polycarbonate plastic detectors and the other the continuous monitor in AlphaGUARD passive mode. The concentrations of radon gas within radon emanation chambers were measured using calibrated / traceable sources generating {sup 222}Rn through {sup 226}Ra. In calibration the 'calibration factor' or 'sensitivity' was determined for the LEXAN plastic detector. The calibration work of the dosimeters was carried out at the Radon Laboratory of the Environmental Analysis Division - DIRAD IRD/CNEN and at the Natural Radioactivity Laboratory (LRN) of the Center for the Development of Nuclear Technology (CDTN/CNEN). The 'calibration factor' or 'sensitivity' was found to be 32.34 (traits.cm{sup -2})/(kBq.d.m{sup -3}). This factor was used to determine the radon concentration measured by the LEXAN plastic detectors. Also in the calibration, the efficiencies for LEXAN (94.1% ± 9.7%) and AlphaGUARD (92.5% ± 7.2%) were determined. The statistical analysis used showed good parity in the results of the measurements. It was concluded that the results were satisfactory and will serve as a good reference for studies related to the radon air meters used in this work. (author)

  11. Optimisation of elevated radon concentration measurement by using electro-chemical etching of nuclear track detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celikovic, I.; Ujic, P.; Fujimoto, K.; Tommasino, L.; Demajo, A.; Zunic, Z.; Celikovic, I.)

    2007-01-01

    In the paper, two methods for adjusting of passive radon-thoron discriminative dosimeters (UFO detector) for enhanced radon concentration measurement are presented. Achieved upper limit of detection is 5.94 MBq m-3 d [sr

  12. Systematic measurements of the radon concentration indoor from Remetea, Harghita county

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csegzi, Sandor

    2000-01-01

    Primary goal of the Remetea radon program was to carry out an indoor radon survey. The program can be applied too, in other places of the country. Remetea was built on volcanic rocks, where aligning of mineral water springs tells about the existence of geologic faulting. The 1992 census counted 2406 houses and 6550 residents of the village. The sample consisted of 120 houses chosen randomly from the entire stock. A hypergeometric statistical model has been used for sampling. Measurements were done in bedrooms at pillow level using etched track type Radamon radon detectors. Exposure lasted from January 1999 to July 1999. From the measurements it can be stated that the number of houses with radon concentration exceeding 200 Bq/m 3 is around 82. A high precision determination of activity has been done (errors under 3 %). Mapping indoor radon levels resembles the fault location that is indicated by springs and exhibited by geological studies. Particular points of the program were the soulful and self-aware approach the more than 30 schoolboys and girls participated, and the fact that the program met with a warm response from the public. (author)

  13. Geographical information system for radon gas from soil measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlando, P.; Amici, M.; Altieri, A.; Massari, P.; Miccadei, E.; Onofri, A.; Orlando, C.; Paolelli, C.; Paron, P.; Perticaroli, P.; Piacentini, T.; Silvestri, C.; Minach, L.; Verdi, L.; Bertolo, A.; Trotti, F.

    2000-03-01

    The working program foresees the realization of an geographical information system for the check in field of the geological parameters and determination of uranium and radium contents in various type of rocks. It is here also pointed out a measuring method for radon concentration in soil [it

  14. Traceability on radon measurements at the JAEA Ningyo-toge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishimori, Yuu

    2007-01-01

    The study on the establishment and maintenance of the traceability on radon measurements at the Ningyo-toge Environmental Engineering Center of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA Ningyo-toge) is illustrated in this paper. The primary standard is a radium solution provided by the National Bureau of Standard (present the National Institute of Standards and Technology) in the USA, and the secondary standard is the method with gas-filled ionization chambers calibrated with the solution. The radon reference chamber is utilized to provide reference atmospheres in calibration experiments for other monitors. Through the intercomparison experiments among the international reference institutes, it was confirmed that the reliability and consistency of the secondary standard of the JAEA Ningyo-toge have been retained since 1984. It shows that the calibration and measurement techniques associated with the traceability system constructed have been maintained well at the JAEA Ningyo-toge. Science there is no reference field as a national standard and no method regulated by the Japanese Industrial standard, this paper provides not only reliability and accuracy of the radon measurements at the JAEA Ningyo-toge, but also useful information for the standardization of radon measurements in Japan. (author)

  15. The discussion on a new measure method of radon chamber leak rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Junkui; Tang Bing

    2010-01-01

    Radon chamber is the third standard radon source. The leak rate is the key parameter for the radon chamber to naturally and safely operate. One way, that measure the leak rate is introduced. The experience result is that the way is simple and veracious to measure the leak rate. (authors)

  16. Measurement of indoor radon concentration by CR-39 track detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Masayoshi; Yoneda, Shigeru; Nakanishi, Takashi.

    1990-01-01

    A convenient and cheap method for measuring indoor radon ( 222 Rn) concentration with a CR-39 track detector is described. The detector consisted of two sheets of CR-39 enclosed separately in two plastic pots : one covered by a filter (cup method) and another no covering (bare method). The bare method was used here to supplement the cup method. To compare with the result of the CR-39 detector, alpha-ray spectrometry was carried out with a Si(Au) detector in a controlled radon exposure chamber. Indoor radon concentration measured in 133 houses in several districts of Ishikawa Prefecture have been found to range from 6 Bq/m 3 to as high as 113 Bq/m 3 with a median value of 24 Bq/m 3 . The problems to measure indoor radon concentration using the CR-39 detector are also discussed with emphasis on the position of setting the detector in the room and the possible thoron contribution to the detector. (author)

  17. Radon and thoron daughter activities in the environment of the King George Island (West Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. T. Solecki

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Results of 253 gamma spectrometric analyses of radon daughters in soil and bedrocks of the King George Island (West Antarctica are presented. Measured values range from 0.1 to 58.4 Bq/kg, and from 4.9 to 75.5 Bq/kg for 214Bi and 208Tl respectively, but most measurements fall in the lower part of this range due to predominantly basaltic character of the geological basement. Obtained gamma spectrometric data correspond well to very low soil gas radon content measured by means of Kodak LR115 being below 454 Bqm-3. Low soil gas radon content and characteristic type of architecture is responsible for low indoor radon activity in Arctowski Station being as low as 10- 15 Bqm-3. The highest 105 Bqm-3 indoor Rn activity has been measured in the greenhouse bungalow of the station. This increased value was probably connected with the presence of about 1000 kg of imported soil material in the greenhouse room of the bungalow. Local zones of increased uranium and thorium content, discovered as a result of radiometric mapping, can potentaily influence atmospheric radon used for meteorological interpretation.

  18. Radon measurements with charcoal canisters temperature and humidity considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živanović Miloš Z.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Radon testing by using open-faced charcoal canisters is a cheap and fast screening method. Many laboratories perform the sampling and measurements according to the United States Environmental Protection Agency method - EPA 520. According to this method, no corrections for temperature are applied and corrections for humidity are based on canister mass gain. The EPA method is practiced in the Vinča Institute of Nuclear Sciences with recycled canisters. In the course of measurements, it was established that the mass gain of the recycled canisters differs from mass gain measured by Environmental Protection Agency in an active atmosphere. In order to quantify and correct these discrepancies, in the laboratory, canisters were exposed for periods of 3 and 4 days between February 2015 and December 2015. Temperature and humidity were monitored continuously and mass gain measured. No significant correlation between mass gain and temperature was found. Based on Environmental Protection Agency calibration data, functional dependence of mass gain on humidity was determined, yielding Environmental Protection Agency mass gain curves. The results of mass gain measurements of recycled canisters were plotted against these curves and a discrepancy confirmed. After correcting the independent variable in the curve equation and calculating the corrected mass gain for recycled canisters, the agreement between measured mass gain and Environmental Protection Agency mass gain curves was attained. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III43009: New Technologies for Monitoring and Protection of Environment from Harmful Chemical Substances and Radiation Impact

  19. The measurement of radon concentration of soil in a civil construction site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Hanbin; Fan Guang

    2004-01-01

    Radon is one of radioactive resources which do harm to human body. Therefore, its concentration in the soil should be measured before the civil construction works. Code for Indoor Environmental Pollution Control of Civil Building Engineering (GB50325-2001) is the main norm used for soil radon concentration measurement. By using FD-3017 RaA radon measuring equipment, the soil radon concentration in a civil building engineering site has been measured, the result shows that the concentration is lower than the regional average value, radon protective measures should not be installed in that site. (authors)

  20. Qualitative and quantative analysis of some physical processes encountered in measurements of low level radon activity by means of proportional counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bluszcz, A.; Moscicki, W.

    1980-01-01

    Physical model for absorption of radon and its decay products on the electrodes of the proportional counter filled with Rn-CO 2 mixture is presented. The results of calculations based on developed model are compared with observed changes of counting rate of radon and its decay products. (author)

  1. Estimation of the radon dose in buildings by measuring the exhalation rate from building materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, V.; Kovler, K.; Perevalov, A.; Kelm, H.

    2004-01-01

    We review the accumulator technique using active (CRM) and passive detectors (activated charcoal and electret). We describe the ERS2 detector, an electrostatic radon sampler followed by alpha spectrometry, with improved algorithm and adapted to measure the exhalation rate from walls. The technique produces accurate results over a broad range of materials: concrete, Pumice, ceramics, tiles, granite, etc. The measured exhalation rate is the same, within errors, as measured by the standard detectors

  2. Development and implementation of radon daughter measurement in Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, A.Z.; Mohamed, I.H.

    2005-01-01

    During the last decade, a programme was developed to study radon daughter risks and to carry out field and experimental measurements. The Egyptian Atomic Energy Authority lead the implementation of this programme in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency through the coordination project EGY/9/020 and EGY/9/030. Several national authorities participated also in this study such as Nuclear Materials Corporation. This work involved the preparation and calibration of equipment, establishment of measuring techniques, survey in some cities and mines countrywide, and preparation of regulations for radiation safety of the workers who may be exposed to high levels of radon daughters. The study shows that there is no major environmental problem for the public due to exposure to radon daughter. Occupational problem may be probable in some underground mines with bad ventilation. Reported values for radon daughter levels in units of working level ranged from 0-0.26 in some buildings and ruins in the Egyptian cities and from 0-3 working level in underground phosphate and uranium mine in the Egyptian Eastern Desert

  3. Measurement of radon concentration in air employing Lucas chamber; Pomiar koncentracji radonu za pomoca komory Lucasa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machaj, B.

    1997-12-31

    The results of investigations aimed to determine the main features of radon concentration gauge in air, employing 0.17 L Lucas chamber, and air sample forced by an air pump are presented. For two hour sampling and measuring cycle time the dynamic error in the worst case (first read out) equals 5 % relative to the step jump of radon concentration. This is due to the increase of activity of the decay products in the chamber. It was observed that the short lived radon decay products (Po-218, Pb-214, Bi-214) are depositing on the walls of the chamber and they are not removed by flushing the chamber with air. (author). 4 refs, 19 figs, 2 tabs.

  4. A comparison of 'radon' measurement devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rolle, R.

    2004-01-01

    For the indoor concentration measurement of Rn decay chain members, instruments ranging from long-term integrating passive devices to far more sensitive active devices with good time resolution are in use. The former are used mainly to screen for potentially high exposure locations, while the latter are useful for assessing the exposure dynamics of encumbered premises, with potential clarification (modelling) for optimal remediation, before, during and after such process. Concentration measurement of any one decay chain member always involves its complete decay chain. The 222 Rn gas concentration can be measured with gas measuring devices or with spectrometric measuring instruments that concentrate the decay products. The latter generally offer far more accurate measurement per time of the 222 Rn concentration, than mere Rn gas measuring devices, and also give the decay product concentrations and thus activity ratios which are related to air exchange. The concentrations of the unattached Rn decay products may be measured simultaneously with inline screen measurement. In premises steady state ventilation conditions are rare. Rapidly changing concentrations can be measured more accurately with the more sensitive concentrating instruments - the inherent instrumental time lag of detected signals from chain decay, relative to time of sampling, should however be corrected where rates of concentration change approximate chain decay constants. Counting of beta-signals in addition to alpha-spectrometry, and quasi-continuous sampling while continuously measuring, enhances the sensitivity, and particularly measurement time lag correction, where concentration ratios are sought for elucidating air exchange. Appropriate software ought to be made available to evaluate the spectrometric data and to link it to suitable compartment ventilation models (automatic adjustment for a dynamic change in alpha-calibration could be incorporated) - this would constitute the modern version of

  5. Uncertainties of retrospective radon concentration measurements by multilayer surface trap detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastrikov, V.; Kruzhalov, A.; Zhukovsky, M.

    2006-01-01

    The detector for retrospective radon exposure measurements is developed. The detector consists of the multilayer package of solid-state nuclear track detectors LR-115 type. Nitrocellulose films works both as α-particle detector and as absorber decreasing the energy of α-particles. The uncertainties of implanted 210 Pb measurements by two- and three-layer detectors are assessed in dependence on surface 210 Po activity and gross background activity of the glass. The generalized compartment behavior model of radon decay products in the room atmosphere was developed and verified. It is shown that the most influencing parameters on the value of conversion coefficient from 210 Po surface activity to average radon concentration are aerosol particles concentration, deposition velocity of unattached 218 Po and air exchange rate. It is demonstrated that with the use of additional information on surface to volume room ratio, air exchange rate and aerosol particles concentration the systematic bias of conversion coefficient between surface activity of 210 Po and average radon concentration can be decreased up to 30 %. (N.C.)

  6. Indoor radon measurement in some adobe houses in the Kassena Nankana area of the Upper East Region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quashie, F. K.

    2010-06-01

    Inhalation of radon and its daughter products is the major contributor to the total exposure of the population to natural radiation. The present study has measured radon gas concentration in some Adobe houses and the soil radon gas around these houses in the Kassena Nankana Area of the Upper East Region by using passive radon indoor dosimeter containing solid-state nuclear track detector (SSNTD) commercially known as LR - 115 (type II, pelliculable). Fifty (50) indoor radon dosimeters were placed in the various Adobe houses in the study area. Additionally, thirty (30) dosimeters were placed in the soil around some of the houses at a depth of 75 cm. Soil radon dosimeters were retrieved after two (2) weeks while the indoor radon dosimeters were retrieved after 78 to 82 days. The detectors were then chemically etched. The digital laser optic system and the spark counter coupled with microfiche reader were used in counting both the indoor and soil detectors respectively. Indoor radon concentration in the study area range from 35.28 Bq/m 3 to 244.22 Bq/m 3 . An active dosimeter known as the radon scout plus which gives instantaneous readings between 1 to 3 hours was also used in nineteen of the adobe houses in the study area and a total average radon concentration of 56.90 Bq/m3 was obtained. The soil radon concentration was also found to range from 2.12 kBq/m 3 to 15.03 kBq/m 3 . A good correlation was found to exist between the soil radon concentration and that of the indoor radon concentration with a correlation coefficient of about 0.61. The mean radon emanation coefficient of some fifteen (15) soil samples monitored was 0.46. The average annual effective dose was estimated to be about 1.66 mSv/y and that of the average annual effective dose using the equilibrium equivalent factor (F) was 1.00 mSv/y

  7. Radon as an environmental risk: concentration measurements in family buildings at Cordoba city

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonzi, A.; Murua, C.; Martin, H.R.

    1992-01-01

    Measurements of radon concentration at homes are usual activities in the last years at the countries with uranium in their soils. On the other hand, the man's radiological protection about radiation is related to the environmental actions for a healthy life, but not much known for a public. The great quantities of ore with uranium can be an important source of irradiation when they are used as building materials. The soils are important too for the emanations of radon in the interior of buildings and for these reasons, the radon concentration measurements in Cordoba familiar houses were implemented in the summer of 1991. The Alpha Track Technique and the results obtained indicate the need of other measurements and a winter measurement for investigation variations of radon concentration. The typical values measured were low, about 4.13 Bq/m 3 if they are compared with other Argentine values measured. This paper discusses the procedure, techniques and criteria used in the work held in Cordoba city, Argentina. (Author)

  8. National and Regional Surveys of Radon Concentration in Dwellings. Review of Methodology and Measurement Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Reliable, comparable and 'fit for purpose' results are essential requirements for any decision based on analytical measurements. For the analyst, the availability of tested and validated sampling and analytical procedures is an extremely important tool for carrying out such measurements. For maximum utility, such procedures should be comprehensive, clearly formulated and readily available to both the analyst and the customer for reference. In the specific case of radon surveys, it is very important to design a survey in such a way as to obtain results that can reasonably be considered representative of a population. Since 2004, the Environment Programme of the IAEA has included activities aimed at the development of a set of procedures for the measurement of radionuclides in terrestrial environmental samples. The development of radon measurement procedures for national and regional surveys started with the collection and review of more than 160 relevant scientific papers. On the basis of this review, this publication summarizes the methodology and the measurement techniques suitable for a population representative national or regional survey on radon concentration in the indoor air of dwellings. The main elements of the survey design are described and discussed, such as the sampling scheme, the protocols, the questionnaire and the data analysis, with particular attention to the potential biases that can affect the representativeness of the results. Moreover, the main measurement techniques suitable for national surveys on indoor radon are reviewed, with particular attention to the elements that can affect the precision and accuracy of the results

  9. National and Regional Surveys of Radon Concentration in Dwellings. Review of Methodology and Measurement Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-12-15

    Reliable, comparable and 'fit for purpose' results are essential requirements for any decision based on analytical measurements. For the analyst, the availability of tested and validated sampling and analytical procedures is an extremely important tool for carrying out such measurements. For maximum utility, such procedures should be comprehensive, clearly formulated and readily available to both the analyst and the customer for reference. In the specific case of radon surveys, it is very important to design a survey in such a way as to obtain results that can reasonably be considered representative of a population. Since 2004, the Environment Programme of the IAEA has included activities aimed at the development of a set of procedures for the measurement of radionuclides in terrestrial environmental samples. The development of radon measurement procedures for national and regional surveys started with the collection and review of more than 160 relevant scientific papers. On the basis of this review, this publication summarizes the methodology and the measurement techniques suitable for a population representative national or regional survey on radon concentration in the indoor air of dwellings. The main elements of the survey design are described and discussed, such as the sampling scheme, the protocols, the questionnaire and the data analysis, with particular attention to the potential biases that can affect the representativeness of the results. Moreover, the main measurement techniques suitable for national surveys on indoor radon are reviewed, with particular attention to the elements that can affect the precision and accuracy of the results.

  10. National campaign of measurement of domestic exposure to radon IPSN-DGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gailliez, E.

    2000-10-01

    The radon atlas in accommodation, published by the Institute of Nuclear Protection and Safety (I.P.S.N.) and the General Direction of Health (D.G.S.), and available from http://www.ipsn.fr, presents maps and statistical elements from 12 641 measures made in 10013 communes, from 1982 up to and including 1999. The objective pursued is to estimate in an overall way the French population exposure to domestic radon. An update is planned regularly (every two years). In its present version, the modesty of the measures number and the local strong disparities make very difficult the identification of risk areas at the communal level: high voluminal activities can be noticed in any commune; whereas a housing situated in a commune classified in the highest group will not show inescapably a strong concentration in radon leading to take rapid measures. The average value of radon voluminal activity measured in France is 90 Bq. by m 3 . For the risk management, the authorities have kept the value of 400 Bq. by m 3 as caution objective and this one of 1000 Bq. by m 3 as alert threshold, in yearly average value. (N.C.)

  11. Measurement of the Radon equilibrium factor in Ottawa dwellings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, Naureen M.; Tracy, Bliss L.; Chen, Jing; Moir, Deborah

    2008-01-01

    The degree of radioactive equilibrium between radon and its short-lived radioactive decay products can be expressed as the equilibrium factor 'F'. It is often assumed to be 0.40 for assessing risk. While this is usually a reasonable assumption, there are cases where the equilibrium factor can differ from 0.40 significantly due to various housing and environmental factors. Because the effective dose depends strongly on the F value, it is important for risk assessment to know the normal range of the F factor for settings specific to Canada. For this purpose, measurements were undertaken at several Ottawa homes with a wide range of radon concentrations. The experimental homes were detached houses with a composite structure of brick, concrete blocks and wood. The hourly variation of radon concentration and its decay products concentration were observed employing a portable ionisation chamber (permitting the continuous radon monitoring as well as the determination of selected parameters -- air temperature, pressure and humidity), Lucas type passive scintillation cell and a working level monitor. The calculated F value lay between 0.20 - 0.52. In addition, the diurnal variation of the F value was observed and the indoor environment was monitored. (author)

  12. Radon concentration measurements in waters in Greece and Cyprus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louizi, A.; Nikolopoulos, D.; Tzortzi, A.; Thanassas, D.; Serefoglou, A.; Georgiou, E.; Vogiannis, E.; Koukouliou, V.

    2004-01-01

    A total of 35 measurements in Greece and 15 in Cyprus were performed. Radon concentrations in drinking water in Greece were from (1.1±0.5) to (410±50) Bq/L. The corresponding concentrations in underground potable waters in Cyprus ranged between (0.4±0.3) Bq/L and (15±4) Bq/L. High concentrations, viz. (120±20), (320±40) and (410±50) Bq/L, were observed in three samples collected from the city of Arnea Chalkidekis in northern Greece. One water sample from Lesvos Island (north-eastern part of Greece) exhibited a radon concentration of (140±20) Bq/L. Six samples of hot spring water from the city of Loutraki (Attica prefecture), characterized as 'medicinal drinking water', contained concentrations of radon between (220±10) and (340±20) Bq/L. Radon concentrations in potable and non-potable underground water in Greece and Cyprus ranged between (0.4±0.3) and (15±4) Bq/L, whereas in surface water the range was from (2.7±0.8) to (24±6) Bq/L. (P.A.)

  13. Radon concentration measurements in waters in Greece and Cyprus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louizi, A.; Nikolopoulos, D.; Tzortzi, A.; Thanassas, D.; Serefoglou, A.; Georgiou, E.; Vogiannis, E.; Koukouliou, V.

    2004-01-01

    The radon content of drinking water samples was determined with Alpha Guard Pro equipped with an appropriate unit (Aqua Kit). The samples were collected from water taps in dwellings located at various cities in Greece and Cyprus. In addition, surface water samples from rivers, lakes and seas as well as potable underground and hot spring water samples from Greece and Cyprus were also collected. For a precise determination of radon concentration in water samples, special procedures were followed both for sampling and transportation, as well as for measurement. Intercomparison experiments were designed and implemented before and during the study. Radon concentrations in drinking water samples in Greece ranged between 1.1 ± 0.5 Bq/L and 410±50 Bq/L. The corresponding concentrations in Cyprus ranged between 1.3 ± 0.8 Bq/L and 15±4 Bq/L. Three samples collected from the city of Arnea Chalkidikis (Northern Greece) exhibited high concentrations of 120±20 Bq/L, 320±40 Bq/L and 410±50 Bq/L. This city is identified as a high radon potential area. One water sample located in Lesvos Island (North-East part of Greece) exhibited radon concentration 140±20 Bq/L. Additional six samples displayed high concentrations in potable hot spring water samples. These samples which were collected from the city of Loutraki (Peloponnesus) ranged between 220-230 Bq/L. In addition, two samples characterized as 'medicinal drinking water' gave concentrations between 320 Bq/L and 340 Bq/L. For underground water samples the radon concentrations ranged between 1.2±0.7 Bq/L and 15±4 Bq/L, while for surface water samples the range was 2.7±0.8 Bq/L to 24±6 Bq/L. The observed concentrations of radon gas in potable water samples in Greece were found to be largely low. In Cyprus, they were all well below 15 Bq/L

  14. Measurements of parameters for determining the radon load in the framework of the Dutch national research program SAWORA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groen, G.C.H.; Groot, T.J.H. de; Nyqvist, R.G.; Keverling Buisman, A.S.; Stoute, J.R.D.

    1986-06-01

    This report describes a series of measurements related to the indoor exposure to daughters of radon and thoron. Important parameters are the Potential Alpha Energy Concentration (PAEC) and the Activity Median Aerodynamic Diameter (AMAD). The results for indoor atmosphere are presented leading to an order of magnitude estimate of the effective dose-equivalent rate of 500 μSv/y. The thoron daughter concentrations are relatively high with respect to those of radon daughters. (Auth.)

  15. Diagnostics of and measures against radon concentrations in a dwelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, H.

    1994-02-01

    Results are presented of measurements in a test-dwelling in the period april 1993 - november 1993. The purpose of the measurements was to investigate the possibilities of using a blower door (a fan in a wall of the dwelling) for specifying sources of radon in the dwelling, employing the diagnostic method developed at the KVI (Nuclear Physics Accelerator Institute in Groningen, Netherlands). Special attention is paid to the measurement of two input variables for the diagnostic method: transparency of the walls of the dwelling and the strength of static sources. Also measures aimed at reducing radon concentrations in the dwelling are discussed. The main conclusions are that (a) the pressure-variation method is a valid procedure to measure the transparency of walls and floors; (b) the blower door is a suitable technique for arriving at a correct diagnosis; and (c) over-pressurizing the crawl-space is the most effective measure in reducing the radon concentration of the crawl-space. More research on air flows in the soil is recommended. 21 figs., 28 tabs., 7 refs

  16. Study on the measurement method of diffusion coefficient for radon in the soil. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iida, Takao

    2000-03-01

    To investigate radon behavior in the soil at Ningyo Pass, the radon concentrations in the soil and the radon exhalation rate from soil surface were measured by four continuous soil radon monitoring systems, soil gas sampling method, and accumulation method. The radon concentrations in the soil measured with continuous soil radon monitoring systems varied form 5000 Bq·m -3 to 15000 Bq·m -3 at 10 cm to 40 cm depth. On the other hand, the radon concentrations measured by soil gas sampling method was 15000 Bq·m -3 at 15 cm depth. The accumulation method gives the vales of 0. 36∼0.68 Bq·m -2 ·s -1 for radon exhalation rate from soil surface. To simulate the radon transport in soil, the following parameters of the soil are important: radon diffusion coefficients, dry density, wet density, soil particle density, true density, water content and radium concentration. The measured radon diffusion coefficients in the soil were (1.61±0.09)x10 -6 m 2 s -1 , (8.68±0.23)x10 -7 m 2 s -1 ∼ (1.53±0.12)x10 -6 m 2 s -1 and (2.99±0.32)x10 -6 m 2 s -1 ∼ (4.39±0.43)x10 -6 m 2 s -1 for sandy soils of the campus of Nagoya University, Tsuruga peninsula, and Ningyo Pass, respectively. By using these parameters, the radon transport phenomena in the soil of two layers were calculated by analytical and numerical methods. The radon profile calculated by numerical method agrees fairly well with measured values. By covering of 2 m soil, the radon exhalation rate decreases to 1/4 by analytical method, and 3/5 by numerical method. The covering of normal soil is not so effective for reducing the radon exhalation rate. (author)

  17. Measurement of unattached radon progeny based in electrostatic deposition method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canoba, A.C.; Lopez, F.O.

    1999-01-01

    A method for the measurement of unattached radon progeny based on its electrostatic deposition onto wire screens, using only one pump, has been implemented and calibrated. The importance of being able of making use of this method is related with the special radiological significance that has the unattached fraction of the short-lived radon progeny. Because of this, the assessment of exposure could be directly related to dose with far greater accuracy than before. The advantages of this method are its simplicity, even with the tools needed for the sample collection, as well as the measurement instruments used. Also, the suitability of this method is enhanced by the fact that it can effectively be used with a simple measuring procedure such as the Kusnetz method. (author)

  18. Review of official measuring methods and official interpretations of measuring results used in the radon programme of the Czech Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.; Hulka, J.; Fojtikova, I.

    2004-01-01

    Attention is centered on the following topics: 1. Preventive measures (Monitoring the radioactivity in building materials; Monitoring the radioactivity in drinking water; Monitoring the evaluating building sites; Evaluating finished unoccupied new buildings; Survey of occupied new buildings); 2. Measuring methods in the intervention programme (Identification of houses with elevated radon risk; Testing the effectiveness of mitigation; Searching for radon sources - radon diagnosis); 3. Metrological assurance of the Czech Radon Programme. (P.A.)

  19. Radon gas sampler for indoor and soil measurements and its applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azimi-Garakani, D.; Flores, B.; Piermattei, S.; Susanna, A.F.; Seidel, J.L.; Tommasino, L.; Torri, G.

    1988-01-01

    A national large scale survey of indoor radon (based on an optimised sampling strategy) is needed in Italy to obtain average population dose for use in epidemiological studies. Since in the great majority of cases, one of the most important radon sources is the soil and rock beneath the houses, it would be interesting to combine this survey with measurements of bed-soil radon. With these objectives in mind, a new radon monitor device has been developed consisting of two etched track detectors enclosed in a heat-sealed polyethylene bag. When compared with existing techniques, this radon gas sampler presents several advantages for both indoor and outdoor measurements. As a pilot project, radon gas measurements have been carried out in hundreds of different sites and for several locations; measurements have been made for different years. Typical houses with relatively high radon concentrations have also been thoroughly investigated. (author)

  20. Measurement of Radon concentration in groundwater by technique of nuclear track detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trinh Van Giap; Nguyen Manh Hung; Dang Duc Nhan

    2000-01-01

    A method for measuring radon concentration in groundwater using nuclear track detector LR-115 stripping is reported. The radon-monitoring device in groundwater is a small box with two pieces of nuclear track detector and all these materials is placed in a plastic bag made by polyethylene. It is very suitable to measure radon concentration in groundwater well in long term. Alpha tracks produced by radon and it daughter on nuclear track detector is counted automatically by spark counting method. The paper also presents some results of radon concentration in some groundwater well and mineral water sources. (author)

  1. Indoor radon measurements and radon prognosis for eastern Uusimaa. Askola, Lapinjaervi, Liljendal, Loviisa, Myrskylae, Maentsaelae, Maentsaelae, Pernaja, Pornainen, Porvoo, Porvoon mlk, Pukkila, Ruotsinpyhtaeae and Sipoo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voutilainen, A.; Maekelaeinen, I.

    1995-02-01

    The purpose of the regional radon prognosis is to classify areas with different levels of radon risk. The radon prognosis gives the percentages of future homes expected to have indoor radon concentrations exceeding the levels of 200 and 400 Bq/m 3 . It is assumed that no protection against the entry of radon is used in construction. In the study about 2400 indoor radon measurements made in single family houses, semi-detached houses and row houses were used. Data on the location, geology and construction of buildings were determined form maps and questionnaires. An empirical statistical model, the adjusted indoor radon measurement and geological data were used to assess the radon risk form soil and bedrock in different areas. (15 refs., 19 figs., 9 tabs.)

  2. Some measurements of the equilibrium factor for radon daughters in houses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toohey, R.E.; Essling, M.A.; Wang, H.; Rundo, J.

    1982-01-01

    Because the radiation dose to the lung from environmental radon is due almost entirely to the inhalation of the short-lived daughter products, measurements of radon levels alone are not sufficient to determine the dose. Typically the activities of the daughter products in air are not in daughters themselves. The working level (WL) was introduced as a convenient unit to overcome this problem in uranium mines, and it is also applicable to other environments where radiation dosimetry is the principal concern. Since it is easier to determine the radon concentration than the working level, the task of determining lung doses would be simplified if those factors which determine equilibrium could be identified and their effects quantified. In order to do this, simultaneous measurements of radon concentrations and working levels must be made in houses under a variety of conditions. In addition, parameters that may affect the equilibrium factor, such as aerosol concentration and ventilation rate, must also be identified and monitored. Although the effects of such parameters may be best determined under controlled conditions in a laboratory, the results must be validated by measurements in houses. This paper describes these measurements

  3. Properties of membranes to permeation to radon 222. New development for the measurement of radon 222 in water and water-saturated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labed, V.; Robe, M.C.

    1992-01-01

    Membranes that exclude water but are permeable to radon can extend the range of environments in which many radon detection systems could operate. We have studied the permeation of 222 Rn through membranes separating air and water phases. The permeation coefficients and the activation energy were calculated for various conditions. Potential applications such as in situ detection of radon in water are discussed

  4. Radon measurement waters from different regions of Transylvania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moldovan, M.; Cosma, C.

    2004-01-01

    Radon exposure is still a very current problem in the scientific world. It is well-known that 222 Rn and its short-lived daughters contribute to the effective dose equivalent, through inhalation, in a percent of 50% of the total effective dose equivalent from natural sources [UNSCEAR, 1988]. The radon gas incorporated in water is transferred into the indoor air by simple utilisation of water for domestic purposes. According to the American standards, the waters with concentrations of radon higher than 11.11 Bq/l (300 pCi/l) must not be consumed. Radon studies are very motivated even from the medical and geophysical point of view. Moreover, interesting correlations can be done between the measured concentration indoors and the concentration of those underground waters that supply them. We measured over 135 samples of groundwater. These were collected from wells, at different depths. The samples were measured after 12 hours, in order to prevent the radon loss. For groundwater measurements we used, a device called LUK-3A, manufactured in Czech Republic, which has a standard deviation of ± 10% and a sensibility of 0.56 Bq/l (15 pCi/l).The method is based on the detection of alpha radioactivity of 222 Rn. It can be set to perform measurements of 222 Rn from water. In case of this method a water sample of 0.3 l is collected into a glass container which is intensely stirred and shaken for one minute. The container is then connected to a vacuumed Lucas cell on one side and on the other side connected to a syringe in which distillated water was introduced having an amount equal to the volume of gas left into the collector container. Three successive measurements of 100 s were made for each sample. Before starting the measurements the background of the Lucas cells that were going to be used was determined. The concentration of radon is calculated using the formula: C Rn = k · N [Bq/l] where k - calibration constant, k = 9.85; N - count of pulses recorded in 100 minutes

  5. Radon-Instrumentation; Radon-Instrumentacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno y Moreno, A. [Departamento de Apoyo en Ciencias Aplicadas, Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, 4 Sur 104, Centro Historico 72000 Puebla (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    The presentation of the active and passive methods for radon, their identification and measure, instrumentation and characteristics are the objectives of this work. Active detectors: Active Alpha Cam Continuous Air Monitor, Model 758 of Victoreen, Model CMR-510 Continuous Radon Monitor of the Signature Femto-Tech. Passive detectors: SSNTD track detectors in solids Measurement Using Charcoal Canisters, disk of activated coal deposited in a metallic box Electrets Methodology. (Author)

  6. Indoor radon progeny aerosol size measurements in urban, suburban, and rural regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tu, K.W.; Knutson, E.O.; George, A.C.

    1991-01-01

    By using direct and indirect methods, the authors conducted size distribution measurements of radon progeny particles in a variety of indoor environments in urban, suburban, and rural areas. The radon progeny particle size distribution owing to indoor activities has two definable source categories: (1) gas combustion from stoves and kerosene heaters - particles were found to be smaller than 0.1 μm in diameter, mostly in the range 0.02-0.08 μm; and (2) cigarette smoking and food frying - particles were found to be larger, in the size range 0.1-0.2 μm. The radon progeny particle size distribution, without significant indoor activities, such as cooking, was found to be larger in rural areas than in urban or suburban areas. The modal diameters of the size spectra in the rural areas were two to three times larger than those in urban or suburban areas, around 0.3-0.4 bs. 0.1-0.2 μm. Results obtained by applying the attachment theory to the measured number-weighted size spectra from an electrical aerosol size analyzer support this finding. These results, if confirmed by more extensive studies, will be useful for the assessment of the risk from the inhalation of radon progeny in various indoor environments

  7. The detection and measurement of the electrical mobility size distributions associated with radon decay products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fei, Lin.

    1996-04-01

    The potential risk of lung cancer has evoked interest in the properties of radon decay products. There are two forms of this progeny: either attached to ambient aerosols, or still in the status of ions/molecules/small clusters. This ''unattached'' activity would give a higher dose per unit of airborne activity than the ''attached'' progeny that are rather poorly deposited. In this thesis, a system for determining unattached radon decay products electrical mobility size distribution by measuring their electrical mobilities was developed, based on the fact that about 88% of 218 Po atoms have unit charge at the end of their recoil after decay from 222 Rn, while the remainder are neutral. Essential part of the setup is the radon-aerosol chamber with the Circular Electrical Mobility Spectrometer (CEMS) inside. CEMS is used for sampling and classifying the charged radioactive clusters produced in the chamber. An alpha- sensitive plastic, CR-39 disk, is placed in CEMS as an inlaid disk electrode and the alpha particle detector. CEMS showed good performance in fine inactive particles' classification. If it also works well for radon decay products, it can offer a convenient size distribution measurement for radioactive ultrafine particles. However, the experiments did not obtain an acceptable resolution. Suggestions are made for solving this problem

  8. The efficacy and durability of radon remedial measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cliff, K.D.; Naismith, S.P.; Scivyer, C.; Stephen, R.

    1994-01-01

    In the UK, over 16,000 homes, from an estimated 100,000, with annual average radon concentrations exceeding the UK Action Level of 200 Bq.m -3 have been discovered. Some 600 householders who have taken action have sought confirmatory measurements from NRPB. Results for 345 such homes are discussed. A number of remedied homes are being remeasured annually to determine the durability of the remedies: results for the first year follow-up measurements are given. In a separate exercise, homes having the highest radon levels known in the UK have been enrolled in a research programme of the Building Research Establishment. The results for 53 homes in which BRE surveyed, designed and supervised remedial work are presented. (author)

  9. Radon measurements technique in air using a track plastic detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, J.F.A.; Silva Estrada, J.J. da; Binns, D.A.C.; Urban, M.

    1983-01-01

    A difusion chamber is used to measure the radon concentration in air through alpha particles tracks in Makrofol E, 300μm thick. This system was developed by Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Centre, Germany, and is already used by the Occupational Radiological Protection Department of IRD/CNEN, for premilimar measurements in Pocos de Caldas and Rio de Janeiro. In the chamber, the plastic detector is set at the lower end and a filter is placed at the upper end. In this way, a known volume is defined in the detector system. To amplify the tracks produced by the alpha particles due to radon and short-lived dadon-daughter products, an electrochemical system is employed. Some theoretical questions about the treeing produced by the electrochemical etching, the detector characteristics, as well as the adapted statistics model are also discussed. (Author) [pt

  10. Long-term Radon Levels and Equilibrium Factor in Some Spanish Workplaces Measured with a Passive Integrating Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baixeras, C.; Amgarou, K.; Font, Ll.; Domingo, C.

    1999-01-01

    The measurement of long-term radon levels and equilibrium factor is important to estimate the annual averaged dose due to radon progeny inhalation indoors. According to the European Union directive 96/26/EURATOM it is necessary to control the radon level in workplaces. This paper presents the radon concentration and equilibrium factor values obtained in some workplaces from the Barcelona area with a passive integrating dosemeter exposed for two months. The dosemeter consists of two Makrofol-DE nuclear etched track foils, one within a diffusion chamber and the other one bare, allowing the separated measurement of 222 Rn (C 0 ) and 214 Po (C 4 ) activity concentration respectively. The equilibrium factor is estimated from the disequilibrium degree (k 4 = C 4 /C 0 ). A description of the dosemeter and the methodology used, and an estimation of the annual dose received for the workers at the different workplaces are presented. (author)

  11. Find a Radon Test Kit or Measurement and Mitigation Professional

    Science.gov (United States)

    Find a qualified radon service professional to fix or mitigate your home. If you have questions about a radon, you should contact your state radon contact and/or contact one or both of the two privately-run National Radon Proficiency Programs

  12. Systematic indoor radon and gamma-ray measurements in Slovenian schools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaupotic, J.; Sikovec, M.; Kobal, I.

    2000-01-01

    During the winter months of 1992/93 and 1993/94, instantaneous indoor radon concentrations and gamma dose rates were measured in 890 schools in Slovenia attended in total by about 280,000 pupils. Under closed conditions, the room to be surveyed was closed for more than 12 h prior to sampling, the air was sampled into alpha scintillation cells with a volume of 700 cm 3 , and alpha activity was measured. An arithmetic mean of 168 Bq m -3 and a geometric mean of 82 Bq m -3 were obtained. In 67% of schools, indoor radon concentrations were below 100 Bq m -3 , and in 8.7% (77 schools with about 16,000 pupils) they exceeded 400 Bq m -3 , which is the proposed Slovene action level. In the majority of cases, radon concentrations were high due to the geological characteristics of the ground. Approximately 70% of schools with high radon levels were found in the Karst region. Gamma dose rates were measured using a portable scintillation counter. An arithmetic mean of 102 nGy h -1 and a geometric mean of 95 nGy h -1 were obtained. No extraordinarily high values were recorded

  13. Measurement of dose-determining physical parameters (F-factor, fp factor,...) for comparative analysis of outdoor/indoor radon exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of the project was to measure the airborne natural radon activity concentrations outdoor and the dose-determining parameters [non-deposited fraction (f p ), radon daughter products (F, PAEC), as well as the radioactive aerosol size distribution]. The impacts of meteorological parameters (pressure, rainfalls, wind velocities and temperature) on the those parameters and the exhalation of radon from the soil were to be determined. The acquired information was to be applied for an evaluation of the radiological outdoor situation and subsequent comparative analysis with the indoor radon exposure. (orig./CB) [de

  14. Correlations between radon in soil gas and the activity of seismogenic faults in the Tangshan area, North China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xin; Li, Ying; Du, Jianguo; Zhou, Xiaocheng

    2014-01-01

    The spatial variation of soil gas radon values were correlated with the seismogenic faults and earthquakes in the Tangshan area (north China). Radon concentrations were measured at 756 sites in an area about 2500 km 2 from April to May 2010. The background and anomaly threshold values calculated were 4730.4 Bq/m 3 and 8294.1 Bq/m 3 , respectively. Radon concentrations highlight a decreasing gradient from NE to SW in the area. Higher values mostly distributed in the NE sector of the Tangshan fault and the Luanxian fault where the Tangshan (Ms 7.8), and Luanxian (MS 7.1) earthquakes occurred in 1976 and 17 earthquakes with MS = 3.0 occurred in this area since 2005. Radon values illustrated a close relation with the shallow fault trace and earthquake activity in the area. The active fault zones and the associated fractures formed by the larger earthquakes, act as paths for radon migration. - Highlights: • Radon concentrations at 756 sites were attained in the Tangshan area. • The background value and anomaly threshold of Rn were calculated out. • Radon concentration decreasing from NE to SW in the study area. • Rn value has a close relation with the fault and earthquake activity

  15. A summary of EPA radon chamber tests and results for rounds 3 and 4 of the National Radon Measurement Proficiency Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.M.; Sensintaffar, E.L.

    1993-02-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Radiation and Indoor Air (ORIA) established the National Radon Measurement Proficiency (RMP) Program in 1986. Through this voluntary program, participants can demonstrate their ability to measure radon and/or radon decay products by submitting their detection devices to a blind test in a designated radon chamber. In this report, two EPA radon and radon decay products test chambers (chambers A and C) located at the National Air and Radiation Environmental Laboratory in Montgomery, Alabama are described. These chambers were used to expose detectors submitted for testing in Round 4 of the National Radon Measurement Proficiency Program and are used routinely for calibration purposes. Also described are the measurement and calibration procedures which were used to establish the official target values for radon and radon decay products concentrations during RMP Round 4 testing. The results for RMP Round 3 (conducted at the US DOE Environmental Measurements Laboratory radon chamber in New York) and RMP Round 4 (conducted in the two NAREL chambers) are discussed and compared. Following Round 4, the NAREL staff analyzed the collective performance for each measurement method tested in these rounds and found that all methods agreed with the target values within expected limits except for RPISU's and charcoal adsorbers. After analyzing the RMP4 results, NAREL staff spent several months evaluating the difference in charcoal adsorber response between Round 3 and 4 by performing radon chamber tests using EPA 4-inch, open-faced charcoal adsorbers

  16. Measurement of radon (222Rn) in thermal water of Cerro Pacho, Coatepeque Caldera, El Salvador

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, Ramiro; Olmos, Rodolfo; Payes, Julio

    2014-01-01

    Radon ( 222 Rn) concentrations and radio ( 226 Ra) evaluation dissolved in thermal spring water are presented to contribute to volcanic monitoring, adapting and validating analytical methodology. Sampling was discreet and monthly type, from June 2011 to March 2013. Radon levels was vary from 0,48 ± 0,1 to 1,54 ± 0,13 Bq/L (average 1,24 Bq/L). Radio concentrations were evaluated from January to December 2012. The values found do not show radio detection confidence level of 95% with respect to the detection limit (4,2 mBq/L). A decrease in radon was observed possibly related to subduction anomalies with epicenter at 143 km from Cerro Pacho, in November 2012, volcanic seismicity was also recorded 40 days before with increments of microearthquakes and volcano-tectonic activity. The first measurements of radon in thermal water have been generated, establishing the baseline to evaluate the behavior of these radionuclides with seismic activity. (author) [es

  17. Radon daughter plate-out measurements at SNOLAB for polyethylene and copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stein, Matthew; Bauer, Dan; Bunker, Ray; Calkins, Rob; Cooley, Jodi; Loer, Ben; Scorza, Silvia

    2018-02-01

    Polyethylene and copper samples were exposed to the underground air at SNOLAB for approximately three months while several environmental factors were monitored. Predictions of the radon-daughter plate-out rate are compared to the resulting surface activities, obtained from high-sensitivity measurements of alpha emissivity using the XIA UltraLo-1800 spectrometer at SMU. From these measurements, we determine an average $^{210}$Pb plate-out rate of 249 and 423~atoms/day/cm$^{2}$ for polyethylene and copper, respectively, when exposed to radon activity of 135 Bq/m$^{3}$ at SNOLAB. A time-dependent model of alpha activity is discussed for these materials placed in similar environmental conditions.

  18. Radon in Antarctica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilic, R.; Rusov, V.D.; Pavlovych, V.N.; Vaschenko, V.M.; Hanzic, L.; Bondarchuk, Y.A.

    2005-01-01

    The paper reviews results of radon measurements obtained in Antarctic research stations in the last 40 years by both active and passive radon monitors. A brief description of the radon laboratory set-up in the Ukrainian Academician Vernadsky station on the Antarctic Peninsula (W 64 o 16 ' , S 65 o 15 ' ), where radon is measured by two types of etched track Rn dosimeter and 4 types of continuous radon monitoring devices is presented. Some selected results of research work are described related to: (i) analysis of radon storms, defined as an abrupt increase of 222 Rn during the occurrence of a cyclone, and its applicability for the study of the transport of air masses of continental origin to Antarctica; (ii) a study of the correlation of changes of radon concentration and geomagnetic field induced by tectonic activity and its application to predicting tectonomagnetic anomalies, and (iii) verification of a newly developed theoretical model based on noise analysis of the measured radon signal for earthquake prediction. Suggestions for future utilization of radon for basic research in Antarctica (and not only in Antarctica) conclude the contribution. conclude the contribution

  19. Long-term measurement of radon concentration in the family house

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muellerova, M.; Holy, K.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this report was monitored the family house with radon concentration above radon limit for inhabited areas during one year. We were studied radon concentration changes in different rooms this house. Knowledge concerning of variations of radon activity concentration in family house were obtained. Daily variations show a maximum in the morning and a minimum in the afternoon. The seasonal variations show a minimum in spring months (March -April) and a maximum in early autumn (September). The radon concentration in the upstairs room was similar but ten-times lower than radon concentration in the downstairs room. In next period, the obtained results will be analysed in detail and different model describing the behaviour of radon in indoor air will be tested too. (authors)

  20. Quality assurance for environmental radon measurements by LR115 nuclear track detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomaa, M A [National Network of Radiation Physics, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt); Hafez, A F [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Alexandria Univercity, Alexandria (Egypt); Hussein, A S [Radiation Protection Department, Nuclear Power Plants Authority, Cairo (Egypt)

    2007-06-15

    Passive radon dosimeters based on LR115 nuclear track detectors are very attractive for assessment of radon exposure. For developing countries wishing to undertake national radon survey the most appropriate techniques are those making use of LR115 detectors. These detectors are small, cheap, simple, and non-hazardous and provide an entirely adequate tool for large scale use in assessing levels of radon over several months because of the short - term fluctuations in radon concentrations. In this paper, the principles and philosophy in order to improve the quality and reliability of radon exposure under a quality assurance (QA) program are presented . Also examples of how a QA program of radon measurements by LR115 detectors using the can-techniques are well defined and applied.

  1. Quality assurance for environmental radon measurements by LR115 nuclear track detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomaa, M.A.; Hafez, A.F.; Hussein, A.S.

    2007-01-01

    Passive radon dosimeters based on LR115 nuclear track detectors are very attractive for assessment of radon exposure. For developing countries wishing to undertake national radon survey the most appropriate techniques are those making use of LR115 detectors. These detectors are small, cheap, simple, and non-hazardous and provide an entirely adequate tool for large scale use in assessing levels of radon over several months because of the short - term fluctuations in radon concentrations. In this paper, the principles and philosophy in order to improve the quality and reliability of radon exposure under a quality assurance (QA) program are presented . Also examples of how a QA program of radon measurements by LR115 detectors using the can-techniques are well defined and applied

  2. Measurment of radon, thoron and their progeny in indoor environment of Mohali, Punjab, Northern India, using pinhole dosimeters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehta Vimal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The health hazards of radon and its decay products above certain levels are well known. However, for any preventive measures to be taken, we have to be aware of radon levels of that particular area. Measurement of radon and its decay products in indoor environments is an important aspect of assessing indoor air quality and health conditions associated with it. Keeping this in mind, measurements of radon, thoron and their progeny concentrations were carried out in Mohali, Northern India, using pinhole-based twin cup dosimeters. Radon exhalation rates of soil samples in the dwellings/areas were measured via an active technique of a continuous radon monitor. The indoor radon concentration in Mohali varied from 15.03 ± 0.61 Bq/m3 to 39.21 ± 1.46 Bq/m3 with an average of 26.95 Bq/m3 ,while thoron concentration in the same dwellings varied from 9.62 ± 0.54 Bq/m3 to 52.84 ± 2.77 Bq/m3 with an average of 31.09 Bq/m3. Radon progeny levels in dwellings under study varied from 1.63 to 4.24 mWL, with an average of 2.94 mWL, while thoron progeny levels varied from 0.26 to 1.43 mWL , with an average of 0.84 mWL. The annual dose received by the inhabitants of dwellings under study varied from 0.78 to 2.36 mSv, with an average of 1.61 mSv. The in situ gamma dose rate varied from 0.12 to 0.32 mSv/h.

  3. Radon in Estonian buildings. Establishment of a measurement system and obtained results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pahapill, L.; Rulkov, A.; Swedjemark, G.A.

    1996-12-01

    One purpose of this project was the establishment of a radon monitoring programme inside the state environmental monitoring programme. Another purpose was to investigate regions, expected to have high radon levels indoors. A new method for the long-term measurement of indoor radon was established and the staff for these measurements was trained. The results of the measurement can be used by Estonian decision-makers to work out rules and standards. There is no legislative act in the field of radiation in Estonian at this time. To summarize the results of the measurements we can say that indoor radon concentrations vary by region. The radon investigations must be continued to identify the risk areas and types of housing construction. The results of the state radon monitoring are provided to the municipalities, who advice the owners of planned new houses to select the right construction for the house. A new project will follow with an investigation of radon in randomly selected dwellings, training and equipment for radon measurement in soil, and general advice with regard to radon, as well as assistance in preparing information about radon. 7 refs, 5 figs

  4. A new passive radon-thoron discriminative measurement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sciocchetti, G.; Sciocchetti, A.; Giovannoli, P.; DeFelice, P.; Cardellini, F.; Cotellessa, G.; Pagliari, M.

    2010-01-01

    A new passive radon-thoron discriminative measurement system has been developed for monitoring radon and thoron individually. It consists of a 'couple' of passive integrating devices with a CR39 nuclear track detector (NTD). The experimental prototype is based on the application of a new concept of NTD instrument developed at ENEA, named Alpha-PREM, acronym of piston radon exposure meter, which allows controlling the detector exposure with a patented sampling technique (Int. Eu. Pat. and US Pat.). The 'twin diffusion chambers system' was based on two A-PREM devices consisting of the standard device, named NTD-Rn, and a modified version, named NTD-Rn/Tn, which was set up to improve thoron sampling efficiency of the diffusion chamber, without changing the geometry and the start/stop function of the NTD-Rn device. Coupling devices fitted on each device allowed getting a system, which works as a double-chamber structure when deployed at the monitoring position. In this paper both technical and physical aspects are considered. (authors)

  5. A new passive radon-thoron discriminative measurement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciocchetti, G; Sciocchetti, A; Giovannoli, P; DeFelice, P; Cardellini, F; Cotellessa, G; Pagliari, M

    2010-10-01

    A new passive radon-thoron discriminative measurement system has been developed for monitoring radon and thoron individually. It consists of a 'couple' of passive integrating devices with a CR39 nuclear track detector (NTD). The experimental prototype is based on the application of a new concept of NTD instrument developed at ENEA, named Alpha-PREM, acronym of piston radon exposure meter, which allows controlling the detector exposure with a patented sampling technique (Int. Eu. Pat. and US Pat.). The 'twin diffusion chambers system' was based on two A-PREM devices consisting of the standard device, named NTD-Rn, and a modified version, named NTD-Rn/Tn, which was set up to improve thoron sampling efficiency of the diffusion chamber, without changing the geometry and the start/stop function of the NTD-Rn device. Coupling devices fitted on each device allowed getting a system, which works as a double-chamber structure when deployed at the monitoring position. In this paper both technical and physical aspects are considered.

  6. Measurement of the size distributions of radon progeny in indoor air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopke, P.K.; Ramamurthi, M.; Li, C.S.

    1990-01-01

    A major problem in evaluating the health risk posed by airborne radon progeny in indoor atmospheres is the lack of available information on the activity-weighted size distributions that occur in the domestic environment. With an automated, semicontinuous, graded screen array system, we made a series of measurements of activity-weighted size distributions in several houses in the northeastern United States. Measurements were made in an unoccupied house, in which human aerosol-generating activities were simulated. The time evolution of the aerosol size distribution was measured in each situation. Results of these measurements are presented

  7. Continuous measurement of the radon concentration in water using electret ion chamber method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dua, S.K.; Hopke, P.K.

    1992-10-01

    A radon concentration of 300 pCi/L has been proposed by the US Environmental Protection Agency as a limit for radon dissolved in municipal drinking water supplies. There is therefore a need for a continuous monitor to insure that the daily average concentration does not exceed this limit. In order to calibrate the system, varying concentrations of radon in water have been generated by bubbling radon laden air through a dynamic flowthrough water system. The value of steady state concentration of radon in water from this system depends on the concentration of radon in air, the air bubbling rate, and the water flow rate. The measurement system has been designed and tested using a 1 L volume electret ion chamber to determine the radon in water. In this dynamic method, water flows directly through the electret ion chamber. Radon is released to the air and measured with the electret. A flow of air is maintained through the chamber to prevent the build-up of high radon concentrations and too rapid discharge of the electret. It was found that the system worked well when the air flow was induced by the application of suction. The concentration in the water was calculated from the measured concentration in air and water and air flow rates. Preliminary results suggest that the method has sufficient sensitivity to measure concentrations of radon in water with acceptable accuracy and precision

  8. Measurement of radon and thoron progeny size distributions and dose assessments at the mineral treatment industry in Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chutima Kranrod; Supitcha Chanyotha; Nares Chankow

    2013-01-01

    A new portable type cascade impactor has been developed to determine the activity size distribution of radon and thoron progeny in a natural environment more efficiently. The modified impactor consists of 4 stages with a back up filter stage for the collection of aerosol samples. The aerosol cut points in the impactor are set for 10, 2.5, 1 and 0.5 μm at a flow rate of 4 L min -1 . Five CR-39 chips were used as alpha detectors for each stage. In order to separate α particles emitted from radon and thoron progeny, CR-39 detectors are covered with aluminum-vaporized Mylar films. The thickness of each film is adjusted to allow α particles emitted from radon and thoron progeny to reach the CR-39 detectors. The technique has been successfully tested in field studies, particularly inside a mineral treatment industry in Thailand to estimate doses in the working environment. The dose calculations by lung dose evaluation program showed that activity median aerodynamic diameters played a significant role in determining the particle size distributions of the attached radon and thoron progeny. The dose conversion factor determined from short term measurements due to exposure from the inhalation of thoron and its progeny was found to be 4 times higher than comparable values for radon and its progeny. The effective dose for workers exposed to radon is about 4-6 times higher than thoron. (author)

  9. Cost effectiveness analysis of indoor radon control measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimoto, Kenzo

    1989-01-01

    The problem of radon 222 in buildings as a contributor to radiation exposure is described. Five different control methods and the dose reductions that would result from each are analysed. The annualized cost for each control measure was evaluated and the cost effectiveness of each control measure was calculated on the basis of dollars per person-sievert dose reduction. The use of unipolar ion generators for particle removal appears to be the most cost effective and the use of ceiling fans to increase air circulation the least cost effective. 3 figs., 1 tab

  10. Radon adsorbed in activated charcoal—a simple and safe radiation source for teaching practical radioactivity in schools and colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Azmi, Darwish; Mustapha, Amidu O.; Karunakara, N.

    2012-07-01

    Simple procedures for teaching practical radioactivity are presented in a way that attracts students' attention and does not make them apprehensive about their safety. The radiation source is derived from the natural environment. It is based on the radioactivity of radon, a ubiquitous inert gas, and the adsorptive property of activated charcoal. Radon gas from ambient air in the laboratory was adsorbed into about 70 g of activated charcoal inside metallic canisters. Gamma radiation was subsequently emitted from the canisters, following the radioactive decay of radon and its progenies. The intensities of the emitted gamma-rays were measured at suitable intervals using a NaI gamma-ray detector. The counts obtained were analysed and used to demonstrate the radioactive decay law and determine the half-life of radon. In addition to learning the basic properties of radioactivity the students also get practical experience about the existence of natural sources of radiation in the environment.

  11. Radon adsorbed in activated charcoal- a simple and safe radiation source for teaching practical radioactivity in schools and colleges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Azmi, D.S.

    2014-01-01

    Simple procedures for teaching practical radioactivity are presented in a way that attracts students' attention and does not make them apprehensive about their safety. The radiation source is derived from the natural environment. It is based on the radioactivity of radon, an ubiquitous inert gas, and the adsorptive property of activated charcoal. Radon gas from ambient air in the laboratory was adsorbed into about 70 gram of activated charcoal inside metallic canisters. Gamma radiation was subsequently emitted from the canisters, following the radioactive decay of radon and its progenies. The intensities of the emitted gamma-rays were measured at suitable intervals using a NaI gamma-ray detector. The counts obtained were analysed and used to demonstrate the radioactive decay law and determine the half-life of radon. In addition to learning the basic properties of radioactivity, the students also get practical experience about the existence of natural sources of radiation in the environment. (author)

  12. Indoor radon concentration measurement in the dwellings of Al-Jauf region of Saudi Arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Jarallah, M. I.; Fazal ur, Rehman

    2006-01-01

    Indoor radon concentration measurement in the dwellings of Al-Jauf region of Saudi Arabia was carried out using passive radon dosemeters. The objective of this radon survey was to obtain representative indoor radon data of Al-Jauf region. The study is a continuation of radon survey in main cities of Saudi Arabia which constitutes a baseline for Saudi Arabia in the Radon World Atlas. A total of 318 passive radon dosemeters were distributed randomly in the region and placed for a period of 1 y starting from April 2004 to April 2005. The results of indoor radon concentration measurement in 136 dwellings distributed in Al-Jauf region are presented. The remaining dosemeters were lost in the dwellings or mishandled. The results showed that the average, minimum, maximum radon concentrations and standard deviation were 35, 7, 168 and 30 Bq m -3 , respectively. Geometric mean and geometric standard deviation of the radon distribution were found to be 28 and 1.83, respectively. (authors)

  13. Instrumentation for collecting and measuring radon and its daughters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Essling, M.A.; Hengde, W.; Markun, F.; Toohey, R.E.; Rundo, J.; Miranda, J.E. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    A new sampling can is described for collecting an air sample for determination of its radon content. Instruments which are employed for the continuous monitoring of radon or its daughters in houses are described and their performances discussed

  14. Radon activity concentrations and effective doses in ancient Egyptian tombs of the Valley of the Kings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hafez, A.F.; Hussein, A.S.

    2001-01-01

    Radon concentrations and equilibrium factors were measured in three pharaonic tombs during the year 1998. The tombs, which are open to the public are located in a limestone wadi on the West Bank of the River Nile at Luxor, 650 km south of Cairo. The radon activity concentration and equilibrium factor were measured monthly by two-integral nuclear track detectors (bare and diffusion detectors). Seasonal variation of radon concentrations, with summer maximum and winter minimum were observed in all tombs investigated. The yearly mean radon activity concentrations inside the tombs ranged from 540 to 3115 Bq m -3 . The mean equilibrium factor over a year was found to be 0.25 and 0.32 inside and at the entrance, respectively. Estimated annual effective doses to tour guides ranged from 0.33 to 1.90 mSv, visitors receive doses from 0.65 to 3.80 μSv per visit. The effective dose to tomb workers did not exceed the 20 mSv yr -1 limit

  15. Radon activity concentrations and effective doses in ancient Egyptian tombs of the Valley of the Kings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafez, A F; Hussein, A S

    2001-09-01

    Radon concentrations and equilibrium factors were measured in three pharaonic tombs during the year 1998. The tombs, which are open to the public are located in a limestone wadi on the West Bank of the River Nile at Luxor, 650 km south of Cairo. The radon activity concentration and equilibrium factor were measured monthly by two-integral nuclear track detectors (bare and diffusion detectors). Seasonal variation of radon concentrations, with summer maximum and winter minimum were observed in all tombs investigated. The yearly mean radon activity concentrations insidc the tombs ranged from 540 to 3115 Bq m(-3). The mean equilibrium factor over a year was found to be 0.25 and 0.32 inside and at the entrance, respectively. Estimated annual effective doses to tour guides ranged from 0.33 to 1.90 mSv, visitors receive doses from 0.65 to 3.80 microSv per visit. The effective dose to tomb workers did not exceed the 20 mSv yr(-1) limit.

  16. Radon activity concentrations and effective doses in ancient Egyptian tombs of the Valley of the Kings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hafez, A F; Hussein, A S

    2001-09-01

    Radon concentrations and equilibrium factors were measured in three pharaonic tombs during the year 1998. The tombs, which are open to the public are located in a limestone wadi on the West Bank of the River Nile at Luxor, 650 km south of Cairo. The radon activity concentration and equilibrium factor were measured monthly by two-integral nuclear track detectors (bare and diffusion detectors). Seasonal variation of radon concentrations, with summer maximum and winter minimum were observed in all tombs investigated. The yearly mean radon activity concentrations inside the tombs ranged from 540 to 3115 Bq m{sup -3}. The mean equilibrium factor over a year was found to be 0.25 and 0.32 inside and at the entrance, respectively. Estimated annual effective doses to tour guides ranged from 0.33 to 1.90 mSv, visitors receive doses from 0.65 to 3.80 {mu}Sv per visit. The effective dose to tomb workers did not exceed the 20 mSv yr{sup -1} limit.

  17. Radon and its decay product activities in the magmatic area and the adjacent volcano-sedimentary Intrasudetic Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Tchorz

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available In the magmatic area of Sudetes covering the Karkonosze granite and adjacent volcano-sedimentary Intrasudetic Basin a study of atmospheric radon activity was performed by means of SSNTD Kodak LR-115. The study was completed by gamma spectrometric survey of eU and eTh determined by gamma activity of radon decay products 214Bi and 208Tl respectively. In the case of the western part of the Karkonosze granite area the radon decay products activity in the granitic basement was found to be as high as 343 Bq/kg for 214Bi and 496 Bq/kg for 208Tl respectively. Atmospheric radon content measured by means of Kodak LR115 track detector at the height of 1.5 m was found as high as 70 Bq/m3 in the regions, where no mining activities took place. However in the eastern part of the granitic massif in the proximity of abandoned uranium mine atmospheric radon content was found to be 6000 Bq/m3. In the case of sedimentary basin where sedimentary sequence of Carboniferous rocks has been penetrated by younger gases and fluids of volcanic origin uranium mineralization developed. The region known from its CO2 outburst during coal mining activity is characterized by good ventilation of the uranium enriched geological basement resulting in increased atmospheric radon activity being in average 72 Bq/m3. In the vicinity of coal mine tailing an increase up to 125 Bq/m3 can be observed. Seasonal variations of atmospheric radon content are influenced in agricultural areas by cyclic cultivation works (plough on soils of increased uranium content and in the case of post-industrial brownfields varying rates of radon exhalation from tailings due to different meteorological conditions.

  18. Indoor radon in selected homes in Aburi Municipality: measurement uncertainty, decision analysis and remediation strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeboah, M. S.

    2014-07-01

    The main source of natural internal irradiation of man is radon and its decay products. In this study, the radon concentration levels in selected homes in Aburi of the Akuapim North Municipal Assembly in Eastern Region, Ghana were estimated using time-intergrated passive radon detector; LR-115 Type II solid state nuclear track detector (SSNTD) technique. The primary objective of the study was to measure radon levels in 30 selected homes in the Aburi municipality and determine the uncertainties associated with the measured radon concentrations in order to take a decision on remedial actions to be adopted in case of any abnormality using simple qualitative decision analysis method. Measurements were carried out from December, 2013 to March, 2014. After each month of exposure for a period of three months, the detectors were subjected to chemical etching in a 2.5M analytical grade of sodium hydroxide solution at (60 ± I )OC, for 90mins in a constant temperature water bath to enlarge the latent tracks produced by alpha particles from the decay of radon. The etched tracks were magnified using the microfiche reader and counted with a tally counter. The results obtained from the study revealed that concentration of radon in most of the selected homes in the Aburi municipality is low and it is within the internationally accepted action level of 100Bqm-3 set by WHO (2009). The analysis of the results established that the average radon concentrations vary in the range 23.72- 92.24Bqm -3 , 19.07-124.36 Bqm -3 and 31.63-123.87 Bqm -3 for month I, month 2 and month 3 respectively. The corresponding mean values are 46.77, 45.92 and 56.66 Bqm -3 respectively with standard deviations of ±2.18. ±2.38 and ±2.76. These gave a mean of 49.78 ± 12.50 for the three months. Two (2) of the rooms investigated had values above 20 % of the remedial action level of 100Bqm -3 in two of the months but with their average values slightly lower than the remedial action level. From the

  19. Radon-Instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno y Moreno, A.

    2003-01-01

    The presentation of the active and passive methods for radon, their identification and measure, instrumentation and characteristics are the objectives of this work. Active detectors: Active Alpha Cam Continuous Air Monitor, Model 758 of Victoreen, Model CMR-510 Continuous Radon Monitor of the Signature Femto-Tech. Passive detectors: SSNTD track detectors in solids Measurement Using Charcoal Canisters, disk of activated coal deposited in a metallic box Electrets Methodology. (Author)

  20. Construction and measurements of an improved vacuum-swing-adsorption radon-mitigation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Street, J.; Bunker, R.; Dunagan, C.; Loose, X.; Schnee, R. W.; Stark, M.; Sundarnath, K.; Tronstad, D.

    2015-01-01

    In order to reduce backgrounds from radon-daughter plate-out onto detector surfaces, an ultra-low-radon cleanroom is being commissioned at the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology. An improved vacuum-swing-adsorption radon mitigation system and cleanroom build upon a previous design implemented at Syracuse University that achieved radon levels of ∼0.2 Bq m −3 . This improved system will employ a better pump and larger carbon beds feeding a redesigned cleanroom with an internal HVAC unit and aged water for humidification. With the rebuilt (original) radon mitigation system, the new low-radon cleanroom has already achieved a > 300× reduction from an input activity of 58.6 ± 0.7 Bq m −3 to a cleanroom activity of 0.13 ± 0.06 Bq m −3

  1. Construction and measurements of an improved vacuum-swing-adsorption radon-mitigation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, J.; Bunker, R.; Dunagan, C.; Loose, X.; Schnee, R. W.; Stark, M.; Sundarnath, K.; Tronstad, D.

    2015-08-01

    In order to reduce backgrounds from radon-daughter plate-out onto detector surfaces, an ultra-low-radon cleanroom is being commissioned at the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology. An improved vacuum-swing-adsorption radon mitigation system and cleanroom build upon a previous design implemented at Syracuse University that achieved radon levels of ˜0.2 Bq m-3. This improved system will employ a better pump and larger carbon beds feeding a redesigned cleanroom with an internal HVAC unit and aged water for humidification. With the rebuilt (original) radon mitigation system, the new low-radon cleanroom has already achieved a > 300× reduction from an input activity of 58.6 ± 0.7 Bq m-3 to a cleanroom activity of 0.13 ± 0.06 Bq m-3.

  2. Construction and measurements of an improved vacuum-swing-adsorption radon-mitigation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Street, J., E-mail: joseph.street@mines.sdsmt.edu; Bunker, R.; Dunagan, C.; Loose, X.; Schnee, R. W.; Stark, M.; Sundarnath, K.; Tronstad, D. [Department of Physics, South Dakota School of Mines & Technology, Rapid City, SD 57701 (United States)

    2015-08-17

    In order to reduce backgrounds from radon-daughter plate-out onto detector surfaces, an ultra-low-radon cleanroom is being commissioned at the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology. An improved vacuum-swing-adsorption radon mitigation system and cleanroom build upon a previous design implemented at Syracuse University that achieved radon levels of ∼0.2 Bq m{sup −3}. This improved system will employ a better pump and larger carbon beds feeding a redesigned cleanroom with an internal HVAC unit and aged water for humidification. With the rebuilt (original) radon mitigation system, the new low-radon cleanroom has already achieved a > 300× reduction from an input activity of 58.6 ± 0.7 Bq m{sup −3} to a cleanroom activity of 0.13 ± 0.06 Bq m{sup −3}.

  3. Measurement of radon in Spanish houses: characterization of its sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The determination of radon concentrations in-house are analyzed by different universities. The programs of Cantabria, Valencia, Barcelona and La Laguna Universities are presented. These programs study the environmental impact of radon in Barcelona and Madrid and characterize the radon sources

  4. Radon and radon progeny in 70 houses in the Tennessee Valley area: study design and measurement methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudney, C.S.; Hawthorne, A.R.; Monar, K.P.; Quillen, J.L.; Clark, C. Jr.; Doane, R.W.; Wallace, R.G.; Reed, R.P.

    1986-01-01

    Levels of radon and its short-lived airborne progeny are being measured in a year-long study of 70 houses in four states in the Tennessee Valley. Various methods were used to solicit volunteers with differing degrees of success. Criteria for selection of houses in the study included presence of a lower level with cement floor and one or more block walls in contact with the soil, absence of obvious indications of technologically enhanced sources of radium, and proximity to one of four cities, (Knoxville, Chattanooga, Birmingham, or Florence). By design, most houses in the study are in the same neighborhood as at least one other house in the study. Houses range in age from newly constructed to about 40 years old. Most of the houses have more than 2000 square feet of finished floor space. The lower level encompasses a garage in most cases. More complete information pertaining to house characteristics will be gathered in the course of the study. Measurements are being made to obtain information on both location- and season-dependent variation of radon and radon progeny. Simultaneous measurements are made quarterly on both upper and lower levels of each house. Grab samples of air are collected and analyzed for radon using a modified Lucas cell technique. Short-term (10-minute) samples of airborne particulate material are collected and analyzed for radon progeny. One-week integrated measurements of working levels are made once each quarter using modified thermoluminescent dosimeters. Both three- and twelve-month integrated measurements of radon using track-etch monitors are being made. 19 references, 1 figures

  5. Regional and Detailed Survey for Radon Activities in Soil-Gas and Groundwater in the Okchon Zone, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Je, H.-K.; Chon, H.-T.

    2012-04-01

    The Okchon zone in Korea provides a typical example of natural geological materials enriched in potentially toxic elements including uranium which is parent nuclide for radon gas. For the purpose of radon radioactivity risk assessment, making the map of radon risk grade from Okchon zone, regional and detailed field surveys were carried out during 3 years. The study area is located in the central part of Korea, called the Okchon zone (about 5,100 km2), which occur in a 80km wide, northeast-trending belt that extends across the Korean Peninsula. The Okchon zone is underlain by metasedimentary rocks of unknown age that are composed mainly of black slate, phyllite, shale, and limestone. The three research areas (defined as Boeun, Chungju, and Nonsan) for detailed survey were selected from the results of regional survey. Results of detailed radon survey indicated a wide range of radon activities for soil-gases (148-1,843 pCi/L) and ground waters (23-5,540 pCi/L). About 15 percent of soil-gas samples exceeded 1,000 pCi/L and 84 percent of ground water samples exceeded the MCL (maximum contaminant level) of drinking water, 300 pCi/L, which proposed by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in 1999. For detailed survey, radon activities of soil-gas and ground water were classified as bedrock geology, based on 1/50,000 geological map and field research. For soil-gas measurements, mean values of radon activity from black slate-shale (789 pCi/L) were highest among the other base rocks. And for groundwater measurements, mean value of radon activities were decreased in the order of granite (1,345 pCi/L) > black shale-slate (915 pCi/L) > metasediments (617 pCi/L). Result of indoor radon measurement from detailed survey areas showed that about 50% of houses exceeded the indoor guideline, 4 pCi/L. For the radon risk assessment in indoor environment showed that probability of lung cancer risk from the houses located on the granite base rock (3.0×10-2) was highest among the other

  6. Design and application of a continuous, digital-output, environmental radon measuring instrument

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spitz, H.; Wrenn, M.E.

    1977-01-01

    A radon measuring instrument has been developed which can continuously measure environmental concentrations of radon in the atmosphere without employing any air movers or pumps. The unit is entirely passive in design and relies upon the diffusion of radon for sample collection. Since radon is an inert noble gas it will follow the classical theory of motion and diffuse in a direction dependent upon the concentration gradient existing between the atmosphere and the sensitive portion of the detector. A porous foam filter allows radon, but not its daughters, to enter the detector where an electrostatic field is maintained to facilitate collection of the decay products of radon, i.e., initially the positive ions of RaA (Po-218). Alpha particles from RaA and RaC' (Po-214) within the sensitive volume are detected using a ZnS scintillator and photomultiplier tube with the usual complement of electronics

  7. Long term indoor radon measurements in the pelletron laboratory at the UNAM physics institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinosa, G.; Golzarri, J. I.; Lopez, K.; Rickards, J.

    2011-01-01

    The results of six months of continuous measurement of the indoor radon concentration levels in the building where the Physics Institute 3 MV Pelletron particle accelerator is located are presented. This study has three major objectives: a) to know the actual values of the levels of indoor radon in this installation, where personnel spend many hours and sometimes days; b) assess the radiological risk from radon inhalation for personnel working permanently in the laboratory, as well as incidental users; and c) establish, if necessary, time limits for continuous permanence on the location for indoor radon exposure. Passive nuclear track detectors and dynamic systems were employed, covering six months (August, 2009 to January, 2010). For the calculation of internal dose the Radon Individual Dose Calculator was used. The results indicate that the indoor radon levels are below the US EPA recommended levels (400 Bq/m 3 ) in workplaces. The measurements help to establish levels for workplaces in Mexico. (Author)

  8. Time-integrated radon measurements in spring and well waters by track technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somogyi, G.; Lenart, L.

    1986-01-01

    The radon content dissolved in natural waters seems to be a very sensitive indicator of potential uranium deposits. We have developed different track methods to perform time-integrated, ''in-situ'' measurements of radon in different natural waters (spring, lake, well) and their neighbouring soil gas. One of our main purposes was to study the seasonal variation of radon content and its possible correlation with certain water (yield, flow rate) and environmental (depth, temperature) parameters. Simultaneous radon measurements have been carried out in lake and spring waters in a cave, in thermal and cold water springs of a public bath and in a deep drilled well. The radon profiles obtained in the deep well lend support to the idea that the environmental radon can travel large distances in microbubbles of a ''carrier geogas''.

  9. Time-integrated radon measurements in spring and well waters by track technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somogyi, G.

    1986-01-01

    The radon content dissolved in natural waters seems to be a very sensitive indicator of potential uranium deposits. We have developed different track methods to perform time-integrated, ''in-situ'' measurements of radon in different natural waters (spring, lake, well) and their neighbouring soil gas. One of our main purposes was to study the seasonal variation of radon content and its possible correlation with certain water (yield, flow rate) and environmental (depth, temperature) parameters. Simultaneous radon measurements have been carried out in lake and spring waters in a cave, in thermal and cold water springs of a public bath and in a deep drilled well. The radon profiles obtained in the deep well lend support to the idea that the environmental radon can travel large distances in microbubbles of a ''carrier geogas''. (author)

  10. Status of Radon Related Activities in Member States Participating in Technical Cooperation Projects in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-03-01

    This publication summarizes the status of radon programmes at the start of 2014 in the Member States in Europe participating in the IAEA technical cooperation project on establishing enhanced approaches to the control of public exposure to radon. The current status was determined from responses to a questionnaire covering the following elements of a national radon action plan: policies and strategies; radon measurement surveys; establishment of reference levels; managing radon in existing buildings and in future buildings; education and training of professionals; and public awareness initiatives.

  11. Field measurements of radon exhalation and Ra-226 content in soil using the can-technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hafez, A.F.; El-Khatib, A.M.; Moharram, B.M.; Kotb, M.A.; Abdel-Naby, A.

    1991-01-01

    CR-39 and LR-115 plastic nuclear track detectors in the can-technique have been employed in the field measurements of radon exhalation, Ra-226 and U-238 content in dry-soil air at numerous regions in Sudan (the Blue and White Nile and Mogran regions). Measurements gave an average radon exhalation from the soil to the atmosphere and Ra-226 content of (23.4±2.60) kBq.m -2 and (123±13.65) Bq.kg -1 respectively. A polyethylene permeable memebrane cover was used to eliminate the contribution of thoron activity inside the can. Assuming a radioactive equilibrium between the U-series, the average U-238 content in the soil was found to be (9.92±1.01) ppm. This survey may be used for uranium prospection in soil. (orig.) [de

  12. Measurements of radon in residential buildings in Maryland and Pennsylvania, U.S.A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, A.C.; Duncan, M.; Franklin, H.

    1984-01-01

    Radon concentrations were measured in six all-electric and 31 randomly selected homes in Pennslyvania, and 41 homes in Maryland. The measurements were made in the basements and living areas of each home using integrating passive activated carbon detectors for an exposure period of about 3 days. The average concentration varied substantially among the homes and correlated well with the age of the home, the degree of insulation, and ventilation. On average, concentrations in the living areas were lower than those in the basements. Radon levels in the living areas of a substantial number of homes (39% in Pennslyvania, excluding the six all-electric homes, and 51% in Maryland) were greater than or equal to 3 pCi.1 -1 , resulting in a substantial annual absorbed dose to the bronchial epithelial cells of the occupants of the homes. (author)

  13. Implementation of radon measurements to evaluate the suitability of using cement containers for storing radioactive waste containing Ra-226

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shweikani, R.; Kheituo, M.; Hushari, M.; Ali, A. F.

    2003-12-01

    This work aimed at studying radon diffusion through walls of cubic cement containers containing inside radioactive waste rich in Radium-226. In addition, the effect of the wall thickness on radon exhalation and external gamma exposure were also studded. Cubic cement molds were prepared with different dimensions ranged from 5 to 11 cm containing central cubic holes to contain the radioactive materials with dimensions ranged from 2 to 7 cm. The thicknesses of the walls were varied from 1 to 4 cm. Radon exhalation was studied by placing each pre-prepared cement specimen in a tightly closed glass container (desiccators, volume 7 liters) provided with input and output gas system circulation for one week. Active method (Lucas cell) was used to measure the concentration of radon in the container. It was noticed that radon concentration increased with the increase of the radioactive materials inside the specimens. This was simply explained as it is due to the increase of the amount of radium-226 in the specimen with will definitely lead to the increase of radon production. In addition, it was noticed that radon concentration were increased by increasing the thickness of the specimen wall for fixed amount of the radioactive materials inside. This result was unexpected. Therefore, many attempts were performed to explain it. For that, the mechanism of cement solidifications and structure of cement after solidification were studied. The conditions which affect the size and number of the formed pores in the specimens were also studied assuming that increasing the wall thickness will increase porosity and lead to the increase diffusion paths. It was concluded that it is possible to use the cubic cement containers to stop gamma radiation from the radioactive materials, but it is not possible to use them to stop radon unless special arrangements are performed. (author)

  14. Long term indoor radon measurements in the pelletron laboratory at the UNAM physics institute

    OpenAIRE

    Espinosa, G.; Golzarri, J.I.; Lopez, K.; Rickards, J.

    2011-01-01

    The results of six months of continuous measurement of the indoor radon concentration levels in the building where the Instituto de Física 3 MV Pelletron particle accelerator is located are presented. This study has three major objectives: (a) to know the actual values of the levels of indoor radon in this installation, where personnel spend many hours and sometimes days; (b) assess the radiological risk from radon inhalation for personnel working permanently in the laboratory, as well as inc...

  15. Radon thematic days - Conference proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-03-01

    This document brings together the available presentations given at the Radon thematic days organized by the French society of radiation protection (SFRP). Twenty five presentations (slides) are compiled in the document and deal with: 1 - General introduction about radon (Sebastien Baechler, IRA); 2 - Survey of epidemiological studies (Dominique Laurier, IRSN); 3 - Dosimetric model (Eric Blanchardon, Estelle Davesne, IRSN); 4 - Radon issue in Franche-Comte: measurement of the domestic exposure and evaluation of the associated health impact (Francois Clinard, InVS); 5 - WHO's (World Health Organization) viewpoint in limiting radon exposure in homes (Ferid Shannoun, OMS); 6 - Radon measurement techniques (Roselyne Ameon, IRSN); 7 - Quality of radon measurements (Francois Bochud, IRA); 8 - International recommendations (Jean-Francois Lecomte, IRSN); 9 - Radon management strategy in Switzerland - 1994-2014 (Christophe Murith, OFSP); 10 - 2011-2015 action plan for radon risk management (Jean-Luc Godet, Eric Dechaux, ASN); 11 - Radon at work place in Switzerland (Lisa Pedrazzi, SUVA); 12 - Strategies of radiation protection optimization in radon exposure situations (Cynthia Reaud, CEPN); 13 - Mapping of the radon potential of geologic formations in France (Geraldine Ielsch, IRSN); 14 - Radon database in Switzerland (Martha Gruson, OFSP); 15 - Radon 222 in taps water (Jeanne Loyen, IRSN); 16 - Buildings protection methods (Bernard Collignan, CSTB, Roselyne Ameon, IRSN); 17 - Preventive and sanitation measures in Switzerland (Claudio Valsangiacomo, SUPSI); 18 - Training and support approach for building specialists (Joelle Goyette-Pernot, Fribourg engineers and architects' school); 19 - Status of radon bulk activity measurements performed between 2005-2010 in public areas (Cyril Pineau, ASN); 20 - Neuchatel Canton experiments (Didier Racine, SENE); 21 - Montbeliard region experience in the radon risk management (Isabelle Netillard, Pays de Montbeliard Agglomeration); 22

  16. Measurement of simulated lung deposition of radon daughters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonassen, N.; Jensen, B.

    1992-01-01

    A measurement system for the lung deposition of radon daughters based on respiratory models was suggested by Hopke et al. By choosing suitable mesh size and flow velocities it is possible to design a multiple-wire screen sampler simulating deposition in the respiratory tract of aerosols over the size range 0.5-1000 nm. This paper describes a preliminary investigation where simulated deposition in the nasal tract and in the bronchii (for mouth breathing as well as nasal breathing) is determined. The measurements were performed in atmospheres where the normalised exposure rate (equilibrium factor) was varied by changing the aerosol loading of the air as well as by enhanced electrostatic plateout. The general results of the measurements are that the energy deposited in the nose with nasal breathing and in the bronchii with mouth breathing varies as the calculated dose while the energy deposited in the bronchii with nasal breathing follows the exposure. It is also demonstrated that the energy deposited for a fixed value of the radon concentration may vary by a factor of 2-7 depending on the treatment of the air. (author)

  17. Comparison of calculated and measured soil-gas radon concentration and radon exhalation rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neznal, Martin; Neznal, Matej; Jiranek, Martin

    2000-01-01

    The computer model RADON2D for WINDOWS, which makes it possible to estimate the radon exhalation rate from the ground surface and the distribution of soil-gas radon concentration, was tested using a large set of experimental data coming from four reference areas located in regions with different geological structure. A good agreement between calculated and experimental data was observed. In the majority of cases, a correct description of the real situation was obtained using non-modified experimental input data. (author)

  18. Radiation and Radon Survey of Akchatau (Khazakstan) and Experience with Radon Remedial Measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soroka, Y.; Molchanov, A.

    1998-01-01

    A radiation survey of the territory of Akchatau settlement has been carried out. The main factors affecting the high content of radon in dwelling houses were revealed. The experiment on isolation of under floor spaces was carried out to prevent the entry of radon-containing soil gas into living rooms. The repair works efficiency for decreasing of the radon content in hazardous houses was analysed. The survey showed a need for regulation of the value of 222 Rn exhalation on the territories planned for construction works. (author)

  19. Portable monitors for measuring radon and its progenies air by intergrated sampling method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Huaiqin; Su Jingling; Yao Wanyuan; Liu Jinhua

    1989-01-01

    Two kinds of portable monitors have been developed, which can be used to measure the concentration of radon or potential energy concentration of radon or potential energy concentration of radon progenies in air. The thermoluminescent material CaSO 4 (Tm) is used as a detecting element for both of them. The lowest detectable limit of the passive radon monitor is about 1.5 Bq/m 3 for radon in air, as the exposure time being one week. Its main advantages are high reliability and convenient manipulation. The working level monitor for radon progenies in air consists of a mini membrane pump and an integrating probe. The lowest detectable limit is about 6.2 x 10 -9 J/m 3 , as the sampling time being 6 hours. It weights only about 0.35 kg

  20. Measurements of the radon-222 and its daughters concentrations throughout Gaza strip, Palestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasas, M.F.; Yassin, S.S.; Shabat, M.M.

    2005-01-01

    High Radon levels are present in the granite and grandiositic rocks that. spread in sand dunes along coast of Gaza. Such materials are rich in uranium and T widely used in the construction of dwelling in the Gaza, and their contribution to high indoor Radon levels is most relevant.The present work aims to investigate approaches, measures and detection of indoor Radon level throughout Gaza Strip. Five hundred CR-39 dosimeters were distributed over six locations in the middle Yv-region of Gaza Strip. Results suggest that Radon concentrations range from l3.36 to 83.82 Bq/m 3 and a maximum value of 97.01 Bq/m 3 .The average Radon concentrations was 37.83 Bq/m 3 with standard deviation of 11.23.The results provide a framework for future studies that include a large, broader survey of Radon concentration in Palestine

  1. Measurement of indoor radon-thoron and their progeny levels in dwellings and radon concentrations in ground water of Hassan city, Karnataka, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasa, E.; Rangaswamy, D.R.; Sannappa, J.

    2014-01-01

    The indoor radon and thoron concentrations in dwellings of Hassan city have been measured by using LR-115 type-Il Solid State Nuclear Tracks Detectors (SSNTDs). Measurements were carried in summer season from March to May-2013. The radon and thoron activity concentration in the corresponding dwellings has been found to vary from 7.4 to 45.7 Bqm -3 and 5.4 to 34.9 Bqm -3 with a median of 23.59±11 Bqm -3 and 14.47±8 Bqm -3 respectively. The overall average radon concentrations are found to be less than the lower reference level of 200 Bq m -3 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection. The annual effective dose received due to radon and its progeny by the inhabitants in the dwellings under study has also been calculated which found to vary from 0.320 ±0.4 to 1.86 ±1.1 mSv y -1 with an average value of 0.957±0.8 mSv -1 . The obtained results are much lower than the upper reference level of 10 mSv y -1 (ICRP 2007). Radon in bore well water at different locations of Hassan city was determined using the emanometry technique and exposure dose from ingestion of drinking water was estimated. The radon concentration in ground water was found to vary from 19.49 to 60.74 Bq l -1 with an average value of 47.16±14Bq l -1 . From this study it is evident that, the recorded ground water radon concentration values are higher than MCL of 11 Bq l -1 proposed by USEPA. The total dose due to inhalation and ingestion of 222 Rn in ground water ranges from 0.053 mSv y -1 to 0.165mSv y -1 with an average value of 0.127±0.038mSv y -1 . (author)

  2. An experimental setup for measuring generation and transport of radon in building materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Pal, M.; Hendriks, N.A.; de Meijer, R.J.; van der Graaf, E.R.; de Wit, M.H.

    2001-01-01

    This study describes an approach for measuring and modelling diffusive and advective transport of radon through building materials. The goal of these measurements and model calculations is to improve our understanding concerning the factors influencing the transport of radon through building

  3. Experimental Setup for Measuring Diffusive and Advective Transport of Radon through Building Materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pal, van der M.; Graaf, van der E.R.; Meijer, de R.J.; Wit, de M.H.; Hendriks, N.A.

    2000-01-01

    This study describes an approach for measuring and modelling diffusive and advective transport of radon through building materials. The goal of these measurements and model calculations is to improve our understanding concerning the factors influencing the transport of radon through building

  4. Study of indoor radon levels in some radioactive areas of Himachal Pradesh: an inter-comparison of active and passive techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajwa, B.S.; Singh, S.; Sharma, N.; Virk, H.S.

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Indoor radon levels measurements were carried using both the active and passive techniques in the dwellings of some villages, known to be located in the vicinity of uranium mineralized zones of Hamirpur district, Himachal Pradesh. Even in the passive technique using S.S.N.T.D., both the bare -slide and twin chamber dosemeter cup modes were utilized. An attempt has also been made to assess the levels of the indoor radon in these dwellings and inhalation dose rates of the population living in these villages. The average value of radon concentration levels using the bare-slide mode varies from 109.0 to 741.5 Bq/m3 in these dwellings, where as the maximum radon level using the twin cup dosemeter technique was found to be 140.3 Bq/m3. As usual the radon concentrations were found to be varying with seasonal changes, building materials etc. The radon survey in the dwellings of these villages has also been carried out using the Alpha-Guard technique, which is based on the pulse ionization chamber. The indoor radon concentration levels measured using the active technique of Alpha Guard have been found to be quite different from those measured in these dwellings by the passive technique of S.S.N.T.D.; indicating the importance of the S.S.N.T.D. in the long -term integrated measurement of the indoor radon levels in the dwellings. (authors)

  5. Surveying dwellings with high indoor radon levels: a BRE guide to radon remedial measures in existing dwellings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scivyer, C.R.

    1993-01-01

    This report is one of a series giving practical advice on methods of reducing radom levels in existing dwellings. It is aimed specifically at builders, surveyors and building specialists surveying for and prescribing remedial measures for dwellings. It supplements guidance available in 'The householders' guide to radon, obtainable from local environmental health officers or from the Department of the Environment. (Author)

  6. THE REPUBLIC OF BELARUS RADON DANGER MAP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Chunikhin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Radon is the major contributor to the background exposure of the population. In the world practice, the radon risk or radon potential mapping are used for the radon dose assessment.The aim of this work was a radon danger mapping of the Republic of Belarus to assess the radiation situation and determine the radon hazard critical areas.Materials and methods: The mapping is based on measured values of radon volume activity in the living rooms of different buildings on the territory of the six regions of the Republic of Belarus. We have performed more than 4000 measurements. Integral track radon radiometers based on the polymer Kodak LR-115 film were used to evaluate radon volume activity. Exposure time ranged from 90 to 120 days. The cartogram was built with using the MAPINFO software package.Results: The low levels of radon concentrations were determined in the Brest and Gomel regions, as well as in the southern districts of Minsk and south-western districts of the Mogilev region. The high levels radon concentrations were determined in some districts of the Vitebsk and Grodno regions, as well as in the north-eastern districts of the Mogilev region. About 2–5 times nonuniformity of radon distribution in settlements of the Republic was observed. The radon hazard critical areas with radon concentrations in the range of 200–400 Bq/m3 were found in some districts of the Vitebsk, Grodno and Mogilev regions.Conclusions: The radon risk map of the Republic of Belarus gives the possibility to estimate the existing radiation risk. Taking into account the low efficiency of countermeasures long after the Chernobyl accident, it is necessary to increase the level of radiation protection through the radon mitigation activities or to change the radon normative documents.

  7. Radon measurements in the SE and NE flank of Mt. Etna (Italy)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    La Delfa, S.; Imme, G.; Lo Nigro, S.; Morelli, D.; Patane, G.; Vizzini, F.

    2007-01-01

    Soil Radon has been monitored at two fixed sites located in the northeastern and southeastern flank of Mt. Etna. In this study we report the comparison between in-soil Radon concentration trend recorded in the SE flank and that one recorded in the NE one, where an in-soil Radon detection system is operating since 2001. The aim of this work was to implement the investigation area finding a suitable radon detection site, in the south-east flank of Mt. Etna, in order to better understand possible links between Radon anomalies and volcano dynamic. Radon data collected in NE and SE sites were compared with the volcanic tremor, frequency of occurrence of earthquakes and seismic strain-release recorded at a fixed 3D digital seismic station placed in the NE site. Same general in-soil Radon trends and anomalies were found in both sites. These results have confirmed the suitability of the chosen southeastern site for the in-soil Radon monitoring at Mt. Etna. The comparison of the recorded Radon concentration anomalies with seismicity and volcanic tremor trends, has also verified a possible link with the volcanic activity, as observed in our previous published studies

  8. Measurements on, and modelling of diffusive and advective radon transport in soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graff, E.R. van der; Witteman, G.A.A.; Spoel, W.H. van der

    1994-01-01

    Results are presented of measurements on radon transport in soil under controlled conditions with a laboratory facility consisting of a stainless steel vessel (height and diameter 2 m) filled with a uniform column of sand. At several depths under the sand surface, probes are radially inserted...... into the vessel to measure the radon concentration in the soil gas. To study advective radon transport a perforated circular box is placed in the sand close to the bottom of the vessel. By pressurising this box, an air flow through the sand column is induced. Radon concentration profiles were measured without...... an air flow as a function of time, and for several values of the air flow, equilibrium radon concentration profiles were measured....

  9. Results of indoor radon measurements in the republic of macedonia: - a review -

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stojanovska, Zdenka; Boev, Blazho; Boev, Ivan

    2017-01-01

    Radon and its short lived decay products accumulated in indoor environment are the main source of public exposure to natural radiations. The health effects as well as a great number of natural and artificial factors affecting the radon accumulation in indoor environments are some of the motives for the scientific interest in radon issue. Following this global trend, many studies of indoor radon in the Balkan region, including the Republic of Macedonia have been conducted in the last decade. This paper is an overview of the published papers regarding indoor radon concentration measurements with nuclear track detectors in the Republic of Macedonia. It gives basic information about the spatial and temporal variability of indoor radon over the territory of the country, following by a description of the some factors which affect its variations. This review attempts: to organize available indoor radon results in order to show clear picture of the so far conducted surveys; to highlight the need for continuation of more extensive radon investigation in workplaces; to motivate the building professionals to create as much as possible mitigation methods for indoor radon reduction, to motivate the health professionals for epidemiological studies etc. (author)

  10. The use of track registration detectors to reconstruct contemporary and historical airborne radon ( sup 2 sup 2 sup 2 Rn) and radon progeny concentrations for a radon-lung cancer epidemiologic study

    CERN Document Server

    Steck, D J

    1999-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies that investigate the relationship between radon and lung cancer require accurate estimates for the long-term average concentrations of radon progeny in dwellings. Year-to-year and home-to-home variations of radon in domestic environments pose serious difficulties for reconstructing an individual's long-term radon-related exposure. The use of contemporary radon gas concentrations as a surrogate for radon-related dose introduces additional uncertainty in dose assessment. Studies of glass exposed in radon chambers and in a home show that radon progeny deposited on, and implanted in, glass hold promise for reconstructing past radon concentrations in a variety of atmospheres. We developed an inexpensive track registration detector for the Iowa Radon Lung Cancer Study (IRLCS) that simultaneously measures contemporary airborne radon concentrations, surface deposited alpha activity density, and implanted sup 2 sup 1 sup 0 Po activity density. The implanted activity is used to reconstruct the cum...

  11. Comparison of field-measured radon diffusion coefficients with laboratory-measured coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepel, E.A.; Silker, W.B.; Thomas, V.W.; Kalkwarf, D.R.

    1983-04-01

    Experiments were conducted to compare radon diffusion coefficients determined for 0.1-m depths of soils by a steady-state method in the laboratory and diffusion coefficients evaluated from radon fluxes through several-fold greater depths of the same soils covering uranium-mill tailings. The coefficients referred to diffusion in the total pore volume of the soils and are equivalent to values for the quantity, D/P, in the Generic Environmental Impact Statement on Uranium Milling prepared by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Two soils were tested: a well-graded sand and an inorganic clay of low plasticity. For the flux evaluations, radon was collected by adsorption on charcoal following passive diffusion from the soil surface and also from air recirculating through an aluminum tent over the soil surface. An analysis of variance in the flux evaluations showed no significant difference between these two collection methods. Radon diffusion coefficients evaluated from field data were statistically indistinguishable, at the 95% confidence level, from those measured in the laboratory; however, the low precision of the field data prevented a sensitive validation of the laboratory measurements. From the field data, the coefficients were calculated to be 0.03 +- 0.03 cm 2 /s for the sand cover and 0.0036 +- 0.0004 cm 2 /s for the clay cover. The low precision in the coefficients evaluated from field data was attributed to high variation in radon flux with time and surface location at the field site

  12. Radon campaigns. Status report 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arvela, H.; Valmari, T.; Reisbacka, H.; Niemelae, H.; Oinas, T.; Maekelaeinen, I.; Laitinen-Sorvari, R.

    2008-12-01

    Radon campaigns aim at activating citizens to make indoor radon measurements and remediation as well as increasing the common awareness of indoor radon questions. Indoor radon increases the risk of lung cancer. Through radon campaigns Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) also promotes the attainment of those goals that the Ministry of Social Affairs and Health has set for municipal authorities in Finland for prevention of the harmful effects of radon. The Ministry of Social Affairs and Health supports this campaign. Radon campaigns were started in autumn 2003. By autumn 2008 the campaigns have been organised already in 64 regions altogether in 160 municipalities. In some municipalities they have already arranged two campaigns. Altogether 14 100 houses have been measured and in 2 100 of these the action limit of radon remediation 400 Bq / m 3 has been exceeded. When participating in radon campaigns the house owners receive a special offer on radon detectors with a reduced price. In 2008 a new practice was introduced where the campaign advertisements were distributed by mail to low-rise residential houses in a certain region. The advertisement includes an order / deposit slip with postage paid that the house owner can send directly to STUK to easily make an order for radon measurement. In the previous radon campaigns in 2003 - 2007 the municipal authorities collected the orders from house owners and distributed later the radon detectors. The radon concentrations measured in the campaign regions have exceeded the action limit of 400 Bq / m 3 in 0 - 39% of houses, depending on the region. The total of 15% of all measurements made exceeded this limit. The remediation activities have been followed by sending a special questionnaire on remedies performed to the house owners. In 2006 - 2007 a questionnaire was sent to those households where the radon concentration of 400 Bq / m 3 was exceeded during the two first campaign seasons. Among the households that replied

  13. Intercomparison and intercalibration of active and passive radon detectors in North America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, A.C.

    1991-04-01

    The state of the art of the most commonly used instrumentation for radon measurements was evaluated at an intercomparison exercise held at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory, between April 24, and May 10, 1990. More than 50 sets of active and passive devices were submitted for evaluation by 30 laboratories from private firms, local, state and federal agencies and universities. There were basically five different types of detectors representing the majority of instruments used to assess the indoor airborne concentration of radon. After exposure, the devices were returned to the participating laboratories for analysis. The results reported to EML indicate that the overall performance was good with the majority of the participating laboratories reporting mean results within 10% of the EML reference values. In general, the majority of radon measuring devices gave slightly lower readings than the reference values. The individual measurements made with activated carbon collectors of both the open face and diffusion barrier type and the electret/ionization chambers showed the best precision and accuracy. The nuclear track detectors showed mixed results, exhibiting the largest measurement errors. This suggests that there are problems with sensitivity and with quality control procedures that must be addressed to improve their performance. 7 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  14. Radon-222 measurements aboard an airplane for the description of atmospheric diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogen, J.

    1973-01-01

    Radon-222 is absorbed aboard an airplane in tubes filled with 50 g of selected charcoal and cooked in Dewars by carbon dioxide and freon. After air collection at different heights up to 5 km, the tubes are evacuated and heated in the laboratory for desorption of the gas molecules and for transfer into a decay chamber covered with zinc-sulfide serving as a scintillator for the detection of alpha activity from radon-222 and its daughters. In general, the measurements show an exponential decrease of the concentration up to 5 km in height, if there is no cloud layer. The height for a reduction by a factor of two is about 900 meters. Assuming a constant diffusion coefficient K 0 up to 5 km, the measurements yield a K 0 of approximately 3.7 x 10 4 cm 2 s -1 . For flights in stratiform clouds a decrease is observed of the concentration up to a certain height, then radon-222 is again increasing or remains constant. This must be explained with respect to the meteorological situation. Assuming only a constant value for K 0 between the different flying heights, it was possible to appraise the development of the eddy diffusion coefficient with height

  15. Variation of vertical atmospheric stability by means of radon measurements and of sodar monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guedalia, D.; Druilhet, A.; Fontan, J.; N'tsila, A.

    1980-01-01

    Continuous measurements of radon at ground level are used to infer variations in equivalent mixing height and atmospheric vertical stability. Simultaneous determinations of the height of the inversion layer, when present, permit, with the use of sodar techniques, the estimation of radon flux from the ground and of the vertical diffusion coefficient. The two sets of data often indicate similar variations in mixing height

  16. Radon programme in the Czech Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulka, J.; Thomas, J.

    2003-01-01

    The framework of the Radon programme in the Czech republic includes both precautionary measures and interventions. The programme informally started in early eighties has been now incorporated in national legislation (Atomic Act, Radiation Protection Decree, etc.). Aim of precautionary measures is to avert construction of building above natural radiation guidance levels (200 Bq/m 3 for indoor radon concentration and 0.5 Sv/h for gamma dose rate) by protection of new buildings against soil radon ingress, by regulation of natural radioactivity in building materials and supplied water. Aim of interventions is to identify buildings affected by enhanced natural radioactivity and help owners to put into effect reasonable remedial measures. Two sets of intervention levels for indoor natural exposure were established: guidance intervention levels 400 Bq/m 3 (indoor radon), 1.0 Sv/h (indoor gamma dose rate) and limit values 4000 Bq/m 3 and 10 Sv/h. The radon programme is based both on governmental and private activities. The governmental activities include representative and targeted indoor radon survey, subsidy for radon mitigation, mitigation test measurements and public information on radon issue. The private activities include radon measurement (radon index of building site, indoor measurements, radon diagnosis) and remedial measures. More than 100 commercial companies were authorised by Radiation Protection Authority (SUJB) to provide these measurements

  17. Radon measurements in air in waterworks and indoor swimming pools - a primary mapping project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinko, J.; Mjoenes, L.; Soederman, A.-L.

    2004-01-01

    In 2001 the Swedish Work Environment Authority asked five regional offices around the country; Falun, Malmoe, Vaexjoe, Umeaa and Oerebro, to measure radon in air in workplaces where water was likely to enhance radon levels indoors. Track etch detectors were used and placed in workplaces according to the SSI measurement protocol for determining the annual average radon concentration in homes. Rooms that are frequently used by employees were measured. The detectors were exposed between 1 to 3 months. 225 detectors were used in the project and analysed at the same laboratory. The results showed that the radon concentration in waterworks often is high. Measurements were made in 60 waterworks. Levels exceeding 1000 Bq/m 3 were found in 49 of them and levels exceeding 4000 Bq/m 3 were found in 21 waterworks. The variation between waterworks may be a result of the radon concentration in the raw water, the amount of radon gas escaping to the air when water is treated, the air exchange rate in the building and where the detectors were deployed. Measurements were made in 28 indoor swimming baths. The maximum level was 290 Bq/m 3 , but most concentrations were between 30 to 70 Bq/m 3 . The conclusion is that high radon levels do not seem to be a problem in indoor swimming baths. Maybe this is due to good ventilation or the fact that water often has been treated for radon before it is used in swimming pools. The results from measurement in food industries such as breweries showed no extreme radon levels except for a fish farm where levels over 1000 Bq/m 3 were measured in the farming room and 790 Bq/m 3 in the office. The radon concentrations in laundries were relatively low, between 30 and 170 Bq/m 3

  18. Spatial distribution of soil radon as a tool to recognize active faulting on an active volcano: the example of Mt. Etna (Italy)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neri, Marco, E-mail: marco.neri@ct.ingv.it [Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Piazza Roma, 2 - 95123 Catania (Italy); Giammanco, Salvatore [Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Piazza Roma, 2 - 95123 Catania (Italy); Ferrera, Elisabetta; Patane, Giuseppe [Universita degli Studi di Catania, Dip. Scienze della Terra, Corso Italia, 52 - 95129 Catania (Italy); Zanon, Vittorio [Centro de Vulcanologia e Avaliacao de Riscos Geologicos - Universidade dos Acores, Rua Mae de Deus, 9501-801 Ponta Delgada (Portugal)

    2011-09-15

    This study concerns measurements of radon and thoron emissions from soil carried out in 2004 on the eastern flank of Mt. Etna, in a zone characterized by the presence of numerous seismogenic and aseismic faults. The statistical treatment of the geochemical data allowed recognizing anomaly thresholds for both parameters and producing distribution maps that highlighted a significant spatial correlation between soil gas anomalies and tectonic lineaments. The seismic activity occurring in and around the study area during 2004 was analyzed, producing maps of hypocentral depth and released seismic energy. Both radon and thoron anomalies were located in areas affected by relatively deep (5-10 km depth) seismic activity, while less evident correlation was found between soil gas anomalies and the released seismic energy. This study confirms that mapping the distribution of radon and thoron in soil gas can reveal hidden faults buried by recent soil cover or faults that are not clearly visible at the surface. The correlation between soil gas data and earthquakes depth and intensity can give some hints on the source of gas and/or on fault dynamics. - Highlights: > We performed measurements of radon from soil carried out on Mt. Etna. > The sampled zone is characterized by the presence of numerous active faults. > Radon mapping reveal dangerous hidden faults buried by recent soil cover. > Our study gives some hints on the source of gas and on fault dynamics. > We recognized areas where radon activity represents a hazard to the population.

  19. Radon concentration and exhalation measurements with semiconductor detector and electrostatic precipitator working in a closed circulation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wojcik, M.; Morawska, L.

    1982-01-01

    An apparatus is described and a method presented for the determination of concentration of radon emanated from solid and liquid samples. In this method an object or a sample of air is closed in an hermetically sealed chamber. The air contaminated by radon and its daughters is circulated in a closed system a few times through an electrostatic precipitator mounted in one housing with a semiconductor Si Li detector. The concentration of radon is determined by the alpha activity measurement of its daughters. The sensitivity of the apparatus is very high. While calculating a radon concentration from an activity measurement of RaA (fast method) the sensitivity is about 0.07 pCi/l and when measuring the activity of RaC' (slow method) it is 0.008 pCi/l. Due to the application of an electrostatic precipitator and a silicon detector it is possible to perform alpha spectrometric measurements and thus separate activities of RaA, RaC', and ThC and to calculate 222 Rn or 220 Rn concentrations. The efficiency of RaA, RaB, RaC, ThB and ThC collection is constant, due to the method involving the circulation of the air through the electrostatic precipitator several times. (author)

  20. Evaluation of the open vial method in the radon measurement; Evaluacion del metodo del vial abierto en la medicion de radon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez del Rio, H.; Davila R, J. I.; Mireles G, F., E-mail: hlopezdelrio@hotmail.com [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    The open vial method is a simple technique, under-utilized but that take advantage of the great radon solubility in organic solvents, therefore applies in the measurement of the radon concentration exhaled in soil. The method consists on the exposition to the gas radon of an open vial with scintillating solution. An integral mathematical model for indoors that describes the emanation processes and gas radon exhalation was developed, as well as the radon dissolution in the scintillation liquid, besides obtaining the characteristic parameters of the experimental system proposed for the radon concentration calculation exhaled by soils. Two experimental arrangements were designed with exposition cameras of 12 and 6 L and quantity of different soil. The open vial was prepared with a mixture of 8 ml of deionized water and 12 ml of scintillation liquid OptiPhase Hi Safe 3 in polyethylene vials; the measurements of the dissolved radon were carried out in scintillation liquid equipment. As a result, on average 2.0% of the exhaled radon is dissolved in the open vial and the dissolved fraction is independent of the experimental arrangement. Also was observed that the exposition time does not affect the radon dissolution significantly, in correspondence with the reported in the literature. (Author)

  1. Indoor and underground radon activity in the northern part of Bangladesh: a preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haque, A.K.F.; Islam, G.S.; Islam, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    CR-39 solid state nuclear track detectors were used to determine the indoor and underground radon activity at three locations in the northern part of Bangladesh. The indoor radon activity at Naogaon was found to be higher than that at Rajshahi and Ruppur. Radon concentration in the mud-built houses at Naogaon was estimated to be ∼ 500 Bq m -3 (14pCi 1 -1 ) which is more than three times the recommended limit. The underground radon emanation at Naogaon was found to be one order of magnitude higher than that at the other two places. (author)

  2. Sources of error in etched-track radon measurements and a review of passive detectors using results from a series of radon intercomparisons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahimi, Z.-F.; Howarth, C.B.; Miles, J.C.H.

    2009-01-01

    Etched-track passive radon detectors are a well established and apparently simple technology. As with any measurement system, there are multiple sources of uncertainty and potential for error. The authors discuss these as well as good quality assurance practices. Identification and assessment of sources of error is crucial to maintain high quality standards by a measurement laboratory. These sources can be found both within and outside the radon measurement laboratory itself. They can lead to changes in track characteristics and ultimately detector response to radon exposure. Changes don't just happen during etching, but can happen during the recording or counting of etched-tracks (for example ageing and fading effects on track sensitivity, or focus and image acquisition variables). Track overlap means the linearity of response of detectors will vary as exposure increases. The laboratory needs to correct the calibration curve due to this effect if it wishes to offer detectors that cover a range of exposures likely to be observed in the field. Extrapolation of results to estimate annual average concentrations also has uncertainty associated with it. Measurement systems need to be robust, reliable and stable. If a laboratory is not actively and constantly monitoring for anomalies via internal testing, the laboratory may not become aware of a problem until some form of external testing occurs, eg an accreditation process, performance test, interlaboratory comparison exercise or when a customer has cause to query results. Benchmark standards of accuracy and precision achievable with passive detectors are discussed drawing on trends from the series of intercomparison exercises for passive radon detectors which began in 1982, organised by the National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB), subsequently the Health Protection Agency (HPA).

  3. Seasonal variation measurements of radon levels in caves using SSNTD method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinosa, G.; Golzarri, J.I.; Gammage, R.B.; Sajo-Bohus, L.; Viccon-Pale, J.; Signoret-Poillon, M.

    2008-01-01

    The results of radon concentration measurements inside of the Gabriel caves of Mexico, during three consecutive two-month periods covering almost three seasons, are reported in the present work. The radio-ecological importance of this site is related to the radon and its concentration-dynamic behavior in the cave. Further interest in radiation safety motivated this initiative since routine biological field work is done, with people spending long periods of time there. CR-39 passive nuclear track detector was chosen for this survey. Radon concentration levels decrease during the rainy season and show different values depending on the ventilation and geometeorological structure. Measured values range between 956 and 4931Bqm -3 , an indication that radon doses may exceed the allowed values for workers. This project is part of a larger study of indoor radon alpha emitters in Mexican caves

  4. Seasonal variation measurements of radon levels in caves using SSNTD method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinosa, G. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 20-364, 01000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)], E-mail: espinosa@fisica.unam.mx; Golzarri, J.I. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 20-364, 01000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Gammage, R.B. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, PO Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6480 (United States); Sajo-Bohus, L. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Simon Bolivar (Venezuela); Viccon-Pale, J.; Signoret-Poillon, M. [El Hombre y su Ambiente, UAM-Xochimilco, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2008-08-15

    The results of radon concentration measurements inside of the Gabriel caves of Mexico, during three consecutive two-month periods covering almost three seasons, are reported in the present work. The radio-ecological importance of this site is related to the radon and its concentration-dynamic behavior in the cave. Further interest in radiation safety motivated this initiative since routine biological field work is done, with people spending long periods of time there. CR-39 passive nuclear track detector was chosen for this survey. Radon concentration levels decrease during the rainy season and show different values depending on the ventilation and geometeorological structure. Measured values range between 956 and 4931Bqm{sup -3}, an indication that radon doses may exceed the allowed values for workers. This project is part of a larger study of indoor radon alpha emitters in Mexican caves.

  5. The effect of the nuclear track detectors' position on the radon concentration measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yilmaz, A.; Kuerkcueoglu, M. E.; Haner, B.

    2009-01-01

    It is important to determine the radon concentration values of the underground mines according to workers' health. For this purpose, to be able to measure radon concentrations by using passive nuclear etched track detectors, CR-39 detectors were placed into 66 points on the way of aeration galleries of Armutcuk, Amasra, Karadon, Kozlu and Uezuelmez bituminous coal mines which are known as the Carboniferous outcrops of the Western Black Sea Area in Turkey. In every measurement point, a pair of detectors, one of them is being perpendicular and the other one is parallel to air flow, were exposed to radon gases over 40 days for four seasons of the year 2008. The relationship between the readings of vertically and horizontally positioned detectors was investigated by evaluating the effect of the detectors' positions on the detected radon concentrations. It can be concluded that, the vertically positioned detectors, in general, recorded higher radon gases concentration values than that of the horizontally positioned ones.

  6. In situ Ge(Li)-spectrometric measurements of gamma radiation from radon daughters under different weather conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finck, R.R.; Persson, B.R.R.

    1980-01-01

    The photon fluence from radionuclides in the ground and air was measured continuously with a Ge(Li) spectrometer during several weeks. The most prominent change in photon fluence rate near the ground was obtained during periods of heavy rainfall. Deposition of the short-lived radon daughters 214 Pb and 214 Bi on the ground surface can cause a temporary increase in the external absorbed dose rate of approximately 2μrads/h. The photon fluence from airborne radon daughters can be correlated to the degree of atmospheric stability. During stable conditions the photon fluence increases and the activity ratio 214 Bi/ 214 Pb decreases

  7. Radon variations in active volcanoes and in regions with high seismicity: internal and external factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segovia, N.; Cruz-Reyna, S. De la; Mena, M.

    1986-01-01

    The results of 4 years of observations of radon concentrations in soils of active volcanoes of Costa Rica and a highly seismic region in Mexico are discussed. A distinction is made between the influences of external (mostly meteorological) and internal (magmatic or tectonic) factors on the variation in radon levels. The geological meaning of the radon data can be thus enhanced if the external factors are excluded. (author)

  8. Radon emanation chamber: High sensitivity measurements for the SuperNEMO experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soulé, B. [Université Bordeaux 1, Centre d' Etudes Nucléaires de Bordeaux Gradignan, UMR 5797, Chemin du Solarium, Le Haut-Vigneau, BP120, F-33175 Gradignan (France); Collaboration: SuperNEMO Collaboration; and others

    2013-08-08

    Radon is a well-known source of background in ββ0ν experiments due to the high Q{sub β} value of one of its daughter nucleus, {sup 214}Bi. The SuperNEMO collaboration requires a maximum radon contamination of 0.1 mBq/m{sup 3} inside its next-generation double beta decay detector. To reach such a low activity, a drastic screening process has been set for the selection of the detector's materials. In addition to a good radiopurity, a low emanation rate is required. To test this parameter, a Radon Emanation Setup is running at CENBG. It consists in a large emanation chamber connected to an electrostatic detector. By measuring large samples and having a low background level, this setup reaches a sensitivity of a few μ Bq. m{sup −2}. d{sup −1} and is able to qualify materials used in the construction of the SuperNEMO detector.

  9. The influence of thoron on measurement results of radon exhalation rate

    CERN Document Server

    Xiao De Tao; Ling Qiu; Leung, J K C

    2002-01-01

    Because of thoron exhalation, the measurement results of radon exhalation rate using a local still method is usually larger than the true value of radon flux rate of the monitored material surface. The influence of sup 2 sup 1 sup 6 Po(ThA) on radon exhalation rate can be eliminated for sensitive radon monitors. Theoretical evaluations of the influence of sup 2 sup 1 sup 2 Bi(ThC) and sup 2 sup 1 sup 2 Po(ThC')on radon exhalation rate are carried out in a sampler with diameter of 188 mm, and height of 125 mm, and supplied electrostatic field inside (generated by high voltage and electret) under following conditions: the sampling time are 1, 2, 3 h, respectively, thoron exhalation rate is 100 times of radon's. The calculation results indicate that the measurement results of radon flux rate are possibly 35.5% larger than true value due to the influence of thoron for fast and multifunctional radon monitors with electret, high voltage, respectively and using CR-39 SSNTD as detector, but this influence is negligib...

  10. Preliminary indoor radon and gamma measurements in kindergartens and schools in Bucharest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumitrescu, A.; Milu, C.; Gheorghe, R.; Vaupotic, J.; Stegnar, P.

    2001-01-01

    A pilot study on indoor radon and gamma dose rates in schools and kindergartens (totalling one hundred buildings) in the Bucharest metropolitan area was performed jointly by the Institute of Public Health, Bucharest, Romania, and the J. Stefan Institute, Ljubljana, Slovenia. Because the geological structure of subsoil over the whole Bucharest area is uniform (a loess platform), the criteria for selecting a kindergarten or a school to be monitored were the age of the building and the building materials. Indoor radon concentrations were measured by a single one-month exposure of radon monitoring device based on etched track detectors in December 2000. Data show a lognormal distribution within the concentration range of 43/477 Bq/m 3 . An arithmetic mean of 146 Bq/m 3 and a geometric mean of 128 Bq/m 3 were obtained. Concomitant with indoor radon levels gamma dose rates were also measured, using thermoluminescent dosimeters. Values ranged from 54 to 100 μSv mo -1 , with a mean value of 74 μSv mo -1 . Having only a single average indoor radon concentration for a winter month, it is not possible to comment on our results, applying the ICRP Publication 65 methodology for indoor radon action level for the general public. Nevertheless, they give a preliminary picture of indoor radon and gamma dose rate levels in schools and kindergartens in Bucharest, and constitute a solid basis on which to design and perform a nation-wide radon survey programme.(author)

  11. Measurement of Radon Exhalation Rate in Sand Samples from Gopalpur and Rushikulya Beach Orissa, Eastern India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahur, Ajay Kumar; Sharma, Anil; Sonkawade, R. G.; Sengupta, D.; Sharma, A. C.; Prasad, Rajendra

    Natural radioactivity is wide spread in the earth's environment and exists in various geological formations like soils, rocks, water and sand etc. The measurement of activities of naturally occurring radionuclides 226Ra, 232Th and 40K is important for the estimation of radiation risk and has been the subject of interest of research scientists all over the world. Building construction materials and soil beneath the house are the main sources of radon inside the dwellings. Radon exhalation rate from building materials like, cement, sand and concrete etc. is a major source of radiation to the habitants. In the present studies radon exhalation rates in sand samples collected from Gopalpur and Rushikulya beach placer deposit in Orissa are measured by using "Sealed Can technique" with LR-115 type II nuclear track detectors. In Samples from Rushikulya beach show radon activities varying from 389 ± 24 to 997 ± 38 Bq m-3 with an average value of 549 ±28 Bq m-3. Surface exhalation rates in these samples are found to vary from 140 ± 9 to 359 ± 14 mBq m-2 h-1with an average value of 197 ±10 mBq m-2 h-1, whereas, mass exhalation rates vary from 5 ± 0.3 to 14 ± 0.5 mBq kg-1 h-1 with an average value of 8 ± 0.4 mBq kg-1 h-1. Samples from Gopalpur radon activities are found to vary from 371 ± 23 to 800 ± 34 Bq m-3 with an average value of 549 ± 28 Bq m-3. Surface exhalation rates in these samples are found to vary from 133 ± 8 to 288 ± 12 mBq m-2h-1 with an average value of 197 ± 10 mBq m-2 h-1, whereas, mass exhalation rates vary from 5 ± 0.3 to 11 ± 1 mBq kg-1 h-1 with an average value of 8 ± 0.4 mBq kg-1 h-1.

  12. Comparative Measurements of Indoor Radon in Homes and Floating Houses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changmuang, Wirote; Tantawiroon, Malulee; Polphong, Pornsri

    2003-06-01

    A survey of the radon ( 222 Rn) concentrations in 318 homes and 152 floating houses (1410 samples) in Phitsanulok province, using a passive 222 Rn charcoal canister and measurement by gamma spectrometry. Floating houses showed significant lower mean levels (8.22 Bqm -3 ) than homes (21.56 Bqm -3 ) (p 222 Rn concentrations indicated that concrete homes had a higher level than wooden homes and homes lying on ground had a higher level than those built at 1 meter or more above ground. The estimated annual mean effective dose equivalent 0.35 mSvy -1 and the annual lung dose equivalent of 5.94 mSvy -1 were only one-third of the world mean estimates

  13. Radon in active volcanic areas of Southern Italy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avino, R.; Capaldi, G.; Pece, R.

    1999-01-01

    The paper presents the preliminary data dealing with the variations in time of the radiogenic gas radon in soils and waters of many active volcanic areas of Southern Italy. The greatest differences in Rn content of the investigated volcanic areas are: Ischia and Campi Flegrei, which have more Rn than Vesuvio and Volcano, both in soils and in waters. The thermalized waters of Ischia are enriched in Rn 15 times with respect to soils, while in the other areas soils and underground waters have comparable Rn contents

  14. Anomalous Radon Levels in Thermal Water as an Indicator of Seismic Activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zmazek, B.; Gregoric, A.; Vaupotic, J.; Kobal, I.

    2008-01-01

    Radon can be transported effectively from deep layers of the Earth to the surface by carrier gases and by water. This transport is affected by phenomena accompanying seismic events. If radon is therefore monitored shortly before or during an earthquake, at a thermal water spring, an anomaly, i. e. a sudden increase or decrease in radon level, may be observed. Thermal springs and ground waters in Slovenia have therefore been systematically surveyed for radon. The work presented here is a continuation of our previous radon monitoring related to seismic activity carried out on weekly analyses during 1981-82 in thermal waters of the Ljubljana basin. In this paper, we focus on radon anomalies in thermal springs at Hotavlje and Bled in the period from October 2005 to September 2007

  15. Comparison of seasonal variability in European domestic radon measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groves-Kirkby, C. J.; Denman, A. R.; Phillips, P. S.; Crockett, R. G. M.; Sinclair, J. M.

    2010-03-01

    Analysis of published data characterising seasonal variability of domestic radon concentrations in Europe and elsewhere shows significant variability between different countries and between regions where regional data is available. Comparison is facilitated by application of the Gini Coefficient methodology to reported seasonal variation data. Overall, radon-rich sedimentary strata, particularly high-porosity limestones, exhibit high seasonal variation, while radon-rich igneous lithologies demonstrate relatively constant, but somewhat higher, radon concentrations. High-variability regions include the Pennines and South Downs in England, Languedoc and Brittany in France, and especially Switzerland. Low-variability high-radon regions include the granite-rich Cornwall/Devon peninsula in England, and Auvergne and Ardennes in France, all components of the Devonian-Carboniferous Hercynian belt.

  16. Comparison of seasonal variability in European domestic radon measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Groves-Kirkby

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of published data characterising seasonal variability of domestic radon concentrations in Europe and elsewhere shows significant variability between different countries and between regions where regional data is available. Comparison is facilitated by application of the Gini Coefficient methodology to reported seasonal variation data. Overall, radon-rich sedimentary strata, particularly high-porosity limestones, exhibit high seasonal variation, while radon-rich igneous lithologies demonstrate relatively constant, but somewhat higher, radon concentrations. High-variability regions include the Pennines and South Downs in England, Languedoc and Brittany in France, and especially Switzerland. Low-variability high-radon regions include the granite-rich Cornwall/Devon peninsula in England, and Auvergne and Ardennes in France, all components of the Devonian-Carboniferous Hercynian belt.

  17. Dwellings with cellars and basements. A BRE guide to radon remedial measures in existing dwellings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scivyer, C.R.; Jaggs, M.P.R.

    1998-01-01

    This guide is one of a series giving practical advice on methods of reducing radon levels in existing dwellings. It is intended to help surveyors, builders and householders who are trying to reduce indoor radon levels in houses with cellars or basements. The guide is based on a large body of remedial work carried out to advice given by BRE, and on discussions with others working in the field. The measures it describes are applicable, in principle, to all dwellings and other buildings of a similar scale and construction which have cellars or basements. Contact details of other organisations referred to are listed at the back of this guide. Basements and cellars are relatively uncommon in the United Kingdom, but where they do occur they are likely to be major contributors to the radon problem within a building. Experience shows that most houses with high indoor radon levels can be remedied through the use of straightforward building works. These can be carried out by a builder or householder competent in DIY. The cost should not be excessive. Before reading this guide, for background information on radon, consult Radon: a householder's guide and Radon: a guide to reducing levels M your home, obtainable from local Environmental Health Officers or from the Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions. The Government recommends that, if the average radon concentration in a dwelling exceeds 200 Bq/m 3 (the 'action' level), measures should be taken to reduce it. This guide assumes that radon measurements have been made in the building and that the annual average indoor radon level was shown to exceed the action level

  18. Statistics and error considerations at the application of SSND T-technique in radon measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonsson, G.

    1993-01-01

    Plastic films are used for the detection of alpha particles from disintegrating radon and radon daughter nuclei. After etching there are tracks (cones) or holes in the film as a result of the exposure. The step from a counted number of tracks/holes per surface unit of the film to a reliable value of the radon and radon daughter level is surrounded by statistical considerations of different nature. Some of them are the number of counted tracks, the length of the time of exposure, the season of the time of exposure, the etching technique and the method of counting the tracks or holes. The number of background tracks of an unexposed film increases the error of the measured radon level. Some of the mentioned effects of statistical nature will be discussed in the report. (Author)

  19. Effective diffusion coefficient of radon in concrete, theory and method for field measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Culot, M.V.J.; Olson, H.G.; Schiager, K.J.

    1976-01-01

    A linear diffusion model serves as the basis for determination of an effective radon diffusion coefficient in concrete. The coefficient was needed to later allow quantitative prediction of radon accumulation within and behind concrete walls after application of an impervious radon barrier. A resolution of certain discrepancies noted in the literature in the use of an effective diffusion coefficient to model diffusion of a radioactive gas through a porous medium is suggested. An outline of factors expected to affect the concrete physical structure and the effective diffusion coefficient of radon through it is also presented. Finally, a field method for evaluating effective radon diffusion coefficients in concrete is proposed and results of measurements performed on a concrete foundation wall are compared with similar published values of gas diffusion coefficients in concrete. (author)

  20. Basement radon entry and stack driven moisture infiltration reduced by active soil depressurization

    Science.gov (United States)

    C.R. Boardman; Samuel V. Glass

    2015-01-01

    This case study presents measurements of radon and moisture infiltration from soil gases into the basement of an unoccupied research house in Madison, Wisconsin, over two full years. The basement floor and exterior walls were constructed with preservative-treated lumber and plywood. In addition to continuous radon monitoring, measurements included building air...

  1. Physical distributions of radon decay chain activities in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rolle, R.

    2004-01-01

    The distribution of short-lived radon decay chain activities in air - in time, space and on aerosols - determines their exposure potential and measurement thereof. The radioactive decay constants and flow variables in a flow system combine, yielding activity concentration distributions and ratios of concentrations characteristic of the flow scheme, its source(s) and sink(s). The clock of 'internal' decay constants allows the unraveling of characteristics of the flow scheme from activity concentration measurements of individual members of a decay chain. Basic flow string calculations are shown. These can be assembled to define or simulate concentrations in a single- or multiple-compartment flow network. Response calculations to single- and multiple-step, or continuous changes in sources and sinks yield time-, spatial- and attachment-distributions. For the short-lived 222 Rn and 212 Pb decay chains the decay constants of the shorter-lived progeny in relation to the parent impose air activity ratios on successive chain members. Ratio limits had been used in the past to improve older grab-sampling- or integral gross-alpha measurement procedures for assessing exposure level. Assessment of individual concentrations, ratios and their distributions enables unravelling of dynamic flow systems, with restriction from the range of the parameters of flow and decay. An activity measuring instrument by itself represents a flow system with a response time distribution. Instrument response correction during continuous or quasi-continuous sampling and continuous spectrometric measurement allows far more accurate time-resolved measurement evaluation of continuously varying air concentrations, than previously attainable. Strong diurnal or even shorter (≤ 1 hr) changes probably are the norm in indoor and outdoor air activity concentrations. A mere average response evaluation, as used in steady state instrument calibration, and using less efficient instruments, is usually inadequate

  2. Measurement of radon, thoron and their progeny concentrations in the dwellings of Pauri Garhwal, Uttarakhand, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, Veena; Bijalwan, Pramesh; Rawat, Jasbir; Yadav, Manjulata; Ramola, R.C.; Mishra, Rosaline

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that inhalation of radon, thoron and their progeny contribute more than 50% of natural background radiation dose to human being. The time integrated passive measurements of radon, thoron and their progeny concentrations were carried out in the dwellings of Pauri Garhwal, Uttarakhand, India. The measurements of radon and thoron concentrations were performed by LR-115 detector based single entry Pin-Hole dosimeter while for the measurement of progeny concentrations, LR-115 deposition based DTPS/DRPS technique was used. The experimental techniques and results obtained are discussed in detail. (author)

  3. Radon measurements during the building of a low-level laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Antanasijevic, R; Bikit, I; Banjanac, R; Dragic, A; Joksimovic, D; Krmpotic, D; Udovicic, V; Vukovic, J

    1999-01-01

    Radon measurements were provided during the different stages of building of a low-level laboratory in Belgrade. The depth of the laboratory is 12 m, equivalent to 30 m of water with an area of 45 m sup 2. The whole of the laboratory is hermetically lined with 1 mm A1 foil and is ventilated with filtered air. Radon concentrations were measured with the CR-39 detector as well as via the gamma-ray spectroscopic measurements. The radon concentrations in the air were achieved to 20 Bqm sup - sup 3 and reduction of secondary and tertiary cosmic-ray fluxes is five times when ventilation, filtering and sealing was applied.

  4. Radon measurements during the building of a low-level laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antanasijevic, R.; Anicin, I.; Bikit, I.; Banjanac, R.; Dragic, A.; Joksimovic, D.; Krmpotic, D.; Udovicic, V.; Vukovic, J.

    1999-01-01

    Radon measurements were provided during the different stages of building of a low-level laboratory in Belgrade. The depth of the laboratory is 12 m, equivalent to 30 m of water with an area of 45 m 2 . The whole of the laboratory is hermetically lined with 1 mm A1 foil and is ventilated with filtered air. Radon concentrations were measured with the CR-39 detector as well as via the gamma-ray spectroscopic measurements. The radon concentrations in the air were achieved to 20 Bqm -3 and reduction of secondary and tertiary cosmic-ray fluxes is five times when ventilation, filtering and sealing was applied

  5. Measurements of radon concentrations in a sample representative of housing in Franche-Comte

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aury, K.; Clinard, F.; Tillier, C.; Catelinois, O.; Pirard, P.; Aury, K.; Nourry, L.; Hochart, A.

    2008-01-01

    Three departments on four ones in Franche-Comte are classified at risk for radon: measurements are so compulsory in establishments receiving public. For the residential sector, no obligation of measurement are compulsory when french people spend 70% of their time in it. The data concerning homes are fragmentary and deserve to be completed. This campaign of measurements has confirmed the existence of radon in relatively high concentrations in Franche-Comte, including the sedimentary areas, justifying the necessity to realize a precise evaluation of the sanitary impact. The model will allow to study different strategies to reduce radon in houses. (N.C.)

  6. Radon and radium measurement in well water at Curitiba (PR), Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa, Janine N.; Paschuk, Sergei A.; Perna, Allan F.N.; Kappke, Jaqueline; Claro, Flavio del; Denyak, Valeriy; Schelin, Hugo R.; Rocha, Zildete

    2011-01-01

    This study presents the results of 226 Ra and 222 Rn activity concentration measurements in well water in the city of Curitiba - Parana State of Brazil. Water samples were collected from 31 wells and submitted to the radioactivity measurements in the Laboratory of Applied Nuclear Physics of the Federal University of Technology (UTFPR) in cooperation with CDTN-CNEN. Each water sample was submitted to 4 measurements of radon concentration with interval of three days. After two months the same samples were submitted once again to 222 Rn concentration measurements with an objective to evaluate indirectly the amount of 226 Ra contained in water samples. The 222 Rn concentration measurements were performed using AlphaGUARD radon monitor (Genitron Instruments) and 226 Ra concentration was evaluated using the decay curves of 222 Rn. Within few hours after extraction about 70% of water samples from monitored wells presented 222 Rn concentration values above the limit of 11.1 Bq/L recommended by the USEPA. Obtained activity values varied between 1.57 Bq/L - 215.16 Bq/L for radon concentration, and radium concentrations deviated within an interval of 0.61 Bq/L - 6.76 Bq/L. Obtained results showed that the biggest part of 222 Rn found in water samples was not originated from the 226 Ra compounds soluble in water but from gas exhalation by the soil adjacent to the well. The results of present research show the requirement of radioactivity monitoring of water extracted from artesian wells at Curitiba region and indicate the necessity of mitigation procedure development for better control of global alpha radioactivity in drinking water. (author)

  7. Correlation of radon volume activity in bedrock and in drinking water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnet, I.

    1993-01-01

    Derived radon risk maps set up by the Czech Geological Institute can be applied with advantage when seeking out regions with a high probability of radon occurrence in drinking water at concentrations exceeding regulatory limits. Data of radon concentrations in drinking water sources as obtained from health physics stations were used to calculate the average values for various rock types and to compare them with soil air radon data for the same sites. The two sets of data were found to correlate. The measurements concerned southern and eastern Bohemia. (M.D.). 4 tabs., 3 figs

  8. On the applicability of short time measurements to the determination of annual average of radon concentration in dwelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loskiewicz, J.; Olko, P.; Swakon, J.; Bogacz, J.; Janik, M.; Mazur, D.; Mazur, J.

    1998-01-01

    The variation of radon concentration in some houses in the Krakow region was investigated in order to compare results obtained using various measuring techniques. It is concluded that short-term measurements should last at least 4 days to avoid errors exceeding 30%; that weather parameters and human activity during the measurement should be recorded; that measurements should be repeated several times under various weather conditions; that seasonal variation in the region should be taken into account. (A.K.)

  9. Pre- and post construction radon measurements in a new housing development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rydock, J.P.; Naess-Rolstad, A.; Brunsell, J.T.

    2001-01-01

    Results from pre- and post construction radon measurements in a new housing development are presented. The houses were built in an area that had not been previously associated with elevated indoor radon concentrations. Exhalation measurements of gravel and stone from the site and soil gas measurements under several houses did not indicate an elevated radon potential. However, 4 of 21 finished houses (or 19%) exhibited annual average indoor radon concentrations over 200 Bq.m -3 (5.4 pCi/l). The highest concentrations were observed in the first house built in 1 of the 6 houses built differently than the original designs, with the elements of a sub floor ventilation system included for possible radon control if necessary. These results suggest that site investigations can be of limited value in determining where not to include radon protection measures in new housing. Also, that care must be taken to adequately inform everyone involved in the building process of the importance of maintaining a tight seal against the ground to prevent possible radon gas entry into a house. (author)

  10. Indoor radon measurements in dwellings and workplaces of Curitiba urban area, Parana state, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Claro, Flavia; Paschuk, Sergei A.; Correa, Janine N.; Kappke, Jaqueline; Perna, Allan F.N.; Schelin, Hugo R., E-mail: sergei@utfpr.edu.br [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Rocha, Zildete; Santos, Talita O., E-mail: rochaz@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Considering that radon and its progeny exposure is proved to be the main cause of lung cancer among nonsmokers and occupation-time at some commercial establishments and workplaces is equal or even bigger then at domiciles and dwelling, present study has been spread to the constructed closed environment and workplaces of commerce and productive sector. The measurements were performed by the Laboratory of Applied Nuclear Physics of UTFPR in 2009 - 2011 when 120 detectors were installed at domiciles and workplaces of Curitiba, Parana St., Brazil. Experimental setup was based at CR-39 detectors that were installed in diffusion chambers protected with filters. In collaboration with CDTN/CNEN it was performed the calibration of CR-39 detectors at the NIRS in Japan. The exposure time was set to be of 100 days. Alpha particle track development was performed using 6.25M sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solution and ethanol (2%) during 14 hours at 70 deg C. The counting was conducted using an optical microscope. Measured {sup 222}Rn activity levels in dwellings varied between 4.37 Bq/m{sup 3} and 320.82 Bq/m{sup 3} resulting at an average of 46.94 Bq/m{sup 3}. Indoor measurements at workplaces presented the variation of radon activity concentration between 3.08 Bq/m{sup 3} and 67.50 Bq/m{sup 3} resulting at the average of 34.51 Bq/m{sup 3}. Considering the recommendations of the World Health Organization, UNSCEAR and the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) concerning the radon-in-air concentration inside the dwellings that can reach 200 Bq/m{sup 3} taking into account the occupation-time of 7000 hours/year, obtained results are within normal limits and no mitigation measures have to be performed. (author)

  11. Indoor radon measurements in dwellings and workplaces of Curitiba urban area, Parana state, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Claro, Flavia; Paschuk, Sergei A.; Correa, Janine N.; Kappke, Jaqueline; Perna, Allan F.N.; Schelin, Hugo R.; Rocha, Zildete; Santos, Talita O.

    2011-01-01

    Considering that radon and its progeny exposure is proved to be the main cause of lung cancer among nonsmokers and occupation-time at some commercial establishments and workplaces is equal or even bigger then at domiciles and dwelling, present study has been spread to the constructed closed environment and workplaces of commerce and productive sector. The measurements were performed by the Laboratory of Applied Nuclear Physics of UTFPR in 2009 - 2011 when 120 detectors were installed at domiciles and workplaces of Curitiba, Parana St., Brazil. Experimental setup was based at CR-39 detectors that were installed in diffusion chambers protected with filters. In collaboration with CDTN/CNEN it was performed the calibration of CR-39 detectors at the NIRS in Japan. The exposure time was set to be of 100 days. Alpha particle track development was performed using 6.25M sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solution and ethanol (2%) during 14 hours at 70 deg C. The counting was conducted using an optical microscope. Measured 222 Rn activity levels in dwellings varied between 4.37 Bq/m 3 and 320.82 Bq/m 3 resulting at an average of 46.94 Bq/m 3 . Indoor measurements at workplaces presented the variation of radon activity concentration between 3.08 Bq/m 3 and 67.50 Bq/m 3 resulting at the average of 34.51 Bq/m 3 . Considering the recommendations of the World Health Organization, UNSCEAR and the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) concerning the radon-in-air concentration inside the dwellings that can reach 200 Bq/m 3 taking into account the occupation-time of 7000 hours/year, obtained results are within normal limits and no mitigation measures have to be performed. (author)

  12. Indoor radon measurements in the Women College, Dammam, Saudi Arabia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Qahtani, Mona [Women College, P. O. Box 838, Dammam 31113 (Saudi Arabia); Al-Jarallah, M.I. [Department of Physics, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)]. E-mail: mibrahim@kfupm.edu.sa; Fazal-ur-Rehman [Department of Physics, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)

    2005-11-15

    Passive radon dosimeters, based on alpha particle etched track detectors, were used in the indoor radon survey of the College of Science for Girls in Dammam, Saudi Arabia. A total of 95 dosimeters were distributed in the academic departments and the administrative building in the College. The exposure time in all the buildings was one complete lunar year in the period October 2001-October 2002 to get the average annual indoor radon concentration. All the buildings were constructed with ready-made concrete, except the administrative building which constructed with ordinary concrete bricks. A significant difference in the average indoor radon concentrations in the two types of buildings was found. The average indoor radon concentration in the ready-made concrete buildings was 6+/-2Bqm{sup -3} whereas that for the ordinary concrete brick building was 24+/-2Bqm{sup -3}. This could be due to the fact that ready-made concrete has a significantly less voids for the radon to emanate compared with ordinary concrete bricks. The indoor radon concentration in the ground floor is slightly higher than that in the first and second floors.

  13. Failure of preventive measures against radon penetration from the ground in a new-built family house - a case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neznal, M.; Neznal, M.; Jiranek, M.; Fronka, A.

    2006-01-01

    structure in contact with soil, i.e. even under walls. Special attention should be devoted to the sealing of joints and pipe penetrations through the insulation. The high-quality insulation may be replaced by a common damp-proofing if some special conditions are met: the house is built with a cellar under the complete house area; no residential rooms are found in the cellar; all year reliable natural ventilation of the cellar is provided; the cellar entrance from the floors above is provided with an automatic closing door system and with door sealing. The above mentioned approach is considered to be sufficient even in cases when the building site is classified close to the lower limit of the high radon index (the radon concentration in soil does not exceed twice the concentration that separates the medium and high radon index). In all other cases, the radon-proof insulation in all structures in direct contact with soil must be completed with either a a sub-slab ventilation system or an air gap ventilation under the insulation. The sub-slab ventilation system should reduce the radon concentration under the foundation plate, or create negative pressure in subsoil compared to indoor air pressure. It is a system of perforated drainage pipes that are inserted into a gravel layer under the foundation plate. To ensure effective operation of sub-slab ventilation, it is recommended to extract the soil air from the sub-slab region by the vertical exhaust pipes. The ventilation system can operate in two ways: a passive ventilation, i.e. the ventilation system is controlled by temperature and pressure indoor/sub-floor differences, or an active one, using a fan. Because the fan is usually installed on the vertical exhaust pipes, each passive system may be easily transformed into an active one. A failure of preventive protective measures in a new-built family house will be described and analysed in the paper. Detailed measurements of sub-slab parameters, continual monitoring of indoor

  14. Method for radon measurement in the subsoil in geothermal prospectus; Metodos de medicion de radon en el subsuelo en prospeccion geotermica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balcazar G, M

    1991-02-15

    The present formless describe the technique for radon measurement in the underground, being able to be used as an additional study in the geothermal prospecting. This methodology has been developed in the National Institute of Nuclear Research of Mexico using a film of cellulose nitrate to detect those emanated alpha particles, by the Rn (222). By means of the trace account in this films its settle down the present radon levels in the underground. The present method thinks about as an alternating one to overcome in it leaves the limitations found in the development of the methodology using a radon emanometer ETR-1, of the trade mark SCINTREX. The radon detected by plastics is also an integral method of measuring in a geothermal field that avoids the problems of variations of radon to pluvial precipitations and barometric variations. These variations affect the results strongly when it is used the punctual sampler as it is the ETR-1. (Author)

  15. Submicron-sized aerosol and radon progeny measurements in an uranium mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulaud, D.; Chouard, J.C.

    1992-01-01

    Submicron-sized aerosol was studied in an uranium mine using an Electrical Aerosol Analyzer and a Differential Mobility Particle Sizer. In addition radon progeny particle size distributions were measured using a prototype instrument developed by us (SDI 2000). With cascade impactor the number weighted mean electrical mobility diameters and the geometric standard deviations ranged respectively from 0.05 to 0.1 μm and 1.8 to 2. The gross alpha activity weighted mean thermodynamic diameters ranged typically from 0.1 to 0.2 μm. 6 refs., 3 figs

  16. Campaign 1999-2001 of radon measurement in the establishments receiving public

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-11-01

    After some elements of context on the radon measurement in France, and a presentation of realised actions in 2001 by the Ministry in charge of health to manage the radon risk, this document exposes a synthesis in three parts on the situation of radon measurement campaigns in the establishments receiving public. The first part gives the methodology followed to make this state, the second part presents the synthetic results by department, and the last one the results at the regional level. (N.C.)

  17. Radon permeability of foils measured by SSNTD technique (non-equilibrium approach)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakl, J.; Hunyadi, I.; Toth-Szilagyi, M. (Magyar Tudomanyos Akademia, Debrecen (Hungary).