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Sample records for radionuclides beta dosimetry

  1. Monte Carlo investigation of single cell beta dosimetry for intraperitoneal radionuclide therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syme, A M [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, 412 Avadh Bhatia Physics Laboratory, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2J1 (Canada); Kirkby, C [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, 412 Avadh Bhatia Physics Laboratory, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2J1 (Canada); Riauka, T A [Department of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, University of Alberta, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 1Z2 (Canada); Fallone, B G [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, 412 Avadh Bhatia Physics Laboratory, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2J1 (Canada); McQuarrie, S A [Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Alberta, 3118 Dentistry/Pharmacy Centre, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2N8 (Canada)

    2004-05-21

    Single event spectra for five beta-emitting radionuclides (Lu-177, Cu-67, Re-186, Re-188, Y-90) were calculated for single cells from two source geometries. The first was a surface-bound isotropically emitting point source and the second was a bath of free radioactivity in which the cell was submerged. Together these represent a targeted intraperitoneal radionuclide therapy. Monoenergetic single event spectra were calculated over an energy range of 11 keV to 2500 keV using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo system. Radionuclide single event spectra were constructed by weighting monoenergetic single event spectra according to radionuclide spectra appropriate for each source geometry. In the case of surface-bound radioactivity, these were radionuclide beta decay spectra. For the free radioactivity, a continuous slowing down approximation spectrum was used that was calculated based on the radionuclide decay spectra. The frequency mean specific energy per event increased as the energy of the beta emitter decreased. This is because, at these energies, the stopping power of the electrons decreases with increasing energy. The free radioactivity produced a higher frequency mean specific energy per event than the corresponding surface-bound value. This was primarily due to the longer mean path length through the target for this geometry. This information differentiates the radionuclides in terms of the physical process of energy deposition and could be of use in the radionuclide selection procedure for this type of therapy.

  2. Beta-particle dosimetry in radiation synovectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, L.S. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Yanch, J.C. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Shortkroff, S. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Brigham and Women`s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Barnes, C.L. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Brigham and Women`s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Spitzer, A.I. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Brigham and Women`s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Sledge, C.B. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Brigham and Women`s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Beta-particle dosimetry of various radionuclides used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis was estimated using Monte Carlo radiation transport simulation coupled with experiments using reactor-produced radionuclides and radiachromic film dosimeters inserted into joint phantoms and the knees of cadavers. Results are presented as absorbed dose factors (cGy-cm{sup 2}/MBq-s) versus depth in a mathematical model of the rheumatoid joint which includes regions of bone, articular cartilage, joint capsule, and tissue (synovium) found in all synovial joints. The factors can be used to estimate absorbed dose and dose rate distributions in treated joints. In particular, guidance is provided for those interested in (a) a given radionuclide`s therapeutic range, (b) the amount of radioactivity to administer on a case-by-case basis, (c) the expected therapeutic dose to synovium, and (d) the radiation dose imparted to other, nontarget components in the joint, including bone and articular cartilage. (orig.). With 6 figs., 6 tabs.

  3. Applied Beta Dosimetry

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    Rich, B.L.

    1986-01-01

    Measurements of beta and/or nonpenetrating exposure results is complicated and past techniques and capabilities have resulted in significant inaccuracies in recorded results. Current developments have resulted in increased capabilities which make the results more accurate and should result in less total exposure to the work force. Continued development of works in progress should provide equivalent future improvements.

  4. Dosimetry of Low-Energy Beta Radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borg, Jette

    Useful techniques and procedures for derermination of absorbed doses from exposure in a low-energy beta radiation were studied and evaluated. The four techniques included were beta spectrometry, extrapolation chamber dosimetry, Monte Carlo (MC) calculations, and exoelectron dosimetry. As a typical...... low-energy beta radiation field a moderated spectrum from a carbon-14 source was used. The measured responce of a Si(Li) detector to photons (bremsstrahlung) showed fine agreemant with the MC calculated photon response, whereas the difference between measured and MC calculated response to electrons...

  5. Dosimetry of Low-Energy Beta Radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borg, Jette

    Useful techniques and procedures for derermination of absorbed doses from exposure in a low-energy beta radiation were studied and evaluated. The four techniques included were beta spectrometry, extrapolation chamber dosimetry, Monte Carlo (MC) calculations, and exoelectron dosimetry. As a typical...... low-energy beta radiation field a moderated spectrum from a carbon-14 source was used. The measured responce of a Si(Li) detector to photons (bremsstrahlung) showed fine agreemant with the MC calculated photon response, whereas the difference between measured and MC calculated response to electrons...

  6. The radiation dosimetry of intrathecally administered radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stabin, M.G. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States); Evans, J.F. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    1999-01-01

    The radiation dose to the spine, spinal cord, marrow, and other organs of the body from intrathecal administration of several radiopharmaceuticals was studied. Anatomic models were developed for the spine, spinal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), spinal cord, spinal skeleton, cranial skeleton, and cranial CSF. A kinetic model for the transport of CSF was used to determine residence times in the CSF; material leaving the CSF was thereafter assumed to enter the bloodstream and follow the kinetics of the radiopharmaceutical as if intravenously administered. The radiation transport codes MCNP and ALGAMP were used to model the electron and photon transport and energy deposition. The dosimetry of Tc-99m DTPA and HSA, In-111 DTPA, I-131 HSA, and Yb-169 DTPA was studied. Radiation dose profiles for the spinal cord and marrow in the spine were developed and average doses to all other organs were estimated, including dose distributions within the bone and marrow.

  7. Dosimetry of low-energy beta radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borg, J.

    1996-08-01

    Useful techniques and procedures for determination of absorbed doses from exposure in a low-energy {beta} radiation field were studied and evaluated in this project. The four different techniques included were {beta} spectrometry, extrapolation chamber dosimetry, Monte Carlo (MC) calculations, and exoelectron dosimetry. As a typical low-energy {beta} radiation field a moderated spectrum from a {sup 14}C source (E{sub {beta}},{sub max} =156 keV) was chosen for the study. The measured response of a Si(Li) detector to photons (bremsstrahlung) showed fine agreement with the MC calculated photon response, whereas the difference between measured and MC calculated responses to electrons indicates an additional dead layer thickness of about 12 {mu}m in the Si(Li) detector. The depth-dose profiles measured with extrapolation chambers at two laboratories agreed very well, and it was confirmed that the fitting procedure previously reported for {sup 147}Pm depth-dose profiles is also suitable for {beta} radiation from {sup 14}C. An increasing difference between measured and MC calculated dose rates for increasing absorber thickness was found, which is explained by limitations of the EGS4 code for transport of very low-energy electrons (below 10-20 keV). Finally a study of the thermally stimulated exoelectron emission (TSEE) response of BeO thin film dosemeters to {beta} radiation for radiation fields with maximum {beta} energies ranging from 67 keV to 2.27 MeV is reported. For maximum {beta} energies below approximately 500 keV, a decrease in the response amounting to about 20% was observed. It is thus concluded that a {beta} dose higher than about 10 {mu}Gy can be measured with these dosemeters to within 0 to -20% independently of the {beta}energy for E{sub {beta}},{sub max} values down to 67 keV. (au) 12 tabs., 38 ills., 71 refs.

  8. Dosimetry of {beta} extensive sources; Dosimetria de fuentes {beta} extensas

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    Rojas C, E.L.; Lallena R, A.M. [Departamento de Fisica Moderna, Universidad de Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain)

    2002-07-01

    In this work, we have been studied, making use of the Penelope Monte Carlo simulation code, the dosimetry of {beta} extensive sources in situations of spherical geometry including interfaces. These configurations are of interest in the treatment of the called cranealfaringyomes of some synovia leisure of knee and other problems of interest in medical physics. Therefore, its application can be extended toward problems of another areas with similar geometric situation and beta sources. (Author)

  9. Experimental validation of Monte Carlo depth-dose calculations using radiochromic dye film dosimetry for a beta-gamma {sup 153}Sm radionuclide applied to the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villarreal-Barajas, J.E.; Ferro-Flores, G.; Hernandez-Oviedo, O

    2002-07-01

    In this work we compare the Monte Carlo (MCNP4B) calculated beta-gamma depth-dose profile for a liquid {sup 153}Sm beta-gamma source used in radiation synovectomy with the experimental depth-dose distribution obtained using radiochromic dye film dosimetry. The calculated and experimental depth-dose distribution shows a very good agreement (within 5%) in the region where the dose deposition is dominated by the beta particle component (first 800 {mu}m depth on tissue-equivalent material). The agreement worsens, reaching a maximum deviation of 15%, at depths close to the maximum range of the beta particles. Finally the agreement improves for the region where the gamma component accounts for one-third of the total absorbed dose (depths >1 mm ). The possible contributions to these differences are discussed, as well as their relevance for the application of {sup 153}Sm in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. (author)

  10. Comparison of Different Internal Dosimetry Systems for Selected Radionuclides Important to Nuclear Power Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leggett, Richard Wayne [ORNL; Eckerman, Keith F [ORNL; Manger, Ryan P [ORNL

    2013-08-01

    This report compares three different radiation dosimetry systems currently applied by various U.S. Federal agencies and dose estimates based on these three dosimetry systems for a set of radionuclides often identified in power reactor effluents. These dosimetry systems were developed and applied by the International Commission on Radiological Protection at different times over the past six decades. Two primary modes of intake of radionuclides are addressed: ingestion in drinking water and inhalation. Estimated doses to individual organs and to the whole body based on each dosimetry system are compared for each of four age groups: infant, child, teenager, and adult. Substantial differences between dosimetry systems in estimated dose per unit intake are found for some individual radionuclides, but differences in estimated dose per unit intake generally are modest for mixtures of radionuclides typically found in nuclear power plant effluents.

  11. Boundary electron and beta dosimetry-quantification of the effects of dissimilar media on absorbed dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunes, J.C.

    1991-01-01

    This work quantifies the changes effected in electron absorbed dose to a soft-tissue equivalent medium when part of this medium is replaced by a material that is not soft-tissue equivalent. That is, heterogeneous dosimetry is addressed. Radionuclides which emit beta particles are the electron sources of primary interest. They are used in brachytherapy and in nuclear medicine: for example, beta-ray applicators made with strontium-90 are employed in certain ophthalmic treatments and iodine-131 is used to test thyroid function. More recent medical procedures under development and which involve beta radionuclides include radiommunotherapy and radiation synovectomy; the first is a cancer modality and the second deals with the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. In addition, the possibility of skin surface contamination exists whenever there is handling of radioactive material. Determination of absorbed doses in the examples of the preceding paragraph requires considering boundaries of interfaces. Whilst the Monte Carlo method can be applied to boundary calculations, for routine work such as in clinical situations, or in other circumstances where doses need to be determined quickly, analytical dosimetry would be invaluable. Unfortunately, few analytical methods for boundary beta dosimetry exist. Furthermore, the accuracy of results from both Monte Carlo and analytical methods had to be assessed. Although restricted to one radionuclide, phosphorus-32, the experimental data obtained in this work serve several purposes, one of which is to provide standards against which calculated results can be tested. The experimental data may be useful in developing analytical boundary dosimetry methodology. The first application of the experimental data is demonstrated. Results from two Monte Carlo codes and two analytical methods are compared with experimental data. Monte Carlo results compare satisfactory with experimental results for the boundaries considered.

  12. Boundary Electron and Beta Dosimetry-Quantification of the Effects of Dissimilar Media on Absorbed Dose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Josane C.

    1991-02-01

    This work quantifies the changes effected in electron absorbed dose to a soft-tissue equivalent medium when part of this medium is replaced by a material that is not soft -tissue equivalent. That is, heterogeneous dosimetry is addressed. Radionuclides which emit beta particles are the electron sources of primary interest. They are used in brachytherapy and in nuclear medicine: for example, beta -ray applicators made with strontium-90 are employed in certain ophthalmic treatments and iodine-131 is used to test thyroid function. More recent medical procedures under development and which involve beta radionuclides include radioimmunotherapy and radiation synovectomy; the first is a cancer modality and the second deals with the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. In addition, the possibility of skin surface contamination exists whenever there is handling of radioactive material. Determination of absorbed doses in the examples of the preceding paragraph requires considering boundaries of interfaces. Whilst the Monte Carlo method can be applied to boundary calculations, for routine work such as in clinical situations, or in other circumstances where doses need to be determined quickly, analytical dosimetry would be invaluable. Unfortunately, few analytical methods for boundary beta dosimetry exist. Furthermore, the accuracy of results from both Monte Carlo and analytical methods has to be assessed. Although restricted to one radionuclide, phosphorus -32, the experimental data obtained in this work serve several purposes, one of which is to provide standards against which calculated results can be tested. The experimental data also contribute to the relatively sparse set of published boundary dosimetry data. At the same time, they may be useful in developing analytical boundary dosimetry methodology. The first application of the experimental data is demonstrated. Results from two Monte Carlo codes and two analytical methods, which were developed elsewhere, are compared

  13. Monte Carol-Based Dosimetry of Beta-Emitters for Intravascular Brachytherapy

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    Choi, C.K.

    2002-06-25

    Monte Carlo simulations for radiation dosimetry and the experimental verifications of the simulations have been developed for the treatment geometry of intravascular brachytherapy, a form of radionuclide therapy for occluded coronary disease (restenosis). Monte Carlo code, MCNP4C, has been used to calculate the radiation dose from the encapsulated array of B-emitting seeds (Sr/Y-source train). Solid water phantoms have been fabricated to measure the dose on the radiochromic films that were exposed to the beta source train for both linear and curved coronary vessel geometries. While the dose difference for the 5-degree curved vessel at the prescription point of f+2.0 mm is within the 10% guideline set by the AAPM, however, the difference increased dramatically to 16.85% for the 10-degree case which requires additional adjustment for the acceptable dosimetry planning. The experimental dose measurements agree well with the simulation results

  14. Patient-Specific Dosimetry and Radiobiological Modeling of Targeted Radionuclide Therapy Grant - final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George Sgouros, Ph.D.

    2007-03-20

    The broad, long-term objectives of this application are to 1. develop easily implementable tools for radionuclide dosimetry that can be used to predict normal organ toxicity and tumor response in targeted radionuclide therapy; and 2. to apply these tools to the analysis of clinical trial data in order to demonstrate dose-response relationships for radionuclide therapy treatment planning. The work is founded on the hypothesis that robust dose-response relationships have not been observed in targeted radionuclide therapy studies because currently available internal dosimetry methodologies are inadequate, failing to adequately account for individual variations in patient anatomy, radionuclide activity distribution/kinetics, absorbed dose-distribution, and absorbed dose-rate. To reduce development time the previously available software package, 3D-ID, one of the first dosimetry software packages to incorporate 3-D radionuclide distribution with individual patient anatomy; and the first to be applied for the comprehensive analysis of patient data, will be used as a platform to build the functionality listed above. The following specific aims are proposed to satisfy the long-term objectives stated above: 1. develop a comprehensive and validated methodology for converting one or more SPECT images of the radionuclide distribution to a 3-D representation of the cumulated activity distribution; 2. account for differences in tissue density and atomic number by incorporating an easily implementable Monte Carlo methodology for the 3-D dosimetry calculations; 3. incorporate the biologically equivalent dose (BED) and equivalent uniform dose (EUD) models to convert the spatial distribution of absorbed dose and dose-rate into equivalent single values that account for differences in dose uniformity and rate and that may be correlated with tumor response and normal organ toxicity; 4. test the hypothesis stated above by applying the resulting package to patient trials of targeted

  15. Graphite mixed magnesium borate TL dosemeters for beta ray dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prokic, M; Christensen, Poul

    1984-01-01

    Sintered MgB4O7:Dy dosemeters with graphite contents from 1 to 10% were investigated for application for personnel dosimetry. Data are given on dose response, dose threshold, reproducibility, beta energy response and fading. Furthermore, results from practical field experiments are presented...

  16. Extension of the biological effective dose to the MIRD schema and possible implications in radionuclide therapy dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baechler, Sébastien; Hobbs, Robert F; Prideaux, Andrew R; Wahl, Richard L; Sgouros, George

    2008-03-01

    In dosimetry-based treatment planning protocols, patients with rapid clearance of the radiopharmaceutical require a larger amount of initial activity than those with slow clearance to match the absorbed dose to the critical organ. As a result, the dose-rate to the critical organ is higher in patients with rapid clearance and may cause unexpected toxicity compared to patients with slow clearance. In order to account for the biological impact of different dose-rates, radiobiological modeling is beginning to be applied to the analysis of radionuclide therapy patient data. To date, the formalism used for these analyses is based on kinetics derived from activity in a single organ, the target. This does not include the influence of other source organs to the dose and dose-rate to the target organ. As a result, only self-dose irradiation in the target organ contributes to the dose-rate. In this work, the biological effective dose (BED) formalism has been extended to include the effect of multiple source organ contributions to the net dose-rate in a target organ. The generalized BED derivation has been based on the Medical Internal Radionuclide Dose Committee (MIRD) schema assuming multiple source organs following exponential effective clearance of the radionuclide. A BED-based approach to determine the largest safe dose to critical organs has also been developed. The extended BED formalism is applied to red marrow dosimetry, as well as kidney dosimetry considering the cortex and the medulla separately, since both those organs are commonly dose limiting in radionuclide therapy. The analysis shows that because the red marrow is an early responding tissue (high alpha/beta), it is less susceptible to unexpected toxicity arising from rapid clearance of high levels of administered activity in the marrow or in the remainder of the body. In kidney dosimetry, the study demonstrates a complex interplay between clearance of activity in the cortex and the medulla, as well as the

  17. A free database of radionuclide voxel S values for the dosimetry of nonuniform activity distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanconelli, N.; Pacilio, M.; Lo Meo, S.; Botta, F.; Di Dia, A.; Torres Aroche, L. A.; Coca Pérez, M. A.; Cremonesi, M.

    2012-01-01

    The increasing availability of SPECT/CT devices with advanced technology offers the opportunity for the accurate assessment of the radiation dose to the biological target volume during radionuclide therapy. Voxel dosimetry can be performed employing direct Monte Carlo radiation transport simulations, based on both morphological and functional images of the patient. On the other hand, for voxel dosimetry calculations the voxel S value method can be considered an easier approach than patient-specific Monte Carlo simulations, ensuring a good dosimetric accuracy at least for anatomic regions which are characterized by uniform density tissue. However, this approach has been limited because of the lack of tabulated S values for different voxel dimensions and radionuclides. The aim of this work is to provide a free dataset of values which can be used for voxel dosimetry in targeted radionuclide studies. Seven different radionuclides (89Sr, 90Y, 131I, 153Sm, 177Lu, 186Re, 188Re), and 13 different voxel sizes (2.21, 2.33, 2.4, 3, 3.59, 3.9, 4, 4.42, 4.8, 5, 6, 6.8 and 9.28 mm) are considered. Voxel S values are calculated performing simulations of monochromatic photon and electron sources in two different homogeneous tissues (soft tissue and bone) with DOSXYZnrc code, and weighting the contributions on the basis of the radionuclide emission spectra. The outcomes are validated by comparison with Monte Carlo simulations obtained with other codes (PENELOPE and MCNP4c) performing direct simulation of the radionuclide emission spectra. The differences among the different Monte Carlo codes are of the order of a few per cent when considering the source voxel and the bremsstrahlung tail, whereas the highest differences are observed at a distance close to the maximum continuous slowing down approximation range of electrons. These discrepancies would negligibly affect dosimetric assessments. The dataset of voxel S values can be freely downloaded from the website www.medphys.it.

  18. A free database of radionuclide voxel S values for the dosimetry of nonuniform activity distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanconelli, N; Pacilio, M; Lo Meo, S; Botta, F; Di Dia, A; Aroche, A Torres; Pérez, M A Coca; Cremonesi, M

    2012-01-21

    The increasing availability of SPECT/CT devices with advanced technology offers the opportunity for the accurate assessment of the radiation dose to the biological target volume during radionuclide therapy. Voxel dosimetry can be performed employing direct Monte Carlo radiation transport simulations, based on both morphological and functional images of the patient. On the other hand, for voxel dosimetry calculations the voxel S value method can be considered an easier approach than patient-specific Monte Carlo simulations, ensuring a good dosimetric accuracy at least for anatomic regions which are characterized by uniform density tissue. However, this approach has been limited because of the lack of tabulated S values for different voxel dimensions and radionuclides. The aim of this work is to provide a free dataset of values which can be used for voxel dosimetry in targeted radionuclide studies. Seven different radionuclides (89Sr, 90Y, 131I, 153Sm, 177Lu, 186Re, 188Re), and 13 different voxel sizes (2.21, 2.33, 2.4, 3, 3.59, 3.9, 4, 4.42, 4.8, 5, 6, 6.8 and 9.28 mm) are considered. Voxel S values are calculated performing simulations of monochromatic photon and electron sources in two different homogeneous tissues (soft tissue and bone) with DOSXYZnrc code, and weighting the contributions on the basis of the radionuclide emission spectra. The outcomes are validated by comparison with Monte Carlo simulations obtained with other codes (PENELOPE and MCNP4c) performing direct simulation of the radionuclide emission spectra. The differences among the different Monte Carlo codes are of the order of a few per cent when considering the source voxel and the bremsstrahlung tail, whereas the highest differences are observed at a distance close to the maximum continuous slowing down approximation range of electrons. These discrepancies would negligibly affect dosimetric assessments. The dataset of voxel S values can be freely downloaded from the website www.medphys.it.

  19. VIDA: a voxel-based dosimetry method for targeted radionuclide therapy using Geant4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kost, Susan D; Dewaraja, Yuni K; Abramson, Richard G; Stabin, Michael G

    2015-02-01

    We have developed the Voxel-Based Internal Dosimetry Application (VIDA) to provide patient-specific dosimetry in targeted radionuclide therapy performing Monte Carlo simulations of radiation transport with the Geant4 toolkit. The code generates voxel-level dose rate maps using anatomical and physiological data taken from individual patients. Voxel level dose rate curves are then fit and integrated to yield a spatial map of radiation absorbed dose. In this article, we present validation studies using established dosimetry results, including self-dose factors (DFs) from the OLINDA/EXM program for uniform activity in unit density spheres and organ self- and cross-organ DFs in the Radiation Dose Assessment Resource (RADAR) reference adult phantom. The comparison with reference data demonstrated agreement within 5% for self-DFs to spheres and reference phantom source organs for four common radionuclides used in targeted therapy ((131)I, (90)Y, (111)In, (177)Lu). Agreement within 9% was achieved for cross-organ DFs. We also present dose estimates to normal tissues and tumors from studies of two non-Hodgkin Lymphoma patients treated by (131)I radioimmunotherapy, with comparison to results generated independently with another dosimetry code. A relative difference of 12% or less was found between methods for mean absorbed tumor doses accounting for tumor regression.

  20. SCALING PARAMETERS FOR HOT-PARTICLE BETA DOSIMETRY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangini, Colby D; Hamby, David M

    2016-12-01

    Scaling of dose-point kernel (DPK) values for beta particles transmitted by high-Z sources will overestimate dose at shallow depths while underestimating dose at greater depths due to spectral hardening. A new model has been developed based on a determination of the amount of monoenergetic electron absorption that occurs in a given source thickness through the use of EGSnrc (Electron Gamma Shower) Monte Carlo simulations. Integration over a particular beta spectrum provides the beta-particle DPK following self-absorption as a function of source thickness and radial depth in water, thereby accounting for spectral hardening that may occur in higher-Z materials. Beta spectra of varying spectral shapes and endpoint energies were used to test the model for select source materials with 7.42 ≤ Z ≤ 94. The results demonstrate that significant improvements can be made to DPK-based dosimetry models when dealing with high-Z volumetric sources. This new scaling model is currently being used to improve the accuracy of the beta-dosimetry calculations in VARSKIN 5.

  1. Three-dimensional radiobiological dosimetry of kidneys for treatment planning in peptide receptor radionuclide therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baechler, Sebastien; Hobbs, Robert F.; Boubaker, Ariane; Buchegger, Franz; He Bin; Frey, Eric C.; Sgouros, George [Institute of Radiation Physics, Lausanne University Hospital, 1007 Lausanne (Switzerland); Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21231 (United States); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Lausanne University Hospital, 1011 Lausanne (Switzerland); Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21231 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) delivers high absorbed doses to kidneys and may lead to permanent nephropathy. Reliable dosimetry of kidneys is thus critical for safe and effective PRRT. The aim of this work was to assess the feasibility of planning PRRT based on 3D radiobiological dosimetry (3D-RD) in order to optimize both the amount of activity to administer and the fractionation scheme, while limiting the absorbed dose and the biological effective dose (BED) to the renal cortex. Methods: Planar and SPECT data were available for a patient examined with {sup 111}In-DTPA-octreotide at 0.5 (planar only), 4, 24, and 48 h post-injection. Absorbed dose and BED distributions were calculated for common therapeutic radionuclides, i.e., {sup 111}In, {sup 90}Y and {sup 177}Lu, using the 3D-RD methodology. Dose-volume histograms were computed and mean absorbed doses to kidneys, renal cortices, and medullae were compared with results obtained using the MIRD schema (S-values) with the multiregion kidney dosimetry model. Two different treatment planning approaches based on (1) the fixed absorbed dose to the cortex and (2) the fixed BED to the cortex were then considered to optimize the activity to administer by varying the number of fractions. Results: Mean absorbed doses calculated with 3D-RD were in good agreement with those obtained with S-value-based SPECT dosimetry for {sup 90}Y and {sup 177}Lu. Nevertheless, for {sup 111}In, differences of 14% and 22% were found for the whole kidneys and the cortex, respectively. Moreover, the authors found that planar-based dosimetry systematically underestimates the absorbed dose in comparison with SPECT-based methods, up to 32%. Regarding the 3D-RD-based treatment planning using a fixed BED constraint to the renal cortex, the optimal number of fractions was found to be 3 or 4, depending on the radionuclide administered and the value of the fixed BED. Cumulative activities obtained using the proposed simulated

  2. Beta-radiation exposure at the finger tips during the radionuclide synovectomy; Beta-Ortsdosimetrie der Fingerkuppen bei der Radiosynoviorthese

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liepe, K.; Andreeff, M.; Wunderlich, G.; Kropp, J.; Kotzerke, J. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, TU Dresden (Germany); Mielcarek, J.; Barth, I. [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz (Germany)

    2003-06-01

    Aim: The radiation synovectomy is a widespread therapeutic option in rheumatoid arthritis. However, data for the {beta}-radiation exposure are rare. The aim of this study was to determine the personal dose equivalent H{sub p}(0.07) of the skin of the hands. Methods: Thermoluminescence detectors (TLDs) were attached at all fingertips of the therapist, the radiochemist and the nurse. In summary, the measurement of {beta}-exposure occurred in 155 joints at 6 days with different radionuclides ({sup 169}Er, {sup 186}Re, {sup 90}Y). Results: The greatest beta exposure were show at the forefinger (L-Ff) and thumb (L-Th) of the left hand, with which the therapist (right hander) fixed the injection needle. In 52 treated finger-joints (1204 MBq {sup 169}Er), 29 treated large joints (2405 MBq {sup 186}Re) and 15 treated knees (3100 MBq {sup 90}Y) we found a cumulative beta exposure over all radionuclides of 190 mSv at L-Ff and 48 mSv at L-Th. The specific beta exposure for the individual radionuclides showed beta exposures of 0,56 {mu}Sv/MBq for {sup 169}Er and 1,52 {mu}Sv/MBq for {sup 186}Re-186 at the L-Ff. With using a manipulator the {beta}-exposure ({sup 90}Y) could reduced from 22,09 to 0,42 {mu}Sv/MBq at the L-Ff. The greatest beta exposures for the radiochemist was 119 mSv at the L-Ff for all radionuclides. Conclusion: In usual techniques of radiation synovectomy the {sup 90}Y produced the greatest part of radiation exposure. Especially at the L-Ff it might exceed the German limit for the official dosimetry service at the skin (paragraph 55 Strl-SchV). Using a holding forceps we can keep the legal rules and can reduce considerably the beta exposure. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Der Anstieg der Therapiezahlen bei der Radiosynoviorthese (RSO) und die neue Strahlenschutzverordnung (StrSchV) erfordern, die {beta}-Strahlenbelastung, H{sub p}(0,07), des Personals bei der RSO zu dokumentieren. Methode: Da die amtlichen Teilkoerperdosimeter (TLD-Fingerringdosimeter) die {beta

  3. State-of-the-Art Beta Detection and Dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David M. Hamby

    2008-08-15

    The research funded by this NEER grant establishes the framework for a detailed understanding of the challenges in beta dosimetry, especially in the presence of a mixed radiation field. The work also stimulated the thinking of the research group which will lead to new concepts in digital signal processing to allow collection of detection signals and real-time analysis such that simultaneous beta and gamma spectroscopy can take place. The work described herein (with detail in the many publications that came out of this research) was conducted in a manner that provided dissertation and thesis topics for three students, one of whom was completely funded by this grant. The overall benefit of the work came in the form of a dramatic shift in signal processing that is normally conducted in analog pulse shape analysis. Analog signal processing was shown not to be feasible for this type of work; digital signal processing was a must. This, in turn, led the research team to a new understanding of pulse analysis, one in which expands the state-of-the-art in simultaneous beta and gamma spectroscopy with a single detector.

  4. Patient-specific dosimetry in peptide receptor radionuclide therapy: a clinical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalkia, M T; Stefanoyiannis, A P; Chatziioannou, S N; Round, W H; Efstathopoulos, E P; Nikiforidis, G C

    2015-03-01

    Neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) belong to a relatively rare class of neoplasms. Nonetheless, their prevalence has increased significantly during the last decades. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) is a relatively new treatment approach for inoperable or metastasised NETs. The therapeutic effect is based on the binding of radiolabelled somatostatin analogue peptides with NETs' somatostatin receptors, resulting in internal irradiation of tumours. Pre-therapeutic patient-specific dosimetry is essential to ensure that a treatment course has high levels of safety and efficacy. This paper reviews the methods applied for PRRT dosimetry, as well as the dosimetric results presented in the literature. Focus is given on data concerning the therapeutic somatostatin analogue radiopeptides (111)In-[DTPA(0),D-Phe(1)]-octreotide ((111)In-DTPA-octreotide), (90)Y-[DOTA(0),Tyr(3)]-octreotide ((90)Y-DOTATOC) and (177)Lu-[DOTA(0),Tyr(3),Thr(8)]-octreotide ((177)Lu-DOTATATE). Following the Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) Committee formalism, dosimetric analysis demonstrates large interpatient variability in tumour and organ uptake, with kidneys and bone marrow being the critical organs. The results are dependent on the image acquisition and processing protocol, as well as the dosimetric imaging radiopharmaceutical.

  5. MIRD Pamphlet No. 22 (Unabridged): Radiobiology and Dosimetry of alpha-Particle Emitters for Targeted Radionuclide Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sgouros, George; Roeske, John C.; McDevitt, Michael S.; Palm, Stig; Allen, Barry J.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Brill, Bertrand A.; Song, Hong; Howell, R. W.; Akabani, Gamal

    2010-02-28

    The potential of alpha-particle emitters to treat cancer has been recognized since the early 1900s. Advances in the targeted delivery of radionuclides, in radionuclide conjugation chemistry, and in the increased availability of alpha-emitters appropriate for clinical use have recently led to patient trials of alpha-particle-emitter labeled radiopharmaceuticals. Although alpha-emitters have been studied for many decades, their current use in humans for targeted therapy is an important milestone. The objective of this work is to review those aspects of the field that are pertinent to targeted alpha-particle-emitter therapy and to provide guidance and recommendations for human alpha-particle-emitter dosimetry.

  6. Uptake and dosimetry of Auger emitting diagnostic radionuclides (in particular indium-111) in human male germ cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nettleton, J.S. [Health and Safety Executive, Quay House, Manchester (United Kingdom); Lawson, R.S.; Prescott, M.C. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Manchester Royal Infirmary, Manchester (United Kingdom); Hoyes, K.P.; Morris, I.D. [School of Biological Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2000-05-01

    This paper concerns the uptake and dosimetry of Auger electron emitting radionuclides which are used during routine diagnostic nuclear medicine procedures, in human testes and spermatozoa (sperm). A computer model was developed to calculate the doses to sperm heads from cellular localisation of the Auger electron emitting radionuclides {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 111}In, {sup 123}I and {sup 201}Tl. An assumption of ellipsoidal geometry was made to approximate the sperm head. S Factors were determined for differing sub-cellular localisations of radionuclide. The S-Factors determined were then combined with in-vitro data for quantification of radionuclide uptake for {sup 99m}Tc pertechnetate, {sup 111}In chloride and {sup 201}Tl chloride, to estimate in-vivo doses to sperm heads following intravenous administration of radionuclide in typical diagnostic quantities. The uptake and resulting cellular radiation dose of {sup 111}In (from the chloride) was significantly larger than the other radionuclides in the chemical forms investigated. Further investigations were carried out to determine localisation of {sup 111}In on sperm. The results of these experiments indicate that the radiation dose to mature sperm following administration of {sup 111}In pharmaceuticals for diagnostic purposes might be large enough to result in DNA damage which is not expressed until after fertilisation of an oocyte. Consideration should therefore be given to providing some contraceptive advice following diagnostic administrations of this radionuclide. In order to consider the possible effects of these radionuclides on other spermatogenic cells, further studies were undertaken to obtain in-vivo data for quantification of {sup 111}In chloride and {sup 201}Tl chloride uptake into the human testis following intravenous administration. Conventional dosimetry was then used to estimate testicular radiation dose using our values of percentage uptake. The results obtained indicate that the values of testicular

  7. Performance of a parallel plate ionization chamber in beta radiation dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonio, Patricia L.; Caldas, Linda V.E., E-mail: patrilan@ipen.b, E-mail: lcaldas@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    A homemade parallel plate ionization chamber with graphite collecting electrode, and developed for use in mammography beams, was tested in relation to its usefulness in beta radiation dosimetry at the Calibration Laboratory of IPEN. Characterization tests of this ionization chamber were performed, using the Sr-90 + Y-90, Kr-85 and Pm-147 sources of a beta secondary standard system. The results of saturation, leakage current, stabilization time, response stability, linearity, angular dependence, and calibration coefficients are within the recommended limits of international recommendations that indicate that this chamber may be used for beta radiation dosimetry. (author)

  8. Effect of voxel size when calculating patient specific radionuclide dosimetry estimates using direct Monte Carlo simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickson, Kevin J; O'Keefe, Graeme J

    2014-09-01

    The scalable XCAT voxelised phantom was used with the GATE Monte Carlo toolkit to investigate the effect of voxel size on dosimetry estimates of internally distributed radionuclide calculated using direct Monte Carlo simulation. A uniformly distributed Fluorine-18 source was simulated in the Kidneys of the XCAT phantom with the organ self dose (kidney ← kidney) and organ cross dose (liver ← kidney) being calculated for a number of organ and voxel sizes. Patient specific dose factors (DF) from a clinically acquired FDG PET/CT study have also been calculated for kidney self dose and liver ← kidney cross dose. Using the XCAT phantom it was found that significantly small voxel sizes are required to achieve accurate calculation of organ self dose. It has also been used to show that a voxel size of 2 mm or less is suitable for accurate calculations of organ cross dose. To compensate for insufficient voxel sampling a correction factor is proposed. This correction factor is applied to the patient specific dose factors calculated with the native voxel size of the PET/CT study.

  9. Simple counting technique for measuring mixtures of two pure beta-emitting radionuclides

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Wyngaardt, WM

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available A simple counting technique to measure mixtures of two pure beta-emitting radionuclides is described. The method is based on elements of two liquid scintillation techniques that are widely used to measure single-radionuclide solutions, namely...

  10. OPTIMAL BETA-RAY SHIELDING THICKNESSES FOR DIFFERENT THERAPEUTIC RADIONUCLIDES AND SHIELDING MATERIALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yong In; Kim, Ja Mee; Kim, Jung Hoon

    2016-04-06

    To better understand the distribution of deposited energy of beta and gamma rays according to changes in shielding materials and thicknesses when radionuclides are used for therapeutic nuclear medicine, a simulation was conducted. The results showed that due to the physical characteristics of each therapeutic radionuclide, the thicknesses of shielding materials at which beta-ray shielding takes place varied. Additional analysis of the shielding of gamma ray was conducted for radionuclides that emit both beta and gamma rays simultaneously with results showing shielding effects proportional to the atomic number and density of the shielding materials. Also, analysis of bremsstrahlung emission after beta-ray interactions in the simulation revealed that the occurrence of bremsstrahlung was relatively lower than theoretically calculated and varied depending on different radionuclides.

  11. The application of polymer gel dosimeters to dosimetry for targeted radionuclide therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gear, J I [Joint Department of Physics, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust and Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Flux, G D [Joint Department of Physics, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust and Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Charles-Edwards, E [Clinical Magnetic Research Group, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust and Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Partridge, M [Joint Department of Physics, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust and Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Cook, G [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust and Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Ott, R J [Joint Department of Physics, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust and Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-21

    observed, with up to 40% increased sensitivity for internally irradiated gels. Curve fits to the calibration data followed a single exponential function. The correlation coefficients for internally and externally irradiated gels were 0.991 and 0.985, respectively. With the ability to accurately calibrate internally dosed polymer gels, this technology shows promise as a means to evaluate dosimetry methods, particularly in cases of non-uniform uptake of a radionuclide.

  12. The impact of PET and SPECT on dosimetry for targeted radionuclide therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flux, G. [Dept. of Physics, Royal Marsden Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Bardies, M. [INSERM UMR 601, Nantes (France); Monsieurs, M. [Dept. Anatomy, Embryology, Histology and Medical Physics, Ghent Univ. (Belgium); Savolainen, S. [HUS, Medical Imaging Centre and Dept. of Physical Sciences, Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Strand, S.E. [Medical Radiation Physics, Dept. of Clinical Sciences, Lund Univ (Sweden); Lassmann, M. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin der Univ. Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2006-07-01

    Targeted radionuclide therapy (TRT) is an increasingly used treatment modality for a range of cancers. To date, few treatments have involved the use of dosimetry either to plan treatment or to retrospectively ascertain the absorbed dose delivered during treatment. Also the correlation between absorbed dose and biological effect has been difficult to establish. Tomographic methods permit the determination of the activity volume on a macroscopic scale at different time points. Proper attenuation correction in tomographic imaging requires a patient-specific attenuation map. This can be obtained from scintillation-camera transmission scanning, CT, or by using segmented scatter-emission images. Attenuation corrections can be performed either on the projection images, on the reconstructed images, or as part of an iterative reconstruction method. The problem of image quantification for therapy radionuclides, particularly for I-131, is exacerbated by the fact that most cameras are optimised for diagnostic imaging with Tc-99m. In addition, problems may arise when high activities are to be measured due to count losses and mis-positioned events, because of insufficient pile-up and dead time correction methods. Sufficient image quantification, however, is only possible if all effects that degrade the quantitative content of the image have been corrected for. Monte Carlo simulations are an appealing tool that can help to model interactions occurring in the patient or in the detector system. This is helpful to develop and test correction techniques, or to help to define detectors better suited to quantitative imaging. PET is probably the most accurate imaging method for the determination of activity concentrations in tissue. PET imaging can be considered for pre-therapeutic treatment planning but ideally requires the use of a radioisotope from the same element as that used for treatment (e.g. I-124 for I-131; Y-86 for Y-90). Problems, however, are that - some of the positron

  13. High-dose dosimetry of beta rays using blue beryl dosimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmo, Lucas S. do, E-mail: lsatiro@usp.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Watanabe, Shigueo; Bittencour, Jose F., E-mail: Lacifid@if.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica. Departamento de Fisica Nuclear

    2015-07-01

    High dose radiation is widely used in industrial applications as sterilization of medical products, improvement of materials properties, color enhancement of jewelry stones, etc. The radiation dosimetry of high doses is quite important for these applications. In this work we have investigated the usage of blue beryl crystal also known as aquamarine in high dose dosimetry of beta rays. Some works have shown that silicate minerals exhibit a good Thermoluminescent response when irradiated up to 2000 kGy of gamma rays. Here, we have produced small beryl pellets of approximately 5 mm in diameter and 3 mm thickness to measure high doses of beta rays produced at an electron accelerator at IPEN. Twelve beryl dosimeters were made and six of them were irradiated from 10kGy up to 100 kGy. The technique used to create a calibration curve was the thermoluminescence using the glow peak at 310°C. (author)

  14. DOSIMETRY

    CERN Multimedia

    Service de dosimétrie individuelle

    2000-01-01

    From the distribution Novembre/Decembre 2000 (film colour green), the people who worked in LEP experiments and who have not announced their participation to LEP dismantling or new activities in another experiment or group will be taken out from the regular distribution list of the Individual Dosimetry Service. Please contact Individual Dosimetry Service, tel. 72155 or e-mail to Jeannine.Fraisse@cern.ch We inform all staff and users under regular dosimetric control that the dosimeters for the monitoring period SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER will be available from their usual dispatchers on the 1st of September 2000. Please have your films changed before the 12th of September. The colour of the dosimeter valid in SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER is RED. The service will be closed exceptionally on Friday 8 September.

  15. DOSIMETRY

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    From the month of May on, the neutron dosimeter will be worn in an extra package distinct from the usual film-badge. We will give you more ample information in Weekly Bulletin No. 18/2001 of April 30, 2001. In the week following Easter (17 - 20. 4. 2001) the Individual Dosimetry Service will be opened in the mornings from 8:30 to 11:30 h only. The Service will be closed on April 30.

  16. Hot beta particles in the lung: Results from dogs exposed to fission product radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, F.F.; Griffith, W.C.; Hobbs, C.H. [and others

    1995-12-01

    The Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident resulted in the release of uranium dioxide fuel and fission product radionuclides into the environment with the fallout of respirable, highly radioactive particles that have been termed {open_quotes}hot beta particles.{close_quotes} There is concern that these hot beta particles (containing an average of 150-20,000 Bq/particle), when inhaled and deposited in the lung, may present an extraordinary hazard for the induction of lung cancer. We reviewed data from a group of studies in dogs exposed to different quantities of beta-emitting radionuclides with varied physical half-lives to determine if those that inhaled hot beta particles were at unusual risk for lung cancer. This analysis indicates that the average dose to the lung is adequate to predict biologic effects of lung cancer for inhaled beta-emitting radionuclides in the range of 5-50 Gy to the lung and with particle activities in the range of 0.10-50 Bq/particle.

  17. A search for cosmogenic production of $\\beta$-neutron emitting radionuclides in water

    CERN Document Server

    Dazeley, S; Bergevin, M; Bernstein, A; Bowden, N S; Jaffke, P; Rountree, S D; Shokair, T M; Sweany, M

    2015-01-01

    Here we present the first results of WATCHBOY, a water Cherenkov detector designed to measure the yield of $\\beta$-neutron emitting radionuclides produced by cosmic ray muons in water. In addition to the $\\beta$-neutron measurement, we also provide a first look at isolating single-$\\beta$ producing radionuclides following showering muons as a check of the detection capabilities of WATCHBOY. The data taken over $207$ live days indicates a $^{9}$Li production yield upper limit of $1.9\\times10^{-7}\\mu^{-1}g^{-1}\\mathrm{cm}^2$ at $\\sim400$ meters water equivalent (m.w.e.) overburden at the $90\\%$ confidence level. In this work the $^{9}$Li signal in WATCHBOY was used as a proxy for the combined search for $^{9}$Li and $^{8}$He production. This result will provide a constraint on estimates of antineutrino-like backgrounds in future water-based antineutrino detectors.

  18. Extremity dosimetry problems during the handling of radionuclides syringes in nuclear medicine: A Monte Carlo radiation transport simplified approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariotti, F., E-mail: francesca.mariotti@bologna.enea.i [ENEA-BAS-ION IRP Radiation Protection Institute, Via dei Colli 16, 40136, Bologna (Italy); Gualdrini, G. [ENEA-BAS-ION IRP Radiation Protection Institute, Via dei Colli 16, 40136, Bologna (Italy)

    2011-04-15

    The ORAMED (Optimization of RAdiation protection for MEDical staff) Working Tasks (WP4) is addressed at evaluating extremity doses (and dose distributions across the hands) of medical staff working in nuclear medicine departments, to study the influence of protective devices such as syringe and vial shields, to improve such devices when possible and to propose 'levels of reference doses' for each standard nuclear medicine procedure. In particular task 4 is concerned with the study of the extremity dosimetry for the hand of operators devoted to the preparation and administration stages of the usage, for example, of {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 18}F and {sup 90}Y (Zevalin) radionuclides. The aim of this report consists in the study of photon-electron equilibrium conditions at 0.07 mm in the skin to justify a simplified 'kerma approximation' approach in the planned complex Monte Carlo voxel hand modeling. Furthermore a detailed investigation on primary electron and secondary bremsstrahlung photon transport from {sup 90}Y to speed up the calculations was performed. The results obtained in the simplified investigated conditions could be of help for the production calculations, introducing, if necessary, suited correction factors applicable to the complex condition results.

  19. Pediatric radiation dosimetry for positron-emitting radionuclides using anthropomorphic phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Tianwu [Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva University Hospital, CH-1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Bolch, Wesley E. [Departments of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Lee, Choonsik [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institute of Health, Rockville, Maryland 20850 (United States); Zaidi, Habib [Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva University Hospital, CH-1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Geneva Neuroscience Center, Geneva University, CH-1205 Geneva (Switzerland); Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, 9700 RB Groningen (Netherlands)

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: Positron emission tomography (PET) plays an important role in the diagnosis, staging, treatment, and surveillance of clinically localized diseases. Combined PET/CT imaging exhibits significantly higher sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy than conventional imaging when it comes to detecting malignant tumors in children. However, the radiation dose from positron-emitting radionuclide to the pediatric population is a matter of concern since children are at a particularly high risk when exposed to ionizing radiation.Methods: The authors evaluate the absorbed fractions and specific absorbed fractions (SAFs) of monoenergy photons/electrons as well as S-values of 9 positron-emitting radionuclides (C-11, N-13, O-15, F-18, Cu-64, Ga-68, Rb-82, Y-86, and I-124) in 48 source regions for 10 anthropomorphic pediatric hybrid models, including the reference newborn, 1-, 5-, 10-, and 15-yr-old male and female models, using the Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended general purpose Monte Carlo transport code.Results: The self-absorbed SAFs and S-values for most organs were inversely related to the age and body weight, whereas the cross-dose terms presented less correlation with body weight. For most source/target organ pairs, Rb-82 and Y-86 produce the highest self-absorbed and cross-absorbed S-values, respectively, while Cu-64 produces the lowest S-values because of the low-energy and high-frequency of electron emissions. Most of the total self-absorbed S-values are contributed from nonpenetrating particles (electrons and positrons), which have a linear relationship with body weight. The dependence of self-absorbed S-values of the two annihilation photons varies to the reciprocal of 0.76 power of the mass, whereas the self-absorbed S-values of positrons vary according to the reciprocal mass.Conclusions: The produced S-values for common positron-emitting radionuclides can be exploited for the assessment of radiation dose delivered to the pediatric population from various PET

  20. Respiratory tract clearance model for dosimetry and bioassay of inhaled radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, M.R.; Birchall, A. (National Radiological Protection Board, Chilton (UK)); Cuddihy, R.G. (Inhalation Toxicology Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); James, A.C. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Roy, M. (CEA Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire)

    1990-07-01

    The ICRP Task Group on Respiratory Tract Models is developing a model to describe the retention and clearance of deposited radionuclides for dose-intake calculations and interpretation of bioassay data. Clearance from each region is treated as competition between mechanical transport, which moves particles to the gastro-intestinal tract and lymph nodes, and the translocation of material to blood. It is assumed that mechanical transport rates are the same for all materials, and that rates of translocation to blood are the same in all regions. Time-dependent clearance is represented by combinations of compartments. Representative values of parameters to describe mechanical transport from the human respiratory tract have been estimated, and guidance is given on the determination of translocation rates. It is emphasized that the current version of the model described here is still provisional. 30 refs.

  1. Manufacture of polystyrene phantoms for beta radiation dosimetry; Confeccao de objetos simuladores em poliestireno para dosimetria da radiacao beta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Marcia L.; Caldas, Linda V.E. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: mlolivei@ipen.br; lcaldas@ipen.br

    2005-07-01

    {sup 90}Sr+{sup 90}Y beta radiation sources should be specified in terms of absorbed dose rate to water, following recent international recommendations. Due to the high dose gradients near source surfaces, the accurate determination of the distances involved in calibration procedures is extremely important, since the calibration of these sources is performed at 1 mm from their surfaces, in their central symmetry axis. To guarantee the adequate and reproducible positioning between the source during the calibration procedure and the radiation detector, the use of solid phantoms is convenient. Recent papers show that the most appropriate material as water substitute for beta radiation is the polystyrene. In this work, polystyrene phantoms were manufactured for thermoluminescent samples of LiF, CaF{sub 2}:Dy and CaF{sub 2}:Mn. A {sup 90}Sr+{sup 90}Y plane applicator was utilized to irradiate the samples. The maximum sample response variation was equal to: 4.9% for LiF; 3.7% for CaF{sub 2}:Dy; and 3.3% for CaF{sub 2}:Mn. The obtained results show the feasibility of the use of polystyrene phantoms in beta radiation dosimetry. The low cost phantoms guaranteed the reproducible positioning between the {sup 90}Sr+{sup 90}Y source and the samples, as desired. (author)

  2. 3D dosimetry in patients with early breast cancer undergoing Intraoperative Avidination for Radionuclide Therapy (IART {sup registered}) combined with external beam radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrari, Mahila E.; Cremonesi, Marta; Di Dia, Amalia; Botta, Francesca; Pedroli, Guido [European Institute of Oncology, Division of Medical Physics, Milan (Italy); De Cicco, Concetta; Calabrese, Michele; Paganelli, Giovanni [European Institute of Oncology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Milan (Italy); Sarnelli, Anna [IRCCS Istituto Romagnolo per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori, Medical Physics Unit, Meldola, FC (Italy); Pedicini, Piernicola [Centro Regionale Oncologico Basilicata (IRCCS-CROB), Department of Radiation Oncology, Rionero in Vulture, PZ (Italy); Orecchia, Roberto [European Institute of Oncology, Division of Radiotherapy, Milan (Italy)

    2012-11-15

    Intraoperative Avidination for Radionuclide Therapy (IART {sup registered}) is a novel targeted radionuclide therapy recently used in patients with early breast cancer. It is a radionuclide approach with {sup 90}Y-biotin combined with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) to release a boost of radiation in the tumour bed. Two previous clinical trials using dosimetry based on the calculation of mean absorbed dose values with the hypothesis of uniform activity distribution (MIRD 16 method) assessed the feasibility and safety of IART {sup registered}. In the present retrospective study, a voxel dosimetry analysis was performed to investigate heterogeneity in distribution of the absorbed dose. The aim of this work was to compare dosimetric and radiobiological evaluations derived from average absorbed dose vs. voxel absorbed dose approaches. We evaluated 14 patients who were injected with avidin into the tumour bed after conservative surgery and 1 day later received an intravenous injection of 3.7 GBq of {sup 90}Y-biotin (together with 185 MBq {sup 111}In-biotin for imaging). Sequential images were used to estimate the absorbed dose in the target region according to the standard dosimetry method (SDM) and the voxel dosimetry method (VDM). The biologically effective dose (BED) distribution was also evaluated. Dose/volume and BED volume histograms were generated to derive equivalent uniform BED (EUBED) and equivalent uniform dose (EUD) values. No ''cold spots'' were highlighted by voxel dosimetry. The median absorbed-dose in the target region was 20 Gy (range 15-27 Gy) by SDM, and the median EUD was 20.4 Gy (range 16.5-29.4 Gy) by the VDM; SDM and VDM estimates differed by about 6 %. The EUD/mean voxel absorbed dose ratio was >0.9 in all patients, indicative of acceptable uniformity in the target. The median BED and EUBED values were 21.8 Gy (range 15.9-29.3 Gy) and 22.8 Gy (range 17.3-31.8 Gy), respectively. VDM highlighted the absence of significant

  3. Relationship between internal dosimetry and DNA double strand breaks in lymphocytes after radionuclide therapy; Zusammenhang zwischen physikalischer Dosimetrie und DNA Doppelstrangbruechen in Lymphozyten nach Radionuklidtherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eberlein, Uta

    2015-09-30

    In radionuclide therapy radiopharmaceuticals are administered mostly systemically. Primarily, beta-emitters are used because of their short range in tissue. As a result the radiopharmaceutical distributes within the human body and accumulates in organs and target structures. Thus, the body is irradiated internally, in contrast to external irradiation in radiotherapy. The pattern of the activity distribution within the human body is determined by the physical and chemical properties of the radiopharmaceutical. Furthermore, the amount of activity and its accumulation in organs or tissues is essential for the calculation of the absorbed dose which defines the energy deposited in the body by ionizing radiation. During internal or external irradiation, patients are exposed to ionizing radiation which does not only destroy the malignant cells but also damages healthy tissue and cells. This is mainly caused by direct and indirect interaction of the radiation with the DNA which damages the DNA structure. Most frequently, there are single strand breaks and base damages. DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) are rare; nevertheless, they are the most critical lesions for cells as repairing the damage is difficult. Unrepaired or misrepaired DNA could cause mutations, chromosomal aberrations or lead to cell death. The formation of a DNA DSB in nuclear chromatin results in the rapid phosphorylation of the histone H2 variant H2AX, then called gamma-H2AX. Furthermore, DSBs also recruit the damage sensor 53BP1 to the chromatin surrounding the DSBs, which leads to 53BP1 and gamma-H2AX co-localization in the chromatin surrounding a DSB. By immunofluorescence staining with gamma-H2AX and 53BP1 antibodies those biomarkers can be addressed by microscopically visible DNA damage protein foci, this is also known as the DNA damage focus assay. With progression of DSB repair, gamma-H2AX and 53BP1 foci disappear. It is assumed that one focus corresponds to one DSB. Therefore, the number of foci per

  4. Considerations of beta and electron transport in internal dose calculations. Final progress report, 1994--1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolch, W.E. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States). Dept. of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering

    1998-12-31

    This research focused on the following major tasks: improved dosimetric models of the head and brain; development of improved skeletal dosimetry models; development of dosimetric techniques for nonuniform activity distributions; pediatric dosimetry phantoms and radionuclide S values; microdosimetry of beta emitters in radioimmunotherapy; and mechanisms of molecular radiation damage.

  5. Thermoluminescent dosimetry of new phosphors of Zn O exposed to beta radiation; Dosimetria termoluminiscente de nuevos fosforos de ZnO expuestos a radiacion beta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz V, C.; Burruel I, S.E.; Grijalva M, H. [UNISON, A.P. 130, Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Barboza F, M.; Bernal, R. [CIF, UNISON, A.P. 5-088, Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    In this work, we report the thermoluminescence dosimetry of a new Zn O phosphor obtained by annealing of Zn S powder precipitated when Zn S films were grown by employing a CBD method. The collected Zn S powder was pressed in a die to form pellets which were subjected to different thermal treatments under air atmosphere. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns and energy-dispersive X-ray Spectrometry (EDS) analyses confirmed the transformation of Zn S to Zn O. The phosphors thus obtained were exposed to high doses of beta radiation and their thermoluminescent dosimetry show that these new phosphors are materials suitable to be used in high dose thermoluminescence dosimetry. (Author)

  6. Development of A phantom for ophthalmic beta source applicator quality control using TL dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, N. A.; da Rosa, L. A. R.; Braz, D.

    2015-11-01

    Concave eye applicators with 90Sr/90Y and 106Ru/106Rh beta ray sources are usually used in brachytherapy for the treatment of superficial intraocular tumors as uveal melanoma with thickness up to 5 mm. The calculation of the dose delivered to the eye is carried out based on the data present in the beta source calibration certificate. Therefore, it would be interesting to have a system that could evaluate that dose. In this work, an eye phantom to be used with 106Ru/106Rh betatherapy applicators was developed in solid water. This phantom can hold nine micro-cube thermoluminescent (TL) dosimeters, TLD-100. The characteristics of the TL response of the dosimeters, namely reproducibility and individual sensitivity, were determined for a 60Co source. Using Monte Carlo code MCNPX, the dose to a water eye was determined at different depths. Exposing the eye phantom with TL dosimeters to the 106Ru/106Rh applicator, it is possible to assess calibration factors using the dose values obtained by Monte Carlo simulation to each depth. Using mean calibration factors, dose values obtained by TL dosimetry were compared to the data present in the applicators certificate. Mean differences for both applicators were lower than ±10%, maximum value 17% and minimum value 0.08%. Considering that the certificate values present an uncertainty of ±20%, the calibration procedure and the developed phantom are validated and can be applied.

  7. Experimental studies of the early effects of inhaled beta-emitting radionuclides for nuclear accident risk assessment: Phase 2 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, B.R.; Hahn, F.F.; Newton, G.J.; Snipes, M.B.; Damon, E.G.; Mauderly, J.L.; Boecker, B.B.; Gray, D.H.

    1987-11-01

    This report summarizes a series of experiments concerning the effect of linear energy transfer and temporal radiation dose pattern to the lung from inhaled beta-emitting radionuclides. The results were used to test the validity of a hazard-function mathematical model for predicting death from radiation pneumonitis. Both morbidity and mortality within 18 months after exposure were examined in rats exposed to beta-emitting radionuclides, giving brief or protracted irradiation of the lung or having weak or strong beta emissions. Protraction of the radiation dose to the lung from a half-time in the lung of less than three days to a half-time with a long-term component of about 150 days has a sparing effect. The median lethal dose for the protracted irradiation is about 1.7 times the median lethal dose for the brief irradiation. Low energy beta emissions from /sup 147/Pm have a similar effectiveness in producing lethal injury as high energy beta emissions from /sup 90/Sr. Changes in three parameters of morbidity were measured: body weight, hematology and pulmonary function; only changes in pulmonary function correlated well with pulmonary radiation injury. The doses of radiation required to produce impaired function, however, were not significantly different from those that produced death. The hazard-function model for predicting death from radiation pneumonitis, which was developed from previously obtained data for inhalation exposures of dogs to beta-emitting radionuclides, adequately predicted the median lethal doses for rats receiving one of several different beta dose rate patterns to the lung, thus strengthening the validity of the mathematical model. 23 refs., 41 figs., 12 tabs.

  8. Impact of PET and MRI threshold-based tumor volume segmentation on patient-specific targeted radionuclide therapy dosimetry using CLR1404

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besemer, Abigail E.; Titz, Benjamin; Grudzinski, Joseph J.; Weichert, Jamey P.; Kuo, John S.; Robins, H. Ian; Hall, Lance T.; Bednarz, Bryan P.

    2017-08-01

    Variations in tumor volume segmentation methods in targeted radionuclide therapy (TRT) may lead to dosimetric uncertainties. This work investigates the impact of PET and MRI threshold-based tumor segmentation on TRT dosimetry in patients with primary and metastatic brain tumors. In this study, PET/CT images of five brain cancer patients were acquired at 6, 24, and 48 h post-injection of 124I-CLR1404. The tumor volume was segmented using two standardized uptake value (SUV) threshold levels, two tumor-to-background ratio (TBR) threshold levels, and a T1 Gadolinium-enhanced MRI threshold. The dice similarity coefficient (DSC), jaccard similarity coefficient (JSC), and overlap volume (OV) metrics were calculated to compare differences in the MRI and PET contours. The therapeutic 131I-CLR1404 voxel-level dose distribution was calculated from the 124I-CLR1404 activity distribution using RAPID, a Geant4 Monte Carlo internal dosimetry platform. The TBR, SUV, and MRI tumor volumes ranged from 2.3-63.9 cc, 0.1-34.7 cc, and 0.4-11.8 cc, respectively. The average  ±  standard deviation (range) was 0.19  ±  0.13 (0.01-0.51), 0.30  ±  0.17 (0.03-0.67), and 0.75  ±  0.29 (0.05-1.00) for the JSC, DSC, and OV, respectively. The DSC and JSC values were small and the OV values were large for both the MRI-SUV and MRI-TBR combinations because the regions of PET uptake were generally larger than the MRI enhancement. Notable differences in the tumor dose volume histograms were observed for each patient. The mean (standard deviation) 131I-CLR1404 tumor doses ranged from 0.28-1.75 Gy GBq-1 (0.07-0.37 Gy GBq-1). The ratio of maximum-to-minimum mean doses for each patient ranged from 1.4-2.0. The tumor volume and the interpretation of the tumor dose is highly sensitive to the imaging modality, PET enhancement metric, and threshold level used for tumor volume segmentation. The large variations in tumor doses clearly demonstrate the need for standard

  9. Partial-body dosimetry for photons and beta radiation; Teilkoerperdosimetrie fuer Photonen und Betastrahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behrens, Rolf [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Braunschweig (Germany). Arbeitsgruppe ' Betadosimetrie'

    2013-06-15

    After a description of typical application positions of partial-body dosimetry in medicine the technical details of such dosemeters mostly based on thermoluminescence detectors are described. then especially eye and finger-ring dosemeters are described more detailedly. Finally different applied dosemeter types are considered. (HSI)

  10. Feasibility of the $\\beta^-$ Radio-Guided Surgery with a Variety of Radio-Nuclides of Interest to Nuclear Medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Mancini-Terracciano, Carlo; Bencivenga, Gaia; Bocci, Valerio; Cartoni, Antonella; Collamati, Francesco; Fratoddi, Ilaria; Giordano, Alessandro; Indovina, Luca; Marafini, Michela; Morganti, Silvio; Rotili, Dante; Russomando, Andrea; Scotognella, Teresa; Camillocci, Elena Solfaroli; Toppi, Marco; Traini, Giacomo; Venditti, Iole; Faccini, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    The $\\beta^-$ based radio-guided surgery overcomes the corresponding $\\gamma$ technique in case the background from healthy tissues is relevant. It can be used only in case a radio-tracer marked with $^{90}$Y is available since the current probe prototype was optimized for the emission spectrum of this radio-nuclide. Here we study, with a set of laboratory tests and simulations, the prototype capability in case a different radio-nuclide is chosen among those used in nuclear medicine. As a result we estimate the probe efficiency on electrons and photons as a function of energy and we evaluate the feasibility of a radio-guided surgery exploiting the selected radio-nuclides. We conclude that requiring a 0.1~ml residue to be detected within 1~s by administering 3~MBq/Kg of radio-isotope, the current probe prototype would yield a significant signal in a vast range of values of SUV and TNR in case $^{31}$Si,$^{32}$P, $^{97}$Zr, and $^{188}$Re are used. Conversely, a tuning of the detector would be needed to efficie...

  11. Dosimetry characterization of the commercial CaF{sub 2} for beta radiation of {sup 90}Sr + {sup 90}Y; Caracterizacao dosimetrica de CaF{sub 2} comercial para radiacao beta de {sup 90}Sr + {sup 90}Y

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Mercia L.; Caldas, Linda V.E. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], e-mail: mlolivei@ipen.br, e-mail: lcaldas@ipen.br

    2003-07-01

    This work studies the dosimetric characteristics of the CaF{sub 2} commercial dosimetry for detection of {sup 90}Sr + {sup 90}Y beta radiation for using in the calibration of flat and concave appliers. Were determined the repetitiousness and linearity of answers of the samples, and their calibration curves.

  12. Individualized dosimetry-based activity reduction of {sup 90}Y-DOTATOC prevents severe and rapid kidney function deterioration from peptide receptor radionuclide therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binnebeek, Sofie van; Baete, Kristof; Vanbilloen, Bert; Terwinghe, Christelle; Mortelmans, Luc [University Hospitals Leuven, Nuclear Medicine, Leuven (Belgium); KU Leuven, Department of Imaging and Pathology, Leuven (Belgium); Koole, Michel [University Medical Centre Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Groningen (Netherlands); Mottaghy, Felix M. [University Hospital Aachen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany); Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht (Netherlands); Clement, Paul M. [University Hospitals Leuven, Medical Oncology, Leuven (Belgium); KU Leuven, Laboratory of Experimental Oncology, Leuven (Belgium); Haustermans, Karin [University Hospitals Leuven, Radiation Oncology, Leuven (Belgium); KU Leuven, Department of Oncology, Leuven (Belgium); Cutsem, Eric van; Verslype, Chris [KU Leuven, Department of Oncology, Leuven (Belgium); University Hospitals Leuven, Division of Digestive Oncology, Leuven (Belgium); Verbruggen, Alfons [KU Leuven, Laboratory for Radiopharmacy, Leuven (Belgium); Bogaerts, Kris [KU Leuven, Division of Public Health and Primary Care (I-Biostat), Leuven (Belgium); Deroose, Christophe M. [University Hospitals Leuven, Nuclear Medicine, Leuven (Belgium); KU Leuven, Department of Imaging and Pathology, Leuven (Belgium); UZ Leuven, Nuclear Medicine, Leuven (Belgium)

    2014-06-15

    Assessment of kidney function evolution after {sup 90}Y-DOTATOC peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) with capped activity administration based on a 37-Gy threshold of biological effective dose (BED) to the kidney. In a prospective phase II study, patients with metastasized neuroendocrine tumours were evaluated for therapy using 185 MBq {sup 111}In-pentetreotide with amino acid coinfusion. Planar whole-body images were acquired at four time-points after injection and kidney volumes were measured using CT/MRI. BED to the kidneys was estimated using an extended BED formula and biexponential renal clearance. Based on published BED dose-toxicity relationships, we allowed a maximal kidney BED of 37 Gy; if the calculated BED exceeded 37 Gy, treatment activity was reduced accordingly. Kidney function was assessed at baseline and at 18 months, predominantly using {sup 51}Cr-EDTA. The rate of renal function decline was expressed as annual glomerular filtration rate loss (aGFRL). Only 22 of 50 patients reached the 18-months time-point, with most missing patients having died due to disease progression. In the 22 patients who reached 18 months, no rapid kidney function deterioration was observed over the 18 months, aGFRL >33 % was not seen, and only three patients showed an increase of one toxicity grade and one patient an increase of two grades. No significant correlations between kidney volume (p = 0.35), baseline GFR (p = 0.18), risk factors for renal function loss (p = 0.74) and aGFRL were observed. Among the 28 patients who did not reach 18 months, one developed grade 4 kidney toxicity at 15 months after PRRT. Prospective dosimetry using a 37 Gy BED as the threshold for kidney toxicity is a good guide for {sup 90}Y-DOTATOC PRRT and is associated with a low risk of rapid renal function deterioration and evolution to severe nephrotoxicity. (orig.)

  13. Development of a portable triple silicon detector telescope for beta spectroscopy and skin dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helt-Hansen, J

    2000-11-01

    It is now recognized that beta radiation can be a significant radiation problem for exposure of the skin. There is thus a need for a portable and rugged active beta dosemeter-spectrometer to carry out immediate measurements of doses and energies of beta particles even in the presence of photon radiation. The main objective of this report is to describe the development of such an instrument. A beta-spectrometer has been developed consisting of three silicon surface barrier detectors with the thickness: 50{mu}m/150{mu}m/7000{mu}m covered by a 2 {mu}m thick titanium window. The spectrometer is capable of measuring electron energies from 50 keV to 3.5 MeV. The spectrometer is characterized by a compact low weight design, achieved by digital signal processing beginning at an early stage in the signal chain. 255 channels are available for each of the three detectors. The spectrometer is controlled by a laptop computer, which also handles all subsequent data analysis. By use of coincidence/anti-coincidence considerations of the absorbed energy in the three detector elements, counts caused by electrons are separated from those originating from photons. The electron energy distribution is multiplied by a set of conversion coefficients to obtain the dose at 0.07 mm tissue. Monte Carlo calculations has been used to derive the conversion coefficients and to investigate the influence of noise and the design of detector assembly on the performance of the spectrometer. This report describes the development of the spectrometer and its mode of operation, followed by a description of the Monte Carlo calculations carried out to obtain the conversion coefficients. Finally is the capability of the telescope spectrometer to measure beta and photon spectra as well as beta dose rates in pure beta and mixed beta/photon radiation fields described. (au)

  14. Dosimetry; La dosimetrie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Couteulx, I.; Apretna, D.; Beaugerie, M.F. [Electricite de France (EDF), 75 - Paris (France)] [and others

    2003-07-01

    Eight articles treat the dosimetry. Two articles evaluate the radiation doses in specific cases, dosimetry of patients in radiodiagnosis, three articles are devoted to detectors (neutrons and x and gamma radiations) and a computer code to build up the dosimetry of an accident due to an external exposure. (N.C.)

  15. Bone marrow dosimetry in peptide receptor radionuclide therapy with [{sup 177}Lu-DOTA{sup 0},Tyr{sup 3}]octreotate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forrer, Flavio; Krenning, Eric P.; Kooij, Peter P.; Bernard, Bert F.; Bakker, Willem H.; Teunissen, Jaap J.M.; Jong, Marion de; Kwekkeboom, Dik J. [Erasmus MC Rotterdam, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Konijnenberg, Mark [Mallinckrodt Medical BV, Research and Development, Petten (Netherlands); Lom, Kirsten van [Erasmus MC Rotterdam, Department of Haematology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Herder, Wouter W. de [Erasmus MC Rotterdam, Department of Internal Medicine, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2009-07-15

    Adequate dosimetry is mandatory for effective and safe peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT). Besides the kidneys, the bone marrow is a potentially dose-limiting organ. The radiation dose to the bone marrow is usually calculated according to the MIRD scheme, where the accumulated activity in the bone marrow is calculated from the accumulated radioactivity of the radiopharmaceutical in the blood. This may underestimate the absorbed dose since stem cells express somatostatin receptors. We verified the blood-based method by comparing the activity in the blood with the radioactivity in bone marrow aspirates. Also, we evaluated the absorbed cross-dose from the source organs (liver, spleen, kidneys and blood), tumours and the so-called ''remainder of the body'' to the bone marrow. Bone marrow aspirates were drawn in 15 patients after treatment with [{sup 177}Lu-DOTA{sup 0},Tyr{sup 3}]octreotate. Radioactivity in the bone marrow was compared with radioactivity in the blood drawn simultaneously. The nucleated cell fraction was isolated from the bone marrow aspirate and radioactivity was measured. The absorbed dose to the bone marrow was calculated. The results were correlated to the change in platelet counts 6 weeks after treatment. A strong linear correlation and high agreement between the measured radioactivities in the bone marrow aspirates and in the blood was found (r=0.914, p<0.001). No correlation between the calculated absorbed dose in the bone marrow and the change in platelets was found. There was a considerable contribution from other organs and the remainder of the body to the bone marrow absorbed dose. (1) After PRRT with [{sup 177}Lu-DOTA{sup 0},Tyr{sup 3}]octreotate, the radioactivity concentration in the bone marrow is identical to that in the blood; (2) There is no significant binding of the radiopharmaceutical to bone marrow precursor stem cells; (3) The contribution of the cross dose from source organs and tumours to the bone

  16. Determination of dose rates from natural radionuclides in dental materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veronese, I. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Milan (Italy) and INFN, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Milano, Milan (Italy)]. E-mail: ivan.veronese@unimi.it; Guzzi, G. [AIRMEB - Italian Association for Metal and Biocompatibility Research, Milan (Italy); Giussani, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Milan (Italy); INFN, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Milano, Milan (Italy); Cantone, M.C. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Milan (Italy); INFN, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Milano, Milan (Italy); Ripamonti, D. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Milan (Italy)

    2006-07-01

    Different types of materials used for dental prosthetics restoration, including feldspathic ceramics, glass ceramics, zirconia-based ceramics, alumina-based ceramics, and resin-based materials, were investigated with regard to content of natural radionuclides by means of thermoluminescence beta dosimetry and gamma spectrometry. The gross beta dose rate from feldspathic and glass ceramics was about ten times higher than the background measurement, whereas resin-based materials generated negligible beta dose rate, similarly to natural tooth samples. The specific activity of uranium and thorium was significantly below the levels found in the period when addition of uranium to dental porcelain materials was still permitted. The high-beta dose levels observed in feldspathic porcelains and glass ceramics are thus mainly ascribable to {sup 4}K, naturally present in these specimens. Although the measured values are below the recommended limits, results indicate that patients with prostheses are subject to higher dose levels than other members of the population. Alumina- and zirconia-based ceramics might be a promising alternative, as they have generally lower beta dose rates than the conventional porcelain materials. However, the dosimetry results, which imply the presence of inhomogeneously distributed clusters of radionuclides in the sample matrix, and the still unsuitable structural properties call for further optimization of these materials.

  17. Responses of different dosemeters in beta dosimetry of {sup 106}Ru/{sup 106}Rh ophthalmic applicators;Respostas de diferentes dosimetros termoluminescentes na dosimetria beta de aplicadores oftalmicos de {sup 106}Ru/{sup 106}Rh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, D.F.P.; Daros, K.A.C.; Segreto, R.A.; Medeiros, R.B. [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    This work presents the TL response of three kinds of dosimeters from different manufacturing characteristics under irradiation of 106 Ru / 106 Rh sealed sources used in ophthalmic brachytherapy. They are: Ca SO{sub 4}:Dy + teflon (D- Ca SO{sub 4}:Dy -0,4), LiF:Mg, Ti (TLD-100) and Ca SO{sub 4}:Dy (TLD-900). Some of reports accepted by scientific community (NCS report 14 e ICRU report 72) as reference in the quality control of beta applicators dosimetry recommend that the absorbed dose standard uncertainties can be kept below 20%. The TLD Ca SO{sub 4}:Dy + teflon presented proper sensibility and high precision comparing with the others. Considering the similar dimensions of ophthalmic tumors and aside critical structures it is relevant to reduce undesirable effects due to the irradiation of these structures. Therefore, the quality control in the beta dosimetry using this kind of source is a constant challenge. (author)

  18. MIRD radionuclide data and decay schemes

    CERN Document Server

    Eckerman, Keith F

    2007-01-01

    For all physicians, scientists, and physicists working in the nuclear medicine field, the MIRD: Radionuclide Data and Decay Schemes updated edition is an essential sourcebook for radiation dosimetry and understanding the properties of radionuclides. Includes CD Table of Contents Decay schemes listed by atomic number Radioactive decay processes Serial decay schemes Decay schemes and decay tables This essential reference for nuclear medicine physicians, scientists and physicists also includes a CD with tabulations of the radionuclide data necessary for dosimetry calculations.

  19. Counting efficiency for radionuclides decaying by beta and gamma-ray emission; Calculo de la eficiencia de recuento de nucleidos que experimentan desintegracion beta y desexcitacion gamma simple

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grau, A.; Garcia-Torano, E.

    1988-07-01

    In this paper, counting efficiency vs figure of merit for beta and gamma-ray emitters has been computed. It is assumed that the decay scheme has only a gamma level and the beta-ray emission may be coincident with the gamma-rays or the internal-conversion electrons. The radionuclides tabulated are: 20 {sub 0}, 20{sub p}, 28{sub A}l, 35{sub p}, 41{sub A}r, 42{sub K}, 47{sub S}e, 62{sub F}e, 66{sub C}u, 81{sub G}e, 86{sub B}b, 108{sub R}u, 112{sub p}d, 121{sub S}n(Ni), 122{sub I}n, 129{sub I}, 141{sub C}e 171{sub T}m, 194{sub O}s, 2O3{sub H}g, 205{sub H}g, 210{sub p}b, 225{sub R}a, 142{sub p}r, 151{sub S}m, 244{sub A}m(m). It has been assumed that the liquid is a toluene based scintillator solution in standard glass vials containing 10 cm''3. (Author) 8 refs.

  20. Laser heating of thermoluminescent films: Dose mapping applied to beta dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Setzkorn, R.; Prévost, H.; Gasiot, J.

    1996-01-01

    and angular responses of CaSO4:Dy-based TL foils for irradiation in air with beta rays (Pm-147, (TI)-T-204 and Sr-90/Y-90). Laser scanning results are compared with results from measurements using very thin graphite-mixed MgB4O7Dy TL detectors. Results show that detectors based on CaSO4:Dy films...

  1. Quantitative imaging for clinical dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardiès, Manuel; Flux, Glenn; Lassmann, Michael; Monsieurs, Myriam; Savolainen, Sauli; Strand, Sven-Erik

    2006-12-01

    Patient-specific dosimetry in nuclear medicine is now a legal requirement in many countries throughout the EU for targeted radionuclide therapy (TRT) applications. In order to achieve that goal, an increased level of accuracy in dosimetry procedures is needed. Current research in nuclear medicine dosimetry should not only aim at developing new methods to assess the delivered radiation absorbed dose at the patient level, but also to ensure that the proposed methods can be put into practice in a sufficient number of institutions. A unified dosimetry methodology is required for making clinical outcome comparisons possible.

  2. Calibration of radionuclides with decay trough beta emission or electron capture by liquid scintillation technique; Calibracao de radionuclideos que decaem por emissao beta ou por captura eletronica pela tecnica de cintilacao liquida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loureiro, Jamir dos Santos

    2000-02-01

    In this work is reported a methodology a methodology for pure beta and electron capture radionuclides standardization, suing liquid scintillation technique. In this sense the CIEMAT/NIST method, recently utilized by international laboratories, was implemented and the lack in the Laboratorio Nacional das Radiacoes Ionizantes - LNMRI, of the Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear - CNEN, for adequate methodology to standardize this kind if radionuclides was filled, fact that was not present with alpha and gamma radionuclides. The implementation procedure evaluation was provided by concentration activity determination of the following radionuclides: {sup 14} C and {sup 90} Sr, pure beta emitters; {sup 55} Fe, electron capture decay; {sup 204} Tl, electron capture and beta decay and {sup 60} Co, beta-gamma emitter. In this way, a careful analysis of the implementation procedure with these radionuclides types, ranging on a broad energy spectral, was possible. To check the calibration results, intercomparisons among our measurements of these radionuclides and the reference values of the CIEMAT/Spain laboratory were provided. To check the calibration results, intercomparisons among our measurements of these radionuclides and the reference values of the CIEMAT/Spain laboratory were provided. Besides this intercomparisons, one was provided with a {sup 204} Tl solution, utilized in the international comparison recently promoted by BIPM, and another one with a {sup 60} C solution calibrated in LNMRI/CNEN previously by a relative calibration system, with a well type pressurized ionization chamber, and an absolute beta-gamma coincidence system, with a pill-box type proportional counter 4 {pi} geometry, coupled with a scintillator system with a sodium iodide cristal of 4x4 inches. The comparisons among LNMRI/CNEN results and the reference values, showed a small deviation of 1,32% for {sup 14} C, 0,40% for {sup 60} Co, 1,12% for {sup 55} Fe, 0,10% for {sup 90} Sr and 0,73% for {sup

  3. Studies on stabilities of some human chorionic gonadotropin complexes with {beta}-emitting radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maiti, Moumita [Chemical Sciences Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Sen, Kamalika [Department of Chemistry, University of Calcutta, 92 APC Road, Kolkata 700009 (India); Sen, Souvik [Malda Town Divisional Railway Hospital, Malda 732102 (India); Lahiri, Susanta, E-mail: susanta.lahiri@saha.ac.i [Chemical Sciences Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India)

    2011-02-15

    Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is a peptide hormone, whose one of the structural subunits is identical to that of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). As a consequence, the receptors of TSH also act as receptor for hCG hormone. Keeping in mind this interesting property of hCG we have studied the complex formation ability of various no-carrier-added {beta}-emitting isotopes of {sup 61}Cu (3.3 h), {sup 62}Zn (9.2 h), {sup 90}Nb (14.60 h) and {sup 99}Mo (66.02 h) with hCG molecule. Stability of the hCG-M (M=metal ions) complexes was investigated by dialysis with respect to triple distilled water and ringer lactate solution, which has the same composition as extracellular fluid.

  4. Age-specific models for evaluating dose and risk from internal exposures to radionuclides: Report of current work of the Metabolism and Dosimetry Research Group, July 1, 1985-June 30, 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leggett, R.W.; Warren, B.P. (eds.)

    1987-09-01

    A projection of the health risk to a population internally exposed to a radionuclide requires explicit or implicit use of demographic, biokinetic, dosimetric, and dose-response models. Exposure guidelines have been based on models for a reference adult with a fixed life span. In this report, we describe recent efforts to develop a comprehensive methodology for estimation of radiogenic risk to individuals and to heterogeneous populations. Emphasis is on age-dependent biokinetics and dosimetry for internal emitters, but consideration also is given to conversion of age-specific doses to estimates of risk using realistic, site-specific demographic models and best available age-specific dose-response functions. We discuss how the methods described here may also improve estimates for the reference adult usually considered in radiation protection. 159 refs.

  5. Assessment and management of risks associated with exposures to Auger- and beta-emitting radionuclides. Recommendations and proposals for lines of research; L'evaluation et la gestion des risques associes aux expositions aux radionucleides emetteurs Auger et beta. Avis et propositions de pistes de recherche

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    The assessment and management of risks associated with exposures to ionising radiation are defined by the general radiological protection system, proposed by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). This system is regarded by a large majority of users as a robust system with well-established relevance for the management and prevention of exposures. Despite this, there are a number of dissenting voices, claiming that this system is not suitable for estimating the risks resulting from internal exposures, particularly when incorporated radionuclides decay, emitting electrons. Criticisms of the system particularly pertain to Auger- and beta-emitting radionuclides, the intake of which can occur during environmental and industrial exposures or, simply, during a medical use of ionising radiation for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. These debates result from a lack of data in the fields of dosimetry and toxicology of these radionuclides. Auger and beta emitters can be distributed preferentially in certain tissue structures and even in certain cellular organelles, according to the vector with which they are associated. Given the limited range of electrons in matter, this heterogeneous distribution can generate highly localised energy depositions, not taken into account in conventional dosimetry methods, which make the assumption of uniform energy depositions. These specific physical and biochemical features of some of these radionuclides seem to influence their cellular toxicity directly. It is thus established that intranuclear distribution of iodine-125 is more effective for the induction of mutations or even cell death than a cytosolic distribution. This point is explained by the very short range of Auger electrons in matter (around a few dozen nm), which, in the case of an intranuclear distribution, would deliver all of their energy in the vicinity of the DNA, which, if affected, would be detrimental to the survival of the cell. The observation

  6. Nuclear medicine radiation dosimetry

    CERN Document Server

    McParland, Brian J

    2010-01-01

    Complexities of the requirements for accurate radiation dosimetry evaluation in both diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine (including PET) have grown over the past decade. This is due primarily to four factors: growing consideration of accurate patient-specific treatment planning for radionuclide therapy as a means of improving the therapeutic benefit, development of more realistic anthropomorphic phantoms and their use in estimating radiation transport and dosimetry in patients, design and use of advanced Monte Carlo algorithms in calculating the above-mentioned radiation transport and

  7. The effect of the beta-emitting yttrium-90 citrate on the dose-response of dicentric chromosomes in human lymphocytes: a basis for biological dosimetry after radiosynoviorthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, E; Selbach, H-J; Voth, M; Pinkert, J; Gildehaus, F J; Klett, R; Haney, M

    2006-07-01

    The production of dicentric chromosomes in human lymphocytes by beta-particles of yttrium-90 (Y-90) was studied in vitro to provide a basis of biological dosimetry after radiosynoviorthesis (RSO) of persistent synovitis by intra-articular administration of yttrium-90 citrate colloid. Since the injected colloid may leak into the lymphatic drainage exposing other parts of the body to radiation, the measurement of biological damage induced by beta-particles of Y-90 is important for the assessment of radiation risk to the patients. A linear dose-response relationship (alpha = 0.0229 +/- 0.0028 dicentric chromosomes per cell per gray) was found over the dose range of 0.2176-2.176 Gy. The absorbed doses were calculated for exposure of blood samples to Y-90 activities from 40 to 400 kBq using both Monte Carlo simulation and an analytical model. The maximum low-dose RBE, the RBE(M) which is equivalent to the ratio of the alpha coefficients of the dose-response curves, is well in line with published results obtained earlier for irradiation of blood of the same donor with heavily filtered 220 kV X-rays (3.35 mm copper), but half of the RBE(M) relative to weakly filtered 220 kV X-rays. Therefore, it can be concluded that for estimating an absorbed dose during RSO by the technique of biological dosimetry, in vitro and in vivo data for the same radiation quality are necessary.

  8. Hanford internal dosimetry program manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carbaugh, E.H.; Sula, M.J.; Bihl, D.E.; Aldridge, T.L.

    1989-10-01

    This document describes the Hanford Internal Dosimetry program. Program Services include administrating the bioassay monitoring program, evaluating and documenting assessments of internal exposure and dose, ensuring that analytical laboratories conform to requirements, selecting and applying appropriate models and procedures for evaluating internal radionuclide deposition and the resulting dose, and technically guiding and supporting Hanford contractors in matters regarding internal dosimetry. 13 refs., 16 figs., 42 tabs.

  9. Technical basis for internal dosimetry at Hanford

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sula, M.J.; Carbaugh, E.H.; Bihl, D.E.

    1991-07-01

    The Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program, administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Department of Energy, provides routine bioassay monitoring for employees who are potentially exposed to radionuclides in the workplace. This report presents the technical basis for routine bioassay monitoring and the assessment of internal dose at Hanford. The radionuclides of concern include tritium, corrosion products ({sup 58}Co, {sup 60}Co, {sup 54}Mn, and {sup 59}Fe), strontium, cesium, iodine, europium, uranium, plutonium, and americium,. Sections on each of these radionuclides discuss the sources and characteristics; dosimetry; bioassay measurements and monitoring; dose measurement, assessment, and mitigation and bioassay follow-up treatment. 78 refs., 35 figs., 115 tabs.

  10. Technical basis for internal dosimetry at Hanford

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sula, M.J.; Carbaugh, E.H.; Bihl, D.E.

    1989-04-01

    The Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program, administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Department of Energy, provides routine bioassay monitoring for employees who are potentially exposed to radionuclides in the workplace. This report presents the technical basis for routine bioassay monitoring and the assessment of internal dose at Hanford. The radionuclides of concern include tritium, corrosion products (/sup 58/Co, /sup 60/Co, /sup 54/Mn, and /sup 59/Fe), strontium, cesium, iodine, europium, uranium, plutonium, and americium. Sections on each of these radionuclides discuss the sources and characteristics; dosimetry; bioassay measurements and monitoring; dose measurement, assessment, and mitigation; and bioassay follow-up treatment. 64 refs., 42 figs., 118 tabs.

  11. Primary 4{pi}{beta}-{gamma} coincidence system for standardization of radionuclides by means of plastic scintillators; Sistema primario por coincidencias 4{pi}{beta}-{gamma} para a padronizacao de radionuclideos empregando cintiladores plasticos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baccarelli, Aida Maria

    2003-07-01

    The present work describes a 4{pi}({alpha},{beta})-{gamma} coincidence system for absolute measurement of radionuclide activity using a plastic scintillator in 4{pi} geometry for charged particles detection and a Nal (Tl) crystal for gamma-ray detection. Several shapes and dimensions of the plastic scintillator have been tried in order to obtain the best system configuration. Radionuclides which decay by alpha emission, {beta}{sup -}, {beta}{sup +} and electron capture have been standardized. The results showed excellent agreement with other conventional primary system which makes use of a 4{pi} proportional counter for X-ray and charged particle detection. The system developed in the present work have some advantages when compared with the conventional systems, namely; it does not need metal coating on the films used as radioactive source holders. When compared to liquid scintillators, is showed the advantage of not needing to be kept in dark for more than 24 h to allow phosphorescence decay of ambient light. Therefore it can be set to count immediately after the sources are placed inside of it. (author)

  12. Fetal organ dosimetry for the Techa River and Ozyorsk Offspring Cohorts. Pt. 2. Radionuclide S values for fetal self-dose and maternal cross-dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maynard, Matthew R.; Bolch, Wesley E. [University of Florida, Advanced Laboratory for Radiation Dosimetry Studies (ALRADS), J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering, Gainesville, FL (United States); Shagina, Natalia B.; Tolstykh, Evgenia I.; Degteva, Marina O. [Urals Research Center for Radiation Medicine, Chelyabinsk (Russian Federation); Fell, Tim P. [Centre for Radiation, Chemical, and Environmental Health, Didcot, Oxon (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-15

    One of the many objectives of the European Union's SOLO (Epidemiological Studies of Exposed Southern Urals Populations) project is to quantify the radiation dose-response following chronic in utero exposures to ionizing radiation. The project is presently conducting a pooled analysis of two cohorts of individuals born to exposed mothers - the Techa River Offspring Cohort (TROC) and the Ozyorsk Offspring Cohort (OOC). The TROC includes the offspring of mothers with external exposures to contaminated riverbanks and internal ingestions of {sup 89}Sr, {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y, and {sup 137}Cs/{sup 137m}Ba, while the OOC includes the offspring of mothers with external exposures seen within the Mayak plutonium production facilities and internal inhalation of {sup 239}Pu and possibly {sup 131}I. In the present study, a newly created Urals-based series of fetal and maternal models is employed to assess S values for all seven radionuclides. Among all fetal ages, S values ranged in magnitude from 10{sup -14} to 10{sup -10} Gy per Bq-s for fetal source organs and from 10{sup -18} to 10{sup -14} Gy per Bq-s from maternal source organs, depending upon particle type, particle energy, and fetal age. For a given radionuclide and fetal age, S values for fetal source organs were approximately two orders of magnitude higher than for maternal source organs. Little variation in S values was observed among fetal source organs, while variations of over 100 % with respect to the mean were observed for maternal source organs near the fetus. S value variations from maternal cross-fire were highly dependent on fetal position and separation distance from the maternal source organ. These radionuclide S values have been coupled with biokinetic models for use in cohort dose assessment within the SOLO project. (orig.)

  13. Radiation dosimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Hine, Gerald J; Hine, Gerald J

    1956-01-01

    Radiation Dosimetry focuses on the advancements, processes, technologies, techniques, and principles involved in radiation dosimetry, including counters and calibration and standardization techniques. The selection first offers information on radiation units and the theory of ionization dosimetry and interaction of radiation with matter. Topics include quantities derivable from roentgens, determination of dose in roentgens, ionization dosimetry of high-energy photons and corpuscular radiations, and heavy charged particles. The text then examines the biological and medical effects of radiation,

  14. Blood flow measurements in the irradiated pig skin using {beta} emitters radionuclides; Mesure de la circulation sanguine cutanee chez le porc irradie a l`aide de radioisotopes emetteurs {beta}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daburon, F.; Lefaix, J.L.; Leplat, J.J.; Fayart, G.; Delacroix, D.; Le Thanh, P.

    1997-01-01

    Non invasive methods of study of the skin blood flow are numerous, but generally do not give any indication on the cutaneous micro-circulatory flow, except for cutaneous laser Doppler. The isotopic exploration of the skin with injected {gamma} radionuclides, even of weak energy, doe snot allow to characterize the skin blood flow, because of the important contribution of the subcutaneous tissues. The use of {beta} emitters energy spectrum, analyzed by different quantitative methods, are proportional to the thickness of the screen localized between the radioactive source and detector. Using simple and complex phantoms composed of tissue equivalent screens, with {sup 32}P sources placed at different depths, it was possible to study the degradation of {beta} spectra, simulating respectively the sub-epidermis and sub-dermis vascular levels. A modelization and an experimental study in-vivo are proposed in this work, with {sup 32}P phosphate administered intravenously in pigs. (author).

  15. Hematological dosimetry. Dosimetrie hematologique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fluery-Herard, A. (CEA Centre d' Etudes de Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (FR). Direction des Sciences du Vivant)

    1991-01-01

    The principles of hematological dosimetry after acute or protracted whole-body irradiation are reviewed. In both cases, over-exposure is never homogeneous and the clinical consequences, viz medullary aplasia, are directly associated with the mean absorbed dose and the seriousness and location of the overexposure. The main hematological data required to assess the seriousness of exposure are the following: repeated blood analysis, blood precursor cultures, as indicators of whole-body exposure; bone marrow puncture, medullary precursor cultures and medullary scintigraphy as indicators of the importance of a local over-exposure and capacity for spontaneous repair. These paraclinical investigations, which are essential for diagnosis and dosimetry, are also used for surveillance and for the main therapeutic issues.

  16. Dosimetry Service

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Cern Staff and Users can now consult their dose records for an individual or an organizational unit with HRT. Please see more information on our web page: http://cern.ch/rp-dosimetry Dosimetry Service is open every morning from 8.30 - 12.00. Closed in the afternoons. We would like to remind you that dosimeters cannot be sent to customers by internal mail. Short-term dosimeters (VCT's) must always be returned to the Service after the use and must not be left on the racks in the experimental areas or in the secretariats. Dosimetry Service Tel. 7 2155 Dosimetry.service@cern.ch http://cern.ch/rp-dosimetry

  17. Study of a 4{pi}{beta}-{gamma} coincidence system for absolute radionuclide activity measurement using plastic scintillators; Estudo de um sistema de coincidencias 4{pi}{beta}-{gamma} para a medida absoluta de atividade de radionuclideos empregando cintiladores plasticos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piuvezam Filho, Helio

    2007-07-01

    The present work was intended to study a coincidence system 4{pi}(PS){beta}-{gamma} for absolute activity measurement using plastic scintillators in 4{pi} geometry. Along with experiments on the coincidence system, simulations were also performed applying the Monte Carlo Method, by means of codes PENELOPE and ESQUEMA. These simulations were performed in order to calculate the extrapolation curve of the coincidence system 4{pi}(PS){beta}-{gamma} and compare it to experimental data. A new geometry was proposed to the coincidence system adding up a second photomultiplier tube to the previous system for improving light collection from the plastic scintillator, as this system presented limitations in the minimum detected energy due to the presence of electronic noise and low gain. The results show that an improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio was obtained, as well as in the minimum detected energy. Moreover, there was an increase in the detection efficiency. With these modifications, it is now possible to calibrate radionuclides which emit low energy electrons or X-rays, increasing the number of radionuclides that can be standardized with this type of system.(author)

  18. Radiation dosimetry and biodistribution of the beta-amyloid plaque imaging tracer {sup 11}C-BTA-1 in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thees, S. [Ulm Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Leipzig Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Neumaier, B.; Glatting, G.; Deisenhofer, S.; Reske, S.N.; Mottaghy, F.M. [Ulm Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Arnim, C.A.F. von [Ulm Univ. (Germany). Abt. fuer Neurologie

    2007-07-01

    Aim: [N-methyl-{sup 11}C]2-(4'-(methylaminophenyl)-benzothiazole({sup 11}C-BTA-1)) is a thioflavin-T derivative that has been one of the promising PET tracers for imaging of amyloid plaque distribution in the Alzheimer patients brain in vivo. The biodistribution and dosimetry of this tracer in humans is presented and compared to the results of a previous dosimetry and biodistribution study of another thioflavin-T derivative [N-methyl-{sup 11}C]2-hydroxy-(4'-(methylaminophenyl)-benzothiazole ({sup 11}C-OH-BTA-1)) in baboons. Methods: Five subjects underwent 2D dynamic PET imaging. Source organs were segmented using a semiautomatic algorithm based on clustering. Residence times for each source organ were determined by analytical integration of an exponential fit of the time activity curves. Finally organ doses were estimated using the software OLINDA/EXM. Results: The administration of 286 {+-} 93 MBq {sup 11}C-BTA-1 was well tolerated by all subjects. Effective radiation dose was 4.3 {mu}Sv/MBq, range 3.6-5.0 {mu}Sv/MBq. In four ofthe five subjects the liver, in one of the subjects the gallbladder was the critical organ. Conclusion: The radiation burden of a single dose of 300 MBq {sup 11}C-BTA-1 is within the accepted limits for research purpose. In contrast to the previous non-human primate study revealing the gallbladder as the critical organ for {sup 11}C-6-OH-BTA-1, we found the liver as the critical organ in humans using {sup 11}C-BTA-1. Possible explanations may be (1) a reduced bile concentration of {sup 11}C-BTA-1 due to the absent OH-group or (2) a different hepatic metabolism of thioflavin derivatives in human and baboon. (orig.)

  19. Results from 2010 Caliban Criticality Dosimetry Intercomparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veinot, K. G.

    2011-10-12

    The external dosimetry program participated in a criticality dosimetry intercomparison conducted at the Caliban facility in Valduc, France in 2010. Representatives from the dosimetry and instrumentation groups were present during testing which included irradiations of whole-body beta/gamma (HBGT) and neutron thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), a fixed nuclear accident dosimeter (FNAD), electronic alarming dosimeters, and a humanoid phantom filled with reference man concentrations of sodium. This report reviews the testing procedures, preparations, irradiations, and presents results of the tests.

  20. Computational dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siebert, B.R.L.; Thomas, R.H.

    1996-01-01

    The paper presents a definition of the term ``Computational Dosimetry`` that is interpreted as the sub-discipline of computational physics which is devoted to radiation metrology. It is shown that computational dosimetry is more than a mere collection of computational methods. Computational simulations directed at basic understanding and modelling are important tools provided by computational dosimetry, while another very important application is the support that it can give to the design, optimization and analysis of experiments. However, the primary task of computational dosimetry is to reduce the variance in the determination of absorbed dose (and its related quantities), for example in the disciplines of radiological protection and radiation therapy. In this paper emphasis is given to the discussion of potential pitfalls in the applications of computational dosimetry and recommendations are given for their avoidance. The need for comparison of calculated and experimental data whenever possible is strongly stressed.

  1. Decay profiles of {beta} and {gamma} for a radionuclide inventory in equilibrium cycle of a BWR type reactor; Perfiles de decaimiento de radiacion {beta} y {gamma} para un inventario de radionuclidos en ciclo de equilibrio de un reactor tipo BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salaices, M.; Sandoval, S.; Ovando, R. [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas. Gerencia de Energia Nuclear, Av. Reforma 113 Col. Palmira. 62490 Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)]. e-mail: sal@iie.org.mx

    2007-07-01

    Presently work the {beta} and {gamma} radiation decay profiles for a radionuclides inventory in equilibrium cycle of a BWR type reactor is presented. The profiles are presented in terms of decay in the activity of the total inventory as well as of the chemical groups that conform the inventory. In the obtaining of the radionuclides inventory in equilibrium cycle the ORIGEN2 code, version 1 was used, which simulates fuel burnup cycles and it calculates the evolution of the isotopic composition as a result of the burnt one, irradiation and decay of the nuclear fuel. It can be observed starting from the results that the decrease in the activity for the initial inventory and the different chemical groups that conform it is approximately proportional to the base 10 logarithm of the time for the first 24 hours of having concluded the burnt one. It can also be observed that the chemical groups that contribute in more proportion to the total activity of the inventory are the lanthanides-actinides and the transition metals, with 39% and 28%, respectively. The groups of alkaline earth metals, halogens, metalloids, noble gases and alkaline metals, contribute with percentages that go from the 8 to 5%. The groups that less they contribute to the total activity of the inventory they are the non metals and semi-metals with smaller proportions that 1%. The chemical groups that more contribute to the energy of {beta} and {gamma} radiation its are the transition metals and the lanthanides-actinides with a change in the order of importance at the end of the 24 hours period. The case of the halogens is of relevance for the case of the {gamma} radiation energy due that occupying the very near third site to the dimensions of the two previous groups. Additionally, the decay in the activity for the total inventory and the groups that conform it can be simulated by means of order 6 polynomials or smaller than describe its behavior appropriately. The results presented in this work, coupled

  2. Radionuclide cystogram

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003832.htm Radionuclide cystogram To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A radionuclide cystogram is a special imaging test called a nuclear ...

  3. Properties of different thin-layer LiF:Mg,Cu,P TL detectors for beta dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bilski, P.; Budzanowski, M.; Olko, P.;

    1996-01-01

    Dosimetric properties of two different types of thin TL detectors, designed to measure personal doses at a depth of 7 mg.cm(-2) in tissue, have been compared. At Riso National Laboratory detectors were prepared by fixing LiF:Mg,Cu,P GR-200 thin detectors to 0.7 mm thick Al pieces. At the Institute...... of Nuclear Physics, a thin layer of LiF:Mg,Cup phosphor of effective thickness 8.5 mg.cm(-2) was sintered to a base of undoped LiF. Beta energy and angular response, detection threshold, stability, etc. were investigated for the two detector types. Results show that both detectors possess good energy...

  4. Dosimetry of beta particles using Li:Mg, Cu, P + Ptfe; Dosimetria de particulas beta usando Li: Mg, Cu, P + Ptfe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olvera, L.; Azorin, J.; Rivera, T. [Depto. de Fisica, UAM-I, 09340 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    This paper presents the experimental results of determining the thermoluminescence (Tl) response of LiF: Mg, Cu, P + Ptfe pellets excited with {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y beta radiation. The glow curve exhibited three peaks which appear at 121 C, 178 C and 217 C . Its relative sensitivity is 49 with respect to that of the TLD-100 dosemeter taken as a reference. The minimal dose that could be measured was 750 mGy. The Tl response as a function of dose was linear in the range of 0.7 mGy to 22.5 mGy. The study of the repeatability of the information contained in the pellets showed a standard deviation of 2 %. (Author)

  5. Preclinical animal research on therapy dosimetry with dual isotopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.W. Konijnenberg (Mark); M. de Jong (Marion)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractPreclinical research into radionuclide therapies based on radiation dosimetry will enable the use of any LET-equivalent radionuclide. Radiation dose and dose rate have significant influence on dose effects in the tumour depending on its radiation sensitivity, possibilities for repair of

  6. Preclinical animal research on therapy dosimetry with dual isotopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.W. Konijnenberg (Mark); M. de Jong (Marion)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractPreclinical research into radionuclide therapies based on radiation dosimetry will enable the use of any LET-equivalent radionuclide. Radiation dose and dose rate have significant influence on dose effects in the tumour depending on its radiation sensitivity, possibilities for repair of

  7. Primary and scattering contributions to beta scaled dose point kernels by means of Monte Carlo simulations; Contribuicoes primaria e espalhada para dosimetria beta calculadas pelo dose point kernels empregando simulacoes pelo Metodo Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valente, Mauro [CONICET - Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas de La Republica Argentina (Conicet), Buenos Aires, AR (Brazil); Botta, Francesca; Pedroli, Guido [European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy). Medical Physics Department; Perez, Pedro, E-mail: valente@famaf.unc.edu.ar [Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Cordoba (Argentina). Fac. de Matematica, Astronomia y Fisica (FaMAF)

    2012-07-01

    Beta-emitters have proved to be appropriate for radioimmunotherapy. The dosimetric characterization of each radionuclide has to be carefully investigated. One usual and practical dosimetric approach is the calculation of dose distribution from a unit point source emitting particles according to any radionuclide of interest, which is known as dose point kernel. Absorbed dose distributions are due to primary and radiation scattering contributions. This work presented a method capable of performing dose distributions for nuclear medicine dosimetry by means of Monte Carlo methods. Dedicated subroutines have been developed in order to separately compute primary and scattering contributions to the total absorbed dose, performing particle transport up to 1 keV or least. Preliminarily, the suitability of the calculation method has been satisfactory, being tested for monoenergetic sources, and it was further applied to the characterization of different beta-minus radionuclides of nuclear medicine interests for radioimmunotherapy. (author)

  8. Measurements of {beta} or {alpha} emitter long lived radionuclides using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry; Dosage a tres bas niveau de radionucleides a longue periode emetteurs {beta} ou {alpha} par spectrometrie de masse a couplage plasma inductif

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Provitina, O.

    1993-10-18

    The measurement of long-lived radionuclides is highly important for characterizing nuclear wastes for their later storage. The main techniques are {alpha} spectrometry, {beta} counting and {gamma} spectrometry. The large period of these isotopes leads to low specific activity needing time consuming measurements. Moreover, the radiometric techniques are often limited by problems of interferences involving several steps of pretreatments. Among these steps, the specific extraction with crown ethers is highly selective for the separation of {sup 99}Tc, {sup 129}I and {sup 135}Cs. The radiometric techniques are here replaced by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) the advantages of which are: few interferences, sensitivity which does not depend on the radiologic period as compared to radiochemistry. ICP-MS can then measure {sup 237}Np in enriched uranium matrix and reduce by a factor of 4 the sample pretreatment and the duration of the analysis usually performed by {alpha} spectrometry. Another technique, electrothermal vaporization (ETV), is consequently used. Crown ether extraction-ETV-ICP-MS is employed for measuring the long lived radionuclides {sup 99}Tc and {sup 129}I. The conditions of the extraction and the parameters of the ETV and the ICP-MS are studied and optimized. The methods optimized (extraction, electrothermal vaporization) are validated in the case of {sup 99}Tc, in real samples. The spike method is required to quantify technetium, the quantification with calibration leading to bad results. The results obtained are in good agreement with the expected values. Extraction of technetium on anionic resin and its measurement by the spike method with pneumatic nebulization-ICP-MS is also performed on other samples. Measured values are also in agreement with expected values, but the method of extraction is more time consuming (half a day) than the extraction with crown ether (one hour). (author). 54 figs., 38 tabs.

  9. Dosimetry methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McLaughlin, W.L.; Miller, A.; Kovacs, A.;

    2003-01-01

    Chemical and physical radiation dosimetry methods, used for the measurement of absorbed dose mainly during the practical use of ionizing radiation, are discussed with respect to their characteristics and fields of application.......Chemical and physical radiation dosimetry methods, used for the measurement of absorbed dose mainly during the practical use of ionizing radiation, are discussed with respect to their characteristics and fields of application....

  10. Dosimetry Service

    CERN Multimedia

    Dosimetry Service

    2005-01-01

    Please remember to read your dosimeter at least once every month. A regular read-out is indispensable to ensure periodic monitoring of your personal dose. You must read your dosimeter even if you have not visited the controlled areas. Film badges are no longer valid at CERN and holders of film badges are no longer allowed to enter the controlled radiation areas or work with a source. Dosimetry Service Tel. 72155 http://cern.ch/rp-dosimetry

  11. Epid Dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Peter B.; Vial, Philip

    2011-05-01

    Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) were introduced originally for patient position verification. The idea of using EPIDs for dosimetry was realised in the 1980s. Little was published on the topic until the mid 1990's, when the interest in EPIDs for dosimetry increased rapidly and continues to grow. The increasing research on EPID dosimetry coincided with the introduction of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). EPIDs are well suited to IMRT dosimetry because they are high resolution, two-dimensional (2D) digital detectors. They are also pre-existing on almost all modern linear accelerators. They generally show a linear response to increasing dose. Different types of EPIDs have been clinically implemented, and these have been described in several review papers. The current generation of commercially available EPIDs are indirect detection active matrix flat panel imagers, also known as amorphous silicon (a-Si) EPIDs. Disadvantages of a-Si EPIDs for dosimetry include non-water equivalent construction materials, and the energy sensitivity and optical scatter of the phosphor scintillators used to create optical signal from the megavoltage beam. This report discusses current knowledge regarding a-Si EPIDs for dosimetry.

  12. 100 years of radionuclide metrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judge, S M; Arnold, D; Chauvenet, B; Collé, R; De Felice, P; García-Toraño, E; Wätjen, U

    2014-05-01

    The discipline of radionuclide metrology at national standards institutes started in 1913 with the certification by Curie, Rutherford and Meyer of the first primary standards of radium. In early years, radium was a valuable commodity and the aim of the standards was largely to facilitate trade. The focus later changed to providing standards for the new wide range of radionuclides, so that radioactivity could be used for healthcare and industrial applications while minimising the risk to patients, workers and the environment. National measurement institutes responded to the changing demands by developing new techniques for realising primary standards of radioactivity. Looking ahead, there are likely to be demands for standards for new radionuclides used in nuclear medicine, an expansion of the scope of the field into quantitative imaging to facilitate accurate patient dosimetry for nuclear medicine, and an increasing need for accurate standards for radioactive waste management and nuclear forensics.

  13. Cosmogenic radionuclides

    CERN Document Server

    Beer, Jürg; Von Steiger, R

    2012-01-01

    Cosmogenic radionuclides are radioactive isotopes which are produced by natural processes and distributed within the Earth system. With a holistic view of the environment the authors show in this book how cosmogenic radionuclides can be used to trace and to reconstruct the history of a large variety of processes. They discuss the way in which cosmogenic radionuclides can assist in the quantification of complex processes in the present-day environment. This book aims to demonstrate to the reader the strength of analytic tools based on cosmogenic radionuclides, their contribution to almost any f

  14. Application of Monte Carlo method in study of the padronization for radionuclides with complex disintegration scheme in 4{pi}{beta}-{gamma} coincidence System; Aplicacao do metodo de Monte Carlo no estudo da padronizacao de radionuclideos com esquema de desintegracao complexos em sistema de coincidencias 4{pi}{beta}-{gamma}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, Mauro Noriaki

    2006-07-01

    The present work described a new methodology for modelling the behaviour of the activity in a 4{pi}{beta}-{gamma} coincidence system. The detection efficiency for electrons in the proportional counter and gamma radiation in the NaI(Tl) detector was calculated using the Monte Carlo program MCNP4C. Another Monte Carlo code was developed which follows the path in the disintegration scheme from the initial state of the precursor radionuclide, until the ground state of the daughter nucleus. Every step of the disintegration scheme is sorted by random numbers taking into account the probabilities of all {beta}{sup -} branches, electronic capture branches, transitions probabilities and internal conversion coefficients. Once the final state was reached beta, electronic capture events and gamma transitions are accounted for the three spectra: beta, gamma and coincidence variation in the beta efficiency was performed simulating energy cut off or use of absorbers (Collodion). The selected radionuclides for simulation were: {sup 134}Cs, {sup 72}Ga which disintegrate by {beta}{sup -} transition, {sup 133}Ba which disintegrates by electronic capture and {sup 35}S which is a beta pure emitter. For the latter, the Efficiency Tracing technique was simulated. The extrapolation curves obtained by Monte Carlo were filled by the Least Square Method with the experimental points and the results were compared to the Linear Extrapolation method. (author)

  15. (Biological dosimetry)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preston, R.J.

    1990-12-17

    The traveler attended the 1st International Conference on Biological Dosimetry in Madrid, Spain. This conference was organized to provide information to a general audience of biologists, physicists, radiotherapists, industrial hygiene personnel and individuals from related fields on the current ability of cytogenetic analysis to provide estimates of radiation dose in cases of occupational or environmental exposure. There is a growing interest in Spain in biological dosimetry because of the increased use of radiation sources for medical and occupational uses, and with this the anticipated and actual increase in numbers of overexposure. The traveler delivered the introductory lecture on Biological Dosimetry: Mechanistic Concepts'' that was intended to provide a framework by which the more applied lectures could be interpreted in a mechanistic way. A second component of the trip was to provide advice with regard to several recent cases of overexposure that had been or were being assessed by the Radiopathology and Radiotherapy Department of the Hospital General Gregorio Maranon'' in Madrid. The traveler had provided information on several of these, and had analyzed cells from some exposed or purportedly exposed individuals. The members of the biological dosimetry group were referred to individuals at REACTS at Oak Ridge Associated Universities for advice on follow-up treatment.

  16. THERMOLUMINESCENT DOSIMETRY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2005-10-20

    Oct 20, 2005 ... abo area of the city has the least radiation dose rate while Obantoku area has the upper limit. aking this as ... 'n Abeokuta. eywords: Environmental radiation, thermoluminescent dosimetry, Abeokuta, outdoor ... Both 238U and 232Th have long decay series with ... effects of radiation exposure (Hanson and.

  17. THERMOLUMINESCENT DOSIMETRY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2005-10-20

    Oct 20, 2005 ... abo area of the city has the least radiation dose rate while Obantoku area has the upper limit. aking this as ... “n Abeokuta. eywords: Environmental radiation, thermoluminescent dosimetry, Abeokuta, outdoor ... Both 238U and 232Th have long decay series with ... effects of radiation exposure (Hanson and.

  18. Dosimetry Service

    CERN Multimedia

    Dosimetry Service

    2005-01-01

    Please remember to read your dosimeter every month at least once and preferably during the first week. A regular read-out is indispensable in order to ensure a periodic monitoring of the personal dose. You should read your dosimeter even if you have not visited the controlled areas. If you still have the old dosimeter (film badge), please send it immediately for evaluation to us (Bdg 24 E-011). After January 2005 there will be no developing process for the old film system. Information for Contractors: Please remember also to bring the form ‘Confirm Reception of a CERN Dosimeter' signed with ‘Feuille d'enregistrement du CERN'. Without these forms the dosimeter cannot be assigned. Thank you for your cooperation. Dosimetry Service Tel 767 2155 http://cern.ch/rp-dosimetry

  19. Radiation dosimetry.

    OpenAIRE

    Cameron, J

    1991-01-01

    This article summarizes the basic facts about the measurement of ionizing radiation, usually referred to as radiation dosimetry. The article defines the common radiation quantities and units; gives typical levels of natural radiation and medical exposures; and describes the most important biological effects of radiation and the methods used to measure radiation. Finally, a proposal is made for a new radiation risk unit to make radiation risks more understandable to nonspecialists.

  20. Strategies for CT tissue segmentation for Monte Carlo calculations in nuclear medicine dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Braad, Poul-Erik; Andersen, Thomas; Hansen, Søren Baarsgaard;

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: CT images are used for patient specific Monte Carlo treatment planning in radionuclide therapy. The authors investigated the impact of tissue classification, CT image segmentation, and CT errors on Monte Carlo calculated absorbed dose estimates in nuclear medicine. Methods: CT errors...... patient specific dosimetry in nuclear medicine. Accurate dosimetry was obtained with a 13-tissue ramp that included five different bone types....

  1. Dosimetric studies of anti-CD20 labeled with therapeutic radionuclides at IPEN/CNEN-SP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrio, G.; Dias, C.R.B.R.; Osso Junior, J.A., E-mail: gracielabarrio@gmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) makes use of monoclonal antibodies (MAb) labeled with alpha/beta radionuclides for therapeutical purposes, leading to tumor irradiation and destruction, preserving the normal organs on the radiation excess. The therapeutic activity to be injected in a specific patient is based on information obtained in dosimetric studies. Beta emitting radionuclides such as {sup 131}I, {sup 188}Re, {sup 90}Y, {sup 177}Lu and {sup 166}Ho are useful for the development of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals. Anti-CD20 (Rituximab) is a chimeric MAb directed against antigen surface CD20 on B-lymphocytes, used in non-Hodgkin lymphoma treatment (NHL). The association with beta radionuclides have shown greater therapeutic efficacy. Currently, two radiopharmaceuticals with Anti-CD20 for radioimmunotherapy have FDA approval for NHL treatment: {sup 131}I-AntiCD20 (Bexar) and {sup 90}Y-AntiCD20 (Zevalin). Techniques for the radiolabeling of {sup 188}Re-antiCD20 have been recently developed by IPEN-CNEN/SP in order to evaluate the clinical use of this radionuclide in particular. The use of {sup 188}Re (T{sub 1/2} 17h) produced by the decay of {sup 188}W (T{sub 1/2} 69d), from an {sup 188}W/{sup 188}Re generator system, has represented an alternative to RIT. Beyond high energy beta emission for therapy, {sup 188}Re also emits gamma rays (155keV) suitable for image. The aim of this new project is to compare the labeling of anti-CD20 with {sup 188}Re with the same MAb labeled with {sup 131}I, {sup 177}Lu, {sup 90}Y and even {sup 99m}Tc. The first step in this project is the review of the published data available concerning the labeling of this MAb with different radionuclides, along with data obtained at IPEN, taking into account labeling procedures, labeling yields, reaction time, level and kind of impurities and biodistribution studies. The pharmacokinetic code will be developed in Visual Studio.NET platform through VB.NET and C{sup ++} for biodistribution and dosimetric

  2. Dosimetry of Auger emitters: Physical and phenomenological approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sastry, K.S.R.; Howell, R.W.; Rao, D.V.; Mylavarapu, V.B.; Kassis, A.I.; Adelstein, S.J.; Wright, H.A.; Hamm, R.N.; Turner, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    Recent radiobiological studies have demonstrated that Auger cascades can cause severe biological damage contrary to expectations based on conventional dosimetry. Several determinants govern these effects, including the nature of the Auger electron spectrum; localized energy deposition; cellular geometry; chemical form of the carrier; cellular localization, concentration, and subcellular distribution of the radionuclide. Conventional dosimetry is inadequate in that these considerations are ignored. Our results provide the basis for biophysical approaches toward subcellular dosimetry of Auger emitters in vitro and in vivo. 12 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Topics in radiation dosimetry radiation dosimetry

    CERN Document Server

    1972-01-01

    Radiation Dosimetry, Supplement 1: Topics in Radiation Dosimetry covers instruments and techniques in dealing with special dosimetry problems. The book discusses thermoluminescence dosimetry in archeological dating; dosimetric applications of track etching; vacuum chambers of radiation measurement. The text also describes wall-less detectors in microdosimetry; dosimetry of low-energy X-rays; and the theory and general applicability of the gamma-ray theory of track effects to various systems. Dose equivalent determinations in neutron fields by means of moderator techniques; as well as developm

  4. Monte Carlo modeling of beta-radiometer device used to measure milk contaminated as a result of the Chernobyl accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khrutchinsky, A.; Kutsen, S. [Research Institute for Nuclear Problems, 11 Bobruiskaya Street, Minsk 220050 (Belarus); Minenko, V. [Belarusian Medical Academy of Post-Graduate Education, 3 Brovki Street, Minsk 220714 (Belarus); Zhukova, O. [Center of Radiation Control and Environment Monitoring, 110A Nezalezhnosti Avenue, Minsk 220023 (Belarus); Luckyanov, N.; Bouville, A. [DHHS, NIH, National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, 6120 Executive Blvd, EPS 7100, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Drozdovitch, V. [DHHS, NIH, National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, 6120 Executive Blvd, EPS 7100, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)], E-mail: drozdovv@mail.nih.gov

    2009-06-15

    This paper presents results of Monte Carlo modeling of the beta-radiometer device with Geiger-Mueller detector used in Belarus and Russia to measure the radioactive contamination of milk after the Chernobyl accident. This type of detector, which is not energy selective, measured the total beta-activity of the radionuclide mix. A mathematical model of the beta-radiometer device, namely DP-100, was developed, and the calibration factors for the different radionuclides that might contribute to the milk contamination were calculated. The estimated calibration factors for {sup 131}I, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 134}Cs, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 144}Ce, and {sup 106}Ru reasonably agree with calibration factors determined experimentally. The calculated calibration factors for {sup 132}Te, {sup 132}I, {sup 133}I, {sup 136}Cs, {sup 89}Sr, {sup 103}Ru, {sup 140}Ba, {sup 140}La, and {sup 141}Ce had not been previously determined experimentally. The obtained results allow to derive the activity of specific radionuclides, in particular {sup 131}I, from the results of the total beta-activity measurements in milk. Results of this study are important for the purposes of retrospective dosimetry that uses measurements of radioactivity in environmental samples performed with beta-radiometer devices.

  5. Moderate increase of radioactivity in air, attributable of beta emitter radionuclides, in France at the end of September 2011; Elevation moderee de la radioactivite dans l'air, imputable aux radionucleides emetteurs beta, en France fin septembre 2011. Note d'information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    Within the frame of the regular monitoring of radioactivity in the environment about its nuclear sites, EDF has noticed a moderate but unusual increase of radioactivity in the air. This radioactivity is attributed to beta emitter radionuclides. This document reports and comments measurements performed by EDF and the IRSN (the French Institute for radiation protection and nuclear safety), and additional investigations performed by the IRSN. The possible origin of the radioactivity increase is discussed in terms of meteorological conditions and dust accumulation levels, and of their incidence of activity levels in the air

  6. Personnel radiation dosimetry symposium: program and abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-10-01

    The purpose was to provide applied and research dosimetrists with sufficient information to evaluate the status and direction of their programs relative to the latest guidelines and techniques. A technical program was presented concerning experience, requirements, and advances in gamma, beta, and neutron personnel dosimetry.

  7. SU-C-201-06: Utility of Quantitative 3D SPECT/CT Imaging in Patient Specific Internal Dosimetry of 153-Samarium with GATE Monte Carlo Package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fallahpoor, M; Abbasi, M [Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Vali-Asr Hospital, Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sen, A [University of Houston, Houston, TX (United States); Parach, A [Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, Yazd (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kalantari, F [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Patient-specific 3-dimensional (3D) internal dosimetry in targeted radionuclide therapy is essential for efficient treatment. Two major steps to achieve reliable results are: 1) generating quantitative 3D images of radionuclide distribution and attenuation coefficients and 2) using a reliable method for dose calculation based on activity and attenuation map. In this research, internal dosimetry for 153-Samarium (153-Sm) was done by SPECT-CT images coupled GATE Monte Carlo package for internal dosimetry. Methods: A 50 years old woman with bone metastases from breast cancer was prescribed 153-Sm treatment (Gamma: 103keV and beta: 0.81MeV). A SPECT/CT scan was performed with the Siemens Simbia-T scanner. SPECT and CT images were registered using default registration software. SPECT quantification was achieved by compensating for all image degrading factors including body attenuation, Compton scattering and collimator-detector response (CDR). Triple energy window method was used to estimate and eliminate the scattered photons. Iterative ordered-subsets expectation maximization (OSEM) with correction for attenuation and distance-dependent CDR was used for image reconstruction. Bilinear energy mapping is used to convert Hounsfield units in CT image to attenuation map. Organ borders were defined by the itk-SNAP toolkit segmentation on CT image. GATE was then used for internal dose calculation. The Specific Absorbed Fractions (SAFs) and S-values were reported as MIRD schema. Results: The results showed that the largest SAFs and S-values are in osseous organs as expected. S-value for lung is the highest after spine that can be important in 153-Sm therapy. Conclusion: We presented the utility of SPECT-CT images and Monte Carlo for patient-specific dosimetry as a reliable and accurate method. It has several advantages over template-based methods or simplified dose estimation methods. With advent of high speed computers, Monte Carlo can be used for treatment planning

  8. Dosimetry for radiation processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Arne

    1986-01-01

    During the past few years significant advances have taken place in the different areas of dosimetry for radiation processing, mainly stimulated by the increased interest in radiation for food preservation, plastic processing and sterilization of medical products. Reference services both...... and sterilization dosimetry, optichromic dosimeters in the shape of small tubes for food processing, and ESR spectroscopy of alanine for reference dosimetry. In this paper the special features of radiation processing dosimetry are discussed, several commonly used dosimeters are reviewed, and factors leading...

  9. ASSESSMENTOF BETA PARTICLE FLUX FROM SURFACE CONTAMINATION AS A RELATIVE INDICATOR FOR RADIONUCLIDE DISTRIBUTION ON EXTERNAL SURFACES OF A MULTI-STORY BUILDING IN PRIPYAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farfan, E.

    2009-11-17

    How would we recover if a Radiological Dispersion Device (e.g., dirty bomb) or Improvised Nuclear Device were to detonate in a large city? In order to assess the feasibility of remediation following such an event, several issues would have to be considered, including the levels and characteristics of the radioactive contamination, the availability of the required resources to accomplish decontamination, and the planned future use of the city's structures and buildings. Presently little is known about the distribution, redistribution, and migration of radionuclides in an urban environment. However, Pripyat, a city substantially contaminated by the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident, may provide some answers. The main objective of this study was to determine the radionuclide distribution on a Pripyat multi-story building, which had not been previously decontaminated and therefore could reflect the initial fallout and its further natural redistribution on external surfaces. The 7-story building selected was surveyed from the ground floor to the roof on horizontal and vertical surfaces along seven ground-to-roof transections. Some of the results from this study indicate that the upper floors of the building had higher contamination levels than the lower floors. The authors consequently recommend that existing decontamination procedures for tall structures be re-examined and modified accordingly.

  10. {sup 213}Bi-DOTATOC receptor-targeted alpha-radionuclide therapy induces remission in neuroendocrine tumours refractory to beta radiation: a first-in-human experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kratochwil, C.; Giesel, F.L.; Mier, W.; Haberkorn, U. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Bruchertseifer, F.; Apostolidis, C.; Morgenstern, A. [European Commission, Institute for Transuranium Elements, Karlsruhe (Germany); Boll, R.; Murphy, K. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Radiopeptide therapy using a somatostatin analogue labelled with a beta emitter such as {sup 90}Y/{sup 177}Lu-DOTATOC is a new therapeutic option in neuroendocrine cancer. Alternative treatments for patients with refractory disease are rare. Here we report the first-in-human experience with {sup 213}Bi-DOTATOC targeted alpha therapy (TAT) in patients pretreated with beta emitters. Seven patients with progressive advanced neuroendocrine liver metastases refractory to treatment with {sup 90}Y/{sup 177}Lu-DOTATOC were treated with an intraarterial infusion of {sup 213}Bi-DOTATOC, and one patient with bone marrow carcinosis was treated with a systemic infusion of {sup 213}Bi-DOTATOC. Haematological, kidney and endocrine toxicities were assessed according to CTCAE criteria. Radiological response was assessed with contrast-enhanced MRI and {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC-PET/CT. More than 2 years of follow-up were available in seven patients. The biodistribution of {sup 213}Bi-DOTATOC was evaluable with 440 keV gamma emission scans, and demonstrated specific tumour binding. Enduring responses were observed in all treated patients. Chronic kidney toxicity was moderate. Acute haematotoxicity was even less pronounced than with the preceding beta therapies. TAT can induce remission of tumours refractory to beta radiation with favourable acute and mid-term toxicity at therapeutic effective doses. (orig.)

  11. Dosimetry analysis of distribution radial dose profiles of {sup 90}Sr + {sup 90}Y beta therapy applicators using the MCNP-4C code and radio chromium films; Analise dosimetrica de perfis de distribuicoes radiais de doses relativas de um aplicador de betaterapia de {sup 90}Sr + {sup 90}Y utilizando o codigo MCNP-4C e filmes radiocromicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coelho, T.S.; Yoriyaz, H. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Fernandes, M.A.R. [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina. Servico de Radioterapia; Louzada, M.J.Q. [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Aracatuba, SP (Brazil). Curso de Medicina Veterinaria

    2010-07-01

    Although they are no longer manufactured, the applicators of {sup 90}Sr +{sup 90}Y acquired in the decades of 1990 are still in use, by having half-life of 28.5 years. These applicators have calibration certificate given by their manufacturers, where few have been recalibrated. Thus it becomes necessary to accomplish thorough dosimetry of these applicators. This paper presents a dosimetric analysis distribution radial dose profiles for emitted by an {sup 90}Sr+{sup 90}Y beta therapy applicator, using the MCNP-4C code to simulate the distribution radial dose profiles and radiochromium films to get them experimentally . The results with the simulated values were compared with the results of experimental measurements, where both curves show similar behavior, which may validate the use of MCNP-4C and radiochromium films for this type of dosimetry. (author)

  12. Dosimetry analysis of distributions radials dose profiles of {sup 90}Sr + {sup 90}Y beta therapy applicators using the MCNP-4C code and radio chromium films; Analise dosimetrica de perfis de distribuicoes radias de doses relativas de um aplicador de betaterapia de {sup 90}Sr + {sup 90}Y utilizando o codigo MCNP-4C e filmes radiocromicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coelho, Talita S.; Yoriyaz, Helio [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Fernandes, Marco A.R., E-mail: tasallesc@gmail.co [UNESP, Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Servico de Radioterapia; Louzada, Mario J.Q. [UNESP, Aracatuba, SP (Brazil). Curso de Medicina Veterinaria

    2011-07-01

    Although they are no longer manufactured, the applicators of {sup 90}Sr + {sup 90}Y acquired in the decades of 1990 are still in use, by having half-life of 28.5 years. These applicators have calibration certificate given by their manufacturers, where few have been re calibrated. Thus it becomes necessary to accomplish thorough dosimetry of these applicators. This paper presents a dosimetric analysis distribution radial dose profiles for emitted by an {sup 90}Sr + {sup 90}Y beta therapy applicator, using the MCNP-4C code to simulate the distribution radial dose profiles and radio chromium films to get them experimentally . The results with the simulated values were compared with the results of experimental measurements, where both curves show similar behavior, which may validate the use of MCNP-4C and radio chromium films for this type of dosimetry. (author)

  13. Radioactivity, radionuclides, radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Magill, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    RADIOACTIVITY – RADIONUCLIDES – RADIATION is suitable for a general audience interested in topical environmental and human health radiological issues such as radiation exposure in aircraft, food sterilisation, nuclear medicine, radon gas, radiation dispersion devices ("dirty bombs")… It leads the interested reader through the three Rs of nuclear science, to the forefront of research and developments in the field. The book is also suitable for students and professionals in the related disciplines of nuclear and radiochemistry, health physics, environmental sciences, nuclear and astrophysics. Recent developments in the areas of exotic decay modes (bound beta decay of ‘bare’ or fully ionized nuclei), laser transmutation, nuclear forensics, radiation hormesis and the LNT hypothesis are covered. Atomic mass data for over 3000 nuclides from the most recent (2003) evaluation are included.

  14. Differences among Monte Carlo codes in the calculations of voxel S values for radionuclide targeted therapy and analysis of their impact on absorbed dose evaluations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pacilio, M.; Lanconelli, N.; Lo Meo, S.; Betti, M.; Montani, L.; Torres Aroche, L. A.; Coca Perez, M. A. [Department of Medical Physics, Azienda Ospedaliera S. Camillo Forlanini, Piazza Forlanini 1, Rome 00151 (Italy); Department of Physics, Alma Mater Studiorum University of Bologna, Viale Berti-Pichat 6/2, Bologna 40127 (Italy); Department of Medical Physics, Azienda Ospedaliera S. Camillo Forlanini, Piazza Forlanini 1, Rome 00151 (Italy); Department of Medical Physics, Azienda Ospedaliera Sant' Andrea, Via di Grotarossa 1035, Rome 00189 (Italy); Department of Medical Physics, Center for Clinical Researches, Calle 34 North 4501, Havana 11300 (Cuba)

    2009-05-15

    (in our case, for {sup 131}I). For {sup 90}Y and {sup 188}Re, the differences among the various codes have a negligible impact (within few percents) on convolution calculations of the absorbed dose; thus either one of the MC programs is suitable to produce voxel S values for radionuclide targeted therapy dosimetry. However, if a low-energy beta-emitting radionuclide is considered, these differences can affect also dose depositions at small source-target voxel distances, leading to more conspicuous variations (about 9% for {sup 131}I) when calculating the absorbed dose in the volume of interest.

  15. Thermoluminescent dosimetry of beta radiations of {sup 90} Sr/ {sup 90} Y using ZrO{sub 2}: Eu; Dosimetria termoluminiscente de radiaciones beta de {sup 90} Sr/ {sup 90} Y usando ZrO{sub 2}: Eu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olvera T, L.; Azorin N, J.; Barrera S, M.; Soto E, A.M. [UAM-I, 09340 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Rivera M, T. [CICATA-IPN, Legaria 694, 11500 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2005-07-01

    In this work the results of studying the thermoluminescent properties (TL) of the doped zirconium oxide with europium (ZrO{sub 2}: Eu{sup 3+}) before beta radiations of {sup 90}Sr/ {sup 90}Y are presented. The powders of ZrO{sub 2}: Eu{sup 3+} were obtained by means of the sol-gel technique and they were characterized by means of thermal analysis and by X-ray diffraction. The powders of ZrO{sub 2}: Eu{sup 3+}, previously irradiated with beta particles of {sup 90}Sr/ {sup 90}Y, presented a thermoluminescent curve with two peaks at 204 and 292 C respectively. The TL response of the ZrO{sub 2}: Eu{sup 3+} as function of the absorbed dose was lineal from 2 Gy up to 90 Gy. The fading of the information of the ZrO{sub 2}: Eu{sup 3+} was of 10% the first 2 hours remaining almost constant the information by the following 30 days. The ZrO{sub 2} doped with the (Eu{sup 3+}) ion it was found more sensitive to the beta radiation that the one of zirconium oxide without doping (ZrO{sub 2}) obtained by the same method. Those studied characteristics allow to propose to the doped zirconium oxide with europium like thermoluminescent dosemeter for the detection of the beta radiation. (Author)

  16. Quantitative nuclear imaging for dosimetry in radioembolization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elschot, M.

    2013-01-01

    Intra-arterial microsphere radioembolization is an increasingly applied technique for treatment of unresectable liver tumors. During radioembolization, microspheres (diameter 30 μm) loaded with a high-energy beta-emitting radionuclide, such as yttrium-90 (Y-90) and holmium-166 (Ho-166), are instille

  17. Thermoluminescent dosimetry of beta radiations of {sup 90} Sr/ {sup 90} Y using amorphous ZrO{sub 2}; Dosimetria termoluminiscente de radiaciones beta de {sup 90} Sr/ {sup 90} Y usando ZrO{sub 2} amorfo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivera M, T. [CICATA-Legaria, IPN, Legaria Num. 694, 11500 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Olvera T, L.; Azorin N, J.; Barrera R, M.; Soto E, A.M. [UAM-I, 09340 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2005-07-01

    In this work the results of studying the thermoluminescent properties (Tl) of the zirconium oxide in its amorphous state (ZrO{sub 2}-a) before beta radiations of {sup 90} Sr/ {sup 90} Y are presented. The amorphous powders of the zirconium oxide were synthesized by means of the sol-gel technique. The sol-gel process using alkoxides like precursors, is an efficient method to prepare a matrix of zirconium oxide by hydrolysis - condensation of the precursor to form chains of Zr-H{sub 3} and Zr-O{sub 2}. One of the advantages of this technique is the obtention of gels at low temperatures with very high purity and homogeneity. The powders were characterized by means of thermal analysis and by X-ray diffraction. The powders of ZrO{sub 2}-a, previously irradiated with beta particles of {sup 90} Sr/{sup 90} Y, presented a thermoluminescent curve with two peaks at 150 and 257 C. The dissipation of the information of the one ZrO{sub 2}-a was of 40% the first 2 hours remaining constant the information for the following 30 days. The reproducibility of the information was of {+-} 2.5% in standard deviation. The studied characteristics allow to propose to the amorphous zirconium oxide as thermoluminescent dosemeter for the detection of beta radiation. (Author)

  18. Radionuclides: Accumulation and Transport in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, D K; Chatterjee, S; Datta, S; Voronina, A V; Walther, C

    Application of radioactive elements or radionuclides for anthropogenic use is a widespread phenomenon nowadays. Radionuclides undergo radioactive decays releasing ionizing radiation like gamma ray(s) and/or alpha or beta particles that can displace electrons in the living matter (like in DNA) and disturb its function. Radionuclides are highly hazardous pollutants of considerable impact on the environment, food chain and human health. Cleaning up of the contaminated environment through plants is a promising technology where the rhizosphere may play an important role. Plants belonging to the families of Brassicaceae, Papilionaceae, Caryophyllaceae, Poaceae, and Asteraceae are most important in this respect and offer the largest potential for heavy metal phytoremediation. Plants like Lactuca sativa L., Silybum marianum Gaertn., Centaurea cyanus L., Carthamus tinctorius L., Helianthus annuus and H. tuberosus are also important plants for heavy metal phytoremediation. However, transfer factors (TF) of radionuclide from soil/water to plant ([Radionuclide]plant/[Radionuclide]soil) vary widely in different plants. Rhizosphere, rhizobacteria and varied metal transporters like NRAMP, ZIP families CDF, ATPases (HMAs) family like P1B-ATPases, are involved in the radio-phytoremediation processes. This review will discuss recent advancements and potential application of plants for radionuclide removal from the environment.

  19. Dosimetry service removal

    CERN Multimedia

    Safety Commission

    2010-01-01

    Dear personal dosimeter user, Please note that the Dosimetry service has moved in building 55, the service is now located in the main floor: 55-R-004. Main floor instead of second floor. On your right hand when accessing in the building. Thank you Dosimetry Service

  20. Development of medical application methods using radiation. Radionuclide therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Chang Woon; Lim, S. M.; Kim, E.H.; Woo, K. S.; Chung, W. S.; Lim, S. J.; Choi, T. H.; Hong, S. W.; Chung, H. Y.; No, W. C. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute. Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul, (Korea, Republic of); Oh, B. H. [Seoul National University. Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hong, H. J. [Antibody Engineering Research Unit, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-04-01

    In this project, we studied following subjects: 1. development of monoclonal antibodies and radiopharmaceuticals 2. clinical applications of radionuclide therapy 3. radioimmunoguided surgery 4. prevention of restenosis with intracoronary radiation. The results can be applied for the following objectives: (1) radionuclide therapy will be applied in clinical practice to treat the cancer patients or other diseases in multi-center trial. (2) The newly developed monoclonal antibodies and biomolecules can be used in biology, chemistry or other basic life science research. (3) The new methods for the analysis of therapeutic effects, such as dosimetry, and quantitative analysis methods of radioactivity, can be applied in basic research, such as radiation oncology and radiation biology.

  1. Scintillation detector for dosing unknown {beta} emitters deposited on large-surface filters (1963); Detecteur a scintillation pour la dosimetrie d'emetteurs beta inconnus deposes sur filtre de grande surface (1963)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soudain, G.; Cercy, J.; Geoffre, B. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1963-07-01

    The apparatus described has been specially studied for direct counting, using a plastic scintillator, of unknown emitters occurring in atmospheric samples collected on large-surface filters (10 cm diameter). In view of the fairly large contribution of low-energy fission products to the overall {beta}-activity of radio-active fallout, the adjustments have been chosen so as to obtain the best yield in an energy range as wide as possible. This has led to the acceptance of a certain background noise which is later reduced by the anti-coincidence method. The quality of the apparatus depends largely on the uniformity of the photocathode in the photomultiplier used. The counter which was built had a counting efficiency for a 10 cm diameter source of 30 per cent for S-35, 88 per cent for P-32, 45 per cent for unknown emitters and a background noise of 56 cpm. (authors) [French] L'appareil decrit a ete specialement etudie pour le comptage direct, a l'aide d'un scintillateur plastique d'emetteurs inconnus recueillis dans les prelevements atmospheriques sur des filtres de grande surface (10 cm de diametre). Etant donne la participation assez importante des produits de fission de faible energie a l'activite globale {beta} des retombees radioactives, les reglages ont ete choisis de maniere a obtenir le meilleur rendement dans une gamme d'energie aussi etendue que possible. Cela a conduit a admettre un certain bruit de fond que l'on reduit ensuite par la methode d'anticoincidence. La qualite de l'appareil depend en grande partie de l'uniformite de la photocathode du photomultiplicateur utilise. Le compteur que l'on a construit possede une efficacite de comptage pour une source de 10 cm de diametre de 30 pour cent pour {sup 35}S, 88 pour cent pour {sup 32}P, 45 pour des emetteurs {beta} inconnus et un bruit de fond de 56 cpm. (auteurs)

  2. Hanford Internal Dosimetry Project manual. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carbaugh, E.H.; Bihl, D.E.; MacLellan, J.A.; Long, M.P.

    1994-07-01

    This document describes the Hanford Internal Dosimetry Project, as it is administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in support of the US Department of Energy and its Hanford contractors. Project services include administrating the bioassay monitoring program, evaluating and documenting assessment of potential intakes and internal dose, ensuring that analytical laboratories conform to requirements, selecting and applying appropriate models and procedures for evaluating radionuclide deposition and the resulting dose, and technically guiding and supporting Hanford contractors in matters regarding internal dosimetry. Specific chapters deal with the following subjects: practices of the project, including interpretation of applicable DOE Orders, regulations, and guidance into criteria for assessment, documentation, and reporting of doses; assessment of internal dose, including summary explanations of when and how assessments are performed; recording and reporting practices for internal dose; selection of workers for bioassay monitoring and establishment of type and frequency of bioassay measurements; capability and scheduling of bioassay monitoring services; recommended dosimetry response to potential internal exposure incidents; quality control and quality assurance provisions of the program.

  3. In vivo dosimetry in external beam radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mijnheer, Ben [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam 1066 CX (Netherlands); Beddar, Sam [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Izewska, Joanna [Division of Human Health, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna 1400 (Austria); Reft, Chester [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    In vivo dosimetry (IVD) is in use in external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) to detect major errors, to assess clinically relevant differences between planned and delivered dose, to record dose received by individual patients, and to fulfill legal requirements. After discussing briefly the main characteristics of the most commonly applied IVD systems, the clinical experience of IVD during EBRT will be summarized. Advancement of the traditional aspects of in vivo dosimetry as well as the development of currently available and newly emerging noninterventional technologies are required for large-scale implementation of IVD in EBRT. These new technologies include the development of electronic portal imaging devices for 2D and 3D patient dosimetry during advanced treatment techniques, such as IMRT and VMAT, and the use of IVD in proton and ion radiotherapy by measuring the decay of radiation-induced radionuclides. In the final analysis, we will show in this Vision 20/20 paper that in addition to regulatory compliance and reimbursement issues, the rationale for in vivo measurements is to provide an accurate and independent verification of the overall treatment procedure. It will enable the identification of potential errors in dose calculation, data transfer, dose delivery, patient setup, and changes in patient anatomy. It is the authors' opinion that all treatments with curative intent should be verified through in vivo dose measurements in combination with pretreatment checks.

  4. Introduction to radiobiology of targeted radionuclide therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Pierre ePOUGET

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available During the last decades, new radionuclide-based targeted therapies have emerged as efficient tools for cancer treatment. Targeted radionuclide therapies (TRT are based on a multidisciplinary approach that involves the cooperation of specialists in several research fields. Among them, radiobiologists investigate the biological effects of ionizing radiation, specifically the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in the radiation response. Most of the knowledge about radiation effects concerns external beam radiation therapy (EBRT and radiobiology has then strongly contributed to the development of this therapeutic approach. Similarly, radiobiology and dosimetry are also assumed to be ways for improving TRT, in particular in the therapy of solid tumors which are radioresistant. However, extrapolation of EBRT radiobiology to TRT is not straightforward. Indeed, the specific physical characteristics of TRT (heterogeneous and mixed irradiation, protracted exposure and low absorbed dose rate differ from those of conventional EBRT (homogeneous irradiation, short exposure and high absorbed dose rate, and consequently the response of irradiated tissues might be different. Therefore, specific TRT radiobiology needs to be explored. Determining dose-effect correlation is also a prerequisite for rigorous preclinical radiobiology studies because dosimetry provides the necessary referential to all TRT situations. It is required too for developing patient-tailored TRT in the clinic in order to estimate the best dose for tumor control, while protecting the healthy tissues, thereby improving therapeutic efficacy. Finally, it will allow to determine the relative contribution of targeted effects (assumed to be dose-related and non-targeted effects (assumed to be non-dose-related of ionizing radiation. However, conversely to EBRT where it is routinely used, dosimetry is still challenging in TRT. Therefore, it constitutes with radiobiology, one of the main

  5. Whole Body Activity Retentions in the Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy with Lu-177

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, B.

    2013-01-01

    The patients with the neuroendocrine tumours (liver, spleen, etc.) often need treatment by the Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy with 177Lu. The amount of 177Lu activity in the body of patients has to be known accurately for assessment of the dosimetry and for evaluation of the effectiveness of

  6. Quantitative radionuclide angiocardiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scholz, P.M.; Rerych, S.K.; Moran, J.F.; Newman, G.E.; Douglas, J.M.; Sabiston, D.C. Jr.; Jones, R.H.

    1980-01-01

    This study introduces a new method for calculating actual left ventricular volumes and cardiac output from data recorded during a single transit of a radionuclide bolus through the heart, and describes in detail current radionuclide angiocardiography methodology. A group of 64 healthy adults with a wide age range were studied to define the normal range of hemodynamic parameters determined by the technique. Radionuclide angiocardiograms were performed in patients undergoing cardiac catherization to validate the measurements. In 33 patients studied by both techniques on the same day, a close correlation was documented for measurement of ejection fraction and end-diastolic volume. To validate the method of volumetric cardiac output calcuation, 33 simultaneous radionuclide and indocyanine green dye determinations of cardiac output were performed in 18 normal young adults. These independent comparisons of radionuclide measurements with two separate methods document that initial transit radionuclide angiocardiography accurately assesses left ventricular function.

  7. Quantitative nuclear imaging for dosimetry in radioembolization

    OpenAIRE

    Elschot, M.

    2013-01-01

    Intra-arterial microsphere radioembolization is an increasingly applied technique for treatment of unresectable liver tumors. During radioembolization, microspheres (diameter 30 μm) loaded with a high-energy beta-emitting radionuclide, such as yttrium-90 (Y-90) and holmium-166 (Ho-166), are instilled in the hepatic artery via a catheter. The majority of microspheres will accumulate in and around the liver tumors, because these are almost exclusively perfused by arterial blood, whereas the hea...

  8. History of dose specification in Brachytherapy: From Threshold Erythema Dose to Computational Dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Jeffrey F.

    2006-09-01

    This paper briefly reviews the evolution of brachytherapy dosimetry from 1900 to the present. Dosimetric practices in brachytherapy fall into three distinct eras: During the era of biological dosimetry (1900-1938), radium pioneers could only specify Ra-226 and Rn-222 implants in terms of the mass of radium encapsulated within the implanted sources. Due to the high energy of its emitted gamma rays and the long range of its secondary electrons in air, free-air chambers could not be used to quantify the output of Ra-226 sources in terms of exposure. Biological dosimetry, most prominently the threshold erythema dose, gained currency as a means of intercomparing radium treatments with exposure-calibrated orthovoltage x-ray units. The classical dosimetry era (1940-1980) began with successful exposure standardization of Ra-226 sources by Bragg-Gray cavity chambers. Classical dose-computation algorithms, based upon 1-D buildup factor measurements and point-source superposition computational algorithms, were able to accommodate artificial radionuclides such as Co-60, Ir-192, and Cs-137. The quantitative dosimetry era (1980- ) arose in response to the increasing utilization of low energy K-capture radionuclides such as I-125 and Pd-103 for which classical approaches could not be expected to estimate accurate correct doses. This led to intensive development of both experimental (largely TLD-100 dosimetry) and Monte Carlo dosimetry techniques along with more accurate air-kerma strength standards. As a result of extensive benchmarking and intercomparison of these different methods, single-seed low-energy radionuclide dose distributions are now known with a total uncertainty of 3%-5%.

  9. Trends of personal dosimetry at atomic power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamura, Seini [Fuji Electric Co. Ltd., Tokyo Factory, Radiation Equipment Department, Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-12-31

    The individual dosimetry at the atomic power station is sorted for monthly dosimetry, daily dosimetry and special job dosimetry in high dose circumstance. Film badge (passive dosimeter) can measure gamma dose, beta dose and neutron dose respectively lower than about 0.1 mSv. While workers are in the radiation controlled area, they have to wear the dosimeters and the individual dose is accumulated for every one month. Recently the Silicon semiconductors detecting beta ray and neutron have been developed. With microcircuit technology and these new sensors, new multiple function dosimeter of the card size had been put to practical use. The result of dose measurement obtained by the electronic dosimeter is consistent well with the measurement of usual film badge and new dosimeter can determine the dose as low as 0.01 mSv. The result is stored in the non-volatile memory in the electronic personal dosimeter and held for more than one year without the power supply. The function to read data directly from the memory improves the reliability of the data protection. The realization of the unified radiation control system that uses the electronic personal dosimeter for monthly dosimetry is expected. (J.P.N.)

  10. Reactor Dosimetry State of the Art 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorbraak, Wim; Debarberis, Luigi; D'Hondt, Pierre; Wagemans, Jan

    2009-08-01

    . Williams, A. P. Ribaric and T. Schnauber. Agile high-fidelity MCNP model development techniques for rapid mechanical design iteration / J. A. Kulesza.Extension of Raptor-M3G to r-8-z geometry for use in reactor dosimetry applications / M. A. Hunter, G. Longoni and S. L. Anderson. In vessel exposure distributions evaluated with MCNP5 for Atucha II / J. M. Longhino, H. Blaumann and G. Zamonsky. Atucha I nuclear power plant azimutal ex-vessel flux profile evaluation / J. M. Longhino ... [et al.]. UFTR thermal column characterization and redesign for maximized thermal flux / C. Polit and A. Haghighat. Activation counter using liquid light-guide for dosimetry of neutron burst / M. Hayashi ... [et al.]. Control rod reactivity curves for the annular core research reactor / K. R. DePriest ... [et al.]. Specification of irradiation conditions in VVER-440 surveillance positions / V. Kochkin ... [et al.]. Simulations of Mg-Ar ionisation and TE-TE ionisation chambers with MCNPX in a straightforward gamma and beta irradiation field / S. Nievaart ... [et al.]. The change of austenitic stainless steel elements content in the inner parts of VVER-440 reactor during operation / V. Smutný, J. Hep and P. Novosad. Fast neutron environmental spectrometry using disk activation / G. Lövestam ... [et al.]. Optimization of the neutron activation detector location scheme for VVER-lOOO ex-vessel dosimetry / V. N. Bukanov ... [et al.]. Irradiation conditions for surveillance specimens located into plane containers installed in the WWER-lOOO reactor of unit 2 of the South-Ukrainian NPP / O. V. Grytsenko. V. N. Bukanov and S. M. Pugach. Conformity between LRO mock-ups and VVERS NPP RPV neutron flux attenuation / S. Belousov. Kr. Ilieva and D. Kirilova. FLUOLE: a new relevant experiment for PWR pressure vessel surveillance / D. Beretz ... [et al.]. Transport of neutrons and photons through the iron and water layers / M. J. Kost'ál ... [et al.]. Condition evaluation of spent nuclear fuel assemblies

  11. INDIVIDUAL DOSIMETRY SERVICE

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    Personnel in the distribution groups Aleph, Delphi, L3, Opal who also work for other experiments than at LEP, should contact their dispatchers to explain their activities for the future, after LEP dismantling in order to be maintained on the regular distribution list at Individual DosimetryWe inform all staff and users under regular dosimetric control that the dosimeters for the monitoring period MAY/JUNE will be available from their usual dispatchers on Tuesday 2 May.Please have your films changed before the 12 May.The colour of the dosimeter valid in is MAY/JUNE is YELLOW.Individual Dosimetry Service will be closed on Friday 28 April.

  12. Eurados trial performance test for photon dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stadtmann, H.; Bordy, J.M.; Ambrosi, P.

    2001-01-01

    Within the framework of the EURADOS Action entitled Harmonisation and Dosimetric Quality Assurance in Individual Monitoring for External Radiation, trial performance tests for whole-body and extremity personal dosemeters were carried out. Photon, beta and neutron dosemeters were considered....... This paper summarises the results of the whole-body photon dosemeter test. Twenty-six dosimetry services from all EU Member States and Switzerland participated. Twelve different radiation fields were used to simulate various workplace irradiation fields. Dose values from 0.4 mSv to 80 mSv were chosen. From...

  13. Dosimetry for SIRT; Dosimetrie bei der SIRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, S.P. [Universitatesklinikum Essen (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2011-09-15

    Dosimetry is only one aspect of treatment planning for 'Selective internal radiotherapy' (SIRT) or 'transarterial radioembolization' (TARE) with Yttrium-90 Microspheres is an emerging palliative therapy for malignant hepatoma. Dosimetric considerations, together with interventional, oncological and hepatological aspects need to be considered for optimal treatment stratification. The product-specific dosimetric calculations for 2 commercially available microsphere products are compared and set in relation to the average doses to liver and tumor. Ostensible discrepancies between the dose-response of Y-90-microspheres and external beam radiation therapy are discussed in the context of radiobiological concepts. (orig.)

  14. Status of radiation processing dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, A.

    1993-01-01

    Several milestones have marked the field of radiation processing dosimetry since IMRP 7. Among them are the IAEA symposium on High Dose Dosimetry for Radiation Processing and the international Workshops on Dosimetry for Radiation Processing organized by the ASTM. Several standards have been...... or are being published by the ASTM in this field, both on dosimetry procedures and on the proper use of specific dosimeter systems. Several individuals are involved in this international cooperation which contribute significantly to the broader understanding of the role of dosimetry in radiation processing....... The importance of dosimetry is emphasized in the standards on radiation sterilization which are currently drafted by the European standards organization CEN and by the international standards organization ISO. In both standards, dosimetry plays key roles in characterization of the facility, in qualification...

  15. National intercomparison programme for radionuclide analysis in environmental samples: Aramar radioecological laboratory performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arine, Bruno Burini Robles, E-mail: bruno.arine@ctmsp.mar.mil.b [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo (CTMSP/ARAMAR), Ipero, SP (Brazil). Lab. Radioecologico; Moraes, Marco Antonio P.V., E-mail: marco.proenca@ctmsp.mar.mil.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The radioecological laboratory is concerned with the measurements of background radiation (mainly uranium and thorium natural series) and present effluents in the Aramar Experimental Centre, as well as in its surroundings. The laboratory is directly subordinated to the Navy Technological Centre in Sao Paulo (CTMSP - Sao Paulo - Brazil), a military research organization whose goal is to develop nuclear and energy systems for the Brazilian naval ship propulsion. The measurements were performed in addition to the Environmental Monitoring Programme carried out in the same region. For this endeavour, the laboratory has attended to the National Intercomparison Programme conducted by the Institute for Radioprotection and Dosimetry (IRD) by analyzing several kinds of solid and liquid samples containing specific radionuclides through gamma spectrometry, liquid scintillation, alpha-beta total counting and fluorimetry techniques, since December 1995. In the last 15 years, our results were compared to another 19 laboratories and rated as 'very good' and 'acceptable' in at least 90% of the results. (author)

  16. Radionuclides in radiation-induced bystander effect; may it share in radionuclide therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widel, M

    2017-01-01

    For many years in radiobiology and radiotherapy predominated the conviction that cellular DNA is the main target for ionizing radiation, however, the view has changed in the past 20 years. Nowadays, it is assumed that not only directed (targeted) radiation effect, but also an indirect (non-targeted) effect may contribute to the result of radiation treatment. Non-targeted effect is relatively well recognized after external beam irradiation in vitro and in vivo, and comprises such phenomena like radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE), genomic instability, adaptive response and abscopal (out of field) effect. These stress-induced and molecular signaling mediated phenomena appear in non-targeted cells as variety responses resembling that observed in directly hit cells. Bystander effects can be both detrimental and beneficial in dependence on dose, dose-rate, cell type, genetic status and experimental condition. Less is known about radionuclide-induced non-targeted effects in radionuclide therapy, although, based on characteristics of the radionuclide radiation, on experiments in vitro utilizing classical and 3-D cell cultures, and preclinical study on animals it seems obvious that exposure to radionuclide is accompanied by various bystander effects, mostly damaging, less often protective. This review summarizes existing data on radionuclide induced bystander effects comprising radionuclides emitting beta- and alpha-particles and Auger electrons used in tumor radiotherapy and diagnostics. So far, separation of the direct effect of radionuclide decay from crossfire and bystander effects in clinical targeted radionuclide therapy is impossible because of the lack of methods to assess whether, and to what extent bystander effect is involved in human organism. Considerations on this topic are also included.

  17. Dosimetry for the treatment of cystic craniopharyngioma through radiocolloids with {sup 186} Re; Dosimetria para el tratamiento de craneofaringiomas quisticos mediante radiocoloide con {sup 186} Re

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rojas, E.L.; Al-dweri, F.M.O.; Lallena, A.M. [Depto. de Fisica Moderna, Universidad de Granada (Spain); Bodineau, C.; Galan, P. [Servicio de Radiofisica Hospitalaria, Hospital Regional Universitario ' Carlos Haya' , 29010 Malaga (Spain)

    2003-07-01

    The cystic craniopharyngioma (CQ) are histologically benign tumors that can affect important organs, as the hypothalamus or the optic nerve. They are treated introducing, inside the cyst, a radioactive colloid. The wall constitutes the white volume and the dosimetry is usually carried out starting from analytic formulas that only are valid in the case of an homogeneous media, uniform and infinite. In this work it is studied the dosimetry of the CQ by means of Monte Carlo simulation (MC), taking in account the different materials and interfaces that conform them. We present the obtained results for the radionuclide {sup 186} Re. We have used the Monte Carlo code Penelope and we follow 5x10{sup 6} histories in each simulation. We supposed a size of CQ of 1.75 cm of radio and a wall thickness of 1 mm and we have varied the constituent materials of the interior of the cyst and of the wall. The analytic calculations that we carry out show an excellent agreement with the MC results for an unique media (water), as much for the beta radiation as for those originated of the Rhenium disintegration. However, when it takes in account the gel that is introduced in the tumor for the treatment and we vary the constituent material of the wall, we find important differences. Of the analysis of our results we can conclude that the dosimetry for the treatment of CQ based in the usual analytic formulas overestimates the doses really deposited in the wall of the CQ. (Author)

  18. High frequency electromagnetic dosimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Sánchez-Hernández, David A

    2009-01-01

    Along with the growth of RF and microwave technology applications, there is a mounting concern about the possible adverse effects over human health from electromagnetic radiation. Addressing this issue and putting it into perspective, this groundbreaking resource provides critical details on the latest advances in high frequency electromagnetic dosimetry.

  19. Individual dosimetry service

    CERN Document Server

    2004-01-01

    We inform all staff and users under regular dosimetry control that the dosimeters for the monitoring period JULY-AUGUST 2004 are available from their usual dispatchers. Please have your films changed before the 15 JULY 2004. The color of the dosimeter valid in July-August 2004 is PINK.

  20. Kinetics model for lutate dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, M.F.; Mesquita, C.H., E-mail: mflima@ipen.br, E-mail: chmesqui@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-11-01

    The use of compartmental analysis to predict the behavior of drugs in the organism is considered the better option among numerous methods employed in pharmacodynamics. A six compartments model was developed to determinate the kinetic constants of 177Lu-DOTATATO biodistribution using data from one published study with 67 patients treated by PRRT (Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy) and followed by CT during 68,25 hours. The compartmental analysis was made using the software AnaComp Registered-Sign . The influence of the time pos-injection over the dose assessment was studied taking into account the renal excretion management by aminoacid coinfusion, whose direct effects persist in the first day. The biodistribution curve was split in five sectors: 0-0.25h; 0-3.25h; 3.25-24.25h; 24.25-68.25h and 3.25-68.25h. After the examination of that influence, the study was concentrated in separate the biodistribution curve in two phases. Phase 1: governed by uptake from the blood, considering the time pos-injection until 3.25h and phase 2: governed by renal excretion, considering the time pos-injection from 3.25h to 68.25h. The model considered the organs and tissues superposition in the CT image acquisition by sampling parameters as the contribution of the the activity concentration in blood and relation between the sizes of the whole body and measured organs. The kinetic constants obtained from each phase (1 and 2) were used in dose assessment to patients in 26 organs and tissues described by MIRD. Dosimetry results were in agreement with the available results from literature, restrict to whole body, kidneys, bone marrow, spleen and liver. The advantage of the proposed model is the compartmental method quickness and power to estimate dose in organs and tissues, including tumor that, in the most part, were not discriminate by voxels of phantoms built using CT images. (author)

  1. Radionuclides in US coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisselle, C. A.; Brown, R. D.

    1984-03-01

    The current state of knowledge with respect to radionuclide concentrations in US coals is discussed. Emphasis is placed on the levels of uranium in coal (and lignite) which are considered to represent a concern resulting from coal combustion; areas of the US where such levels have been found; and possible origins of high radionuclide levels in coal. The report reviews relevant studies and presents new data derived from a computerized search of radionuclide content in about 4000 coal samples collected throughout the coterminous US. 103 references, 5 figures, 5 tables.

  2. Radiation-Induced Second Cancer Risk Estimates From Radionuclide Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarz, Bryan; Besemer, Abigail

    2017-09-01

    The use of radionuclide therapy in the clinical setting is expected to increase significantly over the next decade. There is an important need to understand the radiation-induced second cancer risk associated with these procedures. In this study the radiation-induced cancer risk in five radionuclide therapy patients was investigated. These patients underwent serial SPECT imaging scans following injection as part of a clinical trial testing the efficacy of a 131Iodine-labeled radiopharmaceutical. Using these datasets the committed absorbed doses to multiple sensitive structures were calculated using RAPID, which is a novel Monte Carlo-based 3D dosimetry platform developed for personalized dosimetry. The excess relative risk (ERR) for radiation-induced cancer in these structures was then derived from these dose estimates following the recommendations set forth in the BEIR VII report. The radiation-induced leukemia ERR was highest among all sites considered reaching a maximum value of approximately 4.5. The radiation-induced cancer risk in the kidneys, liver and spleen ranged between 0.3 and 1.3. The lifetime attributable risks (LARs) were also calculated, which ranged from 30 to 1700 cancers per 100,000 persons and were highest for leukemia and the liver for both males and females followed by radiation-induced spleen and kidney cancer. The risks associated with radionuclide therapy are similar to the risk associated with external beam radiation therapy.

  3. Individualized dosimetry in patients undergoing therapy with {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-D-Phe{sup 1}-Tyr{sup 3}-octreotate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandstroem, Mattias [Uppsala University Hospital, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Division of Medical Physics, Uppsala (Sweden); Uppsala University Hospital, Department of Hospital Physics, Uppsala (Sweden); Garske, Ulrike [Uppsala University Hospital, Department of Medical Sciences, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Uppsala (Sweden); Granberg, Dan [Uppsala University Hospital, Department of Medical Sciences, Division of Endocrine Oncology, Uppsala (Sweden); Sundin, Anders [Karolinska University Hospital, Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Division of Diagnostic Radiology, Stockholm (Sweden); Lundqvist, Hans [Uppsala University, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2010-02-15

    In recent years, targeted radionuclide therapy with [{sup 177}Lu-DOTA{sup 0}, Tyr{sup 3}]octreotate for neuroendocrine tumours has yielded promising results. This therapy may be further improved by using individualized dosimetry allowing optimization of the absorbed dose to the tumours and the normal organs. The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility and reliability of individualized dosimetry based on SPECT in comparison to conventional planar imaging. Attenuation-corrected SPECT data were analysed both by using organ-based volumes of interest (VOIs) to obtain the total radioactivity in the organ, and by using small VOIs to measure the tissue radioactivity concentration. During the first treatment session in 24 patients, imaging was performed 1, 24, 96 and 168 h after [{sup 177}Lu-DOTA{sup 0}, Tyr{sup 3}]octreotate infusion. Absorbed doses in non tumour-affected kidney, liver and spleen were calculated and compared for all three methods (planar imaging, SPECT organ VOIs, SPECT small VOIs). Planar and SPECT dosimetry were comparable in areas free of tumours, but due to overlap the planar dosimetry highly overestimated the absorbed dose in organs with tumours. Furthermore, SPECT dosimetry based on small VOIs proved to be more reliable than whole-organ dosimetry. We conclude that SPECT dosimetry based on small VOIs is feasible and more accurate than conventional planar dosimetry, and thus may contribute towards optimising targeted radionuclide therapy. (orig.)

  4. The SUCIMA project: A status report on high granularity dosimetry and proton beam monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caccia, M. [Dipartimento di Scienze CC.FF.MM., Universita dell' Insubria, Como (Italy)]. E-mail: Massimo.Caccia@uninsubria.it; Badano, L. [Fondazione per Adroterapia Oncologica, Novara (Italy); Berst, D. [Laboratoire d' Electronique et de Physique des Systemes Instrumentaux, Universite Luis Pasteur, Strasbourg (France); Centre National de la Recherce Scientifique/IN2P3 - Paris (France)] (and others)

    2006-05-01

    The SUCIMA collaboration has been developing instruments and methods for real-time, high granularity imaging of extended electron sources. In particular, dosimetry of intravascular brachytherapy {beta} sources has been intensively studied, together with monitoring of hadrontherapy beams by imaging of secondary electrons emitted by a non-disruptive target. The paper reports the latest results on absolute dosimetry with a large-area silicon strip detectors and on beam monitoring with a hybrid pad sensor.

  5. Dosimetry of radium-223 and progeny

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, D.R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Sgouros, G. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Radium-223 is a short-lived (11.4 d) alpha emitter with potential applications in radioimmunotherapy of cancer. Radium-223 can be complexed and linked to protein delivery molecules for specific tumor-cell targeting. It decays through a cascade of short-lived alpha- and beta-emitting daughters with emission of about 28 MeV of energy through complete decay. The first three alpha particles are essentially instantaneous. Photons associated with Ra-223 and progeny provide the means for tumor and normal-organ imaging and dosimetry. Two beta particles provide additional therapeutic value. Radium-223 may be produced economically and in sufficient amounts for widescale application. Many aspects of the chemistry of carrier-free isotope preparation, complexation, and linkage to the antibody have been developed and are being tested. The radiation dosimetry of a Ra-223-labeled antibody shows favorable tumor to normal tissue dose ratios for therapy. The 11.4-d half-life of Ra-223 allows sufficient time for immunoconjugate preparation, administration, and tumor localization by carrier antibodies before significant radiological decay takes place. If 0.01 percent of a 37 MBq (1 mCi) injection deposits in a one gram tumor mass, and if the activity is retained with a typical effective half-time (75 h), the absorbed dose will be 163 mGy MBq{sup {minus}1} (600 rad mCi{sup {minus}1}) administered. 49 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Preparation of Radiopharmaceuticals Labeled with Metal Radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, M.J.

    2012-02-16

    oxygen retention of the tissue and the significantly greater retention amounting in hypoxic tissue. This hypothesis was confirmed in a series of animal studies. Cu-64 can be used both as an imaging radionuclide and a therapeutic radionuclide. The therapeutic efficacy of Cu-64 ATSM was proven in hamsters bearing the CW39 human colorectal tumors. The administration of Cu-64 ATSM significantly increased the survival time of tumor-bearing animals with no acute toxicity. This copper agent therefore shows promise for radiotherapy. The flow tracer Cu-64 PTSM also demonstrates therapeutic potential by inhibiting cancer cells implanted in animal models. Again, this inhibition occurred at doses which showed no sign of toxicity to the animals. Cu-ATSM was translated to humans, under other support a series of tumors were investigated; these included head and neck cancer, non-small cell lung cancer, cervical cancer and renal cancer. Another radionuclide that was investigated was titanium 45. This radionuclide was successfully produced by radiation of a scandium foil with 15 MeV protons. The titanium 45 was processed and separated from residual scandium by high exchange chomotrophy. Titanium titanocene has been utilized as a therapeutic agent; this compound was prepared and studied in vitro and in vivo. Another project was the preparation of cyclodextrin dimers as a new pre-targeting approach for tumor uptake. Beta-cyclodextradin and two other dimers were synthesized. These dimers were studied for the in vivo application. Work continued on the application of the radionuclide already discussed. Technetium 94m, a positron emitting radionuclide of the widely used 99m Tc nuclide was also prepared. This allows the quantification of the uptake of technetium radiopharmaceuticals. In collaboration with Professor David Piwnica-Worms, technetium 94m, sestamibi was studied in animal models and in a limited number of human subjects.

  7. The dosimetry of ionizing radiation

    CERN Document Server

    1990-01-01

    A continuation of the treatise The Dosimetry of Ionizing Radiation, Volume III builds upon the foundations of Volumes I and II and the tradition of the preceeding treatise Radiation Dosimetry. Volume III contains three comprehensive chapters on the applications of radiation dosimetry in particular research and medical settings, a chapter on unique and useful detectors, and two chapters on Monte Carlo techniques and their applications.

  8. Present status and perspective of radiochemical analysis of radionuclides in Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Xiaolin; Olsson, Mattias; Togneri, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Radiochemical analysis plays a critical role in the determination of pure beta and alpha emitting radionuclides for environmental monitoring, radioecology, decommissioning, nuclear forensics and geological dating. A remarkable development on radiochemical analysis has been achieved in the past...

  9. Neutron beam measurement dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amaro, C.R. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1995-11-01

    This report describes animal dosimetry studies and phantom measurements. During 1994, 12 dogs were irradiated at BMRR as part of a 4 fraction dose tolerance study. The animals were first infused with BSH and irradiated daily for 4 consecutive days. BNL irradiated 2 beagles as part of their dose tolerance study using BPA fructose. In addition, a dog at WSU was irradiated at BMRR after an infusion of BPA fructose. During 1994, the INEL BNCT dosimetry team measured neutron flux and gamma dose profiles in two phantoms exposed to the epithermal neutron beam at the BMRR. These measurements were performed as a preparatory step to the commencement of human clinical trials in progress at the BMRR.

  10. INDIVIDUAL DOSIMETRY SERVICE

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    Personnel in the distribution groups Aleph, Delphi, L3, Opal who also work for other experiments than at LEP, should contact the Individual Dosimetry Service.We inform all staff and users under regular dosimetric control that the dosimeters for the monitoring period MARCH/APRIL will be available from their usual dispatchers on the third of March 2000.Please have your films changed before the 13th of March.The colour of the dosimeter valid in MARCH/APRIL is BLUE.

  11. INDIVIDUAL DOSIMETRY SERVICE

    CERN Multimedia

    1999-01-01

    Personnel in the distribution groups Aleph, Delphi, L3, Opal who also work for other experiments than at LEP, should contact the Individual Dosimetry ServiceWe inform all staff and users under regular dosimetric control that the dosimeters for the monitoring period JANUARY/FEBRUARY will be available from their usual dispatchers on Monday the third of January 2000.Please have your films changed:before the 12 January.The colour of the dosimeter valid in JANUARY/FEBRUARY is WHITE.

  12. Dosimetry: an ARDENT topic

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2012-01-01

    The first annual ARDENT workshop took place in Vienna from 20 to 23 November. The workshop gathered together the Early-Stage Researchers (ESR) and their supervisors, plus other people involved from all the participating institutions.   “The meeting, which was organised with the local support of the Austrian Institute of Technology, was a nice opportunity for the ESRs to get together, meet each other, and present their research plans and some preliminary results of their work,” says Marco Silari, a member of CERN Radiation Protection Group and the scientist in charge of the programme. Two full days were devoted to a training course on radiation dosimetry, delivered by renowned experts. The workshop closed with a half-day visit to the MedAustron facility in Wiener Neustadt. ARDENT (Advanced Radiation Dosimetry European Network Training) is a Marie Curie ITN project funded under EU FP7 with €4 million. The project focuses on radiation dosimetry exploiting se...

  13. EANM/ESC guidelines for radionuclide imaging of cardiac function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hesse, B.; Lindhardt, T.B.; Acampa, W.;

    2008-01-01

    radionuclide ventriculography, gated myocardial perfusion scintigraphy, gated PET, and studies with non-imaging devices for the evaluation of cardiac function. The items covered are presented in 11 sections: clinical indications, radiopharmaceuticals and dosimetry, study acquisition, RV EF, LV EF, LV volumes......Radionuclide imaging of cardiac function represents a number of well-validated techniques for accurate determination of right (RV) and left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction (EF) and LV volumes. These first European guidelines give recommendations for how and when to use first-pass and equilibrium......, LV regional function, LV diastolic function, reports and image display and reference values from the literature of RVEF, LVEF and LV volumes. If specific recommendations given cannot be based on evidence from original, scientific studies, referral is given to "prevailing or general consensus...

  14. Luminescence imaging using radionuclides: a potential application in molecular imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jeong Chan [Department of Molecular Medicine, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 700-422 (Korea, Republic of); Il An, Gwang [Molecular Imaging Research Center, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Se-Il [Department of Molecular Medicine, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 700-422 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Jungmin [Korea Basic Science Institute Chuncheon Center, Gangwon-do 200-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hong Joo [Department of Physics and Energy Science, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-710 (Korea, Republic of); Su Ha, Yeong; Wang, Eun Kyung [Department of Molecular Medicine, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 700-422 (Korea, Republic of); Min Kim, Kyeong; Kim, Jung Young [Molecular Imaging Research Center, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jaetae [Department of Nuclear Medicine, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 700-422 (Korea, Republic of); Welch, Michael J. [Department of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Yoo, Jeongsoo, E-mail: yooj@knu.ac.k [Department of Molecular Medicine, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 700-422 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-04-15

    Introduction: Nuclear and optical imaging are complementary in many aspects and there would be many advantages when optical imaging probes are prepared using radionuclides rather than classic fluorophores, and when nuclear and optical dual images are obtained using single imaging probe. Methods: The luminescence intensities of various radionuclides having different decay modes have been assayed using luminescence imaging and in vitro luminometer. Radioiodinated Herceptin was injected into a tumor-bearing mouse, and luminescence and microPET images were obtained. The plant dipped in [{sup 32}P]phosphate solution was scanned in luminescence mode. Radio-TLC plate was also imaged in the same imaging mode. Results: Radionuclides emitting high energy {beta}{sup +}/{beta}{sup -} particles showed higher luminescence signals. NIH3T6.7 tumors were detected in both optical and nuclear imaging. The uptake of [{sup 32}P]phosphate in plant was easily followed by luminescence imaging. Radio-TLC plate was visualized and radiochemical purity was quantified using luminescence imaging. Conclusion: Many radionuclides with high energetic {beta}{sup +} or {beta}{sup -} particles during decay were found to be imaged in luminescence mode due mainly to Cerenkov radiation. 'Cerenkov imaging' provides a new optical imaging platform and an invaluable bridge between optical and nuclear imaging. New optical imaging probes could be easily prepared using well-established radioiodination methods. Cerenkov imaging will have more applications in the research field of plant science and autoradiography.

  15. Radionuclide therapy revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoefnagel, C.A. (Nederlands Kanker Inst., Amsterdam (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine)

    1991-06-01

    Apart from its use in endocrinology and rheumatology, therapeutic nuclear medicine is developing rapidly as an additional treatment modality in oncology. Many different specific tumour-seeking radiopharmaceuticals are being applied both for diagnostic scintigraphy and treatment, using multiple routes and mechanisms to target radionuclides at tumours. After a brief introduction of some basic principles of radionuclide targeting, the therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals available are reviewed according to the accumulation site in relation to the cell nucleus; the results of their current clinical use for therapy are also reviewed. The response observed to a number of these applications, the non-invasiveness of the procedure and the relative lack of toxicity and late effects in comparison with chemotherapy and external beam radiotherapy make radionuclide therapy an attractive and realistic alternative in the management of malignant disease, as well as in the treatment of a few benign disorders. (orig.).

  16. Radionuclides in house dust

    CERN Document Server

    Fry, F A; Green, N; Hammond, D J

    1985-01-01

    Discharges of radionuclides from the British Nuclear Fuel plc (BNFL) reprocessing plant at Sellafield in Cumbria have led to elevated concentrations radionuclides in the local environment. The major routes of exposure of the public are kept under review by the appropriate Government departments and monitoring is carried out both by the departments and by BNFL itself. Recently, there has been increasing public concern about general environmental contamination resulting from the discharges and, in particular, about possible exposure of members of the public by routes not previously investigated in detail. One such postulated route of exposure that has attracted the interest of the public, the press and Parliament arises from the presence of radionuclides within houses. In view of this obvious and widespread concern, the Board has undertaken a sampling programme in a few communities in Cumbria to assess the radiological significance of this source of exposure. From the results of our study, we conclude that, alt...

  17. Radioembolization dosimetry : the road ahead

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, Maarten L J; Elschot, Mattijs; Sze, Daniel Y; Kao, Yung H; Nijsen, JFW; Iagaru, Andre H; de Jong, Hugo W A M; van den Bosch, Maurice A A J; Lam, Marnix G E H

    2015-01-01

    Methods for calculating the activity to be administered during yttrium-90 radioembolization (RE) are largely based on empirical toxicity and efficacy analyses, rather than dosimetry. At the same time, it is recognized that treatment planning based on proper dosimetry is of vital importance for the o

  18. Targeted Radionuclide Therapy of Melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norain, Abdullah; Dadachova, Ekaterina

    2016-05-01

    An estimated 60,000 individuals in the United States and 132,000 worldwide are yearly diagnosed with melanoma. Until recently, treatment options for patients with stages III-IV metastatic disease were limited and offered marginal, if any, improvement in overall survival. The situation changed with the introduction of B-RAF inhibitors and anti-cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 and anti-programmed cell death protein 1 immunotherapies into the clinical practice. With only some patients responding well to the immune therapies and with very serious side effects and high costs of immunotherapy, there is still room for other approaches for the treatment of metastatic melanoma. Targeted radionuclide therapy of melanoma could be divided into the domains of radioimmunotherapy (RIT), radiolabeled peptides, and radiolabeled small molecules. RIT of melanoma is currently experiencing a renaissance with the clinical trials of alpha-emitter (213)Bi-labeled and beta-emitter (188)Rhenium-labeled monoclonal antibodies in patients with metastatic melanoma producing encouraging results. The investigation of the mechanism of efficacy of melanoma RIT points at killing of melanoma stem cells by RIT and involvement of immune system such as complement-dependent cytotoxicity. The domain of radiolabeled peptides for targeted melanoma therapy has been preclinical so far, with work concentrated on radiolabeled peptide analogues of melanocyte-stimulating hormone receptor and on melanin-binding peptides. The field of radiolabeled small molecule produced radioiodinated benzamides that cross the cellular membrane and bind to the intracellular melanin. The recent clinical trial demonstrated measurable antitumor effects and no acute or midterm toxicities. We are hopeful that the targeted radionuclide therapy of metastatic melanoma would become a clinical reality as a stand-alone therapy or in combination with the immunotherapies such as anti-PD1 programmed cell death protein 1 monoclonal antibodies

  19. Targeted Radionuclide Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Cheng

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Targeted radiotherapy is an evolving and promising modality of cancer treatment. The killing of cancer cells is achieved with the use of biological vectors and appropriate radionuclides. Among the many advantages of this approach are its selectiveness in delivering the radiation to the target, relatively less severe and infrequent side effects, and the possibility of assessing the uptake by the tumor prior to the therapy. Several different radiopharmaceuticals are currently being used by various administration routes and targeting mechanisms. This article aims to briefly review the current status of targeted radiotherapy as well as to outline the advantages and disadvantages of radionuclides used for this purpose.

  20. 90Yttrium PET/MR-based dosimetry after liver radioembolization (SIRT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wissmeyer, Michael; Delattre, Bénédicte M A; Zaidi, Habib; Terraz, Sylvain; Ratib, Osman

    2015-04-01

    Biodistribution and dosimetric aspects are important issues in the preparation realization of radionuclide therapies and thus play an emerging role in radioembolization of liver malignancies. Biodistribution assessment of liver selective internal radiotherapy (SIRT) has been shown feasible using PET/CT PET/magnetic resonance (MR). Whereas prospective dosimetry using 99mTc macroaggregated albumin SPECT/CT is discussed controversially, retrospective 90Y PET/CT has been shown feasible for dosimetry of SIRT in recent studies. Considering the advantages of PET/MR with regard to lesion detection radiation dose reduction compared to PET/CT, especially when repeated scanning is intended, we investigated the use of PET/MR for dosimetry of liver SIRT.

  1. Internal exposure to neutron-activated {sup 56}Mn dioxide powder in Wistar rats. Pt. 1. Dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stepanenko, Valeriy; Kaprin, Andrey; Galkin, Vsevolod; Ivanov, Sergey; Kolyzhenkov, Timofey; Petukhov, Aleksey; Yaskova, Elena; Belukha, Irina; Khailov, Artem; Skvortsov, Valeriy; Ivannikov, Alexander; Akhmedova, Umukusum; Bogacheva, Viktoria [Medical Radiological Research Center (MRRC) named after A.F. Tsyb - National Medical Research Radiological Center of the Health Ministry of the Russian Federation, Obninsk, Kaluga Region (Russian Federation); Rakhypbekov, Tolebay; Dyussupov, Altay; Chaizhunusova, Nailya; Sayakenov, Nurlan; Uzbekov, Darkhan; Saimova, Aisulu; Shabdarbaeva, Dariya; Kairkhanova, Yankar [Semey State Medical University, Semey (Kazakhstan); Otani, Keiko; Endo, Satoru; Satoh, Kenichi; Kawano, Noriyuki; Fujimoto, Nariaki; Hoshi, Masaharu [Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Shichijo, Kazuko; Nakashima, Masahiro; Takatsuji, Toshihiro [Nagasaki University, Nagasaki (Japan); Sakaguchi, Aya; Kato, Hiroaki; Onda, Yuichi [University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Toyoda, Shin [Okayama University of Science, Okayama (Japan); Sato, Hitoshi [Ibaraki Prefectural University of Health Science, Ibaraki (Japan); Skakov, Mazhin; Vurim, Alexandr; Gnyrya, Vyacheslav; Azimkhanov, Almas; Kolbayenkov, Alexander [National Nuclear Center of the Republic of Kazakhstan, Kurchatov (Kazakhstan); Zhumadilov, Kasym [Eurasian National University named after L.N. Gumilyov, Astana (Kazakhstan)

    2017-03-15

    There were two sources of ionizing irradiation after the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki: (1) initial gamma-neutron irradiation at the moment of detonation and (2) residual radioactivity. Residual radioactivity consisted of two components: radioactive fallout containing fission products, including radioactive fissile materials from nuclear device, and neutron-activated radioisotopes from materials on the ground. The dosimetry systems DS86 and DS02 were mainly devoted to the assessment of initial radiation exposure to neutrons and gamma rays, while only brief considerations were given for the estimation of doses caused by residual radiation exposure. Currently, estimation of internal exposure of atomic bomb survivors due to dispersed radioactivity and neutron-activated radioisotopes from materials on the ground is a matter of some interest, in Japan. The main neutron-activated radionuclides in soil dust were {sup 24}Na, {sup 28}Al, {sup 31}Si, {sup 32}P, {sup 38}Cl, {sup 42}K, {sup 45}Ca, {sup 46}Sc, {sup 56}Mn, {sup 59}Fe, {sup 60}Co, and {sup 134}Cs. The radionuclide {sup 56}Mn (T{sub 1/2} = 2.58 h) is known as one of the dominant beta- and gamma emitters during the first few hours after neutron irradiation of soil and other materials on ground, dispersed in the form of dust after a nuclear explosion in the atmosphere. To investigate the peculiarities of biological effects of internal exposure to {sup 56}Mn in comparison with external gamma irradiation, a dedicated experiment with Wistar rats exposed to neutron-activated {sup 56}Mn dioxide powder was performed recently by Shichijo and coworkers. The dosimetry required for this experiment is described here. Assessment of internal radiation doses was performed on the basis of measured {sup 56}Mn activity in the organs and tissues of the rats and of absorbed fractions of internal exposure to photons and electrons calculated with the MCNP-4C Monte Carlo using a mathematical rat phantom. The first results of

  2. Chancellor Water Colloids: Characterization and Radionuclide Association

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel-Fattah, Amr I. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-18

    Concluding remarks about this paper are: (1) Gravitational settling, zeta potential, and ultrafiltration data indicate the existence of a colloidal phase of both the alpha and beta emitters in the Chancellor water; (2) The low activity combined with high dispersion homogeneity of the Chancellor water indicate that both alpha and beta emitters are not intrinsic colloids; (3) Radionuclides in the Chancellor water, particularly Pu, coexist as dissolved aqueous and sorbed phases - in other words the radionuclides are partitioned between the aqueous phase and the colloidal phase; (4) The presence of Pu as a dissolved species in the aqueous phase, suggests the possibility of Pu in the (V) oxidation state - this conclusion is supported by the similarity of the k{sub d} value of Pu determined in the current study to that determined for Pu(V) sorbed onto smectite colloids, and the similar electrokinetic behavior of the Chancellor water colloids to smectite colloids; (5) About 50% of the Pu(V) is in the aqueous phase and 50% is sorbed on colloids (mass concentration of colloids in the Chancellor water is 0.12 g/L); (6) The k{sub d} of the Pu and the beta emitters (fission products) between aqueous and colloidal phases in the Chancellor water is {approx}8.0 x 10{sup 3} mL/g using two different activity measurement techniques (LSC and alpha spectroscopy); (7) The gravitational settling and size distributions of the association colloids indicate that the properties (at least the physical ones) of the colloids to which the alpha emitters are associated with seem to be different that the properties of the colloids to which the beta emitters are associated with - the beta emitters are associated with very small particles ({approx}50 - 120 nm), while the alpha emitters are associated with relatively larger particles; and (8) The Chancellor water colloids are extremely stable under the natural pH and ionic strength conditions, indicating high potential for transport in the

  3. Relocation of Dosimetry Service

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    The Dosimetry Service is moving from Building 24 to Building 55 and will therefore be closed on Friday, March 30. From Monday, April 2 onwards you will find us in building 55/1-001. Please note that during that day we might still have some problems with the internet connections and cannot fully guarantee normal service procedures. The service's opening hours and telephone number will not change as a result of the move 8.30 - 12.00, afternoons closed Tel. 72155

  4. INDIVIDUAL DOSIMETRY SERVICE

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    Personnel in the distribution groups Aleph, Delphi, L3, Opal who also work for other experiments than at LEP, should contact their dispatchers to explain their activities for the future, after LEP dismantling in order to be maintained on the regular distribution list at Individual Dosimetry ServiceWe inform all staffs and users under regular dosimetric control that the dosimeters for the monitoring period JULY/AUGUST are available from their usual dispatchers.Please have your films changed before the 10th of July.The colour of the dosimeter valid in JULY/AUGUST is PINK.

  5. Latest developments in silica fibre luminescence dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, D. A.; Abdul S, S. F.; Jafari, S. M.; Alanazi, A. [University of Surrey, Department of Physics, GU2 7XH Guildford, Surrey (United Kingdom); Amouzad M, G. [University of Malaya, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Electrical Engineering, Integrated Lightwave Research Group, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Addul R, H. A.; Mizanur R, A. K. M.; Zubair, H. T.; Begum, M.; Yusoff, Z.; Omar, N. Y. M. [Multimedia University, Faculty of Engineering, 2010 Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia); Maah, M. J. [University of Malaya, Department of Chemistry, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Collin, S. [National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, Teddington, TW11 OLW Middlesex (United Kingdom); Mat-Sharif, K. A.; Muhd-Yassin, S. Z.; Zulkifli, M. I., E-mail: d.a.bradley@surrey.ac.uk [Telekom Malaysia Research and Development Sdn Bhd., 63000 Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: Using tailor made sub-mm diameter doped-silica fibres, we are carrying out luminescence dosimetry studies for a range of situations, including thermoluminescence (Tl)investigations on a liquid alpha source formed of {sup 223}RaCl (the basis of the Bayer Health care product Xofigo), the Tl response to a 62 MeV proton source and Tl response to irradiation from an {sup 241}Am-Be neutron source. In regard to the former, in accord with the intrinsic high linear energy transfer (Let) and short path length (<100 um) of the α-particles in calcified tissue, the product is in part intended as a bone-seeking radionuclide for treatment of metastatic cancer, offering high specificity and efficacy. The Tl yield of Ge-doped SiO{sub 2} fibres has been investigated including for photonic crystal fibre un collapsed, flat fibres and single mode fibres, these systems offering many advantages over conventional passive dosimetry types. In particular, one can mention comparable and even superior sensitivity, an effective atomic number Z{sub eff} of the silica dosimetric material close to that of bone, and the glassy nature of the fibres offering the additional advantage of being able to place such dosimeters directly into liquid environments. Finally we review the use of our tailor made fibres for on-line radioluminescence measurements of radiotherapy beams. The outcome from these various lines of research is expected to inform development of doped fiber radiation dosimeters of versatile utility, ranging from clinical applications through to industrial studies and environmental evaluations. (Author)

  6. Participation of the radioanalytical laboratories of CDTN/CNEN in the national intercomparison program for radionuclide analysis in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, Renata D.; Kastner, Geraldo F.; Gomes, Nilton C.; Furtado, Renato C.S.; Amaral, Angela M.; Temba, Eliane S.C.; Andrade, Geraldo V.; Monteiro, Roberto Pellacani G., E-mail: rda@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    This paper reports the performance of the radioanalytical laboratories of Analytical Techniques Service - SERTA/CDTN/CNEN achieved in the National Intercomparison Program - PNI conducted by the Institute of Radiation Protection and Dosimetry - IRD. The program comprehends the distribution of synthetic water samples for some (approximately 25) national laboratories in order to promote analytical credibility and to ensure the reliability of the analytical results based on radiochemical methodologies. In this program water samples are artificially contaminated at environmental level with known amounts of important radionuclides for radiological protection. The parameters and analytes evaluated are, {sup 60}Co, {sup 65}Zn, {sup 106}Ru, {sup 133}Ba, {sup 134}Cs, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 3}H, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra, {sup 210}Pb, U{sub nat}, {sup 232}Th and gross alpha and beta measurements. In the last 13 years our performance was considered 'good' and 'acceptable' in over 90% of the rounds accomplished. (author)

  7. Workshop Report on Atomic Bomb Dosimetry--Review of Dose Related Factors for the Evaluation of Exposures to Residual Radiation at Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, George D; Egbert, Stephen D; Al-Nabulsi, Isaf; Bailiff, Ian K; Beck, Harold L; Belukha, Irina G; Cockayne, John E; Cullings, Harry M; Eckerman, Keith F; Granovskaya, Evgeniya; Grant, Eric J; Hoshi, Masaharu; Kaul, Dean C; Kryuchkov, Victor; Mannis, Daniel; Ohtaki, Megu; Otani, Keiko; Shinkarev, Sergey; Simon, Steven L; Spriggs, Gregory D; Stepanenko, Valeriy F; Stricklin, Daniela; Weiss, Joseph F; Weitz, Ronald L; Woda, Clemens; Worthington, Patricia R; Yamamoto, Keiko; Young, Robert W

    2015-12-01

    Groups of Japanese and American scientists, supported by international collaborators, have worked for many years to ensure the accuracy of the radiation dosimetry used in studies of health effects in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. Reliable dosimetric models and systems are especially critical to epidemiologic studies of this population because of their importance in the development of worldwide radiation protection standards. While dosimetry systems, such as Dosimetry System 1986 (DS86) and Dosimetry System 2002 (DS02), have improved, the research groups that developed them were unable to propose or confirm an additional contribution by residual radiation to the survivor's total body dose. In recognition of the need for an up-to-date review of residual radiation exposures in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, a half-day technical session was held for reports on newer studies at the 59 th Annual HPS Meeting in 2014 in Baltimore, MD. A day-and-a-half workshop was also held to provide time for detailed discussion of the newer studies and to evaluate their potential use in clarifying the residual radiation exposure to atomic bomb survivors at Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The process also involved a re-examination of very early surveys of radioisotope emissions from ground surfaces at Hiroshima and Nagasaki and early reports of health effects. New insights were reported on the potential contribution to residual radiation from neutron-activated radionuclides in the airburst's dust stem and pedestal and in unlofted soil, as well as from fission products and weapon debris from the nuclear cloud. However, disparate views remain concerning the actual residual radiation doses received by the atomic bomb survivors at different distances from the hypocenter. The workshop discussion indicated that measurements made using thermal luminescence and optically stimulated luminescence, like earlier measurements, especially in very thin layers of the samples, could be expanded to detect possible

  8. First approach to radionuclide mixtures quantification by using plastic scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarancon, A. [Departament de Quimica Analitica, Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 647, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Garcia, J.F. [Departament de Pintura, Universitat de Barcelona, Pau Gargallo 4, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain)]. E-mail: jfgarcia@ub.edu; Rauret, G. [Departament de Quimica Analitica, Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 647, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2007-05-08

    Recent studies have evaluated the capability of plastic scintillation (PS) as an alternative to liquid scintillation (LS) in radionuclide activity determination without mixed waste production. In order to complete the comparison, we now assess the extent to which PS can be used to quantify mixtures of radionuclides and the influence of the diameter of the plastic scintillation beads in detection efficiency. The results show that the detection efficiency decreases and the spectrum shrink to lower energies when the size of the plastic scintillation beads increases, and that the lower the energy of the beta particle, the greater the variation takes place. Similar behaviour has been observed for beta-gamma and alpha emitters. Two scenarios for the quantification of mixtures are considered, one including two radionuclides ({sup 14}C and {sup 60}Co) whose spectra do not overlap significantly, and the other including two radionuclides ({sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y), where the spectra of one the isotopes is totally overlapped by the other The calculation has been performed by using the conventional window selection procedure and a new approach in which the selected windows correspond to those with lower quantification errors. Relative errors obtained using the proposed approach (less than 10%) are lower than those of the conventional procedure, even when a radionuclide is completely overlapped, except for those samples with extreme activity ratios that were not included in the window optimization process.

  9. Information from the Dosimetry Service

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Please note the following opening hours of the Service: From 31st July onwards: Every morning from 8:30 to 12:00 The Service is closed in the afternoons. We should like to remind you that dosimeters cannot be sent to customers by internal mail. Short-term dosimeters (VCTs) must always be returned to the Service after use and must not be left on the racks in the experimental areas or in the secretariats. Dosimetry Service Tel 72155 Bldg. 24 E 011 Dosimetry.service@cern.ch http://cern.ch/rp-dosimetry

  10. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Prouty

    2006-07-14

    The purpose of this report is to develop and analyze the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, consistent with Level I and Level II model validation, as identified in Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Engineered Barrier System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report Integration (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173617]). The EBS radionuclide transport abstraction (or EBS RT Abstraction) is the conceptual model used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) to determine the rate of radionuclide releases from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ). The EBS RT Abstraction conceptual model consists of two main components: a flow model and a transport model. Both models are developed mathematically from first principles in order to show explicitly what assumptions, simplifications, and approximations are incorporated into the models used in the TSPA. The flow model defines the pathways for water flow in the EBS and specifies how the flow rate is computed in each pathway. Input to this model includes the seepage flux into a drift. The seepage flux is potentially split by the drip shield, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the drip shield and some passing through breaches in the drip shield that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. The flux through drip shield breaches is potentially split by the waste package, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the waste package and some passing through waste package breaches that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. Neither the drip shield nor the waste package survives an igneous intrusion, so the flux splitting submodel is not used in the igneous scenario class. The flow model is validated in an independent model validation technical review. The drip shield and waste package flux splitting algorithms are developed and validated using experimental data. The transport model considers advective transport and diffusive transport

  11. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Schreiner

    2001-06-27

    The purpose of this work is to develop the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, as directed by a written development plan (CRWMS M&O 1999a). This abstraction is the conceptual model that will be used to determine the rate of release of radionuclides from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ) in the total system performance assessment-license application (TSPA-LA). In particular, this model will be used to quantify the time-dependent radionuclide releases from a failed waste package (WP) and their subsequent transport through the EBS to the emplacement drift wall/UZ interface. The development of this conceptual model will allow Performance Assessment Operations (PAO) and its Engineered Barrier Performance Department to provide a more detailed and complete EBS flow and transport abstraction. The results from this conceptual model will allow PA0 to address portions of the key technical issues (KTIs) presented in three NRC Issue Resolution Status Reports (IRSRs): (1) the Evolution of the Near-Field Environment (ENFE), Revision 2 (NRC 1999a), (2) the Container Life and Source Term (CLST), Revision 2 (NRC 1999b), and (3) the Thermal Effects on Flow (TEF), Revision 1 (NRC 1998). The conceptual model for flow and transport in the EBS will be referred to as the ''EBS RT Abstraction'' in this analysis/modeling report (AMR). The scope of this abstraction and report is limited to flow and transport processes. More specifically, this AMR does not discuss elements of the TSPA-SR and TSPA-LA that relate to the EBS but are discussed in other AMRs. These elements include corrosion processes, radionuclide solubility limits, waste form dissolution rates and concentrations of colloidal particles that are generally represented as boundary conditions or input parameters for the EBS RT Abstraction. In effect, this AMR provides the algorithms for transporting radionuclides using the flow geometry and radionuclide concentrations

  12. Characterization of hydrofracture grouts for radionuclide migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stinton, D.P.; McDaniel, E.W.; Weeren, H.O.

    1983-01-01

    Detailed characterization of hydrofracture grouts was performed by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and ..beta..-..gamma.. autoradiography. Laboratory-produced samples containing simulated wastes as well as actual radioactive samples of hydrofracture grout sheets obtained by core drilling were examined in this work. X-ray diffraction results revealed that both laboratory-produced samples and a core-drilled sample consisted primarily of calcium carbonate phases. Both sample types contained very small amounts of strontium or cesium wastes, neither of which could be detected by microscopic techniques. The core-drilled sample contained radioactive /sup 90/Sr, /sup 137/Cs, and /sup 60/Co that could be detected by ..beta..-..gamma.. autoradiography. The autoradiograph revealed that these radionuclides were still present in the 20-year-old grout and that they had not migrated into the trapped shale fragments.

  13. Uncertainties in electron-absorbed fractions and lung doses from inhaled beta-emitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farfán, Eduardo B; Bolch, Wesley E; Huston, Thomas E; Rajon, Didier A; Huh, Chulhaeng; Bolch, W Emmett

    2005-01-01

    The computer code LUDUC (Lung Dose Uncertainty Code), developed at the University of Florida, was originally used to investigate the range of potential doses from the inhalation of either plutonium or uranium oxides. The code employs the ICRP Publication 66 Human Respiratory Tract model; however, rather than using simple point estimates for each of the model parameters associated with particle deposition, clearance, and lung-tissue dosimetry, probability density functions are ascribed to these parameters based upon detailed literature review. These distributions are subsequently sampled within LUDUC using Latin hypercube sampling techniques to generate multiple (e.g., approximately 1,000) sets of input vectors (i.e., trials), each yielding a unique estimate of lung dose. In the present study, the dosimetry component of the ICRP-66 model within LUDUC has been extended to explicitly consider variations in the beta particle absorbed fraction due to corresponding uncertainties and biological variabilities in both source and target tissue depths and thicknesses within the bronchi and bronchioles of the thoracic airways. Example dose distributions are given for the inhalation of absorption Type S compounds of 90Sr (Tmax = 546 keV) and 90Y (Tmax = 2,284 keV) as a function of particle size. Over the particle size range of 0.001 to 1 microm, estimates of total lung dose vary by a factor of 10 for 90Sr particles and by a factor of 4 to 10 for 90Y particles. As the particle size increases to 10 microm, dose uncertainties reach a factor of 100 for both radionuclides. In comparisons to identical exposures scenarios run by the LUDEP 2.0 code, Reference Man doses for inhaled beta-emitters were shown to provide slightly conservative estimates of lung dose compared to those in this study where uncertainties in lung airway histology are considered.

  14. Internal dosimetry technical basis manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-20

    The internal dosimetry program at the Savannah River Site (SRS) consists of radiation protection programs and activities used to detect and evaluate intakes of radioactive material by radiation workers. Examples of such programs are: air monitoring; surface contamination monitoring; personal contamination surveys; radiobioassay; and dose assessment. The objectives of the internal dosimetry program are to demonstrate that the workplace is under control and that workers are not being exposed to radioactive material, and to detect and assess inadvertent intakes in the workplace. The Savannah River Site Internal Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual (TBM) is intended to provide a technical and philosophical discussion of the radiobioassay and dose assessment aspects of the internal dosimetry program. Detailed information on air, surface, and personal contamination surveillance programs is not given in this manual except for how these programs interface with routine and special bioassay programs.

  15. Radioembolization Dosimetry: The Road Ahead

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smits, Maarten L. J., E-mail: m.l.j.smits-3@umcutrecht.nl; Elschot, Mattijs [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Netherlands); Sze, Daniel Y. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Division of Interventional Radiology (United States); Kao, Yung H. [Austin Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine (Australia); Nijsen, Johannes F. W. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Netherlands); Iagaru, Andre H. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (United States); Jong, Hugo W. A. M. de; Bosch, Maurice A. A. J. van den; Lam, Marnix G. E. H. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Netherlands)

    2015-04-15

    Methods for calculating the activity to be administered during yttrium-90 radioembolization (RE) are largely based on empirical toxicity and efficacy analyses, rather than dosimetry. At the same time, it is recognized that treatment planning based on proper dosimetry is of vital importance for the optimization of the results of RE. The heterogeneous and often clustered intrahepatic biodistribution of millions of point-source radioactive particles poses a challenge for dosimetry. Several studies found a relationship between absorbed doses and treatment outcome, with regard to both toxicity and efficacy. This should ultimately lead to improved patient selection and individualized treatment planning. New calculation methods and imaging techniques and a new generation of microspheres for image-guided RE will all contribute to these improvements. The aim of this review is to give insight into the latest and most important developments in RE dosimetry and to suggest future directions on patient selection, individualized treatment planning, and study designs.

  16. Radioembolization dosimetry: the road ahead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, Maarten L J; Elschot, Mattijs; Sze, Daniel Y; Kao, Yung H; Nijsen, Johannes F W; Iagaru, Andre H; de Jong, Hugo W A M; van den Bosch, Maurice A A J; Lam, Marnix G E H

    2015-04-01

    Methods for calculating the activity to be administered during yttrium-90 radioembolization (RE) are largely based on empirical toxicity and efficacy analyses, rather than dosimetry. At the same time, it is recognized that treatment planning based on proper dosimetry is of vital importance for the optimization of the results of RE. The heterogeneous and often clustered intrahepatic biodistribution of millions of point-source radioactive particles poses a challenge for dosimetry. Several studies found a relationship between absorbed doses and treatment outcome, with regard to both toxicity and efficacy. This should ultimately lead to improved patient selection and individualized treatment planning. New calculation methods and imaging techniques and a new generation of microspheres for image-guided RE will all contribute to these improvements. The aim of this review is to give insight into the latest and most important developments in RE dosimetry and to suggest future directions on patient selection, individualized treatment planning, and study designs.

  17. Radionuclide transfer. Radionuklid Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, G.B.

    1993-01-01

    The research project described here had the aim to obtain further information on the transfer of nuclides during pregnancy and lactation. The tests were carried out in mini-pigs and rats receiving unchanging doses of radionuclides with the food. The following findings were revealed for the elements examined: Fe, Se, Cs and Zn were characterized by very high transfer levels in the mother, infant and foetus. A substantial uptake by the mother alone was observed for Co, Ag and Mn. The uptake by the foetus and infant here was 1 to 10 times lower. A preferential concentration in certain tissues was seen for Sr and Tc; the thyroid levels of Tc were about equally high in mothers and infants, while Sr showed less accumulation in the maternal bone. The lanthanide group of substances (Ce, Eu and Gd as well as Y and Ru) were only taken up to a very limited extent. The uptake of the examined radionuclides (Fe, Co, Ag, Ce) with the food ingested was found here to be ten times greater in rats as compared to mini-pigs. This showed that great caution must be observed, if the behaviour of radionuclides in man is extrapolated from relevant data obtained in rodents. (orig./MG)

  18. Dosimetry of iodoantipyrine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, R Y; Ekeh, S; Basmadjian, G

    1989-01-01

    Dosimetry of iodoantipyrine labeled with radioactive iodine was determined by measuring the biodistribution of 131I-iodoantipyrine in 41 female rabbits. Following administration of the radiopharmaceutical, subjects were killed at 0.5, 6, 12, 17, 24, 36, and 48 h. Organs and samples of tissues and body fluids were assayed. Results were corrected for physical decay. Exponential functions were employed to describe the time-concentration curves; representative value would be the biological half life of 9.96 +/- 0.55 h for blood. Cumulated activity estimates for 123I, 125I and 131I were then computed. Extrapolation to absorbed dose in humans followed the formulation of the Medical International Radiation Dose (MIRD) Committee of the Society of Nuclear Medicine. The whole body absorbed doses are 7 mu Gray, 5 mu Gray and 29 mu Gray per MBq of 123I, 125I, and 131I administered respectively.

  19. Medical dosimetry in Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turák, O.; Osvay, M.; Ballay, L.

    2012-09-01

    Radiation exposure of medical staff during cardiological and radiological procedures was investigated. The exposure of medical staff is directly connected to patient exposure. The aim of this study was to determine the distribution of doses on uncovered part of body of medical staff using LiF thermoluminescent (TL) dosimeters in seven locations. Individual Kodak film dosimeters (as authorized dosimetry system) were used for the assessment of medical staff's effective dose. Results achieved on dose distribution measurements confirm that wearing only one film badge under the lead apron does not provide enough information on the personal dose. The value of estimated annual doses on eye lens and extremities (fingers) were in good correlation with international publications.

  20. Strahlungsmessung und Dosimetrie

    CERN Document Server

    Krieger, Hanno

    2013-01-01

    „Strahlungsquellen und Dosimetrie“ ist Teil einer Lehrbuchreihe zur Strahlungsphysik und zum Strahlenschutz. Der erste Teil befasst sich mit den physikalischen Grundlagen der Strahlungsdetektoren und der Strahlungsmessung. Im zweiten Teil werden die Konzepte und Verfahren der klinischen Dosimetrie dargestellt. Der dritte Abschnitt erläutert ausführlich die Dosisverteilungen der klinisch angewendeten Strahlungsarten. Im vierten Teil werden weitere Messaufgaben der Strahlungsphysik einschließlich der Messsysteme für die Bildgebung mit Röntgenstrahlung dargestellt. Neben den grundlegenden Ausführungen enthält dieser Band im laufenden Text zahlreiche Tabellen und Grafiken zur technischen und medizinischen Radiologie, die bei der praktischen Arbeit sehr hilfreich sein können und 199 Übungsaufgaben mit Lösungen zur Vertiefung der Inhalte. Für die zweite Auflage wurden die Darstellungen der Elektronen- und der Protonendosimetrie sowie der bildgebenden Verfahren mit Computertomografen deutlich erweit...

  1. Fundamentals of Radiation Dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, Adrie J. J.

    2011-05-01

    The basic concepts of radiation dosimetry are reviewed on basis of ICRU reports and text books. The radiation field is described with, among others, the particle fluence. Cross sections for indirectly ionizing radiation are defined and indicated is how they are related to the mass energy transfer and mass energy absorption coefficients. Definitions of total and restricted mass stopping powers of directly ionizing radiation are given. The dosimetric quantities, kerma, absorbed dose and exposure together with the relations between them are discussed in depth. Finally it is indicated how the absorbed dose can be measured with a calorimeter by measuring the temperature increase and with an ionisation chamber measuring the charge produced by the ionizing radiation and making use of the Bragg-Gray relation.

  2. Dosimetry considerations in phototherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Profio, A.E.; Doiron, D.R.

    Dosimetry in phototherapy involves a determination of the energy absorbed per unit mass of tissue, corrected for the quantum yield in a photochemical reaction. The dose rate in photochemotherapy of cancer with hematoporphyrin derivative and visible light is related to the extinction coefficient, quantum yield for singlet oxygen production, concentration of sensitizer and energy flux density at depth. Data or methods of determining these quantities are presented. Calculations have been performed for the energy flux density at depth, as a function of the total attenuation coefficient and ratio of scattering coefficient to total attenuation coefficient, for isotropic scattering in slab geometry. For small absorption, these depth dose curves exhibit a maximum within the tissue followed by an exponential decrease.

  3. Dosimetry considerations in phototherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Profio, A.E.; Doiron, D.R.

    1981-03-01

    Dosimetry in phototherapy involves a determination of the energy absorbed per unit mass of tissue, corrected for the quantum yield in a photochemical reaction. The dose rate in photochemotherapy of cancer with hematoporphyrin derivative and visible light is related to the extinction coefficient, quantum yield for singlet oxygen production, concentration of sensitizer and energy flux density at depth. Data or methods of determining these quantities are presented. Calculations have been performed for the energy flux density at depth, as a function of the total attenuation coefficient and ratio of scattering coefficient to total attenuation coefficient, for isotropic scattering in slab geometry. For small absorption, these depth dose curves exhibit a maximum within the tissue followed by an exponential decrease.

  4. US Army Radiological Bioassay and Dosimetry: The RBD software package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckerman, K. F.; Ward, R. C.; Maddox, L. B.

    1993-01-01

    The RBD (Radiological Bioassay and Dosimetry) software package was developed for the U. S. Army Material Command, Arlington, Virginia, to demonstrate compliance with the radiation protection guidance 10 CFR Part 20 (ref. 1). Designed to be run interactively on an IBM-compatible personal computer, RBD consists of a data base module to manage bioassay data and a computational module that incorporates algorithms for estimating radionuclide intake from either acute or chronic exposures based on measurement of the worker's rate of excretion of the radionuclide or the retained activity in the body. In estimating the intake,RBD uses a separate file for each radionuclide containing parametric representations of the retention and excretion functions. These files also contain dose-per-unit-intake coefficients used to compute the committed dose equivalent. For a given nuclide, if measurements exist for more than one type of assay, an auxiliary module, REPORT, estimates the intake by applying weights assigned in the nuclide file for each assay. Bioassay data and computed results (estimates of intake and committed dose equivalent) are stored in separate data bases, and the bioassay measurements used to compute a given result can be identified. The REPORT module creates a file containing committed effective dose equivalent for each individual that can be combined with the individual's external exposure.

  5. Thermoluminescent dosimetry and of optically stimulated luminescence of diamond films grown up by the chemical vapor deposition technique exposed to beta radiation; Dosimetria termoluminiscente y de luminiscencia opticamente estimulada de peliculas de diamante crecidas por la tecnica de DVQ expuestas a radiacion beta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melendrez A, R.; Barboza F, M. [Centro de Investigacion en Fisica, Universidad de Sonora, A.P. 5-88, Hermosillo, Sonora, 83190 (Mexico)

    2002-07-01

    A study of the dosimetric properties through the thermoluminescence (Tl) and Optically stimulated luminescence (Lobe) in diamond films grown up by the chemical vapor deposition (Dq) techniques was realized.The films under study have thickness of 6, 12, 180 and 500 microns. The dose range was from 0 to 1.5 KGy, observing for the case of the thermoluminescent dosimetry a linear behavior in the range 0-300 Gy and a supra linearity effect in the range from 300-1500 Gy. For the case of the dosimetry by means of LOE a linear behavior in the range (0-300 Gy) without be enough for the saturation was observed, although some samples exhibit a linear behavior until 1500 Gy (6 microns). The irradiation was realized with a source of Strontium 90 of (40 mCi) and the photoestimulation for realizing the measures of LOE was realized using diodes emitting of laser light (470 nm) which generate until 50 MW/cm{sup 2}. The Tl peak which was used to realize the dosimetry such Tl as LOE was that located around 340 C degrees in the brilliance curve which presents another peaks centered around of 110, 190, and 340 C degrees, depending on the film. It was realized a study of the Tl signal drop and it was observed that after 3 hours the signal was stable reaching a decay of 15 %. the analysis of the drop in the Tl signal, immediately after to irradiate and after to photoestimulate with the blue light laser for observing the LOE, indicated that exists a fall in all the Tl peaks, decaying in greater proportion those of more low temperature. (Author)

  6. RADIOLOGICAL CRITERIA FOR PATIENT RELEASE FROM CLINIC AFTER RADIONUCLIDE THERAPY OF BRACHYTHERAPY WITH SEALED SOURCE IMPLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. M.I. Balonov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Dose criteria for limitation of exposure incurred by persons helping the patients or living with patients discharged from hospitals following radionuclide therapy or brachytherapy with implanted sealed radionuclide sources have been proposed for national Russian regulation. By means of a conservative dosimetry model, the values of operational radiological criteria for patient discharge from hospital are substantiated, i.e. whole body activity for radionuclides 125I,131I,153Sm and 188Re as well as dose rate near patient body. Observance of suggested criteria included in the new Russian Standards for Radiation Safety (RSS-99/2009 will ensure radiation safety of people in near environment (family, close friends et ah.

  7. Paving the way to personalized medicine. Production of some theragnostic radionuclides at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, S.C. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Medical Dept.

    2011-07-01

    This paper introduces a relatively novel paradigm that involves specific individual radionuclides or radionuclide pairs that have emissions that allow pre-therapy low-dose imaging plus higher-dose therapy in the same patient. We have made an attempt to sort out and organize a number of such theragnostic radionuclides and radionuclide pairs that may potentially bring us closer to the age-long dream of personalized medicine for performing tailored low-dose molecular imaging (SPECT/CT or PET/CT) to provide the necessary pre-therapy information on biodistribution, dosimetry, the limiting or critical organ or tissue, and the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), etc. If the imaging results then warrant it, it would be possible to perform higher-dose targeted molecular therapy in the same patient with the same radiopharmaceutical. A major problem that remains yet to be fully resolved is the lack of availability, in sufficient quantities, of a majority of the best candidate theragnostic radionuclides in a no-carrier-added (NCA) form. A brief description of the recently developed new or modified methods at BNL for the production of four theragnostic radionuclides, whose nuclear, physical, and chemical characteristics seem to show great promise for personalized cancer therapy are described.

  8. Paving the way to personalized medicine: production of some theragnostic radionuclides at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava S. C.

    2011-06-06

    This paper introduces a relatively novel paradigm that involves specific individual radionuclides or radionuclide pairs that have emissions that allow pre-therapy low-dose imaging plus higher-dose therapy in the same patient. We have made an attempt to sort out and organize a number of such theragnostic radionuclides and radionuclide pairs that may potentially bring us closer to the age-long dream of personalized medicine for performing tailored low-dose molecular imaging (SPECT/CT or PET/CT) to provide the necessary pre-therapy information on biodistribution, dosimetry, the limiting or critical organ or tissue, and the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), etc. If the imaging results then warrant it, it would be possible to perform higher-dose targeted molecular therapy in the same patient with the same radiopharmaceutical. A major problem that remains yet to be fully resolved is the lack of availability, in sufficient quantities, of a majority of the best candidate theragnostic radionuclides in a no-carrier-added (NCA) form. A brief description of the recently developed new or modified methods at BNL for the production of four theragnostic radionuclides, whose nuclear, physical, and chemical characteristics seem to show great promise for personalized cancer therapy are described.

  9. Testis dosimetry in individual patients by combining a small-scale dosimetry model and pharmacokinetic modeling-application of 111In-Ibritumomab Tiuxetan (Zevalin®)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meerkhan, Suaad A.; Sjögreen-Gleisner, Katarina; Larsson, Erik; Strand, Sven-Erik; Jönsson, Bo-Anders

    2014-12-01

    A heterogeneous distribution of radionuclides emitting low-energy electrons in the testicles may result in a significant difference between an absorbed dose to the radiosensitive spermatogonia and the mean absorbed dose to the whole testis. This study focused on absorbed dose distribution in patients at a finer scale than normally available in clinical dosimetry, which was accomplished by combining a small-scale dosimetry model with patient pharmacokinetic data. The activity in the testes was measured and blood sampling was performed for patients that underwent pre-therapy imaging with 111In-Zevalin®. Using compartment modeling, testicular activity was separated into two components: vascular and extravascular. The uncertainty of absorbed dose due to geometry variations between testicles was explored by an assumed activity micro-distribution and by varying the radius of the interstitial tubule. Results showed that the absorbed dose to germ cells might be strongly dependent on the location of the radioactive source, and may exceed the absorbed dose to the whole testis by as much as a factor of two. Small-scale dosimetry combined with compartmental analysis of clinical data proved useful for gauging tissue dosimetry and interpreting how intrinsic geometric variation influences the absorbed dose.

  10. The personal dosimetry in Mexico; La dosimetria personal en Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salazar, M.A. [Proxtronics/ Asesoria Integral en Dosimetria Termoluminiscente S.A. de C.V., Canal de Miramontes 2030-14, Col. Educacion, 04400 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)]. e-mail: aidtsa@avantel.net

    2006-07-01

    The Personal Dosimetry in Mexico, has an approximately 30 year-old history; and it had been and it is at the moment, one of the more important resources with which the personnel that works with ionizing radiation sources counts for its protection. The Personal Dosimetry begins with the film dosimetry, technique that even continues being used at the present time by some users, and the main reason of its use is for economic reasons. At the moment this technique, it has been surpassed, by the Thermoluminescent dosimetry, which has taken a lot of peak, mainly by the technological development with which it is counted at the present time; what has given as a result that this technique becomes tip technology; that supported in the characteristic of the used materials, as the handling and processing of the information associated with the new PC, digitizer cards, software etc, what has allowed increases it potential. In this work the current necessities of the market are presented as well as an analysis of the future real necessities in Mexico, at national level, the companies that provide this service and that they spread to satisfy this necessity of the market, including the different used technologies are also mentioned. The application ranges, at the same time, of the advantages and disadvantages of the different systems of Personal Dosimetry in the market. The companies that at the moment provide the service of Personal Dosimetry, its use materials and equipment in indistinct form, for the monitoring of gamma radiation, beta particles, different qualities of x-ray radiation, and sometimes neutrons. The monitoring of the exposed personnel at the diverse sources of ionizing radiation mentioned is carried out in many occasions without having with the materials (detectors), neither the appropriate infrastructure and therefore without the quality control that guarantees a correct evaluation of the dose equivalent, as a result of the exposure to the ionizing radiations; it

  11. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.D. Schreiber

    2005-08-25

    The purpose of this report is to develop and analyze the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, consistent with Level I and Level II model validation, as identified in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Engineered Barrier System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173617]). The EBS radionuclide transport abstraction (or EBS RT Abstraction) is the conceptual model used in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) to determine the rate of radionuclide releases from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ). The EBS RT Abstraction conceptual model consists of two main components: a flow model and a transport model. Both models are developed mathematically from first principles in order to show explicitly what assumptions, simplifications, and approximations are incorporated into the models used in the TSPA-LA. The flow model defines the pathways for water flow in the EBS and specifies how the flow rate is computed in each pathway. Input to this model includes the seepage flux into a drift. The seepage flux is potentially split by the drip shield, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the drip shield and some passing through breaches in the drip shield that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. The flux through drip shield breaches is potentially split by the waste package, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the waste package and some passing through waste package breaches that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. Neither the drip shield nor the waste package survives an igneous intrusion, so the flux splitting submodel is not used in the igneous scenario class. The flow model is validated in an independent model validation technical review. The drip shield and waste package flux splitting algorithms are developed and validated using experimental data. The transport

  12. Comparison of different classes of radionuclides for potential use in radioimmunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagiannis, Tom C

    2007-01-01

    Currently, beta-emitting radionuclides are used almost exclusively in the clinic and in clinical radioimmunotherapy studies. The main advantage of beta-emitters is the relatively long path length in biological tissue (in the mm range), which is sufficient to irradiate cancer cells that do not have bound radiolabelled antibody (cross-fire effect). This alleviates problems with inadequate uptake and heterogeneous distribution of radiolabelled antibodies in tumours. Hence, beta-emitters provide a relatively uniform radiation dose to the tumour and it is generally accepted that this class of radionuclides is more appropriate for radioimmunotherapy of solid tumours and large tumour burdens (> 0.5 cm). However, the shorter-range alpha-emitters (50-100 mm) and the ultra-short range Auger electron-emitting radionuclides (the majority of electrons traverse a few nm), have been shown to be more efficient than beta-emitters at inducing lethal lesions in single cells. It has been suggested that these classes of radionuclides may have the potential to provide a more favourable therapeutic index than beta-emitters for radioimmunotherapy of single tumour cells in the circulation, micrometastases and in certain cases, minimal residual disease. The aim of this article is to discuss the different classes of radionuclides with potential for clinical use in radioimmunotherapy.

  13. Upgrading the dosimetry at Ontario Hydro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirning, C.R. [Ontario Hydro, Whitby, ON (Canada). Health Physics Dept.

    1996-12-01

    Ontario Hydro has embarked upon a major programme to replace and upgrade its external dosimetry systems. In two year`s time, the utility expects to have two state-of-the-art dosimetry systems in place: a new TLD dosimetry of legal record that was designed nearly 30 years ago; and an electronic dosimetry system which could eventually replace the TLD as the primary system. (Author).

  14. Characterising an aluminium oxide dosimetry system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conheady, Clement F; Gagliardi, Frank M; Ackerly, Trevor

    2015-09-01

    In vivo dosimetry is recommended as a defence-in-depth strategy in radiotherapy treatments and is currently employed by clinics around the world. The characteristics of a new optically stimulated luminescence dosimetry system were investigated for the purpose of replacing an aging thermoluminescence dosimetry system for in vivo dosimetry. The stability of the system was not sufficient to satisfy commissioning requirements and therefore it has not been released into clinical service at this time.

  15. Osteopetrosis: Radiological & Radionuclide Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sit, Cherry; Agrawal, Kanhaiyalal; Fogelman, Ignac; Gnanasegaran, Gopinath

    2015-01-01

    Osteopetrosis is a rare inherited bone disease where bones harden and become abnormally dense. While the diagnosis is clinical, it also greatly relies on appearance of the skeleton radiographically. X-ray, radionuclide bone scintigraphy and magnetic resonance imaging have been reported to identify characteristics of osteopetrosis. We present an interesting case of a 59-year-old man with a history of bilateral hip fractures. He underwent 99mTc-methylene diphosphonate whole body scan supplemented with single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography of spine, which showed increased uptake in the humeri, tibiae and femora, which were in keeping with osteopetrosis. PMID:25589808

  16. Osteopetrosis: radiological & radionuclide imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sit, Cherry; Agrawal, Kanhaiyalal; Fogelman, Ignac; Gnanasegaran, Gopinath

    2015-01-01

    Osteopetrosis is a rare inherited bone disease where bones harden and become abnormally dense. While the diagnosis is clinical, it also greatly relies on appearance of the skeleton radiographically. X-ray, radionuclide bone scintigraphy and magnetic resonance imaging have been reported to identify characteristics of osteopetrosis. We present an interesting case of a 59-year-old man with a history of bilateral hip fractures. He underwent (99m)Tc-methylene diphosphonate whole body scan supplemented with single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography of spine, which showed increased uptake in the humeri, tibiae and femora, which were in keeping with osteopetrosis.

  17. Nuclear accident dosimetry intercomparison studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, C S

    1989-09-01

    Twenty-two nuclear accident dosimetry intercomparison studies utilizing the fast-pulse Health Physics Research Reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory have been conducted since 1965. These studies have provided a total of 62 different organizations a forum for discussion of criticality accident dosimetry, an opportunity to test their neutron and gamma-ray dosimetry systems under a variety of simulated criticality accident conditions, and the experience of comparing results with reference dose values as well as with the measured results obtained by others making measurements under identical conditions. Sixty-nine nuclear accidents (27 with unmoderated neutron energy spectra and 42 with eight different shielded spectra) have been simulated in the studies. Neutron doses were in the 0.2-8.5 Gy range and gamma doses in the 0.1-2.0 Gy range. A total of 2,289 dose measurements (1,311 neutron, 978 gamma) were made during the intercomparisons. The primary methods of neutron dosimetry were activation foils, thermoluminescent dosimeters, and blood sodium activation. The main methods of gamma dose measurement were thermoluminescent dosimeters, radiophotoluminescent glass, and film. About 68% of the neutron measurements met the accuracy guidelines (+/- 25%) and about 52% of the gamma measurements met the accuracy criterion (+/- 20%) for accident dosimetry.

  18. Excitation functions of proton-induced reactions on natural Nd in the 10-30 MeV energy range, and production of radionuclides relevant for double-{\\beta} decay

    CERN Document Server

    Lebeda, O; Schrock, P; Štursa, J; Zuber, K; 10.1103/PhysRevC.85.014602

    2012-01-01

    A preferred candidate for neutrinoless double-{\\beta} decay, 150Nd, is present in natural neodymium at an abundance level of 5.64%. However, neodymium could be activated by cosmic rays during the period it spends on the Earth's surface. Its activation by protons is therefore of interest when it comes to estimating the possible disturbance effects and increased background during neutrinoless double-{\\beta}-decay experiments like Sudbury Neutrino Observatory plus liquid scintillator (SNO+). In most cases, we lack experimental data on proton-induced reactions on neodymium. Therefore, a measurement of cross sections has been performed for the formation of 141Pm, 143Pm, 144Pm, 146Pm, 148Pm, 148Pmm, 149Pm, 150Pm, 140Nd, 141Nd, 147Nd, 149Nd, 138Prm, 139Pr, 142Pr, and 139Ce by 10-30 MeV protons. Oxidation-protected metal foil targets of natural isotopic abundance were irradiated by the usual stacked-foil technique on the external proton beam of the isochronous cyclotron U-120M at the Nuclear Physics Institute at \\v{R...

  19. Dosimetry of iodoantipyrine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, R.Y.L.; Ekeh, S. (Oklahoma Univ., Oklahoma City, OK (USA). Dept. of Radiological Sciences; Veterans Administration Medical Center, Oklahoma City, OK (USA)); Basmadjian, G. (Oklahoma Univ., Oklahoma City, OK (USA). Dept. of Pharmaceutical Sciences)

    1989-12-01

    Dosimetry of iodoantipyrine labeled with radioactive iodine was determined by measuring the biodistribution of {sup 131}I-iodoantipyrine in 41 female rabbits. Following administration of the radiopharmaceutical, subjects were killed at 0.5, 6, 12, 17, 24, 36, and 48 h. Organs and samples of tissues and body fluids were assayed. Results were corrected for physical decay. Exponential functions were employed to describe the time-concentration curves; representative value would be the biological half life of 9.96+-0.55 h for blood. Cumulated activity estimates for {sup 123}I, {sup 125}I and {sup 131}I were then computed. Extrapolation to absorbed dose in humans followed the formulation of the Medical International Radiation Dose (MIRD) Committee of the Society of Nuclear Medicine. The whole body absorbed doses are 0.7 {mu}Gray, 0.5 {mu}Gray and 2.9 {mu}Gray per MBq of {sup 123}I, {sup 123}I, and {sup 131}I administered respectively. (orig.).

  20. Radionuclides in nephrology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lausanne, A.B.D.

    1987-01-01

    In 47 expert contributions, this volume provides a summary of the latest research on radionuclides in nephro-urology together with current and new clinical applications especially in renovascular hypertension, kidney transplantation, and metabolic and urological diseases. In addition, attention is given to aspects of basic renal physiology and function and possible applications of nuclear magnetic resonance and spectroscopy in nephro-urology. New testing procedures which promise to improve diagnosis, and new radiopharmaceuticals are described. The reports are divided into eight sections, the first of which features studies on the renin-angiotensin system, cisplatin, atrial natriuretic factor and determining plasma oxalate. Four papers describe a number of new radiopharmaceuticals which have the potential to replace hippuran. In the third section, radionuclide methods for the measurement of renal function parameters are discussed. The book then focuses on the potential role of captopril in the improved diagnosis of renovascular hypertension. Applications of nuclear magnetic resonance and spectroscopy are demonstrated in the diagnosis of acute pyelonephritis, kidney assessment after lithotripsy, kidney evaluation prior to transplantation, and in monitoring renal ischemia during hypotension.

  1. Radionuclide - Soil Organic Matter Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Lars

    1985-01-01

    Interactions between soil organic matter, i.e. humic and fulvic acids, and radionuclides of primary interest to shallow land burial of low activity solid waste have been reviewed and to some extent studied experimentally. The radionuclides considered in the present study comprise cesium, strontium...

  2. Bad Beta, Good Beta

    OpenAIRE

    Campbell, John; Vuolteenaho, Tuomo

    2003-01-01

    This paper explains the size and value "anomalies" in stock returns using an economically motivated two-beta model. We break the beta of a stock with the market portfolio into two components, one reflecting news about the market's future cash flows and one reflecting news about the market's discount rates. Intertemporal asset pricing theory suggests that the former should have a higher price of risk; thus beta, like cholesterol, comes in "had" and "good" varieties. Empirically, we find that v...

  3. Information from the Dosimetry Service

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Please note the following opening hours of the Service: In June: Every morning from 8:30 to 12:00 In July: Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays from 8:30 to 11:30 Closed all day on Tuesdays and Thursdays From 31st July onwards: Every morning from 8:30 to 12:00 The Service is closed in the afternoons. We should like to remind you that dosimeters cannot be sent to customers by internal mail. Short-term dosimeters (VCTs) must always be returned to the Service after use and must not be left on the racks in the experimental areas or in the secretariats. Dosimetry Service Tel 72155 Bldg. 24 E 011 Dosimetry.service@cern.ch http://cern.ch/rp-dosimetry

  4. For information: Individual dosimetry service

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The service has noticed that there are dosimeter holders who have changed their activities and thus have no longer need of dosimeter as a permanent basis in their work (persons who go rarely to the controlled areas). The reduction of persons in the regular distribution list of dosimeters will lighten the work of the service (distribution, evaluation and consolidation of doses) as well as the work of the distributors, needless to say the economical input this would have for CERN. For the persons who only need a dosimeter temporarily we would like to remind that there is a quick and simple procedure to have one immediately from the Individual Dosimetry Service. Please contact the service (dosimetry.service@cern.ch) if you do not need a dosimeter regularly. Thank you for your cooperation. http://cern.ch/rp-dosimetry

  5. Critical comparison of radiometric and mass spectrometric methods for the determination of radionuclides in environmental, biological and nuclear waste samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Xiaolin; Roos, Per

    2008-02-11

    The radiometric methods, alpha (alpha)-, beta (beta)-, gamma (gamma)-spectrometry, and mass spectrometric methods, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, accelerator mass spectrometry, thermal ionization mass spectrometry, resonance ionization mass spectrometry, secondary ion mass spectrometry, and glow discharge mass spectrometry are reviewed for the determination of radionuclides. These methods are critically compared for the determination of long-lived radionuclides important for radiation protection, decommissioning of nuclear facilities, repository of nuclear waste, tracer application in the environmental and biological researches, these radionuclides include (3)H, (14)C, (36)Cl, (41)Ca, (59,63)Ni, (89,90)Sr, (99)Tc, (129)I, (135,137)Cs, (210)Pb, (226,228)Ra, (237)Np, (241)Am, and isotopes of thorium, uranium and plutonium. The application of on-line methods (flow injection/sequential injection) for separation of radionuclides and automated determination of radionuclides is also discussed.

  6. Information from the Dosimetry Service

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    CERN Staff and Users can now consult their dose records for an individual or an organizational unit with HRT. Please see more information on our web page http://cern.ch/rp-dosimetry. The Dosimetry Service is open every morning from 8.30 - 12.00, and closed in the afternoons. We would like to remind you that dosimeters cannot be sent to customers by internal mail. Short-term dosimeters (VCT's) must always be returned to the Service after use and must not be left on the racks in the experimental areas or in the secretariats.

  7. Information from the Dosimetry Service

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    CERN Staff and Users can now consult their dose records for an individual or an organizational unit with HRT. Please see more information on our web page: http://cern.ch/rp-dosimetry. The Dosimetry Service is open every morning from 8.30 to 12.00 and is closed in the afternoons. We would like to remind you that dosimeters cannot be sent to customers by internal mail. Short-term dosimeters (VCT's) must always be returned to the Service after use and must not be left on the racks in the experimental areas or in the secretariats.

  8. Dosimetry in intravascular brachytherapy; Calculos dosimetricos em braquiterapia intravascular

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, Laelia Pumilla Botelho

    2000-03-01

    Among the cardiovascular diseases responsible for deaths in the adult population in almost all countries of the world, the most common is acute myocardial infarction, which generally occurs because of the occlusion of one or more coronary arteries. Several diagnostic techniques and therapies are being tested for the treatment of coronary artery disease. Balloon angioplasty has been a popular treatment which is less invasive than traditional surgeries involving revascularization of the myocardium, thus promising a better quality of life for patients. Unfortunately, the rate of restenosis (re-closing of the vessel) after balloon angioplasty is high (approximately 30-50% within the first year after treatment).Recently, the idea of delivering high radiation doses to coronary arteries to avoid or delay restenosis has been suggested. Known as intravascular brachytherapy, the technique has been used with several radiation sources, and researchers have obtained success in decreasing the rate of restenosis in some patient populations. In order to study the radiation dosimetry in the patient and radiological protection for the attending staff for this therapy, radiation dose distributions for monoenergetic electrons and photons (at nine discrete energies) were calculated for blood vessels of diameter 0.15, o,30 and 0.45 cm with balloon and wire sources using the radiation transport code MCNP4B. Specific calculations were carried out for several candidate radionuclides as well. Two s tent sources (metallic prosthesis that put inside of patient's artery through angioplasty) employing {sup 32} P are also simulated. Advantages and disadvantages of the various radionuclides and source geometries are discussed. The dosimetry developed here will aid in the realization of the benefits obtained in patients for this promising new technology. (author)

  9. Characterisation of OSL and OSLN droplets for dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, L F; D'Agostino, E; Vaniqui, A C S; Saldarriaga, C; Vanhavere, F; De Deene, Y

    2014-10-01

    In spite of considerable progress in neutron dosimetry, there is no dosemeter that is capable of measuring neutron doses independently of the neutron spectrum with good accuracy. Carbon-doped aluminium oxide (Al2O3:C) is a sensitive material for ionising radiation (beta-ray, X ray and electron) and has been used for applications in personal and medical dosimetry as an optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosemeter. Al2O3:C has a low sensitivity to neutron radiation; this prevents its application to neutron fields, representing a disadvantage of Al2O3:C-OSL when compared with LiF, which is used as a thermoluminescent detector. Recently an improvement for neutron dosimetry (Passmore and Kirr. Neutron response characterisation of an OSL neutron dosemeter. Radiat. Prot. Dosim. 2011; 144: 155-60) uses Al2O3:C coated with (6)Li2CO3 (OSLN),which gives the high-sensitive response as known for Al2O3:C with the advantage of being also sensitive to thermal neutrons. In this article, the authors compare small-size detectors (droplets) of Al2O3:C (OSL) and of Al2O3:C+(6)Li2CO3 (OSLN) and discuss the advantages and drawbacks of both materials, regarding size vs. response.

  10. Total lymphoid irradiation in the Wistar rat: technique and dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoogenhout, J.; Kazem, I.; de Jong, J.

    1983-01-01

    The technical and dosimetric aspects of total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) in the Wistar rat were evaluated as part of a set-up to develop a new model for tumor xenotransplantation. Information obtained from anatomical dissections, radionuclide imaging of the spleen, lymphography and chromolymphography was used to standardize the localization portals cut out in a lead plate. The two portals encompassed the lymphoid tissue above and below the diaphragm. A specially designed masonite phantom was used to measure the dose distribution in the simulated target volumes. Ionization chamber dosimetery, thermoluminescence dosimetry and film densitometry were used for measuring exposure and absorbed dose. Irradiation was performed with 250 kV X rays (HVL 3.1 mm Cu). The dose rate was regulated by adjusting the treatment distance. The dose inhomogeneity measured in the target volumes varied between 80-100%. The side scatter dose to non target tissues under the shielded area between the two portals ranged between 20-30%. The technique and dosimetry of total lymphoid irradiation in Wistar rats are now standardized and validated and pave the way for tumor xenotransplantation experiments.

  11. MIRD pamphlet No. 21: a generalized schema for radiopharmaceutical dosimetry--standardization of nomenclature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolch, Wesley E; Eckerman, Keith F; Sgouros, George; Thomas, Stephen R

    2009-03-01

    The internal dosimetry schema of the Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) Committee of the Society of Nuclear Medicine has provided a broad framework for assessment of the absorbed dose to whole organs, tissue subregions, voxelized tissue structures, and individual cellular compartments for use in both diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine. The schema was originally published in 1968, revised in 1976, and republished in didactic form with comprehensive examples as the MIRD primer in 1988 and 1991. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) is an organization that also supplies dosimetric models and technical data, for use in providing recommendations for limits on ionizing radiation exposure to workers and members of the general public. The ICRP has developed a dosimetry schema similar to that of the MIRD Committee but has used different terminology and symbols for fundamental quantities such as the absorbed fraction, specific absorbed fraction, and various dose coefficients. The MIRD Committee objectives for this pamphlet are 3-fold: to restate its schema for assessment of absorbed dose in a manner consistent with the needs of both the nuclear medicine and the radiation protection communities, with the goal of standardizing nomenclature; to formally adopt the dosimetry quantities equivalent dose and effective dose for use in comparative evaluations of potential risks of radiation-induced stochastic effects to patients after nuclear medicine procedures; and to discuss the need to identify dosimetry quantities based on absorbed dose that address deterministic effects relevant to targeted radionuclide therapy.

  12. MIRD Pamphlet No. 21: A Generalized Schema for Radiopharmaceutical Dosimetry-Standardization of Nomenclature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolch, W E [University of Florida, Gainesville; Eckerman, Keith F [ORNL; Sgouros, George [Johns Hopkins University; Thomas, Steven R. [University of Cincinnati

    2009-03-01

    The internal dosimetry schema of the Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) Committee of the Society of Nuclear Medicine has provided a broad framework for assessment of the absorbed dose to whole organs, tissue subregions, voxelized tissue structures, and individual cellular compartments for use in both diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine. The schema was originally published in 1968, revised in 1976, and republished in didactic form with comprehensive examples as the MIRD primer in 1988 and 1991. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) is an organization that also supplies dosimetric models and technical data, for use in providing recommendations for limits on ionizing radiation exposure to workers and members of the general public. The ICRP has developed a dosimetry schema similar to that of the MIRD Committee but has used different terminology and symbols for fundamental quantities such as the absorbed fraction, specific absorbed fraction, and various dose coefficients. The MIRD Committee objectives for this pamphlet are 3-fold: to restate its schema for assessment of absorbed dose in a manner consistent with the needs of both the nuclear medicine and the radiation protection communities, with the goal of standardizing nomenclature; to formally adopt the dosimetry quantities equivalent dose and effective dose for use in comparative evaluations of potential risks of radiation-induced stochastic effects to patients after nuclear medicine procedures; and to discuss the need to identify dosimetry quantities based on absorbed dose that address deterministic effects relevant to targeted radionuclide therapy.

  13. Dosimetry for Electron Beam Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Arne

    1983-01-01

    This report describes two aspects of electron bean dosimetry, on one hand developaent of thin fil« dosimeters and measurements of their properties, and on the other hand developaent of calorimeters for calibration of routine dosimeters, e.g. thin films. Two types of radiochromic thin film...

  14. In aqua vivo EPID dosimetry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wendling, M.; McDermott, L.N.; Mans, A.; Olaciregui-Ruiz, I.; Pecharroman-Gallego, R.; Sonke, J.J.; Stroom, J.; Herk, M. van; Mijnheer, B.J.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: At the Netherlands Cancer Institute--Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital in vivo dosimetry using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) has been implemented for almost all high-energy photon treatments of cancer with curative intent. Lung cancer treatments were initially excluded, because t

  15. In vivo dosimetry in brachytherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanderup, Kari; Beddar, Sam; Andersen, Claus Erik;

    2013-01-01

    In vivo dosimetry (IVD) has been used in brachytherapy (BT) for decades with a number of different detectors and measurement technologies. However, IVD in BT has been subject to certain difficulties and complexities, in particular due to challenges of the high-gradient BT dose distribution and th...

  16. Portal dosimetry in wedged beams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spreeuw, H.; Rozendaal, R.; Camargo, P.; Mans, A.; Wendling, M.; Olaciregui-Ruiz, I.; Sonke, J.J.; Herk, M. van; Mijnheer, B.

    2015-01-01

    Portal dosimetry using electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) is often applied to verify high-energy photon beam treatments. Due to the change in photon energy spectrum, the resulting dose values are, however, not very accurate in the case of wedged beams if the pixel-to-dose conversion for the s

  17. What is the role of the bystander response in radionuclide therapies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darren eBrady

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Radionuclide therapy for cancer is undergoing a renaissance, with a wide range of radionuclide and clinical delivery systems currently under investigation. Dosimetry at the cellular and subcellular level is complex with inhomogeneity and incomplete targeting of all cells such that some tumour cells will receive little or no direct radiation energy. There is now sufficient preclinical evidence of a bystander response which can modulate the biology of these unirradiated cells with current research demonstrating both protective and inhibitory responses. Dependence upon fraction of irradiated cells has also been found has and the presence of functional gap junctions appears to be import for several bystander responses. The selection of either high or low LET radionuclides may be critical. While low LET radionuclides appear to have a bystander response proportional to dose, the dose-response from high LET radionuclides are more complex. In media transfer experiments a U shaped response curve has been demonstrated for high LET treatments. However this U shaped response has not been seen with co-culture experiments and its relevance remains uncertain. For high LET treatments there is a suggestion that dose rate effects may also be important with inhibitory effects noted with 125I labelling study and a stimulatory seen with 123I labelling in one study.

  18. Plutonium worker dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birchall, Alan; Puncher, M; Harrison, J; Riddell, A; Bailey, M R; Khokryakov, V; Romanov, S

    2010-05-01

    Epidemiological studies of the relationship between risk and internal exposure to plutonium are clearly reliant on the dose estimates used. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) is currently reviewing the latest scientific information available on biokinetic models and dosimetry, and it is likely that a number of changes to the existing models will be recommended. The effect of certain changes, particularly to the ICRP model of the respiratory tract, has been investigated for inhaled forms of (239)Pu and uncertainties have also been assessed. Notable effects of possible changes to respiratory tract model assumptions are (1) a reduction in the absorbed dose to target cells in the airways, if changes under consideration are made to the slow clearing fraction and (2) a doubling of absorbed dose to the alveolar region for insoluble forms, if evidence of longer retention times is taken into account. An important factor influencing doses for moderately soluble forms of (239)Pu is the extent of binding of dissolved plutonium to lung tissues and assumptions regarding the extent of binding in the airways. Uncertainty analyses have been performed with prior distributions chosen for application in epidemiological studies. The resulting distributions for dose per unit intake were lognormal with geometric standard deviations of 2.3 and 2.6 for nitrates and oxides, respectively. The wide ranges were due largely to consideration of results for a range of experimental data for the solubility of different forms of nitrate and oxides. The medians of these distributions were a factor of three times higher than calculated using current default ICRP parameter values. For nitrates, this was due to the assumption of a bound fraction, and for oxides due mainly to the assumption of slower alveolar clearance. This study highlights areas where more research is needed to reduce biokinetic uncertainties, including more accurate determination of particle transport rates

  19. Methods and Models of the Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program, PNNL-MA-860

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carbaugh, Eugene H.; Bihl, Donald E.; Maclellan, Jay A.; Antonio, Cheryl L.; Hill, Robin L.

    2009-09-30

    The Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program (HIDP) provides internal dosimetry support services for operations at the Hanford Site. The HIDP is staffed and managed by the Radiation and Health Technology group, within the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Operations supported by the HIDP include research and development, the decontamination and decommissioning of facilities formerly used to produce and purify plutonium, and waste management activities. Radioelements of particular interest are plutonium, uranium, americium, tritium, and the fission and activation product radionuclides 137Cs, 90Sr, and 60Co. This manual describes the technical basis for the design of the routine bioassay monitoring program and for assessment of internal dose. The purposes of the manual are as follows: • Provide assurance that the HIDP derives from a sound technical base. • Promote the consistency and continuity of routine program activities. • Provide a historical record. • Serve as a technical reference for radiation protection personnel. • Aid in identifying and planning for future needs.

  20. ESR dosimetry: achievements and challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baffa, O., E-mail: baffa@usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Departamento de Fisica, Av. Bandeirantes 3900, 14040-901 Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: Electron Spin Resonance (ESR), also known as Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) and more recently as Electron Magnetic Resonance (Emr), is a spectroscopy technique able to detect unpaired electrons such as those created by the interaction ionizing radiation with matter. When the unpaired electrons created by ionizing radiation are stable over some reasonable time, ESR can be used to measure the radiation dose deposited in the material under study. In principle, any insulating material that satisfies this requisite can be used as a dosimeter. ESR has been used in retrospective dosimetry in case of radiological accidents using natural constituents of human body such as teeth, bones and nails as well as fortuitous materials as sugar, sweeteners and plastics. When using teeth the typical detected dose is 0.5 Gy for, for X-Band spectrometers (9 GHz) and even lower doses if higher frequency spectrometers are used. Clinical dosimetry is another area of potential use of this dosimetric modality. In this application the amino acid alanine has been proposed and being used. Alanine dosimeters are very easy to prepare and require no complicated treatments for use. Alanine/ESR dosimetry satisfies many of the required properties for clinical applications such as water equivalent composition, independence of response for the energy range used in therapy and high precision. Other organic materials such as ammonium tartrate are being investigated to increase the sensitivity of ESR for clinical applications. Finally, industrial applications can also benefit from this dosimetry. The challenges to expand applications, the number of users and research groups of ESR dosimetry will be discussed. (Author)

  1. Anthropogenic radionuclides in the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Q; Weng, J; Wang, J

    2007-11-15

    Studies of radionuclides in the environment have entered a new era with the renaissance of nuclear energy and associated fuel reprocessing, geological disposal of high-level nuclear wastes, and concerns about national security with respect to nuclear non-proliferation. This work presents an overview of anthropogenic radionuclide contamination in the environment, as well as the salient geochemical behavior of important radionuclides. We first discuss the following major anthropogenic sources and current development that contribute to the radionuclide contamination of the environment: (1) nuclear weapons program; (2) nuclear weapons testing; (3) nuclear power plants; (4) commercial fuel reprocessing; (5) geological repository of high-level nuclear wastes, and (6) nuclear accidents. Then, we summarize the geochemical behavior for radionuclides {sup 99}Tc, {sup 129}I, and {sup 237}Np, because of their complex geochemical behavior, long half-lives, and presumably high mobility in the environment. Biogeochemical cycling and environment risk assessment must take into account speciation of these redox-sensitive radionuclides.

  2. Radionuclide salivary gland imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishkin, F.S.

    1981-10-01

    Salivary gland imaging with 99mTc as pertechnetate provides functional information concerning trapping and excretion of the parotid and submandibular glands. Anatomic information gained often adds little to clinical evaluation. On the other hand, functional information may detect subclinical involvement, which correlates well with biopsy of the minor labial salivary glands. Salivary gland abnormalities in systemic disease such as sarcoidosis, rheumatoid arthritis, lupus erythematosus, and other collagenvascular disorders may be detected before they result in the clinical manifestaions of Sjoegren's syndrome. Such glands, after initially demonstrating increased trapping in the acute phase, tend to have decreased trapping and failure to discharge pertechnetate in response to an appropriate physiologic stimulus. Increased uptake of gallium-67 citrate often accompanies these findings. Inflammatory parotitis can be suspected when increased perfusion is evident on radionuclide angiography with any agent. The ability of the salivary gland image to detect and categorize mass lesions, which result in focal areas of diminished activity such as tumors, cysts, and most other masses, is disappointing, while its ability to detect and categorize Warthin's tumor, which concentrates pertechnetate, is much more valuable, although not specific.

  3. Beta Thalassemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beta thalassemia is found in people of Mediterranean, Middle Eastern, African, South Asian (Indian, Pakistani, etc.), Southeast Asian and Chinese descent. 1 Beta Thalassemia ßß Normal beta globin genes found on chromosomes ...

  4. MISTI Shielding and Dosimetry Experiment Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Reliable on-orbit dosimetry is necessary for understanding effects of space radiation environments on spacecraft microelectronics performance and comparison of...

  5. Fifth personnel dosimetry intercomparison study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sims, C.S.

    1980-02-01

    The fifth Personnel Dosimetry Intercomparison Study (PDIS) was conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL) Dosimetry Applications Research (DOSAR) facility on March 20-22, 1979. This study is the latest PDIS in the continuing series started at the DOSAR facility in 1974. The PDIS is a three day study, typically in March, where personnel dosimeters are mailed to the DOSAR facility, exposed to a range of low-level neutron radiation doses (1 to 15 mSv or equivalently, 100 to 1500 mrem) and neutron-to-gamma ratios (1:1-10:1) using the Health Physics Research Reactor (HPRR) as the radiation source, and returned to the participants for evaluation. This report is a summary and analysis of the results reported by the various participants. The participants are able to intercompare their results with those of others who made dose measurements under identical experimental conditions.

  6. Gel dosimetry for conformal radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gambarini, G. [Department of Physics of the University and INFN, Milan (Italy)]. e-mail: grazia.gambarini@mi.infn.it

    2005-07-01

    With the continuum development of conformal radio therapies, aimed at delivering high dose to tumor tissue and low dose to the healthy tissue around, the necessities has appeared of suitable improvement of dosimetry techniques giving the possibility of obtaining dose images to be compared with diagnostic images. Also if wide software has been developed for calculating dose distributions in the fields of various radiotherapy units, experimental verifications are necessary, in particular in the case of complex geometries in conformal radiotherapy. Gel dosimetry is a promising method for imaging the absorbed dose in tissue-equivalent phantoms, with the possibility of 3D reconstruction of the spatial dose distribution, with milli metric resolution. Optical imaging of gel dosimeters, based on visible light absorbance analysis, has shown to be a reliable technique for achieving dose distributions. (Author)

  7. NOTE FROM THE DOSIMETRY SERVICE

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    During March, the Dosimetry Service will be opened from 8h30 to 12h in the morning and closed every afternoon.   We have established that many people, who are provided regularly with a personal dosimeter (film badge), have changed their activity and do not need it anymore, because they do not, or only exceptionally, enter controlled areas. If you are one of these persons, please contact the Personal Dosimeter Service (tel: 72155). There is a simplified procedure for obtaining a dosimeter if you have an immediate need for short-term visits in controlled areas. A reduction of the number of persons on the regular distribution list of dosimeters would decrease our and the distributors workload. It would also contribute to significant savings in the dosimetry, and thus CERN, budget. We thank you in advance for your understanding and for your collaboration.

  8. Dosimetry for the external radiation therapy. Dosimetry with alanine; Dosimetrie fuer die externe Strahlentherapie. Dosimetrie mit Alanin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anton, Mathias [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Braunschweig (Germany). Arbeitsgruppe ' Alanin-Dosimetrie'

    2013-06-15

    The alanine-ESR dosimetry in the PTB is described. The response power of alanine related to the water energy dose for X-rays with average energy of 10-1000 keV is presented. Furthermore the application of alanine for the quality assurance in the radiation therapy is described by means of the prostate irradiation and the therapy of a tumor in the neck region as examples. (HSI)

  9. EPR Dosimetry - Present and Future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regulla, D.F. [GSF - National Research Centre for Environment and Health, Institute of Radiation Protection, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany)

    1999-07-01

    In the past, IAEA has played a central role in stipulating research and development in EPR high-dose standardisation as well as in coordinating and organising international dose intercomparison programs, within the Member States of the United Nations from the mid-seventies till today. The future tasks of EPR dosimetry seem to tend towards different subjects such as bio markers, biological radiation effects, post-accident dose reconstruction in the environment, and retrospective human dosimetry. The latter may be considered a promising tool for epidemiology on the way to re-define radiation risk of man for chronicle radiation exposures, based on e.g. South Ural civil population and radiation workers. There are on-going international activities in the field of standardising high-level dosimetry by the American Standards on Testing and Materials (Astm), and by the International Organisation of Standards (ISO). The International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) is considering the establishment of relevant recommendations concerning industrial radiation processing, but also human dose reconstruction. (Author)

  10. I-124 Imaging and Dosimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russ Kuker

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Although radioactive iodine imaging and therapy are one of the earliest applications of theranostics, there still remain a number of unresolved clinical questions as to the optimization of diagnostic techniques and dosimetry protocols. I-124 as a positron emission tomography (PET radiotracer has the potential to improve the current clinical practice in the diagnosis and treatment of differentiated thyroid cancer. The higher sensitivity and spatial resolution of PET/computed tomography (CT compared to standard gamma scintigraphy can aid in the detection of recurrent or metastatic disease and provide more accurate measurements of metabolic tumor volumes. However the complex decay schema of I-124 poses challenges to quantitative PET imaging. More prospective studies are needed to define optimal dosimetry protocols and to improve patient-specific treatment planning strategies, taking into account not only the absorbed dose to tumors but also methods to avoid toxicity to normal organs. A historical perspective of I-124 imaging and dosimetry as well as future concepts are discussed.

  11. Dosimetry studies in Zaborie village.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, J; Hoshi, M; Endo, S; Stepanenko, V F; Kondrashov, A E; Petin, D; Skvortsov, V; Ivannikov, A; Tikounov, D; Gavrilin, Y; Snykov, V P

    2000-05-01

    Dosimetry studies in Zaborie, a territory in Russia highly contaminated by the Chernobyl accident, were carried out in July, 1997. Studies on dosimetry for people are important not only for epidemiology but also for recovery of local social activity. The local contamination of the soil was measured to be 1.5-6.3 MBq/m2 of Cs-137 with 0.7-4 microSv/h of dose rate. A case study for a villager presently 40 years old indicates estimations of 72 and 269 mSv as the expected internal and external doses during 50 years starting in 1997 based on data of a whole-body measurement of Cs-137 and environmental dose rates. Mean values of accumulated external and internal doses for the period from the year 1986 till 1996 are also estimated to be 130 mSv and 16 mSv for Zaborie. The estimation of the 1986-1996 accumulated dose on the basis of large scale ESR teeth enamel dosimetry provides for this village, the value of 180 mSv. For a short term visitor from Japan to this area, external and internal dose are estimated to be 0.13 mSv/9d (during visit in 1997) and 0.024 mSv/50y (during 50 years starting from 1997), respectively.

  12. Radionuclide Retention in Concrete Wasteforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wellman, Dawn M.; Jansik, Danielle P.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Cordova, Elsa A.

    2012-09-24

    Assessing long-term performance of Category 3 waste cement grouts for radionuclide encasement requires knowledge of the radionuclide-cement interactions and mechanisms of retention (i.e., sorption or precipitation); the mechanism of contaminant release; the significance of contaminant release pathways; how wasteform performance is affected by the full range of environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the process of wasteform aging under conditions that are representative of processes occurring in response to changing environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the effect of wasteform aging on chemical, physical, and radiological properties; and the associated impact on contaminant release. This knowledge will enable accurate prediction of radionuclide fate when the wasteforms come in contact with groundwater. Data collected throughout the course of this work will be used to quantify the efficacy of concrete wasteforms, similar to those used in the disposal of LLW and MLLW, for the immobilization of key radionuclides (i.e., uranium, technetium, and iodine). Data collected will also be used to quantify the physical and chemical properties of the concrete affecting radionuclide retention.

  13. Dosimetry of internal emitting: principles and perspectives of the MIRD technology; Dosimetria de emisores internos: principios y perspectivas de la metodologia MIRD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferro F, G. [Gerencia de Aplicaciones Nucleares en la Salud, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Salazar, Estado de Mexico C.P. 52045 (Mexico)

    1999-07-01

    The development of the radiopharmaceutical technology have multiplied the number of radioisotopes with applications in therapeutical nuclear medicine so known as Directed radiotherapy. Assuming the radiation is capable to produce noxious effects in the biological systems, it is important to evaluate appropriately the risks and benefits of the administration of radioactive agents in the patient. The outstanding parameter in this evaluation is the absorbed dose, which is product of the radiation emitted by a radionuclide that is localized or distributed to the interior of the human body in study and whose its estimation helps to predict the efficacy of the treatment. The scheme generalized of MIRD, it was formulated from thirty years ago for evaluating the interior dosimetry at level of organs.The finality of this work is to show the basic principles of the MIRD methodology and its perspectives using innovator tools as the dosimetry for dynamic masses, in particular the personnel dosimetry for the organs of each patient, the dosimetry for the small structures inside the organs (sub organic dosimetry), the distributions of doses in three dimensions (S voxel), the dosimetry at cellular level and the quantitative acquisition of pharmaceutical data. (Author)

  14. Study on natural radionuclide activities in meat samples consumed in Sao Paulo City, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosa, Mychelle M.L.; Taddei, Maria HelenaT. [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (LAPOC/CNEN), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Laboratorio de Pocos de Caldas; Avegliano, Roseane P.; Maihara, Vera A., E-mail: mychelle@cnen.gov.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Consumption of food is usually the most important route by which natural and artificial radionuclides can enter the human body. An assessment of radionuclide levels in different foods and diets is therefore important to estimate the intake of these radionuclides by man. The contamination by radionuclides can occur via the food chain (soil, root, plant and animal), with emphasis to the long half-life radionuclides, which can also have their transfer through the animal meat. The inclusion of meat in human nutrition is important because it is an excellent source of high quality protein, nutrient related to construction and cell regeneration. This work aims the determination of natural radionuclides ({sup 234}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 228}Th, {sup 230}Th, {sup 232}Th, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra, and {sup 210}Pb) in meat samples. Five groups of samples were analyzed, such as cattle meat (beef), fish, pork, poultry, and processed meat, after radiochemical separation followed by alpha or alpha beta spectrophotometry, and total count quantification. The determination of these radionuclides is very important because they are products of the natural decay series of {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th, being easily found in meat samples. (author)

  15. Intercomparison of radionuclides in environmental samples 2000-2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fogh, C.L.; Nielsen, S.P.; Keith-Roach, M.J. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark)

    2002-07-01

    An intercomparison exercise on radionuclides in environmental samples was carried out during 2000-2001 as part of a Nordic NKS project. The exercise included six sample types (aerosols, dry milk, soil, seawater, seaweed and lake water) and a range of man-made and naturally occurring radionuclides, mainly gamma-emitters but also beta- and alpha-emitters. A total of 25 Nordic and Baltic laboratories participated. The analytical quality across participants was generally good with about two thirds of the results in close agreement with estimated mean values. The exercise has demonstrated improved agreement between the results and more realistic analytical uncertainties submitted by the participants compared with a previous exercise carried out during 1998-1999 in the same NKS project. (au)

  16. Table of radionuclides (Vol. 5 - A = 22 to 244)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Be, M.M.; Chiste, V.; Dulieu, C.; Mougeot, X.; Browne, E.; Chechev, V.; Kuzmenko, N.; Kondev, F.; Luca, A.; Galan, M.; Arinc, A.; Huang, X.

    2010-07-01

    This monograph is one of several published in a series by the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) on behalf of the Comite Consultatif des Rayonnements Ionisants (CCRI), previously known as the Comite Consultatif pour les Etalons de Mesure des Rayonnements Ionisants (CCEMRI). The aim of this series of publications is to review topics that are of importance for the measurement of ionizing radiation and especially of radioactivity, in particular those techniques normally used by participants in international comparisons. It is hoped that these publications will prove to be useful reference volumes both for those who are already engaged in this field and for those who are approaching such measurements for the first time. The purpose of this monograph is to present the recommended values of nuclear and decay data for a wide range of radionuclides. Activity measurements for more than forty of these radionuclides have already been the subject of comparisons under the auspices of Section II of the CCRI. The material for this monograph is now covered in four volumes. The first two volumes contain the primary recommended data relating to half-lives, decay modes, x-rays, gamma-rays, electron emissions; alpha- and beta-particle transitions and emissions, and their uncertainties for a set of sixty-eight radionuclides: Volume 1 for those radionuclides with mass number up to and including 150, and Volume 2 for those radionuclides with mass number over 150. Volume 3 contains the equivalent data for twenty-six additional radionuclides and re-evaluations for {sup 125}Sb and {sup 153}Sm; Volume 4 contains the data for a further thirty-one radionuclides with re-evaluation for {sup 226}Ra while the present Volume 5 includes 17 new radionuclide evaluations and 8 re-evaluations of previous data as identified in the contents page. The data have been collated and evaluated by an international working group (Decay Data Evaluation Project) led by the LNE-LNHB. The evaluators

  17. A Critical Review of Alpha Radionuclide Therapy: How to Deal with Recoiling Daughters?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Kruijff, R.M.; Wolterbeek, H.T.; Denkova, A.G.

    2015-01-01

    This review presents an overview of the successes and challenges currently faced in alpha radionuclide therapy. Alpha particles have an advantage in killing tumour cells as compared to beta or gamma radiation due to their short penetration depth and high linear energy transfer (LET). Touching briefl

  18. Luminescence properties after X-ray irradiation for dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Duk-Geun; Kim, Myung-Jin

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the luminescence characteristics after exposure to X-ray radiation, we developed an independent, small X-ray irradiation system comprising a Varian VF-50J mini X-ray generator, a Pb collimator, a delay shutter, and an Al absorber. With this system, the apparent dose rate increased linearly to 0.8 Gy/s against the emission current for a 50 kV anode potential when the shutter was delayed for an initial 4 s and the Al absorber was 300 µm thick. In addition, an approximately 20 mm diameter sample area was irradiated homogeneously with X rays. Based on three-dimensional (3D) thermoluminescence (TL) spectra, the small X-ray irradiator was considered comparable to the conventional 90Sr/90Y beta source even though the TL intensity from beta irradiation was higher than that from X-ray irradiation. The single aliquot regenerative (SAR) growth curve for the small X-ray irradiator was identical to that for the beta source. Therefore, we concluded that the characteristics of the small X-ray irradiator and the conventional 90Sr/90Y beta source were similar and that X ray irradiation had the potential for being suitable for use in luminescence dosimetry.

  19. Dosimetry requirements derived from the sterilization standards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, A.

    1998-01-01

    The main standards for radiation sterilization, ISO 11137 and EN 552, rest the documentation for the properly executed sterilization process on dosimetry. Both standards describe general requirements to the dosimetry system: The dose measurements must be traceable to national standards, the uncer...

  20. Hydrogeological interpretation of natural radionuclide contents in Austrian groundwaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Gerhard; Berka, Rudolf; Hörhan, Thomas; Katzlberger, Christian; Landstetter, Claudia; Philippitsch, Rudolf

    2010-05-01

    The Austrian Agency for Health and Food Safety (AGES) stores comprehensive data sets of radionuclide contents in Austrian groundwater. There are several analyses concerning Rn-222, Ra-226, gross alpha and gross beta as well as selected analyses of Ra-228, Pb-210, Po-210, Uranium and U-234/U-238. In a current project financed by the Austrian Federal Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry, Environment and Water Management, AGES and the Geological Survey of Austria (GBA) are evaluating these data sets with regard to the geological backgrounds. Several similar studies based on groundwater monitoring have been made in the USA (for instance by Focazio, M.J., Szabo, Z., Kraemer, T.F., Mullin, A.H., Barringer, T.H., De Paul, V.T. (2001): Occurrence of selected radionuclides in groundwater used for drinking water in the United States: a reconnaissance survey, 1998. U.S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigations Report 00-4273). The geological background for the radionuclide contents of groundwater will be derived from geological maps in combination with existing Thorium and Uranium analyses of the country rocks and stream-sediments and from airborne radiometric maps. Airborne radiometric data could contribute to identify potential radionuclide hot spot areas as only airborne radiometric mapping could provide countrywide Thorium and Uranium data coverage in high resolution. The project will also focus on the habit of the sampled wells and springs and the hydrological situation during the sampling as these factors can have an important influence on the Radon content of the sampled groundwater (Schubert, G., Alletsgruber, I., Finger, F., Gasser, V., Hobiger, G. and Lettner, H. (2010): Radon im Grundwasser des Mühlviertels (Oberösterreich) Grundwasser. - Springer (in print). Based on the project results an overview map (1:500,000) concerning the radionuclide potential should be produced. The first version should be available in February 2011.

  1. Intercalibration of radiological measurements for surveillance purposes of the internal dosimetry laboratory coordinated by the IAEA; Intercalibracion de mediciones radiologicas para fines de vigilancia del laboratorio de dosimetria interna coordinada por el OIEA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfaro L, M.M. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2002-07-15

    The ININ of Mexico participated in this intercomparison organized by the IAEA in 2000. The objective of this activity is that the dosimetry laboratories that participate can validate the programs of internal dosimetry, with the purpose of improving its capacity in the evaluation of the internal dose and have access to a mechanism to evaluate its dosimetry system under real conditions. The specific objectives of this intercomparison were: 1. To evaluate the participant's capacity to manage the measurements of individual monitoring in terms of the activity in the phantom. 2. To provide the access to the unique calibration resources that otherwise would not be available. 3. To compare the operation of several detection systems, the geometry, phantoms, calibration methods and methods for the evaluation of activity of the radionuclide used by each institution. 4. To provide the independent verification of the direct measurement methods of the dosimetry service. (Author)

  2. A probabilistic gastrointestinal tract dosimetry model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Chulhaeng

    In internal dosimetry, the tissues of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract represent one of the most radiosensitive organs of the body with the hematopoietic bone marrow. Endoscopic ultrasound is a unique tool to acquire in-vivo data on GI tract wall thicknesses of sufficient resolution needed in radiation dosimetry studies. Through their different echo texture and intensity, five layers of differing echo patterns for superficial mucosa, deep mucosa, submucosa, muscularis propria and serosa exist within the walls of organs composing the alimentary tract. Thicknesses for stomach mucosa ranged from 620 +/- 150 mum to 1320 +/- 80 mum (total stomach wall thicknesses from 2.56 +/- 0.12 to 4.12 +/- 0.11 mm). Measurements made for the rectal images revealed rectal mucosal thicknesses from 150 +/- 90 mum to 670 +/- 110 mum (total rectal wall thicknesses from 2.01 +/- 0.06 to 3.35 +/- 0.46 mm). The mucosa thus accounted for 28 +/- 3% and 16 +/- 6% of the total thickness of the stomach and rectal wall, respectively. Radiation transport simulations were then performed using the Monte Carlo N-particle transport code (MCNP) 4C transport code to calculate S values (Gy/Bq-s) for penetrating and nonpenetrating radiations such as photons, beta particles, conversion electrons and auger electrons of selected nuclides, I123, I131, Tc 99m and Y90 under two source conditions: content and mucosa sources, respectively. The results of this study demonstrate generally good agreement with published data for the stomach mucosa wall. The rectal mucosa data are consistently higher than published data compared with the large intestine due to different radiosensitive cell thicknesses (350 mum vs. a range spanning from 149 mum to 729 mum) and different geometry when a rectal content source is considered. Generally, the ICRP models have been designed to predict the amount of radiation dose in the human body from a "typical" or "reference" individual in a given population. The study has been performed to

  3. Radionuclide Sensors for Subsurface Water Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timothy DeVol

    2006-06-30

    Contamination of the subsurface by radionuclides is a persistent and vexing problem for the Department of Energy. These radionuclides must be measured in field studies and monitoed in the long term when they cannot be removed. However, no radionuclide sensors existed for groundwater monitoring prior to this team's research under the EMSP program Detection of a and b decays from radionuclides in water is difficult due to their short ranges in condensed media.

  4. Development of probabilistic internal dosimetry computer code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Siwan; Kwon, Tae-Eun; Lee, Jai-Ki

    2017-02-01

    Internal radiation dose assessment involves biokinetic models, the corresponding parameters, measured data, and many assumptions. Every component considered in the internal dose assessment has its own uncertainty, which is propagated in the intake activity and internal dose estimates. For research or scientific purposes, and for retrospective dose reconstruction for accident scenarios occurring in workplaces having a large quantity of unsealed radionuclides, such as nuclear power plants, nuclear fuel cycle facilities, and facilities in which nuclear medicine is practiced, a quantitative uncertainty assessment of the internal dose is often required. However, no calculation tools or computer codes that incorporate all the relevant processes and their corresponding uncertainties, i.e., from the measured data to the committed dose, are available. Thus, the objective of the present study is to develop an integrated probabilistic internal-dose-assessment computer code. First, the uncertainty components in internal dosimetry are identified, and quantitative uncertainty data are collected. Then, an uncertainty database is established for each component. In order to propagate these uncertainties in an internal dose assessment, a probabilistic internal-dose-assessment system that employs the Bayesian and Monte Carlo methods. Based on the developed system, we developed a probabilistic internal-dose-assessment code by using MATLAB so as to estimate the dose distributions from the measured data with uncertainty. Using the developed code, we calculated the internal dose distribution and statistical values ( e.g. the 2.5th, 5th, median, 95th, and 97.5th percentiles) for three sample scenarios. On the basis of the distributions, we performed a sensitivity analysis to determine the influence of each component on the resulting dose in order to identify the major component of the uncertainty in a bioassay. The results of this study can be applied to various situations. In cases of

  5. Modeling radionuclide migration from underground nuclear explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harp, Dylan Robert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Stauffer, Philip H. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Viswanathan, Hari S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Karra, Satish [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Pandey, Sachin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); O' Malley, Daniel [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Anderson, Dale [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-06

    The travel time of radionuclide gases to the ground surface in fracture rock depends on many complex factors. Numerical simulators are the most complete repositories of knowledge of the complex processes governing radionuclide gas migration to the ground surface allowing us to verify conceptualizations of physical processes against observations and forecast radionuclide gas travel times to the ground surface and isotopic ratios

  6. Chemistry and analysis of radionuclides

    CERN Document Server

    Lehto, Jukka

    2010-01-01

    Written by chemists for chemists, this is a comprehensive guide to the important radionuclides as well as techniques for their separation and analysis. It introduces readers to the important laboratory techniques and methodologies in the field, providing practical instructions on how to handle nuclear waste and radioactivity in the environment.

  7. Tumor Immunotargeting Using Innovative Radionuclides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Françoise Kraeber-Bodéré

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews some aspects and recent developments in the use of antibodies to target radionuclides for tumor imaging and therapy. While radiolabeled antibodies have been considered for many years in this context, only a few have reached the level of routine clinical use. However, alternative radionuclides, with more appropriate physical properties, such as lutetium-177 or copper-67, as well as alpha-emitting radionuclides, including astatine-211, bismuth-213, actinium-225, and others are currently reviving hopes in cancer treatments, both in hematological diseases and solid tumors. At the same time, PET imaging, with short-lived radionuclides, such as gallium-68, fluorine-18 or copper-64, or long half-life ones, particularly iodine-124 and zirconium-89 now offers new perspectives in immuno-specific phenotype tumor imaging. New antibody analogues and pretargeting strategies have also considerably improved the performances of tumor immunotargeting and completely renewed the interest in these approaches for imaging and therapy by providing theranostics, companion diagnostics and news tools to make personalized medicine a reality.

  8. Radionuclide Diagnosis of Pulmonary Embolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hess, Søren; Madsen, Poul Henning

    2016-01-01

    Diagnostic imaging plays an integral role in the diagnostic workup of suspected pulmonary embolism, and several modalities have been employed over the years. In recent years, the choice has been narrowed to either computer tomographic or radionuclide based methods, i.e. computer tomographic angio...

  9. ESR dosimetry using eggshells and tooth enamel for accidental dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oka, Toshihide; Yamanaka, Chihiro; Ikeya, Motoji [Department of Earth and Space Science, Faculty of Science, Osaka Univ., Toyonaka, Osaka (Japan)

    1997-07-01

    The CO{sub 2}{sup -} signal of eggshells showed a good dose linearity and was appropriate in the wide dose range from 1 to 10 kGy, while ESR signal of CO{sub 2}{sup -} in sea and fresh water shells were saturated at a dose od below 10 kGy. The minimum detectable dose and G-value of CO{sub 2}{sup -} in eggshells were estimated 0.3 Gy and 0.28, respectively. The lifetime of CO{sub 2}{sup -} in eggshells could not be determined exactly because of overlapping organic signals, however it is still sufficiently long for practical use as ESR dosimeter materials. Various bird`s or reptile`s eggshells would be available as natural retrospective ESR dosimeter materials after nuclear accidents. Eggshells will be useful for the food irradiation dosimetry in the dose range of about a few kGy. Tooth enamel is one of the most useful dosimeter materials in public at a accident because of its high sensitivity. ESR dosimetry will replace TLD in near future if the cost of an ESR reader is further reduced . (author)

  10. Radiation dosimetry by potassium feldspar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arun Pandya; S G Vaijapurkar; P K Bhatnagar

    2000-04-01

    The thermoluminescence (TL) properties of raw and annealed feldspar have been studied for their use in gamma dosimetry. The raw gamma exposed feldspar shows glow peaks at 120°C and 319°C. Gamma dose beyond 500 cGy can be measured without any significant fading even after 40 days of termination of exposure. The annealed feldspar shows a glow peak at 120°C after gamma exposure. This peak can be used to measure gamma doses beyond 25 cGy when the TL is measured after 24 h from termination of exposure.

  11. Relocation of the Dosimetry Service

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    The Dosimetry Service is moving from Building 24 to Building 55 and will therefore be closed on Friday, 30 March. From Monday, 2 April onwards you will find us in Building 55/1-001. Please note that we cannot exclude problems with Internet connections on that day and are therefore unable to guarantee normal service. The Service's opening hours and telephone number will not change as a result of the move: Open from 8.30 - 12.00. Closed in the afternoons. Tel. 7 2155

  12. Radiation fields, dosimetry, biokinetics and biophysical models for cancer induction by ionising radiation 1996 - 1999. Mid-term reports for the period 1996-1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacob, P.; Paretzke, H.G.; Roth, P. [GSF - Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit Neuherberg GmbH, Oberschleissheim (Germany). Inst. fuer Strahlenschutz; Michael, B.D. [Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood (United Kingdom). Gray Lab.; O`Sullivan, D. [Dublin Inst. for Advanced Studies (Ireland)

    1998-12-31

    The main objectives of the first dosimetry project are the measurement of neutron and charged particle flux and energy spectra at altitudes in civil aviation, the determination of response characteristics for detectors, the investigation of calibration procedures, and the evaluation of exposures of aircrews. The overall objective of the second dosimetry project is to improve estimates of dose following the intake of radionuclides by adults and children. The work includes the development of biokinetic and dosimetric models, including models of the gastrointestinal tract, for the systemic behaviour of radionuclides, and for the developing embryo and foetus. Further subjects are target cell dosimetry for short-range particles and the development of computational tools for sensitivity and uncertainty analysis models. The third dosimetry project encompasses the study of different methods for retrospective dose assessments for individuals or groups of individuals accidentally exposed to increased levels of radiation. The methods investigated include electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) of tooth enamel and chromosome painting (FISH) for lymphocytes in peripheral blood for individual retrospective dose assessments, luminescence techniques on materials in inhabited environment (ceramics, bricks) and model calculations using environmental data as input. (orig.)

  13. Physical aspects of scintigraphy-based dosimetry for nuclear medicine therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geworski, L.; Knoop, B.O. [Dept. of Radiation Protection and Medical Physics, Hannover Medical School, Hannover (Germany); Schaefer, A.; Kirsch, C.M. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Saarland Univ. Medical Center, Homburg (Germany); Pinkert, J. [Bayer Vital GmbH, Leverkusen (Germany); Plotkin, M. [Clinic for Nuclear Medicine, Univ. Hospital Charitee, Berlin (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    In nuclear medicine therapy the treatment of tumours by radiation exposure from internally deposited labelled antibodies or labelled peptides is currently an active field of investigation. To permit the efficient delivery of high amounts of radiation dose to tumours while limiting the radiation dose to critical organs dosimetry calculations have to be performed. These are relying on scintigraphic data being input to the well known MIRD formalism. This paper focuses on the methods and the difficulties associated with the scintigraphic determination of organ kinetics. The physical properties of the well-known scintigraphic imaging modalities, PET, SPECT and planar scintigraphy, are discussed thereby taking into account the properties of the appropriate radionuclides currently being available for therapy and dosimetry. Several arguments are given and disputed for the limited clinical use of PET and SPECT in dosimetry and the ongoing preference of planar whole-body imaging as the method of choice. The quantitative restrictions still inherent to this method are also discussed in detail. Procedural recommendations are proposed covering all processes related to data acquisition, data correction and data analysis which finally lead to reliable estimations of organ dose. (orig.)

  14. Assessment of beta-emitter radionuclides in biological samples using liquid scintillation counting. Application to the study of internal doses in molecular and cellular biology techniques; Evaluacion en muestras biologicas de radionucleidos emisores beta mediante espectrometria de centelleo en fase liquida. Aplicaciones al estudio de dosis internas en tecnicas de investigacion de biologia molecular y celular

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sierra, I.; Delgado, A.; Navarro, T.; Macias, M. T.

    2007-07-01

    The radioisotopic techniques used in Molecular and Cellular Biology involve external and internal irradiation risk. It is necessary to control the possible internal contamination associated to the development of these techniques. The internal contamination risk can be due to physical and chemical properties of the labelled compounds, aerosols generated during the performance technique. The aim of this work was to estimate the possible intake of specific beta emitters during the technique development and to propose the required criterions to perform Individual Monitoring. The most representative radioisotopic techniques were selected attending their potential risk of internal contamination. Techniques were analysed applying IAEA methodology according to the used activity in each technique. It was necessary to identify the worker groups that would require individual monitoring on the base of their specific risk. Different measurement procedures were applied to study the possible intake in group risk and more than 160 persons were measured by in vitro bioassay. (Author) 96 refs.

  15. Conditions and processes affecting radionuclide transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Ardyth M.; Neymark, Leonid A.

    2012-01-01

    Characteristics of host rocks, secondary minerals, and fluids would affect the transport of radionuclides from a previously proposed repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Minerals in the Yucca Mountain tuffs that are important for retarding radionuclides include clinoptilolite and mordenite (zeolites), clay minerals, and iron and manganese oxides and hydroxides. Water compositions along flow paths beneath Yucca Mountain are controlled by dissolution reactions, silica and calcite precipitation, and ion-exchange reactions. Radionuclide concentrations along flow paths from a repository could be limited by (1) low waste-form dissolution rates, (2) low radionuclide solubility, and (3) radionuclide sorption onto geological media.

  16. TDCR and CIEMAT/NIST liquid scintillation methods applied to the radionuclide metrology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz, Paulo A.L. da; Silva, Carlos J. da; Iwahara, Akira; Loureiro, Jamir S.; Oliveira, Antonio E. de; Tauhata, Luiz, E-mail: palcruz@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Lopes, Ricardo T. [Coordenacao de Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (PEN/COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2015-07-01

    In this work are presented TDCR and CIEMAT/NIST methods of liquid scintillation implemented in National Institutes of Metrology for activity standardization of radionuclides which decay by beta emission and electron capture. The computer codes to calculate the detection efficiency take into account: decay schemes, beta decay theory, quenching parameter evaluation, Poisson statistic model and Monte Carlo simulation for photon and particle interactions in the detection system. Measurements were performed for {sup 3}H, {sup 14}C, {sup 99}Tc pure beta emitters in a large energy range, and {sup 68}Ge/{sup 68}Ga which decay by electron capture and positron emission, with uncertainties smaller than 1% (k = 1). (author)

  17. Three new projects for the CERN Dosimetry Service

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    The measures for the protection of personnel against ionising radiation at CERN are very strict. As soon as a new directive is issued by EURATOM, the Laboratory ensures it is adopted quickly. Since every system can be perfected, Pierre Carbonez and the Dosimetry Service team are working on three new projects aimed at improving the safety of workers exposed to ionising radiation in the course of their work on the CERN sites.       The two types of dosimeters currently in use at CERN. 4,700 people at CERN have a dosimeter. Every month, they have to have their dosimeter scanned by one of the 45 readers installed at various strategic locations around the Laboratory. Each month, the dosimetry team led by Pierre Carbonez exchanges around 450 dosimeters to recalibrate them and prepare them for further use. “These dosimeters are passive detectors which record the doses caused by beta, gamma and neutron radiation," explains Pierre Carbonez. &a...

  18. An Automated Biological Dosimetry System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorch, T.; Bille, J.; Frieben, M.; Stephan, G.

    1986-04-01

    The scoring of structural chromosome aberrations in peripheral human blood lymphocytes can be used in biological dosimetry to estimate the radiation dose which an individual has received. Especially the dicentric chromosome is a rather specific indicator for an exposure to ionizing radiation. For statistical reasons, in the low dose range a great number of cells must be analysed, which is a very tedious task. The resulting high cost of a biological dose estimation limits the application of this method to cases of suspected irradiation for which physical dosimetry is not possible or not sufficient. Therefore an automated system has been designed to do the major part of the routine work. It uses a standard light microscope with motorized scanning stage, a Plumbicon TV-camera, a real-time hardware preprocessor, a binary and a grey level image buffer system. All computations are performed by a very powerful multi-microprocessor-system (POLYP) based on a MIMD-architecture. The task of the automated system can be split in finding the metaphases (see Figure 1) at low microscope magnification and scoring dicentrics at high magnification. The metaphase finding part has been completed and is now in routine use giving good results. The dicentric scoring part is still under development.

  19. Path forward for dosimetry cross sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, P.J. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 87185-1146 (United States); Peters, C.D. [Sandia Staffing Alliance, Albuquerque, NM 87110 (United States)

    2011-07-01

    In the 1980's the dosimetry community embraced the need for a high fidelity quantification of uncertainty in nuclear data used for dosimetry applications. This led to the adoption of energy-dependent covariance matrices as the accepted manner of quantifying the uncertainty data. The trend for the dosimetry community to require high fidelity treatment of uncertainty estimates has continued to the current time where requirements on nuclear data are codified in standards such as ASTM E 1018. This paper surveys the current state of the dosimetry cross sections and investigates the quality of the current dosimetry cross section evaluations by examining calculated-to-experimental ratios in neutron benchmark fields. In recent years more nuclear-related technical areas are placing an emphasis on uncertainty quantification. With the availability of model-based cross sections and covariance matrices produced by nuclear data codes, some nuclear-related communities are considering the role these covariance matrices should play. While funding within the dosimetry community for cross section evaluations has been very meager, other areas, such as the solar-related astrophysics community and the US Nuclear Criticality Safety Program, have been supporting research in the area of neutron cross sections. The Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) is responsible for the creation and maintenance of the ENDF/B library which has been the mainstay for the reactor dosimetry community. Given the new trends in cross section evaluations, this paper explores the path forward for the US nuclear reactor dosimetry community and its use of the ENDF/B cross-sections. The major concern is maintenance of the sufficiency and accuracy of the uncertainty estimate when used for dosimetry applications. The two major areas of deficiency in the proposed ENDF/B approach are: 1) the use of unrelated covariance matrices in ENDF/B evaluations and 2) the lack of 'due consideration' of

  20. Introduction to radiological physics and radiation dosimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Attix, Frank Herbert

    2004-01-01

    A straightforward presentation of the broad concepts underlying radiological physics and radiation dosimetry for the graduate-level student. Covers photon and neutron attenuation, radiation and charged particle equilibrium, interactions of photons and charged particles with matter, radiotherapy dosimetry, as well as photographic, calorimetric, chemical, and thermoluminescence dosimetry. Includes many new derivations, such as Kramers X-ray spectrum, as well as topics that have not been thoroughly analyzed in other texts, such as broad-beam attenuation and geometrics, and the reciprocity theorem

  1. Pilot test of ANSI draft standard N13.29 environmental dosimetry -- Performance criteria for testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klemic, G.; Shebell, P.; Monetti, M.; Raccah, F. [Dept. of Energy, New York, NY (United States). Environmental Measurement Lab.; Shobe, J.; Lamperti, P.; Soares, C. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Sengupta, S. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1998-09-01

    American National Standards Institute Draft N13.29 describes performance tests for environmental radiation dosimetry providers. If approved it would be the first step toward applying the types of performance testing now required in personnel dosimetry to environmental radiation monitoring. The objective of this study was to pilot test the draft standard, before it undergoes final balloting, on a small group of dosimetry providers that were selected to provide a mix of facility types, thermoluminescent dosimeter designs and monitoring program applications. The first phase of the pilot test involved exposing dosimeters to laboratory photon, beta, and x-ray sources at routine and accident dose levels. In the second phase, dosimeters were subjected to ninety days of simulated environmental conditions in an environmental chamber that cycled through extremes of temperature and humidity. Two out of seven participants passed all categories of the laboratory testing phase, and all seven passed the environmental test phase. While some relatively minor deficiencies were uncovered in the course of the pilot test, the results show that draft N13.29 describes useful tests that could be appropriate for environmental dosimetry providers. An appendix to this report contains recommendations that should be addressed by the N13.29 working group before draft N13.29 is submitted for balloting.

  2. Advances in SPECT imaging with respect to radionuclide therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Asseler, Y

    2009-06-01

    Radionuclide therapy is gradually becoming more important as a therapy option in various diseases. Nuclear medicine imaging plays an important role in this, before, during and after the therapy. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging can be used to predict therapy response, calculate doses delivered to the tumour and the surrounding organ, check radiopharmaceutical distribution and follow-up this distribution in time. On a technological level, radionuclide imaging in a therapy setting shows some particularities and issues to be resolved. Accurate quantification is important but is hampered by attenuation, scatter from different energy peaks and from bremsstrahlung photons, septal penetration, partial volume effects etc. Some of these issues are discussed in this paper. A technique specific for therapy imaging is bremsstrahlung imaging, which can be used if the therapeutical agent is a pure beta emitter. Quantitative bremsstrahlung imaging is particularly challenging due to the complicated nature of the energy spectrum of these photons. Some work towards quantitative bremsstrahlung imaging is discussed here. Finally, some recent technical advances relevant to this field are pointed out. On the software side, Monte Carlo simulations seem to have a great potential for accurate quantitative SPECT reconstruction and subsequent patient specific image based dose calculations. Concerning hardware, the availability of SPECT-CT technology may have a large impact in imaging in radionuclide therapy. Novel detector technologies such as solid-state detectors may also prove to have significant advantages in this field.

  3. Irradiation and dosimetry of Nitinol stent for renal artery brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arbabi, Azim [Science and Research Campus, Islamic Azad University, P.O. Box 14515-775, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shahid Beheshti Medical University, P.O. Box 14335-1419, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sadeghi, Mahdi [Science and Research Campus, Islamic Azad University, P.O. Box 14515-775, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nuclear Medicine Research Group, Agricultural, Medical and Industrial Research School, P.O. Box 31485-498, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: msadeghi@nrcam.org; Joharifard, Mahdi [Science and Research Campus, Islamic Azad University, P.O. Box 14515-775, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2009-01-15

    This study was conducted to assess the suitability of {sup 48}V radioactive stent for use in renal artery brachytherapy. A nickel-titanium alloy Nitinol stent was irradiated over the proton energy range of up to 8.5 MeV, to obtain {sup 48}V. The depth dose distribution analysis of the activated stent was done with TLD-700GR in a Perspex phantom. We investigated a unique mixed gamma/beta brachytherapy source of {sup 48}V. For a 10 mm outer-diameter {sup 48}V stent, the average measured dose rate to vessel was 37 mGy/h. The dosimetry results of the {sup 48}V stent suggest that the stent is suitable for use in renal artery brachytherapy.

  4. Confocal microscopy, a tool for biological dosimetry in tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritsch, P.; Lenaour, H.; Morlier, J.P. [CEA/DSV/DRR, Laboratoire de Radio Toxicologie, 91 - Bruyeres-le-chatel (France)

    1997-03-01

    Because standard histological methods and related observation are very time consuming, only a few studies have concerned biological dosimetry in tissues. This experimental approach is however the only one that could characterize a heterogeneous irradiation such as that induced after internal contamination with {alpha} and/or {beta} emitters. The aim advantage of CM is to observe thin optical sections (<0.5{mu}m) within a thick section (>50{mu}m) which allows observation of many cells and to score events even those occurring at a low frequency if an appropriate staining has been performed. Two rat tissues have been studies, cerebellum during its histogenesis which was irradiated from bone after {sup 90}Sr contamination, and lungs from adults after radon daughter inhalation. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that CM might be an appropriate method to characterize the heterogeneous distribution of doses after internal contamination. (authors)

  5. Radionuclide synovectomy - essentials for rheumatologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chojnowski, Marek M; Felis-Giemza, Anna; Kobylecka, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Radionuclide synovectomy is a minimally invasive method of treating persistent joint inflammation. It involves intra-articular injection of radioactive colloids which induce necrosis and fibrosis of hypertrophic synovial membrane. The most common indication for radiosynovectomy is rheumatoid arthritis, although patients with seronegative spondyloarthropathies, unclassified arthritis, haemophilic arthropathy and other less common arthropathies can also benefit from this method. Radiosynovectomy is safe, well tolerated and efficacious. About 70-80% of patients respond well to the therapy. However, the therapeutic effects are considerably worse in patients with co-existent osteoarthritis and advanced joint degeneration. Despite its advantages, radionuclide synovectomy is not performed as often as it could be, so greater knowledge and understanding of this method are needed. The authors present the most important facts about radiosynovectomy that may help rheumatologists in their daily clinical practice.

  6. Radionuclide behavior at underground environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, Phil Soo; Park, Chung Kyun; Keum, Dong Kwon; Cho, Young Hwan; Kang, Moon Ja; Baik, Min Hoon; Hahn, Kyung Won; Chun, Kwan Sik; Park, Hyun Soo

    2000-03-01

    This study of radionuclide behavior at underground environment has been carried out as a part of the study of high-level waste disposal technology development. Therefore, the main objectives of this project are constructing a data-base and producing data for the safety assessment of a high-level radioactive waste, and verification of the objectivity of the assessment through characterization of the geochemical processes and experimental validation of the radionuclide migration. The various results from the this project can be applicable to the preliminary safety and performance assessments of the established disposal concept for a future high-level radioactive waste repository. Providing required data and technical basis for assessment methodologies could be a direct application of the results. In a long-term view, the results can also be utilized as a technical background for the establishment of government policy for high-level radioactive waste disposal.

  7. [Radionuclide diagnosis of kidney calculi].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlakhov, N; Penkova, D

    1986-09-01

    Radionuclide investigations were conducted in 322 patients with nephrolithiasis. Unilateral calculosis was established in 46.3% of the patients, bilateral calculosis in 50.6%. The nature of changes on renograms, scintigrams and in clearance values was shown to depend on the localization of concrements, their size and the presence of concomitant infection. A conclusion has been made as to the usefulness of the methods with relation to operative treatment, especially in a bilateral localization of a pathological renal process.

  8. Chernobyl radionuclide distribution and migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izrael, Yury A

    2007-11-01

    The accident at Unit No. 4 of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant on 26 April 1986 presented severe challenges in radiation protection. Early activity measurements defined the contaminated areas in order to determine what persons should be evacuated on the basis of the exposure limit at that time of 100 mSv (10 rem) for accidents. The immediate definition of these areas was accomplished with specially equipped aircraft capable of measuring external gamma-exposure rate and radionuclide spectra. Over time, maps of 137Cs contamination (the most important long-lived radionuclide) have become more and more sophisticated and have been used for further determinations of the control of the consequences of the accident. About 70% of the total release of 137Cs was deposited in Belarus, the Russian Federation, and Ukraine; but there was also widespread deposition throughout the countries of Western Europe. Two atlases of contamination throughout Europe were prepared, and the Russian atlas included data on other radionuclides and on external gamma-exposure rates. The radiocesiums behaved as volatile radionuclides because of the volatility of cesium. In contrast to the typical pattern after nuclear weapons tests, 90Sr behaved only as a refractory element, as its volatile precursors krypton and rubidium had already decayed within the reactor. Nearly all of the refractory elements (strontium, plutonium, etc.) released by the accident were confined to the 30-km zone around the reactor. A proposal is made to develop a more complete atlas of 137Cs deposition from the accident that would include the entire Northern Hemisphere. Water was not an important vector of exposure to human beings following the accident.

  9. Radionuclide behavior in the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tveten, U. (Institutt for Energiteknikk, Kjeller (Norway))

    1991-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the results of the following task: Review for quality and consistency the available data on measurements of initial ground contamination of Chernobyl radionuclides in various parts of Norway and subsequent concentrations of these radionuclides in various environmental media as functions of time. Utilize the data obtained to verify the existing models, or to improve them, for describing radionuclide behavior in the environment. Some of the processes standard were: migration into soil; weathering; resuspension; food-chain contamination; and loss or reconcentration by run-off. The task performed within this contract has been to use post-Chernobyl data from Norway to verify or find areas for possible improvement in the chronic exposure pathway models utilized in MACCS. Work has consisted mainly of collecting and evaluating post-Chernobyl information from Norway or other countries when relevant; but has also included experimental work performed specifically for the current task. In most connections the data available show the models and data in MACCS to be appropriate. A few areas where the data indicate that the MACCS approach is faulty or inadequate are, however, pointed out in the report. These should be examined carefully, and appropriate modifications should eventually be made. 14 refs., 12 figs., 22 tabs.

  10. Alternative radionuclides for using in oil exploratory tools - PIG TAG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira Junior, Robson da Costa; Estrada, Julio Jose da Silva, E-mail: jestrada@ime.eb.br [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Delgado, Jose Ubiratan; Pinho, Adaugoberto Soares de; Oliveira, Estela Maria de, E-mail: delgado@ird.gov.br, E-mail: soares@ird.gov.br, E-mail: estela@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The ionizing radiations are present from prospecting to production of oil or gas, using a variety of techniques with radioactive sources. The radioactive tracer (pip tag) is a technique in which is placed a mark in different depths of the well that is being profiled. This marker is done generally with gamma emitter {sup 60}Co which activity until 74 kBq (2 {mu}Ci). The purpose of this marker is to identify places of interest of investigations or where will be blast the rock that has been identified as potential hydrocarbon deposits. Currently, these radioactive markers are obtained in the international market in the form of metallic solid sources. However, there are some difficulties in the importation of material, ranging from the permission by the regulatory organization (CNEN) to the customs costs, through the attendance criteria set out in international and national standards related to the transport of radioactive material. These import processes, therefore, involve high costs and delays in having the products. This work aims to develop a methodology that makes possible the preparation of alternative radioactive sources in the country in order to supply the growing demand for this market in a shorter time and with less cost. For this purpose, are being evaluated not only the appropriate support for the markers as well as the possibility of replacement {sup 60}Co by other radionuclides that can perform the same functional properly. This replacement will be based on technical parameters such as energy, half-life, and activity and emission intensity, according to the characteristics of each radionuclide to be evaluated. The production of radioactive markers will be made at the National Laboratory for Metrology of Ionizing Radiation of the Institute of Radioprotection and Dosimetry (IRD), while the field tests had been performed in an industry located in the region of Macae-RJ, which is specialized in marking and profiling of wells oil in deep waters. (author)

  11. Protocol for emergency EPR dosimetry in fingernails

    OpenAIRE

    Trompier, F; Kornak, L.; Calas, C.; Romanyukha, A.; LeBlanc, B.; Mitchell, C. A.; Swartz, H M; Clairand, I.

    2007-01-01

    There is an increased need for after-the-fact dosimetry because of the high risk of radiation exposures due to terrorism or accidents. In case of such an event, a method is needed to make measurements of dose in a large number of individuals rapidly and with sufficient accuracy to facilitate effective medical triage. Dosimetry based on EPR measurements of fingernails potentially could be an effective tool for this purpose. This paper presents the first operational protocols for EPR fingernail...

  12. Development of radiation biological dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Chul Koo; Kim, Tae Hwan; Lee, Yun Sil; Son, Young Sook; Kim, Soo Kwan; Jang, Won Suk; Le, Sun Joo; Jee, Young Heun; Jung, Woo Jung

    1999-04-01

    Up until now, only a few methods have been developed for radiation biological dosimetry such as conventional chromosome aberration and micronucleus in peripheral blood cell. However, because these methods not only can be estimated by the expert, but also have a little limitation due to need high technique and many times in the case of radiation accident, it is very difficult to evaluate the absorbed dose of victims. Therefore, we should develop effective, easy, simple and rapid biodosimetry and its guideline (triage) to be able to be treated the victims as fast as possible. We established the premature chromosome condensation assay and apoptotic fragment assay which was the significant relationship between dose and cell damages to evaluate the irradiation dose as correct and rapid as possible using lymphocytes and crypt cells, and compared with conventional chromosome aberration assay and micronuclei assay.

  13. Advanced materials in radiation dosimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Bruzzi, M; Nava, F; Pini, S; Russo, S

    2002-01-01

    High band-gap semiconductor materials can represent good alternatives to silicon in relative dosimetry. Schottky diodes made with epitaxial n-type 4 H SiC and Chemical Vapor Deposited diamond films with ohmic contacts have been exposed to a sup 6 sup 0 Co gamma-source, 20 MeV electrons and 6 MV X photons from a linear accelerator to test the current response in on-line configuration in the dose range 0.1-10 Gy. The released charge as a function of the dose and the radiation-induced current as a function of the dose-rate are found to be linear. No priming effects have been observed using epitaxial SiC, due to the low density of lattice defects present in this material.

  14. Gamma dosimetry of the uranium deposit in Sao Jose de Espinharas, Paraiba, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Alberto Antonio da, E-mail: alberto.silva@barreiros.ifpe.edu.br [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia de Pernambuco (IFPE), Barreiros, PE (Brazil); Santos Junior, Jose Araujo dos; Cunha, Andre Felippe Vieira da; Amaral, Romilton dos Santos; Oliveira, Iane Andrade de; Bezerra, Jairo Dias; Silva, Flavio Ferreira da, E-mail: alberto.silva@barreiros.ifpe.edu.br, E-mail: jaraujo@ufpe.br, E-mail: andre.fvcunha@ufpe.br, E-mail: romilton@ufpe.br, E-mail: jairo.dias@ufpe.br, E-mail: iane_andrade@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (RAE/UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear. Grupo de Estudo sobre Radioecologia

    2013-07-01

    Radioecology studies contribute to the monitoring of both anthropic and natural radionuclides, as well as their correlation with the ecosystem and the population. Terrestrial sources, which mainly include the primary radionuclides of the {sup 238}U, {sup 232}Th, and {sup 40}K series, contribute to a higher effective dose received by humanity, with 84% from terrestrial radionuclides and another 16% derived from cosmogenic nuclides. Areas with high levels of natural radiation, above the acceptable limits, are of great relevance for the development of dosimetry studies, whose core aims include the preservation of the environment and the control of the population's exposure to radiation. The town of Sao Jose de Espinharas, Paraiba, Brazil, has a uranium oxide mine with an average grade of 1,200 mg/kg. In the present study, non-destructive, in situ assays were performed along the entire radiometrically anomalous area. The results obtained in terms of effective doses varied from 3.79 to 93.80 mSv.y{sup -1}, with an average of 19.47 mSv.y{sup -1} thus leading to the conclusion that all of the monitored points presented environmental doses of above the reference value of 2.4 mSv.y{sup -1}, suggesting that both qualitative and quantitative analyses concerning the environmental matrixes in question need to be performed. (author)

  15. Intraoperative avidination for radionuclide treatment as a radiotherapy boost in breast cancer: results of a phase II study with {sup 90}Y-labeled biotin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paganelli, Giovanni; De Cicco, Concetta; Carbone, Giuseppe; Pacifici, Monica [European Institute of Oncology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Milan (Italy); Ferrari, Mahila E.; Cremonesi, Marta; Di Dia, Amalia [European Institute of Oncology, Division of Medical Physics, Milan (Italy); Pagani, Gianmatteo; Galimberti, Viviana; Luini, Alberto [European Institute of Oncology, Division of Senology, Milan (Italy); Leonardi, Maria Cristina; Ferrari, Annamaria; Orecchia, Roberto [European Institute of Oncology, Division of Radiotherapy, Milan (Italy); De Santis, Rita [Sigma-Tau SpA R and D, Rome (Italy); Zurrida, Stefano [European Institute of Oncology, Division of Senology, Milan (Italy); University of Milan School of Medicine, Milan (Italy); Veronesi, Umberto [European Institute of Oncology, Scientific Director, Milan (Italy)

    2010-02-15

    External beam radiotherapy (EBRT) after conservative surgery for early breast cancer requires 5-7 weeks. For elderly patients and those distant from an RT center, attending for EBRT may be difficult or impossible. We investigated local toxicity, cosmetic outcomes, and quality of life in a new breast irradiation technique - intraoperative avidination for radionuclide therapy (IART) - in which avidin is administered to the tumor bed and {sup 90}Y-labelled biotin later administered intravenously to bind the avidin and provide irradiation. Reduced duration EBRT (40 Gy) is given subsequently. After surgery, 50 (ten patients), 100 (15 patients) or 150 mg (ten patients) of avidin was injected into the tumor bed. After 12-24 h, 3.7 GBq {sup 90}Y-biotin (beta source for therapeutic effect) plus 185 MBq {sup 111}In-biotin (gamma source for imaging and dosimetry) was infused slowly. Whole-body scintigraphy and SPECT/CT images were taken for up to 30 h. Shortened EBRT started 4 weeks later. Local toxicity was assessed by RTOG scale; quality of life was assessed by EORTC QOL-30. Of 35 patients recruited (mean age 63 years; range 42-74) 32 received IART plus EBRT. 100 mg avidin provided 19.5 {+-} 4.0 Gy to the tumor bed and was considered the optimum dose. No side-effects of avidin or {sup 90}Y-biotin occurred, with no hematological or local toxicity. Local G3 toxicity occurred in 3/32 patients during EBRT. IART plus EBRT was well accepted, with good cosmetic outcomes and maintained quality of life. IART plus reduced EBRT can accelerate irradiation after conservative breast surgery. (orig.)

  16. Microbial Transformations of Actinides and Other Radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francis,A.J.; Dodge, C. J.

    2009-01-07

    Microorganisms can affect the stability and mobility of the actinides and other radionuclides released from nuclear fuel cycle and from nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. Under appropriate conditions, microorganisms can alter the chemical speciation, solubility and sorption properties and thus could increase or decrease the concentrations of radionuclides in solution in the environment and the bioavailability. Dissolution or immobilization of radionuclides is brought about by direct enzymatic action or indirect non-enzymatic action of microorganisms. Although the physical, chemical, and geochemical processes affecting dissolution, precipitation, and mobilization of radionuclides have been extensively investigated, we have only limited information on the effects of microbial processes and biochemical mechanisms which affect the stability and mobility of radionuclides. The mechanisms of microbial transformations of the major and minor actinides U, Pu, Cm, Am, Np, the fission products and other radionuclides such as Ra, Tc, I, Cs, Sr, under aerobic and anaerobic conditions in the presence of electron donors and acceptors are reviewed.

  17. Targeted Radionuclide Therapy of Human Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey V. Gudkov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Targeted radionuclide therapy is one of the most intensively developing directions of nuclear medicine. Unlike conventional external beam therapy, the targeted radionuclide therapy causes less collateral damage to normal tissues and allows targeted drug delivery to a clinically diagnosed neoplastic malformations, as well as metastasized cells and cellular clusters, thus providing systemic therapy of cancer. The methods of targeted radionuclide therapy are based on the use of molecular carriers of radionuclides with high affinity to antigens on the surface of tumor cells. The potential of targeted radionuclide therapy has markedly grown nowadays due to the expanded knowledge base in cancer biology, bioengineering, and radiochemistry. In this review, progress in the radionuclide therapy of hematological malignancies and approaches for treatment of solid tumors is addressed.

  18. Performance analysis of numeric solutions applied to biokinetics of radionuclides; Analise de desempenho de solucoes numericas aplicadas a biocinetica de radionuclideos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mingatos, Danielle dos Santos; Bevilacqua, Joyce da Silva, E-mail: dani@ime.usp.br, E-mail: joyce@ime.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IME/USP), SP (Brazil). Instituto de Matematica e Estatistica; Todo, Alberto Saburo; Rodrigues Junior, Orlando, E-mail: astodo@ipen.br, E-mail: rodrijr@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Biokinetics models for radionuclides applied to dosimetry problems are constantly reviewed by ICRP. The radionuclide trajectory could be represented by compartmental models, assuming constant transfer rates between compartments. A better understanding of physiological or biochemical phenomena, improve the comprehension of radionuclide behavior in the human body and, in general, more complex compartmental models are proposed, increasing the difficulty of obtaining the analytical solution for the system of first order differential equations. Even with constant transfer rates numerical solutions must be carefully implemented because of almost singular characteristic of the matrix of coefficients. In this work we compare numerical methods with different strategies for ICRP-78 models for Thorium-228 and Uranium-234. The impact of uncertainty in the parameters of the equations is also estimated for local and global truncation errors. (author)

  19. Uncertainty in 3D gel dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Deene, Yves; Jirasek, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) gel dosimetry has a unique role to play in safeguarding conformal radiotherapy treatments as the technique can cover the full treatment chain and provides the radiation oncologist with the integrated dose distribution in 3D. It can also be applied to benchmark new treatment strategies such as image guided and tracking radiotherapy techniques. A major obstacle that has hindered the wider dissemination of gel dosimetry in radiotherapy centres is a lack of confidence in the reliability of the measured dose distribution. Uncertainties in 3D dosimeters are attributed to both dosimeter properties and scanning performance. In polymer gel dosimetry with MRI readout, discrepancies in dose response of large polymer gel dosimeters versus small calibration phantoms have been reported which can lead to significant inaccuracies in the dose maps. The sources of error in polymer gel dosimetry with MRI readout are well understood and it has been demonstrated that with a carefully designed scanning protocol, the overall uncertainty in absolute dose that can currently be obtained falls within 5% on an individual voxel basis, for a minimum voxel size of 5 mm3. However, several research groups have chosen to use polymer gel dosimetry in a relative manner by normalizing the dose distribution towards an internal reference dose within the gel dosimeter phantom. 3D dosimetry with optical scanning has also been mostly applied in a relative way, although in principle absolute calibration is possible. As the optical absorption in 3D dosimeters is less dependent on temperature it can be expected that the achievable accuracy is higher with optical CT. The precision in optical scanning of 3D dosimeters depends to a large extend on the performance of the detector. 3D dosimetry with X-ray CT readout is a low contrast imaging modality for polymer gel dosimetry. Sources of error in x-ray CT polymer gel dosimetry (XCT) are currently under investigation and include inherent

  20. Microorganisms and radionuclides in the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Yoshitomo [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Abiko, Chiba (Japan)

    2002-11-01

    The influence of microorganisms on the behavior of radionuclides in the subsurface environment is one of the factors to be concerned with for the safety assessment of the geological disposal of radioactive waste. It is considered that the important microbiological aspects with respect to radionuclide behavior are biological adsorption, oxidation-reduction and complex formation between organic matter and radionuclides. These phenomena with respect to radionuclides, especially actinides, in the environment should be understood. A description of two studies, illustrating these points are presented. (author)

  1. Pediatric radiation dosimetry for positron-emitting radionuclides using anthropomorphic phantoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xie, Tianwu; Bolch, Wesley E.; Lee, Choonsik; Zaidi, Habib

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Positron emission tomography (PET) plays an important role in the diagnosis, staging, treatment, and surveillance of clinically localized diseases. Combined PET/CT imaging exhibits significantly higher sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy than conventional imaging when it comes to detecti

  2. Pediatric radiation dosimetry for positron-emitting radionuclides using anthropomorphic phantoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xie, Tianwu; Bolch, Wesley E.; Lee, Choonsik; Zaidi, Habib

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Positron emission tomography (PET) plays an important role in the diagnosis, staging, treatment, and surveillance of clinically localized diseases. Combined PET/CT imaging exhibits significantly higher sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy than conventional imaging when it comes to detecti

  3. Radiation Dosimetry of Intratumoral Injection of Radionuclides into Human Breast Cancer. Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-07-01

    2 sites will be selected for a single inoculation each. The site will be shaved, the skin will be prepared in sterile fashion using betadine...cyclosporin 6 lungs cTVT Inoculation 6 prostate 6 prostate + lungs 2 spare for failure of tumor growth; will recycle to other dog protocols Follow...breast following breast conserving surgery may not be a necessary approach for the majority of women. More directed local treatment with radiotherapy

  4. Radiation Dosimetry of Intratumoral Injection of Radionuclides into Human Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-07-01

    2 sites will be selected for a single inoculation each. The site will be shaved, the skin will be prepared in sterile fashion using betadine...cyclosporin 6 lungs cTVT Inoculation 6 prostate 6 prostate + lungs 2 spare for failure of tumor growth; will recycle to other dog protocols Follow...breast following breast conserving surgery may not be a necessary approach for the majority of women. More directed local treatment with radiotherapy

  5. Radiation Dosimetry from Intratumoral Injection of Radionuclides in Human Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-07-01

    0.0320 Spleen 0.1100 0.0220 Testes 0.0053 0.0011 Thymus 0.5800 0.1160 Thyroid 0.0790 0.0158 Urine Bladder Wall 0.0140 0.0028 Uterus 0.0170 0.0034 Total...PBS buffer and ammonia (Ammonium hydroxide, 28% NH3 in water,99.99% LOT# 07923LA SIGMA-ALDRICH, Inc, 3050 Page 14 of 66 Spruce St Louis, MO 63103

  6. Radionuclides and heavy metals in Borovac, Southern Serbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovic, Dragana; Todorovic, Dragana; Frontasyeva, Marina; Ajtic, Jelena; Tasic, Mirjana; Rajsic, Slavica

    2008-09-01

    The paper presents the complex approach to the assessment of the state of the environment in Southern Serbia, surroundings of Bujanovac, the region which is of great concern as being exposed to contamination by depleted uranium (DU) ammunition during the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) attacks in 1999. It includes studies on concentrations of radionuclides and heavy metals in different environmental samples 5 years after the military actions. In October 2004, samples of soil, grass, lichen, moss, honey, and water were collected at two sites, in the immediate vicinity of the targeted area and 5 km away from it. Radionuclide ((7)Be, (40)K, (137)Cs, (210)Pb, (226)Ra, (232)Th, (235)U, (238)U) activities in solid samples were determined by standard gamma spectrometry and total alpha and beta activity in water was determined by proportional alpha-beta counting. Concentrations of 35 elements were determined in the samples of soil, moss, grass, and lichen by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). The results are discussed in the context of a possible contamination by DU that reached the environment during the attacks as well as in the context of an environmental pollution by radionuclides and heavy metals in Southern Serbia. The results are compared to the state of environment in the region and other parts of the country both prior to and following the attacks. This is the first comprehensive study of the contents of radionuclides and heavy metals in Southern Serbia and consequently highly important for the assessment of the state of environment in this part of the country concerning possible effects of DU ammunition on the environment, as well as anthropogenic source of pollution by radionuclides and heavy metals and other elements. Also, the highly sensitive method of INAA was used for the first time to analyze the environmental samples from this area. The results of the study of radionuclides in the samples of soils, leaves, grass, moss, lichen

  7. Bone marrow dosimetry via microCT imaging and stem cell spatial mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kielar, Kayla N.

    In order to make predictions of radiation dose in patients undergoing targeted radionuclide therapy of cancer, an accurate model of skeletal tissues is necessary. Concerning these tissues, the dose-limiting factor in these therapies is the toxicity of the hematopoietically active bone marrow. In addition to acute effects, one must be concerned as well with long-term stochastic effects such as radiation-induced leukemia. Particular cells of interest for both toxicity and cancer risk are the hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), found within the active marrow regions of the skeleton. At present, cellular-level dosimetry models are complex, and thus we cannot model individual stem cells in an anatomic model of the patient. As a result, one reverts to looking at larger tissue regions where these cell populations may reside. To provide a more accurate marrow dose assessment, the skeletal dosimetry model must also be patient-specific. That is, it should be designed to match as closely as possible to the patient undergoing treatment. Absorbed dose estimates then can be tailored based on the skeletal size and trabecular microstructure of an individual for an accurate prediction of marrow toxicity. Thus, not only is it important to accurately model the target tissues of interest in a normal patient, it is important to do so for differing levels of marrow health. A skeletal dosimetry model for the adult female was provided for better predictions of marrow toxicity in patients undergoing radionuclide therapy. This work is the first fully established gender specific model for these applications, and supersedes previous models in scalability of the skeleton and radiation transport methods. Furthermore, the applicability of using bone marrow biopsies was deemed sufficient in prediction of bone marrow health, specifically for the hematopoietic stem cell population. The location and concentration of the HSC in bone marrow was found to follow a spatial gradient from the bone trabeculae

  8. Emission of near-zero energy electrons from the surface of a source with complex radionuclide composition

    CERN Document Server

    Kupryashkyin, V T; Feoktistov, O Y; Shapovalova, Y P

    2002-01-01

    The emission of near-zero energy electrons e sub 0 from the surface of a source with complex radionuclide composition is investigated by the (e gamma)-coincidence method. Yields of e sub 0 -electrons a determined in beta-decay, electron capture, and internal conversion of gamma-rays for radionuclides which were created as admixtures in the thin layer of Pt and Al substrate after irradiation by neutrons in a reactor. The density distribution of radionuclides over the thickness of the Pt layer is determined. The developed (e gamma)-coincidence method allows one to investigate e sub 0 -electron emission for admixed radionuclides whose contents are a few hundredths of percent.

  9. Internal dosimetry for occupationally exposed personnel in nuclear medicine; Dosimetria interna para personal ocupacionalmente expuesto en medicina nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, M.T.; Alfaro, L.M.M.; Angeles, C.A., E-mail: teodoro.garcia@inin.gob.mx, E-mail: mercedes.alfaro@inin.gob.mx, E-mail: arturo.angeles@inin.gob.mx [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares Carrelera Mexico-Toluca, Ocoyoacac, MX (Mexico)

    2013-10-01

    Internal dosimetry plays an important role in nuclear medicine dosimetry control of personnel occupationally exposed, and that in recent years there has been a large increase in the use of radionuclides both in medical diagnosis as radiotherapy. But currently, in Mexico and in many parts of the world, this internal dosimetry control is not performed. The Instituto Nacional de lnvestigaciones Nucleares de Mexico (ININ) together with the Centro Oncologico de Toluca (ISEMMYM) have developed a simple and feasible methodology for monitoring of personnel working in these facilities. It was aimed to carry out the dosimetry of the personnel, due to the incorporation of I-131, using the spectrometric devices that the hospital has, a gamma camera. The first step in this methodology was to make a thyroid phantom to meet the specifications of the ninth ANSI. This phantom is compared under controlled conditions with RMC- II phantom used for system calibration of the ININ internal dosimetry (ACCUSCAN - Ll), and with another phantom developed in Brazil with ANSI specifications, in order to determine the variations in measurements due to the density of the material of each of the phantoms and adjust to the system ACCUSCAN, already certificate. Furthermore, necessary counts were performed with the gamma camera of the phantom developed at ININ, with a standard source of {sup 133}Ba which simulates the energy of {sup 131}I. With these data, were determined the counting efficiencies for a distance of 15 to 20 cm between the surface of the phantom and the the plate of the detectors. Another important aspect was to determine the lower limit of detection (LLD). In this paper we present the results obtained from the detectors calibration of the gamma camera of the hospital.

  10. In aqua vivo EPID dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendling, Markus; McDermott, Leah N.; Mans, Anton; Olaciregui-Ruiz, Igor; Pecharroman-Gallego, Raul; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Stroom, Joep; Herk, Marcel J.; Mijnheer, Ben van [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Plesmanlaan 121, 1066 CX Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-01-15

    Purpose: At the Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital in vivo dosimetry using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) has been implemented for almost all high-energy photon treatments of cancer with curative intent. Lung cancer treatments were initially excluded, because the original back-projection dose-reconstruction algorithm uses water-based scatter-correction kernels and therefore does not account for tissue inhomogeneities accurately. The aim of this study was to test a new method, in aqua vivo EPID dosimetry, for fast dose verification of lung cancer irradiations during actual patient treatment. Methods: The key feature of our method is the dose reconstruction in the patient from EPID images, obtained during the actual treatment, whereby the images have been converted to a situation as if the patient consisted entirely of water; hence, the method is termed in aqua vivo. This is done by multiplying the measured in vivo EPID image with the ratio of two digitally reconstructed transmission images for the unit-density and inhomogeneous tissue situation. For dose verification, a comparison is made with the calculated dose distribution with the inhomogeneity correction switched off. IMRT treatment verification is performed for each beam in 2D using a 2D {gamma} evaluation, while for the verification of volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatments in 3D a 3D {gamma} evaluation is applied using the same parameters (3%, 3 mm). The method was tested using two inhomogeneous phantoms simulating a tumor in lung and measuring its sensitivity for patient positioning errors. Subsequently five IMRT and five VMAT clinical lung cancer treatments were investigated, using both the conventional back-projection algorithm and the in aqua vivo method. The verification results of the in aqua vivo method were statistically analyzed for 751 lung cancer patients treated with IMRT and 50 lung cancer patients treated with VMAT. Results: The improvements by

  11. Gross-beta activity in ground water: natural sources and artifacts of sampling and laboratory analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Alan H.

    1995-01-01

    Gross-beta activity has been used as an indicator of beta-emitting isotopes in water since at least the early 1950s. Originally designed for detection of radioactive releases from nuclear facilities and weapons tests, analysis of gross-beta activity is widely used in studies of naturally occurring radioactivity in ground water. Analyses of about 800 samples from 5 ground-water regions of the United States provide a basis for evaluating the utility of this measurement. The data suggest that measured gross-beta activities are due to (1) long-lived radionuclides in ground water, and (2) ingrowth of beta-emitting radionuclides during holding times between collection of samples and laboratory measurements.Although40K and228Ra appear to be the primary sources of beta activity in ground water, the sum of40K plus228Ra appears to be less than the measured gross-beta activity in most ground-water samples. The difference between the contribution from these radionuclides and gross-beta activity is most pronounced in ground water with gross-beta activities > 10 pCi/L, where these 2 radionuclides account for less than one-half the measured ross-beta activity. One exception is groundwater from the Coastal Plain of New Jersey, where40K plus228Ra generally contribute most of the gross-beta activity. In contrast,40K and228Ra generally contribute most of beta activity in ground water with gross-beta activities measure all beta activity in ground water. Although3H contributes beta activity to some ground water, it is driven from the sample before counting and therefore is not detected by gross-beta measurements. Beta-emitting radionuclides with half-lives shorter than a few days can decay to low values between sampling and counting. Although little is known about concentrations of most short-lived beta-emitting radionuclides in environmental ground water (water unaffected by direct releases from nuclear facilities and weapons tests), their activities are expected to be low.Ingrowth of

  12. Technical Basis Document for PFP Area Monitoring Dosimetry Program

    CERN Document Server

    Cooper, J R

    2000-01-01

    This document describes the phantom dosimetry used for the PFP Area Monitoring program and establishes the basis for the Plutonium Finishing Plant's (PFP) area monitoring dosimetry program in accordance with the following requirements: Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), part 835, ''Occupational Radiation Protection'' Part 835.403; Hanford Site Radiological Control Manual (HSRCM-1), Part 514; HNF-PRO-382, Area Dosimetry Program; and PNL-MA-842, Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual.

  13. Dosimetry at a 400 keV accelerator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, A.

    1992-01-01

    Absolute calorimetric dosimetry and relative dose mapping methods are described for a 400 keV electron accelerator used for polymer curing and crosslinking experiments. These methods of dosimetry are also useful at accelerators used in gas cleaning processes.......Absolute calorimetric dosimetry and relative dose mapping methods are described for a 400 keV electron accelerator used for polymer curing and crosslinking experiments. These methods of dosimetry are also useful at accelerators used in gas cleaning processes....

  14. Personnel neutron dosimetry at Department of Energy facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brackenbush, L.W.; Endres, G.W.R.; Selby, J.M.; Vallario, E.J.

    1980-08-01

    This study assesses the state of personnel neutron dosimetry at DOE facilities. A survey of the personnel dosimetry systems in use at major DOE facilities was conducted, a literature search was made to determine recent advances in neutron dosimetry, and several dosimetry experts were interviewed. It was concluded that personnel neutron dosimeters do not meet current needs and that serious problems exist now and will increase in the future if neutron quality factors are increased and/or dose limits are lowered.

  15. Investigation of the effects of tumor size and type of radionuclide on tumor curability in targeted radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Ranjbar

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Targeted radiotherapy is one of the important methods of radiotherapy that involves the use of beta-emitting radionuclides to deliver a dose of radiation to tumor cells. An important feature of this method is the tumor size and the finite range of beta particles emitted as a result of radionuclide disintegration those have significant effects for the curability of tumors. Material and Methods: Monte Carlo simulations and mathematical models have been used to investigate the relationship of curability to tumors size for tumors treated with targeted 131I and 90Y. The model assumed that radionuclides are distributed uniformly throughout tumors. Results: The results show that there is an optimal tumor size for cure. For any given cumulated activity, cure probability is greatest for tumors whose diameter is close to the optimum value. There is a maximum value of curability that occurs at a diameter of approximately 3.5 mm for 131I. For 90Y maximum curability occurs at a tumor diameter of approximately 3.5 cm. Tumors smaller than the optimal size are less vulnerable to irradiation from radionuclides because a significant proportion of the disintegration energy escapes and is deposited outside the tumor volume. Tumors larger than the optimal size are less curable because of greater clonogenic cell number. Conclusion: With single radionuclide targeted radiotherapy, there is an optimal tumor size for tumor cure. It is suggested that single agent targeted radiotherapy should not be used for treatment of disseminated disease when multiple tumors of differing size may be present. The use of several radionuclides concurrently would be more effective than reliance on single radionuclide. This approach of using combination of radionuclides with complementary properties could hopefully prepare new measures and improve the efficiency of tumor therapy.

  16. Radionuclide scintigraphy of the scrotum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jun Hyung; Park, Young Hee; Lee, Soon Jin; Lee, Sun Wha; Ko, Young Tae; Kim, Soon Yong [Kyung Hee University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1984-12-15

    Radionuclide scrotal scintigraphy with {sup 99m}Tc-pertechnetate is an easy, well established, useful and readily available technique for evaluation of acute scrotum. We studied 41 cases of radionuclide scrotal scintigraphy and the results were as follows: 1. The over all diagnostic accuracy of scrotal scintigraphy was 93% (38/41 cases). 2. Scrotal scintigraphy was very useful and accurate in differential diagnosis of epididymo-orchitis and testticular torsion in patient with acute scrotal pain and swelling, while there was some limitation in differential diagnosis of hematoma from acute epididymo-orchitis or torsion. 3. Scintigraphy of epididymo-orchitis showed increased perfusion and radioactivity in the epididymis and/or testis and its diagnosis accuracy was 90% (19/21 cases). 4. Acute testicular torsion showed normal flow in perfusion and cold defect occupying affected testis in static image, while missed torsion showed slightly increased flow in perfusion image and cold defect surrounded by an uniform rim of hyperactivity (halo sign). Diagnostic accuracy of testicular torsion was 86% (6/7 cases)

  17. Entrapment of Radionuclides in Nanoparticle Compositions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    such as radionuclides,for example 61Cu and 64Cu copper isotopes. The invention further relates to a novel method for loading delivery systems, such as liposome compositions, with metal entities such as radionuclides, and the use of liposomes for targeted diagnosis and treatment of a target site, such as cancerous...

  18. Background dose-rates to reference animals and plants arising from exposure to naturally occurring radionuclides in aquatic environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosseini, A; Brown, J E; Thoerring, H [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (Norway); Beresford, N A [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Lancaster Environment Centre, Bailrigg, Lancaster LA1 4AP (United Kingdom); Jones, D G [British Geological Society, Keyworth, Nottingham NG12 5GG (United Kingdom); Phaneuf, M [Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (Canada); Yankovich, T [AREVA Resources Canada Inc. (Canada)

    2010-06-15

    In order to put dose-rates derived in environmental impact assessments into context, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has recommended the structuring of effects data according to background exposure levels. The ICRP has also recommended a suite of reference animals and plants (RAPs), including seven aquatic organisms, for use within their developing framework. In light of these propositions, the objective of this work was to collate information on activity concentrations of naturally occurring primordial radionuclides for marine and freshwater ecosystems and apply appropriate dosimetry models to derive absorbed dose-rates. Although coverage of activity concentration data is comprehensive for sediment and water, few, or in some cases no, data were found for some RAPs, e.g. for frogs (Ranidae) and freshwater grasses (Poaceae) for most radionuclides. The activity concentrations for individual radionuclides in both organisms and their habitat often exhibit standard deviations that are substantially greater than arithmetic mean values, reflecting large variability in activity concentrations. To take account of variability a probabilistic approach was adopted. The dominating radionuclides contributing to exposure in the RAPs are {sup 40}K, {sup 210}Po and {sup 226}Ra. The mean unweighted and weighted dose-rates for aquatic RAPs are in the ranges 0.07-0.39 {mu}Gy h{sup -1} and 0.37-1.9 {mu}Gy h{sup -1} respectively.

  19. Radiation Effects on the Sorption and Mobilization of Radionuclide during Transport through the Geosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L.M. Wang; R.C. Eqing; K.F. Hayes

    2004-03-14

    Site restoration activities at DOE facilities and the permanent disposal of nuclear waste inevitably involve understanding the behavior of materials in a radiation field. Radionuclide decay and the associated radiation fields lead to physical and chemical changes that can degrade or enhance important material properties. Alpha-decay of the actinide elements and beta-decay of the fission products lead to atomic-scale changes in materials (radiation damage and transmutation).

  20. Advances in nuclear particle dosimetry for radiation protection and medicine - Ninth Symposium on Neutron Dosimetry (Editorial Material, English)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zoetelief, J; Bos, A J.; Schuhmacher, H; McDonald, Joseph C.; Schultz, F W.; Pihet, P

    2004-12-15

    The Ninth Symposium on Neutron Dosimetry has been expanded to cover not only neutron radiation but heavy charged particle dosimetry as well. The applications are found in such fields as radiation protection, aircrew dosimetry, medicine, nuclear power and accelerator health physics. Scientists from many countries from around the world presented their work, and described the latest developments in techniques and instrumentation.

  1. Instrumentation for the individual dosimetry of workers

    CERN Document Server

    Thévenin, J C

    2003-01-01

    The control of the radiation dose exposure of workers and personnel exposed to ionizing radiations (nuclear industry, nuclear medicine, army, university laboratories etc..) is ensured by individual dosemeters. This dosimetry is mandatory for all workers susceptible to be exposed to more than 30% of the regulatory dose limit. dosemeters are worn on the chest and in some particular cases, on the finger (dosemeter rings) or on the wrist. Passive dosemeters allow to measure the dose a posteriori, while electronic dosemeters allow a direct reading and recording of the dose. This article presents successively: 1 - the general principles of individual dosimetry: situations of exposure, radiation detection, operational data, standardization, calibration and quality assurance, measurement uncertainties; 2 - goals and regulatory framework of individual dosimetry: regulation and recommendations, optimization, respect of dose limits, accidental situations; 3 - passive dosemeters: film, thermoluminescent, radio-photolumin...

  2. Model selection for radiochromic film dosimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Méndez, Ignasi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to find the most accurate model for radiochromic film dosimetry by comparing different channel independent perturbation models. A model selection approach based on (algorithmic) information theory was followed, and the results were validated using gamma-index analysis on a set of benchmark test cases. Several questions were addressed: (a) whether incorporating the information of the non-irradiated film, by scanning prior to irradiation, improves the results; (b) whether lateral corrections are necessary when using multichannel models; (c) whether multichannel dosimetry produces better results than single-channel dosimetry; (d) which multichannel perturbation model provides more accurate film doses. It was found that scanning prior to irradiation and applying lateral corrections improved the accuracy of the results. For some perturbation models, increasing the number of color channels did not result in more accurate film doses. Employing Truncated Normal perturbations was found to...

  3. Performance testing of UK personal dosimetry laboratories

    CERN Document Server

    Marshall, T O

    1985-01-01

    The proposed Ionising Radiations Regulations will require all UK personal dosimetry laboratories that monitor classified personnel to be approved for personal dosimetry by the Health and Safety Executive. It is suggested that these approvals should be based on general and supplementary criteria published by the British Calibration Service (BCS) for laboratory approval for the provision of personal dosimetry services. These criteria specify certain qualitative requirements and also indicate the need for regular tests of performance to be carried out to ensure constancy of dosimetric standards. This report concerns the latter. The status of the BCS criteria is discussed and the need for additional documents to cover new techniques and some modifications to existing documents is indicated. A means is described by which the technical performance of laboratories, concerned with personal monitoring for external radiations, can be assessed, both initially and ongoing. The costs to establish the scheme and operate it...

  4. Bayesian Methods for Radiation Detection and Dosimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Groer, Peter G

    2002-01-01

    We performed work in three areas: radiation detection, external and internal radiation dosimetry. In radiation detection we developed Bayesian techniques to estimate the net activity of high and low activity radioactive samples. These techniques have the advantage that the remaining uncertainty about the net activity is described by probability densities. Graphs of the densities show the uncertainty in pictorial form. Figure 1 below demonstrates this point. We applied stochastic processes for a method to obtain Bayesian estimates of 222Rn-daughter products from observed counting rates. In external radiation dosimetry we studied and developed Bayesian methods to estimate radiation doses to an individual with radiation induced chromosome aberrations. We analyzed chromosome aberrations after exposure to gammas and neutrons and developed a method for dose-estimation after criticality accidents. The research in internal radiation dosimetry focused on parameter estimation for compartmental models from observed comp...

  5. Dosimetry procedures for an industrial irradiation plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grahn, Ch.

    Accurate and reliable dosimetry procedures constitute a very important part of process control and quality assurance at a radiation processing plant. γ-Dose measurements were made on the GBS 84 irradiator for food and other products on pallets or in containers. Chemical dosimeters wre exposed in the facility under conditions of the typical plant operation. The choice of the dosimeter systems employed was based on the experience in chemical dosimetry gained over several years. Dose uniformity information was obtained in air, spices, bulbs, feeds, cosmetics, plastics and surgical goods. Most products currently irradiated require dose uniformity which can be efficiently provided by pallet or box irradiators like GBS 84. The radiation performance characteristics and some dosimetry procedures are discussed.

  6. Protocol for emergency EPR dosimetry in fingernails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trompier, F; Kornak, L; Calas, C; Romanyukha, A; Leblanc, B; Mitchell, C A; Swartz, H M; Clairand, I

    2007-08-01

    There is an increased need for after-the-fact dosimetry because of the high risk of radiation exposures due to terrorism or accidents. In case of such an event, a method is needed to make measurements of dose in a large number of individuals rapidly and with sufficient accuracy to facilitate effective medical triage. Dosimetry based on EPR measurements of fingernails potentially could be an effective tool for this purpose. This paper presents the first operational protocols for EPR fingernail dosimetry, including guidelines for collection and storage of samples, parameters for EPR measurements, and the method of dose assessment. In a blinded test of this protocol application was carried out on nails freshly sampled and irradiated to 4 and 20 Gy; this protocol gave dose estimates with an error of less than 30%.

  7. TDCR and CIEMAT/NIST Liquid Scintillation Methods applied to the Radionuclide Metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cruz, P. A. L.; da Silva, C. J.; Iwahara, A.; Loureiro, J. S.; De Oliveira, A. E.; Tauhata, L.; Lopes, R. T.

    2016-07-01

    This work presents TDCR and CIEMAT/NIST methods of liquid scintillation implemented in National Institutes of Metrology for activity standardization of radionuclides, which decay by beta emission and electron capture. The computer codes used to calculate the detection efficiency take into account: decay schemes, beta decay theory, quenching parameter evaluation, Poisson statistic model and Monte Carlo simulation for photon and particle interactions in the detection system. Measurements were performed for pure emitters 3H, 14C, 99Tc and for 68Ge/68Ga which decay by electron capture and positron emission, with uncertainties smaller than 1% (k = 1).

  8. Dosimetric characterization of two radium sources for retrospective dosimetry studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candela-Juan, C., E-mail: ccanjuan@gmail.com [Radiation Oncology Department, La Fe University and Polytechnic Hospital, Valencia 46026, Spain and Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, Burjassot 46100 (Spain); Karlsson, M. [Division of Radiological Sciences, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping SE 581 85 (Sweden); Lundell, M. [Department of Medical Physics and Oncology, Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institute, Stockholm SE 171 76 (Sweden); Ballester, F. [Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, Burjassot 46100 (Spain); Tedgren, Å. Carlsson [Division of Radiological Sciences, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping SE 581 85, Sweden and Swedish Radiation Safety Authority, Stockholm SE 171 16 (Sweden)

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: During the first part of the 20th century, {sup 226}Ra was the most used radionuclide for brachytherapy. Retrospective accurate dosimetry, coupled with patient follow up, is important for advancing knowledge on long-term radiation effects. The purpose of this work was to dosimetrically characterize two {sup 226}Ra sources, commonly used in Sweden during the first half of the 20th century, for retrospective dose–effect studies. Methods: An 8 mg {sup 226}Ra tube and a 10 mg {sup 226}Ra needle, used at Radiumhemmet (Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden), from 1925 to the 1960s, were modeled in two independent Monte Carlo (MC) radiation transport codes: GEANT4 and MCNP5. Absorbed dose and collision kerma around the two sources were obtained, from which the TG-43 parameters were derived for the secular equilibrium state. Furthermore, results from this dosimetric formalism were compared with results from a MC simulation with a superficial mould constituted by five needles inside a glass casing, placed over a water phantom, trying to mimic a typical clinical setup. Calculated absorbed doses using the TG-43 formalism were also compared with previously reported measurements and calculations based on the Sievert integral. Finally, the dose rate at large distances from a {sup 226}Ra point-like-source placed in the center of 1 m radius water sphere was calculated with GEANT4. Results: TG-43 parameters [including g{sub L}(r), F(r, θ), Λ, and s{sub K}] have been uploaded in spreadsheets as additional material, and the fitting parameters of a mathematical curve that provides the dose rate between 10 and 60 cm from the source have been provided. Results from TG-43 formalism are consistent within the treatment volume with those of a MC simulation of a typical clinical scenario. Comparisons with reported measurements made with thermoluminescent dosimeters show differences up to 13% along the transverse axis of the radium needle. It has been estimated that

  9. Natural radionuclides in waste water discharged from coal-fired power plants in Serbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janković, Marija M; Todorović, Dragana J; Sarap, Nataša B; Krneta Nikolić, Jelena D; Rajačić, Milica M; Pantelić, Gordana K

    2016-12-01

    Investigation of the natural radioactivity levels in water around power plants, as well as in plants, coal, ash, slag and soil, and to assess the associated radiation hazard is becoming an emerging and interesting topic. This paper is focused on the results of the radioactivity analysis in waste water samples from five coal-fired power plants in Serbia (Nikola Tesla A, Nikola Tesla B, Kolubara, Morava and Kostolac), which were analyzed in the period 2003-2015. River water samples taken upstream and downstream from the power plants, drain water and overflow water were analyzed. In the water samples gamma spectrometry analysis was performed as well as determination of gross alpha and beta activity. Natural radionuclide (40)K was detected by gamma spectrometry, while the concentrations of other radionuclides, (226)Ra, (235)U and (238)U, usually were below the minimum detection activity (MDA). (232)Th and artificial radionuclide (137)Cs were not detected in these samples. Gross alpha and beta activities were determined by the α/β low level proportional counter Thermo Eberline FHT 770 T. In the analyzed samples, gross alpha activity ranged from MDA to 0.47 Bq L(-)(1), while the gross beta activity ranged from MDA to 1.55 Bq L(-)(1).

  10. Radionuclide imaging of spinal infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gemmel, Filip [Ghent Maria-Middelares, General Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Ghent (Belgium); Medical Center Leeuwarden (MCL), Division of Nuclear Medicine, Henri Dunantweg 2, Postbus 888, Leeuwarden (Netherlands); Dumarey, Nicolas [Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Hopital Erasme, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Brussels (Belgium); Palestro, Christopher J. [Long Island Jewish Medical Center, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Long Island, NY (United States)

    2006-10-15

    The diagnosis of spinal infection, with or without implants, has been a challenge for physicians for many years. Spinal infections are now being recognised more frequently, owing to aging of the population and the increasing use of spinal-fusion surgery. The diagnosis in many cases is delayed, and this may result in permanent neurological damage or even death. Laboratory evidence of infection is variable. Conventional radiography and radionuclide bone imaging lack both sensitivity and specificity. Neither in vitro labelled leucocyte scintigraphy nor {sup 99m}Tc-anti-granulocyte antibody scintigraphy is especially useful, because of the frequency with which spinal infection presents as a non-specific photopenic area on these tests. Sequential bone/gallium imaging and {sup 67}Ga-SPECT are currently the radionuclide procedures of choice for spinal osteomyelitis, but these tests lack specificity, suffer from poor spatial resolution and require several days to complete. [{sup 18}F]Fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) PET is a promising technique for diagnosing spinal infection, and has several potential advantages over conventional radionuclide tests. The study is sensitive and is completed in a single session, and image quality is superior to that obtained with single-photon emitting tracers. The specificity of FDG-PET may also be superior to that of conventional tracers because degenerative bone disease and fractures usually do not produce intense FDG uptake; moreover, spinal implants do not affect FDG imaging. However, FDG-PET images have to be read with caution in patients with instrumented spinal-fusion surgery since non-specific accumulation of FDG around the fusion material is not uncommon. In the future, PET-CT will likely provide more precise localisation of abnormalities. FDG-PET may prove to be useful for monitoring response to treatment in patients with spinal osteomyelitis. Other tracers for diagnosing spinal osteomyelitis are also under investigation, including

  11. Optically stimulated luminescence in retrospective dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Murray, A.S.

    2002-01-01

    Since the beginning of the 1990s the exploration of optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) in retrospective accident dosimetry has driven an intensive investigation and development programme at Riso into measurement facilities and techniques. This paper reviews some of the outcomes of this progr......Since the beginning of the 1990s the exploration of optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) in retrospective accident dosimetry has driven an intensive investigation and development programme at Riso into measurement facilities and techniques. This paper reviews some of the outcomes...

  12. SNL RML recommended dosimetry cross section compendium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, P.J.; Kelly, J.G.; Luera, T.F. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); VanDenburg, J. [Science and Engineering Associates, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-11-01

    A compendium of dosimetry cross sections is presented for use in the characterization of fission reactor spectrum and fluence. The contents of this cross section library are based upon the ENDF/B-VI and IRDF-90 cross section libraries and are recommended as a replacement for the DOSCROS84 multigroup library that is widely used by the dosimetry community. Documentation is provided on the rationale for the choice of the cross sections selected for inclusion in this library and on the uncertainty and variation in cross sections presented by state-of-the-art evaluations.

  13. Radionuclide Diagnosis of Pulmonary Embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Søren; Madsen, Poul Henning

    2017-01-01

    Diagnostic imaging plays an integral role in the diagnostic workup of suspected pulmonary embolism, and several modalities have been employed over the years. In recent years, the choice has been narrowed to either computer tomographic or radionuclide based methods, i.e. computer tomographic angiography (CTA) and ventilation-perfusion scintigraphy (V/Q-scan). Both methods display advantages and shortcomings, and while we provide some insights into CTA and alternative methods, the paper's main focus is a review of the V/Q-scan. We discuss basic considerations, interpretation criteria, clinical value, and controversies of conventional planar lung scintigraphy as well as the more contemporary 3-dimensional imaging technique of single photon emission tomography (SPECT) with or without CT.

  14. Radionuclides in surface and groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Kate M.

    2009-01-01

    Unique among all the contaminants that adversely affect surface and water quality, radioactive compounds pose a double threat from both toxicity and damaging radiation. The extreme energy potential of many of these materials makes them both useful and toxic. The unique properties of radioactive materials make them invaluable for medical, weapons, and energy applications. However, mining, production, use, and disposal of these compounds provide potential pathways for their release into the environment, posing a risk to both humans and wildlife. This chapter discusses the sources, uses, and regulation of radioactive compounds in the United States, biogeochemical processes that control mobility in the environment, examples of radionuclide contamination, and current work related to contaminated site remediation.

  15. Radionuclide diagnosis of allograft rejection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, E.A.

    1982-10-01

    Interaction with one or more anatomical and physiopathological characteristics of the rejecting renal allograft is suggested by those radioagents utilized specifically for the diagnosis of allograft rejection. Rejection, the most common cause of declining allograft function, is frequently mimicked clinically or masked by other immediate or long term post transplant complications. Understanding of the anatomical pathological features and kinetics of rejection and their modification by immunosuppressive maintenance and therapy are important for the proper clinical utilization of these radioagents. Furthermore, in selecting these radionuclides, one has to consider the comparative availability, preparatory and procedural simplicity, acquisition and display techniques and the possibility of timely report. The clinical utilities of radiofibrinogen, /sup 99m/Tc sulfur colloid and /sup 67/Ga in the diagnosis of allograft rejection have been evaluated to a variable extent in the past. The potential usefulness of the recently developed preparations of /sup 111/In labeled autologous leukocytes and platelets are presently under investigation.

  16. Findings of cardiac radionuclide images in myotonic dystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honda, Norinari; Machida, Kikuo; Hosono, Makoto [Saitama Medical School., Kawagoe (Japan). Saitama Medical Center] [and others

    2002-09-01

    Purpose of this study was to report our experiences of cardiac radionuclide imaging in patients with myotonic dystrophy to assess its clinical implications. Consecutive 18 patients (6 men and 12 women with age range of 34-66 years) entered the study. Thallium-201, I-123 beta-methyliodophenylpentadecanoic acid (BMIPP), and I-123 m-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) myocardial SPECT were performed 15 minutes and 195 minutes after the injection of the radiotracers (111 MBq). SPECT images were interpreted by consensus of 3 nuclear medicine physicians blinded to clinical information. Bull's eye washout rates of SPECT of the three rediopharmaceuticals, H/M ratios of I-123 MIBG planar images were calculated. Reduced uptake was found in 93 and 103 out of 234 segments on early and delayed Tl-201 SPECT, 110 and 104 out of 234 on I-123 BMIPP, and 71 and 81 out of 221 on I-123 MIBG, respectively. The photopenia was mild in majority. Frequency of photopenic areas was greater in I-123 BMIPP than in Tl-201 (p=0.001) followed by I-123 MIBG (p<0.0001). Photopenia was most often found in infero-posterior wall (p<0.0001). The washout rates and H/M ratios between mild and severe disease were not statistically different after excluding the patients complicated with diabetes mellitus. In conclusion, radionuclide myocardial imaging is frequently abnormal in the patients with myotonic dystrophy. Early detection of the cardiac involvement may be possible in some patients by cardiac radionuclide imaging. (author)

  17. Thermoluminescent dosimetry in computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lara C, A.; Rivera M, T. [IPN, Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Unidad Legaria, Av. Legaria 694, Col. Irrigacion, 11500 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico); Osorio V, M. [ISSSTE, Centro Medico Nacional 20 de Noviembre, Felix Cuevas 540, Col. del Valle, 03100 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico); Hernandez O, O., E-mail: armando_lara_cam@yahoo.com.mx [Hospital General de Mexico, Dr. Balmis 148, Col. Doctores, 06726 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico)

    2016-10-15

    In this work we studied the dosimetry performed on CT scan in two different equipment, SOMATOM and Phillips, with 16 and 64 slice respectively. We used 51 pellets of lithium fluoride doped with magnesium and titanium (LiF: Mg, Ti) also knows as TLD-100 due to its physical properties and its easy of use, in this study, first analysis a batch of 56 pellets, but only 53 pellets were optimal for this study, cesium-137 was used as source irradiation, then proceeded to calibrate the batch with X-rays source, measuring the corresponding dose in a Farmers ionization chamber, then, we obtained a calibration curve, and we used as reference to calculation of the applied dose, finally designing ergonomic mesh, were it was deposited a TLD 100, placed in a regions of interest were made to each scan type. Once characterized our material proceeded to testing in 30 patients, which were irradiated with X-ray tube, whose operation was performed at 80, 120 kV with a current of 100, 300 and 400 m A according to scanning protocol. Overall we measured dose of 5 mGy to 53 mGy, these measurements reflect significant dose to can induced cancer, due previous reports published, that doses greater than 20 mGy there is a risk of developing cancer in the long term, but in practice when it assigned a medical diagnosis, there are no dose limits due to benefits patients, however, IAEA publish recommendations that allow us to carry out optimum handling of ionizing radiation, among these is the quality control of the tomography equipment that helps greatly reduce patient dose. (Author)

  18. Illicit Trafficking of Natural Radionuclides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Steinhäusler; Lyudmila, Zaitseva

    2008-08-01

    Natural radionuclides have been subject to trafficking worldwide, involving natural uranium ore (U 238), processed uranium (yellow cake), low enriched uranium (20% U 235), radium (Ra 226), polonium (Po 210), and natural thorium ore (Th 232). An important prerequisite to successful illicit trafficking activities is access to a suitable logistical infrastructure enabling an undercover shipment of radioactive materials and, in case of trafficking natural uranium or thorium ore, capable of transporting large volumes of material. Covert en route diversion of an authorised uranium transport, together with covert diversion of uranium concentrate from an operating or closed uranium mines or mills, are subject of case studies. Such cases, involving Israel, Iran, Pakistan and Libya, have been analyzed in terms of international actors involved and methods deployed. Using international incident data contained in the Database on Nuclear Smuggling, Theft and Orphan Radiation Sources (DSTO) and international experience gained from the fight against drug trafficking, a generic Trafficking Pathway Model (TPM) is developed for trafficking of natural radionuclides. The TPM covers the complete trafficking cycle, ranging from material diversion, covert material transport, material concealment, and all associated operational procedures. The model subdivides the trafficking cycle into five phases: (1) Material diversion by insider(s) or initiation by outsider(s); (2) Covert transport; (3) Material brokerage; (4) Material sale; (5) Material delivery. An Action Plan is recommended, addressing the strengthening of the national infrastructure for material protection and accounting, development of higher standards of good governance, and needs for improving the control system deployed by customs, border guards and security forces.

  19. Dosimetry for {sup 131}I-MIBG therapies in metastatic neuroblastoma, phaeochromocytoma and paraganglioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sudbrock, Ferdinand [University of Cologne, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Cologne (Germany); University Hospital of Cologne, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Cologne (Germany); Schmidt, Matthias; Eschner, Wolfgang; Schicha, Harald [University of Cologne, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Cologne (Germany); Simon, Thorsten; Berthold, Frank [University of Cologne, Children' s Hospital, Cologne (Germany)

    2010-07-15

    Radiation dosimetry is a basic requirement for targeted radionuclide therapies (TRT) which have become of increasing interest in nuclear medicine. Despite the significant role of the radiopharmaceutical {sup 131}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) for the treatment of metastatic neuroblastoma, phaeochromocytoma and paraganglioma details for a reliable dosimetry are still sparse. This work presents our procedures, the dosimetric data and experiences with TRT using {sup 131}I-MIBG. A total of 21 patients were treated with {sup 131}I-MIBG between 2004 and 2008 according to a clearly defined protocol. Whole-body absorbed doses were determined by a series of scintillation probe readings for all 21 cases. Tumour absorbed doses were calculated on the basis of quantitative imaging for an entity of 25 lesions investigated individually using the region of interest (ROI) technique based on five scans each. Typical whole-body absorbed doses are found in the region of 2 Gy (range: 1.0-2.9 Gy) whereas tumour absorbed doses in turn cover a span between 10 and 60 Gy. Nonetheless this variation of tumour absorbed doses is comparatively low. The trial protocol in use is a substantial advancement in terms of reliable dosimetry. A clearly defined modus operandi for MIBG therapies should involve precisely described dosimetric procedures, e.g. a minimum of 20 whole-body measurements using a calibrated counter and at least four gamma camera scans over the whole period of the inpatient stay should be carried out. Calculation of tumour volumes is accomplished best via evaluation of SPECT and CT images. (orig.)

  20. Factors affecting dosimetry in pregnancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wegst, A.V.

    1981-06-01

    Society has made attempts to reduce fetal exposure. Of note recently in the practice of medicine is the use of diagnostic ultrasound in obstetrics to supplant radiographic procedures. During the incident at Three Mile Island pregnant women were removed from the immediate vicinity to minimize internal contamination and thus fetal exposure. BRH is currently launching a public campaign to heighten public awareness of the need to question diagnostic x-ray procedures during pregnancy or suspected pregnancy. Despite these admirable intentions our pursuit of knowledge, at least when concerned with the fetal dose from internally deposited radionuclides, has been less than exemplary. There is a paucity of biological information available to determine the radiation absorbed dose to the fetus when the mother's body contains radioactivity, either by intent or by accidental exposure. The government has severely limited fetal research on humans with a net result of preventing the accumulation of valuable information. The delivered placenta, the study of which would yield currently unavailable information, has historically been treated with disrespect. Even in a well regulated American hospital, it is the only human tissue that can be discarded with the impunity. Unpredictable interspecies differences cause animal data to be tenuous and unreliable when quantitatively extrapolated to humans.

  1. What is New in Internal Dosimetry and Monitoring?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henrichs, K. [Siemens AG, Corporate Radiation Safety and Dangerous Goods Transport, Munich (Germany); Nosske, D. [Federal Office for Radiation Protection, Neuherberg (Germany)

    2006-07-01

    This file is divided in two parts:the first one concerns the progress in internal dosimetry. This part gives an overview on new model developments by ICRP, the series of age dependent doses for members of the public was continued by biokinetic and dosimetric models for the embryo and foetus due to activity intake by the mother (ICRP,2001) and for the infant via consumption of mother's milk after activity intake by the mother (ICRP, 2004). In both publications dose coefficients for the embryo and foetus as well the infant were given for various intake scenarios by mother. The present model development work of ICRP is a revision of Publications 30, 54, 68, and 78 based on the new human Alimentary tract model (H.A.T.M.) of ICRP (ICRP, 2006), a revision of absorption parameters for the human respiratory tract model (ICRP, 1994a), new systemic models as well as new dosimetric parameters derived with new Voxel models for the reference male and female adult. The second part concerns the progress in workers monitoring for radionuclide intake. The initiatives to improve the situation are the guidelines published by the International Atomic Energy Agency (2004), giving guidance for the assessment of occupational exposures due to intakes of radionuclides, research project funded by the European Commission: the objective of O.M.I.N.E.X. was the improvement of monitoring programmes, taking into account the uncertainties of biokinetic models and data, the programme I.D.E.A. tried to improve measuring techniques and I.D.E.A.S derives rules for the evaluation of measured activity values in terms of exposure. Standardization projects by the International Standardization Organization I.S.O.: I.S.O. (2001) published a standard defining the requirements for bioassay laboratories, which will soon followed by a second part giving the rationale behind these rules., presently the final version (I.S.O. 2005) of a standard is circulating among the I.S.O. member states which guidance on

  2. TRANSPORT OF RADIONUCLIDES ALONG MARINE FOODCHAIN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴国斌; 余君岳; 等

    1995-01-01

    A compartment model is employed to calculate the radionuclide concentrations in the ocean currents for a nuclear accient scenario where the long-lived 137 Cs is totally discharged into the sea.The radionuclide concentrations in both the waters of Daya Bay and the adjacent south China Sea are considered.Using the concentration factors for the marine organisms:fish,crustacea and mollusca,their radionuclide concentrations are also estimated.In this way,the whole body radiation doses received by an individual due to ingestion of marine organisms from the Daya Bay and the South China Sea are calculated.

  3. 2008 LANL radionuclide air emissions report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuehne, David P.

    2009-06-01

    The emissions of radionuclides from Department of Energy Facilities such as Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are regulated by the Amendments to the Clean Air Act of 1990, National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (40 CFR 61 Subpart H). These regulations established an annual dose limit of 10 mrem to the maximally exposed member of the public attributable to emissions of radionuclides. This document describes the emissions of radionuclides from LANL and the dose calculations resulting from these emissions for calendar year 2008. This report meets the reporting requirements established in the regulations.

  4. 2009 LANL radionuclide air emissions report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuehne, David P.

    2010-06-01

    The emissions of radionuclides from Department of Energy Facilities such as Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are regulated by the Amendments to the Clean Air Act of 1990, National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (40 CFR 61 Subpart H). These regulations established an annual dose limit of 10 mrem to the maximally exposed member of the public attributable to emissions of radionuclides. This document describes the emissions of radionuclides from LANL and the dose calculations resulting from these emissions for calendar year 2009. This report meets the reporting requirements established in the regulations.

  5. 2010 LANL radionuclide air emissions report /

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuehne, David P.

    2011-06-01

    The emissions of radionuclides from Department of Energy Facilities such as Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are regulated by the Amendments to the Clean Air Act of 1990, National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (40 CFR 61 Subpart H). These regulations established an annual dose limit of 10 mrem to the maximally exposed member of the public attributable to emissions of radionuclides. This document describes the emissions of radionuclides from LANL and the dose calculations resulting from these emissions for calendar year 2010. This report meets the reporting requirements established in the regulations.

  6. Information on biological health effects of ionizing radiation and radionuclides: the rule of a web site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comte, A.; Gaillard-Lecanu, E.; Flury-Herard, A. [CEA Fontenay aux Roses, 92 (France); Ourly, F. [CEA Saclay, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Hemidy, P.; Lallemand, J. [Electricite de France (EDF), Service de Radioprotection, 75 - Paris (France)

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of this project is to provide a source of information on biological and health effects of radionuclides and ionizing radiation in an easy to use format. Reported work is made up of two distinct parts: data sheets for selected radionuclides and a web file. Data sheets: Specific radiation data sheets provide an overview of the properties, the environmental behaviour, the different pathways of human exposure and the biological and health consequences of selected radionuclides. Radionuclides that have been selected are those commonly dealt with in nuclear industry (and in other areas such as medicine) and released to the environment or naturally occurring (plutonium, tritium, carbon 14). Data sheets corresponding to the different radionuclides are based on the main sources of scientific information in dosimetry, epidemiology, radiobiology and radiation protection. These data sheets are intended for radiation protection specialists and physicians. They include: main physical and chemical characteristics, main radiation protection data: dose coefficients (public, workers), dose limits sources, total released estimate (nuclear industry, atmospheric tests, main pathway of human exposure and biological behaviour, biological and health effects, medical supervision, treatment a list of the main references, appendix providing accurate information. Web file: http://www-dsv.cea.fr/doc/carmin{sub e}xt/fond.php This web file provides a source of information on biological and health effects of ionizing radiation and biological basic knowledge of radiation protection. Available for consultation via Internet, compiled information provides, in a same file, subjects as varied as biological mechanisms, ionizing radiations action, biological and health effects, risk assessment This file is mainly intended to assist in informing and training of non-specialist readership (students, teaching on radiation protection basic knowledge. This electronic document is divided in three

  7. Dosimetry implant for treating restenosis and hyperplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Suresh; Gonzales, Gilbert R; Howell, Roger W; Bolch, Wesley E; Adzic, Radoslav

    2014-09-16

    The present invention discloses a method of selectively providing radiation dosimetry to a subject in need of such treatment. The radiation is applied by an implant comprising a body member and .sup.117mSn electroplated at selected locations of the body member, emitting conversion electrons absorbed immediately adjacent selected locations while not affecting surrounding tissue outside of the immediately adjacent area.

  8. Optically stimulated luminescence techniques in retrospective dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Murray, A.S.

    2001-01-01

    Optically stimulated luminescence signals from natural quartz and feldspar are now used routinely in dating geological and archaeological materials. More recently they have also been employed in accident dosimetry, i.e. the retrospective assessment of doses received as a result of a nuclear...

  9. Development of A-bomb survivor dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerr, G.D.

    1995-12-31

    An all important datum in risk assessment is the radiation dose to individual survivors of the bombings in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The first set of dose estimates for survivors was based on a dosimetry system developed in 1957 by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These Tentative 1957 Doses (T57D) were later replaced by a more extensive and refined set of Tentative 1965 Doses (T65D). The T65D system of dose estimation for survivors was also developed at ORNL and served as a basis for risk assessment throughout the 1970s. In the late 1970s, it was suggested that there were serious inadequacies with the T65D system, and these inadequacies were the topic of discussion at two symposia held in 1981. In early 1983, joint US- Japan research programs were established to conduct a thorough review of all aspects of the radiation dosimetry for the Hiroshima and Nagasaki A-bomb survivors. A number of important contributions to this review were made by ORNL staff members. The review was completed in 1986 and a new Dosimetry System 1986 (DS86) was adopted for use. This paper discusses the development of the various systems of A-bomb survivor dosimetry, and the status of the current DS86 system as it is being applied in the medical follow-up studies of the A-bomb survivors and their offspring.

  10. Computational Techniques of Electromagnetic Dosimetry for Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Akimasa; Fujiwara, Osamu

    There has been increasing public concern about the adverse health effects of human exposure to electromagnetic fields. This paper reviews the rationale of international safety guidelines for human protection against electromagnetic fields. Then, this paper also presents computational techniques to conduct dosimetry in anatomically-based human body models. Computational examples and remaining problems are also described briefly.

  11. Thermoluminescence Dosimetry Applied to Radiation Protection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Poul; Bøtter-Jensen, Lars; Majborn, Benny

    1982-01-01

    This is a general review of the present state of the development and application of thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) for radiation protection purposes. A description is given of commonly used thermoluminescent dosimeters and their main dosimetric properties, e.g. energy response, dose range...

  12. Dosimetry implant for treating restenosis and hyperplasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, Suresh; Gonzales, Gilbert R; Howell, Roger W; Bolch, Wesley E; Adzic, Radoslav

    2014-09-16

    The present invention discloses a method of selectively providing radiation dosimetry to a subject in need of such treatment. The radiation is applied by an implant comprising a body member and .sup.117mSn electroplated at selected locations of the body member, emitting conversion electrons absorbed immediately adjacent selected locations while not affecting surrounding tissue outside of the immediately adjacent area.

  13. Intra-Operative Dosimetry in Prostate Brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-01

    CT-based post-implant dosimetry. Figure 1: System concept for TRUS and C-arm fusion B BODY B.1 Brief System Concept The system concept for...C-arm calibration - is it really necessary?,” MICCAI, pp. 639–646, 2005. 10. Brainlab, Inc., Heimstetten, Germany, Vector Vision. 11. Medtronic

  14. Advances in reference and transfer dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desrosiers, M.F. [Ionizing Radiation Division, Physics Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States)

    1999-07-01

    All prerequisites are now in place to create a fundamentally and radically different type of calibration service for the radiation processing industry. Advancements in dosimetry and information technology can be combined to provide industry with on-line calibrations, on demand at a low cost. The remote calibration service will serve as a basis for other areas of metrology. (Author)

  15. Film dosimetry in conformal radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danciu, C.; Proimos, B.S. [Patras Univ. (Greece). Dept. of Medical Physics

    1995-12-01

    Dosimetry, through a film sandwiched in a transverse cross-section of a solid phantom, is a method of choice in Conformal Radiotherapy because: (a) the blackness (density) of the film at each point offers a measure of the total dose received at that point, and (b) the film is easily calibrated by exposing a film strip in the same cross-section, through a stationary field. The film must therefore have the following properties: (a) it must be slow, in order not to be overexposed, even at a therapeutic dose of 200 cGy, and (b) the response of the film (density versus dose curve) must be independent of the photon energy spectrum. A few slow films were compared. It was found that the Kodak X-Omat V for therapy verification was the best choice. To investigate whether the film response was independent of the photon energy, response curves for six depths, starting from the depth of maximum dose to the depth of 25 cm, in solid phantom were derived. The vertical beam was perpendicular to the anterior surface of the phantom, which was at the distance of 100 cm from the source and the field was 15x15 cm at that distance. This procedure was repeated for photon beams emitted by a Cobalt-60 unit, two 6 MV and 15 MV Linear Accelerators, as well as a 45 MV Betatron. For each of those four different beams the film response was the same for all six depths. The results, as shown in the diagrams, are very satisfactory. The response curve under a geometry similar to that actually applied, when the film is irradiated in a transverse cross-section of the phantom, was derived. The horizontal beam was almost parallel (angle of 85) to the plane of the film. The same was repeated with the central ray parallel to the film (angle 90) and at a distance of 1.5 cm from the horizontal film. The field size was again 15x15 at the lateral entrance surface of the beam. The response curves remained the same, as when the beam was perpendicular to the films.

  16. Neutron dosimetry; Dosimetria de neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fratin, Luciano

    1993-12-31

    A neutron irradiation facility was designed and built in order to establish a procedure for calibrating neutron monitors and dosemeters. A 185 GBq {sup 241} Am Be source of known is used as a reference source. The irradiation facility using this source in the air provides neutron dose rates between 9 nSv s{sup -1} and 0,5 {sup {mu}}Sv s{sup -1}. A calibrated 50 nSv s{sup -1} thermal neutron field is obtained by using a specially designed paraffin block in conjunction with the {sup 241} Am Be source. A Bonner multisphere spectrometer was calibrated, using a procedure based on three methods proposed by international standards. The unfold {sup 241} Am Be neutron spectrum was determined from the Bonner spheres data and resulted in a good agreement with expected values for fluence rate, dose rate and mean energy. A dosimetric system based on the electrochemical etching of CR-39 was developed for personal dosimetry. The dosemeter badge using a (n,{alpha}) converter, the etching chamber and high frequency power supply were designed and built specially for this project. The electrochemical etching (ECE) parameters used were: a 6N KOH solution, 59 deg C, 20 kV{sub pp} cm{sup -1}, 2,0 kHz, 3 hours of ECE for thermal and intermediate neutrons and 6 hours for fast neutrons. The calibration factors for thermal, intermediate and fast neutrons were determined for this personal dosemeter. The sensitivities determined for the developed dosimetric system were (1,46{+-} 0,09) 10{sup 4} tracks cm{sup -2} mSv{sup -1} for thermal neutrons, (9{+-}3) 10{sup 2} tracks cm{sup -2} mSV{sup -1} for intermediate neutrons and (26{+-}4) tracks cm{sup -2} mSv{sup -1} for fast neutrons. The lower and upper limits of detection were respectively 0,002 mSv and 0,6 mSv for thermal neutrons, 0,04 mSv and 8 mSv for intermediate neutrons and 1 mSv and 12 mSv for fast neutrons. In view of the 1990`s ICRP recommendations, it is possible to conclude that the personal dosemeter described in this work is

  17. Development of Calculation Module for Intake Retention Functions based on Occupational Intakes of Radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Siwan; Kwon, Tae-Eun; Lee, Jai-Ki [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong-Il; Kim, Jang-Lyul [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    In internal dosimetry, intake retention and excretion functions are essential to estimate intake activity using bioassay sample such as whole body counter, lung counter, and urine sample. Even though ICRP (International Commission on Radiological Protection)provides the functions in some ICRP publications, it is needed to calculate the functions because the functions from the publications are provided for very limited time. Thus, some computer program are generally used to calculate intake retention and excretion functions and estimate intake activity. OIR (Occupational Intakes of Radionuclides) will be published soon by ICRP, which totally replaces existing internal dosimetry models and relevant data including intake retention and excretion functions. Thus, the calculation tool for the functions is needed based on OIR. In this study, we developed calculation module for intake retention and excretion functions based on OIR using C++ programming language with Intel Math Kernel Library. In this study, we developed the intake retention and excretion function calculation module based on OIR using C++ programing language.

  18. Table of radionuclides (Vol. 4 - A = 133 to 252)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Be, M.M.; Chiste, V.; Dulieu, Ch. [CEA Saclay, Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel (LNHB), 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Browne, E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Chechev, V.; Kuzmenko, N. [Khlopin Radium Institute (KRI) (Russian Federation); Kondev, F.G. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Luca, A. [Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH) (Romania); Galan, M. [Ciemat, Lab. de Metrologia de Radiaciones Ionizantes (Spain); Pearce, A. [National Physical Laboratory (NPL) (United Kingdom); Huang, X. [China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE) (China)

    2008-07-01

    This monograph is one of several published in a series by the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) on behalf of the Comite Consultatif des Rayonnements Ionisants (CCRI), previously known as the Comite Consultatif pour les Etalons de Mesure des Rayonnements Ionisants (CCEMRI). The aim of this series of publications is to review topics that are of importance for the measurement of ionizing radiation and especially of radioactivity, in particular those techniques normally used by participants in international comparisons. It is hoped that these publications will prove to be useful reference volumes both for those who are already engaged in this field and for those who are approaching such measurements for the first time. The purpose of this monograph, number 4 in the series, is to present the recommended values of nuclear and decay data for a wide range of radionuclides. Activity measurements for more than fifty-five of these radionuclides have already been the subject of comparisons under the auspices of Section II (dedicated to the Measurement of radionuclides) of the CCRI. The material for this monograph is now covered in four volumes. The first two volumes contain the primary recommended data relating to half-lives, decay modes, x-rays, gamma-rays, electron emissions; alpha- and beta-particle transitions and emissions, and their uncertainties for a set of sixty-eight radionuclides, Volume I for those radionuclides with mass number up to and including 150 and Volume 2 for those radionuclides with mass number over 150. Volume 3 contains the equivalent data for twenty-six additional radionuclides as listed and reevaluations for {sup 125}Sb and {sup 153}Sm while Volume 4 contains the data for a further thirty-one radionuclides with re-evaluation for {sup 226}Ra. The data have been collated and evaluated by an international working group (Decay Data Evaluation Project) led by the LNE-LNHB. The evaluators have agreed on the methodologies to be used and the

  19. Radiation safety requirements for radionuclide laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    The guide lays down the requirements for laboratories and storage rooms in which radioactive substances are used or stored as unsealed sources. In addition, some general instructions concerning work in radionuclide laboratories are set out.

  20. Long lived gamma emitting radionuclides in incense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrefae, Tareq

    2013-10-01

    A study of long-lived gamma emitters in incense was performed. The incense samples originated from seven different countries, and the investigated radionuclides were Ra, Ra, and K. Gamma spectroscopy revealed the presence of all three investigated radionuclides in all samples. Interestingly, the activity concentrations revealed a clear bimodal distribution that distinguished samples that were natural incense from others that were processed incense. The activity concentrations in the latter group were found to be one order of magnitude greater than in the former group. Consequently, the estimated annual effective dose from the latter group was one order of magnitude higher than that of the former group. Nonetheless, the doses from both groups were found to be some three orders of magnitude less than the average worldwide exposure to inhaled natural radionuclides. This finding suggests the radiological safety of incense for the investigated radionuclides.

  1. Radionuclide imaging of musculoskeletal infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J. Palestro

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Radionuclide imaging studies are routinely used to evaluate patients suspected of having musculoskeletal infection. Three-phase bone imaging is readily available, relatively inexpensive, and very accurate in the setting of otherwise normal bone. Labeled leukocyte imaging should be used in cases of "complicating osteomyelitis" such as prosthetic joint infection. This test also is useful in clinically unsuspected diabetic pedal osteomyelitis as well as in the neuropathic joint. It is often necessary, however, to perform complementary bone marrow imaging, to maximize the accuracy of labeled leukocyte imaging. In contrast to other regions in the skeleton, labeled leukocyte imaging is not useful for diagnosing spinal osteomyelitis. At the moment, gallium is the preferred radionuclide procedure for this condition and is a useful adjunct to magnetic resonance imaging. FDG-PET likely will play an important role in the evaluation of musculoskeletal infection, especially spinal osteomyelitis, and may replace gallium imaging for this purpose.Estudos através de imagens com o uso de radionuclídeos são rotineiramente usadas para avaliar pacientes suspeitos de terem infecção músculo-esquelética. A imagem óssea em tridimensional é facilmente avaliável, relativamente de baixo custo, e muito precisa na localização de alterações ósseas. Imagem com leucócito marcado poderia ser usada nos casos de "osteomielite com complicações" tais como infecção prostética articular. Esse teste também é útil na não suspeita clinica de osteomielite associada ao pé diabético tanto quanto nas junções neuropáticas. É sempre necessário, por outro lado, realizar imagem complementar da medula óssea para aumentar a precisão da imagem com leucócito marcado. Em contraste com outras regiões no esqueleto, imagem com leucócito marcado não é útil para diagnosticar osteomielite da coluna vertebral. Até agora, o gálio é o radionuclídeo preferido para

  2. 49 CFR 173.433 - Requirements for determining basic radionuclide values, and for the listing of radionuclides on...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... radionuclide values, and for the listing of radionuclides on shipping papers and labels. (a) For individual radionuclides listed in the table in § 173.435 and § 173.436: (1) A1 and A2 values are given in the table in... values, and for the listing of radionuclides on shipping papers and labels. 173.433 Section...

  3. Livermore Accelerator Source for Radionuclide Science (LASRS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Scott [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bleuel, Darren [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Johnson, Micah [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rusnak, Brian [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Soltz, Ron [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Tonchev, Anton [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-05-05

    The Livermore Accelerator Source for Radionuclide Science (LASRS) will generate intense photon and neutron beams to address important gaps in the study of radionuclide science that directly impact Stockpile Stewardship, Nuclear Forensics, and Nuclear Material Detection. The co-location of MeV-scale neutral and photon sources with radiochemical analytics provides a unique facility to meet current and future challenges in nuclear security and nuclear science.

  4. Development of derived investigation levels for use in internal dosimetry at the West Valley Demonstration Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, P. [Pittsburgh Univ., PA (United States)

    1991-12-31

    The objective was to determine if the routine intemal dosimetry program at the West Valley Demonstration Project is capable of meeting the performance objective of 1 mSv annual effective dose equivalent due to internal contamination. With the use of the computer code REMedy the annual effective dose equivalent is calculated. Some of the radionuclides of concern result in an annual effective dose equivalent that exceeds the performance objective. Although the results exceed the performance objective, in all but two cases they do not exceed the US DOE regulatory limits. In these instances the Th-232 and Am-241 were determined to exceed the committed dose equivalent limit to their limiting tissue. In order to document the potential missed dose for regulatory compliance, Sr-90 is used as an indicator for Th-232. For Am-241 an investigation as to whether or not the minimum detectable amount can be lowered is performed. The derived investigation levels as a result of this project are 4.9E3 Bq/lung count for Co-60, 2.2E4 Bq/lung count for Cs-137, 1.9 Bq/1 for Sr-90 and for radionuclides other than Sr-90 any value greater than or equal to three standard deviations above their net count is considered to require further investigation.

  5. Realistic multi-cellular dosimetry for (177)Lu-labelled antibodies: model and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcatili, S; Pichard, A; Courteau, A; Ladjohounlou, R; Navarro-Teulon, I; Repetto-Llamazares, A; Heyerdahl, H; Dahle, J; Pouget, J P; Bardiès, M

    2016-10-07

    Current preclinical dosimetric models often fail to take account of the complex nature of absorbed dose distribution typical of in vitro clonogenic experiments in targeted radionuclide therapy. For this reason, clonogenic survival is often expressed as a function of added activity rather than the absorbed dose delivered to cells/cell nuclei. We designed a multi-cellular dosimetry model that takes into account the realistic distributions of cells in the Petri dish, for the establishment of survival curves as a function of the absorbed dose. General-purpose software tools were used for the generation of realistic, randomised 3D cell culture geometries based on experimentally determined parameters (cell size, cell density, cluster density, average cluster size, cell cumulated activity). A mixture of Monte Carlo and analytical approaches was implemented in order to achieve as accurate as possible results while reducing calculation time. The model was here applied to clonogenic survival experiments carried out to compare the efficacy of Betalutin(®), a novel (177)Lu-labelled antibody radionuclide conjugate for the treatment of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, to that of (177)Lu-labelled CD20-specific (rituximab) and non-specific antibodies (Erbitux) on lymphocyte B cells. The 3D cellular model developed allowed a better understanding of the radiative and non-radiative processes associated with cellular death. Our approach is generic and can also be applied to other radiopharmaceuticals and cell distributions.

  6. Realistic multi-cellular dosimetry for 177Lu-labelled antibodies: model and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcatili, S.; Pichard, A.; Courteau, A.; Ladjohounlou, R.; Navarro-Teulon, I.; Repetto-Llamazares, A.; Heyerdahl, H.; Dahle, J.; Pouget, J. P.; Bardiès, M.

    2016-10-01

    Current preclinical dosimetric models often fail to take account of the complex nature of absorbed dose distribution typical of in vitro clonogenic experiments in targeted radionuclide therapy. For this reason, clonogenic survival is often expressed as a function of added activity rather than the absorbed dose delivered to cells/cell nuclei. We designed a multi-cellular dosimetry model that takes into account the realistic distributions of cells in the Petri dish, for the establishment of survival curves as a function of the absorbed dose. General-purpose software tools were used for the generation of realistic, randomised 3D cell culture geometries based on experimentally determined parameters (cell size, cell density, cluster density, average cluster size, cell cumulated activity). A mixture of Monte Carlo and analytical approaches was implemented in order to achieve as accurate as possible results while reducing calculation time. The model was here applied to clonogenic survival experiments carried out to compare the efficacy of Betalutin®, a novel 177Lu-labelled antibody radionuclide conjugate for the treatment of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, to that of 177Lu-labelled CD20-specific (rituximab) and non-specific antibodies (Erbitux) on lymphocyte B cells. The 3D cellular model developed allowed a better understanding of the radiative and non-radiative processes associated with cellular death. Our approach is generic and can also be applied to other radiopharmaceuticals and cell distributions.

  7. Incorporation of current ICRP recommendations in the GENMOD internal dosimetry code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richardson, R.B.; Dunford, D.W

    1998-07-01

    Genmod was initially developed by Johnson and Dunford to perform internal dose assessments and evaluate bioassay data using the methods described by the ICRP in Publications 26 and 30. The mainframe code, Genmod-MF was modified to implement the ICRP's new lung model, new weighting factors and new values for specific effective energy (SEE) available from M. Cristy and K.F. Eckerman, Oak Ridge Laboratories. Organ equivalent doses and effective dose for selected radionuclides employing the ICRP 30 general organ model have been verified, for ingestion and inhalation cases, against current ICRP publications, the internal dosimetry code LUDEP and mainframe codes. The PC version of Genmod has been rewritten to operate under the MS-Windows 95 system. A demonstration package has been developed that calculates doses and provides graphics for radionuclides where the ICRP's general organ model is appropriate. Data will be presented showing the differences and similarities in dose conversion factors using the ICRP 26/30 methodology and recommendations in ICRP Publication 60 onwards. (author)

  8. Incorporation of current ICRP recommendations in the Genmod internal dosimetry code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richardson, R.B.; Dunford, D.W

    1998-07-01

    Genmod was initially developed by Johnson and Dunford to perform internal dose assessments and evaluate bioassay data using the methods described by the ICRP in Publications 26 and 30. The mainframe code, Genmod-MF was modified to implement the ICRP's new lung model, new weighting factors and new values for specific effective energy (SEE) available from M. Cristy and K. F. Eckerman, Oak Ridge Laboratories. Organ equivalent doses and effective dose for selected radionuclides employing the ICRP 30 general organ model have been verified, for ingestion and inhalation cases, against current ICRP publications, the internal dosimetry code LUDEP and mainframe codes. The PC version of Genmod has been rewritten to operate under the MS-Windows95 system. A demonstration package has been developed that calculates doses and provides graphics for radionuclides where the ICRP's general organ model is appropriate. Data will be presented showing the differences and similarities in dose conversion factors using the ICRP 26/30 methodology and recommendations in ICRP Publication 60 onwards. (author)

  9. Migration of radionuclides through a river system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsunaga, Takeshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1999-03-01

    Migration behavior of several atmospherically-derived radionuclides in a river watershed was studied. A main interest was in their relocation from the ground soil of the watershed to a downstream region through a river. Studied radionuclides are: {sup 137}Cs generated by weapon tests in the atmosphere; {sup 210}Pb and {sup 7}Be of naturally occurring radionuclides; {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 239,240}Pu and {sup 241}Am released by the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident. Dominance of the form in suspended solid in river water (particulate form) was qualified for the radionuclides in the Kuji river watershed. An importance of discharge in flooding was also confirmed. A historical budget analysis for weapon test derived {sup 137}Cs was presented for the Hi-i river watershed and its accompanied lake sediment (Lake Shinji). The work afforded a scheme of a fate of {sup 137}Cs after falling on the ground soil and on the lake surface. Several controlling factors, which can influence on the chemical form of radionuclides discharged to a river, were also investigated in the vicinity of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant. A special attention was paid on the association of the radionuclides with dissolved species in water. Preferential association of Pu and Am isotopes to a large molecular size of dissolved matrices, probably of humic substances, was suggested. (author)

  10. Vertical distribution of natural radionuclides in soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lozano J. C.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Low-level alpha spectrometry techniques using semiconductor detectors (PIPS and liquid scintillation counters (LKB Quantulus 1220™ were used in order to determine the activity concentration of 238U, 232Th, 234U, 230Th, 226Ra, and 210Pb in soil samples. The soils were collected from an old disused uranium mine located in southwest Spain. The soils were selected with different levels of influence from the installation, in such a way that they had different levels of radioactive contamination. The vertical profiles in the soils (down to 40 cm depth were studied in order to evaluate the vertical distribution of the natural radionuclides. The possible contamination of subsurface waters depends strongly on vertical migration, and the transfer to plants (herbs, shrubs, and trees also will depend on the distribution of the radionuclides in the root zone. The study of the activity ratios between radionuclides belonging to the same series allowed us to assess the differing behaviour of the radionuclides involved. The vertical profiles for these radionuclides were different at each sampling point, showing the local impact of the installation. However, the profiles per point were similar for the long-lived radionuclides of the 238TJ series (238U, 234U, 230Th, and 226Ra. Also, a major disequilibrium was observed between 210Pb and 226Ra in the surface layer, due to 222Rn emanation and subsequent surface deposition of 210Pb.

  11. Radionuclide Air Emissions Report for 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahl, Linnea [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Berkeley Lab operates facilities where radionuclides are produced, handled, store d, and potentially emitted . These facilities are subject to the EPA radioactive air emission regulations in 40 CFR 61, Subpart H (EPA 1989a). Radionuclides may be emitted from stacks or vents on buildings where radionuclide production or use is authorized or they may be emitted as diffuse sources. In 2012, all Berkeley Lab sources were minor sources of radionuclides (sources resulting in a potential dose of less than 0.1 mrem/yr [0.001 mSv/yr]) . These minor sources include d about 140 stack sources and no diffuse sources . T here were no unplanned airborne radionuclide emissions from Berkeley Lab operations . Emissions from minor sources were measured by sampling or monitoring or were calculated based on quantities used, received for use, or produced during the year. Using measured and calculated emissions, and building- specific and common parameters, Laboratory personnel applied the EPA -approved computer code s, CAP88-PC and COMPLY , to calculate doses to the maximally exposed individual (MEI) at any offsite point where there is a residence, school, business, or office. Because radionuclides are used at three noncontiguous locations (the main site, Berkeley West Bio center, and Joint BioEnergy Institute), three different MEIs were identified.

  12. Solubility limits on radionuclide dissolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerrisk, J.F.

    1984-12-31

    This paper examines the effects of solubility in limiting dissolution rates of a number of important radionuclides from spent fuel and high-level waste. Two simple dissolution models were used for calculations that would be characteristics of a Yucca Mountain repository. A saturation-limited dissolution model, in which the water flowing through the repository is assumed to be saturated with each waste element, is very conservative in that it overestimates dissolution rates. A diffusion-limited dissolution model, in which element-dissolution rates are limited by diffusion of waste elements into water flowing past the waste, is more realistic, but it is subject to some uncertainty at this time. Dissolution rates of some elements (Pu, Am, Sn, Th, Zr, Sm) are always limited by solubility. Dissolution rates of other elements (Cs, Tc, Np, Sr, C, I) are never solubility limited; their release would be limited by dissolution of the bulk waste form. Still other elements (U, Cm, Ni, Ra) show solubility-limited dissolution under some conditions. 9 references, 3 tables.

  13. Biodistribution and dosimetry of {sup 123}I-mZIENT: a novel ligand for imaging serotonin transporters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicol, Alice [NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Southern General Hospital, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Krishnadas, Rajeev [University of Glasgow, Sackler Institute of Psychobiological Research, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Champion, Sue [University of Glasgow, Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Tamagnan, Gilles [Institute for Neurodegenerative Disorders, New Haven, CT (United States); Stehouwer, Jeffrey S.; Goodman, Mark M. [Emory University, Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Atlanta, GA (United States); Hadley, Donald M. [NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde, Department of Neuro-Radiology, Institute of Neurological Sciences, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Pimlott, Sally L. [NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde, West of Scotland Radionuclide Dispensary, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2012-05-15

    {sup 123}I-labelled mZIENT (2{beta}-carbomethoxy-3{beta}-(3'-((Z)-2-iodoethenyl)phenyl)nortropane) has been developed as a radioligand for the serotonin transporter. The aim of this preliminary study was to assess its whole-body biodistribution in humans and estimate dosimetry. Three healthy controls and three patients receiving selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) therapy for depression were included (two men, four women, age range 41-56 years). Whole-body imaging, brain SPECT imaging and blood and urine sampling were performed. Whole-body images were analysed using regions of interest (ROIs), time-activity curves were derived using compartmental analysis and dosimetry estimated using OLINDA software. Brain ROI analysis was performed to obtain specific-to-nonspecific binding ratios in the midbrain, thalamus and striatum. Initial high uptake in the lungs decreased in later images. Lower uptake was seen in the brain, liver and intestines. Excretion was primarily through the urinary system. The effective dose was estimated to be of the order of 0.03 mSv/MBq. The organ receiving the highest absorbed dose was the lower large intestine wall. Uptake in the brain was consistent with the known SERT distribution with higher specific-to-nonspecific binding in the midbrain, thalamus and striatum in healthy controls compared with patients receiving SSRI therapy. {sup 123}I-mZIENT may be a promising radioligand for imaging the serotonin transporters in humans with acceptable dosimetry. (orig.)

  14. Kaolinite as an in situ dosimeter for past radionuclide migration at the Earth's surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allard, T.; Muller, J.-P. [Laboratoire de Mineralogie-Cristallographie, Universites Paris 6 et 7, UMR CNRS 7590 et IPGP, 4 Place Jussieu, 75252 Paris (France)

    1998-08-01

    The origin of 3 types of point defects (A-, Aminutes or feet- and B-centers) in kaolinite, due to natural irradiation and detected by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR), has been demonstrated by artificial irradiation. The potential use of tracing the dynamics of the transfer of radionuclides through A-centers (i.e. the most stable centers) was qualitatively tested on different low-temperature alteration systems, some associated with U-concentrations. This paper proposes a quantitative approach to the reconstruction of the past migration of radionuclides by dosimetry of A-centers. With this aim in mind, the efficiency of {alpha}- and {gamma}-radiations to produce A-centers was determined by experimental irradiation. Parameters extracted from A-center growth curves, together with their relationship with a parameter describing the degree of order of kaolinite, permitted (i) a definition to be made of the dose range in which a given kaolinite could be used as a dosimeter and (ii) the quantitative derivation of U-concentration from the cumulative dose (paleodose) of kaolinites. This was achieved by a formalism that accounted for the contribution of natural radiosources to the production of A-centers. The formalism was applied to the Nopal I U-deposit (Chihuhua, Mexico), considered as a natural analogue of a high level nuclear waste repository. Irrespective of the scenario considered, in terms of kaolinite age and of degree of isotopic disequilibrium in the system, A-center dosimetry permitted the determination of past occurrences of U which were several orders of magnitude higher than the present-day measured U-concentrations. Furthermore, this approach also provided evidence for several previous episodes of U-migration. EPR spectroscopy is thus a unique tool for the quantitative, indirect assessment of past radionuclide migration in the geosphere and kaolinite is a reliable in-situ dosimeter. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All

  15. Kidney protection during peptide receptor radionuclide therapy with somatostatin analogues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rolleman, Edgar J.; Melis, Marleen; Valkema, Roelf; Krenning, Eric P.; Jong, Marion de [Erasmus MC, Department of Nuclear Medicine, V 220, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Boerman, Otto C. [Radboud University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2010-05-15

    This review focuses on the present status of kidney protection during peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) using radiolabelled somatostatin analogues. This treatment modality for somatostatin receptor-positive tumours is limited by renal reabsorption and retention of radiolabelled peptides resulting in dose-limiting high kidney radiation doses. Radiation nephropathy has been described in several patients. Studies on the mechanism and localization demonstrate that renal uptake of radiolabelled somatostatin analogues largely depends on the megalin/cubulin system in the proximal tubule cells. Thus methods are needed that interfere with this reabsorption pathway to achieve kidney protection. Such methods include coadministration of basic amino acids, the bovine gelatin-containing solution Gelofusine or albumin fragments. Amino acids are already commonly used in the clinical setting during PRRT. Other compounds that interfere with renal reabsorption capacity (maleic acid and colchicine) are not suitable for clinical use because of potential toxicity. The safe limit for the renal radiation dose during PRRT is not exactly known. Dosimetry studies applying the principle of the biological equivalent dose (correcting for the effect of dose fractionation) suggest that a dose of about 37 Gy is the threshold for development of kidney toxicity. This threshold is lower when risk factors for development of renal damage exist: age over 60 years, hypertension, diabetes mellitus and previous chemotherapy. A still experimental pathway for kidney protection is mitigation of radiation effects, possibly achievable by cotreatment with amifostine (Ethylol), a radiation protector, or with blockers of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. Future perspectives on improving kidney protection during PRRT include combinations of agents to reduce renal retention of radiolabelled peptides, eventually together with mitigating medicines. Moreover, new somatostatin analogues with lower

  16. Performance test of dosimetric services in the EU member states and Switzerland for the routine assessment of individual doses (photon, beta and neutron)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bordy, J.M.; Stadtmann, H.; Ambrosi, P.;

    2000-01-01

    of the dosimetry of routine services. It was assumed that each service would have already done a type test before performing routine dosimetry: the radiation fields were chosen to simulate, as far as possible, workplace radiation fields by mixing combining energies and incident angles. The results of photon...... dosemeters were good for all fields except for R-F. Beta test results showed that many types of dosemeter were not able accurately to determine personal dose equivalent when large incident angles and low energies were encountered. Neutron dosimetry, results were very dependent on the dosemeter type...

  17. Design and Fabrication of Kidney Phantoms for Internal Radiation Dosimetry Using 3D Printing Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran-Gia, Johannes; Schlögl, Susanne; Lassmann, Michael

    2016-12-01

    Currently, the validation of multimodal quantitative imaging and absorbed dose measurements is impeded by the lack of suitable, commercially available anthropomorphic phantoms of variable sizes and shapes. To demonstrate the potential of 3-dimensional (3D) printing techniques for quantitative SPECT/CT imaging, a set of kidney dosimetry phantoms and their spherical counterparts was designed and manufactured with a fused-deposition-modeling 3D printer. Nuclide-dependent SPECT/CT calibration factors were determined to assess the accuracy of quantitative imaging for internal renal dosimetry. A set of 4 single-compartment kidney phantoms with filling volumes between 8 and 123 mL was designed on the basis of the outer kidney dimensions provided by MIRD pamphlet 19. After the phantoms had been printed, SPECT/CT acquisitions of 3 radionuclides ((99m)Tc, (177)Lu, and (131)I) were obtained and calibration constants determined for each radionuclide-volume combination. A set of additionally manufactured spheres matching the kidney volumes was also examined to assess the influence of phantom shape and size on the calibration constants. A set of refillable, waterproof, and chemically stable kidneys and spheres was successfully manufactured. Average calibration factors for (99m)Tc, (177)Lu, and (131)I were obtained in a large source measured in air. For the largest phantom (122.9 mL), the volumes of interest had to be enlarged by 1.2 mm for (99m)Tc, 2.5 mm for (177)Lu, and 4.9 mm for (131)I in all directions to obtain calibration factors comparable to the reference. Although partial-volume effects were observed for decreasing phantom volumes (percentage difference of up to 9.8% for the smallest volume [8.6 mL]), the difference between corresponding sphere-kidney pairs was small (3D printing is a promising prototyping technique for geometry-specific calibration of SPECT/CT systems. Although the underlying radionuclide and the related collimator have a major influence on the

  18. Targeted radiotherapy dosimetry of 153Sm hydroxide macroaggregates for radiation synovectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal, José E.; Ferro, Guillermina; Hernández, Omar; Carmona, Juan

    2001-10-01

    The dosimetry of the recently developed 153Sm hydroxide macroaggregates (153Sm-MH) for radiation synovectomy has been studied as an agent for the treatment of arthritic synovial joint diseases. This pharmaceutical formulation presents optimal properties in terms of particle size (average 4 μm) sedimentation (0.008 cm min-1) and biological behavior. Direct measurements of depth dose distributions for this beta-gamma emitter present a difficult task; therefore, calculations of depth dose profiles are an invaluable tool for investigating the effectiveness of this therapeutic technique. In spite of the importance of these calculations there are only a few studies dealing with the experimental validation of these calculated depth dose distributions. On the present work the Monte Carlo (MCNP4B) calculated beta-gamma depth dose profiles for a liquid 153Sm beta-gamma source used in radiation synovectomy are compared with experimental depth dose distribution obtained using radiochromic dye film dosimetry (GafChromic™). The calculated and experimental depth dose distribution showed a very good agreement (within 5%) on the region where the dose deposition is dominated by the bëta-particle component (first 800 microns depth on tissue equivalent material). The agreement worsens reaching a maximum deviation of 15% at depths close to the maximum range of the beta-particles. Finally the agreement improves for the region where the gamma component accounts for one third of the total absorbed dose (depths>1 mm). The possible contributions to these differences are discussed as well as their relevance for the application of 153Sm for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

  19. Thermoluminescence in medical dosimetry; Termoluminiscencia en dosimetria medica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivera, T., E-mail: trivera@ipn.mx [IPN, Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Av. Legaria 694, Col. Irrigacion, 11500 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2011-10-15

    The dosimetry by thermoluminescence (Tl) is applied in the entire world for the dosimetry of ionizing radiations specially to personal and medical dosimetry. This dosimetry method has been very interesting for measures in vivo because the Tl dosimeters have the advantage of being very sensitive in a very small volume and they are also equivalent to tissue and they do not need additional accessories (for example, cable, electrometer, etc.) The main characteristics of the diverse Tl materials to be used in the radiation measures and practical applications are: the Tl curve, the share homogeneity, the signal stability after the irradiation, precision and exactitude, the response in function with the dose and the energy influence. In this work a brief summary of the advances of the radiations dosimetry is presented by means of the thermally stimulated luminescence and its application to the dosimetry in radiotherapy. (Author)

  20. Uptake, depuration, and radiation dose estimation in zebrafish exposed to radionuclides via aqueous or dietary routes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinardy, Helena C., E-mail: helena.reinardy@plymouth.ac.uk [Ecotoxicology Research and Innovation Centre, School of Biomedical and Biological Sciences, The University of Plymouth (United Kingdom); Teyssie, Jean-Louis, E-mail: J.Teyssie@iaea.org [IAEA Marine Environment Laboratories, 4, Quai Antoine 1er, MC 98000 (Monaco); Jeffree, Ross A., E-mail: R.Jeffree@iaea.org [IAEA Marine Environment Laboratories, 4, Quai Antoine 1er, MC 98000 (Monaco); Faculty of Science, University of Technology, Sydney, PO Box 123, Broadway, NSW 2007 (Australia); Copplestone, David, E-mail: David.copplestone@stir.ac.uk [School of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Stirling (United Kingdom); Henry, Theodore B., E-mail: ted.henry@plymouth.ac.uk [Ecotoxicology Research and Innovation Centre, School of Biomedical and Biological Sciences, University of Plymouth (United Kingdom); Center for Environmental Biotechnology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Department of Forestry, Wildlife and Fisheries, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Jha, Awadhesh N., E-mail: A.Jha@plymouth.ac.uk [Ecotoxicology Research and Innovation Centre, School of Biomedical and Biological Sciences, The University of Plymouth (United Kingdom)

    2011-09-01

    Understanding uptake and depuration of radionuclides in organisms is necessary to relate exposure to radiation dose and ultimately to biological effects. We investigated uptake and depuration of a mixture of radionuclides to link bioaccumulation with radiation dose in zebrafish, Danio rerio. Adult zebrafish were exposed to radionuclides ({sup 54}Mn, {sup 60}Co, {sup 65}Zn, {sup 75}Se, {sup 109}Cd, {sup 110m}Ag, {sup 134}Cs and {sup 241}Am) at tracer levels (< 200 Bq g{sup -1}) for 14 d, either via water or diet. Radioactivity concentrations were measured in whole body and excised gonads of exposed fish during uptake (14 d) and depuration phases (47 d and 42 d for aqueous and dietary exposures respectively), and dose rates were modelled from activity concentrations in whole body and exposure medium (water or diet). After 14-day aqueous exposure, radionuclides were detected in decreasing activity concentrations: {sup 75}Se > {sup 65}Zn > {sup 109}Cd > {sup 110m}Ag > {sup 54}Mn > {sup 60}Co > {sup 241}Am > {sup 134}Cs (range: 175-8 Bq g{sup 1}). After dietary exposure the order of radionuclide activity concentration in tissues (Bq g{sup -1}) was: {sup 65}Zn > {sup 60}Co > {sup 75}Se > {sup 109}Cd > {sup 110m}Ag > {sup 241}Am > {sup 54}Mn > {sup 134}Cs (range: 91-1 Bq g{sup -1}). Aqueous exposure resulted in higher whole body activity concentrations for all radionuclides except {sup 60}Co. Route of exposure did not appear to influence activity concentrations in gonads, except for {sup 54}Mn, {sup 65}Zn, and {sup 75}Se, which had higher activity concentrations in gonads following aqueous exposure. Highest gonad activity concentrations (Bq g{sup -1}) were for {sup 75}Se (211), {sup 109}Cd (142), and {sup 65}Zn (117), and highest dose rates ({mu}Gy h{sup -1}) were from {sup 241}Am (aqueous, 1050; diet 242). This study links radionuclide bioaccumulation data obtained in laboratory experiments with radiation dose determined by application of a dosimetry modelling tool, an

  1. Cellular- and micro-dosimetry of heterogeneously distributed tritium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Tsi-Chian; Wang, Chun-Ching; Li, Junli; Li, Chunyan; Tung, Chuan-Jong

    2012-01-01

    The assessment of radiotoxicity for heterogeneously distributed tritium should be based on the subcellular dose and relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for cell nucleus. In the present work, geometry-dependent absorbed dose and RBE were calculated using Monte Carlo codes for tritium in the cell, cell surface, cytoplasm, or cell nucleus. Penelope (PENetration and Energy LOss of Positrins and Electrons) code was used to calculate the geometry-dependent absorbed dose, lineal energy, and electron fluence spectrum. RBE for the intestinal crypt regeneration was calculated using a lineal energy-dependent biological weighting function. RBE for the induction of DNA double strand breaks was estimated using a nucleotide-level map for clustered DNA lesions of the Monte Carlo damage simulation (MCDS) code. For a typical cell of 10 μm radius and 5 μm nuclear radius, tritium in the cell nucleus resulted in much higher RBE-weighted absorbed dose than tritium distributed uniformly. Conversely, tritium distributed on the cell surface led to trivial RBE-weighted absorbed dose due to irradiation geometry and great attenuation of beta particles in the cytoplasm. For tritium uniformly distributed in the cell, the RBE-weighted absorbed dose was larger compared to tritium uniformly distributed in the tissue. Cellular- and micro-dosimetry models were developed for the assessment of heterogeneously distributed tritium.

  2. Three dosimetry models of lipoma arborescens treated by {sup 90}Y synovectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O’Doherty, Jim, E-mail: jim.odoherty@kcl.ac.uk [Department of Medical Physics-Nuclear Medicine, Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guildford GU2 7XX, United Kingdom and Division of Imaging Sciences, PET Imaging Centre at St. Thomas’ Hospital, King' s College London, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom); Clauss, Ralf [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guildford GU2 7XX (United Kingdom); Scuffham, James [Department of Medical Physics-Nuclear Medicine, Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guildford GU2 7XX (United Kingdom); Khan, Aman [Department of Rheumatology, Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guildford GU2 7XX (United Kingdom); Petitguillaume, Alice; Desbrée, Aurélie [Service de Dosimétrie Interne, Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire, 92260 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: Lipoma arborescens (LA) is a benign intra-articular lipomatous proliferation of the synovial membrane. This extremely rare condition has previously been treated by intra-articular{sup 90}Y radiosynoviorthesis but dosimetry literature on this form of radionuclide therapy is nonexistent. The authors detail methodology for successful treatment of LA and provide for the first time estimates of radiation dosimetry. The authors also analyze the biodistribution of the radiopharmaceutical over the course of the patient's treatment through sequential imaging. Methods: A patient with bilateral LA underwent intracavity injection of{sup 90}Y citrate colloid to the right and left knee joint spaces (181 and 198 MBq, respectively). SPECT/CT datasets were acquired over 9 days to quantify the biodistribution and kinetics of the radiopharmaceutical. Radiation dosimetry was performed using the MIRD schema (through OLINDA software), a custom voxel-based method, and a direct Monte Carlo calculation (OEDIPE). Results: Follow-up MRI showed marked reduction in LA size in both knees. Mean absorbed doses to the LA were 21.2 ± 0.8 and 42.9 ± 2.3 Gy using OLINDA, 8.1 ± 0.3 and 16.7 ± 0.5 Gy using voxel based methodology, and 8.2 ± 0.3 and 15.7 ± 0.5 Gy for OEDIPE in the right and left LA, respectively. Distribution of the radiopharmaceutical within the joint space alters over the imaging period, with less than 1% of the remaining activity having moved posteriorly in the knee cavity. No uptake was detected outside of the joint space after assessment with whole-body scintigraphy. Conclusions: An activity of approximately 185 MBq successfully relieved clinical symptoms of LA. There was good correlation between direct Monte Carlo and voxel based techniques, but OLINDA was shown to overestimate the absorbed dose to the tumor. Accurate dosimetry may help select an activity more tailored to the specific size and location of the LA.

  3. TU-F-201-00: Radiochromic Film Dosimetry Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-06-15

    Since the introduction of radiochromic films (RCF) for radiation dosimetry, the scope of RCF dosimetry has expanded steadily to include many medical applications, such as radiation therapy and diagnostic radiology. The AAPM Task Group (TG) 55 published a report on the recommendations for RCF dosimetry in 1998. As the technology is advancing rapidly, and its routine clinical use is expanding, TG 235 has been formed to provide an update to TG-55 on radiochromic film dosimetry. RCF dosimetry applications in clinical radiotherapy have become even more widespread, expanding from primarily brachytherapy and radiosurgery applications, and gravitating towards (but not limited to) external beam therapy (photon, electron and protons), such as quality assurance for IMRT, VMAT, Tomotherapy, SRS/SRT, and SBRT. In addition, RCF applications now extend to measurements of radiation dose in particle beams and patients undergoing medical exams, especially fluoroscopically guided interventional procedures and CT. The densitometers/scanners used for RCF dosimetry have also evolved from the He-Ne laser scanner to CCD-based scanners, including roller-based scanner, light box-based digital camera, and flatbed color scanner. More recently, multichannel RCF dosimetry introduced a new paradigm for external beam dose QA for its high accuracy and efficiency. This course covers in detail the recent advancements in RCF dosimetry. Learning Objectives: Introduce the paradigm shift on multichannel film dosimetry Outline the procedures to achieve accurate dosimetry with a RCF dosimetry system Provide comprehensive guidelines on RCF dosimetry for various clinical applications One of the speakers has a research agreement from Ashland Inc., the manufacturer of Gafchromic film.

  4. Matched pairs dosimetry: {sup 124}I/{sup 131}I metaiodobenzylguanidine and {sup 124}I/{sup 131}I and {sup 86}Y/{sup 90}Y antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopci, Egesta; Fanti, Stefano [Policlinico S.Orsola-Malpighi and University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Chiti, Arturo; Pepe, Giovanna; Antunovic, Lidija [IRCCS Humanitas, Nuclear Medicine, Rozzano, MI (Italy); Castellani, Maria Rita; Bombardieri, Emilio [Istituto Nazionale per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori, Milan (Italy)

    2011-06-15

    The technological advances in imaging and production of radiopharmaceuticals are driving an innovative way of evaluating the targets for antineoplastic therapies. Besides the use of imaging to better delineate the volume of external beam radiation therapy in oncology, modern imaging techniques are able to identify targets for highly specific medical therapies, using chemotherapeutic drugs and antiangiogenesis molecules. Moreover, radionuclide imaging is able to select targets for radionuclide therapy and to give the way to in vivo dose calculation to target tissues and to critical organs. This contribution reports the main studies published on matched pairs dosimetry with {sup 124}I/{sup 131}I- and {sup 86}Y/{sup 90}Y-labelled radiopharmaceuticals, with an emphasis on metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) and monoclonal antibodies. (orig.)

  5. Nuclear Decay Data for the International Reactor Dosimetry Library for Fission and Fusion (IRDFF: Updated Evaluations of the Half-Lives and Gamma Ray Intensities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chechev Valery P.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Updated evaluations of the half-lives and prominent gamma ray intensities have been presented for 20 radionuclidesdosimetry reaction residuals. The new values of these decay characteristics recommended for the IRDFF library were obtained using the approaches and methodology adopted by the working group of the Decay Data Evaluation Project (DDEP cooperation. The experimental data published up to 2014 were taken into account in updated evaluations. The list of radionuclides includes 3H, 18F, 22Na, 24Na, 46Sc, 51Cr, 54Mn, 59Fe, 57Co, 60Co, 57Ni, 64Cu, 88Y, 132Te, 131I, 140Ba, 140La, 141Ce, 182Ta, 198Au.

  6. Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rathbone, Bruce A.

    2005-02-25

    The Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842 documents the design and implementation of the external dosimetry system used at Hanford. The manual describes the dosimeter design, processing protocols, dose calculation methodology, radiation fields encountered, dosimeter response characteristics, limitations of dosimeter design under field conditions, and makes recommendations for effective use of the dosimeters in the field. The manual describes the technical basis for the dosimetry system in a manner intended to help ensure defensibility of the dose of record at Hanford and to demonstrate compliance with 10 CFR 835, DOELAP, DOE-RL, ORP, PNSO, and Hanford contractor requirements. The dosimetry system is operated by PNNL’s Hanford External Dosimetry Program which provides dosimetry services to all Hanford contractors. The primary users of this manual are DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford using the dosimetry services of PNNL. Development and maintenance of this manual is funded directly by DOE and DOE contractors. Its contents have been reviewed and approved by DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford through the Hanford Personnel Dosimetry Advisory Committee which is chartered and chaired by DOE-RL and serves as means of coordinating dosimetry practices across contractors at Hanford. This manual was established in 1996. Since inception, it has been revised many times and maintained by PNNL as a controlled document with controlled distribution. Rev. 0 marks the first revision to be released through PNNL’s Electronic Records & Information Capture Architecture (ERICA) database.

  7. Performance demonstration of 4πβ(LS)-γ coincidence counting system for standardization of radionuclides with complex decay scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, D B; Anuradha, R; Joseph, Leena; Kulkarni, M S; Tomar, B S

    2016-02-01

    A standardization of (134)Cs and (131)I was carried out in order to demonstrate the performance and applicability of the 4πβ(LS)-γ coincidence counting system for standardization of radionuclides with complex decay scheme. The coincidence analyzer, capable of analyzing coincidence between beta and two gamma windows simultaneously, was developed and used for the standardization. The use of this dual coincidence analyzer has reduced the total experimental time by half. The activity concentrations obtained using the 4πβ(LS)-γ coincidence counting system, a 4πβ(PC)-γ coincidence counting system, and the CIEMAT/NIST method are in excellent agreement with each other within uncertainty limits and hence demonstrates its performance for standardization of radionuclides decaying with complex decay scheme. Hence use of this 4πβ(LS)-γ coincidence counting system can be an alternative method suitable to standardize radionuclides with complex decay scheme with acceptable precision.

  8. Absolute and relative dosimetry for ELIMED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Candiano, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Leonora, E.; Lo Presti, D.; Musumarra, A.; Pisciotta, P.; Raffaele, L.; Randazzo, N.; Romano, F.; Schillaci, F.; Scuderi, V.; Tramontana, A.; Cirio, R.; Marchetto, F.; Sacchi, R.; Giordanengo, S.; Monaco, V.

    2013-07-01

    The definition of detectors, methods and procedures for the absolute and relative dosimetry of laser-driven proton beams is a crucial step toward the clinical use of this new kind of beams. Hence, one of the ELIMED task, will be the definition of procedures aiming to obtain an absolute dose measure at the end of the transport beamline with an accuracy as close as possible to the one required for clinical applications (i.e. of the order of 5% or less). Relative dosimetry procedures must be established, as well: they are necessary in order to determine and verify the beam dose distributions and to monitor the beam fluence and the energetic spectra during irradiations. Radiochromic films, CR39, Faraday Cup, Secondary Emission Monitor (SEM) and transmission ionization chamber will be considered, designed and studied in order to perform a fully dosimetric characterization of the ELIMED proton beam.

  9. Trigeminal neuralgia treatment dosimetry of the Cyberknife

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Anthony [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Lo, Anthony T., E-mail: tonyho22003@yahoo.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Dieterich, Sonja; Soltys, Scott G.; Gibbs, Iris C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Chang, Steve G.; Adler, John R. [Department of Neurosurgery, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2012-04-01

    There are 2 Cyberknife units at Stanford University. The robot of 1 Cyberknife is positioned on the patient's right, whereas the second is on the patient's left. The present study examines whether there is any difference in dosimetry when we are treating patients with trigeminal neuralgia when the target is on the right side or the left side of the patient. In addition, we also study whether Monte Carlo dose calculation has any effect on the dosimetry. We concluded that the clinical and dosimetric outcomes of CyberKnife treatment for trigeminal neuralgia are independent of the robot position. Monte Carlo calculation algorithm may be useful in deriving the dose necessary for trigeminal neuralgia treatments.

  10. Absolute and relative dosimetry for ELIMED

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cirrone, G. A. P.; Schillaci, F.; Scuderi, V. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via Santa Sofia 62, Catania, Italy and Institute of Physics Czech Academy of Science, ELI-Beamlines project, Na Slovance 2, Prague (Czech Republic); Cuttone, G.; Candiano, G.; Musumarra, A.; Pisciotta, P.; Romano, F. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via Santa Sofia 62, Catania (Italy); Carpinelli, M. [INFN Sezione di Cagliari, c/o Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Cagliari, Cagliari (Italy); Leonora, E.; Randazzo, N. [INFN-Sezione di Catania, Via Santa Sofia 64, Catania (Italy); Presti, D. Lo [INFN-Sezione di Catania, Via Santa Sofia 64, Catania, Italy and Università di Catania, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Via S. Sofia 64, Catania (Italy); Raffaele, L. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via Santa Sofia 62, Catania, Italy and INFN-Sezione di Catania, Via Santa Sofia 64, Catania (Italy); Tramontana, A. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via Santa Sofia 62, Catania, Italy and Università di Catania, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Via S. Sofia 64, Catania (Italy); Cirio, R.; Sacchi, R.; Monaco, V. [INFN, Sezione di Torino, Via P.Giuria, 1 10125 Torino, Italy and Università di Torino, Dipartimento di Fisica, Via P.Giuria, 1 10125 Torino (Italy); Marchetto, F.; Giordanengo, S. [INFN, Sezione di Torino, Via P.Giuria, 1 10125 Torino (Italy)

    2013-07-26

    The definition of detectors, methods and procedures for the absolute and relative dosimetry of laser-driven proton beams is a crucial step toward the clinical use of this new kind of beams. Hence, one of the ELIMED task, will be the definition of procedures aiming to obtain an absolute dose measure at the end of the transport beamline with an accuracy as close as possible to the one required for clinical applications (i.e. of the order of 5% or less). Relative dosimetry procedures must be established, as well: they are necessary in order to determine and verify the beam dose distributions and to monitor the beam fluence and the energetic spectra during irradiations. Radiochromic films, CR39, Faraday Cup, Secondary Emission Monitor (SEM) and transmission ionization chamber will be considered, designed and studied in order to perform a fully dosimetric characterization of the ELIMED proton beam.

  11. Technical basis document for internal dosimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Hickman, D P

    1991-01-01

    This document provides the technical basis for the Chem-Nuclear Geotech (Geotech) internal dosimetry program. Geotech policy describes the intentions of the company in complying with radiation protection standards and the as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) program. It uses this policy and applicable protection standards to derive acceptable methods and levels of bioassay to assure compliance. The models and computational methods used are described in detail within this document. FR-om these models, dose- conversion factors and derived limits are computed. These computations are then verified using existing documentation and verification information or by demonstration of the calculations used to obtain the dose-conversion factors and derived limits. Recommendations for methods of optimizing the internal dosimetry program to provide effective monitoring and dose assessment for workers are provided in the last section of this document. This document is intended to be used in establishing an accredited dosi...

  12. Criticality accident dosimetry with ESR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D`Errico, F. [DCMN, Universita degli Studi di Pisa (Italy); Fattibene, P.; Onori, S.; Pantaloni, M. [Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Rome (Italy). Lab. di Fisica

    1997-01-01

    The suitability of the ESR alanine and sugar detectors for criticality accident dosimetry was experimentally investigated during an intercomparison of dosimetry techniques. Tests were performed irradiating detectors both free-in-air and on-phantom during controlled criticality excursions at the SILENE reactor in Valduc, France. Several grays of absorbed dose were imparted in neutron gamma-ray fields of various relative intensities and spectral distributions. Analysed results confirmed the potential of these systems which can immediately provide an acute dose assessment with an average underestimate of 30% in the various fields. This performance allows for the screening of severely exposed individuals and meets the IAEA recommendations on the early estimate of accident absorbed doses. (Author).

  13. Use of dual-head gamma camera in radionuclide internal contamination monitoring on radiation workers from a nuclear medicine department

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Laguna, A.; Brandan, M.E., E-mail: alejandro.rodriguez.laguna@gmail.com [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico D.F. (Mexico). Instituto de Fisica; Trujillo-Zamudio, F.E.; Estrada-Lobato, E. [Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2008-07-01

    As a part of an internal dosimetry program that is performed at the Mexican National Institute of Cancerology - Nuclear Medicine Department, in the present work we suggest a procedure for the routinely monitoring of internal contamination on radiation workers and nuclear medicine staff. The procedure is based on the identification and quantification of contaminating radionuclides in human body by using a dual-head whole-body gamma camera. The results have shown that the procedures described in this study can be used to implement a method to quantify minimal accumulated activity in the main human organs to evaluate internal contamination with radionuclides. The high sensitivity of the uncollimated gamma camera is advantageous for the routinely detection and identification of small activities of internal contamination. But, the null spatial resolution makes impossible the definition of contaminated region of interest. Then, the use of collimators is necessary to the quantification of incorporated radionuclides activities in the main human organs and for the internal doses assessment. (author)

  14. Thermocurrent dosimetry with high purity aluminum oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fullerton, G.D.; Cameron, J.R.; Moran, P.R.

    1976-01-01

    The application of thermocurrent (TC) to ionizing radiation dosimetry was studied. It was shown that TC in alumina (Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/) has properties that are suited to personnel dosimetry and environmental monitoring. TC dosimeters were made from thin disks of alumina. Aluminum electrodes were evaporated on each side: on one face a high voltage electrode and on the opposite face a measuring electrode encircled by a guard ring. Exposure to ionizing radiation resulted in stored electrons and holes in metastable trapping sites. The signal was read-out by heating the dosimeter with a voltage source and picnometer connected in series between the opposite electrodes. The thermally remobilized charge caused a transient TC. The thermogram, TC versus time or temperature, is similar to a TL glow curve. Either the peak current or the integrated current is a measure of absorbed dose. Six grades of alumina were studied from a total of four commercial suppliers. All six materials displayed radiation induced TC signals. Sapphire of uv-grade quality from the Adolf Meller Co. (AM) had the best dosimetry properties of those investigated. Sources of interference were studied. Thermal fading, residual signal and radiation damage do not limit TC dosimetry. Ultraviolet light can induce a TC response but it is readily excluded with uv-opaque cladding. Improper surface preparation prior to electrode evaporation was shown to cause interference. A spurious TC signal resulted from polarization of surface contaminants. Spurious TC was reduced by improved cleaning prior to electrode application. Polished surfaces resulted in blocking electrodes and caused a sensitivity shift due to radiation induced thermally activated polarization. This was not observed with rough cut surfaces.

  15. Report: dosimetry of diagnostic exams in nuclear medicine; Rapport: dosimetrie des explorations diagnostiques en medecine nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Touzery, C. [Centre Regional de Lutte Contre le Cancer de Bourgogne, Centre Georges-Francois Leclerc, 21 - Dijon (France); Aubert, B. [Institut Gustave Roussy, 94 - Villejuif (France); Caselles, O. [Centre Claudius-Regaud, 31 - Toulouse (France); Gardin, I. [Centre Henri Becquerel, 76 - Rouen (France); Guilhem, M.Th. [Centre Hospitalier Regional de la Source, 45 - Orleans (France); Laffont, S. [Centre Eugene-Marquis, 35 - Rennes (France); Lisbona, A. [Centre Regional de Lutte Contre le Cancer Rene-Gauducheau, 44 - Nantes (France)

    2002-07-01

    A compilation about dosimetry of diagnosis explorations in nuclear medicine is presented in this issue. Dosimetry tables of the different radiopharmaceuticals used in nuclear medicine give indications on absorbed and efficient doses according the patients age from one year to adult age. The doses received by a fetus during a lung scintigraphy realized for the pregnant woman susceptible to suffer of pulmonary emboli is presented. A table of efficient doses for the infants until the age of six months for the principal scintigraphy explorations realized in nuclear medicine are given. A chapter of theoretical headlines is devoted to dosimetry and the calculations methods of absorbed and efficient doses in function of patients age. A short chapter concerns the recommendations to explore nursing mothers by scintigraphy. A last chapter treats the efficient doses received during explorations using ionizing radiations in radiology and their place in annual natural irradiation scale. (N.C.)

  16. Reconstructive dosimetry for cutaneous radiation syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, C.M.A.; Lima, A.R.; Degenhardt, Ä.L.; Da Silva, F.C.A., E-mail: dasilva@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Valverde, N.J. [Fundacao Eletronuclear de Assistencia Medica, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-10-15

    According to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), a relatively significant number of radiological accidents have occurred in recent years mainly because of the practices referred to as potentially high-risk activities, such as radiotherapy, large irradiators and industrial radiography, especially in gammagraphy assays. In some instances, severe injuries have occurred in exposed persons due to high radiation doses. In industrial radiography, 80 cases involving a total of 120 radiation workers, 110 members of the public including 12 deaths have been recorded up to 2014. Radiological accidents in industrial practices in Brazil have mainly resulted in development of cutaneous radiation syndrome (CRS) in hands and fingers. Brazilian data include 5 serious cases related to industrial gammagraphy, affecting 7 radiation workers and 19 members of the public; however, none of them were fatal. Some methods of reconstructive dosimetry have been used to estimate the radiation dose to assist in prescribing medical treatment. The type and development of cutaneous manifestations in the exposed areas of a person is the first achievable gross dose estimation. This review article presents the state-of-the-art reconstructive dosimetry methods enabling estimation of local radiation doses and provides guidelines for medical handling of the exposed individuals. The review also presents the Chilean and Brazilian radiological accident cases to highlight the importance of reconstructive dosimetry. (author)

  17. Electron paramagnetic resonance dosimetry using synthetic hydroxyapatite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Kwon; Kim, Hwi Young; Ye, Sung Joon [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hirata, Hiroshi [Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Park, Jong Min [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    The victims exposed doses under 3.5-4.0 Gy have chance to survive if treated urgently. To determine the priority of treatment among a large number of victims, the triage – distinguishing patients who need an urgent treatment from who may not be urgent – is necessary based on radiation biodosimetry. A current gold standard for radiation biodosimetry is the chromosomal assay using human lymphocytes. But this method requires too much time and skilled labors to cover the mass victims in radiation emergencies. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) has been known for its capability of quantifying radicals in matters. EPR dosimetry is based on the measurement of stable radiation-induced radicals in tooth enamel. Hydroxyapatite (HAP) (Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2) contained in tooth enamel is a major probe for radiation dose reconstruction. This HAP dosimetry study was performed using a novel EPR spectrometer in Hokkaido University, Japan. The EPR dose-response curve was made using HAP samples. The blind test using 250 cGy samples showed the feasibility of EPR dosimetry for the triage purpose.

  18. Reconstructive dosimetry for cutaneous radiation syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, C M A; Lima, A R; Degenhardt, Ä L; Valverde, N J; Silva, F C A da

    2015-10-01

    According to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), a relatively significant number of radiological accidents have occurred in recent years mainly because of the practices referred to as potentially high-risk activities, such as radiotherapy, large irradiators and industrial radiography, especially in gammagraphy assays. In some instances, severe injuries have occurred in exposed persons due to high radiation doses. In industrial radiography, 80 cases involving a total of 120 radiation workers, 110 members of the public including 12 deaths have been recorded up to 2014. Radiological accidents in industrial practices in Brazil have mainly resulted in development of cutaneous radiation syndrome (CRS) in hands and fingers. Brazilian data include 5 serious cases related to industrial gammagraphy, affecting 7 radiation workers and 19 members of the public; however, none of them were fatal. Some methods of reconstructive dosimetry have been used to estimate the radiation dose to assist in prescribing medical treatment. The type and development of cutaneous manifestations in the exposed areas of a person is the first achievable gross dose estimation. This review article presents the state-of-the-art reconstructive dosimetry methods enabling estimation of local radiation doses and provides guidelines for medical handling of the exposed individuals. The review also presents the Chilean and Brazilian radiological accident cases to highlight the importance of reconstructive dosimetry.

  19. Reconstructive dosimetry for cutaneous radiation syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.M.A. Lima

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA, a relatively significant number of radiological accidents have occurred in recent years mainly because of the practices referred to as potentially high-risk activities, such as radiotherapy, large irradiators and industrial radiography, especially in gammagraphy assays. In some instances, severe injuries have occurred in exposed persons due to high radiation doses. In industrial radiography, 80 cases involving a total of 120 radiation workers, 110 members of the public including 12 deaths have been recorded up to 2014. Radiological accidents in industrial practices in Brazil have mainly resulted in development of cutaneous radiation syndrome (CRS in hands and fingers. Brazilian data include 5 serious cases related to industrial gammagraphy, affecting 7 radiation workers and 19 members of the public; however, none of them were fatal. Some methods of reconstructive dosimetry have been used to estimate the radiation dose to assist in prescribing medical treatment. The type and development of cutaneous manifestations in the exposed areas of a person is the first achievable gross dose estimation. This review article presents the state-of-the-art reconstructive dosimetry methods enabling estimation of local radiation doses and provides guidelines for medical handling of the exposed individuals. The review also presents the Chilean and Brazilian radiological accident cases to highlight the importance of reconstructive dosimetry.

  20. Software tool for portal dosimetry research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vial, P; Hunt, P; Greer, P B; Oliver, L; Baldock, C

    2008-09-01

    This paper describes a software tool developed for research into the use of an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) to verify dose for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) beams. A portal dose image prediction (PDIP) model that predicts the EPID response to IMRT beams has been implemented into a commercially available treatment planning system (TPS). The software tool described in this work was developed to modify the TPS PDIP model by incorporating correction factors into the predicted EPID image to account for the difference in EPID response to open beam radiation and multileaf collimator (MLC) transmitted radiation. The processes performed by the software tool include; i) read the MLC file and the PDIP from the TPS, ii) calculate the fraction of beam-on time that each point in the IMRT beam is shielded by MLC leaves, iii) interpolate correction factors from look-up tables, iv) create a corrected PDIP image from the product of the original PDIP and the correction factors and write the corrected image to file, v) display, analyse, and export various image datasets. The software tool was developed using the Microsoft Visual Studio.NET framework with the C# compiler. The operation of the software tool was validated. This software provided useful tools for EPID dosimetry research, and it is being utilised and further developed in ongoing EPID dosimetry and IMRT dosimetry projects.

  1. Diagnostic radiology dosimetry: status and trends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivera M, T., E-mail: trivera@ipn.mx [IPN, Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Av. Legaria 694, 11500 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: Medical radiation is by far the largest man-made source of public exposure to ionizing radiation. Since 1970 the expression of protection standards shifted from a dose- to a risk-based approach, with dose limits established to yield risks to radiation workers comparable with those for workers in other safe industries. Another hand, worldwide interest in patient dose measurement was stimulated by the publication of Patient Dose Reduction in Diagnostic Radiology by the UK National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB). In response to heightened awareness of the importance of patient dose contributed by radiology procedures, there has been a general trend to effect control of patient doses by applying the principles of optimization coupled with an increase in regulatory enforcement. In this sense, thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) has been actively proposed in the last 3 decades thanks to their successful applications in diagnostic radiology. At the same time, it is emerged as the best radiation dosimetry method. The present work presents advantages of thermoluminescent dosimetry for X-ray beams measurements and its optimization. (Author)

  2. Methodological aspects of EPR dosimetry with teeth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sholom, S.; Chumak, V. [Scientific Center for Radiation Medicine, Kiev (Ukraine)

    2001-07-01

    EPR dosimetry with tooth enamel is known today as one of the most reliable and accurate methods of retrospective dosimetry. In the present study a comprehensive analysis of influence of the major confounding factors (solar UV exposure and dental X-ray diagnostic procedures) on the accuracy of accidental dose reconstruction is given. In this analysis, the facts known from literature as well as own authors' results were considered. Among the latter it is worth to mention study of doses in enamel caused by X-ray diagnostic procedures as well as investigation of dose profiles in front teeth, which are most affected to solar radiation. As a main result, the variant of dosimetric technique is proposed. It comprises the optimal combination of strongest sides of existing techniques which allows to conduct routine reconstruction of accidental doses as low as few tens of mGy with errors of the same order of magnitude. The proposed technique is primarily destined for dosimetry of Chernobyl liquidators, but could be used for reconstruction of doses of other over-exposed categories. (orig.)

  3. Sensitivity studies associated with dosimetry experiment interpretation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourganel, S.; Soldevila, M. [CEA/DANS/DM2S/SERMA, CEA Saclay, 91191, Gif sur Yvette (France); Ferrer, A.; Gregoire, G.; Destouches, C.; Beretz, D. [CEA/DEN-CAD/DER/SPEX, CEA Cadarache, F13108, Saint Paul lez Durance (France)

    2011-07-01

    Document available in abstract form only, full text of document follows: Interpretation of reactor dosimetry experiments with C/E comparison requires precise knowledge of parameters involved in modeling. Some parameters have more weight than others on the calculated values. So, sensitivity studies should be conducted to verify the importance of these parameters. The conclusions of these studies are used to refine the experiment modeling, or to correct uncertainty calculations. The results of these sensitivity studies allow a post-irradiation analysis, which can justify the discarding of some atypical C/M values. Derived uncertainties may be improved by the sensitivity analyses. Beyond classical parameters as geometry or composition, this paper describes some specific sensitivity studies conducted for dosimetry irradiation in reactor, and presents conclusions. These studies are based on dosimeters irradiated in the EOLE reactor facility at Cadarache CEA center. Conclusions drawn from these studies are generic and can be applied to any dosimetry study. Calculations performed for these studies were realized using TRIPOLI-4 Monte Carlo code. (authors)

  4. Radionuclide Mobility at the Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Q; Smith, D; Rose, T; Glascoe, L; Steefel, C; Zavarin, M

    2003-11-13

    Underground nuclear tests conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) are characterized by abundant fission product and actinide source terms. Included are {sup 99}Tc and other soluble radionuclides ({sup 3}H, {sup 14}C, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 85}Kr, and {sup 129}I), which are presumably mobile in groundwater and potentially toxic to down-gradient receptors. NTS provides the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) with an analog of the release of these radionuclides from a nuclear waste repository in the absence of engineered barriers. The investigation described in this report synthesizes a substantial body of data collected on the identity and distribution of soluble radionuclides at field scales over distances of hundreds of meters, for durations up to 40 years, and under hydrogeologic conditions very similar to the proposed geological repository at Yucca Mountain. This body of data is complemented by laboratory transport studies and a synthesis of recent modeling investigations from the NTS, with an emphasis on the ongoing Yucca Mountain Program (YMP) efforts. Overall, understanding the controls of radionuclide mobility associated with these nuclear tests will provide insight into the repository's future performance as well as bounds and calibrations for the numerical predictions of long-term radionuclide releases and migration.

  5. Radionuclide Retention in Concrete Waste Forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Bovaird, Chase C.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Wood, Marcus I.

    2010-09-30

    Assessing long-term performance of Category 3 waste cement grouts for radionuclide encasement requires knowledge of the radionuclide-cement interactions and mechanisms of retention (i.e., sorption or precipitation); the mechanism of contaminant release; the significance of contaminant release pathways; how waste form performance is affected by the full range of environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the process of waste form aging under conditions that are representative of processes occurring in response to changing environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the effect of waste form aging on chemical, physical, and radiological properties; and the associated impact on contaminant release. This knowledge will enable accurate prediction of radionuclide fate when the waste forms come in contact with groundwater. The information presented in the report provides data that 1) quantify radionuclide retention within concrete waste form materials similar to those used to encapsulate waste in the Low-Level Waste Burial Grounds (LLBG); 2) measure the effect of concrete waste form properties likely to influence radionuclide migration; and 3) quantify the stability of uranium-bearing solid phases of limited solubility in concrete.

  6. Radionuclide Retention in Concrete Wasteforms - FY13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snyder, Michelle MV; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Lapierre, Robert; Dage, Denomy C.; Parker, Kent E.; Cordova, Elsa A.

    2013-10-15

    Assessing long-term performance of Category 3 waste cement grouts for radionuclide encasement requires knowledge of the radionuclide-cement interactions and mechanisms of retention (i.e., sorption or precipitation); the mechanism of contaminant release; the significance of contaminant release pathways; how wasteform performance is affected by the full range of environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the process of wasteform aging under conditions that are representative of processes occurring in response to changing environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the effect of wasteform aging on chemical, physical, and radiological properties; and the associated impact on contaminant release. This knowledge will enable accurate prediction of radionuclide fate when the wasteforms come in contact with groundwater. Data collected throughout the course of this work will be used to quantify the efficacy of concrete wasteforms, similar to those used in the disposal of low-level waste and mixed low-level waste, for the immobilization of key radionuclides (i.e., uranium, technetium, and iodine). Data collected will also be used to quantify the physical and chemical properties of the concrete affecting radionuclide retention.

  7. Distribution of radionuclides in bayer process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuccia, Valeria; Oliveira, Arno H. de [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Nuclear; Rocha, Zildete [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Servico de Quimica e Radioquimica], E-mail: rochaz@cdtn.br

    2007-07-01

    Natural occurring radionuclides are present in many natural resources. Human activities may enhance concentrations of radionuclides and/or enhance potential of exposure to naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). The industrial residues containing radionuclides have been receiving a considerable global attention, because of the large amounts of NORM containing wastes and the potential long term risks of long-lived radionuclides. Included in this global concern, this work focuses on the characterization of radioactivity in bauxite and samples of intermediate phases of Bayer process for alumina production, including the end product - alumina - and its main residue - red mud. The analytical techniques used were gamma spectrometry (HPGe detector) and Neutron Activation Analysis. It was found that the bauxite is the major contributor to radioactivity in Bayer process. It has activities of 37+-12 Bq.kg{sup -1} for {sup 238}U and 154+-16 Bq.kg{sup -1} for {sup 232}Th. The intermediate phases and the end product do not carry significant activity, desirable characteristic from the health physics point of view. Sand and red mud carry most part of radionuclides, and the concentrations are higher in the red mud than in the sand. Thus, these solid residues present activities concentrations enhanced, when compared to bauxite. (author)

  8. Accumulation of radionuclides by lichen symbionts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nifontova, M.G.; Kulikov, N.V. (AN SSSR, Sverdlovsk. Inst. Ehkologii Rastenij i Zhivotnykh)

    1983-01-01

    The aim of investigation is the quantitative estimation of ability and role of separate symbionts in the accumulation of radionuclides. As investigation volumes, durably cultivated green lichen alga Trebouxia erici and lichen fungi extracted from Cladonia rangiferina, Parmelia caperata and Acarospora fuscata are used. The accumulation of radioactive isotopes with fungi and seaweeds is estimated according to accumulation coefficients (AC) which are the ratio of radiation concentration in plants and agarized medium. Radionuclide content (/sup 90/Sr and /sup 137/Cs) is determined radiometrically. A special series of experiments is done to investigate radionuclide accumulation dependences with lichen seaweed and fungi on light conditions. It is shown that both symbionts of lichen-seaweed and fungus take part in the accumulation of radionuclide from outer medium (atmospheric fall-out and soil). However fungus component constituting the base of structural organization of thallus provides the greater part of radionuclides accumulated by the plant. Along with this the violation of viability of seaweed symbionts particularly in the case of light deficiency brings about the reduction of /sup 137/Cs sorption by seaweeds and tells on the total content of radiocesium in plant thallus.

  9. Patient dosimetry in classical radiology;Dosimetrie patient en radiologie classique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valero, M. [Autorite de Surete Nucleaire, 75 Paris (France); Sirinelli, D. [Tours Univ., 37 (France); Chateil, J.F. [CHU Bordeaux, 33 (France)

    2009-10-15

    The objective is to give to the participants the means to determine, by simple methods, the dose delivered to skin during a radiological examination (conventional or numerical). The message to remember is: the use of a numerical detector does not lead systematically to reduce the dose at the patient. The dose.length product is a risk indicator. It is important to compare our practices to the procedures written in the guide of procedures and to note and to send to I.R.S.N. the dosimetry data relative to the dosimetry reference levels. (N.C.)

  10. Dosimetry tools and techniques for IMRT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Daniel A; Moran, Jean M; Dempsey, James F; Dong, Lei; Oldham, Mark

    2011-03-01

    Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) poses a number of challenges for properly measuring commissioning data and quality assurance (QA) radiation dose distributions. This report provides a comprehensive overview of how dosimeters, phantoms, and dose distribution analysis techniques should be used to support the commissioning and quality assurance requirements of an IMRT program. The proper applications of each dosimeter are described along with the limitations of each system. Point detectors, arrays, film, and electronic portal imagers are discussed with respect to their proper use, along with potential applications of 3D dosimetry. Regardless of the IMRT technique utilized, some situations require the use of multiple detectors for the acquisition of accurate commissioning data. The overall goal of this task group report is to provide a document that aids the physicist in the proper selection and use of the dosimetry tools available for IMRT QA and to provide a resource for physicists that describes dosimetry measurement techniques for purposes of IMRT commissioning and measurement-based characterization or verification of IMRT treatment plans. This report is not intended to provide a comprehensive review of commissioning and QA procedures for IMRT. Instead, this report focuses on the aspects of metrology, particularly the practical aspects of measurements that are unique to IMRT. The metrology of IMRT concerns the application of measurement instruments and their suitability, calibration, and quality control of measurements. Each of the dosimetry measurement tools has limitations that need to be considered when incorporating them into a commissioning process or a comprehensive QA program. For example, routine quality assurance procedures require the use of robust field dosimetry systems. These often exhibit limitations with respect to spatial resolution or energy response and need to themselves be commissioned against more established dosimeters. A chain of

  11. Table of radionuclides (Vol.3 - {alpha} = 3 to 244); Table de radionucleides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Be, M.M.; Chiste, V.; Dulieu, Ch. [Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel - Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Browne, E.; Baglin, C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Chechev, V.; Kuzmenko [Khlopin Radium Institute (KRI) (Russian Federation); Helmer, R. [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kondev, F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); MacMahon, T.D. [National Physical Lab., Teddington (United Kingdom); Lee, K.B. [Korea Research Inst. of Standards and Science (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-07-01

    This monograph is one of several published in a series by the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) on behalf of the Comite Consultatif des Rayonnements Ionisants (CCRI), previously known as the Comite Consultatif pour les Etalons de Mesure des Rayonnements Ionisants (CCEMRI). The aim of this series of publications is to review topics that are of importance for the measurement of ionizing radiation and especially of radioactivity, in particular those techniques normally used by participants in international comparisons. It is hoped that these publications will prove to be useful reference volumes both for those who are already engaged in this field and for those who are approaching such measurements for the first time. The purpose of this monograph, number 5 in the series, is to present the recommended values of nuclear and decay data for a wide range of radionuclides. Activity measurements for more than forty of these radionuclides have already been the subject of comparisons under the auspices of Section II of the CCRI. The material for this monograph is now covered in three volumes. The first two volumes contain the primary recommended data relating to half-lives, decay modes, x-rays, gamma-rays, electron emissions; alpha- and beta-particle transitions and emissions, and their uncertainties for a set of sixty-eight radionuclides, Volume 1 for those radionuclides with mass number up to and including 150 and Volume 2 for those radionuclides with mass number over 150. Volume 3 contains the equivalent data for twenty-six additional radionuclides as listed and re-evaluation for {sup 125}Sb and {sup 153}Sm. The data have been collated and evaluated by an international working group (Decay Data Evaluation Project) led by the LNE-LNHB. The evaluators have agreed on the methodologies to be used and the CD-ROM included with this monograph contains the evaluators' comments for each radionuclide in addition to the data tables included in the monograph. The

  12. Dynamic and static small-animal SPECT in rats for monitoring renal function after 177Lu-labeled Tyr3-octreotate radionuclide therapy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melis, M.; Swart, J.; Visser, M. de; Berndsen, S.C.; Koelewijn, S.; Valkema, R.; Boerman, O.C.; Krenning, E.P.; Jong, M. de

    2010-01-01

    High kidney radiation doses during clinical peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) with beta-particle-emitting radiolabeled somatostatin analogs will lead to renal failure several months after treatment, urging the coinfusion of the cationic amino acids lysine and arginine to reduce the renal

  13. DEVELOPMENT HISTORY OF NATURAL SOURCES DOSIMETRY LABORATORY AT THE RESEARCH INSTITUTE OF RADIATION HYGIENE AFTER PROFESSOR P.V. RAMZAEV: 1970–1986

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. P. Lisachenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available At the initial development stage of the Leningrad Research Institute of Radiation Hygiene natural sources dosimetry laboratory the experts focused at establishment of equipment and methodology. The following period of the lab activity was rather related to theoretical and experimental research which finally led to creation of a new in radiation hygiene field of work on standard protection of population irradiation caused by natural sources of ionizing radiation. The article describes the main results of the laboratory research of construction materials natural radioactivity and the subsequent substantiation of specifications on natural radionuclides content in them. There was parallel research of natural radionuclides transfer in the system “fertilizers→soil→plants” and further along the nutrition chain into the human body. In these works there were first obtained the quantitative data on coefficients of natural radionuclides transfer from fertilizers into agricultural plants, data on the natural radionuclides content in phosphate fertilizers of the main manufacturers, and the reference data on the natural radioactivity of arable soils. This research provided substantiation of a standard of natural radionuclides content in phosphate fertilizers. Important results were also received in a large-scale research of natural environment radioactivity and of technological processes of production, processing and use of mineral raw materials. During this research for the first time there were obtained the tool data on irradiation levels and structure of doses of non-uranium industries enterprises’ employees and on natural radionuclides balance parameters in different technologies.For the last two years of the considered period the laboratory was practically not engaged in its primary activity – the efforts of all laboratory and the Institute experts were focused at analysis of Chernobyl NPP accident consequences, research of man

  14. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy of neuroendocrine tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brabander, Tessa; Teunissen, Jaap J M; Van Eijck, Casper H J; Franssen, Gaston J H; Feelders, Richard A; de Herder, Wouter W; Kwekkeboom, Dik J

    2016-01-01

    In the past decades, the number of neuroendocrine tumours that are detected is increasing. A relative new and promising therapy for patients with metastasised or inoperable disease is peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT). This therapy involves an infusion of somatostatin analogues linked to radionuclides like Yttrium-90 or Lutetium-177. Objective response rates are reported in 15-35%. Response rates may vary between type of tumour and radionuclide. Besides the objective response rate, overall survival and progression free survival increase significantly. Also, the quality of life improves as well. Serious side-affects are rare. PRRT is usually well tolerated, also in patients with extensive metastasised disease. Recent studies combined PRRT with other types of therapies. Unfortunately no randomised trials comparing these strategies are available. In the future, more research is needed to evaluate the best therapy combinations or sequence of therapies.

  15. Therapeutic radionuclides: Making the right choice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1996-08-01

    Recently, there has been a resurgence of interest in nuclear medicine therapeutic procedures. Using unsealed sources for therapy is not a new concept; it has been around since the beginnings of nuclear medicine. Treatment of thyroid disorders with radioiodine is a classic example. The availability of radionuclides with suitable therapeutic properties for specific applications, as well as methods for their selective targeting to diseased tissue have, however, remained the main obstacles for therapy to assume a more widespread role in nuclear medicine. Nonetheless, a number of new techniques that have recently emerged, (e.g., tumor therapy with radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies, treatment of metastatic bone pain, etc.) appear to have provided a substantial impetus to research on production of new therapeutic radionuclides. Although there are a number of new therapeutic approaches requiring specific radionuclides, only selected broad areas will be used as examples in this article.

  16. 2014 LANL Radionuclide Air Emissions Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuehne, David Patrick [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-07-21

    This report describes the emissions of airborne radionuclides from operations at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for calendar year 2014, and the resulting off-site dose from these emissions. This document fulfills the requirements established by the National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants in 40 CFR 61, Subpart H – Emissions of Radionuclides other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities, commonly referred to as the Radionuclide NESHAP or Rad-NESHAP. Compliance with this regulation and preparation of this document is the responsibility of LANL’s RadNESHAP compliance program, which is part of the Environmental Protection Division. The information in this report is required under the Clean Air Act and is being submitted to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 6.

  17. Determination of differential dose rates in a mixed beta and gamma field using shielded Al2O3:C : Results of Monte Carlo modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aznar, M.C.; Nathan, R.; Murray, A.S.

    2003-01-01

    Mixed beta and gamma heterogeneous radiation fields are found in many circumstances, ranging from retrospective dosimetry to medical therapy treatments. It can be very important to provide a direct measurement of the contribution to dose rate from beta particles and gamma rays separately, especia...

  18. External accumulation of radionuclide in hepatic hydrothorax

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albin, R.J.; Johnston, G.S.

    1989-05-01

    Hepatic hydrothorax is a complication in approximately 5% of patients with cirrhosis. Ascites is almost always present and helps to suggest the correct diagnosis. However, when ascites is absent, radionuclide imaging has proven to be helpful in establishing that the pleural effusion originated from ascitic fluid. When pleural fluid is rapidly removed, such as by thoracostomy tube drainage, the radioisotope may accumulate outside the thorax and produce a negative scan of the chest. When the radionuclide scan is nondiagnostic and the pleural space is being rapidly drained, the pleural fluid collecting system should always be imaged before rejecting a diagnosis of hepatic hydrothorax.

  19. Dosimetry intercomparisons in European medical device sterilization plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, A.; Sharpe, P.H.G.

    2000-01-01

    Dosimetry intercomparisons have been carried out involving two-thirds of all European radiation sterilization facilities. Dosimeters for the intercomparisons were supplied by two accredited calibration laboratories. The results show good agreement, and indicate overall dosimetry accuracy of the o...... of the order of +/-5% (1 sigma) for both Co-60 and electron beam plants. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  20. [Instrumental radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation dosimetry: general principals and modern methodology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perov, S Iu; Kudriashov, Iu B; Rubtsova, N B

    2012-01-01

    The modern experimental radiofrequency electromagnetic field dosimetry approach has been considered. The main principles of specific absorbed rate measurement are analyzed for electromagnetic field biological effect assessment. The general methodology of specific absorbed rate automated dosimetry system applied to establish the compliance of radiation sources with the safety standard requirements (maximum permissible levels and base restrictions) is described.

  1. Neutron dosimetry and radiation damage calculations for HFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenwood, L.R.; Ratner, R.T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., TN (United States)

    1998-03-01

    Neutron dosimetry measurements have been conducted for various positions of the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in order to measure the neutron flux and energy spectra. Neutron dosimetry results and radiation damage calculations are presented for positions V10, V14, and V15.

  2. Use of the GATE Monte Carlo package for dosimetry applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visvikis, D. [INSERM U650, LaTIM, University Hospital Medical School, F 29609 Brest (France)]. E-mail: Visvikis.Dimitris@univ-brest.fr; Bardies, M. [INSERM U601, CHU Nantes, F 44093 Nantes (France); Chiavassa, S. [INSERM U601, CHU Nantes, F 44093 Nantes (France); Danford, C. [Department of Medical Physics, MSKCC, New York (United States); Kirov, A. [Department of Medical Physics, MSKCC, New York (United States); Lamare, F. [INSERM U650, LaTIM, University Hospital Medical School, F 29609 Brest (France); Maigne, L. [Departement de Curietherapie-Radiotherapie, Centre Jean Perrin, F 63000 Clemont-Ferrand (France); Staelens, S. [UGent-ELIS, St-Pietersnieuwstraat, 41, B 9000 Gent (Belgium); Taschereau, R. [CRUMP Institute for Molecular Imaging, UCLA, Los Angeles (United States)

    2006-12-20

    One of the roles for Monte Carlo (MC) simulation studies is in the area of dosimetry. A number of different codes dedicated to dosimetry applications are available and widely used today, such as MCNP, EGSnrc and PTRAN. However, such codes do not easily facilitate the description of complicated 3D sources or emission tomography systems and associated data flow, which may be useful in different dosimetry application domains. Such problems can be overcome by the use of specific MC codes such as GATE (GEANT4 Application to Tomographic Emission), which is based on Geant4 libraries, providing a scripting interface with a number of advantages for the simulation of SPECT and PET systems. Despite this potential, its major disadvantage is in terms of efficiency involving long execution times for applications such as dosimetry. The strong points and disadvantages of GATE in comparison to other dosimetry specific codes are discussed and illustrated in terms of accuracy, efficiency and flexibility. A number of features, such as the use of voxelised and moving sources, as well as developments such as advanced visualization tools and the development of dose estimation maps allowing GATE to be used for dosimetry applications are presented. In addition, different examples from dosimetry applications with GATE are given. Finally, future directions with respect to the use of GATE for dosimetry applications are outlined.

  3. Radionuclide Therapies in Molecular Imaging and Precision Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendi, A Tuba; Moncayo, Valeria M; Nye, Jonathon A; Galt, James R; Halkar, Raghuveer; Schuster, David M

    2017-01-01

    This article reviews recent advances and applications of radionuclide therapy. Individualized precision medicine, new treatments, and the evolving role of radionuclide therapy are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Film dosimetry calibration method for pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy with an 192Ir source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwob, Nathan; Orion, Itzhak

    2007-05-01

    192Ir sources have been widely used in clinical brachytherapy. An important challenge is to perform dosimetric measurements close to the source despite the steep dose gradient. The common, inexpensive silver halide film is a classic two-dimensional integrator dosimeter and would be an attractive solution for these dose measurements. The main disadvantage of film dosimetry is the film response to the low-energy photon. Since the photon energy spectrum is known to vary with depth, the sensitometric curves are expected to be dependent on depth. The purpose of this study is to suggest a correction method for silver halide film dosimetry that overcomes the response changes at different depths. Sensitometric curves have been obtained at different depths with verification film near a 1 Ci 192Ir pulsed-dose-rate source. The depth dependence of the film response was observed and a correction function was established. The suitability of the method was tested through measurement of the radial dose profile and radial dose function. The results were compared to Monte Carlo-simulated values according to the TG43 formalism. Monte Carlo simulations were performed separately for the beta and gamma source emissions, using the EGS4 code system, including the low-energy photon and electron transport optimization procedures. The beta source emission simulation showed that the beta dose contribution could be neglected and therefore the film-depth dependence could not be attributed to this part of the source radioactivity. The gamma source emission simulations included photon-spectra collection at several depths. The results showed a depth-dependent softening of the photon spectrum that can explain the film-energy dependence.

  5. Migration of radionuclides in geologic media: Fundamental research needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, D.T. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Zachara, J.M.; Wildung, R.E. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Wobber, F.J. (USDOE, Washington, DC (USA))

    1990-01-01

    An assessment of the fundamental research needs in understanding and predicting the migration of radionuclides in the subsurface is provided. Emphasis is on the following three technical areas: (1) aqueous speciation of radionuclides, (2) the interaction of radionuclides with substrates, and (3) intermediate-scale interaction studies. This research relates to important issues associated with environmental restoration and remediation of DOE sites contaminated with mixed radionuclide-organic wastes. 64 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  6. Radiopharmaceuticals and other compounds labelled with short-lived radionuclides

    CERN Document Server

    Welch, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals and Other Compounds Labelled with Short-Lived Radionuclides covers through both review and contributed articles the potential applications and developments in labeling with short-lived radionuclides whose use is restricted to institutions with accelerators. The book discusses the current and potential use of generator-produced radionuclides as well as other short-lived radionuclides, and the problems of quality control of such labeled compounds. The book is useful to nuclear medicine physicians.

  7. Sandia National Laboratories Internal Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual (Rev 4)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goke, Sarah Hayes [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Elliott, Nathan Ryan [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-09-01

    The Sandia National Laboratories’ Internal Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual is intended to provide extended technical discussion and justification of the internal dosimetry program at SNL. It serves to record the approach to evaluating internal doses from radiobioassay data, and where appropriate, from workplace monitoring data per the Department of Energy Internal Dosimetry Program Guide DOE G 441.1C. The discussion contained herein is directed primarily to current and future SNL internal dosimetrists. In an effort to conserve space in the TBM and avoid duplication, it contains numerous references providing an entry point into the internal dosimetry literature relevant to this program. The TBM is not intended to act as a policy or procedure statement, but will supplement the information normally found in procedures or policy documents. The internal dosimetry program outlined in this manual is intended to meet the requirements of Federal Rule 10CFR835 for monitoring the workplace and for assessing internal radiation doses to workers.

  8. 21 CFR 892.5650 - Manual radionuclide applicator system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manual radionuclide applicator system. 892.5650... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5650 Manual radionuclide applicator system. (a) Identification. A manual radionuclide applicator system is a manually operated...

  9. Plant uptake of radionuclides and rhizosphere factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arie, Tsutomu; Gouthu, S.; Ambe, Shizuko; Yamaguchi, Isamu [Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, Wako, Saitama (Japan); Hirata, Hiroaki

    1999-03-01

    Influence of soil factors such as nuclide availability, pH, organic carbon, cation exchange capacity (CEC), exchangeable cations (Ca{sup 2+}, Mg{sup 2+}, and K{sup +}), phosphate absorption coefficient (PAC), physical composition of soil (coarse sand, fine sand, silt, and clay), soil texture, and rhizosphere microbes on uptake of radionuclides by plants are studied. (author)

  10. Radionuclide tumor therapy with ultrasound contrast microbubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wamel, van Annemieke; Bouakaz, Ayache; Bernard, Bert; Cate, ten Folkert; Jong, de Nico

    2004-01-01

    Radionuclides have shown to be effective in tumour therapy. However, the side effects determine the maximum deliverable dose. Recently, it has been demonstrated that cells can be permeabilised through sonoporation using ultrasound and contrast microbubbles. The use of sonoporation in treatment of tu

  11. Chapter 7: Primary standardization in radionuclide metrology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delgado, Jose Ubiratan

    2014-07-01

    The chapter 7 presents: Primary methods for radionuclide standardization; 4πβ-γ Coincidence counting method; Anticoincidence; Counting π Method; Defined Solid Angle Counting Method; Liquid scintillator counting method (CIEMAT/NIST); Sum-peak Method and LNMRI Absolute Standardization.

  12. Radionuclide Geomicrobiology of the Deep Biosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderson, Craig; Johnsson, Anna; Moll, Henry

    2011-01-01

    species (i.e., Shewanella putrefaciens and Desulfovibrio aespoeensis) with Cm, Pm, and Pu were investigated in vitro and the results were found to agree with literature data. Siderophores are capable of binding actinides strongly and need to be considered in terms of radionuclide mobility...

  13. RADIONUCLIDE TRANSPORT MODELS UNDER AMBIENT CONDITIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Magnuson

    2004-11-01

    The purpose of this model report is to document the unsaturated zone (UZ) radionuclide transport model, which evaluates, by means of three-dimensional numerical models, the transport of radioactive solutes and colloids in the UZ, under ambient conditions, from the repository horizon to the water table at Yucca Mountain, Nevada.

  14. Radionuclide imaging of bone marrow disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agool, Ali; Glaudemans, Andor W. J. M.; Boersma, Hendrikus H.; Dierckx, Rudi A. J. O.; Vellenga, Edo; Slart, Riemer H. J. A.

    2011-01-01

    Noninvasive imaging techniques have been used in the past for visualization the functional activity of the bone marrow compartment. Imaging with radiolabelled compounds may allow different bone marrow disorders to be distinguished. These imaging techniques, almost all of which use radionuclide-label

  15. Neutron dosimetry for low dose rate Cf-252 AT sources and adherence to recent clinical dosimetry protocol for brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivard, M.J.; Wierzbicki, J.G.; Van den Heuvel, F. [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Martin, R.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Chemical Technology Div.

    1997-12-01

    In 1995, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group 43 (AAPM TG-43) published a protocol obsoleting all mixed-field radiation dosimetry for Cf-252. Recommendations for a new brachytherapy dosimetry formalism made by this Task Group favor quantification of source strength in terms of air kerma rather than apparent Curies or other radiation units. Additionally, representation of this dosimetry data in terms of radial dose functions, anisotropy functions, geometric factors, and dose rate constants are in an angular and radial (spherical) coordinate system as recommended, rather than the along-away dosimetry data (Cartesian coordinate system) currently available. This paper presents the initial results of calculated neutron dosimetry in a water phantom for a Cf-252 applicator tube (AT) type medical source soon available from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL).

  16. Dosimetry applications in GATE Monte Carlo toolkit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadimitroulas, Panagiotis

    2017-02-21

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are a well-established method for studying physical processes in medical physics. The purpose of this review is to present GATE dosimetry applications on diagnostic and therapeutic simulated protocols. There is a significant need for accurate quantification of the absorbed dose in several specific applications such as preclinical and pediatric studies. GATE is an open-source MC toolkit for simulating imaging, radiotherapy (RT) and dosimetry applications in a user-friendly environment, which is well validated and widely accepted by the scientific community. In RT applications, during treatment planning, it is essential to accurately assess the deposited energy and the absorbed dose per tissue/organ of interest, as well as the local statistical uncertainty. Several types of realistic dosimetric applications are described including: molecular imaging, radio-immunotherapy, radiotherapy and brachytherapy. GATE has been efficiently used in several applications, such as Dose Point Kernels, S-values, Brachytherapy parameters, and has been compared against various MC codes which are considered as standard tools for decades. Furthermore, the presented studies show reliable modeling of particle beams when comparing experimental with simulated data. Examples of different dosimetric protocols are reported for individualized dosimetry and simulations combining imaging and therapy dose monitoring, with the use of modern computational phantoms. Personalization of medical protocols can be achieved by combining GATE MC simulations with anthropomorphic computational models and clinical anatomical data. This is a review study, covering several dosimetric applications of GATE, and the different tools used for modeling realistic clinical acquisitions with accurate dose assessment. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Retrospective accident dosimetry using trapped charges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. I.; Kim, J. L.; Chang, I.; Kim, B. H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Dicentric chromosome aberrations technique scoring of aberrations in metaphases prepared from human lymphocytes is most commonly used. This is considered as a reliable technique because the sample is extracted from the individual human body itself. There are other techniques in biological dosimetry such as Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH) using translocations, premature chromosome condensation (PCC) and micronucleus assay. However the minimum detectable doses (MDD) are relatively high and sample preparation time is also relatively longer. Therefore, there is limitation in use of these techniques for the purpose of triage in a short time in case of emergency situation relating large number of persons. Electronic paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technique is based on the signal from unpaired electrons such as free radicals in irradiated materials especially tooth enamel, however it has also limitation for the purpose of triage because of difficulty of sample taking and its high MDD. Recently as physical methods, thermoluminescence (TL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) technique have been attracted due to its lower MDD and simplicity of sample preparation. Density of the trapped charges is generally proportional to the radiation dose absorbed and the intensity of emitting light is also proportional to the density of trapped charges, thus it can be applied to measure radiation dose retrospectively. In this presentation, TL and OSL techniques are going to introduced and discussed as physical methods for retrospective accident dosimetry using trapped charges especially in electronic component materials. As a tool for dose reconstruction for emergency situation, thermoluminescece and optically stimulated luminescence techniques which are based on trapped charges during exposure of material are introduced. These techniques have several advantages such as high sensitivity, fast evaluation and ease to sample collection over common biological dosimetry and EPR

  18. In vivo light dosimetry for pleural PDT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimofte, Andreea; Zhu, Timothy C.; Finlay, Jarod C.; Culligan, Melissa; Edmonds, Christine E.; Friedberg, Joseph S.; Cengel, Keith; Hahn, Stephen M.

    2009-02-01

    In-vivo light Dosimetry for patients undergoing photodynamic therapy (PDT) is one of the important dosimetry quantities critical for predicting PDT outcome. This study examines the light fluence (rate) delivered to patients undergoing pleural PDT as a function of treatment time, treatment volume and surface area, and its accuracy as a function of the calibration accuracies of each isotropic detector and the calibration integrating sphere. The patients studied here were enrolled in Phase II clinical trial of Photofrin-mediated PDT for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer with pleural effusion. The ages of the patients studied varied from 34 to 69 year old. All patients were administered 2mg per kg body weight Photoprin 24 hours before the surgery. Patients undergoing photodynamic therapy (PDT) are treated with laser light with a light fluence of 60 J/cm^2 at 630nm. Fluence rate (mW/cm^2) and cumulative fluence (J/cm^2) was monitored at 7 different sites during the entire light treatment delivery. Isotropic detectors were used for in-vivo light dosimetry. The anisotropy of each isotropic detector was found to be within 30%. The mean fluence rate delivery varied from 37.84 to 94.05 mW/cm^2 and treatment time varied from 1762 to 5232s. We have established a correlation between the treatment time and the treatment volume. The results are discussed using an integrating sphere theory and the measured tissue optical properties. The result can be used as a clinical guideline for future pleural PDT treatment.

  19. Sediment and radionuclide transport in rivers: radionuclide transport modeling for Cattaraugus and Buttermilk Creeks, New York

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onishi, Y.; Yabusaki, S.B.; Kincaid, C.T.; Skaggs, R.L.; Walters, W.H.

    1982-12-01

    SERATRA, a transient, two-dimensional (laterally-averaged) computer model of sediment-contaminant transport in rivers, satisfactorily resolved the distribution of sediment and radionuclide concentrations in the Cattaraugus Creek stream system in New York. By modeling the physical processes of advection, diffusion, erosion, deposition, and bed armoring, SERATRA routed three sediment size fractions, including cohesive soils, to simulate three dynamic flow events. In conjunction with the sediment transport, SERATRA computed radionuclide levels in dissolved, suspended sediment, and bed sediment forms for four radionuclides (/sup 137/Cs, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu, and /sup 3/H). By accounting for time-dependent sediment-radionuclide interaction in the water column and bed, SERATA is a physically explicit model of radionuclide fate and migration. Sediment and radionuclide concentrations calculated by SERATA in the Cattaraugus Creek stream system are in reasonable agreement with measured values. SERATRA is in the field performance phase of an extensive testing program designed to establish the utility of the model as a site assessment tool. The model handles not only radionuclides but other contaminants such as pesticides, heavy metals and other toxic chemicals. Now that the model has been applied to four field sites, including the latest study of the Cattaraugus Creek stream system, it is recommended that a final model be validated through comparison of predicted results with field data from a carefully controlled tracer test at a field site. It is also recommended that a detailed laboratory flume be tested to study cohesive sediment transport, deposition, and erosion characteristics. The lack of current understanding of these characteristics is one of the weakest areas hindering the accurate assessment of the migration of radionuclides sorbed by fine sediments of silt and clay.

  20. Monte Carlo dosimetry in simple geometries with interfaces: applications in radiotherapy; Dosimetria Monte Carlo en geometrias simples con interfases: aplicaciones en radioterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rojas C, E.L

    2004-07-01

    In the last decade, dosimetry has evolved in an accelerated way due in part, to the development of new techniques and advances in instruments manufactured for several applications in Medical Physics. In order to improve achievements gotten with the use of radiation sources for therapeutic use, a guessed right dosimetry must be done and clinical data must be explained with the aid of investigation and supported with scientific bases. In this context, Monte Carlo (MC) method used to simulate radiation transport in materials, contribute with extensive knowledge and extremely useful information to that objective. MC dosimetry has some advantages over experimental and analytical dosimetry but it also has limitations. Maybe the most important is the computer time required to reach to an acceptable uncertainty level in a complex problem. Though this restrictive factor, a right application of MC simulation of radiation transport is a useful, reliable and versatile instrument for dosimetric calculations. From our point of view, the problem of heterogeneities in the sources or in the treatment targets in radiotherapy is of great importance, and this is the principal question to study aboard in this work. We use the MC simulation code Penelope to calculate some dosimetric quantities.The cases we study involve dosimetric aspects of different geometric distributions of radionuclides where interfaces are evident and must be taken into account. This work is divided in five chapters. In the first chapter we give a succinctly description of MC codes for simulation of the transport of particles in a medium and we describe the code Penelope. In chapter two, we study spherical distributions of radionuclides and the effect that interfaces in the target have in the dose received by the tumor. Specifically we study the application of radiocolloids with {sup 186} Re and {sup 32} P to treat homogeneous and nonhomogeneous cystic craniopharyngioma. Chapter three is dedicated to study plane

  1. Scientific Analysis Cover Sheet for Radionuclide Screening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Ragan

    2002-08-09

    The waste forms under consideration for disposal in the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain contain scores of radionuclides (Attachments V and VI). It would be impractical and highly inefficient to model all of these radionuclides in a total system performance assessment (TSPA). Thus, the purpose of this radionuclide screening analysis is to remove from further consideration (screen out) radionuclides that are unlikely to significantly contribute to radiation dose to the public from the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. The remaining nuclides (those screened in) are recommended for consideration in TSPA modeling for license application. This analysis also covers radionuclides that are not screened in based on dose, but need to be included in TSPA modeling for other reasons. For example, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations require consideration of the combined activity of Ra-226 and Ra-228 in groundwater (40 CFR 197.30, 10 CFR 63.331). Also, Cm-245, Pu-241, and U-235 decay indirectly to potentially important radionuclides, and are not identified by the screening analysis as important. The radionuclide screening analysis separately considers two different postclosure time periods: the 10,000-y regulatory period for the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain and the period after 10,000 y up to 1 million y after emplacement. The incremental effect of extending the screening for the regulatory period to 20,000 y is also addressed. Four release scenarios are considered: (1) the nominal scenario, which entails long-term degradation of disposal containers and waste forms, (2) a human-intrusion scenario, (3) an intrusive igneous event, and (4) an eruptive igneous event. Because the first three scenarios require groundwater transport, they are called groundwater scenarios below. The screening analysis considers the following waste forms: spent boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel, spent

  2. Experimental dosimetry of a {sup 32}P catheter-based endovascular brachytherapy source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piermattei, A [Istituto di Fisica, Universita Cattolica S Cuore, Rome (Italy); Fidanzio, A [Istituto di Fisica, Universita Cattolica S Cuore, Rome (Italy); Perrone, F [Azienda Ospedaliera Pisana, UO Fisica Sanitaria, Pisa (Italy); Azario, L [Istituto di Fisica, Universita Cattolica S Cuore, Rome (Italy); Grimaldi, L [Istituto di Fisica, Universita Cattolica S Cuore, Rome (Italy); Viola, P [Istituto di Fisica, Universita Cattolica S Cuore, Rome (Italy); Capote, R [Dpto Fisiologia Medica y Biofisica, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Sevilla, Avda Sanchez Pizjuan 4, E41009 Sevilla (Spain)

    2003-08-07

    The experimental dosimetry in a water phantom of a {sup 32}P linear source, 20 mm in length, used for the brachytherapy of coronary vessels is reported. The source content activity, A, was determined by means of a calibrated well ion-chamber and the value was compared with the contained activity reported in the manufacturer's certification. In this field of brachytherapy dosimetry, radiochromic film supplies a high enough spatial resolution. A highly sensitive radiochromic film, that presents only one active layer, was used in this work for the source dosimetry in a water phantom. The radiochromic film was characterized by electron beams produced by a clinical linac. A Monte Carlo calculation of beta spectra in water at different distances along the source transverse bisector axis allowed to take into account the low dependence of film response from the electron beam energy. The adopted experimental set-up, with the source in its catheter positioned on the film plane inside the water phantom, supplies accurate dosimetric information. The measured dose rate to water per unit of source activity at reference distance, D-dot (r{sub 0}, {theta}{sub 0})/A, in units of cGy s{sup -1} GBq{sup -1}, was in agreement with the value reported in the manufacturer's certification within the experimental uncertainty. The radial dose function, g(r), is in good agreement with the literature data. The anisotropy function F(r, {theta}) is also reported. The analysis of the dose profile obtained at 2 mm from the source longitudinal axis shows that the uniformity is within 10% along 75% of the 20 mm treatment length. The adopted experimental set-up seems to be adequate for the quality control procedure of the dose homogeneity distribution in the water medium.

  3. Neutron spectrometry and dosimetry with ANNs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega C, H. R.; Hernandez D, V. M. [Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Cipres 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico); Gallego, E.; Lorente, A. [Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, 28006 Madrid (Spain)], e-mail: fermineutron@yahoo.com

    2009-10-15

    Artificial neural networks technology has been applied to unfold the neutron spectra and to calculate the effective dose, the ambient equivalent dose, and the personal dose equivalent for {sup 252}Cf and {sup 241}AmBe neutron sources. A Bonner sphere spectrometry with a {sup 6}LiI(Eu) scintillator was utilized to measure the count rates of the spheres that were utilized as input in two artificial neural networks, one for spectrometry and another for dosimetry. Spectra and the ambient dose equivalent were also obtained with BUNKIUT code and the UTA4 response matrix. With both procedures spectra and ambient dose equivalent agrees in less than 10%. (author)

  4. Secondary standard dosimetry laboratory at INFLPR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scarlat, F.; Minea, R.; Scarisoreanu, A.; Badita, E.; Sima, E.; Dumitrascu, M.; Stancu, E.; Vancea, C., E-mail: scarlat.f@gmail.com [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics - INFLPR, Bucharest (Romania)

    2011-07-01

    National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics (INFLPR) has constructed a High Energy Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory SSDL-STARDOOR - for performing dosimetric calibrations according to ISO IEC SR/EN 17025:2005 standards. This is outfitted with UNIDOS Secondary Standard Dosimeter from PTW (Freiburg Physikalisch-Technische Werksttaten) calibrated at the PTB-Braunschweig (German Federal Institute of Physics and Metrology). A radiation beam of the quality of Q used by our laboratory as calibration source are provided by INFLPR 7 MeV electron beam linear accelerator mounted in our facility. (author)

  5. Proton minibeam radiation therapy: Experimental dosimetry evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peucelle, C.; Martínez-Rovira, I.; Prezado, Y., E-mail: prezado@imnc.in2p3.fr [IMNC-UMR 8165, CNRS, Paris 7 and Paris 11 Universities, 15 rue Georges Clemenceau, Orsay Cedex 91406 (France); Nauraye, C.; Patriarca, A.; Hierso, E.; Fournier-Bidoz, N. [Institut Curie - Centre de Protonthérapie d’Orsay, Campus Universitaire, Bât. 101, Orsay 91898 (France)

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: Proton minibeam radiation therapy (pMBRT) is a new radiotherapy (RT) approach that allies the inherent physical advantages of protons with the normal tissue preservation observed when irradiated with submillimetric spatially fractionated beams. This dosimetry work aims at demonstrating the feasibility of the technical implementation of pMBRT. This has been performed at the Institut Curie - Proton Therapy Center in Orsay. Methods: Proton minibeams (400 and 700 μm-width) were generated by means of a brass multislit collimator. Center-to-center distances between consecutive beams of 3200 and 3500 μm, respectively, were employed. The (passive scattered) beam energy was 100 MeV corresponding to a range of 7.7 cm water equivalent. Absolute dosimetry was performed with a thimble ionization chamber (IBA CC13) in a water tank. Relative dosimetry was carried out irradiating radiochromic films interspersed in a IBA RW3 slab phantom. Depth dose curves and lateral profiles at different depths were evaluated. Peak-to-valley dose ratios (PVDR), beam widths, and output factors were also assessed as a function of depth. Results: A pattern of peaks and valleys was maintained in the transverse direction with PVDR values decreasing as a function of depth until 6.7 cm. From that depth, the transverse dose profiles became homogeneous due to multiple Coulomb scattering. Peak-to-valley dose ratio values extended from 8.2 ± 0.5 at the phantom surface to 1.08 ± 0.06 at the Bragg peak. This was the first time that dosimetry in such small proton field sizes was performed. Despite the challenge, a complete set of dosimetric data needed to guide the first biological experiments was achieved. Conclusions: pMBRT is a novel strategy in order to reduce the side effects of RT. This works provides the experimental proof of concept of this new RT method: clinical proton beams might allow depositing a (high) uniform dose in a brain tumor located in the center of the brain (7.5 cm depth

  6. Characterization of brazilian wollastonite for radiation dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, D.N. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, Sao Cristovao/SE (Brazil); Melo, A.P.; Gazano, V.S.O.; Caldas, L.V.E. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Sao Paulo (Brazil)]. e-mail: dnsouza@fisca.ufs.br

    2006-07-01

    In these work preliminary results of the characterization analyses of Brazilian Wollastonite for radiation dosimetry are presented. Wollastonite is a silicate of calcium, Ca(SiO{sub 3}), and it was acquired in the form of rude mineral with Andradite inclusions. The sample was cleaned and prepared for obtained selected grains of Wollastonite. The analyses of chemical and mineralogical compositions were obtained using the neutron activation and X-ray powder diffraction techniques. The thermoluminescent (TL) glow curve of the material shows a prominent peak at about 200 C. TL emission spectra, and photoinduced emission spectra were also obtained. (Author)

  7. RADIONUCLIDES DISTRIBUTION NEAR FORMER URANIUM MINING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Zaredinov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper shows, that radionuclides from the stony rocks of uranium mines can be leached by atmospheric precipitations. In acid conditions, a degree of leaching is greater.Goal. The aim of this investigation was to study the distribution of radionuclides in uranium minings and their impact on the environmental contamination.Materials and methods. The study was carried out in two stages. In the first stage, a blade of rock was mixed with distilled water in proportions of 0,3 kg of gravel and 1 liter of water. After thirty days of soaking, water was sent to the gamma-spectrometric analysis to Canberra’s spectrometer (USA with a high-purity germanium detector. In the second stage, we carried out the similar experiment with water, wich was acidified to pH = 3. Contamination levels of areas near the in-situ leaching mine were determined. Intervention levels were used to estimate risk and possible water consumption by the population. Estimations were carried out taking into account the combined presence of several radionuclides in the water.Results. The results of these studies have shown that the distribution of radionuclides from the source of the contamination is about 360 meters during the 30 y period. The stream, along which samples of soil were collected and studied, was formed by the miner waters that flow along small ruts towards a village, thereby increasing the likelihood of water use by the public.Conclusions. The uranium mines are the source of radioactive contamination. Radionuclides are distributed due to the erosion of rocks and leached out of the stony rock by precipitations. The extent of leaching is significantly increased in an acidic environment, which takes place near the in-situ leaching mines.

  8. 2006 LANL Radionuclide Air Emissions Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David P. Fuehne

    2007-06-30

    This report describes the impacts from emissions of radionuclides at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for calendar year 2006. This report fulfills the requirements established by the Radionuclide National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (Rad-NESHAP). This report is prepared by LANL's Rad-NESHAP compliance team, part of the Environmental Protection Division. The information in this report is required under the Clean Air Act and is being reported to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The highest effective dose equivalent (EDE) to an off-site member of the public was calculated using procedures specified by the EPA and described in this report. LANL's EDE was 0.47 mrem for 2006. The annual limit established by the EPA is 10 mrem per year. During calendar year 2006, LANL continuously monitored radionuclide emissions at 28 release points, or stacks. The Laboratory estimates emissions from an additional 58 release points using radionuclide usage source terms. Also, LANL uses a network of air samplers around the Laboratory perimeter to monitor ambient airborne levels of radionuclides. To provide data for dispersion modeling and dose assessment, LANL maintains and operates meteorological monitoring systems. From these measurement systems, a comprehensive evaluation is conducted to calculate the EDE for the Laboratory. The EDE is evaluated as any member of the public at any off-site location where there is a residence, school, business, or office. In 2006, this location was the Los Alamos Airport Terminal. The majority of this dose is due to ambient air sampling of plutonium emitted from 2006 clean-up activities at an environmental restoration site (73-002-99; ash pile). Doses reported to the EPA for the past 10 years are shown in Table E1.

  9. THE FEATURES OF BYOCINETICS OF PLUTONIUM AND OTHERS HEPATO-OSTEOTROPIC RADIONUCLIDES AFTER INTRAVENOUS INFUSION OF SODIUM ETYLENDYAMINTETRAACETAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Repin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In experimental work with experimental animals it is shown that creation of artificial deficiency of calcium in the blood of rats at the 2-hours infusion of sodium salt EDTA stimulates activation of resorption processes in a skeleton and promotes increase an urine temp excretion of plutonium-239, americium-241 and ittrium-91 whereas the temp of calcium-45 excretion with urine decreases and becomes below the level which was before EDTA intake. Activation of resorption processes begins after12 hours from the moment of EDTA intake and proceeds within 3 days and more. The effect can find practical application in the estimation of radionuclides content in a skeleton by method of indirect dosimetry using the value of excretion with urine velocity.

  10. [Separation of the effects of transmutation and radiation after incorporation of radionuclides into DNA (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, H J; Irskens, M

    1975-01-01

    Among the various methods for studying the relative effects of transmutation and radiation of incorporated nuclides, simulation of beta radiation by external gamma exposure is of practical importance. Self-irradiation and mutual irradiation of the labeled cells cannot be neglected in any case. Furthermore, additional hypothetical and experimental problems may arise from using either external beta radiation or different isotopes of an element. By means of external gamma irradiation on the other hand, this being equivalent to the internal beta radiation from a microdosimetrical point of view, the radiation effect of the nuclide alone can be observed without any modification of other experimental parameters. To determine such equivalent gamma radiation for labeled cell nuclei of Vicia faba roots, the authors applied the Monte Carlo Method to the beta spectra of 32-P, 3-H, 14-C and 131-J, to the energy-dependent LET and to different cell diameters. The existence of secondary particle equilibrium inside the nuclei during gamma exposure was assumed. For certain radionuclides and cell sizes it is possible to calculate gamma spectra which induce energy spectra in the nuclei similar to those caused by the beta particles originating in the nuclear DNA.

  11. Dosimetry of ionising radiation in modern radiation oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kron, Tomas; Lehmann, Joerg; Greer, Peter B.

    2016-07-01

    Dosimetry of ionising radiation is a well-established and mature branch of physical sciences with many applications in medicine and biology. In particular radiotherapy relies on dosimetry for optimisation of cancer treatment and avoidance of severe toxicity for patients. Several novel developments in radiotherapy have introduced new challenges for dosimetry with small and dynamically changing radiation fields being central to many of these applications such as stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy. There is also an increasing awareness of low doses given to structures not in the target region and the associated risk of secondary cancer induction. Here accurate dosimetry is important not only for treatment optimisation but also for the generation of data that can inform radiation protection approaches in the future. The article introduces some of the challenges and highlights the interdependence of dosimetric calculations and measurements. Dosimetric concepts are explored in the context of six application fields: reference dosimetry, small fields, low dose out of field, in vivo dosimetry, brachytherapy and auditing of radiotherapy practice. Recent developments of dosimeters that can be used for these purposes are discussed using spatial resolution and number of dimensions for measurement as sorting criteria. While dosimetry is ever evolving to address the needs of advancing applications of radiation in medicine two fundamental issues remain: the accuracy of the measurement from a scientific perspective and the importance to link the measurement to a clinically relevant question. This review aims to provide an update on both of these.

  12. Dosimetry of Strontium eye applicator: Comparison of Monte Carlo calculations and radiochromic film measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laoues, M.; Khelifi, R.; Moussa, A. S.

    2015-01-01

    Strontium-90 eye applicators are a beta-ray emitter with a relatively high-energy (maximum energy about 2.28 MeV and average energy about 0.9 MeV). These applicators come in different shapes and dimensions; they are used for the treatment of eye diseases. Whenever, radiation is used in treatment, dosimetry is essential. However, knowledge of the exact dose distribution is a critical decision-making to the outcome of the treatment. The main aim of our study is to simulate the dosimetry of the SIA.20 eye applicator with Monte Carlo GATE 6.1 platform and to compare the calculated results with those measured with EBT2 films. This means that GATE and EBT2 were used to quantify the surface and depths dose- rate, the relative dose profile and the dosimetric parameters in according to international recommendations. Calculated and measured results are in good agreement and they are consistent with the ICRU and NCS recommendations.

  13. National Low-Level Waste Management Program Radionuclide Report Series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudin, M.J.; Garcia, R.S.

    1992-02-01

    This volume serves as an introduction to the National Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Program Radionuclide Report Series. This report includes discussions of radionuclides listed in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 61.55, Tables 1 and 2 (including alpha-emitting transuranics with half-lives greater than five years). Each report includes information regarding radiological and chemical characteristics of specific radionuclides. Information is also included discussing waste streams and waste forms that may contain each radionuclide, and radionuclide behavior in the environment and in the human body. Not all radionuclides commonly found at low-level radioactive waste sites are included in this report. The discussion in this volume explains the rationale of the radionuclide selection process.

  14. Uptake by plants of radionuclides from FUSRAP waste materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knight, M.J.

    1983-04-01

    Radionuclides from FUSRAP wastes potentially may be taken up by plants during remedial action activities and permanent near-surface burial of contaminated materials. In order to better understand the propensity of radionuclides to accumulate in plant tissue, soil and plant factors influencing the uptake and accumulation of radionuclides by plants are reviewed. In addition, data describing the uptake of the principal radionuclides present in FUSRAP wastes (uranium-238, thorium-230, radium-226, lead-210, and polonium-210) are summarized. All five radionuclides can accumulate in plant root tissue to some extent, and there is potential for the translocation and accumulation of these radionuclides in plant shoot tissue. Of these five radionuclides, radium-226 appears to have the greatest potential for translocation and accumulation in plant shoot tissue. 28 references, 1 figure, 3 tables.

  15. Monte Carlo simulations for heavy ion dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geithner, O.

    2006-07-26

    Water-to-air stopping power ratio (s{sub w,air}) calculations for the ionization chamber dosimetry of clinically relevant ion beams with initial energies from 50 to 450 MeV/u have been performed using the Monte Carlo technique. To simulate the transport of a particle in water the computer code SHIELD-HIT v2 was used which is a substantially modified version of its predecessor SHIELD-HIT v1. The code was partially rewritten, replacing formerly used single precision variables with double precision variables. The lowest particle transport specific energy was decreased from 1 MeV/u down to 10 keV/u by modifying the Bethe- Bloch formula, thus widening its range for medical dosimetry applications. Optional MSTAR and ICRU-73 stopping power data were included. The fragmentation model was verified using all available experimental data and some parameters were adjusted. The present code version shows excellent agreement with experimental data. Additional to the calculations of stopping power ratios, s{sub w,air}, the influence of fragments and I-values on s{sub w,air} for carbon ion beams was investigated. The value of s{sub w,air} deviates as much as 2.3% at the Bragg peak from the recommended by TRS-398 constant value of 1.130 for an energy of 50 MeV/u. (orig.)

  16. Eleventh DOE workshop on personnel neutron dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-31

    Since its formation, the Office of Health (EH-40) has stressed the importance of the exchange of information related to and improvements in neutron dosimetry. This Workshop was the eleventh in the series sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE). It provided a forum for operational personnel at DOE facilities to discuss current issues related to neutron dosimetry and for leading investigators in the field to discuss promising approaches for future research. A total of 26 papers were presented including the keynote address by Dr. Warren K. Sinclair, who spoke on, ``The 1990 Recommendations of the ICRP and their Biological Background.`` The first several papers discussed difficulties in measuring neutrons of different energies and ways of compensating or deriving correction factors at individual facilities. Presentations were also given by the US Navy and Air Force. Current research in neutron dosimeter development was the subject of the largest number of papers. These included a number on the development of neutron spectrometers. Selected papers were processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  17. DRDC Ottawa working standard for biological dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segura, T.M.; Prud' homme-Lalonde, L. [Defence Research and Development Canada, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Thorleifson, E. [Health Canada, Gatineau, Quebec (Canada); Lachapelle, S.; Mullins, D. [JERA Consulting (Canada); Qutob, S. [Health Canada, Gatineau, Quebec (Canada); Wilkinson, D.

    2005-07-15

    This Standard provides quality assurance, quality control, and evaluation of the performance criteria for the purpose of accreditation of the Radiation Biology laboratory at Defence Research and Development Canada - Ottawa (DRDC Ottawa) using biological dosimetry to predict radiation exposure doses. The International Standard (ISO 19238) and the International Atomic Energy Association (IAEA) Technical Report Series No. 405 are used as guiding documents in preparation of this working document specific to the DRDC Ottawa Radiation Biology Laboratory. This Standard addresses: 1. The confidentiality of personal information, for the customer and the service laboratory; 2. The laboratory safety requirements; 3. The calibration sources and calibration dose ranges useful for establishing the reference dose-effect curves allowing the dose estimation from chromosome aberration frequency, and the minimum detection levels; 4. Transportation criteria for shipping of test samples to the laboratory; 5. Preparation of samples for analysis; 6. The scoring procedure for unstable chromosome aberrations used for biological dosimetry; 7. The criteria for converting a measured aberration frequency into an estimate of absorbed dose; 8. The reporting of results; 9. The quality assurance and quality control plan for the laboratory; and 10. Informative annexes containing examples of a questionnaire, instructions for customers, a data sheet for recording aberrations, a sample report and other supportive documents. (author)

  18. Dosimetry methods in boron neutron capture therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gambarini, G.; Artuso, E.; Felisi, M.; Regazzoni, V.; Giove, D. [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Department of Physics, Via Festa del Patrono 7, 20122 Milano (Italy); Agosteo, S.; Barcaglioni, L. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Milano (Italy); Campi, F.; Garlati, L. [Politecnico di Milano, Energy Department, Piazza Leonardo Da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); De Errico, F. [Universita degli Studi di Pisa, Department of Civil and Industrial Engineering, Lungamo Pacinotti 43, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Borroni, M.; Carrara, M. [Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Medical Physics Unit, Via Venezian 1, 20133 Milano (Italy); Burian, J.; Klupak, V.; Viererbl, L.; Marek, M. [Research Centre Rez, Department of Neutron Physics, 250-68 Husinec-Rez (Czech Republic)

    2014-08-15

    Dosimetry studies have been carried out at thermal and epithermal columns of Lvr-15 research reactor for investigating the spatial distribution of gamma dose, fast neutron dose and thermal neutron fluence. Two different dosimetry methods, both based on solid state detectors, have been studied and applied and the accuracy and consistency of the results have been inspected. One method is based on Fricke gel dosimeters that are dilute water solutions and have good tissue equivalence for neutrons and also for all the secondary radiations produced by neutron interactions in tissue or water phantoms. Fricke gel dosimeters give the possibility of separating the various dose contributions, i.e. the gamma dose, the fast neutron dose and the dose due to charged particles generated during thermal neutron reactions by isotopes having high cross section, like 10-B. From this last dose, thermal neutron fluence can be obtained by means of the kerma factor. The second method is based on thermoluminescence dosimeters. In particular, the developed method draw advantage from the different heights of the peaks of the glow curve of such phosphors when irradiated with photons or with thermal neutrons. The results show that satisfactory results can be obtained with simple methods, in spite of the complexity of the subject. However, the more suitable dosimeters and principally their utilization and analysis modalities are different for the various neutron beams, mainly depending on the relative intensities of the three components of the neutron field, in particular are different for thermal and epithermal columns. (Author)

  19. Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rathbone, Bruce A.

    2009-08-28

    The Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842 documents the design and implementation of the external dosimetry system used at Hanford. The manual describes the dosimeter design, processing protocols, dose calculation methodology, radiation fields encountered, dosimeter response characteristics, limitations of dosimeter design under field conditions, and makes recommendations for effective use of the dosimeters in the field. The manual describes the technical basis for the dosimetry system in a manner intended to help ensure defensibility of the dose of record at Hanford and to demonstrate compliance with 10 CFR 835, DOELAP, DOE-RL, ORP, PNSO, and Hanford contractor requirements. The dosimetry system is operated by PNNL’s Hanford External Dosimetry Program (HEDP) which provides dosimetry services to all Hanford contractors. The primary users of this manual are DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford using the dosimetry services of PNNL. Development and maintenance of this manual is funded directly by DOE and DOE contractors. Its contents have been reviewed and approved by DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford through the Hanford Personnel Dosimetry Advisory Committee (HPDAC) which is chartered and chaired by DOE-RL and serves as means of coordinating dosimetry practices across contractors at Hanford. This manual was established in 1996. Since inception, it has been revised many times and maintained by PNNL as a controlled document with controlled distribution. The first revision to be released through PNNL’s Electronic Records & Information Capture Architecture (ERICA) database was designated Revision 0. Revision numbers that are whole numbers reflect major revisions typically involving changes to all chapters in the document. Revision numbers that include a decimal fraction reflect minor revisions, usually restricted to selected chapters or selected pages in the document.

  20. Effectiveness of syringe shieldings using radionuclides in radiation synovectomy; Effizienz von Spritzenabschirmungen bei Radionuklidanwendung zur Radiosynoviorthese

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roedel, R.; Reichmann, K.; Reinhardt, M.; Palmedo, H.; Biersack, H.J.; Mallek, D. von [Klinik und Poliklinik des Universitaetsklinikums Bonn (Germany); Ebert, A. [Gemeinschaftspraxis fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Bonn (Germany)

    2003-02-01

    Aim: The radiation exposure in radiation synovectomy was investigated for technician and therapist using Erbium-169, Rhenium-186 and Yttrium-90 with and without syringe shieldings. Methods: Dose rates were measured in relation to the distance of the syringe containing the radionuclide. Measurements were repeated using syringe shieldings which consist of plastic surrounded by a lead layer. Results: The most relevant radiation exposure arises from Yttrium-90. Using syringe shieldings radiation exposure can be reduced by a factor of thousand. Conclusion: This kind of radiological protection is completely sufficient for the therapist. Concerning the technician preparing the radiopharmaceutics, the limit of the official German dosimetry service (500 mSv) might be exceeded if no special radiological protection is established. Thus, special dosimetry is recommended. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Beim Umgang mit Radionukliden im Rahmen der Radiosynoviorthese wurde das Ausmass der Strahlenexposition fuer aerztliches Personal ermittelt und der Frage nachgegangen, inwieweit eine Reduktion der zugrunde liegenden Dosisleistungen durch handelsuebliche Spritzenabschirmungen moeglich ist. Methode: In verschiedenen Abstaenden zu Spritzen, die uebliche Aktivitaeten von Erbium-169, Rhenium-186 und Yttrium-90 enthielten, werden die oertlichen Dosisleistungen mit und ohne Spritzenabschirmungen aus Plastik und Bleiummantelung gemessen. Ergebnisse: Eine relevante Strahlenexposition war beim Umgang mit Yttrium-90 festzustellen. Unter Verwendung von Spritzenabschirmungen aus Plastik mit Bleiummantelung liess sich die Strahlenbelastung in unmittelbarer Naehe zur Spritze um etwa den Faktor 1000 reduzieren. Schlussfolgerung: Eine Abschirmung aus Plastik mit Bleiummantelung kann fuer den applizierenden Arzt als voellig ausreichend angesehen werden. Fuer das Personal, dem die Nuklidzubereitung obliegt, kann jedoch ohne besondere Strahlenschutzmassnahmen der Jahresgrenzwert von 500 mSv ueberschritten

  1. Beta Thalassemia (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kids to Be Smart About Social Media Beta Thalassemia KidsHealth > For Parents > Beta Thalassemia Print A A ... Complications Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment en español Beta talasemia Thalassemias Thalassemias are a group of blood disorders that ...

  2. Radiation Dosimetry for Quality Control of Food Preservation and Disinfestation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McLaughlin, W.L.; Miller, Arne; Uribe, R.M.

    1983-01-01

    In the use of x and gamma rays and scanned electron beams to extend the shelf life of food by delay of sprouting and ripening, killing of microbes, and control of insect population, quality assurance is provided by standardized radiation dosimetry. By strategic placement of calibrated dosimeters...... speed) to meet changes that occur in product and source parameters (e.g. bulk density and radiation spectrum). Routine dosimetry methods and certain corrections of dosimetry data may be selected for the radiations used in typical food processes....

  3. Dosimetry in clinical static magnetic fields using plastic scintillation detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefanowicz, S.; Latzel, H.; Lindvold, Lars René

    2013-01-01

    , however, not clear yet how dosimetry will be conducted as standard methods and might not be easily transferred to systems with clinical magnetic fields. For dosimetry in MRI accelerators, we have tested plastic scintillation detectors (PSD) coupled to optical fibers. They are suitable for real-time and in......-vivo dosimetry in radiation treatments and diagnostics and could be, being all-optical, promising candidates for this application. To study the basic feasibility of using PSDs with organic scintillators in magnetic fields, we measured the response of these dosimeters in presence of magnetic fields up to 1 T...

  4. Monte Carlo dosimetry for 125I and 103Pd eye plaque brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, R M; Taylor, R E P; Rogers, D W O

    2008-12-01

    A Monte Carlo study of dosimetry for eye plaque brachytherapy is performed. BrachyDose, an EGSnrc user code which makes use of Yegin's multi-geometry package, is used to fully model 125I (model 6711) and 103Pd (model 200) brachytherapy seeds and the standardized plaques of the Collaborative Ocular Melanoma Study (COMS). Three-dimensional dose distributions in the eye region are obtained. In general, dose to water is scored; however, the implications of replacing water with eye tissues are explored. The effect of the gold alloy (Modulay) backing is investigated and the dose is found to be sensitive to the elemental composition of the backing. The presence of the silicone polymer (Silastic) seed carrier results in substantial dose decreases relative to water, particularly for 103Pd. For a 20 mm plaque with a Modulay backing and Silastic insert, fully loaded with 24 seeds, the dose decrease relative to water is of the order of 14% for 125I and 20% for 103Pd at a distance of 1 cm from the inner sclera along the plaque's central axis. For the configurations of seeds used in COMS plaques, interseed attenuation is a small effect within the eye region. The introduction of an air interface results in a dose reduction in its vicinity which depends on the plaque's position within the eye and the radionuclide. Introducing bone in the eye's vicinity also causes dose reductions. The dose distributions in the eye for the two different radionuclides are compared and, for the same prescription dose, 103Pd generally offers a lower dose to critical normal structures. BrachyDose is sufficiently fast to allow full Monte Carlo dose calculations for routine clinical treatment planning.

  5. Monte Carlo dosimetry for I125 and Pd103 eye plaque brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, R M; Taylor, R E P; Rogers, D W O

    2008-12-01

    A Monte Carlo study of dosimetry for eye plaque brachytherapy is performed. BrachyDose, an EGSnrc user code which makes use of Yegin's multi-geometry package, is used to fully model I125 (model 6711) and Pd103 (model 200) brachytherapy seeds and the standardized plaques of the Collaborative Ocular Melanoma Study (COMS). Three-dimensional dose distributions in the eye region are obtained. In general, dose to water is scored; however, the implications of replacing water with eye tissues are explored. The effect of the gold alloy (Modulay) backing is investigated and the dose is found to be sensitive to the elemental composition of the backing. The presence of the silicone polymer (Silastic) seed carrier results in substantial dose decreases relative to water, particularly for Pd103. For a 20mm plaque with a Modulay backing and Silastic insert, fully loaded with 24 seeds, the dose decrease relative to water is of the order of 14% for I125 and 20% for Pd103 at a distance of 1cm from the inner sclera along the plaque's central axis. For the configurations of seeds used in COMS plaques, interseed attenuation is a small effect within the eye region. The introduction of an air interface results in a dose reduction in its vicinity which depends on the plaque's position within the eye and the radionuclide. Introducing bone in the eye's vicinity also causes dose reductions. The dose distributions in the eye for the two different radionuclides are compared and, for the same prescription dose, Pd103 generally offers a lower dose to critical normal structures. BrachyDose is sufficiently fast to allow full Monte Carlo dose calculations for routine clinical treatment planning. © 2008 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  6. Accelerator based production of auger-electron-emitting isotopes for radionuclide therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thisgaard, H.

    2008-08-15

    In this research project the focus has been on the identification and production of new, unconventional Auger-electron-emitting isotopes for targeted radionuclide therapy of cancer. Based on 1st principles dosimetry calculations on the subcellular level, the Auger-emitter 119Sb has been identified as a potent candidate for therapy. The corresponding imaging analogue 117Sb has been shown from planar scintigraphy and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) to be suitable for SPECT-based dosimetry of a future Sb-labeled radiopharmaceutical. The production method of these radioisotopes has been developed using a low-energy cyclotron via the nuclear reactions 119Sn(p,n)119Sb and 117Sn(p,n)117Sb including measurements of the excitation function for the former reaction. Moreover, a new high-yield radiochemical separation method has been developed to allow the subsequent separation of the produced 119Sb from the enriched 119Sn target material with high radionuclidic- and chemical purity. A method that also allows efficient recovery of the 119Sn for recycling. To demonstrate the ability of producing therapeutic quantities of 119Sb and other radioisotopes for therapy with a low-energy cyclotron, two new 'High Power' cyclotron targets were developed in this study. The target development was primarily based on theoretical thermal modeling calculations using finite-element-analysis software. With these targets, I have shown that it will be possible to produce several tens of GBq of therapeutics isotopes (e.g. 119Sb or 64Cu) using the PETtrace cyclotron commonly found at the larger PET-centers in the hospitals. Finally, research in a new method to measure the radiotoxicity of Auger-emitters invitro using cellular microinjection has been carried out. The purpose of this method is to be able to experimentally evaluate and compare the potency of the new and unconventional Auger-emitters (e.g. 119Sb). However, due to experimental complications, the development

  7. THE CHALLENGE OF CIEMAT INTERNAL DOSIMETRY SERVICE FOR ACCREDITATION ACCORDING TO ISO/IEC 17025 STANDARD, FOR IN VIVO AND IN VITRO MONITORING AND DOSE ASSESSMENT OF INTERNAL EXPOSURES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, M A; Martin, R; Hernandez, C; Navarro, J F; Navarro, T; Perez, B; Sierra, I

    2016-09-01

    The accreditation of an Internal Dosimetry Service (IDS) according to ISO/IEC 17025 Standard is a challenge. The aim of this process is to guarantee the technical competence for the monitoring of radionuclides incorporated in the body and for the evaluation of the associated committed effective dose E(50). This publication describes the main accreditation issues addressed by CIEMAT IDS regarding all the procedures involving good practice in internal dosimetry, focussing in the difficulties to ensure the traceability in the whole process, the appropriate calculation of detection limit of measurement techniques, the validation of methods (monitoring and dose assessments), the description of all the uncertainty sources and the interpretation of monitoring data to evaluate the intake and the committed effective dose. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Concentration activities of natural radionuclides in three fish species in Brazilian coast and their contributions to the absorbed doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Wagner de S.; Py Junior, Delcy de A., E-mail: wspereira@inb.gov.b, E-mail: delcy@inb.gov.b [Industrias Nucleares do Brasil SA, Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Unidade de Tratamento de Minerios. Coordenacao de Protecao Radiologica; Kelecom, Alphonse, E-mail: kelecom@uol.com.b [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Biologia. Curso de Pos-Graduacao em Biologia Marinha

    2009-07-01

    Activity concentrations of U-238, Ra-226, Pb-210, Th-232 e Ra-228 were analysed in three fish species at the Brasilian Coast. The fish 'Cubera snapper' (Lutjanus cyanopterus, Cuvier, 1828), in the region of Ceara and 'Whitemouth croaker' (Micropogonias furnieri, Desmarest, 1823) and 'Lebranche mullet' (Mugil liza, Valenciennes, 1836) in the region of Rio de Janeiro. These concentrations were transformed in absorbed dose rate using a dose conversion factor in unit of gray per year (muGy y{sup -1}), per becquerel per kilogram (Bq kg{sup -1}). Only the absorbed dose due to intake of radionuclides was examined, and the contributions due to radionuclides present in water and sediment were disregarded. The radionuclides were considered to be uniformly distributed in the fish body. The limit of the dose rate used, proposed by the Department of Energy of the USA, is equal to 3.65 10{sup 03} mGy y{sup -1}. The average dose rate due to the studied radionuclides is equal to 6.09 10{sup 00} muGy y{sup -1}, a value minor than 0.1% than the limits indicated by DOE, and quite similar to that found in the literature for 'benthic' fish. The most important radionuclides were the alpha emitters Ra-226 having 61 % of absorbed dose rate. U-238 and Th-232, each contributes with approximately 20 % of the absorbed dose rate. These three radionuclides are responsible for almost 100% of the dose rate received by the studied organisms. The beta emitters Ra-228 and Pb-210 account for approximately 1 % of the absorbed dose rate. (author)

  9. Dosimetry of (125)I and (103)Pd COMS eye plaques for intraocular tumors: report of Task Group 129 by the AAPM and ABS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu-Tsao, Sou-Tung; Astrahan, Melvin A; Finger, Paul T; Followill, David S; Meigooni, Ali S; Melhus, Christopher S; Mourtada, Firas; Napolitano, Mary E; Nath, Ravinder; Rivard, Mark J; Rogers, D W O; Thomson, Rowan M

    2012-10-01

    heterogeneous dose calculation methods in clinical practice would result in dose differences >10% and warrant a careful evaluation of the corresponding changes in prescription doses. Doses to normal ocular structures vary with choice of radionuclide, plaque location, and prescription depth, such that further dosimetric evaluations of the adoption of MC-based dosimetry methods are needed. The AAPM and American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) recommend that clinical medical physicists should make concurrent estimates of heterogeneity-corrected delivered dose using the information in this report's tables to prepare for brachytherapy TPS that can account for material heterogeneities and for a transition to heterogeneity-corrected prescriptive goals. It is recommended that brachytherapy TPS vendors include material heterogeneity corrections in their systems and take steps to integrate planned plaque localization and image guidance. In the interim, before the availability of commercial MC-based brachytherapy TPS, it is recommended that clinical medical physicists use the line-source approximation in homogeneous water medium and the 2D AAPM TG-43U1 dosimetry formalism and brachytherapy source dosimetry parameter datasets for treatment planning calculations. Furthermore, this report includes quality management program recommendations for eye-plaque brachytherapy.

  10. Identifying large chondrites using cosmogenic radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welten, K.C. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Caffee, M.W., E-mail: mcaffee@purdue.ed [PRIME Laboratory, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Hillegonds, D.J. [Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Masarik, J. [Department of Nuclear Physics, Comenius University, Bratislava (Slovakia); Nishiizumi, K. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States)

    2010-04-15

    We measured the concentrations of the cosmogenic radionuclides {sup 10}Be, {sup 26}Al, {sup 36}Cl and {sup 41}Ca in the metal and stone fractions of three large chondrite showers to determine their pre-atmospheric size. Large chondrites are characterized by substantial contributions of neutron-capture {sup 41}Ca in the stone fraction (up to approx2 dpm/gCa), low radionuclide concentrations in the metal fraction and high {sup 10}Be(stone)/{sup 10}Be(metal) ratios. Based on the measured concentrations in comparison with calculated cosmogenic nuclide depth profiles, using a semi-empirical and a purely physical model, we conclude that these objects had pre-atmospheric radii ranging from approx80 cm to >3 m. We conclude that the semi-empirical model is more reliable for spallogenic production rates in large objects, while the purely physical model is more reliable for neutron-capture products.

  11. Tracing Noble Gas Radionuclides in the Environment

    CERN Document Server

    Collon, P; Lu, Z T

    2004-01-01

    Trace analysis of radionuclides is an essential and versatile tool in modern science and technology. Due to their ideal geophysical and geochemical properties, long-lived noble gas radionuclides, in particular, 39Ar (t1/2 = 269 yr), 81Kr (t1/2 = 2.3x10^5 yr) and 85Kr (t1/2 = 10.8 yr), have long been recognized to have a wide range of important applications in Earth sciences. In recent years, significant progress has been made in the development of practical analytical methods, and has led to applications of these isotopes in the hydrosphere (tracing the flow of groundwater and ocean water). In this article, we introduce the applications of these isotopes and review three leading analytical methods: Low-Level Counting (LLC), Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) and Atom Trap Trace Analysis (ATTA).

  12. Radionuclide synovectomy – essentials for rheumatologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek M. Chojnowski

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Radionuclide synovectomy is a minimally invasive method of treating persistent joint inflammation. It involves intra-articular injection of radioactive colloids which induce necrosis and fibrosis of hypertrophic synovial membrane. The most common indication for radiosynovectomy is rheumatoid arthritis, although patients with seronegative spondyloarthropathies, unclassified arthritis, haemophilic arthropathy and other less common arthropathies can also benefit from this method. Radiosynovectomy is safe, well tolerated and efficacious. About 70–80% of patients respond well to the therapy. However, the therapeutic effects are considerably worse in patients with co-existent osteoarthritis and advanced joint degeneration. Despite its advantages, radionuclide synovectomy is not performed as often as it could be, so greater knowledge and understanding of this method are needed. The authors present the most important facts about radiosynovectomy that may help rheumatologists in their daily clinical practice.

  13. Radionuclide transport in the Yenisei River

    CERN Document Server

    Vakulovsky, S M; Kabanov, A I

    2012-01-01

    Data characterizing the pollution of the Yenisei River (water and bottom sediment) by radionuclide resulting from the use of the river water for cooling industrial reactors in the Mining-Chemical Complex are presented. Studies have been made of the contamination of the river during the period when reactors with direct flow cooling were used and after these were shut down. Distinctive features of the migration of radionuclide in the Yenisei are noted, in particular, their distribution between the solid and liquid phases. The amounts of 137Cs, 65Zn, 60Co, 54Mn, and 152Eu in the channel are determined from the effluent discharge site to Dudinka port. The rate of continuous self removal of 137Cs is estimated to be 0.19 1/year, corresponding to a half purification time of 3.6 years for a 600 km long segment of the river bed.

  14. Radionuclide synovectomy – essentials for rheumatologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felis-Giemza, Anna; Kobylecka, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Radionuclide synovectomy is a minimally invasive method of treating persistent joint inflammation. It involves intra-articular injection of radioactive colloids which induce necrosis and fibrosis of hypertrophic synovial membrane. The most common indication for radiosynovectomy is rheumatoid arthritis, although patients with seronegative spondyloarthropathies, unclassified arthritis, haemophilic arthropathy and other less common arthropathies can also benefit from this method. Radiosynovectomy is safe, well tolerated and efficacious. About 70–80% of patients respond well to the therapy. However, the therapeutic effects are considerably worse in patients with co-existent osteoarthritis and advanced joint degeneration. Despite its advantages, radionuclide synovectomy is not performed as often as it could be, so greater knowledge and understanding of this method are needed. The authors present the most important facts about radiosynovectomy that may help rheumatologists in their daily clinical practice. PMID:27504020

  15. Decline of radionuclides in Columbia River biota

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cushing, C.E.; Watson, D.G.; Scott, A.J.; Gurtisen, J.M.

    1980-03-01

    In January 1971, the last of nine plutonium production reactors using direct discharge of once-through cooling waters into the Columbia River was closed. Sampling was initiated at three stations on the Columbia River to document the decline of the radionuclide body burdens in the biota of the Columbia River ecosystem. The data show that in a river-reservoir complex, the measurable body burden of fission-produced radionuclides decreased to essentially undetectable levels within 18 to 24 mo after cessation of discharge of once-through cooling water into the river. On the basis of data from the free-flowing station, we believe that this decrease would be even more rapid in an unimpounded river.

  16. Radionuclides accumulation in milk and its products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marmuleva, N.I.; Barinov, E.Y.; Petukhov, V.L. [Novosibirsk State Agrarian University (Russian Federation)

    2003-05-01

    The problem of radioactive pollution is extremely urgent in Russia in connection with presence of territories polluted by radionuclides on places of nuclear tests, in zones around the enterprises on production, processing and storage of radioactive materials, and also in areas of emergency pollution (Barakhtin, 2001). The aim of our investigation was a determination of the levels of the main radioactive elements - {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr in diary products. 363 samples of milk, dry milk, butter, cheese and yogurt from Novosibirsk region were examined. {sup 137}Cs level was 3.7 to 9.2 times higher than {sup 90}Sr one in milk, cheese and yogurt. At the same time the level of these radio-nuclides in butter was identical (8.03 Bk/kg). (authors)

  17. Improving cancer treatment with cyclotron produced radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, S.M. Finn, R.D.

    1992-08-04

    This report describes the author's continuing long term goal of promoting nuclear medicine applications by improving the scientific basis for tumor diagnosis treatment and treatment follow-up based on the use of cyclotron produced radiotracers in oncology. The program has 3 interactive components: Radiochemistry /Cyclotron; Pharmacology; and Immunology. An essential strategy is as follows: novel radionuclides and radiotracers developed in the Radiochemistry/Cyclotron section under the DOE grant during the 1989--1992 grant period, will be employed in the Pharmacology and Immunology sections of the DOE grant during the 1992--1995 grant period. The development of novel radionuclides and tracers is of course useful in and of itself, but their utility is greatly enhanced by the interaction with the immunology and pharmacology components of the program.

  18. Cadastral valuation of lands polluted with radionuclides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarov, O. A.; Tsvetnov, E. V.; Shcheglov, A. I.; Romashkina, A. D.; Ermiyaev, Ya. R.

    2016-11-01

    The major method to correct the cadastral value of land for contamination with radionuclides is to reduce it by the sum of expenses necessary for land remediation and for special measures ensuring the obtaining of agricultural and forestry products satisfying safety norms. Lands contaminated with radionuclides and used in agriculture and forestry are often removed from the system of land taxation. In this case, their cadastral value becomes an excessive element of the state cadaster of real estate. An approach toward cadastral valuation of such lands suggested by the authors assumes the creation of a system of compensation payments as the main source of financing of land rehabilitation and soil conservation measures. An original system of calculation of such payments has been tested for radioactively contaminated lands in Plavsk district of Tula oblast. It is argued that compensation payments for radioactively contaminated agrocenoses should be higher than those for natural cenoses.

  19. Radionuclide methods of tumor diagnosis in ophthalmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubinskaya, L.R. (Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij Inst. Glaznykh boleznej (USSR))

    1982-08-01

    The radionuclide methods used in opthalmology for diagnosis of eyes and orbit tumors are described: radiophosphorus indication, method of gamma-topography, method of external radiometry, method of blood circulation study in organ of vision. Diagnostic value was determined of such radiopharmaceuticals as /sup 32/P-phosphate, /sup 67/Ga-citrate, /sup 131/I-Ralbumin, /sup 197/Hg-neohydrine, /sup 125/I-fluorescein, /sup 75/Se-methionine, sup(99m)Tc-pertechnete and others. The conclusion was drawn that the considered radionuclides and radiopharmaceuticals were not perfect indicators for diagnosis of different tumors of organ of vision. Simultaneous using of several radiopharmaceuticals with the aim of increasing information content of described methods is recommended.

  20. Radionuclide evaluation of renal artery dilatation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Born, M.L.; Gerlock, A.J. Jr.; Goncharenko, V.; Hollifield, J.W.; MacDonell, R.C. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Radionuclide studies were used in three patients to evaluate renal perfusion and function within 24 hours following transluminal dilatation. In one patient, technetium-99 m pertechnetate showed good renal perfusion one and 12 hours after a post-dilatation arteriogram had shown a renal artery intimal defect. Improved clearance of iodine-131 ortho-iodohippurate from the blood demonstrated an increase in renal function 18 hours following dilatation of a stenosis at a renal allograft anastomosis in the second patient, while technetium-99 m-labeled DTPA showed an improved total glomerular filtration rate 24 hours after dilatation of a saphenous vein bypass graft in the third patient. It was concluded that renal radionuclide studies are of benefit in evaluating patients in the immediate post-dilatation period.

  1. Thermoluminescence dosimetric properties of a new thin beta detector (LiF:Mg, Cu, P; GR-200F) in comparison with highly sensitive Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C beta dosimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Faramawy, N A [GSF-National Research Centre for Environment and Health, Institute for Radiation Protection, D-85758 Neuherberg (Germany); Goeksu, H Y [GSF-National Research Centre for Environment and Health, Institute for Radiation Protection, D-85758 Neuherberg (Germany); Panzer, W [GSF-National Research Centre for Environment and Health, Institute for Radiation Protection, D-85758 Neuherberg (Germany)

    2004-09-01

    There is an increasing need for efficient beta detectors to fulfil ICRU recommendations for new quantities especially in the field of medical physics and retrospective dosimetry. The thermoluminescence properties of thin LiF:Mg, Cu, P (GR-200F) tapes produced in 1998 by Sange Company, People's Republic of China, are investigated and compared with those of highly sensitive thin Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C beta detectors as regards their applicability in the detection of low energy photons and beta particles. The radiation dose response, minimum detectable dose, reproducibility of measurements and effect of residual signal at low dose are assessed for the possible low level beta dosimetry use. The radiation dose response and photon and beta detection efficiencies are tested under practical laboratory conditions. The effects of indoor fluorescent light and residual signal after the first read-out are investigated with a view to optimising handling conditions such as post-irradiation and pre-heating treatments for routine dosimetry. The photon energy responses of the detectors are investigated using 150 keV filtered x-rays and {sup 60}Co {gamma}-rays.

  2. Radionuclide release calculations for SAR-08

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomson, Gavin; Miller, Alex; Smith, Graham; Jackson, Duncan (Enviros Consulting Ltd, Wolverhampton (United Kingdom))

    2008-04-15

    Following a review by the Swedish regulatory authorities of the post-closure safety assessment of the SFR 1 disposal facility for low and intermediate waste (L/ILW), SAFE, the SKB has prepared an updated assessment called SAR-08. This report describes the radionuclide release calculations that have been undertaken as part of SAR-08. The information, assumptions and data used in the calculations are reported and the results are presented. The calculations address issues raised in the regulatory review, but also take account of new information including revised inventory data. The scenarios considered include the main case of expected behaviour of the system, with variants; low probability releases, and so-called residual scenarios. Apart from these scenario uncertainties, data uncertainties have been examined using a probabilistic approach. Calculations have been made using the AMBER software. This allows all the component features of the assessment model to be included in one place. AMBER has been previously used to reproduce results the corresponding calculations in the SAFE assessment. It is also used in demonstration of the IAEA's near surface disposal assessment methodology ISAM and has been subject to very substantial verification tests and has been used in verifying other assessment codes. Results are presented as a function of time for the release of radionuclides from the near field, and then from the far field into the biosphere. Radiological impacts of the releases are reported elsewhere. Consideration is given to each radionuclide and to each component part of the repository. The releases from the entire repository are also presented. The peak releases rates are, for most scenarios, due to organic C-14. Other radionuclides which contribute to peak release rates include inorganic C-14, Ni-59 and Ni-63. (author)

  3. Radionuclide Air Emission Report for 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahl, Linnea

    2009-05-21

    Berkeley Lab operates facilities where radionuclides are handled and stored. These facilities are subject to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) radioactive air emission regulations in Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H (EPA 1989). Radionuclides may be emitted from stacks or vents on buildings where radionuclide production or use is authorized or they may be emitted as diffuse sources. In 2008, all Berkeley Lab sources were minor sources of radionuclides (sources resulting in a potential dose of less than 0.1 mrem/yr [0.001 mSv/yr]). These minor sources include more than 100 stack sources and one source of diffuse emissions. There were no unplanned emissions from the Berkeley Lab site. Emissions from minor sources (stacks and diffuse emissions) either were measured by sampling or monitoring or were calculated based on quantities used, received for use, or produced during the year. Using measured and calculated emissions, and building-specific and common parameters, Laboratory personnel applied the EPA-approved computer code, CAP88-PC, to calculate the effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual (MEI). The effective dose equivalent from all sources at Berkeley Lab in 2008 is 5.2 x 10{sup -3} mrem/yr (5.2 x 10{sup -5} mSv/yr) to the MEI, well below the 10 mrem/yr (0.1 mSv/yr) dose standard. The location of the MEI is at the University of California (UC) Lawrence Hall of Science, a public science museum about 1500 ft (460 m) east of Berkeley Lab's Building 56. The estimated collective effective dose equivalent to persons living within 50 mi (80 km) of Berkeley Lab is 1.1 x 10{sup -1} person-rem (1.1 x 10{sup -3} person-Sv) attributable to the Lab's airborne emissions in 2008.

  4. Loading technique for preparing radionuclide containing nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    Source: US2012213698A The present invention relates to a novel composition and method for loading delivery systems such as liposome compositions with radionuclides useful in targeted diagnostic and/or therapy of target site, such as cancerous tissue and, in general, pathological conditions associ...... of positron emission tomography (PET) imaging technique. One specific aspect of the invention is directed to a method of producing nanoparticles with desired targeting properties for diagnostic and/or radio-therapeutic applications....

  5. Radionuclide Air Emission Report for 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahl, Linnea

    2010-06-01

    Berkeley Lab operates facilities where radionuclides are handled and stored. These facilities are subject to the EPA radioactive air emission regulations in 40CFR61, Subpart H (EPA 1989). Radionuclides may be emitted from stacks or vents on buildings where radionuclide production or use is authorized or they may be emitted as diffuse sources. In 2009, all Berkeley Lab sources were minor sources of radionuclides (sources resulting in a potential dose of less than 0.1 mrem/yr [0.001 mSv/yr]). These minor sources included more than 100 stack sources and one source of diffuse emissions. There were no unplanned emissions from the Berkeley Lab site. Emissions from minor sources (stacks and diffuse emissions) either were measured by sampling or monitoring or were calculated based on quantities used, received for use, or produced during the year. Using measured and calculated emissions, and building-specific and common parameters, Laboratory personnel applied the EPA-approved computer code, CAP88-PC, to calculate the effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual (MEI). The effective dose equivalent from all sources at Berkeley Lab in 2009 is 7.0 x 10{sup -3} mrem/yr (7.0 x 10{sup -5} mSv/yr) to the MEI, well below the 10 mrem/yr (0.1 mSv/yr) dose standard. The location of the MEI is at the University of California (UC) Lawrence Hall of Science, a public science museum about 1500 ft (460 m) east of Berkeley Lab's Building 56. The estimated collective effective dose equivalent to persons living within 50 mi (80 km) of Berkeley Lab is 1.5 x 10{sup -1} person-rem (1.5 x 10{sup -3} person-Sv) attributable to the Lab's airborne emissions in 2009.

  6. Accelerator mass spectrometry analyses of environmental radionuclides: sensitivity, precision and standardisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotchkis; Fink; Tuniz; Vogt

    2000-07-01

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is the analytical technique of choice for the detection of long-lived radionuclides which cannot be practically analysed with decay counting or conventional mass spectrometry. AMS allows an isotopic sensitivity as low as one part in 10(15) for 14C (5.73 ka), 10Be (1.6 Ma), 26Al (720 ka), 36Cl (301 ka), 41Ca (104 ka), 129I (16 Ma) and other long-lived radionuclides occurring in nature at ultra-trace levels. These radionuclides can be used as tracers and chronometers in many disciplines: geology, archaeology, astrophysics, biomedicine and materials science. Low-level decay counting techniques have been developed in the last 40-50 years to detect the concentration of cosmogenic, radiogenic and anthropogenic radionuclides in a variety of specimens. Radioactivity measurements for long-lived radionuclides are made difficult by low counting rates and in some cases the need for complicated radiochemistry procedures and efficient detectors of soft beta-particles and low energy x-rays. The sensitivity of AMS is unaffected by the half-life of the isotope being measured, since the atoms not the radiations that result from their decay, are counted directly. Hence, the efficiency of AMS in the detection of long-lived radionuclides is 10(6)-10(9) times higher than decay counting and the size of the sample required for analysis is reduced accordingly. For example, 14C is being analysed in samples containing as little as 20 microg carbon. There is also a world-wide effort to use AMS for the analysis of rare nuclides of heavy mass, such as actinides, with important applications in safeguards and nuclear waste disposal. Finally, AMS microprobes are being developed for the in-situ analysis of stable isotopes in geological samples, semiconductors and other materials. Unfortunately, the use of AMS is limited by the expensive accelerator technology required, but there are several attempts to develop compact AMS spectrometers at low (< or = 0.5 MV

  7. Concrete Property and Radionuclide Migration Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wellman, Dawn M.; Mattigod, Shas V.; Powers, Laura; Parker, Kent E.; Clayton, Libby N.; Wood, Marcus I.

    2008-10-01

    The Waste Management Project provides safe, compliant, and cost-effective waste management services for the Hanford Site and the DOE Complex. Part of theses services includes safe disposal of LLW and MLLW at the Hanford Low-Level Waste Burial Grounds (LLBG) in accordance with the requirements listed in DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management. To partially satisfy these requirements, a Performance Assessment (PA) analyses were completed and approved. DOE Order 435.1 also requires that continuing data collection be conducted to enhance confidence in the critical assumptions used in these analyses to characterize the operational features of the disposal facility that are relied upon to satisfy the performance objectives identified in the Order. One critical assumption is that concrete will frequently be used as waste form or container material to control and minimize the release of radionuclide constituents in waste into the surrounding environment. Data was collected to (1) quantify radionuclide migration through concrete materials similar to those used to encapsulate waste in the LLBG, (2) measure the properties of the concrete materials, especially those likely to influence radionuclide migration, and (3) quantify the stability of U-bearing solid phases of limited solubility in concrete.

  8. Radionuclide adsorption characteristics around coastal water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Young Il; Chung, Yang Geun; Hong, Sung Yul; Lee, Gab Bock [KEPCO, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-07-01

    The adsorption capacity of radionuclides onto suspended sediment was experimented on each of the coastal seawater sampled around the Kori and the Wolsung nuclear power plant. During the experiment the quantity and size fraction of suspended sediment were adjusted and the seawater and sediment chemistry is approximated to the expected field condition. Because the sorption capacity depends on the specific minerals, ocean chemistry and radionuclide involved, it is necessary to analyze sediment mineralogy. Clay mineral is dominant in seabed mineral and suspended sediment as the result of x-ray diffraction. Radionuclide sorbed to silty-clay mineral can be rather transported to ocean than scavenged to seabed because of low quantity and fine grained suspended sediment in the coast around the Kori and the Wolsung. The result of adsorption examinations shows that {sup 139}Ce and {sup 51}Cr and {sup 110m}Ag are strongly sorbed to suspended particle, while {sup 137}Cs is less sorbed and {sup 60}Co uptake is varied with experiment condition, which can be inferred from various biological factors. (author). 9 refs., 2 tabs., 7 figs.

  9. Model for radionuclide transport in running waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonsson, Karin; Elert, Mark [Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2005-11-15

    Two sites in Sweden are currently under investigation by SKB for their suitability as places for deep repository of radioactive waste, the Forsmark and Simpevarp/Laxemar area. As a part of the safety assessment, SKB has formulated a biosphere model with different sub-models for different parts of the ecosystem in order to be able to predict the dose to humans following a possible radionuclide discharge from a future deep repository. In this report, a new model concept describing radionuclide transport in streams is presented. The main difference from the previous model for running water used by SKB, where only dilution of the inflow of radionuclides was considered, is that the new model includes parameterizations also of the exchange processes present along the stream. This is done in order to be able to investigate the effect of the retention on the transport and to be able to estimate the resulting concentrations in the different parts of the system. The concentrations determined with this new model could later be used for order of magnitude predictions of the dose to humans. The presented model concept is divided in two parts, one hydraulic and one radionuclide transport model. The hydraulic model is used to determine the flow conditions in the stream channel and is based on the assumption of uniform flow and quasi-stationary conditions. The results from the hydraulic model are used in the radionuclide transport model where the concentration is determined in the different parts of the stream ecosystem. The exchange processes considered are exchange with the sediments due to diffusion, advective transport and sedimentation/resuspension and uptake of radionuclides in biota. Transport of both dissolved radionuclides and sorbed onto particulates is considered. Sorption kinetics in the stream water phase is implemented as the time scale of the residence time in the stream water probably is short in comparison to the time scale of the kinetic sorption. In the sediment

  10. Radionuclide content of Las Vegas wash sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudin, M.J.; Meyers, A.M.; Johnson, W.H. [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    1996-06-01

    The Las Vegas Wash is an excavated waterway channel which drains all surface water and effluent discharge from sewage-treatment facilities from the greater Las Vegas Metropolitan Area to Lake Mead. Runoff and erosion processes are expected to transport man-made radioactivity that was deposited over the past several decades in the Las Vegas Valley. Additionally, radionuclides disposed of via the city`s sanitary system are expected to accumulate in the Wash sediments. Fine and coarse sediment samples were collected at 100 m intervals and analyzed to determine the distribution of alpha- and gamma-emitting radionuclides in the lower 5,500 in of the Las Vegas Wash. Results indicate little accumulation of long-lived fission products in upstream Wash sediments. However, trace amounts of fission products measured in downstream sediments suggest the resuspension and transport of radioactive particulate matter within the Wash. Levels of naturally-occurring radionuclides found in Wash sediments were found to be consistent with levels typically found in southeast Nevada soils.

  11. Fungi and ionizing radiation from radionuclides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dighton, John; Tugay, Tatyana; Zhdanova, Nelli

    2008-04-01

    Radionuclides in the environment are one of the major concerns to human health and ecotoxicology. The explosion at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant renewed interest in the role played by fungi in mediating radionuclide movement in ecosystems. As a result of these studies, our knowledge of the importance of fungi, especially in their mycorrhizal habit, in long-term accumulation of radionuclides, transfer up the food chain and regulation of accumulation by their host plants was increased. Micro-fungi have been found to be highly resilient to exposure to ionizing radiation, with fungi having been isolated from within and around the Chernobyl plant. Radioresistance of some fungal species has been linked to the presence of melanin, which has been shown to have emerging properties of acting as an energy transporter for metabolism and has been implicated in enhancing hyphal growth and directed growth of sensitized hyphae towards sources of radiation. Using this recently acquired knowledge, we may be in a better position to suggest the use of fungi in bioremediation of radioactively contaminated sites and cleanup of industrial effluent.

  12. Radionuclides in peat bogs and energy peat; Turvesoiden ja polttoturpeen radionuklidit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helariutta, K.; Rantavaara, A. [Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki (Finland); Lehtovaara, J. [Vapo Oy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    2000-06-01

    The study was aimed at improving the general view on radionuclides contents in energy peat produced in Finland. The annual harvest of fuel peat in 1994 was studied extensively. Also thirteen peat bogs used for peat production and one bog in natural condition were analysed for vertical distributions of several radionuclides. These distributions demonstrate the future change in radioactivity of energy peat. Both natural nuclides emitting gamma radiation ({sup 238}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 232}Th, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 40}K) and radiocaesium ({sup 137}Cs, {sup 134}Cs) origin in fallout from a nuclear power plant accident (1986) and in atmospheric nuclear weapon tests were analysed. The beta and alpha active natural nuclides of lead and polonium ({sup 210}Pb, {sup 210}Po) were determined on a set of peat samples. These nuclides potentially contribute to radiation exposure through inhalation when partially released to atmosphere during combustion of peat. The activity concentrations of natural radionuclides often increased towards the deepest peat bog layers whereas the radioactive caesium deposited from atmosphere was missing in the deep layers. In undisturbed surface layers of a natural bog and peat production bogs the contents of {sup 210}Pb and {sup 210}Po exceeded those of the deeper peat layers. The nuclides of the uranium series in the samples were generally not in radioactive equilibrium, as different environmental processes change their activity ratios in peat. Radiation exposure from handling and utilisation of peat ash was estimated with activity indices derived from the data for energy peat harvested in 1994. Intervention doses were exceeded in a minor selection of samples due to {sup 137}Cs, whereas natural radionuclides contributed very little to the doses. (orig.)

  13. Radionuclides in peat bogs and energy peat; Turvesoiden ja polttoturpeen radionuklidit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helariutta, K.; Rantavaara, A. [Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki (Finland); Lehtovaara, J. [Vapo Oy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    2000-06-01

    The study was aimed at improving the general view on radionuclides contents in energy peat produced in Finland. The annual harvest of fuel peat in 1994 was studied extensively. Also thirteen peat bogs used for peat production and one bog in natural condition were analysed for vertical distributions of several radionuclides. These distributions demonstrate the future change in radioactivity of energy peat. Both natural nuclides emitting gamma radiation ({sup 238}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 232}Th, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 40}K) and radiocaesium ({sup 137}Cs, {sup 134}Cs) origin in fallout from a nuclear power plant accident (1986) and in atmospheric nuclear weapon tests were analysed. The beta and alpha active natural nuclides of lead and polonium ({sup 210}Pb, {sup 210}Po) were determined on a set of peat samples. These nuclides potentially contribute to radiation exposure through inhalation when partially released to atmosphere during combustion of peat. The activity concentrations of natural radionuclides often increased towards the deepest peat bog layers whereas the radioactive caesium deposited from atmosphere was missing in the deep layers. In undisturbed surface layers of a natural bog and peat production bogs the contents of {sup 210}Pb and {sup 210}Po exceeded those of the deeper peat layers. The nuclides of the uranium series in the samples were generally not in radioactive equilibrium, as different environmental processes change their activity ratios in peat. Radiation exposure from handling and utilisation of peat ash was estimated with activity indices derived from the data for energy peat harvested in 1994. Intervention doses were exceeded in a minor selection of samples due to {sup 137}Cs, whereas natural radionuclides contributed very little to the doses. (orig.)

  14. One click film (OCF) dosimetry system for routine QA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, So Young; Yi, Byong Yong; Kim, Jong Hoon; Ahn, Seung Do; Lee, Sang Wook; Choi, Eun Kyoung [Asan Medical Center, College of Medicine, University of Ulsan, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Joo, Kwan Sik [MyongJi University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-12-15

    To develop a practical film dosimetry system for routine Quality Assurance (QA). An One Click Film (OCF) Dosimetry system was designed to perform swift routine QA with functions including automatic fog value elimination, angle adjustment, automatic symmetry calculation, and realtime profile generation with the ability to display realtime three-dimensional dose distributions. The most frequently used functions for routine QA, such as the elimination of the fog value, conversion into an H and D curve, symmetry, and isodose distribution, can be achieved with only one click. Reliable results were achieved with the OCF dosimetry with simpler steps than other commercially available film dosimetry systems for routine QA. More research on the refined user interface will make this system be clinically useful.

  15. Software for evaluation of EPR-dosimetry performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishkina, E A; Timofeev, Yu S; Ivanov, D V

    2014-06-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) with tooth enamel is a method extensively used for retrospective external dosimetry. Different research groups apply different equipment, sample preparation procedures and spectrum processing algorithms for EPR dosimetry. A uniform algorithm for description and comparison of performances was designed and implemented in a new computer code. The aim of the paper is to introduce the new software 'EPR-dosimetry performance'. The computer code is a user-friendly tool for providing a full description of method-specific capabilities of EPR tooth dosimetry, from metrological characteristics to practical limitations in applications. The software designed for scientists and engineers has several applications, including support of method calibration by evaluation of calibration parameters, evaluation of critical value and detection limit for registration of radiation-induced signal amplitude, estimation of critical value and detection limit for dose evaluation, estimation of minimal detectable value for anthropogenic dose assessment and description of method uncertainty.

  16. Retrospective dosimetry analyses of reactor vessel cladding samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenwood, L. R.; Soderquist, C. Z. [Battelle Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Fero, A. H. [Westinghouse Electric Company, Cranberry Twp., PA 16066 (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Reactor pressure vessel cladding samples for Ringhals Units 3 and 4 in Sweden were analyzed using retrospective reactor dosimetry techniques. The objective was to provide the best estimates of the neutron fluence for comparison with neutron transport calculations. A total of 51 stainless steel samples consisting of chips weighing approximately 100 to 200 mg were removed from selected locations around the pressure vessel and were sent to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for analysis. The samples were fully characterized and analyzed for radioactive isotopes, with special interest in the presence of Nb-93m. The RPV cladding retrospective dosimetry results will be combined with a re-evaluation of the surveillance capsule dosimetry and with ex-vessel neutron dosimetry results to form a comprehensive 3D comparison of measurements to calculations performed with 3D deterministic transport code. (authors)

  17. Proceedings of the third conference on radiation protection and dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swaja, R.E.; Sims, C.S.; Casson, W.H. [eds.

    1991-10-01

    The Third Conference on Radiation Protection and Dosimetry was held during October 21--24, 1991, at the Sheraton Plaza Hotel in Orlando, Florida. This meeting was designed with the objectives of promoting communication among applied, research, regulatory, and standards personnel involved in radiation protection, and providing them with sufficient information to evaluate their programs. To meet these objectives, a technical program consisting of more than 75 invited and contributed oral presentations encompassing all aspects of radiation protection was prepared. General topics considered in the technical session included external dosimetry, internal dosimetry, instruments, accident dosimetry, regulations and standards, research advances, and applied program experience. In addition, special sessions were held to afford attendees the opportunity to make short presentations of recent work or to discuss topics of general interest. Individual reports are processed separately on the database.

  18. Methodology for estimating radiation dose rates to freshwater biota exposed to radionuclides in the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaylock, B.G.; Frank, M.L.; O`Neal, B.R.

    1993-08-01

    The purpose of this report is to present a methodology for evaluating the potential for aquatic biota to incur effects from exposure to chronic low-level radiation in the environment. Aquatic organisms inhabiting an environment contaminated with radioactivity receive external radiation from radionuclides in water, sediment, and from other biota such as vegetation. Aquatic organisms receive internal radiation from radionuclides ingested via food and water and, in some cases, from radionuclides absorbed through the skin and respiratory organs. Dose rate equations, which have been developed previously, are presented for estimating the radiation dose rate to representative aquatic organisms from alpha, beta, and gamma irradiation from external and internal sources. Tables containing parameter values for calculating radiation doses from selected alpha, beta, and gamma emitters are presented in the appendix to facilitate dose rate calculations. The risk of detrimental effects to aquatic biota from radiation exposure is evaluated by comparing the calculated radiation dose rate to biota to the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) recommended dose rate limit of 0.4 mGy h{sup {minus}1} (1 rad d{sup {minus}1}). A dose rate no greater than 0.4 mGy h{sup {minus}1} to the most sensitive organisms should ensure the protection of populations of aquatic organisms. DOE`s recommended dose rate is based on a number of published reviews on the effects of radiation on aquatic organisms that are summarized in the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements Report No. 109 (NCRP 1991). DOE recommends that if the results of radiological models or dosimetric measurements indicate that a radiation dose rate of 0. 1 mGy h{sup {minus}1} will be exceeded, then a more detailed evaluation of the potential ecological consequences of radiation exposure to endemic populations should be conducted.

  19. Methodology for estimating radiation dose rates to freshwater biota exposed to radionuclides in the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaylock, B.G.; Frank, M.L.; O`Neal, B.R.

    1993-08-01

    The purpose of this report is to present a methodology for evaluating the potential for aquatic biota to incur effects from exposure to chronic low-level radiation in the environment. Aquatic organisms inhabiting an environment contaminated with radioactivity receive external radiation from radionuclides in water, sediment, and from other biota such as vegetation. Aquatic organisms receive internal radiation from radionuclides ingested via food and water and, in some cases, from radionuclides absorbed through the skin and respiratory organs. Dose rate equations, which have been developed previously, are presented for estimating the radiation dose rate to representative aquatic organisms from alpha, beta, and gamma irradiation from external and internal sources. Tables containing parameter values for calculating radiation doses from selected alpha, beta, and gamma emitters are presented in the appendix to facilitate dose rate calculations. The risk of detrimental effects to aquatic biota from radiation exposure is evaluated by comparing the calculated radiation dose rate to biota to the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) recommended dose rate limit of 0.4 mGy h{sup {minus}1} (1 rad d{sup {minus}1}). A dose rate no greater than 0.4 mGy h{sup {minus}1} to the most sensitive organisms should ensure the protection of populations of aquatic organisms. DOE`s recommended dose rate is based on a number of published reviews on the effects of radiation on aquatic organisms that are summarized in the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements Report No. 109 (NCRP 1991). DOE recommends that if the results of radiological models or dosimetric measurements indicate that a radiation dose rate of 0. 1 mGy h{sup {minus}1} will be exceeded, then a more detailed evaluation of the potential ecological consequences of radiation exposure to endemic populations should be conducted.

  20. Natural radionuclides in major aquifer systems of the Parana sedimentary basin, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonotto, Daniel Marcos, E-mail: danielbonotto@yahoo.com.br [Departamento de Petrologia e Metalogenia, IGCE-Instituto de Geociencias e Ciencias Exatas, UNESP-Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho, Av. 24-A, No. 1515 - CP 178, CEP 13506-900-Rio Claro, SP (Brazil)

    2011-10-15

    This paper describes the natural radioactivity of groundwater occurring in sedimentary (Bauru and Guarani) and fractured rock (Serra Geral) aquifer systems in the Parana sedimentary basin, South America that is extensively used for drinking purposes, among others. The measurements of gross alpha and gross beta radioactivity as well the activity concentration of the natural dissolved radionuclides {sup 40}K, {sup 238}U, {sup 234}U, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 222}Rn, {sup 210}Po and {sup 210}Pb were held in 80 tubular wells drilled in 21 municipalities located at Sao Paulo State and its border with Mato Grosso do Sul State in Brazil. Most of the gross alpha radioactivity data were below 1 mBq/L, whereas values exceeding the gross beta radioactivity detection limit of 30 mBq/L were found. The radioelement solubility in the studied systems varied according to the sequence radon>radium>other radionuclides and the higher porosity of sandstones relatively to basalts and diabases could justify the enhanced presence of dissolved radon in the porous aquifer. The implications of the data obtained in terms of standards established for defining the drinking water quality have also been discussed. The population-weighted average activity concentration for these radionuclides was compared to the guideline value of 0.1 mSv/yr for the total effective dose and discussed in terms of the choice of the dose conversion factors. - Highlights: > Integration of distinct radiometric data acquired in groundwaters. > Radiation dose in important hydrological resources in South America. > Contribution of {sup 226}Ra for the more accentuated radiation dose in aquifers. > Dose factors for Rn and generation of values exceeding the maximum of 0.1 mSv/yr.

  1. Image-based dosimetry for selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT) using yttrium-90 microspheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selwyn, Reed G.

    90Y-loaded microspheres are currently used as a palliative treatment for patients with primary and metastatic solid liver tumors. These microspheres contain radioactive 90Y, which decays via beta-minus transition to 90Zr. While the normal liver receives about 75% of its blood supply from the portal vein, hepatic tumors receive their blood supply almost exclusively from the hepatic artery. Taking advantage of this unique blood flow, radioactive microspheres are injected into the hepatic artery resulting in a preferential distribution to tumor sites within the liver. Studies show that the single best prognostic indicator for patient response is the tumor-to-normal tissue (T:N) activity uptake ratio. However, 90Y emits very few photons its broad bremsstrahlung spectrum leads to diffuse, low resolution images, which are insufficient for accurate T:N quantification. Thus, the first objective was to develop a PET-labeled microsphere as a surrogate for the therapeutic microsphere to provide accurate biodistribution information. Furthermore, patient outcome is also suspected to be linked to the mean tumor dose and tumor dose volume histogram. Therefore, a second objective was to develop and validate a method to calculate the dose distribution within the tumor and normal liver tissue. Computer software that generates three-dimensional (3D) dose distributions was validated by comparing results to experimental measurements. The novel development of a 3D gel dosimeter will be discussed as well as a new protocol for 2D film dosimetry. Both dosimetry methods were validated but only film provided the desired accuracy. The overall accuracy of the dose distribution depends on the uncertainty of the 90Y assay, which can extend to 15% at 1sigma. Therefore, the third objective was to develop an accurate non-destructive assay of 90Y. To this end, a new 90Y positron branching ratio was measured and a clinically relevant transfer standard was developed. In summation, this thesis will

  2. Dosimetry in Thermal Neutron Irradiation Facility at BMRR

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Radiation dosimetry for Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT) has been performed since 1959 at Thermal Neutron Irradiation Facility (TNIF) of the three-megawatt light-water cooled Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR). In the early 1990s when more effective drug carriers were developed for NCT, in which the eye melanoma and brain tumors in rats were irradiated in situ, extensive clinical trials of small animals began using a focused thermal neutron beam. To improve the dosimetry at irradiation f...

  3. Why is a high accuracy needed in dosimetry. [Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanzl, L.H.

    1976-01-01

    Dose and exposure intercomparisons on a national or international basis have become an important component of quality assurance in the practice of good radiotherapy. A high degree of accuracy of ..gamma.. and x radiation dosimetry is essential in our international society, where medical information is so readily exchanged and used. The value of accurate dosimetry lies mainly in the avoidance of complications in normal tissue and an optimal degree of tumor control.

  4. EPID dosimetry for pretreatment quality assurance with two commercial systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Daniel W; Kumaraswamy, Lalith; Bakhtiari, Mohammad; Malhotra, Harish K; Podgorsak, Matthew B

    2012-07-05

    This study compares the EPID dosimetry algorithms of two commercial systems for pretreatment QA, and analyzes dosimetric measurements made with each system alongside the results obtained with a standard diode array. 126 IMRT fields are examined with both EPID dosimetry systems (EPIDose by Sun Nuclear Corporation, Melbourne FL, and Portal Dosimetry by Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto CA) and the diode array, MapCHECK (also by Sun Nuclear Corporation). Twenty-six VMAT arcs of varying modulation complexity are examined with the EPIDose and MapCHECK systems. Optimization and commissioning testing of the EPIDose physics model is detailed. Each EPID IMRT QA system is tested for sensitivity to critical TPS beam model errors. Absolute dose gamma evaluation (3%, 3 mm, 10% threshold, global normalization to the maximum measured dose) yields similar results (within 1%-2%) for all three dosimetry modalities, except in the case of off-axis breast tangents. For these off-axis fields, the Portal Dosimetry system does not adequately model EPID response, though a previously-published correction algorithm improves performance. Both MapCHECK and EPIDose are found to yield good results for VMAT QA, though limitations are discussed. Both the Portal Dosimetry and EPIDose algorithms, though distinctly different, yield similar results for the majority of clinical IMRT cases, in close agreement with a standard diode array. Portal dose image prediction may overlook errors in beam modeling beyond the calculation of the actual fluence, while MapCHECK and EPIDose include verification of the dose calculation algorithm, albeit in simplified phantom conditions (and with limited data density in the case of the MapCHECK detector). Unlike the commercial Portal Dosimetry package, the EPIDose algorithm (when sufficiently optimized) allows accurate analysis of EPID response for off-axis, asymmetric fields, and for orthogonal VMAT QA. Other forms of QA are necessary to supplement the limitations of the

  5. Basic principles in the radiation dosimetry of nuclear medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stabin, Michael; Xu, Xie George

    2014-05-01

    The basic principles of the use of radiation dosimetry in nuclear medicine are reviewed. The basic structure of the main mathematical equations are given and formal dosimetry systems are discussed. An extensive overview of the history and current status of anthropomorphic models (phantoms) is given. The sources and magnitudes of uncertainties in calculated internal dose estimates are reviewed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A practical three-dimensional dosimetry system for radiation therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Pengyi; Adamovics, John; Oldham, Mark

    2006-01-01

    There is a pressing need for a practical three-dimensional (3D) dosimetry system, convenient for clinical use, and with the accuracy and resolution to enable comprehensive verification of the complex dose distributions typical of modern radiation therapy. Here we introduce a dosimetry system that can achieve this challenge, consisting of a radiochromic dosimeter (PRESAGE™) and a commercial optical computed tomography (CT) scanning system (OCTOPUS™). PRESAGE™ is a transparent material with com...

  7. Individual dosimetry of workers and patients: implementation and perspectives; La dosimetrie individuelle des travailleurs et de patients: mise en oeuvre et perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rannou, A.; Aubert, B.; Lahaye, Th.; Scaff, P.; Casanova, Ph.; Van Bladel, L.; Queinnec, F.; Valendru, N.; Jehanno, J.; Grude, E.; Berard, Ph.; Desbree, A.; Kafrouni, H.; Paquet, F.; Vanhavere, F.; Bridier, A.; Ginestet, Ch.; Magne, S.; Donadille, L.; Bordy, J.M.; Bottollier-Depois, J.F.; Barrere, J.L.; Ferragut, A.; Metivier, H.; Gaillard-Lecanu, E

    2008-07-01

    These days organised by the section of the technical protection of the S.F.R.P. review the different techniques of dosimetry used in France and Europe, and present the future orientations.The different interventions are as follow: Individual exposures of the workers: historic assessment and perspectives; medical exposure: where are the doses; legal obligations in individual dosimetry: which are the objective and the need on the subject; the dosimetry follow-up of workers by the S.I.S.E.R.I. system: assessment and perspectives; impact of the norm ISO 20553 on the follow-up of internal exposure; the implementation of the patient dose measurement in Belgium; techniques of passive dosimetry used in Europe; Supervision radiation protection at EDF: long term and short term approach; Comparison active and passive dosimetry at Melox; methodology for the choice of new neutron dosemeters; the working group M.E.D.O.R.: guide of internal dosimetry for the use of practitioners; O.E.D.I.P.E.: tool of modeling for the personalized internal dosimetry; the use of the Monte-Carlo method for the planning of the cancer treatment by radiotherapy becomes a reality; the works of the committee 2 of the ICRP; passive dosimetry versus operational dosimetry: situation in Europe; Implementation of the in vivo dosimetry in a radiotherapy department: experience of the Gustave Roussy institute; experience feedback on the in vivo measures in radiotherapy, based on the use of O.S.L. pellets; multi points O.S.L. instrumentation for the radiation dose monitoring in radiotherapy; dosimetry for extremities for medical applications: principle results of the European contract C.O.N.R.A.D.; references and perspectives in dosimetry; what perspectives for numerical dosimetry, an example: Sievert; system of dose management: how to answer to needs; the last technical evolutions in terms of electronic dosimetry in nuclear power plant; the fourth generation type reactors: what dosimetry. (N.C.)

  8. Accidental neutron dosimetry with human hair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekendahl, Daniela; Bečková, Věra; Zdychová, Vlasta; Bulánek, Boris; Prouza, Zdeněk; Štefánik, Milan

    2014-11-01

    Human hair contains sulfur, which can be activated by fast neutrons. The 32S(n,p)32P reaction with a threshold of 2.5 MeV was used for fast neutron dose estimation. It is a very important parameter for individual dose reconstruction with regards to the heterogeneity of the neutron transfer to the human body. Samples of human hair were irradiated in a radial channel of a training reactor VR-1. 32P activity in hair was measured both, directly by means of a proportional counter, and as ash dispersed in a liquid scintillator. Based on neutron spectrum estimation, a relationship between the neutron dose and induced activity was derived. The experiment verified the practical feasibility of this dosimetry method in cases of criticality accidents or malevolent acts with nuclear materials.

  9. EPR tooth dosimetry of SNTS area inhabitants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sholom, Sergey [Scientific Center for Radiation Medicine, Melnikova str., 53, Kiev (Ukraine); Desrosiers, Marc [Ionizing Radiation Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Bouville, Andre; Luckyanov, Nicholas [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, 6120 Executive Boulevard, Bethesda, MD (United States); Chumak, Vadim [Scientific Center for Radiation Medicine, Melnikova str., 53, Kiev (Ukraine); Simon, Steven L. [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, 6120 Executive Boulevard, Bethesda, MD (United States)], E-mail: ssimon@mail.nih.gov

    2007-07-15

    The determination of external dose to teeth of inhabitants of settlements near the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site (SNTS) was conducted using the EPR dosimetry technique to assess radiation doses associated with exposure to radioactive fallout from the test site. In this study, tooth doses have been reconstructed for 103 persons with all studied teeth having been formed before the first nuclear test in 1949. Doses above those received from natural background radiation, termed 'accident doses', were found to lie in the range from zero to approximately 2 Gy, with one exception, a dose for one person from Semipalatinsk city was approximately 9 Gy. The variability of reconstructed doses within each of the settlements demonstrated heterogeneity of the deposited fallout as well as variations in lifestyle. The village mean external gamma doses for residents of nine settlements were in the range from a few tens of mGy to approximately 100 mGy.

  10. Dosimetry for radiocolloid therapy of cystic craniopharyngiomas

    CERN Document Server

    Rojas, E L; Lallena, A M; Bodineau, C; Galan, P; Al-Dweri, Feras M.O.; Lallena, Antonio M.; Bodineau, Coral; Galan, Pedro

    2003-01-01

    The dosimetry for radiocolloid therapy of cystic craniopharyngiomas is investigated. Analytical calculations based on the Loevinger and the Berger formulae for electrons and photons, respectively, are compared with Monte Carlo simulations. The role of the material of which the colloid introduced inside the craniopharyngioma is made of as well as that forming the cyst wall is analyzed. It is found that the analytical approaches provide a very good description of the simulated data in the conditions where they can be applied (i.e., in the case of a uniform and infinite homogeneous medium). However, the consideration of the different materials and interfaces produces a strong reduction of the dose delivered to the cyst wall in relation to that predicted by the Loevinger and the Berger formulae.

  11. EPR-dosimetry with carious teeth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sholom, S.V. E-mail: sholom@leed1.kiev.ua; Haskell, E.H.; Hayes, R.B.; Chumak, V.V.; Kenner, G.H

    2000-12-15

    The effect of caries in EPR dosimetry of tooth enamel (in the dose range of 0-1 Gy) was investigated. The enamel of each tooth was divided into carious, non-carious and intermediate portions. The EPR signals of enamel at g=2.0018 (dosimetric) and g=2.0045 (native) were examined. The intensity of the dosimetric signal was the same for all three portions, while that of the native signal was higher for carious portions than for non-carious and intermediate portions. Reconstruction of the laboratory applied doses was done using all portions. Reasonable correlation between nominal and reconstructed doses was found in most cases. The effect of alkali treatment on the native and dosimetric signals of enamel was also tested. Reduction of the native signal intensity, particularly in the carious portions, was found to be the only significant effect. This resulted in a slight improvement in the accuracy of the reconstructed doses.

  12. In vivo dosimetry during tangential breast treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heukelom, S.; Lanson, J.H.; Tienhoven, G. van; Mijnheer, B.J. (Nederlands Kanker Inst. ' Antoni van Leeuwenhoekhuis' , Amsterdam (Netherlands))

    1991-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) dose distribution as calculated in clinical practice for tangential breast treatment was verified through in vivo dosimetry. Clinical practice at Netherlands Cancer Institute implies use of 8MV X-ray beams, 2-D treatment planning system, collimator rotation and a limited set of patient data for dose calculations. By positioning diodes at the central beam axes as well as in the periphery of the breast the magnitude of dose values at the isocentre and in points situated in high-dose regions behind the lung could be assessed. The position of diodes was verified by means of an on-line portal imaging device. Reproducibility of these in vivo dose measurements was better than 2% (1SD). This study shows that on the average dose delivery at the isocentre is 2% less at the points behind the lung, 5.7% higher with respect to the calculated dose values. Detailed analysis of these in vivo dosimetry results, based on dose measurements performed with a breast shaped phantom, yielded the magnitudes of errors in predicted dose due to several limitations in dose calculation algorithms and dose calculation procedure. These limitations are each introducing an error of several percent but are compensating each other for the dose calculation at the isocentre. It is concluded that dose distribution in patient for this treatment technique and dose calculation procedure can be predicted with a 2-D treatment planning system in an acceptable way. A more accurate prediction of dose distribution can be performed but requires an estimation of the lack of scatter due to missing tissue, the change in the dose distribution due to oblique incident beams and incorporation of the actual output of the treatment machine in the assessment of the number of monitor units. (author). 28 refs.; 3 figs.; 4 tabs.

  13. Fast neutron activation dosimetry with TLDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearson, D.W.; Moran, P.R.

    1975-01-01

    Fast neutron activation using threshold reactions is the only neutron dosimetry method which offers complete discrimination against gamma-rays and preserves some information about the neutron energy. Conventional activation foil technique requires sensitive radiation detectors to count the decay of the neutron induced activity. For extensive measurements at low neutron fluences, vast outlays of counting equipment are required. TL dosimeters are inexpensive, extremely sensitive radiation detectors. The work of Mayhugh et al. (Proc. Third Int. Conf. on Luminescence Dosimetry, Riso Report 249, 1040, (1971)) showed that CaSO/sub 4/: DyTLDs could be used to measure the integrated dose from the decay of the radioactivity produced in the dosimeters by exposure to thermal neutrons. This neatly combines the activation detector and counter functions in one solid state device. This work has been expanded to fast neutron exposures and other TL phosphors. The reactions /sup 19/F(n, 2n)/sup 18/F, /sup 32/S(n,p)/sup 32/P, /sup 24/Mg(n,p)/sup 24/, and /sup 64/Zn(n,p)/sup 64/Cu were found useful for fast neutron activation in commercial TLDs. As each TLD is its own integrating decay particle counter, many activation measurements can be made at the same time. The subsequent readings of the TL signals can be done serially after the induced radioactivity has decayed, using only one TL reader. The neutron detection sensitivity is limited mainly by the number statistics of the neutron activations. The precision of the neutron measurement is within a factor of two of conventional foil activation for comparable mass detectors. Commercially available TLDs can measure neutron fluences of 10/sup 9/n/cm/sup 2/ with 10 percent precision.

  14. High sensitive radiation detector for radiology dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valente, M.; Malano, F. [Instituto de Fisica Enrique Gaviola, Oficina 102 FaMAF - UNC, Av. Luis Medina Allende, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina); Molina, W.; Vedelago, J., E-mail: valente@famac.unc.edu.ar [Laboratorio de Investigaciones e Instrumentacion en Fisica Aplicada a la Medicina e Imagenes por Rayos X, Laboratorio 448 FaMAF - UNC, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina)

    2014-08-15

    Fricke solution has a wide range of applications as radiation detector and dosimetry. It is particularly appreciated in terms of relevant comparative advantages, like tissue equivalence when prepared in aqueous media like gel matrix, continuous mapping capability, dose rate recorded and incident direction independence as well as linear dose response. This work presents the development and characterization of a novel Fricke gel system, based on modified chemical compositions making possible its application in clinical radiology. Properties of standard Fricke gel dosimeter for high dose levels are used as starting point and suitable chemical modifications are introduced and carefully investigated in order to attain high resolution for low dose ranges, like those corresponding to radiology interventions. The developed Fricke gel radiation dosimeter system achieves the expected typical dose dependency, actually showing linear response in the dose range from 20 up to 4000 mGy. Systematic investigations including several chemical compositions are carried out in order to obtain a good enough dosimeter response for low dose levels. A suitable composition among those studied is selected as a good candidate for low dose level radiation dosimetry consisting on a modified Fricke solution fixed to a gel matrix containing benzoic acid along with sulfuric acid, ferrous sulfate, xylenol orange and ultra-pure reactive grade water. Dosimeter samples are prepared in standard vials for its in phantom irradiation and further characterization by spectrophotometry measuring visible light transmission and absorbance before and after irradiation. Samples are irradiated by typical kV X-ray tubes and calibrated Farmer type ionization chamber is used as reference to measure dose rates inside phantoms in at vials locations. Once sensitive material composition is already optimized, dose-response curves show significant improvement regarding overall sensitivity for low dose levels. According to

  15. Personal Dosimetry Enhancement for Underground Workplaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Thinová

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Personal dosimetry for underground workers mainly concerns measurement of the concentration of radon (and its daughters and the correct application of the data in dose calculation, using a biokinetic model for lung dosimetry. A conservative approach for estimating the potential dose in caves (or underground is based on solid state alpha track detector measurements. The obtained dataset is converted into an annual effective dose in agreement with the ICRP recommendations using the “cave factor”, the value of which depends on the spectrum of aerosol particles, or on the proportional representation of the unattached and the attached fraction and on the equilibrium factor. The main difference between apartments and caves is the absence of aerosol sources, high humidity, low ventilation rate and the uneven surface in caves. A more precisely determined dose value would have a significant impact on radon remedies or on restricting the time workers stay underground. In order to determine  how the effective dose is calculated, it is necessary to divide these areas into distinct categories by the following measuring procedures: continual radon measurement (to capture the differences in EERC between working hours and night-time, and also between daily and seasonal radon concentration variations; regular measurements of radon and its daughters to estimate the equilibrium factor and the presence of 218Po; regular indoor air flow measurements to study the location of the radon supply and its transfer among individual areas of the cave; natural radioactive element content evaluation in subsoils and in water inside/outside, a study of the radon sources in the cave; aerosol particle-size spectrum measurements to determine the free fraction; monitoring the behaviour of guides and workers to record the actual time spent in the cave, in relation to the continuously monitored levels of Rn concentration. 

  16. Review of the near-earth space radiation dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jianming; Chen, Xiaoqian; Li, Shiyou

    2016-07-01

    The near-earth space radiation environment has a great effect to the spacecraft and maybe do harm to the astronaut's health. Thus, how to measure the radiation has become a serious challenge. In order to provide sufficient protection both for astronauts and for instruments on-board, dose equivalent and linear energy transfer should be measured instead of merely measuring total radiation dose. This paper reviews the methods of radiation measurement and presents a brief introduction of dosimetry instruments. The method can be divided into two different kinds, i.e., positive dosimetry and passive dosimetry. The former usually includes electronic devices which can be used for data storage and can offer simultaneous monitoring on space radiation. The passive dosimetry has a much simple structure, and need extra operation after on-orbit missions for measuring. To get more reliable data of radiation dosimetry, various instruments and methods had been applied in the spacecrafts and the manned spacecrafts in particular. The outlook of the development in the space radiation dosimetry measurement is also presented.

  17. Human Anti-Oxidation Protein A1M—A Potential Kidney Protection Agent in Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Ahlstedt

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT has been in clinical use for 15 years to treat metastatic neuroendocrine tumors. PRRT is limited by reabsorption and retention of the administered radiolabeled somatostatin analogues in the proximal tubule. Consequently, it is essential to develop and employ methods to protect the kidneys during PRRT. Today, infusion of positively charged amino acids is the standard method of kidney protection. Other methods, such as administration of amifostine, are still under evaluation and show promising results. α1-microglobulin (A1M is a reductase and radical scavenging protein ubiquitously present in plasma and extravascular tissue. Human A1M has antioxidation properties and has been shown to prevent radiation-induced in vitro cell damage and protect non-irradiated surrounding cells. It has recently been shown in mice that exogenously infused A1M and the somatostatin analogue octreotide are co-localized in proximal tubules of the kidney after intravenous infusion. In this review we describe the current situation of kidney protection during PRRT, discuss the necessity and implications of more precise dosimetry and present A1M as a new, potential candidate for renal protection during PRRT and related targeted radionuclide therapies.

  18. Effect of chemical composition and density of the pelvic structure in intracavitary brachytherapy dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez-Aguilera, N.; Torres-García, E.; Mitsoura, E.

    2011-03-01

    High dose rate (HDR) and low dose rate (LDR) intracavitary brachytherapies dosimetry in clinical practice are typically performed by commercial treatment planning systems. However, these systems do not fully consider the heterogeneities present in the real structure of the patient. The aim of this work is to obtain isodose curves and surfaces around the usual array of sources used in LDR ( 137Cs) and HDR ( 192Ir) intracavitary brachytherapy by Monte Carlo simulation, considering the real anatomic structure, density and chemical composition of media and tissues from the female pelvic region. The structural information was obtained from computed tomography images in the DICOM format. A voxel phantom (VP) was developed to perform ionizing radiation transport, considering the gamma spectrum of 137Cs and 192Ir. The absorbed dose was computed within each voxel of 2×2×3 mm 3. Four materials were considered in the VP—air, fat, muscle tissue and bone; however, one material per voxel was defined. Results show and quantify the effect of density and chemical composition of the medium on the absorbed dose distribution. According to them, the treatment planning systems underestimate the absorbed dose by 8% approximately for both radionuclides. In a heterogeneous medium, the absorbed dose distribution of 192Ir is more irregular than that of 137Cs but spatially better defined.

  19. Background radiation and individual dosimetry in the costal area of Tamil Nadu, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Naoki; Brahmanandhan, G M; Yoshida, Masahiro; Takamura, Noboru; Suyama, Akihiko; Koguchi, Yasuhiro; Juto, Norimichi; Raj, Y Lenin; Winsley, Godwin; Selvasekarapandian, S

    2011-07-01

    South coast of India is known as the high-level background radiation area (HBRA) mainly due to beach sands that contain natural radionuclides as components of the mineral monazite. The rich deposit of monazite is unevenly distributed along the coastal belt of Tamil Nadu and Kerala. An HBRA site that laid in 2×7 m along the sea was found in the beach of Chinnavillai, Tamil Nadu, where the maximum ambient dose equivalent reached as high as 162.7 mSv y(-1). From the sands collected at the HBRA spot, the high-purity germanium semi-conductor detector identified six nuclides of thorium series, four nuclides of uranium series and two nuclides belonging to actinium series. The highest radioactivity observed was 43.7 Bq g(-1) of Th-228. The individual dose of five inhabitants in Chinnavillai, as measured by the radiophotoluminescence glass dosimetry system, demonstrated the average dose of 7.17 mSv y(-1) ranging from 2.79 to 14.17 mSv y(-1).

  20. Radiation exposure and dosimetry in transplant patients due to Nuclear Medicine studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Maghraby, T. A. F. [Leiden Univ., Leiden (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiology, Div. of Nuclear Medicine; Cairo Univ., Cairo (Egypt). Faculty of Medicine, Dept. of Oncology and Nuclear Medicine; Camps, J. A. J.; Geleyns, J.; Pauwels, E. K. J. [Leiden Univ., Leiden (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiology, Div. of Nuclear Medicine

    2000-12-01

    Organ transplantation is now an accepted method of therapy for treating patients with end stage failure of kidneys, liver, heart or lung. Nuclear Medicine may provide functional data and semi-quantitative parameters. However, one serious factor that hampers the use of nuclear medicine procedures in transplant patients is the general clinical concern about radiation exposure to the patient. This lead the researcher to discuss the effective doses and radiation dosimetry associated with radionuclide procedures used in the management and follow-up of transplant patients. A simple way to place the risk associated with Nuclear Medicine studies in an appropriate context is to compare the dose with that received from more familiar source of exposure such as from a diagnostic X-ray procedure. The radiation dose for the different radiopharmaceuticals used to study transplant organ function ranges between 0.1 and 5.3 mSv which is comparable to X-ray procedures with the exception of {sup 201}Tl and {sup 111}In-antimyosin. Thus Nuclear Medicine studies do not bear a higher radiation risk than the often used X-ray studies in transplant patients.