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Sample records for radiologically contaminated buildings

  1. Radiological contamination by depleted uranium in the Al-Tahreer tower building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Ataby, N.R.; Aisa, B.H.; Jebir, H.M.; Hatem, J.N.

    2011-01-01

    The research plan included assessment of the radioactivity of the Al-Tahreer Tower Building (the Turkish restaurant recent) through direct measurements and sampling of soil for the four floors (1th,2th,3th,4th) of the building, which contains fourteen floor in addition to the basement, by using portable radiation detection equipment to know the increasing in the levels of exposure and contamination resulting from the bombing a Al-Tahreer Tower building by depleted uranium bullets, the results of radiological surveys by using the portable contamination radiation detection (CAB) indicated readings of contaminated soil reached to 60 c/sec, and parts of shells of depleted uranium reached to 90 c/ sec , while the natural contamination rate in the area is (0.5 c/sec), the natural exposure rate in the area is 9 μR/ hr but the higher exposure rate reached to 60 μR / hr when the device (Ludlum) putting on the contaminated regions(distance about 0.5 cm). The radiological analyses of the collected soil samples were done in the laboratory of the center of Radiological Researches in the Ministry of sciences and Technology by using gamma spectrometry (which contains High-purity Germanium Detector) with a efficiency of 40% and resolution 2 keV for Energy, 1.33 Mev,collection,preparations and tests of soil samples were all done according to IAEA.The normal concentration for Th 234 and Pa 234 m in the soil samples taken from areas near to the building (can consider as background radiation region) is in range 41 Bq /Kg for Th 234 ,and nil for pa 234 m ,while higher concentration of Th 234 in contaminated soil is 1194 Bq/kg,and 1664 Bq/kg for pa 234 m which is a clear indication of the presence of high concentrations an isotope of uranium 238 as they are supposed to be in equilibrium radiation. The major aim of this study include removal the contaminated regions in the building, to protect the population and the environment from the effect of radiological contamination which

  2. Radiological characterisation on V1 NPP technological systems and buildings - Contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanzel, Richard; Rapant, Tibor; Svitek, Jaroslav

    2012-01-01

    Since 2001, the preparation of V1 NPP practical decommissioning has been supported and partly financed by the Bohunice International Decommissioning Support Fund, under the administration of the European bank for Reconstruction and development. AMEC Nuclear Slovakia, together with partners STM Power and EWN GmbH, performed BIDSF B.4 project - Decommissioning database development. The main purpose of the B6.4 project was to develop a comprehensive physical and radiological inventory database to support RAW management development of the decommissioning studies and decommissioning project of Bohunice V1 NPP. AMEC Nuclear Slovakia was responsible mainly for DDB design, planning documents and physical and radiological characterization including sampling and analyses of the plant controlled area. The objective of V1 NPP radiological characterization was summarisation of sampling and analyses results, description of methodology used for radiological characterization and determination of the V1 NPP radiological inventory. Results of the characterization survey included the identification and distribution of contamination in buildings, structures, and other site facilities or other impacted media. The characterization survey clearly identified those portions of the site that have been affected by site activities and are contaminated. The survey also identified the portions of the site that have not been affected by these activities and can be marked as 'not impacted'. Radiological data have been presented also on the basis of index RAI level, where 5 radiological classes have been defined. On the basis of sampling and analyses results following radiological parameters have been assigned to all impacted components and civil structures included in DDB: dose rate in contact, dose rate in distance 1 m, external surface contamination, internal surface contamination and volume/mass contamination. Each room in controlled area has been described by following radiological parameters

  3. Key decisions in a generic process for disposition of buildings that have actual or potential radiological contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spesard, A.; Donavan, K.; Bowden, B.; Crane, L.; Jensen, G.; Fox, K.L.; Goodwin, R.; Vandegrift, R.

    1997-01-01

    The Cleanup Standards Committee, formed within the Ohio Federal Facilities Forum, focuses on addressing issues related to cleanup levels and standards. To facilitate decision-making for the disposition of buildings that have potential or actual radiological contamination, the Cleanup Standards Committee developed a process to support building disposition decisions. This process is needed for two reasons: (1) due to changing missions, an increasing number of buildings on federal properties require disposition, and (2) current federal initiatives encourage the transfer of buildings and land for reuse and economic redevelopment. Since the committee developed this process using a teaming effort, the process reflects the experience, expertise, and opinions of committee members and other individuals with a broad range of experience and knowledge. The Generic Process for the Disposition of Buildings that have Potential or Actual Radiological Contamination is intended for use by Federal Facilities responsible for the cleanup of buildings at sites that have radiological process history. This process provides (1) a framework and supporting implementation guidelines for evaluating buildings that have actual or potential radiological contamination, and (2) a process for making building disposition decisions. This paper outlines on the key decision points and the associated data requirements of the process. Specifically, this paper focuses on the following decisions: Which decision-makers are appropriate to involve in the building disposition process; What is the preferred disposition of a building; What criteria are applicable for unconditional release; Is there sufficient existing information to proceed with disposition of a building; What level of survey is appropriate to determine and/or implement a preferred disposition of a building; and how are uncertainties addressed when implementing a building disposition

  4. Radiological protection principles concerning the safeguard, use or release of contaminated materials, buildings, areas or dumps from uranium mining. Recommendations of the Commission on Radiological Protection with explanations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller-Neumann, M.

    1992-01-01

    The volume presents the full texts of the SSK Recommendations addressing the aspects and problems involved, and which can be separately retrieved from the database: 1) Radiological protection principles concerning the release of scrap from the shut-down of uranium mining plants; 2) Radiological protection principles concerning the release for industrial use of areas contaminated from uranium mining; 3) Radiological protection principles concerning the use for forest and agricultural purposes and as public gardens (parks) and residential areas of areas contaminated from uranium mining; 4) Radiological protection principles concerning the safeguard and use of mine dumps; 5) Radiological protection principles concerning the release for further commercial or industrial use of buildings used for commercial or industrial purposes and the disposal of building debris from uranium mining and milling; 6) Radiological protection principles concerning the release for general use of reusable equipment and installations from uranium mining. The following appendices round up the material: 1) Radiation exposure from mining in Saxony and Thuringia and its evaluation (Summary of the results of consultations during the 1990 closed meeting); 2) Radiological protection principles for the limitation of the radiation exposure of the public to radon and its daughters; 3) Epidemiological studies on the health state of the inhabitants of the mining region and the miners in Saxony and Thuringia. (orig.) [de

  5. Understanding Contamination; Twenty Years of Simulating Radiological Contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emily Snyder; John Drake; Ryan James

    2012-02-01

    A wide variety of simulated contamination methods have been developed by researchers to reproducibly test radiological decontamination methods. Some twenty years ago a method of non-radioactive contamination simulation was proposed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) that mimicked the character of radioactive cesium and zirconium contamination on stainless steel. It involved baking the contamination into the surface of the stainless steel in order to 'fix' it into a tenacious, tightly bound oxide layer. This type of contamination was particularly applicable to nuclear processing facilities (and nuclear reactors) where oxide growth and exchange of radioactive materials within the oxide layer became the predominant model for material/contaminant interaction. Additional simulation methods and their empirically derived basis (from a nuclear fuel reprocessing facility) are discussed. In the last ten years the INL, working with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and the National Homeland Security Research Center (NHSRC), has continued to develop contamination simulation methodologies. The most notable of these newer methodologies was developed to compare the efficacy of different decontamination technologies against radiological dispersal device (RDD, 'dirty bomb') type of contamination. There are many different scenarios for how RDD contamination may be spread, but the most commonly used one at the INL involves the dispersal of an aqueous solution containing radioactive Cs-137. This method was chosen during the DARPA projects and has continued through the NHSRC series of decontamination trials and also gives a tenacious 'fixed' contamination. Much has been learned about the interaction of cesium contamination with building materials, particularly concrete, throughout these tests. The effects of porosity, cation-exchange capacity of the material and the amount of dirt and debris on the surface are very important factors

  6. RESRAD-BUILD: A computer model for analyzing the radiological doses resulting from the remediation and occupancy of buildings contaminated with radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, C.; LePoire, D.J.; Jones, L.G.

    1994-11-01

    The RESRAD-BUILD computer code is a pathway analysis model designed to evaluate the potential radiological dose incurred by an individual who works or lives in a building contaminated with radioactive material. The transport of radioactive material inside the building from one compartment to another is calculated with an indoor air quality model. The air quality model considers the transport of radioactive dust particulates and radon progeny due to air exchange, deposition and resuspension, and radioactive decay and ingrowth. A single run of the RESRAD-BUILD code can model a building with up to: three compartments, 10 distinct source geometries, and 10 receptor locations. A shielding material can be specified between each source-receptor pair for external gamma dose calculations. Six exposure pathways are considered in the RESRAD-BUILD code: (1) external exposure directly from the source; (2) external exposure to materials deposited on the floor; (3) external exposure due to air submersion; (4) inhalation of airborne radioactive particulates; (5) inhalation of aerosol indoor radon progeny; and (6) inadvertent ingestion of radioactive material, either directly from the sources or from materials deposited on the surfaces of the building compartments

  7. 324 Building Baseline Radiological Characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reeder, R.J.; Cooper, J.C.

    2010-01-01

    This report documents the analysis of radiological data collected as part of the characterization study performed in 1998. The study was performed to create a baseline of the radiological conditions in the 324 Building. A total of 85 technical (100 square centimeter (cm 2 )) smears were collected from the Room 147 hoods, the Shielded Materials Facility (SMF), and the Radiochemical Engineering Cells (REC). Exposure rate readings (window open and window closed) were taken at a distance of 2.5 centimeters (cm) and 30 cm from the surface of each smear. Gross beta-gamma and alpha counts of each smear were also performed. The smear samples were analyzed by gamma energy analysis (GEA). Alpha energy analysis (AEA) and strontium-90 analysis were also performed on selected smears. GEA results for one or more samples reported the presence of manganese-54, cobalt-60, silver-108m antimony-125, cesium-134, cesium-137, europium-154, europium-155, and americium-241. AEA results reported the presence of plutonium-239/240, plutonium-238/ 241 Am, curium-243/244, curium-242, and americium-243. Tables 5 through 9 present a summary by location of the estimated maximum removable and total contamination levels in the Room 147 hoods, the SMF, and the REC. The smear sample survey data and laboratory analytical results are presented in tabular form by sample in Appendix A. The Appendix A tables combine survey data documented in radiological survey reports found in Appendix B and laboratory analytical results reported in the 324 Building Physical and Radiological Characterization Study (Berk, Hill, and Landsman 1998), supplemented by the laboratory analytical results found in Appendix C.

  8. Understanding Mechanisms of Radiological Contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rick Demmer; John Drake; Ryan James, PhD

    2014-03-01

    Over the last 50 years, the study of radiological contamination and decontamination has expanded significantly. This paper addresses the mechanisms of radiological contamination that have been reported and then discusses which methods have recently been used during performance testing of several different decontamination technologies. About twenty years ago the Idaho Nuclear Technology Engineering Center (INTEC) at the INL began a search for decontamination processes which could minimize secondary waste. In order to test the effectiveness of these decontamination technologies, a new simulated contamination, termed SIMCON, was developed. SIMCON was designed to replicate the types of contamination found on stainless steel, spent fuel processing equipment. Ten years later, the INL began research into methods for simulating urban contamination resulting from a radiological dispersal device (RDD). This work was sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and included the initial development an aqueous application of contaminant to substrate. Since 2007, research sponsored by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has advanced that effort and led to the development of a contamination method that simulates particulate fallout from an Improvised Nuclear Device (IND). The IND method diverges from previous efforts to create tenacious contamination by simulating a reproducible “loose” contamination. Examining these different types of contamination (and subsequent decontamination processes), which have included several different radionuclides and substrates, sheds light on contamination processes that occur throughout the nuclear industry and in the urban environment.

  9. use of the RESRAD-BUILD code to calculate building surface contamination limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faillace, E.R.; LePoire, D.; Yu, C.

    1996-01-01

    Surface contamination limits in buildings were calculated for 226 Ra, 230 Th, 232 Th, and natural uranium on the basis of 1 mSv y -1 (100 mrem y -1 ) dose limit. The RESRAD-BUILD computer code was used to calculate these limits for two scenarios: building occupancy and building renovation. RESRAD-BUILD is a pathway analysis model designed to evaluate the potential radiological dose incurred by individuals working or living inside a building contaminated with radioactive material. Six exposure pathways are considered in the RESRAD-BUILD code: (1) external exposure directly from the source; (2) external exposure from materials deposited on the floor; (3) external exposure due to air submersion; (4) inhalation of airborne radioactive particles; (5) inhalation of aerosol indoor radon progeny; and (6) inadvertent ingestion of radioactive material, either directly from the sources or from materials deposited on the surfaces. The code models point, line, area, and volume sources and calculates the effects of radiation shielding, building ventilation, and ingrowth of radioactive decay products. A sensitivity analysis was performed to determine how variations in input parameters would affect the surface contamination limits. In most cases considered, inhalation of airborne radioactive particles was the primary exposure pathway. However, the direct external exposure contribution from surfaces contaminated with 226 Ra was in some cases the dominant pathway for building occupancy depending on the room size, ventilation rates, and surface release fractions. The surface contamination limits are most restrictive for 232 Th, followed by 230 Th, natural uranium, and 226 Ra. The results are compared with the surface contamination limits in the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Regulatory Guide 1.86, which are most restrictive for 226 Ra and 230 Th, followed by 232 Th, and are least restrictive for natural uranium

  10. Radiological conditions and experiences in the TMI-2 Auxiliary Building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruhter, P.E.; Zurliene, W.G.

    1988-01-01

    Although the radiological conditions following the TMI-2 accident were extraordinary, those that had a potential impact on personnel were largely confined to the Auxiliary and Fuel Handling Building. The most significant pathway was the Letdown and Make-Up and Purification System. Dose rates in some locations in the Aux/Fuel Handling Buildings were in excess of 3 mSv/s (1000 R/h) during the first few days following the accident. They decreased after three to four days and stabilized after about one week. Airborne radioactivity levels were initially due to the release of noble gases, and subsequently due to resuspension of surface contamination. During the first month, the mixture of fission products in the reactor coolant change from one of largely cesium to where the strontium and cesium were about equal in radiological importance. This created some very high beta radiation levels. The significant strontium levels caused the contamination control limit to be reduced to one-half of the pre-accident limit. 5 refs., 6 figs

  11. Radiological and hazardous material characterization report for the south portion of the 313 Building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, R.A.

    1995-12-01

    The objective of the characterization was to determine the extent of radiological contamination and presence of hazardous materials, to allow the preparation of an accurate cost estimate, and to plan for pre-demolition cleanup work to support building isolation. The scope of services for the project included the following tasks: Records Review and Interviews; Site Reconnaissance; Radiological Survey; and Sampling and Analysis

  12. Biological Treatment of Petroleum in Radiologically Contaminated Soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BERRY, CHRISTOPHER

    2005-11-14

    This chapter describes ex situ bioremediation of the petroleum portion of radiologically co-contaminated soils using microorganisms isolated from a waste site and innovative bioreactor technology. Microorganisms first isolated and screened in the laboratory for bioremediation of petroleum were eventually used to treat soils in a bioreactor. The bioreactor treated soils contaminated with over 20,000 mg/kg total petroleum hydrocarbon and reduced the levels to less than 100 mg/kg in 22 months. After treatment, the soils were permanently disposed as low-level radiological waste. The petroleum and radiologically contaminated soil (PRCS) bioreactor operated using bioventing to control the supply of oxygen (air) to the soil being treated. The system treated 3.67 tons of PCRS amended with weathered compost, ammonium nitrate, fertilizer, and water. In addition, a consortium of microbes (patent pending) isolated at the Savannah River National Laboratory from a petroleum-contaminated site was added to the PRCS system. During operation, degradation of petroleum waste was accounted for through monitoring of carbon dioxide levels in the system effluent. The project demonstrated that co-contaminated soils could be successfully treated through bioventing and bioaugmentation to remove petroleum contamination to levels below 100 mg/kg while protecting workers and the environment from radiological contamination.

  13. 324 Building Baseline Radiological Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.J. Reeder, J.C. Cooper

    2010-06-24

    This report documents the analysis of radiological data collected as part of the characterization study performed in 1998. The study was performed to create a baseline of the radiological conditions in the 324 Building.

  14. Final report of the radiological release survey of Building 11 at the Grand Junction Office Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.K.; Corle, S.G.

    1997-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Office (GJO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore concentrates and mill tailings during vanadium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District, and during sampling, assaying, pilot milling, storage, and brokerage activities conducted for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission's domestic uranium procurement program. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJO Remedial Action Project (GJORAP) to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and underlying aquifer. WASTREN-Grand Junction is the site contractor for the facility and the remedial action contractor for GJORAP. Building 11 and the underlying soil were found not to be radiologically contaminated; therefore, the building can be released for unrestricted use. Placards have been placed at the building entrances indicating the completion of the radiological release survey and prohibiting the introduction of any radioactive materials within the building without written approvals from the GJO Facilities Operations Manager. This document was prepared in response to a DOE-GJO request for an individual final release report for each GJO building

  15. Final report of the radiological release survey of Building 29 at the Grand Junction Office Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.K.; Corle, S.G.

    1997-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Office (GJO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore concentrates and mill tailing during vanadium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District, and during sampling, assaying, pilot milling, storage, and brokerage activities conducted for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission's domestic uranium procurement program. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJO Remedial Action Project (GJORAP) to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and underlying aquifer. WASTREN-Grand Junction is the site contractor for the facility and the remedial action contractor for GJORAP. Building 29 and the underlying soil were found not to be radiologically contaminated; therefore, the building can be released for unrestricted use. Placards have been placed at the building entrances indicating the completion of the radiological release survey and prohibiting the introduction of any radioactive materials within the building without written approvals from the GJO Facilities Operations Manager. This document was prepared in response to a DOE-GJO request for an individual final release report for each GJO building

  16. Final report of the radiological release survey of Building 19 at the Grand Junction Office Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.K.; Corle, S.G.

    1997-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Office (GJO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore concentrates and mill tailings during vanadium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District, and during sampling, assaying, pilot milling, storage, and brokerage activities conducted for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission's domestic uranium procurement program. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJO Remedial Action Project (GJORAP) to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and underlying aquifer. WASTREN-Grand Junction is the site contractor for the facility and the remedial action contractor for GJORAP. Building 19 and the underlying soil were found not to be radiologically contaminated; therefore, the building can be released for unrestricted use. Placards have been placed at the building entrances indicating the completion of the radiological release survey and prohibiting the introduction of any radioactive materials within the building without written approvals from the GJO Facilities Operations Manager. This document was prepared in response to a DOE-GJO request for an individual final release report for each GJO building

  17. Radioactive Contamination Tenacity on Building Substrate – 17417

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demmer, Rick; Boxall, Colin

    2017-01-01

    Radiological decontamination is an essential enterprise that has become more important over the last four decades due to unfortunate accidents and the threat of terrorist actions. Decontamination can be an effective, beneficial alternative for the cleanup of radiological contamination events; however, the costs and benefits need to be balanced against those for complete removal and demolition of contaminated areas or facilities. Demolition and removal are often the first options considered in such circumstances as decontamination may be thought of as slow and costly. Decontamination has advantages, including significant waste reduction over demolition. In areas with buildings of cultural or societal importance, demolition may not be an option. Three decontamination evaluation test series are the focus of this article: SIMCON 1 and 2 (i.e., simulated contamination), and Urban RDD (radiological dispersal device, i.e., a dirty bomb detonation). These test series revealed that different contaminants respond differently during decontamination. This was found to be true with both SIMCON and Urban RDD simulant tests. SIMCON 2 especially demonstrated that chemically different contaminants respond differently to different decontamination methods: cesium appears to be less tenacious (more easily removed) than zirconium using chemical methods. These differences were underscored by the Urban RDD tests where americium and cobalt tended to precipitate on high pH surfaces (such as concrete), making them easier to remove, while cesium and strontium were essentially unaffected by surface pH and were imbibed more strongly into the substrate pore structure. While authorities argue over the contributions of contaminant chemistry and substrate morphology, the clear answer is that each has a contribution to the tenacity of a contaminant. Knowing how these characteristics interact will make us better at decontamination in the field. This knowledge refutes the efforts of perhaps well

  18. Radiological assessment of radioactive contamination on private clothing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schartmann, F.; Thierfeldt, S.

    2003-01-01

    In the very rare, cases where private clothing of persons working in a nuclear installation are inadvertently contaminated and this contamination is not detected when leaving the facility, there may be radiological consequences for this person as well as for members of his or her family. The VGB (Technische Vereinigung der Grosskraftwerksbetreiber) in Germany has investigated in detail the spread of contamination in nuclear power plants. Part of this evaluation programme was a radiological analysis which has been carried out by Brenk Systemplanung GmbH (Aachen/Germany). The radiological analysis started with the definition of the source term. It is highly unlikely that activities of more than 5 kBq 60 Co could leave a plant undetected on the body or the clothes. Nevertheless activities up to 50 kBq and different nuclide vectors were regarded. It has been found that 60 Co is the most important contaminant. The radiological analysis focusses on two types of contamination: particles and surface contamination. The pathways by which such a contamination can lead to an exposure by external irradiation or by ingestion depend on the type of contamination and are analysed in detail. For example, a particle could be retained in pockets or other parts of clothing and may lead to prolonged external irradiation until the piece of clothing is washed. The analysis is performed on the basis of conservative to realistic assumptions. In conclusion, the analysis has shown that especially particle contamination needs to be focussed on. However, by the advanced detection equipment in German plants doses which may pose a health hazard can safely be excluded. (authors)

  19. Technical basis for radiological release of Grand Junction Office Building 2. Volume 1, dose assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, R.; Warga, J.; Thorne, D.

    1997-07-01

    Building 2 on the US Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Office (GJO) site is part of the GJO Remedial Action Program (GJORAP). During evaluation of Building 2 for determination of radiological release disposition, some inaccessible surface contamination measurements were detected to be greater than the generic surface contamination guidelines of DOE Order 5400.5 (which are functionally equivalent to US Nuclear Regulatory Commission [NRC] Regulatory Guide 1.86). Although the building is nominal in size, it houses the site telecommunications system, that is critical to continued GJO operations, and demolition is estimated at $1.9 million. Because unrestricted release under generic surface contamination guidelines is cost-prohibitive, supplemental standards consistent with DOE Order 5400.5 are being pursued. This report describes measurements and dose analysis modeling efforts to evaluate the radiation dose to members of the public who might occupy or demolish Building 2, a 2,480 square-foot (ft) building constructed in 1944. The north portion of the building was used as a shower facility for Manhattan Project uranium-processing mill workers and the south portion was a warehouse. Many originally exposed surfaces are no longer accessible for contamination surveys because expensive telecommunications equipment have been installed on the floors and mounted on panels covering the walls. These inaccessible surfaces are contaminated above generic contamination limits

  20. Radiological Risk Assessment and Survey of Radioactive Contamination for Foodstuffs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, W.R.; Lee, C.W.; Choi, K.S.

    2007-11-01

    After the Chernobyl nuclear accident in 1986, a radiological dose assessment and a survey of a radioactive contamination for foodstuffs have been investigated by many countries such as EU, Japan, USA. In the case of Japan which is similar to our country for the imported regions of foodstuffs, there were some instances of the excess for regulation on the maximum permitted levels of radioactive contamination among some imported foodstuffs. Concerns about the radioactive contamination of foodstuffs are increased because of the recently special situation (Nuclear test of North Korea). The purpose of this study is a radiological dose assessment and a survey of a radioactive contamination for foodstuffs in order to reduce the probability of intake of contaminated foodstuffs. Analytical results of the collected samples are below MDA. In this project, the model of radiological dose assessment via the food chain was also developed and radiological dose assessment was conducted based on surveys results of a radioactive contamination for foodstuffs in the Korean open markets since 2002. The results of radiological dose assessment are far below international reference level. It shows that public radiation exposure via food chain is well controlled within the international guide level. However, the radioactive contamination research of imported foodstuffs should be continuous considering the special situation(nuclear test of North Korea). These results are used to manage the radioactive contamination of the imported foodstuffs and also amend the regulation on the maximum permitted levels of radioactive contamination of foodstuffs

  1. Final report of the radiological release survey of Building 30B at the Grand Junction Office Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krauland, P.A.; Corle, S.G.

    1997-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Office (GJO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore concentrates and mill tailings during vanadium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District, and during sampling, assaying, pilot milling, storage, and brokerage activities conducted for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission's domestic uranium procurement program. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJO Remedial Action Project (GJORAP) to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and underlying aquifer. WASTREN-Grand Junction is the site contractor for the facility and the remedial action contractor for GJORAP. Building 30B and the underlying soil were found not to be radiologically contaminated; therefore, the building can be released for unrestricted use. Placards have been placed at the building entrances indicating the completion of the radiological release survey and prohibiting the introduction of any radioactive materials within the building without written approvals from the GJO Facilities Operations Manager. This document was prepared in response to a DOE-GJO request for an individual final release report for each GJO building

  2. Final report of the radiological release survey of Building 54 at the Grand Junction Office Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.K.; Corle, S.G.

    1997-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Office (GJO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore concentrates and mill tailings during vanadium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District, and during sampling, assaying, pilot milling, storage, and brokerage activities conducted for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission's domestic uranium procurement program. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJO Remedial Action Project (GJORAP) to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and underlying aquifer. WASTREN-Grand Junction is the site contractor for the facility and the remedial action contractor for GJORAP. Building 54 and the underlying soil were found not to be radiologically contaminated, and can be released for unrestricted use. Placards have been placed at the building entrances indicating the completion of the radiological release survey and prohibiting the introduction of any radioactive materials within the building without written approvals from the GJO Facilities Operations Manager. This document was prepared in response to a DOE-GJO request for an individual release report for each GJO building

  3. Criteria and actions facing a radiological environmental contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutierrez, Jose; Montero, Milagros

    2008-01-01

    An approach to improve the management of the radiological risk due to an environmental contamination is presented. The experience gained in emergency response has clearly demonstrated the importance to have an efficient emergency system including planning, procedures and operational internally consistent criteria. The lack of these components in the emergency system could lead to important radiological and non radiological consequences. The setting of internationally agreed criteria and guides is very important in the anticipated emergency response plan. The paper firstly reviews the approaches proposed by international recommendations and norms. From this review, a substantial coincidence on the basic principles is stated, in spite of small differences in its formulation. Also, a need for harmonization is endorsed. So, generic levels, in terms of imparted dose or avoided dose due to intervention, and, in some cases, derived levels, in terms of activity concentration, are proposed. Numerical values for emergency actions are also identified. The second part deals with the adaptation of the existing prediction and decision systems to the above radiological criteria. Relations among deposition, activity concentrations and annual doses for different scenarios, exposure pathways and age groups are established. Also, the sensibility of the radiological impact against different characteristics of the intervention scenarios is stated. This makes easy to assess the radiological significance of different contamination situations by comparison to the existing action generic levels. Furthermore, the radiological impact can be numerically incorporated in a decision system which includes non radiological aspects of the applicable intervention options. Agricultural, urban and mixed scenarios are presented and solved for a 137 Cs contamination. The results can be further used to develop a methodology guide for setting action generic levels in post-accidental interventions and

  4. Non-Destructive Radiological Characterisation Of Contaminated And Activated Concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantrel, E.

    2005-01-01

    The decommissioning of nuclear facilities leads to large quantities of concrete and building material wastes. Radioactivity in building structures arise from very different physical processes such as neutron activation (bioshield), diffusion of the contaminants in the material (primary coolant leakage, maintenance and fuel loading) or aerosol deposition. The variety of the building material also extends the range of faced radiological characteristics. Therefore the minimization of concrete waste generation requires extensive characterisations and the availability of different measurement tools and methods. Up to now, these measurements came from the coring and the radiological analysis of the concrete, which is a destructive, long and costly technique. Looking for alternative solutions, SCK-CEN has started to investigate in collaboration with EDF -research and development and CEA (France) several non destructive methods based on gamma spectroscopy and different spectral examinations using mathematical calibration and modelling tools available on the market. Information on in-depth activity distribution can be derived from in situ gamma spectra by modelling absorption laws (peak to peak ratios) and photons interactions (Compton front) in the bulk of the concrete. As they combine modelling and measurement, the different methodologies being evaluated involve a lot of uncertainty sources linked to the measurement environment, to the knowledge available on site (historical background, material composition), to the operator responsible for the data acquisition and to the performance of the equipment. Therefore a detailed sensitivity analysis is required to define the range of applicability and the performances of the different methods

  5. Assessment of SRS radiological liquid and airborne contaminants and pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jannik, G.T.

    1997-04-01

    This report compiles and documents the radiological critical-contaminant/critical-pathway analysis performed for SRS. The analysis covers radiological releases to the atmosphere and to surface water, which are the principal media that carry contaminants off site. During routine operations at SRS, limited amounts of radionuclides are released to the environment through atmospheric and/or liquid pathways. These releases potentially result in exposure to offsite people. Though the groundwater beneath an estimated 5 to 10 percent of SRS has been contaminated by radionuclides, there is no evidence that groundwater contaminated with these constituents has migrated offsite (Arnett, 1996). Therefore, with the notable exception of radiological source terms originating from shallow surface water migration into site streams, onsite groundwater was not considered as a potential exposure pathway to offsite people

  6. Radiological risk assessment of a radioactively contaminated site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devgun, J.S.

    1990-01-01

    A limited-scope preliminary assessment of radiological risk has been conducted at a radioactively contaminated site under current site use conditions and based on the available preliminary radiological characterization data for the site. The assessment provides useful input to the remedial action planning for the site. 8 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  7. Contaminant deposition building shielding factors for US residential structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Elijah; Hamby, David; Eckerman, Keith

    2017-10-10

    This paper presents validated building shielding factors designed for contemporary US housing-stock under an idealized, yet realistic, exposure scenario from contaminant deposition on the roof and surrounding surfaces. The building shielding factors are intended for use in emergency planning and level three probabilistic risk assessments for a variety of postulated radiological events in which a realistic assessment is necessary to better understand the potential risks for accident mitigation and emergency response planning. Factors are calculated from detailed computational housing-units models using the general-purpose Monte Carlo N-Particle computational code, MCNP5, and are benchmarked from a series of narrow- and broad-beam measurements analyzing the shielding effectiveness of ten common general-purpose construction materials and ten shielding models representing the primary weather barriers (walls and roofs) of likely US housing-stock. Each model was designed to scale based on common residential construction practices and include, to the extent practical, all structurally significant components important for shielding against ionizing radiation. Calculations were performed for floor-specific locations from contaminant deposition on the roof and surrounding ground as well as for computing a weighted-average representative building shielding factor for single- and multi-story detached homes, both with and without basement as well for single-wide manufactured housing-unit. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  8. Contaminant deposition building shielding factors for US residential structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickson, E D; Hamby, D M; Eckerman, K F

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents validated building shielding factors designed for contemporary US housing-stock under an idealized, yet realistic, exposure scenario from contaminant deposition on the roof and surrounding surfaces. The building shielding factors are intended for use in emergency planning and level three probabilistic risk assessments for a variety of postulated radiological events in which a realistic assessment is necessary to better understand the potential risks for accident mitigation and emergency response planning. Factors are calculated from detailed computational housing-units models using the general-purpose Monte Carlo N-Particle computational code, MCNP5, and are benchmarked from a series of narrow- and broad-beam measurements analyzing the shielding effectiveness of ten common general-purpose construction materials and ten shielding models representing the primary weather barriers (walls and roofs) of likely US housing-stock. Each model was designed to scale based on common residential construction practices and include, to the extent practical, all structurally significant components important for shielding against ionizing radiation. Calculations were performed for floor-specific locations from contaminant deposition on the roof and surrounding ground as well as for computing a weighted-average representative building shielding factor for single- and multi-story detached homes, both with and without basement as well for single-wide manufactured housing-unit. (paper)

  9. Geostatistical methods for radiological evaluation and risk analysis of contaminated premises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desnoyers, Y.; Jeannee, N.; Chiles, J.P.; Dubot, D.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: At the end of process equipment dismantling, the complete decontamination of nuclear facilities requires the radiological assessment of residual activity levels of building structures. As stated by the IAEA, 'Segregation and characterization of contaminated materials are the key elements of waste minimization'. From this point of view, the set up of an appropriate evaluation methodology is of primordial importance. The radiological characterization of contaminated premises can be divided into three steps. First, the most exhaustive facility analysis provides historical, functional and qualitative information. Then, a systematic (exhaustive or not) control of the emergent signal is performed by means of in situ measurement methods such as surface control device combined with in situ gamma spectrometry. Besides, in order to assess the contamination depth, samples can be collected from boreholes at several locations within the premises and analyzed. Combined with historical information and emergent signal maps, such data improve and reinforce the preliminary waste zoning. In order to provide reliable estimates while avoiding supplementary investigation costs, there is therefore a crucial need for sampling optimization methods together with appropriate data processing techniques. The relevance of the geostatistical methodology relies on the presence of a spatial continuity for radiological contamination. In this case, geostatistics provides reliable methods for activity estimation, uncertainty quantification and risk analysis, which are essential decision-making tools for decommissioning and dismantling projects of nuclear installations. Besides, the ability of this geostatistical framework to provide answers to several key issues that generally occur during the clean-up preparation phase is discussed: How to optimise the investigation costs? How to deal with data quality issues? How to consistently take into account auxiliary information such as historical

  10. JUSTIFICATION FOR THE RADIOLOGICAL CRITERIA FOR THE USE OF AREAS WITH RESIDUAL RADIOACTIVE CONTAMINATION BASED ON THE DOSE APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Yu. Golikov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a methodology for assessing the radiological criteria for the use of the territory (a land plot with buildings with residual radioactive contamination from the so-called “green area”, i.e., complete release from radiation control until a number of restrictions are imposed on the use of the territory. In accordance with the further use of the territory, a range of scenarios and pathways for the exposure of the population was considered. A set of models and their parameters, corresponding to the number of the considered pathways of exposure, was defined. Assuming a uniform distribution of a radionuclide with a unit concentration in the source zone, the distribution of effective doses for the population living in the territory with the residual radioactive contamination for different irradiation scenarios was calculated by stochastic modeling, 95% of the quantile of which was attributed to the dose in the representatives of the critical population group. Next, the value of radiological criteria, depending on the implemented scenario, was determined as the ratio of the dose constraint EL = 0,3 mSv/yr and 95% quantile in the distribution of the effective dose from a unit contamination. The numerical values of radiological criteria for the presence of radionuclides in the soil are presented, both for the radiation scenarios that correspond to the permanent residence of the population in the contaminated territory and for recreational use. A further consideration is given to the so-called worker scenario, which corresponds to the limited time spent on the contaminated territory and the simultaneous effects of radionuclides contained both in the soil and in the construction of the buildings. A comparison of the results of the own calculations with the data of other authors was carried out.

  11. Hospital management of mass radiological casualties: reassessing exposures from contaminated victims of an exploded radiological dispersal device (RDD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansari, Armin; Harper, Frederick Taylor; Smith, James M.

    2005-01-01

    One of the key issues in the aftermath of an exploded radiological dispersal device from a terrorist event is that of the contaminated victim and the concern among healthcare providers for the harmful exposures they may receive in treating patients, especially if the patient has not been thoroughly decontaminated. This is critically important in the event of mass casualties from a nuclear or radiological incident because of the essential rapidity of acute medical decisions and that those who have life- or limb-threatening injuries may have treatment unduly delayed by a decontamination process that may be unnecessary for protecting the health and safety of the patient or the healthcare provider. To estimate potential contamination of those exposed in a radiological dispersal device event, results were used from explosive aerosolization tests of surrogate radionuclides detonated with high explosives at the Sandia National Laboratories. Computer modeling was also used to assess radiation dose rates to surgical personnel treating patients with blast injuries who are contaminated with any of a variety of common radionuclides. It is demonstrated that exceptional but plausible cases may require special precautions by the healthcare provider, even while managing life-threatening injuries of a contaminated victim from a radiological dispersal device event.

  12. RI Mapping System for Identification of Radiological Contamination in Environmental Water Supply System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, Teresa W.; Ha, Jang Ho; Kim, Han Soo; Lee, Seung Hyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Na, Teresa W.; Lee, Rena [Ewha Womans Univ., Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    The interest of radiation protection has risen due to accidents of the Nuclear Power Plant, nuclear terrorism, and the radiological contamination in the city, In this respect, the development of environmental radiation monitoring for the radiological contaminants has been studied. In this study, the experiment for the radiological contamination in the water supply pipe line system has been simulated and preliminarily tested. The CsI(Tl)-PIN diode detectors were used and the preliminary test of radiation monitoring system was performed as multi detection system. The 2D image reconstruction algorithm was also developed for feasibility of the constructed multi-detection system.

  13. Mobile autonomous robot for radiological surveys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudar, A.M.; Wagner, D.G.; Teese, G.D.

    1992-01-01

    The robotics development group at the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) is developing a mobile autonomous robot that performs radiological surveys of potentially contaminated floors. The robot is called SIMON, which stands for Semi-Intelligent Mobile Observing Navigator. Certain areas of SRL are classified as radiologically controlled areas (RCAs). In an RCA, radioactive materials are frequently handled by workers, and thus, the potential for contamination is ever present. Current methods used for floor radiological surveying includes labor-intensive manual scanning or random smearing of certain floor locations. An autonomous robot such as SIMON performs the surveying task in a much more efficient manner and will track down contamination before it is contacted by humans. SIMON scans floors at a speed of 1 in./s and stops and alarms upon encountering contamination. Its environment is well defined, consisting of smooth building floors with wide corridors. The kind of contaminations that SIMON is capable of detecting are alpha and beta-gamma. The contamination levels of interest are low to moderate

  14. Review of alternative residual contamination guides for the 324 Building B-Cell Cleanout Project. Phase 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargo, G.J.; Durham, J.S.; Brackenbush, L.W.

    1995-09-01

    This report provides a proposed residual contamination guide (RCG) for the 324 Building B-Cell Cleanout Project, Phase 1, at the Hanford Site. The RCG is expressed as a fraction of the amount of highly dispersible radioactive material that would result in offsite doses equal to the Pacific Northwest Laboratory radiological risk guidelines following the worst credible accident scenario for release of the holdup material. The proposed RCG is 10 -1 to 10 -2 of the PNL radiological risk guidelines. As part of the development of the RCG, a number of factors were considered. These include the need to provide an appropriate level of flexibility for other activities within the 324 Building that could contribute to the facility's overall radiological risk, uncertainties inherent in safety analyses, and the possible contribution of other 300 Area facilities to overall radiological risk. Because of these factors and the nature of the cleanout project, the RCG is expressed as a range rather than a point value. This report also provides guidance on determining conformance to the RCG, including inspection and measurement techniques, quality assurance requirements, and consideration of uncertainty

  15. Characterization of a deep radiological contamination: integration of geostatistical processing and historical data - 59062

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desnoyers, Yvon; De Moura, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    The problem of site characterization is quite complex, especially for deep radiological contamination. This article illustrates the added value of the geo-statistical processing on a real application case dealing with grounds of facilities partially dismantled at the end of the 1950's in Fontenay-aux-Roses CEA Center (France). 12 years ago, a first exploratory drill-hole confirmed the presence of a deep radiological contamination (more than 4 m deep). More recently, 8 additional drill-holes failed to delineate the contamination extension. The integration of the former topography and other geological data led to the realization of 10 additional drill holes. This final stage significantly improved the characterization of the radiological contamination, which impacted the remediation project and the initially estimated volumes. (authors)

  16. Restoration projects for decontamination of facilities from chemical, biological and radiological contamination after terrorist actions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fingas, M.; Volchek, K.; Lumley, T.; Thouin, G.; Harrison, S.; Kuang, W. [Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Emergencies Science and Technology Division, Environmental Technology Centre, Science and Technology Branch; Payette, P.; Laframboise, D.; Best, M. [Public Health Agency of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Krishnan, J.; Wagener, S.; Bernard, K.; Majcher, M. [Public Health Agency of Canada, Winnipeg, MB (Canada); Cousins, T.; Jones, T. [Defence Research and Development Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Velicogna, D.; Hornof, M.; Punt, M. [SAIC Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    This paper reviewed studies that identified better decontamination methods for chemical, biological and radiological/nuclear (CBRN) attacks. In particular, it reviewed aspects of 3 projects in which procedures were tested and validated for site restoration. Cleanup targets or standards for decontaminating buildings and materials after a CBRN attack were also developed. The projects were based on physicochemical and toxicological knowledge of potential terrorist agents and selected surface matrices. The projects also involved modeling and assessing environmental and health risks. The first multi-agent project involved gathering information on known procedures for restoration of areas including interiors and exteriors of buildings, contents, parking lots, lawn, and vehicles. Air inside the building was included. The efficacy of some of the proposed concepts was tested. Results included the determination of appropriate surrogates for anthrax and tests of liquid and gaseous biocides on the surrogates. The development of new contamination procedures using peroxyacetic acid were also discussed. The second project involved decontamination tests on CBRN using specially-constructed buildings at the Counter-terrorism Technology Centre at Defence Research and Development Canada in Suffield. The buildings will be contaminated with chemical and biological agents and with short-lived radionuclides. They will be decontaminated using the best-performing technologies known. Information collected will include fate of the contaminant and decontamination products, effectiveness of the restoration methods, cost and duration of cleanup and logistical problems. The third project is aimed at developing cleanup standards for decontaminating buildings and construction materials after a chemical or biological attack. It will create as many as 12 algorithms for the development of 50 standards which will help cleanup personnel and first-responders to gauge whether proposed methods can achieve

  17. Radioactive waste management for a radiologically contaminated hospitalized patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pina Jomir, G.; Michel, X.; Lecompte, Y.; Chianea, N.; Cazoulat, A.

    2015-01-01

    Radioactive waste management in the post-accidental phase following caring for a radiologically contaminated patient in a hospital decontamination facility must be anticipated at a local level to be truly efficient, as the volume of waste could be substantial. This management must comply with the principles set out for radioactive as well as medical waste. The first step involves identification of radiologically contaminated waste based on radioactivity measurement for volume reduction. Then, the management depends on the longest radioactive half-life of contaminative radionuclides. For a half-life inferior to 100 days, wastes are stored for their radioactivity to decay for at least 10 periods before disposal like conventional medical waste. Long-lived radioactive waste management implies treatment of liquid waste and special handling for sorting and packaging before final elimination at the French National Agency for Radioactive Waste Management (ANDRA). Following this, highly specialized waste management skills, financial responsibility issues and detention of non-medical radioactive sources are questions raised by hospital radioactive waste management in the post-accidental phase. (authors)

  18. Assessment of the radiological impact of contaminated discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sweeck, L; Zeevaert, T

    1996-09-18

    A biosphere model has been used to calculate the release of radionuclides from contaminated soils and their dose impact on critical individuals in the environment. Normal evolution and accidental scenarios are considered. The objective of the model is to provide an indication of the radiological risk rather than to predict its future impact.

  19. European network on the determination of site end points for radiologically contaminated land

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booth, Peter; Lennon, Chris

    2007-01-01

    Nexia Solutions are currently running a small European network entitled 'European Network on the Determination of Site End Points for Radiologically Contaminated Land (ENDSEP)'. Other network members include NRG (Netherlands), UKAEA (UK), CEA (France), SOGIN (Italy), Wismut (Germany), Saxon State Agency of Environment and Geology (Germany). The network is focused on the technical and socio-economical issues associated with the determination of end points for sites potentially, or actually, impacted by radiological contamination. Such issues will cover: - Those associated with the run up to establishing a site end point; - Those associated with verifying that the end points have been met; and Those associated with post closure. The network's current high level objectives can be summarized as follows: Share experience and best practice in the key issues running up to determining site end points; Gain a better understanding of the potential effects of recent and forthcoming EU legislation; Assess consistency between approaches; Highlight potential gaps within the remit of site end point determination and management; and - Consider the formulation of research projects with a view to sharing time and expense. The programme of work revolves around the following key tasks: - Share information, experience and existing good practice. - Look to determine sustainable approaches to contaminated land site end point management. - Through site visits, gain first hand experience of determining an appropriate end point strategy, and identifying and resolving end point issues. Highlight the key data gaps and consider the development of programmes to either close out these gaps or to build confidence in the approaches taken. Production of position papers on each technical are a highlighting how different countries approach/resolve a specific problem. (authors)

  20. Bulk Building Material Characterization and Decontamination Using a Concrete Floor and Wall Contamination Profiling Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, S.; Charters, G.; Blauvelt, D.

    2002-01-01

    The concrete profiling technology, RadPro(trademark) has four major components: a drill with a specialized cutting and sampling head, drill bits, a sample collection unit and a vacuum pump. The equipment in conjunction with portable radiometric instrumentation produces a profile of radiological or chemical contamination through the material being studied. The drill head is used under hammer action to penetrate hard surfaces. This causes the bulk material to be pulverized as the drill travels through the radioactive media efficiently transmitting to the sampling unit a representative sample of powdered bulk material. The profiling equipment is designed to sequentially collect all material from the hole. The bulk material samples are continuously retrieved by use of a specially designed vacuumed sample retrieval unit that prevents cross contamination of the clean retrieved samples. No circulation medium is required with this profiling process; therefore, the only by-product from drilling is the sample. The data quality, quantity, and representativeness may be used to produce an activity profile from the hot spot surface into the bulk building material. The activity data obtained during the profiling process is reduced and transferred to building drawings as part of a detailed report of the radiological problem. This activity profile may then be expanded to ultimately characterize the facility and expedite waste segregation and facility closure at a reduced cost and risk

  1. Radiological hazards of alpha-contaminated waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodgers, J.C.

    1982-01-01

    The radiological hazards of alpha-contaminated wastes are discussed in this overview in terms of two components of hazard: radiobiological hazard, and radioecological hazard. Radiobiological hazard refers to human uptake of alpha-emitters by inhalation and ingestion, and the resultant dose to critical organs of the body. Radioecological hazard refers to the processes of release from buried wastes, transport in the environment, and translocation to man through the food chain. Besides detailing the sources and magnitude of hazards, this brief review identifies the uncertainties in their estimation, and implications for the regulatory process

  2. SUDOQU, a new dose-assessment methodology for radiological surface contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dillen, Teun; van Dijk, Arjan

    2018-06-12

    A new methodology has been developed for the assessment of the annual effective dose resulting from removable and fixed radiological surface contamination. It is entitled SUDOQU (SUrface DOse QUantification) and it can for instance be used to derive criteria for surface contamination related to the import of non-food consumer goods, containers and conveyances, e.g., limiting values and operational screening levels. SUDOQU imposes mass (activity)-balance equations based on radioactive decay, removal and deposition processes in indoor and outdoor environments. This leads to time-dependent contamination levels that may be of particular importance in exposure scenarios dealing with one or a few contaminated items only (usually public exposure scenarios, therefore referred to as the 'consumer' model). Exposure scenarios with a continuous flow of freshly contaminated goods also fall within the scope of the methodology (typically occupational exposure scenarios, thus referred to as the 'worker model'). In this paper we describe SUDOQU, its applications, and its current limitations. First, we delineate the contamination issue, present the assumptions and explain the concepts. We describe the relevant removal, transfer, and deposition processes, and derive equations for the time evolution of the radiological surface-, air- and skin-contamination levels. These are then input for the subsequent evaluation of the annual effective dose with possible contributions from external gamma radiation, inhalation, secondary ingestion (indirect, from hand to mouth), skin contamination, direct ingestion and skin-contact exposure. The limiting effective surface dose is introduced for issues involving the conservatism of dose calculations. SUDOQU can be used by radiation-protection scientists/experts and policy makers in the field of e.g. emergency preparedness, trade and transport, exemption and clearance, waste management, and nuclear facilities. Several practical examples are worked

  3. Surface radiological free release program for the Battelle Columbus Laboratory Decommissioning Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horton, C.N.

    1995-01-01

    This paper was prepared for the Second Residual Radioactivity and Recycling Criteria Workshop and discusses decommissioning and decontamination activities at the Battelle Columbus Laboratories Decommissioning Project (BCLDP). The BCLDP is a joint effort between the Department of Energy (DOE) and Battelle Columbus Operations to decontaminate fifteen Battelle-owned buildings contaminated with DOE radioactive materials. The privately owned buildings located across the street from The Ohio State University campus became contaminated with natural uranium and thorium during nuclear research activities. BCLDP waste management is supported by an extensive radiological free-release program. Miscellaneous materials and building surfaces have been free-released from the BCLDP. The free-release program has substantially reduced radioactive waste volumes and supported waste minimization. Free release for unrestricted use has challenged regulators and NRC licensees since the development of early surface-release criteria. This paper discusses the surface radiological free-release program incorporated by the BCLDP and the historical development of the surface radiological free-release criteria. Concerns regarding radiological free-release criteria are also presented. (author)

  4. Radiological consequences of radioactive substances in building materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tschurlovits, M.

    1982-01-01

    A review of radiological consequences of radioactive substances in building materials is given. Where the other contributing papers are dealing with technical problems and measuring techniques, this paper is going beyond the term dose and is considering the risk by radioactive substances in building materials in relation to conventional risks. The present state of international standards is also discussed. If a limit of 1 mSv is adopted, it is shown that this limit is just met at present conditions. (Author) [de

  5. Analysis of body surface radiological contamination for inbound people from Japan to China during the Fukushima nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Long; Ma Weidong; Lei Cuiping; Chen Huifang; Li Yuwen; Liu Ying

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the radiological contamination of body surface for inbound people from Japan to China during Fukushima nuclear accident. Methods: According to The guidance for radiological contamination management for body surface issued by Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, for people evacuated from Japan, the body surface monitoring of radiological contamination was performed by the related agencies in main provinces and cities in China. The monitoring data were collected, analyzed and reported to Ministry of Health. Results: A total of 432 persons were checked. The monitoring results of 429 cases were close to the background level, while those of three persons were higher than the background level. Conclusions: In general,the detected results were as low as the background level. The radiological contamination monitoring of body surface for people from Japan could provide scientific data to relax the horror and panic among them. (authors)

  6. RESRAD-Build: A model to estimate dose from contaminated structures. Innovative technology summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-12-01

    The RESRAD-BUILD model is an exposure pathway and analysis code used to determine whether radiologically contaminated buildings and structures can be free released for a specific land use (e.g., residential or industrial). The model provides estimates of dose to a hypothetical receptor from the structure. The RESRAD-BUILD technology can calculate dose from variety of site-specific hypothetical scenarios, decay-time intervals, and radionuclides. When using the RESRAD-BUILD code, specific project assumptions must be developed with the appropriate regulatory agencies, especially the cleanup criteria and the exposure scenario to be used. The C Reactor demonstration of RESRAD-BUILD modeled hypothetical future use of below grade portions of the reactor building complex. A residential exposure scenario with a cleanup criteria of 15 mrem/yr above background (Environmental Protection Agency [EPA] draft guidance) was used to coordinate decommissioning with adjacent ongoing remedial actions conducted in accordance with an existing Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) Record of Decision. This paper gives a description of the technology and discusses its performance, applications, cost, regulatory and policy issues, and lessons learned

  7. RESRAD-BUILD: A model to estimate dose from contaminated structures. Innovative technology summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-01

    The RESRAD-BUILD model is an exposure pathway and analysis code used to determine whether radiologically contaminated buildings and structures can be free released for a specific land use (e.g., residential or industrial). The model provides estimates of dose to a hypothetical receptor from the structure. The RESRAD-BUILD technology can calculate dose from variety of site-specific hypothetical scenarios, decay-time intervals, and radionuclides. When using the RESRAD-BUILD code, specific project assumptions must be developed with the appropriate regulatory agencies, especially the cleanup criteria and the exposure scenario to be used. The C Reactor demonstration of RESRAD-BUILD modeled hypothetical future use of below grade portions of the reactor building complex. A residential exposure scenario with a cleanup criteria of 15 mrem/yr above background (Environmental Protection Agency [EPA] draft guidance) was used to coordinate decommissioning with adjacent ongoing remedial actions conducted in accordance with an existing Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) Record of Decision. This paper gives a description of the technology and discusses its performance, applications, cost, regulatory and policy issues, and lessons learned.

  8. Bioremediation of Petroleum and Radiological Contaminated Soils at the Savannah River Site: Laboratory to Field Scale Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BRIGMON, ROBINL.

    2004-06-07

    In the process of Savannah River Site (SRS) operations limited amounts of waste are generated containing petroleum, and radiological contaminated soils. Currently, this combination of radiological and petroleum contaminated waste does not have an immediate disposal route and is being stored in low activity vaults. SRS developed and implemented a successful plan for clean up of the petroleum portion of the soils in situ using simple, inexpensive, bioreactor technology. Treatment in a bioreactor removes the petroleum contamination from the soil without spreading radiological contamination to the environment. This bioreactor uses the bioventing process and bioaugmentation or the addition of the select hydrocarbon degrading bacteria. Oxygen is usually the initial rate-limiting factor in the biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons. Using the bioventing process allowed control of the supply of nutrients and moisture based on petroleum contamination concentrations and soil type. The results of this work have proven to be a safe and cost-effective means of cleaning up low level radiological and petroleum-contaminated soil. Many of the other elements of the bioreactor design were developed or enhanced during the demonstration of a ''biopile'' to treat the soils beneath a Polish oil refinery's waste disposal lagoons. Aerobic microorganisms were isolated from the aged refinery's acidic sludge contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Twelve hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria were isolated from the sludge. The predominant PAH degraders were tentatively identified as Achromobacter, Pseudomonas Burkholderia, and Sphingomonas spp. Several Ralstonia spp were also isolated that produce biosurfactants. Biosurfactants can enhance bioremediation by increasing the bioavailability of hydrophobic contaminants including hydrocarbons. The results indicated that the diversity of acid-tolerant PAH-degrading microorganisms in acidic oil wastes may

  9. Feasibility study to combine the evaluation of radiological and chemical-toxicological effects of old contaminated sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacob, P.; Proehl, G.

    1997-01-01

    The uranium mining regions of the German Federal States Saxony, Thuringia and Saxony-Anhalt are contaminated by radionuclides and by chemical substances. For both, ionizing radiations and chemicals, concepts and models exists to assess possible health effects for the population living in such areas. However, these assessment models were developed independently for both kinds of contaminants. Therefore, the 9 th Conference of the State Ministers for Environmental Protection have claimed that for the evaluation of contaminated sites the radiological and chemical contaminants should be integrated into a joint assessment. This feasibility study describes the state of the art of the concepts and models used for the evaluation of radiological and chemical contaminants. The similarities and differences of these evaluation methods are identified and discussed. Suggestions are made for an integrated assessment to standardize the evaluation of sites contaminated by radionuclides or chemicals. (orig.) [de

  10. Radiological Monitoring Equipment For Real-Time Quantification Of Area Contamination In Soils And Facility Decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M. V. Carpenter; Jay A. Roach; John R Giles; Lyle G. Roybal

    2005-01-01

    The environmental restoration industry offers several systems that perform scan-type characterization of radiologically contaminated areas. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed and deployed a suite of field systems that rapidly scan, characterize, and analyze radiological contamination in surface soils. The base system consists of a detector, such as sodium iodide (NaI) spectrometers, a global positioning system (GPS), and an integrated user-friendly computer interface. This mobile concept was initially developed to provide precertification analyses of soils contaminated with uranium, thorium, and radium at the Fernald Closure Project, near Cincinnati, Ohio. INL has expanded the functionality of this basic system to create a suite of integrated field-deployable analytical systems. Using its engineering and radiation measurement expertise, aided by computer hardware and software support, INL has streamlined the data acquisition and analysis process to provide real-time information presented on wireless screens and in the form of coverage maps immediately available to field technicians. In addition, custom software offers a user-friendly interface with user-selectable alarm levels and automated data quality monitoring functions that validate the data. This system is deployed from various platforms, depending on the nature of the survey. The deployment platforms include a small all-terrain vehicle used to survey large, relatively flat areas, a hand-pushed unit for areas where maneuverability is important, an excavator-mounted system used to scan pits and trenches where personnel access is restricted, and backpack- mounted systems to survey rocky shoreline features and other physical settings that preclude vehicle-based deployment. Variants of the base system include sealed proportional counters for measuring actinides (i.e., plutonium-238 and americium-241) in building demolitions, soil areas, roadbeds, and process line routes at the Miamisburg Closure

  11. Dosskin code for radiological evaluation of skin radioactive contaminations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornejo D, N.

    1996-01-01

    The conceptual procedure and computational features of the DOSSKIN code are shown. This code calculates, in a very interactive way, skin equivalent doses and radiological risk related to skin radioactive contaminations. The evaluation takes into account the contributions of contaminant daughter nuclides and backscattering of beta particles in any skin cover. DOSSKIN also allows to estimate the maximum time needed to decontaminate the affected zone, using, as input quantity, the limit value of skin equivalent dose considered by users. The comparison of the results obtained by the DOSSKIN code with those reported by different authors are showed. The differences of results are less than 30%. (authors). 4 refs., 3 fig., 1 tab

  12. Radiological survey support activities for the decommissioning of the Ames Laboratory Research Reactor Facility, Ames, Iowa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wynveen, R.A.; Smith, W.H.; Sholeen, C.M.; Justus, A.L.; Flynn, K.F.

    1984-09-01

    At the request of the Engineering Support Division of the US Department of Energy-Chicago Operations Office and in accordance with the programmatic overview/certification responsibilities of the Department of Energy Environmental and Safety Engineering Division, the Argonne National Laboratory Radiological Survey Group conducted a series of radiological measurements and tests at the Ames Laboratory Research Reactor located in Ames, Iowa. These measurements and tests were conducted during 1980 and 1981 while the reactor building was being decontaminated and decommissioned for the purpose of returning the building to general use. The results of these evaluations are included in this report. Although the surface contamination within the reactor building could presumably be reduced to negligible levels, the potential for airborne contamination from tritiated water vapor remains. This vapor emmanates from contamination within the concrete of the building and should be monitored until such time as it is reduced to background levels. 2 references, 8 figures, 6 tables.

  13. Nevada Test Site Area 25. Radiological survey and cleanup project, 1974-1983. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKnight, R.K.; Rosenberry, C.E.; Orcutt, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    This report describes radiological survey, decontamination and decommissioning of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) Area 25 facilities and land areas incorporated in the Nuclear Rocket Development Station (NRDS). Buildings, facilities and support systems used after 1959 for nuclear reactor and engine testing were surveyed for the presence of radioactive contamination. The cleanup was part of the Surplus Facilities Management Program funded by the Department of Energy's Richland Operations Office. The radiological survey portion of the project encompassed portable instrument surveys and removable contamination surveys (swipe) for alpha and beta plus gamma radiation contamination of facilities, equipment and land areas. Soil sampling was also accomplished. The majority of Area 25 facilities and land areas have been returned to unrestricted use. Remaining radiologically contaminated areas are posted with warning signs and barricades. 12 figures

  14. Analysis of radioactive contaminations and radiological hazard in Poland after the Chernobyl reactor accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarnowiecki, K.

    1988-01-01

    It is a report on radiological impact in Poland following the Chernobyl reactor accident prepared in the Central Laboratory for Radiological Protection. The results of measurement and its analysis are presented. Isotopic composition of the contamined air and the concentration of radionuclides are determined. The trajectories of the airborne radioactive material movement from Chernobyl to Poland at the last days of April 1986 are presented. Assessment of the radiological risk of the population is done. 38 refs., 20 figs., 11 tabs. (M.F.W.)

  15. How to deal with radiologically contaminated vegetation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilde, E.W.; Murphy, C.E.; Lamar, R.T.; Larson, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the findings from a literature review conducted as part of a Department of Energy, Office of Technology Development Biomass Remediation Task. The principal objective of this project is to develop a process or group of processes to treat radiologically contaminated vegetation in a manner that minimizes handling, processing, and treatment costs. Contaminated, woody vegetation growing on waste sites at SRS poses a problem to waste site closure technologies that are being considered for these sites. It is feared that large sections of woody vegetation (logs) can not be buried in waste sites where isolation of waste is accomplished by capping the site. Logs or large piles of woody debris have the potential of decaying and leaving voids under the cap. This could lead to cap failure and entrance of water into the waste. Large solid objects could also interfere with treatments like in situ mixing of soil with grout or other materials to encapsulate the contaminated sediments and soils in the waste sites. Optimal disposal of the wood includes considerations of volume reduction, treatment of the radioactive residue resulting from volume reduction, or confinement without volume reduction. Volume reduction consists primarily of removing the carbon, oxygen, and hydrogen in the wood, leaving an ash that would contain most of the contamination. The only contaminant that would be released by volume reduction would by small amounts of the radioactive isotope of hydrogen, tritium. The following sections will describe the waste sites at SRS which contain contaminated vegetation and are potential candidates for the technology developed under this proposal. The description will provide a context for the magnitude of the problem and the logistics of the alternative solutions that are evaluated later in the review. 76 refs

  16. How to deal with radiologically contaminated vegetation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilde, E.W.; Murphy, C.E.; Lamar, R.T.; Larson, M.J.

    1996-12-31

    This report describes the findings from a literature review conducted as part of a Department of Energy, Office of Technology Development Biomass Remediation Task. The principal objective of this project is to develop a process or group of processes to treat radiologically contaminated vegetation in a manner that minimizes handling, processing, and treatment costs. Contaminated, woody vegetation growing on waste sites at SRS poses a problem to waste site closure technologies that are being considered for these sites. It is feared that large sections of woody vegetation (logs) can not be buried in waste sites where isolation of waste is accomplished by capping the site. Logs or large piles of woody debris have the potential of decaying and leaving voids under the cap. This could lead to cap failure and entrance of water into the waste. Large solid objects could also interfere with treatments like in situ mixing of soil with grout or other materials to encapsulate the contaminated sediments and soils in the waste sites. Optimal disposal of the wood includes considerations of volume reduction, treatment of the radioactive residue resulting from volume reduction, or confinement without volume reduction. Volume reduction consists primarily of removing the carbon, oxygen, and hydrogen in the wood, leaving an ash that would contain most of the contamination. The only contaminant that would be released by volume reduction would by small amounts of the radioactive isotope of hydrogen, tritium. The following sections will describe the waste sites at SRS which contain contaminated vegetation and are potential candidates for the technology developed under this proposal. The description will provide a context for the magnitude of the problem and the logistics of the alternative solutions that are evaluated later in the review. 76 refs.

  17. The application of entropy weight topsis method for optimal choice in low radiological decorative building materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Guangwen; Hu Youhua; Liu Qian

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, the principle of TOPSIS method was introduced and applied to sorting the given indexes of glazed brick and granite respectively in different areas' decorative building materials in order to selecting the optimal low radiological decorative building materials. First, the entropy weight TOPSIS method was used for data processing about the sample numbers and radio nuclides content, and then different weights were given to different indexes. Finally, by using the SAS software for data analysis and sorting, we obtained that the optimal low radiological decorative building materials were Sichuan glazed brick and Henan granite. Through the results, it could be seen that the application of entropy weight TOPSIS method in selecting low radiological decorative building materials was feasible, and it will also provide the method reference. (authors)

  18. Radiological assessment of decommissioned nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickson, H.W.; Cottrell, W.D.

    1976-01-01

    A radiological survey of the former Middlesex Sampling Plant, Middlesex, New Jersey, has been completed. The surveyed property served as a uranium ore sampling plant during the 1940's and early 1950's. It was released for unrestricted use in 1967 following a radiological survey by the Atomic Energy Commission and is now a reserve training center for the U. S. Marine Sixth Motor Transport Battalion. The present survey was undertaken to determine whether the existing radiological status of the property is consistent with current health standards and radiation protection practices. The radiological survey included measurement of residual alpha, beta, and gamma contamination levels, radon and radon daughter concentrations in buildings, external gamma radiation levels on the site and on adjacent property, and radium concentrations in soil on the site and on adjacent property

  19. Skin decontamination cream for radiological contaminants: Formulation development and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Abdul Wadood; Kotta, Sabna; Rana, Sudha; Ansari, Shahid Husain; Sharma, Rakesh Kumar; Ali, Javed

    2013-01-01

    Increased use of the radioactive materials in the field of research, medical, nuclear power plant, and industry has increased the risk of accidental exposure. Intentional use of the radioisotopes by terrorist organizations could cause exposure/contamination of a number of the population. In view of the accidental contamination, there is a need to develop self-usable decontamination formulations that could be used immediately after contamination is suspected. Present work was planned to optimize and develop self-usable radiation decontamination cream formulation. Various pharmaceutical parameters were characterized. (99m)Tc-sodium pertechnetate was used as radiocontaminant. Static counts were recorded before and after decontamination using single photon emission computed tomography. Decontamination efficacy of the cream was found to be 42% ± 3% at 0-0.5 h after the exposure. Primary skin irritancy test was satisfactory as no erythema or edema was observed visually after 2 weeks of the formulation application. The decontamination studies proved the potential of EDTA to remove the radiological contaminants effectively.

  20. Nevada Test Site Area 25, Radiological Survey and Cleanup Project, 1974-1983 (a revised final report). Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, M.G.

    1984-12-01

    This report describes the radiological survey, decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) Area 25 facilities and land areas incorporated in the Nuclear Rocket Development Station (NRDS). Buildings, facilities and support systems used after 1959 for nuclear reactor and engine testing were surveyed for the presence of radioactive contamination. The radiological survey portion of the project encompassed portable instrument surveys and removable contamination surveys (swipe) for beta plus gamma and alpha radioactive contamination of facilities, equipment and land areas. Soil sampling was also accomplished. The majority of Area 25 facilities and land areas have been returned to unrestricted use. Remaining radiologically contaminated areas are posted with warning signs and barricades. 9 references, 23 figures

  1. Knowledge Management Learned from Decommissioning and Environmental Remediation after an Unexpected Radiological Contamination Occurred at Fukushima Dai-ichi NPP Accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, T.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: The Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) Accident resulted in severe damage of cores in units 1 to 3, and subsequently entailed not only contamination of facility but also widely-spread radiological contamination in environment due to the release of radioactive nuclides. Decommissioning activities will require at least 30–40 years with various stages of operation, such as contaminated water treatment, decontamination of reactor buildings, retrieval of spent fuel (SF) from SF pools, inspection of primary containment vessel (PCV) and reactor pressure vessel (RPV), and retrieval and further management of damaged fuel and melted debris. Especially, a water injection for core cooling is a pressing issue to stabilize the melted debris, which leads to produce a large amount of contaminated water. Environmental remediation is a crucial issue to return a normal life for local residents. On-site cleaning and off-site remediation produce various kinds and enormous amount of contaminated material with low to high radioactivity. Knowledge management of on-site and off-site issues over generation are critical to achieve the cleaning and remediation requiring a couple of decades. In addition, knowledge obtained through a long term-operation should be shared globally. (author

  2. Results of the independent radiological verification survey at the former Bridgeport Brass Company Facility, Seymour, Connecticut (SSC001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Rice, D.E.; Allred, J.F.; Brown, K.S.

    1995-03-01

    At the request of the USDOE, a team from ORNL conducted an independent radiological verification survey at the former Bridgeport Brass Company Facility, Seymour, Connecticut, from September 1992 to March 1993. Purpose of the survey was to determine whether residual levels of radioactivity inside the Ruffert Building and selected adjacent areas were rmediated to levels below DOE guidelines for FUSRAP sites. The property was contaminated with radioactive residues of 238 U from uranium processing experiments conducted by Reactive Metals, Inc., from 1962 to 1964 for the Atomic Energy Commission. A previous radiological survey did not characterize the entire floor space because equipment which could not be moved at the time made it inaccessible for radiological surveys. During the remediation process, additional areas of elevated radioactivity were discovered under stationary equipment, which required additional remediation and further verification. Results of the independent radiological verification survey confirm that, with the exception of the drain system inside the building, residual uranium contamination has been remediated to levels below DOE guidelines for unrestricted release of property at FUSRAP sites inside and outside the Ruffert Building. However, certain sections of the drain system retain uranium contamination above DOE surface guideline levels. These sections of pipe are addressed in separate, referenced documentation

  3. Radiological characterisation of contaminated concretes from the object 44/20 of NPP A1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slavik, O.; Listjak, M.; Pely, I.; Soos, F.

    2005-01-01

    Results of radiological characterisation of contaminated concretes from object 44/20 of the NPP A-1 Jaslovske Bohunice are summarized in this work. These works were carried out in VUJE in the laboratory of environmental dosimetry in 2004 and partially in 2005. The main results of radiological characterisation can be summarised as follow: (1) Contamination of concretes is in all cases surficial, it reaches up to 5-10 mm, the dominant contaminant is 137 Cs; (2) The spawn concrete is mostly contaminated only from one side (one being adjacent to the ceiling concrete), crucial part of them is even on this side contaminated in very low level complying with free release level; (3) The ceiling concrete blocks are contaminated mostly on one side, only (the inner side of shafts), their decontamination will require removing of about 5 mm thick surface layer. (4) The floor concrete is covered by heavily contaminated dust 137 CS, 100-500 Bq/g), originating from sorting of the wet RAW .Its decontamination will require removing of 10 mm thick surface concrete layer; (5) The core samples taken from the whole depth profile of the ceiling concrete show also only surface contamination, samples prepared from the deeper layers have not demonstrated any contamination in these layers. Control measurements of deeper concrete layers, however, went on with negative results also in year 2005; (6) The relative content for 90 Sr in these concretes is in average about 8%, for 241 Am determined by gamma-spectrometry is 0.4% and for 239 , 240 Pu determined radiochemically is 0.33% in comparison with the content of 137 Cs. (authors)

  4. ASSESSMENTOF BETA PARTICLE FLUX FROM SURFACE CONTAMINATION AS A RELATIVE INDICATOR FOR RADIONUCLIDE DISTRIBUTION ON EXTERNAL SURFACES OF A MULTI-STORY BUILDING IN PRIPYAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farfan, E.

    2009-11-17

    How would we recover if a Radiological Dispersion Device (e.g., dirty bomb) or Improvised Nuclear Device were to detonate in a large city? In order to assess the feasibility of remediation following such an event, several issues would have to be considered, including the levels and characteristics of the radioactive contamination, the availability of the required resources to accomplish decontamination, and the planned future use of the city's structures and buildings. Presently little is known about the distribution, redistribution, and migration of radionuclides in an urban environment. However, Pripyat, a city substantially contaminated by the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident, may provide some answers. The main objective of this study was to determine the radionuclide distribution on a Pripyat multi-story building, which had not been previously decontaminated and therefore could reflect the initial fallout and its further natural redistribution on external surfaces. The 7-story building selected was surveyed from the ground floor to the roof on horizontal and vertical surfaces along seven ground-to-roof transections. Some of the results from this study indicate that the upper floors of the building had higher contamination levels than the lower floors. The authors consequently recommend that existing decontamination procedures for tall structures be re-examined and modified accordingly.

  5. Cursory radiological assessment: Battelle Columbus Laboratory Decommissioning and Decontamination Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, W.H.; Munyon, W.J.; Mosho, G.D.; Robinet, M.J.; Wynveen, R.A.

    1988-10-01

    This document reports on the results obtained from a cursory radiological assessment of various properties at the Battelle Columbus Laboratory, Columbia, Ohio. The cursory radiological assessment is part of a preliminary investigation for the Battelle Columbus Laboratory Decommissioning and Decontamination Project. The radiological assessment of Battelle Columbus Laboratory's two sites included conducting interior and exterior building surveys and collecting and analyzing air, sewer system, and soil samples. Direct radiological surveys were made of floor, wall, and overhead areas. Smear surveys were made on various interior building surfaces as well as the exterior building vents. Air samples were collected in select areas to determine concentrations of Rn-222, Rn-220, and Rn-219 daughters, in addition to any long-lived radioactive particulates. Radon-222 concentrations were continuously monitored over a 24-hr period at several building locations using a radon gas monitoring system. The sanitary sewer systems at King Avenue, West Jefferson-North, and West Jefferson-South were each sampled at select locations. All samples were submitted to the Argonne Analytical Chemistry Laboratory for various radiological and chemical analyses. Environmental soil corings were taken at both the King Avenue and West Jefferson sites to investigate the potential for soil contamination within the first 12-inches below grade. Further subsurface investigations at the West Jefferson-North and West Jefferson-South areas were conducted using soil boring techniques. 4 refs., 10 figs., 10 tabs

  6. The Mobile Surface Contamination Monitor II environmental radiological characterization utilizing GPS/GIS technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wendling, M.A.

    1993-05-01

    Time, cost, and most importantly quality of data are the three factors to measure the success of field radiological characterizations. The application of coupling radiation detection instrumentation to a GPS receiver has dramatically increased the data quality achievable compared to traditional environmental radiological survey methods. Improvements in verifying adequate spatial coverage of an area while collecting data and at,the same time reducing field time requirements can be realized. Data acquired during the recent implementation of the Mobile Surface Contamination Monitor 11 (MSCM-11) will be presented to demonstrate the advantages of this system over traditional radiological survey methods. The comparison will include time and manpower requirements. Linking the complimentary GPS, GIS and radiation detection technologies on a mobile tractor based platform has provided a tool to provide radiological characterization data faster, cheaper, and better to assist in the Environmental Restoration Mission of the Hanford Site

  7. EVALUATION OF THE ADA TECHNOLOGIES' ELECTRO-DECON PROCESS TO REMOVE RADIOLOGICAL CONTAMINATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pao, Jenn-Hai; Demmer, Rick L.; Argyle, Mark D.; Veatch, Brad D.

    2003-01-01

    A surface decontamination system featuring the use of ADA's electrochemical process was tested and evaluated. The process can be flexibly deployed by using an electrolyte delivery system that has been demonstrated to be reliable and effective. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of this system for the surface decontamination of radiologically contaminated stainless steel

  8. Management of contaminated territories -- radiological principles and practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedemann-Jensen, P.; Belyaev, S.T.; Demin, V.F.; Rolevich, I.V.; Likhtariov, I.A.; Kovgan, L.N.; Bariakhtar, V.G.

    1996-01-01

    The current status of internationally agreed principles and guidance for the management of contaminated territories and the international development of intervention guidance since the Chernobyl accident is reviewed. The experience gained after the Chernobyl accident indicates that the international advice on intervention existing at the time of the Chernobyl accident was not fully understood by decision makers neither in Western Europe nor in the former USSR and that the guidance failed to address adequately the difficult social problems which can arise after a serious nuclear accident. The differences between CIS practice and international guidance, both conceptually and practically, are identified. The general response of the authorities in the former USSR regarding many early actions for protection of the affected population after the Chernobyl accident were broadly reasonable and consistent with internationally established guidelines pertaining at the time of the accident. During the years following the accident, decisions on countermeasures in the former USSR were based on four different criteria: annual dose, lifetime dose, temporary permissible levels in foodstuffs and surface contamination density of 137 Cs. Due to socio-psychological and political factors, requirements for radiation protection were made more and more strict. The CIS criteria of today for different protective actions and strategies are given in terms of annual doses or activity concentrations of 137 Cs in different foodstuffs. International guidance is given as intervention levels in terms of avertable doses by specific countermeasures and as action levels. Action levels refer to different protective actions or protection strategies. Action levels are levels above which remedial actions are taken and below which they are not, and they refer to the maximum residual dose without any action. The CIS criteria are conceptually a system of action levels rather than a set of intervention levels

  9. Natural radioactivity in granite stones and their radiological aspects as building material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumaravel, S.; Sunil, C.N.; Narashimha Nath, V.; Raghunath, T.; Prashanth Kumar, M.; Ramakrishna, V.; Nair, B.S.K.; Purohit, R.G.; Tripati, R.M.

    2014-01-01

    Natural radioactivity in building and building decorating materials comes mainly from natural radioactive series like 238 U, 232 Th and 40 K. India is one of the leading users of granite stones as it is preferred by decorators and architects. The knowledge of presence of natural radioactivity in these materials is required for the assessment of radiation exposure due to them. The objective of this study is to determine the natural radioactivity and radiological aspects of granite stones as building material

  10. Determination of contamination-free build-up for 60Co

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgins, P.D.; Sibata, CH.; Paliwal, B.R.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental verification of the difference between absorbed dose in tissue and the collision fraction of kerma requires precise knowledge of the absorbed dose curve, particularly in the build-up and build-down regions. A simple method from direct measurement of contamination-free build-up for 60 Co, which should also be applicable for most of the photon energies commonly employed for treatment, is presented. It is shown that the contribution from air-scattered electrons to the surface dose may be removed by extrapolating measurements of build-up to zero field size. The remaining contribution to contamination from the collimators and other source-related hardware may be minimised by measuring these build-up curves sufficiently far from the source. These results were tested by measuring the build-up using a magnet to sweep scattered electrons from the primary photon beam and by measuring the surface dose in the limit of an evacuated beam path. The relative dose at zero depth in polystyrene was found to be approximately 8.9+-0.3% of the dose at the depth of maximum build-up. (author)

  11. Contaminant ingress into multizone buildings: An analytical state-space approach

    KAUST Repository

    Parker, Simon; Coffey, Chris; Gravesen, Jens; Kirkpatrick, James; Ratcliffe, Keith; Lingard, Bryan; Nally, James

    2013-01-01

    The ingress of exterior contaminants into buildings is often assessed by treating the building interior as a single well-mixed space. Multizone modelling provides an alternative way of representing buildings that can estimate concentration time

  12. Radiological risk assessment for an urban area: Focusing on a drinking water contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Hyo-Joon; Hwang, Won-Tae; Kim, Eun-Han; Han, Moon-Hee

    2009-01-01

    This paper specifically discusses a water quality modeling and health risk assessment for cesium-137 to assess the potential and actual effects on human health from drinking water contaminated by a radiological terrorist attack in the Seoul metropolitan area, Korea. With respect to the source term caused by a terrorist attack, it was assumed that 50 TBq of cesium-137 was introduced into the Paldang Lake which is a single water resource for the Seoul metropolitan area. EFDC (Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code) model was used to calculate the hydrodynamic and water quality for the model domain, Paldang Lake. Mortality risk and morbid risk coefficients caused by the ingestion of tap water were used to assess a human health risk due to cesium-137. The transport of cesium-137 in the Paldang water system was mainly dependent on the flow streamlines and the effect of the dilution from the other branches. The mortality and morbidity risks due to the drinking water contamination by cesium-137 were 4.77 x 10 -7 and 6.92 x 10 -7 , respectively. Accordingly, it is very important to take appropriate countermeasures when radiological terrorist attacks have occurred at water resources to prevent radiological risks by radionuclides.

  13. Non-radiological contaminants from uranium mining and milling at Ranger, Jabiru, Northern Territory, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noller, B N

    1991-10-01

    Protection from the hazards from radioactivity is of prime importance in the management of uranium mine and mill wastes. Such wastes also contain non-radiological contaminants (heavy metals, acids and neutralising agents) which give rise to potential long-term health and environmental hazards and short-term hazards to the aquatic ecosystem, e.g. as a result of release of waste water. This study seeks to identify non-radiological contaminants (elements) transferred to waste water at the Ranger uranium mine/mill complex at Jabiru, which are likely to hazardous to the aquatic environment.The two principal sources of contaminants are: (i) ore and waste rock mobilised from mining; and (ii) process reagents used in the milling and mineral extraction process. These substances may or may not already be present in the natural environment but may lead to deleterious effects on the aquatic environment if increased above threshold levels.Rhenium, derived from the ore body, was found to be significantly enriched in waste water from Ranger, indicating its suitability as an indicator element for water originating from the mining and milling process, but only uranium, likewise derived from the ore, and magnesium, manganese and sulfur (as sulfate) from the milling process were found to be significant environmental contaminants.

  14. Predecommissioning radiological survey of BR3 infrastructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantrel, E.

    2006-01-01

    The decommissioning of the BR3 (Belgian Reactor 3) approaches its final phase, in which the buildings infrastructures are being decontaminated targeting either the reuse or the conventional demolition after denuclearisation. In a PWR with a significant operation lifetime, such as the BR3, maintenance operations, failure and/or leakages, incidents occurring in the different circuits of the plant result in the contamination of the buildings infrastructures at various activity levels with contaminants penetrating/migrating up to several cm inside the material bulk structure. Moreover, the BR3 bioshield has been exposed to rather high neutron leakage fluxes during the reactor operation and is therefore activated. The different radiological situations faced require the implementation of different characterization methodologies based on the use of an adequate combination of measurement devices and/or sampling devices. The non-destructive assay of activation depth using the ISOCS (In Situ Object Counting System) and a specific spectra analysis protocol has been tested in 2004. The first results obtained were encouraging and the qualification program for activated material is running. We are now investigating the possibilities to extend the methodology to building materials contaminated in-depth with 137 Cs. The overall process of dismantling/denuclearization of the BR3 building infrastructure consists of: (1) a preliminary characterization and determination of the contamination or activation depth; (2) the determination of the decontamination method; (3) the effective decontamination and clean up; (4) a possible intermediate characterization followed by an additional decontamination step; and (5) the characterization for clearance. The more accurate the preliminary survey is performed the less additional control/decontamination cycles are needed to reach clearance levels. The pre-decommissioning characterization process includes a preliminary categorisation (see picture

  15. Contamination source review for Building E2370, Edgewood Area, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Reilly, D.P.; Glennon, M.A.; Draugelis, A.K.; Rueda, J.; Zimmerman, R.E.

    1995-09-01

    The US Army Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG) commissioned Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to conduct a contamination source review to identify and define areas of toxic or hazardous contaminants and to assess the physical condition and accessibility of APG buildings. The information obtained from this review may be used to assist the US Army in planning for the future use or disposition of the buildings. The contamination source review consisted of the following tasks: historical records search, physical inspection, photographic documentation, and geophysical investigation. This report provides the results of the contamination source review for Building E2370. Many of the APG facilities constructed between 1917 and the 1960s are no longer used because of obsolescence and their poor state of repair. Because many of these buildings were used for research, development, testing, and/or pilot-scale production of chemical warfare agents and other military substances, the potential exists for portions of the buildings to be contaminated with these substances, their degradation products, and other laboratory or industrial chemicals. These buildings and associated structures or appurtenances may contribute to environmental concerns at APG.

  16. Contamination source review for Building E3236, Edgewood Area, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zellmer, S.D.; Smits, M.P.; Draugelis, A.K.; Glennon, M.A.; Rueda, J.; Zimmerman, R.E.

    1995-09-01

    The US Army Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG) commissioned Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to conduct a contamination source review to identify and define areas of toxic or hazardous contaminants and to assess the physical condition and accessibility of APG buildings. The information obtained from the review may be used to assist the US Army in planning for the future use or disposition of the buildings. The contamination source review consisted of the following tasks: historical records search, physical inspection, photographic documentation, geophysical investigation, and review of available records regarding underground storage tanks associated with each building. This report provides the results of the contamination source review for Building E3236. Many of the APG facilities constructed between 1917 and the 1960s are no longer used because of obsolescence and their poor state of repair. Because many of these buildings were used for research, development, testing, and/or pilot- scale production of chemical warfare agents and other military substances, the potential exists for portions of the buildings to be contaminated with these substances, their degradation products, and other laboratory or industrial chemicals. These buildings and associated structures or appurtenances may contribute to environmental concerns at APG.

  17. Radiological aspects of the usability of red mud as building material additive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somlai, Janos; Jobbagy, Viktor; Kovacs, Jozsef; Tarjan, Sandor; Kovacs, Tibor

    2008-01-01

    Several researchers have examined and achieved favourable results in connection with the building industry's use of red mud extracted in large quantities from the processing of bauxite. These days more and more precedence is being given to limiting the radiological dose to the population. In this study carried out in Hungary, the use of red mud, bauxite, and clay additives recommended for the production of special cements, were examined from a radiological aspect. 226 Ra and 232 Th activity concentrations measured in Hungarian bauxite, red mud and clay samples were significantly similar with the levels for such raw materials mentioned in international literature. Taking radiation protection aspects into consideration, none of these products can be directly used for building construction. Taking Hungarian and international values into consideration, a small amount of red mud, not exceeding 15% could be used for brick production, for example as a colouring material. However, beyond this amount the standards for building materials would not be met. For the production of cements an even stricter limit needs to be determined when both bauxite and red mud are used

  18. A virtual environment for simulation of radiological accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Tadeu Augusto de Almeida; Farias, Oscar Luiz Monteiro de

    2013-01-01

    A virtual environment is a computer environment, representative of a subset of the real world, and where models of the real world entities, process and events are included in a virtual (three-dimensional) space. Virtual environments are ideal tools for simulation of certain critical processes, such as radiological accidents, where human beings or properties can suffer irreversible or long term damages. Radiological accidents are characterized by the significant exposure to radiation of specialized workers and general public. The early detection of a radiological accident and the determination of its possible extension are essential factors for the planning of prompt answers and emergency actions. This paper proposes the integration of georeferenced representation of the three-dimensional space and agent-based models, with the objective to construct virtual environments that have the capacity to simulate radiological accidents. The three-dimensional georeferenced representations of space candidates are: 1) the spatial representation of traditional geographical information systems (GIS); 2) the representation adopted by Google Maps®. Adding agents to these spatial representations allow us to simulate radiological accidents, quantify the doses received by members of the public, obtain a possible spatial distribution of people contaminated, estimate the number of contaminated individuals, estimate the impact on the health-network, estimate environmental impacts, generate exclusion zones, build alternative scenarios and train staff to deal with radiological accidents. (author)

  19. A virtual environment for simulation of radiological accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Tadeu Augusto de Almeida, E-mail: tedsilva@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Farias, Oscar Luiz Monteiro de, E-mail: fariasol@eng.uerj.br [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    A virtual environment is a computer environment, representative of a subset of the real world, and where models of the real world entities, process and events are included in a virtual (three-dimensional) space. Virtual environments are ideal tools for simulation of certain critical processes, such as radiological accidents, where human beings or properties can suffer irreversible or long term damages. Radiological accidents are characterized by the significant exposure to radiation of specialized workers and general public. The early detection of a radiological accident and the determination of its possible extension are essential factors for the planning of prompt answers and emergency actions. This paper proposes the integration of georeferenced representation of the three-dimensional space and agent-based models, with the objective to construct virtual environments that have the capacity to simulate radiological accidents. The three-dimensional georeferenced representations of space candidates are: 1) the spatial representation of traditional geographical information systems (GIS); 2) the representation adopted by Google Maps®. Adding agents to these spatial representations allow us to simulate radiological accidents, quantify the doses received by members of the public, obtain a possible spatial distribution of people contaminated, estimate the number of contaminated individuals, estimate the impact on the health-network, estimate environmental impacts, generate exclusion zones, build alternative scenarios and train staff to deal with radiological accidents. (author)

  20. Radiological dose assessment of naturally occurring radioactive materials in concrete building materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amran AB Majid; Aznan Fazli Ismail; Muhamad Samudi Yasir; Redzuwan Yahaya; Ismail Bahari

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the natural radioactivity contained in building materials have significantly influenced the dose rates in dwelling. Exposure to natural radiation in building has been of concerned since almost 80 % of our daily live are spend indoor. Thus, the aim of the study is to assess the radiological risk associated by natural radioactivity in soil based building materials to dwellers. A total of 13 Portland cement, 46 sand and 43 gravel samples obtained from manufacturers or bought directly from local hardware stores in Peninsular of Malaysia were analysed for their radioactivity concentrations. The activity concentrations of 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K in the studied building materials samples were found to be in the range of 3.7-359.3, 2.0-370.8 and 10.3-1,949.5 Bq kg -1 respectively. The annual radiation dose rates (μSv year -1 ) received by dwellers were evaluated for 1 to 50 years of exposure using Resrad-Build Computer Code based on the activity concentration of 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K found in the studied building material samples. The rooms modelling were based on the changing parameters of concrete wall thickness and the room dimensions. The annual radiation dose rates to dwellers were found to increase annually over a period of 50 years. The concrete thicknesses were found to have significantly influenced the dose rates in building. The self-absorption occurred when the concrete thickness was thicker than 0.4 m. Results of this study shows that the dose rates received by the dwellers of the building are proportional to the size of the room. In general the study concludes that concrete building materials; Portland cements, sands, and gravels in Peninsular of Malaysia does not pose radiological hazard to the building dwellers. (author)

  1. Sequestration Coating Performance Requirements for Mitigation of Contamination from a Radiological Dispersion Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drake, J.

    2009-01-01

    Immediate action would be necessary to minimize the effects of a radiological 'dirty bomb' detonation in a major city. After a dirty bomb has been detonated, vehicular and pedestrian traffic, as well as weather effects, would increase the spread of loose contamination, making control and recovery more difficult and costly. While contaminant migration and chemical binding into surface materials can be relatively rapid, the immediate treatment of surfaces with large quantities of an appropriate compound could alleviate much of the difficulty in decontamination. The EPA's National Homeland Security Research Center (NHSRC), in collaboration with ASTM International, is currently developing performance standards for materials which could be applied to exterior surfaces contaminated by an RDD to mitigate the spread and migration of radioactive contamination. These performance standards are being promulgated via an ASTM Standard Specification to be published by ASTM International. Test methods will be developed to determine if candidate coatings meet the performance requirements stipulated in the ASTM performance standard. These test methods will be adapted from existing standard methods, or will be devised through laboratory research. The final set of test methods will be codified in an ASTM or other standard test method. The principal market for products described in the ASTM performance standard would be federal, state and local government emergency responders and response planners, decontamination service providers and those whose interests include protection and recovery of real estate potentially at risk from radiological terrorism. (authors)

  2. Toxicology profiles of chemical and radiological contaminants at Hanford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harper, B.L.; Strenge, D.L.; Stenner, R.D.; Maughan, A.D.; Jarvis, M.K.

    1995-07-01

    This document summarizes toxicology information required under Section 3.3 (Toxicity Assessment) of HSRAM, and can also be used to develop the short toxicology profiles required in site assessments (described in HSRAM, Section 3.3.5). Toxicology information is used in the dose-response step of the risk assessment process. The dose-response assessment describes the quantitative relationship between the amount of exposure to a substance and the extent of toxic injury or disease. Data are derived from animal studies or, less frequently, from studies in exposed human populations. The risks of a substance cannot be ascertained with any degree of confidence unless dose-response relations are quantified. This document summarizes dose-response information available from the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The contaminants selected for inclusion in this document represent most of the contaminants found at Hanford (both radiological and chemical), based on sampling and analysis performed during site investigations, and historical information on waste disposal practices at the Hanford Site

  3. Toxicology profiles of chemical and radiological contaminants at Hanford

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harper, B.L.; Strenge, D.L.; Stenner, R.D.; Maughan, A.D.; Jarvis, M.K.

    1995-07-01

    This document summarizes toxicology information required under Section 3.3 (Toxicity Assessment) of HSRAM, and can also be used to develop the short toxicology profiles required in site assessments (described in HSRAM, Section 3.3.5). Toxicology information is used in the dose-response step of the risk assessment process. The dose-response assessment describes the quantitative relationship between the amount of exposure to a substance and the extent of toxic injury or disease. Data are derived from animal studies or, less frequently, from studies in exposed human populations. The risks of a substance cannot be ascertained with any degree of confidence unless dose-response relations are quantified. This document summarizes dose-response information available from the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The contaminants selected for inclusion in this document represent most of the contaminants found at Hanford (both radiological and chemical), based on sampling and analysis performed during site investigations, and historical information on waste disposal practices at the Hanford Site.

  4. A Planning Tool for Estimating Waste Generated by a Radiological Incident and Subsequent Decontamination Efforts - 13569

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boe, Timothy; Lemieux, Paul; Schultheisz, Daniel; Peake, Tom; Hayes, Colin

    2013-01-01

    Management of debris and waste from a wide-area radiological incident would probably constitute a significant percentage of the total remediation cost and effort. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Waste Estimation Support Tool (WEST) is a unique planning tool for estimating the potential volume and radioactivity levels of waste generated by a radiological incident and subsequent decontamination efforts. The WEST was developed to support planners and decision makers by generating a first-order estimate of the quantity and characteristics of waste resulting from a radiological incident. The tool then allows the user to evaluate the impact of various decontamination/demolition strategies on the waste types and volumes generated. WEST consists of a suite of standalone applications and Esri R ArcGIS R scripts for rapidly estimating waste inventories and levels of radioactivity generated from a radiological contamination incident as a function of user-defined decontamination and demolition approaches. WEST accepts Geographic Information System (GIS) shape-files defining contaminated areas and extent of contamination. Building stock information, including square footage, building counts, and building composition estimates are then generated using the Federal Emergency Management Agency's (FEMA's) Hazus R -MH software. WEST then identifies outdoor surfaces based on the application of pattern recognition to overhead aerial imagery. The results from the GIS calculations are then fed into a Microsoft Excel R 2007 spreadsheet with a custom graphical user interface where the user can examine the impact of various decontamination/demolition scenarios on the quantity, characteristics, and residual radioactivity of the resulting waste streams. (authors)

  5. Analysis of environmental contamination resulting from catastrophic incidents: part 1. Building and sustaining capacity in laboratory networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnuson, Matthew; Ernst, Hiba; Griggs, John; Fitz-James, Schatzi; Mapp, Latisha; Mullins, Marissa; Nichols, Tonya; Shah, Sanjiv; Smith, Terry; Hedrick, Elizabeth

    2014-11-01

    Catastrophic incidents, such as natural disasters, terrorist attacks, and industrial accidents, can occur suddenly and have high impact. However, they often occur at such a low frequency and in unpredictable locations that planning for the management of the consequences of a catastrophe can be difficult. For those catastrophes that result in the release of contaminants, the ability to analyze environmental samples is critical and contributes to the resilience of affected communities. Analyses of environmental samples are needed to make appropriate decisions about the course of action to restore the area affected by the contamination. Environmental samples range from soil, water, and air to vegetation, building materials, and debris. In addition, processes used to decontaminate any of these matrices may also generate wastewater and other materials that require analyses to determine the best course for proper disposal. This paper summarizes activities and programs the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) has implemented to ensure capability and capacity for the analysis of contaminated environmental samples following catastrophic incidents. USEPA's focus has been on building capability for a wide variety of contaminant classes and on ensuring national laboratory capacity for potential surges in the numbers of samples that could quickly exhaust the resources of local communities. USEPA's efforts have been designed to ensure a strong and resilient laboratory infrastructure in the United States to support communities as they respond to contamination incidents of any magnitude. The efforts include not only addressing technical issues related to the best-available methods for chemical, biological, and radiological contaminants, but also include addressing the challenges of coordination and administration of an efficient and effective response. Laboratory networks designed for responding to large scale contamination incidents can be sustained by applying

  6. Formerly utilized MED/AEC sites remedial action program: radiological survey of the Building Site 421, United States, Watertown Arsenel, Watertown, MA. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-02-01

    This report contains the results of surveys of the current radiological condition of the Building Site 421, United States Arsenal Watertown, Watertown, Massachusetts. Findings of this survey indicate there are four spots involving an area of less than 6000 cm 2 of identifiable low-level residual radioactivity on the concrete pad which is all that remains of Building Site 421. The largest spot is approximately 5000 cm 2 . The other three spots are 100 cm 2 or less. The beta-gamma readings at these spots are 8.4 x 10 2 dis/min-100 cm 2 , 2.2 x 10 5 dis/min-100 cm 2 , 2.2 x 10 5 dis/min-100 cm 2 and 8.5 x 10 4 dis/min-100 cm 2 . No alpha contamination was found at these locations. Gamma spectral analysis of a chip of contaminated concrete from one of the spots indicates that the contaminant is natural uranium. This contamination is fixed in the concrete and does not present an internal or external exposure hazard under present conditions. A hypothetical hazard analysis under a conservative set of assumed conditions indicates minimal internal hazard. The highest End Window contact reading was 0.09 mR/h. None of the other three spots indicated an elevated direct reading with the End Window Detector. Radon daughter concentrations were determined at three locations on the Building 421 pad. These were 0.00013 WL, 0.00011 WL and 0.00009 WL. According to the Surgeon General's Guidelines found in 10 CFR 712, radon daughter concentrations below 0.03 WL do not require remedial action in structures other than private dwellings and schools. Soil samples taken about the site indicate no elevated levels above the natural background levels in the soil. A gamma spectral analysis of a water sample obtained from the storm sewer line near the Building 421 pad indicates no elevated radioactivity in the sample. It was therefore felt that no contamination is present in this sewer

  7. WASTE TREATMENT BUILDING SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F. Habashi

    2000-06-22

    The Waste Treatment Building System provides the space, layout, structures, and embedded subsystems that support the processing of low-level liquid and solid radioactive waste generated within the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). The activities conducted in the Waste Treatment Building include sorting, volume reduction, and packaging of dry waste, and collecting, processing, solidification, and packaging of liquid waste. The Waste Treatment Building System is located on the surface within the protected area of the MGR. The Waste Treatment Building System helps maintain a suitable environment for the waste processing and protects the systems within the Waste Treatment Building (WTB) from most of the natural and induced environments. The WTB also confines contaminants and provides radiological protection to personnel. In addition to the waste processing operations, the Waste Treatment Building System provides space and layout for staging of packaged waste for shipment, industrial and radiological safety systems, control and monitoring of operations, safeguards and security systems, and fire protection, ventilation and utilities systems. The Waste Treatment Building System also provides the required space and layout for maintenance activities, tool storage, and administrative facilities. The Waste Treatment Building System integrates waste processing systems within its protective structure to support the throughput rates established for the MGR. The Waste Treatment Building System also provides shielding, layout, and other design features to help limit personnel radiation exposures to levels which are as low as is reasonably achievable (ALARA). The Waste Treatment Building System interfaces with the Site Generated Radiological Waste Handling System, and with other MGR systems that support the waste processing operations. The Waste Treatment Building System interfaces with the General Site Transportation System, Site Communications System, Site Water System, MGR

  8. WASTE TREATMENT BUILDING SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habashi, F.

    2000-01-01

    The Waste Treatment Building System provides the space, layout, structures, and embedded subsystems that support the processing of low-level liquid and solid radioactive waste generated within the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). The activities conducted in the Waste Treatment Building include sorting, volume reduction, and packaging of dry waste, and collecting, processing, solidification, and packaging of liquid waste. The Waste Treatment Building System is located on the surface within the protected area of the MGR. The Waste Treatment Building System helps maintain a suitable environment for the waste processing and protects the systems within the Waste Treatment Building (WTB) from most of the natural and induced environments. The WTB also confines contaminants and provides radiological protection to personnel. In addition to the waste processing operations, the Waste Treatment Building System provides space and layout for staging of packaged waste for shipment, industrial and radiological safety systems, control and monitoring of operations, safeguards and security systems, and fire protection, ventilation and utilities systems. The Waste Treatment Building System also provides the required space and layout for maintenance activities, tool storage, and administrative facilities. The Waste Treatment Building System integrates waste processing systems within its protective structure to support the throughput rates established for the MGR. The Waste Treatment Building System also provides shielding, layout, and other design features to help limit personnel radiation exposures to levels which are as low as is reasonably achievable (ALARA). The Waste Treatment Building System interfaces with the Site Generated Radiological Waste Handling System, and with other MGR systems that support the waste processing operations. The Waste Treatment Building System interfaces with the General Site Transportation System, Site Communications System, Site Water System, MGR

  9. Formerly utilized MED/AEC sites remedial action program post-remedial-action radiological survey of Kent Chemical Laboratory, the University of Chicago, Chicago, IL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wynveen, R.A.; Smith, W.H.; Sholeen, C.M.; Justus, A.L.; Flynn, K.F.

    1983-05-01

    A comprehensive radiological assessment of Kent Laboratory was conducted during September 1977, by the ANL Radiological Survey Group to determine if any radioactive contamination remained. The results of the assessment indicated the need for remedial action. Since 1977, the University has decontaminated this laboratory building, and in May 1983, the Department of Energy requested the ANL Radiological Survey Group to conduct a post-remedial-action survey. All the contaminated areas identified during the 1977 assessment were rechecked. Contamination remained in six of the rooms. Further decontamination of these areas was conducted by university personnel, and as a result, these areas are now free of contamination. However, a contaminated clay pipe in the attic remained. The clay pipe has since been removed and disposed of as solid radioactive waste. During the post-remedial-action survey, six soil samples were collected from excavation trenches dug in Rooms 1 and 2 as part of the University's remedial action efforts. Also, four sludge samples were taken from below the manhole covers in the basement of Kent Chemical Laboratory to assess the radiological condition of the sewer system. A radiological assessment of the sewer system had not been accomplished during the 1977 survey as per program direction. Radiochemical (fluorometric) and gamma-spectral analyses indicated that eight out of ten soil and sludge samples contained levels of radioactivity above expected background concentrations. The soil has since been further excavated. The building is now free of radioactive contamination in excess of background levels; however, the sewers do contain radioactive materials above background levels since contamination was found at appropriate access points. 6 references, 16 figures, 7 tables

  10. 209-E Building -- Response to ventilation failure evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foust, D.J.

    1998-01-01

    This document provides an evaluation and recommendations for radiological workplace air monitoring and response to ventilation failure for the Critical Mass Laboratory, 209-E Building. The Critical Mass Laboratory, part of the 209-E Building, was designed to provide a heavily shielded room where plutonium and uranium liquid solutions could be brought into various critical configurations under readily controlled and monitored conditions. The facility is contained within a one-story L-shaped concrete block and reinforced concrete building. One wing houses offices, a control room, shops, and a common area while the other wing includes an equipment room, the change room, work areas, and the two-story Critical Assembly Room (CAR). Three of the rooms contain radiologically contaminated equipment and materials

  11. Radiologically contaminated lead shot reuse at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heileson, W.M.; Grant, R.P.

    1995-01-01

    This project involved the utilization of radioactively contaminated lead shot located at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) for radiation shielding on a radioactive liquid process tank located at Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W). The use of previously contaminated shot precludes the radioactive contamination of clean shot. With limited treatment and disposal options for contaminated lead shot, the reuse of lead for shielding is significant due to the inherent characteristic of becoming a mixed waste when radiologically contaminated. The INEL conducted a lead cleanup campaign in 1990. This was designed to ensure control of potential Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulated waste. Contaminated lead from throughout the INEL, was containerized per the lead Waste Acceptance Criteria at the generator sites. Limited areas at the INEL are designated for mixed waste storage. As a result, some of the lead was stored at the RWMC in the air support weather shield (ASWS). This lead was contaminated with small amounts of fission product contamination. The lead was in the form of shot, brick, sheet, casks, and other various sized pieces. In 1993, ANL-W identified a need for lead shot to be used as shielding in a radioactive liquid waste storage and processing tank at the Fuel Cycle Facility (FCF). The contaminated lead used on this project had been in storage as mixed waste at the RWMC. This paper will focus on the processes and problems encountered to utilize the contaminated lead shot

  12. Radiological Worker Training: Radiological Worker 2 lesson plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    Upon completion of this g course, the participant will have the knowledge to work safely in areas controlled for a radiological purposes using proper radiological practices. The participant will be able toidentify the fundamentals of radiation, radioactive material and radioactive contamination includes identify the three basic particles of an atom, define ionization, define ionizing radiation, radioactive material and radioactive contamination, distinguish between ionizing radiation and non-ionizing radiation, define radioactivity and radioactive half-life

  13. A Planning Tool for Estimating Waste Generated by a Radiological Incident and Subsequent Decontamination Efforts - 13569

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boe, Timothy [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Lemieux, Paul [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Schultheisz, Daniel; Peake, Tom [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC 20460 (United States); Hayes, Colin [Eastern Research Group, Inc, Morrisville, NC 26560 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Management of debris and waste from a wide-area radiological incident would probably constitute a significant percentage of the total remediation cost and effort. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Waste Estimation Support Tool (WEST) is a unique planning tool for estimating the potential volume and radioactivity levels of waste generated by a radiological incident and subsequent decontamination efforts. The WEST was developed to support planners and decision makers by generating a first-order estimate of the quantity and characteristics of waste resulting from a radiological incident. The tool then allows the user to evaluate the impact of various decontamination/demolition strategies on the waste types and volumes generated. WEST consists of a suite of standalone applications and Esri{sup R} ArcGIS{sup R} scripts for rapidly estimating waste inventories and levels of radioactivity generated from a radiological contamination incident as a function of user-defined decontamination and demolition approaches. WEST accepts Geographic Information System (GIS) shape-files defining contaminated areas and extent of contamination. Building stock information, including square footage, building counts, and building composition estimates are then generated using the Federal Emergency Management Agency's (FEMA's) Hazus{sup R}-MH software. WEST then identifies outdoor surfaces based on the application of pattern recognition to overhead aerial imagery. The results from the GIS calculations are then fed into a Microsoft Excel{sup R} 2007 spreadsheet with a custom graphical user interface where the user can examine the impact of various decontamination/demolition scenarios on the quantity, characteristics, and residual radioactivity of the resulting waste streams. (authors)

  14. Radiological Worker Training: Radiological Worker 2 study guides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    Upon completion of this training course, the participant will have the knowledge to work safely in areas controlled for radiological purposes using proper radiological practices. Radiological Worker H Training, for the worker whose job assignment involves entry into Radiological Buffer Areas and all types of Radiation Contamination and Airborne Radioactivity Areas. This course is designed to prepare the worker to work safely in and around radiological areas and present methods to use to ensure individual radiation exposure is maintained As Low As Reasonably Achievable

  15. Formerly utilized MED/AEC sites remedial action program. Radiological survey of the former Watertown arsenal property, Site 34 and Site 41, Watertown, Massachusetts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wynveen, R.A.; Smith, W.H.; Sholeen, C.M.; Justus, A.L.; Flynn, K.F.

    1983-10-01

    During the MED/AEC era, work involving radioactive materials was conducted at various sites within the arsenal complex. Building 34 housed a uranium machine shop, and a portion of Building 41 contained a foundry that was used for uranium work. Information provided by site personnel indicated that only depleted uranium was used in these buildings. Results of radiological analyses of contaminated material found at these sites indicated depleted uranium with uranium-236. Both buildings have been razed. The remnants still in place consist of the concrete floor slabs, access drives, and underground utility service trenches. This area is currently under the control of the Watertown Redevelopment Authority of Watertown, Massachusetts. During the period from June 25 through July 1, 1981, the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Occupational Health and Safety Division (OHS) Radiological Survey Group (RSG), conducted a radiological survey of Building Sites 34 and 41 at the direction of the US Department of Energy. Significant levels of contamination were found at 33 locations on the pad of Site 34 and in 5 out of 15 soild corings from the perimeter of the pad. No contamination was found on the pad of Site 41; however, two-thirds of this pad was covered with soil up to 4 ft thick. One of the 14 soil corings taken adjacent to the pad of Site 41 had elevated levels of uranium. Levels of contamination in excess of criteria, as identified in ANSI 13.12 and NRC Guidelines, were found at this site. The analyses of the samples from the sewer access points also revealed uranium and radium-226 anomalies. Therefore, according to NRC guidelines dated July 1982, it must be concluded that they are contaminated

  16. Ventilation Relevant Contaminants of Concern in Commercial Buildings Screening Process and Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parthasarathy, Srinandini [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); McKone, Thomas E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Apte, Michael G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2011-04-29

    This report summarizes the screening procedure and its results for selecting contaminants of concern (COC), whose concentrations are affected by ventilation in commercial buildings. Many pollutants comprising criteria pollutants, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) and biological contaminants are found in commercial buildings. In this report, we focus primarily on identifying potential volatile organic COC, which are impacted by ventilation. In the future we plan to extend this effort to inorganic gases and particles. Our screening considers compounds detected frequently in indoor air and compares the concentrations to health-guidelines and thresholds. However, given the range of buildings under consideration, the contaminant sources and their concentrations will vary depending on the activity and use of the buildings. We used a literature review to identify a large list of chemicals found in commercial-building indoor air. The VOCs selected were subject to a two stage screening process, and the compounds of greater interest are included in priority List A. Other VOCs that have been detected in commercial buildings are included in priority List B. The compounds in List B, were further classified into groups B1, B2, B3, B4 in order of decreasing interest.

  17. Radiological health risk evaluation of radium contaminated land: A real life implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paridaens, J.

    2005-01-01

    A plot of land, currently used for dairy farming, has been contaminated over the years with radium due to the operation of one of the world's largest radium production plants. Within the framework of a global remediation approach for the plant surroundings, the land owner needed advice for a future destination of the land. Therefore, the radium contamination was accurately mapped, and on the basis of its severity a practically feasible subdivision of the land into four plots was proposed. For all four plots, the radiological risk was evaluated for the current type of land use and for possible alternative types. Hence a clear and usable advice could be formulated to the authorities reconciling public health, economic and practical issues. (authors)

  18. Results of the radiological verification survey at the former Herring-Hall-Marvin Safe Company, 1550 Grand Boulevard, Hamilton Ohio (HO001V)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, M.E.; allred, J.F.; Johnson, C.A.

    1995-11-01

    During the period between the 1940s and early 1950s, the Herring-Hall-Marvin Safe Company, 1550 Grand Boulevard, Hamilton, Ohio, was one company under subcontract to the Manhattan Engineer District (MED), and the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), the lead agencies in the development of nuclear energy for defense-related projects. The US Department of Energy (DOE) conducted radiological surveys of these sites to evaluate current radiological conditions as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). In 1988, a radiological survey of the Herring-Hall-Marvin Safe Company facility was conducted, and after small fragments of uranium metal were removed, no beta or gamma radiation above background was detected and the building was dismissed from any additional DOE restrictions. In 1993, it was discovered that a portion of the actual machining work was conducted on the third floor of the facility, located in the southeastern comer of the building. At the request of DOE, this part of the facility was radiologically surveyed by an ORNL survey team to determine whether fixed surface contamination could be found that might exceed the DOE guidelines. Results of this radiological survey indicated 238 U contamination in excess of the DOE criteria for surface contamination, and the site was recommended for remediation. In February and March of 1995, a verification survey of the third floor of the former Herring-Hall-Marvin Safe Company facility by an ORNL survey team was performed in conjunction with decontamination operations conducted under the supervision of Bechtel National Incorporated. The verification survey included gamma scans at the surface and at one meter, alpha and beta-gamma scans for fixed contamination, and smears for transferable contamination

  19. Formerly utilized MED/AEC sites remedial action program: radiological survey of the Building Site 421, United States, Watertown Arsenel, Watertown, MA. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-02-01

    This report contains the results of surveys of the current radiological condition of the Building Site 421, United States Arsenal Watertown, Watertown, Massachusetts. Findings of this survey indicate there are four spots involving an area of less than 6000 cm/sup 2/ of identifiable low-level residual radioactivity on the concrete pad which is all that remains of Building Site 421. The largest spot is approximately 5000 cm/sup 2/. The other three spots are 100 cm/sup 2/ or less. The beta-gamma readings at these spots are 8.4 x 10/sup 2/ dis/min-100 cm/sup 2/, 2.2 x 10/sup 5/ dis/min-100 cm/sup 2/, 2.2 x 10/sup 5/ dis/min-100 cm/sup 2/ and 8.5 x 10/sup 4/ dis/min-100 cm/sup 2/. No alpha contamination was found at these locations. Gamma spectral analysis of a chip of contaminated concrete from one of the spots indicates that the contaminant is natural uranium. This contamination is fixed in the concrete and does not present an internal or external exposure hazard under present conditions. A hypothetical hazard analysis under a conservative set of assumed conditions indicates minimal internal hazard. The highest End Window contact reading was 0.09 mR/h. None of the other three spots indicated an elevated direct reading with the End Window Detector. Radon daughter concentrations were determined at three locations on the Building 421 pad. These were 0.00013 WL, 0.00011 WL and 0.00009 WL. According to the Surgeon General's Guidelines found in 10 CFR 712, radon daughter concentrations below 0.03 WL do not require remedial action in structures other than private dwellings and schools. Soil samples taken about the site indicate no elevated levels above the natural background levels in the soil. A gamma spectral analysis of a water sample obtained from the storm sewer line near the Building 421 pad indicates no elevated radioactivity in the sample. It was therefore felt that no contamination is present in this sewer.

  20. Site characterization report for Building 3506 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-01

    Building 3506, also known as the Waste Evaporator Facility, is a surplus facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) slated for decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). The building is located in the ORNL main plant area, to the west of the South Tank Farm and near the intersection of Central Avenue and Third Street. Characterization tasks consisted of three main activities: inspections, radiological measurements, and radiological and chemical sampling and analysis. Inspection reports document general facility conditions, as-built information, and specialized information such as structural evaluations. Radiological measurements define the quantity and distribution of radioactive contaminants; this information is used to calibrate a dose model of the facility and estimate the total activity, in curies, of each major radioactive isotope. The radiological information from sample analyses is used to refine the radiological model of the facility, and the radionuclide and hazardous chemical analyses are used for waste management planning. This report presents data from the field investigation and laboratory analyses in the form of a site description, as-built drawings, summary tables of radiological and chemical contaminant concentrations, and a waste volume estimate.

  1. Site characterization report for Building 3506 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-07-01

    Building 3506, also known as the Waste Evaporator Facility, is a surplus facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) slated for decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D). The building is located in the ORNL main plant area, to the west of the South Tank Farm and near the intersection of Central Avenue and Third Street. Characterization tasks consisted of three main activities: inspections, radiological measurements, and radiological and chemical sampling and analysis. Inspection reports document general facility conditions, as-built information, and specialized information such as structural evaluations. Radiological measurements define the quantity and distribution of radioactive contaminants; this information is used to calibrate a dose model of the facility and estimate the total activity, in curies, of each major radioactive isotope. The radiological information from sample analyses is used to refine the radiological model of the facility, and the radionuclide and hazardous chemical analyses are used for waste management planning. This report presents data from the field investigation and laboratory analyses in the form of a site description, as-built drawings, summary tables of radiological and chemical contaminant concentrations, and a waste volume estimate

  2. Influence of building maintenance, environmental factors, and seasons on airborne contaminants of swine confinement buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchaine, C; Grimard, Y; Cormier, Y

    2000-01-01

    Eight swine confinement buildings, selected to cover the widest possible range of cleanliness, were visited twice during winter and once during summer to verify the range, seasonal variations, and correlations between biological and chemical contaminants. Physical aspects were graded for dirtiness (1 = clean, 10 = dirty), ventilation, air temperature, number of animals, building, and room size. Air samples were taken to measure relative humidity, CO2, ammonia, total dust, and microbiological counts and/or identification (bacteria and molds); endotoxin levels also were measured. During winter, average measurements and ranges were: CO2 = 0.304% (0.254 to 0.349%); ammonia = 19.6 ppm (1.9 to 25.9 ppm); dust = 3.54 mg/m3 (2.15 to 5.60 mg/m3). There were 883 cfu/m3 (547 to 2862 cfu/m3) of molds, 4.25 x 10(5) cfu/m3 (1.67 x 10(5) to 9.30 x 10(5) cfu/m3) of total bacteria, 29 cfu/m3 (3 to 94 cfu/m3) of thermophilic actinomycetes). A significant decrease in bacterial levels (p = 0.04), dust (p = 0.0008), ammonia (p = 0.005), and CO2 (p < 0.0001) was observed during summer sampling when compared with winter levels. Mold counts were positively correlated (p = 0.03) with dirtiness scores, while bacterial counts were negatively correlated with this parameter (p < 0.002), whereas bacteria and endotoxins were correlated with the number of animals (p < 0.05). Ambient gases (CO2 and ammonia) correlated with each other (p = 0.006). Bacteria were the most important contaminant in swine confinement buildings, and endotoxin levels found were also very high (mean = 4.9 x 10(3) EU/m3). We conclude that a wide range of air contamination exists in swine confinement buildings of different maintenance. There is a decrease in some of these contaminants during summer. Observed dirtiness of the swine confinement buildings has a poor predictive value concerning air quality.

  3. Characterization report for Building 301 Hot Cell Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    During the period from October, 1997, through March, 1998, ANL-E Health Physics conducted a pre-D and D characterization of Building 301, referred to as the Hot Cell Facility. While primary emphasis was placed on radiological evaluation, the presence of non-nuclear hazardous and toxic material was also included in the scope of the characterization. This is one of the early buildings on the ANL-E site, and was heavily used in the 1950`s and 1960`s for various nuclear reaction and reactor design studies. Some degree of cleanup and contamination fixation was done in the 1970`s, so that the building could be used with a minimum of risk of personnel contamination. Work records are largely nonexistent for the early history of the building, so that any assumptions about extent and type of contamination had to be kept very open in the survey planning process. The primary contaminant was found to be painted-over Cs-137 embedded in the concrete floors, although a variety of other nuclides consistent with the work said to have been performed were found in smaller quantities. Due to leaks and drips through the floor, a relatively modest amount of soil contamination was found in the service trench under the building, not penetrating deeply. Two contaminated, disconnected drain lines leaving the building could not be traced by site records, and remain a problem for remediation. The D and D Characterization Plan was fulfilled.

  4. Characterization report for Building 301 Hot Cell Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-07-01

    During the period from October, 1997, through March, 1998, ANL-E Health Physics conducted a pre-D and D characterization of Building 301, referred to as the Hot Cell Facility. While primary emphasis was placed on radiological evaluation, the presence of non-nuclear hazardous and toxic material was also included in the scope of the characterization. This is one of the early buildings on the ANL-E site, and was heavily used in the 1950's and 1960's for various nuclear reaction and reactor design studies. Some degree of cleanup and contamination fixation was done in the 1970's, so that the building could be used with a minimum of risk of personnel contamination. Work records are largely nonexistent for the early history of the building, so that any assumptions about extent and type of contamination had to be kept very open in the survey planning process. The primary contaminant was found to be painted-over Cs-137 embedded in the concrete floors, although a variety of other nuclides consistent with the work said to have been performed were found in smaller quantities. Due to leaks and drips through the floor, a relatively modest amount of soil contamination was found in the service trench under the building, not penetrating deeply. Two contaminated, disconnected drain lines leaving the building could not be traced by site records, and remain a problem for remediation. The D and D Characterization Plan was fulfilled

  5. Radiological Worker Training: Radiological Worker 1 lesson plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    Upon completion of this training course, the participant will have the knowledge to work safely in areas controlled for radiological purposes using proper radiological practices. Upon completion of this unit the participant will be able to identify the fundamentals of radiation, radioactive material and radioactive contamination. The participant will be able to select the correct response from a group of responses which verifies his/her ability to: Define ionizing radiation, radioactive material and radioactive contamination and identify the units used to measure radiation and radioactivity

  6. Estimating risk at a Superfund site contaminated with radiological and chemical wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temeshy, A.; Liedle, J.M.; Sims, L.M.; Efird, C.R.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the method and results for estimating carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic effects at a Superfund site that is radiologically and chemically contaminated. Risk to receptors from disposal of waste in soil and resulting contamination of groundwater, air, surface water, and sediment is quantified. Specific risk assessment components which are addressed are the exposure assessment, toxicity assessment, and the resulting risk characterization. In the exposure assessment, potential exposure pathways are identified using waste disposal inventory information for soil and modeled information for other media. Models are used to calculate future radionuclide concentrations in groundwater, soil, surface water and air. Chemical exposure concentrations are quantified using site characterization data. Models are used to determine concentrations of chemicals in surface water and in air. Toxicity parameters used to quantify the dose-response relationship associated with the carcinogenic contaminants are slope factors and with noncarcinogenic contaminants are reference doses. In the risk characterization step, results from the exposure assessment and toxicity assessment are summarized and integrated into quantitative risk estimates for carcinogens and hazard induces for noncarcinogens. Calculated risks for carcinogenic contaminants are compared with EPA's target risk range. At WAG 6, the risk from radionuclides and chemicals for an on-WAG homesteader exceeds EPA's target risk range. Hazard indices are compared to unity for noncarcinogenic contaminants. At WAG 6, the total pathway hazard index for the on-WAG homesteader exceeds unity

  7. Developing GIS based decision-making tools in case of radiological contamination of agricultural soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kepka, Pavel; Brom, Jakub; Prochazka, Jan; Vincikova, Hana; Pecharova, Emilie

    2010-01-01

    A set of supporting tools to help take remedial decisions in case of radiological contamination of agricultural produce is being developed within the EURANOS project. The tools are created in the ArcGIS environment in the Python programming language. So far, a simple model to estimate biomass in the contaminated area has been set up. This module will make it possible to estimate additional parameters, such as activity per kg or amount of waste created, which are useful when taking decision regarding premature crops harvesting. Areas where no remedial action is required can be also identified, of course

  8. Natural radioactivity level and radiological hazard assessment of commonly used building material in Xining, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shigang Chao; Xinwei Lu; Mengmeng Zhang; Long Pang

    2014-01-01

    Natural radioactivity of the commonly used building materials in Xining of China was measured using gamma-ray spectrometer system comprising a NaI(Tl) detector. Radioactivity concentrations of 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K in the studied samples range from 11.6 to 120.6, 10.2 to 107.1 and 228.0 to 1,036.2 Bq kg -1 , respectively. The concentrations for these natural radionuclides were compared with the reported data of other countries and the mean value for soil. Radium equivalent activity, indoor air absorbed dose rate, annual effective dose rate as well as external and internal hazard indices were calculated to assess radiological hazards for people living in dwelling made of the building materials. The radiological hazard assessment results show that the studied building materials, except for some aerated concrete block samples, are safe for use in construction of dwellings in the study area and do not pose any significant source of radiation hazard. (author)

  9. OPEN AIR DEMOLITION OF FACILITIES HIGHLY CONTAMINATED WITH PLUTONIUM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LLOYD, E.R.

    2007-01-01

    The demolition of highly contaminated plutonium buildings usually is a long and expensive process that involves decontaminating the building to near free- release standards and then using conventional methods to remove the structure. It doesn't, however, have to be that way. Fluor has torn down buildings highly contaminated with plutonium without excessive decontamination. By removing the select source term and fixing the remaining contamination on the walls, ceilings, floors, and equipment surfaces; open-air demolition is not only feasible, but it can be done cheaper, better (safer), and faster. Open-air demolition techniques were used to demolish two highly contaminated buildings to slab-on-grade. These facilities on the Department of Energy's Hanford Site were located in, or very near, compounds of operating nuclear facilities that housed hundreds of people working on a daily basis. To keep the facilities operating and the personnel safe, the projects had to be creative in demolishing the structures. Several key techniques were used to control contamination and keep it within the confines of the demolition area: spraying fixatives before demolition; applying fixative and misting with a fine spray of water as the buildings were being taken down; and demolishing the buildings in a controlled and methodical manner. In addition, detailed air-dispersion modeling was done to establish necessary building and meteorological conditions and to confirm the adequacy of the proposed methods. Both demolition projects were accomplished without any spread of contamination outside the modest buffer areas established for contamination control. Furthermore, personnel exposure to radiological and physical hazards was significantly reduced by using heavy equipment rather than ''hands on'' techniques

  10. Post-remedial-action radiological survey of the Westinghouse Advanced Reactors Division Plutonium Fuel Laboratories, Cheswick, Pennsylvania, October 1-8, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flynn, K.F.; Justus, A.L.; Sholeen, C.M.; Smith, W.H.; Wynveen, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    The post-remedial-action radiological assessment conducted by the ANL Radiological Survey Group in October 1981, following decommissioning and decontamination efforts by Westinghouse personnel, indicated that except for the Advanced Fuels Laboratory exhaust ductwork and north wall, the interior surfaces of the Plutonium Laboratory and associated areas within Building 7 and the Advanced Fuels Laboratory within Building 8 were below both the ANSI Draft Standard N13.12 and NRC Guideline criteria for acceptable surface contamination levels. Hence, with the exceptions noted above, the interior surfaces of those areas within Buildings 7 and 8 that were included in the assessment are suitable for unrestricted use. Air samples collected at the involved areas within Buildings 7 and 8 indicated that the radon, thoron, and progeny concentrations within the air were well below the limits prescribed by the US Surgeon General, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the Department of Energy. The Building 7 drain lines are contaminated with uranium, plutonium, and americium. Radiochemical analysis of water and dirt/sludge samples collected from accessible Low-Bay, High-Bay, Shower Room, and Sodium laboratory drains revealed uranium, plutonium, and americium contaminants. The Building 7 drain lines hence are unsuitable for release for unrestricted use in their present condition. Low levels of enriched uranium, plutonium, and americium were detected in an environmental soil coring near Building 8, indicating release or spillage due to Advanced Reactors Division activities or Nuclear Fuel Division activities undr NRC licensure. 60 Co contamination was detected within the Building 7 Shower Room and in soil corings from the environs of Building 7. All other radionuclide concentrations measured in soil corings and the storm sewer outfall sample collected from the environs about Buildings 7 and 8 were within the range of normally expected background concentrations

  11. Analysis of environmental contamination resulting from catastrophic incidents: part 2. Building laboratory capability by selecting and developing analytical methodologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnuson, Matthew; Campisano, Romy; Griggs, John; Fitz-James, Schatzi; Hall, Kathy; Mapp, Latisha; Mullins, Marissa; Nichols, Tonya; Shah, Sanjiv; Silvestri, Erin; Smith, Terry; Willison, Stuart; Ernst, Hiba

    2014-11-01

    Catastrophic incidents can generate a large number of samples of analytically diverse types, including forensic, clinical, environmental, food, and others. Environmental samples include water, wastewater, soil, air, urban building and infrastructure materials, and surface residue. Such samples may arise not only from contamination from the incident but also from the multitude of activities surrounding the response to the incident, including decontamination. This document summarizes a range of activities to help build laboratory capability in preparation for sample analysis following a catastrophic incident, including selection and development of fit-for-purpose analytical methods for chemical, biological, and radiological contaminants. Fit-for-purpose methods are those which have been selected to meet project specific data quality objectives. For example, methods could be fit for screening contamination in the early phases of investigation of contamination incidents because they are rapid and easily implemented, but those same methods may not be fit for the purpose of remediating the environment to acceptable levels when a more sensitive method is required. While the exact data quality objectives defining fitness-for-purpose can vary with each incident, a governing principle of the method selection and development process for environmental remediation and recovery is based on achieving high throughput while maintaining high quality analytical results. This paper illustrates the result of applying this principle, in the form of a compendium of analytical methods for contaminants of interest. The compendium is based on experience with actual incidents, where appropriate and available. This paper also discusses efforts aimed at adaptation of existing methods to increase fitness-for-purpose and development of innovative methods when necessary. The contaminants of interest are primarily those potentially released through catastrophes resulting from malicious activity

  12. Contaminated sediment removal from a spent fuel storage canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geber, K.R.

    1993-01-01

    A leaking underground spent fuel transfer canal between a decommissioned reactor and a radiochemical separations building at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was found to contain RCRA-hazardous and radioactive sediment. Closure of the Part B RCRA permitted facility required the use of an underwater robotic vacuum and a filtration-containment system to separate and stabilize the contaminated sediment. This paper discusses the radiological controls established to maintain contamination and exposures As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) during the sediment removal

  13. Building for changing-rooms, laundry, laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemeth, L.; Mezes, J.; Gulyas, F.; Hejj, A.; Matyas, J.

    1979-01-01

    This building accomodates important service sections of the power plant. The changing-rooms of the primary circuit are here, through which the employees, under the supervision of health physics service, pass to the radioactive contaminated jobs. Working-clothes are cleaned in laundries located on the ground-floor. The building houses the health measurement control rooms of the four reactor sets and the control centre of the power plant. The laboratories dealing with process control, electrical engineering, radiology, dosimetry, material tests and reactor physics will be located here. (author)

  14. Radiological data on building stones from a Spanish region. Castilla y Leon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, A.; Neves, L. [Coimbra Univ. (Portugal). Dept. Ciencias da Terra; Pereira, D.; Peinado, M.; Armenteros, I. [Salamanca Univ. (Spain). Dept. de Geologia

    2013-07-01

    As construction and building material, natural stone has a great potential to promote the commercial activities of certain European regions. Such is the case of Castilla y Leon in Spain, where many different rocks, ranging from sedimentary to metamorphic and igneous, are commercialized for building purposes. However, to be able to compete in a market subject to an economic crisis, highly exacerbated in the construction sector, and to compete with the lower prices offered by emerging countries, the issue would be to make the Spanish offer more attractive. Here we propose a complete characterization of rocks regarding their radiological properties, which are related to their mineralogy and geochemistry. Rocks emit natural radioactivity, and the presence of Rn and its decay products in dwellings has become an important issue in North America and Europe owing to its relationship with the carcinogenic effects of this gas. Although most of the studied rocks comply with the I parameter proposed in the European Norm 112 for Radiological Protection (accepted value I ≤ 1; average for sedimentary rock: I = 0.22, SD 0.14; average for metamorphic rocks: I = 0.70, SD 0.48; average for igneous rock: I = 0.86, SD 0.22), the inclusion of a proper radiological characterization in the list of characteristics would guarantee quality and safety in their use in comparison with products lacking this information. Some natural stones have been demonized for the potential exhalation of natural radioactivity, and the different parameters used should be addressed in a more systematic way.

  15. Radiological impact assessment of building materials on ordinary houses dwellers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, M.P. de.

    1994-01-01

    The radiological impact due to building materials on habitants living in the Santo Andre district of Sao Paulo state, Brazil, was assessed through the total effective dose equivalent rate determination, for external and internal irradiation. The effective dose equivalent rate for external irradiation was calculated by the gamma spectrometry determination of natural radionuclides specific activity in the dwelling materials. The effective dose equivalent rate due to 222 Rn inhalation was calculated through the radon indoor activity determination by using solid state nuclear track detectors. (author). 46 refs, 6 figs, 14 tabs

  16. Survey of radiological contaminants in the near-shore environment at the Hanford Site 100-N Area reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Verst, S.P.; Albin, C.L.; Patton, G.W.; Blanton, M.L.; Poston, T.M.; Cooper, A.T.; Antonio, E.J.

    1998-09-01

    Past operations at the Hanford Site 100-N Area reactor resulted in the release of radiological contaminants to the soil column, local groundwater, and ultimately to the near-shore environment of the Columbia River. In September 1997, the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH) and the Hanford Site Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP) initiated a special study of the near-shore vicinity at the Hanford Site's retired 100-N Area reactor. Environmental samples were collected and analyzed for radiological contaminants ( 3 H, 90 Sr, and gamma/ emitters), with both the WDOH and SESP analyzing a portion of the samples. Samples of river water, sediment, riverbank springs, periphyton, milfoil, flying insects, clam shells, and reed canary grass were collected. External exposure rates were also measured for the near-shore environment in the vicinity of the 100-N Area. In addition, samples were collected at background locations above Vernita Bridge

  17. Westinghouse radiological containment guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aitken, S.B.; Brown, R.L.; Cantrell, J.R.; Wilcox, D.P.

    1994-03-01

    This document provides uniform guidance for Westinghouse contractors on the implementation of radiological containments. This document reflects standard industry practices and is provided as a guide. The guidance presented herein is consistent with the requirements of the DOE Radiological Control Manual (DOE N 5480.6). This guidance should further serve to enable and encourage the use of containments for contamination control and to accomplish the following: Minimize personnel contamination; Prevent the spread of contamination; Minimize the required use of protective clothing and personal protective equipment; Minimize the generation of waste

  18. Westinghouse radiological containment guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aitken, S.B. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Brown, R.L. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Cantrell, J.R. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Wilcox, D.P. [West Valley Nuclear Services Co., Inc., West Valley, NY (United States)

    1994-03-01

    This document provides uniform guidance for Westinghouse contractors on the implementation of radiological containments. This document reflects standard industry practices and is provided as a guide. The guidance presented herein is consistent with the requirements of the DOE Radiological Control Manual (DOE N 5480.6). This guidance should further serve to enable and encourage the use of containments for contamination control and to accomplish the following: Minimize personnel contamination; Prevent the spread of contamination; Minimize the required use of protective clothing and personal protective equipment; Minimize the generation of waste.

  19. Sources of indoor air contamination on the ground floor of a high-rise commercial building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nayebzadeh, A.; Cragg-Elkouh, S.; Rancy, R.; Dufresne, A.

    1999-01-01

    Indoor air quality is a subject of growing concern in the developed world. Many sources of indoor air contamination in commercial and office buildings are recognised and have been investigated. In addition to the usual internal sources of air contaminants, other external sources from attached facilities can find their way into the building. This report presents the results of an indoor air quality survey in a high-rise office building which demonstrated an obvious seasonal change in regard to the concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ). Furthermore, a complementary survey in the same building was carried out to identify the relevant sources of air contamination in the building and the results indicated that an attached train station and the nearby street traffic had a significant impact on indoor air quality. (author)

  20. Effective radiological contamination control and monitoring techniques in high alpha environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funke, Kevin C

    2003-02-01

    In the decommissioning of a highly contaminated alpha environment, such as the one at Hanford's 233-S Plutonium Concentration Facility, one of the key elements of a successful radiological control program is an integrated safety approach. This approach begins with the job-planning phase where the scope of the work is described. This is followed by a brainstorming session involving engineering and craft to identify how to perform the work in a logical sequence of events. Once the brainstorming session is over, a Job Hazard Analysis is performed to identify any potential problems. Mockups are utilized to enable the craft to get hands on experience and provide feedback and ideas to make the job run smoother. Ideas and experience gained during mockups are incorporated into the task instruction. To assure appropriate data are used in planning and executing the job, our principal evaluation tools included lapel and workplace air sampling, plus continuous air monitors and frequent surveys to effectively monitor job progress. In this highly contaminated alpha environment, with contamination levels ranging from 0.3 Bq cm-2 to approximately 100,000 Bq cm-2 (2,000 dpm per 100 cm2 to approximately 600 million dpm per 100 cm2), with average working levels of 1,600-3,200 Bq cm-2 (10-20 million dpm per 100 cm2) without concomitant ambient radiation levels, control of the spread of contamination is key to keeping airborne levels As Low As Reasonably Achievable.

  1. Automatic Measurement of Low Level Contamination on Concrete Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachibana, M.; Itoh, H.; Shimada, T.; Yanagihara, S.

    2002-01-01

    Automatic measurement of radioactivity is necessary for considering cost effectiveness in final radiological survey of building structures in decommissioning nuclear facilities. The RAPID (radiation measuring pilot device for surface contamination) was developed to be applied to automatic measurement of low level contamination on concrete surfaces. The RAPID has a capability to measure contamination with detection limit of 0.14 Bq/cm2 for 60Co in 30 seconds of measurement time and its efficiency is evaluated to be 5 m2/h in a normal measurement option. It was confirmed that low level contamination on concrete surfaces could be surveyed by the RAPID efficiently compared with direct measurement by workers through its actual application

  2. Indoor and Outdoor Surface-Growing Fungi Contamination at Higher Institutional Buildings in a Malaysian University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Er, C. M.; Sunar, N. M.; Leman, A. M.; Khalid, A.; Ali, R.; Zaidi, E.; Azhar, A. T. S.

    2018-04-01

    Surface-growing indoor and outdoor fungi were assessed using swabbing method to investigate the indoor contamination. The painted wall surface samples were collected from two institutional buildings (B1 and B2) of a university in southern Peninsular Malaysia; indoors and outdoors. The mould concentrations varied widely between indoor and outdoor surface samples of both buildings. The total indoor surface-growing mould concentration (8776.49 CFU/cm2) is significantly higher (pair quality parameters (relative humidity, temperature and air velocity) were also measured indoors and outdoors during the study and violation of the guideline provided by ICOP-IAQ 2010 were proven in indoor environment in both buildings. The results of this assessment showed that the indoor environments of both institutional buildings were contaminated by the surface-growing mould. It also suggested the faulty designs and/or usages of building material in these institutional buildings contributed toward the contamination. An innovative solution is needed to correct the problems.

  3. Rapidly locating sources and predicting contaminant dispersion in buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohn, Michael D.; Reynolds, Pamela; Gadgil, Ashok J.; Sextro, Richard G.

    2002-01-01

    Contaminant releases in or near a building can lead to significant human exposures unless prompt response measures are taken. However, selecting the proper response depends in part on knowing the source locations, the amounts released, and the dispersion characteristics of the pollutants. We present an approach that estimates this information in real time. It uses Bayesian statistics to interpret measurements from sensors placed in the building yielding best estimates and uncertainties for the release conditions, including the operating state of the building. Because the method is fast, it continuously updates the estimates as measurements stream in from the sensors. We show preliminary results for characterizing a gas release in a three-floor, multi-room building at the Dugway Proving Grounds, Utah, USA

  4. Radiological survey techniques for decontamination and dismantlement applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruesink, G.P.; Stempfley, D.H.; Pettit, P.J.; Warner, R.D.

    1997-01-01

    The Department of Energy's Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) is engaged in an aggressive Program to remove all above ground structures as part of the Fernald sites final remediation remedy. Through the complete removal of major facilities such as Plant 7, Plant 4, and Plant 1, the FEMP has developed radiological survey approaches that are effective for the different phases of the Decontamination and Dismantlement (D ampersand D) process. Some of the most pressing challenges facing the FEMP are implementing effective, low cost methods for the D ampersand D of former process buildings while minimizing environmental effects. One of the key components to ensure minimal impact on the environment is the collection of radiological contamination information during the D ampersand D process to facilitate the decision making process. Prior to the final demolition of any structure, radiological surveys of floors, walls, and ceilings must take place. These surveys must demonstrate that contamination levels am below 5000 dpm removable beta/gamma for non-porous surfaces and below 1000 dpm removable-beta/gamma for all porous surfaces. Technique which can perform these activities in a safe, effective, and cost efficient manner are greatly desired. The FEMP has investigated new approaches to address this need. These techniques include sampling approaches using standard baseline methodology as well as innovative approaches to accelerate final radiological clearance processes. To further improve upon this process, the FEMP has investigated several new technologies through the Fernald Plant 1 Large Scale Technology Demonstration Project. One of the most promising of these new technologies, Laser Induced Fluorescence, may significantly improve the radiological clearance survey process. This paper will present real world experiences in applying radiological control limits to D ampersand D projects as well as relate potential productivity and cost improvements with the

  5. Final Status Survey Report for Corrective Action Unit 117 - Pluto Disassembly Facility, Building 2201, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gwin, Jeremy; Frenette, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    This document contains the process knowledge, radiological data and subsequent statistical methodology and analysis to support approval for the radiological release of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 117 - Pluto Disassembly Facility, Building 2201 located in Area 26 of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). Preparations for release of the building began in 2009 and followed the methodology described in the Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual (MARSSIM). MARSSIM is the DOE approved process for release of Real Property (buildings and landmasses) to a set of established criteria or authorized limits. The pre-approved authorized limits for surface contamination values and corresponding assumptions were established by DOE O 5400.5. The release criteria coincide with the acceptance criteria of the U10C landfill permit. The U10C landfill is the proposed location to dispose of the radiologically non-impacted, or ''clean,'' building rubble following demolition. However, other disposition options that include the building and/or waste remaining at the NNSS may be considered providing that the same release limits apply. The Final Status Survey was designed following MARSSIM guidance by reviewing historical documentation and radiological survey data. Following this review a formal radiological characterization survey was performed in two phases. The characterization revealed multiple areas of residual radioactivity above the release criteria. These locations were remediated (decontaminated) and then the surface activity was verified to be less than the release criteria. Once remediation efforts had been successfully completed, a Final Status Survey Plan (10-015, ''Final Status Survey Plan for Corrective Action Unit 117 - Pluto Disassembly Facility, Building 2201'') was developed and implemented to complete the final step in the MARSSIM process, the Final Status Survey. The Final Status Survey Plan consisted of categorizing each individual room into one

  6. A model to determine the radiological implications of non-fixed radioactive contamination on the surfaces of packages and conveyances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, J.S.; Warner Jones, S.M.; Lizot, M.T.; Perrin, M.L.; Thierfeld, S.; Schroedl, E.; Schwarz, G.; Rawl, R.; Munakata, M.; Hirose, M.

    2004-01-01

    The surfaces of packages and conveyances used to transport radioactive materials can sometimes become contaminated with radioactive material. This usually occurs as a result of the transfer of radioactive material from areas in which these packages and conveyances are handled. This contamination may subsequently be transferred to transport equipment, workers and to areas accessible to the public. This can represent a significant radiation safety issue that requires careful management. The current regulatory limits for non-fixed contamination on packages and conveyances have been in use for over 40 years, and are based on a simple exposure model. However, the bases on which these limits were derived have been subject to changes, as a result of successive revisions of international recommendations. In recognition of this need for a review and analysis of the current contamination limits an IAEA Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on the ''Radiological Aspects of Package and Conveyance Non-Fixed Contamination'' was initiated to review the scientific basis for the current regulatory limits for surface contamination. The CRP was also to develop guidance material for evaluating the radiological significance of surface contamination to workers and the public in light of state-of-the-art research, technical developments and current transport practices. The specific objectives of the work undertaken within this multi-national CRP were, in accordance with the terms of reference: To ensure that appropriate models exist for all package types including consideration of the aspects pertinent for assessing and revising a surface contamination model for transport. To collect - where possible - contamination, operational and dosimetric data to ensure modelling consistency. To use models for assessing the limitations and optimisation of radiation doses incurred in transport operations, and to consider preventive methods for package and conveyance contamination

  7. Guidelines for selection of radiological protective head covering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galloway, G.R. Jr.

    1995-08-01

    The hood is recognized throughout the nuclear industry as the standard radiological protective head covering for use in radioactively contaminated work environments. As of June 15, 1995, hoods were required for all activities performed in contaminated areas at the Y-12 Plant. The use of hoods had historically been limited to those radiological activities with a high potential for personnel contamination. Due to the large size of many posted contaminated areas at the Y-12 Plant, and compounding safety factors, requirements for the use of hoods are being reevaluated. The purpose of the evaluation is to develop technically sound guidelines for the selection of hoods when prescribing radiological protective head covering. This report presents the guidelines for selection of radiological protective hoods

  8. Results of the radiological survey at 1047 Central Avenue, Albany, New York (AL209)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, S.C.; Marley, J.L.

    1987-11-01

    A number of properties in the Albany/Colonie area have been identified as being potentially contaminated with uranium originating from the former National Lead Company's uranium forming plant in Colonie, New York. The property at 1047 Central Avenue in Albany, New York was the subject of a radiological investigation initiated August 26, 1986. The commercial property consists of a two-story frame building located on an irregular lot. An asphalt drive connects the property to the street. A diagram of the property showing the approximate boundaries and the 6-m grid network established for measurements outside the building is shown. The lot included in the radiological survey was /approximately/18 m wide by 60 m deep. Front and rear views of the property are shown. 13 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs

  9. Results of the radiological survey at 1054 Central Avenue, Albany, New York (AL211)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, S.C.; Marley, J.L.

    1987-11-01

    A number of properties in the Albany/Colonie area have been identified as being potentially contaminated with uranium originating from the former National Lead Company's uranium forming plant in Colonie, New York. The property at 1054 Central Avenue in Albany, New York was the subject of a radiological investigation initiated August 27, 1986. The commercial property consists of a two-story frame and block building located on a rectangular lot. An asphalt drive connects the working areas to the street. A diagram of the property showing the approximate boundaries and the 5-m grid network established for measurements outside the building is shown. The lot included in the radiological survey was /approximately/13 m wide by 43 m deep. Front and side views of the property are shown. 13 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs

  10. Visual Sample Plan (VSP) Software: Designs and Data Analyses for Sampling Contaminated Buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulsipher, Brent A.; Wilson, John E.; Gilbert, Richard O.; Nuffer, Lisa L.; Hassig, Nancy L.

    2005-01-01

    A new module of the Visual Sample Plan (VSP) software has been developed to provide sampling designs and data analyses for potentially contaminated buildings. An important application is assessing levels of contamination in buildings after a terrorist attack. This new module, funded by DHS through the Combating Terrorism Technology Support Office, Technical Support Working Group, was developed to provide a tailored, user-friendly and visually-orientated buildings module within the existing VSP software toolkit, the latest version of which can be downloaded from http://dqo.pnl.gov/vsp. In case of, or when planning against, a chemical, biological, or radionuclide release within a building, the VSP module can be used to quickly and easily develop and visualize technically defensible sampling schemes for walls, floors, ceilings, and other surfaces to statistically determine if contamination is present, its magnitude and extent throughout the building and if decontamination has been effective. This paper demonstrates the features of this new VSP buildings module, which include: the ability to import building floor plans or to easily draw, manipulate, and view rooms in several ways; being able to insert doors, windows and annotations into a room; 3-D graphic room views with surfaces labeled and floor plans that show building zones that have separate air handing units. The paper will also discuss the statistical design and data analysis options available in the buildings module. Design objectives supported include comparing an average to a threshold when the data distribution is normal or unknown, and comparing measurements to a threshold to detect hotspots or to insure most of the area is uncontaminated when the data distribution is normal or unknown

  11. Radiological characterisation by means of 3D-laser modelling and positioning of measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedvall, Robert; Johansson, Patrik; Erixon, Peter; Ekenborg, Fredrik; Quanhong, Feng

    2012-01-01

    AB SVAFO is a nuclear waste technology and decommissioning company based in Sweden in the scenic surroundings of Studsvik on the Baltic coast. SVAFO is owned by the Swedish nuclear power industry. MultiInfo 3D Laser Scan Solution AB is a technical consult company focusing on the development and solution of 3D laser scanning techniques and its applications in different fields. For better viewing we are using a 3D-laser modelling of a building, national coordinates and using radiological measurements from a database. It is then possible to visualize the contamination situation in the whole building using a CAD-program. The results will be used for the upcoming R2-reactor decommissioning and for visualisation of dose rates and contamination levels in other nuclear buildings. For better documentation of radioactivity distribution of a decommissioned facility any object in a building can be accurately measured in 3D and visualized in 3D-laser image in a CAD program (e.g. AutoCAD), and then link to a database (e.g. SVALA), which have stored the measurements of radioactivity by other tools (e.g. RFID-tags). The position of any measured object can also be identified in 3D model and laser image, so the situation of contamination levels and distribution can be monitored and visualized in 3D. The results will be used for visualisation of dose rates and contamination levels in other nuclear buildings. AB SVAFO's main business is to take care of formerly state-owned spent nuclear waste at the site, including small amounts of nuclear fuel. Buildings are also included, mainly nuclear waste storage buildings and a research reactor. Some buildings have already been decommissioned with results of contamination shown in long and not very clear tables. With 3D-modelling the results are shown more clear. (authors)

  12. Validation of radiological efficiency model applied for the crops/soils contaminated by radiocaesium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montero, M.; Vazquez, C.; Moraleda, M.; Claver, F.

    2000-01-01

    The differences shown in the radiological efficiency applying the same agrochemical interventions on a range of contaminated agricultural scenarios by long-live radionuclides have conducted the radioecological studies to quantify the influence of local characteristics on the soil-to-plant transference. In the framework of the Decision Support Systems for post-accidental environmental restoration, a semi-mechanistic approach has been developed to estimate the soil-to-plant transfer factor from the major properties underlying the bioavailability of radiocaesium in soils and the absorption capacity by the crop. The model describes, for each soil texture class, the effects of time and K status on the transference of radiocaesium to plants. The approach lets to estimate the actual and the available minimum transference and to calculate the optimum amendment warranting the maximum radiological efficiency on an specific soil-crop combination. The parameterization and validation of the model from a database providing information about experimental transference studies for a collection of soil-crop combinations are shown. (Author) 4 refs

  13. The restoration project : decontamination of facilities from chemical, biological and radiological contamination after terrorist action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fingas, M.; Volchek, K.; Thouin, G.; Harrison, S.; Kuang, W. [Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Emergencies Science Div; Velicogna, D.; Hornof, M.; Punt, M. [SAIC Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Payette, P.; Duncan, L.; Best, M.; Krishnan; Wagener, S.; Bernard, K.; Majcher, M. [Public Health Agency of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Cousins, T.; Jones, T. [Defence Research and Development Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2005-07-01

    Bioterrorism poses a real threat to the public health and national security, and the restoration of affected facilities after a chemical, biological or radiological attack is a major concern. This paper reviewed aspects of a project conducted to collect information, test and validate procedures for site restoration after a terrorist attack. The project began with a review of existing technology and then examined new technologies. Restoration included pickup, neutralization, decontamination, removal and final destruction and deposition of contaminants as well as cleaning and neutralization of material and contaminated waste from decontamination. The project was also intended to test existing concepts and develop new ideas. Laboratory scale experiments consisted of testing, using standard laboratory techniques. Radiation decontamination consisted of removal and concentration of the radioisotopes from removal fluid. General restoration guidelines were provided, as well as details of factors considered important in specific applications, including growth conditions and phases of microorganisms in biological decontamination, or the presence of inhibitors or scavengers in chemical decontamination. Various agents were proposed that were considered to have broad spectrum capability. Test surrogates for anthrax were discussed. The feasibility of enhanced oxidation processes was examined in relation to the destruction of organophosphorus, organochlorine and carbamate pesticides. The goal was to identify a process for the treatment of surfaces contaminated with pesticides. Tests included removal from carpet, porous ceiling tile, steel plates, and floor tiles. General radiation contamination procedures and techniques were reviewed, as well as radiological decontamination waste treatment. It was concluded that there is no single decontamination technique applicable for all contaminants, and decontamination methods depend on economic, social and health factors. The amount of

  14. Buildings radiological characterization report for the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project, Weldon Spring, Missouri

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-04-01

    This report summarizes radiological characterization data on the Weldon Spring Chemical Plant (WSCP) buildings gathered as part of five previous investigations, and provides a consistent will be used to support future feasibility studies which will determine the best available technologies for ultimate disposition of the buildings and associated equipment. At present no structure or piece of equipment can be released from the WSCP for unrestricted use without further radiation measurements being performed. A final group of equipment and building components contains surface radioactivity levels in excess of DOE guidelines; this group, usually found in buildings housing uranium and/or thorium processing equipment, will require decontamination and comprehensive scanning in order to be considered for unrestricted use release. 9 refs., 44 tabs

  15. Final report on contamination surveys at NPL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuplin, T.A.

    1984-02-01

    The Environmental and Medical Sciences Division of Harwell was contracted to carry out detailed surveys of Building 154 at the National Physical Laboratory, Teddington. The survey used a variety of radiation detectors appropriate to the conditions found and also involved monitoring for the presence of beryllium, by means of smear (wiping) tests. The results from the beryllium survey showed that no areas exceeded accepted control limits. The results of the contamination survey indicated a few places where the derived limit was exceeded However, averaged over the accepted surface area (1000 cm 2 ), and noting that the contamination was fixed, the levels were considered to present no hazard to any worker in the area nor to anyone outside the building. The environmental radiation in Room 35, the most contaminated room, was one hundredth of a millirem per hour. In only one area (Room 26) was there a radiologically significant dose rate, caused by a sealed source of cobalt-60. The accessible dose rates close to the source were around 8 millirem per hour. However, the uranium contamination should be removed to be consistent with the principle that radiation exposure should be as low as reasonably achievable. (U.K.)

  16. An Intercomparison of Model Predictions for an Urban Contamination Resulting from the Explosion of a Radiological Dispersal Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Won Tae; Jeong, Hyo Jun; Kim, Eun Han; Han, Moon Hee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-03-15

    The METRO-K is a model for a radiological dose assessment due to a radioactive contamination in the Korean urban environment. The model has been taken part in the Urban Remediation Working Group within the IAEA's (International Atomic Energy Agency) EMRAS (Environmental Modeling for Radiation Safety) program. The Working Croup designed for the intercomparison of radioactive contamination to be resulted from the explosion of a radiological dispersal device in a hypothetical city. This paper dealt intensively with a part among a lot of predictive results which had been performed in the EMRAS program. The predictive results of three different models (METRO-K, RESRAD-RDD, CPHR) were submitted to the Working Group. The gap of predictive results was due to the difference of mathematical modeling approaches, parameter values, understanding of assessors. Even if final results (for example, dose rates from contaminated surfaces which might affect to a receptor) are similar, the understanding on the contribution of contaminated surfaces showed a great difference. Judging from the authors, it is due to the lack of understanding and information on radioactive terrors as well as the social and cultural gaps which assessors have been experienced. Therefore, it can be known that the experience of assessors and their subjective judgements might be important factors to get reliable results. If the acquisition of a little additional information is possible, it was identified that the METRO-K might be a useful tool for decision support against contamination resulting from radioactive terrors by improving the existing model.

  17. An Intercomparison of Model Predictions for an Urban Contamination Resulting from the Explosion of a Radiological Dispersal Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Won Tae; Jeong, Hyo Jun; Kim, Eun Han; Han, Moon Hee

    2009-01-01

    The METRO-K is a model for a radiological dose assessment due to a radioactive contamination in the Korean urban environment. The model has been taken part in the Urban Remediation Working Group within the IAEA's (International Atomic Energy Agency) EMRAS (Environmental Modeling for Radiation Safety) program. The Working Croup designed for the intercomparison of radioactive contamination to be resulted from the explosion of a radiological dispersal device in a hypothetical city. This paper dealt intensively with a part among a lot of predictive results which had been performed in the EMRAS program. The predictive results of three different models (METRO-K, RESRAD-RDD, CPHR) were submitted to the Working Group. The gap of predictive results was due to the difference of mathematical modeling approaches, parameter values, understanding of assessors. Even if final results (for example, dose rates from contaminated surfaces which might affect to a receptor) are similar, the understanding on the contribution of contaminated surfaces showed a great difference. Judging from the authors, it is due to the lack of understanding and information on radioactive terrors as well as the social and cultural gaps which assessors have been experienced. Therefore, it can be known that the experience of assessors and their subjective judgements might be important factors to get reliable results. If the acquisition of a little additional information is possible, it was identified that the METRO-K might be a useful tool for decision support against contamination resulting from radioactive terrors by improving the existing model.

  18. The release of lindane from contaminated building materials

    OpenAIRE

    Volchek, Konstantin; Thouin, Geneviève; Kuang, Wenxing; Li, Ken; Tezel, F. Handan; Brown, Carl E.

    2014-01-01

    The release of the organochlorine pesticide lindane (γ-hexachlorocyclohexane) from several types of contaminated building materials was studied to assess inhalation hazard and decontamination requirements in response to accidental and/or intentional spills. The materials included glass, polypropylene carpet, latex-painted drywall, ceramic tiles, vinyl floor tiles, and gypsum ceiling tiles. For each surface concentration, an equilibrium concentration was determined in the vapour phase of the s...

  19. Building a Culture of Continuous Quality Improvement in an Academic Radiology Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzman, Gregory L; Paushter, David M

    2016-04-01

    As we enter a new era of health care in the United States, radiologists must be adequately prepared to prove, and continually improve, our value to our customers. This goal can be achieved in large part by providing high-quality services. Although quality efforts on the national and international levels provide a framework for improving radiologic quality, some of the greatest opportunities for quality improvement can be found at the departmental level, through the implementation of total quality management programs. Establishing such a program requires not only strong leadership and employee engagement, but also a firm understanding of the multiple total quality management tools and continuous quality improvement strategies available. In this article, we discuss key tools and strategies required to build a culture of continuous quality improvement in an academic department, based on our experience. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Bacterial contamination of ultrasound probes in different radiological institutions before and after specific hygiene training: do we have a general hygienical problem?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartoretti, Thomas; Sartoretti, Elisabeth; Bucher, Candid; Doert, Aleksis; Binkert, Christoph; Hergan, Klaus; Meissnitzer, Matthias; Froehlich, Johannes; Kolokythas, Orpheus; Matoori, Simon; Orasch, Christina; Kos, Sebastian; Sartoretti-Schefer, Sabine; Gutzeit, Andreas

    2017-10-01

    Aim was to investigate hygienic conditions of ultrasound probes before and after hygiene training in radiology institutions in comparison to bacterial contamination in public places. In three radiology departments, bacterial contamination was evaluated using baseline agar plates for cultures taken from 36 ultrasound probes. Afterwards teams were trained by a hygiene service centre and 36 ultrasound probes were routinely disinfected with regular disinfecting wipes and then evaluated. In comparison, bacterial contamination in public places (bus poles, n = 11; toilet seats, n = 10) were analysed. Plates were routinely incubated and the number of colony forming units (CFU) analysed. Cultures taken from the probes showed a median of 53 CFU before and 0 CFU after training (p contamination of ultrasound probes prior to hygiene training proved to be high and showed higher bacterial load than toilets seats or bus poles. Radiologists should be aware that the lack of hygiene in the field of ultrasound diagnostics puts patients at risk of healthcare-associated infections. • Hospital-associated infections are a problem for patient care. • Hygiene training of staff prevents bacterial contamination of ultrasound probes. • Disinfection of ultrasound probes is an easy method to protect patients.

  1. Radiological risks in an operational environment; Risque radiologique en operation exterieure: prise en charge initiale d'un blesse irradie ou contamine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castagnet, X.; Lafferrerie, C. [Service Medical BCRM de Toulon, Escadrille des sous-marins nucleaires d' attaque, 83 - Toulon (France); Amabile, J.C.; Cazoulat, A.; Laroche, P. [Service de Protection radiologique des armees, 94 - Clamart (France)

    2010-10-15

    A radiological hazard (e. g. a detonating dirty bomb or accidental radionuclide dispersion) leading to a large number of contaminated or irradiated people needing immediate medical assistance is one of the main threats our troops deployed in an operational environment are facing. Immediate first aid anyway shall take precedence over decontamination but the unique nature of these injuries necessitates specific medical knowledge and training. A contaminated victim needs a rapid -clinical physical and biological- medical evaluation which will determine the amount of required medical support. A person with external contamination needs to be rapidly cleansed to limit spreading surface burns as well as limiting the possible contamination internally spreading into the body. A person with internal contamination requires rapid decontamination at the wound point and antidotes to internally cleanse the body. In France, the Military Health Service has developed a centre of expertise at the Percy military hospital near Paris which is geared up to deal with the victims of radiological attacks. It also has a mobile laboratory equipped with full radio toxicology equipment and body dosimeters to enable rapid and effective results when required. (authors)

  2. Radiological engineering services for the design of special contamination containments. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide radiological engineering services for the design of special contamination containments. These containments were to be used during the replacement of leaking and damaged gaskets on the glove boxes in Technical Area-55 (TA-55). The damaged gaskets involved 18 windows and 5 interconnecting spool pieces in fuel processing glove boxes. The work scope included the design and manufacture of special contamination containment enclosures (containments), the preparation of procedures and tool lists to support gasket replacement while using the containments, and the training of appropriate TA-55 personnel in the proper installation, operation and removal of the containments. It was originally anticipated that two basic containment designs would be required, one for the windows and one for spool pieces. Upon examination of the glove boxes it was evident that the individual space envelopes and interferences associated with each glove box would require uniquely designed containments for effective gasket replacement. This resulted in 13 individual containment designs that accommodated the interferences and allowed gasket replacement within the containment. Successful use of the containments for glove box gasket replacement was a significant accomplishment. The operation has proven that a properly managed containment program can enhance routine maintenance of the glove boxes while preventing a contamination release. The ability to perform these operations in containments reduces costs by preventing a contaminant release and eliminating the associated cleanup expenses, reduced radioactive waste and fuel processing down time

  3. Natural radioactivity and radiological hazards of building materials in Xianyang, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Xinwei; Yang Guang; Ren Chunhui

    2012-01-01

    Common building materials collected from Xianyang, China were analyzed for the natural radioactivity of 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K using γ-ray spectroscopy. The average activity concentration of 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K in the studied building materials ranges from 13.4 to 69.9, 13.1–99.1 and 124.7–915.1 Bq kg −1 , respectively. The measured activity concentrations for these radionuclides were compared with the reported data of other countries and with the worldwide average activity of soil. To assess the radiation hazard of the natural radioactivity in all samples to the people, the radium equivalent activity, external hazard index, internal hazard index, indoor absorbed dose rate and total annual effective dose were estimated. The radium equivalent activities of the studied samples are below the internationally accepted values. The external hazard index and internal hazard index of all analyzed building materials are less than unity. The mean values of indoor absorbed dose rate for all building materials except for lime are higher than the world population-weighted average of 84 nGy h −1 and the total annual effective dose values of building materials are lower than 1 mSv y −1 except for some cyan brick samples. The study shows the measured building materials do not pose significant source of radiation hazard and are safe for use in the construction of dwellings. - Highlights: ► Natural radioactivity in building materials was determined by gamma ray spectrometry. ► The radiological hazard of studied building materials is within the recommended safety limit. ► Most of the studied building materials do not pose significant radiation risk to residents.

  4. Final report of the decontamination and decommissioning of Building 44 at the Grand Junction Projects Office Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widdop, M.R.

    1996-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Junction Projects Office (GJPO) occupies a 61.7 acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore and mill tailings during uranium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District and during pilot milling experiments conducted for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission's domestic uranium procurement program. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and the underlying aquifer. The site contractor for the facility, Rust Geotech, is also the remedial action contractor. Building 44 was radiologically contaminated and the building was demolished in 1994. The soil area within the footprint of the building was not contaminated; it complies with the identified standards and the area can be released for unlimited exposure and unrestricted use. This document was prepared in response to a DOE request for an individual final report for each contaminated GJPO building

  5. Final report of the decontamination and decommissioning of Building 34 at the Grand Junction Projects Office Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widdop, M.R.

    1996-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) occupies a 61.7 acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore and mill tailings during uranium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District and during pilot milling experiments conducted for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission's domestic uranium procurement program. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and the underlying aquifer. The site contractor for the facility, Rust Geotech, was also the remedial action contractor. Building 34 was radiologically contaminated and the building was demolished in 1996. The soil area within the footprint of the building was analyzed and found to be not contaminated. The area can be released for unlimited exposure and unrestricted use. This document was prepared in response to a DOE request for an individual closeout report for each contaminated GJPO building

  6. Bacteriological Monitoring of Radiology Room Apparatus in the Department of Radiological Technology and Contamination on Hands of Radiological Technologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seon Chil

    2008-01-01

    Distribution of microorganisms were examined for the bucky tables in the radiology rooms of the department of radiological technology, the aprons, handles of various apparatus, handles of mobile radiological apparatus, and hands of the radiological technologists. As a result, relatively larger amounts of bacteria were found on the handles of the mobile radiological apparatus and the aprons. Among the isolated bacteria, Acinetobacter baumanni (7.3%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (6.7%), Staphylococcus aureus (3.9%), Serratia liquefaciens (1.7%), Enterobacter cloaceae (0.6%), Providenica rettgeri (0.6%) are known as the cause of nosocomial infection (hospital acquired infection). In addition, similar colonies were also found on the hands of the radiological technologists such as microorganisms of Klebsiella pneumoniae (8.4%), Staphylococcus aureus (6.6%), Yersinia enterocolotica (5.4%), Acinetobacter baumanni (4.2%), Enterobacter cloaceae (2.4%), Serratia liquefaciens (1.8%), Yersinia pseuotuberculosis (18%), Enterobacter sakazakii (1.2%), and Escherichia coli (0.6%). In particular, this result indicates clinical significance since Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli show strong pathogenicity. Therefore, a continuous education is essential for the radiological technologists to prevent the nosocomial infection.

  7. Bacteriological Monitoring of Radiology Room Apparatus in the Department of Radiological Technology and Contamination on Hands of Radiological Technologists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seon Chil [Dept. of Radiologic Technology, Daegu Health College, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    Distribution of microorganisms were examined for the bucky tables in the radiology rooms of the department of radiological technology, the aprons, handles of various apparatus, handles of mobile radiological apparatus, and hands of the radiological technologists. As a result, relatively larger amounts of bacteria were found on the handles of the mobile radiological apparatus and the aprons. Among the isolated bacteria, Acinetobacter baumanni (7.3%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (6.7%), Staphylococcus aureus (3.9%), Serratia liquefaciens (1.7%), Enterobacter cloaceae (0.6%), Providenica rettgeri (0.6%) are known as the cause of nosocomial infection (hospital acquired infection). In addition, similar colonies were also found on the hands of the radiological technologists such as microorganisms of Klebsiella pneumoniae (8.4%), Staphylococcus aureus (6.6%), Yersinia enterocolotica (5.4%), Acinetobacter baumanni (4.2%), Enterobacter cloaceae (2.4%), Serratia liquefaciens (1.8%), Yersinia pseuotuberculosis (18%), Enterobacter sakazakii (1.2%), and Escherichia coli (0.6%). In particular, this result indicates clinical significance since Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli show strong pathogenicity. Therefore, a continuous education is essential for the radiological technologists to prevent the nosocomial infection.

  8. Radiological Control Technician: Phase 1, Site academic training study guides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    This volume is a study guide for training Radiological Control Technicians. Provided herein are support materials for learning radiological documentation, communication systems, counting errors and statistics, dosimetry, contamination control, airborne sampling program methods, respiratory protection, radiological source control, environmental monitoring, access control and work area setup, radiological work coverage, shipment and receipt for radioactive material, radiological incidents and emergencies, personnel decontamination, first aid, radiation survey instrumentation, contamination monitoring, air sampling, and counting room equipment

  9. Contaminant ingress into multizone buildings: An analytical state-space approach

    KAUST Repository

    Parker, Simon

    2013-08-13

    The ingress of exterior contaminants into buildings is often assessed by treating the building interior as a single well-mixed space. Multizone modelling provides an alternative way of representing buildings that can estimate concentration time series in different internal locations. A state-space approach is adopted to represent the concentration dynamics within multizone buildings. Analysis based on this approach is used to demonstrate that the exposure in every interior location is limited to the exterior exposure in the absence of removal mechanisms. Estimates are also developed for the short term maximum concentration and exposure in a multizone building in response to a step-change in concentration. These have considerable potential for practical use. The analytical development is demonstrated using a simple two-zone building with an inner zone and a range of existing multizone models of residential buildings. Quantitative measures are provided of the standard deviation of concentration and exposure within a range of residential multizone buildings. Ratios of the maximum short term concentrations and exposures to single zone building estimates are also provided for the same buildings. © 2013 Tsinghua University Press and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  10. Characterization of Under-Building Contamination at Rocky Flats Implementing Environmental-Measurement While Drilling Process with Horizontal Directional Drilling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WILLIAMS, CECELIA V.; LOCKWOOD, GRANT J.; NORMANN, RANDY A.; LINDSAY, THOMAS

    2001-01-01

    Characterization is required on thirty-one buildings at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS or the Site) with known or suspected under building contamination. The Site has teamed with Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) to deploy Environmental Measure-While-Drilling (EMWD) in conjunction with horizontal directional drilling (HDD) to characterize under building contamination and to evaluate the performance and applicability for future characterization efforts. The Environmental Measurement-While-Drilling-Gamma Ray Spectrometer (EMWD-GRS) system represents an innovative blend of new and existing technology that provides the capability of producing real-time environmental drill bit data during drilling operations. The project investigated two locations, Building 886 and Building 123. Building 886 is currently undergoing D and D activities. Building 123 was demolished in 1998; however, the slab is present with under building process waste lines and utilities. This report presents the results of the EMWD Gamma Ray Spectrometer logging of boreholes at these two sites. No gamma emitting contamination was detected at either location.(author)

  11. Comprehensive engineering and radiological survey of the Bochvar VNIINM site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazhanov, M.S.; Belousov, S.V.; Grishin, E.Zh.; Kotov, A.L.; Kuznetsov, A.Yu.; Savin, S.K.; Sukhanov, L.P.; Chernikov, M.A.; Utrobin, D.V.

    2012-01-01

    The comprehensive engineering and radiological survey (CERS) of Bochvar VNIINM war performed in 2010-2012. During the performance of the survey, radiometric measurements were taken to determine the total activity of α-emitting radionuclides in the air of work rooms, gas releases and in the environment, α- and β-emitting radionuclides in the air of work rooms, air releases from the site, waste waters, samples of snow, soil and vegetation, and in process oils. As a result of the work, experience was obtained in performing CERS of buildings and territory, standardized CERS programmes were developed, essential information was collected about radioactive contamination of both buildings and territory of the Bochvar VNIINM [ru

  12. Development of emergency response tools for accidental radiological contamination of French coastal areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffa, Céline; Bailly du Bois, Pascal; Caillaud, Matthieu; Charmasson, Sabine; Couvez, Céline; Didier, Damien; Dumas, Franck; Fievet, Bruno; Morillon, Mehdi; Renaud, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The Fukushima nuclear accident resulted in the largest ever accidental release of artificial radionuclides in coastal waters. This accident has shown the importance of marine assessment capabilities for emergency response and the need to develop tools for adequately predicting the evolution and potential impact of radioactive releases to the marine environment. The French Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) equips its emergency response centre with operational tools to assist experts and decision makers in the event of accidental atmospheric releases and contamination of the terrestrial environment. The on-going project aims to develop tools for the management of marine contamination events in French coastal areas. This should allow us to evaluate and anticipate post-accident conditions, including potential contamination sites, contamination levels and potential consequences. In order to achieve this goal, two complementary tools are developed: site-specific marine data sheets and a dedicated simulation tool (STERNE, Simulation du Transport et du transfert d’Eléments Radioactifs dans l'environNEment marin). Marine data sheets are used to summarize the marine environment characteristics of the various sites considered, and to identify vulnerable areas requiring implementation of population protection measures, such as aquaculture areas, beaches or industrial water intakes, as well as areas of major ecological interest. Local climatological data (dominant sea currents as a function of meteorological or tidal conditions) serving as the basis for an initial environmental sampling strategy is provided whenever possible, along with a list of possible local contacts for operational management purposes. The STERNE simulation tool is designed to predict radionuclide dispersion and contamination in seawater and marine species by incorporating spatio-temporal data. 3D hydrodynamic forecasts are used as input data. Direct discharge points or

  13. Assessment of Natural Radioactivity Levels and Potential Radiological Risks of Common Building Materials Used in Bangladeshi Dwellings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asaduzzaman, Khandoker; Mannan, Farhana; Khandaker, Mayeen Uddin; Farook, Mohideen Salihu; Elkezza, Aeman; Amin, Yusoff Bin Mohd; Sharma, Sailesh; Abu Kassim, Hasan Bin

    2015-01-01

    The concentrations of primordial radionuclides (226Ra, 232Th and 40K) in commonly used building materials (brick, cement and sand), the raw materials of cement and the by-products of coal-fired power plants (fly ash) collected from various manufacturers and suppliers in Bangladesh were determined via gamma-ray spectrometry using an HPGe detector. The results showed that the mean concentrations of 226Ra, 232Th and 40K in all studied samples slightly exceeded the typical world average values of 50 Bq kg(-1), 50 Bq kg(-1) and 500 Bq kg(-1), respectively. The activity concentrations (especially 226Ra) of fly-ash-containing cement in this study were found to be higher than those of fly-ash-free cement. To evaluate the potential radiological risk to individuals associated with these building materials, various radiological hazard indicators were calculated. The radium equivalent activity values for all samples were found to be lower than the recommended limit for building materials of 370 Bq kg(-1), with the exception of the fly ash. For most samples, the values of the alpha index and the radiological hazard (external and internal) indices were found to be within the safe limit of 1. The mean indoor absorbed dose rate was observed to be higher than the population-weighted world average of 84 nGy h(-1), and the corresponding annual effective dose for most samples fell below the recommended upper dose limit of 1 mSv y(-1). For all investigated materials, the values of the gamma index were found to be greater than 0.5 but less than 1, indicating that the gamma dose contribution from the studied building materials exceeds the exemption dose criterion of 0.3 mSv y(-1) but complies with the upper dose principle of 1 mSv y(-1).

  14. Radiological passports as a decision support technique for post Chernobyl dose reduction in contaminated settlements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grebenkov, A.; Mansoux, H.; Yakushau, A.; Antsipov, G.; Averin, V.; Zhouchenko, Y.; Minenko, V.; Tirmarche, M.

    2004-01-01

    In 2000, IRSN and GRS initiated a support for collecting, securing and validating of existing data in the field of Chernobyl accident consequences and establishing a database including a detailed documentation in order to make available all reliable and objective information for decision makers, for planning of actions, for information of the public and for further scientific work. Three projects as a part of French/German Initiative (FGI) for humanitarian and technical assistance in favour of the Ukraine, Belarus and Russia have been established. The authors represent sub-project 3.9.1, which objectives are as follows: (i) develop and replenish the database for the Radiological-Hygienic Passports (RHP) and perform additional investigation of the target settlements in Belarus where comprehensive information has not been acquired yet, (ii) establish conditions and communication infrastructure for database availability, (iii) provide data analysis involving data on individual effective dose monitoring and results of countermeasures applied, and (iii) formulate the wider recommendations for the target settlements located in contaminated areas, concerning radiation, health, sanitary and social protection, countermeasures, industrial infrastructure development and reviving the local economy. During implementation of the project, 96 settlements with total population of 25 thousand were investigated and their RHPs were compiled. Every RHP consisted of 13 separate forms grouped under three principal headings: Statistics (societal and demographic structure of population, housing, land used and predominant soil type); Economical infrastructure and public utilities (farms, industries, schools, hospitals, shops, service, etc.); Radiological data and doses (total area subdivided vs. level of contamination, Cs-137 content in human body, contamination of agricultural products, contamination of households, annual effective dose). Every RHP was concluded with proposals as to the

  15. PARATI - a dynamic model for radiological assessments in urban areas. Pt. 1. Modelling of urban areas, their contamination and radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rochedo, E.R.R.; Conti, L.F.C.; Paretzke, H.G.

    1996-01-01

    The structure and mathematical model of PARATI, a detailed computer programme developed for the assessment of the radiological consequences of an accidental contamination of urban areas, is described with respect to the scenarios used for the estimation of exposure fields in a village or town, the models for the initial and secondary contamination with the radionuclide 137 Cs, the concepts for calculating the resulting radiation exposures and the changes with time of the contamination and radiation fields. Kerma rates at various locations in tropical urban areas are given, and the contribution of different contaminated surfaces to these rates after dry or wet deposition are discussed. (orig.). With 6 figs., 12 tabs

  16. Radiological survey of the Mallinckrodt Chemical Works, St. Louis, Missouri

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldsmith, W.A.; Leggett, R.W.; Haywood, F.F.

    1981-12-01

    The results of a radiological survey of part of the Mallinckrodt Chemical Works (former Destrehan and Broadway Street plants), St. Louis, Missouri, are presented. During the period 1942 through 1957, this site was used for various projects involving the production of purified uranium from pitchblende concentrates. The survey included measurements of the following: residual alpha and beta-gamma contamination levels in the existing buildings that were used in the uranium projects; external gamma radiation levels at 1 m above the surface in these buildings and outdoors around these buildings; radon and radon daughter concentrations in the air in these buildings; uranium, radium, actinium, and thorium concentrations in surface and subsurface soil on the site; concentrations of radionuclides in water and sediment found in drains both inside and outside the buildings; and concentrations of radionuclides in ground and surface water on the site and in river water taken near the site. Alpha and beta-gamma contamination levels inside and outside some of the buildings were above limits set by current federal guidelines concerning the release of property for unrestricted use. Elevated external gamma radiation levels were measured at some outdoor locations and in some of the buildings. Licensable concentrations of uranium were found in soil at some places, and the concentration of uranium in a water sample taken from a core hole between Buildings 100 and 101 was in excess of limits set by current federal standards. Radon and radon daughter concentrations in three buildings were in excess of current federal guidelines for nonoccupational radiation exposure

  17. Radiological survey of the Mallinckrodt Chemical Works, St. Louis, Missouri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldsmith, W A; Leggett, R W; Haywood, F F

    1981-12-01

    The results of a radiological survey of part of the Mallinckrodt Chemical Works (former Destrehan and Broadway Street plants), St. Louis, Missouri, are presented. During the period 1942 through 1957, this site was used for various projects involving the production of purified uranium from pitchblende concentrates. The survey included measurements of the following: residual alpha and beta-gamma contamination levels in the existing buildings that were used in the uranium projects; external gamma radiation levels at 1 m above the surface in these buildings and outdoors around these buildings; radon and radon daughter concentrations in the air in these buildings; uranium, radium, actinium, and thorium concentrations in surface and subsurface soil on the site; concentrations of radionuclides in water and sediment found in drains both inside and outside the buildings; and concentrations of radionuclides in ground and surface water on the site and in river water taken near the site. Alpha and beta-gamma contamination levels inside and outside some of the buildings were above limits set by current federal guidelines concerning the release of property for unrestricted use. Elevated external gamma radiation levels were measured at some outdoor locations and in some of the buildings. Licensable concentrations of uranium were found in soil at some places, and the concentration of uranium in a water sample taken from a core hole between Buildings 100 and 101 was in excess of limits set by current federal standards. Radon and radon daughter concentrations in three buildings were in excess of current federal guidelines for nonoccupational radiation exposure.

  18. Summary of data concerning radiological contamination at well PM-2, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, G.M.; Locke, G.L.

    1997-01-01

    Analysis of water from well Pahute Mesa No. 2 (PM-2), on Pahute Mesa in the extreme northwestern part of the Nevada Test Site, indicated tritium concentrations above background levels in August 1993. A coordinated investigation of the tritium occurrence in well PM-2 was undertaken by the Hydrologic Resources Management Program of the US Department of Energy. Geologic and hydrologic properties of the hydrogeologic units were characterized using existing information. Soil around the well and water quality in the well were characterized during the investigation. The purpose of this report is to present existing information and results from a coordinated investigation of tritium occurrence. The objectives of the overall investigation include: (1) determination of the type and concentration of contamination; (2) identification of the source and mechanism of contamination; (3) estimation of the extent of radiological contamination; (4) initiation of appropriate monitoring of the contamination; and (5) reporting of investigation results. Compiled and tabulated data of the area are presented. The report also includes characterization of geology, soil, hydrology, and water quality data

  19. Technical Basis - Spent Nuclear Fuels (SNF) Project Radiation and Contamination Trending Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ELGIN, J.C.

    2000-01-01

    This report documents the technical basis for the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Program radiation and contamination trending program. The program consists of standardized radiation and contamination surveys of the KE Basin, radiation surveys of the KW basin, radiation surveys of the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVD), and radiation surveys of the Canister Storage Building (CSB) with the associated tracking. This report also discusses the remainder of radiological areas within the SNFP that do not have standardized trending programs and the basis for not having this program in those areas

  20. Stakeholder participation in radiological decision making: processes and implication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    Since 1998, the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency has been organizing a series of workshops to address the various aspects of stakeholder involvement in radiological protection decision making. These workshops have been instrumental in forging consensus and improving understanding of key issues in this area. Building on the experience of the first two 'Villigen workshops', the third in the series extensively analysed three case studies, which covered the licensing of a new facility, the clean-up and release of an old facility, and the rehabilitation of a large, contaminated area. Consideration was given to the stakeholder involvement processes that had been used, and the implications that these did or could have on radiological protection policy, regulation and application. The workshop papers analysing these processes and implications are presented in these proceedings, which should provide valuable examples and lessons for governments, regulators and practitioners. (author)

  1. TA-03-0035 Press Building – D&D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasenack, Marvin Leroy [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-11-02

    The Press Building was constructed in 1954 with 15,073 ft2 of floor space. It was built to house a 5000 ton double action Lake Erie hydraulic press and a uranium casting area. Missions included uranium activities associated with the Nuclear Weapons and Rover Rocket programs. At the end of the Rover program, the building continued to support various uranium materials science projects until the building was placed into a cold and dark status in 2013 and then was demolished in 2017. The building interior, the press, and associated systems were radiological contaminated and disposed of as low level waste. The demolition of this building opened up valuable real estate in the TA-3 area for the future construction of an ~11,000 Sq. Ft. Biosafety Level 2 laboratory and office building. This building will support the ongoing Bioscience Division mission at the laboratory.

  2. Site-specific analysis of radiological and physical parameters for cobbly soils at the Gunnison, Colorado, processing site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-10-01

    The remedial action at the Gunnison, Colorado, processing site is being performed under the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978 [Public Law (PL) 95-6041]. Under UMTRCA, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is charged with the responsibility of developing appropriate and applicable standards for the cleanup of radiologically contaminated land and buildings at 24 designated sites, including the Gunnison, Colorado, inactive processing site. The remedial action at the processing site will be conducted to remove the tailings and contaminated materials to meet the EPA bulk soil cleanup standards for surface and subsurface soils. The site areas disturbed by remedial action excavation will be either contoured or backfilled with radiologically uncontaminated soil and contoured to restore the site. The final contours will produce a final surface grade that will create positive drainage from the site

  3. Radiological survey of the former Baker Brothers, Inc. site, 2551--2555 Harleau Place, Toledo, Ohio (BTO001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.

    1992-03-01

    At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted investigative radiological surveys at the REMS, Inc., and the Doug Beet Company, 2551-2555 Harleau Place, Toledo, Ohio (BTO001) in 1988. The purpose of the surveys was to determine whether the property was contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 238 U, as a result of work contracted to the Manhattan Engineer District (MED). The survey included gamma scans; directly measured alpha, beta, and gamma radiation levels; transferable contamination levels; and soil, dust, debris, and air sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey and sampling covered accessible portions of the exterior ground surface, roof, and interiors of buildings. Results of the surveys demonstrated four general areas having radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria for 238 U outdoors and as surface contamination on shelves in one building

  4. 300 Area D4 Project 2nd Quarter FY06 Building Completion Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, David S.

    2006-01-01

    This report documents the deactivation, decontamination, decommissioning, and demolition of 16 buildings in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. The D4 of these facilities included characterization, engineering, removal of hazardous and radiologically contaminated materials, equipment removal, utility disconnection, deactivation, decontamination, demolition of the structure, and stabilization or removal of the remaining slab and foundation as appropriate.

  5. Guidelines for Remediation Strategies to Reduce the Radiological Consequences of Environmental Contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fesenko, S; Howard, B J [eds.

    2012-11-15

    There are many areas around the world contaminated with radioactive substances which may require remediation. The source of contamination with radionuclides varies; the most important sources include nuclear testing, radiation accidents and inadequate waste disposal practices. Contamination at such sites may present a risk to humans and the environment. Therefore, issues related to remediation of such sites are potentially of concern for both the general public and a wide variety of stakeholders. In response to the needs of its Member States, the IAEA has published many books covering different aspects of remediation of contaminated environments. These books range from safety fundamentals and safety requirements to technical publications describing remedial technologies. Almost all of the publications on environmental remediation are related to uranium mining areas and decommissioning of nuclear facilities. IAEA radiation safety standards on remediation of contaminated environments are largely based on these two types of remediation. The exception is a publication that was a joint undertaking by the IAEA and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) related to accidents entitled Guidelines for Agricultural Countermeasures Following an Accidental Release of Radionuclides, Technical Reports Series No. 363 (1994) (TRS 363). This publication has constituted a major source of information over many years for staff of authorities providing environmental remediation planning after accidents. TRS 363 focused mainly on agricultural management options following an accidental release of radionuclides; remedial actions for other environments and other practices were not considered. Since the publication of TRS 363, there has been a considerable increase in relevant information. Given the importance of Chernobyl and other accidents, there have been a considerable number of IAEA activities devoted to the remediation of radiation accidents since 1994. Many

  6. Guidelines for Remediation Strategies to Reduce the Radiological Consequences of Environmental Contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fesenko, S.; Howard, B.J.

    2012-01-01

    There are many areas around the world contaminated with radioactive substances which may require remediation. The source of contamination with radionuclides varies; the most important sources include nuclear testing, radiation accidents and inadequate waste disposal practices. Contamination at such sites may present a risk to humans and the environment. Therefore, issues related to remediation of such sites are potentially of concern for both the general public and a wide variety of stakeholders. In response to the needs of its Member States, the IAEA has published many books covering different aspects of remediation of contaminated environments. These books range from safety fundamentals and safety requirements to technical publications describing remedial technologies. Almost all of the publications on environmental remediation are related to uranium mining areas and decommissioning of nuclear facilities. IAEA radiation safety standards on remediation of contaminated environments are largely based on these two types of remediation. The exception is a publication that was a joint undertaking by the IAEA and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) related to accidents entitled Guidelines for Agricultural Countermeasures Following an Accidental Release of Radionuclides, Technical Reports Series No. 363 (1994) (TRS 363). This publication has constituted a major source of information over many years for staff of authorities providing environmental remediation planning after accidents. TRS 363 focused mainly on agricultural management options following an accidental release of radionuclides; remedial actions for other environments and other practices were not considered. Since the publication of TRS 363, there has been a considerable increase in relevant information. Given the importance of Chernobyl and other accidents, there have been a considerable number of IAEA activities devoted to the remediation of radiation accidents since 1994. Many

  7. Quantification of mold contamination in multi-level buildings using the Environmental Relative Moldiness Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the possible use of the Environmental Relative Moldiness Index (ERMI) to quantify mold contamination in multi-level, office buildings. Settled-dust samples were collected in multi-level, office buildings and the ERMI value for each sample de...

  8. Final report of the decontamination and decommissioning of Building 39 at the Grand Junction Projects Office Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widdop, M.R.

    1996-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore and mill tailings during uranium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District and during pilot milling experiments conducted for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission's domestic uranium procurement program. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJPO Remedial Action Project to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and the underlying aquifer. The site contractor for the facility, Rust Geotech, is also the remedial action contractor. The soil beneath Building 39 was radiologically contaminated and the building was demolished in 1992. The soil area within the footprint of the building has been remediated in accordance with the identified standards and the area can be released for unlimited exposure and unrestricted use. This document was prepared in response to a DOE request for an individual final report for each contaminated GJPO building

  9. Alternative agriculture as a substitute for environmental remediation. Production of poultry in radiologically contaminated areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, E.L.; Brisbin, I.L.; Kennamer, R.A. Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Exploiting the physiological and ecological characteristics of domesticated species has seldom been considered as a means of returning radiologically contaminated areas to safe agricultural production. However, the proper choice of cultivated and domesticated species, together with appropriate husbandry practices, may allow safe production of foods, fibre and energy. As an example, factors that could permit safe production of food products for human consumption from poultry raised in contaminated areas are considered. These factors include radionuclide transfer from the environment into poultry and methods for reducing radionuclide uptake and/or decontaminating chickens to yield acceptable food products. Studies of growth and feed intake rates of chickens under intensive management and free-ranging husbandries, 137 Cs uptake by chickens exposed to contaminated sediments, potential effects of husbandry on 137 Cs concentrations and 137 Cs elimination by chickens after removal of contaminated feed are described. Data from these and other studies are combined in simulation models of the 13 '7Cs kinetics of chickens. Chicken product 137 Cs concentrations ([ 137 Cs]s) decrease with increases in body mass, apparently as a result of decreasing mass specific intake rates. Husbandries that increase contaminant intake (e.g. free-ranging rearing conditions versus brooder house production) or access to contaminated soils (e.g. scattering feed directly onto contaminated solid versus the use of feeders) increase total body [ 137 Cs]s. However, model simulations indicate that it is possible to produce safe poultry products (especially eggs) at all but unrealistically high feed contamination levels. Even when dietary 137 Cs levels produce [ 137 Cs]s in poultry products that exceed acceptable limits, the high metabolism of poultry leads to a rapid decrease in [ 137 Cs]s once the chickens are placed on uncontaminated rations. This permits the use of contaminated feed or forage for

  10. Radiological scenario modeling using the Hotspot code and potential financial impact of treatment of radiation induced cancer to the public

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Gabriel Fidalgo Queiroz da; Andrade, Edson Ramos de; Rebello, Wilson Freitas; Araujo, Olga Maria Oliveira de

    2015-01-01

    The work aims to develop a methodology that is able to estimate the financial impact in a radiological emergency events, considering the radiation induced cancer, particularly leukemia. Considering a RDD - Radiological Dispersive Device, consisting of explosives and cesium-137 as radioactive material, a scenario building on the Rio de Janeiro was modeled. The convergence of a risk modeling platform (HotSpot 3.0), the analysis of excess relative risks for humans (BEIR V-Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation V), considering scenarios composed of contaminated areas, are secondary goals

  11. A model for radiological dose assessment in an urban environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Won Tae; Kim, Eun Han; Jeong, Hyo Joon; Suh, Kyung Suk; Han, Moon Hee

    2007-01-01

    A model for radiological dose assessment in an urban environment, METRO-K has been developed. Characteristics of the model are as follows ; 1) mathematical structures are simple (i.e. simplified input parameters) and easy to understand due to get the results by analytical methods using experimental and empirical data, 2) complex urban environment can easily be made up using only 5 types of basic surfaces, 3) various remediation measures can be applied to different surfaces by evaluating the exposure doses contributing from each contamination surface. Exposure doses contributing from each contamination surface at a particular location of a receptor were evaluated using the data library of kerma values as a function of gamma energy and contamination surface. A kerma data library was prepared for 7 representative types of Korean urban building by extending those data given for 4 representative types of European urban buildings. Initial input data are daily radionuclide concentration in air and precipitation, and fraction of chemical type. Final outputs are absorbed dose rate in air contributing from the basic surfaces as a function of time following a radionuclide deposition, and exposure dose rate contributing from various surfaces constituting the urban environment at a particular location of a receptor. As the result of a contaminative scenario for an apartment built-up area, exposure dose rates show a distinct difference for surrounding environment as well as locations of a receptor

  12. The management of post nuclear or radiological emergency situations in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godet, Jean-Luc; Mehl-Auget, Isabelle; Johanna Fite

    2008-01-01

    For several years, public authorities have defined an organisation for the management of emergency situations arising from an accident occurring at a nuclear installation. So far, the management of the risk arising from the post accident step was, in itself, not explored with the same care. Whatsoever, no formal policy on which the action of public authority could be based is today available. The French Nuclear Safety Authority (ASN), in relation with the other concerned departments, is now in charge to prepare and implement the necessary provisions to respond to a post accident situation. In June 2005, ASN established the steering committee for the management of post nuclear or radiological emergency situations (CODIRPA). The definition of a national policy related to the management of the radiological risk during a post event situation has to integrate various organisation aspects such as: lifting of protection emergency provisions and rehabilitation of buildings, life in contaminated rural territories, agriculture and water, dose and radiological consequences, sanitary surveillance of victims and populations, indemnification, waste management of contaminated crops and soils, organisation of public Authorities. During the 2nd step of CODIRPA work (2008-2009), the first elements of policy will be consolidated and new scenarios will be studied (one worsened scenario and one scenario with alpha emitting radionuclide). In parallel, a procedure for local actor's consultation has just been launched. (author)

  13. Radiological monitoring of food in Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jerez V, S.F.

    1996-01-01

    The appearing of the problem for protecting the environment from radioactive contamination is not an accidental matter. The introduction into the earth crust of radioactive material coming from nuclear weapons, accidents, wastes, etc, has caused, as a consequence, the contamination of the biosphere. The extensive trade of food in our country has made necessary the establishment of radiological monitoring in food, which was organized by the Department of Public Health. The structure, functions, characteristics and aspects related to radiological monitoring of food in Cuba are shown in the present paper. The organization and resources for performing the monitoring program, both for normal conditions and for nuclear and/or radiological emergency cases, are detailed. (author). 12 refs., 2 figs

  14. Natural radionuclide and radiological assessment of building materials in high background radiation areas of Ramsar, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavarnegin, Elham; Moghaddam, Masoud Vahabi; Fathabadi, Nasrin

    2013-04-01

    Building materials, collected from different sites in Ramsar, a northern coastal city in Iran, were analyzed for their natural radionuclide contents. The measurements were carried out using a high resolution high purity Germanium (HPGe) gamma-ray spectrometer system. The activity concentration of (226)Ra, (232)Th, and (40)K content varied from below the minimum detection limit up to 86,400 Bqkg(-1), 187 Bqkg(-1), and 1350 Bqkg(-1), respectively. The radiological hazards incurred from the use of these building materials were estimated through various radiation hazard indices. The result of this survey shows that values obtained for some samples are more than the internationally accepted maximum limits and as such, the use of them as a building material pose significant radiation hazard to individuals.

  15. An integrated system for conducting radiological surveys of contaminated sites - 16312

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCown, Jay P.; Rogers, Donna M.; Waggoner, Charles A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes an integrated detection system that has been developed to conduct radiological surveys of sites suspected of contamination of materials such as depleted uranium. This system utilizes cerium activated lanthanum bromide and thallium activated sodium iodide gamma detectors and can be easily adapted to include units for detecting neutrons. The detection system includes software controlling the collection of radiological spectra and GPS data. Two different platforms are described for conducting surveys, a modified zero turn radius (ZTR) mower and a three-wheeled cart that is manually pushed. The detection system software controlling data collection has components that facilitate completing a grid-less survey on user specified spacings. Another package confirms that all data quality activities (calibrations, etc.) are conducted prior to beginning the survey and also reviews data to identify areas that have been missed for which data quality falls below user designated parameters. Advanced digital signal processing algorithms are used to enhance the interpretation of spectra for conducting background subtractions and for mapping. Data from radiation detection instruments and GPS antennae are merged and made compatible with mapping using Geosoft Oasis montaj software. A summary of system performance during field-testing is included in the paper. This includes survey rate, detection limits, duty cycle, supporting ancillary equipment/material, and manpower requirements. The rate of false positives and false negatives is discussed with the benefits of surveys conducted using synergetic detection systems such as electromagnetic induction imaging. (authors)

  16. 300 Area D4 Project 3rd Quarter Fiscal Year 2006 Building Completion Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.S.

    2006-01-01

    This report documents the deactivation, decontamination, decommissioning, and demolition of five buildings in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. The D4 of these facilities included characterization, engineering, removal of hazardous and radiologically contaminated materials, equipment removal, utility disconnection, deactivation, decontamination, demolition of the structure, and stabilization or removal of the remaining slab and foundation as appropriate.

  17. Indexing contamination surveys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.L.

    1998-01-01

    The responsibility for safely managing the Tank Farms at Hanford belongs to Lockheed Martin Hanford Corporation which is part of the six company Project Hanford Management Team led by Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc.. These Tank Farm Facilities contain numerous outdoor contamination areas which are surveyed at a periodicity consistent with the potential radiological conditions, occupancy, and risk of changes in radiological conditions. This document describes the survey documentation and data tracking method devised to track the results of contamination surveys this process is referred to as indexing. The indexing process takes a representative data set as an indicator for the contamination status of the facility. The data are further manipulated into a single value that can be tracked and trended using standard statistical methodology. To report meaningful data, the routine contamination surveys must be performed in a manner that allows the survey method and the data collection process to be recreated. Three key criteria are necessary to accomplish this goal: Accurate maps, consistent documentation, and consistent consolidation of data meeting these criteria provides data of sufficient quality to be tracked. Tracking of survey data is accomplished by converting the individual survey results into a weighted value, corrected for the actual number of survey points. This information can be compared over time using standard statistical analysis to identify trends. At the Tank Farms, the need to track and trend the facility's radiological status presents unique challenges. Many of these Tank Farm facilities date back to the second world war. The Tank Farm Facilities are exposed to weather extremes, plant and animal intrusion, as well as all of the normal challenges associated with handling radiological waste streams. Routine radiological surveys did not provide a radiological status adequate for continuing comparisons

  18. Air contamination analysis during emergency medical treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Y.; Fukutsu, K.; Yuuki, M.; Akashi, M.

    2009-01-01

    After radiological emergencies, patients contaminated with radioactivity are taken to radiation emergency hospitals for treatment. Numerical simulations using the computer software 'Flow Designer R were made in order to evaluate indoor air contamination caused by the breathing out of contaminated air. The National Inst. of Radiological Sciences facility was used for the numerical evaluation. Results indicate that the dispersion of contaminated air depends on the characteristics of the contaminants, and that the dispersion range was limited and localised. Only medical staff standing in a special position near the patient was exposed to almost un-diluted contaminated air. Highly contaminated air was evacuated with a local exhaust pump system. Room air quality was monitored using a continuous air sampling system, but it was found that the sampling point was not representative for the purpose of radiation protection. From the air-flow analysis, some problems that affect radiological safety were revealed and valuable information and measures for preventing secondary contamination were determined. (authors)

  19. Electrical power line and pole removal radiological survey completion report: Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-02-01

    Each electric power pole and all wire, cross members, and attached hardware were radiologically surveyed and removed. The survey procedures did not conform in every respect with the planned procedures because the actual work differed from the removal plan. The survey showed that all contamination was fixed. Certain poles that were suspected of being contaminated with Th-230 were cut off one foot above ground level and left on site. Each truck load of materials was checked at the access point to ensure it met release criteria. Wood samples were taken from all the poles at Building 403 and 5% of all the rest and analyzed for U-238 and Th-232. Only U-238 was detected. 1903 bundles of wire (95,150 lin ft) were released, and 76 bundles (1520 lin ft) were found to be contaminated. 7163 lin ft of power pole material were released, and 1484 lin ft were contaminated. A comprehensive quality measure assurance/quality control program was applied to this work

  20. Radiological assessment report for the University of Rochester Annex, 400 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, New York, April-May 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wynveen, R.A.; Smith, W.H.; Sholeen, C.M.; Flynn, K.F.

    1984-12-01

    In light of the results of the comprehensive radiological assessment of the annex and auxiliary facilities, the following conclusions can be made: There is no immediate hazard from the elevated levels of radioactivity detected; however, some of these levels are above criteria. The radon, thoron, actinon, long-lived particulates, and tritium in the air are all below criteria for unrestricted use. Some ductwork has been identified as being contaminated. All ductwork must, therefore, be considered potentially contaminated. Since several floor drains were found to exhibit elevated readings, and the samples had elevated concentrations of radionuclides, it must be concluded that the drain and sewer systems of the Annex are contaminated with radioactive material. Since the samples collected from the storm and sewer systems outside the building also had elevated concentrations of radionuclides, these systems are also considered contaminated with radioactive material. The grounds around the Annex have exhibited background concentrations of radionuclides. Two rooms, B-330 and B-332, were inaccessible for survey due to the presence of stored furniture and equipment. Therefore, no comment about their radiological status can be made. At the common baseboard for Room C-12 and C-16 and on the floor below the tile in Room C-40, contamination appeared to be masked by construction modifications. Other areas of the Annex must also be considered potentially contaminated where modifications may have masked the contamination

  1. The release of lindane from contaminated building materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volchek, Konstantin; Thouin, Geneviève; Kuang, Wenxing; Li, Ken; Tezel, F Handan; Brown, Carl E

    2014-10-01

    The release of the organochlorine pesticide lindane (γ-hexachlorocyclohexane) from several types of contaminated building materials was studied to assess inhalation hazard and decontamination requirements in response to accidental and/or intentional spills. The materials included glass, polypropylene carpet, latex-painted drywall, ceramic tiles, vinyl floor tiles, and gypsum ceiling tiles. For each surface concentration, an equilibrium concentration was determined in the vapour phase of the surrounding air. Vapor concentrations depended upon initial surface concentration, temperature, and type of building material. A time-weighted average (TWA) concentration in the air was used to quantify the health risk associated with the inhalation of lindane vapors. Transformation products of lindane, namely α-hexachlorocyclohexane and pentachlorocyclohexene, were detected in the vapour phase at both temperatures and for all of the test materials. Their formation was greater on glass and ceramic tiles, compared to other building materials. An empiric Sips isotherm model was employed to approximate experimental results and to estimate the release of lindane and its transformation products. This helped determine the extent of decontamination required to reduce the surface concentrations of lindane to the levels corresponding to vapor concentrations below TWA.

  2. Worker radiological protection: occupational medical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardenas Herrera, Juan; Fernandez Gomez, Isis Maria

    2008-01-01

    Radiation exposures experienced by workers are widely explained. The first evidences of biological effects, the implications for human health and the radiological protection have been covered. The conceptual structure that covers the radiological protection and adequate protection without limiting benefits, the scientific basis of radiology, the benefits and risks of the radiological protection are specified. The effective per capita doses are exposed in medical uses both for Latin America and for other regions in the average radiology, dental radiology, nuclear medicine and radiotherapy. The manners of occupational exposures in the medicine are presented. Industrial uses have also its average effective dose in the industrial irradiation, industrial radiography and radioisotopes production. Within the natural radiation the natural sources can significantly contribute to occupational exposure and have their average effective dose. Occupational medical surveillance to be taken into industrial sites is detailed. In addition, the plan of international action for the solution of dilemmas of occupational exposures is mentioned and the different dilemmas of radioactive exposure are showed. The external irradiation, the acute diseases by radiations, the cutaneous syndrome of the chronic radiation, the radioactive contamination, the internal radioactive contamination, the combined lesion and accidental exposures are also treated [es

  3. Dacfood: a knowledge-based system for decision support in case of radiological contamination of foodstuffs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz, A.; Despres, A.; Soulatges, D.

    1991-01-01

    In case of radiological contamination of foodstuffs, the introduction of a countermeasure has to be justified by balancing its advantages and drawbacks, as recommended by ICRP. Also, to provide authorities with information about the decision context, it has been decided to develop a Decision Support System (DSS). A knowledge-based approach is used for the DSS. Indeed, it allows: . better modelling thanks to, for instance, object oriented programming and rules, . ability to introduce more knowledge thanks to an easier consistency and validity control of the knowledge base, . handling of uncertainties (incomplete, uncertain or evolving knowledge). The present state of the system is presented. DACFOOD is a decision aiding system for contamined foodstuffs, based on a knowledge-based approach. A demonstration model has been developed in a post-Chernobyl CEC research program. It evaluates the sanitary situation, the alternative actions through costs and sanitary effects, and gives information on the decisional background

  4. Surface radiological investigations at environmental research area 11, 137Cs- and 60Co-contaminated plots at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uziel, M.S.; Tiner, P.F.; Williams, J.K.

    1993-02-01

    A surface radiological investigation at the 137 Cs- and 6O Co-contaminated forest area (Chestnut Ridge east and west plots) was conducted from January 1992 through August 1992. Results of the survey revealed numerous spots and small areas of surface contamination that followed the original placement of feeders used for 6O Co- and 137 Cs-labeled seeds in a 1969--1970 study. Surface gamma exposure rates reached 380 μR/h at the east plot and 400 μR/h at the west plot, but approximately one-half and one- third, respectively, of the identified anomalies did not exceed 39 μR/h. Results of soil sample analyses demonstrated that 137 Cs and 6O Co were responsible for the elevated radiation levels. Radionuclides were found below the surface at soil sample locations, in some cases at depths below 18 in. The same pattern of subsurface contamination may be present at other elevated surface spots at both plots. These survey results show that current radiological conditions at the site remain an environmental problem. Recommendations for corrective actions are included

  5. Consequences of radiological emergencies at Goiania and Mayapuri

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Ranjit; Pradeepkumar, K.S.; Singh, Rajvir

    2012-01-01

    Radiological accidents due to orphan sources can lead to emergencies in the public domain, as reported worldwide. Inadequate regulatory control, lack of accountability and improper disposal of radioactive materials in scrap have resulted in radiological emergencies. Apart from few fatalities, they lead to environmental contamination, economic loss and social and psychological impact on the society. The 137 Cs and 60 Co sources of strength TBq to PBq activity level may pose high radiation exposure risk if shielding integrity is affected in any accident. There had been few radiological accidents reported world over which resulted in radiation injuries, environmental contamination and out of proportion panic in the society. The response actions for both these radiological emergencies included search, recovery of sources, decontamination and waste removal for reducing the radiation/contamination levels at the affected site. In both cases, encapsulated sources were damaged by the persons unknowingly. Response operations were carried out for longer period at Goiania compared to Mayapuri because of large scale contamination. 60 Co source being metallic in nature, even after the breaking of sources at Mayapuri the spread of contamination was confined to a small area. In Goiania, the granules of Cesium Chloride were distributed to many people because of its glowing nature in dark which caused spread of contamination to a large area and the accident was detected early as more persons reported with radiation injuries. The detection of Mayapuri accident was delayed as affected personnel reported to the hospital after three weeks of exposure to radiation. The lack of expertise in identifying radiation injuries by medical professionals contributed to further delay in reporting and detection of this emergency. The fatalities in both accidents resulted from acute radiation exposures and delay in getting medical support. The experience gained at radiological emergencies of Goiania

  6. Off-site contamination at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setaro, J.A.

    1993-01-01

    An upgrade of the radioactive liquid waste system at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) had been under way for the past several years. One of the upgrades involves the construction of a Monitoring and Control Station (MCS) which will receive waste from an analytical chemistry building prior to the waste being discharged to the main waste processing area. The MCS was located in a radiologically clean area adjacent to the analytical chemistry facility and no monitoring of personnel was necessary. On December 29, 1992, workers became contaminated and left the site prior to the discovery of the contamination. The construction workers were not employees of the Facility Management Contractor, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, but were subcontractor employees answering to the Construction Manager, a different prime contractor

  7. New nuclear build and evolving radiological protection challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazo, T.

    2010-01-01

    Many trends and indicators suggest that the use of nuclear power for generating electricity will increase, perhaps significantly, in the coming 10 to 20 years and beyond. Any such expansion will not take place in a static scientific or social context, but rather in the midst of ongoing changes in many relevant fields, radiological protection, radioactive waste management and nuclear safety to name a few. Regarding radiological protection, this evolution can be characterised in many different ways, but can conveniently be described as having scientific and socially driven aspects. These may well pose challenges to radiological protection (RP) policy, regulation and application in the future

  8. Soil Radiological Characterisation Methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attiogbe, Julien; Aubonnet, Emilie; De Maquille, Laurence; De Moura, Patrick; Desnoyers, Yvon; Dubot, Didier; Feret, Bruno; Fichet, Pascal; Granier, Guy; Iooss, Bertrand; Nokhamzon, Jean-Guy; Ollivier Dehaye, Catherine; Pillette-Cousin, Lucien; Savary, Alain

    2014-12-01

    This report presents the general methodology and best practice approaches which combine proven existing techniques for sampling and characterisation to assess the contamination of soils prior to remediation. It is based on feedback of projects conducted by main French nuclear stakeholders involved in the field of remediation and dismantling (EDF, CEA, AREVA and IRSN). The application of this methodology will enable the project managers to obtain the elements necessary for the drawing up of files associated with remediation operations, as required by the regulatory authorities. It is applicable to each of the steps necessary for the piloting of remediation work-sites, depending on the objectives targeted (release into the public domain, re-use, etc.). The main part describes the applied statistical methodology with the exploratory analysis and variogram data, identification of singular points and their location. The results obtained permit assessment of a mapping to identify the contaminated surface and subsurface areas. It stakes the way for radiological site characterisation since the initial investigations from historical and functional analysis to check that the remediation objectives have been met. It follows an example application from the feedback of the remediation of a contaminated site on the Fontenay aux Roses facility. It is supplemented by a glossary of main terms used in the field from different publications or international standards. This technical report is a support of the ISO Standard ISO ISO/TC 85/SC 5 N 18557 'Sampling and characterisation principles for soils, buildings and infrastructures contaminated by radionuclides for remediation purposes'. (authors) [fr

  9. 300 Area D4 Project 4th Quarter Fiscal Year 2006 Building Completion Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D. S. Smith

    2007-01-01

    This report documents the deactivation, decontamination, decommissioning, and demolition (D4) of nine buildings in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. The D4 of these facilities included characterization, engineering, removal of hazardous and radiologically contaminated materials, equipment removal, utility disconnection, deactivation, decontamination, demolition of the structure, and stabilization or removal of the remaining slab and foundation, as appropriate

  10. Radiological assessment of past, present and potential sources to environmental contamination in the Southern Urals and strategies for remedial measures (SUCON)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarkrog, A.; Simmonds, J.; Strand, P.

    2001-01-01

    This report summarises work done on the SUCON Project during 1996-1999 (European Commission Contract No. FI4C-CT95-0001). The project has focused on three major objectives: 1) An assessment of the radiological consequences of the contamination of theSouth Urals and the Ob river system from...

  11. Final report of the decontamination and decommissioning of Building 1 at the Grand Junction Projects Office Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widdop, M.R.

    1996-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore and mill tailings during uranium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District and during pilot milling experiments conducted for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission's domestic uranium procurement program. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJPO Remedial Action Project to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and the underlying aquifer. The site contractor for the facility, Rust Geotech, also is the remedial action contractor. Building 1 was found to be radiologically contaminated and was demolished in 1996. The soil beneath and adjacent to the building was remediated in accordance with identified standards and can be released for unlimited exposure and unrestricted use. This document was prepared in response to a DOE request for an individual final report for each contaminated GJPO building

  12. Final report of the decontamination and decommissioning of Building 6 at the Grand Junction Projects Office Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widdop, M.R.

    1996-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore and mill tailings during uranium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District and during pilot milling experiments conducted for the domestic uranium procurement program funded by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJPO Remedial Action Project to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and the underlying aquifer. The site contractor for the facility, Rust Geotech, is also the remedial action contractor. Radiological contamination was identified in Building 6, and the building was demolished in 1992. The soil area within the footprint of the building has been remediated in accordance with the identified standards and the area can be released for unlimited exposure and unrestricted use. This document was prepared in response to a DOE request for an individual final report for each contaminated GJPO building

  13. Methodology for performing surveys for fixed contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durham, J.S.; Gardner, D.L.

    1994-10-01

    This report describes a methodology for performing instrument surveys for fixed contamination that can be used to support the release of material from radiological areas, including release to controlled areas and release from radiological control. The methodology, which is based on a fast scan survey and a series of statistical, fixed measurements, meets the requirements of the U.S. Department of Energy Radiological Control Manual (RadCon Manual) (DOE 1994) and DOE Order 5400.5 (DOE 1990) for surveys for fixed contamination and requires less time than a conventional scan survey. The confidence interval associated with the new methodology conforms to the draft national standard for surveys. The methodology that is presented applies only to surveys for fixed contamination. Surveys for removable contamination are not discussed, and the new methodology does not affect surveys for removable contamination

  14. A radiological and chemical investigation of the 7500 Area Contamination Site at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, J.K.; Foley, R.D.; Tiner, P.F.; Hatmaker, T.L.; Uziel, M.S.; Swaja, R.E.

    1993-05-01

    A radiological and chemical investigation of the 7500 Area Contamination Site at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was conducted intermittently from February 1992 through May 1992. The investigation was performed by the Measurement Applications and Development Group of the Health and Safety Research Division of ORNL at the request of the US Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Operations Office and the ORNL Environmental Restoration Program. Results of this investigation indicate that the source of radioactive contamination at the point of the contamination incident is from one of the underground abandoned lines. The contamination in soil is likely the result of residual contamination from years of waste transport and maintenance operations (e.g., replacement of degraded joints, upgrading or replacement of entire pipelines, and associated landscaping activities). However, because (1) there is currently an active LLW line positioned in the same subsurface trench with the abandoned lines and (2) the physical condition of the abandoned lines may be brittle, this inquiry could not determine which abandoned line was responsible for the subsurface contamination. Soil sampling at the location of the contamination incident and along the pipeline route was performed in a manner so as not to damage the active LLW line and abandoned lines. Recommendations for corrective actions are included

  15. Basic radiological studies contamination control experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duce, S.W.; Winberg, M.R.; Freeman, A.L.

    1989-09-01

    This report describes the results of experiments relating to contamination control performed in support of the Environmental Restoration Programs Retrieval Project. During the years 1950 to 1970 waste contaminated with plutonium and other transuranic radionuclides was disposed of in shallow land-filled pits and trenches at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Due to potential for migration of radionuclides to an existing aquifer the feasibility of retrieving and repackaging the waste for placement in a final repository is being examined as part of a retrieval project. Contamination control experiments were conducted to determine expected respirable and nonrespirable plutonium contaminated dust fractions and the effectiveness of various dust suppression techniques. Three soil types were tested to determine respirable fractions: Rocky Flats Plant generic soil, Radioactive Waste Management Complex generic soil, and a 1:1 blend of the two soil types. Overall, the average respirable fraction of airborne dust was 5.4% by weight. Three contamination control techniques were studied: soil fixative sprays, misting agents, and dust suppression agents. All of the tested agents proved to be effective in reducing dust in the air. Details of product performance and recommended usage are discussed

  16. Resource book: Decommissioning of contaminated facilities at Hanford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    In 1942 Hanford was commissioned as a site for the production of weapons-grade plutonium. The years since have seen the construction and operation of several generations of plutonium-producing reactors, plants for the chemical processing of irradiated fuel elements, plutonium and uranium processing and fabrication plants, and other facilities. There has also been a diversification of the Hanford site with the building of new laboratories, a fission product encapsulation plant, improved high-level waste management facilities, the Fast Flux test facility, commercial power reactors and commercial solid waste disposal facilities. Obsolescence and changing requirements will result in the deactivation or retirement of buildings, waste storage tanks, waste burial grounds and liquid waste disposal sites which have become contaminated with varying levels of radionuclides. This manual was established as a written repository of information pertinent to decommissioning planning and operations at Hanford. The Resource Book contains, in several volumes, descriptive information of the Hanford Site and general discussions of several classes of contaminated facilities found at Hanford. Supplementing these discussions are appendices containing data sheets on individual contaminated facilities and sites at Hanford. Twelve appendices are provided, corresponding to the twelve classes into which the contaminated facilities at Hanford have been organized. Within each appendix are individual data sheets containing administrative, geographical, physical, radiological, functional and decommissioning information on each facility within the class. 68 refs., 54 figs., 18 tabs

  17. Resource book: Decommissioning of contaminated facilities at Hanford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    In 1942 Hanford was commissioned as a site for the production of weapons-grade plutonium. The years since have seen the construction and operation of several generations of plutonium-producing reactors, plants for the chemical processing of irradiated fuel elements, plutonium and uranium processing and fabrication plants, and other facilities. There has also been a diversification of the Hanford site with the building of new laboratories, a fission product encapsulation plant, improved high-level waste management facilities, the Fast Flux test facility, commercial power reactors and commercial solid waste disposal facilities. Obsolescence and changing requirements will result in the deactivation or retirement of buildings, waste storage tanks, waste burial grounds and liquid waste disposal sites which have become contaminated with varying levels of radionuclides. This manual was established as a written repository of information pertinent to decommissioning planning and operations at Hanford. The Resource Book contains, in several volumes, descriptive information of the Hanford Site and general discussions of several classes of contaminated facilities found at Hanford. Supplementing these discussions are appendices containing data sheets on individual contaminated facilities and sites at Hanford. Twelve appendices are provided, corresponding to the twelve classes into which the contaminated facilities at Hanford have been organized. Within each appendix are individual data sheets containing administrative, geographical, physical, radiological, functional and decommissioning information on each facility within the class. 49 refs., 44 figs., 14 tabs

  18. Decontamination and decommissioning of the Argonne National Laboratory East Area radioactively contaminated surplus facilities: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kline, W.H.; Fassnacht, G.F.; Moe, H.J.

    1987-07-01

    ANL has decontaminated and decommissioned (D and D) seven radiologically contaminated surplus facilities at its Illinois site: a ''Hot'' Machine Shop (Building 17) and support facilities; Fan House No. 1 (Building 37), Fan House No. 2 (Building 38), the Pangborn Dust Collector (Building 41), and the Industrial Waste Treatment Plant (Building 34) for exhaust air from machining of radioactive materials. Also included were a Nuclear Materials Storage Vault (Building 16F) and a Nuclear Research Laboratory (Building 22). The D and D work involved dismantling of all process equipment and associated plumbing, ductwork, drain lines, etc. After radiation surveys, floor and wall coverings, suspended ceilings, room partitions, pipe, conduit and electrical gear were taken down as necessary. In addition, underground sewers were excavated. The grounds around each facility were also thoroughly surveyed. Contaminated materials and soil were packaged and shipped to a low-level waste burial site, while nonactive debris was buried in the ANL landfill. Clean, reusable items were saved, and clean metal scrap was sold for salvage. After the decommissioning work, each building was torn down and the site relandscaped. The project was completed in 1985, ahead of schedule, with substantial savings

  19. Wind-induced contaminant transport in near-surface soils with application to radon entry into buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, William Jowett [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1996-05-01

    Indoor air exposures to gaseous contaminants originating in soil can cause large human health risks. To predict and control these exposures, the mechanisms that affect vapor transport in near-surface soils need to be understood. In particular, radon exposure is a concern since average indoor radon concentrations lead to much higher risks than are generally accepted for exposure to other environmental contaminants. This dissertation examines an important component of the indoor radon problem: the impacts of wind on soil-gas and radon transport and entry into buildings. The research includes experimental and modeling studies of wind`s interactions with a building`s superstructure and the resulting soil-gas and radon flows in the surrounding soil. In addition to exploring the effects of steady winds, a novel modeling technique is developed to examine the impacts of fluctuating winds on soil-gas and radon transport.

  20. Study of plutonium and americium contamination in agricultural area, radiological impact caused by consumption of vegetables of this area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinosa, Assuncion; Aragon, Antonio; Cruz, Berta de la; Gutierrez, Jose

    2001-01-01

    The transuranide concentration has been studied for 30 years in vegetable production, crops in wide extensions and in private-owned farms, all of them situated within the Pu-contaminated area of Palomares due to an air accident in 1966. Based on these studies, a preliminary estimation of the radiological risk caused by the consumption of these products by the inhabitants was possible. The results show that most of the fruits present a surface contamination, which disappears or is significantly reduced when they are washed. The contamination present in edible parts of the vegetables, as well as the contamination of other products included in the diet, has facilitated the estimation of the effective dose for ingestion and the committed effective dose for 50 years for the inhabitants. The main conclusions are: those plants, whose cultivation period is less than a year, present a low level of contamination; the green parts of the plants have a higher contamination than the fruits; the Pu soil to plant transfer factor is very low. In general, those plants that have remained in the contaminated land for several years present a high contamination level; the ingestion of products from Palomares does not represent an important risk for the population, even in the case that the products were totally consumed by a critical group.( author)

  1. Building for tomorrow today: opportunities and directions in radiology resident research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, John-Paul J; Kansagra, Akash P; Thaker, Ashesh; Colucci, Andrew; Sherry, Steven J; Subramaniam, Rathan M

    2015-01-01

    With rapid scientific and technological advancements in radiological research, there is renewed emphasis on promoting early research training to develop researchers who are capable of tackling the hypothesis-driven research that is typically funded in contemporary academic research enterprises. This review article aims to introduce radiology residents to the abundant radiology research opportunities available to them and to encourage early research engagement among trainees. To encourage early resident participation in radiology research, we review the various research opportunities available to trainees spanning basic, clinical, and translational science opportunities to ongoing research in information technology, informatics, and quality improvement research. There is an incredible breadth and depth of ongoing research at academic radiology departments across the country, and the material presented herein aspires to highlight both subject matter and opportunities available to radiology residents eager to engage in radiologic research. The opportunities for interested radiology residents are as numerous as they are broad, spanning the basic sciences to clinical research to informatics, with abundant opportunities to shape our future practice of radiology. Copyright © 2015 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Controlling Beryllium Contaminated Material And Equipment For The Building 9201-5 Legacy Material Disposition Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynolds, T.D.; Easterling, S.D.

    2010-01-01

    This position paper addresses the management of beryllium contamination on legacy waste. The goal of the beryllium management program is to protect human health and the environment by preventing the release of beryllium through controlling surface contamination. Studies have shown by controlling beryllium surface contamination, potential airborne contamination is reduced or eliminated. Although there are areas in Building 9201-5 that are contaminated with radioactive materials and mercury, only beryllium contamination is addressed in this management plan. The overall goal of this initiative is the compliant packaging and disposal of beryllium waste from the 9201-5 Legacy Material Removal (LMR) Project to ensure that beryllium surface contamination and any potential airborne release of beryllium is controlled to levels as low as practicable in accordance with 10 CFR 850.25.

  3. Radiological Characterization and Final Facility Status Report Tritium Research Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, T.B.; Gorman, T.P.

    1996-08-01

    This document contains the specific radiological characterization information on Building 968, the Tritium Research Laboratory (TRL) Complex and Facility. We performed the characterization as outlined in its Radiological Characterization Plan. The Radiological Characterization and Final Facility Status Report (RC ampersand FFSR) provides historic background information on each laboratory within the TRL complex as related to its original and present radiological condition. Along with the work outlined in the Radiological Characterization Plan (RCP), we performed a Radiological Soils Characterization, Radiological and Chemical Characterization of the Waste Water Hold-up System including all drains, and a Radiological Characterization of the Building 968 roof ventilation system. These characterizations will provide the basis for the Sandia National Laboratory, California (SNL/CA) Site Termination Survey .Plan, when appropriate

  4. Valorisation of phosphogypsum as building material: Radiological aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayibi, H.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, alternative uses of phosphogypsum (PG in the building industry are being considered in several countries; however, the natural radioactivity level in the PG could be a restriction for those uses. United States Environmental Protection Agency (US-EPA classified PG as Technologically Enhanced Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (TENORM. This drawback could be avoided controlling its percentage in the cement preparation and the radionuclides content in the other raw materials used in its production, and calculating the activity concentration index (I in the final by-products. The valorization of PG as a building material has been studied, from a radiological point of view, by developing a new stabilisation/solidification process. PG is incorporated within a polymeric sulphur matrix, obtaining a concrete-like material, which presents lower natural radioactive content than the initial PG. The 226Ra content of this material ranged between 26-27 Bq·kg-1 and it is quite similar to that of common Spanish building materials.

    Actualmente, en muchos países se está contemplando el uso alternativo del fosfoyeso (PG en la industria de la construcción, aunque su contenido en radionucleidos naturales puede presentar ciertas restricciones para dicha aplicación (material clasificado por la US-EPA como TENORM: “Technologically Enhanced Naturally Occurring Materials. No obstante, estos inconvenientes podrían paliarse controlando el porcentaje del PG y los niveles de radioactividad en las materias primas a incorporar al cemento y calculando el índice de concentración de actividad (I en los productos finales. La valorización del PG como material de construcción se ha estudiado en este trabajo desde el punto de vista radiológico, desarrollando un nuevo proceso de estabilización/solidificación, obteniéndose un material de características similares al cemento y que presenta menor contenido de radionucleidos naturales que el

  5. Decontamination and decommissioning of a luminous dial painting facility: radiological characterization, segregation and disposal of building materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ed, D.; Chu, L.; Chepulis, P.; Hamel, M.

    1986-01-01

    The State of Illinois, Department of Nuclear Safety, has decontaminated and decommissioned the defunct Luminous Processes, Inc. facility located in Ottawa, Illinois. The state's overall experience throughout the project is generally described, with particular emphasis given to the radiological characterization (Ra-226+progeny and H-3) and subsequent segregation and disposal of building materials as either radioactive or non-radioactive. Experiences involving direct application of health physics principles (criteria selection, sampling schemes, analytical techniques, data reduction, quality assurance) are discussed. Experiences involving other health physics regimens (personnel protection and dosimetry, environmental monitoring) as well as social sciences and economic considerations (public perception, media relations, political involvement, contractor interactions, fiscal management) are discussed only insofar as they affect the radiological characterization, segregation and disposal processes

  6. Radiological terrorism and Australia's response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, D.

    2003-01-01

    A terrorist attack in Australia involving dispersal of radioactive material is different from conventional terrorist attacks involving explosives. The trauma experienced by victims during an explosive incident includes cuts, broken limbs, burns and shock. When an explosive device involving radioactive materials is involved, there are a number of additional characteristics including the contamination of victims and the surrounding area and the potential requirement for ongoing monitoring and decontamination. Response actions may require additional complex emergency response measures including immediate protective actions to protect those potentially exposed to contamination, mass casualty care, and public and mental health. There are concerns that terrorist organizations are showing increasing interest in acquiring radiological material that could be used with explosive. A dirty bomb or technically known as a radiological dispersal device (RDD) is a device designed to spread radioactive contamination over a wide area and pose a health and safety threat to those within the contaminated area. The radioactive material could be in the form of a large chunk of material, fine powder, a liquid mist, or a gas. The material may also be spread in other ways, such as by simply emptying a container over the desired area. As RDD's do not require large amounts of explosives, there is unlikely to be a large numbers of casualties, however the areas contaminated by the radiological material may cause immediate and long term health risks to those exposed. An RDD is a weapon of Mass Disruption rather than destruction. While the likelihood of RDD's being employed by terrorist in Australia is still considered remote, Australia's emergency response organizations are developing plans to ensure a rapid and comprehensive response occurs should such an event occur in this country, The presentation will outline Australia's response arrangements at the local/state level and the type of federal

  7. Detecting Chloride Contamination of Objects and Buildings – Evaluating a New Testing Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynda Skipper

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Soluble salts play a key factor in damage to a variety of materials, including stone, ceramics and metals. Particularly, salt contamination can lead to weakening of porous materials through salt crystallisation events, and increases the rate of metal corrosion. Over time, this results in physical damage to affected objects and buildings. It is therefore important to be able to monitor the salt content of materials, in order to understand levels of salt contamination and the potential for damage to occur. This research discusses the further development of the testing method for surface chlorides originally proposed by Piechota and Drake Piechota (2016 in their article “A simple survey kit for chloride detection on cuneiform tablets and other collections”. It introduces new and revised steps into the original protocol in order to make the achieved results semi-quantifiable, as well as identifying the limits of detection of the test kit. A comparison to alternative testing methods showed that comparable results were achievable using this methodology. The revised methodology was tested for efficacy on a range of salt contaminated objects, as well as on samples from buildings.

  8. A Transparent Framework for guiding Radiological and Non-Radiological Contaminated Land Risk Assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Alex; Mathers, Dan

    2003-01-01

    A framework is presented that may be used as a transparent guidance to both radiological and non-radiological risk assessments. This framework has been developed by BNFL, with external consultation, to provide a systematic approach for identifying key system drivers and to guide associated research packages in light of data deficiencies and sources of model uncertainty. The process presented represents an advance on existing working practices yet combines regulator philosophy to produce a robust, comprehensive, cost-effective and transparent work package. It aims at lending added confidence to risk models thereby adding value to the decision process

  9. Determination of in-depth contamination in concrete using a non-destructive technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boden, S.; Cantrel, E.

    2007-01-01

    The decommissioning of the BR3 (Belgian Reactor 3) approaches its final phase, in which the building structures are being decontaminated and either denuclearized for possible reuse or demolished. Apart from the presence of naturally occurring radionuclides in building materials, other radionuclides might be present due to activation or contamination. The BR3 bioshield has been exposed to rather high neutron leakage fluxes during the reactor operation and is therefore activated. Building structure contamination usually results from leakages during reactor operation, releases due to maintenance works or even dismantling operations. In case of in-depth contamination in concrete it is important to know the exact in-depth profile before decontamination, in order to minimize the amount of radioactive waste that will be produced during the decontamination process and to optimize both the decontamination process and the final control measurements. Common non-destructive analyses used in decommissioning are usually based on the measurement of beta radiation, using e.g. hand-held plastic scintillators. This kind of measurement technique can not be used to determine in-depth contamination. Therefore, most of the decontamination specialists currently base themselves on the results of the radiological analysis of samples taken by core drilling. The use of such a destructive method implies a number of disadvantages: it is time consuming and therefore costly and the different sample preparation steps can conceivably lead to cross-contamination. Moreover, one only receives results of a limited number of points, while the in-depth contamination is usually very inhomogeneously distributed and the relationship between in-depth contamination and surface contamination and/or dose rate (hotspot detection) is generally rather poor.The objective therefore is to test the use of the ISOCS (In Situ Object Counting System) for the determination of contamination depth

  10. Radiological risk of building materials using homemade airtight radon chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norafatin Khalid; Amran Abdul Majid; Redzuwan Yahaya; Muhammad Samudi Yasir

    2013-01-01

    Full-text: Soil based building materials known to contain various amounts of natural radionuclide mainly 238 U and 232 Th series and 40 K. In general most individuals spend 80 % of their time indoors and the natural radioactivity in building materials is a main source of indoor radiation exposure. The internal exposure due to building materials in dwellings and workplaces is mainly caused by the activity concentrations of short lived 222 Radon and its progenies which arise from the decay of 226 Ra. In this study, the indoor radon concentration emanating from cement brick, red-clay brick, gravel aggregate and Portland cement samples were measured in a homemade airtight radon chamber using continuous radon monitor 1029 model of Sun Nuclear. Radon monitor were left in the chamber for 96 hours with an hour counting time interval. From the result, the indoor radon concentrations for cement brick, red-clay brick, gravel aggregate and Portland cement samples determined were 396 Bq m -3 , 192 Bq m -3 , 176 Bq m -3 and 28 Bq m -3 , respectively. The result indicates that the radon concentration in the studied building materials have more than 100 Bq m -3 for example higher than the WHO action level except for Portland cement sample. The calculated annual effective dose for cement brick, red-clay brick, gravel aggregate and Portland cement samples were determined to be 10 mSv y -1 , 4.85 mSv y -1 , 4.44 mSv y -1 and 0.72 mSv y -1 , respectively. This study showed that all the calculated effective doses generated from indoor radon to dwellers or workers were in the range of limit recommended ICRP action levels for example 3 - 10 mSv y -1 . As consequences, the radiological risk for the dwellers in terms of fatal lifetime cancer risk per million for cement brick, red-clay brick, gravel aggregate and Portland cement were calculated to be 550, 267, 244 and 40 persons respectively. (author)

  11. Radiological risk of building materials using homemade airtight radon chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalid, Norafatin; Majid, Amran Ab.; Yahaya, Redzuwan; Yasir, Muhammad Samudi

    2014-01-01

    Soil based building materials known to contain various amounts of natural radionuclide mainly 238 U and 232 Th series and 40 K. In general most individuals spend 80% of their time indoors and the natural radioactivity in building materials is a main source of indoor radiation exposure. The internal exposure due to building materials in dwellings and workplaces is mainly caused by the activity concentrations of short lived 222 Radon and its progenies which arise from the decay of 226 Ra. In this study, the indoor radon concentration emanating from cement brick, red-clay brick, gravel aggregate and Portland cement samples were measured in a homemade airtight radon chamber using continuous radon monitor 1029 model of Sun Nuclear. Radon monitor were left in the chamber for 96 hours with an hour counting time interval. From the result, the indoor radon concentrations for cement brick, red-clay brick, gravel aggregate and Portland cement samples determined were 396 Bq m −3 , 192 Bq m −3 , 176 Bq m −3 and 28 Bq m −3 , respectively. The result indicates that the radon concentration in the studied building materials have more than 100 Bq m −3 i.e. higher than the WHO action level except for Portland cement sample. The calculated annual effective dose for cement brick, red-clay brick, gravel aggregate and Portland cement samples were determined to be 10 mSv y −1 , 4.85 mSv y −1 , 4.44 mSv y −1 and 0.72 mSv y −1 , respectively. This study showed that all the calculated effective doses generated from indoor radon to dwellers or workers were in the range of limit recommended ICRP action levels i.e. 3 - 10 mSv y −1 . As consequences, the radiological risk for the dwellers in terms of fatal lifetime cancer risk per million for cement brick, red-clay brick, gravel aggregate and Portland cement were calculated to be 550, 267, 244 and 40 persons respectively

  12. Formerly utilized MED/AEC sites remedial action program. Radiological survey of the Middlesex Sampling Plant, Middlesex, New Jersey. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-11-01

    The results of a radiological survey of the former Middlesex Sampling Plant, Middlesex, New Jersey, are presented in this report. The surveyed property served as a uranium ore sampling plant during the 1940's and early 1950's. It was released for unrestricted use in 1968 following a radiological survey by the Atomic Energy Commission and is now a reserve training center for the U.S. Marine Sixth Motor Transport Battalion. The present survey was undertaken to determine whether the existing radiological status of the property is consistent with current health guidelines and radiation protection practices. The radiological survey included measurement of residual alpha and beta-gamma contamination levels, radon and radon daughter concentrations in buildings, external gamma radiation levels on the site and on adjacent property, and radium concentrations in soil on the site and on adjacent property. Surface contamination levels exceeded U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) guidelines and 222 Rn concentration levels exceeded the non-occupational maximum permissible concentration MPC/sub a/ of 3 pCi/liter in some structures. These results indicate the possible need for extensive radon and radon daughter measurements in structures both onsite and offsite over periods as suggested by the U.S. Surgeon General

  13. Feedback on the radiological management of a urban site contaminated with tritium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leprieur, F.; Pierrard, O. [Institut de radioportection et de surete nucleaire - IRSN (France)

    2014-07-01

    Introduction: In November 2010, the IRSN is reached on a rare case of environmental tritium contamination on a site located in an urban area near Paris (Saint-Maur-des-Fosses - dpt 94). This contamination resulted from the presence in an enterprise's premises of an experimental device containing molecular sieve from the Valduc nuclear site, wrongly considered as un-used. First actions: IRSN has quickly performed an initial characterization of tritium contamination in the premises of the company and its close environment. The first results showed the existence of a strong local contamination (tritium activity> 150 000 Bq/m{sup 3} in air) and a important labeling in samples collected in the close vicinity of the company premises (between 1000 and 10000 Bq/kg f.w. in plants, between 500 and 1500 Bq/L in water). These results led IRSN to conduct multiple investigations: - tritium measurements on samples of water, air and plants collected in the area close to the building to know the importance and extent of environmental marking and follow its evolution over time. In this aim, 450 measurements were made between 2010 and 2013; - measurements of tritium in the urine of residents living near the contaminated building: the results showed traces of tritium for some of them but the assessments conducted by the IRSN from these results led to extremely low dosimetry estimates without consequences for the health of these people; - dosimetric evaluations of tritium exposure of employees and visitors of the company contaminated. Informing the public and stakeholders In November 2010, IRSN has collaborated with the mayor to facilitate early interventions in urban areas and in particular to facilitate contacts for access to private property. In this perspective, the IRSN participated in public meetings to explain the cause of this accident and the results of tritium measurements to residents. IRSN also published regularly on its web site briefing notes reflecting the results

  14. Materiel management and radiology: building a teamwork relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, M D; Cirino, J C

    1991-01-01

    Mr. Burke and Mr. Cirino explain how a teamwork relationship between radiology and materiel management can serve both well--radiology can continually strive to provide high quality diagnostic data and superior patient care, while materiel management can provide a continuous flow of supplies and services, keep inventory investment low, and develop a competent supplier base. Effective communication is the necessary element that will allow each to achieve its respective goals.

  15. Data analysis for radiological characterisation: Geostatistical and statistical complementarity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desnoyers, Yvon; Dubot, Didier

    2012-01-01

    Radiological characterisation may cover a large range of evaluation objectives during a decommissioning and dismantling (D and D) project: removal of doubt, delineation of contaminated materials, monitoring of the decontamination work and final survey. At each stage, collecting relevant data to be able to draw the conclusions needed is quite a big challenge. In particular two radiological characterisation stages require an advanced sampling process and data analysis, namely the initial categorization and optimisation of the materials to be removed and the final survey to demonstrate compliance with clearance levels. On the one hand the latter is widely used and well developed in national guides and norms, using random sampling designs and statistical data analysis. On the other hand a more complex evaluation methodology has to be implemented for the initial radiological characterisation, both for sampling design and for data analysis. The geostatistical framework is an efficient way to satisfy the radiological characterisation requirements providing a sound decision-making approach for the decommissioning and dismantling of nuclear premises. The relevance of the geostatistical methodology relies on the presence of a spatial continuity for radiological contamination. Thus geo-statistics provides reliable methods for activity estimation, uncertainty quantification and risk analysis, leading to a sound classification of radiological waste (surfaces and volumes). This way, the radiological characterization of contaminated premises can be divided into three steps. First, the most exhaustive facility analysis provides historical and qualitative information. Then, a systematic (exhaustive or not) surface survey of the contamination is implemented on a regular grid. Finally, in order to assess activity levels and contamination depths, destructive samples are collected at several locations within the premises (based on the surface survey results) and analysed. Combined with

  16. New threats and new challenges for radiological decision support

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Kasper Grann; Astrup, Poul; Mikkelsen, Torben

    2011-01-01

    It is described how ongoing work will extend European standard decision support systems currently integrated in the nuclear power plant preparedness in many countries, to enable estimation of the radiological consequences of atmospheric dispersion of contaminants following a terror attack in a city....... Factors relating to the contaminant release processes, dispersion, deposition and post deposition migration are discussed, and non-radiological issues are highlighted in relation to decision making....

  17. Environmental Pollution in five floors (5th to 9th) Resulting from the use of Depleted Uranium Weaponry in the Al-Tahreer Tower Building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ameen, N.H; Al-ghirrawy, M.A; Kadhim, H.H

    2014-01-01

    The goals of this study include measuring the increase in radioactivity and removal the contamination regions to protect the population and the environment resulting from bombing the Al-Tahreer Tower Building (the Turkish restaurant previously) by the depleted uranium bullets through direct measurement and sampling of soil from five floors (Fifth,Sixth,Seventh,Eighth,and Ninth) of the building, which contains fourteen floors in addition to basement by using different types of portable monitoring equipment s.The results of radiological surveys by using the portable monitor (CAB) indicated the presence of contaminated soil reached to 55 c/sec, and small particles of depleted uranium shells has very high levels of contamination reached to 70 c /sec ,while the background level is (0.5 c/sec) ,and the higher exposure rates is 55 μR/hr when the portable monitor (Ludlum) put on the contaminated regions approximately on distance 0.5 cm), where the natural background level is 9 μR/hr in the floors of the building.The radiological analyses of the collected soil samples were done in the laboratory of the center of Radiological Researches in the Ministry of sciences and Technology by using gamma spectrometry (which contains High- purity Germanium Detector) with a efficiency of 40% and resolution 2 keV for Energy, 1.33Mev, collection, preparations and tests of soil samples were all done according to IAEA.The laboratory results indicated the presence of high concentrations of the isotopes Th-234 (1550.1) Bq/kg, and Pa-234 m (1394.8) in the soil samples taken from the floors while the concentrations of Th-234 and Pa-234 m in natural background levels are (nearly 40, nil) Bq/Kg respectively which is a clear indication of the presence of high concentrations an isotope of uranium - 238 as they are supposed to be in equilibrium radiation.

  18. 100 Area D4 Project Building Completion Report: December 2008 to December 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finucane, K.G.; Harrie, J.P.

    2010-01-01

    This report documents the final status of buildings after the completion of D4 activities at the 100 Area of the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site from December 1, 2008, to December 31, 2009. The following buildings are included in this report: 11-N Change Room; 13-N Storage Building; 107-N Basin Recirculation Facility; 108-N Chemical Unloading Facility; 183-ND Resin Disposal Pit; 183-F Clearwells; 188-D Ash Disposal Pit; 1524-N Hazardous Waste Storage Pad; 1525-N Laydown Storage Area; 1607-Ni Sewage Tank; 1607-N2 Sewage Tank; 1706-NA Sewage Lift Station; 1904-D Outfall Structure; MO-013 Mobile Office Trailer; MO-422 Mobile Office Trailer; and MO-999 Mobile Office Trailer. Demolition debris and soil associated with completion of these buildings were disposed at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF), located at the Hanford Site. Postdemolition direct hand instrument surveys and Global Positioning Environmental Radiological Survey (GPERS) surveys were performed on excavations after loadout of debris and prior to backfill. The 100 Area D4/Interim Safe Storage (ISS) project personnel worked a total of approximately 137,930 hours (manual and non-manual, not including subcontractors) from December 1, 2008, to December 31, 2009. During this time there were 10 Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) recordable injuries, two of which involved lost time. There also were 27 first aid cases during this time period. No clothing contamination and no skin contamination incidents occurred during demolition of the 100 Area buildings. Workers received 7,350.2 person-mrem of radiological exposure from December 1, 2008, to December 31, 2009 during their support of D4 activities associated with the buildings discussed in this report. All boundary air sample results were below procedural action levels for the duration of the work performed.

  19. Formerly utilized MED/AEC sites Remedial Action Program. Radiological survey of the former Watertown Arsenal property GSA site Watertown, Massachusetts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wynveen, R.A.; Smith, W.H.; Sholeen, C.M.; Justus, A.L.; Flynn, K.F.

    1983-10-01

    The complete radiological survey of all the buildings located on the GSA site revealed no contamination. However, significant contamination was found on the site grounds. A total of approximately 6 m 2 of surface area exhibited elevated radiation levels. The area of contamination is centered around Section I (the burn area) and spreads out from this point. The contamination includes the subsurface, descending to the water table at the 6-ft level in some places. The contamination is primarily reprocessed depleted uranium. The ambient radiation level in the vicinity of the contamination as measured with a pressurized ionization chamber is significantly above background levels (up to 18 μR/h). As expected, no significant levels of radon contamination were found in any of the air samples. These levels of contamination of exceed the criteria as defined in ANSI 13.12 and the NRC Guidelines. The ambient radiation levels (up to 18 μR/h) are not in excess of criteria as defined in Appendix 6

  20. Developments in radiological protection of the environment and a commentary on its implications for new build of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brownless, George; Lazo, Ted

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Development of radiological protection of non-human biota continues to be the focus of much interest and differing views amongst the radiological protection community. To nurture discussion of these developments, the Nuclear Energy Agency's Committee on Radiological Protection and Public Health is taking the lead in organising coverage of a spectrum of views on the topic at the International Conference on Radioecology and Radioactivity in the Environment (Bergen, 2008), with the aim of assisting the international community to construct a consensual, fit-for-purpose approach. To support discussion of these views, the session will also include scientific presentations and reports from implementers. This paper will report on these developments, based principally on the session at the Conference but also other activities in which NEA participates, to provide an up-to-date summary in this area including progress in developing understanding of how radiological protection of the environment will be implemented for the three exposure situations - planned, existing and emergency - set out in the new ICRP general recommendations. Furthermore, given the NEA's mandate across the civil nuclear energy field, the paper will give a commentary on how developments in radiological protection of the environment may interplay with new build of nuclear power plants. (author)

  1. A managed approach to achieve a safe, cost effective, and environmentally sound demolition of a plutonium-238 contaminated building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaeger, Ralph R.; Geichman, Jack R.; Keener, Douglas E.; Farmer, Billy M.

    1992-01-01

    DOE's Mound Plant has the problem of demolishing a former plutonium-238 processing facility, the Special Metallurgical (SM) Building. The building is located within 200 feet of a major public road and golf course. Previous removal efforts on appendages to the building used the technique of tenting small segments and used labor intensive segment-by-segment removal with expendable hand tools. This approach was very slow and costly, but offered good environmental control of radioactive contamination. It was realized that this method, when applied to the entire structure of the building, would not only be very costly, but would also be of high risk to worker safety and worker exposure to contamination. The new approach to overcome these problems is to dismantle the building structure using a rotating grapple to hold sections of the building structure while a portable rotating shear cuts the steel beams into appropriate lengths for loading directly into large waste containers. By the former method, the cut jagged steel would be size reduced with hand tools and loaded into waste containers manually. The additional handling has a high probability of producing minor, yet potentially contaminated, skin lacerations. The shear and grapple method eliminates this hazard. To apply this safer and more cost effective technology, Mound had to assure that the method would be environmentally sound and that neither onsite workers or the general public would be exposed to radioactivity. The Annex was decontaminated to as low as reasonably possible and the contaminated interior painted. However, there were numerous areas where contamination could be trapped. Mound conducted a formal sampling of these areas and had the results modeled for potential release during demolition. The results of this sampling and modeling effort showed that the building could be dismantled using this technology without producing a harmful effect on the environment. Application of this managed approach to the

  2. Development of management tools for accidental radiological contamination of the French coastal areas - Development of management tools for accidental radiological contamination in the French marine coastal areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duffa, C.; Charmasson, S. [IRSN/PRP-ENV/SESURE/LERCM - Antenne de Radioecologie Marine, Centre Ifremer, Zone portuaire de Bregaillon, 13507 La Seyne sur Mer (France); Bailly du Bois, P.; Fievet, B. [IRSN/PRP-ENV/SERIS/LRC (France); Couvez, C.; Renaud, P. [IRSN/PRP-ENV/SESURE/DIR (France); Didier, D. [IRSN/PRP-CRI/SESUC/BMTA (France)

    2014-07-01

    The Fukushima nuclear accident led to the most important accidental release of artificial radionuclides into the sea. This accident has underlined the importance of being able to adequately reproduce the fate of radioactive releases and to estimate their consequences for the marine environment. For its Crisis Centre, the French Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) has operational tools, in order to help experts and decision makers in case of any atmospheric accidental release and terrestrial environment contamination. The on-going project aims to develop tools to manage any marine contamination of the French coastal areas. We should be able to evaluate and anticipate the marine post-accidental situation: contaminated areas localization and contamination levels, and possible consequences. Many sites has be considered as potential source terms into the sea: the Coastal Nuclear Power Plants, the La Hague reprocessing Plant, the Brest and Toulon Military Harbours as home-ports of nuclear powered vessels, and different river mouths (Rhone River, Gironde, Loire, Seine) that could be contaminated by upstream accidental release. To achieve this goal, two complementary approaches are developed: Marine sheets and a dedicated modelling tool (STERNE). - Marine sheets aim to summarize marine environment characteristics for the different sites, identify potential stakes for human protection such as aquaculture areas, beaches, or industrial water intakes, and ecological stakes. Whenever possible, a local climatology (main currents depending on meteorological or tide conditions) that could be a support to first environmental measurement strategy is proposed. A list of available local contacts for any operational management is also provided. - The modelling tool, STERNE (Simulation du Transport et du transfert d'Elements Radioactifs dans l'environNEment marin), must predict radionuclide dispersion and contamination of water, marine species and sediments

  3. Removal site evaluation report on Building 3019B at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-09-01

    This removal site evaluation report on Building 3019B at Oak Ridge National Laboratory was prepared to provide the environmental Restoration Program with information necessary to evaluate whether hazardous and/or radiological contaminants in and around the facility pose a substantial risk to human health or the environment and whether remedial site evaluations or removal actions are, therefore, required. The scope of the project included (1) a search for, and review of, readily available historical records regarding operations and use of the facility (including hazardous substance usage and existing contamination); (2) interviews with facility personnel concerning current and past practices; and (3) a brief walk-through to visually inspect the facility nd identify existing hazard areas requiring maintenance actions or remedial evaluation. The results of the removal site evaluation indicate that areas inside Building 3019B pose no imminent hazard because adequate engineering and administrative controls are in place and enforced within the facility to ensure worker and environmental protection. A maintenance action, however, is being undertaken or proposed. Deteriorated and peeling exterior paint in areas on the west and south walls on the exterior of the building has an uninhibited pathway to the storm water drainage system and can potentially impact the local surface water during periods of storm water runoff. The paint is assumed to be lead based, thus posing a potential problem. In addition, the subsurface of all of the exterior walls may be radiologically contaminated. A maintenance action will be necessary to prevent further deterioration and dislodging of the paint

  4. A project to develop restoration methods for buildings and facilities after a terrorist attack

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fingas, M.F. [Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Emergencies Science and Technology Div]|[Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). River Road Environmental Technology Centre; Volchek, K.; Hornof, M.; Boudreau, L.; Punt, M. [SAIC Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Payette, P.; Best, M. [Health Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Garbutt, M.; Krishnan, J.; Wagener, S.; Bernard, K. [Health Canada, Winnipeg, MB (Canada); Cousins, T.; Haslip, D. [Defence Research and Development Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    A multi-agent project was initiated to review site restoration after a terrorist attack. The objective was to acquire and compile information on all known restoration procedures for buildings, exteriors of buildings, their interior contents, and adjacent areas such as parking lots, lawns and vehicles. All procedures were then tested and validated. Restoration procedures included pickup, neutralization, decontamination, removal and final destruction/deposition of the contaminant, cleaning material and contaminated debris resulting from the terrorist act. This research and development project considered chemical, biological and nuclear contamination with the intent to develop methods to decontaminate and restore buildings after a chemical, biological and radiological (CBR) attack. Ideas were collected from work conducted around the world. The efficacy of best candidates was tested along with all selected chemical target items. The project also involved the preparation of procedures for decontamination and restoration. Ultimately, a tradeoff decision basis will be developed to provide information on abandonment and quarantine versus cleanup. The study revealed that there are several technologies that can be used for the decontamination of structures and equipment after acts of terrorism, however, no one technique will work for all contaminants on all surfaces. The selection of a decontamination method depends on the contaminant, the surface being decontaminated and economic, social and health factors. The amount of waste generated by decontamination is a major feasibility factor. 25 refs., 6 tabs.

  5. Radiological characterization of nuclear plants under decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mincarini, M.

    1989-01-01

    In the present work a description of major problems encountered in qualitative and quantitative radiological characterization of nuclear plants for decommissioning and decontamination purpose is presented. Referring to several nuclear plant classes activation and contamination processes, direct and indirect radiological analysis and some italian significant experience are descripted

  6. Survey of Radiological and Chemical Contaminants in the Near-Shore Environment at the Hanford Site 300 Area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patton, Gregory W.; Van Verst, Scott P.; Tiller, Brett L.; Antonio, Ernest J.; Poston, Ted M.

    2003-01-01

    This updates the original report by correcting some errors and adding new information. This assessment of the 300 Area was completed to identify any contamination present and determine if it could present a risk to humans and plant and animal life. The assessment characterized the radiological and chemical conditions existing in the near-shore environment of the Columbia River at the 300 Area by collecting water, biota, and sediment samples and measuring radiation levels during a time when the effects of riverbank spring discharges and groundwater upwelling into the river was likely to be present

  7. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 600-111, P-11 Critical Mass Laboratory Crib, and UPR-600-16, Fire and Contamination Spread Waste Sites. Attachment to Waste Site Reclassification Form 2004-065 and 2008-045

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capron, J.M.

    2008-01-01

    The UPR-600-16, Fire and Contamination Spread waste site is an unplanned release that occurred on December 4, 1951, when plutonium contamination was spread by a fire that ignited inside the 120 Experimental Building. The 120 Experimental Building was a laboratory building that was constructed in 1949 and used for plutonium criticality studies as part of the P-11 Project. In November 1951, a criticality occurred in the 120 Experimental Building that resulted in extensive plutonium contamination inside the building. The confirmatory evaluation supports a reclassification of this site to Interim Closed Out. The current site conditions achieve the remedial action objectives and the corresponding remedial action goals established in the Remaining Sites ROD. The results of the extensive radiological survey of the surface soil and the confirmatory and verification sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River

  8. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Radiological Control performance indicator report: First quarter, calendar year 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aitken, S.B.

    1995-07-01

    The INEL Radiological Control Performance Indicator Report is provided quarterly, inaccordance with Article 133 of the INEL Radiological Control Manual. Indicators are used as a measure of performance of the Radiological Control Program and as a motivation for improvement, not as a goal in themselves. These indicators should be used by management to assist in focusing priorities and attention and adherence to As-Low-As-Reasonably-Achievable (ALARA) practices. The ALARA Committees establish ALARA goals for the INEL based on forecasts and goals provided by each facility organizational manager or supervisor.Performance goals are realistic and measurable. Stringent goals are set at least annually to reflect expected workloads and improvement of radiological performance. Goals higher than previous goals may occasionally be set due to changes in work scope or mission. The INEL Radiological Control Performance Indicators consist of: Collective dose in person-rem; average worker dose, maximum dose to a worker, and maximum neutron dose to a worker;the number of skin and clothing contaminations, including the number of contaminated wounds and facial contaminations; the number of radioactive material intakes; the area of Contamination, High Contamination, and Airborne Radioactivity Areas in square feet; and airborne radioactivity events and spills

  9. Surplus Facilities Management Program. Post-remedial-action survey report for SNAP-8 Experimental Reactor Facility, Building 010 site, Santa Susana Field Laboratories, Rockwell International, Ventura County, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wynveen, R.A.; Smith, W.H.; Sholeen, C.M.; Mayes, C.B.; Justus, A.L.; Flynn, K.F.

    1984-04-01

    Based on the results of the radiological assessment, the Argonne National Laboratory Radiological Survey Group arrived at the following conclusions: (1) soil contaminated with the radionuclides 60 Co and 152 Eu of undetermined origin was detected in the southwest quadrant of the Building 010 site. 60 Co was also detected in one environmental sample taken from an area northwest of the site and in a borehole sample taken from the area that previously held the radioactive gas hold-up tanks. Uranium was detected in soil from a hole in the center of the building site and in a second hole southwest of the building site. In all cases, the radionuclide levels encountered in the soil were well below the criteria set by DOE for this site; and (2) the direct instrument readings at the surface of the site were probably the result of natural radiation (terrestrial and celestial), as well as shine from the material being stored at the nearby RMDF facility. There was no evidence that the contaminated soil under the asphalt pad contributed detectable levels to the total background readings

  10. Final report of the decontamination and decommission of Building 31 at the Grand Junction Projects Office Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krabacher, J.E.

    1996-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore and mill tailings during uranium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District and during pilot milling experiments conducted for the domestic uranium procurement program funded by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJPO Remedial Action Project to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and the underlying aquifer. The site contractor for the facility, Rust Geotech, also was the remedial action contractor. Radiological contamination was identified in Building 31 and the building was demolished in 1992. The soil area within the footprint of the building has been remediated in accordance with the identified standards and the area can be released for unlimited exposure and unrestricted use. This area was addressed in the summary final report of the remediation of the exterior areas of the GJPO facility. This document was prepared in response to a DOE request for an individual final report for each contaminated GJPO building

  11. Analysis of bacterial contamination on surface of general radiography equipment and CT equipment in emergency room of radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Dong Hee; KIm, Hyeong Gyun [Dept. of Radiological Science, Far East University, Eumseong (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    We aim to offer basic materials about infection management through conducting bacterial contamination test about general radiography equipment and CT equipment installed in ER of three general hospitals with 100 sickbeds or more located in Gyeongsangbuk-do Province, and suggest management plan. It had been conducted from 1st December 2015 to 31st December, and objects were general radiography equipment and CT equipment of emergency room located in Gyeongsangbuk-do Province. For general radiography equipment, sources were collected from 4 places such as upper side of control box which employees use most, upper side of exposure button, whole upper side of table which is touching part of patient's skin, upper side of stand bucky's grid, and where patients put their jaws on. For CT equipment, sources were collected from 3 places such as upper side of control box which radiography room employees use most, X-ray exposure button, whole upper side of table which is touching part of patient's skin, and gantry inner. Surface contamination strain found at general radiography equipment in emergency room of radiology are Providencia stuartii(25%), Stenotrophomonas maltophilia(18%), Enterobacter cloacae(8%), Pseudomonas species(8%), Staphylococcus epidermidis(8%), Gram negative bacilli(8%), and ungrown bacteria at incubator after 48 hours of incubation (67%) which is the biggest. Most bacteria were found at upper side of stand bucky-grid and stand bucky of radiology's general radiography equipment, and most sources of CT equipment were focused at patient table, which means it is contaminated by patients who have various diseases, and patients who have strains with decreased immunity may get severe diseases. Thus infection prevention should be made through 70% alcohol disinfection at both before test and after test.

  12. Analysis of bacterial contamination on surface of general radiography equipment and CT equipment in emergency room of radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Dong Hee; KIm, Hyeong Gyun

    2016-01-01

    We aim to offer basic materials about infection management through conducting bacterial contamination test about general radiography equipment and CT equipment installed in ER of three general hospitals with 100 sickbeds or more located in Gyeongsangbuk-do Province, and suggest management plan. It had been conducted from 1st December 2015 to 31st December, and objects were general radiography equipment and CT equipment of emergency room located in Gyeongsangbuk-do Province. For general radiography equipment, sources were collected from 4 places such as upper side of control box which employees use most, upper side of exposure button, whole upper side of table which is touching part of patient's skin, upper side of stand bucky's grid, and where patients put their jaws on. For CT equipment, sources were collected from 3 places such as upper side of control box which radiography room employees use most, X-ray exposure button, whole upper side of table which is touching part of patient's skin, and gantry inner. Surface contamination strain found at general radiography equipment in emergency room of radiology are Providencia stuartii(25%), Stenotrophomonas maltophilia(18%), Enterobacter cloacae(8%), Pseudomonas species(8%), Staphylococcus epidermidis(8%), Gram negative bacilli(8%), and ungrown bacteria at incubator after 48 hours of incubation (67%) which is the biggest. Most bacteria were found at upper side of stand bucky-grid and stand bucky of radiology's general radiography equipment, and most sources of CT equipment were focused at patient table, which means it is contaminated by patients who have various diseases, and patients who have strains with decreased immunity may get severe diseases. Thus infection prevention should be made through 70% alcohol disinfection at both before test and after test

  13. A consequence index approach to identifying radiological sabotage targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altman, W.D.; Hockert, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    One of the threats to concern to facilities using significant quantities of radioactive material is radiological sabotage. Both the Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission have issued guidance to facilities for radiological sabotage protection. At those facilities where the inventories of radioactive materials change frequently, there is an operational need for a technically defensible method of determining whether or not the inventory of radioactive material at a given facility poses a potential radiological sabotage risk. In order to determine quickly whether a building is a potential radiological sabotage target, Lawrence Livermore National Loaboratory (LLNL) has developed a radiological sabotage consequence index that provides a conservative estimate of the maximum potential off-site consequences of a radiological sabotage attempt involving the facility. This radiological sabotage consequence index can be used by safeguards and security staff to rapidly determine whether a change in building operations poses a potential radiological sabotage risk. In those cases where such a potential risk is identified, a more detailed radiological sabotage vulnerability analysis can be performed

  14. Radiological risks in an operational environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castagnet, X.; Lafferrerie, C.; Amabile, J.C.; Cazoulat, A.; Laroche, P.

    2010-01-01

    A radiological hazard (e. g. a detonating dirty bomb or accidental radionuclide dispersion) leading to a large number of contaminated or irradiated people needing immediate medical assistance is one of the main threats our troops deployed in an operational environment are facing. Immediate first aid anyway shall take precedence over decontamination but the unique nature of these injuries necessitates specific medical knowledge and training. A contaminated victim needs a rapid -clinical physical and biological- medical evaluation which will determine the amount of required medical support. A person with external contamination needs to be rapidly cleansed to limit spreading surface burns as well as limiting the possible contamination internally spreading into the body. A person with internal contamination requires rapid decontamination at the wound point and antidotes to internally cleanse the body. In France, the Military Health Service has developed a centre of expertise at the Percy military hospital near Paris which is geared up to deal with the victims of radiological attacks. It also has a mobile laboratory equipped with full radio toxicology equipment and body dosimeters to enable rapid and effective results when required. (authors)

  15. Radiological emergency preparedness (REP) program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwiatkowski, D.H.

    1995-01-01

    This talk focuses on the accomplishments of Radiological Emergency Preparedness Program. Major topics include the following: strengthening the partnership between FEMA, the States, and the Industry; the Standard Exercise Report Format (SERF); Multi-year performance partnership agreement (MYPPA); new REP Program guidance; comprehensive exercise program; federal radiological emergency response plan (FRERP); international interest; REP user fee; implementation EPA PAGs and Dose Limits; Contamination monitoring standard for portal monitors; guidance documents and training

  16. Rehabilitation of radioactive contaminated forests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panfilov, A.V.; Uspenskaya, E.Ju.

    2002-01-01

    As a result of radiation accidents and nuclear-weapon tests at the territory of the former USSR a part of the Forest Fund of 23 subjects of the Russian Federation has been contaminated by radionuclides. The contaminated forests, which are included in a structure of more than 130 forest management units (leskhozes) and more then 330 local forest management units, as a rule, are located in highly inhabited regions with traditionally intensive forestry management and high level of forest resources use. To provide radiologically safe forest management in the contaminated areas, the Federal Forest Service has developed and validated a special system of countermeasures. Use of this system makes it possible to diminish significantly the dose to personnel, to exclude the use of forest products with contamination exceeding radiological standards and to provide protection of the forest as a biogeochemical barrier to radionuclide migration from contaminated areas to human habitat. (author)

  17. Soils radiological characterization under a nuclear facility - 59046

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aubonnet, Emilie; Dubot, Didier

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays, nuclear industry is facing a crucial need in establishing radiological characterization for the appraisal and the monitoring of any remediation work. Regarding its experience in this domain, the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) of Fontenay-aux- Roses, established an important feedback and developed over the last 10 years a sound methodology for radiological characterization. This approach is based on several steps: - historical investigations; - assumption and confirmation of the contamination; - surface characterization; - in-depth characterization; - rehabilitation objectives; - remediation process. The amount of measures, samples and analysis is optimized for data processing using geo-statistics. This approach is now used to characterize soils under facilities. The paper presents the radiological characterization of soils under a facility basement. This facility has been built after the first generation of nuclear facilities, replacing a plutonium facility which has been dismantled in 1960. The presentation details the different steps of radiological characterization from historical investigations to optimization of excavation depths, impact studies and contaminated volumes. (authors)

  18. Radiological monitoring. Controlling surface water pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morin, Maxime

    2018-01-01

    Throughout France, surface waters (from rivers to brooks) located at the vicinity of nuclear or industrial sites, are subject to regular radiological monitoring. An example is given with the radiological monitoring of a small river near La Hague Areva's plant, where contaminations have been detected with the help of the French IRSN nuclear safety research organization. The sampling method and various measurement types are described

  19. Protecting National Critical Infrastructure against Radiological Threat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaar, I.; Halevy, I.; Berenstein, Z.; Sharon, A.

    2014-01-01

    responder equipped with a radiation detector or a dosimeter. The main impact of such a radiological attack is the contamination of a large areaxxxii. The size of the contaminated area depends on the type and activity of the radioactive material, on the type and geometry of the dispersion device, on the micro-meteorology conditions and on the cross contamination caused by the movement of people inside the contaminated areaxxxiii. Two experimental programs, G reen Field x xxiv (GF) and R ed House x xxv (RH) were recently conducted in Israel in order to increase the preparedness for a RDD event. The GF program aimed at evaluating the consequences of an outdoor and an indoor explosion of an RDD device; while the RH program aimed at evaluating the outcome of a silent dispersion of a radioactive material inside a building. Based on the results of these two experimental programs, the consequences of a possible RDD attack or a silent indoor dispersion of a radioactive material will be given and the necessary preventative steps that can be taken in order to secure NCI's against these threats will be specified

  20. Public monitoring during the radiological accident in Goiania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, W.M.

    2000-01-01

    During the radiological accident with Cs 137 occurred at Goiania, Brazil, many people were contaminated. To identify the people with possible contamination a large place in the center of the city was selected for screening people with a possibility of contamination. This paper describes the work involved monitoring about 112.800 persons in a period of three month. (author)

  1. OPERATIONAL LIMITATIONS FOR DEMOLITION OF A HIGHLY ALPHA CONTAMINATED BUILDING MODLES VERSUS MEASURED AIR & SURFACE ACTIVITY CONCENTRATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LLOYD, E.R.

    2006-11-02

    The demolition of a facility historically used for processing and handling transuranic materials is considered. Residual alpha emitting radionuclide contamination poses an exposure hazard if released to the local environment during the demolition. The process of planning for the demolition of this highly alpha contaminated building, 232-Z, included a predemolition modeling analysis of potential exposures. Estimated emission rates were used as input to an air dispersion model to estimate frequencies of occurrence of peak air and surface exposures. Postdemolition modeling was also conducted, based on the actual demolition schedule and conditions. The modeling results indicated that downwind deposition is the main operational limitation for demolition of a highly alpha-contaminated building. During the demolition of 232-Z, airborne radiation and surface contamination were monitored. The resultant non-detect monitoring results indicate a significant level of conservatism in the modeled results. This comparison supports the use of more realistic assumption in the estimating emission rates. The resultant reduction in modeled levels of potential exposures has significant implications in terms of the projected costs of demolition of such structures.

  2. Preliminary study of dose equivalent evaluation for residents in radioactivity contaminated rebar buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, W.L.; Liao, C.C.; Wang, M.T.; Chen, F. D.

    1998-01-01

    It has recently been found that several resident and office buildings in Taiwan were constructed with 60 Co-contaminated reinforcing steel bar (rebar). Both governmental officials and the residents of such buildings have been concerned about this finding. In order to respond to the situation, the government has adopted a number of remedial measures, including full-scale radiation survey, dose evaluation and physical examinations of residents. This article presents three methods for evaluating the dose equivalents of the residents living in the contaminated rebar buildings by means of γ-ray survey, necklace-type thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs) and the human lymphocyte chromosome aberration analyses. The results reveal that the dose evaluation by γ-ray survey is rather conservative. Generally for the residents whose annual dose equivalents are greater than 5 mSv (0.5 rem) by γ-ray survey, the dose equivalents from necklace-type TLDs are only within the range of 20 to 50% of the evaluated values mentioned above. For chromosome analyses, at least 500 lymphocyte cells were scored and analyzed for each resident. Most of the chromosome analysis data show that the dose equivalents received by residents are lower than the detection limit of the method (100 mSv) and quite different from the estimated dose obtained from either γ-ray survey or necklace-type TLD measurements

  3. Release protocol to address DOE moratorium on shipments of waste generated in radiologically controlled areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rathbun, L.A.; Boothe, G.F.

    1992-10-01

    On May 17, 1991 the US DOE Office of Waste Operations issued a moratorium on the shipment of hazardous waste from radiologically contaminated or potentially contaminated areas on DOE sites to offsite facilities not licensed for radiological material. This document describes a release protocol generated by Westinghouse Hanford submitted for US DOE approval. Topics considered include designating Radiological Materials Management Areas (RMMAs), classification of wastes, handling of mixed wastes, detection limits

  4. Wind-induced contaminant transport in near-surface soils with application to radon entry into buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riley, W.J.

    1996-05-01

    Indoor air exposures to gaseous contaminants originating in soil can cause large human health risks. To predict and control these exposures, the mechanisms that affect vapor transport in near-surface soils need to be understood. In particular, radon exposure is a concern since average indoor radon concentrations lead to much higher risks than are generally accepted for exposure to other environmental contaminants. This dissertation examines an important component of the indoor radon problem: the impacts of wind on soil-gas and radon transport and entry into buildings. The research includes experimental and modeling studies of wind's interactions with a building's superstructure and the resulting soil-gas and radon flows in the surrounding soil. In addition to exploring the effects of steady winds, a novel modeling technique is developed to examine the impacts of fluctuating winds on soil-gas and radon transport

  5. Conference on soldiers, civilians and environment protection against contaminations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The military and civil aspects of radiation protection have been discussed. The special emphasize has been done on contamination monitoring of environment, soldier radiological protection during hypothetical warfare, radiological health hazard assessment, post Chernobyl contamination control of environment and food products in Poland, dose equivalent estimation and radiometric control equipment used in military and civil service

  6. Internal radioactive contamination treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobajas, L. M.

    1998-01-01

    In a radiological emergency, the internal radioactive contamination becomes a therapeutic urgency and must be established as fast as possible. Just when a radioactive contamination accident occurs, it is difficult to know exactly the amount of radioactive materials absorbed and to estimate the dose received.. The decision to be taken after the incorporation of the radioactive material depends on the method and on the Radiological Protection Department collaboration. Any treatment achieving a reduction of the doses received or expected will be useful. The International Radiological Protection Commission doesn't recommend the use of the dose limit, to decide about the intervention necessity. However the LIA can be used as the reference point to establish the necessity and reach of the treatment. The object of the present work, is to introduce the general principles to carry out the internal people decontamination, under the last international recommendations. (Author) 4 refs

  7. Radiological accidents, scenarios, planning and answers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solis Delgado, Alexander.

    2008-01-01

    Radiological accidents, scenarios and the importance of a good planning to prevent and control these types of accidents are presented. The radiation can be only one of the risks in an accident, most of dominant radiological risks are not radiological (fire, toxic gases, etc.). The common causes of radiological accidents, potential risks such as external irradiation, internal contamination and the environment pollution are highlighted. In addition, why accidents happen and how they evolve is explained. It describes some incidents with the radiation occurred in Costa Rica from 1993 to 2007. The coordination of emergency management in Costa Rica in relation to a radiological accident, and some mechanisms of action that have practiced in other places are focuses. Among the final considerations are the need to finalize the national plan for radiological emergencies as a tool of empowerment for the teams of emergency care and the availability of information. Likewise the processes of communication, coordination and cooperation to avoid chaos, confusion and crisis are also highlighted [es

  8. Estimates of radiological risk from depleted uranium weapons in war scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durante, Marco; Pugliese, Mariagabriella

    2002-01-01

    Several weapons used during the recent conflict in Yugoslavia contain depleted uranium, including missiles and armor-piercing incendiary rounds. Health concern is related to the use of these weapons, because of the heavy-metal toxicity and radioactivity of uranium. Although chemical toxicity is considered the more important source of health risk related to uranium, radiation exposure has been allegedly related to cancers among veterans of the Balkan conflict, and uranium munitions are a possible source of contamination in the environment. Actual measurements of radioactive contamination are needed to assess the risk. In this paper, a computer simulation is proposed to estimate radiological risk related to different exposure scenarios. Dose caused by inhalation of radioactive aerosols and ground contamination induced by Tomahawk missile impact are simulated using a Gaussian plume model (HOTSPOT code). Environmental contamination and committed dose to the population resident in contaminated areas are predicted by a food-web model (RESRAD code). Small values of committed effective dose equivalent appear to be associated with missile impacts (50-y CEDE radiological risk. These computer simulations suggest that little radiological risk is associated to the use of depleted uranium weapons.

  9. Confirmatory radiological survey of the BORAX-V turbine building Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, G.H.; Coleman, R.L.; Jensen, M.K.; Pierce, G.A.; Egidi, P.V.; Mather, S.K.

    1993-01-01

    An independent assessment of the remediation of the BORAX-V (Boiling Water Reactor Experiment) turbine building at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Idaho Falls, Idaho, was accomplished by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Pollutant Assessments Group (ORNL/PAG). The purpose of the assessment was to confirm the site's compliance with applicable Department of Energy guidelines. The assessment included reviews of both the decontamination and decommissioning Plan and data provided from the pre- and post-remedial action surveys and an independent verification survey of the facility. The independent verification survey included determination of background exposure rates and soil concentrations, beta-gamma and gamma radiation scans, smears for detection of removable contamination, and direct measurements for alpha and beta-gamma radiation activity on the basement and mezzanine floors and the building's interior and exterior walls. Soil samples were taken, and beta-gamma and gamma radiation exposure rates were measured on areas adjacent to the building. Results of measurements on building surfaces at this facility were within established contamination guidelines except for elevated beta-gamma radiation levels located on three isolated areas of the basement floor. Following remediation of these areas, ORNL/PAG reviewed the remedial action contractor's report and agreed that remediation was effective in removing the source of the elevated direct radiation. Results of all independent soil analyses for 60 Co were below the detection limit. The highest 137 Cs analysis result was 4.6 pCi/g; this value is below the INEL site-specific guideline of 10 pCi/g

  10. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Radiological Control Performance Indicator Report. Fourth quarter -- year-end report, Calendar year 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reavis, R.

    1996-03-01

    The INEL Radiological Control Performance Indicator Report is comprised of a description of the indicator and the criteria used for measurement. Indicators evaluated in this report include: collective radiation dose; average worker radiation dose; maximum radiation dose to a worker; maximum neutron dose to a worker; number of skin contaminations; number of clothing contaminations; airborne events; total radiological intakes; contamination areas; high contamination area; airborne radioactivity area; and radioactive spills

  11. Removal site evaluation report on Building 7602 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-09-01

    This removal site evaluation report for Building 7602 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory was prepared to provide the Environmental Restoration Program with information necessary to evaluate whether hazardous and/or radiological contaminants in and around the facility pose a substantial risk to human health or the environment (i.e., a high probability of adverse effects) and whether remedial site evaluations or removal actions are, therefore, required. The scope of the project included (1) a search for, and review of, readily available historical records regarding operations and use of the facility (including hazardous substance usage and existing contamination); (2) interviews with facility personnel concerning current and past practices; and (3) a brief walk-through to visually inspect the facility and identify existing hazard areas requiring maintenance actions, removal actions, or remedial evaluation. The results of the removal site evaluation indicate that areas associated with Building 7602 pose no imminent hazards requiring maintenance actions. Adequate engineering and administrative controls are in place and enforced within the facility to ensure worker and environmental protection. Current actions that are being taken to prevent further release of contamination and ensure worker safety within Building 7602 are considered adequate until decontamination and decommissioning activities begin. Given the current status and condition of Building 7602, this removal site evaluation is considered complete and terminated

  12. Radiological, physical, and chemical characterization of low-level alpha contaminated wastes stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apel, M.L.; Becker, G.K.; Ragan, Z.K.; Frasure, J.; Raivo, B.D.; Gale, L.G.; Pace, D.P.

    1994-03-01

    This document provides radiological, physical, and chemical characterization data for low-level alpha-contaminated radioactive and low-level alpha-contaminated radioactive and hazardous (i.e., mixed) wastes stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and considered for treatment under the Private Sector Participation Initiative Program. Waste characterization data are provided in the form of INEL Waste Profile Sheets. These documents provide, for each content code, information on waste identification, waste description, waste storage configuration, physical/chemical waste composition, radionuclide and associated alpha activity waste characterization data, and hazardous constituents present in the waste. Information is provided for 97 waste streams which represent an estimated total volume of 25,450 m 3 corresponding to a total mass of approximately 12,000,000 kg. In addition, considerable information concerning alpha, beta, gamma, and neutron source term data specific to Rocky Flats-generated waste forms stored at the INEL are provided to assist in facility design specification

  13. Radiological, physical, and chemical characterization of low-level alpha contaminated wastes stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, M.L.; Becker, G.K.; Ragan, Z.K.; Frasure, J.; Raivo, B.D.; Gale, L.G.; Pace, D.P.

    1994-03-01

    This document provides radiological, physical, and chemical characterization data for low-level alpha-contaminated radioactive and low-level alpha-contaminated radioactive and hazardous (i.e., mixed) wastes stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and considered for treatment under the Private Sector Participation Initiative Program. Waste characterization data are provided in the form of INEL Waste Profile Sheets. These documents provide, for each content code, information on waste identification, waste description, waste storage configuration, physical/chemical waste composition, radionuclide and associated alpha activity waste characterization data, and hazardous constituents present in the waste. Information is provided for 97 waste streams which represent an estimated total volume of 25,450 m 3 corresponding to a total mass of approximately 12,000,000 kg. In addition, considerable information concerning alpha, beta, gamma, and neutron source term data specific to Rocky Flats-generated waste forms stored at the INEL are provided to assist in facility design specification.

  14. Formerly utilized MED/AEC sites remedial action program. Radiological survey of the Harshaw Chemical Company, Cleveland, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wynveen, R.A.; Smith, W.H.; Sholeen, C.M.; Justus, A.L.; Flynn, K.F.

    1984-04-01

    During the MED/AEC era, the Harshaw Chemical Company processed large quantities of normal uranium to produce both oxide and fluoride compounds. This work was done under contract to MED and its successor, AEC. Records indicated that at the time the AEC contract was terminated, the facility was decontaminated by Harshaw and released from AEC control in 1960. However, a search of AEC records indicated that documentation was insufficient to determine whether the decontamination work was adequate by current guidelines. Hence, a radiological assessment of the site ws initiated in 1976. The entire grounds and all buildings were surveyed using surface survey instruments to detect surface contamination and radiation detectors to determine general radiation levels. Extensive surface contamination was found throughout the site. While the major contamination was found in Plant C, significant levels of contamination also were found in 16 other buildings and at 32 exterior locations. The contaminating material seemed to be normal uranium exclusively. Air samples were taken at numerous indoor locations throughout the site, but no elevated levels of radon were detected. This was as expected since normal uranium has been separated from radium and hence radon levels are very low. Several soil samples were taken from around the site. Analyses of these samples indicated extensive soil contamination, as well as suspected contamination of the river bed in the vicinity of the plant outfall. Scheduled subsurface investigation of the site, as well as of the river bed and sewer system, have not been conducted. Levels of contamination at this site are significantly above guidelines for release of the site for unrestricted use. 57 figures, 7 tables

  15. Development of a national doctrine for the management of the post-accident phase of a radiological emergency situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niel, J.Ch.; Godet, J.L.

    2008-01-01

    For several years, public Authorities have defined an organization for the management of emergency situations arising from an accident occurring at a nuclear installation. So far, the management of the risk arising from the post accident phase was, in itself, not explored with the same care. What so ever, no format policy on which the action of public Authority could be based is today available. The nuclear safety Authority (ASN), in relation with the other concerned departments, is now in charge, according to the above mentioned directive, to prepare and implement the necessary provisions to respond to a post accident situation. In dune 2005, ASN established the steering committee for the management of post nuclear or radiological emergency situations (CODIRPA). The definition of a national policy related to the management of the radiological risk during a post event situation having to integrate various organization aspects as: lifting of protection emergency provisions and rehabilitation of buildings, life in contaminated rural territories, agriculture and water, dose and radiological consequences, sanitary surveillance of victims and populations, indemnification, waste management of contaminated crops and soils, organization of public Authorities. During the 2. phase of CODIRPA work (2008-2009), the first elements of policy will be consolidated and new scenarios will be studied (one worsened scenario and one scenario with alpha emitting radionuclide). in parallel, a procedure for local actor's consultation should be elaborated. (authors)

  16. Mobile means for the monitoring of atmospheric contamination in a reactor building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, S.; Lestang, M.

    2009-01-01

    After having evoked the context and challenges of contamination monitoring when exploiting nuclear reactors, the authors discuss the representativeness of the atmospheric contamination measurement as it depends on the different physicochemical forms of radionuclides present in the circuits. They indicate the different gaseous or aerosol radioactive elements which are monitored within EDF installations. They discuss the incorporation of monitoring means at the installation design level, briefly present the use of beacons inside and outside the reactor building. They describe how monitoring is organized on the basis of alert threshold adjustments: an investigation threshold and an evacuation threshold. They discuss the beacon (or sensor) selection and indicate recommendations for their implementation for optimization purposes. They indicate where these beacons are installed and evoke the experimentation of networked mobile beacons with data remote transmission

  17. Depleted uranium residual radiological risk assessment for Kosovo sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durante, Marco; Pugliese, Mariagabriella

    2003-01-01

    During the recent conflict in Yugoslavia, depleted uranium rounds were employed and were left in the battlefield. Health concern is related to the risk arising from contamination of areas in Kosovo with depleted uranium penetrators and dust. Although chemical toxicity is the most significant health risk related to uranium, radiation exposure has been allegedly related to cancers among veterans of the Balkan conflict. Uranium munitions are considered to be a source of radiological contamination of the environment. Based on measurements and estimates from the recent Balkan Task Force UNEP mission in Kosovo, we have estimated effective doses to resident populations using a well-established food-web mathematical model (RESRAD code). The UNEP mission did not find any evidence of widespread contamination in Kosovo. Rather than the actual measurements, we elected to use a desk assessment scenario (Reference Case) proposed by the UNEP group as the source term for computer simulations. Specific applications to two Kosovo sites (Planeja village and Vranovac hill) are described. Results of the simulations suggest that radiation doses from water-independent pathways are negligible (annual doses below 30 μSv). A small radiological risk is expected from contamination of the groundwater in conditions of effective leaching and low distribution coefficient of uranium metal. Under the assumptions of the Reference Case, significant radiological doses (>1 mSv/year) might be achieved after many years from the conflict through water-dependent pathways. Even in this worst-case scenario, DU radiological risk would be far overshadowed by its chemical toxicity

  18. Quarterly environmental radiological survey summary - first quarter 1997 100, 200, 300, and 600 areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mckinney, S.M.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides a summary of the radiological surveys performed in support of near-facility environmental monitoring at the Hanford Site. The First Quarter 1997 survey results and the status of actions required are summarized below: (1) All of the routine environmental radiological surveys scheduled during January, February, and March 1997, were performed as planned. (2) One hundred four environmental radiological surveys were performed during the first quarter 1997, twenty-nine at the active waste sites and seventy-five at the inactive waste sites. Contamination above background levels was found at eight of the active waste sites and seven of the inactive waste sites. Contamination levels as high as >1,000,000 disintegrations per minute (dpm) were reported. Of these contaminated surveys twelve were in Underground Radioactive Material (URM) areas and three were in contamination areas. The contamination found within ten of the URM areas was immediately cleaned up and no further action was required. In the remaining five sites the areas were posted and will require decontamination. Radiological Problem Reports (RPR's) were issued and the sites were turned over to the landlord for further action if required. (3) During the first quarter of 1997, 5.6 hectares (13.8 acres) were stabilized and radiologically down posted from Contamination Area (CA)/Soil Contamination (SC) to URM. (4) During the first quarter of 1997, the size of 216-A-25 Gable Mountain Pond was increased from 30.4 to 34.5 hectares (75.0 to 85.2 acres). This increase in size was due to the correction of the original boundary area by using the advanced technology of a global positioning system (GPS). An area, 1.6 hectares (4.0 acres), east of and adjacent to the 241-S/SX/SY tank farm complex was posted as a contamination/soil contamination area. (5) Five open Surveillance Compliance Inspection Reports (SCIRs) had not been resolved

  19. Fixatives Used for Decommissioning and Maintenance of Radiological Facilities – 17537

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demmer, Rick; Fox, Don; Reese, Stephen; Banford, Anthony; Dodds, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the United Kingdom (UK) National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) have been collaborating for several years on materials and methods for the fogged/misted introduction of fixatives into radiologically contaminated facilities. The objective of the project is to deliver a process for reducing airborne radiological and/or mercury contamination and affixing loose contamination in place, thereby reducing contamination risk to employees and decreasing D&D cost and schedule. The developed process provides a reliable, unmanned method of introducing a coating that captures and fixes contamination in place within facilities. The INL coating, termed FX2, has undergone extensive non-radiological testing, including determination that it is non-flammable, affixes contamination and flows well through unusual geometries (testing at Florida International University). A series of non-active fogging trials for activity knock/tie-down application have been completed at NNL Workington on behalf of Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These trials performed by the NNL employed commercially available agricultural fogging equipment and the INL’s knock/tie-down latex formulation (FX-2). This testing successfully demonstrated the ability of the fogging devices to successfully spray the FX-2 formulation within various scenarios, and prepared the project for a radioactive trial. The INL has also developed a mercury vapor reducing form of the coating termed FX-Hg, which has shown great promise in laboratory studies.

  20. Quarterly Environmental Radiological Survey Summary Third Quarter 1998, 100, 200, 300, and 600 Areas; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MCKINNEY, S.M.

    1998-01-01

    This report provides a summary of the radiological surveys performed in support of near-facility environmental monitoring at the Hanford Site. The Third Quarter 1998 survey results and the status of actions required are summarized: (1) All of the eighty-five environmental radiological surveys scheduled during July, August and September were performed as planned. Fifty-one of the surveys were conducted at Project Hanford Management Contractors (PHMC) sites and thirty-four at Environmental Restoration Contractor (ERC) sites. Contamination above background levels was found at seventeen of the PHMC waste sites and two of the ERC waste sites. Contamination levels as high and gt;1,000,000 disintegrations per minute (dpm) per 100 cm(sup 2) were reported. Of these contaminated surveys nine were in Underground Radioactive Material (URM) areas, three were in unposted areas and seven were in contamination areas. The contamination found within four of the URM and three of the CA areas was immediately cleaned up and no further action was required. The remaining five URM and two unposted sites were posted and along with the five CA sites will require remediation. Radiological Problem Reports (RPR's) were issued and the sites were turned over to the landlord for further action as required. (2) During the second quarter of 1998, 1.2 hectares (3.0 acres) were stabilized and radiologically down posted from Contamination Area (CA)/Soil Contamination (SC) to URM. (3) Four hectares (10 acres) located south and west of B-Plant were posted as a radiological buffer area as a result of a contamination spread. This off-normal occurrence is currently being investigated. (4) Four Surveillance Compliance Inspection Reports (SCIRs) remained open and had not been resolved. Tank Farms Operations has responsibility for the unresolved SCIRs

  1. Aerial radiological survey of the creeks and tributaries near the Rancho Seco Nuclear Generation Station, Clay Station, California. Date of survey: December 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-06-01

    Radiological contamination due to man-made radionuclides was detected using hand-held instruments in the summer of 1984 in the creeks and tributaries near the Rancho Seco Nuclear Generating Station at Clay Station, California. To help determine the extent of the contamination an aerial radiological survey centered over the creeks and tributaries and including the Rancho Seco facility was conducted during the period 3 to 15 December 1984. Radiological contaminants were detected along a 9-mile segment of the system of creeks in the area. These contaminants included cesium-134, cesium-137, and cobalt-60. Radiation measurements away from the contaminated areas were the same as those made during the aerial radiological survey conducted in 1980

  2. Contaminated Land Remediation on decommissioned nuclear facilities: an optimized approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauer, Emilie

    2016-01-01

    The site of the Monts d'Arree located in Brennilis in the area of Brittany in France is a former 70 MWe heavy water reactor. EDF is now in charge of its decommissioning. The effluent treatment facility (STE) is currently being dismantled. As the future use of the site will exclude any nuclear activity, EDF is taking site release into consideration. Therefore a land management strategy for the land and soil is needed. An optimized approach is being proposed for the STE, to the French Regulator. In France, there is no specific regulation related to contaminated land (either radiologically contaminated or chemically contaminated). The French Nuclear Safety Authority's doctrine for radioactively contaminated land is a reference approach which involves complete clean-up, removing any trace of artificial radioactivity in the ground. If technical difficulties are encountered or the quantity of radioactive waste produced is too voluminous, an optimised clean-up can be implemented. EDF has been engaged since 2008 in drawing up a common guideline with other French nuclear operators (CEA and AREVA). The operators' guideline proposed the first steps to define how to optimise nuclear waste and to carry out a cost-benefits analysis. This is in accordance with the IAEA's prescriptions. Historically, various incidents involving effluent drum spills caused radiological contamination in the building platform and the underlying soil. While conducting the decontamination works in 2004/2005, it was impossible to remove all contamination (that went deeper than expected). A large characterization campaign was carried out in order to map the contamination. For the site investigation, 34 boreholes were drilled from 2 to 5 m under the building platform and 98 samples were analyzed to search for gamma, beta and alpha emitters. With the results, the contamination was mapped using a geostatistical approach developed by Geovariances TM . Main results were: - Soils are

  3. Building 773-A, Lab F003 Glovebox Project Radiological Design Summary Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaul, W.C.

    2003-01-01

    Engineering Standards present the radiological design criteria and requirements, which must be satisfied for all SRS facility designs. The radiological design criteria and requirements specified in the standard are based on the Code of Federal Regulations, DOE Orders, Site manuals, other applicable standards, and various DOE guides and handbooks. This report contains top-level requirements for the various areas of radiological protection for workers. For the purposes of demonstrating compliance with these requirements, the designer must examine the requirement for the design and either incorporate or provide a technical justification as to why the requirement is not incorporated. This document reports a radiological design review for the STREAK lab glovebox upgrades of inlet ventilation, additional mechanical and electrical services, new glovebox instrumentation and alarms. This report demonstrates that the gloveboxes meet the radiological design requirements of Engineering Standards

  4. Analysis of East Tank Farms Contamination Survey Frequency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ELDER, R.E.

    2000-01-01

    This document provides the justification for the change in survey frequency in East Tank Farms occupied contamination areas from weekly to monthly. The Tank Farms Radiological Control Organization has performed radiological surveys of its Contamination Area (CA) Double Shell Tank (DST) farms in 200 East Area on a weekly basis for several years. The task package (DST-W012) controlling these routines designates specific components, at a minimum, that must be surveyed whenever the task is performed. This document documents the evaluation of these survey requirements and provides the recommendation and basis for moving DST tank farms in the 200 East Area from a weekly to monthly contamination survey. The contamination surveys for occupied contamination areas in West Tank Farms (WTF) were changed from a weekly frequency to a monthly frequency in 1997. Review of contamination survey data in WTF indicates a monthly interval remains satisfactory

  5. RCT: Module 2.11, Radiological Work Coverage, Course 8777

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hillmer, Kurt T. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-07-20

    Radiological work is usually approved and controlled by radiation protection personnel by using administrative and procedural controls, such as radiological work permits (RWPs). In addition, some jobs will require working in, or will have the potential for creating, very high radiation, contamination, or airborne radioactivity areas. Radiological control technicians (RCTs) providing job coverage have an integral role in controlling radiological hazards. This course will prepare the student with the skills necessary for RCT qualification by passing quizzes, tests, and the RCT Comprehensive Phase 1, Unit 2 Examination (TEST 27566) and will provide in-the-field skills.

  6. Recommended radiological controls for tritium operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansfield, G.

    1992-01-01

    This informal report presents recommendations for an adequate radiological protection program for tritium operations. Topics include hazards analysis, facility design, personnel protection equipment, training, operational procedures, radiation monitoring, to include surface and airborne tritium contamination, and program management

  7. Assessment of natural radioactivity and radiological hazards in building materials used in Yan'an, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xinwei; Li, Nan; Yang, Guang; Zhao, Caifeng

    2013-03-01

    The concentration of natural radionuclides in commonly used building materials collected from Yan'an, China, was determined using gamma ray spectroscopy with a NaI(Tl) detector. The activity concentration of ²²⁶Ra, ²³²Th, and ⁴⁰K in the studied building materials ranges from 9.4-73.1, 11.5-86.9, and 258.9-1,055.1 Bq kg⁻¹, respectively. The concentrations for these natural radionuclides were compared with the reported data of other countries and the world mean values for soil. The radium equivalent activity (Raeq), external hazard index (Hex), internal hazard index (Hin), indoor air absorbed dose rate, and annual effective dose rate due to natural radionuclides in samples were estimated to assess radiological hazards for people living in dwellings made of the studied building materials. The calculated Raeq values of all building materials (75.7-222.1 Bq kg⁻¹) are lower than the limit of 370 Bq kg⁻¹. The values of Hex and Hin are less than unity. The mean values of indoor air absorbed dose rates of all building materials (101.0 ± 14.1-177.0 ± 6.8 nGy h⁻¹) are higher than the world population-weighted average of 84 nGy h⁻¹, while the mean values of annual effective dose range from 0.50 ± 0.07-0.87 ± 0.03 mSv y⁻¹, which are lower than the recommended limit of 1 mSv y⁻¹. It is found that these materials may be used safely as construction materials and do not pose significant radiation hazards to inhabitants.

  8. US Department of Energy Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project, final report of the decontamination and decommissioning of Building 36 at the Grand Junction Projects Office Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widdop, M.R.

    1996-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore and mill tailings during uranium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District and during pilot milling experiments conducted for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission's domestic uranium procurement program. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJPO Remedial Action Project to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and the underlying aquifer. The site contractor for the facility, Rust Geotech, also is the remedial action contractor. Building 36 was found to be radiologically contaminated and was demolished in 1996. The soil beneath the building was remediated in accordance with identified standards and can be released for unlimited exposure and unrestricted use. This document was prepared in response to a DOE request for an individual final report for each contaminated GJPO building

  9. US Department of Energy Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project. Final report of the decontamination and decommissioning of Building 52 at the Grand Junction Projects Office Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krabacher, J.E.

    1996-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore and mill tailings during uranium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District and during pilot milling experiments conducted for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission's domestic uranium procurement program. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJPO Remedial Action Project to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and the underlying aquifer. The site contractor for the facility, Rust Geotech, also was the remedial action contractor. Building 52 was found to be radiologically contaminated and was demolished in 1994. The soil area within the footprint of the building has been remediated in accordance with the identified standards and the area can be released for unlimited exposure and unrestricted use. This document was prepared in response to a DOE request for an individual final report for each contaminated GJPO building

  10. The inspection of a radiologically contaminated pipeline using a teleoperated pipe crawler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fogle, R.F.; Kuelske, K.; Kellner, R.A.

    1995-01-01

    In the 1950s, the Savannah River Site built an open, unlined retention basin to temporarily store potentially radionuclide contaminated cooling water from a chemical separations process and storm water drainage from a nearby waste management facility that stored large quantities of nuclear fission byproducts in carbon steel tanks. The retention basin was retired from service in 1972 when a new, lined basin was completed. In 1978, the old retention basin was excavated, backfilled with uncontaminated dirt, and covered with grass. At the same time, much of the underground process pipeline leading to the basin was abandoned. Since the closure of the retention basin, new environmental regulations require that the basin undergo further assessment to determine whether additional remediation is required. A visual and radiological inspection of the pipeline was necessary to aid in the remediation decision making process for the retention basin system. A teleoperated pipe crawler inspection system was developed to survey the abandoned sections of underground pipelines leading to the retired retention basin. This paper will describe the background to this project, the scope of the investigation, the equipment requirements, and the results of the pipeline inspection

  11. Radiological Emergency Preparedness after the Early Phase of an Accident : Focusing on an Air Contamination Event

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Hyo Joon; Hwang, Won Tae; Kim, Eun Han; Han, Moon Hee

    2010-01-01

    Toxic materials in an urban area can be caused by a variety of events, such as accidental releases on industrial complexes, accidents during the transportation of hazardous materials and intentional explosions. Most governments around the world and their citizens have become increasingly worried about intentional accidents in urban area after the 911 terrorist attack in the United States of America. Even though there have been only a few attempted uses of Radiological Dispersal Devices (RDDs), accidental releases have occurred many times at commercial nuclear power plants and nuclear waste disposal sites. When an intentional release of radioactive materials occurs in an urban area, air quality for radioactive materials in the environment is of great importance to take action for countermeasures and environmental risk assessments. Atmospheric modeling is part of the decision making tasks and that it is particularly important for emergency managers as they often need to take actions quickly on very inadequate information(1). A simple model such as HOTSPOT required wind direction and source term would be enough to support the decision making in the early phase of an accident, but more sophisticated atmospheric modeling is required to adjust decontamination area and relocation etc after the early phase of an accidental event. In this study, we assume an explosion of 137 Cs using RDDs in the metropolitan area of Soul, South Korea. California Puff Model (CALPUFF) is used to calculate an atmospheric dispersion and transport for 137 Cs. Atmospheric dispersion and quantitative radiological risk analysis for 137 Cs were performed assuming an intentional explosion in the metropolitan area of Soul, South Korea after the early phase of emergency. These kinds of atmospheric modeling and risk analysis could provide a means for decision makers to take action on important issues such as the cleanup of the contaminated area and countermeasures to protect the public caused by

  12. A comprehensive inventory of radiological and nonradiological contaminants in waste buried or projected to be buried in the subsurface disposal area of the INEL RWMC during the years 1984-2003, Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-05-01

    This is the second volume of this comprehensive report of the inventory of radiological and nonradiological contaminants in waste buried or projected to be buried in the subsurface disposal area of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Appendix B contains a complete printout of contaminant inventory and other information from the CIDRA Database and is presented in volumes 2 and 3 of the report

  13. Feasibility study to combine the evaluation of radiological and chemical-toxicological effects of old contaminated sites; Machbarkeitsstudie zur Verknuepfung der Bewertung radiologischer und chemisch-toxischer Wirkungen von Altlasten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacob, P; Proehl, G [Gesellschaft fuer Strahlen- und Umweltforschung mbH Muenchen, Neuherberg (Germany). Inst. fuer Strahlenschutz; Schneider, K; Voss, J U [FoBiG Forschungs- und Beratungsinstitut Gefahrstoffe GmbH, Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany)

    1997-08-01

    The uranium mining regions of the German Federal States Saxony, Thuringia and Saxony-Anhalt are contaminated by radionuclides and by chemical substances. For both, ionizing radiations and chemicals, concepts and models exists to assess possible health effects for the population living in such areas. However, these assessment models were developed independently for both kinds of contaminants. Therefore, the 9{sup th} Conference of the State Ministers for Environmental Protection have claimed that for the evaluation of contaminated sites the radiological and chemical contaminants should be integrated into a joint assessment. This feasibility study describes the state of the art of the concepts and models used for the evaluation of radiological and chemical contaminants. The similarities and differences of these evaluation methods are identified and discussed. Suggestions are made for an integrated assessment to standardize the evaluation of sites contaminated by radionuclides or chemicals. (orig.) [Deutsch] In den Gebieten des ehemaligen Uranbergbaus der Bundeslaender Sachsen, Thueringen und Sachsen-Anhalt treten neben den radioaktiven Kontaminationen auch andere Schadstoffe, insbesondere Schwermetalle, auf. Fuer ionisierende Strahlung und fuer chemische Noxen existieren unabhaengig voneinander entwickelte Bewertungssysteme zum Schutz vor Gesundheitsgefahren und Empfehlungen zum Umgang mit kontaminierten Standorten. Vor diesem Hintergrund forderte die 9. Umweltministerkonferenz - Ost am 17./18. Juni 1993 eine `Verknuepfung der radiologischen und konventionellen Altlastenbewertung`. Ob diese Verknuepfung moeglich ist und in welcher Weise diese vorgenommen werden kann, ist bisher nicht untersucht worden. Diese Machbarkeitsstudie unternimmt eine Bestandsaufnahme von Uebereinstimmungen und Unterschieden der beiden bestehenden Bewertungssysteme fuer Kontaminationen mit Radionukliden und mit chemisch-toxischen Stoffen und zeigt einen Weg auf zur Verinheitlichung der

  14. Using Coupled Energy, Airflow and IAQ Software (TRNSYS/CONTAM) to Evaluate Building Ventilation Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dols, W Stuart; Emmerich, Steven J; Polidoro, Brian J

    2016-03-01

    Building energy analysis tools are available in many forms that provide the ability to address a broad spectrum of energy-related issues in various combinations. Often these tools operate in isolation from one another, making it difficult to evaluate the interactions between related phenomena and interacting systems, forcing oversimplified assumptions to be made about various phenomena that could otherwise be addressed directly with another tool. One example of such interdependence is the interaction between heat transfer, inter-zone airflow and indoor contaminant transport. In order to better address these interdependencies, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has developed an updated version of the multi-zone airflow and contaminant transport modelling tool, CONTAM, along with a set of utilities to enable coupling of the full CONTAM model with the TRNSYS simulation tool in a more seamless manner and with additional capabilities that were previously not available. This paper provides an overview of these new capabilities and applies them to simulating a medium-size office building. These simulations address the interaction between whole-building energy, airflow and contaminant transport in evaluating various ventilation strategies including natural and demand-controlled ventilation. CONTAM has been in practical use for many years allowing building designers, as well as IAQ and ventilation system analysts, to simulate the complex interactions between building physical layout and HVAC system configuration in determining building airflow and contaminant transport. It has been widely used to design and analyse smoke management systems and evaluate building performance in response to chemical, biological and radiological events. While CONTAM has been used to address design and performance of buildings implementing energy conserving ventilation systems, e.g., natural and hybrid, this new coupled simulation capability will enable users to apply the

  15. Formerly utilized MED/AEC sites, Remedial Action Program: radiological survey of the Hooker Chemical Company, Niagara Falls, New York. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Results of a radiological survey of a portion of the Hooker Chemical Company, Niagara Falls, New York, are presented. The survey was conducted over 5.5-acres in which uranium-bearing materials were handled in the early 1940's. The survey included direct measurements of alpha, beta-gamma, and external gamma radiation throughout the site, measurement of transferable alpha and beta contamination levels in the buildings, determination of uranium and radium concentrations in the soild on the site, measurement of radon and radon daughter concentrations in the buildings, and determination of radionuclide concentrations in surface water samples. The results of the survey indicate that radiation levels throughout the site are within pertinent guidelines for unrestricted release of the property

  16. Microbiological contamination in digital radiography: evaluation at the radiology clinic of an educational institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malta, Cristiana P; Damasceno, Naiana Nl; Ribeiro, Rosangela A; Silva, Carolina Sf; Devito, Karina L

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the contamination rate of intra and extraoral digital X ray equipment in a dental radiology clinic at a public educational institution. Samples were collected on three different days, at two times in the day: in the morning, before attending patients, and at the end of the day, after appointment hours and before cleaning and disinfection procedures. Samples were collected from the periapical X-ray machine (tube head, positioning device, control panel and activator button), the panoramic X- ray machine (temporal support, bite block, control panel and activator button), the intraoral digital system (sensor), and the digital system computers (keyboard and mouse). The samples were seeded in different culture media, incubated, and colony forming units (CFU/mL) counted. Biochemical tests were performed for suspected colonies of Staphylococcus, Streptococcus and Gramnegative bacilli (GNB). Fungi were visually differentiated into filamentous fungi and yeasts. The results indicated the growth of fungi and Staphylococcus fromall sampling locations. GNB growth was observed from all sites sampled from the intraoral X-ray equipment. On the panoramic unit, GNB growth was observed in samples from activator button, keyboard and mouse. In general, a higher number of CFU/mL was present before use. It can be concluded that more stringent protocols are needed to control infection and prevent X-ray exams from acting as vehicle for cross contamination. Sociedad Argentina de Investigación Odontológica.

  17. Radiology Architecture Project Primer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sze, Raymond W; Hogan, Laurie; Teshima, Satoshi; Davidson, Scott

    2017-12-19

    The rapid pace of technologic advancement and increasing expectations for patient- and family-friendly environments make it common for radiology leaders to be involved in imaging remodel and construction projects. Most radiologists and business directors lack formal training in architectural and construction processes but are expected to play significant and often leading roles in all phases of an imaging construction project. Avoidable mistakes can result in significant increased costs and scheduling delays; knowledgeable participation and communication can result in a final product that enhances staff workflow and morale and improves patient care and experience. This article presents practical guidelines for preparing for and leading a new imaging architectural and construction project. We share principles derived from the radiology and nonradiology literature and our own experience over the past decade completely remodeling a large pediatric radiology department and building a full-service outpatient imaging center. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Formerly utilized MED/AEC sites remedial action program. Radiological survey of the former Horizons, Inc., metal handling facility, Cleveland, Ohio. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leggett, R.W.; Cottrell, W.D.; Shinpaugh, W.H.; Doane, R.W.; Haywood, F.F.; Johnson, W.M.

    1979-02-01

    The results of a radiological survey of the former Horizons, Inc., metal handling facility in Cleveland, Ohio, are presented in this report. During the 1940's and early 1950's, two of the three buildings on this site (Buildings B and C) were used for the production of granular thorium metal. The survey included measurements related to the following: fixed and transferable alpha and beta-gamma contamination levels on the surfaces in Buildings B and C and on the roofs of these buildings; external gamma radiation levels at 1 m above the floors and grounds on and near the property; radionuclide concentrations in soil, water, and other materials collected from surfaces and drains inside Buildings B and C, from beneath the floor in Building C, and from outdoor locations on and near the site; and thoron ( 220 Rn) daughter concentrations in the air in Buildings B and C. Elevated concentrations of 232 Th, 228 Ra, 228 Th, and 230 Th were found in some samples. Alpha and beta-gamma contamination levels exceeded applicable guideline limits in some areas of Buildings B and C. External gamma radiation levels, approximately 10 times the average background level, were measured at isolated points in and near Building B. Thorium B ( 212 Pb) concentrations in air in Building B were near the Radioactivity Concentration Guide (RCG) level. Most of the elevated radiation levels were found indoors in areas presently used for storage. Outdoors on and near the site, significant radiation levels were found only near the east wall of Building B

  19. Radiological benchmarks for screening contaminants of potential concern for effects on aquatic biota at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    A hazardous waste site may contain hundreds of contaminants; therefore, it is important to screen contaminants of potential concern for the ecological risk assessment. Often this screening is done as part of a screening assessment, the purpose of which is to evaluate the available data, identify data gaps, and screen contaminants of potential concern. Screening may be accomplished by using a set of toxicological benchmarks. These benchmarks are helpful in determining whether contaminants warrant further assessment or are at a level that requires no further attention. Unlike exposures to chemicals, which are expressed as the concentration in water or sediment, exposures to radionuclides are expressed as the dose rate received by the organism. The recommended acceptable dose rate to natural populations of aquatic biota is 1 rad d{sup {minus}1}. Blaylock, Frank, and O`Neal provide formulas and exposure factors for estimating the dose rates to representative aquatic organisms. Those formulas were used herein to calculate the water and sediment concentrations that result in a total dose rate of 1 rad d{sup {minus}1} to fish for selected radionuclides. These radiological benchmarks are intended for use at the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Oak Ridge Reservation and at the Portsmouth and Paducah gaseous diffusion plants as screening values only to show the nature and extent of contamination and identify the need for additional site-specific investigation.

  20. Radiological benchmarks for screening contaminants of potential concern for effects on aquatic biota at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-07-01

    A hazardous waste site may contain hundreds of contaminants; therefore, it is important to screen contaminants of potential concern for the ecological risk assessment. Often this screening is done as part of a screening assessment, the purpose of which is to evaluate the available data, identify data gaps, and screen contaminants of potential concern. Screening may be accomplished by using a set of toxicological benchmarks. These benchmarks are helpful in determining whether contaminants warrant further assessment or are at a level that requires no further attention. Unlike exposures to chemicals, which are expressed as the concentration in water or sediment, exposures to radionuclides are expressed as the dose rate received by the organism. The recommended acceptable dose rate to natural populations of aquatic biota is 1 rad d -1 . Blaylock, Frank, and O'Neal provide formulas and exposure factors for estimating the dose rates to representative aquatic organisms. Those formulas were used herein to calculate the water and sediment concentrations that result in a total dose rate of 1 rad d -1 to fish for selected radionuclides. These radiological benchmarks are intended for use at the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oak Ridge Reservation and at the Portsmouth and Paducah gaseous diffusion plants as screening values only to show the nature and extent of contamination and identify the need for additional site-specific investigation

  1. Radiological emergencies the first response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-11-01

    This national training course about radiological emergencies first answer include: Targets and preparation for emergency response in case of a nuclear or radiological accident. Operations center, action guide for fire fighting, medical coverage, forensic test, first aid, basic instrumentation for radiation, safety equipment, monitoring radiation, gamma rays, personnel exposed protection , radiation exposure rate, injury and illness for radiation, cancer risk, contamination, decontamination and treatment, markers, personnel dosimetry, training, medical and equipment transportation, shielded and tools. Psychological, physical (health and illness), economical (agriculture and industry) and environment impacts. Terrorist attacks, security belts. Support and international agreements (IAEA)

  2. Total effective dose equivalent associated with fixed uranium surface contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogard, J.S.; Hamm, R.N.; Ashley, J.C.; Turner, J.E.; England, C.A.; Swenson, D.E.; Brown, K.S.

    1997-04-01

    This report provides the technical basis for establishing a uranium fixed-contamination action level, a fixed uranium surface contamination level exceeding the total radioactivity values of Appendix D of Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, part 835 (10CFR835), but below which the monitoring, posting, and control requirements for Radiological Areas are not required for the area of the contamination. An area of fixed uranium contamination between 1,000 dpm/100 cm 2 and that level corresponding to an annual total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) of 100 mrem requires only routine monitoring, posting to alert personnel of the contamination, and administrative control. The more extensive requirements for monitoring, posting, and control designated by 10CFR835 for Radiological Areas do not have to be applied for these intermediate fixed-contamination levels

  3. A study on the industrialization of building stones and industrial stone crafts - Study on the causes of stone contaminations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyun, Jeon Ki; Lee, Han Yeang [Korea Institute of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-01

    Causes of building stone contamination are acid rains in polluted areas, iron bearing minerals in stone itself, salts, sealants, cutting and grinding processes in stone factory and steel compounds structures such as stone anchors, bolts, rain culvert and guide frames. Contaminations on the building stone surface of Sejong culture center can be found around floor stones, stair stones, parterre stones, pillar stones and other outdoor stone panels. The parterre stones are contaminated by white tarnishes and rust flows are occurred on the surface of pillar stones and outdoor stone panels around entrance. Black tarnishes are cumulated on the pillar stones and other outdoor decorated stone panels and change the original granite color. Causes of building stone contaminations from Sejong culture center are wet method to attach stone panels, rust from steel compounds structures and air pollutants. Cement and mortar used from wet method react with sulfur dioxides in polluted air and from fine calcite crystals (white tarnish). Rusts from steel compounds structures such as rainwater culvert and steel guide frames can move to the stone surface by rain and leave rust flows on it. Pollutants (tar compounds, carbons, dusts, etc.) in air are cumulated with humidity on the stone surface and change color from white granite color to dusty dark color. Historical stone sculptures such as man and animal shaped stone crafts, tombstones, square stone tables in front of a tomb and guide and circumference stones around tomb in Royal Tombs (Donggu rung, Yung rung, Seoou rung and Hunin rung) distributed in Kyunggi province are contaminated by various moss and air pollutants and its original colors are deeply changed. (author). 21 refs., 11 tabs., 22 figs.

  4. WS-011: EPR-First Responders: Demonstration of a radiological emergency response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this working session is that the participant can apply their knowledge in a radiological emergency response as well as how to prevent potential contamination damage. The participants have to know how to respond in a radiological criminal scenario, the personal protection and the risks

  5. Results of the radiological survey at the Niagara-Mohawk property, Railroad Avenue, Colonie, New York (AL218)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marley, J.L.; Carrier, R.F.

    1987-12-01

    A number of properties in the Albany/Colonie area have been identified as being potentially contaminated with uranium originating from the former National Lead Company's uranium forming plant in Colonie, New York. The Niagara-Mohawk property on Railroad Avenue in Colonie, New York, was the subject of a radiological investigation initiated June 11, 1987. This commercial property is an irregularly shaped lot partially occupied by an electric power substation and associated transmission lines. Portions of the property that were swampy and heavily vegetated were inaccessible to the survey team. There are no buildings on the property. A diagram showing the approximate boundaries and the 15-m grid network established for measurements on the property is shown. The lot included in the radiological survey was /approximately/45 m wide by 246 m deep. Two views of the property are shown. 13 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs

  6. Formerly utilized MED/AEC sites remedial action program. Radiological survey of The George Herbert Jones Chemical Laboratory, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, June 13-17, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wynveen, R.A.; Smith, W.H.; Mayes, C.B.; Justus, A.L.

    1982-05-01

    A comprehensive radiological survey was conducted at George Herbert Jones Chemical Laboratory at the University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois. Radiochemistry for the MED/AEC project was performed in this building in the 1940s. The building is now used as laboratories, offices, and classrooms. The survey was undertaken to determine the location and quantities of any radioactive materials remaining from the MED/AEC operations. Forty-three spots of contamination possibly resulting from MED/AEC occupancy in 17 rooms exceeded the allowable limits as given in the ANSI Standard N13.12. Under current use conditions, the potential for radiation exposure to occupants of this building from these sources of contamination is remote. Concentrations of radon daughters in the air of the building, as measured with grab-sampling techniques, were below the limit of 0.01 WL above background as given in the Surgeon General's Guidelines. No long-lived radionuclides were detected in any air sample. Concentrations of radionuclides in soil samples from near the laboratory generally indicated background levels. In order to reduce the potential for radiation exposure, remedial measures such as stabilization of the contamination in place would be applicable as a short-term measure. In order to reduce the risk in the event that building modifications take place in the future, health physics procedures and coverage are recommended. The long-term solution would involve decontamination by removal of the radioactive residues from the 17 rooms or areas where contamination possibly resulting from MED/AEC activities was detected

  7. Radiological Worker II Training, Course 20301 (Live), Course 12909 (Test)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Jimmy D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-01-13

    Radiological worker training is the basic building block for any additional radiological training you may receive. Upon completing radiological worker training, you will have the basic knowledge needed to work safely, using proper radiological practices, in areas where radiological hazards exist. You will also have a better understanding of the hazards and responsibilities associated with radiological work to help prevent the carelessness that can occur when working continually with or around radioactive material. This course does not qualify you for any specific radiological work. You may be required to take additional training at individual facilities to address facility- and job-specific hazards and procedures.

  8. Radiological emergency: Malaysian preparedness and response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yusof, M. A. W.; Ali, H. M.

    2011-01-01

    Planning and preparation in advance for radiological emergencies can help to minimise potential public health and environmental threats if and when an actual emergency occurs. During the planning process, emergency response organisations think through how they would respond to each type of incident and the resources that will be needed. In Malaysia, planning, preparation for and response to radiological emergencies involve many parties. In the event of a radiological emergency and if it is considered a disaster, the National Security Council, the Atomic Energy Licensing Board and the Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia) will work together with other federal agencies, state and local governments, first responders and international organisations to monitor the situation, contain the release, and clean up the contaminated site. Throughout the response, these agencies use their protective action guidelines. This paper discusses Malaysian preparedness for, and response to, any potential radiological emergency. (authors)

  9. Radiological Characterisation for Decommissioning of Nuclear Installations - Final Report of the Task Group on Radiological Characterisation and Decommissioning (RCD) of the Working Party on Decommissioning and Dismantling (WPDD) - Final Report, September 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrieu, Caroline; Olivier Dehaye, Catherine; Tardy, Frederic; Boisserie, Thierry; Desnoyers, Yvon; Thierfeldt, Stefan; Martin, Nieves; Henrik Efraimsson; Haakansson, Lars; Larsson, Arne; Dunlop, Alister A.; Jarman, Sean; Orr, Peter; Abu-Eid, Boby

    2013-01-01

    , or during the dismantling phase where systems, structures, components and buildings have to be characterised for decisions regarding the extent of decontamination, application of appropriate dismantling techniques, identification, classification, treatment of radioactive materials, etc. The final status survey on the site has quite distinctive features as it also has to take into account the possibility of subsurface contamination, which may lead to radionuclide transfer into ground water and surface water bodies. Careful planning and implementation of radiological characterisation campaigns will allow significant reduction of time, costs and effort. On a strategic and managerial level, there are ways to maximise the efficiency of measurement techniques (e.g. by combining several types of measurement and sampling approaches) to increase efficiency of characterisation (e.g. by integrating characterisation into other tasks), or to choose an optimum form of organisation by allocating staff and resources timely and adequately to achieve the required characterisation results when needed, thus avoiding delays in the normal decommissioning work-flow or radioactive waste management. Today, experience gained from a large number of decommissioning projects helps to implement radiological characterisation effectively. Radiological characterisation is undoubtedly one of the key factors for any successful decommissioning project. The aim of this report is to identify and give an overview of the best practice for radiological characterisation at different stages of decommissioning and to point out areas that could or should be developed further through international co-operation and co-ordination. The report summarises various issues relating to radiological characterisation in a short and succinct way, giving an overview of the issues, the techniques, possible obstacles, strategic aspects and lessons learned. The reader interested in more in-depth or detailed information should

  10. Radiological scenario modeling using the Hotspot code and potential financial impact of treatment of radiation induced cancer to the public; Modelagem de cenario radiologico utilizando o codigo Hotspot e potenciais impactos financeiros para tratamento de cancer radioinduzido ao publico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Gabriel Fidalgo Queiroz da; Andrade, Edson Ramos de; Rebello, Wilson Freitas; Araujo, Olga Maria Oliveira de, E-mail: profgabriel.fisica@gmail.com, E-mail: fisica.dna@gmail.com, E-mail: rebello@ime.eb.br, E-mail: olgafisica2013@hotmail.com [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Secao de Engenharia Nuclear

    2015-07-01

    The work aims to develop a methodology that is able to estimate the financial impact in a radiological emergency events, considering the radiation induced cancer, particularly leukemia. Considering a RDD - Radiological Dispersive Device, consisting of explosives and cesium-137 as radioactive material, a scenario building on the Rio de Janeiro was modeled. The convergence of a risk modeling platform (HotSpot 3.0), the analysis of excess relative risks for humans (BEIR V-Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation V), considering scenarios composed of contaminated areas, are secondary goals.

  11. IAEA Perspectives on Radiological Characterisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Sullivan, Patrick; Ljubenov, Vladan

    2012-01-01

    Requirements for characterization of radiological and other hazards in nuclear facilities are reflected in the IAEA Safety Standards. WS-R-5, Safety Requirements for Decommissioning of Facilities using Radioactive Material, includes a requirement that 'During the preparation of the final decommissioning plan, the extent and type of radioactive material (irradiated and contaminated structures and components) at the facility shall be determined by means of a detailed characterization survey and on the basis of records collected during the operational period'. The subsidiary Safety Guide WS-G-2.1, Decommissioning of Nuclear Power Plants and Research Reactors, further elaborates that 'A survey of radiological and non-radiological hazards provides an important input for the safety assessment and for implementing a safe approach during the work'. Although the characterisation requirements addressed in the Safety Standards relate primarily to the detailed survey activities undertaken following the shutdown of the facility, it is evident that radiological characterization is of relevance to all major phases of the lifetime of a nuclear facility, including: - the siting phase - baseline surveys are undertaken to determine background radiation levels; - the construction phase - construction materials are retained to support future calculations of radioactivity distributions; - the operational phase - surveys are done regularly, with additional surveys being required following incidents involving plant contamination; - the transition phase - detailed radiological surveys are required to support the development of the final decommissioning plan; and - the closure phase - a final survey of the site and any remaining structures will be needed to support an application for release of the site from regulatory control. In the case of facilities that are already shut down, the main purpose of radiological characterisation is to provide a reliable database of information on the

  12. The Importance of Particle Size in Estimating Downwind Contamination from an RDD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, T.

    2007-01-01

    There is general agreement that realistic quantities of radiological material released from a radiological dispersal device (RDD) will not travel more than hundred meters at toxic levels. Of greater concern in the case of such an incident is the size of the area contaminated with radiological particles. Remediation of contaminated areas will require either removal of the deposited articles or disposal of the contaminated materials. Contours of expected contaminated areas have been presented which extend more than 10 miles downwind of the release location. It would be impossible to remediate such a large area, so the likely response will be to permanently seal most of it off from further use. Not only are these radiation contours below levels of concern, the particle size assumed is unreasonably low, especially when the density of radioactive materials is considered. Using of appropriate RDD characterization and range of particle size, this presentation will show that expected contamination areas should be small enough to make remediation feasible.(author)

  13. Radiological protection of populations in contaminated areas: synthesis of tools, concepts and methods elaborated in the ETHOS project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepicard, S.; Lochard, J.; Schneider, T.

    2004-01-01

    The ETHOS project has been implemented in Belarus from 1996 to 2001. This report addresses several issues concerning the monitoring of radioactivity of the environment and of persons, and its modalities: organization of measurement devices, restitution of measurements, formatting and exploitation of results by different actors in order to develop strategies adapted to a contaminated environment. Thus, the report discusses the methodological fundamentals, the common information base on a radiological situation, and modalities for information exchange, formatting and processing. Then, it addresses the articulation between individual and public actions in improvement strategies (monitoring of local product quality with example of milk, children health monitoring), and the issue of the management of radioactive wastes in household activities

  14. Lepton contamination and photon scatter produced by open field 18 MV X-ray beams in the build-up region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butson, M.J.; Cheung Tsang; Yu, P.K.N.

    2002-01-01

    18 MV X-ray beams used in radiotherapy have skin sparing properties as they produce a dose build-up effect whereby a smaller dose is delivered to the skin compared to dose at depth. Experimental results have shown that variations in the build-up dose significantly contribute to lepton contamination produced outside of the patient or the phantom in question. Monte Carlo simulations of 18 MV X-ray beams show that the surface dose contribution from in-phantom scatter alone is approximately 6% of the maximum dose. The contribution to dose from lepton contamination is found by comparison of Monte Carlo phantom photon scatter dose only and experimental data. Results show that the percentage contributions to dose from lepton contamination are approximately, 65%, 90% of dose at 0.05 mm (basal cell layer), 52%, 79% at 1 mm depth (dermal layer) and 15%, 26% at 10 mm depth (subcutaneous tissue) for 10 cmx10 cm 2 and 40 cmx40 cm 2 fields, respectively

  15. Lepton contamination and photon scatter produced by open field 18 MV X-ray beams in the build-up region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butson, M.J. E-mail: mbutson@guessmail.com; Cheung Tsang; Yu, P.K.N

    2002-04-01

    18 MV X-ray beams used in radiotherapy have skin sparing properties as they produce a dose build-up effect whereby a smaller dose is delivered to the skin compared to dose at depth. Experimental results have shown that variations in the build-up dose significantly contribute to lepton contamination produced outside of the patient or the phantom in question. Monte Carlo simulations of 18 MV X-ray beams show that the surface dose contribution from in-phantom scatter alone is approximately 6% of the maximum dose. The contribution to dose from lepton contamination is found by comparison of Monte Carlo phantom photon scatter dose only and experimental data. Results show that the percentage contributions to dose from lepton contamination are approximately, 65%, 90% of dose at 0.05 mm (basal cell layer), 52%, 79% at 1 mm depth (dermal layer) and 15%, 26% at 10 mm depth (subcutaneous tissue) for 10 cmx10 cm{sup 2} and 40 cmx40 cm{sup 2} fields, respectively.

  16. Measurement techniques for radiological characterization of contaminated sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loos, M

    1996-09-18

    Once the decision is taken to characterize a contaminated site, appropriate measurement techniques must be selected. The choice will depend on the available information, on the nature and extent of the contamination, as well as on available resources (staff and budget). Some techniques are described on the basis of examples of characterization projects (e.g. Olen area in Belgium).

  17. Modeling for Airborne Contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    F.R. Faillace; Y. Yuan

    2000-01-01

    The objective of Modeling for Airborne Contamination (referred to from now on as ''this report'') is to provide a documented methodology, along with supporting information, for estimating the release, transport, and assessment of dose to workers from airborne radioactive contaminants within the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) subsurface during the pre-closure period. Specifically, this report provides engineers and scientists with methodologies for estimating how concentrations of contaminants might be distributed in the air and on the drift surfaces if released from waste packages inside the repository. This report also provides dose conversion factors for inhalation, air submersion, and ground exposure pathways used to derive doses to potentially exposed subsurface workers. The scope of this report is limited to radiological contaminants (particulate, volatile and gaseous) resulting from waste package leaks (if any) and surface contamination and their transport processes. Neutron activation of air, dust in the air and the rock walls of the drift during the preclosure time is not considered within the scope of this report. Any neutrons causing such activation are not themselves considered to be ''contaminants'' released from the waste package. This report: (1) Documents mathematical models and model parameters for evaluating airborne contaminant transport within the MGR subsurface; and (2) Provides tables of dose conversion factors for inhalation, air submersion, and ground exposure pathways for important radionuclides. The dose conversion factors for air submersion and ground exposure pathways are further limited to drift diameters of 7.62 m and 5.5 m, corresponding to the main and emplacement drifts, respectively. If the final repository design significantly deviates from these drift dimensions, the results in this report may require revision. The dose conversion factors are further derived by using concrete of sufficient thickness to simulate the drift

  18. Protecting people against radiation exposure in the event of a radiological attack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentin, J.

    2005-01-01

    This report responds to a widely perceived need for professional advice on radiological protection measures to be undertaken in the event of a radiological attack. The report, which is mainly concerned with possible attacks involving 'radioactive dispersion devices', re-affirms the applicability of existing ICRP recommendations to such situations, should they ever occur. Many aspects of the emergency scenarios expected to arise in the event of a radiological attack may be similar to those that experience has shown can arise from radiological accidents, but there may also be important differences. For instance, a radiological attack would probably be targeted at a public area, possibly in an urban environment, where the presence of radiation is not anticipated and the dispersion conditions commonly assumed for a nuclear or radiological emergency, such as at a nuclear installation, may not be applicable. First responders to a radiological attack and other rescuers need to be adequately trained and to have the proper equipment for identifying radiation and radioactive contamination, and specialists in radiological protection must be available to provide advice. It may be prudent to assume that radiological, chemical, and/or biological agents are involved in an attack until it is proven otherwise. This calls for an 'all-hazard' approach to the response. In the aftermath of an attack, the main aim of radiological protection must be to prevent the occurrence of acute health effects attributable to radiation exposure (termed 'deterministic' effects) and to restrict the likelihood of late health effects (termed 'stochastic' effects) such as cancers and some hereditable diseases. A supplementary aim is to minimise environmental contamination from radioactive residues and the subsequent general disruption of daily life. The report notes that action taken to avert exposures is a much more effective protective measure than protective measure the provision of medical treatment

  19. Contamination vs. Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... into the environment can cause air, water, surfaces, soil, plants, buildings, people, or animals to become contaminated. ... water to remove contamination. This process is called decontamination. Try to avoid spreading contamination to parts of ...

  20. Digital Radiology Image Learning Library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arenson, R.L.; Greenes, R.; Allman, R.; Swett, H.

    1989-01-01

    The Digital Radiology Image Learning Library (DRILL) is designed as an interactive teaching tool targeted to the radiologic community. The DRILL pilot comprises a comprehensive mammographic information base consisting of factual data in a relational database, an extensive knowledge base in semantic nets and high-resolution images. A flexible query module permits the user to browse and retrieve examination data, case discussions, and related images. Other applications, including expert systems, instructional programs, and skill building exercises, can be accessed through well-defined software constructs

  1. Mobile Radiological Laboratories Intercomparison Measurements - Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martincic, R.; Glavic-Cindro, D.; Korun, M.; Pucelj, B.; Vodenik, B.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: In last decade different institutions in European countries have organised periodic intercomparison exercises of mobile radiological laboratories to improve the preparedness of emergency monitoring teams. The 12th Regular Workshop on Mobile Radiological Laboratories was held in Exclusion Zone of the Chernobyl NPP, Ukraine from September 13 to September 18, 1999 under the acronym MORAL-12. The European Centre of Technological Safety (TESEC), Kiev, Ukraine and J. Stefan Institute, Ljubljana, Slovenia organised Intercomparison Measurements 99 jointly under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Nineteen teams from 9 countries and IAEA participated in the Workshop. Six field and personal and equipment contamination control exercises were prepared and conducted at two measuring sites with very different ambient dose rate levels. The Workshop pointed out that such exercises are very valuable for rapid, efficient and harmonised emergency response in case of nuclear or radiological emergency. The teams had an opportunity to test their ability to perform field measurements in the contaminated environment, and to report results on the spot, as well as to test their emergency preparedness and persistence. They gained new experiences for fieldwork under stress conditions. An overview and results of these intercomparison measurements are presented and lessons learned are discussed. (author)

  2. Semi-portable whole body counter deployable during post-radiological accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panchal, C.G.; Bansode, P.Y.; Vinod, M.; Sarade, Bhagyashree; Jain, R.K.; Jakati, R.K.; Pithawa, C.K.

    2012-01-01

    A versatile whole body counter with the state of art electronics has been indigenously designed and developed which can be readily deployed for use during nuclear emergency. This instrument is designed to quickly identify and quantify the activity of high energy photon emitters accumulated particularly in vital organs like thyroid, lungs besides the body of the victims of the radiological incident or accident. Special features of the instruments are swivel type detectors assembly mountable on a wall or table top and detachable collimator configurable to assess the internal contamination selectively to meet protective measures of the radiological accidents, mechanically rugged and functionally reliable to perform in contaminated environmental field conditions. (author)

  3. Radio-contaminant behaviour in the cover-gas space and the containment building of a sodium-cooled fast reactor in accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathe, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    In the context of the Generation IV initiative, the consequences of a severe-accident (SA) in a sodium-cooled fast reactor must be studied. A SFR (Sodium cooled Fast Reactor) severe accident involves the disruption of the core by super-criticality involving the destruction of a certain number of fuel assemblies. Subsequently the interaction between hot fuel and liquid sodium can lead to a vapor explosion which could create a breach in the primary system. Some contaminated liquid sodium would thus be ejected into the containment building. In this situation, the evaluation of potential releases to the environment (the source term) must forecast the quantity and the chemical speciation of the radio-contaminants likely to be released from the containment building. One critical risk of a SA is the production of contaminated aerosols in the containment building by spray ejection of primary-system sodium. Being pyrophoric, the sodium droplets react with oxygen first oxidizing then burning, with significant heat of combustion. As well as evaluating the consequences of a pressure rise inside the containment, the evolution of the sodium must be assessed since not only is it activated and contaminated but, in oxide form, very toxic. Ultimately, the aerosols are the main radiological risk acting as the vector for radionuclide transport to the environment in the event of a problem with the confinement. These aerosols could evolve and interact with the FP (Fissile Products) and these interactions could modify the physical and chemical nature of the PF. We model a large part of the events that occur during a SA inside a SFR from the sodium spray fire to the reaction between sodium aerosols and PF (iodine). At first, we develop a numerical model (NATRAC) that simulates the sodium spray fire, calculates the temperature and the pressure inside the containment as well as the mass of aerosols produced during this kind of fire. The simulation has been validated with different

  4. Evaluating factors affecting the permeability of emulsions used to stabilize radioactive contamination from a radiological dispersal device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Garey A; Medina, Victor F

    2005-05-15

    Present strategies for alleviating radioactive contamination from a radiological dispersal device (RDD) or dirty bomb involve either demolishing and removing radioactive surfaces or abandoning portions of the area near the release point. In both cases, it is imperative to eliminate or reduce migration of the radioisotopes until the cleanup is complete or until the radiation has decayed back to acceptable levels. This research investigated an alternative strategy of using emulsions to stabilize radioactive particulate contamination. Emergency response personnel would coat surfaces with emulsions consisting of asphalt or tall oil pitch to prevent migration of contamination. The site can then be evaluated and cleaned up as needed. In order for this approach to be effective, the treatment must eliminate migration of the radioactive agents in the terror device. Water application is an environmental condition that could promote migration into the external environment. This research investigated the potential for water, and correspondingly contaminant, migration through two emulsions consisting of Topein, a resinous byproduct during paper manufacture. Topein C is an asphaltic-based emulsion and Topein S is a tall oil pitch, nonionic emulsion. Experiments included water adsorption/ mobilization studies, filtration tests, and image analysis of photomicrographs from an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) and a stereomicroscope. Both emulsions were effective at reducing water migration. Conductivity estimates were on the order of 10(-80) cm s(-1) for Topein C and 10(-7) cm s(-1) for Topein S. Water mobility depended on emulsion flocculation and coalescence time. Photomicrographs indicate that Topein S consisted of greater and more interconnected porosity. Dilute foams of isolated spherical gas cells formed when emulsions were applied to basic surfaces. Gas cells rose to the surface and ruptured, leaving void spaces that penetrated throughout the emulsion. These

  5. Results of the radiological survey at the former Alba Craft Laboratory site properties, Oxford, Ohio (OXO001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, M.E.; Brown, K.S.; Mathis, R.A.

    1993-03-01

    At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted a radiological survey at the former Alba Craft Laboratory Site Properties, Oxford, Ohio. The survey was performed in July and September of 1992. The purpose of the survey was to determine whether the property was contaminated with radioactive residues, primarily 238 U, from uranium machining operations conducted for National Lead of Ohio, a prime Atomic Energy Commission contractor. The survey included scan measurement of direct radiation levels inside and outside the former laboratory, outdoors on eight properties adjoining the former laboratory, and the city right-of-way adjacent to the surveyed properties. Radionuclide concentrations were determined in outdoor surface and subsurface soil samples taken from each property and the exterior of the laboratory. Fixed surface residual radioactivity was measured inside the laboratory and outside the building. Air samples were collected, direct exposure was measured, and samples were collected to measure transferable radioactivity inside the building. Results of the survey indicate areas where surface and soil contamination level s are above the DOE guidelines for uncontrolled areas

  6. ICRP Recommendations to the Protection of People Living in Long-Term Contaminated Areas ICRP publication 111 in brief

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salama, S.; Gomaa, M. A.; Rashad, S.

    2013-01-01

    The main aim of the present study is to through some lights on ICRP free release publication at 4 April 2011-Internationally Known as ICRP publication 111. The title of the publication is (application of the commission's recommendations to the protection of people living in long-term contaminated areas after a nuclear accident or a radiation emergency). Nuclear accidents or a radiation emergency may cause contamination. The contamination may be spread on a large area. There are people living in these areas. For many factors the people refuse to leave their homes. They want to stay along their life as in the case of the normal conditions. So, it is important to facilitate their stay and make it safe. This is not easy. But it is possible without neglect the radiation hazard. The radiation hazard is effective on the life fields. It is harmful in plants, animals, foods, water, milk and the buildings it self. With considering the radiological protection principles the living of the people for a long time could be a fact of the life and will be more easy and safe. Optimization principle has priority to apply. This publication achieves these purposes.The ICRP-111 is translated into Arabic at August 2012. This work is a continuation of the efforts series to translate some of the most important of the ICRP radiological protection references into the Arabic; aiming to maximize the benefit. The previous translations include, ICRP-105 (radiation protection in medicine) and ICRP -113 (education and training in radiological protection for diagnostic and interventional procedures).

  7. Formerly utilized MED/AEC sites remedial action program: radiological survey of the former Simonds Saw and Steel Co., Lockport, New York. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-11-01

    Results of a radiological survey of the former Simonds Saw and Steel Company (current name of this facility is Guterl Special Steel Corporation), Lockport, New York, are presented in this report. During the period 1948 to 1956, this company handled large quantities of uranium metal and smaller quantities of thorium metal in rolling mill operations. The survey included measurement of residual alpha and beta-gamma radiation levels in the rolling mill building and forging shop; external gamma radiation in the same area; uranium, radium, and thorium in soil samples taken from beneath removable floor plates in the rolling mill area and from other parts of the site; radon and radon daughter concentrations in the rolling mill building; and contamination in drainage paths leading from the buildings and grounds. Elevated concentrations of uranium were found in soil samples taken from beneath the floor plates within 40 ft of the 16-inch rolling mill. Beta-gamma radiation levels were greater than 1 mrad/hr at the locations having the highest concentrations of uranium. External gamma radiation levels were above the background level in a few small isolated areas in the rolling mill building. The 16-inch rolling mill showed elevated alpha and beta contamination levels in several areas

  8. Results of the radiological environmental monitoring network in the Central Eastern region of Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montalvan Estrada, O.; Brigido Flores, R.; Rosa Suarez, R.; Barreras Caballero, A.; Damera Martinez, A.

    1998-01-01

    The radiological environmental monitoring laboratory of Camaguey is a member of the Cuban radiological environmental network and it has been carried out a series of measures about radioactivity in the atmosphere: gamma-dose rate, gross-beta activities in fallout and in aerosols. The results show that this region has a low radiological background and it has been exposure contamination

  9. Site-specific analysis of radiological and physical parameters for cobbly soils at the Gunnison, Colorado, processing site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The remedial action at the Gunnison, Colorado, processing site is being performed under the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978. Under UMTRCA, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is charged with the responsibility of developing appropriate and applicable standards for the cleanup of radiologically contaminated land and buildings at 24 designated sites, including the Gunnison, Colorado, inactive processing site. Section 108 of Public Law 95-604 states that the US Department of Energy (DOE) shall ''select and perform remedial actions at the designated processing sites and disposal sites in accordance with the general standards'' prescribed by the EPA. Regulations governing the required remedial action at inactive uranium processing sites were promulgated by the EPA in 1983 and are contained in 40 CFR Part 192 (1993), Health and Environmental Protection Standards for Uranium and Thorium Mill Tailings. This document describes the radiological and physical parameters for the remedial action of the soil

  10. Results of radiological surveys of 20 borough-owned properties, Maywood, New Jersey (MJ050)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Carrier, R.F.

    1990-08-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of these 20 borough-owned properties Maywood, New Jersey, was conducted during 1987. Survey measurements indicate that none of the properties contained radioactive contamination. Slightly elevated gamma exposure rates in several areas were related to the presence of ashes or to natural materials used in the construction of buildings and asphalt surfaces. 4 refs., 1 figs., 1 tab

  11. Building Virtual Models by Postprocessing Radiology Images: A Guide for Anatomy Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Matthew D. B. S.

    2010-01-01

    Radiology and radiologists are recognized as increasingly valuable resources for the teaching and learning of anatomy. State-of-the-art radiology department workstations with industry-standard software applications can provide exquisite demonstrations of anatomy, pathology, and more recently, physiology. Similar advances in personal computers and…

  12. Air cleaning issues with contaminated sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellamy, R.R. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, King of Prussia, PA (United States)

    1997-08-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has developed a list of contaminated sites that warrant special USNRC attention because they pose unique or complex decommissioning issues. This list of radiologically contaminated sites is termed the Site Decommissioning Management Plan (SDMP), and was first issued in 1990. A site is placed on the SDMP list if it has; (1) Problems with the viability of the responsible organization (e.g., the licensee for the site is unable or unwilling to pay for the decommissioning); (2) Large amounts of soil contamination or unused settling ponds or burial grounds that may make the waste difficult to dispose of; (3) The long-term presence of contaminated, unused buildings; (4) A previously terminated license; or (5) Contaminated or potential contamination of the ground water from on-site wastes. In deciding whether to add a site to the SDMP list, the NRC also considers the projected length of time for decommissioning and the willingness of the responsible organization to complete the decommissioning in a timely manner. Since the list was established, 9 sites have been removed from the list, and the current SDMP list contains 47 sites in 11 states. The USNRC annually publishes NUREG-1444, {open_quotes}Site Decommissioning Management Plan{close_quotes}, which updates the status of each site. This paper will discuss the philosophical goals of the SDMP, then will concentrate on the regulatory requirements associated with air cleaning issues at the SDMP sites during characterization and remediation. Both effluent and worker protection issues will be discussed. For effluents, the source terms at sites will be characterized, and measurement techniques will be presented. Off-site dose impacts will be included. For worker protection issues, air sampling analyses will be presented in order to show how the workers are adequately protected and their doses measured to satisfy regulatory criteria during decontamination operations. 1 tab.

  13. Personnel contamination protection techniques applied during the TMI-2 [Three Mile Island Unit 2] cleanup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hildebrand, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    The severe damage to the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) core and the subsequent discharge of reactor coolant to the reactor and auxiliary buildings resulted in extremely hostile radiological environments in the TMI-2 plant. High fission product surface contamination and radiation levels necessitated the implementation of innovative techniques and methods in performing cleanup operations while assuring effective as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) practices. The approach utilized by GPU Nuclear throughout the cleanup in applying protective clothing requirements was to consider the overall health risk to the worker including factors such as cardiopulmonary stress, visual and hearing acuity, and heat stress. In applying protective clothing requirements, trade-off considerations had to be made between preventing skin contaminations and possibly overprotecting the worker, thus impacting his ability to perform his intended task at maximum efficiency and in accordance with ALARA principles. The paper discusses the following topics: protective clothing-general use, beta protection, skin contamination, training, personnel access facility, and heat stress

  14. Nuclear radiation sensors and monitoring following a nuclear or radiological emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatnagar, P.K.

    2009-01-01

    Management of Nuclear and Radiological Emergencies arising from Radiological Dispersive Device (RDD), Improvised Nuclear Devices (IND), Nuclear Reactors/Power plants and Nuclear War require measurement of ionizing radiations and radioactivity on an enhanced scale relative to the levels encountered in peaceful uses of ionizing radiations and radioactivity. It is heartening that since Hiroshima, Nagasaki nuclear disaster, the world has been quiet but since early 2000 there has been a fear of certain devices to be used by terrorists, which could lead to panic, and disaster due to dispersal of radioactivity by RDD, IND. Nuclear attack would lead to blast, thermal, initial nuclear radiation, nuclear fall out leading to gamma and neutron dose, dose rates in range from few R, R/h to kR, kR/h, and determinations of k Bq or higher order. Such situations have been visualized at national levels and National Disaster Management Authority NDMA has been established and Disaster Management Act 2005 has come into existence. NDMA has prepared guidelines for Nuclear and radiological emergency management highlighting preparedness, mitigation, response, capacity building, etc. Critical point in all these issues is detection of emergency, quick intimation to the concerned for action in shortest possible time. Upper most requirement by those involved in pursuing action, is radiation sensor based radiation monitors for personnel, area, and to assess contamination due to radioactivity.This presentation briefly describes the Indian scenario in the development of the radiation sensors and the sensor-based radiation monitors. (author)

  15. Nuclear radiation sensors and monitoring following a nuclear or radiological emergencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatnagar, P K [Defence Laboratory, Jodhpur (India)

    2009-01-15

    Management of Nuclear and Radiological Emergencies arising from Radiological Dispersive Device (RDD), Improvised Nuclear Devices (IND), Nuclear Reactors/Power plants and Nuclear War require measurement of ionizing radiations and radioactivity on an enhanced scale relative to the levels encountered in peaceful uses of ionizing radiations and radioactivity. It is heartening that since Hiroshima, Nagasaki nuclear disaster, the world has been quiet but since early 2000 there has been a fear of certain devices to be used by terrorists, which could lead to panic, and disaster due to dispersal of radioactivity by RDD, IND. Nuclear attack would lead to blast, thermal, initial nuclear radiation, nuclear fall out leading to gamma and neutron dose, dose rates in range from few R, R/h to kR, kR/h, and determinations of k Bq or higher order. Such situations have been visualized at national levels and National Disaster Management Authority NDMA has been established and Disaster Management Act 2005 has come into existence. NDMA has prepared guidelines for Nuclear and radiological emergency management highlighting preparedness, mitigation, response, capacity building, etc. Critical point in all these issues is detection of emergency, quick intimation to the concerned for action in shortest possible time. Upper most requirement by those involved in pursuing action, is radiation sensor based radiation monitors for personnel, area, and to assess contamination due to radioactivity.This presentation briefly describes the Indian scenario in the development of the radiation sensors and the sensor-based radiation monitors. (author)

  16. Radiological safety evaluation report for NUWAX-79 exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, W.C.

    1979-03-01

    An analysis of the radiological safety of the NUWAX-79 exercise to be conducted on the Nevada Test Site in April 1979 is given. An evaluation of the radiological safety to the participants is made using depleted uranium (D-38) in mock weapons parts, and 223 Ra and its daughters as a radioactive contaminant of equipment and terrain. The radiological impact to offsite persons is also discussed, particularly for people living at Lathrop Wells, Nevada, which is located 7 miles south of the site proposed for the exercise. It is the conclusion of this evaluation that the potential radiological risk of this exercise is very low, and that no individual should receive exposure to radioactivity greater than one-tenth of the level permitted under current federal radiation exposure guidelines

  17. Results of the indoor radiological survey at the W.R. Grace Co., Curtis Bay site, Baltimore, Maryland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cottrell, W.D.; Foley, R.D.; Johnson, C.A.

    1989-07-01

    The W.R. Grace Company, Davison Chemical Division, conducted developmental research and extraction of thorium from monazite ore at its Curtis Bay facility in Baltimore, Maryland, during the 1950s under contract to the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC). Only one of the numerous buildings on the site was used for these operations. A 1979 aerial survey of the site for the Department of Energy (DOE) indicated that a comprehensive ground survey was required to determine whether or not any contamination remained from the AEC activities in that building. A radiological scoping survey performed later that year for DOE by a team from the Measurement Applications and Development Group of the Health and Safety Research Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), disclosed surface contamination (alpha) levels in excess of DOE criteria on all five levels of the building. As a result of this finding, two additional surveys were performed in 1986 by ORNL at the request of DOE to evaluate any present or potential health risk. They are detailed in this report. The results of the 1986 surveys revealed several areas having elevated levels of radiation as a result of significant quantities of thorium on some building surfaces such as floors and ceiling beams. Most areas were small spots and in locations of low occupancy; thus, the possibility for significant exposure to workers was judged to be low. To confirm this evaluation, annual radiation exposure estimates for workers frequenting the few, larger contaminated areas on the site were derived using ORNL survey data and occupancy factors provided by the W.R. Grace Company. Estimates ranged from 27 to 41 mrem/yr or a maximum of 41% of the basic dose limit of 100 mrem/yr for members of the general public. 2 refs., 14 figs., 8 tabs

  18. Soil radiological characterisation and remediation at CIEMAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa, Cristina; Garcia Tapias, Esther; Leganes, Jose

    2012-01-01

    Located in Madrid, CIEMAT is the Spanish Centre for Energy-Related, Environmental and Technological Research. It used to have more than 60 facilities in operation that allowed a wide range of activities in the nuclear field and in the application of ionising radiations. At present, the centre includes several facilities; some of them are now obsolete, shut down and in dismantling phases. In 2000 CIEMAT started the 'Integrated plan for the improvement of CIEMAT facilities (PIMIC)', which includes activities for the decontamination, dismantling, rehabilitation of obsolete installations and soil remediation activities. A small contaminated area named with the Spanish word 'Lenteja' (Lentil), has had to be remediate and restored. In the 70's, an incidental leakage of radioactive liquid occurred during a transference operation from the Reprocessing Plant to the Liquid Treatment Installation, and contaminated about 1000 m 3 of soil. Remediation activities in this area started with an exhaustive radiological characterisation of the soil, including surface samples and up to 16 meters boreholes, and the development of a comprehensive radiological characterization methodology for pre-classification of materials. Once the framework was defined the following tasks were being carried out: preparation of the area, soil extraction activities and final radiological characterisation for release purposes. Next step will be the refilling of the resulting hole from the removal soil activities. This paper will describe the soil radiological characterization and remediation activities at the Lentil Zone in Ciemat Research Centre. (authors)

  19. Radiological accident 'The Citadel' medical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardenas Herrera, Juan; Fernandez, Isis M.; Lopez, Gladys; Garcia, Omar; Lamadrid, Ana I.; Ramos, Enma O.; Villa, Rosario; Giron, Carmen M.; Escobar, Myrian; Zerpa, Miguel; Romero, Argenis H.; Medina, Julio; Laurenti, Zenia; Oliva, Maria T.; Sierra, Nitza; Lorenzo, Alexis

    2008-01-01

    The work exposes the medical actions carried out in the mitigation of the consequences of the accident and its main results. In a facility of storage of radioactive waste in Caracas, Venezuela, it was happened a radiological accident. This event caused radioactive contamination of the environment, as well as the irradiation and radioactive contamination of at least 10 people involved in the fact, in its majority children. Cuban institutions participated in response to the accident. Among the decisions adopted by the team of combined work Cuban-Venezuelan, we find the one of transferring affected people to Cuba, for their dosimetric and medical evaluation. Being designed a work strategy to develop the investigations to people affected by the radiological accident, in correspondence with the circumstances, magnitude and consequences of the accident. The obtained main results are: 100% presented affectations in its health, not associate directly to the accident, although the accident influenced in its psychological state. In 3 of studied people they were detected radioactive contamination with Cesium -137 with dose among 2.01 X 10-4 Sv up to 2.78 X 10-4 Sv. This accident demonstrated the necessity to have technical capacities to face these events and the importance of the international solidarity. (author)

  20. Formerly utilized MED/AEC sites remedial action program. Radiological survey of Eckhart Hall, the University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, September 14, 1976-March 22, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wynveen, R.A.; Smith, W.H.; Boggs Mayes, C.; Justus, A.L.

    1982-05-01

    A comprehensive radiological survey was conducted at the Eckhart Hall at the University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois. General radiochemistry and/or physics research was performed at this facility during the MED/AEC era in the 1940s. The building is now used as laboratories, offices, and classrooms. Survey measurements included alpha and beta-gamma contamination determinations, both fixed and removable; beta-gamma exposure readings at contact and at 1 m (3 ft); estimates of radon-daughter concentrations in the air; and determination of concentrations of 137 Cs, the 232 Th decay chain, the 226 Ra decay chain, and uranium in the soil on the site. Thirteen spots of contamination were found to be fixed to or under existing surfaces and not readily available for transfer to other locations. Under current use conditions, the potential for radiation exposure to occupants of this building from these sources of contamination is remote. Concentrations of radon daughters in the air of the building were less than the limit of 0.01 Working Level (WL) above background. No long-lived radionuclides were detected in any air sample. Concentrations of radionuclides in soil samples collected around the facility indicated background levels. The presumed maximum potential internal radiation 50-year dose commitments from inhalation/ingestion of contamination remaining from MED/AEC activities were calculated to be less than 25% of the appropriate annual standards for an individual in an uncontrolled area. Remedial measures such as stabilization of the contamination in place would be applicable as a short-term measure. In order to reduce the risk in the event that building modifications take place in the future, health physics procedures and coverage are recommended. The long-term solution would involve decontamination by removal of the radioactive residues

  1. 308 Building zone I stabilization and confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metcalf, I.L.; Schwartz, K.E.; Rich, J.W.; Benecke, M.W.; Lanham, G.W.

    1994-08-01

    The 308 Building located on the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington, is currently in transition to shutdown status. After this transition is complete, the facility will be maintained/surveilled and given to the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Facility Transition and Management (EM-60) for utilization, remedial action, or decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D). This may require that the facility be maintained in the shutdown status for as long as 30 yrs. To date, all of the special nuclear material (SNM) has been removed, potential fuel supply equipment preserved, surplus materials and equipment excessed, and enclosure cleanup and stabilization completed. A major activity in support of the 308 Building shutdown was the cleanup and stabilization of the enclosures and surface contamination areas. This document discusses the specific designs, processes, and methods used to stabilize and confine the radiological material within the enclosure and exhaust ducts to allow the shutdown of the active support systems. The process and designs employed were effective, yet simple, and maximized the use of current technologies and commercial products

  2. Radiological assessment of past, present and potential sources to environmental contamination in the Southern Urals and strategies for remedial measures (SUCON)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aarkrog, A. [Risoe National Lab. (Denmark); Simmonds, J. [National Radiological Protection Board (United Kingdom); Strand, P. [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (Norway); Christensen, G. [Institute of Energy Technology (Norway); Salbu, B. [Agricultural Univ. of Norway (Norway)

    2000-12-01

    This report summarises work done on the SUCON Project during 1996-1999 (European Commission Contract No. FI4C-CT95-0001). The project has focused on three major objectives: 1) An assessment of the radiological consequences of the contamination of the South Urals and the Ob river system from the production of plutonium at 'Mayak', 2) The development of models to calculate doses to individuals and populations in the South Urals using environmental data, and 3) The intercomparison, harmonisation and standardisation of techniques used in dose reconstruction and specification of good practice in particular with regard to remedial measures. (au)

  3. Radiological assessment of past, present and potential sources to environmental contamination in the Southern Urals and strategies for remedial measures (SUCON)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aarkrog, A.; Simmonds, J.; Strand, P.; Christensen, G.; Salbu, B.

    2000-12-01

    This report summarises work done on the SUCON Project during 1996-1999 (European Commission Contract No. FI4C-CT95-0001). The project has focused on three major objectives: 1) An assessment of the radiological consequences of the contamination of the South Urals and the Ob river system from the production of plutonium at 'Mayak', 2) The development of models to calculate doses to individuals and populations in the South Urals using environmental data, and 3) The intercomparison, harmonisation and standardisation of techniques used in dose reconstruction and specification of good practice in particular with regard to remedial measures. (au)

  4. Good practices in radiological protection at Narora Atomic Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, V.P.; Kumar, Sanjeev; Agrawal, Mitesh; Tiwari, S.K.; Kulhari, Praveen; Gupta, Ashok

    2016-01-01

    Radiological protection performance of nuclear power plant is assessed by collective exposure, individual average exposure, external/external exposure, personnel/surface contamination and reduction of radioactive wastes. Collective exposure is reduced by integrated comprehensive ALARA program in all aspects of nuclear plant operation and maintenance has reduced collective dose many folds. In the present paper, implementation of new good practices in Radiological Protection is presented

  5. Environmental remediation. Strategies and techniques for cleaning radioactively contaminated sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falck, W. Eberhard

    2001-01-01

    Actions for a cleaner and safety environment have risen on social and political agendas in recent years. They include efforts to remediate contaminated sites posing a radiological risk to humans and the surrounding environment. Radiological risks can result from a variety of nuclear and non-nuclear activities. They include: nuclear or radiological accidents; nuclear weapons production and testing; poor radioactive waste management and disposal practices; industrial manufacturing involving radioactive materials; conventional mining and milling of ores and other production processes, e.g. oil and gas production, resulting in enhanced concentrations of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORMs). The IAEA has developed a comprehensive programme directed at the remediation of radioactively contaminated sites. The programme collates and distributes knowledge about contaminated sites; appropriate methods for their characterization; assessment of their potential environmental and radiological impact; and applicable methods for their clean-up, following internationally recommended safety criteria. The overall resources, and which are technologically less advanced, to focus their efforts and chose appropriate strategies for the abatement or removal of exposure to radiation. An important aspect is the intention to 'close the loop' in the nuclear fuel cycle in the interests of sustainable energy development including nuclear power

  6. Mapping of contamination at Savannah River Site FBWU by INEEL trolley

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, M.V.; Gehrke, R.J.; Helmer, R.G.; Josten, N.

    1998-01-01

    The Ford Building Waste Unit (FBWU) 643-11G is a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act/Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (RCRA/CERCLA) designated site at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, South Carolina. Pre-Work Plan Characterization at the FBWU in May 1996 indicated that radiological contamination was present in surface and near surface soils and identified cesium-137, 137 Cs, the unit specific contaminant, as being primarily in the top 15 cm of soil. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) sent the dig-face trolley system to SRS where it demonstrated its capability over a 6.1-m (20 ft.) x 9.6-m (30 ft.) area to rapidly map the contamination on-line with its large area plastic scintillation detector. Also, an extended-range (10 keV to 3 MeV) Ge detector was used at selected locations to identify and quantify the 137 Cs contamination. The coordinate locations of each measurement acquired in either the scanning or fixed position mode was obtained with a survey system based on radial encoders. Topography measurements were also made during measurements to permit correction of field of view and activity concentrations for changes in the ground to detector distance

  7. Radioactive sources of main radiological concern in the Kola-Barents region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergman, R.; Baklanov, A.

    1998-07-01

    This overview focuses on some major issues for risk analysis appearing in our recent study surveying radioactive sources on the Kola Peninsula, along with adjacent parts of the Arctic seas. The main issues of the parts are as follows: An introduction to the presence of radioactive sources and environmental contamination in the Barents Euro-Arctic Region and the current status as regards various significant studies. Radioactive contamination in man and the environment on the Kola Peninsula, as well as radioactive transfer during the last three decades from external sources to the Kola-Barents region. The main conclusion from the findings is that the contamination is generally relatively low and that neither the activity levels in samples of soil, vegetation, and the important food-chains, nor the content in man indicate any changes since 1986 that could not be explained by the combined effect of the cumulative deposition from the nuclear weapons testing and the accident in Chernobyl. The radioactive sources of main concern in the region belong to the following categories: nuclear power submarine and cruiser naval bases; civil nuclear power ice-breaker fleet; building and repairing shipyards; nuclear power plants; radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel storage facilities; sunken reactors/ships; liquid radioactive waste dumping; solid radioactive waste dumping; nuclear weapon bases; nuclear weapon tests; civil nuclear explosions; nuclear accidents; mining radioactive ore deposits and plants; new projects and others. Several case studies concerning releases in the Kola-Barents region are reviewed, and followed by consequence analyses for the categories of primary interest covering: a) airborne releases from the Kola NPP, and from submarines or spent nuclear fuel; b) releases from objects in the marine environment including submarines, dumped reactors, and various other radioactive objects and waste; c) releases from liquid and solid wastes stored on land or during

  8. Radioactive sources of main radiological concern in the Kola-Barents region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergman, R.; Baklanov, A

    1998-07-01

    This overview focuses on some major issues for risk analysis appearing in our recent study surveying radioactive sources on the Kola Peninsula, along with adjacent parts of the Arctic seas. The main issues of the parts are as follows: An introduction to the presence of radioactive sources and environmental contamination in the Barents Euro-Arctic Region and the current status as regards various significant studies. Radioactive contamination in man and the environment on the Kola Peninsula, as well as radioactive transfer during the last three decades from external sources to the Kola-Barents region. The main conclusion from the findings is that the contamination is generally relatively low and that neither the activity levels in samples of soil, vegetation, and the important food-chains, nor the content in man indicate any changes since 1986 that could not be explained by the combined effect of the cumulative deposition from the nuclear weapons testing and the accident in Chernobyl. The radioactive sources of main concern in the region belong to the following categories: nuclear power submarine and cruiser naval bases; civil nuclear power ice-breaker fleet; building and repairing shipyards; nuclear power plants; radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel storage facilities; sunken reactors/ships; liquid radioactive waste dumping; solid radioactive waste dumping; nuclear weapon bases; nuclear weapon tests; civil nuclear explosions; nuclear accidents; mining radioactive ore deposits and plants; new projects and others. Several case studies concerning releases in the Kola-Barents region are reviewed, and followed by consequence analyses for the categories of primary interest covering: a) airborne releases from the Kola NPP, and from submarines or spent nuclear fuel; b) releases from objects in the marine environment including submarines, dumped reactors, and various other radioactive objects and waste; c) releases from liquid and solid wastes stored on land or during

  9. Level III baseline risk evaluation for Building 3505 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mostella, W.B. Jr.

    1994-12-01

    The Level III Baseline Risk Evaluation (BRE) for Building 3505, the ORNL Metal Recovery Facility, provides an analysis of the potential for adverse health effects, current or future, associated with the presence of hazardous substances in the building. The Metal Recovery Facility was used from 1952 through 1960 to process large quantities of radioactive material using the PUREX process for the recovery of uranium-238, plutonium-239, neptunium-237, and americium-241. The facility consists of seven process cells (A through G), a canal, a dissolver room, a dissolver pit, an office, locker room, storage area, control room, electrical gallery, shop, and makeup area. The cells were used to house the nuclear fuel reprocessing equipment, and the canal was constructed to be used as a water-shielded transfer canal. Currently, there are no known releases of radioactive contaminants from Building 3505. To perform the BRE, historical radiological survey data were used to estimate the concentration of alpha- and beta/gamma emitting radionuclides in the various cells, rooms, and other areas in Building 3505. Data from smear surveys were used to estimate the amount of transferable contamination (to which receptors can be exposed via inhalation and ingestion), and data from probe surveys were used to estimate the amount of both fixed and transferable contamination (from which receptors can receive external exposure). Two land use scenarios, current and future, and their subsequent exposure scenarios were explored in the BRE. Under the current land use scenario, two exposure scenarios were evaluated. The first was a worst-case industrial exposure scenario in which the receptor is a maintenance worker who works 8 hours/day, 350 days/year in the building for 25 years. In the second, more realistic exposure scenario, the receptor is a surveillance and maintenance (S ampersand M) worker who spends two 8-hour days/year in the building for 25 years

  10. Toward raising the higher level of radiological nursing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusama, Tomoko; Ban, Nobuhiko; Ono, Koji

    2013-01-01

    The role and purpose of nursing in the radiological field are discussed with essentials of radiological nursing for raising its higher level and needed fundamental education. The discussion is from the thought that, at Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant Accident (Mar. 2011), general medical staff including nurses are rather insufficient of radiological knowledge like the exposure, radiation effect and risk. In the medical radiological field, nurses are expected to play roles of arranging the circumstance for patient's ease like explanation about health effect/risk, appropriate nursing of them after radiological diagnosis, radiation protection of nurses themselves, and of environment. At such an emergency as the Accident, care for the acutely exposed victims, their decontamination and responding to patient's concern are necessary. At the later phase, also needed are nursing of victims undergoing health management done by authorities and of radiological workers concerned as well as the third item above. Therefore, fundamentals of radiological knowledge such as physics, exposure, health effects, protection, contamination, legal rules and risk communication are required in the education of nurses. Otherwise, this education can be conducted as a part of safety security and physical assessment. The Accident also gives us the importance of radiological risk communication with its victims. (T.T.)

  11. Assessment of natural radioactivity and radiological hazards in building materials used in the Tiruvannamalai District, Tamilnadu, India, using a statistical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Raghu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available One-hundred-fifty-one samples of six types of building materials were collected from different locations of the Tiruvannamalai District, Tamilnadu, and were analyzed using a gamma ray spectroscopy system. From the results, the highest values observed in the specific activities of 226Ra, 232Th and 40K were 116.1 (soil 106.67 (sand and 527.533 (tiles in Bq kg−1, while the lowest values observed in the specific activities of the same radionuclides were 35.73, 37.75 and 159.83 for cement in Bq kg−1, respectively. The potential radiological hazards were assessed by calculating the radium equivalent activity (Raeq, the indoor absorbed gamma dose rate (DR, the annual effective dose rate (HR, the activity utilization index (I, the alpha index (Iα, the gamma index (Iγ, and the external hazard (Hex and internal hazard (Hin indices. The estimated mean value of the absorbed dose rate of 148.35 nGy h−1 is slightly higher than the world average value of 84 nGy h−1, and the annual effective dose in the studied samples is 0.1824 mSv y−1, which is lower than the recommended limit. Multivariate statistical methods are applied to determine the existing relationship between radionuclides and radiological health hazard parameters and to identify the maximum contribution of radionuclide in radioactivity. The values of the hazard indices were below the recommended levels; therefore, it is concluded that the buildings constructed from such materials are safe for the inhabitants. The findings from this research will be useful to assess the radiation hazards of building materials in humans.

  12. Pre-decommissioning radiological characterization of concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boden, Sven; Cantrel, Eric

    2007-01-01

    The decommissioning of the BR3 (Belgian Reactor 3) approaches its final phase, in which the building structures are being decontaminated and either denuclearized for possible reuse or demolished. Apart from the presence of naturally occurring radionuclides in building materials, other radionuclides might be present due to contamination or activation. The overall process of the BR3 building structure D and D (Decontamination and Decommissioning) consists of the following steps: - make a complete inventory and preliminary categorize all elements based on historical data; characterize and determine the contamination or activation depth; - determine the decontamination method; - perform the decontamination and clean up; - a possible intermediate characterization followed by an additional decontamination step; and characterize for clearance. A good knowledge of the contamination and activation depth (second step) is fundamental in view of cost minimization. Currently, the method commonly used for the determination of the depth is based on core drilling and destructive analysis. Recently, we have introduced a complementary non destructive assay based on in-situ gamma spectroscopy. Field tests at BR3, both for contamination and activation, showed promising results. (authors)

  13. Characterisation of contaminated metals using an advanced statistical toolbox - Geostatistical characterisation of contaminated metals: methodology and illustrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsson, Arne; Lidar, Per; Desnoyers, Yvon

    2014-01-01

    Radiological characterisation plays an important role in the process to recycle contaminated or potentially contaminated metals. It is a platform for planning, identification of the extent and nature of contamination, assessing potential risk impacts, cost estimation, radiation protection, management of material arising from decommissioning as well as for the release of the materials as well as the disposal of the generated secondary waste as radioactive waste. Key issues in radiological characterisation are identification of objectives, development of a measurement and sampling strategy (probabilistic, judgmental or a combination thereof), knowledge management, traceability, recording and processing of obtained information. By applying advanced combination of statistical and geostatistical in the concept better performance can be achieved at a lower cost. This paper will describe the benefits with the usage of the available methods in the different stages of the characterisation, treatment and clearance processes aiming for reliable results in line with the data quality objectives. (authors)

  14. Results of the radiological survey at the former Associate Aircraft Tool and Manufacturing Company site, Fairfield, Ohio (FOH001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, M.E.; Carrier, R.F.; Mathis, R.A.

    1993-03-01

    At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a team from oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted a radiological survey of the former Associate Aircraft Tool and Manufacturing Company facility, Fairfield, Ohio. The survey was performed in July and September 1992. The purpose of the survey was to determine if the facility had become contaminated with residuals containing radioactive materials during the work performed under government contract from February to September, 1956. The survey included gamma scanning over a circumscribed area around and outside of the building, and gamma scanning over most accessible indoor floor surfaces as well as the collection of soil and other samples for radionuclide analyses. Roof trusses were beta-gamma scanned in locations where floor contamination was found. Results of the survey demonstrated radionuclide concentrations in indoor and outdoor samples, and radiation measurements over floor and overhead surfaces, in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program guidelines. Elevated uranium concentrations outdoors were limited to several small, isolated spots. Radiation measurements exceeded guidelines indoors over numerous spots and areas inside the building, mainly in the areas that had been used in the early government work

  15. Radiological characterisation of V1 NPP technological systems and buildings - Activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kristofova, Kristina; Rapant, Tibor; Svitek, Jaroslav

    2012-01-01

    V1 NPP at Jaslovske Bohunice site has been finally shutdown after 28 years of successful operation in 2006 (Unit 1) and 2008 (Unit 2). At present, both units are finally shutdown and since July 2011 under decommissioning license. The preparation of V1 NPP decommissioning has been supported and partly financed by the Bohunice International Decommissioning Support Fund (BIDSF), under the administration of the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development. From 06/2008 to 12/2011 AMEC Nuclear Slovakia, together with partners STM Power and EWN GmbH, carried out BIDSF B6.4 project - Decommissioning database development (DDB). The main purpose of the B6.4 project was to develop a physical and radiological inventory database to support V1 NPP decommissioning process planning and performance. One of the specific deliverable tasks within the B6.4 project was deliverable D12 - Characterization of activated equipment and civil structures based on measurement, sampling and analyses performed on the samples. The scope of deliverable services within D12 task consisted of: 1. Categorization of activated components ; 2. Development of single working programs for their radiological monitoring and sampling ; 3. Preparation of sampling device and revision of all handling equipment; 4. Dose rate monitoring and sampling of: - Civil structures from reactors shaft on both units ; - Components placed in HLW storage, (so called 'Mogilnik') - connection rods, absorbers ; of control rod assemblies and neutron flux measurement channels ; - Reactor pressure vessel and shielding assemblies at both units of V1 NPP, reactor; internals from Unit 2 of V1 NPP; 5. Analysis of samples ; 6. Determination of radiological inventory ; 7. Import of radiological data for activated components into DDB. During sampling, mainly remotely controlled sampling device and radiation resistant camera with LED lightening for visual checking of all performed activities was used. In total, 125 samples have been taken

  16. Final report of the decontamination and decommissioning of the BORAX-V facility turbine building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arave, A.E.; Rodman, G.R.

    1992-12-01

    The Boiling Water Reactor Experiment (BORAX)-V Facility Turbine Building Decontamination and Decommissioning (D ampersand D) Project is described in this report. The BORAX series of five National Reactor Testing Station (NRTS) reactors pioneered intensive work on boiling water reactor (BWR) experiments conducted between 1953 and 1964. Facility characterization, decision analyses, and D ampersand D plans for the turbine building were prepared from 1979 through 1990. D ampersand D activities of the turbine building systems were initiated in November of 1988 and completed with the demolition and backfill of the concrete foundation in March 1992. Due to the low levels of radioactivity and the absence of loose contamination, the D ampersand D activities were completed with no radiation exposure to the workers. The D ampersand D activities were performed in a manner that no radiological health or safety hazard to the public or to personnel at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) remain

  17. Decontamination and dismantlement of the building 200/205 pneumatic transfer tube at Argonne National Laboratory-East project final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiese, E. C.

    1998-01-01

    The Building 200/205 Pneumatic Transfer Tube D and D Project was directed toward the following goals: Remove any radioactive and hazardous materials associated with the transfer tube; Survey the transfer tube to identify any external contamination; Remove the transfer tube and package for disposal; Survey the soil and sand surrounding the transfer tube for any contamination; and Backfill the trench in which the tube sat and restore the area to its original condition. These goals had been set in order to eliminate the radiological and hazardous safety concerns inherent in the buried transfer tube and to allow, upon completion of the project, the removal of this project from the ANL-E action item list. The physical condition of the transfer tube and possible nuclear fuel samples lost in the tube were the primary areas of concern, while the exact location of the transfer tube was of secondary concern. ANL-E health physics technicians collected characterization data from the ends of the Building 200/205 pneumatic transfer tube in January 1998. The characterization surveys identified contamination to a level of 67,000 dpm (1,117 Bq) (β/γ) and 20,000 dpm (333 Bq) α smearable at the opening

  18. Results of the Radiological Survey at Conviber, Inc., 644 Garfield Street, Springdale, Pennsylvania (CVP001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Cottrell, W.D.; Crutcher, J.W.

    1991-10-01

    As part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), the US Department of Energy (DOE) is implementing a radiological survey program to determine the radiological conditions at sites that were used by the department's predecessor agencies. During the mid-1940s, and possibly continuing until 1951, the Conviber site in Springdale, Pennsylvania, was used to machine extruded uranium in support of government efforts. In 1980 a radiological scanning survey of this site was conducted by DOE and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) staffs. Their report noted one anomaly: elevated radiation levels over a small area inside the building where uranium had been machined. Because much of the floor was inaccessible, for surveying and because of the lack of definitive records documenting use of this site, a comprehensive radiological assessment was recommended. The radiological survey discussed in this report for the site of Conviber, Inc., Springdale, Pennsylvania, was conducted by members of the Measurement Applications and Development Group of Oak Ridge National Laboratory in June of 1989. The survey included a surface gamma scan, collection of concrete and soil samples, and measurement of direct and removable alpha and beta-gamma contamination. One indoor location with a gamma measurement of 20 μR/h was found. In June of 1990 ORNL staff returned to investigate the location with elevated gamma. A hole was drilled through the concrete, gamma measurements were taken, and soil samples were obtained for analyses. In these eight indoor soil samples, concentrations of 238 U ranged from 90 to 20,000 pCi/g. However, under current site use, residual uranium covered by concrete does not pose a health risk

  19. [Biological contamination in office buildings related to ventilation/air conditioning system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bródka, Karolina; Sowiak, Małgorzata; Kozajda, Anna; Cyprowski, Marcin; Irena, Szadkowska-Stańczyk

    2012-01-01

    Indoor air is contaminated with microorganisms coming from both the atmospheric air and sources present in premises. The aim of this study was to analyze the concentrations of biological agents in office buildings, dependending on ventilation/air conditioning system and season. The study covered office buildings (different in the system of ventila-tion/air conditioning). Air samples for assessing the levels of inhalable dust, endotoxins and (1-->3)-beta-D-glucans, were taken at the selected stationary points of each building during summer and winter. The air was sampled for 6 h, using portable sets consisting of the GilAir 5 pump and the head filled with a filter of fiber glass. The samples for the presence of airborne bacteria and fungi were collected twice during the day using the impaction method. Average concentrations of inhalable dust, bacteria, fungi, endotoxins and (1-->3)-beta-D-glucans in office premises were 0.09 mg/m3, 6.00 x 10(2) cfu/m3, 4.59 x 10(1) cfu/m3, 0.42 ng/m3 and 3.91 ng/m3, respectively. Higher concentrations of the investigated agents were found in summer. In premises with air conditioning concentrations of airborne fungi, (1-->3)-beta-D-glucans and inhalable dust were significantly lower in winter. In summer the trend was reverse except for (1-->3)-beta-D-glucans. Concentrations of biological agents were affected by the season and the presence of air conditioning. Concentrations of inhalable dust, bacteria, fungi, endotoxins and (1-->3)-beta-D-glucans, observed inside the office buildings, were significantly higher in summer than in winter. The presence of the air conditioning system modified in various ways the levels of biological agents. Its influence was greater on the concentration of fungi and (1-->3)-beta-D-glucans than on that of bacteria and endotoxins.

  20. Radiological and chemical characterization report for the planned Quarry Construction Staging Area and Water Treatment Plant: Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-03-01

    The Quarry Construction Staging Area and Water Treatment Plant (QCSA) will be used in the support of the bulk waste removal of the Weldon Spring Quarry. Radiological and chemical characterization was performed on a 12 acre site where the QCSA will be constructed. The characterization revealed approximately .5 acres of radiologically contaminated land. No chemical contamination was found. 8 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs

  1. Determination of action zone in the nuclear / radiology handling process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ade Awalludin

    2013-01-01

    Assessment has been conducted on determination of action zone in nuclear or radiological emergency. The assessment is taken into account radiological risk level in nuclear or radiological emergency management process outside nuclear installation. Managing of nuclear emergency is same as that one of other emergency by adding the principles of radiation protection. This study aims to provide guidance in making of safety and security perimeter outside the nuclear installation for first responders during nuclear/radiological emergency based on dose rate, contamination level or distance from the scene. Separation of working zone is important for first responder safety that works in radiological environment in the event of nuclear or radiation emergency without violating their standard operating procedure. Value limit of safety and security perimeter has been made according to the conditions in Indonesia and considering the applicability in practical. (author)

  2. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Monitoring Manual Volume 1, Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Aerial Measurement Systems

    2012-07-31

    The Monitoring division is primarily responsible for the coordination and direction of: Aerial measurements to delineate the footprint of radioactive contaminants that have been released into the environment. Monitoring of radiation levels in the environment; Sampling to determine the extent of contaminant deposition in soil, water, air and on vegetation; Preliminary field analyses to quantify soil concentrations or depositions; and Environmental and personal dosimetry for FRMAC field personnel, during a Consequence Management Response Team (CMRT) and Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) response. Monitoring and sampling techniques used during CM/FRMAC operations are specifically selected for use during radiological emergencies where large numbers of measurements and samples must be acquired, analyzed, and interpreted in the shortest amount of time possible. In addition, techniques and procedures are flexible so that they can be used during a variety of different scenarios; e.g., accidents involving releases from nuclear reactors, contamination by nuclear waste, nuclear weapon accidents, space vehicle reentries, or contamination from a radiological dispersal device. The Monitoring division also provides technicians to support specific Health and Safety Division activities including: The operation of the Hotline; FRMAC facility surveys; Assistance with Health and Safety at Check Points; and Assistance at population assembly areas which require support from the FRMAC. This volume covers deployment activities, initial FRMAC activities, development and implementation of the monitoring and assessment plan, the briefing of field teams, and the transfer of FRMAC to the EPA.

  3. Radiologic findings of the anthrax: focus on alimentary anthrax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sung Woo; Kim, Won Ho; Yang, Geun Seok; Kim, Tae Hun; Kang, Duk Sik

    1995-01-01

    To evaluate the radiologic findings of alimentary anthrax. 19 patients with alimentary anthrax, which was caused by ingestion of contaminated beef, were included in this study. The diagnosis was made by demonstration of Bacillus anthracis in smear and culture of the contaminated meat. We evaluated the clinical manifestations and the findings of thoracic, abdominal radiographs, cervical, abdominal ultrasonograms and abdominal CT scans. Out of the 19 patients with the alimentary infection, 9 had oropharyngeal form, 18 had abdominal form and 8 had combination of oropharyngeal and abdominal form. The patients had general symptoms and signs such as fever, chill, myalgia. Clinical symptoms and signs were sore throat, throat injection, throat ulcer and patch in oropharyngeal form, and nausea, vomiting abdominal pain, diarrhea, and gross GI bleeding in abdominal form. Radiologic findings included enlarged cervical lymph nodes (36%) in oropharyngeal form, and paralytic ileus (26%), ascites (26%), hepatomegaly (21%), enlarged mesenteric lymph nodes (26%), small bowel wall thickening (5%) in abdominal form. In two patients, late complications occurred as intestinal obstruction due to ileal stricture with perforation, and inflammatory changes of pelvic cavity due to ileovesical fistula. Radiologic findings of alimentary anthrax are difficult in differentiation from those of other inflammatory bowel disease, but those radiologic findings with clinical manifestations may be helpful in diagnosis and evaluation of disease process in patients with alimentary anthrax

  4. Consequence Assessment for Potential Scenarios of Radiological Terrorists Events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Hyeongki; Kim, Juyoul

    2007-01-01

    Radiological dispersal device (RDD) means any method used to deliberately disperse radioactive material to create terror or harm. Dirty bomb is an example of RDD, which usually consists of radioactive material and unconventional explosive. Dirty bomb was a problem long before September 11, 2001. In 1987, the Iraqi government tested a one-ton radiological bomb. The Iraqi tests confirmed that a dirty bomb is not effective as weapons of mass destruction (WMD) and that its main value is as a psychological weapon. In 1995, Chechen rebels buried a dirty bomb in a park in Moscow threatening to detonate one in the future if their demands were not met. Another good example of potential dirty bomb effects was an incident in Goiania, Brazil on September 18, 1987, where an orphaned medical source containing 1,375 Ci of Cs-137 resulted the death of four people and extensive environmental contamination. The purposes of radiological terrorists events are not to destroy or damage the target but to disperse radioactivity in the environment. They inflict panic on a public and economic damage by disruption of business. They also have influence on enormous clean-up costs by spreading radioactive contamination including secondary impacts on water supply reservoirs. Generally, two major long-term concerns following a RDD are human health and economic impacts. In this study, we developed potential scenarios of radiological terrorists events and performed their radiological consequence assessments in terms of total effective dose equivalent (TEDE), projected cumulative external and internal dose, and ground deposition of radioactivity

  5. Consequence Assessment for Potential Scenarios of Radiological Terrorists Events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Hyeongki [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Juyoul [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    Radiological dispersal device (RDD) means any method used to deliberately disperse radioactive material to create terror or harm. Dirty bomb is an example of RDD, which usually consists of radioactive material and unconventional explosive. Dirty bomb was a problem long before September 11, 2001. In 1987, the Iraqi government tested a one-ton radiological bomb. The Iraqi tests confirmed that a dirty bomb is not effective as weapons of mass destruction (WMD) and that its main value is as a psychological weapon. In 1995, Chechen rebels buried a dirty bomb in a park in Moscow threatening to detonate one in the future if their demands were not met. Another good example of potential dirty bomb effects was an incident in Goiania, Brazil on September 18, 1987, where an orphaned medical source containing 1,375 Ci of Cs-137 resulted the death of four people and extensive environmental contamination. The purposes of radiological terrorists events are not to destroy or damage the target but to disperse radioactivity in the environment. They inflict panic on a public and economic damage by disruption of business. They also have influence on enormous clean-up costs by spreading radioactive contamination including secondary impacts on water supply reservoirs. Generally, two major long-term concerns following a RDD are human health and economic impacts. In this study, we developed potential scenarios of radiological terrorists events and performed their radiological consequence assessments in terms of total effective dose equivalent (TEDE), projected cumulative external and internal dose, and ground deposition of radioactivity.

  6. TENORM radiological survey of Utica and Marcellus Shale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ying, Leong; O’Connor, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Comprehensive on-site radiological survey of processed sludge drilled materials extracted from the oil and gas production activities in the Utica and Marcellus Shale in Ohio has been conducted with a shielded isotopic identifier incorporating an advanced patented algorithmic processor to measure low-activity levels in compliance with environmental standards. - highlights: • First on-site radiological survey of processed shale sludge from oil and gas fields. • Mobile spectroscopic radiation inspection system with shielding for low-activity measurements. • Quantification of Ra-226 and Ra-228 radionuclides contamination in soil samples

  7. Enviromental sampling at remote sites based on radiological screening assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebinger, M.H.; Hansen, W.R.; Wenz, G.; Oxenberg, T.P.

    1996-01-01

    Environmental radiation monitoring (ERM) data from remote sites on the White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico, were used to estimate doses to humans and terrestrial mammals from residual radiation deposited during testing of components containing depleted uranium (DU) and thorium (Th). ERM data were used with the DOE code RESRAD and a simple steady-state pathway code to estimate the potential adverse effects from DU and Th to workers in the contaminated zones, to hunters consuming animals from the contaminated zones, and to terrestrial mammals that inhabit the contaminated zones. Assessments of zones contaminated with DU and Th and DU alone were conducted. Radiological doses from Th and DU in soils were largest with a maximum of about 3.5 mrem y -1 in humans and maximum of about 0.1 mrad d -1 in deer. Dose estimates from DU alone in soils were significantly less with a maximum of about 1 mrem y -1 in humans and about 0.04 mrad d -1 in deer. The results of the dose estimates suggest strongly that environmental sampling in these affected areas can be infrequent and still provide adequate assessments of radiological doses to workers, hunters, and terrestrial mammals

  8. Radiological characterisation and decommissioning in Denmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nellemenn, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Danish Decommissioning (DD) is currently decommissioning the last Danish research reactor (DR3) and the Hot Cell facility. The DR3 project will soon finish dismantling of the external parts of the reactor (January 2012). The approval for dismantling of neutron activated and tritium contaminated heavy water pumps and tubing was granted in December 2011. DD will begin the work on the inner parts as the tendering process for equipment will start in 2012. Hereafter the dismantling of the top of the reactor will begin using the obtained remote controlled equipment. The Hot Cell facility consists of 6 contaminated cells. The first cell have been opened and cleaned. Currently the work progresses by removing parts and hot spots from the other cells with the use of robotic equipment. Challenges, lack of conventional and radiological documentation, dose rates and contamination higher than expected and the confined space in the cells have delayed the project. No final repository exists in Denmark. Therefore no official Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) have been formulated. However the Danish authority (SIS) does require a description of the waste in the interim storage facility (Inventory). Furthermore radiological characterisation of key nuclides is needed during decommissioning and dismantling. The information gained from the characterisation helps in the planning phase prior to the dismantling and for inventory calculations for later use. DD performs the radiological characterisation via both non-destructive and destructive analysis on samples. The samples are measured with gamma spectroscopy using mathematical and geometrical analysis. Scaling factors are used for neutron activated waste (DR3) to determine the difficult-to-measure isotopes and pure beta emitters. The primary scaling isotope is Co-60. Waste from the Hot Cell facility is alpha contaminated and scaling procedures for determination of alpha contamination are currently used in the planning process. Scaling of

  9. Radiological characterisation - Know your objective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindow, Veronica; Moeller, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    When developing a programme for mapping the radiological characteristics of a facility to be decommissioned it is important to take into account the objectives of the programme. Will the results be used to plan for radiological control and selection of appropriate decontamination and dismantling techniques? Will the radiological inventory be used for dimensioning of future waste repositories? These are two examples of the applications for such studies, which could require that a radiological characterisation programme be adapted to provide the data appropriate to the intended use. The level of detail and scope needed for a radiological characterisation will also vary depending on how the data will be used. An application to free-release a facility requires a comprehensive survey and well documented analysis in order to ensure that no radioactive contamination above prescribed levels is present. A bounding calculation to determine the maximum anticipated volumes and activity of radioactive waste requires a different approach. During the past few years, older decommissioning studies for the Swedish nuclear power plants have been updated (or are in the process of being updated). The decommissioning study's main purpose is to estimate the cost for decommissioning. The cost estimation is based on material and activity inventories, which in turn is based on previous and, in some cases, updated radiological characterisations of the facilities. The radiological inventory is an important part of the study as it affects the cost of decommissioning but also the uncertainties and accuracy of the cost estimation. The presentation will discuss the challenges in specifying a radiological characterisation programme with multiple objectives, together with insights on how data delivered can be applied to yield results suitable for the intended purpose, without introducing excessive conservatism. The intent of the presentation is to define issues that can be of use in various aspects

  10. Notes on basic radiological protection. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDowell, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    A booklet has been compiled giving a basic guide to anyone who has to work with ionising radiations and radioactive and the nature of radiation, radiological units, biological radiation effects, legislation and radiation dose limits, radiation and contamination monitoring and finally methods of protection from both external and internal radiation. (UK)

  11. Development and field testing of a mobile chlorine dioxide generation system for the decontamination of buildings contaminated with Bacillus anthracis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, Joseph P.; Blair Martin, G.

    2009-01-01

    The numerous buildings that became contaminated with Bacillus anthracis (the bacterium causing the disease anthrax) in 2001, and more recent B. anthracis - related events, point to the need to have effective decontamination technologies for buildings contaminated with biological threat agents. The U.S. Government developed a portable chlorine dioxide (ClO 2 ) generation system to decontaminate buildings contaminated with B. anthracis spores, and this so-called mobile decontamination trailer (MDT) prototype was tested through a series of three field trials. The first test of the MDT was conducted at Fort McClellan in Anniston, AL. during October 2004. Four test attempts occurred over two weekends; however, a number of system problems resulted in termination of the activity prior to any ClO 2 introduction into the test building. After making several design enhancements and equipment changes, the MDT was subjected to a second test. During this test, extensive leak checks were made using argon and nitrogen in lieu of chlorine gas; each subsystem was checked for functionality, and the MDT was operated for 24 h. This second test demonstrated the MDT flow and control systems functioned satisfactorily, and thus it was decided to proceed to a third, more challenging field trial. In the last field test, ClO 2 was generated and routed directly to the scrubber in a 12-h continuous run. Measurement of ClO 2 levels at the generator outlet showed that the desired production rate was not achieved. Additionally, only one of the two scrubbers performed adequately with regard to maintaining ClO 2 emissions below the limit. Numerous lessons were learned in the field trials of this ClO 2 decontamination technology.

  12. Clearance of buildings for demolition: ways to clearance on the standing structure for covered surfaces and inaccessible areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thraenert, S.; Riemann, T.

    2014-01-01

    In general terms, the TUV NORD Nuclear services encompass safety assessments, design reviews, documentation re-views and inspections. They reflect the full scope of a technical service provider in the nuclear field. In the domestic market, these services are provided for the regulator, whereas in the international market any party involved in a nuclear project is a potential customer of TUV NORD Nuclear. This implies that TUV NORD Nuclear is offering consultancy, engineering and inspection services. Regarding the clearance of buildings for demolition, there are two different possible ways for the radiological characterization. The first option is a characterization on the standing structure before demolition and the second option is the characterization of the building rubble after demolition. According to the German Radiation Protection Ordinance, buildings of decommissioned nuclear sites have to be preferentially cleared on the standing structure. If compliance with the surface specific clearance levels is achieved on the standing structure, usually the cleared buildings can be demolished and the resulting rubble may be used without any further radiological considerations. In the case of the former nuclear power plant Wuergassen the majority of the building rubble is scheduled to stay on site to serve as backfill for the building pit. As such a scenario was not considered in the radiological considerations of, e.g., the German Radiation Protection Ordinance, an additional dose calculation was carried out for Wuergassen NPP basing on its radiological characteristics to directly prove compliance with the de-minimis-concept. The radiation controlled area (RCA) of Wuergassen NPP comprises an area of about 140.000 m 2 . This area is more or less easily accessible to characterization and decontamination using, if necessary, scaffoldings or lifting platforms. Up to the beginning of 2013, compliance with the surface specific clearance levels was verified on the standing

  13. Stakeholder participation in radiological decision making: processes and implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    Within the radiological protection community, stakeholder issues have moved steadily to the fore-front of policy discussions, and clearly form a key element in decisions regarding the development and implementation of radiological protection policy. It was in this light that the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) undertook three case studies on stakeholder involvement processes and experiences. Experience and lessons were analysed and extracted that may have application to numerous situations in other national contexts. They are intended to aid decision makers and regulators who are involved in radiological protection, and may have particular value for post-accident contamination situations, the siting of new nuclear installations, the management of emissions from routine operations at nuclear facilities, and the decommissioning of existing nuclear installations. The three case studies presented in this report were specifically developed as input to the Third Villigen Workshop (Villigen, Switzerland, 21-23 October 2003) and address the following situations: - the Canadian review process for uranium production projects in Northern Saskatchewan; - the Rocky Flats controversy on radionuclide action levels; - the ETHOS project for post-accident rehabilitation in the area of Belarus contaminated by the Chernobyl disaster. (author)

  14. Monitoring airborne biotic contaminants in the indoor environment of pig and poultry confinement buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Pei-Ying; Li, Xiangzhen; Yang, Xufei; Shinkai, Takumi; Zhang, Yuanhui; Wang, Xinlei; Mackie, Roderick I

    2012-06-01

    Given the growing concerns over human and animal health issues related to confined animal feeding operations, an in-depth examination is required to monitor for airborne bacteria and associated antibiotic resistance genes. Our 16S rRNA-based pyrosequencing revealed that the airborne microbial community skewed towards a higher abundance of Firmicutes (> 59.2%) and Bacteroidetes (4.2-31.4%) within the confinement buildings, while the office environment was predominated by Proteobacteria (55.2%). Furthermore, bioaerosols in the confinement buildings were sporadically associated with genera of potential pathogens, and these genera were more frequently observed in the bioaerosols of pig and layer hen confinement than the turkey confinement buildings and office environment. High abundances of tetracycline resistance genes (9.55 × 10(2) to 1.69 × 10(6) copies ng(-1) DNA) were also detected in the bioaerosols sampled from confinement buildings. Bacterial lineages present in the poultry bioaerosols clustered apart from those present in the pig bioaerosols and among the different phases of pig production, suggesting that different livestock as well as production phase were associated with a distinct airborne microbial community. By understanding the diversity of biotic contaminants associated with the different confinement buildings, this study facilitates the implementation of better management strategies to minimize potential health impacts on both livestock and humans working in this environment. © 2012 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Radiological risk assessment for radioactive contamination at landfill site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devgun, J.S.

    1990-01-01

    A limited-scope preliminary assessment of radiological risk has been conducted for a landfill site where radioactive residues resulting from past uranium ore processing operations are present. Potential radiation doses to an individual under different scenarios have been predicted using the RESRAD computer code. The assessment provides useful input to the remedial action planning for the site that is currently underway. 7 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  16. The Pathology of Infection in the Department of Radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Seong Gyu [Dept. of Radiology, Dong a University Medical Center, Pusan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyo Yeong [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Pusan National University Hospital, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    This study was performed to understand the bacteriologic contamination level of radiological equipment which have frequent contacts with patients in the Department of Radiology of an university hospital in Busan area. Before sterilizing in-patient of the radiology rooms, MRSA, VRE, acinetobacter baumannii, candida albicans, and enterococcus sp. were detected. After sterilization, all the bacteria were not found. As examine times become longer, more bacteria were detected and after 7 hours, bacillus sp.(GPR), CNS, acinetobacter baumannii, and Enterococcus sp. were detected. After examining infected patients, bacillus sp.(GPR), VRE, enterococcus sp. CNS, and micrococcus sp. were detected and on the hands of radiological technologists, CNS, enterococcus sp. escherichia coli, and enterobacter sp. were detected. Similar species of bacteria were detected from each radiology room, but pseudomonas aeruginosa was detected on the handles of portable radiological equipment and the chair in the waiting room. Therefore, it is the most important to regularly sterilize radiological equipment and devices which have frequent contacts with patients and to sterilize them right after the use of infected patients in order to prevent the spread of infection. Also, thorough hand washing, education on infection and management for the characteristics of Department of Radiology should be performed for the systematic prevention of infection.

  17. The Pathology of Infection in the Department of Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Seong Gyu; Lee, Hyo Yeong

    2012-01-01

    This study was performed to understand the bacteriologic contamination level of radiological equipment which have frequent contacts with patients in the Department of Radiology of an university hospital in Busan area. Before sterilizing in-patient of the radiology rooms, MRSA, VRE, acinetobacter baumannii, candida albicans, and enterococcus sp. were detected. After sterilization, all the bacteria were not found. As examine times become longer, more bacteria were detected and after 7 hours, bacillus sp.(GPR), CNS, acinetobacter baumannii, and Enterococcus sp. were detected. After examining infected patients, bacillus sp.(GPR), VRE, enterococcus sp. CNS, and micrococcus sp. were detected and on the hands of radiological technologists, CNS, enterococcus sp. escherichia coli, and enterobacter sp. were detected. Similar species of bacteria were detected from each radiology room, but pseudomonas aeruginosa was detected on the handles of portable radiological equipment and the chair in the waiting room. Therefore, it is the most important to regularly sterilize radiological equipment and devices which have frequent contacts with patients and to sterilize them right after the use of infected patients in order to prevent the spread of infection. Also, thorough hand washing, education on infection and management for the characteristics of Department of Radiology should be performed for the systematic prevention of infection.

  18. Study of application of protective measures for the public and remediation of contaminated areas in case of nuclear and / or radiological accidents in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Diogo Neves Gomes da

    2011-01-01

    Since the radiological accident in Goiania in 1987, the IRD (Institute of Radiological Protection and Dosimetry - IRD / CNEN) has been developing tools to support decision-making processes after a nuclear or radiological accident which leads to an environmental contamination and to an exposure of individuals the public These processes include the establishment of a supporting multicriteria model, which involves the application of protective and remediation measures of contaminated areas in tropical environments. In this study, it was performed an evaluation of the efficiency of these measures in order to determine the consequences of their implementation, based on results obtained from the code SIEM (Emergency Integrated System), which constitutes an environmental mode1 developed at IRD to simulate this type of accident. In order to perform this evaluation, it was first developed a database containing descriptions of various protection/remediation measures, which could be applied nationwide. Afterwards, some basic scenarios were established, considering the environmental, housing and food characteristics of the population of the vicinity of the nuclear power plants in Angra dos Reis (state of Rio de Janeiro). Thus, the accident simulations were carried out separately containing releases of 137 Cs, 90 Sr and 131 I. The results showed that the dose reduction varies according to the extent and the timing of the remediation measure applied. Although it is possible to establish some basic guidelines, generic solutions are not recommended, since the resulting doses are highly dependent on the actual situation. Any decision-making process should be made case by case, according to the actual conditions of the affected area and to the occupation characteristics and use of the affected areas, considering the characteristics of the source term of contamination, the time of the year in which the accident occurs, the local agricultural practices and food habits of real people

  19. The long-term problems of contaminated land: Sources, impacts and countermeasures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baes, C.F. III.

    1986-11-01

    This report examines the various sources of radiological land contamination; its extent; its impacts on man, agriculture, and the environment; countermeasures for mitigating exposures; radiological standards; alternatives for achieving land decontamination and cleanup; and possible alternatives for utilizing the land. The major potential sources of extensive long-term land contamination with radionuclides, in order of decreasing extent, are nuclear war, detonation of a single nuclear weapon (e.g., a terrorist act), serious reactor accidents, and nonfission nuclear weapons accidents that disperse the nuclear fuels (termed ''broken arrows'')

  20. The importance of determining the air exchange rate in flats and buildings for calculations of the averted indoor inhalation doses arising from contaminated outdoor air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jilek, Karel; Thomas, J.; Bulanek, B.; Lenk, J.; Marikova, S.

    2015-01-01

    The indoor-outdoor air exchange rate is an important parameter when refining estimates of the averted inhaled doses to population in houses and buildings after an emergency event resulting in contamination of outdoor air with a radioactive material. The air exchange rates measured in 70 occupied houses and in 20 unoccupied houses using N 2 O as the tracer gas are presented, and the results of modelling the averted doses in the residential buildings for both gaseous and aerosol outdoor contaminants are demonstrated. (orig.)

  1. Novel real-time 3D radiological mapping solution for ALARA maximization, D and D assessments and radiological management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubart, Philippe; Hautot, Felix [AREVA Group, 1 route de la Noue, Gif sur Yvette (France); Morichi, Massimo; Abou-Khalil, Roger [AREVA Group, Tour AREVA-1, place Jean Millier, Paris (France)

    2015-07-01

    Good management of dismantling and decontamination (D and D) operations and activities is requiring safety, time saving and perfect radiological knowledge of the contaminated environment as well as optimization for personnel dose and minimization of waste volume. In the same time, Fukushima accident has imposed a stretch to the nuclear measurement operational approach requiring in such emergency situation: fast deployment and intervention, quick analysis and fast scenario definition. AREVA, as return of experience from his activities carried out at Fukushima and D and D sites has developed a novel multi-sensor solution as part of his D and D research, approach and method, a system with real-time 3D photo-realistic spatial radiation distribution cartography of contaminated premises. The system may be hand-held or mounted on a mobile device (robot, drone, e.g). In this paper, we will present our current development based on a SLAM technology (Simultaneous Localization And Mapping) and integrated sensors and detectors allowing simultaneous topographic and radiological (dose rate and/or spectroscopy) data acquisitions. This enabling technology permits 3D gamma activity cartography in real-time. (authors)

  2. Novel real-time 3D radiological mapping solution for ALARA maximization, D and D assessments and radiological management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubart, Philippe; Hautot, Felix; Morichi, Massimo; Abou-Khalil, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Good management of dismantling and decontamination (D and D) operations and activities is requiring safety, time saving and perfect radiological knowledge of the contaminated environment as well as optimization for personnel dose and minimization of waste volume. In the same time, Fukushima accident has imposed a stretch to the nuclear measurement operational approach requiring in such emergency situation: fast deployment and intervention, quick analysis and fast scenario definition. AREVA, as return of experience from his activities carried out at Fukushima and D and D sites has developed a novel multi-sensor solution as part of his D and D research, approach and method, a system with real-time 3D photo-realistic spatial radiation distribution cartography of contaminated premises. The system may be hand-held or mounted on a mobile device (robot, drone, e.g). In this paper, we will present our current development based on a SLAM technology (Simultaneous Localization And Mapping) and integrated sensors and detectors allowing simultaneous topographic and radiological (dose rate and/or spectroscopy) data acquisitions. This enabling technology permits 3D gamma activity cartography in real-time. (authors)

  3. Radiological effects of a nuclear power plant on a river system, as demonstrated by the Gundremmingen BWR on the Danube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmann, H.; Ruf, M.; Huebel, K.; Luensmann, W.

    1975-01-01

    The Gundremmingen Nuclear Power Plant (boiling water reactor, 237 MW(e)), on the Upper Danube, has been in operation since 1967. Radiological data have been collected throughout its period of operation. The behaviour of the radioactive waste products in the ecological system of the Upper Danube (water, sediments, suspended solids, water-plants, fish) has been analysed in connection with environmental contamination, the uptake capacity of the Danube, and the possible pathways to man. As a result of the investigations, it seems possible to build further nuclear power plants on the Danube, if their rates of release of radioactivity are similar to those at Gundremmingen. (author)

  4. Wide-area decontamination in an urban environment after radiological dispersion: A review and perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaminski, Michael D., E-mail: Kaminski@anl.gov [Nuclear Decontamination and Separations, Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory (United States); Lee, Sang Don; Magnuson, Matthew [US Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Homeland Security Research Center (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Highlights: • We review wide area, urban decontamination techniques for rapid response. • We examine historical data and its application to radiological terrorism scenario. • Data is insufficient to ensure a detailed, organized mitigation response. • Primary deficit is lessons-learned and relations to extrapolate a limited data set. • Research is needed to model a mitigation response and help guide data gathering. - Abstract: Nuclear or radiological terrorism in the form of uncontrolled radioactive contamination presents a unique challenge in the field of nuclear decontamination. Potential targets require an immediate decontamination response, or mitigation plan to limit the social and economic impact. To date, experience with urban decontamination of building materials – specifically hard, porous, external surfaces – is limited to nuclear weapon fallout and nuclear reactor accidents. Methods are lacking for performing wide-area decontamination in an urban environment so that in all release scenarios the area may be re-occupied without evaluation and/or restriction. Also lacking is experience in developing mitigation strategies, that is, methods of mitigating contamination and its resultant radiation dose in key areas during the immediate aftermath of an event and after lifesaving operations. To date, the tremendous strategy development effort primarily by the European community has focused on the recovery phase, which extends years beyond the release event. In this review, we summarize the methods and data collected over the past 70 years in the field of hard, external surface decontamination of radionuclide contaminations, with emphasis on methods suitable for response to radiological dispersal devices and their potentially unique physico-chemical characteristics. This review concludes that although a tremendous amount of work has been completed primarily by the European Community (EU) and the United Kingdom (UK), the few studies existing on each

  5. Wide-area decontamination in an urban environment after radiological dispersion: A review and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaminski, Michael D.; Lee, Sang Don; Magnuson, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • We review wide area, urban decontamination techniques for rapid response. • We examine historical data and its application to radiological terrorism scenario. • Data is insufficient to ensure a detailed, organized mitigation response. • Primary deficit is lessons-learned and relations to extrapolate a limited data set. • Research is needed to model a mitigation response and help guide data gathering. - Abstract: Nuclear or radiological terrorism in the form of uncontrolled radioactive contamination presents a unique challenge in the field of nuclear decontamination. Potential targets require an immediate decontamination response, or mitigation plan to limit the social and economic impact. To date, experience with urban decontamination of building materials – specifically hard, porous, external surfaces – is limited to nuclear weapon fallout and nuclear reactor accidents. Methods are lacking for performing wide-area decontamination in an urban environment so that in all release scenarios the area may be re-occupied without evaluation and/or restriction. Also lacking is experience in developing mitigation strategies, that is, methods of mitigating contamination and its resultant radiation dose in key areas during the immediate aftermath of an event and after lifesaving operations. To date, the tremendous strategy development effort primarily by the European community has focused on the recovery phase, which extends years beyond the release event. In this review, we summarize the methods and data collected over the past 70 years in the field of hard, external surface decontamination of radionuclide contaminations, with emphasis on methods suitable for response to radiological dispersal devices and their potentially unique physico-chemical characteristics. This review concludes that although a tremendous amount of work has been completed primarily by the European Community (EU) and the United Kingdom (UK), the few studies existing on each

  6. L-62: Radiological emergencies revision to first responders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This conference describes the different types of radiological emergencies, the different emergency situations as well as the experience obtained. The radioactive material places, the damages and injuries caused by radioactive sources, the overexposure and the contamination levels are the main aspects to be considered in each situation

  7. Radiological analysis of solids around the old uranium mine of Rosglas (Morbihan). CRIIRAD N.08-119 note

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    As uranium mines present significant radiological contaminations years after their exploitation, this document reports preliminary investigations performed around old uranium mines in Brittany. This preliminary work showed significant radiological anomalies, with gamma radiation fluxes between ten and twenty times higher than the natural level. Measurement procedures and results are presented. Sampling has been performed on surface soil, stones and waters. Sample processing is briefly described. Results are commented in terms of contamination by uranium 238 and 235

  8. Formerly utilized MED/AEC sites remedial action program. Radiological survey of Universal Cyclopes, Inc., Titusville, Plant (formerly Vulcan Crucible Steel Company, Aliquippa, Pennsylvania, May 2-8, 1978)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wynveen, R.A.; Smith, W.H.; Mundis, R.L.; Mayes, C.B.

    1982-05-01

    A radiological survey was conducted at the Universal Cyclops, Inc. Titusville Plant (formerly Vulcan Crucible Steel Company), in Aliquippa, Pennsylvania, to determine the location and quantities of any radioactive materials remaining on the site as a result of MED/AEC activities in the late 1940s. This facility was used for rolling uranium billets during the MED/AEC era. The survey included measurements of alpha and beta-gamma contamination, both fixed and removable; beta-gamma exposure readings at contact and at 1 m (3 ft) above the floor or ground level; and measurements of the concentrations of radon daughters in air and concentrations of 137 Cs, the 232 Th decay chain, the 226 Ra decay chain, and uranium in the soil on the site. Fourteen spots of contamination exceeded the allowable limits for natural uranium. Under current use conditions, the potential for radiation exposure of occupants of the building from these sources of contamination is remote. Concentrations of radon daughters were below the 0.01 WL limit. Calculated radon concentrations based on the radon-daughter determinations ranged from 0.11 to 0.27 pCi/l. The concentration guide for 222 Rn in uncontrolled areas is 3 pCi/l. Analysis of soil samples from the site indicated elevated concentrations of uranium (15.1 +- 0.7 to 109.0 +- 5.5 pCi/g) at one sampling location near the building. There currently are no regulatory limits for uranium concentration in soil, but, a proposed guide value is pCi/g. After evaluation of results of the survey, it was concluded that although some areas of the Universal Cyclops facility are contaminated, these areas do not pose a significant risk to the present occupants of the building. Nonetheless, in a few cases the contamination does exceed accepted guidelines. Remedial measures are indicated to bring the contaminated areas within the guidelines

  9. The environmental restoration in the management of radiological accidents with off site consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez, C.; Montero, M.; Moraleda, M.; Diaz, J.; Claver, F.; Valles, O.; Rodriguez, N.; Gutierrez, J.

    1998-01-01

    Radiological accidents are among the potential cases of environmental contamination that could have consequences on the health of the population. These accidents, associated with an increase in the level of radiological exposure surpassing the natural background, have been investigated in greater depth than other conventional accidents. This investigation has included the evaluation of their probability, magnitude and consequences in order to establish safety norms. Nevertheless, the social perception of this type of risk appears to be disproportionately high. The development of a comprehensible and adequate standardized system for the evaluation of the radiological risk and the applicability of corrective actions to reduce this type of risk at local level, will undoubtedly contribute to increase the public confidence in the advised options for the restoration of environments contaminated with the long lived radionuclides. This system should consider the local specificity of each contaminated place, and take into account the associated unwanted consequences for each option. This paper presents the first results of a system to help the decision makers in the quantitative evaluation of the radiological risk produced by long lived radionuclides Cs 137, Cs 134 and Sr 90 spread over urban, agricultural and semi-natural environments and the applicable options to reduce it. The evaluation of these applicable options is made considering the reduction of dose that can be reached, the monetary costs and the significant associated secondary effects if there are any. All these factors are integrated for a time period depending on the half-life of the contaminants and on their strength and distribution on the scenario when intervention is being planned. (authors)

  10. The role of radiation protection in the rehabilitation of living conditions in contaminated territories after a nuclear accident or a radiological event

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lochard, J.

    2006-01-01

    The implementation of radiation protection programmes in long -term contaminated territories is raising difficult technical, methodological, but also ethical questions, which commit the responsibility of the radiation protection professionals and the way they are exercising their expertise in such situation. The presence of contamination in the environment is a new reality which is profoundly affecting the living conditions of the population in all aspects: health, environment but also the psychological, social and economical cultural dimensions of daily life. In such a context, the classical radiation protection approach is inoperative to restore the normality of the ante accident situation On the contrary, the scientific and technological expertise and the prescriptive administrative arrangements, including the radiation protection ones, which are heavily mobilized to respond to the many challenges facing the society induce a progressive de -qualification of the environment and goods and a loss of control of the situation by the population which turn into a social depression. The paper illustrates how radiation protection programmes for managing long term contaminated territories have an ambivalent impact: on the one hand they ensure the protection of the population against the potential health impacts of radiations, on the other hand they re -enforce the loss of control, de-qualification and exclusion processes which results in a weakening of the resilience capacity of the population and the territories. The recent experience of co-expertise and co-operation implemented in the contaminated territories of Belarus have demonstrated that the direct engagement of local professionals and the population in the daily management of the radiological situation is not only feasible but also necessary to stop this vicious circle of loss of control and exclusion. To be effective and sustainable this engagement must rely on the diffusion among the population of a 'practical

  11. Systematic radiological survey distinguishing contaminated from non-contaminated agricultural areas in the Korma district

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hille, R.; Dederichs, H.

    1999-01-01

    The results of soil measurements justify the conclusion that the population of the CIS resident in areas heavily affected by the fallout from the Chernobyl reactor accident returned to normal life, neglecting or refusing to accept precautionary practice in land use or other restrictions recommended for radiological protection. One factor is the time elapsed since the accident happened, another is the succession of generations. Those who then were young children now are the mothers and fathers of the third post-accident generation, and their anyhow weak awareness of the persisting radiological danger has fallen into oblivion. This may serve as an explanation of the fact that there is an extremely strong increase in the body doses measured in children of pre-school age. Further major factors are the poor agricultural situation and the resulting nutritional problems, forcing people to increasingly live on the fruit of the forest. This is clearly reflected in the increased internal radiation doses measured, while the external doses are decreasing with continuing vertical migration of radionuclides. Increasing internal accumulation of cesium in the population as a dominant contribution to total body doses was revealed by the measuring campaign, extending to the population of villages farther off the forests. (orig./CB) [de

  12. Radiological accident of cesium-137 in brazil activities of surveillance and decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Toshiyuki

    1989-01-01

    In 1987, a serious radiological accident occurred in Goiania, Brazil. Four inhabitants died and about 250 persons were internally or externally contaminated with 137 Cs released from a removed and then broken source vessel. In this report, outline of the accident and, activities on surveillance of contamination and works for decontamination are described. (author)

  13. Strategic Expansion Models in Academic Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natesan, Rajni; Yang, Wei T; Tannir, Habib; Parikh, Jay

    2016-03-01

    In response to economic pressures, academic institutions in the United States and their radiology practices, are expanding into the community to build a larger network, thereby driving growth and achieving economies of scale. These economies of scale are being achieved variously via brick-and-mortar construction, community practice acquisition, and partnership-based network expansion. We describe and compare these three expansion models within a 4-part framework of: (1) upfront investment; (2) profitability impact; (3) brand impact; and (4) risk of execution. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Radiological protection aspects regarding to assistance of the cesium-137 radiation accident victims in Goiania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, John Graham; Oliveira Filho, Denizart Silveira de; Rabelo, Paulo Ney Pamplona

    1997-01-01

    The radiological protection measures taken in the general hospital of Goiania (HGG/INAMPS) and in the FEBEM institution, due to the accident involving Cesium-137 are described, as well as the work of the IRD personnel in the areas of: radiological protection of the medical and auxiliary staff, contamination control of the ward, radiological monitoring of the patients, waste management, personnel and area decontamination and patient transportation. (author)

  15. Off-site consequences of radiological accidents: methods, costs and schedules for decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tawil, J.J.; Bold, F.C.; Harrer, B.J.; Currie, J.W.

    1985-08-01

    This report documents a data base and a computer program for conducting a decontamination analysis of a large, radiologically contaminated area. The data base, which was compiled largely through interviews with knowledgeable persons both in the public and private sectors, consists of the costs, physical inputs, rates and contaminant removal efficiencies of a large number of decontamination procedures. The computer program utilizes this data base along with information specific to the contaminated site to provide detailed information that includes the least costly method for effectively decontaminating each surface at the site, various types of property losses associated with the contamination, the time at which each subarea within the site should be decontaminated to minimize these property losses, the quantity of various types of labor and equipment necessary to complete the decontamination, dose to radiation workers, the costs for surveying and monitoring activities, and the disposal costs associated with radiological waste generated during cleanup. The program and data base are demonstrated with a decontamination analysis of a hypothetical site. 39 refs., 24 figs., 155 tabs

  16. Off-site consequences of radiological accidents: methods, costs and schedules for decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tawil, J.J.; Bold, F.C.; Harrer, B.J.; Currie, J.W.

    1985-08-01

    This report documents a data base and a computer program for conducting a decontamination analysis of a large, radiologically contaminated area. The data base, which was compiled largely through interviews with knowledgeable persons both in the public and private sectors, consists of the costs, physical inputs, rates and contaminant removal efficiencies of a large number of decontamination procedures. The computer program utilizes this data base along with information specific to the contaminated site to provide detailed information that includes the least costly method for effectively decontaminating each surface at the site, various types of property losses associated with the contamination, the time at which each subarea within the site should be decontaminated to minimize these property losses, the quantity of various types of labor and equipment necessary to complete the decontamination, dose to radiation workers, the costs for surveying and monitoring activities, and the disposal costs associated with radiological waste generated during cleanup. The program and data base are demonstrated with a decontamination analysis of a hypothetical site. 39 refs., 24 figs., 155 tabs.

  17. Radiological surveillance of airborne contaminants in the working environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    Contamination of the air of the working environment may result from incidental or accidental releases during the handling of radioactive materials. Representative sampling and measurement are complicated by a variety of factors, arising mainly from the physical and chemical properties of radioactive aerosols. The following topics are presented in detail: sources and types of airborne contaminants, sampling techniques and instruments, measurement techniques and instruments, interpretation of measurements, examples of air monitoring programmes

  18. Radiological contamination control training for laboratory research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-02-01

    This program management guide describes the proper implementation standard for core training as outlined in the DOE Radiological Control (RadCon) Manual. The guide is to assist those individuals, both within the Department of Energy (DOE) and Managing and Operating (M and O) contractors, identified as having responsibility for implementing the core training recommended by the RadCon Manual. The management guide is divided into the following sections: introduction; instructional materials development; training program standards and policies; and course-specific information. The goal of the core training program is to provide a standardized, baseline knowledge for those individuals completing the core training. Standardization of the knowledge provides personnel with the information necessary to perform their assigned duties at a predetermined level of expertise. Implementing a core training program ensures consistent and appropriate training of personnel

  19. The long-term problems of contaminated land: Sources, impacts and countermeasures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baes, C.F. III

    1986-11-01

    This report examines the various sources of radiological land contamination; its extent; its impacts on man, agriculture, and the environment; countermeasures for mitigating exposures; radiological standards; alternatives for achieving land decontamination and cleanup; and possible alternatives for utilizing the land. The major potential sources of extensive long-term land contamination with radionuclides, in order of decreasing extent, are nuclear war, detonation of a single nuclear weapon (e.g., a terrorist act), serious reactor accidents, and nonfission nuclear weapons accidents that disperse the nuclear fuels (termed ''broken arrows'').

  20. Characterizing Contamination and Assessing Exposure, Risk and Resilience

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA supports its responders' ability to characterize site contamination by developing sampling protocols, sample preparation methods, and analytical methods for chemicals, biotoxins, microbial pathogens, and radiological agents.

  1. Response to nuclear and radiological terrorism - the viewpoint from the security forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baciu, A.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: A threat of a malevolent act may be deemed to exist when information has been received that terrorists, criminals or other persons intend to: manufacture, use, transport, dispose radioactive materials in order to hide the nature of material; perpetrate a deliberate act to irradiate a person or persons; perpetrate a deliberate act to contaminate food or water supplies with radioactive materials; create and deploy a radiation dispersal device; perpetrate a deliberate act to contaminate a site or the environment with radioactive materials; or mount a sabotage attack upon a nuclear facility aimed at causing an uncontrolled release of radioactive materials. Security forces will be involved in all aspects of the response: at the scene, to lead, to control the crime scene and preserve evidence; at the hospitals, to identify and manage witnesses who may assist in the ensuing investigation, and to protect emergency medical personnel if perpetrators are part of the casualties; and at the regional and national coordination level, to manage the overall criminal investigation; to take under physical protection the seized materials. Law enforcement response: key considerations to all police (security and investigating) personnel at the scene of a terrorist act will include the following: do not approach the scene without proper radiological support; be aware of the possible presence of other radiological hazards; the radiological team will seek the removal of safety hazards. Work with that team to minimize hazards while not compromising the investigation. Minimize traffic through the scene: this will help reduce the spread of radioactive contamination, if present; people present at the scene need to be held for questioning. However, they will also have fears due to the presence of radiation. Work with the radiological team to minimize radiological hazards and fears while not compromising the investigation procedure. (author)

  2. A probabilistic approach to Radiological Environmental Impact Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avila, Rodolfo; Larsson, Carl-Magnus

    2001-01-01

    Since a radiological environmental impact assessment typically relies on limited data and poorly based extrapolation methods, point estimations, as implied by a deterministic approach, do not suffice. To be of practical use for risk management, it is necessary to quantify the uncertainty margins of the estimates as well. In this paper we discuss how to work out a probabilistic approach for dealing with uncertainties in assessments of the radiological risks to non-human biota of a radioactive contamination. Possible strategies for deriving the relevant probability distribution functions from available empirical data and theoretical knowledge are outlined

  3. Comparison of Air Impaction and Electrostatic Dust Collector Sampling Methods to Assess Airborne Fungal Contamination in Public Buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Normand, Anne-Cécile; Ranque, Stéphane; Cassagne, Carole; Gaudart, Jean; Sallah, Kankoé; Charpin, Denis-André; Piarroux, Renaud

    2016-03-01

    Many ailments can be linked to exposure to indoor airborne fungus. However, obtaining a precise measurement of airborne fungal levels is complicated partly due to indoor air fluctuations and non-standardized techniques. Electrostatic dust collector (EDC) sampling devices have been used to measure a wide range of airborne analytes, including endotoxins, allergens, β-glucans, and microbial DNA in various indoor environments. In contrast, viable mold contamination has only been assessed in highly contaminated environments such as farms and archive buildings. This study aimed to assess the use of EDCs, compared with repeated air-impactor measurements, to assess airborne viable fungal flora in moderately contaminated indoor environments. Indoor airborne fungal flora was cultured from EDCs and daily air-impaction samples collected in an office building and a daycare center. The quantitative fungal measurements obtained using a single EDC significantly correlated with the cumulative measurement of nine daily air impactions. Both methods enabled the assessment of fungal exposure, although a few differences were observed between the detected fungal species and the relative quantity of each species. EDCs were also used over a 32-month period to monitor indoor airborne fungal flora in a hospital office building, which enabled us to assess the impact of outdoor events (e.g. ground excavations) on the fungal flora levels on the indoor environment. In conclusion, EDC-based measurements provided a relatively accurate profile of the viable airborne flora present during a sampling period. In particular, EDCs provided a more representative assessment of fungal levels compared with single air-impactor sampling. The EDC technique is also simpler than performing repetitive air-impaction measures over the course of several consecutive days. EDC is a versatile tool for collecting airborne samples and was efficient for measuring mold levels in indoor environments. © The Author 2015

  4. Nuclear and radiological risk: contaminated mass casualties in the hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Telion, C.; Lejay, M.; Carli, P.

    2006-01-01

    The basic scenario for the medical response organization is the explosion of the dirty bomb in public places spreading radioactive material and contaminating casualties. The French plan gives precise directions for the organization of the emergency room and the simple protective measures for medical staff and equipment to avoid dissemination and contamination into the hospital. Decontamination consists of the undressing of the victims followed by showering. The detection of the contamination can limit the time-consuming unnecessary decontamination procedure and the radioactive waste. Medical and paramedical staff is trained to wear protective disposal paper suits and to direct the procedure of decontamination. (author)

  5. Radiation Protection Research: Radiological Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeevaert, T.

    2000-01-01

    The objectives of SCK-CEN's research in the field of radiological impact assessment are (1) to elaborate and to improve methods and guidelines for the evaluation of restoration options for contaminated sites; (2) to develop, test and improve biosphere models for the performance assessment of radioactive waste disposal in near-surface or geological repositories; (3) to asses the impact of releases from nuclear or industrial installations. Main achievements in these areas for 2000 are summarised

  6. Radiological decontamination, survey, and statistical release method for vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodwill, M.E.; Lively, J.W.; Morris, R.L.

    1996-06-01

    Earth-moving vehicles (e.g., dump trucks, belly dumps) commonly haul radiologically contaminated materials from a site being remediated to a disposal site. Traditionally, each vehicle must be surveyed before being released. The logistical difficulties of implementing the traditional approach on a large scale demand that an alternative be devised. A statistical method for assessing product quality from a continuous process was adapted to the vehicle decontamination process. This method produced a sampling scheme that automatically compensates and accommodates fluctuating batch sizes and changing conditions without the need to modify or rectify the sampling scheme in the field. Vehicles are randomly selected (sampled) upon completion of the decontamination process to be surveyed for residual radioactive surface contamination. The frequency of sampling is based on the expected number of vehicles passing through the decontamination process in a given period and the confidence level desired. This process has been successfully used for 1 year at the former uranium millsite in Monticello, Utah (a cleanup site regulated under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act). The method forces improvement in the quality of the decontamination process and results in a lower likelihood that vehicles exceeding the surface contamination standards are offered for survey. Implementation of this statistical sampling method on Monticello projects has resulted in more efficient processing of vehicles through decontamination and radiological release, saved hundreds of hours of processing time, provided a high level of confidence that release limits are met, and improved the radiological cleanliness of vehicles leaving the controlled site

  7. Wide-area decontamination in an urban environment after radiological dispersion: A review and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, Michael D; Lee, Sang Don; Magnuson, Matthew

    2016-03-15

    Nuclear or radiological terrorism in the form of uncontrolled radioactive contamination presents a unique challenge in the field of nuclear decontamination. Potential targets require an immediate decontamination response, or mitigation plan to limit the social and economic impact. To date, experience with urban decontamination of building materials - specifically hard, porous, external surfaces - is limited to nuclear weapon fallout and nuclear reactor accidents. Methods are lacking for performing wide-area decontamination in an urban environment so that in all release scenarios the area may be re-occupied without evaluation and/or restriction. Also lacking is experience in developing mitigation strategies, that is, methods of mitigating contamination and its resultant radiation dose in key areas during the immediate aftermath of an event and after lifesaving operations. To date, the tremendous strategy development effort primarily by the European community has focused on the recovery phase, which extends years beyond the release event. In this review, we summarize the methods and data collected over the past 70 years in the field of hard, external surface decontamination of radionuclide contaminations, with emphasis on methods suitable for response to radiological dispersal devices and their potentially unique physico-chemical characteristics. This review concludes that although a tremendous amount of work has been completed primarily by the European Community (EU) and the United Kingdom (UK), the few studies existing on each technique permit only very preliminary estimates of decontamination factors for various building materials and methods and extrapolation of those values for use in environments outside the EU and UK. This data shortage prevents us from developing an effective and detailed mitigation response plan and remediation effort. Perhaps most importantly, while the data available does include valuable information on the practical aspects of performing

  8. Geostatistics for radiological characterization: overview and application cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desnoyers, Yvon

    2016-01-01

    The objective of radiological characterization is to find a suitable balance between gathering data (constrained by cost, deadlines, accessibility or radiation) and managing the issues (waste volumes, levels of activity or exposure). It is necessary to have enough information to have confidence in the results without multiplying useless data. Geo-statistics processing of data considers all available pieces of information: historical data, non-destructive measurements and laboratory analyses of samples. The spatial structure modelling is then used to produce maps and to estimate the extent of radioactive contamination (surface and depth). Quantifications of local and global uncertainties are powerful decision-making tools for better management of remediation projects at contaminated sites, and for decontamination and dismantling projects at nuclear facilities. They can be used to identify hot spots, estimate contamination of surfaces and volumes, classify radioactive waste according to thresholds, estimate source terms, and so on. The spatial structure of radioactive contamination makes the optimization of sampling (number and position of data points) particularly important. Geo-statistics methodology can help determine the initial mesh size and reduce estimation uncertainties. Several show cases are presented to illustrate why and how geo-statistics can be applied to a range of radiological characterization where investigated units can represent very small areas (a few m 2 or a few m 3 ) or very large sites (at a country scale). The focus is then put on experience gained over years in the use of geo-statistics and sampling optimization. (author)

  9. Airborne systems for emergency radiological monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jupiter, C.; Boyns, P.

    1976-01-01

    A variety of aerial radiological monitoring systems are available to respond to a radiological accident or incident affecting large areas. These are operated by EG and G, Inc. for ERDA's Division of Operational Safety. A survey system can be airborne within approximately two hours after notification. Both airborne and terrestrial radioactivity can be measured and mapped. Special analysis procedures allow discrimination between radioactivity from most man-made radioelements and naturally occurring radioelements. A position accuracy of +-54 feet can be maintained over a large area survey. Detection sensitivity for gamma sources employing NaI detector arrays on board an airplane flying at 500 feet altitude is better than 2 μR/hr for surface planar contaminants and approximately 10 mCi for a point gamma source

  10. The deployment of an innovative real-time radiological soil characterization system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, David; Danahy, Raymond; Laird, Gregory; Seiller, Dale; White, Joan; Janke, Robert

    2000-01-01

    Fluor Fernald Inc., in conjunction with partners from Argonne National Laboratory, the Department of Energy's Environmental Measurements Laboratory, and Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, has developed a program for characterizing radiological contaminants in soil in real time. The soil characterization system in use at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) for over three years combines gamma ray spectrometry equipment with other technologies to produce a system that can scan large areas of ground and produce color coded maps which display quantitative information regarding isotopic contamination patterns. Software running on a battery powered lap-top computer, is used to control acquisition of gamma spectral data to link the spectral Information with precise detector position measurements from Global Positioning System (GPS) satellites, and to control transmission of data to a central station or van via a wireless Ethernet link where Surfer6 mapping software is used to produce maps showing the position and amount of each target analyte. Either sodium iodide (NaI) gamma ray detectors mounted on three different vehicles for mobile measurements or stationary tripod-mounted hyper-pure germanium (HPGe) detectors can be used in this system to radiologically characterize soil. The operational and performance characteristics, as well as the strengths and limitations of each of these units, will be described. The isotopic information generated by this system can be made available to remediation project mangers within an hour after the completion of a scan to aid in determination of excavation footprints, segregation of contaminated soil and verification of contamination removal. The immediate availability of radiological characterization data made possible by this real-time scanning system has allowed Fluor Fernald to accelerate remediation schedules and reduce costs by avoiding excavation delays and expensive and time consuming

  11. Radiological evaluation of building materials used in Malumfashi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... in building materials (sand, cement, blocks, granite, and paints) used in the construction of buildings in Malumfashi local Government area of Katsina state, Nigeria were determined by means of a gamma-ray spectrometry system using Sodium Iodide thallium activated (NaI(Tl)) detector in a low background configuration.

  12. Aspects of radiation protection to attend the victims of radiological accident with cesium 137 in Goiania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, J.G.; Oliveira Filho, D.S. de; Rabello, P.N.P.

    1988-01-01

    The radiological protection measures taken in the general hospital of Goiania (HGG/INAMPS) and in the FEBEM institution, due do the accident involving cesium 137 are described, as well the work of the NUCLEI personnel in the areas of: radiological protection of the medical and auxiliary staff, contamination control of the ward, radiological monitoring of the patients, waste management, personnel and area decontamination and patient transportation. (author) [pt

  13. Nevada Test Site Radiological Control Manual, Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    Management. The NTS has been the primary location for testing nuclear explosives in the continental United States since 1951. The topographical and geological characteristics of the NTS afford some protection to the inhabitants of the surrounding areas from potential radiation exposure as a result of release of radioactivity or contamination from nuclear testing operations. Historically, testing programs at the NTS have included atmospheric testing in the 1950s and early 1960s; underground testing in drilled, vertical holes and horizontal tunnels; earth-cratering experiments; and open air nuclear reactor and engine testing. Current activities include operating low-level radioactive and mixed waste disposal facilities for United States defense-generated waste, assembly and execution of subcritical experiments, assembly/disassembly of special experiments, the storage and use of special nuclear materials, performing criticality experiments, emergency responder training, surface cleanup and site characterization of contaminated land areas, environmental activity by the University system, and nonnuclear test operations, such as controlled spills of hazardous materials at the Hazardous Materials Spill Center. Currently, the major potential for occupational radiation exposure is associated with the burial of low-level radioactive waste and the handling of radioactive sources. Remediation of contaminated land areas may also result in radiological exposures. The Tenant Organizations (TOs) that are responsible for conducting operations, according to this manual, include National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), Defense Threat Reduction Agency, Desert Research Institute, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Navarro Nevada Environmental Services, LLC, Sandia National Laboratories, and WSI. These organizations operate under this manual only when they are performing activities under the purview of NNSA/NSO. To ensure that the appropriate procedures

  14. Field demonstrations of passive detectors for screening of alpha contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, K.E.; Gammage, R.B.; Dudney, C.S.

    1994-01-01

    There are numerous sites around the country, DOE and otherwise, that are faced with the daunting task of remediating radiologically contaminated soils and groundwaters. Some of these sites, such as the Nevada Test Site and the Rocky Flats Plant, have contaminants that have been dispersed over wide areas. The costs of the characterization phase alone for such remediation programs can be prohibitive. Therefore there are pressing needs for testing and evaluation of new technologies for screening for radiological contaminants that may offer significant advantages in capital costs, ease of use, sensitivity, ruggedness, and/or reliability. This work reports on laboratory and Field tests of two types of passive alpha detectors, electret ionization chambers (EIC's) and alpha track detectors (ATD's), that have been commercially developed for indoor radon measurements. Previous work documented calibration and measurement protocols developed for these detectors for indoor surface contamination measurements

  15. Radiological/biological/aerosol removal system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslam, Jeffery J

    2015-03-17

    An air filter replacement system for existing buildings, vehicles, arenas, and other enclosed airspaces includes a replacement air filter for replacing a standard air filter. The replacement air filter has dimensions and air flow specifications that allow it to replace the standard air filter. The replacement air filter includes a filter material that removes radiological or biological or aerosol particles.

  16. EURANOS. Generic handbook for assisting in the management of contaminated food production systems in Europe following a radiological emergency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nisbet, A.F.; Howard, B.J.; Jones, A.

    production sectors and others who may be affected. The handbook is a living document that requires updating from time to time to remain state-of-the-art and customisation of the generic handbook is an essential part of its use within individual countries. The handbook includes management options......The handbook for food production systems has been developed as a result of a series of UK and European initiatives involving a wide range of stakeholders. It is aimed at national and local authorities, central government departments and agencies, radiation protection experts, agriculture and food...... for application in the pre-release, emergency and longer term phases of an incident. Sources of contamination considered in the handbook are nuclear accidents, radiological dispersion devices and satellite accidents. Agricultural and domestic food production systems are considered, including the gathering of free...

  17. Improving patient safety in radiology: a work in progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sze, Raymond W.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to share the experiences, including successes and failures, as well as the ongoing process of developing and implementing a safety program in a large pediatric radiology department. Building a multidisciplinary pediatric radiology safety team requires successful recruitment of team members, selection of a team leader, and proper and ongoing training and tools, and protected time. Challenges, including thorough examples, are presented on improving pediatric radiology safety intradepartmentally, interdepartmentally, and institutionally. Finally, some major challenges to improving safety in pediatric radiology, and healthcare in general, are presented along with strategies to overcome these challenges. Our safety program is a work in progress; this article is a personal account and the reader is asked for tolerance of its occasional subjective tone and contents. (orig.)

  18. Training Workers to use Localized Ventilation for Radiological Work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WAGGONER, L.O.

    2000-01-01

    Work on radiological systems and components needs to be accomplished using techniques that reduce radiation dose to workers, limit contamination spread, and minimize radioactive waste. One of the best methods to control contamination spread is to use localized ventilation to capture radioactive material and keep it from spreading. The Fluor Hanford ALARA Center teaches workers how to use ventilation in partnership with other engineered controls and this has resulted in improved work practices, minimized the impact on adjacent work operations, and decreased the amount of radioactive waste generated. This presentation will emphasize how the workers are trained to use localized ventilation for contamination control

  19. Monitoring techniques for the impact assessment during nuclear and radiological emergencies: current status and the challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradeepkumar, K.S.; Sharma, D.N.

    2003-01-01

    Preparedness and response capability for Nuclear and Radiological emergencies, existing world over, are mainly based on the requirement of responding to radiation emergency caused by nuclear or radiological accidents. Cosmos satellite accident, plutonium contamination at Polaris, nuclear accidents like Kystium, Windscale, TMI and Chernobyl, radiological accidents at Goiania etc have demonstrated the requirement of improved radiation monitoring techniques. For quick decision making, state of the art monitoring methodology which can support quantitative and qualitative impact assessment is essential. Evaluation of radiological mapping of the area suspected to be contaminated needs ground based as well as aerial based monitoring systems to predict the level of radioactive contamination on ground. This will help in delineating the area and deciding the required countermeasures, based on the quantity and type of radionuclides responsible for it. The response can be successful with the effective use of i) Early Warning System ii) Mobile Monitoring System and iii) Aerial Gamma Spectrometric System. Selection of the monitoring methodology and survey parameters and assessment of situation using available resources etc. are to be optimized depending on the accident scenario. Recently, many countries and agencies like IAEA have expressed the requirement for responding to other types of nuclear/radiological emergencies i.e, man made radiation emergency situations aimed at harming public at large that can also lead to environmental contamination and significant exposure to public. Reports of lost / misplaced / stolen radioactive sources from many countries are alarming as safety and security of these radioactive sources are under challenge. The monitoring methodology has to take into account of the increase in such demands and more periodic monitoring in suspected locations is to be carried out. Detection of orphan sources possible amidst large heap of metallic scraps may pose

  20. Processing plutonium-contaminated soil on Johnston Atoll

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moroney, K.; Moroney, J. III; Turney, J.

    1994-01-01

    This article describes a cleanup project to process plutonium- and americium-contaminated soil on Johnston Atoll for volume reduction. Thermo Analytical's (TMA's) segmented gate system (SGS) for this remedial operation has been in successful on-site operation since 1992. Topics covered include the basis for development, a description of the Johnston Atoll; the significance of results; the benefits of the technology; applicability to other radiologically contaminated sites. 7 figs., 1 tab

  1. Radioactive Contamination of Agricultural Products in Poland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muszynski, W.; Grabowski, D.; Rubel, B.; Kurowski, W.; Swietochowska, J.; Smagala, G.

    2003-01-01

    Radiological contamination of the environment is caused by nuclear activities on the globe: nuclear weapon tests and the Chernobyl accident. The transfer of radionuclides to the organism via ingestion is one of the sources of doses obtained by people. To assess the doses received by humans the intake of isotopes with daily diet was defined. The concentration of radionuclides in foodstuffs was determined. The network of Service for Measurement of Radioactive Contamination systematically controls all kinds of important agricultural products such as milk, meat, vegetables, fruit, cereals and forest products: mushrooms, blueberries etc. Measurement stations involved in food monitoring act within Sanitary-Epidemiological Stations, Veterinary Hygiene Units and Chemical-Agricultural Stations. All activities are co-ordinated by the Central Laboratory for Radiological Protection. The level of activity of caesium isotopes has regularly been monitored in collected samples originating from different administrative districts of Poland. Since 1994 the 134 Cs concentration has been below the detection limit. The activity of 137 Cs has been measured to determine long-term effect of the accident on the contamination of milk, meat and other foodstuffs. (orig.)

  2. Sorbent materials for rapid remediation of wash water during radiological event relief

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jolin, William C.; Kaminski, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Procedures for removing harmful radiation from interior and exterior surfaces of homes and businesses after a nuclear or radiological disaster may generate large volumes of radiologically contaminated waste water. Rather than releasing this waste water to potentially contaminate surrounding areas, it is preferable to treat it onsite. Retention barrels are a viable option because of their simplicity in preparation and availability of possible sorbent materials. This study investigated the use of aluminosilicate clay minerals as sorbent materials to retain 137Cs, 85Sr, and 152Eu. Vermiculite strongly retained 137Cs, though other radionuclides displayed diminished affinity for the surface. Montmorillonite exhibited increased affinity to sorb 85Sr and 152Eu in the presence of higher concentrations of 137Cs. To simulate flow within retention barrels, vermiculite was mixed with sand and used in small-scale column experiments. The GoldSim contaminate fate module was used to model breakthrough and assess the feasibility of using clay minerals as sorbent materials in retention barrels. The modeled radionuclide breakthrough profiles suggest that vermiculite-sand and montmorillonite-sand filled barrels could be used for treatment of contaminated water generated from field operations.

  3. Discussion on the method of environmental radiological impact assessment for the highway construction project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu Guohua

    2008-01-01

    Based on the characteristics and environmental radiological impact of the highway construction project, the basic procedure of environmental radiological impact assessment for the highway construction project is put forward, including analysis and determination of contamination sources, selection of evaluation factors, determination of assessment range and dose limit, environmental investigation, environmental impact prediction and assessment. The working method of each procedure is analyzed. (authors)

  4. Rapid radiological characterization method based on the use of dose coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dulama, C.; Toma, Al.; Dobrin, R.; Valeca, M.

    2010-01-01

    Intervention actions in case of radiological emergencies and exploratory radiological surveys require rapid methods for the evaluation of the range and extent of contamination. When simple and homogeneous radionuclide composition characterize the radioactive contamination, surrogate measurements can be used to reduce the costs implied by laboratory analyses and to speed-up the process of decision support. A dose-rate measurement-based methodology can be used in conjunction with adequate dose coefficients to assess radionuclide inventories and to calculate dose projections for various intervention scenarios. The paper presents the results obtained for dose coefficients in some particular exposure geometries and the methodology used for deriving dose rate guidelines from activity concentration upper levels specified as contamination limits. All calculations were performed by using the commercial software MicroShield from Grove Software Inc. A test case was selected as to meet the conditions from EPA Federal Guidance Report no. 12 (FGR12) concerning the evaluation of dose coefficients for external exposure from contaminated soil and the obtained results were compared to values given in the referred document. The geometries considered as test cases are: contaminated ground surface; - infinite extended homogeneous surface contamination and soil contaminated to a depth of 15 cm. As shown by the results, the values agree within 50% relative difference for most of the cases. The greatest discrepancies were observed for depth contamination simulation and in the case of radionuclides with complicated gamma emission and this is due to the different approach from MicroShield and FGR12. A case study is presented for validation of the methodology, where both dose rate measurements and laboratory analyses were performed on an extended quasi-homogeneous NORM contamination. The dose rate estimations obtained by applying the dose coefficients to the radionuclide concentrations

  5. Contribution to the optimization of worker's radiological protection in a uranium mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombard, J.; Oudiz, A.; Zettwoog, P.

    1984-04-01

    This report presents the results of an optimization study dealing with radiological protection in a uranium mine. The modelization of alpha contamination associated with short-lived radon daughter in a mine branch allows the comparison of various protection strategies by a cost-effectiveness analysis in view of determining the ''optimal'' protection strategy. The study points out the interest of the optimization procedure as a decision-aiding tool within the framework of radiological protection [fr

  6. Characterization of radiological emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chester, C.V.

    1985-01-01

    Several severe radiological emergencies were reviewed to determine the likely range of conditions which must be coped with by a mobile teleoperator designed for emergencies. The events reviewed included accidents at TMI (1978), SL-1 (1961), Y-12 (1958), Bethesda (1982), Chalk River (1952 and 1958), Lucens (1969). The important conditions were: radiation fields over 10,000 R/h, severe contamination, possible critical excursion, possible inert atmosphere, temperatures from 50 0 C to -20 0 C, 100% relative humidity, 60-cm-high obstacles, stairs, airlocks, darkness, and lack of electric power

  7. Ensuring the safety of surgical teams when managing casualties of a radiological dirty bomb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Geraint; O'Malley, Michael; Nocera, Antony

    2010-09-01

    The capacity for surgical teams to ensure their own safety when dealing with the consequences caused by the detonation of a radiological dirty bomb is primarily determined by prior knowledge, familiarity and training for this type of event. This review article defines the associated radiological terminology with an emphasis on the personal safety of surgical team members in respect to the principles of radiological protection. The article also describes a technique for use of hand held radiation monitors and will discuss the identification and management of radiologically contaminated patients who may pose a significant danger to the surgical team. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Asian Radiology Forum 2015 for Building an Asian Friendship: A Step toward the Vigorous Intersociety Collaboration in Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ho Sung; Choi, Jung-Ah

    2016-01-01

    According to the reports presented at the Asian Radiology Forum 2015, organized by the Korean Society of Radiology (KSR) during the Korean Congress of Radiology (KCR) in September 2015 in Seoul, there is an increasing need to promote international exchange and collaboration amongst radiology societies in Asian countries. The Asian Radiology Forum was first held by KSR and the national delegates of Asian radiological partner societies, who attended this meeting with the aim of discussing selected subjects of global relevance in radiology. In 2015, current stands, pros and cons, and future plans for inter-society collaboration between each Asian radiological partner societies were primarily discussed. The Asian radiology societies have international collaborations with each other through various activities, such as joint symposia, exchange programs, social exchange, and international membership. The advantages of continuing inter-society collaboration in most of the Asian radiology societies include international speakers, diverse clinical research, and cutting edge technology; while limited range of financial and human resources, language barrier, differences in goals and expectations are claimed as disadvantages. With regard to the future, most of the Asian radiology societies focus on expanding partner societies and enhancing globalization and collaboration programs through various international meetings and exchange programs. PMID:26957902

  9. Asian radiology forum 2015 for building an Asian friendship: A step toward the vigorous intersociety collaboration in Asia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ho Sung; Choi, Jung Ah; Lee, Jong Min

    2016-01-01

    According to the reports presented at the Asian Radiology Forum 2015, organized by the Korean Society of Radiology (KSR) during the Korean Congress of Radiology (KCR) in September 2015 in Seoul, there is an increasing need to promote international exchange and collaboration amongst radiology societies in Asian countries. The Asian Radiology Forum was first held by KSR and the national delegates of Asian radiological partner societies, who attended this meeting with the aim of discussing selected subjects of global relevance in radiology. In 2015, current stands, pros and cons, and future plans for inter-society collaboration between each Asian radiological partner societies were primarily discussed. The Asian radiology societies have international collaborations with each other through various activities, such as joint symposia, exchange programs, social exchange, and international membership. The advantages of continuing inter-society collaboration in most of the Asian radiology societies include international speakers, diverse clinical research, and cutting edge technology; while limited range of financial and human resources, language barrier, differences in goals and expectations are claimed as disadvantages. With regard to the future, most of the Asian radiology societies focus on expanding partner societies and enhancing globalization and collaboration programs through various international meetings and exchange programs

  10. Asian radiology forum 2015 for building an Asian friendship: A step toward the vigorous intersociety collaboration in Asia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ho Sung [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jung Ah [Dept. of Radiology, Hallym University College of Medicine, Hallym University Dongtan Sacred Heart Hospital, Hwaseong (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong Min [Dept. of Radiology and Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    According to the reports presented at the Asian Radiology Forum 2015, organized by the Korean Society of Radiology (KSR) during the Korean Congress of Radiology (KCR) in September 2015 in Seoul, there is an increasing need to promote international exchange and collaboration amongst radiology societies in Asian countries. The Asian Radiology Forum was first held by KSR and the national delegates of Asian radiological partner societies, who attended this meeting with the aim of discussing selected subjects of global relevance in radiology. In 2015, current stands, pros and cons, and future plans for inter-society collaboration between each Asian radiological partner societies were primarily discussed. The Asian radiology societies have international collaborations with each other through various activities, such as joint symposia, exchange programs, social exchange, and international membership. The advantages of continuing inter-society collaboration in most of the Asian radiology societies include international speakers, diverse clinical research, and cutting edge technology; while limited range of financial and human resources, language barrier, differences in goals and expectations are claimed as disadvantages. With regard to the future, most of the Asian radiology societies focus on expanding partner societies and enhancing globalization and collaboration programs through various international meetings and exchange programs.

  11. Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Extent Of The Primary Groundwater Contaminants At The Y-12 National Security Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2013-12-01

    This report presents data summary tables and maps used to define and illustrate the approximate lateral extent of groundwater contamination at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The data tables and maps address the primary (i.e., most widespread and mobile) organic, inorganic, and radiological contaminants in the groundwater. The sampling locations, calculated contaminant concentrations, plume boundary values, and paired map format used to define, quantify, delineate, and illustrate the approximate extent of the primary organic, inorganic, and radiological contaminants in groundwater at Y-12 are described.

  12. The Study of Radiological Characteristics of the Environment of Factory Contaminated with NORM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syaifudin, Mukh

    2003-01-01

    A study of radiological characteristics of the environment of a plant contaminated with NORM (naturally occurring radioactive materials) and entered decommissioning time has been conducted which covered the thorium and radioactive gas concentrations in the ground and sub ground soils and FeCb slag, as well as external gross gamma analysis. The concentration of Th-232 in soil was analyzed by gamma spectrometry methods. The contents of radioactive gases were measured by placing the samples in an emanation flask connected with a Lucas flask. The external gross gamma was measured by using a PIC (pressurized ionization chamber) and internal gross gamma was measured by lowering a portable gamma spectrometer to various depths in the boreholes. The results showed that the concentration of Th-228 in the FeCb slag analyzed by gamma spectrometry was 680.53±90.89 pCi/g and the radioactivity balance was 36%. The concentration of thoron in bulk was 0.77±0.09 pCi/g with the half life of 64.96±11.10 seconds, the concentration of radon was 0.17±0.03 pCi/g and concentration of Th-232 was 603.44±67.88. The study of fractionation of soil samples and thorium powder showed that concentration of Th-232 was inversely proportionate to particle size. The external gross gamma measured with PIC was 14.1 μR/hour. (author)

  13. Assessment of radiological impact in mineral industrial plants caused by deposition of wastes with U238 and/or Th232 associated

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladeira, Paula C.; Alves, Rex Nazare; Ruperti Junior, Nerbe J.

    2011-01-01

    The industrial-mining facilities constantly produce, in Brazil and in abroad, wastes from its production, many times containing uranium and/or thorium associated. Due to the large quantities generated, these wastes are usually deposited at the site of the facility, close to the place where they were produced. Since the chains of radioactive U 238 and Th 232 with alpha-emitting radionuclides have long half-life, waste deposits associated with these elements may cause radiological impact on the man and on the environment, even in the long term. Mathematical models are often used to represent the biosphere and the transport of radionuclides near to the surface. Thus, it was decided, through the software M athematica , to present a methodology based on the solution of Bateman equations for the calculation of radiological impact on individuals from the public exposed to contamination. The radiological impact appraisal was carried out considering a scenario of intrusion into landfills containing U 238 and / or Th 232 in post-operational phase of an industrial-mining installation. The critical group examined was represented by farmers who used water from an artesian well for daily consumption and which feed themselves on vegetables locally grown in clay soil. As a result, there was the exposure in pathways evaluated, a minor contribution of dose for ingestion of contaminated water. The conclusion of this work, show us that calculated doses were within the accepted international limits for the intrusion scenario. Parameters associated with mathematical models defining the choice of project to build a landfill for the purpose of deposition, whereas rates of doses can be estimated in each of the scenarios proposed. (author)

  14. Remediation strategies for contaminated territories resulting from Chernobyl accident. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacob, P.; Fesenko, S.; Firsakova, S.K.

    2001-03-01

    The present report realizes a settlement specific approach to derive remediation strategies and generalizes the results to the whole affected area. The ultimate aim of the study is to prepare possible investment projects on remediation activities in the contaminated territories. Its current aim was to identify the areas and the remedial actions that should be primarily supported and their corresponding cost. The present report starts with an outline of the methodology of deriving remediation strategies, a description of data for 70 representative settlements and of parameters of the remedial actions considered, and a classification of the contaminated territory according to radiological criteria. After summarising aspects of the contamination situation and applications of remedial actions in the past, dose calculations and derived remediation strategies for the representative settlements are described. These are generalized to the total contaminated territory. Within the contaminated territory private produce is of main importance for the radionuclide intake. At the end of the report, radiological aspects of the produce of collective farms are described. (orig.)

  15. Exposure to radiation from the natural radioactivity in Tunisian building materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharbi, F; Oueslati, M; Abdelli, W; Samaali, M; Ben Tekaya, M

    2012-12-01

    Building materials can expose public and workers to radiation because of their content of radium, thorium and potassium isotopes. This is why it is very important from the radiological point of view to survey the natural radioactivity content of commonly used building materials in any country. This work consists of the measurement of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K activity concentrations in a variety of commonly used building materials in Tunisia and on the estimation of their radiological hazard. The maximum value of radium equivalent for the studied materials was equal to 169 Bq kg(-1) and corresponds to the clay brick, which is lower than the recommended value of 370 Bq kg(-1). In this work, several radiological indexes were calculated and were found to be under their highest permitted limit.

  16. Contaminants in Buildings and Occupied Spaces as Risk Factors forOccupant Symptoms in U.S. Office Buildings: Findings from the U.S. EPABASE Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendell, M.J.; Mirer, A.; Lei-Gomez, Q.

    2007-08-01

    Nonspecific building-related symptoms among occupants of modern office buildings worldwide are common and may be associated with important reductions in work performance, but their etiology remains uncertain. Most reported research into environmental risk factors for these symptoms has focused on ventilation system-related factors, dampness, and particle removal through filtration and cleaning, with relatively few studies of other potential sources of indoor contaminants. We analyzed data collected by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) from a representative sample of 100 large U.S. office buildings--the Building Assessment and Survey Evaluation (BASE) study--using multivariate-adjusted logistic regression models with generalized estimating equations. We estimated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for associations between seven building-related symptom outcomes and a diverse set of potential indoor and outdoor sources for indoor pollutants. Although most of the investigated risk factors showed no apparent association with building-related symptoms, some interesting associations resulted. Increased prevalence of symptoms was associated with carpets older than one year (lower respiratory symptoms), non-carpeted floors (upper and lower respiratory symptoms), older furniture (eye and skin symptoms), infrequent vacuuming (upper respiratory, eye, and skin symptoms and headache), and masonry exterior walls (cough, eye symptoms, and fatigue/concentration difficulty). For the many potential risk factors assessed, almost none had been investigated previously, and many associations found here may have been by chance. Additional confirmatory research focused on risk factors initially identified here is needed, using more objective measures of health outcomes and risk factors or exposures.

  17. An assessment on the environmental contamination caused by the Fukushima accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jin Ho

    2018-01-15

    The radiological releases from the damaged fuel to the atmosphere and into the cooling water in the Fukushima Daiich Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident are investigated. Atmospheric releases to the land and ocean mostly occurred during the first week after the accident whereas continuous release from the damaged fuel into the cooling water resulted in an accumulation of contaminated water in the plant during last six years. An evaluation of measurement data and analytical model for the release of radionuclides indicated that atmospheric releases were mainly governed by the volatility of the radionuclides. Using the measurement data on the contaminated water, the mechanism for the release of long-lived radionuclides into the cooling water was analyzed. It was found that the radioactivity concentrations of 90 Sr in the contaminated water in the Primary Containment Vessel (PCV) of unit 2 and unit 3 were consistently higher than that of 137 Cs and the radioactivity concentration of 90 Sr in the turbine building of unit 1 in year 2015 was higher than that in year 2011. It was also observed that the radioactivity concentration of long-lived radionuclides in the contaminated water in the FDNPP is still high even in year 2015. The activity ratio of 238 Pu/ 239+240 Pu for the contaminated water was in the range of 1.7-5.4, which was significantly different from the ratios from the soil samples representing the atmospheric releases of FDNPP. It is concluded that the release mechanisms into the atmosphere and cooling water are clearly different and there has been significant amount of long-lived radionuclides released into the contaminated water. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Doctor-patient communication in radiology: a great opportunity for future radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzocchi, M

    2012-04-01

    This text discusses several aspects of doctor-patient communication in radiology, including the origins, advantages, and ethical and legal aspects. Over the last 10 years, radiologists have assumed increasing responsibilities towards patients and society. Patients, who are becoming better informed and more aware about medical issues, have a right to be given a timely diagnosis and want to receive as much information as possible from the radiologist. This has implications for several levels of everyday radiological practice, including the organisation of work, legal and ethical aspects and radiologist training. Better interaction with the patient helps to build a closer, more trusting, relationship with the result that the radiologist will be more motivated in his or her work. Until now, radiologists were not adequately trained to communicate the diagnosis directly and verbally to patients, especially when the diagnosis was unfavourable. It is important to emphasise the need for more specific and practical training in this respect, which is indispensable for future developments of the discipline.

  19. Educational treasures in Radiology: The Radiology Olympics - striving for gold in Radiology education

    OpenAIRE

    Talanow, Roland

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on Radiology Olympics (www.RadiologyOlympics.com) - a collaboration with the international Radiology community for Radiology education, Radiolopolis (www.Radiolopolis.com). The Radiology Olympics honour the movers and shakers in Radiology education and offer an easy to use platform for educating medical professionals based on Radiology cases.

  20. Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigot, J.M.; Moreau, J.F.; Nahum, H.; Bellet, M.

    1990-01-01

    The 17th International Congress of Radiology was conducted in two separate scientific sessions, one for radiodiagnosis and one for radiation oncology. Topics covered are: Radiobiology -radioprotection; imaging and data processing; contrast media; MRI; nuclear medicine; radiology and disasters; radiology of tropical diseases; cardiovascular radiology; interventional radiology; imaging of trauma; imaging of chest, gastro-intestinal tract, breast and genito-urinary tract; imaging in gynecology;imaging in oncology; bone and joint radiology; head and neck-radiology; neuro-radiology. (H.W.). refs.; fig.; tabs

  1. Decontamination analysis of a radiologically contaminated site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tawil, J.J.; Strenge, D.L.

    1984-02-01

    This paper presents an analysis of decontamination options at the NUWAZX-83 exercise site. Held in May 1983, the purpose of the exercise was to evaluate the ability of federal, state and local officials to respond to a radiological accident involving nuclear weapons. A computer program developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory was used to conduct the decontamination analysis. The program, called DECON, was designed to assist personnel engaged in the planning of decontamination activities. The many features of DECON that are demonstrated in this paper contribute to its potential usefulness as a planning tool for site restoration. Strategies that are analyzed with DECON include: (1) using a Quick-Vac option, under which exterior surfaces are vacuumed before it rains; (2) protecting surfaces against precipitation; (3) prohibiting specific operations on selected surfaces; (4) requiring that specific methods be used on selected surfaces; (5) evaluating the trade-off between cleanup standards and decontamination costs; and (6) varying clean-up standards according to expected human exposure to the surface

  2. Comprehensive resurvey program to prevent radiological incidents at a national laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipton, W.V.; Hunckler, C.A.

    1978-01-01

    A comprehensive resurvey program in a general purpose research building at Argonne National Laboratory is being implemented. The program was designed to prevent radiological incidents by increasing the awareness of Health Physics personnel of radiological hazards, initiating corrective actions, and providing information for improving routine survey schedules, and for establishing manpower requirements. The following aspects of the program are described: scheduling, surveys, records, follow-up, and statistics

  3. Decontamination and decommissioning assessment for the Waste Incineration Facility (Building 232-Z) Hanford Site, [Hanford], WA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dean, L.N.

    1994-02-01

    Building 232-Z is an element of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. From 1961 until 1972, plutonium-bearing combustible materials were incinerated in the building. Between 1972 and 1983, following shutdown of the incinerator, the facility was used for waste segregation activities. The facility was placed in retired inactive status in 1984 and classified as a Limited Control Facility pursuant to DOE Order 5480.5, Safety of Nuclear Facilities, and 6430.1A, General Design Criteria. The current plutonium inventory within the building is estimated to be approximately 848 grams, the majority of which is retained within the process hood ventilation system. As a contaminated retired facility, Building 232-Z is included in the DOE Surplus Facility Management Program. The objective of this Decontamination and Decommissioning (D ampersand D) assessment is to remove Building 232-Z, thereby elmininating the radiological and environmental hazards associated with the plutonium inventory within the structure. The steps to accomplish the plan objectives are: (1) identifying the locations of the most significant amounts of plutonium, (2) removing residual plutonium, (3) removing and decontaminating remaining building equipment, (4) dismantling the remaining structure, and (5) closing out the project

  4. Decontamination and decommissioning assessment for the Waste Incineration Facility (Building 232-Z) Hanford Site, [Hanford], WA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dean, L.N. [Advanced Sciences, Inc., (United States)

    1994-02-01

    Building 232-Z is an element of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. From 1961 until 1972, plutonium-bearing combustible materials were incinerated in the building. Between 1972 and 1983, following shutdown of the incinerator, the facility was used for waste segregation activities. The facility was placed in retired inactive status in 1984 and classified as a Limited Control Facility pursuant to DOE Order 5480.5, Safety of Nuclear Facilities, and 6430.1A, General Design Criteria. The current plutonium inventory within the building is estimated to be approximately 848 grams, the majority of which is retained within the process hood ventilation system. As a contaminated retired facility, Building 232-Z is included in the DOE Surplus Facility Management Program. The objective of this Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) assessment is to remove Building 232-Z, thereby elmininating the radiological and environmental hazards associated with the plutonium inventory within the structure. The steps to accomplish the plan objectives are: (1) identifying the locations of the most significant amounts of plutonium, (2) removing residual plutonium, (3) removing and decontaminating remaining building equipment, (4) dismantling the remaining structure, and (5) closing out the project.

  5. Results of the radiological survey at 200 State Route 17 (MJ035), Maywood, New Jersey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Crutcher, J.W.; Carrier, R.F.; Floyd, L.M.

    1989-02-01

    The property discussed in this report and properties in its vicinity contaminated with residues from the former Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) were included as a decontamination research and development project under the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. As part of this project, DOE is conducting radiological surveys in the vicinity of the site to identify properties contaminated with residues derived from the MCW. The principal radionuclide of concern is thorium-232. The radiological survey discussed in this report is part of that effort and was conducted, at the request of DOE, by members of the Measurement Applications and Development Group of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A radiological survey of the commercial property at 200 State Route 17, Maywood, New Jersey, was conducted during 1987. The survey and sampling of the ground surface and subsurface were carried out on September 2, 1987. 4 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  6. Optimized determination of the radiological inventory during different phases of decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hillberg, Matthias; Beltz, Detlef; Karschnick, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    The decommissioning of nuclear facilities comprises a lot of activities such as decontamination, dismantling and demolition of equipment and structures. For these activities the aspects of health and safety of the operational personnel and of the general public as well as the minimization of radioactive waste have to be taken into account. An optimized, comprehensible and verifiable determination of the radiological inventory is essential for the decommissioning management with respect to safety, time, and costs. For example: right from the start of the post operational phase, the radiological characterization has to enable the decision whether to perform a system decontamination or not. Furthermore it is necessary, e.g. to determine the relevant nuclides and their composition (nuclide vector) for the release of material and for sustaining the radiological health and safety at work (e. g. minimizing the risk of incorporation). Our contribution will focus on the optimization of the radiological characterization with respect to the requisite extent and the best instant of time during the decommissioning process. For example: which additional information, besides the history of operation, is essential for an adequate amount of sampling and measurements needed in order to determine the relevant nuclides and their compositions? Furthermore, the characterization of buildings requires a kind of a graded approach during the decommissioning process. At the beginning of decommissioning, only a rough estimate of the expected radioactive waste due to the necessary decontamination of the building structures is sufficient. With ongoing decommissioning, a more precise radiological characterization of buildings is needed in order to guarantee an optimized, comprehensible and verifiable decontamination, dismantling and trouble-free clearance. These and other examples will be discussed on the background of and with reference to different decommissioning projects involving direct

  7. Development of a radiological protection culture in contaminated territories: lessons learned from a School Twinning Between France and Belarus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayrault, D. [Lycee du Bois d' Amour, 86 - Poitiers (France); Schneider, T. [Centre d' Etude sur l' Evaluation de la Protection dans le Domaine Nucleaire(CEPN), 92 - Fontenay aux Roses (France); Baumont, G. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), 92 - Fontenay aux Roses (France)

    2006-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a pilot project set up between a French school (Lyc du Bois d'Amour Poitiers) and two Belarussian schools of the Stolyn district (Olmany and Terebejov schools) located in territories contaminated by the Chernobyl accident. This project has been developed within the framework of the international Programme CORE (Cooperation for Rehabilitation of living conditions in Chernobyl affected areas in Belarus) [1]. The main objective of this pilot project is to promote the development of a practical radiological culture at school through the twinning of French and Belarussian schools. This project, developed in cooperation with CEPN (Nuclear Evaluation Protection Centre) and IRSN (Institute of Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety), relies on the direct involvement of the students in the learning process of their local environment together with the international exchange for sharing the knowledge on the consequences of the Chernobyl accident.

  8. Development of a radiological protection culture in contaminated territories: lessons learned from a School Twinning Between France and Belarus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayrault, D.; Schneider, T.; Baumont, G.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a pilot project set up between a French school (Lyc du Bois d'Amour Poitiers) and two Belarussian schools of the Stolyn district (Olmany and Terebejov schools) located in territories contaminated by the Chernobyl accident. This project has been developed within the framework of the international Programme CORE (Cooperation for Rehabilitation of living conditions in Chernobyl affected areas in Belarus) [1]. The main objective of this pilot project is to promote the development of a practical radiological culture at school through the twinning of French and Belarussian schools. This project, developed in cooperation with CEPN (Nuclear Evaluation Protection Centre) and IRSN (Institute of Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety), relies on the direct involvement of the students in the learning process of their local environment together with the international exchange for sharing the knowledge on the consequences of the Chernobyl accident

  9. Remediation and restoration of a thorium and radium contaminated site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drury, N.C.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the remediation and restoration of approximately 130,000 square metres of derelict land in East London, contaminated with radioactive and chemical substances. The land had been the location of a chemical plant operated under different owners for about ninety years. The plant was demolished in the 1970's and lay derelict for approximately 10 years. This site was bought by developers in the late 1980's with the intention of constructing a residential complex, and therefore had to be cleared of contamination such that it could be released for unrestricted use. This paper provides an overview of the initial radiological status of the site, the methodology and safety measures adopted for the decontamination operations with emphasis placed on the various radiological monitoring and sampling regimes and techniques employed for: a) providing on-going evaluation of the decontamination progress, b) the radiological characterisation of the waste arisings in order to identify various available disposal routes, c) ensuring safety for both operators and members of the public during decontamination operations, d) ensuring compliance with the radiological end-point agreed with the authorising department (HMIP) as the final stage of the restoration. (author) 5 figs

  10. Remediation and restoration of a thorium and radium contaminated site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drury, N.C. [WS Atkins Consultants, Epsom Surrey (United Kingdom)

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes the remediation and restoration of approximately 130,000 square metres of derelict land in East London, contaminated with radioactive and chemical substances. The land had been the location of a chemical plant operated under different owners for about ninety years. The plant was demolished in the 1970`s and lay derelict for approximately 10 years. This site was bought by developers in the late 1980`s with the intention of constructing a residential complex, and therefore had to be cleared of contamination such that it could be released for unrestricted use. This paper provides an overview of the initial radiological status of the site, the methodology and safety measures adopted for the decontamination operations with emphasis placed on the various radiological monitoring and sampling regimes and techniques employed for: (a) providing on-going evaluation of the decontamination progress, (b) the radiological characterisation of the waste arisings in order to identify various available disposal routes, (c) ensuring safety for both operators and members of the public during decontamination operations, (d) ensuring compliance with the radiological end-point agreed with the authorising department (HMIP) as the final stage of the restoration. (author) 5 figs.

  11. Radiological preparedness in the case of a terrorist attack or an accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cizmek, A.

    2005-01-01

    During the Cold War, every information about weapons of mass destruction was treated as top secret, regardless of whether the information concerned friend or foe. The most serious threat in our post Cold War era are terrorist radiological dispersal devices. Dirty nukes are what you may choose to build if you're unable to create a real nuclear bomb, i.e. one whose explosion is based on a nuclear reaction. A dirty bomb is a conventional explosive salted with radioactive isotopes in order to spew out that nuclear material and contaminate a wide area. The military usefulness of such devices have always been in dispute. In fact, the TNT in such a bomb may still be more dangerous than the nuclear material. Its destructive power would really depend on the size of the conventional bomb, and the volume and nature of nuclear material. This paper addresses the possibilities of decontamination and preparedness in the case of a terrorist attack or accident.(author)

  12. AERIAL RADIOLOGICAL SURVEYS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proctor, A.E.

    1997-01-01

    Measuring terrestrial gamma radiation from airborne platforms has proved to be a useful method for characterizing radiation levels over large areas. Over 300 aerial radiological surveys have been carried out over the past 25 years including U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites, commercial nuclear power plants, Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program/Uranium Mine Tailing Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP/UMTRAP) sites, nuclear weapons test sites, contaminated industrial areas, and nuclear accident sites. This paper describes the aerial measurement technology currently in use by the Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) for routine environmental surveys and emergency response activities. Equipment, data-collection and -analysis methods, and examples of survey results are described

  13. Requirement of trained first responders and national level preparedness for prevention and response to radiological terrorism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, R.; Pradeepkumar, K.S.

    2011-01-01

    The increase in the usage of radioactive sources in various fields and the present scenario of adopting various means of terrorism indicates a possible environment for malicious usage of radioactive sources. Many nations, India inclusive, have to strengthen further it's capability to deal with Nuclear/Radiological Emergencies. The probable radiological emergency scenario in public domain involves inadvertent melting of radioactive material, transport accident involving radioactive material/sources and presence of orphan sources as reported elsewhere. Explosion of Radiological Dispersal Device (RDDs) or Improvised Nuclear Devices (IND) leading to spread of radioactive contamination in public places have been identified by IAEA as probable radiological threats. The IAEA documents put lot of emphasis, at national level, on training and educational issues related with Radiological Emergencies. The agencies and institutions dealing with radioactive sources have few personnel trained in radiation protection. Experience so far indicates that public awareness is also not adequate in the field of radiological safety which may create difficulties during emergency response in public domain. The major challenges are associated with mitigation, monitoring methodology, contaminated and overexposed casualties, decontamination and media briefing. In this paper, we have identified the educational needs for response to radiological emergency in India with major thrust on training. The paper has also enumerated the available educational and training infrastructure, the human resources, as well as the important stake holders for development of sustainable education and training programme. (author)

  14. L-043: EPR-First Responders: Control of contamination resulting from the response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This conference is about the actions to be carried out by the first responders in a radiological emergency contamination control .The entrance and the exit to the contaminated area, the personnel dose, the waste and the equipment used are important aspects in the situation control

  15. Impact of risk analysis on ITER nuclear buildings layout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabathe, Laurent; Lignini, Franck; Rodriguez-Rodrigo, Lina; Uzan-Elbez, Joelle; Girard, Jean-Philippe

    2007-01-01

    The internal layout of ITER nuclear buildings (Tokamak, Tritium, Hot cell and Radwaste buildings) is the result of an iterative process. Notwithstanding civil engineering requirements, technical and functional requirements for the processes housed in the buildings, the internal layout must also take into account safety requirements and workers protection requirements in normal, incidental and accidental conditions. Potential hazards and constraints result in the definition of various zonings. Each room is classified depending on the level of the risks induced by normal and incidental or accidental conditions: - radiological exposure to tritium, and activated products → radiological zoning; - exposure to beryllium (vacuum vessel blankets) → beryllium zoning; - exposure to electromagnetic fields during plasma shots → electromagnetic zoning; - fire hazard: fire compartmentalization; ·explosion hazard: anti-blast zoning; - waste treatment → waste zoning. Prevention of common mode failure due to internal hazards (fire, flooding, load drop...) for redundant safety important components is also taken into account by geographical separation or by installation of protections between components (either in the same room or preferably when possible by segregation in different rooms). The designer has also taken into account access requirements to equipments and circulation rules for personal, material and substances in ITER nuclear buildings. Risk analyses are performed in the Preliminary Safety Report in order to demonstrate that the layout of ITER nuclear buildings allows meeting the safety objectives and takes into account the requirements associated with the zonings classifications and complies with the regulation. When necessary, modifications are implemented in the design. For example, recent layout modifications are been studied in the tritium building: utility rooms (electrical supply) were transferred outside the radiological hazard zones. A direct access from

  16. The Importance of Building and Enhancing Worldwide Industry Cooperation in the Areas of Radiological Protection, Waste Management and Decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saint-Pierre, S.

    2006-01-01

    The slow or stagnant rate of nuclear power generation development in many developed countries over the last two decades has resulted in a significant shortage in the population of mid-career nuclear industry professionals. This shortage is even more pronounced in some specific areas of expertise such as radiological protection, waste management and decommissioning. This situation has occurred at a time when the renaissance of nuclear power and the globalization of the nuclear industry are steadily gaining momentum and when the industry's involvement in international and national debates in these three fields of expertise (and the industry's impact on these debates) is of vital importance. This paper presents the World Nuclear Association (WNA) approach to building and enhancing worldwide industry cooperation in radiological protection, waste management and decommissioning, which is manifested through the activities of the two WNA working groups on radiological protection (RPWG) and on waste management and decommissioning (WM and DWG). This paper also briefly describes the WNA's participatory role, as of summer 2005, in the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) standard development committees on radiation safety (RASSC), waste safety (WASSC) and nuclear safety (NUSSC). This participation provides the worldwide nuclear industry with an opportunity to be part of IAEA's discussions on shaping changes to the control regime of IAEA safety standards. The review (and the prospect of a revision) of IAEA safety standards, which began in October 2005, makes this WNA participation and the industry ' s involvement at the national level timely and important. All of this excellent industry cooperation and team effort is done through 'collegial' exchanges between key industry experts, which help tackle important issues more effectively. The WNA is continuously looking to enhance its worldwide industry representation in these fields of expertise through the RPWG and WM and DWG

  17. The importance of building and enhancing worldwide industry cooperation in the areas of radiological protection, waste management and decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saint-Pierre, S.

    2006-01-01

    The slow or stagnant rate of nuclear power generation development in many developed countries over the last two decades has resulted in a significant shortage in the population of mid-career nuclear industry professionals. This shortage is even more pronounced in some specific areas of expertise such as radiological protection, waste management and decommissioning. This situation has occurred at a time when the renaissance of nuclear power and the globalization of the nuclear industry are steadily gaining momentum and when the industry's involvement in international and national debates in these three fields of expertise (and the industry's impact on these debates) is of vital importance. This paper presents the World Nuclear Association (WNA) approach to building and enhancing worldwide industry cooperation in radiological protection, waste management and decommissioning, which is manifested through the activities of the two WNA working groups on radiological protection (RPWG) and on waste management and decommissioning (WM and DWG). This paper also briefly describes the WNA's participatory role, as of Summer 2005, in the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) standard development committees on radiation safety (RASSC), waste safety (WASSC) and nuclear safety (NUSSC). This participation provides the worldwide nuclear industry with an opportunity to be part of IAEA's discussions on shaping changes to the control regime of IAEA safety standards. The review (and the prospect of a revision) of IAEA safety standards, which began in October 2005, makes this WNA participation and the industry's involvement at the national level timely and important. All of this excellent industry cooperation and team effort is done through 'collegial' exchanges between key industry experts, which help tackle important issues more effectively. The WNA is continuously looking to enhance its worldwide industry representation in these fields of expertise through the RPWG and WM and DWG

  18. Living conditions in the contaminated territories of Bielorussia 8 years after the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heriard-Dubreuil, G.; Girard, P.

    1997-01-01

    Living conditions in the contaminated territories of Bielorussia after the Chernobyl accident: evaluation of the situation in the district of Chetchersk in Bielorussia. This article presents an analysis of the social and economic aspects of radiological protection in the territories contaminated by the Chernobyl accident. It is based on the results of two surveys performed in 1994 on the living conditions of the inhabitants of a territorial community located in Bielorussia, 180 km north of Chernobyl. The first part presents the radiological post-accident situation of the district, together with an analysis of this situation's demographic impact since 1986. The second part presents a description of the modes of exposure of the inhabitants of the contaminated territories and an assessment of he various countermeasures programmes initiated by the authorities in the legislative framework of 1991. The last part addresses the economic aspects of the Chetchersk district and an evaluation of the consequences of the radiological situation on the economic, and above all agricultural, activities of the district.The conclusion highlights the difficulties that face the Byelorussian authorities today. The now definitive presence of inhabitants in a durably contaminated environment poses a new category of problems. The objectives of radiological protection have to be reshaped within a set of constraints of different types, notably social and economic. The development of radiological safety cannot be dissociated from a return to quality living in these territories. This necessarily entails re-establishing a climate of social confidence. The initial legislative plan for post-accident management must be adapted to give greater autonomy to local participants in the reconstruction of satisfactory living conditions. (authors)

  19. Orphan sources and the challenges: requirement for the prevention of malevolent use of radioactive sources and preparedness for radiological emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradeepkumar, K.S.; Sharma, D.N.

    2006-01-01

    cannot be ensured internationally. Past experiences from the radiological accidents demonstrate the magnitude of the possible acute exposure to persons and spread of contamination. On the other hand, the challenges from the dispersion of a Radiological Dispersal Device (R.D.D.) are more due to the environmental contamination causing panic, disruption and economic loss due to the large scale clean up needed, though the acute radiation exposure and immediate causalities due to radiation will be much lower. 50 TBq (1.3 k Ci) of 137 Cs (quantity that caused radiological emergency in Goiania) can be contained in 15 gm and if unshielded and un-dispersed can lead to dose rate of 45 Gy.h -1 at 30 cm from the source. For 60 Co, 50 TBq can be contained in 1.2 gm giving dose rate of 188 Gy.h -1 at 30 cm and 17 Gy.h -1 at 1 meter. This can lead to lethal doses to those in proximity. But if dispersed in an explosion, these may not lead to an acute exposure more than few mSv within an area of 60 m radius. Even at 50 mSv, the life time fatal cancer risk for members of public is about 1 in 400 compared to 80 persons succumbing to natural cancer. Since a dispersed source can contaminate many buildings/area leading to generation of large volume of radioactive waste, strengthening control over the radioactive sources, preventing its illegal transport and developing quick response capability are very essential. (authors)

  20. Prevention and preparedness for response to nuclear and radiological threats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradeepkumar, K.S.

    2016-01-01

    Challenges from smuggled or illegally transported radioactive sources with malevolent intention of causing potential threats to the society are much higher to those potential radiological emergencies from misplaced, orphan or lost radioactive sources. Large number of radioactive sources world over is transported for its application in various fields. The emergency preparedness and response system is less developed for potential radiological emergencies caused by them compared to those at nuclear facilities which are kept in readiness to respond to any kind of emergency. After the terrorist attack on WTC of 2001, there is significant concern world over about the malicious use of nuclear and other radioactive material. This calls for prevention of stealing/smuggling of radioactive materials and improving the emergency response system. Use of Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD) and Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) are considered as possible radiological and nuclear threats, can lead to large area contamination in addition to the injuries caused by blast and thermal effects. (author)

  1. Radiological accident and incident in Thailand: Lesson to be learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ya-anant, N.; Tiyapun, K.; Saiyut, K.

    2011-01-01

    Radioactive materials in Thailand have been used in medicine, research and industry for more than 50 y. Several radiological accident and incidents happened in the past 10 y. A serious one was the radiological accident that occurred in Samut Prakan (Thailand) in 2000. The serious radiological accident occurred when the 60 Co head was partially dismantled, taken from that storage to sell as scrap metal. Three victims died and 10 people received high dose from the source. The lesson learned from the radiological accident in Samut Prakan was to improve in many subjects, such as efficiency in Ministerial Regulations and Atomic Energy Act, emergency response and etc. In addition to the serious accident, there are also some small incidents that occurred, such as detection of contaminated scrap metals from the re-cycling of scrap metals from steel factories. Therefore, the radiation protection infrastructure was established after the accident. Laws and regulations of radiation safety and the relevant regulatory procedures must be revised. (authors)

  2. System to control contamination during retrieval of buried TRU waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menkhaus, Daniel E.; Loomis, Guy G.; Mullen, Carlan K.; Scott, Donald W.; Feldman, Edgar M.; Meyer, Leroy C.

    1993-01-01

    A system to control contamination during the retrieval of hazardous waste comprising an outer containment building, an inner containment building, within the outer containment building, an electrostatic radioactive particle recovery unit connected to and in communication with the inner and outer containment buildings, and a contaminate suppression system including a moisture control subsystem, and a rapid monitoring system having the ability to monitor conditions in the inner and outer containment buildings.

  3. Initial building investigations at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland: Objectives and methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brubaker, K.L.; Dougherty, J.M.; McGinnis, L.D.

    1994-12-01

    As part of an environmental-contamination source-definition program at Aberdeen Proving Ground, detailed internal and external inspections of 23 potentially contaminated buildings are being conducted to describe and characterize the state of each building as it currently exists and to identify areas potentially contaminated with toxic or other hazardous substances. In addition, a detailed geophysical investigation is being conducted in the vicinity of each target building to locate and identify subsurface structures, associated with former building operations, that are potential sources of contamination. This report describes the objectives of the initial building inspections, including the geophysical investigations, and discusses the methodology that has been developed to achieve these objectives.

  4. Radioactivity in building materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The present report, drawn up at the request of the former Minister of Public Health and Environmental Affairs of the Netherlands, discusses the potential radiological consequences for the population of the Netherlands of using waste materials as building materials in housing construction. (Auth.)

  5. Radiological assessment of the town of Edgemont

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, P.O.; Thomas, V.W.; Young, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    Congress, in 1980, gave the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) the responsibility to coordinate and conduct a monitoring, engineering assessment, and remedial cleanup program in Edgemont, South Dakota. The Congressional intent was to locate public properties in Edgemont that had been contaminated by radioactive materials from a local uranium mill, and to clean up those properties. Because the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 gave NRC the authority to monitor for contamination but not to clean up contamination, Congress later assigned the remedial cleanup responsibility to the Department of Energy (DOE). NRC, through Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), conducted a radiological survey of 96% of the properties in Edgemont and vicinity during the time period of September 1980 through April 1984. (Out of 976 total properties, 941 were surveyed.) The strategy of the survey was to screen properties for the possible presence of contamination by using short- and long-term radon progeny measurements, indoor and outdoor gamma exposure rate measurements, and soil radium-226 measurements. Properties that failed the screening surveys were measured more extensively to determine whether the elevated readings were due to residual radioactive materials from the uranium mill. This report contains the historical perspective of the Edgemont survey, explains the development and modifications of survey protocols, examines the problems encountered during the survey, and lists a summary of the results. The report also presents conclusions about the effectiveness of the survey techniques and about the rationale of a comprehensive survey of a whole community. The appendices section of this report contains all the protocols, a list of all the properties showing survey results for each, and reports on special studies conducted during the survey. These special studies contain many valuable insights that may prove beneficial to future radiological assessment surveys

  6. Methodology to assess the radiological sensitivity of soils: Application to Spanish soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trueba Alonso, C.

    2005-01-01

    A methodology, based on standard physical and chemical soil properties, has been developed to estimate the radiological sensitivity of soils to a 137 C s and 90 S r contamination. In this framework, the soil radiological sensitivity is defined as the soil capability to mobilise or to retain these radionuclides. The purpose of this methodology is to assess, in terms of radiological sensitivity indexes, the behaviour of 137 C s and 90 S r in soils and their fluxes to man, considering two exposure pathways, the external irradiation exposure and the internal exposure from ingestion. The methodology is applied to the great variety of soil types found in Spain, where the soil profile is the reference unit for the assessment. The results for these soil types show, that their basic soil properties are the key to categorise the radiological sensitivity according to the risks considered. The final categorisation allows to identify soils specially sensible and improves the radiological impact assessment predictions. (Author)

  7. Development of a technical guide for the identification of radiological sources of potential exposure and/or contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes, R.; Scott, A.; Falo, G.; Collins, J.; Szrom, F.; Collins, D.

    1999-01-01

    Radiological assessment of sites with radioactive residues starts with the identification of potential sources. The US Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine (USACHPPM) has developed a technical guide that summarizes sources of potential radiological exposures of both civilian and military origin. These sources include those found in the natural environment, in the nuclear fuel cycle, in medical and industrial settings, in the transportation of radioactive materials, in US Army commodities and foreign materiel, and in the use and storage of nuclear weapons. This technical guide is intended to foster awareness of radiological hazards and to provide the reader with the knowledge necessary to take the first step in radiological health risk assessment: recognition of the hazard. Furthermore, this guide can be used in conjunction with other technical guides for performing radiological surveys and field dose assessments in war or peacetime operations. (author)

  8. Radiological protection of paediatric patients: An overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ringertz, H.G.; Bremmer, S.

    2001-01-01

    Paediatric patients require special attention with respect to radiation protection, for various reasons. The difference between a 1 kg premature baby and a 100 kg teenager puts special demands on the radiographic techniques used, and the increased radiosensitivity of growing tissue and the patients' longer life expectancy put greater demands on the justification of the procedures to be carried out. The optimization procedure involves practical aspects such as immobilization, body build specific exposure parameters and body build specific anatomical knowledge. These and other aspects of paediatric radiological protection are discussed in this overview. (author)

  9. Assessment of radiological impact in mineral industrial plants caused by deposition of wastes with U{sup 238} and/or Th{sup 232} associated

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ladeira, Paula C.; Alves, Rex Nazare, E-mail: rexnazare@ime.eb.b [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Ruperti Junior, Nerbe J., E-mail: nruperti@cnen.gov.b [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (DIREJ/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Div. de Rejeitos Radioativos

    2011-07-01

    The industrial-mining facilities constantly produce, in Brazil and in abroad, wastes from its production, many times containing uranium and/or thorium associated. Due to the large quantities generated, these wastes are usually deposited at the site of the facility, close to the place where they were produced. Since the chains of radioactive U{sup 238} and Th{sup 232} with alpha-emitting radionuclides have long half-life, waste deposits associated with these elements may cause radiological impact on the man and on the environment, even in the long term. Mathematical models are often used to represent the biosphere and the transport of radionuclides near to the surface. Thus, it was decided, through the software {sup M}athematica{sup ,} to present a methodology based on the solution of Bateman equations for the calculation of radiological impact on individuals from the public exposed to contamination. The radiological impact appraisal was carried out considering a scenario of intrusion into landfills containing U{sup 238} and / or Th{sup 232} in post-operational phase of an industrial-mining installation. The critical group examined was represented by farmers who used water from an artesian well for daily consumption and which feed themselves on vegetables locally grown in clay soil. As a result, there was the exposure in pathways evaluated, a minor contribution of dose for ingestion of contaminated water. The conclusion of this work, show us that calculated doses were within the accepted international limits for the intrusion scenario. Parameters associated with mathematical models defining the choice of project to build a landfill for the purpose of deposition, whereas rates of doses can be estimated in each of the scenarios proposed. (author)

  10. Results of the radiological survey at 136 West Central Avenue (MJ030), Maywood, New Jersey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Crutcher, J.W.; Carrier, R.F.; Floyd, L.M.

    1989-02-01

    As a result of the Energy and Water Appropriations Act of Fiscal Year 1984, the property discussed in this report and properties in its vicinity contaminated with residues from the former Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) were included as a decontamination research and development project under the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. As part of this project, DOE is conducting radiological surveys in the vicinity of the site to identify properties contaminated with residues derived from the MCW. The principal radionuclide of concern is thorium-232. The radiological survey discussed in this report is part of that effort and was conducted, at the request of DOE by members of the Measurement Applications and Development Group of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A radiological survey of the private, residential property at 136 West Central Avenue, Maywood, New Jersey, was conducted during 1987. The survey and sampling of the ground surface and subsurface were carried out on April 29, 1987

  11. Optimal management routes for the restoration of territories contaminated during and after the Chernobyl accident: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, G.

    1997-01-01

    This report identifies optimised restoration strategies for contaminated territories (actually private agricultural lands and forests) in Ukraine, Belarus and the Russian Federation resulting from the Chernobyl accident. The evaluation of restoration strategies is based on economic and radiological criteria. For this purpose a methodology involving the subdivision of the territories into categories based on doses was developed. Remediation strategies for agricultural lands involves many options; for example, extensive resettlement, supply of clean milk, radical improvement of land, etc. For contaminated forests the potential radiological impact resulting from a selection of countermeasures like incineration of contaminated wood has been thoroughly evaluated

  12. Decision-making in abnormal radiological situations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pretre, S.

    1998-01-01

    General problems associated with social impacts of radiology and decision making is discussed, as the main topics of the meeting. The problem of population is discussed living in areas contaminates with radioactive substances resulting from a major accident or from pest practices. This situation needs decision making process for initiating actions like relocation, resettlement or large-scale decontamination. The roles of various participants in this decision making process and in the communication with the public are considered. (R.P.)

  13. L-027: EPR-First Responders: First Medical Response in a radiological emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The main topics covered in this conference are the tasks and the roles of medical emergency services and the local hospital such as firsts aid in a radiological emergency, protective measures, contamination level of the victims and lifesaving

  14. Uranium mill tailings remedial action program. Radiological survey of Shiprock vicinity property SH02 Shiprock, New Mexico, August-November 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flynn, K.F.; Justus, A.L.; Sholeen, C.M.; Smith, W.H.; Wynveen, R.A.

    1984-04-01

    A comprehensive survey of the vicinity property designated as SH02 was conducted on an intermittent basis from August 3 to November 11, 1982. At the time of the survey, seven structures were located on the property - two residential trailers, one institutional building, two institutional trailers, a storage building, and a pump house. The lands surrounding the structures were either sparsely covered with vegetation or gravelled. The assessment activities included determination of indoor and outdoor surface radiation levels through direct instrument surveys; measurement of ambient external penetrating radiation levels at 1-meter heights; and analysis of air and soil samples. No evidence of radioactive contamination was found inside the structures; background levels of radioactivity were indicated within all seven. The short-term radon daughter measurements did not exceed the limit of 0.02 Working Level for average annual concentration including background, as specified in the EPA Standard 40 CFR 192. The assessment indicated elevated levels of radioactivity at one general area in the outdoor environs, encompassing about 1400 ft 2 (130 m 2 ) of land along the property's northern boundary. Analysis of a surface soil sample collected from this area indicated a radium concentration considerably in excess of the limit of 5 pCi/g above background specified in the EPA Standard. Subsurface soil sampling was not conducted, and thus the vertical extent of the radiological contamination is not known. Since the surface soil contamination level exceeded the limit specified in the EPA Standard, remedial action for this vicinity site should be considered

  15. Radiological protection and transuranic wastes from the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morley, F.; Kelly, G.N.

    1976-01-01

    The significant higher actinides in the nuclear fuel cycle are identified and current knowledge of their radiotoxicity is reviewed with particular emphasis on plutonium. Experience of plutonium in the environment is briefly summarised. The origins of fuel cycle wastes contaminated by actinides are described and available data examined to estimate the amounts of radioactivity involved now and in the future. The radiological importance of individual isotopes of the various actinide elements in wastes is compared and attention drawn to changes with time. Some possible alternative waste management policies are reviewed against the requirements of radiological safety. (author)

  16. Thorium-230 contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noey, K.C.; Liedle, S.D.; Hickey, C.R.; Doane, R.W.

    1989-01-01

    The authors are currently performing radiological surveys on approximately ninety properties in the St. Louis, Missouri area as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. The properties involved are the St. Louis Airport Site, Latty Avenue Properties, St. Louis Downtown Site, Coldwater Creek, and the associated roads and vicinity properties. The primary radioactive contaminant on these properties is thorium-230. Since field instrumentation is not available to detect the presence of alpha-emitting contamination in soil, soil samples are being collected and sent to an analytical laboratory for analysis. Thorium-230 analysis is costly and time-consuming, and as a result, soil sample analysis results are not available to help direct the field sampling program. This paper provides discussion of the manner in which the properties became radioactively contaminated, followed by a discussion of the difficulties associated with the detection of thorium-230. Finally, new methodologies for detecting alpha-emitting radionuclides in the field are described

  17. Statistical data treatment of environmental radiological measurements extracted by the CSN and submitted to a lower limit of detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felipe, A.; Martin, M.; Valdes, T.

    1992-01-01

    The quantification of radiological environmental contamination is usually carried out by mean of sample measurements around the emission points. These data are submitted to the so called Lower Limit of Detection which makes data to be statistically censored. The following topics have been included in our work: (a) Correction of mean values of the radiological contamination levels by the estimation of its distribution. (b) Development of the computer programs to carry out the former correction of estimators. (c) Estimation of the existing correlation among the different types of measurements. (author)

  18. Nevada National Security Site Radiological Control Manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    This document supersedes DOE/NV/25946--801, 'Nevada Test Site Radiological Control Manual,' Revision 1 issued in February 2010. Brief Description of Revision: A complete revision to reflect a recent change in name for the NTS; changes in name for some tenant organizations; and to update references to current DOE policies, orders, and guidance documents. Article 237.2 was deleted. Appendix 3B was updated. Article 411.2 was modified. Article 422 was re-written to reflect the wording of DOE O 458.1. Article 431.6.d was modified. The glossary was updated. This manual contains the radiological control requirements to be used for all radiological activities conducted by programs under the purview of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). Compliance with these requirements will ensure compliance with Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 835, 'Occupational Radiation Protection.' Programs covered by this manual are located at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS); Nellis Air Force Base and North Las Vegas, Nevada; Santa Barbara and Livermore, California; and Andrews Air Force Base, Maryland. In addition, fieldwork by NNSA/NSO at other locations is covered by this manual. Current activities at NNSS include operating low-level radioactive and mixed waste disposal facilities for United States defense-generated waste, assembly and execution of subcritical experiments, assembly/disassembly of special experiments, the storage and use of special nuclear materials, performing criticality experiments, emergency responder training, surface cleanup and site characterization of contaminated land areas, environmental activity by the University system, and nonnuclear test operations, such as controlled spills of hazardous materials at the Hazardous Materials Spill Center. Currently, the major potential for occupational radiation exposure is associated with the burial of

  19. Nevada National Security Site Radiological Control Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radiological Control Managers’ Council

    2012-03-26

    This document supersedes DOE/NV/25946--801, 'Nevada Test Site Radiological Control Manual,' Revision 1 issued in February 2010. Brief Description of Revision: A complete revision to reflect a recent change in name for the NTS; changes in name for some tenant organizations; and to update references to current DOE policies, orders, and guidance documents. Article 237.2 was deleted. Appendix 3B was updated. Article 411.2 was modified. Article 422 was re-written to reflect the wording of DOE O 458.1. Article 431.6.d was modified. The glossary was updated. This manual contains the radiological control requirements to be used for all radiological activities conducted by programs under the purview of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). Compliance with these requirements will ensure compliance with Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 835, 'Occupational Radiation Protection.' Programs covered by this manual are located at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS); Nellis Air Force Base and North Las Vegas, Nevada; Santa Barbara and Livermore, California; and Andrews Air Force Base, Maryland. In addition, fieldwork by NNSA/NSO at other locations is covered by this manual. Current activities at NNSS include operating low-level radioactive and mixed waste disposal facilities for United States defense-generated waste, assembly and execution of subcritical experiments, assembly/disassembly of special experiments, the storage and use of special nuclear materials, performing criticality experiments, emergency responder training, surface cleanup and site characterization of contaminated land areas, environmental activity by the University system, and nonnuclear test operations, such as controlled spills of hazardous materials at the Hazardous Materials Spill Center. Currently, the major potential for occupational radiation exposure is associated with the burial of

  20. Study of surface potential contamination in radioisotope and radiopharmaceutical production facilities and alternative solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suhaedi Muhammad; Rimin Sumantri; Farida Tusafariah; Djarwanti Rahayu Pipin Soedjarwo

    2013-01-01

    Radioisotope and radiopharmaceutical production facilities that exist in their operations around the world in the form of radiological impacts of radiation exposure, contamination of surface and air contamination. Given the number of existing open source in radioisotope and radiopharmaceutical production facility, then the possibility of surface contamination in the work area is quite high. For that to protect the safety and health of both workers, the public and the environment, then the licensee must conduct an inventory of some of the potential that could result in contamination of surfaces in radioisotope and radiopharmaceutical production facilities. Several potential to cause surface contamination in radioisotope and radiopharmaceutical production facilities consist of loss of resources, the VAC system disorders, impaired production facilities, limited resources and lack of work discipline and radioactive waste handling activities. From the study of some potential, there are several alternative solutions that can be implemented by the licensee to address the contamination of the surface so as not to cause adverse radiological impacts for both radiation workers, the public or the environment. (author)

  1. Results of the radiological survey at the Jessop Steel Company Site, 500 Green Street, Washington, Pennsylvania (JSP001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cottrell, W.D.; Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.

    1991-04-01

    At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted investigative radiological surveys at the Jessop Steel company, 500 Green Street, Washington, Pennsylvania (JSP001) in 1989. The purpose of the surveys was to determine whether the property was contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 238 U, as a result of work contracted to the Atomic Energy Commission. The survey included gamma scans; direct and transferable measurements of alpha and beta-gamma radiation levels; and soil dust, debris, grinding wheel, and air sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey and sampling covered portions of the exterior ground surface, the roof and gutter section above the saw shop and rolling mill area of building D, and the interiors of buildings A, B, C and D. Results of the survey demonstrated no radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program guidelines for radium, thorium, and uranium. The radionuclide distributions were not significantly different from typical background levels in the Pennsylvania are. 7 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs