WorldWideScience

Sample records for radiolabelled biomolecules perspectivas

  1. Diagnostic and therapeutic perspectives in nuclear medicine: radiolabelled biomolecules; Perspectivas diagnosticas y terapeuticas en medicina nuclear: biomoleculas radiomarcadas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferro F, G. [Gerencia de Aplicaciones Nucleares en la Salud. ININ, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Murphy, C.A. de; Pedraza L, M. [Departamento de Medicina Nuclear. Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Melendez A, L. [Facultad de Medicina, UAEM, 50000 Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    From their beginning, the radiopharmaceuticals chemistry has gone to the study of the molecular chemistry. The radiopharmaceuticals are only in their capacity to detect such specific biochemical places as the receivers and the enzymes. With the recent obtaining of the complete structural sequence of the genome, it doesn't fit doubt of the importance that they have acquired the molecular images for the study from the genetic information to the alterations phenotypic in the chemistry of the human body. So, the future of the diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine, practically is based in the study of protein fragments, peptide structures and chains of DNA radiolabelled for the study of the metabolism In vivo. These investigations represent a substantial change in those paradigms of the pharmaceutical development, when using the own organic capacities as source of medications, instead of considering to the organism like a simple assay tube where molecules act, like they are most of the traditional medications. The investigation of new techniques to design complex stable of Tc-99m, Re-188, Lu-177, Y-90 and Dy-166/Ho-l66 with biomolecules that don't alter the specificity and in general the molecular properties of the same ones. it is a topic of world interest in the environment of the radiopharmaceutical chemistry. In this work some achievements and perspectives are presented on those main diagnostic and therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals of third generation. (Author)

  2. Diagnostic and therapeutic perspectives in nuclear medicine: radiolabelled biomolecules; Perspectivas diagnosticas y terapeuticas en medicina nuclear: biomoleculas radiomarcadas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferro F, G [Gerencia de Aplicaciones Nucleares en la Salud. ININ, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Murphy, C.A. de; Pedraza L, M [Departamento de Medicina Nuclear. Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Melendez A, L [Facultad de Medicina, UAEM, 50000 Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    From their beginning, the radiopharmaceuticals chemistry has gone to the study of the molecular chemistry. The radiopharmaceuticals are only in their capacity to detect such specific biochemical places as the receivers and the enzymes. With the recent obtaining of the complete structural sequence of the genome, it doesn't fit doubt of the importance that they have acquired the molecular images for the study from the genetic information to the alterations phenotypic in the chemistry of the human body. So, the future of the diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine, practically is based in the study of protein fragments, peptide structures and chains of DNA radiolabelled for the study of the metabolism In vivo. These investigations represent a substantial change in those paradigms of the pharmaceutical development, when using the own organic capacities as source of medications, instead of considering to the organism like a simple assay tube where molecules act, like they are most of the traditional medications. The investigation of new techniques to design complex stable of Tc-99m, Re-188, Lu-177, Y-90 and Dy-166/Ho-l66 with biomolecules that don't alter the specificity and in general the molecular properties of the same ones. it is a topic of world interest in the environment of the radiopharmaceutical chemistry. In this work some achievements and perspectives are presented on those main diagnostic and therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals of third generation. (Author)

  3. Microfluidic radiolabeling of biomolecules with PET radiometals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Dexing; Desai, Amit V.; Ranganathan, David; Wheeler, Tobias D.; Kenis, Paul J.A.; Reichert, David E.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: A robust, versatile and compact microreactor has been designed, fabricated and tested for the labeling of bifunctional chelate conjugated biomolecules (BFC-BM) with PET radiometals. Methods: The developed microreactor was used to radiolabel a chelate, either 1,4,7,10-Tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) or 1,4,7-triazacyclononane-1,4,7-triacetic acid (NOTA) that had been conjugated to cyclo(Arg-Gly-Asp-DPhe-Lys) peptide, with both 64 Cu and 68 Ga respectively. The microreactor radiolabeling conditions were optimized by varying temperature, concentration and residence time. Results: Direct comparisons between the microreactor approach and conventional methods showed improved labeling yields and increased reproducibility with the microreactor under identical labeling conditions, due to enhanced mass and heat transfer at the microscale. More importantly, over 90% radiolabeling yields (incorporation of radiometal) were achieved with a 1:1 stoichiometry of bifunctional chelate biomolecule conjugate (BFC-BM) to radiometal in the microreactor, which potentially obviates extensive chromatographic purification that is typically required to remove the large excess of unlabeled biomolecule in radioligands prepared using conventional methods. Moreover, higher yields for radiolabeling of DOTA-functionalized BSA protein (Bovine Serum Albumin) were observed with 64 Cu/ 68 Ga using the microreactor, which demonstrates the ability to label both small and large molecules. Conclusions: A robust, reliable, compact microreactor capable of chelating radiometals with common chelates has been developed and validated. Based on our radiolabeling results, the reported microfluidic approach overall outperforms conventional radiosynthetic methods, and is a promising technology for the radiometal labeling of commonly utilized BFC-BM in aqueous solutions.

  4. Microfluidic radiolabeling of biomolecules with PET radiometals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Dexing; Desai, Amit V; Ranganathan, David; Wheeler, Tobias D; Kenis, Paul J A; Reichert, David E

    2013-01-01

    A robust, versatile and compact microreactor has been designed, fabricated and tested for the labeling of bifunctional chelate conjugated biomolecules (BFC-BM) with PET radiometals. The developed microreactor was used to radiolabel a chelate, either 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) or 1,4,7-triazacyclononane-1,4,7-triacetic acid (NOTA) that had been conjugated to cyclo(Arg-Gly-Asp-DPhe-Lys) peptide, with both ⁶⁴Cu and ⁶⁸Ga respectively. The microreactor radiolabeling conditions were optimized by varying temperature, concentration and residence time. Direct comparisons between the microreactor approach and conventional methods showed improved labeling yields and increased reproducibility with the microreactor under identical labeling conditions, due to enhanced mass and heat transfer at the microscale. More importantly, over 90% radiolabeling yields (incorporation of radiometal) were achieved with a 1:1 stoichiometry of bifunctional chelate biomolecule conjugate (BFC-BM) to radiometal in the microreactor, which potentially obviates extensive chromatographic purification that is typically required to remove the large excess of unlabeled biomolecule in radioligands prepared using conventional methods. Moreover, higher yields for radiolabeling of DOTA-functionalized BSA protein (Bovine Serum Albumin) were observed with ⁶⁴Cu/⁶⁸Ga using the microreactor, which demonstrates the ability to label both small and large molecules. A robust, reliable, compact microreactor capable of chelating radiometals with common chelates has been developed and validated. Based on our radiolabeling results, the reported microfluidic approach overall outperforms conventional radiosynthetic methods, and is a promising technology for the radiometal labeling of commonly utilized BFC-BM in aqueous solutions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Diagnostic and therapeutic perspectives in nuclear medicine: radiolabelled biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferro F, G.; Murphy, C.A. de; Pedraza L, M.; Melendez A, L.

    2003-01-01

    From their beginning, the radiopharmaceuticals chemistry has gone to the study of the molecular chemistry. The radiopharmaceuticals are only in their capacity to detect such specific biochemical places as the receivers and the enzymes. With the recent obtaining of the complete structural sequence of the genome, it doesn't fit doubt of the importance that they have acquired the molecular images for the study from the genetic information to the alterations phenotypic in the chemistry of the human body. So, the future of the diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine, practically is based in the study of protein fragments, peptide structures and chains of DNA radiolabelled for the study of the metabolism In vivo. These investigations represent a substantial change in those paradigms of the pharmaceutical development, when using the own organic capacities as source of medications, instead of considering to the organism like a simple assay tube where molecules act, like they are most of the traditional medications. The investigation of new techniques to design complex stable of Tc-99m, Re-188, Lu-177, Y-90 and Dy-166/Ho-l66 with biomolecules that don't alter the specificity and in general the molecular properties of the same ones. it is a topic of world interest in the environment of the radiopharmaceutical chemistry. In this work some achievements and perspectives are presented on those main diagnostic and therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals of third generation. (Author)

  6. Microreactor and method for preparing a radiolabeled complex or a biomolecule conjugate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichert, David E; Kenis, Paul J. A.; Wheeler, Tobias D; Desai, Amit V; Zeng, Dexing; Onal, Birce C

    2015-03-17

    A microreactor for preparing a radiolabeled complex or a biomolecule conjugate comprises a microchannel for fluid flow, where the microchannel comprises a mixing portion comprising one or more passive mixing elements, and a reservoir for incubating a mixed fluid. The reservoir is in fluid communication with the microchannel and is disposed downstream of the mixing portion. A method of preparing a radiolabeled complex includes flowing a radiometal solution comprising a metallic radionuclide through a downstream mixing portion of a microchannel, where the downstream mixing portion includes one or more passive mixing elements, and flowing a ligand solution comprising a bifunctional chelator through the downstream mixing portion. The ligand solution and the radiometal solution are passively mixed while in the downstream mixing portion to initiate a chelation reaction between the metallic radionuclide and the bifunctional chelator. The chelation reaction is completed to form a radiolabeled complex.

  7. Highly efficient method for 125I-radiolabeling of biomolecules using inverse-electron-demand Diels-Alder reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Mi Hee; Shim, Ha Eun; Yun, Seong-Jae; Kim, Hye Rim; Mushtaq, Sajid; Lee, Chang Heon; Park, Sang Hyun; Choi, Dae Seong; Lee, Dong-Eun; Byun, Eui-Baek; Jang, Beom-Su; Jeon, Jongho

    2016-04-19

    In this report, we present a rapid and highly efficient method for radioactive iodine labeling of trans-cyclooctene group conjugated biomolecules using inverse-electron-demand Diels-Alder reaction. Radioiodination reaction of the tetrazine structure was carried out using the stannylated precursor 2 to give 125 I-labeled azide ([ 125 I]1) with high radiochemical yield (65±8%) and radiochemical purity (>99%). For radiolabeling application of [ 125 I]1, trans-cyclooctene derived cRGD peptide and human serum albumin were prepared. These substrated were reacted with [ 125 I]1 under mild condition to provide the radiolabeled products [ 125 I]6 and [ 125 I]8, respectively, with excellent radiochemical yields. The biodistribution study of [ 125 I]8 in normal ICR mice showed significantly lower thyroid uptake values than that of 125 I-labeled human serum albumin prepared by a traditional radiolabeling method. Therefore [ 125 I]8 will be a useful radiolabeled tracer in various molecular imaging and biological studies. Those results clearly demonstrate that [ 125 I]1 will be used as a valuable prosthetic group for radiolabeling of biomolecules. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Production, Isolation and Radiolabeling Methods for 211AT- Labeling of Biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilbur, D.S.; Hamlin, D.K.; Chyan, M.

    2009-01-01

    Targeted alpha therapy with 211 At-labeled compounds holds great promise for treatment of cancer, particularly compartmentalized cancer (e.g. ovarian cancer), minimal residual cancer after surgery and metastatic disease. Unfortunately, 211 At has limited availability and, due to its unique nature, has the potential to be readily dissociated from the cancer-targeting agents used in vivo. Finding methods to circumvent these two problems has occupied a large amount of our efforts over the past few years. 211 At is produced at the University of Washington on a Scanditronix MC-50 using a 28 MeV alpha beam. Our initial preclinical studies were conducted using a small target assembly with irradiations of a 10 □ A alpha beam, but our desire to ultimately conduct clinical studies led to the design and installation of a new target assembly that had much larger irradiation surface and would withstand beam energies of 50 □A or more. Prior to this upgrade, 211 At was efficiently isolated (60-80%) from the irradiated aluminum-backed bismuth targets by dry distillation at 650 o C. However, the dry distillation method gave low recovery yields (e.g. 10-40%) when the much larger new targets were used. After some attempts to improve the distillation yields, we have more recently conducted a wet chemistry approach to the 211 At isolation. While this method still needs to be optimized, it has provided good recovery (60-90%) of the 211 At. Our radiolabeling methods have undergone a similar transition in the past few years. Until recently our 211 At studies were limited to the use of intact monoclonal antibodies (MAb) labeled using conjugates containing aryl-astatine derivatives due to the deastatination of more rapidly metabolized targeting biomolecules. This limitation made it all but impossible to label important biomolecules such as MAb fragments, engineered proteins, peptides and small molecules. This critical shortcoming of labeling methods for 211 At led to our investigating

  9. Radiohalogenation of biomolecules. An experimental study on radiohalogen preparation, precursor synthesis, radiolabeling and biodistribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koziorowski, J.

    1998-01-01

    Radiohalogens are widely used in nuclear medicine, both as tool for diagnostic in vivo imaging, and in radionuclide therapy. This study deals with the use of radiohalogens; separation, precursor synthesis, labeling and biological behavior. The focus is on 211 At and 124 I, the former being a candidate for nuclide therapy and the latter potentially useful for diagnostic imaging and Auger-electron based radiotherapy. For astatine the separation, labeling and some biological behavior is described, and for iodine the latter two. Astatine was separated from an irradiated bismuth target by dry distillation. A novel cryotrap was developed for the isolation of astatine and subsequent synthesis of radiolabeled compounds. 5-[ 211 At]astato-2'-deoxyuridine (AUdR) and N-succinimidyl-4-[ 211 At]astatobenzoate (SAB) were synthesized in 95% respectively 90% radiochemical yields. The former is incorporated into DNA of proliferating cells and can therefore be used as an endoradiotherapeutic agent. The latter is a conjugate for the astatination of proteins. Human epidermal growth factor (hEGF) was tagged with astatine using three approaches: a) direct labeling of native hEGF, b) conjugation with SAB, and c) direct labeling of an hEGF - 7-(3-aminopropyl)-7,8-dicarba-nido-undecaborate(1-) conjugate. The overall labeling yields were 3.5% for direct labeling, 44% for SAB and 70% for the hEGF-nido-carborane conjugate. A new route to N-succinimidyl 3- and 4- [ 124 I]iodobenzoate, two reagents for radioiodination of proteins is described affording 90% radiochemical yield. Three radioiodinated analogs of PK11195, 1-(2-chlorophenyl)-N-methyl-N-(1-methylpropyl)isoquinoline-3-carboxyam ide, a peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor antagonist, were synthesized. All three analogs were obtained in >90% radiochemical yield. Synthesis and application of 5-[ 124 I]iodo-2'-deoxyuridine (IUdR) is presented. The closo-dodecaborate anion was evaluated as prosthetic group for radioiodination of

  10. Country report: Vietnam. Setting Up of a 90Sr/90Y Generator System Based on Supported Liquid Membrane (SLM) Technique and Radiolabeling of Eluted 90Y with Biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Thi Thu; Duong Van Dong; Bui Van Cuong; Chu Van Khoa

    2010-01-01

    In the course of participating in the IAEA-CRP during the last two years, Vietnam has achieved the goal of setting up a 90 Sr/ 90 Y generator system based on Supported Liquid Membrane (SLM) technique and also radiolabeling of the eluted 90 Y with antibody, peptides and albumin. A two stage SLM based 90 Sr- 90 Y generator was set up in-house to generate carrier-free 90 Y at different activity levels viz. 5, 20, 50 mCi. The generator system was operated in sequential mode in which 2-ethylhexyl 2-ethylhexyl phosphonic acid (PC88A) based SLM was used in the first stage for the transport 90 Y in 4.0 M nitric acid from source phase where 90 Sr- 90 Y equilibrium mixture is placed in nitric acid medium at pH to 1-2. In the second stage, octyl (phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethyl phosphine oxide (CMPO) based SLM was used for the transport of 90 Y selectively to 1.0 M acetic acid which is the best medium for radiolebeling. The eluted 90 Y from the generator was tested for the presence of any traces of 90 Sr using the Extraction Paper Chromatography (EPC) and was found suitable for radiolabeling. The generator system could be upgraded to 100 mCi level successfully due to an expert mission from India through IAEA. The 90 Y product obtained from the generator system was used for radiolabeling of antibody and peptides viz. Rituximab, DOTATATE and albumin particles under different experimental conditions. A new chromatography system could be developed for analyzing 90 Y labeled albumin using the TAE buffer as mobile phase in PC and ITLC

  11. Biomolecule labelling by 186 Re

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lungu, Valeria Viorica; Mihailescu, Gabriela; Dumitrescu, Gabriela

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this study is to develop and improve the existing radiolabelling techniques of peptides and monoclonal antibodies with 186 Re and 188 Re as potential agents for cancer targeted radiotherapy. We selected the following methods and techniques for direct labelling of peptides and monoclonal antibody: 1. Prereduction of -S-S- bridges of biomolecule to sulfhydryls using reducing agents: ascorbic acid, cysteine, active hydrogen, 2,3 dimercaptopropanol. The prereduction reactions are controlled by massic ratios of reduction agents/biomolecule, pH, temperature and time of incubation; 2. Reduction of 186 Re O 4 - stannous chloride in acid and alkaline pH; 3. Coupling reaction of 186 Re (red) with the biomolecule controlled by the time and temperature of incubation, the influence of pH regarding the binding of 186 Re to the biomolecules. The quality control was effected by chromatography techniques (paper and elution gel chromatography) on labeled biomolecule before and after purification. The elution gel chromatography was spectrophotometricaly monitored at 280 nm. In the same time the radioactivity of samples was measured using a gamma counter. All the results confirm in vitro stability of labeled biomolecule. The biological evaluation studies regarding accumulation and biological affinity will be controlled by scintigraphy method. Biodistribution studies will be effected to Walker tumor bearing animals at 4 and 24 hours after injections. (authors)

  12. Radiolabeled peptides: experimental and clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakur, M.L.; Pallela, V.R.

    1998-01-01

    Radiolabeled receptor specific biomolecules hold unlimited potential in nuclear medicine. During the past few years much attention has been drawn to the development radiolabeled peptides for a variety of diagnostic applications, as well as for therapy of malignant tumors. Although only one peptide, In-111-DTPA-(D)-Phe 1 -octreotide, is available commercially for oncologic imaging, many more have been examined in humans with hematological disorders, and the early results appear to be promising. Impetus generated by these results have prompted investigators to label peptides with such radionuclides as Tc-99m, I-123, F-18, Cu-64, and Y-90. This review is intended to highlight the qualities of peptides, summarize the clinical results, and address some important issues associated with radiolabeling of highly potent peptides. While doing so, various methods of radiolabeling have been described, and their strengths and weaknesses have also been discussed. (author)

  13. Country report: Vietnam. Setting Up of a {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y Generator System Based on Supported Liquid Membrane (SLM) Technique and Radiolabeling of Eluted {sup 90}Y with Biomolecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thu, Nguyen Thi; Dong, Duong Van; Cuong, Bui Van; Khoa, Chu Van [Vietnam Atomic Energy Commission (VAEC), Nuclear Research Institute, Dalat (Viet Nam)

    2010-07-01

    In the course of participating in the IAEA-CRP during the last two years, Vietnam has achieved the goal of setting up a {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y generator system based on Supported Liquid Membrane (SLM) technique and also radiolabeling of the eluted {sup 90}Y with antibody, peptides and albumin. A two stage SLM based {sup 90}Sr-{sup 90}Y generator was set up in-house to generate carrier-free {sup 90}Y at different activity levels viz. 5, 20, 50 mCi. The generator system was operated in sequential mode in which 2-ethylhexyl 2-ethylhexyl phosphonic acid (PC88A) based SLM was used in the first stage for the transport {sup 90}Y in 4.0 M nitric acid from source phase where {sup 90}Sr-{sup 90}Y equilibrium mixture is placed in nitric acid medium at pH to 1-2. In the second stage, octyl (phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethyl phosphine oxide (CMPO) based SLM was used for the transport of {sup 90}Y selectively to 1.0 M acetic acid which is the best medium for radiolebeling. The eluted {sup 90}Y from the generator was tested for the presence of any traces of {sup 90}Sr using the Extraction Paper Chromatography (EPC) and was found suitable for radiolabeling. The generator system could be upgraded to 100 mCi level successfully due to an expert mission from India through IAEA. The {sup 90}Y product obtained from the generator system was used for radiolabeling of antibody and peptides viz. Rituximab, DOTATATE and albumin particles under different experimental conditions. A new chromatography system could be developed for analyzing {sup 90}Y labeled albumin using the TAE buffer as mobile phase in PC and ITLC.

  14. Radiolabeled platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datz, F.L.; Taylor, A.T.

    1986-01-01

    Initial interest in developing techniques to radiolabel platelets was spurred by the lack of an accurate method for measuring platelet life span in both normals and in thrombocytopenic patients. Early investigators could obtain only rough estimates of platelet life spans by monitoring the platelet counts of thrombocytopenic patients undergoing platelet transfusions. Labels were also sought that would allow imaging of platelets in vivo in order to better understand the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis, thrombophlebitis, and clotting disorders, and to improve the clinical diagnosis of these diseases. Two types of platelet labels were investigated: cohort (pulse) labels and random labels. Cohort labels are taken up by megakaryocytes in the bone marrow and incorporated in the DNA and other components of the forming platelet. In theory, only freshly released platelets of a uniform age are labeled. Random labels, on the other hand, tag platelets in the peripheral blood, labeling platelets of all ages

  15. Promising Biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Isabel; Carvalho, Ana L; Radhouani, Hajer; Gonçalves, Cristiana; Oliveira, J Miguel; Reis, Rui L

    2018-01-01

    The osteochondral defect (OD) comprises the articular cartilage and its subchondral bone. The treatment of these lesions remains as one of the most problematic clinical issues, since these defects include different tissues, requiring distinct healing approaches. Among the growing applications of regenerative medicine, clinical articular cartilage repair has been used for two decades, and it is an effective example of translational medicine; one of the most used cell-based repair strategies includes implantation of autologous cells in degradable scaffolds such as alginate, agarose, collagen, chitosan, chondroitin sulfate, cellulose, silk fibroin, hyaluronic acid, and gelatin, among others. Concerning the repair of osteochondral defects, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine started to design single- or bi-phased scaffold constructs, often containing hydroxyapatite-collagen composites, usually used as a bone substitute. Biomolecules such as natural and synthetic have been explored to recreate the cartilage-bone interface through multilayered biomimetic scaffolds. In this chapter, a succinct description about the most relevant natural and synthetic biomolecules used on cartilage and bone repair, describing the procedures to obtain these biomolecules, their chemical structure, common modifications to improve its characteristics, and also their application in the biomedical fields, is given.

  16. A novel method of 18F radiolabeling for PET.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McBride, W.J.; Sharkey, R.M.; Karacay, H.; D'Souza, C.A.; Rossi, E.A.; Laverman, P.; Chang, C.H.; Boerman, O.C.; Goldenberg, D.M.

    2009-01-01

    Small biomolecules are typically radiolabeled with (18)F by binding it to a carbon atom, a process that usually is designed uniquely for each new molecule and requires several steps and hours to produce. We report a facile method wherein (18)F is first attached to aluminum as Al(18)F, which is then

  17. Radiolabelled cellular blood elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinzinger, H.

    1990-01-01

    This book reports on radiolabelled cellular blood elements, covering new advances made during the past several years, in particular the use of Tc-99 as a tracer for blood elements. Coverage extends to several radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies that are specific for blood components and may label blood elements in vivo

  18. Radiolabelled sucralfate compositions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasquez, T.E.; Bridges, R.L.; Braunstein, P.; Jansholt, A.

    1984-01-01

    A novel radiopharmaceutical composition comprising an aqueous solution or suspension containing a radiolabelled sucralfate or sucralfate derivative or precursor is claimed. The composition is effective for in vivo scintigraphic imaging of the gastrointestinal muscosal areas in humans. The sucralfate is combined with a radiolabelled albumin or other protein or protein derivative under acidic conditions

  19. Biomolecules in Astrobiology

    OpenAIRE

    Meringer, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Astrobiology is the study of the origin, distribution and future of life in the universe, biomolecules are molecules produced by living organisms. This talk reviews known facts and open questions about biomolecules in the context of Astrobiology and introduces a research project on "Creating a Reference Set of Amino Acids Structures for Use in Multiple Astrobiology Investigations" that tries to find answers using computational methods.

  20. Biodistribution of radiolabeled lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fawwaz, R.A.; Oluwole, S.; Wang, T.S.; Kuromoto, N.; Iga, C.; Hardy, M.A.; Alderson, P.O.

    1985-01-01

    Factors that might affect the biodistribution and clinical utility of radiolabeled lymphocytes were evaluated in experimental animals. Indium-111 (In-111) labeled lymphocytes obtained from peripheral blood, lymph node, or spleen were found in significant amounts in the lymphoid tissues of Lewis rats as early as 3 hours after infusion. A progressive increase in nodal activity with concomitant fall of activity in other organs followed, indicating active recirculation of the lymphocytes. In vitro irradiation of the In-111 labeled lymphocytes resulted in no detectable lymphocyte recirculation and/or reduced localization in lymphoid tissue. Splenectomized animals and those sensitized to an organ allograft before cell infusion showed increased activity in their bone marrow. These results suggest that the source of the injected cells, cell irradiation dose level and host sensitization should be considered when radiolabeled lymphocytes are being prepared for use in clinical diagnosis and therapy

  1. Radiolabeled antibody imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahl, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    Radiolabeled antibodies, in particular monoclonal antibodies, offer the potential for the specific nuclear imaging of malignant and benign diseases in man. If this imaging potential is realized, they may also have a large role in cancer treatment. This paper reviews: (1) what monoclonal antibodies are and how they differ from polyclonal antibodies, (2) how they are produced and radiolabeled, (3) the results of preclinical and clinical trials in cancer imaging, including the utility of SPECT and antibody fragments, (4) the role of antibodies in the diagnosis of benign diseases, (5) alternate routes of antibody delivery, (6) the role of these agents in therapy, and (7) whether this technology ''revolutionizes'' the practice of nuclear radiology, or has a more limited complementary role in the imaging department

  2. Radiolabeling of biological vectors by poly-aza-macrocyclic complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreau, M.

    2012-01-01

    This work conducted at the 'Institut de Chimie Moleculaire de l'Universite de Bourgogne' carries at first on the synthesis of bifunctional chelating agents suitable for the chelation of trivalent radio-metals, including indium-111. The greater part of this work was then dedicated to the grafting of a DOTA derivative bifunctional chelating agent on different antibodies or fragments of monoclonal antibodies: trastuzumab (anti-HER2 treatment of breast cancer), cetuximab (anti EGFR, treatment of many cancers, including colorectal cancer) and abciximab (antiplatelet). Particular attention was paid to the characterization of various immuno-conjugates. The critical step of this thesis consisted in the indium-111 radiolabeling of two previously prepared immuno-conjugates: trastuzumab and cetuximab. These steps of radiolabelling allowed us to determine the immunoreactive fraction and affinity of each radiotracer. Thus, we were able to study the in vivo biodistribution of the radiotracers in tumour-bearing mice by SPECT-CT. We also developed an original method for the labeling of a Fab antibody fragment in order to monitor the biodistribution of the antiplatelet agent (abciximab). Finally, we also validated the concept of multimodal imaging through grafting and radiolabeling of a bimodal agent for optical and SPECT imaging on bacterial lipopolysaccharide. Thanks to this work, we gained an expertise in antibodies radiolabeling. The results obtained allow to consider the labeling of antibodies or other biomolecules, and the use of other radionuclides for PET imaging and radioimmunotherapy. (author)

  3. Radiolabeled antibodies in cancer. Oncology Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-11-01

    Oncology Overviews are a service of the International Cancer Research Data Bank (ICRDB) Program of the National Cancer Institute, intended to facilitate and promote the exchange of information between cancer scientists by keeping them aware of literature related to their research being published by other laboratories through the world. Each Oncology Overview represents a survey of the literature associated with a selected area of cancer research. It contains abstracts of articles which have been selected and organized by researchers associated with the field. Contents: Radiolabeled antibodies--labeling and imaging techniques; Radiolabeled antibodies--carcinoembryonic antigen; Radiolabeled antibodies--alpha-fetoprotein; Radiolabeled antibodies--human chorionic gonadotropin; Radiolabeled antibodies--ferritin; Radiolabeled antibodies--imaging of colorectal tumors; Radiolabeled antibodies--imaging of malignant melanoma; Radiolabeled antibodies--imaging of urogenital tumors; Radiolabeled antibodies--imaging of thyroid tumors; Radiolabeled antibodies--other clinical studies; Radiolabeled antibodies--selected preclinical studies; Radiolabeled antibodies--reviews

  4. Radiolabeled derivatives of folic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Derivatives of folic acid are described, in which the α-carboxyl group is substituted with an amino compound having an aromatic or heterocyclic ring substituent which is capable of being radiolabelled. Particularly mentioned as a radiolabel is 125 I. (author)

  5. Frustration in biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreiro, Diego U; Komives, Elizabeth A; Wolynes, Peter G

    2014-11-01

    Biomolecules are the prime information processing elements of living matter. Most of these inanimate systems are polymers that compute their own structures and dynamics using as input seemingly random character strings of their sequence, following which they coalesce and perform integrated cellular functions. In large computational systems with finite interaction-codes, the appearance of conflicting goals is inevitable. Simple conflicting forces can lead to quite complex structures and behaviors, leading to the concept of frustration in condensed matter. We present here some basic ideas about frustration in biomolecules and how the frustration concept leads to a better appreciation of many aspects of the architecture of biomolecules, and especially how biomolecular structure connects to function by means of localized frustration. These ideas are simultaneously both seductively simple and perilously subtle to grasp completely. The energy landscape theory of protein folding provides a framework for quantifying frustration in large systems and has been implemented at many levels of description. We first review the notion of frustration from the areas of abstract logic and its uses in simple condensed matter systems. We discuss then how the frustration concept applies specifically to heteropolymers, testing folding landscape theory in computer simulations of protein models and in experimentally accessible systems. Studying the aspects of frustration averaged over many proteins provides ways to infer energy functions useful for reliable structure prediction. We discuss how frustration affects folding mechanisms. We review here how the biological functions of proteins are related to subtle local physical frustration effects and how frustration influences the appearance of metastable states, the nature of binding processes, catalysis and allosteric transitions. In this review, we also emphasize that frustration, far from being always a bad thing, is an essential feature

  6. Development of radioactively labelled cancer seeking biomolecules for targeted radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varvarigou, A.D.; Archimandritis, S.C.

    2000-01-01

    Within the framework of the above project we are studying the labelling of biomolecules, peptides and antibodies, with radionuclides emitting β - and γ radiation. More specifically, for the time being, we have investigated the labelling of peptides with Re-188 and of antibodies with Sm-153 and Re-188. The radiolabelled derivatives are further evaluated in vivo for possible application in Oncology. For these radiobiological studies we are trying to apply ectopic and orthotopic tumour animal models and to develop, in collaboration with other national and foreign institutes, proper imaging devices for small animal imaging

  7. Methods to obtain radiolabelled monocrotaline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lame, M.W.; Morin, D.; Wilson, D.W.; Segall, H.J.

    1996-01-01

    Crotalaria spectabilis, a plant found in many areas of the world is associated with the pyrrolizidine alkaloid monocrotaline. Monocrotaline when injected subcutaneously in Sprague Dawley rats has been utilized for years to create a condition known to mimic pulmonary hypertension in humans. We attempted to determine the optimum conditions for the biosynthesis of radiolabelled monocrotaline. Our work describes the plant growth conditions and the time periods associated with the production of radiolabelled monocrotaline. In addition, the incorporation of 14 CO 2 or [2,3- 3 H]-putrescine dihydrochloride and the specific activity plus the amount(s) of recovered radiolabelled monocrotaline are discussed. We conclude that the most efficient and cost effective method for the biosynthesis of radiolabelled monocrotaline is still the utilization of 14 CO 2 . (author)

  8. Methods to obtain radiolabelled monocrotaline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lame, M.W.; Morin, D.; Wilson, D.W.; Segall, H.J. [University of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    1996-12-01

    Crotalaria spectabilis, a plant found in many areas of the world is associated with the pyrrolizidine alkaloid monocrotaline. Monocrotaline when injected subcutaneously in Sprague Dawley rats has been utilized for years to create a condition known to mimic pulmonary hypertension in humans. We attempted to determine the optimum conditions for the biosynthesis of radiolabelled monocrotaline. Our work describes the plant growth conditions and the time periods associated with the production of radiolabelled monocrotaline. In addition, the incorporation of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} or [2,3-{sup 3}H]-putrescine dihydrochloride and the specific activity plus the amount(s) of recovered radiolabelled monocrotaline are discussed. We conclude that the most efficient and cost effective method for the biosynthesis of radiolabelled monocrotaline is still the utilization of {sup 14}CO{sub 2}. (author).

  9. Biomolecule-functionalized polymer brushes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hui; Xu, Fu-Jian

    2013-04-21

    Functional polymer brushes have been utilized extensively for the immobilization of biomolecules, which is of crucial importance for the development of biosensors and biotechnology. Recent progress in polymerization methods, in particular surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP), has provided a unique means for the design and synthesis of new biomolecule-functionalized polymer brushes. This current review summarizes such recent research activities. The different preparation strategies for biomolecule immobilization through polymer brush spacers are described in detail. The functional groups of the polymer brushes used for biomolecule immobilization include epoxide, carboxylic acid, hydroxyl, aldehyde, and amine groups. The recent research activities indicate that functional polymer brushes become versatile and powerful spacers for immobilization of various biomolecules to maximize their functionalities. This review also demonstrates that surface-initiated ATRP is used more frequently than other polymerization methods in the designs of new biomolecule-functionalized polymer brushes.

  10. Radiolabelling of cholera toxin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, R.G.; Neves, Nicoli M.J. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Abdalla, L.F.; Brandao, R.L.; Etchehebehere, L. [Ouro Preto Univ., MG (Brazil). Escola de Farmacia. Lab. de Fisiologia e Bioquimica de Microorganismos; Lima, M.E. de [Minas Gerais Univ., Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Inst. de Ciencias Biologicas. Dept. de Bioquimica e Imunologia; Nicoli, J.R. [Minas Gerais Univ., Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Inst. de Ciencias Biologicas. Dept. de Microbiologia

    1999-11-01

    Binding of cholera toxin to ganglioside receptors of enterocyte microvilli catalyzes the activation of adenylate cyclase causing a rise in cAMP which final result is a copious diarrhea. Saccharomyces boulardii, a nonpathogenic yeast has been used to prevent diarrhea. Although the antidiarrheic properties of S. boulardii are widely recognized, this yeast has been used on empirical basis, and the mechanism of this protective effect is unknown. The addition of cholera toxin to S. boulardii induces the raising of cAMP that triggers the activation of neutral trehalase. This suggests that toxin specifically binding to cells, is internalized and active the protein phosphorylation cascade. Our objective is labeling the cholera toxin to verify the presence of binding sites on yeast cell surfaces for the cholera toxin. Cholera toxin was radiolabelled with Na {sup 125} I by a chloramine-T method modified from Cuatrecasas and Griffiths et alii. The {sup 125} I-Cholera toxin showed a specific radioactivity at about 1000 cpm/fmol toxin. Biological activity of labeled cholera toxin measured by trehalase activation was similar to the native toxin. (author) 5 refs., 3 figs.; e-mail: nevesmj at urano.cdtn.br

  11. Radiolabelled blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavender, J.P.

    1986-12-01

    After the introduction of gamma-emitting labels for blood-cells the use of radio-labelled blood cells is not only limited to kinetics of blood cells but it is also possible to localise inflammations, abscesses and thrombus. The most commonly applied label for red cells is Tc-99m. The most widely used technique for labelling granulocytes or platelets is In-111-oxine. In future the labelling of blood cells will be more simple and more specific due to monoclonal antibodies onto the platelet or the granulocyte cell surface. Labelled red cells have their main application in blood-pool imaging and in localisation of gastrointestinal bleeding. Besides the determination of the platelet life-span in haematologic disorders labelled platelets allow to localise thrombus and to show abnormal vasculature in the rejecting kidney. The commonest application for In-111-oxin labelled granulocytes is to show abdominal inflammations to localise inflamed bowel segments and to assess the inflammatory activity in chronic inflammatory bowel diseases. Moreover brain abscesses, bone sepsis and lung sepsis can be identified.

  12. Radiolabelling of cholera toxin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, R.G.; Neves, Nicoli M.J.; Abdalla, L.F.; Brandao, R.L.; Etchehebehere, L.; Lima, M.E. de; Nicoli, J.R.

    1999-01-01

    Binding of cholera toxin to ganglioside receptors of enterocyte microvilli catalyzes the activation of adenylate cyclase causing a rise in cAMP which final result is a copious diarrhea. Saccharomyces boulardii, a nonpathogenic yeast has been used to prevent diarrhea. Although the antidiarrheic properties of S. boulardii are widely recognized, this yeast has been used on empirical basis, and the mechanism of this protective effect is unknown. The addition of cholera toxin to S. boulardii induces the raising of cAMP that triggers the activation of neutral trehalase. This suggests that toxin specifically binding to cells, is internalized and active the protein phosphorylation cascade. Our objective is labeling the cholera toxin to verify the presence of binding sites on yeast cell surfaces for the cholera toxin. Cholera toxin was radiolabelled with Na 125 I by a chloramine-T method modified from Cuatrecasas and Griffiths et alii. The 125 I-Cholera toxin showed a specific radioactivity at about 1000 cpm/fmol toxin. Biological activity of labeled cholera toxin measured by trehalase activation was similar to the native toxin. (author)

  13. Dynamics of biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frauenfelder, H.

    1975-01-01

    The dynamics of the biomolecules is shown by the example of myoglobin (Mb). The photodissociation of MbCO with a laser flash and the recapture process of CO were followed optically in the temperature region of 2 to 350 K. The binding procedure exhibits four components which stretch out over many orders of magnitude of time. Above 250 K, the time dependence of the components is exponential, below 180 K, only one component is present which follows an exponential equation. A potential barrier model is shown to explain the observed courses of binding. See also 'Biochemistry', in printing. (BJ/LH) [de

  14. Nonlinear excitations in biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peyrard, M.

    1995-01-01

    The aim of the workshop entitled ''Nonlinear Excitations in Biomolecules'' is to attempt to bridge the gap between the physicists and biologists communities which is mainly due to language and cultural barriers. The progress of nonlinear science in the last few decades which have shown that the combination of nonlinearity, which characterize most biological phenomena, and cooperative effects in a system having a large number of degrees of freedom, can give rise to coherent excitations with remarkable properties. New concepts, such as solitons nd nonlinear energy localisation have become familiar to physicists and applied mathematicians. It is thus tempting to make an analogy between these coherent excitations and the exceptional stability of some biological processes, such as for instance DNA transcription, which require the coordination of many events in the ever changing environment of a cell. Physicists are now invoking nonlinear excitations to describe and explain many bio-molecular processes while biologists often doubt that the seemingly infinite variety of phenomena that they are attempting to classify can be reduced to such simple concepts. A large part of the meeting is devoted to tutorial lectures rather than to latest research results. The book provides a pedagogical introduction to the two topics forming the backbone of the meeting: the theory of nonlinear excitations and solitons, and their application in biology; and the structure and function of biomolecules, as well as energy and charge transport in biophysics. In order to emphasize the link between physics and biology, the volume is not divided along these two topics but according to biological subjects. Each chapter starts with a short introduction attempting to help the reader to find his way among the contributions and point out the connection between them. 23 lectures over the 32 presented have been selected and refers to quantum properties of macro-molecules. (J.S.)

  15. Microfluidic Radiometal Labeling Systems for Biomolecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichert, D E; Kenis, P J. A.

    2011-12-29

    In a typical labeling procedure with radiometals, such as Cu-64 and Ga-68; a very large (~ 100-fold) excess of the non-radioactive reactant (precursor) is used to promote rapid and efficient incorporation of the radioisotope into the PET imaging agent. In order to achieve high specific activities, careful control of reaction conditions and extensive chromatographic purifications are required in order to separate the labeled compounds from the cold precursors. Here we propose a microfluidic approach to overcome these problems, and achieve high specific activities in a more convenient, semi-automated fashion and faster time frame. Microfluidic reactors, consisting of a network of micron-sized channels (typical dimensions in the range 10 - 300¼m), filters, separation columns, electrodes and reaction loops/chambers etched onto a solid substrate, are now emerging as an extremely useful technology for the intensification and miniaturization of chemical processes. The ability to manipulate, process and analyze reagent concentrations and reaction interfaces in both space and time within the channel network of a microreactor provides the fine level of reaction control that is desirable in PET radiochemistry practice. These factors can bring radiometal labeling, specifically the preparation of radio-labeled biomolecules such as antibodies, much closer to their theoretical maximum specific activities.

  16. A source for microhydrated biomolecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Förstel, M.; Hergenhahn, U., E-mail: uwe.hergenhahn@ipp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Wendelsteinstraße 1, 17491 Greifswald (Germany); Neustetter, M.; Denifl, S. [Institut für Ionenphysik und Angewandte Physik, Technikerstraße 25, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Lelievre, F. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Wendelsteinstraße 1, 17491 Greifswald (Germany); University Paris-Sud 11, Faculté des Science d’Orsay, 91405 Orsay (France)

    2015-07-15

    We describe the construction of an apparatus for the production of a molecular jet of microhydrated biomolecules. Our design uses a water reservoir producing water vapour, which then passes through a separate reservoir containing a vapour of a sublimated biomolecule. The mixture coexpands into a molecular beam apparatus through a conical nozzle. Mass spectra showing water-adenin and water-uracil complexes are shown as typical examples. Suitable expansion conditions are reached without the use of an inert carrier gas.

  17. Recoil halogen reactions in liquid and frozen aqueous solutions of biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenault, L.J.; Blotcky, A.J.; Firouzbakht, M.L.; Rack, E.P.; Nebraska Univ., Omaha

    1982-01-01

    Reactions of recoil 38 Cl, 80 Br and 128 I have been studied in crystalline systems of 5-halouracil, 5-halo-2'-deoxyuridine and 5-halouridine as well as liquid and frozen aqueous solutions of these halogenated biomolecules. In all systems expect crystalline 5-iuodouracil the major product was the radio-labelled halide ion. There was no evidence for other halogen inorganic species. The major labelled organic product was the parent molecule. A recoil atom tracer technique was developed to acquire site information of the biomolecule solutes in the liquid and frozen aqueous systems. For all liquid and frozen aqueous systems, the halogenated biomolecules tended to aggregate. For liquid systems, the tendency for aggregation diminished as the solute concentration approached zero, where the probable state of the solute approached a monomolecular dispersion. Unlike the liquid state, the frozen ice lattice demonstated a ''caging effect'' for the solute aggregates which resulted in constant product yields over the whole concentration range. (orig.)

  18. Monoclonal Antibodies Radiolabeling with Rhenium-188 for Radioimmunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Petra; Pasquali, Micol

    2017-01-01

    Rhenium-188, obtained from an alumina-based tungsten-188/rhenium-188 generator, is actually considered a useful candidate for labeling biomolecules such as antibodies, antibody fragments, peptides, and DNAs for radiotherapy. There is a widespread interest in the availability of labeling procedures that allow obtaining 188Re-labeled radiopharmaceuticals for various therapeutic applications, in particular for the rhenium attachment to tumor-specific monoclonal antibodies (Mo)Abs for immunotherapy. Different approaches have been developed in order to obtain 188Re-radioimmunoconjugates in high radiochemical purity starting from the generator eluted [188Re]ReO4−. The aim of this paper is to provide a short overview on 188Re-labeled (Mo)Abs, focusing in particular on the radiolabeling methods, quality control of radioimmunoconjugates, and their in vitro stability for radioimmunotherapy (RIT), with particular reference to the most important contributions published in literature in this topic. PMID:28951872

  19. Radiolabelled peptides for oncological diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laverman, Peter; Boerman, Otto C.; Oyen, Wim J.G. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Sosabowski, Jane K. [Queen Mary University of London, Centre for Molecular Oncology, Barts Cancer Institute, London (United Kingdom)

    2012-02-15

    Radiolabelled receptor-binding peptides targeting receptors (over)expressed on tumour cells are widely under investigation for tumour diagnosis and therapy. The concept of using radiolabelled receptor-binding peptides to target receptor-expressing tissues in vivo has stimulated a large body of research in nuclear medicine. The {sup 111}In-labelled somatostatin analogue octreotide (OctreoScan trademark) is the most successful radiopeptide for tumour imaging, and was the first to be approved for diagnostic use. Based on the success of these studies, other receptor-targeting peptides such as cholecystokinin/gastrin analogues, glucagon-like peptide-1, bombesin (BN), chemokine receptor CXCR4 targeting peptides, and RGD peptides are currently under development or undergoing clinical trials. In this review, we discuss some of these peptides and their analogues, with regard to their potential for radionuclide imaging of tumours. (orig.)

  20. Al18F-Labeling Of Heat-Sensitive Biomolecules for Positron Emission Tomography Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleeren, Frederik; Lecina, Joan; Ahamed, Muneer; Raes, Geert; Devoogdt, Nick; Caveliers, Vicky; McQuade, Paul; Rubins, Daniel J; Li, Wenping; Verbruggen, Alfons; Xavier, Catarina; Bormans, Guy

    2017-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) using radiolabeled biomolecules is a translational molecular imaging technology that is increasingly used in support of drug development. Current methods for radiolabeling biomolecules with fluorine-18 are laborious and require multistep procedures with moderate labeling yields. The Al 18 F-labeling strategy involves chelation in aqueous medium of aluminum mono[ 18 F]fluoride ({Al 18 F} 2+ ) by a suitable chelator conjugated to a biomolecule. However, the need for elevated temperatures (100-120 °C) required for the chelation reaction limits its widespread use. Therefore, we designed a new restrained complexing agent (RESCA) for application of the AlF strategy at room temperature. Methods. The new chelator RESCA was conjugated to three relevant biologicals and the constructs were labeled with {Al 18 F} 2+ to evaluate the generic applicability of the one-step Al 18 F-RESCA-method. Results. We successfully labeled human serum albumin with excellent radiochemical yields in less than 30 minutes and confirmed in vivo stability of the Al 18 F-labeled protein in rats. In addition, we efficiently labeled nanobodies targeting the Kupffer cell marker CRIg, and performed µPET studies in healthy and CRIg deficient mice to demonstrate that the proposed radiolabeling method does not affect the functional integrity of the protein. Finally, an affibody targeting HER2 (PEP04314) was labeled site-specifically, and the distribution profile of (±)-[ 18 F]AlF(RESCA)-PEP04314 in a rhesus monkey was compared with that of [ 18 F]AlF(NOTA)-PEP04314 using whole-body PET/CT. Conclusion. This generic radiolabeling method has the potential to be a kit-based fluorine-18 labeling strategy, and could have a large impact on PET radiochemical space, potentially enabling the development of many new fluorine-18 labeled protein-based radiotracers.

  1. Al18F-Labeling Of Heat-Sensitive Biomolecules for Positron Emission Tomography Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleeren, Frederik; Lecina, Joan; Ahamed, Muneer; Raes, Geert; Devoogdt, Nick; Caveliers, Vicky; McQuade, Paul; Rubins, Daniel J; Li, Wenping; Verbruggen, Alfons; Xavier, Catarina; Bormans, Guy

    2017-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) using radiolabeled biomolecules is a translational molecular imaging technology that is increasingly used in support of drug development. Current methods for radiolabeling biomolecules with fluorine-18 are laborious and require multistep procedures with moderate labeling yields. The Al18F-labeling strategy involves chelation in aqueous medium of aluminum mono[18F]fluoride ({Al18F}2+) by a suitable chelator conjugated to a biomolecule. However, the need for elevated temperatures (100-120 °C) required for the chelation reaction limits its widespread use. Therefore, we designed a new restrained complexing agent (RESCA) for application of the AlF strategy at room temperature. Methods. The new chelator RESCA was conjugated to three relevant biologicals and the constructs were labeled with {Al18F}2+ to evaluate the generic applicability of the one-step Al18F-RESCA-method. Results. We successfully labeled human serum albumin with excellent radiochemical yields in less than 30 minutes and confirmed in vivo stability of the Al18F-labeled protein in rats. In addition, we efficiently labeled nanobodies targeting the Kupffer cell marker CRIg, and performed µPET studies in healthy and CRIg deficient mice to demonstrate that the proposed radiolabeling method does not affect the functional integrity of the protein. Finally, an affibody targeting HER2 (PEP04314) was labeled site-specifically, and the distribution profile of (±)-[18F]AlF(RESCA)-PEP04314 in a rhesus monkey was compared with that of [18F]AlF(NOTA)-PEP04314 using whole-body PET/CT. Conclusion. This generic radiolabeling method has the potential to be a kit-based fluorine-18 labeling strategy, and could have a large impact on PET radiochemical space, potentially enabling the development of many new fluorine-18 labeled protein-based radiotracers. PMID:28824726

  2. Radiopharmaceutical development of radiolabelled peptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fani, Melpomeni; Maecke, Helmut R. [University Hospital Freiburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Freiburg (Germany)

    2012-02-15

    Receptor targeting with radiolabelled peptides has become very important in nuclear medicine and oncology in the past few years. The overexpression of many peptide receptors in numerous cancers, compared to their relatively low density in physiological organs, represents the molecular basis for in vivo imaging and targeted radionuclide therapy with radiolabelled peptide-based probes. The prototypes are analogs of somatostatin which are routinely used in the clinic. More recent developments include somatostatin analogs with a broader receptor subtype profile or with antagonistic properties. Many other peptide families such as bombesin, cholecystokinin/gastrin, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)/exendin, arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) etc. have been explored during the last few years and quite a number of potential radiolabelled probes have been derived from them. On the other hand, a variety of strategies and optimized protocols for efficient labelling of peptides with clinically relevant radionuclides such as {sup 99m}Tc, M{sup 3+} radiometals ({sup 111}In, {sup 86/90}Y, {sup 177}Lu, {sup 67/68}Ga), {sup 64/67}Cu, {sup 18}F or radioisotopes of iodine have been developed. The labelling approaches include direct labelling, the use of bifunctional chelators or prosthetic groups. The choice of the labelling approach is driven by the nature and the chemical properties of the radionuclide. Additionally, chemical strategies, including modification of the amino acid sequence and introduction of linkers/spacers with different characteristics, have been explored for the improvement of the overall performance of the radiopeptides, e.g. metabolic stability and pharmacokinetics. Herein, we discuss the development of peptides as radiopharmaceuticals starting from the choice of the labelling method and the conditions to the design and optimization of the peptide probe, as well as some recent developments, focusing on a selected list of peptide families, including somatostatin

  3. Ancient Biomolecules and Evolutionary Inference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cappellini, Enrico; Prohaska, Ana; Racimo, Fernando

    2018-01-01

    Over the last decade, studies of ancient biomolecules-particularly ancient DNA, proteins, and lipids-have revolutionized our understanding of evolutionary history. Though initially fraught with many challenges, the field now stands on firm foundations. Researchers now successfully retrieve nucleo...

  4. Ancient Biomolecules and Evolutionary Inference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappellini, Enrico; Prohaska, Ana; Racimo, Fernando; Welker, Frido; Pedersen, Mikkel Winther; Allentoft, Morten E; de Barros Damgaard, Peter; Gutenbrunner, Petra; Dunne, Julie; Hammann, Simon; Roffet-Salque, Mélanie; Ilardo, Melissa; Moreno-Mayar, J Víctor; Wang, Yucheng; Sikora, Martin; Vinner, Lasse; Cox, Jürgen; Evershed, Richard P; Willerslev, Eske

    2018-04-25

    Over the last decade, studies of ancient biomolecules-particularly ancient DNA, proteins, and lipids-have revolutionized our understanding of evolutionary history. Though initially fraught with many challenges, the field now stands on firm foundations. Researchers now successfully retrieve nucleotide and amino acid sequences, as well as lipid signatures, from progressively older samples, originating from geographic areas and depositional environments that, until recently, were regarded as hostile to long-term preservation of biomolecules. Sampling frequencies and the spatial and temporal scope of studies have also increased markedly, and with them the size and quality of the data sets generated. This progress has been made possible by continuous technical innovations in analytical methods, enhanced criteria for the selection of ancient samples, integrated experimental methods, and advanced computational approaches. Here, we discuss the history and current state of ancient biomolecule research, its applications to evolutionary inference, and future directions for this young and exciting field. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Biochemistry Volume 87 is June 20, 2018. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  5. Cancer imaging with radiolabeled antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldenberg, D.M.

    1990-01-01

    This book presents a perspective of the use of antibodies to target diagnostic isotopes to tumors. Antibodies with reasonable specificity can be developed against almost any substance. If selective targeting to cancer cells can be achieved, the prospects for a selective therapy are equally intriguing. But the development of cancer detection, or imaging, with radiolabeled antibodies has depended upon advances in a number of different areas, including cancer immunology and immunochemistry for identifying suitable antigen targets and antibodies to these targets, tumor biology for model systems, radiochemistry for he attachment of radionuclides to antibodies, molecular biology for reengineering the antibodies for safer and more effective use in humans, and nuclear medicine for providing the best imaging protocols and instrumentation to detect minute amounts of elevated radioactivity against a background of considerable noise. Accordingly, this book has been organized to address the advances that are being made in many of these areas

  6. Preclinical evaluation of neurotensin(8-13) analog radiolabeled with 99mTc: in vitro and in vivo characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teodoro, Rodrigo

    2010-01-01

    The radiolabeling of receptor specific biomolecules with 99m Tc using bifunctional chelator agents represents a growing field in Nuclear Medicine, specially, regarding regulatory peptides, such as Neurotensin, which are important in several essential physiological functions, particularly in tumor growth. The aim of the study was the comparative radiolabeling evaluation of the double-stabilized NT(8-13) analog with 99m Tc, via the bifunctional chelating agents 6- hydrazinonicotinamide (HYNIC) and S-acetyl-mercaptoacetyltriglycine (MAG3) in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line. High radiochemical yields (> 97%) and stability toward transchelant agents was observed for both radiolabeled analogs. Also, comparable in vitro behaviour regarding the percentage of plasma protein binding (nearby 22%), metabolic stability, receptor binding affinity (nM range), and internalization/externalization rates were obtained. The greater lipophilicity found for the analog radiolabeled via MAG 3 , reflected in the major differences in biodistribution studies. The in vivo metabolic stability studies suggested that the degradation observed in the later time point (90 min) for the conjugate radiolabeled via HYNIC, leads not only to lower tumor uptake accumulation (0,44±0,02% ID/g), but also to lower tumor-to-non-tumor ratios ( 3 had been confirmed in the present study, a structural re-design aiming the reduction of the high gastrointestinal uptake must be done in order to guarantee the potential applicability of MAG 3 -radio complex. (author)

  7. Development of radioactively labelled cancer seeking biomolecules for targeted radiotherapy. Greece

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varvarigou, Alexandra D.; Archimandritis, Spyridon C.

    2000-01-01

    Within the framework of the above project we are studying the labelling of biomolecules, peptides and antibodies, with radionuclides emitting β - and γ radiation. More specifically, for the time being, we have investigated the labelling of peptides with Re-188 and of antibodies with Sm-153 and Re-188. The radiolabelled derivatives are further evaluated in vivo for possible application in Oncology. For these radiobiological studies we are trying to apply ectopic and orthotopic tumour animal models and to develop, in collaboration with other national and foreign institutes, proper imaging devices for small animal imaging

  8. Recent developments in monoclonal antibody radiolabeling techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, S.C.; Mease, R.C.

    1989-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) have shown the potential to serve as selective carriers of radionuclides to specific in vivo antigens. Accordingly, there has been an intense surge of research activity in an effort to develop and evaluate MAb-based radiopharmaceuticals for tumor imaging (radioimmunoscintigraphy) and therapy (radioimmunotherapy), as well as for diagnosing nonmalignant diseases. A number of problems have recently been identified, related to the MAbs themselves and to radiolabeling techniques, that comprise both the selectivity and the specificity of the in vivo distribution of radiolabeled MAbs. This paper will address some of these issues and primarily discuss recent developments in the techniques for radiolabeling monoclonal antibodies that may help resolve problems related to the poor in vivo stability of the radiolabel and may thus produce improved biodistribution. Even though many issues are identical with therapeutic radionuclides, the discussion will focus mainly on radioimmunoscintigraphic labels. 78 refs., 6 tabs.

  9. Recent developments in monoclonal antibody radiolabeling techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, S.C.; Mease, R.C.

    1989-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) have shown the potential to serve as selective carriers of radionuclides to specific in vivo antigens. Accordingly, there has been an intense surge of research activity in an effort to develop and evaluate MAb-based radiopharmaceuticals for tumor imaging (radioimmunoscintigraphy) and therapy (radioimmunotherapy), as well as for diagnosing nonmalignant diseases. A number of problems have recently been identified, related to the MAbs themselves and to radiolabeling techniques, that comprise both the selectivity and the specificity of the in vivo distribution of radiolabeled MAbs. This paper will address some of these issues and primarily discuss recent developments in the techniques for radiolabeling monoclonal antibodies that may help resolve problems related to the poor in vivo stability of the radiolabel and may thus produce improved biodistribution. Even though many issues are identical with therapeutic radionuclides, the discussion will focus mainly on radioimmunoscintigraphic labels. 78 refs., 6 tabs

  10. Localization of tumors by radiolabelled antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, H.J.; Primus, F.J.

    1975-01-01

    A method of utilizing radiolabelled antibodies to carcinoembryonic antigens for determining the site of tumors which produce or are associated with carcinoembryonic antigen is disclosed. 3 claims, no drawings

  11. Radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toledo e Souza, I.T. de; Okada, H.

    1990-05-01

    Since the description by Kohler and Milstein 1975 of their technique for producing monoclonal antibodies of predefined specificity, it has become a mainstay in most laboratories that utilize immunochemical techniques to study problems in basic, applied or clinical research. Paradoxically, the very success of monoclonal antibodies has generated a literature which is now so vast and scattered that it has become difficult to obtain a perspective. This brief review represents the distillation of many publications relating to the production and use of monoclonaal antibodies as radiopharmaceuticals. Significant advances were made possible in the last few years by combined developments in the fields of tumor-associated antigens and of monoclonal antibodies. In fact monoclonal antibodies against some well defined tumor-associated antigens, has led to significantly greater practical possibilities for producing highly specific radiolabeled antibodies as radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis and therapy of human tumors. One of the main requirements of this methodology is the availability of stable radiopharmaceutical reagents which after labeling in vivo injection retain the capacity of specific interaction with the defined antigen and their molecular integrity. Since injection into human is the objetive of this kind of study all the specifications of radiopharmaceutical have to be fulfilled e.g. sterility, apirogenicity and absence of toxicity. (author) [pt

  12. BSDB: the Biomolecule Stretching Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieplak, Marek; Sikora, Mateusz; Sulkowska, Joanna I.; Witkowski, Bartlomiej

    2011-03-01

    Despite more than a decade of experiments on single biomolecule manipulation, mechanical properties of only several scores of proteins have been measured. A characteristic scale of the force of resistance to stretching, Fmax , has been found to range between ~ 10 and 480 pN. The Biomolecule Stretching Data Base (BSDB) described here provides information about expected values of Fmax for, currently, 17 134 proteins. The values and other characteristics of the unfolding proces, including the nature of identified mechanical clamps, are available at www://info.ifpan.edu.pl/BSDB/. They have been obtained through simulations within a structure-based model which correlates satisfactorily with the available experimental data on stretching. BSDB also lists experimental data and results of the existing all-atom simulations. The database offers a Protein-Data-Bank-wide guide to mechano-stability of proteins. Its description is provided by a forthcoming Nucleic Acids Research paper. Supported by EC FUNMOL project FP7-NMP-2007-SMALL-1, and European Regional Development Fund: Innovative Economy (POIG.01.01.02-00-008/08).

  13. Structures of Biomolecules by NMR Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    an edge over the X-ray method as it can be used to study biomolecules ... currently as an Associate. Professor. ... Such a wealth of data is made available to the NMR ... important step towards structural characterization of a biomolecule. Box 1.

  14. Biomolecule-based nanomaterials and nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willner, Itamar; Willner, Bilha

    2010-10-13

    Biomolecule-nanoparticle (or carbon nanotube) hybrid systems provide new materials that combine the unique optical, electronic, or catalytic properties of the nanoelements with the recognition or biocatalytic functions of biomolecules. This article summarizes recent applications of biomolecule-nanoparticle (or carbon nanotubes) hybrid systems for sensing, synthesis of nanostructures, and for the fabrication of nanoscale devices. The use of metallic nanoparticles for the electrical contacting of redox enzymes with electrodes, and as catalytic labels for the development of electrochemical biosensors is discussed. Similarly, biomolecule-quantum dot hybrid systems are implemented for optical biosensing, and for monitoring intracellular metabolic processes. Also, the self-assembly of biomolecule-metal nanoparticle hybrids into nanostructures and functional nanodevices is presented. The future perspectives of the field are addressed by discussing future challenges and highlighting different potential applications.

  15. A review: radiolabeled synthesis of pesticides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Juying; Han Ailiang; Wang Haiyan; Wang Wei; Ye Qingfu

    2010-01-01

    Isotope tracer technique has been widely applied in studies of metabolism, mode action, fate and environmental behavior of pesticides. In such studies, the key point is to obtain suitable radiolabelled compounds. However, the radiotracers, especially the labelled pesticides which are novel compounds with complex structures and longer synthesis routes, are usually unavailable from domestic and /or foreign markets. Therefore, it is essential to explore the synthesis methods of radiolabelled pesticides, which are quite different from the conventional nonradiosynthesis, and are requested to obtain higher yield. This article is a review on current status of choosing the available radionuclide and labelled position, the main synthesis methods and problems in the process of preparing radiolabelled pesticides. (authors)

  16. Quantitative imaging with radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moldofsky, P.J.; Hammond, N.D.

    1988-01-01

    The ability to image tumor by using radiolabeled monoclonal antibody products has been widely demonstrated. The questions of safety and efficacy remain open and require further experience, but at least in some clinical situations radioimmunoimaging has provided clinically useful information. Imaging tumor with radiolabeled monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies has been widely reported, and several summaries have recently appeared. For extensive review of recent clinical imaging the reader is referred to these excellent sources. Having demonstrated the possibility of imaging tumor with radiolabeled antibody, the question now apparent is: will the imaging modality provide information new and different from the already available with established techniques in computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and standard nuclear medicine?

  17. Radiolabelled RGD peptides for imaging and therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaertner, F.C.; Schwaiger, M.; Beer, A.J. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Kessler, H. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Institute for Advanced Study and Center of Integrated Protein Science, Department of Chemistry, Garching (Germany); King Abdulaziz University, Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Wester, H.-J. [Institute for Pharmaceutical Radiochemistry, Garching (Germany)

    2012-02-15

    Imaging of angiogenesis has become increasingly important with the rising use of targeted antiangiogenic therapies like bevacizumab (Avastin). Non-invasive assessment of angiogenic activity is in this respect interesting, e.g. for response assessment of such targeted antiangiogenic therapies. One promising approach of angiogenesis imaging is imaging of specific molecular markers of the angiogenic cascade like the integrin {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3}. For molecular imaging of integrin expression, the use of radiolabelled peptides is still the only approach that has been successfully translated into the clinic. In this review we will summarize the current data on imaging of {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} expression using radiolabelled RGD peptides with a focus on tracers already in clinical use. A perspective will be presented on the future clinical use of radiolabelled RGD peptides including an outlook on potential applications for radionuclide therapy. (orig.)

  18. Biomolecule conjugation strategy using novel water-soluble phosphine-based chelating agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katti, Kattesh V.; Gali, Hariprasad; Volkert, Wynn A.

    2004-08-24

    This invention describes a novel strategy to produce phosphine-functionalized biomolecules (e.g. peptides or proteins) for potential use in the design and development of site-specific radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis or therapy of specific cancers. Hydrophilic alkyl phosphines, in general, tend to be oxidatively unstable. Therefore, incorporation of such phosphine functionalities on peptide (and other biomolecule) backbones, without oxidizing the P.sup.III centers, is difficult. In this context this discovery reports on a new technology by which phosphines, in the form of bifunctional chelating agents, can be directly incorporated on biomolecular backbones using manual synthetic or solid phase peptide synthesis methodologies. The superior ligating abilities of phosphine ligands, with various diagnostically (e.g. TC-99m) or therapeutically (e.g. Re186/188, Rh-105, Au-199) useful radiometals, coupled with the findings that the resulting complexes demonstrate high in vivo stability makes this approach useful in the development of radiolabeled biomolecules for applications in the design of tumor-specific radiopharmaceuticals.

  19. Composition and method for stabilizing radiolabelled compounds using thiocarbonylated diethylenetriamines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tzodikov, N.R.

    1984-01-01

    Radiolabelled compounds, such as amino acids, nucleosides, vitamins and drugs, are stabilised against radiolytic decomposition by adding a solution of a thiocarbonylated diethylenetriamine to a solution of the radiolabelled compound. (author)

  20. Analysis of nanoparticle biomolecule complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnarsson, Stefán B; Bernfur, Katja; Mikkelsen, Anders; Cedervall, Tommy

    2018-03-01

    Nanoparticles exposed to biological fluids adsorb biomolecules on their surface forming a biomolecular corona. This corona determines, on a molecular level, the interactions and impact the newly formed complex has on cells and organisms. The corona formation as well as the physiological and toxicological relevance are commonly investigated. However, an acknowledged but rarely addressed problem in many fields of nanobiotechnology is aggregation and broadened size distribution of nanoparticles following their interactions with the molecules of biological fluids. In blood serum, TiO 2 nanoparticles form complexes with a size distribution from 30 nm to more than 500 nm. In this study we have separated these complexes, with good resolution, using preparative centrifugation in a sucrose gradient. Two main apparent size populations were obtained, a fast sedimenting population of complexes that formed a pellet in the preparative centrifugation tube, and a slow sedimenting complex population still suspended in the gradient after centrifugation. Concentration and surface area dependent differences are found in the biomolecular corona between the slow and fast sedimenting fractions. There are more immunoglobulins, lipid binding proteins, and lipid-rich complexes at higher serum concentrations. Sedimentation rate and the biomolecular corona are important factors for evaluating any experiment including nanoparticle exposure. Our results show that traditional description of nanoparticles in biological fluids is an oversimplification and that more thorough characterisations are needed.

  1. Magnetic GMI sensor for detection of biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiriac, Horia; Tibu, Mihai; Moga, Anca-Eugenia; Herea, Dumitru D.

    2005-01-01

    A magnetic sensor based on the giant magnetoimpedance (GMI) effect for the detection of biomolecules was made with a CoFeSiB amorphous magnetic microwire as sensing element. Using soft ferromagnetic cobalt microparticles and field sensitivities of the impedance of about 2.5%/A m -1 in the very low field region (less than 200 A m -1 ) at frequencies close to 10 MHz, a highly sensitive response was measured, appropriate for the detection of low biomolecule concentrations

  2. Synthesis of 14C-radiolabelled Tilmicosin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crouse, G.D.; Terando, N.H.

    1989-01-01

    Tilmicosin was radiolabelled with carbon-14 on the 3,5-dimethylpiperidinyl sidechain as a requirement for animal metabolism studies. A new radiosynthesis of 3,5-dimethyl-piperidine was developed for this purpose. Incorporation into the desmycosin nucleus was accomplished by a reductive amination reaction. (author)

  3. Biomolecule-coated metal nanoparticles on titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Stephen L; Chatt, Amares; Zhang, Peng

    2012-02-07

    Immobilizations of nanoparticles and biomolecules on biocompatible substrates such as titanium are two promising approaches to bringing new functionalities to Ti-based biomaterials. Herein, we used a variety of X-ray spectroscopic techniques to study and better understand metal-thiolate interactions in biofunctionalized metal nanoparticle systems supported on Ti substrates. Using a facile one-step procedure, a series of Au nanoparticle samples with varied biomolecule coatings ((2-mercatopropionyl)glycine (MPG) and bovine serum albumin (BSA)) and biomolecule concentrations are prepared. Ag and Pd systems are also studied to observe change with varying metal composition. The structure and properties of these biomolecule-coated nanoparticles are investigated with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and element-specific X-ray techniques, including extended X-ray absorption fine structure (Au L(3)-edge), X-ray absorption near-edge structure (Au L(3), Ag L(3), Pd L(3), and S K-edge), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (Au 4f, Ag 3d, Pd 3d, and S 2p core level). It was found that, by comparison of SEM and X-ray spectroscopy results, the coating of metal nanoparticles with varying model biomolecule systems can have a significant effect on both surface coverage and organization. This work offers a facile chemical method for bio- and nanofunctionalization of Ti substrates as well as provides a physical picture of the structure and bonding of biocoated metal nanoparticles, which may lead to useful applications in orthopedics and biomedicine.

  4. Thermodynamic stability of biomolecules and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarty, Ashim K

    2017-08-01

    The thermodynamic stability of biomolecules in the perspective of evolution is a complex issue and needs discussion. Intra molecular bonds maintain the structure and the state of internal energy (E) of a biomolecule at "local minima". In this communication, possibility of loss in internal energy level of a biomolecule through the changes in the bonds has been discussed, that might earn more thermodynamic stability for the molecule. In the process variations in structure and functions of the molecule could occur. Thus, E of a biomolecule is likely to have energy stature for minimization. Such change in energy status is an intrinsic factor for evolving biomolecules buying more stability and generating variations in the structure and function of DNA molecules undergoing natural selection. Thus, the variations might very well contribute towards the process of evolution. A brief discussion on conserved sequence in the light of proposition in this communication has been made at the end. Extension of the idea may resolve certain standing problems in evolution, such as maintenance of conserved sequences in genome of diverse species, pre- versus post adaptive mutations, 'orthogenesis', etc. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Biomolecules for Removal of Heavy Metal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Namita Ashish

    2017-01-01

    Patents reveal that heavy metals are natural constituents of the earth's crust, but some heavy metals like cadmium, lead, mercury, arsenic etc. are injurious to living organisms at higher concentration. Nowadays, anthropogenic activities have altered geochemical cycles and biochemical balance of heavy metals. Biomolecules are used nowadays for removal of heavy metals compared to other synthetic biosorbents due to their environmental friendly nature and cost effectiveness. The goal of this work is to identify the role of biomolecules like polysaccharides, polypeptides, natural compounds containing aromatic acid etc. for heavy metal removal by bio sorption. It has been observed that efficiency of biomolecules can be increased by functionalization e.g. cellulose functionalization with EDTA, chitosan with sulphur groups, alginate with carboxyl/ hydroxyl group etc. It was found that the porous structure of aerogel beads improves both sorption and kinetic properties of the material. Out of polypeptides metallothionein has been widely used for removal of heavy metal up to 88% from seawater after a single centrifugation. These cost effective functionalized biomolecules are significantly used for remediation of heavy metals by immobilizing these biomolecules onto materials. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  6. Detection of inflammatory lesions with radiolabelled immunoglobulins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blok, D.; Rijksuniversiteit Leiden; Ogtrop, M. van; Arndt, J.W.; Camps, J.A.J.; Feitsma, R.I.J.; Pauwels, E.K.J.

    1990-01-01

    Previous reports on the use of radiolabelled immunoglobulins led us to undertake a pilot experiment in an animal model to investigate the potentials sodium pertechnate Tc 99m-immunoglobulin scintigraphy in the detection of infectious foci. Mice infected in one leg with staphylococcus infection in were injected with sodium pertechnote Tc 99m-immunoglobulin, albumin aggregated technetium Tc 99m or gallium citrate Ga 67. The results obtained by scintigraphy suggested a specific accumulation of radiolabelled immunoglobulin at the site of infection. Visualization of the infection and the image quality, especially the 6- and 24-h images, were clearly enhanced after the use of immunoglobulin preparations as compared with those labelled with gallium. (orig.)

  7. Chitosan Microspheres as Radiolabeled Delivery Devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Permtermsin, Chalermsin; Ngamprayad, Tippanan; Phumkhem, Sudkanung; Srinuttrakul, Wannee; Kewsuwan, Prartana

    2007-08-01

    Full text: This study optimized conditions for preparing, characterizing, radiolabeled of chitosan microspheres and the biodistribution of 99mTc-Chitosan microspheres after intravenous administration. Particle size distribution of the microspheres was determined by light scattering. Zeta potential was studied by dynamic light scattering and electrophoresis technique. Biodistribution studies were performed by radiolabeling using 99mTc. The results shown that geometric mean diameter of the microspheres was found to be 77.26?1.96 ?m. Microsphere surface charge of chitosan microspheres was positive charge and zeta potential was 25.80 ? 0.46 mV. The labeling efficiency for this condition was more than 95% and under this condition was stable for at least 6 h. Radioactivity

  8. Radiolabelled blood elements techniques and clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakur, M.L.

    1992-01-01

    Over the past few years, in nuclear medicine, the diagnostic applications of radiolabelled blood elements in general, and of radiolabelled white blood cells in particular, have become increasingly popular. This is primarily due to the introduction of lipid soluble 111 In-oxine as an agent, which not only is an excellent and a reliable tracer for blood cells but also enables the investigators to study the in vivo cell kinetics and map the localization of labelled cells by external gamma scintigraphy. The tracer has the modest half life of 67 hours and decays with the emission of two gamma photons (173 and 247 keV) in high abundance. This technique has provided a powerful tool to study the in vivo cell kinetics in health and localize abnormal lesions in diseases which invoke intense focal cellular concentration

  9. Radiolabelled blood elements techniques and clinical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thakur, M L

    1993-12-31

    Over the past few years, in nuclear medicine, the diagnostic applications of radiolabelled blood elements in general, and of radiolabelled white blood cells in particular, have become increasingly popular. This is primarily due to the introduction of lipid soluble {sup 111}In-oxine as an agent, which not only is an excellent and a reliable tracer for blood cells but also enables the investigators to study the in vivo cell kinetics and map the localization of labelled cells by external gamma scintigraphy. The tracer has the modest half life of 67 hours and decays with the emission of two gamma photons (173 and 247 keV) in high abundance. This technique has provided a powerful tool to study the in vivo cell kinetics in health and localize abnormal lesions in diseases which invoke intense focal cellular concentration 5 figs, 2 tabs

  10. Monitoring radiolabelled antacid preparations in the stomach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    May, H.A.; Wilson, C.G.; Hardy, J.G.

    1984-01-01

    Radiolabelled antacid preparations have been monitored in the stomach using gamma scintigraphy. The stomach contents were labelled with technetium-99m and two antacid preparations with indium-113m. It has been shown that the antacid containing aluminium hydroxide and magnesium oxide mixed and emptied with the other stomach contents. An alginate containing preparation tended to float on the food and emptied only slowly from the stomach. (Auth.)

  11. Preparation of radiolabeled bioactive asbestos fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tewson, T J; Francsechini, M P; Scheule, R K; Holian, A [Texas Univ., Houston, TX (USA). Health Science Center

    1991-01-01

    We have developed an efficient procedure to radiolabel asbestos fibers while retaining the bioactivity of the fibers. The fibers are labeled with {sup 68}Ge. The {sup 68}Ge decays into {sup 68}Ga, which then can be detected by its characteristic positron emission. Both chrysotile and crocidolite asbestos, a serpentine and an amphibole, respectively, were radiolabeled successfully. Mild reaction conditions and short reaction times were found under which {similar to}90% of the added {sup 68}Ge and {sup 68}Ga bound to the fibers. The radiolabel was retained even after washing the fibers extensively with physiologic buffers. The effects of the labeling on the bioactivity of the fibers were evaluated in an in vitro assay using guinea pig alveolar macrophages as a target cell. Labeled chrysotile fibers were found to retain >95% of their ability to stimulate these cells. The labeling procedure described in this study should be useful in preparing labeled fibers to investigate both in vitro and in vivo phenomena. (author).

  12. On the thermodynamics of biomolecule surface transformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federici, Stefania; Oliviero, Giulio; Maiolo, Daniele; Depero, Laura E; Colombo, Italo; Bergese, Paolo

    2012-06-01

    Biological surface science is receiving great and renewed attention owing the rising interest in applications of nanoscience and nanotechnology to biological systems, with horizons that range from nanomedicine and biomimetic photosynthesis to the unexpected effects of nanomaterials on health and environment. Biomolecule surface transformations are among the fundamental aspects of the field that remain elusive so far and urgently need to be understood to further the field. Our recent findings indicate that surface thermodynamics can give a substantial contribution toward this challenging goal. In the first part of the article, we show that biomolecule surface transformations can be framed by a general and simple thermodynamic model. Then, we explore its effectiveness by addressing some typical cases, including ligand-receptor surface binding, protein thin film machines, nanomechanical aspects of the biomolecule-nanoparticle interface and nanomechanical biosensors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Polyvalent Display of Biomolecules on Live Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Peng; Zhao, Nan; Lai, Jinping; Coyne, James; Gaddes, Erin R; Wang, Yong

    2018-06-04

    Surface display of biomolecules on live cells offers new opportunities to treat human diseases and perform basic studies. Existing methods are primarily focused on monovalent functionalization, that is, the display of single biomolecules across the cell surface. Here we show that the surface of live cells can be functionalized to display polyvalent biomolecular structures through two-step reactions under physiological conditions. This polyvalent functionalization enables the cell surface to recognize the microenvironment one order of magnitude more effectively than with monovalent functionalization. Thus, polyvalent display of biomolecules on live cells holds great potential for various biological and biomedical applications. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Heat-induced-radiolabeling and click chemistry: A powerful combination for generating multifunctional nanomaterials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hushan Yuan

    Full Text Available A key advantage of nanomaterials for biomedical applications is their ability to feature multiple small reporter groups (multimodality, or combinations of reporter groups and therapeutic agents (multifunctionality, while being targeted to cell surface receptors. Here a facile combination of techniques for the syntheses of multimodal, targeted nanoparticles (NPs is presented, whereby heat-induced-radiolabeling (HIR labels NPs with radiometals and so-called click chemistry is used to attach bioactive groups to the NP surface. Click-reactive alkyne or azide groups were first attached to the nonradioactive clinical Feraheme (FH NPs. Resulting "Alkyne-FH" and "Azide-FH" intermediates, like the parent NP, tolerated 89Zr labeling by the HIR method previously described. Subsequently, biomolecules were quickly conjugated to the radioactive NPs by either copper-catalyzed or copper-free click reactions with high efficiency. Synthesis of the Alkyne-FH or Azide-FH intermediates, followed by HIR and then by click reactions for biomolecule attachment, provides a simple and potentially general path for the synthesis of multimodal, multifunctional, and targeted NPs for biomedical applications.

  15. Evolved Minimal Frustration in Multifunctional Biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röder, Konstantin; Wales, David J

    2018-05-25

    Protein folding is often viewed in terms of a funnelled potential or free energy landscape. A variety of experiments now indicate the existence of multifunnel landscapes, associated with multifunctional biomolecules. Here, we present evidence that these systems have evolved to exhibit the minimal number of funnels required to fulfil their cellular functions, suggesting an extension to the principle of minimum frustration. We find that minimal disruptive mutations result in additional funnels, and the associated structural ensembles become more diverse. The same trends are observed in an atomic cluster. These observations suggest guidelines for rational design of engineered multifunctional biomolecules.

  16. Microorganisms and biomolecules in space hard environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horneck, G.

    1981-01-01

    Microorganisms and biomolecules exposed to space vacuum and to different intensities of selected wavelengths of solar ultraviolet radiation is studied. The influence of these factors, applied singly or simultaneously, on the integrity of microbial systems and biomolecules is measured. Specifically, this experiment will study in Bacillus subtilis spores (1) disturbances in subsequent germination, outgrowth, and colony formation; (2) photochemical reactions of the DNA and protein in vivo and in vitro and their role in biological injury; and (3) the efficiency of repair processes in these events.

  17. Nanofluidic technology for biomolecule applications: a critical review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Napoli, M.; Eijkel, Jan C.T.; Pennathur, S.

    2010-01-01

    In this review, we present nanofluidic phenomena, particularly as they relate to applications involving analysis of biomolecules within nanofabricated devices. The relevant length scales and physical phenomena that govern biomolecule transport and manipulation within nanofabricated nanofluidic

  18. A Multidisciplinary, Open Access Platform for Research on Biomolecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürg Bähler

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available I am pleased to introduce Biomolecules, a new journal to report on all aspects of science that focuses on biologically derived substances, from small molecules to complex polymers. Some examples are lipids, carbohydrates, vitamins, hormones, amino acids, nucleotides, peptides, RNA and polysaccharides, but this list is far from exhaustive. Research on biomolecules encompasses multiple fascinating questions. How are biomolecules synthesized and modified? What are their structures and interactions with other biomolecules? How do biomolecules function in biological processes, at the level of organelles, cells, organs, organisms, or even ecosystems? How do biomolecules affect either the organism that produces them or other organisms of the same or different species? How are biomolecules shaped by evolution, and how in turn do they affect cellular phenotypes? What is the systems-level contribution of biomolecules to biological function?

  19. A Multidisciplinary, Open Access Platform for Research on Biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bähler, Jürg

    2011-08-22

    I am pleased to introduce Biomolecules, a new journal to report on all aspects of science that focuses on biologically derived substances, from small molecules to complex polymers. Some examples are lipids, carbohydrates, vitamins, hormones, amino acids, nucleotides, peptides, RNA and polysaccharides, but this list is far from exhaustive. Research on biomolecules encompasses multiple fascinating questions. How are biomolecules synthesized and modified? What are their structures and interactions with other biomolecules? How do biomolecules function in biological processes, at the level of organelles, cells, organs, organisms, or even ecosystems? How do biomolecules affect either the organism that produces them or other organisms of the same or different species? How are biomolecules shaped by evolution, and how in turn do they affect cellular phenotypes? What is the systems-level contribution of biomolecules to biological function? [...].

  20. Immobilizing Biomolecules Near the Diffraction Limit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovsen, Esben; Petersen, Maria Teresa Neves; Gennaro, Ane Kold Di

    2009-01-01

    Our group has previously shown that biomolecules containing disulfide bridges in close proximity to aromatic residues can be immobilized, through covalent bonds, onto thiol derivatized surfaces upon UV excitation of the aromatic residue(s). We have also previously shown that our new technology ca...

  1. Tuneable graphene nanopores for single biomolecule detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Dirini, Feras; Mohammed, Mahmood A; Hossain, Md Sharafat; Hossain, Faruque M; Nirmalathas, Ampalavanapillai; Skafidas, Efstratios

    2016-05-21

    Solid-state nanopores are promising candidates for next generation DNA and protein sequencing. However, once fabricated, such devices lack tuneability, which greatly restricts their biosensing capabilities. Here we propose a new class of solid-state graphene-based nanopore devices that exhibit a unique capability of self-tuneability, which is used to control their conductance, tuning it to levels comparable to the changes caused by the translocation of a single biomolecule, and hence, enabling high detection sensitivities. Our presented quantum simulation results suggest that the smallest amino acid, glycine, when present in water and in an aqueous saline solution can be detected with high sensitivity, up to a 90% change in conductance. Our results also suggest that passivating the device with nitrogen, making it an n-type device, greatly enhances its sensitivity, and makes it highly sensitive to not only the translocation of a single biomolecule, but more interestingly to intramolecular electrostatics within the biomolecule. Sensitive detection of the carboxyl group within the glycine molecule, which carries a charge equivalent to a single electron, is achieved with a conductance change that reaches as high as 99% when present in an aqueous saline solution. The presented findings suggest that tuneable graphene nanopores, with their capability of probing intramolecular electrostatics, could pave the way towards a new generation of single biomolecule detection devices.

  2. Biomolecule-Responsive Hydrogels in Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifzadeh, Ghorbanali; Hosseinkhani, Hossein

    2017-12-01

    Recent advances and applications of biomolecule-responsive hydrogels, namely, glucose-responsive hydrogels, protein-responsive hydrogels, and nucleic-acid-responsive hydrogels are highlighted. However, achieving the ultimate purpose of using biomolecule-responsive hydrogels in preclinical and clinical areas is still at the very early stage and calls for more novel designing concepts and advance ideas. On the way toward the real/clinical application of biomolecule-responsive hydrogels, plenty of factors should be extensively studied and examined under both in vitro and in vivo conditions. For example, biocompatibility, biointegration, and toxicity of biomolecule-responsive hydrogels should be carefully evaluated. From the living body's point of view, biocompatibility is seriously depended on the interactions at the tissue/polymer interface. These interactions are influenced by physical nature, chemical structure, surface properties, and degradation of the materials. In addition, the developments of advanced hydrogels with tunable biological and mechanical properties which cause no/low side effects are of great importance. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Microfluidic labeling of biomolecules with radiometals for use in nuclear medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Tobias D; Zeng, Dexing; Desai, Amit V; Önal, Birce; Reichert, David E; Kenis, Paul J A

    2010-12-21

    Radiometal-based radiopharmaceuticals, used as imaging and therapeutic agents in nuclear medicine, consist of a radiometal that is bound to a targeting biomolecule (BM) using a bifunctional chelator (BFC). Conventional, macroscale radiolabeling methods use an excess of the BFC-BM conjugate (ligand) to achieve high radiolabeling yields. Subsequently, to achieve maximal specific activity (minimal amount of unlabeled ligand), extensive chromatographic purification is required to remove unlabeled ligand, often resulting in longer synthesis times and loss of imaging sensitivity due to radioactive decay. Here we describe a microreactor that overcomes the above issues through integration of efficient mixing and heating strategies while working with small volumes of concentrated reagents. As a model reaction, we radiolabel 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) conjugated to the peptide cyclo(Arg-Gly-Asp-DPhe-Lys) with (64)Cu(2+). We show that the microreactor (made from polydimethylsiloxane and glass) can withstand 260 mCi of activity over 720 hours and retains only minimal amounts of (64)Cu(2+) (50 µM), yields of over 90% can be achieved in the microreactor when using a 1:1 stoichiometry of radiometal to BFC-BM. These high yields eliminate the need for use of excess amounts of often precious BM and obviate the need for a chromatographic purification process to remove unlabeled ligand. The results reported here demonstrate the potential of microreactor technology to improve the production of patient-tailored doses of radiometal-based radiopharmaceuticals in the clinic.

  4. Radiolabelled peptides: New radiopharmaceuticals for targeted therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chinol, M.

    2001-01-01

    Radiolabelled peptides have been the focus of an increasing interest by the nuclear medicine community within the last few years. This has mainly been due to successful development of one of these peptides, somatostatin, as a tool to visualise various pathologic conditions known to express a high number of somatostatin receptors. Somatostatin receptors have been identified in different tumours such as neuroendocrine tumours, tumours of the central nervous system, breast, lung and lymphatic tissue. These observations served as the biomolecular basis for the clinical use of radiolabelled somatostatin analogs, which are at present of great interest for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. A promising somatostatin analogue, DOTA-D-Phe 1 -Ty 3 -octreotide, named DOTATOC, has shown favourable biodistribution and high affinity binding to SSTR2 and SSTR5, high hydrophilicity and ease of labelling and stability with 111 In and 90 Y. A clinical trial aimed at evaluating the biodistribution and dosimetry of DOTATOC radiolabelled with 111 In, in anticipation of therapy trials with 90 Y-DOTATOC in patients was undertaken. 111 In-DOTATOC showed favourable pharmacokinetics (fast blood clearance and urinary excretion) and biodistribution, and high affinity to tumours expressing somatostatin receptors (thus, a high residence time in tumour). These results are promising for therapy trials with 90 Y-DOTAOC, for which radiation dosimetry appears acceptable for normal organs (including the red marrow). Moreover, labelling conditions of DOTATOC with 90 Y has been optimised in order to achieve labelling yields of more than 98% and specific activities of greater than 60 GBq (1.6 Ci)/μmol. (author)

  5. Radiolabeling Of Albumin Particles With Yttrium-90

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Thi Thu; Nguyen Thi Khanh Giang; Bui Van Cuong, Vo Thi Cam Hoa

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the process of the radiolabeling of microaggregated albumin particles with radionuclide Yttrium-90 using the directed method. The albumin microsphere kit was prepared in sodium phosphate buffer. The original solution includes 2 mg albumin particle and 0.5 mg stannous chloride dihydrate. The albumin particles size was ranged from 5 ?m to 30 ?m. The mixture was washed three times with phosphate buffer saline, pH 7.2 by centrifugation and suspended in 0.5 M sodium acetate buffer, pH 6. Yttrium - 90 in 1.0 M acetic acid was collected from 90 Sr/ 90 Y generator. The labeling of the particles with Y-90 (185 MBq) was performed at pH 5.5 in acetate buffer with agitating for 60 min at room temperature. The labeled albumin suspensions were centrifuged at 3000 rpm for 15 min. Labeling yields was calculated using centrifugation, filtration and compared with paper chromatography, which is developed in the Tris Acetic EDTA. In this system, the unbound of Y-90 migrates to an R f of 0.9-1.0 and the radiolabeled albumin particles remains at the point of origin (R f = 0). The size of 90 Y-albumin particles was compared with the albumin particles in the original solution to be sure that they did not change during the labeling treatment. The radiolabeling yields were more than 80%. The labeled compound was dialysis in phosphate buffer. The radiochemical purity was 98%. The 90 Y- albumin is an ideal radiopharmaceutical for potential use in malignant cancer treatment as brachytherapy. (author)

  6. Breast cancer imaging using radiolabelled somatostatin analogues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalm, Simone U.; Melis, Marleen; Emmering, Jasper; Kwekkeboom, Dik J.; Jong, Marion de

    2016-01-01

    Imaging and therapy using radiolabelled somatostatin analogues are methods successfully used in patients with somatostatin receptor (SSTR)-expressing neuroendocrine tumours. Since these techniques were first introduced, many improvements have been made. SSTR expression has also been reported on breast cancer (BC). Currently mammography, magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound are the most frequent methods used for BC imaging. Since SSTR expression on BC was demonstrated, clinical studies examining the feasibility of visualizing primary BC using SSTR radioligands have been performed. However, to date SSTR-mediated nuclear imaging is not used clinically in BC patients. The aim of this review is to assess whether recent improvements made within nuclear medicine may enable SSTR-mediated imaging to play a role in BC management. For this we critically analysed results of past studies and discussed the potential of the improvements made within nuclear medicine on SSTR-mediated nuclear imaging of BC. Seven databases were searched for publications on BC imaging with SSTR radioligands. The papers found were analysed by 3 individual observers to identify whether the studies met the pre-set inclusion criteria defined as studies in which nuclear imaging using radiolabelled SST analogues was performed in patients with breast lesions. Twenty-four papers were selected for this review including studies on SSTR-mediated nuclear imaging in BC, neuroendocrine BC and other breast lesions. The analysed studies were heterogeneous with respect to the imaging method, imaging protocol, patient groups and the radiolabelled SST analogues used. Despite the fact that the analysed studies were heterogeneous, sensitivity for primary BC ranged from 36–100%. In a subset of the studies LN lesions were visualized, but sensitivity was lower compared to that for primary tumours. A part of the studies included benign lesions and specificity ranged from 22–100%. Furthermore, false negatives and

  7. Porous-wall hollow glass microspheres as carriers for biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuyi; Dynan, William S; Wicks, George; Serkiz, Steven

    2013-09-17

    The present invention includes compositions of porous-wall hollow glass microspheres and one or more biomolecules, wherein the one or more biomolecules are positioned within a void location within the hollow glass microsphere, and the use of such compositions for the diagnostic and/or therapeutic delivery of biomolecules.

  8. Tumor detection using radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moldofsky, P.J.; Powe, J.; Hammond, N.D.

    1987-01-01

    Radioisotope conjugated to monoclonal antibody products has been used for imaging tumors targeted by the antibody. As imaging progresses, new sets of procedural and technical questions arise. In this chapter, we discuss several current problems in imaging tumor with radiolabeled monoclonal antibody. These include (1) methods for selection of specific antibody and, once the particular antibody is selected, which fragment form is to be used; (2) imaging procedures: what are the optimum imaging parameters, such as optimum time for imaging after administration of tracer and considerations regarding background subtraction; and (3) noninvasive quantitative techniques: quantitation of localization of antibody indirectly from quantitative information in the images.100 references

  9. Embolus radiolabelling in a new canine model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaufman, H.H.; Huchton, J.D.; Woo, J.; Cannon, D.C.; Anderson, J.H.

    1980-01-01

    Embolus radiolabelling with 131 I fibrinogen was studied in a canine model of internal carotid artery embolization. The dog was chosen as the experimental animal because of its maxillocarotid artery which permits collateral flow round the occlusion and helps to prevent strokes. Clot was prepared by incubating blood at room temperature to inactivate plasminogen activators and then refrigerating it to promote clot retraction. Emboli persisting 48 hours were seen in 80% of animals. Major strokes were not seen when 0.25 to 0.30 cm 3 were used. Autoradiography and well counting revealed uptake of isotope. The test, when refined, should provide a tool for the investigation of thromboemboli. (author)

  10. la perspectiva psicosocial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Guerrero

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Con la opción de analizar las condiciones de trabajo en oficina, el texto realiza una sucinta pero precisa revisión de la conceptualización sobre productividad y consumo. Se documenta la relación contradictoria entre bienestar y rendimiento en el trabajo al identificar el riesgo de llevar al límite de sus capacidades la participación del trabajador como factor de productividad, ignorando que éste tiene además el rol de consumidor activo de bienes y servicios para que la producción tenga sentido. Se plantea que exigir al trabajador hasta su agotamiento puede mermar sustancialmente su doble condición de productor y consumidor. Específicamente, se presenta la perspectiva del trabajo en o"cinas innovadas conceptual y tecnológicamente, con procesos laborales y patrones de desgaste y morbilidad definidos. El tiempo, el ritmo, la parcelación, el control del trabajo y la reestructuración en las organizaciones son, entre otros, factores que convergen para potenciar fenómenos de sobrecarga o subcarga mental con la consecuente aparición de estrés excedente y sus patologías asociadas.

  11. Study on the preparation and stability of 188Re biomolecules via EHDP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferro-Flores, G.; Garcia-Salinas, L.; Paredes-Gutierrez, L.; Hashimoto, K.; Melendez-Alafort, L.; Murphy, C.A.

    2001-01-01

    A direct labelling technique via ethane-1-hydroxy-1,1-diphosphonic acid (EHDP) as a weak competing ligand was developed for the preparation of several biomolecules: 188 Re-monoclonal antibody ior cea1 against carcinoembryonic antigen ( 188 Re-MoAb), biotinylated 188 Re-MoAb ( 188 Re-MoAb-biotin), 188 Re-polyclonal IgG ( 188 Re-IgG), 188 Re-peptide (somatostatine analogue peptide b-(2-naphtyl)-D-Ala-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Lys-Val-Cys-Thr-amide), 188 Re-MoAb fragments ( 188 Re-F(ab') 2 ) and biotinylated 188 Re-F(ab') 2 ( 188 Re-F(ab') 2 -biotin). The reaction conditions such as pH, temperature, weak ligand concentration and stannous chloride concentration were optimized during the radiolabelling of each biomolecule. Before the labelling procedure, disulphide bridge groups of the biomolecules were reduced with 2-mercaptoethanol (2-ME). To obtain 188 Re labelled antibodies and peptides in high radiochemical yields (>90%) via EHDP, it was necessary to use acidic conditions and a high concentration of stannous chloride to allow the redox reaction Re +7 →Re +5 :Re +4 . The labelling of MoAb and F(ab') 2 with 188 Re via EHDP was also evaluated employing a pretargeted technique by avidin-biotin strategy in normal mice, demonstrating that the 188 Re-labelled biotinylated antibodies are stable complexes in vivo. The 188 Re-peptide complex prepared by this method, was stable for 24 h and no radiolytic degradation was observed. (author)

  12. Blood cells radiolabelling achievements, challanges, and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weininger, Jolie; Trumper, Jacob

    1987-01-01

    A study in performed about the different ways of blood cells radiolabelling. The labelling of red blood cells (RBCs), compared with that of other blood cells, is facilitated by several factors such as a) RBCs are the most abundant of all cellular blood elements, b) they are relatively easy to separate and manipulate in vitro, c) in vitro they are less dependent on energy and nutricional requirements, d) they are easy to label due to the presence of a variety of cellular transport mechanism. 99m Tc was reconized and became as the ideal radioisotope for nuclear medicine imaging. After considerations about RBCs radiolabelling, it is presented a new in vitro technique based on the BNL kit, developed by Srivastava and co-workers. The Sorep optimized one-vial labelling method for 2 ml whole blood. In vivo and in vivo/in vitro labelling are presented too, the last method seems to combine the superior binding efficiency of in vitro labelling with the convenience of in vitro labelling. Lipophilic chelates of 111 In with oxine, acetylacetone, tropolone and mercaptopyridine N-oxide have been used successfully for labelling platelets and leukocytes. A very promising aproach is the labelling of cells with monoclonal antibodies and the developing optimized methods for in vitro labelling with various radionuclides such as 123 I, 125 I, 131 I, 111 I and 99m Tc. The advantages of the antibody technique over conventional cell labelling are shown. (M.E.L.) [es

  13. Biomolecule delivery to engineer the cellular microenvironment for regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Corey J; Kim, Jayoung; Green, Jordan J

    2014-07-01

    To realize the potential of regenerative medicine, controlling the delivery of biomolecules in the cellular microenvironment is important as these factors control cell fate. Controlled delivery for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine often requires bioengineered materials and cells capable of spatiotemporal modulation of biomolecule release and presentation. This review discusses biomolecule delivery from the outside of the cell inwards through the delivery of soluble and insoluble biomolecules as well as from the inside of the cell outwards through gene transfer. Ex vivo and in vivo therapeutic strategies are discussed, as well as combination delivery of biomolecules, scaffolds, and cells. Various applications in regenerative medicine are highlighted including bone tissue engineering and wound healing.

  14. Radiolabeled amino acids : Basic aspects and clinical applications in oncology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager, PL; Vaalburg, W; Pruim, J; de Vries, EGE; Langen, KJ; Piers, DA

    As the applications of metabolic imaging are expanding, radiolabeled amino acids may gain increased clinical interest, This review first describes the basic aspects of amino acid metabolism, then continues with basic aspects of radiolabeled amino acids, and finally describes clinical applications,

  15. Monitoring the synthesis of biomolecules using mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyagi, Masaru; Kasumov, Takhar

    2016-10-28

    The controlled and selective synthesis/clearance of biomolecules is critical for most cellular processes. In most high-throughput 'omics' studies, we measure the static quantities of only one class of biomolecules (e.g. DNA, mRNA, proteins or metabolites). It is, however, important to recognize that biological systems are highly dynamic in which biomolecules are continuously renewed and different classes of biomolecules interact and affect each other's production/clearance. Therefore, it is necessary to measure the turnover of diverse classes of biomolecules to understand the dynamic nature of biological systems. Herein, we explain why the kinetic analysis of a diverse range of biomolecules is important and how such an analysis can be done. We argue that heavy water ((2)H2O) could be a universal tracer for monitoring the synthesis of biomolecules on a global scale.This article is part of the themed issue 'Quantitative mass spectrometry'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  16. Natural Antioxidants: Fascinating or Mythical Biomolecules?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Van Staden

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Research on the use, properties, characteristics and sources of antioxidants especially phenolic compounds, flavonoids, vitamins, synthetic chemicals and some micronutrients began in the late 18th century. Since then antioxidant research has received considerable attention and over a hundred thousand papers have been published on the subject. This has led to a rampant use of antioxidants in order to try to obtain and preserve optimal health. A number of nutraceuticals and food supplements are frequently fortified with synthetic or natural antioxidants. However, some research outcomes have led to the belief that antioxidants exist as mythical biomolecules. This review provides a critical evaluation of some common in vitro antioxidant capacity methods, and a discussion on the role and controversies surrounding non-enzymatic biomolecules, in particular phenolic compounds and non-phenolic compounds, in oxidative processes in an attempt of stemming the tidal wave that is threatening to swamp the concept of natural antioxidants.

  17. Development of radiolabeling procedures of bioconjugates with 153Sm and 186-188Re: In-vitro and in-vivo studies. Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez de Castiglia, Silvia

    2000-01-01

    Mercaptoacetyltriglycine (MAG3) is a compound that has been extensively used in nuclear medicine as a prosthetic group, following carbodiimide activation, for labeling antibodies with 99m Tc and also 188 Re. MAG3 and related derivatives are attractive ligands for coupling to biomolecules in that they provide very stable complexes. In the preconjugate approach radiolabeled MAG3 is chemically activated to obtain Re188-MAG3-activated ester and then this ester is coupled to amines. 188 Re has several potential advantages over other therapeutic radionuclides including the fact that carrier-free 188 Re(T1/2=17 h) can be obtained cost-effectively and on demand from an ''in house'' 188 W/ 189 Re generator. 189 Re decays by emission of a relatively high energy beta particle(Emax=2,11 Mev) which is suitable for radiotherapy followed by emission of 155KeV gamma photons in 10% abundance. The average penetration of the beta particle is 3.3 mm (maximum 10.8 mm), which provides a highly localised region of high energy deposition with little or no damage to adjacent organs. The gamma photon can be used to monitor biodistribution and estimate dosimetry with standard scintigraphic equipment. The aim of this project is to label biomolecules with 188 Re using an active ester of the MAG3. The labeled chelating agent was conjugated with a biotin derivative and with the Polyclonal Immunoglobulin IgG (Sandoz). During this multistep procedure an active ester of tetrafluorophenol and MAG3 carrying the radioisotope is prepared, which is subsequently conjugated to amino groups of the biomolecule. Of the commercially available biotin derivatives we used biocytin which contains a free amino group for conjugation to MAG3 via the MAG3TFP ester. Another derivative DTPA-biocytinamide (DB2) was also labeled with 188 Re. Quality assurance tests were performed on the final preparation of the radiolabeled biomolecules

  18. Development of radiolabeling procedures of bioconjugates with 135Sm and 186-188 Re: In-vitro and in-vivo studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez de Castiglia, S.

    2000-01-01

    Mercaptoacetyltriglycine (MAG3) is a compound that has been extensively used in nuclear medicine as a prosthetic group, following carbodiimide activation, for labeling antibodies with 99m Tc and also 188 Re. MAG3 and related derivatives are attractive ligands for coupling to biomolecules in that they provide very stable complexes. The aim of this project is to label biomolecules with 188 Re using an active ester of the MAG3. The labeled chelating agent was conjugated with a biotin derivative and with the Polyclonal Immunoglobulin IgG (Sandoz). During this multistep procedure an active ester of tetrafluorophenol and MAG3 carrying the radioisotope is prepared, which is subsequently conjugated to amino groups of the biomolecule. Of the commercially available biotin derivatives we used biocytin which contains a free amino group for conjugation to MAG3 via the MAG3TFP ester. Another derivative DTPA-biocytinamide (DB2) was also labeled with 188 Re. Quality assurance tests were performed on the final preparation of the radiolabeled biomolecules

  19. Possible therapeutic use of radiolabeled cisplatin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leal, Alexandre S.; Bernardes, Felipe D.; Gonçalves, Natalia A.Z., E-mail: asleal@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The cisplatin, cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (II), (NH{sub 3}){sub 2}PtCl{sub 2} or (CDDP) is a very common chemotherapeutical agent used in the treatment of ovary, lungs, testicle, head and neck carcinoma. It has been used for treatment of numerous human cancers including bladder, head and neck, lung, ovarian, and testicular cancers. However, because of the drug resistance and numerous undesirable side effects, a lot of work involving new formulations or administration of the CDDP has been done. In this work, we present a preliminary discussion about the possibilities of using the radiolabeled CDDP or CDDP⁎, as new alternative therapy. The works based on previous very positive in-vitro results of using the CDDP⁎ compared to CDDP in the cytotoxic effect of some kind of tumor cells. The preparation and characterization of the CDDP⁎ as well as the dose of CDDP⁎ required are presented and discussed. (author)

  20. Possible therapeutic use of radiolabeled cisplatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leal, Alexandre S.; Bernardes, Felipe D.; Gonçalves, Natalia A.Z.

    2017-01-01

    The cisplatin, cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (II), (NH 3 ) 2 PtCl 2 or (CDDP) is a very common chemotherapeutical agent used in the treatment of ovary, lungs, testicle, head and neck carcinoma. It has been used for treatment of numerous human cancers including bladder, head and neck, lung, ovarian, and testicular cancers. However, because of the drug resistance and numerous undesirable side effects, a lot of work involving new formulations or administration of the CDDP has been done. In this work, we present a preliminary discussion about the possibilities of using the radiolabeled CDDP or CDDP⁎, as new alternative therapy. The works based on previous very positive in-vitro results of using the CDDP⁎ compared to CDDP in the cytotoxic effect of some kind of tumor cells. The preparation and characterization of the CDDP⁎ as well as the dose of CDDP⁎ required are presented and discussed. (author)

  1. Autodecomposition of radiolabeled human growth hormone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumann, G.; Amburn, K.

    1986-01-01

    Human growth hormone (hGH) was radiolabeled with 125 I, using a gentle lactoperoxidase technique. The stability and decomposition products of this tracer were studied by frequent periodic analysis by Sephadex G-100 chromatography on a long column. Monomeric 125 I-hGH showed an exponential decline, with a half-life of 61 days. The main radioactive degradation product was iodide, which appeared with a fractional appearance rate of 0.01136 per day. Secondary degradation products were a series of radioactive oligomers of hGH, which appeared with an overall fractional rate of 0.00525 per day. The kinetic data obtained should provide guidelines for the shelf-life and repurification schedule of radioiodinated polypeptides

  2. Preparation and biodistribution of radiolabeled fullerene C60 nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolic, Nadezda; Vranjes-Duric, Sanja; Jankovic, Drina; Dokic, Divna; Mirkovic, Marija; Bibic, Natasa; Trajkovic, Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    The present study describes for the first time a procedure for the radiolabeling of fullerene (C 60 ) nanocrystals (nanoC 60 ) with Na 125 I, as well as the biodistribution of radiolabeled nanoC 60 ( 125 I-nanoC 60 ). The solvent exchange method with tetrahydrofuran was used to make colloidal water suspensions of radiolabeled nanoC 60 particles. The radiolabeling procedure with the addition of Na 125 I to tetrahydrofuran during dissolution of C 60 gave a higher radiochemical yield of radiolabeled nanoC 60 particles in comparison to the second option, in which Na 125 I was added after C 60 was dissolved. Using photon correlation spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy, 125 I-nanoC 60 particles were found to have a crystalline structure and a mean diameter of 200-250 nm. The 125 I-nanoC 60 had a particularly high affinity for human serum albumin, displaying 95% binding efficiency after 1 h. Biodistribution studies of 125 I-nanoC 60 in rats indicated significant differences in tissue accumulation of 125 I-nanoC 60 and the radioactive tracer Na 125 I. The higher accumulation of radiolabeled nanoC 60 was observed in liver and spleen, while accumulation in thyroid, stomach, lungs and intestines was significantly lower in comparison to Na 125 I. In addition to being useful for testing the biological distribution of nanoC 60 , the described radiolabeling procedure might have possible applications in cancer radiotherapy.

  3. Targeting of human glioma xenografts in vivo utilizing radiolabeled antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, J.A.; Wessels, B.W.; Wharam, M.D.; Order, S.E.; Wanek, P.M.; Poggenburg, J.K.; Klein, J.L.

    1990-01-01

    Radiolabeled antibodies provide a potential basis for selective radiotherapy of human gliomas. We have measured tumor targeting by radiolabeled monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies directed against neuroectodermal and tumor-associated antigens in nude mice bearing human glioma xenografts. Monoclonal P96.5, a mouse IgG2a immunoglobulin, defines an epitope of a human melanoma cell surface protein, and specifically binds the U-251 human glioma as measured by immunoperoxidase histochemistry. 111In-radiolabeled P96.5 specifically targets the U-251 human glioma xenograft and yields 87.0 microCuries (microCi) of tumor activity per gram per 100 microCi injected activity compared to 4.5 microCi following administration of radiolabeled irrelevant monoclonal antibody. Calculations of targeting ratios demonstrate deposited dose to be 11.6 times greater with radiolabeled P96.5 administration compared to irrelevant monoclonal antibody. The proportion of tumor dose found in normal organs is less than 10%, further supporting specific targeting of the human glioma xenograft by this antibody. Monoclonal antibody ZME018, which defines a second melanoma-associated antigen, and polyclonal rabbit antiferritin, which defines a tumor-associated antigen, demonstrate positive immunoperoxidase staining of the tumor, but comparatively decreased targeting. When compared to the 111In-radiolabeled antibody, 90Y-radiolabeled P96.5 demonstrates comparable tumor targeting and percentages of tumor dose found in normal organs. To test the therapeutic potential of 90Y-radiolabeled P96.5, tumors and normal sites were implanted with miniature thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). Seven days following administration of 100 microCi 90Y-radiolabeled P96.5, average absorbed doses of 3770, 980, 353, and 274 cGy were observed in tumor, liver, contralateral control site, and total body, respectively

  4. Recolecta: estado actual y perspectivas

    OpenAIRE

    López Medina, Alicia

    2010-01-01

    Estado actual del Recolector de ciencia abierta español: Recolecta y proyectos de futuro. López Medina, A. (2010). Recolecta: estado actual y perspectivas. X Workshop Rebiun sobre proyectos digitales. http://hdl.handle.net/10251/8710.

  5. System for exposing animals to radiolabeled diesel exhaust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, J.A.; Wolf, I.; Wolff, R.K.; Sun, J.D.; Mokler, B.V.

    1981-01-01

    One approach to determining the deposition and fate of inhaled diesel particles is the conduct of inhalation exposure studies with radiolabeled diesel fuel. A system was designed, constructed and tested for the simultaneous exposure of animals to radiolabeled diesel exhaust and collection of large quantities of radiolabeled diesel exhaust particles from a single cylinder diesel engine. The system performance was characterized and evaluated over a range of operating conditions: 0 to 1800 watts of engine load, 1000 to 2500 rpm and dilution air rates of 1:2 and 1:10. The exposure system met required design and operating criteria for safety, portability, space and flexibility

  6. Site-Specific Biomolecule Labeling with Gold Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerson, Christopher J.; Powell, Richard D.; Hainfeld, James F.

    2013-01-01

    Site-specific labeling of biomolecules in vitro with gold clusters can enhance the information content of electron cryomicroscopy experiments. This chapter provides a practical overview of well-established techniques for forming biomolecule/gold cluster conjugates. Three bioconjugation chemistries are covered: Linker-mediated bioconjugation, direct gold–biomolecule bonding, and coordination-mediated bonding of nickel(II) nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA)-derivatized gold clusters to polyhistidine (His)-tagged proteins. PMID:20887859

  7. Site-Specific Biomolecule Labeling with Gold Clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Ackerson, Christopher J.; Powell, Richard D.; Hainfeld, James F.

    2010-01-01

    Site-specific labeling of biomolecules in vitro with gold clusters can enhance the information content of electron cryomicroscopy experiments. This chapter provides a practical overview of well-established techniques for forming biomolecule/gold cluster conjugates. Three bioconjugation chemistries are covered: Linker-mediated bioconjugation, direct gold–biomolecule bonding, and coordination-mediated bonding of nickel(II) nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA)-derivatized gold clusters to polyhistidine (...

  8. Porous solid ion exchange wafer for immobilizing biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Michelle B.; Hestekin, Jamie A.; Lin, YuPo J.; St. Martin, Edward J.; Snyder, Seth W.

    2007-12-11

    A porous solid ion exchange wafer having a combination of a biomolecule capture-resin and an ion-exchange resin forming a charged capture resin within said wafer. Also disclosed is a porous solid ion exchange wafer having a combination of a biomolecule capture-resin and an ion-exchange resin forming a charged capture resin within said wafer containing a biomolecule with a tag. A separate bioreactor is also disclosed incorporating the wafer described above.

  9. Reaction between protein radicals and other biomolecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østdal, H.; Davies, M.J.; Andersen, Henrik Jørgen

    2002-01-01

    The present study investigates the reactivity of bovine serum albumin (BSA) radicals towards different biomolecules (urate, linoleic acid, and a polypeptide, poly(Glu-Ala-Tyr)). The BSA radical was formed at room temperature through a direct protein-to-protein radical transfer from H(2)O(2....... Subsequent analysis showed a decrease in the concentration of urate upon reaction with the BSA radical, while the BSA radical in the presence of poly(Glu-Ala-Tyr) resulted in increased formation of the characteristic protein oxidation product, dityrosine. Reaction between the BSA radical and a linoleic acid...

  10. Two possible improvements for mass spectrometry analysis of intact biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raznikov, Valeriy V; Zelenov, Vladislav V; Aparina, Elena V; Pikhtelev, Alexander R; Sulimenkov, Ilia V; Raznikova, Marina O

    2017-08-01

    The goals of our study were to investigate abilities of two approaches to eliminate possible errors in electrospray mass spectrometry measurements of biomolecules. Passing of a relatively dense supersonic gas jet through ionization region followed by its hitting the spray of the analyzed solution in low vacuum may be effective to keep an initial biomolecule structure in solution. Provided that retention of charge carriers for some sites in the biomolecule cannot be changed noticeably in electrospray ion source, decomposition and separation of charge-state distributions of electrosprayed ions may give additional information about native structure of biomolecules in solution.

  11. Imaging of colorectal carcinoma with radiolabeled antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenberg, D M; Goldenberg, H; Sharkey, R M; Lee, R E; Higgenbotham-Ford, E; Horowitz, J A; Hall, T C; Pinsky, C M; Hansen, H J

    1989-10-01

    Colorectal cancer has been the tumor type most frequently studied with radiolabeled antibodies. Among the various antibodies, a majority of patients with colorectal cancer have received xenogeneic polyclonal or monoclonal antibodies against carcino-embryonic antigen. This review summarizes the current status of colorectal cancer imaging with radiolabeled antibodies, ie, radioimmunodetection (RAID), and examines the published studies involving carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) antibodies and 17-1A, 19-9, and B72.3, and other monoclonal antibodies. In order to better address the issue of the current and future clinical usefulness of this emerging technology, particular attention is given to the protocols, methods, and results of the published studies. Despite differences in study parameters, antibodies and forms, labels, administration routes and doses, and scanning instruments and methods, it has been found that (1) almost no adverse reactions have been evident; (2) antibody fragments are preferred over whole immunoglobulin G reagents because they achieve higher tumor-to-background ratios earlier, thus reducing or precluding the need for dual-isotope subtraction methods or long delays before imaging; (3) use of antibody fragments, including the monovalent Fab' form, permits imaging with short-lived radionuclides of excellent photon properties, such as 123I and 99mTc; (4) circulating antigens against which the imaging antibody is directed can complex with the injected antibody, but such complexes have not prevented successful RAID; (5) patients with high serum titers of the appropriate antigen target usually have higher rates of positive RAID; (6) patients who are seronegative for the tumor antigen being studied can have positive RAID findings, which can represent the detection of occult lesions; (7) single photon emission computed tomography appears to provide better image resolution than planar scanning; (8) regardless of the sensitivity reported in any particular

  12. The role of radiolabelled compounds in preclinical drug development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkins, D.R.

    1988-01-01

    The role of radiolabelled compounds in the development of new drugs is discussed, with particular reference to their use in toxicological, metabolic and pharmacokinetic studies for the pre-clinical safety evaluation of new drugs. (U.K.)

  13. Efficient optimization of electrostatic interactions between biomolecules.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bardhan, J. P.; Altman, M. D.; White, J. K.; Tidor, B.; Mathematics and Computer Science; MIT

    2007-01-01

    We present a PDE-constrained approach to optimizing the electrostatic interactions between two biomolecules. These interactions play important roles in the determination of binding affinity and specificity, and are therefore of significant interest when designing a ligand molecule to bind tightly to a receptor. Using a popular continuum model and physically reasonable assumptions, the electrostatic component of the binding free energy is a convex, quadratic function of the ligand charge distribution. Traditional optimization methods require exhaustive pre-computation, and the expense has precluded a full exploration of the promise of electrostatic optimization in biomolecule analysis and design. In this paper we describe an approach in which the electrostatic simulations and optimization problem are solved simultaneously; unlike many PDE- constrained optimization frameworks, the proposed method does not incorporate the PDE as a set of equality constraints. This co-optimization approach can be used by itself to solve unconstrained problems or those with linear equality constraints, or in conjunction with primal-dual interior point methods to solve problems with inequality constraints. Model problems demonstrate that the co-optimization method is computationally efficient and can be used to solve realistic problems.

  14. Thermally modulated biomolecule transport through nanoconfined channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Zhu, Lizhong

    2015-01-01

    In this work, a nanofluidic device containing both a feed cell and a permeation cell linked by nanopore arrays has been fabricated, which is employed to investigate thermally controlled biomolecular transporting properties through confined nanochannels. The ionic currents modulated by the translocations of goat antibody to human immunoglobulin G (IgG) or bovine serum albumin (BSA) are recorded and analyzed. The results suggest that the modulation effect decreases with the electrolyte concentration increasing, while the effects generated by IgG translocation are more significant than that generated by BSA translocation. More importantly, there is a maximum decreasing value in each modulated current curve with biomolecule concentration increasing for thermally induced intermolecular collision. Furthermore, the turning point for the maximum shifts to lower biomolecule concentrations with the system temperature rising (from 4°C to 45°C), and it is mainly determined by the temperature in the feed cell if the temperature difference exists in the two separated cells. These findings are expected to be valuable for the future design of novel sensing device based on nanopore and/or nanopore arrays.

  15. Electrically Excited Plasmonic Nanoruler for Biomolecule Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dathe, André; Ziegler, Mario; Hübner, Uwe; Fritzsche, Wolfgang; Stranik, Ondrej

    2016-09-14

    Plasmon-based sensors are excellent tools for a label-free detection of small biomolecules. An interesting group of such sensors are plasmonic nanorulers that rely on the plasmon hybridization upon modification of their morphology to sense nanoscale distances. Sensor geometries based on the interaction of plasmons in a flat metallic layer together with metal nanoparticles inherit unique advantages but need a special optical excitation configuration that is not easy to miniaturize. Herein, we introduce the concept of nanoruler excitation by direct, electrically induced generation of surface plasmons based on the quantum shot noise of tunneling currents. An electron tunneling junction consisting of a metal-dielectric-semiconductor heterostructure is directly incorporated into the nanoruler basic geometry. With the application of voltage on this modified nanoruler, the plasmon modes are directly excited without any additional optical component as a light source. We demonstrate via several experiments that this electrically driven nanoruler possesses similar properties as an optically exited one and confirm its sensing capabilities by the detection of the binding of small biomolecules such as antibodies. This new sensing principle could open the way to a new platform of highly miniaturized, integrated plasmonic sensors compatible with monolithic integrated circuits.

  16. SPM for functional identification of individual biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ros, Robert; Schwesinger, Falk; Padeste, Celestino; Plueckthun, Andreas; Anselmetti, Dario; Guentherodt, Hans-Joachim; Tiefenauer, Louis

    1999-06-01

    The identification of specific binding molecules is of increasing interest in the context of drug development based on combinatorial libraries. Scanning Probe Microscopy (SPM) is the method of choice to image and probe individual biomolecules on a surface. Functional identification of biomolecules is a first step towards screening on a single molecule level. As a model system we use recombinant single- chain Fv fragment (scFv) antibody molecules directed against the antigen fluorescein. The scFv's are covalently immobilized on a flat gold surface via the C-terminal cysteine, resulting in a high accessibility of the binding site. The antigen is immobilized covalently via a long hydrophilic spacer to the silicon nitride SPM-tip. This arrangement allows a direct measurement of binding forces. Thus, closely related antibody molecules differing in only one amino acid at their binding site could be distinguished. A novel SPM-software has been developed which combines imaging, force spectroscopic modes, and online analysis. This is a major prerequisite for future screening methods.

  17. A new technique for radiolabelling of humic substances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franke, K.; Patt, J.T.; Patt, M.; Kupsch, H.; Steinbach, J. [Inst. of Interdisciplinary Isotope Research, Leipzig (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    A new method of radiolabelling of humic substances (HS) in the aqueous phase has been developed. Radiolabelling with the short-lived positron-emitter {sup 18}F was carried out via diazonium coupling to electron-rich aromatic residues of the humic substances. Labelling yields of up to 75% were obtained after optimization of the synthetic procedure. Introductory experimental steps were performed for testing the labelling stability of the humic substances with ultrafiltration, electrophoretic and chromatographic methods. (orig.)

  18. A new technique for radiolabelling of humic substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franke, K.; Patt, J.T.; Patt, M.; Kupsch, H.; Steinbach, J.

    2004-01-01

    A new method of radiolabelling of humic substances (HS) in the aqueous phase has been developed. Radiolabelling with the short-lived positron-emitter 18 F was carried out via diazonium coupling to electron-rich aromatic residues of the humic substances. Labelling yields of up to 75% were obtained after optimization of the synthetic procedure. Introductory experimental steps were performed for testing the labelling stability of the humic substances with ultrafiltration, electrophoretic and chromatographic methods. (orig.)

  19. Radiolabelling of RC-160: preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verdera, E.S.; Balter Binsky, H.S.; Robles, A.M.; Rodriguez, G.; Souto, B.; Laiz, J.; Oliver, P.; Leon, E.

    1998-01-01

    Vapreotide (RC-160) was labelled with 125 I using Chloramine-T and Iodogen methods and with 99m Tc by a direct method with sodium ditionite as reducing agent in the presence of ascorbic acid. Several methods of purification and quality control were evaluated. Yields of the reactions and of purification steps were calculated. The results obtained for the radioiodination reactions showed higher yields when limiting Chloramine-T method was used. Labelling of RC-160 with 99m Tc indicated better yields when high radioactivity concentration of the radionuclide was used. Stability of the products obtained was assessed at different post-labelling times by selected quality control methods: Sep-Pak cartridge as purification method and chromatography by RP-HPLC and ITLC-SG using saline solution as solvent. It was demonstrated that I-125-RC-160 and Tc-99m-RC-160 were stable during five weeks (at -20 deg. C) and 6 hours (at room temperature) respectively. Preliminary biodistribution of Tc-99m-RC-160 in normal rats and mice were done showing different biological behaviour compared with control animals injected with pertechnetate. In conclusion, RC-160 was successfully labelled with both radionuclides, with radiochemical purity higher than 95%. These results encourage further research work in animal models as well as to investigate the biochemical behaviour of radiolabelled peptide. (author)

  20. Development of labelled biomolecules for targeted radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arteaga de Murphy, C.

    2000-01-01

    The scope of the co-ordinated research project (Dec 15 1997) included the following activities: 1) develop coupling techniques using bifunctional chelating agents for monoclonal antibodies and peptides, 2) optimised radiolabelling procedures and reaction parameters using Sm-153 and Re-188, 3) investigate direct methods of labelling monoclonal antibodies and peptides with Re-188. 4) initiate animal distribution studies. The modifications specified for the period 1999/02/15 to 2000/02/14 are as follows: a) continue with the optimisation of Re-188-peptide labelling, b) continue with the work to prepare a kit, c) in-vivo and in-vitro studies, d) lanreotide labelling. The group formed by researchers from several Mexican Institutions have worked together and in different aspects of the CRP in order to fulfil the proposed aims (our published work listed)

  1. Development of labelled biomolecules for targeted radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arteaga de Murphy, C [Instituto Nacional de la Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Departmento de Medicina Nuclear, Mexico D.F. (Mexico). E-mail: cmurphy at data.net.mx

    2000-07-01

    The scope of the co-ordinated research project (Dec 15 1997) included the following activities: 1) develop coupling techniques using bifunctional chelating agents for monoclonal antibodies and peptides, 2) optimised radiolabelling procedures and reaction parameters using Sm-153 and Re-188, 3) investigate direct methods of labelling monoclonal antibodies and peptides with Re-188. 4) initiate animal distribution studies. The modifications specified for the period 1999/02/15 to 2000/02/14 are as follows: a) continue with the optimisation of Re-188-peptide labelling, b) continue with the work to prepare a kit, c) in-vivo and in-vitro studies, d) lanreotide labelling. The group formed by researchers from several Mexican Institutions have worked together and in different aspects of the CRP in order to fulfil the proposed aims (our published work listed)

  2. Synthesizing biomolecule-based Boolean logic gates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Takafumi; Razavi, Shiva; DeRose, Robert; Inoue, Takanari

    2013-02-15

    One fascinating recent avenue of study in the field of synthetic biology is the creation of biomolecule-based computers. The main components of a computing device consist of an arithmetic logic unit, the control unit, memory, and the input and output devices. Boolean logic gates are at the core of the operational machinery of these parts, and hence to make biocomputers a reality, biomolecular logic gates become a necessity. Indeed, with the advent of more sophisticated biological tools, both nucleic acid- and protein-based logic systems have been generated. These devices function in the context of either test tubes or living cells and yield highly specific outputs given a set of inputs. In this review, we discuss various types of biomolecular logic gates that have been synthesized, with particular emphasis on recent developments that promise increased complexity of logic gate circuitry, improved computational speed, and potential clinical applications.

  3. Synthesizing Biomolecule-based Boolean Logic Gates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Takafumi; Razavi, Shiva; DeRose, Robert; Inoue, Takanari

    2012-01-01

    One fascinating recent avenue of study in the field of synthetic biology is the creation of biomolecule-based computers. The main components of a computing device consist of an arithmetic logic unit, the control unit, memory, and the input and output devices. Boolean logic gates are at the core of the operational machinery of these parts, hence to make biocomputers a reality, biomolecular logic gates become a necessity. Indeed, with the advent of more sophisticated biological tools, both nucleic acid- and protein-based logic systems have been generated. These devices function in the context of either test tubes or living cells and yield highly specific outputs given a set of inputs. In this review, we discuss various types of biomolecular logic gates that have been synthesized, with particular emphasis on recent developments that promise increased complexity of logic gate circuitry, improved computational speed, and potential clinical applications. PMID:23526588

  4. New Chelators for Low Temperature Al(18)F-Labeling of Biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleeren, Frederik; Lecina, Joan; Billaud, Emilie M F; Ahamed, Muneer; Verbruggen, Alfons; Bormans, Guy M

    2016-03-16

    The Al(18)F labeling method is a relatively new approach that allows radiofluorination of biomolecules such as peptides and proteins in a one-step procedure and in aqueous solution. However, the chelation of the {Al(18)F}(2+) core with the macrocyclic chelators NOTA or NODA requires heating to 100-120 °C. Therefore, we have developed new polydentate ligands for the complexation of {Al(18)F}(2+) with good radiochemical yields at a temperature of 40 °C. The stability of the new Al(18)F-complexes was tested in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) at pH 7.4 and in rat serum. The stability of the Al(18)F-L3 complex was found to be comparable to that of the previously reported Al(18)F-NODA complex up to 60 min in rat serum. Moreover, the biodistribution of Al(18)F-L3 in healthy mice showed the absence of in vivo defluorination since no significant bone uptake was observed, whereas the major fraction of activity at 60 min p.i. was observed in liver and intestines, indicating hepatobiliary clearance of the radiolabeled ligand. The acyclic chelator H3L3 proved to be a good lead candidate for labeling of heat-sensitive biomolecules with fluorine-18. In order to obtain a better understanding of the different factors influencing the formation and stability of the complex, we carried out more in-depth experiments with ligand H3L3. As a proof of concept, we successfully conjugated the new AlF-chelator with the urea-based PSMA inhibitor Glu-NH-CO-NH-Lys to form Glu-NH-CO-NH-Lys(Ahx)L3, and a biodistribution study in healthy mice was performed with the Al(18)F-labeled construct. This new class of AlF-chelators may have a great impact on PET radiochemical space as it will stimulate the rapid development of new fluorine-18 labeled peptides and other heat-sensitive biomolecules.

  5. Ionic strength independence of charge distributions in solvation of biomolecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Virtanen, J. J. [Department of Chemistry, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); James Franck Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Sosnick, T. R. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Institute for Biophysical Dynamics, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Computation Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Freed, K. F. [Department of Chemistry, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); James Franck Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Computation Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    2014-12-14

    Electrostatic forces enormously impact the structure, interactions, and function of biomolecules. We perform all-atom molecular dynamics simulations for 5 proteins and 5 RNAs to determine the dependence on ionic strength of the ion and water charge distributions surrounding the biomolecules, as well as the contributions of ions to the electrostatic free energy of interaction between the biomolecule and the surrounding salt solution (for a total of 40 different biomolecule/solvent combinations). Although water provides the dominant contribution to the charge density distribution and to the electrostatic potential even in 1M NaCl solutions, the contributions of water molecules and of ions to the total electrostatic interaction free energy with the solvated biomolecule are comparable. The electrostatic biomolecule/solvent interaction energies and the total charge distribution exhibit a remarkable insensitivity to salt concentrations over a huge range of salt concentrations (20 mM to 1M NaCl). The electrostatic potentials near the biomolecule's surface obtained from the MD simulations differ markedly, as expected, from the potentials predicted by continuum dielectric models, even though the total electrostatic interaction free energies are within 11% of each other.

  6. Ionic strength independence of charge distributions in solvation of biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virtanen, J. J.; Sosnick, T. R.; Freed, K. F.

    2014-01-01

    Electrostatic forces enormously impact the structure, interactions, and function of biomolecules. We perform all-atom molecular dynamics simulations for 5 proteins and 5 RNAs to determine the dependence on ionic strength of the ion and water charge distributions surrounding the biomolecules, as well as the contributions of ions to the electrostatic free energy of interaction between the biomolecule and the surrounding salt solution (for a total of 40 different biomolecule/solvent combinations). Although water provides the dominant contribution to the charge density distribution and to the electrostatic potential even in 1M NaCl solutions, the contributions of water molecules and of ions to the total electrostatic interaction free energy with the solvated biomolecule are comparable. The electrostatic biomolecule/solvent interaction energies and the total charge distribution exhibit a remarkable insensitivity to salt concentrations over a huge range of salt concentrations (20 mM to 1M NaCl). The electrostatic potentials near the biomolecule's surface obtained from the MD simulations differ markedly, as expected, from the potentials predicted by continuum dielectric models, even though the total electrostatic interaction free energies are within 11% of each other

  7. Interactions of heavy ions with biomolecules: a dynamical microscopic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Fengshou; Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing; National Laboratory of Heavy Ion Accelerator of Lanzhou, Lanzhou

    2006-01-01

    The status of studying biology system therapy with X-rays, γ-rays, neutron, proton, and heavy ions is reviewed. The depth dose profile, called Bragg profile, makes heavy ion an ideal tool for radiotherapy. The physical process of therapy with heavy ions is analyzed and a 3-step interaction processes of heavy ions with biomolecules is proposed, that is, nuclear fragmentation in nuclear interaction, electron excitation in Coulomb interaction, and the biomolecules relaxation in surroundings, finally leads to a new structure of biomolecule. Since this physical process is the base of the following chemical process and biological process, a dynamical microscopic approach is strongly demanded to be built. (authors)

  8. Noncovalent Labeling of Biomolecules with Red and Near- Infrared Dyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucjan Strekowski

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Biopolymers such as proteins and nucleic acids can be labeled with a fluorescent marker to allow for their detection. Covalent labeling is achieved by the reaction of an appropriately functionalized dye marker with a reactive group on a biomolecule. The recent trend, however, is the use of noncovalent labeling that results from strong hydrophobic and/or ionic interactions between the marker and biomolecule of interest. The main advantage of noncovalent labeling is that it affects the functional activity of the biomolecule to a lesser extent. The applications of luminescent cyanine and squarylium dyes are reviewed.

  9. Computational simulation of biomolecules transport with multi-physics near microchannel surface for development of biomolecules-detection devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yuma; Shimizu, Tetsuhide; Yang, Ming

    2017-01-01

    The quantitative evaluation of the biomolecules transport with multi-physics in nano/micro scale is demanded in order to optimize the design of microfluidics device for the biomolecules detection with high detection sensitivity and rapid diagnosis. This paper aimed to investigate the effectivity of the computational simulation using the numerical model of the biomolecules transport with multi-physics near a microchannel surface on the development of biomolecules-detection devices. The biomolecules transport with fluid drag force, electric double layer (EDL) force, and van der Waals force was modeled by Newtonian Equation of motion. The model validity was verified in the influence of ion strength and flow velocity on biomolecules distribution near the surface compared with experimental results of previous studies. The influence of acting forces on its distribution near the surface was investigated by the simulation. The trend of its distribution to ion strength and flow velocity was agreement with the experimental result by the combination of all acting forces. Furthermore, EDL force dominantly influenced its distribution near its surface compared with fluid drag force except for the case of high velocity and low ion strength. The knowledges from the simulation might be useful for the design of biomolecules-detection devices and the simulation can be expected to be applied on its development as the design tool for high detection sensitivity and rapid diagnosis in the future.

  10. Chemical radiolabeling of carboxyatractyloside by [14C]acetic anhydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Block, M.R.; Pougeois, R.; Vignais, P.V.

    1980-01-01

    The authors report the synthesis and biological properties of a radiolabeled derivative of CAT obtained with acetylation of the primary alcohol of CAT with radiolabeled acetic anhydride. They also investigate the question of mutual exclusion of CAT and BA for binding to the mitochondrial ADP/ATP carrier in double labeling experiments based on the use of [ 3 H]BA and [ 14 C]Ac-CAT. The results are consistent with the view that the ADP/ATP carrier possesses two separate interacting binding sites for AT (or CAT) and for BA. (Auth.)

  11. Positron Emission Tomography Imaging Using Radiolabeled Inorganic Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaolian; Cai, Weibo; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-01-01

    CONSPECTUS Positron emission tomography (PET) is a radionuclide imaging technology that plays an important role in preclinical and clinical research. With administration of a small amount of radiotracer, PET imaging can provide a noninvasive, highly sensitive, and quantitative readout of its organ/tissue targeting efficiency and pharmacokinetics. Various radiotracers have been designed to target specific molecular events. Compared with antibodies, proteins, peptides, and other biologically relevant molecules, nanoparticles represent a new frontier in molecular imaging probe design, enabling the attachment of different imaging modalities, targeting ligands, and therapeutic payloads in a single vector. We introduce the radiolabeled nanoparticle platforms that we and others have developed. Due to the fundamental differences in the various nanoparticles and radioisotopes, most radiolabeling methods are designed case-by-case. We focus on some general rules about selecting appropriate isotopes for given types of nanoparticles, as well as adjusting the labeling strategies according to specific applications. We classified these radiolabeling methods into four categories: (1) complexation reaction of radiometal ions with chelators via coordination chemistry; (2) direct bombardment of nanoparticles via hadronic projectiles; (3) synthesis of nanoparticles using a mixture of radioactive and nonradioactive precursors; (4) chelator-free postsynthetic radiolabeling. Method 1 is generally applicable to different nanomaterials as long as the surface chemistry is well-designed. However, the addition of chelators brings concerns of possible changes to the physicochemical properties of nanomaterials and detachment of the radiometal. Methods 2 and 3 have improved radiochemical stability. The applications are, however, limited by the possible damage to the nanocomponent caused by the proton beams (method 2) and harsh synthetic conditions (method 3). Method 4 is still in its infancy

  12. Pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of radiolabeled avidin, streptavidin and biotin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosebrough, S.F.

    1993-01-01

    The extraordinarily high affinity of avidin and streptavidin for biotin may be exploited in a two-step approach for delivering radiolabeled biotin derivatives suitable for imaging and therapy to target-bound streptavidin or avidin conjugated monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). The in vivo pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of radiolabeled avidin, streptavidin (SA) and DTPA-biocytinamide (DTPA-biotin) were studied in the rabbit and dog. SA circulated in the blood similar to other 60 kDa proteins, avidin cleared immediately and DTPA-biotin exhibited plasma clearance by glomerular filtration. (author)

  13. Cell and biomolecule delivery for regenerative medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ian O; Ma, Peter X

    2010-01-01

    Regenerative medicine is an exciting field that aims to create regenerative alternatives to harvest tissues for transplantation. In this approach, the delivery of cells and biological molecules plays a central role. The scaffold (synthetic temporary extracellular matrix) delivers cells to the regenerative site and provides three-dimensional environments for the cells. To fulfil these functions, we design biodegradable polymer scaffolds with structural features on multiple size scales. To enhance positive cell–material interactions, we design nano-sized structural features in the scaffolds to mimic the natural extracellular matrix. We also integrate micro-sized pore networks to facilitate mass transport and neo tissue regeneration. We also design novel polymer devices and self-assembled nanospheres for biomolecule delivery to recapitulate key events in developmental and wound healing processes. Herein, we present recent work in biomedical polymer synthesis, novel processing techniques, surface engineering and biologic delivery. Examples of enhanced cellular/tissue function and regenerative outcomes of these approaches are discussed to demonstrate the excitement of the biomimetic scaffold design and biologic delivery in regenerative medicine. PMID:27877317

  14. Role of Carbamylated Biomolecules in Human Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badar, Asim; Arif, Zarina; Alam, Khursheed

    2018-04-01

    Carbamylation (or carbamoylation) is a non-enzymatic modification of biomolecules mediated by cyanate, a dissociation product of urea. Proteins are more sensitive to carbamylation. Two major sites of carbamylation reaction are: N α -amino moiety of a protein N-terminus and the N ɛ -amino moiety of proteins' lysine residues. In kidney diseases, urea accumulates and the burden of carbamylation increases. This may lead to alteration in the structure and function of many important proteins relevant in maintenance of homeostasis. Carbamylated proteins namely, carbamylated-haemoglobin and carbamylated-low density lipoprotein (LDL) have been implicated in hypoxia and atherosclerosis, respectively. Furthermore, carbamylation of insulin, oxytocin, and erythropoietin have caused changes in the action of these hormones vis-à-vis the metabolic pathways they control. In this short review, authors have compiled the data on role of carbamylated proteins, enzymes, hormones, LDL, and so on, in human diseases. © 2018 IUBMB Life, 70(4):267-275, 2018. © 2018 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  15. Radiolabelled aptamers for tumour imaging and therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, A.C.; Missailidis, S.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: The growth in biotechnology has led to new techniques for the design, selection and production of ligands capable of molecular recognition. One promising approach is the production of specific receptor binding molecules based on specific nucleic acid sequences that are capable of recognising a wide array of target molecules. These oligonuclide ligands are known as aptamers. The technology that allows production of aptamer molecules is known as systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX). We have used combinatorial chemistry techniques coupled with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to rapidly select aptamers from degenerate libraries that bind with high affinity and specificity to the protein core of the MUC1 antigen, a tumour marker previously extensively used in tumour imaging and therapy. MUC1 is widely expressed by normal glandular epithelial cells, however this expression is dramatically increased when the cells become malignant. This has been well documented for breast and ovarian cancer, as well as some lung, pancreatic and prostate cancers. Recently it has also been shown that MUC1 is a valuable marker for bladder and has been used for the imaging and targeted therapy of bladder cancer. The aptamer selection process was performed on affinity chromatography matrices. After ten rounds of selection and amplification, aptamers were cloned and sequenced. Post SELEX amino modifications have been used to confer nuclease resistance and coupling potential. The aptamers bound to MUC1 antigen with a Kd of 5nm and high specificity, demonstrated by fluorescent microscopy on MUC1-expressing tumour cells. Using peptide coupling reactions, we have successfully attached chelators for Tc-99m radiolabelling. Two of the constructs tested were based on mono-aptamer chelator complexes, one with commercially available MAG3 and one with a novel designed cyclen-based chelator. The other two constructs were based on the use of multi-aptamer complexes

  16. Cellular content of biomolecules in sub-seafloor microbial communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Braun, Stefan; Morono, Yuki; Becker, Kevin W.

    2016-01-01

    the lifetime of their microbial sources. Here we provide for the first time measurements of the cellular content of biomolecules in sedimentary microbial cells. We separated intact cells from sediment matrices in samples from surficial, deeply buried, organic-rich, and organic-lean marine sediments by density...... content. We find that the cellular content of biomolecules in the marine subsurface is up to four times lower than previous estimates. Our approach will facilitate and improve the use of biomolecules as proxies for microbial abundance in environmental samples and ultimately provide better global estimates......Microbial biomolecules, typically from the cell envelope, can provide crucial information about distribution, activity, and adaptations of sub-seafloor microbial communities. However, when cells die these molecules can be preserved in the sediment on timescales that are likely longer than...

  17. Fullerene-biomolecule conjugates and their biomedicinal applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xinlin; Ebrahimi, Ali; Li, Jie; Cui, Quanjun

    2014-01-01

    Fullerenes are among the strongest antioxidants and are characterized as "radical sponges." The research on biomedicinal applications of fullerenes has achieved significant progress since the landmark publication by Friedman et al in 1993. Fullerene-biomolecule conjugates have become an important area of research during the past 2 decades. By a thorough literature search, we attempt to update the information about the synthesis of different types of fullerene-biomolecule conjugates, including fullerene-containing amino acids and peptides, oligonucleotides, sugars, and esters. Moreover, we also discuss in this review recently reported data on the biological and pharmaceutical utilities of these compounds and some other fullerene derivatives of biomedical importance. While within the fullerene-biomolecule conjugates, in which fullerene may act as both an antioxidant and a carrier, specific targeting biomolecules conjugated to fullerene will undoubtedly strengthen the delivery of functional fullerenes to sites of clinical interest.

  18. Diffusion phenomena of cells and biomolecules in microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz-Ozturk, Ece; Yesil-Celiktas, Ozlem

    2015-09-01

    Biomicrofluidics is an emerging field at the cross roads of microfluidics and life sciences which requires intensive research efforts in terms of introducing appropriate designs, production techniques, and analysis. The ultimate goal is to deliver innovative and cost-effective microfluidic devices to biotech, biomedical, and pharmaceutical industries. Therefore, creating an in-depth understanding of the transport phenomena of cells and biomolecules becomes vital and concurrently poses significant challenges. The present article outlines the recent advancements in diffusion phenomena of cells and biomolecules by highlighting transport principles from an engineering perspective, cell responses in microfluidic devices with emphases on diffusion- and flow-based microfluidic gradient platforms, macroscopic and microscopic approaches for investigating the diffusion phenomena of biomolecules, microfluidic platforms for the delivery of these molecules, as well as the state of the art in biological applications of mammalian cell responses and diffusion of biomolecules.

  19. Cell-selective metabolic labeling of biomolecules with bioorthogonal functionalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Ran; Hong, Senlian; Chen, Xing

    2013-10-01

    Metabolic labeling of biomolecules with bioorthogonal functionalities enables visualization, enrichment, and analysis of the biomolecules of interest in their physiological environments. This versatile strategy has found utility in probing various classes of biomolecules in a broad range of biological processes. On the other hand, metabolic labeling is nonselective with respect to cell type, which imposes limitations for studies performed in complex biological systems. Herein, we review the recent methodological developments aiming to endow metabolic labeling strategies with cell-type selectivity. The cell-selective metabolic labeling strategies have emerged from protein and glycan labeling. We envision that these strategies can be readily extended to labeling of other classes of biomolecules. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of curcumin against oxidation of biomolecules by hydroxyl radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borra, Sai Krishna; Mahendra, Jaideep; Gurumurthy, Prema; Jayamathi; Iqbal, Shabeer S; Mahendra, Little

    2014-10-01

    Among various reactive oxygen species, hydroxyl radicals have the strongest chemical activity, which can damage a wide range of essential biomolecules such as lipids, proteins, and DNA. The objective of this study was to investigate the beneficial effects of curcumin on prevention of oxidative damage of biomolecules by hydroxyl radicals generated in in vitro by a Fenton like reaction. We have incubated the serum, plasma and whole blood with H2O2/Cu2+/ Ascorbic acid system for 4 hours at 37 0C and observed the oxidation of biomolecules like albumin, lipids, proteins and DNA. Curcumin at the concentrations of 50,100 and 200 μmoles, prevented the formation of ischemia modified albumin, MDA, protein carbonyls, oxidized DNA and increased the total antioxidant levels and GSH significantly. These observations suggest the hydroxyl radical scavenging potentials of curcumin and protective actions to prevent the oxidation of biomolecules by hydroxyl radicals.

  1. On the mobility of biomolecules : a fluorescence microscopy approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogaart, Geert van den

    2008-01-01

    This thesis describes the development and application of a number of fluorescence spectroscopy related techniques (FCS, FRAP, DCFBA) to measure diffusion of biomolecules in cells, in membranes and through membrane pores.

  2. Synthesis of selenium nanorods with assistance of biomolecule

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    that the optical band gap energy is increased with aging time up to 1 day, whereas it decreases in 4 days aging ... researchers have used biomolecule substances such as oleic ..... ther investigation is needed to determine the changes of Se.

  3. Liposome Disruption Assay to Examine Lytic Properties of Biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimah, John R; Schlesinger, Paul H; Tolia, Niraj H

    2017-08-05

    Proteins may have three dimensional structural or amino acid features that suggest a role in targeting and disrupting lipids within cell membranes. It is often necessary to experimentally investigate if these proteins and biomolecules are able to disrupt membranes in order to conclusively characterize the function of these biomolecules. Here, we describe an in vitro assay to evaluate the membrane lytic properties of proteins and biomolecules. Large unilamellar vesicles (liposomes) containing carboxyfluorescein at fluorescence-quenching concentrations are treated with the biomolecule of interest. A resulting increase in fluorescence due to leakage of the dye from liposomes and subsequent dilution in the buffer demonstrates that the biomolecule is sufficient for disrupting liposomes and membranes. Additionally, since liposome disruption may occur via pore-formation or via general solubilization of lipids similar to detergents, we provide a method to distinguish between these two mechanisms. Pore-formation can be identified and evaluated by examining the blockade of carboxyfluorescein release with dextran molecules that fit the pore. The methods described here were used to determine that the malaria vaccine candidate CelTOS and proapoptotic Bax disrupt liposomes by pore formation (Saito et al. , 2000; Jimah et al. , 2016). Since membrane lipid binding by a biomolecule precedes membrane disruption, we recommend the companion protocol: Jimah et al. , 2017.

  4. Radiolabeling as a tool to study uptake pathways in plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schymura, Stefan; Hildebrand, Heike; Franke, Karsten [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Reactive Transport; Fricke, T. [Vita34 BioPlanta, Leipzig (Germany)

    2017-06-01

    The identification of major uptake pathways in plants is an important factor when evaluation the fate of manufactured nanoparticles in the environment and the associated risks. Using different radiolabeling techniques we were able to show a predominantly particulate uptake for CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles (NPs) in contrast to a possible uptake in the form of ionic cerium.

  5. Radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies: magic bullets for colorectal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slade, Linda

    1997-01-01

    Radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) have been heralded as highly specific detection agents for many types of tumours. However, because of the many problems that have been associated with the use of these agents, their development and successes did not meet expectations. This paper discusses the use of radiolabelled MoAbs in the diagnosis and staging of colorectal cancer, the type of antibodies and radionuclides investigated over the past thirty years, and the advantages and disadvantages of each. An attempt is made to define the role of radioimmunoscintigraphy (RIS) in the investigation and management of patients with colorectal cancer. It appears that this technique can improve tumour detection, especially when used in conjunction with other imaging modalities. High sensitivities and specificities have been found using radio-labelled MoAbs for investigation of colorectal carcinoma. However, the author estimates there are a number of areas that require further research and improvement before naming radiolabelled MoAbs as 'magic bullets' for colorectal cancer. 8 refs., 3 tabs

  6. Imaging thrombus with radiolabelled monoclonal antibody to platelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, A.M.; Lavender, J.P.; Needham, S.G.; Loutfi, I.; Snook, D.; Epenetos, A.A.; Lumley, P.; Keery, R.J.; Hogg, N.

    1986-12-13

    A study was conducted evaluating a method of imaging thrombus with platelets radiolabelled with a /sup 111/In labelled monoclonal antibody, P256, directed to the platelet surface glycoprotein complex IIb/IIIa. when the number of receptors occupied by P256 was less than 3% of the total available on the platelet surface, platelet function was undisturbed. P256 was radiolabelled with /sup 111/In using diethylenetriaminepenta-acetic acid, which achieved a specific activity of 185 MBq (5 mCi)/mg. No impairment of immunoreactivity was detected at this specific activity. Platelets were labelled with radiolabelled monoclonal antibody in vitro in two patients at a receptor occupancy of 6% and in vivo in six patients at a receptor occupancy of 1%. In vivo recovery and biodistribution kinetics suggested that after in vitro labelling platelets were minimally activated. The /sup 111/In kinetics recorded after intravenous P256 suggested rapid and efficient radiolabelling of platelets and gave no indication of platelet activation. Of the six patients who received intravenous P256, three had documented thrombus, two of whom gave positive results on P256 platelet scintigraphy. The third had chronic deep venous thrombosis and was scintigraphically negative.

  7. Current status and future developments in radiolabelled immunoassays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, R.

    1998-01-01

    Radioisotopes are used extensively in medical practice and their use in RIA or IRMA usually represent a small proportion of the total. Radiolabelled immunoassays based on 125 I constitute a simple didactic, cost effective and robust technology which is still regarded as the reference method in many clinical applications. The IAEA has implemented many successful programmes using the ''bulk reagent'' approach, involving 68 countries in all the different regions. The main achievements have been in technology transfer with self sufficiency in production for some countries; training of large numbers of staff; quality control and quality assurance schemes; devolution of screening programmes for neonatal congenital hypothryoidism. Alternatives to the use of radioisotopic tracers are constrained by many factors and are often only available in restricted commercial packages. They are often not suitable for technology transfer programmes and often lack any didactic component in addition to a relative high cost. The production of radiolabels using 125 I is both simple and adaptable. In addition expertise in their preparation and purification is widespread even in developing countries. Together with the ease of producing antibodies, the facts have made 125 I-radiolabelled immunoassays ideal for investigative procedures for many research activities (30,31) particularly in the medical context where radioisotopes are commonly used. In conclusion, even a superficial examination of public health statistics for various countries throughout the continents indicates a need for a simple, inexpensive and robust analytical tool. In this light, there is a predicted continuing role for radiolabelled immunoassays. (author)

  8. Synthesis of sup 14 C-radiolabelled Tilmicosin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crouse, G D; Terando, N H [Lilly (Eli) and Co., Indianapolis, IN (USA). Lilly Research Labs.

    1989-04-01

    Tilmicosin was radiolabelled with carbon-14 on the 3,5-dimethylpiperidinyl sidechain as a requirement for animal metabolism studies. A new radiosynthesis of 3,5-dimethyl-piperidine was developed for this purpose. Incorporation into the desmycosin nucleus was accomplished by a reductive amination reaction. (author).

  9. Radiolabeled antibodies and RGD-peptides for the treatment of ovarian cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, M.L.H.

    2004-01-01

    In this thesis, preclinical studies on new treatment modalities for ovarian cancer are descibed, applying radiolabeled antibodies and radiolabeled RGD-peptides. In chapter 2 a study is described comparing the therapeutic efficacy of the antibody HMFG1 radiolabeled with several beta-emitting

  10. An integrated platform for biomolecule interaction analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, Chia-Ming; Tsai, Pei-I.; Chou, Shin-Ting; Lee, Shu-Sheng; Lee, Chih-Kung

    2013-02-01

    We developed a new metrology platform which can detect real-time changes in both a phase-interrogation mode and intensity mode of a SPR (surface plasmon resonance). We integrated a SPR and ellipsometer to a biosensor chip platform to create a new biomolecular interaction measurement mechanism. We adopted a conductive ITO (indium-tinoxide) film to the bio-sensor platform chip to expand the dynamic range and improve measurement accuracy. The thickness of the conductive film and the suitable voltage constants were found to enhance performance. A circularly polarized ellipsometry configuration was incorporated into the newly developed platform to measure the label-free interactions of recombinant human C-reactive protein (CRP) with immobilized biomolecule target monoclonal human CRP antibody at various concentrations. CRP was chosen as it is a cardiovascular risk biomarker and is an acute phase reactant as well as a specific prognostic indicator for inflammation. We found that the sensitivity of a phaseinterrogation SPR is predominantly dependent on the optimization of the sample incidence angle. The effect of the ITO layer effective index under DC and AC effects as well as an optimal modulation were experimentally performed and discussed. Our experimental results showed that the modulated dynamic range for phase detection was 10E-2 RIU based on a current effect and 10E-4 RIU based on a potential effect of which a 0.55 (°/RIU) measurement was found by angular-interrogation. The performance of our newly developed metrology platform was characterized to have a higher sensitivity and less dynamic range when compared to a traditional full-field measurement system.

  11. Multi-state modeling of biomolecules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie I Stefan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Multi-state modeling of biomolecules refers to a series of techniques used to represent and compute the behavior of biological molecules or complexes that can adopt a large number of possible functional states. Biological signaling systems often rely on complexes of biological macromolecules that can undergo several functionally significant modifications that are mutually compatible. Thus, they can exist in a very large number of functionally different states. Modeling such multi-state systems poses two problems: the problem of how to describe and specify a multi-state system (the "specification problem" and the problem of how to use a computer to simulate the progress of the system over time (the "computation problem". To address the specification problem, modelers have in recent years moved away from explicit specification of all possible states and towards rule-based formalisms that allow for implicit model specification, including the κ-calculus, BioNetGen, the Allosteric Network Compiler, and others. To tackle the computation problem, they have turned to particle-based methods that have in many cases proved more computationally efficient than population-based methods based on ordinary differential equations, partial differential equations, or the Gillespie stochastic simulation algorithm. Given current computing technology, particle-based methods are sometimes the only possible option. Particle-based simulators fall into two further categories: nonspatial simulators, such as StochSim, DYNSTOC, RuleMonkey, and the Network-Free Stochastic Simulator (NFSim, and spatial simulators, including Meredys, SRSim, and MCell. Modelers can thus choose from a variety of tools, the best choice depending on the particular problem. Development of faster and more powerful methods is ongoing, promising the ability to simulate ever more complex signaling processes in the future.

  12. Miniature Laboratory for Detecting Sparse Biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ying; Yu, Nan

    2005-01-01

    A miniature laboratory system has been proposed for use in the field to detect sparsely distributed biomolecules. By emphasizing concentration and sorting of specimens prior to detection, the underlying system concept would make it possible to attain high detection sensitivities without the need to develop ever more sensitive biosensors. The original purpose of the proposal is to aid the search for signs of life on a remote planet by enabling the detection of specimens as sparse as a few molecules or microbes in a large amount of soil, dust, rocks, water/ice, or other raw sample material. Some version of the system could prove useful on Earth for remote sensing of biological contamination, including agents of biological warfare. Processing in this system would begin with dissolution of the raw sample material in a sample-separation vessel. The solution in the vessel would contain floating microscopic magnetic beads coated with substances that could engage in chemical reactions with various target functional groups that are parts of target molecules. The chemical reactions would cause the targeted molecules to be captured on the surfaces of the beads. By use of a controlled magnetic field, the beads would be concentrated in a specified location in the vessel. Once the beads were thus concentrated, the rest of the solution would be discarded. This procedure would obviate the filtration steps and thereby also eliminate the filter-clogging difficulties of typical prior sample-concentration schemes. For ferrous dust/soil samples, the dissolution would be done first in a separate vessel before the solution is transferred to the microbead-containing vessel.

  13. Development of Radiolabeled compounds using reactor-produced radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sun Ju; Park, K. B.; Park, S. H.

    2007-06-01

    To establish a robust technology for radiopharmaceutical development, we focused on the configuration of fundamental development of radiolabeled compounds for radioimmunotherapy and drug delivery as well as the development of bifunctional chelating agents and radiolabeling methods for the radiopharmaceuticals with highly specific activity to deliver sufficient number of radionuclides to the target site. In this project, we aim to improve the quality of life and the public welfare by fostering the medical application of radioisotopes for the effective treatment of malignant diseases and by developing efficient radiolabeling methods of specific bio-active materials with radioisotopes and new candidates for radiopharmaceutical application. We have established the procedure for the preparation of radiolabeled antibody and biotin with radioisotopes such as 166 Ho, 131 I, 90 Y and 111 In for tumour targeting. In the future, these technologies will be applicable to development of radioimmunotherapeutic drug. The combination treatment of radioisotope with anti-cancer agents or chemotherapeutic agents may produce a synergistic static effects in the tumour and this synergism would be exerted via gene level through the activation of a cell death pathway. The combination therapy may be very beneficial for cancer treatment and this can overcome not only the hazards of unnecessary exposure to high radiation level during therapy, but also the tendency for drug resistance caused by chemotherapy. To develop new drug delivery system suitable for CT imaging agent, a chitosan derivative and radiolabed Folate-targeted polymer with 131 I were synthesized. We also carried out the development of DTPA derivatives for CT imaging agent, radiolabeled precursor, and established a highly efficient radiolabeling methodology with lanthanide nuclide. In order to develop neuroreceptor targeting compounds, we synthesized WAY-100635 compound and 99m Tc(CO) 3 precursor from Chrysamine G derivatives

  14. Imaging thrombus with radiolabelled monoclonal antibody to platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loutfi, I.; Peters, A.M.; Lavender, J.P.; Epenetos, A.A.

    1988-01-01

    Indium-111-hydroxyquinoline labelled platelets, though useful in the detection of thrombus, have not gained widespread use owing to the time and technical skill required for their preparation. A study was therefore conducted evaluating a new method of imaging thrombus with platelets radiolabelled with a 111 In labelled monoclonal antibody, P 256 , directed to the platelet surface glycoprotein complex IIb/IIIa. When the number of receptors occupied by P 256 was less than 3% of the total available on the platelet surface platelet function, as assessed by platelet aggregometry, was undisturbed. P 256 was radiolabelled with 111 In using diethylenetriaminepenta-acetic acid, which achieved a specific activity of 185 MBq (5 mCi)/mg. No impairment of immunoreactivity was detected at this specific activity. Platelets were labelled with radiolabelled monoclonal antibody in vitro in two patients at a receptor occupancy of 6% and in vivo - that is, by direct intravenous injection of P 256 - in six patients at a receptor occupancy of 1%. In vivo recovery and biodistribution kinetics suggested that after in vitro labelling platelets were minimally activated. The 111 In kinetics recorded after intravenous P 256 suggested rapid and efficient radiolabelling of platelets and gave no indication of platelet activation. Of the six patients who received intravenous P 256 , three had documented thrombus, tow of whom gave positive results on P 256 platelet scintigraphy. The third subject had chromic deep venous thrombosis and was scintigraphically negative. Imaging thrombus using a radiolabelled monoclonal antibody directed to platelets appears to offer great potential as a simple, non-invasive approach to the diagnosis of thrombosis. 3 refs. (Author)

  15. Active immobilization of biomolecules on a hybrid three-dimensional nanoelectrode by dielectrophoresis for single-biomolecule study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Takatoki; Fujii, Teruo

    2007-01-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a method of active immobilization for biomolecules on a three-dimensional nanometre-scale electrode (3D nanoelectrode) using dielectrophoresis to immobilize the biomolecules at predetermined locations for single-biomolecule study. We have developed a novel two-step fabrication process for obtaining a 3D nanoelectrode having a sharp top, which is necessary for immobilizing a single biomolecule at a single point. The first step is to fabricate the backbone structure, which is rigid and defines the shape of the 3D nanoelectrode. It was fabricated with diamond-like carbon (DLC) obtained using focused ion beam assisted chemical vapour deposition followed by post-plasma etching, which reshapes the DLC structure. The second step coats the DLC structure with a thin layer of aluminium, which supplies electrical conductivity to the DLC structure. By applying a high frequency (of the order of megahertz) and high intensity (greater than or equal to a few megavolts per metre) electric field using the 3D nanoelectrodes, the generated dielectrophoresis attracted and then immobilized target biomolecules onto the tops of 3D nanoelectrodes, as a demonstration of active immobilization of biomolecules

  16. Temperature-responsive chromatography for the separation of biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanazawa, Hideko; Okano, Teruo

    2011-12-09

    Temperature-responsive chromatography for the separation of biomolecules utilizing poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) and its copolymer-modified stationary phase is performed with an aqueous mobile phase without using organic solvent. The surface properties and function of the stationary phase are controlled by external temperature changes without changing the mobile-phase composition. This analytical system is based on nonspecific adsorption by the reversible transition of a hydrophilic-hydrophobic PNIPAAm-grafted surface. The driving force for retention is hydrophobic interaction between the solute molecules and the hydrophobized polymer chains on the stationary phase surface. The separation of the biomolecules, such as nucleotides and proteins was achieved by a dual temperature- and pH-responsive chromatography system. The electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions could be modulated simultaneously with the temperature in an aqueous mobile phase, thus the separation system would have potential applications in the separation of biomolecules. Additionally, chromatographic matrices prepared by a surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) exhibit a strong interaction with analytes, because the polymerization procedure forms a densely packed polymer, called a polymer brush, on the surfaces. The copolymer brush grafted surfaces prepared by ATRP was an effective tool for separating basic biomolecules by modulating the electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. Applications of thermally responsive columns for the separations of biomolecules are reviewed here. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Improved radioiodination of biomolecules using exhaustive Chloramine-T oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robles, Ana M.; Balter, Henia S.; Oliver, Patricia; Welling, Mick M.; Pauwels, Ernest K.J.

    2001-01-01

    To improve standardization in analytical reagents we investigated Chloramine-T radioiodination ( 125 I) of several biomolecules based on the use of a single amount of the oxidizing agent Chloramine-T as the limiting reagent being exhausted during the course of the reaction. Whenever the labeling yield resulted in less than one atom 125 I/molecule, a second amount of the oxidizing agent was added. Thereafter, the integrity of the various biomolecules was assessed using radioimmunoassays, radioreceptor binding assays, or radioimmunometric assays. Purification yields were done by gel permeation (56%±19%, n=230) or by precipitation with trichloroacetic acid (59%±19%, n=230). Specific activity (117±61 MBq/nmol) and the degree of iodine incorporation (1.4±0.8 atoms of 125 I/molecule) were achieved after 300 sec of incubation. A second addition of Chloramine-T resulted in an increased labeling yield of all biomolecules tested by a mean factor of 1.8±0.9. After the second addition of Chloramine-T, we observed for some biomolecules a significant (p<0.001) decreased effect in biological performance. In conclusion, the use of Chloramine-T as a limiting reagent resulted in molecules with appropriate immunological and biological performance. In general, tracers were minimally damaged and assessment of the shelf life as well as storing conditions showed the usefulness of the standardization of biomolecule labeling

  18. Tools and procedures for visualization of proteins and other biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Lurong; Aller, Stephen G

    2015-04-01

    Protein, peptides, and nucleic acids are biomolecules that drive biological processes in living organisms. An enormous amount of structural data for a large number of these biomolecules has been described with atomic precision in the form of structural "snapshots" that are freely available in public repositories. These snapshots can help explain how the biomolecules function, the nature of interactions between multi-molecular complexes, and even how small-molecule drugs can modulate the biomolecules for clinical benefits. Furthermore, these structural snapshots serve as inputs for sophisticated computer simulations to turn the biomolecules into moving, "breathing" molecular machines for understanding their dynamic properties in real-time computer simulations. In order for the researcher to take advantage of such a wealth of structural data, it is necessary to gain competency in the use of computer molecular visualization tools for exploring the structures and visualizing three-dimensional spatial representations. Here, we present protocols for using two common visualization tools--the Web-based Jmol and the stand-alone PyMOL package--as well as a few examples of other popular tools. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  19. Method for radiolabeling proteins with technetium-99m

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crockford, D.R.; Rhodes, B.A.

    1984-01-01

    In accordance with this invention, a substrate to be radiolabeled with technetium-99m is admixed with a buffered stannous chloride composition having a pH between about 4.5 and about 8.5 wherein the stannous chloride is produced from a non-oxidized tin source, the buffered stannous chloride is purged of oxygen and the buffer comprises a mixture of alkali metal biphthalate and an alkali metal tartrate. Alternatively, the buffer may include alkali metal borate or gentisate. The stannous chloride solution is admixed with the buffer and the resultant mixture is neutralized with sodium hydroxide. The neutralized solution then is admixed with the substrate eventually to be radiolabeled with technetium-99m. This solution is allowed to incubate for several hours (usually over 15 hours) in the absence of oxygen and at room temperature

  20. Quantitation of radiolabeled compounds eluting from the HPLC system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kessler, M.J.

    1982-01-01

    Three techniques are compared for the quantitation of various radiolabeled compounds eluting in the high performance liquid chromatography system. The first technique requires fraction-collecting the effluent from the HPLC, removing an aliquot to scintillation vials, and counting each fraction in a liquid scintillation counter. The second uses direct interface of the HPLC effluent to a flow-through radioactivity detector. The third involves quantitation of various radiolabeled compounds (proteins, steroids, and nucleotides) by splitting the effluent from the HPLC with an electronic steam splitter, thus diverting a present portion to the fraction collector for further chemical characterization and the remainder to the radioactivity flow detector for direct quantitation. A direct comparison of the chromatograms and the radioactivity counting efficiencies of these three techniques is presented

  1. Radiolabeled microsphere measurements of alveolar bone blood flow in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, M.L.; Jeffcoat, M.K.; Goldhaber, P.

    1978-01-01

    Radiolabeled microspheres were injected into the left cardiac ventricle in healthy adult dogs to quantify blood in maxillary and mandibular alveolar bone. Heart rate, arterial blood pressure and pulse contour were monitored throughout each experiment. Blood flow in maxillary alveolar bone was more than 30 % greater (p<.001) than in mandibular alveolar bone. Alveolar bone blood flow (mean +- S.D.) measured as ml/min per gram was 0.12 +- .02 in the maxilla compared to 0.09 +- .02 in the mandible. The cardiovascular parameters monitored were constant immediately prior to the injection of microspheres and remained unchanged during and following injection. It is possible that radiolabeled microspheres can be used to quantify the circulatory changes in alveolar bone during the development of destructive periodontal disease in dogs. (author)

  2. Printing technologies for biomolecule and cell-based applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihalainen, Petri; Määttänen, Anni; Sandler, Niklas

    2015-10-30

    Biomolecules, such as enzymes, proteins and other biomacromolecules (polynucleotides, polypeptides, polysaccharides and DNA) that are immobilized on solid surfaces are relevant to many areas of science and technology. These functionalized surfaces have applications in biosensors, chromatography, diagnostic immunoassays, cell culturing, DNA microarrays and other analytical techniques. Printing technologies offer opportunities in this context. The main interests in printing biomolecules are in immobilizing them on surfaces for sensors and catalysts or for controlled delivery of protein-based drugs. Recently, there have been significant developments in the use of inkjet printing for dispensing of proteins, biomacromolecules and cells. This review discusses the use of roll-to-roll and inkjet printing technologies in manufacturing of biomolecule and cell-based applications. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Constraint methods that accelerate free-energy simulations of biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Alberto; MacCallum, Justin L; Coutsias, Evangelos A; Dill, Ken A

    2015-12-28

    Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of biomolecules are critical for generating narratives about biological mechanisms. The power of atomistic simulations is that these are physics-based methods that satisfy Boltzmann's law, so they can be used to compute populations, dynamics, and mechanisms. But physical simulations are computationally intensive and do not scale well to the sizes of many important biomolecules. One way to speed up physical simulations is by coarse-graining the potential function. Another way is to harness structural knowledge, often by imposing spring-like restraints. But harnessing external knowledge in physical simulations is problematic because knowledge, data, or hunches have errors, noise, and combinatoric uncertainties. Here, we review recent principled methods for imposing restraints to speed up physics-based molecular simulations that promise to scale to larger biomolecules and motions.

  4. Magnetic behavior of iron oxide nanoparticle-biomolecule assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Taegyun; Reis, Lynn; Rajan, Krishna; Shima, Mutsuhiro

    2005-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles of 8-20 nm in size were investigated as an assembly with biomolecules synthesized in an aqueous solution. The magnetic behavior of the biomolecule-nanoparticles assembly depends sensitively on the morphology and hence the distribution of the nanoparticles, where the dipole coupling between the nanoparticles governs the overall magnetic behavior. In assemblies of iron oxide nanoparticles with trypsin, we observe a formation of unusual self-alignment of nanoparticles within trypsin molecules. In such an assembly structure, the magnetic particles tend to exhibit a lower spin-glass transition temperature than as-synthesized bare iron oxide nanoparticles probably due to reduced interparticle couplings within the molecular matrix. The observed self-alignment of nanoparticles in biomolecules may be a useful approach for directed nanoparticles assembly

  5. Understanding small biomolecule-biomaterial interactions: a review of fundamental theoretical and experimental approaches for biomolecule interactions with inorganic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Dominique; Garrain, Pierre-Alain; Baaden, Marc

    2013-04-01

    Interactions between biomolecules and inorganic surfaces play an important role in natural environments and in industry, including a wide variety of conditions: marine environment, ship hulls (fouling), water treatment, heat exchange, membrane separation, soils, mineral particles at the earth's surface, hospitals (hygiene), art and buildings (degradation and biocorrosion), paper industry (fouling) and more. To better control the first steps leading to adsorption of a biomolecule on an inorganic surface, it is mandatory to understand the adsorption mechanisms of biomolecules of several sizes at the atomic scale, that is, the nature of the chemical interaction between the biomolecule and the surface and the resulting biomolecule conformations once adsorbed at the surface. This remains a challenging and unsolved problem. Here, we review the state of art in experimental and theoretical approaches. We focus on metallic biomaterial surfaces such as TiO(2) and stainless steel, mentioning some remarkable results on hydroxyapatite. Experimental techniques include atomic force microscopy, surface plasmon resonance, quartz crystal microbalance, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, fluorescence microscopy, polarization modulation infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy, sum frequency generation and time of flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy. Theoretical models range from detailed quantum mechanical representations to classical forcefield-based approaches. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Localisation and mechanism of renal retention of radiolabelled somatostatin analogues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melis, Marleen; Krenning, Eric P.; Bernard, Bert F.; Jong, Marion de [Erasmus MC, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Barone, Raffaella [UCL, Centre of Nuclear Medicine and Laboratory of PET, Brussels (Belgium); Visser, Theo J. [Erasmus MC, Department of Internal Medicine, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2005-10-01

    Radiolabelled somatostatin analogues, such as octreotide and octreotate, are used for tumour scintigraphy and radionuclide therapy. The kidney is the most important critical organ during such therapy owing to the reabsorption and retention of radiolabelled peptides. The aim of this study was to investigate in a rat model both the localisation and the mechanism of renal uptake after intravenous injection of radiolabelled somatostatin analogues. The multi-ligand megalin/cubilin receptor complex, responsible for reabsorption of many peptides and proteins in the kidney, is an interesting candidate for renal endocytosis of these peptide analogues. For localisation studies, ex vivo autoradiography and micro-autoradiography of rat kidneys were performed 1-24 h after injection of radiolabelled somatostatin analogues and compared with the renal anti-megalin immunohistochemical staining pattern. To confirm a role of megalin in the mechanism of renal retention of [{sup 111}In-DTPA]octreotide, the effects of three inhibitory substances were explored in rats. Renal ex vivo autoradiography showed high cortical radioactivity and lower radioactivity in the outer medulla. The distribution of cortical radioactivity was inhomogeneous. Micro-autoradiography indicated that radioactivity was only retained in the proximal tubules. The anti-megalin immunohistochemical staining pattern showed a strong similarity with the renal [{sup 111}In-DTPA]octreotide ex vivo autoradiograms. Biodistribution studies showed that co-injection of positively charged d-lysine reduced renal uptake to 60% of control. Sodium maleate reduced renal [{sup 111}In-DTPA]octreotide uptake to 15% of control. Finally, cisplatin pre-treatment of rats reduced kidney uptake to 70% of control. Renal retention of [{sup 111}In-DTPA]octreotide is confined to proximal tubules in the rat kidney, in which megalin-mediated endocytosis may play an important part. (orig.)

  7. O ATLETISMO NA PERSPECTIVA EDUCACIONAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Araujo de Sousa

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A educação física escolar deve proporcionar experiências aos alunos para o seu desenvolvimento integral. As aulas muitas vezes são reduzidas ao ensino de esportes tradicionais, o que limita o repertório de movimentos dos alunos. Dessa forma o presente estudo de revisão objetiva problematizar o atletismo no ambiente escolar e propor possibilidades pedagógicas para seu ensino. Nesta pesquisa propomos tratar o ensino do atletismo na escola, caracterizando-o pelo seu repertório de movimentos que são naturais ao ser humano, como correr, saltar e lançar, o que possibilita maior praticidade em sua aplicação pedagógica, porém essas possibilidades não são consideradas no ambiente educacional. Diante dos dados encontrados, sugerimos que esse esporte seja abordado de forma multidimensional no ambiente escolar contextualizando-o à visão de algumas correntes teóricas. Nessa perspectiva do esporte educacional, o atletismo pode, assim como deve ser trabalhado nas aulas de educação física como instrumento pedagógico de ensino e auxiliar na formação do aluno de forma global.

  8. Carioca: a perspectiva da enfermagem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Elisa Fernandes Lima

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: describir las acciones recomendadas por el Programa Cigüeña Carioca para atención a las parturientes y determinar si la aplicación de este Programa tuvo repercusiones en esta asistencia desde la perspectiva del equipo de enfermería. Métodos: estudio descriptivo, con abordaje cualitativo, realizado en una maternidad pública. Entrevistas semiestructuradas se realizaron con cuatro enfermeras obstétricas y siete auxiliares de enfermería que trabajan en el centro de obstetricia de la maternidad. Se utilizó la técnica de análisis de contenido temático. Resultados: las categorías del estudio fueron: Calificación de la atención obstétrica hospitalaria y Repercusiones asistenciales y profesionales del Programa Cigüeña Carioca. Conclusión: el personal de enfermería consideró que la aplicación del Programa ha traído mejoras en la atención al parto, favoreciendo la garantía de los derechos de la mujer y el cumplimiento de la enfermería obstétrica en la red de salud municipal.

  9. Novel strategies for microdose studies using non-radiolabeled compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Kazuya; Sugiyama, Yuichi

    2011-06-19

    Microdose studies using non-radiolabeled compounds enable assessment of the clinical pharmacokinetics of drug candidates in humans without the need to synthesize radiolabeled compounds. We have demonstrated that the quantification limits of many drugs measured by LC-MS/MS are low enough to allow estimation of their pharmacokinetic parameters following administration of a microdose. Our previous microdose studies with LC-MS/MS demonstrated the linear pharmacokinetics of fexofenadine between microdoses and therapeutic doses. We also obtained time profiles of plasma concentrations of nicardipine and its multiple metabolites following administration of a microdose. A significant advantage of using non-radiolabeled compounds is the ability to perform cassette microdose studies. By administering multiple drug candidates to the same subject, we can select compounds with appropriate pharmacokinetic properties simultaneously. We can also clarify major factors dominating the pharmacokinetics of drug candidates by cocktail microdosing of the test compounds and probe substrates with or without specific inhibitors for enzymes/transporters. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Radiolabelling of autologous leucocytes: technique and clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strobl-Jaeger, E.; Kolbe, H.; Ludwig, H.; Sinzinger, H.

    1988-01-01

    Gamma-camera imaging after injection of radiolabelled autologous leucocytes can be very helpful in the diagnosis, localization and further clinical treatment of inflammatory diseases. We present a technique allowing sterile separation of white blood cells and labelling with 99m Tc-phytate or -oxine and with 111 In-oxine, -oxine sulphate or -tropolone. The method is non-invasive and the radiation dose amounts to less than 80 mrad using 100 μCi 111 Indium. The use of radiolabelled granulocytes is of particular diagnostic value in patients with septicaemia of unknown origin. Whole body scanning allows not only visualization of enhanced splenic uptake in septicaemia, but also localization of an inflammatory process. Preferential indications for a diagnostic approach using radiolabelled granulocytes are inflammatory abdominal processes which cannot easily be documented by means of other non-invasive techniques, such as inflammatory bowel disease (Crohn's diseases and ulcerative colitis), arthritic processes and abscesses of the liver and spleen, as well as subphrenic and retroperitoneal abscesses. Untreated osteomyelitis can be located with the help of labelled granulocytes, but in patients treated with antibiotics a false negative result is obtained in approximately 50 % of cases for as yet unknown reasons, even in the presence of a still active osteomyelitic process. (Authors)

  11. Radiolabeling, biodistribution and tumor imaging of stealth liposomes containing methotrexate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subramanian, N; Arulsudar, N; Chuttani, K; Mishra, P; Sharma, R.K; Murthy, R.S.R

    2003-01-01

    To study the utility of sterically stabilized liposomes (stealth liposomes) in tumor scintigraphy by studying its biodistribution and accumulation in target tissue after radiolabeling with Technetium-99m (99mTC). Conventional and Stealth liposomes were prepared by lipid film hydration method using methotrexate as model anticancer drug. Radiolabeling of the liposomes was carried out by direct labeling using reduced 99mTc. Experimental conditions for maximum labeling yield were optimized. The stability studies were carried out to check binding strength of the radiolabeled complexes. The blood kinetic study was carried out in rabbits after giving the labeled complex by intravenous administration through ear vein. The biodistribution studies were carried out in the Ehrlich ascites tumor (EAT) bearing mice after intravenous administration through tail vein, showed prolonged circulation in blood and significant increase in the accumulation in tumor for the sterically stabilized liposomes compared to the conventional liposomes. The gamma scintigraphic image shows the distribution of the stealth liposomes in liver, spleen, kidney and tumor. The study gives precise idea about the use of stealth liposomes in tumor scintigraphy and organ distribution studies (Au)

  12. A relationship between solvent viscosity and biomolecule picosecond thermal fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornicchi, E.; De Francesco, A.; Marconi, M.; Onori, G.; Paciaroni, A.

    2008-01-01

    Through elastic neutron scattering measurements, we investigated the picosecond dynamics of DNA in the hydrated powder state or embedded in glycerol glassy matrix from 20 K to 300 K. We calculated the relaxational contribution of the mean square displacements (MSD) of DNA hydrogen atoms. We found the existence of a linear relationship between the inverse of the biomolecule relaxational MSD and the logarithm of the bulk viscosity of the surrounding environment. From the comparison with the case of lysozyme in the same environments, for which the validity of the relationship was already verified, possible differences and analogies concerning the biomolecule-to-solvent dynamical coupling can be stressed

  13. One-step mild biorefinery of functional biomolecules from microalgae extracts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Desai, R.K.; Monteillet, H.J.M.; Li, Xiaohua; Schuur, Boelo; Wijffels, R.H.; Eppink, M.H.M.

    2018-01-01

    Fractionation of complex matrices such as biomass into diverse functional biomolecules without disrupting the biomolecule functionalities is a real challenge. Known separation processes are designed for the recovery
    of single products such as hydrophilic proteins or hydrophobic pigments,

  14. One-step mild biorefinery of functional biomolecules from microalgae extracts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Desai, Rupali K.; Monteillet, Hélène; Li, Xiaohua; Schuur, Boelo; Kleijn, J. Mieke; Leermakers, Frans A.M.; Wijffels, Rene H.; Eppink, Michel H.M.

    2018-01-01

    Fractionation of complex matrices such as biomass into diverse functional biomolecules without disrupting the biomolecule functionalities is a real challenge. Known separation processes are designed for the recovery of single products such as hydrophilic proteins or hydrophobic pigments, discarding

  15. Fundamentals of Biomolecule Analysis by Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinecke, Andrea; Ryzhov, Victor

    2005-01-01

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) is a soft ionization technique that allows transfer of fragile biomolecules directly from solution into the gas phase. An instrumental analysis laboratory experiment is designed that would introduce the students to the ESI technique, major parameters of the ion trap mass spectrometers and some caveats in…

  16. Artificial tongue based on metal-biomolecule coordination polymer nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Fang; Ran, Xiang; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2016-02-25

    We construct an array-based recognition system (the so-called artificial tongue) through the self-assembly of nucleotides, dyes and lanthanide ions. Metal ions are selected as model analytes for verifying its discrimination ability. The work provides valuable insights into the application and development of biomolecule-based materials.

  17. Photochemical Microscale Electrophoresis Allows Fast Quantification of Biomolecule Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, Friederike M; Kieß, Michael; Braun, Dieter

    2016-04-27

    Intricate spatiotemporal patterns emerge when chemical reactions couple to physical transport. We induce electrophoretic transport by a confined photochemical reaction and use it to infer the binding strength of a second, biomolecular binding reaction under physiological conditions. To this end, we use the photoactive compound 2-nitrobenzaldehyde, which releases a proton upon 375 nm irradiation. The charged photoproducts locally perturb electroneutrality due to differential diffusion, giving rise to an electric potential Φ in the 100 μV range on the micrometer scale. Electrophoresis of biomolecules in this field is counterbalanced by back-diffusion within seconds. The biomolecule concentration is measured by fluorescence and settles proportionally to exp(-μ/D Φ). Typically, binding alters either the diffusion coefficient D or the electrophoretic mobility μ. Hence, the local biomolecule fluorescence directly reflects the binding state. A fit to the law of mass action reveals the dissociation constant of the binding reaction. We apply this approach to quantify the binding of the aptamer TBA15 to its protein target human-α-thrombin and to probe the hybridization of DNA. Dissociation constants in the nanomolar regime were determined and match both results in literature and in control experiments using microscale thermophoresis. As our approach is all-optical, isothermal and requires only nanoliter volumes at nanomolar concentrations, it will allow for the fast screening of biomolecule binding in low volume multiwell formats.

  18. Silica biomineralization via the self-assembly of helical biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ben; Cao, Yuanyuan; Huang, Zhehao; Duan, Yingying; Che, Shunai

    2015-01-21

    The biomimetic synthesis of relevant silica materials using biological macromolecules as templates via silica biomineralization processes attract rapidly rising attention toward natural and artificial materials. Biomimetic synthesis studies are useful for improving the understanding of the formation mechanism of the hierarchical structures found in living organisms (such as diatoms and sponges) and for promoting significant developments in the biotechnology, nanotechnology and materials chemistry fields. Chirality is a ubiquitous phenomenon in nature and is an inherent feature of biomolecular components in organisms. Helical biomolecules, one of the most important types of chiral macromolecules, can self-assemble into multiple liquid-crystal structures and be used as biotemplates for silica biomineralization, which renders them particularly useful for fabricating complex silica materials under ambient conditions. Over the past two decades, many new silica materials with hierarchical structures and complex morphologies have been created using helical biomolecules. In this review, the developments in this field are described and the recent progress in silica biomineralization templating using several classes of helical biomolecules, including DNA, polypeptides, cellulose and rod-like viruses is summarized. Particular focus is placed on the formation mechanism of biomolecule-silica materials (BSMs) with hierarchical structures. Finally, current research challenges and future developments are discussed in the conclusion. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Optical aptasensors for quantitative detection of small biomolecules: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Chunjing; Dai, Shuang; Wang, Lei

    2014-09-15

    Aptasensors are aptamer-based biosensors with excellent recognition capability towards a wide range of targets. Specially, there have been ever-growing interests in the development of aptasensors for the detection of small molecules. This phenomenon is contributed to two reasons. On one hand, small biomolecules play an important role in living organisms with many kinds of biological function, such as antiarrhythmic effect and vasodilator activity of adenosine. On the other hand, the concentration of small molecules can be an indicator for disease diagnosis, for example, the concentration of ATP is closely associated with cell injury and cell viability. As a potential analysis tool in the construction of aptasensors, optical analysis has attracted much more interest of researchers due to its high sensitivity, quick response and simple operation. Besides, it promises the promotion of aptasensors in performance toward a new level. Review the development of optical aptasensors for small biomolecules will give readers an overall understanding of its progress and provide some theoretical guidelines for its future development. Hence, we give a mini-review on the advance of optical aptasensors for small biomolecules. This review focuses on recent achievements in the design of various optical aptasensors for small biomolecules, containing fluorescence aptasensors, colorimetric aptasensors, chemiluminescence aptasensors and other optical aptasensors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Recovery of biomolecules from food wastes--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baiano, Antonietta

    2014-09-17

    Food wastes are produced by a variety of sources, ranging from agricultural operations to household consumption. About 38% occurs during food processing. At present, the European Union legislation encourages the exploitation of co-products. This valorisation can be achieved through the extraction of high-value components such as proteins, polysaccharides, fibres, flavour compounds, and phytochemicals, which can be re-used as nutritionally and pharmacologically functional ingredients. Extraction can proceed according to solid-liquid extraction, Soxhlet extraction, pressurized fluid extraction, supercritical fluid extraction, ultrasound-assisted extraction, microwave-assisted extraction, pulsed electric field extraction, and enzyme-assisted extraction. Nevertheless, these techniques cannot be used indiscriminately and their choice depends on the type of biomolecules and matrix, the scale processing (laboratory or industrial), the ratio between production costs and economic values of the compounds to be extracted. The vegetable wastes include trimmings, peelings, stems, seeds, shells, bran, residues remaining after extraction of oil, starch, sugar, and juice. The animal-derived wastes include wastes from bred animals, wastes from seafood, wastes from dairy processing. The recovered biomolecules and by-products can be used to produce functional foods or as adjuvants in food processing or in medicinal and pharmaceutical preparations. This work is an overview of the type and amounts of food wastes; food waste legislation; conventional and novel techniques suitable for extracting biomolecules; food, medicinal and pharmaceutical uses of the recovered biomolecules and by-products, and future trends in these areas.

  1. Fullerene–biomolecule conjugates and their biomedicinal applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang X

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Xinlin Yang,1 Ali Ebrahimi,1 Jie Li,1,2 Quanjun Cui11Orthopaedic Research Laboratory, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USA; 2School of Materials Science, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: Fullerenes are among the strongest antioxidants and are characterized as "radical sponges." The research on biomedicinal applications of fullerenes has achieved significant progress since the landmark publication by Friedman et al in 1993. Fullerene–biomolecule conjugates have become an important area of research during the past 2 decades. By a thorough literature search, we attempt to update the information about the synthesis of different types of fullerene–biomolecule conjugates, including fullerene-containing amino acids and peptides, oligonucleotides, sugars, and esters. Moreover, we also discuss in this review recently reported data on the biological and pharmaceutical utilities of these compounds and some other fullerene derivatives of biomedical importance. While within the fullerene–biomolecule conjugates, in which fullerene may act as both an antioxidant and a carrier, specific targeting biomolecules conjugated to fullerene will undoubtedly strengthen the delivery of functional fullerenes to sites of clinical interest.Keywords: fullerene, amino acid, peptide, oligonucleotide, sugar, ester

  2. Recovery of Biomolecules from Food Wastes — A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonietta Baiano

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Food wastes are produced by a variety of sources, ranging from agricultural operations to household consumption. About 38% occurs during food processing. At present, the European Union legislation encourages the exploitation of co-products. This valorisation can be achieved through the extraction of high-value components such as proteins, polysaccharides, fibres, flavour compounds, and phytochemicals, which can be re-used as nutritionally and pharmacologically functional ingredients. Extraction can proceed according to solid-liquid extraction, Soxhlet extraction, pressurized fluid extraction, supercritical fluid extraction, ultrasound-assisted extraction, microwave-assisted extraction, pulsed electric field extraction, and enzyme-assisted extraction. Nevertheless, these techniques cannot be used indiscriminately and their choice depends on the type of biomolecules and matrix, the scale processing (laboratory or industrial, the ratio between production costs and economic values of the compounds to be extracted. The vegetable wastes include trimmings, peelings, stems, seeds, shells, bran, residues remaining after extraction of oil, starch, sugar, and juice. The animal-derived wastes include wastes from bred animals, wastes from seafood, wastes from dairy processing. The recovered biomolecules and by-products can be used to produce functional foods or as adjuvants in food processing or in medicinal and pharmaceutical preparations. This work is an overview of the type and amounts of food wastes; food waste legislation; conventional and novel techniques suitable for extracting biomolecules; food, medicinal and pharmaceutical uses of the recovered biomolecules and by-products, and future trends in these areas.

  3. Radiolabeling parameters of {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-RITUXIMAB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massicano, Adriana V.F.; Alcarde, Lais F.; Oliveira, Ricardo S.; Mengatti, Jair; Araujo, Elaine B. de, E-mail: adriana.avfernandes@gmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Cancer treatment using radioimmunotherapy (RIT) has been the focus of much research in the last two decades. In RIT, a radioisotope is coupled to a monoclonal antibody (mAb) to form a tumor-specific target agent to improve the cytocidal effect of the mAbs. RIT allows the systemic delivery of radiation to disease target by mAbs while sparing normal tissues. Rituximab® (Mabthera - Roche) is a chimeric mouse-human monoclonal antibody; it selectively binds with high affinity to the CD20 antigen, a hydrophobic transmembrane protein, which is expressed on B-lymphocytes and in more than 90% of B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL). The conjugation and radiolabeling process involve special conditions of pH and temperature, long processes of manipulation and mixing. All this process can damage the antibody structure and compromise its clinical application. Therefore, these parameters must be largely studied. The aim of this work was to evaluate the best radiolabeling conditions of DOTA-rituximab. Briefly, 10 mg of antibody previously purified by ultrafiltration device was conjugated with DOTA-NHS-ester (Macrocyclics) in 50 fold molar excess. The reaction was conducted for 1 hour in phosphate buffer pH 8.0 and gently mixing at room temperature, remaining for 24 hours under refrigeration. The immunoconjugated was purified by size exclusion column and ultrafiltration device. The radiolabeled parameters studied were: immunoconjugated mass, activity of {sup 177}LuCl{sub 3}, reaction time, temperature and pH. The radiochemical purity of the preparations was determined using analysis by thin layer chromatography (TLC-SG plates). The best studied condition presented radiochemical purity above 95% and the integrity of antibody was preserved. (author)

  4. Elevated Lipoprotein(A Impairs Platelet Radiolabeling Yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Granegger

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Platelet radiolabeling in clinical routine usually results in labeling efficiencies (LE above 80%. A variety of risk factors and clinical conditions are known to impair platelet labeling yield, among them elevated triglycerides and low-density lipoproteins. The potential influence of lipoprotein(a (Lp(a, an atherogenic lipoprotein particle containing a kringle subunit, which is widely found in the proteins of fibrinolysis pathway, has never been studied. Normal Lp(a levels range below 30 mg/ dl. The exact prevalence of elevated Lp(a is unknown, most likely ranging below 10%. Even more rare is an isolated elevation despite an otherwise normal lipoprotein profile. Methods: We examined the role of isolated elevated Lp(a (> 50 mg/dl, ranging up to 440 mg/dl compared to patients with normal lipid profile. Platelets were radiolabeled with in-111-oxine at 37 °C for 5 minutes using ISORBE-consensus methodology. Results: The findings indicate that already at levels below 100 mg/dl Lp(a decreases LE. LE assessment after cross-incubation of hyper-Lp(a platelets with normal Lp(a plasma and vice versa reveals that platelets rather than the plasmatic environment are responsible for the deterioration of labeling yield. This behavior already has been reported for elevated low-density lipoproteins. Apparently, the quantitative influence of LDL and Lp(a/mg is comparable. Plotting the sum of LDL and Lp(a versus LE reveals a clear significant negative correlation. Conclusion: As extremely elevated Lp(a, particularly above 150 mg/dl, may significantly impair labeling results. We therefore recommend to include extremely elevated Lp(a into the list of parameters, which should be known before performing radiolabeling of human platelets.

  5. Radiolabeling parameters of 177Lu-DOTA-RITUXIMAB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massicano, Adriana V.F.; Alcarde, Lais F.; Oliveira, Ricardo S.; Mengatti, Jair; Araujo, Elaine B. de

    2013-01-01

    Cancer treatment using radioimmunotherapy (RIT) has been the focus of much research in the last two decades. In RIT, a radioisotope is coupled to a monoclonal antibody (mAb) to form a tumor-specific target agent to improve the cytocidal effect of the mAbs. RIT allows the systemic delivery of radiation to disease target by mAbs while sparing normal tissues. Rituximab® (Mabthera - Roche) is a chimeric mouse-human monoclonal antibody; it selectively binds with high affinity to the CD20 antigen, a hydrophobic transmembrane protein, which is expressed on B-lymphocytes and in more than 90% of B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL). The conjugation and radiolabeling process involve special conditions of pH and temperature, long processes of manipulation and mixing. All this process can damage the antibody structure and compromise its clinical application. Therefore, these parameters must be largely studied. The aim of this work was to evaluate the best radiolabeling conditions of DOTA-rituximab. Briefly, 10 mg of antibody previously purified by ultrafiltration device was conjugated with DOTA-NHS-ester (Macrocyclics) in 50 fold molar excess. The reaction was conducted for 1 hour in phosphate buffer pH 8.0 and gently mixing at room temperature, remaining for 24 hours under refrigeration. The immunoconjugated was purified by size exclusion column and ultrafiltration device. The radiolabeled parameters studied were: immunoconjugated mass, activity of 177 LuCl 3 , reaction time, temperature and pH. The radiochemical purity of the preparations was determined using analysis by thin layer chromatography (TLC-SG plates). The best studied condition presented radiochemical purity above 95% and the integrity of antibody was preserved. (author)

  6. Gene transfer strategies for improving radiolabeled peptide imaging and therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, B.E.; Buchsbaum, D.J.; Zinn, K.R.

    2000-01-01

    Utilization of molecular biology techniques offers attractive options in nuclear medicine for improving cancer imaging and therapy with radiolabeled peptides. Two of these options include utilization of phage-panning to identify novel tumor specific peptides or single chain antibodies and gene transfer techniques to increase the antibodies and gene transfer techniques to increase the number of antigen/receptor sites expressed on malignant cells. The group has focused on the latter approach for improving radiolabeled peptide imaging and therapy. The most widely used gene transfer vectors in clinical gene therapy trials include retrovirus, cationic lipids and adenovirus. It has been utilized adenovirus vectors for gene transfer because of their ability to accomplish efficient in vivo gene transfer. Adenovirus vectors encoding the genes for a variety of antigens/receptors (carcinoembryonic antigen, gastrin-releasing peptide receptor, somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (SSTr2) have all shown that their expression is increased on cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo following adenovirus infection. Of particular interest has been the adenovirus encoding for SSTr2 (AdCMVSSTr2). Various radioisotopes have been attached to somatostatin analogues for imaging and therapy of SSTr2-positive tumors both clinically and in animal models. The use of these analogues in combination with AdCMVSSTr2 is a promising approach for improving the detection sensitivity and therapeutic efficacy of these radiolabeled peptides against solid tumors. In addition, it has been proposed the use of SSTr2 as a marker for imaging the expression of another cancer therapeutic transgene (e.g. cytosine deaminase, thymidine kinase) encoded within the same vector. This would allow for non-invasive monitoring of gene delivery to tumor sites

  7. Search for new and improved radiolabeling methods for monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiltunen, J.V.

    1993-01-01

    In this review the selection of different radioisotopes is discussed as well as the various traditional or newer methods to introduce the radiolabel into the antibody structure. Labeling methods for radiohalogens, for technetium and rhenium isotopes, and for 3-valent cation radiometals are reviewed. Some of the newer methods offer simplified labeling procedures, but usually the new methods are more complicated than the earlier ones. However, new labeling methods are available for almost any radioelement group and they may result in better preserved original natural of the antibody and lead to better clinical results. (orig./MG)

  8. A radiolabel release microassay for phagocytic killing of Candida albicans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bistoni, F.; Baccarini, M.; Blasi, E.; Marconi, P.; Puccetti, P.

    1982-01-01

    The chromium-51 release technique for quantifying intracellular killing of radiolabelled Candida albicans particles was exploited in a microassay in which murine and human phagocytes acted as effectors under peculiarly simple conditions. At appropriate effector: target ratios and with a 4 h incubation, up to 50% specific chromium release could be detected in the supernatant with no need for opsonization or lysis of phagocytes. This simple microassay permits easy-to-perform, simultaneous testing of a variety of different phagocytes even if only available in limited amounts, and provides an objective measurement of intracellular killing of Candida albicans. (Auth.)

  9. A simple method for affinity purification of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juweid, M; Sato, J; Paik, C; Onay-Basaran, S; Weinstein, J N; Neumann, R D [National Cancer Inst., Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1993-04-01

    A simple method is described for affinity purification of radiolabeled antibodies using glutaraldehyde-fixed tumor target cells. The cell-bound antibody fraction is removed from the cells by an acid wash and then immediately subjected to buffer-exchange chromatography. The method was applied to the D3 murine monoclonal antibody which binds to a 290 kDa antigen on the surface of Line 10 guinea pig carcinoma cells. No alteration in the molecular size profile was detected after acid washing. Purification resulted in a significant increase in immunoreactivity by an average of 14 [+-] 47% (SD; range 4-30%). (author).

  10. Radio-labelled quaternary compounds and their diagnostic use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, D.V.

    1984-01-01

    Radio-labelled compounds having a lipophilic cation, which are quaternary ammonium, phosphonium or arsonium halides, in which the halide is a chloride, bromide or iodide, and in which the four quaternary substituents are independently selected from Csub(1-3) alkyl, phenyl and benzyl, at least two substituents being phenyl or benzyl, and one phenyl or benzyl substituent carrying a ring-substituent selected from 123 I, 125 I, 131 I, 77 Br, 82 Br and 18 F. Such compounds can be administered by injection, and a radio-image of the myocardium obtained. (author)

  11. Fabrication of Biomolecule Microarrays for Cell Immobilization Using Automated Microcontact Printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foncy, Julie; Estève, Aurore; Degache, Amélie; Colin, Camille; Cau, Jean Christophe; Malaquin, Laurent; Vieu, Christophe; Trévisiol, Emmanuelle

    2018-01-01

    Biomolecule microarrays are generally produced by conventional microarrayer, i.e., by contact or inkjet printing. Microcontact printing represents an alternative way of deposition of biomolecules on solid supports but even if various biomolecules have been successfully microcontact printed, the production of biomolecule microarrays in routine by microcontact printing remains a challenging task and needs an effective, fast, robust, and low-cost automation process. Here, we describe the production of biomolecule microarrays composed of extracellular matrix protein for the fabrication of cell microarrays by using an automated microcontact printing device. Large scale cell microarrays can be reproducibly obtained by this method.

  12. Radiolabeled cypoxic cell sensitizers: tracer for assessment of ischemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathias, C.J.; Welch, M.J.; Kilbourn, M.R.; Jerabek, P.A.; Patrick, T.B.; Raichle, M.E.; Krohn, K.A.; Rasey, J.S.; Shaw, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    Hypoxic, non-functional, but viable, tissue may exist in heart and brain following an arterial occlusion. Identification of such tissue in vivo is crucial to the development of effective treatment strategies. It has been suggested that certain compounds capable of sensitizing hypoxic tumor cells to killing by x-rays (i.e., misonidazole) might serve as in vivo markers of hypoxic tissue in ischemic myocardium or brain if properly radiolabeled. To this end the authors have radiolabeled two fluorinated analogs of nitroimidazole based hypoxic cell sensitizers with the 110 minute half-lived positron-emitting fluorine-18. The ability of these tracers to quantitate the presence of hypoxic tissue has been studied in a gerbil stroke model. The in vivo uptake of one of these tracers [F-18]-fluoronormethyoxymisonidazole is dependent on the extent of tissue hypoxia, and thus, appears to have potential as a diagnostic indicator of non-functional but viable tissue when the tracer is used in conjunction with positron emission tomography. 80 references, 2 figures, 1 table

  13. Dielectric Spectroscopy of Biomolecules up to 110 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laux, Eva-Maria; Ermilova, Elena; Pannwitz, Daniel; Gibbons, Jessica; Hölzel, Ralph; Bier, Frank F.

    2018-03-01

    Radio-frequency fields in the GHz range are increasingly applied in biotechnology and medicine. In order to fully exploit both their potential and their risks detailed information about the dielectric properties of biological material is needed. For this purpose a measuring system is presented that allows the acquisition of complex dielectric spectra over 4 frequency decade up to 110 GHz. Routines for calibration and for data evaluation according to physicochemical interaction models have been developed. The frequency dependent permittivity and dielectric loss of some proteins and nucleic acids, the main classes of biomolecules, and of their sub-units have been determined. Dielectric spectra are presented for the amino acid alanine, the proteins lysozyme and haemoglobin, the nucleotides AMP and ATP, and for the plasmid pET-21, which has been produced by bacterial culture. Characterisation of a variety of biomolecules is envisaged, as is the application to studies on protein structure and function.

  14. Surface Treatment of Polymeric Materials Controlling the Adhesion of Biomolecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willy Zorzi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This review describes different strategies of surface elaboration for a better control of biomolecule adsorption. After a brief description of the fundamental interactions between surfaces and biomolecules, various routes of surface elaboration are presented dealing with the attachment of functional groups mostly thanks to plasma techniques, with the grafting to and from methods, and with the adsorption of surfactants. The grafting of stimuli-responsive polymers is also pointed out. Then, the discussion is focused on the protein adsorption phenomena showing how their interactions with solid surfaces are complex. The adsorption mechanism is proved to be dependent on the solid surface physicochemical properties as well as on the surface and conformation properties of the proteins. Different behaviors are also reported for complex multiple protein solutions.

  15. Surface Treatment of Polymeric Materials Controlling the Adhesion of Biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poncin-Epaillard, Fabienne; Vrlinic, Tjasa; Debarnot, Dominique; Mozetic, Miran; Coudreuse, Arnaud; Legeay, Gilbert; El Moualij, Benaïssa; Zorzi, Willy

    2012-01-01

    This review describes different strategies of surface elaboration for a better control of biomolecule adsorption. After a brief description of the fundamental interactions between surfaces and biomolecules, various routes of surface elaboration are presented dealing with the attachment of functional groups mostly thanks to plasma techniques, with the grafting to and from methods, and with the adsorption of surfactants. The grafting of stimuli-responsive polymers is also pointed out. Then, the discussion is focused on the protein adsorption phenomena showing how their interactions with solid surfaces are complex. The adsorption mechanism is proved to be dependent on the solid surface physicochemical properties as well as on the surface and conformation properties of the proteins. Different behaviors are also reported for complex multiple protein solutions. PMID:24955631

  16. Electronic sputtering of biomolecules and its application in mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haakansson, P.; Sundqvist, B.U.R.

    1989-01-01

    In 1974 Macfarlane discovered that fast heavy ions from a 252-Cf source can desorb and ionize molecules from a solid surface. The mass of the molecules was determined by time-of-flight technique. It has been shown that the desorption mechanism is associated with the electron part of the stopping power of the primary ion and the name 'electron sputtering' has been adopted for the phenomenon to distinguish it from the well-known sputtering process with ions of KeV energy. A review of electronic sputtering of biomolecules will be given as well as recent measurements on Langmuir-Blodgett films. One important application of electronic sputtering is in the field of mass spectrometry. With this technique large and nonvolatile molecules can be studied. Particularly adsorption of biomolecules to a nitrocellulose backing has proven to be very useful. Examples will be given of mass spectra from peptides with a molecular weight above 20,000 u. (author)

  17. Hierarchically Ordered Nanopatterns for Spatial Control of Biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The development and study of a benchtop, high-throughput, and inexpensive fabrication strategy to obtain hierarchical patterns of biomolecules with sub-50 nm resolution is presented. A diblock copolymer of polystyrene-b-poly(ethylene oxide), PS-b-PEO, is synthesized with biotin capping the PEO block and 4-bromostyrene copolymerized within the polystyrene block at 5 wt %. These two handles allow thin films of the block copolymer to be postfunctionalized with biotinylated biomolecules of interest and to obtain micropatterns of nanoscale-ordered films via photolithography. The design of this single polymer further allows access to two distinct superficial nanopatterns (lines and dots), where the PEO cylinders are oriented parallel or perpendicular to the substrate. Moreover, we present a strategy to obtain hierarchical mixed morphologies: a thin-film coating of cylinders both parallel and perpendicular to the substrate can be obtained by tuning the solvent annealing and irradiation conditions. PMID:25363506

  18. Universal scaling for biomolecule desorption induced by swift heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szenes, G.

    2005-01-01

    A thermal activation mechanism is proposed for the desorption of biomolecules. Good agreement is found with the experiments in a broad range of the electronic stopping power. The activation energies of desorption U are 0.33, 1.57 and 5.35 eV for positive, negative and neutral leucine molecules, respectively, and 2.05 eV for positive ergosterol molecules. The desorption of valine clusters is analyzed. The magnitude of the specific heat shows that the internal degrees of freedom are not excited up to the moment of desorption. The effect of irradiation temperature and of ion velocity on the desorption yield is discussed on the basis of the author's model. The scaling function derived in the model for the desorption of biomolecules is applied also to the sputtering of SiO 2 and U = 0.42 eV is obtained

  19. From clusters to biomolecules: electric dipole, structure and dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broyer, M; Antoine, R; Compagnon, I; Rayane, D; Dugourd, P

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, it is demonstrated that the electric dipole of complex molecules or clusters can be measured by beam deviation in an inhomogeneous electric field. This measurement, associated to appropriate theoretical calculations and simulations, allows us to determine the geometry of these systems and their dynamical behaviour as a function of temperature. Selected examples for mixed clusters (metal-fullerene, metal-benzene, salt) and biomolecules (hydrogen bound amino acids and glycine based polypeptides) are discussed

  20. Thermo-responsive hydrogels for intravitreal injection and biomolecule release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drapala, Pawel

    In this dissertation, we develop an injectable polymer system to enable localized and prolonged release of therapeutic biomolecules for improved treatment of Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD). Thermo-responsive hydrogels derived from N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAAm) and cross-linked with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) poly(L-Lactic acid) (PLLA) copolymer were synthesized via free-radical polymerization. These materials were investigated for (a) phase change behavior, (b) in-vitro degradation, (c) capacity for controlled drug delivery, and (d) biocompatibility. The volume-phase transition temperature (VPTT) of the PNIPAAm- co-PEG-b-PLLA hydrogels was adjusted using hydrophilic and hydrophobic moieties so that it is ca. 33°C. These hydrogels did not initially show evidence of degradation at 37°C due to physical cross-links of collapsed PNIPAAm. Only after addition of glutathione chain transfer agents (CTA)s to the precursor did the collapsed hydrogels become fully soluble at 37°C. CTAs significantly affected the release kinetics of biomolecules; addition of 1.0 mg/mL glutathione to 3 mM cross-linker accelerated hydrogel degradation, resulting in 100% release in less than 2 days. This work also explored the effect of PEGylation in order to tether biomolecules to the polymer matrix. It was demonstrated that non-site-specific PEGylation can postpone the burst release of solutes (up to 10 days in hydrogels with 0.5 mg/mL glutathione). Cell viability assays showed that at least two 20-minute buffer extraction steps were needed to remove cytotoxic elements from the hydrogels. Clinically-used therapeutic biomolecules LucentisRTM and AvastinRTM were demonstrated to be both stable and bioactive after release form PNIPAAm-co-PEG-b-PLLA hydrogels. The thermo-responsive hydrogels presented here offer a promising platform for the localized delivery of proteins such as recombinant antibodies.

  1. Optical Sensors for Biomolecules Using Nanoporous Sol-Gel Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jonathan; Zhou, Jing C.; Lan, Esther H.; Dunn, Bruce; Gillman, Patricia L.; Smith, Scott M.

    2004-01-01

    An important consideration for space missions to Mars is the ability to detect biosignatures. Solid-state sensing elements for optical detection of biological entities are possible using sol-gel based biologically active materials. We have used these materials as optical sensing elements in a variety of bioassays, including immunoassays and enzyme assays. By immobilizing an appropriate biomolecule in the sol-gel sensing element, we have successfully detected analytes such as amino acids and hormones. In the case of the amino acid glutamate, the enzyme glutamate dehydrogenase was the immobilized molecule, whereas in the case of the hormone cortisol, an anti-cortisol antibody was immobilized in the sensing element. In this previous work with immobilized enzymes and antibodies, excellent sensitivity and specificity were demonstrated in a variety of formats including bulk materials, thin films and fibers. We believe that the sol-gel approach is an attractive platform for bioastronautics sensing applications because of the ability to detect a wide range of entities such as amino acids, fatty acids, hopanes, porphyrins, etc. The sol-gel approach produces an optically transparent 3D silica matrix that forms around the biomolecule of interest, thus stabilizing its structure and functionality while allowing for optical detection. This encapsulation process protects the biomolecule and leads to a more "rugged" sensor. The nanoporous structure of the sol-gel matrix allows diffusion of small target molecules but keeps larger, biomolecules immobilized in the pores. We are currently developing these biologically active sol-gel materials into small portable devices for on-orbit cortisol detection

  2. Transition-Metal-Free Biomolecule-Based Flexible Asymmetric Supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yun; Wang, Hua; Hao, Rui; Guo, Lin

    2016-09-01

    A transition-metal-free asymmetric supercapacitor (ASC) is successfully fabricated based on an earth-abundant biomass derived redox-active biomolecule, named lawsone. Such an ASC exhibits comparable or even higher energy densities than most of the recently reported transition-metal-based ASCs, and this green ASC generation from renewable resources is promising for addressing current issues of electronic hazard processing, high cost, and unsustainability. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Renewable-Biomolecule-Based Full Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Pengfei; Wang, Hua; Yang, Yun; Yang, Jie; Lin, Jie; Guo, Lin

    2016-05-01

    A renewable-biomolecule-based full lithium-ion battery is successfully fabricated for the first time. Naturally derivable emodin and humic acid based electrodes are used as cathode and anode, respectively. The as-assembled batteries exhibit superb specific capacity and substantial operating voltage capable of powering a wearable electronic watch, suggesting the great potential for practical applications with the significant merits of sustainability and biocompatibility. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. In situ hybridization of superparamagnetic iron-biomolecule nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghimi, Nafiseh; Donkor, Apraku David; Mohapatra, Mamata; Thomas, Joseph Palathinkal; Su, Zhengding; Tang, Xiaowu Shirley; Leung, Kam Tong

    2014-07-23

    The increase in interest in the integration of organic-inorganic nanostructures in recent years has promoted the use of hybrid nanoparticles (HNPs) in medicine, energy conversion, and other applications. Conventional hybridization methods are, however, often long, complicated, and multistepped, and they involve biomolecules and discrete nanostructures as separate entities, all of which hinder the practical use of the resulting HNPs. Here, we present a novel, in situ approach to synthesizing size-specific HNPs using Fe-biomolecule complexes as the building blocks. We choose an anticancer peptide (p53p, MW 1.8 kDa) and an enzyme (GOx, MW 160 kDa) as model molecules to demonstrate the versatility of the method toward different types of molecules over a large size range. We show that electrostatic interaction for complex formation of metal hydroxide ion with the partially charged side of biomolecule in the solution is the key to hybridization of metal-biomolecule materials. Electrochemical deposition is then used to produce hybrid NPs from these complexes. These HNPs with controllable sizes ranging from 30 nm to 3.5 μm are found to exhibit superparamagnetic behavior, which is a big challenge for particles in this size regime. As an example of greatly improved properties and functionality of the new hybrid material, in vitro toxicity assessment of Fe-GOx HNPs shows no adverse effect, and the Fe-p53p HNPs are found to selectively bind to cancer cells. The superparamagnetic nature of these HNPs (superparamagnetic even above the size regime of 15-20 nm!), their biocompatibility, and the direct integration approach are fundamentally important to biomineralization and general synthesis strategy for bioinspired functional materials.

  5. Development of radioactively labelled cancer seeking biomolecules for targeted radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balter, H.; Verdera, S.

    2000-01-01

    The main objective of this project is the labelling and quality control of biomolecules with radionuclides beta emitters with high purity and stability. Techniques and methodology for labelling with 188 Re, 153 Sm, and 125 I as well as quality controls were done according the recommendations of the first research coordination meeting of this CRP. Also some useful chelators reported in the literature were synthesized in our laboratory

  6. Low energy electron-driven damage in biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanche, L.

    2005-01-01

    The damage induced by the impact of low energy electrons (LEE) on biomolecules is reviewed from a radiobiological perspective with emphasis on transient anion formation. The major type of experiments, which measure the yields of fragments produced as a function of incident electron energy (0.1 - 30 eV), are briefly described. Theoretical advances are also summarized. Several examples are presented from the results of recent experiments performed in the gas-phase and on bio-molecular films bombarded with LEE under ultra-high vacuum conditions. These include the results obtained from DNA films and those obtained from the fragmentation of elementary components of the DNA molecule (i.e., the bases, sugar and phosphate group analogs and oligonucleotides) and of proteins (e.g. amino acids). By comparing the results from different experiments and theory, it is possible to determine fundamental mechanisms that are involved in the dissociation of the biomolecules and the production of single- and double-strand breaks in DNA. Below 15 eV, electron resonances (i.e., the formation of transient anions) play a dominant role in the fragmentation of all biomolecules investigated. These transient anions fragment molecules by decaying into dissociative electronically excited states or by dissociating into a stable anion and a neutral radical. These fragments can initiate further reactions within large biomolecules or with nearby molecules and thus cause more complex chemical damage. Dissociation of a transient anion within DNA may occur by direct electron attachment at the location of dissociation or by electron transfer from another subunit. Damage to DNA is dependent on the molecular environment, topology, type of counter ion, sequence context and chemical modifications. (author)

  7. Models and algorithms for biomolecules and molecular networks

    CERN Document Server

    DasGupta, Bhaskar

    2016-01-01

    By providing expositions to modeling principles, theories, computational solutions, and open problems, this reference presents a full scope on relevant biological phenomena, modeling frameworks, technical challenges, and algorithms. * Up-to-date developments of structures of biomolecules, systems biology, advanced models, and algorithms * Sampling techniques for estimating evolutionary rates and generating molecular structures * Accurate computation of probability landscape of stochastic networks, solving discrete chemical master equations * End-of-chapter exercises

  8. Nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopic studies of iron-containing biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, Takehiro; Seto, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we report recent nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopic (NRVS) studies of iron-containing biomolecules and their model complexes. The NRVS is synchrotron-based element-specific vibrational spectroscopic methods. Unlike Raman and infrared spectroscopy, the NRVS can investigate all iron motions without selection rules, which provide atomic level insights into the structure/reactivity correlation of biologically relevant iron complexes. (author)

  9. Quantitative autoradiographic mapping of focal herpes simplex virus encephalitis using a radiolabeled antiviral drug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, R.

    1984-01-01

    A method of mapping herpes simplex viral infection comprising administering a radiolabeled antiviral active 5-substituted 1-(2'-deoxy-2'-substituted-D-arabinofuranosyl) pyrimidine nucleoside to the infected subject, and scanning the area in which the infection is to be mapped for the radiolabel

  10. Immobilization of biomolecules to plasma polymerized pentafluorophenyl methacrylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duque, Luis; Menges, Bernhard; Borros, Salvador; Förch, Renate

    2010-10-11

    Thin films of plasma polymerized pentafluorophenyl methacrylate (pp-PFM) offer highly reactive ester groups throughout the structure of the film that allow for subsequent reactions with different aminated reagents and biological molecules. The present paper follows on from previous work on the plasma deposition of pentafluorophenyl methacrylate (PFM) for optimum functional group retention (Francesch, L.; Borros, S.; Knoll, W.; Foerch, R. Langmuir 2007, 23, 3927) and reactivity in aqueous solution (Duque, L.; Queralto, N.; Francesch, L.; Bumbu, G. G.; Borros, S.; Berger, R.; Förch, R. Plasma Process. Polym. 2010, accepted for publication) to investigate the binding of a biologically active peptide known to induce cellular adhesion (IKVAV) and of biochemically active proteins such as BSA and fibrinogen. Analyses of the films and of the immobilization of the biomolecules were carried out using infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The attachment of the biomolecules on pulsed plasma polymerized pentafluorophenyl methacrylate was monitored using surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy (SPR). SPR analysis confirmed the presence of immobilized biomolecules on the plasma polymer and was used to determine the mass coverage of the peptide and proteins adsorbed onto the films. The combined analysis of the surfaces suggests the covalent binding of the peptide and proteins to the surface of the pp-PFM.

  11. Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticle-Biomolecule Interactions Influence Oral Absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Mi-Rae; Yu, Jin; Kim, Hyoung-Jun; Song, Jae Ho; Kim, Kyoung-Min; Oh, Jae-Min; Choi, Soo-Jin

    2016-11-29

    Titanium dioxide (TiO₂) nanoparticles (NPs) have been widely applied in various industrial fields, such as electronics, packaging, food, and cosmetics. Accordingly, concerns about the potential toxicity of TiO₂ NPs have increased. In order to comprehend their in vivo behavior and potential toxicity, we must evaluate the interactions between TiO₂ NPs and biomolecules, which can alter the physicochemical properties and the fate of NPs under physiological conditions. In the present study, in vivo solubility, oral absorption, tissue distribution, and excretion kinetics of food grade TiO₂ (f-TiO₂) NPs were evaluated following a single-dose oral administration to rats and were compared to those of general grade TiO₂ (g-TiO₂) NPs. The effect of the interactions between the TiO₂ NPs and biomolecules, such as glucose and albumin, on oral absorption was also investigated, with the aim of determining the surface interactions between them. The intestinal transport pathway was also assessed using 3-dimensional culture systems. The results demonstrate that slightly higher oral absorption of f-TiO₂ NPs compared to g-TiO₂ NPs could be related to their intestinal transport mechanism by microfold (M) cells, however, most of the NPs were eliminated through the feces. Moreover, the biokinetics of f-TiO₂ NPs was highly dependent on their interaction with biomolecules, and the dispersibility was affected by modified surface chemistry.

  12. Repulsive effects of hydrophobic diamond thin films on biomolecule detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruslinda, A. Rahim, E-mail: ruslindarahim@gmail.com [Institute of Nano Electronic Engineering, Universiti Malaysia Perlis, Jln Kgr-Alor Setar, Seriab, 01000 Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Department of Nano Science and Nano Engineering, School of Advance Science and Engineering, Ohkubo 3-4-1, Shinjuku, 169-8555 Tokyo (Japan); Ishiyama, Y. [Department of Nano Science and Nano Engineering, School of Advance Science and Engineering, Ohkubo 3-4-1, Shinjuku, 169-8555 Tokyo (Japan); Penmatsa, V. [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Florida International University, 10555 West Flagler Street, Miami, FL 33174 (United States); Ibori, S.; Kawarada, H. [Department of Nano Science and Nano Engineering, School of Advance Science and Engineering, Ohkubo 3-4-1, Shinjuku, 169-8555 Tokyo (Japan)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • We report the effect of fluorine plasma treatment on diamond thin film to resist the nonspecific adsorption of biomolecules. • The diamond thin film were highly hydrophobic with a surface energy value of ∼25 mN/m. • The repulsive effect shows excellent binding efficiency for both DNA and HIV-1 Tat protein. - Abstract: The repulsive effect of hydrophobic diamond thin film on biomolecule detection, such as single-nucleotide polymorphisms and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 trans-activator of transcription peptide protein detection, was investigated using a mixture of a fluorine-, amine-, and hydrogen-terminated diamond surfaces. These chemical modifications lead to the formation of a surface that effectively resists the nonspecific adsorption of proteins and other biomolecules. The effect of fluorine plasma treatment on elemental composition was also investigated via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). XPS results revealed a fluorocarbon layer on the diamond thin films. The contact angle measurement results indicated that the fluorine-treated diamond thin films were highly hydrophobic with a surface energy value of ∼25 mN/m.

  13. Repulsive effects of hydrophobic diamond thin films on biomolecule detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruslinda, A. Rahim; Ishiyama, Y.; Penmatsa, V.; Ibori, S.; Kawarada, H.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We report the effect of fluorine plasma treatment on diamond thin film to resist the nonspecific adsorption of biomolecules. • The diamond thin film were highly hydrophobic with a surface energy value of ∼25 mN/m. • The repulsive effect shows excellent binding efficiency for both DNA and HIV-1 Tat protein. - Abstract: The repulsive effect of hydrophobic diamond thin film on biomolecule detection, such as single-nucleotide polymorphisms and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 trans-activator of transcription peptide protein detection, was investigated using a mixture of a fluorine-, amine-, and hydrogen-terminated diamond surfaces. These chemical modifications lead to the formation of a surface that effectively resists the nonspecific adsorption of proteins and other biomolecules. The effect of fluorine plasma treatment on elemental composition was also investigated via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). XPS results revealed a fluorocarbon layer on the diamond thin films. The contact angle measurement results indicated that the fluorine-treated diamond thin films were highly hydrophobic with a surface energy value of ∼25 mN/m

  14. Applications of polymers for biomolecule immobilization in electrochemical biosensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teles, F.R.R.; Fonseca, L.P.

    2008-01-01

    Polymers are becoming inseparable from biomolecule immobilization strategies and biosensor platforms. Their original role as electrical insulators has been progressively substituted by their electrical conductive abilities, which opens a new and broad scope of applications. In addition, recent advances in diagnostic chips and microfluidic systems, together with the requirements of mass-production technologies, have raised the need to replace glass by polymeric materials, which are more suitable for production through simple manufacturing processes. Conducting polymers (CPs), in particular, are especially amenable for electrochemical biosensor development for providing biomolecule immobilization and for rapid electron transfer. It is expected that the combination of known polymer substrates, but also new transducing and biocompatible interfaces, with nanobiotechnological structures, like nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and nanoengineered 'smart' polymers, may generate composites with new and interesting properties, providing higher sensitivity and stability of the immobilized molecules, thus constituting the basis for new and improved analytical devices for biomedical and other applications. This review covers the state-of-the-art and main novelties about the use of polymers for immobilization of biomolecules in electrochemical biosensor platforms

  15. Effect of water and ionic liquids on biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Debasis; Mukherjee, Arnab

    2018-02-08

    The remarkable progress in the field of ionic liquids (ILs) in the last two decades has involved investigations on different aspects of ILs in various conditions. The nontoxic and biocompatible nature of ILs makes them a suitable substance for the storage and application of biomolecules. In this regard, the aqueous IL solutions have attracted a large number of studies to comprehend the role of water in modulating various properties of biomolecules. Here, we review some of the recent studies on aqueous ILs that concern the role of water in altering the behavior of ILs in general and in case of biomolecules solvated in ILs. The different structural and dynamic effects caused by water have been highlighted. We discuss the different modes of IL interaction that are responsible for stabilization and destabilization of proteins and enzymes followed by examples of water effect on this. The role of water in the case of nucleic acid storage in ILs, an area which has mostly been underrated, also has been emphasized. Our discussions highlight the fact that the effects of water on IL behavior are not general and are highly dependent on the nature of the IL under consideration. Overall, we aim to draw attention to the significance of water dynamics in the aqueous IL solutions, a better understanding of which can help in developing superior storage materials for application purposes.

  16. Functionalization of titanium dioxide nanotubes with biomolecules for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Weslley F; Arruda, Isabel R S; Silva, Germana M M; Machado, Giovanna; Coelho, Luana C B B; Correia, Maria T S

    2017-12-01

    Titanium (Ti) and its alloys are extensively used in the manufacture of implants because they have biocompatibility. The production of a nanostructured surface can be achieved by means of titanium dioxide nanotubes (TNTs) which can have dimensions equivalent to the nanometric components of human bone, in addition to increasing the efficiency of such implants. The search is ongoing for ways to improve the performance of these TNTs in terms of their functionalization through coating these nanotubular matrices with biomolecules. The biocompatibility of the functionalized TNTs can be improved by promoting rapid osseointegration, by preventing the adhesion of bacteria on such surfaces and/or by promoting a more sustained local release of drugs that are loaded into such TNTs. In addition to the implants, these nanotubular matrices have been used in the manufacture of high-performance biosensors capable of immobilizing principally enzymes on their surfaces, which has possible use in disease diagnosis. The objective of this review is to show the main techniques of immobilization of biomolecules in TNTs, evidencing the most recent applications of bioactive molecules that have been functionalized in the nanotubular matrices for use in implants and biosensors. This surveillance also proposes a new class of biomolecules that can be used to functionalize these nanostructured surfaces, lectins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Nucleobases, nucleosides, and nucleotides: versatile biomolecules for generating functional nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Fang; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2018-02-21

    The incorporation of biomolecules into nanomaterials generates functional nanosystems with novel and advanced properties, presenting great potential for applications in various fields. Nucleobases, nucleosides and nucleotides, as building blocks of nucleic acids and biological coenzymes, constitute necessary components of the foundation of life. In recent years, as versatile biomolecules for the construction or regulation of functional nanomaterials, they have stimulated interest in researchers, due to their unique properties such as structural diversity, multiplex binding sites, self-assembly ability, stability, biocompatibility, and chirality. In this review, strategies for the synthesis of nanomaterials and the regulation of their morphologies and functions using nucleobases, nucleosides, and nucleotides as building blocks, templates or modulators are summarized alongside selected applications. The diverse applications range from sensing, bioimaging, and drug delivery to mimicking light-harvesting antenna, the construction of logic gates, and beyond. Furthermore, some perspectives and challenges in this emerging field are proposed. This review is directed toward the broader scientific community interested in biomolecule-based functional nanomaterials.

  18. Surface plasmon resonance sensing: from purified biomolecules to intact cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yu-Wen; Wang, Wei

    2018-04-12

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) has become a well-recognized label-free technique for measuring the binding kinetics between biomolecules since the invention of the first SPR-based immunosensor in 1980s. The most popular and traditional format for SPR analysis is to monitor the real-time optical signals when a solution containing ligand molecules is flowing over a sensor substrate functionalized with purified receptor molecules. In recent years, rapid development of several kinds of SPR imaging techniques have allowed for mapping the dynamic distribution of local mass density within single living cells with high spatial and temporal resolutions and reliable sensitivity. Such capability immediately enabled one to investigate the interaction between important biomolecules and intact cells in a label-free, quantitative, and single cell manner, leading to an exciting new trend of cell-based SPR bioanalysis. In this Trend Article, we first describe the principle and technical features of two types of SPR imaging techniques based on prism and objective, respectively. Then we survey the intact cell-based applications in both fundamental cell biology and drug discovery. We conclude the article with comments and perspectives on the future developments. Graphical abstract Recent developments in surface plasmon resonance (SPR) imaging techniques allow for label-free mapping the mass-distribution within single living cells, leading to great expansions in biomolecular interactions studies from homogeneous substrates functionalized with purified biomolecules to heterogeneous substrates containing individual living cells.

  19. Development of 90Sr/90Y Generator Systems Based on SLM Techniques for Radiolabelling of Therapeutic Biomolecules with 90Y. Chapter 14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thu, N.T.; Van Dong, D.; Van Cuong, B.; Van Khoa, C.; Cam Hoa, V.T.

    2015-01-01

    Yttrium-90 is one of the most useful radionuclides for radioimmunotherapeutic applications, especially for labelling peptides and antibodies. Studies were carried out to develop a 90 Sr/ 90 Y generator system based on the SLM technique. Two stages of 90 Sr/ 90 Y generator systems were developed at different activity levels of 5, 20, 50 and 100 mCi and operated with semiautomation in sequential mode. In the first stage of the system, PC88A based SLM was used, which transported 90 Y from a nitric acid medium containing 0.01–4M HNO 3 . In the second stage, the 90 Y from the first stage was transferred to the first compartment of the second stage using carbamoylmethyl phosphine oxide (CMPO) based SLM where 1M acetic acid was used as the receiving phase for 90 Y. Quality control was carried out for the products of 90 Y using EPC with paper chromatography and Tec control chromatography. Peptides and antibodies were labelled using the 90 Y product obtained from the generator developed in house. (author)

  20. Development of radioactively labelled cancer seeking biomolecules for targeted therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillai, M.R.A.

    2000-01-01

    The work done towards the development of bifunctional chelating agents, modified peptide and their radiolabelling studies with 90 Y and 188 Re are reported. Bifunctional chelating agents DOTA, TETA and DAHPES were synthesised. DOTA-Lanreotide (Mauritius) was synthesised from lanreotide. 90 Y and 188 Re used in the studies were obtained from 90 Sr- 90 Y and 188 W- 188 Re generators. Complexation studies of DOTA and Mauritius with 90 Y and that of DAHPES and EC with 188 Re were carried out. Cell labelling of 90 Y-DOTA-Lanreotide with a cell line expressing somatostatin receptors was also carried out

  1. Quantitation of passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) by using radiolabelled antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ring, J.; Seifert, J.; Brendel, W.

    1978-01-01

    The major problem of detecting reaginic antibody by passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) is the quantitation of the dye reaction. Radiolabelled antigen was used in an attempt to quantitate the PCA reaction (Radio-PCA). Antisera containing reaginic antibody against human serum albumin (HSA) were produced in rabbits. These antisera were injected into normal rabbit skin in different dilutions. Twentyfour hours later HSA was injected intravenously either with Evans Blue or as 125-I-HSA. Radioactivity found in antibody-containing skin was significantly higher than in control specimens containing saline or normal rabbit serum, as low as antiserum dilutions of 1:1,000. Compared with Evans Blue technique Radio-PCA was able to distinguish quantitatively between different antiserum dilutions at a higher level of statistical significance. (author)

  2. Radiolabeling of liposomes and polymeric micelles with PET-isotopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Andreas Tue Ingemann

    as a revolution in modern therapeutics, especially in chemotherapy. A major reason is the ability of nanoparticles to accumulate in tumor tissue. Liposomes are the classic nanoparticle, consisting of a lipid membrane with an aqueous core. Polymeric micelles are made from amphiphilic detergent‐like copolymers......This thesis is divided into three separate chapters that can be read independently. Chapter 1 is a general introduction, touching upon liposomes and polymeric micelles and radiolabeling with 18F and 64Cu. Chapter 2 and 3 address two separate research projects, each described below. A complete......‐life only allowing up to 8 hours scans. 18F must be covalently attached to components of the liposome. By binding to a lipid, it can be stably lodged in the membrane. A glycerolipid and a cholesteryl ether were synthesized with free primary alcohols and a series of their sulphonates (Ms, Ts, Tf) were...

  3. Development of Novel Radio-labeled Materials using Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sun Ju; Hong, Y. D.; Choi, K. H.

    2010-04-01

    In this project, we aim to develop the novel radiomaterials using reactor-produced radioisotope for the targeted therapy of cancer. At initial stage, we have examined the effect of beta particle-emission radionuclides on the proliferation of various types of tumor cells and found that beta particle emission radionuclides significantly inhibited the proliferation of tumor cells. We have synthesized new bifunctional chelating agents (BFCAs) for bio-conjugation with bio-active molecules, such as peptide and antibody, and radioabeling with radionuclide. For targeted radiotherapy, we have prepared target materials and radiolabeled with various radionuclides using BFCAs and obtained candidate materials for the treatment of melanoma. We have next treated melanoma-induced animals with candidate radiopharmaceuticals. The tumor growth was significantly reduced by treatment with candidates, and survival rate of the animals was prolonged, suggesting that candidate radiopharmaceuticals are promising agents for the treatment of melanoma

  4. Aspects of monitoring and quality assurance for radiolabeled antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barber, D.E.

    1992-06-01

    This report provides an informational resource and guide for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and NRC licensees who produce or use radiolabeled antibodies (RABs). Components of quality assurance programs related to the production and use of RABs are reviewed and evaluated, and recommendations are made on dosage calibrations, exposure control, monitoring, and personnel requirements. Special emphasis is placed on dose calibrators because these instruments are used extensively to measure the dosage of radiopharmaceuticals to be administered to patients. The difficulties of using dose calibrators to quantify dosages of beta- and alpha-emitters are discussed. The advantages and disadvantages of using other instruments are examined, and recommendations are made on the types of instruments to be used for different applications. 46 refs., 8 tabs

  5. Localisation of metastatic carcinoma by a radiolabelled monoclonal antibody

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smedley, H M; Ritson, A; Wraight, P; Sikora, K [Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Cambridge (UK); Hinchingbrooke Hospital, Huntingdon (UK)); Finan, P [St. James Hospital, Leeds (UK); Lennox, E S; Takei, F [Medical Research Council, Cambridge (UK)

    1983-02-01

    Rat monoclonal antibodies were prepared by immunising rats with human colorectal carcinoma cell membranes and fusing splenic lymphocytes with a rat myeloma. Hybridoma supernatants were screened by binding assays on membranes prepared from colorectal carcinoma tissue. One hybridoma supernatant, containing a monoclonal antibody with high binding activity on malignant compared to normal colon sections, was grown in large quantities in serum-free medium. After ammonium sulphate precipitation the antibody was purified by ion-exchange chromatography and labelled with /sup 131/I. Radiolabelled antibody was administered i.v. to 27 patients with colonic and other tumours. Scintigrams were obtained at 48 h. Computerised subtraction of the blood pool image revealed localised areas of uptake corresponding with areas of known disease in 13/16 patients with colorectal carcinoma and 3/4 patients with breast cancer.

  6. Therapy with radiolabelled somatostatin analogs in neuroendocrine tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunikowska, J.; Krolicki, L.

    2007-01-01

    In the 80's the discovery of somatostatin receptors expression on NET cells enabled the application of somatostatin analogues in diagnosis and therapy. Initially, 'cold' somatostatin analogs were used for therapeutical purpose, with overall good clinical response, but with minimal anti-proliferation effect. Furthermore, radiolabelled receptor-binding peptides have been shown to be an important class of radiopharmaceuticals for tumor diagnosis and therapy with minimal side-effects. Specific binding between receptor on tumor cell and peptide with beta emitting radionuclide act not only on tumor related symptoms but also on tumor cell via radiotoxic effect of beta radiation. Discoveries of next receptor combinations, allow the work over synthesis and applications of next receptors' analogs both in diagnosis and in therapy. Due to complex characteristics of NET's, the use therapeutic 'cocktail' containing the variety analogs may be of great importance. (author)

  7. Radioimmunoimaging of experimental gliomas using radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glaessner, H.

    1986-01-01

    The biodistribution and tumour uptake of radiolabelled (131 I) glioma-seeking monoclonal antibodies (14 AC1) and their F(ab') 2 fragments were investigated in nude mice having received glioma transplants. Radioimmunoimaging by external scintigraphy at 48 and 96 hours pointed to a superior tumour localisation by the fragments that was clearly related to the dose. Wholebody determinations of the biokinetic behaviour led to the following results: Faster clearance anc more ready elimination from the blood pool for the fragments, preferential uptake in the tumour; intact antibodies; binding in the liver, spleen and lungs. The study confirmed the value of fragments of monoclonal antibodies in the diagnosis of tumours and pointed to the possibility of using intact monoclonal antibodies as carriers of radioisotopes and cytotoxic drugs within the scope of therapeutic programmes. (TRV) [de

  8. Utilisation of radiolabeled antibiotic for the diagnosis of infectious foci

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khammassi, Sabrine; Gharbi, Sabrine

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear imaging is a non-invasive exploration technique, used for rapid diagnostic of infectious disease .Thus, for osteoarticular infection scintigraphic techniques were proposed to ameliorate the diagnostic sensibility and the use of radiolabeled antibiotics as imaging agents of infectious loci become more and more recognized. In this work, a new sulfanil amid derivative, the N sulfanilamide-ferrocene-carboxamide was chemically synthesized then labeled with technetium-99m, with a radiochemical yield, 87 pour cent. In in-vitro studies were done with E.coli. first , the up-take of labeled molecule was estimated as 40 pour cent. Then, the bacteriostatic al effect of the molecule was de terminated by considering the Optical Density at 600 nm. The obtained results, encourage us to do more, with biodistribution on normal and infected mice; with Staphylococcus aureus. Then to carry out scintigraphic imaging with gamma camera to check out the potentiality of the molecule as an infectious imaging agent. (Author)

  9. Optimized procedures for manganese-52: Production, separation and radiolabeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fonslet, Jesper; Tietze, Sabrina; Jensen, Andreas Tue Ingemann

    2017-01-01

    ±0.4×105. An additional AG 1-X8 column was used to remove copper, iron, cobalt and zinc impurities from the prepared 52Mn in 8M HCl. The macrocyclic chelator DOTA was rapidly radiolabeled with 52Mn in aq. ammonium acetate (pH 7.5R.T.) with a radiochemical yield >99% within 1min and was stable for >2 days in bovine serum......Pressed chromium-powder cyclotron targets were irradiated with 16MeV protons, producing 52Mn with average yields of 6.2±0.8MBq/µAh. Separation by solid-phase anion exchange from ethanol-HCl mixtures recovered 94.3±1.7% of 52Mn and reduced the chromium content by a factor of 2.2...

  10. Retro y perspectiva del (desempleo sonorense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Peralta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available El artículo revisa y actualiza la evolución, estado actual y perspectiva del (desempleo sonorense. Compara su evolución con previos pronósticos y la proyecta hasta 2030 porque los buscadores de empleo viven actualmente; da un marco para políticas que lo reduzcan. La hipótesis es que si bien no suficiente, sí es nece-sario acelerar y cambiar la estructura del crecimiento económico en favor de sectores intensivos en trabajo. Este trabajo tiene cinco secciones: la primera revisa el (desempleo reciente y lo compara con su perspectiva delineada años atrás; la segunda presenta el marco teórico; en la tercera se proyectan y contrastan oferta y demanda laboral; la cuarta revisa tipos de desempleo y la inversión para reducirlo; la quinta es para conclusiones y recomendaciones.

  11. Tissue distribution of radiolabeled phosphatidylserine-containing liposome in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borborema, Samanta E.T.; Nascimento, Nanci do [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Biotecnologia], e-mail: samanta@usp.br, e-mail: nnascime@ipen.br; Andrade Junior, Heitor F. de [Instituto de Medicina Tropical de Sao Paulo (IMTSP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], e-mail: hfandrad@usp.br; Osso Junior, Joao A. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Radiofarmacia], e-mail: jaosso@ipen.br

    2009-07-01

    Liposomes are used as drug delivery systems to modify pharmacokinetic of drugs and also to improve their action in target cells. Liposomes containing phosphatidylserine are efficiently eliminated from the blood by cells of the mononuclear phagocytic system (MPS), predominantly Kupffer cells in the liver. In this way, this is a valuable approach to treat infectious diseases involving MPS, especially leishmaniasis. Leishmaniasis is a severe parasitic disease, caused by intramacrophage protozoa Leishmania sp., and is fatal if left untreated. Leishmania resides mainly in the liver and the spleen. Antileishmanial agents containing-liposomes showed more effective therapies with reduction of toxicity and adverse side effects. The purpose of this study was to investigate the tissue distribution of radioactive meglumine antimoniate encapsulated in phosphatidylserine-containing liposome. Meglumine antimoniate was neutron irradiated inside the IEA-R1 nuclear reactor to produce antimony radiotracers, {sup 122}Sb and {sup 124}Sb, and encapsulated in liposome. Healthy mice received a single intraperitoneal dose of the radiolabeled drug. Analysis of the mean radioactive tissue concentration-time data curves showed that liver and spleen had the highest levels of radioactivity. In addition these levels of drug remained for more than 48 hours. The dominant route of elimination was via biliary excretion with slow rate. Small fraction of the drug was found in the kidneys with very fast elimination. In conclusion, the phosphatidylserine-containing liposome showed to be a very useful tool to target antileishmanial agents to MPS and to sustain the drug levels for longer times. Besides, radiolabeled liposome is the easiest approach to perform biodistribution evaluation. (author)

  12. Tissue distribution of radiolabeled phosphatidylserine-containing liposome in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borborema, Samanta E.T.; Nascimento, Nanci do; Osso Junior, Joao A.

    2009-01-01

    Liposomes are used as drug delivery systems to modify pharmacokinetic of drugs and also to improve their action in target cells. Liposomes containing phosphatidylserine are efficiently eliminated from the blood by cells of the mononuclear phagocytic system (MPS), predominantly Kupffer cells in the liver. In this way, this is a valuable approach to treat infectious diseases involving MPS, especially leishmaniasis. Leishmaniasis is a severe parasitic disease, caused by intramacrophage protozoa Leishmania sp., and is fatal if left untreated. Leishmania resides mainly in the liver and the spleen. Antileishmanial agents containing-liposomes showed more effective therapies with reduction of toxicity and adverse side effects. The purpose of this study was to investigate the tissue distribution of radioactive meglumine antimoniate encapsulated in phosphatidylserine-containing liposome. Meglumine antimoniate was neutron irradiated inside the IEA-R1 nuclear reactor to produce antimony radiotracers, 122 Sb and 124 Sb, and encapsulated in liposome. Healthy mice received a single intraperitoneal dose of the radiolabeled drug. Analysis of the mean radioactive tissue concentration-time data curves showed that liver and spleen had the highest levels of radioactivity. In addition these levels of drug remained for more than 48 hours. The dominant route of elimination was via biliary excretion with slow rate. Small fraction of the drug was found in the kidneys with very fast elimination. In conclusion, the phosphatidylserine-containing liposome showed to be a very useful tool to target antileishmanial agents to MPS and to sustain the drug levels for longer times. Besides, radiolabeled liposome is the easiest approach to perform biodistribution evaluation. (author)

  13. Development of methods for the purification of 67Ga and 68Ga for biomolecules labeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Renata Ferreira

    2012-01-01

    For more than fifty years, the long-lived 68 Ge/ 68 Ga generators have been in development, obtaining 68 Ga without the need of having in house cyclotron, which is a considerable convenience for PET centers that have no nearby cyclotrons. 68 Ga decays 89% by positron emission and low photon emission (1077 keV) and the physical half life of 67.7 minutes is compatible with the pharmacokinetics of low biomolecular weight substances like peptides and antibody fragments. Moreover, its established metallic chemistry allows it to be stably bound to the carrier peptide sequence via a suitable bifunctional chelator, such as DOTA. All these reasons together with the technology of PET/CT allowed advances in molecular imaging, in particular in the diagnosis of neuroendocrine diseases. However, the eluate from the commercial 68 Ge/ 68 Ga generators still contains high levels of long lived 68 Ge, besides other metallic impurities, which competes with 68 Ga with a consequent reduction of the labeling yield of biomolecules, such as Fe 3+ and Zn 2+ . Thus, the lower the amount of impurities in the eluate, the competition between the radiolabeled and unlabeled peptide by the receptor will be smaller and the quality of imaging will be better, a subsequent purification step is needed after the generator elution. The aim of this work is to evaluate different purifications methods of 68 Ga to label biomolecules, with emphasis on the study of the chemical impurities contained in the eluate and to develop a new purification method. Several purification methods were studied. Many cationic resin were tested simulating the commercial process. 68 Ga is adsorbed in cationic resin, which is not commercial available and eluted in acid/acetone solution. The use of minor particles of cationic resin AG50W-X4 (200-400 mesh) showed the best results. An innovate method was the extraction chromatography, which is based on the absorption of diisopropyl ether in XAD 16 and 68 Ga recovery in deionized

  14. The Importance of Phytoplankton Biomolecule Availability for Secondary Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elina T. Peltomaa

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The growth and reproduction of animals is affected by their access to resources. In aquatic ecosystems, the availability of essential biomolecules for filter-feeding zooplankton depends greatly on phytoplankton. Here, we analyzed the biochemical composition, i.e., the fatty acid, sterol and amino acid profiles and concentrations as well as protein, carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus content of 17 phytoplankton monocultures representing the seven most abundant phytoplankton classes in boreal and sub-arctic lakes. To examine how the differences in the biochemical composition between phytoplankton classes affect their nutritional quality for consumers, we assessed the performance of Daphnia, on these diets. Furthermore, we defined the most important biomolecules regulating the somatic growth and reproduction of Daphnia, expecting that higher concentrations of certain biomolecules are needed for reproduction than for growth. Finally, we combined these results with phytoplankton field data from over 900 boreal and sub-arctic lakes in order to estimate whether the somatic growth of Daphnia is sterol-limited when the natural phytoplankton communities are cyanobacteria-dominated. Our analysis shows that Daphnia grows best with phytoplankton rich in sterols, ω-3 fatty acids, protein, and amino acids. Their reproduction follows food sterol and ω-3 concentration as well as C:P-ratio being two times higher in Daphnia feeding on cryptophytes than any other diet. Interestingly, we found that a high dietary ω-6 fatty acid concentration decreases both somatic growth and reproduction of Daphnia. When combined with phytoplankton community composition field data, our results indicate that zooplankton is constantly limited by sterols in lakes dominated by cyanobacteria (≥40% of total phytoplankton biomass, and that the absence of cryptophytes can severely hinder zooplankton production in nature.

  15. Simple approach to study biomolecule adsorption in polymeric microfluidic channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gubala, Vladimir; Siegrist, Jonathan; Monaghan, Ruairi; O’Reilly, Brian; Gandhiraman, Ram Prasad; Daniels, Stephen; Williams, David E.; Ducrée, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► A simple tool to assess biomolecule adsorption onto the surfaces of microchannels. ► Development for dilution by surface-adsorption based depletion of protein samples. ► It can easily be done using a readily available apparatus like a spin-coater. ► The assessment tool is facile and quantitative. ► Straightforward comparison of different surface chemistries. - Abstract: Herein a simple analytical method is presented for the characterization of biomolecule adsorption on cyclo olefin polymer (COP, trade name: Zeonor ® ) substrates which are widely used in microfluidic lab-on-a-chip devices. These Zeonor ® substrates do not possess native functional groups for specific reactions with biomolecules. Therefore, depending on the application, such substrates must be functionalized by surface chemistry methods to either enhance or suppress biomolecular adsorption. This work demonstrates a microfluidic method for evaluating the adsorption of antibodies and oligonucleotides surfaces. The method uses centrifugal microfluidic flow-through chips and can easily be implemented using common equipment such as a spin coater. The working principle is very simple. The user adds 40 L of the solution containing the sample to the starting side of a microfluidic channel, where it is moved through by centrifugal force. Some molecules are adsorbed in the channel. The sample is then collected at the other end in a small reservoir and the biomolecule concentration is measured. As a pilot application, we characterized the adsorption of goat anti-human IgG and a 20-mer DNA on Zeonor ® , and on three types of functionalized Zeonor: 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) modified surface with mainly positive charge, negatively charged surface with immobilized bovine serum albumin (BSA), and neutral, hydrogel-like film with polyethylene glycol (PEG) characteristics. This simple analytical approach adds to the fundamental understanding of the interaction forces in real

  16. Structure analysis of biomolecules using synchrotron radiation circular dichroism spectrophotometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gekko, Kunihiko; Matsuo, Koichi

    2004-01-01

    We constructed the vacuum-ultraviolet circular dichroism (VUVCD) spectrophotometer, which is capable of measuring circular dichroism spectra to 140 nm for aqueous solutions at temperature from -30 to 70degC, using a small-scale SR source at Hiroshima Synchrotron Radiation Center (HiSOR). This spectrophotometer was used for structural analyses of amino acids, saccharides, and proteins in water. The obtained results demonstrate that a synchrotron radiation VUVCD spectroscopy provides more detailed and new information on the structures of biomolecules, based on the high energy transitions of chromophores such as hydroxyl, acetal, and peptide groups. (author)

  17. Simple approach to study biomolecule adsorption in polymeric microfluidic channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gubala, Vladimir, E-mail: V.Gubala@kent.ac.uk [Biomedical Diagnostics Institute (BDI), National Centre for Sensor Research (NCSR), Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Medway School of Pharmacy, University of Kent, Central Avenue, Anson 120, Chatham Maritime, Kent ME4 4TB (United Kingdom); Siegrist, Jonathan; Monaghan, Ruairi; O' Reilly, Brian; Gandhiraman, Ram Prasad [Biomedical Diagnostics Institute (BDI), National Centre for Sensor Research (NCSR), Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Daniels, Stephen [Biomedical Diagnostics Institute (BDI), National Centre for Sensor Research (NCSR), Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland); National Centre for Plasma Science and Technology (NCPST), Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Williams, David E. [Biomedical Diagnostics Institute (BDI), National Centre for Sensor Research (NCSR), Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland); MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, School of Chemical Sciences, University of Auckland, Auckland 1142 (New Zealand); Ducree, Jens [Biomedical Diagnostics Institute (BDI), National Centre for Sensor Research (NCSR), Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland)

    2013-01-14

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A simple tool to assess biomolecule adsorption onto the surfaces of microchannels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Development for dilution by surface-adsorption based depletion of protein samples. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It can easily be done using a readily available apparatus like a spin-coater. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The assessment tool is facile and quantitative. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Straightforward comparison of different surface chemistries. - Abstract: Herein a simple analytical method is presented for the characterization of biomolecule adsorption on cyclo olefin polymer (COP, trade name: Zeonor{sup Registered-Sign }) substrates which are widely used in microfluidic lab-on-a-chip devices. These Zeonor{sup Registered-Sign} substrates do not possess native functional groups for specific reactions with biomolecules. Therefore, depending on the application, such substrates must be functionalized by surface chemistry methods to either enhance or suppress biomolecular adsorption. This work demonstrates a microfluidic method for evaluating the adsorption of antibodies and oligonucleotides surfaces. The method uses centrifugal microfluidic flow-through chips and can easily be implemented using common equipment such as a spin coater. The working principle is very simple. The user adds 40 L of the solution containing the sample to the starting side of a microfluidic channel, where it is moved through by centrifugal force. Some molecules are adsorbed in the channel. The sample is then collected at the other end in a small reservoir and the biomolecule concentration is measured. As a pilot application, we characterized the adsorption of goat anti-human IgG and a 20-mer DNA on Zeonor{sup Registered-Sign }, and on three types of functionalized Zeonor: 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) modified surface with mainly positive charge, negatively charged surface with immobilized bovine serum albumin (BSA), and

  18. Linkage of biomolecules to solid phases for immunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, R.S.

    1998-01-01

    Topics covered by this lecture include a brief review of the principal methods of linkage of biomolecules to solid phase matrices. Copies of the key self explanatory slides are presented as figures together with reprints of two publications by the author dealing with a preferred chemistry for the covalent linkage of antibodies to hydroxyl and amino functional groups and the effects of changes in solid phase matrix and antibody coupling chemistry on the performance of a typical excess reagent immunoassay for thyroid stimulating hormone

  19. Biomolecule-Functionalized Smart Polydiacetylene for Biomedical and Environmental Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Eunae; Jung, Seunho

    2018-01-04

    Polydiacetylene (PDA) has attracted interest for use as a sensing platform in biomedical, environmental, and chemical engineering applications owing to its capacity for colorimetric and fluorescent transition in response to external stimuli. Many researchers have attempted to develop a tailor-made PDA sensor via conjugation of chemical or biological substances to PDA. Here, we review smart bio-conjugates of PDA with various biomolecules such as carbohydrates, lipids, nucleic acids, and proteins. In addition, materialization and signal amplification strategies to improve handling and sensitivity are described.

  20. Low-energy electron scattering from molecules, biomolecules and surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Carsky, Petr

    2011-01-01

    Since the turn of the 21st century, the field of electron molecule collisions has undergone a renaissance. The importance of such collisions in applications from radiation chemistry to astrochemistry has flowered, and their role in industrial processes such as plasma technology and lighting are vital to the advancement of next generation devices. Furthermore, the development of the scanning tunneling microscope highlights the role of such collisions in the condensed phase, in surface processing, and in the development of nanotechnology.Low-Energy Electron Scattering from Molecules, Biomolecule

  1. Preparation and radiolabeling of human serum albumin (HSA)-coated magnetite nanoparticles for magnetically targeted therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Chunfu; Cao Jinquan; Yin Duanzhi; Wang Yongxian; Feng Yanlin; Tan Jiajue

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the preparation of human serum albumin-coated magnetic particles of about 200 nm in diameter with narrow size distribution radiolabeled with 188 Re for the purpose of magnetically targeted therapy. The optimum radiolabeling conditions are: SnCl 2 ·2H 2 O 8 mg/ml, citric acid 20 mg/ml, vitamin C 8 mg/ml, labeling volume 500 μl and a reaction time of 3 h. The stability of the radiolabeled particles is suitable for in vivo study

  2. Preparation and radiolabeling of human serum albumin (HSA)-coated magnetite nanoparticles for magnetically targeted therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Chunfu E-mail: zchunfu@yahoo.com.cn; Cao Jinquan; Yin Duanzhi; Wang Yongxian; Feng Yanlin; Tan Jiajue

    2004-12-01

    In this paper, we describe the preparation of human serum albumin-coated magnetic particles of about 200 nm in diameter with narrow size distribution radiolabeled with {sup 188}Re for the purpose of magnetically targeted therapy. The optimum radiolabeling conditions are: SnCl{sub 2}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O 8 mg/ml, citric acid 20 mg/ml, vitamin C 8 mg/ml, labeling volume 500 {mu}l and a reaction time of 3 h. The stability of the radiolabeled particles is suitable for in vivo study.

  3. Raman spectroscopy detection of biomolecules in biocrusts from differing environmental conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miralles, I.; Jorge-Villar, S. E.; van Wesemael, B.; Lázaro, R.

    2017-01-01

    Lichens and cyanobacteria colonize inhospitable places covering a wide climate range due to their different survival strategies, such as the synthesis of protective biomolecules. The effect of ecological factors on the synthesis of biomolecules has not been widely analysed. This study aimed to assess the effects of four factors (species, microclimate, seasonality and hydration state) and their interactions on the biomolecule frequency detected by Raman Spectroscopy. We included cyanobacterial biocrusts, and the lichens Diploschistes diacapsis, Squamarina lentigera, and Lepraria isidiata; two contrasted microclimates (typical and marginal), two contrasted seasons (hot and dry vs cool and wet) and two hydration states (dry and wet). ;Species; was the most influential factor in the identity and frequency of the main biomolecules. Microclimatic differences in the range of the local specific habitats only influenced the biomolecules in cyanobacteria. There was a quadruple interaction among the factors, the effects being different mainly depending on the species. At D. diacapsis, the production of their main biomolecules depended on microclimate, although it also depended on seasonality. Nevertheless, in L. isidiata and S. lentigera microclimatic differences did not significantly affect the production of biomolecules. In the lichen species, the microhabitats exposed to relatively larger incident radiation did not show significantly larger relative frequency of photoprotective biomolecules. No clear connection between higher production of oxalates and drier microhabitats was found, suggesting that the synthesis of oxalates is not related to water reserve strategy. The pros and cons of monitor biomolecules in biocrust by Raman spectrometry were also discussed.

  4. Radiolabelled peptides and nanoparticles for specific molecular targeting in oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helbok, A.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is the development of radiolabelled peptides and nanoparticles (NP) for specific molecular targeting in oncology. Three different types of NP were investigated in this study: lipid - based NP (liposomes and micelles), human serum albumin - based NP (albumin NP) and protamine - oligonucleotide - based NP (proticles). In a first step, radiolabelling protocols were set up for the different NP - formulations. The variety of radioisotopes used, covers the whole spectrum of applications in nuclear medicine: SPECT (111In, 99mTc), (2) PET (68Ga) and therapeutic applications (177Lu, 90Y) opening a manifold administration potential for these NP aiming towards multiple targeting and hybrid imaging strategies (combined SPECT / PET and MRI). Radiolabelling quality was analyzed by instant thin layer chromatography (ITLC). High radiochemical yields (RCY >90 %) and high specific activity (SA) were achieved. NP - formulations were derivatized with the chelating agent Diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) allowing complexation of trivalent radiometals, and potentially nonradioactive metals, such as Gd3+, for MRI imaging leading to the development of multifunctionalized NP for a unified labelling approach. Furthermore, NP were derivatized with the pharmacokinetic modifier polyethylene glycol (PEG) to maintain NP with long circulating ability. Stability assessments included incubation in different media (serum, 4 mM DTPA - solution and PBS pH 7.4, at 37 o C for a period of 24 h). For the in vivo biodistribution of the NP, static and / or dynamic SPECT / PET imaging studies were performed at different time points with Lewis rats and correlated to results from quantification of tissue - uptake. Results indicate differences in stability and general pharmacokinetic behaviour depended on the NP - formulation. However, a positive influence expressed in a prolonged retention time in circulation was investigated for all different NP - formulations due to PEG

  5. Active and Dynamic Nanomaterials Based on Active Biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Steven J.; Rivera, Susan B.; Boal, Andrew K.; Edwards, J. Matthew; Bauer, Joseph M.; Manginell, Ronald P.; Liu, Jun; Bunker, Bruce C.; Bachand, George D.

    2004-03-01

    Living organisms have evolved dynamic and adaptable materials that fundamentally differ from synthetic materials. These biomaterials use chemical energy to drive non-equilibrium assembly processes, and to reconfigure in response to external stimuli or life cycle changes. Two striking examples are the diatom's active assembly of silica into a patterned cytoskeleton, and the chameleon's active transport of pigment particles to rapidly change skin color. Advances in molecular biology and nanoscale materials synthesis now present the opportunity for integrating biomolecules with synthetic components to produce new types of materials with novel assembly and adaptation capabilities. Our group has begun utilizing kinesin motor proteins and microtubules (MTs) to explore the construction of biomimetic materials. Initial work has focused on characterizing and engineering the properties of the biomolecules for robust performance in artificial systems. We have characterized the biochemical and biophysical properties of a kinesin motor protein from a thermostable fungus, and have evaluated strategies for stabilizing and functionalizing the MTs. We also have developed strategies for directed transport of MT shuttles, and for controlling the loading and unloading of nanoscale cargo.

  6. Biosurfactants: Multifunctional Biomolecules of the 21st Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Danyelle Khadydja F; Rufino, Raquel D; Luna, Juliana M; Santos, Valdemir A; Sarubbo, Leonie A

    2016-03-18

    In the era of global industrialisation, the exploration of natural resources has served as a source of experimentation for science and advanced technologies, giving rise to the manufacturing of products with high aggregate value in the world market, such as biosurfactants. Biosurfactants are amphiphilic microbial molecules with hydrophilic and hydrophobic moieties that partition at liquid/liquid, liquid/gas or liquid/solid interfaces. Such characteristics allow these biomolecules to play a key role in emulsification, foam formation, detergency and dispersal, which are desirable qualities in different industries. Biosurfactant production is considered one of the key technologies for development in the 21st century. Besides exerting a strong positive impact on the main global problems, biosurfactant production has considerable importance to the implantation of sustainable industrial processes, such as the use of renewable resources and "green" products. Biodegradability and low toxicity have led to the intensification of scientific studies on a wide range of industrial applications for biosurfactants in the field of bioremediation as well as the petroleum, food processing, health, chemical, agricultural and cosmetic industries. In this paper, we offer an extensive review regarding knowledge accumulated over the years and advances achieved in the incorporation of biomolecules in different industries.

  7. Polymeric Nanomaterials as Nanomembrane Entities for Biomolecule and Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albisa, Airama; Espanol, Laura; Prieto, Martin; Sebastian, Victor

    2017-01-01

    Bio-nanomaterials assembled into nanomembrane entities are actively studied to circumvent the uncontrollable list of shortcomings of conventional delivery systems: low water solubility, unfavorable stability, short circulation time in plasma, rapid clearance from the human body, poor bioavailability, non-specific toxicity against normal tissue and cells, low cellular uptake and susceptibility to enzyme degradation. Basically, these nanoentities enable to exploit the therapeutic value of many promising biomolecules and drugs (B&D), controlling the mass transport of B&D at a certain rate or even on demand if a stimulus is applied. The large surface-to-volume ratio of bio-nanomaterials as well as their tunable properties enable to increase the biocompatibility, bioavailability, solubility and permeability of many unique B&D which are otherwise difficult to deliver. This review paper will focus on the last advances of bio-nanomaterials applied as nanomembranes in biomolecule and drug delivery, as well as their more remarkable properties and applications in biomedicine. New advances have been drastically established in the production of smart nanomembranes that alter their own structure and function in response to the environment. These new insights have been used for the production of smart drug delivery nanomembranes. These nanomembranes entities have the potential to revolutionize the biomedicine but there are still some shortcomings to address in order to translate the laboratory production to the clinic. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  8. The nanoparticle biomolecule corona: lessons learned - challenge accepted?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docter, D; Westmeier, D; Markiewicz, M; Stolte, S; Knauer, S K; Stauber, R H

    2015-10-07

    Besides the wide use of engineered nanomaterials (NMs) in technical products, their applications are not only increasing in biotechnology and biomedicine, but also in the environmental field. While the physico-chemical properties and behaviour of NMs can be characterized accurately under idealized conditions, this is no longer the case in complex physiological or natural environments. Herein, proteins and other biomolecules rapidly bind to NMs, forming a protein/biomolecule corona that critically affects the NMs' (patho)biological and technical identities. As the corona impacts the in vitro and/or in vivo NM applications in humans and ecosystems, a mechanistic understanding of its relevance and of the biophysical forces regulating corona formation is mandatory. Based on recent insights, we here critically review and present an updated concept of corona formation and evolution. We comment on how corona signatures may be linked to effects at the nano-bio interface in physiological and environmental systems. In order to comprehensively analyse corona profiles and to mechanistically understand the coronas' biological/ecological impact, we present a tiered multidisciplinary approach. To stimulate progress in this field, we introduce the potential impact of the corona for NM-microbiome-(human)host interactions and the novel concept of 'nanologicals', i.e., the nanomaterial-specific targeting of molecular machines. We conclude by discussing the relevant challenges that still need to be resolved in this field.

  9. Autonomous Magnetic Microrobots by Navigating Gates for Multiple Biomolecules Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xinghao; Lim, Byeonghwa; Torati, Sri Ramulu; Ding, Junjia; Novosad, Valentine; Im, Mi-Young; Reddy, Venu; Kim, Kunwoo; Jung, Eunjoo; Shawl, Asif Iqbal; Kim, Eunjoo; Kim, CheolGi

    2018-05-08

    The precise delivery of biofunctionalized matters is of great interest from the fundamental and applied viewpoints. In spite of significant progress achieved during the last decade, a parallel and automated isolation and manipulation of rare analyte, and their simultaneous on-chip separation and trapping, still remain challenging. Here, a universal micromagnet junction for self-navigating gates of microrobotic particles to deliver the biomolecules to specific sites using a remote magnetic field is described. In the proposed concept, the nonmagnetic gap between the lithographically defined donor and acceptor micromagnets creates a crucial energy barrier to restrict particle gating. It is shown that by carefully designing the geometry of the junctions, it becomes possible to deliver multiple protein-functionalized carriers in high resolution, as well as MCF-7 and THP-1 cells from the mixture, with high fidelity and trap them in individual apartments. Integration of such junctions with magnetophoretic circuitry elements could lead to novel platforms without retrieving for the synchronous digital manipulation of particles/biomolecules in microfluidic multiplex arrays for next-generation biochips. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Biosurfactants: Multifunctional Biomolecules of the 21st Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danyelle Khadydja F. Santos

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the era of global industrialisation, the exploration of natural resources has served as a source of experimentation for science and advanced technologies, giving rise to the manufacturing of products with high aggregate value in the world market, such as biosurfactants. Biosurfactants are amphiphilic microbial molecules with hydrophilic and hydrophobic moieties that partition at liquid/liquid, liquid/gas or liquid/solid interfaces. Such characteristics allow these biomolecules to play a key role in emulsification, foam formation, detergency and dispersal, which are desirable qualities in different industries. Biosurfactant production is considered one of the key technologies for development in the 21st century. Besides exerting a strong positive impact on the main global problems, biosurfactant production has considerable importance to the implantation of sustainable industrial processes, such as the use of renewable resources and “green” products. Biodegradability and low toxicity have led to the intensification of scientific studies on a wide range of industrial applications for biosurfactants in the field of bioremediation as well as the petroleum, food processing, health, chemical, agricultural and cosmetic industries. In this paper, we offer an extensive review regarding knowledge accumulated over the years and advances achieved in the incorporation of biomolecules in different industries.

  11. Novel in Vitro Efficiency of Chitosan Biomolecule Against Trichomonas Gallinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SH Pourseyed

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Development of new natural agents for parasitic diseases treatment has unexpectedly increased to overcome effectively against emergence and re-emergence of parasitic diseases, the appearance of drug resistant organisms and toxic side effects of current agents. The aim of the study was to evaluate antiprotozoal activities of chitosan biomolecule on trophozoites of Trichomonas gallinae.Methods: The antitrichomonal activity of various low molecular weight chitosan concentrations including 125, 250, 500 and 1250 μg ml-1 against T. gallinae trophozoites cultured in trypticase-yeast extract-maltose medium supplemented with heat-inactivated cold horse serum was evaluated in vitro. Samples containing medium without chitosan were also assayed as controls.Results: The mortality rates at 0, 3 and 6 h post treatment with all concentrations were significantly different from control group (P<0.05. Treated trophozoites showed more susceptibility to the highest concentration reaching mortality rate of 100% at 3h post inoculation. However, at this time, results for 125, 250 and 500 μg ml-1 were 93%, 95% and 96.7%, respectively.Conclusion: The results demonstrate that the application of chitosan biomolecule is a promising option for treatment of trichomoniasis in pigeons.

  12. Sequestration of carbon dioxide and production of biomolecules using cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upendar, Ganta; Singh, Sunita; Chakrabarty, Jitamanyu; Chandra Ghanta, Kartik; Dutta, Susmita; Dutta, Abhishek

    2018-07-15

    A cyanobacterial strain, Synechococcus sp. NIT18, has been applied to sequester CO 2 using sodium carbonate as inorganic carbon source due to its efficiency of CO 2 bioconversion and high biomass production. The biomass obtained is used for the extraction of biomolecules - protein, carbohydrate and lipid. The main objective of the study is to maximize the biomass and biomolecules production with CO 2 sequestration using cyanobacterial strain cultivated under different concentrations of CO 2 (5-20%), pH (7-11) and inoculum size (5-12.5%) within a statistical framework. Maximum sequestration of CO 2 and maximum productivities of protein, carbohydrate and lipid are 71.02%, 4.9 mg/L/day, 6.7 mg/L/day and 1.6 mg/L/day respectively, at initial CO 2 concentration: 10%, pH: 9 and inoculum size: 12.5%. Since flue gas contains 10-15% CO 2 and the present strain is able to sequester CO 2 in this range, the strain could be considered as a useful tool for CO 2 mitigation for greener world. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Radiolabeling and biodistribution of 62Cu-dithiocarbamate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Kazuya; Fujibayashi, Yasuhisa; Yokoyama, Akira; Konishi, Junji.

    1990-01-01

    The newly developed 62 Zn/ 62 Cu generator system has made available the production of the short-lived 62 Cu (T 1/2 = 9.8 min) positron radionuclide, eluted as 62 Cu-glycine. In the search for 62 Cu labeled radiopharmaceuticals for positron CT (PET) brain diagnostic studies, two ligands N,N-diethyl- and N,N-dimethyl-dithiocarbamic acid (DDC and DmDC) were selected, based on their Cu chelating abilities and the neutral lipophilic character of their copper chelates. In the present work, an in vitro study with non-radioactive Cu-glycine showed that both ligands easily formed the stable, neutral Cu-DDC and Cu-DmDC chelates (1:2 metal-ligand complexes) based on the ligand exchange reaction. Then the 62 Zn/ 62 Cu generator eluate, the 62 Cu-glycine was used for the radiolabeling of DDC and DmDC. The following HPLC analysis revealed that the ligand exchange reaction proceeded rapidly; the radiochemical purities of 62 Cu-DDC and 62 Cu-DmDC were extremely high (non-detectable 62 Cu-glycine) and both chelates were more lipophilic than 62 Cu-glycine. The mouse biodistribution of both radiolabeled compounds, 62 Cu-DDC and 62 Cu-DmDC indicated a brain accumlation of 2.8 and 5.3 times higher than 62 Cu-glycine, 15 min post injection, respectively. The brain accumulation observed with both 62 Cu-DDC and 62 Cu-DmDC might be due to their stable, neutral and lipophilic character; the latter enhanced by the presence of the methylated side chains. The gathered results indicated the applicability of dithiocarbamic acid derivatives in the production of new 62 Cu-labeled compounds using the 62 Zn/ 62 Cu generator system based on the ligand exchange reaction with 62 Cu-glycine eluate. Further studies with Cu-dithiocarbamic acid derivatives for development of new generator-produced 62 Cu positron radiopharmaceuticals can be recalled. (author)

  14. Radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies for imaging and therapy: Potential, problems, and prospects: Scientific highlights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, S.C.; Buraggi, G.L.

    1986-01-01

    This meeting focused on areas of research on radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies. Topics covered included the production, purification, and fragmentation of monoclonal antibodies and immunochemistry of hybridomas; the production and the chemistry of radionuclides; the radiohalogenation and radiometal labeling techniques; the in-vivo pharmacokinetics of radiolabeled antibodies; the considerations of immunoreactivity of radiolabeled preparations; the instrumentation and imaging techniques as applied to radioimmunodetection; the radiation dosimetry in diagnostic and therapeutic use of labeled antibodies; the radioimmunoscintigraphy and radioimmunotherapy studies; and perspectives and directions for future research. Tutorial as well as scientific lectures describing the latest research data on the above topics were presented. Three workshop panels were convened on ''Methods for Determining Immunoreactivity of Radiolabeled Monoclonal Antibodies - Problems and Pitfalls,'' Radiobiological and Dosimetric Considerations for Immunotherapy with Labeled Antibodies,'' and ''The Human Anti-Mouse Antibody Response in Patients.''

  15. Towards tumour targeting with copper-radiolabelled macrocycle-antibody conjugates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morphy, J.R.; Parker, David; Kataky, Ritu

    1989-01-01

    Tetraaza-macrocycles covalently attached to a monoclonal antibody may be efficiently radiolabelled with 64 Cu or 67 Cu at pH4, minimising non-specific binding to the protein, giving a kinetically stable conjugate in vivo. (author)

  16. An Efficient and Straightforward Method for Radiolabeling of Nanoparticles with {sup 64}Cu via Click Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dong-Eun [Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup 580-185 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kwangmeyung [Center for Theragnosis, Biomedical Research Institute, Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sang Hyun [Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup 580-185 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiobiotechnology and Applied Radioisotope Science, Korea University of Science and Technology, Deajeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-01

    Recently, nanoparticles have received a great deal of interest in diagnosis and therapy applications. Since nanoparticles possess intrinsic features that are often required for a drug delivery system and diagnosis, they have potential to be used as platforms for integrating imaging and therapeutic functions, simultaneously. Intrinsic issues that are associated with theranostic nanoparticles, particularly in cancer treatment, include an efficient and straightforward radiolabeling method for understanding the in vivo biodistribution of nanoparticles to reach the tumor region, and monitoring therapeutic responses. Herein, we investigated a facile and highly efficient strategy to prepare radiolabeled nanoparticles with {sup 64}Cu via a strain-promoted azide, i.e., an alkyne cycloaddition strategy, which is often referred to as click chemistry. First, the azide (N3) group, which allows for the preparation of radiolabeled nanoparticles by copper-free click chemistry, was incorporated into glycol chitosan nanoparticles (CNPs). Second, the strained cyclooctyne derivative, dibenzyl cyclooctyne (DBCO) conjugated with a 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane- 1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) chelator, was synthesized for preparing the pre-radiolabeled alkyne complex with {sup 64}Cu radionuclide. Following incubation with the {sup 64}Cu-radiolabeled DBCO complex (DBCO-PEG4-Lys-DOTA-{sup 64}Cu with high specific activity, 18.5 GBq/μ mol), the azide-functionalized CNPs were radiolabeled successfully with {sup 64}Cu, with a high radiolabeling efficiency and a high radiolabeling yield (>98%). Importantly, the radiolabeling of CNPs by copper-free click chemistry was accomplished within 30 min, with great efficiency in aqueous conditions. After {sup 64}Cu-CNPs were intravenously administered to tumor-bearing mice, the real time, in vivo biodistribution and tumor-targeting ability of {sup 64}Cu-CNPs were quantitatively evaluated by micro-PET images of tumor-bearing mice. These results

  17. New surface radiolabeling schemes of super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) for biodistribution studies†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nallathamby, Prakash D.; Mortensen, Ninell P.; Palko, Heather A.; Malfatti, Mike; Smith, Catherine; Sonnett, James; Doktycz, Mitchel J.; Gu, Baohua; Roeder, Ryan K.; Wang, Wei; Retterer, Scott T.

    2016-01-01

    Nanomaterial based drug delivery systems allow for the independent tuning of the surface chemical and physical properties that affect their biodistribution in vivo and the therapeutic payloads that they are intended to deliver. Additionally, the added therapeutic and diagnostic value of their inherent material properties often provides extra functionality. Iron based nanomaterials with their magnetic properties and easily tailorable surface chemistry are of particular interest as model systems. In this study the core radius of the iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) was 14.08 ± 3.92 nm while the hydrodynamic radius of the NPs, as determined by Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS), was between 90–110 nm. In this study, different approaches were explored to create radiolabeled NPs that are stable in solution. The NPs were functionalized with polycarboxylate or polyamine surface functional groups. Polycarboxylate functionalized NPs had a zeta potential of –35 mV and polyamine functionalized NPs had a zeta potential of +40 mV. The polycarboxylate functionalized NPs were chosen for in vivo biodistribution studies and hence were radiolabeled with 14C, with a final activity of 0.097 nCi mg–1 of NPs. In chronic studies, the biodistribution profile is tracked using low-level radiolabeled proxies of the nanoparticles of interest. Conventionally, these radiolabeled proxies are chemically similar but not chemically identical to the non-radiolabeled NPs of interest. This study is novel as different approaches were explored to create radiolabeled NPs that are stable, possess a hydrodynamic radius of <100 nm and most importantly they exhibit an identical surface chemical functionality as their non-radiolabeled counterparts. Identical chemical functionality of the radiolabeled probes to the non-radiolabeled probes was an important consideration to generate statistically similar biodistribution data sets using multiple imaging and detection techniques. The radiolabeling approach

  18. New surface radiolabeling schemes of super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) for biodistribution studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nallathamby, Prakash D; Mortensen, Ninell P; Palko, Heather A; Malfatti, Mike; Smith, Catherine; Sonnett, James; Doktycz, Mitchel J; Gu, Baohua; Roeder, Ryan K; Wang, Wei; Retterer, Scott T

    2015-04-21

    Nanomaterial based drug delivery systems allow for the independent tuning of the surface chemical and physical properties that affect their biodistribution in vivo and the therapeutic payloads that they are intended to deliver. Additionally, the added therapeutic and diagnostic value of their inherent material properties often provides extra functionality. Iron based nanomaterials with their magnetic properties and easily tailorable surface chemistry are of particular interest as model systems. In this study the core radius of the iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) was 14.08 ± 3.92 nm while the hydrodynamic radius of the NPs, as determined by Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS), was between 90-110 nm. In this study, different approaches were explored to create radiolabeled NPs that are stable in solution. The NPs were functionalized with polycarboxylate or polyamine surface functional groups. Polycarboxylate functionalized NPs had a zeta potential of -35 mV and polyamine functionalized NPs had a zeta potential of +40 mV. The polycarboxylate functionalized NPs were chosen for in vivo biodistribution studies and hence were radiolabeled with (14)C, with a final activity of 0.097 nCi mg(-1) of NPs. In chronic studies, the biodistribution profile is tracked using low level radiolabeled proxies of the nanoparticles of interest. Conventionally, these radiolabeled proxies are chemically similar but not chemically identical to the non-radiolabeled NPs of interest. This study is novel as different approaches were explored to create radiolabeled NPs that are stable, possess a hydrodynamic radius of <100 nm and most importantly they exhibit an identical surface chemical functionality as their non-radiolabeled counterparts. Identical chemical functionality of the radiolabeled probes to the non-radiolabeled probes was an important consideration to generate statistically similar biodistribution data sets using multiple imaging and detection techniques. The radiolabeling approach

  19. Microassay for measurement of binding of radiolabelled ligands to cell surface molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woof, J.M.; Burton, D.R.

    1988-01-01

    An improved technique for measuring the binding of radiolabelled ligands to cell surface molecules has been developed by modification of a procedure using centrifugation through a water-immiscible oil to separate free and cell-bound ligand. It maximises the percentage of ligand bound since cell-bound and free ligand can be separated easily and reproducibly even when very small reaction volumes are used. This permits low levels of ligand radiolabelling and relatively low numbers of cells to be used

  20. Brexit na perspectiva do Path Dependency

    OpenAIRE

    Giorgio Romano Schutte

    2018-01-01

    Esta pesquisa analisou o Brexit em uma perspectiva histórica, focando a conturbada relação entre a Europa continental e o Reino Unido ao longo do século XX, com ênfase no período pós Segunda Guerra Mundial. Foi utilizado o conceito de path dependency para argumentar sobre o papel de fatores históricos e decisões do passado, embora tomados em outras circunstâncias, ainda com força para influenciar o presente, para entender o Brexit. A premissa básica que será apresentada no ensaio é que o Rein...

  1. Desarrollo social y personalidad. Una perspectiva interdisciplinar

    OpenAIRE

    Riesco González, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    En las siguientes páginas se pretende establecer un diálogo interdisciplinar y abierto sobre cuestiones relevantes acerca del desarrollo social y de la personalidad. A partir de una breve reseña histórica del tema desde una perspectiva psicológica, se trata de comprender, con una visión amplia, el progreso humano como marco general del desarrollo social y de las personas. Finalmente, se muestra un bosquejo de la sociedad actual, definida como “sociedad del conocimiento”, “sociedad abierta” y ...

  2. Development of labelled biomolecules for targeted radiotherapy. Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arteaga de Murphy, Consuelo

    2000-01-01

    The scope of the co-ordinated research project (Dec 15 1997) included the following activities: 1) develop coupling techniques using bifunctional chelating agents for monoclonal antibodies and peptides; 2) optimise radiolabelling procedures and reaction parameters using Sm-153 and Re-188; 3) investigate direct methods of labelling monoclonal antibodies and peptides with Re-188; 4) initiate animal distribution studies. The modifications specified for the period 1999/02/15 to 2000/02/14 are as follows: a) continue with the optimisation of Re-188-peptide labelling; b) continue with the work to prepare a kit; c) in-vivo and in-vitro studies; d) Lanreotide labelling. The group formed by researchers from several Mexican institutions have worked together and in different aspects of the CRP in order to fulfil the proposed aims

  3. A radiolabeled antiglobulin test for crossmatching platelet transfusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kickler, T.S.; Braine, H.G.; Ness, P.M.; Koester, A.; Bias, W.

    1983-01-01

    Despite the use of HLA-matched platelets for alloimmunized recipients, transfusion failures occur. In order to reduce these failures, researchers investigated the use of a radiolabeled antiglobulin technique for platelet crossmatching. The principle of the test is that of an indirect Coombs test using 125 I labeled goat anti-human IgG. Incompatibility is determined by calculating a radioactivity antiglobulin test (RAGT) index. Using this technique, researchers performed 89 crossmatches on 19 leukemic or aplastic patients who were refractory to random donor platelets and receiving varying degrees of HLA-matched platelets. Effectiveness of the transfusion was assessed from the posttransfusion corrected platelet count increment (CCI) determined at 1 and 20 hr. When the RAGT index was 1.9 or less, the mean CCI at 1 lhr was 17,570 +/- 7003/cu mm, n . 55. When the RAGT index was 2.0 or greater, the mean CCI was 4237 +/- 4100/cu mm, n . 34. At 20 hr when the RAGT index was 1.9 or less, the mean CCI was 8722 +/- 3143/cu mm, n . 33, and when the index was 2.0 or greater, the mean CCI was 571 +/- 1286/cu mm, n . 23. Using this technique, one false negative resulted. Nine positive crossmatches with good increments at 1 hr were found; at 20 hr, however, the survival of these units was zero. These data suggest that this method is a useful adjunct in the selection of platelets in the refractory patient

  4. Radiolabeling of liposomes and polymeric micelles with PET-isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ingemann Jensen, A.T.

    2013-06-01

    This thesis is divided into three separate chapters that can be read independently. Chapter 1 is a general introduction, touching upon liposomes and polymeric micelles and radiolabeling with 18F and 64Cu. Chapter 2 and 3 address two separate research projects, each described below. A complete reference list is compiled in the end, immediately after the three chapters. This is followed by the supplementary information, divided into appropriate sections. Finally, the two first-authored manuscripts are attached as appendices. Chapter 1. The field of nanoparticulate drug delivery has been hailed as a revolution in modern therapeutics, especially in chemotherapy. A major reason is the ability of nanoparticles to accumulate in tumor tissue. Liposomes are the classic nanoparticle, consisting of a lipid membrane with an aqueous core. Polymeric micelles are made from amphiphilic detergent-like copolymers, that self-assemble in water. Therapy with nanoparticles is hampered by often poor tumor accumulation, combined with massive uptake by macrophages in the liver and spleen. For this reason, visualizing nanoparticle pharmacokinetics in-vivo is a valuable tool in the on-going research. Such visualization can be done by labeling with radio isotopes. Isotopes that emit positrons (PET-isotopes) can be detected by PET (positron emission tomography) technology, an accurate technique that has gained popularity in recent years. PET-isotopes of interest include 18F and 64Cu. In addition to being a research tool, radiolabeled nanoparticles hold promise as a radiopharmaceutical in themselves, as a means of imaging tumor tissue, aiding in diagnosis and surgery. Chapter 2. A method for labeling liposomes with 18F (97% positron decay, T = 110 min) was investigated. 18F is widely available, but is hampered by a short half-life only allowing up to 8 hours scans. 18F must be covalently attached to components of the liposome. By binding to a lipid, it can be stably lodged in the membrane. A

  5. Radiolabeling of liposomes and polymeric micelles with PET-isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingemann Jensen, A.T.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis is divided into three separate chapters that can be read independently. Chapter 1 is a general introduction, touching upon liposomes and polymeric micelles and radiolabeling with 18F and 64Cu. Chapter 2 and 3 address two separate research projects, each described below. A complete reference list is compiled in the end, immediately after the three chapters. This is followed by the supplementary information, divided into appropriate sections. Finally, the two first-authored manuscripts are attached as appendices. Chapter 1. The field of nanoparticulate drug delivery has been hailed as a revolution in modern therapeutics, especially in chemotherapy. A major reason is the ability of nanoparticles to accumulate in tumor tissue. Liposomes are the classic nanoparticle, consisting of a lipid membrane with an aqueous core. Polymeric micelles are made from amphiphilic detergent-like copolymers, that self-assemble in water. Therapy with nanoparticles is hampered by often poor tumor accumulation, combined with massive uptake by macrophages in the liver and spleen. For this reason, visualizing nanoparticle pharmacokinetics in-vivo is a valuable tool in the on-going research. Such visualization can be done by labeling with radio isotopes. Isotopes that emit positrons (PET-isotopes) can be detected by PET (positron emission tomography) technology, an accurate technique that has gained popularity in recent years. PET-isotopes of interest include 18F and 64Cu. In addition to being a research tool, radiolabeled nanoparticles hold promise as a radiopharmaceutical in themselves, as a means of imaging tumor tissue, aiding in diagnosis and surgery. Chapter 2. A method for labeling liposomes with 18F (97% positron decay, T = 110 min) was investigated. 18F is widely available, but is hampered by a short half-life only allowing up to 8 hours scans. 18F must be covalently attached to components of the liposome. By binding to a lipid, it can be stably lodged in the membrane. A

  6. Osteomyelitis diagnosis by {sup 99m}Tc radiolabeled aptamers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, S.R.; Ferreira, I.M.; Andrade, A.S.R., E-mail: sararoberta7@hotmail.com, E-mail: imendesf@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: antero@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Barros, A.L.B.; Cardoso, V.N.; Diniz, O.F., E-mail: brancodebarros@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: valbertcardoso@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: simoneodilia@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Faculdade de Farmacia. Departamento de Analises Clinicas e Toxicologicas

    2015-07-01

    Osteomyelitis, which is characterized by progressive inflammatory destruction and new opposition of bone, is still a difficult infection to treat. The clinical diagnosis in late stages is achieved easily, but an early diagnosis is more challenging. Staphylococcus aureus is a common agent found in osteomyelitis and bone prostheses infection. Diagnosis by scintigraphy has advantages because it is a non-invasive procedure and is able to perform an early diagnosis even before anatomic changes. Thus, nuclear medicine could contribute to an accurate diagnosis since specific radiopharmaceuticals were developed. In this study, aptamers selected to Staphylococcus aureus were labeled with {sup 99m}Tc and used for bacteria identification in an osteomyelitis experimental model. The aptamers selected to S. aureus were directly labelled with {sup 99m}Tc and were evaluated by biodistribution studies. Wistar rats with intraosseous infection in the right paw were used. A random aptamer labelled with {sup 99m}Tc was as control. Six animals were used in each group. The aptamers labeled with {sup 99m}Tc were able to identify the infection foci caused by S. aureus displaying a target/non-target ratio of 2,23 ± 0,20, after 3 h. The control group presented a target/non-target ratio 1,08 ± 0.23. The results indicated that the radiolabeled aptamers were able to identify specifically the infection foci and they should be further explored for infection diagnosis by scintigraphy. (author)

  7. Radiolabeled bivalent haptens for tumor immunodetection and radioimmunotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruaz-Guyon, A.; Janevik-Ivanovska, E.; Raguin, O. [Hopital Saint-Antoine, Faculte' de Medecine, Paris (France); De Labriolle-Vaylet, C. [Hopital Saint-Antoine, Faculte' de Medecine, Paris (France); Hopital Saint-Antoine, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Paris (France); Barbet, J. [Universite' de la Mediterranee, Faculte' de Medecine, Marseille (France)

    2001-06-01

    The pre targeting technique referred to as the Affinity Enhancement System (AES) uses bispecific antibodies and radiolabeled bivalent haptens that bind cooperatively to target cells in vivo. Experimental and clinical data demonstrate that DTPA bivalent haptens can deliver large radiation doses to tumor cells with high tumor to normal tissue contrast ratios and long activity residence time in tumors. Preliminary clinical results of radioimmunotherapy of medullary thyroid carcinomas and lung cancers look promising. Very encouraging results in biodistribution and radioimmunotherapy experiments in animals have been obtained with new haptens bearing two histamine-hemisuccinate suitable for {sup 131}I, {sup 99m}Tc and {sup 188}Re labeling. Targeting isotopes to double antigen positive tumor cells provides a binding enhancement that increases specificity for tumor cells as compared to single antigen targeting on normal cells. This approach may be beneficial for targeting isotopes to B type acute lymphoblastic leukemia and Burkitt lymphoma, as well as others tumors co-expressing two markers of low specificity, and might increase tumor irradiation with minimal irradiation of normal cells.

  8. Radiolabeled bivalent haptens for tumor immunodetection and radioimmunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruaz-Guyon, A.; Janevik-Ivanovska, E.; Raguin, O.; De Labriolle-Vaylet, C.; Barbet, J.

    2001-01-01

    The pre targeting technique referred to as the Affinity Enhancement System (AES) uses bispecific antibodies and radiolabeled bivalent haptens that bind cooperatively to target cells in vivo. Experimental and clinical data demonstrate that DTPA bivalent haptens can deliver large radiation doses to tumor cells with high tumor to normal tissue contrast ratios and long activity residence time in tumors. Preliminary clinical results of radioimmunotherapy of medullary thyroid carcinomas and lung cancers look promising. Very encouraging results in biodistribution and radioimmunotherapy experiments in animals have been obtained with new haptens bearing two histamine-hemisuccinate suitable for 131 I, 99m Tc and 188 Re labeling. Targeting isotopes to double antigen positive tumor cells provides a binding enhancement that increases specificity for tumor cells as compared to single antigen targeting on normal cells. This approach may be beneficial for targeting isotopes to B type acute lymphoblastic leukemia and Burkitt lymphoma, as well as others tumors co-expressing two markers of low specificity, and might increase tumor irradiation with minimal irradiation of normal cells

  9. Radiolabeled Cetuximab Conjugates for EGFR Targeted Cancer Diagnostics and Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiebke Sihver

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR has evolved over years into a main molecular target for the treatment of different cancer entities. In this regard, the anti-EGFR antibody cetuximab has been approved alone or in combination with: (a chemotherapy for treatment of colorectal and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma and (b with external radiotherapy for treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. The conjugation of radionuclides to cetuximab in combination with the specific targeting properties of this antibody might increase its therapeutic efficiency. This review article gives an overview of the preclinical studies that have been performed with radiolabeled cetuximab for imaging and/or treatment of different tumor models. A particularly promising approach seems to be the treatment with therapeutic radionuclide-labeled cetuximab in combination with external radiotherapy. Present data support an important impact of the tumor micromilieu on treatment response that needs to be further validated in patients. Another important challenge is the reduction of nonspecific uptake of the radioactive substance in metabolic organs like liver and radiosensitive organs like bone marrow and kidneys. Overall, the integration of diagnosis, treatment and monitoring as a theranostic approach appears to be a promising strategy for improvement of individualized cancer treatment.

  10. Radiolabeling oligo nuclieotide with 90Y and its radiolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Changbin; Tian Jiahe; Zhang Jinming; Yin Dayi; Guo Zhe

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate labeling Morpholinos (MORF), a DNA analogue, with 90 Y using p-isothiocyanatobenzyl-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) as chelater and assess its stability and hybridization in vitro. Methods: A 25 mer MORF with a primary amine on the 3' equivalent end attached via a 10 member linker was conjugated with an isothiocyanate backbone derivative of DOTA. The conjugated product was labeled in various buffers over a different range of concentrations (0.5-2 mol/L) and pH(3-8.5). The labeled MORF was investigated for stability and hybridization in vitro. Results: By size exclusion high performance liquid chromatogram (HPLC) and instant thin layer chromatography (ITLC) analysis, the DOTA conjugated MORF was successfully radiolabeled, the labeling efficiency was (50 ± 12)%, the specific radioactivity was 5.05 x 10 6 MBq/mmol, radiochemistry purity >95%. The labeled MORF showed one sharp peak by HPLC that shifted completely to earlier retention times following addition of a polymer conjugated with the complementary MORF. In saline at room temperature and in serum at 37 degree C, the radioactivity profile of 90 Y showed a pronounced lower molecular weight peak which did not shifted and was shown due to 90 Y-DOTA resulting from radiolysis. Conclusion: MORF can be successfully labeled with 90 Y via DOTA as chelater, but care it must be taken to avoid the effect of radiolysis. (authors)

  11. 99mTc-tetrapeptides: radiolabelling and biodistribution in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laznickova, A.; Laznicek, M.; Trejtnar, F.; Mather, S.J.

    1998-01-01

    Preparation of 99m Tc-labelled tetrapeptides, namely acetyl-Gly-Gly-Cys-Gly (I), acetyl-Ser-Ser-Cys-Gly (II) and acetyl-Gly-Gly-Cys-Lys (III), analysis of their radiochemical purity and biodistribution were investigated in rats. The aim was to determine the relationship between structure and biological behaviour of 99m Tc-labelled peptides which are formed by amino-acid sequences capable of chelating technetium useful as universal chelators in ''hybrid'' peptides composed of receptor-specific part and the part chelating technetium. For labelling with 99m Tc, a conventional transchelation from 99m Tc-gluconate was used and radiolabelled peptides were purified by filtration on Whatman microfilters 12 kD. Radiochemical purity was higher than 98%. Biodistribution studies in rats showed that all agents are rapidly cleared from the body mostly via urine, but some part of administered radioactivity also in the faces was found. The later route of elimination way increased in the order III 99m Tc-MAG3. The results obtained will assist with design of optimal biocompatible tetrapeptides as chelators for formation of hybrid receptor-specific peptides. (author)

  12. Uptake of radiolabeled leukocytes in prosthetic graft infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serota, A.I.; Williams, R.A.; Rose, J.G.; Wilson, S.E.

    1981-01-01

    The utility of radionuclide labeled leukocytes in the demonstration of infection within vascular prostheses was examined. The infrarenal aorta was replaced with a 3 cm Dacron graft in 12 dogs. On the third postoperative day, six of the animals received an intravenous injection of 10(8) Staphylococcus aureus. Labeled leukocyte scans were performed at postoperative days one and three, and then weekly for 8 weeks with indium-111 and technetium-99 labeled autologous leukocytes. When scans showed focal uptake of isotope in the area of prosthetic material, the grafts were aseptically excised and cultured on mannitol-salt agar. Both control and infected animals had retroperitoneal isotope activity in the immediate postoperative period that disappeared by the end of the first week. By the eighth postoperative week, all of the animals that received the bacteremic challenge had both radionuclide concentration in the region of the vascular prosthesis and S. aureus cultured subsequently from the perigraft tissues. None of the control animals had either radionuclide or bacteriologic evidence of infection at the eighth postoperative week. The radiolabeled leukocyte scan is a highly sensitive and specific technique, clinically applicable for the diagnosis of vascular prosthetic infections

  13. Synthesis and applications of radiolabelled drugs in pharmaceutical development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landvatter, S.W.; Heys, J.R.; Garner, K.T.; Mack, J.F.; Senderoff, S.G.; Shu, A.Y.; Villani, A.J.; Saunders, D.

    1994-01-01

    Radiolabelled drugs play a vital role in the development of new pharmaceuticals including application in drug discovery, pre-clinical development and clinical development. The synthesis of these pharmaceuticals in tritium or carbon-14 labelled form poses many challenges for the synthetic organic chemist. The actual choice of synthetic route must take into account the small scale, limited choice and high cost of labelled precursors, and the positioning of the label into a metabolically stable position. There are, however, a number of synthetic strategies available for overcoming these constraints. Although in some C-14 syntheses the requisite labelled raw material can be purchased and the existing synthesis adapted for labelling, frequently the synthetic challenge is the synthesis of a structurally simple, yet commercially unavailable, labelled precursor (e.g., γ-butyrolactone-[2- 14 C], cyclohexanone-[ 3 H], CuCN-[ 14 C], 2-furancarboxaldehyde-[ 14 C]). Another useful strategy in C-14 synthesis is the conversion of an advanced intermediate, or perhaps the unlabelled product itself, into a precursor which can then be reconverted into the labelled version of the intermediate. Occasionally, a new total synthesis must be developed. In addition to these strategies, tritium labelling can uniquely take advantage of exchange labelling techniques, synthesis and reduction of unsaturated precursors, or tritium-halogen replacement reactions. Examples of these strategies and use of the labelled products are discussed

  14. Osteomyelitis diagnosis by 99mTc radiolabeled aptamers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, S.R.; Ferreira, I.M.; Andrade, A.S.R.; Barros, A.L.B.; Cardoso, V.N.; Diniz, O.F.

    2015-01-01

    Osteomyelitis, which is characterized by progressive inflammatory destruction and new opposition of bone, is still a difficult infection to treat. The clinical diagnosis in late stages is achieved easily, but an early diagnosis is more challenging. Staphylococcus aureus is a common agent found in osteomyelitis and bone prostheses infection. Diagnosis by scintigraphy has advantages because it is a non-invasive procedure and is able to perform an early diagnosis even before anatomic changes. Thus, nuclear medicine could contribute to an accurate diagnosis since specific radiopharmaceuticals were developed. In this study, aptamers selected to Staphylococcus aureus were labeled with 99m Tc and used for bacteria identification in an osteomyelitis experimental model. The aptamers selected to S. aureus were directly labelled with 99m Tc and were evaluated by biodistribution studies. Wistar rats with intraosseous infection in the right paw were used. A random aptamer labelled with 99m Tc was as control. Six animals were used in each group. The aptamers labeled with 99m Tc were able to identify the infection foci caused by S. aureus displaying a target/non-target ratio of 2,23 ± 0,20, after 3 h. The control group presented a target/non-target ratio 1,08 ± 0.23. The results indicated that the radiolabeled aptamers were able to identify specifically the infection foci and they should be further explored for infection diagnosis by scintigraphy. (author)

  15. Integrative self-assembly of functional hybrid nanoconstructs by inorganic wrapping of single biomolecules, biomolecule arrays and organic supramolecular assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Avinash J; Li, Mei; Mann, Stephen

    2013-08-21

    Synthesis of functional hybrid nanoscale objects has been a core focus of the rapidly progressing field of nanomaterials science. In particular, there has been significant interest in the integration of evolutionally optimized biological systems such as proteins, DNA, virus particles and cells with functional inorganic building blocks to construct mesoscopic architectures and nanostructured materials. However, in many cases the fragile nature of the biomolecules seriously constrains their potential applications. As a consequence, there is an on-going quest for the development of novel strategies to modulate the thermal and chemical stabilities, and performance of biomolecules under adverse conditions. This feature article highlights new methods of "inorganic molecular wrapping" of single or multiple protein molecules, individual double-stranded DNA helices, lipid bilayer vesicles and self-assembled organic dye superstructures using inorganic building blocks to produce bio-inorganic nanoconstructs with core-shell type structures. We show that spatial isolation of the functional biological nanostructures as "armour-plated" enzyme molecules or polynucleotide strands not only maintains their intact structure and biochemical properties, but also enables the fabrication of novel hybrid nanomaterials for potential applications in diverse areas of bionanotechnology.

  16. Integrative self-assembly of functional hybrid nanoconstructs by inorganic wrapping of single biomolecules, biomolecule arrays and organic supramolecular assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Avinash J.; Li, Mei; Mann, Stephen

    2013-07-01

    Synthesis of functional hybrid nanoscale objects has been a core focus of the rapidly progressing field of nanomaterials science. In particular, there has been significant interest in the integration of evolutionally optimized biological systems such as proteins, DNA, virus particles and cells with functional inorganic building blocks to construct mesoscopic architectures and nanostructured materials. However, in many cases the fragile nature of the biomolecules seriously constrains their potential applications. As a consequence, there is an on-going quest for the development of novel strategies to modulate the thermal and chemical stabilities, and performance of biomolecules under adverse conditions. This feature article highlights new methods of ``inorganic molecular wrapping'' of single or multiple protein molecules, individual double-stranded DNA helices, lipid bilayer vesicles and self-assembled organic dye superstructures using inorganic building blocks to produce bio-inorganic nanoconstructs with core-shell type structures. We show that spatial isolation of the functional biological nanostructures as ``armour-plated'' enzyme molecules or polynucleotide strands not only maintains their intact structure and biochemical properties, but also enables the fabrication of novel hybrid nanomaterials for potential applications in diverse areas of bionanotechnology.

  17. Electromagnetic study of surface enhanced Raman scattering of plasmonic-biomolecule: An interaction between nanodimer and single biomolecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Gyanendra Krishna; Pathak, Nilesh Kumar; Uma, R.; Sharma, R. P.

    2017-04-01

    In this article we have investigated the electromagnetic surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) of single biomolecule adsorbed at the surface of spherical nanodimer. The SERS mechanism has been studied using first principle approach for spherical nanodimer geometry. The coupling of plasmonic concept to biomolecule results the broadband tunable enhancement in Raman gain factor. In this observation the enhancement factor was observed around ≈ 1015. The plasmonic properties of metal nanodimer are analysed in terms of surface plasmon resonances, extinction efficiency and polarisability that have been derived under quasistatic approximation. In this paper, various facets like interdipole separation, molecule distance and size of the plasmonic nanogeometry are taken into account to analyse the Raman gain factor. We also observe that the frequency range expands sufficiently which increases the broad detectability range of the molecule which generates signal even in the outside of Raman range i.e. in between IR to UV region. Lastly, the extinction spectra and electric field profile have been evaluated at resonance wavelength 364 nm. The comparison between electrostatic approach and numerical approach (using DDA) has also been done in terms of extinction spectra.

  18. Comparison of endogenous and radiolabeled bile acid excretion in patients with idiopathic chronic diarrhea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiller, L.R.; Bilhartz, L.E.; Santa Ana, C.A.

    1990-01-01

    Fecal recovery of radioactivity after ingestion of a bolus of radiolabeled bile acid is abnormally high in most patients with idiopathic chronic diarrhea. To evaluate the significance of this malabsorption, concurrent fecal excretion of both exogenous radiolabeled bile acid and endogenous (unlabeled) bile acid were measured in patients with idiopathic chronic diarrhea. Subjects received a 2.5-microCi oral dose of taurocholic acid labeled with 14C in the 24th position of the steroid moiety. Endogenous bile acid excretion was measured by a hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase assay on a concurrent 72-h stool collection. Both radiolabeled and endogenous bile acid excretion were abnormally high in most patients with chronic diarrhea compared with normal subjects, even when equivoluminous diarrhea was induced in normal subjects by ingestion of osmotically active solutions. The correlation between radiolabeled and endogenous bile acid excretion was good. However, neither radiolabeled nor endogenous bile acid excretion was as abnormal as is typically seen in patients with ileal resection, and none of these diarrhea patients responded to treatment with cholestyramine with stool weights less than 200 g. These results suggest (a) that this radiolabeled bile acid excretion test accurately reflects excess endogenous bile acid excretion; (b) that excess endogenous bile acid excretion is not caused by diarrhea per se; (c) that spontaneously occurring idiopathic chronic diarrhea is often associated with increased endogenous bile acid excretion; and (d) that bile acid malabsorption is not likely to be the primary cause of diarrhea in most of these patients

  19. In vitro incorporation of radiolabeled cholesteryl esters into high and low density lipoproteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terpstra, A.H.; Nicolosi, R.J.; Herbert, P.N.

    1989-01-01

    We have developed and validated a method for in vitro incorporation of radiolabeled cholesteryl esters into low density (LDL) and high density lipoproteins (HDL). Radiolabeled cholesteryl esters dissolved in absolute ethanol were mixed with LDL or HDL in the presence of lipoprotein-deficient serum (LPDS) as a source of core lipid transfer activity. The efficiency of incorporation was dependent on: (a) the core lipid transfer activity and quantity of LPDS, (b) the mass of added radiolabeled cholesteryl esters, (c) the length of incubation, and (d) the amount of acceptor lipoprotein cholesterol. The tracer incorporation was documented by repeat density gradient ultracentrifugation, agarose gel electrophoresis, and precipitation with heparin-MnCl2. The radiolabeling conditions did not affect the following properties of the lipoproteins: (1) chemical composition, (2) electrophoretic mobility on agarose gels, (3) hydrated density, (4) distribution of apoproteins on SDS gels, (5) plasma clearance rates, and (6) immunoprecipitability of HDL apoproteins A-I and A-II. Rat HDL containing radiolabeled cholesteryl esters incorporated in vitro had plasma disappearance rates identical to HDL radiolabeled in vivo

  20. Biomolecule-nanoparticle interactions: Elucidation of the thermodynamics by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rixiang; Lau, Boris L T

    2016-05-01

    Nanomaterials (NMs) are often exposed to a broad range of biomolecules of different abundances. Biomolecule sorption driven by various interfacial forces determines the surface structure and composition of NMs, subsequently governs their functionality and the reactivity of the adsorbed biomolecules. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is a nondestructive technique that quantifies thermodynamic parameters through in-situ measurement of the heat absorption or release associated with an interaction. This review highlights the recent applications of ITC in understanding the thermodynamics of interactions between various nanoparticles (NPs) and biomolecules. Different aspects of a typical ITC experiment that are crucial for obtaining accurate and meaningful data, as well as the strengths, weaknesses, and challenges of ITC applications to NP research were discussed. ITC reveals the driving forces behind biomolecule-NP interactions and the effects of the physicochemical properties of both NPs and biomolecules by quantifying the crucial thermodynamics parameters (e.g., binding stoichiometry, ΔH, ΔS, and ΔG). Complimentary techniques would strengthen the interpretation of ITC results for a more holistic understanding of biomolecule-NP interactions. The thermodynamic information revealed by ITC and its complimentary characterizations is important for understanding biomolecule-NP interactions that are fundamental to the biomedical and environmental applications of NMs and their toxicological effects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Stereoselective assembly of amino acid-based metal-biomolecule nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hong; Tian, Chunyong; Zhang, Yufei; Yang, Chen; Zhang, Songping; Jiang, Zhongyi

    2015-04-14

    A series of amino acid-based metal-biomolecule nanofibers are fabricated through a coordination-directed assembly process. The chirality and carbon chain length of the amino acids exert a pronounced influence on the assembly process. This study may be extended to design diverse kinds of 1-D metal-biomolecule frameworks (MBioFs).

  2. Soft x-ray circular dichroism of biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Kazumichi; Tanaka, Makoto; Agui, Akane

    2005-01-01

    We succeeded to observe natural circular dichroism NCD for biomolecules in soft X-ray region for the first time. Evaporated films of amino acids, phenylalanine (phe) and serine (ser) were prepared in vacuum with the thickness of about 300 nm. Measurement was carried out at the soft X-ray undulator beamline BL23SU of the Spring-8, where left- and right-circularly polarized light (LCPL and RCPL) was available from an APPLE-2 undulator. Difference spectra DA(hν) was plotted as a function of photon energy hν of soft X-ray to be the difference between absorption coefficient A L for LCPL and absorption coefficient A R for RCPL, namely, DA(hν) ≡ A L (hν) - A R (hν). Values of A L and A R were determined by means of the photoelectric drain current measurement. In the DA(hν) spectra for L-phe films, negative peak was observed at 407 eV. On the contrary, for D-phe films, positive peak was observed at 407 eV with the same magnitude but opposite sign. Moreover, no signal was observed for racemic phenylalanine (DL-phe). In the wavelength region of visible to ultraviolet, there is well-known general law in which NCD signals for D- and L-enantiomers are the same magnitude but opposite sign and racemic compound does not show NCD spectra. Characteristic features in DA(hν) spectra of the L-phe, D-phe and DL-phe were of good agreement with this well-known general law. Based on this good agreement, we concluded that peaks at 407 eV in the DA(hν) spectra are true NCD peaks. For ser films, we assigned peaks at 540 eV and 548 eV to be NCD peaks in the same manner. We hope that our first observation of NCD for biomolecules at soft X-ray region will open new science and technologies such as basic science including elucidation of fundamental mechanism of NCD and application to manipulate biomolecules using circularly polarized soft X-ray beams. (author)

  3. Bifunctional chelating agent for the design and development of site specific radiopharmaceuticals and biomolecule conjugation strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katti, Kattesh V.; Prabhu, Kandikere R.; Gali, Hariprasad; Pillarsetty, Nagavara Kishore; Volkert, Wynn A.

    2003-10-21

    There is provided a method of labeling a biomolecule with a transition metal or radiometal in a site specific manner to produce a diagnostic or therapeutic pharmaceutical compound by synthesizing a P.sub.2 N.sub.2 -bifunctional chelating agent intermediate, complexing the intermediate with a radio metal or a transition metal, and covalently linking the resulting metal-complexed bifunctional chelating agent with a biomolecule in a site specific manner. Also provided is a method of synthesizing the --PR.sub.2 containing biomolecules by synthesizing a P.sub.2 N.sub.2 -bifunctional chelating agent intermediate, complexing the intermediate with a radiometal or a transition metal, and covalently linking the resulting radio metal-complexed bifunctional chelating agent with a biomolecule in a site specific manner. There is provided a therapeutic or diagnostic agent comprising a --PR.sub.2 containing biomolecule.

  4. Sustained delivery of biomolecules from gelatin carriers for applications in bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jiankang; Leeuwenburgh, Sander Cg

    2014-08-01

    Local delivery of therapeutic biomolecules to stimulate bone regeneration has matured considerably during the past decades, but control over the release of these biomolecules still remains a major challenge. To this end, suitable carriers that allow for tunable spatial and temporal delivery of biomolecules need to be developed. Gelatin is one of the most widely used natural polymers for the controlled and sustained delivery of biomolecules because of its biodegradability, biocompatibility, biosafety and cost-effectiveness. The current study reviews the applications of gelatin as carriers in form of bulk hydrogels, microspheres, nanospheres, colloidal gels and composites for the programmed delivery of commonly used biomolecules for applications in bone regeneration with a specific focus on the relationship between carrier properties and delivery characteristics.

  5. Determination of the three-dimensional structure for weakly aligned biomolecules by NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahkhatuni, Astghik A; Shahkhatuni, Aleksan G

    2002-01-01

    The key achievements and the potential of NMR spectroscopy for weakly aligned biomolecules are considered. Due to weak alignment, it becomes possible to determine a number of NMR parameters dependent on the orientation of biomolecules, which are averaged to zero in usual isotropic media. The addition of new orientational constraints to standard procedures of 3D structure determination markedly increases the achievable accuracy. The possibility of structure determination for biomolecules using only orientation-dependent parameters without invoking other NMR data is discussed. The methods of orientation, experimental techniques, and calculation methods are systematised. The main results obtained and the prospects of using NMR spectroscopy of weakly aligned systems to study different classes of biomolecules and to solve various problems of molecular biology are analysed. Examples of biomolecules whose structures have been determined using orientation-dependent parameters are given. The bibliography includes 508 references.

  6. A printed electronic platform for the specific detection of biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doumbia, A.; Webb, M.; Turner, M. L.; Behrendt, J. M.; Wilson, R.

    2017-08-01

    The rapid detection of disease specific biomarkers in a clinically relevant range using a low-cost sensor can facilitate the development of individual treatment plans for a given patient, known as precision, personalized or genomic medicine. In the recent decade Electrolyte-Gated Organic Field Effect Transistors (EGOFETs), a subtype of OFETs where the dielectric is replaced by an electrolyte, have attracted a great deal of attention for sensing applications. This is due to their capacity to operate at low voltage (market are not yet achieved. In this contribution, we describe the development of a stable and reproducible EGOFET sensor that is able to detect biomolecules selectively in real-time. Facile and scalable techniques are used to prepare arrays of these devices. The selectivity of individual EGOFETs is investigated by immobilization of specific ligands to the target molecule of interest on the gate electrode within a microfluidic flow cell.

  7. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for biomolecule detection and its applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winston Chen, C. H.; Sammartano, L. J.; Isola, N. R.; Allman, S. L.

    2001-08-01

    During the past few years, we developed and used laser desorption mass spectrometry for biomolecule detections. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) was successfully used to detect DNA fragments with the size larger than 3000 base pairs. It was also successfully used to sequence DNA with both enzymatic and chemical degradation methods to produce DNA ladders. We also developed MALDI with fragmentation for direct DNA sequencing for short DNA probes. Since laser desorption mass spectrometry for DNA detection has the advantages of fast speed and no need of labeling, it has a great potential for molecular diagnosis for disease and person identification by DNA fingerprinting. We applied laser desorption mass spectrometry to succeed in the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis and several other nerve degenerative diseases such as Huntington's disease. We also succeeded in demonstrating DNA typing for forensic applications.

  8. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for biomolecule detection and its applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winston Chen, C.H.; Allman, S.L.; Sammartano, L.J.; Isola, N.R.

    2001-01-01

    During the past few years, we developed and used laser desorption mass spectrometry for biomolecule detections. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) was successfully used to detect DNA fragments with the size larger than 3000 base pairs. It was also successfully used to sequence DNA with both enzymatic and chemical degradation methods to produce DNA ladders. We also developed MALDI with fragmentation for direct DNA sequencing for short DNA probes. Since laser desorption mass spectrometry for DNA detection has the advantages of fast speed and no need of labeling, it has a great potential for molecular diagnosis for disease and person identification by DNA fingerprinting. We applied laser desorption mass spectrometry to succeed in the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis and several other nerve degenerative diseases such as Huntington's disease. We also succeeded in demonstrating DNA typing for forensic applications

  9. Integrated nanoparticle-biomolecule systems for biosensing and bioelectronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willner, Itamar; Baron, Ronan; Willner, Bilha

    2007-04-15

    The similar dimensions of biomolecules such as enzymes, antibodies or DNA, and metallic or semiconductor nanoparticles (NPs) enable the synthesis of biomolecule-NP hybrid systems where the unique electronic, photonic and catalytic properties of NPs are combined with the specific recognition and biocatalytic properties of biomolecules. The unique functions of biomolecule-NP hybrid systems are discussed with several examples: (i) the electrical contacting of redox enzymes with electrodes is the basis for the development of enzymatic electrodes for amperometric biosensors or biofuel cell elements. The reconstitution of the apo-glucose oxidase or apo-glucose dehydrogenase on flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-functionalized Au NPs (1.4 nm) associated with electrodes, or on pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ)-functionalized Au NPs (1.4 nm) associated with electrodes, respectively, yields electrically contacted enzyme electrodes. The aligned, reconstituted enzymes on the electrode surfaces reveal effective electrical contacting, and the glucose oxidase and glucose dehydrogenase reveal turnover rates of 5000 and 11,800 s(-1), respectively. (ii) The photoexcitation of semiconductor nanoparticles yields fluorescence with a wavelength controlled by the size of the NPs. The fluorescence functions of semiconductor NPs are used to develop a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) assay for nucleic acids, and specifically, for analyzing telomerase activity in cancer cells. CdSe-ZnS NPs are functionalized by a primer recognized by telomerase, and this is elongated by telomerase extracted from HeLa cancer cells in the presence of dNTPs and Texas-red-functionalized dUTP. The dye integrated into the telomers allows the FRET process that is intensified as telomerization proceeds. Also, the photoexcited electron-hole pair generated in semiconductor NPs is used to generate photocurrents in a CdS-DNA hybrid system associated with an electrode. A redox-active intercalator, methylene blue

  10. Electrophoretic transport of biomolecules across liquid-liquid interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, Thomas; Hardt, Steffen [Center of Smart Interfaces, TU Darmstadt, Petersenstrasse 32, D-64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Muenchow, Goetz, E-mail: hardt@csi.tu-darmstadt.de [Institut fuer Mikrotechnik Mainz GmbH, Carl-Zeiss-Strasse 18-20, D-55129 Mainz (Germany)

    2011-05-11

    The mass transfer resistance of a liquid-liquid interface in an aqueous two-phase system composed of poly(ethylene glycol) and dextran is investigated. Different types of proteins and DNA stained with fluorescent dyes serve as probes to study the transport processes close to the interface. A microfluidic device is employed to enable the electrophoretic transport of biomolecules from one phase to another. The results obtained for proteins can be explained solely via the different electrophoretic mobilities and different affinities of the molecules to the two phases, without any indications of a significant mass transfer resistance of the liquid-liquid interface. By contrast, DNA molecules adsorb to the interface and only desorb under an increased electric field strength. The desorption process carries the signature of a thermally activated escape from a metastable state, as reflected in the exponential decay of the fluorescence intensity at the interface as a function of time.

  11. Manipulation of Biomolecule-Modified Liquid-Metal Blobs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yue; Miyako, Eijiro

    2017-10-23

    Soft and deformable liquid metals (LMs) are building components in various systems related to uncertain and dynamic task environments. Herein we describe the development of a biomolecule-triggered external-manipulation method involving LM conjugates for the construction of future innovative soft robotics operating in physiological environments. Functional soft hybrids composed of a liquid-metal droplet, a thiolated ligand, and proteins were synthesized for the expression of diverse macroscopic commands, such as attachment to cells, binary fusion, and self-propelled movement through molecular recognition and enzymatic reactions. Our technology could be used to create new state-of-the-art soft robots for chemical and biomedical engineering applications. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Modification of biomolecules and combined actions by radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Kyu; Lee, J. W.; Kim, J. H.; Choi, J. I.; Song, B. S.; Kim, J. K.; Park, J. H.; Lee, Y. J.; Ryu, S. H.; Sung, N. Y.; Cha, M. K.; Nam, J. Y.; Park, J. Y.; Cho, E. R.; Ryu, T. H.

    2011-12-01

    Advanced Radiation Technology Institute is a government-supported institute for radiation research and application. It has focused on development of fundamentals for radiation applications based on the existing radiation technology, and on enhancement of biological effectiveness of radiation through theoretical approach to the combined actions of radiation with another factor. Application of radiation technology together with the existing technologies to enhance the physical, chemical, biological characteristics through modification of biomolecules resulted in creation of de novo materials of scientific and industrial values. A theoretical model for combined action of radiation with another physico-chemical factor has been established. Conclusively the results of this study can provide scientific bases for maximizing the efficacy of ionizing radiation in relation to industrial applications

  13. Water Dynamics in the Hydration Shells of Biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The structure and function of biomolecules are strongly influenced by their hydration shells. Structural fluctuations and molecular excitations of hydrating water molecules cover a broad range in space and time, from individual water molecules to larger pools and from femtosecond to microsecond time scales. Recent progress in theory and molecular dynamics simulations as well as in ultrafast vibrational spectroscopy has led to new and detailed insight into fluctuations of water structure, elementary water motions, electric fields at hydrated biointerfaces, and processes of vibrational relaxation and energy dissipation. Here, we review recent advances in both theory and experiment, focusing on hydrated DNA, proteins, and phospholipids, and compare dynamics in the hydration shells to bulk water. PMID:28248491

  14. Interactions of model biomolecules. Benchmark CC calculations within MOLCAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urban, Miroslav [Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava, Faculty of Materials Science and Technology in Trnava, Institute of Materials Science, Bottova 25, SK-917 24 Trnava, Slovakia and Department of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Faculty of Natural Scie (Slovakia); Pitoňák, Michal; Neogrády, Pavel; Dedíková, Pavlína [Department of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Comenius University, Mlynská dolina, SK-842 15 Bratislava (Slovakia); Hobza, Pavel [Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry and Center for Complex Molecular Systems and biomolecules, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2015-01-22

    We present results using the OVOS approach (Optimized Virtual Orbitals Space) aimed at enhancing the effectiveness of the Coupled Cluster calculations. This approach allows to reduce the total computer time required for large-scale CCSD(T) calculations about ten times when the original full virtual space is reduced to about 50% of its original size without affecting the accuracy. The method is implemented in the MOLCAS computer program. When combined with the Cholesky decomposition of the two-electron integrals and suitable parallelization it allows calculations which were formerly prohibitively too demanding. We focused ourselves to accurate calculations of the hydrogen bonded and the stacking interactions of the model biomolecules. Interaction energies of the formaldehyde, formamide, benzene, and uracil dimers and the three-body contributions in the cytosine – guanine tetramer are presented. Other applications, as the electron affinity of the uracil affected by solvation are also shortly mentioned.

  15. Platinum(II) complexes as spectroscopic probes for biomolecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratilla, E.

    1990-09-21

    The use of platinum(II) complexes as tags and probes for biomolecules is indeed advantageous for their reactivities can be selective for certain purposes through an interplay of mild reaction conditions and of the ligands bound to the platinum. The use of {sup 195}Pt NMR as a method of detecting platinum and its interactions with biomolecules was carried out with the simplest model of platinum(II) tagging to proteins. Variable-temperature {sup 195}Pt NMR spectroscopy proved useful in studying the stereodynamics of complex thioethers like methionine. The complex, Pt(trpy)Cl{sup +}, with its chromophore has a greater potential for probing proteins. It is a noninvasive and selective tag for histidine and cysteine residues on the surface of cytochrome c at pH 5. The protein derivatives obtained are separable, and the tags are easily quantitated and differentiated through the metal-to-ligand charge transfer bands which are sensitive to the environment of the tag. Increasing the pH to 7.0 led to the modification by Pt(trpy)Cl{sup +}of Arg 91 in cytochrome c. Further studies with guanidine-containing ligands as models for arginine modification by Pt(trpy)Cl{sup +} showed that guanidine can act as a terminal ligand and as a bridging ligand. Owing to the potential utility of Pt(trpy)L{sup n+} as electron dense probes of nucleic acid structure, interactions of this bis-Pt(trpy){sup 2+} complex with nucleic acids was evaluated. Indeed, the complex interacts non-covalently with nucleic acids. Its interactions with DNA are not exactly the same as those of its precedents. Most striking is its ability to form highly immobile bands of DNA upon gel electrophoresis. 232 refs.

  16. The processing and fate of antibodies and their radiolabels bound to the surface of tumor cells in vitro: A comparison of nine radiolabels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shih, L.B.; Thorpe, S.R.; Griffiths, G.L.; Diril, H.; Ong, G.L.; Hansen, H.J.; Goldenberg, D.M.; Mattes, M.J.

    1994-01-01

    Processing radiolabeled degradation products is the key factor affecting retention of antibodies within the cell. In this study, the authors have analyzed the processing of antibodies labeled in nine different ways. Antibodies were labeled with three different radioisotopes and seven different forms of 125 I. Eight of the radiolabels (except 188 Re) were conjugated to the same antibody, MA103, and tested on the renal carcinoma cell line SK-RC-18 and/or the ovarian carcinoma cell line SK-OV-6. Rhenium conjugation utilized the antibody RS7, the target cell line ME180 and three of the other radiolabels were also tested with this antibody-target cell combination for comparison. Iodine conjugated to antibodies by conventional methods was rapidly released from the cell after antibody catabolism. In contrast, iodinated moieties, such as dilactitol-tyramine and inulin-tyramine were retained within cells four to five times longer. The use of radiolabels that are trapped within cells after antibody catabolism can potentially increase the dose of radiation delivered to the tumor, from the same amount of radioactivity deposited by a factor of four or five. The prolonged retention of 111 In relative to 125 I is not due to deiodination of iodine conjugates, but rather to intracellular retention of catabolic products containing 111 In, perhaps within lysosomes. 45 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  17. Current status of cancer immunodetection with radiolabeled human monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jager, R; Abdel-Nabi, H; Serafini, A; Pecking, A; Klein, J L; Hanna, M G

    1993-04-01

    The use of radiolabeled murine monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) for cancer immunodetection has been limited by the development of human antimouse antibodies (HAMA). Human monoclonal antibodies do not elicit a significant human antihuman (HAHA) response. The generation and production of human monoclonal antibodies met with technical difficulties that resulted in delaying their clinical testing. Human monoclonal antibodies of all isotypes have been obtained. Most were immunoglobulin (Ig) M directed against intracellular antigens. Two antibodies, 16.88 (IgM) and 88BV59 (IgG3k), recognize different epitopes on a tumor-associated antigen, CTA 16.88, homologous to cytokeratins 8, 18, and 19. CTA 16.88 is expressed by most epithelial-derived tumors including carcinomas of the colon, pancreas, breast, ovary, and lung. The in vivo targeting by these antibodies is related to their localization in nonnecrotic areas of tumors. Repeated administration of 16.88 over 5 weeks to a cumulative dose of 1,000 mg did not elicit a HAHA response. Two of 53 patients developed a low titer of HAHA 1 to 3 months after a single administration of 88BV59. Planar imaging of colorectal cancer with Iodine-131 (131I)-16.88 was positive in two studies in 9 of 12 and 16 of 20 patients preselected by immunohistochemistry. Tumors less than 2 cm in diameter are usually not detected. The lack of immunogenicity and long tumor residence time (average = 17 days) makes 16.88 a good candidate for therapy. Radioimmunlymphoscintigraphy with indium-111 (111In)-LiLo-16.88 administered by an intramammary route was used in the presurgical staging of primary breast cancer. The negative predictive value of lymph node metastases for tumors less than 3 cm was 90.5%. Planar and single photon emission computed tomography imaging of colorectal carcinoma with technetium-99m (99mTc) 88BV59 was compared with computed tomography (CT) scan in 36 surgical patients. The antibody scan was more sensitive than the CT scan in detecting

  18. Radiolabeling, characterization and preliminary studies of 90Y-octreotate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klementyeva, O.E.; Bruskin, A.B.; Larenkov, A.A.; Kodina, G.E.; Korsunsky, V.N.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Introduction: Overexpression of the somatostatin receptors in neuroendocrine tumors has become the molecular basis for the use of somatostatin analogues in diagnosis and therapy for these neoplasms. The high energy (maximum 2.2 MeV) and penetration range (R 95 5.7 mm) of β-particles from 90 Y are advantageous, with a direct killing of somatostatin receptor positive cells and a crossfire effect which hits nearby receptor-negative tumour cells [Ref. 1]. Aim: the investigation of the reaction conditions for the preparation of 90 Y-Octreotate and its in vitro characterization. Materials and methods: DOTA-Octreotate (Farm-Syntez Ltd.) and 88 YCl 3 (V/O Isotop) were used without purification. 88 Y-Octreotate was prepared in acetate buffer solution and its radiochemical purity was controlled by ITLC. In-vitro experiments were carried out with melanoma B16. Studies of internalization were performed as described in [Ref. 2]. Results: the maximal accumulation in the cells was observed after 90 min from the beginning of incubation and was about 3.9%. In our experiments, we found high level of internalization of the surface-bound 88 Y-Octreotate into B16 cells. Maximal internalization level was 80% after 60 min of incubation. Conclusion: the optimal conditions for effective labeling (> 95%) of DOTA-Octreotate were found. The results obtained using the gamma-emitting 88 Y, provide a basis for in vivo research 90 Y octreotate as radiotherapeutic agent. References: [Ref. 1] Bodei, L.; Pepe, G.; Paganelli, G.; Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) of neuroendocrine tumors with somatostatin analogues. Eur. Rev. Med. Pharmacol. Sci., 2010; v. 14: 347-351. [Ref. 2] Garcia Garayoa E., Allemann-Tannahill L., et al. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of new radiolabeled neurotensin (8-13) analogs with high affinity for NT1 receptors. Nucl. Med. Biol. 2001; 28: 75-84. (authors)

  19. In vitro evaluation of radiolabeled aptamers for colon carcinoma diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correa, C.R.; Ferreira, I.M; Santos, S.R.; Faria, L.S.; Andrade, A.S.R., E-mail: crisrcorrea@gmail.com, E-mail: antero@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Goes, A.M., E-mail: goes@icb.ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Inst. de Ciencias Biologicas. Dept. de Imunologia e Bioquimica

    2013-07-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide, representing a major public health problem worldwide. Colorectal cancers accounts around 8% of all deaths for cancer in 2008, is the fourth most lethal. Many colorectal cancer markers, such as carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), A33, and CSA-p, have been studied as the therapeutic targets in preclinical or clinical settings. CEA is a complex intracellular glycoprotein produced by about 90% of colorectal cancers. Since its discovery in 1965, a very large number of studies have been carried out to determine the effectiveness of CEA as clinically useful tumor markers. Aptamers are short single-stranded nucleic acid oligomers (DNA or RNA) that can form specific and complex three-dimensional structures which can bind with high affinity to specific targets, they are functionally equivalent of antibodies. Aptamers have the advantage of being highly specific, relatively small size, and non-immunogenic. The aim of this study was develop anti-CEA aptamers for use as imaging agents. The aptamers are obtained through by SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment), in which aptamers are selected from a library of random sequences of synthetic DNA by repetitive binding of the oligonucleotides to target molecule. These aptamers were confirmed to have affinity and specific binding for T84 cell line (target cell), showed by fluorescence microscopic images. Individual aptamers sequences that bound T84 cells were {sup 32}P-radiolabeled and incubated at different concentrations on cell monolayers, to monitor the aptamers affinity binding. The selected aptamers can identify colon cancer cell line. This aptamers could be further developed for early disease detection as radiopharmaceuticals, as well as prognostic markers, of colorectal cancers. (author)

  20. In vitro evaluation of radiolabeled aptamers for colon carcinoma diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa, C.R.; Ferreira, I.M; Santos, S.R.; Faria, L.S.; Andrade, A.S.R.; Goes, A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide, representing a major public health problem worldwide. Colorectal cancers accounts around 8% of all deaths for cancer in 2008, is the fourth most lethal. Many colorectal cancer markers, such as carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), A33, and CSA-p, have been studied as the therapeutic targets in preclinical or clinical settings. CEA is a complex intracellular glycoprotein produced by about 90% of colorectal cancers. Since its discovery in 1965, a very large number of studies have been carried out to determine the effectiveness of CEA as clinically useful tumor markers. Aptamers are short single-stranded nucleic acid oligomers (DNA or RNA) that can form specific and complex three-dimensional structures which can bind with high affinity to specific targets, they are functionally equivalent of antibodies. Aptamers have the advantage of being highly specific, relatively small size, and non-immunogenic. The aim of this study was develop anti-CEA aptamers for use as imaging agents. The aptamers are obtained through by SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment), in which aptamers are selected from a library of random sequences of synthetic DNA by repetitive binding of the oligonucleotides to target molecule. These aptamers were confirmed to have affinity and specific binding for T84 cell line (target cell), showed by fluorescence microscopic images. Individual aptamers sequences that bound T84 cells were 32 P-radiolabeled and incubated at different concentrations on cell monolayers, to monitor the aptamers affinity binding. The selected aptamers can identify colon cancer cell line. This aptamers could be further developed for early disease detection as radiopharmaceuticals, as well as prognostic markers, of colorectal cancers. (author)

  1. Labelled biomolecules with Sm-153, Re-188 and Y-90 for targeted radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, M.; Pervez, S.

    2000-01-01

    Direct labeling of Lanreotide with Rhenium-188 was studied. Reduction of cysteine bridge was performed by reducing agents (ascorbic acid, 2ME). The perrhenate eluted from the generator was reduced with stannous chloride. Tartarate was used as transchelating agent. After pH adjustment, shaking and incubation for various time intervals were carried out. Thin Layer chromatography and reverse phase chromatography were used to monitor the radiolabelling yield. Stability of radiolabelled Lanreotide was also checked

  2. Labelled biomolecules with SM-153, Re-188 and Y-90 for targeted radiotherapy. Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, Mushtaq; Pervez, Shahid

    2000-01-01

    Direct labeling of Lanreotide with Rhenium-188 was studied. Reduction of cysteine bridge was performed by reducing agents (ascorbic acid, 2ME). The perrhenate eluted from the generator was reduced with stannous chloride. Tartarate was used as transchelating agent. After pH adjustment, shaking and incubation for various time intervals were carried out. Thin layer chromatography and reverse phase chromatography were used to monitor the radiolabelling yield. Stability of radiolabelled Lanreotide was also checked

  3. Electrochemical immobilization of biomolecules on gold surface modified with monolayered L-cysteine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honda, Mitsunori, E-mail: honda.mitsunori@jaea.go.jp; Baba, Yuji; Sekiguchi, Tetsuhiro; Shimoyama, Iwao; Hirao, Norie

    2014-04-01

    Immobilization of organic molecules on the top of a metal surface is not easy because of lattice mismatch between organic and metal crystals. Gold atoms bind to thiol groups through strong chemical bonds, and a self-assembled monolayer of sulfur-terminated organic molecules is formed on the gold surface. Herein, we suggested that a monolayer of L-cysteine deposited on a gold surface can act as a buffer layer to immobilize biomolecules on the metal surface. We selected lactic acid as the immobilized biomolecule because it is one of the simplest carboxyl-containing biomolecules. The immobilization of lactic acid on the metal surface was carried out by an electrochemical method in an aqueous environment under the potential range varying from − 0.6 to + 0.8 V. The surface chemical states before and after the electrochemical reaction were characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The N 1s and C 1s XPS spectra showed that the L-cysteine-modified gold surface can immobilize lactic acid via peptide bonds. This technique might enable the immobilization of large organic molecules and biomolecules. - Highlights: • Monolayer l-cysteine deposited on Au surface as a buffer layer to immobilize biomolecules. • Lactic acid as the immobilized biomolecule as it is simple carboxyl-containing biomolecule. • X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) of surface chemical states, before and after. • L-cysteine-modified Au surface can immobilize lactic acid via peptide bonds.

  4. Electrochemical immobilization of biomolecules on gold surface modified with monolayered L-cysteine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, Mitsunori; Baba, Yuji; Sekiguchi, Tetsuhiro; Shimoyama, Iwao; Hirao, Norie

    2014-01-01

    Immobilization of organic molecules on the top of a metal surface is not easy because of lattice mismatch between organic and metal crystals. Gold atoms bind to thiol groups through strong chemical bonds, and a self-assembled monolayer of sulfur-terminated organic molecules is formed on the gold surface. Herein, we suggested that a monolayer of L-cysteine deposited on a gold surface can act as a buffer layer to immobilize biomolecules on the metal surface. We selected lactic acid as the immobilized biomolecule because it is one of the simplest carboxyl-containing biomolecules. The immobilization of lactic acid on the metal surface was carried out by an electrochemical method in an aqueous environment under the potential range varying from − 0.6 to + 0.8 V. The surface chemical states before and after the electrochemical reaction were characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The N 1s and C 1s XPS spectra showed that the L-cysteine-modified gold surface can immobilize lactic acid via peptide bonds. This technique might enable the immobilization of large organic molecules and biomolecules. - Highlights: • Monolayer l-cysteine deposited on Au surface as a buffer layer to immobilize biomolecules. • Lactic acid as the immobilized biomolecule as it is simple carboxyl-containing biomolecule. • X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) of surface chemical states, before and after. • L-cysteine-modified Au surface can immobilize lactic acid via peptide bonds

  5. Biomolecule-recognition gating membrane using biomolecular cross-linking and polymer phase transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroki, Hidenori; Ito, Taichi; Ohashi, Hidenori; Tamaki, Takanori; Yamaguchi, Takeo

    2011-12-15

    We present for the first time a biomolecule-recognition gating system that responds to small signals of biomolecules by the cooperation of biorecognition cross-linking and polymer phase transition in nanosized pores. The biomolecule-recognition gating membrane immobilizes the stimuli-responsive polymer, including the biomolecule-recognition receptor, onto the pore surface of a porous membrane. The pore state (open/closed) of this gating membrane depends on the formation of specific biorecognition cross-linking in the pores: a specific biomolecule having multibinding sites can be recognized by several receptors and acts as the cross-linker of the grafted polymer, whereas a nonspecific molecule cannot. The pore state can be distinguished by a volume phase transition of the grafted polymer. In the present study, the principle of the proposed system is demonstrated using poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) as the stimuli-responsive polymer and avidin-biotin as a multibindable biomolecule-specific receptor. As a result of the selective response to the specific biomolecule, a clear permeability change of an order of magnitude was achieved. The principle is versatile and can be applied to many combinations of multibindable analyte-specific receptors, including antibody-antigen and lectin-sugar analogues. The new gating system can find wide application in the bioanalytical field and aid the design of novel biodevices.

  6. When biomolecules meet graphene: from molecular level interactions to material design and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dapeng; Zhang, Wensi; Yu, Xiaoqing; Wang, Zhenping; Su, Zhiqiang; Wei, Gang

    2016-12-01

    Graphene-based materials have attracted increasing attention due to their atomically-thick two-dimensional structures, high conductivity, excellent mechanical properties, and large specific surface areas. The combination of biomolecules with graphene-based materials offers a promising method to fabricate novel graphene-biomolecule hybrid nanomaterials with unique functions in biology, medicine, nanotechnology, and materials science. In this review, we focus on a summarization of the recent studies in functionalizing graphene-based materials using different biomolecules, such as DNA, peptides, proteins, enzymes, carbohydrates, and viruses. The different interactions between graphene and biomolecules at the molecular level are demonstrated and discussed in detail. In addition, the potential applications of the created graphene-biomolecule nanohybrids in drug delivery, cancer treatment, tissue engineering, biosensors, bioimaging, energy materials, and other nanotechnological applications are presented. This review will be helpful to know the modification of graphene with biomolecules, understand the interactions between graphene and biomolecules at the molecular level, and design functional graphene-based nanomaterials with unique properties for various applications.

  7. Comprehensive spectroscopic studies on the interaction of biomolecules with surfactant detached multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekar, Gajalakshmi; Mukherjee, Amitava; Chandrasekaran, Natarajan

    2015-04-01

    This paper investigates the interaction of ten diverse biomolecules with surfactant detached Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNTs) using multiple spectroscopic methods. Declining fluorescence intensity of biomolecules in combination with the hyperchromic effect in UV-Visible spectra confirmed the existence of the ground state complex formation. Quenching mechanism remains static and non-fluorescent. 3D spectral data of biomolecules suggested the possibilities of disturbances to the aromatic microenvironment of tryptophan and tyrosine residues arising out of CNTs interaction. Amide band Shifts corresponding to the secondary structure of biomolecules were observed in the of FTIR and FT-Raman spectra. In addition, there exists an increased Raman intensity of tryptophan residues of biomolecules upon interaction with CNTs. Hence, the binding of the aromatic structures of CNTs with the aromatic amino acid residues, in a particular, tryptophan was evidenced. Far UV Circular spectra have showed the loss of alpha-helical contents in biomolecules upon interaction with CNTs. Near UV CD spectra confirmed the alterations in the tryptophan positions of the peptide backbone. Hence, our results have demonstrated that the interaction of biomolecules with OH-MWCNTs would involve binding cum structural changes and alteration to their aromatic micro-environment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. [Novel Hyphenated Techniques of Atomic Spectrometry for Metal Species Interaction with Biomolecules].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Yan, Xiu-ping

    2015-09-01

    Trace metals may be adopted by biological systems to assist in the syntheses and metabolic functions of genes (DNA and RNA) and proteins in the environment. These metals may be beneficial or may pose a risk to humans and other life forms. Novel hybrid techniques are required for studies on the interaction between different metal species and biomolecules, which is significant for biology, biochemistry, nutrition, agriculture, medicine, pharmacy, and environmental science. In recent years, our group dwells on new hyphenated techniques based on capillary electrophoresis (CE), electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS), and inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS), and their application for different metal species interaction with biomolecules such as DNA, HSA, and GSH. The CE-ETAAS assay and CE-ICP-MS assay allow sensitively probing the level of biomolecules such as DNA damage by different metal species and extracting the kinetic and thermodynamic information on the interactions of different metal species with biomolecules, provides direct evidences for the formation of different metal species--biomolecule adducts. In addition, the consequent structural information were extracted from circular dichroism (CD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The present works represent the most complete and extensive study to date on the interactions between different metal species with biomolecules, and also provide new evidences for and insights into the interactions of different metal species with biomolecules for further understanding of the toxicological effects of metal species.

  9. Radiolabeling Silica-Based Nanoparticles via Coordination Chemistry: Basic Principles, Strategies, and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Dalong; Jiang, Dawei; Ehlerding, Emily B; Huang, Peng; Cai, Weibo

    2018-03-20

    As one of the most biocompatible and well-tolerated inorganic nanomaterials, silica-based nanoparticles (SiNPs) have received extensive attention over the last several decades. Recently, positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of radiolabeled SiNPs has provided a highly sensitive, noninvasive, and quantitative readout of the organ/tissue distribution, pharmacokinetics, and tumor targeting efficiency in vivo, which can greatly expedite the clinical translation of these promising NPs. Encouraged by the successful PET imaging of patients with metastatic melanoma using 124 I-labeled ultrasmall SiNPs (known as Cornell dots or C dots) and their approval as an Investigational New Drug (IND) by the United States Food and Drug Administration, different radioisotopes ( 64 Cu, 89 Zr, 18 F, 68 Ga, 124 I, etc.) have been reported to radiolabel a wide variety of SiNPs-based nanostructures, including dense silica (dSiO 2 ), mesoporous silica (MSN), biodegradable mesoporous silica (bMSN), and hollow mesoporous silica nanoparticles (HMSN). With in-depth knowledge of coordination chemistry, abundant silanol groups (-Si-O-) on the silica surface or inside mesoporous channels not only can be directly used for chelator-free radiolabeling but also can be readily modified with the right chelators for chelator-based labeling. However, integrating these labeling strategies for constructing stably radiolabeled SiNPs with high efficiency has proven difficult because of the complexity of the involved key parameters, such as the choice of radioisotopes and chelators, nanostructures, and radiolabeling strategy. In this Account, we present an overview of recent progress in the development of radiolabeled SiNPs for cancer theranostics in the hope of speeding up their biomedical applications and potential translation into the clinic. We first introduce the basic principles and mechanisms for radiolabeling SiNPs via coordination chemistry, including general rules of selecting proper

  10. GESTIÓN HUMANA: TENDENCIAS Y PERSPECTIVAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JUAN GUILLERMO SALDARRIAGA RÍOS

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo se hace referencia a las tendencias y las perspectivas de gestión humana que se imponen en el mundo en la actualidad y que, a su manera, pretenden optimizar la administración del personal de la organización y contribuir al desarrollo e incremento de la productividad y la competitividad. Mediante la realización de un Estado del Arte se logran determinar algunas de las tendencias más relevantes en la actualidad y se concluye que, cada vez con mayor fuerza, dichas tendencias se sustentan en discursos que pretenden "rescatar" al ser humano dentro de la organización, lo que no necesariamente se traduce en los procesos de gestión humana que se realizan en las organizaciones nacionales e internacionales.

  11. Comparative study of anti-angiogenic activities of luteolin, lectin and lupeol biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambasta, Rashmi K; Jha, Saurabh Kumar; Kumar, Dhiraj; Sharma, Renu; Jha, Niraj Kumar; Kumar, Pravir

    2015-09-18

    Angiogenesis is a hallmark feature in the initiation, progression and growth of tumour. There are various factors for promotion of angiogenesis on one hand and on the other hand, biomolecules have been reported to inhibit cancer through anti-angiogenesis mechanism. Biomolecules, for instance, luteolin, lectin and lupeol are known to suppress cancer. This study aims to compare and evaluate the biomolecule(s) like luteolin, lupeol and lectin on CAM assay and HT-29 cell culture to understand the efficacy of these drugs. The biomolecules have been administered on CAM assay, HT-29 cell culture, cell migration assay. Furthermore, bioinformatics analysis of the identified targets of these biomolecules have been performed. Luteolin has been found to be better in inhibiting angiogenesis on CAM assay in comparison to lupeol and lectin. In line with this study when biomolecules was administered on cell migration assay via scratch assay method. We provided evidence that Luteolin was again found to be better in inhibiting HT-29 cell migration. In order to identify the target sites of luteolin for inhibition, we used software analysis for identifying the best molecular targets of luteolin. Using software analysis best target protein molecule of these biomolecules have been identified. VEGF was found to be one of the target of luteolin. Studies have found several critical point mutation in VEGF A, B and C. Hence docking analysis of all biomolecules with VEGFR have been performed. Multiple allignment result have shown that the receptors are conserved at the docking site. Therefore, it can be concluded that luteolin is not only comparatively better in inhibiting blood vessel in CAM assay, HT-29 cell proliferation and cell migration assay rather the domain of VEGFR is conserved to be targeted by luteolin, lupeol and lectin.

  12. Raman spectroscopy detection of biomolecules in biocrusts from differing environmental conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miralles, I; Jorge-Villar, S E; van Wesemael, B; Lázaro, R

    2017-01-15

    Lichens and cyanobacteria colonize inhospitable places covering a wide climate range due to their different survival strategies, such as the synthesis of protective biomolecules. The effect of ecological factors on the synthesis of biomolecules has not been widely analysed. This study aimed to assess the effects of four factors (species, microclimate, seasonality and hydration state) and their interactions on the biomolecule frequency detected by Raman Spectroscopy. We included cyanobacterial biocrusts, and the lichens Diploschistes diacapsis, Squamarina lentigera, and Lepraria isidiata; two contrasted microclimates (typical and marginal), two contrasted seasons (hot and dry vs cool and wet) and two hydration states (dry and wet). "Species" was the most influential factor in the identity and frequency of the main biomolecules. Microclimatic differences in the range of the local specific habitats only influenced the biomolecules in cyanobacteria. There was a quadruple interaction among the factors, the effects being different mainly depending on the species. At D. diacapsis, the production of their main biomolecules depended on microclimate, although it also depended on seasonality. Nevertheless, in L. isidiata and S. lentigera microclimatic differences did not significantly affect the production of biomolecules. In the lichen species, the microhabitats exposed to relatively larger incident radiation did not show significantly larger relative frequency of photoprotective biomolecules. No clear connection between higher production of oxalates and drier microhabitats was found, suggesting that the synthesis of oxalates is not related to water reserve strategy. The pros and cons of monitor biomolecules in biocrust by Raman spectrometry were also discussed. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Advances in the synthesis of nitroxide radicals for use in biomolecule spin labelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugland, Marius M; Lovett, Janet E; Anderson, Edward A

    2018-02-05

    EPR spectroscopy is an increasingly useful analytical tool to probe biomolecule structure, dynamic behaviour, and interactions. Nitroxide radicals are the most commonly used radical probe in EPR experiments, and many methods have been developed for their synthesis, as well as incorporation into biomolecules using site-directed spin labelling. In this Tutorial Review, we discuss the most practical methods for the synthesis of nitroxides, focusing on the tunability of their structures, the manipulation of their sidechains into spin labelling handles, and their installation into biomolecules.

  14. 18 F-Labeling of Sensitive Biomolecules for Positron Emission Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Hema S; Ma, Longle; Vasdev, Neil; Liang, Steven H

    2017-11-07

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging study of fluorine-18 labeled biomolecules is an emerging and rapidly growing area for preclinical and clinical research. The present review focuses on recent advances in radiochemical methods for incorporating fluorine-18 into biomolecules via "direct" or "indirect" bioconjugation. Recently developed prosthetic groups and pre-targeting strategies, as well as representative examples in 18 F-labeling of biomolecules in PET imaging research studies are highlighted. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Radiation physics and chemistry of biomolecules. Recent developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spotheim-Maurizot, Melanie

    2016-11-01

    A chapter of the book ;Radiation chemistry. From basics to application in materials and life sciences (EDP Science, Paris, France, 2008); was devoted to the state-of-the-art in the research on ionizing radiation (IR) effects on biomolecules. An update, eight years later, seemed pertinent enough to the editors of this journal who accepted to dedicate a Special Issue to the latest developments in this area of high interest for cancer radiotherapy, nuclear workers' radioprotection and food radiosterilisation. We sincerely thank them and the authors who accepted to present reviews of their most recent work. Obviously, only a small part of the research in the fascinating domain of molecular radiobiology can be covered here. Some articles are presenting the contribution of biophysical models and computational techniques to the understanding of IR effects on molecules such as DNA and proteins, or on larger systems such as chromatin, chromosomes and even cells (Nikjoo et al., Štěpán & Davídková, Ballarini & Carante, and Nikitaki et al.). In these papers, as well as in many others, several qualities of IR are compared in order to explain the observed differences of effects. The damages induced by the low energy electrons and new techniques involved in their study are discussed in great detail (Sanche and Fromm & Boulanouar). The chemistry behind the IR induced damages (single or clustered), studied in many laboratories around the world is presented in several papers (Cadet & Wagner, Sevilla et al., Chatgilialoglu et al., and Greenberg). One of them addresses a very useful comparison between the effects of IR and UV exposure on DNA (Ravanat & Douki). The majority of the papers in this Special Issue is dealing with DNA and this reflects the real situation: damages of DNA are more studied than those of other biomolecules. This is due to the role of DNA as main support of hereditary information. Nevertheless, more and more studies are outlining the influence of epigenetic

  16. Si Nanopores Development for External Control of Transport of Biomolecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ileri, N; Tringe, J; Letant, S; Palozoglu, A; Stroeve, P; Faller, R

    2008-06-13

    Nazar Ileri has been involved in an independent, multidisciplinary effort to create a new class of molecular sieves for proteins and viruses. Her experimental work has been performed concurrently at two campuses, LLNL and UC Davis, while theoretical components have been largely accomplished at UC Davis. As will be described, the devices she is creating have great potential to improve very significantly the efficiency and selectivity of molecular transport over what is presently available from state-of-the-art membranes. Our biotechnology training program is based on an integrated study of the transport of biomolecules through conically-shaped, nanoporous silicon membranes. The overall objective of this effort is to demonstrate an efficient, highly selective membrane technology that is manufacturable for macroscopic areas and can be employed in sensing, diagnostic and biomedical applications. Our specific aims are to (1) fabricate and characterize the physical characteristics of the membranes, (2) to demonstrate their utility for molecular transport and separation, and (3) to develop models that will facilitate understanding of these devices as well as improved performance of the next generation of devices. We have proposed that the conical pores have superior performance characteristics compared to other porous filters. To study this hypothesis, complementary approaches from different disciplines, such as membrane synthesis, experiment, and molecular simulation need to be combined. This provides an ideal training environment for a future leader in biotechnology. Hence, for this study, Nazar Ileri has started to carry out a full range of experimental and theoretical investigations under our guidance. First, she has begun fabrication of filters with conical/pyramidal pores. She characterized the pores by AFM and SEM, and analyzed the images using wavelets and other mathematical tools. She has also started to conduct biomolecule transport experiments to compare the

  17. 123I and 13I purification for biomolecules labelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catanoso, Marcela Forli

    2011-01-01

    The 123 I and 131 I are iodine radioisotopes widely used in Nuclear Medicine. The radioisotope 123 I is used in diagnosis through the SPECT technique and is routinely produced at IPEN in cyclotron through the reaction: '1 24 Xe (p, 2n) '1 23 Cs -> 123 Xe -> 123 I. The radioisotope 131 I is used both in diagnosis and therapy due to its physical characteristics of decay by β - and its γ-ray emissions that are softened with the use of specific collimators for diagnosis. It is routinely produced at IPEN using the nuclear reactor through the indirect reaction: 130 Te (n, γ) -> 131 Te -> 131 I, irradiating compounds containing Te. The radiopharmaceuticals prepared with these radioisotopes go through rigorous quality control tests and the chemical purity of the primary radioisotopes 123 I and 131 I are within the permissible limits currently defined. However, the presence of some chemical contaminants can prejudice the biomolecules labeling (monoclonal antibodies and peptides), that will produce radiopharmaceuticals of first generation to the oncology area. The aim of this work was to obtain a new purification method of these radioisotopes, allowing the labeling of biomolecules and also to established a process control on those radioisotopes. The methodology was separated on 3 steps: Evaluation of '1 23 I e 131 I radionuclidic purity using a hyper pure germanium detector, chemical purity using ICP-OES and the retention and elution study of 131 I in several absorbers to choose the most appropriate for the purification tests analyzing the behavior of the possible contaminants. The radionuclidic analyses showed the presence of Te and Co on 131 I samples and Te, Tc e Co on 123 I samples. The chemical purity analyses showed the presence of Al and Mo in 123 I, coming from the window material of the target holder and the presence of Al and Te in 131 I samples, coming from the target holder and the target, respectively. The retention and elution study selected the most

  18. Si Nanopores Development for External Control of Transport of Biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ileri, N.; Tringe, J.; Letant, S.; Palozoglu, A.; Stroeve, P.; Faller, R.

    2008-01-01

    Nazar Ileri has been involved in an independent, multidisciplinary effort to create a new class of molecular sieves for proteins and viruses. Her experimental work has been performed concurrently at two campuses, LLNL and UC Davis, while theoretical components have been largely accomplished at UC Davis. As will be described, the devices she is creating have great potential to improve very significantly the efficiency and selectivity of molecular transport over what is presently available from state-of-the-art membranes. Our biotechnology training program is based on an integrated study of the transport of biomolecules through conically-shaped, nanoporous silicon membranes. The overall objective of this effort is to demonstrate an efficient, highly selective membrane technology that is manufacturable for macroscopic areas and can be employed in sensing, diagnostic and biomedical applications. Our specific aims are to (1) fabricate and characterize the physical characteristics of the membranes, (2) to demonstrate their utility for molecular transport and separation, and (3) to develop models that will facilitate understanding of these devices as well as improved performance of the next generation of devices. We have proposed that the conical pores have superior performance characteristics compared to other porous filters. To study this hypothesis, complementary approaches from different disciplines, such as membrane synthesis, experiment, and molecular simulation need to be combined. This provides an ideal training environment for a future leader in biotechnology. Hence, for this study, Nazar Ileri has started to carry out a full range of experimental and theoretical investigations under our guidance. First, she has begun fabrication of filters with conical/pyramidal pores. She characterized the pores by AFM and SEM, and analyzed the images using wavelets and other mathematical tools. She has also started to conduct biomolecule transport experiments to compare the

  19. Watching Conformations of Biomolecules: a Microwave Spectroscopy Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, J. C.

    2011-06-01

    The combination of laser ablation with Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy in supersonic jets (LA-MB-FTMW) has made possible the gas-phase study of solid biomolecules with high melting points. In the experiment, solids are efficiently vaporized by a high-energy laser pulse, supersonically expanded into a evacuated Fabry-Perot cavity and characterised by their rotational spectra. Recent improvements such as the use of picosecond pulse lasers, new ablation nozzles and the extension of the range of the spectrometers to low frequecy have notably increased the sensitivity of our experimental setup. To date different α-, β- and γ-amino acids have been studied using this technique, making possible the characterization of their preferred conformations and gaining insight in the role of intramolecular interactions. Even in conformationally challenging systems the different rotamers of such biomolecules can be identified by rotational spectroscopy as can be illustrated by the assignment of six low-energy conformers in cysteine and aspartic acid, seven in serine and threonine,^a and nine in γ-amino butyric acid (GABA). In all cases the low-energy conformers have been conclusive identified from their experimental rotational and 14N quadrupole coupling constants. The spectra of neurotransmitters and of the nucleic acid bases uracil, thymine, cytosine and guanine have also been studied and their preferred conformers or tautomeric forms determined. The complexes between amino acids and nucleic acid bases with water have also been investigated to obtain information on the possible changes induced in the conformational or tautomeric preferences by the addition of solvent molecules. J. L. Alonso, C. Pérez, M. E. Sanz, J. C. López, S. Blanco, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 11, 617-627 (2009) and references therein M. E. Sanz, J. C. López, J. L. Alonso, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 12, 3573-3578 (2010) S. Blanco, J. C. López, S. Mata and J. L. Alonso, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 49, 9187

  20. Higher biomolecules yield in phytoplankton under copper exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Jaqueline Carmo; Echeveste, Pedro; Lombardi, Ana Teresa

    2018-05-30

    Copper is an important metal for industry, and its toxic threshold in natural ecosystems has increased since the industrial revolution. As an essential nutrient, it is required in minute amounts, being toxic in slightly increased concentrations, causing great biochemical transformation in microalgae. This study aimed at investigating the physiology of Scenedesmus quadricauda, a cosmopolitan species, exposed to copper concentrations including those that trigger intracellular biochemical modifications. The Cu exposure concentrations tested ranged from 0.1 to 25 µM, thus including environmentally important levels. Microalgae cultures were kept under controlled environmental conditions and monitored daily for cell density, in vivo chlorophyll a, and photosynthetic quantum yield (Φ M ). After 24 h growth, free Cu 2+ ions were determined, and after 96 h, cellular Cu concentration, total carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, and cell volume were determined. The results showed that both free Cu 2+ ions and cellular Cu increased with Cu increase in culture medium. Microalgae cell abundance and in vivo chlorophyll a were mostly affected at 2.5 µM Cu exposure (3.8 pg Cu cell -1 ) and above. Approximately 31% decrease of photosynthetic quantum yield was obtained at the highest Cu exposure concentration (25 µM; 25 pg Cu cell -1 ) in comparison with the control. However, at environmentally relevant copper concentrations (0.5 µM Cu; 0.4 pg Cu cell -1 ) cell volume increased in comparison with the control. Considering biomolecules accumulation per unit cell volume, the highest carbohydrates and proteins yield was obtained at 1.0 µM Cu (1.1 pg Cu cell -1 ), while for lipids higher Cu was necessary (2.5 µM Cu; 3.8 pg Cu cell -1 ). This study is a contribution to the understanding of the effects of environmentally significant copper concentrations in the physiology of S. quadricauda, as well as to biotechnological approach to increase biomolecule yield in

  1. Assessment of radioactive residues arising from radiolabel instability in a multiple dose tissue distribution study in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slatter, J.G. [Pharmacia Corp., Peapack, NJ (United States); Sams, J.P.; Easter, J.A. [Pharmacia Corp., Kalamazoo, MI (United States)] [and others

    2003-05-01

    Our study objectives were to quantitatively determine the effect of radiolabel instability on terminal phase radioactive tissue residues in a multiple dose tissue distribution study, to quantitatively compare tissue residue artifacts (non drug-related radioactivity) from two chemically-distinct radiolabel locations, and to conduct a definitive multiple dose tissue distribution study using the better of the two radiolabeled compounds. We compared the excretion and tissue distribution in rats of [{sup 14}C]linezolid, radiolabeled in two different locations, after 7 consecutive once daily [{sup 14}C] oral doses. The radiolabels were in the acetamide (two carbon) and oxazolidinone (isolated carbon) functional groups. Terminal phase tissue residue and excretion data were compared to data from rats dosed orally with [{sup 14}C]sodium acetate. Drug-related radioactivity was excreted rapidly over 24 h. After a single dose, the acetamide and oxazolidinone radiolabel sites both gave 3% of dose as exhaled {sup 14}CO{sub 2}. After 7 daily [{sup 14}C] oral doses, terminal phase radioactive tissue residues were higher from the acetamide radiolabel, relative to the oxazolidinone radiolabel, and were primarily not drug-related. In the definitive tissue distribution study, low concentrations of drug-related radioactivity in skin and thyroid were observed. We conclude that although small amounts of radiolabel instability do not significantly affect single dose tissue radioactivity C{sub max} and area under the curve (AUC), artifacts arising from radiolabel instability can prolong the apparent terminal phase half life and complicate study data interpretation. When possible, it is always preferable to use a completely stable radiolabel site. (author)

  2. Assessment of radioactive residues arising from radiolabel instability in a multiple dose tissue distribution study in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slatter, J.G.; Sams, J.P.; Easter, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    Our study objectives were to quantitatively determine the effect of radiolabel instability on terminal phase radioactive tissue residues in a multiple dose tissue distribution study, to quantitatively compare tissue residue artifacts (non drug-related radioactivity) from two chemically-distinct radiolabel locations, and to conduct a definitive multiple dose tissue distribution study using the better of the two radiolabeled compounds. We compared the excretion and tissue distribution in rats of [ 14 C]linezolid, radiolabeled in two different locations, after 7 consecutive once daily [ 14 C] oral doses. The radiolabels were in the acetamide (two carbon) and oxazolidinone (isolated carbon) functional groups. Terminal phase tissue residue and excretion data were compared to data from rats dosed orally with [ 14 C]sodium acetate. Drug-related radioactivity was excreted rapidly over 24 h. After a single dose, the acetamide and oxazolidinone radiolabel sites both gave 3% of dose as exhaled 14 CO 2 . After 7 daily [ 14 C] oral doses, terminal phase radioactive tissue residues were higher from the acetamide radiolabel, relative to the oxazolidinone radiolabel, and were primarily not drug-related. In the definitive tissue distribution study, low concentrations of drug-related radioactivity in skin and thyroid were observed. We conclude that although small amounts of radiolabel instability do not significantly affect single dose tissue radioactivity C max and area under the curve (AUC), artifacts arising from radiolabel instability can prolong the apparent terminal phase half life and complicate study data interpretation. When possible, it is always preferable to use a completely stable radiolabel site. (author)

  3. Advances in infectious foci imaging using 99mTc radiolabelled antibiotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seyedeh Fatemeh Mirshojaei

    2015-01-01

    Conventional methods of infection diagnosis, relying on experimental tests and culture of organisms from infected foci have continued to developing new technologies and automation. Nuclear medicine is a reliable diagnostic technique capable to detect infectious foci in human disease. A wide range of radiolabeled agents have been evaluated for demonstrating their ability to distinguish microbial infectious lesions. New researches continue to be made on the use of radiolabeled antibiotics which as well as being highly specific in the diagnosis of infection would be useful in monitoring of disease treatment. Here, the new approaches of infection scintigraphic imaging by radiolabeled antibiotics are thoroughly discussed in order to assess and compare their diagnostic value as targeting imaging radiopharmaceuticals. (author)

  4. Current status and future perspectives of in vivo small animal imaging using radiolabeled nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loudos, George; Kagadis, George C.; Psimadas, Dimitris

    2011-01-01

    Small animal molecular imaging is a rapidly expanding efficient tool to study biological processes non-invasively. The use of radiolabeled tracers provides non-destructive, imaging information, allowing time related phenomena to be repeatedly studied in a single animal. In the last decade there has been an enormous progress in related technologies and a number of dedicated imaging systems overcome the limitations that the size of small animal possesses. On the other hand, nanoparticles (NPs) gain increased interest, due to their unique properties, which make them perfect candidates for biological applications. Over the past 5 years the two fields seem to cross more and more often; radiolabeled NPs have been assessed in numerous pre-clinical studies that range from oncology, till HIV treatment. In this article the current status in the tools, applications and trends of radiolabeled NPs reviewed.

  5. Investigation of bacterial adherence to a non-precious alloy with radiolabeling method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonugelen, M.; Iyiyapici Destan, U.; Oeztuerk, B.; Yurt Lambrecht, F.

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the bacterial adherence to a non-precious alloy with radiolabeling method. S. mutans, E. coliand C. albicanswere labeled with 99m Tc by using stannous chloride and their radiolabeling yields were calculated. After the labeling procedure, metal disks (3 mm x 10 mm) were treated with microorganisms. The amount of labeled microorganisms adhered on metal surfaces was determined by activity measurements. The labeling yields for S. mutans, E. coliand C. albicanswere 69.95 ± 7.58%, 78.84 ± 0.44% and 79.71 ± 10.17%, respectively. The mean values for adherence for S. mutans, E. coliand C. albicans on metal samples were 7.02 ± 2.18%, 0.96 ± 0.49% and 8.80 ± 8.24%, respectively. The radiolabeling method could be considered as safe and precise for determining the adherence of microorganisms. (author)

  6. Masaccio y la perspectiva matemática

    OpenAIRE

    Casalderrey, Martín

    2010-01-01

    En esta enumeración de Alberti, aparece el núcleo de artistas,todos amigos entre sí, que revolucionaron la concepción del arte en el primer renacimiento. Y si hay algo que caracteriza ese periodo en lo que respecta al arte y las matemáticas es la invención de la perspectiva artificialis, o perspectiva matemática.

  7. Graphene-edge dielectrophoretic tweezers for trapping of biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barik, Avijit; Zhang, Yao; Grassi, Roberto; Nadappuram, Binoy Paulose; Edel, Joshua B; Low, Tony; Koester, Steven J; Oh, Sang-Hyun

    2017-11-30

    The many unique properties of graphene, such as the tunable optical, electrical, and plasmonic response make it ideally suited for applications such as biosensing. As with other surface-based biosensors, however, the performance is limited by the diffusive transport of target molecules to the surface. Here we show that atomically sharp edges of monolayer graphene can generate singular electrical field gradients for trapping biomolecules via dielectrophoresis. Graphene-edge dielectrophoresis pushes the physical limit of gradient-force-based trapping by creating atomically sharp tweezers. We have fabricated locally backgated devices with an 8-nm-thick HfO 2 dielectric layer and chemical-vapor-deposited graphene to generate 10× higher gradient forces as compared to metal electrodes. We further demonstrate near-100% position-controlled particle trapping at voltages as low as 0.45 V with nanodiamonds, nanobeads, and DNA from bulk solution within seconds. This trapping scheme can be seamlessly integrated with sensors utilizing graphene as well as other two-dimensional materials.

  8. Acoustic cavity transducers for the manipulation of cells and biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovar, Armando; Patel, Maulik; Lee, Abraham P.

    2010-02-01

    A novel fluidic actuator that is simple to fabricate, integrate, and operate is demonstrated for use within microfluidic systems. The actuator is designed around the use of trapped air bubbles in lateral cavities and the resultant acoustic streaming generated from an outside acoustic energy source. The orientation of the lateral cavities to the main microchannel is used to control the bulk fluid motion within the device. The first order flow generated by the oscillating bubble is used to develop a pumping platform that is capable of driving fluid within a chip. This pump is integrated into a recirculation immunoassay device for enhanced biomolecule binding through fluid flow for convection limited transport. The recirculation system showed an increase in binding site concentration when compared with traditional passive and flow-through methods. The acoustic cavity transducer has also been demonstrated for application in particle switching. Bursts of acoustic energy are used to generate a second order streaming pattern near the cavity interface to drive particles away or towards the cavity. The use of this switching mechanism is being extended to the application of sorting cells and other particles within a microfluidic system.

  9. Interfacial water thickness at inorganic nanoconstructs and biomolecules: Size matters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardellini, Annalisa; Fasano, Matteo; Chiavazzo, Eliodoro; Asinari, Pietro, E-mail: pietro.asinari@polito.it

    2016-04-29

    Water molecules in the proximity of solid nanostructures influence both the overall properties of liquid and the structure and functionality of solid particles. The study of water dynamics at solid–liquid interfaces has strong implications in energy, environmental and biomedical fields. This article focuses on the hydration layer properties in the proximity of Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) and biomolecules (proteins, polypeptides and amino acids). Here we show a quantitative relation between the solid surface extension and the characteristic length of water nanolayer (δ), which is confined at solid–liquid interfaces. Specifically, the size dependence is attributed to the limited superposition of nonbonded interactions in case of small molecules. These results may facilitate the design of novel energy or biomedical colloidal nanosuspensions, and a more fundamental understanding of biomolecular processes influenced by nanoscale water dynamics. - Highlights: • Properties of the water hydration layer are investigated. • New relation between extension of solid size and hydration layer established. • Possible impact on rational design of nanosuspensions.

  10. Comparison of biomolecules on the basis of Molecular Interaction Potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Jordi

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular Interaction Potentials (MIP are frequently used for the comparison of series of compounds displaying related biological behaviors. These potentials are interaction energies between the considered compounds and relevant probes. The interaction energies are computed in the nodes of grids defined around the compounds. There is a need of detailed and objective comparative analyses of MIP distributions in the framework of structure-activity studies. On the other hand, MIP-based studies do not have to be restricted to series of small ligands, since such studies present also interesting possibilities for the analysis and comparison of biological macromolecules. Such analyses can benefit from the application of new methods and computational approaches. The new software MIPSim (Molecular Interaction Potentials Similarity analysis has recently been introduced with the purpose of analyzing and comparing MIP distributions of series of biomolecules. This program is transparently integrated with other programs, like GAMESS or GRID, which can be used for the computation of the potentials to be analyzed or compared. MIPSim incorporates several definitions of similarity coefficients, and is capable of combining several similarity measures into a single one. On the other hand, MIPSim can perform automatic explorations of the maximum similarity alignments between pairs of molecules.

  11. Hybrid carbon nanomaterials for electrochemical detection of biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurila, Tomi

    2015-01-01

    Electrochemical detection of different biomolecules in vivo is a promising path towards in situ monitoring of human body and its functions. However, there are several major obstacles, such as sensitivity, selectivity and biocompatiblity, which must be tackled in order to achieve reliably and safely operating sensor devices. Here we show that by utilizing hybrid carbon materials as electrodes to detect two types of neurotransmitters, dopamine and glutamate, several advantages over commonly used electrode materials can be achieved. In particular, we will demonstrate here that it is possible to combine the properties of different carbon allotropes to obtain hybrid materials with greatly improved electrochemical performance. Three following examples of the approach are given: (i) diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin film electrodes with different layer thicknesses, (ii) multi-walled carbon nanotubes grown directly on top of DLC and (iii) carbon nanofibres synthesized on top of DLC thin films. Detailed structural and electrochemical characterization is carried out to rationalize the reasons behind the observed behvior. In addition, results from the atomistic simulations are utilized to obtain more information about the properties of the amorphous carbon thin films. (paper)

  12. Natural Biomolecules and Protein Aggregation: Emerging Strategies against Amyloidogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Sgarbossa

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Biomolecular self-assembly is a fundamental process in all organisms. As primary components of the life molecular machinery, proteins have a vast array of resources available to them for self-assembly in a functional structure. Protein self-assembly, however, can also occur in an aberrant way, giving rise to non-native aggregated structures responsible for severe, progressive human diseases that have a serious social impact. Different neurodegenerative disorders, like Huntington’s, Alzheimer’s, and spongiform encephalopathy diseases, have in common the presence of insoluble protein aggregates, generally termed “amyloid,” that share several physicochemical features: a fibrillar morphology, a predominantly beta-sheet secondary structure, birefringence upon staining with the dye Congo red, insolubility in common solvents and detergents, and protease resistance. Conformational constrains, hydrophobic and stacking interactions can play a key role in the fibrillogenesis process and protein–protein and peptide–peptide interactions—resulting in self-assembly phenomena of peptides yielding fibrils—that can be modulated and influenced by natural biomolecules. Small organic molecules, which possess both hydrophilic and hydrophobic moieties able to bind to peptide/protein molecules through hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic and aromatic interactions, are potential candidates against amyloidogenesis. In this review some significant case examples will be critically discussed.

  13. Quantification of specific bindings of biomolecules by magnetorelaxometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steinhoff Uwe

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The binding reaction of the biomolecules streptavidin and anti-biotin antibody, both labelled by magnetic nanoparticles (MNP, to biotin coated on agarose beads, was quantified by magnetorelaxometry (MRX. Highly sensitive SQUID-based MRX revealed the immobilization of the MNP caused by the biotin-streptavidin coupling. We found that about 85% of streptavidin-functionalised MNP bound specifically to biotin-agarose beads. On the other hand only 20% of antibiotin-antibody functionalised MNP were specifically bound. Variation of the suspension medium revealed in comparison to phosphate buffer with 0.1% bovine serum albumin a slight change of the binding behaviour in human serum, probably due to the presence of functioning (non heated serum proteins. Furthermore, in human serum an additional non-specific binding occurs, being independent from the serum protein functionality. The presented homogeneous bead based assay is applicable in simple, uncoated vials and it enables the assessment of the binding kinetics in a volume without liquid flow. The estimated association rate constant for the MNP-labelled streptavidin is by about two orders of magnitude smaller than the value reported for free streptavidin. This is probably due to the relatively large size of the magnetic markers which reduces the diffusion of streptavidin. Furthermore, long time non-exponential kinetics were observed and interpreted as agglutination of the agarose beads.

  14. GroPBS: Fast Solver for Implicit Electrostatics of Biomolecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska eBertelshofer

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge about the electrostatic potential on the surface of biomolecules or biomembranes under physiological conditions is an important step in the attempt to characterize the physico-chemical properties of these molecules and in particular also their interactions with each other. Additionally, knowledge about solution electrostatics may guide also the design of molecules with specified properties. However, explicit water models come at a high computational cost, rendering them unsuitable for large design studies or for docking purposes. Implicit models with the water phase treated as a continuum require the numerical solution of the Poisson-Boltzmann Equation (PBE. Here, we present a new flexible program for the numerical solution of the PBE, allowing for different geometries, and the explicit and implicit inclusion of membranes. It involves a discretization of space and the computation of the molecular surface. The PBE is solved using finite differences, the resulting set of equations is solved using a Gauss-Seidel method. It is shown for the example of the sucrose transporter ScrY that the implicit inclusion of a surrounding membrane has a strong effect also on the electrostatics within the pore region and thus need to be carefully considered e.g. in design studies on membrane proteins.

  15. Direct patterning of nanoparticles and biomolecules by liquid nanodispensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabié, Laure; Agostini, Pierre; Stopel, Martijn; Blum, Christian; Lassagne, Benjamin; Subramaniam, Vinod; Ondarçuhu, Thierry

    2015-03-14

    We report on the localized deposition of nanoparticles and proteins, nano-objects commonly used in many nanodevices, by the liquid nanodispensing (NADIS) technique which consists in depositing droplets of a solution through a nanochannel drilled at the apex of an AFM tip. We demonstrate that the size of spots can be adjusted from microns down to sub-50 nm by tuning the channel diameter, independently of the chemical nature of the solute. In the case of nanoparticles, we demonstrated the ultimate limit of the method and showed that large arrays of single (or pairs of) nanoparticles can be reproducibly deposited. We further explored the possibility to deposit different visible fluorescent proteins using NADIS without loss of protein function. The intrinsic fluorescence of these proteins is characteristic of their structural integrity; the retention of fluorescence after NADIS deposition demonstrates that the proteins are intact and functional. This study demonstrates that NADIS can be a viable alternative to other scanning probe lithography techniques since it combines high resolution direct writing of nanoparticles or biomolecules with the versatility of liquid lithography techniques.

  16. Small biomolecule immunosensing with plasmonic optical fiber grating sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribaut, Clotilde; Voisin, Valérie; Malachovská, Viera; Dubois, Valentin; Mégret, Patrice; Wattiez, Ruddy; Caucheteur, Christophe

    2016-03-15

    This study reports on the development of a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) optical fiber biosensor based on tilted fiber Bragg grating technology for direct detection of small biomarkers of interest for lung cancer diagnosis. Since SPR principle relies on the refractive index modifications to sensitively detect mass changes at the gold coated surface, we have proposed here a comparative study in relation to the target size. Two cytokeratin 7 (CK7) samples with a molecular weight ranging from 78 kDa to 2.6 kDa, respectively CK7 full protein and CK7 peptide, have been used for label-free monitoring. This work has first consisted in the elaboration and the characterization of a robust and reproducible bioreceptor, based on antibody/antigen cross-linking. Immobilized antibodies were then utilized as binding agents to investigate the sensitivity of the biosensor towards the two CK7 antigens. Results have highlighted a very good sensitivity of the biosensor response for both samples diluted in phosphate buffer with a higher limit of detection for the larger CK7 full protein. The most groundbreaking nature of this study relies on the detection of small biomolecule CK7 peptides in buffer and in the presence of complex media such as serum, achieving a limit of detection of 0.4 nM. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Polyacrylamide medium for the electrophoretic separation of biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madabhushi, Ramakrishna S.; Gammon, Stuart A.

    2003-11-11

    A polyacryalmide medium for the electrophoretic separation of biomolecules. The polyacryalmide medium comprises high molecular weight polyacrylamides (PAAm) having a viscosity average molecular weight (M.sub.v) of about 675-725 kDa were synthesized by conventional red-ox polymerization technique. Using this separation medium, capillary electrophoresis of BigDye DNA sequencing standard was performed. A single base resolution of .about.725 bases was achieved in .about.60 minute in a non-covalently coated capillary of 50 .mu.m i.d., 40 cm effective length, and a filed of 160 V/cm at 40.degree. C. The resolution achieved with this formulation to separate DNA under identical conditions is much superior (725 bases vs. 625 bases) and faster (60 min. vs. 75 min.) to the commercially available PAAm, such as supplied by Amersham. The formulation method employed here to synthesize PAAm is straight-forward, simple and does not require cumbersome methods such as emulsion polymerizaiton in order to achieve very high molecular weights. Also, the formulation here does not require separation of PAAm from the reaction mixture prior to reconstituting the polymer to a final concentration. Furthermore, the formulation here is prepared from a single average mol. wt. PAAm as opposed to the mixture of two different average mo. wt. PAAm previously required to achieve high resolution.

  18. Investigation of damage mechanism by ionising radiation on biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau How Mooi

    1996-01-01

    Occupational radiation hazard is a very controversial subject. Effects from high radiation doses are well known from past experiences. However, hazard from low doses is still a subject that is hotly debated upon until now. The occupational dosimetry used now is based on a macroscopic scale. Lately, microdosimetry is fast gaining recognition as a more superior way of measuring hazard. More importantly, scientists are researching the basic damage mechanism that leads to biological effects by ionising radiation. In this report, a simulation study of the basic damage mechanism is discussed . This simulation is based upon Monte Carlo calculations and using polyuridylic acid (Poly-U) as the DNA model This simulation tries to relate the physics and chemistry of interactions of ionising radiation with biomolecules. The computer codes used in this simulation, OREC and RADLYS were created by Hamm et al. (1983) in Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The biological endpoints in this simulation are the strand break and base release of the DNA, which is the precursor of all biological effects. These results are compared with model studies that had been done experimentally to check the validity of this simulation. The G-values of strand break and base release from this simulation were -2.35 and 2.75 and compared well with results from irradiation experiments by von Sonntag (I 98 7) from Max Plank's Institute, Germany

  19. Hard X-ray-induced optical luminescence via biomolecule-directed metal clusters†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratx, Guillem; Sun, Conroy; Sakamoto, Masanori; Ahmad, Moiz; Volotskova, Olga; Ong, Qunxiang; Teranishi, Toshiharu; Harada, Yoshie

    2014-01-01

    Here, we demonstrate that biomolecule-directed metal clusters are applicable in the study of hard X-ray excited optical luminescence, promising a new direction in the development of novel X-ray-activated imaging probes. PMID:24463467

  20. Morphological changes of calcite single crystals induced by graphene-biomolecule adducts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvaresi, Matteo; Di Giosia, Matteo; Ianiro, Alessandro; Valle, Francesco; Fermani, Simona; Polishchuk, Iryna; Pokroy, Boaz; Falini, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Calcite has the capability to interact with a wide variety of molecules. This usually induces changes in shape and morphology of crystals. Here, this process was investigated using sheets of graphene-biomolecule adducts. They were prepared and made dispersible in water through the exfoliation of graphite by tip sonication in the presence tryptophan or N-acetyl-D-glucosamine. The crystallization of calcium carbonate in the presence of these additives was obtained by the vapor diffusion method and only calcite formed. The analysis of the microscopic observations showed that the graphene-biomolecule adducts affected shape and morphology of rhombohedral {10.4} faced calcite crystals, due to their stabilization of additional {hk.0} faces. The only presence of the biomolecule affected minimally shape and morphology of calcite crystals, highlighting the key role of the graphene sheets as 2D support for the adsorption of the biomolecules.

  1. Toward the Atomic-Level Mass Analysis of Biomolecules by the Scanning Atom Probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Osamu; Taniguchi, Masahiro

    2017-04-01

    In 1994, a new type of atom probe instrument, named the scanning atom probe (SAP), was proposed. The unique feature of the SAP is the introduction of a small extraction electrode, which scans over a specimen surface and confines the high field, required for field evaporation of surface atoms in a small space, between the specimen and the electrode. Thus, the SAP does not require a sharp specimen tip. This indicates that the SAP can mass analyze the specimens which are difficult to form in a sharp tip, such as organic materials and biomolecules. Clean single wall carbon nanotubes (CNT), made by high-pressure carbon monoxide process are found to be the best substrates for biomolecules. Various amino acids and dipeptide biomolecules were successfully mass analyzed, revealing characteristic clusters formed by strongly bound atoms in the specimens. The mass analysis indicates that SAP analysis of biomolecules is not only qualitative, but also quantitative.

  2. Single-Molecule Flow Platform for the Quantification of Biomolecules Attached to Single Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Seung-Ryoung; Han, Rui; Sun, Wei; Jiang, Yifei; Fujimoto, Bryant S; Yu, Jiangbo; Kuo, Chun-Ting; Rong, Yu; Zhou, Xing-Hua; Chiu, Daniel T

    2018-05-15

    We describe here a flow platform for quantifying the number of biomolecules on individual fluorescent nanoparticles. The platform combines line-confocal fluorescence detection with near nanoscale channels (1-2 μm in width and height) to achieve high single-molecule detection sensitivity and throughput. The number of biomolecules present on each nanoparticle was determined by deconvolving the fluorescence intensity distribution of single-nanoparticle-biomolecule complexes with the intensity distribution of single biomolecules. We demonstrate this approach by quantifying the number of streptavidins on individual semiconducting polymer dots (Pdots); streptavidin was rendered fluorescent using biotin-Alexa647. This flow platform has high-throughput (hundreds to thousands of nanoparticles detected per second) and requires minute amounts of sample (∼5 μL at a dilute concentration of 10 pM). This measurement method is an additional tool for characterizing synthetic or biological nanoparticles.

  3. Synthesis of vaterite and aragonite crystals using biomolecules of tomato and capsicum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Long; Xu, Wang-Hua; Zhao, Ying-Guo; Kang, Yan; Liu, Shao-Hua; Zhang, Zai-Yong

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, biomimetic synthesis of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) in the presence of biomolecules of two vegetables-tomato and capsicum is investigated. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray powder diffractometry were used to characterize the CaCO3 obtained. The biomolecules in the extracts of two vegetables are determined by UV-vis or FTIR. The results indicate that a mixture of calcite and vaterite spheres constructed from small particles is produced with the extract of tomato, while aragonite rods or ellipsoids are formed in the presence of extract of capsicum. The possible formation mechanism of the CaCO3 crystals with tomato biomolecules can be interpreted by particle-aggregation based non-classical crystallization laws. The proteins and/or other biomolecules in tomato and capsicum may control the formation of vaterite and aragonite crystals by adsorbing onto facets of them.

  4. Radiolabelling of antibodies with indium: Use of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) as chelating agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loetscher, H.

    1986-01-01

    /sup 111/In/sup 3+/ was used to radiolabel the F(ab')/sub 2/ fragment of a monoclonal antibody (b-12) raised against a surface antigen of a mammalian breast tumor cell line (5). The in vivo distribution of the radiolabel was analyzed in mice bearing a transplant of fixed tumor cells in the left thigh. The results demonstrate that DTPA can be efficiently coupled to a tumor specific F(ab')/sub 2/ fragment and loaded with /sup 111/In/sup 3+/ yielding a stable, highly labelled complex

  5. In vitro metabolism of radiolabeled carbohydrates by protective cecal anaerobic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hume, M E; Beier, R C; Hinton, A; Scanlan, C M; Corrier, D E; Peterson, D V; DeLoach, J R

    1993-12-01

    Cecal anaerobic bacteria from adult broilers were cultured in media containing .25% glucose or .25% lactose. Media also contained either [14C]-labeled lactose, glucose, galactose, or lactic acid as metabolic tracers. Cultures were analyzed at 4, 8, and 12 h for pH, radiolabeled and unlabeled volatile fatty acids, and lactic acid. The pH values of cultures containing .25% lactose were significantly (P galactose, lactose > glucose. The volatile fatty acids in which radiolabel was most concentrated were acetic acid, propionic acid, or butyric acid.

  6. Progresses in optimization strategy for radiolabeled molecular probes targeting integrin αvβ3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Haojun; Wu Hua

    2012-01-01

    Tumor angiogenesis is critical in the growth, invasion and metastasis of malignant tumors. The integrins, which express on many types of tumor cells and activated vascular endothelial cells, play an important role in regulation of the tumor angiogenesis. RGD peptide, which contains Arg-Gly-Asp sequence, binds specifically to integrin α v β 3 . Therefore, the radiolabeled RGD peptides may have broad application prospects in radionuclide imaging and therapy. Major research interests include the selection of radionuclides, modification and improvement of RGD structures. In this article, we give a review on research progresses in optimization strategy for radiolabeled molecular probes targeting integrin α v β 3 . (authors)

  7. Method for radio imaging the myocardium of mammals using radio-labelled lipophil cations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The invention relates to a method for the radio imaging of myocardia of mammals by concentrating a radiolabelled cation in myocardial tissue and by producing a radiograph using imaging techniques. According to the invention, it is found that a group of substances shows a preference to myocardial tissues upon intravenous injection in mammals. The characteristic of the invention is that radiolabelled quaternary ammonium, quaternary phosphorous or quaternary arsenic compounds with at least two aryl groups are intravenously injected. These substances provide a sufficiently high radioactivity giving an approved diagnostic image of the myocardium. (G.J.P.)

  8. Inelastic and quasielastic neutron scattering studies on soft matter and biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanaya, Toshiji

    2015-01-01

    Some characteristic features of soft matter and biomolecules in the inelastic and quasielastic neutron scattering (INS and QENS) studies are described. In order to clarify the current situation of the studies the research history on soft matter and biomolecules by INS and QENS are described. As examples of the studies of slow dynamics of soft matter, neutron spin echo studies on breathing mode of polymer micelle and static and dynamics fluctuations in polymer gels. (author)

  9. Enhancing Protease Activity Assay in Droplet-Based Microfluidics Using a Biomolecule Concentrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chia-Hung; Sarkar, Aniruddh; Song, Yong-Ak; Miller, Miles A.; Kim, Sung Jae; Griffith, Linda G.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; Han, Jongyoon

    2011-01-01

    We introduce an integrated microfluidic device consisting of a biomolecule concentrator and a microdroplet generator, which enhances the limited sensitivity of low-abundance enzyme assays by concentrating biomolecules before encapsulating them into droplet microreactors. We used this platform to detect ultra low levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) from diluted cellular supernatant and showed that it significantly (∼10-fold) reduced the time required to complete the assay and the sample volume used. PMID:21671557

  10. LIAD-fs: A novel method for studies of ultrafast processes in gas phase neutral biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvert, C R; Kelly, O; Duffy, M J; Belshaw, L; King, R B; Williams, I D; Greenwood, J B

    2012-01-01

    A new experimental technique for femtosecond (fs) pulse studies of gas phase biomolecules is reported. Using Laser-Induced Acoustic Desorption (LIAD) to produce a plume of neutral molecules, a time-delayed fs pulse is employed for ionisation/fragmentation, with subsequent products extracted and mass analysed electrostatically. By varying critical laser pulse parameters, this technique can be used to implement control over molecular fragmentation for a range of small biomolecules, with specific studies of amino acids demonstrated.

  11. (99m)Tc-aprotinin - optimisation and validation of radiolabelling kits for routine preparation for diagnostic imaging of amyloidosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Denholt, Charlotte; Gillings, Nic

    2016-01-01

    Technetium-99m aprotinin was prepared from an optimised radiolabelling kit formulation containing aprotinin, alkaline buffer and stannous chloride (reducing agent) and radiolabelled using (99m) Tc-pertechnetate. The labelling was achieved within 25 min, with radiochemical purities of >98%....

  12. Recent advances in exploiting ionic liquids for biomolecules: Solubility, stability and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivapragasam, Magaret; Moniruzzaman, Muhammad; Goto, Masahiro

    2016-08-01

    The technological utility of biomolecules (e.g. proteins, enzymes and DNA) can be significantly enhanced by combining them with ionic liquids (ILs) - potentially attractive "green" and "designer" solvents - rather than using in conventional organic solvents or water. In recent years, ILs have been used as solvents, cosolvents, and reagents for biocatalysis, biotransformation, protein preservation and stabilization, DNA solubilization and stabilization, and other biomolecule-based applications. Using ILs can dramatically enhance the structural and chemical stability of proteins, DNA, and enzymes. This article reviews the recent technological developments of ILs in protein-, enzyme-, and DNA-based applications. We discuss the different routes to increase biomolecule stability and activity in ILs, and the design of biomolecule-friendly ILs that can dissolve biomolecules with minimum alteration to their structure. This information will be helpful to design IL-based processes in biotechnology and the biological sciences that can serve as novel and selective processes for enzymatic reactions, protein and DNA stability, and other biomolecule-based applications. Copyright © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Cell and biomolecule delivery for tissue repair and regeneration in the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott Donaghue, Irja; Tam, Roger; Sefton, Michael V; Shoichet, Molly S

    2014-09-28

    Tissue engineering frequently involves cells and scaffolds to replace damaged or diseased tissue. It originated, in part, as a means of effecting the delivery of biomolecules such as insulin or neurotrophic factors, given that cells are constitutive producers of such therapeutic agents. Thus cell delivery is intrinsic to tissue engineering. Controlled release of biomolecules is also an important tool for enabling cell delivery since the biomolecules can enable cell engraftment, modulate inflammatory response or otherwise benefit the behavior of the delivered cells. We describe advances in cell and biomolecule delivery for tissue regeneration, with emphasis on the central nervous system (CNS). In the first section, the focus is on encapsulated cell therapy. In the second section, the focus is on biomolecule delivery in polymeric nano/microspheres and hydrogels for the nerve regeneration and endogenous cell stimulation. In the third section, the focus is on combination strategies of neural stem/progenitor cell or mesenchymal stem cell and biomolecule delivery for tissue regeneration and repair. In each section, the challenges and potential solutions associated with delivery to the CNS are highlighted. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Bio-NCs--the marriage of ultrasmall metal nanoclusters with biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Nirmal; Zheng, Kaiyuan; Xie, Jianping

    2014-11-21

    Ultrasmall metal nanoclusters (NCs) have attracted increasing attention due to their fascinating physicochemical properties. Today, functional metal NCs are finding growing acceptance in biomedical applications. To achieve a better performance in biomedical applications, metal NCs can be interfaced with biomolecules, such as proteins, peptides, and DNA, to form a new class of biomolecule-NC composites (or bio-NCs in short), which typically show synergistic or novel physicochemical and physiological properties. This feature article focuses on the recent studies emerging at the interface of metal NCs and biomolecules, where the interactions could impart unique physicochemical properties to the metal NCs, as well as mutually regulate biological functions of the bio-NCs. In this article, we first provide a broad overview of key concepts and developments in the novel biomolecule-directed synthesis of metal NCs. A special focus is placed on the key roles of biomolecules in metal NC synthesis. In the second part, we describe how the encapsulated metal NCs affect the structure and function of biomolecules. Followed by that, we discuss several unique synergistic effects observed in the bio-NCs, and illustrate them with examples highlighting their potential biomedical applications. Continued interdisciplinary efforts are required to build up in-depth knowledge about the interfacial chemistry and biology of bio-NCs, which could further pave their ways toward biomedical applications.

  15. Generating multiplex gradients of biomolecules for controlling cellular adhesion in parallel microfluidic channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didar, Tohid Fatanat; Tabrizian, Maryam

    2012-11-07

    Here we present a microfluidic platform to generate multiplex gradients of biomolecules within parallel microfluidic channels, in which a range of multiplex concentration gradients with different profile shapes are simultaneously produced. Nonlinear polynomial gradients were also generated using this device. The gradient generation principle is based on implementing parrallel channels with each providing a different hydrodynamic resistance. The generated biomolecule gradients were then covalently functionalized onto the microchannel surfaces. Surface gradients along the channel width were a result of covalent attachments of biomolecules to the surface, which remained functional under high shear stresses (50 dyn/cm(2)). An IgG antibody conjugated to three different fluorescence dyes (FITC, Cy5 and Cy3) was used to demonstrate the resulting multiplex concentration gradients of biomolecules. The device enabled generation of gradients with up to three different biomolecules in each channel with varying concentration profiles. We were also able to produce 2-dimensional gradients in which biomolecules were distributed along the length and width of the channel. To demonstrate the applicability of the developed design, three different multiplex concentration gradients of REDV and KRSR peptides were patterned along the width of three parallel channels and adhesion of primary human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) in each channel was subsequently investigated using a single chip.

  16. Desalting by crystallization: detection of attomole biomolecules in picoliter buffers by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Xiaoyun; Xiong, Xingchuang; Wang, Song; Li, Yanyan; Zhang, Sichun; Fang, Xiang; Zhang, Xinrong

    2015-10-06

    Sensitive detection of biomolecules in small-volume samples by mass spectrometry is, in many cases, challenging because of the use of buffers to maintain the biological activities of proteins and cells. Here, we report a highly effective desalting method for picoliter samples. It was based on the spontaneous separation of biomolecules from salts during crystallization of the salts. After desalting, the biomolecules were deposited in the tip of the quartz pipet because of the evaporation of the solvent. Subsequent detection of the separated biomolecules was achieved using solvent assisted electric field induced desorption/ionization (SAEFIDI) coupled with mass spectrometry. It allowed for direct desorption/ionization of the biomolecules in situ from the tip of the pipet. The organic component in the assistant solvent inhibited the desorption/ionization of salts, thus assured successful detection of biomolecules. Proteins and peptides down to 50 amol were successfully detected using our method even if there were 3 × 10(5) folds more amount of salts in the sample. The concentration and ion species of the salts had little influence on the detection results.

  17. Bio-NCs - the marriage of ultrasmall metal nanoclusters with biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Nirmal; Zheng, Kaiyuan; Xie, Jianping

    2014-10-01

    Ultrasmall metal nanoclusters (NCs) have attracted increasing attention due to their fascinating physicochemical properties. Today, functional metal NCs are finding growing acceptance in biomedical applications. To achieve a better performance in biomedical applications, metal NCs can be interfaced with biomolecules, such as proteins, peptides, and DNA, to form a new class of biomolecule-NC composites (or bio-NCs in short), which typically show synergistic or novel physicochemical and physiological properties. This feature article focuses on the recent studies emerging at the interface of metal NCs and biomolecules, where the interactions could impart unique physicochemical properties to the metal NCs, as well as mutually regulate biological functions of the bio-NCs. In this article, we first provide a broad overview of key concepts and developments in the novel biomolecule-directed synthesis of metal NCs. A special focus is placed on the key roles of biomolecules in metal NC synthesis. In the second part, we describe how the encapsulated metal NCs affect the structure and function of biomolecules. Followed by that, we discuss several unique synergistic effects observed in the bio-NCs, and illustrate them with examples highlighting their potential biomedical applications. Continued interdisciplinary efforts are required to build up in-depth knowledge about the interfacial chemistry and biology of bio-NCs, which could further pave their ways toward biomedical applications.

  18. Os conflitos conjugais na perspectiva dos filhos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Ribeiro Goulart

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Se investigó sobre la perspectiva de los hijos en los conflictos conyugales. Participaron 17 estudiantes de una escuela pública de Porto Alegre (RS, de ambos sexos, reunidos en dos grupos focales: uno con 8 niños (8-9 años, y otro con 9 jóvenes (12-13 años, que vivían con sus padres. Cada grupo ha tenido sólo una cita en la escuela. Las informaciones fueron grabadas, transcritas y el contenido analizado a partir de los temas emergentes. De acuerdo con los niños, los conflictos conyugales van desde una discusión hasta la agresión física, son recurrientes, versan sobre cualquier tema, y su expresión es predominantemente negativa. Los niños reconocen la existencia del conflicto pero ni siempre entienden sus causas y todavía sufren sus consecuencias. Los niños adoptan distintas estrategias para lidiar con los conflictos, desde ignorarlos hasta las actitudes autodestructivas. Se concluye que los sujetos son conscientes de los conflictos conyugales de sus padres y reconocen sus repercusiones.

  19. en perspectiva de género

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Hernández Corrochano

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Los estudios sobre la familia, desde las diferentes perspectivas que aquí trato, nos muestran no sólo la importancia del parentesco en las relaciones sociales y en la construcción de la identidad de los sujetos, sino que nos indica cómo en sociedades definidas como modernizadas –donde los Estado sólo tienen interés en alcanzar un cambio económico y el acceso a las nuevas tecnologías, olvidándose de las cuestiones sociales, políticas o filosóficas que caracterizan a la modernidad– a mayor individualismo en las acciones de los varones, mayor sujeción de las mujeres al grupo. En estas sociedades la “autorización” que la comunidad da a los hombres para actuar en relación con sus intereses personales, “endurece” la posición de las mujeres que deben, con relación a su bienestar, mantener un orden social comunitario simbolizado por la buena familia y custodiado por una opinión pública que limita su capacidad de actuar como individuos.

  20. Brexit na perspectiva do Path Dependency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Romano Schutte

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Esta pesquisa analisou o Brexit em uma perspectiva histórica, focando a conturbada relação entre a Europa continental e o Reino Unido ao longo do século XX, com ênfase no período pós Segunda Guerra Mundial. Foi utilizado o conceito de path dependency para argumentar sobre o papel de fatores históricos e decisões do passado, embora tomados em outras circunstâncias, ainda com força para influenciar o presente, para entender o Brexit. A premissa básica que será apresentada no ensaio é que o Reino Unido nunca participou de fato da ideia da Europa e sempre se viu como um país diferente por sua história e seu papel no mundo. Quando entrou, foi com uma perna só, a outra sempre ficou atrás, inclusive devido às especificidades de sua estrutura econômica herdada do passado, em particular no que diz respeito à agricultura. Desta forma, defende-se que, embora longe de ter sido inevitável, se tratou de um fenômeno limitado ao Reino Unido que tinha pouquíssima probabilidade de se repetir em outros países da União Europeia.

  1. Productividad, trabajo y salud: la perspectiva psicosocial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    York Iván Puerto Barrios

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Con la opción de analizar las condiciones de trabajo en oficina, el texto realiza una sucinta pero precisa revisión de la conceptualización sobre productividad y consumo. Se documenta la relación contradictoria entre bienestar y rendimiento en el trabajo al identificar el riesgo de llevar al límite de sus capacidades la participación del trabajador como factor de productividad, ignorando que éste tiene además el rol de consumidor activo de bienes y servicios para que la producción tenga sentido. Se plantea que exigir al trabajador hasta su agotamiento puede mermar sustancialmente su doble condición de productor y consumidor. Específicamente, se presenta la perspectiva del trabajo en oficinas innovadas conceptual y tecnológicamente, con procesos laborales y patrones de desgaste y morbilidad de"nidos. El tiempo, el ritmo, la parcelación, el control del trabajo y la reestructuración en las organizaciones son, entre otros, factores que convergen para potenciar fenómenos de sobrecarga o subcarga mental con la consecuente aparición de estrés excedente y sus patologías asociadas.

  2. An analytical method for computing atomic contact areas in biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mach, Paul; Koehl, Patrice

    2013-01-15

    We propose a new analytical method for detecting and computing contacts between atoms in biomolecules. It is based on the alpha shape theory and proceeds in three steps. First, we compute the weighted Delaunay triangulation of the union of spheres representing the molecule. In the second step, the Delaunay complex is filtered to derive the dual complex. Finally, contacts between spheres are collected. In this approach, two atoms i and j are defined to be in contact if their centers are connected by an edge in the dual complex. The contact areas between atom i and its neighbors are computed based on the caps formed by these neighbors on the surface of i; the total area of all these caps is partitioned according to their spherical Laguerre Voronoi diagram on the surface of i. This method is analytical and its implementation in a new program BallContact is fast and robust. We have used BallContact to study contacts in a database of 1551 high resolution protein structures. We show that with this new definition of atomic contacts, we generate realistic representations of the environments of atoms and residues within a protein. In particular, we establish the importance of nonpolar contact areas that complement the information represented by the accessible surface areas. This new method bears similarity to the tessellation methods used to quantify atomic volumes and contacts, with the advantage that it does not require the presence of explicit solvent molecules if the surface of the protein is to be considered. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Enhanced specificity in immunoscreening of expression cDNA clones using radiolabeled antigen overlay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, S.; Chao, L.; Chao, J.

    1989-01-01

    A highly sensitive and specific method has been developed for immunoscreening clones from an expression cDNA library. The procedures utilize a radiolabeled antigen detection method described originally for the immunoblotting of plasma proteins. Screening of rat alpha 1-antitrypsin clones was used. Comparison between Western blots of alpha 1-antitrypsin using both labeled antigen and protein A detection methods showed that the former yielded lower background and greater sensitivity than the latter. Further, this technique was shown to have a lower detection limit of less than 20 ng through Western blot analysis of varying concentrations of alpha 1-antitrypsin. The procedures are based on the expression of the protein by cDNA clones containing the DNA inserts in the correct reading frame. Following the transfer of phage proteins to nitrocellulose membranes, the bivalent antibodies bind monovalently to both nitrocellulose-bound-antigen in the phage lysates and radiolabeled antigen. The radiolabeled antigen overlay method is superior to the protein A detection method in sensitivity, specificity and reproducibility. This improved method can be applied in general for screening expression cDNA libraries, provided that the specific antiserum and radiolabeled antigen are available

  4. Partition of radiolabeled amino acids in detached wheat heads in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inwood, W.; Bernardin, J.

    1990-01-01

    The concentration of a particular amino acid supplied to a detached wheat head affected the ultimate distribution of that amino acid among the tissues of the head. Detached wheat heads (Triticum aestivum L. cv Cheyenne) were supplied with a pulse of [ 3 H]leucine in the culture medium and were chased with medium that contained glutamine as the sole nitrogen source. When the amount of radiolabel was held constant, an increasing concentration of unlabeled leucine in the pulse medium led to an increased partition of the radiolabel into the grain tissues of the head. When the concentration of unlabeled leucine was increased from zero to radiolabeled leucine was partitioned to endosperm tissue and twice as much to seedcoat tissues. An effect of amino acid concentration on radiolabel partition was also found for methionine and proline, but the effect was not as dramatic. These results suggest the existence of an amino acid transport system between the transpiration stream of the wheat head and the grain that exhibits cooperative kinetics or amino acid activation

  5. SPECT/CT imaging of radiolabeled cubosomes and hexosomes for potential theranostic applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Christa; Barrios-Lopez, Brianda; Kallinen, Annukka

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a highly efficient method for the radiolabeling of phytantriol (PHYT)/oleic acid (OA)-based hexosomes based on the surface chelation of technetium-99m ((99m)Tc) to preformed hexosomes using the polyamine 1, 12-diamino-3, 6, 9-triazododecane (SpmTrien) as chelating agent. We also...

  6. Long-circulating liposomes radiolabeled with [18F]fluorodipalmitin ([18F]FDP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marik, Jan; Tartis, Michaelann S.; Zhang, Hua; Fung, Jennifer Y.; Kheirolomoom, Azadeh; Sutcliffe, Julie L.; Ferrara, Katherine W.

    2007-01-01

    Synthesis of a radiolabeled diglyceride, 3-[ 18 F]fluoro-1,2-dipalmitoylglycerol [[ 18 F]fluorodipalmitin ([ 18 F]FDP)], and its potential as a reagent for radiolabeling long-circulating liposomes were investigated. The incorporation of 18 F into the lipid molecule was accomplished by nucleophilic substitution of the p-toluenesulfonyl moiety with a decay-corrected yield of 43±10% (n=12). Radiolabeled, long-circulating polyethylene-glycol-coated liposomes were prepared using a mixture of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, cholesterol, 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N- [methoxy(polyethyleneglycol)-2000] ammonium salt (61:30:9) and [ 18 F]FDP with a decay-corrected yield of 70±8% (n=4). PET imaging and biodistribution studies were performed with free [ 18 F]FDP and liposome-incorporated [ 18 F]FDP. Freely injected [ 18 F]FDP had the highest uptake in the liver, spleen and lungs. Liposomal [ 18 F]FDP remained in blood circulation at near-constant levels for at least 90 min, with a peak concentration near 2.5%ID/cc. Since [ 18 F]FDP was incorporated into the phospholipid bilayer, it could potentially be used for radiolabeling a variety of lipid-based drug carriers

  7. Radiolabeling of VEGF(165) with Tc-99m to evaluate VEGFR expression in tumor angiogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galli, Filippo; Artico, Marco; Taurone, Samanta; Manni, Isabella; Bianchi, Enrica; Piaggio, Giulia; Weintraub, Bruce D.; Szkudlinski, Mariusz W.; Agostinelli, Enzo; Dierckx, Rudi A. J. O.; Signore, Alberto

    Angiogenesis is the main process responsible for tumor growth and metastatization. The principal effector of such mechanism is the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) secreted by cancer cells and other components of tumor microenvironment. Radiolabeled VEGF analogues may provide a useful tool

  8. Lymphoma: current status of clinical and preclinical imaging with radiolabeled antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    England, Christopher G. [University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Medical Physics, Madison, WI (United States); Rui, Lixin [University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Medicine, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Carbone Cancer Center, Madison, WI (United States); Cai, Weibo [University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Medical Physics, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Carbone Cancer Center, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Lymphoma is a complex disease that arises from cells of the immune system with an intricate pathology. While lymphoma may be classified as Hodgkin or non-Hodgkin, each type of tumor is genetically and phenotypically different and highly invasive tissue biopsies are the only method to investigate these differences. Noninvasive imaging strategies, such as immunoPET, can provide a vital insight into disease staging, monitoring treatment response in patients, and dose planning in radioimmunotherapy. ImmunoPET imaging with radiolabeled antibody-based tracers may also assist physicians in optimizing treatment strategies and enhancing patient stratification. Currently, there are two common biomarkers for molecular imaging of lymphoma, CD20 and CD30, both of which have been considered for investigation in preclinical imaging studies. In this review, we examine the current status of both preclinical and clinical imaging of lymphoma using radiolabeled antibodies. Additionally, we briefly investigate the role of radiolabeled antibodies in lymphoma therapy. As radiolabeled antibodies play critical roles in both imaging and therapy of lymphoma, the development of novel antibodies and the discovery of new biomarkers may greatly affect lymphoma imaging and therapy in the future. (orig.)

  9. Species specific uptake of radio-labelled phytodetritus by benthic meiofauna from the Baltic Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ólafsson, E.; Modig, H.; Van de Bund, W.J.

    1999-01-01

    The diatom Sheletonema costatum is one of the dominant phytoplankton species during spring in the northern Baltic Sea. We followed the uptake of radio-labelled S, costatum by all major meiofauna species in a laboratory experiment. The uptake of labelled diatom carbon varied greatly among major

  10. Bystander responses in three-dimensional cultures containing radiolabelled and unlabelled human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto, M.; Azzam, E. I.; Howell, R. W.

    2006-01-01

    Research on the radiation-induced bystander effect has been carried out mainly in 2-D tissue culture systems. This study uses a 3-D model, wherein apparently normal human diploid fibroblasts (AG1522) are grown in a carbon scaffold, to investigate the induction of a G 1 checkpoint in bystander cells present alongside radiolabelled cells. Cultures were simultaneously pulse-labelled with 3 H-deoxycytidine ( 3 HdC) to selectively irradiate a minor fraction of cells, and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) to identify the radiolabelled cells. After thorough washing of cultures, iododeoxyuridine (IdU) was administered to detect proliferating bystander cells. The cultures were harvested at various times thereafter, and cells were reacted with two monoclonal antibodies specific to IdU/BrdU or BrdU, respectively, stained with propidium iodide, and subjected to multi-parameter flow cytometry. Cell-cycle progression was followed in radiolabelled cells (BrdU + ) that were chronically irradiated by low energy beta particles emitted by DNA-incorporated 3 H, and in unlabelled bystander cells (BrdU - ) by a flow cytometry based cumulative labelling index assay. As expected, radiolabelled cells were delayed, in a dose-dependent manner, in G 2 and subsequently G 1 . No delay occurred in progression of bystander cells through G 1 , when the labelled cells were irradiated at dose rates up to 0.32 Gy h -1 . (authors)

  11. Progress of radiolabelled bombesin in diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing Yan; Zhao Jihua

    2010-01-01

    Studies show that high expression of bombesin exist in the face of many kind of tumors such as prostate cancer, so bombesin and its receptor can be used as target in radionuclide receptor imaging and targeted therapy of tumor, and become the focus of prostate cancer research. This article reviews the progress of radiolabelled bombesin in prostate cancer imaging and therapy. (authors)

  12. Extraction, radiolabeling and in vivo biological evaluation of {sup 131}I labeled egonol glycosides extract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akguel, Yurdanur; Pazar, Erdinc [Ege Univ., Izmir (Turkey). Chemistry Dept.; Yilmaz, Habibe; Sanlier, Senay Hamarat [Ege Univ., Izmir (Turkey). Biochemistry Dept.; Lambrecht, Fatma Yurt [Ege Univ., Izmir (Turkey). Dept. of Nuclear Applications; Yilmaz, Osman [Dokuz Eyluel Univ., Izmir (Turkey). Dept. of Lab. Animal Science

    2015-09-01

    Crude extract of S. officinalis L. was found to have suspending agent, hemolytic, antitumor, antioxidant and antimicrobial activities. Its major components benzofurans and benzofuran glycosides have antifungal, anticancer, antibacterial and anticomplement activities and display acetylcholinesterase-cyclooxygenase inhibitory and cytotoxic properties. Recently, it has been reported that egonolgentiobioside is a valuable target for structural modification and warrants further investigation for its potential as a novel pharmaceutical tool for the prevention of estrogen deficiency induced diseases. The aim of the current study is to perform in vivo biological evaluation of a glycosides extract, which was isolated from the fruits endocarp of Styrax officinalis L, identified as egonolgentiobioside and homoegonolgentiobioside and labeled with {sup 131}I. The radiolabeled glycosides extract was labeled with {sup 131}I with high yield. The labeled obtained radiolabeled compound was found to be quite stable and lipophilic. In order to determine its tissue distribution, an in vivo study was performed using healthy female Albino Wistar rats injected by {sup 131}I-glycosides. The biodistribution results showed that clearance of the radiolabeled compound is through the hepatobiliary pathway. The experimental study indicated that the radiolabeled glycosides extract accumulated in the large intestine. Therefore, the potential of {sup 131}I-glycosides might be evaluated in colon cancer cell lines and this might be a promising of tumor-imaging agent.

  13. In vivo VEGF imaging with radiolabeled bevacizumab in a human ovarian tumor xenograft

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagengast, Wouter B.; Hospers, Geke A.; Mulder, Nanno H.; de Jong, Johan R.; Hollema, Harry; Brouwers, Adrienne H.; van Dongen, Guns A.; Perk, Lars R.; Lub-de Hooge, Marjolijn N.

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), released by tumor cells, is an important growth factor in tumor angiogenesis. The humanized monoclonal antibody bevacizumab blocks VEGF-induced tumor angiogenesis by binding, thereby neutralizing VEGF. Our aim was to develop radiolabeled bevacizumab for

  14. Towards tumour targeting with copper-radiolabelled macrocycle-antibody conjugates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morphy, J.R.; Parker, David; Kataky, Ritu; Harrison, Alice; Walker, Carole; Eaton, M.A.W.; Millican, Andrew; Phipps, Alison

    1989-06-15

    Tetraaza-macrocycles covalently attached to a monoclonal antibody may be efficiently radiolabelled with /sup 64/Cu or /sup 67/Cu at pH4, minimising non-specific binding to the protein, giving a kinetically stable conjugate in vivo. (author).

  15. Studies towards the synthesis of radiolabeled R106-1(LY295337)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, M.J.; Zweifel, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    A unique semisynthetic pathway has been used as a route to acquire radiolabeled material of a complex natural product, R106. The retro-aldol reaction of R106-1 gave a key intermediate R106-sarcosine that was used in a subsequent aldol reaction to incorporate acetone--[2- 14 C]. (author)

  16. Lymphoma: current status of clinical and preclinical imaging with radiolabeled antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    England, Christopher G.; Rui, Lixin; Cai, Weibo

    2017-01-01

    Lymphoma is a complex disease that arises from cells of the immune system with an intricate pathology. While lymphoma may be classified as Hodgkin or non-Hodgkin, each type of tumor is genetically and phenotypically different and highly invasive tissue biopsies are the only method to investigate these differences. Noninvasive imaging strategies, such as immunoPET, can provide a vital insight into disease staging, monitoring treatment response in patients, and dose planning in radioimmunotherapy. ImmunoPET imaging with radiolabeled antibody-based tracers may also assist physicians in optimizing treatment strategies and enhancing patient stratification. Currently, there are two common biomarkers for molecular imaging of lymphoma, CD20 and CD30, both of which have been considered for investigation in preclinical imaging studies. In this review, we examine the current status of both preclinical and clinical imaging of lymphoma using radiolabeled antibodies. Additionally, we briefly investigate the role of radiolabeled antibodies in lymphoma therapy. As radiolabeled antibodies play critical roles in both imaging and therapy of lymphoma, the development of novel antibodies and the discovery of new biomarkers may greatly affect lymphoma imaging and therapy in the future. (orig.)

  17. Molecular imaging of rheumatoid arthritis by radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies: new imaging strategies to guide molecular therapies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malviya, G.; Dierckx, R.A. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University Medical Centre Groningen, University of Groningen (Netherlands); Conti, F. [Rheumatology Unit, I Faculty of Medicine and Surgery, Sapienza University of Rome (Italy); Chianelli, M. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University Medical Centre Groningen, University of Groningen (Netherlands); Unit of Nuclear Medicine, Regina apostolorum Hospital, Albano, Rome (Italy); Scopinaro, F. [Nuclear Medicine Department, Sapienza University of Rome, St. Andrea Hospital, Rome (Italy); Signore, A. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University Medical Centre Groningen, University of Groningen (Netherlands); Nuclear Medicine Department, Sapienza University of Rome, St. Andrea Hospital, Rome (Italy)

    2010-02-15

    The closing of the last century opened a wide variety of approaches for inflammation imaging and treatment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The introduction of biological therapies for the management of RA started a revolution in the therapeutic armamentarium with the development of several novel monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), which can be murine, chimeric, humanised and fully human antibodies. Monoclonal antibodies specifically bind to their target, which could be adhesion molecules, activation markers, antigens or receptors, to interfere with specific inflammation pathways at the molecular level, leading to immune-modulation of the underlying pathogenic process. These new generation of mAbs can also be radiolabelled by using direct or indirect method, with a variety of nuclides, depending upon the specific diagnostic application. For studying rheumatoid arthritis patients, several monoclonal antibodies and their fragments, including anti-TNF-{alpha}, anti-CD20, anti-CD3, anti-CD4 and anti-E-selectin antibody, have been radiolabelled mainly with {sup 99m}Tc or {sup 111}In. Scintigraphy with these radiolabelled antibodies may offer an exciting possibility for the study of RA patients and holds two types of information: (1) it allows better staging of the disease and diagnosis of the state of activity by early detection of inflamed joints that might be difficult to assess; (2) it might provide a possibility to perform 'evidence-based biological therapy' of arthritis with a view to assessing whether an antibody will localise in an inflamed joint before using the same unlabelled antibody therapeutically. This might prove particularly important for the selection of patients to be treated since biological therapies can be associated with severe side-effects and are considerably expensive. This article reviews the use of radiolabelled mAbs in the study of RA with particular emphasis on the use of different radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies for

  18. Synthesis of fluorine-18 radio-labeled serum albumins for PET blood pool imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basuli, Falguni; Li, Changhui; Xu, Biying; Williams, Mark; Wong, Karen; Coble, Vincent L.; Vasalatiy, Olga; Seidel, Jurgen; Green, Michael V.; Griffiths, Gary L.; Choyke, Peter L.; Jagoda, Elaine M.

    2015-01-01

    We sought to develop a practical, reproducible and clinically translatable method of radiolabeling serum albumins with fluorine-18 for use as a PET blood pool imaging agent in animals and man. Fluorine-18 radiolabeled fluoronicotinic acid-2,3,5,6-tetrafluorophenyl ester, [ 18 F]F-Py-TFP was prepared first by the reaction of its quaternary ammonium triflate precursor with [ 18 F]tetrabutylammonium fluoride ([ 18 F]TBAF) according to a previously published method for peptides, with minor modifications. The incubation of [ 18 F]F-Py-TFP with rat serum albumin (RSA) in phosphate buffer (pH 9) for 15 min at 37–40 °C produced fluorine-18-radiolabeled RSA and the product was purified using a mini-PD MiniTrap G-25 column. The overall radiochemical yield of the reaction was 18–35% (n = 30, uncorrected) in a 90-min synthesis. This procedure, repeated with human serum albumin (HSA), yielded similar results. Fluorine-18-radiolabeled RSA demonstrated prolonged blood retention (biological half-life of 4.8 hours) in healthy awake rats. The distribution of major organ radioactivity remained relatively unchanged during the 4 hour observation periods either by direct tissue counting or by dynamic PET whole-body imaging except for a gradual accumulation of labeled metabolic products in the bladder. This manual method for synthesizing radiolabeled serum albumins uses fluorine-18, a widely available PET radionuclide, and natural protein available in both pure and recombinant forms which could be scaled up for widespread clinical applications. These preclinical biodistribution and PET imaging results indicate that [ 18 F]RSA is an effective blood pool imaging agent in rats and might, as [ 18 F]HSA, prove similarly useful as a clinical imaging agent

  19. In vitro and in vivo analysis of radiolabeled clindamycin hydrogel gel by radioscintigraphic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, N.; Datta, M.; Chopra, M.K.; Soni, N.L.; Mittal, G.; Singh, T.; Bhatnagar, A.; Bhawna

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Acne is one of the common dermatological problems caused by microorganism Acne vulgaris, therefore being used commonly in the treatment of acne. Clindamycin is the 7- deoxy, 7- chloro congener of the lincomycin, a macrolide antibiotic derived from Streptomyces lincolnensis. This study was performed for in-vitro and in-vivo estimation of radiolabeled clindamycin hydrogel using radioscintigraphic techniques for transdermal permeation. Clindamycin was supplied as a gift sample by Glenmark Research Laboratory (Mumbai, India) and other chemicals and reagents used were of analytical grade and were purchased from Merck Chemicals (India). Clindamycin was radiolabeled with 99m Tc-pertechnetate using stannous chloride as a reducing agent. Radiolabeled clindamycin was characterized for its stability at room temperature and in physiological conditions (serum). Clindamycin hydrogel was prepared by dispersion of radiolabeled clindamycin in carbopol 980 containing polaxomer as surfactant and methyl paraben as preservative solution. The prepared hydrogel was analysed for in vitro analysis via franz diffusion cell and in vivo studies were performed in balb-C mice for biodistribution and skin permeation and were analysed by radiometry. The results obtained showed labeling efficiency of clindamycin was more than 90%, and that was consistent and the radiolabeled drug was stable upto 24 hrs in serum. In vitro release studies showed an increased release rate till four hours and it's become plateaus after 4 hours. In vivo biodistribution studies were showed 99m Tc clindamycin hydrogel remains stable and follow predominantly hepatic excretion. Biodistribution pattern suggests late redistribution from a storage sight, probably, body fats

  20. Synthesis of fluorine-18 radio-labeled serum albumins for PET blood pool imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basuli, Falguni; Li, Changhui; Xu, Biying; Williams, Mark; Wong, Karen; Coble, Vincent L; Vasalatiy, Olga; Seidel, Jurgen; Green, Michael V; Griffiths, Gary L; Choyke, Peter L; Jagoda, Elaine M

    2015-03-01

    We sought to develop a practical, reproducible and clinically translatable method of radiolabeling serum albumins with fluorine-18 for use as a PET blood pool imaging agent in animals and man. Fluorine-18 radiolabeled fluoronicotinic acid-2,3,5,6-tetrafluorophenyl ester, [(18)F]F-Py-TFP was prepared first by the reaction of its quaternary ammonium triflate precursor with [(18)F]tetrabutylammonium fluoride ([(18)F]TBAF) according to a previously published method for peptides, with minor modifications. The incubation of [(18)F]F-Py-TFP with rat serum albumin (RSA) in phosphate buffer (pH9) for 15 min at 37-40 °C produced fluorine-18-radiolabeled RSA and the product was purified using a mini-PD MiniTrap G-25 column. The overall radiochemical yield of the reaction was 18-35% (n=30, uncorrected) in a 90-min synthesis. This procedure, repeated with human serum albumin (HSA), yielded similar results. Fluorine-18-radiolabeled RSA demonstrated prolonged blood retention (biological half-life of 4.8 hours) in healthy awake rats. The distribution of major organ radioactivity remained relatively unchanged during the 4 hour observation periods either by direct tissue counting or by dynamic PET whole-body imaging except for a gradual accumulation of labeled metabolic products in the bladder. This manual method for synthesizing radiolabeled serum albumins uses fluorine-18, a widely available PET radionuclide, and natural protein available in both pure and recombinant forms which could be scaled up for widespread clinical applications. These preclinical biodistribution and PET imaging results indicate that [(18)F]RSA is an effective blood pool imaging agent in rats and might, as [(18)F]HSA, prove similarly useful as a clinical imaging agent. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Molecular imaging of rheumatoid arthritis by radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies: new imaging strategies to guide molecular therapies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malviya, G.; Dierckx, R.A.; Conti, F.; Chianelli, M.; Scopinaro, F.; Signore, A.

    2010-01-01

    The closing of the last century opened a wide variety of approaches for inflammation imaging and treatment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The introduction of biological therapies for the management of RA started a revolution in the therapeutic armamentarium with the development of several novel monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), which can be murine, chimeric, humanised and fully human antibodies. Monoclonal antibodies specifically bind to their target, which could be adhesion molecules, activation markers, antigens or receptors, to interfere with specific inflammation pathways at the molecular level, leading to immune-modulation of the underlying pathogenic process. These new generation of mAbs can also be radiolabelled by using direct or indirect method, with a variety of nuclides, depending upon the specific diagnostic application. For studying rheumatoid arthritis patients, several monoclonal antibodies and their fragments, including anti-TNF-α, anti-CD20, anti-CD3, anti-CD4 and anti-E-selectin antibody, have been radiolabelled mainly with 99m Tc or 111 In. Scintigraphy with these radiolabelled antibodies may offer an exciting possibility for the study of RA patients and holds two types of information: (1) it allows better staging of the disease and diagnosis of the state of activity by early detection of inflamed joints that might be difficult to assess; (2) it might provide a possibility to perform 'evidence-based biological therapy' of arthritis with a view to assessing whether an antibody will localise in an inflamed joint before using the same unlabelled antibody therapeutically. This might prove particularly important for the selection of patients to be treated since biological therapies can be associated with severe side-effects and are considerably expensive. This article reviews the use of radiolabelled mAbs in the study of RA with particular emphasis on the use of different radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies for therapy decision-making and

  2. Microcontact printing with aminosilanes: creating biomolecule micro- and nanoarrays for multiplexed microfluidic bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathish, Shivani; Ricoult, Sébastien G; Toda-Peters, Kazumi; Shen, Amy Q

    2017-05-21

    Microfluidic systems integrated with protein and DNA micro- and nanoarrays have been the most sought-after technologies to satisfy the growing demand for high-throughput disease diagnostics. As the sensitivity of these systems relies on the bio-functionalities of the patterned recognition biomolecules, the primary concern has been to develop simple technologies that enable biomolecule immobilization within microfluidic devices whilst preserving bio-functionalities. To address this concern, we introduce a two-step patterning approach to create micro- and nanoarrays of biomolecules within microfluidic devices. First, we introduce a simple aqueous based microcontact printing (μCP) method to pattern arrays of (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES) on glass substrates, with feature sizes ranging from a few hundred microns down to 200 nm (for the first time). Next, these substrates are integrated with microfluidic channels to then covalently couple DNA aptamers and antibodies with the micro- and nanopatterned APTES. As these biomolecules are covalently tethered to the device substrates, the resulting bonds enable them to withstand the high shear stresses originating from the flow in these devices. We further demonstrated the flexibility of this technique, by immobilizing multiple proteins onto these APTES-patterned substrates using liquid-dispensing robots to create multiple microarrays. Next, to validate the functionalities of these microfluidic biomolecule microarrays, we perform (i) aptamer-based sandwich immunoassays to detect human interleukin 6 (IL6); and (ii) antibody-based sandwich immunoassays to detect human c-reactive protein (hCRP) with the limit of detection at 5 nM, a level below the range required for clinical screening. Lastly, the shelf-life potential of these ready-to-use microfluidic microarray devices is validated by effectively functionalizing the patterns with biomolecules up to 3 months post-printing. In summary, with a single printing step, this

  3. Selective chromogenic detection of thiol-containing biomolecules using carbonaceous nanospheres loaded with silver nanoparticles as carrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Bo; Zhao, Yang; Zhu, Hai-Zhou; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2011-04-26

    Thiol-containing biomolecules show strong affinity with noble metal nanostructures and could not only stably protect them but also control the self-assembly process of these special nanostructures. A highly selective and sensitive chromogenic detection method has been designed for the low and high molecular weight thiol-containing biomolecules, including cysteine, glutathione, dithiothreitol, and bovine serum albumin, using a new type of carbonaceous nanospheres loaded with silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) as carrier. This strategy relies upon the place-exchange process between the reporter dyes on the surface of Ag NPs and the thiol groups of thiol-containing biomolecules. The concentration of biomolecules can be determined by monitoring with the fluorescence intensity of reporter dyes dispersed in solution. This new chromogenic assay method could selectively detect these biomolecules in the presence of various other amino acids and monosaccharides and even sensitively detect the thiol-containing biomolecules with different molecular weight, even including proteins.

  4. O banco do futuro: perspectivas e desafios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Accorsi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Neste artigo, apresentam-se as perspectivas e os desafios dos bancos no futuro. Com o referencial teórico sobre o tema, construiu-se um questionário para identificar o grau de importância atribuído a 20 diferentes questões. Na pesquisa de campo, abarcaram-se 93 bancários dos níveis gerencial e operacional dos principais bancos brasileiros e 9 professores universitários especialistas em mercado financeiro. Os dados coletados foram analisados estatisticamente usando-se o software Statistical Package for the Social Sciences, versão 13.0. Observando-se as principais conclusões da amostra, não há diferença estatística entre os funcionários dos bancos pesquisados, mas o mesmo não ocorreu entre bancários e professores. Algumas variáveis apresentaram maior relevância: combate às fraudes, business intelligence, bancarização e atendimento rápido. A partir da análise fatorial, identificaram-se seis fatores: sustentabilidade e papel do Brasil; mobilidade e segurança; regulação e novas tecnologias; globalização, inserção e privacidade; atendimento inteligente e bancarização. Pela análise discriminante, classificaram-se corretamente 79,3 e 66,7% dos funcionários do Bradesco e do Banco do Brasil, respectivamente, e 78,8% dos gerentes.

  5. El bienestar subjetivo: Actualidad y perspectivas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Díaz Llanes

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó una revisión de los trabajos sobre bienestar subjetivo publicados en el mundo en los últimos años y se analizaron críticamente los resultados obtenidos tomando en consideración algunos de los fundamentos epistemológicos que les sirvieron de sustento. La enorme vigencia de los estudios sobre bienestar subjetivo en la actualidad pone de manifiesto la creciente conciencia de los investigadores acerca de la importancia del estudio de los factores que tributan a la salud desde una perspectiva positiva. La comprensión de la compleja madeja de interacciones que determinan el bienestar subjetivo en los niveles macrosocial, microsocial e individual, resulta requisito indispensable para la instrumentación de intervenciones en el nivel primario de atención y así elevar dicho indicador, tan ligado a la salud.A review of the papers on subjective well-being published in the world during the last years was made. The results obtained were critically analyzed taking into account the epistemological foundations that served as a sustenance. The fact that the studies about subjective well-being are still in force shows the increasing awareness of the investigators about the importance of studying those factors influencing positively on health. The understanding of the complex skein of interactions determining the subjective well-being at the macrosocial, microsocial and individual levels is an indispensable requirement for the implementation of interventions at the primary health care level and for elevating this indicator so closely related to health.

  6. Effect of membrane hydrophilization on ultrafiltration performance for biomolecules separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susanto, H.; Roihatin, A.; Aryanti, N.; Anggoro, D.D.; Ulbricht, M.

    2012-01-01

    We characterized the membranes before and after modification. ► We examined the unmodified and modified membranes for biomolecules filtration. ► All the modifications changed the membrane characteristics and the membrane performance. ► All the modifications resulted in UF membranes having higher resistance towards fouling.

  7. Formation of noble metal nanocrystals in the presence of biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Justin Lockheart

    One of the most promising, yet least studied routes for producing biocompatible nanostructures involves synthesis in the presence of biomolecules. I hypothesized that globular proteins could provide a suitable framework to regulate the formation of noble metal nanocrystals. As proof of concept, I designed two novel synthesis protocols utilizing bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein to regulate the formation of gold nanocrystals. In the first case, the standard protocol for polyol reduction was modified by replacing ethylene glycol with glycerin, replacing synthetic polymers with BSA as protecting agent, and decreasing the reaction temperature. In the second case, the Brust-Schiffrin two-phase reduction was modified by replacing alkylthiols with BSA as protecting agent, which facilitated a strictly aqueous phase synthesis. Due to superior product yield and rapid reduction at room temperature, the aqueous protocol became the foundation for subsequent studies. I extended this approach to produce well-dispersed ˜2nm silver, gold, and platinum nanocrystals. Having demonstrated the feasibility of BSA-functionalized nanocrystals, some potential uses were explored. BSA-functionalized silver nanocrystals were employed in a broader study on the interaction of silver nanocrystals with HIV. BSA-functionalized gold nanocrystals were utilized for in vivo dosage of a contrast enhancing agent to bacteria. BSA-functionalized platinum nanocrystals were studied as hydrogenation catalysts. Since many intriguing uses for protein-functionalized nanocrystals involve incorporation into biosystems, I sought to enhance biocompatibility by using ascorbic acid as reducing agent. Initial experiments revealed elongated and branched nanocrystals. Such structures were not observed in previous synthesis protocols with BSA, so I hypothesized ascorbic acid was driving their formation. To test my assertion, I reduced ionic gold in an aqueous solution of ascorbic acid, thereby discovering a new method

  8. Effect of membrane hydrophilization on ultrafiltration performance for biomolecules separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susanto, H., E-mail: heru.susanto@undip.ac.id [Department of Chemical Engineering, Universitas Diponegoro, Jl. Prof. Sudarto-Tembalang, Semarang (Indonesia); Roihatin, A.; Aryanti, N.; Anggoro, D.D. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Universitas Diponegoro, Jl. Prof. Sudarto-Tembalang, Semarang (Indonesia); Ulbricht, M. [Lehrstuhl fuer Technische Chemie, Universitaet Duisburg-Essen, Germany, Universitaetstr. 5, Essen (Germany)

    2012-10-01

    fouling ultrafiltration (UF) membranes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We characterized the membranes before and after modification. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examined the unmodified and modified membranes for biomolecules filtration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer All the modifications changed the membrane characteristics and the membrane performance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer All the modifications resulted in UF membranes having higher resistance towards fouling.

  9. Room temperature ionic liquids interacting with bio-molecules: an overview of experimental and computational studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetto, Antonio; Ballone, Pietro

    2016-03-01

    We briefly review experimental and computational studies of room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) interacting with important classes of biomolecules, including phospholipids, peptides and proteins, nucleic acids and carbohydrates. Most of these studies have been driven by the interest for RTILs applications as solvents. Thus, available experimental data cover primarily thermodynamic properties such as the reciprocal solubility of RTILs and bio-molecules, as well as phase boundaries. Less extensive data are also available on transport properties such as diffusion and viscosity of homogeneous binary (RTILs/biomolecules) and ternary (RTIL/biomolecules/water) solutions. Most of the structural information at the atomistic level, of interest especially for biochemical, pharmaceutical and nanotechnology applications, has been made available by molecular dynamics simulations. Major exceptions to this statement are represented by the results from NMR and circular dichroism spectroscopy, by selected neutron and X-ray scattering data, and by recent neutron reflectometry measurements on lipid bilayers on surfaces, hydrated by water-RTIL solutions. A final section of our paper summarizes new developments in the field of RTILs based on amino acids, that combine in themselves the two main aspects of our discussion, i.e. ionic liquids and bio-molecules.

  10. Different size biomolecules anchoring on porous silicon surface: fluorescence and reflectivity pores infiltration comparative studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giovannozzi, Andrea M.; Rossi, Andrea M. [National Institute for Metrological Research, Thermodynamic Division, Strada delle Cacce 91, 10135 Torino (Italy); Renacco, Chiara; Farano, Alessandro [Ribes Ricecrhe Srl, Via Lavoratori Vittime del Col du Mont 24, 11100 Aosta (Italy); Derosas, Manuela [Biodiversity Srl, Via Corfu 71, 25124 Brescia (Italy); Enrico, Emanuele [National Institute for Metrological Research, Electromagnetism Division, Strada delle Cacce 91, 10135 Torino (Italy)

    2011-06-15

    The performance of porous silicon optical based biosensors strongly depends on material nanomorphology, on biomolecules distribution inside the pores and on the ability to link sensing species to the pore walls. In this paper we studied the immobilization of biomolecules with different size, such as antibody anti aflatoxin (anti Aflatox Ab, {proportional_to}150 KDa), malate dehydrogenase (MDH, {proportional_to}36KDa) and metallothionein (MT, {proportional_to}6KDa) at different concentrations on mesoporous silicon samples ({proportional_to}15 nm pores diameter). Fluorescence measurements using FITC- labeled biomolecules and refractive index analysis based on reflectivity spectra have been employed together to detect the amount of proteins bound to the surface and to evaluate their diffusion inside the pores. Here we suggest that these two techniques should be used together to have a better understanding of what happens at the porous silicon surface. In fact, when pores dimensions are not perfectly tuned to the protein size a higher fluorescence signal doesn't often correspond to a higher biomolecules distribution inside the pores. When a too much higher concentration of biomolecule is anchored on the surface, steric crowd effects and repulsive interactions probably take over and hinder pores infiltration, inducing a small or absent shift in the fringe pattern even if a higher fluorescence signal is registered. (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  11. Conditions to minimize soft single biomolecule deformation when imaging with atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godon, Christian; Teulon, Jean-Marie; Odorico, Michael; Basset, Christian; Meillan, Matthieu; Vellutini, Luc; Chen, Shu-Wen W; Pellequer, Jean-Luc

    2017-03-01

    A recurrent interrogation when imaging soft biomolecules using atomic force microscopy (AFM) is the putative deformation of molecules leading to a bias in recording true topographical surfaces. Deformation of biomolecules comes from three sources: sample instability, adsorption to the imaging substrate, and crushing under tip pressure. To disentangle these causes, we measured the maximum height of a well-known biomolecule, the tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), under eight different experimental conditions positing that the maximum height value is a specific indicator of sample deformations. Six basic AFM experimental factors were tested: imaging in air (AIR) versus in liquid (LIQ), imaging with flat minerals (MICA) versus flat organic surfaces (self-assembled monolayers, SAM), and imaging forces with oscillating tapping mode (TAP) versus PeakForce tapping (PFT). The results show that the most critical parameter in accurately measuring the height of TMV in air is the substrate. In a liquid environment, regardless of the substrate, the most critical parameter is the imaging mode. Most importantly, the expected TMV height values were obtained with both imaging with the PeakForce tapping mode either in liquid or in air at the condition of using self-assembled monolayers as substrate. This study unambiguously explains previous poor results of imaging biomolecules on mica in air and suggests alternative methodologies for depositing soft biomolecules on well organized self-assembled monolayers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Role of PAMAM-OH dendrimers against the fibrillation pathway of biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekar, Gajalakshmi; Florance, Ida; Sivakumar, A; Mukherjee, Amitava; Chandrasekaran, Natarajan

    2016-12-01

    The binding behavior of nanoparticle with proteins determines its biocompatibility. This study reports the interaction of ten different biomolecules (proteins-BSA, HSA, haemoglobin, gamma globulin, transferrin and enzymes-hog and bacillus amylase, lysozyme from chicken and human and laccases from Tramates versicolor) with a surface group hydroxylated Poly AMido AMide dendrimer (PAMAM) of generation 5. The study has utilized various spectroscopic methods like UV-vis spectroscopy, Fluorescence emission, Synchronous, 3-D spectroscopy and Circular Dichroism to detect the binding induced structural changes in biomolecules that occur upon interaction with mounting concentration of the dendrimers. Aggregation of proteins results in the formation of amyloid fibrils causing several human diseases. In this study, fibrillar samples of all ten biomolecules formed in the absence and the presence of dendrimers were investigated with Congo Red absorbance and ThT Assay to detect fibril formation, Trp Emission and 3-D scan to evaluate the effect of fibrillation on aromatic environment of biomolecules, and CD spectroscopy to measure the conformational changes in a quantitative manner. These assays have generated useful information on the role of dendrimers in amyloid fibril formation of biomolecules. The outcomes of the study remain valuable in evaluating the biological safety of PAMAM-OH dendrimers for their biomedical application in vivo. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Constructing Optimal Coarse-Grained Sites of Huge Biomolecules by Fluctuation Maximization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Zhang, John Zenghui; Xia, Fei

    2016-04-12

    Coarse-grained (CG) models are valuable tools for the study of functions of large biomolecules on large length and time scales. The definition of CG representations for huge biomolecules is always a formidable challenge. In this work, we propose a new method called fluctuation maximization coarse-graining (FM-CG) to construct the CG sites of biomolecules. The defined residual in FM-CG converges to a maximal value as the number of CG sites increases, allowing an optimal CG model to be rigorously defined on the basis of the maximum. More importantly, we developed a robust algorithm called stepwise local iterative optimization (SLIO) to accelerate the process of coarse-graining large biomolecules. By means of the efficient SLIO algorithm, the computational cost of coarse-graining large biomolecules is reduced to within the time scale of seconds, which is far lower than that of conventional simulated annealing. The coarse-graining of two huge systems, chaperonin GroEL and lengsin, indicates that our new methods can coarse-grain huge biomolecular systems with up to 10,000 residues within the time scale of minutes. The further parametrization of CG sites derived from FM-CG allows us to construct the corresponding CG models for studies of the functions of huge biomolecular systems.

  14. Immobilization of biomolecules on cysteamine-modified polyaniline film for highly sensitive biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Qi; Xu, Baojian; Ye, Lin; Di, Zengfeng; Zhang, Jishen; Jin, Qinghui; Zhao, Jianlong; Xue, Jian; Chen, Xianfeng

    2014-03-01

    We present a new cysteamine (CS)-modified polyaniline (PANI) film for highly efficient immobilization of biomolecules in biosensing technology. This electrochemical deposited PANI film treated with CS and glutaraldehyde could be employed as an excellent substrate for biomolecules immobilization. The parameters of PANI growth were optimized to obtain suitable surface morphology of films for biomolecules combination with the help of electron and atomic force microscopy. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) was utilized to illustrate the different electrochemical activities of each modified electrode. Due to the existence of sulfydryl group and amino group in CS, surface modification with CS was proven to reduce oxidized units on PANI film remarkably, as evidenced by both ATR-FTIR and Raman spectroscopy characterizations. Furthermore, bovine serum albumin (BSA) was used as the model protein to investigate the immobilization efficiency of biomolecules on the PANI film, comparative study using quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) showed that BSA immobilized on CS-modified PANI could be increased by at least 20% than that without CS-modified PANI in BSA solution with the concentration of 0.1-1mg/mL. The CS-modified PANI film would be significant for the immobilization and detection of biomolecules and especially promising in the application of immunosensor for ultrasensitive detection. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Fabrication of biomolecules self-assembled on Au nanodot array for bioelectronic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Taek; Kumar, Ajay Yagati; Yoo, Si-Youl; Jung, Mi; Min, Junhong; Choi, Jeong-Woo

    2013-09-01

    In the present study, an nano-platform composed of Au nanodot arrays on which biomolecules could be self-assembled was developed and investigated for a stable bioelectronic device platform. Au nanodot pattern was fabricated using a nanoporous alumina template. Two different biomolecules, a cytochrome c and a single strand DNA (ssDNA), were immobilized on the Au nanodot arrays. Cytochorme c and single stranded DNA could be immobilized on the Au nanodot using the chemical linker 11-MUA and thiol-modification by covalent bonding, respectively. The atomic structure of the fabricated nano-platform device was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The electrical conductivity of biomolecules immobilized on the Au nanodot arrays was confirmed by scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS). To investigate the activity of biomolecule-immobilized Au-nano dot array, the cyclic voltammetry was carried out. This proposed nano-platform device, which is composed of biomolecules, can be used for the construction of a novel bioelectronic device.

  16. A new algorithm for construction of coarse-grained sites of large biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Zhang, John Z H; Xia, Fei

    2016-04-05

    The development of coarse-grained (CG) models for large biomolecules remains a challenge in multiscale simulations, including a rigorous definition of CG representations for them. In this work, we proposed a new stepwise optimization imposed with the boundary-constraint (SOBC) algorithm to construct the CG sites of large biomolecules, based on the s cheme of essential dynamics CG. By means of SOBC, we can rigorously derive the CG representations of biomolecules with less computational cost. The SOBC is particularly efficient for the CG definition of large systems with thousands of residues. The resulted CG sites can be parameterized as a CG model using the normal mode analysis based fluctuation matching method. Through normal mode analysis, the obtained modes of CG model can accurately reflect the functionally related slow motions of biomolecules. The SOBC algorithm can be used for the construction of CG sites of large biomolecules such as F-actin and for the study of mechanical properties of biomaterials. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Radiolabeling procedure, quality control and stability of 99mTc-labeled chondroitin sulfate: A new approach of targeting osteoarthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobal, Grazyna; Menzel, Ernst Johannes; Sinzinger, Helmut

    2008-01-01

    Chondroitin sulfate (CS) is an endogenous component of cartilage which could determine osteoarthritis after radiolabeling. Radiolabeling was performed by 99m TcO 4 - /tin method. We found that pH is a limiting factor. At pH 6.2 in 0.05 M Na acetate buffer 32.8% colloid was formed, at pH 5.0 in 0.5 M Na acetate, in our methodology only 4.7% colloid. The tracer was highly stable. We conclude that 99m TcCS could be a promising imaging agent of osteoarthritis due to simple radiolabeling and high stability

  18. Radical Reactions in the Gas Phase: Recent Development and Application in Biomolecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Gao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes recent literature describing the use of gas phase radical reactions for structural characterization of complex biomolecules other than peptides. Specifically, chemical derivatization, in-source chemical reaction, and gas phase ion/ion reactions have been demonstrated as effective ways to generate radical precursor ions that yield structural informative fragments complementary to those from conventional collision-induced dissociation (CID. Radical driven dissociation has been applied to a variety of biomolecules including peptides, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, and phospholipids. The majority of the molecules discussed in this review see limited fragmentation from conventional CID, and the gas phase radical reactions open up completely new dissociation channels for these molecules and therefore yield high fidelity confirmation of the structures of the target molecules. Due to the extensively studied peptide fragmentation, this review focuses only on nonpeptide biomolecules such as nucleic acids, carbohydrates, and phospholipids.

  19. Control of Target Molecular Recognition in a Small Pore Space with Biomolecule-Recognition Gating Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuyama, Hiroto; Oshiba, Yuhei; Ohashi, Hidenori; Yamaguchi, Takeo

    2018-05-01

    A biomolecule-recognition gating membrane, which introduces thermosensitive graft polymer including molecular recognition receptor into porous membrane substrate, can close its pores by recognizing target biomolecule. The present study reports strategies for improving both versatility and sensitivity of the gating membrane. First, the membrane is fabricated by introducing the receptor via a selectively reactive click reaction improving the versatility. Second, the sensitivity of the membrane is enhanced via an active delivering method of the target molecules into the pores. In the method, the tiny signal of the target biomolecule is amplified as obvious pressure change. Furthermore, this offers 15 times higher sensitivity compared to the previously reported passive delivering method (membrane immersion to sample solution) with significantly shorter recognition time. The improvement will aid in applying the gating membrane to membrane sensors in medical fields. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. The origin of methane and biomolecules from a CO2 cycle on terrestrial planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civiš, Svatopluk; Knížek, Antonín; Ivanek, Ondřej; Kubelík, Petr; Zukalová, Markéta; Kavan, Ladislav; Ferus, Martin

    2017-10-01

    Understanding the chemical evolution of newly formed terrestrial planets involves uncertainties in atmospheric chemical composition and assessing the plausibility of biomolecule synthesis. In this study, an original scenario for the origin of methane on Mars and terrestrial planets is suggested. Carbon dioxide in Martian and other planetary atmospheres can be abiotically converted into a mixture of methane and carbon monoxide by `methanogenesis' on porous mineral photoactive surfaces under soft ultraviolet irradiation. On young planets exposed to heavy bombardment by interplanetary matter, this process can be followed by biomolecule synthesis through the reprocessing of reactive reducing atmospheres by impact-induced shock waves. The proposed mechanism of methanogenesis may help to answer the question concerning the formation of methane and carbon monoxide by photochemical processes, the formation of biomolecules on early Earth and other terrestrial planets, and the source and seasonal variation of methane concentrations on Mars.

  1. Light-triggerable formulations for the intracellular controlled release of biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lino, Miguel M; Ferreira, Lino

    2018-05-01

    New therapies based on the use of biomolecules [e.g., proteins, peptides, and non-coding (nc)RNAs] have emerged during the past few years. Given their instability, adverse effects, and limited ability to cross cell membranes, delivery systems are required to fully reveal their biological potential. Sophisticated nanoformulations responsive to light offer an excellent opportunity for the controlled release of these biomolecules, enabling the control of timing, duration, location, and dosage. In this review, we discuss the design principles for the delivery of biomolecules, in particular proteins and RNA-based therapeutics, by light-triggerable formulations. We further discuss the opportunities offered by these formulations in terms of endosomal escape, as well as their limitations. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Could comets be carriers of intact homochiral biomolecules from interstellar space?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navarro Gonzales, R.; Khanna, R.K.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1992-01-01

    It has been suggested that the synchrotron circularly polarized ultraviolet light produced off-angle to the orbit of neutron star remnants of supernova explosions interacted with interstellar grains from the presolar nebula producing chiral molecules. Furthermore, it has also been suggested that comets were the carriers of such extraterrestrial sources of homochirality from interstellar space to the primitive Earth. We present here a computer model calculation of the effect of ionizing radiation on cometary material. The external (cosmic rays) and internal (embedded radionuclides) contributions were considered to determine the degree of destruction of possible homochiral biomolecules present such as amino acids and carboxylic acids. Our results suggest that an insignificant degree of destruction (2-12%) of the homochiral biomolecules could be expected. Therefore, comets could be carriers of intact homochiral biomolecules. (author)

  3. SERS imaging of cell-surface biomolecules metabolically labeled with bioorthogonal Raman reporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ming; Lin, Liang; Li, Zefan; Liu, Jie; Hong, Senlian; Li, Yaya; Zheng, Meiling; Duan, Xuanming; Chen, Xing

    2014-08-01

    Live imaging of biomolecules with high specificity and sensitivity as well as minimal perturbation is essential for studying cellular processes. Here, we report the development of a bioorthogonal surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) imaging approach that exploits small Raman reporters for visualizing cell-surface biomolecules. The cells were cultured and imaged by SERS microscopy on arrays of Raman-enhancing nanoparticles coated on silicon wafers or glass slides. The Raman reporters including azides, alkynes, and carbondeuterium bonds are small in size and spectroscopically bioorthogonal (background-free). We demonstrated that various cell-surface biomolecules including proteins, glycans, and lipids were metabolically incorporated with the corresponding precursors bearing a Raman reporter and visualized by SERS microscopy. The coupling of SERS microscopy with bioorthogonal Raman reporters expands the capabilities of live-cell microscopy beyond the modalities of fluorescence and label-free imaging. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Composite Scaffold of Poly(Vinyl Alcohol) and Interfacial Polyelectrolyte Complexation Fibers for Controlled Biomolecule Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutiongco, Marie Francene A.; Choo, Royden K. T.; Shen, Nathaniel J. X.; Chua, Bryan M. X.; Sju, Ervi; Choo, Amanda W. L.; Le Visage, Catherine; Yim, Evelyn K. F.

    2015-01-01

    Controlled delivery of hydrophilic proteins is an important therapeutic strategy. However, widely used methods for protein delivery suffer from low incorporation efficiency and loss of bioactivity. The versatile interfacial polyelectrolyte complexation (IPC) fibers have the capacity for precise spatiotemporal release and protection of protein, growth factor, and cell bioactivity. Yet its weak mechanical properties limit its application and translation into a viable clinical solution. To overcome this limitation, IPC fibers can be incorporated into polymeric scaffolds such as the biocompatible poly(vinyl alcohol) hydrogel (PVA). Therefore, we explored the use of a composite scaffold of PVA and IPC fibers for controlled biomolecule release. We first observed that the permeability of biomolecules through PVA films were dependent on molecular weight. Next, IPC fibers were incorporated in between layers of PVA to produce PVA–IPC composite scaffolds with different IPC fiber orientation. The composite scaffold demonstrated excellent mechanical properties and efficient biomolecule incorporation. The rate of biomolecule release from PVA–IPC composite grafts exhibited dependence on molecular weight, with lysozyme showing near-linear release for 1 month. Angiogenic factors were also incorporated into the PVA–IPC grafts, as a potential biomedical application of the composite graft. While vascular endothelial growth factor only showed a maximum cumulative release of 3%, the smaller PEGylated-QK peptide showed maximum release of 33%. Notably, the released angiogenic biomolecules induced endothelial cell activity thus indicating retention of bioactivity. We also observed lack of significant macrophage response against PVA–IPC grafts in a rabbit model. Showing permeability, mechanical strength, precise temporal growth factor release, and bioinertness, PVA–IPC fibers composite scaffolds are excellent scaffolds for controlled biomolecule delivery in soft tissue

  5. Composite scaffold of poly(vinyl alcohol) and interfacial polyelectrolyte complexation fibers for controlled biomolecule delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutiongco, Marie Francene A; Choo, Royden K T; Shen, Nathaniel J X; Chua, Bryan M X; Sju, Ervi; Choo, Amanda W L; Le Visage, Catherine; Yim, Evelyn K F

    2015-01-01

    Controlled delivery of hydrophilic proteins is an important therapeutic strategy. However, widely used methods for protein delivery suffer from low incorporation efficiency and loss of bioactivity. The versatile interfacial polyelectrolyte complexation (IPC) fibers have the capacity for precise spatiotemporal release and protection of protein, growth factor, and cell bioactivity. Yet its weak mechanical properties limit its application and translation into a viable clinical solution. To overcome this limitation, IPC fibers can be incorporated into polymeric scaffolds such as the biocompatible poly(vinyl alcohol) hydrogel (PVA). Therefore, we explored the use of a composite scaffold of PVA and IPC fibers for controlled biomolecule release. We first observed that the permeability of biomolecules through PVA films were dependent on molecular weight. Next, IPC fibers were incorporated in between layers of PVA to produce PVA-IPC composite scaffolds with different IPC fiber orientation. The composite scaffold demonstrated excellent mechanical properties and efficient biomolecule incorporation. The rate of biomolecule release from PVA-IPC composite grafts exhibited dependence on molecular weight, with lysozyme showing near-linear release for 1 month. Angiogenic factors were also incorporated into the PVA-IPC grafts, as a potential biomedical application of the composite graft. While vascular endothelial growth factor only showed a maximum cumulative release of 3%, the smaller PEGylated-QK peptide showed maximum release of 33%. Notably, the released angiogenic biomolecules induced endothelial cell activity thus indicating retention of bioactivity. We also observed lack of significant macrophage response against PVA-IPC grafts in a rabbit model. Showing permeability, mechanical strength, precise temporal growth factor release, and bioinertness, PVA-IPC fibers composite scaffolds are excellent scaffolds for controlled biomolecule delivery in soft tissue engineering.

  6. New method for immobilization of biomolecules using preirradiation grafting at low temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang Chang Dong; Hoffman, A.S.

    1986-01-01

    A new method of biomolecule immobilization is described in which a monomer-conjugated enzyme (asparaginase, Asp) is grafted together with free monomer (acrylamide, AAm) onto a cellulose sheet which had been preirradiated in a /sup 60/Co source. The preirradiation and grafting steps are carried out in air at - 78/sup 0/C and in vacuum at 0/sup 0/C respectively. The grafting is probably caused by trapped radicals. The immobilized enzyme retains significant activity and is stable to storage. The technique is applicable to immobilization of a wide variety of biomolecules, such as enzymes, antibodies and drugs. The products may be used for therapeutic or diagnostic applications.

  7. Induction of Biomolecules in Mature Leaves of Terminalia arjuna Due to Feeding of Antheraea mylitta Drury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Abraham

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Terminalia arjuna is an important food plant of the tasar silkworm, Antheraea mylitta Drury. In this study, we investigated the induction of biomolecules in mature leaves of these plants subjected to insect feeding. Increase in total tannin content, lipid peroxidation, and trypsin inhibitor activity have been observed in mature leaves damaged by the insects. The growth rate of Vth instar larvae of A. mylitta fed on previously damaged foliage reduced by 87.1%. Induction of biomolecules for defense mechanisms in relation to herbivore damage has been discussed.

  8. Photopatterning of self assembled monolayers on oxide surfaces for the selective attachment of biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazarika, Pompi; Behrendt, Jonathan M; Petersson, Linn; Wingren, Christer; Turner, Michael L

    2014-03-15

    The immobilization of functional biomolecules to surfaces is a critical process for the development of biosensors for disease diagnostics. In this work we report the patterned attachment of single chain fragment variable (scFv) antibodies to the surface of metal oxides by the photodeprotection of self-assembled monolayers, using near-UV light. The photodeprotection step alters the functionality at the surface; revealing amino groups that are utilized to bind biomolecules in the exposed regions of the substrate only. The patterned antibodies are used for the detection of specific disease biomarker proteins in buffer and in complex samples such as human serum. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A new method for immobilization of biomolecules using preirradiation grafting at low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Chang Dong; Hoffman, A.S.

    1986-01-01

    A new method of biomolecule immobilization is described in which a monomer-conjugated enzyme (asparaginase, Asp) is grafted together with free monomer (acrylamide, AAm) onto a cellulose sheet which had been preirradiated in a 60 Co source. The preirradiation and grafting steps are carried out in air at - 78 0 C and in vacuum at 0 0 C respectively. The grafting is probably caused by trapped radicals. The immobilized enzyme retains significant activity and is stable to storage. The technique is applicable to immobilization of a wide variety of biomolecules, such as enzymes, antibodies and drugs. The products may be used for therapeutic or diagnostic applications. (author)

  10. Fabrication of Biomolecule Microarrays Using Rapid Photochemical Surface Patterning in Thiol-Ene-Based Microfluidic Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jönsson, Alexander; Lafleur, Josiane P

    2018-01-01

    In many biochip applications, it is advantageous to be able to immobilize biomolecules at specific locations on the surface of solid supports. In this protocol, we describe a photochemical surface patterning procedure based on thiol-ene/yne photochemistry which allows for the simple and rapid selective patterning of biomolecules on thiol-ene solid supports. We describe the preparation of solid supports which are required for the immobilization, including porous monoliths, as well as two different immobilization schemes based on biotin-streptavidin interactions and covalent linkage via free amino groups respectively.

  11. Study of interactions between cells and microbubbles in high speed centrifugation field for biomolecule delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chuan; Chen, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Biomolecule delivery has a very wide range of applications in biology and medicine. In this study, a microbubble based delivery method was developed. In a high centrifugation field, cells deform and collide with microbubbles to induce intracellular pathways on cell membranes. As a result, biomaterials can then easily enter cells. Experimental results show that this delivery method can achieve high delivery efficiency. Simulation results showed that cells with more deformed structure experienced higher strain on cell membranes than cells with less deformed structure. The models can help explain how centrifugation affects cell membrane permeability. By controlling cell morphology and its mechanical properties, high biomolecule delivery efficiency can be achieved.

  12. Metal Stable Isotope Tagging: Renaissance of Radioimmunoassay for Multiplex and Absolute Quantification of Biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rui; Zhang, Shixi; Wei, Chao; Xing, Zhi; Zhang, Sichun; Zhang, Xinrong

    2016-05-17

    The unambiguous quantification of biomolecules is of great significance in fundamental biological research as well as practical clinical diagnosis. Due to the lack of a detectable moiety, the direct and highly sensitive quantification of biomolecules is often a "mission impossible". Consequently, tagging strategies to introduce detectable moieties for labeling target biomolecules were invented, which had a long and significant impact on studies of biomolecules in the past decades. For instance, immunoassays have been developed with radioisotope tagging by Yalow and Berson in the late 1950s. The later languishment of this technology can be almost exclusively ascribed to the use of radioactive isotopes, which led to the development of nonradioactive tagging strategy-based assays such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, fluorescent immunoassay, and chemiluminescent and electrochemiluminescent immunoassay. Despite great success, these strategies suffered from drawbacks such as limited spectral window capacity for multiplex detection and inability to provide absolute quantification of biomolecules. After recalling the sequences of tagging strategies, an apparent question is why not use stable isotopes from the start? A reasonable explanation is the lack of reliable means for accurate and precise quantification of stable isotopes at that time. The situation has changed greatly at present, since several atomic mass spectrometric measures for metal stable isotopes have been developed. Among the newly developed techniques, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry is an ideal technique to determine metal stable isotope-tagged biomolecules, for its high sensitivity, wide dynamic linear range, and more importantly multiplex and absolute quantification ability. Since the first published report by our group, metal stable isotope tagging has become a revolutionary technique and gained great success in biomolecule quantification. An exciting research highlight in this area

  13. Use of radiolabeled monoclonal anti-B1 antibody for B lymphocyte imaging in Rhesus monkeys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letvin, N.L.; Zalutsky, M.R.; Chalifoux, L.V.; Atkins, H.L.

    1987-01-01

    Imaging tissues rich in B lymphocytes in man using a radiolabeled monoclonal anti-B cell antibody would be extremely useful in the clinical staging of non-Hodgkins lymphomas. Studies were done in rhesus monkeys using radiolabeled monoclonal anti-B1 antibody to determine the feasibility of such an approach. Immunohistologic studies demonstrated that infused monoclonal anti-B1 binds in vivo with specificity to B cells in lymph nodes and spleen. The kinetics of clearance of 131 I-labeled anti-B1 were determined. The B lymphocyte-rich spleen could be readily visualized by gamma camera scanning without significant background and without the need for image intensification or blood background subtraction techniques. These data support the feasibility of using anti-B1 for staging B cell lymphomas in man. (author)

  14. An Alternate, Egg-Free Radiolabeled Meal Formulation for Gastric-Emptying Scintigraphy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrigue, Philippe; Bodin-Hullin, Aurore; Gonzalez, Sandra; Sala, Quentin; Guillet, Benjamin

    2017-07-01

    Tc-radiolabeled scrambled eggs (SEs) are most often used as the ingested solid phase for gastric-emptying scintigraphy, leading egg-reluctant patients to avoid the examination. We formulated and validated 2 egg-free alternate meals, in the absence of any commercialized formulation: chocolate mug cake (MC) and scrambled tofu (ST). Six healthy volunteers underwent gastric-emptying scintigraphy after ingesting Tc-radiolabeled MC, ST, or SE. Gastric retention indexes did not change significantly between formulations (% of overtime variation to SE: MC 7.75% ± 7.1%, ST 7.17% ± 5.8%; P = 0.6618, not statistically significant), suggesting MC and ST as interesting egg-free alternatives.

  15. Purification of immunoreactive radiolabeled moniclonal antibodies with anti-iodiotypic moniclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temponi, M.; Pupa, S.; Ferrone, S.

    1990-01-01

    A method is described to purify immunoreactive moniclonal antibodies from radiolabeled monoclonal antibody preparations. The method is based on incubation of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies with insolubilized anti-idiotypic monoclonal antibodies to idiotopes within the antigen-combining site of monoclonal antibodies to be purified an elution of bound monoclonal antibodies with a low pH buffer. The immunoreactive fraction of the purified monoclonal antibodies was at least 82%; the yeald was at least 73%. The purification procedure did not cause any detectable change in the affinity constant of the eluted monoclonal antibodies. The method is simple and rapid; the requirement for anti-idiotypic monoclonal antibodies to idiotopes within the antigen-combining site of the antibodies to be purified is not likely to represent a major limitation in the broad application of the present method, since the hybridoma technology has greatly facilitated the development of anti-idiotypic monoclonal antibodies. (author). 12 refs.; 4 figs.; 1 tab

  16. Purification of radiolabeled RNA using sephadex G-15 or G-50 chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Beong Gyu; Lee, Jong Seok

    1998-01-01

    We attempted to purify radiolabeled RNA using Sephadex G-15 and G-50 chromatography instead of commercial RNA purification kit. In the Sephadex G-15 chromatography the major portion of RNA was eluted in the fractions ranging from 3rd to 5th whereas broad elution profile of RNA was obtained from the Sephadex G-50 chromatography. The elution profile and purity of RNA obtained from Sephadex G-15 chromatography was very similar to that by commercial RNA purification kit. Furthermore, operating time required for purification of RNA by Sephadex G-15 was rather smaller than that by commercial kit. Overall results suggest that the purification of radiolabeled RNA using Sephadex G-15 is more money and time saving than using commercial RNA purification kit

  17. Study of pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of radiolabelled receptor specific peptides in laboratory animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laznickova, A.; Laznicek, M.; Trejtnar, F.; Maecke, H.R.; Mather, S.J.

    2001-01-01

    Somatostatin analogues labelled with different radionuclides could be employed for visualization or treatment of somatostatin receptor-positive tumours. An octapeptide 111 In [DTPA] octreotide is a synthetic radiolabelled somatostatin analogue which is currently in clinical use for detecting small neuroendocrine tumours and metastases not detectable by conventional means. However, several other somatostatin analogues have been under development and testing. The aim of this study was to radiolabel selected somatostatin receptor-binding octapeptides by different radionuclides and to report the results of their biodistribution in rats. The study was focused on the direct labelling of vapreotide (RC-160) with 99m Tc, on the conjugates of octreotide with DFO (desferrioxamine) for labelling with 67 Ga, and on the conjugates of octreotide and TOC with DOTA (tetraazacyclo-dodecane tetraacetic acid) for labelling with 88 Y. In the present study, 88 Y isotope instead of 90 Y was used as a label as 88 Y exhibits a longer half life of decay and emits gamma radiation which can be much more easily detected in biological samples than beta emission. The labelling of octreotide analogues with metal radionuclides using derived bifunctional chelates was simple, straightforward and consistently resulted in high radiochemical purity of the product. On the other hand, the application of the direct labelling method for labelling of RC-160 with 99m Tc was difficult because all procedures had to be made under nitrogen atmosphere and an attainment of high yield proved to be highly dependent on the accurate observation of reaction conditions. The labelling efficiency makes an immediate use of the radiolabelled RC-160 for biological studies impossible and it is necessary to involve the purification step into the labelling procedure. All radiolabelled receptor specific peptides under study exhibited rapid radioactivity clearance from the blood and most organs and tissues. On the other hand

  18. Technical Report (Final): Development of Solid State Reagents for Preparing Radiolabeled Imaging Agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabalka, George W

    2011-05-20

    The goal of this research was on the development of new, rapid, and efficient synthetic methods for incorporating short-lived radionuclides into agents of use in measuring dynamic processes. The initial project period (Year 1) was focused on the preparation of stable, solid state precursors that could be used to efficiently incorporate short-lived radioisotopes into small molecules of use in biological applications (environmental, plant, and animal). The investigation included development and evaluation of new methods for preparing carbon-carbon and carbon-halogen bonds for use in constructing the substrates to be radiolabeled. The second phase (Year 2) was focused on developing isotope incorporation techniques using the stable, boronated polymeric precursors. The final phase (Year 3), was focused on the preparation of specific radiolabeled agents and evaluation of their biodistribution using micro-PET and micro-SPECT. In addition, we began the development of a new series of polymeric borane reagents based on polyethylene glycol backbones.

  19. Langmuir hydrogen dissociation approach in radiolabeling carbon nanotubes and graphene oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badun, Gennadii A.; Chernysheva, Maria G.; Eremina, Elena A.; Egorov, Alexander V.; Grigorieva, Anastasia V.

    2016-01-01

    Carbon-based nanomaterials have piqued the interest of several researchers. At the same time, radioactive labeling is a powerful tool for studying processes in different systems, including biological and organic; however, the introduction of radioactive isotopes into carbon-based nanomaterial remains a great challenge. We have used the Langmuir hydrogen dissociation method to introduce tritium in single-walled carbon nanotubes and graphene oxide. The technique allows us to achieve a specific radioactivity of 107 and 27 Ci/g for single-layer graphene oxide and single-walled carbon nanotubes, respectively. Based on the analysis of characteristic Raman modes at 1350 and 1580 cm -1 , a minimal amount of structural changes to the nanomaterials due to radiolabeling was observed. The availability of a simple, nondestructive, and economic technique for the introduction of radiolabels to single-walled carbon nanotubes and graphene oxide will ultimately expand the applicability of these materials.

  20. Radiolabeled porphyrin versus gallium-67 citrate for the detection of human melanoma in athymic mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maric, N.; Chan, S. Ming; Hoffer, P.B.; Duray, P.

    1987-01-01

    We performed the biodistribution and imaging studies of 111 In and 67 Ga labeled tetra(4-N-methylpyridyl) porphine, (T4NMPYP), and compared it to that of 67 Ga citrate in athymic mice bearing a human melanoma xenograft. The biodistribution results of both 111 In and 67 Ga labeled T4NMPYP (3, 6, 24, and 48 hours) were similar but differed from that of 67 Ga citrate (48 hours). The optimum tumor uptake of both radiolabeled porphyrins was at 6 hours postinjection and was lower than the tumor uptake of 67 Ga citrate at 48 hours postinjection. Kidney was the only organ showing higher uptake of radiolabeled porphyrin compared to that of 67 Ga citrate. The imaging studies performed with 111 In T4NMPYP and 67 Ga citrate correspond to the biodistribution results. Osteomyelitis present in one mouse showed good localization of 111 In T4NMPYP. 15 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs

  1. Langmuir hydrogen dissociation approach in radiolabeling carbon nanotubes and graphene oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badun, Gennadii A.; Chernysheva, Maria G.; Eremina, Elena A.; Egorov, Alexander V. [Lomonosov Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation). Dept. of Chemistry; Grigorieva, Anastasia V. [Lomonosov Moscow State Univ., Moscow (Russian Federation). Dept. of Materials Science

    2016-11-01

    Carbon-based nanomaterials have piqued the interest of several researchers. At the same time, radioactive labeling is a powerful tool for studying processes in different systems, including biological and organic; however, the introduction of radioactive isotopes into carbon-based nanomaterial remains a great challenge. We have used the Langmuir hydrogen dissociation method to introduce tritium in single-walled carbon nanotubes and graphene oxide. The technique allows us to achieve a specific radioactivity of 107 and 27 Ci/g for single-layer graphene oxide and single-walled carbon nanotubes, respectively. Based on the analysis of characteristic Raman modes at 1350 and 1580 cm{sup -1}, a minimal amount of structural changes to the nanomaterials due to radiolabeling was observed. The availability of a simple, nondestructive, and economic technique for the introduction of radiolabels to single-walled carbon nanotubes and graphene oxide will ultimately expand the applicability of these materials.

  2. Preparation and biodistribution of {sup 59}Fe-radiolabelled iron oxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pospisilova, Martina, E-mail: martinapospisilova@gmail.com; Zapotocky, Vojtech; Nesporova, Kristina [Contipro a.s (Czech Republic); Laznicek, Milan; Laznickova, Alice [Charles University, Faculty of Pharmacy in Hradec Králové (Czech Republic); Zidek, Ondrej; Cepa, Martin; Vagnerova, Hana; Velebny, Vladimir [Contipro a.s (Czech Republic)

    2017-02-15

    We report on the {sup 59}Fe radiolabelling of iron oxide nanoparticle cores through post-synthetic isotope exchange ({sup 59}Fe-IONP{sub ex}) and precursor labelling ({sup 59}Fe-IONP{sub pre}). Scanning electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering measurements showed no impact of radiolabelling on nanoparticle size or morphology. While incorporation efficiencies of these methods are comparable—83 and 90% for precursor labelling and post-synthetic isotope exchange, respectively—{sup 59}Fe-IONP{sub pre} exhibited much higher radiochemical stability in citrated human plasma. Quantitative ex vivo biodistribution study of {sup 59}Fe-IONP{sub pre} coated with triethylene glycol was performed in Wistar rats. Following the intravenous administration, high {sup 59}Fe concentration was observed in the lung and the organs of the reticuloendothelial system such as the liver, the spleen and the femur.

  3. Reactivity comparison of biological material after radiolabeling with avidin-biotin system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Wo; Qian Jianhua; Zhu Benxing

    2003-01-01

    To find a method for determining the immunoreactivity of monoclonal antibodies after radiolabeling avidin is unlabeled and labeled with Rodamine, 131 I and 188 Re, respectively. The affinities and half-desorbed amounts of biotin and four kinds of avidin are determined by the biotin columns plus non-labeled avidin (cold avidin). The affinities of biotin and avidin unlabeled and labeled with Rodamine, 188 Re and 131 I are decreased in turn. Their half-desorbed amounts from biotin are 21.9, 19.5, 25.7 and 47.9 μg of cold avidin. Two kinds of radiolabeled avidin have lower affinity with biotin than that of avidin unlabeled and labeled with Rodamine. There is a possibility to evaluate the reactivity of biological materials with different labeling methods by avidin-biotin system

  4. Synthesis, radiolabeling and biodistribution of a new opioid glucuronide derivative. Ethyl-morphine glucuronide (em-glu)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enginar, H.

    2012-01-01

    In current study, ethyl-morphine (em) was synthesized from the morphine and glucuronidated via enzymatic mechanism. The conjugated glucuronide ethyl-morphine (em-glu) was radiolabeled with 131 I using iodogen method. The quality control studies of radiolabeled compound ( 131 I-em-glu) were done with Thin Layer Radio Chromatography to confirm the radiolabeling efficiency. Biodistribution studies of 131 I labeled em-glu were run on healthy male Albino Wistar rats. The distribution figures demonstrated that 131 I-em-glu was eliminated through the small intestine, large intestine and accumulated in urinary bladder both receptor blocked and unblocked biodistribution studies. A greater uptake of the radiolabeled substance was observed in the m.pons, hypothalamus and mid brain than in the other branches of the rats' brains. (author)

  5. Preparation and characterization of high-specific activity radiolabeled 50 S measles virus RNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spruance, S.L.; Ashton, B.N.; Smith, C.B.

    1980-01-01

    A method is described to radiolabeled measles virus RNA for hybridization studies. Tritiated nucleosides were added to the media of measles virus infected Vero cells and negative-strand (genome) RNA with a specific activity of 6X10 5 c.p.m./μg was purified from viral nucleocapsids. 50 S RNA was the sole RNA present in nucleocapsids and self-annealed to 50% due to the presence of 25% 50 S plus-strands (anti-genomes). (Auth.)

  6. Some problems associated with radiolabeling surface antigens on helminth parasites: a brief review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayunga, E.G. (Division of Tropical Public Health, Department of Preventive Medicine and Biometrics, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD (USA)); Murrell, K.D. (Agricultural Research Service, Beltsville, MD (USA))

    1982-06-01

    Recent developments in technology have facilitated substantial advances in the characterization of surface antigens from a wide variety of both normal and neoplastic cells. However, the immunochemistry of parasites has lagged behind. Efforts to apply conventional radiolabeling methods to helminths have not always been successful. Experimental work with Schistosoma mansoni is reviewed to illustrate common problems encountered in surface labeling studies. These findings should provide insight for the future investigation of other helminth species.

  7. Some problems associated with radiolabeling surface antigens on helminth parasites: a brief review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayunga, E.G.; Murrell, K.D.

    1982-01-01

    Recent developments in technology have facilitated substantial advances in the characterization of surface antigens from a wide variety of both normal and neoplastic cells. However, the immunochemistry of parasites has lagged behind. Efforts to apply conventional radiolabeling methods to helminths have not always been successful. Experimental work with Schistosoma mansoni is reviewed to illustrate common problems encountered in surface labeling studies. These findings should provide insight for the future investigation of other helminth species. (Auth.)

  8. Tumor affinity of radiolabeled peanut agglutinin compared with that of Ga-67 citrate in animal models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, K.; Aburano, T.; Watanabe, N.; Kawabata, S.; Ishida, H.; Mukai, K.; Tonami, N.; Hisada, K.

    1985-01-01

    Peanut agglutinin (PNA) binds avidly to the immunodominant group of the tumor associated T antigen. The purpose of this study was to evaluate oncodiagnostic potential of radiolabeled PNA in animal models. PNA was labeled with I-125 or I-131 by Iodogen and also with In-111 by cyclic DTPA anhydride. The biological activity of PNA was examined by a hemaglutination titer with a photometer before and after labeling. Animal tumor models used were Lewis Lung Cancer(LLC), B-16 Melanotic Melanoma(MM), Yoshida Sarcoma(YS), Ehrlich Ascites Tumor(EAT and Hepatoma AH109A(HAH). Inflammatory tissue induced by turpentine oil was used as an abscess model. Serial scintigraphic images were obtained following IV injections of 100 μCi of I-131 or In-111-DTPA-PNA. The tumor affinity of Ga-67 citrate was studied to compare that of radiolabeled PNA. Tissue biodistribution was studied in EAT bearing mice. All of these tumor models except HAH were clearly visible by radiolabeled PNA without subtraction techniques. In the models of LLC and EAT, PNA showed the better accumulation into the tumor tissue than Ga-67 citrate. In YS and MM, PNA represented almost the same accumulation as Ga-67 citrate. The localization of PNA into abscess tissue wasn't found although Ga-67 citrate markedly accumulated into abscess tissue as well as tumor tissue. The clearance of PNA from tumor was slower than those from any other organs. Tumor to muscle ratio was 5.1 at 48hrs. and tumor to blood ratio increased with time to 2.3 at 96hrs. These results suggested that radiolabeled PNA may have a potential in the detection of tumor

  9. Intrinsically radiolabelled [59Fe]-SPIONs for dual MRI/radionuclide detection

    OpenAIRE

    Hoffman, David; Sun, Minghao; Yang, Likun; McDonagh, Philip R; Corwin, Frank; Sundaresan, Gobalakrishnan; Wang, Li; Vijayaragavan, Vimalan; Thadigiri, Celina; Lamichhane, Narottam; Zweit, Jamal

    2014-01-01

    Towards the development of iron oxide nanoparticles with intrinsically incorporated radionuclides for dual Positron Emission Tomography/Magnetic Resonance Imaging (PET/MRI) and more recently of Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography/Magnetic Resonance Imaging (SPECT/MRI), we have developed intrinsically radiolabeled [59Fe]-superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles ([59Fe]-SPIONs) as a proof of concept for an intrinsic dual probe strategy. 59Fe was incorporated into Fe3O4 nanoparticle cry...

  10. Experimental study of capacity of the blood blow of spinal cord using radiolabelling microspbere technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Xuan; Li Rui

    2007-01-01

    Objective In order to study the relation ship between local blood flow and neurofunction at the later stage of spinal injury. Method: Measured the capacity of the local blood flow in the spinal cord injury by the radiolabelling microsphere technique and scored the nervus function grade. Result: There are no correlation between the local blood flow and the nervus function. Conclusion: It is obvious that the increase of the local blood supply can't reflect the nervus function. (authors)

  11. Radiolabelled peptides for tumour therapy: current status and future directions. Plenary lecture at the EANM 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jong, Marion de; Kwekkeboom, Dik; Valkema, Roelf; Krenning, Eric P.

    2003-01-01

    On their plasma membranes, cells express receptor proteins with high affinity for regulatory peptides, such as somatostatin. Changes in the density of these receptors during disease, e.g. overexpression in many tumours, provide the basis for new imaging methods. The first peptide analogues successfully applied for visualisation of receptor-positive tumours were radiolabelled somatostatin analogues. The next step was to label these analogues with therapeutic radionuclides for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT). Results from preclinical and clinical multicentre studies have already shown an effective therapeutic response when using radiolabelled somatostatin analogues to treat receptor-positive tumours. Infusion of positively charged amino acids reduces kidney uptake, enlarging the therapeutic window. For PRRT of CCK-B receptor-positive tumours, such as medullary thyroid carcinoma, radiolabelled minigastrin analogues are currently being successfully applied. The combination of different therapy modalities holds interest as a means of improving the clinical therapeutic effects of radiolabelled peptides. The combination of different radionuclides, such as 177 Lu- and 90 Y-labelled somatostatin analogues, to reach a wider tumour region of high curability, has been described. A variety of other peptide-based radioligands, such as bombesin and NPY(Y 1 ) analogues, receptors for which are expressed on common cancers such as prostate and breast cancer, are currently under development and in different phases of (pre)clinical investigation. Multi-receptor tumour targeting using the combination of bombesin and NPY(Y 1 ) analogues is promising for scintigraphy and PRRT of breast carcinomas and their lymph node metastases. (orig.)

  12. Radiolabeled antibody in the detection of infection using endocarditis as a model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishkin, F.S.; Wong, D.W.; Dhawan, V.K.; Reese, I.C.; Thadepalli, H.

    1983-01-01

    The authors have examined a method to detect infections using radiolabeled antibodies. Staphylococcal endocarditis was chosen as a model because it poses a common clinical diagnostic problem. The experiments demonstrate that biologically active antibodies may be extracted and efficiently labeled by a relatively simple process. This has the potential to make the specificity of the in vivo antigen-antibody reaction available through the use of autologously extracted, labeled γ-globulin

  13. Albumin-derived peptides efficiently reduce renal uptake of radiolabelled peptides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vegt, Erik; Eek, Annemarie; Oyen, Wim J.G.; Gotthardt, Martin; Boerman, Otto C.; Jong, Marion de

    2010-01-01

    In peptide-receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT), the maximum activity dose that can safely be administered is limited by high renal uptake and retention of radiolabelled peptides. The kidney radiation dose can be reduced by coinfusion of agents that competitively inhibit the reabsorption of radiolabelled peptides, such as positively charged amino acids, Gelofusine, or trypsinised albumin. The aim of this study was to identify more specific and potent inhibitors of the kidney reabsorption of radiolabelled peptides, based on albumin. Albumin was fragmented using cyanogen bromide and six albumin-derived peptides with different numbers of electric charges were selected and synthesised. The effect of albumin fragments (FRALB-C) and selected albumin-derived peptides on the internalisation of 111 In-albumin, 111 In-minigastrin, 111 In-exendin and 111 In-octreotide by megalin-expressing cells was assessed. In rats, the effect of Gelofusine and albumin-derived peptides on the renal uptake and biodistribution of 111 In-minigastrin, 111 In-exendin and 111 In-octreotide was determined. FRALB-C significantly reduced the uptake of all radiolabelled peptides in vitro. The albumin-derived peptides showed different potencies in reducing the uptake of 111 In-albumin, 111 In-exendin and 111 In-minigastrin in vitro. The most efficient albumin-derived peptide (peptide 6), was selected for in vivo testing. In rats, 5 mg of peptide 6 very efficiently inhibited the renal uptake of 111 In-minigastrin, by 88%. Uptake of 111 In-exendin and 111 In-octreotide was reduced by 26 and 33%, respectively. The albumin-derived peptide 6 efficiently inhibited the renal reabsorption of 111 In-minigastrin, 111 In-exendin and 111 In-octreotide and is a promising candidate for kidney protection in PRRT. (orig.)

  14. Radiolabeling and in vitro evaluation of 99mTc-methotrexate on breast cancer cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emre Ozgenc; Meliha Ekinci; Derya Ilem-Ozdemir; Evren Gundogdu; Makbule Asikoglu

    2016-01-01

    In the present study 99m Tc-MTX was prepared with high labeling yield by a new simple and easy formulation method. According to cell culture studies, 99m Tc- MTX incorporated with both MCF-7 and CRL8798 cells, with significant differences in the uptake percentages. Since 99m Tc-MTX highly uptake in cancer cell line, the results demonstrated that radiolabeled MTX may be promising for breast cancer diagnosis of oncological patients. (author)

  15. Crisis vital desde una perspectiva de género

    OpenAIRE

    Castro, Eva; Flores López, Olga

    2004-01-01

    A continuación se presenta el caso de una mujer de 55 años que presenta una crisis de identidad, abordado desde una perspectiva de género y un modelo explicativo y terapéutico que incluye elementos del análisis transaccional y la terapia constructivista.

  16. Evaluation of a technique for the intraoperative detection of a radiolabelled monoclonal antibody against colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waddington, W.A.; Todd-Pokropek, A.; Short, M.D.; Davidson, B.R.; Boulos, P.B.; Middlesex Hospital, London

    1991-01-01

    Occult tumour deposits may be localised at operation with a radiation detecting probe following the administration of a radiolabelled monoclonal antibody (MoAb) recognising a tumour-associated antigen. We have recently evaluated the clinical usefulness of this technique in detecting primary colorectal tumours targetted with an indium-111 MoAb. In the present study the physical characteristics of the two detector systems used were investigated; a sodium iodide [NaI(Tl)] scintilation detector and a cadmium telluride (CdTe) semiconductor probe. Limitations of the technique in use have been examined by testing the statistical significance of tumour detecting using an abdominal phantom based on the currently available clinical biodistribution data for tumour uptake of radiolabelled MoAbs. The effect of tumour volume, antibody uptake, collimation and counting conditions was examined. Results indicate that tumours of 10-ml volume may be detected with the NaI(Tl) probe at the lowest levels of radiolabelled antibody uptake currently reported in the literature but that at higher published levels, lesions as small as 1 ml may be identified with both detector systems. Detector sensitivity and limited antibody specificity restrict the usefulness of the technique, although moderate improvements in tumour uptake may allow the detection of tumour deposits not clinically apparent. The statistical significance criterion used for this study could be an accurate and reliable indicator for tumour detection in vivo. (orig.)

  17. Recent Advances in the Development and Application of Radiolabeled Kinase Inhibitors for PET Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadim Bernard-Gauthier

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Over the last 20 years, intensive investigation and multiple clinical successes targeting protein kinases, mostly for cancer treatment, have identified small molecule kinase inhibitors as a prominent therapeutic class. In the course of those investigations, radiolabeled kinase inhibitors for positron emission tomography (PET imaging have been synthesized and evaluated as diagnostic imaging probes for cancer characterization. Given that inhibitor coverage of the kinome is continuously expanding, in vivo PET imaging will likely find increasing applications for therapy monitoring and receptor density studies both in- and outside of oncological conditions. Early investigated radiolabeled inhibitors, which are mostly based on clinically approved tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI isotopologues, have now entered clinical trials. Novel radioligands for cancer and PET neuroimaging originating from novel but relevant target kinases are currently being explored in preclinical studies. This article reviews the literature involving radiotracer design, radiochemistry approaches, biological tracer evaluation and nuclear imaging results of radiolabeled kinase inhibitors for PET reported between 2010 and mid-2015. Aspects regarding the usefulness of pursuing selective vs. promiscuous inhibitor scaffolds and the inherent challenges associated with intracellular enzyme imaging will be discussed.

  18. Selective radiolabeling of cell surface proteins to a high specific activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, J.A.; Lau, A.L.; Cunningham, D.D.

    1987-01-01

    A procedure was developed for selective radiolabeling of membrane proteins on cells to higher specific activities than possible with available techniques. Cell surface amino groups were derivatized with 125 I-(hydroxyphenyl)propionyl groups via 125 I-sulfosuccinimidyl (hydroxyphenyl)propionate ( 125 II-sulfo-SHPP). This reagent preferentially labeled membrane proteins exposed at the cell surface of erythrocytes as assessed by the degree of radiolabel incorporation into erythrocyte ghost proteins and hemoglobin. Comparison with the lactoperoxidase-[ 125 I]iodide labeling technique revealed that 125 I-sulfo-SHPP labeled cell surface proteins to a much higher specific activity and hemoglobin to a much lower specific activity. Additionally, this reagent was used for selective radiolabeling of membrane proteins on the cytoplasmic face of the plasma membrane by blocking exofacial amino groups with uniodinated sulfo-SHPP, lysing the cells, and then incubating them with 125 I-sulfo-SHPP. Exclusive labeling of either side of the plasma membrane was demonstrated by the labeling of some marker proteins with well-defined spacial orientations on erythroctyes. Transmembrane proteins such as the epidermal growth factor receptor on cultured cells could also be labeled differentially from either side of the plasma membrane

  19. Radiolabeling of VEGF165 with 99mTc to evaluate VEGFR expression in tumor angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galli, Filippo; Artico, Marco; Taurone, Samanta; Manni, Isabella; Bianchi, Enrica; Piaggio, Giulia; Weintraub, Bruce D; Szkudlinski, Mariusz W; Agostinelli, Enzo; Dierckx, Rudi A J O; Signore, Alberto

    2017-06-01

    Angiogenesis is the main process responsible for tumor growth and metastatization. The principal effector of such mechanism is the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) secreted by cancer cells and other components of tumor microenvironment. Radiolabeled VEGF analogues may provide a useful tool to noninvasively image tumor lesions and evaluate the efficacy of anti-angiogenic drugs that block the VEGFR pathway. Aim of the present study was to radiolabel the human VEGF165 analogue with 99mTechnetium (99mTc) and to evaluate the expression of VEGFR in both cancer and endothelial cells in the tumor microenvironment. 99mTc-VEGF showed in vitro binding to HUVEC cells and in vivo to xenograft tumors in mice (ARO, K1 and HT29). By comparing in vivo data with immunohistochemical analysis of excised tumors we found an inverse correlation between 99mTc-VEGF165 uptake and VEGF histologically detected, but a positive correlation with VEGF receptor expression (VEGFR1). Results of our studies indicate that endogenous VEGF production by cancer cells and other cells of tumor microenvironment should be taken in consideration when performing scintigraphy with radiolabeled VEGF, because of possible false negative results due to saturation of VEGFRs.

  20. Metabolic comparison of radiolabeled aniline- and phenol-phthaleins with 131I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avcibasi, Ugur; Avcibasi, Nesibe; Unak, Turan; Unak, Perihan; Mueftueler, Fazilet Zuemruet; Yildirim, Yeliz; Dincalp, Haluk; Guemueser, Fikriye Guel; Dursun, Ebru Rueksen

    2008-01-01

    The metabolic comparison of aniline- and phenol-phthaleins radiolabeled with 131 I ( 131 I-APH and 131 I-PPH, respectively) has been investigated in this study. To compare the metabolic behavior of these phthaleins and their glucuronide conjugates radiolabeled with 131 I, scintigraphic and biodistributional techniques were applied using male Albino rabbits. The results obtained have shown that these compounds were successfully radioiodinated with a radioiodination yield of about 100%. Maximum uptakes of 131 I-APH and 131 I-PPH, which were metabolized as N- and O-glucuronides, were observed within 2 h in the bladder and in the small intestine, respectively. In the case of verification of considerably up taking of these compounds also by tumors developed in the small intestine and in the bladder tissues, these results can be expected to be encouraging to test these compounds, which will be radiolabeled with other radioiodines such as 125 I, 123 I and 124 I as imaging and therapeutic agents in nuclear medical applications

  1. Metabolic comparison of radiolabeled aniline- and phenol-phthaleins with (131)I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avcibaşi, Uğur; Avcibaşi, Nesibe; Unak, Turan; Unak, Perihan; Müftüler, Fazilet Zümrüt; Yildirim, Yeliz; Dinçalp, Haluk; Gümüşer, Fikriye Gül; Dursun, Ebru Rükşen

    2008-05-01

    The metabolic comparison of aniline- and phenol-phthaleins radiolabeled with (131)I ((131)I-APH and (131)I-PPH, respectively) has been investigated in this study. To compare the metabolic behavior of these phthaleins and their glucuronide conjugates radiolabeled with (131)I, scintigraphic and biodistributional techniques were applied using male Albino rabbits. The results obtained have shown that these compounds were successfully radioiodinated with a radioiodination yield of about 100%. Maximum uptakes of (131)I-APH and (131)I-PPH, which were metabolized as N- and O-glucuronides, were observed within 2 h in the bladder and in the small intestine, respectively. In the case of verification of considerably up taking of these compounds also by tumors developed in the small intestine and in the bladder tissues, these results can be expected to be encouraging to test these compounds, which will be radiolabeled with other radioiodines such as (125)I, (123)I and (124)I as imaging and therapeutic agents in nuclear medical applications.

  2. Development of radiolabeled mannose-dextran conjugates for sentinel lymph node detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez Nunez, Eutimio Gustavo

    2011-01-01

    Early diagnosis of tumors and metastasis is the current cornerstone in public health policies directed towards the fights against cancer. In breast cancer and melanoma, the sentinel lymph node biopsy has been widely used for diagnoses of metastasis. The minor impact in patient of this technique compared with total nodes dissection and the accurate definition of therapeutic strategies have powered its spreading. The aim of this work was the development of radiolabeled dextran-mannose conjugates for diagnosis using the stable technetium core [ 99m Tc(CO)3] + . Cysteine, a trident ligand, was attached to the conjugates backbone, as a chelate for 99m Tc labeling. Radiolabeling conditions established for all products considered in this study showed high radiochemical purities (> 90%) and specific activities (>59,9 MBq/nmol) as well and high stability obtained through in vitro tests. The lymphatic node uptake increased significantly (4-folds) when mannose units were added to the conjugates compared with those without this monosaccharide. The radiolabeled cysteine-mannose-dextran conjugate with 30 kDa ( 99m Tc - DCM2) showed the best performance at different injected activities among the studied tracers. Concentrations of this radio complex higher than 1 M demonstrated an improvement of lymph node uptakes. Comparisons of 99m Tc - DCM2 performance with commercial radiopharmaceuticals in Brazil market for lymph node detection showed its upper profile. (author)

  3. A novel method for radiolabeling antigen-binding receptors of lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Y.S.; Lee, M.S.; Rosenspire, A.J.

    1983-01-01

    Antigen-binding receptor (ABR) molecules have been selectively radiolabeled and isolated from immunized chicken spleen cells. The specific radiolabeling of the receptors has been accomplished by utilizing a novel technique employing lactoperoxidase (LPO) covalently linked to antigen (Ag) for which human gammaglobulin was used. The cell surface ABRs were first bound to the Ag-LPO conjugates through specific recognition sites on the Ag portion of the conjugates. The bound LPO portions were then allowed to catalyze the radioiodination of the ABRs. After radiolabeling, cells were solubilized with detergents, ABRs still bound to Ag-LPO conjugates were directly isolated from the lysates via immunoaffinity chromatography utilizing an immunoaffinity reagent directed toward the antigen portion of the ABR-Ag-LPO complex. The radioactive materials were then analyzed via SDS-PAGE under reducing conditions. Most of the specifically-labeled and isolated materials were immunoglobulin (Ig). Both the membrane-bound form of the heavy chain as well as the secreted form were detected, along with the light chain. An additional polypeptide was also selectively labeled and isolated along with the Ig. This may be a molecule closely associated with the membrane immunoglobulin on the B-cell surface. (author)

  4. Radiolabeled cholesteryl ethers: A need to analyze for biological stability before use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manual Kollareth, Denny Joseph; Chang, Chuchun L; Hansen, Inge H; Deckelbaum, Richard J

    2018-03-01

    Radiolabeled cholesteryl ethers are widely used as non-metabolizable tracers for lipoproteins and lipid emulsions in a variety of in vitro and in vivo experiments. Since cholesteryl ethers do not leave cells after uptake and are not hydrolyzed by mammalian cellular enzymes, these compounds can act as markers for cumulative cell uptakes of labeled particles. We have employed [ 3 H]cholesteryl oleoyl ether to study the uptake and distribution of triglyceride-rich emulsion particles on animal models. However, questionable unexpected results compelled us to analyze the stability of these ethers. We tested the stability of two commercially available radiolabeled cholesteryl ethers - [ 3 H]cholesteryl oleoyl ether and [ 3 H]cholesteryl hexadecyl ether from different suppliers, employing in vitro , in vivo and chemical model systems. Our results show that, among the two cholesteryl ethers tested, one ether was hydrolyzed to free cholesterol in vitro , in vivo and chemically under alkaline hydrolyzing agent. Free cholesterol, unlike cholesteryl ether, can then re-enter the circulation leading to confounding results. The other ether was not hydrolyzed to free cholesterol and remained as a stable ether. Hence, radiolabeled cholesteryl ethers should be analyzed for biological stability before utilizing them for in vitro or in vivo experiments.

  5. Radiolabeled cholesteryl ethers: A need to analyze for biological stability before use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denny Joseph Manual Kollareth

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Radiolabeled cholesteryl ethers are widely used as non-metabolizable tracers for lipoproteins and lipid emulsions in a variety of in vitro and in vivo experiments. Since cholesteryl ethers do not leave cells after uptake and are not hydrolyzed by mammalian cellular enzymes, these compounds can act as markers for cumulative cell uptakes of labeled particles. We have employed [3H]cholesteryl oleoyl ether to study the uptake and distribution of triglyceride-rich emulsion particles on animal models. However, questionable unexpected results compelled us to analyze the stability of these ethers. We tested the stability of two commercially available radiolabeled cholesteryl ethers - [3H]cholesteryl oleoyl ether and [3H]cholesteryl hexadecyl ether from different suppliers, employing in vitro, in vivo and chemical model systems. Our results show that, among the two cholesteryl ethers tested, one ether was hydrolyzed to free cholesterol in vitro, in vivo and chemically under alkaline hydrolyzing agent. Free cholesterol, unlike cholesteryl ether, can then re-enter the circulation leading to confounding results. The other ether was not hydrolyzed to free cholesterol and remained as a stable ether. Hence, radiolabeled cholesteryl ethers should be analyzed for biological stability before utilizing them for in vitro or in vivo experiments. Keywords: Cholesteryl ether, J774 A2 macrophages, Soy oil emulsion, Thin layer chromatography, triDHA emulsion

  6. Potential of 57Ni/57Co generator system for radiolabelling proteins for imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, T.; Smith, S.V.; Baker, T.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: There is increasing interest in the use of inert metal complexes for radiolabelling proteins. The present study involves an investigation into the use to the parent/daughter system 57 Ni/ 57 Co for PET and SPECT imaging. In order to assess the potential of the system for such applications it is important to examine whether the ligand chosen complexes with both 57 Ni and 57 Co. A selection of ligands with varying number of donor groups and open-chain and macrocyclic ligands were chosen; ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), 1,4,8,11 - tetraazocyclotetradecane-1 4,8,11-tetraacetic acid (TETA) and diaminohydroxyaryl - diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid, (DAHA-EDTA). Complexation behaviour over a range of pH and temperatures was investigated. Results show that the ligands have strong complexation for 57 Ni however once 57 Ni decayed to 57 Co evidence ol chemical instability was noted. The DAHA-EDTA ligand (developed in house) was observed to be the most stable under conditions studied. lt was selected for use in radiolabelling B72.3 antibody and preliminary radiolabelling conditions were established

  7. Radiolabeling small RNA with technetium-99m for visualizing cellular delivery and mouse biodistribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Ning; Ding Hongliu; Vanderheyden, Jean-Luc; Zhu Zhihong; Zhang Yumin

    2007-01-01

    To develop a noninvasive direct method for the in vivo tracking of small interfering RNA (siRNA) used in RNA interference, two 18-nucleotide oligoribonucleotides were radiolabeled with technetium-99m ( 99m Tc-RNA). The ability of 99m Tc-RNA to track delivery was tested in cultured cells and living mice. The cellular delivery of 99m Tc-RNAs could be quantified by gamma counting and could be visualized by microautoradiography. Radiolabeled RNAs can be efficiently delivered into cells by reaching up to 3x10 5 molecules of small RNAs per cell. Moreover, RNAs were internalized with homogeneous distribution throughout the cytoplasm and nucleus. In tumor-bearing mice, whole-body images and biodistribution studies showed that 99m Tc-RNAs were delivered to almost all tissues after intravenous injection. The imaging of living animals allowed noninvasive and longitudinal monitoring of the in vivo delivery of these small RNAs. In conclusion, using 99m Tc radiolabeling, the delivery of small RNAs could be measured quantitatively in cultured cells and could be noninvasively visualized in living animals using a gamma camera. The results of this study could open up a new approach for measuring the in vivo delivery of small RNAs that might further facilitate the development of siRNAs as targeted therapies

  8. Selective suppression of antibody production with the aid of radiolabelled birch pollen allergen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filipp, G.; Biro, G.; Hartung, W.D.; Lehmann, G.

    1981-01-01

    In accordance with the clonal selection theory we intended to prevent the development of artificially induced birch pollen allergy in rabbits with the aid of of the radiolabelled pollen allergen (75-1000 μCi 125 I-pollen/animal) intravenously administered prior to pollen sensitization. The birch pollen allergen, in accordance with Burnet's working hypothesis, reacts only with a genetically determining B cell subpopulation. The fixation of the radiolabelled birch pollen allergen to the receptors of the competent B cell clone causes the lesion of the latter. Compared with the control group, this group of rabbits showed an extensive suppression of anaphylactic reagin-like PCA-antibodies, and haemagglutinating antibodies in the blood as well as in nasal secretion. In addition, we tried to influence the already ongoing synthesis of the antibodies with the aid of a subsequent intravenously administered radiolabelled birch pollen allergen (750-1000μCi 125 I-pollen/animal). An intensive suppression of the synthesis of antibodies could also be proved in this case. The simultaneous immunization of the control rabbits with birch pollen and egg albumin resulted in the production of antibodies against both antigens, as expected. The hot-labelled birch pollen antigen intravenously injected before or after immunization with egg albumin and birch pollen led selectively to suppression of anti-birch-pollen PCA antibodies. The synthesis of anti-egg albumin PCA antibodies was unaffected. (author)

  9. Labelling techniques of biomolecules for targeted radiotherapy. Final report of a co-ordinated research project 1998-2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    optimization of radiolabelling techniques with beta emitting radioisotopes, including quality control procedures and evaluation of the labelled products in in vitro and in vivo models. Biomolecule carriers that were considered for investigation included somatostatin analogues like lanreotide, Tyr-octreotide, ior-P1394 and vasointestinal peptide (VIP), as well as anti-CEA monoclonal antibody. Using either the bifunctional chelate approach or direct reductive exposure of -SH groups, labelling of these biomolecules with therapeutic radionuclides was pursued. Through these attempts it was expected to identify one or two agents with high radiochemical purity and labelling efficiency for further evaluation. Promising agents would be selected for further investigation using biodistribution studies in animals and uptake in tumour bearing animals. Fifteen selected research institutes from Argentina, Austria, Brazil, Cuba, Greece, Finland, Hungary, India, Italy, Mexico, Pakistan, Peoples Republic of China, Romania, Thailand and Uruguay with recognized expertise in the field of therapeutic radionuclides and radiopharmaceutical research were selected to participate in the CRP. The first research co-ordination meeting to plan the work and define the research protocols to be investigated was held in Milan, Italy in July 1998. At this meeting it was decided to concentrate the efforts on two radionuclides, 188Re and 90Y, which are produced by generator systems and result in carrier free products; lanreotide was selected as a model peptide. Synthesis of the bifunctional chelating agent DOTA was also recommended for the labelling of biomolecules with 90Y. The development of the corresponding coupling techniques, optimization of protocols for direct and indirect labelling of lanreotide and anti-carcino embryonic antigen (CEA) monoclonal antibody and in vitro evaluation in cell lines and membrane receptors were also included in the work plan for the following period. IgG labelled with 131I and

  10. Labelling techniques of biomolecules for targeted radiotherapy. Final report of a co-ordinated research project 1998-2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-07-01

    optimization of radiolabelling techniques with beta emitting radioisotopes, including quality control procedures and evaluation of the labelled products in in vitro and in vivo models. Biomolecule carriers that were considered for investigation included somatostatin analogues like lanreotide, Tyr-octreotide, ior-P1394 and vasointestinal peptide (VIP), as well as anti-CEA monoclonal antibody. Using either the bifunctional chelate approach or direct reductive exposure of -SH groups, labelling of these biomolecules with therapeutic radionuclides was pursued. Through these attempts it was expected to identify one or two agents with high radiochemical purity and labelling efficiency for further evaluation. Promising agents would be selected for further investigation using biodistribution studies in animals and uptake in tumour bearing animals. Fifteen selected research institutes from Argentina, Austria, Brazil, Cuba, Greece, Finland, Hungary, India, Italy, Mexico, Pakistan, Peoples Republic of China, Romania, Thailand and Uruguay with recognized expertise in the field of therapeutic radionuclides and radiopharmaceutical research were selected to participate in the CRP. The first research co-ordination meeting to plan the work and define the research protocols to be investigated was held in Milan, Italy in July 1998. At this meeting it was decided to concentrate the efforts on two radionuclides, 188Re and 90Y, which are produced by generator systems and result in carrier free products; lanreotide was selected as a model peptide. Synthesis of the bifunctional chelating agent DOTA was also recommended for the labelling of biomolecules with 90Y. The development of the corresponding coupling techniques, optimization of protocols for direct and indirect labelling of lanreotide and anti-carcino embryonic antigen (CEA) monoclonal antibody and in vitro evaluation in cell lines and membrane receptors were also included in the work plan for the following period. IgG labelled with 131I and

  11. Engineered collagen hydrogels for the sustained release of biomolecules and imaging agents: promoting the growth of human gingival cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jonghoon; Park, Hoyoung; Kim, Taeho; Jeong, Yoon; Oh, Myoung Hwan; Hyeon, Taeghwan; Gilad, Assaf A; Lee, Kwan Hyi

    2014-01-01

    We present here the in vitro release profiles of either fluorescently labeled biomolecules or computed tomography contrast nanoagents from engineered collagen hydrogels under physiological conditions. The collagen constructs were designed as potential biocompatible inserts into wounded human gingiva. The collagen hydrogels were fabricated under a variety of conditions in order to optimize the release profile of biomolecules and nanoparticles for the desired duration and amount. The collagen constructs containing biomolecules/nanoconstructs were incubated under physiological conditions (ie, 37°C and 5% CO2) for 24 hours, and the release profile was tuned from 20% to 70% of initially loaded materials by varying the gelation conditions of the collagen constructs. The amounts of released biomolecules and nanoparticles were quantified respectively by measuring the intensity of fluorescence and X-ray scattering. The collagen hydrogel we fabricated may serve as an efficient platform for the controlled release of biomolecules and imaging agents in human gingiva to facilitate the regeneration of oral tissues.

  12. Predicting the biodistribution of radiolabeled cMORF effector in MORF-pretargeted mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Guozheng; Dou, Shuping; He, Jiang; Liu, Xinrong; Rusckowski, Mary; Hnatowich, Donald J.

    2007-01-01

    Pretargeting with phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers (MORFs) involves administration of a MORF-conjugated anti-tumor antibody such as MN14 as a pretargeting agent before that of the radiolabeled complementary MORF (cMORF) as the effector. The dosages of the pretargeting agent and effector, the pretargeting interval, and the detection time are the four pretargeting variables. The goal of this study was to develop a semiempirical description capable of predicting the biodistribution of the radiolabeled effector in pretargeted mice and then to compare predictions with experimental results from pretargeting studies in tumored animals in which the pretargeting interval and the detection time were both fixed but the dosages of both the effector and the pretargeting agent were separately varied. Pretargeting studies in LS174T tumored mice were performed using the anti-CEA antibody MN14 conjugated with MORF and the cMORF radiolabeled with 99m Tc. A description was developed based on our previous observations in the same mouse model of the blood and tumor levels of MORF-MN14, accessibility of MORF-MN14 to labeled cMORF, the tumor accumulation of labeled cMORF relative to MORF-MN14 levels therein, and the kidney accumulation of labeled cMORF. The predicted values were then compared with the experimental values. The predicted biodistribution of the radiolabeled effector and the experimental data were in gratifying agreement in normal organs, suggesting that the description of the pretargeting process was reliable. The tumor accumulations occasionally fell outside two standard deviations of that predicted, but after tumor size correction, good agreement between predicted and experimental values was observed here as well. A semiempirical description of the biodistribution of labeled cMORF was capable of predicting the biodistribution of the radiolabeled effector in the pretargeted tumored mouse model, demonstrating that the underlying pretargeting concepts are correct. We

  13. Quantification of the activity of biomolecules in microarrays obtained by direct laser transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinca, V; Ranella, A; Farsari, M; Kafetzopoulos, D; Dinescu, M; Popescu, A; Fotakis, C

    2008-10-01

    The direct-writing technique laser-induced forward transfer has been employed for the micro-array printing of liquid solutions of the enzyme horseradish peroxidase and the protein Titin on nitrocellulose solid surfaces. The effect of two UV laser pulse lengths, femtosecond and nanosecond has been studied in relation with maintaining the activity of the transferred biomolecules. The quantification of the active biomolecules after transfer has been carried out using Bradford assay, quantitative colorimetric enzymatic assay and fluorescence techniques. Spectrophotometric measurements of the HRP and the Titin activity as well as chromatogenic and fluorescence assay studies have revealed a connection between the properties of the deposited, biologically active biomolecules, the experimental conditions and the target composition. The bioassays have shown that up to 78% of the biomolecules remained active after femtosecond laser transfer, while this value reduced to 54% after nanosecond laser transfer. The addition of glycerol in a percentage up to 70% in the solution to be transferred has contributed to the stabilization of the micro-array patterns and the increase of their resolution.

  14. Microwave synthesis of metal nanocatalysts for the electrochemical oxidation of small biomolecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kathrine Schiørring Steen; Sun, Hongyu; Werchmeister, Rebecka Maria Larsen

    2017-01-01

    Electrochemical oxidation of small biomolecules provides an approach to generate clean energy from a sustainable resource. It serves as a principle for anode reactions in fuel cells to convert energy stored in chemical bonds into electrical power. Efficient and robust nanocatalysts are essential ...

  15. A photocleavable affinity tag for the enrichment of alkyne-modified biomolecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopmans, Timo; Dekker, Frank J.; Martin, Nathaniel I.

    2012-01-01

    A new photocleavable affinity tag for use in the enrichment of alkyne-labelled biomolecules is reported. The tag is prepared via a concise synthetic route using readily available materials. The photolytic conditions employed for cleavage of the tag provide for a clean release of enriched

  16. Immobilization of biomolecules onto surfaces according to ultraviolet light diffraction patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Steffen B.; Gennaro, Ane Kold Di; Neves Petersen, Teresa

    2010-01-01

    We developed a method for immobilization of biomolecules onto thiol functionalized surfaces according to UV diffraction patterns. UV light-assisted molecular immobilization proceeds through the formation of free, reactive thiol groups that can bind covalently to thiol reactive surfaces. We demons......, with a fine structured interference pattern superimposed. (C) 2010 Optical Society of America...

  17. Nanocoating for biomolecule delivery using layer-by-layer self-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeney, M; Jiang, X Y; Yamane, M; Lee, M; Goodman, S; Yang, F

    2015-11-07

    Since its introduction in the early 1990s, layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly of films has been widely used in the fields of nanoelectronics, optics, sensors, surface coatings, and controlled drug delivery. The growth of this industry is propelled by the ease of film manufacture, low cost, mild assembly conditions, precise control of coating thickness, and versatility of coating materials. Despite the wealth of research on LbL for biomolecule delivery, clinical translation has been limited and slow. This review provides an overview of methods and mechanisms of loading biomolecules within LbL films and achieving controlled release. In particular, this review highlights recent advances in the development of LbL coatings for the delivery of different types of biomolecules including proteins, polypeptides, DNA, particles and viruses. To address the need for co-delivery of multiple types of biomolecules at different timing, we also review recent advances in incorporating compartmentalization into LbL assembly. Existing obstacles to clinical translation of LbL technologies and enabling technologies for future directions are also discussed.

  18. High sensitivity detection of desorbed biomolecules by photoionization with tunable VUV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, J.F.; Calaway, W.F.; Veryovkin, I.V.; Pellin, M.J.; Lewellen, J.W.; Li, Y.; Milton, S.V.; King, B.V.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The spectral region from 7 to 11eV has two attributes that make it attractive for biomolecule photoionization: 1. high photoionization cross sections, leading to high detection efficiency, and 2. overlap with nearly all first ionization energies of biomolecules, allowing possible control over fragmentation by accessing different final states via tuning. The lack of available tunable lasers in this energy range has generally hindered exploitation of these features thus far. A free-electron laser in operation at Argonne National Laboratory provides high pulse energy, widely tunable VUV pulses of 300 fs duration. Coupled with a novel time-of-flight mass spectrometer, this laser is able to photoionize and detect biomolecules, including peptides and nucleosides. Either laser desorption or primary ion beams are used to desorb sample material, followed by photoionization with a VUV laser. The instrument uses novel ion optics to extract photoions from a large volume while maintaining high mass resolution. This approach is capable of yielding dramatically improved detection limits over more conventional methods such as MALDI and SIMS. In the case of the common peptide substance P, for example, a substantial improvement over the MALDI signal was observed using VUV photoionization with very little observed fragmentation of the molecule. Nucleosides and cisplatin were also measured with typically order of magnitude improvements in signal. These and other examples show clearly the benefits that can be obtained in high sensitivity mass spectrometry of biomolecules with the increasing availability of VUV laser sources

  19. Preparation of Biomolecule Microstructures and Microarrays by Thiol–ene Photoimmobilization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weinrich, Dirk; Köhn, Maja; Jonkheijm, Pascal; Westerlind, Ulrika; Dehmelt, Leif; Engelkamp, Hans; Christianen, Peter C.M.; Kuhlmann, Jürgen; Maan, Jan C.; Nüsse, Dirk; Schröder, Hendrik; Wacker, Ron; Voges, Edgar; Breinbauer, Rolf; Kunz, Horst; Niemeyer, Christof M.; Waldmann, Herbert

    2010-01-01

    A mild, fast and flexible method for photoimmobilization of biomolecules based on the light-initiated thiol–ene reaction has been developed. After investigation and optimization of various surface materials, surface chemistries and reaction parameters, microstructures and microarrays of biotin,

  20. Sensitive Detection of Biomolecules by Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering using Plant Leaves as Natural Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Vipul

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Detection of biomolecules is highly important for biomedical and other biological applications. Although several methods exist for the detection of biomolecules, surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS has a unique role in greatly enhancing the sensitivity. In this work, we have demonstrated the use of natural plant leaves as facile, low cost and eco-friendly SERS substrates for the sensitive detection of biomolecules. Specifically, we have investigated the influence of surface topography of five different plant leaf based substrates, deposited with Au, on the SERS performance by using L-cysteine as a model biomolecule. In addition, we have also compared the effect of sputter deposition of Au thin film with dropcast deposition of Au nanoparticles on the leaf substrates. Our results indicate that L-cysteine could be detected with high sensitivity using these plant leaf based substrates and the leaf possessing hierarchical micro/nanostructures on its surface shows higher SERS enhancement compared to a leaf having a nearplanar surface. Furthermore, leaves with drop-casted Au nanoparticle clusters performed better than the leaves sputter deposited with a thin Au film.

  1. In situ biomolecule production by bacteria; a synthetic biology approach to medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores Bueso, Yensi; Lehouritis, Panos; Tangney, Mark

    2018-04-10

    The ability to modify existing microbiota at different sites presents enormous potential for local or indirect management of various diseases. Because bacteria can be maintained for lengthy periods in various regions of the body, they represent a platform with enormous potential for targeted production of biomolecules, which offer tremendous promise for therapeutic and diagnostic approaches for various diseases. While biological medicines are currently limited in the clinic to patient administration of exogenously produced biomolecules from engineered cells, in situ production of biomolecules presents enormous scope in medicine and beyond. The slow pace and high expense of traditional research approaches has particularly hampered the development of biological medicines. It may be argued that bacterial-based medicine has been "waiting" for the advent of enabling technology. We propose that this technology is Synthetic Biology, and that the wait is over. Synthetic Biology facilitates a systematic approach to programming living entities and/or their products, using an approach to Research and Development (R&D) that facilitates rapid, cheap, accessible, yet sophisticated product development. Full engagement with the Synthetic Biology approach to R&D can unlock the potential for bacteria as medicines for cancer and other indications. In this review, we describe how by employing Synthetic Biology, designer bugs can be used as drugs, drug-production factories or diagnostic devices, using oncology as an exemplar for the concept of in situ biomolecule production in medicine. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The Polygonal Model: A Simple Representation of Biomolecules as a Tool for Teaching Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonafe, Carlos Francisco Sampaio; Bispo, Jose Ailton Conceição; de Jesus, Marcelo Bispo

    2018-01-01

    Metabolism involves numerous reactions and organic compounds that the student must master to understand adequately the processes involved. Part of biochemical learning should include some knowledge of the structure of biomolecules, although the acquisition of such knowledge can be time-consuming and may require significant effort from the student.…

  3. Biomolecule Analogues 2-Hydroxypyridine and 2-Pyridone Base Pairing on Ice Nanoparticles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rubovič, Peter; Pysanenko, Andriy; Lengyel, Jozef; Nachtigallová, Dana; Fárník, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 120, č. 27 (2016), s. 4720-4730 ISSN 1089-5639 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-14082S Institutional support: RVO:61388955 ; RVO:61388963 Keywords : doped nanoparticles * argon * biomolecule s Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.847, year: 2016

  4. Systematic methods for defining coarse-grained maps in large biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiyong

    2015-01-01

    Large biomolecules are involved in many important biological processes. It would be difficult to use large-scale atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to study the functional motions of these systems because of the computational expense. Therefore various coarse-grained (CG) approaches have attracted rapidly growing interest, which enable simulations of large biomolecules over longer effective timescales than all-atom MD simulations. The first issue in CG modeling is to construct CG maps from atomic structures. In this chapter, we review the recent development of a novel and systematic method for constructing CG representations of arbitrarily complex biomolecules, in order to preserve large-scale and functionally relevant essential dynamics (ED) at the CG level. In this ED-CG scheme, the essential dynamics can be characterized by principal component analysis (PCA) on a structural ensemble, or elastic network model (ENM) of a single atomic structure. Validation and applications of the method cover various biological systems, such as multi-domain proteins, protein complexes, and even biomolecular machines. The results demonstrate that the ED-CG method may serve as a very useful tool for identifying functional dynamics of large biomolecules at the CG level.

  5. Extraction of Biomolecules Using Phosphonium-Based Ionic Liquids + K3PO4 Aqueous Biphasic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louros, Cláudia L. S.; Cláudio, Ana Filipa M.; Neves, Catarina M. S. S.; Freire, Mara G.; Marrucho, Isabel M.; Pauly, Jérôme; Coutinho, João A. P.

    2010-01-01

    Aqueous biphasic systems (ABS) provide an alternative and efficient approach for the extraction, recovery and purification of biomolecules through their partitioning between two liquid aqueous phases. In this work, the ability of hydrophilic phosphonium-based ionic liquids (ILs) to form ABS with aqueous K3PO4 solutions was evaluated for the first time. Ternary phase diagrams, and respective tie-lines and tie-lines length, formed by distinct phosphonium-based ILs, water, and K3PO4 at 298 K, were measured and are reported. The studied phosphonium-based ILs have shown to be more effective in promoting ABS compared to the imidazolium-based counterparts with similar anions. Moreover, the extractive capability of such systems was assessed for distinct biomolecules (including amino acids, food colourants and alkaloids). Densities and viscosities of both aqueous phases, at the mass fraction compositions used for the biomolecules extraction, were also determined. The evaluated IL-based ABS have been shown to be prospective extraction media, particularly for hydrophobic biomolecules, with several advantages over conventional polymer-inorganic salt ABS. PMID:20480041

  6. Cellular Viscosity in Prokaryotes and Thermal Stability of Low Molecular Weight Biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuecas, Alba; Cruces, Jorge; Galisteo-López, Juan F; Peng, Xiaojun; Gonzalez, Juan M

    2016-08-23

    Some low molecular weight biomolecules, i.e., NAD(P)H, are unstable at high temperatures. The use of these biomolecules by thermophilic microorganisms has been scarcely analyzed. Herein, NADH stability has been studied at different temperatures and viscosities. NADH decay increased at increasing temperatures. At increasing viscosities, NADH decay rates decreased. Thus, maintaining relatively high cellular viscosity in cells could result in increased stability of low molecular weight biomolecules (i.e., NADH) at high temperatures, unlike what was previously deduced from studies in diluted water solutions. Cellular viscosity was determined using a fluorescent molecular rotor in various prokaryotes covering the range from 10 to 100°C. Some mesophiles showed the capability of changing cellular viscosity depending on growth temperature. Thermophiles and extreme thermophiles presented a relatively high cellular viscosity, suggesting this strategy as a reasonable mechanism to thrive under these high temperatures. Results substantiate the capability of thermophiles and extreme thermophiles (growth range 50-80°C) to stabilize and use generally considered unstable, universal low molecular weight biomolecules. In addition, this study represents a first report, to our knowledge, on cellular viscosity measurements in prokaryotes and it shows the dependency of prokaryotic cellular viscosity on species and growth temperature. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Prospects of biomolecule sequencing with the techniques of translocation through nanopores: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nosik, V. L.; Rudakova, E. B.

    2013-01-01

    The interest in the functional properties of biomolecules in native solutions (in particular, their interaction with membranes) constantly increases with accumulation of data on the macromolecular structure, obtained by X-ray diffraction (with synchrotron radiation sources), nuclear magnetic resonance, and mass spectrometry; this interest is closely related to the development of new technologies of sequencing (i.e., determining the sequence of nucleotides in DNA biomolecule). One of the most promising “physical” approaches to sequencing is the application of methods based on the use of nanochannels or nanopores, through which biomolecules pass in ionic solutions under an electric field applied. A nanopore provides spatial localization of molecules and makes it possible to detect a signal (electric, fluorescent, etc.) from an individual nucleotide. In view of the development of new high-intensity pulsed X-ray sources, the popularity of fluorescence analysis constantly increases. The existing methods for simulating the motion of biomolecules and interpreting their structure, sequencing techniques, and the prospects of further development of investigations in this field are discussed

  8. Photonic crystal fiber based evanescent-wave sensor for detection of biomolecules in aqueous solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper Bo Damm; Pedersen, Lars H.; Hoiby, Poul E.

    2004-01-01

    We demonstrate highly efficient evanescent-wave detection of fluorophore-labeled biomolecules in aqueous solutions positioned in the air holes of the microstructured part of a photonic crystal fiber. The air-suspended silica structures located between three neighboring air holes in the cladding c...

  9. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy detection of biomolecules using EBL fabricated nanostructured substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Robert F; Gutierrez-Rivera, Luis; Dew, Steven K; Stepanova, Maria

    2015-03-20

    Fabrication and characterization of conjugate nano-biological systems interfacing metallic nanostructures on solid supports with immobilized biomolecules is reported. The entire sequence of relevant experimental steps is described, involving the fabrication of nanostructured substrates using electron beam lithography, immobilization of biomolecules on the substrates, and their characterization utilizing surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). Three different designs of nano-biological systems are employed, including protein A, glucose binding protein, and a dopamine binding DNA aptamer. In the latter two cases, the binding of respective ligands, D-glucose and dopamine, is also included. The three kinds of biomolecules are immobilized on nanostructured substrates by different methods, and the results of SERS imaging are reported. The capabilities of SERS to detect vibrational modes from surface-immobilized proteins, as well as to capture the protein-ligand and aptamer-ligand binding are demonstrated. The results also illustrate the influence of the surface nanostructure geometry, biomolecules immobilization strategy, Raman activity of the molecules and presence or absence of the ligand binding on the SERS spectra acquired.

  10. Label Free Detection of Biomolecules Using Charge-Plasma-Based Gate Underlap Dielectric Modulated Junctionless TFET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadhwa, Girish; Raj, Balwinder

    2018-05-01

    Nanoscale devices are emerging as a platform for detecting biomolecules. Various issues were observed during the fabrication process such as random dopant fluctuation and thermal budget. To reduce these issues charge-plasma-based concept is introduced. This paper proposes the implementation of charge-plasma-based gate underlap dielectric modulated junctionless tunnel field effect transistor (DM-JLTFET) for the revelation of biomolecule immobilized in the open cavity gate channel region. In this p+ source and n+ drain regions are introduced by employing different work function over the intrinsic silicon. Also dual material gate architecture is implemented to reduce short channel effect without abandoning any other device characteristic. The sensitivity of biosensor is studied for both the neutral and charge-neutral biomolecules. The effect of device parameters such as channel thickness, cavity length and cavity thickness on drain current have been analyzed through simulations. This paper investigates the performance of charge-plasma-based gate underlap DM-JLTFET for biomolecule sensing applications while varying dielectric constant, charge density at different biasing conditions.

  11. Large pore mesoporous silica nanomaterials for application in delivery of biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knežević, Nikola Ž.; Durand, Jean-Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Various approaches for the synthesis of mesoporous silicate nanoparticles (MSN) with large pore (LP) diameters (in the range of 3-50 nm) are reviewed in this article. The work also covers the construction of magnetic analogues of large pore-mesoporous silica nanoparticles (LPMMSN) and their biomedical applications. The constructed materials exhibit vast potential for application in the loading and delivery of large drug molecules and biomolecules. Literature reports on the application of LPMSN and LPMMSN materials for the adsorption and delivery of proteins, enzymes, antibodies, and nucleic acids are covered in depth, which exemplify their highly potent characteristics for use in drug and biomolecule delivery to diseased tissues.Various approaches for the synthesis of mesoporous silicate nanoparticles (MSN) with large pore (LP) diameters (in the range of 3-50 nm) are reviewed in this article. The work also covers the construction of magnetic analogues of large pore-mesoporous silica nanoparticles (LPMMSN) and their biomedical applications. The constructed materials exhibit vast potential for application in the loading and delivery of large drug molecules and biomolecules. Literature reports on the application of LPMSN and LPMMSN materials for the adsorption and delivery of proteins, enzymes, antibodies, and nucleic acids are covered in depth, which exemplify their highly potent characteristics for use in drug and biomolecule delivery to diseased tissues. Dedicated to Professor Jeffrey I. Zink on the occasion of his 70th birthday.

  12. Approaches in the design of 99mTc based peptide radiolabelling for tumour targeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, A.; Horiuchi, K.; Arano, Y.

    2001-01-01

    One of the major drawbacks in diagnostic and/or therapeutic uses of peptides radiolabelled with radiometals via bifunctional chelating agents (BCA) is their accumulation in excretory organs such as liver or kidney. Thus, the aim of the project is centred in the search for chemical and radiochemical approaches to reduce radioactivity accumulated in excretory organs while preserving the in vivo receptor binding affinity of the peptide. During the first stage a suitable procedure using the F-moc-chemistry (solid phase) was developed and synthesis of DTPA-D-Phen1-Octreotide and DTPA-L-Phen1-Octreotide was carried out. During the synthesis, the need to improve the yield demanded the synthesis of a DTPA derivative holding only one reactive carboxylic group to avoid side intermolecular reaction. The availability of both isomeric conjugated octreotide led to their radiolabelling with 111 In. Their metabolic studies in animals indicated that the degradation rate of the peptide containing the natural aminoacid, 111 In DTPA-L-Phen1-Octreotide, was slightly higher than the corresponding D-aminoacid derivative, as expected. Stability of the peptide during radiolabelling with 99m Tc was then studied, requiring the use of variable agents such as ascorbic acid, dithionite and stannous ion. The selected peptide, RC-160, was provided by the IAEA and, as reference compounds, corresponding iodinated and radioiodinated peptides were synthesized. Demonstration of the stability of the peptide was carried out using disodium 2-nitro-5-thiosulfobenzoate (NTBS) and the lack of Bunte salt formation served as an indication of the stability of the disulfide bond under various mild conditions required for the future radiolabelling with 99m Tc. The knowledge gained served in moving to the next stage of 99m Tc radiolabelling using HYNIC as the BCA and tricine as co-ligands. The biodistribution studies demonstrated great accumulation on excretory organs. This led us to look for a model protein

  13. Exploring the flexible chemistry of 4-fluoro-3-nitrophenyl azide for biomolecule immobilization and bioconjugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Saroj; Kumar, Dileep; Ahirwar, Rajesh; Nahar, Pradip

    2016-10-01

    Bioconjugation and functionalization of polymer surfaces are two major tasks in materials chemistry which are accomplished using a variety of coupling agents. Immobilization of biomolecules onto polymer surfaces and the construction of bioconjugates are essential requirements of many biochemical assays and chemical syntheses. Different linkers with a variety of functional groups are used for these purposes. Among them, the benzophenones, aryldiazirines, and arylazides represent the most commonly used photolinker to produce the desired chemical linkage upon their photo-irradiation. In this review, we describe the versatile applications of 4-fluoro-3-nitrophenyl azide, one of the oldest photolinkers used for photoaffinity labeling in the late 1960s. Surprisingly, this photolinker, historically known as 1-fluoro-2-nitro-4-azidobenzene (FNAB), has remained unexplored for a long time because of apprehension that FNAB forms ring-expanded dehydroazepine as a major product and hence cannot activate an inert polymer. The first evidence of photochemical activation of an inert surface by FNAB through nitrene insertion reaction was reported in 2001, and the FNAB-activated surface was found to conjugate a biomolecule without any catalyst, reagent, or modification. FNAB has distinct advantages over perfluorophenyl azide derivatives, which are contemporary nitrene-generating photolinkers, because of its simple, single-step preparation and ease of thermochemical and photochemical reactions with versatile polymers and biomolecules. Covering these aspects, the present review highlights the flexible chemistry of FNAB and its applications in the field of surface engineering, immobilization of biomolecules such as antibodies, enzymes, cells, carbohydrates, oligonucleotides, and DNA aptamers, and rapid diagnostics. Graphical Abstract An overview of the FNAB-engineered activated polymer surfaces for covalent ligation of versatile biomolecules.

  14. Preparation of supramolecular hydrogel-enzyme hybrids exhibiting biomolecule-responsive gel degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigemitsu, Hajime; Fujisaku, Takahiro; Onogi, Shoji; Yoshii, Tatsuyuki; Ikeda, Masato; Hamachi, Itaru

    2016-09-01

    Hydrogelators are small, self-assembling molecules that form supramolecular nanofiber networks that exhibit unique dynamic properties. Development of supramolecular hydrogels that degrade in response to various biomolecules could potentially be used for applications in areas such as drug delivery and diagnostics. Here we provide a synthetic procedure for preparing redox-responsive supramolecular hydrogelators that are used to create hydrogels that degrade in response to oxidizing or reducing conditions. The synthesis takes ∼2-4 d, and it can potentially be carried out in parallel to prepare multiple hydrogelator candidates. This described solid-phase peptide synthesis protocol can be used to produce previously described hydrogelators or to construct a focused molecular library to efficiently discover and optimize new hydrogelators. In addition, we describe the preparation of redox-responsive supramolecular hydrogel-enzyme hybrids that are created by mixing aqueous solutions of hydrogelators and enzymes, which requires 2 h for completion. The resultant supramolecular hydrogel-enzyme hybrids exhibit gel degradation in response to various biomolecules, and can be rationally designed by connecting the chemical reactions of the hydrogelators with enzymatic reactions. Gel degradation in response to biomolecules as triggers occurs within a few hours. We also describe the preparation of hydrogel-enzyme hybrids arrayed on flat glass slides, enabling high-throughput analysis of biomolecules such as glucose, uric acid, lactate and so on by gel degradation, which is detectable by the naked eye. The protocol requires ∼6 h to prepare the hydrogel-enzyme hybrid array and to complete the biomolecule assay.

  15. Self-organized pattern formation of biomolecules at silicon surfaces: Intended application of a dislocation network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kittler, M.; Yu, X.; Vyvenko, O.F.; Birkholz, M.; Seifert, W.; Reiche, M.; Wilhelm, T.; Arguirov, T.; Wolff, A.; Fritzsche, W.; Seibt, M.

    2006-01-01

    Defined placement of biomolecules at Si surfaces is a precondition for a successful combination of Si electronics with biological applications. We aim to realize this by Coulomb interaction of biomolecules with dislocations in Si. The dislocations form charged lines and they will be surrounded with a space charge region being connected with an electric field. The electric stray field in a solution of biomolecules, caused by dislocations located close to the Si surface, was estimated to yield values up to few kVcm -1 . A regular dislocation network can be formed by wafer direct bonding at the interface between the bonded wafers in case of misorientation. The adjustment of misorientation allows the variation of the distance between dislocations in a range from 10 nm to a few μm. This is appropriate for nanobiotechnology dealing with protein or DNA molecules with sizes in the nm and lower μm range. Actually, we achieved a distance between the dislocations of 10-20 nm. Also the existence of a distinct electric field formed by the dislocation network was demonstrated by the technique of the electron-beam-induced current (EBIC). Because of the relatively short range of the field, the dislocations have to be placed close to the surface. We positioned the dislocation network in an interface being 200 nm parallel to the Si surface by layer transfer techniques using hydrogen implantation and bonding. Based on EBIC and luminescence data we postulate a barrier of the dislocations at the as bonded interface < 100 meV. We plan to dope the dislocations with metal atoms to increase the electric field. We demonstrated that regular periodic dislocation networks close to the Si surface formed by bonding are realistic candidates for self-organized placing of biomolecules. Experiments are underway to test whether biomolecules decorate the pattern of the dislocation lines

  16. Developing the 186 Re radiolabelling procedures of peptides and monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lungu, V.; Mihailescu, G.

    1999-01-01

    Mono and poli-clonal antibodies are the most recent candidate molecules for the radiopharmaceutical preparation used in radioimmunotherapy and radiodiagnostic. Our study presents results in 186 Re direct labelling of HIgG (Human Immunoglobulin G) poli-clonal antibody. The steps in labelling process are: 1. pre-reduction -S-S- bridges of HIgG molecule with ascorbic acid in pH = 3.5 - 4.5; 2. preparation of the reducing system for 186 ReO 4 - in presence of Sn 2+ ions excess and 3. coupling 186 Re (red) to -SH groups of biomolecules. The specific reactions of each step above are controlled by: incubation time and temperature, pH, molar ratio 186 Re: HIgG. 186 Re-HIgG samples were purified by gel elution chromatography method and the quality control was performed by chromatography techniques. To labelled of HIgG we effected the pre-reduction of -S-S- bridges of biomolecules to sulfhydryls using the following reducing agents: ascorbic acid, cysteine, active hydrogen, 2,3 dimercaptopropanol. The pre-reduction reactions are controlled by mass ratios of reduction agent/biomolecule, pH, temperature and time of incubation. HIgG was the biomolecule used in the pre-reduction reactions. The specific parameters for each systems are presented. The stannous chloride was used as reducing agent in two systems, SnCl 2 : 0.05 N HCl and SnCl 2 : 20 mg/ml citric acid. The coupling reaction of 186 Re (red) with the biomolecule has been controlled by time and incubation temperature and the influence of pH regarding the binding of 186 Re to the biomolecule. 186 Re-HIgG was obtained by: i) incubation at the room temperature, 1 hour time of HIgG in thiol form and 186 Re in reducing form and ii) incubation of HIgG in thiol form, at 37 deg C and 22 hours time, with adding after pre-reduction of SnCl 2 and Na 186 ReO 4 . Quality control was effected by chromatography techniques (paper and gel chromatography) on labelled biomolecule before and after purification. The elution gel chromatography

  17. UNA PERSPECTIVA NEUROCIENTÍFICA SOBRE LA HISTERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucía Amoruso

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available En la última década, el desarrollo y la puesta en marcha delas modernas técnicas de neuroimagen en el campo de laneurociencia cognitiva han proporcionado una nueva vía deacercamiento al estudio experimental de algunos trastornosmentales. Dentro de esta perspectiva, denominada por algunosautores “neuropsiquiatría cognitiva”, la histeria (o trastornode conversión, de acuerdo con la clasificación psiquiátricaactual ha cobrado un amplio protagonismo. De acuerdo conlo anterior, el objetivo del presente trabajo consiste en introducirestudios pioneros basados en una perspectiva neurocientíficade la histeria. Conviene destacar que, si bien estosaportan evidencia significativa sobre algunas de las áreascerebrales y las disfunciones cognitivas comprometidas enel mencionado trastorno, los resultados obtenidos a la fechadistan aún de ser concluyentes.

  18. Tomasello y Stern: Dos perspectivas actuales incluyentes del Desarrollo Infantil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mata Isabel López

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available El presente artículo tiene como objetivo ilustrar dos perspectivas actuales del desarrollo infantil incluyentes más que excluyentes -Michael Tomasello (cognitivo y Daniel Stern (social-subjetivo-, en cuanto a que integran a su explicación los descubrimientos de las capacidades tempranas del bebé -realizados a partir de 1970/80- y, sin renunciar al paradigma teórico particular del que provienen, reconocen junto a estas competencias tempranas el rol fundamental de los diversos factores intervinientes en el desarrollo -lo innato y lo ambiental (social y cultural-, los diferentes métodos de investigación y las limitaciones de una mirada reduccionista. Además, postulan que se hace necesaria la conversación entre las diferentes perspectivas teóricas, para lograr una descripción del infante como una unidad.

  19. Improvement of A.E.S System, using a 188Re-radiolabeled hapten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morandeau, L.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Feasibility of two-step radioimmunotherapy (RIT) of cancer by the Affinity Enhancement System (AES) has been demonstrated in experimental and clinical studies. This technique, associating a bispecific antibody (BsAb) and a radiolabeled bivalent peptide, reduces toxicity and improves therapeutic efficacy of the treatment compared to the one step targeting method. The formation of a cyclic complex (antigen-BsAb- hapten-BsAb-antigen) observed on the tumor allows good tumoral fixation. This is associated with low non-specific uptake, due to the fast clearance of the hapten from the organism. Iodine 131, used currently in clinical applications, has however several disadvantages. These include the mean energy of □ . particles, strong y emission and long physical half-life. Rhenium-188 is the radionuclide of choice to replace iodine-131; its low cost, its availability from a W-188/Re-188 generator and its very favorable radiophysical properties (t 1/2 =16.9h; E□=2.118 MeV; Ey (15%)=155keV) make it a very interesting radionuclide for radioimmunotherapy applications. Unlike the case of iodine-131, the radiolabelling of the peptide by rhenium-188 requires the preliminary coupling of a bifunctional chelating agent. This ensures the formation of an in vivo stable complex with the radionuclide. The object of this post-doctoral project is to obtain a rhenium-188 radiolabeled bivalent hapten. To do this, a monovalent hapten will be coupled to a chelating agent that involves two or three patterns to complex the radionuclide, leading to a bivalent or trivalent radiolabeled hapten, suitable for applications in A.E.S. system. The monovalent hapten used, called HSGL (histaminosuccinylglycyllysine) is a small heteropeptide composed of a chain of four molecules which are histamine, succinic acid, glycine, lysine. It is recognised by the antibody anti-HSG. Two kinds of chelating agents, dithiocarbamates and dithiobenzoates will be studied. They have been synthesised at

  20. Perspectiva espiritual de la mujer con cáncer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Alexandra Galvis-López

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: comparar la perspectiva espiritual de las mujeres diagnosticadas con cáncer propio de su género (seno, útero, ovarios y de las mujeres diagnosticadas con otros tipos de cáncer. Método: diseño cuantitativo de tipo descriptivo comparativo, de corte transversal. Se empleó una encuesta sociodemográfica para caracterizar la población y la Escala de perspectiva espiritual de Pamela Reed, a la cual se le realizó el análisis de confiabilidad que reportó un alfa de Cronbach de 0,799 en el grupo 1 y 0,763 en el grupo 2. La muestra incluyó a 100 mujeres que se encuentran en tratamiento contra el cáncer. Resultados: la perspectiva espiritual de las mujeres con cáncer propio de su género es moderada al igual que la de las mujeres con otros tipos de cáncer; al hacer la comparación de estos dos grupos no se encontró evidencia estadística que demostrara una diferencia significativa. Discusión: los resultados de este estudio aportan nuevos elementos para el cuidado de las mujeres con enfermedad oncológica y señalan que una perspectiva espiritual moderada puede ser un potencial para su cuidado integral, en el que la enfermera reconozca sus objetivos en el cuidado de la mujer como un ser total, más que el tipo de cáncer que tiene.

  1. Los derivados financieros desde una perspectiva jurídica

    OpenAIRE

    Cuartas Gómez, Lucas; Sierra Vásquez, Paula

    2008-01-01

    El importante aumento en el uso de los contratos de derivados en Colombia1 y el mundo, además de la dificultad que puede traer su comprensión, nos ha llevado a escribir el presente trabajo, con el fin de darle a el lector una perspectiva general sobre el funcionamiento de estos instrumentos financieros, su regulación en Colombia y la forma como éstos se han venido contratando a nivel internacional.

  2. Radiolabelled multifunctional nanoparticles for targeted diagnostic and therapeutic applications in oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rangger, C.

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticles, liposomes in particular, have gained great attention as easily engineerable nanoscale systems with distinct properties, offering an ideal platform for a variety of diagnostic and therapeutic applications. The aim of this PhD thesis was the design, synthesis as well as the in vitro and in vivo evaluation of several radiolabelled multifunctional liposomal nanoparticles for the targeted imaging of tumour cells and tumour-induced angiogenesis. Radiolabelling methods for different radionuclides were developed and the liposomes were functionalised with polyethylene glycol (PEG) to improve the pharmacokinetic profile. Targeting sequences such as the tripeptide Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD), the neuropeptide substance P (SP), the somatostatin analogue tyrosine-3-octreotide (TOC), and the vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) were tested for their applicability as tools for the targeted delivery of imaging agents. Finally, by the combination of two targeting sequences, namely RGD and SP, on one liposome multireceptor-targeting (hybrid-targeting) was investigated. These multifunctional vehicles were also functionalized with imaging labels for the detection and imaging of tumours by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), fluorescence microscopy as well as magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The liposomes developed in this thesis showed multifunctional properties combining several imaging approaches with specific targeting for oncological applications. In vitro behaviour, e.g., receptor binding could be improved, resulting in optimised targeting shown both by the radiolabel and fluorescent label. However, the in vivo properties, especially the tumour targeting characteristics remained suboptimal, revealing the challenges of targeting approaches in nanoscience. Nonetheless, these results brought important insights for the development and optimisation of multifunctional nanocarriers. (author) [de

  3. Effect of glycosylation on biodistribution of radiolabeled glucagon-like peptide 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Ayahisa; Nishijima, Ken-ichi; Zhao, Songji; Tamaki, Nagara; Kuge, Yuji; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Itoh, Takeshi; Takemoto, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Glycosylation is generally applicable as a strategy for increasing the activity of bioactive proteins. In this study, we examined the effect of glycosylation on biodistribution of radiolabeled glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) as a bioactive peptide for type 2 diabetes. Noninvasive imaging studies were performed using a gamma camera after the intravenous administration of 123 I-GLP-1 or 123 I-α2, 6-sialyl N-acetyllactosamine (glycosylated) GLP-1 in rats. In ex vivo biodistribution studies using 125 I-GLP-1 or 125 I-glycosylated GLP-1, organ samples were measured for radioactivity. Plasma samples were added to 15% trichloroacetic acid (TCA) to obtain TCA-insoluble and TCA-soluble fractions. The radioactivity in the TCA-insoluble and TCA-soluble fractions was measured. In the noninvasive imaging studies, a relatively high accumulation level of 123 I-GLP-1 was found in the liver, which is the major organ to eliminate exogenous GLP-1. The area under the time-activity curve (AUC) of 123 I-glycosylated GLP-1 in the liver was significantly lower (89%) than that of 123 I-GLP-1. These results were consistent with those of ex vivo biodistribution studies using 125 I-labeled peptides. The AUC of 125 I-glycosylated GLP-1 in the TCA-insoluble fraction was significantly higher (1.7-fold) than that of GLP-1. This study demonstrated that glycosylation significantly decreased the distribution of radiolabeled GLP-1 into the liver and increased the concentration of radiolabeled GLP-1 in plasma. These results suggested that glycosylation is a useful strategy for decreasing the distribution into the liver of bioactive peptides as desirable pharmaceuticals. (author)

  4. Identification of Staphylococcus aureus infection by aptamers directly radiolabeled with technetium-99m

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Sara Roberta dos; Rodrigues Corrêa, Cristiane; Branco de Barros, André Luís; Serakides, Rogéria; Fernandes, Simone Odília

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Aptamers are oligonucleotides that have high affinity and specificity for their molecular targets which are emerging as a new class of molecules for radiopharmaceuticals development. In this study, aptamers selected to Staphylococcus aureus were evaluated for bacterial infection identification. Methods: Anti S. aureus aptamers were labeled with 99m Tc by the direct method. The radiolabel yield and complex stability were assessed by thin-layer chromatography (TLC). Three groups of Swiss mice containing 6 animals each were used. The first group was infected intramuscularly in the right thigh with S. aureus. The second group was infected in the same way with C. albicans and the third group was injected with zymosan to induce aseptic inflammation. After 24 h, radiolabeled aptamers (22.2 MBq) were injected by the tail vein. The mice were euthanized 4 h post injection and tissue sample activities measured in a gamma counter. Results: The 99m Tc labeled aptamers were stable in saline, plasma and cystein excess. Radiolabeled aptamers showed increased uptake in the kidneys for all groups indicating a main renal excretion, which is consistent with the hydrophilic nature and small size of aptamers. The radiopharmaceutical showed rapid blood clearance indicated by a reduced dose (% ID/g) in the blood. The biodistribution showed that aptamers were able to identify the infection foci caused by S. aureus displaying a target/non-target ratio of 4.0 ± 0.5. This ratio for mice infected with C. albicans was 2.0 ± 0.4 while for mice with aseptic inflammation was 1.2 ± 0.2. Histology confirmed the presence of infection in groups 1 and 2, and inflammation in group 3. Conclusions: The biodistibution study demonstrated a statistically higher uptake in the S. aureus foci relative to inflammation and C. albicans infected areas. These results highlight the potential of aptamers labeled directly with 99m Tc for bacterial infection diagnosis by scintigraphy

  5. Effect of biomolecules adsorption on oxide layers developed on metallic materials used in cooling water systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres-Bautista, Blanca-Estela

    2014-01-01

    This thesis was carried out in the frame of the BIOCOR ITN European project, in collaboration with the industrial partner RSE S.p.A. (Italy). Metallic materials commonly used in cooling systems of power plants may be affected by bio-corrosion induced by biofilm formation. The objective of this work was to study the influence of biomolecules adsorption, which is the initial stage of biofilm formation, on the electrochemical behaviour and the surface chemical composition of three metallic materials (70Cu-30Ni alloy, 304L stainless steel and titanium) in seawater environments. In a first step, the interactions between a model protein, the bovine serum albumin (BSA), and the surface of these materials were investigated. Secondly, tightly bound (TB) and loosely bound (LB) extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), that play a fundamental role in the different stages of biofilm formation, maturation and maintenance, were extracted from Pseudomonas NCIMB 2021 marine strain, and their effects on oxide layers were also evaluated. For that purpose, electrochemical measurements (corrosion potential E(corr) vs time, polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS)) performed during the very first steps of oxide layers formation (1 h immersion time) were combined to surface analysis by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ions mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). Compared to 70Cu-30Ni alloy in static artificial seawater (ASW) without biomolecules, for which a thick duplex oxide layer (outer redeposited Cu 2 O layer and inner oxidized nickel layer) is shown, the presence of BSA, TB EPS and LB EPS leads to a mixed oxide layer (oxidized copper and nickel) with a lower thickness. In the biomolecules-containing solutions, this oxide layer is covered by an adsorbed organic layer, mainly composed of proteins. A model is proposed to analyse impedance data obtained at E(corr). The results show a slow-down of the anodic reaction in the presence

  6. Spin boson models for quantum decoherence of electronic excitations of biomolecules and quantum dots in a solvent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilmore, Joel; McKenzie, Ross H

    2005-01-01

    We give a theoretical treatment of the interaction of electronic excitations (excitons) in biomolecules and quantum dots with the surrounding polar solvent. Significant quantum decoherence occurs due to the interaction of the electric dipole moment of the solute with the fluctuating electric dipole moments of the individual molecules in the solvent. We introduce spin boson models which could be used to describe the effects of decoherence on the quantum dynamics of biomolecules which undergo light-induced conformational change and on biomolecules or quantum dots which are coupled by Foerster resonant energy transfer

  7. A radiolabeled antiglobulin assay to identify human cervical mucus immunoglobulin (Ig) A and IgG antisperm antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, G.G. Jr.; D'Cruz, O.J.

    1989-01-01

    Antisperm immunoglobulin (Ig) A and IgG antibodies in human cervical mucus (CM) were identified by a radiolabeled antiglobulin assay. Cervical mucus samples from fertile and infertile women were exposed to a 1:3,200 dilution of 2-mercaptoethanol (2-ME), and 5 micrograms of the solubilized CM protein were assayed for the presence of IgA and IgG antisperm and anti-Candida activity by the radiolabeled antiglobulin assay. Purified human secretory IgA and IgG exposed to 2-ME retained the molecular integrity and functional activity of the untreated antibody molecules. CM aliquots collected after high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) fractionation were assessed for antisperm antibody activity; antisperm antibody activity was retained in the appropriate IgA or IgG CM fractions. The incidence of CM antisperm antibodies was minimally affected when the radiolabeled antiglobulin assay was performed with a motile sperm population. Approximately 70% of the CM IgA antisperm antibodies were of the IgA1 subclass; CM IgG was primarily of the IgG4 subclass. When Candida antigen was substituted for sperm in the radiolabeled antiglobulin assay, the CM antisperm antibodies were found to be exclusively sperm-specific. These data indicate that the radiolabeled antiglobulin assay using 2-ME to extract CM antibodies is a specific method for the assay of antisperm antibodies in CM

  8. Distribution and pharmacokinetics of radiolabeled monoclonal antibody OC 125 after intravenous and intraperitoneal administration in gynecologic tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haisma, H.J.; Moseley, K.R.; Battaile, A.; Griffiths, T.C.; Knapp, R.C.

    1988-01-01

    Radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies may be useful for radioimmunotherapy of gynecologic tumors. Iodine 131-labeled F(ab')2 fragments of a monoclonal antibody, OC 125, with specificity for ovarian carcinoma, were used to study the distribution and pharmacokinetics of this antibody in patients with gynecologic tumors. The radiolabeled antibody was injected intravenously or intraperitoneally into 10 patients suspected of having ovarian cancer. Blood and urine samples were used for pharmacokinetic studies, and biopsy specimens were examined for the uptake of antibody. The serum half-life of the labeled antibody was 30 hours after intravenous administration, with 20% of the injected dose per liter detected at 24 hours. After intraperitoneal injection, the appearance of antibody in serum was slow, with a maximum level of 1.4% of the injected dose per liter at 24 hours. Urinary excretion of the radiolabeled antibody was similar for intravenous and intraperitoneal administration, with approximately 50% of the injected dose excreted after 48 hours. Intraperitoneal administration of the radiolabeled antibody resulted in a higher uptake of antibody in the tumor and a lower uptake of antibody in normal tissues. On the basis of this limited study, intraperitoneal administration of radiolabeled antibody is preferred over intravenous administration for radioimmunotherapy of ovarian cancer

  9. Correlating labeling chemistry and in-vitro test results with the biological behavior of radiolabeled proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, S.C.; Meinken, G.E.

    1985-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies possess enormous potential for delivery of therapeutic amounts of radionuclides to target antigens in vivo, in particular for tumor imaging and therapy. Translation of this concept into practice has encountered numerous problems. Specifically whereas general protein radiolabeling methods are applicable to antibodies, immunological properties of the antibodies are often compromised resulting in reduced in-vivo specificity for the target antigens. The bifunctional chelating agent approach shows the most promise, however, development of other agents will be necessary for widespread usefulness of this technique. The effects of labeling chemistry on the in-vivo behavior of several monoclonal antibodies are described. 30 refs., 4 figs., 10 tabs

  10. Radiolabelled parasite antigens as tools for diagnosis and identification of protective antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkhouse, R.M.E.; Cabrera, Z.

    1986-01-01

    Radiolabelling specific compartments and molecules of parasites provides a valuable tool for establishing parasite antigen-host response systems with utility and/or importance in protection, diagnosis and pathology. The combined immunological, biochemical and molecular biological expertise currently available forms a sufficient basis for a relatively logical and effective programme directed towards the ultimate eradication of tropical diseases. The organization of carefully selected and clinically well characterized sera and patients, representing the range of commonly occurring parasitic infections, would be of great practical value in the pursuance of this goal. (author)

  11. Advance of apoptosis imaging with radiolabeled annexin V in tumor research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Daijuan

    2003-01-01

    One of the most important reasons that cause tumor is decrease or complete absence of apoptosis of tumor cells. Conversely successful anti-tumor therapy is correlated with the introduction of apoptosis into tumor cells. Radiolabeled annexin V is used to image in vivo the phosphatidylserine (PS) that explode on the outer surface of cell membrane after apoptosis so that apoptosis can be detected on the early stage. This imaging method can be introduced into the research of tumor in order to help direct the choose of tumor therapy, inspect the effect and evaluate the prognosis

  12. Radiolabeling of rituximab with 188Re and 99mTc using the tricarbonyl technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, Carla Roberta; Jeger, Simone; Osso, Joao Alberto; Mueller, Cristina; De Pasquale, Christine; Hohn, Alexander; Waibel, Robert; Schibli, Roger

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The most successful clinical studies of immunotherapy in patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) use the antibody rituximab (RTX) targeting CD20 + B-cell tumors. Rituximab radiolabeled with β - emitters could potentiate the therapeutic efficacy of the antibody by virtue of the particle radiation. Here, we report on a direct radiolabeling approach of rituximab with the 99m Tc- and 188 Re-tricarbonyl core (IsoLink technology). Methods: The native format of the antibody (RTX wt ) as well as a reduced form (RTX red ) was labeled with 99m Tc/ 188 Re(CO) 3 . The partial reduction of the disulfide bonds to produce free sulfhydryl groups (-SH) was achieved with 2-mercaptoethanol. Radiolabeling efficiency, in vitro human plasma stability as well as transchelation toward cysteine and histidine was investigated. The immunoreactivity and binding affinity were determined on Ramos and/or Raji cells expressing CD20. Biodistribution was performed in mice bearing subcutaneous Ramos lymphoma xenografts. Results: The radiolabeling efficiency and kinetics of RTX red were superior to that of RTX wt ( 99m Tc: 98% after 3 h for RTX red vs. 70% after 24 h for RTX wt ). 99m Tc(CO) 3 -RTX red was used without purification for in vitro and in vivo studies whereas 188 Re(CO) 3 -RTX red was purified to eliminate free 188 Re-precursor. Both radioimmunoconjugates were stable in human plasma for 24 h at 37 o C. In contrast, displacement experiments with excess cysteine/histidine showed significant transchelation in the case of 99m Tc(CO) 3 -RTX red but not with pre-purified 188 Re(CO) 3 -RTX red . Both conjugates revealed high binding affinity to the CD20 antigen (K d =5-6 nM). Tumor uptake of 188 Re(CO) 3 -RTX red was 2.5 %ID/g and 0.8 %ID/g for 99m Tc(CO) 3 -RTX red 48 h after injection. The values for other organs and tissues were similar for both compounds, for example the tumor-to-blood and tumor-to-liver ratios were 0.4 and 0.3 for 99m Tc(CO) 3 -RTX red and for 188 Re

  13. Whole-body effective half-lives for radiolabeled antibodies and related issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaurin, D.G.L.; Carsten, A.L.; Baum, J.W.; Barber, D.E.

    1996-08-01

    Radiolabeled antibodies (RABs) are being developed and used in medical imaging and therapy in rapidly increasing numbers. Data on the whole body half effective half-lives were calculated from external dose rates obtained from attending physicians and radiation safety officers at participating institutions. Calculations were made using exponential regression analysis of data from patients receiving single and multiple administrations. Theses data were analyzed on the basis of age, sex, isotope label, radiation energy, antibody type, disease treated, administration method, and number of administrations

  14. Localisation of lung cancer by a radiolabelled monoclonal antibody against the c-myc oncogene product

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, S Y.T.; Evan, G I; Ritson, A; Watson, J; Wraight, P; Sikora, K

    1986-11-01

    A set of mouse monoclonal antibodies against the c-myc oncogene product, a 62,000 dalton nuclear binding protein involved in cell cycle control, has been constructed by immunisation with synthetic peptide fragments. One such antibody, CT14, was radiolabelled with /sup 131/I and administered to 20 patients with different malignant diseases. Good tumour localisation was observed in 12 out of 14 patients with primary bronchial carcinoma but not in patients with pulmonary metastases from primary tumours elsewhere. Successfully localised tumours were all 3 cm or more in diameter. Monoclonal antibodies against oncogene products may provide novel selective tools for the diagnosis and therapy of cancer.

  15. Alternate radiolabeled markers for detecting metabolic activity of Mycobacterium leprae residing in murine macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, H.K.; Hastings, R.C.

    1985-05-01

    This study demonstrated the utility of using 4% NaOH as a murine macrophage cell-solubilizing agent to discriminate between host macrophage metabolism and that of intracellular Mycobacterium leprae. A 4% concentration of NaOH had no deleterious effect on labeled mycobacteria. Thereby, alternate radiolabeled indicators of the metabolic activity of intracellular M. leprae could be experimented with. Significant incorporation of /sup 14/C-amino acid mixture, (/sup 14/C)leucine, (/sup 14/C)uridine, and carrier-free /sup 32/P was observed in cultures containing freshly extracted (''live'') strains of M. leprae as compared with control cultures containing autoclaved bacilli.

  16. Alternate radiolabeled markers for detecting metabolic activity of Mycobacterium leprae residing in murine macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, H.K.; Hastings, R.C.

    1985-01-01

    This study demonstrated the utility of using 4% NaOH as a murine macrophage cell-solubilizing agent to discriminate between host macrophage metabolism and that of intracellular Mycobacterium leprae. A 4% concentration of NaOH had no deleterious effect on labeled mycobacteria. Thereby, alternate radiolabeled indicators of the metabolic activity of intracellular M. leprae could be experimented with. Significant incorporation of 14 C-amino acid mixture, [ 14 C]leucine, [ 14 C]uridine, and carrier-free 32 P was observed in cultures containing freshly extracted (''live'') strains of M. leprae as compared with control cultures containing autoclaved bacilli

  17. Parameters optimization defined by statistical analysis for cysteine-dextran radiolabeling with technetium tricarbonyl core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, Eutimio Gustavo Fernández; Faintuch, Bluma Linkowski; Teodoro, Rodrigo; Wiecek, Danielle Pereira; da Silva, Natanael Gomes; Papadopoulos, Minas; Pelecanou, Maria; Pirmettis, Ioannis; de Oliveira Filho, Renato Santos; Duatti, Adriano; Pasqualini, Roberto

    2011-04-01

    The objective of this study was the development of a statistical approach for radiolabeling optimization of cysteine-dextran conjugates with Tc-99m tricarbonyl core. This strategy has been applied to the labeling of 2-propylene-S-cysteine-dextran in the attempt to prepare a new class of tracers for sentinel lymph node detection, and can be extended to other radiopharmaceuticals for different targets. The statistical routine was based on three-level factorial design. Best labeling conditions were achieved. The specific activity reached was 5 MBq/μg. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Parameters optimization defined by statistical analysis for cysteine-dextran radiolabeling with technetium tricarbonyl core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez Nunez, Eutimio Gustavo, E-mail: eutimiocu@yahoo.co [Radiopharmacy Center, Institute of Energetic and Nuclear Research, Sao Paulo, SP 05508-000 (Brazil); Linkowski Faintuch, Bluma; Teodoro, Rodrigo; Pereira Wiecek, Danielle; Gomes da Silva, Natanael [Radiopharmacy Center, Institute of Energetic and Nuclear Research, Sao Paulo, SP 05508-000 (Brazil); Papadopoulos, Minas [Institute of Radioisotopes, Radiodiagnostic Products, National Center for Scientific Research ' Demokritos' , Athens (Greece); Pelecanou, Maria [Institute of Biology, National Center for Scientific Research ' Demokritos' , Athens (Greece); Pirmettis, Ioannis [Institute of Radioisotopes, Radiodiagnostic Products, National Center for Scientific Research ' Demokritos' , Athens (Greece); Santos Oliveira Filho, Renato de [Faculty of Medicine, Federal University of Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Duatti, Adriano [Department of Radiological Sciences, University of Ferrara, Ferrara (Italy); Pasqualini, Roberto [CIS Bio International, Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2011-04-15

    The objective of this study was the development of a statistical approach for radiolabeling optimization of cysteine-dextran conjugates with Tc-99m tricarbonyl core. This strategy has been applied to the labeling of 2-propylene-S-cysteine-dextran in the attempt to prepare a new class of tracers for sentinel lymph node detection, and can be extended to other radiopharmaceuticals for different targets. The statistical routine was based on three-level factorial design. Best labeling conditions were achieved. The specific activity reached was 5 MBq/{mu}g.

  19. Radiolabeled Peptide Scaffolds for PET/SPECT - Optical in Vivo Imaging of Carbohydrate-Lectin Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deutscher, Susan

    2014-09-30

    The objective of this research is to develop phage display-selected peptides into radio- and fluoresecently- labeled scaffolds for the multimodal imaging of carbohydrate-lectin interactions. While numerous protein and receptor systems are being explored for the development of targeted imaging agents, the targeting and analysis of carbohydrate-lectin complexes in vivo remains relatively unexplored. Antibodies, nanoparticles, and peptides are being developed that target carbohydrate-lectin complexes in living systems. However, antibodies and nanoparticles often suffer from slow clearance and toxicity problems. Peptides are attractive alternative vehicles for the specific delivery of radionuclides or fluorophores to sites of interest in vivo, although, because of their size, uptake and retention may be less than antibodies. We have selected high affinity peptides that bind a specific carbohydrate-lectin complex involved in cell-cell adhesion and cross-linking using bacteriophage (phage) display technologies (1,2). These peptides have allowed us to probe the role of these antigens in cell adhesion. Fluorescent versions of the peptides have been developed for optical imaging and radiolabeled versions have been used in single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) in vivo imaging (3-6). A benefit in employing the radiolabeled peptides in SPECT and PET is that these imaging modalities are widely used in living systems and offer deep tissue sensitivity. Radiolabeled peptides, however, often exhibit poor stability and high kidney uptake in vivo. Conversely, optical imaging is sensitive and offers good spatial resolution, but is not useful for deep tissue penetration and is semi-quantitative. Thus, multimodality imaging that relies on the strengths of both radio- and optical- imaging is a current focus for development of new in vivo imaging agents. We propose a novel means to improve the efficacy of radiolabeled and fluorescently

  20. Computer-assisted high-pressure liquid chromatography of radio-labelled phenylthiohydantoin amino acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhown, A.S.; Mole, J.E.; Hollaway, W.L.; Bennet, J.C.

    1978-01-01

    A computer-controlled high-pressure liquid chromatographic (HPLC) system is described to identify in vitro phenyl [ 35 S]isothiocyanate-labelled phenylthiohydantoin (PTH) amino acids from a solid-phase sequencer. Each radio-labelled amino acid from the sequencer is added to a PTH amino acid standard and the mixture separated by HPLC using a computer, programmed to detect a slope change in the absorbance. Individual fractions corresponding to the PTH amino acids are collected and counted. The sensitivity of the system is demonstrated on 700 pmoles of lysozyme. (Auth.)