WorldWideScience

Sample records for radiogenic isotope signatures

  1. Enhanced sea-ice export from the Arctic to the GIN seas during the Younger Dryas: A "Canadian" source from radiogenic isotope signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillaire-Marcel, C.; Maccali, J.; Not, C.; Poirier, A.

    2012-04-01

    The Younger Dryas (YD) cooling event and the related slowing of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) have been linked to a large array of processes. The most widely supported causal mechanism involves an influx of freshwater into the North Atlantic Ocean linked to a partial drainage of glacial Lake Agassiz. Recently, a northward drainage route, through the Mackenzie River outlet into the Arctic Ocean, has been suggested from land-based studies [Murton et al., Nature 464, 740-743]. Sedimentological and geochemical analysis of cores raised from Lomonosov Ridge and the Fram Strait area, yield relatively robust evidence for enhanced ice-rafting deposition -IRD- (with a 5-fold increase -) during the critical interval. At Lomonosov, the corresponding sedimentary layer (from ca. 13 to 12 ka) is marked by a pulse of detrital carbonates in the silt to sand fractions, with approximately equal amounts of calcite and dolomite, pointing towards an Arctic Canadian sediment source area [Not & Hillaire-Marcel, Nature Communication, Jan. 31, 2012]. The layer also depicts a 5 fold increase 230Th-excess, which we link to an enhanced flux of scavenging particles. At both sites, the geochemical signatures of the YD-layer, based on elemental (Zr/Al) and isotopic (Sr, Nd and Pb) data on bulk sediments and residues ensuing from the removal of exchangeable fractions (Zr/Al, Nd, Pb, Sr), are used to identify detrital sediment source areas. Whereas three major source areas variably contributed to IRD during the MIS 3-Present interval (i.e., the Russian, Canadian and Greenland margins), the YD interval singles out by strongelemental and isotopic excursions, notably a peak in radiogenic Sr, indicating prominent supplies from the Canadian end-member. This suggests enhanced sea-ice production and drifting along the BeaufordGyre, then the Trans-Polar Drift. A major drainage event along the Mackenzie outlet area, as proposed in the above reference,would be a suitable trigger for

  2. Persistently strong Indonesian Throughflow during marine isotope stage 3: evidence from radiogenic isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stumpf, Roland; Kraft, Steffanie; Frank, Martin; Haley, Brian; Holbourn, Ann; Kuhnt, Wolfgang

    2015-03-01

    The Indonesian Throughflow (ITF) connects the western Pacific Ocean with the eastern Indian Ocean, thus forming one of the major near surface current systems of the global thermohaline circulation. The intensity of the ITF has been found to be sensitive to changes in global ocean circulation, fluctuations in sea level, as well as to the prevailing monsoonal conditions of the Indonesian Archipelago and NW Australia. This study presents the first reconstruction of ITF dynamics combining radiogenic isotope compositions of neodymium (Nd), strontium (Sr), and lead (Pb) of the clay-size detrital fraction to investigate changes in sediment provenance, and paleo seawater Nd signatures extracted from the planktonic foraminifera and authigenic Fe-Mn oxyhydroxide coatings of the marine sediments focussing on marine isotope stage 3 (MIS3). Sediment core MD01-2378 was recovered within the framework of the International Marine Global Change Study (IMAGES) and is located in the area of the ITF outflow in the western Timor Sea (Scott Plateau, 13° 04.95‧ S and 121° 47.27‧ E, 1783 m water depth). In order to produce reliable seawater signatures, several extraction methods were tested against each other. The results of the study show that at this core location the extraction of surface water Nd isotope compositions from planktonic foraminifera is complicated by incomplete removal of contributions from Fe-Mn oxyhydroxides carrying ambient bottom water signatures. The bottom water Nd isotope signatures reliably obtained from the sediment coatings (average ɛNd = -5.0) document an essentially invariable water mass composition similar to today throughout the entire MIS3. The radiogenic Nd, Sr, and Pb isotope records of the clay-sized detrital fraction suggest that the Indonesian Archipelago rather than NW Australia was the main particle source at the location of core MD01-2378, and thus indicating a persistently strong ITF during MIS3. Furthermore, the variations of the detrital

  3. Statistical clumped isotope signatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Röckmann, T.; Popa, M. E.; Krol, M. C.; Hofmann, M. E. G.

    2016-01-01

    High precision measurements of molecules containing more than one heavy isotope may provide novel constraints on element cycles in nature. These so-called clumped isotope signatures are reported relative to the random (stochastic) distribution of heavy isotopes over all available isotopocules of a m

  4. Error Propagation in Equations for Geochemical Modeling of Radiogenic Isotopes in Two-Component Mixing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Surendra P Verma

    2000-03-01

    This paper presents error propagation equations for modeling of radiogenic isotopes during mixing of two components or end-members. These equations can be used to estimate errors on an isotopic ratio in the mixture of two components, as a function of the analytical errors or the total errors of geological field sampling and analytical errors. Two typical cases (``Small errors'' and ``Large errors'') are illustrated for mixing of Sr isotopes. Similar examples can be formulated for the other radiogenic isotopic ratios. Actual isotopic data for sediment and basalt samples from the Cocos plate are also included to further illustrate the use of these equations. The isotopic compositions of the predicted mixtures can be used to constrain the origin of magmas in the central part of the Mexican Volcanic Belt. These examples show the need of high quality experimental data for them to be useful in geochemical modeling of magmatic processes.

  5. Radioactive and radiogenic isotopes in sediments from Cooper Creek, Western Arnhem Land

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frostick, A. [Charles Darwin University, Darwin, NT 0909 (Australia); ERISS, GPO Box 461, Darwin, NT 0801 (Australia)], E-mail: alison.frostick@cdu.edu.au; Bollhoefer, A. [ERISS, GPO Box 461, Darwin, NT 0801 (Australia); Parry, D.; Munksgaard, N. [Charles Darwin University, Darwin, NT 0909 (Australia); Evans, K. [ERISS, GPO Box 461, Darwin, NT 0801 (Australia)

    2008-03-15

    Protection of the environment post-mining is a key objective of rehabilitation, especially where runoff and erosion from rehabilitated mine sites could potentially lead to contamination of the surrounding land and watercourses. As part of an overall assessment of the success of rehabilitation at the former Nabarlek uranium (U) mine, an appraisal of stable lead (Pb) isotopes, radionuclides and trace metals within sediments and soils was conducted to determine the off site impacts from a spatial and temporal perspective. The study found localised areas on and adjacent to the site where soils had elevated levels of trace metals and radionuclides. Lead isotope ratios are highly radiogenic in some samples, indicating the presence of U-rich material. There is some indication that erosion products with more radiogenic Pb isotope ratios have deposited in sediments downstream of the former ore body. However, there is no indication that the radiogenic erosion products found on the mine site at present have significantly contaminated sediments further downstream of Cooper Creek.

  6. Geochemical proxies of ocean circulation and weathering inputs: Radiogenic isotopes of Nd, Pb, Sr, Hf, and Os

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank, Martin, E-mail: mfrank@ifm-geomar.de [IFM-GEOMAR, Leibniz Institute of Marine Sciences at the University of Kiel, Wischhofstrasse 1-3, 24148 Kiel (Germany)

    2011-05-15

    Marine records of the radiogenic isotope composition of the elements neodymium (Nd), lead (Pb), hafnium (Hf), strontium (Sr), and osmium (Os) allow the reconstruction of past continental weathering inputs on different time scales as a function of their respective oceanic residence times. Sr and Os have oceanic residence times significantly longer than the global mixing time of the ocean and are efficiently mixed on a global scale. Their isotope composition changes on long time scales as a function of plate tectonics and major orogenies, which allows their use as precise stratigraphic tools for the entire Phanerozoic. In contrast, Hf, Pb, and in particular Nd, have residence times on the order of or shorter than the global mixing time of the ocean, which results in distinct isotopic signatures of water masses and allows the reconstruction of past water mass mixing and weathering inputs on both long and short time scales. Here applications of these isotopes systems with a focus on the shorter residence time tracers are reviewed (without claiming to be comprehensive) and problems and potential solutions are discussed.

  7. Pleistocene paleo-groundwater as a pristine fresh water resource in southern Germany – evidence from stable and radiogenic isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geldern, Robert van, E-mail: robert.van.geldern@fau.de [Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuremberg (FAU), Department of Geography and Geosciences, GeoZentrum Nordbayern, Schlossgarten 5, 91054 Erlangen (Germany); Baier, Alfons; Subert, Hannah L. [Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuremberg (FAU), Department of Geography and Geosciences, GeoZentrum Nordbayern, Schlossgarten 5, 91054 Erlangen (Germany); Kowol, Sigrid [Erlanger Stadtwerke AG, Äußere Brucker Str. 33, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); Balk, Laura; Barth, Johannes A.C. [Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuremberg (FAU), Department of Geography and Geosciences, GeoZentrum Nordbayern, Schlossgarten 5, 91054 Erlangen (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    Shallow groundwater aquifers are often influenced by anthropogenic contaminants or increased nutrient levels. In contrast, deeper aquifers hold potentially pristine paleo-waters that are not influenced by modern recharge. They thus represent important water resources, but their recharge history is often unknown. In this study groundwater from two aquifers in southern Germany were analyzed for their hydrogen and oxygen stable isotope compositions. One sampling campaign targeted the upper aquifer that is actively recharged by modern precipitation, whereas the second campaign sampled the confined, deep Benkersandstein aquifer. The groundwater samples from both aquifers were compared to the local meteoric water line to investigate sources and conditions of groundwater recharge. In addition, the deep groundwater was dated by tritium and radiocarbon analyses. Stable and radiogenic isotope data indicate that the deep-aquifer groundwater was not part of the hydrological water cycle in the recent human history. The results show that the groundwater is older than ∼20,000 years and most likely originates from isotopically depleted melt waters of the Pleistocene ice age. Today, the use of this aquifer is strictly regulated to preserve the pristine water. Clear identification of such non-renewable paleo-waters by means of isotope geochemistry will help local water authorities to enact and justify measures for conservation of these valuable resources for future generations in the context of a sustainable water management. - Highlights: • Groundwater from deep aquifer identified as paleo-water with age over 20,000 years. • Low stable isotope values indicate recharge during Pleistocene. • Shallow aquifer mirrors stable isotope signature of average modern precipitation. • Identification of non-renewable paleo-waters enhance sustainable water management. • Strict protection measures of authorities justified by isotope geochemistry.

  8. Biogeochemistry of stable Ca and radiogenic Sr isotopes in a larch-covered permafrost-dominated watershed of Central Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagard, Marie-Laure; Schmitt, Anne-Désirée; Chabaux, François; Pokrovsky, Oleg S.; Viers, Jérôme; Stille, Peter; Labolle, François; Prokushkin, Anatoly S.

    2013-08-01

    Stable Ca and radiogenic Sr isotope compositions were measured in different compartments (stream water, soil solutions, rocks, soils and soil leachates and vegetation) of a small permafrost-dominated watershed in the Central Siberian Plateau. The Sr and Ca in the area are supplied by basalt weathering and atmospheric depositions, which significantly impact the Sr isotopic compositions. Only vegetation significantly fractionates the calcium isotopes within the watershed. These fractionations occur during Ca uptake by roots and along the transpiration stream within the larch trees and are hypothesised to be the result of chromatographic processes and Ca oxalate crystallisations during Ca circulation or storage within plant organs. Biomass degradation significantly influences the Ca isotopic compositions of soil solutions and soil leachates via the release of light Ca, and organic and organo-mineral colloids are thought to affect the Ca isotopic compositions of soil solutions by preferential scavenging of 40Ca. The imprint of organic matter degradation on the δ44/40Ca of soil solutions is much more significant for the warmer south-facing slope of the watershed than for the shallow and cold soil active layer of the north-facing slope. As a result, the available stock of biomass and the decomposition rates appear to be critical parameters that regulate the impact of vegetation on the soil-water system in permafrost areas. Finally, the obtained δ44/40Ca patterns contrast with those described for permafrost-free environments with a much lower δ44/40Ca fractionation factor between soils and plants, suggesting specific features of organic matter decomposition in permafrost environments. The biologically induced Ca isotopic fractionation observed at the soil profile scale is not pronounced at the scale of the streams and large rivers in which the δ44/40Ca signature may be controlled by the heterogeneity of lithological sources.

  9. Radiogenic p-isotopes from SNIa, nuclear physics uncertainties and Galactic chemical evolution compared with values in primitive meteorites

    CERN Document Server

    Travaglio, C; Rauscher, T; Dauphas, N; Roepke, F K R; Hillebrandt, W

    2014-01-01

    The nucleosynthesis of proton-rich isotopes is calculated for multi-dimensional Chandrasekhar-mass models of Type Ia supernovae with different metallicities. The predicted abundances of the short-lived radioactive isotopes 92Nb, 97Tc, 98Tc and 146Sm are given in this framework. The abundance seeds are obtained by calculating s-process nucleosynthesis in the material accreted onto a carbon-oxygen white dwarf from a binary companion. A fine grid of s-seeds at different metallicities and 13C-pocket efficiencies is considered. A galactic chemical evolution model is used to predict the contribution of SNIa to the solar system p-nuclei composition measured in meteorites. Nuclear physics uncertainties are critical to determine the role of SNeIa in the production of 92Nb and 146Sm. We find that, if standard Chandrasekhar-mass SNeIa are at least 50% of all SNIa, they are strong candidates for reproducing the radiogenic p-process signature observed in meteorites.

  10. The growth of the continental crust: Constraints from radiogenic isotope geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Paul N.

    1988-01-01

    Most models for evolution of continental crust are expressed in the form of a diagram illustrating the cumulative crustal mass (normalized relative to the present crustal mass) as a function of time. Thus, geochronological data inevitably play a major role in either constructing or testing crustal growth models. For all models, determining the start-time for effective crustal accretion is of vital importance. To this end, the continuing search for, and reliable characterization of, the most ancient crustal rock-units remains a worthy enterprise. Another important role for geochronology and radiogenic isotope geochemistry is to assess the status of major geological events as period either of new crust generation or of reworking of earlier formed continental crust. For age characterization of major geological provinces, using the critieria outined, the mass (or volume) of crust surviving to the present day should be determinable as a function of crust formation age. More recent developments, however, appear to set severe limitations on recycling of crust, at least by the process of sediment subduction. In modeling crustal growth without recycling, valuable constaints on growth rate variations through time can be provided if variations in the average age of the continental crust can be monitored through geological history. The question of the average age of the exposed continental crust was addressed by determining Sm-Nd crustal residence model ages (T-CR) for fine-grained sediment loads of many of the world's major rivers.

  11. Automated Sample Preparation for Radiogenic and Non-Traditional Metal Isotopes: Removing an Analytical Barrier for High Sample Throughput

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, M. Paul; Romaniello, Stephen; Gordon, Gwyneth W.; Anbar, Ariel D.; Herrmann, Achim; Martinez-Boti, Miguel A.; Anagnostou, Eleni; Foster, Gavin L.

    2014-05-01

    MC-ICP-MS has dramatically improved the analytical throughput for high-precision radiogenic and non-traditional isotope ratio measurements, compared to TIMS. The generation of large data sets, however, remains hampered by tedious manual drip chromatography required for sample purification. A new, automated chromatography system reduces the laboratory bottle neck and expands the utility of high-precision isotope analyses in applications where large data sets are required: geochemistry, forensic anthropology, nuclear forensics, medical research and food authentication. We have developed protocols to automate ion exchange purification for several isotopic systems (B, Ca, Fe, Cu, Zn, Sr, Cd, Pb and U) using the new prepFAST-MC™ (ESI, Nebraska, Omaha). The system is not only inert (all-flouropolymer flow paths), but is also very flexible and can easily facilitate different resins, samples, and reagent types. When programmed, precise and accurate user defined volumes and flow rates are implemented to automatically load samples, wash the column, condition the column and elute fractions. Unattended, the automated, low-pressure ion exchange chromatography system can process up to 60 samples overnight. Excellent reproducibility, reliability, recovery, with low blank and carry over for samples in a variety of different matrices, have been demonstrated to give accurate and precise isotopic ratios within analytical error for several isotopic systems (B, Ca, Fe, Cu, Zn, Sr, Cd, Pb and U). This illustrates the potential of the new prepFAST-MC™ (ESI, Nebraska, Omaha) as a powerful tool in radiogenic and non-traditional isotope research.

  12. Isotope geochemistry. Biological signatures in clumped isotopes of O₂.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Laurence Y; Ash, Jeanine L; Young, Edward D

    2015-04-24

    The abundances of molecules containing more than one rare isotope have been applied broadly to determine formation temperatures of natural materials. These applications of "clumped" isotopes rely on the assumption that isotope-exchange equilibrium is reached, or at least approached, during the formation of those materials. In a closed-system terrarium experiment, we demonstrate that biological oxygen (O2) cycling drives the clumped-isotope composition of O2 away from isotopic equilibrium. Our model of the system suggests that unique biological signatures are present in clumped isotopes of O2—and not formation temperatures. Photosynthetic O2 is depleted in (18)O(18)O and (17)O(18)O relative to a stochastic distribution of isotopes, unlike at equilibrium, where heavy-isotope pairs are enriched. Similar signatures may be widespread in nature, offering new tracers of biological and geochemical cycling.

  13. Tracking seasonal subglacial drainage evolution of alpine glaciers using radiogenic Nd and Sr isotope systematics: Lemon Creek Glacier, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinger, A. E.; Aciego, S.; Stevenson, E. I.; Arendt, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    The transport pathways of water beneath a glacier are subject to change as melt seasons progress due to variability in the balance between basal water pressure and water flux. Subglacial hydrology has been well studied, but the understanding of spatial distribution is less well constrained. Whereas radiogenic isotopic tracers have been traditionally used as proxies to track spatial variability and weathering rates in fluvial and riverine systems, these techniques have yet to be applied extensively to the subglacial environment and may help resolve ambiguity in subglacial hydrology. Research has shown the 143Nd/144Nd values can reflect variation in source provenance processes due to variations in the age of the continental crust. Correlating the 143Nd/144Nd with other radiogenic isotope systematics such as strontium (87Sr/86Sr) provides important constraints on the role of congruent and incongruent weathering processes. Our study presents the application of Nd and Sr systematics using isotopic ratios to the suspended load of subglacial meltwater collected over a single melt season at Lemon Creek Glacier, USA (LCG). The time-series data show an average ɛNd ~ -6.83, indicating a young bedrock (~60 MYA). Isotopic variation helps track the seasonal expansion of the subglacial meltwater channels and subsequent return to early season conditions due to the parabolic trend towards less radiogenic Nd in June and towards more radiogenic Nd beginning in mid-August. However, the high variability in July and early August may reflect a mixture of source as the channels diverge and derive sediment from differently aged lithologies. We find a poor correlation between 143Nd/144Nd and 87Sr/86Sr (R2= 0.38) along with a slight trend towards more radiogenic 87Sr/86Sr values with time ((R2= 0.49). This may indicate that, even as the residence time decreases over the melt season, the LCG subglacial system is relatively stable and that the bedrock is congruently weathered. Our study

  14. Calcium biogeochemical cycle at the beech tree-soil solution interface from the Strengbach CZO (NE France): insights from stable Ca and radiogenic Sr isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Anne-Désirée; Gangloff, Sophie; Labolle, François; Chabaux, François; Stille, Peter

    2017-09-01

    Calcium (Ca) is the fourth most abundant element in mineral nutrition and plays key physiological and structural roles in plant metabolism. At the soil-water-plant scale, stable Ca isotopes are a powerful tool for the identification of plant-mineral interactions and recycling via vegetation. Radiogenic Sr isotopes are often used as tracers of Ca sources and mixtures of different reservoirs. In this study, stable Ca and radiogenic Sr are combined and analysed in several organs from two beech trees that were collected in June and September in the Strengbach critical zone observatory (CZO) (NE France) and in corresponding soil solutions. At the beech-tree scale, this study confirms the field Ca adsorption (i.e., physico-chemical mechanism and not vital effects) on carboxyl acid groups of pectin in the apoplasm of small roots. The analysis of the xylem sap and corresponding organs shows that although the Strengbach CZO is nutrient-poor, Ca seems to be non-limiting for tree-growth. Different viscosities of xylem sap between the stemwood and branches or leaves can explain δ44/40Ca values in different tree-organs. The bark and phloem 40Ca-enrichments could be due to Ca-oxalate precipitation in the bark tissues and in the phloem. The results from this study regarding the combination of these two isotopic systems show that the isotopic signatures of the roots are dominated by Ca fractionation mechanisms and Sr, and thus Ca, source variations. In contrast, translocation mechanisms are only governed by Ca fractionation processes. This study showed that at the root-soil solution interface, litter degradation was not the main source of Ca and Sr and that the soil solutions are not the complement of uptake by roots for samples from the 2011/2013 period. The opposite is observed for older samples. These observations indicate the decreasing contribution of low radiogenic Sr fluxes, such as recycling, alimenting the soil solutions. Such reduced importance of nutrient uptake and

  15. Radiogenic nephropathy; Radiogene Nephropathie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gotthardt, M. [Univ. Medisch Centrum St Radboud, Nijmegen (Netherlands). Nucleaire Geneeskunde

    2010-07-01

    Patient-individual dosimetric analyses are a useful tool in external beam radiotherapy (EBR) to protect patients from side effects such as radiogenic nephropathy. At this point in time, individual dosimetry is not used as a standard in patient treated with radiolabelled antibody fragments or polypeptides. The reasons are a number of problems, which make patient dosimetry more challenging than in EBR. While in EBR, the dose is distributed evenly in the organ and the organ volume can exactly be determined, in internal radiotherapy the tracer is not evenly distributed within the organ leading to a non-uniform dose distribution. In addition, the dose rate of the most commonly used radionuclides is lower than in EBR and the range of their radiation differ, so that the radiobiological effects are differing considerably in comparison to EBR. Conclusion: More complex models have to be used for clinical kidney dosimetry in internal radiotherapy. In this paper, we give a concise overview of the reasons for accumulation of radiotracers in the kidney, the most recent developments in kidney dosimetry, and approaches to reduce the kidney uptake of radiotracers in order to avoid radiogenic nephropathy. (orig.)

  16. Technical Report on the Behavior of Trace Elements, Stable Isotopes, and Radiogenic Isotopes During the Processing of Uranium Ore to Uranium Ore Concentrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marks, N. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Borg, L. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Eppich, G. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gaffney, A. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Genneti, V. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hutcheon, I. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kristo, M. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lindvall, R. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ramon, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Robel, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Roberts, S. K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Schorzman, K. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sharp, M. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Singleton, M. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Williams, R. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-07-09

    The goals of this SP-1 effort were to understand how isotopic and elemental signatures behave during mining, milling, and concentration and to identify analytes that might preserve geologic signatures of the protolith ores. The impurities that are preserved through the concentration process could provide useful forensic signatures and perhaps prove diagnostic of sample origin.

  17. Copper isotope signatures in modern marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Susan H.; Vance, Derek; McManus, James; Severmann, Silke; Lyons, Timothy W.

    2017-09-01

    The development of metal stable isotopes as tools in paleoceanography requires a thorough understanding of their modern marine cycling. To date, no Cu isotope data has been published for modern sediments deposited under low oxygen conditions. We present data encompassing a broad spectrum of hydrographic and redox regimes, including continental margin and euxinic (sulphide-containing) settings. Taken together with previously published data from oxic settings, these data indicate that the modern oceanic sink for Cu has a surprisingly homogeneous isotopic composition of about +0.3‰ (δ65Cu, relative to NIST SRM976). We suggest that this signature reflects one of two specific water-column processes: (1) an equilibrium isotope fractionation between soluble, isotopically heavy, Cu complexed to strong organic ligands and an isotopically light pool sorbed to particles that deliver Cu to the sediment, or (2) an equilibrium isotope fractionation between the same isotopically heavy ligand-bound pool and the particle reactive free Cu2+ species, with the latter being scavenged by particulates and thereby delivered to the sediment. An output flux of about +0.3‰ into sediments is isotopically light relative to the known inputs to the ocean (at around +0.6‰) and the seawater value of +0.6 to +0.9‰, suggesting the presence of an as yet unidentified isotopically light source of Cu to the oceans. We hypothesize that this source may be hydrothermal, or may result from the partial dissolution of continentally derived particles.

  18. Radiogenic p-isotopes from type Ia supernova, nuclear physics uncertainties, and galactic chemical evolution compared with values in primitive meteorites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Travaglio, C. [INAF—Astrophysical Observatory Turin, Strada Osservatorio 20, I-10025 Pino Torinese (Turin) (Italy); Gallino, R. [B2FH Association, I-10025 Pino Torinese (Turin) (Italy); Rauscher, T. [Centre for Astrophysics Research, School of Physics, Astronomy and Mathematics, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); Dauphas, N. [Origins Laboratory, Department of the Geophysical Sciences and Enrico Fermi Institute, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Röpke, F. K. [Universität Würzburg, Am Hubland, D-97074 Würzburg (Germany); Hillebrandt, W., E-mail: travaglio@oato.inaf.it, E-mail: claudia.travaglio@b2fh.org [Max-Planck-Institut für Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85748 Garching bei München (Germany)

    2014-11-10

    The nucleosynthesis of proton-rich isotopes is calculated for multi-dimensional Chandrasekhar-mass models of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) with different metallicities. The predicted abundances of the short-lived radioactive isotopes {sup 92}Nb, {sup 97,} {sup 98}Tc, and {sup 146}Sm are given in this framework. The abundance seeds are obtained by calculating s-process nucleosynthesis in the material accreted onto a carbon-oxygen white dwarf from a binary companion. A fine grid of s-seeds at different metallicities and {sup 13}C-pocket efficiencies is considered. A galactic chemical evolution model is used to predict the contribution of SN Ia to the solar system p-nuclei composition measured in meteorites. Nuclear physics uncertainties are critical to determine the role of SNe Ia in the production of {sup 92}Nb and {sup 146}Sm. We find that, if standard Chandrasekhar-mass SNe Ia are at least 50% of all SN Ia, they are strong candidates for reproducing the radiogenic p-process signature observed in meteorites.

  19. Pleistocene paleo-groundwater as a pristine fresh water resource in southern Germany--evidence from stable and radiogenic isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Geldern, Robert; Baier, Alfons; Subert, Hannah L; Kowol, Sigrid; Balk, Laura; Barth, Johannes A C

    2014-10-15

    Shallow groundwater aquifers are often influenced by anthropogenic contaminants or increased nutrient levels. In contrast, deeper aquifers hold potentially pristine paleo-waters that are not influenced by modern recharge. They thus represent important water resources, but their recharge history is often unknown. In this study groundwater from two aquifers in southern Germany were analyzed for their hydrogen and oxygen stable isotope compositions. One sampling campaign targeted the upper aquifer that is actively recharged by modern precipitation, whereas the second campaign sampled the confined, deep Benkersandstein aquifer. The groundwater samples from both aquifers were compared to the local meteoric water line to investigate sources and conditions of groundwater recharge. In addition, the deep groundwater was dated by tritium and radiocarbon analyses. Stable and radiogenic isotope data indicate that the deep-aquifer groundwater was not part of the hydrological water cycle in the recent human history. The results show that the groundwater is older than ~20,000 years and most likely originates from isotopically depleted melt waters of the Pleistocene ice age. Today, the use of this aquifer is strictly regulated to preserve the pristine water. Clear identification of such non-renewable paleo-waters by means of isotope geochemistry will help local water authorities to enact and justify measures for conservation of these valuable resources for future generations in the context of a sustainable water management.

  20. Mesoclimatic imprints on palaeoclimate records from rift graben sediments: Implications from stable and radiogenic isotope data from mammalian tooth enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brachert, Thomas; Brügmann, Gerhard; Mertz, Dieter F.; Kullmer, Ottmar; Schrenk, Friedemann; Ssemmanda, Immaculate; Taubald, Herbert

    2010-05-01

    within the habitat of the hippopotamids and implies increasing evaporation of lake waters in the Albertine Rift. The variation in the Sr isotopic composition documents variable Sr fluxes from the Albertine Rift catchments composed of radiogenic Archaean, less radiogenic Proterozoic crustal rocks and unradiogenic Neogene mantle derived volcanic rocks. Lake Albert is located in Archaean rocks. Therefore, the most radiogenic strontium isotopic composition at 2 Ma implies contributions of meteoric waters draining dominantly Archaean crust and maximum isolation of the lake. This is consistent with its maximum evaporation state reflected in 18O/16O values and vegetation change inferred from 13C/12C. Our data show that mesoclimate variation induced by graben formation and rift shoulder uplift must be taken into account when interpreting rift floor related climate archives such as palaeosols.

  1. Isotopic and geochemical signatures of Late Quaternary sediments in the Fram Strait area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccali, J.; Hillaire-Marcel, C.; Carignan, J.; Reisberg, L. C.

    2010-12-01

    Arctic freshwater/sea-ice export through Fram Strait contributes to the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) and acts as a trigger or feedback mechanism in the climate/ocean system. Here, geochemical and isotopic analyses of cores raised along a transect through the Strait are used to document changes in sediment sources and sea-ice transport since the LGM. Radiogenic isotope and elemental data in leachable fractions vs residues are used as proxies for water mass vs sediment source signatures, respectively. Unequivocal linkage between leachates and water-mass properties are illustrated by the anthropogenic-lead overprint in leachates from core-top sediments. Below this polluted layer, leachates and residues from late Holocene sediments carry distinct geochemical signatures E and W of the Strait. Eastward, below the North Atlantic Water (NAW) mass flowing northward, Th/Zr and Th/Pb concentration ratios ranging 0.040-0.041 and 0.85-0.90, respectively, label GIN seas and western Spitzbergen sediment-sources. Westward, below outflowing Arctic waters and sea-ice routes, these ratios range 0.032-0.035 and 0.72-0.75, respectively, and label NE Greenland and Arctic sediment sources. Pb-isotopes exhibit a similar pattern with sediment carrying a mixed Variscan-Pan-African signature below the NAW route, and a mixture of less radiogenic sources in sediments deposited below the outflowing Arctic waters and sea-ice route. Back in time, divergent trends in some radiogenic isotope values are recorded westward, below the outflowing Arctic waters and sea-ice route. Whereas isotopic properties of residues suggest sedimentary supplies originating from the Canadian Arctic and/or the NW Greenland margin, lead data from leachates bear an "Arctic Ocean" signature illustrating variable relative contributions from the Russian vs Canadian ice-margins and/or rivers. During deglacial times, a significant change in sedimentary supplies is recorded at ~ 14 ka along with some

  2. Mechanical properties and permeability of hydrogen isotopes through CrNi35WTiAl alloy, containing radiogenic helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maksimkin, I.P.; Yukhimchuk, A.A.; Boitsov, I.Y.; Malkov, I.L.; Musyaev, R.K.; Baurin, A.Y.; Shevnin, E.V.; Vertey, A.V. [Russian Federal Nuclear Centre, RFNC-VNIIEf, Sarov (Russian Federation)

    2015-03-15

    The long-term contact of structural materials (SM) with tritium-containing media makes their properties in terms of kinetic permeability of hydrogen isotopes change. This change is the consequence of the defect formation in SM due to the result of {sup 3}He build-up generated by the radioactive decay of tritium dissolved in SM. This paper presents the experimental results concerning the permeability of hydrogen isotopes through CrNi35WTiAl alloy containing {sup 3}He and the impact of the presence of {sup 3}He and H on its mechanical properties. Tensile tests of cylindrical samples containing various concentrations of {sup 3}He (90, 230 and 560 appm) have been performed in inert and hydrogen atmospheres. The build-up of {sup 3}He has been made using the 'helium trick' technique. The maximal decrease in the plastic characteristics of the CrNi35WTiAl alloy occurs in samples with the highest {sup 3}He (560 appm) content at 873 K. The permeability of deuterium through the CrNi35WTiAl alloy in the initial state and that with 560 appm of {sup 3}He content was explored. The presence of this {sup 3}He concentration has shown an increase in deuterium permeability, evidently due to structural changes in the material under the impact of radiogenic helium.

  3. Automated sample preparation for radiogenic and non-traditional metal isotope analysis by MC-ICP-MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, M. P.; Romaniello, S. J.; Gordon, G. W.; Anbar, A. D.

    2012-12-01

    High throughput analysis is becoming increasingly important for many applications of radiogenic and non-traditional metal isotopes. While MC-ICP-MS instruments offer the potential for very high sample throughout, the requirement for labor-intensive sample preparation and purification procedures remains a substantial bottleneck. Current purification protocols require manually feeding gravity-driven separation columns, a process that is both costly and time consuming. This bottleneck is eliminated with the prepFAST-MC™, an automated, low-pressure ion exchange chromatography system that can process from 1 to 60 samples in unattended operation. The syringe-driven system allows sample loading, multiple acid washes, column conditioning and elution cycles necessary to isolate elements of interest and automatically collect up to 3 discrete eluent fractions at user-defined intervals (time, volume and flow rate). Newly developed protocols for automated purification of uranium illustrates high throughput (>30 per run), multiple samples processed per column (>30), complete (>99%) matrix removal, high recovery (> 98%, n=25), and excellent precision (2 sigma =0.03 permil, n=10). The prepFAST-MC™ maximizes sample throughput and minimizes costs associated with personnel and consumables providing an opportunity to greatly expand research horizons in fields where large isotopic data sets are required, including archeology, geochemistry, and climate/environmental science

  4. Compilation of Radiogenic Isotope Data in Mexico and their Petrogenetic Implications

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ignacio S Torres-Alvarado; Surendra P Verma1; Gerardo Carrasco-Nunez

    2000-03-01

    Seven hundred and twenty-five Sr, two hundred and forty-three Nd and one hundred and fifty-one Pb isotopic ratios from seven different Mexican magmatic provinces were compiled in an extensive geochemical database. Data were arranged according to the Mexican geological provinces, indicating for each province total number of analyses, range and mean of values and two times standard deviation (2). Data from seven provinces were included in the database: Mexican Volcanic Belt (MVB), Sierra Madre Occidental (SMO), Baja California (BC), Pacific Ocean (PacOc), Altiplano (AP), Sierra Madre del Sur (SMS), and Sierra Madre Oriental (SMOr). Isotopic values from upper mantle and lower crustal xenoliths, basement outcrops and sediments from the Cocos Plate were also compiled. In the MVB the isotopic ratios range as follows: 87Sr/86Sr 0.703003-0.70841; 143Nd/144Nd 0.512496-0.513098; 206Pb/204Pb 18.567-19.580; 207Pb/204Pb 15.466-15.647; 208Pb/204Pb 38.065-38.632. The SMO shows a large variation in 87Sr/86Sr ranging from ~ 0.7033 to 0.71387. 143Nd/144Nd ratios are relatively less variable with values from 0.51191 to 0.51286. Pb isotope ratios in the SMO are as follows: 206Pb/204Pb 18.060-18.860; 207Pb/204Pb 15.558- 15.636; 208Pb/204Pb 37.945-38.625. PacOc rocks show the most depleted Sr and Nd isotopic ratios (0.70232-0.70567 for Sr and 0.512631-0.513261 for Nd). Pb isotopes for PacOc show the following range: 206Pb/204Pb 18.049-19.910; 207Pb/204Pb 15.425-15.734; 208Pb/204Pb 37.449-39.404. The isotopic ratios of the AP rocks seem to be within the range of those from the PacOc. Most samples with reported Sr and Nd isotopic data are spread within and around the ``mantle array''. The SMO seems to have been formed by a mixing process between mantle derived magmas and continental crust. The MVB appears to have a larger mantle component, with AFC as the dominant petrogenetic process for the evolved rocks. There is still a need for Pb isotopic data in all Mexican magmatic provinces andof

  5. Radiogenic uveitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lommatzsch, P.K.; Weise, B. (Karl-Marx-Universitaet, Leipzig (German Democratic Republic). Bereich Medizin)

    1985-01-01

    Short irradiation (0.25 Gy/min) causes stronger exudative reactions in the rabbit's eye (amotio chorioideae at retinae) than protracted irradiation (0.025 Gy/min) with equal total dose. In patients with melanoma of the choroid membrane short irradiation times (1 - 6 days) more frequently cause early exudative reactions (amotio chorioideae et retinae, hemorrhages of the vessels of the retina) than longer irradiation times (7 - 14 days). The radiogenic exudative reactions in general recede spontaneously.

  6. Isotopic signatures for natural versus anthropogenic Pb in high-altitude Mt. Everest ice cores during the past 800 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Khanghyun; Hur, Soon Do; Hou, Shugui; Burn-Nunes, Laurie J; Hong, Sungmin; Barbante, Carlo; Boutron, Claude F; Rosman, Kevin J R

    2011-12-15

    A long-term record, extending back 800 years (1205 to 2002 AD), of the Pb isotopic composition ((206)Pb/(207)Pb and (208)Pb/(207)Pb) as well as Pb concentrations from high altitude Mt. Everest ice cores has the potential to identify sources and source regions affecting natural and anthropogenic Pb deposition in central Asia. The results show that the regional natural background Pb isotope signature (~1.20 for (206)Pb/(207)Pb and ~2.50 for (208)Pb/(207)Pb) in the central Himalayas was dominated by mineral dust over the last ~750 years from 1205 to 1960s, mostly originating from local sources with occasional contributions of long-range transported dust probably from Sahara desert and northwestern India. Since the 1970s, the Pb isotope ratios are characterized by a continuous decline toward less radiogenic ratios with the least mean ratios of 1.178 for (206)Pb/(207)Pb and 2.471 for (208)Pb/(207)Pb in the period 1990-1996. The depression of the (206)Pb/(207)Pb and (208)Pb/(207)Pb values during the corresponding periods is most likely due to an increasing influence of less radiogenic Pb of anthropogenic origin mainly from leaded gasoline used in South Asia (India as well as possibly Bangladesh and Nepal). From 1997 to 2002, isotopic composition tends to show a shift to slightly more radiogenic signature. This is likely attributed to reducing Pb emissions from leaded gasoline in source regions, coinciding with the nationwide reduction of Pb in gasoline and subsequent phase-out of leaded gasoline in South Asia since 1997. An interesting feature is the relatively high levels of Pb concentrations and enrichment factors (EF) between 1997 and 2002. Although the reason for this feature remains uncertain, it would be probably linked with an increasing influence of anthropogenic Pb emitted from other sources such as fossil fuel combustion and non-ferrous metal production.

  7. Potential application of radiogenic isotopes and geophysical methods to understand the hydrothermal dystem of the Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paces, James B.; Long, Andrew J.; Koth, Karl R.

    2015-01-01

    Numerous geochemical and geophysical studies have been conducted at Yellowstone National Park to better understand the hydrogeologic processes supporting the thermal features of the Park. This report provides the first 87Sr/86Sr and 234U/238U data for thermal water from the Upper Geyser Basin (UGB) intended to evaluate whether heavy radiogenic isotopes might provide insight to sources of groundwater supply and how they interact over time and space. In addition, this report summarizes previous geophysical studies made at Yellowstone National Park and provides suggestions for applying non-invasive ground and airborne studies to better understand groundwater flow in the subsurface of the UGB. Multiple samples from Old Faithful, Aurum, Grand, Oblong, and Daisy geysers characterized previously for major-ion concentrations and isotopes of water (δ2H, δ18O, and 3H) were analyzed for Sr and U isotopes. Concentrations of dissolved Sr and U are low (4.3–128 ng g-1 Sr and 0.026–0.0008 ng g-1 U); consequently only 87Sr/86Sr data are reported for most samples. Values of 87Sr/86Sr for most geysers remained uniform between April and September 2007, but show large increases in all five geysers between late October 2007 and early April, 2008. By late summer of 2008, 87Sr/86Sr values returned to values similar to those observed a year earlier. Similar patterns are not present in major-ion data measured on the same samples. Furthermore, large geochemical differences documented between geysers are not observed in 87Sr/86Sr data, although smaller differences between sites may be present. Sr-isotope data are consistent with a stratified hydrologic system where water erupted in spring and summer of 2007 and summer of 2008 equilibrated with local intracaldera rhyolite flows at shallower depths. Water erupted between October 2007 and April 2008 includes greater amounts of groundwater that circulated deep enough to acquire a radiogenic 87Sr/86Sr, most likely from Archean basement

  8. Anthropogenic influences on Pb/Al and lead isotope signature in annually layered Holocene Maar lake sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schettler, G.; Romer, R.L. [GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam, Telegrafenberg, D-14473 Potsdam (Germany)

    1998-08-01

    Annually laminated sediments from two Maar lakes in the West Eifel volcanic field (Germany) show anomalously high Pb within sections deposited during the first centuries A.D. exceeding the local geological background 8.5-fold in Lake Meerfelder Maar (MFM) and 4-fold in Lake Schalkenmehrener Maar (SMM). These Pb anomalies are associated with a distinct shift in the Pb isotope signature to less radiogenic compositions. The excess Pb causing the anomaly has the same isotopic composition as galena deposits 60 km to the NW of the Maar lakes. It is suggested that this component was transported airborne into the Maar lakes and originates from regional Roman Pb refinement and cupellation of argentiferous Pb. Varve chronostratigraphy of correlated cores indicates that significant Roman Pb input lasted for about 230 a. SMM does not get fluviatile input. Its sedimentary record is more sensitive to variations in airborne input than that of MFM, which had an inflow. SMM sediment sections deposited during periods of low soil erosion (early Holocene, Dark Ages) with comparably high Pb/Al values also show little radiogenic Pb. This is caused by airborne minerogenic matter from a geochemically and isotopically distinct remote source that becomes apparent only in sedimentation periods of very restricted local allochthonous input. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  9. Oxygen isotopic signature of CO2 from combustion processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. A. Brand

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available For a comprehensive understanding of the global carbon cycle precise knowledge of all processes is necessary. Stable isotope (13C and 18O abundances provide information for the qualification and the quantification of the diverse source and sink processes. This study focuses on the δ18O signature of CO2 from combustion processes, which are widely present both naturally (wild fires, and human induced (fossil fuel combustion, biomass burning in the carbon cycle. All these combustion processes use atmospheric oxygen, of which the isotopic signature is assumed to be constant with time throughout the whole atmosphere. The combustion is generally presumed to take place at high temperatures, thus minimizing isotopic fractionation. Therefore it is generally supposed that the 18O signature of the produced CO2 is equal to that of the atmospheric oxygen. This study, however, reveals that the situation is much more complicated and that important fractionation effects do occur. From laboratory studies fractionation effects on the order of up to 26%permil; became obvious in the derived CO2 from combustion of different kinds of material, a clear differentiation of about 7‰ was also found in car exhausts which were sampled directly under ambient atmospheric conditions. We investigated a wide range of materials (both different raw materials and similar materials with different inherent 18O signature, sample geometries (e.g. texture and surface-volume ratios and combustion circumstances. We found that the main factor influencing the specific isotopic signatures of the combustion-derived CO2 and of the concomitantly released oxygen-containing side products, is the case-specific rate of combustion. This points firmly into the direction of (diffusive transport of oxygen to the reaction zone as the cause of the isotope fractionation. The original total 18O signature of the material appeared to have little influence, however, a contribution of specific bio

  10. Global Isotopic Signatures of Oceanic Island Basalts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-08-01

    Appendix). Samples in the data set are mainly basalt. with some gabbros and trachybasalts, trachytes and other silica-rich rocks relative to basalt...Hart (1984) contoured world maps of OIB isotope data for his three DUPAL anomaly criteria [ASr> 40; A7/4 > 3; A8/4 > 401. These maps show a

  11. Isotopic signature and impact of car catalysts on the anthropogenic osmium budget.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, André; Gariépy, Clement

    2005-06-15

    Higher osmium concentrations and lower 187Os/188Os ratios in sediments from urban areas have been linked to anthropogenic osmium sources. Automobile catalytic converters that use platinum group metals (PGM) are a potential source for this Os pollution. We present the first direct Os concentrations and isotopic measurements of catalytic converters for major automobile brands to test the assumption that car catalysts release Os with a distinct signature in the environment. The analysis of four new catalytic converters yields similar low 187Os/188Os ratios (0.1-0.2), suggesting a similar source for the PGM. The Os concentrations measured are in the ppt range (6-228 ppt). From our results, the osmium contribution of the car catalysts to the environment through attrition (wearing and grinding down of the catalyst by friction) is predicted to be low, car catalyst operating temperatures. Moreover, we estimate that car catalysts may be responsible for up to approximately 120 pg Os/m2 deposited per year in urban areas and that part of it may be exported to sedimentary sinks. Car catalytic converters are thus an important anthropogenic osmium source in densely populated areas. The NIST car catalyst standard (SRM-2557, made from recycled used catalysts) yields higher concentrations (up to 721 ppt Os) and a more radiogenic isotopic composition (approximately 0.38), perhaps indicative of Os contamination during its preparation.

  12. Hydrothermal versus active margin sediment supply to the eastern equatorial Pacific over the past 23 million years traced by radiogenic Pb isotopes: Paleoceanographic and paleoclimatic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höfig, Tobias W.; Hoernle, Kaj; Hauff, Folkmar; Frank, Martin

    2016-10-01

    We investigated the evolution of the Pb isotopic composition of bulk sediments on the Cocos Plate in sedimentary successions of Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) Site 495 and Ocean Drilling Program/Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (ODP/IODP) Site 1256 over the past 23 million years of depositional history. Our study addresses the relationship of the sediment Pb isotope record to plate tectonics, weathering inputs, and paleoceanography. It is the first effort to characterize the Pb isotopic evolution of eastern equatorial Pacific sedimentation covering the entire tectonic pathway of the Cocos Plate from its formation at the East Pacific Rise to its arrival at the Central American subduction zone. The Sites 495 and 1256 bulk sediment Pb isotope records are fully consistent over time despite distinct differences between the type of sediment deposited at both locations. A systematic and continuous trend from ∼23 to ∼6-4 Ma toward more radiogenic Pb isotopic compositions, e.g., 206Pb/204Pb ratios increase from 18.29 to 18.81, reflects a decrease in the contribution of hydrothermal particles from the East Pacific Rise and an increase in the predominantly eolian contribution of mixed weathering products from the continental arcs of the Northern and south Central Andes as well as from southern Mexico. Surprisingly, both the Pb isotopic composition of the detrital fraction and that of past seawater indicate that inputs from nearby Central America and the Galápagos Archipelago did not significantly contribute to the sediments of our core locations but were overwhelmed by other sediment sources. A systematic change to less radiogenic Pb isotope ratios in sediments younger than ∼4-3 Ma, reaching present-day 206Pb/204Pb values near 18.70, reflects a reduction of the continental input from the South Central Volcanic Zone of the Andean Arc and increased contributions from southern Mexican igneous complexes. This isotopic trend reversal took place as a consequence of

  13. Isotopic signatures for natural versus anthropogenic Pb in high-altitude Mt. Everest ice cores during the past 800 years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Khanghyun; Hur, Soon Do [Korea Polar Research Institute, Songdo Techno Park, 7-50, Songdo-dong, Yeonsu-gu, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of); Hou, Shugui [State Key Laboratory of Cryospheric Science, Cold and Arid Regions Environmental and Engineering Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Science, Lanzhou 730000 (China); School of Geographic and Oceanographic Sciences, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Burn-Nunes, Laurie J. [Department of Imaging and Applied Physics, Curtin University of Technology, GPO Box U1987, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia); Hong, Sungmin, E-mail: smhong@inha.ac.kr [Department of Ocean Sciences, Inha University, 253 Yonghyun-dong, Nam-gu, Incheon, 402-751 (Korea, Republic of); Barbante, Carlo [Department of Environmental Sciences, University Ca' Foscari of Venice, Dorsoduro 2137, 30 123 Venice (Italy); Institute for the Dynamics of Environmental Processes-CNR, University Ca' Foscari of Venice, Dorsoduro 2137, 30 123 Venice (Italy); Boutron, Claude F. [Laboratoire de Glaciologie et Geophysique de l' Environnement (UMR Universite Joseph Fourier/CNRS 5183 ), 54 rue Moliere, BP 96, 38402 Saint Martin d' Heres Cedex (France); Unite de Formation et de Recherche ' Physique, Ingenierie, Terre, Environnement, Mecanique' , Universite Joseph Fourier de Grenoble ( Institut Universitaire de France ), 715 rue de la Houille Blanche, BP 53, 38041 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Rosman, Kevin J.R. [Department of Imaging and Applied Physics, Curtin University of Technology, GPO Box U1987, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia)

    2011-12-15

    A long-term record, extending back 800 years (1205 to 2002 AD), of the Pb isotopic composition ({sup 206}Pb/{sup 207}Pb and {sup 208}Pb/{sup 207}Pb) as well as Pb concentrations from high altitude Mt. Everest ice cores has the potential to identify sources and source regions affecting natural and anthropogenic Pb deposition in central Asia. The results show that the regional natural background Pb isotope signature ({approx} 1.20 for {sup 206}Pb/{sup 207}Pb and {approx} 2.50 for {sup 208}Pb/{sup 207}Pb) in the central Himalayas was dominated by mineral dust over the last {approx} 750 years from 1205 to 1960s, mostly originating from local sources with occasional contributions of long-range transported dust probably from Sahara desert and northwestern India. Since the 1970s, the Pb isotope ratios are characterized by a continuous decline toward less radiogenic ratios with the least mean ratios of 1.178 for {sup 206}Pb/{sup 207}Pb and 2.471 for {sup 208}Pb/{sup 207}Pb in the period 1990-1996. The depression of the {sup 206}Pb/{sup 207}Pb and {sup 208}Pb/{sup 207}Pb values during the corresponding periods is most likely due to an increasing influence of less radiogenic Pb of anthropogenic origin mainly from leaded gasoline used in South Asia (India as well as possibly Bangladesh and Nepal). From 1997 to 2002, isotopic composition tends to show a shift to slightly more radiogenic signature. This is likely attributed to reducing Pb emissions from leaded gasoline in source regions, coinciding with the nationwide reduction of Pb in gasoline and subsequent phase-out of leaded gasoline in South Asia since 1997. An interesting feature is the relatively high levels of Pb concentrations and enrichment factors (EF) between 1997 and 2002. Although the reason for this feature remains uncertain, it would be probably linked with an increasing influence of anthropogenic Pb emitted from other sources such as fossil fuel combustion and non-ferrous metal production.

  14. Isotopic signatures of anthropogenic CH4 sources in Alberta, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, M.; Sherwood, O. A.; Dlugokencky, E. J.; Kessler, R.; Giroux, L.; Worthy, D. E. J.

    2017-09-01

    A mobile system was used for continuous ambient measurements of stable CH4 isotopes (12CH4 and 13CH4) and ethane (C2H6). This system was used during a winter mobile campaign to investigate the CH4 isotopic signatures and the C2H6/CH4 ratios of the main anthropogenic sources of CH4 in the Canadian province of Alberta. Individual signatures were derived from δ13CH4 and C2H6 measurements in plumes arriving from identifiable single sources. Methane emissions from beef cattle feedlots (n = 2) and landfill (n = 1) had δ13CH4 signatures of -66.7 ± 2.4‰ and -55.3 ± 0.2‰, respectively. The CH4 emissions associated with the oil or gas industry had distinct δ13CH4 signatures, depending on the formation process. Emissions from oil storage tanks (n = 5) had δ13CH4 signatures ranging from -54.9 ± 2.9‰ to -60.6 ± 0.6‰ and non-detectable C2H6, characteristic of secondary microbial methanogenesis in oil-bearing reservoirs. In contrast, CH4 emissions associated with natural gas facilities (n = 8) had δ13CH4 signatures ranging from -41.7 ± 0.7‰ to -49.7 ± 0.7‰ and C2H6/CH4 molar ratios of 0.10 for raw natural gas to 0.04 for processed/refined natural gas, consistent with thermogenic origins. These isotopic signatures and C2H6/CH4 ratios have been used for source discrimination in the weekly atmospheric measurements of stable CH4 isotopes over a two-month winter period at the Lac La Biche (LLB) measurement station, located in Alberta, approximately 200 km northeast of Edmonton. The average signature of -59.5 ± 1.4‰ observed at LLB is likely associated with transport of air after passing over oil industry sources located south of the station.

  15. Isotopic Signature of the Ancient Biosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    DesMarais, D. J.; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The age distribution of 261 field localities, sampled for their well-preserved Archean and Proterozoic sedimentary rocks, revealed a 500-700 Ma episodicity. Assuming that the numbers of sites are a proxy for mass of sediments, the record of well-preserved sediments is more abundant in the intervals 3.5-3.3, 2.8-2.5, 2.1-1.8, 1.5-1.3, and 1.0-0.54 Ga than in the intervening intervals. It is proposed that the crustal inventory of photosynthetic organic carbon was modulated by the volume of sedimentation in sites favorable for the burial and long-term preservation of organic carbon. Tectonic processes controlled this sediment volume. Episodic increases in the organic inventory led to stepwise increases in oxidized reservoirs (e.g., O2, SO4(2-), Fe(3+). The interval 2.9-2.5 Ga recorded a large rise in seawater Sr-87/Sr-86, the oldest-known extensive banded iron formations, and the first evidence (C-13-depleted kerogens) of O2 use by methylotrophic bacteria. The interval 2.2-1.8 Ga has both carbon isotopic evidence for a stepwise increase in the organic reservoir and also paleosol evidence for an O2 increase. The interval 1.1-0.6 Ga shows isotopic evidence for another organic carbon increase. The interval 1.5-1.3 Ga revealed no such increases as yet, perhaps because incomplete rifting of the mid-Proterozoic supercontinent was associated with extensive sedimentation in oxidized continental basins, producing redbeds, coarse clastics, etc. Such sedimentation did not promote the burial of reduced carbon.

  16. Aerosol isotopic ammonium signatures over the remote Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, C. T.; Jickells, T. D.; Baker, A. R.; Marca, A.; Johnson, M. T.

    2016-05-01

    We report aerosol ammonium 15N signatures for samples collected from research cruises on the South Atlantic and Caribbean using a new high sensitivity method. We confirm a pattern of isotopic signals from generally light (δ15N -5 to -10‰), for aerosols with very low (ocean, to generally heavier values (δ15N +5 to +10‰), for aerosols collected in temperate and tropical latitudes and with higher ammonium concentrations (>2 nmol m-3). We discuss whether this reflects a mixing of aerosols from two end-members (polluted continental and remote marine emissions), or isotopic fractionation during aerosol transport.

  17. Metal stable isotope signatures as tracers in environmental geochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiederhold, Jan G

    2015-03-03

    The biogeochemical cycling of metals in natural systems is often accompanied by stable isotope fractionation which can now be measured due to recent analytical advances. In consequence, a new research field has emerged over the last two decades, complementing the traditional stable isotope systems (H, C, O, N, S) with many more elements across the periodic table (Li, B, Mg, Si, Cl, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ge, Se, Br, Sr, Mo, Ag, Cd, Sn, Sb, Te, Ba, W, Pt, Hg, Tl, U) which are being explored and potentially applicable as novel geochemical tracers. This review presents the application of metal stable isotopes as source and process tracers in environmental studies, in particular by using mixing and Rayleigh model approaches. The most important concepts of mass-dependent and mass-independent metal stable isotope fractionation are introduced, and the extent of natural isotopic variations for different elements is compared. A particular focus lies on a discussion of processes (redox transformations, complexation, sorption, precipitation, dissolution, evaporation, diffusion, biological cycling) which are able to induce metal stable isotope fractionation in environmental systems. Additionally, the usefulness and limitations of metal stable isotope signatures as tracers in environmental geochemistry are discussed and future perspectives presented.

  18. Isotopic signatures: An important tool in today`s world

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rokop, D.J.; Efurd, D.W.; Benjamin, T.M.; Cappis, J.H.; Chamberlin, J.W.; Poths, H.; Roensch, F.R.

    1995-12-01

    High-sensitivity/high-accuracy actinide measurement techniques developed to support weapons diagnostic capabilities at the Los Alamos National Laboratory are now being used for environmental monitoring. The measurement techniques used are Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry (TIMS), Alpha Spectrometry(AS), and High Resolution Gamma Spectrometry(HRGS). These techniques are used to address a wide variety of actinide inventory issues: Environmental surveillance, site characterizations, food chain member determination, sedimentary records of activities, and treaty compliance concerns. As little as 10 femtograms of plutonium can be detected in samples and isotopic signatures determined on samples containing sub-100 femtogram amounts. Uranium, present in all environmental samples, can generally yield isotopic signatures of anthropogenic origin when present at the 40 picogam/gram level. Solid samples (soils, sediments, fauna, and tissue) can range from a few particles to several kilograms in size. Water samples can range from a few milliliters to as much as 200 liters.

  19. Kinetic control on Zn isotope signatures recorded in marine diatoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köbberich, Michael; Vance, Derek

    2017-08-01

    Marine diatoms dominate the oceanic cycle of the essential micronutrient zinc (Zn). The stable isotopes of zinc and other metals are increasingly used to understand trace metal micronutrient cycling in the oceans. One clear feature of the early isotope data is the heavy Zn isotope signature of the average oceanic dissolved pool relative to the inputs, potentially driven by uptake of light isotopes into phytoplankton cells and export to sediments. However, despite the fact that diatoms strip Zn from surface waters across the Antarctic polar front in the Southern Ocean, the local upper ocean is not isotopically heavy. Here we use culturing experiments to quantify the extent of Zn isotope fractionation by diatoms and to elucidate the mechanisms driving it. We have cultured two different open-ocean diatom species (T. oceanica and Chaetoceros sp.) in a series of experiments at constant medium Zn concentration but at bioavailable medium Fe ranging from limiting to replete. We find that T. oceanica can maintain high growth rates and Zn uptake rates over the full range of bioavailable iron (Fe) investigated, and that the Zn taken up has a δ66Zn that is unfractionated relative to that of the bioavailable free Zn in the medium. The studied representative of the genus Chaetoceros, on the other hand, shows more significantly reduced Zn uptake rates at low Fe and records more variable biomass δ66Zn signatures, of up to 0.85‰ heavier than the medium. We interpret the preferential uptake of heavy isotopes at extremely low Zn uptake rates as potentially due to either of the following two mechanisms. First, the release of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), at low Fe levels, may preferentially scavenge heavy Zn isotopes. Second, the Zn uptake rate may be slow enough to establish pseudo-equilibrium conditions at the transporter site, with heavy Zn isotopes forming more stable surface complexes. Thus we find that, in our experiments, Fe-limitation exerts a key control that

  20. Shergottite Lead Isotope Signature in Chassigny and the Nakhlites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J. H.; Simon, J. I.

    2017-01-01

    The nakhlites/chassignites and the shergottites represent two differing suites of basaltic martian meteorites. The shergottites have ages less than or equal to 0.6 Ga and a large range of initial Sr-/Sr-86 and epsilon (Nd-143) ratios. Conversely, the nakhlites and chassignites cluster at 1.3-1.4 Ga and have a limited range of initial Sr-87/Sr-86 and epsilon (Nd-143). More importantly, the shergottites have epsilon (W-182) less than 1, whereas the nakhlites and chassignites have epsilon (W-182) approximately 3. This latter observation precludes the extraction of both meteorite groups from a single source region. However, recent Pb isotopic analyses indicate that there may have been interaction between shergottite and nakhlite/chassignite Pb reservoirs.Pb Analyses of Chassigny: Two different studies haveinvestigated 207Pb/204Pb vs. 206Pb/204Pb in Chassigny: (i)TIMS bulk-rock analyses of successive leaches and theirresidue [3]; and (ii) SIMS analysis of individual minerals[4]. The bulk-rock analyses fall along a regression of SIMSplagioclase analyses that define an errorchron that is olderthan the Solar System (4.61±0.1 Ga); i.e., these define amixing line between Chassigny’s principal Pb isotopic components(Fig. 1). Augites and olivines in Chassingy (notshown) also fall along or near the plagioclase regression [4].This agreement indicates that the whole-rock leachateslikely measure indigenous, martian Pb, not terrestrial contamination[5]. SIMS analyses of K-spars and sulfides definea separate, sub-parallel trend having higher 207Pb/206Pbvalues ([4]; Fig. 1). The good agreement between the bulkrockanalyses and the SIMS analyses of plagioclases alsoindicates that the Pb in the K-spars and sulfides cannot be amajor component of Chassigny.The depleted reservoir sampled by Chassigny plagioclaseis not the same as the solar system initial (PAT) andrequires a multi-stage origin. Here we show a two-stagemodel (Fig. 1) with a 238U/204Pb (µ) of 0.5 for 4.5-2.4 Gaand a µ of

  1. The provenance of Cretaceous to Quaternary sediments in the Tarfaya basin, SW Morocco: Evidence from trace element geochemistry and radiogenic Nd-Sr isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Sajid; Stattegger, Karl; Garbe-Schönberg, Dieter; Frank, Martin; Kraft, Steffanie; Kuhnt, Wolfgang

    2014-02-01

    We present trace element compositions, rare earth elements (REEs) and radiogenic Nd-Sr isotope analyses of Cretaceous to recent sediments of the Tarfaya basin, SW Morocco, in order to identify tectonic setting, source rocks composition and sediments provenance. The results suggest that the sediments originate from heterogeneous source areas of the Reguibat Shield and the Mauritanides (West African Craton), as well as the western Anti-Atlas, which probably form the basement in this area. For interpreting the analyzed trace element results, we assume that elemental ratios such as La/Sc, Th/Sc, Cr/Th, Th/Co, La/Co and Eu/Eu∗ in the detrital silicate fraction of the sedimentary rocks behaved as a closed system during transport and cementation, which is justified by the consistency of all obtained results. The La/Y-Sc/Cr binary and La-Th-Sc ternary relationships suggest that the Tarfaya basin sediments were deposited in a passive margin setting. The trace element ratios of La/Sc, Th/Sc, Cr/Th and Th/Co indicate a felsic source. Moreover, chondrite-normalized REE patterns with light rare earth elements (LREE) enrichment, a flat heavy rare earth elements (HREE) and negative Eu anomalies can also be attributed to a felsic source for the Tarfaya basin sediments. The Nd isotope model ages (TDM = 2.0-2.2 Ga) of the Early Cretaceous sediments suggest that sediments were derived from the Eburnean terrain (Reguibat Shield). On the other hand, Late Cretaceous to Miocene--Pliocene sediments show younger model ages (TDM = 1.8 Ga, on average) indicating an origin from both the Reguibat Shield and the western Anti-Atlas. In contrast, the southernmost studied Sebkha Aridal section (Oligocene to Miocene-Pliocene) yields older provenance ages (TDM = 2.5-2.6 Ga) indicating that these sediments were dominantly derived from the Archean terrain of the Reguibat Shield.

  2. Cadmium Isotope Fractionation in Seawater - A Signature of Nutrient Utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichtlhuber, S.; Rehkaemper, M.; Halliday, A. N.

    2005-12-01

    Cadmium displays a nutrient-like distribution akin to phosphorous in the oceans. This has been attributed to the assimilation of Cd by phytoplankton in surface waters and re-mineralization at depth. If biological uptake is associated with kinetic isotopic fractionation, as recently suggested by Lacan et al. (2005), then the Cd-depleted surface waters of the oceans (with Cd contents of Lacan et al., 2005). In this study, we have extended the search for Cd isotope variations in the oceans with analyses of two depth profiles and various additional seawater samples from the North Pacific, the Arctic, and the Southern Ocean. The Cd isotope measurements utilized a double spike technique in conjunction with multiple-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS), to achieve a precision and accuracy of about ± 0.8 to 1.5 ɛ114/110Cd. This precision is about a factor of 3 to 4 better than that of previous studies, which did not utilize a double spike. The data collected for the samples display a clear co-variation of Cd isotope compositions with Cd concentrations. The most Cd-rich water samples (with ~1 nmol/kg Cd) display the "lightest" Cd isotope compositions with ɛ114/110Cd ~ +3, akin to results previously obtained for crustal and mantle rocks (Wombacher et. al, 2003). In contrast, samples from the upper water column of the North Pacific (with Lacan et al. (2005), because inorganic geological processes (other than evaporation/condensation) do not appear to generate isotope effects as large as those observed in the present study (Wombacher et. al, 2003). These preliminary results suggest that Cd isotopes have the potential to become a useful proxy of nutrient utilization, which could supplement the Cd/Ca and δ13C records of previous studies, if suitable sedimentary archives can be identified that preserve the Cd isotope signatures of past seawater. References: Lacan F., Francois R., Ji Y. and Sherrell R., 2005. Does oceanic productivity production

  3. Latitudinal Trends in Stable Isotope Signatures of Northeast Atlantic Rhodoliths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Laurie

    2017-04-01

    Rhodoliths are free-living calcifying red algae that form extensive beds in shallow marine benthic environments (marine organisms and contribute to carbonate sediment accumulation. There is growing concern that these organisms are sensitive to global climate change, which will have important consequences for coastal productivity and stability. Despite their significance and sensitivity, their basic photosynthetic and calcification mechanisms are not well understood. The goal of this study was to determine the plasticity of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) uptake mechanisms of rhodoliths along a latitudinal gradient in the Northeast (NE) Atlantic using natural stable isotope signatures. The delta 13C signature of macroalgae can be used to provide an indication of the preferred inorganic carbon source (CO2 vs. HCO3-). Here we present the total and organic delta 13C signatures of NE Atlantic rhodoliths with respect to changing temperature and light along the latitudinal gradient from the Canary Islands to Spitsbergen. A decreasing trend in delta 13C signatures with increasing latitude suggests that rhodoliths rely solely on CO2 as an inorganic carbon source at mid latitudes, while those at low latitudes may be able to utilize HCO3-. Polar rhodoliths deviate from this trend, suggesting they may have unique physiological mechanisms related to inorganic carbon acquisition and assimilation, which may have important implications for calcification in an environment undergoing rapid changing ocean chemistry.

  4. Isotopic signature of atmospheric phosphate emitted from coal combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberger, Roi; Weiner, Tal; Angert, Alon

    2016-07-01

    Atmospheric deposition of phosphorus (P) serves as an important nutrient input for many terrestrial, marine and freshwater ecosystems, influencing their biogeochemistry and primary production. Fossil fuel combustion, principally coal, is estimated to be a major source of atmospheric-P in industrialized regions. In this research, we aim to find a distinct isotopic signature for fly coal ash, the by-product of coal combustion that is emitted to the atmosphere. This signature could be used to identify coal's contribution to atmospheric-P. For this aim, ten fly coal ash samples from different coal sources, collected by power station filters, were analyzed for P concentrations and stable oxygen isotopic composition (δ18OP). Two inorganic phosphate fractions were analyzed: HCl-extractable and resin-extractable (bioavailable P). High HCl-P concentrations of up to 3500 μg P/g ash were found with a distinct δ18OP range of 17.1-20.5‰. The resin-P concentrations were substantially lower (biosphere since these combustion products likely acidify in the atmosphere to become bioavailable. This is also supported by our finding that smaller particles, which are more indicative of the particles actually emitted to the atmosphere, are significantly P-richer. Natural dust sources' δ18OP overlap fly ash's range, complicating the assessment of coal's contribution. Nonetheless, our results provide a new tool for identification of fossil fuel combustion sources in local and global atmospheric P deposition.

  5. Understanding the interaction of injected CO2 and reservoir fluids in the Cranfield enhanced oil recovery (EOR) field (MS, USA) by non-radiogenic noble gas isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyore, Domokos; Stuart, Finlay; Gilfillan, Stuart

    2016-04-01

    Identifying the mechanism by which the injected CO2 is stored in underground reservoirs is a key challenge for carbon sequestration. Developing tracing tools that are universally deployable will increase confidence that CO2 remains safely stored. CO2 has been injected into the Cranfield enhanced oil recovery (EOR) field (MS, USA) since 2008 and significant amount of CO2 has remained (stored) in the reservoir. Noble gases (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe) are present as minor natural components in the injected CO2. He, Ne and Ar previously have been shown to be powerful tracers of the CO2 injected in the field (Györe et al., 2015). It also has been implied that interaction with the formation water might have been responsible for the observed CO2 loss. Here we will present work, which examines the role of reservoir fluids as a CO2 sink by examining non-radiogenic noble gas isotopes (20Ne, 36Ar, 84Kr, 132Xe). Gas samples from injection and production wells were taken 18 and 45 months after the start of injection. We will show that the fractionation of noble gases relative to Ar is consistent with the different degrees of CO2 - fluid interaction in the individual samples. The early injection samples indicate that the CO2 injected is in contact with the formation water. The spatial distribution of the data reveal significant heterogeneity in the reservoir with some wells exhibiting a relatively free flow path, where little formation water is contacted. Significantly, in the samples, where CO2 loss has been previously identified show active and ongoing contact. Data from the later stage of the injection shows that the CO2 - oil interaction has became more important than the CO2 - formation water interaction in controlling the noble gas fingerprint. This potentially provides a means to estimate the oil displacement efficiency. This dataset is a demonstration that noble gases can resolve CO2 storage mechanisms and its interaction with the reservoir fluids with high resolution

  6. Isotopic source signatures for atmospheric lead: the Southern Hemisphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollhöfer, A.; Rosman, K. J. R.

    2000-10-01

    Aerosols collected between 1994 and 1999 at more than 70 different sites affecting the Southern Hemisphere have been measured for their 206Pb/ 207Pb, 208Pb/ 207Pb and 206Pb/ 204Pb ratios and Pb concentrations. Lower ratios are found at the southern tips of Africa, Australia and South America probably due to the supply of alkyllead from a common supplier such as Associated Octel. The ratios increase in a northerly direction probably due to a changing market share in alkyllead or an increasing industrial Pb contribution. The geographical variations in isotopic signatures made it possible to broadly characterize the different regions that influence the Southern Hemisphere. Brazil and Argentina exhibited 206Pb/ 207Pb, 208Pb/ 207Pb and 206Pb/ 204Pb ratios in aerosols of 1.141-1.184, 2.416-2.442 and 17.77-18.57, respectively. Mexican aerosols had values of 1.188-1.197, 2.452-2.463 and 18.46-18.73. Aerosols sampled in Chile had low ratios in the South of 1.063-1.094, 2.337-2.373 and 16.46-17.13 which increased in a northerly direction. Emissions from South Africa were characterized by ratios 1.067-1.090, 2.340-2.358 and 16.53-16.99. In 1994-1995 Australia and New Zealand had ratios of 1.060-1.193, 2.324-2.445 and 16.08-18.54. In 1997 however, the range was narrower: 1.072-1.112, 2.342-2.398 and 16.55-17.36, respectively. These isotopic signatures are potentially useful for tracing sources of pollution and the movement of air-masses on a global scale.

  7. Coupled Pb isotopic and trace element systematics of the Tissint meteorite: Geochemical signatures of the depleted shergottite source mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriwaki, Ryota; Usui, Tomohiro; Simon, Justin I.; Jones, John H.; Yokoyama, Tetsuya; Tobita, Minato

    2017-09-01

    The application of Martian meteorite U-Th-Pb isotope systematics to track the geochemical evolution of the Martian mantle has had limited success because of the difficulty in discriminating an indigenous magmatic Pb component from secondary near-surface components that have additionally been overprinted by terrestrial contamination. To mitigate this challenge, a successive acid-leaching experiment was conducted on the Tissint meteorite, the freshest, witnessed fall of a primitive, olivine-bearing Martian basalt. Trace element concentration analyses of acid leachates and residues indicate that secondary terrestrial contaminants were effectively removed by the early steps in the leaching experiments and that the acid residues contain pristine Pb from Tissint. The acid residue, which shows the most depleted REE signature, also has the least radiogenic Pb isotopic composition (206Pb/204Pb = 10.948, 207Pb/204Pb = 11.187, 208Pb/204Pb = 30.228). A two-stage mantle evolution model based on this composition indicates that the Tissint mantle has the lowest μ-value (238U/204Pb = 1.62 ± 0.09) among the shergottite sources.

  8. THE CD ISOTOPE SIGNATURE OF THE SOUTHERN OCEAN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abouchami, W.; Galer, S. J.; Middag, R.; de Baar, H.; Andreae, M. O.; Feldmann, H.; Raczek, I.

    2009-12-01

    The availability of micronutrients can limit and control plankton ecosystems, notably in the Southern Ocean which plays a major role in regulating the CO2 biological pump. Cadmium has a nutrient-like distribution in seawater - it is directly incorporated into living plankton in the upper water column and re-mineralised at depth. The nutritional role of Cd (Price and Morel, 1990) makes it a potentially useful tracer of biological productivity. We report Cd concentration and Cd stable isotope data obtained using a double-spike TIMS method on seawater samples collected during the Zero and Drake Passage cruise (ANTXXIV-III, IPY-GEOTRACES 2008). Four vertical profiles were collected from 40 to 70°S across the Polar Front using the ultra-clean Titan frame (De Baar et al., 2008), providing a record of changes in biological productivity from the Subantarctic to the Antarctic region. Data from two profiles from the SE Atlantic (47.66°S, 4.28W) and Drake Passage (55.13°S, 65.53°W) obtained on 1 litre-sized samples are presented. Both profiles show a increase in Cd concentration with depth, with noticeably higher concentrations in the SE Atlantic. Cd and PO4 are positively correlated with distinct slopes for the two profiles. The Cd isotope data are expressed as ɛ112/110Cd relative to our JMC Mainz standard (± 8ppm, 2SD, N=17). ɛ112/110Cd values show a continuous decrease with increasing depth and a significant shift towards heavier values in the upper 400m at both stations resolvable outside analytical error (2SE ≤ 20ppm). The sense of Cd isotope fractionation confirms previous findings of uptake of “light” Cd by phytoplankton in the upper water column (Lacan et al., 2006; Ripperger et al., 2007; Schmidt et al., 2009). Most important is the evidence for a distinctive heavier Cd isotope signature in AASW relative to AAIW. This result demonstrates that different water masses carry distinct Cd isotopic compositions reflecting changes in Cd uptake by phytoplankton

  9. Stable isotope signatures of gases liberated from fluid inclusions in bedrock at Olkiluoto

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichinger, F. (Hydroisotop GmbH, Schweitenkirchen (DE)); Meier, D.; Haemmerli, J.; Diamond, L. (Bern Univ. (CH), RWI, Institute of Geological Sciences)

    2010-12-15

    Fluid inclusions in quartzes of the Olkiluoto bedrock contain gaseous N{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and higher hydrocarbons in varying proportions. Stable carbon and hydrogen isotope signatures of the gas phases give valuable information on their origin and the formation conditions. In previous studies, a method to liberate and quantify the gases trapped in fluid inclusions was developed. It allowed determining the carbon isotope signatures of liberated CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and higher hydrocarbons (HHC), but no hydrogen isotope data were acquired. The method was advanced and, in this study, also stable hydrogen isotopes of CH{sub 4} and H{sub 2} liberated from fluid inclusions could be analysed. The stable carbon signatures of methane and higher hydrocarbons, as well as the hydrogen isotope signatures of methane indicate a predominant thermogenic provenance for those gases. (orig.)

  10. Radiogenic and stable isotopes of mid-Miocene silicic volcanism in eastern Oregon: Evidence for variable and high Sr / low δ18O domains west of the terrane-cratonic lithosphere transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, E. N.; Streck, M. J.; Ramos, F. C.; Bindeman, I. N.

    2013-12-01

    Widespread mid-Miocene rhyolite volcanism of eastern Oregon mostly coeval with flood basalts of the Columbia River Basalt Province allows for mapping crustal domains using radiogenic and stable isotopes. Rhyolites are thought to be derived in large part by partial melting of the crust and thus yield direct information on the composition of the crust. Silicic volcanism is expressed in the form of numerous domes and tuffs exposed over a wide area (~300 km in N-S dimension and ~100 km in E-W dimension) west of the craton boundary, which runs parallel but mostly east of the Oregon-Idaho state border as delineated by geophysical characteristics and isotopic transitions. Here, we mainly focus on initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios and δ18O obtained from mid-Miocene silicic volcanic centers in eastern Oregon. Our data, in combination with data from the literature, indicate variable 87Sr/86Sr mostly along longitudinal sections, yet more similar ratios in latitudinal directions. Except for rare examples on the west side, dispersion of 87Sr/86Sr ratios among both silicic and basaltic rocks occurs eastward of 118.6°W. For example, rhyolites in the Owyhee region between 117.10°W and 117.25°W retain 87Sr/86Sr ratios ranging from 0.70413 to 0.70566. The most radiogenic Sri ratio of 0.70787 in our study is obtained on a plagioclase separate from Buchanan Dome complex located near the western boundary of our study area. Feldspar separates and fresh groundmass of samples from adjacent centers yield similar 87Sr/86Sr ratios. δ18O values for feldspars range from below 2‰ to above 9‰. In addition, there is a crude trend of rhyolites having lower δ18O and more radiogenic 87Sr/86Sr ratios. With one exception, all samples with 87Sr/86Sr above 0.7050 are depleted in 18O (δ18O 6‰). The most depleted oxygen ratios (<2‰) come from rhyolites ~80 km west of the cratonic margin reflecting remelting or assimilation of hydrothermally altered crust. Yet, some compositionally similar rhyolites

  11. Stable isotope deltas: Tiny, yet robust signatures in nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Willi A.; Coplen, Tyler B.

    2012-01-01

    Although most of them are relatively small, stable isotope deltas of naturally occurring substances are robust and enable workers in anthropology, atmospheric sciences, biology, chemistry, environmental sciences, food and drug authentication, forensic science, geochemistry, geology, oceanography, and paleoclimatology to study a variety of topics. Two fundamental processes explain the stable isotope deltas measured in most terrestrial systems: isotopic fractionation and isotope mixing. Isotopic fractionation is the result of equilibrium or kinetic physicochemical processes that fractionate isotopes because of small differences in physical or chemical properties of molecular species having different isotopes. It is shown that the mixing of radioactive and stable isotope end members can be modelled to provide information on many natural processes, including 14C abundances in the modern atmosphere and the stable hydrogen and oxygen isotopic compositions of the oceans during glacial and interglacial times. The calculation of mixing fractions using isotope balance equations with isotope deltas can be substantially in error when substances with high concentrations of heavy isotopes (e.g. 13C, 2H, and 18O ) are mixed. In such cases, calculations using mole fractions are preferred as they produce accurate mixing fractions. Isotope deltas are dimensionless quantities. In the International System of Units (SI), these quantities have the unit 1 and the usual list of prefixes is not applicable. To overcome traditional limitations with expressing orders of magnitude differences in isotope deltas, we propose the term urey (symbol Ur), after Harold C. Urey, for the unit 1. In such a manner, an isotope delta value expressed traditionally as−25 per mil can be written as−25 mUr (or−2.5 cUr or−0.25 dUr; the use of any SI prefix is possible). Likewise, very small isotopic differences often expressed in per meg ‘units’ are easily included (e.g. either+0.015 ‰ or+15 per meg

  12. Stable isotope deltas: tiny, yet robust signatures in nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Willi A; Coplen, Tyler B

    2012-09-01

    Although most of them are relatively small, stable isotope deltas of naturally occurring substances are robust and enable workers in anthropology, atmospheric sciences, biology, chemistry, environmental sciences, food and drug authentication, forensic science, geochemistry, geology, oceanography, and paleoclimatology to study a variety of topics. Two fundamental processes explain the stable isotope deltas measured in most terrestrial systems: isotopic fractionation and isotope mixing. Isotopic fractionation is the result of equilibrium or kinetic physicochemical processes that fractionate isotopes because of small differences in physical or chemical properties of molecular species having different isotopes. It is shown that the mixing of radioactive and stable isotope end members can be modelled to provide information on many natural processes, including (14)C abundances in the modern atmosphere and the stable hydrogen and oxygen isotopic compositions of the oceans during glacial and interglacial times. The calculation of mixing fractions using isotope balance equations with isotope deltas can be substantially in error when substances with high concentrations of heavy isotopes (e.g. (13)C, (2)H, and (18)O ) are mixed. In such cases, calculations using mole fractions are preferred as they produce accurate mixing fractions. Isotope deltas are dimensionless quantities. In the International System of Units (SI), these quantities have the unit 1 and the usual list of prefixes is not applicable. To overcome traditional limitations with expressing orders of magnitude differences in isotope deltas, we propose the term urey (symbol Ur), after Harold C. Urey, for the unit 1. In such a manner, an isotope delta value expressed traditionally as-25 per mil can be written as-25 mUr (or-2.5 cUr or-0.25 dUr; the use of any SI prefix is possible). Likewise, very small isotopic differences often expressed in per meg 'units' are easily included (e.g. either+0.015 ‰ or+15 per meg

  13. Os and U-Th isotope signatures of arc magmatism near Mount Mazama, Crater Lake, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ankney, Meagan E.; Shirey, Steven B.; Hart, Garret L.; Bacon, Charles R.; Johnson, Clark M.

    2016-03-01

    Interaction of mantle melts with the continental crust can have significant effects on the composition of the resulting melts as well as on the crust itself, and tracing this interaction is key to our understanding of arc magmatism. Lava flows and pyroclastic deposits erupted from ∼50 to 7.7 ka at Mt. Mazama (Crater Lake, Oregon) were analyzed for their Re/Os and U-Th isotopic compositions. Mafic lavas from monogenetic vents around Mt. Mazama that erupted during the buildup to its climactic eruption have lower 187Os/188Os ratios (0.1394 to 0.1956) and high 230Th excess ((230Th/238U)0 of 1.180 to 1.302), whereas dacites and rhyodacites tend to have higher 187Os/188Os ratios (0.2292 to 0.2788) and significant 238U excess ((230Th/238U)0 of 0.975 to 0.989). The less radiogenic Os isotope compositions of the mafic lavas can be modeled by assimilation of young (∼2.5 to 7 Ma), mafic lower crust that was modified during regional extension, whereas the more radiogenic Os isotope compositions of the dacites and rhyodacites can be attributed to assimilation of older (∼10 to 16 Ma), mid to upper crust that acquired its composition during an earlier period of Cascade magmatism. Production of Th excesses in the lower crust requires very young garnet formation accompanying dehydration melting in the lower crust at less than a few 100 ka by heat from recent basaltic magma injection. The results from this study suggest that the combination of Os and Th isotopes may be used to provide insights into the timescales of evolution of the continental crust in arc settings, as well as the influence of the crust on erupted magmas, and suggest a link between the age and composition of the lower and upper crust to regional tectonic extension and/or earlier Cascade magmatism.

  14. Stable isotopic signature of Australian monsoon controlled by regional convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwart, C.; Munksgaard, N. C.; Kurita, N.; Bird, M. I.

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the main meteorological drivers of rainfall isotopic variation in north Australia in order to improve the interpretation of isotopic proxy records in this region. An intense monitoring program was conducted during two monsoonal events that showed significant and systematic isotopic change over time. The results showed a close link between isotopic variation in precipitation and variability in monsoon conditions, associated with the presence of large convective envelopes propagating through the study site. The largest negative amplitudes in the isotopic signal were observed when eastward and westward moving precipitation systems within the convective envelope merged over the measurement site. This suggests that the amplitude of the isotopic signal is related to the size and activity of the convective envelope. The strong correlation between rainfall isotopic variation, regional outgoing longwave radiation and regional rainfall amount supports this conclusion. This is further strengthened by the strong relationship between isotopic variation and the integrated rainfall history of air masses prior to arriving at the measurement locations. A local amount effect was not significant and these findings support the interpretation of δ18O as proxy for regional climatic conditions rather than local rainfall amount. Meteorological parameters that characterize intra-seasonal variability of monsoon conditions were also found to be strongly linked to inter-seasonal variability of the monthly based δ18O values in the Global Network of Isotopes in Precipitation (GNIP) database. This leads to the conclusion that information about the Australian monsoon variability can likely be inferred from the isotopic proxy record in North Australia on short (intra seasonal) and long (inter seasonal or longer) timescales.

  15. Zinc Isotopic Signatures of the Upper Continental Crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Y.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, H.; Huang, F.

    2016-12-01

    To examine the Zn isotope systematics within the Upper Continental Crust (UCC), and isotope fractionation during chemical weathering in large spatial and temporal scales, we analyzed Zn isotopic compositions of loess, glacial diamictites, river sediments, and igneous rocks (samples in total 77). The Zn isotopic compositions (δ66Zn relative to JMC-Lyon) of loess display a limited variation (0.17‰ to 0.29‰), which is negatively correlated with Zn content and proxies for chemical weathering (e.g. CIA values), reflect the impact of chemical weathering. Glacial diamictites have more variable δ66Zn (0.09‰ to 0.48‰), but the average δ66Zn (0.29±0.03‰, 2SD) is similar to loess. δ66Zn of glacial diamictites correlate roughly negatively with CIA values, but have no correlation with Zn content, implying source heterogeneity and effect from chemical weathering. δ66Zn of A-type (0.39‰ to 0.45‰) and S-type (0.28‰ to 0.35‰) granites are both homogeneous, but the latter have systematically lighter δ66Zn. This may reflect no Zn isotopic fractionation during magmatic processes and involvement of isotopically light meta-sedimentary into the sources of S-type granites. Furthermore, δ66Zn in riverine sediments display a small variation from 0.23‰ to 0.37‰, while δ66Zn of the the shales vary from 0.14‰ to 0.53‰, which could result from a combination of processes, such as biological cycling and chemical weathering. Overall, our data suggest that incipient chemical weathering can fractionate Zn isotopes significantly, meanwhile, during this process, heavy Zn are released preferentially. The UCC is estimated to have an average δ66Zn of 0.30 ±0.03‰ (2SD) with data collected in this study, which is similar to the estimated value of Bulk Silicate Earth (0.28±0.05‰)[1] and mean dissolved riverine flux (0.33‰)[2], but distinctly lighter than the bulk composition of dissolved Zn in the ocean (0.51‰)[2]. [1] Chen et al., Zinc isotope fractionation

  16. Understanding the Carbon Isotopic Signature in Complex Environmental Matrices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Natali

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Elemental and isotopic analyses of carbon in environmental matrices usually integrate multiple sources having distinct concentration (wt% and 13C/12C isotopic ratio. Interpretation necessarily needs the characterization of the diverse end-members that usually are constituted by carbonate, organic and elemental components. In this view, we developed a routine protocol based on the analytical coupling of elementary and isotopic compositions that is able to discriminate the inorganic (TIC and organic (TOC contributions to the total carbon (TC content. The procedure is only based on thermal destabilization of the different carbon species and has been successfully applied on different environmental matrices (rocks, soils, biological samples with a mean C elemental and isotopic recovery of 99% (SD = 3% and -0.3‰ (SD = 0.3‰, respectively. The thermal speciation lead us to define precise isotopic end-members whose are unaffected by any chemical treatment of the samples. The approach allows accurate mass balance calculation that represents a powerful tool to quantify the distinct carbon species.

  17. Generation and fate of glacial sediments in the central Transantarctic Mountains based on radiogenic isotopes and implications for reconstructing past ice dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, G. Lang; Licht, Kathy J.

    2016-10-01

    The Nd, Sr and Pb isotopic compositions of glacial tills from the Byrd and Nimrod Glaciers in the central Transantarctic Mountains (TAM) in East Antarctica were obtained to assess the sources of detritus transported by these ice masses. Tills from lateral moraines along the entire extent of both glaciers have isotopic compositions consistent with their derivation predominately from erosion of adjacent bedrock. Fine- (<63μ) and coarser-grained (0.5 mm-2 mm) sediment from these tills have identical isotopic characteristics, indicating that fine-grained detritus is the product of further comminution of coarser sediments. Comparison of present-day till isotopic data to existing data from fine-grained LGM tills in the central Ross Sea confirm that these were deposited from East Antarctic ice that expanded through the TAM and indicates that the LGM sediments are mixtures of detritus eroded along the entire path of ice transiting the TAM. If specific lithologies were preferentially eroded as ice passed through the TAM, it is not clearly evident in the Ross Sea till isotopic compositions. Our data do demonstrate, however, that glacial tills generated from erosion of inboard regions of the mountain belt yield sediment with a larger component of 560 Ma to 600 Ma detrital zircons and lower average εNd(0) values (<-5) than that produced further downstream. As a result, past retreat of ice grounding-lines up the narrow valleys of the TAM resulting in active erosion of inboard region should recognizable in glacial sediments deposited in the Ross Sea and so provide a means to identify times when the East Antarctic ice sheet was smaller than today. This study highlights both the value and necessity of utilizing multiple provenance methods in evaluating glacial erosion and transport when reconstructing past ice sheet dynamics.

  18. Nd isotope composition and rare earth element distribution in early Paleozoic biogenic apatite from Baltoscandia: A signature of Iapetus ocean water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felitsyn, Sergei; Sturesson, Ulf; Popov, Leonid; Holmer, Lars

    1998-12-01

    Analyses of the Nd isotopic composition and REE distribution in biogenic apatite (organophosphatic brachiopods and conodont elements) from the Cambrian and Ordovician sequences of the Baltic plate give new insights into the development of the southeastern segment of the continental margin bounding the Iapetus ocean. The Nd isotope analyses show ɛNd(t) of ˜-8.0 for the Cambrian, indicating that the main source of the sedimentary deposition came from weathered sedimentary rocks of Vendian and Cambrian age. The increase of ɛNd(t) to ˜-5.0 for the Early Ordovician indicates the appearance of a new source of radiogenic Nd in the surrounding area—most likely a volcanic arc along the western borderland of Baltic plate from Arenigian time. Samples of Cambrian biogenic apatite show significantly lower total amounts of REE than do the Ordovician samples, and this is probably due to a shorter exposure to seawater before burial during Ordovician sedimentary accumulation in Baltoscandia. These preliminary results suggest that biogenic apatite from the Baltoscandian basin preserves geochemical signatures of the water masses that will be important for understanding the evolution of the Iapetus ocean during the early Paleozoic.

  19. Geochemical and isotopic signatures for the identification of seawater intrusion in an alluvial aquifer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Indu S Nair; S P Rajaveni; M Schneider; L Elango

    2015-08-01

    Seawater intrusion is one of the alarming processes that reduces the water quality and imperils the supply of freshwater in coastal aquifers. The region, north of the Chennai city, India is one such site affected by seawater intrusion. The objective of this study is to identify the extent of seawater intruded area by major geochemical and isotopic signatures. A total of 102 groundwater samples were collected and analysed for major and minor ions. Groundwater samples with electrical conductivity (EC) greater than 5000 S/cm and a river mouth sample were analyzed for Oxygen-18 (18O) and Deuterium (2H) isotopes to study their importance in monitoring seawater intrusion. The molar ratio of geochemical indicators and isotopic signatures suggests an intrusion up to a distance of 13 km from the sea as on March 2012 and up to 14.7 km during May 2012.

  20. Oxygen isotope signatures of transpired water vapor: the role of isotopic non-steady-state transpiration under natural conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubbert, Maren; Cuntz, Matthias; Piayda, Arndt; Werner, Christiane

    2014-09-01

    The oxygen isotope signature of water is a powerful tracer of water movement from plants to the global scale. However, little is known about the short-term variability of oxygen isotopes leaving the ecosystem via transpiration, as high-frequency measurements are lacking. A laser spectrometer was coupled to a gas-exchange chamber directly estimating branch-level fluxes in order to evaluate the short-term variability of the isotopic composition of transpiration (δE ) and to investigate the role of isotopic non-steady-state transpiration under natural conditions in cork-oak trees (Quercus suber) during distinct Mediterranean seasons. The measured δ(18) O of transpiration (δE ) deviated from isotopic steady state throughout most of the day even when leaf water at the evaporating sites was near isotopic steady state. High agreement was found between estimated and modeled δE values assuming non-steady-state enrichment of leaf water. Isoforcing, that is, the influence of the transpirational δ(18) O flux on atmospheric values, deviated from steady-state calculations but daily means were similar between steady state and non-steady state. However, strong daytime isoforcing on the atmosphere implies that short-term variations in δE are likely to have consequences for large-scale applications, for example, partitioning of ecosystem fluxes or satellite-based applications.

  1. Ba isotopic signature for early differentiation between Cs and Ba in natural fission reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidaka, Hiroshi; Gauthier-Lafaye, François

    2008-08-01

    Ba isotopic studies of the Oklo and Bangombé natural fission reactors in east Gabon provide information on the geochemical behavior of radioactive Cs ( 135Cs and 137Cs) in a geological medium. Large isotopic deviations derived from fissiogenic Ba were found in chemical leachates of the reactor uraninites. The fissiogenic Ba isotopic patterns calculated by subtracting the non-fissiogenic component are classified into three types that show different magnifications of chemical fractionation between Cs and Ba. In addition, the isotopic signatures of fissiogenic 135Ba, 137Ba and 138Ba suggest an early differentiation between Cs and Ba of less than 20 years after the production of fissiogenic Cs and Ba. On the other hand, only small excesses of 135Ba ( ɛ < +1.8) and/or 137Ba ( ɛ < +1.3) were identified in some clay samples, which might have resulted from selective adsorption of 135Cs and 137Cs that migrated from the reactors by differentiation.

  2. Rapid Environmental Fluctuations Recorded over the Last Glacial/Interglacial Cycle in the Sediments from Borehole PRGL1-4 (Gulf of Lions; Western Mediterranean) using Radiogenic Isotopes (Sr & Nd)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizou, J.

    2015-12-01

    The study of sediments deposited and preserved in oceanic basins unable us to examine how terrigenous sediment supply varied through time in relation to paleoenvironmental and climatic changes on land. The geochemical and isotopic compositions of marine sediment are used to unravel its provenance, and provide information about its formation. Providing that the paleoclimatic frame is known, such data give an insight into the rock-source location and allow us to decipher between genetic processes of mechanical erosion and chemical alteration. Borehole PRGL1-4 (European project PROMESS), located in the Gulf of Lions (W Mediterranean) at 300 mwd, was investigated geochemically at high-temporal resolution over the last glacial/interglacial cycle (i.e. 130 ka) to study sediment-source variations during rapid climate changes. Besides, sediments originating from the Rhône's and the Pyreneo-Languedocian's catchment areas have been analyzed to measure the isotopic composition of five source end-members that are the Alps, the Higher Rhône valley, the Lower Rhône valley, the Languedoc and the Pyrenees. Epsilon Nd and 87Sr/86Sr were measured on 60 samples encompassing 4 marine isotopic stages with an emphasis on Heinrich events. The epsilon Nd values of PRGL1-4 lean towards the Lower Rhône valley unradiogenic end-member during cold stadial intervals, and towards the Alpine radiogenic end-member during warm interstadials. The presence of an ice cap over the crystalline Alpine watershed during cold phases could prevent the sediments originating from this region from reaching the Gulf of Lions. The same pattern is observed during the time of Heinrich events. An influence of the sea level variations on the sedimentation at the borehole site during the Heinrich events is unlikely since they are only 10 to 15 m in amplitude. Furthermore, a major isotopic shift in epsilon Nd mean values is displayed around 40 ka that coincides with the connection of the Durance to the Rhône River

  3. Partial radiogenic heat model for Earth revealed by geoneutrino measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Abe; . et al.; M.P. Decowski

    2011-01-01

    The Earth has cooled since its formation, yet the decay of radiogenic isotopes, and in particular uranium, thorium and potassium, in the planet’s interior provides a continuing heat source. The current total heat flux from the Earth to space is 44.2±1.0 TW, but the relative contributions from residu

  4. Tropical-Depression Precipitation In Southwestern North America: An Isotope Record From Arizona, And Isotope Signatures In Baja California Groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastoe, C. J.; Hess, G.; Mahieux, S.

    2011-12-01

    A 30-year data set of O and H isotopes in individual precipitation events in Tucson, Arizona, includes entries identified with rainfall associated with tropical depressions, which occasionally pass through southern Arizona. Tropical-depression rain events yielding > 7 mm have a δ18O range -9 to -16 per mil, compared to volume-weighted average summer rainfall with δ18O = -6 per mil, a set of isotope effects similar to those observed in south Texas. The isotope signature of tropical-depression rain is present in groundwater of central and southern Baja California (BC), where summer and fall rain make up at least 50% of annual precipitation. Tritium-bearing groundwater at Todos los Santos (southern BC) has a δ18O range of -8 to -11 per mil and d-parameters near 10. Altitude effects related to adjacent, 1800 m mountains do not explain the isotope data. Groundwater of similar isotope character is present near the Tres Virgenes geothermal field (central BC), but not at Santo Tomas (northern BC). Large deuterium excess (d > 15) is not observed in any of the data.

  5. Surface area dependence of calcium isotopic reequilibration in carbonates: Implications for isotopic signatures in the weathering zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, N. M.; Druhan, J. L.; Potrel, A.; Jacobson, A. D.

    2016-12-01

    The concept of dynamic equilibrium carries the implicit assumption of continued isotopic exchange between a mineral and the surrounding fluid. While this effect has received much attention in the marine paleoproxy literature, it has been relatively overlooked in application to the terrestrial environment. In weathering systems, a potential consequence is that rapid reequilibration may alter or erase isotopic signatures generated during secondary mineral formation. The extent and timescale over which isotopic signatures are reset in these hydrologic systems is unknown. Using reactive transport modeling, we show isotopic reequilibration under conditions reflecting terrestrial hydrologic settings to be significant and dependent on the reactive surface area of the solid. In particular, we suggest that the non-traditional stable isotopes commonly used in application to carbonates (e.g., Ca, Mg, Sr) are sensitive to these effects due to their rapid reaction rates. We aim to characterize the dependence of Ca isotopic reequilibration on surface area during calcite precipitation via batch experiments conducted at ambient temperature over 48-hour time periods. Calcite precipitation was performed in a closed batch reactor utilizing a controlled free-drift method. The batch reactors contained mixed supersaturated solutions of CaCl2 and NaHCO3 at an initial pH of 8.54. Precipitation was initiated by seed inoculation of calcite crystals with two distinct, pre-constrained surface areas. All experiments achieved the same final state of chemical equilibrium, but as expected, the fastest approach to equilibrium occurred for experiments employing calcite seeds with the highest surface area. This implies that differences in equilibrated Ca isotope ratios (δ44/40Ca) should reflect differences in surface area. This prediction is upheld by models of the experiments, indicating a measureable difference in δ44Ca during calcite precipitation where the higher surface area corresponds to

  6. Radiogenic and stable Sr isotope ratios (87Sr/86Sr, δ88/86Sr) as tracers of riverine cation sources and biogeochemical cycling in the Milford Sound region of Fiordland, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, M. Grace; Jacobson, Andrew D.; Lehn, Gregory O.; Horton, Travis W.; Craw, Dave

    2016-01-01

    This study reports radiogenic Sr isotope ratios (87Sr/86Sr), stable Sr isotope ratios (δ88/86Sr), and major ion concentrations for river, rock, sediment, soil, and plant samples collected from the Cleddau and Hollyford catchments in the Milford Sound region of Fiordland, New Zealand. The catchments primarily drain gabbro, but some tributaries access limestone and volcanogenic sediments. The goal of the study was to understand controls on riverine δ88/86Sr values in a landscape with multiple factors that may influence chemical weathering, including dense vegetation, high rainfall, and abundant, freshly-eroded Holocene fluvio-glacial and landslide debris. Rivers draining gabbro have higher δ88/86Sr values than bedrock, by as much as ∼0.14‰, and the δ88/86Sr values strongly correlate with molar Ca/Sr ratios (R2 = 0.69). Leaching of rocks and sediment reveals no evidence for the preferential dissolution of minerals having high δ88/86Sr values and Ca/Sr ratios. In-stream Sr isotope fractionation seems unlikely because comparison against 87Sr/86Sr and Ca/Sr ratios demonstrates that riverine δ88/86Sr values conservatively trace water-mass mixing. The riverine data are best explained by the input of soil water, which is distinct from potential bedrock end-members (i.e., silicates and carbonates) based on δ88/86Sr but indistinguishable in terms of Ca/Sr and 87Sr/86Sr. While strontium isotope fractionation during secondary mineral formation and pedogenesis is possible, clay mineral formation is minor and most soils are poorly developed. Instead, soil water δ88/86Sr values more likely reflect plant uptake. Plant samples yielded a wide range of δ88/86Sr values, but on average, they are lower than those for bedrock, consistent with the expectation that plants preferentially incorporate lighter Sr isotopes. Mass-balance constraints, together with 87Sr/86Sr ratios, indicate that soil water δ88/86Sr values are ∼0.30‰ higher than bedrock δ88/86Sr values, and

  7. Impact of amorphous precursor phases on magnesium isotope signatures of Mg-calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavromatis, Vasileios; Purgstaller, Bettina; Dietzel, Martin; Buhl, Dieter; Immenhauser, Adrian; Schott, Jacques

    2017-04-01

    Various marine calcifiers form exoskeletons via an amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) precursor phase and magnesium plays an important role in the temporary stabilization of this metastable phase. Thus, the use of Mg isotope ratios of marine biogenic carbonates as a proxy to reconstruct past seawater chemistry calls for a detailed understanding of the mechanisms controlling Mg isotope signatures during the formation and transformation of ACC to the final crystalline carbonate mineral. For this purpose we have investigated the Mg isotope fractionation between (Ca,Mg)CO3 solids and aqueous fluids at 25 °C and pH = 8.3 during (i) the direct precipitation of crystalline Mg-calcite and (ii) the formation of Mg-rich ACC (Mg-ACC) and its transformation to Mg-calcite. The outcome documents that the small Mg isotope fractionation between Mg-ACC and reactive fluid (ΔMg26ACC-fluid = - 1.0 ± 0.1 ‰) is not preserved during the transformation of the ACCs into Mg-calcite. Following a pronounced isotopic shift accompanying the transformation of Mg-ACC into Mg-calcite, Δ26Mgcalcite-fluid progressively decreases with reaction progress from ∼ - 3.0 ‰ to - 3.6 ‰, reflecting both the approach of isotopic equilibrium and the increase of calcite Mg content (to near 20 mol % Mg). In contrast the crystalline Mg-calcite precipitated directly from the reacting fluid, i.e. lacking a discernable formation of an amorphous precursor, exhibits only small temporal variations in Δ26Mgcalcite-fluid which overall is affected by the precipitation kinetics. The values found in this study at the onset of Mg-ACC precipitation for Mg isotope fractionation between Mg-ACC and the fluid (ΔMg26ACC-fluid = - 1.0 ‰) and between Mg-ACC and Mg2+(aq) (Δ(aq) 26 Mg ACC-Mg2+ = + 2.0 ‰) are consistent with the formation of a hydrated Ca nanoporous solid accommodating Mg bicarbonate/carbonate species in combination with hydrated magnesium. This material crossed by percolating channels filled with the

  8. Natural Radionuclides and Isotopic Signatures for Determining Carbonaceous Aerosol Sources, Aerosol Lifetimes, and Washout Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaffney, Jeffrey [Univ. of Arkansas, Little Rock, AR (United States)

    2012-12-12

    This is the final technical report. The project description is as follows: to determine the role of aerosol radiative forcing on climate, the processes that control their atmospheric concentrations must be understood, and aerosol sources need to be determined for mitigation. Measurements of naturally occurring radionuclides and stable isotopic signatures allow the sources, removal and transport processes, as well as atmospheric lifetimes of fine carbonaceous aerosols, to be evaluated.

  9. Stable Isotope and Signature Fatty Acid Analyses Suggest Reef Manta Rays Feed on Demersal Zooplankton: e77152

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lydie I E Couturier; Christoph A Rohner; Anthony J Richardson; Andrea D Marshall; Fabrice R A Jaine; Michael B Bennett; Kathy A Townsend; Scarla J Weeks; Peter D Nichols

    2013-01-01

    .... Stable isotope and signature fatty acid analyses of muscle tissue were used for the first time to examine assimilated diet of the reef manta ray Manta alfredi, and were compared with different...

  10. A change of Sr cycle in the Ediacaran Ocean: Evidence from radiogenic and stable isotope ratios of Sr, in Three Gorges, South China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawaki, Y.; Tahata, M.; Komiya, T.; Maruyama, S.

    2008-12-01

    Objective. To decode surface environmental changes and patterns of biological evolution during the Ediacaran Methods employed. We undertook deep drilling in Three Gorges area in South China to obtain continuous and fresh samples without surface alteration and oxidation. 87Sr/86Sr and 88Sr/86Sr ratios of the fresh carbonate rocks were measured with multiple collector-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometric techniques. We discuss the surface environmental change in the Ediacaran by comparing the Sr isotope ratios with 13C/12C and 18O/16O. Result. The chemostratigraphy of 87Sr/86Sr ratios of the drilled samples displays a smooth curve and two large positive shifts in the Ediacaran. The combination of the detailed chemostratigraphies of 13C/12C, 18O/16O, and 87Sr/86Sr enable us to find connections among them and indicates that the first large positive shift of 87Sr/86Sr is slightly preceded by negative 13C/12C and positive 18O/16O excursions. The second large positive shift of 87Sr/86Sr is simultaneous with positive 13C/12C shift and clearly precedes next negative 13C/12C excursion. Considering Mn content and Fe content of carbonate rocks, which respond to redox in the ocean, the first positive shift can be explained by Gaskiers glaciation. Exposed surface of continental crust were increased by regression accompanied by Gaskiers glaciation and enhanced weathering rate by rivers increased seawater 87Sr/86Sr. The second positive shift of 87Sr/86Sr is a long-term fluctuation. We speculate enhanced weathering rate, resulting from convergence of Gondwana supercontinent, as a cause of the second positive shift of 87Sr/86Sr. Chemostratigraphy of 88Sr/86Sr also displays a smooth curve. Before Gaskiers glaciation, 88Sr/86Sr curve have a negative correlation with 87Sr/86Sr fluctuation. We interpret that this negative correlation is explained by mass-dependent fractionation. When Sr are increased in ocean (high 87Sr/86Sr), 86Sr are selectively taken in carbonate (low 88Sr

  11. Carbonate "clumped" isotope signatures in aragonitic scleractinian and calcitic gorgonian deep-sea corals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kimball

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Deep-sea corals are a potentially valuable archive of the temperature and ocean chemistry of intermediate and deep waters. Living in near constant temperature, salinity and pH, and having amongst the slowest calcification rates observed in carbonate-precipitating biological organisms, deep-sea corals can provide valuable constraints on processes driving mineral equilibrium and disequilibrium isotope signatures. Here we report new data to further develop "clumped" isotopes as a paleothermometer in deep-sea corals as well as to investigate mineral-specific, taxon-specific, and growth-rate related effects. Carbonate clumped isotope thermometry is based on measurements of the abundance of the doubly-substituted isotopologue 13C18O16O2 in carbonate minerals, analyzed in CO2 gas liberated on phosphoric acid digestion of carbonates and reported as Δ47 values. We analyzed Δ47 in live-collected aragonitic scleractinian (Enallopsammia sp. and calcitic gorgonian (Isididae and Coralliidae deep-sea corals, and compared results to published data for other aragonitic scleractinian taxa. Measured Δ47 values were compared to in situ temperatures and the relationship between Δ47 and temperature was determined for each group to investigate taxon-specific effects. We find that aragonitic scleractinian deep-sea corals exhibit higher values than calcitic gorgonian corals and the two groups of coral produce statistically different relationship between Δ47-temperature calibrations. These data are significant in the interpretation of all carbonate "clumped" isotope calibration data as they show that distinct Δ47-temperature calibrations can be observed in different materials recovered from the same environment and analyzed using the same instrumentation, phosphoric acid composition, digestion temperature and technique, CO2 gas purification apparatus, and data handling. There are three possible explanations for the origin of these different calibrations. The offset

  12. Carbonate "clumped" isotope signatures in aragonitic scleractinian and calcitic gorgonian deep-sea corals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimball, Justine; Eagle, Robert; Dunbar, Robert

    2016-12-01

    Deep-sea corals are a potentially valuable archive of the temperature and ocean chemistry of intermediate and deep waters. Living in near-constant temperature, salinity, and pH and having amongst the slowest calcification rates observed in carbonate-precipitating biological organisms, deep-sea corals can provide valuable constraints on processes driving mineral equilibrium and disequilibrium isotope signatures. Here we report new data to further develop "clumped" isotopes as a paleothermometer in deep-sea corals as well as to investigate mineral-specific, taxon-specific, and growth-rate-related effects. Carbonate clumped isotope thermometry is based on measurements of the abundance of the doubly substituted isotopologue 13C18O16O2 in carbonate minerals, analyzed in CO2 gas liberated on phosphoric acid digestion of carbonates and reported as Δ47 values. We analyzed Δ47 in live-collected aragonitic scleractinian (Enallopsammia sp.) and high-Mg calcitic gorgonian (Isididae and Coralliidae) deep-sea corals and compared results to published data for other aragonitic scleractinian taxa. Measured Δ47 values were compared to in situ temperatures, and the relationship between Δ47 and temperature was determined for each group to investigate taxon-specific effects. We find that aragonitic scleractinian deep-sea corals exhibit higher values than high-Mg calcitic gorgonian corals and the two groups of coral produce statistically different relationships between Δ47-temperature calibrations. These data are significant in the interpretation of all carbonate clumped isotope calibration data as they show that distinct Δ47-temperature calibrations can be observed in different materials recovered from the same environment and analyzed using the same instrumentation, phosphoric acid composition, digestion temperature and technique, CO2 gas purification apparatus, and data handling. There are three possible explanations for the origin of these different calibrations. The offset

  13. Role of radiogenic heat generation in surface heat flow formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khutorskoi, M. D.; Polyak, B. G.

    2016-03-01

    Heat generation due to decay of long-lived radioactive isotopes is considered in the Earth's crust of the Archean-Proterozoic and Paleozoic provinces of Eurasia and North America. The heat flow that forms in the mantle is calculated as the difference between the heat flow observed at the boundary of the solid Earth and radiogenic heat flow produced in the crust. The heat regime in regions with anomalously high radiogenic heat generation is discussed. The relationship between various heat flow components in the Precambrian and Phanerozoic provinces has been comparatively analyzed, and the role of erosion of the surfaceheat- generating layer has been estimated.

  14. Stable isotope signatures for characterising the biological stability of landfilled municipal solid waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wimmer, Bernhard, E-mail: bernhard.wimmer@ait.ac.at [AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Health and Environment Department, Environmental Resources and Technologies, Konrad-Lorenz-Strasse 24, 3430 Tulln (Austria); Hrad, Marlies; Huber-Humer, Marion [Institute of Waste Management, Department of Water-Atmosphere-Environment, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Muthgasse 107, 1190 Vienna (Austria); Watzinger, Andrea; Wyhlidal, Stefan; Reichenauer, Thomas G. [AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Health and Environment Department, Environmental Resources and Technologies, Konrad-Lorenz-Strasse 24, 3430 Tulln (Austria)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► The isotopic signature of δ{sup 13}C-DIC of leachates is linked to the reactivity of MSW. ► Isotopic signatures of leachates depend on aerobic/anaerobic conditions in landfills. ► In situ aeration of landfills can be monitored by isotope analysis in leachate. ► The isotopic analysis of leachates can be used for assessing the stability of MSW. ► δ{sup 13}C-DIC of leachates helps to define the duration of landfill aftercare. - Abstract: Stable isotopic signatures of landfill leachates are influenced by processes within municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills mainly depending on the aerobic/anaerobic phase of the landfill. We investigated the isotopic signatures of δ{sup 13}C, δ{sup 2}H and δ{sup 18}O of different leachates from lab-scale experiments, lysimeter experiments and a landfill under in situ aeration. In the laboratory, columns filled with MSW of different age and reactivity were percolated under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. In landfill simulation reactors, waste of a 25 year old landfill was kept under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The lysimeter facility was filled with mechanically shredded fresh waste. After starting of the methane production the waste in the lysimeter containments was aerated in situ. Leachate and gas composition were monitored continuously. In addition the seepage water of an old landfill was collected and analysed periodically before and during an in situ aeration. We found significant differences in the δ{sup 13}C-value of the dissolved inorganic carbon (δ{sup 13}C-DIC) of the leachate between aerobic and anaerobic waste material. During aerobic degradation, the signature of δ{sup 13}C-DIC was mainly dependent on the isotopic composition of the organic matter in the waste, resulting in a δ{sup 13}C-DIC of −20‰ to −25‰. The production of methane under anaerobic conditions caused an increase in δ{sup 13}C-DIC up to values of +10‰ and higher depending on the actual reactivity of the MSW

  15. The extent of aqueous alteration in C-class asteroids, and the survival of presolar isotopic signatures in chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigo-Rodriguez, J. M.

    2011-05-01

    Several sample return missions are being planned by different space agencies for in situ sampling of undifferentiated bodies. Such missions wish to bring back to Earth pristine samples from C-class asteroids and comets to obtain clues on solar system formation conditions. A careful selection of targeted areas is required as many C-class asteroids and periodic comets have been subjected to collisional and space weathering processing since their formation. Their surfaces have been reworked by impacts as pointed out by the brecciated nature of many chondrites arrived to Earth, exhibiting different levels of thermal and aqueous alteration. It is not surprising that pristine chondrites can be considered quite rare in meteorite collections because they were naturally sampled in collisions, but several groups of carbonaceous chondrites contain a few members with promising unaltered properties. The CI and CM groups suffered extensive aqueous alteration [1], but for the most part escaped thermal metamorphism (only a few CMs evidence heating temperature over several hundred K). Both chondrite groups are water-rich, containing secondary minerals as consequence of the pervasive alteration of their primary mineral phases [2]. CO, CV, and CR chondrite groups suffered much less severe aqueous alteration, but some CRs are moderately aqueously altered. All five groups are good candidates to find unequilibrated materials between samples unaffected by aqueous alteration or metamorphism. The water was incorporated during accretion, and was released as consequence of shock after impact compaction, and/or by mild radiogenic heating. Primary minerals were transformed by water into secondary ones. Water soaking the bodies participated in chemical homogenization of the different components [1]. Hydrothermal alteration and collisional metamorphism changed the abundances of isotopically distinguishable presolar silicates [3]. Additional instruments in the landers to identify aqueous

  16. Origin of the mysterious Yin-Shang bronzes in China indicated by lead isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei-dong; Zhang, Li-peng; Guo, Jia; Li, Cong-ying; Jiang, Yu-hang; Zartman, Robert E.; Zhang, Zhao-feng

    2016-01-01

    Fine Yin-Shang bronzes containing lead with puzzlingly highly radiogenic isotopic compositions appeared suddenly in the alluvial plain of the Yellow River around 1400 BC. The Tongkuangyu copper deposit in central China is known to have lead isotopic compositions even more radiogenic and scattered than those of the Yin-Shang bronzes. Most of the Yin-Shang bronzes are tin-copper alloys with high lead contents. The low lead and tin concentrations, together with the less radiogenic lead isotopes of bronzes in an ancient smelting site nearby, however, exclude Tongkuangyu as the sole supplier of the Yin-Shang bronzes. Interestingly, tin ingots/prills and bronzes found in Africa also have highly radiogenic lead isotopes, but it remains mysterious as to how such African bronzes may have been transported to China. Nevertheless, these African bronzes are the only bronzes outside China so far reported that have lead isotopes similar to those of the Yin-Shang bronzes. All these radiogenic lead isotopes plot along ~2.0–2.5 Ga isochron lines, implying that deposits around Archean cratons are the most likely candidates for the sources. African cratons along the Nile and even micro-cratons in the Sahara desert may have similar lead signatures. These places were probably accessible by ancient civilizations, and thus are the most favorable suppliers of the bronzes. PMID:26988425

  17. Stable isotope signatures for characterising the biological stability of landfilled municipal solid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimmer, Bernhard; Hrad, Marlies; Huber-Humer, Marion; Watzinger, Andrea; Wyhlidal, Stefan; Reichenauer, Thomas G

    2013-10-01

    Stable isotopic signatures of landfill leachates are influenced by processes within municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills mainly depending on the aerobic/anaerobic phase of the landfill. We investigated the isotopic signatures of δ(13)C, δ(2)H and δ(18)O of different leachates from lab-scale experiments, lysimeter experiments and a landfill under in situ aeration. In the laboratory, columns filled with MSW of different age and reactivity were percolated under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. In landfill simulation reactors, waste of a 25year old landfill was kept under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The lysimeter facility was filled with mechanically shredded fresh waste. After starting of the methane production the waste in the lysimeter containments was aerated in situ. Leachate and gas composition were monitored continuously. In addition the seepage water of an old landfill was collected and analysed periodically before and during an in situ aeration. We found significant differences in the δ(13)C-value of the dissolved inorganic carbon (δ(13)C-DIC) of the leachate between aerobic and anaerobic waste material. During aerobic degradation, the signature of δ(13)C-DIC was mainly dependent on the isotopic composition of the organic matter in the waste, resulting in a δ(13)C-DIC of -20‰ to -25‰. The production of methane under anaerobic conditions caused an increase in δ(13)C-DIC up to values of +10‰ and higher depending on the actual reactivity of the MSW. During aeration of a landfill the aerobic degradation of the remaining organic matter caused a decrease to a δ(13)C-DIC of about -20‰. Therefore carbon isotope analysis in leachates and groundwater can be used for tracing the oxidation-reduction status of MSW landfills. Our results indicate that monitoring of stable isotopic signatures of landfill leachates over a longer time period (e.g. during in situ aeration) is a powerful and cost-effective tool for characterising the biodegradability and

  18. The determination of minor isotope abundances in naturally occurring uranium materials. The tracing power of isotopic signatures for uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ovaskainen, R

    1999-11-01

    The mass spectrometric determination of minor abundant isotopes, {sup 234}U and {sup 236}U in naturally occurring uranium materials requires instruments of high abundance sensitivity and the use of highly sensitive detection systems. In this study the thermal ionisation mass spectrometer Finnigan MAT 262RPQ was used. It was equipped with 6 Faraday cups and a Secondary Electron Multiplier (SEM), which was operated in pulse counting mode for the detection of extremely low ion currents. The dynamic measurement range was increased considerably combining these two different detectors. The instrument calibration was performed carefully. The linearity of each detector, the deadtime of the ion counting detector, the detector normalisation factor, the baseline of each detector and the mass discrimination in the ion source were checked and optimised. A measurement technique based on the combination of a Gas Source Mass Spectrometry (GSMS) and a Thermal Ionisation Mass Spectrometry (TIMS) was developed for the accurate determination of isotopic composition in naturally occurring uranium materials. Because the expected ratio of n({sup 234}U)/n({sup 238}U) exceeded the dynamic measurement range of the Faraday detectors of the TIMS instrument, an experimental design using a combination of two detectors was developed. The n({sup 234}U)/n({sup 235}U) and n({sup 236}U)/n({sup 235}U) ratios were determined using ion counting in combination with the decelerating device. The n({sup 235}U)/n({sup 238}U) ratio was determined by the Faraday detector. This experimental design allowed the detector cross calibration to be circumvented. Precisions of less than 1 percent for the n({sup 234}U)/n({sup 235}U) ratios and 5-25 percent for the n({sup 236}U)/n({sup 235}U) ratios were achieved. The purpose of the study was to establish a register of isotopic signatures for natural uranium materials. The amount ratio, and isotopic composition of 18 ore concentrates, collected by the International

  19. Opposing authigenic controls on the isotopic signature of dissolved iron in hydrothermal plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lough, A. J. M.; Klar, J. K.; Homoky, W. B.; Comer-Warner, S. A.; Milton, J. A.; Connelly, D. P.; James, R. H.; Mills, R. A.

    2017-04-01

    Iron is a scarce but essential micronutrient in the oceans that limits primary productivity in many regions of the surface ocean. The mechanisms and rates of Fe supply to the ocean interior are still poorly understood and quantified. Iron isotope ratios of different Fe pools can potentially be used to trace sources and sinks of the global Fe biogeochemical cycle if these boundary fluxes have distinct signatures. Seafloor hydrothermal vents emit metal rich fluids from mid-ocean ridges into the deep ocean. Iron isotope ratios have the potential to be used to trace the input of hydrothermal dissolved iron to the oceans if the local controls on the fractionation of Fe isotopes during plume dispersal in the deep ocean are understood. In this study we assess the behaviour of Fe isotopes in a Southern Ocean hydrothermal plume using a sampling program of Total Dissolvable Fe (TDFe), and dissolved Fe (dFe). We demonstrate that δ56Fe values of dFe (δ56dFe) within the hydrothermal plume change dramatically during early plume dispersal, ranging from -2.39 ± 0.05‰ to -0.13 ± 0.06‰ (2 SD). The isotopic composition of TDFe (δ56TDFe) was consistently heavier than dFe values, ranging from -0.31 ± 0.03‰ to 0.78 ± 0.05‰, consistent with Fe oxyhydroxide precipitation as the plume samples age. The dFe present in the hydrothermal plume includes stabilised dFe species with potential to be transported to the deep ocean. We estimate that stable dFe exported from the plume will have a δ56Fe of -0.28 ± 0.17‰. Further, we show that the proportion of authigenic iron-sulfide and iron-oxyhydroxide minerals precipitating in the buoyant plume exert opposing controls on the resultant isotope composition of dissolved Fe passed into the neutrally buoyant plume. We show that such controls yield variable dissolved Fe isotope signatures under the authigenic conditions reported from modern vent sites elsewhere, and so ought to be considered during iron isotope reconstructions of past

  20. Geochemistry and isotopic signatures of Paleogene plutonic and detrital rocks of the Northern Andes of Colombia: A record of post-collisional arc magmatism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante, Camilo; Cardona, Agustín; Archanjo, Carlos J.; Bayona, Germán; Lara, Mario; Valencia, Victor

    2017-04-01

    Between the Late Cretaceous and Paleogene, the Northern Andes experienced subduction and collision due to the convergence between the oceanic Caribbean Plate and the continental margin of Ecuador and Colombia. Subduction-related calc-alkaline plutonic rocks form stocks of limited areal expression or local batholiths that consist mostly of diorites and granodiorites. We investigated two stocks (Hatillo and Bosque) exposed in the Central Cordillera of Colombia that had U-Pb zircon crystallization ages between 60 and 53 Ma. Relatively low radiogenic Sr, Nd and Pb isotopes from selected samples account for a heterogeneous crustal source, whereas negative anomalies of Nb and Ti, high LREE/HREE and Sr/Y > 28 ratios indicate that the magmas were emplaced in a continental magmatic arc setting. ƐHf(i) values of the dated zircons were between - 4 and + 7 and suggest some contamination of the magmas during their ascent through the crust. The high Sr/Y ratios recorded both in the investigated plutons as well as in other Paleogene plutons in the Central Cordillera suggest that the magmas differentiate in high-pressure conditions (garnet stability field). This differentiation probably occurred at the base of a thickened crust through the Mesozoic subduction and accretion of oceanic arcs to the continental margin during the Lower Cretaceous and Paleocene. The existence of other Paleogene granitoids with evidence of shallower differentiation signatures may be also an inheritance of along strike variations in the Northern Andean continental crust due to Cretaceous to Paleogene oblique convergence. The Hf isotope results from Paleogene detrital zircons from volcanoclastic rocks of the eastern Colombian basins reinforce the possibility of a distal magmatic focus.

  1. Study of medical isotope production facility stack emissions and noble gas isotopic signature using automatic gamma-spectra analysis platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weihua; Hoffmann, Emmy; Ungar, Kurt; Dolinar, George; Miley, Harry; Mekarski, Pawel; Schrom, Brian; Hoffman, Ian; Lawrie, Ryan; Loosz, Tom

    2013-04-01

    The nuclear industry emissions of the four CTBT (Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty) relevant radioxenon isotopes are unavoidably detected by the IMS along with possible treaty violations. Another civil source of radioxenon emissions which contributes to the global background is radiopharmaceutical production companies. To better understand the source terms of these background emissions, a joint project between HC, ANSTO, PNNL and CRL was formed to install real-time detection systems to support 135Xe, 133Xe, 131mXe and 133mXe measurements at the ANSTO and CRL 99Mo production facility stacks as well as the CANDU (CANada Deuterium Uranium) primary coolant monitoring system at CRL. At each site, high resolution gamma spectra were collected every 15 minutes using a HPGe detector to continuously monitor a bypass feed from the stack or CANDU primary coolant system as it passed through a sampling cell. HC also conducted atmospheric monitoring for radioxenon at approximately 200 km distant from CRL. A program was written to transfer each spectrum into a text file format suitable for the automatic gamma-spectra analysis platform and then email the file to a server. Once the email was received by the server, it was automatically analysed with the gamma-spectrum software UniSampo/Shaman to perform radionuclide identification and activity calculation for a large number of gamma-spectra in a short period of time (less than 10 seconds per spectrum). The results of nuclide activity together with other spectrum parameters were saved into the Linssi database. This database contains a large amount of radionuclide information which is a valuable resource for the analysis of radionuclide distribution within the noble gas fission product emissions. The results could be useful to identify the specific mechanisms of the activity release. The isotopic signatures of the various radioxenon species can be determined as a function of release time. Comparison of 133mXe and 133Xe activity

  2. Using Bathymodiolus tissue stable isotope signatures to infer biogeochemical process at hydrocarbon seeps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, D.; Kiel, S.; Qiu, J.; Yang, Q.; Zhou, H.; Peng, Y.; Chen, D.

    2015-12-01

    Here we use stable isotopes of carbon, nitrogen and sulfur in the tissue of two bathymodiolin mussel species with different chemotrophic symbionts (methanotrophs in B. platifrons and sulfide-oxidizers in B. aduloides) to gain insights into the biogeochemical processes at an active site in 1120 m depth on the Formosa Ridge, called Site F. Because mussels with methanotrophic symbionts acquire the isotope signature of the used methane, the average δ13C values of B. platifrons (-70.3‰; n=36) indicates a biogenic methane source at Site F, consistent with the measured carbon isotope signature of methane (-61.1‰ to -58.7‰) sampled 1.5 m above the mussel beds. The only small offset between the δ13C signatures of the ascending methane and the authigenic carbonate at site F (as low as -55.3‰) suggests only minor mixing of the pore water with marine bicarbonate, which in turn may be used as an indicator for advective rather than diffusive seepage at this site. B. aduloides has much higher average δ13C values of -34.4‰ (n=9), indicating inorganic carbon (DIC) dissolved in epibenthic bottom water as its main carbon source. The DIC was apparently marine bicarbonate with a small contribution of 13C-depleted carbon from locally oxidized methane. The δ34S values of the two mussel species indicate that they used two different sulfur sources. B. platifrons (average δ34S = +6.4±2.6‰; n=36) used seawater sulfate mixed with isotopically light re-oxidized sulfide from the sulfate-dependent anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM), while the sulfur source of B. aduloides (δ34S = -8.0±3.1‰; n=9) was AOM-derived sulfide used by its symbionts. δ15N values differed between the mussels, with B. platifrons having a wider range of on average slightly lower values (mean = +0.5±0.7‰, n=36) than B. aduloides (mean = +1.1±0.0‰). These values are significantly lower than δ15N values of South China Sea deep-sea sediments (+5‰ to +6‰), indicating that the organic nitrogen

  3. Zinc concentrations and isotopic signatures of an aquatic insect (mayfly, Baetis tricaudatus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesner, Jeff S; Walters, David; Schmidt, Travis S.; Kraus, Johanna M.; Stricker, Craig A.; Clements, William H.

    2017-01-01

    Insect metamorphosis often results in substantial chemical changes that can fractionate isotopes and alter contaminant concentrations. We exposed larval mayflies (Baetis tricaudatus) to an aqueous zinc gradient (3-340 µg Zn/l) and measured the change in zinc tissue concentrations at different stages of metamorphosis. We also measured changes in stable isotopes (δ15N and δ13C) in unexposed B. tricaudatus. Zinc concentrations in larvae were positively related to aqueous zinc, increasing 9-fold across the exposure gradient. Zinc concentrations in adults were also positively related to aqueous concentrations, but were 7-fold lower than larvae. However, this relationship varied according to adult substage (subimago vs imago) and sex. Tissue concentrations in female imagoes were not related to exposure concentrations, but the converse was true for all other stage by sex combinations. Metamorphosis also altered isotopic ratios, increasing δ15N, but not δ13C. Thus, the main effects of metamorphosis on insect chemistry were large declines in zinc concentrations coupled with enriched δ15N signatures. For zinc, this change is largely consistent across the aqueous exposure gradient. However, the differences among sexes and stages suggest that caution is warranted when using isotopes or metal concentrations measured in one insect stage (e.g., larvae) to assess risk to wildlife that feed on subsequent life stages (e.g., adults).

  4. Quantifying nitrogen process rates in a constructed wetland using natural abundance stable isotope signatures and stable isotope amendment experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erler, Dirk V; Eyre, Bradley D

    2010-01-01

    This study describes the spatial variability in nitrogen (N) transformation within a constructed wetland (CW) treating domestic effluent. Nitrogen cycling within the CW was driven by settlement and mineralization of particulate organic nitrogen and uptake of NO3-. The concentration of NO3- was found to decrease, as the delta15N-NO3- signature increased, as water flowed through the CW, allowing denitrification rates to be estimated on the basis of the degree of fractionation of delta15N-NO3-. Estimates of denitrification hinged on the determination of a net isotope effect (eta), which was influenced byprocesses that enrich or deplete 15NO3- (e.g., nitrification), as well as the rate constants associated with the different processes involved in denitrification (i.e., diffusion and enzyme activity). The influence of nitrification on eta was quantified; however, it remained unclear how eta varied due to variability in denitrification rate constants. A series of stable isotope amendment experiments was used to further constrain the value of eta and calculate rates of denitrification, and nitrification, within the wetland. The maximum calculated rate of denitrification was 956 +/- 187 micromol N m(-2) h(-1), and the maximum rate of nitrification was 182 +/- 28.9 micromol N m(-2) h(-1). Uptake of NO3- was quantitatively more important than denitrification throughoutthe wetland. Rates of N cycling varied spatially within thewetland, with denitrification dominating in the downstream deoxygenated region of the wetland. Studies that use fractionation of N to derive rate estimates must exercise caution when interpreting the net isotope effect. We suggest a sampling procedure for future natural abundance studies that may help improve the accuracy of N cycling rate estimates.

  5. Isotopic signatures of production and uptake of H2 by soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. Chen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Molecular hydrogen (H2 is the second most abundant reduced trace gas (after methane in the atmosphere, but its biogeochemical cycle is not well understood. Our study focuses on the soil production and uptake of H2 and the associated isotope effects. Air samples from a grass field and a forest site in the Netherlands were collected using soil chambers. The results show that uptake and emission of H2 occurred simultaneously at all sampling sites, with strongest emission at the grassland sites where clover (N2 fixing legume was present. The H2 mole fraction and deuterium content were measured in the laboratory to determine the isotopic fractionation factor during H2 soil uptake (αsoil and the isotopic signature of H2 that is simultaneously emitted from the soil (δDsoil. By considering all net-uptake experiments, an overall fractionation factor for deposition of αsoil = kHD/kHH = 0.945 ± 0.004 (95 % CI was obtained. The difference in mean αsoil between the forest soil 0.937 ± 0.008 and the grassland 0.951 ± 0.025 is not statistically significant. For two experiments, the removal of soil cover increased the deposition velocity (vd and αsoil simultaneously, but a general positive correlation between vd and αsoil was not found in this study. When the data are evaluated with a model of simultaneous production and uptake, the isotopic composition of H2 that is emitted at the grassland site is calculated as δDsoil = (−530 ± 40 ‰. This is less deuterium-depleted than what is expected from isotope equilibrium between H2O and H2.

  6. Stable carbon isotopic signature of methane from high-emitting wetland sites in discontinuous permafrost landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marushchak, Maija; Liimatainen, Maarit; Lind, Saara; Biasi, Christina; Martikainen, Pertti

    2017-04-01

    The rising methane concentration in the atmosphere during the past years has been associated with a concurrent change in the carbon isotopic signature: The atmospheric methane is getting more and more depleted in the heavy carbon isotope. The decreasing 13C/12C ratio indicates an increasing contribution of methane from biogenic sources, most importantly wetlands and inland waters, whose global emissions are still poorly constrained. From the climate change perspective, arctic and subarctic wetlands are particularly interesting due to the strong warming and permafrost thaw predicted for these regions that will cause changes in the methane dynamics. Coupling methane flux inventories with determination of the stable isotopic signature can provide useful information about the pathways of methane production, consumption and transport in these ecosystems. Here, we present data on the emissions and carbon isotopic composition of methane from subarctic tundra wetlands at the Seida study site, Northeast European Russia. In this landscape, underlain by discontinuous permafrost, waterlogged fens represent sites of high carbon turnover and high methane release. Despite they cover less than 15% of the region, their methane emissions comprise 98% of the regional mean (± SD) release of 6.7 (± 1.8) g CH4 m-2 y-1 (Marushchak et al. 2016). The methane emission from the studied fens was clearly depleted in 13C compared to the pore water methane. The bulk mean δ13CH4 (± SD) over the growing season was -68.2 (± 2.0) ‰ which is similar to the relatively few values previously reported from tundra wetlands. We explain the depleted methane emissions by the high importance of passive transport via aerenchymous plants, a process that discriminates against the heavier isotopes. This idea is supported by the strong positive correlation observed between the methane emission and the vascular leaf area index (LAI), and the inverse relationship between the δ13CH4 of emitted methane and LAI

  7. Integrating ontogenetic shift, growth and mortality to determine a species' ecological role from isotopic signatures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson F Fontoura

    Full Text Available Understanding species linkages and energy transfer is a basic goal underlying any attempt at ecosystem analysis. Although the first food-web studies were based on gut contents of captured specimens, the assessment of stable isotopes, mainly δ13C and δ15N, has become a standard methodology for wide-range analyses in the last 30 years. Stable isotopes provide information on the trophic level of species, food-web length, and origin of organic matter ingested by consumers. In this study, we analyzed the ontogenetic variability of δ13C and δ15N obtained from samples of three Neotropical fish species: silver sardine (Lycengraulis grossidens, n=46, white lambari (Cyanocharax alburnus, n= 26, and the red-tail lambari (Astyanax fasciatus, n=23 in Pinguela Lagoon, southern Brazil. We developed a new metric, called the Weighted Isotopic Signature (φ 15N or φ 13C, ‰, that incorporates ontogenetic variability, body growth, and natural mortality into a single number.

  8. Variation in nitrate isotopic signatures in sewage for source apportionment with urbanization: a case study in Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xian, Chaofan; Ouyang, Zhiyun; Li, Yanmin; Xiao, Yang; Ren, Yufen

    2016-11-01

    Nitrate (NO3(-)) pollution is a severe problem in urban aquatic systems especially within megacity undergoing rapid urbanization, and mostly, sewage is supposed as the prevailing NO3(-) source. A dual isotope approach (δ (15)N-NO3(-) and δ (18)O-NO3(-)) was applied to explore the variation in NO3(-) isotopic signatures in sewage processed by wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in Beijing from 2014 to 2015. We found that the raw and treated sewage owned the different NO3(-) isotopic signatures, including δ (15)N from 1.1 to 24.7 ‰ and δ (18)O from 1.6 to 22.8 ‰ in raw sewage, as well as δ (15)N from 6.1 to 22.8 ‰ and δ (18)O from 1.6 to 13.2 ‰ in treated effluents. The WWTP processing would result in the enrichment of NO3(-) isotopic compositions in discharged effluents with NO3(-) concentrations increasing. Besides, advanced sewage treatment technology with more pollutant N reduction may raise the heavier NO3(-) isotopic compositions further. The NO3(-) isotope value ranges of urban sewage and manure should be separated, and the seasonal and tighter NO3(-) isotope value ranges are supposed to improve the accuracy of source apportionment. The NO3(-) isotope value ranges conducted in this study might provide useful information for tracing NO3(-) sources towards the implementation of efficient water pollution control in Beijing.

  9. Molybdenum isotope signatures from the Yangtze block continental margin and its indication to organic burial rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, L.; Zhou, H. B.; Huang, J. H.

    2007-12-01

    The paper presents the molybdenum isotope data, along with the trace element content, to investigate the geochemical behavior of authigenic Mo during long-term burial in sediments in continental margin settings of the Yangtze block, as well as their indication to the burial of original organic carbon. The burial rate of original organic carbon were estimated on the basis of the amount of sedimentary sulfur (TS content), whilst the carbon loss by aerobic degradation was estimated according to calculated Mn contents. On these points, the original organic carbon flux was calculated, exhibiting a large range of variation (2.54-15.82 mmol/m2/day). The strong correlation between sedimentary Mo isotope values and organic carbon burial rates previously proposed on the basis of the investigations on modern ocean sediments was also used here to estimate the organic carbon burial rate. The data gained through this model showed that organic carbon burial rates have large variations, ranging from 0.43- 2.87mmol/m2/day. Although the two sets of data gained through different geochemical records in the Yangtze block show a deviation of one order of magnitude, they do display a strong correlation. It is thus tempting to speculate that the Mo isotope signature of sediments may serve as a tracer for the accumulation rate of original organic carbon in the continental margin sediments. Keywords: Molybdenum isotopes; organic carbon burial rate; ancient continental margin setting ACKNOWLEDGMENTS We thank Professor Xie Shucheng for his constructive review comments. This research is co-supported by the Program for Changjiang Scholars and Innovative Research Team in University (grants IRT0441), the SinoPec project (grant no. G0800-06-ZS-319) and the National Nature Science Foundation of China (grants 40673020).

  10. Oxygen isotope signatures of transpired water vapor - the role of isotopic non-steady-state transpiration of Mediterranean cork-oaks (Quercus suber L.)under natural conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubbert, Maren; Piayda, Arndt; Cuntz, Matthias; Werner, Christiane

    2014-05-01

    Oxygen isotope signatures of transpired water vapor (δT) are a powerful tracer of water movement from plants to the global scale, but little is known on short-term variability of δT as direct high-frequency measurements are lacking. A laser spectrometer was coupled to a gas-exchange chamber directly estimating branch-level fluxes and δT to evaluate a modeling approach and investigate the role of isotopic non-steady-state transpiration under natural conditions in distinct seasons in cork-oaks (Quercus suber L.). The isotope signature of transpiration (δT) always deviated from steady-state predictions (ΔT) throughout most of the day even when leaf water at the evaporating sites is near isotopic steady-state. Thus, ΔT is further amplified compared to deviations of leaf water isotopes from steady-state, specifically in dry conditions. High agreement was found for direct estimates and modeled ΔT assuming non-steady-state conditions of leaf-water at the evaporating sites. Strong isoforcing on the atmosphere of transpiration in isotopic non-steady-state imply that short-term variations in δT have likely consequences for large-scale applications, e.g. partitioning of ecosystem evapotranspiration or carbon fluxes using C18O16O, or satellite-based applications.

  11. Measurement of the Isotopic Signatures of Water on Mars: Implications for Studying Methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, R. E.; Mumma, M. J.; Villanueva, G. L.

    2010-01-01

    The recent discovery of methane on Mars has led to much discussion concerning its origin. On Earth, the isotopic signatures of methane vary with the nature of its production. Specifically, the ratios among 12CH4, 13CH4, and 12CH3D differ for biotic and abiotic origins. On Mars, measuring these ratios would provide insights into the origins of methane and measurements of water isotopologues co-released with methane would assist in testing their chemical relationship. Since 1997, we have been measuring HDO and H2O in Mars atmosphere and comparing their ratio to that in Earth s oceans. We recently incorporated a line-by-line radiative transfer model (LBLRTM) into our analysis. Here, we present a map for [HDO]/[H2O] along the central meridian (1541W) for Ls 501. From these results, we constructed models to determine the observational conditions needed to quantify the isotopic ratios of methane in Mars atmosphere. Current ground-based instruments lack the spectral resolution and sensitivity needed to make these measurements. Measurements of the isotopologues of methane will likely require in situ sampling.

  12. Trace elements and Pb isotopes in soils and sediments impacted by uranium mining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuvier, A., E-mail: alicia.cuvier@hotmail.fr [ECOLAB, Université de Toulouse, CNRS, INPT, UPS, Toulouse (France); IRSN/PRP-ENV/SESURE/Laboratoire d' études radioécologiques en milieu continental et marin, BP 1, 13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Pourcelot, L. [IRSN/PRP-ENV/SESURE/Laboratoire d' études radioécologiques en milieu continental et marin, BP 1, 13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Probst, A. [ECOLAB, Université de Toulouse, CNRS, INPT, UPS, Toulouse (France); Prunier, J. [Observatoire Midi-Pyrénées, laboratoire Géosciences Environnement Toulouse, CNRS/IRD/Université Paul Sabatier, 14 avenue Edouard Belin, 31400 Toulouse (France); Le Roux, G., E-mail: gael.leroux@ensat.fr [ECOLAB, Université de Toulouse, CNRS, INPT, UPS, Toulouse (France)

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the contamination in As, Ba, Co, Cu, Mn, Ni, Sr, V, Zn and REE, in a high uranium activity (up to 21,000 Bq ∙ kg{sup −1}) area, downstream of a former uranium mine. Different geochemical proxies like enrichment factor and fractions from a sequential extraction procedure are used to evaluate the level of contamination, the mobility and the availability of the potential contaminants. Pb isotope ratios are determined in the total samples and in the sequential leachates to identify the sources of the contaminants and to determine the mobility of radiogenic Pb in the context of uranium mining. In spite of the large uranium contamination measured in the soils and the sediments (EF ≫ 40), trace element contamination is low to moderate (2 < EF < 5), except for Ba (5 < EF < 15), due to the precipitation of barium sulfate resulting from mining activities. Most of the trace elements are associated with the most mobile fractions of the sediments/soils, implying an enhanced potential availability. Even if no Pb enrichment is highlighted, the Pb isotopic signature of the contaminated soils is strongly radiogenic. Measurements performed on the sequential leachates reveal inputs of radiogenic Pb in the most mobile fractions of the contaminated soil. Inputs of low-mobile radiogenic Pb from mining activities may also contribute to the Pb signature recorded in the residual phase of the contaminated samples. We demonstrate that Pb isotopes are efficient tools to trace the origin and the mobility of the contaminants in environments affected by uranium mining. - Highlights: • Contamination of soils is evidenced by a multiproxy approach. • Enrichment factors highlight a low contamination except for U, S and Ba. • Pb isotope ratios point out inputs of radiogenic Pb from the mine. • Radiogenic Pb is mainly in the acid-soluble and the reducible fractions.

  13. Evidence for Radiogenic Sulfur-32 in Type AB Presolar Silicon Carbide Grains?

    CERN Document Server

    Fujiya, Wataru; Zinner, Ernst; Pignatari, Marco; Herwig, Falk

    2013-01-01

    We report C, Si, and S isotope measurements on 34 presolar silicon carbide grains of Type AB, characterized by 12C/13C < 10. Nitrogen, Mg-Al-, and Ca-Ti-isotopic compositions were measured on a subset of these grains. Three grains show large 32S excesses, a signature that has been previously observed for grains from supernovae (SNe). Enrichments in 32S may be due to contributions from the Si/S zone and the result of S molecule chemistry in still unmixed SN ejecta or due to incorporation of radioactive 32Si from C-rich explosive He shell ejecta. However, a SN origin remains unlikely for the three AB grains considered here, because of missing evidence for 44Ti, relatively low 26Al/27Al ratios (a few times 10-3), and radiogenic 32S along with low 12C/13C ratios. Instead, we show that born-again asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars that have undergone a very-late thermal pulse (VLTP), known to have low 12C/13C ratios and enhanced abundances of the light s-process elements, can produce 32Si, which makes such sta...

  14. Radiogenic cell transformation and carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, T. C.; Georgy, K. A.; Mei, M.; Durante, M.; Craise, L. M.

    1995-01-01

    Radiation carcinogenesis is one of the major biological effects considered important in the risk assessment for space travel. Various biological model systems, including both cultured cells and animals, have been found useful for studying the carcinogenic effects of space radiations, which consist of energetic electrons, protons and heavy ions. The development of techniques for studying neoplastic cell transformation in culture has made it possible to examine the cellular and molecular mechanisms of radiation carcinogenesis. Cultured cell systems are thus complementary to animal models. Many investigators have determined the oncogenic effects of ionizing and nonionizing radiation in cultured mammalian cells. One of the cell systems used most often for radiation transformation studies is mouse embryonic cells (C3H10T1/2), which are easy to culture and give good quantitative dose-response curves. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for heavy ions with various energies and linear energy transfer (LET) have been obtained with this cell system. Similar RBE and LET relationship was observed by investigators for other cell systems. In addition to RBE measurements, fundamental questions on repair of sub- and potential oncogenic lesions, direct and indirect effect, primary target and lesion, the importance of cell-cell interaction and the role of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in radiogenic carcinogenesis have been studied, and interesting results have been found. Recently several human epithelial cell systems have been developed, and ionizing radiation have been shown to transform these cells. Oncogenic transformation of these cells, however, requires a long expression time and/or multiple radiation exposures. Limited experimental data indicate high-LET heavy ions can be more effective than low-LET radiation in inducing cell transformation. Cytogenetic and molecular analyses can be performed with cloned transformants to provide insights into basic genetic

  15. The stable isotopic signature of biologically produced molecular hydrogen (H2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Röckmann

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Biologically produced molecular hydrogen (H2 is characterised by a very strong depletion in deuterium. Although the biological source to the atmosphere is small compared to photochemical or combustion sources, it makes an important contribution to the global isotope budget of H2. Large uncertainties exist in the quantification of the individual production and degradation processes that contribute to the atmospheric budget, and isotope measurements are a tool to distinguish the contributions from the different sources. Measurements of δ D from the various H2 sources are scarce and for biologically produced H2 only very few measurements exist. Here the first systematic study of the isotopic composition of biologically produced H2 is presented. In a first set of experiments, we investigated δ D of H2 produced in a biogas plant, covering different treatments of biogas production. In a second set of experiments, we investigated pure cultures of several H2 producing microorganisms such as bacteria or green algae. A Keeling plot analysis provides a robust overall source signature of δ D = −712‰ (±13‰ for the samples from the biogas reactor (at 38 °C, δ DH2O= +73.4‰, with a fractionation constant ϵH2-H2O of −689‰ (±20‰ between H2 and the water. The five experiments using pure culture samples from different microorganisms give a mean source signature of δ D = −728‰ (±28‰, and a fractionation constant ϵH2-H2O of −711‰ (±34‰ between H2 and the water. The results confirm the massive deuterium depletion of biologically produced H2 as was predicted by the calculation of the thermodynamic fractionation factors for hydrogen exchange between H2 and water vapour. Systematic errors in the isotope scale are difficult to assess in the absence of international standards for δ D of H2. As expected for a thermodynamic equilibrium, the fractionation factor is temperature dependent, but largely independent of the

  16. Hercynian Pb-Zn mineralization types in the Alcudia Valley mining district (Spain) and their reflect in Pb isotopic signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    García de Madinabeitia, S.; Santos Zalduegui, J. F.; Palero, F.; Gil Ibarguchi, J. I.; Carracedo, M.

    2003-04-01

    More than 450 ore deposits indexed within the Alcudia Valley of the Central-Iberian Zone (Spain) may be grouped by their tectonic and lithologic characteristics (1,2) as follows: type A of rare stratabound mineralizations, and types B, C, D and E represented by abundant Hercynian veins (post-Namurian). 86 new Pb isotope analyses of galenas from the four vein types reveal that types B and C have similar isotopic ratios with values of μ_2 = 10.07, ω_2 = 40.6 and a mean model age of 564 Ma. Types D and E have μ_2 and ω_2 values of 9.79 and 38.5, respectively, but differ each other with respect to their model ages, 600 Ma (type D) and 335 Ma (type E). The observed variations appear to be related to the geochemical features of the metasedimentary host-rocks of the mineralizations where two distinct types of Pb isotopic ratios have been reported (3): one with μ_2 and ω_2 comparable to those of the D and E types and another with a more radiogenic composition, close to those of the B and C types of galenas. Nägler et al. have suggested partial rehomogeneization of Pb isotopic composition within the metasediments at ca. 330 Ma, that is, prior to the mineralization events, but the extent of this process and its effects on the ore bodies isotopic features is not evident. The origin of the more abundant E type ore bodies has been related to the Hercynian granitic rocks in the area (2, and references therein). Other plutons within this sector of the Central Iberian Zone (e.g., Linares, etc.; cf. accompanying Abstract) associate ore bodies whose Pb isotopic composition is very similar to that of the E type galenas from the Alcudia Valley. The isotopic data obtained thus point to a related or common source material for the various types of granites within the area studied. Yet, the Pb isotopic composition of other mineralizations (B, C, D), likewise located in Hercynian veins, allow to consider different types of Pb-Zn ore bodies and point therefore to different sources of

  17. Pushing back the frontiers of mercury speciation using a combination of biomolecular and isotopic signatures: challenge and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrero, Zoyne; Donard, Olivier F X; Amouroux, David

    2016-04-01

    Mercury (Hg) pollution is considered a major environmental problem due to the extreme toxicity of Hg. However, Hg metabolic pathways in biota remain elusive. An understanding of these pathways is crucial to elucidating the (eco)toxic effects of Hg and its biogeochemical cycle. The development of a new analytical methodology based on both speciation and natural isotopic fractionation represents a promising approach for metabolic studies of Hg and other metal(loid)s. Speciation provides valuable information about the reactivity and potential toxicity of metabolites, while the use of natural isotopic signature analysis adds a complementary dynamic dimension that allows the life history of the target element to be probed, the source of the target element (i.e., the source of pollution) to be identified, and reactions to be tracked. The resulting combined (bio)molecular and isotopic signature affords precious insight into the behavior of Hg in biota and Hg detoxification mechanisms. In the long term, this highly innovative methodology could be used in life and environmental science studies of metal(loid)s to push back the frontiers of our knowledge in this field. This paper summarizes the current status of the application of Hg speciation and the isotopic signature of Hg at the biomolecular level in living organisms, and discusses potential future uses of this combination of techniques.

  18. Monsoonal influence on variation of hydrochemistry and isotopic signatures: Implications for associated arsenic release in groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Santanu; Datta, Saugata; Nath, Bibhash; Neidhardt, Harald; Sarkar, Simita; Roman-Ross, Gabriela; Berner, Zsolt; Hidalgo, Manuela; Chatterjee, Debankur; Chatterjee, Debashis

    2016-04-01

    The present study examines the groundwater and surface water geochemistry of two different geomorphic domains within the Chakdaha block, West Bengal, in an attempt to decipher potential influences of groundwater abstraction on the hydrochemical evolution of the aquifer, the effect of different water inputs (monsoon rain, irrigation and downward percolation from surface water impoundments) to the groundwater system and concomitant As release. A low-land flood plain and a natural levee have been selected for this purpose. Although the stable isotopic signatures of oxygen (δ18O) and hydrogen (δ2H) are largely controlled by local precipitation, the isotopic composition falls sub-parallel to the Global Meteoric Water Line (GMWL). The Cl/Br molar ratio indicates vertical recharge into the wells within the flood plain area, especially during the post-monsoon season, while influences of both evaporation and vertical mixing are visible within the natural levee wells. Increase in mean DOC concentrations (from 1.33 to 6.29 mg/L), from pre- to post-monsoon season, indicates possible inflow of organic carbon to the aquifer during the monsoonal recharge. Concomitant increase in AsT, Fe(II) and HCO3- highlights a possible initial episode of reductive dissolution of As-rich Fe-oxyhydroxides. The subsequent sharp increase in the mean As(III) proportions (by 223%), particularly in the flood plain samples during the post-monsoon season, which is accompanied by a slight increase in mean AsT (7%) may refer to anaerobic microbial degradation of DOC coupled with the reduction of As(V) to As(III) without triggering additional As release from the aquifer sediments.

  19. Evolution of carbon isotope signatures during reactive transport of hydrocarbons in heterogeneous aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höyng, Dominik; Prommer, Henning; Blum, Philipp; Grathwohl, Peter; Mazo D'Affonseca, Fernando

    2015-03-01

    Compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) of organic pollutants has become a well-established tool for assessing the occurrence and extent of biodegradation processes in contaminated aquifers. However, the precision of CSIA is influenced by the degree to which assumptions underlying CSIA data interpretation hold under realistic field-scale conditions. For the first time this study demonstrates how aquifer analogs combined with reactive transport models offer an underexplored way to develop generic process understanding, evaluate monitoring and quantification strategies in highly heterogeneous subsurface settings. Data from high-resolution aquifer analogs were used in numerical experiments to track the propagation of a representative oxidizable organic compound (toluene) within a variety of realistic heterogeneous aquifers and to investigate its detailed fate. The simulations were used to analyze (1) the effects of physical aquifer heterogeneities on spatiotemporal patterns of contaminant concentrations and isotope signatures, (2) the performance of the commonly applied Rayleigh equation and (3) the applicability of an extension of the Rayleigh equation for complex hydrogeological conditions. The results indicate that if field-derived enrichment factors are applied without corrections for dilution, the conventional Rayleigh equation is inaccurate and estimates for biodegradation are typically overestimated and unreliable in heterogeneous aquifers. Underestimations can occur due to the partial source zone depletion. In contrast, if dilution can be accurately accounted for, field-derived enrichment factors comprise a suitable alternative to laboratory-derived and redox-specific enrichment factors. The study also examines to what extent variations in monitoring/sampling strategies influence the obtained results. Especially measurements from long-screened wells (> 1 m) reveal to be inappropriate for the application of the Rayleigh equation in the investigated aquifer

  20. Sequential isotopic signature along gladius highlights contrasted individual foraging strategies of jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Lorrain

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cephalopods play a major role in marine ecosystems, but knowledge of their feeding ecology is limited. In particular, intra- and inter-individual variations in their use of resources has not been adequatly explored, although there is growing evidence that individual organisms can vary considerably in the way they use their habitats and resources. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using δ(13C and δ(15N values of serially sampled gladius (an archival tissue, we examined high resolution variations in the trophic niche of five large (>60 cm mantle length jumbo squids (Dosidicus gigas that were collected off the coast of Peru. We report the first evidence of large inter-individual differences in jumbo squid foraging strategies with no systematic increase of trophic level with size. Overall, gladius δ(13C values indicated one or several migrations through the squid's lifetime (∼8-9 months, during which δ(15N values also fluctuated (range: 1 to 5‰. One individual showed an unexpected terminal 4.6‰ δ(15N decrease (more than one trophic level, thus indicating a shift from higher- to lower-trophic level prey at that time. The data illustrate the high diversity of prey types and foraging histories of this species at the individual level. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The isotopic signature of gladii proved to be a powerful tool to depict high resolution and ontogenic variations in individual foraging strategies of squids, thus complementing traditional information offered by stomach content analysis and stable isotopes on metabolically active tissues. The observed differences in life history strategies highlight the high degree of plasticity of the jumbo squid and its high potential to adapt to environmental changes.

  1. Estimation of lake water - groundwater interactions in meromictic mining lakes by modelling isotope signatures of lake water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seebach, Anne; Dietz, Severine; Lessmann, Dieter; Knoeller, Kay

    2008-03-01

    A method is presented to assess lake water-groundwater interactions by modelling isotope signatures of lake water using meteorological parameters and field data. The modelling of delta(18)O and deltaD variations offers information about the groundwater influx into a meromictic Lusatian mining lake. Therefore, a water balance model is combined with an isotope water balance model to estimate analogies between simulated and measured isotope signatures within the lake water body. The model is operated with different evaporation rates to predict delta(18)O and deltaD values in a lake that is only controlled by weather conditions with neither groundwater inflow nor outflow. Comparisons between modelled and measured isotope values show whether the lake is fed by the groundwater or not. Furthermore, our investigations show that an adaptation of the Craig and Gordon model [H. Craig, L.I. Gordon. Deuterium and oxygen-18 variations in the ocean and the marine atmosphere. In Stable Isotopes in Oceanographic Studies and Paleotemperature, Spoleto, E. Tongiorgi (Ed.), pp. 9-130, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Laboratorio di Geologia Nucleare, Pisa (1965).] to specific conditions in temperate regions seems necessary.

  2. Partial radiogenic heat model for Earth revealed by geoneutrino measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamland Collaboration; Gando, A.; Gando, Y.; Ichimura, K.; Ikeda, H.; Inoue, K.; Kibe, Y.; Kishimoto, Y.; Koga, M.; Minekawa, Y.; Mitsui, T.; Morikawa, T.; Nagai, N.; Nakajima, K.; Nakamura, K.; Narita, K.; Shimizu, I.; Shimizu, Y.; Shirai, J.; Suekane, F.; Suzuki, A.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, N.; Takemoto, Y.; Tamae, K.; Watanabe, H.; Xu, B. D.; Yabumoto, H.; Yoshida, H.; Yoshida, S.; Enomoto, S.; Kozlov, A.; Murayama, H.; Grant, C.; Keefer, G.; Piepke, A.; Banks, T. I.; Bloxham, T.; Detwiler, J. A.; Freedman, S. J.; Fujikawa, B. K.; Han, K.; Kadel, R.; O'Donnell, T.; Steiner, H. M.; Dwyer, D. A.; McKeown, R. D.; Zhang, C.; Berger, B. E.; Lane, C. E.; Maricic, J.; Miletic, T.; Batygov, M.; Learned, J. G.; Matsuno, S.; Sakai, M.; Horton-Smith, G. A.; Downum, K. E.; Gratta, G.; Tolich, K.; Efremenko, Y.; Perevozchikov, O.; Karwowski, H. J.; Markoff, D. M.; Tornow, W.; Heeger, K. M.; Decowski, M. P.

    2011-09-01

    The Earth has cooled since its formation, yet the decay of radiogenic isotopes, and in particular uranium, thorium and potassium, in the planet's interior provides a continuing heat source. The current total heat flux from the Earth to space is 44.2+/-1.0TW, but the relative contributions from residual primordial heat and radiogenic decay remain uncertain. However, radiogenic decay can be estimated from the flux of geoneutrinos, electrically neutral particles that are emitted during radioactive decay and can pass through the Earth virtually unaffected. Here we combine precise measurements of the geoneutrino flux from the Kamioka Liquid-Scintillator Antineutrino Detector, Japan, with existing measurements from the Borexino detector, Italy. We find that decay of uranium-238 and thorium-232 together contribute TW to Earth's heat flux. The neutrinos emitted from the decay of potassium-40 are below the limits of detection in our experiments, but are known to contribute 4TW. Taken together, our observations indicate that heat from radioactive decay contributes about half of Earth's total heat flux. We therefore conclude that Earth's primordial heat supply has not yet been exhausted.

  3. Stable isotope ratios in Cape gannets around the southern coasts of Africa reveal penetration of biogeographic patterns in oceanic signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaquemet, Sébastien; McQuaid, Christopher

    2008-11-01

    The southern coasts of Africa are influenced by two major oceanic currents, leading to biogeographic patterns in inshore and offshore species assemblages, and in the stable isotope signatures of suspended particulate matter and filter-feeding mussels. We used the stable isotope ratios of carbon ( 13C/ 12C) and nitrogen ( 15N/ 14N) from the blood and feathers of adult and chick Cape gannets ( Morus capensis) to investigate whether the geographic differences observed at the lower levels in the marine communities are deep penetrating effects that reach top predators. Additionally, we evaluated whether trophic segregation occurs between adult and reared chick gannets, and whether a shift to wintering habitat occurs in adults. The study was conducted during the 2006 breeding season on Bird Island in the Agulhas system, and on Malgas and Ichaboe Islands, in the south and north Benguela respectively. Our results showed significant differences in the isotope ratios of members of different colonies, but no intra-colony differences between tissues or age groups. These results indicate that there is neither age-related nor temporal segregation in the diet of members of the same colony. Feather isotopic values suggest that adults remain all year round in the same habitats, and do not undertake long migration after reproduction. Since all gannets tend to target similar prey, we attributed among-colony differences in isotope signatures mostly to the oceanic conditions experienced by the main prey of birds rather than substantial differences in diet composition. Overall, isotopic signatures segregate the two current systems, with depleted carbon values in the Agulhas and enriched nitrogen values in the upwelled waters of the Benguela. Within the Benguela birds from Ichaboe in the north had higher δ 15N values than those from Malgas in the south, which we attributed to differences in the functioning of the upwelling cells in the vicinity of the two colonies. Finally, slight

  4. Beyond temperature: Clumped isotope signatures in dissolved inorganic carbon species and the influence of solution chemistry on carbonate mineral composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripati, Aradhna K.; Hill, Pamela S.; Eagle, Robert A.; Mosenfelder, Jed L.; Tang, Jianwu; Schauble, Edwin A.; Eiler, John M.; Zeebe, Richard E.; Uchikawa, Joji; Coplen, Tyler B.; Ries, Justin B.; Henry, Drew

    2015-01-01

    “Clumped-isotope” thermometry is an emerging tool to probe the temperature history of surface and subsurface environments based on measurements of the proportion of 13C and 18O isotopes bound to each other within carbonate minerals in 13C18O16O22- groups (heavy isotope “clumps”). Although most clumped isotope geothermometry implicitly presumes carbonate crystals have attained lattice equilibrium (i.e., thermodynamic equilibrium for a mineral, which is independent of solution chemistry), several factors other than temperature, including dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) speciation may influence mineral isotopic signatures. Therefore we used a combination of approaches to understand the potential influence of different variables on the clumped isotope (and oxygen isotope) composition of minerals.We conducted witherite precipitation experiments at a single temperature and at varied pH to empirically determine 13C-18O bond ordering (Δ47) and δ18O of CO32- and HCO3- molecules at a 25 °C equilibrium. Ab initio cluster models based on density functional theory were used to predict equilibrium 13C-18O bond abundances and δ18O of different DIC species and minerals as a function of temperature. Experiments and theory indicate Δ47 and δ18O compositions of CO32- and HCO3- ions are significantly different from each other. Experiments constrain the Δ47-δ18O slope for a pH effect (0.011 ± 0.001; 12 ⩾ pH ⩾ 7). Rapidly-growing temperate corals exhibit disequilibrium mineral isotopic signatures with a Δ47-δ18O slope of 0.011 ± 0.003, consistent with a pH effect.Our theoretical calculations for carbonate minerals indicate equilibrium lattice calcite values for Δ47 and δ18O are intermediate between HCO3− and CO32−. We analyzed synthetic calcites grown at temperatures ranging from 0.5 to 50 °C with and without the enzyme carbonic anhydrase present. This enzyme catalyzes oxygen isotopic exchange between DIC species and is present in many

  5. Investigation of uranium isotopic signatures in real-life particles from a nuclear facility by thermal ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraiem, Monia; Richter, Stephan; Kühn, Heinz; Stefaniak, Elzbieta A; Kerckhove, Giovani; Truyens, Jan; Aregbe, Yetunde

    2011-04-15

    An improved method was recently developed for the isotopic analysis of single-reference uranium oxide particles for nuclear safeguards. This method is a combination of analytical tools including in situ SEM micromanipulation, filament carburization and multiple ion counting (MIC) detection, which is found to improve sensitivity for thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) isotope ratio analysis. The question was raised whether this method could be applied for the detection of nuclear signatures in real-life particles with unknown isotopic composition. Therefore, environmental dust was collected in different locations within a nuclear facility. The screening of the samples to find the uranium particles of interest was performed using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with an energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) detector. The comparison of the measurement results to reference data evaluated by international safeguards authorities was of key importance for data interpretation. For the majority of investigated particles, detection of uranium isotopic signatures provided information on current and past nuclear feed operations that compared well with facility declarations.

  6. Linking foraging strategies of marine calanoid copepods to patterns of nitrogen stable isotope signatures in a mesocosm study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, Frank; Saage, A.; Santer, B.

    2005-01-01

    foraging mode and, further, with its nitrogen stable isotope signature (delta(15)N). This is because a more carnivorous diet may be expected to result in a higher delta(15)N. We tested this hypothesis in a mesocosm study using a density gradient (0 to 80 ind. 1(-1)) of calanoid copepods. We expected......, whereas nanoflagellates increased with increasing copepod density. As expected, Centropages hamatus, a cruising species, showed the strongest isotopic increase and also highest population growth at low copepod density, suggesting that it was the most efficient species in capturing ciliates. Temora...... longicornis, a stationary suspension-feeder, showed a uniform isotopic increase in all mesocosms, which we believe resulted from nutritional stress arising from poor feeding on both ciliates (too fast for ingestion by T. longicornis) and nanoflagellates (too small). However, Pseudocalanus elongatus, a species...

  7. Impact of Leaf Traits on Temporal Dynamics of Transpired Oxygen Isotope Signatures and Its Impact on Atmospheric Vapor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubbert, Maren; Kübert, Angelika; Werner, Christiane

    2017-01-01

    Oxygen isotope signatures of transpiration (δ E ) are powerful tracers of water movement from plant to global scale. However, a mechanistic understanding of how leaf morphological/physiological traits effect δ E is missing. A laser spectrometer was coupled to a leaf-level gas-exchange system to measure fluxes and isotopic signatures of plant transpiration under controlled conditions in seven distinct species (Fagus sylvatica, Pinus sylvestris, Acacia longifolia, Quercus suber, Coffea arabica, Plantago lanceolata, Oxalis triangularis). We analyzed the role of stomatal conductance (gs ) and leaf water content (W) on the temporal dynamics of δ E following changes in relative humidity (rH). Changes in rH were applied from 60 to 30% and from 30 to 60%, which is probably more than covering the maximum step changes occurring under natural conditions. Further, the impact of gs and W on isotopic non-steady state isofluxes was analyzed. Following changes in rH, temporal development of δ E was well described by a one-pool modeling approach for most species. Isofluxes of δ E were dominantly driven by stomatal control on E, particularly for the initial period of 30 min following a step change. Hence, the deviation of isofluxes from isotopic steady state can be large, even though plants transpire near to isotopic steady state. Notably, not only transpiration rate and stomatal conductance, but also the leaf traits stomatal density (as a measure of gmax) and leaf water content are significantly related to the time constant (τ) and non-steady-state isofluxes. This might provide an easy-to-access means of a priori assumptions for the impact of isotopic non-steady-state transpiration in various ecosystems. We discuss the implications of our results from leaf to ecosystem scale.

  8. Impact of Leaf Traits on Temporal Dynamics of Transpired Oxygen Isotope Signatures and Its Impact on Atmospheric Vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubbert, Maren; Kübert, Angelika; Werner, Christiane

    2017-01-01

    Oxygen isotope signatures of transpiration (δE) are powerful tracers of water movement from plant to global scale. However, a mechanistic understanding of how leaf morphological/physiological traits effect δE is missing. A laser spectrometer was coupled to a leaf-level gas-exchange system to measure fluxes and isotopic signatures of plant transpiration under controlled conditions in seven distinct species (Fagus sylvatica, Pinus sylvestris, Acacia longifolia, Quercus suber, Coffea arabica, Plantago lanceolata, Oxalis triangularis). We analyzed the role of stomatal conductance (gs) and leaf water content (W) on the temporal dynamics of δE following changes in relative humidity (rH). Changes in rH were applied from 60 to 30% and from 30 to 60%, which is probably more than covering the maximum step changes occurring under natural conditions. Further, the impact of gs and W on isotopic non-steady state isofluxes was analyzed. Following changes in rH, temporal development of δE was well described by a one-pool modeling approach for most species. Isofluxes of δE were dominantly driven by stomatal control on E, particularly for the initial period of 30 min following a step change. Hence, the deviation of isofluxes from isotopic steady state can be large, even though plants transpire near to isotopic steady state. Notably, not only transpiration rate and stomatal conductance, but also the leaf traits stomatal density (as a measure of gmax) and leaf water content are significantly related to the time constant (τ) and non-steady-state isofluxes. This might provide an easy-to-access means of a priori assumptions for the impact of isotopic non-steady-state transpiration in various ecosystems. We discuss the implications of our results from leaf to ecosystem scale. PMID:28149303

  9. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope signatures indicate recovery of marine biota from sewage pollution at Moa Point, New Zealand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, Karyne M

    2003-07-01

    Stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes have been used to assess sewage contamination of a sewage outfall, discharging milli-screened effluent into Moa Point Bay, New Zealand, and monitor the recovery of flora and fauna after the outfall's closure. An initial study characterising the extent of the discharge and the effects on seaweed (Ulva lactuca L.), blue mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) and limpets (Cellana denticulata) from the area, showed effects of the sewage discharge on flora and fauna were localised within in the bay. The immediate area surrounding the discharge area was found to contain limited biodiversity, with an abundance of Ulva lactuca, a bright green lettuce-like seaweed, typically found in areas with high nutrient input, limpets and small blue mussels. The nitrogen isotopic signature ({delta}{sup 15}N) is shown to be a good tracer of sewage pollution in seaweed and associated grazers (i.e. limpets) as a result of the increased contribution of urea and ammonia to seawater nitrogen derived from the effluent. The carbon isotopic signature ({delta}{sup 13}C) is suggested as a more appropriate sewage tracer for mussels, which filter feed the effluent's particulate organic matter from the water. Lower carbon:nitrogen ratios were found in Ulva lactuca sampled from around the outfall region compared to uncontaminated control sites. However carbon:nitrogen ratios do not vary significantly amongst shellfish species. After closure, monitoring continued for 9 months and showed that the carbon and nitrogen isotopic signatures of algae (Ulva lactuca L.) returned to similar control site levels within 3 months. Limpet and blue mussels (Cellana denticulata and Mytilus galloprovincialis) showed slower recovery times than the Ulva lactuca, with detectable levels of the sewage-derived carbon and nitrogen remaining in the animal's tissue for up to 9 months.

  10. Interannual Variability in Carbon and Nitrogen Stable Isotopic Signatures of Size-Fractionated POM from the South Florida Coastal Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, S. L.; Anderson, W. T.; Jochem, F. J.; Fourqurean, J. W.

    2004-12-01

    Environmental conditions in South Florida coastal waters have been of local and national concern over the past 15 years. Attention has focused on the ecosystem impacts of salinity increases, seagrass die-off, increased algal bloom frequency, waste water influence, groundwater discharge, and exchange between Florida Bay, the Gulf of Mexico, and the Atlantic Ocean. Changes in water quality and productivity levels may be reflected in the isotopic signatures of coastal zone primary producers. Recent work with seagrasses in South Florida has demonstrated high seasonal and spatial variability in C and N isotopic signatures and decoupling between the two isotopic systems as they vary. To better understand the sources of seasonal and spatial fluctuation, size fractionated POM (particulate organic matter) samples have been collected on a quarterly basis since Sept. 2002. Fractions collected include >150μ m, 50-150μ m, and 0.1-50μ m using Nitex mesh sieves and a portable pump system deployed from a small boat at 10 sites around the Florida Keys and Florida Bay. It was hypothesized that planktonic groups respond more quickly to changes in water quality then seagrasses, and thus variations may be more clearly attributed to environmental parameters. Significant spatial and temporal variability is evident both within site between size fractions and between sites. Seasonal oscillations of up to 4‰ were observed in N isotopic values and 6‰ in C isotopic values of the 50-150μ m size fraction, which is dominated by diatoms and dinoflagellates. δ 13C values are depleted in the late winter/early spring sampling period possibly reflecting decreased productivity stress on available C pools. 13C depletion is generally coincident with δ 15N enrichment in the late winter/early spring, possibly demonstrating changes in DIN pools (NO3- and NH4+ concentrations) or changes in decomposition or denitrification rates. Broad groupings appear to separate Atlantic coral reef sites

  11. Microbial methane from in situ biodegradation of coal and shale: A review and reevaluation of hydrogen and carbon isotope signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinson, David S.; Blair, Neal E.; Martini, Anna M.; Larter, Steve; Orem, William H.; McIntosh, Jennifer C.

    2017-01-01

    Stable carbon and hydrogen isotope signatures of methane, water, and inorganic carbon are widely utilized in natural gas systems for distinguishing microbial and thermogenic methane and for delineating methanogenic pathways (acetoclastic, hydrogenotrophic, and/or methylotrophic methanogenesis). Recent studies of coal and shale gas systems have characterized in situ microbial communities and provided stable isotope data (δD-CH4, δD-H2O, δ13C-CH4, and δ13C-CO2) from a wider range of environments than available previously. Here we review the principal biogenic methane-yielding pathways in coal beds and shales and the isotope effects imparted on methane, document the uncertainties and inconsistencies in established isotopic fingerprinting techniques, and identify the knowledge gaps in understanding the subsurface processes that govern H and C isotope signatures of biogenic methane. We also compare established isotopic interpretations with recent microbial community characterization techniques, which reveal additional inconsistencies in the interpretation of microbial metabolic pathways in coal beds and shales. Collectively, the re-assessed data show that widely-utilized isotopic fingerprinting techniques neglect important complications in coal beds and shales.Isotopic fingerprinting techniques that combine δ13C-CH4 with δD-CH4 and/or δ13C-CO2have significant limitations: (1) The consistent ~ 160‰ offset between δD-H2O and δD-CH4 could imply that hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis is the dominant metabolic pathway in microbial gas systems. However, hydrogen isotopes can equilibrate between methane precursors and coexisting water, yielding a similar apparent H isotope signal as hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis, regardless of the actual methane formation pathway. (2) Non-methanogenic processes such as sulfate reduction, Fe oxide reduction, inputs of thermogenic methane, anaerobic methane oxidation, and/or formation water interaction can cause the apparent carbon

  12. Mass-dependent and -independent signature of Fe isotopes in magnetotactic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amor, Matthieu; Busigny, Vincent; Louvat, Pascale; Gélabert, Alexandre; Cartigny, Pierre; Durand-Dubief, Mickaël; Ona-Nguema, Georges; Alphandéry, Edouard; Chebbi, Imène; Guyot, François

    2016-05-06

    Magnetotactic bacteria perform biomineralization of intracellular magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles. Although they may be among the earliest microorganisms capable of biomineralization on Earth, identifying their activity in ancient sedimentary rocks remains challenging because of the lack of a reliable biosignature. We determined Fe isotope fractionations by the magnetotactic bacterium Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1. The AMB-1 strain produced magnetite strongly depleted in heavy Fe isotopes, by 1.5 to 2.5 per mil relative to the initial growth medium. Moreover, we observed mass-independent isotope fractionations in (57)Fe during magnetite biomineralization but not in even Fe isotopes ((54)Fe, (56)Fe, and (58)Fe), highlighting a magnetic isotope effect. This Fe isotope anomaly provides a potential biosignature for the identification of magnetite produced by magnetotactic bacteria in the geological record.

  13. Stable isotope signatures and element stoichiometry of Fucus vesiculosus as indicators for environmental conditions in the Kiel Bight, Baltic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winde, Vera; Mahler, Annika; Voss, Maren; Böttcher, Michael E.

    2014-05-01

    In the frame of the BMBF project BIOACID II we aim for an understanding of the natural distribution and variation of isotopic composition and C-N-S stoichiometry in Fucus vesiculosus growing around the coast line of the Kiel fjord (part of the Kiel bight). Environmental conditions (aquatic chemistry, temperature, salinity) were monitored, too. Some changes in aquatic chemistry are related to stress factors like human activity (e.g., waste input) and further factors leading to specific changes in the composition of Fucus vesiculosus. Sampling was carried out at different stations at the west and east coast of the Kiel Fjord. For each sampling station the aquatic chemistry (TA, pH, salinity, d13C(DIC), main and trace elements and nutrients) as well as the composition of the Fucus organic tissues (stoichiometry and stable isotope composition of carbon, nitrogen) are analysed. The Fucus tissue was sampled in three size classes (small, medium, large). It is shown, that Fucus vesiculosus indicates clear differences in the N contents and stable isotopes between the west and the east site of the Kiel Fjord. Stable nitrogen isotope signatures in Fucus vesiculosus, are useful proxies to identify the influence factors in the Fucus habitat. From the data it is obtained that the influence of human activity (wastewater treatment plant, harbour), small stream and drainage channels, which flow from the near coastal area into the bight, leads to different Fucus vesiculosus compositions. In future work, it is intended to extend the investigation to trace element signatures to further estimate environmental impacts.

  14. Reconsideration of Methane Isotope Signature As a Criterion for the Genesis of Natural Gas: Influence of Migration on Isotopic Signatures Reconsidération de la signature isotopique du méthane comme critère pour la genèse du gaz naturel : influence de la migration sur les signatures isotopiques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pernaton E.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Experiments were performed in the purpose of studying the isotopic consequences of the diffusional transport of hydrocarbon gases through sediment rocks. Linked to a numerical model, these gas diffusion experiments through a shale porous plug allowed us to correlate porosity and diffusivity of the migration medium. Significant isotopic fractionations (carbon and hydrogen of methane, and ethane at a lesser degree were observed. This is in contradiction with the actual dogma of isotope geochemistry of natural gases which claims that no fractionation occurs during gas migration. The genetic characterization of natural gases by using the isotopic signature of methane appears as an ambiguous method. Plusieurs expériences ont été réalisées dans le but d'étudier les conséquences isotopiques du transport par diffusion des gaz hydrocarbures au travers des roches sédimentaires. Associées à un modèle numérique, ces expériences de diffusion au travers d'une membrane d'argile reconstituée nous ont permis de corréler deux paramètres pétrophysiques du milieu de migration : la porosité et la diffusivité. D'importants fractionnements isotopiques ont été observés au cours de la diffusion du méthane et, à plus petite échelle, lors de la diffusion de l'éthane. Ces résultats remettent en cause le dogme actuel de la géochimie isotopique des gaz naturels qui stipule que la migration des gaz ne peut induire de fractionnements isotopiques. En conséquence, les méthodes de caractérisation génétique des gaz naturels utilisant la signature isotopique du méthane apparaissent comme insuffisantes.

  15. Exploring the structural controls on helium, nitrogen and carbon isotope signatures in hydrothermal fluids along an intra-arc fault system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardani, Daniele; Reich, Martin; Roulleau, Emilie; Takahata, Naoto; Sano, Yuji; Pérez-Flores, Pamela; Sánchez-Alfaro, Pablo; Cembrano, José; Arancibia, Gloria

    2016-07-01

    There is a general agreement that fault-fracture meshes exert a primary control on fluid flow in both volcanic/magmatic and geothermal/hydrothermal systems. For example, in geothermal systems and epithermal gold deposits, optimally oriented faults and fractures play a key role in promoting fluid flow through high vertical permeability pathways. In the Southern Volcanic Zone (SVZ) of the Chilean Andes, both volcanism and hydrothermal activity are strongly controlled by the Liquiñe-Ofqui Fault System (LOFS), an intra-arc, strike-slip fault, and by the Arc-oblique Long-lived Basement Fault System (ALFS), a set of transpressive NW-striking faults. However, the role that principal and subsidiary fault systems exert on magma degassing, hydrothermal fluid flow and fluid compositions remains poorly constrained. In this study we report new helium, carbon and nitrogen isotope data (3He/4He, δ13C-CO2 and δ15N) of a suite of fumarole and hot spring gas samples from 23 volcanic/geothermal localities that are spatially associated with either the LOFS or the ALFS in the central part of the SVZ. The dataset is characterized by a wide range of 3He/4He ratios (3.39 Ra to 7.53 Ra, where Ra = (3He/4He)air), δ13C-CO2 values (-7.44‰ to -49.41‰) and δ15N values (0.02‰ to 4.93‰). The regional variations in 3He/4He, δ13C-CO2 and δ15N values are remarkably consistent with those reported for 87Sr/86Sr in lavas along the studied segment, which are strongly controlled by the regional spatial distribution of faults. Two fumaroles gas samples associated with the northern "horsetail" transtensional termination of the LOFS are the only datapoints showing uncontaminated MORB-like 3He/4He signatures. In contrast, the dominant mechanism controlling helium isotope ratios of hydrothermal systems towards the south appears to be the mixing between mantle-derived helium and a radiogenic component derived from, e.g., magmatic assimilation of 4He-rich country rocks or contamination during the

  16. Methane and its Stable Isotope Signature Across Pennsylvania: Assessing the Potential Impacts of Natural Gas Development and Agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Garcés, F.; Fuentes, J. D.; Grannas, A. M.; Martins, D. K.

    2012-12-01

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas with a global warming potential 72 times that of carbon dioxide (20 year time horizon). Many recent efforts have been focused on improving our understanding of methane sources to the atmosphere and better quantifying the atmospheric methane budget. Increased natural gas exploration, particularly associated with shale gas drilling, has been hypothesized to be a potential source of atmospheric methane during well development and also due to fugitive emissions from operational well sites and pipelines. For a six-day period in June 2012, measurements of methane and its stable isotope signature were obtained from a mobile measurement platform using cavity ringdown spectroscopy. Transects from southwestern to northeastern Pennsylvania were studied, with samples obtained in rural, forested, urban, farm-impacted and well-impacted sites. Particular emphasis was placed on performing air sampling in the vicinity of natural gas wells under development, just completed, and in full operation. In the rural atmosphere, away from cattle farms and natural gas systems, the ambient levels of methane were around 1.75 ppm. Near and around gas wells under development, ambient methane levels resembled those found in the rural atmosphere. In some cases, the atmosphere was enriched with methane (up to 2.2 ppm) in areas near old wells and existing pipelines. Ambient methane levels around cattle farms were significantly enhanced, with mixing ratios reaching about 4 ppm. We will discuss here the impact of both gas well development and agricultural activities on observed methane concentrations and stable isotope signatures.

  17. Bacterial sulphate reduction and mixing processes at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory indicated by groundwater delta34S isotope signatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallin, Bill (Geokema AB (Sweden))

    2011-04-15

    This report includes data mostly obtained from delta34S isotope measurements of groundwater at the Aespoe Island and one sampling from the Laxemar site, southeastern Sweden, during tunnel construction. Early sampling at Aespoe (up to 1992), before tunnel excavation, indicates a groundwater system with multiple sulphur sources. The isotope changes over time in the dissolved sulphate were studied during a sampling campaign in the monitoring phase from 1993 to 1995. A total of 88 samples were collected by SKB between 1992 and 1995 from core-drilled surface boreholes and from boreholes drilled in the tunnel (34 of these samples were collected from the tunnel boreholes). The results of the analyses have been the focus of discussion of the isotope changes with time in the dissolved sulphate (SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}). The results indicate that the sulphur isotope signatures in the dissolved sulphate of the groundwater and those from fracture-filling sulphides at Aespoe originate from multiple sulphur sources in the groundwater at Aespoe and Laxemar. The data may be grouped as follows: a) typically homogeneous marine signatures of dissolved SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} are observed, with delta34S values of approximately +21 per mille CDT at intermediate depths of approximately 100-250 m; b) dissolved sulphate in the groundwater at greater depths (below 600 m) with average values of approximately +10 per mille CDT; and c) a dissolved SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} originating from a mixture of these sulphur sources (100-600m), although there is a difference between a mixture and modification by reduction. Reduced sulphur with low delta34S values is also recorded in fracture-filling sulphides, with delta34S values of approximately 0 to -10 per mille CDT. This may contribute to small changes in the isotope signature of the dissolved SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, probably by sulphide oxidation in the past. The changes in the delta34S isotope data for dissolved SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} over the 1992-1996 period suggest a

  18. Endogenous opiates mediate radiogenic behavioral change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mickley, G.A.; Stevens, K.E.; White, G.A.; Gibbs, G.L.

    1983-07-10

    Exposure of C57BL/6J mice to ionizing radiation caused stereotypical locomotor hyperactivity similar to that produced by morphine. Naloxone administration prevented this radiation-induced behavioral activation. These results support the hypothesis that endorphins are involved in some aspects of radiogenic behavioral change.

  19. Cu isotopic signature in blood serum of liver transplant patients: a follow-up study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauwens, Sara; Costas-Rodríguez, Marta; van Vlierberghe, Hans; Vanhaecke, Frank

    2016-07-01

    End-stage liver disease (ESLD) is life-threatening and liver transplantation (LTx) is the definitive treatment with good outcomes. Given the essential role of hepatocytes in Cu homeostasis, the potential of the serum Cu isotopic composition for monitoring a patient’s condition post-LTx was evaluated. For this purpose, high-precision Cu isotopic analysis of blood serum of ESLD patients pre- and post-LTx was accomplished via multi-collector ICP-mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS). The Cu isotopic composition of the ESLD patients was fractionated in favour of the lighter isotope (by about ‑0.50‰). Post-LTx, a generalized normalization of the Cu isotopic composition was observed for the patients with normal liver function, while it remained light when this condition was not reached. A strong decrease in the δ65Cu value a longer term post-LTx seems to indicate the recurrence of liver failure or cancer. The observed trend in favour of the heavier Cu isotopic composition post-LTx seems to be related with the restored biosynthetic capacity of the liver, the restored hepatic metabolism and/or the restored biliary secretion pathways. Thus, Cu isotopic analysis could be a valuable tool for the follow-up of liver transplant patients and for establishing the potential recurrence of liver failure.

  20. Chromium-isotope signatures in scleractinian corals from the Rocas Atoll, Tropical South Atlantic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, N S; Voegelin, A R; Paulukat, C; Sial, A N; Ferreira, V P; Frei, R

    2016-01-01

    Chromium-isotope compositions (expressed as δ(53) Cr) of recent and ancient skeletal and non-skeletal carbonates are currently explored as a (paleo-) redox-proxy for shallow seawater. The idea behind this approach is that biogenic and non-biogenic carbonates could potentially be used as archives recording the Cr-isotope composition of seawater in which they formed, and with this contribute to the reconstruction of past paleo-environmental changes in the marine realm, and potentially to climate changes on land. However, investigations addressing the behavior and uptake mechanism of Cr, and the potential isotope fractionations between seawater and biogenic carbonates are scarce. Here, we present a study of Cr-isotope variations in three species of corals and contemporary seawater from the Rocas Atoll, NE, Brazil. Cr-isotope values of the studied coral species (Siderastrea stellata, Porites sp., and Montastrea cavernosa) vary from -0.5 to +0.33‰ and point to significant isotopic disequilibrium with coexisting seawater characterized by a Cr-isotope value of +0.92 ± 0.2‰. This isotopic offset requires reduction of hexavalent Cr(VI) in the sequestration process of all the studied coral species. Cr-isotope values in a profile across an S. stellata colony returned homogeneous, slightly positively fractioned δ(53) Cr values of +0.07 ± 0.08‰ (n = 8, 2σ), which we interpret to reflect a constant reductive uptake during the 20-year growth period recorded in this coral. In contrast, samples across a 12-year growth profile from Porites sp. display rather heterogeneous Cr-isotope values with δ(53) Cr varying from -0.50 to +0.10‰, indicating Cr incorporation under changing redox processes during its growth intervals. We propose a mechanism whereby initial photoreduction of isotopically heavy Cr(VI) to isotopically lighter Cr(III) in the endodermal layer of corals must be followed by efficient and effective re-oxidation of reduced Cr species to favor subsequent

  1. Geogenic lead isotope signatures from meat products in Great Britain: Potential for use in food authentication and supply chain traceability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, Jane A.; Pashley, Vanessa [NIGL, BGS, Keyworth, NG12 5GG (United Kingdom); Richards, Gemma J. [School of Veterinary Science, University of Bristol, Bristol BS40 5DU (United Kingdom); Brereton, Nicola [The Food and Environment Research Agency, Sand Hutton, York YO41 1LZ (United Kingdom); Knowles, Toby G. [School of Veterinary Science, University of Bristol, Bristol BS40 5DU (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-15

    This paper presents lead (Pb) isotope data from samples of farm livestock raised in three areas of Britain that have elevated natural Pb levels: Central Wales, the Mendips and the Derbyshire Peak District. This study highlights three important observations; that the Pb found in modern British meat from these three areas is geogenic and shows no clear evidence of modern tetraethyl anthropogenic Pb contribution; that the generally excellent match between the biological samples and the ore field data, particularly for the Mendip and Welsh data, suggests that this technique might be used to provenance biological products to specific ore sites, under favourable conditions; and that modern systems reflect the same process of biosphere averaging that is analogous to cultural focusing in human archaeological studies that is the process of biological averaging leading to an homogenised isotope signature with increasing Pb concentration. - Highlights: • Lead (Pb) isotopes measured in modern British meat were geogenic in origin. • The match indicates that this technique may be used to provenance biological products. • There was no evidence for a contribution from modern anthropogenic Pb sources.

  2. Evolving Pb isotope signatures of London airborne particulate matter (PM 10)-constraints from on-filter and solution-mode MC-ICP-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Stephen R; Horstwood, Matthew S A; Davy, Pamela; Pashley, Vanessa; Spiro, Baruch; Smith, Steve

    2008-07-01

    Pb isotope compositions of biologically significant PM(10) atmospheric particulates from a busy roadside location in London UK were measured using solution- and laser ablation-mode MC-ICP-MS. The solution-mode data for PM(10) sampled between 1998-2001 document a dramatic shift to increasingly radiogenic compositions as leaded petrol was phased out. LA-MC-ICP-MS isotope analysis, piloted on a subset of the available samples, is shown to be a potential reconnaissance analytical technique. PM(10) particles trapped on quartz filters were liberated from the filter surface, without ablating the filter substrate, using a 266 nm UV laser and a dynamic, large diameter, low-fluence ablation protocol. The Pb isotope evolution noted in the London data set obtained by both analytical protocols is similar to that observed elsewhere in Western Europe following leaded petrol elimination. The data therefore provide important baseline isotope composition information useful for continued UK atmospheric monitoring through the early 21(st) century.

  3. APPLICATIONS OF STABLE AND RADIOGENIC ISOTOPES TO MAGMATIC Cu-Ni-PGE DEPOSITS: EXAMPLES AND CAUTIONS%稳定和放射性同位素在Cu-Ni-PGE岩浆矿床研究中的应用:实例及需要注意的问题

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Measurements of S, O, and radiogenic isotope ratios are all potentially powerful tracers of magma interaction with country rocks and the importance of assimilation processes in the genesis of magmatic Ni-CuPGE deposits. Sulfur isotope measurements of deposits such as those in the 1.1 Ga Duluth Complex, the Permo-Triassic intrusions of the Noril'sk area, and the 1.4 Ga Kabanga intrusions provide evidence for the derivation of S from both sulfide-and sulfate-bearing country rocks. The 1.3 Ga Voisey's Bay deposit provides an example where δ34S values of the ores commonly fall within the accepted mantle range of 0 ± 2‰, but detailed studies of Proterozoic metasedimentary country rocks show that their weighted average δ34S value is also within this range. A thorough knowledge of the isotopic compositions of potential contaminants is essential for a proper evaluation of the role of country rock derived S in ore formation. When O and radiogenic isotopic measurements are employed as tracers to evaluate magma-country rock interaction it is essential to provide evidence that open system processes have not perturbed the isotopic systematics. Low-temperature hydrothermal processes can mask evidence of high-temperature processes in the oxygen isotope system, and in radiogenic systems such as Re/Os and Pb where involved elements may be mobile under hydrothermal conditions, or host phases may close to exchange and uptake at different temperatures. Careful petrographic observation and analyses of individual minerals may be required before the models involving the contamination of magmas by country rocks can be meaningfully applied.%硫、氧同位素和放射性同位素比值在示踪岩浆与围岩的反应及在岩浆镍-铜-铂族元素矿床成因中同化过程的重要性方面有很大作用.如1.1 Ga的Duluth杂岩、Noril'sk地区二叠-三叠纪侵入岩和1.4 Ga的Kabanga侵入岩体中矿床的硫同位素测定结果证明硫来自含

  4. Origin of Tertiary to Recent EM- and subduction-like chemical and isotopic signatures in Auca Mahuida region (37°-38°S) and other Patagonian plateau lavas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Suzanne Mahlburg; Jones, Helen A.; Kay, Robert W.

    2013-07-01

    The alkaline volcanic rocks of the 1.8-0.9 Ma Auca Mahuida and post-mid-Pliocene Rio Colorado backarc volcanic fields east of the Andean Southern Volcanic Zone at ~37°-38°S have pronounced intraplate-like chemical signatures with some striking similarities to oceanic DM-EM1-like lavas of the south Atlantic Tristan da Cunha type. These backarc lavas are considered to have formed as a series of mantle batches typified by 4-7 % melting, with decompression melting initiating in a garnet-bearing mantle above a steepening subduction zone, and final equilibration occurring near the base of a ~65- to 70-km-thick lithosphere at temperatures of ~1,350-1,380 °C. Evolved Auca Mahuida mugearite to trachytic samples are best explained by crystal fractionation with limited mixing of partial melts of recently underplated basalts, in line with isotopic signatures that preclude significant radiogenic contamination in a preexisting refractory crust. Higher Ba/La and subtly higher La/Ta ratios than in nearby ~24-20 Ma primitive basalts or oceanic (OIB) lavas are attributed to the residual effects of slab fluids introduced during a shallow subduction episode recorded in the arc-like chemistry of the adjacent 7-4 Ma Chachahuén volcanic complex. Positive Sr, K and Ba spikes on mantle-normalized patterns of both primitive Auca Mahuida and ~24-20 Ma basalts, like those in EM-like OIB basalts, are attributed to mixing of continental lithosphere into the asthenosphere. In Patagonia, this mixing is suggested to have peaked as the South America continent accommodated to major late Oligocene plate convergence changes, as similar Sr, K and Ba spikes and DM-EM1 signatures are absent in ~50-30 Ma backarc lavas north of 51°S, and all of those south of 51°S. Introduction of an EM1-like component associated with lateral mantle flow of a Tristan da Cunha source is largely precluded by its Cretaceous age and distance to Patagonia.

  5. Isotopic signatures, foraging habitats and trophic relationships between fish and seasnakes on the coral reefs of New Caledonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brischoux, F.; Bonnet, X.; Cherel, Y.; Shine, R.

    2011-03-01

    A predator's species, sex and body size can influence the types of prey that it consumes, but why? Do such dietary divergences result from differences in foraging habitats, or reflect differential ability to locate, capture or ingest different types of prey? That question is difficult to answer if foraging occurs in places that preclude direct observation. In New Caledonia, amphibious sea kraits ( Laticauda laticaudata and L. saintgironsi) mostly eat eels—but the species consumed differ between snake species and vary with snake body size and sex. Because the snakes capture eels within crevices on the sea floor, it is not possible to observe snake foraging on any quantitative basis. We used stable isotopes to investigate habitat-divergence and ontogenetic shifts in feeding habits of sympatric species of sea kraits. Similarities in δ15 N (~10.5‰) values suggest that the two snake species occupy similar trophic levels in the coral-reef foodweb. However, δ13C values differed among the eight eel species consumed by snakes, as well as between the two snake species, and were linked to habitat types. Specifically, δ13C differed between soft- vs. hard-substrate eel species, and consistently differed between the soft-bottom forager L. laticaudata (~ -14.7‰) and the hard-bottom forager L. saintgironsi (~ -12.5‰). Differences in isotopic signatures within and between the two sea krait species and their prey were consistent with the hypothesis of habitat-based dietary divergence. Isotopic composition varied with body size within each of the snake species and varied with body size within some eel species, reflecting ontogenetic shifts in feeding habits of both the sea kraits and their prey. Our results support the findings of previous studies based on snake stomach contents, indicating that further studies could usefully expand these isotopic analyses to a broader range of trophic levels, fish species and spatial scales.

  6. METHODOLOGICAL PROBLEMS OF PRACTICAL RADIOGENIC RISK ESTIMATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Т. Gubin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mathematical ratios were established according to the description of the calculation procedure for the values of the nominal risk coefficient given in the ICRP Recommendations 2007. It is shown that the lifetime radiogenic risk is a linear functional from the distribution of the dose in time with a multiplier descending with age. As a consequence, application of the nominal risk coefficient in the risk calculations is justified in the case when prolonged exposure is practically evenly distributed in time, and gives a significant deviation at a single exposure. When using the additive model of radiogenic risk proposed in the UNSCEAR Report 2006 for solid cancers, this factor is almost linearly decreasing with the age, which is convenient for its practical application.

  7. Current status of tumor radiogenic therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng-Ling Min; Hong Zhang; Wen-Jian Li

    2005-01-01

    Although tumor gene therapy falls behind its clinical use, the combination of irradiation and gene therapy is full ofpromise in cancer therapy based on traditional radiotherapy, chemotherapy and surgery. We have termed it as radiogenic therapy. This review focuses on the following aspects of radiogenic therapy in recent years: improvement of gene transfer efficiency by irradiation, radiotherapy combined with cytokine gene delivery or enhancement of the immunity of tumor cells by transgene, direct stimulation by radiation toproduce cytotoxic agents, increase of tumor cell radiosensitivity in gene therapy by controlling the radiosensitivity genes and adjusting the fraction dose and interval of radiation so as to achieve the optimum antitumor effect while reducing the normal tissue damage, radioprotective gene therapy enhancing radiation tumor killing effect while protecting the normal tissue and organs with transgene using transfer vectors.

  8. Oxygen isotope signature of UV degradation of glyphosate and phosphonoacetate: Tracing sources and cycling of phosphonates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandy, Edward H. [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Department of Geology and Geophysics, Yale University, P.O. Box 208109, New Haven, CT 06520-8109 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of Sierra Leone, Freetown (Sierra Leone); Blake, Ruth E., E-mail: ruth.blake@yale.edu [Department of Geology and Geophysics, Yale University, P.O. Box 208109, New Haven, CT 06520-8109 (United States); School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, and National “International Cooperation Base on Environment and Energy”, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100084 (China); Chang, Sae Jung [Department of Geology and Geophysics, Yale University, P.O. Box 208109, New Haven, CT 06520-8109 (United States); Jun, Yao, E-mail: yaojun@ustb.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Department of Geology and Geophysics, Yale University, P.O. Box 208109, New Haven, CT 06520-8109 (United States); School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, and National “International Cooperation Base on Environment and Energy”, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100084 (China); Yu, Chan [Department of Geology and Geophysics, Yale University, P.O. Box 208109, New Haven, CT 06520-8109 (United States); School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, and National “International Cooperation Base on Environment and Energy”, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • Phosphonate (phon) hydrolysis by UVR (1.2 kW) attained ≥90% completion in 84 h. • Isotope study reveals both ambient H{sub 2}O and O{sub 2} involvements in phon C-P bond cleavage. • Mechanistic models proposed for phon C-P bond cleavage based on O-isotope analysis. • Model equations used to calculate δ{sup 18}O{sub P-org} of original phon P-moiety-useful as a tracer. • Study shows relevance in tracing phon sources and cycling in the environment. -- Abstract: The degradation of phosphonates in the natural environment constitutes a major route by which orthophosphate (Pi) is regenerated from organic phosphorus and recently implicated in marine methane production, with ramifications to environmental pollution issues and global climate change concerns. This work explores the application of stable oxygen isotope analysis in elucidating the C-P bond cleavage mechanism(s) of phosphonates by UV photo-oxidation and for tracing their sources in the environment. The two model phosphonates used, glyphosate and phosphonoacetic acid were effectively degraded after exposure to UV irradiation. The isotope results indicate the involvement of both ambient water and atmospheric oxygen in the C-P bond cleavage and generally consistent with previously posited mechanisms of UV-photon excitation reactions. A model developed to calculate the oxygen isotopic composition of the original phosphonate P-moiety, shows both synthetic phosphonates having distinctly lower values compared to naturally derived organophosphorus compounds. Such mechanistic models, based on O-isotope probing, are useful for tracing the sources and reactions of phosphonates in the environment.

  9. Quantification of insect nitrogen utilization by the venus fly trap Dionaea muscipula catching prey with highly variable isotope signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, W; Schulze, E D; Schulze, I; Oren, R

    2001-05-01

    Dionaea is a highly specialized carnivorous plant species with a unique mechanism for insect capture. The leaf is converted into an osmotically driven trap that closes when an insect triggers sensory trichomes. This study investigates the significance of insect capture for growth of Dionaea at different successional stages after a fire, under conditions where the prey is highly variable in its isotope signature. The contribution of insect-derived nitrogen (N) was estimated using the natural abundance of 15N. In contrast to previous 15N studies on carnivorous plants, the problem emerges that delta15N values of prey insects ranged between -4.47 per thousand (grasshoppers) and +7.21 per thousand (ants), a range that exceeds the delta15N values of non carnivorous reference plants (-4.2 per thousand) and soils (+3 per thousand). Thus, the isotope-mixing model used by Shearer and Kohl to estimate the amount of insect-derived N is not applicable. In a novel approach, the relationships of delta15N values of different organs with delta15N of trapping leaves were used to estimate N partitioning within the plant. It is estimated that soon after fire approximately 75% of the nitrogen is obtained from insects, regardless of plant size or developmental stage. The estimates are verified by calculating the average isotope signatures of insects from an isotope mass balance and comparing this with the average measured delta15N values of insects. It appears that for Dionaea to survive and reach the flowering stage, seedlings must first reach the 6th-leaf rosette stage, in which trap surface area nearly doubles and facilitates the capture of large insects. Large amounts of nitrogen thus made available to plants may facilitate an enhanced growth rate and the progressive production of additional large traps. Dionaea reaches a maximum abundance after fire when growth of the competing vegetation is suppressed. About 10 years after fire, when grasses and shrubs recover, Dionaea becomes

  10. Carbon and Sulfur Isotopic Signatures of Ancient Life and Environment at the Microbial Scale: Neoarchean Shales and Carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williford, K. H.; Ushikubo, T.; Lepot, K.; Kitajima, K.; Hallmann, C.; Spicuzza, M. J.; Kozdon, R.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Summons, R. E.; Valley, J. W.

    2015-01-01

    An approach to coordinated, spatially resolved, in situ carbon isotope analysis of organic matter and carbonate minerals, and sulfur three- and four-isotope analysis of pyrite with an unprecedented combination of spatial resolution, precision, and accuracy is described. Organic matter and pyrite from eleven rock samples of Neoarchean drill core express nearly the entire range of delta(sup 13)C, delta(sup 34)S, Delta(sup 33)S, and Delta(sup 36)S known from the geologic record, commonly in correlation with morphology, mineralogy, and elemental composition. A new analytical approach (including a set of organic calibration standards) to account for a strong correlation between H/C and instrumental bias in SIMS delta(sup 13)C measurement of organic matter is identified. Small (2-3 microns) organic domains in carbonate matrices are analyzed with sub-permil accuracy and precision. Separate 20- to 50-micron domains of kerogen in a single approx. 0.5 cu cm sample of the approx. 2.7 Ga Tumbiana Formation have delta(sup 13)C = -52.3 +/- 0.1per mille and -34.4 +/- 0.1per mille, likely preserving distinct signatures of methanotrophy and photoautotrophy. Pyrobitumen in the approx. 2.6 Ga Jeerinah Formation and the approx. 2.5 Ga Mount McRae Shale is systematically 13C-enriched relative to co-occurring kerogen, and associations with uraniferous mineral grains suggest radiolytic alteration. A large range in sulfur isotopic compositions (including higher Delta(sup 33)S and more extreme spatial gradients in Delta(sup 33)S and Delta(sup 36)S than any previously reported) are observed in correlation with morphology and associated mineralogy. Changing systematics of delta(sup 34)S, Delta(sup 33)S, and Delta(sup 36)S, previously investigated at the millimeter to centimeter scale using bulk analysis, are shown to occur at the micrometer scale of individual pyrite grains. These results support the emerging view that the dampened signature of mass-independent sulfur isotope fractionation

  11. Carbon and sulfur isotopic signatures of ancient life and environment at the microbial scale: Neoarchean shales and carbonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williford, K H; Ushikubo, T; Lepot, K; Kitajima, K; Hallmann, C; Spicuzza, M J; Kozdon, R; Eigenbrode, J L; Summons, R E; Valley, J W

    2016-03-01

    An approach to coordinated, spatially resolved, in situ carbon isotope analysis of organic matter and carbonate minerals, and sulfur three- and four-isotope analysis of pyrite with an unprecedented combination of spatial resolution, precision, and accuracy is described. Organic matter and pyrite from eleven rock samples of Neoarchean drill core express nearly the entire range of δ(13) C, δ(34) S, Δ(33) S, and Δ(36) S known from the geologic record, commonly in correlation with morphology, mineralogy, and elemental composition. A new analytical approach (including a set of organic calibration standards) to account for a strong correlation between H/C and instrumental bias in SIMS δ(13) C measurement of organic matter is identified. Small (2-3 μm) organic domains in carbonate matrices are analyzed with sub-permil accuracy and precision. Separate 20- to 50-μm domains of kerogen in a single ~0.5 cm(3) sample of the ~2.7 Ga Tumbiana Formation have δ(13) C = -52.3 ± 0.1‰ and -34.4 ± 0.1‰, likely preserving distinct signatures of methanotrophy and photoautotrophy. Pyrobitumen in the ~2.6 Ga Jeerinah Formation and the ~2.5 Ga Mount McRae Shale is systematically (13) C-enriched relative to co-occurring kerogen, and associations with uraniferous mineral grains suggest radiolytic alteration. A large range in sulfur isotopic compositions (including higher Δ(33) S and more extreme spatial gradients in Δ(33) S and Δ(36) S than any previously reported) are observed in correlation with morphology and associated mineralogy. Changing systematics of δ(34) S, Δ(33) S, and Δ(36) S, previously investigated at the millimeter to centimeter scale using bulk analysis, are shown to occur at the micrometer scale of individual pyrite grains. These results support the emerging view that the dampened signature of mass-independent sulfur isotope fractionation (S-MIF) associated with the Mesoarchean continued into the early Neoarchean, and that the connections

  12. Radiogenic lead from poly-metallic thorium ores as a valuable material for advanced nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulikov, Gennady G.; Apse, Vladimir A.; Kulikov, Evgeny G.; Kozhahmet, Bauyrzhan K.; Shkodin, Alexey O.; Shmelev, Anatoly N.

    2017-03-15

    Main purpose of the study is assessing reasonability for recovery, production and application of radiogenic lead as a coolant, neutron moderator and neutron reflector in advanced fast reactors and accelerator-driven systems (ADS). The following results were obtained: 1. Radiogenic lead with high content of isotope {sup 208}Pb can be extracted from thorium or mixed thorium-uranium ores because {sup 208}Pb is a final product of {sup 232}Th natural decay chain. 2. The use of radiogenic lead with high {sup 208}Pb content in advanced fast reactors and ADS makes it possible to improve significantly their neutron-physical and thermal-hydraulic parameters. 3. The use of radiogenic lead with high {sup 208}Pb content in advanced fast reactors as a coolant opens the possibilities for more intense fuel breeding and for application of well-known oxide fuel instead of the promising but not tested enough nitride fuel under the same safety parameters. 4. The use of radiogenic lead with high {sup 208}Pb content in advanced fast reactors as a neutron reflector opens a possibility for substantial elongation of prompt neutron lifetime. As a result, chain fission reaction in the reactor core could be slowed down, and the reactor operation could become safer. 5. The use of radiogenic lead with high {sup 208}Pb content in ADS as a coolant can upgrade substantially the level of neutron flux in the ADS blanket. Thus, favorable conditions could be formed in the ADS blanket for effective transmutation of radioactive wastes with low cross-sections of radiative neutron capture.

  13. Changes in atmospheric CO2 levels recorded by the isotopic signature of n-alkanes from plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Karina Scurupa; Froehner, Sandro

    2017-01-01

    The isotopic signature of sedimentary organic matter acts as a tracer for past changes in the terrestrial and aquatic carbon cycles. The temporal variation in δ13C values of n-alkanes from plants was assigned as resulting from changes in atmospheric composition in the study area, due to both global and local influences. Two rises in atmospheric CO2 concentration were assigned from the variation in n-alkane δ13C values for the periods between 1600 and 1880 and from 1930 to the present. In the first period, the sources of excess CO2 were predominantly natural, mainly volcanism, while in the second period local anthropogenic emissions were the major reason.

  14. Tracing estuarine organic matter sources into the southern North Sea using C and N isotopic signatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bristow, Laura A.; Jickells, Timothy D.; Weston, Keith;

    2013-01-01

    Sources and distribution of particulate organic matter in surface waters of the Humber and Thames estuaries and in the East Anglian plume in the southern North Sea were investigated in winter 2006/2007. Carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) stable isotopes provided evidence for the presence of three partic...

  15. Budgetary and biogeochemical implications of N sub(2)O isotope signatures in the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naqvi, S.W.A; Yoshinari, T.; Jayakumar, D.A; Altabet, M.A; Narvekar, P.V.; Devols, A; Brandes, J.A; Codispoti, L.A.

    Nitrous oxide (N sub(2)O) is an important greenhouse gas that also plays a role in the chemistry of stratospheric ozone depletion, but its atmospheric budget has yet to be well-quantified sup(1-5). However, multi-isotope characterization of N sub(2...

  16. Cloud water in windward and leeward mountain forests: The stable isotope signature of orographic cloud water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholl, M.A.; Giambelluca, T.W.; Gingerich, S.B.; Nullet, M.A.; Loope, L.L.

    2007-01-01

    Cloud water can be a significant hydrologic input to mountain forests. Because it is a precipitation source that is vulnerable to climate change, it is important to quantify amounts of cloud water input at watershed and regional scales. During this study, cloud water and rain samples were collected monthly for 2 years at sites on windward and leeward East Maui. The difference in isotopic composition between volume-weighted average cloud water and rain samples was 1.4??? ??18O and 12??? ??2H for the windward site and 2.8??? ??18O and 25??? ??2H for the leeward site, with the cloud water samples enriched in 18O and 2H relative to the rain samples. A summary of previous literature shows that fog and/or cloud water is enriched in 18O and 2H compared to rain at many locations around the world; this study documents cloud water and rain isotopic composition resulting from weather patterns common to montane environments in the trade wind latitudes. An end-member isotopic composition for cloud water was identified for each site and was used in an isotopic mixing model to estimate the proportion of precipitation input from orographic clouds. Orographic cloud water input was 37% of the total precipitation at the windward site and 46% at the leeward site. This represents an estimate of water input to the forest that could be altered by changes in cloud base altitude resulting from global climate change or deforestation.

  17. Determining the Impactor of the Ordovician Lockne Crater: Oxygen Isotopes in Chromite Versus Sedimentary PGE Signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, B.; Heck, P. R.; Alwmark, C.; Kita, N. T.; Peucker-Ehrenbrink, B.; Ushikubo, T.; Valley, J. W.

    2009-03-01

    Oxygen isotopic results for chromite from the Lockne cCater and new PGE results show that the claims by Tagle and Schmitt (2008, LPSC abstr. #1418) that the Lockne Crater was caused by a nonmagmatic iron meteorite lacks substance entirely.

  18. Chromium-isotope signatures in scleractinian corals from the Rocas Atoll, Tropical South Atlantic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pereira, Natan S.; Vögelin, Andrea Regula; Paulukat, Cora Stefanie

    2016-01-01

    Chromium-isotope compositions (expressed as δ53Cr) of recent and ancient skeletal and non-skeletal carbonates are currently explored as a (paleo-) redox-proxy for shallow seawater. The idea behind this approach is that biogenic and non-biogenic carbonates could potentially be used as archives rec...

  19. The stable isotopic signature of biologically produced molecular hydrogen (H2)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walter, S.; Laukenmann, S.; Stams, A.J.M.; Vollmer, M.K.; Gleixner, G.; Roeckmann, T.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304838233

    2011-01-01

    Biologically produced molecular hydrogen (H2) is characterized by a very strong depletion in deuterium. Although the biological source to the atmosphere is small compared to photochemical or combustion sources, it makes an important contribution to the global isotope budget of molecular hydrogen

  20. The stable isotopic signature of biologically produced molecular hydrogen (H2)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walter, S.; Laukenmann, S.; Stams, A.J.M.; Vollmer, M.K.; Gleixner, G.; Roeckmann, T.

    2012-01-01

    Biologically produced molecular hydrogen (H2) is characterised by a very strong depletion in deuterium. Although the biological source to the atmosphere is small compared to photochemical or combustion sources, it makes an important contribution to the global isotope budget of H2. Large

  1. Oxygen isotope signature of UV degradation of glyphosate and phosphonoacetate: tracing sources and cycling of phosphonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandy, Edward H; Blake, Ruth E; Chang, Sae Jung; Jun, Yao; Yu, Chan

    2013-09-15

    The degradation of phosphonates in the natural environment constitutes a major route by which orthophosphate (Pi) is regenerated from organic phosphorus and recently implicated in marine methane production, with ramifications to environmental pollution issues and global climate change concerns. This work explores the application of stable oxygen isotope analysis in elucidating the CP bond cleavage mechanism(s) of phosphonates by UV photo-oxidation and for tracing their sources in the environment. The two model phosphonates used, glyphosate and phosphonoacetic acid were effectively degraded after exposure to UV irradiation. The isotope results indicate the involvement of both ambient water and atmospheric oxygen in the CP bond cleavage and generally consistent with previously posited mechanisms of UV-photon excitation reactions. A model developed to calculate the oxygen isotopic composition of the original phosphonate P-moiety, shows both synthetic phosphonates having distinctly lower values compared to naturally derived organophosphorus compounds. Such mechanistic models, based on O-isotope probing, are useful for tracing the sources and reactions of phosphonates in the environment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Molecular hydrogen (H2) combustion emissions and their isotope (D/H) signatures from domestic heaters, diesel vehicle engines, waste incinerator plants, and biomass burning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vollmer, M.K.; Walter, S.; Mohn, J.; Steinbacher, M.; Bond, S.W.; Röckmann, T.; Reimann, S.

    2012-01-01

    Molecular hydrogen (H2), its stable isotope signature ( D), and the key combustion parameters carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), and methane (CH4) were measured from various combustion processes. H2 in the exhaust of gas and oil-fired heaters and of waste incinerator plants was generally de

  3. Molecular hydrogen (H2) combustion emissions and their isotope (D/H) signatures from domestic heaters, diesel vehicle engines, waste incinerator plants, and biomass burning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vollmer, M.K.; Walter, S.; Mohn, J.; Steinbacher, M.; Bond, S.W.; Röckmann, T.; Reimann, S.

    2012-01-01

    Molecular hydrogen (H2), its stable isotope signature ( D), and the key combustion parameters carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), and methane (CH4) were measured from various combustion processes. H2 in the exhaust of gas and oil-fired heaters and of waste incinerator plants was generally

  4. Molecular hydrogen (H2) emissions and their isotopic signatures (H/D) from a motor vehicle : implications on atmospheric H2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vollmer, M.K.; Walter, S.; Bond, S.W.; Soltic, P.; Röckmann, T.

    2010-01-01

    Molecular hydrogen (H2), its isotopic signature (deuterium/hydrogen, δD), carbon monoxide (CO) and other compounds were studied in the exhaust of a passenger car engine fuelled with gasoline or methane and run under variable air-fuel ratios and operating modes. H2 and CO concentrations were largely

  5. Molecular hydrogen (H2) emissions and their isotopic signatures (H/D) from a motor vehicle : implications on atmospheric H2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vollmer, M.K.; Walter, S.; Bond, S.W.; Soltic, P.; Röckmann, T.

    2010-01-01

    Molecular hydrogen (H2), its isotopic signature (deuterium/hydrogen, δD), carbon monoxide (CO) and other compounds were studied in the exhaust of a passenger car engine fuelled with gasoline or methane and run under variable air-fuel ratios and operating modes. H2 and CO concentrations were largely

  6. Mercury stable isotope signatures of world coal deposits and historical coal combustion emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ruoyu; Sonke, Jeroen E; Heimbürger, Lars-Eric; Belkin, Harvey E; Liu, Guijian; Shome, Debasish; Cukrowska, Ewa; Liousse, Catherine; Pokrovsky, Oleg S; Streets, David G

    2014-07-01

    Mercury (Hg) emissions from coal combustion contribute approximately half of anthropogenic Hg emissions to the atmosphere. With the implementation of the first legally binding UNEP treaty aimed at reducing anthropogenic Hg emissions, the identification and traceability of Hg emissions from different countries/regions are critically important. Here, we present a comprehensive world coal Hg stable isotope database including 108 new coal samples from major coal-producing deposits in South Africa, China, Europe, India, Indonesia, Mongolia, former USSR, and the U.S. A 4.7‰ range in δ(202)Hg (-3.9 to 0.8‰) and a 1‰ range in Δ(199)Hg (-0.6 to 0.4‰) are observed. Fourteen (p coal Hg emissions tracing. A revised coal combustion Hg isotope fractionation model is presented, and suggests that gaseous elemental coal Hg emissions are enriched in the heavier Hg isotopes relative to oxidized forms of emitted Hg. The model explains to first order the published δ(202)Hg observations on near-field Hg deposition from a power plant and global scale atmospheric gaseous Hg. Yet, model uncertainties appear too large at present to permit straightforward Hg isotope source identification of atmospheric forms of Hg. Finally, global historical (1850-2008) coal Hg isotope emission curves were modeled and indicate modern-day mean δ(202)Hg and Δ(199)Hg values for bulk coal emissions of -1.2 ± 0.5‰ (1SD) and 0.05 ± 0.06‰ (1SD).

  7. C and N stable isotope signatures reveal constraints to nutritional modes in orchids from the Mediterranean and Macaronesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebel, Heiko T; Bidartondo, Martin I; Preiss, Katja; Segreto, Rossana; Stöckel, Marcus; Rodda, Michele; Gebauer, Gerhard

    2010-06-01

    We compared the nutritional modes and habitats of orchids (e.g., autotrophic, partially or fully mycoheterotrophic) of the Mediterranean region and adjacent islands of Macaronesia. We hypothesized that ecological factors (e.g., relative light availability, surrounding vegetation) determine the nutritional modes of orchids and thus impose restrictions upon orchid distribution. Covering habitats from dark forests to open sites, orchid samples of 35 species from 14 genera were collected from 20 locations in the Mediterranean and Macaronesia to test for mycoheterotrophy. Mycorrhizal fungi were identified via molecular analyses, and stable isotope analyses were applied to test whether organic nutrients are gained from the fungal associates. Our results show that orchids with partial or full mycoheterotrophy among the investigated species are found exclusively in Neottieae thriving in light-limited forests. Neottioid orchids are missing in Macaronesia, possibly because mycoheterotrophy is constrained by the lack of suitable ectomycorrhizal fungi. Furthermore, most adult orchids of open habitats in the Mediterranean and Macaronesia show weak or no N gains from fungi and no C gain through mycoheterotrophy. Instead isotope signatures of some of these species indicate net plant-to-fungus C transfer.

  8. Multi-isotopic signatures of organic and conventional Italian pasta along the production chain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bontempo, L.; Camin, F.; Paolini, M.

    2016-01-01

    The variability of stable isotope ratios (δ2H, δ13C, δ15N, δ18O and δ34S) along the production chain of pasta (durum wheat, flour and pasta) produced by using both conventional and organic farming systems in four Italian regions in 2 years was investigated. The aim was to evaluate if and how...... control procedures that can be used to check the geographical origin of Italian organic and conventional pasta and its raw materials....

  9. Signatures of the source for the Emeishan flood basalts in the Ertan area: Pb isotope evidence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The Emeishan flood basalts can be divided into high-Ti (HT) basalt (Ti/Y>500) and low-Ti (LT) basalt (Ti/Y<500). Sr, Nd isotopic characteristics of the lavas indicate that the LT- and the HT-type magmas originated from distinct mantle sources and parental magmas. The LT-type magma was derived from a shallower lithospheric mantle, whereas the HT-type magma was derived from a deeper mantle source that may be possibly a mantle plume. However, few studies on the Emeishan flood basalts involved their Pb isotopes, especially the Ertan basalts. In this paper, the authors investigated basalt samples from the Ertan area in terms of Pb isotopes, in order to constrain the source of the Emeishan flood basalts. The ratios of 206Pb/204Pb (18.31-18.41), 207Pb/204Pb (15.55-15.56) and 208Pb/204Pb (38.81-38.94) are significantly higher than those of the depleted mantle, just lying between EM I and EM II. This indicates that the Emeishan HT basalts (in the Ertan area) are the result of mixing of EMI end-member and EMII end-member.

  10. Pyrolysis of oil at high temperatures: Gas potentials, chemical and carbon isotopic signatures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Hui; XIAO XianMing; YANG LiGuo; XIAO ZhongYao; GUO LiGuo; SHEN JiaGui; LU YuHong

    2009-01-01

    Although the gas cracked from oil has been believed to be one of the important sources in highly ma-tured marine basins, there are still some debates on its resource potentials and chemical and isotopic compositions. In this study a Cambrian-sourced marine oil sample from the Silurian reservoir of well TZ62 in the central Tarim basin was pyrolyzed using sealed gold tubes with two different pyrolysis schemes: continuous pyrolysis in a closed system and stepwise semi-open pyrolysis. The results show that the maximum weight yield of C1-5 gases occurs at EasyRo=2.3% and the residual gas poten-tial after this maturity is only 43.4 mL/g, about 12% of the yield of 361 mL/g at EasyRo=2.3%. Combined with the results of kinetic modeling, the main stage of gas generation from oil cracking is believed within the EasyRo=1.6%-2.3%. The increase in the volume yield of C1-5 gases at EasyRo2.3% in a closed system is mainly related to the re-cracking of previously formed C2-5 wet gases, not the direct cracking of oil. The stepwise pyrolysis experiments show that the gas from the cracking of residual oil at EasyRo2.3% is characterized by very high dryness index (higher than 92%) and heavy methane carbon isotopes ranging from -28.7‰ to -26.7‰, which is quite different from the gases from the con-tinuous pyrolysis in a closed system. The kinetic modeling of methane carbon isotope fractionation shows that the carbon isotopes of methane within the main stage of gas generation (EasyRo<2.3%) are far lighter than the carbon isotopes of the precursor oils under a geological heating rate of 2℃/Ma. The above observations and results provide some new clues to the accurate recognition and objective re-source evaluation of oil cracking gas in highly mature marine basins.

  11. Isotopic (Pb, Sr, Nd, C, O) evidence for plume-related sampling of an ancient, depleted mantle reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Simonetti, Antonio

    2015-02-01

    The exact mantle source for carbonatite melts remains highly controversial. Despite their predominant occurrence within continental (lithospheric) domains, the radiogenic isotope data from young (oceanic island basalts (OIBs). This feature suggests an intimate petrogenetic relationship with asthenospheric mantle. New Pb, Sr, C, and O isotopic data are reported here for constituent minerals from the Oka carbonatite complex, which is associated with the Cretaceous Monteregian Igneous Province (MIP), northeastern North America. The Pb isotope data define linear arrays in Pb-Pb isotope diagrams, with the corresponding Sr isotope ratios being highly variable (0.70314-0.70343); both these features are consistent with open system behavior involving at least three distinct mantle reservoirs. Compared to the isotope composition of known mantle sources for OIBs and carbonatite occurrences worldwide, the least radiogenic 207Pb/204Pb (14.96 ± 0.07) and 208Pb/204Pb (37.29 ± 0.15) isotopic compositions relative to their corresponding 206Pb/204Pb ratios (18.86 ± 0.08) reported here are distinct, and indicate the involvement of an ancient depleted mantle (ADM) source. The extremely unradiogenic Pb isotope compositions necessitate U/Pb fractionation early in Earth's history (prior to 4.0 Ga ago) and growth via a multi-stage Pb evolution model. The combined stable (C and O) and radiogenic isotopic compositions effectively rule out crustal/lithosphere contamination during the petrogenetic history of the Oka complex. Instead, the isotopic variations reported here most likely result from the mixing of discrete, small volume partial melts derived from a heterogeneous plume source characterized by a mixed HIMU-EM1-ADM signature.

  12. 13C-18O isotope signatures and ‘clumped isotope’ thermometry in foraminifera and coccoliths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripati, Aradhna K.; Eagle, Robert A.; Thiagarajan, Nivedita; Gagnon, Alexander C.; Bauch, Henning; Halloran, Paul R.; Eiler, John M.

    2010-10-01

    Accurate constraints on past ocean temperatures and compositions are critical for documenting climate change and resolving its causes. Most proxies for temperature are not thermodynamically based, appear to be subject to biological processes, require regional calibrations, and/or are influenced by fluid composition. As a result, their interpretation becomes uncertain when they are applied in settings not necessarily resembling those in which they were empirically calibrated. Independent proxies for past temperature could provide an important means of testing and/or expanding on existing reconstructions. Here we report measurements of abundances of stable isotopologues of calcitic and aragonitic benthic and planktic foraminifera and coccoliths, relate those abundances to independently estimated growth temperatures, and discuss the possible scope of equilibrium and kinetic isotope effects. The proportions of 13C- 18O bonds in these samples exhibits a temperature dependence that is generally similar to that previously been reported for inorganic calcite and other biologically precipitated carbonate-containing minerals (apatite from fish, reptile, and mammal teeth; calcitic brachiopods and molluscs; aragonitic coral and mollusks). Most species that exhibit non-equilibrium 18O/ 16O (δ 18O) and 13C/ 12C (δ 13C) ratios are characterized by 13C- 18O bond abundances that are similar to inorganic calcite and are generally indistinguishable from apparent equilibrium, with possible exceptions among benthic foraminiferal samples from the Arctic Ocean where temperatures are near-freezing. Observed isotope ratios in biogenic carbonates can be explained if carbonate minerals generally preserve a state of ordering that reflects the extent of isotopic equilibration of the dissolved inorganic carbon species.

  13. Stable isotope signatures reveal small-scale spatial separation in populations of European sea bass

    OpenAIRE

    Cambiè, Giulia; Kaiser, Michel J.; Marriott, Andrew L.; Fox, Jennifer; Lambert, Gwladys; Hiddink, Jan G.; Overy, Thomas; Bennett, Sarah A.; Leng, Melanie J.; McCarthy, Ian D

    2016-01-01

    Scientific information about European sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax stocks in the NE Atlantic is limited and a more accurate definition of the stock boundaries in the area is required to improve assessment and management advice. We investigated the connectivity and movement patterns of D. labrax in Wales (UK) using the stable isotope (δ13C and δ15N) composition of their scales. Analysis of δ13C and δ15N values in the last growing season was performed on 189 adult sea bass caught at 9 coastal ...

  14. Interplay of community dynamics, temperature, and productivity on the hydrogen isotope signatures of lipid biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemiah Ladd, S.; Dubois, Nathalie; Schubert, Carsten J.

    2017-09-01

    The hydrogen isotopic composition (δ2H) of lipid biomarkers has diverse applications in the fields of paleoclimatology, biogeochemistry, and microbial community dynamics. Large changes in hydrogen isotope fractionation have been observed among microbes with differing core metabolisms, while environmental factors including temperature and nutrient availability can affect isotope fractionation by photoautotrophs. Much effort has gone into studying these effects under laboratory conditions with single species cultures. Moving beyond controlled environments and quantifying the natural extent of these changes in freshwater lacustrine settings and identifying their causes is essential for robust application of δ2H values of common short-chain fatty acids as a proxy of net community metabolism and of phytoplankton-specific biomarkers as a paleohydrologic proxy. This work targets the effect of community dynamics, temperature, and productivity on 2H/1H fractionation in lipid biomarkers through a comparative time series in two central Swiss lakes: eutrophic Lake Greifen and oligotrophic Lake Lucerne. Particulate organic matter was collected from surface waters at six time points throughout the spring and summer of 2015, and δ2H values of short-chain fatty acids, as well as chlorophyll-derived phytol and the diatom biomarker brassicasterol, were measured. We paired these measurements with in situ incubations conducted with NaH13CO3, which were used to calculate the production rates of individual lipids in lake surface water. As algal productivity increased from April to June, net discrimination against 2H in Lake Greifen increased by as much as 148 ‰ for individual fatty acids. During the same time period in Lake Lucerne, net discrimination against 2H increased by as much as 58 ‰ for individual fatty acids. A large portion of this signal is likely due to a greater proportion of heterotrophically derived fatty acids in the winter and early spring, which are displaced by

  15. Mass independent sulfur isotope signatures in CMs: Implications for sulfur chemistry in the early solar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labidi, J.; Farquhar, J.; Alexander, C. M. O.'D.; Eldridge, D. L.; Oduro, H.

    2017-01-01

    We have investigated the quadruple sulfur isotopic composition of inorganic sulfur-bearing phases from 13 carbonaceous chondrites of CM type. Our samples include 4 falls and 9 Antarctic finds. We extracted sulfur from sulfides, sulfates, and elemental sulfur (S0) from all samples. On average, we recover a bulk sulfur (S) content of 2.11 ± 0.39 wt.% S (1σ). The recovered sulfate, S0 and sulfide contents represent 25 ± 12%, 10 ± 7% and 65 ± 15% of the bulk S, respectively (all 1σ). There is no evidence for differences in the bulk S content between falls and finds, and there is no correlation between the S speciation and the extent of aqueous alteration. We report ranges of Δ33S and Δ36S values in CMs that are significantly larger than previously observed. The largest variations are exhibited by S0, with Δ33S values ranging between -0.104 ± 0.012‰ and +0.256 ± 0.018‰ (2σ). The Δ36S/33S ratios of S0 are on average -3.1 ± 1.0 (2σ). Two CMs show distinct Δ36S/33S ratios, of +1.3 ± 0.1 and +0.9 ± 0.1. We suggest that these mass independent S isotopic compositions record H2S photodissociation in the nebula. The varying Δ36S/Δ33S ratios are interpreted to reflect photodissociation that occurred at different UV wavelengths. The preservation of these isotopic features requires that the S-bearing phases were heterogeneously accreted to the CM parent body. Non-zero Δ33S values are also preserved in sulfide and sulfate, and are positively correlated with S0 values. This indicates a genetic relationship between the S-bearing phases: We argue that sulfates were produced by the direct oxidation of S0 (not sulfide) in the parent body. We describe two types of models that, although imperfect, can explain the major features of the CM S isotope compositions, and can be tested in future studies. Sulfide and S0 could both be condensates from the nebula, as the residue and product, respectively, of incomplete H2S photodissociation by UV light (wavelength H2S

  16. Isotopic signatures suggest important contributions from recycled gasoline, road dust and non-exhaust traffic sources for copper, zinc and lead in PM10 in London, United Kingdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Shuofei; Ochoa Gonzalez, Raquel; Harrison, Roy M.; Green, David; North, Robin; Fowler, Geoff; Weiss, Dominik

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to improve our understanding of what controls the isotope composition of Cu, Zn and Pb in particulate matter (PM) in the urban environment and to develop these isotope systems as possible source tracers. To this end, isotope ratios (Cu, Zn and Pb) and trace element concentrations (Fe, Al, Cu, Zn, Sb, Ba, Pb, Cr, Ni and V) were determined in PM10 collected at two road sites with contrasting traffic densities in central London, UK, during two weeks in summer 2010, and in potential sources, including non-combustion traffic emissions (tires and brakes), road furniture (road paint, manhole cover and road tarmac surface) and road dust. Iron, Ba and Sb were used as proxies for emissions derived from brake pads, and Ni, and V for emissions derived from fossil fuel oil. The isotopic composition of Pb (expressed using 206Pb/207Pb) ranged between 1.1137 and 1.1364. The isotope ratios of Cu and Zn expressed as δ65CuNIST976 and δ66ZnLyon ranged between -0.01‰ and +0.51‰ and between -0.21‰ and +0.33‰, respectively. We did not find significant differences in the isotope signatures in PM10 over the two weeks sampling period and between the two sites, suggesting similar sources for each metal at both sites despite their different traffic densities. The stable isotope composition of Pb suggests significant contribution from road dust resuspension and from recycled leaded gasoline. The Cu and Zn isotope signatures of tires, brakes and road dust overlap with those of PM10. The correlation between the enrichments of Sb, Cu, Ba and Fe in PM10 support the previously established hypothesis that Cu isotope ratios are controlled by non-exhaust traffic emission sources in urban environments (Ochoa Gonzalez et al., 2016). Analysis of the Zn isotope signatures in PM10 and possible sources at the two sites suggests significant contribution from tire wear. However, temporary additional sources, likely high temperature industrial emissions, need to be invoked

  17. Volcanic degassing at Somma-Vesuvio (Italy) inferred by chemical and isotopic signatures of groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caliro, S. [Osservatorio Vesuviano sezione di Napoli dell' Istituto, Nazionale Geofisica Vulcanologia, Via Diocleziano 328, 80124 Naples (Italy)]. E-mail: caliro@ov.ingv.it; Chiodini, G. [Osservatorio Vesuviano sezione di Napoli dell' Istituto, Nazionale Geofisica Vulcanologia, Via Diocleziano 328, 80124 Naples (Italy); Avino, R. [Osservatorio Vesuviano sezione di Napoli dell' Istituto, Nazionale Geofisica Vulcanologia, Via Diocleziano 328, 80124 Naples (Italy); Cardellini, C. [Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Universita di Perugia (Italy); Frondini, F. [Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Universita di Perugia (Italy)

    2005-06-15

    A geochemical model is proposed for water evolution at Somma-Vesuvio, based on the chemical and isotopic composition of groundwaters, submarine gas emission and chemical composition of the dissolved gases. The active degassing processes, present in the highest part of the volcano edifice, strongly influence the groundwater evolution. The geological-volcanological setting of the volcano forces the waters infiltrating at Somma-Vesuvio caldera, enriched in volcanic gases, to flow towards the southern sector to an area of high pCO{sub 2} groundwaters. Reaction path modelling applied to this conceptual model, involving gas-water-rock interaction, highlights an intense degassing process in the aquifer controlling the chemical and isotopic composition of dissolved gases, total dissolved inorganic C (TDIC) and submarine gas emission. Mapping of TDIC shows a unique area of high values situated SSE of Vesuvio volcano with an average TDIC value of 0.039 mol/L, i.e., one order of magnitude higher than groundwaters from other sectors of the volcano. On the basis of TDIC values, the amount of CO{sub 2} transported by Vesuvio groundwaters was estimated at about 150 t/d. This estimate does not take into account the fraction of gas loss by degassing, however, it represents a relevant part of the CO{sub 2} emitted in this quiescent period by the Vesuvio volcanic system, being of the same order of magnitude as the CO{sub 2} diffusely degassed from the crater area.

  18. Trace elements and Pb isotopes in soils and sediments impacted by uranium mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuvier, A; Pourcelot, L; Probst, A; Prunier, J; Le Roux, G

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the contamination in As, Ba, Co, Cu, Mn, Ni, Sr, V, Zn and REE, in a high uranium activity (up to 21,000Bq∙kg(-1)) area, downstream of a former uranium mine. Different geochemical proxies like enrichment factor and fractions from a sequential extraction procedure are used to evaluate the level of contamination, the mobility and the availability of the potential contaminants. Pb isotope ratios are determined in the total samples and in the sequential leachates to identify the sources of the contaminants and to determine the mobility of radiogenic Pb in the context of uranium mining. In spite of the large uranium contamination measured in the soils and the sediments (EF≫40), trace element contamination is low to moderate (2isotopic signature of the contaminated soils is strongly radiogenic. Measurements performed on the sequential leachates reveal inputs of radiogenic Pb in the most mobile fractions of the contaminated soil. Inputs of low-mobile radiogenic Pb from mining activities may also contribute to the Pb signature recorded in the residual phase of the contaminated samples. We demonstrate that Pb isotopes are efficient tools to trace the origin and the mobility of the contaminants in environments affected by uranium mining.

  19. Uranium-Lead Zircon Ages and Sr, Nd, and Pb Isotope Geochemistry of Selected Plutonic Rocks from Western Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unruh, Daniel M.; Lund, Karen; Kuntz, Mel A.; Snee, Lawrence W.

    2008-01-01

    Across the Salmon River suture in western Idaho, where allochthonous Permian to Cretaceous oceanic rocks are juxtaposed against Proterozoic North American rocks, a wide variety of plutonic rocks are exposed. Available data indicate much variation in composition, source, and structural state of these plutons. The plutonic rocks were long described as the western border zone of the Cretaceous Idaho batholith but limited pre-existing age data indicate more complicated origins. Because the affinity and age of the plutonic rocks cannot be reliably determined from field relations, TIMS U-Pb dating in conjunction with Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopic studies of selected plutons across the suture in western Idaho were undertaken. The data indicate three general groups of plutons including (1) those that intruded the island arc terranes during the Triassic and Jurassic, those that intruded near the western edge of oceanic rocks along the suture in the Early Cretaceous, and the plutons of the Idaho batholith that intruded Proterozoic North American rocks in the Late Cretaceous. Plutons that intruded Proterozoic North American rocks commonly include xenocrystic zircons and in several cases, ages could not be determined. The least radiogenic Sr and most radiogenic Nd are found among the Blue Mountains superterrane island arc samples. Suture-zone plutons have isotopic characteristics that span the range between Idaho batholith and island arc samples but mostly follow island arc signatures. Plutons of the Idaho batholith have the most radiogenic initial Pb and Sr ratios and the least radiogenic Nd of the samples analyzed.

  20. Tracking isotopic signatures of CO2 at Jungfraujoch with laser spectroscopy: analytical improvements and exemplary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Emmenegger

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the continuous data record of atmospheric CO2 isotopes measured by laser absorption spectroscopy for an almost four year period at the High Altitude Research Station Jungfraujoch (3580 m a.s.l., Switzerland. The mean annual cycles derived from data of December 2008 to September 2012 exhibit peak-to-peak amplitudes of 11.0 μmol mol−1 for CO2, 0.60‰ for δ13C and 0.81‰ for δ18O. The high temporal resolution of the measurements also allow to capture variations on hourly and diurnal time scales. For CO2 the mean diurnal peak-to-peak amplitude is about 1 μmol mol−1 in spring, autumn and winter and about 2 μmol mol−1 in summer. The mean diurnal variability in the isotope ratios is largest during the summer months too, with an amplitude of about 0.1‰ both in the δ13C and δ18O, and a smaller or no discernible diurnal cycle during the other seasons. The day-to-day variability, however, is much larger and depends on the origin of the air masses arriving at Jungfraujoch. Backward Lagrangian particle dispersion model simulations revealed a close link between air composition and prevailing transport regimes and could be used to explain part of the observed variability in terms of transport history and influence region. A footprint clustering showed significantly different wintertime CO2, δ13C and δ18O values depending on the origin and surface residence times of the air masses. Based on the experiences gained from our measurements, several major updates on the instrument and the calibration procedures were performed in order to further improve the data quality. We describe the new measurement and calibration setup in detail and demonstrate the enhanced performance of the analyser. A precision of about 0.02‰ for both isotope ratios has been obtained for an averaging time of 10 min.

  1. Re-assessing H and C Isotope Signatures of Biogenic Methane in Coalbeds and Shales: Metabolic Pathways and Alternative Influences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinson, D. S.; McIntosh, J. C.; Blair, N. E.; Martini, A. M.

    2013-12-01

    Hydrogen and carbon isotopes of microbial methane have long been applied to distinguish metabolic pathways of methanogenesis (utilization of acetate vs. H2+CO2 by methanogens). However, application of isotopic tools in hydrocarbon and biodegradation systems requires improved understanding of what is actually recorded by C and H isotopes of biogenic methane. Unlike culture studies where the fractionation factors of methanogenic pathways have been defined, field-collected gas or water samples represent net apparent isotope signatures influenced by a variety of overlapping water-rock-microbial interaction processes. Understanding these processes is important for modeling subsurface carbon cycling and biostimulation efforts for enhanced microbial gas production. Briefly, trends are apparent from a re-analysis of recently published water and gas isotope data from biogenic coalbed methane and shale gas systems: (1) δ13C-CH4 and the relationship between δ13C-CH4 and δ13C-CO2 (α13CCO2-CH4=(δ13C-CO2 + 1000)/(δ13C-CH4 +1000)), can also record the competition between methanogenesis and non-methanogenic processes (e.g. sulfate reduction), rather than simply recording the pathways of methanogenesis itself; and (2) Interpretation of δ2H-CH4 and δ2H-H2O can be inconsistent with δ13C-based fingerprinting techniques and indeed could be highly influenced by isotope exchange between water and methane precursors. This study provides an alternative approach for interpreting δ13C in shallow biogenic gas which considers that Corg may be consumed by competing, highly-fractionating and less-fractionating processes (e.g. methanogenesis and sulfate reduction, respectively). Whereas variation in apparent α13CCO2-CH4 could be inferred to indicate variation of metabolic pathways (that is, acetate fermentation vs. CO2 reduction) in some coalbed methane systems such as the Powder River Basin, the influx of sulfate relative to the overall Corg biodegradation rate could also be an

  2. Stable silicon isotope signatures of marine pore waters - Biogenic opal dissolution versus authigenic clay mineral formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlert, Claudia; Doering, Kristin; Wallmann, Klaus; Scholz, Florian; Sommer, Stefan; Grasse, Patricia; Geilert, Sonja; Frank, Martin

    2016-10-01

    Dissolved silicon isotope compositions have been analysed for the first time in pore waters (δ30SiPW) of three short sediment cores from the Peruvian margin upwelling region with distinctly different biogenic opal content in order to investigate silicon isotope fractionation behaviour during early diagenetic turnover of biogenic opal in marine sediments. The δ30SiPW varies between +1.1‰ and +1.9‰ with the highest values occurring in the uppermost part close to the sediment-water interface. These values are of the same order or higher than the δ30Si of the biogenic opal extracted from the same sediments (+0.3‰ to +1.2‰) and of the overlying bottom waters (+1.1‰ to +1.5‰). Together with dissolved silicic acid concentrations well below biogenic opal saturation, our collective observations are consistent with the formation of authigenic alumino-silicates from the dissolving biogenic opal. Using a numerical transport-reaction model we find that approximately 24% of the dissolving biogenic opal is re-precipitated in the sediments in the form of these authigenic phases at a relatively low precipitation rate of 56 μmol Si cm-2 yr-1. The fractionation factor between the precipitates and the pore waters is estimated at -2.0‰. Dissolved and solid cation concentrations further indicate that off Peru, where biogenic opal concentrations in the sediments are high, the availability of reactive terrigenous material is the limiting factor for the formation of authigenic alumino-silicate phases.

  3. Carbon and oxygen isotope signatures in conifers from the Swiss National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churakova (Sidorova), Olga; Saurer, Matthias; Siegwolf, Rolf; Bryukhanova, Marina; Bigler, Christof

    2015-04-01

    Our study investigates the physiological response and plasticity of trees under climatic changes for larch (Larix decidua) and mountain pine (Pinus mugo var. uncinata) in the Swiss National Park.This research was done in the context of investigation tree mortality and their potential to survive under the harsh mountainous conditions. For the stable isotope analysis we selected four mountain pine and four larch trees from each a south- and north-facing slope. Oxygen isotope ratios can give insight into water sources and evaporative processes. To understand the differential response of mountain pine and larch to short-term climatic changes we measured 18O/16O in water extracted from twigs and needles as well as soil samples for each species at both sites. The seasonal variabilities in 18O/16O needles and twigs of mountain pine and larch trees as well as soil samples were related to changes in climate conditions from end of May until middle of October. To reveal the main climatic factors driving tree growth of pine and larch trees in the long-term, tree-ring width chronologies were built and bulk 18O/16O, 13C/12C wood chronologies were analyzed and correlated with climatic parameters over the last 100 years. The results indicate a strong influence of spring and summer temperatures for larch trees, while variation of spring and summer precipitations is more relevant for mountain pine trees. This work is supported by the Swiss National Science Foundation, Marie-Heim Vögtlin Program PMPDP-2 145507

  4. Cestodes change the isotopic signature of brine shrimp, Artemia, hosts: implications for aquatic food webs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Marta I; Varo, Nico; Matesanz, Cristina; Ramo, Cristina; Amat, Juan A; Green, Andy J

    2013-01-01

    To reach the final host (greater flamingos), the cestode Flamingolepis liguloides alters the behaviour of its intermediate host, the brine shrimp, Artemia parthenogenetica, causing it to spend more time close to the water surface. During summer 2010, we showed that the prevalence of this cestode was consistently higher at the top of the water column in the Odiel salt pans in south-western Spain. We used stable nitrogen (N) and carbon (C) isotopic analysis to test the hypothesis that cestodes also alter resource use by Artemia. In early summer, we compared stable isotopes in infected hosts at the surface with those from uninfected hosts at the bottom of the water column. In late summer, we compared infected and uninfected Artemia from the bottom. δ(15)N was consistently enriched in infected individuals compared with uninfected hosts, especially in Artemia with multiple infections of F. liguloides (family Hymenolepididae) and those with mixed infections of F. liguloides and cestodes of the family Dilepididae. Infected individuals from the surface were enriched in δ(13)C compared with uninfected ones from the bottom, but the opposite was found when comparing uninfected and infected Artemia from the same depth. This may be caused by the increase in lipid concentration in infected Artemia. Isolated cysticercoids of F. liguloides were significantly enriched in δ(13)C compared with cysticercoids in infected hosts, but surprisingly were not enriched in N. Our findings illustrate the way cestodes can alter food webs and highlight the importance of considering the parasitic status of prey in studies of trophic ecology in saline wetlands. Copyright © 2012 Australian Society for Parasitology Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Relationships between water and paddlefish Polyodon spathula dentary elemental and stable-isotopic signatures: potential application for reconstructing environmental history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, L R; Whitledge, G W; Pracheil, B; Bailey, P

    2017-02-01

    The objectives of this study were to characterize relationships between water and paddlefish Polyodon spathula dentary Sr:Ca, δ(18) O and stable hydrogen isotope ratio (δD) to determine the accuracy with which individual P. spathula could be assigned to their collection locations using dentary-edge Sr:Ca, δD and δ(18) O. A laboratory experiment was also conducted to determine whether dentary Sr:Ca in age 0 year P. spathula would reflect shifts in water Sr:Ca to which fish were exposed. Significant linear relationships between water and dentary Sr:Ca, δD and δ(18) O were observed, although the relationship between water and dentary δ(18) O was weaker than those for Sr:Ca and δD. Classification success for individual fish to collection locations that differed in water Sr:Ca, δD and δ(18) O ranged from 86 to 100% based on dentary-edge Sr:Ca, δD and δ(18) O. Dentary Sr:Ca increased significantly in laboratory-reared age 0 year P. spathula following 4 weeks of exposure to elevated water Sr:Ca; dentary Sr:Ca of fish held in water with elevated Sr:Ca was also significantly higher than that of control fish reared in ambient laboratory water. Results indicated that P. spathula dentaries reflect water signatures for commonly-applied natural chemical markers and strongly suggest that dentary microchemistry and stable-isotopic compositions will be applicable for reconstructing P. spathula environmental history in locations where sufficient spatial differences in water chemistry occur.

  6. Cenomanian-turonian stable isotope signatures and depositional sequences in northeast Egypt and central Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farouk, Sherif; Ahmad, Fayez; Powell, John H.

    2017-02-01

    Lithostratigraphic, biostratigraphic and microfacies studies of two Cenomanian-Turonian shallow-marine, siliciclastic-carbonate successions at Gebel Ekma plateau (southwestern Sinai, Egypt) and Wadi Karak section (central Jordan) are calibrated with δ13C-, profiles to reveal relative sea-level changes within a sequence stratigraphic framework. The study provides significantly enhanced stratigraphic resolution and key sections for regional correlation. Lithofacies are dominated by well-developed peritidal to subtidal facies associations indicating deposition in a rimmed carbonate shelf setting. Biostratigraphic analysis indicates the presence of 6 ammonite zones, 3 calcareous nannofossil zones and 3 planktonic foraminiferal zones within the Cenomanian to Turonian succession. Six, third-order depositional sequences, bounded by correlatable sequence boundaries can be traced across the African-Arabian platform. Comparison with δ13C records in deeper water pelagic sequences help to improve the resolution of the boundaries of each depositional sequence. Recognition of time gaps at the sequence boundaries on the platform, recorded in different parts of African-Arabian platform, is attributed to local tectonic activity, associated with the change from passive to active margins, which are overprinted by the global eustatic signature.

  7. Can isotopic signatures reveal reactive nitrogen priming of soil organic matter decompostion ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood-Nowotny, Rebecca; Msii Participants, Alter-Net

    2015-04-01

    The newest meta-data analyses and the model based hypotheses state that global soil C storage is controlled by microbial scale processes of fungal competition for available nitrogen (N). However, the details of these microbe-dependent feedback mechanisms on N and C dynamics in European soils are largely unknown and contentious. Given global trends of increasing atmospheric N deposition and the continuing use of inorganic N fertilizer, the function of soils as a carbon sink is potentially under threat. Therefore, further research is urgently required in order to be able to provide reliable information on soil microbial responses for predictive climate change models. Changes in nutrient status could result in a chain reaction of interacting microbial mechanisms which in turn could lead to the shifts in underlying ecosystem biogeochemical process rates. Recent meta-analysis has shown that plant fungal symbiont community structure, exerts a greater fundamental control over soil C storage than temperature, precipitation or net primary production. Based on the hypothesis that plant associated fungi effectively scavenge all available organic and inorganic N leaving little N for the growth of the free-living decomposer microbial community and preventing further breakdown of SOM To investigate these possible effects we have sampled natural grassland and forest soils across a trans European gradient (ALTER-net-MSII Network) which have received additional inputs of inorganic nitrogen for the last five years and studied the impacts of nitrogen on the concentrations and isotope ratios of bulk soil organic matter (SOM) in addition to particular organic matter (POM) fractions, as early indicators of SOM decomposition. Initial results suggest that isotope ratios combined with C:N ratios of SOM can be useful to tease out some underlying mechanisms of organic matter breakdown for example the impact of carbonate/pH on SOM decomposition. But more detailed analyses of specific soil

  8. Organic matter dynamics and stable isotope signature as tracers of the sources of suspended sediment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Schindler Wildhaber

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Suspended sediment (SS and organic matter in rivers can harm brown trout Salmo trutta by affecting the health and fitness of free swimming fish and by causing siltation of the riverbed. The temporal and spatial dynamics of sediment, carbon (C, and nitrogen (N during the brown trout spawning season in a small river of the Swiss Plateau were assessed and C isotopes as well as the C/N atomic ratio were used to distinguish autochthonous and allochthonous sources of organic matter in SS loads. The visual basic program IsoSource with 13Ctot and 15N as input isotopes was used to quantify the temporal and spatial sources of SS. Organic matter concentrations in the infiltrated and suspended sediment were highest during low flow periods with small sediment loads and lowest during high flow periods with high sediment loads. Peak values in nitrate and dissolved organic C were measured during high flow and high rainfall, probably due to leaching from pasture and arable land. The organic matter was of allochthonous sources as indicated by the C/N atomic ratio and δ13Corg. Organic matter in SS increased from up- to downstream due to an increase of pasture and arable land downstream of the river. The mean fraction of SS originating from upper watershed riverbed sediment decreased from up to downstream and increased during high flow at all measuring sites along the course of the river. During base flow conditions, the major sources of SS are pasture, forest and arable land. The latter increased during rainy and warmer winter periods, most likely because both triggered snow melt and thus erosion. The measured increase in DOC and nitrate concentrations during high flow support these modeling results. Enhanced soil erosion processes on pasture and arable land are expected with increasing heavy rain events and less snow during winter seasons due to climate change. Consequently, SS and organic

  9. Understanding wetland sub-surface hydrology using geologic and isotopic signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Sahu

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper attempts to utilize hydrogeology and isotope composition of groundwater to understand the present hydrological processes prevalent in a freshwater wetland, source of wetland groundwater, surface water/groundwater interaction and mixing of groundwater of various depth zones in the aquifer. This study considers East Calcutta Wetlands (ECW – a freshwater peri-urban inland wetland ecosystem located at the lower part of the deltaic alluvial plain of South Bengal Basin and east of Kolkata city. This wetland is well known over the world for its resource recovery systems, developed by local people through ages, using wastewater of the city. Geological investigations reveal that the sub-surface geology is completely blanketed by the Quaternary sediments comprising a succession of silty clay, sand of various grades and sand mixed with occasional gravels and thin intercalations of silty clay. At few places the top silty clay layer is absent due to scouring action of past channels. In these areas sand is present throughout the geological column and the areas are vulnerable to groundwater pollution. Groundwater mainly flows from east to west and is being over-extracted to the tune of 65×103 m3/day. δ18O and δD values of shallow and deep groundwater are similar indicating resemblance in hydrostratigraphy and climate of the recharge areas. Groundwater originates mainly from monsoonal rain with some evaporation prior to or during infiltration and partly from bottom of ponds, canals and infiltration of groundwater withdrawn for irrigation. Relatively high tritium content of the shallow groundwater indicates local recharge, while the deep groundwater with very low tritium is recharged mainly from distant areas. At places the deep aquifer has relatively high tritium, indicating mixing of groundwater of shallow and deep aquifers. Metals such as copper, lead, arsenic, cadmium, aluminium, nickel and chromium are also

  10. Isotopic mass independent signature of black crusts: a proxy for atmospheric aerosols formation in the Paris area (France).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genot, Isabelle; Martin, Erwan; Yang, David Au; De Rafelis, Marc; Cartigny, Pierre; Wing, Boswell; Le Gendre, Erwann; Bekki, Slimane

    2016-04-01

    In view of the negative forcing of the sulfate aerosols on climate, a more accurate understanding of the formation of these particles is crucial. Indeed, despite the knowledge of their effects, uncertainties remain regarding the formation of sulfate aerosols, particularly the oxidation processes of S-bearing gases. Since the discovery of oxygen and sulfur mass independent fractionation (O- and S-MIF) processes on Earth, the sulfate isotopic composition became essential to investigate the atmospheric composition evolution and its consequences on the climate and the biosphere. Large amount of S-bearing compounds (SO2 mainly) is released into the atmosphere by anthropogenic and natural sources. Their oxidation in the atmosphere generates sulfate aerosols, H2SO4, which precipitate on the earth surface mainly as acid rain. One consequence of this precipitation is the formation of black crust on buildings made of carbonate stones. Indeed the chemical alteration of CaCO3 by H2SO4 leads to gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O) concretions on building walls. Associated to other particles, gypsum forms black-crusts. Therefore, black crusts acts as 'sulfate aerosol traps', meaning that their isotopic composition reveals the composition and thus the source and formation processes of sulfate aerosols in the atmosphere in a specific region. In this study we collected 37 black crusts on a 300km NW-SE profile centered on Paris (France). In our samples, sulfate represent 40wt.% and other particles 60wt.% of the black crusts. After sulfate extraction from each samples we measured their O- and S-isotopes composition. Variations of about 10‰ in δ18O and δ34S are observed and both O-MIF (Δ17O from 0 to 1.4‰) and S-MIF (Δ33S from 0 to -0.3‰) compositions have been measured. In regards to these compositions we can discuss the source and formation (oxidation pathways) of the sulfate aerosols in troposphere above the Paris region that covers urban, rural and coastal environments. Furthermore

  11. Microbial isotopic signatures in calcareous tufa from Punta Mita coastal vents, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canet, C.; Prol-Ledesma, R. M.; Melgarejo, J. C.; Reyes, A.

    2002-12-01

    Numerous small calcareous mounds accompanied by Ba, Hg and Tl mineralization occur in shallow submarine hydrothermal manifestations on the sea bottom, at 10 m depth, in Punta Mita (Western coast of Mexico). The formation of calcite mounds in these coastal vents provides an uncommon example of calcareous tufa deposits in a submarine hydrothermal environment. The hydrothermal activity consists in water and gas (essentially nitrogen and methane) venting at 85°C, through a 100 m fissure hosted in basaltic rocks and partially covered by unconsolidated sediments. The mounds consist of travertine-like metre-sized calcite aggregates that develop around the main submarine hot springs. Barite, sulphides (mostly pyrite and cinnabar) and phosphates (carbonate-hydroxylapatite) are also present in these mounds. Two main calcite types are texturally distinguished: firstly an earlier radial-fibrous generation, and a later fine-grained calcite generation that cements the detrital grains and fills the pore spaces. Stable isotope analyses were performed in calcite from these mounds. The δ13C measured values show a strong depletion in 13C, with values as low as -39.2 per mil (PDB). These values agree with a microbially mediated calcite mineralization process, by means of bacterial oxidation of vent derived methane. In contrast to most known cases of microbial methane oxidation, in Punta Mita this process took place under hydrothermal conditions.

  12. Carbon and Nitrogen Stable Isotopes in Fastfood: Signatures of Corn and Confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahren, H.; Kraft, R.

    2008-12-01

    Americans spend more than one hundred billion dollars on restaurant fastfood each year; fastfood meals comprise a disproportionate amount of both meat and calories within the U.S. diet. Frustrated by futile attempts to gain information about the origin and production of fastfood from the companies themselves, we used carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes to infer the source of feed to meat animals, the source of fat within fries, and the extent of fertilization and confinement inherent to production. We sampled food from McDonald's, Burger King and Wendy's chains, purchasing more than 480 servings of hamburgers, chicken sandwiches and fries within geographically-distributed U.S. cities: Los Angeles, San Francisco, Denver, Detroit, Boston and Baltimore. From the entire sample set of beef and chicken, only 12 servings of beef had δ13C < -21 ‰; for these animals only was a food source other than corn possible. We observed remarkably invariant values of δ15N in both beef and chicken, reflecting uniform confinement and exposure to heavily fertilized feed for all animals. The δ13C value of fries differed significantly among restaurants indicating that the chains employed different protocols for deep- frying: Wendy's clearly employed only corn oil, while McDonald's and Burger King favored other vegetable oils; this differed from ingredient reports. Our results highlighted the overwhelming importance of corn agriculture within virtually every aspect of fastfood manufacture.

  13. Characterisation and origin of New Zealand nephrite jade using its strontium isotopic signature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, C. J.; Beck, R. J.; Campbell, H. J.

    2007-09-01

    Nephrite jade occurs in three terranes (Dun Mountain-Maitai, Caples and Torlesse) in New Zealand, where it is associated with ultramafic and ophiolitic rocks in narrow metasomatic reaction zones at the margins of serpentinite (having harzburgite/gabbro/dolerite precursors) with silicic metasediments and metavolcanics. True nephrite fabrics are developed only locally where marginal shearing is intense, and late in the metamorphic history. 87Sr/ 86Sr values of these nephrites do not display the primitive values of their gabbro/dolerite precursor component i.e. 0.7030-0.7035, as expected if formed during serpentinisation. Rather, the nephrites have more evolved 87Sr/ 86Sr values inherited from the metasediment component at a later stage, and which fall within particular terrane groups: Dun Mountain-Maitai 0.7045-0.7060, Caples 0.7058-0.7075 and Torlesse 0.7085-0.7110. Rb-Sr ages and initial 87Sr/ 86Sr ratios of the metasediment component from in situ nephrite localities, when compared with their counterparts throughout the host terrane, show that nephrite Sr isotopic compositions are characteristic of the host terrane.

  14. Soil carbon dioxide emissions controlled by an extracellular oxidative metabolism identifiable by its isotope signature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kéraval, Benoit; Lehours, Anne Catherine; Colombet, Jonathan; Amblard, Christian; Alvarez, Gaël; Fontaine, Sébastien

    2016-11-01

    Soil heterotrophic respiration is a major determinant of the carbon (C) cycle and its interactions with climate. Given the complexity of the respiratory machinery, it is traditionally considered that oxidation of organic C into carbon dioxide (CO2) strictly results from intracellular metabolic processes. Here we show that C mineralization can operate in soils deprived of all observable cellular forms. Moreover, the process responsible for CO2 emissions in sterilized soils induced a strong C isotope fractionation (up to 50 ‰) incompatible with respiration of cellular origin. The supply of 13C glucose in sterilized soil led to the release of 13CO2 suggesting the presence of respiratory-like metabolism (glycolysis, decarboxylation reaction, chain of electron transfer) carried out by soil-stabilized enzymes, and by soil mineral and metal catalysts. These findings indicate that CO2 emissions from soils can have two origins: (1) from the well-known respiration of soil heterotrophic microorganisms and (2) from an extracellular oxidative metabolism (EXOMET) or, at least, catabolism. These two metabolisms should be considered separately when studying effects of environmental factors on the C cycle because the likelihood is that they do not obey the same laws and they respond differently to abiotic factors.

  15. Oxygen isotope signatures of quartz from major Asian dust sources: Implications for changes in the provenance of Chinese loess

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yan; Sun, Youbin; Chen, Hongyun; Ma, Long

    2014-08-01

    We present a systematic investigation of the oxygen isotopic composition of quartz in both fine and coarse fractions (values of both the fine and coarse fractions from the various sources are overlapped to varying degrees, thus making it difficult to differentiate them. Nevertheless, the quartz δ18O values of both fractions exhibit an increasing trend from the Mongolian Gobi, to the northern Chinese deserts, and then to the Taklimakan desert. This implies that the geological settings of the source areas are different, which in turn results in differing contributions of high-temperature igneous rocks. The combination of quartz δ18O results with other quartz-based provenance tracers can clearly differentiate the three major source areas, i.e., the Taklimakan desert, the Mongolian Gobi, and the northern Chinese deserts. In addition, comparison of our results with previous δ18O measurements of fine-grained quartz from the Luochuan loess sequence suggests the likely glacial-interglacial fluctuations in dust provenance. Finally, we suggest that the combination of quartz δ18O signatures and other dust provenance tracers can potentially improve the recognition of long-term fluctuations in the provenance of Chinese loess-red clay deposits.

  16. Lead isotopic signatures in Antarctic marine sediment cores: a comparison between 1M HCl partial extraction and HF total digestion pre-treatments for discerning anthropogenic inputs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, A T; Snape, I; Palmer, A S; Seen, A J

    2009-12-20

    Sensitive analytical techniques are typically required when dealing with samples from Antarctica as even low concentrations of contaminants can have detrimental environmental effects. Magnetic Sector ICP-MS is an ideal technique for environmental assessment as it offers high sensitivity, multi-element capability and the opportunity to determine isotope ratios. Here we consider the Pb isotope record of five marine sediment cores collected from three sites in the Windmill Islands area of East Antarctica: Brown Bay adjacent to the current Australian station Casey, Wilkes near the abandoned US/Australian Station and McGrady Cove lying midway between the two. Two sediment pre-treatment approaches were considered, namely partial extraction with 1M HCl and total dissolution involving HF. Lead isotope ratio measurements made following sediment partial extraction provided a more sensitive indication of Pb contamination than either Pb concentrations alone (irrespective of sample pre-treatment method) or isotope ratios made after HF digestion, offering greater opportunity for discrimination between impacted and natural/geogenic samples and sites. Over 90% of the easily extractable Pb from sediments near Casey was anthropogenic in origin, consisting of Pb from major Australian deposits. At Wilkes impact from discarded batteries with a unique isotopic signature was found to be a key source of Pb contamination to the marine environment with ~70-80% of Pb being anthropogenic in origin. The country and source of origin of these batteries remain unknown. Little evidence was found suggesting contamination at Wilkes by Pb originating from the major US source, Missouri. No definitive assessment could be made regarding Pb impact at McGrady Cove as the collected sediment core was of insufficient depth. Although Pb isotope ratio signatures may indicate anthropogenic input, spatial concentration gradients at nearby Brown Bay suggest contamination at McGrady Cove is unlikely. We recommend

  17. Oxygen Isotope Signatures of UV Oxidation of Phosphite: Implications for a Biomarker in the Search for Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, S.; Blake, R.

    2013-12-01

    On the present Earth, phosphorus (P) occurs primarily in fully-oxidized form (P5+) as orthophosphate (PO4), and PO4 derived from igneous apatite minerals is considered as the primary source of P for prebiotic reactions and evolution of first life. Recent discoveries have shown, however, that abundant P compounds with valence aqueous weathering of phosphides in meteorites(1) and of fulgurites formed by lightning strikes or high-energy impacts(2). These studies concluded that PO3 was likely abundant on the oxygen-free early Earth and extraterrestrial environments, and was possibly the first form of biologically-available P, due to its greater solubility and reactivity relative to PO4 and apatite(1). These findings suggest alternative prebiotic P reservoirs to igneous apatite that would also likely have very different prebiotic/baseline PO4 δ18O values. Here we report results of experimental studies to determine the O-isotope signature of PO4 derived from PO3 oxidation catalyzed by ultraviolet (UV) radiation, which was not blocked on early Earth due to lack of an ozone layer(3). These studies are critical for interpretation of PO4 δ18O biosignatures preserved in ancient terrestrial and extraterrestrial samples. Experiments on UV-catalyzed oxidation of aqueous PO3 to PO4 were conducted using δ18O-labled PO3 and different δ18O-labled waters to gain information on (i) the source(s) of O involved and mechanism of oxidation of PO3 to PO4, and (ii) fractionations accompanying O incorporation into product PO4. Our preliminary results under modern atmospheric conditions indicate incorporation of ca. 15 % O from ambient water and ca. 10 % atmospheric O (δ18O: ~23.5 ‰) into product PO4 with a fractionation between incorporated water O and ambient water O of -20 × 4 ‰ (1 SD), assuming 75 % inheritance of O from PO3 and direct incorporation of atmospheric O into product PO4 without fractionation. If initial δ18O values of PO3 sources were the same as igneous apatite (6

  18. Radiogenic neoplasia in thyroid and mammary clonogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifton, K.H.

    1992-05-20

    We have developed rat thyroid and mammary clonogen transplantation systems for the study of radiogenic cancer induction at the target cell level in vivo. The epithelial cell populations of both glands contain small subpopulations of cells which are capable of giving rise to monoclonal glandular structures when transplanted and stimulated with appropriate hormones. Previous results indicated that these clonogens are the precursor cells of radiogenic cancer, and that initiation, is common event at the clonegenic cell level. Detailed information on the physiologic control of clonogen proliferation, differentiation, and total numbers is thus essential to an understanding of the carcinogenic process. We report here studies on investigations on the relationships between grafted thyroid cell number and the rapidity and degree of reestablishment of the thyroid-hypothalamus-pituitary feedback axis in thyroidectomized rats maintained on a normal diet or an iodine deficient diet; studies of the persistence of, and the differentiation potential and functional characteristics of, the TSH-(thyrotropin-) responsive sub- population of clonogens during goitrogenesis, the plateau-phase of goiter growth, and goiter involution; studies of changes in the size of the clonogen sub-population during goitrogenesis, goiter involution and the response to goitrogen rechallenge; and a large carcinogenesis experiment on the nature of the grafted thyroid cell number-dependent suppression of promotion/progression to neoplasia in grafts of radiation-initiated thyroid cells. Data from these studies will be used in the design of future carcinogenesis experiments on neoplastic initiation by high and low LET radiations and on cell interactions during the neoplastic process.

  19. Non-linear dynamics of stable carbon and hydrogen isotope signatures based on a biological kinetic model of aerobic enzymatic methane oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavilin, Vasily A; Rytov, Sergey V; Shim, Natalia; Vogt, Carsten

    2016-06-01

    The non-linear dynamics of stable carbon and hydrogen isotope signatures during methane oxidation by the methanotrophic bacteria Methylosinus sporium strain 5 (NCIMB 11126) and Methylocaldum gracile strain 14 L (NCIMB 11912) under copper-rich (8.9 µM Cu(2+)), copper-limited (0.3 µM Cu(2+)) or copper-regular (1.1 µM Cu(2+)) conditions has been described mathematically. The model was calibrated by experimental data of methane quantities and carbon and hydrogen isotope signatures of methane measured previously in laboratory microcosms reported by Feisthauer et al. [ 1 ] M. gracile initially oxidizes methane by a particulate methane monooxygenase and assimilates formaldehyde via the ribulose monophosphate pathway, whereas M. sporium expresses a soluble methane monooxygenase under copper-limited conditions and uses the serine pathway for carbon assimilation. The model shows that during methane solubilization dominant carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation occurs. An increase of biomass due to growth of methanotrophs causes an increase of particulate or soluble monooxygenase that, in turn, decreases soluble methane concentration intensifying methane solubilization. The specific maximum rate of methane oxidation υm was proved to be equal to 4.0 and 1.3 mM mM(-1) h(-1) for M. sporium under copper-rich and copper-limited conditions, respectively, and 0.5 mM mM(-1) h(-1) for M. gracile. The model shows that methane oxidation cannot be described by traditional first-order kinetics. The kinetic isotope fractionation ceases when methane concentrations decrease close to the threshold value. Applicability of the non-linear model was confirmed by dynamics of carbon isotope signature for carbon dioxide that was depleted and later enriched in (13)C. Contrasting to the common Rayleigh linear graph, the dynamic curves allow identifying inappropriate isotope data due to inaccurate substrate concentration analyses. The non-linear model pretty adequately described experimental

  20. Carbon and nitrogen isotopic signatures and nitrogen profile to identify adulteration in organic fertilizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verenitch, Sergei; Mazumder, Asit

    2012-08-29

    Recently it has been shown that stable isotopes of nitrogen can be used to discriminate between organic and synthetic fertilizers, but the robustness of the approach is questionable. This work developed a comprehensive method that is far more robust in identifying an adulteration of organic nitrogen fertilizers. Organic fertilizers of various types (manures, composts, blood meal, bone meal, fish meal, products of poultry and plant productions, molasses and seaweed based, and others) available on the North American market were analyzed to reveal the most sensitive criteria as well as their quantitative ranges, which can be used in their authentication. Organic nitrogen fertilizers of known origins with a wide δ(15)N range between -0.55 and 28.85‰ (n = 1258) were characterized for C and N content, δ(13)C, δ(15)N, viscosity, pH, and nitrogen profile (urea, ammonia, organic N, water insoluble N, and NO3). A statistically significant data set of characterized unique organic nitrogen fertilizers (n = 335) of various known origins has been assembled. Deliberately adulterated samples of different types of organic fertilizers mixed with synthetic fertilizers at a wide range of proportions have been used to develop the quantitative critical characteristics of organic fertilizers as the key indicators of their adulteration. Statistical analysis based on the discriminant functions of the quantitative critical characteristics of organic nitrogen fertilizers from 14 different source materials revealed a very high average rate of correct classification. The developed methodology has been successfully used as a source identification tool for numerous commercial nitrogen fertilizers available on the North American market.

  1. Understanding wetland sub-surface hydrology using geologic and isotopic signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. K. Sikdar

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper attempts to utilize hydrogeoloy and isotope composition of groundwater to understand the present hydrological processes prevalent in a freshwater wetland, source of wetland groundwater, surface water/groundwater interaction and mixing of groundwater of various depth zones in the aquifer. This study considers East Calcutta Wetlands (ECW – a freshwater peri-urban inland wetland ecosystem located at the lower part of the deltaic alluvial plain of South Bengal Basin and east of Kolkata city. This wetland is well known over the world for its resource recovery systems, developed by local people through ages, using wastewater from the city. Geological investigations reveal that the sub-surface geology is completely blanketed by the Quaternary sediments comprising a succession of silty clay, sand of various grades and sand mixed with occasional gravels and thin intercalations of silty clay. Aquifer within the depths of 80 m to 120 m has the maximum potential to supply water. Groundwater mainly flows from east to west and is being over-extracted to the tune of 65×103 m3/day. δ18O and δD values of shallow and deep groundwater are similar indicating resemblance in hydrostratigraphy and climate of the recharge areas. Groundwater originates mainly from monsoonal rain with some evaporation prior to or during infiltration and partly from bottom of ponds, canals and infiltration of groundwater withdrawn for irrigation. Relatively high tritium content of the shallow groundwater indicates local recharge, while the deeper groundwater with very low tritium is recharged mainly from distant areas. At places the deeper aquifer has relatively high tritium, indicating mixing of groundwater of shallow and deep aquifers. Metals such as copper, lead, arsenic, cadmium, aluminum, nickel and chromium are also present in groundwater of various depths. Therefore, aquifers of wetland and surrounding urban areas which are heavily

  2. Source apportionment of atmospheric ammonia before, during, and after the 2014 APEC summit in Beijing using stable nitrogen isotope signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yunhua; Liu, Xuejun; Deng, Congrui; Dore, Anthony J.; Zhuang, Guoshun

    2016-09-01

    Stable nitrogen isotope composition (δ15N) offers new opportunities to address the long-standing and ongoing controversy regarding the origins of ambient ammonia (NH3), a vital precursor of PM2.5 (particulate matters with aerodynamic diameter equal or less than 2.5 µm) inorganic components, in the urban atmosphere. In this study, the δ15N values of NH3 samples collected from various sources were constrained using a novel and robust chemical method coupled with standard elemental analysis procedures. Independent of the wide variation in mass concentrations (ranging from 33 (vehicle) to over 6000 (human excreta) µg m-3), different NH3 sources have generally different δ15N values (ranging from -52.0 to -9.6 ‰). Significantly high δ15N values are seen as a characteristic feature of all vehicle-derived NH3 samples (-14.2 ± 2.8 ‰), which can be distinguished from other sources emitted at environmental temperature (-29.1 ± 1.7, -37.8 ± 3.6, and -50.0 ± 1.8 ‰ for livestock, waste, and fertilizer, respectively). The isotope δ15N signatures for a range of NH3 emission sources were used to evaluate the contributions of the different sources within measured ambient NH3 in Beijing, using an isotope mixing model (IsoSource). The method was used to quantify the sources of ambient NH3 before, during and after the 2014 Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit, when a set of stringent air quality control measures were implemented. Results show that the average NH3 concentrations (the overall contributions of traffic, waste, livestock, and fertilizer) during the three periods were 9.1 (20.3, 28.3, 23.6, and 27.7 %), 7.3 (8.8, 24.9, 14.3, and 52.0 %), and 12.7 (29.4, 23.6, 31.7, and 15.4 %) µg m-3, respectively, representing a 20.0 % decrease first and then a 74.5 % increase in overall NH3 mass concentrations. During (after) the summit, the contributions of traffic, waste, livestock, and fertilizer decreased (increased) by 56.7 (234.2), 12.0 (-5.0), 39.4 (120

  3. Application of δ13C and δ15N isotopic signatures of organic matter fractions sequentially separated from adjacent arable and forest soils to identify carbon stabilization mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sommer

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Identifying the chemical mechanisms behind soil carbon bound in organo-mineral complexes is necessary to determine the degree to which soil organic carbon is stabilized belowground. We used the δ13C and δ15N isotopic signatures from two organic matter (OM fractions from soil to identify the likely binding mechanisms involved. We used OM fractions hypothesized to contain carbon stabilized through organo-mineral complexes: (1 OM separated chemically with sodium pyrophosphate (OM(PY and (2 OM stabilized in microstructures found in the chemical extraction residue (OM(ER. Furthermore, because the OM fractions were separated from five different soils with paired forest and arable land use histories, we could address the impact of land use change on carbon binding and processing mechanisms within these soils. We used partial least squares regression to analyze patterns in the isotopic signature of OM with established proxies of different binding mechanisms. Parsing soil OM into different fractions is a systematic method of dissection, however, we are primarily interested in how OM is bound in soil as a whole, requiring a means of re-assembly. Thus, we implemented the recent zonal framework described by Kleber et al. (2007 to relate our findings to undisturbed soil. The δ15N signature of OM fractions served as a reliable indicator for microbial processed carbon in both arable and forest land use types. The δ13C signature of OM fractions in arable sites did not correlate well with proxies of soil mineral properties while a consistent pattern of enrichment was seen in the δ13C of OM fractions in the forest sites. We found a significant difference in δ13C of pooled OM fractions between the forest and arable land use type although it was relatively small (<1‰. We found different binding mechanisms predominate in each land use type. The isotopic signatures of OM fractions from arable soils were highly related to the clay and silt size particles

  4. A protocol to correct for intra- and interspecific variation in tail hair growth to align isotope signatures of segmentally cut tail hair to a common time line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnik Šturm, Martina; Pukazhenthi, Budhan; Reed, Dolores; Ganbaatar, Oyunsaikhan; Sušnik, Stane; Haymerle, Agnes; Voigt, Christian C; Kaczensky, Petra

    2015-06-15

    In recent years, segmental stable isotope analysis of hair has been a focus of research in animal dietary ecology and migration. To correctly assign tail hair segments to seasons or even Julian dates, information on tail hair growth rates is a key parameter, but is lacking for most species. We (a) reviewed the literature on tail hair growth rates in mammals; b) made own measurements of three captive equid species; (c) measured δ(2)H, δ(13)C and δ(15)N values in sequentially cut tail hairs of three sympatric, free-ranging equids from the Mongolian Gobi, using isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS); and (d) collected environmental background data on seasonal variation by measuring δ(2)H values in precipitation by IRMS and by compiling pasture productivity measured by remote sensing via the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI). Tail hair growth rates showed significant inter- and intra-specific variation making temporal alignment problematic. In the Mongolian Gobi, high seasonal variation of δ(2)H values in precipitation results in winter lows and summer highs of δ(2)H values of available water sources. In water-dependent equids, this seasonality is reflected in the isotope signatures of sequentially cut tails hairs. In regions which are subject to strong seasonal patterns we suggest identifying key isotopes which show strong seasonal variation in the environment and can be expected to be reflected in the animal tissue. The known interval between the maxima and minima of these isotope values can then be used to correctly temporally align the segmental stable isotope signature for each individual animal. © 2015 The Authors. Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Radiogenic Lead with Dominant Content of 208Pb: New Coolant and Neutron Moderator for Innovative Nuclear Facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Shmelev

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available As a rule materials of small atomic weight (light and heavy water, graphite, and so on are used as neutron moderators and reflectors. A new very heavy atomic weight moderator is proposed—radiogenic lead consisting mainly of isotope 208Pb. It is characterized by extremely low neutron radiative capture cross-section (0.23 mbarn for thermal neutrons, i.e., less than that for graphite and deuterium and highest albedo of thermal neutrons. It is evaluated that the use of radiogenic lead makes it possible to slow down the chain fission reaction on prompt neutrons in a fast reactor. This can increase safety of the fast reactors and reduce as well requirements pertaining to the fuel fabrication technology. Radiogenic lead with high 208Pb content as a liquid-metal coolant of fast reactors helps to achieve a favorable (negative reactivity coefficient on coolant temperature. It is noteworthy that radiogenic lead with high 208Pb content may be extracted from thorium (as well as thorium-uranium ores without isotope separation. This has been confirmed experimentally by the investigations performed at San Paulo University, Brazil.

  6. Biogeochemical controls and isotopic signatures of nitrous oxide production by a marine ammonia-oxidizing bacterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. H. Frame

    2010-09-01

    medium also increased N2O yields by an average of 70% to 87% depending on O2 concentration. We made stable isotopic measurements on N2O from these cultures to identify the biochemical mechanisms behind variations in N2O yield. Based on measurements of δ15Nbulk, site preference (SP = δ15Nα−δ15Nβ, and δ18O of N2O (δ18O-N2O, we estimate that nitrifier-denitrification produced between 11% and 26% of N2O from cultures grown under 20% O2 and 43% to 87% under 0.5% O2. We also demonstrate that a positive correlation between SP and δ18O-N2O is expected when nitrifying bacteria produce N2O. A positive relationship between SP and δ18O-N2O has been observed in environmental N2O datasets, but until now, explanations for the observation invoked only denitrification. Such interpretations may overestimate the role of heterotrophic denitrification and underestimate the role of ammonia oxidation in environmental N2O production.

  7. Phytoplankton functional traits and seston stable isotopes signature: a functional-based approach in a deep, subalpine lake, Lake Maggiore (N. Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Visconti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The seasonal variation of seston stable isotopes signature of carbon (δ13C in Lake Maggiore during 2008 was related to seasonal variation of the lake phytoplankton community, investigated in terms of phytoplankton taxonomic groups, morpho-functional groups (MBFG, cell size classes and cell shape classes. Three open water stations were selected to reflect truly pelagic, influenced by littoral and riverine carbon sources; phytoplankton samples were collected from two water depths, 0-20 m and 25-50 m. Among stations differences in δ13C signatures of seston were statistically non significant, confirming that allochthonous input may become important only after exceptional rainfall events. Nonparametric multiplicative regression (NPMR was utilized to identify among the phytoplankton parameters (taxonomic groups, MBFG, cell shapes, cell sizes which were the best predictors of the δ13C variation. Bacillariophyceae and two morpho-functional groups, Group 6 (non-flagellated organisms with siliceous exoskeletons and Group 3 (large filamentous algae with aerotopes were statistically significant. Non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMS ordination was used to investigate differences in phytoplankton samples and their relationship with δ13C variation. When morphological and functional phytoplankton traits were superimposed, the NMS ordination showed that cylinder cells (for cell shape classes, class 500-2000 mm3 (for cell size classes and Group 6 (for MBFG were the most related to δ13C variation. Our study confirms that the variation in the pelagic δ13C seston most probably reflects changes in phytoplankton carbon isotopic signature, consequent to changes in availability of carbon sources depending on the season and due to different isotopic fractionation of phytoplankton taxonomic groups. Statistical investigations have allowed us to investigate the potential role of phytoplankton morphological and functional traits in the seasonal variation of δ13C

  8. Release of radiogenic noble gases as a new signal of rock deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Stephen J.; Gardner, W. Payton; Lee, Hyunwoo

    2016-10-01

    In this study we investigate the release of radiogenic noble gas isotopes during mechanical deformation. We developed an analytical system for dynamic mass spectrometry of noble gas composition and helium release rate of gas produced during mechanical deformation of rocks. Our results indicate that rocks release accumulated radiogenic helium and argon from mineral grains as they undergo deformation. We found that the release of accumulated 4He and 40Ar from rocks follows a reproducible pattern and can provide insight into the deformation process. Increased gas release can be observed before dilation, and macroscopic failure is observed during high-pressure triaxial rock deformation experiments. Accumulated radiogenic noble gases can be released due to fracturing of mineral grains during small-scale strain in Earth materials. Helium and argon are highly mobile, conservative species and could be used to provide information on changes in the state of stress and strain in Earth materials, and as an early warning signal of macroscopic failure. These results pave the way for the use of noble gases to trace and monitor rock deformation for earthquake prediction and a variety of other subsurface engineering projects.

  9. Major Sources of Organic Matter in a Complex Coral Reef Lagoon: Identification from Isotopic Signatures (δ13C and δ15N.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marine J Briand

    Full Text Available A wide investigation was conducted into the main organic matter (OM sources supporting coral reef trophic networks in the lagoon of New Caledonia. Sampling included different reef locations (fringing, intermediate and barrier reef, different associated ecosystems (mangroves and seagrass beds and rivers. In total, 30 taxa of macrophytes, plus pools of particulate and sedimentary OM (POM and SOM were sampled. Isotopic signatures (C and N of each OM sources was characterized and the composition of OM pools assessed. In addition, spatial and seasonal variations of reef OM sources were examined. Mangroves isotopic signatures were the most C-depleted (-30.17 ± 0.41 ‰ and seagrass signatures were the most C-enriched (-4.36 ± 0.72 ‰. Trichodesmium spp. had the most N-depleted signatures (-0.14 ± 0.03 ‰ whereas mangroves had the most N-enriched signatures (6.47 ± 0.41 ‰. The composition of POM and SOM varied along a coast-to-barrier reef gradient. River POM and marine POM contributed equally to coastal POM, whereas marine POM represented 90% of the POM on barrier reefs, compared to 10% river POM. The relative importance of river POM, marine POM and mangroves to the SOM pool decreased from fringing to barrier reefs. Conversely, the relative importance of seagrass, Trichodesmium spp. and macroalgae increased along this gradient. Overall, spatial fluctuations in POM and SOM were much greater than in primary producers. Seasonal fluctuations were low for all OM sources. Our results demonstrated that a large variety of OM sources sustain coral reefs, varying in their origin, composition and role and suggest that δ13C was a more useful fingerprint than δ15N in this endeavour. This study also suggested substantial OM exchanges and trophic connections between coral reefs and surrounding ecosystems. Finally, the importance of accounting for environmental characteristics at small temporal and spatial scales before drawing general patterns is

  10. Application of δ13C and δ15N isotopic signatures of organic matter fractions sequentially separated from adjacent arable and forest soils to identify carbon stabilization mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sommer

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Identifying the chemical mechanisms behind soil carbon bound in organo-mineral complexes is necessary to determine the degree to which soil organic carbon is stabilized belowground. Analysis of δ13C and δ15N isotopic signatures of stabilized OM fractions along with soil mineral characteristics may yield important information about OM-mineral associations and their processing history. We anlayzed the δ13C and δ15N isotopic signatures from two organic matter (OM fractions along with soil mineral proxies to identify the likely binding mechanisms involved. We analyzed OM fractions hypothesized to contain carbon stabilized through organo-mineral complexes: (1 OM separated chemically with sodium pyrophosphate (OM(PY and (2 OM occluded in micro-structures found in the chemical extraction residue (OM(ER. Because the OM fractions were separated from five different soils with paired forest and arable land use histories, we could address the impact of land use change on carbon binding and processing mechanisms. We used partial least squares regression to analyze patterns in the isotopic signature of OM with established mineral and chemical proxies indicative for certain binding mechanisms. We found different mechanisms predominate in each land use type. For arable soils, the formation of OM(PY-Ca-mineral associations was identified as an important OM binding mechanism. Therefore, we hypothesize an increased stabilization of microbial processed OM(PY through Ca2+ interactions. In general, we found the forest soils to contain on average 10% more stabilized carbon relative to total carbon stocks, than the agricultural counter part. In forest soils, we found a positive relationship between isotopic signatures of OM(PY and the ratio of soil organic carbon content to soil surface area (SOC/SSA. This indicates that the OM(PY fractions of forest soils represent layers of slower exchange not directly attached to mineral surfaces. From the isotopic composition

  11. First real-time measurements of N2O isotopic signatures above intensively managed grassland: analytical performance, validation and illustrative examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Benjamin; Tuzson, Béla; Merbold, Lutz; Decock, Charlotte; Emmenegger, Lukas; Mohn, Joachim

    2014-05-01

    Measurement of the four main N2O isotopic species (14N15N16O / 15N14N16O / 14N14N18O / 14N14N16O) has been suggested as a powerful tool to trace the biogeochemical cycle of N2O and to allocate its emission sources. Studies carried out with microbial pure cultures and mixed population systems (Wunderlin et al. 2012) allowed the determination of characteristic isotopic signatures for the most important production processes. These characteristic signatures have been applied to identify relevant sources at different scales (Park et al. 2012). However, current studies suffer from limited spatial and temporal resolution due to the combination of discrete flask sampling in conjunction with laboratory-based mass spectrometric analysis. We recently demonstrated that a quantum cascade laser (QCL) based absorption spectrometer is capable of simultaneously measuring the three main N2O isotopomers at trace levels (Waechter et al. 2008). Furthermore, its potential for in-situ measurements in conjunction with a liquid nitrogen-free preconcentration unit has been proven (Mohn et al. 2012). Here we present results from the first long-term field measurement campaign conducted on intensively managed grassland in central Switzerland during three months. A modified state-of-the-art laser spectrometer (Aerodyne Research, Inc.) employing a mid-infrared cw-QCL (4.54 μm) and a novel astigmatic multipass cell with 204 m optical path-length was connected to a N2O preconcentration unit. High analytical performance in combination with the applied calibration strategy resulted in excellent long-term precision of 0.20, 0.12 and 0.11o for δ15Nα, δ15Nβ and δ18O which was determined from repeated preconcentration and measurement of target gas from a compressed air tank. This instrumental setup allowed investigating responses of isotopic composition in soil-emitted N2O to management events and weather influences. The accompanying measurements of soil temperature, soil water content, ammonia

  12. Probing Archean lithosphere using the Lu-Hf isotope systematics of peridotite xenoliths from Somerset Island kimberlites, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidberger, Stefanie S.; Simonetti, Antonio; Francis, Don; Gariépy, Clément

    2002-04-01

    A knowledge of the Hf isotopic composition of the subcontinental lithosphere beneath Archean cratons is essential to constrain the Hf isotope budget of the Earth's mantle. Hf isotopic measurements were obtained by MC-ICP-MS for a suite of refractory peridotite xenoliths and constituent garnets from the Nikos kimberlite (100 Ma) on Somerset Island in order to constrain the isotopic composition and age of the lithosphere beneath the northern Canadian craton. The low-temperature Nikos peridotites (Somerset lithosphere, are characterized by higher 176Lu/ 177Hf ratios (0.03-0.05) and Hf isotopic values ( 176Hf/ 177Hf (0.1Ga)=0.28296-0.28419) than the deep-seated high-temperature peridotites (>1100°C; 0.004-0.03, 0.28265-0.28333, respectively). These differences in Hf isotope signatures suggest that shallow and deep subcontinental lithosphere beneath Somerset Island represent isotopically distinct domains and do not share a common petrogenetic history. The Lu-Hf isotope systematics of the shallow low-temperature peridotites define a positively sloped line that plot along a 2.8 Ga reference isochron. A number of these peridotites are characterized by highly radiogenic Hf isotopic compositions suggestive of long-term radiogenic ingrowth (billions of years). These findings are consistent with an interpretation that the shallow Somerset lithosphere (to depths of ˜150 km) stabilized in the Archean. The majority of the high-temperature peridotites plot closer to the composition of the host kimberlite. Although the observed isotopic variation may be attributed in part to kimberlite-related Hf addition, it is possible that these deep-seated xenoliths represent younger mantle. The superchondritic 176Lu/ 177Hf ratios observed for a number of the shallow low-temperature peridotites indicate strong fractionation of Lu and Hf, suggesting mantle root formation in the garnet stability field (depths >80 km). The Hf isotope compositions for the Somerset low-temperature peridotites

  13. Radiogenic neoplasia in thyroid and mammary clonogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifton, K.H.

    1991-05-31

    We have developed rat thyroid and mammary clonogen transplantation systems for the study of radiogenic cancer induction at the target cell level in vivo. The epithelial cell populations of both glands contain small subpopulations of cells which are capable of giving rise to monoclonal glandular structures when transplanted and stimulated with appropriate hormones. During the end of the last grant year and the first half of the current grant year, we have completed analyses and summarized for publication: investigations on the relationship between grafted thyroid cell number and the rapidity and degree of reestablishment of the thyroid-hypothalamicpituitary axis in thyroidectomized rats maintained on a normal diet or an iodine deficient diet; studies of the persistence of, and the differentiation potential and functional characteristics of, the TSH- (thyrotropin-) responsive sub-population of clonogens during goitrogenesis, the plateau-phase of goiter growth, and goiter involution; studies of changes in the size of the clonogen sub-population during goitrogenesis, goiter involution and the response to goitrogen rechallenge; and the results of the large carcinogenesis experiment on the nature of the grafted thyroid cell number-dependent suppression of promotion/progression to neoplasia in grafts of radiation-initiated thyroid cells. We are testing new techniques for the culture, cytofluorescent analysis and characterization mammary epithelial cells and of clonogens in a parallel project, and plan to apply similar technology to the thyroid epithelial cells and clonogen population. Data from these studies will be used in the design of future carcinogenesis experiments on neoplastic initiation by high and low LET radiations and on cells interactions during the neoplastic process.

  14. Assessment of pollution aerosols sources above the Straits of Dover using lead isotope geochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deboudt, K; Flament, P; Weis, D; Mennessier, J P; Maquinghen, P

    1999-09-15

    We assess the capability of lead isotopes to study the transport of pollution aerosols above the Straits of Dover by collecting atmospheric aerosols above the Eastern Channel and the Southern Bight of the North Sea. During the same period, we characterized the lead isotopic signature of the main industrial sources on the French coast near the Straits of Dover. Urban and automobile-derived aerosols were also collected. Due to the phasing out of lead in gasoline, the urban isotopic composition (206Pb/207Pb = 1.158 +/- 0.003) has become more radiogenic, although it is highly variable. On a regional scale, major industrial emissions have a well-defined isotopic composition (1.13 isotopic compositions, it can be shown that lead aerosols originating from eastern Europe have an isotopic signature (1.145 isotopic composition of west-European lead aerosols (1.111 < 206Pb/207Pb < 1.142). The influence of remote North American sources is suggested, with caution, due to uncertainties in meteorological calculations.

  15. Contrasting origins of the upper mantle revealed by hafnium and lead isotopes from the Southeast Indian Ridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanan, Barry B; Blichert-Toft, Janne; Pyle, Douglas G; Christie, David M

    2004-11-04

    The origin of the isotopic signature of Indian mid-ocean ridge basalts has remained enigmatic, because the geochemical composition of these basalts is consistent either with pollution from recycled, ancient altered oceanic crust and sediments, or with ancient continental crust or lithosphere. The radiogenic isotopic signature may therefore be the result of contamination of the upper mantle by plumes containing recycled altered ancient oceanic crust and sediments, detachment and dispersal of continental material into the shallow mantle during rifting and breakup of Gondwana, or contamination of the upper mantle by ancient subduction processes. The identification of a process operating on a scale large enough to affect major portions of the Indian mid-ocean ridge basalt source region has been a long-standing problem. Here we present hafnium and lead isotope data from across the Indian-Pacific mantle boundary at the Australian-Antarctic discordance region of the Southeast Indian Ridge, which demonstrate that the Pacific and Indian upper mantle basalt source domains were each affected by different mechanisms. We infer that the Indian upper-mantle isotope signature in this region is affected mainly by lower continental crust entrained during Gondwana rifting, whereas the isotope signature of the Pacific upper mantle is influenced predominantly by ocean floor subduction-related processes.

  16. Multiple sulfur isotope signatures of sulfite and thiosulfate reduction by the model dissimilatory sulfate-reducer, Desulfovibrio alaskensis str. G20

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William D. Leavitt

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Dissimilatory sulfate reduction serves as a key metabolic carbon remineralization process in anoxic marine environments. Sulfate reducing microorganisms can impart a wide range in mass-dependent sulfur isotopic fractionation. As such, the presence and relative activity of these organisms is identifiable from geological materials. By extension, sulfur isotope records are used to infer the redox balance of marine sedimentary environments, and the oxidation state of Earth’s oceans and atmosphere. However, recent work suggests that our understanding of microbial sulfate reducers (MSRs may be missing complexity associated with the presence and role of key chemical intermediates in the reductive process. This study provides a test of proposed metabolic models of sulfate reduction by growing an axenic culture of the well-studied MSRs, Desulfovibrio alaskensis strain G20, under electron donor limited conditions on the terminal electron acceptors sulfate, sulfite or thiosulfate, and tracking the multiple S isotopic consequences of each condition set. The dissimilatory reduction of thiosulfate and sulfite produce unique minor isotope effects, as compared to the reduction of sulfate. Further, these experiments reveal a complex biochemistry associated with sulfite reduction. That is, under high sulfite concentrations, sulfur is shuttled to an intermediate pool of thiosulfate. Site-specific isotope fractionation (within thiosulfate is very large (34ε ~ 30‰ while terminal product sulfide carries only a small fractionation from the initial sulfite (34ε < 10‰: a signature similar in magnitude to sulfate and thiosulfate reduction. Together these findings show that microbial sulfate reduction (MSR is highly sensitive to the concentration of environmentally important sulfur-cycle intermediates (sulfite and thiosulfate, especially when thiosulfate and the large site-specific isotope effects are involved.

  17. Sulfur- and lead-isotope signatures of orogenic gold mineralisation associated with the Hill End Trough, Lachlan Orogen, New South Wales, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downes, P. M.; Seccombe, P. K.; Carr, G. R.

    2008-11-01

    The Hill End Trough (HET) is a deformed middle Silurian to Early Devonian sediment-dominated rift within the northeastern Lachlan Orogen. The HET hosts the Hill End, Hargraves, Napoleon Reefs, Stuart Town and Windeyer low-sulfide orogenic gold deposits. Adjacent to the HET are the Bodangora and Gulgong gold deposits. In this study we present 91 new sulfur- and 18 new lead-isotope analyses and collate a further 25 sulfur- and 32 lead-isotopes analyses from unpublished sources for these deposits. Larger gold deposits in the HET have near 0 δ34S‰ values indicating that sulfur in these systems was sourced from a magmatic reservoir. The dominant lead isotope signature for HET-hosted deposits reflects a crustal source however some mantle-derived lead has been introduced into the HET. Sulfur- and lead-isotopic results suggest that gold was sourced from mantle-derived magmatic units beneath the HET. The study supports earlier studies at Hill End by concluding that the majority of orogenic gold mineralisation in and adjacent to the HET formed during the Early Carboniferous period.

  18. Ocean circulation and freshwater pathways in the Arctic Mediterranean based on a combined Nd isotope, REE and oxygen isotope section across Fram Strait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laukert, Georgi; Frank, Martin; Bauch, Dorothea; Hathorne, Ed C.; Rabe, Benjamin; von Appen, Wilken-Jon; Wegner, Carolyn; Zieringer, Moritz; Kassens, Heidemarie

    2017-04-01

    The water masses passing the Fram Strait are mainly responsible for the exchange of heat and freshwater between the Nordic Seas and the Arctic Ocean (the Arctic Mediterranean, AM). Disentangling their exact sources, distribution and mixing, however, is complex. This work provides new insights based on a detailed geochemical tracer inventory including dissolved Nd isotope (εNd), rare earth element (REE) and stable oxygen isotope (δ18O) data along a full water depth section across Fram Strait. We find that Nd isotope and REE distributions in the open AM primarily reflect lateral advection of water masses and their mixing. Seawater-particle interactions exert important control only above the shelf regions, as observed above the NE Greenland Shelf. Advection of northward flowing warm Atlantic Water (AW) is clearly reflected by an εNd signature of -11.7 and a Nd concentration ([Nd]) of 16 pmol/kg in the upper ∼500 m of the eastern and central Fram Strait. Freshening and cooling of the AW on its way trough the AM are accompanied by a continuous change towards more radiogenic εNd signatures (e.g. -10.4 of dense Arctic Atlantic Water). This mainly reflects mixing with intermediate waters but also admixture of dense Kara Sea waters and Pacific-derived waters. The more radiogenic εNd signatures of the intermediate and deep waters (reaching -9.5) are mainly acquired in the SW Nordic Seas through exchange with basaltic formations of Iceland and CE Greenland. Inputs of Nd from Svalbard are not observed and surface waters and Nd on the Svalbard shelf originate from the Barents Sea. Shallow southward flowing Arctic-derived waters (freshwater of up to ∼6%. In addition to these observations, this study shows that the pronounced gradients in εNd signatures and REE characteristics in the upper water column provide a reliable basis for assessments of shallow hydrological changes within the AM.

  19. Isotopic signature of selected lanthanides for nuclear activities profiling using cloud point extraction and ICP-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrecque, Charles; Lebed, Pablo J; Larivière, Dominic

    2016-05-01

    The presence of fission products, which include numerous isotopes of lanthanides, can impact the isotopic ratios of these elements in the environment. A cloud point extraction (CPE) method was used as a preconcentration/separation strategy prior to measurement of isotopic ratios of three lanthanides (Nd, Sm, and Eu) by inductively coupled plasma tandem mass spectrometry (ICP-MS/MS). To minimise polyatomic interference, the combination of interferents removal by CPE, reaction/collision cell conditions in He and NH3 mode and tandem quadrupole configuration was investigated and provided optimal results for the determination of isotopic ratio in environmental samples. Isotopic ratios were initially measured in San Joaquin soil (NIST-2709a), an area with little contamination of nuclear origin. Finally, samples collected from three sites with known nuclear activities (Fangataufa Lagoon in French Polynesia, Chernobyl and the Ottawa River near Chalk River Laboratory) were analysed and all exhibited altered isotopic ratios for (143/145)Nd, (147/149)Sm, and (151/153)Eu. These results demonstrate the potential of CPE and ICP-MS/MS for the detection of altered isotopic ratio in environmental samples collected in area subjected to nuclear anthropogenic contamination. The detection of variations in these isotopic ratios of fission products represents the first application of CPE in nuclear forensic investigations of environmental samples.

  20. Primary multiple sulfur isotopic compositions of pyrite in 2.7 Ga shales from the Joy Lake sequence (Superior Province) show felsic volcanic array-like signature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianghanyang; Zhang, Zhe; Stern, Richard A.; Hannah, Judith L.; Stein, Holly J.; Yang, Gang; Li, Long

    2017-04-01

    Multiple sulfur isotopes provide a powerful tool to study photochemical and biological processes controlling the Archean sulfur cycle and infer related atmospheric and marine environments. However, our understanding of early Earth's environment remains limited by the availability of well-preserved geological samples, as most Archean sedimentary rocks have experienced some degree of metamorphic alteration. To evaluate sulfur isotopic behavior during post-depositional processes and elucidate the sulfur cycle at 2.7 Ga, we use high-resolution in situ analytical techniques (EPMA and SIMS) to determine elemental compositions and multiple sulfur isotopic compositions of large diagenetic pyrite nodules and fine-grained secondary pyrite disseminated in quartz veins (formed during a lower greenschist metamorphic event) in shales from the 2.7 Ga Joy Lake sequence in the southwest Superior Province. Results show that trace metals and sulfur in the secondary pyrite were derived from both metamorphic fluid and pre-existing diagenetic pyrite. Diagenetic pyrite nodules could have been partially dissolved by metamorphic fluid. But the surviving nodules show elemental and isotopic features different from those of the deduced metamorphic fluid endmember, suggesting the nodules were not geochemically altered by metamorphism, and thus preserve primary isotopic signatures acquired during diagenesis. The sulfur isotopic ratios of pyrite nodules show strong variations, with decreasing δ34S values and increasing Δ33S values from cores to rims. This negative Δ33S-δ34S relationship is different from the commonly observed 'Archean reference line' defined by most Archean pyrite data, but similar to the 'felsic volcanic array'. Our observation provides a first possible case from 2.7 Ga, the age of peak crustal growth in the Archean, to support the hypothesis that photochemical pathways could be different under conditions of intense volcanic emission. This study also shows that high

  1. Lead and its isotopes in the sediment of three sites on the Lebanese coast: Identification of contamination sources and mobility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abi-Ghanem, C., E-mail: carine.a.ghanem@hotmail.fr [Centre National des Sciences Marines, CNRSL, P.O. Box 534, Batroun (Lebanon); Chiffoleau, J.F. [Ifremer, LBCM, Centre de Nantes, BP 21105, F.44311 Nantes cedex 3 (France); Bermond, A. [Agro-ParisTech, 16, rue C. Bernard, F.75231 Paris cedex 5 (France); Nakhle, K.; Khalaf, G. [Centre National des Sciences Marines, CNRSL, P.O. Box 534, Batroun (Lebanon); Borschneck, D. [CEREGE CNRS, Aix-Marseille University, Europole Mediterraneen de l' Arbois, BP 80, 13545 Aix-en-Provence (France); Cossa, D. [Ifremer, LBCM, Centre de Nantes, BP 21105, F.44311 Nantes cedex 3 (France)

    2009-10-15

    Lead concentrations and isotopic composition of sediment samples collected from three sites within the Lebanese coastal zones were measured: at Akkar, Dora and Selaata. Akkar is located far from any direct source of contamination, while Dora and Selaata receive urban and industrial wastes, respectively. Low Pb concentrations (6-16 {mu}g g{sup -1}) were detected in the Akkar sediments, and high concentrations of Pb (70-101 {mu}g g{sup -1}) were detected in the Dora sediments. Measuring stable isotope ratios of Pb makes it possible to identify the principal sources of Pb in the Akkar sediments as Pb emitted from gasoline combustion and Pb originating from natural sources. On the other hand, Pb stable isotopic ratios in Dora sediments indicate that they are more highly influenced by anthropogenic sources. Isotopic Pb ratios in the Selaata deposits, where Pb concentrations range between 5 and 35 {mu}g g{sup -1}, have an exceptional radiogenic signature for marine sediments 1.25 < {sup 206}Pb/{sup 207}Pb < 1.6 and 0.5 < {sup 206}Pb/{sup 208}Pb < 0.67, which shows the impact of the phosphogypsum discharged by Selaata's chemical plant. Isotopic Pb analysis applied to EDTA extracts, to test the mobility of Pb, shows that that this mobility is high (>60%) after 24 h of extraction, and that the extracted Pb is less radiogenic than the residual Pb.

  2. Lead isotope and trace element composition of urban soils in Mongolia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tserenpil, Sh.; Sapkota, A.; Liu, C.-Q.; Peng, J.-H.; Liu, B.; Segebade, P. Chr.

    2016-08-01

    Lead (Pb) pollution in and around Ulaanbaatar is of national concern, given that the Mongolian capital is home to nearly half of the country's entire population. By comparison, Mongolian countryside is a pristine environment because of its sparse population and low industrial activity. The concentration of Pb in urban soils (average of 39.1 mg kg-1) was twice the values found (average 18.6 mg kg-1) in background territories (i.e., Mongolian rural sites). Furthermore, Pb contamination was examined by using Pb stable isotopic composition, and covariance of Pb isotopic ratios showed two groups between rural and urban soils as pristine and disturbed sites. The 206Pb/207Pb ratio, the most prominent fingerprint for Pb pollution, was 1.163-1.185 for the urban whereas values for rural soils (1.186-1.207) were analogue to the regional Pb isotopic signatures. Local coal sources and their combustion products, one of the potential Pb pollution sources in Ulaanbaatar, have significant radiogenic properties in terms of Pb isotopic composition and revealed an average of 1.25 for 206Pb/207Pb and 19.551 for 206Pb/204Pb ratios. Thus, contributions from coal firing activity to Pb pollution lower than it was assumed, and smaller range of these values measured in urban soils may be attributed to the mixing of less radiogenic Pb as a constituent of the leaded gasolines.

  3. Mantle mixing and crustal contamination as the origin of the high-Sr radiogenic magmatism of Stromboli (Aeolian arc)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luais, Béatrice

    1988-04-01

    The temporal evolution of the volcanic activity on Stromboli (Aeolian arc) is characterized by high-K calc-alkaline magmatism followed by shoshonitic magmatism. Rocks from the two series can be distinguished by their K and P concentrations, hygromagmaphile element concentrations, and Sr isotopic ratios, which are higher in the shoshonitic series than in high-K calc-alkaline series. The mantle oxygen isotopic ratios of the shoshonitic series (Javoy, 1976 [39]) suggest that these characteristics are generated in the upper mantle. The geochemical and isotopic characteristics of the magmatism on Stromboli are midway between those of calc-alkaline rocks from the Aeolian arc and potassic rocks from Central Italy (Campanian region). The similarity between the most radiogenic and LILE-enriched samples of the shoshonitic series and the low-K magmatism in Central Italy suggests that the volcanism on Stromboli is the result of mantle mixing between a calc-alkaline magma and a radiogenic Sr/hygromagmaphile element-enriched magma, such as the high-K magmatism in Central Italy (Alban Hills). The chemical and isotopic characteristics of the differentiated samples can be explained by crustal contamination during the differentiation of the basic liquid by fractional crystallization. An anorthose-bearing xenolith with high Sr isotopic composition of crustal origin (0.71300) is a likely candidate for this crustal component.

  4. Mantle mixing and crustal contamination as the origin of the high-Sr radiogenic magmatism of Stromboli (Aeolian arc)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luais, B.

    1988-04-01

    The temporal evolution of the volcanic activity on Stromboli (Aeolian arc) is characterized by high-K calc-alkaline magmatism followed by shoshonitic magmatism. Rocks from the two series can be distinguished by their K and P concentrations, hygromagmaphile element concentrations, and Sr isotopic ratios, which are higher in the shoshonitic series than in high-K calc-alkaline series. The mantle oxygen isotopic ratios of the shoshonitic series suggest that these characteristics are generated in the upper mantle. The geometrical and isotopic characteristics of the magmatism on Stromboli are midway between those of calc-alkaline rocks from the Aeolian arc and potassic rocks from Central Italy (Campanian region). The similarity between the most radiogenic and LILE-enriched samples of the shoshonitic series and the low-K magmatism in Central Italy suggests that the volcanism on Stromboli is the result of mantle mixing between a calc-alkaline magma and a radiogenic Sr/hygromagmaphile element-enriched magma, such as the high-K magmatism in Central Italy (Alban Hills). The chemical and isotopic characteristics of the differentiated samples can be explained by crustal contamination during the differentiation of the basic liquid by fractional crystallization. An anorthose-bearing xenolith with high Sr isotopic composition of crustal origin (0.71300) is a likely candidate for thus crustal component.

  5. A multi-layer, closed-loop system for continuous measurement of soil CO2 concentrations and its isotopic signature applied in a beech and a pine forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jochheim, Hubert; Wirth, Stephan

    2016-04-01

    We present a setup of measurement devices that allows the application of the soil CO2 gradient approach for CO2 efflux calculation in combination with the analysis of isotopic signature (δ13C). Vertical profiles of CO2 concentrations in air-filled pores of soil were measured using miniature NDIR sensors within a 16-channel closed-loop system where equilibrium with soil air can be achieved using hydrophobic, gas-permeable porous polypropylene tubes circulating gas using peristaltic pumps. A 16-position multiplexer allows the connection to an isotopic CO2 analyser. This setup was applied at two ICP Forest intensive monitoring sites, a beech and a pine forest on sandy soils located in Brandenburg, Germany. CO2 concentrations in air-filled pores of soils were measured on top of soil surface, below the humus layer, and in 10cm, 20cm, 30cm and 100 cm depths every 30 min. At both sites, soil moisture and temperature were measured continuously in the respective soil depths in identical time intervals. Isotopic signatures of soil CO2 was detected by measurement campaigns. After three years of measurements, our results provided evidence for distinct seasonal dynamics and vertical gradients of soil CO2 concentration and δ13C values. Varying impacts of soil temperature and moisture on CO2 concentration were revealed, highlighting its impact on soil physical and soil biological controls. Higher levels of CO2 concentration and a more distinct seasonal dynamics were detected at the beech site compared to the pine site. The collected data provide a suitable database for calculation of CO2 efflux and modelling of soil respiration.

  6. New Elemental and Isotopic Data From Mafic Lavas on the Puna Plateau and Re-Examining the Geochemical Signature of Convective Lithospheric Removal in the Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, K. E.; Ducea, M. N.; Reiners, P. W.

    2009-12-01

    Foundering or delamination of the lower lithosphere into the convecting mantle is required by mass balance in convergent orogens such as the central Andes. In the central Andean volcanic zone (CVZ), late Miocene to Recent mafic lavas erupted on the Puna plateau are small volume fissure flows and cinder cones classically cited as evidence of convective lithospheric removal, in concert with a suite of observations including high surface elevation (>4000m) and anomalously thin lithosphere relative to other parts of the CVZ. Mafic lavas provide the best available geochemical window into the recent history of the upper mantle in this and other regions. However, an increasing number of elemental and isotopic data suggest that these melts are less distinct from the neighboring arc magmatism than originally predicted. This observation weakens the hypothesis that there is a distinct geochemical fingerprint for so-called delamination magmatism, while advancing our understanding of the size of delaminating bodies and the timescales over which they detach from the lithosphere and interact with the mantle wedge. In this contribution, we present elemental and radiogenic isotopic data from 20 newly sampled mafic lavas from the Puna plateau (24.5°S to 27°S). Preliminary major element analyses show that the Puna lavas are high-K to shoshonitic in composition, in broad agreement with other mafic lavas sampled though out the region. Several sampled flows contain xenotliths of granitoid composition, which likely represent the crustal end member that contributed to the more evolved lavas. Along with major, trace and rare earth element analyses, we will present 87Sr/86Sr and 143Nd/144Nd data to further characterize source regions of these melts. In sum, these data will allow us to (1) expand the spatial coverage of this dataset in the central Andes, (2) contribute to the effort to parse contributions from the subcontinental lithosphere, asthenosphere, subduction-related fluids, and

  7. Basin-Scale nd Isotope Gradients in South Atlantic Marine Sedimentary Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, W.; Abouchami, W.; Zahn, R.; Masque, P.

    2012-12-01

    Recent 231Pa/230Th and Nd isotopes studies have suggested a slower and re-configured Meridional Overturning Circulation in the Atlantic (AMOC) during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) [1]. We have undertaken a Sr and Nd isotope study on sediment core MD02-2594 (34°43'S, 17°20'E, 2440 m) located in the Cape Basin where nutrient-based proxies - δ13C and Cd/Ca ratios - and low 231Pa/230Th, a tracer of deep water overturning rate, indicate the presence of Southern Component Water (SCW) and a weaker AMOC during the LGM [1]. Samples cover the LGM and Holocene sections of the core previously analysed for Pa/Th [1]. Sr and Nd isotope data were obtained on the bulk sediment as well as on the Fe-Mn oxides leachates and the residual detrital fraction extracted using established sequential leaching procedure. Analyses were performed on a ThermoFisher Triton TIMS at MPIC and Nd isotopes measured as NdO. Our results show that the bulk sediment Nd isotope record is, as expected, overprinted by the Nd isotope composition of the lithogenic fraction and follows closely the 231Pa/230Th record. Sr isotope ratios in Fe-Mn leachates have been used as diagnostic of a seawater origin for the Fe-Mn oxides which should yield modern seawater Sr isotopic composition. Our samples have 87Sr/86Sr ratios similar to or slightly higher than those measured for seawater [2]. The Nd isotope composition of the Fe-Mn leachates show, nevertheless, a distinct signature from both the bulk sediment and the detrital fraction, both of which display systematically less radiogenic Nd isotope ratios throughout the whole record. The seawater ɛNd record exhibits a decreasing trend from the LGM into the Bolling-Allerød and Younger Dryas, prior to stabilizing at a value of about -9 during the Holocene. Covariations between Nd isotope ratios of Fe-Mn leachates and 231Pa/230Th reveal contrasted behaviour during the LGM and the Holocene period: low and nearly constant glacial Pa/Th values are associated with

  8. Steady state or non-steady state? Identifying driving mechanisms of oxygen isotope signatures of leaf transpiration in functionally distinct plant species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubbert, Maren; Kübert, Angelika; Cuntz, Matthias; Werner, Christiane

    2015-04-01

    Isotope techniques are widely applied in ecosystem studies. For example, isoflux models are used to separate soil evaporation from transpiration in ecosystems. These models often assume that plant transpiration occurs at isotopic steady state, i.e. that the transpired water shows the same isotopic signature as the source water. Yet, several studies found that transpiration did not occur at isotopic steady state, under both controlled and field conditions. Here we focused on identifying the internal and external factors which drive the isotopic signature of leaf transpiration. Using cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS), the effect of both environmental variables and leaf physiological traits on δ18OT was investigated under controlled conditions. Six plant species with distinct leaf physiological traits were exposed to step changes in relative air humidity (RH), their response in δ18OT and gas exchange parameters and their leaf physiological traits were assessed. Moreover, two functionally distinct plant types (tree, i.e. Quercus suber, and grassland) of a semi-arid Mediterranean oak-woodland where observed under natural conditions throughout an entire growth period in the field. The species differed substantially in their leaf physiological traits and their turn-over times of leaf water. They could be grouped in species with fast (240 min.) turn-over times, mostly due to differences in stomatal conductance, leaf water content or a combination of both. Changes in RH caused an immediate response in δ18OT, which were similarly strong in all species, while leaf physiological traits affected the subsequent response in δ18OT. The turn-over time of leaf water determined the speed of return to the isotopic steady or a stable δ18OT value (Dubbert & Kübert et al., in prep.). Under natural conditions, changes in environmental conditions over the diurnal cycle had a huge impact on the diurnal development of δ18OT in both observed plant functional types. However, in

  9. Lead isotopes in iron and manganese oxide coatings and their use as an exploration guide for concealed mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulson, B.L.; Church, S.E.; Mizon, K.J.; Meier, A.L.

    1992-01-01

    Lead isotopes from Fe and Mn oxides that coat stream pebbles from around the Mount Emmons porphyry molybdenum deposit in Colorado were studied to assess the feasibility of using Pb isotopes to detect concealed mineral deposits. The Fe/Mn oxide coatings were analyzed to determine their elemental concentrations using ICP-AES. The Pb isotope compositions of solutions from a selected suite of samples were measured, using both thermal ionization and ICP mass spectrometry, to compare results determined by the two analytical methods. Heavy mineral concentrates from the same sites were also analyzed to compare the Pb isotope compositions of the Fe/Mn coatings with those found in panned concentrates. The Fe/Mn and 206Pb/204Pb ratios of the oxide coatings are related to the lithology of the host rocks; Fe/Mn oxide coatings on pebbles of black shale have higher Fe/Mn values than do the coatings on either sandstone or igneous rocks. The shale host rocks have a more radiogenic signature (e.g. higher 206Pb/ 204Pb) than the sandstone or igneous host rocks. The Pb isotope data from sandstone and igneous hosts can detect concealed mineralized rock on both a regional and local scale, even though there are contributions from: (1) metals from the main-stage molybdenite ore deposit; (2) metals from the phyllic alteration zone which has a more radiogenic Pb isotope signature reflecting hydrothermal leaching of Pb from the Mancos Shale; (3) Pb-rich base metal veins with a highly variable Pb isotope signature; and (4) sedimentary country rocks which have a more radiogenic Pb isotope signature. An investigation of within-stream variation shows that the Pb isotope signature of the molybdenite ore zone is retained in the Fe/Mn oxide coatings and is not camouflaged by contributions from Pb-rich base-metal veins that crop out upstream. In another traverse, the Pb isotope data from Fe/Mn oxide coatings reflect a complex mixing of Pb from the molybdenite ore zone and its hornfels margin, Pb

  10. Metamorphosis affects metal concentrations and isotopic signatures in a mayfly (Baetis tricaudatus): Implications for the aquatic-terrestrial transfer of metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesner, Jeff S.; Walters, David; Schmidt, Travis S.; Kraus, Johanna M.; Stricker, Craig A.; Clements, William H.; Wolf, Ruth E.

    2017-01-01

    Insect metamorphosis often results in substantial chemical changes that can alter contaminant concentrations and fractionate isotopes. We exposed larval mayflies (Baetis tricaudatus) and their food (periphyton) to an aqueous zinc gradient (3-340 µg Zn/l) and measured zinc concentrations at different stages of metamorphosis: larval, subimago, and imago. We also measured changes in stable isotopes (δ15N and δ13C) in unexposed mayflies. Larval zinc concentrations were positively related to aqueous zinc, increasing 9-fold across the exposure gradient. Adult zinc concentrations were also positively related to aqueous zinc, but were 7-fold lower than larvae. This relationship varied according to adult substage and sex. Tissue concentrations in female imagoes were not related to exposure concentrations, but the converse was true for all other stage-by-sex combinations. Metamorphosis also increased δ15N by ~0.8‰, but not δ13C. Thus, the main effects of metamorphosis on insect chemistry were large declines in zinc concentrations coupled with increased δ15N signatures. For zinc, this change was largely consistent across the aqueous exposure gradient. However, differences among sexes and stages suggest that caution is warranted when using nitrogen isotopes or metal concentrations measured in one insect stage (e.g. larvae) to assess risk to wildlife that feed on subsequent life stages (e.g. adults).

  11. Nd-isotope evidence for the distal provenance of the historical (c. Gabon (Western Africa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiéblemont, D.; Guerrot, C.; Négrel, Ph.; Braucher, R.; Bourlès, D. L.; Thiéblemont, R.

    2014-12-01

    Surficial formations in Gabon, as well as in other places of western Central Africa include a ubiquitous, homogeneous and 1-3 m-thick clayey to sandy lateritic surface cover known as the 'Cover Horizon'. From 14C radiometric dating it has been concluded that the emplacement of this unit was correlative with a major environmental crisis which affected Central Africa c. 3000-2000 years ago. 10Be and Nd-isotopic analyses have been performed to provide new constraints on the age and origin of this layer. Six samples from two depth profiles investigated for 10Be exhibit an almost constant concentration consistent with a very recent deposition age. Nd-isotopic analyses performed on the silt to clay fraction of eleven samples from widely spaced locations over Gabon attest for mildly radiogenic signatures (εNd = -23 to -17) in ten of them, and a slightly radiogenic signature (εNd = -9) in one sample. TDM model ages range from 1.6 to 2.6 Ga, and a perfect discrimination is observed between the Nd-isotopic signature of the Cover Horizon and that of the underlying Congo Craton. This makes an aeolian origin as the most probable for the Cover Horizon. The average εNd (c. -20) is however rather unusual for aeolian sediments or aerosols. A possible source of particles is therefore tested by considering the present-day atmospheric flux over Gabon and adjacent regions. Combined atmospheric modeling and Nd-isotopes leads to the conclusion that the fine fraction of the Cover Horizon could have originated from the northern part of the Namib desert.

  12. A model for osmium isotopic evolution of metallic solids at the core-mantle boundary

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Munir Humayun

    2011-01-01

      Radiogenic and unradiogenic Os isotopes require a new physical model A cumulate pile model of the CMB provides a suitable explanation Other isotope systematics are consistent with this model Some...

  13. Diamond growth history from in situ measurement of Pb and S isotopic compositions of sulfide inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudnick, Roberta L.; Eldridge, C. Stewart; Bulanova, Galina P.

    1993-01-01

    In a continuing effort to understand crust-mantle dynamics, we have determined the S and Pb isotopic compositions of mantle sulfides encapsulated within diamonds from under the Siberian craton and compared these results to those of previously investigated African counterparts. Because diamond inclusions are isolated from exchange with surrounding mantle, they may preserve the history of diamond growth and act as direct tracers of the origins of mantle materials. Study of these inclusions may thus offer the best chance of recognizing global-scale interaction between Earth's crust and mantle. Although δ34S values of the Siberian sulfides do not deviate significantly from the mantle value of 0‰ ± 3‰, Pb isotopic compositions are highly variable. Pb isotopic compositions of sulfides from peridotitic suite diamonds generally plot near the terrestrial Pb growth curve, with model ages ranging between 0 and 2 Ga, whereas sulfides from eclogitic suite diamonds have radiogenic compositions, plotting beyond the growth curve. These results, which are similar to those for sulfides in African diamonds, suggest that the sulfides from eclogitic suite diamonds were derived from a source with an unusually high U/Pb ratio and may indicate a common process (such as subduction of crystal materials into the mantle) operating beneath Africa and Siberia. The absence of extremely radiogenic Pb in sulfides from eclogite xenoliths suggests that the radiogenic material from which eclogitic suite diamonds grew was a transient feature of the mantle, associated with diamond growth. The ultimate origin of this high U/Pb signature, however, remains enigmatic. Large variations in Pb isotopic composition of sulfides from different zones in a single peridotitic suite diamond document (1) crystallization of the diamond's core near 2.0 Ga, (2) growth of its outer zone in an environment with a high U/Pb ratio similar to the growth environment of eclogitic suite diamonds, and (3) growth of the

  14. Differentiating sources of dissolved lead in mine waters using lead isotope techniques, Sullivan Mine, British Columbia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepitre, M. E.; Allen, D. M.; Mortensen, J. K.; Gabites, J. E.

    2003-01-01

    This study investigates the use of Pb isotopes in acid rock drainage studies and outlines a protocol for sampling and analysis of dissolved Pb in mine waters. Groundwaters and surface waters were sampled at the Sullivan Mine, British Columbia, to quantify Pb isotope ratios and to identify possible sources of Pb in mine effluent and back groundwaters, respectively. The Sullivan Deposit is a sediment-hosted Fe-Pb-Zn massive sulphide deposit with a well-defined homogeneous Pb isotopic composition, which provided a suitable end-member for the isotopic study. The Pb isotopic compositions of water samples define a mixing line between the homogeneous Pb isotopic signature of the Sullivan Ore and at least one other more radiogenic end-member. This end-member may correspond to Pb in the host rocks (Aldridge Formation), Pb from aerosols that have infiltrated the local surficial deposits with recharge, or Pb from the surficial deposits themselves. Further study is needed to more completely characterize the composition of potential isotopic end-members in the study area. The study demonstrates that different source regions for Pb have distinct and measurable isotopic compositions, which enable "fingerprinting" sources of Pb contamination that result from ore deposits or from other sources.

  15. Organic vs. conventional grassland management: do (15N and (13C isotopic signatures of hay and soil samples differ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin H Klaus

    Full Text Available Distinguishing organic and conventional products is a major issue of food security and authenticity. Previous studies successfully used stable isotopes to separate organic and conventional products, but up to now, this approach was not tested for organic grassland hay and soil. Moreover, isotopic abundances could be a powerful tool to elucidate differences in ecosystem functioning and driving mechanisms of element cycling in organic and conventional management systems. Here, we studied the δ(15N and δ(13C isotopic composition of soil and hay samples of 21 organic and 34 conventional grasslands in two German regions. We also used Δδ(15N (δ(15N plant - δ(15N soil to characterize nitrogen dynamics. In order to detect temporal trends, isotopic abundances in organic grasslands were related to the time since certification. Furthermore, discriminant analysis was used to test whether the respective management type can be deduced from observed isotopic abundances. Isotopic analyses revealed no significant differences in δ(13C in hay and δ(15N in both soil and hay between management types, but showed that δ(13C abundances were significantly lower in soil of organic compared to conventional grasslands. Δδ(15N values implied that management types did not substantially differ in nitrogen cycling. Only δ(13C in soil and hay showed significant negative relationships with the time since certification. Thus, our result suggest that organic grasslands suffered less from drought stress compared to conventional grasslands most likely due to a benefit of higher plant species richness, as previously shown by manipulative biodiversity experiments. Finally, it was possible to correctly classify about two third of the samples according to their management using isotopic abundances in soil and hay. However, as more than half of the organic samples were incorrectly classified, we infer that more research is needed to improve this approach before it can be

  16. Organic vs. conventional grassland management: do (15)N and (13)C isotopic signatures of hay and soil samples differ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaus, Valentin H; Hölzel, Norbert; Prati, Daniel; Schmitt, Barbara; Schöning, Ingo; Schrumpf, Marion; Fischer, Markus; Kleinebecker, Till

    2013-01-01

    Distinguishing organic and conventional products is a major issue of food security and authenticity. Previous studies successfully used stable isotopes to separate organic and conventional products, but up to now, this approach was not tested for organic grassland hay and soil. Moreover, isotopic abundances could be a powerful tool to elucidate differences in ecosystem functioning and driving mechanisms of element cycling in organic and conventional management systems. Here, we studied the δ(15)N and δ(13)C isotopic composition of soil and hay samples of 21 organic and 34 conventional grasslands in two German regions. We also used Δδ(15)N (δ(15)N plant - δ(15)N soil) to characterize nitrogen dynamics. In order to detect temporal trends, isotopic abundances in organic grasslands were related to the time since certification. Furthermore, discriminant analysis was used to test whether the respective management type can be deduced from observed isotopic abundances. Isotopic analyses revealed no significant differences in δ(13)C in hay and δ(15)N in both soil and hay between management types, but showed that δ(13)C abundances were significantly lower in soil of organic compared to conventional grasslands. Δδ(15)N values implied that management types did not substantially differ in nitrogen cycling. Only δ(13)C in soil and hay showed significant negative relationships with the time since certification. Thus, our result suggest that organic grasslands suffered less from drought stress compared to conventional grasslands most likely due to a benefit of higher plant species richness, as previously shown by manipulative biodiversity experiments. Finally, it was possible to correctly classify about two third of the samples according to their management using isotopic abundances in soil and hay. However, as more than half of the organic samples were incorrectly classified, we infer that more research is needed to improve this approach before it can be efficiently

  17. Dissolved Neodymium Isotopes and Concentrations in the South Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basak, C.; Pahnke, K.

    2013-12-01

    The isotopic composition of dissolved Neodymium (expressed as ɛNd) in seawater is becoming increasingly established as a tracer for present and past water mass structure and flow paths. The South Pacific represents the largest sector of the Southern Ocean and harbors major areas of bottom and intermediate water mass formation and is therefore a key area for understanding present and past deep ocean circulation. While more dissolved Nd data are becoming available from different ocean basins, the South Pacific is still understudied with respect to the distribution of Nd isotopes and concentrations. In this study we have analyzed dissolved Nd isotopes and concentrations from 11 water column profiles across the South Pacific between 46°S and 69°S that sample all water masses. Our data show that the bottom water in the vicinity of the Ross Sea (Ross Sea Bottom water, RSBW) is represented by an ɛNd value of ~ -7, while the overlying Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW) carries a signature of ɛNd = -8 to -9. The characteristic Nd isotopic signal of RSBW can be tracked along its flow path into the southeast Pacific where it progressively looses its signal through interaction with ambient CDW. The easternmost stations, closer to South America, exhibit an excursion towards radiogenic ɛNd at ≤2000 m water depth. This change towards more positive ɛNd coincides with low oxygen and high phosphate concentrations representing Pacific Deep Water (PDW) and possibly indicates water mass mixing of CDW with more radiogenic PDW. While the Nd isotopic composition shows apparent variations between stations and different water masses, the concentration profiles show a rather uniform and gradual increase with depth, a pattern typical for open ocean settings. Spatial and vertical contrasts in Nd isotopic values throughout the South Pacific indicate that Nd isotopes can be used as a water mass tracer in this region. It is reasonable to infer that local lithology in the Ross Sea influenced

  18. Moisture source in the Hyblean Mountains region (south-eastern Sicily, Italy): Evidence from stable isotopes signature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grassa, Fausto [Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione di Palermo, Via Ugo La Malfa, 153, 90146 Palermo (Italy)]. E-mail: f.grassa@pa.ingv.it; Favara, Rocco [Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione di Palermo, Via Ugo La Malfa, 153, 90146 Palermo (Italy); Valenza, Mariano [Dipartimento CFTA, Universita di Palermo, Palermo, Via Archirafi, 36, 90123, Palermo (Italy)

    2006-12-15

    Here the authors present results of an isotope study on precipitation collected during a 2-a period from a rain-gauge network consisting of 6 stations located at different elevations in the Hyblean Mountains (HM) region, in south-eastern Sicily. The slope of the local meteoric water line ({delta}D = 6.50 {delta} {sup 18}O + 9.87) obtained for the region suggests that precipitation is affected by evaporation during rainfall events. The main variations in rainwater isotope composition are due to seasonal effects and elevation. An average {sup 2}H excess value of +21.2 per mille was found for precipitation events less affected by evaporation (i.e. when the rainfall was >65 mm/month). The spatial distribution of O isotope composition of precipitation shows a negative gradient from east and south to the inner areas. The depositional rate of Cl, used as a tracer of the origin of air masses, is highest at the coastal rain-gauges (SR and MRG stations) and lowest on the northern flank of the HM region (SC station). Based on these findings, a model is proposed for the origin of precipitation in the HM region, which assumes that a Mediterranean-derived component is the main source of moisture in the studied area. D/H and {sup 18}O/{sup 16}O ratios of inferred meteoric recharge waters were also compared with the isotope composition of waters collected from the main local springs and wells. The best linear fit of the {delta} {sup 18}O vs {delta}D relationship for Hyblean groundwater is {delta}D = 4.85 {delta} {sup 18}O-2.01. The enrichment of heavy isotopes in Hyblean groundwater is probably due to evaporation occurring after precipitation events or to a recharging contribution from surface waters (lakes or rivers) enriched in heavy isotopes.

  19. Regional trends in radiogenic heat generation in the Precambrian basement of the Western Canadian Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, F. W.; Majorowicz, J. A.

    Radiogenic heat generation values for 381 basement samples from 229 sites in the western Canadian basin exhibit a lognormal frequency distribution. The mean value = 2.06 (S.D. = 1.22) µWm-3 is larger than the radiogenic heat generation values reported for the shield in the Superior (ca. 1.2 µWm-3, Jessop and Lewis, 1978) and Churchill (ca. 0.7 µWm-3, Drury, 1985) provinces. When equal Log A contour intervals are used to map the basement heat generation, three large zones of relatively high heat generation are found. One coincides with the Peace River Arch basement structure and one with the Athabasca axis (Darnley, 1981). There is no apparent indication of increased heat flow through the Paleozoic formations associated with these two zones. The third zone, in southwestern Saskatchewan, coincides with a high heat flow zone in the Swift Current area. The lack of correlation between heat flow and heat generation in Alberta may be due to the disturbance to the heat flow in the Paleozoic formations by water motion, or may indicate that the heat is from uranium, thorium and potassium isotope enrichment near the basement surface rather than enrichment throughout the entire upper crust.

  20. The lead (Pb) isotope signature, behaviour and fate of traffic-related lead pollution in roadside soils in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walraven, N.; van Os, B.J.H.; Klaver, G.Th.; Middelburg, J.J.; Davies, G.R.

    2014-01-01

    In this study the origin, behaviour and fate of anthropogenic Pb in sandy roadside soils were assessed by measuring soil characteristics, Pb isotope composition and content. In 1991 and 2003 samples were taken at different depth intervals at approximately 8 and 75 m from two highways in The

  1. Impact of feeding and short-term temperature stress on the content and isotopic signature of fatty acids, sterols, and alcohols in the scleractinian coral Turbinaria reniformis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolosa, I.; Treignier, C.; Grover, R.; Ferrier-Pagès, C.

    2011-09-01

    This study assesses the combined effect of feeding and short-term thermal stress on various physiological parameters and on the fatty acid, sterol, and alcohol composition of the scleractinian coral Turbinaria reniformis. The compound-specific carbon isotope composition of the lipids was also measured. Under control conditions (26°C), feeding with Artemia salina significantly increased the symbiont density and chlorophyll content and the growth rates of the corals. It also doubled the concentrations of almost all fatty acid (FA) compounds and increased the n-alcohol and sterol contents. δ13C results showed that the feeding enhancement of FA concentrations occurred either via a direct pathway, for one of the major polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) compounds of the food (18:3n-3 FA), or via an enhancement of photosynthate transfer (indirect pathway), for the other coral FAs. Cholesterol (C27Δ5) was also directly acquired from the food. Thermal stress (31°C) affected corals, but differently according to their feeding status. Chlorophyll, protein content, and maximal photosynthetic efficiency of photosystem II (PSII) decreased to a greater extent in starved corals. In such corals, FA concentrations were reduced by 33%, (especially C16, C18 FAs, and n-3 PUFA) and the sterol content by 27% (especially the C28∆5,22 and C28∆5). The enrichment in the δ13C signature of the storage and structural FAs suggests that they were the main compounds respired during the stress to maintain the coral metabolism. Thermal stress had less effect on the lipid concentrations of fed corals, as only FA levels were reduced by 13%, with no major changes in their isotope carbon signatures. In conclusion, feeding plays an essential role in sustaining T. reniformis metabolism during the thermal stress.

  2. Indian Ocean-MORB-type isotopic signature of Yushigou ophiolite in North Qilian Mountains and its implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Qingye; ZHAO Zhidan; ZHANG Hongfei; ZHANG Benren; CHEN Yuelong

    2006-01-01

    In order to explore the disputed issue concerning the tectonic affinity of the ancient ocean mantle of North Qilian Mountains (NQM), geochemical and Sr, Nd, Pb isotopic compositions of pillow basalts of the Yushigou Ophiolite (YSGO) suite from NQM have been analyzed systematically. The pillow basalts exhibit tholeiitic characteristics, with flat chondrite-normalized REE patterns ((La/Yb)N = 0.98―1.27). They display no Nb, Ta, Zr, Hf negative anomalies, and show MORB features in 2Nb-Zr/4-Y and Ti/100-Zr-Y×3 tectonic discrimination diagrams. These results indicate that the Yushigou ophiolite is most likely to be formed in a mid-ocean ridge or mature back-arc basin. Their isotopic data show a relatively broad and enriched 87Sr/86Sr (0.70509―0.70700), restricted 143Nd/144Nd (0.512955―0.512978). Pb isotopes are in the range of 206Pb/204Pb (18.054―20.562), 207Pb/204Pb (15.537―15.743) and 208Pb/204Pb (38.068―38.530). These isotopic data imply that the basalts originated from the depleted mantle (DMM), with the involvement of enriched mantle components (mainly EMII). Geochemical comparisons between the basalts in YSGO and the MORB-type basalts of ophiolite suites occurring in the known ancient Tethyan tectonic domain indicate that the ancient oceanic mantle represented by YSGO suite forming in early Paleozoic in the North Qilian Moutains is very similar to the Tethyan mantle in both trace elements and isotopic compositions. The North Qilian Mountains should be a part of the Tethyan tectonic domain in early Paleozoic. This further implies that the Tethyan tectonic domain can be deduced to early Paleozoic in the study area, which will be helpful to discussing the tectonic affinity and evolution of the North Qilian Mountains.

  3. Isotopic (18O) signature of CO2-H2O vapor exchange in the vadose air of Nerja cave (Malaga, Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadillo, Iñaki; Ojeda, Lucía; Benavente, José; Liñán, Cristina; del Rosal, Yolanda; Carrasco, Francisco

    2017-04-01

    In caves, carbon dioxide contents and its δ13C signature have been widely studied to provide information about the ventilation regime and the source of carbon dioxide. However, less has been researched about δ18O signature in vadose air. We analysed cave-air samples for the CO2 concentration and oxygen isotopic composition from a monthly sampling campaigns for two years within different halls in Nerja cave. In general terms, ventilation controls the variation of CO2 content seasonally, showing two distinct modes with the highest values in summer. The δ18O values range from -8.74 to +0.47 ‰ being maximum in January and minimum in September, coinciding with the lowest and highest humidity values within the cave respectively. We found that a gas exchange between δ18O-CO2 and δ18O-H2O vapor is carried out and pattern is repeated every season, showing the importance that water has in karst environment.

  4. S Isotope Ratios of Central Italy Waters to Assess Their Origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castorina, Francesca; Masi, Umberto

    2010-05-01

    Sr isotopes have so far applied only occasionally to the study of the waters from central Italy. Therefore, we have analyzed more than 30 water samples from thermal and cold springs, and from the lakes located in the Quaternary K-alkaline volcanic districts of Latium, aimed at providing significant information on the sources of Sr and the hydrologic circulation. The 87Sr/86Sr composition of the waters shows a general correlation with the aquifer rocks, resulting in the waters from older carbonatic rocks having a less radiogenic signature than those from younger K-alkaline volcanic rocks. The Sr-isotope ratios of most thermal waters range narrowly by 0.708, indicating a common source of Sr, likely represented by the Upper Triassic Burano Anhydrites, i.e. the lowermost permeable formation in the study area. Moreover, the positive correlation between Sr and Ca suggests that bulk Ca was also supplied from that source. A minor number of thermal waters as well as all the waters from the lakes and cold springs display a larger Sr isotopic range (0.7085-0.7115), suggesting a relative large spectrum of sources for Sr. In particular, some waters derive their Sr from a singular source, but the most show isotopic signatures suggestive of mixed contributions from different aquifers. As a whole, the results from this study confirm that Sr isotopes are a useful tool contributing to explain the geochemical characteristics of surficial and groundwaters.

  5. Trace Element Signatures of Particles in the Fraser River Estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snauffer, A. M.; Menard, O.; Kieffer, B.; Francois, R. H.; Weis, D. A.; Pcigr

    2010-12-01

    Characterization of trace element transport via particles at the estuarine boundary is critical to understanding the processes involved in translating these signatures to the ocean. The Fraser River in British Columbia, Canada, is the largest river by volume flowing from the Pacific coast and dumps 20 million tons of sediment into the ocean per year, yet its trace elements have not been studied extensively. The aim of this study is to determine the Sr, Nd, Hf and Pb signatures of suspended matter in the Fraser River estuary. We collected 20L water samples at 3m depth at 12 locations along the north arm of the Fraser River, along the salinity gradient from freshwater to saline water approaching open straight values of ~25 per mil. Samples were allowed to settle and then filtered. Settled particulate matter was taken from each sample and digested in high-pressure vessels. Sr, Nd, Hf, and Pb were separated using ion exchange chromatography columns. Sr and Nd isotopes were analyzed on a TIMS (Thermo Finnigan Triton-TI); Hf and Pb were measured with a MC-ICP-MS (Nu Plasma). The measured ratios were 87Sr/86Sr = 0.71051 to 0.71289, 143Nd/144Nd = 0.51203 to 0.51221 and 176Hf/177Hf = 0.28253 to 0.28267 in the river and 0.70961, 0.51220 and 0.28273 respectively in the open straight. They reflect the local terrane compositions [2.3]. The collected particles have relatively radiogenic signatures compared with those obtained by Cameron and Hattori [1] between Lillooet and Hope but similar to those from higher in the river, i.e. they have a signature similar to older terranes drained by the Fraser headwaters. Between Hope and Vancouver, the Fraser River drains younger mantle-derived batholiths (Coast Belt). Therefore a more juvenile signature was expected for the particles collected at the mouth of the river. A possible explanation for this unexpected radiogenic signature is a difference in flow rate between the 1993 sampling (~3000m3/s) and ours in 2010 (~5500m3/s). The

  6. Ca isotope fingerprints of early crust-mantle evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreissig, K.; Elliott, T.

    2005-01-01

    The utility of 40Ca/ 44Ca as a tracer of pre-existing crustal contributions in early Archaean cratons has been explored to identify traces of Hadean crust and to assess the style of continental growth. The relatively short half-life of 40K (˜1.3 Gy) means that its decay to 40Ca occurs dominantly during early Earth History. If Archaean crust had a significant component derived from a more ancient protolith, as anticipated by "steady state" crustal evolution models, this should be clearly reflected in radiogenic 40Ca/ 44Ca ratios (or positive initial ɛ Ca) in different Archaean cratons. A high precision thermal ionisation technique has been used to analyse the 40Ca/ 44Ca ratios of plagioclase separates and associated whole rocks in ˜3.6 Ga (early Archaean) samples from Zimbabwe and West Greenland. Three out of four tonalite, trondhjemite, granodiorite (TTG) suite samples from Zimbabwe display initial 40Ca/ 44Ca ratios indistinguishable from our measured modern MORB value (i.e., ɛ Ca(3.6) ˜ 0). Greenland samples, however, are very diverse ranging from ɛ Ca(3.7) = 0.1 in mafic pillow lavas and felsic sheets from the Isua supracrustal belt, up to very radiogenic signatures (ɛ Ca(3.7) = 2.9) in both mafic rocks of the Akilia association and felsic TTG from the coastal Amîtsoq gneisses. At face value, these results imply the Zimbabwe crust is juvenile whereas most Greenland samples include an earlier crustal component. Yet the west Greenland craton, as with many Archaean localities, has experienced a complex geological history and the interpretation of age-corrected initial isotope values requires great care. Both felsic and mafic samples from Greenland display ɛ Ca(3.7) so radiogenic that they are not readily explained by crustal growth scenarios. The presence of such radiogenic 40Ca/ 44Ca found in low K/Ca plagioclases requires Ca isotope exchange between plagioclase and whole rock during later metamorphic event(s). In addition the unexpectedly radiogenic Ca

  7. Effect on a long-term afforestation of pine in a beech domain in NE-Spain as reflected in soil C and N isotopic signature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girona García, Antonio; Badía-Villas, David; González-Pérez, José Antonio; Tomás Jiménez-Morillo, Nicasio; Martí-Dalmau, Clara

    2015-04-01

    The replacement of native beech forests (Fagus sylvatica) by Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) afforestation may exert changes in soil properties, particularly in soil organic matter (SOM) (Carceller and Vallejo, 1996). Stable isotopic signatures of light elements (d13C, d15N) in soils and plants are valuable proxies for the identification of biogeochemical processes and their rates in the pedosphere (Andreeva et al., 2013 and refs therein). In this work the C and N stable isotopic analysis is used as a proxy to detect changes in SOM surrogated to the effect of centennial replacement of beech by the Scots pinewood. Two acid soil profiles, developed on quartzites under a humid climate at an altitude of 1400-1500 masl, have been sampled in Moncayo (Iberian range, NE-Spain). For each soil profile three O-layers (litter: OL, fragmented litter OF and humified litter OH) and mineral soil horizons (Ah, E, Bhs and C) were sampled. Content and bulk isotopic signature of light elements (C and N) were analysed in a Flash 2000 elemental micro-analyser coupled via a ConFlo IV interface to a Delta V Advantage isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS) (Thermo Scientific, Bremen, Germany). Isotopic ratios are reported as parts per thousand deviations from appropriate standards. The standard deviations of d13C and d15N were typically less than ± 0.05 per thousand, ± 0.2 per thousand, respectively. After 100 years since the pine afforestation, no differences on C content were observed in the O-layers, ranging from 30-47% in pine soils and 37-47 % in beech soils. Similarly, no differences on N content were observed in the O-layers, ranging from 1.24-1.86 % in pine soils and 1.70-1.71 % in beech soils. C and N contents decrease progressively in depth with the exception of E-horizons where the lowest C and N content values were found. C/N ratio is higher in pine soil (20.7-38.1) than in beech O soil horizons (21.8-27.5), showing similar behavior with soil depth. Pine biomass was slightly

  8. Insights of Pb isotopic signature into the historical evolution and sources of Pb contamination in a sediment core of the southwestern Iberian Atlantic shelf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mil-Homens, Mário; Vale, Carlos; Brito, Pedro; Naughton, Filipa; Drago, Teresa; Raimundo, Joana; Anes, Bárbara; Schmidt, Sabine; Caetano, Miguel

    2017-05-15

    Stable Pb isotopic ratios and concentrations of Al, Cu and Pb were measured in a 5m long sediment core (VC2B) retrieved at 96m water depth in the southwestern Iberian Atlantic shelf. Five phases during the last 9.5kyrs were identified, two of them (Roman Period and modern mining) marked by a decrease of (206)Pb/(207)Pb ratios reflecting additional inputs of Pb derived from mining activities. The Roman Period was also characterized by high (208)Pb/(206)Pb ratios suggesting the exploitation of the outcropping portion of the orebody intensely weathered when compared with the other formations later mined. The shift of (208)Pb/(206)Pb ratios towards linearity took approximately 1.0kyrs, which may mirror the time of environmental recovery from the impact of Roman mining activities. The application of a mixing model allowed the quantification of the contribution associated with anthropogenic mining activities to the shelf sediments. The maximum values of Pb contamination occurred in the 20(th) century. This study gives direct evidence of Pb and Cu exploitation over the last 2000years. The stable Pb isotopic signatures point to legacy of mining activities that are still the prevailing metal source recorded in the southwestern Iberian Atlantic shelf sediments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Autotrophic fixation of geogenic CO2 by microorganisms contributes to soil organic matter formation and alters isotope signatures in a wetland mofette

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. E. Nowak

    2015-09-01

    indicated from quantification of cbbL/cbbM marker genes encoding for RubisCO by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR and by acetogenic and methanogenic microorganisms, shown present in the moffettes by previous studies. Combined Δ14C and δ13C isotope mass balances indicated that microbially derived carbon accounted for 8 to 27 % of bulk SOM in this soil layer. The findings imply that autotrophic organisms can recycle significant amounts of carbon in wetland soils and might contribute to observed reservoir effects influencing radiocarbon signatures in peat deposits.

  10. Molecular hydrogen (H2 emissions and their isotopic signatures (H/D from a motor vehicle: implications on atmospheric H2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Röckmann

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Molecular hydrogen (H2, its isotopic signature (deuterium/hydrogen, δD, carbon monoxide (CO, and other compounds were studied in the exhaust of a passenger car engine fuelled with gasoline or methane and run under variable air-fuel ratios and operating modes. H2 and CO concentrations were largely reduced downstream of the three-way catalytic converter (TWC compared to levels upstream, and showed a strong dependence on the air-fuel ratio (expressed as lambda, λ. The isotopic composition of H2 ranged from δD = −140‰ to δD = −195‰ upstream of the TWC but these values decreased to −270‰ to −370‰ after passing through the TWC. Post-TWC δD values for the fuel-rich range showed a strong dependence on TWC temperature with more negative δD for lower temperatures. These effects are attributed to a rapid temperature-dependent H-D isotope equilibration between H2 and water (H2O. In addition, post TWC δD in H2 showed a strong dependence on the fraction of removed H2, suggesting isotopic enrichment during catalytic removal of H2 with enrichment factors (ε ranging from −39.8‰ to −15.5‰ depending on the operating mode. Our results imply that there may be considerable variability in real-world δD emissions from vehicle exhaust, which may mainly depend on TWC technology and exhaust temperature regime. This variability is suggestive of a δD from traffic that varies over time, by season, and by geographical location. An earlier-derived integrated pure (end-member δD from anthropogenic activities of −270‰ (Rahn et al., 2002 can be explained as a mixture of mainly vehicle emissions from cold starts and fully functional TWCs, but enhanced δD values by >50‰ are likely for regions where TWC technology is not fully implemented. Our results also suggest that a full hydrogen isotope analysis on fuel and exhaust gas may greatly aid at understanding process-level reactions in the exhaust gas, in particular in the TWC.

  11. Molecular hydrogen (H2 emissions and their isotopic signatures (H/D from a motor vehicle: implications on atmospheric H2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Röckmann

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Molecular hydrogen (H2, its isotopic signature (deuterium/hydrogen, δD, carbon monoxide (CO and other compounds were studied in the exhaust of a passenger car engine fuelled with gasoline or methane and run under variable air-fuel ratios and operating modes. H2 and CO concentrations were largely reduced downstream of the three-way catalytic converter (TWC compared to levels upstream, and showed a strong dependence on the air-fuel ratio (expressed as lambda, λ. The isotopic composition of H2 ranged from δD=–140‰ to δD=–195‰ upstream of the TWC but these values decreased to –270‰ to –370‰ after passing through the TWC. Post-TWC δD values for the fuel-rich range showed a strong dependence on TWC temperature with more negative δD for lower temperatures. These effects are attributed to a rapid temperature-dependent H-D isotope equilibration between H2 and water (H2O. In addition, post TWC δD in H2 showed a strong dependence on the fraction of removed H2, suggesting isotopic enrichment during catalytic removal of H2 with enrichment factors (ε ranging from –39.8‰ to –15.5‰ depending on the operating mode. Our results imply that there may be considerable variability in real-world δD emissions from vehicle exhaust, which may mainly depend on TWC technology and exhaust temperature regime. This variability is suggestive of a δD from traffic that varies over time, by season, and by geographical location. An earlier-derived integrated pure (end-member δD from anthropogenic activities of –270‰ (Rahn et al., 2002 can be explained as a mixture of mainly vehicle emissions from cold starts and fully functional TWCs, but enhanced δD values by >50‰ are likely for regions where TWC technology is not fully implemented. Our results also suggest that a full hydrogen isotope analysis on fuel and exhaust gas may greatly aid at understanding process-level reactions in the exhaust gas, in particular in the TWC.

  12. Radiogenic heat production in the continental crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaupart, Claude; Mareschal, Jean-Claude; Iarotsky, Lidia

    2016-10-01

    , suggesting an intrinsic thermal control on crustal thickness and heat production distribution. Crustal thickening by more than about 10 km above this mean value induces changes of gravitational potential energy that exceed the strength of the lithosphere. For several provinces where strong constraints on heat production are available, it is shown that, prior to intracrustal fractionation, only modest amounts of thickening were needed to generate the conditions of ultra-high temperature metamorphism. The tell-tale signature of crustal heat production is anatectic and metamorphic events that lag the cessation of orogenic activity by several tens of million years. Crustal heat production is decreasing with time because it is due to the radioactive decay of Uranium Thorium and Potassium. Its rundown is responsible for the secular cooling of lithospheric roots at a typical rate of about 100 K Gy - 1, implying complex thermal interactions with a convecting mantle that is not cooling at the same rate.

  13. Intrinsic biodegradation potential of aromatic hydrocarbons in an alluvial aquifer--potentials and limits of signature metabolite analysis and two stable isotope-based techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morasch, Barbara; Hunkeler, Daniel; Zopfi, Jakob; Temime, Brice; Höhener, Patrick

    2011-10-01

    Three independent techniques were used to assess the biodegradation of monoaromatic hydrocarbons and low-molecular weight polyaromatic hydrocarbons in the alluvial aquifer at the site of a former cokery (Flémalle, Belgium). Firstly, a stable carbon isotope-based field method allowed quantifying biodegradation of monoaromatic compounds in situ and confirmed the degradation of naphthalene. No evidence could be deduced from stable isotope shifts for the intrinsic biodegradation of larger molecules such as methylnaphthalenes or acenaphthene. Secondly, using signature metabolite analysis, various intermediates of the anaerobic degradation of (poly-) aromatic and heterocyclic compounds were identified. The discovery of a novel metabolite of acenaphthene in groundwater samples permitted deeper insights into the anaerobic biodegradation of almost persistent environmental contaminants. A third method, microcosm incubations with 13C-labeled compounds under in situ-like conditions, complemented techniques one and two by providing quantitative information on contaminant biodegradation independent of molecule size and sorption properties. Thanks to stable isotope labels, the sensitivity of this method was much higher compared to classical microcosm studies. The 13C-microcosm approach allowed the determination of first-order rate constants for 13C-labeled benzene, naphthalene, or acenaphthene even in cases when degradation activities were only small. The plausibility of the third method was checked by comparing 13C-microcosm-derived rates to field-derived rates of the first approach. Further advantage of the use of 13C-labels in microcosms is that novel metabolites can be linked more easily to specific mother compounds even in complex systems. This was achieved using alluvial sediments where 13C-acenaphthyl methylsuccinate was identified as transformation product of the anaerobic degradation of acenaphthene.

  14. Lead isotope signatures of Kerguelen plume-derived olivine-hosted melt inclusions: Constraints on the ocean island basalt petrogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisova, Anastassia Y.; Faure, François; Deloule, Etienne; Grégoire, Michel; Béjina, Frédéric; de Parseval, Philippe; Devidal, Jean-Luc

    2014-06-01

    The nature of magmatic sources reflected by isotopic composition of the ocean island basalt (OIB) remains an on-going question in igneous geochemistry. To constrain the magmatic sources for OIB related to the Kerguelen plume activity, we performed detailed microanalytical investigation of the 21.4 Ma picritic basalt (MD109-D6-87) dredged during the “Marion Dufresne” cruise on a seamount between Kerguelen Archipelago and Heard Island. Lead isotope compositions of olivine-hosted melt inclusions and matrix glasses were measured by Laser Ablation Multiple Collector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (LA-MC-ICP-MS) and Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS). We also performed major and trace element microanalyses and mapping of the inclusions and the host olivine phenocrysts by electron microprobe (wavelength-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, WDS). The observed significant major element (K2O/P2O5, Al2O3/TiO2) and Pb isotope (207Pb/206Pb and 208Pb/206Pb) heterogeneities of parental melts (MgO = 7-10 wt.%) during early high pressure crystallisation stage (200-300 MPa, Fo82-86 mol%), and relative homogeneity at later lower-pressure crystallisation stage ( 4), Al2O3/TiO2 (> 4) ratios are attributed to assimilation of the plateau basaltic crust (≥ 50 wt.%) by the melts in the magma chamber at palaeodepths from 6 to 9 km. The crustal assimilation may have happened through plagioclase dissolution. The large chemical and isotopic heterogeneity of the parental OIB melts found by in situ microanalyses in this study suggests that the bulk rock chemistry alone cannot provide enough information to constrain the nature of the magmatic sources.

  15. Multiple sulfur-isotope signatures in Archean sulfates and their implications for the chemistry and dynamics of the early atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Élodie; Philippot, Pascal; Rollion-Bard, Claire; Cartigny, Pierre

    2016-07-01

    Sulfur isotopic anomalies (∆33S and ∆36S) have been used to trace the redox evolution of the Precambrian atmosphere and to document the photochemistry and transport properties of the modern atmosphere. Recently, it was shown that modern sulfate aerosols formed in an oxidizing atmosphere can display important isotopic anomalies, thus questioning the significance of Archean sulfate deposits. Here, we performed in situ 4S-isotope measurements of 3.2- and 3.5-billion-year (Ga)-old sulfates. This in situ approach allows us to investigate the diversity of Archean sulfate texture and mineralogy with unprecedented resolution and from then on to deconvolute the ocean and atmosphere Archean sulfur cycle. A striking feature of our data is a bimodal distribution of δ34S values at ˜+5‰ and +9‰, which is matched by modern sulfate aerosols. The peak at +5‰ represents barite of different ages and host-rock lithology showing a wide range of ∆33S between -1.77‰ and +0.24‰. These barites are interpreted as primary volcanic emissions formed by SO2 photochemical processes with variable contribution of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) shielding in an evolving volcanic plume. The δ34S peak at +9‰ is associated with non-33S-anomalous barites displaying negative ∆36S values, which are best interpreted as volcanic sulfate aerosols formed from OCS photolysis. Our findings confirm the occurrence of a volcanic photochemical pathway specific to the early reduced atmosphere but identify variability within the Archean sulfate isotope record that suggests persistence throughout Earth history of photochemical reactions characteristic of the present-day stratosphere.

  16. The lead (Pb) isotope signature, behaviour and fate of traffic-related lead pollution in roadside soils in The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walraven, N; van Os, B J H; Klaver, G Th; Middelburg, J J; Davies, G R

    2014-02-15

    In this study the origin, behaviour and fate of anthropogenic Pb in sandy roadside soils were assessed by measuring soil characteristics, Pb isotope composition and content. In 1991 and 2003 samples were taken at different depth intervals at approximately 8 and 75 m from two highways in The Netherlands. The Pb isotope composition of the litter layer ((206)Pb/(207)Pb=1.12-1.14) differs from the deeper soil samples ((206)Pb/(207)Pb=1.20-1.21). Based on a mixing model it is concluded that the samples contain two Pb sources: natural Pb and anthropogenic Pb, the latter mainly derived from gasoline. (206)Pb/(207)Pb ratios demonstrate that the roadside soils were polluted to a depth of ~15 cm. Within this depth interval, anthropogenic Pb content is associated with organic matter. Although Pb pollution only reached a depth of ~15 cm, this does not mean that the topsoils retain all anthropogenic Pb. Due to the low pH and negligible binding capacity of soils at depths >15 cm, anthropogenic Pb migrated towards groundwater after reaching depths of >15 cm. The Pb isotope composition of the groundwater ((206)Pb/(207)Pb=1.135-1.185) establishes that groundwater is polluted with anthropogenic Pb. The contribution of anthropogenic Pb to the groundwater varies between ~30 and 100%. Based on the difference in soil Pb content and Pb isotope compositions over a period of 12 years, downward Pb migration is calculated to vary from 72 ± 95 to 324 ± 279 mg m(-2)y(-1). Assuming that the downward Pb flux is constant over time, it is calculated that 35-90% of the atmospherically delivered Pb has migrated to the groundwater.

  17. Stable isotope signatures reflect competitiveness between trees under changed CO{sub 2}/O{sub 3} regimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grams, T.E.E., E-mail: grams@tum.d [Ecophysiology of Plants, Department of Ecology and Ecosystem Sciences, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Hochanger 13, D-85354 Freising (Germany); Matyssek, R. [Ecophysiology of Plants, Department of Ecology and Ecosystem Sciences, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Hochanger 13, D-85354 Freising (Germany)

    2010-04-15

    Here we synthesize key findings from a series of experiments to gain new insight on inter-plant competition between juvenile beech (Fagus sylvatica) and spruce (Picea abies) under the influence of increased O{sub 3} and CO{sub 2} concentrations. Competitiveness of plants was quantified and mechanistically interpreted as space-related resource investments and gains. Stable isotopes were addressed as temporal integrators of plant performance, such as photosynthesis and its relation to water use and nitrogen uptake. In the weaker competitor, beech, efficiency in space-related aboveground resource investment was decreased in competition with spruce and positively related to DELTA{sup 13}C, as well as stomatal conductance, but negatively related to delta{sup 18}O. Likewise, our synthesis revealed that strong belowground competition for water in spruce was paralleled in this species by high N assimilation capacity. We suggest combining the time-integrative potential of stable isotopes with space-related investigations of competitiveness to accomplish mechanistic understanding of plant competition for resources. - Combination of space-related concepts of competitiveness with stable isotopes has potential to clarify mechanisms of competition.

  18. Mapping the isotopic signature of methane in South-Eastern Spain: complementing biogeochemical long-term research with short term observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Àgueda, Alba; Morguí, Josep Anton; Vazquez Garcia, Eusebi; Curcoll, Roger; Lowry, David; Fisher, Rebecca E.; Nisbet, Euan G.

    2016-04-01

    As a greenhouse gas, methane has a global warming potential of 25 in a 100 year scale. In order to establish mitigation plans it is important to assess its sources and sinks which can be both of geological and biological origin. South-Eastern Spain is a region with many different possible methane sources: i) by seismic activity of many geological faults both inland and in the neighbouring marine region (i.e. the Carboneras fault crossing the Alborán Sea along Málaga coastline); ii) by seepage of methane from hydrates present in the marine regions close to the Gibraltar Strait and the Gulf of Cádiz; iii) by emissions from fossil fuels caused by high traffic of merchant ships and the presence of large harbours (Algeciras, Tetuan and Cádiz), and the Africa - Europe Gas Transport Network in the Gibraltar Strait region; iv) by organic matter decomposition in both highly productive marshlands and eutrophic reservoirs; v) by burning of agricultural debris for energy supply, mainly from olive residues. In this study, a methane mapping survey has been conducted in the area around three atmospheric stations of the ClimaDat Atmospheric Network for Continuous Measurements of Greenhouse Gases (www.climadat.es) located in South-Eastern Spain (Sierra de Grazalema (SGC3), Tarifa (EEC3) and Sierra de Segura (SSC3). A cavity ring down spectrometer (CRDS) (G2301m, Picarro®) installed on a car has been used to measure methane concentrations. Additionally, in selected points, air samples have been collected in Tedlar bags for isotopic signature analysis by CF-GC-IRMS (Continuous Flow Gas Chromatography-Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry). In order to obtain a map facilitating the identification of the different methane sources in the background air at regional scale, the mapping of isotopic signature of methane together with its concentration is a useful tool to obtain fast and direct information that will contribute to the knowledge of methane transport at the regional scale and

  19. Stable Isotopic signatures of Adélie penguin remains provide long-term paleodietary records in Northern Victoria Land (Ross Sea, Antarctica)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzini, Sandra; Baroni, Carlo; Fallick, Anthony Edward; Baneschi, Ilaria; Salvatore, Maria Cristina; Zanchetta, Giovanni; Dallai, Luigi

    2010-05-01

    The stable isotopes geochemistry of carbon and nitrogen provides a powerful tools for investigating in animal dietary patterns and shifts during the past. The signature of C and N isotopes provide direct information about the diet of an individual and its dietary patterns, especially when the dietary sources consist of prey from different trophic levels (i.e. different C and N isotopic composition) (DeNiro and Epstein 1978, Minawaga and Wada 1984, Koch et al. 1994, Hobson 1995). By analyzing the isotopic composition of penguin remains, we present a new detailed Adélie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae) paleodietary record for the area of Terra Nova Bay (Victoria Land, Ross Sea). Adélie penguins primarily feed on fish (mainly the silverfish Pleuragramma antarcticum) and krill (Euphausia superba, Euphausia cristallorophias) (Ainley 2002, Lorenzini et al. 2009) that belonging to two different trophic levels. Consequently, they are characterized by different isotopic signatures. Specifically, we analyzed 13C/12C and 15N/14N ratios of more than one thousand of modern and fossil Adélie penguin eggshell and guano samples collected from ornithogenic soils (penguin guano-formed) dated back to ≈7,200 years BP (Baroni and Orombelli 1994, Lambert et al. 2002, Baroni and Hall 2004, Hall et al. 2006). The expanded database of stable isotope values obtained from Adélie penguin remains define a detailed paleodietary record with an excellent temporal continuity over all the investigated time period. Our data indicate a significant dietary shift between fish and krill, with a gradual decrease from past to present time in the proportion of fish compared to krill in Adélie penguin diet. From 7200 yrs BP to 2000 yrs BP, δ13C and δ15N values indicate fish as the most eaten prey. The dietary contribution of lower-trophic prey in penguin diet started becoming evident not earlier than 2000 yrs BP, when the δ13C values reveal a mixed diet based on fish and krill consumption. Modern

  20. Prodigious degassing of a billion years of accumulated radiogenic helium at Yellowstone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowenstern, J B; Evans, W C; Bergfeld, D; Hunt, A G

    2014-02-20

    Helium is used as a critical tracer throughout the Earth sciences, where its relatively simple isotopic systematics is used to trace degassing from the mantle, to date groundwater and to time the rise of continents. The hydrothermal system at Yellowstone National Park is famous for its high helium-3/helium-4 isotope ratio, commonly cited as evidence for a deep mantle source for the Yellowstone hotspot. However, much of the helium emitted from this region is actually radiogenic helium-4 produced within the crust by α-decay of uranium and thorium. Here we show, by combining gas emission rates with chemistry and isotopic analyses, that crustal helium-4 emission rates from Yellowstone exceed (by orders of magnitude) any conceivable rate of generation within the crust. It seems that helium has accumulated for (at least) many hundreds of millions of years in Archaean (more than 2.5 billion years old) cratonic rocks beneath Yellowstone, only to be liberated over the past two million years by intense crustal metamorphism induced by the Yellowstone hotspot. Our results demonstrate the extremes in variability of crustal helium efflux on geologic timescales and imply crustal-scale open-system behaviour of helium in tectonically and magmatically active regions.

  1. The impact of Great Cormorants on biogenic pollution of land ecosystems: Stable isotope signatures in small mammals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balčiauskas, Linas, E-mail: linasbal@ekoi.lt [Nature Research Centre, Akademijos 2, LT-08412 Vilnius (Lithuania); Skipitytė, Raminta, E-mail: raminta.skipityte@ftmc.lt [Nature Research Centre, Akademijos 2, LT-08412 Vilnius (Lithuania); Center for Physical Sciences and Technology, Savanorių 231, LT-02300 Vilnius (Lithuania); Jasiulionis, Marius, E-mail: mjasiulionis@ekoi.lt [Nature Research Centre, Akademijos 2, LT-08412 Vilnius (Lithuania); Trakimas, Giedrius, E-mail: giedrius.trakimas@gf.vu.lt [Center for Ecology and Environmental Research, Vilnius University, Vilnius (Lithuania); Institute of Life Sciences and Technology, Daugavpils University, Parades Str. 1a, Daugavpils, LV-5401 (Latvia); Balčiauskienė, Laima, E-mail: laiba@ekoi.lt [Nature Research Centre, Akademijos 2, LT-08412 Vilnius (Lithuania); Remeikis, Vidmantas, E-mail: vidrem@fi.lt [Center for Physical Sciences and Technology, Savanorių 231, LT-02300 Vilnius (Lithuania)

    2016-09-15

    Studying the isotopic composition of the hair of two rodent species trapped in the territories of Great Cormorant colonies, we aimed to show that Great Cormorants transfer biogens from aquatic ecosystems to terrestrial ecosystems, and that these substances reach small mammals through the trophic cascade, thus influencing the nutrient balance in the terrestrial ecosystem. Analysis of δ{sup 13}C and δ{sup 15}N was performed on two dominant species of small mammals, Apodemus flavicollis and Myodes glareolus, inhabiting the territories of the colonies. For both species, the values of δ{sup 13}C and δ{sup 15}N were higher in the animals trapped in the territories of the colonies than those in control territories. In the hair of A. flavicollis and M. glareolus, the highest values of δ{sup 15}N (16.31 ± 3.01‰ and 17.86 ± 2.76‰, respectively) were determined in those animals trapped in the biggest Great Cormorant colony. δ{sup 15}N values were age dependent, highest in adult A. flavicollis and M. glareolus and lowest in juvenile animals. For δ{sup 13}C values, age-dependent differences were not registered. δ{sup 15}N values in both small mammal species from the biggest Great Cormorant colony show direct dependence on the intensity of influence. Biogenic pollution is at its strongest in the territories of the colonies with nests, significantly diminishing in the ecotones of the colonies and further in the control zones, where the influence of birds is negligible. Thus, Great Cormorant colonies alter ecosystem functioning by enrichment with biogens, with stable isotope values in small mammals significantly higher in the affected territories. - Highlights: • Cormorants transport nutrients from water to land ecosystems and pollute biogenically. • We studied stable isotope composition of small mammal hair in 3 cormorant colonies. • δ{sup 13}C and δ{sup 15}N were measured using elemental analyzer–isotope ratio mass spectrometer. • δ{sup 13}C and

  2. Re-Os isotopic systematics of primitive lavas from the Lassen region of the Cascade arc, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, L.E.; Brandon, A.D.; Clynne, M.A.; Walker, R.J.

    2000-01-01

    Rhenium-osmium isotopic systematics of primitive calc-alkaline lavas from the Lassen region appear to be controlled by mantle wedge processes. Lavas with a large proportion of slab component have relatively low Re and Os abundances, and have radiogenic Os and mid ocean ridge basalt-like Sr and Pb isotopic compositions. Lavas with a small proportion of slab component have higher Re and Os elemental abundances and display mantle-like Os, Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopic compositions. Assimilation with fractional crystallization can only generate the Re-Os systematics of the Lassen lavas from a common parent if the distribution coefficient for Re in sulfide is ~40-1100 times higher than most published estimates and if most incompatible element abundances decrease during differentiation. High Re/Os ratios in mid ocean ridge basalts makes subducted oceanic crust a potential source of radiogenic Os in volcanic arcs. The slab beneath the southernmost Cascades is estimated to have 187Os/188Os ratios as high as 1.4. Mixing between a slab component and mantle wedge peridotite can generate the Os isotopic systematics of the Lassen lavas provided the slab component has a Sr/Os ratio of ~7.5X105 and Os abundances that are 100-600 times higher than mid ocean ridge basalts. For this model to be correct, Os must be readily mobilized and concentrated in the slab component, perhaps as a result of high water and HCl fugacities in this subduction environment. Another possible mechanism to account for the correlation between the magnitude of the subduction geochemical signature and Os isotopic composition involves increasing the stability of an Os-bearing phase in mantle wedge peridotites as a result of fluxing with the slab component. Melting of such a source could yield low Os magmas that are more susceptible to crustal contamination, and hence have more radiogenic Os isotopic compositions, than magmas derived from sources with a smaller contribution from the slab. Thus, the addition of the

  3. Tracking isotopic signatures of CO2 at the high altitude site Jungfraujoch with laser spectroscopy: analytical improvements and representative results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Sturm

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We present the continuous data record of atmospheric CO2 isotopes measured by laser absorption spectroscopy for an almost four year period at the High Altitude Research Station Jungfraujoch (3580 m a.s.l., Switzerland. The mean annual cycles derived from data of December 2008 to September 2012 exhibit peak-to-peak amplitudes of 11.0 μmol mol−1 for CO2, 0.60‰ for δ13C and 0.81‰ for δ18O. The high temporal resolution of the measurements also allow us to capture variations on hourly and diurnal timescales. For CO2 the mean diurnal peak-to-peak amplitude is about 1 μmol mol−1 in spring, autumn and winter and about 2 μmol mol−1 in summer. The mean diurnal variability in the isotope ratios is largest during the summer months too, with an amplitude of about 0.1‰ both in the δ13C and δ18O, and a smaller or no discernible diurnal cycle during the other seasons. The day-to-day variability, however, is much larger and depends on the origin of the air masses arriving at Jungfraujoch. Backward Lagrangian particle dispersion model simulations revealed a close link between air composition and prevailing transport regimes and could be used to explain part of the observed variability in terms of transport history and influence region. A footprint clustering showed significantly different wintertime CO2, δ13C and δ18O values depending on the origin and surface residence times of the air masses. Several major updates on the instrument and the calibration procedures were performed in order to further improve the data quality. We describe the new measurement and calibration setup in detail and demonstrate the enhanced performance of the analyzer. A measurement precision of about 0.02‰ for both isotope ratios has been obtained for an averaging time of 10 min, while the accuracy was estimated to be 0.1‰, including the uncertainty of the calibration gases.

  4. Developmental and spatial variations in the diet signatures of hyperbenthic shrimp Nauticaris marionis at the Prince Edward Islands based on stable isotope ratios and fatty acid profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richoux, Nicole B.; Allan, E. Louise; Froneman, P. William

    2016-04-01

    The caridean shrimp Nauticaris marionis is an ecologically important species in the benthic community around the sub-Antarctic Prince Edward Islands (PEI) as it represents a key prey item for a variety of top predators breeding on the islands. We hypothesized that the diet of N. marionis shifts during its development, and that spatial variability in food availability results in differentiation in the diet signatures of specimens collected from various locations of the shelf waters around the PEI. Specimens were collected from nine stations (depth range 70 to 240 m) around the PEI at inter-island shelf (from west to east: upstream, between and downstream) and nearshore regions during austral autumn 2009. Stable isotope and fatty acid data both revealed spatial and developmental variations in the shrimp diet. Nearshore shrimp were more 13C-enriched than those from the inter-island region, suggesting increased kelp detritus entered the food web in the nearshore regions. The shrimp showed increases in δ13C and δ15N signatures (and trophic position) with an increase in body size, resulting in distinctions between size classes that reflected shifts in their trophic niche through development. The fatty acid profiles similarly indicated distinctions in diet with increased shrimp size (in the deep regions), and spatial variability was evident in relation to region and depth. All shrimp contained large proportions of polyunsaturated and essential fatty acids, indicating that the quality of food consumed was similar between regions despite the diet variability. Our results provide new dietary information about a key species operating near the base of the food web at the highly productive PEI, and show that there were no areas of enhanced nutrition available to the shrimp. As such, there was no nutritional advantage to shrimp inhabiting any specific region around the PEI.

  5. The role of soil biogeochemistry in wine taste: Soil factors influencing grape elemental composition, photosynthetic biomarkers and Cu/Zn isotopic signature of Vitis vinifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blotevogel, Simon; Oliva, Priscia; Darrozes, José; Viers, Jérôme; Audry, Stéphane; Courjault-Radé, Pierre; Orgogozo, Laurent; Le Guedard, Marina; Schreck, Eva

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the influence of soil composition in wine taste is of great economic and environmental interest in France and around the world. Nevertheless the impact of soil composition on wine taste is still controversially discussed. Since inorganic soil components do not have a proper taste and do not enter the plant anyway, their influence needs to be induced by nutrient absorption and its impact on plant functioning and grape composition. Indeed recent development of geological tracers of origin proof the existence of soil chemical and isotopic signatures in wine. However, type and scale of the impact of soil composition on wine taste are not well understood yet, and little experimental evidence exists due to the complexity of mechanisms involved. Thus, to provide evidence for the impact of soil composition on grape composition and potentially wine taste, we studied soil and plant material from two relevant vineyards (Soave, Italia). On those two directly adjacent vineyards, two different wines are produced with the same plant material and cultivation techniques. The vineyards only differ by their underlying bedrock - limestone versus basaltic rock - and thus present suitable conditions for investigating the impact of soil composition on grapes and wine. Pedological and mineralogical parameters were analyzed for the two vineyards whereas chemical extractions (citrate, CaCl2) were performed to determine nutrient bioavailability in both soils. Elemental compositions were determined by ICP-MS analyses in different compartments (soils, vine leaves and grapes). Isotopic fractionation of Cu and Zn was investigated in various samples as source tracers and in order to better understand fractionation mechanisms involved. Finally, plant health was studied using the Omega-3 biomarker which determines the fatty acid composition in vine leaves, directly involved in photosynthetic processes. Results show that the vineyards are characterized by two different soil types due

  6. The impact of Great Cormorants on biogenic pollution of land ecosystems: Stable isotope signatures in small mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balčiauskas, Linas; Skipitytė, Raminta; Jasiulionis, Marius; Trakimas, Giedrius; Balčiauskienė, Laima; Remeikis, Vidmantas

    2016-09-15

    Studying the isotopic composition of the hair of two rodent species trapped in the territories of Great Cormorant colonies, we aimed to show that Great Cormorants transfer biogens from aquatic ecosystems to terrestrial ecosystems, and that these substances reach small mammals through the trophic cascade, thus influencing the nutrient balance in the terrestrial ecosystem. Analysis of δ(13)C and δ(15)N was performed on two dominant species of small mammals, Apodemus flavicollis and Myodes glareolus, inhabiting the territories of the colonies. For both species, the values of δ(13)C and δ(15)N were higher in the animals trapped in the territories of the colonies than those in control territories. In the hair of A. flavicollis and M. glareolus, the highest values of δ(15)N (16.31±3.01‰ and 17.86±2.76‰, respectively) were determined in those animals trapped in the biggest Great Cormorant colony. δ(15)N values were age dependent, highest in adult A. flavicollis and M. glareolus and lowest in juvenile animals. For δ(13)C values, age-dependent differences were not registered. δ(15)N values in both small mammal species from the biggest Great Cormorant colony show direct dependence on the intensity of influence. Biogenic pollution is at its strongest in the territories of the colonies with nests, significantly diminishing in the ecotones of the colonies and further in the control zones, where the influence of birds is negligible. Thus, Great Cormorant colonies alter ecosystem functioning by enrichment with biogens, with stable isotope values in small mammals significantly higher in the affected territories. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Contributions of detrital subsidies to aboveground spiders during secondary succession, revealed by radiocarbon and stable isotope signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraguchi, Takashi F; Uchida, Masao; Shibata, Yasuyuki; Tayasu, Ichiro

    2013-04-01

    Prey subsidies originating from detritus add nutrients and energy to arboreal communities. Measurement of this subsidy is required in the understanding of how food web dynamics respond to changes in surrounding environments. Shrub spiders are one of the key predators involved in food web coupling. We evaluate the effects of potential changes in prey availabilities during secondary succession on the contribution of subsidy from detrital food webs to shrub spiders and how different spider feeding guilds used the subsidy of prey from detrital food webs. We measured the relative importance of the subsidy for the spider feeding guilds, using the ratios of stable isotopes of C (δ(13)C), and N (δ(15)N) and C isotope discrimination (Δ(14)C). Diet age was calculated from Δ(14)C values, because old diet ages of spiders indicate that the spiders consume prey from detrital food sources. Dominant aerial prey (Diptera) had a distinctively old diet age compared with arboreal prey, which indicates that aerial prey were subsidized from detrital food webs. Sit-and-wait spiders tended to have an older diet age than active hunting spiders, which indicates that sit-and-wait spiders depended more on subsidies. Diet age varied only slightly for spiders in stands of different ages, indicating that rates at which spiders use grazing and detrital prey are probably determined more by foraging strategies and not by stand age. A dominance of sit-and-wait predators will lead to higher detrital subsidy inputs in shrub habitats. This study highlights the effect of shrub spider community structure (feeding guild composition) on the volume of the subsidy received from the detrital food web.

  8. An analysis of diet quality, how it controls fatty acid profiles, isotope signatures and stoichiometry in the malaria mosquito Anopheles arabiensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Hood-Nowotny

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Knowing the underlying mechanisms of mosquito ecology will ensure effective vector management and contribute to the overall goal of malaria control. Mosquito populations show a high degree of population plasticity in response to environmental variability. However, the principle factors controlling population size and fecundity are for the most part unknown. Larval habitat and diet play a crucial role in subsequent mosquito fitness. Developing the most competitive insects for sterile insect technique programmes requires a "production" orientated perspective, to deduce the most effective larval diet formulation; the information gained from this process offers us some insight into the mechanisms and processes taking place in natural native mosquito habitats. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Fatty acid profiles and de-novo or direct assimilation pathways, of whole-individual mosquitoes reared on a range of larval diets were determined using pyrolysis gas chromatograph/mass spectrometry. We used elemental analysis and isotope ratio mass spectrometry to measure individual-whole-body carbon, nitrogen and phosphorous values and to assess the impact of dietary quality on subsequent population stoichiometry, size, quality and isotopic signature. Diet had the greatest impact on fatty acid (FA profiles of the mosquitoes, which exhibited a high degree of dietary routing, characteristic of generalist feeders. De-novo synthesis of a number of important FAs was observed. Mosquito C:N stoichiometry was fixed in the teneral stage. Dietary N content had significant influence on mosquito size, and P was shown to be a flexible pool which limited overall population size. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Direct routing of FAs was evident but there was ubiquitous de-novo synthesis suggesting mosquito larvae are competent generalist feeders capable of survival on diet with varying characteristics. It was concluded that nitrogen availability in the larval diet

  9. Isotopic signatures associated with growth and metabolic activities of chemosynthetic nitrate-reducing microbes from deep-sea hydrothermal vents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Rodriguez, I. M.; Foustoukos, D.; Fogel, M. L.; Sievert, S. M.

    2013-12-01

    Epsilonproteobacteria and Aquificaceae have been identified as dominant members of microbial communities at deep-sea hydrothermal vents. Cultured representatives from these two groups appear to be mostly genetically wired to perform chemosynthesis at moderate-to-high temperatures (45 - 80oC) under anaerobic and sulfidic conditions. In this study we used Caminibacter mediatlanticus and Thermovibrio ammonificans as model organisms to constrain physiological parameters associated with dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) in deep-sea vent Epsilonproteobacteria and Aquificaceae. We postulate that nitrate-based metabolic processes are of relevance for understanding primary production as well as nitrate mobilization in deep-sea vents. By constraining growth and respiration rates during DNRA, we observed that C. mediatlanticus achieved higher cell densities than T. ammonificans while exhibiting similar growth rates. DNRA kinetic rate constants and cell-specific nitrate reduction rates (csNRR) obtained from our data showed that within similar time frames T. ammonificans used 2.5 to 3 times as much nitrate than C. mediatlanticus and it did so ~3 times faster. However, the increased consumption of nitrate in T. ammonificans did not translate into higher growth yield. This is suggestive of either differential efficiencies in energy generating pathways or differential organic matter production (cell biomass versus extracellular organic material) associated with DNRA in these microorganisms. Nitrogen isotope fractionation for nitrate was similar for both organisms, with discrimination factors of ~ -5 to -6‰ for C. mediatlanticus and ~ -7 to -8‰ for T. ammonificans. Similar experiments performed under high hydrostatic pressure conditions (50 and 200 bar) showed that changes in pressure greatly affected both growth rates and DNRA kinetic rate constants in both microorganisms, however, δ15N discrimination factors for nitrate were not affected. This study provides

  10. Molecular hydrogen (H2 combustion emissions and their isotope (D/H signatures from domestic heaters, diesel vehicle engines, waste incinerator plants, and biomass burning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Röckmann

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Molecular hydrogen (H2, its stable isotope signature (δD, and the key combustion parameters carbon monoxide (CO, carbon dioxide (CO2, and methane (CH4 were measured from various combustion processes. H2 in the exhaust of gas and oil-fired heaters and of waste incinerator plants was generally depleted compared to ambient intake air, while CO was significantly elevated. These findings contradict the often assumed co-occurring net H2 and CO emissions in combustion processes and suggest that previous H2 emissions from combustion may have been overestimated when scaled to CO emissions. For the heater exhausts, H2 and δD generally decrease with increasing fuel-to-air ratio, from ambient values of ∼0.5 ppm and +130‰ to 0.2 ppm and −206‰, respectively. These results are interpreted as a combination of an isotopically light H2 source from fossil fuel combustion and a D/H kinetic isotope fractionation of hydrogen in the advected ambient air during its partial removal during combustion. Diesel exhaust measurements from dynamometer test stand driving cycles show elevated H2 and CO emissions during cold-start and some acceleration phases. Their molar H2/CO ratios are 2/CO emission ratios, along with CO global emission inventories, we estimate global H2 emissions for 2000, 2005, and 2010. For road transportation (gasoline and diesel, we calculate 8.6 ± 2.1 Tg, 6.3 ± 1.5 Tg, and 4.1 ± 1.0 Tg, respectively, whereas the contribution from diesel vehicles has increased from 5% to 8% over this time. Other fossil fuel emissions are believed to be negligible but H2 emissions from coal combustion are unknown. For residential (domestic emissions, which are likely dominated by biofuel combustion, emissions for the same years are estimated at 2.7 ± 0.7 Tg, 2.8 ± 0.7 Tg, and 3.0 ± 0.8 Tg, respectively. Our wood combustion measurements are combined with results from the literature to calculate biomass burning emissions. For these estimates, we propose a

  11. Monitoring the bio-stimulation of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils by measurements of soil electrical properties, and CO2 content and its 13C/12C isotopic signature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel, C.; Gourry, J.; Ignatiadis, I.; Colombano, S.; Dictor, M.; Guimbaud, C.; Chartier, M.; Dumestre, A.; Dehez, S.; Naudet, V.

    2013-12-01

    Hydrocarbon contaminated soils represent an environmental issue as it impacts on ecosystems and aquifers. Where significant subsurface heterogeneity exists, conventional intrusive investigations and groundwater sampling can be insufficient to obtain a robust monitoring of hydrocarbon contaminants, as the information they provide is restricted to vertical profiles at discrete locations, with no information between sampling points. In order to obtain wider information in space volume on subsurface modifications, complementary methods can be used like geophysics. Among geophysical methods, geoelectrical techniques such as electrical resistivity (ER) and induced polarization (IP) seem the more promising, especially to study the effects of biodegradation processes. Laboratory and field geoelectrical experiments to characterize soils contaminated by oil products have shown that mature hydrocarbon-contaminated soils are characterized by enhanced electrical conductivity although hydrocarbons are electrically resistive. This high bulk conductivity is due to bacterial impacts on geological media, resulting in changes in the chemical and physical properties and thus, to the geophysical properties of the ground. Moreover, microbial activity induced CO2 production and isotopic deviation of carbon. Indeed, produced CO2 will reflect the pollutant isotopic signature. Thus, the ratio δ13C(CO2) will come closer to δ13C(hydrocarbon). BIOPHY, project supported by the French National Research Agency (ANR), proposes to use electrical methods and gas analyses to develop an operational and non-destructive method for monitoring in situ biodegradation of hydrocarbons in order to optimize soil treatment. Demonstration field is located in the South of Paris (France), where liquid fuels (gasoline and diesel) leaked from some tanks in 1997. In order to stimulate biodegradation, a trench has been dug to supply oxygen to the water table and thus stimulate aerobic metabolic bioprocesses. ER and

  12. Nitrogen deposition to lakes in national parks of the western Great Lakes region: Isotopic signatures, watershed retention, and algal shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, William O.; Lafrancois, Brenda Moraska; Stottlemyer, Robert; Toczydlowski, David; Engstrom, Daniel R.; Edlund, Mark B.; Almendinger, James E.; Strock, Kristin E.; VanderMeulen, David; Elias, Joan E.; Saros, Jasmine E.

    2016-03-01

    Atmospheric deposition is a primary source of reactive nitrogen (Nr) to undisturbed watersheds of the Great Lakes region of the U.S., raising concerns over whether enhanced delivery over recent decades has affected lake ecosystems. The National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP) has been measuring Nr deposition in this region for over 35 years. Here we explore the relationships among NADP-measured Nr deposition, nitrogen stable isotopes (δ15N) in lake sediments, and the response of algal communities in 28 lakes situated in national parks of the western Great Lakes region of the U.S. We find that 36% of the lakes preserve a sediment δ15N record that is statistically correlated with some form of Nr deposition (total dissolved inorganic N, nitrate, or ammonium). Furthermore, measured long-term (since 1982) nitrogen biogeochemistry and inferred critical nitrogen loads suggest that watershed nitrogen retention and climate strongly affect whether sediment δ15N is related to Nr deposition in lake sediment records. Measurements of algal change over the last ~ 150 years suggest that Nr deposition, in-lake nutrient cycling, and watershed inputs are important factors affecting diatom community composition, in addition to direct climatic effects on lake physical limnology. The findings suggest that bulk sediment δ15N does reflect Nr deposition in some instances. In addition, this study highlights the interactive effects of Nr deposition and climate variability.

  13. Enantiomer signature and carbon isotope evidence for the migration and transformation of DDTs in arable soils across China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Lili; Xu, Chao; Zhu, Siyu; Bao, Huiming; Xu, Yang; Li, Hongyi; Zhang, Zhijian; Zhang, Xichang; Qiu, Jiguo; Liu, Weiping

    2016-12-01

    Due to the adverse impact of DDTs on ecosystems and humans, a full fate assessment deems a comprehensive study on their occurrence in soils over a large region. Through a sampling campaign across China, we measured the concentrations, enantiomeric fractions (EFs), compound-specific carbon isotope composition of DDT and its metabolites, and the microbial community in related arable soils. The geographically total DDT concentrations are higher in eastern than western China. The EFs and δ13C of o,p’-DDT in soils from western China show smaller deviations from those of racemic/standard compound, indicating the DDT residues there mainly result from atmospheric transport. However, the sources of DDT in eastern China are mainly from historic application of technical DDTs and dicofol. The inverse dependence of o,p’-DDT and p,p’-DDE on temperature evidences the transformation of parent DDT to its metabolites. Initial usage, abiotic parameters and microbial communities are found to be the main factors influencing the migration and transformation of DDT isomers and their metabolites in soils. In addition, a prediction equation of DDT concentrations in soils based on stepwise multiple regression analysis is developed. Results from this study offer insights into the migration and transformation pathways of DDTs in Chinese arable soils, which will allow data-based risk assessment on their use.

  14. Recovery of nitrogen stable isotope signatures in the food web of an intermittently open estuary following removal of wastewater loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Phoebe E.; Oakes, Joanne M.; Eyre, Bradley D.

    2016-12-01

    Nitrogen (N) stable isotope values (δ15N) were used to assess the removal of wastewater N from the food web within Tallow Creek, a small intermittently closed/open lake/lagoon (ICOLL) on the east coast of Australia, following the cessation of wastewater inputs in 2005. Current (2013) δ15N values of sediment organic carbon, plants, and animals within Tallow Creek were compared to values obtained before wastewater inputs ceased, and to values within a nearby near-pristine ICOLL (Jerusalem Creek). Most biota had significantly depleted δ15N values compared to conspecifics collected before wastewater inputs ceased (mean reduction of 6.0‰; 38% of impacted enrichment), indicating substantial loss of wastewater N since inputs ceased. However, δ15N values remained enriched compared to the near-pristine ICOLL for some components (mean enrichment of 3.3‰ or 38%), suggesting that some wastewater N remains. The δ15N recovery rate (decrease in δ15N as a percentage of the impacted enrichment) for Tallow Creek biota was slow compared to that of biota in more open systems. This slow recovery rate and the persistence of some wastewater N, even after 8 years without new inputs, reflects differences in hydrology and nitrogen cycling between permanently open and intermittently open estuarine systems and highlights the likely lower resilience of ICOLLs to anthropogenic N inputs.

  15. Century-long source apportionment of PAHs in Athabasca oil sands region lakes using diagnostic ratios and compound-specific carbon isotope signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jautzy, Josué; Ahad, Jason M E; Gobeil, Charles; Savard, Martine M

    2013-06-18

    Evaluating the impact that airborne contamination associated with Athabasca oil sands (AOS) mining operations has on the surrounding boreal forest ecosystem requires a rigorous approach to source discrimination. This study presents a century-long historical record of source apportionment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in dated sediments from two headwater lakes located approximately 40 and 55 km east from the main area of open pit mining activities. Concentrations of the 16 Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) priority PAHs in addition to retene, dibenzothiophene (DBT), and six alkylated groups were measured, and both PAH molecular diagnostic ratios and carbon isotopic signatures (δ(13)C) of individual PAHs were used to differentiate natural from anthropogenic inputs. Although concentrations of PAHs in these lakes were low and below the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment (CCME) guidelines, diagnostic ratios pointed to an increasingly larger input of petroleum-derived (i.e., petrogenic) PAHs over the past 30 years concomitant with δ(13)C values progressively shifting to the value of unprocessed AOS bitumen. This petrogenic source is attributed to the deposition of bitumen in dust particles associated with wind erosion from open pit mines.

  16. Determination of bovine lactoferrin in dairy products by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry based on tryptic signature peptides employing an isotope-labeled winged peptide as internal standard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jingshun [Zhejiang Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Hangzhou 310051 (China); Lai, Shiyun [Beingmate Research Institute, Beingmate Baby and Child Food Co., Ltd., Hangzhou 310007 (China); Cai, Zengxuan [Zhejiang Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Hangzhou 310051 (China); Chen, Qi [Beingmate Research Institute, Beingmate Baby and Child Food Co., Ltd., Hangzhou 310007 (China); Huang, Baifen [Zhejiang Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Hangzhou 310051 (China); Ren, Yiping, E-mail: renyiping@263.net [Zhejiang Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Hangzhou 310051 (China)

    2014-06-01

    Highlights: • A UHPLC–MS/MS method for quantification of bovine lactoferrin was developed. • Tryptic fragment LRPVAAEIYGTK was chosen as signature peptide of bovine lactoferrin. • A winged peptide containing isotopically-labeled signature peptide was designed as internal standard. • The method for determining lactoferrin does not discriminate between the different forms of lactoferrin. • Meet the growing demand to quantify bovine lactoferrin in different dairy products. Abstract: A new and sensitive determination method was developed for bovine lactoferrin in dairy products including infant formulas based on the signature peptide by ultra high-performance liquid chromatography and triple-quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry under the multiple reaction monitoring mode. The simple pretreatment procedures included the addition of a winged peptide containing the isotope-labeled signature peptide as internal standard, followed by an enzymatic digestion with trypsin. The signature peptide was chosen and identified from the tryptic hydrolyzates of bovine lactoferrin by ultra high-performance liquid chromatography and quadrupole-time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry based on sequence database search. Analytes were separated on an ACQUITY UPLC BEH 300 C18 column and monitored by MS/MS in seven minutes. Quantitative result bias due to matrix effect and tryptic efficiency was corrected through the use of synthetic isotope-labeled standards. The limit of detection and limit of quantification were 0.3 mg/100 g and 1.0 mg/100 g, respectively. Bovine lactoferrin within the concentration range of 10–1000 nmol L⁻¹ showed a strong linear relationship with a linear correlation coefficient (r) of >0.998. The intra- and inter-day precision of the method were RSD < 6.5% and RSD < 7.1%, respectively. Excellent repeatability (RSD < 6.4%) substantially supported the application of this method for the determination of bovine lactoferrin in dairy samples. The present method

  17. Quasi – biological model of radiogenic cancer morbidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. T. Gubin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The methods: Linear differential equations were used to formalize contemporary assumptions of self –sustaining tissue cell kinetics under the impact of adverse factors, on the formation and repairing of cell “pre-cancer” defects, on inheritance and retaining such defects in daughter cells which results in malignant neoplasms, on age-dependent impairment of human body’s function to eliminate such cells.The results: The model reproduces the well-known regularities of radiogenic cancer morbidity increase depending on instantaneous radiation exposure age and on attained age: the relative reduction at increased radiation age which the model attributes to age decrease of stem cells, relative reduction at increased time after radiation induced by “sorting out” of cells with “pre-cancer” defects, absolute increase with age proportional to natural cause mortality rate.The relevance of the developed quasi-biological model is displayed via comparison to the ICRP model for radiogenic increase of solid carcinomas’ morbidity after single radiation exposure. The latter model had been developed after Japanese cohort observations. For both genders high goodness-of-fit was achieved between the models at values of Gompertz’ law factor which had been defined for men and women in this cohort via selecting the value of the only free parameter indicating age-dependent exponential retardation of stem cells’ division.The conclusion: The proposed model suggests that the estimation of radiogenic risk inter-population transfer can be done on the basis of the data on age-dependent mortality intensity increase from all natural causes. The model also creates the premises for inter-species transfer of risk following the well-known parameters of cell populations’ kinetics in animal’s organs and tissues and Gompertz’s law parameters. This model is applicable also for analyses of age-dependent changes of background cancer morbidity. 

  18. Isotopic disequilibrium and lower crustal contamination in slowly ascending magmas: Insights from Proterozoic anorthosites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bybee, G. M.; Ashwal, L. D.

    2015-10-01

    disequilibrium geometries cannot be explained by melting of the lower crust. Assimilation of crust with distinctive Sr, Nd and Pb isotopic compositions does, however, explain the origin of decoupling in internal mineral isotopic compositions. We also find unexpected patterns of internal isotopic disequilibrium, such as isotopically radiogenic orthopyroxene relative to plagioclase and differences in plagioclase isotopic disequilibrium between orthopyroxene- and olivine-bearing samples. These various lines of evidence provide strong support for the generation of crustal isotopic signatures through assimilation, and not anatexis, of the lower crust. These isotopic data show that anorthosite petrogenesis likely involves significant differentiation and solidification at lower crustal depths, followed by ascent of high-crystallinity bodies (⩾50% crystallinity) to mid- or upper crustal levels. We show that protracted lower crustal differentiation imparts a clear chemical and isotopic signature on mantle-derived magmas of Proterozoic anorthosites and that this process is central in the development of such slowly ascending, plagioclase-rich magmas.

  19. Signature lipids and stable carbon isotope analyses of Octopus Spring hyperthermophilic communities compared with those of Aquificales representatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahnke, L. L.; Eder, W.; Huber, R.; Hope, J. M.; Hinrichs, K. U.; Hayes, J. M.; Des Marais, D. J.; Cady, S. L.; Summons, R. E.

    2001-01-01

    The molecular and isotopic compositions of lipid biomarkers of cultured Aquificales genera have been used to study the community and trophic structure of the hyperthermophilic pink streamers and vent biofilm from Octopus Spring. Thermocrinis ruber, Thermocrinis sp. strain HI 11/12, Hydrogenobacter thermophilus TK-6, Aquifex pyrophilus, and Aquifex aeolicus all contained glycerol-ether phospholipids as well as acyl glycerides. The n-C(20:1) and cy-C(21) fatty acids dominated all of the Aquificales, while the alkyl glycerol ethers were mainly C(18:0). These Aquificales biomarkers were major constituents of the lipid extracts of two Octopus Spring samples, a biofilm associated with the siliceous vent walls, and the well-known pink streamer community (PSC). Both the biofilm and the PSC contained mono- and dialkyl glycerol ethers in which C(18) and C(20) alkyl groups were prevalent. Phospholipid fatty acids included both the Aquificales n-C(20:1) and cy-C(21), plus a series of iso-branched fatty acids (i-C(15:0) to i-C(21:0)), indicating an additional bacterial component. Biomass and lipids from the PSC were depleted in (13)C relative to source water CO(2) by 10.9 and 17.2 per thousand, respectively. The C(20-21) fatty acids of the PSC were less depleted than the iso-branched fatty acids, 18.4 and 22.6 per thousand, respectively. The biomass of T. ruber grown on CO(2) was depleted in (13)C by only 3.3 per thousand relative to C source. In contrast, biomass was depleted by 19.7 per thousand when formate was the C source. Independent of carbon source, T. ruber lipids were heavier than biomass (+1.3 per thousand). The depletion in the C(20-21) fatty acids from the PSC indicates that Thermocrinis biomass must be similarly depleted and too light to be explained by growth on CO(2). Accordingly, Thermocrinis in the PSC is likely to have utilized formate, presumably generated in the spring source region.

  20. Climate and root proximity as dominant drivers of enzyme activity and C and N isotopic signature in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Svenja; Köster, Moritz; Dippold, Michaela; Boy, Jens; Matus, Francisco; Merino, Carolina; Nájera, Francisco; Spielvogel, Sandra; Gorbushina, Anna; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2017-04-01

    The Chilean ecosystems provide a unique study area to investigate biotic controls on soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition and mineral weathering depending on climate (from hyper arid to temperate humid). Microorganisms play a crucial role in the SOM decomposition, nutrient release and cycling. By means of extracellular enzymes microorganisms break down organic compounds and provide nutrients for plants. Soil moisture (abiotic factor) and root carbon (biotic factor providing easily available energy source for microorganisms), are important factors for microbial decomposition of SOM and show strong gradients along the investigated climatic gradient. A high input of root carbon increases microbial activity and enzyme production, and facilitates SOM breakdown and nutrient release The aim of this study was to determine the potential enzymatic SOM decomposition and nutrient release depending on root proximity and precipitation. C and N contents, δ13C and δ15N values, and kinetics (Vmax, Km) of six extracellular enzymes, responsible for C, N, and P cycles, were quantified in vertical (soil depth) and horizontal (from roots to bulk soil) gradients in two climatic regions: within a humid temperate forest and a semiarid open forest. The greater productivity of the temperate forest was reflected by higher C and N contents compared to the semiarid forest. Regression lines between δ13C and -[ln(%C)] showed a stronger isotopic fractionation from top- to subsoil at the semiarid open forest, indicating a faster SOM turnover compared to the humid temperate forest. This is the result of more favorable soil conditions (esp. temperature and smaller C/N ratios) in the semiarid forest. Depth trends of δ15N values indicated N limitation in both soils, though the limitation at the temperate site was stronger. The activity of enzymes degrading cellulose and hemicellulose increased with C content. Activity of enzymes involved in C, N and P cycles decreased from top- to subsoil and

  1. Biomarker and stable carbon isotopic signatures for 100–200 year sediment record in the Chaihe catchment in southwest China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yanhua, E-mail: wangyanhua@njnu.edu.cn [School of Geography Science, Nanjing Normal University, 1 Wenyuan Road, Qixia, Nanjing 210023 (China); Jiangsu Center for Collaborative Innovation in Geographical Information Resource Development and Application (China); Yang, Hao [School of Geography Science, Nanjing Normal University, 1 Wenyuan Road, Qixia, Nanjing 210023 (China); Jiangsu Center for Collaborative Innovation in Geographical Information Resource Development and Application (China); Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory of Materials Cycling and Pollution Control (China); Zhang, Jixiang [College of Economics and Management, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, 29 Yudao Street, Baixia, Nanjing 210016 (China); Xu, Meina; Wu, Changbin [School of Geography Science, Nanjing Normal University, 1 Wenyuan Road, Qixia, Nanjing 210023 (China)

    2015-01-01

    Natural inputs and anthropogenic influences on lakes and their catchments are reflected in the sediment record. In the present study, the extractable organic compounds from sediments in the Chaihe catchment of the Dianchi watershed were analyzed to characterize source inputs. Results show that the sediments are dominated by odd numbered n-alkanes (n-C{sub 16}–n-C{sub 33}), maximizing at n-C{sub 17}, n-C{sub 29} and n-C{sub 31}. Aliphatic hydrocarbon may be composed of terrestrial plants and bacteria. The values of δ{sup 13}C{sub 27}, δ{sup 13}C{sub 29} and δ{sup 13}C{sub 31} of n-alkanes exhibit a range from − 33.27‰ to − 25.46‰, from − 35.76‰ to − 28.47‰ and from − 33.67‰ to − 27.42‰, respectively and three records strongly covary with depth, falling within the range of C{sub 3} plants in the study area. An isotopic model revealed C{sub 3} plant contribution to sedimentary organic matter (OM) ranging from 40.75% to 97.22%. The values of ACL{sub 27–33}, CPI{sub 27–33}, OEP, Paq, Pr/Ph, (C{sub 27} + C{sub 29})/2C{sub 31}, (C{sub 21} + C{sub 23} + C{sub 25})/3C{sub 17} and nC{sub 26}{sup −}/nC{sub 27}{sup +} are consistent with the C{sub 3} plant predominance. A constant CRS model gave the accumulation rates ranging from 2.69 to 8.46 mm a{sup −1} spanning 1885–2010. It was concluded that OM transport in the Chaihe catchment was influenced strongly by human activities resulting in enhanced eutrophication. - Highlights: • Strong predominance of odd-numbered n-alkanes maximized at n-C{sub 17}, n-C{sub 29} and n-C{sub 31} • Sedimentary OM in the Chaihe catchment was deduced mainly from C{sub 3} plants. • Human activities enhanced OM transport, resulting in worse ecosystem.

  2. Radiogenic transformation of human mammary epithelial cells in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, T. C.; Georgy, K. A.; Tavakoli, A.; Craise, L. M.; Durante, M.

    1996-01-01

    Cancer induction by space radiations is a major concern for manned space exploration. Accurate assessment of radiation risk at low doses requires basic understanding of mechanism(s) of radiation carcinogenesis. For determining the oncogenic effects of ionizing radiation in human epithelial cells, we transformed a mammary epithelial cell line (185B5), which was immortalized by benzo(a)pyrene, with energetic heavy ions and obtained several transformed clones. These transformed cells showed growth properties on Matrigel similar to human mammary tumor cells. To better understand the mechanisms of radiogenic transformation of human cells, we systematically examined the alterations in chromosomes and cancer genes. Among 16 autosomes examined for translocations, by using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique, chromosomes 3, 12, 13, 15, 16, and 18 appeared to be normal in transformed cells. Chromosomes 1, 4, 6, 8, and 17 in transformed cells, however, showed patterns different from those in nontransformed cells. Southern blot analyses indicated no detectable alterations in myc, ras, Rb, or p53 genes. Further studies of chromosome 17 by using in situ hybridization with unique sequence p53 gene probe and a centromere probe showed no loss of p53 gene in transformed cells. Experimental results from cell fusion studies indicated that the transforming gene(s) is recessive. The role of genomic instability and tumor suppressor gene(s) in radiogenic transformation of human breast cells remains to be identified.

  3. Entropy-information perspective to radiogenic heat distribution in continental crust

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, R N; Manglik, A.

    2013-01-01

    Depth distribution of radiogenic heat sources in continental crust is an important parameter that controls its thermal structure as well as the mantle heat flow at the base of continental lithosphere. Various models for the depth distribution of radiogenic heat sources have been proposed. Starting from constant and exponential models based on linear heat flow–heat generation relationship the present-day layered models integrate crustal structure and laboratory measurements of radiogenic heat ...

  4. Lipid biomarkers for anaerobic oxidation of methane and sulphate reduction in cold seep sediments of Nyegga pockmarks (Norwegian margin): discrepancies in contents and carbon isotope signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, Nicolas; Bouloubassi, Ioanna; Stadnitskaia, Alina; Taphanel, Marie-Hélène; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.

    2014-06-01

    Distributions and carbon isotopic compositions of microbial lipid biomarkers were investigated in sediment cores from the G11 and G12 pockmarks in the Nyegga sector of the Storegga Slide on the mid-Norwegian margin to explore differences in depth zonation, type and carbon assimilation mode of anaerobic methane-oxidizing archaea (ANMEs) and associated sulphate-reducing bacteria responsible for anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) in these cold seep environments. While the G11 site is characterised by black reduced sediments colonized by gastropods and Siboglinidae tubeworms, the G12 site has black reduced sediments devoid of fauna but surrounded by a peripheral occurrence of gastropods and white filamentous microbial mats. At both sites, bulk sediments contained abundant archaeal and bacterial lipid biomarkers substantially depleted in 13C, consisting mainly of isoprenoidal hydrocarbons and dialkyl glycerol diethers, fatty acids and non-isoprenoidal monoalkylglycerol ethers. At the G11 site, down-core profiles revealed that lipid biomarkers were in maximum abundance from 10 cm depth to the core bottom at 16 cm depth, associated with δ13C values of -57 to -136‰. At the G12 site, by contrast, lipid biomarkers were in high abundance in the upper 5 cm sediment layer, associated with δ13C values of -43 to -133‰. This suggests that, as expected from the benthic fauna characteristics of the sites, AOM takes place mainly at depth in the G11 pockmark but just below the seafloor in the G12 pockmark. These patterns can be explained largely by variable fluid flow rates. Furthermore, at both sites, a dominance of ANME-2 archaea accompanied by their bacterial partners is inferred based on lipid biomarker distributions and carbon isotope signatures, which is in agreement with recently published DNA analyses for the G11 pockmark. However, the present data reveal high discrepancies in the contents and δ13C values for both archaeal and bacterial lipid profiles, implying the

  5. Sr isotope tracing of aquifer interactions in an area of accelerating coal-bed methane production, Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frost, C.D.; Pearson, B.N.; Ogle, K.M.; Heffern, E.L.; Lyman, R.M. [University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States). Dept. of Geology & Geophysics

    2002-07-01

    Sr isotope data on groundwater samples from coal and overlying sandstone aquifers in the eastern Powder River Basin, Wyoming, demonstrate that the Sr isotope ratio effectively identifies groundwater from different aquifers where major ion geochemistry and 0 and H stable isotope data fail. Groundwaters from sandstone aquifers have a uniform Sr-87/Sr-86 ratio of 0.7126-0.7127. Waters from coal seams vary from Sr-87/Sr-86 ratio = 0.7127 near the recharge area to 0.7151 farther into the basin. The distinct Sr isotope signatures of sandstone and coal aquifers may reflect different sources of Sr in these two rock types: Sr in sandstones is held primarily in carbonate cement, whereas coals contain more radiogenic Sr in organic matter. The Sr isotope ratio is useful in identifying wells that contain mixed waters, whether due to well construction or to incomplete aquifer isolation. Measurement and continued monitoring of the Sr isotope ratio in groundwaters should provide a powerful tool for characterizing the impact of the burgeoning coal-bed methane industry on the hydrology of the Powder River Basin.

  6. Comment on "Changes in atmospheric CO2 levels recorded by the isotopic signature of n-alkanes from plants" from K.S. Machado and S. Froehner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Peter; Nehrbass-Ahles, Christoph; Schmitt, Jochen; Stocker, Thomas F.; Fischer, Hubertus

    2017-09-01

    The recently published invited research article by Machado and Froehner (2017) is presenting δ13C values from sedimentary organic matter (n-alkane), measured on samples collected in the Barigui watershed (Brazil) covering the last 400 years. The derived δ13C time series based on C27n-alkane, beginning approximately in the calendar year 1600 (or 1600 CE; with CE for Common Era) until recent times is subsequently - in their Fig. 3 - compared with a record, which is believed to be a representative reconstruction of atmospheric CO2 concentrations covering approximately the last 650 years (with respect to the year 2005 CE). The final conclusion of this article, as reflected in its title, is that changes in atmospheric CO2 levels are recorded in isotopic signatures on n-alkane from plants. We argue, that this conclusion can not be drawn from the study of Machado and Froehner (2017), since what is shown in their Fig. 3 is not a time series of atmospheric CO2 concentration of the last 650 years. The authors show reconstructions of atmospheric CO2 concentrations based on Antarctic ice cores over the past 650,000 years and use them for the past 650 years by ignoring the fact that the time scale in IPCC (2007), from which, according to the caption of their Fig. 3, they took this CO2 time series, is in kyr (1 kyr = 1 kilo year = 1000 years). This is wrong and any conclusion based on this comparison is incorrect. Instead they should have used for a correct CO2 time series for the comparison with their measurements.

  7. Systematic Osmium Isotope Binary Mixing Arrays in Arc Volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, S.; Alves, S.; Schiano, P.; Capmas, F.; Allegre, C. J.

    2001-12-01

    Isotopic and geochemical studies on subduction-related lavas aim at constraining the nature of their mantle sources and the respective roles of source heterogeneity and petrogenetic processes in their compositions. Many components are potentially involved in producing the geochemical signatures of arc lavas: depleted mantle, subducted oceanic crust and sediments, and the overlying continental or oceanic crust. A further complication in characterizing mantle sources of arc lavas is complex mixing of some component parts via derivative fluids or melts released from the slab. Os isotope ratios are potential tracers of slab contribution in arc lavas because 1) subducted sediments are very radiogenic in Os compared to the upper mantle, and 2) Re behaves as a moderately incompatible element during mantle partial melting, whereas Os is highly compatible. Therefore, MORB have much higher Re/Os ratios than peridotites. Consequently, old oceanic crust is likely to be extremely more radiogenic than the depleted upper mantle so that recycled basaltic components should be identified by their elevated 187Os/188Os ratios. Os isotope ratios and Os and Re concentrations have been measured in 55 lavas coming from 10 different subduction zones. Samples span a large range of major element concentrations (from basalts to dacites) and Mg# (from 0.32 to 0.81). The 10 subduction zones, namely the Lesser Antilles, Java, Papua-New Guinea, the Philippines, Izu-Bonin, Kamchatka, the Aleutians, Mexico, Colombia and Peru-Chile, have a range of basement nature and thickness, as well as a range of age and sediment cover of the subducting plate. Measured 187Os/188Os ratios range from 0.130 to 1.524 and Os concentrations range from 0.048 to 46 ppt. Re concentrations range from 37 to 915 ppt. Os initial isotope ratios are systematically positively and linearly correlated with the inverse of Os concentrations in arc lavas from a given volcano, indicating that the Os isotopic compositions always

  8. Natural radiogenic heat production in the northeastern part of the North German Basin; Natuerliche radiogene Waermeproduktion im Nordostdeutschen Becken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ullner, H.A. [GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam (Germany)

    1997-12-01

    The radiogenic heat-production rate is a parameter that affects the thermal structure in the sedimentary cover. The parameter is important to warrant an extensive study. The first results gained in the northeastern part of the North German Basin show values in the range between 2.2 and 2.6 {mu}W/m{sup 3} in Permian mudstones in the Peckensen borehole and in the Bonese borehole (Altmark area). Comparable results were obtained in mudstones from a {gamma}-ray log measured in the Rheinsberg borehole (Brandenburg area). (orig.) [Deutsch] Die Untersuchung der thermischen Struktur des nordostdeutschen Beckens erfordert Kenntnisse ueber die radiogene Waermeproduktion der in zahlreichen Bohrungen aufgeschlossenen Sedimente. Die erste Ergebnisse eines am GFZ Postdam begonnenen Messprogrammes zeigen Waermeproduktionsraten im Bereich 2,2 bis 2,6 {mu}W/m{sup 3} in Tonsteinen des Perm in den Bohrungen Peckensen und Bonese (Altmark). Eine vergleichbare Waermeproduktion wurde anhand eines {gamma}-ray-Logs in Tonsteinen in der Bohrung Rheinsberg (Brandenburg) ermittelt. (orig.)

  9. Sulfur isotope signatures in gypsiferous sediments of the Estancia and Tularosa Basins as indicators of sulfate sources, hydrological processes, and microbial activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szynkiewicz, Anna; Moore, Craig H.; Glamoclija, Mihaela; Pratt, Lisa M.

    2009-10-01

    In order to reconstruct paleo-environmental conditions for the saline playa lakes of the Rio Grande Rift, we investigated sediment sulfate sources using sulfur isotope compositions of dissolved SO42- ions in modern surface water, groundwater, and SO42- precipitated in the form of gypsum sediments deposited during the Pleistocene and Holocene in the Tularosa and Estancia Basins. The major sulfate sources are Lower and Middle Permian marine evaporites (δ 34S of 10.9-14.4‰), but the diverse physiography of the Tularosa Basin led to a complex drainage system which contributed sulfates from various sources depending on the climate at the time of sedimentation. As inferred from sulfur isotope mass balance constraints, weathering of sulfides of magmatic/hydrothermal and sedimentary origin associated with climate oscillations during Last Glacial Maximum contributed about 35-50% of the sulfates and led to deposition of gypsum with δ 34S values of -1.2‰ to 2.2‰ which are substantially lower than Permian evaporates. In the Estancia Basin, microbial sulfate reduction appears to overprint sulfur isotopic signatures that might elucidate past groundwater flows. A Rayleigh distillation model indicates that about 3-18% of sulfates from an inorganic groundwater pool (δ 34S of 12.6-13.8‰) have been metabolized by bacteria and preserved as partially to fully reduced sulfur-bearing minerals species (elemental sulfur, monosulfides, disulfides) with distinctly negative δ 34S values (-42.3‰ to -20.3‰) compared to co-existing gypsum (-3.8‰ to 22.4‰). For the Tularosa Basin microbial sulfate reduction had negligible effect on δ 34S value of the gypsiferous sediments most likely because of higher annual temperatures (15-33 °C) and lower organic carbon content (median 0.09%) in those sediments leading to more efficient oxidation of H 2S and/or smaller rates of sulfate reduction compared to the saline playas of the Estancia Basin (5-28 °C; median 0.46% of organic carbon

  10. Molecular hydrogen (H2) combustion emissions and their isotope (D/H) signatures from domestic heaters, diesel vehicle engines, waste incinerator plants, and biomass burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, M. K.; Walter, S.; Mohn, J.; Steinbacher, M.; Bond, S. W.; Röckmann, T.; Reimann, S.

    2012-07-01

    Molecular hydrogen (H2), its stable isotope signature (δD), and the key combustion parameters carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), and methane (CH4) were measured from various combustion processes. H2 in the exhaust of gas and oil-fired heaters and of waste incinerator plants was generally depleted compared to ambient intake air, while CO was significantly elevated. These findings contradict the often assumed co-occurring net H2 and CO emissions in combustion processes and suggest that previous H2 emissions from combustion may have been overestimated when scaled to CO emissions. For the gas and oil-fired heater exhausts, H2 and δD generally decrease with increasing CO2, from ambient values of ~0.5 ppm and +130‰ to 0.2 ppm and -206‰, respectively. These results are interpreted as a combination of an isotopically light H2 source from fossil fuel combustion and a D/H kinetic isotope fractionation of hydrogen in the advected ambient air during its partial removal during combustion. Diesel exhaust measurements from dynamometer test stand driving cycles show elevated H2 and CO emissions during cold-start and some acceleration phases. While H2 and CO emissions from diesel vehicles are known to be significantly less than those from gasoline vehicles (on a fuel-energy base), we find that their molar H2/CO ratios (median 0.026, interpercentile range 0.12) are also significantly less compared to gasoline vehicle exhaust. Using H2/CO emission ratios, along with CO global emission inventories, we estimate global H2 emissions for 2000, 2005, and 2010. For road transportation (gasoline and diesel), we calculate 8.3 ± 2.2 Tg, 6.0 ± 1.5 Tg, and 3.8 ± 0.94 Tg, respectively, whereas the contribution from diesel vehicles is low (0.9-1.4%). Other fossil fuel emissions are believed to be negligible but H2 emissions from coal combustion are unknown. For residential (domestic) emissions, which are likely dominated by biofuel combustion, emissions for the same years are

  11. Rare earth element concentrations and Nd isotopes in the Southeast Pacific Ocean

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jeandel, C; Delattre, H; Grenier, M; Pradoux, C; Lacan, F

    2013-01-01

    .... At this station Nd isotopic compositions are clearly more radiogenic than in the open ocean, suggesting that boundary exchange process is releasing lithogenic rare earth element from the volcanic Andes...

  12. KamLAND results and the radiogenic terrestrial heat

    CERN Document Server

    Fiorentini, G; Mantovani, F; Ricci, B; Fiorentini, Gianni; Lissia, Marcello; Mantovani, Fabio; Ricci, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    We find that recent results from the KamLAND collaboration on geologically produced antineutrinos, N(U+Th) = 28+16-15 events, correspond to a radiogenic heat production from Uranium and Thorium decay chains H(U+Th) = 38+35-33 TW. The 99% confidence limit on the geo-neutrino signal translates into the upper bound H(U+Th) < 162 TW, which is much weaker than that claimed by KamLAND, H(U+Th) < 60 TW, based on a too narrow class of geological models. We also performed an analysis of KamLAND data including recent high precision measurements of the C13(\\alpha,n)O16 cross section. The result, N(U+Th) = 31+14-13, corroborates the evidence (approx 2.5\\sigma) for geo-neutrinos in KamLAND data.

  13. Quaternary naltrexone reverses radiogenic and morphine-induced locomotor hyperactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mickley, G.A.; Stevens, K.E.; Galbraith, J.A.; White, G.A.; Gibbs, G.L.

    1984-04-01

    The present study attempted to determine the relative role of the peripheral and central nervous system in the production of morphine-induced or radiation-induced locomotor hyperactivity of the mouse. Toward this end, we used a quaternary derivative of an opiate antagonist (naltrexone methobromide), which presumably does not cross the blood-brain barrier. Quaternary naltrexone was used to challenge the stereotypic locomotor response observed in these mice after either an i.p. injection of morphine or exposure to 1500 rads /sup 60/Co. The quaternary derivative of naltrexone reversed the locomotor hyperactivity normally observed in the C57BL/6J mouse after an injection of morphine. It also significantly attenuated radiation-induced locomotion. The data reported here support the hypothesis of endorphin involvement in radiation-induced and radiogenic behaviors. However, these conclusions are contingent upon further research which more fully evaluates naltrexone methobromide's capacity to cross the blood-brain barrier.

  14. Proof of direct radiogenic destruction of collagen in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acil, Y.; Springer, I.N.; Gassling, P.; Warnke, P.H.; Acmaz, S.; Soenmez, T.T.; Wiltfang, J. [Univ. Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel (Germany). Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery; Niehoff, P.; Kimmig, B. [Univ. Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel (DE). Dept. of Radiotherapy (Radiooncology); Lefteris, V. [Univ. of Athens Medical School (Greece). Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery

    2007-07-15

    Background: Fibroses of vessels and soft tissue are side effects of radiotherapy. The authors assumed that there was an immediate direct radiogenic damage of collagen of bone, periosteum and skin. Material and Methods: 15 porcine jaws samples (group 1) were exposed to a total dose of 60 Gy (cobalt-60, 2 Gy/day, five fractions/week). 15 jaws samples were stored accordingly (group 2, no irradiation, control). Collagen fragments of bone, periosteum and skin samples of groups 1 and 2 were isolated by ultrafiltration. Collagen types were characterized by SDS-PAGE measurement of the mature collagen cross-links hydroxylysylpyridinoline (HP) and lysylpyridinoline (LP) by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and analysis of hydroxyproline (Hyp) was used to determine the ratio of the amount of collagen fragments from irradiated as opposed to nonirradiated samples. Results: The concentrations of HP, LP and Hyp in ultrafiltrates of probes of irradiated bone, periosteum and skin were markedly increased (average factors for bone: 3.69, 1.84, and 3.40, respectively; average factors for periosteum: 1.55, 1.41, and 1.77, respectively; average factors for skin: 1.55, 1.60, and 2.23, respectively) as compared to nonirradiated probes. SDS-PAGE did show collagen types I and V in nonirradiated bone, I and III in nonirradiated skin, and I in nonirradiated periosteum samples. In irradiated samples, smeared bands illustrated fragmentation of the collagen molecule. Conclusion: The increased concentrations of HP, LP and Hyp in ultrafiltrates indicated increased concentrations of split collagen. Direct and instant radiogenic damage of (extracellular matrix of) bone, periosteum and skin tissue collagen could be demonstrated. (orig.)

  15. Historical changes of the anthropogenic impact in a coastal lagoon: Pb isotopes and trace elements on mussel`s fleshes and shells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labonne, M.; Othman, D.B.; Luck, J.M. [Universite Montpellier II, Laboratoire Geofluides, Bassins, Eaux, Montpellier (France)

    1997-10-01

    Molluscs are known to concentrate metals and are used as bioindicators in many programs of coastal survey. The aims of this study were: (1) to better understand the spatial and temporal variations of metals in a greatly anthropized lagoon (Thau, S France) by using concentrations and Pb isotopes in mussel flesh; (2) to compare present and past environment and the different sources of local Pb in recent mussel shells and ones from the Roman empire. Young mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) from the sea were introduced at various locations in the lagoon. The ancient shells came from a Roman villa on the lagoon coast. We compare their isotopic compositions to different sources present on the watershed such as rocks, road, harbour, ancient lead castings or Spanish and English ingots. Concentrations of trace metals were determined directly by ICP-MS after proper dilution and the isotopic compositions was determined on a VG Sector mass spectrometer. The Pb concentration variations are difficult to separate from weight variations so we use isotopic compositions for determination of lead sources. The Pb isotopic composition of the flesh define nice alignments in {sup 207}Pb/{sup 204}Pb vs {sup 206}Pb/{sup 204}Pb diagram with season, which can be explained by two-component mixtures. However, while one end-member remains quite stable and influenced by road network, the other one shifts to more radiogenic values indicating either a variable origin, or varying proportions of a third component. The ancient shells have more radiogenic isotopes than the current shells but shift towards ancient lead castings and ingots signature. Variations of Pb ratios in the ancient shells can be roughly correlated with age and the evolution of population density around the lagoon over the centuries

  16. Lead isotope study of Zn-Pb ore deposits associated with the Basque-Cantabrian basin and Paleozoic basement, Northern Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco, F.; Pesquera, A.; Herrero, J. M.

    1996-01-01

    A total of forty-three galena samples from syngenetic and epigenetic Pb-Zn mineralizations emplaced in the Lower Cretaceous Basque-Cantabrian basin and Paleozoic basement of the Cinco Villas massif in the western Pyrenees, have been analyzed for Pb-isotopic composition. Galena from sedex mineralizations hosted in Carboniferous clastic rocks in the Cinco Villas massif display an homogeneous lead isotopic signature (206Pb/2044Pb ≈ 18.43, 207Pb/204Pb ≈ 15.66, 208Pb/ 204Pb ≈ 38.69) suggesting a single lead reservoir. These values are slightly more radiogenic than lead from other European Hercynian deposits, possibly reflecting the influence of a more evolved upper crustal source. Underlying Paleozoic sediments are proposed as lead source for the Cinco Villas massif ores. Analyses from twenty-six galena samples from the four strata-bound ore districts hosted in Mesozoic rocks reveal the existence of two populations regarding their lead isotopic composition. Galena from the western Santander districts (e.g., Reocin) is characterized by more radiogenic isotope values (206Pb/204Pb ≈ 18.74, 207Pb/204Pb ≈ 15.67, 208Pb/ 204Pb ≈ 38.73) than those from the central and eastern districts (Troya-Legorreta, Central and Western Vizcaya, 206Pb/204Pb ≈ 18.59, 207Pb/204Pb ≈ 15.66, 208Pb/ 204Pb ≈ 38.73). In all districts, the most likely source for these mineralizations was the thick sequence of Lower Cretaceous clastic sediments. The existence of two separate lead isotopic populations could be the result of regional difference in the composition of the basement rocks and the clastic sediments derived of it or different evolution histories. In both sub-basins, isotopic ratios indicate an increase in crustal influence as the age of the ores decreases.

  17. Strontium isotope geochemistry of groundwater affected by human activities in Nandong underground river system, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang Yongjun, E-mail: jiangjyj@swu.edu.cn [School of Geographical Sciences, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China)] [Institute of Karst Environment and Rock Desertification Rehabilitation, Chongqing 400715 (China)

    2011-03-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Spatio-temporal variations of Sr concentrations and Sr isotopic composition of groundwater were investigated in a karst underground river system. {yields} Agricultural fertilizers and sewage effluents significantly modified the natural Sr isotopic signature of karst groundwater. {yields} Sr in the carbonate aquifers was relatively non-radiogenic, with low Sr concentrations, while anthropogenic Sr correlated with agricultural fertilizers and sewage effluents was relatively radiogenic, with higher Sr concentrations. {yields} {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios can provide key information for natural and anthropogenic sources in karst groundwater. - Abstract: The Nandong Underground River System (NURS) is located in a typical karst area dominated by agriculture in SE Yunnan Province, China. Groundwater plays an important role in the social and economical development in the area. The effects of human activities (agriculture and sewage effluents) on the Sr isotope geochemistry were investigated in the NURS. Seventy-two representative groundwater samples, which were collected from different aquifers (calcite and dolomite), under varying land-use types, both in summer and winter, showed significant spatial differences and slight seasonal variations in Sr concentrations and {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios. Agricultural fertilizers and sewage effluents significantly modified the natural {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios signature of groundwater that was otherwise dominated by water-rock interaction. Three major sources of Sr could be distinguished by {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios and Sr concentrations in karst groundwater. Two sources of Sr are the Triassic calcite and dolomite aquifers, where waters have low Sr concentrations (0.1-0.2 mg/L) and low {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios (0.7075-0.7080 and 0.7080-0.7100, respectively); the third source is anthropogenic Sr from agricultural fertilizers and sewage effluents with waters affected having radiogenic {sup 87

  18. Linking carbon isotope signatures of nighttime leaf-respiratory and daytime assimilatory CO2 fluxes observed with laser spectrometry under field conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentsch, Lydia; Ogée, Jérôme; Wingate, Lisa; Sturm, Patrick; Siegwolf, Rolf; Werner, Roland A.; Buchmann, Nina; Knohl, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    The 13C/12C ratio (δ13C) of atmospheric CO2 is a valuable tool for constraining the impact of the terrestrial biosphere on atmospheric CO2 dynamics. Alterations of the 13C signal of terrestrial net CO2 fluxes are generally attributed to variations in photosynthetic 13C discrimination. Yet, over the past decade, evidence has emerged that plant metabolism and respiration modify the initial δ13C signature of recent photosynthetic assimilates. Such postphotosynthetic δ13C modifications were reported for all plant organs, but leaf respiratory metabolism may play a central role as it impacts carbon turnover in other plant tissues. Leaf-respired CO2 is frequently 13C enriched with respect to leaf organic matter. Mechanisms potentially explaining this enrichment include the differential use of carbon sources, metabolite fragmentation or the expression of kinetic isotope effects of respiratory enzymes. For global and ecosystem-scale applications of δ13C, it is now important to study, under field conditions, the variability of δ13C in leaf-respired CO2 (δ13CRES) and the deviation of the latter from δ13C of recent assimilates (δ13CAS). Here, we present 74 days of hourly δ13C measurements for daytime assimilatory and nighttime respiratory CO2 fluxes on leafy branches of three mature Fagus sylvatica trees in a temperate forest. Measurements were conducted with a laser spectrometer (QCLAS-ISO, Aerodyne Research Inc.) measuring CO2 isotopologue mixing ratios in ambient and sampling air from photosynthetic gas exchange chambers. We used daytime measurements of photosynthetic 13C discrimination for diurnally flux-weighted estimates of δ13CAS, and found that flux-weighted δ13CRES roughly tracked previous-day shifts in δ13CAS. Deviations between flux-weighted δ13CAS and δ13CRES were further robustly predicted by previous-day assimilation, with δ13CRES displaying 13C enrichment on low and 13C depletion on high assimilation days. On the hourly timescale, δ13CRES either

  19. Regional variations in the lead isotopic composition of galena from southern Korea with implications for the discrimination of lead provenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Youn-Joong; Cheong, Chang-sik; Shin, Dongbok; Lee, Kwang-Sik; Jo, Hui Je; Gautam, Mukesh Kumar; Lee, Insung

    2012-11-01

    This study presents a comprehensive database (n = 215) of lead isotopes in galena from the southern Korean peninsula using new and published data. Of the 69 metal mines examined, predominantly skarn- and hydrothermal-type Pb-Zn-Au-Ag-Cu deposits were observed and were associated with Mesozoic magmatic activities. Galena samples from each geotectonic unit showed discrete lead isotopic signatures. The Gyeongsang basin samples were characteristically unradiogenic and had restricted variations in lead isotopic composition (206Pb/204Pb = 18.16-18.59, 207Pb/204Pb = 15.48-15.64, 208Pb/204Pb = 37.87-38.77). Their 208Pb/204Pb range indicated an involvement of source materials less thorogenic than the associated granites. The galena samples from Cambro-Ordovician carbonate rocks of the northeastern Yeongnam massif and eastern Taebaeksan basin had the most radiogenic 206Pb/204Pb (19.28 ± 0.14) and 207Pb/204Pb (15.833 ± 0.027) ratios. Their lead isotopic trend indicated a combined contribution of ore lead from granitic magmas, Precambrian basements, and overlain host rocks. Less radiogenic galena samples from the middle to southwestern parts of the Yeongnam massif and Okcheon belt showed limited lead isotopic variations (206Pb/204Pb = 18.332 ± 0.065, 207Pb/204Pb = 15.693 ± 0.012, 208Pb/204Pb = 38.93 ± 0.07 on average), probably resulted from mixing with a common crustal basement. The differences in lead isotopes between the radiogenic and unradiogenic groups from the Yeongnam massif and Okcheon belt may reflect the spatial dissimilarity of involved crustal rocks. The old crust appears to have significantly contributed ore lead to galenas from the western Gyeonggi massif, but the geochronological meaning of their steep 207Pb/204Pb-206Pb/204Pb trend is not clear. The comprehensive database constructed by the present study suggests that lead province in the southern Korean peninsula may be subdivided into four discrete zones. Linear discriminant analysis showed that more

  20. The effects of magmatic processes and crustal recycling on the molybdenum stable isotopic composition of Mid-Ocean Ridge Basalts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezard, Rachel; Fischer-Gödde, Mario; Hamelin, Cédric; Brennecka, Gregory A.; Kleine, Thorsten

    2016-11-01

    Molybdenum (Mo) stable isotopes hold great potential to investigate the processes involved in planetary formation and differentiation. However their use is currently hampered by the lack of understanding of the dominant controls driving mass-dependent fractionations at high temperature. Here we investigate the role of magmatic processes and mantle source heterogeneities on the Mo isotope composition of Mid-Ocean Ridges Basalts (MORBs) using samples from two contrasting ridge segments: (1) the extremely fast spreading Pacific-Antarctic (66-41°S) section devoid of plume influence and; (2) the slow spreading Mohns-Knipovich segment (77-71°N) intercepted by the Jan Mayen Plume (71°N). We show that significant variations in Mo stable isotope composition exist in MORBs with δ98/95Mo ranging from - 0.24 ‰ to + 0.15 ‰ (relative to NIST SRM3134). The absence of correlation between δ98/95Mo and indices of magma differentiation or partial melting suggests a negligible impact of these processes on the isotopic variations observed. On the other hand, the δ98/95Mo variations seem to be associated with changes in radiogenic isotope signatures and rare earth element ratios (e.g., (La/Sm)N), suggesting mantle source heterogeneities as a dominant factor for the δ98/95Mo variations amongst MORBs. The heaviest Mo isotope compositions correspond to the most enriched signatures, suggesting that recycled crustal components are isotopically heavy compared to the uncontaminated depleted mantle. The uncontaminated depleted mantle shows slightly sub-chondritic δ98/95Mo, which cannot be produced by core formation and, therefore, more likely result from extensive anterior partial melting of the mantle. Consequently, the primitive δ98/95Mo composition of the depleted mantle appears overprinted by the effects of both partial melting and crustal recycling.

  1. Hafnium and iron isotopes in early Archean komatiites record a plume-driven convection cycle in the Hadean Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebel, Oliver; Campbell, Ian H.; Sossi, Paolo A.; Van Kranendonk, Martin J.

    2014-07-01

    Archean (>2.5 billion years) komatiites are considered expressions of mantle plumes that originate from and thereby sample the lowermost mantle overlying the Earth's core. Some komatiites have reported Hf isotope signatures that require a mantle source with a time-integrated Lu/Hf that is appreciably higher than average modern depleted mantle. The systematic study of the time and locus of parent-daughter fractionation of the mantle sources of these komatiites potentially constrains differentiation processes in the early Earth, and subsequent distribution and storage of early mantle reservoirs. We present radiogenic Hf and stable Fe isotopes for a series of komatiites from the Pilbara craton in Western Australia (aged 3.5 to 2.9 Ga). After careful evaluation of the effects of alteration, we find that pristine samples are characterised by a light Fe isotope mantle source and initial 176Hf/177Hf well above the age-corrected depleted mantle. Taken together these observations require a component of an old, melt-depleted reservoir in their mantle source. The Hf isotope signature of this component appears to be complementary to the first terrestrial crust, as preserved in Hadean (i.e., >4 Ga) detrital zircon cores, suggesting a causal relationship and a Hadean age for this depletion event. We propose that this Early Refractory Reservoir (ERR) is the residue formed by deep melting in hot Hadean mantle plumes, which then accumulated at the base of the first crust. Parts of this primordial lithosphere were destabilised and sank to the core-mantle boundary in cold drips and subsequently returned in hot mantle plumes, whose thermal capacity allows melting of such refractory mantle with its archetype isotope signature. The cycling of this material via cold drips and hot plumes suggests a plume-dominated convection prior to ∼3.9 Ga, which is then replaced by Archean-style plate tectonics.

  2. Lead isotope studies of the Guerrero composite terrane, west-central Mexico: implications for ore genesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potra, Adriana; Macfarlane, Andrew W.

    2014-01-01

    New thermal ionization mass spectrometry and multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry Pb isotope analyses of three Cenozoic ores from the La Verde porphyry copper deposit located in the Zihuatanejo-Huetamo subterrane of the Guerrero composite terrane are presented and the metal sources are evaluated. Lead isotope ratios of 3 Cenozoic ores from the El Malacate and La Esmeralda porphyry copper deposits located in the Zihuatanejo-Huetamo subterrane and of 14 ores from the Zimapan and La Negra skarn deposits from the adjoining Sierra Madre terrane are also presented to look for systematic differences in the lead isotope trends and ore metal sources among the proposed exotic tectonostratigraphic terranes of southern Mexico. Comparison among the isotopic signatures of ores from the Sierra Madre terrane and distinct subterranes of the Guerrero terrane supports the idea that there is no direct correlation between the distinct suspect terranes of Mexico and the isotopic signatures of the associated Cenozoic ores. Rather, these Pb isotope patterns are interpreted to reflect increasing crustal contribution to mantle-derived magmas as the arc advanced eastward onto a progressively thicker continental crust. The lead isotope trend observed in Cenozoic ores is not recognized in the ores from Mesozoic volcanogenic massive sulfide and sedimentary exhalative deposits. The Mesozoic ores formed prior to the amalgamation of the Guerrero composite terrane to the continental margin, which took place during the Late Cretaceous, in intraoceanic island arc and intracontinental marginal basin settings, while the Tertiary deposits formed after this event in a continental arc setting. Lead isotope ratios of the Mesozoic and Cenozoic ores appear to reflect these differences in tectonic setting of ore formation. Most Pb isotope values of ores from the La Verde deposit (206Pb/204Pb = 18.674-18.719) are less radiogenic than those of the host igneous rocks, but plot within the

  3. Water mass circulation and weathering inputs in the Labrador Sea based on coupled Hf-Nd isotope compositions and rare earth element distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippova, Alexandra; Frank, Martin; Kienast, Markus; Rickli, Jörg; Hathorne, Ed; Yashayaev, Igor M.; Pahnke, Katharina

    2017-02-01

    The Labrador Sea is one of the key areas for deep water formation driving the Atlantic thermohaline circulation and thus plays an important role in Northern Hemisphere climatic fluctuations. In order to better constrain the overturning processes and the origins of the distinct water masses, combined dissolved Hf-Nd isotopic compositions and rare earth element (REE) distribution patterns were obtained from four water depth profiles along a section across the Labrador Sea. These were complemented by one surface sample off the southern tip of Greenland, three shallow water samples off the coast of Newfoundland, and two deep water samples off Nova Scotia. Although light REEs are markedly enriched in the surface waters off the coast of Newfoundland compared to north Atlantic waters, the REE concentration profiles are essentially invariant throughout the water column across the Labrador Sea. The hafnium concentrations of surface waters exhibit a narrow range between 0.6 and 1 pmol/kg but are not significantly higher than at depth. Neodymium isotope signatures (ɛNd) vary from unradiogenic values between -16.8 and -14.9 at the surface to more radiogenic values near -11.0 at the bottom of the Labrador Sea mainly reflecting the advection of the Denmark Strait Overflow Water and North East Atlantic Deep Water, the signatures of which are influenced by weathering contributions from Icelandic basalts. Unlike Nd, water column radiogenic Hf isotope signatures (ɛHf) are more variable representing diverse weathering inputs from the surrounding landmasses. The least radiogenic seawater ɛHf signatures (up to -11.7) are found in surface waters close to Greenland and near the Canadian margin. This reflects the influence of recirculating Irminger Current Waters, which are affected by highly unradiogenic inputs from Greenland. A three to four ɛHf unit difference is observed between Denmark Strait Overflow Water (ɛHf ∼ -4) and North East Atlantic Deep Water (ɛHf ∼ -0

  4. Modeling the Nd isotopic composition in the North Atlantic basin using an eddy-permitting model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsouze, T.; Treguier, A. M.; Peronne, S.; Dutay, J.-C.; Lacan, F.; Jeandel, C.

    2010-09-01

    Boundary Exchange (BE - exchange of elements between continental margins and the open ocean) has been emphasized as a key process in the oceanic cycle of neodymium (Nd) (Lacan and Jeandel, 2005a). Here, we use a regional eddy-permitting resolution Ocean General Circulation Model (1/4°) of the North Atlantic basin to simulate the distribution of the Nd isotopic composition, considering BE as the only source. Results show good agreement with the data, confirming previous results obtained using the same parameterization of the source in a coarse resolution global model (Arsouze et al., 2007), and therefore the major control played by the BE processes in the Nd cycle on the regional scale. We quantified the exchange rate of the BE, and found that the time needed for the continental margins to significantly imprint the chemical composition of the surrounding seawater (further referred as characteristic exchange time) is of the order of 0.2 years. However, the timescale of the BE may be subject to large variations as a very short exchange time (a few days) is needed to reproduce the highly negative values of surface waters in the Labrador Sea, whereas a longer one (up to 0.5 years) is required to simulate the radiogenic influence of basaltic margins and distinguish the negative isotopic signatures of North Atlantic Deep Water from the more radiogenic southern origin water masses. This likely represents geographical variations in erosion fluxes and the subsequent particle load onto the continental margins. Although the parameterization of the BE is the same in both configurations of the model, the characteristic exchange time in the eddy-permitting configuration is significantly lower than the previous evaluations using a low resolution configuration (6 months to 10 years), but however in agreement with the available seawater Nd isotope data. This results highlights the importance of the model dynamics in simulating the BE process.

  5. Coupled Hf-Nd-Pb isotope co-variations of HIMU oceanic island basalts from Mangaia, Cook-Austral islands, suggest an Archean source component in the mantle transition zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebel, Oliver; Arculus, Richard J.; van Westrenen, Wim; Woodhead, Jon D.; Jenner, Frances E.; Nebel-Jacobsen, Yona J.; Wille, Martin; Eggins, Stephen M.

    2013-07-01

    Although it is widely accepted that oceanic island basalts (OIB) sample geochemically distinct mantle reservoirs including recycled oceanic crust, the composition, age, and locus of these reservoirs remain uncertain. OIB with highly radiogenic Pb isotope signatures are grouped as HIMU (high-μ, with μ = 238U/204Pb), and exhibit unique Hf-Nd isotopic characteristics, defined as ΔɛHf, deviant from a terrestrial igneous rock array that includes all other OIB types. Here we combine new Hf isotope data with previous Nd-Pb isotope measurements to assess the coupled, time-integrated Hf-Nd-Pb isotope evolution of the most extreme HIMU location (Mangaia, French Polynesia). In comparison with global MORB and other OIB types, Mangaia samples define a unique trend in coupled Hf-Nd-Pb isotope co-variations (expressed in 207Pb/206Pb vs. ΔɛHf). In a model employing subducted, dehydrated oceanic crust, mixing between present-day depleted MORB mantle (DMM) and small proportions (˜5%) of a HIMU mantle endmember can re-produce the Hf-Nd-Pb isotope systematics of global HIMU basalts (sensu stricto; i.e., without EM-1/EM-2/FOZO components). An age range of 3.5 to affected by other enriched mantle endmembers (sensu lato). If correct, this requires isolation of parts of the mantle transition zone for >3 Gyr and implies that OIB chemistry can be used to test geodynamic models.

  6. Geochemical and isotopic signatures of surficial sediments from the western continental shelf of India: Inferring provenance, weathering, and the nature of organic matter

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kurian, S.; Nath, B.N.; Kumar, N.C.; Nair, K.K.C.

    matter. Major elements such as Si, Ti, Mg, and discrimination plots involving alkalies and silica have shown a distinct north-south provinciality, with the source signatures pointing at Deccan basalt for sediments in the north (from Dwaraka to Goa...

  7. Comparative analysis of using natural and radiogenic lead as heat-transfer agent in fast reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laas, R. A.; Gizbrekht, R. V.; Komarov, P. A.; Nesterov, V. N.

    2016-06-01

    Fast reactors with lead coolant have several advantages over analogues. Performance can be further improved by replacement of natural composition lead with radiogenic one. Thus, two main issues need to be addressed: induced radioactivity in coolant and efficient neutron multiplication factor in the core will be changed and need to be estimated. To address these issues analysis of the scheme of the nuclear transformations in the lead heat-transfer agent in the process of radiation was carried out. Induced radioactivity of radiogenic and natural lead has been studied. It is shown that replacement of lead affects multiplication factor in a certain way. Application of radiogenic lead can significantly affect reactor operation.

  8. 40Ar/39Ar and (U-Th)/He model age signatures of elusive Mercurian and Venusian meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jourdan, Fred; Eroglu, Ela

    2017-05-01

    No meteorites from Mercury and Venus have been conclusively identified so far. In this study, we develop an original approach based on extensive Monte Carlo simulations and diffusion models to explore the radiogenic argon (40Ar*) and helium (4He*) loss behavior and the range of 40Ar/39Ar and (U-Th)/He age signatures expected for a range of crystals if meteorites from these planets were ever to be found. We show that we can accurately date the crystallization age of a meteorite from both Mercury and Venus using the 40Ar/39Ar technique on clinopyroxene (± orthopyroxene) and that its 40Ar/39Ar age should match the Pb-Pb age. At the surface of Mercury, phases like albite and anorthite will exhibit a complete range of 40Ar* loss ranging from 0% to 100%, whereas merrillite and apatite will show 100% 4He* loss. By measuring the crystal size and diffusion parameters of a series of plagioclase crystals, one can inverse the 40Ar* loss value to estimate the maximum temperature experienced by a rock, and narrow down the possible pre-ejection location of the meteorite at the surface of Mercury. At the surface of Venus, plagioclase and phosphate phases will only record the age of ejection. The (U-Th)/He systematics of merrillite and apatite will be, respectively, moderately and strongly affected by 4He* loss during the transit of the meteorite from its host planet to Earth. Finally, meteorites from Mercury or Venus will each have their own 40Ar/39Ar and (U-Th)/He isotopic age and 38Arc cosmic ray exposure age signatures over a series of different crystal types, allowing to unambiguously recognize a meteorite for any of these two planets using radiogenic and cosmogenic noble gases.

  9. Tissue and size-related changes in the fatty acid and stable isotope signatures of the deep sea grenadier fish Coryphaenoides armatus from the Charlie-Gibbs Fracture Zone region of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayor, Daniel J.; Sharples, Caroline J.; Webster, Lynda; Walsham, Pamela; Lacaze, Jean-Pierre; Cousins, Nicola J.

    2013-12-01

    Coryphaenoides armatus is a cosmopolitan deep-sea fish that plays a major role in the ecology of abyssal ecosystems. We investigated the trophic ecology and physiology of this species by determining the δ13C, δ15N and fatty acid signatures of muscle, liver and ovary tissues of individuals collected from ∼2700 m to the north and south of the Charlie-Gibbs Fracture Zone (CGFZ) of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, NE Atlantic. Fatty acid and δ13C data both suggested that C. armatus shows an ontogenetic dietary shift, with the relative contributions of benthic and pelagic prey decreasing and increasing respectively as the animals grow. They also indicated that dietary overlap between animals living to the north and south of the CGFZ increases as they grow, suggesting that larger animals forage over greater distances and are not hindered by the presence of the CGFZ. Comparison of tissue-specific fatty acid signatures with previously published data suggests compositional homeostasis of the fatty acids 20:5(n-3) and 22:6(n-3) in the muscle, and 18:1(n-9) in the liver tissues. We ascribe this primarily to strict physiological requirements for these compounds, rather than simply to their abundance in the diet. We pose several speculative mechanisms to explain the observed trends in tissue-specific δ13C and δ15N values, illustrating some of the numerous processes that can influence the isotopic signatures of bulk tissues.

  10. The 1998-2001 submarine lava balloon eruption at the Serreta ridge (Azores archipelago): Constraints from volcanic facies architecture, isotope geochemistry and magnetic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madureira, Pedro; Rosa, Carlos; Marques, Ana Filipa; Silva, Pedro; Moreira, Manuel; Hamelin, Cédric; Relvas, Jorge; Lourenço, Nuno; Conceição, Patrícia; Pinto de Abreu, Manuel; Barriga, Fernando J. A. S.

    2017-01-01

    The most recent submarine eruption observed offshore the Azores archipelago occurred between 1998 and 2001 along the submarine Serreta ridge (SSR), 4-5 nautical miles WNW of Terceira Island. This submarine eruption delivered abundant basaltic lava balloons floating at the sea surface and significantly changed the bathymetry around the eruption area. Our work combines bathymetry, volcanic facies cartography, petrography, rock magnetism and geochemistry in order to (1) track the possible vent source at seabed, (2) better constrain the Azores magma source(s) sampled through the Serreta submarine volcanic event, and (3) interpret the data within the small-scale mantle source heterogeneity framework that has been demonstrated for the Azores archipelago. Lava balloons sampled at sea surface display a radiogenic signature, which is also correlated with relatively primitive (low) 4He/3He isotopic ratios. Conversely, SSR lavas are characterized by significantly lower radiogenic 87Sr/86Sr, 206Pb/204Pb and 208Pb/204Pb ratios than the lava balloons and the onshore lavas from the Terceira Island. SSR lavas are primitive, but incompatible trace-enriched. Apparent decoupling between the enriched incompatible trace element abundances and depleted radiogenic isotope ratios is best explained by binary mixing of a depleted MORB source and a HIMU­type component into magma batches that evolved by similar shallower processes in their travel to the surface. The collected data suggest that the freshest samples collected in the SSR may correspond to volcanic products of an unnoticed and more recent eruption than the 1998-2001 episode.

  11. Identification of radiogenic heat source distribution in the crust: A variational approach

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R N Singh; Ajay Manglik

    2000-04-01

    Radiogenic heat sources present in the continental crust contribute significantly to the total surface heat flow and temperature distribution in the crust. Various modelsforthe depth distribution of radiogenic sources have been proposed. Among these modelsthe exponential model has been shown to be an optimal, smooth model through the variational approach applied to the heat conduction equation. In the present work, a two-layered model of the crust is considered and heat transport by advection is included in the upper layer. The heat transport in the lower layer is by conduction only. Application of variational principle determines the nature of the radiogenic source distribution in both the layers. The resultsthus obtained indicate a radiogenic source distribution which is more complex than a simple exponential model.

  12. On the valency state of radiogenic lead in zircon and its consequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramers, J.; Frei, Robert; Newville, M.

    2009-01-01

    at this temperature, show age effects that should have been observed in SIMS dating. Further, in zircon evaporation as well as in leaching experiments, common Pb is generally released preferentially to radiogenic Pb. After removal of less radiogenic Pb, the evaporation record generally shows pure radiogenic Pb during...... not resemble that of PbO2. The arguments why radiogenic Pb should be tetravalent are based on analogies with studies relating to the tetravalent state of 234Th and the hexavalent state of 234U, which show that a-recoil in silicates generates a strongly oxidizing environment at the site where the recoiling......-recoil damaged sites could be leached out by any electrolyte solution that reduces it to the divalent state, making it both incompatible and soluble. Thus, discordia can be generated in weathering. The curious observation that discordant Archaean zircon suites generally define trends to lower intercepts at up...

  13. The signatures of stable isotopes δ 15N and δ 13C in anadromous and non-anadromous Coilia nasus living in the Yangtze River, and the adjacent sea waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Tang, Wenqiao; Dong, Wenxia

    2015-12-01

    Stable isotopes are increasingly used to investigate seasonal migrations of aquatic organisms. This study employed stable isotopes ( δ 13C and δ 15N) for Coilia nasus from the lower Yangtze River and the adjacent East China Sea to distinguish different ecotypic groups, ascertain trophic nutrition positions, and reflect environmental influences on C. nasus. δ 13C signatures of C. nasus sampled from Zhoushan (ZS), Chongming (CM), and Jingjiang (JJ) waters were significantly higher than those from the Poyang Lake (PYL) ( P nutrition positions in the marine and Poyang Lake food webs, respectively. C. nasus in Poyang Lake were significantly more enriched in δ 15N but depleted in δ 13C, suggesting that anthropogenic nutrient inputs and terrigenous organic carbon are important to the Poyang Lake food web. This study is the first to apply δ 15N and δ 13C to population assignment studies of C. nasus in the Yangtze River and its affiliated waters. Analysis of stable isotopes ( δ 15N and δ 13C) is shown to be a useful tool for discriminating anadromous and non-anadromous C. nasus.

  14. Simultaneous quantification of α-lactalbumin and β-casein in human milk using ultra-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry based on their signature peptides and winged isotope internal standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qi; Zhang, Jingshun; Ke, Xing; Lai, Shiyun; Li, Duo; Yang, Jinchuan; Mo, Weimin; Ren, Yiping

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, there is an increasing need to measure the concentration of individual proteins in human milk, instead of total human milk proteins. Due to lack of human milk protein standards, there are only few quantification methods established. The objective of the present work was to develop a simple and rapid quantification method for simultaneous determination of α-lactalbumin and β-casein in human milk using signature peptides according to a modified quantitative proteomics strategy. The internal standards containing the signature peptide sequences were synthesized with isotope-labeled amino acids. The purity of synthesized peptides as standards was determined by amino acid analysis method and area normalization method. The contents of α-lactalbumin and β-casein in human milk were measured according to the equimolar relationship between the two proteins and their corresponding signature peptides. The method validation results showed a satisfied linearity (R(2)>0.99) and recoveries (97.2-102.5% for α-lactalbumin and 99.5-100.3% for β-casein). The limit of quantification for α-lactalbumin and β-casein was 8.0mg/100g and 1.2mg/100g, respectively. CVs for α-lactalbumin and β-casein in human milk were 5.2% and 3.0%. The contents of α-lactalbumin and β-casein in 147 human milk samples were successfully determined by the established method and their contents were 205.5-578.2mg/100g and 116.4-467.4mg/100g at different lactation stages. The developed method allows simultaneously determination of α-lactalbumin and β-casein in human milk. The quantitative strategy based on signature peptide should be applicable to other endogenous proteins in breast milk and other body fluids.

  15. Correlated carbon and oxygen isotope signatures in eclogitic diamonds with coesite inclusions: A SIMS investigation of diamonds from Guaniamo, Argyle and Orapa mines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, D. J.; Page, Z.; Harte, B.; Valley, J.; Channer, D.; Jaques, L.

    2006-12-01

    Using ion microprobes and secondary-ion mass spectrometry we have analyzed the carbon and oxygen isotopic composition of eclogite-suite diamonds and their coesite inclusions, respectively, from three suites of diamonds of Proterozoic age. Extremely high (for the mantle) oxygen isotope values (delta 18O of +10.2 to +16.9 per mil VSMOW) are preserved in coesites included in eclogitic diamonds from Guaniamo, Venezuela (Schulze et al., Nature, 2003), providing compelling evidence for an origin of their eclogite hosts by subduction of sea water altered ocean floor basalts. In situ SIMS analyses of their host diamonds yield carbon isotope values (delta 13C) of -12 to -18 per mil PDB. SIMS analyses of coesite inclusions from Argyle, Australia diamonds previously analyzed by combustion methods for d13C composition (Jaques et al., Proc. 4th Kimb. Conf, 1989), also yield anomalously high d18O values (+6.8 to +16.0 per mil VSMOW), that correlate with the anomalously low carbon isotope values (-10.3 to -14.1 per mil PDB). One coesite-bearing diamond from Orapa, Botswana analyzed in situ by SIMS has a d18O value of the coesite of +8.5 per mil VSMOW and a d13C value of the adjacent diamond host of -9.0 per mil PDB. A second Orapa stone has a SIMS carbon isotope compositional range of d13C = -14 to -16 per mil PDB, but the coesite is too small for ion probe analysis. At each of these localities, carbon isotope values of coesite-bearing diamonds that are lower than typical of mantle carbon are correlated with oxygen isotope compositions of included coesites that are substantially above the common mantle oxygen isotope range. Such results are not in accord with diamond genesis models involving formation of eclogitic diamonds from igneous melts undergoing fractionation in the mantle or by crystallization from primordial inhomogeneities in Earth's mantle. By analogy with the oxygen isotope compositions of altered ocean floor basalts and Alpine (subduction zone) eclogites they are

  16. Entropy-information perspective to radiogenic heat distribution in continental crust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. N. Singh

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Depth distribution of radiogenic heat sources in continental crust is an important parameter that controls its thermal structure as well as the mantle heat flow at the base of continental lithosphere. Various models for the depth distribution of radiogenic heat sources have been proposed. Starting from constant and exponential models based on linear heat flow–heat generation relationship the present-day layered models integrate crustal structure and laboratory measurements of radiogenic heat sources in various exposed rocks representing crustal composition. In the present work, an extended entropy theory formalism is used for estimation of radiogenic heat sources distribution in continental crust based on principle of maximum entropy (POME. The extended entropy principle yields a constant heat generation model if only a constraint given by total radiogenic heat in the crust is used and an exponential form of radiogenic heat sources distribution if an additional constraint in the form of a second moment is used in the minimization of entropy.

  17. A Sr-Nd-Hf isotope characterization of dust source areas in Victoria Land and the McMurdo Sound sector of Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakowski, Molly A.; Aciego, Sarah M.; Delmonte, Barbara; Baroni, Carlo; Salvatore, Maria Cristina; Sims, Kenneth W. W.

    2016-06-01

    Determining the geographical provenance of dust provides crucial insight into the global dust cycle. For the East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS), the importance of Southern hemisphere potential dust sources has been thoroughly investigated using radiogenic isotopes, whereas proximal dust source areas located on the periphery of the ice sheet remain poorly documented from a geochemical standpoint. In this work, we expand the existing isotopic (Srsbnd Nd) catalogue of dust and sand-sized sediments from Victoria Land and the McMurdo Sound sector, and incorporate Hf isotopic data to place additional constraints on dust source identification. The isotopic field for materials considered in this study is characterized by 87Sr/86Sr ratios ranging from 0.703 to 0.783, εNd between -12.01 and 6.36, and εHf from -16.77 to 6.89. As reported in previous works, the data reveal close relationships between Antarctic sediments and distinct parent lithologies; in addition, our findings emphasize the background presence of very fine dusts originating from dominant global sources and regional volcanic activity as barriers to direct source-to-sink comparison of isotopic signatures. Thus, geochemical characterizations of dust sources to the Antarctic ice sheet involving multiple size fractions, including coarser-grained particles more susceptible to short-range transport, can help us to rule out global sources of dust when examining local sediment cores and ice cores.

  18. Signature Balancing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordkamp, H.W.; Brink, M. van den

    2006-01-01

    Signatures are an important part of the design of a ship. In an ideal situation, signatures must be as low as possible. However, due to budget constraints it is most unlikely to reach this ideal situation. The arising question is which levels of signatures are optimal given the different scenarios i

  19. Radiogenic and Stable Isotope and Hydrogeochemical Investigation of Groundwater, Pajarito Plateau and Surrounding Areas, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patrick Longmire, Michael Dale, Dale Counce, Andrew Manning, Toti Larson, Kim Granzow, Robert Gray, and Brent Newman

    2007-07-15

    From October 2004 through February 2006, Los Alamos National Laboratory, the New Mexico Environment Department-Department of Energy Oversight Bureau, and the United States Geological Survey conducted a hydrochemical investigation. The purpose of the investigation was to evaluate groundwater flow paths and determine groundwater ages using tritium/helium-3 and carbon-14 along with aqueous inorganic chemistry. Knowledge of groundwater age and flow paths provides a technical basis for selecting wells and springs for monitoring. Groundwater dating is also relevant to groundwater resource management, including aquifer sustainability, especially during periods of long-term drought. At Los Alamos, New Mexico, groundwater is either modern (post-1943), submodern (pre-1943), or mixed (containing both pre- and post-1943 components). The regional aquifer primarily consists of submodern groundwater. Mixed-age groundwater results from initial infiltration of surface water, followed by mixing with perched alluvial and intermediate-depth groundwater and the regional aquifer. No groundwater investigation is complete without using tritium/helium-3 and carbon-14 dating methods to quantify amounts of modern, mixed, and/or submodern components present in samples. Computer models of groundwater flow and transport at Los Alamos should be calibrated to groundwater ages for perched intermediate zones and the regional aquifer determined from this investigation. Results of this study clearly demonstrate the occurrence of multiple flow paths and groundwater ages occurring within the Sierra de los Valles, beneath the Pajarito Plateau, and at the White Rock Canyon springs. Localized groundwater recharge occurs within several canyons dissecting the Pajarito Plateau. Perched intermediate-depth groundwater and the regional aquifer beneath Pueblo Canyon, Los Alamos Canyon, Sandia Canyon, Mortandad Canyon, Pajarito Canyon, and Canon de Valle contain a modern component. This modern component consists of tritium, nitrate, perchlorate, chromate, boron, uranium, and/or high explosive compounds. It is very unlikely that there is only one transport or travel time, ranging from 25 to 62 years, for these conservative chemicals migrating from surface water to the regional water table. Lengths of groundwater flow paths vary within deep saturated zones containing variable concentrations of tritium. The 4-series springs discharging within White Rock Canyon contain a modern component of groundwater, primarily tritium. Average groundwater ages for the regional aquifer beneath the Pajarito Plateau varied from 565 to 10,817 years, based on unadjusted carbon-14 measurements.

  20. Refinement of the supercontinent cycle with Hf, Nd and Sr isotopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kent C. Condie

    2013-11-01

    External and internal orogens show similar patterns in ɛNd and ɛHf with age suggesting that both juvenile and reworked crustal components are produced in both types of orogens with similar proportions. However, both types of orogens clearly produce more juvenile isotopic signatures in retreating mode than in advancing mode. Many secular changes in ɛHf and ɛNd distributions correlate with the supercontinent cycle. Although supercontinent breakup is correlated with short-lived decreasing ɛHf and ɛNd (≤100 Myr for most supercontinents, there is no isotopic evidence for the breakup of the Paleoproterozoic supercontinent Nuna. Assembly of supercontinents by extroversion is recorded by decreasing ɛNd in granitoids and metasediments and decreasing ɛHf in zircons, attesting to the role of crustal reworking in external orogens in advancing mode. As expected, seawater Sr isotopes increase and seawater Nd isotopes decrease during supercontinent assembly by extroversion. Pangea is the only supercontinent that has a clear isotopic record of introversion assembly, during which median ɛNd and ɛHf rise rapidly for ≤100 Myr. Although expected to increase, radiogenic seawater Sr decreases (and seawater Nd increases during assembly of Pangea, a feature that may be caused by juvenile input into the oceans from new ocean ridges and external orogens in retreating mode. The fact that a probable onset of plate tectonics around 3 Ga is not recorded in isotopic distributions may be due the existence of widespread felsic crust formed prior to the onset of plate tectonics in a stagnant lid tectonic regime, as supported by Nd and Hf model ages.

  1. Combining metal and nonmetal isotopic measurements in barite to identify mode of formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, E. M.; Paytan, A.; Eisenhauer, A.; Scher, H. D.; Wortmann, U.

    2014-12-01

    Barite (BaSO4) is a highly stable and widely-distributed mineral found in magmatic, metamorphic, and sedimentary rocks (of all ages), as well as in soils, aerosol dust, and extraterrestrial material. Today, barite can form in a variety of settings in the oceans (hydrothermal, cold seeps, water column, sediments) and on the continents - where supersaturation and precipitation of barite typically occurs from the mixing of fluids - one containing Ba and another containing sulfate. Sulfur (δ34S) and oxygen (δ18O) isotopes together with 87Sr/86Sr and stable Sr-isotopic signatures (δ88/86Sr) of modern authigenic continental barite are compared to modern pelagic marine barite and marine hydrothermal and cold seep barite to investigate the potential for their combined use to indicate mode of barite formation. The 87Sr/86Sr in barite cleary identifies the source of fluid for any particular type of barite (as previously noted, see Paytan et al., 2002). The highest (most radiogenic) 87Sr/86Sr values are measured in continental barite samples. There is no unique δ88/86Sr signature for any particular type of barite, but coretop marine (pelagic) barite has a consistent value measured from samples collected in different ocean basins. The highest and lowest δ88/86Sr values were measured in continental barite samples. The combination of isotopic systems result in unique δ88/86Sr and δ18O relationships and distinct δ88/86Sr and δ34S relationships for different types of barites investigated. Data suggest that the combined use of these metal and nonmetal isotopic measurements in barite could be useful as a new geochemical proxy to identify mode of barite mineralization for use in earth science applications including understanding ancient barite deposits.

  2. The effect of permafrost, vegetation, and lithology on Mg and Si isotope composition of the Yenisey River and its tributaries at the end of the spring flood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavromatis, Vasileios; Rinder, Thomas; Prokushkin, Anatoly S.; Pokrovsky, Oleg S.; Korets, Mikhail A.; Chmeleff, Jérôme; Oelkers, Eric H.

    2016-10-01

    This work focuses on the behavior of the stable Mg and Si isotope compositions of the largest Arctic river, the Yenisey River and 28 of its major and minor tributaries during the spring flood period. Samples were collected along a 1500 km latitudinal profile covering a wide range of permafrost, lithology, and vegetation. Despite significant contrasts in the main physico-geographical, climate, and lithological parameters of the watersheds, the isotope composition of both dissolved Mg and Si was found to be only weakly influenced by the degree of the permafrost coverage, type of vegetation (forest vs. tundra), and lithology (granites, basalts, carbonates or terrigenous rocks). This observation is generally consistent with the lack of chemical uptake of Mg and Si by soil mineral formation and vegetation during the early spring. The radiogenic Sr isotope composition of the Yenisey and its tributaries varied within a narrow range (0.708 ⩽ 87Sr/86Sr ⩽ 0.711) reflecting the dominance of Phanerozoic rock weathering and/or atmospheric deposition on these compositions. The Mg and Si isotopic compositions of riverine samples reflect two main processes with distinct isotopic signatures. First, isotopically heavier Mg (δ26Mg = -1.0 ± 0.2‰) and isotopically lighter Si (δ30Si = 1.0 ± 0.25‰) are added to the waters by river suspended matter dissolution and leaching from vegetation biomass/topsoil litter. Second, isotopically lighter Mg (δ26Mg = -1.5 to -1.75‰) and isotopically heavier Si (δ30Si = 1.75-2.0‰) are delivered to the Yenisey's tributaries from deep underground water feeding the rivers via taliks. This lighter Mg and heavier Si isotopic composition is interpreted to originate from Precambrian dolomite dissolution and aluminosilicate dissolution coupled with authigenic mineral precipitation, respectively, in deep underground water reservoirs. Taking account of the isotopic composition evolution over the course of the year established earlier on mono

  3. Carbon isotope signatures of latest Permian marine successions of the Southern Alps suggest a continental runoff pulse enriched in land plant material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. H. Kraus

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The latest Permian mass extinction, the most severe Phanerozoic biotic crisis, is marked by dramatic changes in palaeoenvironments. These changes significantly disrupted the global carbon cycle, reflected by a prominent and well known negative carbon isotope excursion recorded in marine and continental sediments. Carbon isotope trends of bulk carbonate and bulk organic matter in marine deposits of the European Southern Alps near the low-latitude marine event horizon deviate from each other. A positive excursion of several permil in δ13Corg starts earlier and is much more pronounced than the short-term positive 13Ccarb excursion; both excursions interrupt the general negative trend. Throughout the entire period investigated, 13Corg values become lighter with increasing distance from the palaeocoastline. Changing 13Corg values may be due to the influx of comparatively isotopically heavy land plant material. The stronger influence of land plant material on the 13Corg during the positive isotope excursion indicates a temporarily enhanced continental runoff that may either reflect increased precipitation, possibly triggered by aerosols originating from Siberian Trap volcanism, or indicate higher erosion rate in the face of reduced land vegetation cover. doi:10.1002/mmng.201300004

  4. Lipid biomarkers for anaerobic oxidation of methane and sulphate reduction in cold seep sediments of Nyegga pockmarks (Norwegian margin): discrepancies in contents and carbon isotope signatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chevalier, N.; Bouloubassi, I.; Stadnitskaia, A.; Taphanel, M.H.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.

    2014-01-01

    Distributions and carbon isotopic compositions of microbial lipid biomarkers were investigated in sediment cores from the G11 and G12 pockmarks in the Nyegga sector of the Storegga Slide on the mid-Norwegian margin to explore differences in depth zonation, type and carbon assimilation mode of anaero

  5. Search for isotopic signatures of a supernova explosion close to the solar system in marine sediments; Recherche de signatures isotopiques dans les sediments marins de l'explosion d'une supernova proche du systeme solaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitoussi, Caroline [Centre de Spectrometrie Nucleaire et de Spectrometrie de Masse, (CSNSM) IN2P3/CNRS, Campus d' Orsay, Bat 108, 91405 Orsay (France)

    2006-06-15

    The recent observation of a {sup 60}Fe peak in a deep-sea ferro-manganese crust has been interpreted as due to a supernova explosion relatively close to the solar system 2.8 {+-} 0.4 Myr ago. To confirm this interpretation with better time-resolved measurements, and the simultaneous access, on the same sample, to other isotopes and geochemical phases, marine sediments seem to be a tool of choice. The objective of this work was to search for isotopic anomalies which would be characteristic for residues of this supernova. More specifically, {sup 129}I, {sup 60}Fe, and {sup 26}Al have been investigated, being measured by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS). Quantifying these nuclides' fluxes would help constrain stellar nucleosynthesis models. These residues are isotopes initially produced during hydrostatic and/or explosive nucleosynthesis. The physical conditions during the explosion (temperature, neutron density) are such that supernovae are thought to be good candidates for the astrophysical site of the r-process. The {sup 129}I study showed that measurement of pre-anthropogenic {sup 129}I/{sup 127}I ratios need a very strict control of the various potential {sup 129}I sources, especially when working with small quantities (micrograms) of iodine. This study revealed that the expected pre-anthropogenic {sup 129}I/{sup 127}I ratio for pre-nuclear samples in the marine environment shows a large discrepancy between theoretical calculations and experimental measurements. {sup 60}Fe and {sup 26}Al measurements allow us to conclude that, in the authigenic phase of the marine sediments, there is no {sup 60}Fe anomaly in the time interval defined by the signal found on the Fe-Mn crust (from 2.4 to 3.2 Myr), and no {sup 26}Al anomaly from 2.6 to 3.2 Myr. (author)

  6. The origin of Cenozoic continental basalts in east-central China: Constrained by linking Pb isotopes to other geochemical variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zheng; Zheng, Yong-Fei; Zhao, Zi-Fu

    2017-01-01

    Cenozoic continental basalts in east-central China are characterized by OIB-like trace element patterns with more depleted to less enriched Sr-Nd isotope compositions. Such geochemical signatures are attributable to variable contributions to their mantle sources from crustal components in the oceanic subduction zone. A combined study of basalt Pb isotope variations with other geochemical variables indicates that four mantle and crustal components were involved in the basalt petrogenesis. Model calculations verify the geochemical transfer from the subducted crustal components to the mantle sources. The depleted MORB mantle component is indicated by the depleted Sr-Nd isotope compositions of basalts. Relatively high 206Pb/204Pb and low Δ8/4 ratios are ascribed to contributions from the igneous oceanic crust with high U/Pb and low Th/U ratios, low 206Pb/204Pb and high Δ8/4 ratios are ascribed to the lower continental crust, and high 206Pb/204Pb and high Δ8/4 ratios are linked to the seafloor sediment. This generates different compositions of mantle sources for these OIB-like continental basalts. The basalts with the most depleted Sr-Nd isotope compositions show Pb isotope compositions distinct from Pacific MORB but similar to Indian MORB, suggesting the occurrence of Indian type asthenospheric mantle beneath the continental lithosphere of eastern China. The depleted MORB mantle would be metasomatized by the three crustal components at the slab-mantle interface in oceanic subduction channel, generating the mantle sources that are enriched in melt-mobile incompatible trace elements and their pertinent radiogenic isotopes. Nevertheless, the crustal components were not directly incorporated in the forms of crustal rocks into the mantle sources, but underwent partial melting to produce the felsic melts that predominate the composition of those trace elements and their pertinent radiogenic isotopes in the basalts. As such, the depleted MORB mantle component was

  7. Legacy of contaminant N sources to the NO3(-) signature in rivers: a combined isotopic (δ(15)N-NO3(-), δ(18)O-NO3(-), δ(11)B) and microbiological investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briand, Cyrielle; Sebilo, Mathieu; Louvat, Pascale; Chesnot, Thierry; Vaury, Véronique; Schneider, Maude; Plagnes, Valérie

    2017-02-02

    Nitrate content of surface waters results from complex mixing of multiple sources, whose signatures can be modified through N reactions occurring within the different compartments of the whole catchment. Despite this complexity, the determination of nitrate origin is the first and crucial step for water resource preservation. Here, for the first time, we combined at the catchment scale stable isotopic tracers (δ(15)N and δ(18)O of nitrate and δ(11)B) and fecal indicators to trace nitrate sources and pathways to the stream. We tested this approach on two rivers in an agricultural region of SW France. Boron isotopic ratios evidenced inflow from anthropogenic waters, microbiological markers revealed organic contaminations from both human and animal wastes. Nitrate δ(15N) and δ(18)O traced inputs from the surface leaching during high flow events and from the subsurface drainage in base flow regime. They also showed that denitrification occurred within the soils before reaching the rivers. Furthermore, this study highlighted the determinant role of the soil compartment in nitrate formation and recycling with important spatial heterogeneity and temporal variability.

  8. Legacy of contaminant N sources to the NO3- signature in rivers: a combined isotopic (δ15N-NO3-, δ18O-NO3-, δ11B) and microbiological investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briand, Cyrielle; Sebilo, Mathieu; Louvat, Pascale; Chesnot, Thierry; Vaury, Véronique; Schneider, Maude; Plagnes, Valérie

    2017-02-01

    Nitrate content of surface waters results from complex mixing of multiple sources, whose signatures can be modified through N reactions occurring within the different compartments of the whole catchment. Despite this complexity, the determination of nitrate origin is the first and crucial step for water resource preservation. Here, for the first time, we combined at the catchment scale stable isotopic tracers (δ15N and δ18O of nitrate and δ11B) and fecal indicators to trace nitrate sources and pathways to the stream. We tested this approach on two rivers in an agricultural region of SW France. Boron isotopic ratios evidenced inflow from anthropogenic waters, microbiological markers revealed organic contaminations from both human and animal wastes. Nitrate δ15N and δ18O traced inputs from the surface leaching during high flow events and from the subsurface drainage in base flow regime. They also showed that denitrification occurred within the soils before reaching the rivers. Furthermore, this study highlighted the determinant role of the soil compartment in nitrate formation and recycling with important spatial heterogeneity and temporal variability.

  9. Sequentially sampled gas hydrate water, coupled with pore water and bottom water isotopic and ionic signatures at the Kukuy mud volcano, Lake Baikal: ambiguous deep-rooted source of hydrate-forming water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Hirotsugu; Hachikubo, Akihiro; Sakagami, Hirotoshi; Yamashita, Satoshi; Soramoto, Yusuke; Kotake, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Nobuo; Shoji, Hitoshi; Pogodaeva, Tatyana; Khlystov, Oleg; Khabuev, Andrey; Naudts, Lieven; De Batist, Marc

    2014-06-01

    The isotopic and ionic composition of pure gas hydrate (GH) water was examined for GHs recovered in three gravity cores (165-193 cm length) from the Kukuy K-9 mud volcano (MV) in Lake Baikal. A massive GH sample from core St6GC4 (143-165 cm core depth interval) was dissociated progressively over 6 h in a closed glass chamber, and 11 sequentially collected fractions of dissociated GH water analyzed. Their hydrogen and oxygen isotopic compositions, and the concentrations of Cl- and HCO3 - remained essentially constant over time, except that the fraction collected during the first 50 minutes deviated partly from this pattern. Fraction #1 had a substantially higher Cl- concentration, similar to that of pore water sampled immediately above (135-142 cm core depth) the main GH-bearing interval in that core. Like the subsequent fractions, however, the HCO3 - concentration was markedly lower than that of pore water. For the GH water fractions #2 to #11, an essentially constant HCO3 -/Cl- ratio of 305 differed markedly from downcore pore water HCO3 -/Cl- ratios of 63-99. Evidently, contamination of the extracted GH water by ambient pore water probably adhered to the massive GH sample was satisfactorily restricted to the initial phase of GH dissociation. The hydrogen and oxygen isotopic composition of hydrate-forming water was estimated using the measured isotopic composition of extracted GH water combined with known isotopic fractionation factors between GH and GH-forming water. Estimated δD of -126 to -133‰ and δ18O of -15.7 to -16.7‰ differed partly from the corresponding signatures of ambient pore water (δD of -123‰, δ18O of -15.6‰) and of lake bottom water (δD of -121‰, δ18O of -15.8‰) at the St6GC4 coring site, suggesting that the GH was not formed from those waters. Observations of breccias in that core point to a possible deep-rooted water source, consistent with published thermal measurements for the neighboring Kukuy K-2 MV. By contrast, the pore

  10. Autotrophic fixation of geogenic CO2 by microorganisms contributes to soil organic matter formation and alters isotope signatures in a wetland mofette

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beulig, Felix

    2015-01-01

    To quantify the contribution of autotrophic microorganisms to organic matter (OM) formation in soils, we investigated natural CO2 vents (mofettes) situated in a wetland in northwest Bohemia (Czech Republic). Mofette soils had higher soil organic matter (SOM) concentrations than reference soils due...... of radiocarbon and enriched in 13C compared to atmospheric CO2. Together, these isotopic signals allow us to distinguish C fixed by plants from C fixed by autotrophic microorganisms using their differences in 13C discrimination. We can then estimate that up to 27 % of soil organic matter in the 0–10 cm layer...... (qPCR) and by acetogenic and methanogenic microorganisms, shown present in the mofettes by previous studies. Combined Δ14C and δ13C isotope mass balances indicated that microbially derived carbon accounted for 8–27 % of bulk SOM in this soil layer. The findings imply that autotrophic microorganisms...

  11. Simulation of the mantle and crustal helium isotope signature in the Mediterranean Sea using a high-resolution regional circulation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayache, M.; Dutay, J.-C.; Jean-Baptiste, P.; Fourré, E.

    2015-12-01

    Helium isotopes (3He, 4He) are useful tracers for investigating the deep ocean circulation and for evaluating ocean general circulation models, because helium is a stable and conservative nuclide that does not take part in any chemical or biological process. Helium in the ocean originates from three different sources, namely, (i) gas dissolution in equilibrium with atmospheric helium, (ii) helium-3 addition by radioactive decay of tritium (called tritiugenic helium), and (iii) injection of terrigenic helium-3 and helium-4 by the submarine volcanic activity which occurs mainly at plate boundaries, and also addition of (mainly) helium-4 from the crust and sedimentary cover by α-decay of uranium and thorium contained in various minerals. We present the first simulation of the terrigenic helium isotope distribution in the whole Mediterranean Sea using a high-resolution model (NEMO-MED12). For this simulation we build a simple source function for terrigenic helium isotopes based on published estimates of terrestrial helium fluxes. We estimate a hydrothermal flux of 3.5 mol3 He yr-1 and a lower limit for the crustal flux at 1.6 × 10-7 4He mol m-2 yr-1. In addition to providing constraints on helium isotope degassing fluxes in the Mediterranean, our simulations provide information on the ventilation of the deep Mediterranean waters which is useful for assessing NEMO-MED12 performance. This study is part of the work carried out to assess the robustness of the NEMO-MED12 model, which will be used to study the evolution of the climate and its effect on the biogeochemical cycles in the Mediterranean Sea, and to improve our ability to predict the future evolution of the Mediterranean Sea under the increasing anthropogenic pressure.

  12. Laser-based measurements of δ13 C and δ2 H methane isotope signatures: precisions competitive with mass spectrometry methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yacovitch, Tara; Shorter, Joanne; Nelson, David; Herndon, Scott; Agnese, Mike; McManus, Barry; Zahniser, Mark

    2017-04-01

    In order to understand how and why methane (CH4 ) concentrations change over time, it is necessary to understand their sources and sinks. Stable isotope measurements of 13 CH4 :12 CH4 and CH3 D:12 CH4 ratios constrain the inventory of these sinks and sources. Current measurements often depend on Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS), which requires extensive sample preparation including cryogenic separation of methane from air and subsequent conversion to either CO2 or H2 . Here, we detail improvements to a direct-absorption laser spectrometer that enable fast and precise measurements of methane isotope ratios (δ13 C and δ2 H ) of ambient air samples, without such sample preparation. The measurement system consists of a laser-based direct absorption spectrometer configured with a sample manifold for measurement of discrete samples (as opposed to flow-through measurements). Samples are trapped in the instrument using a rapid sample switching technique that compares each flask sample against a monitor tank sample. This approach reduces instrument drift and results in excellent precision. Precisions of 0.054 o/oo for δ13 C and 1.4 o/oo for δ2 H have been achieved (Allan-Werle deviations). These results are obtained in 20 minutes using 4 replicate comparisons to a monitor tank.

  13. Comparison of clumped isotope signatures of dolomite cements to fluid inclusion thermometry in the temperature range of 73-176 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Came, Rosemarie E.; Azmy, Karem; Tripati, Aradhna; Olanipekun, Babatunde-John

    2017-02-01

    Widespread application of the novel clumped isotope paleothermometer (Δ47) using dolomite samples from shallow crustal settings has been hindered by a lack of adequate constraints on clumped isotope systematics in dolomites that formed at temperatures greater than 50 °C. Consequently, many high-temperature applications involving diagenetic dolomites have required an assumption that the relationship between temperature and Δ47 in diagenetic dolomite resembles the theoretical temperature dependence for calcite. Here we present Δ47 results from dolomite cements for which precipitation temperatures were determined independently using fluid inclusion microthermometry. We compare a rock-based ;calibration; for samples from the temperature range of ∼73 to 176 °C to previously published laboratory-derived calibrations for synthetic calcites. This novel combination of approaches yields results that are broadly consistent with results reported from controlled laboratory experiments, providing an important confirmation of the utility of clumped isotopes in real-world systems. Our results suggest that the Δ47 of dolomite cements may provide key information in the reconstruction of burial and thermal histories and also in the recognition of potential petroleum reservoirs.

  14. Investigation of amino acid δ 13C signatures in bone collagen to reconstruct human palaeodiets using liquid chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, Kyungcheol; Smith, Colin I.; Fuller, Benjamin T.; Richards, Michael P.

    2010-11-01

    This research presents the individual amino acid δ 13C values in bone collagen of humans ( n = 9) and animals ( n = 27) from two prehistoric shell midden sites in Korea. We obtained complete baseline separation of 16 of the 18 amino acids found in bone collagen by using liquid chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (LC-IRMS). The isotopic results reveal that the humans and animals in the two sites had similar patterns in essential amino acids (EAAs) and non-essential amino acids (NEAAs). The EAA and NEAA δ 13C values in humans are intermediate between those in marine and terrestrial animals. However, the threonine δ 13C values in humans and animals measured in this study are more highly enriched than those of other amino acids. At both sites, all amino acids in marine animals are 13C-enriched relative to those of the terrestrial animals. The isotopic evidence suggests that the Tongsamdong human had EAAs and NEAAs from marine food resources, while the Nukdo humans mainly had EAAs from terrestrial food resources but obtained NEAAs from both terrestrial and marine resources. The δ 13C isotopic differences in amino acids between marine and terrestrial animals were the largest for glycine (NEAA) and histidine (EAA) and the smallest for tyrosine (NEAA) and phenylalanine (EAA). In addition, threonine among the EAAs also had a large difference (˜8‰) in δ 13C values between marine and terrestrial animals, and has the potential to be used as an isotopic marker in palaeodietary studies. Threonine δ 13C values were used in conjunction with the established Δ 13C Glycine-phenylalanine values and produced three distinct dietary groups (terrestrial, omnivorous, and marine). In addition, threonine δ 13C values and Δ 13C Serine-phenylalanine values were discovered to separate between two dietary groups (terrestrial vs. marine), and these δ 13C values may provide a potential new indicator for investigating the distinction between marine and terrestrial protein

  15. Hf-Nd Isotopes in West Philippine Basin Basalts: Results from International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) Site U1438 and Implications for the Early History of the Izu-Bonin-Mariana (IBM) Subduction System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yogodzinski, G. M.; Hocking, B.; Bizimis, M.; Hickey-Vargas, R.; Ishizuka, O.; Bogus, K.; Arculus, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    Drilling at IODP Site U1438, located immediately west of Kyushu-Palau Ridge (KPR), the site of IBM subduction initiation, penetrated 1460 m of volcaniclastic sedimentary rock and 150 m of underlying basement. Biostratigraphic controls indicate a probable age for the oldest sedimentary rocks at around 55 Ma (51-64 Ma - Arculus et al., Nat Geosci in-press). This is close to the 48-52 Ma time period of IBM subduction initiation, based on studies in the forearc. There, the first products of volcanism are tholeiitic basalts termed FAB (forearc basalt), which are more depleted than average MORB and show subtle indicators of subduction geochemical enrichment (Reagan et al., 2010 - Geochem Geophy Geosy). Shipboard data indicate that Site U1438 basement basalts share many characteristics with FABs, including primitive major elements (high MgO/FeO*) and strongly depleted incompatible element patterns (Ti, Zr, Ti/V and Zr/Y below those of average MORB). Initial results thus indicate that FAB geochemistry may have been produced not only in the forearc, but also in backarc locations (west of the KPR) at the time of subduction initiation. Hf-Nd isotopes for Site 1438 basement basalts show a significant range of compositions from ɛNd of 7.0 to 9.5 and ɛHf of 14.5 to 19.8 (present-day values). The data define a well-correlated and steep array in Hf-Nd isotope space. Relatively radiogenic Hf compared to Nd indicates an Indian Ocean-type MORB source, but the dominant signature, with ɛHf >16.5, is more radiogenic than most Indian MORB. The pattern through time is from more-to-less radiogenic and more variable Hf-Nd isotopes within the basement section. This pattern culminates in basaltic andesite sills, which intrude the lower parts of the sedimentary section. The sills have the least radiogenic compositions measured so far (ɛNd ~6.6, ɛHf ~13.8), and are similar to those of boninites of the IBM forearc and modern IBM arc and reararc rocks. The pattern within the basement

  16. Pb isotopes during mingling and melting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waight, Tod Earle; Lesher, Charles E.

    2010-01-01

    Pb isotopic data are presented for hybrid rocks formed by mingling between mantle-derived tholeiitic magma of the Eocene Miki Fjord macrodike (East Greenland) and melt derived from the adjacent Precambrian basement. Bulk mixing and AFC processes between end-members readily identified in the field...... fail to model the Pb isotope systematics. Selective contamination during diffusional exchange, which can explain the complex Sr and Nd isotope compositions of the hybrid rocks (Blichert-Toft et al., 1992), cannot fully account for the variability of the Pb isotopic data using the identified crustal end......-members. The crustal anatectic end-member, although similar in Sr and Nd isotope composition, has a markedly different Pb isotopic composition than its source gneiss. The differences are consistent with preferential incorporation of radiogenic Pb from accessory phases such as metamict zircon or loosely-bound Pb from...

  17. Contrasting isotopic signatures between anthropogenic and geogenic Zn and evidence for post-depositional fractionation processes in smelter-impacted soils from Northern France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juillot, Farid; Maréchal, Chloe; Morin, Guillaume; Jouvin, Delphine; Cacaly, Sylvain; Telouk, Philipe; Benedetti, Marc F.; Ildefonse, Philippe; Sutton, Steve; Guyot, François; Brown, Gordon E., Jr.

    2011-05-01

    Zinc isotopes have been studied along two smelter-impacted soil profiles sampled near one of the largest Pb and Zn processing plants in Europe located in northern France, about 50 km south of Lille. Mean δ 66Zn values along these two soil profiles range from +0.22 ± 0.17‰ (2 σ) to +0.34 ± 0.17‰ (2 σ) at the lowest horizons and from +0.38 ± 0.45‰ (2 σ) to +0.76 ± 0.14‰ (2 σ) near the surface. The δ 66Zn values in the lowest horizons of the soils are interpreted as being representative of the local geochemical background (mean value +0.31 ± 0.38‰), whereas heavier δ 66Zn values near the surface of the two soils are related to anthropogenic Zn. This anthropogenic Zn occurs in the form of franklinite (ZnFe 2O 4)-bearing slag grains originating from processing wastes at the smelter site and exhibiting δ 66Zn values of +0.81 ± 0.20‰ (2 σ). The presence of franklinite is indicated by EXAFS analysis of the topsoil samples from both soil profiles as well as by micro-XANES analysis of the surface horizon of a third smelter-impacted soil from a distant site. These results indicate that naturally occurring Zn and smelter-derived Zn exhibit significantly different δ 66Zn values, which suggests that zinc isotopes can be used to distinguish between geogenic and anthropogenic sources of Zn in smelter-impacted soils. In addition to a possible influence of additional past sources of light Zn (likely Zn-sulfides and Zn-sulfates directly emitted by the smelter), the light δ 66Zn values in the surface horizons compared to smelter-derived slag materials are interpreted as resulting mainly from fractionation processes associated with biotic and/or abiotic pedological processes (Zn-bearing mineral precipitation, Zn complexation by organic matter, and plant uptake of Zn). This conclusion emphasizes the need for additional Zn isotopic studies before being able to use Zn isotopes to trace sources and pathways of this element in surface environments.

  18. Lignite deposits of the Kutch Basin, western India: Carbon isotopic and palynological signatures of the early Eocene hyperthermal event ETM2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Shailesh; Verma, Poonam; Rao, M. R.; Garg, Rahul; Kapur, Vivesh V.; Bajpai, Sunil

    2017-09-01

    This study presents new results of combined palynological and stable carbon isotope (δ13C) investigations carried out in the well known lignite sequence at Panandhro, District Kutch, in the Gujarat state of western India. Dinoflagellate cysts and associated spore-pollen assemblage assign an early Eocene (Ypresian) age to the lignitic succession at Panandhro. Furthermore, a pronounced negative Carbon Isotope Excursion (CIE) of about 2.7‰, correlated to the Second Eocene Thermal Maximum (53.7 Ma), a globally recognized hyperthermal event, was discovered in the middle part of the succession, consistent with the palynological constraints. This is the first record of an Eocene hyperthermal event (ETM2) from the Kutch Basin. Our data has regional implications for the age of the lignitic sequences across western India as it demonstrates that there is no significant age difference between the lignite deposits of the Kutch and Cambay basins. Our results also support a Lutetian age for the previously described vertebrate fossils, including whales, from the Panandhro mine section.

  19. Geochemistry of organic carbon and nitrogen in surface sediments of coastal Bohai Bay inferred from their ratios and stable isotopic signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xuelu; Yang, Yuwei; Wang, Chuanyuan

    2012-06-01

    Total organic carbon (TOC), total nitrogen (TN) and their δ(13)C and δ(15)N values were determined for 42 surface sediments from coastal Bohai Bay in order to determine the concentration and identify the source of organic matter. The sampling sites covered both the marine region of coastal Bohai Bay and the major rivers it connects with. More abundant TOC and TN in sediments from rivers than from the marine region reflect the situation that most of the terrestrial organic matter is deposited before it meets the sea. The spatial variation in δ(13)C and δ(15)N signatures implies that the input of organic matter from anthropogenic activities has a more significant influence on its distribution than that from natural processes. Taking the area as a whole, surface sediments in the marine region of coastal Bohai Bay are dominated by marine derived organic carbon, which on average accounts for 62±11% of TOC.

  20. Pb-Sr-Nd isotopes in surficial materials at the Pebble Porphyry Cu-Au-Mo Deposit, Southwestern Alaska: can the mineralizing fingerprint be detected through cover?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayuso, Robert A.; Kelley, Karen D.; Eppinger, Robert G.; Forni, Francesca

    2013-01-01

    The Cretaceous Pebble porphyry Cu-Au-Mo deposit is covered by tundra and glacigenic sediments. Pb-Sr-Nd measurements were done on sediments and soils to establish baseline conditions prior to the onset of mining operations and contribute to the development of exploration methods for concealed base metal deposits of this type. Pebble rocks have a moderate range for 206Pb/204Pb = 18.574 to 18.874, 207Pb/204Pb = 15.484 to 15.526, and 208,Pb/204Pb = 38.053 to 38.266. Mineralized granodiorite shows a modest spread in 87Sr/86Sr (0.704354–0.707621) and 143Nd/144Nd (0.512639–0.512750). Age-corrected (89 Ma) values for the granodiorite yield relatively unradiogenic Pb (e.g., 207Pb/204Pb 87Sr/86Sr, and positive values of ɛNd (1.00–4.52) that attest to a major contribution of mantle-derived source rocks. Pond sediments and soils have similar Pb isotope signatures and 87Sr/86Sr and 143Nd/144Nd values that resemble the mineralized granodiorites. Glacial events have obscured the recognition of isotope signatures of mineralized rocks in the sediments and soils. Baseline radiogenic isotope compositions, prior to the onset of mining operations, reflect natural erosion, transport and deposition of heterogeneous till sheets that included debris from barren rocks, mineralized granodiorite and sulfides from the Pebble deposit, and other country rocks that pre- and postdate the mineralization events. Isotopic variations suggest that natural weathering of the deposit is generally reflected in these surficial materials. The isotope data provide geochemical constraints to glimpse through the extensive cover and together with other geochemical observations provide a vector to concealed mineralized rocks genetically linked with the Pebble deposit.

  1. The Chemical and Isotopic Signature of Old Groundwater and Magmatic Solutes in a Costa Rican Rainforest: Evidence From Carbon, Helium, and Chlorine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, M. D.; Genereux, D. P.; Solomon, D. K.

    2008-12-01

    Major ion, 18O, and water budget data from previous hydrologic studies at a Costa Rica lowland rainforest site, La Selva Biological station at the foot of Volcan Barva, indicate the presence and mixing of two distinct groundwaters: - bedrock groundwater: relatively high-solute groundwater that represents interbasin groundwater flow into the lowland rainforest watersheds, and - local groundwater: more dilute groundwater recharged locally in the lowlands. In this study we found that C, He, and Cl concentrations and isotope data (ä13C, 14C, 3He/4He, 36Cl/Cl), in groundwater and surface water at La Selva and upslope in Braulio Carillo National Park, are strongly consistent with the mixing hypothesis and provide insight into the age and origin of the two groundwaters. Highly significant linear trends on plots of isotopic abundance vs. the inverse of concentration support the mixing of two groundwaters. High ä13C (-4.89), low 14C (7.98 pmC), high R/RA for He (6.88), and low 36Cl/Cl (17 x 10-15) of bedrock groundwater indicate that elevated C, He, and Cl concentrations in this groundwater are derived from magmatic outgassing and/or weathering of volcanic rock, most likely beneath nearby Volcan Barva. The estimated ä13C of magmatic CO2 was -2.6 , almost identical to the previously- measured ä13C of CO2 in high-temperature gases from two volcanoes in the region (-2.9 at Momotombo in Nicaragua and -2.7 at Arenal in Costa Rica). Concentrations and isotopic ratios of C, He, and Cl in local water are consistent with atmospheric/precipitation sources for He and Cl and a biogenic soil-gas CO2 source for DIC. 14C dating, using NETPATH (a geochemical mass-balance model), indicate an apparent age of bedrock groundwater in the range 2700-4300 years. Local groundwater has 14C concentrations >100 pmC, indicating the presence of anthropogenic "bomb carbon" and thus ages less than ~55 years for these samples collected in 2006. Overall the data are fully consistent with the conceptual

  2. ELECTRONIC SIGNATURES

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    10332324

    'electronic signature' means data attached to, incorporated in, or logically ... See Cwele v S 2012 4 All SA 497 (SCA); Mohlabeng v Minister of Safety and Security ... ZAKZPHC 51 (2 September 2010); Delta Finance, a Division of Wesbank, ...

  3. Target rocks, impact glasses, and melt rocks from the Lonar crater, India: Highly siderophile element systematics and Sr-Nd-Os isotopic signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Toni; Luguet, Ambre; Wegner, Wencke; Acken, David; Koeberl, Christian

    2016-07-01

    The Lonar crater is a ~0.57-Myr-old impact structure located in the Deccan Traps of the Indian peninsula. It probably represents the best-preserved impact structure hosted in continental flood basalts, providing unique opportunities to study processes of impact cratering in basaltic targets. Here we present highly siderophile element (HSE) abundances and Sr-Nd and Os isotope data for target basalts and impactites (impact glasses and impact melt rocks) from the Lonar area. These tools may enable us to better constrain the interplay of a variety of impact-related processes such as mixing, volatilization, and contamination. Strontium and Nd isotopic compositions of impactites confirm and extend earlier suggestions about the incorporation of ancient basement rocks in Lonar impactites. In the Re-Os isochron plot, target basalts exhibit considerable scatter around a 65.6 Myr Re-Os reference isochron, most likely reflecting weathering and/or magma replenishment processes. Most impactites plot at distinctly lower 187Re/188Os and 187Os/188Os ratios compared to the target rocks and exhibit up to two orders of magnitude higher abundances of Ir, Os, and Ru. Moreover, the impactites show near-chondritic interelement ratios of HSE. We interpret our results in terms of an addition of up to 0.03% of a chondritc component to most impact glasses and impact melt rocks. The magnitude of the admixture is significantly lower than the earlier reported 12-20 wt% of extraterrestrial component for Lonar impact spherules, reflecting the typical difference in the distribution of projectile component between impact glass spherules and bulk impactites.

  4. On the valency state of radiogenic lead in zircon and its consequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramers, J.; Frei, R; Newville, M.; Kober, B.; Villa, I.; (UCopenhagen); (Universitä); (t Bern); (UC); (University of Heidelberg)

    2009-03-23

    In zircon U-Pb systematics, extreme robustness up to the temperatures of granulite facies and anatexis contrasts with apparently easy loss of radiogenic Pb at low temperatures, often without any metamorphic event being in evidence. Here we propose that this paradoxical behaviour can be understood with the hypothesis that radiogenic Pb in zircon is tetravalent. We review data and arguments in favour of this hypothesis. Diffusion profiles calculated for Pb{sup 2+} in a 25 {micro}m radius zircon xenocryst in a melt at 1000 C, combined with the incompatibility of Pb{sup 2+}, or for a zircon core inside a younger zircon rim at this temperature, show age effects that should have been observed in SIMS dating. Further, in zircon evaporation as well as in leaching experiments, common Pb is generally released preferentially to radiogenic Pb. After removal of less radiogenic Pb, the evaporation record generally shows pure radiogenic Pb during the final evaporation steps. The distribution of residual Pb in a leached titanite, revealed by PIXE, is similar to that of Ti. Lastly, XANES spectra of a 1 Ga old titanite (predominantly radiogenic Pb) and an Alpine one (predominantly common Pb) are significantly different, although the former does not resemble that of PbO{sub 2}. The arguments why radiogenic Pb should be tetravalent are based on analogies with studies relating to the tetravalent state of {sup 234}Th and the hexavalent state of {sup 234}U, which show that {alpha}-recoil in silicates generates a strongly oxidizing environment at the site where the recoiling nucleus comes to rest. Further, a zircon grain, being small, should remain highly oxidizing in its interior by the constant loss of {beta}-particles, maintaining the 4+ state of radiogenic Pb. From its effective ion radius, similar to that of Zr{sup 4+}, and its charge, Pb{sup 4+} has to be compatible in the zircon lattice. Also, by analogy with U{sup 4+}, Th{sup 4+} and Hf{sup 4+}, its diffusivity should be several

  5. Radiogenic heat production in sedimentary rocks of the Gulf of Mexico Basin, south Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, T.E.; Sharp, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    Radiogenic heat production within the sedimentary section of the Gulf of Mexico basin is a significant source of heat. Radiogenic heat should be included in thermal models of this basin (and perhaps other sedimentary basins). We calculate that radiogenic heat may contribute up to 26% of the overall surface heat-flow density for an area in south Texas. Based on measurements of the radioactive decay rate of ??-particles, potassium concentration, and bulk density, we calculate radiogenic heat production for Stuart City (Lower Cretaceous) limestones, Wilcox (Eocene) sandstones and mudrocks, and Frio (Oligocene) sandstones and mudrocks from south Texas. Heat production rates range from a low of 0.07 ?? 0.01 ??W/m3 in clean Stuart City limestones to 2.21 ?? 0.24??W/m3 in Frio mudrocks. Mean heat production rates for Wilcox sandstones, Frio sandstones, Wilcox mudrocks, and Frio mudrocks are 0.88, 1.19, 1.50, and 1.72 ??W/m3, respectively. In general, the mudrocks produce about 30-40% more heat than stratigraphically equivalent sandstones. Frio rocks produce about 15% more heat than Wilcox rocks per unit volume of clastic rock (sandstone/mudrock). A one-dimensional heat-conduction model indicates that this radiogenic heat source has a significant effect on subsurface temperatures. If a thermal model were calibrated to observed temperatures by optimizing basal heat-flow density and ignoring sediment heat production, the extrapolated present-day temperature of a deeply buried source rock would be overestimated.Radiogenic heat production within the sedimentary section of the Gulf of Mexico basin is a significant source of heat. Radiogenic heat should be included in thermal models of this basin (and perhaps other sedimentary basins). We calculate that radiogenic heat may contribute up to 26% of the overall surface heat-flow density for an area in south Texas. Based on measurements of the radioactive decay rate of ??-particles, potassium concentration, and bulk density, we

  6. CERTIFICATELESS SIGNATURE AND BLIND SIGNATURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Lei; Zhang Futai

    2008-01-01

    Certificateless public key cryptography is a new paradigm introduced by AI-Riyami and Paterson. It eliminates the need of the certificates in traditional public key cryptosystems and the key escrow problem in IDentity-based Public Key Cryptography (ID-PKC). Due to the advantages of the certificateless public key cryptography,a new efficient certificateless pairing-based signature scheme is presented,which has some advantages over previous constructions in computational cost. Based on this new signature scheme,a certificateless blind signature scheme is proposed. The security of our schemes is proven based on the hardness of computational Diffie-Hellman problem.

  7. [Pooled Analysis of RET/PTC Gene Rearrangement Rate in Sporadic and Radiogenic Thyroid Papillary Carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushenkova, L N; Koterov, A N; Biryukov, A P

    2015-01-01

    The database of publications on molecular epidemiology of RET/PTC rearrangements in sporadic and radiogenic thyroid papillary carcinoma has been formed (197 sources at the end of 2014; coverage of 100%). Based on this database a pooled analysis of data on the rates of RET/PTC1, RET/PTC3 and RET/PTC in total was conducted. Statistical approach involves a simple pooling, as well as calculations on the models of random and fixed effects. Since almost all the strata were characterized by heterogeneity, simple pooling and random effect models were adequate. Calculations using both models led to almost identical results. For rates of RET/PTC1, RET/PTC3 and RET/PTC in total with respect to formed carcinoma striations the following values (pooling, in %) were obtained: sporadic, total--13.2; 8.9; 21.2; sporadic, adults--13.3; 9.9; 21.1; sporadic, children--22.4; 17.5; 44.5; radiogenic, total--20.9; 20.3; 40.4; radiotherapy (exposure in childhood)--31.1; 11.8; 42.5; children affected after the Chernobyl accident--19.9; 23.6; 46.1; radiological incidents (exposure in adulthood)--19.9; 7.7; 18.4. Statistically proven is the reliability of differences of carcinoma indicators for children compared with adults (both sporadic and radiogenic tumors) and for radiogenic cancer compared with sporadic. The greatest increase in rate after irradiation was found for RET/PTC1, previously characterized in vitro as one of radiogenic types of RET/PTC.

  8. Isotope and elemental geochemistry of Cretaceous fossiliferous concretions (Santana Formation, Brazil)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimhofer, Ulrich; Meister, Patrick; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Ariztegui, Daniel; Martill, David M.; Schwark, Lorenz

    2014-05-01

    carbonates. These radiogenic strontium-isotope signatures support late diagenetic overprinting of early carbonate phases and may reflect the particular tectono-sedimentary regime in this region during early rifting of the evolving Atlantic. Results from the Santana concretions demonstrate how the application of new geochemical tools can help to advance our understanding of early diagenetic processes and fossil preservation in the geological record.

  9. Dynamics of δ(15)N isotopic signatures of different intertidal macroalgal species: Assessment of bioindicators of N sources in coastal areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemesle, Stéphanie; Erraud, Alexandre; Mussio, Isabelle; Rusig, Anne-Marie; Claquin, Pascal

    2016-09-15

    δ(15)N of annual (Ulva sp., Porphyra sp.) and perennial intertidal seaweed species (Chondrus crispus, Fucus sp.) collected on 17 sampling points along the French coast of the English Channel in 2012 and 2013 were assessed on their suitability as bioindicators of N pollution in coastal areas. A sine function applied for δ(15)N time series data showed for all the species the same seasonal trend with lowest δ(15)N values in April and highest in summer but with no significant interspecific differences of amplitude (α) and phase angle (ϕ). This model provides a useful tool for monitoring the inter-annual changes of N pollution. An interspecific variability of δ(15)N values was observed, probably due to their tolerance to emersion. An in vitro study for comparing the kinetic acquisition of the isotopic signal and N uptake mechanisms of each species underlined the influence of algal physiology on the δ(15)N interspecific variability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Contribution of the ear and the flag leaf to grain filling in durum wheat inferred from the carbon isotope signature:Genotypic and growing conditions effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rut Sanchez-Bragado; Abdelhalim Elazab; Bangwei Zhou; Maria Dolors Serret; Jordi Bort; Maria Teresa Nieto-Taladriz; Jos Luis Araus

    2014-01-01

    The ear, together with the flag leaf, is believed to play a major role as a source of assimilates during grain fil ing in C3 cereals. However, the intrusive nature of most of the available methodologies prevents reaching conclusive results in this regard. This study compares the carbon isotope composition (d13C) in its natural abundance in the water-soluble fractions of the flag leaf blade and the ear with the d13C of mature kernels to assess the relative contribution of both organs to grain fil ing in durum wheat (Triticum turgidum L. var. durum). The relative contribution of the ear was higher in landraces compared to modern cultivars, as wel as in response to nitrogen fertilization and water stress. Such genotypic and environmental y driven differences were associated with changes in harvest index (HI), with the relative contribution of the ear being negatively associated with HI. In the case of the genotypic differences, the lower relative contribution of the ear in modern cultivars compared with landraces is probably associated with the appearance in the former of a certain amount of source limitation driven by a higher HI. In fact, the relative contribution of the ear was far more responsive to changes in HI in modern cultivars compared with landraces.

  11. Source apportionment of organic pollutants of a highway-traffic-influenced urban area in Bayreuth (Germany) using biomarker and stable carbon isotope signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, Bruno; Dreyer, Annekatrin; Bock, Michael; Fiedler, Stefan; Mehring, Marion; Heitmann, Tobias

    2005-06-01

    Traffic- and urban-influenced areas are prone to enhanced pollution with products of incomplete combustion of fossil fuels and biomass such as black carbon or polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Black carbon is composed of aromatic and graphitic structures and may act as a carrier for pollutants such as PAHs and heavy metals. However, little is known about possible contributions of traffic-derived black carbon to the black carbon inventory in soils. Similar uncertainties exist regarding the contribution of different pollutant sources to total PAH and black carbon contents. Therefore, the objective of this study was to quantify the importance of traffic pollution to black carbon and PAH inventories in soils. PAH contamination of soils adjacent to a major German highway in the urban area of Bayreuth with about 50,000 vehicles per day was in the same order of magnitude compared to highway-close soils reported in other studies. Using molecular (black carbon and PAHs) and compound-specific stable carbon isotope evidence (PAHs) it was demonstrated that this contamination originated not only from automobile exhausts, here primarily diesel, but also from tire abrasion and tailpipe soot which significantly contributed to the traffic-caused black carbon and PAH contamination. Low molecular weight PAHs were more widely transported than their heavy molecular counterparts (local distillation), whereas highway-traffic-caused black carbon contamination was distributed to at least 30 m from the highway. On the other hand, urban fire exhausts were distributed more homogeneously among the urban area.

  12. Paleo-hydrological changes in the Chew Bahir area during the past 50 ka inferred from isotope signatures in aquatic microfossils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junginger, Annett

    2017-04-01

    A major challenge in paleo-anthropology is to understand the impact of climatic changes on human evolution. The Hominin Sites and Paleo-lakes Drilling Project (HSPDP) is currently meeting that challenge by providing records that cover the last 3.7 Ma of paleoenvironmental change all located in close proximity to key paleo-anthropological findings in East Africa. One of the cored climatic archives comes from the Chew Bahir basin in southern Ethiopia, where duplicate sediment cores provide valuable insights about East African environmental variability during the last 550 ka. The lake basins in the eastern branch of the East African Rift System today contain mainly shallow and alkaline lakes. However, paleo-shorelines in the form of wave cut notches, shell beds, and beach ridges are common morphological evidences for deep freshwater lakes that have filled the basins up to their overflow level during pronounced humid episodes, such as the African Humid Period (15-5 ka). Unfortunately, further back in time, many of those morphological features disappear due to erosion and the estimation of paleo-water depths depend merely on qualitative proxies from core analyses. We here present a method that shows high potential to translate qualitative proxy signals from sediment core analyses to quantitative climate signals in the Ethiopian Rift. The method aims at water level reconstruction in the Chew Bahir basin using strontium isotope ratios (87Sr/86Sr, SIR) in lacustrine microfossils. SIR reflect the lithology of the drained catchment. SIR have changed pronouncedly when higher elevated paleo-lakes Abaya, Chamo and Awassa were overflowing into paleo-lake Chew Bahir. This new method may help to quantify paleo-lake levels beyond the past 20 ka and may also detect migrational barriers or routes due to the occurrence of synchronous large, connected and deep paleo-lakes.

  13. Carbon (δ13C) and Nitrogen (δ15N) Stable Isotope Signatures in Bat Fur Indicate Swarming Sites Have Catchment Areas for Bats from Different Summering Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segers, Jordi L; Broders, Hugh G

    2015-01-01

    Migratory patterns of bats are not well understood and traditional methods to study this, like capture-mark-recapture, may not provide enough detail unless there are many records. Stable isotope profiles of many animal species have been used to make inferences about migration. Each year Myotis lucifugus and M. septentrionalis migrate from summering roosts to swarming caves and mines in the fall, but the pattern of movement between them is not well understood. In this study, fur δ13C and δ15N values of 305 M. lucifugus and 200 M. septentrionalis were analyzed to make inferences about migration patterns between summering areas and swarming sites in Nova Scotia, Canada. We expected that there would be greater variability in δ13C and δ15N among individuals at swarming sites because it was believed that these sites are used by individuals originating from many summering areas. There was extensive overlap in the standard ellipse area, corrected for small sample sizes (SEAc), of bats at swarming sites and much less overlap in SEAc among groups sampled at summering areas. Meaningful inference could not be made on M. septentrionalis because their low variation in SEAc may have been the result of sampling only 3 summering areas. However, for M. lucifugus, swarming sites had larger SEAc than summering areas and predictive discriminant analysis assigned swarming bats to multiple summering areas, supporting the contention that swarming bats are mixed aggregations of bats from several summering areas. Together, these data support the contention that swarming sites have catchment areas for bats from multiple summering areas and it is likely that the catchment areas for swarming sites overlap. These data suggest that δ13C and δ15N profiling of bat fur offer some potential to make inferences about regional migration in bats.

  14. Shell architecture, element composition, and stable isotope signature of the giant deep-sea oyster Neopycnodonte zibrowii sp. n. from the NE Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisshak, Max; López Correa, Matthias; Gofas, Serge; Salas, Carmen; Taviani, Marco; Jakobsen, Joachim; Freiwald, André

    2009-03-01

    considerable inter-specimen variability with high Mg/Ca molar ratios and fluctuations (22.5±17.6 mmol/mol), low Sr/Ca values (0.2±0.1 mmol/mol), and a typical to high S/Ca content (6.9±2.2 mmol/mol), when compared to other calcitic bivalves. Unlike short-lived, shallow-water oysters, N. zibrowii thrives under very stable environmental conditions. Minimal temperature fluctuations and stable open marine salinity provide an optimal basis to recognise biological fractionation processes. Strong Mg/Ca fluctuations indicate a physiological control related to metabolism and biomineralisation, prohibiting the use of this ratio as a temperature or ocean chemistry proxy. Low Sr/Ca ratios indicate rather constant and low long-term accretion rates, while short-scale fluctuations may be attributed to short-term variations in growth rate and Mg incorporation. Oxygen isotopes yield a considerable spread of 1.8‰ with a mean of 2.0±0.3‰ δ18O V-PDB, and low correlation between different contemporaneous parts of the shell and between specimens. These values surprisingly exceed expected equilibrium conditions, calculated from in situ temperature data (annual mean 12.3±0.3 °C) and seawater isotopic composition (0.5±0.1‰ δ18O SMOW), by 0.5‰ on average. Such positively shifting vital effects, previously reported for limpets and barnacles, are often overlooked in high-temperature and high-amplitude settings and may be more common than is currently believed. Carbon isotopes range from 0.2 to 3.5‰ δ13C V-PDB (mean 1.8±0.7‰) and show an ontogenetic decrease, but may incorporate an environmental signal in adult portions, indicated by a strong correspondence of peaks between specimens. This signal is likely driven by a complex interplay of different factors, such as primary production, current-based food supply and metabolism.

  15. The Upper Mantle Flow Field around South-Africa as Reflected by Isotopic Provinciality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyzen, C.; Blichert-Toft, J.; Ludden, J.; Humler, E.; Mevel, C.; Albarede, F.

    2006-12-01

    Isotopic studies of MORB have established the existence of broad isotopic provinces within the underlying asthenosphere, such as in the Indian Ocean (DUPAL). How these features relate to mantle circulation is, however, still unknown. The steepness of the transition between such isotopic provinces will define the geometry of the velocity field in the upper mantle. In this respect, the transition between the Indian and South Atlantic provinces, two domains that are isotopically contrasted, should be readily identifiable over this long ridge segment. Here, we present Hf isotope data for 60 samples dredged along the SWIR between 35° and 69°E. The new Hf isotope data show that the Indian asthenosphere does not spill directly into the South Atlantic upper mantle: the general decreasing southward gradient observed for ^{176}Hf/^{177}Hf down the mid- Atlantic Ridge, and also for Sr isotopes and model Th/U ratios (derived from Pb isotopes), is overprinted by material with radiogenic Sr, unradiogenic Hf and high Th/U. The Indian domain grades into the South Atlantic around Bouvet, while the South Atlantic collides with the Atlantic province around Tristan. We interpret these features to represent fronts between three adjacent isotopic provinces similar to what has been suggested for the Australian-Antarctic Discordance. The common DUPAL signature of MORB and OIB from the Indian province and the geochemistry of Gulf of Aden MORB and the Afar plume suggest that the source of this distinctive mantle component is deep and lies to the north of the province. This is also what the three-dimensional flow field computed by Behn et al. (2004) from shear-wave splitting shows with a major lower mantle upwelling radiating at the base of the asthenosphere under the Afar plume. Lower mantle gushing out from this source flows southward unimpeded along the Indian ridges, whereas it only reaches the South Atlantic ridge after first having been deflected under the deep roots of the South

  16. Iron and copper isotope fractionation during filtration and ultrafiltration of boreal organic-rich waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilina, Svetlana M.; Viers, Jerome; Pokrovsky, Oleg S.; Poitrasson, Franck; Lapitsky, Sergey A.; Alekhin, Yuriy V.

    2010-05-01

    Typical feature of all boreal surface waters is high concentration of dissolved (complexes. Organic and organo-mineral colloids are the most likely carriers of trace metals such as Cu in rivers of the boreal zone. This work addresses colloidal speciation of Cu and Fe using conventional size separation technique, on-site frontal ultrafiltration. Specifically, we aimed to test the possibility of the presence of different pools of metal having specific isotopic signatures in different colloidal fractions using stable isotope measurements. We have chosen Cu for its high affinity to colloidal DOM and Fe for its tendency to form stable organo-mineral colloids of various size. Samples of natural waters were collected from small rivers, lakes, bogs, groundwater and soil environments in the Northern Karelia (NW Russia) during summer baseflow period. Large volumes (20-40 L) of water were filtered in the field through progressively decreasing pore size filters: 20, 10, 5, 0.8, 0.45, 0.22, 0.1 µm and 100, 10 and 1 kDa (1 kDa ~ 1 nm) using nylon and regenerated cellulose membranes and frontal ultrafiltration (Millipore, Amicon) devises. The homogeneity of the sample was verified by tracing radiogenic Sr isotopes in each fraction. In all filtrates and ultrafiltrates (permeates), and in selected retentates, stable isotopic composition of Cu and Fe was measured using double focusing high resolution MC-ICP MS (Neptune). We observe rather constant Cu isotopic ratio in all filtrate series and a systematic enrichment of heavy isotope of Fe with decreasing poresize. These preliminary results can be explained by strong complexation of Cu with small-size organic ligands of fulvic nature and its partial association with organo-mineral colloids. Both Fe(III) - OM complxeation and Fe(III) oxyhydroxides precipitation can be invoked to explain Fe isotope fractionation. This work allows, for the first, time, multi-isotopic approach to trace the origin of colloids in surficial waters and it

  17. Understanding the role of soil erosion on co{sub 2}-c loss using {sup 13}c isotopic signatures in abandoned Mediterranean agricultural land

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novara, Agata, E-mail: agata.novara@unipa.it [Department of Scienze Agrarie e Forestali, University of Palermo, viale delle Scienze, ed.4, 90128 Palermo (Italy); Keesstra, Saskia, E-mail: saskia.keesstra@wur.nl [Soil Physics and Land Management Group, Wageningen University, Droevendaalsesteeg 4, 6708PB Wageningen (Netherlands); Cerdà, Artemio, E-mail: artemio.cerda@uv.es [Soil Erosion and Degradation Research Group, Department of Geography, University of Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Pereira, Paulo, E-mail: paulo@mruni.eu [Environmental Management Centre, Mykolas Romeris University, Vilnius (Lithuania); Gristina, Luciano [Department of Scienze Agrarie e Forestali, University of Palermo, viale delle Scienze, ed.4, 90128 Palermo (Italy)

    2016-04-15

    Understanding soil water erosion processes is essential to evaluate the redistribution of soil organic carbon (SOC) within a landscape and is fundamental to assess the role of soil erosion in the global carbon (C) budget. The main aim of this study was to estimate the C redistribution and losses using {sup 13}C natural abundance. Carbon losses in soil sediment, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and CO{sub 2} emission were determined. Four bounded parallel plots were installed on a 10% slope. In the upper part of the plots, C{sub 3}soil was replaced with C{sub 4}soil. The SOC and δ{sup 13}C were measured after 145.2 mm rainfall in the upper (2 m far from C{sub 4}strip), middle (4 m far from C{sub 4}strip) lower (6 m far from C{sub 4}strip) trams of the plot and in the sediments collected in the Gerlach collector at the lower part of the plot. A laboratory incubation experiment was performed to evaluate the CO{sub 2} emission rate of soils in each area. OC was mainly lost in the sediments as 2.08 g{sup −2} of C was lost after 145.2 mm rainfall. DOC losses were only 5.61% of off-site OC loss. Three months after the beginning of the experiment, 15.90% of SOC in the upper tram of the plot had a C{sub 4} origin. The C{sub 4}-SOC content decreased along the 6 m length of the plot, and in the sediments collected by the Gerlach collector. CO{sub 2} emission rate was high in the upper plot tram due to the high SOC content. The discrimination of CO{sub 2} in C{sub 3} and C{sub 4} portion permitted to increase our level of understanding on the stability of SOC and its resilience to decomposition. The transport of sediments along the plot increased SOC mineralization by 43%. Our study underlined the impact of rainfall in C losses in soil and water in abandoned Mediterranean agriculture fields and the consequent implications on the C balance. - Highlights: • The soil C isotopic difference is a useful tracer for erosion processes studies. • The main loss of Carbon was

  18. Geochemical and Sr-Pb-Nd isotopic characteristics of the Shakhtama porphyry Mo-Cu system (Eastern Transbaikalia, Russia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berzina, A. P.; Berzina, A. N.; Gimon, V. O.

    2014-01-01

    The Shakhtama Mo-Cu porphyry deposit is located within the eastern segment of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt, bordering the southern margin of the Mongol-Okhotsk suture zone. The deposit includes rocks of two magmatic complexes: the precursor plutonic (J2) and ore-bearing porphyry (J3) complexes. The plutonic complex was emplaced at the final stages of the collisional regime in the region; the formation of the porphyry complex may have overlapped with a transition to extension. The Shakhtama rocks are predominantly metaluminous, I-type high K calc-alkaline to shoshonitic in composition, with relatively high Mg#, Ni, Cr and V. They are characterized by crustal-like ISr (0.70741-0.70782), relatively radiogenic Pb isotopic compositions, ɛNd(T) values close to CHUR (-2.7 to +2.1) and Nd model ages from 0.8 to 1.2 Ga. Both complexes are composed of rocks with K-adakitic features and rocks without adakite trace element signatures. The regional geological setting together with geochemical and isotopic data indicate that both juvenile and old continental crust contributed to their origin. High-Mg# K-adakitic Shakhtama magmas were most likely generated by partial melting of thickened lower crust during delamination and interaction with mantle material, while magmas lacking adakite-like signatures were probably generated at shallower levels of lower crust. The derivation of melts, related to the formation of plutonic and porphyry complexes involved variable amounts of old Precambrian lower crust and juvenile Phanerozoic crust. Isotopic data imply stronger contribution of juvenile mantle-derived material to the fertile magmas of the porphyry complex. Juvenile crust is proposed as an important source of fluids and metals for the Shakhtama ore-magmatic system.

  19. Natural uranium and strontium isotope tracers of water sources and surface water-groundwater interactions in arid wetlands: Pahranagat Valley, Nevada, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paces, James B.; Wurster, Frederic C.

    2014-01-01

    Near-surface physical and chemical process can strongly affect dissolved-ion concentrations and stable isotope compositions of water in wetland settings, especially under arid climate conditions. In contrast, heavy radiogenic isotopes of strontium (87Sr/86Sr) and uranium (234U/238U) remain largely unaffected and can be used to help identify unique signatures from different sources and quantify end-member mixing that would otherwise be difficult to determine. The utility of combined Sr and U isotopes are demonstrated in this study of wetland habitats on the Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, which depend on supply from large-volume springs north of the Refuge, and from small-volume springs and seeps within the Refuge. Water budgets from these sources have not been quantified previously. Evaporation, transpiration, seasonally variable surface flow, and water management practices complicate the use of conventional methods for determining source contributions and mixing relations. In contrast, 87Sr/86Sr and 234U/238U remain unfractionated under these conditions, and compositions at a given site remain constant. Differences in Sr- and U-isotopic signatures between individual sites can be related by simple two- or three-component mixing models. Results indicate that surface flow constituting the Refuge’s irrigation source consists of a 65:25:10 mixture of water from two distinct regionally sourced carbonate aquifer springs, and groundwater from locally sourced volcanic aquifers. Within the Refuge, contributions from the irrigation source and local groundwater are readily determined and depend on proximity to those sources as well as water management practices.

  20. Radiogenic and Muon-Induced Backgrounds in the LUX Dark Matter Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Akerib, D S; Bai, X; Bailey, A J; Balajthy, J; Bernard, E; Bernstein, A; Bradley, A; Byram, D; Cahn, S B; Carmona-Benitez, M C; Chan, C; Chapman, J J; Chiller, A A; Chiller, C; Coffey, T; Currie, A; de Viveiros, L; Dobi, A; Dobson, J; Druszkiewicz, E; Edwards, B; Faham, C H; Fiorucci, S; Flores, C; Gaitskell, R J; Gehman, V M; Ghag, C; Gibson, K R; Gilchriese, M G D; Hall, C; Hertel, S A; Horn, M; Huang, D Q; Ihm, M; Jacobsen, R G; Kazkaz, K; Knoche, R; Larsen, N A; Lee, C; Lindote, A; Lopes, M I; Malling, D C; Mannino, R; McKinsey, D N; Mei, D -M; Mock, J; Moongweluwan, M; Morad, J; Murphy, A St J; Nehrkorn, C; Nelson, H; Neves, F; Ott, R A; Pangilinan, M; Parker, P D; Pease, E K; Pech, K; Phelps, P; Reichhart, L; Shutt, T; Silva, C; Solovov, V N; Sorensen, P; O'Sullivan, K; Sumner, T J; Szydagis, M; Taylor, D; Tennyson, B; Tiedt, D R; Tripathi, M; Uvarov, S; Verbus, J R; Walsh, N; Webb, R; White, J T; Witherell, M S; Wolfs, F L H; Woods, M; Zhang, C

    2014-01-01

    The Large Underground Xenon (LUX) dark matter experiment aims to detect rare low-energy interactions from Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). The radiogenic backgrounds in the LUX detector have been measured and compared with Monte Carlo simulation. Measurements of LUX high-energy data have provided direct constraints on all background sources contributing to the background model. The expected background rate from the background model for the 85.3 day WIMP search run is $(2.6\\pm0.2_{\\textrm{stat}}\\pm0.4_{\\textrm{sys}})\\times10^{-3}$~events~keV$_{ee}^{-1}$~kg$^{-1}$~day$^{-1}$ in a 118~kg fiducial volume. The observed background rate is $(3.6\\pm0.4_{\\textrm{stat}})\\times10^{-3}$~events~keV$_{ee}^{-1}$~kg$^{-1}$~day$^{-1}$, consistent with model projections. The expectation for the radiogenic background in a subsequent one-year run is presented.

  1. C, O, Sr and Nd isotope systematics of carbonates of Papaghni sub-basin, Andhra Pradesh, India: Implications for genesis of carbonate-hosted stratiform uranium mineralisation and geodynamic evolution of the Cuddapah basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Absar, Nurul; Nizamudheen, B. M.; Augustine, Sminto; Managave, Shreyas; Balakrishnan, S.

    2016-10-01

    The Cuddapah basin (CB) is one of a series of Proterozoic basins that overlie the Archaean cratons of India, and contains a unique stratiform carbonate-hosted uranium mineralisation. In the present work, we discuss stable (C, O) and radiogenic (Nd, Sr) isotope systematics of carbonates of the Papaghni sub-basin in order to understand uranium ore forming processes and geodynamic evolution of the CB. Uranium mineralised dolomites (UMDs) of the basal Vempalle Formation show a significantly lighter (~ 1.5‰) C-isotope signature compared to that of open-marine stromatolitic sub-tidal facies, suggesting input of isotopically lighter carbon through in situ remineralisation of organic matter (OM). This implies deposition in a hydrologically-restricted, redox-stratified lagoonal basin wherein exchange with open oceanic dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) was limited. Persistent bottom water anoxia was created and maintained through consumption of dissolved oxygen (DO) by decaying OM produced in oxidised surface water zone. Significantly more radiogenic εNd(t) of UMD (- 6.31 ± 0.54) compared to that of Dharwar upper crust (- 8.64 ± 3.11) indicates that dissolved constituents did not originate from the Dharwar craton, rather were derived from more juvenile exotic sources - possibly from a continental arc. Dissolved uranyl ions (U+ 6) were introduced to the basin through fluvial run-off and were reduced to immobile uranous ions (U+ 4) at the redox interface resulting in precipitation of pitchblende and coffinite. Carbonate horizons of upper Vempalle Formation and Tadpatri Formation show progressively more radiogenic Nd isotope compositions signifying increased juvenile arc contribution to the Papaghni sub-basin through time, which is also corroborated by the presence of younger zircons (1923 ± 22 Ma) in Pulivendla quartzites. We propose that the Papaghni sub-basin opened as a back-arc extensional basin at ~ 2 Ga as a result of westerly-directed subduction of oceanic crust

  2. Radiogenic neoplasia in thyroid and mammary clonogens. Progress report, January 1, 1993--December 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifton, K.H.

    1993-07-30

    The induction of cancer by ionizing radiation is a matter of great practical importance to the nuclear industry, to national defense, to radiological medicine and to the general public. It is increasingly apparent that carcinogenesis is one of the leading dose-limiting effects of radiation exposure (Co90). Quantitative information at the cellular level is essential to an understanding of the mechanisms of radiogenic neoplastic initiation and the stages of promotion and progression to overt neoplasia. We have developed two experimental models, the rat thyroid and rat mammary clonogen transplant systems, for the quantitative study of radiation carcinogenesis at the cellular level in vivo (C185). The most important steps taken or completed during the current grant year include: (a) demonstration of the high age-dependent radiosensitivity of prepubertal rat mammary clonogens to radiogenic damage which may influence their susceptibility to neoplastic initiation, and (b) demonstration of the feasibility of using a molecular test for clonogenicity in which Simple Sequence Repeats in the DNA serve as identifying signals of the genotypic origin of the cells. We have also (c) set up a large carcinogenesis experiment to test the effect of close intercellular contact in thyroid glands in situ on promotion-progression of radiogenically initiated clonogens, (d) achieved considerable further concentration of thyroid clonogens, and (e) begun to explore whether thyroid cells can be induced to give rise to three dimensional multicellular structures in culture in reconstituted basement membrane. These are discussed in this report.

  3. The origin of high-Mg magmas in Mt Shasta and Medicine Lake volcanoes, Cascade Arc (California): higher and lower than mantle oxygen isotope signatures attributed to current and past subduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, E.; Bindeman, I.; Grove, T. L.

    2011-11-01

    We report the oxygen isotope composition of olivine and orthopyroxene phenocrysts in lavas from the main magma types at Mt Shasta and Medicine Lake Volcanoes: primitive high-alumina olivine tholeiite (HAOT), basaltic andesites (BA), primitive magnesian andesites (PMA), and dacites. The most primitive HAOT (MgO > 9 wt%) from Mt. Shasta has olivine δ18O (δ18OOl) values of 5.9-6.1‰, which are about 1‰ higher than those observed in olivine from normal mantle-derived magmas. In contrast, HAOT lavas from Medicine Lake have δ18OOl values ranging from 4.7 to 5.5‰, which are similar to or lower than values for olivine in equilibrium with mantle-derived magmas. Other magma types from both volcanoes show intermediate δ18OOl values. The oxygen isotope composition of the most magnesian lavas cannot be explained by crustal contamination and the trace element composition of olivine phenocrysts precludes a pyroxenitic mantle source. Therefore, the high and variable δ18OOl signature of the most magnesian samples studied (HAOT and BA) comes from the peridotitic mantle wedge itself. As HAOT magma is generated by anhydrous adiabatic partial melting of the shallow mantle, its 1.4‰ range in δ18OOl reflects a heterogeneous composition of the shallow mantle source that has been influenced by subduction fluids and/or melts sometime in the past. Magmas generated in the mantle wedge by flux melting due to modern subduction fluids, as exemplified by BA and probably PMA, display more homogeneous composition with only 0.5‰ variation. The high-δ18O values observed in magnesian lavas, and principally in the HAOT, are difficult to explain by a single-stage flux-melting process in the mantle wedge above the modern subduction zone and require a mantle source enriched in 18O. It is here explained by flow of older, pre-enriched portions of the mantle through the slab window beneath the South Cascades.

  4. Using geoneutrinos to constrain the radiogenic power in the Earth's mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šrámek, Ondřej; Roskovec, Bedřich; Wipperfurth, Scott A.; Xi, Yufei; McDonough, William F.

    2017-04-01

    The Earth's engine is driven by unknown proportions of primordial energy and heat produced in radioactive decay. Unfortunately, competing models of Earth's composition reveal an order of magnitude uncertainty in the amount of radiogenic power driving mantle dynamics. Together with established geoscientific disciplines (seismology, geodynamics, petrology, mineral physics), experimental particle physics now brings additional constraints to our understanding of mantle energetics. Measurements of the Earth's flux of geoneutrinos, electron antineutrinos emitted in β- decays of naturally occurring radionuclides, reveal the amount of uranium and thorium in the Earth and set limits on the amount of radiogenic power in the planet. Comparison of the flux measured at large underground neutrino experiments with geologically informed predictions of geoneutrino emission from the crust provide the critical test needed to define the mantle's radiogenic power. Measuring geoneutrinos at oceanic locations, distant from nuclear reactors and continental crust, would best reveal the mantle flux and by performing a coarse scale geoneutrino tomography could even test the hypothesis of large heterogeneous structures in deep mantle enriched in heat-producing elements. The current geoneutrino detecting experiments, KamLAND in Japan and Borexino in Italy, will by year ˜ 2020 be supplemented with three more experiments: SNO+ in Canada, and JUNO and Jinping in China. We predict the geoneutrino flux at all experimental sites. Within ˜ 8 years from today, the combination of data from all experiments will exclude end-member compositional models of the silicate Earth at the 1σ level, reveal the radiogenic contribution to the global surface heat loss, and provide tight limits on radiogenic power in the Earth's mantle. Additionally, we discuss how the geoneutrino measurements at the three relatively near-lying (≤ 3000 km) detectors KamLAND, JUNO, and Jinping may be harnessed to improve the

  5. Classification of signature-only signature models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO ZhengJun; LIU MuLan

    2008-01-01

    We introduce a set of criterions for classifying signature-only signature models. By the criterions, we classify signature models into 5 basic types and 69 general classes. Theoretically, 21141 kinds of signature models can be derived by appro-priately combining different general classes. The result comprises almost existing signature models. It will be helpful for exploring new signature models. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first time for investigation of the problem of classifica-tion of signature-only signature models.

  6. New constraints on the Paleoarchean meteorite bombardment of the Earth - Geochemistry and Re-Os isotope signatures of spherule layers in the BARB5 ICDP drill core from the Barberton Greenstone Belt, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Toni; Koeberl, Christian; Luguet, Ambre; van Acken, David; Mohr-Westheide, Tanja; Ozdemir, Seda; Reimold, Wolf Uwe

    2017-08-01

    Archean spherule layers, resulting from impacts by large extraterrestrial objects, to date represent the only remnants of the early meteorite, asteroid, and comet bombardment of the Earth. Only few Archean impact debris layers have been documented, all of them embedded in the 3.23-3.47 billion year old successions of the Barberton Greenstone Belt (BGB) in South Africa and the Pilbara Craton in Western Australia. Some of them might be correlated with each other. Given the scarcity of Archean spherule deposits, four spherule layer intersections from the recently recovered BARB5 drill core from the central Barberton Greenstone Belt, analyzed in this study, provide an opportunity to gain new insight into the early terrestrial impact bombardment. Despite being hydrothermally overprinted, siderophile element abundance signatures of spherule-rich samples from the BARB5 drill core, at least in part, retained a meteoritic fingerprint. The impact hypothesis for the generation of the BARB5 spherule layers is supported by correlations between the abundances of moderately (Cr, Co, Ni) and highly siderophile (Re, Os, Ir, Pt, Ru and Pd) elements, whose peak concentrations and interelement ratios are within the range of those for chondrites. Rhenium-Osmium isotope evidence further support the impact hypothesis. Collectively, this study provides evidence for extraterrestrial admixtures ranging between ∼40 and up to 100% to three of the four analyzed BARB5 spherule layers, and a scenario for their genesis involving (i) impact of a chondritic bolide into a sedimentary target, (ii) varying admixtures of meteoritic components to target materials, (iii) spherule formation via condensation in an impact vapor plume, (iv) transportation of the spherules and sedimentation under submarine conditions, followed by (v) moderate post-impact remobilization of transition metals and highly siderophile elements.

  7. Radiogenic Heat Production in the Gölcük Caldera and Direkli, Isparta Angle (Southwest Anatolia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayten Uyanık, Nurten; Öncü, Ziya; Akkurt, İskender

    2016-04-01

    The radiogenic heat is one of the important parameter due to the radioactivity has existed since beginning of universe as prediction of Big-Bang theory. In this study the radiogenic heat production of the Gölcük caldera and Direkli fields of the Isparta-Turkey, has been investigated. Total of 1390 data were obtained in the study area. The study area is included of the Gölcük volcanism and its around that is located in Isparta province of Turkey's Mediterranean region. The Gölcük volcanism is a young volcanism. Around this volcanism the andesite, trachy andesite, tuff, pumice and such a geological units is available. The data were collected using in-situ measurements with gamm-ray spectrometer. These measurements were covered natural radioactive elements (Uranium U, Thorium Th and Potassium K). Radiogenic heat production values were calculated using the literature relationships and in-situ measurement values of these radioactive elements. Radiogenic heat map of study area were obtained using radiogenic heat production values. In the map the red zone areas shows highest heat values while green zones areas of the map presents lowest heat values. Key words: Radioactive elements, radiogenic heat, map, Gölcük-Direkli(Isparta), Turkey

  8. Boron isotopes reveal multiple metasomatic events in the mantle beneath the eastern North China Craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong-Yan; Zhou, Zhou; Ryan, Jeffrey G.; Wei, Gang-Jian; Xu, Yi-Gang

    2016-12-01

    Linkages inferred between the geochemical heterogeneity of the mantle beneath eastern Eurasia and the stagnant Pacific slab documented geophysically in its mantle transition zone are as yet not clearly characterized. In this paper we report new elemental and isotopic data for boron (B) on a suite of well-characterized Cenozoic basalts (alkali basalts, basanites and nephelinites), with ocean island basalt (OIB)-like trace element signatures from western Shandong of the eastern North China Craton (NCC). Correlations between major elements (e.g., FeOT versus SiO2), trace elements (e.g., CeN/PbN versus BaN/ThN) and radiogenic isotopes (e.g., 206Pb/204Pb versus 87Sr/86Sr) suggest these basalts are derived via the mixing of melts from two mantle components: a fluid mobile element (FME; such as Ba, K, Pb and Sr) enriched component, which is most evident in the alkali basalts, and a FME depleted mantle component that is more evident in the basanites and nephelinites. The alkali basalts in this study have lower B concentrations (1.4-2.2 μg/g) but higher δ11B (-4.9 to -1.4) values than the basanites and nephelinites (B = 2.1-5.0 μg/g; δ11B = -6.9 to -3.9), and all the samples have nearly constant B/Nb ratios between 0.03 and 0.07, similar to the observed range in B/Nb for intraplate lavas. Our high-SiO2 samples have higher δ11B than that of our low SiO2 samples, indicating that the B isotopic differences among our samples do not result from the addition of a continental crustal component in the mantle source, or direct crustal assimilation during the eruption process. The positive B versus Nb correlation suggests the B isotopic compositions of the western Shandong basalts primarily reflect the pre-eruptive compositions of their mantle sources. Correlations among B, Nd and Sr isotope signatures of the western Shandong basalts differ from those among basalts from plume settings (e.g., Azores and Hawaii), and are inconsistent with models suggesting single-step metasomatic

  9. Redox-variability and controls in subduction zones from an iron-isotope perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebel, O.; Sossi, P. A.; Bénard, A.; Wille, M.; Vroon, P. Z.; Arculus, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    An ongoing controversy in mantle geochemistry concerns the oxidation state of the sources of island arc lavas (IAL). Three key factors control oxidation-reduction (redox) of IAL sources: (i) metasomatism of the mantle wedge by fluids and/or melts, liberated from the underlying subducted slab; (ii) the oxidation state of the wedge prior to melting and metasomatism; and (iii) the loss of melt from IAL sources. Subsequently, magmatic differentiation by fractional crystallisation, possible crustal contamination and degassing of melts en route to and at the surface can further modify the redox states of IAL. The remote nature of sub-arc processes and the complex interplay between them render direct investigations difficult. However, a possible gauge for redox-controlled, high-temperature pre-eruptive differentiation conditions is variations in stable Fe isotope compositions (expressed here as δ57Fe) in erupting IAL because Fe isotopes can preserve a record of sub-surface mass transfer reactions involving the major element Fe. Here we report Fe isotope compositions of bulk IAL along the active Banda arc, Indonesia, which is well known for a prominent subducted sediment input. In conjunction with other arc rocks, δ57Fe in erupted Banda IAL indicates that fractional crystallisation and possibly crustal contamination primarily control their Fe isotope signatures. When corrected for fractional crystallisation and filtered for contamination, arc magmas that had variable sediment melt contributions in their sources show no resolvable co-variation of δ57Fe with radiogenic isotope tracers. This indicates that crustal recycling in the form of subducted sediment does not alter the Fe isotope character of arc lavas, in agreement with mass balance estimates. Primitive sources of IAL, however, are clearly isotopically lighter than those sourced beneath mid-ocean ridges, indicating either preferential Fe3+-depletion in the mantle wedge by prior, δ57Fe-heavy melt extraction, and

  10. Constraining the amount of radiogenic elements in the interior of Mars from the HP3 heat flow measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grott, Matthias; Plesa, Ana-Catalina; Tosi, Nicola; Breuer, Doris

    2014-05-01

    The InSight mission (Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport) to be launched in 2016 will carry a seismometer (SEIS) and heat flow probe (HP3) to the martian surface, and address questions related to the size, physical state, and composition of the core and mantle, the thickness of the crust, and the thermal state of the interior. The heat flow measured at the surface depends on the amount of heat producing elements (HPE) present in the interior and offers a measurable quantity that can help to constrain the planetary heat budget. If the Urey ratio - the ratio between internal heat production and surface heat loss - is known, the heat production rate in the interior can be determined. We run thermal evolution models of increasing complexity and compared the obtained present-day Urey ratio for a set of different models/parameters. To this end, we used the 2D-3D mantle convection code Gaia [1], as well as 1D parameterized models [2]. We varied the initial amount of HPE [3, 4,5,6], used various viscosity formulations (temperature-, temperature- and depth-dependent viscosity, viscosity jump in the mid mantle), varied the size of the core, and considered models with and without phase transitions in the mantle. Additionally, we tested the effects of different partitioning of HPE between mantle and a fixed crust, different initial conditions (temperatures and boundary layer thicknesses) and reference viscosities. Our simulations show that, for a one-plate planet like Mars, the Urey ratio is mainly sensitive to the efficiency of mantle cooling, i.e. the mantle viscosity, and to the mean half-life of long-lived radiogenic isotopes. Given that models of the thermo-chemical evolution of Mars generally indicate reference viscosities below 1021 Pa s [3, 7], the martian Urey ratio is likely only a function of the Thorium concentration in the planetary interior. Surface radiogenic abundances determined from gamma-ray spectroscopy [8] are best

  11. Triple oxygen isotopic composition of the high-3He/4He mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starkey, N. A.; Jackson, C. R. M.; Greenwood, R. C.; Parman, S.; Franchi, I. A.; Jackson, M.; Fitton, J. G.; Stuart, F. M.; Kurz, M.; Larsen, L. M.

    2016-03-01

    Measurements of Xe isotope ratios in ocean island basalts (OIB) suggest that Earth's mantle accreted heterogeneously, and that compositional remnants of accretion are sampled by modern, high-3He/4He OIB associated with the Icelandic and Samoan plumes. If so, the high-3He/4He source may also have a distinct oxygen isotopic composition from the rest of the mantle. Here, we test if the major elements of the high-3He/4He source preserve any evidence of heterogeneous accretion using measurements of three oxygen isotopes on olivine from a variety of high-3He/4He OIB locations. To high precision, the Δ17O value of high-3He/4He olivines from Hawaii, Pitcairn, Baffin Island and Samoa, are indistinguishable from bulk mantle olivine (Δ17OBulk Mantle - Δ17OHigh 3He/4He olivine = -0.002 ± 0.004 (2 × SEM)‰). Thus, there is no resolvable oxygen isotope evidence for heterogeneous accretion in the high-3He/4He source. Modelling of mixing processes indicates that if an early-forming, oxygen-isotope distinct mantle did exist, either the anomaly was extremely small, or the anomaly was homogenised away by later mantle convection. The δ18O values of olivine with the highest 3He/4He ratios from a variety of OIB locations have a relatively uniform composition (∼5‰). This composition is intermediate to values associated with the depleted MORB mantle and the average mantle. Similarly, δ18O values of olivine from high-3He/4He OIB correlate with radiogenic isotope ratios of He, Sr, and Nd. Combined, this suggests that magmatic oxygen is sourced from the same mantle as other, more incompatible elements and that the intermediate δ18O value is a feature of the high-3He/4He mantle source. The processes responsible for the δ18O signature of high-3He/4He mantle are not certain, but δ18O-87Sr/86Sr correlations indicate that it may be connected to a predominance of a HIMU-like (high U/Pb) component or other moderate δ18O components recycled into the high-3He/4He source.

  12. RING PROXY SIGNATURES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Proxy signatures have been used to enable the transfer of digital signing power within some context and ring signatures can be used to provide the anonymity of a signer. By combining the functionalities of proxy signatures and ring signatures, this paper introduces a new concept, named ring proxy signature, which is a proxy signature generated by an anonymous member from a set of potential signers. The paper also constructs the first concrete ring proxy signature scheme based on the provably secure Schnorr's signatures and two ID-based ring proxy signature schemes. The security analysis is provided as well.

  13. Use of radiogenic heat for demarcation of hydrothermal alteration zones in the Pernambuco-Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Leandro O.; Dutra, Alanna C.; Costa, Alexandre B.

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we identify hydrothermal alteration zones that are located at the eastern extreme of Borborema Province, Pernambuco State, using radiogenic heat, in combination with magnetic and radioelement data collected both from the air and on the ground. The use of these methods enabled the mapping of geological lineaments based on total magnetic intensity maps, radioelement concentration maps, ternary maps and the F factor, as well as physical properties provided by ground data (thermal conductivity, density, and magnetic susceptibility). The data integration was based on low values of radiogenic heat and high K concentrations, as well as high F factors, amplitudes of the analytic signal, and K/eTh and eU/eTh values. These characteristics occur within the Pernambuco lineament and within other features to the southeast, a short distance south of the lineaments, which are made up of units including a migmatitic gneiss complex, as well as the Modern, Itaporanga and Sierra Passira Intrusive Suites. In these areas, elongated sources that are consistent with lineaments were identified. These sources were assigned depths of up to 3 km and are 5-10 km long, with the most significant extending SE-NW. These areas are favorable for the mineralization of iron, titanium and nickel. As the results are satisfactory, such areas can be studied in detail in the future.

  14. Geochemical signatures of sediments documenting Arctic sea-ice and water mass export through Fram Strait since the Last Glacial Maximum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccali, Jenny; Hillaire-Marcel, Claude; Carignan, Jean; Reisberg, Laurie C.

    2013-03-01

    Elemental (Ca, Zr, Th, etc.) and radiogenic isotope (Pb, Nd, Sr) measurements in leachates and residues from deep-sea sediments of core MC16 (WarmPast Program) in central Fram Strait were used to document the geochemical signatures of outflowing Arctic water masses and ice rafted debris (IRD) since the Last Glacial Maximum. In addition, the elemental distribution among the three main sedimentary fractions (terrigenous, biogenic and authigenic) was quantified. Elements dominated by the terrigenous fraction display a change at ˜13 ka assigned to an early Younger Dryas (YD) event. In the authigenic fraction, migration of the redox front, perhaps spurred by discontinuous delivery of organic matter to the sediment, has led to the mobility of elements such as Mn. Fe contents display lesser variability within the sediment suggesting that Fe experienced only minor redox-related redistribution. Authigenic Pb and Nd, thought to be hosted primarily by Fe-oxyhydroxides, also show little evidence of mobility, suggesting that their isotopic compositions should reliably record the isotopic compositions of past bottom water. We have broadly identified the isotopic signatures of the three major source areas of IRD, the Russian, Canadian and Greenland margins. The elemental and isotopic residue records from core MC16 display distinct trends prior to and after the YD. The pre-YD interval, with ɛNd values between -10.1 and -13.2, and 87Sr/86Sr ratios from 0.715 to 0721, reflects a mixture of IRD from the Russian and Canadian margins. The YD episode stands out with sediments originating mostly from the Canadian end-member, displaying the lowest ɛNd values and highest 87Sr/86Sr ratios. This suggests enhanced sea-ice production and/or drifting along the Beaufort Gyre at that time. The post-YD interval, i.e. the Holocene, is characterized by a less variable mixture of IRD material, with ɛNd values and 87Sr/86Sr ratios centred at -12.2 and 0.718 respectively. This material was derived

  15. Marine water from mid-Holocene sea level highstand trapped in a coastal aquifer: Evidence from groundwater isotopes, and environmental significance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Stephen [School of Civil, Environmental and Chemical Engineering, RMIT University, Melbourne (Australia); Currell, Matthew, E-mail: Matthew.currell@rmit.edu.au [School of Civil, Environmental and Chemical Engineering, RMIT University, Melbourne (Australia); Cendón, Dioni I. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Kirrawee (Australia); Connected Water Initiative, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales (UNSW), Sydney (Australia)

    2016-02-15

    A multi-layered coastal aquifer in southeast Australia was assessed using environmental isotopes, to identify the origins of salinity and its links to palaeo-environmental setting. Spatial distribution of groundwater salinity (electrical conductivity values ranging from 0.395 to 56.1 mS/cm) was examined along the coastline along with geological, isotopic and chemical data. This allowed assessment of different salinity sources and emplacement mechanisms. Molar chloride/bromide ratios range from 619 to 1070 (621 to 705 in samples with EC > 15 mS/cm), indicating salts are predominantly marine. Two distinct vertical salinity profiles were observed, one with increasing salinity with depth and another with saline shallow water overlying fresh groundwater. The saline shallow groundwater (EC = 45.4 to 55.7 mS/cm) has somewhat marine-like stable isotope ratios (δ{sup 18}O = − 2.4 to − 1.9 ‰) and radiocarbon activities indicative of middle Holocene emplacement (47.4 to 60.4 pMC). This overlies fresher groundwater with late Pleistocene radiocarbon ages and meteoric stable isotopes (δ{sup 18}O = − 5.5 to − 4.6‰). The configuration suggests surface inundation of the upper sediments by marine water during the mid-Holocene (c. 2–8 kyr BP), when sea level was 1–2 m above today's level. Profiles of chloride, stable isotopes, and radiocarbon indicate mixing between this pre-modern marine water and fresh meteoric groundwater to varying degrees around the coastline. Mixing calculations using chloride and stable isotopes show that in addition to fresh-marine water mixing, some salinity is derived from transpiration by halophytic vegetation (e.g. mangroves). The δ{sup 13}C ratios in saline water (− 17.6 to − 18.4‰) also have vegetation/organic matter signatures, consistent with emplacement by surface inundation and extensive interaction between vegetation and recharging groundwater. Saline shallow groundwater is preserved only in areas where low

  16. Osmium isotopes and highly siderophile elements in lunar glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horan, M.; Walker, R.; Shearer, C.; Papike, J.

    2003-04-01

    has greater depletions in Os and Ir, and more radiogenic 187Os/188Os, indicating substantially fractionated Re/Os since its formation. These features of the coarser orange glass most likely reflect a signature dominantly from the deep lunar mantle. Abundances of Pt and Pd of both size fractions of orange glass are factors of 3-10 less than terrestrial rocks with similar MgO and may indi-cate somewhat lower abundances of HSE in the lunar mantle relative to the terrestrial mantle.

  17. About group digital signatures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Adriana Cristina Enache

    2012-01-01

    ...).A group digital signature is a digital signature with enhanced privacy features that allows members of a given group to anonymously sign messages on behalf of the group, producing a group signature...

  18. Chemical and Physical Signatures for Microbial Forensics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cliff, John B.; Kreuzer, Helen W.; Ehrhardt, Christopher J.; Wunschel, David S.

    2012-01-03

    Chemical and physical signatures for microbial forensics John Cliff and Helen Kreuzer-Martin, eds. Humana Press Chapter 1. Introduction: Review of history and statement of need. Randy Murch, Virginia Tech Chapter 2. The Microbe: Structure, morphology, and physiology of the microbe as they relate to potential signatures of growth conditions. Joany Jackman, Johns Hopkins University Chapter 3. Science for Forensics: Special considerations for the forensic arena - quality control, sample integrity, etc. Mark Wilson (retired FBI): Western Carolina University Chapter 4. Physical signatures: Light and electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, gravimetry etc. Joseph Michael, Sandia National Laboratory Chapter 5. Lipids: FAME, PLFA, steroids, LPS, etc. James Robertson, Federal Bureau of Investigation Chapter 6. Carbohydrates: Cell wall components, cytoplasm components, methods Alvin Fox, University of South Carolina School of Medicine David Wunschel, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Chapter 7. Peptides: Peptides, proteins, lipoproteins David Wunschel, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Chapter 8. Elemental content: CNOHPS (treated in passing), metals, prospective cell types John Cliff, International Atomic Energy Agency Chapter 9. Isotopic signatures: Stable isotopes C,N,H,O,S, 14C dating, potential for heavy elements. Helen Kreuzer-Martin, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Michaele Kashgarian, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Chapter 10. Extracellular signatures: Cellular debris, heme, agar, headspace, spent media, etc Karen Wahl, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Chapter 11. Data Reduction and Integrated Microbial Forensics: Statistical concepts, parametric and multivariate statistics, integrating signatures Kristin Jarman, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

  19. Rare earth element and neodymium isotope tracing of element input and past ocean circulation. Study from north and south pacific seawater and sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froellje, Henning

    2016-08-09

    Hawaiian Islands on coastal waters and the open ocean at Station ALOHA (chapter 2). These results indicate that contributions from volcanic islands (e.g., Hawaii) cannot be disregarded when investigating element budgets in the North Pacific. It is further shown that seasonal variability of Asian dust input most likely has significant influence on the Nd isotope signature of central North Pacific surface waters. New results from measurements of colloidal and truly dissolved REE concentrations indicate for the first time the absence of colloidal-bound REEs in open ocean waters at different depths. Further, a complete water column profile from Station ALOHA allows tracing of North Pacific water masses based on Nd isotopes. This study presents an adjustment of the Nd isotope signature and Nd concentration of North Pacific Deep Water (NPDW), which is considered the radiogenic endmember in the global overturning circulation, and therefore of particular importance for paleoceanographic studies. Moreover, REE patterns demonstrate that vertical processes overprint the REE concentrations in deep and bottom waters, precluding their use to trace water masses in the deep Pacific. Sedimentary Nd isotopes from the last 30,000 years demonstrate the variability in water mass structure in the South Pacific and the evolution of water mass mixing in Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW) during the last glacial-interglacial transition (chapter 3). Combined results from five sediment cores show an expansion of glacial bottom water and its isolation from CDW during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) based on differences in the Nd isotope signatures in cores below and above ∝4000 m. Admixture of bottom water into CDW during the early deglaciation is suggested based on the early deglacial decrease of Nd isotope signatures in CDW-bathed cores before the re-strengthening of North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) advection. This is related to Southern Hemisphere climate and only later during the deglaciation did the

  20. Origin of the Red Dog Zn-Pb-Ag deposits, Brooks Range, Alaska: Evidence from regional Pb and Sr isotope sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayuso, R.A.; Kelley, K.D.; Leach, D.L.; Young, L.E.; Slack, J.F.; Wandless, G.; Lyon, A.M.; Dillingham, J.L.

    2004-01-01

    in the Red Dog district, appears to be consistent with a simple mixing system. Evidence indicates that galena was deposited from largely similar hydrothermal solutions throughout the Red Dog district. A shared regional isotopic reservoir is also supported by the correspondence of Pb isotope compositions of galena in deposits of the Red Dog district and galena in clastic rocks (vein-breccias). Leaching of metals and progressive extraction of radiogenic lead from the clastic rocks in the Endicott Group may account for the trend of increasing 206Pb/204Pb in galena of the Red Dog district. Galena in the Red Dog deposits is unlikely to have been derived entirely from the same isotopic reservoir as that represented by the lead in the Kuna Formation or from the igneous rocks in the Red Dog district. Sr isotope data for barite, calcite, and witherite from the Red Dog deposits are compared with data from regional barite that is associated with sulfides and from barite in sulfide-poor occurrences. Fluids with heterogeneous Sr isotope signatures are indicated. Barite in the Main deposit extends to higher ratios of 87Sr/86Sr (0.709034-0.709899) than barite in the Anarraaq deposit (0.708615-0.709256). All barite is more radiogenic than Carboniferous seawater. Other Mississippian(?) shale-hosted deposits and mineral occurrences containing barite in the Red Dog district and barite in regional occurrences east of Red Dog in the western and central Brooks Range also have heterogeneous 87Sr/86Sr ratios. Carbonate (87Sr/86Sr = 0.710319-0.713637) and witherite (87 Sr/86 Sr = 0.710513) in the Main deposit are more radiogenic than barite. In contrast, carbonate (87Sr/86Sr = 0.708196-0.709740) intergrown with massive sulfides at Anarraaq has isotopic compositions similar to that of barite. Paragenetic and isotop ic studies suggest that early barite is similar to barite typically formed in cold seeps along continental margins. This early fine-grained barite formed before the main

  1. Crustal radiogenic heat production and the selective survival of ancient continental crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, P.

    1985-01-01

    It is pointed out that the oldest terrestrial rocks have so far revealed no evidence of the impact phase of earth evolution. This observation suggests that processes other than impact were dominant at the time of stabilization of these units. However, a use of the oldest terrestrial rocks as a sample of the early terrestrial crust makes it necessary to consider the possibility that these rocks may represent a biased sample. In the present study, the global continental heat flow data set is used to provide further evidence that potassium, uranium, and thorium abundances are, on the average, low in surviving Archean crust relative to younger continental crust. An investigation is conducted of the implications of relatively low crustal radiogenic heat production to the stabilization of early continental crust, and possible Archean crustal stabilization models are discussed.

  2. Radiogenic neoplasia in thyroid and mammary clonogens. Progress report, January 1, 1990--December 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifton, K.H.

    1992-05-20

    We have developed rat thyroid and mammary clonogen transplantation systems for the study of radiogenic cancer induction at the target cell level in vivo. The epithelial cell populations of both glands contain small subpopulations of cells which are capable of giving rise to monoclonal glandular structures when transplanted and stimulated with appropriate hormones. Previous results indicated that these clonogens are the precursor cells of radiogenic cancer, and that initiation, is common event at the clonegenic cell level. Detailed information on the physiologic control of clonogen proliferation, differentiation, and total numbers is thus essential to an understanding of the carcinogenic process. We report here studies on investigations on the relationships between grafted thyroid cell number and the rapidity and degree of reestablishment of the thyroid-hypothalamus-pituitary feedback axis in thyroidectomized rats maintained on a normal diet or an iodine deficient diet; studies of the persistence of, and the differentiation potential and functional characteristics of, the TSH-(thyrotropin-) responsive sub- population of clonogens during goitrogenesis, the plateau-phase of goiter growth, and goiter involution; studies of changes in the size of the clonogen sub-population during goitrogenesis, goiter involution and the response to goitrogen rechallenge; and a large carcinogenesis experiment on the nature of the grafted thyroid cell number-dependent suppression of promotion/progression to neoplasia in grafts of radiation-initiated thyroid cells. Data from these studies will be used in the design of future carcinogenesis experiments on neoplastic initiation by high and low LET radiations and on cell interactions during the neoplastic process.

  3. Geochemistry and Nd-Sr Isotopic Signatures of the Pensamiento Granitoid Complex, Rondonian-San Ignacio Province, Eastern Precambrian Shield of Bolivia: Petrogenetic Constraints for a Mesoproterozoic Magmatic Arc Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramiro Matos

    2009-06-01

    Nd(1330 signatures varying from +1.5 to +2.7, in agreement with a plutonic arc setting as issuggested for the Diamantina pluton. Integrated interpretation of the geochemical and isotopic data coupled with new geologiccorrelations of the PGC with contemporary units in the Brazilian counterpart establishes one Mesoproterozoic magmatic arcin the evolution of the Rondonian-San Ignacio province.

  4. Lead isotopic studies of lunar soils - Their bearing on the time scale of agglutinate formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, S. E.; Tilton, G. R.; Chen, J. H.

    1976-01-01

    Fines (smaller than 75 microns) and bulk soil were studied to analyze loss of volatile lead; losses of the order of 10% to 30% radiogenic lead during the production of agglutinates are assessed. Lead isotope data from fine-agglutinate pairs are analyzed for information on the time scale of micrometeorite bombardment, from the chords generated by the data in concordia diagrams. Resulting mean lead loss ages were compared to spallogenic gas exposure ages for all samples. Labile parentless radiogenic Pb residing preferentially on or in the fines is viewed as possibly responsible for aberrant lead loss ages. Bulk soils plot above the concordia curve (in a field of excess radiogenic Pb) for all samples with anomalous ages.

  5. Tracking selenium behaviour in chalk aquifer (northern France): Sr and 34S-sulphates isotopes constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cary, Lise; Benabderraziq, Hind; Elkhattabi, Jamal; Parmentier, Marc; Gourcy, Laurence; Négrel, Philippe

    2014-05-01

    Groundwaters in parts of the Paris Basin (France) are facing increasing selenium (Se) contents that can exceed the drinking water limit of 10 μg/L according to the European Framework Directive in the field of water policy (2000/60/EC). To better understand the groundwater origins and the selenium dynamics, the water chemistry of the Chalk aquifer supplying drinkable water to Lille city was studied. This area is submitted to quantitative and qualitative pressure from industrial, urban and agriculture origins. An integrated study was settled to determine the water sources and dynamics of elements, with a focus on Se. After a large chemical characterisation of the groundwater chemistry in the four field wells, a monthly monitoring was held in four wells and in the Deûle channel. Chemical analysis of major and trace elements, stable isotopes (δ18O, δ2H), strontium isotopes, and δ34S and δ18O of sulphates were realised. The chemical composition of solids sampled at various depths at vicinity of the four wells was also analysed. The specific geochemical signature of groundwater as revealed by Sr isotopes, in addition to element concentrations ratios like Mg/Sr and Se/Sr, highlighted mixture of three main groundwaters bodies: (1) the upstream groundwaters in the recharge area with the most radiogenic 87Sr/86Sr isotopic signature; (2) the confined groundwaters with high Sr concentrations due to water-rock interactions and the lowest 87Sr/86Sr isotopic signature close to the one of the chalk in Paris and London basins; (3) the Se-rich formations of Tertiary and Quaternary. The contents of Se, mainly present as SeV I (and locally as SeIV ), displayed spatial and temporal disparities that can be explained by geological and hydrogeological conditions. Se-rich clayed sediments originating from the dismantling of Se-rich tertiary formations (i.e. Ypresian) overlay the chalk formation and can be found in saturated conditions depending of the water table level. Oxidation of

  6. 76 FR 31329 - EPA Radiogenic Cancer Risk Models and Projections for the U.S. Population (Blue Book)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-31

    ... AGENCY EPA Radiogenic Cancer Risk Models and Projections for the U.S. Population (Blue Book) AGENCY.... Population (EPA 402-R-11-001, April 2011), also known as the Blue Book, which provides radiation risk... Projections for the U.S. Population, also known as the Blue Book, is a revision to EPA's methodology for...

  7. Estimate of influence of U-Th-K radiogenic heat on cooling process of granitic melt and its geological implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The U-Th-40K concentrations of granite are on 1―2 orders of magnitude greater than those of basal- tic-ultrabasic rocks. Radiogenic heat of a granitic melt has significant influence on the cool- ing-crystallization period of the melt. In this paper we derived a formula to calculate prolongation period (tA) of cooling-crystallization of a granitic melt caused by radiogenic heat. Calculation using this for- mula and radioactive element concentrations (U=5.31×10-6; Th=23.1×10-6; K=4.55%) for the biotite adamellite of the Jinjiling batholith shows that the tA of the adamellite is 1.4 times of the cooling period of the granitic melt without considering radiogenic heat from the initial temperature (Tm=960℃) to crystallization temperature (Tc=600℃) of the melt. It has been demonstrated that the radiogenic heat produced in a granitic melt is a key factor influencing the cooling-crystallization process of the granitic melt, and is likely one of the reasons for inconsistence between emplacement ages and crystallization ages of many Meso-Cenozoic granitoids.

  8. Nd and Pb isotope variability in the Indus River System: implications for sediment provenance and crustal heterogeneity in the Western Himalaya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clift, Peter D.; Lee, Jae Il; Hildebrand, Peter; Shimizu, Nobumichi; Layne, Graham D.; Blusztajn, Jerzy; Blum, Joel D.; Garzanti, Eduardo; Khan, Athar Ali

    2002-06-01

    The Indus River system is the only major drainage system in the western Himalaya, and erodes not only the High Himalaya, but also topographically high regions within and north of the Indus Suture Zone, most notably the Karakoram. Ion microprobe analysis of Pb isotopes in detrital K-feldspar grains taken from the tributaries of the Indus, together with bulk Nd isotope analysis of those same sediments, is here used to identify distinct sediment source regions. These span the very radiogenic Nanga Parbat and associated Lesser Himalaya, the relatively radiogenic-intermediate High Himalaya, the unradiogenic Ladakh and Kohistan Batholiths and intermediate values in the Hindu Kush, Karakoram and Lhasa Block. The range of compositions reflects differing degrees of recycling of older continental crust during petrogenesis. K-feldspars from the Ladakh and Kohistan Batholiths are less radiogenic than the laterally equivalent Gangdese granite of Tibet, interpreted to reflect the preferential recycling of accreted oceanic arc units within the western Transhimalaya prior to India-Asia collision. Similarly the Zanskar High Himalaya are less radiogenic than their equivalents in Nepal. Isotope values from Pleistocene Indus Fan sediment are compatible with a dominant source in the Karakoram, with additional important contributions from the arc batholiths and High Himalaya, reflecting both the area and modern rates of tectonic uplift within the drainage basin. In contrast, radiogenic grains are common in the lower reaches of the modern Indus River, possibly as a result of the damming of the main river channel where it reaches the foreland.

  9. Erosion of Archean continents: The Sm-Nd and Lu-Hf isotopic record of Barberton sedimentary rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garçon, M.; Carlson, R. W.; Shirey, S. B.; Arndt, N. T.; Horan, M. F.; Mock, T. D.

    2017-06-01

    reworking of older crust at ∼3.2 Ga in the Barberton area. The Si-rich sediments have slightly positive εNd (t=3.23Ga) but extremely radiogenic εHf (t=3.23Ga), up to +11. Based on analyses of 3.4 Ga Buck Reef cherts, we suggest that the radiogenic Hf isotopic signature of the Si-rich sediments can be accounted for by the old chert clasts or detrital silicified rock fragments present in the rocks. The latter have extremely high Lu/Hf ratios such that their εHf values would increase dramatically, by about +100 epsilon units every 100 Ma. In the Ca-, Fe-rich sediments, one sample contains carbonate that preserves the typical rare-earth element features of seawater precipitates. The initial Nd isotopic composition of this sample (εNd (t=3.23Ga) = +1.7) is within the range of previous estimates for Archean anoxic seawater.

  10. Osmium Isotopic Composition of the Sumbar Cretaceous- Tertiary Boundary, Turkmenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisel, T.; Krahenbuhl, U.; Nazarov, M. A.

    1992-07-01

    Turekian (1982) propagated the use of the osmium isotopic composition as a cosmic indicator for the origin of the high osmium (and iridium) layers at the K/T boundaries. He did not consider the osmium isotopic signature of the terrestrial mantle, which also has a chondritic evolution of the Re-Os system. Osmium cannot serve alone as an infallible indicator of the impact theory, but interesting results can be obtained from their investigation. Different K/T boundary section have been analyzed so far for ^187Os/^186Os. An overview of the values is presented in the table. Boundary Clay layer Os ratio Reference Stevns Klint fish clay 1.66 Luck and Turekian, 1983 Woodside Creek 1.12 Lichte et al., 1986 Raton Basin 1.23 Kraehenbuehl et al., 1988 Raton Basin (several) 1.15-1.23 Esser and Turekian, 1989 Sumbar (0-1 cm) 1.16 This work We obtained a complete marine section of the K/T boundary in southern Turkmenia (decribed by Alekseyev, 1988). It shows a very high Ir concentration (66 ppb) at the boundary layer and a remarkable Ir enrichment over crustal rocks continuing up to 30 cm above the boundary. Our aim of this investigation is to analyze several samples from above and below the boundary for the ^187Os/^186Os ratio to obtain a complete picture of the isotopic evolution of the section. We want to evaluate mixing of Os with chondritic ratios with Os from upper crustal rocks. Another goal is to investigate a mobilization of Os. So far only one sample has been analyzed with NTI-MS after fire assay digestion of the sample. The sample 0 to 1 cm has an ^187Os/^186Os ratio of 1.162 +- 13, which is quite low. We expect an even lower value for the boundary clay (0 cm) itself not taking into account a contribution of radiogenic osmium from the decay of terrestrial rhenium. This might put this K/T boundary section closest of all to the present day chondritic value (approx. 1.05). Further analysis will be presented at the meeting. References Alekseyev A. S., Nazarov M. A

  11. Stable isotopic characterisation of francolite formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArthur, J. M.; Benmore, R. A.; Coleman, M. L.; Soldi, C.; Yeh, H.-W.; O'Brien, G. W.

    1986-02-01

    Stable isotopic data are presented for 112 samples of francolite from 18 separate phosphate deposits. Values of δ 13C and δ 34S in most offshore deposits suggest formation within oxic or suboxic environments either by carbonate replacement or direct precipitation of francolite from water of normal marine compositions. The exceptions are concretionary francolite from Namibia, which has an isotopic composition in keeping with its formation within organic-rich sediments, and that from offshore Morocco, which has an isotopic signature of the anoxic/suboxic interface. Onshore deposits from Jordan, Mexico, South Africa and, possibly, the Permian Phosphoria Formation in the western U.S.A., are substantially depleted in 18O: they appear to be too altered for deductions to be made about their environments of formation. In other onshore deposits which are unaltered, or minimally altered, the isotopic composition suggests that some formed within sulphate-reducing sediments (Sedhura, Morocco) whilst francolite from the Georgina Basin of Australia formed at the oxic/anoxic boundary, where oxidation of biogenic H 2S decreases the δ 34S of pore water. In general, pelletal samples show non-oxic isotopic signatures, whilst non-pelletal samples show oxic isotopic signatures, but samples from Namibia, Peru (Ica Plateau) and the Californian and Moroccan margins are exceptions to this rule. Morphology may therefore be a misleading indicator of francolite genesis as no definitive relation exists between phosphorite type and isotopic signature.

  12. Comparative isotope ecology of African great apes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oelze, Vicky M; Fahy, Geraldine; Hohmann, Gottfried; Robbins, Martha M; Leinert, Vera; Lee, Kevin; Eshuis, Henk; Seiler, Nicole; Wessling, Erin G; Head, Josephine; Boesch, Christophe; Kühl, Hjalmar S

    2016-12-01

    The isotope ecology of great apes is a useful reference for palaeodietary reconstructions in fossil hominins. As extant apes live in C3-dominated habitats, variation in isotope signatures is assumed to be low compared to hominoids exploiting C4-plant resources. However, isotopic differences between sites and between and within individuals are poorly understood due to the lack of vegetation baseline data. In this comparative study, we included all species of free-ranging African great apes (Pan troglodytes, Pan paniscus, Gorilla sp.). First, we explore differences in isotope baselines across different habitats and whether isotopic signatures in apes can be related to feeding niches (faunivory and folivory). Secondly, we illustrate how stable isotopic variations within African ape populations compare to other extant and extinct primates and discuss possible implications for dietary flexibility. Using 701 carbon and nitrogen isotope data points resulting from 148 sectioned hair samples and an additional collection of 189 fruit samples, we compare six different great ape sites. We investigate the relationship between vegetation baselines and climatic variables, and subsequently correct great ape isotope data to a standardized plant baseline from the respective sites. We obtained temporal isotopic profiles of individual animals by sectioning hair along its growth trajectory. Isotopic signatures of great apes differed between sites, mainly as vegetation isotope baselines were correlated with site-specific climatic conditions. We show that controlling for plant isotopic characteristics at a given site is essential for faunal data interpretation. While accounting for plant baseline effects, we found distinct isotopic profiles for each great ape population. Based on evidence from habituated groups and sympatric great ape species, these differences could possibly be related to faunivory and folivory. Dietary flexibility in apes varied, but temporal variation was overall

  13. Oxygen isotope heterogeneity of the mantle beneath the Canary Islands: insights from olivine phenocrysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurenko, Andrey A.; Bindeman, Ilya N.; Chaussidon, Marc

    2011-08-01

    peridotite (HIMU-type component inherited its radiogenic isotope composition from ancient, ~1 to 2 Ga, recycled ocean crust) and pyroxenite (young, <1 Ga, recycled oceanic crust preserved as eclogite with depleted MORB-type isotopic signature) components of the Canary plume. The model calculations yield 5.2 and 5.9 ± 0.3‰ for peridotite- and pyroxenite-derived melts, respectively, which appeared to correspond closely to the worldwide HIMU-type OIB and upper limit N-MORB δ 18O values. This difference together with the broad range of δ 18O variations found in the Canarian olivines cannot be explained by thermodynamic effects of oxygen isotopic fractionation and are believed to represent true variations in the mantle, due to oceanic crust and continental lithosphere recycling.

  14. Low-Mass Dark Matter Search Results and Radiogenic Backgrounds for the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pepin, Mark David [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2016-12-01

    An ever-increasing amount of evidence suggests that approximately one quarter of the energy in the universe is composed of some non-luminous, and hitherto unknown, “dark matter”. Physicists from numerous sub-fields have been working on and trying to solve the dark matter problem for decades. The common solution is the existence of some new type of elementary particle with particular focus on weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). One avenue of dark matter research is to create an extremely sensitive particle detector with the goal of directly observing the interaction of WIMPs with standard matter. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) project operated at the Soudan Underground Laboratory from 2003–2015, under the CDMS II and SuperCDMS Soudan experiments, with this goal of directly detecting dark matter. The next installation, SuperCDMS SNOLAB, is planned for near-future operation. The reason the dark-matter particle has not yet been observed in traditional particle physics experiments is that it must have very small cross sections, thus making such interactions extremely rare. In order to identify these rare events in the presence of a background of known particles and interactions, direct detection experiments employ various types and amounts of shielding to prevent known backgrounds from reaching the instrumented detector(s). CDMS utilized various gamma and neutron shielding to such an effect that the shielding, and other experimental components, themselves were sources of background. These radiogenic backgrounds must be understood to have confidence in any WIMP-search result. For this dissertation, radiogenic background studies and estimates were performed for various analyses covering CDMS II, SuperCDMS Soudan, and SuperCDMS SNOLAB. Lower-mass dark matter t c2 inent in the past few years. The CDMS detectors can be operated in an alternative, higher-biased, mode v to decrease their energy thresholds and correspondingly increase their sensitivity

  15. The role of impact and radiogenic heating in the early thermal evolution of Mars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Sahijpal; G K Bhatia

    2015-02-01

    The planetary differentiation models of Mars are proposed that take into account core–mantle and coremantle–crust differentiation. The numerical simulations are presented for the early thermal evolution of Mars spanning up to the initial 25 million years (Ma) of the early solar system, probably for the first time, by taking into account the radiogenic heating due to the short-lived nuclides, 26Al and 60Fe. The influence of impact heating during the accretion of Mars is also incorporated in the simulations. The early accretion of Mars would necessitate a substantial role played by the short-lived nuclides in its heating. 26Al along with impact heating could have provided sufficient thermal energy to the entire body to substantially melt and trigger planetary scale differentiation. This is contrary to the thermal models based exclusively on the impact heating that could not produce widespread melting and planetary differentiation. The early onset of the accretion of Mars perhaps within the initial ∼1.5 Ma in the early solar system could have resulted in substantial differentiation of Mars, provided, it accreted over the timescale of ∼1 Ma. This seems to be consistent with the chronological records of the Martian meteorites.

  16. The role of impact and radiogenic heating in the early thermal evolution of Mars

    CERN Document Server

    Sahijpal, S

    2014-01-01

    The planetary differentiation models of Mars are proposed that take into account core-mantle and core-mantle-crust differentiation. The numerical simulations are presented for the early thermal evolution of Mars spanning up to the initial 25 million years (Ma) of the early solar system, probably for the first time, by taking into account the radiogenic heating due to the short-lived nuclides, 26Al and 60Fe. The influence of impact heating during the accretion of Mars is also incorporated in the simulations. The early accretion of Mars would necessitate a substantial role played by the short-lived nuclides in its heating. 26Al along with impact heating could have provided sufficient thermal energy to the entire body to substantially melt and trigger planetary scale differentiation. This is contrary to the thermal models based exclusively on the impact heating that could not produce widespread melting and planetary differentiation. The early onset of the accretion of Mars perhaps within the initial ~1.5 Ma in t...

  17. Experimental study of the Mg and Sr isotopic evolution of seawater interacting with basalt between 150 and 300 ° C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Martin; Pearce, Christopher R.; Oelkers, Eric H.

    2016-04-01

    The chemical exchange of material between seawater and the oceanic crust plays a major role in marine geochemical cycles [1]. Isotopic signatures provide an important means of tracing elemental transfer in hydrothermal environments, yet only a limited amount of experimental data on the extent of isotopic fractionation under these conditions is currently available. This study consequently investigated the extent of δ26/24Mg and 87Sr/86Sr isotopic variation during a seawater-basalt interaction experiments at 150, 250 and 290 ° C. A suite of closed system experiments were run for several months at each temperature under saturated water pressure, using either crystalline or glassy basalt as the starting material and a water/rock ratio of 10 or 25. Our results demonstrate that the dissolution of basaltic material in hydrothermal environments occurs at the same time as the precipitation of alteration minerals (mainly smectite and anhydrite), which is consistent with results from similar studies in the past (e.g. [2]). As expected, the rate of reaction using crystalline basalt was slower than with basaltic glass, and both sample types reacted faster at higher temperatures. The 87Sr/86Sr composition of the experimental fluids decreased from the initial seawater value (0.70916) towards the lower basaltic signature during the experiments (0.70317), demonstrating the progressive release of Sr during basalt dissolution. Magnesium was steadily removed from the fluid via the precipitation of clay minerals, with the residual fluids having progressively lighter δ26/24Mg compositions. The mean Mg isotope fractionation factor (αsolid-solution) observed at 250 oC was 1.0005±0.0002, supporting low-temperature evidence that clay minerals preferentially incorporate isotopically heavy magnesium [3]. These experiments provide quantitative information on the extent of Mg isotopic fractionation between fluids and secondary silicate minerals in hydrothermal systems, and demonstrate the

  18. Deciphering petrogenic processes using Pb isotope ratios from time-series samples at Bezymianny and Klyuchevskoy volcanoes, Central Kamchatka Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayzar, Theresa M.; Nelson, Bruce K.; Bachmann, Olivier; Bauer, Ann M.; Izbekov, Pavel E.

    2014-10-01

    The Klyuchevskoy group of volcanoes in the Kamchatka arc erupts compositionally diverse magmas (high-Mg basalts to dacites) over small spatial scales. New high-precision Pb isotope data from modern juvenile (1956-present) erupted products and hosted enclaves and xenoliths from Bezymianny volcano reveal that Bezymianny and Klyuchevskoy volcanoes, separated by only 9 km, undergo varying degrees of crustal processing through independent crustal columns. Lead isotope compositions of Klyuchevskoy basalts-basaltic andesites are more radiogenic than Bezymianny andesites (208Pb/204Pb = 37.850-37.903, 207Pb/204Pb = 15.468-15.480, and 206Pb/204Pb = 18.249-18.278 at Bezymianny; 208Pb/204Pb = 37.907-37.949, 207Pb/204Pb = 15.478-15.487, and 206Pb/204Pb = 18.289-18.305 at Klyuchevskoy). A mid-crustal xenolith with a crystallization pressure of 5.2 ± 0.6 kbars inferred from two-pyroxene geobarometry and basaltic andesite enclaves from Bezymianny record less radiogenic Pb isotope compositions than their host magmas. Hence, assimilation of such lithologies in the middle or lower crust can explain the Pb isotope data in Bezymianny andesites, although a component of magma mixing with less radiogenic mafic recharge magmas and possible mantle heterogeneity cannot be excluded. Lead isotope compositions for the Klyuchevskoy Group are less radiogenic than other arc segments (Karymsky—Eastern Volcanic Zone; Shiveluch—Northern Central Kamchatka Depression), which indicate increased lower-crustal assimilation beneath the Klyuchevskoy Group. Decadal timescale Pb isotope variations at Klyuchevskoy demonstrate rapid changes in the magnitude of assimilation at a volcanic center. Lead isotope data coupled with trace element data reflect the influence of crustal processes on magma compositions even in thin mafic volcanic arcs.

  19. Efficient Threshold Signature Scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sattar J Aboud

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we introduce a new threshold signature RSA-typed scheme. The proposed scheme has the characteristics of un-forgeable and robustness in random oracle model. Also, signature generation and verification is entirely non-interactive. In addition, the length of the entity signature participate is restricted by a steady times of the length of the RSA signature modulus. Also, the signing process of the proposed scheme is more efficient in terms of time complexity and interaction.

  20. Determining activities of radionuclides from coincidence signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Glen A.; Smith, L. Eric; Aalseth, Craig E.; Ellis, Edward; Hossbach, Todd W.; Valsan, Andrei B.

    2006-05-01

    The spectral analysis of simultaneously observed photons in separate detectors may provide an invaluable tool for radioisotope identification applications. A general recursive method to determine the activity of an isotope from the observed coincidence signature rate is discussed. The method coherently accounts for effects of true coincidence summing within a single detector and detection efficiencies. A verification of the approach with computer simulations is also discussed.

  1. Zinc isotopic compositions of breast cancer tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larner, Fiona; Woodley, Laura N; Shousha, Sami; Moyes, Ashley; Humphreys-Williams, Emma; Strekopytov, Stanislav; Halliday, Alex N; Rehkämper, Mark; Coombes, R Charles

    2015-01-01

    An early diagnostic biomarker for breast cancer is essential to improve outcome. High precision isotopic analysis, originating in Earth sciences, can detect very small shifts in metal pathways. For the first time, the natural intrinsic Zn isotopic compositions of various tissues in breast cancer patients and controls were determined. Breast cancer tumours were found to have a significantly lighter Zn isotopic composition than the blood, serum and healthy breast tissue in both groups. The Zn isotopic lightness in tumours suggests that sulphur rich metallothionein dominates the isotopic selectivity of a breast tissue cell, rather than Zn-specific proteins. This reveals a possible mechanism of Zn delivery to Zn-sequestering vesicles by metallothionein, and is supported by a similar signature observed in the copper isotopic compositions of one breast cancer patient. This change in intrinsic isotopic compositions due to cancer has the potential to provide a novel early biomarker for breast cancer.

  2. Stable isotopes of summer monsoonal precipitation in southern China and the moisture sources evidence from δ18O signature%中国南部夏季季风降水水汽来源的稳定同位素证据

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柳鉴容; 宋献方; 袁国富; 孙晓敏; 刘鑫; 王仕琴; 王志民

    2008-01-01

    Summer monsoons (South Asian monsoon, South China Sea monsoon and Sub-tropical monsoon) are prominent features of summertime climate over southern China. Dif-ferent monsoons carry different inflow moisture into China and control the temporal and spa-tial distributions of precipitation. Analyses of meteorological data, particularly wind, tempera-ture and pressure anomalies are traditional methods of characterizing moisture sources and transport patterns. Here, we try to utilize the evidence from stable isotopes signatures to trace summer monsoons over southern China. Based on seven CHNIP (Chinese Network of Iso-topes in Precipitation) observatory stations located in southern China, monthly composite precipitation samples have been collected and analyzed for the composition of δ18O during July, 2005. The results indicated that the spatial distributions of δ18O in precipitation could properly portray the moisture sources together with their transport pathways. Moreover, the amount effect, altitude effect, temperature effect and the correlation between δ18O vs. relative humidity were discussed.

  3. Quantum threshold group signature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In most situations, the signer is generally a single person. However, when the message is written on behalf of an organization, a valid message may require the approval or consent of several persons. Threshold signature is a solution to this problem. Generally speaking, as an authority which can be trusted by all members does not exist, a threshold signature scheme without a trusted party appears more attractive. Following some ideas of the classical Shamir’s threshold signature scheme, a quantum threshold group signature one is proposed. In the proposed scheme, only t or more of n persons in the group can generate the group signature and any t-1 or fewer ones cannot do that. In the verification phase, any t or more of n signature receivers can verify the message and any t-1 or fewer receivers cannot verify the validity of the signature.

  4. About group digital signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Cristina Enache

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available

    Group signatures try to combine security (no framing, no cheating and privacy(anonymity, unlinkability.A group digital signature is a digital signature with enhanced privacy features that allows members of a given group to anonymously sign messages on behalf of the group, producing a group signature. However, in the case of dispute the identity of the signature's originator can be revealed by a designated entity (group manager. The present paper describes the main concepts about group signatures, along with a brief state of the art and shows a personal cryptographic library implemented in Java that includes two group signatures.

  5. Radiogenic neoplasia in thyroid and mammary clonogens. Progress report, January 1, 1991--December 31, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifton, K.H.

    1991-05-31

    We have developed rat thyroid and mammary clonogen transplantation systems for the study of radiogenic cancer induction at the target cell level in vivo. The epithelial cell populations of both glands contain small subpopulations of cells which are capable of giving rise to monoclonal glandular structures when transplanted and stimulated with appropriate hormones. During the end of the last grant year and the first half of the current grant year, we have completed analyses and summarized for publication: investigations on the relationship between grafted thyroid cell number and the rapidity and degree of reestablishment of the thyroid-hypothalamicpituitary axis in thyroidectomized rats maintained on a normal diet or an iodine deficient diet; studies of the persistence of, and the differentiation potential and functional characteristics of, the TSH- (thyrotropin-) responsive sub-population of clonogens during goitrogenesis, the plateau-phase of goiter growth, and goiter involution; studies of changes in the size of the clonogen sub-population during goitrogenesis, goiter involution and the response to goitrogen rechallenge; and the results of the large carcinogenesis experiment on the nature of the grafted thyroid cell number-dependent suppression of promotion/progression to neoplasia in grafts of radiation-initiated thyroid cells. We are testing new techniques for the culture, cytofluorescent analysis and characterization mammary epithelial cells and of clonogens in a parallel project, and plan to apply similar technology to the thyroid epithelial cells and clonogen population. Data from these studies will be used in the design of future carcinogenesis experiments on neoplastic initiation by high and low LET radiations and on cells interactions during the neoplastic process.

  6. Iron isotope fractionation in marine invertebrates in near shore environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmanuel, S.; Schuessler, J. A.; Vinther, J.; Matthews, A.; von Blanckenburg, F.

    2014-04-01

    Chitons (Mollusca) are marine invertebrates that produce radula (teeth or rasping tongue) containing high concentrations of biomineralized magnetite and other iron bearing minerals. As Fe isotope signatures are influenced by redox processes and biological fractionation, Fe isotopes in chiton radula might be expected to provide an effective tracer of ambient oceanic conditions and biogeochemical cycling. Here, in a pilot study to measure Fe isotopes in marine invertebrates, we examine Fe isotopes in modern marine chiton radula collected from different locations in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans to assess the range of isotopic values, and to test whether or not the isotopic signatures reflect seawater values. Furthermore, by comparing two species that have very different feeding habits but collected from the same location, we infer a possible link between diet and Fe isotopic signatures. Values of δ56Fe (relative to IRMM-014) in chiton teeth range from -1.90 to 0.00‰ (±0.05‰ (2σ) uncertainty in δ56Fe), probably reflecting a combination of geographical control and biological fractionation processes. Comparison with published local surface seawater Fe isotope data shows a consistent negative offset of chiton teeth Fe isotope compositions relative to seawater. Strikingly, two different species from the same locality in the North Pacific (Puget Sound, Washington, USA) have distinct isotopic signatures. Tonicella lineata, which feeds on red algae, has a mean δ56Fe of -0.65 ± 0.26‰ (2σ, 3 specimens), while Mopalia muscosa, which feeds primarily on green algae, shows lighter isotopic values with a mean δ56Fe of -1.47 ± 0.98‰ (2σ, 5 specimens). Although chitons are not simple recorders of the ambient seawater Fe isotopic signature, these preliminary results suggest that Fe isotopes provide information concerning Fe biogeochemical cycling in near shore environments, and might be used to probe sources of Fe in the diets of different organisms.

  7. Sr, Nd, Pb Isotope geochemistry and magma evolution of the potassic volcanic rocks, Wudalianchi, Northeast China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junwen, W.; Guanghong, X.; Tatsumoto, M.; Basu, A.R.

    1989-01-01

    Wudalianchi volcanic rocks are the most typical Cenozoic potassic volcanic rocks in eastern China. Compositional comparisons between whole rocks and glasses of various occurrences indicate that the magma tends to become rich in silica and alkalis as a result of crystal differentiation in the course of evolution. They are unique in isotopic composition with more radiogenic Sr but less radiogenic Pb.87Sr /86 Sr is higher and143Nd/144Nd is lower than the undifferentiated global values. In comparison to continental potash volcanic rocks, Pb isotopes are apparently lower. These various threads of evidence indicate that the rocks were derived from a primary enriched mantle which had not been subjected to reworking and shows no sign of incorporation of crustal material. The correlation between Pb and Sr suggests the regional heterogeneity in the upper mantle in terms of chemical composition. ?? 1989 Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  8. The geographic distribution of strontium isotopes in Danish surface waters - A base for provenance studies in archaeology, hydrology and agriculture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frei, Karin M., E-mail: kmfrei@hum.ku.dk [Danish National Research Foundation Centre for Textile Research, SAXO Institute, University of Copenhagen, Njalsgade 80, DK-2300 Copenhagen (Denmark); Frei, Robert [Institute of Geography and Geology and Nordic Center for Earth Evolution (NordCEE), University of Copenhagen, Oster Voldgade 10, DK-1350 Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2011-03-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Strontium isotope data of 192 surface waters from Denmark. {yields} Geographic baseline distribution of bio-available fractions. {yields} Applicable for provenance studies within archaeology, geology, agriculture and hydrology. {yields} Proposal of a band of strontium isotope values to characterize 'local' Danish signatures. - Abstract: In this paper Sr isotope signatures are reported for 192 surface water (lakes/ponds and rivers/creeks) samples from within Denmark and an isotope distribution map is presented that may serve as a base for provenance applications, including archaeological migration studies, ground water - surface water - seawater interaction/contamination monitoring, and potentially for agricultural applications, including cases of authenticity proof for particular food products. The Sr isotopic compositions of surface waters range from {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr = 0.7078 to 0.7125 (average 0.7096 {+-} 0.0016; 2{sigma}). This average value lies above the range of {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr values between 0.7078 and 0.7082 expected from Late Cretaceous to Early Tertiary (Oligocene) limestones which form the dominant bedrock type in a NW-SE trending belt in Denmark. The elevated {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr signatures >{approx}0.7095 are explained by additions to the surface waters of radiogenic Sr predominantly derived from the near-surface weathering and wash-out of Quarternary glaciogenic tills and soils deposited and formed during and after the last two ice age stages (Saale and Weichsel). The Sr isotopic compositions and concentrations of the surface waters can, therefore, best be modeled by a two-component mixing involving carbonaceous bedrock and glaciogenic cover sediments as the two predominant Sr sources. A feasibility study for using Sr isotopic compositions of surface waters as a proxy for bio-available Sr signatures was conducted in a representative test area on Zealand (Land of Legends, Lejre) where there is no use

  9. Geochemical and isotopic constraints on the petrogenesis of the Puesto La Peña undersaturated potassic complex, Mendoza province, Argentina: Geodynamic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zappettini, Eduardo O.; Villar, Luisa M.; Hernández, Laura B.; Santos, João O.

    2013-03-01

    Major and trace element and radiogenic and stable isotope data are reported for the Miocene Puesto La Peña undersaturated potassic complex, located in the Argentine Precordillera. The complex is composed of a pyroxenite core surrounded by a malignite-borolanite association, followed by radial and ring dikes composed of alkaline lamprophyres, tephrite to phonolite and intermediate varieties, porphyritic microledmorite, benmoreite, alkaline trachyte and a swarm of ultrabasic ouachitite dikes. Late trachytic to phonolitic volcanic necks and associated dikes crop out surrounding the malignitic-borolanitic massif. Major and trace element data are consistent with their derivation by partial melting from an enriched, probably lithospheric, metasomatized heterogeneous mantle involving spinel- and garnet-facies mantle sources. The trace element and isotope data indicate that all rock types are derived from a common parental magma and are thus cogenetic. Sr, Nd and Pb variations in the different studied lithologies are restricted, except for the evidence of Sr decoupling in the ouachitite samples. Their Sr-Nd isotope compositions follow the "mantle array" defined by oceanic basalts, within the OIB field, consistent with an intraplate depleted source. The genesis of the ouachitite is interpreted to be related to mixing between asthenospheric magma and melts from the lower lithosphere consisting of K-rich metasomatic layers. The Dupal like Pb isotopes signature suggests a mantle modification by introduction of continental crust material in the upper mantle; this is consistent with the Sr-Nd isotope data from the late silica-undersaturated felsic dikes and volcanic necks. Multistage mantle extraction would have occurred by the end of Neoproterozoic to lower Paleozoic times as indicated by the isotopic data. Partial melting was initiated by mantle upwelling decompression during lithosphere extension. Back-arc extensional conditions during the latest Early Miocene (19 Ma

  10. Geochemical and isotopic insights into the assembly, evolution and disruption of a magmatic plumbing system before and after a cataclysmic caldera-collapse eruption at Ischia volcano (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, R. J.; Civetta, L.; Arienzo, I.; D'Antonio, M.; Moretti, R.; Orsi, G.; Tomlinson, E. L.; Albert, P. G.; Menzies, M. A.

    2014-09-01

    New geochemical and isotopic data on volcanic rocks spanning the period ~75-50 ka BP on Ischia volcano, Italy, shed light on the evolution of the magmatic system before and after the catastrophic, caldera-forming Monte Epomeo Green Tuff (MEGT) eruption. Volcanic activity during this period was influenced by a large, composite and differentiating magmatic system, replenished several times with isotopically distinct magmas of deep provenance. Chemical and isotopic variations highlight that the pre-MEGT eruptions were fed by trachytic/phonolitic magmas from an isotopically zoned reservoir that were poorly enriched in radiogenic Sr and became progressively less radiogenic with time. Just prior to the MEGT eruption, the magmatic system was recharged by an isotopically distinct magma, relatively more enriched in radiogenic Sr with respect to the previously erupted magmas. This second magma initially fed several SubPlinian explosive eruptions and later supplied the climactic, phonolitic-to-trachytic MEGT eruption(s). Isotopic data, together with erupted volume estimations obtained for MEGT eruption(s), indicate that >5-10 km3 of this relatively enriched magma had accumulated in the Ischia plumbing system. Geochemical modelling indicates that it accumulated at shallow depths (4-6 km), over a period of ca. 20 ka. After the MEGT eruption, volcanic activity was fed by a new batch of less differentiated (trachyte-latite) magma that was slightly less enriched in radiogenic Sr. The geochemical and Sr-Nd-isotopic variations through time reflect the upward flux of isotopically distinct magma batches, variably contaminated by Hercynian crust at 8-12 km depth. The deep-sourced latitic to trachytic magmas stalled at shallow depths (4-6 km depth), differentiated to phonolite through crystal fractionation and assimilation of a feldspar-rich mush, or ascended directly to the surface and erupted.

  11. Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd Isotope Systematics of Shergottite NWA 856: Crystallization Age and Implications for Alteration of Hot Desert SNC Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon, A. D.; Nyquist, L. E.; Shih, C.-Y.; Wiesmann, H.

    2004-01-01

    Nakhlite NWA 998 was discovered in Algeria in 2001, and is unique among the six known members of this group of Martian meteorites in containing significant modal orthopyroxene. Initial petrologic and isotopic data were reported by Irving et al. This 456 gram stone consists mainly of sub-calcic augite with subordinate olivine and minor orthopyroxene, titanomagnetite, pyrrhotite, chlorapatite, and intercumulus An(sub 35) plagioclase. We report here preliminary results of radiogenic isotopic analyses conducted on fragmental material from the main mass.

  12. Argon isotope fractionation induced by stepwise heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trieloff, Mario; Falter, Martina; Buikin, Alexei I.; Korochantseva, Ekaterina V.; Jessberger, Elmar K.; Altherr, Rainer

    2005-03-01

    Noble gas isotopes are widely used to elucidate the history of the rocks in which they have been trapped, either from distinct reservoirs or by accumulation following radioactive decay. To extract noble gases from their host rocks, stepwise heating is the most commonly used technique to deconvolve isotopically different components, e.g., atmospheric, in situ radiogenic, or excess radiogenic from mantle or crustal reservoirs. The accurate determination of the isotopic composition of these different components is of crucial importance, e.g., for ages obtained by 40Ar- 39Ar stepheating plateaus. However, diffusion theory-based model calculations predict that the stepwise thermal extraction process from mineral phases induces isotope fractionation and, hence, adulterates the original composition. Such effects are largely unconsidered, as they are small and a compelling experimental observation is lacking. We report the first unequivocal evidence for significant mass fractionation of argon isotopes during thermal extraction, observed on shungite, a carbon-rich Precambrian sedimentary rock. The degree of fractionation, as monitored by 38Ar/ 36Ar and 40Ar/ 36Ar ratios, very well agrees with theoretical predictions assuming an inverse square root dependence of diffusion coefficient and atomic mass, resulting in easier extraction of lighter isotopes. Hence, subatmospheric 40Ar/ 36Ar ratios obtained for argon extracted at low temperatures may not represent paleoatmospheric argon. Shungite argon resembles modern atmospheric composition, but constraints on the timing of trapping appear difficult to obtain, as shungites are multicomponent systems. In 40Ar- 39Ar stepwise heating, the isotope fractionation effect could cause systematic underestimations of plateau ages, between 0.15 and 0.4% depending on age, or considerably higher if samples contain appreciable atmospheric Ar. The magnitude of this effect is similar to the presently achieved uncertainties of this increasingly

  13. Generalized Group Signature Scheme

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The concept of generalized group signature scheme will bepresent. Based on the generalized secret sharing scheme proposed by Lin and Ha rn, a non-interactive approach is designed for realizing such generalized group signature scheme. Using the new scheme, the authorized subsets of the group in w hich the group member can cooperate to produce the valid signature for any messa ge can be randomly specified

  14. Stable isotope analysis of the human body. What isotopes in our tissue can reveal and what not; Stabilisotopenanalysen am Menschen. Was die Isotopie unseres Koerpergewebes ueber uns verraet- und was nicht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goerger, Marlene [Technische Univ. Darmstadt (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Most isotopes in the natural environment are stable but there are radioactive isotopes. Premordial radionuclides are nuclides that exist since the development of the earth crust. Cosmogenic radionuclides are generated due to cosmic radiation (protons, electrons, ionized atoms) - for instance C-14. Radiogenic nuclides are daughter products of radioactive nuclei. Anthropogenic radionuclides are generated due to human activities. Deviations from a ''normal'' isotope distribution are used for environmental impact analysis and forensic purposes. The human provenance project was stopped.

  15. Unconditionally Secure Quantum Signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Amiri

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Signature schemes, proposed in 1976 by Diffie and Hellman, have become ubiquitous across modern communications. They allow for the exchange of messages from one sender to multiple recipients, with the guarantees that messages cannot be forged or tampered with and that messages also can be forwarded from one recipient to another without compromising their validity. Signatures are different from, but no less important than encryption, which ensures the privacy of a message. Commonly used signature protocols—signatures based on the Rivest–Adleman–Shamir (RSA algorithm, the digital signature algorithm (DSA, and the elliptic curve digital signature algorithm (ECDSA—are only computationally secure, similar to public key encryption methods. In fact, since these rely on the difficulty of finding discrete logarithms or factoring large primes, it is known that they will become completely insecure with the emergence of quantum computers. We may therefore see a shift towards signature protocols that will remain secure even in a post-quantum world. Ideally, such schemes would provide unconditional or information-theoretic security. In this paper, we aim to provide an accessible and comprehensive review of existing unconditionally securesecure signature schemes for signing classical messages, with a focus on unconditionally secure quantum signature schemes.

  16. Radar Signature Calculation Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: The calculation, analysis, and visualization of the spatially extended radar signatures of complex objects such as ships in a sea multipath environment and...

  17. Blind Collective Signature Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay A. Moldovyan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Using the digital signature (DS scheme specified by Belarusian DS standard there are designed the collective and blind collective DS protocols. Signature formation is performed simultaneously by all of the assigned signers, therefore the proposed protocols can be used also as protocols for simultaneous signing a contract. The proposed blind collective DS protocol represents a particular implementation of the blind multisignature schemes that is a novel type of the signature schemes. The proposed protocols are the first implementations of the multisignature schemes based on Belarusian signature standard.

  18. Tracing magma sources of three different S-type peraluminous granitoid series by in situ U-Pb geochronology and Hf isotope zircon composition: The Variscan Montes de Toledo batholith (central Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino Martínez, E.; Villaseca, C.; Orejana, D.; Pérez-Soba, C.; Belousova, E.; Andersen, T.

    2014-07-01

    Three distinct S-type peraluminous granitoid types have been identified within the Variscan Montes de Toledo batholith, located in the Central Iberian Zone (SW European Variscides): type-1, extremely high peraluminous restite-rich granitoids; type-2, highly peraluminous restite-bearing granitoids; and type-3, moderately peraluminous granitoids with mafic microgranular enclaves. Type-1 and type-2 granitoids are restricted to the western part of the batholith, whereas type-3 granites are mostly restricted to the eastern segment. There is a sequential youngering of emplacement age from type-1 (late-tectonic) to type-2 and type-3 granitoids (post-tectonic), extending the timing of the batholith formation for about 19 Ma between 316 and 297 Ma. Although the degree of peraluminousity of the different series could be related to different partial melting conditions or to the variable entrainment of restitic components (including the peritectic mineral assemblage of the melting reactions), whole-rock geochemical signatures and isotope zircon composition of the peraluminous granitoid types suggest contribution of different crustal sources. There is no evidence for the direct mantle-derived material contribution in the genesis of these peraluminous melts. Type-1 and type-2 granitoids contain mostly Archean to Neoproterozoic inherited zircons, whereas type-3 granites show preferentially Neoproterozoic (up to late Cryogenian) and Ordovician inheritance. The wide range of initial Hf isotope composition, ranging to highly radiogenic values (ƐHf up to + 10), of Neoproterozoic zircon inheritances in type-1 and type-2 granitoids suggests derivation from heterogeneous Neoproterozoic metasedimentary sources composed of both juveline and recycled crustal materials, similar in composition to the host Schist-Greywacke Complex metasediments. Trace-element modelling clearly suggests the involvement of metasediments similar to those mentioned from the southern part of the Central Iberian

  19. Holocene Provenance Identification and Climate Control of Indus Basin By Using Radiogenic Techniques and Clay Mineralogy

    OpenAIRE

    ANWAR ALIZAI

    2011-01-01

    Two commonly used isotopic methods (Zircon U-Pb dating and K-feldspar Pb dating) were employed for the Holocene provenance identification within the Indus basin. Zircon grains from the upper Indus are generally younger than 200 Ma in contrast with the eastern tributaries, which show varying inputs from Greater and Lesser Himalayan sources. The Sutlej river is very rich in Lesser Himalayan-sourced sediments, while the Chenab is mostly eroded from the Greater Himalaya. Grains younger than 200 M...

  20. Arctic methane sources: Isotopic evidence for atmospheric inputs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fisher, R.E.; Sriskantharajah, S.; Lowry, D.; Lanoisellé, M.; Fowler, C.M.R.; James, R.H.; Hermansen, O.; Lund Myhre, C.; Stohl, A.; Greinert, J.; Nisbet-Jones, P.B.R.; Mienert, J.; Nisbet, E.G.

    2011-01-01

    By comparison of the methane mixing ratio and the carbon isotope ratio (delta C-13(CH4)) in Arctic air with regional background, the incremental input of CH4 in an air parcel and the source delta C-13(CH4) signature can be determined. Using this technique the bulk Arctic CH4 source signature of air

  1. Isotopic and trace element characteristics of rhyolites from the Valles Caldera, New Mexico. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Self, S.; Sykes, M.L. [Hawaii Univ., Honolulu, HI (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics; Wolff, J.A. [Texas Univ., Arlington, TX (United States). Dept. of Geology; Skuba, C.E. [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, ON (Canada). Dept. of Geology

    1991-09-01

    This report is a summary of work supported by DOE grant No. DE-FGO5-87ER13795 that was completed or is still in progress. The stated purpose of this grant was to collect geochemical information (trace element, radiogenic isotope and stable oxygen and hydrogen isotope) on samples from core holes VC-I and VC-2a in the Valles caldera in order to establish a consistent detailed intracaldera stratigraphy and relate this to extracaldera volcanic rock units of the Jemez Mountains. Careful stratigraphic control of the intracaldera units is necessary to evaluate models of caldera formation, ignimbrite deposition, and resurgence. Combined stable and radiogenic isotope and trace element data will also provide major insights to petrogenesis of the Bandelier magma system. The composition of non-hydrothermally altered samples from outflow units of the Bandelier Tuff and related volcanics must be known to assess isotopic variations of intracaldera ignimbrite samples. On detailed examination of the VC-2a core samples, it became apparent that hydrothermal alteration is so extensive that no geochemical information useful for stratigraphic fingerprinting or petrogenesis could be obtained, and that correlation with other intracaldera units and extracaldera units must be made on the basis of stratigraphic position and gross lithologic characteristics. Accordingly, we emphasize geochemical data from the extracaldera Bandelier Tuffs and related units which will be useful for comparison with proposed drill hole VC-4 and for any future studies of the region. The stable isotope, radiogenic isotope and trace element data obtained from this project, combined with existing major and trace element data for volcanic rocks from this area, provide an extensive data base essential to future Continental Scientific Drilling Program projects in the Jemez Mountains of New Mexico.

  2. Technology of Electronic Signatur

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    An electronic signature uses a hash of message and an asymetrical algorithm of encryption for its generation. During verification of message on receiver side the hash of original message must be identical with the hash of received message. Electronic message is secured autentization of author and integrity of transmission date. By electronic signature it is possible to sign everything what is in digital form.

  3. Revocable Ring Signature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dennis Y. W. Liu; Joseph K. Liu; Yi Mu; Willy Susilo; Duncan S. Wong

    2007-01-01

    Group signature allows the anonymity of a real signer in a group to be revoked by a trusted party called group manager. It also gives the group manager the absolute power of controlling the formation of the group. Ring signature, on the other hand, does not allow anyone to revoke the signer anonymity, while allowing the real signer to forma group (also known as a ring) arbitrarily without being controlled by any other party. In this paper, we propose a new variant for ring signature, called Revocable Ring Signature. The signature allows a real signer to form a ring arbitrarily while allowing a set of authorities to revoke the anonymity of the real signer. This new variant inherits the desirable properties from both group signature and ring signature in such a way that the real signer will be responsible for what it has signed as the anonymity is revocable by authorities while the real signer still has the freedom on ring formation. We provide a formal security model for revocable ring signature and propose an efficient construction which is proven secure under our security model.

  4. Digital Signature Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassler, Vesna; Biely, Helmut

    1999-01-01

    Describes the Digital Signature Project that was developed in Austria to establish an infrastructure for applying smart card-based digital signatures in banking and electronic-commerce applications. Discusses the need to conform to international standards, an international certification infrastructure, and security features for a public directory…

  5. OIB signatures in basin-related lithosphere-derived alkaline basalts from the Batain basin (Oman) - Constraints from 40Ar/39Ar ages and Nd-Sr-Pb-Hf isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, M.; Jung, S.; Pfänder, J. A.; Romer, R. L.; Mayer, B.; Garbe-Schönberg, D.

    2017-08-01

    Tertiary rift-related intraplate basanites from the Batain basin of northeastern Oman have low SiO2 ( 9.73 wt.%) and moderate to high Cr and Ni contents (Cr > 261 ppm, Ni > 181 ppm), representing near primary magmas that have undergone fractionation of mainly olivine and magnetite. Rare earth element systematics and p-T estimates suggest that the alkaline rocks are generated by different degrees of partial melting (4-13%) of a spinel-peridotite lithospheric mantle containing residual amphibole. The alkaline rocks show restricted variations of 87Sr/86Sr and 143Nd/144Nd ranging from 0.70340 to 0.70405 and 0.51275 to 0.51284, respectively. Variations in Pb isotopes (206Pb/204Pb: 18.59-18.82, 207Pb/204Pb: 15.54-15.56, 208Pb/204Pb: 38.65-38.98) of the alkaline rocks fall in the range of most OIB. Trace element constraints together with Sr-Nd-Pb isotope composition indicate that assimilation through crustal material did not affect the lavas. Instead, trace element variations can be explained by melting of a lithospheric mantle source that was metasomatized by an OIB-type magma that was accumulated at the base of the lithosphere sometimes in the past. Although only an area of less than 1000 km2 was sampled, magmatic activity lasted for about 5.5 Ma with a virtually continuous activity from 40.7 ± 0.7 to 35.3 ± 0.6 Ma. During this period magma composition was nearly constant, i.e. the degree of melting and the nature of the tapped source did not change significantly over time.

  6. Variation in the terrestrial isotopic composition and atomic weight of argon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhlke, John Karl

    2014-01-01

    The isotopic composition and atomic weight of argon (Ar) are variable in terrestrial materials. Those variations are a source of uncertainty in the assignment of standard properties for Ar, but they provide useful information in many areas of science. Variations in the stable isotopic composition and atomic weight of Ar are caused by several different processes, including (1) isotope production from other elements by radioactive decay (radiogenic isotopes) or other nuclear transformations (e.g., nucleogenic isotopes), and (2) isotopic fractionation by physical-chemical processes such as diffusion or phase equilibria. Physical-chemical processes cause correlated mass-dependent variations in the Ar isotope-amount ratios (40Ar/36Ar, 38Ar/36Ar), whereas nuclear transformation processes cause non-mass-dependent variations. While atmospheric Ar can serve as an abundant and homogeneous isotopic reference, deviations from the atmospheric isotopic ratios in other Ar occurrences limit the precision with which a standard atomic weight can be given for Ar. Published data indicate variation of Ar atomic weights in normal terrestrial materials between about 39.7931 and 39.9624. The upper bound of this interval is given by the atomic mass of 40Ar, as some samples contain almost pure radiogenic 40Ar. The lower bound is derived from analyses of pitchblende (uranium mineral) containing large amounts of nucleogenic 36Ar and 38Ar. Within this interval, measurements of different isotope ratios (40Ar/36Ar or 38Ar/36Ar) at various levels of precision are widely used for studies in geochronology, water–rock interaction, atmospheric evolution, and other fields.

  7. Lead fluxes and 206Pb/207Pb isotope ratios in rime and snow collected at remote mountain-top locations (Czech Republic, Central Europe): Patterns and sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimova, Nikoleta; Novak, Martin; Chrastny, Vladislav; Curik, Jan; Veselovsky, Frantisek; Blaha, Vladimir; Prechova, Eva; Pasava, Jan; Houskova, Marie; Bohdalkova, Leona; Stepanova, Marketa; Mikova, Jitka; Krachler, Michael; Komarek, Arnost

    2016-10-01

    During three winter seasons (2009-2011), Pb concentrations were measured in precipitation at 10 high-elevation sites in the Czech Republic, close to the borders with Austria, Germany, Poland, and Slovakia. Soluble and insoluble Pb forms were quantified in snow (vertical deposition), and rime (horizontal deposition). The objective was to compare Pb input fluxes into ecosystems via vertical and horizontal deposition, and to identify the residual Pb pollution sources in an era of rapidly decreasing industrial pollution. Lead soluble in diluted HNO3 made up 96% of total Pb deposition, with the remaining 4% Pb bound mainly in silicates. Three times higher concentrations of soluble Pb in rime than in snow, and 2.5 times higher concentrations of insoluble Pb in rime than in snow were associated with slightly different Pb isotope ratios. On average, the 206Pb/207Pb ratios in rime were higher than those in snow. Higher mean 206Pb/207Pb ratios of insoluble Pb (1.175) than in soluble Pb (1.165) may indicate an increasing role of geogenic Pb in recent atmospheric deposition. A distinct reversal to more radiogenic 206Pb/207Pb ratios in snow and rime in 2010, compared to literature data from rain-fed Sphagnum peatlands (1800-2000 A.D.), documented a recent decrease in anthropogenic Pb in the atmosphere of Central Europe. Since the early 1980s, Pb concentrations in snow decreased 18 times in the rural south of the Czech Republic, but only twice in the industrial north of the Czech Republic. Isotope signatures indicated that Pb in today's atmospheric deposition is mainly derived from Mesozoic ores mined/processed in Poland and coal combustion in the Czech Republic and Poland.

  8. The isotopic composition of CO in vehicle exhaust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naus, Stijn; Röckmann, Thomas; Popa, Elena

    2017-04-01

    The isotopic composition of atmospheric carbon monoxide (CO) and its sources can be a powerful tool to help constrain the CO budget, but data on the isotopic composition of CO sources is sparse. We investigated the isotopic composition (13C16O and 12C18O) of one of the main sources of CO in urban areas: traffic emissions. Samples from individual passenger cars and atmospheric samples from polluted areas were measured. The results show strong indications that CO emissions from traffic are dominated by a small subset of cars or driving conditions, which, in this study, were cold petrol cars. The spread in isotopic composition of the full dataset was large, but this dominant subset showed a relatively stable isotopic composition. Therefore, the individual car samples result in a well-defined overall traffic signature, which was in agreement with the atmospheric isotopic signature derived from the atmospheric samples.

  9. Pb isotopes during crustal melting and magma mingling - A cautionary tale from the Miki Fjord macrodike, central east Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waight, Tod Earle; Lesher, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Pb isotopic data are presented for hybrid rocks formed by mingling between mantle-derived tholeiitic magma of the Eocene Miki Fjord macrodike (East Greenland) and melt derived from the adjacent Precambrian basement. Bulk mixing and AFC processes between end-members readily identified in the field...... fail to model the Pb isotope systematics. Selective contamination during diffusional exchange, which can explain the complex Sr and Nd isotope compositions of the hybrid rocks (Blichert-Toft et al., 1992), cannot fully account for the variability of the Pb isotopic data using the identified crustal end......-members. The crustal anatectic end-member, although similar in Sr and Nd isotope composition, has a markedly different Pb isotopic composition than its source gneiss. The differences are consistent with preferential incorporation of radiogenic Pb from accessory phases such as metamict zircon or loosely-bound Pb from...

  10. Pb isotopes during crustal melting and magma mingling - A cautionary tale from the Miki Fjord macrodike, central east Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waight, Tod Earle; Lesher, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Pb isotopic data are presented for hybrid rocks formed by mingling between mantle-derived tholeiitic magma of the Eocene Miki Fjord macrodike (East Greenland) and melt derived from the adjacent Precambrian basement. Bulk mixing and AFC processes between end-members readily identified in the field...... fail to model the Pb isotope systematics. Selective contamination during diffusional exchange, which can explain the complex Sr and Nd isotope compositions of the hybrid rocks (Blichert-Toft et al., 1992), cannot fully account for the variability of the Pb isotopic data using the identified crustal end......-members. The crustal anatectic end-member, although similar in Sr and Nd isotope composition, has a markedly different Pb isotopic composition than its source gneiss. The differences are consistent with preferential incorporation of radiogenic Pb from accessory phases such as metamict zircon or loosely-bound Pb from...

  11. A "Tail" Of Two Mines: Determining The Sources Of Lead In Mine Waters Using Pb Isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousens, B. L.; Allen, D. M.; Lepitre, M. E.; Mortensen, J. K.; Gabites, J. E.; Nugent, M.; Fortin, D.

    2004-12-01

    Acid mine drainage can be a significant environmental problem in regions where mine tailings are exposed to surface water and shallow groundwater flow. Whereas high metal concentrations in surface waters and groundwaters indicate that metals are being mobilized, these data do not uniquely identify the source of the contamination. The isotopic composition of Pb in mine waters is a superb tracer of Pb sources, because the isotopic composition of ore Pb is usually significantly different from that of host rocks, other surficial deposits, and aerosols. We have investigated metal mobility at two abandoned Pb-Zn mines in different geological settings: the sediment-hosted Sullivan Mine in southeastern British Columbia, and the New Calumet Mine of western Quebec that is hosted in metamorphic rocks of the Grenville Province. Ores from both mines have homogeneous Pb isotopic compositions that are much less radiogenic than surrounding host rocks. At Sullivan, the Pb isotopic compositions of water samples define a mixing line between Sullivan ore and at least one other more radiogenic end-member. Water samples with high Pb concentrations (0.002 to 0.3 mg/L) generally are acidic and have Pb isotope ratios equal to Sullivan ore, whereas waters with low Pb contents have near-neutral pH and have variably more radiogenic Pb isotope ratios. Thus not all the waters collected in the study area originate from Sullivan ore or mining operations, as previously thought. The dominant source of ore Pb in mine waters are the waste rock dumps. Based on their isotopic compositions, host shales or aerosols from the local Pb smelter are potential sources of non-Sullivan ore Pb; local glacial tills are an unlikely source due to their heterogeneous Pb isotopic composition. Similarly, at the New Calumet mine, water samples collected in direct contact with either ore at the surface or tailings have high Pb concentrations (up to 0.02 mg/L) and Pb isotope ratios equal to New Calumet Pb-Zn ore. However

  12. Screening of microbial radiation-inducible promoter and study of its expression; Development of basic technique of radiogenic therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Sangyong; Kim Dongho; Yang, Jaeseung

    2007-02-15

    In the search for new therapeutic modalities for cancer, gene therapy has attracted enormous interest over the last few years. Recently, the use of bacteria as a tumor specific protein transfer system has attracted interest. Attenuated Salmonella has been shown to provide selective colonization in tumors. This strategy to apply gene therapy for cancer has been defined as 'Radiogenic Therapy'. In this research, firstly, we screened a radiation inducible promoter of Salmonella responding to clinically relevant low dose of 10 Gy using microarray analysis. Of all genes showing a expression ratio of at least 2-fold changes relative to wild type, 168 genes were induced. To confirm the findings of the microarray by an alternative method, we investigated the transcriptional changes of radio-inducible genes using real time PCR analysis. To verify the ability of screened genes (fadB, narK, cyoA, STM1011, STM2617, and STM2632) to produce a downstream protein by irradiation, the reporter plasmids were constructed. Finally, we found that the promoter of fadB, cyoA, and STM2617 can be activated by irradiation within cancer cells. These results suggest that these genes may be the most probable candidate used in radiogenic therapy.

  13. Intrinsic W nucleosynthetic isotope variations in carbonaceous chondrites: Implications for W nucleosynthesis and nebular vs. parent body processing of presolar materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, Christoph; Schönbächler, Maria

    2015-09-01

    The progressive dissolution of the carbonaceous chondrites Orgueil (CI1), Murchison (CM2) and Allende (CV3) with acids of increasing strength reveals correlated W isotope variations ranging from 3.5 ε182W and 6.5 ε183W in the initial leachate (acetic acid) to -60 ε182W and -40 ε183W in the leachate residue. The observed variations are readily explained by variable mixing of s-process depleted and s-process enriched components. One W s-process carrier is SiC, however, the observed anomaly patterns and mass-balance considerations require at least on additional s-process carrier, possibly a silicate or sulfide. The data reveal well-defined correlations, which provide a test for s-process nucleosynthesis models. The correlations demonstrate that current models need to be revised and highlight the need for more precise W isotope data of SiC grains. Furthermore the correlations provide a mean to disentangle nucleosynthetic and radiogenic contributions to 182W (ε182Wcorrected = ε182Wmeasured - (1.41 ± 0.05) × ε183Wmeasured; ε182Wcorrected = ε182Wmeasured - (-0.12 ± 0.06) × ε184Wmeasured), a prerequisite for the successful application of the Hf-W chronometer to samples with nucleosynthetic anomalies. The overall magnitude of the W isotope variations decreases in the order CI1 > CM2 > CV3. This can be interpreted as the progressive thermal destruction of an initially homogeneous mixture of presolar grains by parent-body processing. However, not only the magnitude but also the W anomaly patterns of the three chondrites are different. In particular leach step 2, that employs nitric acid, reveals a s-deficit signature for Murchison, but a s-excess for Orgueil and Allende. This could be the result of redistribution of anomalous W into a new phase by parent-body alteration, or, the fingerprint of dust processing in the solar nebula. Given that the thermal and aqueous alteration of Murchison is between the CI and CV3 chondrites, parent-body processing is probably

  14. Origin and fate of sulfide liquids in hotspot volcanism (La Réunion): Pb isotope constraints from residual Fe-Cu oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlastélic, I.; Gannoun, A.; Di Muro, A.; Gurioli, L.; Bachèlery, P.; Henot, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    Immiscible sulfide liquids in basaltic magmas play an important role in trace metal transport and the sulfur budget of volcanic eruptions. However, sulfides are transient phases, whose origin and fate are poorly constrained. We address these issues by analyzing sulfide destabilization products preserved in lavas from La Réunion Island. Iron oxide globules and coatings, typically 20-80 μm in size, were found to occur in vesicles of differentiated lavas from Piton des Neiges, and recent pumice samples from Piton de la Fournaise. Field and mineralogical evidence indicates that the iron oxides are syn-eruptive phases not resulting from hydrothermal processes. Samples were first studied by Scanning Electron Microscopy. The globules were separated, whereas the smaller spherules and coatings were concentrated by magnetic sorting and acid leaching, and samples were processed through wet chemistry. The Fe oxide phases comprise 49-74 wt.% Fe, 26-40 wt.% O, and up to 6 wt.% Cu, 811 ppm Ni, 140 ppm Bi, and 8.5 ppm Pb. Compared to the host lava, Cu, Ni, and Bi are enriched by a factor of 101-103. Systematic Pb isotope disequilibrium (between 500 ppm and 2.9% for 206Pb/204Pb) exists between Fe oxides and host rocks, with Fe oxides generally displaying less radiogenic ratios. Unradiogenic Pb is a typical signature of sulfide, which tends to concentrate Pb, but not its parent elements U and Th. Thus, both the chemical and isotopic compositions of the vesicle-hosted Fe oxides suggest that they are more or less direct products of the destabilization of immiscible sulfide liquids. Although Pb dominantly partitions into the gas phase during sulfide breakdown, the original Pb isotope signature of sulfide is preserved in the residual oxide. The composition estimated for the parent sulfides (206Pb/204Pb = 18.20-18.77, 207Pb/204Pb = 15.575, and 208Pb/204Pb = 38.2-38.8) precludes a genetic link with the La Réunion plume, and suggests a lithospheric or crustal origin. It is estimated

  15. An archaeal genomic signature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, D. E.; Overbeek, R.; Olsen, G. J.; Woese, C. R.

    2000-01-01

    Comparisons of complete genome sequences allow the most objective and comprehensive descriptions possible of a lineage's evolution. This communication uses the completed genomes from four major euryarchaeal taxa to define a genomic signature for the Euryarchaeota and, by extension, the Archaea as a whole. The signature is defined in terms of the set of protein-encoding genes found in at least two diverse members of the euryarchaeal taxa that function uniquely within the Archaea; most signature proteins have no recognizable bacterial or eukaryal homologs. By this definition, 351 clusters of signature proteins have been identified. Functions of most proteins in this signature set are currently unknown. At least 70% of the clusters that contain proteins from all the euryarchaeal genomes also have crenarchaeal homologs. This conservative set, which appears refractory to horizontal gene transfer to the Bacteria or the Eukarya, would seem to reflect the significant innovations that were unique and fundamental to the archaeal "design fabric." Genomic protein signature analysis methods may be extended to characterize the evolution of any phylogenetically defined lineage. The complete set of protein clusters for the archaeal genomic signature is presented as supplementary material (see the PNAS web site, www.pnas.org).

  16. Machine Fault Signature Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratesh Jayaswal

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to present recent developments in the field of machine fault signature analysis with particular regard to vibration analysis. The different types of faults that can be identified from the vibration signature analysis are, for example, gear fault, rolling contact bearing fault, journal bearing fault, flexible coupling faults, and electrical machine fault. It is not the intention of the authors to attempt to provide a detailed coverage of all the faults while detailed consideration is given to the subject of the rolling element bearing fault signature analysis.

  17. Holocene Provenance Identification and Climate Control of Indus Basin By Using Radiogenic Techniques and Clay Mineralogy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANWAR ALIZAI

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Two commonly used isotopic methods (Zircon U-Pb dating and K-feldspar Pb dating were employed for the Holocene provenance identification within the Indus basin. Zircon grains from the upper Indus are generally younger than 200 Ma in contrast with the eastern tributaries, which show varying inputs from Greater and Lesser Himalayan sources. The Sutlej river is very rich in Lesser Himalayan-sourced sediments, while the Chenab is mostly eroded from the Greater Himalaya. Grains younger than 200 Ma in the sands of the Thar desert indicate preferential aeolian transport from the Indus lower reaches. K-feldspar Pb dating of silt and sand-sized grains from the modern Sutlej and Chenab rivers show a clear Himalayan provenance, contrasting with grains from the Indus Suture Zone, but are overlapping with Karakoram compositions. The desert dunes commonly show 207Pb/204Pb and 206Pb/204Pb values that are much higher than those seen in the rivers, most consistent with erosion from Nanga Parbat. This implies at least some origin from the trunk Indus, probably reworked by summer monsoon winds from the SW, a hypothesis supported by U-Pb zircon dating. Further, data collected from Holocene and Pleistocene buried sands on the western edge of the Thar desert were sourced from Himalayan rivers before and at 6–8 ka, but after that time the proportion of high isotopic ratio grains rose, indicating increased contribution from the Thar Desert dunes prior to ~4.5 ka when flow ceased entirely. Clay mineral assemblages are dominated by smectite a