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Sample records for radiochemical laboratory building

  1. Guiding Principles for Sustainable Existing Buildings: Radiochemical Processing Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pope, Jason E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-11-11

    In 2006, the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) signed the Federal Leadership in High Performance and Sustainable Buildings Memorandum of Understanding (MOU), along with 21 other agencies. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is exceeding this requirement and, currently, about 25 percent of its buildings are High Performance and Sustainable Buildings. The pages that follow document the Guiding Principles conformance effort for the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory (RPL) at PNNL. The RPL effort is part of continued progress toward a building inventory that is 100 percent compliant with the Guiding Principles.

  2. Decontamination and decommission of a radiochemical laboratory building complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoubek, Norbert

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Handling of unsealed radioactive substances for research and development purposes in chemical or pharmaceutical industries or research centres as well as production of radioactive substances (e.g. for applications in nuclear medicine or industry) requires operation of special radiochemical laboratories. In general, operation of radiochemical laboratories is strongly regulated by the government and national authorities. The operator needs a permit related to radiological protection. In general, technical requirements for such facilities are very high. To ensure high safety standards with respect to the employees and the environment, several radiological protection measures have to be taken. These measures (for example special shielding or ventilation and waste water systems) depend on various factors, e.g. activity in use, kind of nuclides, chemical properties and volatility of substances. In order to close-down such radiochemical laboratories some radiological protection measures have to be maintained to ensure protection of both humans and the environment induced by possible residual contaminations within the facility including technical inventory. However, a later reuse of the facility as a non-radioactive facility requires removal of all radioactive contamination with respect to national regulation. Resulting radioactive wastes have to be disposed of under control of competent authorities. Based on the experience of a decontamination and decommission project for a former radiochemical laboratory complex, the main steps necessary to release such a facility are discussed. Analytical aspects of initial conditions, necessary organisational structures within the project, resources needed estimation and exploration of the radiological situation in the laboratory, elaboration of a measuring strategy and decontamination methods as well as different waste disposal routes in relation to different waste types are reported. (author)

  3. Radiochemical Processing Laboratory (RPL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Radiochemical Processing Laboratory (RPL)�is a scientific facility funded by DOE to create and implement innovative processes for environmental clean-up and...

  4. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for the 325 Radiochemical Processing Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shields, K.D.; Ballinger, M.Y.

    1999-03-01

    This Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP) has been prepared for the 325 Building Radiochemical Processing Laboratory (RPL) at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to meet the requirements in DOE Order 5400.1, ''General Environmental Protection Programs.'' This FEMP has been prepared for the RPL primarily because it has a ''major'' (potential to emit >0.1 mrem/yr) emission point for radionuclide air emissions according to the annual National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) assessment performed. This section summarizes the airborne and liquid effluents and the inventory based NESHAP assessment for the facility. The complete monitoring plan includes characterization of effluent streams, monitoring/sampling design criteria, a description of the monitoring systems and sample analysis, and quality assurance requirements. The RPL at PNNL houses radiochemistry research, radioanalytical service, radiochemical process development, and hazardous and radioactive mixed waste treatment activities. The laboratories and specialized facilities enable work ranging from that with nonradioactive materials to work with picogram to kilogram quantities of fissionable materials and up to megacurie quantities of other radionuclides. The special facilities within the building include two shielded hot-cell areas that provide for process development or analytical chemistry work with highly radioactive materials and a waste treatment facility for processing hazardous, mixed radioactive, low-level radioactive, and transuranic wastes generated by PNNL activities

  5. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for the 325 Radiochemical Processing Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shields, K.D.; Ballinger, M.Y.

    1999-04-02

    This Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP) has been prepared for the 325 Building Radiochemical Processing Laboratory (RPL) at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to meet the requirements in DOE Order 5400.1, ''General Environmental Protection Programs.'' This FEMP has been prepared for the RPL primarily because it has a ''major'' (potential to emit >0.1 mrem/yr) emission point for radionuclide air emissions according to the annual National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) assessment performed. This section summarizes the airborne and liquid effluents and the inventory based NESHAP assessment for the facility. The complete monitoring plan includes characterization of effluent streams, monitoring/sampling design criteria, a description of the monitoring systems and sample analysis, and quality assurance requirements. The RPL at PNNL houses radiochemistry research, radioanalytical service, radiochemical process development, and hazardous and radioactive mixed waste treatment activities. The laboratories and specialized facilities enable work ranging from that with nonradioactive materials to work with picogram to kilogram quantities of fissionable materials and up to megacurie quantities of other radionuclides. The special facilities within the building include two shielded hot-cell areas that provide for process development or analytical chemistry work with highly radioactive materials and a waste treatment facility for processing hazardous, mixed radioactive, low-level radioactive, and transuranic wastes generated by PNNL activities.

  6. Radiochemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    In this catalogue those radioactive chemicals for research are listed which are produced by the Radiochemical Centre Amersham and our laboratories at Brunswick. The dates given for each product can understandably only be limited within the framework of such a catalogue. Additional dates and references to application technique can be obtained from us any time. Our programme is continually updated by new products. If a compound not listed in the catalogue should be required we ask for inquiry. Our working team for special syntheses will try to produce it according to our possibilities and our requirements. (orig.) [de

  7. The design of a new radiochemical laboratory complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, A.G.

    1984-01-01

    A brief account is given of the history and scope of Amersham International plc in the manufacture of radiopharmaceuticals and other labelled organic compounds, and radioactive sources. Extra facilities were needed and a new site was found, and contracts placed for new radiochemical laboratories. The two new laboratories, which are described in some detail, are intended as follows: (a) a Medical Products building for the production of a range of diagnostic kits for use in the treatment of thyroid and other disorders, the main isotope used being iodine-125; and (b) the Chemical Products building, for the development and manufacture of a wide range of organic compounds, which are labelled with either tritium or carbon-14. Particular emphasis is given to the description of the air conditioning and ventilation systems, the open work benches, and the special ventilated enclosures, and the drainage system. Planning for maximum flexibility is also stressed. (U.K.)

  8. The use of robots for automation in the radiochemical laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huddleston, J.

    1988-01-01

    The use of robotic systems for automated processes such as overnight operations, procedures involving radiation hazards in radiochemical laboratories is discussed. Particular reference is made to their use in analytical problems. Their flexibility is emphasised. (U.K.)

  9. Laboratory Building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera, Joshua M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-03-01

    This report is an analysis of the means of egress and life safety requirements for the laboratory building. The building is located at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in Albuquerque, NM. The report includes a prescriptive-based analysis as well as a performance-based analysis. Following the analysis are appendices which contain maps of the laboratory building used throughout the analysis. The top of all the maps is assumed to be north.

  10. Design of the Laboratory-Scale Plutonium Oxide Processing Unit in the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumetta, Gregg J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Meier, David E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Tingey, Joel M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Casella, Amanda J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Delegard, Calvin H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Edwards, Matthew K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Orton, Robert D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rapko, Brian M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Smart, John E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-05-01

    This report describes a design for a laboratory-scale capability to produce plutonium oxide (PuO2) for use in identifying and validating nuclear forensics signatures associated with plutonium production, as well as for use as exercise and reference materials. This capability will be located in the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The key unit operations are described, including PuO2 dissolution, purification of the Pu by ion exchange, precipitation, and re-conversion to PuO2 by calcination.

  11. Building the Korogwe Laboratory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Jakob; von Seidlein, Lorenz; Richard, Jean Pierre

    2011-01-01

    An illustrated description of the building of a biomedical research laboratory in Korogwe, Tanzania.......An illustrated description of the building of a biomedical research laboratory in Korogwe, Tanzania....

  12. Green Building Research Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sailor, David Jean [Portland State Univ., Portland, OR (United States)

    2013-12-29

    This project provided support to the Green Building Research Laboratory at Portland State University (PSU) so it could work with researchers and industry to solve technical problems for the benefit of the green building industry. It also helped to facilitate the development of PSU’s undergraduate and graduate-level training in building science across the curriculum.

  13. Improved monitoring procedure for Iodine -131 in radiochemical process laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Pratap; Yadav, R.K.B.; Anilkumar, S.; Gopalakrishnan, R.K.; Chakraborty, S.

    2016-01-01

    Radiation Hazard Control Unit at Isotope wing provides radiological safety support and advises for safe processing and production of radiopharmaceuticals. Tellurium Oxide (TeO 2 ), irradiated in a nuclear reactor, is processed in a process laboratory for separating 131 I using dry distillation technique. The workplace environment is being assessed for airborne radioactivity using installed Static Air Samplers (SASs). SASs contains two filter media (glass fibre and charcoal impregnated paper) to collect airborne 131 I radioactivity and laboratory air sampled at 50 litres per minutes (lpm). Personal Air Sampler (PAS) consists of three types of filters viz. a glass fibre, charcoal impregnated paper and cartridges containing activated charcoal granules. Three combinations were studied at a sampling rate of 5 lpm

  14. Rapid radiochemical procedures for a process support laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beals, D.M.

    1998-01-01

    An on-site mobile laboratory has been installed near a groundwater treatment facility, and rapid analytical procedures have been deployed for determining sample activity in the process support laboratory. The required analyses to support the remediation project include gross alpha/, gross nonvolatile beta, 90 Sr, 99 Tc, 137 Cs and total Ra (226 + 228). The present mission of the Savannah River Site (SRS), a US Department of Energy nuclear production facility, is one of nuclear waste stabilization and of environmental restoration and remediation. Because of previous practices of disposing low-level radioactive waste to seepage basins, some of the groundwater under the SRS has become contaminated with radioactive species. A water treatment facility has been installed to remediate the groundwater below the old F and H areas' seepage basins. Groundwater is pumped from the contaminated aquifer through a series of filtration, ion exchange, and reverse osmosis steps and when cleaned is reinjected back into the aquifer. Samples are pulled from various points in the treatment facility to ensure that the process is working as designed. In order to minimize turnaround time for these analyses, a process control station (i.e., a mobile on-site laboratory) has been installed at the F area water treatment unit, and rapid radioanalytical procedures have been deployed

  15. Conceptual Design for the Pilot-Scale Plutonium Oxide Processing Unit in the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumetta, Gregg J.; Meier, David E.; Tingey, Joel M.; Casella, Amanda J.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Jones, Susan A.; Rapko, Brian M.

    2014-08-05

    This report describes a conceptual design for a pilot-scale capability to produce plutonium oxide for use as exercise and reference materials, and for use in identifying and validating nuclear forensics signatures associated with plutonium production. This capability is referred to as the Pilot-scale Plutonium oxide Processing Unit (P3U), and it will be located in the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The key unit operations are described, including plutonium dioxide (PuO2) dissolution, purification of the Pu by ion exchange, precipitation, and conversion to oxide by calcination.

  16. Description of project for pretreatment and storage of wastes of L.P.R. (Radiochemical Processes Laboratory)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doval, J.C.F.; Mehlich, A.M.; Quilici, D.F.

    1987-01-01

    The aim of the project is to allow the start up and operation of LPR (Radiochemical Processes Laboratory) as part of the intended activities in the plant. In this paper, the pretreatment and storage of liquid wastes generated at the LPR are described. The pretreatment section will be set up inside the shielded cells already existent in the LPR, where a previous concentration through the evaporation of liquid wastes will take place. The storage section has to be constructed on purpose in order to temporarily store the concentrates. The cells of transference and preconditioning of solid wastes are also described. These cells will be mounted inside the building, allowing the handling of radioactive solids generated as effluents during the reprocessing plan. In the description, the use of non conventional materials for the boiler making and the construction of cells is specially mentioned. (Author)

  17. Thorium base fuels reprocessing at the L.P.R. (Radiochemical Processes Laboratory) experimental plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almagro, J.C.; Dupetit, G.A.; Deandreis, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    The availability of the LPR (Radiochemical Processes Laboratory) plant offers the possibility to demonstrate and create the necessary technological basis for thorium fuels reprocessing. To this purpose, the solvents extraction technique is used, employing TBP (at 30%) as solvent. The process is named THOREX, a one-cycle acid, which permits an adequate separation of Th 232 and U 233 components and fission products. For thorium oxide elements dissolution, the 'chopp-leach' process (installed at LPR) is used, employing a NO 3 H 13N, 0.05M FH and 0.1M Al (NO 3 ) 3 , as solvent. To adapt the pilot plant to the flow-sheet requirements proposed, minor modifications must be carried out in the interconnection of the existing decanting mixers. The input of the plant has been calculated by Origin Code modified for irradiations in reactors of the HWR type. (Author)

  18. 324 Building radiochemical engineering cells, high-level vault, low-level vault, and associated areas closure plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnett, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    The Hanford Site, located adjacent to and north of Richland, Washington, is operated by the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL). The 324 Building is located in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. The 324 Building was constructed in the 1960s to support materials and chemical process research and development activities ranging from laboratory/bench-scale studies to full engineering-scale pilot plant demonstrations. In the mid-1990s, it was determined that dangerous waste and waste residues were being stored for greater than 90 days in the 324 Building Radiochemical Engineering Cells (REC) and in the High-Level Vault/Low-Level Vault (HLV/LLV) tanks. [These areas are not Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) permitted portions of the 324 Building.] Through the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-89, agreement was reached to close the nonpermitted RCRA unit in the 324 Building. This closure plan, managed under TPA Milestone M-20-55, addresses the identified building areas targeted by the Tri-Party Agreement and provides commitments to achieve the highest degree of compliance practicable, given the special technical difficulties of managing mixed waste that contains high-activity radioactive materials, and the physical limitations of working remotely in the areas within the subject closure unit. This closure plan is divided into nine chapters. Chapter 1.0 provides the introduction, historical perspective, 324 Building history and current mission, and the regulatory basis and strategy for managing the closure unit. Chapters 2.0, 3.0, 4.0, and 5.0 discuss the detailed facility description, process information, waste characteristics, and groundwater monitoring respectively. Chapter 6.0 deals with the closure strategy and performance standard, including the closure activities for the B-Cell, D-Cell, HLV, LLV; piping and miscellaneous associated building areas. Chapter 7.0 addresses the

  19. Elementary computation of radiation doses and shieldings for radiochemical laboratories; Calculo Elemental de dosis y blindajes para laboratorios radioquimicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimeno de Osso, F

    1971-07-01

    Simple procedures for the calculation of radiation exposition, half thickness, shield thickness, etc. are described and equations and graphs are included for those gamma-emitting radionuclides, that are more often used in radiochemical laboratories. Application is made of these procedures to three radionuclides, bromine-82, sodium-24 and cobalt-60 which cover a rather wl.de energy range; theoretical results are compared with those obtained from experimental measurements. (Author) 23 refs.

  20. Application of radiochemical determination methods in cleanability research of building materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeaettae, Jenni; Kymaelaeinen, Hanna-Riitta; Sjoeberg, Anna-Maija

    2011-01-01

    During recent years increasing effort has been made to modify surface properties with easy-to-clean or self-cleaning characteristics, and concomitantly there is a need to be able to quantify cleanability. Methodology is a complex issue, including aspects of selection and characterization of the surface materials, the soiling materials (contaminants), soiling and cleaning methods, and the detection methods. Different biological, chemical, physical and visual methods have been included in studies of surface cleanability. One challenge has been to obtain quantitative information about soiling. The radiochemical methods, gamma spectrometry (NaI(Tl)-crystal) and liquid scintillation counting, have been shown to be suitable for evaluating cleanability of different surface materials and different soiling material types, providing quantitative information about the amount of soiling material both on and beneath the surface. Due to the different labelled soiling components, the interaction of the surface with different soiling material types can be evaluated. Radiochemical methods have unique benefits particularly for examining porous materials and surfaces. However, they are suitable only for highly controlled studies because of the hazards. Different features and details of radiochemical methods are discussed with the view to aid planning of future cleanability studies. - Highlights: → Radiochemical methods can be used for cleanability studies. → These methods give quantitative information about the amount of soiling material. → These methods are suitable particularly for examining porous materials. → These methods are suitable for highly controlled studies because of the hazards.

  1. Radiochemical procedures and techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flynn, K.

    1975-04-01

    A summary is presented of the radiochemical procedures and techniques currently in use by the Chemistry Division Nuclear Chemistry Group at Argonne National Laboratory for the analysis of radioactive samples. (U.S.)

  2. Tools for building virtual laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, Debora; Johnston, William E.; Loken, Stewart; Tierney, Brian

    1996-01-01

    There is increasing interest in making unique research facilities facilities accessible on the Internet. Computer systems, scientific databases and experimental apparatus can be used by international collaborations of scientists using high-speed networks and advanced software tools to support collaboration. We are building tools including video conferencing and electronic white boards that are being used to create examples of virtual laboratories. This paper describes two pilot projects which provide testbeds for the tools. The first is a virtual laboratory project providing remote access to LBNL's Advanced Light Source. The second is the Multidimensional Applications and Gigabit internet work Consortium (MAGIC) testbed which has been established to develop a very high-speed, wide-are network to deliver realtime data at gigabit-per-second rates. (author)

  3. Placement of the radiochemical processing plant at Oak Ridge National Laboratory into a safe standby condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holladay, D.W.; Bopp, C.D.; Farmer, A.J.; Johnson, J.K.; Miller, C.H.; Powers, B.A.; Collins, E.D.

    1986-01-01

    Extensive upgrade, cleanup, and decontamination efforts are being conducted for appropriate areas in the Radiochemical Processing Plant (RPP) with the goal of achieving safe standby condition by the end of FY 1989. The ventilation system must maintain containment thus, it is being upgraded via demolition and replacement of marginally adequate ductwork, fans, and control systems. Areas that are being decontaminated and stripped of various services (e.g., piping, ductwork, and process tanks) include hot cells, makeup rooms, and pipe tunnels. Operating equipment that is being decontaminated includes glove boxes and hoods. Replacement of the ventilation system and removal of equipment from pipe tunnels, cells, and makeup rooms are accomplished by contact labor by workers using proper attire, safety rules, and shielding, Removal of contaminated ductwork and piping is conducted with containment enclosures that are strategically located at breakpoints, and methods of separation are chosen to conform with health physics requirements. The methods of cutting contaminated piping and ductwork include portable reciprocating saws, pipe cutters, burning, and plasma torch. Specially designed containment enclosures will be used to prevent the spread of radioactive contamination while maintaining adequate ventilation

  4. Placement of the radiochemical processing plant at Oak Ridge National Laboratory into a safe standby condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holladay, D.W.; Bopp, C.D.; Farmer, A.J.; Johnson, J.K.; Miller, C.H.; Powers, B.A.; Collins, E.D.

    1986-01-01

    Extensive upgrade, cleanup, and decontamination efforts are being conducted for appropriate areas in the Radiochemical Processing Plant (RPP) with the goal of achieving ''safe standby'' condition by the end of FY 1989. The ventilation system must maintain containment; thus, it is being upgraded via demolition and replacement of marginally adequate ductwork, fans, and control systems. Areas that are being decontaminated and stripped of various services (e.g., piping, ductwork, and process tanks) include hot cells, makeup rooms, and pipe tunnels. Operating equipment that is being decontaminated includes glove boxes and hoods. Replacement of the ventilation system and removal of equipment from pipe tunnels, cells, and makeup rooms are accomplished by contact labor by workers using proper attire, safety rules, and shielding. Removal of contaminated ductwork and piping is conducted with containment enclosures that are strategically located at breakpoints, and methods of separation are chosen to conform with health physics requirements. The methods of cutting contaminated piping and ductwork include portable reciprocating saws, pipe cutters, burning, and plasma torch. Specially designed containment enclosures will be used to prevent the spread of radioactive contamination while maintaining adequate ventilation. 6 figs

  5. Hydrologic conditions and distribution of selected radiochemical and chemical constituents in water, Snake River Plain aquifer, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho, 1992 through 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartholomay, R.C.; Tucker, B.J.; Ackerman, D.J.; Liszewski, M.J.

    1997-04-01

    Radiochemical and chemical wastewater discharged since 1952 to infiltration ponds and disposal wells at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has affected water quality in the Snake River Plain aquifer. The US Geological Survey, in cooperation with the US Department of Energy, maintains a monitoring network at the INEL to determine hydrologic trends and to delineate the movement of radiochemical and chemical wastes in the aquifer. This report presents an analysis of water-level and water-quality data collected from the Snake River Plain aquifer during 1992--95

  6. Postirradiation Testing Laboratory (327 Building)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kammenzind, D.E.

    1997-01-01

    A Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID) is the total list of the Environment, Safety and Health (ES and H) requirements to be implemented by a site, facility, or activity. These requirements are appropriate to the life cycle phase to achieve an adequate level of protection for worker and public health and safety, and the environment during design, construction, operation, decontamination and decommissioning, and environmental restoration. S/RlDs are living documents, to be revised appropriately based on change in the site's or facility's mission or configuration, a change in the facility's life cycle phase, or a change to the applicable standards/requirements. S/RIDs encompass health and safety, environmental, and safety related safeguards and security (S and S) standards/requirements related to the functional areas listed in the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environment, Safety and Health Configuration Guide. The Fluor Daniel Hanford (FDH) Contract S/RID contains standards/requirements, applicable to FDH and FDH subcontractors, necessary for safe operation of Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) facilities, that are not the direct responsibility of the facility manager (e.g., a site-wide fire department). Facility S/RIDs contain standards/requirements applicable to a specific facility that are the direct responsibility of the facility manager. S/RlDs are prepared by those responsible for managing the operation of facilities or the conduct of activities that present a potential threat to the health and safety of workers, public, or the environment, including: Hazard Category 1 and 2 nuclear facilities and activities, as defined in DOE 5480.23. Selected Hazard Category 3 nuclear, and Low Hazard non-nuclear facilities and activities, as agreed upon by RL. The Postirradiation Testing Laboratory (PTL) S/RID contains standards/ requirements that are necessary for safe operation of the PTL facility, and other building/areas that are the direct

  7. Postirradiation Testing Laboratory (327 Building)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kammenzind, D.E.

    1997-05-28

    A Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID) is the total list of the Environment, Safety and Health (ES and H) requirements to be implemented by a site, facility, or activity. These requirements are appropriate to the life cycle phase to achieve an adequate level of protection for worker and public health and safety, and the environment during design, construction, operation, decontamination and decommissioning, and environmental restoration. S/RlDs are living documents, to be revised appropriately based on change in the site`s or facility`s mission or configuration, a change in the facility`s life cycle phase, or a change to the applicable standards/requirements. S/RIDs encompass health and safety, environmental, and safety related safeguards and security (S and S) standards/requirements related to the functional areas listed in the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environment, Safety and Health Configuration Guide. The Fluor Daniel Hanford (FDH) Contract S/RID contains standards/requirements, applicable to FDH and FDH subcontractors, necessary for safe operation of Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) facilities, that are not the direct responsibility of the facility manager (e.g., a site-wide fire department). Facility S/RIDs contain standards/requirements applicable to a specific facility that are the direct responsibility of the facility manager. S/RlDs are prepared by those responsible for managing the operation of facilities or the conduct of activities that present a potential threat to the health and safety of workers, public, or the environment, including: Hazard Category 1 and 2 nuclear facilities and activities, as defined in DOE 5480.23. Selected Hazard Category 3 nuclear, and Low Hazard non-nuclear facilities and activities, as agreed upon by RL. The Postirradiation Testing Laboratory (PTL) S/RID contains standards/ requirements that are necessary for safe operation of the PTL facility, and other building/areas that are the direct

  8. The 324 building radiochemical engineering scales and high-level vault cells plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prignano, A.L.

    1997-01-01

    This closure plan incorporates the requirements and decisions made during a Data Quality Objectives process held in 1996 by the State of Washington Department of Ecology, US Department of Energy Richland Operations Office, and contractors associated with closure of the 324 Building

  9. Toward a virtual building laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klems, J.H.; Finlayson, E.U.; Olsen, T.H.; Banks, D.W.; Pallis, J.M.

    1999-03-01

    In order to achieve in a timely manner the large energy and dollar savings technically possible through improvements in building energy efficiency, it will be necessary to solve the problem of design failure risk. The most economical method of doing this would be to learn to calculate building performance with sufficient detail, accuracy and reliability to avoid design failure. Existing building simulation models (BSM) are a large step in this direction, but are still not capable of this level of modeling. Developments in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques now allow one to construct a road map from present BSM's to a complete building physical model. The most useful first step is a building interior model (BIM) that would allow prediction of local conditions affecting occupant health and comfort. To provide reliable prediction a BIM must incorporate the correct physical boundary conditions on a building interior. Doing so raises a number of specific technical problems and research questions. The solution of these within a context useful for building research and design is not likely to result from other research on CFD, which is directed toward the solution of different types of problems. A six-step plan for incorporating the correct boundary conditions within the context of the model problem of a large atrium has been outlined. A promising strategy for constructing a BIM is the overset grid technique for representing a building space in a CFD calculation. This technique promises to adapt well to building design and allows a step-by-step approach. A state-of-the-art CFD computer code using this technique has been adapted to the problem and can form the departure point for this research.

  10. Radiochemical Facility Laboratory (RFL). Description of the installation and reprogramming of its objectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonini, Alberto; Dominguez, C.; Dell'Occhio, Leonor A.; Stankevicius, Alejandro

    1999-01-01

    A description is made of a laboratory that will be used to characterize radioactive wastes, to study the burnup of fuel elements, to make isotopic analysis by mass spectroscopy and to recover fissile materials from the production of fission 99 Mo. The equipment and the ventilation system are also described. (author)

  11. Radiochemical procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, W.S.

    1982-01-01

    The modern counting instrumentation has largely obviated the need for separation processes in the radiochemical analysis but problems in low-level radioactivity measurement, environmental-type analyses, and special situations caused in the last years a renaissance of the need for separation techniques. Most of the radiochemical procedures, based on the classic works of the Manhattan Project chemists of the 1940's, were published in the National Nuclear Energy Series (NNES). Improvements such as new solvent extraction and ion exchange separations have been added to these methods throughout the years. Recently the Los Alamos Group have reissued their collected Radiochemical Procedures containing a short summary and review of basic inorganic chemistry - 'Chemistry of the Elements on the Basis of Electronic Configuration'. (A.L.)

  12. Rapid Radiochemical Methods for Asphalt Paving Material ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technical Brief Validated rapid radiochemical methods for alpha and beta emitters in solid matrices that are commonly encountered in urban environments were previously unavailable for public use by responding laboratories. A lack of tested rapid methods would delay the quick determination of contamination levels and the assessment of acceptable site-specific exposure levels. Of special concern are matrices with rough and porous surfaces, which allow the movement of radioactive material deep into the building material making it difficult to detect. This research focuses on methods that address preparation, radiochemical separation, and analysis of asphalt paving materials and asphalt roofing shingles. These matrices, common to outdoor environments, challenge the capability and capacity of very experienced radiochemistry laboratories. Generally, routine sample preparation and dissolution techniques produce liquid samples (representative of the original sample material) that can be processed using available radiochemical methods. The asphalt materials are especially difficult because they do not readily lend themselves to these routine sample preparation and dissolution techniques. The HSRP and ORIA coordinate radiological reference laboratory priorities and activities in conjunction with HSRP’s Partner Process. As part of the collaboration, the HSRP worked with ORIA to publish rapid radioanalytical methods for selected radionuclides in building material matrice

  13. Radiochemical and chemical constituents in water from selected wells and springs from the southern boundary of the Idaho National Laboratory to the Hagerman Area, Idaho, 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattray, Gordon W.; Wehnke, Amy J.; Hall, L. Flint; Campbell, Linford J.

    2005-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey and the Idaho Department of Water Resources, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, sampled water from 14 sites as part of an ongoing study to monitor the water quality of the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer between the southern boundary of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the Burley-Twin Falls-Hagerman area. The State of Idaho, Department of Environmental Quality, Division of INL Oversight and Radiation Control cosampled with the U.S. Geological Survey and the Idaho Department of Water Resources and their analytical results are included in this report. The samples were collected from four domestic wells, two dairy wells, two springs, four irrigation wells, one observation well, and one stock well and analyzed for selected radiochemical and chemical constituents. Two quality-assurance samples, sequential replicates, also were collected and analyzed. None of the concentrations of radiochemical or organic-chemical constituents exceeded the maximum contaminant levels for drinking water established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. However, the concentration of one inorganic-chemical constituent, nitrate (as nitrogen), in water from site MV-43 was 20 milligrams per liter which exceeded the maximum contaminant level for that constituent. Of the radiochemical and chemical concentrations analyzed for in the replicate-sample pairs, 267 of the 270 pairs (with 95 percent confidence) were statistically equivalent.

  14. Building for changing-rooms, laundry, laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemeth, L.; Mezes, J.; Gulyas, F.; Hejj, A.; Matyas, J.

    1979-01-01

    This building accomodates important service sections of the power plant. The changing-rooms of the primary circuit are here, through which the employees, under the supervision of health physics service, pass to the radioactive contaminated jobs. Working-clothes are cleaned in laundries located on the ground-floor. The building houses the health measurement control rooms of the four reactor sets and the control centre of the power plant. The laboratories dealing with process control, electrical engineering, radiology, dosimetry, material tests and reactor physics will be located here. (author)

  15. Radiochemical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geary, W.J.

    1986-01-01

    This little volume is one of an extended series of basic textbooks on analytical chemistry produced by the Analytical Chemistry by Open Learning project in the UK. Prefatory sections explain its mission, and how to use the Open Learning format. Seventeen specific sections organized into five chaptrs begin with a general discussion of nuclear properties, types, and laws of nuclear decay and proceeds to specific discussions of three published papers (reproduced in their entirety) giving examples of radiochemical methods which were discussed in the previous chapter. Each section begins with an overview, contains one or more practical problems (called self-assessment questions or SAQ's), and concludes with a summary and a list of objectives for the student. Following the main body are answers to the SAQ's, and several tables of physical constants, SI prefixes, etc. A periodic table graces the inside back cover

  16. Hydrologic conditions and distribution of selected radiochemical and chemical constituents in water, Snake River Plain aquifer, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho, 1989 through 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartholomay, R.C.; Orr, B.R.; Liszewski, M.J.; Jensen, R.G.

    1995-08-01

    Radiochemical and chemical wastewater discharged since 1952 to infiltration ponds and disposal wells at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has affected water quality in the Snake River Plain aquifer. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, maintains a continuous monitoring network at the INEL to determine hydrologic trends and to delineate the movement of radiochemical and chemical wastes in the aquifer. This report presents an analysis of water-level and water-quality data collected from the Snake River Plain aquifer during 1989-91. Water in the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer moves principally through fractures and interflow zones in basalt, generally flows southwestward, and eventually discharges at springs along the Snake River. The aquifer is recharged principally from irrigation water, infiltration of streamflow, and ground-water inflow from adjoining mountain drainage basins. Water levels in wells throughout the INEL generally declined during 1989-91 due to drought. Detectable concentrations of radiochemical constituents in water samples from wells in the Snake River Plain aquifer at the INEL decreased or remained constant during 1989-91. Decreased concentrations are attributed to reduced rates of radioactive-waste disposal, sorption processes, radioactive decay, and changes in waste-disposal practices. Detectable concentrations of chemical constituents in water from the Snake River Plain aquifer at the INEL were variable during 1989-91. Sodium and chloride concentrations in the southern part of the INEL increased slightly during 1989-91 because of increased waste-disposal rates and a lack of recharge from the Big Lost River. Plumes of 1,1,1-trichloroethane have developed near the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant and the Radioactive Waste Management Complex as a result of waste disposal practices

  17. SAFETY IN THE DESIGN OF SCIENCE LABORATORIES AND BUILDING CODES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    HOROWITZ, HAROLD

    THE DESIGN OF COLLEGE AND UNIVERSITY BUILDINGS USED FOR SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH AND EDUCATION IS DISCUSSED IN TERMS OF LABORATORY SAFETY AND BUILDING CODES AND REGULATIONS. MAJOR TOPIC AREAS ARE--(1) SAFETY RELATED DESIGN FEATURES OF SCIENCE LABORATORIES, (2) LABORATORY SAFETY AND BUILDING CODES, AND (3) EVIDENCE OF UNSAFE DESIGN. EXAMPLES EMPHASIZE…

  18. Development of a building performance laboratory for South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Parsons, S

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The CSIR Building Science and Technology Competence area is currently in the process of establishing a Building Performance Laboratory (BPL). The BPL is aimed at becoming a centre at which the knowledge generation and technology development...

  19. Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory building cost index

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemon, G.D.; Morris, D.W.; McConnell, P.H.

    1977-11-01

    The Controller's budget request for FY-1979 established guidance for escalation rates at 6 to 8 percent for construction projects beyond FY-1976. The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) has chosen to use an annual construction escalation rate of 10 percent. Results of this study should contribute toward the establishment of realistic construction cost estimate totals and estimates of annual construction funding requirements. Many methods were used to arrive at the LASL escalation rate recommendation. First, a computer program was developed which greatly expanded the number of materials previously analyzed. The program calculated the 1970 to 76 weighted averages for labor, materials, and equipment for the base line project. It also plotted graphs for each category and composite indexes for labor and material/equipment. Second, estimated increases for 1977 were obtained from several sources. The Zia Company provided labor cost estimates. Projected increases for material and equipment were obtained through conversations with vendors and analysis of trade publications. Third, economic forecast reports and the Wall Street Journal were used for source material, narrative, and forecast support. Finally, we compared LASL Building Cost Index with the effects of escalation associated with three recently developed projects at LASL.

  20. Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory building cost index

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemon, G.D.; Morris, D.W.; McConnell, P.H.

    1977-11-01

    The Controller's budget request for FY-1979 established guidance for escalation rates at 6 to 8 percent for construction projects beyond FY-1976. The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) has chosen to use an annual construction escalation rate of 10 percent. Results of this study should contribute toward the establishment of realistic construction cost estimate totals and estimates of annual construction funding requirements. Many methods were used to arrive at the LASL escalation rate recommendation. First, a computer program was developed which greatly expanded the number of materials previously analyzed. The program calculated the 1970 to 76 weighted averages for labor, materials, and equipment for the base line project. It also plotted graphs for each category and composite indexes for labor and material/equipment. Second, estimated increases for 1977 were obtained from several sources. The Zia Company provided labor cost estimates. Projected increases for material and equipment were obtained through conversations with vendors and analysis of trade publications. Third, economic forecast reports and the Wall Street Journal were used for source material, narrative, and forecast support. Finally, we compared LASL Building Cost Index with the effects of escalation associated with three recently developed projects at LASL

  1. A History of Building 828, Sandia National Laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ullrich, Rebecca

    1999-08-01

    This report documents the history of Building 828 in Sandia National Laboratories' Technical Area I. Building 828 was constructed in 1946 as a mechanical test laboratory for Los Alamos' Z-Division (later Sandia) as it moved to Sandia Base. The building has undergone significant remodeling over the years and has had a variety of occupants. The building was evaluated in compliance with the National Historic Preservation Act, but was not eligible for the National Register of Historic Places. Nevertheless, for many Labs employees, it was a symbol of Sandia's roots in World War II and the Manhattan Project.

  2. Radiochemical and Chemical Constituents in Water from Selected Wells and Springs from the Southern Boundary of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory to the Hagerman Area, Idaho, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. C. Bartholomay (USGS); L. M. Williams (USGS); L. J. Campbell (Idaho Department of Water Resources)

    1998-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey and the Idaho Department of Water Resources, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, sampled 18 sites as part of the fourth round of a long-term project to monitor water quality of the Snake River Plain aquifer from the southern boundary of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory to the Hagerman area. Water samples were collected and analyzed for selected radiochemical and chemical constituents. The samples were collected from seven domestic wells, six irrigation wells, two springs, one dairy well, one observation well, and one stock well. Two quality-assurance samples also were collected and analyzed. None of the radiochemical or chemical constituents exceeded the established maximum contaminant levels for drinking water. Many of the radionuclide- and inorganic-constituent concentrations were greater than their respective reporting levels.

  3. Radiochemical and Chemical Constituents in Water from Selected Wells and Springs from the Southern Boundary of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory to the Hagerman Area, Idaho, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. C. Bartholomay; B. V. Twining (USGS); L. J. Campbell (Idaho Department of Water Resources)

    1999-06-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey and the Idaho Department of Water Resources, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, sampled 18 sites as part of the fourth round of a long-term project to monitor water quality of the Snake River Plain aquifer from the southern boundary of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory to the Hagerman area. The samples were analyzed for selected radiochemical and chemical constituents. The samples were collected from 2 domestic wells, 12 irrigation wells, 2 stock wells, 1 spring, and 1 public supply well. Two quality-assurance samples also were collected and analyzed. None of the reported radiochemical or chemical constituent concentrations exceeded the established maximum contaminant levels for drinking water. Many of the radionuclide- and inorganic-constituent concentrations were greater than the respective reporting levels. Most of the organic-constituent concentrations were less than the reporting levels.

  4. Seismic strengthening of building 111 at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eli, M.; Coats, D.; Freeland, G.; Kamath, M.

    1991-01-01

    Since being designed and constructed in the late 1960s, the Director's Building (Building 111) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been evaluated for 1988 seismic criteria and has been upgraded to withstand a major earthquake in the Livermore area. During and immediately after a large earthquake in the Livermore area, Building 111 occupants would be able to exit safely without loss of life. Building 111 itself would be severely damaged, but would not collapse. Highlights of the seismic upgrade design criteria and of the design, analyses, and construction that resulted are presented in this paper

  5. Build of virtual instrument laboratory related to nuclear species specialized

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shan Jian; Zhao Guizhi; Zhao Xiuliang; Tang Lingzhi

    2009-01-01

    As rapid development of specialized related to nuclear science,the requirement of laboratory construct is analyzed in this article at first, One total conceive, One scheme deploy soft and hardware,three concrete characteristics targets and five different phases of put in practice of virtual instrument laboratory of specialized related to nuclear science are suggest in the paper,the concrete hardware structure and the headway of build of virtual instrument laboratory are described,and the first step effect is introduced.Lastly,the forward target and the further deliberateness that the virtual instrument laboratory construct are set forth in the thesis. (authors)

  6. An update of the distribution of selected radiochemical and chemical constituents in perched ground water, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho, Emphasis 1999-2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Linda C.

    2006-01-01

    Radiochemical and chemical wastes generated at facilities at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) were discharged since 1952 to infiltration ponds at the Reactor Technology Complex (RTC) (known as the Test Reactor Area [TRA] until 2005), and the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) and buried at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). Disposal of wastewater to infiltration ponds and infiltration of surface water at waste burial sites resulted in formation of perched ground water in basalts and in sedimentary interbeds above the Snake River Plain aquifer. Perched ground water is an integral part of the pathway for waste-constituent migration to the aquifer. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, maintains ground-water monitoring networks at the INL to determine hydrologic trends, and to monitor the movement of radiochemical and chemical constituents in wastewater discharged from facilities to both perched ground water and the aquifer. This report presents an analysis of water-quality and water-level data collected from wells completed in perched ground water at the INL during 1999-2001, and summarizes historical disposal data and water-level-and water-quality trends. At the RTC, tritium, strontium-90, cesium-137, dissolved chromium, chloride, sodium, and sulfate were monitored in shallow and deep perched ground water. In shallow perched ground water, no tritium was detected above the reporting level. In deep perched ground water, tritium concentrations generally decreased or varied randomly during 1999-2001. During October 2001, tritium concentrations ranged from less than the reporting level to 39.4?1.4 picocuries per milliliter (pCi/mL). Reportable concentrations of tritium during July-October 2001 were smaller than the reported concentrations measured during July-December 1998. Tritium concentrations in water from wells at the RTC were likely affected by: well's distance from the

  7. Fire preparedness measures in buildings with hot laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberlaender, B.C.

    2003-01-01

    Important hot laboratory safety issues are the general design/construction of the building with respect to fire, fire prevention, fire protection, administrative controls, and risk assessment. Within the network of the European Working Group Hot Laboratories and Remote Handling items concerning 'fire preparedness measures in hot laboratories' were screened and studied. Two questionnaires were sent to European hot laboratories; the first in November 2002 on 'fire preparedness measures, fire detection and fire suppression/extinguishing in lead shielded cells, concrete shielded cells' and the second in June 2003 on 'Fire preparedness measures in buildings with hot laboratories'. The questionnaires were filled in by a total of ten hot laboratories in seven European countries. On request of participants the answers were evaluated and 'anonymised' for presentation and discussion at the plenary meeting. The answers showed that many European hot laboratories are implementing improvements to their fire protection programmes to comply with more stringent requirements of the national authorities. The recommendations ('International guidelines for the fire protection of Nuclear Power Plants') given by the insurance pools are followed up with national variations. An ISO standard (ISO 17873) is in progress giving criteria for the design and the operation of ventilation systems as well as fire hazard management in nuclear installations others than reactors

  8. Self-benchmarking Guide for Laboratory Buildings: Metrics, Benchmarks, Actions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathew, Paul; Greenberg, Steve; Sartor, Dale

    2009-07-13

    This guide describes energy efficiency metrics and benchmarks that can be used to track the performance of and identify potential opportunities to reduce energy use in laboratory buildings. This guide is primarily intended for personnel who have responsibility for managing energy use in existing laboratory facilities - including facilities managers, energy managers, and their engineering consultants. Additionally, laboratory planners and designers may also use the metrics and benchmarks described in this guide for goal-setting in new construction or major renovation. This guide provides the following information: (1) A step-by-step outline of the benchmarking process. (2) A set of performance metrics for the whole building as well as individual systems. For each metric, the guide provides a definition, performance benchmarks, and potential actions that can be inferred from evaluating this metric. (3) A list and descriptions of the data required for computing the metrics. This guide is complemented by spreadsheet templates for data collection and for computing the benchmarking metrics. This guide builds on prior research supported by the national Laboratories for the 21st Century (Labs21) program, supported by the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Much of the benchmarking data are drawn from the Labs21 benchmarking database and technical guides. Additional benchmark data were obtained from engineering experts including laboratory designers and energy managers.

  9. Report of the laboratory building for late occurring injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    In order to estimate the danger of low level radiation to human beings, the studies of the late-occurring injuries and internal exposure due to radionuclide deposition are necessary. In the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, research on the estimation of the danger of late-occurring injuries due to radiation is proceeding. In this connection, a late-occurring injury laboratory building has been completed recently. Basic ideas behind it are as follows. To carry out the above mentioned studies effectively and efficiently, many experimental animals of high quality must be kept under best possible environment. For the observation in a series of experiments, irradiation room and laboratory rooms are essential. The building comprises the following: the first floor for animal receiving, the second floor for laboratory rooms, the third floor for RI facility and X-ray irradiated animal keeping, the fourth floor for SPF animal keeping, and attic floor for water supply, etc. (J.P.N.)

  10. Safety assessment for TA-48 radiochemical operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    The purpose of this report is to document an assessment performed to evaluate the safety of the radiochemical operations conducted at the Los Alamos National Laboratory operations area designated as TA-48. This Safety Assessment for the TA-48 radiochemical operations was prepared to fulfill the requirements of US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5481.1B, ''Safety Analysis and Review System.'' The area designated as TA-48 is operated by the Chemical Science and Technology (CST) Division and is involved with radiochemical operations associated with nuclear weapons testing, evaluation of samples collected from a variety of environmental sources, and nuclear medicine activities. This report documents a systematic evaluation of the hazards associated with the radiochemical operations that are conducted at TA-48. The accident analyses are limited to evaluation of the expected consequences associated with a few bounding accident scenarios that are selected as part of the hazard analysis. Section 2 of this report presents an executive summary and conclusions, Section 3 presents pertinent information concerning the TA-48 site and surrounding area, Section 4 presents a description of the TA-48 radiochemical operations, and Section 5 presents a description of the individual facilities. Section 6 of the report presents an evaluation of the hazards that are associated with the TA-48 operations and Section 7 presents a detailed analysis of selected accident scenarios

  11. Building an Agent-Based Laboratory Infrastructure for Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muna Saqer

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available We present an ongoing project at the University of Houston- Downtown (UHD that aims to build a grid as a laboratory environment to support undergraduate education. We intend to use this PC clusters centered grid to allow students to perform laboratory exercises through web interfaces. In order to accommodate lab packages of a growing number of courses, we design the system as a modular system using multi-agent modeling. Students are recruited to implement the units of the system as senior student project topics or research activities sponsored by the Scholar's Academy of UHD. Through these projects, we geared our research toward higher education and provided students with opportunities to participate in building a computational infrastructure for curriculum improvement. This is very important for a minority-serving institution (MSI with limited resources such as UHD.

  12. Radiochemical and Chemical Constituents in Water from Selected Wells and Springs from the Southern Boundary of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory to the Hagerman Area, Idaho, 2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattray, Gordon W.; Campbell, Linford J.

    2004-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, Idaho Department of Water Resources, and the State of Idaho INEEL Oversight Program, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, sampled water from 17 sites as part of the sixth round of a long-term project to monitor water quality of the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer from the southern boundary of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory to the Hagerman area. The samples were collected from eight irrigation wells, three domestic wells, one stock well, one dairy well, one commercial well, one observation well, and two springs and analyzed for selected radiochemical and chemical constituents. One quality-assurance sample, a sequential replicate, also was collected and analyzed. Many of the radionuclide and inorganic-constituent concentrations were greater than the reporting levels and most of the organic-constituent concentrations were less than the reporting levels. However, none of the reported radiochemical- or chemical-constituent concentrations exceeded the maximum contaminant levels for drinking water established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Statistical evaluation of the replicate sample pair indicated that, with 95 percent confidence, 132 of the 135 constituent concentrations of the replicate pair were equivalent.

  13. Radiochemical solar neutrino experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rich, R.; Spiro, M.

    1993-01-01

    This review covers the three presently running radiochemical solar neutrino experiments, namely the Chlorine, SAGE, and GALLEX experiments. The focus of the review is on a discussion of statistical consistency checks of the available data. The chlorine radiochemical experiment is conceptually simple and shows no strong indication of any statistical anomalies. It still forms the basis of the solar neutrino problem. Each of the two gallium experiments show internal statistical consistency. SAGE's recent preliminary results are consistent with the published GALLEX results. If this convergence is confirmed by a more definitive analysis, this would suggest that the combined result of the two gallium experiments, SAGE and GALLEX, be used for comparisons with theoretical expectations. 5 refs., 15 figs

  14. Radiochemical Solar Neutrino Experiments - Successful and Otherwise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, R.L.

    2008-01-01

    Over the years, several different radiochemical systems have been proposed as solar neutrino detectors. Of these, two achieved operating status and obtained important results that helped to define the current field of neutrino physics: the first solar-neutrino experiment, the Chlorine Detector ( 37 Cl) that was developed by chemist Raymond Davis and colleagues at the Homestake Mine, and the subsequent Gallium ( 71 Ga) Detectors that were operated by (a) the SAGE collaboration at the Baksan Laboratory and (b) the GALLEX/GNO collaborations at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory. These experiments have been extensively discussed in the literature and in many previous International Neutrino Conferences. In this paper, I present important updates to the results from SAGE and GALLEX/GNO. I also review the principles of the radiochemical detectors and briefly describe several different detectors that have been proposed. In light of the well-known successes that have been subsequently obtained by real-time neutrino detectors such as Kamiokande, Super-Kamiokande, SNO, and KamLAND, I do not anticipate that any new radiochemical neutrino detectors will be built. At present, only SAGE is still operating; the Chlorine and GNO radiochemical detectors have been decommissioned and dismantled

  15. Radiochemical solar neutrino experiments, 'successful and otherwise'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, Richard L

    2008-01-01

    Over the years, several different radiochemical systems have been proposed as solar neutrino detectors. Of these, two achieved operating status and obtained important results that helped to define the current field of neutrino physics: the first solar-neutrino experiment, the Chlorine Detector ( 37 Cl) that was developed by chemist Raymond Davis and colleagues at the Homestake Mine, and the subsequent Gallium ( 71 Ga) Detectors that were operated by (a) the SAGE collaboration at the Baksan Laboratory and (b) the GALLEX/GNO collaborations at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory. These experiments have been extensively discussed in the literature and in many previous International Neutrino Conferences. In this paper, I present important updates to the results from SAGE and GALLEX/GNO. I also review the principles of the radiochemical detectors and briefly describe several different detectors that have been proposed. In light of the well-known successes that have been subsequently obtained by real-time neutrino detectors such as Kamiokande, Super-Kamiokande, SNO, and KamLAND, I do not anticipate that any new radiochemical neutrino detectors will be built. At present, only SAGE is still operating; the Chlorine and GNO radiochemical detectors have been decommissioned and dismantled.

  16. Final Safety Analysis Document for Building 693 Chemical Waste Storage Building at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salazar, R.J.; Lane, S.

    1992-02-01

    This Safety Analysis Document (SAD) for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Building 693, Chemical Waste Storage Building (desipated as Building 693 Container Storage Unit in the Laboratory's RCRA Part B permit application), provides the necessary information and analyses to conclude that Building 693 can be operated at low risk without unduly endangering the safety of the building operating personnel or adversely affecting the public or the environment. This Building 693 SAD consists of eight sections and supporting appendices. Section 1 presents a summary of the facility designs and operations and Section 2 summarizes the safety analysis method and results. Section 3 describes the site, the facility desip, operations and management structure. Sections 4 and 5 present the safety analysis and operational safety requirements (OSRs). Section 6 reviews Hazardous Waste Management's (HWM) Quality Assurance (QA) program. Section 7 lists the references and background material used in the preparation of this report Section 8 lists acronyms, abbreviations and symbols. Appendices contain supporting analyses, definitions, and descriptions that are referenced in the body of this report

  17. Building bridges between clinical and forensic toxicology laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Bernardino Barcelo; Gomila, Isabel; Noce, Valeria

    2018-05-09

    Clinical and forensic toxicology can be defined as the two disciplines involved the detection, identification and measurement of xenobiotics in biological and non-biological specimens to help in the diagnosis, treatment, prognosis, prevention of poisonings and to disclose causes and contributory causes of fatal intoxications, respectively. This article explores the close connections between clinical and forensic toxicology in overlapping areas of interest. An update has been carried out of the following seven areas of interest in analytical toxicology: doping control, sudden cardiac death (SCD), brain death, sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and Munchausen syndrome by proxy (MSBP), prenatal exposure to drugs and fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS), drug-facilitated crimes (DFC) and intoxications by new psychoactive substances (NPS). While issues such as SCD, SIDS or doping control are investigated mainly in forensic laboratories, other as prenatal exposure to drugs or FAS are mainly treated in clinical laboratories. On the other hand, areas such MSBP, DFC or the intoxications by NPS are of interest in both laboratories. Some of these topics are initially treated in hospital emergency departments, involving clinical laboratories and sometimes lately derived to forensic laboratories. Conversely, cases with initial medical-legal implications and fatalities are directly handled by forensic toxicology, but may trigger further studies in the clinical setting. Many areas of common interest between clinical and forensic laboratories are building bridges between them. The increasing relationships are improving the growth, the reliability and the robustness of both kind of laboratories. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  18. Structural Analysis and Seismic Design for Cold Neutron Laboratory Building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Sangik; Kim, Y. K.; Kim, H. R.

    2007-05-01

    This report describes all the major results of the dynamic structural analysis and seismic design for the Cold Neutron Laboratory Building which is classified in seismic class II. The results are summarized of the ground response spectrum as seismic input loads, mechanical properties of subsoil, the buoyancy stability due to ground water, the maximum displacement of the main frame under the seismic load and the member design. This report will be used as a basic design report to maintenance its structural integrity in future

  19. Building the basis for a comprehensive radiation protection program for a multi-program laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copenhaver, E.D.

    1987-01-01

    An explicit, workplace-specific training has been developed, implemented, and documented for all radiation workers. In addition to the radiation worker personnel located at reactors, accelerators, radiochemical laboratories, and waste treatment areas, we have trained other personnel who work in areas where a lesser potential for radiological/chemical exposure exists. These workforces include construction crews, site restoration crews, contracted special services such as scoping and site characterization teams, and short-term visitors. We are developing a comprehensive, integrated approach to radiation protection training suited for a multi-purpose research laboratory. 9 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  20. On the activities in building a computerized system of nuclear materials accounting and control at the SChK radiochemical plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skuratov, V.A.; Purygin, V.Ya.; Savchuk, O.A.

    1999-01-01

    The project: Development of the nuclear materials (NM) control and accountancy system model on the example of the SCP Radiochemical Plant (RCP) has been fulfilled by the Siberian Chemical Plant in collaboration with a number of organization since October 1992 through October 1996. One of the key goals of the project was the use of new criteria and approaches to NM control and accounting, including step-by-step implementation for all the NM flows measurement principles. The work on project has resulted in the development of the model for NM control and accountancy system at RCP. When designing the model, the single RCP balance area on uranium and plutonium was broken down to four NM balance areas. The model developed within the project is being implemented in a few ways: introduction of innovative NM measurement techniques, working out regulatory documents, adaptation of computers for control and accountancy. An aim to secure safety in the most problematic area MBA-2 (plutonium dioxide production) transition to the real-time cannot be resolved without implementation of computerized system of NM control and accountancy [ru

  1. Avionics Systems Laboratory/Building 16. Historical Documentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slovinac, Patricia; Deming, Joan

    2011-01-01

    As part of this nation-wide study, in September 2006, historical survey and evaluation of NASA-owned and managed facilities that was conducted by NASA s Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston, Texas. The results of this study are presented in a report entitled, "Survey and Evaluation of NASA-owned Historic Facilities and Properties in the Context of the U.S. Space Shuttle Program, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas," prepared in November 2007 by NASA JSC s contractor, Archaeological Consultants, Inc. As a result of this survey, the Avionics Systems Laboratory (Building 16) was determined eligible for listing in the NRHP, with concurrence by the Texas State Historic Preservation Officer (SHPO). The survey concluded that Building 5 is eligible for the NRHP under Criteria A and C in the context of the U.S. Space Shuttle program (1969-2010). Because it has achieved significance within the past 50 years, Criteria Consideration G applies. At the time of this documentation, Building 16 was still used to support the SSP as an engineering research facility, which is also sometimes used for astronaut training. This documentation package precedes any undertaking as defined by Section 106 of the NHPA, as amended, and implemented in 36 CFR Part 800, as NASA JSC has decided to proactively pursue efforts to mitigate the potential adverse affects of any future modifications to the facility. It includes a historical summary of the Space Shuttle program; the history of JSC in relation to the SSP; a narrative of the history of Building 16 and how it supported the SSP; and a physical description of the structure. In addition, photographs documenting the construction and historical use of Building 16 in support of the SSP, as well as photographs of the facility documenting the existing conditions, special technological features, and engineering details, are included. A contact sheet printed on archival paper, and an electronic copy of the work product on CD, are

  2. Radiochemicals in biomedical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, E.A.; Oldham, K.G.

    1988-01-01

    This volume describes the role of radiochemicals in biomedical research, as tracers in the development of new drugs, their interaction and function with receptor proteins, with the kinetics of binding of hormone - receptor interactions, and their use in cancer research and clinical oncology. The book also aims to identify future trends in this research, the main objective of which is to provide information leading to improvements in the quality of life, and to give readers a basic understanding of the development of new drugs, how they function in relation to receptor proteins and lead to a better understanding of the diagnosis and treatment of cancers. (author)

  3. Simulation Technology Laboratory Building 970 hazards assessment document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, C.L.; Starr, M.D.

    1994-11-01

    The Department of Energy Order 5500.3A requires facility-specific hazards assessments be prepared, maintained, and used for emergency planning purposes. This hazards assessment document describes the chemical and radiological hazards associated with the Simulation Technology Laboratory, Building 970. The entire inventory was screened according to the potential airborne impact to onsite and offsite individuals. The air dispersion model, ALOHA, estimated pollutant concentrations downwind from the source of a release, taking into consideration the toxicological and physical characteristics of the release site, the atmospheric conditions, and the circumstances of the release. The greatest distances at which a postulated facility event will produce consequences exceeding the ERPG-2 and Early Severe Health Effects thresholds are 78 and 46 meters, respectively. The highest emergency classification is a Site Area Emergency. The Emergency Planning Zone is 100 meters

  4. Glass Formulation and Fabrication Laboratory, Building 864, Hazards assessment document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banda, Z.; Wood, C.L.

    1995-08-01

    The Department of Energy Order 5500.3A requires facility-specific hazards assessments be prepared, maintained, and used for emergency planning purposes. This hazards assessment document describes the chemical and radiological hazards associated with the Glass Formulation and Fabrication Laboratory, Building 864. The entire inventory was screened according to the potential airborne impact to onsite and offsite individuals. The air dispersion model, ALOHA, estimated pollutant concentrations downwind from the source of a release, taking into consideration the toxicological and physical characteristics of the release site, the atmospheric conditions, and the circumstances of the release. The greatest distances at which a postulated facility event will produce consequences exceeding the ERPG-2 threshold is 96 meters. The highest emergency classification is a Site Area Emergency. The Emergency Planning Zone is 100 meters.

  5. 11th radiochemical conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasil, Z.

    1987-01-01

    The conference met in four sesions which discussed: Separation methods, Radioanalytical methods, Labelled compounds and Miscellaneous. The first session discussed extraction methods, ion exchange and chromatographic separation of radioisotopes. The second session heard papers on the application of these methods, e.g., in geochemistry, on the use of radioactive tracers in radiochemical analysis and the use of activation analysis in the determination of trace elements. The third session heard papers on the preparation of labelled organic compounds with isotopes 3 H, 14 C, radioiodine and 32 P, on the preparation of RIA kits and on the chemistry and radiopharmacology of technetium compounds. The other contributions which could not be heard in any of the three sessions discussed, e.g., the preparation of elements on the cyclotron and microtron, the production of a new 99m Tc-generator, the participation of the IAEA in processing low- and medium-level radioactive wastes, etc. (E.S.)

  6. DECOMMISSIONING THE BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY BUILDING 830 GAMMA IRRADIATION FACILITY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BOWERMAN, B.S.; SULLIVAN, P.T.

    2001-08-13

    The Building 830 Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) was decommissioned because its design was not in compliance with current hazardous tank standards and its cobalt-60 sources were approaching the end of their useful life. The facility contained 354 stainless steel encapsulated cobalt-60 sources in a pool, which provided shielding. Total cobalt-60 inventory amounted to 24,000 Curies when the sources were shipped for disposal. The decommissioning project included packaging, transport, and disposal of the sources and dismantling and disposing of all other equipment associated with the facility. Worker exposure was a major concern in planning for the packaging and disposal of the sources. These activities were planned carefully according to ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) principles. As a result, the actual occupational exposures experienced during the work were within the planned levels. Disposal of the pool water required addressing environmental concerns, since the planned method was to discharge the slightly contaminated water to the BNL sewage treatment plant. After the BNL evaluation procedure for discharge to the sewage treatment plant was revised and reviewed by regulators and BNL's Community Advisory Council, the pool water was discharged to the Building 830 sanitary system. Because the sources were sealed and the pool water contamination levels were low, most of the remaining equipment was not contaminated; therefore disposal was straightforward, as scrap metal and construction debris.

  7. Radiochemical synthesis of etomoxir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbas, Hafiz G. [Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Oncology (INMOL), New Campus Road, Lahore (Pakistan); Yunus, M. [University of the Punjab, New Campus Road, Lahore (Pakistan); Feinendegen, Ludwig E., E-mail: feinendegen@gmx.ne [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Heinrich-Heine University Duesseldorf, Wannental 45, 88131 Lindau (Germany)

    2011-02-15

    Sodium 2-{l_brace}6-(4-chlorophenoxy)hexyl{r_brace}oxirane-2-carboxylate (Etomoxir) inhibits transport of fatty acids via the carnitine shuttle into mitochondria of muscle cells and prevents long chain fatty acids from providing energy through {beta}-oxidation especially for muscle contraction. The objective of this synthesis is to develop a method for radioiodination of Etomoxir in order to explore its potential in diagnostic metabolic studies and molecular imaging. Thus, a method is described for the radiochemical synthesis and purification of ethyl 2-{l_brace}6-(4-[{sup 131}I]iodophenoxy)hexyl{r_brace}oxirane-2-carboxylate (3) and 2-{l_brace}6-(4-[{sup 131}I]iodo-phenoxy)hexyl{r_brace}oxirane-2-carboxylic acid (4). For the synthesis of these new agents, ethyl 2-{l_brace}6-(4-bromophenoxy)hexyl{r_brace}oxirane-2-carboxylate (1) and 2-{l_brace}6-(4-bromophenoxy)hexyl{r_brace}oxirane-2-carboxylic acid (2) were refluxed with [{sup 131}I]NaI in the presence of anhydrous acetone at a temperature of 80 {sup o}C and 90 {sup o}C for a period of 3-4 hours, respectively. The method of radiolabeling, based on the nucleophilic exchange reaction, resulted in a radiochemical yield of 43% and 67% for compounds 3 and 4, respectively. This paper reports on the labeling of etomoxir with radioiodine as {sup 124}I labeled etomoxir may be of great importance in molecular imaging.

  8. Collected radiochemical and geochemical procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleinberg, J [comp.

    1990-05-01

    This revision of LA-1721, 4th Ed., Collected Radiochemical Procedures, reflects the activities of two groups in the Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory: INC-11, Nuclear and radiochemistry; and INC-7, Isotope Geochemistry. The procedures fall into five categories: I. Separation of Radionuclides from Uranium, Fission-Product Solutions, and Nuclear Debris; II. Separation of Products from Irradiated Targets; III. Preparation of Samples for Mass Spectrometric Analysis; IV. Dissolution Procedures; and V. Geochemical Procedures. With one exception, the first category of procedures is ordered by the positions of the elements in the Periodic Table, with separate parts on the Representative Elements (the A groups); the d-Transition Elements (the B groups and the Transition Triads); and the Lanthanides (Rare Earths) and Actinides (the 4f- and 5f-Transition Elements). The members of Group IIIB-- scandium, yttrium, and lanthanum--are included with the lanthanides, elements they resemble closely in chemistry and with which they occur in nature. The procedures dealing with the isolation of products from irradiated targets are arranged by target element.

  9. Radiochemical analysis of military nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayramov, A.A.; Bayramova, S.M.

    2012-01-01

    Full text : Radiochemical Analysis is a branch of analytical chemistry comprising an aggregate of methods for qualitatively determining the composition and content of radioisotopes in the products of transformations. Safety and minimization of radiation impact on human and environment are important demand of operation of Military Nuclear Facilities (MNF). In accordance of recommendations of International Commission on Radiological Protection there are next objects of radiochemical analysis: 1) potential sources of radiochemical pollution; 2) environment (objects of environment, human environment including buildings, agricultural production, water, air et al.); 3) human himself (determination of dose from external and internal radiation, chemical poisoning). The chemical analysis can be carried out using, for example, the Gas Chromatography instrument whish separates chemical mixtures and identifies the components at a molecular level. It is one of the most accurate tools for analyzing environmental samples. The Gas Chromatography works on the principle that a mixture will separate into individual substances when heated. The heated gases are carried through a column with an inert gas (such as helium). As the separated substances emerge from the column opening, they flow into the Mass Spectrometry. Mass spectrometry identifies compounds by the mass of the analyte molecule. Newly developed portable Gas Chromatography and Mass Spectrometry are techniques that can be used to separate volatile organic compounds and pesticides. Other uses of Gas Chromatography, combined with other separation and analytical techniques, have been developed for radionuclides, explosive compounds such as royal demolition explosive and trinitrotoluene, and metals. So, based on the many years experience of operation of dangerous MNF, in concordance with norms of radiation and chemical safety it was considered that the tasks of the radiochemical analysis of Military Nuclear Facilities include

  10. Evaluation of radiochemical data usability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paar, J.G.; Porterfield, D.R.

    1997-04-01

    This procedure provides a framework for implementation of radiochemical data verification and validation for environmental remediation activities. It has been developed through participation of many individuals currently involved in analytical radiochemistry, radiochemical validation, and validation program development throughout the DOE complex. It should be regarded as a guidance to use in developing an implementable radiochemical validation strategy. This procedure provides specifications for developing and implementing a radiochemical validation methodology flexible enough to allow evaluation of data useability for project-specific Data Quality Objectives (DQO). Data produced by analytical methods for which this procedure provides limited guidance are classified as open-quotes non-routineclose quotes radionuclides and methods, and analyses by these methods may necessitate adoption of modified criteria from this procedure

  11. Acoustics. Measurement of sound insulation in buildings and of building elements. Laboratory measurements of the reduction of transmitted impact noise by floor coverings on a heavyweight standard floor

    CERN Document Server

    British Standards Institution. London

    1998-01-01

    Acoustics. Measurement of sound insulation in buildings and of building elements. Laboratory measurements of the reduction of transmitted impact noise by floor coverings on a heavyweight standard floor

  12. Chemical and Radiochemical Constituents in Water from Wells in the Vicinity of the Naval Reactors Facility, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho, 1997-98

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. C. Bartholomay; L. L. Knobel; B. J. Tucker; B. V. Twining (USGS)

    2000-06-01

    The US Geological Survey, in response to a request from the U.S Department of Energy's Pittsburgh Naval Reactors Office, Idaho Branch Office, sampled water from 13 wells during 1997-98 as part of a long-term project to monitor water quality of the Snake River Plain aquifer in the vicinity of the Naval Reactors Facility, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho. Water samples were analyzed for naturally occurring constituents and man-made contaminants. A total of 91 samples were collected from the 13 monitoring wells. The routine samples contained detectable concentrations of total cations and dissolved anions, and nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen. Most of the samples also had detectable concentrations of gross alpha- and gross beta-particle radioactivity and tritium. Fourteen quality-assurance samples were also collected and analyzed; seven were field-blank samples, and seven were replicate samples. Most of the field blank samples contained less than detectable concentrations of target constituents; however some blank samples did contain detectable concentrations of calcium, magnesium, barium, copper, manganese, nickel, zinc, nitrite plus nitrate, total organic halogens, tritium, and selected volatile organic compounds.

  13. Proficiency test on determination of radioactivity concentration of 137Cs and 90Ssr in food and environmental samples for Polish radiochemical laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polkowska-Motrenko, H.; Sypula, M.; Sadowska-Bratek, M.; Fuks, L.

    2007-01-01

    Proficiency testing (PT) on the determination of radioactivity concentration of 137 Cs and 0S r in samples of drinking and surface waters, wheat flour and sand was organized in 2006 by the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology (INCT). The PT was conducted on the request of the National Atomic Energy Agency, Poland (PAA) and financed by the NAEA President. Report presents statistical evaluation of results obtained by the participants. The PT was provided in accordance with ISO/IEC Guide 43-1:1997. Samples were prepared by spiking the appropriate raw materials separately with known amounts of the certified standard solutions of 137 Cs and 0S r. Ten laboratories from Poland and one from Hungary took part in the PT. The participants were asked to choose which samples they were willing to analyze. the results provided by the participants were statistically evaluated by means of z and zeta-scores in accordance with ISO 13528:2005 and IUPAC protocol. They were evaluated also using the evaluation criteria for trueness and precision usually applied by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). (authors) [pl

  14. Correlation between basalt flows and radiochemical and chemical constituents in selected wells in the southwestern part of the Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholomay, Roy C.; Hodges, Mary K. V.; Champion, Duane E.

    2017-12-21

    Wastewater discharged to wells and ponds and wastes buried in shallow pits and trenches at facilities at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) have contributed contaminants to the eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP) aquifer in the southwestern part of the INL. This report describes the correlation between subsurface stratigraphy in the southwestern part of the INL with information on the presence or absence of wastewater constituents to better understand how flow pathways in the aquifer control the movement of wastewater discharged at INL facilities. Paleomagnetic inclination was used to identify subsurface basalt flows based on similar inclination measurements, polarity, and stratigraphic position. Tritium concentrations, along with other chemical information for wells where tritium concentrations were lacking, were used as an indicator of which wells were influenced by wastewater disposal.The basalt lava flows in the upper 150 feet of the ESRP aquifer where wastewater was discharged at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) consisted of the Central Facilities Area (CFA) Buried Vent flow and the AEC Butte flow. At the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Complex, where wastewater would presumably pond on the surface of the water table, the CFA Buried Vent flow probably occurs as the primary stratigraphic unit present; however, AEC Butte flow also could be present at some of the locations. At the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC), where contamination from buried wastes would presumably move down through the unsaturated zone and pond on the surface of the water table, the CFA Buried Vent; Late Basal Brunhes; or Early Basal Brunhes basalt flows are the flow unit at or near the water table in different cores.In the wells closer to where wastewater disposal occurred at INTEC and the ATR-Complex, almost all the wells show wastewater influence in the upper part of the ESRP aquifer and wastewater is present in both the CFA Buried Vent flow and AEC Butte

  15. Fifty years of radiochemical tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, E.A.

    1992-01-01

    During the past 50 years radiochemical tracers, usually in the form of isotopically labelled organic compounds, have been essential tools to further advance our knowledge at the frontiers of a great variety of scientific developments in the life sciences. This plenary lecture reviews necessarily selected highlights in the synthesis and applications of such radiochemical tracers. Included are examples where important advances, made possible by using radiochemicals, have contributed to improving the quality of life on this planet. The principal radioisotopes involved, 14 C, 3 H, 35 S, 32 P, 125 I, are all relatively safe to handle and are commercially available at maximum theoretical specific activity (carrier free). The compounds labeled with these radioisotopes are used in many fields of research which include biosynthesis and biotechnology studies, cell biology, drug metabolism, clinical research and environmental applications, and are briefly reviewed. (author). 55 refs

  16. Building and Benefiting from Member State Laboratory Capacities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The Department of Nuclear Sciences and Applications implement a number of activities that are designed to enhance and capitalize upon the capacities of Member States’ laboratories worldwide. The Nuclear Sciences and Applications (NA) laboratories strengthen Member States’ analytical capacities through activities such as proficiency tests and inter-laboratory comparisons, and share the capacities of Member States’ laboratories with other Member States through the coordination of relevant networks and participation in the IAEA Collaborating Centre scheme. An example of these activities is the collaborative work carried out by the Terrestrial Environment Laboratory (TEL). The TEL cooperates with the IAEA Environment Laboratories in Monaco to distribute 92 types of reference materials for characterizing radionuclides, stable isotopes, trace elements or organic contaminants. These materials serve as international standards for establishing and evaluating the reliability and accuracy of analytical measurements. This collaborative work between NA laboratories, Member States and laboratories around the globe contribute to the IAEA’s mandate of fostering scientific and technical exchanges for the peaceful use of nuclear science and technology throughout the world

  17. Radiochemical analysis for nuclear waste management in decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou, X.

    2010-07-01

    The NKS-B RadWaste project was launched from June 2009. The on-going decommissioning activities in Nordic countries and current requirements and problems on the radiochemical analysis of decommissioning waste were discussed and overviewed. The radiochemical analytical methods used for determination of various radionuclides in nuclear waste are reviewed, a book was written by the project partners Jukka Lehto and Xiaolin Hou on the chemistry and analysis of radionuclide to be published in 2010. A summary of the methods developed in Nordic laboratories is described in this report. The progresses on the development and optimization of analytical method in the Nordic labs under this project are presented. (author)

  18. Radiochemical analysis for nuclear waste management in decommissioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, X. (Technical Univ. of Denmark, Risoe National Lab. for Sustainable Energy. Radiation Research Div., Roskilde (Denmark))

    2010-07-15

    The NKS-B RadWaste project was launched from June 2009. The on-going decommissioning activities in Nordic countries and current requirements and problems on the radiochemical analysis of decommissioning waste were discussed and overviewed. The radiochemical analytical methods used for determination of various radionuclides in nuclear waste are reviewed, a book was written by the project partners Jukka Lehto and Xiaolin Hou on the chemistry and analysis of radionuclide to be published in 2010. A summary of the methods developed in Nordic laboratories is described in this report. The progresses on the development and optimization of analytical method in the Nordic labs under this project are presented. (author)

  19. Determination of radiochemical purity using gas chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The concepts of chromatography, gas chromatography, activity, radiochemical impurity are defined; the procedure of the application of gas chromatography for detecting radiochemical purity of substances is standardized. (E.F.)

  20. Realizing High-Performance Buildings; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-03-02

    High-performance buildings (HPBs) are exceptional examples of both design and practice. Their energy footprints are small, and these are buildings that people want to work in because of their intelligent structure, operations, and coincident comfort. However, the operation of most buildings, even ones that are properly constructed and commissioned at the start, can deviate significantly from the original design intent over time, particularly due to control system overrides and growing plug and data center loads. With early planning for systems such as submetering and occupant engagement tools, operators can identify and remedy the problems. This guide is a primer for owners and owners’ representatives who are pursuing HPBs. It describes processes that have been successful in the planning, procurement, and operation of HPBs with exceptional energy efficiency. Much of the guidance offered results from a series of semi-structured conference calls with a technical advisory group of 15 owners and operators of prominent HPBs in the United States. The guide provides a prescription for planning, achieving, and maintaining an HPB. Although the guide focuses on the operations stage of buildings, many of the operations practices are specified during the planning stage.

  1. A Laboratory Practical on the House Building Behaviour of Caddis Larvae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansell, M. H.

    1973-01-01

    Describes a laboratory practical on animal behavior suitable for senior secondary school or university biology classes. Several separate exercises relating to the house building behavior of caddis fly larvae are detailed, together with the time required for preparation. (JR)

  2. Advanced Manufacturing Processes Laboratory Building 878 hazards assessment document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, C.; Thornton, W.; Swihart, A.; Gilman, T.

    1994-07-01

    The introduction of the hazards assessment process is to document the impact of the release of hazards at the Advanced Manufacturing Processes Laboratory (AMPL) that are significant enough to warrant consideration in Sandia National Laboratories' operational emergency management program. This hazards assessment is prepared in accordance with the Department of Energy Order 5500.3A requirement that facility-specific hazards assessments be prepared, maintained, and used for emergency planning purposes. This hazards assessment provides an analysis of the potential airborne release of chemicals associated with the operations and processes at the AMPL. This research and development laboratory develops advanced manufacturing technologies, practices, and unique equipment and provides the fabrication of prototype hardware to meet the needs of Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico (SNL/NM). The focus of the hazards assessment is the airborne release of materials because this requires the most rapid, coordinated emergency response on the part of the AMPL, SNL/NM, collocated facilities, and surrounding jurisdiction to protect workers, the public, and the environment

  3. Advanced Manufacturing Processes Laboratory Building 878 hazards assessment document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, C.; Thornton, W.; Swihart, A.; Gilman, T.

    1994-07-01

    The introduction of the hazards assessment process is to document the impact of the release of hazards at the Advanced Manufacturing Processes Laboratory (AMPL) that are significant enough to warrant consideration in Sandia National Laboratories` operational emergency management program. This hazards assessment is prepared in accordance with the Department of Energy Order 5500.3A requirement that facility-specific hazards assessments be prepared, maintained, and used for emergency planning purposes. This hazards assessment provides an analysis of the potential airborne release of chemicals associated with the operations and processes at the AMPL. This research and development laboratory develops advanced manufacturing technologies, practices, and unique equipment and provides the fabrication of prototype hardware to meet the needs of Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico (SNL/NM). The focus of the hazards assessment is the airborne release of materials because this requires the most rapid, coordinated emergency response on the part of the AMPL, SNL/NM, collocated facilities, and surrounding jurisdiction to protect workers, the public, and the environment.

  4. Enhancement of the basic seismic assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory facilities and buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritz-de la Orta, G.O.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a comparison of values obtained for the seismic security of 479 buildings and facilities at Los Alamos National Laboratory following the methodology adapted from Dr. Otto Frit's original System, and the requirements contained both in FEMA-154 ''Rapid Visual Screening of Buildings for Potential Hazards: A Handbook'' and FEMA-187 ''NEHRP Handbook for the Seismic Evaluation of Existing Buildings.'' These comparisons were made from five buildings chosen randomly illustrating a wide variety of construction types and building configurations. Each building is divided into sectors, defined as portions of it that are attached additions to the original building, or portions separated by an expansion joint between the structural systems. The five buildings studied contain a total of sixteen sectors. The paper is divided into the following sections: Introduction; Basic Concepts of the LANL Methodology; Basic Concepts of FEMA-178; Highlights of the Comparison; Comments on the Results; and Final Words

  5. An overview of the status of radiochemical analysis in Hungary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solymosi, J.; Toth, G.

    1994-01-01

    This overview covers the following activities at radioanalytical laboratories in Hungary: tracer techniques and their applications; some important new results; radioimmunoassay; x-ray emission analysis and x-ray fluorescence analysis, Moessbauer-spectroscopy and their applications in various fields of science and technology; neutron activation analysis; radiochemical analysis for nuclear power plant applications activities in various laboratories; nuclear environmental analysis (radioanalytical methods for the investigation of contamination by nuclear facilities). (N.T.) 1 fig.; 7 tabs

  6. [How do hospital clinical laboratories and laboratory testing companies cooperate and build reciprocal relations?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, Seiji

    2014-12-01

    As the 2nd Joint Symposium of the Japanese Society of Laboratory Medicine and the Japanese Association of Laboratory Pathologists, the symposium on clinical test out-sourcing and branch laboratories was held at the 60th General Meeting of the Japanese Society of Laboratory Medicine on November 2nd, 2013 in Kobe. For the symposium, we conducted a questionnaire survey on the usage of clinical test out-sourcing and the introduction of branch laboratories to clinical laboratories of Japanese university hospitals, both private and public, between July 25th and August 20th, 2013. Seventy-two hospitals responded to the questionnaire survey, consisting of 41 public medical school hospitals and 31 private ones. According to the survey, the selection of each clinical test for out-sourcing was mainly determined by the capacities of hospital clinical laboratories and their equipment, as well as the profitability of each test. The main concerns of clinical laboratory members of university hospitals involved the continuity of measurement principles, traceability, and standardization of reference values for each test. They strongly requested the interchangeability and computerization of test data between laboratory testing companies. A branch laboratory was introduced to six hospitals, all of which were private medical college hospitals, out of 72 university hospitals, and eight of the other hospitals were open to its introduction. The merits and demerits of introducing a branch laboratory were also discussed. (Review).

  7. Building a Laboratory Information Management System Using Windows4GL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pickens, M.A.; Shaieb, M.R.

    1996-05-01

    The system discussed is currently implemented at LLNL in the Environmental Services program which operates out of the Chemistry & Materials Science (C&MS) directorate. Responsibility is to provide the C&MS Environmental Services (CES) program with an enterprise-wide information system which will aid CES. The specific portion of the information system is the Sample Tracking, Analysis and Reporting System (STARS). Since CES was formed by merging two analytical laboratory organizations in May 1995, a new Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) had to be developed. The development of a LIMS in Windows4GL was found to be satisfactory. The product STARS was well received by the user community, and it has improved business practices and efficiency in CES. The CES management staff has seen increased personnel productivity since STARS was release. We look forward to upgrading to CA-OpenROAD and taking advantage of its many improved and innovative features to further enhance STARS.

  8. Building a Laboratory Information Management System Using Windows4GL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickens, M.A.; Shaieb, M.R.

    1996-05-01

    The system discussed is currently implemented at LLNL in the Environmental Services program which operates out of the Chemistry ampersand Materials Science (C ampersand MS) directorate. Responsibility is to provide the C ampersand MS Environmental Services (CES) program with an enterprise-wide information system which will aid CES. The specific portion of the information system is the Sample Tracking, Analysis and Reporting System (STARS). Since CES was formed by merging two analytical laboratory organizations in May 1995, a new Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) had to be developed. The development of a LIMS in Windows4GL was found to be satisfactory. The product STARS was well received by the user community, and it has improved business practices and efficiency in CES. The CES management staff has seen increased personnel productivity since STARS was release. We look forward to upgrading to CA-OpenROAD and taking advantage of its many improved and innovative features to further enhance STARS

  9. ESOL facility for the generation and radiochemical separation of short half-life fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gehrke, R.J.; Meikrantz, D.H.; Baker, J.D.; Anderl, R.A.; Novick, V.J.; Greenwood, R.C.

    1988-01-01

    A facility has been developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for the generation and rapid radiochemical separation of short half-life mixed fission products. This facility, referred to as the Idaho Elemental Separation On Line (ESOL), consists of electro-plated sources of spontaneously fissioning 252 Cf with a helium jet transport arrangement to continuously deliver short half-life, mixed fission products to the radiochemistry laboratory for rapid, computer controlled, radiochemical separations. 18 refs., 13 figs

  10. Radiochemical stability of radiopharmaceutical preparations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, Patricia de A.; Silva, Jose L. da; Ramos, Marcelo P.S.; Oliveira, Ideli M. de; Felgueiras, Carlos F.; Herrerias, Rosana; Zapparoli Junior, Carlos L.; Mengatti, Jair; Fukumori, Neuza T.O.; Matsuda, Margareth M.N.

    2011-01-01

    The 'in vitro' stability studies of the radiopharmaceutical preparations are an essential requirement for routine practice in nuclear medicine and are an important parameter for evaluating the quality, safety and efficacy required for the sanitary registration of pharmaceutical products. Several countries have published guidelines for the evaluation of pharmaceutical stability. In Brazil, the stability studies should be conducted according to the Guide for Conducting Stability Studies published in the Resolution-RE n. 1, of 29th July 2005. There are also for radiopharmaceutical products, two specific resolutions: RDC-63 regulates the Good Manufacturing Practices for Radiopharmaceuticals and RDC-64 provides the Registration of Radiopharmaceuticals, both published on the 18th December 2009. The radiopharmaceutical stability is defined as the time during which the radioisotope can be safely used for the intended purpose. The radiochemical stability can be affected by a variety of factors, including storage temperature, amount of radioactivity, radioactive concentration, presence or absence of antioxidants or other stabilizing agents. The radiochemical stability studies must be established under controlled conditions determined by the effective use of the product. The aim of this work was to evaluate the radiochemical stability of labeled molecules with 131 I, 123 I, 153 Sm, 18 F, 51 Cr, 177 Lu and 111 In as well as 67 Ga and 201 Tl radiopharmaceuticals. Radiochemical purity was evaluated after production and in the validity period, with the maximum activity and in the recommended storage conditions. The analyses were carried out by thin-layer silica gel plate, paper chromatography and gel chromatography. The experimental results showed to be in accordance with the specified limits for all the analysed products. (author)

  11. Building Magnets at Brookhaven National Laboratory: A Condensed Account

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willen, Erich

    2017-09-01

    The development of superconducting wire and cable in the late twentieth century enabled high-field magnets and thus much higher beam-collision energies in accelerators. These higher collision energies have allowed experimentalists to probe further into the structure of matter at the most fundamental, subatomic level. The behavior of the early universe, where these high energies prevailed, and its evolution over time are the realm their experiments seek to investigate. The subject has aroused the curiosity of the public as well as scientists and has facilitated the support needed to build and operate such expensive machines and experiments. The path forward has not been easy, however. Success in most projects has been mixed with failure, progress with ineptitude. The building of high energy accelerators is mostly a story of capable people doing their best to develop new and unusual technology toward some defined goal, facing both success and failure along the way. It is also a story of administrative imperatives that had unpredictable effects on a project's success, depending mostly on the people in the administrative roles and the decisions that they made.

  12. Building Magnets at Brookhaven National Laboratory - An Account

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willen, E. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2017-02-01

    The development of superconducting wire and cable in the late 20th century enabled high field magnets and thus much higher beam collision energies in accelerators. These higher collision energies have allowed experiments to probe further into the structure of matter at the most fundamental, subatomic level. The behavior of the early universe, where these high energies prevailed, and its evolution over time are what these experiments seek to investigate. The subject has aroused the curiosity of not only scientists but of the public as well and has facilitated the support needed to build and operate such expensive machines and experiments. The path forward has not been easy, however. Success in most projects has been mixed with failure, progress with ineptitude. The building of high energy accelerators is mostly a story of capable people doing their best to develop new and unusual technology toward some defined goal, with success and failure in uneven measure along the way. It is also a story of administrative imperatives that have had unpredictable effects on a project’s success, depending mostly on the people in the administrative roles and the decisions that they have made.

  13. Building a Laboratory: the Work of Global University Rankers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lim, Miguel Antonio

    2015-01-01

    ’, and more relevant products. The metaphor allows us to understand the changeability of rankings and highlights that the process of making rankings can be influenced by the different audiences they are aimed at. University leaders are not passive players in the recognition of expertise in higher education...... evaluation. I present some of the ways in which these leaders are part of the process from the lesser known point-of-view of the ranking organisations. I propose three questions: 1) Can the university ranker be thought of as a ‘laboratory’? 2) How does the university ranking laboratory produce its ‘science...

  14. Cleanout and decontamination of radiochemical hot cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surma, J.E.; Holton, L.K. Jr.; Katayama, Y.B.; Gose, J.E.; Haun, F.E.; Dierks, R.D.

    1990-01-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory is developing and employing advanced remote and contact technologies in cleaning out and decontaminating six radiochemical hot cells at Hanford under the Department of Energy's Surplus Facilities Management Program. The program is using a series of remote and contact decontamination techniques to reduce costs and to significantly lower radiation doses to workers. Refurbishment of the cover blocks above the air lock trench reduced radiation exposure in the air lock and cleanout and decontamination of an analytical cell achieved a reduction in radioactive contamination. Nuclear Regulatory Commission-approved Type B burial boxes are also being used to reduce waste disposal costs and radiation doses. PNL is currently decommissioning its pilot-scale radioactive liquid-fed ceramic melter. Special tools have been developed and are being used to accomplish the world's first such effort. 4 refs., 5 figs

  15. Standardization of equations for radiochemical calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danahy, R.J.; Dugan, T.A.; Tomlinson, F.K.; Jones, H.W.

    1994-01-01

    In mid 1993, the Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corporation (FERMCO), with USEPA approval implemented a project quality assurance plan containing performance-based specifications for radiochemical sample analyses conducted in support of the Fernald site remediation activities. FERMCO's initial approach to acquiring performance-based radioanalytical services was to provide limited guidance regarding equations for computation of the quantities required in each analysis report. It became evident that there was a significant divergence of opinion on how to compute some very basic radiochemical quantities. The use of a standardized set of equations was needed in order to ensure comparability of data from different laboratories. In a remediation project of this magnitude, use of multiple laboratories is a virtual necessity. Consequently comparability of data becomes an extremely important issue. A critical issue in the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) phase of the dean up project is to avoid the occurrence of excessive false positive sample results. Such results could lead to unnecessary clean up and significant additional cost. This paper describes the specific formulas FERMCO is currently using to define such quantities as net sample count rate, sample radionuclide concentration, radiometric tracer and gravimetric carrier recovery. Equations have also been produced to define the uncertainty in each of the above quantities. Equations for the Total Propagated Uncertainty (TPU) and for a sample-specific Minimum Detectable Concentration (MDC) have also been specified. Generalized equations have been reformulated to address the specific conditions which apply to the analysis of FERMCO samples. In particular, FERMCO requires results which have been corrected for the radioactivity in the blank while in other instances, sample results without blank correction are required

  16. The laboratory efficiencies initiative: partnership for building a sustainable national public health laboratory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridderhof, John C; Moulton, Anthony D; Ned, Renée M; Nicholson, Janet K A; Chu, May C; Becker, Scott J; Blank, Eric C; Breckenridge, Karen J; Waddell, Victor; Brokopp, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Beginning in early 2011, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Association of Public Health Laboratories launched the Laboratory Efficiencies Initiative (LEI) to help public health laboratories (PHLs) and the nation's entire PHL system achieve and maintain sustainability to continue to conduct vital services in the face of unprecedented financial and other pressures. The LEI focuses on stimulating substantial gains in laboratories' operating efficiency and cost efficiency through the adoption of proven and promising management practices. In its first year, the LEI generated a strategic plan and a number of resources that PHL directors can use toward achieving LEI goals. Additionally, the first year saw the formation of a dynamic community of practitioners committed to implementing the LEI strategic plan in coordination with state and local public health executives, program officials, foundations, and other key partners.

  17. Building a Laboratory-Scale Biogas Plant and Verifying its Functionality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boleman, Tomáš; Fiala, Jozef; Blinová, Lenka; Gerulová, Kristína

    2011-01-01

    The paper deals with the process of building a laboratory-scale biogas plant and verifying its functionality. The laboratory-scale prototype was constructed in the Department of Safety and Environmental Engineering at the Faculty of Materials Science and Technology in Trnava, of the Slovak University of Technology. The Department has already built a solar laboratory to promote and utilise solar energy, and designed SETUR hydro engine. The laboratory is the next step in the Department's activities in the field of renewable energy sources and biomass. The Department is also involved in the European Union project, where the goal is to upgrade all existed renewable energy sources used in the Department.

  18. Federal High Performance and Sustainable Buildings: Guiding Principles for the Laboratory Support Building (LSB)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pope, Jason E.

    2014-09-01

    This report documents the federal Guiding Principles conformance effort for LSB at PNNL. The effort is part of continued progress toward a campus building inventory that is 100% compliant with the Guiding Principles. The report documentation provides a narrative of how the LSB complies with each of the Guiding Principles requirements. These narratives draw from the many sources that are explained in the text and rely on extensive data collection. The descriptions point to each of these sources, providing the reader with specific policies, procedures, and data points.

  19. Radon measurements during the building of a low-level laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Antanasijevic, R; Bikit, I; Banjanac, R; Dragic, A; Joksimovic, D; Krmpotic, D; Udovicic, V; Vukovic, J

    1999-01-01

    Radon measurements were provided during the different stages of building of a low-level laboratory in Belgrade. The depth of the laboratory is 12 m, equivalent to 30 m of water with an area of 45 m sup 2. The whole of the laboratory is hermetically lined with 1 mm A1 foil and is ventilated with filtered air. Radon concentrations were measured with the CR-39 detector as well as via the gamma-ray spectroscopic measurements. The radon concentrations in the air were achieved to 20 Bqm sup - sup 3 and reduction of secondary and tertiary cosmic-ray fluxes is five times when ventilation, filtering and sealing was applied.

  20. Radon measurements during the building of a low-level laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antanasijevic, R.; Anicin, I.; Bikit, I.; Banjanac, R.; Dragic, A.; Joksimovic, D.; Krmpotic, D.; Udovicic, V.; Vukovic, J.

    1999-01-01

    Radon measurements were provided during the different stages of building of a low-level laboratory in Belgrade. The depth of the laboratory is 12 m, equivalent to 30 m of water with an area of 45 m 2 . The whole of the laboratory is hermetically lined with 1 mm A1 foil and is ventilated with filtered air. Radon concentrations were measured with the CR-39 detector as well as via the gamma-ray spectroscopic measurements. The radon concentrations in the air were achieved to 20 Bqm -3 and reduction of secondary and tertiary cosmic-ray fluxes is five times when ventilation, filtering and sealing was applied

  1. Experimental Bleaching of a Reef-Building Coral Using a Simplified Recirculating Laboratory Exposure System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Determining stressor-response relationships in reef building corals is a critical need for researchers because of global declines in coral reef ecosystems. A simplified recirculating coral exposure system for laboratory testing of a diversity of species and morphologies of reef b...

  2. Final environmental assessment: TRU waste drum staging building, Technical Area 55, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    Much of the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) research on plutonium metallurgy and plutonium processing is performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), in Los Alamos, New Mexico. LANL's main facility for plutonium research is the Plutonium Facility, also referred to as Technical Area 55 (TA-55). The main laboratory building for plutonium work within the Plutonium Facility (TA-55) is the Plutonium Facility Building 4, or PF-4. This Environmental Assessment (EA) analyzes the potential environmental effects that would be expected to occur if DOE were to stage sealed containers of transuranic (TRU) and TRU mixed waste in a support building at the Plutonium Facility (TA-55) that is adjacent to PF-4. At present, the waste containers are staged in the basement of PF-4. The proposed project is to convert an existing support structure (Building 185), a prefabricated metal building on a concrete foundation, and operate it as a temporary staging facility for sealed containers of solid TRU and TRU mixed waste. The TRU and TRU mixed wastes would be contained in sealed 55-gallon drums and standard waste boxes as they await approval to be transported to TA-54. The containers would then be transported to a longer term TRU waste storage area at TA-54. The TRU wastes are generated from plutonium operations carried out in PF-4. The drum staging building would also be used to store and prepare for use new, empty TRU waste containers

  3. Northern Marshall Islands Radiological Survey: a quality-control program for a radiochemical analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jennings, C.D.; Mount, M.E.

    1983-08-01

    More than 16,000 radiochemical analyses were performed on about 5400 samples of soils, vegetation, animals, fish, invertebrates, and water to establish amounts of 90 Sr, 137 Cs, 241 Am, and plutonium isotopes in the Northern Marshall Islands. Three laboratories were contracted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to perform the radiochemical analyses: Environmental Analysis Laboratory (EAL), Richmond, California; Eberline Instrument Corporation (EIC), Albuquerque, New Mexico; and Laboratory of Radiation Ecology (LRE), University of Washington, Seattle, Washington. The analytical precision and accuracy were monitored by regularly including duplicate samples and natural matrix standards in each group of about 100 samples analyzed. Based on the duplicates and standards, over 83% of the radiochemical analyses in this survey were acceptable - 97% of the analyses by EAL, 45% of the analyses by EIC, and 98% of the analyses by LRE

  4. A Laboratory for studying radon mitigation methods in high-rise office buildings in Hong Kong

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leung, J.K.C.; Hung, L.C.; Tso, M.Y.W.

    1996-01-01

    A territory-wide survey of indoor radon level in 1993 showed that 17% of offices Hong Kong have radon concentrations above 200 Bq m -3 compared with 4% for dwellings. Consequently, the Radioisotope Unit Radon Analysis Laboratory (RURAL) is being built for studying radon mitigation methods applicable to high-rise office buildings. The laboratory consists of three rooms; the main exposure room is built of concrete and is surrounded by the buffer room; and all controls and operations are done inside the control room. The exposure room can, with the aid of the buffer room, simulate any environmental conditions that can be faced by a real building. The pressure, temperature and humidity can be adjusted to any meteorological conditions that can be found in Hong Kong. Pressure differential and temperature differential can be adjusted to simulate the arrival of fronts, troughs or typhoons. Aerosol concentration and distribution inside the exposure room are controllable as well as the ventilation conditions. Various mitigation methods will be tested under different conditions. Passive methods include application of radon barriers to building structures and active methods include the use of air cleaners; techniques to increase radon daughters plateout or reduce their attachment to aerosols; and various modifications to the ventilation systems. Mitigation techniques involving modifications to the building strictures and building services will also be developed with the help of the RURAL. (author)

  5. Upgrades and Enclosure of Building 15 at Technical Area 40: Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plimpton, Kathryn D [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Garcia, Kari L. M [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Brunette, Jeremy Christopher [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); McGehee, Ellen D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-09-15

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Los Alamos Field Office (Field Office) proposes to upgrade and enclose Building 15 at Technical Area (TA) 40, Los Alamos National Laboratory. Building TA-40-15, a Cold War-era firing site, was determined eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places (Register) in DX Division’s Facility Strategic Plan: Consolidation and Revitalization at Technical Areas 6, 8, 9, 14, 15, 22, 36, 39, 40, 60, and 69 (McGehee et al. 2005). Building TA-40-15 was constructed in 1950 to support detonator testing. The firing site will be enclosed by a steel building to create a new indoor facility that will allow for year-round mission capability. Enclosing TA-40-15 will adversely affect the building by altering the characteristics that make it eligible for the Register. In compliance with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, as amended, the Field Office is initiating consultation for this proposed undertaking. The Field Office is also requesting concurrence with the use of standard practices to resolve adverse effects as defined in the Programmatic Agreement among the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Los Alamos Field Office, the New Mexico State Historic Preservation Office and the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation Concerning Management of the Historic Properties at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico.

  6. A Componentizable Server-Side Framework for Building Remote and Virtual Laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Luis Muros-Cobos

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract—Currently, virtual/remotes laboratories are often being built to improve learning and researching capabilities in some areas of knowledge. Generally these virtual/remotes laboratories are built from scratch again and again, instead of reusing software and hardware infrastructures. This paper presents a new framework, RVLab, to help developers building flexible and robust server-side virtual and remotes laboratories quickly. RVLab affords support for the basic requirements of these systems such as the user management or the resources (instruments and devices reservation. Unlike other lab systems, RVLab is adapted to devices and instruments of any real laboratory due to a secure and robust mechanism that allows the remote execution of lab programs. Moreover, it improves the user interaction with real labs, providing a real-time visualization of experiments and lab instruments by means of the control of video camera placed into lab, and the transmission of video streaming with different quality to users.

  7. Derived concentration guideline levels for Argonne National Laboratory's building 310 area.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamboj, S., Dr.; Yu, C ., Dr. (Environmental Science Division)

    2011-08-12

    The derived concentration guideline level (DCGL) is the allowable residual radionuclide concentration that can remain in soil after remediation of the site without radiological restrictions on the use of the site. It is sometimes called the single radionuclide soil guideline or the soil cleanup criteria. This report documents the methodology, scenarios, and parameters used in the analysis to support establishing radionuclide DCGLs for Argonne National Laboratory's Building 310 area.

  8. Radiochemical analysis of chlorine-36

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, M.; Pina, G.; Lara, E.

    2006-01-01

    The radioactive chlorine isotope, 36 Cl, decays with a half-life of 3x10 5 years by emitting a beta particle (98 %) and by electron capture. The aim of this paper is to propose a radiochemical separation method of 36 Cl from the other beta-gamma emitters present in low and medium radioactive wastes such as spent ion exchange resins and evaporator concentrates, that arise from Nuclear Power Plants and particularly in the wastes that come from decommissioning activities of graphite reactors, in order to provide data for 36 Cl inventory calculations. The separation method proposed is based on an oxidation technique where chlorine is trapped by NaOH. 36 Cl beta emissions are measured by liquid scintillation counting by the dual label technique in order to avoid the contamination produced by 14 C which is also trapped by NaOH and which is the main contaminant present in graphite samples. The sensitivity of this method is sufficient to achieve the needed thresholds for the radiological characterization of the radioactive materials to which this method can be applied. (author)

  9. Radiochemical purity determination by paper chromatography 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The standard relates to the determination of radiochemical impurities in labelled compounds using paper chromatography. The basic terms are given as is the description of procedure and evaluation of chromatograms. (E.S.)

  10. Radiochemistry and radiochemical separations. A current bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bujdoso, E.

    1999-01-01

    A current bibliography for years 1993-1996 with 159 references was compiled on radiochemistry and radiochemical separations based on the INIS Atomindex. The references are arranged in alphabetical order of first authors. (N.T.)

  11. [Building and implementation of management system in laboratories of the National Institute of Hygiene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozbicka, Beata; Brulińska-Ostrowska, Elzbieta

    2008-01-01

    The rules of good laboratory practice have always been observed in the laboratories of National Institute of Hygiene (NIH) and the reliability of the results has been carefully cared after when performing tests for clients. In 2003 the laboratories performing analyses related to food safety were designated as the national reference laboratories. This, added to the necessity of compliance with work standards and requirements of EU legislation and to the need of confirmation of competence by an independent organisation, led to a decision to seek accreditation of Polish Centre of Accreditation (PCA). The following stages of building and implementation of management system were presented: training, modifications of Institute's organisational structure, elaboration of management system's documentation, renovation and refurbishment of laboratory facilities, implementation of measuring and test equipment's supervision, internal audits and management review. The importance of earlier experiences and achievements with regard to validation of analytical methods and guarding of the quality of the results through organisation and participation in proficiency tests was highlighted. Current status of accreditation of testing procedures used in NIH laboratories that perform analyses in the field of chemistry, microbiology, radiobiology and medical diagnostic tests was presented.

  12. Radon measurements during the building of a low-level laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antanasijevic, R.; Anicin, I.; Bikit, I.; Banjanac, R.; Dragic, A.; Joksimovic, D.; Krmpotic, D.; Udovicic, V.; Vukovic, J

    1999-06-01

    Radon measurements were provided during the different stages of building of a low-level laboratory in Belgrade. The depth of the laboratory is 12 m, equivalent to 30 m of water with an area of 45 m{sup 2}. The whole of the laboratory is hermetically lined with 1 mm A1 foil and is ventilated with filtered air. Radon concentrations were measured with the CR-39 detector as well as via the gamma-ray spectroscopic measurements. The radon concentrations in the air were achieved to 20 Bqm{sup -3} and reduction of secondary and tertiary cosmic-ray fluxes is five times when ventilation, filtering and sealing was applied.

  13. Effectiveness of daylighting design and occupant visual satisfaction in a LEED gold laboratory building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua, Ying; Oswald, Anne [Department of Design and Environmental Analysis, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Yang, Xiaodi [School of Architecture, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

    2011-01-15

    Using daylight as primary light source has been widely recognized as an important strategy to reduce building energy demand and enhance indoor environment quality. However, to design and operate a building to make full use of daylight, which is a dynamic light source, to meet diverse occupant needs remains a challenge. This paper reports a post-occupancy study of the visual environment in a laboratory building on a university campus, and puts a spotlight on the building occupants as it examines the effectiveness of the daylighting design and systems integration in creating a visual environment to support occupant comfort and satisfaction while reducing artificial lighting demand. Results show generally high satisfaction with daylit work environment and positive effect of the horizontal shading strategy. Issues about the integration between daylighting and electric lighting systems and level of occupant control are identified and discussed for improving the effectiveness of daylighting and enhancing the quality of the visual environment in the building of study. A multiple-tool methodology is developed and tested, which included occupant surveys, interviews, illuminance measurements, continuous data loggers, fisheye-lens camera and glare-identifying software, and documentation of spatial settings, systems features, and user behavior. (author)

  14. Safety decommissioning regulations of radiochemical objects - the problem, requires urgent decision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rovnyj, S.I.; Arsent'eva, N.V.; Emel'yanov, N.M.; Kolesnikov, V.N.

    2001-01-01

    The necessity of planning and pursuance of the measures on decommissioning of radiochemical industry is discussed. Technological processes were stopped more than in 30 buildings and constructions of the PO Mayak. The characteristics of the technological buildings to be decommissioned were treated in the context of building peculiarities, function, character and level of contamination. An acceptable variant for reactor decommissioning invites development of the standard-legal aspects [ru

  15. International intercalibration as a method for control of radiochemical analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelova, A.; Totseva, R.; Karaivanova, R.; Dandulova, Z.; Botsova, L.

    1994-01-01

    The participation of the Radioecology Section at the National Centre for Radiology and Radiation Protection (NCRRP) in the International Interlaboratory Comparison of radiochemical analyses organized by WHO is reported. The method of evaluating accuracy of the results from inter calibrations concerning radionuclide determination of environmental samples is outlined. The data from analysis of cesium 137, strontium 90 and radium 226 in milk, sediments, soil and seaweed made by 21 laboratories are presented. They show a good accuracy values of the results from NCRRP. 1 tab. 2 figs., 6 refs

  16. Removal site evaluation report on Building 7602 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-09-01

    This removal site evaluation report for Building 7602 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory was prepared to provide the Environmental Restoration Program with information necessary to evaluate whether hazardous and/or radiological contaminants in and around the facility pose a substantial risk to human health or the environment (i.e., a high probability of adverse effects) and whether remedial site evaluations or removal actions are, therefore, required. The scope of the project included (1) a search for, and review of, readily available historical records regarding operations and use of the facility (including hazardous substance usage and existing contamination); (2) interviews with facility personnel concerning current and past practices; and (3) a brief walk-through to visually inspect the facility and identify existing hazard areas requiring maintenance actions, removal actions, or remedial evaluation. The results of the removal site evaluation indicate that areas associated with Building 7602 pose no imminent hazards requiring maintenance actions. Adequate engineering and administrative controls are in place and enforced within the facility to ensure worker and environmental protection. Current actions that are being taken to prevent further release of contamination and ensure worker safety within Building 7602 are considered adequate until decontamination and decommissioning activities begin. Given the current status and condition of Building 7602, this removal site evaluation is considered complete and terminated

  17. Termination of the Special Metallurgical (SM) Building at Mound Laboratory: a final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, W.R.; Kokenge, B.R.; Marsh, G.C.

    1976-01-01

    The report describes and highlights the more important factors associated with the termination of the Special Metallurgical (SM) Building at Mound Laboratory. As a result, a written record of the more important techniques and procedures is now available for reference by others involved in similar termination efforts. Included in this report is a description of the organizational units that were used in this effort along with a description of their responsibilities. A general description of the SM Building and a discussion of the more relevant procedures and equipment that were used are also presented. In addition, pertinent Health Physics information, such as personnel exposure, final wipe levels in the terminated facility, and assays of the structure, are provided. Based on the experience gained from this project, recommendations were made regarding the design of future radioactive material handling facilities so that when they are ultimately terminated the effort can be accomplished more efficiently

  18. Plant and equipment division laboratory services series: a ten-year building-maintenance cost history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keesee, H.F.

    1976-09-01

    Maintaining a multifacility national laboratory in a safe, reliable condition is a complex management responsibility in terms of budgets, costs, and proper utilization of personnel and material resources. Increasing wage rates and material costs, combined with decreased budgets and aging facilities, create unusual challenges to maintenance managers. A ten-year history of building-maintenance costs, a brief description of the maintenance program, analyses of personnel requirements, cost increase indexes, unit costs, cost controls, procedures, and a brief discussion of alterations and improvements are presented

  19. Radiochemical separation of cadmium-109

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egamediev, S.; Mukhtarov, A.; Nurbaeva, D.; Rakhmanov, A.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Cadmium-109 has a half-life of 461.9 days and decays by electron capture to 109 Ag with the emission of 88 keV γ-ray (3.79%) along with the characteristic X-ray from the K level of Ag, with energy of 22.5 keV. This radionuclide has found widespread use as a photon source in x-ray fluorescence analysis devices employed in industry for numerous applications such as the direct determination of gold in ores, the analysis of metals and identification of steels. Other applications range from its use as an electron source for measurement of densities of air-pollution samples, to tracer studies in mushrooms and mice and rats. In the nuclear medicine field there is growing interest in employing 109 Cd in a 109 Cd/ 109mA g generator, as an alternative to other biomedical generators of ultra short-lived gamma emitters. There are several methods for the production of 109 Cd in literature: 1. Bombardment of silver cyclotron target via 109 Ag(d,2n) 109 Cd reaction with 16 MeV deuterons. 2. Bombardment of natural silver target via 109 Ag(p,n) 109 Cd reaction with 14 MeV protons. 3. Proton bombardment of natural indium target with 96 MeV protons. 4. Irradiation of enriched 107 Ag target in high-flux nuclear reactor at neutron flux 2x10 15 n·cm -2 ·s -1 via 107 Ag(n,γ) 108 Ag → 108 Cd (n,γ) 109 Cd reaction. 5. Irradiation of enriched 108 Cd target in nuclear reactor at neutron flux 1x10 14 n·cm -2 ·s -1 via 108 Cd (n,γ) 109 Cd reaction. The production of 109 Cd with proton beam via 109 Ag(p,n) 109 Cd reaction is ideal for the cyclotron U-150, since it is not required the change of the regime for the machine functioning. Because of its relatively long half-life the time required for separation is also not an important factor, but its use as an X-ray source requires a very high radiochemical purity. In the present work we studied two methods for separation of 109 Cd from model solution of silver targets. First method is based on precipitation of silver as

  20. Advanced fire prevention techniques for ITER-INDIA laboratory building, IPR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modi, D.V.; Channa Reddy, D.

    2016-01-01

    Just as air and water, survival of human life without fire is unimaginable. However, fire can be a boon as well as a bane. The ability to control the use of fire is an art towards improved industrial development. The same phenomenon is also applicable for research and development sector. Fire Safety is a key issue for any kind of research laboratories. Fire hazards in laboratories arise from the storage and use of flammable materials and electrical installations and from hazardous operations carried out there. The risk of damage due to fire depends on the combustible available, their physical arrangement, the geometry of the building, likelihood of the ignition, etc. The risk is also controlled by the fire protection measures in place, which relate to both fire prevention and fire control. (author)

  1. Development of robotic plasma radiochemical assays for positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexoff, D.L.; Shea, C.; Fowler, J.S.; Gatley, S.J.; Schlyer, D.J.

    1995-01-01

    A commercial laboratory robot system (Zymate PyTechnology II Laboratory Automation System; Zymark Corporation, Hopkinton, MA) was interfaced to standard and custom laboratory equipment and programmed to perform rapid radiochemical analyses for quantitative PET studies. A Zymark XP robot arm was used to carry out the determination of unchanged (parent) radiotracer in plasma using only solid phase extraction methods. Robotic throughput for the assay of parent radiotracer in plasma is 4--6 samples/hour depending on the radiotracer. Robotic assays of parent compound in plasma were validated for the radiotracers [ 11 C]Benztropine, [ 11 C]cocaine, [ 11 C]clorgyline, [ 11 C]deprenyl, [ 11 C]methadone, [ 11 C]methylphenidate, [ 11 C]raclorpride, and [ 11 C]SR46349B. A simple robot-assisted methods development strategy has been implemented to facilitate the automation of plasma assays of new radiotracers

  2. Methods for training radiochemical technicians at ORNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parrott, J.R.; Nicol, R.G.

    The training of personnel to carry out radiochemical operations at ORNL is a formidable and recurrent task since programs are constantly shifting. It is essential that provisions be made for the routine retraining of these personnel if they are to make effective contributions on a continuing basis. Training methods are described that have emerged as a result of thirty years experience in a variety of radiochemical pilot-plant programs. Emphasis is placed on training programs for technicians for the 233 U Processing Facility since essentially all aspects of radiochemical operations are encountered in this facility. These programs have included operations performed in glove boxes, hot-cell manipulator work handling high-neutron-emitting isotopes, and the entire spectrum of remote solvent extraction operations. (U.S.)

  3. Radiochemical analysis of phosphorus in milk samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, R.M. de; Cunha, I.I.L.

    1991-01-01

    The determination of phosphorus in milk samples by thermal neutron activation analysis employing radiochemical separation is described. The radiochemical separation consists of the simultaneous irradiation of samples and standards, dissolution of the milk samples in a perchloric acid and nitric acid mixture, addition of zinc hold-back carrier, precipitation of phosphorus as ammonium phospho molybdate (A.M.P.) and sample counting in a Geiger-Mueller detector. The analysis sources of error were studied and the established method was applied to phosphorus analyses in commercial milk samples. (author)

  4. Biosafety and Biosecurity: A Relative Risk-Based Framework for Safer, More Secure, and Sustainable Laboratory Capacity Building

    OpenAIRE

    Dickmann, Petra; Sheeley, Heather; Lightfoot, Nigel

    2015-01-01

    Background Laboratory capacity building is characterized by a paradox between endemicity and resources: countries with high endemicity of pathogenic agents often have low and intermittent resources (water, electricity) and capacities (laboratories, trained staff, adequate regulations). Meanwhile, countries with low endemicity of pathogenic agents often have high-containment facilities with costly infrastructure and maintenance governed by regulations. The common practice of exporting high ...

  5. Biosafety and Biosecurity: A relative risk-based framework for safer, more secure and sustainable laboratory capacity building

    OpenAIRE

    Petra eDickmann; Heather eSheeley; Nigel Francis Lightfoot; Nigel Francis Lightfoot

    2015-01-01

    Background: Laboratory capacity building is characterized by a paradox between endemicity and resources: Countries with high endemicity of pathogenic agents often have low and intermittent resources (water, electricity) and capacities (laboratories, trained staff, adequate regulations). Meanwhile, countries with low endemicity of pathogenic agents often have high containment facilities with costly infrastructure and maintenance governed by regulations. The common practice of exporting high bi...

  6. Removal site evaluation report on Building 3019B at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-09-01

    This removal site evaluation report on Building 3019B at Oak Ridge National Laboratory was prepared to provide the environmental Restoration Program with information necessary to evaluate whether hazardous and/or radiological contaminants in and around the facility pose a substantial risk to human health or the environment and whether remedial site evaluations or removal actions are, therefore, required. The scope of the project included (1) a search for, and review of, readily available historical records regarding operations and use of the facility (including hazardous substance usage and existing contamination); (2) interviews with facility personnel concerning current and past practices; and (3) a brief walk-through to visually inspect the facility nd identify existing hazard areas requiring maintenance actions or remedial evaluation. The results of the removal site evaluation indicate that areas inside Building 3019B pose no imminent hazard because adequate engineering and administrative controls are in place and enforced within the facility to ensure worker and environmental protection. A maintenance action, however, is being undertaken or proposed. Deteriorated and peeling exterior paint in areas on the west and south walls on the exterior of the building has an uninhibited pathway to the storm water drainage system and can potentially impact the local surface water during periods of storm water runoff. The paint is assumed to be lead based, thus posing a potential problem. In addition, the subsurface of all of the exterior walls may be radiologically contaminated. A maintenance action will be necessary to prevent further deterioration and dislodging of the paint

  7. Decommissioning of the MTR-605 process water building at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Browder, J.H.; Wills, E.L.

    1985-01-01

    Decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of the unused radioactively contaminated portions of the MTR-605 building at the Test Reactor Area of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory has been completed; this final report describes the D and D project. The building is a two-story concrete structure that was used to house piping systems to channel and control coolant water flow for the Materials Testing Reactor (MTR), a 40 MW (thermal) light water test reactor that was operated from 1952 until 1970 and then deactivated. D and D project objectives were to reduce potential environmental and radioactive contamination hazards to levels as low a reasonably achievable. Primary tasks of the D and D project were: to remove contaminated piping (about 400 linear ft of 36- and 30-in.-dia stainless steel pipe) and valves from the primary coolant pipe tunnels, to remove a primary coolant pump and piping, and to remove the three 8-ft-dia by 25-ft-long evaporators from the building second floor

  8. The role of high performance liquid chromatography in radiochemical/radiopharmaceutical synthesis and quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boothe, T.E.; Emran, A.M.

    1990-01-01

    The usefulness of HPLC in all areas of radiopharmaceutics has been demonstrated in numerous laboratories, particularly in the development of in-house radiopharmaceuticals for SPECT and PET. HPLC continues to be a powerful tool in preparation and quality assurance (QA) as illustrated in such areas as chemical and radiochemical identification; product separation and isolation; preparative scale purification; and specific activity determination. A review of established HPLC techniques in radiopharmaceutics will be presented. Examples from the literature as well as newer applications will be used in an attempt to assess and define the present-day role of HPLC in the preparation of radiochemicals and radiopharmaceuticals with emphasis on QA

  9. Radiochemical studies on nuclear fission at Trombay

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    227Ac to 245Cm were determined by radiochemical methods which involved ... foil, followed by direct γ counting using high resolution Ge(Li) detector was also ... the stiffness to mass asymmetric distortion decreases on either side of lead.Also ...

  10. Handling of Ammonium Nitrate Mother-Liquid Radiochemical Production - 13089

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zherebtsov, Alexander; Dvoeglazov, Konstantine; Volk, Vladimir; Zagumenov, Vladimir; Zverev, Dmitriy; Tinin, Vasiliy; Kozyrev, Anatoly; Shamin, Dladimir; Tvilenev, Konstantin

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the work is to develop a basic technology of decomposition of ammonium nitrate stock solutions produced in radiochemical enterprises engaged in the reprocessing of irradiated nuclear fuel and fabrication of fresh fuel. It was necessary to work out how to conduct a one-step thermal decomposition of ammonium nitrate, select and test the catalysts for this process and to prepare proposals for recycling condensation. Necessary accessories were added to a laboratory equipment installation decomposition of ammonium nitrate. It is tested several types of reducing agents and two types of catalyst to neutralize the nitrogen oxides. It is conducted testing of modes of the process to produce condensation, suitable for use in the conversion of a new technological scheme of production. It is studied the structure of the catalysts before and after their use in a laboratory setting. It is tested the selected catalyst in the optimal range for 48 hours of continuous operation. (authors)

  11. The Northern Marshall Islands radiological survey: A quality control program for radiochemical and gamma spectroscopy analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kehl, S.R.; Mount, M.E.; Robison, W.L.

    1995-09-01

    From 1979 to 1989, approximately 25,000 Post Northern Marshall Islands Radiological Survey (PNMIRS) samples were collected, and over 71,400 radiochemical and gamma spectroscopy analyses were performed to establish the concentration of 90 Sr, 137 Cs, 241 Am, and plutonium isotopes in soil, vegetation, fish, and animals in the Northern Marshall Islands. While the Low Level Gamma Counting Facility (B379) in the Health and Ecological Assessment (HEA) division accounted for over 80% of all gamma spectroscopy analyses, approximately 4889 radiochemical and 5437 gamma spectroscopy analyses were performed on 4784 samples of soil, vegetation, terrestrial animal, and marine organisms by outside laboratories. Four laboratories were used by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to perform the radiochemical analyses: Thermo Analytical Norcal, Richmond, California (TMA); Nuclear Energy Services, North Carolina State University (NCSU); Laboratory of Radiation Ecology, University of Washington (LRE); and Health and Ecological Assessment (HEA) division, LLNL, Livermore, California. Additionally, LRE and NCSU were used to perform gamma spectroscopy analyses. The analytical precision and accuracy were monitored by including blind duplicates and natural matrix standards in each group of samples analyzed. On the basis of reported analytical values for duplicates and standards, 88% of the gamma and 87% of the radiochemical analyses in this survey were accepted. By laboratory, 93% of the radiochemical analyses by TMA; 88% of the gamma-ray spectrometry and 100% of the radiochemistry analyses by NCSU; 89% of the gamma spectroscopy and 87% of the radiochemistry analyses by LRE; and 90% of the radiochemistry analyses performed by HEA's radiochemistry department were accepted

  12. Experimental study of a laboratory concrete material representative of containment buildings: desorption isotherms and permeability determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semete, P.; Fevrier, B.; Delorme, J.; Sanahuja, J.; Desgree, P.; Le Pape, Y.

    2015-01-01

    The isotherm sorption curve is a first order parameter for the calculations of concrete drying and/or creep using Finite Element Analysis. An experimental campaign was undertaken by EDF MMC in order to characterize the first desorption isotherm at room temperature of a laboratory material representative of concrete containment buildings. Long term drying tests were carried out on cement paste and on three samples geometries on concrete (with radial and axial one-dimensional drying on thin disks and multi-dimensional drying on Representative Elementary Volumes). The measurements results (porosity, densities and mass loss curves) are provided and the isotherms obtained for the four different configurations are compared. Several analyses of the results are proposed including the assessment of a criterion for the determination of the moisture content final balance (estimation of the asymptotic mass loss) and the back-analysis of equivalent permeability. (authors)

  13. Radiochemical education in Iasi, Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popa, Karin

    2009-01-01

    The teaching and research in radiochemistry is disregarded by most universities (mainly due to the cost and legal requirements for maintaining a nuclear unit of first or second class), although the interest in new generation nuclear reactors is increasing worldwide. The historical background and the educational and the research activities conducted in the Laboratory of Radiochemistry of the Al.I. Cuza University of Iasi as of one of the last bastions of radiochemistry in Romania are presented here. This unit remains one of the last Romanian educational structures which allow the next generation of radio chemists to gain hands on experience as a part of their training: an impressive number of former students are currently employed by nuclear research centres and nuclear energy production facilities not only in Romania but all around Europe. Unfortunately, without a stronger involvement of the authorities, the laboratory risks to be closed by 2011, despite of the effort of a few people (as most of other similar structures in Romania. (author)

  14. Decommissioning the physics laboratory, building 777-10A, at the Savannah River Site (SRS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musall, John C.; Cope, Jeff L.

    2008-01-01

    SRS recently completed a four year mission to decommission ∼250 excess facilities. As part of that effort, SRS decommissioned a 48,000 ft 2 laboratory that housed four low-power test reactors, formerly used by SRS to determine reactor physics. This paper describes and reviews the decommissioning, with a focus on component segmentation and handling (i.e. hazardous material removal, demolition, and waste handling). The paper is intended to be a resource for engineers, planners, and project managers, who face similar decommissioning challenges. Building 777-10A, located at the south end of SRS's A/M-Area, was built in 1953 and had a gross area of ∼48,000 ft 2 . Building 777-10A had two main areas: a west wing, which housed four experimental reactors and associated equipment; and an east wing, which housed laboratories, and shops, offices. The reactors were located in two separate areas: one area housed the Process Development Pile (PDP) reactor and the Lattice Test Reactor (LTR), while the second area housed the Standard Pile (SP) and the Sub-critical Experiment (SE) reactors. The west wing had five levels: three below and three above grade (floor elevations of -37', -28', -15', 0', +13'/+16' and +27' (roof elevation of +62')), while the east wing had two levels: one below and one above grade (floor elevations of -15' and 0' (roof elevation of +16')). Below-grade exterior walls were constructed of reinforced concrete, ∼1' thick. In general, above-grade exterior walls were steel frames covered by insulation and corrugated, asbestos-cement board. The two interior walls around the PDP/LTR were reinforced concrete ∼5' thick and ∼30' high, while the SP/SE reactors resided in a reinforced, concrete cell with 3.5'-6' thick walls/roof. All other interior walls were constructed of metal studs covered with either asbestos-cement or gypsum board. In general, the floors were constructed of reinforced concrete on cast-in-place concrete beams below-grade and concrete on

  15. Level 3 baseline risk evaluation for Building 3506 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golden, K.M.; Robers, S.K.; Cretella, F.M.

    1994-12-01

    This report presents the results of the Level 3 Baseline Risk Evaluation (BRE) performed on Building 3506 located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This BRE is intended to provide an analysis of the potential for adverse health effects (current or future) posed by contaminants at the facility. The decision was made to conduct a Level 3 (least rigorous) BRE because only residual contamination exists in the building. Future plans for the facility (demolition) also preclude a rigorous analysis. Site characterization activities for Building 3506 were conducted in fall of 1993. Concrete core samples were taken from the floors and walls of both the cell and the east gallery. These cores were analyzed for radionuclides and organic and inorganic chemicals. Smear samples and direct radiation measurements were also collected. Sediment exists on the floor of the cell and was also analyzed. To adequately characterize the risks posed by the facility, receptors for both current and potential future land uses were evaluated. For the current land use conditions, two receptors were evaluated. The first receptor is a hypothetical maintenance worker who spends 250 days (8 hours/day) for 25 years working in the facility. The remaining receptor evaluated is a hypothetical S and M worker who spends 2 days (8 hours/day) per year for 25 years working within the facility. This particular receptor best exemplifies the current worker scenario for the facility. The two current exposure scenarios and parameters of exposure (e.g., inhalation and ingestion rates) have been developed to provide a conservative (i.e. health protective) estimate of potential exposure.

  16. Level 3 baseline risk evaluation for Building 3506 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golden, K.M.; Robers, S.K.; Cretella, F.M.

    1994-12-01

    This report presents the results of the Level 3 Baseline Risk Evaluation (BRE) performed on Building 3506 located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This BRE is intended to provide an analysis of the potential for adverse health effects (current or future) posed by contaminants at the facility. The decision was made to conduct a Level 3 (least rigorous) BRE because only residual contamination exists in the building. Future plans for the facility (demolition) also preclude a rigorous analysis. Site characterization activities for Building 3506 were conducted in fall of 1993. Concrete core samples were taken from the floors and walls of both the cell and the east gallery. These cores were analyzed for radionuclides and organic and inorganic chemicals. Smear samples and direct radiation measurements were also collected. Sediment exists on the floor of the cell and was also analyzed. To adequately characterize the risks posed by the facility, receptors for both current and potential future land uses were evaluated. For the current land use conditions, two receptors were evaluated. The first receptor is a hypothetical maintenance worker who spends 250 days (8 hours/day) for 25 years working in the facility. The remaining receptor evaluated is a hypothetical S and M worker who spends 2 days (8 hours/day) per year for 25 years working within the facility. This particular receptor best exemplifies the current worker scenario for the facility. The two current exposure scenarios and parameters of exposure (e.g., inhalation and ingestion rates) have been developed to provide a conservative (i.e. health protective) estimate of potential exposure

  17. Final deactivation project report on the Source Development Laboratory, building 3029, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the condition of Building 3029 after completion of deactivation activities as outlined by the DOE Nuclear Materials and Facility Stabilization Program (EM-60) guidance documentation. This report outlines the activities conducted to place the facility in a safe and environmentally sound condition for transfer to the DOE Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40). This report provides a history and profile of the facility prior to commencing deactivation activities and a profile of the building after completion of deactivation activities. Turnover items, such as the post-deactivation surveillance and maintenance (S ampersand M) plan, remaining hazardous materials, radiological controls, safeguards and security, quality assurance, facility operations, and supporting documentation provided in the EM-60 turnover package are discussed. Building 3029 will require access to facilitate required S ampersand M activities to maintain the building safety envelope. building 3029 was stabilized during deactivation so that when transferred to the EM-40 program, only a minimal S ampersand M effort would be required to maintain the building safety envelope. Other than the minimal S ampersand M activities, the building will be unoccupied and the exterior doors locked to prevent unauthorized access. The building will be entered only to perform the required S ampersand M. 5 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs

  18. Historic Context and Building Assessments for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Built Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ullrich, R. A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sullivan, M. A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2007-09-14

    This document was prepared to support u.s. Department of Energy / National Nuclear Security Agency (DOE/NNSA) compliance with Sections 106 and 110 of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA). Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is a DOE/NNSA laboratory and is engaged in determining the historic status of its properties at both its main site in Livermore, California, and Site 300, its test site located eleven miles from the main site. LLNL contracted with the authors via Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to prepare a historic context statement for properties at both sites and to provide assessments of those properties of potential historic interest. The report contains an extensive historic context statement and the assessments of individual properties and groups of properties determined, via criteria established in the context statement, to be of potential interest. The historic context statement addresses the four contexts within which LLNL falls: Local History, World War II History (WWII), Cold War History, and Post-Cold War History. Appropriate historic preservation themes relevant to LLNL's history are delineated within each context. In addition, thresholds are identified for historic significance within each of the contexts based on the explication and understanding of the Secretary of the Interior's Guidelines for determining eligibility for the National Register of Historic Places. The report identifies specific research areas and events in LLNL's history that are of interest and the portions of the built environment in which they occurred. Based on that discussion, properties of potential interest are identified and assessments of them are provided. Twenty individual buildings and three areas of potential historic interest were assessed. The final recommendation is that, of these, LLNL has five individual historic buildings, two sets of historic objects, and two historic districts eligible for the National Register. All are

  19. Building

    OpenAIRE

    Seavy, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    Building for concrete is temporary. The building of wood and steel stands against the concrete to give form and then gives way, leaving a trace of its existence behind. Concrete is not a building material. One does not build with concrete. One builds for concrete. MARCH

  20. Low-Level, Measured Response of Los Alamos National Laboratories TA 16 - Building 411 and TA 8 - Building 23 to Direct Flash Attachment of Lightning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinallo, Michael A.; Holmes, Parris; Merewether, Kimball O.; Morris, Marvin E.

    1999-01-01

    On September 24, 25, 28, and 29, 1998 and on October 19 and 23, 1998, transfer impedance measurements were made on Los Alamos National Laboratories TA 16 - Building 411 and TA 8-- Building 23 to characterize their interior open-circuit voltage response to a direct lightning flash attachment to the structures. The theory, history, measurement methods and equipment, and specific measured results are detailed. The measured results demonstrate that if the remaining metallic penetrations are bonded, then the rebar of the two structures is sufficiently well connected to form a Faraday cage that reduces the maximum open-circuit voltage inside the structure to a sufficiently low level that the required standoff distance to prevent arcing to explosive assemblies is 6.8 inches for TA 16 - Building 411 and is 11.5 inches for TA 8 - Building 23

  1. Biosafety and Biosecurity: A Relative Risk-Based Framework for Safer, More Secure, and Sustainable Laboratory Capacity Building.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickmann, Petra; Sheeley, Heather; Lightfoot, Nigel

    2015-01-01

    Laboratory capacity building is characterized by a paradox between endemicity and resources: countries with high endemicity of pathogenic agents often have low and intermittent resources (water, electricity) and capacities (laboratories, trained staff, adequate regulations). Meanwhile, countries with low endemicity of pathogenic agents often have high-containment facilities with costly infrastructure and maintenance governed by regulations. The common practice of exporting high biocontainment facilities and standards is not sustainable and concerns about biosafety and biosecurity require careful consideration. A group at Chatham House developed a draft conceptual framework for safer, more secure, and sustainable laboratory capacity building. The draft generic framework is guided by the phrase "LOCAL - PEOPLE - MAKE SENSE" that represents three major principles: capacity building according to local needs (local) with an emphasis on relationship and trust building (people) and continuous outcome and impact measurement (make sense). This draft generic framework can serve as a blueprint for international policy decision-making on improving biosafety and biosecurity in laboratory capacity building, but requires more testing and detailing development.

  2. Biosafety and Biosecurity: A relative risk-based framework for safer, more secure and sustainable laboratory capacity building

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra eDickmann

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Laboratory capacity building is characterized by a paradox between endemicity and resources: Countries with high endemicity of pathogenic agents often have low and intermittent resources (water, electricity and capacities (laboratories, trained staff, adequate regulations. Meanwhile, countries with low endemicity of pathogenic agents often have high containment facilities with costly infrastructure and maintenance governed by regulations. The common practice of exporting high biocontainment facilities and standards is not sustainable and concerns about biosafety and biosecurity require careful consideration. Methods: A group at Chatham House developed a draft conceptual framework for safer, more secure and sustainable laboratory capacity building. Results: The draft generic framework is guided by the phrase ‘LOCAL – PEOPLE – MAKE SENSE’ that represents three major principles: capacity building according to local needs (local with an emphasis on relationship and trust-building (people and continuous outcome and impact measurement (make sense. Conclusions: This draft generic framework can serve as a blueprint for international policy decision-making on improving biosafety and biosecurity in laboratory capacity building, but requires more testing and detailing development.

  3. Methods for training radiochemical technicians at ORNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parrott, J.R.; Nicol, R.G.

    1975-01-01

    The training of personnel to carry out radiochemical operations at ORNL is a formidable and recurrent task since repetitive, production-type operations are not involved, and programs are constantly shifting. It is essential that provisions be made for the routine retraining of personnel if they are to make effective contributions on a continuing basis. The present training methods have emerged as a result of thirty years experience in a variety of radiochemical pilot-plant programs. These programs have included operations performed in glove boxes, hot-cell manipulator work handling high-neutron-emitting isotopes, and the entire spectrum of remote solvent extraction operations. Present methods of training and the results obtained are summarized

  4. Automated radiochemical processing for clinical PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padgett, H.C.; Schmidt, D.G.; Bida, G.T.; Wieland, B.W.; Pekrul, E.; Kingsbury, W.G.

    1991-01-01

    With the recent emergence of positron emission tomography (PET) as a viable clinical tool, there is a need for a convenient, cost-effective source of the positron emitter-labeled radiotracers labeled with carbon-11, nitrogen-13, oxygen-15, and fluorine-18. These short-lived radioisotopes are accelerator produced and thus, require a cyclotron and radiochemistry processing instrumentation that can be operated 3 in a clinical environment by competant technicians. The basic goal is to ensure safety and reliability while setting new standards for economy and ease of operation. The Siemens Radioisotope Delivery System (RDS 112) is a fully automated system dedicated to the production and delivery of positron-emitter labeled precursors and radiochemicals required to support a clinical PET imaging program. Thus, the entire RDS can be thought of as an automated radiochemical processing apparatus

  5. Radiochemical Means of Investigating Delayed Neutron Precursors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marmol, P. del

    1968-01-01

    Fast radiochemical methods used now for the determination of delayed neutron precursors are classified and reviewed: precipitations, solvent extractions, range experiments, milking, gas sweeping, isotopic and ion exchange, hot atom reactions and diffusion loss. Advantages and limitations of irradiation systems with respect to fast separations are discussed: external beams which allow faster separations only have low neutron fluxes, internal beams which are mostly fit for gaseous reactions; and rabbits for solution irradiations. Future prospects of radiochemical procedures are presented; among these, studies should be mostly oriented towards gaseous reactions which offer possibilities of isolating very short-lived delayed neutron precursors. Chemical procedures for delayed neutron precursor detection are compared with mass spectrometric and isotope separator techniques; it is concluded that the methods are complementary. (author)

  6. Radiochemical Means of Investigating Delayed Neutron Precursors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marmol, P. del

    1968-01-01

    Fast radiochemical methods used now for the determination of delayed neutron precursors are classified and reviewed: precipitations, solvent extractions, range experiments, milking, gas sweeping, isotopic and ion exchange, hot-atom reactions and diffusion loss. Advantages and limitations of irradiation systems with respect to fast separations are discussed: external beams which allow faster separations only have low neutron fluxes, internal beams which are mostly fit for gaseous reactions; and rabbits for solution irradiations. Future prospects of radiochemical procedures are presented; among these, studies should be mostly oriented towards gaseous reactions which offer possibilities of isolating very short-lived delayed neutron precursors. Chemical procedures for delayed neutron precursor detection are compared with mass spectrometric and isotope-separator techniques; it is concluded that the methods are complementary. (author)

  7. Radiochemical analysis of the Bikini ashes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishibashi, M; Shigematsu, T; Ishida, T

    1954-01-01

    The following nuclides were detected in the Bikini ashes by radiochemical procedures: /sup 45/Ca, /sup 89/Sr, /sup 91/Y, /sup 95/Zr, /sup 103/Ru, /sup 144/Pr, and /sup 237/U. The ion-exchange method was used for analysis of contaminated rain water which fell on the Kyoto area on May 16, 1954 from which the presence of /sup 89/Sr, /sup 95/Zr, and /sup 140/Ba, was detected. Rare earths seemed also to be present.

  8. Imaging Scanner Usage in Radiochemical Purity Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norhafizah Othman; Yahaya Talib; Wan Hamirul Bahrin Wan Kamal

    2011-01-01

    Imaging Scanner model BIOSCAN AR-2000 has been used in the radiochemical purity test for the product of Mo-99/ Tc-99m generator. Result from this test was produced directly where the percentage of pertechnetate was calculated based on width peak area by thin layer chromatography. This paperwork will explain the function, procedure, calibration of the instrument and discussed the advantages compared to the previous method. (author)

  9. 14th radiochemical conference. Booklet of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-03-01

    The contributions dealt with the following topics: Radionuclides in the environment, radioecology; Nuclear analytical methods; Chemistry of actinide and trans-actinide elements; Ionizing radiation in science, technology, and arts and cultural heritage preservation; Production and application of radionuclides; Separation methods, speciation; Chemistry of nuclear fuel cycle, radiochemical problems in nuclear waste management; and Nuclear methods in medicine, radiopharmaceuticals, and radiodiagnostics, labelled compounds. Of the verbal and poster presentation, 192 have been input to INIS. (P.A.)

  10. Sandia National Laboratories, Tonopah Test Range Assembly Building 9B (Building 09-54): Photographs and Written Historical and Descriptive Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ullrich, Rebecca A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Corporate Archives and History Program

    2017-08-01

    Assembly Building 9B (Building 09-54) is a contributing element to the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Tonopah Test Range (TTR) Historic District. The SNL TTR Historic District played a significant role in U.S. Cold War history in the areas of stockpile surveillance and non-nuclear field testing of nuclear weapons designs. The district covers approximately 179,200 acres and illustrates Cold War development testing of nuclear weapons components and systems. This report includes historical information, architectural information, sources of information, project information, maps, blueprints, and photographs.

  11. RADCHEM - Radiochemical procedures for the determination of Sr, U, Pu, Am and Cm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sidhu, R. [Inst. for Energy Technology (Norway)

    2006-04-15

    An accurate determination of radionuclides from various sources in the environment is essential for assessment of the potential hazards and suitable countermeasures both in case of accidents, authorised release and routine surveillance. Reliable radiochemical separation and detection techniques are needed for accurate determination of alpha and beta emitters. Rapid analytical methods are needed in case of an accident for early decision-making. The objective of this project has been to compare and evaluate radiochemical procedures used at Nordic laboratories for the determination of strontium, uranium, plutonium, americium and curium. To gather detailed information on the procedures in use, a questionnaire regarding various aspects of radionuclide determination was developed and distributed to all (sixteen) relevant laboratories in the Nordic countries. The response and the procedures used by each laboratory were then discussed between those who answered the questionnaire. This report summaries the findings and gives recommendation on suitable practice. (au)

  12. RADCHEM - Radiochemical procedures for the determination of Sr, U, Pu, Am and Cm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidhu, R.

    2006-04-01

    An accurate determination of radionuclides from various sources in the environment is essential for assessment of the potential hazards and suitable countermeasures both in case of accidents, authorised release and routine surveillance. Reliable radiochemical separation and detection techniques are needed for accurate determination of alpha and beta emitters. Rapid analytical methods are needed in case of an accident for early decision-making. The objective of this project has been to compare and evaluate radiochemical procedures used at Nordic laboratories for the determination of strontium, uranium, plutonium, americium and curium. To gather detailed information on the procedures in use, a questionnaire regarding various aspects of radionuclide determination was developed and distributed to all (sixteen) relevant laboratories in the Nordic countries. The response and the procedures used by each laboratory were then discussed between those who answered the questionnaire. This report summaries the findings and gives recommendation on suitable practice. (au)

  13. An easy-to-build remote laboratory with data transfer using the Internet School Experimental System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schauer, Frantisek; Ozvoldova, Miroslava; Lustig, Frantisek; Dvorak, JirI

    2008-01-01

    The present state of information communication technology makes it possible to devise and run computer-based e-laboratories accessible to any user with a connection to the Internet, equipped with very simple technical means and making full use of web services. Thus, the way is open for a new strategy of physics education with strongly global features, based on experiment and experimentation. We name this strategy integrated e-learning, and remote experiments across the Internet are the foundation for this strategy. We present both pedagogical and technical reasoning for the remote experiments and outline a simple system based on a server-client approach, and on web services and Java applets. We give here an outline of the prospective remote laboratory system with data transfer using the Internet School Experimental System (ISES) as hardware and ISES WEB Control kit as software. This approach enables the simple construction of remote experiments without building any hardware and virtually no programming, using a paste and copy approach with typical prebuilt blocks such as a camera view, controls, graphs, displays, etc. We have set up and operate at present seven experiments, running round the clock, with more than 12 000 connections since 2005. The experiments are widely used in practical teaching of both university and secondary level physics. The recording of the detailed steps the experimentor takes during the measurement enables detailed study of the psychological aspects of running the experiments. The system is ready for a network of universities to start covering the basic set of physics experiments. In conclusion we summarize the results achieved and experiences of using remote experiments built on the ISES hardware system

  14. An easy-to-build remote laboratory with data transfer using the Internet School Experimental System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauer, František; Lustig, František; Dvořák, Jiří; Ožvoldová, Miroslava

    2008-07-01

    The present state of information communication technology makes it possible to devise and run computer-based e-laboratories accessible to any user with a connection to the Internet, equipped with very simple technical means and making full use of web services. Thus, the way is open for a new strategy of physics education with strongly global features, based on experiment and experimentation. We name this strategy integrated e-learning, and remote experiments across the Internet are the foundation for this strategy. We present both pedagogical and technical reasoning for the remote experiments and outline a simple system based on a server-client approach, and on web services and Java applets. We give here an outline of the prospective remote laboratory system with data transfer using the Internet School Experimental System (ISES) as hardware and ISES WEB Control kit as software. This approach enables the simple construction of remote experiments without building any hardware and virtually no programming, using a paste and copy approach with typical prebuilt blocks such as a camera view, controls, graphs, displays, etc. We have set up and operate at present seven experiments, running round the clock, with more than 12 000 connections since 2005. The experiments are widely used in practical teaching of both university and secondary level physics. The recording of the detailed steps the experimentor takes during the measurement enables detailed study of the psychological aspects of running the experiments. The system is ready for a network of universities to start covering the basic set of physics experiments. In conclusion we summarize the results achieved and experiences of using remote experiments built on the ISES hardware system.

  15. An easy-to-build remote laboratory with data transfer using the Internet School Experimental System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schauer, Frantisek; Ozvoldova, Miroslava [Trnava University, Faculty of Pedagogy, Department of Physics, Trnava (Slovakia); Lustig, Frantisek; Dvorak, JirI [Charles University, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Department of Didactics of Physics, Prague (Czech Republic)], E-mail: fschauer@ft.utb.cz

    2008-07-15

    The present state of information communication technology makes it possible to devise and run computer-based e-laboratories accessible to any user with a connection to the Internet, equipped with very simple technical means and making full use of web services. Thus, the way is open for a new strategy of physics education with strongly global features, based on experiment and experimentation. We name this strategy integrated e-learning, and remote experiments across the Internet are the foundation for this strategy. We present both pedagogical and technical reasoning for the remote experiments and outline a simple system based on a server-client approach, and on web services and Java applets. We give here an outline of the prospective remote laboratory system with data transfer using the Internet School Experimental System (ISES) as hardware and ISES WEB Control kit as software. This approach enables the simple construction of remote experiments without building any hardware and virtually no programming, using a paste and copy approach with typical prebuilt blocks such as a camera view, controls, graphs, displays, etc. We have set up and operate at present seven experiments, running round the clock, with more than 12 000 connections since 2005. The experiments are widely used in practical teaching of both university and secondary level physics. The recording of the detailed steps the experimentor takes during the measurement enables detailed study of the psychological aspects of running the experiments. The system is ready for a network of universities to start covering the basic set of physics experiments. In conclusion we summarize the results achieved and experiences of using remote experiments built on the ISES hardware system.

  16. Chemical surety material decontamination and decommissioning of Los Alamos National Laboratory Chemical Surety Material Laboratory area TA-3, building SM-29, room 4009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, T.E.; Smith, J.M.

    1994-04-01

    From 1982 through 1987, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) performed surety laboratory operations for the U.S. Army Medical Research and Development Command (MRDC). Room 4009 in building SM-29, TA-3, was used as the laboratory for work with the following chemical surety material (CSM) agents: sarin (GB), soman (GD), lewisite (L), and distilled mustard (HD) radio-labelled with H 3 or C 14 . The work was confined to three CSM-certified fume hoods, located in room 4009 (see diagram in Appendix C). The laboratory ceased all active operations during the late 1986 and early 1987 period. From 1987 until 1993 the laboratory was secured and the ventilation system continued to operate. During late 1992, the decision was made to utilize this laboratory space for other operations, thus a decision was made to dismantle and reconfigure this room. LANL sub-contracted Battelle Memorial Institute (BMI) to draw upon the CSM experience of the technical staff from the Hazardous Materials Research Facility (HMRF) to assist in developing a decontamination and decommissioning plan. BMI was subcontracted to devise a CSM safety training course, and a sampling and air monitoring plan for CSM material to ensure personnel safety during all disassembly operations. LANL subcontracted Johnson Controls personnel to perform all disassembly operations. Beginning in early 1993 BMI personnel from the HMRF visited the laboratory to develop both the safety plan and the sample and air monitoring plan. Execution of that plan began in September 1993 and was completed in January 1994

  17. Decontamination and decommissioning of the Argonne National Laboratory Building 350 Plutonium Fabrication Facility. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kline, W.H.; Moe, H.J.; Lahey, T.J.

    1985-02-01

    In 1973, Argonne National Laboratory began consolidating and upgrading its plutonium-handling operations with the result that the research fuel-fabrication facility located in Building 350 was shut down and declared surplus. Sixteen of the twenty-three gloveboxes which comprised the system were disassembled and relocated for reuse or placed into controlled storage during 1974 but, due to funding constraints, full-scale decommissioning did not start until 1978. Since that time the fourteen remaining contaminated gloveboxes, including all internal and external equipment as well as the associated ventilation systems, have been assayed for radioactive content, dismantled, size reduced to fit acceptable packaging and sent to a US Department of Energy (DOE) transuranic retrievable-storage site or to a DOE low-level nuclear waste burial ground. The project which was completed in 1983, required 5 years to accomplish, 32 man years of effort, produced some 540 m 3 (19,000 ft 3 ) of radioactive waste of which 60% was TRU, and cost 2.4 million dollars

  18. Building trust and confidence in laboratory ES and H policy and practices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graf, J.

    2000-08-01

    This report describes a successful pilot event among LANL employees that can see as a model for employee involvement and community input. The conference was designed to begin building trust and confidence in Laboratory policy and practices in the area of Environment, Safety, and Health (ES and H). It represents a concrete step toward fostering better relationships among Lab employees and creating a new, innovative approach to communication that can also be used to build trust in the larger community. Based on the proven methods of the National Issues Forums and the Jefferson Center Citizen Jury Process, this conference enabled management to learn more about the thoughts and advice of LANL employees, During the course of the day, a random sample of Lab employees representing the LANL workforce learned about issues of health, safety and the environment, and some of the options available to increase trustworthiness in these areas. These Employee Advisors then discussed the options at some length and presented recommendations to senior Lab managers in the role of Decision Makers. At the end of the day, the participants offered their reflections and discussed what they learned during the conference, and Decision Makers responded to what they heard. The most common view expressed by the Employee Advisors was that a bottom-up approach was necessary to develop more relevant ES and H policies. They were unanimous in their desire for more employee inclusion into the decision making process. All Employee Advisors were in support of a Lab wide survey to determine employee concerns about ES and H issues. After listening to the deliberation, the Decision Makers responded with several commitments. The most significant was the pledge to meet with Employee Advisors by the end of February to discuss the status of their recommendations on ES and H policy and practices. The ensuing follow-up meeting explored employee concerns in greater depth resulting in forward-looking action steps

  19. Diaphragms obtained by radiochemical grafting in PTFE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nenner, T.; Fahrasmane, A.

    1984-01-01

    Diaphragms for alkaline water electrolysis are prepared by radiochemical grafting of PTFE fabric with styrene, which is later on sulfonated, or with acrylic acid. The diaphragms obtained are mechanically resistant to potash at temperatures up to 200 0 C, but show some degrafting, which limits the lifetime. The sulfonated styrene group has been found to be more stable in electrolysis than the acrylic acid. In both cases, the incorporation of a cross-linking agent like divinyl benzene improves the lifetime of the diaphragms. Electrolysis during 500 hours at 120 0 C and 10 kAm 2 could be performed. (author)

  20. 13th Radiochemical Conference. Booklet of Abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-04-01

    The Conference included the following sessions: (i) Opening plenary presentations (6 contributions); (ii) Chemistry of natural radionuclides, discovery of radium and polonium (6 verbal presentations + 5 poster presentations); (iii) Radionuclides in the environment, radioecology (29 + 48); (iv) Activation analysis and other radioanalytical methods (36 + 49); (v) Ionizing radiation in science and technology (12 + 12); (vi) Chemistry of actinide and trans-actinide elements (11 + 14); (vii) Separation methods, speciation (18 + 41); (viii) Production and application of radionuclides (14 + 29); and (ix) Radiochemical problems in nuclear waste management (12 + 22). The majority of verbal presentations has been input to INIS, mostly in the form of the full authors` abstracts. (P.A.)

  1. 13th Radiochemical Conference. Booklet of Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-04-01

    The Conference included the following sessions: (i) Opening plenary presentations (6 contributions); (ii) Chemistry of natural radionuclides, discovery of radium and polonium (6 verbal presentations + 5 poster presentations); (iii) Radionuclides in the environment, radioecology (29 + 48); (iv) Activation analysis and other radioanalytical methods (36 + 49); (v) Ionizing radiation in science and technology (12 + 12); (vi) Chemistry of actinide and trans-actinide elements (11 + 14); (vii) Separation methods, speciation (18 + 41); (viii) Production and application of radionuclides (14 + 29); and (ix) Radiochemical problems in nuclear waste management (12 + 22). The majority of verbal presentations has been input to INIS, mostly in the form of the full authors' abstracts. (P.A.)

  2. Hanford radiochemical site decommissioning demonstration program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, D.C.

    1971-01-01

    A program is proposed for the innovation, development, and demonstration of technologies necessary to decommission the Hanford radiochemical plant area to the extent that the sites can have unrestricted public access. The five tasks selected for development and demonstration of restoration techniques were restoration of a burial ground, decommissioning of a separations plant, restoration of a separations plant waste interim storage tank farm, restoration of a liquid disposal area, and disposal of large contaminated equipment. Process development requirements are tabulated and discussed. A proposed schedule and estimated costs are given

  3. Site Characterization Plan for decontamination and decommissioning of Buildings 3506 and 3515 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    Buildings 3506, the Waste Evaporator Facility, and 3515, the Fission Product Pilot Plant, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), are scheduled for decontamination and decommissioning (D and D). This Site Characterization Plan (SCP) presents the strategy and techniques to be used to characterize Buildings 3506/3515 for the purpose of planning D and D activities. The elements of the site characterization for Buildings 3506/3515 are planning and preparation, field investigation, and characterization reporting. Other level of effort activities will include management and oversight, project controls, meetings, and progress reporting. The objective of the site characterization is to determine the nature and extent of radioactive and hazardous materials and other industrial hazards in and around the buildings. This information will be used in subsequent planning to develop a detailed approach for final decommissioning of the facilities: (1) to evaluate decommissioning alternatives and design the most cost-effective D and D approach; (2) to determine the level and type of protection necessary for D and D workers; and (3) to estimate the types and volumes of wastes generated during D and D activities. The current D and D characterization scope includes the entire building, including the foundation and equipment or materials within the building. To estimate potential worker exposure from the soil during D and D, some subfoundation soil sample collection is planned. Buildings 3506/3515 are located in the ORNL main plant area, to the west and east, respectively, of the South Tank Farm. Building 3506 was built in 1949 to house a liquid waste evaporator and was subsequently used for an incinerator experiment. Partial D and D was done prior to abandonment, and most equipment has been removed. Building 3515 was built in 1948 to house fission product separation equipment. In about 1960, all entrances were sealed with concrete block and mortar. Building 3515 is expected to be

  4. Corrective Action Decision Document, Area 15 Environmental Protection Agency Farm Laboratory Building, Corrective Action Unit No. 95, Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-08-18

    This report is the Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) for the Nevada Test Site (NTS) Area 15 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Farm, Laboratory Building (Corrective Action Unit [CAU] No. 95), at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. The scope of this CADD is to identify and evaluate potential corrective action alternatives for the decommissioning and decontamination (D and D) of the Laboratory Building, which were selected based on the results of investigative activities. Based on this evaluation, a preferred corrective action alternative is recommended. Studies were conducted at the EPA Farm from 1963 to 1981 to determine the animal intake and retention of radionuclides. The main building, the Laboratory Building, has approximately 370 square meters (4,000 square feet) of operational space. Other CAUS at the EPA Farm facility that will be investigated and/or remediated through other environmental restoration subprojects are not included in this CADD, with the exception of housekeeping sites. Associated structures that do not require classification as CAUS are considered in the evaluation of corrective action alternatives for CAU 95.

  5. Corrective Action Decision Document, Area 15 Environmental Protection Agency Farm Laboratory Building, Corrective Action Unit No. 95, Revision 0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    This report is the Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) for the Nevada Test Site (NTS) Area 15 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Farm, Laboratory Building (Corrective Action Unit [CAU] No. 95), at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. The scope of this CADD is to identify and evaluate potential corrective action alternatives for the decommissioning and decontamination (D and D) of the Laboratory Building, which were selected based on the results of investigative activities. Based on this evaluation, a preferred corrective action alternative is recommended. Studies were conducted at the EPA Farm from 1963 to 1981 to determine the animal intake and retention of radionuclides. The main building, the Laboratory Building, has approximately 370 square meters (4,000 square feet) of operational space. Other CAUS at the EPA Farm facility that will be investigated and/or remediated through other environmental restoration subprojects are not included in this CADD, with the exception of housekeeping sites. Associated structures that do not require classification as CAUS are considered in the evaluation of corrective action alternatives for CAU 95

  6. Analysis of accidents at the LPR (Radiochemical Processes Laboratory)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaufmann, F.; Boutet, L.I.

    1987-01-01

    Accidents are defined as not planned events that may result in the emission of significative quantities of radioactive materials to the environment. The pilot plant has been specifically designed to prevent this type of accidents but there still exists the possibility that one or more accidents can be produced during the plant life. In a first phase, the emission of radionuclides to the environment were evaluated for 13 credible accidents. In a second phase, by means of the calculation program SEDA, specially adapted to this purpose, the critical doses of critical group were calculated for each accident. Due to the small capacity of the pilot plant and the long cooling period of treated fuel, it is concluded that the radiological consequences for the external environment are of very small magnitude. In this way, without need of developing complex fault- or event-trees, it is shown that any of the accidents falls into the non acceptable zone of Farmer diagram. (Author)

  7. Radiochemical analyses of several spent fuel Approved Testing Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenther, R.J.; Blahnik, D.E.; Wildung, N.J.

    1994-09-01

    Radiochemical characterization data are described for UO 2 and UO 2 plus 3 wt% Gd 2 O 3 commercial spent nuclear fuel taken from a series of Approved Testing Materials (ATMs). These full-length nuclear fuel rods include MLA091 of ATM-103, MKP070 of ATM-104, NBD095 and NBD131 of ATM-106, and ADN0206 of ATM-108. ATMs 103, 104, and 106 were all irradiated in the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant (Reactor No.1), a pressurized-water reactor that used fuel fabricated by Combustion Engineering. ATM-108 was part of the same fuel bundle designed as ATM-105 and came from boiling-water reactor fuel fabricated by General Electric and irradiated in the Cooper Nuclear Power Plant. Rod average burnups and expected fission gas releases ranged from 2,400 to 3,700 GJ/kgM. (25 to 40 Mwd/kgM) and from less than 1% to greater than 10%, respectively, depending on the specific ATM. The radiochemical analyses included uranium and plutonium isotopes in the fuel, selected fission products in the fuel, fuel burnup, cesium and iodine on the inner surfaces of the cladding, 14 C in the fuel and cladding, and analyses of the gases released to the rod plenum. Supporting examinations such as fuel rod design and material descriptions, power histories, and gamma scans used for sectioning diagrams are also included. These ATMs were examined as part of the Materials Characterization Center Program conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory provide a source of well-characterized spent fuel for testing in support of the US Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program

  8. Building laboratory capacity to support HIV care in Nigeria: Harvard/APIN PEPFAR, 2004–2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamel, Donald J.; Sankalé, Jean-Louis; Samuels, Jay Osi; Sarr, Abdoulaye D.; Chaplin, Beth; Ofuche, Eke; Meloni, Seema T.; Okonkwo, Prosper; Kanki, Phyllis J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction From 2004–2012, the Harvard/AIDS Prevention Initiative in Nigeria, funded through the US President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief programme, scaled up HIV care and treatment services in Nigeria. We describe the methodologies and collaborative processes developed to improve laboratory capacity significantly in a resource-limited setting. These methods were implemented at 35 clinic and laboratory locations. Methods Systems were established and modified to optimise numerous laboratory processes. These included strategies for clinic selection and management, equipment and reagent procurement, supply chains, laboratory renovations, equipment maintenance, electronic data management, quality development programmes and trainings. Results Over the eight-year programme, laboratories supported 160 000 patients receiving HIV care in Nigeria, delivering over 2.5 million test results, including regular viral load quantitation. External quality assurance systems were established for CD4+ cell count enumeration, blood chemistries and viral load monitoring. Laboratory equipment platforms were improved and standardised and use of point-of-care analysers was expanded. Laboratory training workshops supported laboratories toward increasing staff skills and improving overall quality. Participation in a World Health Organisation-led African laboratory quality improvement system resulted in significant gains in quality measures at five laboratories. Conclusions Targeted implementation of laboratory development processes, during simultaneous scale-up of HIV treatment programmes in a resource-limited setting, can elicit meaningful gains in laboratory quality and capacity. Systems to improve the physical laboratory environment, develop laboratory staff, create improvements to reduce costs and increase quality are available for future health and laboratory strengthening programmes. We hope that the strategies employed may inform and encourage the development of other

  9. Building laboratory capacity to support HIV care in Nigeria: Harvard/APIN PEPFAR, 2004-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamel, Donald J; Sankalé, Jean-Louis; Samuels, Jay Osi; Sarr, Abdoulaye D; Chaplin, Beth; Ofuche, Eke; Meloni, Seema T; Okonkwo, Prosper; Kanki, Phyllis J

    From 2004-2012, the Harvard/AIDS Prevention Initiative in Nigeria, funded through the US President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief programme, scaled up HIV care and treatment services in Nigeria. We describe the methodologies and collaborative processes developed to improve laboratory capacity significantly in a resource-limited setting. These methods were implemented at 35 clinic and laboratory locations. Systems were established and modified to optimise numerous laboratory processes. These included strategies for clinic selection and management, equipment and reagent procurement, supply chains, laboratory renovations, equipment maintenance, electronic data management, quality development programmes and trainings. Over the eight-year programme, laboratories supported 160 000 patients receiving HIV care in Nigeria, delivering over 2.5 million test results, including regular viral load quantitation. External quality assurance systems were established for CD4+ cell count enumeration, blood chemistries and viral load monitoring. Laboratory equipment platforms were improved and standardised and use of point-of-care analysers was expanded. Laboratory training workshops supported laboratories toward increasing staff skills and improving overall quality. Participation in a World Health Organisation-led African laboratory quality improvement system resulted in significant gains in quality measures at five laboratories. Targeted implementation of laboratory development processes, during simultaneous scale-up of HIV treatment programmes in a resource-limited setting, can elicit meaningful gains in laboratory quality and capacity. Systems to improve the physical laboratory environment, develop laboratory staff, create improvements to reduce costs and increase quality are available for future health and laboratory strengthening programmes. We hope that the strategies employed may inform and encourage the development of other laboratories in resource-limited settings.

  10. Building laboratory capacity to support HIV care in Nigeria: Harvard/APIN PEPFAR, 2004–2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald J. Hamel

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: From 2004–2012, the Harvard/AIDS Prevention Initiative in Nigeria, funded through the US President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief programme, scaled up HIV care and treatment services in Nigeria. We describe the methodologies and collaborative processes developed to improve laboratory capacity significantly in a resource-limited setting. These methods were implemented at 35 clinic and laboratory locations. Methods: Systems were established and modified to optimise numerous laboratory processes. These included strategies for clinic selection and management, equipment and reagent procurement, supply chains, laboratory renovations, equipment maintenance, electronic data management, quality development programmes and trainings. Results: Over the eight-year programme, laboratories supported 160 000 patients receiving HIV care in Nigeria, delivering over 2.5 million test results, including regular viral load quantitation. External quality assurance systems were established for CD4+ cell count enumeration, blood chemistries and viral load monitoring. Laboratory equipment platforms were improved and standardised and use of point-of-care analysers was expanded. Laboratory training workshops supported laboratories toward increasing staff skills and improving overall quality. Participation in a World Health Organisation-led African laboratory quality improvement system resulted in significant gains in quality measures at five laboratories. Conclusions: Targeted implementation of laboratory development processes, during simultaneous scale-up of HIV treatment programmes in a resource-limited setting, can elicit meaningful gains in laboratory quality and capacity. Systems to improve the physical laboratory environment, develop laboratory staff, create improvements to reduce costs and increase quality are available for future health and laboratory strengthening programmes. We hope that the strategies employed may inform

  11. Statistical processing of technological and radiochemical data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahodova, Zdena; Vonkova, Kateřina

    2011-01-01

    The project described in this article had two goals. The main goal was to compare technological and radiochemical data from two units of nuclear power plant. The other goal was to check the collection, organization and interpretation of routinely measured data. Monitoring of analytical and radiochemical data is a very valuable source of knowledge for some processes in the primary circuit. Exploratory analysis of one-dimensional data was performed to estimate location and variability and to find extreme values, data trends, distribution, autocorrelation etc. This process allowed for the cleaning and completion of raw data. Then multiple analyses such as multiple comparisons, multiple correlation, variance analysis, and so on were performed. Measured data was organized into a data matrix. The results and graphs such as Box plots, Mahalanobis distance, Biplot, Correlation, and Trend graphs are presented in this article as statistical analysis tools. Tables of data were replaced with graphs because graphs condense large amounts of information into easy-to-understand formats. The significant conclusion of this work is that the collection and comprehension of data is a very substantial part of statistical processing. With well-prepared and well-understood data, its accurate evaluation is possible. Cooperation between the technicians who collect data and the statistician who processes it is also very important. (author)

  12. Chemical surety material decontamination and decommissioning of Los Alamos National Laboratory Chemical Surety Material Laboratory area TA-3, building SM-29, room 4009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, T.E.; Smith, J.M.

    1994-04-01

    From 1982 through 1987, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) performed surety laboratory operations for the U.S. Army Medical Research and Development Command (MRDC). Room 4009 in building SM-29, TA-3, was used as the laboratory for work with the following chemical surety material (CSM) agents: sarin (GB), soman (GD), lewisite (L), and distilled mustard (HD) radio-labelled with H{sup 3} or C{sup 14}. The work was confined to three CSM-certified fume hoods, located in room 4009 (see diagram in Appendix C). The laboratory ceased all active operations during the late 1986 and early 1987 period. From 1987 until 1993 the laboratory was secured and the ventilation system continued to operate. During late 1992, the decision was made to utilize this laboratory space for other operations, thus a decision was made to dismantle and reconfigure this room. LANL sub-contracted Battelle Memorial Institute (BMI) to draw upon the CSM experience of the technical staff from the Hazardous Materials Research Facility (HMRF) to assist in developing a decontamination and decommissioning plan. BMI was subcontracted to devise a CSM safety training course, and a sampling and air monitoring plan for CSM material to ensure personnel safety during all disassembly operations. LANL subcontracted Johnson Controls personnel to perform all disassembly operations. Beginning in early 1993 BMI personnel from the HMRF visited the laboratory to develop both the safety plan and the sample and air monitoring plan. Execution of that plan began in September 1993 and was completed in January 1994.

  13. Alternatives evaluation for the decontamination and decommissioning of buildings 3506 and 3515 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This is an alternative evaluation document that records the evaluation process and justification for choosing the alternative recommended for the decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D) of the 3506 and 3515 buildings at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The alternatives for the D ampersand D of the two buildings were: (1) no action (continued surveillance and maintenance), (2) decontamination for free release, (3) entombment in place, (4) partial dismantlement, and (5) complete dismantlement. Soil remediation is not included in any of the alternatives. The recommended alternative for the D ampersand D of Building 3506 is partial dismantlement at an estimated cost of $936, 000 in escalated dollars. The cost estimate for complete dismantlement is $1,384,000. The recommended alternative for the D ampersand D of Building 3515 is complete dismantlement at an estimated cost of $3,733,000 in escalated dollars. This alternative is recommended, because the soils below the foundation of the 3515 building are highly contaminated, and removing the foundation in the D ampersand D project results in lower overall worker risk, costs, and improved post-D ampersand D site conditions. A further recommendation is to revise these cost estimates after the conclusion of the ongoing characterization study. The results of the characterization of the two buildings is expected to change some of the assumptions and resolve some of the uncertainties in the development of these estimates

  14. Decontamination and decommissioning of the SPERT-I Reactor Building at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolenc, M.R.

    1986-02-01

    This final report documents the decontamination and decommissioning of the SPERT-I Reactor Building. This 20- by 40-ft galvanized steel building was dismantled; and the resultant contaminated sludge, liquid, and carbon steel were disposed of at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. This report presents the results of the characterization, decision analysis, planning, and decommissioning of the facility. The total cost of these activities was $139,500. Of this total, $103,500 was required for decommissioning operations. (This latter figure represents a 20% savings over the estimated costs generated during the planning effort.) The objectives of decommissioning this facility were to stabilize the seepage pit area and remove the reactor building. The D and D work was divided into two parts; the seepage pit was decommissioned in 1984, and the reactor building in 1985. The entire area was backfilled with radiologically clean soil, graded, and seeded. Two markers were installed to identify the locations of the pit and reactor building. The only isotopes found in either decommissioning operation were cesium-137 and uranium-235 in very low concentrations. Decommissioning operations of the reactor building were carried out during August 1985. The project generate 297 ft 3 of radioactive waste. No personnel radiation exposure above background was received by D and D workers

  15. Environmental assessment for the proposed CMR Building upgrades at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico. Final document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    In order to maintain its ability to continue to conduct uninterrupted radioactive and metallurgical research in a safe, secure, and environmentally sound manner, the US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to upgrade the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Chemistry and Metallurgy Research (CMR) Building. The building was built in the early 1950s to provide a research and experimental facility for analytical chemistry, plutonium and uranium chemistry, and metallurgy. Today, research and development activities are performed involving nuclear materials. A variety of radioactive and chemical hazards are present. The CMR Building is nearing the end of its original design life and does not meet many of today's design codes and standards. The Proposed Action for this Environmental Assessment (EA) includes structural modifications to some portions of the CMR Building which do not meet current seismic criteria for a Hazard Category 2 Facility. Also included are upgrades and improvements in building ventilation, communications, monitoring, and fire protection systems. This EA analyzes the environmental effects of construction of the proposed upgrades. The Proposed Action will have no adverse effects upon agricultural and cultural resources, wetlands and floodplains, endangered and threatened species, recreational resources, or water resources. The Proposed Action would have negligible effects on human health and transportation, and would not pose a disproportionate adverse health or environmental impact on minority or low-income populations within an 80 kilometer (50 mile) radius of the CMR Building

  16. Environmental assessment for the proposed CMR Building upgrades at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico. Final document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-02-04

    In order to maintain its ability to continue to conduct uninterrupted radioactive and metallurgical research in a safe, secure, and environmentally sound manner, the US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to upgrade the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Chemistry and Metallurgy Research (CMR) Building. The building was built in the early 1950s to provide a research and experimental facility for analytical chemistry, plutonium and uranium chemistry, and metallurgy. Today, research and development activities are performed involving nuclear materials. A variety of radioactive and chemical hazards are present. The CMR Building is nearing the end of its original design life and does not meet many of today`s design codes and standards. The Proposed Action for this Environmental Assessment (EA) includes structural modifications to some portions of the CMR Building which do not meet current seismic criteria for a Hazard Category 2 Facility. Also included are upgrades and improvements in building ventilation, communications, monitoring, and fire protection systems. This EA analyzes the environmental effects of construction of the proposed upgrades. The Proposed Action will have no adverse effects upon agricultural and cultural resources, wetlands and floodplains, endangered and threatened species, recreational resources, or water resources. The Proposed Action would have negligible effects on human health and transportation, and would not pose a disproportionate adverse health or environmental impact on minority or low-income populations within an 80 kilometer (50 mile) radius of the CMR Building.

  17. Decontamination of concrete surfaces in Building 3019, Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parrott, J.R. Sr.

    1980-01-01

    This building was built in 1943 to serve as a pilot plant for separating isotopes from irradiated fuels. A chemical explosion leading to widespread Pu contamination occurred on Nov. 20, 1959, and the steps taken to treat the building afterwards are discussed, in particular the floor and the cells. The experience shows how hard it is to decontaminate concrete; smooth coatings should be utilized

  18. Site characterization report for Building 3515 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    Building 3515 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), also known as the Fission Product Pilot Plant, is a surplus facility in the main plant area to the east of the South Tank Farm slated for decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D). The building consists of two concrete cells (north and south) on a concrete pad and was used to extract radioisotopes of ruthenium, strontium, cesium, cerium, rhenium and other elements from aqueous fission product waste. Site characterization activities of the building were initiated. The objective of the site characterization was to provide information necessary for engineering evaluation and planning of D ampersand D approaches, planning for personal protection of D ampersand D workers, and estimating waste volumes from D ampersand D activities. This site characterization report documents the investigation with a site description, a summary of characterization methods, chemical and radiological sample analysis results, field measurement results, and waste volume estimates

  19. Building Design Guidelines of Interior Architecture for Bio safety Levels of Biology Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElDib, A.A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the pivotal role of the Interior Architecture As one of the scientific disciplines minute to complete the Architectural Sciences, which relied upon the achievement and development of facilities containing scientific research laboratories, in terms of planning and design, particularly those containing biological laboratories using radioactive materials, adding to that, the application of the materials or raw materials commensurate with each discipline of laboratory and its work nature, and by the discussion the processing of design techniques and requirements of interior architecture dealing with Research Laboratory for electronic circuits an their applications with the making of its prototypes

  20. Mixing and sampling tests for Radiochemical Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehinger, M.N.; Marfin, H.R.; Hunt, B.

    1999-01-01

    The paper describes results and test procedures used to evaluate uncertainly and basis effects introduced by the sampler systems of a radiochemical plant, and similar parameters associated with mixing. This report will concentrate on experiences at the Barnwell Nuclear Fuels Plant. Mixing and sampling tests can be conducted to establish the statistical parameters for those activities related to overall measurement uncertainties. Density measurements by state-of-the art, commercially availability equipment is the key to conducting those tests. Experience in the U.S. suggests the statistical contribution of mixing and sampling can be controlled to less than 0.01 % and with new equipment and new tests in operating facilities might be controlled to better accuracy [ru

  1. Radiochemical Analysis Methodology for uranium Depletion Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scatena-Wachel DE

    2007-01-09

    This report provides sufficient material for a test sponsor with little or no radiochemistry background to understand and follow physics irradiation test program execution. Most irradiation test programs employ similar techniques and the general details provided here can be applied to the analysis of other irradiated sample types. Aspects of program management directly affecting analysis quality are also provided. This report is not an in-depth treatise on the vast field of radiochemical analysis techniques and related topics such as quality control. Instrumental technology is a very fast growing field and dramatic improvements are made each year, thus the instrumentation described in this report is no longer cutting edge technology. Much of the background material is still applicable and useful for the analysis of older experiments and also for subcontractors who still retain the older instrumentation.

  2. A Place for Materials Science: Laboratory Buildings and Interdisciplinary Research at the University of Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyungsub; Shields, Brit

    2015-01-01

    The Laboratory for Research on the Structure of Matter (LRSM), University of Pennsylvania, was built in 1965 as part of the Advanced Research Projects Agency's (ARPA) Interdisciplinary Laboratories (IDL) program intended to foster interdisciplinary research and training in materials science. The process that led to the construction of the…

  3. Rapid radiochemical separation of short-lived radionuclides in neutron-activated samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fardy, J.

    1985-11-01

    Radiochemical separation procedures based on the removal of metal ions by columns of C 18 -bonded silica gel after selective complexation are examined and the simplicity of the method demonstrated by its application to determination of Mn, Cu and Zn in neutron-activated biological material from the following solutions (pH 0-10, sulphate concentration 0,18M and 1,44M SO 4 ): 8-hydroxyquinoline (oxine), ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (APDC), cupferron (CUP), 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol (PAN), 1-(2'-thiazolylazo)-2-naphthol (TAN), 4-(2-pyridylazo) resorcinol (PAR), diethylammonium diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC), potassium ethyl xanthate (PEX), acetylacetone (AcAc) or thenoyltrifluoracetone (TTA). The method is rapid and reliable and readily adaptable in all radiochemical laboratories

  4. Highlighting High Performance: National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Thermal Test Facility, Golden, Colorado. Office of Building Technology State and Community Programs (BTS) Brochure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgert, S.

    2001-01-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Thermal Test Facility in Golden, Colorado, was designed using a whole-building approach-looking at the way the building's systems worked together most efficiently. Researchers monitor the performance of the 11,000-square-foot building, which boasts an energy cost savings of 63% for heating, cooling, and lighting. The basic plan of the building can be adapted to many needs, including retail and warehouse space. The Thermal Test Facility contains office and laboratory space; research focuses on the development of energy-efficiency and renewable energy technologies that are cost-effective and environmentally friendly

  5. Level III baseline risk evaluation for Building 3505 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mostella, W.B. Jr.

    1994-12-01

    The Level III Baseline Risk Evaluation (BRE) for Building 3505, the ORNL Metal Recovery Facility, provides an analysis of the potential for adverse health effects, current or future, associated with the presence of hazardous substances in the building. The Metal Recovery Facility was used from 1952 through 1960 to process large quantities of radioactive material using the PUREX process for the recovery of uranium-238, plutonium-239, neptunium-237, and americium-241. The facility consists of seven process cells (A through G), a canal, a dissolver room, a dissolver pit, an office, locker room, storage area, control room, electrical gallery, shop, and makeup area. The cells were used to house the nuclear fuel reprocessing equipment, and the canal was constructed to be used as a water-shielded transfer canal. Currently, there are no known releases of radioactive contaminants from Building 3505. To perform the BRE, historical radiological survey data were used to estimate the concentration of alpha- and beta/gamma emitting radionuclides in the various cells, rooms, and other areas in Building 3505. Data from smear surveys were used to estimate the amount of transferable contamination (to which receptors can be exposed via inhalation and ingestion), and data from probe surveys were used to estimate the amount of both fixed and transferable contamination (from which receptors can receive external exposure). Two land use scenarios, current and future, and their subsequent exposure scenarios were explored in the BRE. Under the current land use scenario, two exposure scenarios were evaluated. The first was a worst-case industrial exposure scenario in which the receptor is a maintenance worker who works 8 hours/day, 350 days/year in the building for 25 years. In the second, more realistic exposure scenario, the receptor is a surveillance and maintenance (S ampersand M) worker who spends two 8-hour days/year in the building for 25 years

  6. Waste treatment at the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunson, R.R.; Bond, W.D.; Chattin, F.R.; Collins, R.T.; Sullivan, G.R.; Wiles, R.H.

    1997-01-01

    At the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC) irradiated targets are processed for the recovery of valuable radioisotopes, principally transuranium nuclides. A system was recently installed for treating the various liquid alkaline waste streams for removal of excess radioactive contaminants at the REDC. Radionuclides that are removed will be stored as solids and thus the future discharge of radionuclides to liquid low level waste tank storage will be greatly reduced. The treatment system is of modular design and is installed in a hot cell (Cubicle 7) in Building 7920 at the REDC where preliminary testing is in progress. The module incorporates the following: (1) a resorcinol-formaldehyde resin column for Cs removal, (2) a cross flow filtration unit for removal of rare earths and actinides as hydroxide, and (3) a waste solidification unit. Process flowsheets for operation of the module, key features of the module design, and its computer-assisted control system are presented. Good operability of the cross flow filter system is mandatory to the successful treatment of REDC wastes. Results of tests to date on the operation of the filter in its slurry collection mode and its slurry washing mode are presented. These tests include the effects of entrained organic solvent in the waste stream feed to the filter

  7. Building Transnational Bodies: Norway and the International Development of Laboratory Animal Science, ca. 1956–1980

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druglitrø, Tone; Kirk, Robert G. W.

    2015-01-01

    Argument This article adopts a historical perspective to examine the development of Laboratory Animal Science and Medicine, an auxiliary field which formed to facilitate the work of the biomedical sciences by systematically improving laboratory animal production, provision, and maintenance in the post Second World War period. We investigate how Laboratory Animal Science and Medicine co-developed at the local level (responding to national needs and concerns) yet was simultaneously transnational in orientation (responding to the scientific need that knowledge, practices, objects and animals circulate freely). Adapting the work of Tsing (2004), we argue that national differences provided the creative “friction” that helped drive the formation of Laboratory Animal Science and Medicine as a transnational endeavor. Our analysis engages with the themes of this special issue by focusing on the development of Laboratory Animal Science and Medicine in Norway, which both informed wider transnational developments and was formed by them. We show that Laboratory Animal Science and Medicine can only be properly understood from a spatial perspective; whilst it developed and was structured through national “centers,” its orientation was transnational necessitating international networks through which knowledge, practice, technologies, and animals circulated. More and better laboratory animals are today required than ever before, and this demand will continue to rise if it is to keep pace with the quickening tempo of biological and veterinary research. The provision of this living experimental material is no longer a local problem; local, that is, to the research institute. It has become a national concern, and, in some of its aspects . . . even international. (William Lane-Petter 1957, 240) PMID:24941794

  8. Environmental Assessment for the proposed Induction Linac System Experiments in Building 51B at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-08-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), (DOE/EA-1087) evaluating the proposed action to modify existing Building 51B at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to install and conduct experiments on a new Induction Linear Accelerator System. LBNL is located in Berkeley, California and operated by the University of California (UC). The project consists of placing a pre-fabricated building inside Building 51B to house a new 10 MeV heavy ion linear accelerator. A control room and other support areas would be provided within and directly adjacent to Building 51B. The accelerator system would be used to conduct tests, at reduced scale and cost, many features of a heavy-ion accelerator driver for the Department of Energy's inertial fusion energy program. Based upon information and analyses in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969. Therefore, an Environmental Impact Statement is not required. This report contains the Environmental Assessment, as well as the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI)

  9. Final deactivation project report on the Integrated Process Demonstration Facility, Building 7602 Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the condition of the Integrated Process Demonstration Facility (Building 7602) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) after completion of deactivation activities by the High Ranking Facilities Deactivation Project (HRFDP). This report identifies the activities conducted to place the facility in a safe and environmentally sound condition prior to transfer to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration EM-40 Program. This report provides a history and description of the facility prior to commencing deactivation activities and documents the condition of the building after completion of all deactivation activities. Turnover items, such as the Post-Deactivation Surveillance and Maintenance (S ampersand M) Plan, remaining hazardous and radioactive materials inventory, radiological controls, Safeguards and Security, and supporting documentation provided in the Office of Nuclear Material and Facility Stabilization Program (EM-60) Turnover package are discussed

  10. Laboratory study of the PCB transport from primary sources to building materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    The sorption of airborne polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) by twenty building materials and their subsequent re-emission (desorption) from concrete were investigated using two 53-L environmental chambers connected in series with a field-collected caulk in the source chamber servin...

  11. Characterization report for Buildings 3706 and 37006A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.S.

    1997-06-01

    The 3706 and 3706A Buildings were originally constructed to perform small-scale experiments in support of all Hanford Engineering Works production activities. The primary focus was to perform radiochemical trials aimed at improving the bismuth phosphate process. The facility housed 19 offices, 2 shops, a dark room, 2 storerooms, a lunchroom, locker room, ventilating equipment room, sanitary restrooms, and 57 laboratories, including a special laboratory with 0.6-m-(2-ft) thick concrete walls reserved for the hottest analytical work. The 3706 Building was decontaminated and remodeled in 1954 and 1955, and many of the laboratories were converted to offices at that time. By 1964, the facility was called the General Services Building, and although it still contained some analytical laboratories, the majority of the space was devoted to mail, duplicating, photographic, and drafting services; a first aid station, and the 300 Area Hanford Patrol headquarters. All laboratory work was eventually phased out by the end of the 1980's. The primary objective of the characterization activities described in this report is to properly designate the building debris waste in preparation for demolition of the building and disposal at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility Waste. The scope of services for this characterization project included the following tasks: historical records review; facility inspection; radiological surveys; data quality objective; sampling and analysis instruction; field sampling and laboratory analysis; preparation of this characterization report

  12. Confirmatory radiological survey of the BORAX-V turbine building Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, G.H.; Coleman, R.L.; Jensen, M.K.; Pierce, G.A.; Egidi, P.V.; Mather, S.K.

    1993-01-01

    An independent assessment of the remediation of the BORAX-V (Boiling Water Reactor Experiment) turbine building at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Idaho Falls, Idaho, was accomplished by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Pollutant Assessments Group (ORNL/PAG). The purpose of the assessment was to confirm the site's compliance with applicable Department of Energy guidelines. The assessment included reviews of both the decontamination and decommissioning Plan and data provided from the pre- and post-remedial action surveys and an independent verification survey of the facility. The independent verification survey included determination of background exposure rates and soil concentrations, beta-gamma and gamma radiation scans, smears for detection of removable contamination, and direct measurements for alpha and beta-gamma radiation activity on the basement and mezzanine floors and the building's interior and exterior walls. Soil samples were taken, and beta-gamma and gamma radiation exposure rates were measured on areas adjacent to the building. Results of measurements on building surfaces at this facility were within established contamination guidelines except for elevated beta-gamma radiation levels located on three isolated areas of the basement floor. Following remediation of these areas, ORNL/PAG reviewed the remedial action contractor's report and agreed that remediation was effective in removing the source of the elevated direct radiation. Results of all independent soil analyses for 60 Co were below the detection limit. The highest 137 Cs analysis result was 4.6 pCi/g; this value is below the INEL site-specific guideline of 10 pCi/g

  13. Sandia National Laboratories, Tonopah Test Range Fire Control Bunker (Building 09-51): Photographs and Written Historical and Descriptive Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ullrich, Rebecca A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Corporate Archives and History Program

    2017-08-01

    The Fire Control Bunker (Building 09-51) is a contributing element to the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Tonopah Test Range (TTR) Historic District. The SNL TTR Historic District played a significant role in U.S. Cold War history in the areas of stockpile surveillance and non-nuclear field testing of nuclear weapons design. The district covers approximately 179,200 acres and illustrates Cold War development testing of nuclear weapons components and systems. This report includes historical information, architectural information, sources of information, project information, maps, blueprints, and photographs.

  14. Analysis of environmental contamination resulting from catastrophic incidents: part 1. Building and sustaining capacity in laboratory networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnuson, Matthew; Ernst, Hiba; Griggs, John; Fitz-James, Schatzi; Mapp, Latisha; Mullins, Marissa; Nichols, Tonya; Shah, Sanjiv; Smith, Terry; Hedrick, Elizabeth

    2014-11-01

    Catastrophic incidents, such as natural disasters, terrorist attacks, and industrial accidents, can occur suddenly and have high impact. However, they often occur at such a low frequency and in unpredictable locations that planning for the management of the consequences of a catastrophe can be difficult. For those catastrophes that result in the release of contaminants, the ability to analyze environmental samples is critical and contributes to the resilience of affected communities. Analyses of environmental samples are needed to make appropriate decisions about the course of action to restore the area affected by the contamination. Environmental samples range from soil, water, and air to vegetation, building materials, and debris. In addition, processes used to decontaminate any of these matrices may also generate wastewater and other materials that require analyses to determine the best course for proper disposal. This paper summarizes activities and programs the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) has implemented to ensure capability and capacity for the analysis of contaminated environmental samples following catastrophic incidents. USEPA's focus has been on building capability for a wide variety of contaminant classes and on ensuring national laboratory capacity for potential surges in the numbers of samples that could quickly exhaust the resources of local communities. USEPA's efforts have been designed to ensure a strong and resilient laboratory infrastructure in the United States to support communities as they respond to contamination incidents of any magnitude. The efforts include not only addressing technical issues related to the best-available methods for chemical, biological, and radiological contaminants, but also include addressing the challenges of coordination and administration of an efficient and effective response. Laboratory networks designed for responding to large scale contamination incidents can be sustained by applying

  15. Humidity requirements in WSCF Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, R.A.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop and document a position on Relative Humidity (RH) requirements in the WSCF Laboratories. A current survey of equipment vendors for Organic, Inorganic and Radiochemical laboratories indicate that 25% - 80% relative humidity may meet the environmental requirements for safe operation and protection of all the laboratory equipment

  16. Area balance method for calculation of air interchange in fire-resesistance testing laboratory for building products and constructions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sargsyan Samvel Volodyaevich

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Fire-resistance testing laboratory for building products and constructions is a production room with a substantial excess heat (over 23 W/m . Significant sources of heat inside the aforementioned laboratory are firing furnace, designed to simulate high temperature effects on structures and products of various types in case of fire development. The excess heat production in the laboratory during the tests is due to firing furnaces. The laboratory room is considered as an object consisting of two control volumes (CV, in each of which there may be air intake and air removal, pollutant absorption or emission. In modeling air exchange conditions the following processes are being considered: the processes connected with air movement in the laboratory room: the jet stream in a confined space, distribution of air parameters, air motion and impurity diffusion in the ventilated room. General upward ventilation seems to be the most rational due to impossibility of using local exhaust ventilation. It is connected with the peculiarities of technological processes in the laboratory. Air jets spouted through large-perforated surface mounted at the height of 2 m from the floor level, "flood" the lower control volume, entrained by natural convective currents from heat sources upward and removed from the upper area. In order to take advantage of the proposed method of the required air exchange calculation, you must enter additional conditions, taking into account the provision of sanitary-hygienic characteristics of the current at the entrance of the service (work area. Exhaust air containing pollutants (combustion products, is expelled into the atmosphere by vertical jet discharge. Dividing ventilated rooms into two control volumes allows describing the research process in a ventilated room more accurately and finding the air exchange in the lab room during the tests on a more reasonable basis, allowing to provide safe working conditions for the staff without

  17. Central African Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Program: building and strengthening regional workforce capacity in public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andze, Gervais Ondobo; Namsenmo, Abel; Illunga, Benoit Kebella; Kazambu, Ditu; Delissaint, Dieula; Kuaban, Christopher; Mbopi-Kéou, Francois-Xavier; Gabsa, Wilfred; Mulumba, Leopold; Bangamingo, Jean Pierre; Ngulefac, John; Dahlke, Melissa; Mukanga, David; Nsubuga, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The Central African Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Program (CAFELTP) is a 2-year public health leadership capacity building training program. It was established in October 2010 to enhance capacity for applied epidemiology and public health laboratory services in three countries: Cameroon, Central African Republic, and the Democratic Republic of Congo. The aim of the program is to develop a trained public health workforce to assure that acute public health events are detected, investigated, and responded to quickly and effectively. The program consists of 25% didactic and 75% practical training (field based activities). Although the program is still in its infancy, the residents have already responded to six outbreak investigations in the region, evaluated 18 public health surveillance systems and public health programs, and completed 18 management projects. Through these various activities, information is shared to understand similarities and differences in the region leading to new and innovative approaches in public health. The program provides opportunities for regional and international networking in field epidemiology and laboratory activities, and is particularly beneficial for countries that may not have the immediate resources to host an individual country program. Several of the trainees from the first cohort already hold leadership positions within the ministries of health and national laboratories, and will return to their assignments better equipped to face the public health challenges in the region. They bring with them knowledge, practical training, and experiences gained through the program to shape the future of the public health landscape in their countries.

  18. Radiochemical surveillance of KNK primary sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stamm, H.-H.; Stade, K.Ch.

    1987-05-01

    Radiochemical surveillance of the KNK primary sodium has been performed now for 15 years with 953 effective full-power days. The overflow method used for sodium sampling proved to be reliable. Different crucible materials have been used for different analytical tasks. The amount of radionuclides in the primary system has not given restrictions to plant operation at any time. On-line gamma spectroscopy on pipings and components of the primary circuits was accomplished in reactor downtimes. Activity depositions on the walls were dominated by Ta-182 after KNK I operation. Main deposited activities at KNK II were Mn-54 (fresh core) and after operation with failed fuel Cs-137, in cover gas areas together with Zn-65. Efficient experimental radionuclide traps for the removal of Mn-54, Zn-65 and Cs-137 from the primary coolant were tested successfully. The dose rates on primary pipes and components of KNK I and KNK II were lower by an order of magnitude compared to water-cooled reactors. This is in good agreement with experiences from LMFBR's in other countries. The resulting average yearly accumulated personal dose rate was 0.21 man-Sv at KNK, compared to 3.9 man-Sv at German light-water-cooled power reactors

  19. Radiochemical studies on amorphous zirconium phosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyer, A; Moores, G E [Salford Univ. (UK). Dept. of Chemistry and Applied Chemistry

    1981-01-01

    Amorphous zirconium phosphate (ZrP) is used in some hemodialysis machines for the regeneration of dialysate. Its function is to adsorb ammonium ions formed by the pretreatment of urea by urease. It also adsorbs Ca, Mg and K ions but leaches phosphate ions which are then removed (along with F/sup -/ ions) by a bed of hydrous zirconium oxide. The sodium form of ZrP is used although other forms have been suggested for use. The work reported here describes some preliminary radiochemical studies on the mechanism of release of phosphate ions and its possible relationship to sodium ion-exchange. /sup 32/P labelled material (HHZrP) was used for elution experiments with deionized water and buffer solutions having the pH's 4.2, 7.0 and 9.2. Buffer solutions used were as supplied by BDH. Elution was at four different temperatures in the range 293 to 363/sup 0/C. In the second series of experiments HHZrP was suspended in a NaCl solution labelled with /sup 22/Na. From this, /sup 22/Na labelled ZrP (NaHZrP) was prepared and eluted in the same way as the HHZrP. Results are given and discussed.

  20. Radiochemical measurement of mass transport in sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, M.H.; Chiang, S.H.

    1976-01-01

    Mass transport processes in the sodium coolant of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors (LMFBRs) are significant in determining rates of corrosion and deposition of radioactive nuclides from the fuel cladding, deposition and cold trapping of fission products from defect or failed fuel, carbon and nitrogen redistribution in the containment materials, and removal of impurities by cold trapping or hot trapping. Mass transport between rotating, concentric cylinders in molten sodium has been investigated using a unique radiochemical method. Long-lived (33 year) cesium-137, dissolved in the sodium, decays radioactively emitting a beta to barium-137m, which decays with a short half-life (2.6 minutes) emitting a gamma. Cesium is weakly adsorbed and remains in solution, while the barium is strongly adsorbed on the stainless steel surfaces. Hence, by measuring the barium-137m activity on movable stainless steel surfaces, one can calculate the mass transport to that surface. Mass transfer coefficients in sodium measured by this method are in agreement with published heat transfer correlations when the effect of the volumetric mass source is taken into account. Hence, heat transfer correlations can be confidently utilized by analogy in estimating mass transfer in liquid-metal systems

  1. From the Laboratory to the Field: Updating Capacity Building in Medical Entomology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Antonio Paulo Gouveia; Fouque, Florence; Launois, Pascal; Sousa, Carla A; Silveira, Henrique

    2017-09-01

    Training and innovation in the field of medical entomology are essential to mitigate the burden of vector-borne diseases globally. However, there is a shortage of medical entomologists worldwide, and there are large discrepancies in capacity building in this field. In this article, we discuss the current situation, what is needed from the medical entomologist of today, and how we can bridge this gap. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. PEER Testbed Study on a Laboratory Building: Exercising Seismic Performance Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Comerio, Mary C.; Stallmeyer, John C.; Smith, Ryan; Makris, Nicos; Konstantinidis, Dimitrios; Mosalam, Khalid; Lee, Tae-Hyung; Beck, James L.; Porter, Keith A.; Shaikhutdinov, Rustem; Hutchinson, Tara; Chaudhuri, Samit Ray; Chang, Stephanie E.; Falit-Baiamonte, Anthony; Holmes, William T.

    2005-01-01

    From 2002 to 2004 (years five and six of a ten-year funding cycle), the PEER Center organized the majority of its research around six testbeds. Two buildings and two bridges, a campus, and a transportation network were selected as case studies to “exercise” the PEER performance-based earthquake engineering methodology. All projects involved interdisciplinary teams of researchers, each producing data to be used by other colleagues in their research. The testbeds demonstrat...

  3. A radiochemical assay for biotin in biological materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hood, R.L.

    1975-01-01

    A radiochemical assay for biotin is described. The assay was sensitive to one nanogram and simple enough for routine biotin analyses. The assay yielded results which were comparable to those obtained from a microbiological assay using Lactobacillus plantarum. (author)

  4. The publication lapse of papers in Radiochemical and Radioanalytical Letters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braun, T.; Nagydiosi-Kocsis, Gy.

    1982-01-01

    The time needed for passing through journal editorial and publication processing has been examined for the papers published in Radiochemical and Radioanalytical Letters for the years 1969-1981. (author)

  5. Safety and Waste Management for SAM Radiochemical Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    The General Safety and Waste Management page offers section-specific safety and waste management details for the radiochemical analytes included in EPA's Selected Analytical Methods for Environmental Remediation and Recovery (SAM).

  6. Radiochemical and instrumental neutron activation analysis - recent trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dams, R.

    1990-01-01

    Recent trends of radiochemical and instrumental neutron activation analysis are discussed. Novel developments include the application of cyclic and pulsed activation, better energy resolution with hyperpure germanium detectors, and use of pulse processing systems allowing extremely high count rates of very short-lived isotopes. Further development is anticipated in the field of speciation in biological and environmental studies. Radiochemical methods have led to accurate determinations at the ng/g level. A promising future is expected for neutron activation techniques. (orig.)

  7. Site characterization report for Building 3506 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-01

    Building 3506, also known as the Waste Evaporator Facility, is a surplus facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) slated for decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). The building is located in the ORNL main plant area, to the west of the South Tank Farm and near the intersection of Central Avenue and Third Street. Characterization tasks consisted of three main activities: inspections, radiological measurements, and radiological and chemical sampling and analysis. Inspection reports document general facility conditions, as-built information, and specialized information such as structural evaluations. Radiological measurements define the quantity and distribution of radioactive contaminants; this information is used to calibrate a dose model of the facility and estimate the total activity, in curies, of each major radioactive isotope. The radiological information from sample analyses is used to refine the radiological model of the facility, and the radionuclide and hazardous chemical analyses are used for waste management planning. This report presents data from the field investigation and laboratory analyses in the form of a site description, as-built drawings, summary tables of radiological and chemical contaminant concentrations, and a waste volume estimate.

  8. Site characterization report for Building 3506 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-07-01

    Building 3506, also known as the Waste Evaporator Facility, is a surplus facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) slated for decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D). The building is located in the ORNL main plant area, to the west of the South Tank Farm and near the intersection of Central Avenue and Third Street. Characterization tasks consisted of three main activities: inspections, radiological measurements, and radiological and chemical sampling and analysis. Inspection reports document general facility conditions, as-built information, and specialized information such as structural evaluations. Radiological measurements define the quantity and distribution of radioactive contaminants; this information is used to calibrate a dose model of the facility and estimate the total activity, in curies, of each major radioactive isotope. The radiological information from sample analyses is used to refine the radiological model of the facility, and the radionuclide and hazardous chemical analyses are used for waste management planning. This report presents data from the field investigation and laboratory analyses in the form of a site description, as-built drawings, summary tables of radiological and chemical contaminant concentrations, and a waste volume estimate

  9. Conditions for building a community of practice in an advanced physics laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irving, Paul W.; Sayre, Eleanor C.

    2014-06-01

    We use the theory of communities of practice and the concept of accountable disciplinary knowledge to describe how a learning community develops in the context of an upper-division physics laboratory course. The change in accountable disciplinary knowledge motivates students' enculturation into a community of practice. The enculturation process is facilitated by four specific structural features of the course and supported by a primary instructional choice. The four structural features are "paucity of instructor time," "all in a room together," "long and difficult experiments," and "same experiments at different times." The instructional choice is the encouragement of the sharing and development of knowledge and understanding by the instructor. The combination of the instructional choice and structural features promotes the development of the learning community in which students engage in authentic practices of a physicist. This results in a classroom community that can provide students with the opportunity to have an accelerated trajectory towards being a more central participant of the community of a practice of physicists. We support our claims with video-based observations of laboratory classroom interactions and individual, semistructured interviews with students about their laboratory experiences and physics identity.

  10. Safety Analysis (SA) of the decontamination facility, Building 419, at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odell, B.N.

    1980-01-01

    This safety analysis was performed for the Manager, Plant Services at LLNL and fulfills the requirements of DOE Order 5481.1. The analysis was based on field inspections, document review, computer calculations, and extensive input from Waste Management personnel. It was concluded that the maximum quantities of radioactive materials that safety procedures allow to be handled in this building do not pose undue risks on- or off-site even in postulated severe accidents. Risk from the various hazards at this facility vary from low to moderate as specified in DOE Order 5481.1. Recommendations are made for improvements that will reduce risks even further

  11. Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Building Replacement Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    NNSA, an agency within DOE, proposes to replace the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research (CMR) Building at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The CMRR EIS examines the potential environmental impacts associated with the Proposed Action of consolidating and relocating the mission-critical CMR capabilities from a degraded building to a new modern building(s). The existing CMR Building, constructed in the early 1950s, houses most of LANL's analytical chemistry and materials characterization AC and MC capabilities. Other capabilities at the CMR Building include actinide processing, waste characterization, and nondestructive analysis that support a variety of NNSA and DOE nuclear materials management programs. In 1992, DOE initiated planning and implementation of CMR Building upgrades to address specific safety, reliability, consolidation, and security and safeguards issues. Later, in 1997 and 1998, a series of operational, safety, and seismic issues surfaced regarding the long-term viability of the CMR Building. Because of these issues, DOE determined that the extensive upgrades originally planned would be much more expensive and time consuming and of only marginal effectiveness. As a result, DOE decided to perform only the upgrades necessary to ensure the safe and reliable operation of the CMR Building through 2010 and to seek an alternative path for long-term reliability. The CMRR EIS evaluates the potential direct, indirect, and cumulative environmental impacts associated with the Proposed Action. The Proposed Action is to replace the CMR Building. The Preferred Alternative is to construct a new CMRR Facility at Technical Area (TA) 55, consisting of two or three buildings. One of the new buildings would provide space for administrative offices and support functions. The other building(s) would provide secure laboratory spaces for research and analytical support activities. The buildings would be expected to operate for a minimum of 50 years. Tunnels could be

  12. D and D alternatives risk assessment for Building 3515 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robers, S.K.; Golden, K.M.

    1995-09-01

    This report presents the results of the Level 3 Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) Alternatives Risk Assessment (DARA) performed on Building 3515 located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The goal of the risk evaluation process is to provide risk information necessary to assist decision making for Environmental Restoration (ER) Program D and D facilities. This risk information is developed in the baseline risk assessment (BRA) and in the DARA. The BRA provides risk information necessary for determining whether or not a facility represents an unacceptable risk and requires remediation. In addition, the BRA also provides an estimation of the risks associated with the no-action alternative for use in the DARA. The objective of this Level 3 DARA is to evaluate and document the potential risks to human health, human safety, and the environment associated with the proposed remedial action at Building 3515. A Level 3 assessment is the least rigorous type of DARA. The decision to conduct a Level 3 DARA was based on the fact that characterization data from the facility are limited, and currently only one remedial alternative (complete dismantlement) is being evaluated in addition to the no-action alternative. The results of the DARA along with cost and engineering information may be used by project managers in making decisions regarding the final disposition of Building 3515. This Level 3 assessment meets the requirements of the streamlined risk assessment necessary for an Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis (EE/CA)

  13. Fabrication and laboratory-based performance testing of a building-integrated photovoltaic-thermal roofing panel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Fangliang; Yin, Huiming

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A BIPVT solar panel is designed and fabricated for energy efficient buildings. • A high-speed manufacture method is developed to produce the functionally graded materials. • Laboratory tests demonstrate BIPVT’s energy efficiency improvement and innovations. • The PV efficiency is enhanced ∼24% through temperature control of the panel by water flow. • The combined electric and thermal efficiency reaches >75% of solar irradiation. - Abstract: A building integrated photovoltaic-thermal (BIPVT) multifunctional roofing panel has been developed in this study to harvest solar energy in the form of PV electricity as well as heat energy through the collection of warm water. As a key component of the multifunctional building envelope, an aluminum/high-density polyethylene (HDPE) functionally graded material (FGM) panel embedded with aluminum water tubes has been fabricated through the vibration-sedimentation approach. The FGM layer gradually transits material phases from well-conductive side (with aluminum dominated) to another highly insulated side (with HDPE). The heat in the PV cells can be easily transferred into the conductive side of the FGM and then collected by the water flow in the embedded tubes. Therefore, the operational temperature of the PV cells can be significantly lowered down, which recovers the PV efficiency in hot weather. In this way, the developed BIPVT panel is able to efficiently harvest solar energy in the form of both PV electricity and heat. The performance of a prototype BIPVT panel has been evaluated in terms of its thermal efficiency via warm water collection and PV efficiency via the output electricity. The laboratory test results demonstrate that significant energy conversion efficiency improvement can be achieved for both electricity generation and heat collection by the presented BIPVT roofing system. Overall, the performance indicates a very promising prospective of the new BIPVT multifunctional roofing panel.

  14. Intra-building telecommunications cabling standards for Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, R.L.

    1993-08-01

    This document establishes a working standard for all telecommunications cable installations at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico. It is based on recent national commercial cabling standards. The topics addressed are Secure and Open/Restricted Access telecommunications environments and both twisted-pair and optical-fiber components of communications media. Some of the state-of-the-art technologies that will be supported by the intrabuilding cable infrastructure are Circuit and Packet Switched Networks (PBX/5ESS Voice and Low-Speed Data), Local Area Networks (Ethernet, Token Ring, Fiber and Copper Distributed Data Interface), and Wide Area Networks (Asynchronous Transfer Mode). These technologies can be delivered to every desk and can transport data at rates sufficient to support all existing applications (such as Voice, Text and graphics, Still Images, Full-motion Video), as well as applications to be defined in the future.

  15. Setting the stage - building and working in an ancient DNA laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Michael; Clarke, Andrew C; Horsburgh, K Ann; Matisoo-Smith, Elizabeth A

    2012-01-20

    With the introduction of next generation high throughput sequencing in 2005 and the resulting revolution in genetics, ancient DNA research has rapidly developed from an interesting but marginal field within evolutionary biology into one that can contribute significantly to our understanding of evolution in general and the development of our own species in particular. While the amount of sequence data available from ancient human, other animal and plant remains has increased dramatically over the past five years, some key limitations of ancient DNA research remain. Most notably, reduction of contamination and the authentication of results are of utmost importance. A number of studies have addressed different aspects of sampling, DNA extraction and DNA manipulation in order to establish protocols that most efficiently generate reproducible and authentic results. As increasing numbers of researchers from different backgrounds become interested in using ancient DNA technology to address key questions, the need for practical guidelines on how to construct and use an ancient DNA facility arises. The aim of this article is therefore to provide practical tips for building a state-of-the-art ancient DNA facility. It is intended to help researchers new to the field of ancient DNA research generally, and those considering the application of next generation sequencing, in their planning process. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. Radionuclide characterization of subsurface soil on the site of building 3505 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, W.A.; Oakes, T.W.; Eldridge, J.S.; Huang, S.; Hubbard, H.M.

    1982-12-01

    Ninety-two samples at varying depths were collected from 25 cores. Sample tubes were driven into the ground and segments of soil cores were retrieved at depths from the ground surface to subsurface consolidated material. forty samples of the 92 collected had detectable gamma activities [i.e., > 2 x 10 - 2 Bq/g (0.5 pCi/g)] of 137 Cs. However, only four samples, all from the same borehole, were found to have significant amounts of 137 Cs with a maximum of 1.7 x 10 3 Bq/g (4.6 x 10 4 pCi/g). These four samples also contained the highest activities of other radionuclides ( 60 Co, 90 Sr, 235 U, 238 U, 239 Pu, and 241 Am). These subsamples came from core number 4DD, which was the deepest core collected. Core 4DD was taken at the southwest corner of the site, which is at the lower elevation of the site. Since most of the activity in this core was found below the bedrock (or shale) in the groundwater region, the contamination is probably not from Building 3505. Additional investigation in the area around core location 4DD will be required to determine the extent of contamination

  17. Removal action report on the Building 3001 canal at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-05-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a federal facility managed by Lockheed Martin C, Energy Research, Inc., for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). ORNL on the Oak Ridge Reservation in East Tennessee at the Anderson and Roane County lines, approximately 38 km (24 miles) west of Knoxville, Tennessee, and 18 km (11 miles) southwest of downtown Oak Ridge. The Oak Ridge Graphite Reactor and its storage and transfer canal are located in Bldg. 3001 in the approximate center of Waste Area Grouping I in the ORNL main complex. 4:1 The Bldg. 3001 Storage Canal is an L-shaped, underground, reinforced-concrete structure running from the back and below the Graphite Reactor in Bldg. 3001 to a location beneath a hot cell in the adjacent Bldg. 3019. The Graphite Reactor was built in 1943 to produce small quantities of plutonium and was subsequently used to produce other isotopes for medical research before it was finally shut down in 1963. The associated canal was used to transport, under water, spent fuel slugs and other isotopes from the back of the reactor to the adjacent Bldg. 31319 hot cell for further processing. During its operation and years subsequent to operation, the canal's concrete walls and floor became contaminated with radioisotopes from the water.This report documents the activities involved with replacing the canal water with a solid, controlled, low-strength material (CLSM) in response to a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act non-time-critical removal action

  18. Building an internet-based workflow system - the case of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories` Zephyr project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, C. W., LLNL

    1998-04-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories` Zephyr System provides a showcase for the ways in which emerging technologies can help streamline procurement processes and improve the coordination between participants in engineering projects by allowing collaboration in ways that have not been possible before. The project also shows the success of a highly pragmatic approach that was initiated by the end user community, and that intentionally covered standard situations, rather than aiming at also automating the exceptions. By helping push purchasing responsibilities down to the end user, thereby greatly reducing the involvement of the purchasing department in operational activities, it was possible to streamline the process significantly resulting in time savings of up to 90%, major cost reductions, and improved quality. Left with less day-to- day purchasing operations, the purchasing department has more time for strategic tasks such as selecting and pre-qualifying new suppliers, negotiating blanket orders, or implementing new procurement systems. The case shows once more that the use of information technologies can result in major benefits when aligned with organizational adjustments.

  19. Radiochemical verification and validation in the environmental data collection process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosano-Reece, D.; Bottrell, D.; Bath, R.J.

    1994-01-01

    A credible and cost effective environmental data collection process should produce analytical data which meets regulatory and program specific requirements. Analytical data, which support the sampling and analysis activities at hazardous waste sites, undergo verification and independent validation before the data are submitted to regulators. Understanding the difference between verification and validation and their respective roles in the sampling and analysis process is critical to the effectiveness of a program. Verification is deciding whether the measurement data obtained are what was requested. The verification process determines whether all the requirements were met. Validation is more complicated than verification. It attempts to assess the impacts on data use, especially when requirements are not met. Validation becomes part of the decision-making process. Radiochemical data consists of a sample result with an associated error. Therefore, radiochemical validation is different and more quantitative than is currently possible for the validation of hazardous chemical data. Radiochemical data include both results and uncertainty that can be statistically compared to identify significance of differences in a more technically defensible manner. Radiochemical validation makes decisions about analyte identification, detection, and uncertainty for a batch of data. The process focuses on the variability of the data in the context of the decision to be made. The objectives of this paper are to present radiochemical verification and validation for environmental data and to distinguish the differences between the two operations

  20. Problems Related to the Siting of the Laboratory Building for Civil Engineering Department at the University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagroba, Marek

    2016-10-01

    This paper deals with the conditions underlying and the problems arising from the siting of a building with specialist laboratories in a developed part of the university campus in Olsztyn, Poland. The topography of the terrain and the need to house civil engineering laboratories in the planned building had an immense impact on the shape of the building and consequently on its foundations, whose dimensions responded to the ground conditions and the specification of various loads they would have to support, including the equipment for the laboratories. The siting of a building as a step in the construction process entails several problems, which are first taken into consideration at the stage of making preliminary concept plans and are subsequently verified while working on the final construction plan. The required information included geotechnical documentation, survey of the ground conditions and the data regarding the predicted loads on the building, necessary to select the right type of foundations. All these problems grow in importance when dealing with such unique buildings like the discussed example of a laboratory building for the Civil Engineering Department, built on a site within a conservation zone on the campus of the University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, Poland. The specific character of the building and the specialist equipment with which it was to be furnished (a resistance testing machine, a 17-meter-long wave flume) necessitated a series of analyses prior to the siting of the building and selecting suitable foundations. In turn, the fact that the new building was to be erected in the conservation zone meant that collaboration with the Heritage Conservation Office had to be undertaken at the stage of making the plan and continued during the construction works. The Heritage Officer's recommendations concerning the building's shape, divisions, dimensions, materials used, etc., created a situation where the team of designers and architects had to

  1. Exploration of a Buried Building Foundation and a Septic Tank Plume Dispersion Using a Laboratory-fabricated Resistivity Apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachhab, A.; Stepanik, N.; Booterbaugh, A.

    2010-12-01

    In the following study, an electrical resistivity device was built and used in both a laboratory setup and in the field to accurately identify the location of a septic tank and the foundation of Gustavus Adolphus (GA); a building that was burned at Susquehanna University in 1964. The entire apparatus, which costs a fraction of the price of a typical electrical resistivity device, was tested for accuracy in the laboratory prior to its use in the field. The electrical resistivity apparatus consists of a deep-cycle twelve volt battery, an AC to DC inverter and two multimeters to measure the potential and the current intensity from four linear electrodes via a wireless data transmission system. This apparatus was constructed by using basic inexpensive electrical and electronic equipments. The recorded potential and current values were used to calculate the apparent resistivity of different materials adopting the Wenner array for both investigations. Several tests were performed on the tabletop bench, producing consistent results when applied to find small bricks structures with different geometrical arrangement buried under a mixed sand-soil formation. The apparatus was also used to investigate a subsurface salty water plume in the same formation. The horizontal resistivity profile obtained over the vertical small brick wall matched the theoretical apparent resistivity of resistivity versus displacement on a vertical dike in a homogeneous material. In addition, the two-dimensional resistivity profile replicate the salty plume size conformably. Following the success on the small-scale laboratory tabletop bench, the electrical resistivity apparatus was implemented in the field to explore the foundation of GA in one location and the septic tank in another. An array of transects were performed, analyzed and plotted using MATLAB. The three dimensional contours of apparent resistivity depicted exactly the locations of the buried foundation walls, the septic tank and the

  2. Verification Survey of the Building 315 Zero Power Reactor-6 Facility, Argonne National Laboratory-East, Argonne, Illinois

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    W. C. Adams

    2007-01-01

    Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) conducted independent verification radiological survey activities at Argonne National Laboratory's Building 315, Zero Power Reactor-6 facility in Argonne, Illinois. Independent verification survey activities included document and data reviews, alpha plus beta and gamma surface scans, alpha and beta surface activity measurements, and instrumentation comparisons. An interim letter report and a draft report, documenting the verification survey findings, were submitted to the DOE on November 8, 2006 and February 22, 2007, respectively (ORISE 2006b and 2007). Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) is owned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and is operated under a contract with the University of Chicago. Fundamental and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences are conducted at ANL-E and the laboratory serves as a major center of energy research and development. Building 315, which was completed in 1962, contained two cells, Cells 5 and 4, for holding Zero Power Reactor (ZPR)-6 and ZPR-9, respectively. These reactors were built to increase the knowledge and understanding of fast reactor technology. ZPR-6 was also referred to as the Fast Critical Facility and focused on fast reactor studies for civilian power production. ZPR-9 was used for nuclear rocket and fast reactor studies. In 1967, the reactors were converted for plutonium use. The reactors operated from the mid-1960's until 1982 when they were both shut down. Low levels of radioactivity were expected to be present due to the operating power levels of the ZPR's being restricted to well below 1,000 watts. To evaluate the presence of radiological contamination, DOE characterized the ZPRs in 2001. Currently, the Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) and Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction (MCCI) Experiments are being conducted in Cell 4 where the ZPR-9 is located (ANL 2002 and 2006). ANL has performed final

  3. Laboratory capacity building for the International Health Regulations (IHR[2005]) in resource-poor countries: the experience of the African Field Epidemiology Network (AFENET).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masanza, Monica Musenero; Nqobile, Ndlovu; Mukanga, David; Gitta, Sheba Nakacubo

    2010-12-03

    Laboratory is one of the core capacities that countries must develop for the implementation of the International Health Regulations (IHR[2005]) since laboratory services play a major role in all the key processes of detection, assessment, response, notification, and monitoring of events. While developed countries easily adapt their well-organized routine laboratory services, resource-limited countries need considerable capacity building as many gaps still exist. In this paper, we discuss some of the efforts made by the African Field Epidemiology Network (AFENET) in supporting laboratory capacity development in the Africa region. The efforts range from promoting graduate level training programs to building advanced technical, managerial and leadership skills to in-service short course training for peripheral laboratory staff. A number of specific projects focus on external quality assurance, basic laboratory information systems, strengthening laboratory management towards accreditation, equipment calibration, harmonization of training materials, networking and provision of pre-packaged laboratory kits to support outbreak investigation. Available evidence indicates a positive effect of these efforts on laboratory capacity in the region. However, many opportunities exist, especially to support the roll-out of these projects as well as attending to some additional critical areas such as biosafety and biosecuity. We conclude that AFENET's approach of strengthening national and sub-national systems provide a model that could be adopted in resource-limited settings such as sub-Saharan Africa.

  4. Radiochemical studies on environmental radioactivity in Sudan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sam, Adam Khatir [Sudan Atomic Energy Commission, Khartoum (Sudan)

    1998-09-01

    Measurements of uranium and thorium isotopes, {sup 226} Ra, {sup 210} Po, {sup 228} Ra, {sup 40} K and fallout radionuclide {sup 137} Cs in soil samples collected from different districts in Sudan, rock phosphate samples collected from the uro and kurun rock phosphate deposits in the eastern part of the Nuba mountains in Western Sudan, and surface marine sediments and marine organisms collected from the sudanese coastal waters of the Red Sea have been made using a high resolution gamma-spectrometry, radiochemical separation and {alpha} spectrometry. The external exposure due to {gamma} radiation from the ground has been calculated. The average exposure was found to be 45.4 {+-} 21.3 nGy/h, corresponding to the annual dose equivalent of 278 {mu}Sv/y. With the exception of some areas, the calculated exposure falls within the global wide range of outdoor radiation exposure given in the UNSCEAR publications. The nation-wide average concentrations of {sup 226} Ra, {sup 238} U, {sup 232} Th, {sup 40} K and {sup 137} Cs determined were 31.6 {+-} 27, 20.1 {+-} 16.4, 19.1 {+-} 8.1, 280.3 {+-} 137.6 and 4.1 {+-} 4.3 Bq/Kg, respectively. This shows that there is little contamination due to fallout radioactivity at survey sites. The exchangeable radium fraction constitutes 19-24% of the total radium content. The data show that {sup 238} U and its decay products are the principal contributors of radioactivity in both phosphate deposits at Uro and Kurun. The equivalent mass concentrations of uranium in the Uro rock phosphate fall within the range that could be economically recovered as the by-product of fertilizer industry. The mean activity concentrations weighted by average agricultural consumption of 300 kg/ha of untreated ground rock fertilizer resulted in an annual distribution of 120.63 Bq Ra/m{sup 2} with Uro rock and 12.97, 0.21 and 4.24 Bq/m{sup 2} respectively, with Kurun rock fertilizer. The external radiation exposure over agricultural areas was estimated 23.41 x 10

  5. Radiochemical studies on environmental radioactivity in Sudan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sam, Adam Khatir

    1998-01-01

    Measurements of uranium and thorium isotopes, 226 Ra, 210 Po, 228 Ra, 40 K and fallout radionuclide 137 Cs in soil samples collected from different districts in Sudan, rock phosphate samples collected from the uro and kurun rock phosphate deposits in the eastern part of the Nuba mountains in Western Sudan, and surface marine sediments and marine organisms collected from the sudanese coastal waters of the Red Sea have been made using a high resolution gamma-spectrometry, radiochemical separation and α spectrometry. The external exposure due to γ radiation from the ground has been calculated. The average exposure was found to be 45.4 ± 21.3 nGy/h, corresponding to the annual dose equivalent of 278 μSv/y. With the exception of some areas, the calculated exposure falls within the global wide range of outdoor radiation exposure given in the UNSCEAR publications. The nation-wide average concentrations of 226 Ra, 238 U, 232 Th, 40 K and 137 Cs determined were 31.6 ± 27, 20.1 ± 16.4, 19.1 ± 8.1, 280.3 ± 137.6 and 4.1 ± 4.3 Bq/Kg, respectively. This shows that there is little contamination due to fallout radioactivity at survey sites. The exchangeable radium fraction constitutes 19-24% of the total radium content. The data show that 238 U and its decay products are the principal contributors of radioactivity in both phosphate deposits at Uro and Kurun. The equivalent mass concentrations of uranium in the Uro rock phosphate fall within the range that could be economically recovered as the by-product of fertilizer industry. The mean activity concentrations weighted by average agricultural consumption of 300 kg/ha of untreated ground rock fertilizer resulted in an annual distribution of 120.63 Bq Ra/m 2 with Uro rock and 12.97, 0.21 and 4.24 Bq/m 2 respectively, with Kurun rock fertilizer. The external radiation exposure over agricultural areas was estimated 23.41 x 10 -9 Gy/h and 2.59 x 10 -9 Gy/h at 1 m above ground level for Uro and Kurun rock phosphate fertilizers

  6. Effective Risk Management in Innovative Projects: A Case Study of the Construction of Energy-efficient, Sustainable Building of the Laboratory of Intelligent Building in Cracow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krechowicz, Maria

    2017-10-01

    Many construction projects fail to meet deadlines or they exceed the assumed budget. This scenario is particularly common in the case of innovative projects, in which too late identification of a high risk of delays and exceeding the assumed costs makes a potentially profitable project untenable. A high risk level, far exceeding the level of risk in standard non-innovative projects, is a characteristic feature of the realization phase of innovative projects. This is associated not only with greater complexity of the design and construction phases, but also with the problems with application of new technologies and prototype solutions, lack of qualified personnel with suitable expertise in specialized areas, and with the ability to properly identify the gaps between available and required knowledge and skills. This paper discusses the process of effective risk management in innovative projects on the example of the realization phase of an innovative, energy-efficient and sustainable building of the Laboratory of Intelligent Building in Cracow - DLJM Lab, from the point of view of DORBUD S.A., its general contractor. In this paper, a new approach to risk management process for innovative construction projects is proposed. Risk management process was divided into five stages: gathering information, identification of the important unwanted events, first risk assessment, development and choice of risk reaction strategies, assessment of the residual risk after introducing risk reactions. 18 unwanted events in an innovative construction project were identified. The first risk assessment was carried out using two-parametric risk matrix, in which the probability of unwanted event occurrence and its consequences were analysed. Three levels of risks were defined: tolerable, controlled and uncontrolled. Risk reactions to each defined unwanted event were developed. The following risk reaction types were considered: risk retention, risk reduction, risk transfer and risk

  7. Radiochemical methods to enhance efficiency of α-spectral measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silkina, G.P.; Artem'ev, O.I.

    2001-01-01

    The paper describes possible ways to improve a plutonium radiochemical separation technique developed in the Khlopin Radium Institute and modify it to account for the site-specific features of samples from the former Semipalatinsk test site (STS) and enhance the alpha spectrometry efficiency.The paper describes possible ways to improve a plutonium radiochemical separation technique developed in the Khlopin Radium Institute and modify it to account for the site-specific features of samples from the former Semipalatinsk test site (STS) and enhance the alpha spectrometry efficiency. (author)

  8. Radiochemical studies of some preparation methods for phosphorus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loos-Neskovic, C.; Fedoroff, M.

    1983-01-01

    Various methods of radiochemical separation were tested for the determination of phosphorus in metals and alloys by neutron activation analysis. Classical methods of separation revealed some defects when they were applied to this problem. Methods using liquid extraction gave low yields and were not reproducible. Methods based on precipitation gave better results, but were not selective enough in most cases. Retention on alumina was not possible without preliminary separations. Authors studied a new radiochemical separation based on the extraction of elemental phosphorus in the gaseous phase after reduction at high temperature with carbon. Measurements with radioactive phosphorus showed that the extraction yield is better than 99%. (author)

  9. Low-level waste drum staging building at Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility, TA-16, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico. Environmental Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    The proposed action is to place a 3 meter (m) by 4.5 m (10 ft x 15 ft) prefabricated storage building (transportainer) adjacent to the existing Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility (WETF) at Technical Area (TA-) 16, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and to use the building as a staging site for sealed 55 galllon drums of noncompactible waste contaminated with low levels of tritium (LLW). Up to eight drums of waste would be accumulated before the waste is moved by LANL Waste Management personnel to the existing on-site LLW disposal area at TA-54. The drum staging building would be placed on a bermed asphalt pad, near other existing accumulation structures for office trash and compactible LLW. The no-action alternative is to continue storing drums of LLW in the WETF laboratories where they occupy valuable work space, hamper movement of personnel and equipment, and require waste management personnel to enter those laboratories in order to remove filled drums. No new waste would be generated by implementing the proposed action; no changes or increases in WETF operations or waste production rate are anticipated as a result of staging drums of LLW outside the main laboratory building. The site for the LLW drum staging building would not impact any sensitive areas. Tritium emissions from the drums of LLW were included within the source term for normal operations at the WETF; the cumulative impacts would not be increased

  10. Building and Rebuilding: The National Public Health Laboratory Systems and Services Before and After the Earthquake and Cholera Epidemic, Haiti, 2009-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean Louis, Frantz; Buteau, Josiane; Boncy, Jacques; Anselme, Renette; Stanislas, Magalie; Nagel, Mary C; Juin, Stanley; Charles, Macarthur; Burris, Robert; Antoine, Eva; Yang, Chunfu; Kalou, Mireille; Vertefeuille, John; Marston, Barbara J; Lowrance, David W; Deyde, Varough

    2017-10-01

    Before the 2010 devastating earthquake and cholera outbreak, Haiti's public health laboratory systems were weak and services were limited. There was no national laboratory strategic plan and only minimal coordination across the laboratory network. Laboratory capacity was further weakened by the destruction of over 25 laboratories and testing sites at the departmental and peripheral levels and the loss of life among the laboratory health-care workers. However, since 2010, tremendous progress has been made in building stronger laboratory infrastructure and training a qualified public health laboratory workforce across the country, allowing for decentralization of access to quality-assured services. Major achievements include development and implementation of a national laboratory strategic plan with a formalized and strengthened laboratory network; introduction of automation of testing to ensure better quality of results and diversify the menu of tests to effectively respond to outbreaks; expansion of molecular testing for tuberculosis, human immunodeficiency virus, malaria, diarrheal and respiratory diseases; establishment of laboratory-based surveillance of epidemic-prone diseases; and improvement of the overall quality of testing. Nonetheless, the progress and gains made remain fragile and require the full ownership and continuous investment from the Haitian government to sustain these successes and achievements.

  11. ZZ HATCHES-18, Database for radiochemical modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heath, T.G.

    2008-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: HATCHES is a referenced, quality assured, thermodynamic database, developed by Serco Assurance for Nirex. Although originally compiled for use in radiochemical modelling work, HATCHES also includes data suitable for many other applications e.g. toxic waste disposal, effluent treatment and chemical processing. It is used in conjunction with chemical and geochemical computer programs, to simulate a wide variety of reactions in aqueous environments. The database includes thermodynamic data (the log formation constant and the enthalpy of formation for the chemical species) for the actinides, fission products and decay products. The datasets for Ni, Tc, U, Np, Pu and Am are based on the NEA reviews of the chemical thermodynamics of these elements. The data sets for these elements with oxalate, citrate and EDTA are based on the NEA-selected values. For iso-saccharinic acid, additional data (non-selected values) have been included from the NEA review as well as data derived from other sources. HATCHES also includes data for many toxic metals and for elements commonly found in groundwaters or geological materials. HARPHRQ operates by reference to the PHREEQE master species list. Thus the thermodynamic information supplied is: a) the log equilibrium constant for the formation reaction of the requested species from the PHREEQE master species for the corresponding elements; b) the enthalpy of reaction for the formation reaction of the requested species from the PHREEQE master species for the corresponding elements. This version of HATCHES has been updated since the previous release to provide consistency with the selected data from two recent publications in the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency series on chemical thermodynamics: Chemical Thermodynamics Series Volume 7 (2005): Chemical Thermodynamics of Selenium by Aeke Olin (Chairman), Bengt Nolaeng, Lars-Olof Oehman, Evgeniy Osadchii and Erik Rosen and Chemical Thermodynamics Series Volume 8

  12. Building an integrated nuclear engineering and nuclear science human resources pipeline at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sneed, A.; Sikorski, B.; Lineberry, M.; Jolly, J.

    2004-01-01

    world-class engineers and scientists. The INEEL Education Initiatives Department, housed in the Human Resources (HR) Directorate believes a highly integrated systematic approach from university to laboratory is necessary to the effectiveness of the pipeline. Currently, a refocusing of INEEL educational programs including scholarships, fellowships, internships, faculty exchange, and educational outreach programs is being conducted under the direction of the Education Director and a executive level Education Advisory Council. Additionally a mentoring program is under development to facilitate the integration and transfer of knowledge from senior researchers to incoming graduates. While internal alignment efforts are underway, external alignment efforts must now be planned and developed. Anxious to learn from the experiences of others, INEEL's HR Directorate, the INSE, ANL-W, UI, and ISU will conduct a review of national and international best practices and case studies found in academic and industry literature to identify programs and approaches that might be applied to the INL and the subsequent opportunities and issues that they might represent. It is proposed that the results of this collaborative study be shared with the IAEA in paper and presentation format at the International conference on nuclear knowledge management: Strategies, information management and human resource development. A brief outline of the proposed paper and presentation follows: I. Introduction: a. Brief discussion of the historical role of the US DOE and national laboratory role in nuclear energy research and education. b. Brief discussion of the current state of US nuclear energy education. c. Explanation of the expected role of the INL in revitalizing nuclear engineering and nuclear science education in the US. II. Current collaborative efforts to build components of an HR pipeline from education through full integration into the research environment and transfer on knowledge from senior

  13. Minicomputer system for radiochemical analysis by coincidence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brauer, F.P.; Fager, J.E.

    1979-01-01

    Minicomputer-based coincidence analysis methods have been developed for use in performing radiochemical analysis by high-resolution x- and gamma-ray coincidence spectrometry. This paper describes the data-acquisition and analysis methods develolped for qualitative and quantitative analyses of coincidence spectrometric data. Data-acquisition capabilities include both direct multiparameter pulse-height analysis and buffered list-mode acquisition

  14. Instrumentation for chemical and radiochemical monitoring in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nordmann, F.; Ballard, G.

    2009-01-01

    This article details the instrumentation implemented in French nuclear power plants for the monitoring of chemical and radiochemical effluents with the aim of limiting their environmental impact. It describes the controls performed with chemical automata for the search for drifts, anomalies or pollution in a given circuit. The operation principles of the different types of chemical automata are explained as well as the manual controls performed on samples manually collected. Content: 1 - general considerations; 2 - objectives of the chemical monitoring: usefulness of continuous monitoring with automata, transmission to control rooms and related actions, redundancy of automata; 3 - instrumentation and explanations for the main circuits: principle of chemical automata monitoring, instrumentation of the main primary circuit, instrumentation of the main secondary circuit, instrumentation of the tertiary circuit, preparation of water makeup (demineralized water), other loops, instrumentation for effluents and environment monitoring, measurement principles of chemical automata, control and maintenance of chemical automata; 4 - manual controls after sampling; 5 - radiochemical monitoring: automatized radiochemical measurements, manual radiochemical measurements; 6 - conclusion

  15. Hanford Environmental Restoration data validation process for chemical and radiochemical analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, M.R.; Bechtold, R.A.; Clark, D.E.; Angelos, K.M.; Winter, S.M.

    1993-10-01

    Detailed procedures for validation of chemical and radiochemical data are used to assure consistent application of validation principles and support a uniform database of quality environmental data. During application of these procedures, it was determined that laboratory data packages were frequently missing certain types of documentation causing subsequent delays in meeting critical milestones in the completion of validation activities. A quality improvement team was assembled to address the problems caused by missing documentation and streamline the entire process. The result was the development of a separate data package verification procedure and revisions to the data validation procedures. This has resulted in a system whereby deficient data packages are immediately identified and corrected prior to validation and revised validation procedures which more closely match the common analytical reporting practices of laboratory service vendors

  16. Do you want to build such a machine? : Designing a high energy proton accelerator for Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paris, E.

    2004-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory's efforts toward researching, proposing and then building a high-energy proton accelerator have been discussed in a handful of studies. In the main, these have concentrated on the intense maneuvering amongst politicians, universities, government agencies, outside corporations, and laboratory officials to obtain (or block) approval and/or funds or to establish who would have control over budgets and research programs. These ''top-down'' studies are very important but they can also serve to divorce such proceedings from the individuals actually involved in the ground-level research which physically served to create theories, designs, machines, and experiments. This can lead to a skewed picture, on the one hand, of a lack of effect that so-called scientific and technological factors exert and, on the other hand, of the apparent separation of the so-called social or political from the concrete practice of doing physics. An exception to this approach can be found in the proceedings of a conference on ''History of the ZGS'' held at Argonne at the time of the Zero Gradient Synchrotron's decommissioning in 1979. These accounts insert the individuals quite literally as they are, for the most part, personal reminiscences of those who took part in these efforts on the ground level. As such, they are invaluable raw material for historical inquiry but generally lack the rigor and perspective expected in a finished historical work. The session on ''Constructing Cold War Physics'' at the 2002 annual History of Science Society Meeting served to highlight new approaches circulating towards history of science and technology in the post-WWII period, especially in the 1950s. There is new attention towards the effects of training large numbers of scientists and engineers as well as the caution not to equate ''national security'' with military preparedness, but rather more broadly--at certain points--with the explicit ''struggle for the hearts and minds of

  17. BubbleZERO—Design, Construction and Operation of a Transportable Research Laboratory for Low Exergy Building System Evaluation in the Tropics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arno Schlueter

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available We present the design, construction and operation of a novel building systems laboratory, the BubbleZERO—Zero Emission Research Operation. Our objective was to design a space to evaluate the performance of Swiss-developed low exergy building systems in the tropical climate of Singapore using an integrated design approach. The method we employed for evaluation in the tropics was to design and build a test bed out of the shipping containers that transported the prototype low exergy systems from Switzerland to Singapore. This approach resulted in a novel laboratory environment containing radiant cooling panels and decentralized air supply, along with a self-shading, inflated “bubble” skin, experimental low emissivity (LowE glazing, LED lighting, wireless sensors and distributed control. The laboratory evaluates and demonstrates for the first time in Singapore an integrated high-temperature cooling system with separate demand-controlled ventilation adapted for the tropics. It is a functional lab testing system in real tropical conditions. As such, the results showing the ability to mitigate the risk of condensation by maintaining a dew point below 18 °C by the separate decentralized ventilation are significant and necessary for potential future implementation in buildings. In addition, the control system provides new proof of concept for distributed wireless sensors and control for reliable automation of the systems. These key results are presented along with the integrated design process and real-life tropical operation of the laboratory.

  18. Laboratory Study of Polychlorinated Biphenyl (PCB) Contamination and Mitigation in Buildings -- Part 4. Evaluation of the Activated Metal Treatment System (AMTS) for On-site Destruction of PCBs

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is the fourth, also the last, report of the report series entitled “Laboratory Study of Polychlorinated Biphenyl (PCB) Contamination and Mitigation in Buildings.” This report evaluates the performance of an on-site PCB destruction method, known as the AMTS method, developed ...

  19. Stratigraphy and Geologic Structure at the SCC and NISC Building Sites, Technical Area 3, Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavine, A.; Krier, D.; Caporuscio, F.; Gardner, J.

    1998-01-01

    Ten closely spaced, shallow (<100 ft) drill cores were obtained from the 1.22-Ma-old Bandelier Tuff at a 4-acre site for proposed construction at Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico. The goal of the investigation was to identify faults that may have potential for earthquake-induced surface ruptures at the site. Careful mapping of contact surfaces within the Bandelier Tuff was supplemented with results of geochemical analyses to establish unit boundaries with a high degree of accuracy. Analysis shows that the upper contact surface of Unit 3 of the Bandelier Tuff provides no evidence of faults beneath the building site, and that the subsurface structure is consistent with a shallowly dipping (< 2degree), unbroken block. Because no significant or cumulative faulting events have disturbed the site in the last 1.22 million years, it is unlikely that surface rupture will occur at the site in future large earthquakes. Uncertainty analysis suggests that this method would detect faults with ge2 ft of cumulative stratigraphic separation

  20. Cleanup of building 3019 and surroundings at ORNL following plutonium release of November 20, 1959

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parrott, J.R. Sr.

    1981-01-01

    A non-nuclear explosion involving an evaporator occurred in a shielded cell in the Radiochemical Processing Pilot Plant at Oak Ridge National Laboratory on November 20, 1959. Plutonium was released, probably as an aerosol of fine particles of plutonium oxide, via three principal routes: (1) cell ventilation system: collected about 1.5 g, completely removed from the air stream by roughing and absolute filters; (2) the cell door was blown open (but not off) to the outside, releasing approximately 600 mg to a limited area south and east of the building. The Graphite Reactor Building, directly east of Building 3019, was subjected to the highest level of contamination; and (3) pipe passages and service openings through the cell wall resulted in about 70 mg being spread to the building interior. The extent of contamination and the decontamination effort required for resumption of operations is discussed

  1. Present status and perspective of radiochemical analysis of radionuclides in Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Xiaolin; Olsson, Mattias; Togneri, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Radiochemical analysis plays a critical role in the determination of pure beta and alpha emitting radionuclides for environmental monitoring, radioecology, decommissioning, nuclear forensics and geological dating. A remarkable development on radiochemical analysis has been achieved in the past...... of radionuclides, especially in Nordic countries; some requirements from nuclear industries and research organizations, as well as perspectives on the development of radiochemical analysis are discussed....

  2. Final deactivation project report on the High Radiation Level Analytical Facility, Building 3019B at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the condition of the High Radiation Level Analytical Facility (Building 3019B) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) after completion of deactivation activities. This report identifies the activities conducted to place the facility in a safe and environmentally sound condition prior to transfer to the Environmental Restoration EM-40 Program. This document provides a history and description of the facility prior to the commencement of deactivation activities and documents the condition of the building after completion of all deactivation activities. Turnover items, such as the Post-Deactivation Surveillance and Maintenance (S&M) Plan, remaining hazardous materials inventory, radiological controls, safeguards and security, quality assurance, facility operations, and supporting documentation provided in the Nuclear Material and Facility Stabilization (EM-60) Turnover package are discussed. Building 3019B will require access to perform required S&M activities to maintain the building safety envelope. Building 3019B was stabilized during deactivation so that when transferred to the EM-40 Program, only a minimal S&M effort would be required to maintain the building safety envelope. Other than the minimal S&M activities the building will be unoccupied and the exterior doors locked to prevent unauthorized access. The building will be entered only to perform the required S&M until decommissioning activities begin.

  3. Final deactivation project report on the High Radiation Level Analytical Facility, Building 3019B at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the condition of the High Radiation Level Analytical Facility (Building 3019B) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) after completion of deactivation activities. This report identifies the activities conducted to place the facility in a safe and environmentally sound condition prior to transfer to the Environmental Restoration EM-40 Program. This document provides a history and description of the facility prior to the commencement of deactivation activities and documents the condition of the building after completion of all deactivation activities. Turnover items, such as the Post-Deactivation Surveillance and Maintenance (S ampersand M) Plan, remaining hazardous materials inventory, radiological controls, safeguards and security, quality assurance, facility operations, and supporting documentation provided in the Nuclear Material and Facility Stabilization (EM-60) Turnover package are discussed. Building 3019B will require access to perform required S ampersand M activities to maintain the building safety envelope. Building 3019B was stabilized during deactivation so that when transferred to the EM-40 Program, only a minimal S ampersand M effort would be required to maintain the building safety envelope. Other than the minimal S ampersand M activities the building will be unoccupied and the exterior doors locked to prevent unauthorized access. The building will be entered only to perform the required S ampersand M until decommissioning activities begin

  4. Auditable safety analysis: High Radiation Level Chemical Development Facility (Buildings 4507 and 4556), Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platfoot, J.H.

    1998-07-01

    The High-Radiation-Level Chemical Development Facility includes Buildings 4507 and 4556. Building 4507, located immediately to the west of Building 4500N and to the south of Building 4505, is a doubly contained three-level structure constructed in 1957. The most recent use of the facility was for recovery of multi-gram quantities of 244 Cm during the early 1970s and for Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) fuel studies in the late 1970s. It has remained in safe standby since 1980. Building 4556 is a below-grade filter pit located to the southwest of Building 4507 and was constructed in 1972. Ventilation from the cells in Building 4507 is passed through high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filtration in this building prior to being exhausted to the Building 3039 stack system. This building remains in operation to support ventilation requirements for Building 4507. This Auditable Safety Analysis (ASA) was developed in accordance with the requirements in Energy Systems Program Description FS-103PD, Safety Documentation, Revision 1. This ASA identifies and screens all hazards associated with Buildings 4507 and 4556. The only hazard not screened out and requiring further analysis following the initial screening process is radioactive material in the form of surface contamination. The results of this ASA indicate that the hazards associated with Buildings 4507 and 4556 do not pose a significant threat to workers, the public, or the environment

  5. Radiochemical determination of cesium-137 in seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunha, I.I.L.; Munita, C.S.; Paiva, R.P.

    1990-01-01

    Seawater samples were collected from the Atlantic Ocean, in the vicinity of Ubatuba (Sao Paulo State - Brazil), acidified to pH 1 and stored in polyethylene containers. Cesium was precipitated with ammonium phospho molybdate (AMP), synthesized in our laboratory. The elements potassium and rubidium present in the seawater are also coprecipitated by AMP and adequate decontamination of the cesium is made by preparing a column by mixing Cs-137 AMP precipitate and asbestos. The interfering elements were eluted with 1.0 M ammonium nitrate solution whereas cesium was eluted with 1.0 M sodium hydroxide solution. Cesium was reprecipitated by acidifying the solution with concentrated hydrochloric acid. The overall chemical yield of cesium was of 75%. (author)

  6. Radiochemical aspects of liquid mercury spallation targets

    CERN Document Server

    Neuhausen, Joerg; Eichler, Bernd; Eller, Martin; Horn, Susanne; Schumann, Dorothea; Stora, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    Liquid metal spallation targets using mercury as target material are used in state-of-the-art high power pulsed neutron sources that have been constructed in the USA and Japan within the last decade. Similar target concepts were also proposed for next generation ISOL, beta-beam and neutrino facilities. A large amount of radioactivity will be induced in the liquid metal during operation caused by the interaction of the target material with the intense proton beam. This radioactivity - carried by a wide range of radioisotopes of all the elements of the periodic table from hydrogen up to thallium - must be considered for the assessment of safe operation and maintenance procedures as well as for a final disposal of the used target material and components. This report presents an overview on chemical investigations performed in our laboratory that deal with the behavior of radionuclides in proton irradiated mercury samples. The solubility of elements in mercury was calculated using thermodynamical data obtained by...

  7. Cyclotron production, radiochemical separation and quality control of platinum radiotracers for toxicological studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonardi, M.; Birattari, C.; Groppi, F.; Arginelli, D.; Gini, L.; Gallorini, M.

    1998-01-01

    The increasing concentration of Pt, Pd and Rh in the environment is mainly due to the release of these elements from the catalytic converters of the motorvehicles. This situation makes it necessary to carry out metallotoxicological experiments on both cell cultures and laboratory animals, in order to assess their impact on living organisms after a Long Term and Low Level Exposure (LLE). Both nuclear reactions nat Ir(p,xn) and nat Os(α,xn) were investigated in the energy range up to 45 MeV for protons and 38 MeV for alpha-particles, in order to optimize the irradiation parameters for the production of 188,189,191 Pt. Several sets of thin- and thick-target excitation functions were determined experimentally by cyclotron irradiation at both Milano and Ispra cyclotrons. This paper reports the irradiation parameters studied and adopted and two radiochemical procedures for the separation of radio-Pt from an Os target, as well as from ruthenium, iridium and gold impurities. These procedures were used to obtain very high specific activity Pt radionuclides in No Carrier Added (NCA) form. Radionuclidic, radiochemical and chemical purity measurements were carried out by the use of several techniques like γ-spectrometry, ion-exchange radio-chromatography, atomic absorption spectrometry and neutron activation analysis. (author)

  8. RAPID AUTOMATED RADIOCHEMICAL ANALYZER FOR DETERMINATION OF TARGETED RADIONUCLIDES IN NUCLEAR PROCESS STREAMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Hara, Matthew J.; Durst, Philip C.; Grate, Jay W.; Egorov, Oleg; Devol, Timothy A.

    2008-01-01

    Some industrial process-scale plants require the monitoring of specific radionuclides as an indication of the composition of their feed streams or as indicators of plant performance. In this process environment, radiochemical measurements must be fast, accurate, and reliable. Manual sampling, sample preparation, and analysis of process fluids are highly precise and accurate, but tend to be expensive and slow. Scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have assembled and characterized a fully automated prototype Process Monitor instrument which was originally designed to rapidly measure Tc-99 in the effluent streams of the Waste Treatment Plant at Hanford, WA. The system is capable of a variety of tasks: extraction of a precise volume of sample, sample digestion/analyte redox adjustment, column-based chemical separations, flow-through radiochemical detection and data analysis/reporting. The system is compact, its components are fluidically inter-linked, and analytical results can be immediately calculated and electronically reported. It is capable of performing a complete analytical cycle in less than 15 minutes. The system is highly modular and can be adapted to a variety of sample types and analytical requirements. It exemplifies how automation could be integrated into reprocessing facilities to support international nuclear safeguards needs

  9. Environmental assessment for the proposed construction and operation of a Genome Sequencing Facility in Building 64 at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    This document is an Environmental Assessment (EA) for a proposed project to modify 14,900 square feet of an existing building (Building 64) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) to operate as a Genome Sequencing Facility. This EA addresses the potential environmental impacts from the proposed modifications to Building 64 and operation of the Genome Sequencing Facility. The proposed action is to modify Building 64 to provide space and equipment allowing LBL to demonstrate that the Directed DNA Sequencing Strategy can be scaled up from the current level of 750,000 base pairs per year to a facility that produces over 6,000,000 base pairs per year, while still retaining its efficiency.

  10. Analysis of environmental contamination resulting from catastrophic incidents: part 2. Building laboratory capability by selecting and developing analytical methodologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnuson, Matthew; Campisano, Romy; Griggs, John; Fitz-James, Schatzi; Hall, Kathy; Mapp, Latisha; Mullins, Marissa; Nichols, Tonya; Shah, Sanjiv; Silvestri, Erin; Smith, Terry; Willison, Stuart; Ernst, Hiba

    2014-11-01

    Catastrophic incidents can generate a large number of samples of analytically diverse types, including forensic, clinical, environmental, food, and others. Environmental samples include water, wastewater, soil, air, urban building and infrastructure materials, and surface residue. Such samples may arise not only from contamination from the incident but also from the multitude of activities surrounding the response to the incident, including decontamination. This document summarizes a range of activities to help build laboratory capability in preparation for sample analysis following a catastrophic incident, including selection and development of fit-for-purpose analytical methods for chemical, biological, and radiological contaminants. Fit-for-purpose methods are those which have been selected to meet project specific data quality objectives. For example, methods could be fit for screening contamination in the early phases of investigation of contamination incidents because they are rapid and easily implemented, but those same methods may not be fit for the purpose of remediating the environment to acceptable levels when a more sensitive method is required. While the exact data quality objectives defining fitness-for-purpose can vary with each incident, a governing principle of the method selection and development process for environmental remediation and recovery is based on achieving high throughput while maintaining high quality analytical results. This paper illustrates the result of applying this principle, in the form of a compendium of analytical methods for contaminants of interest. The compendium is based on experience with actual incidents, where appropriate and available. This paper also discusses efforts aimed at adaptation of existing methods to increase fitness-for-purpose and development of innovative methods when necessary. The contaminants of interest are primarily those potentially released through catastrophes resulting from malicious activity

  11. Post remedial action survey report for Building 003, Santa Susana Field Laboratories, Rockwell International, Ventura County, California, October 1981; April 1982. Surplus Facilities Management Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wynveen, R.A.; Smith, W.H.; Sholeen, C.M.; Justus, A.L.; Flynn, K.F.

    1983-10-01

    Rockwell International's Santa Susana Laboratories in Ventura County, California, have been the site of numerous Federally-funded projects involving the use of radioactive materials. One such project was the System for Nuclear Auxiliary Power (SNAP) Program. Building 003 on the Santa Susana site was used in conjunction with the SNAP Program and contained a highly shielded area designed for remote manipulation of radioactive materials. Such facilities are commonly referred to as hot caves. During the SNAP Program, fuel burnup samples were analyzed and irradiation experiments were evaluated in the Building 003 hot cave. Use of the hot cave facility ended when the SNAP Program was terminated in 1973. Subsequently, the Building 003 facilities were declared excess and were decontaminaed and decommissioned during the first half of calendar year 1975. At that time, the building was given a preliminary release. In 1981, a post-remedial-action (certification) survey of Building 003 was conducted at the request of the Department of Energy. Significant levels of residual contamination were found in various parts of the building. Consequently, additional decontamination was conducted by Rockwell International. A final post-remedial-action survey was conducted during April 1982, and those areas in Building 003 that had been found contaminated in 1981 were now found to be free of detectable radioactive contamination. Sludge samples taken from the sewer sump showed elevated levels of enriched uranium contaminant. Hence, all sewer lines within Building 003 were removed. This permitted unconditional release of the building for unrestricted use. However, the sewer lines exterior to the building, which remain in place, must be considered potentially contaminated and, therefore, subject to restricted use

  12. Do you want to build such a machine? : Designing a high energy proton accelerator for Argonne National Laboratory.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paris, E.

    2004-04-05

    Argonne National Laboratory's efforts toward researching, proposing and then building a high-energy proton accelerator have been discussed in a handful of studies. In the main, these have concentrated on the intense maneuvering amongst politicians, universities, government agencies, outside corporations, and laboratory officials to obtain (or block) approval and/or funds or to establish who would have control over budgets and research programs. These ''top-down'' studies are very important but they can also serve to divorce such proceedings from the individuals actually involved in the ground-level research which physically served to create theories, designs, machines, and experiments. This can lead to a skewed picture, on the one hand, of a lack of effect that so-called scientific and technological factors exert and, on the other hand, of the apparent separation of the so-called social or political from the concrete practice of doing physics. An exception to this approach can be found in the proceedings of a conference on ''History of the ZGS'' held at Argonne at the time of the Zero Gradient Synchrotron's decommissioning in 1979. These accounts insert the individuals quite literally as they are, for the most part, personal reminiscences of those who took part in these efforts on the ground level. As such, they are invaluable raw material for historical inquiry but generally lack the rigor and perspective expected in a finished historical work. The session on ''Constructing Cold War Physics'' at the 2002 annual History of Science Society Meeting served to highlight new approaches circulating towards history of science and technology in the post-WWII period, especially in the 1950s. There is new attention towards the effects of training large numbers of scientists and engineers as well as the caution not to equate ''national security'' with military preparedness, but rather

  13. Miniaturized chromatographic radiochemical procedure for 131I - MIBG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barboza, M.F. de; Pereira, N.S. de; Colturato, M.T.; Silva, C.P.G. da.

    1989-12-01

    Different solvents were used in paper chromatographic methods to obtain the best system in routine radiochemical control for 131 I-MIBG produced at IPEN-CNEN/SP. The dates were compared with those obtained with eletrophoresis method in buffer acetate, pH=4.5, 350V, during 40 minutes. The stability of the labeled compound store under 4 0 C was studied during 15 days. Miniaturized chromatographic procedures were established using Whatman 3MM (8x1cm) and n-butanol-:acetic acid: water (S:2:1) as a solvent. the Rf values were: 0.3 (I - ) and 1.0 (MIBG). The radiochemical purity was 99.3 and 99.2% (first day) obtained with eletrophoresis and miniaturized chromatographic procedures, respectively and, 84.7% after 15 days of its preparation. It is a rapid, practical and reproductive method. (author) [pt

  14. Rapid radiochemical separation of zirconium-95 and niobium-95

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downey, D.M.; McLaughlin, C.L.

    1983-01-01

    A rapid method for the quantitative separation of 95 Zr and 95 Nb has been developed. The method is based on the ion flotation of cationic zirconium complex ions with sodium lauryl sulfate (NaLS) from niobium which is masked with hydrogen peroxide. The separation was applied to mixtures of 95 Zr and 95 Nb initially in oxalic acid solution and quantitative recoveries of the radiochemically pure radioisotopes were obtained. (orig.)

  15. Rapid radiochemical separation of zirconium-95 and niobium-95

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Downey, D.M.; McLaughlin, C.L.

    1983-01-01

    A rapid method for the quantitative separation of /sup 95/Zr and /sup 95/Nb has been developed. The method is based on the ion flotation of cationic zirconium complex ions with sodium lauryl sulfate (NaLS) from niobium which is masked with hydrogen peroxide. The separation was applied to mixtures of /sup 95/Zr and /sup 95/Nb initially in oxalic acid solution and quantitative recoveries of the radiochemically pure radioisotopes were obtained.

  16. Radiochemical regularities of migration mobility of Chernobyl' discharge radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skorobogat'ko, E.P.; Rybalko, S.I.

    1992-01-01

    Data on the radionuclude (RN) migration in environment later the Chernobyl' accident are generalized. Introduction of fallout of the radioactive discharge into environment causes necessity to account and to study different factors of geochemical and physicochemical character determining further RN behaviour in the medium. For a well-founded forecast of the behaviour it is necessity to use a complex of radiochemical and physicochemical research, lying in the base of radiation monitoring of environment. 1 refs

  17. Electrochemistry as a basis for radiochemical generator systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentley, G.E.; Steinkruger, F.J.; Wanek, P.M.

    1984-01-01

    Ion exchange and solvent extraction techniques have been used extensively as the basis for radiochemical generators exploiting the differences in absorption behavior between the parent nuclide and its useful daughter nuclide. Many parent/daughter pairs of nuclides have sufficiently different polarographic half wave potentials so that their electrochemical behavior may be exploited for rapid separation of the daughter from the parent with minimal contamination of the product with the parent isotope

  18. Present status of radiochemical double β decay study (238U)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevallier, A.; Chevallier, J.; Escoubes, B.; Schulz, N.; Sens, J.C.; Madic, C.; Maillard, C.

    1989-01-01

    The reasons for which the 238 U is a suitable candidate for the β β decay processes are explained. The strategy adopted for the radiochemical separation of the 234 U is given. A chemical system based on extraction chromatography is applied. The Pu IV breakthrough curves obtained at 40C during 238 Pu/ 238 U separation cycles are presented. A short description of the chromatographic facility is given. The solution adopted for the low background α spectrometer is explained

  19. Radiochemical separation and their application to neutron activation analysis technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turel, Z.R.

    2013-01-01

    The present paper discusses the development of some new, rapid and selective method for the radiochemical separation and estimation of elements such as, Co(II) 2-3 , Ir(III) 4 , Au(III) 5 , Pt(IV), Pd(II), Os(IV) 6 , Cu(II), Ag(I), Mo(VI), Ni(II), Zn(II), Cd(II), Hg(II), Cs(I), Sb(III), La(III), Sc(III) etc. using various reagents. Various parameters such as pH, time of equilibrium, effect of anions and cations, effect of reagent etc. has been determined employing tracers of the elements under consideration and will be discussed. The method is made highly selective by the use of appropriate masking agent. The stoichiometry of metal reagent is determined by the substoichiometric method. Some examples of multielemental radiochemical separation methods thus developed which have been applied in determining the elements by radiochemical thermal neutron activation analysis will be presented and discussed. The implications of the results on the reference system will also be accounted. Statistical evaluation with reference to accuracy, precision and sensitivity will also be presented

  20. Standard practices for dissolving glass containing radioactive and mixed waste for chemical and radiochemical analysis

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2000-01-01

    1.1 These practices cover techniques suitable for dissolving glass samples that may contain nuclear wastes. These techniques used together or independently will produce solutions that can be analyzed by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS), radiochemical methods and wet chemical techniques for major components, minor components and radionuclides. 1.2 One of the fusion practices and the microwave practice can be used in hot cells and shielded hoods after modification to meet local operational requirements. 1.3 The user of these practices must follow radiation protection guidelines in place for their specific laboratories. 1.4 Additional information relating to safety is included in the text. 1.5 The dissolution techniques described in these practices can be used for quality control of the feed materials and the product of plants vitrifying nuclear waste materials in glass. 1.6 These pr...

  1. Decommissioning of Active Ventilation Systems in a Nuclear R and D Facility to Prepare for Building Demolition (Whiteshell Laboratories Decommissioning Project, Canada) - 13073

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilcox, Brian; May, Doug; Howlett, Don; Bilinsky, Dennis

    2013-01-01

    Whiteshell Laboratories (WL) is a nuclear research establishment owned by the Canadian government and operated by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) since the early 1960's. WL is currently under a decommissioning license and the mandate is to remediate the nuclear legacy liabilities in a safe and cost effective manner. The WL Project is the first major nuclear decommissioning project in Canada. A major initiative underway is to decommission and demolish the main R and D Laboratory complex. The Building 300 R and D complex was constructed to accommodate laboratories and offices which were mainly used for research and development associated with organic-cooled reactors, nuclear fuel waste management, reactor safety, advanced fuel cycles and other applications of nuclear energy. Building 300 is a three storey structure of approximately 16,000 m 2 . In order to proceed with building demolition, the contaminated systems inside the building have to be characterized, removed, and the waste managed. There is a significant focus on volume reduction of radioactive waste for the WL project. The active ventilation system is one of the significant contaminated systems in Building 300 that requires decommissioning and removal. The active ventilation system was designed to manage hazardous fumes and radioactivity from ventilation devices (e.g., fume hoods, snorkels and glove boxes) and to prevent the escape of airborne hazardous material outside of the laboratory boundary in the event of an upset condition. The system includes over 200 ventilation devices and 32 active exhaust fan units and high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters. The strategy to remove the ventilation system was to work from the laboratory end back to the fan/filter system. Each ventilation duct was radiologically characterized. Fogging was used to minimize loose contamination. Sections of the duct were removed by various cutting methods and bagged for temporary storage prior to disposition

  2. 324 Building Baseline Radiological Characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reeder, R.J.; Cooper, J.C.

    2010-01-01

    This report documents the analysis of radiological data collected as part of the characterization study performed in 1998. The study was performed to create a baseline of the radiological conditions in the 324 Building. A total of 85 technical (100 square centimeter (cm 2 )) smears were collected from the Room 147 hoods, the Shielded Materials Facility (SMF), and the Radiochemical Engineering Cells (REC). Exposure rate readings (window open and window closed) were taken at a distance of 2.5 centimeters (cm) and 30 cm from the surface of each smear. Gross beta-gamma and alpha counts of each smear were also performed. The smear samples were analyzed by gamma energy analysis (GEA). Alpha energy analysis (AEA) and strontium-90 analysis were also performed on selected smears. GEA results for one or more samples reported the presence of manganese-54, cobalt-60, silver-108m antimony-125, cesium-134, cesium-137, europium-154, europium-155, and americium-241. AEA results reported the presence of plutonium-239/240, plutonium-238/ 241 Am, curium-243/244, curium-242, and americium-243. Tables 5 through 9 present a summary by location of the estimated maximum removable and total contamination levels in the Room 147 hoods, the SMF, and the REC. The smear sample survey data and laboratory analytical results are presented in tabular form by sample in Appendix A. The Appendix A tables combine survey data documented in radiological survey reports found in Appendix B and laboratory analytical results reported in the 324 Building Physical and Radiological Characterization Study (Berk, Hill, and Landsman 1998), supplemented by the laboratory analytical results found in Appendix C.

  3. Building Connecticut's clinical biodosimetry laboratory surge capacity to mitigate the health consequences of radiological and nuclear disasters: A collaborative approach between the state biodosimetry laboratory and Connecticut's medical infrastructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albanese, Joseph; Martens, Kelly; Arnold, Jeffrey L.; Kelley, Katherine; Kristie, Virginia; Forte, Elaine; Schneider, Mark; Dainiak, Nicholas

    2007-01-01

    further optimize biodosimetry specimen processing protocols in Connecticut. Based on our findings, we conclude that clinical laboratory professionals are an important resource for assisting with the processing biodosimetry specimens that are used for triage of patients from accidental or terrorist-related mass-casualty radiological or nuclear catastrophies. The approach described in this paper to enroll and train clinical laboratorians in sample preparation for dicentric analysis forms the basis for the next step (namely, further training on harvesting cultured cells and preparing cytogenetic slides) in collaborative efforts between the State of Connecticut's Biodosimetry Laboratory and the state's medical infrastructure towards building laboratory surge capacity to estimate radiation dose in victims of a mass casualty event

  4. Final deactivation report on the radioisotope production Lab-C, Building 3030, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-08-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the condition of Bldg. 3030 completion of deactivation activities as outlined by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Materials and Facility Stabilization Program (EM-60) guidance documentation. This report outlines the activities conducted to place the facility in a safe and environmentally sound condition for transfer to DOE's Office of Environmental Restoration Program (EM-40). This report provides profile of Bldg. 3030 before and after deactivation activities. Turnover items, such as the Postdeactivation Surveillance ampersand Maintenance Plan, remaining hazardous materials, radiological controls, Safeguards and Security, QA, facility operations, and supporting documentation provided in the Office of Nuclear Materials and Facility Stabilization Program (EM-60) Turnover package are discussed. Building 3030 will require access to facilitate required S ampersand M activities to maintain the building safety envelope. Building 3030 was stabilized during deactivation so that when transferred to the EM-40 program, only a minimal S ampersand M effort would be required to maintain the building's safety envelope. Other than the minimal S ampersand M activities, the building will be unoccupied and the exterior doors locked to prevent unauthorized access. The building will be entered only for required S ampersand M. All materials have been removed from the building and the hot cell, and all utility systems, piping, and alarms have been deactivated

  5. Final deactivation report on the radioisotope production Lab-D, Building 3031, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-08-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the condition of Bldg. 3031 after completion of deactivation activities as outlined by the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Materials and Facility Stabilization Program (EM-60) guidance documentation. This report outlines the activities conducted to place the facility in a safe and environmentally sound condition for transfer to the Department of Energy Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40) Program. This report provides a profile of Bldg. 3031 before and after deactivation activities. Turnover items, such as the Postdeactivation Surveillance ampersand Maintenance Plan, remaining hazardous materials, radiological controls, Safeguards and Security, quality assurance, facility operations, and supporting documentation provided in the Office of Nuclear Materials and Facility Stabilization Program (EM-60) Turnover package, are discussed. Building 3031 will require access to facilitate required surveillance and maintenance activities to maintain the building safety envelope. Building 3031 was stabilized during deactivation so that when transferred to the EM-40 program, only a minimal surveillance and maintenance effort would be required to maintain the building safety envelope. Other than the minimal surveillance and maintenance activities, the building will be unoccupied and the exterior doors locked to prevent unauthorized access. The building will be entered only to perform the required surveillance and maintenance. All materials have been removed from the building and the hot cell, and all utility systems, piping, and alarms have been deactivated

  6. Functional and operational requirements document : building 1012, Battery and Energy Storage Device Test Facility, Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johns, William H. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2013-11-01

    This report provides an overview of information, prior studies, and analyses relevant to the development of functional and operational requirements for electrochemical testing of batteries and energy storage devices carried out by Sandia Organization 2546, Advanced Power Sources R&D. Electrochemical operations for this group are scheduled to transition from Sandia Building 894 to a new Building located in Sandia TA-II referred to as Building 1012. This report also provides background on select design considerations and identifies the Safety Goals, Stakeholder Objectives, and Design Objectives required by the Sandia Design Team to develop the Performance Criteria necessary to the design of Building 1012. This document recognizes the Architecture-Engineering (A-E) Team as the primary design entity. Where safety considerations are identified, suggestions are provided to provide context for the corresponding operational requirement(s).

  7. Evolution and applications of radiochemical procedures. From Marie Curie to Darleane Hoffman

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contis, E. T.; Rengan, K.

    1996-01-01

    Marie Curie carried out the first radiochemical separations which eventually lead to the discovery of polonium and radium, two new elements. Nearly a century later Darleane Hoffman and her collaborators are devising new radiochemical separation procedures for studying the chemical properties of newly discovered transactinide elements. Safety requirements as well as changes necessitated by fast decaying radionuclides have transformed the nature of radiochemical separations. Further, applications in a wide variety of areas such as analysis of trace elements in food to radioimmunoassay have broadened the use of radiochemical separations. Examples of some early, historically important, radiochemical separations are described in this article. In addition, recent trends in the use of radiochemical separations in neutron activation analysis, in dating applications, in fission product studies and in the study of transactinide elements are briefly described with specific examples. (author). 52 refs

  8. Self-decomposition of radiochemicals. Principles, control, observations and effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, E.A.

    1976-01-01

    The aim of the booklet is to remind the established user of radiochemicals of the problems of self-decomposition and to inform those investigators who are new to the applications of radiotracers. The section headings are: introduction; radionuclides; mechanisms of decomposition; effects of temperature; control of decomposition; observations of self-decomposition (sections for compounds labelled with (a) carbon-14, (b) tritium, (c) phosphorus-32, (d) sulphur-35, (e) gamma- or X-ray emitting radionuclides, decomposition of labelled macromolecules); effects of impurities in radiotracer investigations; stability of labelled compounds during radiotracer studies. (U.K.)

  9. Mercury determination in geological samples using radiochemical separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncalves, Cristina; Favaro, Deborah I.T.

    1997-01-01

    In this work, a radiochemical procedure is presented to increase the neutron activation analysis sensitivity. After irradiation, geological reference materials - Buffalo River Sediment (BRS- - NIST SRM 2704), Lake Sediment (BCR - CRM 280) and GXR-5 (USGS - AEG) - were leached with aqua regia in a Parr bomb placed in a domestic microwave oven and then bismuth diethyl dithiocarbamate was used to pre concentrate mercury by solvent extraction. This procedure eliminates the interference from 279 keV Se-75 photopeak and background radiation from 511 keV Cu-64 photopeak. (author). 15 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  10. Low temperature radio-chemical energy conversion processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomberg, H.J.

    1986-01-01

    This patent describes a radio-chemical method of converting radiated energy into chemical energy form comprising the steps of: (a) establishing a starting chemical compound in the liquid phase that chemically reacts endothermically to radiation and heat energy to produce a gaseous and a solid constituent of the compound, (b) irradiating the compound in its liquid phase free of solvents to chemically release therefrom in response to the radiation the gaseous and solid constituents, (c) physically separating the solid and gaseous phase constituents from the liquid, and (d) chemically processing the constituents to recover therefrom energy stored therein by the irradiation step (b)

  11. Rapid, radiochemical-ligand binding assay for methotrexate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caston, J.D.

    1976-01-01

    A radiochemical ligand binding assay for methotrexate is provided. A binder factor comprising a partially purified dihydrofolic acid reductase preparation is employed. The binder factor is conveniently prepared by homogenizing a factor containing animal organ such as liver, and extracting with isotonic saline and ammonium sulfate. A binder cofactor, NADPH 2 , is also employed in the binding reaction. The procedure contemplates both direct and sequential assay techniques, and it is not interfered with by vast excesses of many natural folate derivatives. 12 claims, 6 drawing figures

  12. Radiochemical schemes of obtaining 89Sr and 90Y radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usarov, Z. O.

    2010-03-01

    Key words: strontium-89, yttrium-90, extraction and extraction-chromatographic purification of radionuclides, radiopharmaceuticals. Subjects of research: strontium-89 and yttrium-90 radionuclides and their chloride forms. Purpose of work is developing of radiochemical technologies on obtaining of 89 Sr and 90 Y on the WWR-SM reactor with high radionuclide purity. Methods of research: extraction and extraction-chromatographic methods of radionuclides separation, beta- and gamma-spectrometric methods of activity measuring. The results obtained and their novelty: Were determined the conformity to laws of Y and Sr distribution in two-phase systems TBP-HNO 3 , TBP-NH 4 NO 3 , TBP-HCI, HDEHP-NO 3 , HDEHP-NH 4 NO 3 and HDEHP-HCI. Were determined the conformity to laws of Y and Sr distribution in systems with craun ethers DB-18K-6 and DTBDB-18K-6 from water solutions of HNO 3 . Radiochemical technologies on obtaining of 89 Sr and 90 Y radionuclides including radiochemical process of yttrium target with using the systems TBP-HNO 3 and HDEHP/Teflone were developed. Practical value: the radiochemical technology of obtaining 89 Sr with high radionuclide purity was developed. The method of preparation a chloride compound of 89 SrCl 2 which is used as a drug form for preparation of 89 Sr- 'Metastron' was developed. The relatively simple method of on the way obtaining 90 Y in the reactor with high radionuclidic purity that is useful for follow using in medical practice was offered. Degree of embed and economic effectivity: the developed technologies have approbation in manufacturing conditions in Radiopreparat Enterprise of INP AS RU and were offered for receiving of domestic preparations against of import foreign analogues. The statement about using the invention by obtained patent is attached to dissertation. Field of application: the received results will be introduced in manufacture at Radiopreparat Enterprise of INP AS RU for receiving of domestic preparations

  13. Preparation of proton rich radionuclides in support of radiochemical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jerome, Simon; Larijani, Cyrus; Parker, David

    2012-01-01

    The production of proton rich radionuclides supports a wide range of radiochemical analyses via radioactive yield tracers ( 95m Tc and 236 Pu). In recent years, NPL and the University of Birmingham cyclotron have collaborated to produce these, and other, radionuclides. - Highlights: ► In this paper we options for the production of Tc and Pu tracers. ► The irradiation and measurement of targets producing Tc-95 m and Pu-236 are described. ► Options for production are discussed. ► The results of this study and future work needed are described.

  14. Studies on some Indian paints for radiochemical plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahesh Kumar, V.V.; Srinivasan, R.; Natarajan, R.

    1996-01-01

    The choice of paints in areas subjected to contamination and radiation in nuclear installation need special attention. The types of generic coatings are examined with reference to these requirements. Among those examined, certain types of epoxy paints are found to be attractive for these applications. Samples of epoxy paints obtained from some Indian manufacturers are tested for their suitability. Decontaminability and radiation resistance properties are also evaluated with special reference to radiochemical plants. Important specifications for such applications are listed. This report summarizes the results of these studies. (author)

  15. Rapid Radiochemical Analyses in Support of Fukushima Nuclear Accident - 13196

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxwell, Sherrod L.; Culligan, Brian K.; Hutchison, Jay B. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Building 735-B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    There is an increasing need to develop faster analytical methods for emergency response, including emergency soil and air filter samples [1, 2]. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed analyses on samples received from Japan in April, 2011 as part of a U.S. Department of Energy effort to provide assistance to the government of Japan, following the nuclear event at Fukushima Daiichi, resulting from the earthquake and tsunami on March 11, 2011. Of particular concern was whether it was safe to plant rice in certain areas (prefectures) near Fukushima. The primary objectives of the sample collection, sample analysis, and data assessment teams were to evaluate personnel exposure hazards, identify the nuclear power plant radiological source term and plume deposition, and assist the government of Japan in assessing any environmental and agricultural impacts associated with the nuclear event. SRNL analyzed approximately 250 samples and reported approximately 500 analytical method determinations. Samples included soil from farmland surrounding the Fukushima reactors and air monitoring samples of national interest, including those collected at the U.S. Embassy and American military bases. Samples were analyzed for a wide range of radionuclides, including strontium-89, strontium-90, gamma-emitting radionuclides, and plutonium, uranium, americium and curium isotopes. Technical aspects of the rapid soil and air filter analyses will be described. The extent of radiostrontium contamination was a significant concern. For {sup 89,90}Sr analyses on soil samples, a rapid fusion technique using 1.5 gram soil aliquots to enable a Minimum Detectable Activity (MDA) of <1 pCi {sup 89,90}Sr /g of soil was employed. This sequential technique has been published recently by this laboratory for actinides and radiostrontium in soil and vegetation [3, 4]. It consists of a rapid sodium hydroxide fusion, pre-concentration steps using iron hydroxide and calcium fluoride

  16. TECHNICAL EVALUATION OF SOIL REMEDIATION ALTERNATIVES AT THE BUILDING 812 OPERABLE UNIT, LAWRENCE LIVERMORE NATIONAL LABORATORY SITE 300

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eddy-Dilek, C.; Miles, D.; Abitz, R.

    2009-08-14

    The Department of Energy Livermore Site Office requested a technical review of remedial alternatives proposed for the Building 812 Operable Unit, Site 300 at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The team visited the site and reviewed the alternatives proposed for soil remediation in the draft RI/FS and made the following observations and recommendations. Based on the current information available for the site, the team did not identify a single technology that would be cost effective and/or ecologically sound to remediate DU contamination at Building 812 to current remedial goals. Soil washing is not a viable alternative and should not be considered at the site unless final remediation levels can be negotiated to significantly higher levels. This recommendation is based on the results of soil washing treatability studies at Fernald and Ashtabula that suggest that the technology would only be effective to address final remediation levels higher than 50 pCi/g. The technical review team identified four areas of technical uncertainty that should be resolved before the final selection of a preferred remedial strategy is made. Areas of significant technical uncertainty that should be addressed include: (1) Better delineation of the spatial distribution of surface contamination and the vertical distribution of subsurface contamination in the area of the firing table and associated alluvial deposits; (2) Chemical and physical characterization of residual depleted uranium (DU) at the site; (3) Determination of actual contaminant concentrations in air particulates to support risk modeling; and (4) More realistic estimation of cost for remedial alternatives, including soil washing, that were derived primarily from vendor estimates. Instead of conducting the planned soil washing treatability study, the team recommends that the site consider a new phased approach that combines additional characterization approaches and technologies to address the technical uncertainty in

  17. Technical Evaluation of Soil Remediation Alternatives at the Building 812 Operable Unit, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eddy-Dilek, C.; Miles, D.; Abitz, R.

    2009-01-01

    The Department of Energy Livermore Site Office requested a technical review of remedial alternatives proposed for the Building 812 Operable Unit, Site 300 at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The team visited the site and reviewed the alternatives proposed for soil remediation in the draft RI/FS and made the following observations and recommendations. Based on the current information available for the site, the team did not identify a single technology that would be cost effective and/or ecologically sound to remediate DU contamination at Building 812 to current remedial goals. Soil washing is not a viable alternative and should not be considered at the site unless final remediation levels can be negotiated to significantly higher levels. This recommendation is based on the results of soil washing treatability studies at Fernald and Ashtabula that suggest that the technology would only be effective to address final remediation levels higher than 50 pCi/g. The technical review team identified four areas of technical uncertainty that should be resolved before the final selection of a preferred remedial strategy is made. Areas of significant technical uncertainty that should be addressed include: (1) Better delineation of the spatial distribution of surface contamination and the vertical distribution of subsurface contamination in the area of the firing table and associated alluvial deposits; (2) Chemical and physical characterization of residual depleted uranium (DU) at the site; (3) Determination of actual contaminant concentrations in air particulates to support risk modeling; and (4) More realistic estimation of cost for remedial alternatives, including soil washing, that were derived primarily from vendor estimates. Instead of conducting the planned soil washing treatability study, the team recommends that the site consider a new phased approach that combines additional characterization approaches and technologies to address the technical uncertainty in

  18. Final deactivation report on the Radioisotope Production Lab-E, Building 3032, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the condition of Bldg. 3032, after completion of deactivation activities as outlined by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Materials and Facility Stabilization Program (EM-60) guidance documentation. This report outlines the activities conducted to place the facility in a safe and environmentally sound condition for transfer to the DOE Office of Environmental Restoration Program (EM-40). This report provides a history and profile of Bldg. 3032 prior to commencing deactivation activities and a profile of the building after completion of deactivation activities. Turnover items, such as the Postdeactivation Surveillance ampersand Maintenance Plan, remaining hazardous materials, radiological controls, Safeguards and Security, quality assurance, facility operations, and supporting documentation provided in the EM-60 turnover package are discussed. Building 3032 will be used as the Health Physics Office for the Isotopes Facilities Deactivation Program area and will require access for these offices and to facilitate required surveillance and maintenance (S ampersand M) activities to maintain the building safety envelope. Bldg. 3032 was stabilized during deactivation so that when transferred to the EM-40 program, only a minimal S ampersand M effort would be required to maintain the building safety envelope. All materials have been removed from the building, and all utility systems, piping, and alarms have been deactivated except electricity and steam needed for the office areas

  19. Assessment of radiochemical purity of [{sup 18}F]fludeoxyglucose by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacerda, Aline E.; Silva, Juliana B.; Silveira, Marina B.; Ferreira, Soraya Z., E-mail: radiofarmacoscdtn@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Unidade de Pesquisa e Producao de Radiofarmacos

    2011-07-01

    The quality control of [{sup 18}F]fludeoxyglucose ({sup 18}FDG) has received attention due to its increasing clinical use. Although the quality requirements of {sup 18}FDG are established in various pharmacopoeia, the suitability of all testing methods used should be verified under actual conditions of use and documented. The aim of this study was to develop a high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) method for radiochemical purity evaluation of {sup 18}FDG, based on pharmacopoeia references, and to verify its suitability for routine quality control in our centre. HPLC analysis was performed with an Agilent HPLC. {sup 18}FDG and impurities were separated on an anion-exchange column by isocratic elution with 0.1 M NaOH as the mobile phase. Detection was accomplished with refractive index and NaI (Tl) scintillation detectors. The flow rate of the mobile phase was set at 0.8 mL/min and the column temperature was kept at 35 deg C. Specificity, linearity, precision and robustness were assessed to verify if the method was adequate for its intended purpose. Retention time of {sup 18}FDG was not affected by the presence of other components of the formulation and a good peak resolution was achieved. The analytical curve of {sup 18}FDG was linear, with a correlation coefficient value of 0.9995. Intraday repeatable precision, reported as the relative standard deviation, was 0.11%. Analytical procedure remained unaffected by small variations in mobile phase flow rate. Results evidenced that HPLC is suitable for radiochemical purity evaluation of {sup 18}FDG, considering operational conditions of our laboratory. (author)

  20. On-Line Monitoring for Control and Safeguarding of Radiochemical Streams at Spent Fuel Reprocessing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryan, Samuel A.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Billing, Justin M.; Casella, Amanda J.; Johnsen, Amanda M.; Peterson, James M.

    2009-01-01

    Advanced techniques enabling enhanced safeguarding of the spent fuel reprocessing plants are urgently needed. Our approach is based on prerequisite that real time monitoring of the solvent extraction flowsheets provides unique capability to quickly detect unwanted manipulations with fissile isotopes present in the radiochemical streams during reprocessing activities. The methods used to monitor these processes must be robust and must be able to withstand harsh radiation and chemical environments. A new on-line monitoring system satisfying these requirements and featuring Raman spectroscopy combined with a Coriolis and conductivity probes, has been recently developed by our research team. It provides immediate chemical data and flow parameters of high-level radioactive waste streams with high brine content generated during retrieval activities from Hanford nuclear waste storage tanks. The nature of the radiochemical streams at the spent fuel reprocessing plant calls for additional spectroscopic information, which can be gained by the utilization of UV-vis-NIR capabilities. Raman and UV-vis-NIR spectroscopies are analytical techniques that have extensively been extensively applied for measuring the various organic and inorganic compounds including actinides. The corresponding spectrometers used under the laboratory conditions are easily convertible to the process-friendly configurations allowing remote measurements under the flow conditions. A fiber optic Raman probe allows monitoring of the high concentration species encountered in both aqueous and organic phases within the UREX suite of flowsheets, including metal oxide ions, such as uranyl, components of the organic solvent, inorganic oxo-anions, and water. The actinides and lanthanides are monitored remotely by UV-vis-NIR spectroscopy in aqueous and organic phases. In this report, we will present our recent results on spectroscopic measurements of simulant flowsheet solutions and commercial fuels available at

  1. Assessment of radiochemical purity of [18F]fludeoxyglucose by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacerda, Aline E.; Silva, Juliana B.; Silveira, Marina B.; Ferreira, Soraya Z.

    2011-01-01

    The quality control of [ 18 F]fludeoxyglucose ( 18 FDG) has received attention due to its increasing clinical use. Although the quality requirements of 18 FDG are established in various pharmacopoeia, the suitability of all testing methods used should be verified under actual conditions of use and documented. The aim of this study was to develop a high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) method for radiochemical purity evaluation of 18 FDG, based on pharmacopoeia references, and to verify its suitability for routine quality control in our centre. HPLC analysis was performed with an Agilent HPLC. 18 FDG and impurities were separated on an anion-exchange column by isocratic elution with 0.1 M NaOH as the mobile phase. Detection was accomplished with refractive index and NaI (Tl) scintillation detectors. The flow rate of the mobile phase was set at 0.8 mL/min and the column temperature was kept at 35 deg C. Specificity, linearity, precision and robustness were assessed to verify if the method was adequate for its intended purpose. Retention time of 18 FDG was not affected by the presence of other components of the formulation and a good peak resolution was achieved. The analytical curve of 18 FDG was linear, with a correlation coefficient value of 0.9995. Intraday repeatable precision, reported as the relative standard deviation, was 0.11%. Analytical procedure remained unaffected by small variations in mobile phase flow rate. Results evidenced that HPLC is suitable for radiochemical purity evaluation of 18 FDG, considering operational conditions of our laboratory. (author)

  2. Characterization of filter cartridges from the IEA-R1 reactor by radiochemical method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geraldo, Bianca; Vicente, Roberto; Ferreira, Robson J.; Goes, Marcos M.; Marumo, Julio T.

    2015-01-01

    The filter cartridges used in water purification system of research nuclear reactor IEA-R1 are considered radioactive wastes after their useful life. The characterization of these wastes is one of the stages of management, which aims to identify and quantify the radionuclides present, including those known as 'difficult to measure' (DTM) radionuclides. Establish a radiochemical analysis methodology for this type of waste is a difficult job, not only by the application of these techniques, but also by the amount of radionuclides that should be analyzed. In the waste produced in a nuclear reactor, the most important radionuclides are fission products, activation products and transuranic elements. Since these radionuclides emit gamma radiation not measurable in its decay process and consequently are difficult to measure, their concentrations can be estimated by indirect methods such as scale factors. This method is used to evaluate the DTM concentration, which is represented by alpha and beta nuclides using the correlation between them and the radionuclide key, a gamma emitter. The objective of this work is to describe a radiochemical analysis methodology for gamma emitter nuclides, present in the filter cartridges, evaluating the activity and concentrations by destructive assays. At the same time, two studies have been performed by non-destructive assays, the first one based on dose rates and the point kernel method to correlate the results and the second one based on calibration efficiency with Monte Carlo method. These studies belong to the radioactive waste characterization program that has been conducted at the Waste Management Laboratory of Nuclear and Energy Research Institute, IPEN-CNEN/SP. (author)

  3. Characterization of filter cartridges from the IEA-R1 reactor by radiochemical method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geraldo, Bianca; Vicente, Roberto; Ferreira, Robson J.; Goes, Marcos M.; Marumo, Julio T., E-mail: bgeraldo@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The filter cartridges used in water purification system of research nuclear reactor IEA-R1 are considered radioactive wastes after their useful life. The characterization of these wastes is one of the stages of management, which aims to identify and quantify the radionuclides present, including those known as 'difficult to measure' (DTM) radionuclides. Establish a radiochemical analysis methodology for this type of waste is a difficult job, not only by the application of these techniques, but also by the amount of radionuclides that should be analyzed. In the waste produced in a nuclear reactor, the most important radionuclides are fission products, activation products and transuranic elements. Since these radionuclides emit gamma radiation not measurable in its decay process and consequently are difficult to measure, their concentrations can be estimated by indirect methods such as scale factors. This method is used to evaluate the DTM concentration, which is represented by alpha and beta nuclides using the correlation between them and the radionuclide key, a gamma emitter. The objective of this work is to describe a radiochemical analysis methodology for gamma emitter nuclides, present in the filter cartridges, evaluating the activity and concentrations by destructive assays. At the same time, two studies have been performed by non-destructive assays, the first one based on dose rates and the point kernel method to correlate the results and the second one based on calibration efficiency with Monte Carlo method. These studies belong to the radioactive waste characterization program that has been conducted at the Waste Management Laboratory of Nuclear and Energy Research Institute, IPEN-CNEN/SP. (author)

  4. Next Steps on the Road to Zero Energy Buildings: Report on October 23-24, 2000 Meeting Held at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comer, Jerry [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2000-11-01

    This report summarizes a 2-day meeting held October 23-24, 2000 at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado. Approximately 60 individuals attended the meeting from the following segments: building industry; solar thermal manufacturers (solar hot water, SHW); photovoltaic manufacturers (PV); generalists (consultants and interested parties involved in renewable energy); National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Sandia National Laboratory (SNL); and US Department of Energy. The objectives of the meeting included: acquaint attendees with the Zero Energy Buildings (ZEB) goal; determine the most cost effective methods of incorporating solar technologies in production-built homes; identify 'make or break' areas to focus on; outline 6 month, 1 year, 5 year strategies and tactics; and create action plan with designated responsibilities. The format of the meeting was designed to maximize interaction between all attendees and to create a 'working' environment where a roadmap and action plans to support ZEB efforts would be created. Presentations the morning of the first day set the context for the discussions and breakout sessions that followed. The agenda was modified at the end of the first day of meetings to reflect the input of attendees. The revised agenda is included in the Appendix.

  5. Final deactivation report on the radioisotope production Lab-H, Building 3118, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-08-01

    This report outlines the activities conducted to place the facility in a safe and environmentally sound condition for transfer to the DOE Office of Environmental Restoration Program (EM-40). This report provides a history and profile of Bldg. 3118 prior to and after deactivation. Turnover items (e.g. Surveillance ampersand Maintenance Plant, remaining materials, etc.) are discussed. Building 3118 was stabilized during deactivation so that when transferred to the EM-40 program, only minimal S ampersand M is required (other than that, the building will be unoccupied and the exterior doors locked)

  6. A radiochemical analyses of metastudtite and leachates from spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNamara, Bruce K.; Hanson, Brady D.; Buck, Edgar C.; Soderquist, Chuck Z.

    2004-01-01

    Immersion of commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) in deionized water produced two novel corrosion products after a two-year contact period. Another unexpected result was that suspensions of aggregates were observed to form at the air-water interface for each of five samples. These solids were characterized, by SEM and XRD to be nearly pure metastudtite (UO4-2H2O); while the corrosion present on the surface of the fuel itself was determined to be studtite (UO4-2H2O). The occurrence of the floating phase prompted a radiochemical analysis of these solids. This chemical analysis was a unique opportunity to study the relatively pure corrosion phase for incorporation of radionuclides. The analysis indicated that high concentration of 90Sr, 137Cs, 99Tc, and that lower concentrations 237Np, 238, 239Pu and 243, 244Cm had partitioned with the air-water interface aggregates. The concentrations of 241Am were two orders of magnitude lower than the expected inventory in the suspended solids. The radiochemical analyses of the several leachate samples provide preliminary solubility data for the hydrogen peroxide leaching of CSNF and these data are compared to leaching of the same fuel in J-13 and deionized waters. The extent of fuel dissolution in these media are discussed

  7. RADIOCHEMICAL YIELDS OF GRAFT POLYMERIZATION REACTIONS OF CELLULOSE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arthur, Jr, J C; Blouin, F A

    1963-12-15

    The preparation of radioinduced graft polymers of cotton cellulose, while retaining the fibrous nature and high molecular weight of the cellulose, depended primarily on the radiochemical yields of cellulose reactions and of graft polymerization reactions. Yields of the initial major molecular changes in cellulosic polymer indicated that, in the case of scission of the molecule and carboxyl group formation, chain reactions were not initiated by radiation; however, in the case of carbonyl group formation chain reactions were initiated but quickly terminated. Generally, experimental procedures, used in graft polymerization reactions, were: simultaneous irradiation reactions, that is, application of monomers or solutions of monomers to cellulose or chemically modified celluloses, then irradiation; and post-irradiation reactions, that is, irradiation of cellulose or chemically modified celluloses, then after removal from the field of radiation, contacting the irradiated cellulose with monomer. Some of the most important factors influencing the radiochemical yields of graft polymerization reactions, of styrene and acrylonitrile onto cellulose were: concentration of monomer in treating solution; solvent; ratio of monomer solution to cellulose; prior chemical modification of cellulose; and absence of oxygen, particularly in post-irradiation reactions. Experimental data are presented, and the direct and indirect effects of Co/sup 60/ gamma radiation on these reactions are discussed. (auth)

  8. Specific application for Oak Ridge National Laboratory dismantlement of Building 3004. Appendix A - Quality assurance plan; Appendix B - Records management plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-03-01

    This quality assurance (QA) plan defines the QA requirements for the dismantlement and removal of Building 3004 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The building is a four-story wooden trained structure with wooden siding, which resides approximately 150 ft west of the Bulk Shielding Reactor, and only several feet away from the visitors entrance to the Graphite Reactor museum. Complete descriptions and sketches are in the Performance Specification document for this project. This project is being conducted as a non-CERCLA maintenance action. This plan is an appendix to the QA plan for the ORNL Environmental Restoration (ER) Program. ORNL/ER-225, which is the source of the project QA requirements, tailors those QA requirements to the specific needs of this project as defined in ORNL/ER-225. Project-specific description and organization are also provided in this plan. Appendix B, Records Management Plan, is included

  9. Decontamination and dismantlement of the building 594 waste ion exchange facility at Argonne National Laboratory-East project final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiese, E. C.

    1998-01-01

    The Building 594 D and D Project was directed toward the following goals: Removal of any radioactive and hazardous materials associated with the Waste Ion Exchange Facility; Decontamination of the Waste Ion Exchange Facility to unrestricted use levels; Demolition of Building 594; and Documentation of all project activities affecting quality (i.e., waste packaging, instrument calibration, audit results, and personnel exposure) These goals had been set in order to eliminate the radiological and hazardous safety concerns inherent in the Waste Ion Exchange Facility and to allow, upon completion of the project, unescorted and unmonitored access to the area. The ion exchange system and the resin contained in the system were the primary areas of concern, while the condition of the building which housed the system was of secondary concern. ANL-E health physics technicians characterized the Building 594 Waste Ion Exchange Facility in September 1996. The characterization identified a total of three radionuclides present in the Waste Ion Exchange Facility with a total activity of less than 5 microCi (175 kBq). The radionuclides of concern were Co 60 , Cs 137 , and Am 241 . The highest dose rates observed during the project were associated with the resin in the exchange vessels. DOE Order 5480.2A establishes the maximum whole body exposure for occupational workers at 5 rem (50 mSv)/yr; the administrative limit at ANL-E is 1 rem/yr (10 mSv/yr)

  10. BUILDING 341 Seismic Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halle, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    The Seismic Evaluation of Building 341 located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, California has been completed. The subject building consists of a main building, Increment 1, and two smaller additions; Increments 2 and 3.

  11. Building Blocks of Dust and Large Organic Molecules: a Coordinated Laboratory and Astronomical Study of AGB Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Michael C.; Gottlieb, Carl A.; Cernicharo, Jose

    2017-06-01

    The increased sensitivity and angular resolution of high-altitude ground-based interferometers in the sub-millimeter band has enabled the physics and chemistry of carbon- and oxygen-rich evolved stars to be re-examined at an unprecedented level of detail. Observations of rotational lines in the inner envelope - the region within a few stellar radii of the central star where the molecular seeds of dust are formed - allows one to critically assess models of dust growth. Interferometric observations of the outer envelope provide stringent tests of neutral and ionized molecule formation. All of the astronomical studies are crucially dependent on precise laboratory measurements of the rotational spectra of new species and of vibrationally excited levels of known molecules and their rare isotopic species. By means of a closely coordinated laboratory and astronomical program, a number of exotic species including the disilicon carbide SiCSi, titanium oxides TiO and TiO_2, and carbon chain anions ranging from CN^- to C_8H^- have recently been observed in evolved stars. This talk will provide overview of these findings, and how they impact current models of the ``chemical laboratories'' of evolved stars. Ongoing laboratory studies of small silicon-bearing molecules such as H_2SiO_2 and vibrationally excited SiC_2 will be highlighted.

  12. Building an integrated nuclear engineering and nuclear science human resources pipeline at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sneed, A.; Sikorski, B.; Lineberry, M.; Jolly, J.

    2004-01-01

    In a joint effort with the Argonne National Laboratory - West (ANL-W), the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) has assumed the lead role for nuclear energy reactor research for the United States Government. In 2005, these two laboratories will be combined into one entity, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). There are two objectives for the INL: (1) to act as the lead systems integrator for the Department of Energy's Office of Nuclear Energy Science and Technology and, (2) to establish a Center for Advanced Energy Studies. Focusing on the Center for Advanced Energy Studies, this paper presents a Human Resources Pipeline Model outlining a nuclear educational pathway that leads to university and industry research partnerships. The pathway progresses from education to employment and into retirement. Key to the model is research and mentoring and their impact upon each stage. The Center's success will be the result of effective and advanced communications, faculty/student involvement, industry support, inclusive broadbased involvement, effective long-term partnering, and increased federal and state support. (author)

  13. Pesticide Environmental Fate Research for the 21st Century: Building Bridges Between Laboratory and Field Studies at Varying Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accurate determination of predicted environmental concentrations (PECs) is a continuing and often elusive goal of pesticide risk assessment. PECs are typically derived using simulation models that depend on laboratory generated data for key input parameters (t1/2, Koc, etc.). Model flexibility in ...

  14. Final Deactivation Project report on the Alpha Powder Facility, Building 3028, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    This report documents the condition of the Alpha Powder Facility (APF), Building 3028, after completion of deactivation activities. Activities conducted to place the facility in a safe and environmentally sound condition for transfer to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40) program are outlined. A history and profile of the facility prior to commencing deactivation activities and a profile of the building after completion of deactivation activities are provided. Turnover items, such as the post-deactivation surveillance and maintenance (S&M) plan, remaining hazardous materials, radiological controls, safeguards and security, quality assurance, facility operations, and supporting documentation provided for in the DOE Nuclear Materials and Facility Stabilization Program (EM-60) turnover package are discussed.

  15. Final Deactivation Project report on the Alpha Powder Facility, Building 3028, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-04-01

    This report documents the condition of the Alpha Powder Facility (APF), Building 3028, after completion of deactivation activities. Activities conducted to place the facility in a safe and environmentally sound condition for transfer to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40) program are outlined. A history and profile of the facility prior to commencing deactivation activities and a profile of the building after completion of deactivation activities are provided. Turnover items, such as the post-deactivation surveillance and maintenance (S ampersand M) plan, remaining hazardous materials, radiological controls, safeguards and security, quality assurance, facility operations, and supporting documentation provided for in the DOE Nuclear Materials and Facility Stabilization Program (EM-60) turnover package are discussed

  16. Final deactivation report on the tritium target facility, Building 7025, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-08-01

    This report includes a history and profile of Bldg. 7025 before and after completion of deactivation. It also discusses turnover items, such as the Postdeactivation Surveillance ampersand Maintenance Plan, remaining hazardous materials, radiological controls, Safeguards and Security, quality assurance, facility operations, and supporting documentation in the EM-60 Turnover package. Other than minimal S ampersand M activities, the building will be unoccupied and the exterior doors locked (access only for the required S ampersand M)

  17. Sandia National Laboratories, Tonopah Test Range Askania Tower (Building 02-00): Photographs and Written Historical and Descriptive Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ullrich, Rebecca A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Corporate Archives and History Program

    2017-08-01

    The Askania Tower (Building 02-00) was built in 1956 as part of the first wave of construction at the newly established Tonopah Test Range (TTR). Located at Station 2, near the primary target area at the range, the tower was one of the first four built to house Askania phototheodolites used in tracking test units dropped from aircraft. This report includes historical information, architectural information, sources of information, project information, maps, blueprints, and photographs.

  18. The analytical of radiochemical purity of tumor receptor imaging agent 99Tcm-octreotide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xufu; Zuo Shuyao; Shao Wenbo; Wang Guoming; Sun Jianwen; Zhang Qin

    2003-01-01

    The radiochemical purity of tumor receptor imaging agent 99 Tc m -octreotide is measured by High Pressure Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) and two systems of chromatography combining method of silver stain. The results show that the radiochemical purity of 98 Tc m -octreotide measured by both methods are effective and correct. It can separate 99 Tc m -octreotide from other radioactive compositions correctly and effectively

  19. Decommissioning of AECL Whiteshell laboratories - 16311

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koroll, Grant W.; Bilinsky, Dennis M.; Swartz, Randall S.; Harding, Jeff W.; Rhodes, Michael J.; Ridgway, Randall W.

    2009-01-01

    Whiteshell Laboratories (WL) is a Nuclear Research and Test Establishment near Winnipeg, Canada, operated by AECL since the early 1960's and now under decommissioning. WL occupies approximately 4400 hectares of land and employed more than 1000 staff up to the late-1990's, when the closure decision was made. Nuclear facilities at WL included a research reactor, hot cell facilities and radiochemical laboratories. Programs carried out at the WL site included high level nuclear fuel waste management research, reactor safety research, nuclear materials research, accelerator technology, biophysics, and industrial radiation applications. In preparation for decommissioning, a comprehensive environmental assessment was successfully completed [1] and the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission issued a six-year decommissioning licence for WL starting in 2003 - the first decommissioning licence issued for a Nuclear Research and Test Establishment in Canada. This paper describes the progress in this first six-year licence period. A significant development in 2006 was the establishment of the Nuclear Legacy Liabilities Program (NLLP), by the Government of Canada, to safely and cost effectively reduce, and eventually eliminate the nuclear legacy liabilities and associated risks, using sound waste management and environmental principles. The NLLP endorsed an accelerated approach to WL Decommissioning, which meant advancing the full decommissioning of buildings and facilities that had originally been planned to be decontaminated and prepared for storage-with-surveillance. As well the NLLP endorsed the construction of enabling facilities - facilities that employ modern waste handling and storage technology on a scale needed for full decommissioning of the large radiochemical laboratories and other nuclear facilities. The decommissioning work and the design and construction of enabling facilities are fully underway. Several redundant non-nuclear buildings have been removed and redundant

  20. Paleomagnetism and radiochemical age estimates for Late Brunhes polarity episodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denham, C.R.; Anderson, R.F.; Bacon, M.P.

    1977-01-01

    Several reversed polarity magnetozones occur within deep-sea sediment core CH57-8 from the Greater Antilles Outer Ridge, within sediment of latest Pleistocene/Late Brunhes age. The uppermost reversed interval spanning 31 data points coincides with the X faunal zone of the Last Interglacial Period. Radiochemical dating of cores CH57-8 and KN25-4 has shown that all the reversed polarity magnetozones are significantly younger than the Brunhes/Matuyama boundary at 0.7 m.y.B.P. A variation of the excess 230 Th method was used, in which 210 Po and 238 U were the actual radionuclides measured. In a third core from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, the 210 Po results were similar to those which others obtained earlier by direct 230 Th measurements. (Auth.)

  1. Quantitative radio-chemical separation of calcium, strontium and barium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupuis, M.C.; Dupuis, M.; Le Nagard, M.; Michot, H.

    1965-01-01

    A method for separation of Ca 45 , Sr 89 and Ba 140 has been developed for the radiochemical determination of these isotopes in a solution of fission with a large concentration of mineral salts. After removal of most fission products by solvent extraction (TTA-MIBK) at different pH, the alkaline earths are extracted from the aqueous phase at pH 9. After recovery with diluted hydrochloric acid, the three elements are adsorbed on cationic resin Dowex 50 and eluted sequentially with ammonium α - Hydroxy iso-butyrate using gradient concentration and pH. Ca 45 and Sr 89 are measured by β - counting and Ba 140 by γ spectrometry. The chemical yield approximates 80 per cent for calcium, and 70 per cent for strontium and barium. The decontamination factor is 10 5 for most fission products. Four separations can be performed in twenty hours. (authors) [fr

  2. Radiochemical analysis in the nuclear research establishment (KFA) Juelich, FRG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    KFA Juelich is one of the two great nuclear research centres of the Federal Republic of Germany. About 3700 employees including about 700 scientists are engaged in a great number of programs and projects belonging to six main fields of research and development: high temperature reactor and energy techniques; nuclear fusion; properties of materials; materials research; life and environment; methods. In the article the radiochemical analysis work of the former Central Institute of Analytical Chemistry and its two successors is described: activation analysis, application of tracer techniques, fission product analysis. Further on the irradiation facilities are described, a short survey is given on the instrumentation, and the future work is outlined. (T.G.)

  3. Computer aided design of piping for a radiochemical plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selvaraj, P G; Chandrasekhar, A; Chandrasekar, A V [Reprocessing Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Raju, R P; Mahudeeswaran, K V; Kumar, S V [Reprocessing Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    1994-06-01

    In a radiochemical plant such as reprocessing plants, process equipment, storage tanks, liquid transfer systems and the associated pipe lines etc. are housed in series of concrete cells. Availability of limited cell space/volume, provision of various modes of liquid transfers with associated redundancies and instrumentation lines with standby alternatives increase the overall piping density. Designing such high density piping layout without interference is quite complex and needs lot of human efforts. This paper briefly describes development of computer codes for the entire scheme of design, drafting and fabrication of piping for nuclear fuel reprocessing plant. The general organisation of various programs, their functions, the complete sequence of the scheme and the flow of data are presented. High degree of reliability of each routine, considerable error checking facilities, marking legends on the drawings, provision for scaling in drafting and accuracy to the extent of one mm in layout design are some of the important features of this scheme. (author). 1 fig.

  4. 15th radiochemical conference: Booklet of abstracts and conference programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John, J.; Benes, P.; Kucera, J.; Havela, L.; Bartonicek, B.; Vobecky, M.; Krizova, V.; Kopicka, K.; Prasil, Z.

    2006-04-01

    The conference was structured as follows: Opening plenary lectures (6 lectures); Topic 1 - radionuclides in the environment, radioecology (22 verbal presentations (VPs), 23 poster presentations (PPs)); Topic 2 - nuclear analytical methods (22 VPs, 32 PPs); Topic 3 - chemistry of actinide and transactinide elements (8 VPs, 10 PPs); Topic 4 - radiation chemistry (9 VPs, 5 PPs); Topic 5 - production and application of radionuclides (17 VPs, 6 PPs); Topic 6 - separation methods, speciation (21 VPs, 23 PPs); Topic 7 - chemistry of nuclear fuel cycle, radiochemical problems in nuclear waste management (20 VPs, 16 PPs); Topic 8 - nuclear methods in medicine, radiopharmaceuticals, and radiodiagnostics, labelled compounds (8 VPs, 7 PPs); and Panels (2 introductions). (P.A.)

  5. Fast analysis procedure of radiochemical coordinat uptake for methotrexate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caston, J.D.; Kamen, B.A.

    1976-01-01

    Under this invention, a radio-chemical analysis is submitted to determine the concentration of methotrexate or its equivalents in analysis in a biological medium. The amounts taken up of the labelled compound and the known concentrations of the unlabelled compound to be determined are radio-isotopically related to a first system containing a pre-determined amount of the labelled compound and a pre-determined amount of the unlabelled compound. In a second system, identical to the first, save that the sample of the biological medium to be analyzed takes the place of the unlabelled compound, the amount of labelled compound taken up is determined radio-isotopically. The concentration of the compound in the sample is then determined by correlation of the labelled compound uptake determined in the second system with the relation determined in the first system. The radio-isotopic relations and determinations may be made by direct and sequential analytical techniques [fr

  6. Radiochemical neutron activation analysis of gold in geochemical samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zilliacus, R.

    1983-01-01

    A fast method for the radiochemical neutron activation analysis of gold in geochemical samples is described. The method is intended for samples having background concentrations of gold. The method is based on the dissolution of samples with hydrofluoric acid and aqua regia followed by the dissolution of the fluorides with boric acid and hydrochloric acid. Gold is then adsorbed on activated carbon by filtrating the solution through a thin carbon layer. The activity measurements are carried out using a Ge(Li)-detector and a multichannel analyzer. The chemical yields of the separation determined by reirradiation vary between 60 and 90%. The detection limit of the method is 0.2 ng/g gold in rock samples. USGS standard rocks and exploration reference materials are analyzed and the results are presented and compared with literature data. (author)

  7. Radiochemical methods for studying lipase-catalyzed interesterification of lipids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuch, R.; Mukherjee, K.D.

    1987-01-01

    Reactions involving lipase-catalyzed interesterification of lipids, which are of commendable interest in biotechnology, have been monitored and assayed by radiochemical methods using 14 C-labeled substrates. Medium chain (C 12 plus C 14 ) triacylglycerols were reacted in the presence of an immobilized lipase from Mucor miehei and hexane at 45 0 C with methyl [1- 14 C]oleate, [1- 14 C]oleic acid, [carboxyl- 14 C]trioleoylglycerol, [1- 14 C]octadecenyl alcohol, and [U- 14 C]glycerol, each of known specific activity. The reactions were monitored and the rate of interesterification determined by radio thin layer chromatography from the incorporation of radioactivity into acyl moieties of triacylglycerols (from methyl oleate, oleic acid, and trioleoylglycerol), alkyl moieties of wax esters (from octadecenyl alcohol), and into glycerol backbone of monoacylglycerols and diacylglycerols (from glycerol). (orig.)

  8. Research reactor FR2 - 20 years chemical and radiochemical measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feuerstein, H.; Graebner, H.; Oschinski, J.; Hoffmann, W.; Beyer, J.

    1986-09-01

    The FR2 has been a D 2 O cooled and moderated research reactor with a thermal output of 44 MW. It was in operation from 1961 to 1981. Because of the operating conditions of the reactor, only a small number of routine measurements were performed. For these however special techniques had to be developed. During the 20 years of operation a number of special events occured or have been observed, sometimes with very amazing results, e.g. the 'aceton effect'. This report describes the chemical and radiochemical conditions of the reactor systems, as well as the results of the surveilance work. Not described are measurements for the many experiments. The last chapter gives in a short form a description of the most unusual events and observations. (orig.) [de

  9. Radiochemical plasma salicylamide assay using ring-labeled tritiated salicylamide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stella, V J; Varia, S A; Riedy, M

    1979-05-01

    A rat plasma salicylamide assay was developed using ring-labeled tritiated salicylamide, synthesized by reacting salicylamide with tritium oxide in the presence of heptafluorobutyric acid. The reaction yielded /sup 3/H-salicylamide of specific activity up to 8.41 mCi/mmole, 60% yield. Plasma containing /sup 3/H-salicylamide and its metabolites was extracted with a toluene-based scintillation fluid, which was subsequently counted. Specificity for free salicylamide was demonstrated by radiochemical and standard fluorescence plasma salicylamide level-time curves. Specificity resulted from nonextraction of the salicylamide sulfate and glucuronide metabolites. Sulfatase and beta-glucuronidase treatment allowed the analysis of plasma sulfate and glucuronide conjugates as free salicylamide. This procedure should be effective for the analysis of salicylamide and its metabolites in the presence of similar phenolic compounds.

  10. Radiochemical investigations on the solubility of molybdatophosphate in phosphate determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noack, S.

    1975-01-01

    The solubility of various molybdatophosphates was determined under the conditions of a gravimetric phosphate determination by radiochemical means by labelling PO 4 3- with P-32. Starting with various conditions for phosphate determination via the molybdatophosphate of quinoline, 8-hydroxyquinoline, dimorpholino ethane, N,N,N',N'-tetrakis-β-hydroxypropyl ethylene diamine and N,N,N',N'-tetrakis-β-hydroxybutyl ethylene diamine, a general working rule was developed to determine the solubility. Taking the example of quinoline molybdatophosphates, a series of influencing factors - work, concentration and measuring parameters - were investigated in order to be able to limit the reliability region of the gravimetric phosphate determination. Depending on the conditions, the measured solubilities were between 10 -10 and 10 -6 Mol/l, the corresponding degrees of precipitation between 99.0 and 99.9999%. Apparent solubility products were calculated for the different molybdatophosphates using computer programmes especially developed for this purpose. (orig./RB) [de

  11. A rapid, simple method for obtaining radiochemically pure hepatic heme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonkowski, H.L.; Bement, W.J.; Erny, R.

    1978-01-01

    Radioactively-labelled heme has usually been isolated from liver to which unlabelled carrier has been added by long, laborious techniques involving organic solvent extraction followed by crystallization. A simpler, rapid method is devised for obtaining radiochemically-pure heme synthesized in vivo in rat liver from delta-amino[4- 14 C]levulinate. This method, in which the heme is extracted into ethyl acetate/glacial acetic acid and in which porphyrins are removed from the heme-containing organic phase with HCl washes, does not require addition of carrier heme. The new method gives better heme recoveries than and heme specific activities identical to, those obtained using the crystallization method. In this new method heme must be synthesized from delta-amino[4- 14 C]levulinate; it is not satisfactory to use [2- 14 C]glycine substrate because non-heme counts are isolated in the heme fraction. (Auth.)

  12. Source-Term and building-Wake Consequence Modeling for the Godiva IV Reactor at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letellier, B.C.; McClure, P.; Restrepo, L.

    1999-01-01

    The objectives of this work were to evaluate the consequences of a postulated accident to onsite security personnel stationed near the facility during operations of the Godiva IV critical assembly and to identify controls needed to protect these personnel in case of an extreme criticality excursion equivalent to the design-basis accident (DBA). This paper presents the methodology and results of the source-term calculations, building ventilation rates, air concentrations, and consequence calculations that were performed using a multidisciplinary approach with several phenomenology models. Identification of controls needed to mitigate the consequences to near-field receptors is discussed

  13. The Walls Come Tumbling Down: Decontamination and Demolition of 29 Manhattan Project and Cold War-Era Buildings and Structures at Los Alamos National Laboratory-12301

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaloupka, Allan B.; Finn, Kevin P.; Parsons, Duane A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    When the nation's top scientists and military leaders converged on Los Alamos, New Mexico in the 1943, to work on the Manhattan Project, the facilities they used to conduct their top-secret work were quickly constructed and located in the middle of what eventually became the Los Alamos town site. After one of these early facilities caught on fire, it seemed wise to build labs and production facilities farther away from the homes of the town's residents. They chose to build facilities on what was then known as Delta Prime (DP) Mesa and called it Technical Area 21, or TA-21. With wartime urgency, a number of buildings were built at TA-21, some in as little as a few months. Before long, DP Mesa was populated with several nondescript metal and cinder-block buildings, including what became, immediately following the war, the world's first plutonium production facility. TA-21 also housed labs that used hazardous chemicals and analyzed americium, tritium and plutonium. TA-21 was a bustling center of research and production for the next several decades. Additional buildings were built there in the 1960's, but by the 1990's many of them had reached the end of their service lives. Labs and offices were moved to newer, more modern buildings. When Los Alamos National Laboratory received $212 million in funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act in July 2009 for environmental cleanup projects, about $73 million of the funds were earmarked to decontaminate and demolish 21 of the old buildings at TA-21. Although some D and D of TA-21 buildings was performed in the 1990's, many of the facilities at DP Site remained relatively untouched for nearly three decades following their final operational use. In 2006, there were over three dozen buildings or structures on the mesa to be removed so that soil cleanup could be completed (and the land made available for transfer and reuse). The total footprint of buildings across the mesa was

  14. Surplus Facilities Management Program. Post-remedial-action survey report for SNAP-8 Experimental Reactor Facility, Building 010 site, Santa Susana Field Laboratories, Rockwell International, Ventura County, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wynveen, R.A.; Smith, W.H.; Sholeen, C.M.; Mayes, C.B.; Justus, A.L.; Flynn, K.F.

    1984-04-01

    Based on the results of the radiological assessment, the Argonne National Laboratory Radiological Survey Group arrived at the following conclusions: (1) soil contaminated with the radionuclides 60 Co and 152 Eu of undetermined origin was detected in the southwest quadrant of the Building 010 site. 60 Co was also detected in one environmental sample taken from an area northwest of the site and in a borehole sample taken from the area that previously held the radioactive gas hold-up tanks. Uranium was detected in soil from a hole in the center of the building site and in a second hole southwest of the building site. In all cases, the radionuclide levels encountered in the soil were well below the criteria set by DOE for this site; and (2) the direct instrument readings at the surface of the site were probably the result of natural radiation (terrestrial and celestial), as well as shine from the material being stored at the nearby RMDF facility. There was no evidence that the contaminated soil under the asphalt pad contributed detectable levels to the total background readings

  15. Decommissioning of AECL Whiteshell Laboratories: progress from first five years of legacy funding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swartz, R.S.; Bilinsky, D.M.; Harding, J.W.; Ridgway, W.R.

    2011-01-01

    In 2006, the Government of Canada adopted a new long-term strategy to deal with the nuclear legacy liabilities and initiated a five-year start-up phase. The objective is to safely and cost-effectively reduce these liabilities, and associated risks, based on sound waste management and environmental principles in the best interests of Canadians. AECL's Whiteshell Laboratories is part of the long-term strategy and decommissioning activities are underway. Several redundant non-nuclear buildings have been removed/decommissioned, and redundant nuclear facilities (hot cell facilities, radiochemical laboratories) are being decontaminated and prepared for demolition. This paper describes the progress in the first five-year funding period (2006 April to 2011 March). (author)

  16. Operational experience at RCD and FCD laboratories during various ventilation conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murali, S.; Ashok Kumar, P.; Thanamani, M.; Rath, D.P.; Sapkal, J.A.; Raman, Anand

    2007-01-01

    Radiochemistry and Fuel Chemistry wing of Radiological Laboratory facility has various radio-chemical operations on isotopes of plutonium and trans-plutonium elements, carried out under containment and safe operational conditions. The ventilation provided to the facility is a Once - through system. The ventilation system is designed with separate headers for laboratory and glove box exhausts. There is scheduled periodic shut down of ventilation system for maintenance during non-occupancy hours/week ends. The buildup of natural α - emitters activity due to ventilation shut down, observed to be prevailing on stack air sample filter papers after the ventilation startup, is studied. The paper describes the operational experience gained over a period during ventilation shut down and suggests the course of remedial action for reducing the internal exposure due to build up of natural α - emitters and their progenies. (author)

  17. Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility, Building 205, Technical Area 16: Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-04-01

    The Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility (WETF) was planned by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to retain at Los Alamos National Laboratory the capability of repackaging small quantities of tritium to exacting specifications. Small quantities of tritium are required for energy research and development activities and for research on nuclear weapons test devices carried out as part of the laboratory mission. The WETF is an improved design proposed to replace an aging Los Alamos facility where tritium has been repackaged for many years. This Environmental Assessment evaluates the environmental consequences to be expected from operating the new facility, for which construction was completed in 1984, compared with those from continuing to operate the old facility. The document was prepared for compliance with NEPA. In operation, the WETF will incorporate state-of-the-art systems for containing tritium in glove boxes and capturing any tritium released into the glove box exhaust system and the laboratory atmosphere. Liquid discharges from the WETF would contain less than 1% of the tritium found in effluents from the present facility. Effluent streams would be surface discharges and would not enter the aquifer from which municipal water supplies are drawn. The quantity of solid radioactive waste generated at the WETF would be approximately the same as that generated at the present facility. The risk to the public from normal tritium-packaging operations would be significantly less from the WETF than from the present facility. The proposed action will reduce the adverse environmental impacts caused by tritium repackaging by substantially reducing the amount of tritium that escapes to the environment. 35 refs., 3 figs., 21 tabs

  18. Assessments of the probabilities of aircraft impact with the Sandia Pulsed Reactor and Building 836, Sandia Laboratories, Albuquerque

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biringer, B.E.

    1976-11-01

    This report documents a study of the annual probabilities of aircraft impact with the Sandia Pulsed Reactor (SPR) and Bldg. 836 at Sandia Laboratories, Albuquerque. The probability of aircraft impact into each structure was estimated using total yearly operations, effective structure area, structure location relative to air activity, and accident rate per kilometer. The estimated probability for an aircraft impact with SPR is 1.1 x 10 -4 per year; the estimated probability for impact with Bldg. 836 is 1.0 x 10 -3 per year

  19. Decontamination and decommissioning of 61 plutonium gloveboxes in D-Wing, Building 212 Argonne National Laboratory-East: Final project report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheever, C.L.; Rose, R.W.

    1996-09-01

    Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) is a government-owned, contractor operated, multipurpose research facility located 25 miles southwest of downtown Chicago on 689 hectares (1,700 acres) in DuPage County, Illinois, as shown in Figure 1.1. Building 212 is located in the central area of ANL-E, as shown in Figure 1.2. The purpose of this project was to eliminate the risk of radioactive material release from the contaminated glovebox systems and to make the laboratories available for unrestricted use. The following work objectives were established: (1) Identify and remove radioactive materials for return to ANL-E Special Materials control. (2) Remove and package the radioactively contaminated materials and equipment from the gloveboxes. (3) Decontaminate the gloveboxes to nontransuranic (non-TRU) levels. (4) Size-reduce and package the gloveboxes and support systems. (5) Document and dispose of the radioactive and mixed waste. (6) Decontaminate, survey, and release the nine laboratories and corridor areas for unrestricted use

  20. Building laboratory infrastructure to support scale-up of HIV/AIDS treatment, care, and prevention: in-country experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abimiku, Alash'le G

    2009-06-01

    An unprecedented influx of funds and support through large programs such as the Global Fund for AIDS, Malaria and Tuberculosis and the World Health Organization's and President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) has made it possible for more than 1 million persons in resource-limited settings to access AIDS treatment and several million more to be in care and prevention programs. Nevertheless, there remain major challenges that prevent AIDS drugs and care from reaching many more in need, especially in rural settings. The roll-out of a high-quality treatment, care, and prevention program depends on an effective and reliable laboratory infrastructure. This article presents a strategy used by the Institute of Human Virology (IHV)-University of Maryland and its affiliate IHV-Nigeria to establish a multifaceted, integrated tier laboratory program to support a PEPFAR-funded scale-up of its AIDS Care Treatment in Nigeria program, in collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Nigerian government, as a possible model for overcoming a key challenge that faces several resource-limited countries trying to roll out and scale-up their HIV/AIDS treatment, care, and prevention program.

  1. HAZWOPER project documents for demolition of the Waste Evaporator Facility, Building 3506, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    This document, in support of the Waste Evaporator Facility (WEF) demolition project and contains the Project Work Plan and the Project Health and Safety Plan for demolition and partial remediation actions by ATG at the Waste Evaporator Facility, Building 3506. Various activities will be conducted during the course of demolition, and this plan provides details on the work steps involved, the identification of hazards, and the health and safety practices necessary to mitigate these hazards. The objective of this document is to develop an approach for implementing demolition activities at the WEF. This approach is based on prior site characterization information and takes into account all of the known hazards at this facility. The Project Work Plan provides instructions and requirements for identified work steps that will be utilized during the performance of demolition, while the Health and Safety Plan addresses the radiological, hazardous material exposure, and industrial safety concerns that will be encountered.

  2. HAZWOPER project documents for demolition of the Waste Evaporator Facility, Building 3506, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-03-01

    This document, in support of the Waste Evaporator Facility (WEF) demolition project and contains the Project Work Plan and the Project Health and Safety Plan for demolition and partial remediation actions by ATG at the Waste Evaporator Facility, Building 3506. Various activities will be conducted during the course of demolition, and this plan provides details on the work steps involved, the identification of hazards, and the health and safety practices necessary to mitigate these hazards. The objective of this document is to develop an approach for implementing demolition activities at the WEF. This approach is based on prior site characterization information and takes into account all of the known hazards at this facility. The Project Work Plan provides instructions and requirements for identified work steps that will be utilized during the performance of demolition, while the Health and Safety Plan addresses the radiological, hazardous material exposure, and industrial safety concerns that will be encountered

  3. 324 Radiochemical engineering cells and high level vault tanks mixed waste compliance status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The 324 Building in the Hanford 300 Area contains Radiochemical Engineering Cells and High Level Vault tanks (the open-quotes REC/HLVclose quotes) for research and development activities involving radioactive materials. Radioactive mixed waste within this research installation, found primarily in B-Cell and three of the high level vault tanks, is subject to RCRA/DWR (open-quotes RCRAclose quotes) regulations for storage. This white paper provides a baseline RCRA compliance summary of MW management in the REC/HLV, based on best available knowledge. The REC/HLV compliance project, of which this paper is a part, is intended to achieve the highest degree of compliance practicable given the special technical difficulties of managing high activity radioactive materials, and to assure protection of human health and safety and the environment. The REC/HLV was constructed in 1965 to strict standards for the safe management of highly radioactive materials. Mixed waste in the REC/HLV consists of discarded tools and equipment, dried feed stock from nuclear waste melting experiments, contaminated particulate matter, and liquid feed stock from various experimental programs in the vault tanks. B-Cell contains most of these materials. Total radiological inventory in B-Cell is estimated at 3 MCi, about half of which is potentially open-quotes dispersibleclose quotes, that is, it is in small pieces or mobile particles. Most of the mixed waste currently in the REC/HLV was generated or introduced before mixed wastes were subjected to RCRA in 1987

  4. Laboratory study on the cooling effect of flash water evaporative cooling technology for ventilation and air-conditioning of buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fang, Lei; Yuan, Shu; Yang, Jianrong

    2016-01-01

    in warm/hot and dry environment where dehumidification of outdoor air is not needed. A laboratory experiment was designed and conducted to evaluate the cooling effectiveness of this technology. The experiment was conducted in a twin-climate chamber. One chamber simulated warm/hot and dry outdoor...... evaporation. Two outdoor summer climates were simulated in the study, i.e. the design summer climate of Las Vegas and the extreme summer climate of Copenhagen represented hot/dry and warm/dry climates. The results showed that the flash evaporative cooling technology, a simple and green cooling technology......, is effective for ventilation and air-conditioning in warm/hot and dry climate zones. The technology can provide fresh outdoor air with a temperature of 4 to 7 °C lower than room air temperature....

  5. Building leadership among laboratory-based and clinical and translational researchers: the University of California, San Francisco experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wides, Cynthia; Mertz, Elizabeth; Lindstaedt, Bill; Brown, Jeanette

    2014-02-01

    In 2005 the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) implemented the Scientific Leadership and Management (SLM) course, a 2-day leadership training program to assist laboratory-based postdoctoral scholars in their transition to independent researchers managing their own research programs. In 2011, the course was expanded to clinical and translational junior faculty and fellows. The course enrollment was increased from approximate 100 to 123 participants at the same time. Based on course evaluations, the number and percent of women participants appears to have increased over time from 40% (n = 33) in 2007 to 53% (n = 58) in 2011. Course evaluations also indicated that participants found the course to be relevant and valuable in their transition to academic leadership. This paper describes the background, structure, and content of the SLM and reports on participant evaluations of the course offerings from 2007 through 2011. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Determination of selenium in roasted beans coffee samples consumed in Algeria by radiochemical neutron activation analysis method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messaoudi, Mohammed; Begaa, Samir; Hamidatou, Lylia; Salhi, M'hamed

    2018-01-01

    The essential trace element selenium is a focus of attention due to its effects on human health, there being consequences of both its deficiency and excess. Due to the ultra-trace content of selenium, the neutron activation analysis method (NAA) is difficult to apply. We therefore made use of the radiochemical neutron activation analysis (RNAA) to determine Se at low level concentrations in several consumed food items in Algeria. A radiochemical procedure based on liquid-liquid separation was established in our laboratory. In this research we focused on the determination of selenium in two species of coffee: Arabica and Robusta. The accuracy of the method was assessed by analyzing the certified reference material NIST-SRM 1573a (tomato leaves). The results obtained show a selenium variation from 0.025 to 0.052 μg/g in coffee beans and an average yield of the separation of about 85%. The results of this study were compared with those obtained with samples from Brazilian, Caribbean, Indian and Kenyan coffee beans.

  7. Comprehensive work plan for Building 3001 storage canal at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    This Comprehensive Work Plan describes the method of accomplishment to replace the shielding protection of the water in the canal with a controlled low strength material (CLSM) 4. The canal was used during the operation of the Oak Ridge Graphite Reactor in the 1940s and 1950s to transport spent fuel slugs and irradiated test materials from the reactor, under water to the hot cell in Building 3019 for further processing, packaging, and handling. After the reactor was shut down, the canal was used until 1990 to store some irradiated materials until they could be transferred to a Solid Waste Storage Area. This task has the following objectives and components: (1) minimize potential future risk to human health and the environment; (2) reduce surveillance and maintenance cost of the canal; (3) perform site preparation activities; (4) replace the water in the canal with a solid CLSM; (5) pump the water to the Process Waste Treatment System (PWTS) for further processing at the same rate that the CLSM is pumped under the water; (6) remove the water using a process that will protect the workers and the public in the visitors area from contamination while the CLSM is being pumped underneath the water; (7) painting a protective coating material over the CLSM after the CLSM has cured

  8. Radioactive preparations. Determination of radiochemical purity by thin-layer chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The standard sets the data which must be attached to every sample, and the equipment, chemicals and auxiliary substances used in the determination of radiochemical purity of substances by chromatography. Described are preparation of the sample, the procedure of sample deposition, the development, drying and detection of the radioactive preparation. The qualitative and quantitative assessment of the radiochromatogram is described as are the calculation of radiochemical purity and the determination of the reproducibility of measurement of radiochemical purity of radioactive preparations. (E.S.)

  9. 99mTc-ECD: Comparison of radiochemical purity evaluation techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumont, A.; De Beco, V.; Ait Ben Ali, S.; Goudou-Sinha, C.; Izembart, M.; Jourdain, J.R.; Lemercier, V.; Linsker, S.; Lours, S.; Moati, F.; Pajard, D.; Piketty, M.L.; Rizzo, N.; Schlageter, M.H.; Moretti, J.L.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this study was to validate a testing method for the radiochemical purity (RCP) of the preparations of 99m Tc - ECD that is to be reproducible and easy to realize in services of Nuclear Medicine. After a review of literature, four thin-layer chromatography techniques allowing to evidence the TcO 4 - were evaluated: no.1 - Papier Whatman 31ET / ethyl acetate; no.2 - Papier Whatman 3MM chr / ethyl acetate; no.3 - ITLC Silica gel / ethyl acetate; no.4 - Baker Flex silica gel aluminium oxide IB-F / ethyl acetate (the method proposed by the laboratory). The technique no.1 has presented a bad reproducibility, as well as percentages of RCP very different from those obtained by the other techniques. The techniques no.2 and no.3, although rapid, are characterized by lower reproducibilities in comparison with technique no.4, with, some times, peaks of undetermined nature on the radio-chromatograms no.3. So, in spite of a slower migration (10 min.) the technique no.4 has been selected from the group as the most reliable technique. For this technique, the comparison between the two modes of reading the chromatography (by means of a radio-chromatograph or by measuring the activity of the two halves of the plate by an activity-meter), has shown no significant difference in RCP. Consequently, this method (Baker Flex / ethyl acetate) may by adapted in any service of nuclear medicine, no matter of its equipment

  10. LWR spent-fuel radiochemical measurements and comparison with ORIGEN2 predictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blahnik, D.E.; Jenquin, U.P.; Guenther, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    The Materials Characterization Center (MCC) at Pacific Northwest Laboratory is responsible for providing characterized spent fuel, designated approved testing material (ATMs) for subsequent use in the investigation of nuclear waste disposal forms by the US Department of Energy geologic repository project. The ATMs are selected to assure that test material is available that has a representative range of characteristics important to spent-fuel behavior in a geologic repository. Burnup and fission gas release were the primary criteria for selecting the ATMs. The five spent-fuel ATMs (ATM-101, -103, -104, -105, and -106) currently being characterized by the MCC have rod average burnups ranging from 20 to 43 MWd/kg M, fission gas releases ranging from 0.2 to 11.2%, and are from both boiling water reactors and pressurized water reactors. Radiochemical analyses of the fuel included measurements of 148 Nd (for fuel burnup), the isotopes of uranium and plutonium, and nuclides of importance to repository performance. Cladding samples were analyzed for 14 C. The measured values of selected nuclides were compared with values obtained from calculations with the ORIGEN2 code that was used to predict isotopic quantities for all of the ATMS. Ratios of the ORIGEN2 calculated values to the measured values for ATM-103 and ATM-106 fuel are given

  11. Type B accident investigation board report of the July 2, 1997 curium intake by shredder operator at Building 513 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-08-01

    On July 2, 1997 at approximately 6:00 A.M., two operators (Workers 1 and 2), wearing approved personal protective equipment (PPE), began a shredding operation of HEPA filters for volume reduction in Building 513 (B-513) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The waste requisitions indicated they were shredding filters containing ≤ 1 μCi of americium-241 (Am-241). A third operator (Worker 3) provided support to the shredder operators in the shredding area (hot area) from a room that was adjacent to the shredding area (cold area). At Approximately 8:00 A.M., a fourth operator (Worker 4) relieved Worker 2 in the shredding operation. Sometime between 8:30 A.M. and 9:00 A.M., Worker 3 left the cold area to make a phone call and set off a hand and foot counter in Building 514. Upon discovering the contamination, the shredding operation was stopped and surveys were conducted in the shredder area. Surveys conducted on the workers found significant levels of contamination on their PPE and the exterior of their respirator cartridges. An exit survey of Worker 1 was conducted at approximately 10:05 A.M., and found contamination on his PPE, as well as on the exterior and interior of his respirator. Contamination was also found on his face, chest, back of neck, hair, knees, and mustache. A nose blow indicated significant contamination, which was later determined to be curium-244

  12. Radiochemical search for neutron-rich isotopes of element 107

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaedel, M.

    1987-01-01

    Recent mass calculations have indicated that there is a region of deformed nuclei around neutron number N=162 that is especially stable against spontaneous fission. Barrier heights of about 5 MeV for Z = 107 nuclides can be extrapolated. To search for new, neutron-rich isotopes of element 107 in radiochemical experiments with 254 Es as a target an on-line chemical separation of element 107 (EKA-Rhenium), especially from the actinide elements is needed. An on-line gas-phase chemistry was developed with the homolog Re based on the volatility of the oxide which is transported in an O 2 containing atmosphere along a temperature gradient in a quartz tube and is condensed onto a thin Ta coated Ni-foil. The authors applied this technique in two series of experiments with their rotating wheel on-line gas-phase chemistry apparatus at the 88-inch cyclotron where they irradiated 254 Es as a target with 93 MeV and 96 MeV 16 O ions to search for 266 107. The assignment of the observed alpha events between 8 and 9 MeV to possibly (1) non actinide contaminants like 212 Po, (2) known isotopes of heavy elements like 261 105, or (3) a new isotope will be discussed

  13. Development of a radiochemical sensor. Part I: Feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarancon, A. [Departament de Quimica Analitica, Facultat de Quimica, Universitat de Barcelona, C/ Marti Franques 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Garcia, J.F. [Departament de Pintura, Facultat de Belles Arts, Universitat de Barcelona, C/ Pau Gargallo 4, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)]. E-mail: jfgarcia@apolo.qui.ub.es; Rauret, G. [Departament de Quimica Analitica, Facultat de Quimica, Universitat de Barcelona, C/ Marti Franques 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2005-05-04

    The evolution of nuclear activities and criteria for radiation protection have led to a continuous increase in measures to monitor and control the environment and therefore in the number of determinations required for such purposes. Classical analytical procedures are time-consuming, labor-intense and generate a large amount of waste. The alternative use of sensors for such determinations has seen very limited development. The present study focuses on the evaluation of the behavior of a prototype radiochemical sensor for liquid effluents. The sensor is based on a receptor made of a plastic scintillator and is capable of continuous, on-time and accurate remote quantification of the activity of alpha, beta and beta-gamma emitters. Low-level active solutions of {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 134}Cs and {sup 60}Co in matrices of groundwater, seawater and drinking water were quantified with prediction errors lower than 10% in most cases. The study also yields information about light generation and transmission and transductor configuration that will be useful in the design of future versions of this sensor.

  14. Planning for maintenance in radiochemical facilities [Paper No.: VB-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balasubramanian, G.R.

    1981-01-01

    Reprocessing facilities in the earlier stages of development were planned mainly based on the concept of direct maintenance in view of the inherent advantage of man-machine interface and initial savings in the investment costs. With the mechanical processes finding a firm place in head-end operation and increase in down time necessary for elaborate decontamination efforts even for a minor modification has led to the review of the concept. For the same reason, the recent plants are based on the concept of harmonious blend of both direct and remote maintenance. The paper describes the planning needed from consideration of various aspects related to such concepts of maintenance during different phases of such type of facilities, highlighting some of the tools and special equipments to be developed for this purpose. A brief description of recent development in the field of remote maintenance is also given. Though the basic hot facility of reference is the one of reprocessing fast reactor fuels, the concepts and systems discussed are equally applicable to other radiochemical and radiometallurgical facilities also. (author)

  15. Remote sampling of process fluids in radiochemical plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sengar, P.B.; Bhattacharya, R.; Ozarde, P. D.; Rana, D.S.

    1990-01-01

    Sampling of process fluids, continuous or periodic, is an essential requirement in any chemical process plant, so as to keep a control on process variables. In a radiochemical plant the task of taking and conveying the samples is a very tricky affair. This is due to the fact that neither the vessels/equipment containing radioactive effluents can be approached for manual sampling nor sampled fluids can be handled directly. The problems become more accute with higher levels of radioactivity. As such, inovative systems have to be devised to obtain and handle the raioactive samples employing remote operations. The remote sampling system developed in this Division has some of the unique features such as taking only requisite amount of samples in microlitre range, practically maintenance free design, avoidence of excess radioactive fluids coming out of process systems, etc. The paper describes in detail the design of remote sampling system and compares the same with existing systems. The design efforts are towards simplicity in operation, obtaining homogenised representative samples and highly economical on man-rem expenditure. The performance of a prototype system has also been evaluated. (author). 3 refs

  16. Proceedings of the Tripartite Seminar on Nuclear Material Accounting and Control at Radiochemical Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The problems of creation and operation of nuclear materials (NM) control and accounting systems and their components at radiochemical plants were discussed in seminar during November 2-6 of 1998. There were 63 Russian and 25 foreign participants in seminar. The seminar programme includes following sessions and articles: the aspects of State NM control and accountancy; NM control and accounting in radiochemical plants and at separate stages of reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel and irradiated fuel elements of commercial reactors; NM control and accountancy in storage facilities of radiochemical plants; NM control and accounting computerization, material balance assessment, preparation of reports; qualitative and quantitative measurements in NM control and accounting at radiochemical plants destructive analysis techniques [ru

  17. Automated radiochemical synthesis and biodistribution of [11C]l-α-acetylmethadol ([11C]LAAM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sai, Kiran Kumar Solingapuram; Fan, Jinda; Tu, Zhude; Zerkel, Patrick; Mach, Robert H.; Kharasch, Evan D.

    2014-01-01

    Long-acting opioid agonists methadone and l-α-acetylmethadol (LAAM) prevent withdrawal in opioid-dependent persons. Attempts to synthesize [ 11 C]-methadone for PET evaluation of brain disposition were unsuccessful. Owing, however, to structural and pharmacologic similarities, we aimed to develop [ 11 C]LAAM as a PET ligand to probe the brain exposure of long-lasting opioids in humans. This manuscript describes [ 11 C]LAAM synthesis and its biodistribution in mice. The radiochemical synthetic strategy afforded high radiochemical yield, purity and specific activity, thereby making the synthesis adaptable to automated modules. - Highlights: • Radiochemical synthesis of opioid [ 11 C]l-α-acetylmethadol (LAAM) described for the first time. • High radiochemical yield, purity and specific activity. • Easily reproducible and adaptable synthesis to any C-11 automated modules. • [ 11 C]LAAM utility as a PET radiopharmaceutical for assessing brain penetration

  18. Investigations of radiochemical methods for the platinum group metals for NAA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tredoux, M.

    A radiochemical procedure for the determination of the platinum group metals and gold is outlined in this report. The sample is irradiated, treated with acids and passed through anion-exchange columns before being determined by gamma spectrometry

  19. Radiochemical and biological control of metaiodobenzyl-guanidine (MIBG) labeled with 131I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barboza, M.R.F.F. de; Muramoto, E.; Colturato, M.T.; Silva Valente Goncalves, R. da; Pereira, N.P.S. de; Almeida, M.A.T.M. de; Silva, C.P.G. da.

    1988-07-01

    This study shows the standardization of the radiochemical control of MIBG - 131 I in eletrophoretic system and also the biological control in Wistar rat for a period of time, not longer than 60 minutes after tracer administration. (author) [pt

  20. The use of radiochemical analysis for detecting biotracers of food radioactive contamination in Cherkasy Region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matvyijenko, D.G.

    2003-01-01

    Stable biotracers of radioactive contamination according to the findings of analytical control of the foodstuffs was determined. The use of radiochemical analysis for determining the activity of the foodstuffs and water (Sr-90, Cs-137) was evaluated

  1. Determination of thorium in native gold by radiochemical neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Y.; Kraehenbuehl, U.

    1995-01-01

    Thorium concentrations in 11 native gold samples from different sources, e.g. placer gold, vein and lode gold were determined. Thorium was determined by radiochemical separation and measurement of protactinium from irradiated native gold samples. The chemical yield of the separation procedures is 90%. Other elements were measured by gamma-ray spectroscopy. The radiochemical separation procedures described in this work make accurate determination of Th concentrations in native gold at picogram concentrations possible. (orig.)

  2. Current studies of biological materials using instrumental and radiochemical neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fardy, J.J.; McOrist, G.D.; Farrar, Y.J.

    1985-01-01

    Instrumental neutron activation analysis still remains the preferred option when analysing the trace element distribution in a wide rage of materials by neutron activation analysis. However, when lower limits of detection are required or major interferences reduce the effectiveness of this technique, radiochemical neutron activation analysis is applied. This paper examines the current use of both methods and the development of rapid radiochemical techniques for analysis of the biological materials, hair, cow's milk, human's milk, milk powder, blood and blood serum

  3. A comparison of the radiochemical stability of different iodine-131 labelled metaiodobenzylguanidine formulations for therapeutic use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wafelman, A.R.; Beijnen, J.H.; Hoefnagel, C.A.; Maes, R.A.A.

    1994-01-01

    The results of a stability study of three commercially available formulations of [ 131 I]MIBG for therapeutic use and an unstabilized formulation, stored under various conditions, are presented. The stability was followed for 20 days. In all formulations tested, free [ 131 I]iodide, formed by radiolysis, was the most important radiochemical impurity. The pharmaceutical formulation with the largest amount of stabilizer was radiochemically - but not chemically -most stable. (author)

  4. Post-remedial-action radiological survey of the Westinghouse Advanced Reactors Division Plutonium Fuel Laboratories, Cheswick, Pennsylvania, October 1-8, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flynn, K.F.; Justus, A.L.; Sholeen, C.M.; Smith, W.H.; Wynveen, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    The post-remedial-action radiological assessment conducted by the ANL Radiological Survey Group in October 1981, following decommissioning and decontamination efforts by Westinghouse personnel, indicated that except for the Advanced Fuels Laboratory exhaust ductwork and north wall, the interior surfaces of the Plutonium Laboratory and associated areas within Building 7 and the Advanced Fuels Laboratory within Building 8 were below both the ANSI Draft Standard N13.12 and NRC Guideline criteria for acceptable surface contamination levels. Hence, with the exceptions noted above, the interior surfaces of those areas within Buildings 7 and 8 that were included in the assessment are suitable for unrestricted use. Air samples collected at the involved areas within Buildings 7 and 8 indicated that the radon, thoron, and progeny concentrations within the air were well below the limits prescribed by the US Surgeon General, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the Department of Energy. The Building 7 drain lines are contaminated with uranium, plutonium, and americium. Radiochemical analysis of water and dirt/sludge samples collected from accessible Low-Bay, High-Bay, Shower Room, and Sodium laboratory drains revealed uranium, plutonium, and americium contaminants. The Building 7 drain lines hence are unsuitable for release for unrestricted use in their present condition. Low levels of enriched uranium, plutonium, and americium were detected in an environmental soil coring near Building 8, indicating release or spillage due to Advanced Reactors Division activities or Nuclear Fuel Division activities undr NRC licensure. 60 Co contamination was detected within the Building 7 Shower Room and in soil corings from the environs of Building 7. All other radionuclide concentrations measured in soil corings and the storm sewer outfall sample collected from the environs about Buildings 7 and 8 were within the range of normally expected background concentrations

  5. Building 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Den Ouden, C.; Steemers, T.C.

    1992-01-01

    This is the second volume of Building 2000, a pilot project of the Commission's R and D-programme 'Solar Energy Applications to Buildings' with the purpose of encouraging the adoption of solar architecture in large buildings. In this second rich illustrated volume the results of the design studies illustrating passive solar architecture in buildings in the European Community are presented in particular for the building categories as mentioned in the subtitle. In the first volume, a similar series of studies is presented for the building categories: schools, laboratories and universities, and sports and educational centres. Several Design Support Workshops were organized during the Building 2000 programme during which Building 2000 design teams could directly exchange ideas with the various design advice experts represented at these workshops. In the second part of the Building 2000 final report a summary of a selection of many reports is presented (11 papers), as produced by Design Support experts. Most of the design support activities resulted in changes of the various designs, as have been reported by the design teams in the brochures presented in the first part of this book. It is to be expected that design aids and simulation tools for passive solar options, daylighting concepts, comfort criteria etc., will be utilized more frequently in the future. This will result in a better exchange of information between the actual design practitioners and the European R and D community. This technology transfer will result in buildings with a higher quality with respect to energy and environmental issues

  6. Building 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Den Ouden, C [EGM Engineering BV, Dordrecht (Netherlands); Steemers, T C [Commission of the European Communities, Brussels (Belgium)

    1992-01-01

    This is the second volume of Building 2000, a pilot project of the Commission's R and D-programme 'Solar Energy Applications to Buildings' with the purpose of encouraging the adoption of solar architecture in large buildings. In this second rich illustrated volume the results of the design studies illustrating passive solar architecture in buildings in the European Community are presented in particular for the building categories as mentioned in the subtitle. In the first volume, a similar series of studies is presented for the building categories: schools, laboratories and universities, and sports and educational centres. Several Design Support Workshops were organized during the Building 2000 programme during which Building 2000 design teams could directly exchange ideas with the various design advice experts represented at these workshops. In the second part of the Building 2000 final report a summary of a selection of many reports is presented (11 papers), as produced by Design Support experts. Most of the design support activities resulted in changes of the various designs, as have been reported by the design teams in the brochures presented in the first part of this book. It is to be expected that design aids and simulation tools for passive solar options, daylighting concepts, comfort criteria etc., will be utilized more frequently in the future. This will result in a better exchange of information between the actual design practitioners and the European R and D community. This technology transfer will result in buildings with a higher quality with respect to energy and environmental issues.

  7. Commissioning of calorimeter in radiochemical laboratory for non-destructive assay of special nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patra, S.; Mhatre, A.M.; Agarwal, C.; Chaudhury, S.; Pujari, P.K.

    2017-01-01

    Accounting of special nuclear materials (SNM) in every stages of nuclear fuel cycle is a necessity where one needs the quantitative estimation of SNM in variety of samples like sealed containers or finished products without altering its physical and chemical form. Non-destructive assay (NDA) techniques are capable of assaying such samples by the way of measuring passive/active neutrons/gamma rays or by the measurement of decay heat. Radiochemistry Division has been actively involved in the development and deployment of various NDA methodologies for meeting the demand of nuclear material accounting as and when required. Recently a radiometric calorimeter, developed by Reactor Control Division, E and I Group, BARC, has been installed in Lab C-33, Radiochemistry Division

  8. Scientific achievements of the Institute of General Chemistry Radiochemical Laboratory during the 1972-1979 period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magas, S.; Kostanski, M.; Kasprzak, K.S.

    1980-01-01

    The results of experimental investigations in which radioisotopic tracers were employed to solve research problems of our Institute as well as other scientific and industrial institutions are briefly reported. (author)

  9. Phenolsulphotransferase in human tissue: radiochemical enzymatic assay and biochemical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, R.J.; Weinshilboum, R.M.

    1980-01-01

    Phenolsulphotransferase (EC 2.8.2.1) (PST) is an important catecholamine and drug metabolizing enzyme. Optimal conditions have been determined for the accurate measurement of PST activity in the human platelet, human renal cortex, and human jejunum with a radiochemical microassay. 3-Methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol (MHPG) and 35 S-3'-phosphoadenosine-5'-phosphosulfate ( 35 S-PAPS) were the substrates for the reaction. The apparent Michaelis-Menten (Ksub(m)) values for MHPG with platelet, renal cortex, and jejunum were 1.09, 0.46 and 1.16 mmol/l, respectively. Apparent Ksub(m) values for PAPS in the same tissues were 0.14, 0.13 and 0.21 μmol/l. The pH optimum of the reacton in all three tissues was approximately 6.2-6.8 with three different buffer systems. The coefficients of variation for the assay of platelet, renal cortex, and jejunal activities were 6.2%, 3.4% and 4.4%, respectively. Mean platelet PST activity in blood samples from 75 randomly selected adult subjects was 5.0 +- 1.72 mmol of MHPG sulfate formed per hour per mg of platelet protein (8.3 X 10 -5 +- 2.9 X 10 -5 μmol min -1 mg -1 , mean +- S.D.). There was a 5-fold intersubject variation in platelet PST activity within two standard deviations of the mean value. Experiments in which partially purified human erythrocyte PST was added to platelet, kidney and gut homogenates under these assay conditions provided evidence that endogenous PST inhibitors did not affect the observed enzyme activity. (Auth.)

  10. Design/installation and structural integrity assessment under the Federal Facility Agreement for Bethel Valley Low-Level Waste Collection and Transfer System upgrade for Building 2026 (High Radiation Level Analytical Laboratory) and Building 2099 (Monitoring and Control Station) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-10-01

    This document presents a Design/Installation and Structural Integrity Assessment for a replacement tank system for portions of the Bethel Valley Low Level Waste (LLW) System, located at the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This issue of the assessment covers the design aspects of the replacement tank system, and certifies that the design has sufficient structural integrity and is acceptable for the storing or treating of hazardous and/or radioactive substances. The present issue identifies specific activities that must be completed during the fabrication, installation, and testing of the replacement tank system in order to provide assurance that the final installation complies with governing requirements. Portions of the LLW system are several decades old, or older, and do not comply with current environmental protection regulations. Several subsystems of the LLW system have been designated to receive a state-of-the-art replacement and refurbishment. One such subsystem serves Building 2026, the High Radiation Level Analytical Laboratory. This assessment focuses on the scope of work for the Building 2026 replacement LLW Collection and Transfer System, including the provision of a new Monitoring and Control Station (Building 2099) to receive, store, and treat (adjust pH) low level radioactive waste

  11. Misure in laboratorio di acustica edilizia a bassa frequenza: un approccio modale - Laboratory measurements of building acoustics at low frequency: a modal approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Prato

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Nei tipici ambienti ordinari e di laboratorio (40-80 m3 e a bassa frequenza (50-100 Hz, il campo acustico risulta non diffuso a causa della presenza dei modi. In tali condizioni, le misure classiche di acustica edilizia (isolamento acustico per via aerea e da impatto, tempi di riverbera-zione sono inadeguate per caratterizzare correttamente le proprietà acustiche di partizioni, si-stemi di pavimentazioni e spazi chiusi. L’approccio modale permette di valutare tali proprietà studiando il comportamento dei modi. Sulla base di ciò, appropriate procedure di misura e nuovi descrittori sono proposti e discussi in modo da fornire possibili soluzioni per tali problematiche. ------ In typical laboratory and ordinary rooms (40-80 m3 and at low frequencies (50-100 Hz, the acoustic field is non-diffuse due to the presence of room modes. Under such conditions, standard building acoustics measurements (airborne and impact sound insulation, reverberation time and descriptors are not adequate to correctly characterize the acoustic property of partitions, flooring systems and rooms. The modal approach allows to evaluate such properties by studying the behavior of modes. On the basis of this, proper measurement procedures and new descriptors are proposed and discussed in order to provide possible solutions for such issues.

  12. Corrective Action Plan for CAU No. 95: Area 15 EPA Farm Laboratory Building, Decontamination and Demolition Closure Activities - Nevada Test Site. Rev. 0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, A.L.; Nacht, S.J.

    1997-11-01

    This Corrective Action Plan (CAP) provides the selected corrective action alternative and proposes the closure implementation methodology for the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Farm Laboratory Building 15-06 located in Area 15 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nye County, Nevada. The facility is part of the Environmental Restoration Project managed by the U.S. Department of Energy/Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) under the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D ampersand D) Subproject which serves to manage and dispose of surplus facilities at the NTS in a manner that will protect personnel, the public, and the environment. It is identified as Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 95 in Appendix III of the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). In July 1997, the DOE/NV verbally requested approval from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) for the closure schedule to be accelerated. Currently, field activities are anticipated to be completed by September 30, 1997. In order to meet this new schedule NDEP has agreed to review this document as expeditiously as possible. Comments will be addressed in the Closure Report after field activities have been completed, unless significant issues require resolution during closure activities

  13. Report of the Committee of inquiry into a fire which occurred on 18 March 1987 in a radioisotope processing cell, Building 54 at the Lucas Heights Research Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    At about 1745 hours on Wednesday, 18 March 1987 a fire occurred in a small charcoal filter inside a processing cell (hot cell) in Building 54 at the Lucas Heights Research Laboratories (LHRL). This cell was being used to process irradiated uranium to separate the radioactive isotope molybdenum-99. Some radioactive contamination escaped from the hot cell into the operating area and three AAEC officers were found to have minor radioactive contamination on their skin/hair. The majority of the radioactive material released from the fire was trapped by the main filters outside the cell. The total amounts of radioactive noble gas and of radioiodine released to the environment during the week in which the fire occurred were within the normal range of discharge and were 53% and 2.1%, respectively, of the weekly limit authorised by the NSW Department of Health. On the evidence available to it, the Committee concludes that the fire was caused by spontaneous combustion in the charcoal filter used to trap radioactive gases released by the operations in the hot cell; the mechanism causing the fire cannot be clearly established at this stage; no member of AAEC staff, NSW emergency services personnel or the general public suffered, or will suffer, any adverse health effects from radioactivity as a result of the accident

  14. Corrective Action Plan for CAU No. 95: Area 15 EPA Farm Laboratory Building, Decontamination and Demolition Closure Activities - Nevada Test Site. Rev. 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, A.L.; Nacht, S.J.

    1997-11-01

    This Corrective Action Plan (CAP) provides the selected corrective action alternative and proposes the closure implementation methodology for the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Farm Laboratory Building 15-06 located in Area 15 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nye County, Nevada. The facility is part of the Environmental Restoration Project managed by the U.S. Department of Energy/Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) under the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Subproject which serves to manage and dispose of surplus facilities at the NTS in a manner that will protect personnel, the public, and the environment. It is identified as Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 95 in Appendix III of the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). In July 1997, the DOE/NV verbally requested approval from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) for the closure schedule to be accelerated. Currently, field activities are anticipated to be completed by September 30, 1997. In order to meet this new schedule NDEP has agreed to review this document as expeditiously as possible. Comments will be addressed in the Closure Report after field activities have been completed, unless significant issues require resolution during closure activities.

  15. Radiochemical analysis of concrete samples for decommission of nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zapata-Garcia, Daniel; Wershofen, Herbert [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Bundesallee 100 38116, Braunschweig (Germany); Larijani, Cyrus; Sobrino-Petrirena, Maitane; Garcia-Miranda, Maria; Jerome, Simon M. [National Physical Laboratory (NPL), Hampton Road, Teddington, Middlesex, TW11 0LW (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-01

    Decommissioning of the oldest nuclear power reactors are some of the most challenging technological legacy issues many countries will face in forthcoming years, as many power reactors reach the end of their design lives. Decommissioning of nuclear reactors generates large amounts of waste that need to be classified according to their radioactive content. Approximately 10 % of the contaminated material ends up in different repositories (depending on their level of contamination) while the rest is decontaminated, measured and released into the environment or sent for recycling. Such classification needs to be done accurately in order to ensure that both the personnel involved in decommissioning and the population at large are not needlessly exposed to radiation or radioactive material and to minimise the environmental impact of such work. However, too conservative classification strategies should not be applied, in order to make proper use of radioactive waste repositories since space is limited and the full process must be cost-effective. Implicit in decommissioning and classification of waste is the need to analyse large amounts of material which usually combine a complex matrix with a non-homogeneous distribution of the radionuclides. Because the costs involved are large, it is possible to make great savings by the adoption of best available practices, such as the use of validated methods for on-site measurements and simultaneous determination of more than one radionuclide whenever possible. The work we present deals with the development and the validation of a procedure for the simultaneous determination of {sup 241}Am, plutonium isotopes, uranium isotopes and {sup 90}Sr in concrete samples. Samples are firstly ground and fused with LiBO{sub 2} and Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}. After dissolution of the fused sample, silicate and alkaline elements are removed followed by radiochemical separation of the target radionuclides using extraction chromatography. Measurement

  16. Research Staff | Buildings | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research Staff Research Staff Photo of Roderick Jackson Roderick Jackson Laboratory Program Manager -related research at NREL. He works closely with senior laboratory management to set the strategic agenda for NREL's buildings portfolio, including all research, development, and market implementation

  17. Characterizing the Laboratory Market

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shehabi, Arman [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Ganeshalingam, Mohan [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); DeMates, Lauren [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Mathew, Paul [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sartor, Dale [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2017-04-11

    Laboratories are estimated to be 3-5 times more energy intensive than typical office buildings and offer significant opportunities for energy use reductions. Although energy intensity varies widely, laboratories are generally energy intensive due to ventilation requirements, the research instruments used, and other health and safety concerns. Because the requirements of laboratory facilities differ so dramatically from those of other buildings, a clear need exists for an initiative exclusively targeting these facilities. The building stock of laboratories in the United States span different economic sectors, include governmental and academic institution, and are often defined differently by different groups. Information on laboratory buildings is often limited to a small subsection of the total building stock making aggregate estimates of the total U.S. laboratories and their energy use challenging. Previous estimates of U.S. laboratory space vary widely owing to differences in how laboratories are defined and categorized. A 2006 report on fume hoods provided an estimate of 150,000 laboratories populating the U.S. based in part on interviews of industry experts, however, a 2009 analysis of the 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) generated an estimate of only 9,000 laboratory buildings. This report draws on multiple data sources that have been evaluated to construct an understanding of U.S. laboratories across different sizes and markets segments. This 2016 analysis is an update to draft reports released in October and December 2016.

  18. Literature search, review, and compilation of data for chemical and radiochemical sensors: Task 1 report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    During the next several decades, the US Department of Energy is expected to spend tens of billions of dollars in the characterization, cleanup, and monitoring of DOE's current and former installations that have various degrees of soil and groundwater contamination made up of both hazardous and mixed wastes. Each of these phases will require site surveys to determine type and quantity of hazardous and mixed wastes. It is generally recognized that these required survey and monitoring efforts cannot be performed using traditional chemistry methods based on laboratory evaluation of samples from the field. For that reason, a tremendous push during the past decade or so has been made on research and development of sensors. This report contains the results of an extensive literature search on sensors that are used or have applicability in environmental and waste management. While restricting the search to a relatively small part of the total chemistry spectrum, a sizable body of reference material is included. Results are presented in tabular form for general references obtained from data base searches, as narrative reviews of relevant chapters from proceedings, as book reviews, and as reviews of journal articles with particular relevance to the review. Four broad sensor types are covered: electrochemical processes, piezoelectric devices, fiber optics, and radiochemical processes. The topics of surface chemistry processes and biosensors are not treated separately because they often are an adjunct to one of the four sensors listed. About 1,000 tabular entries are listed, including selected journal articles, reviews of conference/meeting proceedings, and books. Literature to about mid-1992 is covered

  19. Literature search, review, and compilation of data for chemical and radiochemical sensors: Task 1 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-01-01

    During the next several decades, the US Department of Energy is expected to spend tens of billions of dollars in the characterization, cleanup, and monitoring of DOE`s current and former installations that have various degrees of soil and groundwater contamination made up of both hazardous and mixed wastes. Each of these phases will require site surveys to determine type and quantity of hazardous and mixed wastes. It is generally recognized that these required survey and monitoring efforts cannot be performed using traditional chemistry methods based on laboratory evaluation of samples from the field. For that reason, a tremendous push during the past decade or so has been made on research and development of sensors. This report contains the results of an extensive literature search on sensors that are used or have applicability in environmental and waste management. While restricting the search to a relatively small part of the total chemistry spectrum, a sizable body of reference material is included. Results are presented in tabular form for general references obtained from data base searches, as narrative reviews of relevant chapters from proceedings, as book reviews, and as reviews of journal articles with particular relevance to the review. Four broad sensor types are covered: electrochemical processes, piezoelectric devices, fiber optics, and radiochemical processes. The topics of surface chemistry processes and biosensors are not treated separately because they often are an adjunct to one of the four sensors listed. About 1,000 tabular entries are listed, including selected journal articles, reviews of conference/meeting proceedings, and books. Literature to about mid-1992 is covered.

  20. Contamination, decontamination and radiochemical safety analyses of the RA reactor (Report 1966)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maksimovic, Z.

    1966-12-01

    This contract is concerned with development of methods for detection of fission products i the heavy water and quantitative radiochemical analysis for detecting one fission product which enables reliable verification of heavy water contamination by fission products and estimation of contamination level. Qualitative and quantitative radiometry measurements of fission products in water are shown on page 4. Page 6 shows study of contamination and decontamination of water on the laboratory level. Experiments have shown that the majority of fission products was adsorbed on the uranium oxide and that the iodine isotopes are partly in water (non-adsorbed). Gamma spectrometry analyses showed 131 I moves to distillate with the initial quantities of distilled water. decontamination factors compared to the total activity of fission products in distillator and distillate are not higher than ∼10 3 . Decontamination of water contaminated by uranium oxide and fission products in the distillation device of the RA reactor is shown on page 8. Experiments demanded special preparation due to high activity of uranium (1.7 g of uranium irradiated in the reactor for 10 days at neutron flux 1.10 13 n.cm 2 /s. Prior preparations for transport and dissolution of irradiated metal uranium as well as sampling were needed. Distillation was done under lower pressure and temperature to avoid possible contamination of the environment bu fission products and iodine. Decontamination factors are shown in Table. Contamination and decontamination of stainless steel on the laboratory level are described on page 5. It was found that the deposition of activity on the stainless steel plates is inhomogeneous showing that the uranium oxide and fission products are deposited on the rough metal surfaces. According to literature data and our laboratory studies decontamination was done by nitric acid solution (2MHNO 3 ). Since the heavy water system of the RA reactor was made of stainless teel (except the

  1. Comparison of different thin layer detection techniques to determine the radiochemical purity of radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammermaier, A.; Reich, E.; Boegl, W.

    1985-01-01

    Ten radiopharmaceuticals frequently used in clinical treatment were examined as to their radiochemical purity by paper and thin layer chromatography or electrophoresis, respectively. It is known that radiochemical impurities may result in an unnecessary exposure of the patients to be examined. Other than determining the radiochemical purity of several radiopharmaceuticals, a comparison of the different measuring methods of distributing activity on radiochromatograms or electropherograms is intended by this study. For this, the activity distribution in the developed radiochromatograms was assessed by four different measuring methods (TLC-linear analyzer, TLC-scanner with NaI(Tl) detector, TLC-scanner with gas flow counter and NaI(Tl) well-typ counter). As shown by the above analysis, only the TLC-linear analyzer and the NaI(Tl) well-typ counter (measurement of chromatograms or electropherograms cut into strips) are generally suitable methods for determining the radiochemical purity of radiochemicals, the TLC-scanner with gas flow counter is usable in most cases, while TLC-scanner with NaI(Tl) detector is yielding unsatisfactory results. (orig.) [de

  2. Analytical methods for determination of radiochemical and radionuclidic purity of radiopharmaceuticals containing sup(99m)Tc and sup(113m)In. Part of a coordinated programme on radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galatzeanu, I.

    1974-01-01

    The obtained results on radiochemical and radionuclidic purities determination of sup(99m)Tc and sup(113m)In-radiopharmaceuticals proved to be a good tool for small hospital units and laboratories in satisfying their duty to improve the quality control. The complicated behaviour of technetium in aqueous solutions during the preparation of radiopharmaceuticals, needs further research work to elucidate the mechanisms of interaction of reduced species with media and their disproportionation

  3. Method of determination of radiochemical purity of gallium-67 citrate injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Quanji

    1985-01-01

    A simple method is used to compare the effect of five developing agents on the radiochemical purity of neutral products of 67 GaCit and on Rsub(f) values. Two preferable developing agents are recommended as suitable for the identification of 67 GaCit injection in its production. The effect of six pH values of different developing agents on radiochemical purity, Rsub(f) and chromatogram are compared for the neutral products. The results of the experiments show that the ascending paper chromatography with 1:2:4 pyridine/ethanol/water and 85:15 methanol/water is preferable for the determination of the radiochemical purity of 67 GaCit. The other developing agents also can be used if there are not any impurities except gallium radioisotopes

  4. Radiolabeling, quality control and radiochemical purity assessment of 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melero, Laura T.U.H.; Araujo, Elaine B.; Mengatti, Jair

    2009-01-01

    Somatostatine receptors are widely expressed by several tumors, especially of the neuroendocrine origin. In vivo images of these tumors using radiolabeled somatostatine analogues became a useful clinical tool in oncology. The aim of this work was the radiolabeling of the somatostatine analogue HYNIC-TOC with 99mTc as well as the evaluation of the radiochemical stability and quality control of labeled complex. 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC was produced by labeling conditions using 20 μg of peptide, 20 mg of tricine and 10 mg of EDDA as coligands, 1110 MBq of 99mTc (99Mo-99mTc IPEN-TEC generator) and 15 μg of SnCl 2 .2H 2 O. The reaction proceeds for 10 minutes at boiling water bath. Radiochemical purity of labeled preparation was evaluated by different chromatographic systems: ITLC-SG in methanol:ammonium acetate (1:1); TLC-SG in sodium citrate buffer 0.1 N pH 5.0 and methylethylketone, and HPLC employing column C-18, 5 μm, 4.6 mm x 250 mm, UV (220 nm), radioactivity detectors, 1 mL/minute flow of acetonitrile and trifluoroacetic acid solution 0.1 %. Labeled compound has been found radiochemically stable for 5 hours and radiochemical purity was higher than 90 %. The thin layer chromatographic systems enabled the separation of radiochemical species presented in the labeled mixture as well as HPLC system. The labeling procedure studied resulted in high radiochemical yield and easy preparation. Future works include the preparation of a lyophilized reagent to make feasible the preparation of 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC at nuclear medicine services in order to study the clinical potential of the radiopharmaceutical in diagnostic and staging of neuroendocrine tumors. (author)

  5. Radiolabeling, quality control and radiochemical purity assessment of {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-TOC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melero, Laura T.U.H.; Araujo, Elaine B.; Mengatti, Jair [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Somatostatine receptors are widely expressed by several tumors, especially of the neuroendocrine origin. In vivo images of these tumors using radiolabeled somatostatine analogues became a useful clinical tool in oncology. The aim of this work was the radiolabeling of the somatostatine analogue HYNIC-TOC with 99mTc as well as the evaluation of the radiochemical stability and quality control of labeled complex. 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC was produced by labeling conditions using 20 {mu}g of peptide, 20 mg of tricine and 10 mg of EDDA as coligands, 1110 MBq of 99mTc (99Mo-99mTc IPEN-TEC generator) and 15 {mu}g of SnCl{sub 2}.2H{sub 2}O. The reaction proceeds for 10 minutes at boiling water bath. Radiochemical purity of labeled preparation was evaluated by different chromatographic systems: ITLC-SG in methanol:ammonium acetate (1:1); TLC-SG in sodium citrate buffer 0.1 N pH 5.0 and methylethylketone, and HPLC employing column C-18, 5 {mu}m, 4.6 mm x 250 mm, UV (220 nm), radioactivity detectors, 1 mL/minute flow of acetonitrile and trifluoroacetic acid solution 0.1 %. Labeled compound has been found radiochemically stable for 5 hours and radiochemical purity was higher than 90 %. The thin layer chromatographic systems enabled the separation of radiochemical species presented in the labeled mixture as well as HPLC system. The labeling procedure studied resulted in high radiochemical yield and easy preparation. Future works include the preparation of a lyophilized reagent to make feasible the preparation of 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC at nuclear medicine services in order to study the clinical potential of the radiopharmaceutical in diagnostic and staging of neuroendocrine tumors. (author)

  6. Use of reference materials for quality control of elemental analysis by neutron activation with radiochemical separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woittiez, J.R.W.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the use of certified reference materials to monitor the long-term quality of radiochemical separations. The practical limitations which determine the actual design of the quality control are discussed. The hypothesis that the high yield of the radiochemical separation will be constant with time has been checked and validated for the elements Zn, Fe, Co, Cd, Mo and to a lesser extent for W and Th using NBS SRM 1577A, BCR CRM 274 and IAEA RM A-11. This validation could not be made for the elements Cr, Au, and Ag. Especially for Cr there is a serious lack of appropiate certified reference materials. (orig.)

  7. Radiochemical procedures for determination of selected members of the uranium and thorium series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smithson, G.L.

    1979-01-01

    The radiochemical procedures contained in this manual are adaptations of those developed and published by many radiochemists. In many cases the identity of the originator is not clear and usually modifications in the original procedure have been made by subsequent workers. Nearly all of the basic radiochemical techniques and separations in use today were developed during the Manhattan Project and can be found in U.S.A.E.C. reports published from 1945 to 1953. This manual contains methods for the determination of Pb-210, Po-210; Ra-226, Ra-228, Th-228, Th-230 and Th-232. (auth)

  8. Critical evaluation of the determination of zirconium and hafnium by instrumental and radiochemical neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burger, Mario; Kraehenbuehl, Urs

    1991-01-01

    Neutron activation analysis (instrument or radiochemical) is suitable for the determination of zirconium and hafnium in samples of geochemical origin only when sufficient attention is paid to inter-fering nuclides. The size of the necessary correction for INAA depends on the composition of the sample; this problem is discussed. The radio-chemical technique which is recommended involves separation of the samples, precipitations and anion-exchange separation. Results are given for various standard reference materials and for meteorites. (author). 12 refs.; 1 fig.; 9 tabs

  9. On the methodology of radiochemical neutron activation analysis of noble metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chai, C.F.; Ma, S.L.; Mao, X.Y.; Liao, K.N.; Liu, W.C.

    1986-01-01

    Two different radiochemical procedures were developed: chelate ion resin exchange and amine solvent extraction. Two kinds of new Chinese chelate resins (NANKAI-3926 and BEI-5) and a new long-chain primary amine N 1923 were compared with Srafion NMRR and the tertiary amine N 235 in absorption performance of noble metals, respectively. Influences of various experimental conditions, e.g. sample digestion, acidity, equilibrium time, as well as elution of noble metals, on analytical sensitivity and chemical yield were discussed. Combining with neutron activation, the radiochemical separation procedures developed were used to determine the noble metal contents in the geological samples from Permina/Triassic boundary in South China. (author)

  10. Abyssal sediment erosion from the Central Indian Basin: Evidence from radiochemical and radiolarian studies

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Banakar, V.K.; Gupta, S.M.; Padmavati, V.K.

    ) 167-173 167 Elsevier Science Publishers B.V., Amsterdam Letter Section Abyssal sediment erosion in the Central Indian Basin: Evidence from radiochemical and radiolarian studies V.K. Banakar, S.M. Gupta and V.K. Padmavathi National Institute... of Oceanography, Dona-Paula, Goa-403 004, India (Revision accepted September 17, 1990) ABSTRACT Banakar, V.K., Gupta, S.M. and Padmavathi, V.K., 1991. Abyssal sediment erosion from the Central Indian Basin: Evi- dence from radiochemical and radiolarian studies...

  11. Use of ethyl-α-isonitrosoacetoacetate in the rapid estimation and radiochemical separation of gold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawant, A.D.; Haldar, B.C.

    1978-01-01

    The use of ethyl-α-isonitrosoacetoacetate in the rapid estimation and radiochemical separation of gold is reported. As low as 5.00 mg of Au can be estimated with an accuracy better than 1%. Decontamination values against platinum metals and other metals usually associated with Au are greater than 10 5 . Isotopes and results are tabulated. The time required for radiochemical separation is around 20 min and the recovery of Au is better than 80%. γ-activities were measured with a single channel analyser and NaI(Tl) detector. β-activities were counted on a thin end-window type GM counter. (T.I.)

  12. Kit preparation of 153Sm-EDTMP and factors affecting radiochemical purity and stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferro-Flores, G.; Tendilla, J.I.; Lopez-Gomez, M.A.; Aguilar-Hernandez, F.; Gonzalez-Zavala, M.A.; Parades-Gutierrez, L.; Avila-Ramirez, E.

    1996-01-01

    A fast kit method was developed for the production of 153 Sm-EDTMP in two steps avoiding the use of nitric acid, evaporation and sterilization of the final solution by autoclave. Methods of analysis for the determination of chemical and radiochemical purity in the radiopharmaceutical solution were established. Factors affecting radiochemical purity and stability of the complex as the molar ratio of EDTMP/Sm, concentration of phosphate buffer and neutralization of EDTMP prior kit preparation were also analyzed. The use of this radiopharmaceutical in rabbits and patients showed selective skeletal uptake. (author). 5 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  13. Radiochemical methodologies applied to analytical characterization of low and intermediate level wastes from nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteiro, Roberto Pellacani G.; Júnior, Aluísio Souza R.; Kastner, Geraldo F.; Temba, Eliane S.C.; Oliveira, Thiago C. de; Amaral, Ângela M.; Franco, Milton B.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this work is to present radiochemical methodologies developed at CDTN/CNEN in order to answer a program for isotopic inventory of radioactive wastes from Brazilian Nuclear Power Plants. In this program some radionuclides, 3 H, 14 C, 55 Fe, 59 Ni, 63 Ni, 90 Sr, 93 Zr, 94 Nb, 99 Tc, 129 I, 235 U, 238 U, 238 Pu, 239 + 240 Pu, 241 Pu, 242 Pu, 241 Am, 242 Cm e 243 + 244 Cm, were determined in Low Level Wastes (LLW) and Intermediate Level Wastes (ILW) and a protocol of analytical methodologies based on radiochemical separation steps and spectrometric and nuclear techniques was established. (author)

  14. Summary of Laboratory Capabilities Fact Sheets Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility and 222-S Laboratory Complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HADLEY, R.M.

    2002-01-01

    This summary of laboratory capabilities is provided to assist prospective responders to the CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CHG) Requests for Proposal (RFP) issued or to be issued. The RFPs solicit development of treatment technologies as categorized in the CHG Requests for Information (RFI): Solid-Liquid Separations Technology - SOL: Reference-Number-CHG01; Cesium and Technetium Separations Technology - SOL: Reference-Number-CHG02; Sulfate Removal Technology - SOL: Reference-Number-CHG03; Containerized Grout Technology - SOL: Reference-Number-CHG04; Bulk Vitrification Technology - SOL: Reference-Number-CHG05; and TRU Tank Waste Solidification for Disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - SOL: Reference-Number-CHG06 Hanford Analytical Services, Technology Project Management (TPM), has the capability and directly related experience to provide breakthrough innovations and solutions to the challenges presented in the requests. The 222-S Complex includes the 70,000 sq ft 222-S Laboratory, plus several support buildings. The laboratory has 11 hot cells for handling and analyzing highly radioactive samples, including tank farm waste. Inorganic, organic, and radiochemical analyses are performed on a wide variety of air, liquid, soil, sludge, and biota samples. Capabilities also include development of process technology and analytical methods, and preparation of analytical standards. The TPM staff includes many scientists with advanced degrees in chemistry (or closely related fields), over half of which are PhDs. These scientists have an average 20 years of Hanford experience working with Hanford waste in a hot cell environment. They have hundreds of publications related to Hanford tank waste characterization and process support. These would include, but are not limited to, solid-liquid separations engineering, physical chemistry, particle size analysis, and inorganic chemistry. TPM has had revenues in excess of $1 million per year for the past decade in above

  15. Preparing a laboratory for radioanalytical emergency response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, J.; Webb, C.J.; Isch, S.

    2011-01-01

    As the state of the nation's ability to respond to a radiological event is examined, it has become apparent that both capacity and capability are lacking. Department of Homeland Security National Planning Scenario 11 is designed to address the planning activities for the response to an attack using radiological dispersal devices. The scenario details show that the cleanup activity will take several years, and that there will be between 360 000 and 1 000 000 environmental samples in the first year. Based on existing capacity and capabilities it would take four to six years to analyze the samples generated at the lower end of the sample range. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has been given responsibility for the remediation activities following a radiological event, and has awarded cooperative agreements to several laboratories to start the process of developing capacity and capabilities. The Connecticut Department of Public Health Laboratory (DPHL) was awarded one of the cooperative agreements. The DPHL has started activities to further those goals by investigating and implementing procedures to ensure that samples with activity higher than normal background can be processed safely, as well as implementing more rapid methods for radiochemical analysis. The DPHL already served as the primacy radiochemistry laboratory for several New England states and thus had a solid foundation to build upon. The DPHL has taken a process flow approach in preparing for radiological emergency response and recommends that radioanalytical laboratories that are reviewing their roles in such a response: - Ensure that their Nuclear Regulatory Commission licenses allow for appropriate radioisotope types and activities; - Develop procedures and processes to ensure that samples with higher activities can be processed safely, with due regard for sample screening and aliquanting samples; - Provide for enhanced radioanalytical contamination control, with careful consideration of sample

  16. Securing a better future for all: Nuclear techniques for global development and environmental protection. NA factsheet on nuclear sciences and applications laboratories. Supporting development: R and D, capacity building and technical services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The system of twelve dedicated IAEA laboratory facilities is a unique feature in the United Nations. The laboratories support and implement programmatic activities that respond to the developmental needs of Member States in food and agriculture, human health, environmental monitoring and assessment, as well as the use of nuclear analytical instruments. The laboratories carry out three essential types of activity, which are simultaneously supported worldwide in Member State laboratories: (i) applied research and development; (ii) training and capacity building and (iii) technical and analytical services. Their primary aim is to assist in increasing the impact of related IAEA programmes. While the laboratories share certain types of activity, their fields of expertise range from food and agriculture, medical dosimetry to the environment and water resources. Most of the laboratories are based in Seibersdorf, a town about 35 km southeast of Vienna. There are five FAO-IAEA agriculture and biotechnology laboratories assisting Member States to develop and adapt new and existing agricultural technologies involving isotopes and radiation to suit local requirements and environmental conditions, and to provide the necessary training and analytical services pertaining to the efficient use of these technologies.

  17. Single patient doses of {sup 99m}Tc-HDP: Assessment of radiochemical purity, sterility and extractables from a polypropylene syringe over six hours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parkes, S.L.; Varelis, P. [St George Hospital, Kogarah, NSW (Australia). Department of Nuclear Medicine

    1997-12-01

    Full text: The purpose of this investigation was to determine the radiochemical purity (RCP), sterility and extractables for {sup 99m}Tc oxidronate ({sup 99m}Tc-HDP) stored in polypropylene syringes over < six-hour period. The radiochemical purity was determined using a two-strip ITLC procedure, performed at time 0, 1, 2, 4, 6 hours. The sterility and endotoxin levels were tested by a NATA accredited laboratory, after allowing the radiopharmaceutical to stand at room temperature for six hours in the syringes. Plasticisers and other likely compounds that could be extracted from the syringes into the aqueous solution were determined by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) diode array detection. This analysis involved shaking normal saline in a syringe over night and then injecting an aliquot of this solution onto a C18 analytical column and monitoring the effluent at 200 and 253 nm. The radiochemical purity of {sup 99m}Tc-HDP did not significantly change over the course of the study and remained above the recommended RCP for this radiopharmaceutical. Furthermore, at six hours the RCP of {sup 99m}Tc-HDP stored in both the manufacturer`s vial and a syringe were identical. Sterility testing of {sup 99m}Tc-HDP stored in syringes showed no microbial growth and less than 10 endotoxin units/mL (pass). The HPLC analysis did not show the presence of any extraneous compounds in the aqueous solution. Single patient doses of {sup 99m}Tc-HDP stored in polypropylene syringes over a six-hour period fulfill all the quality control requirements for administration to humans.

  18. On the radiochemical purity of elementary 35S with high specific activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todorovsky, D.S.; Kostadinov, K.N.; Efremova, Yu.N.

    1979-01-01

    Radiochemical composition and chemical changes with increasing storage time of benzene solutions and of solid species of elementary 35 S with high specific activity are studied. The dependence of the stability on the specific activity and the radioactive concentration is shown and some tentative limits are given for permissible storage periods. (author)

  19. Determination of the radiochemical purity of phosphorus-32 and tritium-labeled diisopropylphosphorofluoridate (DFP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christopher, R.E.; Sheppard, G.

    1975-01-01

    A method is described for the determination of the radiochemical purity of labeled diisopropylphosphorofluoridate (DFP), based on the irreversible inhibition reaction with the enzyme α-chymotrypsin. The nature of the impurities in commercially available 32 P- and 3 H-labeled DFP is discussed

  20. Radiochemical assay for determination of dihydropyrimidinase activity using reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kuilenburg, A. B.; van Lenthe, H.; van Gennip, A. H.

    1999-01-01

    A radiochemical assay was developed to measure the activity of dihydropyrimidinase (DHP) in human liver homogenates. The method is based on the separation of radiolabeled dihydrouracil from N-carbamyl-beta-alanine by HPLC with on-line detection of radioactivity combined with detection of 14CO2 by

  1. Rapid and sensitive enzymatic-radiochemical assay for the determination of triglycerides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoo, J.C.; Miller, E.; Goldberg, D.I.

    1987-01-01

    An enzymatic-radiochemical method suitable for the determination of triglyceride levels of cells in culture is described. The method is based on the enzymatic hydrolysis of triglycerides to free fatty acids which then complex with 63 Ni. The method is rapid, accurate, and inexpensive. The procedure extends the sensitivity of triglyceride measurement to as low as 0.25 nanomoles

  2. Triphenyl phosphine oxide as a substoichiometric radiochemical reagent: Determination of thallium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, P.C.; Polaiah, B.; Rangamannar, B.

    1991-01-01

    A rapid radiochemical method has been developed for the determination of microgram amounts of thallium based on the substoichiometric extraction of its ocmplex with triphenylphosphine oxide into benzene from 6 M sulphuric acid. 10-90 μg of thallium was determined with an average error of 2.06%. The effect of diverse metal ions on the extraction was studied. (orig.)

  3. Computer aided piping layout design in radiochemical plants- an improved software package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raju, R.P.; Siddiqui, H.R.

    1995-01-01

    A software package was developed and it was successfully implemented for the piping layout design of the four process cells of the Kalpakkam Reprocessing Project. This paper discusses in detail all the improvements and modifications that are being carried out in the package so that it becomes more meaningful and useful for implementation for the forthcoming radiochemical plants

  4. Evaluation of radiochemical purities of some radiopharmaceuticals in Shiraz Namazi teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Sadeghpour

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Many radiopharmaceuticals, as a special group of drugs, are eventually prepared at the nuclear medicine departments of the hospitals. Therefore, their quality control procedures such as sterility tests, radionuclide, radiochemical and chemical purity should be carried out in the hospitals. In this study, radiochemical purity for more than 300 preparations of three different radiopharmaceutical formulations from commercial kits were tested using instant thin layer chromatography. The formulations 99mTc-DTPA, 99mTc-MDP and 99mTc-MIBI were obtained from Pars Isotope Co. Several paper chromatographic systems including standard and factory recommended thin layer chromatography systems were used in this study. In addition different equipments for detection of radioactivity in paper chromatography like gamma camera and dose calibrator were used. The results showed that the most observed impurities were hydrolyzed reduced technetium (HR-Tc. There were no significant differences between calculated 99mTc-MIBI radiochemical purities when the radioactive detection device was gamma camera instead of dose calibrator. In case of 99mTc-DTPA and 99mTc-MDP, there were significant differences in detection of HR-Tc. On the contrary, no significant differences in free pertechnetate were observed when package insert procedures for quality control were used instead of those recommended in the references. Finally, we observed that the package insert procedures for quality control can offer higher radiochemical purities.

  5. Radiochemical separation and alpha-spectrometric determination of Americium in different matrixes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radenkovic, M.; Joksic, J.; Paligoric, D.

    2009-01-01

    A method of separation and alpha-spectrometric determination of americium, developed in VINCA Institute of Nuclear Sciences is described in the paper. The procedure is convenient to be used for 241 Am determination in environmental matrixes as well as samples of human origin if a very small concentrations are expected, using 243 Am as a tracer for radiochemical yield recovery. (author) [sr

  6. The radiochemical purity of radiotracers as the criterion of their usefulness in investigations of hydrocarbons distillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolaczkowski, M.

    1976-01-01

    Among numerous analytic techniques of separation and analysis of radioactive products gas radiochromatography has proved to be particularly suitable. Organic bromides labelled with 82 Br-radionuclide are investigated. The analytic gas chromatographs equipped with appropriately constructed radiochromatographic attachments are used. The results of radiochemical purity determination of radiotracers are compared for various techniques. (author)

  7. Analytical and radiochemical methods in the stability study of the MIBI-Sm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaac, M.; Leyva, R.; Gamboa, R.; Turino, D.

    1997-01-01

    99mT c-MIBI is a radiopharmaceutical imaging agent useful for assessing myocardial perfusion. This paper presents the stability results obtained in the radiochemical purity and others parameters in the quality control of 5 batch during more than 2 years

  8. Protein binding studies with radiolabeled compounds containing radiochemical impurities. Equilibrium dialysis versus dialysis rate determination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honoré, B

    1987-01-01

    The influence of radiochemical impurities in dialysis experiments with high-affinity ligands is investigated. Albumin binding of labeled decanoate (97% pure) is studied by two dialysis techniques. It is shown that equilibrium dialysis is very sensitive to the presence of impurities resulting...

  9. Cadmium determination in biological samples using neutron activation analysis with radiochemical separations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munoz A, Luis; Gras R, Nuri

    2005-01-01

    Chile has 7500 km of coastline on the Southern Pacific ocean,with about 4500 km of continental coastline that contains a variety of different geographical zones.This variety means that there is a great diversity of marine resources such as fish, shellfish and seaweeds. The utilization of these resources has been increasing in recent years making this sector an economically important one. The catch as of May 2002 came to 1.9 million tons and exports of the different species amounted to US$611.5 million as of April.But this important economic resource is being threatened by the technical demands imposed by importing countries, mainly the specific requirements for sanitary certification for fishery export products, depending on the markets of destination. The chemical element cadmium is one of the most strictly controlled elements due some shellfish accumulate a large amount of this element and to its high toxicity. The Chilean standard's analytical procedures for cadmium determination in hydro biological products, which must be met by laboratories that certify and control these products for export, are now being evaluated. Through its Chemical Metrology Unit, the Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission is strongly supporting this sector by preparing the secondary reference or control materials, and it has developed and implemented nuclear analytical methods for the certification of these materials, which will be used mostly in collaborative studies. This work describes the methodology developed for the determination of cadmium in biological samples, particularly in shellfish and fish. The method is based on neutron activation analysis with radiochemical separations, using the radioisotopes 115 Cd and 115m In, generated in the samples by bombarding with neutrons in a nuclear reactor. The samples were digested at 110 o C with H 2 SO 4 and H 2 O 2 and then the radioactive cadmium element was separated from the other elements present in the samples using a Bio Rad AG 2-X8

  10. RADCHEM 2005 - Radiochemical analysis in emergency and routine situations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidhu, R.

    2006-04-01

    The report describes the work performed under the NKS-B project Radchem during 2005. RadChem-2005 has been focused towards laboratory work, and each participant has worked with improvement of existing procedures or development of new procedures. In addition an intercomparison exercise on the determination of natural radionuclides in ground water has been performed. Other work performed in Radchem-2005 include: 1) Development of new procedures for the determination of Am and Cm in environmental samples; 2) Development of a procedure for age determination of Pu; 3) Rapid determination of Pu using ICP-MS; 4) Determination of U, Pu and Am in emergency situations; 5) Sequential determination of Sr, U, Pu, Am and Cm in urine; 6) Ultra low level measurements using ICP-MS. (au)

  11. Implementation of advanced electrochemical oxidation for radiochemical concentrate treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velin, Anna; Bengtsson, Bernt; Lundblad, Magnus

    2012-09-01

    Water treatments in Nuclear Power Plants include ion exchange, evaporation and mechanical filtration techniques. These technologies are used to control the chemical release and to treat coolant in light water reactor types from chemicals and most importantly, from radioactive nuclides. Most of the conventional methods are efficient, but at the same time producing aqueous concentrates with high organic load. Before final storage, the level of organic content of those concentrates must be reduced. Advanced electrochemical oxidation with Boron Doped Diamond (BDD) electrodes are being investigated in laboratory- and pilot scale for treatment of dilute and concentrated aqueous waste streams at Vattenfall-Ringhals NPP. BDD anodes and cathodes are having high over potential against water electrolysis, and therefore well suitable for oxidation of organics. Dilute wastewater, such as laundry water, which has an initial COD level of around 500 mg/l, was reduced to a level of < 20 mg/l in the laboratory. Evaporator concentrates, with a TS content of 3% and pH of 7-8, were treated in pilot scale of 800 liters, working in batch operation mode, at temperatures between 25-50 deg. C. Initial COD levels between 2500 and 8000 mg/l in concentrate was reduced to < 100 mg/l at the first tests and later to < 300 mg/l. The advanced electrochemical oxidation is proven to be a promising technique for radioactive concentrate treatment. Long-term operation is still ongoing to evaluate the performance of the electrodes, cell components and overall process efficiency. (authors)

  12. The metal alloys from the XIX century and weathering action in the Mercado do Ver-o-Peso building, northern Brazil: Identification with the usage of laboratory analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palácios, Flávia Olegário; Angélica, Rômulo Simões; Sanjad, Thais Alessandra Bastos Caminha

    2014-01-01

    The fabrication of metallic buildings started in Europe after the Industrial Revolution in the 18th century. Metallic constructions became very popular, and started being imported by several countries, due to the facility of constructing or assembling. Belém, a northern Brazilian city, holds a great number of buildings entirely made of iron, including the Ver-o-Peso, a fish market which structures were imported from England by the end of the 19th century. This building represents a unique type of architecture and it's an important part of the city's heritage. However, research so far did not focus on its construction materials. Ver-o-Peso building's metal alloys haven't been thoroughly studied concerning physical, chemical and mineralogical characterizations. This paper aims to identify the types of metal alloys used in the building, and also corrosion products' result from weathering actions. The methods used to characterize the materials were scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Through this research it was possible to identify four types of iron alloys used in the different parts of the building, characterize the paint coats, and determine types of corrosion. The characterization of the materials in the building allows enrolling basis for restoration processes, documenting the types of metal alloy used in architectural heritage from the 19th century, as well as understanding the advances of corrosion. - Highlights: • Ver-o-peso is a heritage building from the 19th century with unidentified alloys. • Alloy and weathering product characterization was done using SEM/EDS and XRD. • Four metal alloy types were described, indicating different types of foundries. • Weathering products showed distinct mineral phases and physical characteristics. • Original paint coats were found among corrosion products

  13. The metal alloys from the XIX century and weathering action in the Mercado do Ver-o-Peso building, northern Brazil: Identification with the usage of laboratory analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palácios, Flávia Olegário, E-mail: flavia.op@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Pará, LCM (Laboratório de Caracterização Mineral), Programa de Pós-Graduação em Geologia e Geoquímica (PPGG) (Brazil); Angélica, Rômulo Simões [Universidade Federal do Pará, LCM (Laboratório de Caracterização Mineral), Programa de Pós-Graduação em Geologia e Geoquímica (PPGG) (Brazil); Sanjad, Thais Alessandra Bastos Caminha [Universidade Federal do Pará (UFPA), LACORE (Laboratório de Restauração, Conservação e Reabilitação), Programa de Pós-Graduação em Arquitetura e Urbanismo - PPGAU (Brazil)

    2014-10-15

    The fabrication of metallic buildings started in Europe after the Industrial Revolution in the 18th century. Metallic constructions became very popular, and started being imported by several countries, due to the facility of constructing or assembling. Belém, a northern Brazilian city, holds a great number of buildings entirely made of iron, including the Ver-o-Peso, a fish market which structures were imported from England by the end of the 19th century. This building represents a unique type of architecture and it's an important part of the city's heritage. However, research so far did not focus on its construction materials. Ver-o-Peso building's metal alloys haven't been thoroughly studied concerning physical, chemical and mineralogical characterizations. This paper aims to identify the types of metal alloys used in the building, and also corrosion products' result from weathering actions. The methods used to characterize the materials were scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Through this research it was possible to identify four types of iron alloys used in the different parts of the building, characterize the paint coats, and determine types of corrosion. The characterization of the materials in the building allows enrolling basis for restoration processes, documenting the types of metal alloy used in architectural heritage from the 19th century, as well as understanding the advances of corrosion. - Highlights: • Ver-o-peso is a heritage building from the 19th century with unidentified alloys. • Alloy and weathering product characterization was done using SEM/EDS and XRD. • Four metal alloy types were described, indicating different types of foundries. • Weathering products showed distinct mineral phases and physical characteristics. • Original paint coats were found among corrosion products.

  14. Low-level simultaneous determination of As and Sb in standard reference materials using radiochemical neutron activation analysis with isotopic 77As and 125Sb tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byrne, A.R.

    1987-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to develop an older method used in our laboratory based on selective solvent extraction of As and Sb as their iodides with toluene, and by the use of the radioisotopic tracers 77 As and 125 Sb, to improve the accuracy by better control of the radiochemical yields. 77 As was produced for each sample run by concurrent irradiation of a few mg of GeO 2 followed by a rapid separation of 77 As from 77 Ge. The radiochemically purified sample fraction containing 76+77 As and 122+125 Sb was counted on a Ge detector in good geometry. The γ-lines of the four nuclides do not mutually interfere so that a combined measurement of As and Sb may be made. The method was applied to IAEA Milk Powder A-11, Animal Muscle H-4, Bowen's Kale and some other SRMs. The results obtained are discussed in the light of literature measurements. From present and previous results, together with data by Heydorn, the presently accepted value for As in Bowen's Kale of 140 ngxg -1 may be 20% too high. (orig.)

  15. OPERATIONAL EXPERIENCE: UPGRADED MPC AND A SYSTEMS FOR THE RADIOCHEMICAL PLANT OF THE SIBERIAN CHEMICAL COMBINE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RODRIGUEZ, C.; GOLOSKOKOV, I.; FISHBONE, L.; GOODEY, K.; LOOMIS, M.; CRAIN, B. JR.; LARSEN, R.

    2003-01-01

    The success of reducing the risk of nuclear proliferation through physical protection and material control/accounting systems depends upon the development of an effective design that includes consideration of the objectives of the systems and the resources available to implement the design. Included among the objectives of the design are facility characterization, definition of threat, and identification of targets. When considering resources, the designer must consider funds available, rapid low-cost elements, technology elements, human resources, and the availability of resources to sustain operation of the end system. The Siberian Chemical Combine (SCC) is a multi-function nuclear facility located in the Tomsk region of Siberia, Russia. Beginning in 1996, SCC joined with the United States Department of Energy (US/DOE) Material Protection, Control, and Accounting (MPC and A) Program to develop and implement MPC and A upgrades for the Radiochemical, Chemical Metallurgical, Conversion, Uranium Enrichment, and Reactor Plants of the SCC. At the Radiochemical Plant the MPC and A design and implementation process has been largely completed for the Plutonium Storage Facility and related areas of the Radiochemical Plant. Design and implementation of upgrades for the Radiochemical Plant include rapid physical protection upgrades such as bricking up of doors and windows, and installation of security-hardened doors. Rapid material control and accounting upgrades include installation of modern balances and bar code equipment. Comprehensive MPC and A upgrades include the installation of access controls to sensitive areas of the Plant, alarm communication and display (AC and D) systems to detect and annunciate alarm conditions, closed circuit (CCTV) systems to assess alarm conditions, central and secondary alarm station upgrades that enable security forces to assess and respond to alarm conditions, material control and accounting upgrades that include upgraded physical

  16. Scientific and technical conference. Problems and horizons of development of chemical and radiochemical control in nuclear energetics. Collection of summaries of reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    During scientific and technical conference on problems of development of chemical and radiochemical control in nuclear energetics following themes were considered: the problems of methodological and instrumental assurance of chemical and radiochemical control at working nuclear power plants and nuclear energetic units; modern conceptions of automation systems construction of chemical and radiochemical control on the basis of intellectual measuring channels; the ways of decision of generally system problems of organization and management of chemical and radiochemical control using computed technologies; the problems of certification of chemical and radiochemical methods of measuring in nuclear energetics [ru

  17. Progress on radiochemical analysis for nuclear waste management in decommissioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, X. (Technical Univ. of Denmark. Center for Nuclear Technologies (NuTech), Roskilde (Denmark))

    2012-01-15

    This report summarized the progress in the development and improvement of radioanalytical methods for decommissioning and waste management completed in the NKS-B RadWaste 2011 project. Based on the overview information of the analytical methods in Nordic laboratories and requirement from the nuclear industry provided in the first phase of the RadWaste project (2010), some methods were improved and developed. A method for efficiently separation of Nb from nuclear waste especially metals for measurement of long-lived 94Nb by gamma spectrometry was developed. By systematic investigation of behaviours of technetium in sample treatment and chromatographic separation process, an effective method was developed for the determination of low level 99Tc in waste samples. An AMS approachment was investigated to measure ultra low level 237Np using 242Pu for AMS normalization, the preliminary results show a high potential of this method. Some progress on characterization of waste for decommissioning of Danish DR3 is also presented. (Author)

  18. Progress on radiochemical analysis for nuclear waste management in decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou, X.

    2012-01-01

    This report summarized the progress in the development and improvement of radioanalytical methods for decommissioning and waste management completed in the NKS-B RadWaste 2011 project. Based on the overview information of the analytical methods in Nordic laboratories and requirement from the nuclear industry provided in the first phase of the RadWaste project (2010), some methods were improved and developed. A method for efficiently separation of Nb from nuclear waste especially metals for measurement of long-lived 94Nb by gamma spectrometry was developed. By systematic investigation of behaviours of technetium in sample treatment and chromatographic separation process, an effective method was developed for the determination of low level 99Tc in waste samples. An AMS approachment was investigated to measure ultra low level 237Np using 242Pu for AMS normalization, the preliminary results show a high potential of this method. Some progress on characterization of waste for decommissioning of Danish DR3 is also presented. (Author)

  19. Building Technologies Research and Integration Center (BTRIC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Building Technologies Research and Integration Center (BTRIC), in the Energy and Transportation Science Division (ETSD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL),...

  20. Trace determination of uranium and thorium in biological samples by radiochemical neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benedik, Ljudmila; Repinc, Urska; Byrne, Anthony R.; Stegnar, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Radiochemical neutron activation analysis (RNAA) is an excellent method for determining uranium and thorium; it offers unique possibilities for their ultratrace analysis using selective radiochemical separations. Regarding the favourably sensitive nuclear characteristics of uranium and of thorium with respect to RNAA, but the different half-lives of their induced nuclides, two different approaches were used. In the first approach uranium and thorium were determined separately via 239 U, 239 Np and 233 Pa. In the second approach these elements were 239 239 233 determined simultaneously in a single sample using U and/or Np and Pa. Isolation of induced nuclides was based on separation by extraction and/or anion exchange chromatography. Chemical yields were measured in each sample aliquot using added 235 U, 238 Np and 231 Pa radioisotopic tracers. (author)

  1. Slifers revisited: a method for determining yields independent of radiochemical measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rambo, J.T.

    1976-01-01

    It would be very desirable if an independent method other than radiochemical measurement were available to determine the yields of low-yield events in the alluviums and tuffs of areas 2, 9, and 10 at the Nevada Test Site. The successful application of slifers to the measurement of yields from high-yield events suggests that under some conditions they may also be usable with low-yield events. This view is supported by the evidence discussed here, which is based on direct experience with slifer yield measurements for low-yield events in porous media. Suggested methods for improving slifer yield determinations and a method for determining yields independent of radiochemical measurements are offered

  2. Radiochemical methodologies applied to analytical characterization of low and intermediate level wastes from nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monteiro, Roberto Pellacani G.; Júnior, Aluísio Souza R.; Kastner, Geraldo F.; Temba, Eliane S.C.; Oliveira, Thiago C. de; Amaral, Ângela M.; Franco, Milton B., E-mail: rpgm@cdtn.br, E-mail: reisas@cdtn.br, E-mail: gfk@cdtn.br, E-mail: esct@cdtn.br, E-mail: tco@cdtn.br, E-mail: ama@cdtn.br, E-mail: francom@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this work is to present radiochemical methodologies developed at CDTN/CNEN in order to answer a program for isotopic inventory of radioactive wastes from Brazilian Nuclear Power Plants. In this program some radionuclides, {sup 3}H, {sup 14}C, {sup 55}Fe, {sup 59}Ni, {sup 63}Ni, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 93}Zr, {sup 94}Nb, {sup 99}Tc, {sup 129}I, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}+{sup 240}Pu, {sup 241}Pu, {sup 242}Pu, {sup 241}Am, {sup 242}Cm e {sup 243}+{sup 244}Cm, were determined in Low Level Wastes (LLW) and Intermediate Level Wastes (ILW) and a protocol of analytical methodologies based on radiochemical separation steps and spectrometric and nuclear techniques was established. (author)

  3. Requirement of radiochemical recovery determination for gross alpha and gross beta estimation in drinking water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raveendran, Nanda; Rao, D.D.; Hegde, A.G.

    2010-01-01

    Presence of radionuclides in drinking water which emits Alpha and Beta particles are the potential sources of internal exposure in drinking water. Gross alpha and gross beta determination in drinking water and packaged drinking water (PDW) as per BIS (Bureau of Indian standards) standards is discussed here. The methods have been tested to account for losses in the radiochemical procedures using radionuclides such as 137 Cs, 90 Sr, 226 Ra, 239 Pu, 243 Am, 232 U. The methods have also been validated in an IAEA proficiency test conducted during 2009. Monitoring of gross alpha and gross beta activity observed in drinking water/packaged drinking water from various states of India were within the limits set by BIS. Average radiochemical recoveries of 84% and 63% were obtained for gross α and gross β respectively. (author)

  4. Procedural and developmental aspects of a multielement automatic radiochemical machine, applied to neutron irradiated biomedical samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyengar, G.V.

    1976-06-01

    This report is intended to serve as a practical guide, elaborately describing the working details and some developmental work connected with an automatic multielement radiochemical machine based on thermal neutron activation analysis using ion exchange and partition chromatography. Some of the practical aspects and personal observations after much experience with this versatile multielement method, applied to investigate the elemental composition of different biomedical matrices, are summarized. Standard reference materials are analyzed, and the data are presented with a set of gamma-spectra obtained before and after chemical separation into convenient groups suitable for gamma spectroscopy. The samples analyzed included various human and animal tissues, body fluids, IAEA biological standard reference materials, and samples from the WHO/IAEA project on 'Trace elements in relation to cardiovascular diseases'. Simplified modifications of the radiochemical processing, suitable for fast and routine analysis of clinical samples have also been discussed. (orig.) [de

  5. Ultratrace determination of platinum in biological materials via neutron activation and radiochemical separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeisler, R.; Greenberg, R.R.

    1982-01-01

    A neutron activation analysis scheme based upon a radiochemical separation of the activation products has been developed. The method utilizes the inherent sensitivity of the activation reaction 198 Pt(n,ν) 199 Pt and counting of the daughter nuclide 199 Au. This nuclide is radiochemically separated from interfering activities by homogeneous precipitation as elemental gold. The remaining interference of the secondary reaction 197 Au(n,ν) 198 Au(n,ν) 199 Au from gold in the samples is quantitatively assessed and corrected. During this process accurate gold concentrations in the samples are obtained at ultratrace levels. The analysis scheme is applied to gold and platinum determinations in biological Standard Reference Materials and human liver specimens. Gold and platinum are determined at concentrations of 5x10 - 11 g/g, and at higher levels. (author)

  6. Radiochemical syntheses further radiopharmaceuticals for positron emission tomography and new strategies for their production

    CERN Document Server

    Kilbourn, Michael R; Kilbourn, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    This book describes methods and procedures for preparing PET radiopharmaceuticals, and highlights new methods for conducting radiochemical reactions with carbon-11 (C11) and fluorine-18 (F18), which are two of the most commonly used radionuclides in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging.     Provides reliable methods for radiochemical syntheses and reactions, including all essential information to duplicate the procedure     Eliminates the time-consuming process of searching journal articles and extracting pertinent details from lengthy experimental sections or supporting information     Focuses on an emerging and important area for pharmaceutical and medical applications     Encompasses technical, regulatory, and application aspects     Includes solid-phase radiochemistry, transition-metal catalyzed radiochemistry, microfluidics, click chemistry, green radiochemistry and new strategies for radiopharmaceutical quality control.

  7. Radiochemical neutron activation analysis for trace elements of basic ingredients of pan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaidi, J.H.; Arif, M.; Fatima, I; Qureshi, I.H.

    2002-01-01

    Extensive use of pan, by one-tenth of world's population, entails the evaluation of trace element contents in its ingredients. Radiochemical neutron activation analysis (RNAA) was developed and successfully employed to determine the concentration of 36 trace elements (essential, toxic and nonessential) in its four basic ingredients, leaf of betel pepper, betel nut, catechu and lime. The radiochemical separation methodology has significantly improved the detection limits of most of these elements due to suppression of Compton background. Base-line values of certain toxic and essential elements in these ingredients is provided. The daily intake of essential and toxic elements through pan was estimated and compared with the recommended values. The cumulative intake of Mn is four times higher than the recommended value and that of toxic elements is well below the tolerance limits. (author)

  8. Leakage evaluation in the PCV (Primary Containment Vessel) using chemical and radiochemical data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Katsuji; Nagasawa, Katsumi

    1998-01-01

    Keeping the reliability of nuclear power plant operation, the primary coolant leakage in the PCV is strictly restricted by the Technical Specifications. It is very important to detect an indication of leakage and estimate the source of leakage to provide countermeasures. Usually the indication of leakage will be detected by increase of drain flow in the PCV sump. There are some possibilities of leakage sources in the PCV, such as reactor water, main steam, condensate, feedwater and closed cooling water. The leakage source contain different chemical and radiochemical species. This means that the leakage source can be presumed and detected by using chemical information from the PCV atmosphere and sump water. To detect the leakage indication and the source quickly and exactly, the PCV Leakage Detection Expert System has been developed. This paper describes how to evaluate the leakage indication and source in the PCV by using chemical and radiochemical data. (author)

  9. Rapid radiochemical methods for preparation of sup(99m)Tc labelled compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narasimhan, D.V.S.; Banodkar, S.M.; Kothari, K.; Mani, R.S.

    1981-01-01

    Several inorganic and organic compounds incorporating sup( 99 m)Tc are being extensively used for imaging various body organs. The preparation of these sup( 99 m)Tc compounds with the necessary purity requirements is carried out by controlled reduction of sup( 99 m)Tc-pertechnetate using Sn(II) ions as the reducing agent followed by complexation with various active ingredients. The authors here present procedures developed at Radiopharmaceuticals Section of BARC for preparing sup( 99 m)Tc-diphosphonate, sup( 99 m)Tc-glucoheptonate, sup( 99 m)Tc-albumin microspheres and sup( 99 m)Tc-phytate with high radiochemical purity. The paper also describes procedures for the preparation of freeze-dried kits for single step preparation of these compounds. The paper also describes the authors' experience with various analytical procedures for the determination of radiochemical purity of these preparations. (author)

  10. Some problems concenrning the use of automated radiochemical separation systems in destructive neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagy, L.G.; Toeroek, G.

    1977-01-01

    The present state of a long term program is reviewed. It was started to elaborate a remote controlled automated radiochemical processing system for the neutron activation analysis of biological materials. The system is based on wet ashing of the sample followed by reactive desorption of some volatile components. The distillation residue is passed through a series of columns filled with selective ion screening materials to remove the matrix activity. The solution is thus ''stripped'' from the interfering radioions, and it is processed to single-elements through group separations using ion-exchange chromatographic techniques. Some special problems concerning this system are treated. (a) General aspects of the construction of a (semi)automated radiochemical processing system are discussed. (b) Comparison is made between various technical realizations of the same basic concept. (c) Some problems concerning the ''reconstruction'' of an already published processing system are outlined. (T.G.)

  11. Radiochemical separation of actinides for their determination in environmental samples and waste products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gleisberg, B [Nuclear Engineering and Analytics Rossendorf, Inc. (VKTA), Dresden (Germany)

    1997-03-01

    The determination of low level activities of actinides in environmental samples and waste products makes high demands on radiochemical separation methods. Artificial and natural actinides were analyzed in samples form the surrounding areas of NPP and of uranium mines, incorporation samples, solutions containing radioactive fuel, solutions and solids resutling from the process, and in wastes. The activities are measured by {alpha}-spectrometry and {gamma}-spectrometry. (DG)

  12. Study of performance characteristics of a radiochemical method to determine uranium in biological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puga, Maria J.; Cerchietti, Maria L.R.; Prudenzo, J.E.; Arguelles, Maria G.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper is described a methodology to calculate detection limit (Ld), quantification level (Lq) and minimum detectable activity (MDA) in a radiochemical method for determination of uranium in urine samples. The concentration is measured by fluorimetry and alpha gross activity using liquid scintillation counting (LSC). The calculation of total propagated uncertainty on a spike sample is presented. Furthermore, the major sources of uncertainty and percentage contribution in both measurements are assessed. (author)

  13. New radiochemical methods for determination of 237Np a 241Pu using extraction chromatography (Presentation)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strisovska, J.

    2013-01-01

    Thesis was focused on the development of a new methodology for the separation of anthropogenic transuranium radionuclides 237 Np a 241 Pu from different kinds of matrices. The analytical methods used in this study were based on extraction chromatography and were optimized according to the sample type. The proposed radiochemical procedure is a combination of two algorithms, which represent the separation of radionuclides by using extraction chromatographic sorbents TEVA resin and TRU resin supplied by Eichrom Technologies LLC. 239 Np a 237 Np were selectively captured on sorbent TEVA resin in oxidation state 4+. TRU resin was used for purification of plutonium fraction from interfering americium radionuclide. 242 Pu and 239 Np radionuclides as tracers have been used to monitor the radiochemical yields of separation. Before every radiochemical separation tracer radionuclide 239 Np was obtained by separation from the parent radionuclide 2 43 Am, which is in radioactive equilibrium to 239 Np. The average yield of chemical separation was 69,3% for 239 Np at 277 keV energy line and 65,9% at 228 keV energy line. The NPL AH-B08069 (2008) samples which consist of the mixture of alpha-radionuclides were used for the modification and optimization of separation method used for separation of Np and Pu in model samples. This method provided high radiochemical yields of 239,240 Pu (95,0 ± 3,5)% and 237 Np (87,9 ± 3,0)%.. Reliability of the method was verified by applying our modified separation procedures on reference materials IAEA-375 and IAEA-414 supplied by International Atomic Energy Agency. A good agreement between the results is obtained by this procedure and the certified values were found. Samples of contaminated soils from the area of Nuclear power plant A-1 Jaslovske Bohunice which is stored temporarily before disposal were analyzed using developed separation procedure. Specific activity of investigated radionuclides was determined in these samples. (author)

  14. A radiochemical technique for the determination of mercury in drinking water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, S.; Chaudhri, M.S.; Qureshi, I.H.

    1982-01-01

    A radiochemical method for the separation and determination of mercury in drinking water has been developed. The radionuclides of mercury formed after neutron irradiation of the sample were separated by liquid/liquid extraction using PAN and TBA mixture in chloroform from aqueous nitric acid medium. Quantitative extraction of mercury was achieved in a single step and the equilibrium was attained within five minutes. (orig.)

  15. Determination of mercury in biologycal samples by radiochemical neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suc, N.V.

    1989-01-01

    The radiochemical neutron activation analysis was applied to determine contents of mercury in biological samples. Samples were digested in mixing of H 2 SO 4 and HNO 3 acid. After extraction of mercury by Ni-Ditiodietylphosphoric acid in carbontetrachloride, mercury was back extracted by 5% KI solution. Contents of mercury from five samples of fish was determined by this method. The accuracy of the method was checked by comparing it with NBS standard samples and results are good agreement

  16. Radiochemical determination and separation or total radium, 226Ra and 224Ra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suarez, J. A.; Gonzalez, J. A.; Pablo, M. A. de

    1987-01-01

    Radiochemical purification and separation of radium has been carried out and the determination of total radium solubilized in aqueous samples has been studied assuming that all the alpha emitters of the sample have their origin in the 226Ra and elements of its desintegration chain. Also, the activities of 22Ra and 226 Ra have been evaluated separately doing a measurement after the chemical separation of the radium and another one 10 days after. (Author) 9 refs

  17. Statistical analysis of radiochemical measurements of TRU radionuclides in REDC waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beauchamp, J.; Downing, D.; Chapman, J.; Fedorov, V.; Nguyen, L.; Parks, C.; Schultz, F.; Yong, L.

    1996-10-01

    This report summarizes results of the study on the isotopic ratios of transuranium elements in waste from the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center actinide-processing streams. The knowledge of the isotopic ratios when combined with results of nondestructive assays, in particular with results of Active-Passive Neutron Examination Assay and Gamma Active Segmented Passive Assay, may lead to significant increase in precision of the determination of TRU elements contained in ORNL generated waste streams

  18. Analysis of the radiochemical purity of 18F-FDG by HPLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Liguang; Tang Anwu; He Shanzhen; Chen Yulong

    2001-01-01

    The radiochemical purity (RCP) of 18 F-FDG is analyzed by HPLC. Eighty-five percent acetonitrile is used as the eluting solution. Carbon hydrate column is used as separation column. The t R of 18 F - is 6.50 min and 18 F-FDG is 9.00 min. HPLC take less time and has higher sensitivity than TLC for the same sample at the same time. So HPLC excels TLC in analyzing RCP of 18 F-FDG

  19. Synthesis of N-[methyl-11C]hydromorphone by using multivariate strategies for optimization of radiochemical yields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimland, Annika; Bergson, Goeran; Obenius, Ulf; Sjoeberg, Stefan; Langstroem, Bengt

    1987-01-01

    The synthesis of N-[methyl- 11 C]hydromorphone has been performed by using [ 11 C]methyl iodide and desmethyl hydromorphone in a mixture of dimethylsulphoxide and dimethylformamide as solvent. Optimization of the radiochemical yield by varying the reaction conditions was performed by using multivariate strategies. The labelled hydromorphone was obtained in 72% radiochemical yield in the alkylation reaction with [ 11 C]-methyl iodide, counted from the end of the [ 11 C]methyl iodide synthesis. N-[Methyl- 11 C]hydromorphone was obtained as a ready injectable pharmaceutical solution with a total synthesis time of 40 min and in a 10% total radiochemical yield, with a radiochemical purity > 99.5%, according to HPLC analysis. (author)

  20. Radiochemical problems of radiation chemical synthesis in n, γ-field of nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mironov, V.P.; Frejdus, N.V.; Bugaenko, L.T.; Kalyazin, E.P.; Petryaev, E.P.

    1981-01-01

    A wide applicability of products of radiation chemical synthesis (RCS), using n, γ-irradiation, is limited by possible contamination of the latter with long-lived radioactive isotopes of chemical elements included in the composition of the reagent and compounds syntesized (chemically non-separable radionuclides - CNR). A technique of the determination of the limit accumulation CNR on the basis of radiation chemical parameters of the synthesis (radiation-chemical yield, the dose rate absorbed, singleness of purpose of RCS etc.) and radiochemical parameters of formation and accumulation of CNR (radiochemical yields of CNR in the products of radiolysis, neutron fluence, the reagent purity etc.) is suggested. The radiochemical evaluation of CNR accumulation (tritium and carbon-14), formed at the expense of activation with neutrons of chemical elements of water and organic substances, consisting of hydrogen, carbon and oxygen has shown that at relatively low yields of final products (> or approximately 3 molecules/100 eV) no accumulation of radionuclides in concentrations reaching the average admissible concentration takes place [ru

  1. Radiochemical aging of an epoxy network; Vieillissement radiochimique d'un reseau epoxyde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devanne, Th

    2003-05-01

    This thesis is to give a better understanding of the radiochemical aging of a thermoset resin under gamma irradiation. The conditions of aging are gamma irradiation under air with a dose rate of 2 kGy/h at 120 C. The requested lifetime is four years, it means a dose of 70 MGy. The first step of this work was the choice of a resistive epoxy resin. This choice was made thanks to the literature data. The high glass transition temperature and the high amount of aromatic groups were the main criteria of the final choice. After this choice, thermal and mechanical properties were followed under thermal and radiochemical aging: i) under thermal aging, after 600 hours at 220 C, the glass transition temperature remained unchanged. But, from a mechanical point of view, properties at break dramatically decreased. This embrittlement was assigned to a critical oxidized layer. The thickness of this layer was estimated about 30 {mu}m. ii) the same kind of embrittlement was observed under radiochemical aging. Moreover, it appeared a decrease of the glass transition temperature when increasing the dose of irradiation. This indicates that the main degradation mechanism is chain scission under anaerobic atmosphere. We, then, proposed a mechanistic model associated with a kinetic model to predict the evolution of the glass transition temperature depending on the irradiation conditions. Parameters of the kinetic model were determined by solid NMR and ESR experiments. Comparison between experimental and calculated values at 120 C is satisfactory, a global good agreement was found. (author)

  2. Radiochemical determination of zirconium by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Thiago C.; Oliveira, Arno Heeren de

    2013-01-01

    The zirconium isotope 93 Zr is a long-lived pure β-particle-emitting radionuclide thus occurring as one of the radionuclides found in nuclear reactors. It's produced from 235 U fission and from 92 Zr neutron activation. Due to its long half-life, 93 Zr is one of the interest radionuclides for assessment studies performance of waste storage or disposal. Measurement of 93 Zr is difficult owing to its trace level concentration and its low activity in nuclear wastes and further because its certified standards are not frequently available. The aim of this work was to apply a selective radiochemical separation methodology for 93 Zr determination in nuclear waste and analyze it by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICPMS). To set up the zirconium radiochemical separation procedure, a zirconium tracer solution was used in order to follow the zirconium behavior during the radiochemical separation. A tracer solution containing the main interferences, Ba, Co, Eu, Fe, Mn, Nb, Ni, Sr, and Y was used in order to verify the decontamination factor during separation process. The limit of detection of 0,039 ppb was obtained for zirconium standard solutions by ICPMS. Then, the protocol will be applied to low level waste (LLW) and intermediate level waste (ILW) from nuclear power plants. (author)

  3. Influence of Storage Temperature on Radiochemical Purity of 99mTc-Radiopharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uccelli, Licia; Boschi, Alessandra; Martini, Petra; Cittanti, Corrado; Bertelli, Stefania; Bortolotti, Doretta; Govoni, Elena; Lodi, Luca; Romani, Simona; Zaccaria, Samanta; Zappaterra, Elisa; Farina, Donatella; Rizzo, Carlotta; Giganti, Melchiore; Bartolomei, Mirco

    2018-03-15

    The influence of effective room temperature on the radiochemical purity of 99m Tc-radiopharmaceuticals was reported. This study was born from the observation that in the isolators used for the preparation of the 99m Tc-radiopharmaceuticals the temperatures can be higher than those reported in the commercial illustrative leaflets of the kits. This is due, in particular, to the small size of the work area, the presence of instruments for heating, the continuous activation of air filtration, in addition to the fact that the environment of the isolator used for the 99m Tc-radiopharmaceuticals preparation and storage is completely isolated and not conditioned. A total of 244 99m Tc-radiopharmaceutical preparations (seven different types) have been tested and the radiochemical purity was checked at the end of preparation and until the expiry time. Moreover, we found that the mean temperature into the isolator was significantly higher than 25 °C, the temperature, in general, required for the preparation and storage of 99m Tc-radiopharmaceuticals. Results confirmed the radiochemical stability of radiopharmaceutical products. However, as required in the field of quality assurance, the impact that different conditions than those required by the manufacturer on the radiopharmaceuticals quality have to be verified before human administration.

  4. Investigation of quantitative separation of thorium, uranium, neptunium and plutonium from complex radiochemical mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ushatskij, V.N.; Preobrazhenskaya, L.D.; Kolychev, V.B.; Gugel', E.S.

    1979-01-01

    Quantitative separation of actinides and their radiochemical purification with the aid of TBP with subsequent separation of thorium and quantitative separation of U, Np and Pu with the aid of D2EHPA have been studied. The method has been developed for quantitative extraction-chromatographic separation and radiochemical purification of nanogram amounts of U, Pu and microgram amounts of Th and Np from complex radiochemical mixtures containing both fragment radioisotopes and non-radioactive macrocomponents ( Fe,Al,Mg,Mn, Na and others). The method calls for application of one-extraction-chromatographic column with TBP and one column with D2EHPA. Thorium is separated at the first stage since it does not form complexes in a chloride solution during washing of the sorption column with 6. OM HCl. Npsup((4)) and Pusup((3)) required for separation are stabilized with the aid of hydrazine and hydroxylamine mixture. The yield of each of the above-cited actinide elements during the complete two-stage separation and at the stage of their separation varies within the range of 98.5-99.3%

  5. Lawrence and his laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellbron, J.L.; Seidel, R.W.

    1989-01-01

    The birthplace of nuclear chemistry and nuclear medicine is the subject of this study of the Radiation Laboratory in Berkeley, California, where Ernest Lawrence used local and national technological, economic, and manpower resources to build the cyclotron

  6. Electric Propulsion Research Building (EPRB)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Electric Propulsion Research Building (EPRB) capability centers on its suite of vacuum chambers, which are configured to meet the unique requirements related to...

  7. LETTER REPORT - INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING PROJECT FAN HOUSE, BUILDING 704 BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weaver, P.C.

    2010-01-01

    Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) personnel visited the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) on August 17 through August 23, 2010 to perform visual inspections and conduct independent measurement and sampling of the 'Outside Areas' at the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) decommissioning project. During this visit, ORISE was also able to evaluate Fan House, Building 704 survey units (SUs) 4 and 5, which are part of the Underground Utilities portion of the HFBR decommissioning project. ORISE performed limited alpha plus beta scans of the remaining Fan House foundation lower walls and remaining pedestals while collecting static measurements. Scans were performed using gas proportional detectors coupled to ratemeter-scalers with audible output and encompassed an area of approximately 1 square meter around the static measurement location. Alpha plus beta scans ranged from 120 to 460 cpm. Twenty smears for gross alpha and beta activity and tritium were collected at judgmentally selected locations on the walls and pedestals of the Fan House foundation. Attention was given to joints, cracks, and penetrations when determining each sample location. Removable concentrations ranged from -0.43 to 1.73 dpm/100 cm2 for alpha and -3.64 to 7.80 dpm/100 cm2 for beta. Tritium results for smears ranged from -1.9 to 9.0 pCi/g. On the concrete pad, 100% of accessible area was scanned using a large area alpha plus beta gas proportional detector coupled to a ratemeter-scaler. Gross scan count rates ranged from 800 to 1500 cpm using the large area detector. Three concrete samples were collected from the pad primarily for tritium analysis. Tritium concentrations in concrete samples ranged from 53.3 to 127.5 pCi/g. Gamma spectroscopy results of radionuclide concentrations in concrete samples ranged from 0.02 to 0.11 pCi/g for Cs-137 and 0.19 to 0.22 pCi/g for Ra-226. High density scans for gamma radiation levels were performed in accessible areas in each SU, Fan House

  8. Final Report Independent Verification Survey of the High Flux Beam Reactor, Building 802 Fan House Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York DCN: 5098-SR-06-0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harpeneau, Evan

    2011-01-01

    The Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU) complex located on the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) site in Niskayuna, New York, was constructed in the late 1940s to research the chemical separation of plutonium and uranium (Figure A-1). SPRU operated as a laboratory scale research facility between February 1950 and October 1953. The research activities ceased following the successful development of the reduction oxidation and plutonium/uranium extraction processes. The oxidation and extraction processes were subsequently developed for large scale use by the Hanford and Savannah River sites (aRc 2008a). Decommissioning of the SPRU facilities began in October 1953 and continued through the 1990s.

  9. Final Report Independent Verification Survey of the High Flux Beam Reactor, Building 802 Fan House Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evan Harpeneau

    2011-06-24

    The Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU) complex located on the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) site in Niskayuna, New York, was constructed in the late 1940s to research the chemical separation of plutonium and uranium (Figure A-1). SPRU operated as a laboratory scale research facility between February 1950 and October 1953. The research activities ceased following the successful development of the reduction oxidation and plutonium/uranium extraction processes. The oxidation and extraction processes were subsequently developed for large scale use by the Hanford and Savannah River sites (aRc 2008a). Decommissioning of the SPRU facilities began in October 1953 and continued through the 1990s.

  10. Effectiveness of quenchers to reduce radiolysis of (111)In- or (177)Lu-labelled methionine-containing regulatory peptides. Maintaining radiochemical purity as measured by HPLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Blois, Erik; Chan, Ho Sze; Konijnenberg, Mark; de Zanger, Rory; Breeman, Wouter A P

    2012-01-01

    An overview how to measure and to quantify radiolysis by the addition of quenchers and to maintain Radio-Chemical Purity (RCP) of vulnerable methionine-containing regulatory peptides is presented. High RCP was only achieved with a combination of quenchers. However, quantification of RCP is not standardized, and therefore comparison of radiolabelling and RCP of regulatory peptides between different HPLC-systems and between laboratories is cumbersome. Therefore we suggest a set of standardized requirements to quantify RCP by HPLC for radiolabelled DTPA- or DOTA-peptides. Moreover, a dosimetry model was developed to calculate the doses in the reaction vials during radiolabelling and storage of the radiopeptides, and to predict RCP in the presence and absence of quenchers. RCP was measured by HPLC, and a relation between radiation dose and radiolysis of RCP was established. The here described quenchers are tested individually as ƒ(concentration) to investigate efficacy to reduce radiolysis of radiolabelled methionine-containing regulatory peptides.

  11. U.S. Department of Energy Commercial Reference Building Models of the National Building Stock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deru, M.; Field, K.; Studer, D.; Benne, K.; Griffith, B.; Torcellini, P.; Liu, B.; Halverson, M.; Winiarski, D.; Rosenberg, M.; Yazdanian, M.; Huang, J.; Crawley, D.

    2011-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building Technologies Program has set the aggressive goal of producing marketable net-zero energy buildings by 2025. This goal will require collaboration between the DOE laboratories and the building industry. We developed standard or reference energy models for the most common commercial buildings to serve as starting points for energy efficiency research. These models represent fairly realistic buildings and typical construction practices. Fifteen commercial building types and one multifamily residential building were determined by consensus between DOE, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and represent approximately two-thirds of the commercial building stock.

  12. Study of nitrate contaminated samples from a historic building with the hygroscopic moisture content method: Contribution of laboratory data to interpret results practical significance

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nunes, Cristiana Lara; Skružná, Olga; Válek, Jan

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 30, March-April (2018), s. 57-69 ISSN 1296-2074 R&D Projects: GA MK(CZ) DG16P02H012 Keywords : soluble salts * hygroscopicity * moisture content * nitrate salts * deliquescence * porous building materials Subject RIV: AL - Art, Architecture, Cultural Heritage OBOR OECD: Materials engineering Impact factor: 1.838, year: 2016 https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1296207417302649

  13. Molten Salt Reactor Experiment Facility (Building 7503) standards/requirements identification document adherence assessment plan at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-02-01

    This is the Phase 2 (adherence) assessment plan for the Building 7503 Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) Facility standards/requirements identification document (S/RID). This document outlines the activities to be conducted from FY 1996 through FY 1998 to ensure that the standards and requirements identified in the MSRE S/RID are being implemented properly. This plan is required in accordance with the Department of Energy Implementation Plan for Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 90-2, November 9, 1994, Attachment 1A. This plan addresses the major aspects of the adherence assessment and will be consistent with Energy Systems procedure QA-2. 7 ''Surveillances.''

  14. Decontamination and dismantlement of the building 200/205 pneumatic transfer tube at Argonne National Laboratory-East project final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiese, E. C.

    1998-01-01

    The Building 200/205 Pneumatic Transfer Tube D and D Project was directed toward the following goals: Remove any radioactive and hazardous materials associated with the transfer tube; Survey the transfer tube to identify any external contamination; Remove the transfer tube and package for disposal; Survey the soil and sand surrounding the transfer tube for any contamination; and Backfill the trench in which the tube sat and restore the area to its original condition. These goals had been set in order to eliminate the radiological and hazardous safety concerns inherent in the buried transfer tube and to allow, upon completion of the project, the removal of this project from the ANL-E action item list. The physical condition of the transfer tube and possible nuclear fuel samples lost in the tube were the primary areas of concern, while the exact location of the transfer tube was of secondary concern. ANL-E health physics technicians collected characterization data from the ends of the Building 200/205 pneumatic transfer tube in January 1998. The characterization surveys identified contamination to a level of 67,000 dpm (1,117 Bq) (β/γ) and 20,000 dpm (333 Bq) α smearable at the opening

  15. Preparation, radiochemical purity control and stability of 99mTc-mertiatide (Mag-3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Hemert, F.J.; Schimmel, K.J.M.; Van Eck-Smit, B.L.F.; Van Lenthe, H.

    2005-01-01

    Scintigraphic image analysis of 99m Tc-mertiatide (Mag-3, mercaptoacetyltriglycine) clearance provides the determination of the blood flow, the tubular transit time and the excretion as well from both kidneys. Radiopharmaceutical routine recommends a radiochemical purity control before administration of the product to a patient. The main objective of this study is to develop a Mag-3 labeling procedure that fits better than the previous one in our daily routine production of radiopharmaceuticals. Increasing proportions of 99m Tc-Mag-3 were measured during the heating and cooling steps of the Mag-3 labeling procedure. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis was used to confirm the results of a rapid radiochemical quality control assay on standard instant thin-layer chromatography-silica gel (ITLC-SG) paper. The reconstitution time takes 20-25 minutes from the harvest of pertechnetate to a ready-for-use calibrated patient syringe. The HPLC profile of 99m Tc-Mag-3 including its minor impurities remains unchanged for 24-48 hours after reconstitution. The application of a programmable Peltier-directed device for heating/cooling provides a better control of the temperature course. The procedure proposed fully meets the labeling criteria recommended by the supplier and can be performed with a minimum of attention within a time-span that we formerly needed for solely the radiochemical purity control assay. Moreover, 99m Tc-Mag-3 prepared in this way seems to be considerably more stable than mentioned in the manufacturer's instructions. (author)

  16. Radiochemical determination of 210 Pb and 226Ra in petroleum sludges and scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, Andressa Arruda de

    2005-01-01

    The oil extraction and production, both onshore and offshore, can generate different types of residues, such as sludge, that is deposited in the water/oil separators, valves and storage tanks and scales, which form i the inner surface of ducts and equipment. Analyses already carried out through gamma spectrometry indicated the existence of high radioisotope concentration. However, radionuclides emitting low-energy gamma-rays, such as 210 Pb, are hardly detected by that technique. Consequently, there is a need to test alternative techniques to determine this and other radionuclides from the 238 U series. This work, therefore, focuses on the radiochemical determination of the concentration of 210 Pb, and 226 Ra in samples of sludge and scale from the oil processing stations of the UN-SEAL, a PETROBRAS unit responsible for the exploration and production of petroleum in Sergipe and Alagoas. The sludge and scale samples went through a preliminary process of extraction of oil, in order to separate the solid phase, where the largest fraction of the radioactivity is concentrated. After oil removal, the samples were digested using alkaline fusion as an option for dissolution. Finally, their activity concentration was determined for the samples of sludge and scales, using and alternative radiochemical method, which is based on ionic exchange. The activity concentration found for 210 Pb varied from 1,14 to 507,3 kBq kg -1 . The values for 226 Ra were higher, varying from 4,36 to 3.445 kBq kg -1 . The results for 226 Ra were then compared with the ones found for the same samples of sludge and scales using gamma spectrometry. The results of the comparison confirm the efficiency of the methodology used int hi work, that is, radiochemical determination by means of ionic exchange. (author)

  17. Field guide to the major organisms and processes building reefs and islands of the Dry Tortugas: the Carnegie Dry Tortugas Laboratory Centennial Celebration (1905-2005)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinn, Eugene A.; Jaap, Walter C.

    2005-01-01

    This guide to the geology and biology of the Dry Tortugas is divided into four sections: 1) geologic and anthropogenic features you will pass on your trip to and from the Tortugas, 2) a summary of items of Tortugas geologic, historic, and human interest and what you will experience at Loggerhead Key while walking and snorkeling, 3) a summary of recent coral-monitoring results, and 4) an Appendix with tributes to some of the significant research accomplishments of researchers at the laboratory between 1905 and 1939.

  18. Handbook of laboratory techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Authority in Argentina have laboratories of support to regulations functions on radiological and nuclear safety, safeguards and physical protection, that have a surface of 2950 m 2 in the Ezeiza Atomic Center. The manual describes in seven chapters the different techniques developed and applied in the laboratories along four decades of existence. The chapter 1: Dedicated to the treatment of environmental samples, described the procedures associated with the different types of samples: deposits, waters, sediments, vegetables, milk, fish and diet. The chapter 2: Details 48 radiochemical techniques associated to the measurements of americium 241, carbon 16, strontium 90, iodine 129, plutonium, radium 226, radon, uranium, nickel and actinides. The chapter 3: Describes the measurements techniques of alpha and gamma spectrometry. The different techniques of biological and physical dosimetry are described in the chapters 5 and 6 respectively. The final chapter is dedicated the techniques of external and internal contamination. It s important to emphasize that this manual contains the standardized technologies that the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of Argentina submits regularly to international comparisons

  19. The radiochemical purity of technetium-99m-tin-diethylene-triamino-pentaacetic acid (DTPA) complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besnard, M.; Costerousse, O.; Merlin, L.; Coehn, Y.

    1975-01-01

    The effect on radiochemical purity was studied as a function of the storage period of tin-DTPA solution and of the technetium-complex solution. The quantity of the pertechnetate ions present in the solution is determined by ascending paper chromatography, and an attempt was made to clarify the bond type of technetium by a spectrophotometric method. The tin-DTPA solutions for complexing of the reduced technetium are stable over a period of 8 weeks. The yield of the radiopharmaceutical product is better than 95%. (G.Gy.)

  20. Radiochemical and thermal studies of the cation-exchanged forms of synthetic zeolite Linde sieve A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banerjee, S P [Saugar Univ. (India). Dept. of Chemistry

    1976-02-01

    The compositions of the cobalt and silver-exchanged forms of synthetic zeolite Sieve A have been determined by radiochemical and TGA studies and correspond to Co/sub 6/A.19.8H/sub 2/O and Ag/sub 12/..cap alpha... 20H/sub 2/O respectively (A=Al/sub 12/Si/sub 12/O/sub 48//sup 12/-). Heating of these zeolites inhibits their capacity for cation exchange and water absorption. No evidence of occluded NaAlO/sub 2/ has been found.

  1. Trace element evaluation of different varieties of chewing gum by radiochemical neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaidi, J.H.; Arif, M.; Fatima, I.; Ahmad, S.; Qureshi, I.H.

    2000-01-01

    Extensive use of chewing gums, by children in particular, entails the evaluation of trace element contents in them. Radiochemical neutron activation analysis (RNAA) was successfully employed to determine the concentration of 35 trace elements (essential, toxic and nonessential) in eight different brands of chewing gum generally consumed in Rawalpindi/Islamabad area. Comparison of trace element data of our work with literature has been presented. None of the elements detected in the brands of chewing gum examined was found to be present at a level representing a substantial contribution to the total dietary intake of the element. (author)

  2. A new radiochemical assay for fructose-1,6-diphosphatase in human leucocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janssen, A.J.M.; Trijbels, F.J.M.

    1982-01-01

    Fructose-1,6-diphosphatase (D-fructose-1,6-diphosphate 1-phosphohydrolase, EC 3.1.3.11, FDPase) is one of the key enzymes of the gluconeogenic pathway. Measuring the activity both in the presence and in the absence of AMP yields the true FDPase activity, corrected for non-specific phosphatase activity. In this paper the authors introduce a new radiochemical assay for FDPase, based on the decarboxylating activity of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase. One molecule [U- 14 C]fructose-1,6-diphosphate yields one molecule 14 CO 2 which can be captured in strongly basic solutions and counted in a liquid scintillation counter. (Auth.)

  3. Radiochemical procedure for the determination of plutonium isotopes in powdered milk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taddei, M.H.T.; Silva, N.C.

    2006-01-01

    A radiochemical procedure for the determination of alpha-emitting isotopes of plutonium in powdered milk is proposed. The procedure involves sample dissolution (by HNO 3 and HClO 4 ), separation by ionic-exchange resin, electrodeposition and alpha-spectroscopy. In order to determine the chemical recovery, 242 Pu was employed as a tracer. A reference material (Marine Sediment IAEA 135) was analyzed to validate such procedure, and to show its reliability. Afterwards, some powdered milk, produced for international trade, was analyzed and chemical recovery was found to be around 95%. (author)

  4. Methods for nuclear material control used in the basic production of a typical radiochemical plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kositsyn, V.F.; Mukhortov, N.F.; Korovin, Yu.I.; Rudenko, V.S.; Petrov, A.M.

    1999-01-01

    Techniques for destructive and non-destructive assay of the component and isotopic composition of nuclear materials are described, namely gravimetric, titrimetric, coulometric, mass spectrometry, as well as those based on registration of neutron and γ radiations. Their metrologic characteristics are described. The techniques described are suggested to be used for nuclear material (NM) control and accounting purposes at the model radiochemical plant for processing irradiated fuel subassemblies from power reactors. The measurement control program is also described. This program is intended for the measurement quality assurance in the framework of NM control and accountancy system [ru

  5. Determination of trace elements in bottled water in Greece by instrumental and radiochemical neutron activation analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soupioni, M.J.; Symeopoulos, B.D.; Papaefthymiou, H.V.

    2006-01-01

    Four different bottled water brands sold in Greece in the winter of 2001-2002 were analyzed for a wide range of chemical elements, using neutron activation analysis (NAA). The elements Na and Br were determined instrumentally (INAA), whereas the other metals and trace elements radiochemically (RNAA). The results indicated that the mean level of all the elements determined in the samples were well within the European Union (EU) directive on drinking water and accomplish the drinking water standards of the World Health Organisation (WHO) as well as of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). (author)

  6. Radiochemical techniques for determining some naturally occurring radionuclides in marine environmental materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, C W [Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food, Lowestoft (UK). Fisheries Lab.

    1984-06-15

    The determination of some of the naturally-occurring, alpha-emitting radionuclides in marine environmental materials, is of interest for several reasons. Radium and radon nuclides are potentially useful as oceanographic tracers. Lead and thorium nuclides may be used to study sedimentation rates, mixing processes and bioturbation in sediments. Radium and polonium nuclides are incorporated into food chains and the data may provide a perspective against which to assess the significance, for marine organisms, of exposure to radiation in a marine radioactive waste disposal situation. This paper discusses the manner in which samples are taken, and the radiochemical methods which have been employed to measure the nuclides, together with some data produced.

  7. Integral method of treatment of experimental data from radiochemical solar neutrino detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavrin, V.N.; Kopylov, A.V.; Streltsov, A.V.

    1985-01-01

    An analysis is made of the statistical errors in solar neutrino detection by radiochemical detectors at different times of exposure. It is shown that short exposures (tau/sub e/ = one-half to one half-life) give minimal one-year error. The possibility is considered of the detection of the solar neutrino flux variation due to annual changes of the Earth-Sun distance. The integral method of treatment of the experimental data is described. Results are given of the statistical treatment of computer simulated data

  8. Radiochemical analysis of radio-nuclides in sea water collected near Bikini Atoll

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyake, Y; Sugiura, Y

    1955-01-01

    A radiochemical analysis of sea water containing fission materials collected near Bikini Atoll in June, 1954, was performed. The sea water was boiled with hydrochloric acid, iron and lanthanum salts each 5 mg as Fe and La were added to it. They were precipitated as hydroxide, which was dissolved in hydrochloric acid and ferric chloride was extracted with ethyl ether. The remaining solution was evaporated to dryness and the residue was dissolved in hydrochloric acid. Using the latter solution the group separation was done with cation exchanger resins.

  9. Rapid and accurate determination of radiochemical purity of sup(99m)Tc compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamat, S.R.

    1977-01-01

    The wide spread use of sup(99m)Tc-labelled radiopharmaceuticals and limitation of the short half-life of the isotope, is associated with an urgent need for a rapid, simple but accurate method for determining the radiochemical purity of the compound. A short paper chromatographic (KK) or thin layer chromatographic (KLT) method using 95% methanol or 0.9% saline solution as solvents, has solved the problem. With these methods, the amount of free sup(99m)Tc pertechnetate in a compound, can be determined in only a few minutes. These methods compare satisfactorily with lengtheir procedures. (author)

  10. Product and market study for Los Alamos National Laboratory. Building resources for technology commercialization: The SciBus Analytical, Inc. paradigm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    The study project was undertaken to investigate how entrepreneurial small businesses with technology licenses can develop product and market strategies sufficiently persuasive to attract resources and exploit commercialization opportunities. The study attempts to answer two primary questions: (1) What key business development strategies are likely to make technology transfers successful, and (2) How should the plan best be presented in order to attract resources (e.g., personnel, funding, channels of distribution)? In the opinion of the investigator, Calidex Corporation, if the business strategies later prove to be successful, then the plan model has relevance for any technology licensee attempting to accumulate resources and bridge from technology resident in government laboratories to the commercial marketplace. The study utilized SciBus Analytical, Inc. (SciBus), a Los Alamos National Laboratory CRADA participant, as the paradigm small business technology licensee. The investigator concluded that the optimum value of the study lay in the preparation of an actual business development plan for SciBus that might then have, hopefully, broader relevance and merit for other private sector technology transfer licensees working with various Government agencies.

  11. Monitoring, controlling and safeguarding radiochemical streams at spent fuel reprocessing facilities with optical and gamma-ray spectroscopic methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwantes, J.M.; Bryan, S.A.; Orton, C.R.; Levitskaia, T.G.; Fraga, C.G.

    2013-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has established international safeguards standards for fissionable material at spent fuel reprocessing plants to ensure that significant quantities of weapons-usable nuclear material are not diverted from these facilities. For large throughput nuclear facilities, it is difficult to satisfy the IAEA safeguards accountancy goal for detection of abrupt diversion. Currently, methods to verify material control and accountancy (MCA) at these facilities require time-consuming and resource intensive destructive assay (DA). Leveraging new on-line non-destructive assay (NDA) process monitoring techniques in conjunction with the traditional and highly precise DA methods may provide an additional measure to nuclear material accountancy which would potentially result in a more timely, cost-effective and resource efficient means for safeguards verification at such facilities. By monitoring process control measurements (e.g. flowrates, temperatures, or concentrations of reagents, products or wastes), abnormal plant operations can be detected. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing on-line NDA process monitoring technologies based upon gamma-ray and optical spectroscopic measurements to potentially reduce the time and resource burden associated with current techniques. The Multi-Isotope Process (MIP) Monitor uses gamma spectroscopy and multivariate analysis to identify off-normal conditions in process streams. The spectroscopic monitor continuously measures chemical compositions of the process streams including actinide metal ions (U, Pu, Np), selected fission products, and major stable flowsheet reagents using UV-Vis, Near IR and Raman spectroscopy. Multi-variate analysis is also applied to the optical measurements in order to quantify concentrations of analytes of interest within a complex array of radiochemical streams. This paper will provide an overview of these methods and reports on-going efforts to develop

  12. The platinum group elements and gold: analysis by radiochemical and instrumental neutron activation analysis and relevance to geological exploration and related problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reeves, S.; Plimer, I. R. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents an overview of research conducted with the support of the Australian Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering, at the University of Melbourne, School of Earth Sciences, Radiochemical Neutron Activation Laboratory. The primary objective of this research is to realize the high potential of the platinum group elements (PGE) and gold to the solution of petrogenetic problems, the study of magma generation and magmatic processes in mafic/ultramafic rock suites, as tracers in hydrothermal ore formation. The PGEs (Os, Ru, Ir, Pt, Pd and Rh) are among the least abundant of all elements on earth with unique properties such as high melting points, high electrical and thermal conductivity, high density, strength and toughness as alloys. They exhibit both siderophile and chalcophile characteristics and are valuable tools in providing information about magmatic processes, in particular S-saturation, as well as crystal fractionation trends. Two distinct groups of PGEs are discerned; the IPGEs (Ru, Os, Ir) and the PPGEs (Pt, Pd, Rh, Au) on the basis of their behaviour during fractionation processes. Using chondrite normalized PGE patterns it is possible to distinguish between sulphides that segregated from primitive magmas, such as komatiites, and sulphides which segregated from more fractionated magmas, such as tholeiites. It is critical to the understanding of these processes to be able to analyse key elements, such as the PGE and gold, in the parts per billion to parts per trillion range. Platinum group elements and Au were determined by radiochemical neutron activation analysis using a modified NiS fire-assay preconcentration technique, adapted from procedures first used by Robert, R.V. D. and van Wyk, E. (1975) . Detection limits are generally 0.005-0.01 ppb (Au and Ir), 0.1-0.2 ppb (Pd and Pt), and 0.1-0.5 ppb for Ru. 9 refs.

  13. The platinum group elements and gold: analysis by radiochemical and instrumental neutron activation analysis and relevance to geological exploration and related problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reeves, S.; Plimer, I. R.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of research conducted with the support of the Australian Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering, at the University of Melbourne, School of Earth Sciences, Radiochemical Neutron Activation Laboratory. The primary objective of this research is to realize the high potential of the platinum group elements (PGE) and gold to the solution of petrogenetic problems, the study of magma generation and magmatic processes in mafic/ultramafic rock suites, as tracers in hydrothermal ore formation. The PGEs (Os, Ru, Ir, Pt, Pd and Rh) are among the least abundant of all elements on earth with unique properties such as high melting points, high electrical and thermal conductivity, high density, strength and toughness as alloys. They exhibit both siderophile and chalcophile characteristics and are valuable tools in providing information about magmatic processes, in particular S-saturation, as well as crystal fractionation trends. Two distinct groups of PGEs are discerned; the IPGEs (Ru, Os, Ir) and the PPGEs (Pt, Pd, Rh, Au) on the basis of their behaviour during fractionation processes. Using chondrite normalized PGE patterns it is possible to distinguish between sulphides that segregated from primitive magmas, such as komatiites, and sulphides which segregated from more fractionated magmas, such as tholeiites. It is critical to the understanding of these processes to be able to analyse key elements, such as the PGE and gold, in the parts per billion to parts per trillion range. Platinum group elements and Au were determined by radiochemical neutron activation analysis using a modified NiS fire-assay preconcentration technique, adapted from procedures first used by Robert, R.V. D. and van Wyk, E. (1975) . Detection limits are generally 0.005-0.01 ppb (Au and Ir), 0.1-0.2 ppb (Pd and Pt), and 0.1-0.5 ppb for Ru. 9 refs

  14. The platinum group elements and gold: analysis by radiochemical and instrumental neutron activation analysis and relevance to geological exploration and related problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reeves, S; Plimer, I R [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1997-12-31

    This paper presents an overview of research conducted with the support of the Australian Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering, at the University of Melbourne, School of Earth Sciences, Radiochemical Neutron Activation Laboratory. The primary objective of this research is to realize the high potential of the platinum group elements (PGE) and gold to the solution of petrogenetic problems, the study of magma generation and magmatic processes in mafic/ultramafic rock suites, as tracers in hydrothermal ore formation. The PGEs (Os, Ru, Ir, Pt, Pd and Rh) are among the least abundant of all elements on earth with unique properties such as high melting points, high electrical and thermal conductivity, high density, strength and toughness as alloys. They exhibit both siderophile and chalcophile characteristics and are valuable tools in providing information about magmatic processes, in particular S-saturation, as well as crystal fractionation trends. Two distinct groups of PGEs are discerned; the IPGEs (Ru, Os, Ir) and the PPGEs (Pt, Pd, Rh, Au) on the basis of their behaviour during fractionation processes. Using chondrite normalized PGE patterns it is possible to distinguish between sulphides that segregated from primitive magmas, such as komatiites, and sulphides which segregated from more fractionated magmas, such as tholeiites. It is critical to the understanding of these processes to be able to analyse key elements, such as the PGE and gold, in the parts per billion to parts per trillion range. Platinum group elements and Au were determined by radiochemical neutron activation analysis using a modified NiS fire-assay preconcentration technique, adapted from procedures first used by Robert, R.V. D. and van Wyk, E. (1975) . Detection limits are generally 0.005-0.01 ppb (Au and Ir), 0.1-0.2 ppb (Pd and Pt), and 0.1-0.5 ppb for Ru. 9 refs.

  15. Standardization of radiochemical techniques aiming the study of Hg volatilization and methylation in water and sediment of gold mining areas in the Amazon region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guimaraes, Jean Remy Davee

    1992-09-01

    Methylation of inorganic Hg in aquatic systems is a key process in the environmental cycling of this metal, not yet studied in tropical conditions. Radiochemical techniques were adapted and simplified, aiming at the study of Hg volatilization and methylation in water and sediment of gold mining areas in the Amazon region. Preliminary experiments showed, in 35 days volatilization of up to 32 % of 203 Hg 2+ added to aqueous solutions. Acid K 2 Cr 2 0 7 0.1 M solutions were not effective in 203 Hg 0 trapping and the latter was highly and irreversibly absorbed by a variety of synthetic materials commonly used in laboratory work. Considerably simplified versions of the Furutani and Rudd (1980) radiochemical technique for the determination of methylation rates in environmental samples were developed and showed efficiencies close to 90 % in tests with methyl- 2 0 3 H g standards. In-situ incubations of surface sediments were performed in the Madeira River gold mining region, Rondonia State, Brazil, and potential net Hg methylation rates (MR) of up to 1 %.g-1.h-1 were found in black-water affluent like the Mutum-Parana and Jamari rivers and in the Samuel reservoir. MRs in the Madeira River sediments were lower, ranging 10-5 to 10-3 %.g-1.h-1 . MRs obtained in incubations of samples some weeks after collection were one or two orders of magnitude lower than those resulting from in-situ incubations. Methylation in autoclaved samples was close to minimum detectable rates. MRs in surface water samples was in all cases < 7.10-7 %.ml-1.h-1. The determination of the predominant methylation sites will allow a better standardization of the technique described herein, suitable for MR determinations even under the unfavorable conditions prevailing in the Amazon region. (author)

  16. 324 building safety analysis report supplement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodd, A.O.; Wittenbrock, N.G.

    1977-01-01

    Process engineering designs, major equipment and plant facilities to be utilized in commercial nuclear waste preparation and vitrification in the 324 Radiochemical Engineering Building are reviewed with regard to accident potential and consequences. This Safety Analysis Report Supplement compares calculated environmental doses anticipated from the Commercial Nuclear Waste Vitrification Project (CNWVP) routine operations with the average doses from past waste management operations conducted at the Hanford Project and finds them to be significantly less. The calculated CNWVP environmental doses are found to be far below presently applicable ERDA standards and standards proposed by the EPA for nuclear power operations

  17. 324 Building REC and HLV Tank Closure Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker-Khaleel, B.; Schlick, K.

    1995-12-01

    This closure plan describes the activities necessary to close the 324 Radiochemical Engineering Cells (REC) and High-Level Vault (HLV) in accordance with the Washington State Dangerous Waste regulations. To provide a complete description of the activities required, the closure plan relies on information contained in the 324 Building B-Cell Safety Cleanout Project (BCCP) plans, the 324 Building REC HLV Interim Waste Management Plan (IWMP), the Project Management Plan for Nuclear Facilities Management 300 Area Compliance Program, and the 324 High Level Vault Interim Removal Action Project (project management plan [PMP]). The IWMP addresses the management of mixed waste in accordance with state and federal hazardous waste regulations. It provides a strategy for managing high-activity mixed waste in compliance with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements or provides for an alternative management approach for the waste. The BCCP outlines the past, present, and future activities necessary for removing from B-Cell the solid waste, including mixed waste generated as a result of historical research and development (R ampersand D) activities conducted in the cell. The BCCP also includes all records and project files associated with the B-Cell cleanout. This information is referenced throughout the closure plan. The PMP sets forth the plans, organization, and systems that Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) will use to direct and control the 324 High-Level Vault Interim Removal Action Project. This project will develop and implement a treatment strategy that will remove and stabilize the inventory of liquid waste from the 324 HLV tanks. The PMP also provides for flushing and sampling the flush solution

  18. Determination of chromium, cobalt and nickel in tissue samples by radiochemical activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reisell, A.; Lakomaa, E.L.

    1983-03-01

    A radiochemical neutron activation analysis method for the determination of chromium, cobalt and nickel in tissue samples. A radiochemical neutron activation analysis method for the determination of chromium, cobalt and nickel has been developed. The destruction device used consisted of a combined wet-ashing-distillation and ion-exchange system. Six samples could be treated at the same time. The samples were wet-ashed with H*L2SO*L4-H*L2O*L2 mixture. Volatile elements were distilled as bromide compounds with HBr*H-. The distillation residue in 8M HCl was passed through hydrated antimony pentoxide (HAP) in order to remove disturbing *H2*H4Na-activity and through a Dowex 2 x 8 column so as to retain *H6*H0Co (formed from *H5*H8Ni). Chromium was elutriated from the column and precipitated as Cr(OH)*L3 for the removal of disturbing *H3*H2P-activity. The standards and samples were treated in a similar manner each so that the yield determination is not necessarily needed. The yields by tracer experiments were (43 +- 5) % for Cr, (93 +- 4) % for Co and (88 +- 14) % for Ni. The precision and accuracy of the method were studied by using reference materials of the National Bureau of Standards (NBS) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)

  19. Growth of a manganese nodule from Peru Basin: a radiochemical anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyss, J.L.; Lemaitre, N.; Marchig, V.; Southon, J.R.; Nelson, D.E.; Vogel, J.S.

    1985-01-01

    Attempts have been made to study the entire growth history of a manganese nodule from the northern part of Peru Basin in the Pacific using radiochemical profiles of 230 Th/ 232 Th, 227 Th/ 230 Th and 10 Be/ 9 Be. Combined with the observations on Fe-Mn contents and textural variation, the radiochemical data indicate that the nodule grew more or less concentrically throughout most of its existence since it formed 1.5 my ago, receiving Mn from both bottom water and pore water. This condition appeared to have changed about 180 ky ago when the growth became asymmetric in that the top and bottom sides became fixed in their relative positions on the sea floor. Since then, the bottom side accreted with a fast rate of close to 200 mm/my, apparently fueled by the supply of diagenetically remobilized Mn in pore water from the sediment substrate. In the meantime, the topside accumulated at about 6 mm/my, a value which is in the normal range for deep-sea nodules having their Mn supplied from the hydrogenous source. (author)

  20. Radiochemical guidelines and process specifications for reactor shutdown: the EDF strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mole, D.; Wintergerst, M.; Meylogan, Th.; Rocher, A.; Sagot, M.J.; Bonelli, V.; Bonnefon, J.; Dupont, B.

    2012-09-01

    Changes to French nuclear regulations made in June 2006 [1.] have made it necessary for EDF to modify its ruling principles. These modifications required the restructuring of radiochemical guidelines to better reflect their impact on nuclear safety, the environment and radioprotection. In accordance with these aims, a new authoritative document has been produced. This ruling document identifies all parameters with a potential impact on nuclear safety, radiological releases to the environment and personnel dose rates. These diagnostic and control parameters have been identified for a reactor in production and for a reactor during shutdown. For parameters related to a reactor in production, some indicators are used to evaluate impacts on availability, radioprotection and the environment during shutdown and on outage and to anticipate mitigation ways. On the other side, several parameters related to the stages of shutdown were also directly evaluated in order to minimize the impacts. This paper describes the EDF methodology used to establish operational documents: radiochemical guidelines and process specifications, and includes the following: - description of monitored parameters and their associated areas of risk; - justification of target values, frequencies of inspection and the required actions for the monitored parameters. The sizing methodology is based on theoretical studies and on EDF operational experience analysis. By implementing in the operational and technical specifications requirements linked to nuclear safety, radioprotection and environment respect, EDF will benefit from an improved compromise between these areas as well as an increased focus. (authors)

  1. Validation of the FDG (18F) radiochemical purity assay by thin layer chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leao, R.L.C.; Oliveira, M.L.; Nascimento, J.E.; Nascimento, N.C.E.S.

    2013-01-01

    All methodologies utilized in radiopharmaceutical industry should be validated in order to prove that they meet the requirements of analytical applications, ensuring the reliability of the results. At a radiopharmaceutical industry there is one challenge aspect: sometimes it is not possible use a stable standard to perform the validation analysis. In order to overcome this difficulty, the objective of this study was to suggest a validation protocol for these methodologies, based on the recommendations of RE n° 899/Agencia Nacional de Vigilancia Sanitaria (ANVISA), and prove its efficiency, performing the radiochemical purity validation test of FDG (18F), by TLC. To obtain the calibration curve, we suggested that the theoretical activity values should be determined using a dose calibrator, simultaneously of each analysis performed by TLC, for 5 hours. The method was linear (R 2 of 0.996), precise (CV% <5%) and accurate (96.85% < accuracy < 102.56%). In relation to the robustness test, our experiments evaluated the influence of the distance travelled by mobile phase, variations at mobile phase concentration and type of chromatographic plate (silica gel on glass or aluminium plates). The detection and quantification limits were determined (321.9 and 1065.6 kBq, respectively). As expected, this methodology was nonspecific, showing a slight spot corresponding to the FDM. The proposed protocol was efficient and the methodology tested was effective to determine the radiochemical purity of FDG (18F), in accordance to the limits recommended by ANVISA. (author)

  2. A direct reading on-line flowrate meter for use in radiochemical plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, B.V.; Kaimal, C.K.R.; Siddiqui, I.A.; Kumar, S.V.

    1987-01-01

    A device for measurement and remote direct reading display of the flowrates of streams in a radiochemical plant is described. The device is interposed in the measured stream and consists of a syphon pot with a specially developed attachment on the discharge line. Differential pressure switches are used to trigger a timer device at set levels in the pot and the time required for filling the pot during each cycle is measured and is used to compute and display the flowrate. The device is accurate and reliable and is simple to fabricate and install. It is maintenance-free since it has no moving parts. It is also suggested that a manometer with conductive contacts could be used in place of the d.p. switches. The background and various stages of development of the device are described. The operating data is tabulated and parameters required for plant applications are indicated in detail. A simple method to detect and correct for errors due to drift in d.p. switch setting is also outlined. Sketches of typical syphon pot, the schematic of the apparatus and suggested layout for application in radiochemical plant are also included. (author). 11 figures, 6 tables

  3. The use of cuprous iodide as a precipitation matrix in the radiochemical determination of 131I in milk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCurdy, D.E.; Mellor, R.A.; Lambdin, R.W.; McLain, M.E. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    As a result of the implementation of the As Low As is Reasonably Achievable philosophy to the nuclear power industry, recent U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission requirements have prompted high sensitivity radiochemical analysis for the measurement of 131 I in milk. The most recognized and commonly employed technique incorporates costly palladium iodide as the final precipitate in the radiochemical purification of the iodine chemical species. The procedure presented in this paper outlines the many advantages of using cuprous iodide as the final precipitate. These include lower cost per analysis, consistent recoveries, better precipitate matrix and good self absorption characteristics. Typical lower limit of detection values and operating characteristics obtained for high sensitivity β-γ analysis as well as gas proportional counting and a comparison of radiochemical and Ge(Li) spectrometric results for environmental samples collected during a recent Chinese weapons fallout incident are presented. (author)

  4. Trace analysis measurements in high-purity aluminium by means of radiochemical neutron and proton activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egger, K.P.

    1987-01-01

    The aim of the study consisted in the development of efficient radiochemical composite processes and activation methods for the multi-element determination of traces within the lower ng range in high-purity aluminium. More than 50 elements were determined with the help of activation with reactor neutrons; the selective separation of matrix activity (adsorption with hydrated antimony pentoxide) led to a noticeable improvement of detectability, as compared with instrumental neutron activation analysis. Further improvements were achieved with the help of radiochemical group separations in ion exchangers or with the help of the selective separation of the pure beta-emitting elements. Over 20 elements up to high atomic numbers were determined by means of activating 13 MeV protons and 23 Me protons. In this connection, improvements of the detection limit by as a factor of 10 were achieved with radiochemical separation techniques, as compared with pure instrumental proton activation analysis. (RB) [de

  5. Evolution of a Corporate Knowledge Management and Knowledge Building Effort: A Case Study of Just-In-Time Training and Support of Laboratory Robotic Workstations Driven Through Online Community Portals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Kearns

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available This is a case study of the evolution of how a successful knowledge management initiative was achieved in a corporate learning organization. The initiative was centered on providing training tools and documentation of automated laboratory workstations that are utilized by scientists in a drug discovery environment. The case study will address the software tools, processes for content building, and the organizational dynamics that either assisted or blocked the progression of the initiative. Over a four-year period three distinct efforts were implemented, each differed in the particular software tools and focus of the initiatives. This presentation will compare and contrast the elements that provided barriers to success in the first two initiatives and the mechanisms and focus used in the third initiative that proved successful, scalable, and sustainable.

  6. Bioassay Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Bioassay Laboratory is an accredited laboratory capable of conducting standardized and innovative environmental testing in the area of aquatic ecotoxicology. The...

  7. HYDROMECHANICS LABORATORY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Naval Academy Hydromechanics LaboratoryThe Naval Academy Hydromechanics Laboratory (NAHL) began operations in Rickover Hall in September 1976. The primary purpose of...

  8. HPLC-ICP-MS compared with radiochemical detection for metabolite profiling of H-3-bromohexine in rat urine and faeces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, B.P.; Gammelgaard, B.; Hansen, S.H.

    2005-01-01

    H-3-Bromohexine was dosed to rats as a model compound to allow comparison of HPLC-ICP-MS detection on bromine to radiochemical detection in an in vivo drug metabolism study. Metabolite profiles were obtained in urine and faeces extracts. No influence of the methanol gradient on the bromine response...... was observed in the range of 18 - 75% methanol. The sensitivity obtained by HPLC- ICP-MS was almost two orders of magnitude better than on-line H-3 radiochemical detection. For ICP- MS, the limit of detection was calculated to be 69 nM Br ( injection volume 100 mu l), corresponding to an absolute limit...

  9. Determination of gold and platinum in biological materials by radiochemical neutron activation analysis using electrolytic separation of gold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reitz, B.; Heydorn, K.

    1993-01-01

    A new method is presented for the determination of Au and Pt in biological materials based on neutron activation analysis with radiochemical separation of gold. Separation of gold by electrolytic deposition on a niobium cathode ascertains thee highest radiochemical purity without any interference from calcium or other major elements. With 199 Au as indicator for platinum the gold content of the sample not only strongly affects the limit of detection, but also causes interference by double neutron capture. Replicate analyses of BCR Certified Reference Materials No. 184, 185 and 186 were carried out. (author) 18 refs.; 3 figs.; 2 tabs

  10. A radio-high-performance liquid chromatography dual-flow cell gamma-detection system for on-line radiochemical purity and labeling efficiency determination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegren, S; Jensen, H; Jacobsson, L

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a method of determining radiochemical yield and radiochemical purity using radio-HPLC detection employing a dual-flow-cell system is evaluated. The dual-flow cell, consisting of a reference cell and an analytical cell, was constructed from two PEEK capillary coils to fit into the w...

  11. Building Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Glossary Contact Information Information For… Media Policy Makers Building Languages Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Communicating ... any speech and only very loud sounds. Close × “Building Blocks” “Building Blocks” refers to the different skills ...

  12. Metrological aspects of radiochemical methods for determining activity of gamma-emitting nuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shcherbakov, B.Y.

    1986-01-01

    The author considers the problem of metrological compatibility of the two stages in the radiochemical method of determining the activity of a gamma-emitting nuclide: chemical isolation of the nuclide and radiometric measurement of its activity. The authors show that preparation of the specimen in liquid form provides for important advantages compared with the traditional application of the solid residue onto a flat substate. The work here is of interest for analytical chemists who are involved with determination of the activity of gamma emitting nuclides such as Ru 103, Rh 106, Sn 113, Cs 134, Cs 137, La 140, Ce 141, Ce 144, Hg 203, Na 24, Mn 54, Fe 59, Co 60, Zn 65, Zr 95, and Nb 95, for example, in waste water or in emissions to the atmosphere, with the goal of protecting the environment

  13. The determination of the radiochemical purity of 99Tcm-DTPA-HSA injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Guangrong; Zhang Yan

    1996-01-01

    A simple, rapid analytical method of radiochemical purity for the 99 Tc m -DTPA-HSA injection is established. 99 Tc m (VII), 99 Tc m (IV) and labelled compound 99 Tc m -DTPA-HSA are separated by two systems of paper chromatography on Whatman No.1. The solvent of the system A is 85% methanol and that of the system B is water-95% alcohol-ammonium hydroxide (volume ratio is 5:2:1). 90 Tc m (IV) and labelled compound are located at the origin, while R f of 99 Tc m (VII) is about 0.4-0.5 in the system A. R f of 99 Tc m (VII) and labelled compound are about 0.7-0.8, while 99 Tc m (IV) is located at the origin in the system B

  14. Limits of the radiochemical and geochemical method for the test of nucleon stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergamasco, L [CNR, Laboratorio di Cosmo-Geofisica, Turin, Italy; Texas A and M University, College Station, Tex.); Cini, G [CNR, Laboratorio di Cosmo-Geofisica; Torino, Universita, Turin, Italy)

    1978-07-01

    An estimate is obtained for the limiting nucleon lifetime that can be determined by the radiochemical method of Steinberg and Evans (1977), which counts the Ar-37 production from reactions due to nucleon decay in a large sample of KC2H3O2. To estimate the background rate, processes due to the atmospheric muon component are considered. It is found that the asymptotic limit on the maximum value of the nucleon lifetime is 2 x 10/sup 30/years. This value cannot be increased by going to larger depths or by using a larger sample, but is inherent in the method itself. To improve the limit one would have to resort to methods based on multiparticle decay modes.

  15. Radiochemical separation and effective dose estimation due to ingestion of 90Sr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilic, Z.; Vidic, A.; Deljkic, D.; Sirko, D.; Zovko, E.; Samek, D.

    2009-01-01

    Since 2007. Institute for Public Health of Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina-Radiation Protection Centre, within the framework of monitoring of radioactivity of environment carried out measurement of specific activity of 90 Sr content in selected food and water samples. The paper described the methods of measurement and radiochemical separation. Presented results, as average values of specific activity of 90 Sr, were used for estimation of effective dose due to ingestion of 90 Sr for 2007. and 2008. Estimated effective dose for 2007. due to ingestion of 90 Sr for adults was 1,36 μSv and 2,03 μSv for children (10 year old), and for 2008. 0,67 μSv (adults) and 1,01 μSv (children 10 year old). Estimated effective doses for 2007. and 2008. are varied because of different average specific activity radionuclide 90 Sr in selected samples of food, their number, species and origin. (author) [sr

  16. Determination of radiochemical yields of 186Re-labelled complexes using thin layer chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konirova, R.; Kohlickova, M.; Jedinakova-Krizova, V.

    1999-01-01

    The reaction conditions for synthesis of three rhenium complexes 186 Re-methylendiphosphonate (MDP), 186 Re-hydroxyethylidendiphosphonate (HEDP) and 186 Re-citrate have been investigated. Radiochemical yield of complexation has been determined by thin layer chromatography and paper chromatography. The rhenium complexation with corresponding ligand is dependent on pH values of reaction mixture, concentration of studied ligand (MDP, HEDP and sodium citrate) and concentration of reducing agent. Stannous chloride with ascorbic acid (as antioxidant) was used for reduction of perrhenate. The labeling yield of 186 Re-MDP was about 90 %, of 186 Re-HEDP more than 80 % and more than 75 % for 186 Re-citrate under optimum conditions. Besides, the possibility of application of porphyrins as organic ligands for complexation with rhenium isotopes is examined. (authors)

  17. Development of radiochemical separation method for determination of toxic elements in biological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maihara, V.A.; Vasconcellos, M.B.A.; Favaro, D.I.T.; Armelin, M.J.A.

    1990-01-01

    In order to determine Hg, Sb, As and Se in biological materials by neutron activation analysis, a radiochemical separation was developed. The chemical separation procedure used was based on the digestion of the irradiated sample in a mixture of H NO 3 and H 2 SO 4 in a teflon bomb, at 130 0 C for 1 to 4 hours. After the dissolution of organic matter, Hg and Sb were retained by a Dowex 2-X8 resin column in 6 M HCl. The effluent was passed through a TDO, tin dioxide column which retains As and Se in 3 M HCl medium. Radioactive tracers of these elements were used to determine the yields of the separation process. Certified reference materials were analyzed to check the precision and accuracy of the method. (author)

  18. Development of a radiochemical separation method for toxic elements determination from biologic samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malhara, V.A.; Vasconcellos, M.B.A.; Favaro, D.I.T.; Armelin, M.J.A.

    1990-01-01

    In order to determine Hg, Sb, As and Se in biological materials by neutron activation analysis, a radiochemical separation was developed. The chemical separation procedure used was based on the digestion of the irradiated sample in a mixture of HNO 3 and H 2 SO 4 in a teflon bomb, at 130 0 C for 1 to 4 hours. After the dissolution of organic matter, Hg and Sb were retained by a Dowex 2-XB resin column in 6M HCI. The efluent was passed through a TDO, tin dioxide column which retains As and Se in 3M HCI medium. Radioactive tracers of these elements were used to determine the yields of the separation process. Certified reference materials were analyzed to check the precision and accuracy of the method. (author)

  19. Investigation of the possibility of using hydrogranulation in reprocessing radioactive wastes of radiochemical production facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Revyakin, V.; Borisov, L.M. [All Russian Scientific and Research Institute of Non-Organic Materials, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1996-05-01

    Radio-chemical production facilities are constantly accumulating liquid radioactive wastes (still residues as the result of evaporation of extraction and adsorption solutions etc.) which are a complex multicomponent mixtures. The wastes are frequently stored for extended periods of time while awaiting disposition and in some cases, and this is much worse, they are released into the environment. In this report, I would like to draw your attention to some results we have obtained from investigations aimed at simplifying handing of such wastes by the precipitation of hard to dissolve metal hydroxides, the flocculation of the above into granules with the help of surface-active agents (in this case a polyacrylamide - PAA), quickly precipitated and easily filtered. The precipitate may be quickly dried and calcinated, if necessary, and transformed into a dense oxide sinter. In other words it may be transformed into a material convenient for storage or burial.

  20. Radiochemical determination of Inertial Confinement Fusion capsule compression at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaughnessy, D. A., E-mail: shaughnessy2@llnl.gov; Moody, K. J.; Gharibyan, N.; Grant, P. M.; Gostic, J. M.; Torretto, P. C.; Wooddy, P. T.; Bandong, B. B.; Cerjan, C. J.; Hagmann, C. A.; Caggiano, J. A.; Yeamans, C. B.; Bernstein, L. A.; Schneider, D. H. G.; Henry, E. A.; Fortner, R. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Despotopulos, J. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Radiochemistry Program, University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las Vegas, Nevada 89154 (United States)

    2014-06-15

    We describe a radiochemical measurement of the ratio of isotope concentrations produced in a gold hohlraum surrounding an Inertial Confinement Fusion capsule at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). We relate the ratio of the concentrations of (n,γ) and (n,2n) products in the gold hohlraum matrix to the down-scatter of neutrons in the compressed fuel and, consequently, to the fuel's areal density. The observed ratio of the concentrations of {sup 198m+g}Au and {sup 196g}Au is a performance signature of ablator areal density and the fuel assembly confinement time. We identify the measurement of nuclear cross sections of astrophysical importance as a potential application of the neutrons generated at the NIF.

  1. Radiochemical purity and in vitro stability of Tc-99m radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vucina, J.

    2001-01-01

    The increased contents of long lived 99 Tc, oxygen and cupric ions could affect the labeling yield of eight radiopharmaceuticals. Oxygen and in leaser extend copper were found to affect the radiochemical purity of the preparations. In vitro stability of radiopharmaceuticals, examined on 99m Tc(Sn)-pyrosphoshate solutions, was extended when ascorbic acid was added as the chemical stabilizer. The quantity of 5x10 -7 mol/dm 3 of ascorbic acid was found to be sufficient to keep the content of 99m Tc-pertechnetate below 1 % six hours after labeling even in the cases when 99m Tc was present in high radioactive concentrations (740-814 GBq/dm 3 ). The results led to the development of the kits in which ascorbic or gentisic acid are the standards component in the kit composition (author)

  2. Preparation, radiochemical analysis and biodistribution of 99mTc-dihydrobis(1-pyrazolyl)borate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owunwanne, A.; Abdel-Dayem, H.; Yacoub, T.

    1987-01-01

    Optimum preparation of 99m Tc-dihydrobis(1-pyrazolyl)borate ( 99m Tc-HBPz 2 ) was done by mixing 1.4 mg/ml HBPz 2 and 1.0 mg/ml of stanous PYP. Radiochemical analysis of the preparation using paper chromatography (PC), thin layer chromatography (TLC) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) indicated a stable product with one major component. The labelling efficiency was approximately 90%. Animal biodistribution studies performed in mice showed that most of the injected radioactivity was confined to the liver, kidney, lungs, intestine and heart. The heart to blood ratio was small but persisted up to 3 hrs. after the injection. (orig.) [de

  3. Radiochemical analyses of surface water from U.S. Geological Survey hydrologic bench-mark stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janzer, V.J.; Saindon, L.G.

    1972-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey's program for collecting and analyzing surface-water samples for radiochemical constituents at hydrologic bench-mark stations is described. Analytical methods used during the study are described briefly and data obtained from 55 of the network stations in the United States during the period from 1967 to 1971 are given in tabular form.Concentration values are reported for dissolved uranium, radium, gross alpha and gross beta radioactivity. Values are also given for suspended gross alpha radioactivity in terms of natural uranium. Suspended gross beta radioactivity is expressed both as the equilibrium mixture of strontium-90/yttrium-90 and as cesium-137.Other physical parameters reported which describe the samples include the concentrations of dissolved and suspended solids, the water temperature and stream discharge at the time of the sample collection.

  4. Radiochemical method for evaluating the effect of antibiotics on Escherichia coli biofilms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dix, B.A.; Cohen, P.S.; Laux, D.C.; Cleeland, R.

    1988-01-01

    A simple radiochemical method for evaluating the action of antibiotics on Escherichia coli cells in biofilms is reported. After growth, biofilms of E. coli ATCC 25922 on disks of urinary catheter material were suspended in fresh medium containing or lacking an antibiotic, incubated for 4 h at 37 degrees C, and pulse-labeled with [ 3 H]leucine for 5 min. Radioactivity in trichloracetic acid-precipitable material in the biofilm and in the surrounding medium (planktonic E. coli) was then measured. Antibiotic-induced inhibition of incorporation of [ 3 H]leucine into the cells in the biofilm was far less pronounced than incorporation into planktonic cells and, furthermore, correlated well with loss in viable counts. The method is simple, inexpensive, and extremely timesaving

  5. Radiochemical neutron activation analysis for trace elements evaluation of human milk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gill, K.P.; Zaidi, J.H.; Ahmad, S.

    2003-01-01

    The principal objective pursued in this study is to establish the base-line data on the status of elemental composition in human milk from Pakistani subjects of Rawalpindi/Islamabad area. Radiochemical neutron activation analysis (RNAA) methodology was developed and successfully employed to determine the concentration of 18 minor and trace elements (essential, toxic and nonessential) in human milk. This methodology has significantly improved the detection limits of most of these elements due to suppression of Compton background. The data provide the base-line values of these elements in human milk of low- and medium-income group subjects of the region. The results obtained show good compatibility with the data reported by the WHO on elemental composition of human milk from different geological regions. (orig.)

  6. Standard test methods for chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of uranium hexafluoride

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover procedures for subsampling and for chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of uranium hexafluoride UF6. Most of these test methods are in routine use to determine conformance to UF6 specifications in the Enrichment and Conversion Facilities. 1.2 The analytical procedures in this document appear in the following order: Note 1—Subcommittee C26.05 will confer with C26.02 concerning the renumbered section in Test Methods C761 to determine how concerns with renumbering these sections, as analytical methods are replaced with stand-alone analytical methods, are best addressed in subsequent publications. Sections Subsampling of Uranium Hexafluoride 7 - 10 Gravimetric Determination of Uranium 11 - 19 Titrimetric Determination of Uranium 20 Preparation of High-Purity U3O 8 21 Isotopic Analysis 22 Isotopic Analysis by Double-Standard Mass-Spectrometer Method 23 - 29 Determination of Hydrocarbons, Chlorocarbons, and Partially Substitut...

  7. The study of radiochemical separation methods on gaseous Fission product krypton-88

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Zhihong; Zhang Shengdong; Yang Lei; Ding Youqian; Sun Hongqing; Ma Peng

    2012-01-01

    Half-life of krypton-88 is 2.84 hours, high fission yields and a relatively large gamma branching ratio is had. The gas is short-lived fission products in burnup measurements. Only New fission products can extract from extraction in gas of fissile irradiation target. But krypton-88 with krypton-85, krypton-87, xenon -135, and xenon-138 is coexisted together, thus radiochemical separation must quickly taken. selected the irradiation time is 1-2 hours and cooling time is best 2 hours for sample preparation, krypton and xenon were separated using activated carbon adsorption, the ratio of krypton and xenon were measured by gamma spectroscopy. Then according to the ratio of krypton-85 and xenon-125 count rate coefficient around separation were calculated yield of krypton and decontamination factor of xenon and the final the yield of krypton-85 is calculated. (authors)

  8. Continuous radiochemical analysis of fission products in a nuclear reactor water coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moskvin, L.N.; Zakharov, L.K.; Leont'ev, G.G.; Mel'nikov, V.A.; Orlenkov, I.S.; Slutskij, G.K.

    1975-01-01

    Method for continuous radiochemical analysis of I, Cs, Ba, Sr and Ce isotopes in a reactor water heat-transfer agent was developed. A continuous two-dimensional chromatographic process of complex mixtures separation of substances proved to be feasible on several parallel sorbent layers, which moved at constant velocities and separated by stationary intermediate collectors. Tests on model solutions containing I, Ce, Cs and Ba isotopes and on heat-carrier samples showed quantitative separation of elements. The results were indicative of a basic possibility of using multisorbent chromatographs for continuous control of multicomponent mixtures, particularly for control of radioactive fission product compositions in water heat-transfer agents in nuclear power plants. A diagram is shown for a two-dimensional chromatographic separation of a multicomponent mixture. Also shown is a flow chart of an installation for continuous control of iodine and cesium isotope activities

  9. Determination of rhenium in biological and environmental samples by radiochemical neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kucera, J.; Mizera, J.; Randa, Z.; Byrne, A.R.; Lucanikova, M.

    2006-01-01

    Radiochemical neutron activation procedures using liquid-liquid extraction with tetraphenylarsonium chloride in chloroform from 1 M HCl and solid extraction with ALIQUAT 336 incorporated in a polyacrylonitrile binding matrix from 0.1 M HCl were developed for accurate determination of rhenium in biological and environmental samples at the sub-ng.g -1 level. Concentrations of Re in the range of 0.1 to 2.4 ng.g -1 were determined in several botanical reference materials (RM), while in a RM of road dust a value of approx. 10 ng.g -1 was found. Significantly elevated values of Re, up to 90 ng.g -1 , were found in seaweed (brown algae). Results for Re in the brown algae Fucus vesiculosus in which elevated 99 Tc values had previously been determined suggest possible competition between Re and Tc in the accumulation process. (author)

  10. A radiochemical assay for detection of leukotriene B4 production from isolated cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aharony, D.; Dobson, P.; Krell, R.D.

    1984-01-01

    A radiochemical procedure for quantitating the effect of inhibitors of leukotriene B4 (LTB4) biosynthesis is described. Rat peritoneal cells were labeled with 3 H-arachidonic acid and stimulated with the calcium ionophore A23187. 3 H-LTB4 was isolated by processing on C18-Sep Pak cartridges followed by reverse-phase high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). The identity of this product, as well as other arachidonic acid metabolites, was verified by using silicic acid column chromatography followed by straight-phase HPLC and thin layer chromatography. Using this assay, LTB4 release by ionophore A23187 has been shown to be both time- and concentration-dependent. Indomethacin enhanced, while NDGA and ETYA inhibited, the A23187-induced production of LTB4. This procedure is both simple and direct and is capable of assessing the ability of novel compounds to alter LTB4 production

  11. A radiochemical procedure for the determination of Po-210 in environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godoy, J.M.; Schuettelkopf, H.

    1980-07-01

    A radiochemical procedure for the determination of Po-210 in environmental samples was developed. Soil, sediments, filter materials, plants, water and food samples can be analyzed for Po-210. Wet ashing is achieved with HNO 3 + H 2 O 2 or HCl + HNO 3 . To separate disturbing substances, a coprecipitation with Te is used for sample materials containing silica. Po-210 deposition from HCl solution on Ag platelets with other sample materials is possible directly. Deposited Po-210 is counted by α-spectrometry. For chemical yield determination Po-208 is added, yields range between 60% and 100%. A lower detection limit of about 0,002 pCi Po-210/sample is achievable. (orig./HP) [de

  12. Determination of individual rare earth elements in Vietnamese monazite by radiochemical neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Van Suc; Nguyen Mong Sinh

    1993-01-01

    Radiochemical neutron activation analysis (RNAA) has been applied for determination of rare earth elements (REE) in Vietnamese monazite. The chemical separation procedure used is based on the chromatographic elution of rare earth groups, after the separation of 233 Pa(Th) in irradiated monazite samples by coprecipitation with MnO 2 , the rare earth elements were retained by Biorad AG1 x 8 resin column in 10% 15.4M HNO 3 -90% methanol solution. The elution of heavy rare earth (HREE) and middle rare earth (MREE) groups was carried out with 10% 1M HNO 3 - 90% methanol and 10% 0.05M HNO 3 -90% methanol solution, respectively; while the light rare earths (LREE) were eluted from the column by 0.1M HNO 3 solution. The accuracy of the method was checked by the analysis of granodiorite GSP-I and the rare earth values were in good agreement. (author) 7 refs.; 3 tabs

  13. Comparison study among methodologies of planar chromatography for radiochemical control of technetium-99m

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteiro, Elisiane de Godoy

    2012-01-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals are substances that have radioisotopes in their composition. About 95% of the procedures performed in nuclear medicine use radiopharmaceuticals with diagnostic purposes, and the Lyophilized Reagents (LR) labeled with Technetium-99m ( 99 mTc), obtained from 99 Mo/ 99 mTc generator, are the most one used. Quality Control represents the set of assays to be performed to assure that the product is adequate to its purpose. An important feature to be evaluated in 99m Tc radiopharmaceuticals is the radiochemical purity (% RqP) to quantify free pertechnetate ( 99 mTcO 4 - ) and technetium colloidal (99mTcO 2 ) mainly by paper chromatography (PC), thin layer (TLC) and High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). The objective of this work was to perform the comparison among the radiochemical control methodologies of LR labeled with 99m Tc, described in the United States Pharmacopoeia (USP) and European Pharmacopoeia (EP) and those used by IPEN. 99m TcO 4 - eluate and DISIDA, DMSA, DTPA, EC, ECD, GHA, MIBI, MDP, PIRO, SAH and Sn Coloidal LR were provided by IPEN-CNEN/SP. TLC-cellulose, TLC-SG.TLC-SG reverse phase, HPTLC-cellulose, HPTLC-SG (Merck) and ITLC-SG (Pall Corporation), W1MM, W3MM, W17M e W31ET (Whatman) chromatographic plates were used. The measurement of the radioactivity was done in a Perkin Elmer Cobra D-5002 gamma counter. LR were labeled to obtain 55,0 MBq mL 1 (1,5 mCi mL 1 ) of final radioactive concentration. The % 99m TcO 4 - , % 99m TcO 2 and % RqP were determined up to 4 hour labeling. From 11 LR, only EC and GHA have no radiochemical control methods in USP and EP. In USP and/or EP, DTPA, MDP, PIRO, SAH and Sn Coloidal methods use ITLC-SG; IPEN uses this chromatography plate in DISIDA, EC, ECD, GHA, PIRO, MIBI and SAH. As ITLC-SG had been out of production (recommended in 40, 70 and 41% of the USP, EP and IPEN methodologies, respectively), it was necessary to search alternatives to replace ITLC-SG plate in the radiochemical control

  14. Groundwater quality in wells in central rural Finland: a microbiological and radiochemical survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korhonen, L.; Niskanen, M.; Heinonen-Tanski, H.; Martikainen, P.J.; Salonen, L.; Taipalinen, I.

    1996-01-01

    The microbiological, physicochemical, and radiochemical water quality from samples of 150 rural wells in Finland was analyzed. Organic matter exceeded 12 mg KMnO4 L(-1) in 63% and nitrate 25 mg NO3 L(-1) in 29% of the wells. NO3--concentrations were higher in wells with cattle. Fecal coliforms and fecal streptococci were found in 10-40%. There was no direct positive correlation between heterotrophic and indicator bacteria. Salmonella or Campylobacter were not detected. Human pathogen Listeria monocytogenes was isolated from two and Yersinia enterocolitica serotypes O5 or O6 from four waters not containing fecal coliforms. Thus, the predictive value of fecal coliforms to indicate these pathogens is poor. Coliphages were found in seven wells. Mean concentrations of radon and long-lived alpha-active radionuclides were lower and those of beta-emitting radionuclides higher than the mean concentrations measured from groundwater in Finland. Radionuclides from the Chernobyl fallout were not detected

  15. Radiochemical applications of insoluble sulfate columns. Analytical possibilities in the field of the fission product solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrachina, M.; Sauvagnac, R.

    1962-01-01

    In this paper we go on with our study of the heterogeneous ion-isotopic exchange in column. At present, we apply it to determine the radiochemical composition of the raw solutions used in the industrial recuperation of the long-lived fission products. The separation of the radioelements contained in these solutions is carried out mainly by making use of small columns, 1-3 cm height, of BaSO 4 or SrSO 4 , under selected experimental conditions. These columns behave like a special type of inorganic exchangers, working by absorption or by ion-isotopic exchange depending on the cases,a nd they provide the means for the selective separation of several important fission products employing very small volumes of fixing and eluting solutions. (Author) 11 refs

  16. Courthouse Prototype Building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malhotra, Mini [ORNL; New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL; Im, Piljae [ORNL

    2018-02-01

    As part of DOE's support of ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1 and IECC, researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) apply a suite of prototype buildings covering 80% of the commercial building floor area in the U.S. for new construction. Efforts have started on expanding the prototype building suite to cover 90% of the commercial building floor area in the U.S., by developing prototype models for additional building types including place of worship, public order and safety, public assembly. Courthouse is courthouse is a sub-category under the “Public Order and Safety" building type category; other sub-categories include police station, fire station, and jail, reformatory or penitentiary.ORNL used building design guides, databases, and documented courthouse projects, supplemented by personal communication with courthouse facility planning and design experts, to systematically conduct research on the courthouse building and system characteristics. This report documents the research conducted for the courthouse building type and proposes building and system characteristics for developing a prototype building energy model to be included in the Commercial Building Prototype Model suite. According to the 2012 CBECS, courthouses occupy a total of 436 million sqft of floor space or 0.5% of the total floor space in all commercial buildings in the US, next to fast food (0.35%), grocery store or food market (0.88%), and restaurant or cafeteria (1.2%) building types currently included in the Commercial Prototype Building Model suite. Considering aggregated average, courthouse falls among the larger with a mean floor area of 69,400 sqft smaller fuel consumption intensity building types and an average of 94.7 kBtu/sqft compared to 77.8 kBtu/sqft for office and 80 kBtu/sqft for all commercial buildings.Courthouses range in size from 1000 sqft to over a million square foot building gross square feet and 1 courtroom to over 100 courtrooms. Small courthouses

  17. Radiochemical neutron activation analysis of zirconium and zirconium-niobium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tashimova, F.A.; Sadikov, I.I.; Salimov, M.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Zirconium and zirconium-niobium alloys are used on nuclear technology, as fuel cladding of nuclear reactors. Their nuclear-physical, mechanical and thermophysical properties are influenced them matrix and impurity composition, therefore determination of matrix and impurity content of these materials is a very important task. Neutron activation analysis is one from multielemental and high sensible techniques that are widely applied in analysis of high purity materials. Investigation of nuclear-physical characteristics of zirconium has shown that instrumental variant NAA is unusable for analysis due to high radioactivity of a matrix. Therefore it is necessary carrying out radiochemical separation of impurity radionuclides from matrix. Study of the literature datum have shown, that zirconium and niobium are very well extracted from muriatic solution with 5% tributyl phosphineoxide (TBPO) solution in toluene and 0,75 M solution of di-2-ethyl hexyl phosphoric acid (HDEHP) in cyclohexanone. Investigation of these elements extraction in these systems has shown that more effective and selective separation of matrix radionuclides is achieved in HDEHP-3M HCI system. This system is also extracted and hafnium, witch is an accompanying element of zirconium and its high content prevented determination of other impurity elements in sample. Therefore we used extraction system HDEHP-3M HCl for analysis of zirconium and zirconium-niobium alloys in chromatographic variant. By measurement of distribution profile of a matrix and of elution curve of determined elements is established, that for effective separation of impurity and matrix radionuclides there is enough chromatographic column with diameter 1 cm and height of a sorbent layer 7 cm, thus volume of elute, necessary for complete elution of determinate elements is 35-40 ml. On the basis of the carried out researches the technique of radiochemical NAA of high purity zirconium and zirconium-niobium alloy, which allows to

  18. Project Title: Radiochemical Analysis by High Sensitivity Dual-Optic Micro X-ray Fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Havrilla, George J.; Gao, Ning

    2002-01-01

    A novel dual-optic micro X-ray fluorescence instrument will be developed to do radiochemical analysis of high-level radioactive wastes at DOE sites such as Savannah River Site and Hanford. This concept incorporates new X-ray optical elements such as monolithic polycapillaries and double bent crystals, which focus X-rays. The polycapillary optic can be used to focus X-rays emitted by the X-ray tube thereby increasing the X-ray flux on the sample over 1000 times. Polycapillaries will also be used to collect the X-rays from the excitation site and screen the radiation background from the radioactive species in the specimen. This dual-optic approach significantly reduces the background and increases the analyte signal thereby increasing the sensitivity of the analysis. A doubly bent crystal used as the focusing optic produces focused monochromatic X-ray excitation, which eliminates the bremsstrahlung background from the X-ray source. The coupling of the doubly bent crystal for monochromatic excitation with a polycapillary for signal collection can effectively eliminate the noise background and radiation background from the specimen. The integration of these X-ray optics increases the signal-to-noise and thereby increases the sensitivity of the analysis for low-level analytes. This work will address a key need for radiochemical analysis of high-level waste using a non-destructive, multi-element, and rapid method in a radiation environment. There is significant potential that this instrumentation could be capable of on-line analysis for process waste stream characterization at DOE sites

  19. The reliability of radiochemical and chemical trace analyses in environmental materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinonen, Jorma.

    1977-12-01

    After theoretically exploring the factors which influence the quality of analytical data as well as the means by which a sufficient quality can be assured and controlled, schemes of different kinds have been developed and applied in order to demonstrate the analytical quality assurance and control in practice. Methods have been developed for the determination of cesium, bromine and arsenic by neutron activation analysis at the natural ''background'' concentration level in environmental materials. The calibration of methods is described. The methods were also applied on practical routine analysis, the results of which are briefly reviewed. In the case of Ce the precision of a comprehensive calibration was found to vary between 5.2-9.2% as a relative standard deviation, which agrees well with the calculated statistical random error 5.7-8.7%. In the case of Br the method showed a reasonable precision, about 11% on the average, and accuracy. In employing the method to analyze died samples containing Br from 3 to 12 ppm a continuous control of precison was performed. The analysis of As demonstrates the many problems and difficulties associated with environmental analysis. In developing the final method four former intercomparison materials of IAEA were utilized in the calibration. The tests performed revealed a systematic error. In this case a scheme was developed for the continuous control of both precision and accuracy. The results of radiochemical analyses in environmental materials show a reliability somewhat better than that occuring in the determination of stable trace elements. According to a rough classification, 15% of the results of radiochemical analysis show excellent reliability, whereas 60% show a reliability adequate for certain purposes. The remaining 15% are excellent, 60% adequate for some purposes and 30% good-for-nothing. The reasons for often insufficient reliability of results are both organizational and technical. With reasonable effort and

  20. Improving the radiochemical purity determination of 123I-labeled metaiodobenzylguanidine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luciana Carvalheira; Paulo Bechara Dutra; Paula Fernandes de Aguiar

    2014-01-01

    The HPLC method originally applied at the Nuclear Engineering Institute (IEN) for the radiochemical purity determination of 123iodine labeled m-iodobenzylguanidine ( 123 I-mIBG) takes 18.5 min. The final product release also depends on this result, and to facilitate this stage, we aimed to decrease this analysis time. We also intended to use fewer toxic compounds, if feasible. The optimization approach used herein was a combination of factorial and mixture designs to study simultaneously the selected variables. Analysis time, resolution and chromatograms aspect were the measured responses. The qualitative analysis of these responses provided the best chromatographic separation conditions that were 52 mM KH 2 PO 4 in a solution of ethanol and water (1:1), applying a flow rate of 0.50 mL min -1 and C18 column (4.6 × 250 mm, 5 μm). These optimum conditions not only decreased the analysis time in 61 %, but also allowed the reduction of mobile phase toxicity. To assure reliable data, method validation was performed for these conditions. The method has proved its specificity, the detection limit found was 3.70 × 10 -4 MBq mL -1 and the quantification limit has corresponded to 1.11 × 10 -3 MBq mL -1 . Repeatability and intermediate precision has not exceeded 3 and 5 %, respectively, and the accuracy has matched the interval of 95-105 %. This new method has been routinely applied in the radiochemical purity determination of 123 I-mIBG at IEN. (author)