WorldWideScience

Sample records for radioactive standards program

  1. Environmental radioactive intercomparison program and radioactive standards program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dilbeck, G. [Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    1993-12-31

    The Environmental Radioactivity Intercomparison Program described herein provides quality assurance support for laboratories involved in analyzing public drinking water under the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) Regulations, and to the environmental radiation monitoring activities of various agencies. More than 300 federal and state nuclear facilities and private laboratories participate in some phase of the program. This presentation describes the Intercomparison Program studies and matrices involved, summarizes the precision and accuracy requirements of various radioactive analytes, and describes the traceability determinations involved with radioactive calibration standards distributed to the participants. A summary of program participants, sample and report distributions, and additional responsibilities of this program are discussed.

  2. Radioactivity standards distribution program, 1978--1979. Interim report, 1978--1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziegler, L.H.

    1978-06-01

    A program for the distribution of calibrated radioactive samples, as one function of EPA's quality assurance program for environmental radiation measurements, is described. Included is a discussion of the objectives of the distribution program and a description of the preparation, availability, and distribution of calibrated radioactive samples. Instructions and application forms are included for laboratories desiring to participate in the program. This document is not a research report. It is designed for use by personnel of laboratories participating or desiring to participate in the Radioactivity Standards Distribution Program, which is a part of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's quality assurance program

  3. radioactive waste disposal standards abroad

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Yan; Xin Pingping; Wu Jian; Zhang Xue

    2012-01-01

    With the world focus on human health and environmental protection, the problem of radioactive waste disposal has gradually become a global issue, and the focus of attention of public. The safety of radioactive waste disposal, is not only related to human health and environmental safety, but also an important factor of affecting the sustainable development of nuclear energy. In recent years the formulation of the radioactive waste disposal standards has been generally paid attention to at home and abroad, and it has made great progress. In China, radioactive waste management standards are being improved, and there are many new standards need to be developed. The revised task of implement standards is very arduous, and there are many areas for improvement about methods and procedures of the preparation of standards. This paper studies the current situation of radioactive waste disposal standards of the International Atomic Energy Agency, USA, France, Britain, Russia, Japan, and give some corresponding recommendations of our radioactive waste disposal standards. (authors)

  4. Radioactivity standardization in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Simpson, BRS

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available South Africa's national radioactivity measurement standard is maintained at a satellite laboratory in Cape Town by the National Metrology Laboratory (NML) of the Council-for Scientific and Industrial Research. Standardizations are undertaken by a...

  5. EPA's Radioactive Source Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopsick, D.

    2004-01-01

    The US EPA is the lead Federal agency for emergency responses to unknown radiological materials, not licensed, owned or operated by a Federal agency or an Agreement state (Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan, 1996). The purpose of EPA's clean materials programme is to keep unwanted and unregulated radioactive material out of the public domain. This is achieved by finding and securing lost sources, maintaining control of existing sources and preventing future losses. The focus is on both, domestic and international fronts. The domestic program concentrates on securing lost sources, preventing future losses, alternative technologies like tagging of radioactive sources in commerce, pilot radioactive source roundup, training programs, scrap metal and metal processing facilities, the demolition industry, product stewardship and alternatives to radioactive devices (fewer radioactive source devices means fewer orphan sources). The international program consists of securing lost sources, preventing future losses, radiation monitoring of scrap metal at ports and the international scrap metal monitoring protocol

  6. Standardization of radioactive waste categories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1970-01-01

    A large amount of information about most aspects of radioactive waste management has been accumulated and made available to interested nations in recent years. The efficiency of this service has been somewhat hampered because the terminology used to describe the different types of radioactive waste has varied from country to country and indeed from installation to installation within a given country. This publication is the outcome of a panel meeting on Standardization of Radioactive Waste Categories. It presents a simple standard to be used as a common language between people working in the field of waste management at nuclear installations. The purpose of the standard is only to act as a practical tool for increasing efficiency in communicating, collecting and assessing technical and economical information in the common interest of all nations and the developing countries in particular. 20 refs, 1 fig., 3 tabs

  7. EG type radioactive calibration standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    EG standards are standards with a radioactive substance deposited as a solution on filtration paper and after drying sealed into a plastic disc or cylinder shaped casing. They serve the official testing of X-ray and gamma spectrometers and as test sources. The table shows the types of used radionuclides, nominal values of activity and total error of determination not exceeding +-4%. Activity of standards is calculated from the charge and the specific activity of standard solution used for the preparation of the standard. Tightness and surface contamination is measured for each standard. The manufacturer, UVVVR Praha, gives a guarantee for the given values of activity and total error of determination. (M.D.)

  8. The IAEA radioactive waste safety standards programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tourtellotte, James R.

    1995-01-01

    The IAEA is currently reviewing more than thirty publications in its Safety Series with a view toward consolidating and organizing information pertaining to radioactive waste. the effort is entitled Radioactive Waste Safety Standards programme (RADWASS). RADWASS is a significant undertaking and may have far reaching effects on radioactive waste management both in the international nuclear community and in individual nuclear States. This is because IAEA envisions the development of a consensus on the final document. In this circumstance, the product of RADWASS may ultimately be regarded as an international norm against which future actions of Member States may be measured. This program is organized in five subjects: planning, pre-disposal, disposal, uranium and thorium waste management and decommissioning, which has four levels: safety fundamentals, safety standards, safety guides and safety practices. (author)

  9. Radioactivity standards for drinking water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sastry, V.N.; Mahadevan, T.N.; Nair, R.N.; Krishnamoorthy, T.M.; Nambi, K.S.V.

    1995-01-01

    The Bureau of Indian Standards (BIS) had issued drinking water specifications for radioactivity in 1991 as 0.1 Bq/L for gross α and 1 pCi/L for gross β. The specification for gross β should have been 1 Bq/L, however the basis for arriving at these standards were not clearly stated. The radiological basis for fixing the Drinking Water Standards (DWS) has, therefore, been reviewed in the present work. The values derived now for gross α (0.01 Bq/L) and gross β (0.34 Bq/L) are different from the values given above. In addition, the DWS for some important radionuclides using the ingestion dose factors applicable to members of the general public (adult as well as children) are given here. It is hoped that the presently suggested values will be accepted by the Atomic Energy Regulatory Board and adopted by the BIS in the near future. (author). 14 refs., 2 tabs., 2 ills

  10. Development of standardized radioactive 46Sc solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Hongshan; Jia Zhang; Yu Yiguang; Sun Naiyao

    1988-01-01

    A method of preparation of standardized radioactive 46 Sc solution is developed. The separation of 46 Sc, the composition of 46 Sc solution and its stability, and radioactivity measurement of 46 Sc are systematically studied. The results obtained in the study and in the applications in many laboratories have shown that our method is effective and reliable

  11. Decommissioning standards: the radioactive waste impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, J.L.; Crofford, W.N.

    1979-01-01

    Several considerations are important in establishing standards for decommissioning nuclear facilities, sites and materials. The review includes discussions of some of these considerations and attempts to evaluate their relative importance. Items covered include the form of the standards, timing for decommissioning, occupational radiation protection, costs and financial provisions, and low-level radioactive waste. Decommissioning appears more closely related to radiation protection than to waste management, although it is often carried under waste management programs or activities. Basically, decommissioning is the removal of radioactive contamination from facilities, sites and materials so that they can be returned to unrestricted use or other actions designed to minimize radiation exposure of the public. It is the removed material that is the waste and, as such, it must be managed and disposed of in an environmentally safe manner. It is important to make this distinction even though, for programmatic purposes, decommissioning may be carried under waste management activities. It was concluded that the waste disposal problem from decommissioning activities is significant in that it may produce volumes comparable to volumes produced during the total operating life of a reactor. However, this volume does not appear to place an inordinate demand on shallow land burial capacity. It appears that the greater problems will be associated with occupational exposures and costs, both of which are sensitive to the timing of decommissioning actions

  12. Thermodynamic stability of radioactivity standard solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iroulard, M.G.

    2007-04-01

    The basic requirement when preparing radioactivity standard solutions is to guarantee the concentration of a radionuclide or a radioelement, expressed in the form of activity concentration (Ac = A/m (Bq/g), with A: activity and m: mass of solution). Knowledge of the law of radioactive decay and the half-life of a radionuclide or radioelement makes it possible to determine the activity concentration at any time, and this must be confirmed subsequently by measurement. Furthermore, when radioactivity standard solutions are prepared, it is necessary to establish optimal conditions of thermodynamic stability of the standard solutions. Radioactivity standard solutions are prepared by metrology laboratories from original solutions obtained from a range of suppliers. These radioactivity standard solutions must enable preparation of liquid and/or solid radioactivity standard sources of which measurement by different methods can determine, at a given instant, the activity concentration of the radionuclide or radioelement present in the solution. There are a number of constraints associated with the preparation of such sources. Here only those that relate to the physical and chemical properties of the standard solution are considered, and therefore need to be taken into account when preparing a radioactivity standard solution. These issues are considered in this document in accordance with the following plan: - A first part devoted to the chemical properties of the solutions: - the solubilization media: ultra-pure water and acid media, - the carriers: concentration, oxidation state of the radioactive element and the carrier element. - A second part describing the methodology of the preparation, packaging and storage of standard solutions: - glass ampoules: the structure of glasses, the mechanisms of their dissolution, the sorption phenomenon at the solid-solution interface, - quartz ampoules, - cleaning and packaging: cleaning solutions, internal surface coatings and

  13. Thermodynamic stability of radioactivity standard solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iroulard, M.G

    2007-04-15

    The basic requirement when preparing radioactivity standard solutions is to guarantee the concentration of a radionuclide or a radioelement, expressed in the form of activity concentration (Ac = A/m (Bq/g), with A: activity and m: mass of solution). Knowledge of the law of radioactive decay and the half-life of a radionuclide or radioelement makes it possible to determine the activity concentration at any time, and this must be confirmed subsequently by measurement. Furthermore, when radioactivity standard solutions are prepared, it is necessary to establish optimal conditions of thermodynamic stability of the standard solutions. Radioactivity standard solutions are prepared by metrology laboratories from original solutions obtained from a range of suppliers. These radioactivity standard solutions must enable preparation of liquid and/or solid radioactivity standard sources of which measurement by different methods can determine, at a given instant, the activity concentration of the radionuclide or radioelement present in the solution. There are a number of constraints associated with the preparation of such sources. Here only those that relate to the physical and chemical properties of the standard solution are considered, and therefore need to be taken into account when preparing a radioactivity standard solution. These issues are considered in this document in accordance with the following plan: - A first part devoted to the chemical properties of the solutions: - the solubilization media: ultra-pure water and acid media, - the carriers: concentration, oxidation state of the radioactive element and the carrier element. - A second part describing the methodology of the preparation, packaging and storage of standard solutions: - glass ampoules: the structure of glasses, the mechanisms of their dissolution, the sorption phenomenon at the solid-solution interface, - quartz ampoules, - cleaning and packaging: cleaning solutions, internal surface coatings and

  14. RADWASS update. Radioactive Waste Safety Standards Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delattre, D.

    2000-01-01

    By the late 1980s, the issue of radioactive wastes and their management was becoming increasingly politically important. The IAEA responded by establishing a high profile family of safety standards, the Radioactive Waste Safety Standards (RADWASS). By this means, the IAEA intended to draw attention to the fact that well-established procedures for the safe management of radioactive wastes already were in place. The programme was intended to establish an ordered structure for safety documents on waste management and to ensure comprehensive coverage of all relevant subject areas. RADWASS documents are categorized under four subject areas - discharges, predisposal, disposal, and environmental restoration. The programme is overseen through a formalized review and approval mechanism that was established in 1996 for all safety standards activities. The Waste Safety Standards Committee (WASSC) is a standing body of senior regulatory officials with technical expertise in radioactive waste safety. To date, three Safety Requirements and seven Safety Guides have been issued

  15. Handbook of radioactive medicine standard. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Now, the radioactive medicine standard has been instituted (the Ministry of Health and Welfare announcement No. 28, March 13, 1979) but this is the total revision of the old standard. While the radioactive medicines are used for the treatment of malignant tumors and others, the accuracy and fastness as the diagnostic medicines have been regarded as important. Recently, more safe and convenient medicines have appeared. Since these emit radiation, prudent consideration must be given to their handling. In order to make the properties and qualities of radioactive medicines appropriate, the standard is instituted for all of them based on the Drugs, Cosmetics and Medical Instruments Act. Since the medicines which do not accord with the standard cannot be produced, imported and sold according to the Act, the users must be familiar with the contents of the standard. The Ministry of Health and Welfare announcement No. 28 and the notice concerning it by the director of the Pharmaceutical and Supply Bureau to prefectural governors are reprinted. The standard comprises common rules, the general rules on medicine production, the provisions for individual medicines (94 kinds), 14 general testing methods, and the attached table showing the characteristics of 20 radioactive nuclides contained in the radioactive medicines described in this standard. (Kako, I.)

  16. Double standards with radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkinson, A.

    2002-01-01

    The author claims that whether it is short-lived waste from Commonwealth facilities, long-lived plutonium waste from an atomic bomb test site on Aboriginal land, or reactor waste from Lucas Heights, the Australian government applies double standards to suit its own agenda

  17. Dental Assisting Program Standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    This publication contains statewide standards for the dental assisting program in Georgia. The standards are divided into 12 categories: foundations (philosophy, purpose, goals, program objectives, availability, evaluation); admissions (admission requirements, provisional admission requirements, recruitment, evaluation and planning); program…

  18. Radioactive Waste Management Program Activities in Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matanic, R.

    2000-01-01

    The concept of radioactive waste management in Croatia comprises three major areas: management of low and intermediate level radioactive waste (LILRW), spent fuel management and decommissioning. All the work regarding radioactive waste management program is coordinated by Hazardous Waste Management Agency (APO) and Croatian Power Utility (HEP) in cooperation with other relevant institutions. Since the majority of work has been done in developing low and intermediate level radioactive waste management program, the paper will focus on this part of radioactive waste management, mainly on issues of site selection and characterization, repository design, safety assessment and public acceptance. A short description of national radioactive waste management infrastructure will also be presented. (author)

  19. Traceability system for radioactivity standards in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hino, Yoshio

    2000-01-01

    The electrotechnical laboratory (ETL) is the one of the largest national research institute, affiliated with the Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI). The ETL has a role to maintain the national standards of electricity, acoustics, visible light, ionizing radiation and radioactivity. The primary radioactivity standards have been established in ETL mainly with the 4πβ-γ coincidence method. The liquid scintillation counters and multi-wire proportional counters are also used for pure-beta and surface emission rate standards, respectively. As for the traceability, the primary standard sources are transferred to the Japan Radio Isotope Association (JRIA), and the JRIA measure these sources to calibrate their secondary standard equipments such as high pressurized 4π ionization chambers, high pore Ge and Nal (Tl) gamma spectrometers. The primary sources are also sent to the BIPM and neighboring countries for the intercomparisons to keep the consistency of the national standards. In this paper, these measurement techniques for the primary standardization and transfer system will be introduced, and some results of comparisons for certificate the traceability system will be described. (author)

  20. Standardization of {sup 32}P radioactive solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marques, Caio Pinheiros; Koskinas, Marina Fallone; Almeida, Jamille da Silveira; Yamazaki, Ione M.; Dias, Mauro da Silva, E-mail: cpmarques@usp.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    The standardization of {sup 32}P radioactive solution using three different methods is presented. The disintegration rate was determined by the CIEMAT/NIST and TDCR methods in liquid scintillator systems and self-absorption extrapolation method using 4π(PC)-β system. The results obtained for the activity of the {sup 32}P solution were compared and they agree within the experimental uncertainties. (author)

  1. National Bureau of Standards health physics radioactive material shipment survey, packaging, and labelling program under ICAO/IATA and DOT regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharp, D.R.; Slaback, L.A.

    1984-01-01

    NBS routinely ships many radionuclides in small to moderate activities, with many shipments containing mixtures of radionuclides in a variety of combinations. The ICAO/IATA shipping regulations (and the new DoT regulations on their model) specify individual shipping parameters for every radionuclide. As a result, quality control in the shipment of these radioactive packages has become difficult to maintain. The authors have developed a computer program that will guide a Health Physics technician through package surveys and give exact packaging and labelling instructions. The program is a 27 kilobyte user-friendly BASIC program that runs on an Epson-HX20 notebook computer with microcassette drive and 16 kilobyte memory expansion unit. This small computer is more manageable than the regulation books for which it will be substituted and will be used in routine radioactive shipments

  2. Determination of plutonium in highly radioactive liquid waste by spectrophotometry using neodymium as an internal standard for safeguards analysis. Japan support program for agency safeguards (JASPAS) JC-19

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taguchi, Shigeo; Surugaya, Naoki; Sato, Soichi; Kurosawa, Akira; Watahiki, Masaru; Hiyama, Toshiaki

    2006-06-01

    A spectrophotometric determination using neodymium as an internal standard was developed for safeguards verification analysis of plutonium in highly radioactive liquid waste which is produced by the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. The internal standard is used as a means to analyze plutonium and also to authenticate the instrument conditions. The method offers reduced sample preparation and analysis time compared to isotope dilution mass spectrometry. The sample was mixed with a known amount of internal standard. Subsequently, plutonium was quantitatively oxidized to Pu(VI) by the addition of Ce(IV) for spectrophotometry. Plutonium concentration was calculated from a relation between Nd(III)/Pu(VI) molar extinction coefficient ratio and their absorbance ratio. The relative expanded uncertainty of the repeated analysis (n=5) was 8.9% (coverage factor k=2) for a highly radioactive liquid waste sample (173 mg L -1 ). The determination limit was 6 mg L -1 (ten fold's the standard deviation). This method was validated through comparison experiments with isotope dilution mass spectrometry. The analytical results of plutonium in highly radioactive liquid waste using this method were agree well with values obtained using isotope dilution mass spectrometry. The proposed method can be applied to independent on-site safeguards analysis at the Tokai Reprocessing Plant. (author)

  3. Standard guide for sampling radioactive tank waste

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 This guide addresses techniques used to obtain grab samples from tanks containing high-level radioactive waste created during the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels. Guidance on selecting appropriate sampling devices for waste covered by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) is also provided by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (1). Vapor sampling of the head-space is not included in this guide because it does not significantly affect slurry retrieval, pipeline transport, plugging, or mixing. 1.2 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  4. Croatian radioactive waste management program: Current status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matanic, R.; Lebegner, J.

    2001-01-01

    Croatia has a responsibility to develop a radioactive waste management program partly due to co-ownership of Krsko nuclear power plant (Slovenia) and partly because of its own medical and industrial radioactive waste. The total amount of generated radioactive waste in Croatia is stored in temporary storages located at two national research institutes, while radioactive waste from Krsko remains in temporary storage on site. National power utility Hrvatska Elektroprivreda (HEP) and Hazardous Waste Management Agency (APO) coordinate the work regarding decommissioning, spent fuel management and low and intermediate level radioactive waste (LILRW) management in Croatia. Since the majority of work has been done in developing the LILRW management program, the paper focuses on this part of radioactive waste management. Issues of site selection, repository design, safety assessment and public acceptance are being discussed. A short description of the national radioactive waste management infrastructure has also been presented. (author)

  5. Civilian radioactive waste management program plan. Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    This revision of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program Plan describes the objectives of the Civilian Radioactive Waste management Program (Program) as prescribed by legislative mandate, and the technical achievements, schedule, and costs planned to complete these objectives. The Plan provides Program participants and stakeholders with an updated description of Program activities and milestones for fiscal years (FY) 1998 to 2003. It describes the steps the Program will undertake to provide a viability assessment of the Yucca Mountain site in 1998; prepare the Secretary of Energy`s site recommendation to the President in 2001, if the site is found to be suitable for development as a repository; and submit a license application to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in 2002 for authorization to construct a repository. The Program`s ultimate challenge is to provide adequate assurance to society that an operating geologic repository at a specific site meets the required standards of safety. Chapter 1 describes the Program`s mission and vision, and summarizes the Program`s broad strategic objectives. Chapter 2 describes the Program`s approach to transform strategic objectives, strategies, and success measures to specific Program activities and milestones. Chapter 3 describes the activities and milestones currently projected by the Program for the next five years for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project; the Waste Acceptance, Storage and Transportation Project; ad the Program Management Center. The appendices present information on the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, as amended, and the Energy Policy Act of 1992; the history of the Program; the Program`s organization chart; the Commission`s regulations, Disposal of High-Level Radioactive Wastes in geologic Repositories; and a glossary of terms.

  6. Radioactive standards type EK. Radioaktivni etalony EK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-01-01

    The standard gives the terminology and data on accuracy, properties, uses and technical parameters of EK type standards with radionuclides /sup 3/H and /sup 14/C. Also given are conditions for testing, packing, transportation and storage.

  7. The standard for program management

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    The Standard for Program Management – Fourth Edition differs from prior editions by focusing on the principles of good program management. Program activities have been realigned to program lifecycle phases rather than topics, and the first section was expanded to address the key roles of program manager, program sponsor and program management office. It has also been updated to better align with PMI’s Governance of Portfolios, Programs, and Projects: A Practice Guide.

  8. Civilian radioactive waste management program plan. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-07-01

    This revision of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program Plan describes the objectives of the Civilian Radioactive Waste management Program (Program) as prescribed by legislative mandate, and the technical achievements, schedule, and costs planned to complete these objectives. The Plan provides Program participants and stakeholders with an updated description of Program activities and milestones for fiscal years (FY) 1998 to 2003. It describes the steps the Program will undertake to provide a viability assessment of the Yucca Mountain site in 1998; prepare the Secretary of Energy's site recommendation to the President in 2001, if the site is found to be suitable for development as a repository; and submit a license application to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in 2002 for authorization to construct a repository. The Program's ultimate challenge is to provide adequate assurance to society that an operating geologic repository at a specific site meets the required standards of safety. Chapter 1 describes the Program's mission and vision, and summarizes the Program's broad strategic objectives. Chapter 2 describes the Program's approach to transform strategic objectives, strategies, and success measures to specific Program activities and milestones. Chapter 3 describes the activities and milestones currently projected by the Program for the next five years for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project; the Waste Acceptance, Storage and Transportation Project; ad the Program Management Center. The appendices present information on the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, as amended, and the Energy Policy Act of 1992; the history of the Program; the Program's organization chart; the Commission's regulations, Disposal of High-Level Radioactive Wastes in geologic Repositories; and a glossary of terms

  9. Spanish program on disposal of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Perez, B.; Ramos Salvador, L.; Martines Martinez, A.

    1977-01-01

    The Spanish Energetic Program assumes an installed nuclear electrical power of 23.000 MWe by the year 1985. Therefore, Spain is making an effort in the managment of radioactive wastes, that can be synthesized in the following points: 1.- Make-up and review of the regulation on the management of radioactive wastes. 2.- Development of the processes and equipment for the treatment of solid, liquid and gaseous wastes from the CNEN ''Juan Vigon'', as well as those from the Nuclear Center of Soria. Solidification studies of RAA wastes arisen from the reprocessing. 3.- Evaluation of radioactive waste treatment systems of the new installed nuclear power plants. Assistance to the nuclear and radioactive facilities operators. 4.- Increase the storage capacity of the pilot repository for solid radioactive wastes of categories 1 and 2 IAEA, located in Sierra Albarrana. Studies of adequate geological formation for storage of solid wastes of IAEA categories 3 and 4. 5.- Studies about long term surface storage systems for solidified RAA wastes arisen from the reprocessing [es

  10. EM type radioactive standards. Radioaktivni etalony EM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-01-01

    The standard contains technical specifications and conditions of production, testing, packing, transport and storage of EM type planar calibration standards containing radionuclides /sup 14/C, /sup 60/Co, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 137/Cs, /sup 147/Pm, /sup 204/Tl, /sup 239/Pu, /sup 241/Am and natural U. The terminology is explained, the related Czechoslovak standards and legal prescriptions given and amendments to these prescriptions presented.

  11. Determination of standards for transportation of radioactive material by aircrafts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    These provisions are established on the basis of the Enforcement Regulation for the Law on Aviation. Terms are explained, such as exclusive loading and containers. Spontaneously ignitable liquid radioactive materials and the radioactive substances required to be contained in special vessels and others particularly operated during the transport, are excluded from the radioactive materials permissible for transport. The radioactive substances required to be transported as radioactive loadings don't include empty vessels used to contain radioactive materials and other things contaminated by such materials, when they conform to the prescriptions. The technical standards on radioactive loadings are defined, such as maximum radiation dose rate of 0.5 millirem per hour on the surface of L type loadings, 200 millirem per hour for A, and 1000 millirem per hour at the distance of 1 m for BM and BU types, respectively. Confirmation of the safeness of radioactive loadings may be made through the written documents prepared by the competent persons acknowledged by the Minister of Transport. The requisite of fissile loadings is that such loadings shall not reach critical state during the transport in the specified cases. Radioactive loadings or the containers with such loadings shall be loaded so that the safeness of such loadings is not injured by movement, overturn and fall during the transport. The maximum radiation dose rate of the containers with radioactive loadings shall not be more than 200 millirem per hour on the surface. The written documents describing the handling method and other matters for attention and the measures to be taken on accidents shall be carried with for the transport of radioactive loadings. (Okada, K.)

  12. Plasma vitrification program for radioactive waste treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hung, Tsungmin; Tzeng, Chinchin; Kuo, Pingchun

    1998-01-01

    In order to treat radioactive wastes effectively and solve storage problems, INER has developed the plasma arc technology and plasma process for various waste forms for several years. The plasma vitrification program is commenced via different developing stages through nine years. It includes (a) development of non-transferred DC plasma torch, (b) establishment of a lab-scale plasma system with home-made 100kW non-transferred DC plasma torch, (c) testing of plasma vitrification of simulated radioactive wastes, (d) establishment of a transferred DC plasma torch delivering output power more than 800 kW, (e) study of NOx reduction process for the plasma furnace, (f) development of a pilot-scale plasma melting furnace to verify the vitrification process, and (g) constructing a plasma furnace facility in INER. The final goal of the program is to establish a plasma processing plant with capacity of 250 kg/hr to treat the low-level radioactive wastes generated from INER itself and domestic institutes due to isotope applications. (author)

  13. Establishment and application of standard devices for radioactivity measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Changgui; Li Xingyuan; Chen Zigen

    1991-03-01

    In order to establish the radioactivity measurement standards a 4πβ-γ coincidence apparatus and a 4πγ ionization chamber have been installed in the laboratory. The 4πβ-γ coincidence apparatus is for absolute measurement, and its uncertainty is ±(0.3∼5)%. The 4πγ ionization chamber is for working standard, and its uncertainty is ±(1∼5)%. The combination of these devices can meet the quality requirements controlled by National Verification System in the transfer of radioactivity values

  14. Radioactive material package test standards and performance requirements - public perception

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pope, R.B.; Shappert, L.B.; Rawl, R.R.

    1992-01-01

    This paper addresses issues related to the public perception of the regulatory test standards and performance requirements for packaging and transporting radioactive material. Specifically, it addresses the adequacy of the package performance standards and testing for Type B packages, which are those packages designed for transporting the most hazardous quantities and forms of radioactive material. Type B packages are designed to withstand accident conditions in transport. To improve public perception, the public needs to better understand: (a) the regulatory standards and requirements themselves, (b) the extensive history underlying their development, and (c) the soundness of the technical foundation. The public needs to be fully informed on studies, tests, and analyses that have been carried out worldwide and form the basis of the regulatory standards and requirements. This paper provides specific information aimed at improving the public perception of packages test standards

  15. Radioactive standards and calibration methods for contamination monitoring instruments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Makoto [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-06-01

    Contamination monitoring in the facilities for handling unsealed radioactive materials is one of the most important procedures for radiation protection as well as radiation dose monitoring. For implementation of the proper contamination monitoring, radiation measuring instruments should not only be suitable to the purpose of monitoring, but also be well calibrated for the objective qualities of measurement. In the calibration of contamination monitoring instruments, quality reference activities need to be used. They are supplied in different such as extended sources, radioactive solutions or radioactive gases. These reference activities must be traceable to the national standards or equivalent standards. On the other hand, the appropriate calibration methods must be applied for each type of contamination monitoring instruments. In this paper, the concepts of calibration for contamination monitoring instruments, reference sources, determination methods of reference quantities and practical calibration methods of contamination monitoring instruments, including the procedures carried out in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute and some relevant experimental data. (G.K.)

  16. Environmental Assessment Radioactive Source Recovery Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    In a response to potential risks to public health and safety, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is evaluating the recovery of sealed neutron sources under the Radioactive Source Recovery Program (RSRP). This proposed program would enhance the DOE's and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) joint capabilities in the safe management of commercially held radioactive source materials. Currently there are no federal or commercial options for the recovery, storage, or disposal of sealed neutron sources. This Environmental Assessment (EA) analyzes the potential environmental impacts that would be expected to occur if the DOE were to implement a program for the receipt and recovery at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, New Mexico, of unwanted and excess plutonium-beryllium ( 238 Pu-Be) and americium-beryllium ( 241 Am-Be) sealed neutron sources. About 1 kg (2.2 lb) plutonium and 3 kg (6.6 lb) americium would be recovered over a 15-year project. Personnel at LANL would receive neutron sources from companies, universities, source brokers, and government agencies across the country. These neutron sources would be temporarily stored in floor holes at the CMR Hot Cell Facility. Recovery reduces the neutron emissions from the source material and refers to a process by which: (1) the stainless steel cladding is removed from the neutron source material, (2) the mixture of the radioactive material (Pu-238 or Am-241) and beryllium that constitutes the neutron source material is chemically separated (recovered), and (3) the recovered Pu-238 or Am-241 is converted to an oxide form ( 238 PuO 2 or 241 AmO 2 ). The proposed action would include placing the 238 PuO 2 or 241 AmO 2 in interim storage in a special nuclear material vault at the LANL Plutonium Facility

  17. Conservation Law Enforcement Program Standardization

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rogers, Stan

    2004-01-01

    The ultimate goal of standardization is to develop a safe and effective program that is recognized within the USAF, DoD, and by other Federal and state law enforcement agencies, and the general public...

  18. Implementing necessary and sufficient standards for radioactive waste management at LLNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sims, J.M.; Ladran, A.; Hoyt, D.

    1995-01-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the U.S. Department of Energy, Oakland Field Office (DOE/OAK), are participating in a pilot program to evaluate the process to develop necessary and sufficient sets of standards for contractor activities. This concept of contractor and DOE jointly and locally deciding on what constitutes the set of standards that are necessary and sufficient to perform work safely and in compliance with federal, state, and local regulations, grew out of DOE's Department Standards Committee (Criteria for the Department's Standards Program, August 1994, DOE/EH/-0416). We have chosen radioactive waste management activities as the pilot program at LLNL. This pilot includes low-level radioactive waste, transuranic (TRU) waste, and the radioactive component of low-level and TRU mixed wastes. Guidance for the development and implementation of the necessary and sufficient set of standards is provided in open-quotes The Department of Energy Closure Process for Necessary and Sufficient Sets of Standards,close quotes March 27, 1995 (draft)

  19. Reactive Programming in Standard ML

    OpenAIRE

    Pucella, Riccardo

    2004-01-01

    Reactive systems are systems that maintain an ongoing interaction with their environment, activated by receiving input events from the environment and producing output events in response. Modern programming languages designed to program such systems use a paradigm based on the notions of instants and activations. We describe a library for Standard ML that provides basic primitives for programming reactive systems. The library is a low-level system upon which more sophisticated reactive behavi...

  20. Annual radioactive waste tank inspection program -- 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNatt, F.G. Sr.

    1994-05-01

    Aqueous radioactive wastes from Savannah River Site (SRS) separations processes are contained in large underground carbon steel tanks. Inspections made during 1993 to evaluate these vessels, and evaluations based on data accrued by inspections made since the tanks were constructed, are the subject of this report. The 1993 inspection program revealed that the condition of the Savannah River Site waste tanks had not changed significantly from that reported in the previous annual report. No new leaksites were observed. No evidence of corrosion or materials degradation was observed in the waste tanks. However, degradation was observed on covers of the concrete encasements for the out-of-service transfer lines to Tanks 1 through 8

  1. INEEL Radioactive Liquid Waste Reduction Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millet, C.B.; Tripp, J.L.; Archibald, K.E.; Lauerhauss, L.; Argyle, M.D.; Demmer, R.L.

    1999-01-01

    Reduction of radioactive liquid waste, much of which is Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) listed, is a high priority at the Idaho National Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC). Major strides in the past five years have lead to significant decreases in generation and subsequent reduction in the overall cost of treatment of these wastes. In 1992, the INTEC, which is part of the Idaho National Environmental and Engineering Laboratory (INEEL), began a program to reduce the generation of radioactive liquid waste (both hazardous and non-hazardous). As part of this program, a Waste Minimization Plan was developed that detailed the various contributing waste streams, and identified methods to eliminate or reduce these waste streams. Reduction goals, which will reduce expected waste generation by 43%, were set for five years as part of this plan. The approval of the plan led to a Waste Minimization Incentive being put in place between the Department of Energy Idaho Office (DOE-ID) and the INEEL operating contractor, Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company (LMITCO). This incentive is worth $5 million dollars from FY-98 through FY-02 if the waste reduction goals are met. In addition, a second plan was prepared to show a path forward to either totally eliminate all radioactive liquid waste generation at INTEC by 2005 or find alternative waste treatment paths. Historically, this waste has been sent to an evaporator system with the bottoms sent to the INTEC Tank Farm. However, this Tank Farm is not RCRA permitted for mixed wastes and a Notice of Non-compliance Consent Order gives dates of 2003 and 2012 for removal of this waste from these tanks. Therefore, alternative treatments are needed for the waste streams. This plan investigated waste elimination opportunities as well as treatment alternatives. The alternatives, and the criteria for ranking these alternatives, were identified through Value Engineering meetings with all of the waste generators. The most

  2. National Syrian Program for Radioactive Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Othman, I.; Takriti, S.

    2009-06-01

    A national plan for radioactive waste management has been presented. It includes identifying, transport, recording, classifying, processing and disposal. It is an important reference for radioactive waste management for those dealing with radioactive waste, and presents a complete protection to environemnt and people. (author)

  3. DOE reassesses civilian radioactive waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yates, M.

    1990-01-01

    This article reports on the announcement by the Department of Energy (DOE) that the opening of a high-level radioactive nuclear waste repository site will be delayed for seven years. The article discusses DOE's reassessment plan, the restructuring of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, site access and evaluation, the Monitored Retrievable Storage Commission proposal, and the industry's response

  4. Management of radioactive fuel wastes: the Canadian disposal program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulton, J.

    1978-10-01

    This report describes the research and development program to verify and demonstrate the concepts for the safe, permanent disposal of radioactive fuel wastes from Canadian nuclear reactors. The program is concentrating on deep underground disposal in hard-rock formations. The nature of the radioactive wastes is described, and the options for storing, processing, packaging and disposing of them are outlined. The program to verify the proposed concept, select a suitable site and to build and operate a demonstration facility is described. (author)

  5. Determination of quality standard of cemented radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johan, B.

    1997-01-01

    The standard determination of cemented low activity radioactive waste has been carried out. This study was intended to find the quality of immobilized product as a guaranty to the public and the environmental safety. As preliminary study, there parameters type have been studied i.e, the density, compressive strength and the leaching rate. By adopted the formulations of advanced country and field data, it can be concluded that the cementation waste should have the density, p, between 1.70 and 2.50 g.cm - 3, the compressive strength, S, between 20 and 50 N.mm - 2, the leaching rates R n between 1.70 x 10 - 2 and 2.50 x 10 - 3 g.cm - 2.day - 1 and after 150 days leaching time the leaching rate R n - 3 g.cm - 2.day - 1. This study is expected to be used to propose the Indonesian National Standard (INS) (author)

  6. Educational support programs: Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, R.C.

    1989-01-01

    The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) currently sponsors two educationally related programs: the Radioactive Waste Management Fellowship Program and the Radioactive Waste Management Research Program for Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU). The graduate fellowship program was implemented in 1985 to meet the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) expected manpower needs for trained scientists and engineers to assist in carrying out the activities of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act. It is recognized that a shortage of master's and doctoral level scientists and engineers in disciplines supportive of the nation's high-level radioactive waste management (RWM) program may impede the DOE's ability to properly carry out its mission under the act. The fellowship program encourages talented undergraduate students to enter graduate programs designed to educate and train them in fields directly related to RWM. The program supports graduate students in various disciplines, including nuclear science and engineering, health physics, and certain area of geology and chemical engineering. It also encourages universities to support and improve research activities and academic programs related to the management of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste

  7. Data Processing and Programming Applied to an Environmental Radioactivity Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trinidad, J. A.; Gasco, C.; Palacios, M. A.

    2009-01-01

    This report is the original research work presented for the attainment of the author master degree and its main objective has been the resolution -by means of friendly programming- of some of the observed problems in the environmental radioactivity laboratory belonging to the Department of Radiological Surveillance and Environmental Radioactivity from CIEMAT. The software has been developed in Visual Basic for applications in Excel files and it solves by macro orders three of the detected problems: a) calculation of characteristic limits for the measurements of the beta total and beta rest activity concentrations according to standards MARLAP, ISO and UNE and the comparison of the three results b) Pb-210 and Po-210 decontamination factor determination in the ultra-low level Am-241 analysis in air samples by alpha spectrometry and c) comparison of two analytical techniques for measuring Pb-210 in air ( direct-by gamma spectrometry- and indirect -by radiochemical separation and alpha spectrometry). The organization processes of the different excel files implied in the subroutines, calculations and required formulae are explained graphically for its comprehension. The advantage of using this kind of programmes is based on their versatility and the ease for obtaining data that lately are required by tables that can be modified as time goes by and the laboratory gets more data with the special applications for describing a method (Pb-210 decontamination factors for americium analysis in air) or comparing temporal series of Pb-210 data analysed by different methods (Pb-210 in air). (Author)

  8. Experience with local lymph node assay performance standards using standard radioactivity and nonradioactive cell count measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basketter, David; Kolle, Susanne N; Schrage, Arnhild; Honarvar, Naveed; Gamer, Armin O; van Ravenzwaay, Bennard; Landsiedel, Robert

    2012-08-01

    The local lymph node assay (LLNA) is the preferred test for identification of skin-sensitizing substances by measuring radioactive thymidine incorporation into the lymph node. To facilitate acceptance of nonradioactive variants, validation authorities have published harmonized minimum performance standards (PS) that the alternative endpoint assay must meet. In the present work, these standards were applied to a variant of the LLNA based on lymph node cell counts (LNCC) run in parallel as a control with the standard LLNA with radioactivity measurements, with threshold concentrations (EC3) being determined for the sensitizers. Of the 22 PS chemicals tested in this study, 21 yielded the same results from standard radioactivity and cell count measurements; only 2-mercaptobenzothiazole was positive by LLNA but negative by LNCC. Of the 16 PS positives, 15 were positive by LLNA and 14 by LNCC; methylmethacrylate was not identified as sensitizer by either of the measurements. Two of the six PS negatives tested negative in our study by both LLNA and LNCC. Of the four PS negatives which were positive in our study, chlorobenzene and methyl salicylate were tested at higher concentrations than the published PS, whereas the corresponding concentrations resulted in consistent negative results. Methylmethacrylate and nickel chloride tested positive within the concentration range used for the published PS. The results indicate cell counts and radioactive measurements are in good accordance within the same LLNA using the 22 PS test substances. Comparisons with the published PS results may, however, require balanced analysis rather than a simple checklist approach. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Annual radioactive waste tank inspection program: 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNatt, F.G. Sr.

    1996-01-01

    Aqueous radioactive wastes from Savannah River Site (SRS) separations processes are contained in large underground carbon steel tanks. Inspections made during 1995 to evaluate these vessels and evaluations based on data accrued by inspections performed since the tanks were constructed are the subject of this report

  10. Annual radioactive waste tank inspection program - 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, C.J.

    2000-01-01

    Aqueous radioactive wastes from Savannah River Site (SRS) separations processes are contained in large underground carbon steel tanks. Inspections made during 1999 to evaluate these vessels and auxiliary appurtenances along with evaluations based on data accrued by inspections performed since the tanks were constructed are the subject of this report

  11. Annual radioactive waste tank inspection program - 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNatt, F.G.

    1992-01-01

    Aqueous radioactive wastes from Savannah River Site (SRS) separations processes are contained in large underground carbon steel tanks. Inspections made during 1992 to evaluate these vessels and evaluations based on data accrued by inspections made since the tanks were constructed are the subject of this report

  12. Annual radioactive waste tank inspection program - 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNatt, F.G.

    1992-01-01

    Aqueous radioactive wastes from Savannah River Site (SRS) separations processes are contained in large underground carbon steel tanks. Inspections made during 1991 to evaluate these vessels and evaluations based on data accrued by inspections made since the tanks were constructed are the subject of this report

  13. Implementation of a management applied program for solid radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y. H.; Kim, T. K.; Kang, I. S.; Cho, H. S.; Son, J. S. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    Solid radioactive wastes are generated from the Post-irradiated Fuel Examination Facility, the Irradiated Material Examination Facility, the Research Reactor, and the laboratories at KAERI. A data collection of a solid radioactive waste treatment process of a research organization became necessary while developing the RAWMIS(Radioactive Waste Management Integration System) which it can generate personal history management for efficient management of a waste, documents, all kinds of statistics. This paper introduces an input and output application program design to do to database with data in the results and a stream process of a treatment that analyzed the waste occurrence present situation and data by treatment process. Data on the actual treatment process that is not limited experiment improve by a document, human traces, saving of material resources and improve with efficiency of tracking about a radioactive waste and a process and give help to radioactive waste material balance and inventory study.

  14. Developing an ANSI [American National Standards Institute] standard for semitrailers used to transport radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregory, P.

    1990-01-01

    A proposed new American National Standards Institute (ANSI) standard has been prepared which establishes requirements for the design, fabrication, and maintenance of semitrailers used in the highway transport of weight-concentrated radioactive loads. A weight-concentrated load is any payload which exceeds 1,488 kilograms per lineal meter (1,000 lb/ft) over any portion of the semitrailer. The proposed standard also provides detailed procedures for in-service inspections, as well as requirements for testing and quality assurance. The standard addresses only semitrailers, excluding the tractor. Trailers already in service may be certified as complying with the standard if they meet the requirements of the standard. This standard is intended to provide guidance and acceptance criteria needed to establish a uniform minimum level of performance for the designer, manufacturer, owner, operator, and shipper. This standard is not intended to apply to special, non-routine shipments of a one-time or occasional nature which require special permitting. The background and history of the standard are traced and a summary discussion of the standard is provided in this article

  15. Existing and future international standards for the safety of radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linsley, G.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper the essential features of the current international safety standards are summarised and the issues being raised for inclusion in future standards are discussed. The safety standards of the IAEA are used as the basis for the review and discussion. The IAEA has established a process for establishing international standards of safety for radioactive waste management through its Radioactive Waste Safety Standards (RADWASS) programme. The RADWASS documents are approved by a comprehensive process involving regulatory and other experts from all concerned IAEA Member States. A system of committees for approving the IAEAs safety standards has been established. For radioactive waste safety the committee for review and approval is the Waste Safety Standards Advisory Committee (WASSAC). In 1995 the IAEA published 'The Principles of Radioactive Waste Management' as the top level document in the RADWASS programme. The report sets out the basis principles which most experts believe are fundamental to the safe management of radioactive wastes

  16. Standards for Adult Education ESL Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    TESOL Press, 2013

    2013-01-01

    What are the components of a quality education ESL program? TESOL's "Standards for Adult Education ESL Programs" answers this question by defining quality components from a national perspective. Using program indicators in eight distinct areas, the standards can be used to review an existing program or as a guide in setting up a new…

  17. A study of production of radioactive environmental reference materials used for proficiency testing program in Taiwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, En-Chi; Wang, Jeng-Jong

    2013-01-01

    To realise radioactive environmental reference materials in Taiwan, seven environmental materials of soil, water, vegetation, meat, airborne particles (filter paper), milk and mushroom samples that are frequently encountered were used to establish the preparation of the reference materials. These seven environmental materials were collected, checked for freedom from radioactivity and prepared according to their properties. The preparation was carried out by using activity about 10–100 times that of the minimum detectable activity (MDA) in routine measurements in the radioactive standard used to spike the inactive material and this standard is traceable to national ionising radioactivity standards (TAF, 2004). To demonstrate sample traceability to the added standard, each sample was carefully measured and its uncertainty evaluated. Based on the recommendations of ISO Guide 35 for evaluation of reference materials and with the above assessment and verification procedures, the uncertainties (k=1) of the spike activity used in making reference materials were: 60 Co≤4.6%, 134 Cs≤4.7%, 137 Cs≤5.0%, total β≤0.6% and 3 H≤1.3%. - Highlights: • Seven kinds environmental materials were used to establish the production of the RMs. • Spiking the traceable standard radioactive source to the blank substance. • Each sample was carefully evaluated for its uncertainty. • The performance of the RMs was estimated with the Proficiency Testing program report. • The ability of the environment RMs in the configuration is quite good

  18. Management program on radioactive wastes in research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xavier, Ana Maria; Wieland, Patricia; Heilbron Filho, Paulo Fernando L.; Ferreira, Rubemar de Souza

    1998-01-01

    This document has the objective to orient and advise the researchers to practice a safety management of radioactive wastes in each research laboratory, based upon the technical norms of the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission and the recommendations of the International Atomic Energy Agency. Additionally, basic information on the main radioisotopes used in research are presented, including the processes used for production of radioisotopes, methods for radiation detection, range of alpha and beta particles, background radiation, as well as principles on radioprotection and biological effects of radiation

  19. Research program on radioactive wastes - Overview report 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brander, S.

    2013-01-01

    This short report issued by the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) takes a look at the work done within the framework of the Swiss Research Program on Radioactive Wastes. The program was developed in 2006/2007 by the various federal institutes and commissions involved together with an university of applied sciences. Points investigated included long-term aspects, the planning of deep repositories, opinion building and acceptance as well as depository concepts. Highlights in the research and development areas are discussed, including knowledge conservation, marking concepts, storage of radioactive wastes, repository conception, monitoring and sociological aspects. National and international co-operation in these areas are reported on

  20. Commercial radioactive waste minimization program development guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, D.K.

    1991-01-01

    This document is one of two prepared by the EG ampersand G Idaho, Inc., Waste Management Technical Support Program Group, National Low-Level Waste Management Program Unit. One of several Department of Energy responsibilities stated in the Amendments Act of 1985 is to provide technical assistance to compact regions Host States, and nonmember States (to the extent provided in appropriations acts) in establishing waste minimization program plans. Technical assistance includes, among other things, the development of technical guidelines for volume reduction options. Pursuant to this defined responsibility, the Department of Energy (through EG ampersand G Idaho, Inc.) has prepared this report, which includes guidance on defining a program, State/compact commission participation, and waste minimization program plans

  1. Standards for School Guidance Programs in Maryland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maryland State Dept. of Education, Baltimore. Div. of Compensatory, Urban, and Supplementary Programs.

    This brochure is a checklist to rate school compliance with the standards for school guidance programs in Maryland, which were developed by the Maryland State Department of Education. The first set of standards addresses the philosophy and goals of school guidance programs in Maryland and the extent to which program goals and objectives are…

  2. Program planning for future improvement in managing ORNL's radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    This report is intended to serve as a reference document and guide in developing the long-term improvements section of ORNL's radioactive waste management plan. The report reviews ORNL's operations and future program needs in terms of currently applicable DOE regulations and also in terms of regulations and accepted practices of the commerical sector of the nuclear power industry so that the impact of potential future adoption of these regulations and standards on ORNL's operations can be fully evaluated. The principal conclusion reached after reviewing ORNL's waste management operations is that these operations are currently being conducted in a manner that does not endanger the health or safety of workers or the general public and that does not have an adverse effect on the environment. Although nineteen specific problem areas have been identified all of these problems can be attributed to one of the following: a) the legacy of past practices; b) gradual deterioration of systems which have reached (or are near to reaching) the end of their reasonable design lives; and c) potential changes in regulations applicable to ORNL. All of the programs designed to improve or correct these problem areas could be accomplished within a four year period. However, given current limitations on manpower and capital, these programs would more likely be spread out over a five to ten year period of time if they were all to be undertaken. The cost of undertaking all of these projects concurrently is estimated to be between 60 and 100 million dollars. Due to the many unknowns and uncertainties associated with the problem areas, actual total costs for specific projects could vary from those presented in this report by as much as 300 percent

  3. Quality assurance program description for shipping packages of radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    This quality assurance plan describes the quality assurance program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), for shipping packages of radioactive material. The purpose of this report is to describe how PNL will comply with the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Part 71, Appendix E. In compliance with the instructions from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the 18 criteria from Appendix E are covered

  4. Management plan for the Nuclear Standards Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-11-01

    This Management Plan was prepared to describe the manner in which Oak Ridge National Laboratory will provide technical management of the Nuclear Standards Program. The organizational structure that has been established within ORNL for this function is the Nuclear Standards Management Center, which includes the Nuclear Standards Office (NSO) already in existence at ORNL. This plan is intended to support the policies and practices for the development and application of technical standards in ETN projects, programs, and technology developments as set forth in a standards policy memorandum from the DOE Program Director for Nuclear Energy

  5. PROGER - Management program for radioactive wastes in research institutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Rubemar S.; Costa, Maria Regina Ferro; Ramos Junior, Anthenor C.; Esposito, Irapoan; Vaz, Solange dos Reis e; Pontedeiro, Elizabeth May; Gomes, Carlos de Almeida

    1997-01-01

    This article demonstrates the feasibility of a program, denominated PROGER, and aimed at the improvement of radioactive waste management activities in research institutions in Brazil. This program involves implementation, correction and updating of waste management techniques in those institutions that already possess a waste management system or its full set-up for the institutions where it is non-existent. Partial results are presented, concerning characteristics and quantities of wastes, and the methodology utilized by PROGER discussed

  6. Standards for maintenance documentation of COSMOS programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burstall, R.F.; Rickets, T.M.; Butland, A.T.D.

    1982-06-01

    The Compatible Open Shop Modular Operating Scheme (COSMOS) is used for fast reactor neutronics and subassembly distortion calculations in the UK. It provides database and databank facilities for this purpose. A large number of applications programs use these facilities. This report sets down the standards agreed for use in the preparation of maintenance documents for these programs. These standards have been developed as the result of experience with earlier more complicated standards. Some of the terminology used in this report is particular to COSMOS, but the general features of the standard may be useful to those responsible for other computer programs. (author)

  7. Standards and guidelines pertinent to the development of decommissioning criteria for sites contaminated with radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickson, H.W.

    1978-08-01

    A review of existing health and safety standards and guidelines has been undertaken to assist in the development of criteria for the decontamination and decommissioning of property contaminated with radioactive material. During the early years of development of the nuclear program in the United States, a number of sites were used which became contaminated with radioactive material. Many of these sites are no longer useful for nuclear activities, and the U.S. DOE desires to develop criteria for the management of these sites for future uses. Radiation protection standards promulgated by ICRP, NCRP, and ANSI have been considered. Government regulations, from the Code of Federal Regulations and the legal codes of various states, as well as regulatory guidelines with specific application to decommissioning of nuclear facilities also have been reviewed. In addition, recommendations of other scientific organizations such as the National Academy of Sciences/National Research Council Advisory Committee on the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiations and the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation were considered. Finally, a few specific recommendations and discussions from current literature were included. 28 references

  8. Preliminary Calculation of the Indicators of Sustainable Development for National Radioactive Waste Management Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheong, Jae Hak; Park, Won Jae

    2003-01-01

    As a follow up to the Agenda 21's policy statement for safe management of radioactive waste adopted at Rio Conference held in 1992, the UN invited the IAEA to develop and implement indicators of sustainable development for the management of radioactive waste. The IAEA finalized the indicators in 2002, and is planning to calculate the member states' values of indicators in connection with operation of its Net-Enabled Waste Management Database system. In this paper, the basis for introducing the indicators into the radioactive waste management was analyzed, and calculation methodology and standard assessment procedure were simply depicted. In addition, a series of innate limitations in calculation and comparison of the indicators was analyzed. According to the proposed standard procedure, the indicators for a few major countries including Korea were calculated and compared, by use of each country's radioactive waste management framework and its practices. In addition, a series of measures increasing the values of the indicators was derived so as to enhance the sustainability of domestic radioactive waste management program.

  9. Solid, low-level radioactive waste certification program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grams, W.H.

    1991-11-01

    The Hanford Site solid waste treatment, storage, and disposal facilities accept solid, low-level radioactive waste from onsite and offsite generators. This manual defines the certification program that is used to provide assurance that the waste meets the Hanford Site waste acceptance criteria. Specifically, this program defines the participation and responsibilities of Westinghouse Hanford Company Solid Waste Engineering Support, Westinghouse Hanford Company Quality Assurance, and both onsite and offsite waste generators. It is intended that waste generators use this document to develop certification plans and quality assurance program plans. This document is also intended for use by Westinghouse Hanford Company solid waste technical staff involved in providing assurance that generators have implemented a waste certification program. This assurance involves review and approval of generator certification plans, and review of generator's quality assurance program plans to ensure that they address all applicable requirements. The document also details the Westinghouse Hanford Company Waste Management Audit and Surveillance Program. 5 refs

  10. DCHAIN: A user-friendly computer program for radioactive decay and reaction chain calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    East, L.V.

    1994-05-01

    A computer program for calculating the time-dependent daughter populations in radioactive decay and nuclear reaction chains is described. Chain members can have non-zero initial populations and be produced from the preceding chain member as the result of radioactive decay, a nuclear reaction, or both. As presently implemented, chains can contain up to 15 members. Program input can be supplied interactively or read from ASCII data files. Time units for half-lives, etc. can be specified during data entry. Input values are verified and can be modified if necessary, before used in calculations. Output results can be saved in ASCII files in a format suitable for including in reports or other documents. The calculational method, described in some detail, utilizes a generalized form of the Bateman equations. The program is written in the C language in conformance with current ANSI standards and can be used on multiple hardware platforms

  11. The new orphaned radioactive sources program in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naraine, N.; Karhnak, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    Exposure of the public to uncontrolled radioactive sources has become an significant concern to the United States (US) Government because of the continuous increase in the number of sources that are being found, sometimes without proper radiation markings. This problem is primarily due to inadequate control, insufficient accountability, and improper disposal of radioactive materials. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has funded a cooperative 'orphaned' source initiative with the Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors (CRCPD) to bring under control unwanted sources and thus reduce the potential for unnecessary exposure to the public, workers and the environment. The program is being developed through the cooperative efforts of government agencies and industry, and will provide a quick and efficient method to bring orphaned sources under control and out of potentially dangerous situations. (author)

  12. Radioactive Waste Management Fellowship Program: Summary of program activities for calendar year 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This document describes a graduate fellowship program designed to guide future scientists and engineers toward a career in high level radioactive waste management. Oak Ridge Associated Universities administers this program on behalf of 17 participating universities. The report summarizes the background and qualifications of the last year's applicants and awardees and provides examples of the distributed literature describing the program. 8 figs

  13. Treatment and disposal of radioactive wastes from nuclear power plants. Research programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-09-01

    The report presents programs for research, development and demonstration concerning radioactive waste disposal in underground facilities. The main topics are: Radioactive waste management, radioactive waste storage, capsules, environmental impacts, risk assessment, radionuclide migration, radioactive waste disposal, decommissioning, cost, and international cooperation. (129 refs.)

  14. Pilot internship program on radioactive waste at Vanderbilt University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The fourth year of the program began with the selection of the new interns. Mailings were sent to prospective graduate students and rising juniors at Vanderbilt University with grade point averages of 3.0 or better (out of 4.0) advertising the availability of internships in radioactive waste disposal. New interns were selected. All of the interns selected in the fourth year chose to return to Vanderbilt after their field assignment

  15. Development of a Comprehensive Radioactive Waste Management Program in the Kingdom of Morocco

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abderrahim, Bouhi; Bouchta, Moussaif; El Maati, Mouldoura; Touria, Lambarki; Touria, El Ghailassai; Fischer, R.

    2009-01-01

    The Kingdom of Morocco has been a signatory of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Joint Convention on the Management of Spent Fuel and Radioactive Waste since 1999. In fact Morocco was the first African country to ratify the joint convention. The Centre National de Energie des Sciences et des Techniques Nucleaires (CNESTEN) has been designated as the lead entity within the country for radioactive waste management. Morocco is in the process of receiving authorization to begin operating a new 2 MW MARK-II TRIGA research reactor at its Nuclear Energy Research Center (CENM) in Maamora. With the commissioning of the research reactor imminent, the waste management program has been preparing to disposition waste streams from the reactor, associated research operations, production of radioisotopes and anticipated future needs. The center is also the designated collection and storage facility for radioactive waste generated in the country, primarily spent sealed sources. This paper focuses on developing a radioactive waste management program that meets international standards in a class C country as described in Selection of Efficient Options for Processing and Storage of Radioactive Waste in Countries with Small Amounts of Waste Generation (class C countries are countries with research reactors but without nuclear power plants). In building their radioactive waste management program Morocco has made good use of experts from the IAEA and under a Sister Laboratory Agreement has worked with waste management personnel from the United States. This cooperative approach has provided assistance to Morocco in developing a safe and compliant program. Developing waste stream disposition pathways for all possible waste types can be especially challenging given the lack of commercial waste management infrastructure within the country. This paper will detail how waste management decisions are made, the waste management technology that was selected and how waste conditioning

  16. 1994 DOE Technical Standards Program Workshop: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spellman, D.J.

    1994-01-01

    The DOE Technical Standards Program has been structured to provide guidance and assistance for the development, adoption, and use of voluntary standards within the Department. OMB Circular A-119, ''Federal Participation in the Development and Use of Voluntary Standards'' establishes the policy to be followed in working with voluntary standards bodies, and in adopting and using voluntary standards whenever feasible. The DOE Technical Standards Program is consistent with this policy and is dedicated to the task of promoting its implementation. The theme of this year's workshop is ''Standards Initiatives in Environmental Management fostering the development and use of industry standards for safe, environmentally responsible operations.'' The objective of the workshop is to increase the participant's awareness of the standardization activities taking place nationally and internationally and the impact of these activities on their efforts, and to facilitate the exchange of experiences, processes, and tools for implementing the program. Workshop sessions will include presentations by industry and Government notables in the environment, safety, and health arena with ample opportunity for everyone to ask questions and share experiences. There will be a breakout session which will concentrate on resolution of issues arising from the implementation of the DOE Technical Standards Program and a plenary session to discuss the plans developed by the breakout groups. Many organizations provide services and products which support the development, processing, distribution, and retrieval of standards. Those organizations listed at the end of the agenda will have exhibits available for your perusal throughout the workshop. Last year's workshop was very successful in stimulating an understanding of an interest in the standards program. This year, we hope to build on that success and provide an environment for the synergism of ideas to enhance the program and advance its implementation

  17. Program integration on the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trebules, V.B.

    1995-01-01

    The recent development and implementation of a revised Program Approach for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) was accomplished in response to significant changes in the environment in which the program was being executed. The lack of an interim storage site, growing costs and schedule delays to accomplish the full Yucca Mountain site characterization plan, and the development and incorporation of a multi-purpose (storage, transport, and disposal) canister (MPC) into the CRWMS required a reexamination of Program plans and priorities. Dr. Daniel A. Dreyfus, the Director of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), established top-level schedule, targets and cost goals and commissioned a Program-wide task force of DOE and contractor personnel to identify and evaluate alternatives to meet them. The evaluation of the suitability of Yucca Mountain site by 1998 and the repository license application data of 2001 were maintained and a target date of January 1998 for MPC availability was established. An increased multi-year funding profile was baselined and agreed to by Congress. A $1.3 billion reduction in Yucca Mountain site characterization costs was mandated to hold the cost to $5 billion. The replanning process superseded all previous budget allocations and focused on program requirements and their relative priorities within the cost profiles. This paper discusses the process for defining alternative scenarios to achieve the top-level program goals in an integrated fashion

  18. 1996 DOE technical standards program workshop: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    The workshop theme is `The Strategic Standardization Initiative - A Technology Exchange and Global Competitiveness Challenge for DOE.` The workshop goal is to inform the DOE technical standards community of strategic standardization activities taking place in the Department, other Government agencies, standards developing organizations, and industry. Individuals working on technical standards will be challenged to improve cooperation and communications with the involved organizations in response to the initiative. Workshop sessions include presentations by representatives from various Government agencies that focus on coordination among and participation of Government personnel in the voluntary standards process; reports by standards organizations, industry, and DOE representatives on current technology exchange programs; and how the road ahead appears for `information superhighway` standardization. Another session highlights successful standardization case studies selected from several sites across the DOE complex. The workshop concludes with a panel discussion on the goals and objectives of the DOE Technical Standards Program as envisioned by senior DOE management. The annual workshop on technical standards has proven to be an effective medium for communicating information related to standards throughout the DOE community. Technical standards are used to transfer technology and standardize work processes to produce consistent, acceptable results. They provide a practical solution to the Department`s challenge to protect the environment and the health and safety of the public and workers during all facility operations. Through standards, the technologies of industries and governments worldwide are available to DOE. The DOE Technical Standards Program, a Department-wide effort that crosscuts all organizations and disciplines, links the Department to those technologies.

  19. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) standards and recommendations on radioactive waste and transport safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warnecke, E.; Rawl, R.

    1996-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) publishes standards and recommendations on all aspects of nuclear safety in its Safety Series, which includes radioactive waste management and transport of radioactive materials. Safety Series documents may be adopted by a State into its national legal framework. Most of the States used the IAEA transport regulations (Safety Series No. 6) as a basis for their national regulation. The two highest ranking documents of the Radioactive Waste Safety Standards (RADWASS) programme, the Safety Fundamentals and the Safety Standard on the national waste management system, have been published. Both provide impetus into the waste management safety convention, a legally binding document for signatory states, which is being drafted. The already existing Convention on Nuclear Safety covers the management of radioactive waste at land-based civil nuclear power plants. (author) 1 fig., 18 refs

  20. A users guide to the radioactive waste inventory program 'DATABASE'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prince, G.A.; Tymons, B.J.

    1984-09-01

    The program computes an inventory of radioactive waste accumulation in a form such that a variety of interrogation, collation and summary functions can be used to access the stored information. Database is designed to be used online, that is the user will communicate with it at a computer terminal, and the program will display the result of each enquiry. It has the potential to automate much of the searching and adding up which was involved in compiling and using waste inventories in the past. (author)

  1. Beneficial role of conflict in radioactive waste management programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payne, B.A.; Williams, R.G.

    1985-01-01

    Of the technical, political, and social problems associated with radioactive waste management, least is known about the latter two. Lay persons tend to generalize negative attitudes about other nuclear activity to radioactive waste management. Thus, conflict appears inevitable between the general public, citizen action groups, and decision-makers on radioactive waste management. The basis of conflict, we believe, can be found in the value orientation of certain groups and in differing perceptions of risk. Research on similar controversial issues reveals that conflict may be beneficial in the long run by contributing to the public's participation level and understanding of the issues, and to the decision-makers' appreciation of the lay perspective. The paper is in three parts. First, we review the sources of conflict over radioactive waste management issues. The negative attitudes and fears of the public toward different types of projects involving radioactivity, value conflicts, and differential perceptions of risk are cited as sources. Next we discuss the consequences of conflict in terms of sociological theory. Finally, we discuss how conflict can be directed and managed to produce an informed decision-making process. When the public is sensitized to an issue, when prevailing attitudes on the issue are negative, and when perceived risks are high - all of which are characteristic of waste management issues - specific steps should be taken to establish a legitimate process of communication and interaction between the public and the sponsor agency. When conflict is recognized as inevitable, the goal of a communications program is no longer to avoid it. It is to use the increased awareness to increase knowledge about waste management issues and public participation in decisions so that the final solution is acceptable at some level to all parties

  2. Operational procedure standard for occurrences involving radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piekarz, Leonardo; Rezende, Talita C.; Pinheiro, Christiano J.G.

    2017-01-01

    This study has as objective to analyze more deeply the actions of response to emergencies involving radioactive materials, in the intent to establish a pattern to the actions performed by the military fire fighters of the Military Fire Brigade of Minas Gerais. To met these goals, it has been attempted to analyze the procedures utilized and recommended, nowadays, for the military fire fighters of CBMMG, and through directed studies, to suggest new actions possible to be executed in the local of the emergency in a way that will not expose the garrison to doses of ionizing radiation that may prejudice them. It is a study of bibliographic, exploratory, and also descriptive nature, realized through a qualitative approach. The techniques used for the research were the analysis of institutional documents, norms and other literature produced by renamed entities in the radiologic and biosafety areas. It was then concluded that CBMMG, through simple actions of response, can provide higher quality and safety in the operations involving radiologic accidents, standing out that the implemented actions nowadays are very beneath the capacity of the corporation, due to the lack of knowledge of the matter by the fire fighters. It was proposed, then, that new actions be implemented and instituted as operational procedures to be used on those emergencies, with the objective of provide a higher safety and professionalism in the attendance to emergencies involving radioactive materials. (author)

  3. Operational procedure standard for occurrences involving radioactive materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piekarz, Leonardo, E-mail: leonardopbm@yahoo.com.br [Academia de Bombeiros Militar de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Rezende, Talita C.; Pinheiro, Christiano J.G., E-mail: talitacolombi@yahoo.com, E-mail: christrieste@yahoo.it [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo (CCA/UFES), Alegre, ES (Brazil). Programa de Pós-Graduação em Engenharia Química

    2017-07-01

    This study has as objective to analyze more deeply the actions of response to emergencies involving radioactive materials, in the intent to establish a pattern to the actions performed by the military fire fighters of the Military Fire Brigade of Minas Gerais. To met these goals, it has been attempted to analyze the procedures utilized and recommended, nowadays, for the military fire fighters of CBMMG, and through directed studies, to suggest new actions possible to be executed in the local of the emergency in a way that will not expose the garrison to doses of ionizing radiation that may prejudice them. It is a study of bibliographic, exploratory, and also descriptive nature, realized through a qualitative approach. The techniques used for the research were the analysis of institutional documents, norms and other literature produced by renamed entities in the radiologic and biosafety areas. It was then concluded that CBMMG, through simple actions of response, can provide higher quality and safety in the operations involving radiologic accidents, standing out that the implemented actions nowadays are very beneath the capacity of the corporation, due to the lack of knowledge of the matter by the fire fighters. It was proposed, then, that new actions be implemented and instituted as operational procedures to be used on those emergencies, with the objective of provide a higher safety and professionalism in the attendance to emergencies involving radioactive materials. (author)

  4. Developing international safety standards for the geological disposal of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metcalf, P.

    2001-01-01

    In the context of the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) programme to create a corpus of internationally accepted Radioactive Waste Safety Standards (RADWASS), focus is currently being placed on establishing standards for the 'geological disposal of radioactive waste'. This is a challenging task and to help the standards development process there is a need to stimulate discussion of some of the associated scientific and technical issues. A number of position papers developed in recent years by a subgroup of the Waste Safety Standards Committee (WASSC), the subgroup on Principles and Criteria for Radioactive Waste Disposal, address many of the relevant issues. These include a common safety based framework for radioactive waste disposal, appropriate time frames for safety assessment, different possible indicators of long-term safety, the safety implications of reversibility and retrievability, the assessment of possible human intrusion into the repository, the role and limitations of institutional control, establishing reference critical groups and biospheres for long-term assessment, and what is meant by 'compliance' with the standards. These papers will be discussed at a Specialists Meeting to be held at the IAEA in June 2001 as a means of establishing the extent to which they enjoy the general support of experts. In order to broaden that consensus, the conclusions reached at the Specialists Meeting on the issues listed above will be presented and discussed with participants at a number of international meetings. Later this year, a draft safety standard on the geological disposal of radioactive waste which takes account of the consensus positions reached through the various consultations will be submitted for the consideration of Waste Safety Standards Committee (WASSC), the officially approved body within the IAEA for the review and approval of waste safety standards. The Committee is made up of government appointed radioactive waste regulators

  5. The Canadian approach to nuclear codes and standards. A CSA forum for development of standards for CANDU: radioactive waste management and decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, T.; Azeez, S.; Dua, S.

    2006-01-01

    Together with the Canadian Standards Association (CSA), industry stakeholders, governments, and the public have developed a suite of standards for CANDU nuclear power plants that generate electricity in Canada and abroad. In this paper, we will describe: CSA's role in national and international nuclear standards development; the key issues and priority projects that the nuclear standards program has addressed; the new CSA nuclear committees and projects being established, particularly those related to waste management and decommissioning; the hierarchy of nuclear regulations, nuclear, and other standards in Canada, and how they are applied by AECL; the standards management activities; and the future trends and challenges for CSA and the nuclear community. CSA is an accredited Standards Development Organization (SDO) and part of the international standards system. CSA's Nuclear Strategic Steering Committee (NSSC) provides leadership, direction, and support for a standards committee hierarchy comprised of members from a balanced matrix of interests. The NSSC strategically focuses on industry challenges; a new nuclear regulatory system, deregulated energy markets, and industry restructuring. As the first phase of priority projects is nearing completion, the next phase of priorities is being identified. These priorities address radioactive waste management, environmental radiation management, decommissioning, structural, and seismic issues. As the CSA committees get established in the coming year, members and input will be solicited for the technical committees, subcommittees, and task forces for the following related subjects: Radioactive Waste Management; a) Dry Storage of Irradiated Fuel; b) Short-Term Radioactive Waste Management; c) Long-Term Storage and Disposal of Radioactive Waste. 2. Decommissioning Nuclear Power is highly regulated, and public scrutiny has focused Codes and Standards on public and worker safety. Licensing and regulation serves to control

  6. Development of radioactive standards in epoxy matrix for the control of quality of activimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fragoso, Maria da Conceicao de Farias; Monteiro, Luciane Carollyne de Oliveira Reis; Oliveira, Marcia Liane de

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, a new approach for development of the standards for positron emitting radionuclides in epoxy matrix is presented. Different formulations were prepared using epoxy resin (bisphenol A diglycidyl ether - DGEBA) and curing agents, to immobilize the radioactive material. The efficiency curve and standard sample methods were applied for activity determination of a long-lived positron emitter ("2"2Na). Satisfactory results were obtained in the 3"r"d combination. Thus, these radioactive standards can be used to evaluate the metrological behavior of the systems used for the measurement of the radiopharmaceuticals (activimeters) in the production centers and in nuclear medicine services. (author)

  7. Development of criteria and standards for management of low-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grey, A.E.; Falconer, K.L.

    1980-08-01

    The basic need for criteria and standards for radioactive waste management is to ensure compliance with Federal and State regulations applicable to this activity. In addition, criteria and standards can establish the parameters by which a radioactive waste disposal site is selected, the form in which the waste is to be disposed, how a disposal site is to be operated, and how that site is to be closed when it reaches the end of its useful life. For developing criteria and standards, this report discusses the nature of low-level radioactive waste and the role government agencies play in regulating its management. It describes subject areas for which criteria and standards could be developed, current and evolving requirements, and future suggested analyses

  8. Radioactive waste management: review on clearance levels and acceptance criteria legislation, requirements and standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maringer, F J; Suráň, J; Kovář, P; Chauvenet, B; Peyres, V; García-Toraño, E; Cozzella, M L; De Felice, P; Vodenik, B; Hult, M; Rosengård, U; Merimaa, M; Szücs, L; Jeffery, C; Dean, J C J; Tymiński, Z; Arnold, D; Hinca, R; Mirescu, G

    2013-11-01

    In 2011 the joint research project Metrology for Radioactive Waste Management (MetroRWM)(1) of the European Metrology Research Programme (EMRP) started with a total duration of three years. Within this project, new metrological resources for the assessment of radioactive waste, including their calibration with new reference materials traceable to national standards will be developed. This paper gives a review on national, European and international strategies as basis for science-based metrological requirements in clearance and acceptance of radioactive waste. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Issues related to the USEPA probabilistic standard for geologic disposal of high-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okrent, D.

    1993-01-01

    This paper asks whether some of the fundamental bases for the 1985 USEPA standard on disposal of high level radioactive wastes (40 CFR Part 191) warrant re-examination. Similar questions also apply to the bases for the radioactive waste disposal requirements proposed by most other countries. It is suggested that the issue of intergenerational equity has been dealt with from too narrow a perspective. Not only should radioactive and nonradioactive hazardous waste disposal be regulated from a consistent philosophic basis, but the regulation of waste disposal itself should be embedded in the broader issues of intergenerational conservation of options, conservation of quality, and conservation of access. (author). 25 refs

  10. Programs of recovery of radioactive wastes from the trenches and land decontamination of the radioactive waste storage center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez D, J.; Reyes L, J.

    1999-06-01

    In this report there are the decontamination program of the land of the Radioactive Waste Storage Center, the Program of Recovery of the radioactive waste of the trenches, the recovery of polluted bar with cobalt 60, the recovery of minerals and tailings of uranium and of earth with minerals and tailings of uranium, the recovery of worn out sealed sources and the waste recovery with the accustomed corresponding actions are presented. (Author)

  11. Factor of radioactive waste on nuclear power program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syed Abdul Malik Syed Zain

    2009-01-01

    Global warming phenomena and rising oil prices have brought the excitement of open space use of nuclear power. Arguments in favor of this technology range in terms of more environmentally friendly, energy diversification and cost efficiency has prompted the government to widen the choice of nuclear power be considered as a serious alternative. Despite the attractive factors to the use of these powers, there are also factors that stem from the continued development of nuclear power. These include the factor of safety, security, security of fuel supply, and public attention is often associated with radioactive waste management. This article attempts to debate specific to radioactive waste management factors that impact on public acceptance of a country's nuclear power program, especially in Malaysia. Starting from the absence of radioactive waste management policy to model uncertainty of the landfill and complications in selecting a repository site shows the basic infrastructure is still lacking. In addition, previous experience handling thorium waste has not reached a final settlement after several years of implementation. It reinforced the perception about the level of public confidence in the competence and attitude of local workers who are not very encouraging to pursue this advanced.

  12. BASIC Program for the calculation of radioactive activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortes P, A.; Tejera R, A.; Becerril V, A.

    1990-04-01

    When one makes a measure of radioactive activity with a detection system that operates with a gamma radiation detector (Ge or of NaI (Tl) detector), it is necessary to take in account parameters and correction factors that making sufficiently difficult and tedious those calculations to using a considerable time by part of the person that carries out these measures. Also, this frequently, can to take to erroneous results. In this work a computer program in BASIC language that solves this problem is presented. (Author)

  13. Development of international standards for instrumentation used for detection of illicit trafficking of radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voytchev, M.; Chiaro, P.; Radev, R.

    2006-01-01

    Subcommittee 45 B 'Radiation Protection Instrumentation' of the International Electrotechnical Commission (I.E.C.) is charged with the development of international standards for instrumentation used for monitoring of illicit trafficking of radioactive material through international boarders and territories, as well as inside countries. Currently three I.E.C. standards are in advanced stages of development. They are expected to be approved and published in 2006-2007. The international participation and the main characteristics of the following three standards are discussed and presented: I.E.C. 62327 'Hand-held Instruments for the Detection and Identification of Radionuclides and Additionally for the Indication of Ambient Dose Equivalent Rate from Photon Radiation', I.E.C. 62401 'Alarming Personal Radiation Devices for Detection of Illicit Trafficking of Radioactive Material' and I.E.C. 62244 'Installed Radiation Monitors for the Detection of Radioactive and Special Nuclear Materials at National Borders'

  14. Department of Energy Nuclear Energy Standards Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, E.G.

    1980-01-01

    The policy with respect to the development and use of standards in the Department of Energy (DOE) programs concerned with maintaining and developing the nuclear option for the civilian sector (both in the form of the currently used light water reactors and for advanced concepts including the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor), is embodied in a Nuclear Standards Policy, issued in 1978, whose perspectives and philosophy are discussed

  15. Risk assessment based on current release standards for radioactive surface contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, S.Y.

    1993-09-01

    Standards for uncontrolled releases of radioactive surface contamination have been in existence in the United States for about two decades. Such standards have been issued by various agencies, including the US Department of Energy. This paper reviews the technical basis of published standards, identifies areas in need of revision, provides risk interpretations based on current technical knowledge and the regulatory environment, and offers suggestions for improvements

  16. Radioactive materials packaging standards and regulations: Making sense of it all

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pope, R.B.; Rawl, R.R.

    1989-01-01

    Numerous regulations and standards, both national and international, apply to the packaging and transportation of radioactive material. These are legal and technical prerequisites to practically every action that a designer or user of a radioactive material transportation package will perform. The identity and applicability of these requirements and the bodies that formulate them are also not readily understood. This paper addresses the roles that various international bodies play in developing and implementing the various regulations and standards. It uses the US regulatory and standards-making bodies to illustrate how international requirements feed the domestic control of packaging and transport. It explains the scope and interactions between domestic and international regulatory and standards agencies and summarizes the status and major standards activities at the international level. The overview provided by this paper will be valuable to designers and users of radioactive material packages for better understanding and use of both standards and regulations, and for complying with regulatory requirements in the radioactive materials transportation field. 11 refs., 2 figs

  17. Research program on radioactive wastes 2013-2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berner, U.; Bossart, P.; Brander, S.; Schaub, P.; Frank, E.; Hugi, M.; Holocher, J.; Schlüchter, Ch.

    2013-06-01

    This report issued by the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) takes a look at the work done within the framework of the 2012 Swiss Research Program on radioactive wastes. The implementation program for the period 2013 - 2016 is discussed. Long-term aspects such as knowledge conservation and marking concepts are investigated and regional participation in the planning of repositories is discussed. Environmental protection, the planning of repositories and the definition of their content are discussed. Monitoring concepts and emergency closure in crisis situations are also looked at. The associated material technologies and repository design are discussed. Finally, ethical considerations and environmental policies are discussed. Two appendices include information on the timelines involved as well as information on the players involved and their areas of competence

  18. R and D program of the Spanish National Company for Radioactive Wastes management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astudillo, J.

    1993-01-01

    The second R+D program of the Spanish National Company for Radioactive Wastes Management (ENRESA) has a whole budget of 56 million $ for the period 1991-1995. This program is included within the Spanish Energy Plan (PEN-91) and encompasses four main areas: 1) Low and medium level radioactive wastes 2) High level radioactive wastes 3) Decommissioning and dismantling of nuclear installations 4) Radiological protection The Spanish program is coordinated with policies of international organizations: CEC,OECD and IAEA

  19. Environmental sampling program for a solar evaporation pond for liquid radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero, R.; Gunderson, T.C.; Talley, A.D.

    1980-04-01

    Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) is evaluating solar evaporation as a method for disposal of liquid radioactive wastes. This report describes a sampling program designed to monitor possible escape of radioactivity to the environment from a solar evaporation pond prototype constructed at LASL. Background radioactivity levels at the pond site were determined from soil and vegetation analyses before construction. When the pond is operative, the sampling program will qualitatively and quantitatively detect the transport of radioactivity to the soil, air, and vegetation in the vicinity. Possible correlation of meteorological data with sampling results is being investigated and measures to control export of radioactivity by biological vectors are being assessed

  20. Proposals for the Radioactive Substances (Basic Safety Standards) (England and Wales) Regulations 2000 and the Radioactive Substances (Basic Safety Standards) (England and Wales) Direction 2000. Consultative document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    This document contains proposals for changes to the Radioactive Substances Act 1993 (RSA 93) and proposals for a Direction to be given to the Environment Agency in order to implement aspects of the European Directive 96/29/Euratom concerned with the control of radioactive waste. The Directive lays down basic safety standards for the protection of the health of workers and the general public against the dangers arising from ionising radiation. With the Government pledged to making government more accessible and responsive, an important feature of this approach is effective consultation with all interested organisations. This leads to more realistic and robust proposals, which is particularly important when dealing with proposed legislation. In March this year, the Government published a consultation paper 'The Radioactive Substances Act 1993: Implementing the Revised Basic Safety Standards Directive Euratom 96/29.' This sought comments on the basic principles for change - including the setting of levels of radioactivity below which radioactive material should be considered outside the framework of regulatory control. This document forms the second stage of the consultation process with the aim of gathering views on the proposed legal instruments to implement the Directive. This document: explains the background to the proposed regulations (paragraphs 8-13); summarises the results of the consultation on principles (paragraphs 14-24); describes the proposed changes (paragraphs 25-36); includes draft Regulations (paragraphs 27-29); includes a draft Direction to the Environment Agency (paragraphs 30-36); describes the next steps (paragraphs 37-39); includes a draft Regulatory Impact Assessment (paragraphs 40-41). In general, the devolved administrations in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland have assumed responsibility for environmental issues and hence management of radioactive waste policies and legislation affecting their respective countries. However, this

  1. Integrated Management Program for Radioactive Sealed Sources in Egypt IMPRSS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasan, A.; El-Adham, K.

    2004-01-01

    Sealed sources are usually in capsules made of stainless steel. They are the size of a pen or a finger and contain one of hundreds of radioactive elements (e.g., Iridium, Radium) or their isotopes. They are air-tight and very durable, contain the radioactive material but not radiation. They are used in the health sector, industry, military, and universities. Incidents occurred in Met Halfa, Egypt, 2000 (Iridium-192); Goiania, Brazil, 1987 (Cesium-137); Mexico and Southwest U.S., 1977 -1984 (Cobalt-60); Peru, 1999 (Iridium-1992); Poland 2001 (Cobalt-60). The IMPRSS Mission is based on a joined partnership between the Egyptian Atomic Energy Authority, the Egyptian Ministry of Health, the Sandia National Laboratories, the International Atomic Energy Agency and others. The IMPRSS Mission protects human health and the environment in Egypt from mismanaged sealed sources, is developed jointly with MOH and EAEA, provides capabilities for managing radioactive sealed sources in Egypt, increases public awareness, provides education and training, improves emergency response capabilities, develops a permanent disposal facility, ensures the program is self-sustaining and ensures close coordination with the IAEA. Infrastructure how to manage sealed sources is discussed. It includes awareness, tracking and inventory control, security, recovery, conditioning and storage, recycling and disposal. Emergency response, regulatory reform, education and training and its targets are provided. The government of Egypt can protect the people of Egypt and is ready for emergencies. Prevention is the first line of defence and detection is the second line of defence. Adequate Emergency Response saves lives and adequate control reduces risk of mismanaged uses or deliberate misuses of sources. A Cradle-to-Grave approach is built on existing capabilities at EAEA and MOH

  2. University program in hazardous chemical and radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, F.L.

    1987-01-01

    The three main functions of a university program are education, training, and research. At Vanderbilt University, there is a Solid and Hazardous Waste option in the Master of Science in Engineering Program. The two main foci are treatment of wastes and environmental transport and transformation of the wastes. Courses in Hazardous Waste Engineering and Radioactive Waste Disposal present a synoptic view of the field, including legal, economic, and institutional aspects as well as the requisite technical content. The training is accomplished for some of the students through the aegis of an internship program sponsored by the US Department of Energy. In the summer between the two academic years of the program, the study works at a facility where decontamination and/or decommissioning and/or remedial actions are taking place. Progress in understanding the movement, transformation, and fate of hazardous materials in the environment is so rapid that it will not be possible to be current in the field without participating in that discovery. Therefore, their students are studying these processes and contributing to new knowledge. Some recent examples are the study of safety factors implicit in assuming a saturated zone below a hazardous waste landfill when an unsaturated zone exists, application of probabilistic risk assessment to three National Priority List sites in Tennessee, and the explanation of why certain organics precede pH, conductivity and nitrates through a clay liner at a hazardous waste disposal site

  3. Low-level radioactive waste research program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Donnell, E.; Lambert, J.

    1989-11-01

    The Waste Management Branch, Division of Engineering, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, has developed a strategy for conducting research on issues of concern to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in its efforts to ensure safe disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLW). The resulting LLW research program plan provides an integrated framework for planning the LLW research program to ensure that the program and its products are responsive and timely for use in NRC's LLW regulatory program. The plan discusses technical and scientific issues and uncertainties associated with the disposal of LLW, presents programmatic goals and objectives for resolving them, establishes a long-term strategy for conducting the confirmatory and investigative research needed to meet these goals and objectives, and includes schedules and milestones for completing the research. Areas identified for investigation include waste form and other material concerns, failure mechanisms and radionuclide releases, engineered barrier performance, site characterization and monitoring, and performance assessment. The plan proposes projects that (1) analyze and test actual LLW and solidified LLW under laboratory and field conditions to determine leach rates and radionuclide releases, (2) examine the short- and long-term performance of concrete-enhanced LLW burial structures and high-integrity containers, and (3) attempt to predict water movement and contaminant transport through low permeability saturated media and unsaturated porous media. 4 figs., 3 tabs

  4. Teaching Radioactive Waste Management in an Undergraduate Engineering Program - 13269

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, Brian M. [Faculty of Energy Systems and Nuclear Science, University of Ontario Institute of Technology, 2000 Simcoe Street North, Oshawa, Ontario L1H 7K4 (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    The University of Ontario Institute of Technology is Ontario's newest university and the only one in Canada that offers an accredited Bachelor of Nuclear Engineering (Honours) degree. The nuclear engineering program consists of 48 full-semester courses, including one on radioactive waste management. This is a design course that challenges young engineers to develop a fundamental understanding of how to manage the storage and disposal of various types and forms of radioactive waste, and to recognize the social consequences of their practices and decisions. Students are tasked with developing a major project based on an environmental assessment of a simple conceptual design for a waste disposal facility. They use collaborative learning and self-directed exploration to gain the requisite knowledge of the waste management system. The project constitutes 70% of their mark, but is broken down into several small components that include, an environmental assessment comprehensive study report, a technical review, a facility design, and a public defense of their proposal. Many aspects of the project mirror industry team project situations, including the various levels of participation. The success of the students is correlated with their engagement in the project, the highest final examination scores achieved by students with the strongest effort in the project. (authors)

  5. Teaching Radioactive Waste Management in an Undergraduate Engineering Program - 13269

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Brian M.

    2013-01-01

    The University of Ontario Institute of Technology is Ontario's newest university and the only one in Canada that offers an accredited Bachelor of Nuclear Engineering (Honours) degree. The nuclear engineering program consists of 48 full-semester courses, including one on radioactive waste management. This is a design course that challenges young engineers to develop a fundamental understanding of how to manage the storage and disposal of various types and forms of radioactive waste, and to recognize the social consequences of their practices and decisions. Students are tasked with developing a major project based on an environmental assessment of a simple conceptual design for a waste disposal facility. They use collaborative learning and self-directed exploration to gain the requisite knowledge of the waste management system. The project constitutes 70% of their mark, but is broken down into several small components that include, an environmental assessment comprehensive study report, a technical review, a facility design, and a public defense of their proposal. Many aspects of the project mirror industry team project situations, including the various levels of participation. The success of the students is correlated with their engagement in the project, the highest final examination scores achieved by students with the strongest effort in the project. (authors)

  6. Importance of the Primary Radioactivity Standard Laboratory and Implementation of its Quality Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahagia, Maria; Razdolescu, Anamaria Cristina; Luca, Aurelian; Ivan, Constantin

    2007-04-01

    The paper presents some specific aspects of the implementation of the quality management in the Radionuclide Metrology Laboratory, from IFIN-HH, the owner of the primary Romanian standard in radioactivity. The description of the accreditation, according to the EN ISO/IEC 17025:2005, is presented.

  7. Importance of the Primary Radioactivity Standard Laboratory and Implementation of its Quality Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahagia, Maria; Razdolescu, Anamaria Cristina; Luca, Aurelian; Ivan, Constantin

    2007-01-01

    The paper presents some specific aspects of the implementation of the quality management in the Radionuclide Metrology Laboratory, from IFIN-HH, the owner of the primary Romanian standard in radioactivity. The description of the accreditation, according to the EN ISO/IEC 17025:2005, is presented

  8. The Constitution, waste facility performance standards, and radioactive waste classification: Is equal protection possible?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eye, R.V. [Kansas Dept. of Health and Environment, Topeka, KS (United States)

    1993-03-01

    The process for disposal of so-called low-level radioactive waste is deadlocked at present. Supporters of the proposed near-surface facilities assert that their designs will meet minimum legal and regulatory standards currently in effect. Among opponents there is an overarching concern that the proposed waste management facilities will not isolate radiation from the biosphere for an adequate length of time. This clash between legal acceptability and a perceived need to protect the environment and public health by requiring more than the law demand sis one of the underlying reasons why the process is deadlocked. Perhaps the most exhaustive public hearing yet conducted on low-level radioactive waste management has recently concluded in Illinois. The Illinois Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility Sitting Commission conducted 71 days of fact-finding hearings on the safety and suitability of a site near Martinsville, Illinois, to serve as a location for disposition of low-level radioactive waste. Ultimately, the siting commission rejected the proposed facility site for several reasons. However, almost all the reasons were related, to the prospect that, as currently conceived, the concrete barrier/shallow-land burial method will not isolate radioactive waste from the biosphere. This paper reviews the relevant legal framework of the radioactive waste classification system and will argue that it is inadequate for long-lived radionuclides. Next, the paper will present a case for altering the classification system based on high-level waste regulatory considerations.

  9. Uses of ANSI/HPS N13.12-1999, "Surface and Volume Radioactivity Standards for Clearance" and Comparison with Existing Standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stansbury, Paul S.; Strom, Daniel J.

    2001-04-30

    In August of 1999, the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) approved a standard for clearance of materials contaminated with residual levels of radioactivity. "Clearance," as used in the standard, means the movement of material from the control of a regulatory agency to a use or disposition that has no further regulatory controls of any kind. The standard gives derived screening levels (DSLs) in Bq/g and Bq/cm2 for 50 radionuclides. Items or materials with residual surface and volume radioactivity levels below the DSLs can be cleared, that is, managed without regard to their residual radioactivity. Since federal agencies are to use voluntary, industry standards developed by the private sector whenever possible, the standard should play an important role in DOE's regulatory process. The thrust of this report is to explain the standard, make simple observations on its usefulness to DOE, and to explore uses of the standard within DOE facilities beyond the clearance of radioactive materials.

  10. Radiological Threat Reduction (RTR) program: implementing physical security to protect large radioactive sources worldwide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowe, Daniel L.

    2004-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Radiological Threat Reduction (RTR) Program strives to reduce the threat of a Radiological Dispersion Device (RDD) incident that could affect U.S. interests worldwide. Sandia National Laboratories supports the RTR program on many different levels. Sandia works directly with DOE to develop strategies, including the selection of countries to receive support and the identification of radioactive materials to be protected. Sandia also works with DOE in the development of guidelines and in training DOE project managers in physical protection principles. Other support to DOE includes performing rapid assessments and providing guidance for establishing foreign regulatory and knowledge infrastructure. Sandia works directly with foreign governments to establish cooperative agreements necessary to implement the RTR Program efforts to protect radioactive sources. Once necessary agreements are in place, Sandia works with in-country organizations to implement various security related initiatives, such as installing security systems and searching for (and securing) orphaned radioactive sources. The radioactive materials of interest to the RTR program include Cobalt 60, Cesium 137, Strontium 90, Iridium 192, Radium 226, Plutonium 238, Americium 241, Californium 252, and Others. Security systems are implemented using a standardized approach that provides consistency through out the RTR program efforts at Sandia. The approach incorporates a series of major tasks that overlap in order to provide continuity. The major task sequence is to: Establish in-country contacts - integrators, Obtain material characterizations, Perform site assessments and vulnerability assessments, Develop upgrade plans, Procure and install equipment, Conduct acceptance testing and performance testing, Develop procedures, and Conduct training. Other tasks are incorporated as appropriate and commonly include such as support of reconfiguring infrastructure, and developing security

  11. Avoiding dual regulation of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlahakis, J.G.; Palabrica, R.J.

    1994-01-01

    The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (RW) has successfully negotiated the issuance of a Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters Order that provides for exemption of RW from certain DOE directives. This exemption assures precedence of Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requirements in radiation protection, nuclear safety (including quality assurance), and safeguards and security of nuclear materials. This Order is necessary to avoid the unwarranted cost and potential confusion resulting from dual regulation of RW facilities and activities by DOE and NRC. Development of this Order involved a systematic review of applicable DOE directives and NRC requirements to identify potential overlaps and duplication when applied to the RW program. Following this review and extensive negotiations with appropriate DOE organizations responsible for directives development, this Order was issued as HQ 1321.1 on December 22, 1993

  12. 1997 DOE technical standards program workshop: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-10-01

    The Department of Energy held its annual Technical Standards Program Workshop on July 8--10, 1997, at the Loews L`Enfant Plaza Hotel in Washington, DC. The workshop focused on aspects of implementation of the National Technology Transfer and Advancement Act of 1995 [Public Law (PL) 104-113] and the related revision (still pending) to OMB Circular A119 (OMB A119), Federal Participation in the Development and Use of Voluntary Standards. It also addressed DOE`s efforts in transitioning to a standards-based operating culture, and, through this transition, to change from a developer of internal technical standards to a customer of external technical standards. The workshop was designed to provide a forum to better understand how the new law is affecting Department activities. Panel topics such as ``Public Law 104-113 and Its Influence on Federal Agency Standards Activities`` and ``Update on Global Standards Issues`` provided insight on both the internal and external effects of the new law. Keynote speaker Richard Meier of Meadowbrook International (and formerly the Deputy Assistant US Trade Representative) addressed the subject of international trade balance statistics. He pointed out that increases in US export figures do not necessarily indicate increases in employment. Rather, increased employment results from product growth. Mr Meier also discussed issues such as the US migration to the sue of the metric system, the impact of budget limitations on Government participation in voluntary standards organizations, international standards ISO 9000 and ISO 14000, and DOE`s role in the worldwide transition from weapons production to cleanup.

  13. Study on the establishment of technical standards of radioactive wastes (annual report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jhin Wung; Hwang, Y. S.; Kim, S. H.; Yoo, J. H.; Lee, I. H.; Yang, H. B.; Rhim, J. K.

    1997-03-01

    From 1989, KAERI and KINS have worked together to set up national regulations to safely manage radioactive wastes. This year project covers 3 items : 1) post-closure surveillance criteria and closure criteria for disposal of LLW wastes, 2) standard format and contents of safety analysis report for spent fuel interim storage, and 3) review of existing regulations. Results from detailed research shall be used to set up the MOST notices on the safe management of radioactive wastes. Even though this project has been stopped after the national rearrangement on the management of LLW, KINS which jointly has studied this project shall independently study it in the future. (author)

  14. Germanium detector calibration according to the standard NF M 60-810 without using radioactive sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duda, J. M.; Garell, I.; Losset, Y.; Vichot, L. [CEA de Valduc, Service de Protection Contre Les Rayonnements, 21110 Is sur Tille (France); Chazalet, J.; Tauvel, Y.; Poulet, F. [IUP Genie des Systemes Industriels, Universite Blaise Pascal, Departement de Physique, 24 avenue des Landais, 63177 Aubiere Cedex (France)

    2009-07-01

    In-situ gamma ray spectrometry is used to determine the specific activities of natural and artificial radioactive nuclides in the soil with a good accuracy. This method is very interesting for environmental measurements and leads to soil determination activity. It is a cheaper method than analysis of great amounts of soil samples in the laboratory. As there is no standard soil, detection efficiency can be estimated using either statistical tools or combination of radioactive point sources calibration thanks to mathematical models of NF-M-60-810 standard representing the radionuclide distribution in soil. Experimental determination of detection efficiency requires a large number of operations involving the handling of radioactive standards in the energy range from 0.06 - 2 MeV. For these reasons, detection efficiency model has been determined without using radioactive sources. In order to reduce analytical time and to simplify the efficiency detector calibration, it is possible to associate numerical and deterministic methods and to get a relative accuracy below 25 per cent

  15. Radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chelet, Y.

    2006-01-01

    The beginning of this book explains the why and how of the radioactivity, with a presentation of the different modes of disintegration. Are tackled the reports between radioactivity and time before explaining how the mass-energy equivalence appears during disintegrations. Two chapters treat natural radioisotopes and artificial ones. This book makes an important part to the use of radioisotopes in medicine (scintigraphy, radiotherapy), in archaeology and earth sciences (dating) before giving an inventory of radioactive products that form in the nuclear power plants. (N.C.)

  16. Radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This pedagogical document presents the origin, effects and uses of radioactivity: where does radioactivity comes from, effects on the body, measurement, protection against radiations, uses in the medical field, in the electric power industry, in the food (ionization, radio-mutagenesis, irradiations) and other industries (radiography, gauges, detectors, irradiations, tracers), and in research activities (dating, preservation of cultural objects). The document ends with some examples of irradiation levels (examples of natural radioactivity, distribution of the various sources of exposure in France). (J.S.)

  17. Standard Review Plan Update and Development Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-05-01

    This implementing procedures document (IPD) was prepared for use in implementing tasks under the standard review plan update and development program (SRP-UDP). The IPD provides comprehensive guidance and detailed procedures for SRP-UDP tasks. The IPD is mandatory for contractors performing work for the SRP-UDP. It is guidance for the staff. At the completion of the SRP-UDP, the IPD will be revised (to remove the UDP aspects) and will replace NRR Office Letter No. 800 as long-term maintenance procedures

  18. Standard Review Plan Update and Development Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-05-01

    This implementing procedures document (IPD) was prepared for use in implementing tasks under the standard review plan update and development program (SRP-UDP). The IPD provides comprehensive guidance and detailed procedures for SRP-UDP tasks. The IPD is mandatory for contractors performing work for the SRP-UDP. It is guidance for the staff. At the completion of the SRP-UDP, the IPD will be revised (to remove the UDP aspects) and will replace NRR Office Letter No. 800 as long-term maintenance procedures.

  19. Development of a low cost, GPS-based upgrade to a standard handheld gamma detector for mapping environmental radioactive contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paridaens, J

    2006-02-01

    A low cost extension to a standard handheld radiation monitor was developed, allowing one to perform outdoor georeferenced gamma measurements. It consists of a commercial wireless Bluetooth GPS receiver, a commercial RS-232 to Bluetooth converter combined with a standard Bluetooth enabled pocket personal computer (PPC). The system is intended for use in difficult to access areas, typically for foot campaigns. As the operator walks, a straightforward homemade visual basic program alternately reads GPS position and gamma dose rate into the PPC, creating a data log. This allows a single operator on foot to map between 50 and 200 ha of environmental radiation per day in very rugged areas, depending on the accessibility of the terrain and the detail required. On a test field with known contamination, a spatial precision of about 5-10 m was obtainable. The device was also used to reveal complex contamination patterns in the flooding zones of a radioactively contaminated small river.

  20. Development of international standards for instrumentation used for detection of illicit trafficking of radioactive material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voytchev, M. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN/DSU/SERAC/CTHIR), 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Chiaro, P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Radev, R. [LLNL, Livermore, CA (United States)

    2006-07-01

    Subcommittee 45 B 'Radiation Protection Instrumentation' of the International Electrotechnical Commission (I.E.C.) is charged with the development of international standards for instrumentation used for monitoring of illicit trafficking of radioactive material through international boarders and territories, as well as inside countries. Currently three I.E.C. standards are in advanced stages of development. They are expected to be approved and published in 2006-2007. The international participation and the main characteristics of the following three standards are discussed and presented: I.E.C. 62327 'Hand-held Instruments for the Detection and Identification of Radionuclides and Additionally for the Indication of Ambient Dose Equivalent Rate from Photon Radiation', I.E.C. 62401 'Alarming Personal Radiation Devices for Detection of Illicit Trafficking of Radioactive Material' and I.E.C. 62244 'Installed Radiation Monitors for the Detection of Radioactive and Special Nuclear Materials at National Borders'.

  1. Historically Black Colleges and Universities Radioactive Waste Management Research Program: Summary of activities, 1985-1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This report summarizes the 1985 to 1986 activities of the Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) Radioactive Waste Management Research Program sponsored by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The first set of three awards was made in September,1984. In September, 1985, two of these projects were renewed and a new proposal was funded. The program has been enthusiastically received by the community of HBCUs and the program sponsor

  2. Scintillation detector with anticoincidence shield for determination of the radioactive concentration of standard solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broda, R.; Radoszewski, T.

    1982-01-01

    The construction and parameters of the prototype liquid scintillation detector for disintegration rate determination of standard solutions is described. The detector is equipped with a liquid scintillation anticoincidence shield with a volume of 40 l. The instrument is placed in the building of the Radioisotope Production and Distribution Centre in the Institute of Nuclear Research at Swierk. The results of instrument background reduction are described. The counting efficiency of several beta-emitters 3 H, 63 Ni, 14 C and 90 Sr + 90 Y is given, as well as the examples of a disintegration rate determination of low radioactivity concentration of standard solutions. (author)

  3. Analysis of the qualification test standards for small radioactive material shipping packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McClure, J.D.

    1978-01-01

    The study compares the severity of the existing regulatory standards which are used to license radioactive material (RAM) shipping packages with the severity of transportation accidents. The basic findings of the study indicate that the present regulatory standards provide significantly higher levels of protection for surface transportation modes (truck, rail) than for RAM packages shipped by aircraft. It was also determined that crush can occur in all of the transport modes and is not presently included in existing regulations for accident conditions. Test proposals are included for the surface transport mode (truck, rail) and the air transport mode

  4. Realization of sanitary requirements concerning standardization of rare radioactive gas effluents at NPPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doroshenko, G.G.; Panchenko, S.V.; Chudajkin, O.G.

    1987-01-01

    The paper is aimed at determination of ways for practical realization of main sanitary requirements concerning environment and population protection under NPP operation. The idea of the requirements is reduced to not increasing permissible limits for radiation doses, minimum irradiation of population and decrease of unjustified irradiation of personnel. The given problem may be fully solved only in case of studying real chacteristics of operating reactors, taking into account statistic nature of effluents of inert radioactive gases (IRG). Methods of developing a system of working and reference standards of IRG effluents at NPPs are suggested. The considered approach may be realized in practice as the All-Union state on branch standards

  5. Developing an ANSI standard for semitrailers used to transport radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregory, P.

    1990-01-01

    A proposed new American National Standards Institute (ANSI) standard has been prepared which establishes requirements for the design, fabrication, and maintenance of semitrailers used in the highway transport of weight-concentrated radioactive loads. A weight-concentrated load is any payload which exceeds 1,488 kilograms per lineal meter (1,000 lb/ft) over any portion of the semitrailer. The proposed standard also provides detailed procedures for in-service inspections, as well as requirements for testing and quality assurance. The standard addresses only semitrailers, excluding the tractor. Trailers already in service may be certified as complying with the standard if they meet the requirements of the standard. This standard is intended to provide guidance and acceptance criteria needed to establish a uniform minimum level of performance for the designer, manufacturer, owner, operator, and shipper. This standard is not intended to apply to special, non-routine shipments of a one-time or occasional nature which require special permitting. The background and history of the standard are traced and a summary discussion of the standard is provided in this article

  6. Directory of Certificates of Compliance for Radioactive Materials Packages: Report of NRC Approved Quality Assurance Programs for Radioactive Materials Packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-10-01

    This directory contains a Report of NRC Approved Packages (Volume 1), Certificates of Compliance (Volume 2), and a Report of NRC Approved Quality Assurance Programs for Radioactive Materials Packages (Volume 3). The purpose of this directory is to make available a convenient source of information on Quality Assurance Programs and Packagings which have been approved by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Shipments of radioactive material utilizing these packagings must be in accordance with the provisions of 49 CFR section 173.471 and 10 CFR Part 71, as applicable. In satisfying the requirements of Section 71.12, it is the responsibility of the licensees to insure themselves that they have a copy of the current approval and conduct their transportation activities in accordance with an NRC approved quality assurance program

  7. Users manual. Pursuit program of use licenses of radioactive material or generator equipment of ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becerril M, V.M.; Villarreal, J.E.

    1992-05-01

    The objective of the program 'Databases for the pursuit of licenses of use of radioactive material', it consists on the application of a computer system carried out in dbase IV that it allows the control of the all the information related with those licenses for use, possession and storage of radioactive material or generator equipment of ionizing radiations. (Author)

  8. Objectives, standards and criteria for radioactive waste disposal in the European Community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlowski, S.; Schaller, K.H.

    1989-01-01

    The present report, edited by a working group within the framework of the European Commission research programme on radioactive waste management and disposal, reviews the objectives, standards and criteria for radioactive waste disposal in the European Community with a view to identifying common features and differences in the regulatory frameworks of its Member States. Suggestions for possible harmonization are made. A few common general principles form the basis for legal and regulatory measures. These principles apply to and are discussed for the following: radiation protection (with the systems of dose limitation and control), ethical and sociological questions, environmental and natural resources protection, and nuclear safeguards. A description is given of the implementation of common principles, standards and requirements at Community level, in line with requirements laid down in the European Community Treaties, and in international conventions and recommendations. This is followed by a review of the implementation of basic criteria by national safety authorities. Regulatory measures and national policies, and the approaches used in devising criteria are discussed for both near-surface disposal of low-level waste, and for deep geological disposal of waste in continental geological formations. Finally, the roles and duties of the operators of radioactive waste facilities are reported. More detailed information on particular aspects is presented in the annexes

  9. Packaging and transportation of radioactive materials: summary program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-01-01

    This document contains summaries or abstracts of reports presented at the Symposium on Packaging and Transportation of Radioactive Materials. Separate indexing has been performed on individual items presented at this conference. (DC)

  10. Packaging and transportation of radioactive materials: summary program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    This document contains summaries or abstracts of reports presented at the Symposium on Packaging and Transportation of Radioactive Materials. Separate indexing has been performed on individual items presented at this conference

  11. 14 CFR 151.99 - Modifications of programming standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Modifications of programming standards. 151... (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS FEDERAL AID TO AIRPORTS Project Programming Standards § 151.99 Modifications of programming standards. The Director, Airports, Service, or the Regional Director concerned may, on individual...

  12. Proceedings of the international symposium on radioactive waste disposal: Health and environmental criteria and standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hultcrantz, K.

    1999-04-01

    The co-organisers of the International Symposium on Health and Environmental Criteria and Standards for Radioactive Waste Disposal are pleased to present these proceedings. This Symposium succeeded in bringing together a wide range of participants and perspectives in order to address in a common forum the technical and non-technical issues related to long-term storage of radioactive waste. The papers presented herein reflect both the diversity of the participants and the complexity of the issues addressed. The sessions, panels, and papers developed for the symposium focused on some of the daunting challenges posed by long-term isolation and storage of high level radioactive waste. Panel sessions addressed the basic principles of criteria and standards, the context of the risks involved, and an overview of relevant philosophical, social, and ethical issues. Paper sessions considered national laws, policies and experiences; criteria formulation; environmental protection; compliance; human intrusion; and fundamental philosophical, social, and ethical issues. The presentations stimulated lively discussion and debate, and the contributors received valuable feedback. The interplay between technical and social aspects reflected in some papers and in the discussion highlights the changing role of the public in radioactive waste issues. The average citizen has become more aware of and more involved in radioactive waste matters in recent years. Solutions that were previously analysed through a technological lens are now being viewed in a much broader perspective that better addresses the concerns of local communities as well as national and international interests. Public involvement must begin earlier, last longer, and improve in quality so as to create an ongoing dialogue and debate rather than cycles of dictates and discord. The symposium has offered suggestions as to how government, industry, and the public can foster a broader dialogue on the formulation and

  13. A perspective on demonstrating compliance with standards for disposal of high-level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocher, D.C.; Smith, E.D.; O'Kelley, G.D.; Sjoreen, A.L.

    1985-01-01

    A perspective which the authors have developed on the problem of demonstrating that geologic repositories for the disposal of high-level radioactive wastes will comply with system performance standards is discussed. Their viewpoint arises from a concern that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's proposed environmental standard for high-level waste disposal appears to require demonstrations of compliance which are incompatible with scientific knowledge; i.e., the standard does not take into account the likely importance of unquantifiable and unresolvable uncertainty in repository performance-assessment models. A general approach to demonstrations of compliance is proposed which is thought to be compatible with the kinds of technical information that will be available for judging long-term repository performance. The authors' approach emphasizes the importance of investigating alternative conceptual models and lines of reasoning in evaluating repository performance and the importance of subjective scientific judgment in the decision-making process. (Auth.)

  14. The national standards program for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whittemore, W.L.

    1977-01-01

    In 1970 a standards committee called ANS-15 was established by the American Nuclear Society (ANS) to prepare appropriate standards for research reactors. In addition, ANS acts as Secretariat for a national standards committee N17 which is responsible to the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) for the national consensus efforts for standards related to research reactors. To date ANS-15 has completed or is working on 14 standards covering all aspects of the operation of research reactors. Of the 11 research reactor standards submitted to the ANSI N17 Committee since its inception, six have been issued as National standards, and the remaining are still in the process of review. (author)

  15. A linear program for assessing the assignment and scheduling of radioactive wastes for disposal to sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutchinson, W.

    1983-04-01

    The report takes the form of a user guide to a computer program using linear programming techniques to aid the assignment and scheduling of radioactive wastes for disposal to sea. The program is aimed at the identification of 'optimum' amounts of each waste stream for disposal to sea without violating specific constraints values and/or fairness parameters. (author)

  16. Leveraging Standards to Promote Program Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Michelle D.; Mawhinney, Hanna; Reed, Cynthia J.

    2016-01-01

    Standards provide a foundation for thinking about leadership development and practice. This article explores three sets of standards that impact educational leadership preparation: (a) the recently revised Interstate School Leaders Licensure Consortium (ISLLC) standards, which are now known as the Practice Standards for Educational Leaders (PSEL);…

  17. An automated LS(β)- NaI(Tl)(γ) coincidence system as absolute standard for radioactivity measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Leena; Das, A P; Ravindra, Anuradha; Kulkarni, D B; Kulkarni, M S

    2018-07-01

    4πβ-γ coincidence method is a powerful and widely used method to determine the absolute activity concentration of radioactive solutions. A new automated liquid scintillator based coincidence system has been designed, developed, tested and established as absolute standard for radioactivity measurements. The automation is achieved using PLC (programmable logic controller) and SCADA (supervisory control and data acquisition). Radioactive solution of 60 Co was standardized to compare the performance of the automated system with proportional counter based absolute standard maintained in the laboratory. The activity concentrations determined using these two systems were in very good agreement; the new automated system can be used for absolute measurement of activity concentration of radioactive solutions. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Where is New York State relative to cleanup standards for soils contaminated with radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merges, P.J.

    1995-01-01

    In September 1993, New York State adopted a cleanup guideline for radioactively contaminated sites being remediated for unrestricted release. This paper reviews this cleanup guideline and discusses its implementation by Bureau of Radiation staff. A cleanup guideline (1) has been adopted by the State of New York which applies to residual radiological contamination on sites undergoing remediation for unrestricted use. The guideline is flexible and allows for alternative site cleanup approaches. The application of this guidance by radiation control program staff is discussed herein. There may be a need to revisit properties that were felt to be open-quotes cleanclose quotes previously - but fail to meet the new guidance

  19. USEPA consideration of human intrusion in setting radioactive waste disposal standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egan, D.J.; Hadlock, C.R.

    1989-01-01

    In 1985, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) promulgated standards for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level and transuranic radioactive wastes (40 CFR Part 191). These standards placed limits, called containment requirements, on the projected releases of radioactivity due to both normal and accidental events for 10,000 years after disposal. The standards also contained qualitative assurance requirements that described the role foreseen for both active and passive institutional controls. They included both requirements for such institutional controls and limitations on the ways that they could be relied upon. This paper describes these assumptions about institutional controls made by the USEPA, and it discusses the types of future societies that would be consistent with such assumptions. The paper also reviews the USEPA's approach towards assessing the long-term performance of mined geologic repositories. In these assessments, the risks caused by inadvertent human intrusion into the area of a repository usually dominate the risks projected from other release scenarios. The assumptions made about inadvertent intrusion are discussed, and they are related to the policies regarding institutional controls. The disposal standards that the USEPA promulgated in 1985 were overturned by a Federal court in 1987, and the Agency is now preparing revised standards for public review and comment. These are expected to by published in 1990. However, the approaches regarding institutional controls and human intrusion are expected to remain the same as those used in 1985. Some paragraphs (selected by the NEA Secretariat) of 40 CFR Part 191, subpart B (as of 1985 version) with particular relevance to human intrusion are cited

  20. 78 FR 79567 - National School Lunch Program and School Breakfast Program: Nutrition Standards for All Foods...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-31

    ... Program: Nutrition Standards for All Foods Sold in Schools as Required by the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids... interim rule entitled National School Lunch Program and School Breakfast Program: Nutrition Standards for..., 2013 / Rules and Regulations [[Page 79567

  1. Recent radioactive ion beam program at RIKEN and related topics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. RIKEN; radioactive ion beams; magic numbers. PACS No. 21.10.-k. 1. Introduction. In RIKEN, there are several heavy ion accelerators. Main accelerator is the RIKEN ring cyclotron (RRC) with K = 540, that has been operated from 1986. The RRC has two injectors; one is heavy ion linear accelerator that has been ...

  2. Development of a package program for estimating ground level concentrations of radioactive gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilkamhang, W.

    1986-01-01

    A package program for estimating ground level concentration of radioactive gas from elevate release was develop for use on IBM P C microcomputer. The main program, GAMMA PLUME NT10, is based on the well known VALLEY MODEL which is a Fortran computer code intended for mainframe computers. Other two options were added, namely, calculation of radioactive gas ground level concentration in Ci/m 3 and dose equivalent rate in mren/hr. In addition, a menu program and editor program were developed to render the program easier to use since the option could be readily selected and the input data could be easily modified as required through the keyboard. The accuracy and reliability of the program is almost identical to the mainframe. Ground level concentration of radioactive radon gas due to ore program processing in the nuclear chemistry laboratory of the Department of Nuclear Technology was estimated. In processing radioactive ore at a rate of 2 kg/day, about 35 p Ci/s of radioactive gas was released from a 14 m stack. When meteorological data of Don Muang (average for 5 years 1978-1982) were used maximum ground level concentration and the dose equivalent rate were found to be 0.00094 p Ci/m 3 and 5.0 x 10 -10 mrem/hr respectively. The processing time required for the above problem was about 7 minutes for any case of source on IBM P C which was acceptable for a computer of this class

  3. Evaluation of alternatives for high-level and transuranic radioactive- waste disposal standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klett, R.D.; Gruebel, M.M.

    1992-12-01

    The remand of the US Environmental Protection Agency's long-term performance standards for radioactive-waste disposal provides an opportunity to suggest modifications that would make the regulation more defensible and remove inconsistencies yet retain the basic structure of the original rule. Proposed modifications are in three specific areas: release and dose limits, probabilistic containment requirements, and transuranic-waste disposal criteria. Examination of the modifications includes discussion of the alternatives, demonstration of methods of development and implementation, comparison of the characteristics, attributes, and deficiencies of possible options within each area, and analysis of the implications for performance assessments. An additional consideration is the impact on the entire regulation when developing or modifying the individual components of the radiological standards

  4. Levels of concern for radioactive contaminations in soil according to soil protection standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gellermann, R.; Barkowski, D.; Machtolf, M.

    2016-01-01

    In the paper the question is examined whether the established soil protection standards for carcinogenic substances are also applicable to the assessment of radioactive soil contamination. Referring to the methods applied in soil protection for evaluation of dose-effectrelations and estimations of carcinogenic risks as well as the calculation methods for test values in soil protection ''levels of concern'' for soil contamination by artificial radionuclides are derived. The values obtained are significantly larger than the values for unrestricted clearance of ground according to the German Radiation Protection Ordinance (StrlSchV). The thesis that soil is protected according to environmental standards provided that radiation protection requirements are met needs further checks but can be probably confirmed if the radiation protection requirements are clearly defined.

  5. Benefits of standard format and content for approval of packaging for radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pstrak, D.; Osgood, N.

    2004-01-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) uses Regulatory Guide 7.9, ''Standard Format and Content of Part 71 Applications for Approval of Packaging for Radioactive Material'' to provide recommendations on the preparation of applications for approval of Type B and fissile material packages. The purpose of this Regulatory Guide is to assist the applicant in preparing an application that demonstrates the adequacy of a package in meeting the 10 CFR Part 71 packaging requirements. NRC recently revised Regulatory Guide 7.9 to reflect current changes to the regulations in Part 71 as a result of a recent rulemaking that included changes to the structural, containment, and criticality requirements for packages. Overall, the NRC issues Regulatory Guides to describe methods that are acceptable to the NRC staff for implementing specific parts of the NRC's regulations, to explain techniques used by the NRC staff in evaluating specific problems, and to provide guidance to applicants. It is important to note the specific purpose of this Regulatory Guide. As the name indicates, this Guide sets forth a standard format for application submission that is acceptable to the NRC staff that, when used by the applicant, will accomplish several objectives. First, use of the guide provides a consistent and repeatable approach that indicates the information to be provided by the applicant. Second, the organization of the information in the application will assist the reviewer(s) in locating information. Ultimately, accomplishing these objectives will help to ensure the completeness of the information in the application as well as decrease the review time. From an international perspective, use of a standard format approach could enhance the efficiency with which Competent Authorities certify and validate packages for use in the packaging and transportation of radioactive material worldwide. This streamlined approach of preparing package applications could ultimately lead to uniform

  6. Radioactive material (RAM) accident/incident data analysis program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emerson, E.L.; McClure, J.D.

    1985-03-01

    This report describes the development of the Radioactive Material Transportation Accident/Incident Data Base (RAM-AIDB), which contains information on the occurrences of transportation accidents and incidents, for radioactive materials (RAM) that are involved in the process of transportation, loading and unloading operation, or temporary storage. These transportation operations are in support of the nuclear fuel cycle for electrical energy generation. This study analyzes in some detail basic accident/incident statistical data, RAM packaging accident response data, and the health effects associated with RAM transport accidents/incidents. This report presents a summary of US RAM transport accident/incident experience for the period 1971 through December 1981. In addition, a sample annual summary of accident/incident experience is presented for the calendar year 1981

  7. NCRP Program Area Committee 5: Environmental Radiation and Radioactive Waste Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S Y; Napier, Bruce

    2016-02-01

    Program Area Committee 5 of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) focuses its activities on environmental radiation and radioactive waste issues. The Committee completed a number of reports in these subject areas, most recently NCRP Report No. 175, Decision Making for Late-Phase Recovery from Major Nuclear or Radiological Incidents. Historically this Committee addressed emerging issues of the nation pertaining to radioactivity or radiation in the environment or radioactive waste issues due either to natural origins or to manmade activities.

  8. Radioactive Waste Management Research Program Plan for high-level waste: 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-05-01

    This plan will identify and resolve technical and scientific issues involved in the NRC's licensing and regulation of disposal systems intended to isolate high level hazardous radioactive wastes (HLW) from the human environment. The plan describes the program goals, discusses the research approach to be used, lays out peer review procedures, discusses the history and development of the high level radioactive waste problem and the research effort to date and describes study objectives and research programs in the areas of materials and engineering, hydrology and geochemistry, and compliance assessment and modeling. The plan also details the cooperative interactions with international waste management research programs. Proposed Earth Science Seismotectonic Research Program plan for radioactive waste facilities is appended

  9. IAEA coordinated research program on the evaluation of solidified high-level radioactive waste products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grover, J.R.; Schneider, K.J.

    1979-01-01

    A coordinated research program on the evaluation of solidified high-level radioactive waste products has been active with the IAEA since 1976. The program's objectives are to integrate research and to provide a data bank on an international basis in this subject area. Results and considerations to date are presented

  10. EPA's LLW standards program: Below regulatory concern criteria development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holcomb, W.F.; Gruhlke, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is developing generally applicable environmental standards for land disposal of low-level radioactive wastes. These standards will include criteria for determining which wastes have sufficiently low levels of radioactivity to be considered ''Below Regulatory Concern'' (BRC) in regards to their radiation hazard. Risk assessments to support the BRC criteria include an analysis of 18 surrogate radioactive waste streams, generated by nuclear power reactors and other fuel cycle facilities, industrial, medical and educational facilities, and consumers. Deregulated disposal alternatives, such as sanitary landfills, municipal dumps, incinerators and on-site landfills, situated in diverse demographic settings are used in the analysis. A number of waste streams which contributed only small doses or fractions of a health effect over 10,000 years were identified. Disposal of such wastes without consideration of their very low radioactivity could result in significant cost savings to the commercial fuel cycle and government operations as well as to medical, educational, and industrial facilities, and with minimal risk to the public. The concept of BRC wastes appears both feasible and cost effective

  11. Directory of certificates of compliance for radioactive materials packages: Report of NRC approved quality assurance programs for radioactive material packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-12-01

    This directory contains a Report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Approved Packages (Volume 1), all Certificates of Compliance (Volume 2), and a Report of NRC Approved Quality Assurance Programs (Volume 3) for Radioactive Material Packages effective October 1, 1988. The purpose of this directory is to make available a convenient source of information on packagings which have been approved by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. To assist in identifying packaging, an index by Model Number and corresponding Certificate of Compliance Number is included at the front of Volume 2 of the directory. A listing by packaging types is included in the back of Volume 2. An alphabetical listing by Company name is included in the back of Volume 3 for approved QA programs. The Reports include a listing of all users of each package design and approved QA programs prior to the publication date of the directory

  12. Application of simulated standard spectra in natural radioactivity measurements using gamma spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narayani, K.; Pant, A.D.; Bhosle, Nitin; Anilkumar, S.; Singh, Rajvir; Pradeepkumar, K.S.

    2014-01-01

    Gamma ray spectrometry is one of the well known analytical techniques for environmental radioactivity measurements. Gamma spectrometer based on NaI(Tl) scintillation detectors is very popular since it offers high efficiency, low cost and case in handling. The poor energy resolution of the NaI(TI) detector is the major disadvantage making tile analysis of complex gamma ray spectra difficult. Least square method or the full spectrum analysis method is widely used for the analysis of complex spectra from scintillation detectors. The main requirement of this method is that the individual standard spectra of all nuclides expected in the complex spectrum in the same measurement geometry must be available. It is not always possible and feasible to have all the standards of nuclides in the desired geometry. A methodology based on the use of simulated standard spectra generated by Monte Carlo technique was proposed for analysis of complex spectra of nuclides. In the present work, for the analysis of 238 U, 233 Th and 40 K in soil samples, the same methodology was applied by using the simulated standard spectra in soil matrix. The details of the simulation method and results analysis of 238 U, 232 Th and 40 K in environmental samples are discussed in this paper

  13. Program for responsible and safe disposal of spent fuel elements and radioactive wastes (National disposal program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    The contribution covers the following topics: fundamentals of the disposal policy; amount of radioactive wastes and prognosis; disposal of radioactive wastes - spent fuel elements and wastes from waste processing, radioactive wastes with low heat production; legal framework of the nuclear waste disposal in Germany; public participation, cost and financing.

  14. Review of radioactive waste management programs in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keen, N.J.; Duncan, A.G.

    1982-01-01

    The paper reports progress by the Department of Environment and the nuclear industry in developing and implementing a strategy for the management of radioactive waste in the UK. It outlines the range of possible disposal facilities required to deal with all classes of waste arising from nuclear power generation. The present practices for waste management and the main lines of development by the main waste producers of the plant needed in future are outlined, together with a summary of some of the more generic R and D devoted to treatment, packaging and transport of wastes

  15. NASA software documentation standard software engineering program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    The NASA Software Documentation Standard (hereinafter referred to as Standard) can be applied to the documentation of all NASA software. This Standard is limited to documentation format and content requirements. It does not mandate specific management, engineering, or assurance standards or techniques. This Standard defines the format and content of documentation for software acquisition, development, and sustaining engineering. Format requirements address where information shall be recorded and content requirements address what information shall be recorded. This Standard provides a framework to allow consistency of documentation across NASA and visibility into the completeness of project documentation. This basic framework consists of four major sections (or volumes). The Management Plan contains all planning and business aspects of a software project, including engineering and assurance planning. The Product Specification contains all technical engineering information, including software requirements and design. The Assurance and Test Procedures contains all technical assurance information, including Test, Quality Assurance (QA), and Verification and Validation (V&V). The Management, Engineering, and Assurance Reports is the library and/or listing of all project reports.

  16. The IAEA Standards for the Radioactive Discharge Control: Present Status and Future Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balonov, M.; Linsley, G.; Robinson, C.; Cabianca, T.

    2004-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is the organization within the UN family with a statutory mandate to establish standards for the protection of health and environment against ionizing radiation, and to provide for the application of those standards. As part of these functions, the IAEA periodically reviews the status and continued relevance of the standards to the needs of its Member States. Recent work on the development of standards for the radioactive discharge control includes development of practical guidance for setting discharge limits, elaboration on methodology for the radiation protection of non-human species, and preparation of guidance on environmental monitoring for radiation protection purposes. Development of these safety documents is influenced by recent international and regional tendencies, based on social initiatives, to reduce radioactive discharges substantially below levels justified by radiological criteria. The IAEA has developed preliminary guidance on practical aspects of setting discharge limits, which included a review of national regulatory experience in this regard. This review suggested that societal pressures and regulatory practicalities results in discharge controls that were likely to be more restrictive that those that would be implied by formal optimization techniques. Regulatory review of authorizations includes a number of considerations, including predicted doses to members of the critical group, but the suitability of abatement forms a greater part in the decision-making process than allowed for in previous safety guidance. The IAEA has, in recent years, established a programme of work specifically addressing the development of safety standards on assessing the impact of ionizing radiation on non-human species, in co-operation with other relevant international organizations. The main issues arising will be summarised in the paper with the main focus on an exploration of the possible form of future regulatory

  17. Technical Analysis Program / Flight Standards Automation System -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — 1-TAP is a national data quality application 2-Logbook is field office tracking and suspense program for investigation tracking and certification tracking 3-Numerous...

  18. Comparison of selected DOE and non-DOE requirements, standards, and practices for Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, L.; Kudera, D.; Newberry, W.

    1995-12-01

    This document results from the Secretary of Energy's response to Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 94--2. The Secretary stated that the US Department of Energy (DOE) would ''address such issues as...the need for additional requirements, standards, and guidance on low-level radioactive waste management. '' The authors gathered information and compared DOE requirements and standards for the safety aspects Of low-level disposal with similar requirements and standards of non-DOE entities

  19. Recommended regulatory program plan for low-level radioactive waste management in Maryland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The National Program for Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management was instituted by the US Department of Energy to assist the states in carrying out this new federal policy. Based on the premise that the safe disposal of low-level waste is technologically feasible and that states have the necessary degree of authority to set management policy, the National Program is helping them to develop a responsive, comprehensive regulatory program. The State of Maryland is actively engaged with the National Program in its efforts to form a comprehensive management program. The purpose of this plan is to review existing statutory and regulatory program responsibilities and provide a recommended management scheme for low-level radioactive waste

  20. Study of relationship between radioactivity distribution, contamination burden and quality standard, accommodate energy of code river Yogyakarta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agus Taftazani and Muzakky

    2009-01-01

    Study of relationship between distribution, contamination burden of gross β radioactivity and natural radionuclide in water and sediment sample from 11 observation station Code river to quality standard and maximum capacity of Code river have been done. Natural radio nuclides identification and gross β radioactivity measurement of condensed water, dry and homogeneous sediment powder (past through 100 mesh sieve) samples have been done by using spectrometer and GM counter. Radioactivity data was analyzed descriptive with histogram to show the spreading pattern of data. Contamination burden data, quality standard and maximum capacity of river Code was to descriptive analyzed by line diagram to knowing relationship between contamination burden, quality standard, and maximum capacity of Code river. The observation of water and sediment at 11 observation station show that the emitter natural radionuclides: 210 Pb, 212 Pb, 214 Pb, 226 Ra, 208 Tl, 214 Bi, 228 Ac and 40 K were detected. The analytical result conclusion was that the pattern spread of average activity gross β and were increase from upstream to downstream of the Code river samples. Contamination burden, quality standard and maximum capacity of radionuclide activity of 210 Pb, 212 Pb, 226 Ra and 228 Ac were more smaller than quality standard of river water according to regulation of Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency 02/Ka-BAPETEN/V-99 concerning quality standard of radioactivity. It’s mean that Code river still in good contamination burden for the four radionuclides. (author)

  1. Development of a low cost, GPS-based upgrade to a standard handheld gamma detector for mapping environmental radioactive contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paridaens, J.

    2006-01-01

    A low cost extension to a standard handheld radiation monitor was developed, allowing one to perform outdoor georeferenced gamma measurements. It consists of a commercial wireless Bluetooth[reg] GPS receiver, a commercial RS-232 to Bluetooth[reg] converter combined with a standard Bluetooth[reg] enabled pocket personal computer (PPC). The system is intended for use in difficult to access areas, typically for foot campaigns. As the operator walks, a straightforward homemade visual basic program alternately reads GPS position and gamma dose rate into the PPC, creating a data log. This allows a single operator on foot to map between 50 and 200 ha of environmental radiation per day in very rugged areas, depending on the accessibility of the terrain and the detail required. On a test field with known contamination, a spatial precision of about 5-10 m was obtainable. The device was also used to reveal complex contamination patterns in the flooding zones of a radioactively contaminated small river

  2. Development of a low cost, GPS-based upgrade to a standard handheld gamma detector for mapping environmental radioactive contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paridaens, J. [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, SCK.CEN, Boeretang 200, B2400 Mol (Belgium)]. E-mail: jparidae@sckcen.be

    2006-02-15

    A low cost extension to a standard handheld radiation monitor was developed, allowing one to perform outdoor georeferenced gamma measurements. It consists of a commercial wireless Bluetooth[reg] GPS receiver, a commercial RS-232 to Bluetooth[reg] converter combined with a standard Bluetooth[reg] enabled pocket personal computer (PPC). The system is intended for use in difficult to access areas, typically for foot campaigns. As the operator walks, a straightforward homemade visual basic program alternately reads GPS position and gamma dose rate into the PPC, creating a data log. This allows a single operator on foot to map between 50 and 200 ha of environmental radiation per day in very rugged areas, depending on the accessibility of the terrain and the detail required. On a test field with known contamination, a spatial precision of about 5-10 m was obtainable. The device was also used to reveal complex contamination patterns in the flooding zones of a radioactively contaminated small river.

  3. Environmental monitoring and radiation protection programs of Novi Han radioactive waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christoskova, M.; Kostova, M.; Sheherov, L.; Bekiarov, P.; Iovtchev, M.

    2000-01-01

    The system for monitoring and control as an important part of the safety management of the Novi Han Radioactive Waste Repository contains two independent programs: environmental monitoring of the site (controlled area), the restricted access area and the surveillance area (supervised area) of the repository and radiation protection program including personal dosimetric control and indoor dosimetric control of workplaces in the buildings of the repository. The main activities related to the programs implementation are presented

  4. Forecasting of the radioactive material transport demand for the Brazilian Nuclear Program and the security aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meldonian, Nelson Leon

    1979-01-01

    In the nuclear fuel cycle, a lot of radioactive materials are produced. These radioactive materials must be transported in order to promote the integration of the fuel cycle units. Considerations about the transport characteristics of radioactive material were made for each section of the fuel cycle. These considerations were based on the experience of several countries and in accordance with the International Atomic Energy Agency regulations. A prediction of transport demands for the Brazilian Nuclear Program until year 2.010 was made. The prediction refers mainly to the quantity of radioactive material produced in each section of the cycle the quantity of vehicles needed for the transport of these materials. Several safety aspects were considered specially, the accidents predictions for years 2.000 and 2.010. The accident probability in Brazilian railroads and highways was compared with that of the USA. (author)

  5. Implementation of a management applied program for liquid radioactive waste treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y. H.; Ann, S. J.; Jo, H. S.; Son, J. S.

    2003-01-01

    A data collection of a liquid radioactive waste treatment process of a research organization became necessary while developing the RAWMIS(Radioactive Waste Management Integration System) which it can generate personal history management for efficient management of a waste, documents, all kinds of statistics. This paper introduces an input and output application program design to do to database with data in the results and a stream process of a treatment that analyzed the waste occurrence present situation and data by treatment process. Data on the actual treatment process that is not limited experiment improve by a document, human traces, saving of material resources and improve with efficiency of tracking about a radioactive waste and a process and give help to radioactive waste material valance and inventory study

  6. Special Education Compliance: Program Review Standards and Indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missouri State Dept. of Elementary and Secondary Education, Jefferson City. Div. of Special Education.

    This manual contains special education standards and indicators for educating children with disabilities in Missouri. It is divided into four main sections. Section 1 contains special education compliance standards based upon the federal Office of Special Education Programs Continuous Improvement Monitoring Program clusters and indicators. The…

  7. Summary report of the state surveillance program on the transportation of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-11-01

    From 1973 to 1976, a surveillance program was conducted in New Jersey, Oregon, Missouri, New York, Illinois, Texas, Louisiana, South Carolina, Minnesota, and New York City to provide training support for State radiation personnel and to determine actual radiation exposure conditions and radioactive material package handling practices through the terminals of air carriers and freight forwarders. NRC and DOT along with the participating States, developed the surveillance program. In general, the results did not indicate a public health or safety problem due to the transportation of radioactive materials. Some employees of several freight forwarders, are, however, receiving annual exposures in excess of 500 mrem. Recommendations are given

  8. An integrated approach to strategic planning in the civilian high-level radioactive waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprecher, W.M.; Katz, J.; Redmond, R.J.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the approach that the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) of the Department of Energy (DOE) is taking to the task of strategic planning for the civilian high-level radioactive waste management program. It highlights selected planning products and activities that have emerged over the past year. It demonstrates that this approach is an integrated one, both in the sense of being systematic on the program level but also as a component of DOE strategic planning efforts. Lastly, it indicates that OCRWM strategic planning takes place in a dynamic environment and consequently is a process that is still evolving in response to the demands placed upon it

  9. The radioactive waste management and disposal program in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacq, F.

    2001-01-01

    The bill voted in 1991 provides a framework, up to the year 2006, for all researches conducted in France on the management of high-level and long-lived radioactive wastes. Three complementary directions are explored in the intervening period, including geological disposal. The law sets the conditions for the studies and researches, particularly the necessary reliance on experiments in underground laboratories. In August 1999, the government authorized Andra to build a first laboratory, in the clay formation at the boundary of the Meuse and Haute-Marne departments, an operation that is under way today. A second laboratory is also slated, in a granitic formation, on a site remaining to be determined. When the 2006 deadline arrives, a debate will be organized in the French Parliament. The present article discusses the researches conducted in connection with the feasibility study of disposal in a deep geological formation, and highlights the complementarity between the different research directions. (author)

  10. Approach and issues toward development of risk-based release standards for radioactive scrap metal recycle and reuse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, S.Y.; Nieves, L.A.; Nabelssi, B.K.; LePoire, D.J.

    1994-01-01

    The decontamination and decommissioning of nuclear facilities is expected to generate large amounts of slightly radioactive scrap metal (RSM). It is likely that some of these materials will be suitable for recycling and reuse. The amount of scrap steel from DOE facilities, for instance, is estimated to be more than one million tons (Hertzler 1993). However, under current practice and without the establishment of acceptable recycling standards, the RSM would be disposed of primarily as radioactive low-level waste (LLW). In the United States, no specific standards have been developed for the unrestricted release of bulk contaminated materials. Although standards for unrestricted release of radioactive surface contamination (NRC 1974) have existed for about 20 years, the release of materials is not commonly practiced because of the lack of risk-based justifications. Recent guidance from international bodies (IAEA 1988) has established a basis for deriving risk-based release limits for radioactive materials. It is important, therefore, to evaluate the feasibility of recycling and associated issues necessary for the establishment of risk-based release limits for the radioactive metals

  11. Understanding low-level radioactive waste. National Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-10-01

    Chapters are devoted to: background and policymaking for low-level waste management; commercial low-level waste generation; Department of Energy low-level waste generation; low-level waste treatment; packaging and transportation; commercial low-level waste disposal; Department of Energy low-level waste disposal; Department of Energy low-level waste management program; and laws and regulations

  12. ECOTOURISM CERTIFICATION PROGRAMS: STANDARDS AND BENEFITS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariia Holub

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The problem of researching the ecotourism certification processes in the world is very up-to-date nowadays. The relevance of the research is stipulated by current state of environ-mental pollutants, the development of sustainable politics implementation and the fact that now people aware of real danger of environmental catastrophe that threatens the survival of civilization. That’s why the purpose of the article is conducting a complex analysis of foreign ecotourism certi-fication programs. Moreover, it is necessary to study the evolution of ecotourism development to understand the key issues of this problem. The object of this article is the analysis of ecotourism certification worldwide. The subject of the article is the detection of theoretical, methodological and practical aspects of implementation of effective ecotourism certification programs in Ukraine. To clarify all aspects of studying this issue it is necessary to use such theoretical and methodological basis as: modern theories of the genesis and evolution of ecological tourism, logical and analogy analysis, historical method, hypothetical method, classification and graphical method. Using such methods it was found that the development of ecotourism formation has taking three evolutionary steps, which affected the creation of its definition. This fact reveals the classification of different types of sustainable tourism and provides an impetus of ecotourism certification studies. Moreover, it was identified that there is a logical regularity in ecotourism certification programs all over the world. As the result, it was found that practically all the ecotourism certification processes are functioning successfully nowadays. By the way, it can be observed the rapid increase in the amount of ecocertified companies. Moreover, the programs which were analyzed in this article were divided into several steps (depends on the ecotourism certification program following which a company can

  13. Quality assurance requirements and description for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The Quality Assurance Requirements and Description (QARD) is the principal quality assurance document for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program (Program). It establishes the minimum requirements for the Quality Assurance Program. The QARD contains regulatory requirements and program commitments necessary for the development of an effective quality assurance program. Quality assurance implementing documents must be based on, and consistent with, QARD requirements. The QARD applies to the following: (1) acceptance of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste; (2) transport of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste; (3) the Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) facility through application for an operating license; (4) Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS), including the site characterization activities (exploratory studies facility (ESF) and surface based testing), through application for an operating license; (5) the high-level-waste form from production through acceptance. Section 2.0 defines in greater detail criteria for determining work subject to QARD requirements. The QARD is organized into sections, supplements, appendices, and a glossary. The sections contain requirements that are common to all Program elements. The supplements contain requirements for specialized activities. The appendices contain requirements that are specific to an individual Program element. The glossary establishes a common vocabulary for the Quality Assurance Program

  14. A new large-volume metal reference standard for radioactive waste management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzika, F; Hult, M; Stroh, H; Marissens, G; Arnold, D; Burda, O; Kovář, P; Suran, J; Listkowska, A; Tyminski, Z

    2016-03-01

    A new large-volume metal reference standard has been developed. The intended use is for calibration of free-release radioactivity measurement systems and is made up of cast iron tubes placed inside a box of the size of a Euro-pallet (80 × 120 cm). The tubes contain certified activity concentrations of (60)Co (0.290 ± 0.006 Bq g(-1)) and (110m)Ag (3.05 ± 0.09 Bq g(-1)) (reference date: 30 September 2013). They were produced using centrifugal casting from a smelt into which (60)Co was first added and then one piece of neutron irradiated silver wire was progressively diluted. The iron castings were machined to the desirable dimensions. The final material consists of 12 iron tubes of 20 cm outer diameter, 17.6 cm inner diameter, 40 cm length/height and 245.9 kg total mass. This paper describes the reference standard and the process of determining the reference activity values. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  15. National environmental radiation monitoring program: towards formulating policy on radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sukiman Sarmani

    2002-01-01

    Though Malaysia has no nuclear power station, but the management of its low level radioactive waste generated from industrial activities involves most of the same issues that must be considered in countries with nuclear power. These include public consultation at all stages, an open approach, high level scientific and engineering input and political decision by the Government. A carefully planned approach, which involves the public and gives time to build trust and confidence, is necessary for success. It is also pertinent to establish accurate and reliable data on environmental radiation to accurately assess possible risk. This is where a national monitoring program on environmental radiation is very important. While accurate data will help formulate sound policy on radioactive waste management, it should also be readily available to the public to gain support and acceptance. This paper presents arguments on the importance of a national monitoring program for environmental radiation as an input for formulating a policy on radioactive waste management in Malaysia. (Author)

  16. Research program on radioactive wastes - Overview report for 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brander, S.

    2012-01-01

    This report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) summarises the program's main points of interest and the work done in the year 2011 along with the results obtained. The aims of the program are recapitulated. The research program is co-ordinated by a working group comprising the Swiss Federal Office of Energy, the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate ENSI, the Commission on Nuclear Waste Disposal and the Commission for Safety in Nuclear Installations, Some highlights of the research program are briefly described and discussed. Topics covered concern the marking of nuclear waste repositories, value judgement and opinion building, waste management as well as repository design, including dimensioning and monitoring systems, National and international co-operation is also discussed

  17. Radioactive source recovery program responses to neutron source emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinehart, S.M.; Hatler, V.A.; Gray, D.W.; Guillen, A.D.

    1997-01-01

    Recovery of neutron sources containing Pu 239 and Be is currently taking place at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The program was initiated in 1979 by the Department of Energy (DOE) to dismantle and recover sources owned primarily by universities and the Department of Defense. Since the inception of this program, Los Alamos has dismantled and recovered more than 1000 sources. The dismantlement and recovery process involves the removal of source cladding and the chemical separation of the source materials to eliminate neutron emissions. While this program continues for the disposal of 239 Pu/Be sources, there is currently no avenue for the disposition of any sources other than those containing Pu 239 . Increasingly, there have been demands from agencies both inside and outside the Federal Government and from the public to dispose of unwanted sources containing 238 Pu/Be and 241 Am/Be. DOE is attempting to establish a formal program to recover these sources and is working closely with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) on a proposed Memorandum of Understanding to formalize an Acceptance Program. In the absence of a formal program to handle 238 Pu/Be and 241 Am/Be neutron sources, Los Alamos has responded to several emergency requests to receive and recover sources that have been determined to be a threat to public health and safety. This presentation will: (1) review the established 239 Pu neutron source recovery program at Los Alamos, (2) detail plans for a more extensive neutron source disposal program, and (3) focus on recent emergency responses

  18. The US Public Health Service's radioactive materials program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villforth, J.C.

    1996-01-01

    This review concentrates primarily on the U.S. Public Health Service's radiological health programs that are related to the use of radium in medicine. The history of program development is given, with a focus on legal and regulatory aspects. Federal and state cooperative actions are outlined, including congressional radium hearings, National Advisory Committee on Radiation, and Federal Radiation Council rulings. Problems associated with the medical use of radium, such as contamination and disposal, are also described. 30 refs

  19. Program planning for future improvement in managing ORNL's radioactive wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-01-01

    This report is intended to serve as a reference document and guide in developing the long-term improvements section of ORNL's radioactive waste management plan. The report reviews ORNL's operations and future program needs in terms of currently applicable DOE regulations and also in terms of regulations and accepted practices of the commerical sector of the nuclear power industry so that the impact of potential future adoption of these regulations and standards on ORNL's operations can be fully evaluated. The principal conclusion reached after reviewing ORNL's waste management operations is that these operations are currently being conducted in a manner that does not endanger the health or safety of workers or the general public and that does not have an adverse effect on the environment. Although nineteen specific problem areas have been identified all of these problems can be attributed to one of the following: a) the legacy of past practices; b) gradual deterioration of systems which have reached (or are near to reaching) the end of their reasonable design lives; and c) potential changes in regulations applicable to ORNL. All of the programs designed to improve or correct these problem areas could be accomplished within a four year period. However, given current limitations on manpower and capital, these programs would more likely be spread out over a five to ten year period of time if they were all to be undertaken. The cost of undertaking all of these projects concurrently is estimated to be between 60 and 100 million dollars. Due to the many unknowns and uncertainties associated with the problem areas, actual total costs for specific projects could vary from those presented in this report by as much as 300 percent. (DMC)

  20. Standard Guide for Radiation Protection Program for Decommissioning Operations

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1987-01-01

    1.1 This guide provides instruction to the individual charged with the responsibility for developing and implementing the radiation protection program for decommissioning operations. 1.2 This guide provides a basis for the user to develop radiation protection program documentation that will support both the radiological engineering and radiation safety aspects of the decommissioning project. 1.3 This guide presents a description of those elements that should be addressed in a specific radiation protection plan for each decommissioning project. The plan would, in turn, form the basis for development of the implementation procedures that execute the intent of the plan. 1.4 This guide applies to the development of radiation protection programs established to control exposures to radiation and radioactive materials associated with the decommissioning of nuclear facilities. The intent of this guide is to supplement existing radiation protection programs as they may pertain to decommissioning workers, members of...

  1. Development of a low-level radioactive waste shipper model. National Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-03-01

    During 1982, Inter/Face Associates, Inc., conducted a low-level radioactive waste management survey of Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensees in Massachusetts for the US Department of Energy's National Low-Level Waste Management Program. In the process of conducting the survey, a model was developed, based on existing NRC license classification systems, that would identify licensees who ship low-level waste for disposal. This report presents the model and documents the procedures used in developing and testing it. After the model was tested, several modifications were developed with the goal of determining the model's ability to identify waste shippers under different parameters. The report includes a discussion of the modifications

  2. DOE materials program supporting immobilization of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oertel, G.K.; Scheib, W.S. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    A summary is presented of the DOE program for developing waste-form criteria, immobilization processes, and generation and evaluation of performance characterization data. Interrelationships are discussed among repository design, materials requirements, immobilization process definition, quality assurance, and risk analysis as part of the National Environmental Policy Act and regulatory processes

  3. Recent radioactive ion beam program at RIKEN and related topics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Recent experimental programs at RIKEN concerning RI beams are reviewed. RIKEN has the ring cyclotron (RRC) with high intense heavy-ion beams and large acceptance fragment separator, RIPS. The complex can provide high intense RI-beams. By using the high intense RI-beams, a variety of experiments have been ...

  4. Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management ensuring quality assurance in the waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kehew, W.J.; Barrett, L.H.

    1991-01-01

    This paper focuses on the Quality Assurance (QA) program of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). It describes the objectives and philosophy of quality assurance and the plans and activities that OCRWM is undertaking to implement a fully qualified QA program prior to beginning new site characterization activities in Nevada. This paper outlines OCRWM's plan to implement and use a well-designed and effective QA program throughout all elements of the program. (author) 1 fig., 5 refs

  5. Further experience with the local lymph node assay using standard radioactive and nonradioactive cell count measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolle, Susanne N; Basketter, David; Schrage, Arnhild; Gamer, Armin O; van Ravenzwaay, Bennard; Landsiedel, Robert

    2012-08-01

    In a previous study, the predictive capacity of a modified local lymph node assay (LLNA) based on cell counts, the LNCC, was demonstrated to be closely similar to that of the original assay. In addition, a range of substances, including some technical/commercial materials and a range of agrochemical formulations (n = 180) have also been assessed in both methods in parallel. The results in the LNCC and LLNA were generally consistent, with 86% yielding an identical classification outcome. Discordant results were associated with borderline data and were evenly distributed between the two methods. Potency information derived from each method also demonstrated good consistency (n = 101), with 93% of predictions being close. Skin irritation was observed only infrequently and was most commonly associated with positive results; it was not associated with the discordant results. Where different vehicles were used with the same test material, the effect on sensitizing activity was modest, consistent with historical data. Analysis of positive control data indicated that the LNCC and LLNA displayed similar levels of biological variation. When taken in combination with the previously published results on LLNA Performance Standard chemicals, it is concluded that the LNCC provides a viable non-radioactive alternative to the LLNA for the assessment of substances, including potency predictions, as well as for the evaluation of preparations. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Nuclear Regulatory Commission low-level radioactive waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-09-01

    It is believed that the priorities of NRC work in low-level waste management as described in this action plan are consistent with the needs of the overall national waste management program. Present licensing procedures and criteria are adequate for the short term, and priority attention is being given to the longer term, when the quantities of waste to be managed will be greater and licensing demand will increase. The plan makes use of expertise within NRC to achieve early results and is coordinated with other Federal agencies having related responsibilities. Since NRC decisions will affect industry, other governmental jurisdictions, private interest groups, and the public at large, procedures were developed to involve them in planning the program

  7. Summary of national and international radioactive waste management programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harmon, K.M.

    1979-03-01

    This report summarizes information collected on the status of fuel cycle and waste management programs in Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, China, Denmark, Finland, France, Democratic Republic of Germany, Federal Republic of Germany, India, Iran, Italy, Japan, Mexico, the Netherlands, Pakistan, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom, United States, and USSR. This compilation attempts to provide current information as of the end of January 1979

  8. Selection of optimal treatment procedures for non-standard radioactive waste arising from decommissioning of NPP after accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strážovec, Roman, E-mail: strazovec.roman@javys.sk [Institute of Nuclear and Physical Engineering, Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava, Ilkovičova 3, 812 19 Bratislava (Slovakia); JAVYS, a.s., Tomášikova 22, 821 02 Bratislava (Slovakia); Hrnčíř, Tomáš [DECOM, a.s., Sibírska 1, 917 01 Trnava (Slovakia); Lištjak, Martin [Institute of Nuclear and Physical Engineering, Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava, Ilkovičova 3, 812 19 Bratislava (Slovakia); VUJE, a.s., Okružná 5, 918 64 Trnava (Slovakia); Nečas, Vladimír [Institute of Nuclear and Physical Engineering, Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava, Ilkovičova 3, 812 19 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2016-05-15

    The decommissioning of nuclear power plants is becoming a standard industrial activity where the optimization processes of partial activities are inevitable mainly for technical and economic reasons. In Slovakia, the decommissioning of A1 NPP is very specific case because A1 NPP is rare type of NPP (prototype) and furthermore its operation was affected by the accident. A large number of specific non-standard radioactive waste, such as long-time storage cases (hereinafter LSC), that is not usually present within the decommissioning projects of NPP with a regular termination of operation, represent one of the significant consequences of the accident and issues arisen from follow-up activities. The presented article describes the proposal of processing and conditioning of non-standard radioactive waste (such as LSC), together with description of methodology applied in the proposal for update of waste acceptance criteria for the processing and conditioning of radioactive waste (hereinafter RAW) within Bohunice Radioactive waste Treatment and Conditioning Centre (hereinafter RWTC). The results of performed detailed analysis are summarized into new waste acceptance criteria for technological lines keeping in mind safety principles and requirements for protection of operating personnel, the public and the environment.

  9. DOE standard: The Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program administration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-12-01

    This technical standard describes the US Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP), organizational responsibilities, and the accreditation process. DOELAP evaluates and accredits personnel dosimetry and radiobioassay programs used for worker monitoring and protection at DOE and DOE contractor sites and facilities as required in Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection. The purpose of this technical standard is to establish procedures for administering DOELAP and acquiring accreditation

  10. UNIDOSE - a computer program for the calculation of individual and collective doses from airborne radioactive pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlberg, O.; Schwartz, H.; Forssen, B.-H.; Marklund, J.-E.

    1979-01-01

    UNIDOSE is a program system for calculating the consequences of a radioactive release to the atmosphere. The program is applicable for computation of dispersion in a rnage of 0 - 50 km from the release point. The Gaussion plume model is used for calculating the external dose from activity in the atmosphere, on the ground and the internal dose via inhalation. Radioactive decay, as well as growth and decay of daughter products are accounted for. The influence of dry deposition and wash-out are also considered. It is possible to treat time-dependent release-rates of 1 - 24 hours duration and constant release-rates for up to one year. The program system also contains routines for the calculation of collective dose and health effects. The system operates in a statistical manner. Many weather-situations, based on measured data, can be analysed and statistical properties, such as cumulative frequences, can be calculated. (author)

  11. Radioactive waste transportation systems analysis and program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shappert, L.B.; Joy, D.S.; Heiskell, M.M.

    1978-03-01

    The objective of the Transportation/Logistics Study is to ensure the availability of a viable system for transporting the wastes to a federal repository in 1985. In order to accomplish this objective, a systems analysis of waste transportation has been directed by ORNL to determine the problems that must be solved and to develop a program plan that identifies which problems must first be pursued. To facilitate this overall approach and to provide for short- and long-range waste management, logistics models have been developed to determine the transportation fleet requirements and costs. Results of the study are described in this report

  12. Michigan high-level radioactive waste program. Technical progress report for 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    In 1985, five crystalline rock formations located in Michigan's Upper Peninsula were under consideration in the regional phase of the Department of Energy's (DOE) search for the site of the nation's second high-level radioactive waste repository. The Michigan Department of Public Health has been designated by the Governor as lead state agency in matters related to high-level radioactive waste (HLRW). Mr. Lee E. Jager, Chief of the Department's Bureau of Environmental and Occupational Health, has been designated as the state contact person in this matter, and the Bureau's Division of Radiological Health, Office of Radioactive Waste Management (ORWM), has been designated to provide staff support. Recognizing that adequate state involvement in the various aspects of the Federal high-level radioactive waste (HLRW) programs would require a range of expertise beyond the scope of any single state agency, Governor Blanchard established the High-Level Radioactive Waste Task Force in 1983. In support of the Task Force efforts concerning the implementation of its change, the Department negotiated and concluded an agreement with the DOE, under which federal funds are provided to support state HLRW activities. This report outlines state activities for the calendar year 1985, funded under that agreement

  13. Ontario's standard offer programs: moving toward a cleaner energy future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shervill, P.

    2006-01-01

    The Ontario Standard Offer Program is designed to ensure reliable, long-term electricity supply for Ontario. The functional areas of the program are planning, conservation and supply sector development. The long-term plan is to create a self-sustaining electricity market in Ontario with 2700 MW renewable sources by 2010 including wind, waterpower, solar photovoltaic (PV) and biomass

  14. Penn State continuing education program on low-level radioactive waste disposal and management: lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vincenti, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    Since November of 1983, The Pennsylvania State University, Institute for Research on Land and Water Resources has provided the citizens of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania with information on low-level radioactive waste disposal and management through a continuing education program called the PIER (Public Involvement and Education on Radiation) Program. This paper will review the form, function, and development of this continuing education program and some of the lessons learned in providing citizens of the Commonwealth with information in both formal and informal educational settings

  15. Improvement program of state supervision system for radioactive and nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardenas, J.

    1993-01-01

    The current program begins as part of a policy to take care of the development of the cuban nuclear program and with the objective of improving the state supervision system of nuclear and radioactive facilities on the basis of the national experience, good skills internationally accepted and taking into account IAEA recommendations. The program develops the following topics: reorientation and restructure of state supervision, review of the current nuclear legislature, update of regulations of facility safety and qualification and training of state supervision personnel

  16. A 15 channel 2- and 3-fold coincidence counting system for radioactivity standardization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, B.R.S.; Meyer, B.R.; Raave, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    The 4π β-γ liquid scintillation coincidence counting system which is used at the National Accelerator Centre for standardizing radioisotopes, has been extended to allow for up to fifteen data points to be measured simultaneously by introducing a 15-fold coincidence unit and a 32-channel scaler into the system. A new control / data acquisition computer program has been written and its operation explained in detail. The advantages of the new system are discussed, and the activity of a 139 Ce source as measured by the new system and the old 3-fold system is compared

  17. Issues relating to safety standards on the geological disposal of radioactive waste. Proceedings of a specialists meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-06-01

    Within the International Atomic Energy Agency focus is currently being placed on establishing safety standards for the geological disposal of radioactive waste. This is a challenging task and a Specialists Meeting was held from 18 to 22 June 2001 with the intention of providing a mechanism for promoting discussion on some of the associated scientific and technical issues and as a means of developing the consensus needed for establishing the standards. The meeting used, as its basis, a number of position papers developed in recent years with the help of a subgroup of the Waste Safety Standards Committee (WASSC), the subgroup on Principles and Criteria for Radioactive Waste Disposal, together with selected relevant regional and national papers. The report contains the summaries of the sessions of the Specialists Meeting together with the conclusions drawn relevant to the establishment of standards. The sessions of the Meeting addressed the following topics: Common framework for radioactive waste disposal; Making the safety case - demonstrating compliance; Safety indicators; Reference critical groups and biospheres; Human intrusion; Reversibility and retrievability; Monitoring and institutional control. The publication contains 26 individual presentations delivered by participants. Each of these presentations was indexed separately

  18. Radioactivity metrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legrand, J.

    1979-01-01

    Some aspects of the radioactivity metrology are reviewed. Radioactivity primary references; absolute methods of radioactivity measurements used in the Laboratoire de Metrologie des Rayonnements Ionisants; relative measurement methods; traceability through international comparisons and interlaboratory tests; production and distribution of secondary standards [fr

  19. Historic low-level radioactive waste federal policies, programs and oversight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchette, M.; Kenney, J.; Zelmer, B.

    2011-01-01

    'Full text:' The management of radioactive waste is one of the most serious environmental problems facing Canadians. From the early industrial uses of radioactive material in the 1930s to the development of nuclear power reactors and the medical and experimental use of radio-isotopes today, there has been a steady accumulation of waste products. Historic waste is low-level radioactive waste for which the federal government has accepted responsibility for long-term management. This paper will outline the policy framework used to govern institutional and financial arrangements for the disposal of radioactive waste by waste producers and owners and the major radioactive projects in which the Government of Canada is currently involved. It will provide an overview of the organizations established for the management of historic radioactive waste and NRCan's oversight role. Finally, an overview of the historic waste program activities managed on behalf of the federal government through these organizations in the Port Hope area, the Greater Toronto Area, in Fort McMurray, Alberta and along the Northern Transportation Route is provided. Canada's Policy Framework for Radioactive Waste, sets out principles that govern the institutional and financial arrangements for disposal of radioactive waste by waste producers and owners. According to the Policy Framework: The federal government will ensure that radioactive waste disposal is carried out in a safe, environmentally sound, comprehensive, cost-effective and integrated manner; The federal government has the responsibility to develop policy, to regulate, and to oversee producers and owners; and, The waste producers and owners are responsible, in accordance with the principle of 'polluter pays', for the funding, organization, management and operation of disposal and other facilities required for their wastes. Arrangements may be different for nuclear fuel waste, low-level radioactive waste and

  20. Implementation of standards at a research institute. Storage and keeping of radioactive materials following DIN 25422

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koeble, T.; Weinand, U.

    2016-01-01

    The secure storage and keeping of radioactive materials is increasingly important especially in times of a growing threat by terrorists. Authorities and users are jointly recommended to adapt the storage and keeping of radioactive materials to increasing security requirements. Here the different possibilities to fulfil the requirements regarding fire prevention and theft prevention which in Germany are set by DIN 25422 were determined for the radioactive materials and their storage and keeping places present in a research institute. The required measures were than agreed about with the relevant authority. Difficulties which are occurring due to the demanding combination of requirements out of the areas of radiation protection, fire prevention, and theft prevention are discussed. The storage and keeping of radioactive materials especially such of high activity requires a high level of security which must be continuously adapted to rising requirements.

  1. Recommendations to the NRC for review criteria for alternative methods of low-level radioactive waste disposal: Environmental monitoring and surveillance programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denham, D.H.; Stenner, R.D.; Eddy, P.A.; Jaquish, R.E.; Ramsdell, J.V. Jr.

    1988-07-01

    Licensing of a facility for low-level radioactive waste disposal requires the review of the environmental monitoring and surveillance programs. A set of review criteria is recommended for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff to use in each monitoring phase---preoperational, operational, and post operational---for evaluating radiological and selected nonradiological parameters in proposed environmental monitoring and surveillance programs at low-level waste disposal facilities. Applicable regulations, industry standards, and technical guidance on low-level radioactive waste are noted throughout the document. In the preoperational phase, the applicant must demonstrate that the environmental monitoring program identifies radiation levels and radionuclide concentrations at the site and also provides adequate basic data on the disposal site. Data recording and statistical analyses for this phase are addressed

  2. Standard guide for radioactive pathway methodology for release of sites following decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this guide is to provide guidance in determining site-specific conversion factors for translating between dose limits and residual radioactive contamination levels on equipment structures, and land areas. This guide is to serve as a guide to acceptable methodology for translating the yet to be determined dose limits into allowable levels of residual radioactive materials that can be left at a site following decommissioning

  3. Optimization of radioactive waste management system by application of multiobjective linear programming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Yoshiaki

    1981-01-01

    A mathematical procedure is proposed to make a radioactive waste management plan comprehensively. Since such planning is relevant to some different goals in management, decision making has to be formulated as a multiobjective optimization problem. A mathematical programming method was introduced to make a decision through an interactive manner which enables us to assess the preference of decision maker step by step among the conflicting objectives. The reference system taken as an example is the radioactive waste management system at the Research Reactor Institute of Kyoto University (KUR). Its linear model was built based on the experience in the actual management at KUR. The best-compromise model was then formulated as a multiobjective linear programming by the aid of the computational analysis through a conventional optimization. It was shown from the numerical results that the proposed approach could provide some useful informations to make an actual management plan. (author)

  4. United States Program on Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, L.

    2004-01-01

    The President signed the Congressional Joint Resolution on July 23, 2002, that designated the Yucca Mountain site for a proposed geologic repository to dispose of the nation's spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW). The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is currently focusing its efforts on submitting a license application to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in December 2004 for construction of the proposed repository. The legislative framework underpinning the U.S. repository program is the basis for its continuity and success. The repository development program has significantly benefited from international collaborations with other nations in the Americas

  5. SRS ES ampersand H standards compliance program management plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hearn, W.H.

    1993-01-01

    On March 8, 1990, the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) issued Recommendation 90-2 to the Secretary of Energy. This recommendation, based upon the DNFSB's initial review and evaluation of the content and implementation of standards relating to the design, construction, operations, and decommissioning of defense nuclear facilities of the Department of Energy (DOE), called for three actions: (1) identification of specific standards that apply to design, construction, operation and decommissioning of DOE facilities; (2) assessment of the adequacy of those standards for protecting public health and safety; and (3) determination of the extent to which they have and are being implemented. This document defines the elements of the SRS program required to support the HQ program in response to DNFSB Recommendation 90-2. The objective is to ensure a consistent approach for all sitewide ES and H Standards Compliance Program efforts that satisfied the intent of Recommendation 90-2 and the HQ 90-2 Implementation Plan in a cost-effective manner. The methodology and instructions for implementation of the SRS program are contained in the Standards Compliance Program Implementation Plan. The Management Plan shall be used in conjunction with the Implementation Plan

  6. Determination of detailed standards for transportation of radioactive materials by ships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The notification is defined under the regulations concerning marine transport and storage of dangerous things. Radioactive materials include hereunder uranium 233 and 235, plutonium 238, 239 and 241, their compounds and those materials which contain one or more than two of such materials. Materials whose quantities or quantities of components are less than 15 grams, and natural or depleted uranium are excluded. Permissible surface concentrations are 1/100,000 micro-curie per centi-meter 2 for radioactive materials emitting alpha rays, and 1/10,000 micro-curie per centi-meter 2 for radioactive materials not emitting alpha rays. Radioactive materials to be transported as L loads shall be not dispersing solid substances or those tightly enclosed in capsules, one of whose exterior sides at least is more than 0.5 centi-meter, having other several specified features. Other kinds of liquid and gas L loads are stipulated. Limits of radioactivity of L and A loads are provided for with tables attached. Transport conditions of A, BM and BU loads are fixed with bylaws. Leakages of BM and BU loads are also prescribed. Radioactive loads shall be marked by particular signals. Measures shall be taken to control exposures, which involve measurement of doses and exposure doses on board and appointment of exposure controllers. (Okada, K.)

  7. Determination of detailed standards for transportation of radioactive materials by ships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    These provisions are established on the basis of the ''Regulations on the transport and storage of dangerous things by ships''. The terms used hereinafter are according to those used in the Regulations. Radioactive materials, etc., include uranium 233, uranium 235, plutonium 238, plutonium 239, plutonium 241, the compounds of such materials and the substances containing one or two and more of such materials, excluding such materials of not more than 15 grams. The permissible surface density of radioactive materials is 1/100,000 of one microcurie per cm 2 for the radioactive materials emitting alpha-ray and 1/10,000 of one microcurie per cm 2 for the radioactive materials not emitting alpha-ray. For the radioactive materials which can be transported as L type cargo, their quantity of radioactivity is defined in their solid, liquid and gaseous forms. The limit of quantity of such cargo is described in detail in the lists attached. Transporting conditions of A, BM and BU type cargos are specified respectively in the particular sections. (Okada, K.)

  8. UK program: glasses and ceramics for immobilization of radioactive wastes for disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, K.D.B.

    1979-01-01

    The UK Research Program on Radioactive Waste Management includes the development of processes for the conversion of high-level-liquid-reprocessing wastes from thermal and fast reactors to borosilicate glasses. The properties of these glasses and their behavior under storage and disposal conditions have been examined. Methods for immobilizing activity from other wastes by conversion to glass or ceramic forms are described. The UK philosophy of final solutions to waste management and disposal is presented

  9. Nevada Test Site 2000 Annual Data Report: Groundwater Monitoring Program Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y. E.Townsend

    2001-02-01

    This report is a compilation of the calendar year 2000 groundwater sampling results from the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS). Contamination indicator data are presented in control chart and tabular form with investigation levels (IL) indicated. Gross water chemistry data are presented in graphical and tabular form. Other information in the report includes, the Cumulative Chronology for Area 5 RWMS Groundwater Monitoring Program, a brief description of the site hydrogeology, and the groundwater sampling procedure.

  10. Nevada Test Site 2000 Annual Data Report: Groundwater Monitoring Program Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Y. E.Townsend

    2001-01-01

    This report is a compilation of the calendar year 2000 groundwater sampling results from the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS). Contamination indicator data are presented in control chart and tabular form with investigation levels (IL) indicated. Gross water chemistry data are presented in graphical and tabular form. Other information in the report includes, the Cumulative Chronology for Area 5 RWMS Groundwater Monitoring Program, a brief description of the site hydrogeology, and the groundwater sampling procedure

  11. Material Not Categorized As Waste (MNCAW) data report. Radioactive Waste Technical Support Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, C.; Heath, B.A.

    1992-11-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE), Headquarters, requested all DOE sites storing valuable materials to complete a questionnaire about each material that, if discarded, could be liable to regulation. The Radioactive Waste Technical Support Program entered completed questionnaires into a database and analyzed them for quantities and type of materials stored. This report discusses the data that TSP gathered. The report also discusses problems revealed by the questionnaires and future uses of the data. Appendices contain selected data about material reported.

  12. A study of science leadership and science standards in exemplary standards-based science programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Wendy Renae

    The purpose for conducting this qualitative study was to explore best practices of exemplary standards-based science programs and instructional leadership practices in a charter high school and in a traditional high school. The focus of this study included how twelve participants aligned practices to National Science Education Standards to describe their science programs and science instructional practices. This study used a multi-site case study qualitative design. Data were obtained through a review of literature, interviews, observations, review of educational documents, and researcher's notes collected in a field log. The methodology used was a multi-site case study because of the potential, through cross analysis, for providing greater explanation of the findings in the study (Merriam, 1988). This study discovered six characteristics about the two high school's science programs that enhance the literature found in the National Science Education Standards; (a) Culture of expectations for learning-In exemplary science programs teachers are familiar with a wide range of curricula. They have the ability to examine critically and select activities to use with their students to promote the understanding of science; (b) Culture of varied experiences-In exemplary science programs students are provided different paths to learning, which help students, take in information and make sense of concepts and skills that are set forth by the standards; (c) Culture of continuous feedback-In exemplary science programs teachers and students work together to engage students in ongoing assessments of their work and that of others as prescribed in the standards; (d) Culture of Observations-In exemplary science programs students, teachers, and principals reflect on classroom instructional practices; teachers receive ongoing evaluations about their teaching and apply feedback towards improving practices as outlined in the standards; (e) Culture of continuous learning-In exemplary

  13. Relationship between internal medicine program board examination pass rates, accreditation standards, and program size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcone, John L; Gonzalo, Jed D

    2014-01-19

    To determine Internal Medicine residency program compliance with the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education 80% pass-rate standard and the correlation between residency program size and performance on the American Board of Internal Medicine Certifying Examination. Using a cross-sectional study design from 2010-2012 American Board of Internal Medicine Certifying Examination data of all Internal Medicine residency pro-grams, comparisons were made between program pass rates to the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education pass-rate standard. To assess the correlation between program size and performance, a Spearman's rho was calculated. To evaluate program size and its relationship to the pass-rate standard, receiver operative characteristic curves were calculated. Of 372 Internal Medicine residency programs, 276 programs (74%) achieved a pass rate of =80%, surpassing the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education minimum standard. A weak correlation was found between residency program size and pass rate for the three-year period (p=0.19, pInternal Medicine residency programs complied with Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education pass-rate standards, a quarter of the programs failed to meet this requirement. Program size is positively but weakly associated with American Board of Internal Medicine Certifying Examination performance, suggesting other unidentified variables significantly contribute to program performance.

  14. A program for evolution from storage to disposal of radioactive wastes at CRNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, D.F.

    1985-10-01

    This report reviews past and current radioactive waste management practices at the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL) and outlines the proposed future program. For nearly 40 years, radioactive wastes have been generated at CRNL and have also been received there on a continuing basis from hospitals, industries, universities and miscellaneous other sources across Canada. The solid wastes now at CRNL have been either stored or buried and their total consolidated volume is approaching 50 000 m 3 . Much of that waste will require disposal as will the future wastes of similar character. The waste management program plan describes the proposed development of safe disposal facilities which could be built on site to accommodate most, if not all, of the radioactive wastes for which CRNL has responsibility. Three reference disposal concepts, each potentially capable of accepting a portion of the wastes, are described. One of these, the intrusion-resistant shallow land burial (SLB) concept, could be suitable for disposal of most of the CRNL wastes. It is proposed that a prototype SLB facility be designed, constructed and operated on the CRNL property and filled by 1992 to provide a focus for disposal research and development programs and to accumulate experience in all aspects of waste management. 53 refs

  15. Low-level waste (LLW) reclamation program for the Point Lepreau Solid Radioactive Waste Management Facility (SRWMF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mersereau, M.; McIntyre, K.

    2006-01-01

    Low level radioactive waste retrieved from intermediate storage vaults at Point Lepreau Generating Station has been sorted to remove the non-radioactive portion. The program began with trials to validate procedures and equipment, followed by a production run that is on-going. Waste boxes are opened and sorted at a ventilated sorting table. The sorted waste is directed to the station's free-release ('Likely Clean') waste stream or to the radioactive waste stream, depending on activity measurements. The radioactive waste content of the sorted materials has been reduced by 96% (by mass) using this process. (author)

  16. Low-level waste (LLW) reclamation program for the Point Lepreau Solid Radioactive Waste Management Facility (SRWMF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mersereau, M.; McIntyre, K. [Point Lepreau Generating Station, Lepreau, New Brunswick (Canada)]. E-mail: MMersereau@nbpower.com; KMcIntyre@nbpower.com

    2006-07-01

    Low level radioactive waste retrieved from intermediate storage vaults at Point Lepreau Generating Station has been sorted to remove the non-radioactive portion. The program began with trials to validate procedures and equipment, followed by a production run that is on-going. Waste boxes are opened and sorted at a ventilated sorting table. The sorted waste is directed to the station's free-release ('Likely Clean') waste stream or to the radioactive waste stream, depending on activity measurements. The radioactive waste content of the sorted materials has been reduced by 96% (by mass) using this process. (author)

  17. Program of environmental radiological surveillance of the radioactive wastes storage center of Maquixco in the period January-December 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaso P, M.I.

    1991-12-01

    The primary objective of all program of environmental radiological surveillance (PVRA), it is to follow the evolution of the radioactive content of the links of the chains that constitute the different ways of transfer of the radioactivity toward the man, with the purpose of making a realistic evaluation of the environmental impact produced by the installation under surveillance. In the CADER in Mexico, only accidents or escapes of radioactivity of slow evolution can be detected. At the moment the radioactive wastes in this installation are not treated. In this report the results obtained during the year 1991 are presented. (Author)

  18. Ratio of thyroid radioiodine uptake calculated via the physic decay rate of the standard radioactive source: a preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Yu; Zhou Luyi

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the difference of the ratio of thyroid radioiodine ( 131 I) uptake calculated by actually measuring counts of the standard radioactive source(method 1) and by computing counts of the standard radioactive source via physic half life of 131 I (method 2). Methods: Two hundred and nine consecutive patients with Graves' Disease were prospectively recruited. The ratio of thyroid 131 I uptake was calculated by two methods at 4 h and 24 h after administration of 1.48 MBq 131 I, respectively. Paired t-test was used to compare the difference between the two methods. Results: The ratio of thyroid 131 I uptake at 4h was (32±16)% and ( 35±10)% (t=1.98, P=0.20), at 24h (72±19)% and (69±24)% ( t=1.49, P=0.23), respectively, by the two methods. Conclusion: To calculate the ratio of thyroid 131 I uptake via the physic half life of the standard radioactive resource is feasible, and can both reduce the risk of ionizing radiation to technical staff and act as verifying method for quality control of thyroid function equipment. (authors)

  19. The IAEA Promotes the Application of Safety Standards and Best Practices for the Management of Radioactive Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The IAEA works to promote a high level of safety as it facilitates peaceful uses of nuclear energy worldwide. The IAEA’s Statute authorizes it to establish or adopt standards of safety for protection of health and minimization of danger to life and property, and to provide for the application of these standards. The Statute also mandates the IAEA to foster the exchange of scientific and technical information to facilitate the peaceful uses of atomic energy. To this end, the IAEA develops safety standards on different topics, including on the safety of radioactive waste management. These standards, issued in the IAEA Safety Standards Series, reflect an international consensus on what constitutes a high level of safety for protecting people from harmful effects of ionizing radiation and protecting the environment

  20. Development of knowledge building program concerning about high-level radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Hiroshi; Yamada, Kazuhiro; Takase, Hiroyasu

    2005-01-01

    Acquirement of knowledge about the high-level radioactive waste (HLW) disposal is one of the important factors for public to determine the social acceptance of HLW disposal. However in Japan, public do not have knowledge about HLW and its disposal sufficiently. In this work, we developed the knowledge building program concerning about HLW disposal based on Nonaka, and Takeuchi's SECI spiral model in knowledge management, and carried to the experiment on this program. In the results, we found that the participants' knowledge about the HLW disposal increased and changed from misunderstanding' or 'assuming' to 'facts' or 'consideration' through this experimental program. These results said that the experimental program leads participants to have higher quality of knowledge about the HLW disposal. In consequence, this knowledge building program may be effective in the acquirement of high quality knowledge. (author)

  1. Subseabed Radioactive Waste Disposal Feasibility Program: ocean engineering challenges for the 80's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talbert, D.M.

    1980-01-01

    The objective of the Subseabed Disposal Program is to assess the feasibility of disposing of high-level radioactive wastes or spent fuel in suitable geologic formations beneath the deep ocean floor. The program is entering a phase which will address engineering feasibility. While the current phase of the program to determine the scientific and environmental feasibility of the concept is not yet complete, activities to assess the engineering aspects are being initiated in parallel to facilitate the development of the concept on a time scale commensurate with other related programs both in the United States and abroad. It is anticipated that engineering aspects will become the central focus of the program during the early 80's and will continue so through the establishment of a pilot-plant level activity which could occur by the mid-90's

  2. Subseabed radioactive waste disposal feasibility program: ocean engineering challenges for the 80's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talbert, D.M.

    1980-11-01

    The objective of the Subseabed Disposal Program is to assess the feasibility of disposing of high-level radioactive wastes or spent fuel in suitable geologic formations beneath the deep ocean floor. The program is entering a phase which will address engineering feasibility. While the current phase of the program to determine the scientific and environmental feasibility of the concept is not yet complete, activities to assess the engineering aspects are being initiated in parallel to facilitate the development of the concept on a time scale commensurate with related programs both in the United States and abroad. It is anticipated that engineering aspects will become the central focus of the program during the early 80's and will continue so through the establishment of a pilot-plant level activity which could occur by the mid-90's

  3. ARANO - a computer program for the assessment of radiological consequences of atmospheric radioactive releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savolainen, I.; Vuori, S.

    1980-09-01

    A short description of the calculation possibilities, methods and of the structure of the computer code system ARANO is given, in addition to the input quide. The code can be employed in the calculation of environmental radiological consequences caused by radioactive materials released to atmosphere. Results can be individual doses for different organs at given distances from the release point, collective doses, numbers of persons exceeding given dose limits, numbers of casualties, areas polluted by deposited activity and losses of investments or production due to radioactive contamination. Both a case with a single release and atmospheric dispersion situation and a group of radioactive release and dispersions with discrete probability distributions can be considered. If the radioactive releases or the dispersion conditions are described by probability distributions, the program assesses the magnitudes of the specified effects in all combinations of the release and dispersion situations and then calculates the expectation values and the cumulative probability distributions of the effects. The vertical mixing in the atmosphere is described with a Ksub(Z)-model. In the lateral direction the plume is assumed to be Gaussian, and the release duration can be taken into account in the σsub(y)-values. External gamma dose from the release plume is calculated on the basis of a data file which has been created by 3-dimensional integration. Dose due to inhalation and due to gamma radiation from the contaminated ground are calculated by using appropriate dose conversion factors, which are collected into two mutually alternative block data subprograms. (author)

  4. Developing a public involvement policy for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, S.; Summerson, J.; Gleason, M.E.; Reyes, P.C.

    1994-01-01

    The Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program is entering its second decade. Given the Department of Energy's current efforts toward openness and culture change, the role of stakeholders is likely to evolve throughout the 1990s to enable greater participation by these external parties in making program decisions. Although the program has a tradition of inviting its stakeholders to review and comment on its activities, it also is known for employing on occasion what has been derisively called a open-quotes decide-announce-defendclose quotes strategy. Program efforts to involve the public have come under considerable criticism for being inadequate, inconsistent, lacking in follow-through, and offered on a sporadic and selective basis. The program is vulnerable to these criticisms because ground rules for public involvement have never been firmly established as part of the program's routine operations. This deficiency has contributed, in part, to stakeholder doubts about the program's sincerity in engaging in a meaningful dialogue with them. The program and its stakeholders both could benefit from an official public involvement policy that would serve as a guidepost for interactions between program officials and stakeholders. Such a policy, developed in concert with stakeholders, would ensure that all parties understand how stakeholder participation is to occur. This paper reviews (1) events establishing the need for a formal public involvement policy; (2) public involvement initiatives that will inform the process of developing a new policy; (3) current efforts to develop a Department of Energy public involvement policy; and (4) key elements for inclusion in a public involvement policy developed specifically for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program

  5. Standard Review Plan Maintenance Program implementing procedures document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-11-01

    The implementing Procedures Document (IPD) was developed by the Inspection Program Projects Branch, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, with assistance from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, for the Standard Review Plan Maintenance Program (SRP-MP). The SRP-MP was established to maintain the Standard Review Plan (SRP) on an on-going basis. The IPD provides guidance, including an overall approach and procedures, for SRP-MP tasks. The objective of the IPD is to ensure that modifications to SRP need to reflect current NRC requirements and guidance are identified and that a consistent methodology is used to develop and revise SRP sections

  6. Standard criteria for disposal of liquid radioactive wastes from nuclear power plants into surface waters (river systems)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pisarev, V.V.; Tsybizov, I.S.

    1976-01-01

    Radioactive products discharge into natural water streams results in the necessity to regulate nuclear power plant discharges to ensure radiation safety (RS) for population using a river and surrounding river territory. To ensure RS it is necessary to set scientific-founded standards of permissible discharge level of liquid radioactive wastes (LRW) from nuclear power plant assuring observance of hygienic requirements for surface water puring. Volume of permissible LRW discharge into river systems must be set both with provision for concrete physical-geographycal conditions, specficity of utilizing the river and river valley and social-economical peculiarities of crtical population groups. The value of permissible LRW discharge into river systems is determined by three criterion groups: radiological, ecological and hydrological ones. By means of radiological group the internal and external irradiation doses for the whole body and its separate organs are set and RS of population is determined. Ecological criteria include a number of parameters (coefficients of accumulation, distribution and transition) determining quantitative ratios between radioactive element contents in water and separate links of biological chains: soil/water, fish/water, vegetables/water and others. Hydrological criteria determine the degree of waste dilution in rivers, control radioactive contamination of flood-lands areas and in common with ecological criteria determine radionuclide contents in soil and food products. A method of determining average annual values of LRW dilution in river waters is presented [ru

  7. A method for developing standard patient education program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lura, Carolina Bryne; Hauch, Sophie Misser Pallesgaard; Gøeg, Kirstine Rosenbeck

    2018-01-01

    for developing standard digital patient education programs for patients in self-administration of blood samples drawn from CVC. The Design Science Research Paradigm was used to develop a digital patient education program, called PAVIOSY, to increase patient safety during execution of the blood sample collection...... of the educational patient system, health professionals must be engaged early in the development of content and design phase....

  8. UK safety and standards for radioactive waste management and decommissioning on nuclear licensed sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, D.J.

    2001-01-01

    This paper discusses the regulation of radioactive waste and decommissioning in the United Kingdom and identifies the factors considered by HM Nuclear Installations Inspectorate in examining the adequacy arrangements for their management on nuclear licensed sites. The principal requirements are for decommissioning to be undertaken as soon as reasonably practicable and that radioactive wastes should be minimised, disposed of or contained and controlled by storage in a passively safe form. However, these requirements have to be considered in the context of major organisational changes in the UK nuclear industry and the non-availability of disposal routes for some decommissioning wastes. The legislative framework used to regulate decommissioning of nuclear facilities in the UK is described. Reference is made to radioactive waste and decommissioning strategies, quinquennial reviews criteria for delicensing and the forthcoming Environmental Impact Assessment Regulations. (author)

  9. A programmatic response to the Secretary of Energy's review of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benson, A.B.

    1994-01-01

    On January 19, 1993, in response to a question during her confirmation hearing, Secretary of Energy Hazel R. O'Leary stated that she believed that a comprehensive review of nuclear waste disposal programs and policies was needed. Her preferred approach to such a review would be to engage in a consensus-seeking effort in which all involved parties would be brought to the table to deal with contentious issues. This paper describes both the process and the separate elements of the review of the civilian radioactive waste management program conducted in 1993 and 1994 by Secretary O'Leary. The paper will trace the review beginning with the Secretary's statement at her confirmation hearing, through her interim guidance redirecting certain aspects of the program. It describes some initiatives and changes that are already underway as a result of this review. Throughout the year, stakeholders expressed their concerns, opinions, and recommendations regarding the program. These communications reflected the diversity of perspective that has become a hallmark of the radioactive waste program

  10. A computer program to calculate the committed dose equivalent after the inhalation of radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van der Woude, S.

    1989-03-01

    A growing number of people are, as part of their occupation, at risk of being exposed to radiation originating from sources inside their bodies. The quantification of this exposure is an important part of health physics. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) developed a first-order kinetics compartmental model to determine the transport of radioactive material through the human body. The model and the parameters involved in its use, are discussed. A versatile computer program was developed to do the following after the in vivo measurement of either the organ- or whole-body activity: calculate the original amount of radioactive material which was inhaled (intake) by employing the ICRP compartmental model of the human body; compare this intake to calculated reference levels and state any action to be taken for the case under consideration; calculate the committed dose equivalent resulting from this intake. In the execution of the above-mentioned calculations, the computer program makes provision for different aerosol particle sizes and the effect of previous intakes. Model parameters can easily be changed to take the effects of, for instance, medical intervention into account. The computer program and the organization of the data in the input files are such that the computer program can be applied to any first-order kinetics compartmental model. The computer program can also conveniently be used for research on problems related to the application of the ICRP model. 18 refs., 25 figs., 5 tabs

  11. U Y 105 standard use of non sealed radioactive sources in nuclear medicine: approve for Industry energy and Mining Ministry 28/6/2002 Resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    Establish minimal requirements radiological safety for use non sealed radioactive sources in nuclear medicine.The present standard is used in operation or nuclear medicine practices using non sealed radioactive sources with diagnostic and therapeutic purposes in vivo and in vitro

  12. The fourth radioactive waste management program of the Commission of the European Communities (1990-1994)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlowski, S.; Schaller, K.H.; Simon, R.

    1992-01-01

    The fourth radioactive waste management program 1990-1994 is aimed at perfecting and demonstrating a system of management of radioactive waste, including unprocessed irradiated fuels where these are considered as waste, which will ensure, at the various stages, the best possible protection of man and the environment. In particular, research continues on the characterization and qualification of the various barriers, both engineered and natural (geological) considered in the multiple barrier disposal concept, and the findings are used to evaluate the long-term safety of this waste disposal concept. The program is implemented mainly through shared-cost research contracts with appropriate organizations, undertakings and companies - public or private - established in the European Community Member States. It is composed of two parts; Part A deals with waste management studies and associated research and development actions, whereas in Part B, the construction and operation of underground pilot and/or site validation facilities for deep geological disposal of radioactive waste open to Community joint activities are covered. (author)

  13. The issue resolution process in the Civilian Radioactive Waste Transportation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holm, J.A.; Denny, S.

    1987-01-01

    The Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Program consists of various technical and institutional program activities which engender concern from the general public and from policymakers at federal, state, and local levels. Most familiar are the concerns centered around selection of a site for a repository; however, the transportation portion of the OCRWM program also engenders similar concerns for safety, efficiency and effectiveness. The major Transportation institutional issues were detailed in the Institutional Plan, issued in 1986, and include topics such as liability, defense waste, routing, emergency response, risk identification and mitigation, cash integrity, inspection and enforcement of high-level waste shipments and use of overweight trucks as part of the modal mix. This paper will define the process being used to identify and resolve institutional issues, show how the technical and institutional issues interface and are addressed, and briefly describe four specific activities which illustrate the process of resolving institutional issues in the Transportation program

  14. Monitoring program for evaluating radionuclide emissions from incineration of low-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wittmer, S.C.; Solomon, H.F.

    1984-01-01

    The implementation of an incineration program for low-level radioactive waste is a complex task, especially in the area of obtaining environmental permits. To provide assurance to the appropriate regulatory agencies involved with environmental permitting and others that an incineration program is properly conducted, emissions monitoring to identify radionuclides and their fate may be needed. An electronic spreadsheet software program Lotus 1-2-3 (Lotus Development Corporation) on an IBM Personal Computer has been used to perform data reduction for test results from such a monitoring program and to present them graphically to facilitate interpretation. The sampling technique includes: (1) the use of an EPA Method 5 stack sampling train modified to exclude the dry-catch filtration assembly with ethanolamine used to scrub incinerator gas at depressed temperatures and (2) a continuous composite liquid sampler for incinerator wet scrubber discharge to the sanitary sewer. Radionuclides in the samples are assayed using scintillation spectrometry

  15. 41 CFR 101-26.501-2 - Standardized buying programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Standardized buying programs. 101-26.501-2 Section 101-26.501-2 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS SUPPLY AND PROCUREMENT 26-PROCUREMENT...

  16. How to Integrate International Financial Reporting Standards into Accounting Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    It is expected the SEC will require U.S. domestic companies to prepare and file their annual 10Ks in accordance with international financial reporting standards (IFRS) by 2016. Given the probability that the FASB-IASB convergence project (i.e., Norwalk Agreement) will continue subsequent to mandatory adoption, US accounting programs will be…

  17. Quality assurance program for determining the radioactivity in environmental samples at the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research in Taiwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gone, J.K.; Wang, T.W.

    2000-01-01

    Interest in determining radioactivity in environmental samples has increased considerably in recent years after the Chernobyl accident in 1986. Environmental monitoring programs have been set up in different countries to measure the trace amount of radionuclides in the environment, and quality of the analytical results on these samples is important because the regulation and safety concerns. A good quality assurance program is essential to provide accurate information for the regulatory body and environmentalists to set proper reactions to protect the environment, and a good analytical result is also important for scientists to determine the transfer of radionuclides between environmental matrices. The Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (lNER) in Taiwan has been working on radionuclide analysis in environmental samples for years, and it's environmental media radioanalytical laboratory (EMRAL) has recently upgraded its quality assurance program for the international standard ISO/lEC guide 25 requirements. The general requirements of lSO/lEC guide 25 has been adapted by the Chinese National Laboratory Accreditation (CNLA) of Taiwan, and CNLA is also a member of International Laboratory Accreditation Cooperation (ILAC) and Asia Pacific Laboratory Accreditation Cooperation (APLAC). This paper summarizes the quality assurance program of lNER's EMRAL. It covers both management and technical sections. These sections have ensured the quality of INER's EMRAL, and they can be applied to different laboratories in the future. (author)

  18. Quality assurance program for determining the radioactivity in environmental samples at the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research in Taiwan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gone, J.K. [TRR-II Project Team, Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Wang, T.W. [Division of Health Physics, Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China)

    2000-05-01

    Interest in determining radioactivity in environmental samples has increased considerably in recent years after the Chernobyl accident in 1986. Environmental monitoring programs have been set up in different countries to measure the trace amount of radionuclides in the environment, and quality of the analytical results on these samples is important because the regulation and safety concerns. A good quality assurance program is essential to provide accurate information for the regulatory body and environmentalists to set proper reactions to protect the environment, and a good analytical result is also important for scientists to determine the transfer of radionuclides between environmental matrices. The Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (lNER) in Taiwan has been working on radionuclide analysis in environmental samples for years, and it's environmental media radioanalytical laboratory (EMRAL) has recently upgraded its quality assurance program for the international standard ISO/lEC guide 25 requirements. The general requirements of lSO/lEC guide 25 has been adapted by the Chinese National Laboratory Accreditation (CNLA) of Taiwan, and CNLA is also a member of International Laboratory Accreditation Cooperation (ILAC) and Asia Pacific Laboratory Accreditation Cooperation (APLAC). This paper summarizes the quality assurance program of lNER's EMRAL. It covers both management and technical sections. These sections have ensured the quality of INER's EMRAL, and they can be applied to different laboratories in the future. (author)

  19. Data Processing and Programming Applied to an Environmental Radioactivity Laboratory; Desarrollo Informatico Aplicado a un Laboratorio de Radiactividad Ambiental

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trinidad, J.A.; Gasco, C.; Palacios, M.A.

    2009-07-01

    This report is the original research work presented for the attainment of the author master degree and its main objective has been the resolution -by means of friendly programming- of some of the observed problems in the environmental radioactivity laboratory belonging to the Department of Radiological Surveillance and Environmental Radioactivity from CIEMAT. The software has been developed in Visual Basic for applications in Excel files and it solves by macro orders three of the detected problems: a) calculation of characteristic limits for the measurements of the beta total and beta rest activity concentrations according to standards MARLAP, ISO and UNE and the comparison of the three results b) Pb-210 and Po-210 decontamination factor determination in the ultra-low level Am-241 analysis in air samples by alpha spectrometry and c) comparison of two analytical techniques for measuring Pb-210 in air ( direct-by gamma spectrometry- and indirect -by radiochemical separation and alpha spectrometry). The organization processes of the different excel files implied in the subroutines, calculations and required formulae are explained graphically for its comprehension. The advantage of using this kind of programmes is based on their versatility and the ease for obtaining data that lately are required by tables that can be modified as time goes by and the laboratory gets more data with the special applications for describing a method (Pb-210 decontamination factors for americium analysis in air) or comparing temporal series of Pb-210 data analysed by different methods (Pb-210 in air). (Author)

  20. Separating defence and civilian radioactive waste programs in Nevada: can the public navigate the maze?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, R.A.

    1999-01-01

    Nevada is at the centre of public policy debate with regards to high and low level radioactive waste disposal. Nevada's Yucca Mountain is the only site under consideration for a US geologic repository for commercial spent nuclear fuel and defence high level waste. The Nevada Test Site (NTS) has long been a low level waste (LLW) disposal facility for the Department of Energy (DOE) defence waste and is now expected to take even more LLW as the preferred site for a regional or centralised disposal facility. Furthermore, the primary mission at NTS, defence, continues to add more contamination to the site. Combined, these facts present a public policy enigma, confused further by the intentional separation of the programs by DOE, even though all are essentially conducted at the same site. Involving the public in policy decisions for these programs is a dilemma because the public does not make the same artificial distinctions between them as DOE, DOE credibility suffers from past public involvement efforts conducted during an era of Cold War secrecy and because DOE public involvement programs are operated independently, with little or no co-operation between programs. The public does not know where it fits into the DOE decision-making process or if it impacts the policy decisions being made that affect it. This paper examines the complex maze of radioactive policy and bureaucracy in order to unveil the enigma Nevada residents face. Are they able to navigate this maze to effectively participate in government policy and decision-making? Or, will they remain confused by the government bureaucracy which deliberately makes a mess of the situation and seeks to exploit a politically weak state with large tracts of federally controlled land? lt further evaluates the effect this enigma has in producing acceptable public policy for radioactive waste disposal in the US, the role of public participation in that policy, and the reason the public is disillusioned and disengaged in the

  1. SRS ES and H Standards Compliance Program Implementation Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hearn, W.H.

    1993-01-01

    On March 8, 1990, the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) issued Recommendation 90-2 to the Secretary of Energy. This recommendation, based upon the DNFSB's initial review and evaluation of the content and implementation of standards relating to the design, construction, operations, and decommissioning of defense nuclear facilities of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), called for three actions: identification of specific standards that apply to design, construction, operation and decommissioning of DOE facilities; assessment of the adequacy of those standards for protecting public health and safety; and determination of the extent to which they have and are being implemented. The purpose of this Implementation Plan is to define the single program for all sitewide and facility 90-2 ES and H Standards Compliance efforts, which will satisfy the HQ Implementation Plan, avoid duplicate efforts, be as simple and achievable as possible, include cost-saving innovations, use a graded approach based on facility hazards and future needs of facilities, and support configuration control for facility requirements. The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) has been designated a pilot facility for the 90-2 program and has progressed with their facility program ahead of the site-level program. The DWPF, and other Government-Owned Contractor-Operated (GOCO) facilities that progress on an enhanced schedule, will serve as pilot facilities for the site-level program. The lessons learned with their requirement identifications, and their assessments of the adequacy of and their compliance with these requirements will be used to improve the efficiency of the site-level and subsequent programs

  2. Directory of certificates of compliance for radioactive materials packages. Volume 3, Revision 14: Report of NRC approved quality assurance programs for radioactive materials packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-10-01

    This directory contains a Report of NRC Approved Packages (Volume 1), Certificates of Compliance (Volume 2), and a Report of NRC Approved Quality Assurance Programs for Radioactive Materials Packages (Volume 3). The purpose of this directory is to make available a convenient source of information on Quality Assurance Programs and Packagings which have been approved by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Shipments of radioactive material utilizing these packagings must be in accordance with the provisions of 49 CFR section 173.471 and 10 CFR Part 71, as applicable. In satisfying the requirements of Section 71.12, it is the responsibility of the licensees to insure themselves that they have a copy of the current approval and conduct their transportation activities in accordance with an NRC approved quality assurance program

  3. A directory of computer programs for assessment of radioactive waste disposal in geological formations. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashton, J.; Broyd, T.W.; Jones, M.A.; Knowles, N.C.; Liew, S.K.; Mawbey, C.S.; Read, D.; Smith, S.L.

    1993-01-01

    This directory describes computer programs suitable for the assessment of radioactive waste disposal facilities in geological formations. The programs, which are mainly applicable to the post-closure analysis of the repository, address combinations of the following topics: nuclide inventory, corrosion, leaching, geochemistry, geomechanics, heat transfer, groundwater flow, radionuclide migration, biosphere modelling, safety assessment and site evolution. A total of 320 programs are identified, of which 84 are reviewed in detail, 192 in summary and 44 in tabular fashion. Originally published in 1983, the directory was updated in 1985 with the addition of new programs and the revision of some of the existing program reviews. This directory has been completely rewritten in 1991 with the addition of more new programs and a full revision of all the existing program reviews, some of which have been deleted as they are no longer in general use. Although the directory is specific to the post-closure assessment of a repository site, some of the programs described can also be used in other areas of repository (e.g. repository design). This directory is composed of two volumes, the present volume is the second

  4. A directory of computer programs for assessment of radioactive waste disposal in geological formations. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashton, J.; Broyd, T.W.; Jones, M.A.; Knowles, N.C.; Liew, S.K.; Mawbey, C.S.; Read, D.; Smith, S.L.

    1993-01-01

    This directory describes computer programs suitable for the assessment of radioactive waste disposal facilities in geological formations. The programs, which are mainly applicable to the post-closure analysis of the repository, address combinations of the following topics: nuclide inventory, corrosion, leaching, geochemistry, geomechanics, heat transfer, groundwater flow, radionuclide migration, biosphere modelling, safety assessment and site evolution. A total of 320 programs are identified of which 84 are reviewed in detail, 192 in summary and 44 in tabular fashion. Originally published in 1983, the directory was updated in 1985 with the addition of new programs and the revision of some of the existing program reviews. This directory has been completely rewritten in 1991 with the addition of more new programs and a full revision of all the existing program reviews, some of which have been deleted as they are no longer in general use. Although the directory is specific to the post-closure assessment of a repository site, some of the programs described can also be used in other areas of repository (e.g. repository design). This directory is composed of two volumes, the present volume is the first

  5. A directory of computer programs for assessment of radioactive waste disposal in geological formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broyd, T.W.; Dean, R.B.; Hobbs, G.D.; Knowles, N.C.; Putney, J.M.; Wrigley, J.

    1984-01-01

    This Directory describes computer programs suitable for the assessment of radioactive waste disposal facilities in geological formations. The programs, which are mainly applicable to the post closure analysis of the repository, address combinations of the following topics: nuclide inventory, corrosion, leaching, geochemistry, stress analysis, heat transfer, groundwater flow and radionuclide transport. Biosphere modelling, surface water flow and risk analysis are not covered. A total of 248 programs are identified, of which 50 are reviewed in detail, 134 in summary and 64 in tabular fashion. The directory has been compiled using a combination of literature searches, telephone and postal correspondence and meetings with recognised experts in the respective areas of work covered. It differs from previous reviews of computer programs for similar topics areas in two main respects. Firstly, the method of obtaining information has resulted in program descriptions of considerable breadth and detail. Secondly, the Directory has concentrated wherever possible on European codes, whereas most previous work of this nature has looked solely at programs developed in North America. The reviews are presented in good faith, but it has not been possible to run any of the programs on a computer, and so truly objective comparisons may not be made. Finally, although the Directory is specific to the post-closure assessment of a repository site, some of the programs described could also be used in other areas of repository analysis (eg repository design)

  6. Marketing Program Standardization: The Experience of TNCs in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz Sagan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to determine the rate of standardization of marketing programs in transnational corporations in the consumer goods market in Poland, which currently is one of the fastest growing markets in the world. An important research objective was to observe how Polish consumers adopt the marketing patterns and related lifestyles from countries of Western Europe and the USA. The empirical tests and data, collected in a sample survey of 35 transnational corporations and their 140 products, and using varied methods of statistical inference, allowed to formulate the following conclusions. The analyzed TNC’s adopted a clear standardization strategy in the Polish market. Among the analyzed products, 2/3 of them have been entirely transferred from foreign markets into the Polish market. A detailed analysis has indicated that the standardization rate of product and its items in the FMCG market in Poland is high and very high, and significantly higher than the pricing and advertising strategy standardization rates. The product standardization rate in the Polish market has been slightly higher than the rate in the developed countries, yet the pricing standardization has been significantly lower. The standardization of advertising strategies showed similar features.

  7. C.E.C. program on radioactive waste management disposal and risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlowski, S.; Girardi, F.; Bresesti, M.

    1976-01-01

    The Commission of the European Communities (CEC) has been involved many years with the radioactive waste problem; but a major effort started in 1973 when a specific program was given to the Commission's own laboratories (C.E.C. Joint Research Center, Ispra Establishment). This effort is very much enlarged since June 1975, when the Commission was authorized to start a coordinated program with the national laboratories of the nine member states, financed on a 50/50 basis. The contribution of the Commission for the 1975-79 plan amounts to $19 million. The overall program now involves several laboratories and does represent a significant European effort to contribute to solving a world scale problem; it is intended to promote a large international cooperation

  8. Revised Draft Hanford Site Solid (Radioactive and Hazardous) Waste Program Environmental Impact Statement, Richland, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    This ''Revised Draft Hanford Site Solid (Radioactive and Hazardous) Waste Program Environmental Impact Statement'' (HSW EIS) covers three primary aspects of waste management at Hanford--waste treatment, storage, and disposal. It also addresses four kinds of solid waste--low-level waste (LLW), mixed (radioactive and chemically hazardous) low-level waste (MLLW), transuranic (TRU) waste, and immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW). It fundamentally asks the question: how should we manage the waste we have now and will have in the future? This EIS analyzes the impacts of the LLW, MLLW, TRU waste, and ILAW we currently have in storage, will generate, or expect to receive at Hanford. The HSW EIS is intended to help us determine what specific facilities we will continue to use, modify, or construct to treat, store, and dispose of these wastes (Figure S.1). Because radioactive and chemically hazardous waste management is a complex, technical, and difficult subject, we have made every effort to minimize the use of acronyms (making an exception for our four waste types listed above), use more commonly understood words, and provide the ''big picture'' in this summary. An acronym list, glossary of terms, and conversions for units of measure are provided in a readers guide in Volume 1 of this EIS

  9. Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Materials. Vietnam Standard (TCVN 4985-89)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The regulations were prepared in line with the Safety Regulation for Ionizing Radiations 1988 of Vietnam. Its purpose is to provide requirements in transport of radioactive materials. The exposure levels of transport personnel are determined. The package for different types of materials is regulated. The orders and procedures in transport are defined. In addition, specific requirements for each mean of transport are given. (N.H.A)

  10. The analysis of the program to develop the Nuclear Waste Management System: Allocated requirements for the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, T.W.

    1991-09-01

    This report is volume 3, part B, of the program to satisfy the allocated requirements of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program, in the development of the nuclear waste management system. The report is divided into the following sections: regulatory compliance; external relations; international programs; strategic and contingency planning; contract business management; and administrative services. (CS)

  11. A computer program for controlling a university radioactive material inventory: From confusion to computer to control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robb, D.B.; Riches, C.G.; O'Brian, M.J.; Riordan, F.J.

    1984-01-01

    The University of Washington is a large user of radioactive material. Over 250 authorized programs are working in over 600 labs with nearly 3500 orders of radioactive material per year. The state license sets limits on the total amount of material on campus. There are also limits on sewer disposal. To meet these needs it is necessary to know the amount of material on campus at any time. A computer program was developed which covered many aspects of the radiation safety record needs including inventory control. Inventory is now managed by tracking each order from purchase to disposal. A screen menu as part of the interactive program allows immediate and detailed information about the inventory at time of purchase approval and delivery. Because of this system our knowledge and control of radionuclide work on campus has increased dramatically. A description of how this system is used during ordering, delivery and disposal will be given. Details on the methods to check limits are included along with a summary of the reports made possible by the current data files

  12. The United States program for the safety assessment of geologic disposal of commercial radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claiborne, H.C.

    1977-01-01

    The safe disposal of commercial radioactive wastes in deep geologic formations is the goal of the National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) Program. Safety assessment begins with selection of a disposal site; that is, all geologic and hydrologic factors must indicate long-term stability of the formation and prospective isolation of wastes from circulating ground waters for hundreds of thousands of years. The long-term stability of each site under thermal loading must then be demonstrated by sophisticated rock mechanic analyses. Therefore, it can be expected that the sites that are chosen will effectively isolate the waste for a very long period of time. However, to help provide answers on the mechanisms and consequences of an unlikely breach in the integrity of the repository, a Waste Isolation Safety Assessment Program (WISAP) is studied. The overall objective of this program is an assessment of the safety associated with the long-term disposal of high-level radioactive waste in a geologic formation. This objective will be achieved by developing methods and generating data necessary to characterize the safety of generic geological waste disposal concepts, which are to be applied in the assessment of specific sites. It is expected that no one particular model will suffice. Both deterministic and probabilistic approaches will be used, and the entire spectrum of phenomena that could influence geologic isolation will be considered

  13. DOE standard: Filter test facility quality program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-02-01

    This standard was developed primarily for application in US Department of Energy programs. It contains specific direction for HEPA filter testing performed at a DOE-accepted HEPA Filter Test Facility (FTF). Beneficial comments (recommendations, additions, deletions) and any pertinent data that may improve this document should be sent to the Office of Nuclear Safety Policy and Standards (EH-31), US Department of Energy, Washington, DC 20585, by letter or by using the self-addressed Document Improvement Proposal form (DOE F 1300.3) appearing at the end of this document

  14. Opinions of practitioners and program directors concerning accreditation standards for postdoctoral pediatric dentistry training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casamassimo, P S; Wilson, S

    1999-01-01

    This study was performed to assess opinions of program directors and practitioners about the importance and necessary numbers of experiences required by current accreditation standards for training of pediatric dentists. A 32-item questionnaire was sent to all program directors of ADA-accredited postdoctoral pediatric dentistry training programs and to a random sample of 10% of the fellow/active membership of the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry. An overall response rate of 56% was obtained from the single mailing. Practitioners and program directors differed significantly (P dentistry: initiating and completing a research paper, biostatistics/epidemiology, and practice management. Program directors had little difficulty obtaining required experiences, and program dependence on Medicaid did not negatively affect quality of education. Practitioners and program directors agreed on the importance of most experiences and activities required by current accreditation standards.

  15. Public estimation of the program of the rehabilitation of the east Urals territory of radioactive contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishutina, T.A.; Korobejnikova, T.A.; Pavlov, B.S.; Suslo, A.F.; Sharova, A.F.

    1996-01-01

    The state of public opinion at the East Urals territory of radioactive contamination of the moment of the adoption of a number of govement acts on rehabilitation may be considered as transitory from the state of actually complete neglect of the problem on the part of the government (1950-70) to that of publicity and taking first practical steps towards development and implementation of rehabilitation policies (1990 s). A primary goal for a program for such territories should be achieving their overall revival on the basis of modern requirements of the population

  16. Human factors engineering applications to the cask design activities of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lake, W.H.; Peck, M. III

    1993-01-01

    The use of human factors engineering (HFE) in the design and use of spent fuel casks being developed for the Department of Energy's Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program is addressed. The safety functions of cask systems are presented as background for HFE considerations. Because spent fuel casks are passive safety devices they could be subject to latent system failures due to human error. It is concluded that HFE should focus on operations and verifications tests, but should begin, to the extent possible, at the beginning of cask design. Use of HFE during design could serve to eliminate or preclude opportunity for human error

  17. Methods for estimating costs of transporting spent fuel and defense high-level radioactive waste for the civilian radioactive waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darrough, M.E.; Lilly, M.J.

    1989-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), through the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, is planning and developing a transportation program for the shipment of spent fuel and defense high-level waste from current storage locations to the site of the mined geologic repository. In addition to its responsibility for providing a safe transportation system, the DOE will assure that the transportation program will function with the other system components to create an integrated waste management system. In meeting these objectives, the DOE will use private industry to the maximum extent practicable and in a manner that is cost effective. This paper discusses various methodologies used for estimating costs for the national radioactive waste transportation system. Estimating these transportation costs is a complex effort, as the high-level radioactive waste transportation system, itself, will be complex. Spent fuel and high-level waste will be transported from more than 100 nuclear power plants and defense sites across the continental US, using multiple transport modes (truck, rail, and barge/rail) and varying sizes and types of casks. Advance notification to corridor states will be given and scheduling will need to be coordinated with utilities, carriers, state and local officials, and the DOE waste acceptance facilities. Additionally, the waste forms will vary in terms of reactor type, size, weight, age, radioactivity, and temperature

  18. Directory of certificates of compliance for radioactive materials packages: Summary report of NRC approved quality assurance programs for radioactive material packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-11-01

    This directory contains a Summary Report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Summary Report of NRC Approved Quality Assurance Programs (Volume 3) for Radioactive Material Packages effective October 1, 1987. This directory makes available a convenient source of information on packagings which have been approved by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. To assist in identifying packaging, an alphabetical listing by Company name is included in the back of Volume 3 for approved QA programs. The Summary Reports include a listing of all users of each package design and approved QA programs prior to the publication date of the directory

  19. Development of an ASTM standard glass durability test, the Product Consistency Test (PCT), for high level radioactive waste glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jantzen, C.M.; Bibler, N.E.; Beam, D.C.; Ramsey, W.G.

    1994-01-01

    The nation's first, and the world's largest, facility to immobilize high-level nuclear waste in durable borosilicate glass has started operation at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, South Carolina. The product specifications on the glass wasteform produced in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) required extensive characterization of the glass product before actual production began and for continued characterization during production. To aid in this characterization, a glass durability (leach) test was needed that was easily reproducible, could be performed remotely on highly radioactive samples, and could yield results rapidly. Several standard leach tests were examined with a variety of test configurations. Using existing tests as a starting point, the DWPF Product Consistency Test (PCT was developed in which crushed glass samples are exposed to 90 ± 2 degree C deionized water for seven days. Based on extensive testing, including a seven-laboratory round robin and confirmatory testing with radioactive samples, the PCT is very reproducible, yields reliable results rapidly, and can be performed in shielded cell facilities with radioactive samples

  20. Radioactive waste management: a summary of state laws and administration. National Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Program. Revision 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-12-01

    This is the sixth update of ''Radioactive Waste Management: A Summary of State Laws and Administration.'' It completely replaces the fifth update (15 September 1984). The updated report covers low-level radioactive waste compacts, and the administration, the legislature and the laws related to radioactive waste management in each of the fifty states. The report is organized by low-level waste compact regions. Each section begins with a description of the low-level waste compact, followed by reports on each state within the region. There are also sections for states which have made plans to dispose of waste independently of a compact, and for those states which have not yet declared their intentions. The report on each compact is divided into four sections: Cover Page, Chair Organization, State Delegations, and Compact

  1. Role of secondary standard dosimetry laboratory in radiation protection program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, Sohaila; Ali, Noriah Mohd.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The radiation dosimetry program is an important element of operational radiation protection. Dosimetry data enable workers and radiation protection professionals to evaluate and control work practices to eliminate unnecessary exposure to ionizing radiation. The usefulness of the data produced however depends on its quality and traceability. The emphasis of the global dosimetry program is focused through the IAEA/WHO network of secondary standard dosimetry laboratories (SSDLs), which aims for the determination of SI quantities through proper traceable calibration of radiation protection equipment. The responsibility of SSDL-NUCLEAR MALAYSIA to guarantee a reliable dosimetry service, which is traceable to international standards, is elucidated. It acts as the basis for harmonized occupational radiation monitoring in Malaysia.

  2. Development of the Discrimination Programs between the Internal and External Radioactive Contamination of Workers Using a Whole Body Counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong, T. Y.; Kim, H. G.; Lim, S. N.; Kim, H. J.; Jin, H. H.; Lee, S. G.; Park, S. C.

    2006-01-01

    A whole body counter (WBC) is used to identify and measure the radioactivity in the body of human beings in a nuclear power plant (NPP). In domestic NPPs, several whole body counters are in operation to monitor the internal radioactive contamination of workers. All workers take a whole body counting after radiation works if there is high possibility of radioactive contamination or the radioactivity is detected by portal monitoring. It is, however, found that the external contamination is occasionally estimated as the internal radioactive contamination. In this case, the worker is recommended to take showers for the decontamination of skin and take a whole body counting again. Although the detected radioactivity is reduced remarkably after several decontaminations, confirmed as the external contamination, it is determined finally as an internal contamination if the radioactivity is still detected in the body of worker. The amount of detected radioactivity can be much higher than that of the expected for this mistaken contamination since the radioisotopes attached to skin come to be close to the detectors of WBC. Finally, this makes not only the misjudgment of the external contamination as the internal contamination, but also the excessively conservative estimation of radioactive contamination. In this study, several experiments were carried out to set up the discrimination program between the internal and external radioactive contamination using the humanoid phantom and a whole body counter. After the analysis of experimental results, we found that the use of front and backside counts could be applied to the discrimination of the external contamination and the ratio of detected radioactivities between front and backside counts was more than about factor 2 for the external contamination

  3. A reference standard-based quality assurance program for radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Patrick T; Johnson, C Daniel; Miranda, Rafael; Patel, Maitray D; Phillips, Carrie J

    2010-01-01

    The authors have developed a comprehensive radiology quality assurance (QA) program that evaluates radiology interpretations and procedures by comparing them with reference standards. Performance metrics are calculated and then compared with benchmarks or goals on the basis of published multicenter data and meta-analyses. Additional workload for physicians is kept to a minimum by having trained allied health staff members perform the comparisons of radiology reports with the reference standards. The performance metrics tracked by the QA program include the accuracy of CT colonography for detecting polyps, the false-negative rate for mammographic detection of breast cancer, the accuracy of CT angiography detection of coronary artery stenosis, the accuracy of meniscal tear detection on MRI, the accuracy of carotid artery stenosis detection on MR angiography, the accuracy of parathyroid adenoma detection by parathyroid scintigraphy, the success rate for obtaining cortical tissue on ultrasound-guided core biopsies of pelvic renal transplants, and the technical success rate for peripheral arterial angioplasty procedures. In contrast with peer-review programs, this reference standard-based QA program minimizes the possibilities of reviewer bias and erroneous second reviewer interpretations. The more objective assessment of performance afforded by the QA program will provide data that can easily be used for education and management conferences, research projects, and multicenter evaluations. Additionally, such performance data could be used by radiology departments to demonstrate their value over nonradiology competitors to referring clinicians, hospitals, patients, and third-party payers. Copyright 2010 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Collaboration of the Dutch research program for radioactive waste disposal (OPERA) and TU Delft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bykov, D.M.; Kloosterman, J.L. [TU Delft (Netherlands). Reactor Inst. Delft; Neeft, E.A.C.; Verhoef, E.V. [COVRA N.V., Nieuwdorp (Netherlands)

    2015-07-01

    Radioactive waste in the Netherlands is collected, treated and stored by COVRA (Centrale Organisatie Voor Radioactief Afval) in the interim storage facility for at least 100 a. After this period of long-term storage, geological disposal is foreseen. The policy is based on a step-wise decision process in which all decisions are taken to ensure safe disposal in a repository, but without excluding unforeseen alternative solutions that might develop in the future. OPERA is the Dutch acronym for research program into geological disposal of radioactive waste. It started in 2011 and is running for five years. The OPERA Research plan is developed by NRG in close collaboration with COVRA. Radioactive waste disposal in the Netherlands is at an early, conceptual phase. The aim of Opera is to develop a first preliminary safety case to structure the research necessary for the eventual deployment of a repository in the Netherlands. The OPERA research program aims at a close cooperation with the Belgian research program on radioactive waste disposal. The result of OPERA will be to detail a first roadmap for the long-term research on geological disposal of radioactive waste in the Netherlands, based initially on a re-evaluation of existing safety and feasibility studies conducted more than ten years ago, making use of present international and, wherever possible, national knowledge. This will be done by developing initial and conditional safety cases for generic GDFs in Zechstein rock salt and Boom Clay formations in the Netherlands. The goal in OPERA is to develop initial safety cases that are intended to mark the start of the research development process and to iterate these as knowledge grows to new developed insights. The safety case is conditional since plausible assumptions must later be confirmed in a safety case e.g. for site selection. Dutch, Belgian, German, English and French organizations participate in OPERA. These organizations can be found in the two documents with

  5. Collaboration of the Dutch research program for radioactive waste disposal (OPERA) and TU Delft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bykov, D.M.; Kloosterman, J.L.

    2015-01-01

    Radioactive waste in the Netherlands is collected, treated and stored by COVRA (Centrale Organisatie Voor Radioactief Afval) in the interim storage facility for at least 100 a. After this period of long-term storage, geological disposal is foreseen. The policy is based on a step-wise decision process in which all decisions are taken to ensure safe disposal in a repository, but without excluding unforeseen alternative solutions that might develop in the future. OPERA is the Dutch acronym for research program into geological disposal of radioactive waste. It started in 2011 and is running for five years. The OPERA Research plan is developed by NRG in close collaboration with COVRA. Radioactive waste disposal in the Netherlands is at an early, conceptual phase. The aim of Opera is to develop a first preliminary safety case to structure the research necessary for the eventual deployment of a repository in the Netherlands. The OPERA research program aims at a close cooperation with the Belgian research program on radioactive waste disposal. The result of OPERA will be to detail a first roadmap for the long-term research on geological disposal of radioactive waste in the Netherlands, based initially on a re-evaluation of existing safety and feasibility studies conducted more than ten years ago, making use of present international and, wherever possible, national knowledge. This will be done by developing initial and conditional safety cases for generic GDFs in Zechstein rock salt and Boom Clay formations in the Netherlands. The goal in OPERA is to develop initial safety cases that are intended to mark the start of the research development process and to iterate these as knowledge grows to new developed insights. The safety case is conditional since plausible assumptions must later be confirmed in a safety case e.g. for site selection. Dutch, Belgian, German, English and French organizations participate in OPERA. These organizations can be found in the two documents with

  6. Genetic Programming and Standardization in Water Temperature Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maritza Arganis

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available An application of Genetic Programming (an evolutionary computational tool without and with standardization data is presented with the aim of modeling the behavior of the water temperature in a river in terms of meteorological variables that are easily measured, to explore their explanatory power and to emphasize the utility of the standardization of variables in order to reduce the effect of those with large variance. Recorded data corresponding to the water temperature behavior at the Ebro River, Spain, are used as analysis case, showing a performance improvement on the developed model when data are standardized. This improvement is reflected in a reduction of the mean square error. Finally, the models obtained in this document were applied to estimate the water temperature in 2004, in order to provide evidence about their applicability to forecasting purposes.

  7. Understanding radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, R.L.

    1981-12-01

    This document contains information on all aspects of radioactive wastes. Facts are presented about radioactive wastes simply, clearly and in an unbiased manner which makes the information readily accessible to the interested public. The contents are as follows: questions and concerns about wastes; atoms and chemistry; radioactivity; kinds of radiation; biological effects of radiation; radiation standards and protection; fission and fission products; the Manhattan Project; defense and development; uses of isotopes and radiation; classification of wastes; spent fuels from nuclear reactors; storage of spent fuel; reprocessing, recycling, and resources; uranium mill tailings; low-level wastes; transportation; methods of handling high-level nuclear wastes; project salt vault; multiple barrier approach; research on waste isolation; legal requiremnts; the national waste management program; societal aspects of radioactive wastes; perspectives; glossary; appendix A (scientific American articles); appendix B (reference material on wastes)

  8. Understanding radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, R.L.

    1981-12-01

    This document contains information on all aspects of radioactive wastes. Facts are presented about radioactive wastes simply, clearly and in an unbiased manner which makes the information readily accessible to the interested public. The contents are as follows: questions and concerns about wastes; atoms and chemistry; radioactivity; kinds of radiation; biological effects of radiation; radiation standards and protection; fission and fission products; the Manhattan Project; defense and development; uses of isotopes and radiation; classification of wastes; spent fuels from nuclear reactors; storage of spent fuel; reprocessing, recycling, and resources; uranium mill tailings; low-level wastes; transportation; methods of handling high-level nuclear wastes; project salt vault; multiple barrier approach; research on waste isolation; legal requiremnts; the national waste management program; societal aspects of radioactive wastes; perspectives; glossary; appendix A (scientific American articles); appendix B (reference material on wastes). (ATT)

  9. Site Study Plan for background environmental radioactivity, Deaf Smith County site, Texas: Environmental Field Program: Preliminary draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-06-01

    The Background Environmental Radioactivity Site Study Plan describes a field program consisting of an initial radiological survey and a radiological sampling program. The field program includes measurement of direct radiation and collection and analysis of background radioactivity samples of air, precipitation, soil, water, milk, pasture grass, food crops, meat, poultry, game, and eggs. The plan describes for each study: the need for the study, the study design, data management and use, schedule of proposed activities, and quality assurance requirements. These studies will provide data needed to satisfy requirements contained in, or derived from, the Salt Repository Project (SRP) Requirements Document. 50 refs., 11 figs., 7 tabs

  10. Environmental assessment for the Consumer Products Efficiency Standards program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-05-23

    The Energy Policy and Conservation Act of 1975 as amended by the National Energy Conservation Policy Act of 1978, requires the DOE to prescribe energy efficiency standards for thirteen consumer products. The Consumer Products Efficiency Standards (CPES) program covers the following products: refrigerators and refrigerator-freezers; freezers;clothes dryers;water heaters; room air conditioners; home heating equipment (not including furnaces); kitchen ranges and ovens; central air conditioners (cooling and heat pumps); furnaces; dishwashers; television sets; clothes washers; and humidifiers and dehumidifiers. DOE is proposing two sets of standards for all thirteen consumer products: intermediate standards to become effective in 1981 for the first nine products and in 1982 for the second four products, and final standards to become effective in 1986 and 1987, respectively. The final standards are more restrictive than the intermediate standards and will provide manufacturers with the maximum time permitted under the Act to plan and develop extensive new lines of efficient consumer products. The final standards proposed by DOE require the maximum improvements in efficiency which are technologically feasible and economically justified, as required by Section 325(c) of EPCA. The thirteen consumer products account for approximately 90% of all the energy consumed in the nation's residences, or more than 20% of the nation's energy needs. Increases in the energy efficiency of these consumer products can help to narrow the gap between the nation's increasing demand for energy and decreasing supplies of domestic oil and natural gas. Improvements in the efficiency of consumer products can thus help to solve the nation's energy crisis.

  11. Development of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management's Self-Assessment Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlahakis, J.G.; Palabrica, R.J.; Goldsmith, S.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the development and implementation of the Self-Assessment (SA) Program of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (RW). The basis for RW's SA Program is discussed, as well as RW's approach for meeting self-assessment requirements, RW's organization for self-assessment, actions to establish RW's SA Program, and planned RW SA implementation activities. This paper also discusses how self-assessment can support programmatic decisions and actions. The RW Director has approved and issued the Self-Assessment Management Plan that describes how RW will organize and manage its SA program. He has directed Associate/Office Directors to prepare individual Implementation Plans to provide specifics on how their Offices will meet the requirements of the RW SA Program. To assist in the preparation of these Implementation Plans, the RW Self-Assessment Unit (SAU), which manages the SA Program on behalf of the RW Director, has conducted a series of SA Implementation Workshops. The SAU has also developed an Annotated Outline for SA Implementation Plans. Following issuance of Office-specific Implementation Plans, independent evaluations by the SAU are planned

  12. Practical standard for nuclear power plant life management programs: 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-03-01

    The standard specifies the method of implementing nuclear power plant life management programs. The plant life management programs evaluate the integrity of the plant structures, systems and components, assessing if appropriate measures are taken against existing aging phenomena, if there are possibilities of occurrence and development of aging phenomena and if a sufficient level of margin is maintained to assure the integrity throughout the future operating period. The programs also assess the validity of the current maintenance activities, such as trend monitoring, walkdowns, periodic tests and inspections, repair and replacement work for the purpose of preventive maintenance, and utilization of lessons learned from past trouble experience, in order to newly identify maintenance measures. The technical evaluation on aging phenomena is conducted to establish the 10 year maintenance program for nuclear power plants until the plant reaches 30 years of service. The standard was established and issued by the Atomic Energy Society of Japan (AESJ) through the discussion of experts in the associated fields. (T. Tanaka)

  13. Radioactive waste management: a summary of state laws and administration. National Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Program. Revision 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-09-01

    This updated report covers the administration, the legislature and the laws in the 50 states related to radioactive waste. The report for each state is divided into four sections: Cover Page; Administrative; Legislative; and Applicable Legislation. In general, the information in this report is accurate as of 31 August 1984

  14. Low-level radioactive waste program of the US Geological Survey - in transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, J.N.

    1983-01-01

    In 1983, the US Geological Survey will publish final reports of geohydrologic investigations at five commercial low-level, radioactive-waste burial sites in the United States. These reports mark the end of the first phase of the US Geological Survey program to improve the understanding of earth-science principles related to the effective disposal of low-level wastes. The second phase, which was initiated in 1981, is being developed to address geohydrologic issues identified as needing greater attention based upon results of the first-phase site studies. Specific program elements include unsaturated-zone hydrology, geochemistry, clay mineralogy, surface geophysical techniques, and model development and testing. The information and expertise developed from these and previous studies will allow the US Geological Survey to provide sound technical assistance to State low-level waste compacts, the Department of Energy, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and the Environmental Protection Agency. 11 references

  15. DOE program for improvement practices for shallow burial of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dieckhoner, J.E.

    1978-01-01

    The practice of burying solid radioactive waste in relatively shallow pits or trenches at government nuclear sites dates back to the Manhattan Project. In some cases, where local conditions were considered unfavorable, intersite shipment of waste has been required. This general concept was later used at commercially-operated sites under Federal or state regulation. The purpose, scope, and results of a DOE program begun several years ago for improvements of burial ground disposal methods are reviewed. The program includes the re-evaluation of the original siting and of operating practices at existing burial grounds (including monitoring for migration of activity); the development of improved criteria for siting of new grounds that might be required as the defense site operations continue; and development of corrective measures such as diking and better draining for possible unsatisfactory conditions that might be detected. The possible applications of these findings to commercial burial grounds is discussed

  16. Development and implementation of a construction environmental protection program at a solid radioactive waste management facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, T.S. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Mississauga, Ontario (Canada); Bishop, T. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Saint John, New Brunswick (Canada); Hickman, C.N. [Point Lepreau Generating Station, Saint John, New Brunswick (Canada)

    2007-07-01

    Refurbishment of ageing nuclear stations has great economic and environmental benefits, including reduced greenhouse gas emissions. The Government of New Brunswick (NB) decided in 2005 to refurbish the Point Lepreau Generating Station with Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) as the general contractor. The project includes construction of additional radioactive waste management facilities. AECL developed, for the construction project, an environmental protection program to comply with commitments made during the environmental assessment process, and regulatory requirements. The program covers detailed environmental plans, training courses, and engagement of consultants to provide training and conduct monitoring of the construction activities. Construction related environmental effects have been successfully mitigated and the monitoring results indicate compliance with all environmental requirements. (author)

  17. Report to Congress on reassessment of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-11-01

    In the Report of the House Committee on Appropriations (House Report No. 101-96) on the Energy and Water Development Appropriation Act, 1990 (P.L. 101-101), the Committee directed the Department of Energy (DOE) ''hor-ellipsis to submit a report within 60 days of enactment hor-ellipsis which describes in detail how the Department plans to respond to the Committee's hor-ellipsis concerns dealing with endemic schedule slips, problems in management structure, and lack of integrated contractor efforts.'' This report has been prepared in response to the above-mentioned Congressional directive. It is based on a comprehensive review that the Secretary of Energy has recently completed of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program. The Secretary's review has led to the development of a three-point action plan for restructuring the program. This plan is explained in this report

  18. Assessment of the Japanese Energy Efficiency Standards Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Arakawa

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Japanese energy efficiency standards program for appliances is a unique program which sets and revises mandatory standards based on the products of the highest energy efficiency on the markets. This study assessed the cost-effectiveness of the standard settings for air conditioner as a major residential appliance or typical example in the program. Based on analyses of empirical data, the net costs and effects from 1999 to 2040 were estimated. When applying a discount rate of 3%, the cost of abating CO2 emissions realized through the considered standards was estimated to be -13700 JPY/t-CO2. The sensitivity analysis, however, showed the cost turns into positive at a discount rate of 26% or higher. The authors also revealed that the standards’ “excellent” cost-effectiveness largely depends on that of the 1st standard setting, and the CO2 abatement cost through the 2nd standard was estimated to be as high as 26800 JPY/t-CO2. The results imply that the government is required to be careful about the possible economic burden imposed when considering introducing new, additional standards.

  19. Survey of legal aspects, regulations, standards and guidelines applicable to radioactive waste management of the Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor - RMB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvetti, T.C.; Marumo, J.T.

    2017-01-01

    In Brazil, the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN) and Brazilian Institute of Environment and Renewable Natural Resources (IBAMA) are the agencies responsible for the execution, regulation and control of nuclear and environmental policies, respectively. Such regulatory activities are very comprehensive (IBAMA) or too specific (CNEN), revealing other aspects that would, also, need to be observed so that the management could be carried out efficiently (quality) and effectively (safety), including the three governmental administrative levels: Federal, State and Municipal. In addition to laws, regulations, decrees and resolutions, there are also national and international standards and guides that provide guidelines for structuring the current management and the use of best regulatory practices. The Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor Enterprise (RMB) is a CNEN project, complying with a Multi-Year Plan of the Brazilian Ministry of Planning, Development and Management (MPDG). The Enterprise is being developed under the responsibility of the Directorate of Research and Development - DPD of CNEN and will have a facility for treatment and initial temporary storage of the radioactive waste generated by the operation of the research reactor and the activities carried out in the associated laboratories. The RMB will be built in the city of IPERÓ, located in the state of São Paulo, near ARAMAR Experimental Center of the Brazilian Navy. This work aims to present the research results regarding the various aspects that regulate, legislate and standardize the practices proposed to the Radioactive Waste Management of the RMB project. (author)

  20. Survey of legal aspects, regulations, standards and guidelines applicable to radioactive waste management of the Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor - RMB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvetti, T.C.; Marumo, J.T., E-mail: salvetti@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    In Brazil, the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN) and Brazilian Institute of Environment and Renewable Natural Resources (IBAMA) are the agencies responsible for the execution, regulation and control of nuclear and environmental policies, respectively. Such regulatory activities are very comprehensive (IBAMA) or too specific (CNEN), revealing other aspects that would, also, need to be observed so that the management could be carried out efficiently (quality) and effectively (safety), including the three governmental administrative levels: Federal, State and Municipal. In addition to laws, regulations, decrees and resolutions, there are also national and international standards and guides that provide guidelines for structuring the current management and the use of best regulatory practices. The Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor Enterprise (RMB) is a CNEN project, complying with a Multi-Year Plan of the Brazilian Ministry of Planning, Development and Management (MPDG). The Enterprise is being developed under the responsibility of the Directorate of Research and Development - DPD of CNEN and will have a facility for treatment and initial temporary storage of the radioactive waste generated by the operation of the research reactor and the activities carried out in the associated laboratories. The RMB will be built in the city of IPERÓ, located in the state of São Paulo, near ARAMAR Experimental Center of the Brazilian Navy. This work aims to present the research results regarding the various aspects that regulate, legislate and standardize the practices proposed to the Radioactive Waste Management of the RMB project. (author)

  1. Establishment and utilization of radiological protection programs for the transport of radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez V, J.; Capadona, N.

    2006-01-01

    The present work has by objective to indicate rules for the establishment and the use of the Radiological Protection Programs (PPR) that are of application to the transport of radioactive materials according to that required by the Transport Regulation of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The PPR are established and applied in systematic form for remittent, transport and addressees, to consider the measures of radiological protection and its appropriately control during the transport stages of radioactive material. In particular, in the work it is analyzed the PPR applied to the operative stage, in the one that can be considered as one of the more important documents to use since it summarizes the evaluations and the necessary controls of radiological protection. Also it is analyzed the importance that this document gets ready on the base that it converges in the the analyses, evaluations and data that have been kept in mind during the previous stages of design of bundles and production of packings, the types and quantities of involved bundles, as well as of considering the quantities of expeditions and its frequencies, the ways of transport, etc. It is included a brief description of the parts that the PPR conforms on the base of that suggested in the advanced draft of the TS-G-1.5 Guide 'Radiation Protection Programmes for Transport of Radioactive Material', of October, 2005, of the IAEA: objectives. necessity, scope, basic elements of a PPR in function of the occupational dose. assignment of functions and responsibilities for the establishment of a PPR, evaluation and dose optimization, surface contamination, segregation and other protection measures, responses in emergencies. training and administration systems for baled and transport of radioactive material. Next an example of PPR for the transport of bundles of the A Type by lorry with content of radiopharmaceuticals that are the bundles more used worldwide in the expeditions of radioactive

  2. Standard test method for static leaching of monolithic waste forms for disposal of radioactive waste

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This test method provides a measure of the chemical durability of a simulated or radioactive monolithic waste form, such as a glass, ceramic, cement (grout), or cermet, in a test solution at temperatures <100°C under low specimen surface- area-to-leachant volume (S/V) ratio conditions. 1.2 This test method can be used to characterize the dissolution or leaching behaviors of various simulated or radioactive waste forms in various leachants under the specific conditions of the test based on analysis of the test solution. Data from this test are used to calculate normalized elemental mass loss values from specimens exposed to aqueous solutions at temperatures <100°C. 1.3 The test is conducted under static conditions in a constant solution volume and at a constant temperature. The reactivity of the test specimen is determined from the amounts of components released and accumulated in the solution over the test duration. A wide range of test conditions can be used to study material behavior, includin...

  3. Standard Guide for Unrestricted Disposition of Bulk Materials Containing Residual Amounts of Radioactivity

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 This guide covers the techniques for obtaining approval for release of materials encountered in decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) from restricted use. This would be addressed in the decommissioning plan (E 1281). It applies to materials that do not meet any of the requirements for regulatory control because of radioactivity content. Fig. 1 shows the logic diagram for determining the materials that could be considered for release. Materials that negotiate this logic tree are referred to as “candidate for release based on dose.” 1.2 The objective of this guide is to provide a methodology for distinguishing between material that must be carefully isolated to prevent human contact from that that can be recycled or otherwise disposed of. It applies to material in which the radioactivity is dispersed more or less uniformly throughout the volume of the material (termed residual in bulk form) as opposed to surface contaminated objects. 1.3 Surface contaminated objects are materials externally co...

  4. The support for a purification of water contaminated with radioactivity, and problems of the radioactivity standard in an emergency situation at the stricken area 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Yoshiaki

    2011-01-01

    The accident of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Station of Tokyo Electric Power Company associated with the Great East Japan Earthquake incurred severe situation, where lifeline was cut off due to the discharge of a large amount of radioactive substances. In particular, the supply of safe foods and drinking water in radiation-polluted areas is urgently required. The authors have been developing up to now Crystal Valley water purifier and CV-Rescue water purifier that can purify well-water unsuitable for drinking due to contamination with toxic substances and produce drinkable water with safety without anxiety. This paper introduces the processes, in which verification test was performed to confirm that the above purifiers can be used for the removal of radioactivity discharged from the Great East Japan Earthquake this time, the validity of these purifiers was clarified, and these purifiers have actually been used for supporting water supply. This paper especially points out that a problem exists in the various standards on radioactivity that were temporarily determined in face of emergency of radiation pollution due to the nuclear power station accident this time. In these standards, the temporary standard on radioactive iodine 131 in drinking water is too high compared with the standards of WHO and those of advanced countries like U.S.A. It also points out the problem that radioactive substances in drinking water have not been removed yet. (O.A.)

  5. Summary of national and international fuel cycle and radioactive waste management programs, 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmon, K.M.; Lakey, L.T.; Leigh, I.W.

    1984-07-01

    Worldwide activities related to nuclear fuel cycle and radioactive waste management programs are summarized. Several trends have developed in waste management strategy: All countries having to dispose of reprocessing wastes plan on conversion of the high-level waste (HLW) stream to a borosilicate glass and eventual emplacement of the glass logs, suitably packaged, in a deep geologic repository. Countries that must deal with plutonium-contaminated waste emphasize pluonium recovery, volume reduction and fixation in cement or bitumen in their treatment plans and expect to use deep geologic repositories for final disposal. Commercially available, classical engineering processing are being used worldwide to treat and immobilize low- and intermediate-level wastes (LLW, ILW); disposal to surface structures, shallow-land burial and deep-underground repositories, such as played-out mines, is being done widely with no obvious technical problems. Many countries have established extensive programs to prepare for construction and operation of geologic repositories. Geologic media being studied fall into three main classes: argillites (clay or shale); crystalline rock (granite, basalt, gneiss or gabbro); and evaporates (salt formations). Most nations plan to allow 30 years or longer between discharge of fuel from the reactor and emplacement of HLW or spent fuel is a repository to permit thermal and radioactive decay. Most repository designs are based on the mined-gallery concept, placing waste or spent fuel packages into shallow holes in the floor of the gallery. Many countries have established extensive and costly programs of site evaluation, repository development and safety assessment. Two other waste management problems are the subject of major R and D programs in several countries: stabilization of uranium mill tailing piles; and immobilization or disposal of contaminated nuclear facilities, namely reactors, fuel cycle plants and R and D laboratories.

  6. Summary of national and international fuel cycle and radioactive waste management programs, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harmon, K.M.; Lakey, L.T.; Leigh, I.W.

    1984-07-01

    Worldwide activities related to nuclear fuel cycle and radioactive waste management programs are summarized. Several trends have developed in waste management strategy: All countries having to dispose of reprocessing wastes plan on conversion of the high-level waste (HLW) stream to a borosilicate glass and eventual emplacement of the glass logs, suitably packaged, in a deep geologic repository. Countries that must deal with plutonium-contaminated waste emphasize pluonium recovery, volume reduction and fixation in cement or bitumen in their treatment plans and expect to use deep geologic repositories for final disposal. Commercially available, classical engineering processing are being used worldwide to treat and immobilize low- and intermediate-level wastes (LLW, ILW); disposal to surface structures, shallow-land burial and deep-underground repositories, such as played-out mines, is being done widely with no obvious technical problems. Many countries have established extensive programs to prepare for construction and operation of geologic repositories. Geologic media being studied fall into three main classes: argillites (clay or shale); crystalline rock (granite, basalt, gneiss or gabbro); and evaporates (salt formations). Most nations plan to allow 30 years or longer between discharge of fuel from the reactor and emplacement of HLW or spent fuel is a repository to permit thermal and radioactive decay. Most repository designs are based on the mined-gallery concept, placing waste or spent fuel packages into shallow holes in the floor of the gallery. Many countries have established extensive and costly programs of site evaluation, repository development and safety assessment. Two other waste management problems are the subject of major R and D programs in several countries: stabilization of uranium mill tailing piles; and immobilization or disposal of contaminated nuclear facilities, namely reactors, fuel cycle plants and R and D laboratories

  7. Standard Review Plan for Environmental Restoration Program Quality Management Plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-12-01

    The Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) Manual Environmental Restoration Program Quality System Requirements (QSR) for the Hanford Site, defines all quality requirements governing Hanford Environmental Restoration (ER) Program activities. The QSR requires that ER Program participants develop Quality Management Plans (QMPs) that describe how the QSR requirements will be implemented for their assigned scopes of work. This standard review plan (SRP) describes the ER program participant responsibilities for submittal of QMPs to the RL Environmental Restoration Division for review and the RL methodology for performing the reviews of participant QMPS. The SRP serves the following functions: acts as a guide in the development or revision of QMPs to assure that the content is complete and adequate; acts as a checklist to be used by the RL staff in their review of participant QMPs; acts as an index or matrix between the requirements of the QSR and implementing methodologies described in the QMPs; decreases the time and subjectivity of document reviews; and provides a formal, documented method for describing exceptions, modifications, or waivers to established ER Program quality requirements

  8. Legal, political, and institutional implications of the seabed assessment program for radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deese, D.A.

    1977-01-01

    Sub-seabed disposal of high-level radioactive waste is discussed. The following conclusions are drawn: The outcome will be determined largely by the national political stances taken toward a sub-seabed disposal program. Political and diplomatic responses from individual countries should be expected to be heavily influenced by the number, type, and timing of options available for high-level waste disposal. The budgetary and institutional support Washington gives to the sub-seabed program will have a crucial influence on the progress of sub-seabed science and technology over the next three to five years. Despite the growing need of nations, such as Japan and Britain, for a high-level waste disposal option, a sub-seabed program will probably not be employed if it is not strongly funded and supported by the United States. Clearly, there are enough level and political obstacles to destroy or delay a sub-seabed disposal program. The nontechnical hurdles to seabed disposal at least equal the scientific and technical ones. But, on the other hand, there are important potential social and political benefits to be gained from any serious attempt to mount a successful sub-seabed program. These lie principally in international cooperation on waste management, environmental protection, nonproliferation of nuclear weapons, and governing the deep seabed

  9. CRUSH1: a simplified computer program for impact analysis of radioactive material transport casks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikushima, Takeshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1996-07-01

    In drop impact analyses for radioactive transport casks, it has become possible to perform them in detail by using interaction evaluation, computer programs, such as DYNA2D, DYNA3D, PISCES and HONDO. However, the considerable cost and computer time are necessitated to perform analyses by these programs. To meet the above requirements, a simplified computer program CRUSH1 has been developed. The CRUSH1 is a static calculation computer program capable of evaluating the maximum acceleration of cask bodies and the maximum deformation of shock absorbers using an Uniaxial Displacement Method (UDM). The CRUSH1 is a revised version of the CRUSH. Main revisions of the computer program are as follows; (1) not only main frame computer but also work stations (OS UNIX) and personal computer (OS Windows 3.1 or Windows NT) are available for use of the CRUSH1 and (2) input data set are revised. In the paper, brief illustration of calculation method using UDM is presented. The second section presents comparisons between UDM and the detailed method. The third section provides a use`s guide for CRUSH1. (author)

  10. CRUSH1: a simplified computer program for impact analysis of radioactive material transport casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikushima, Takeshi

    1996-07-01

    In drop impact analyses for radioactive transport casks, it has become possible to perform them in detail by using interaction evaluation, computer programs, such as DYNA2D, DYNA3D, PISCES and HONDO. However, the considerable cost and computer time are necessitated to perform analyses by these programs. To meet the above requirements, a simplified computer program CRUSH1 has been developed. The CRUSH1 is a static calculation computer program capable of evaluating the maximum acceleration of cask bodies and the maximum deformation of shock absorbers using an Uniaxial Displacement Method (UDM). The CRUSH1 is a revised version of the CRUSH. Main revisions of the computer program are as follows; (1) not only main frame computer but also work stations (OS UNIX) and personal computer (OS Windows 3.1 or Windows NT) are available for use of the CRUSH1 and (2) input data set are revised. In the paper, brief illustration of calculation method using UDM is presented. The second section presents comparisons between UDM and the detailed method. The third section provides a use's guide for CRUSH1. (author)

  11. Evaluating public involvement in the National Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-09-01

    The Department of Energy contracted with the Keystone Center to evaluate the effectiveness of the National Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Program's public-involvement efforts. The Center chose six evaluators with diverse training and experience related to low-level waste management and public-participation programs. Keystone's evaluation was based on (a) observations by the evaluators who attended the National Program-sponsored strategy review meetings and fairs; (b) interviews with low-level waste generators, local government officials, state legislators, public-interest groups, and members of the general public; and (c) observations of the final National Program strategy task force meeting. The evaluators concluded that, overall, the public-participation processes yielded some very positive results - for policy development and for DOE and the EG and G staff. They judged the strategy document to be complete, concise, and helpful to public dialogue on low-level waste issues. They also made specific recommendations for improvements to the public-participation program

  12. Standard guide for characterization of radioactive and/or hazardous wastes for thermal treatment

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2003-01-01

    1.1 This guide identifies methods to determine the physical and chemical characteristics of radioactive and/or hazardous wastes before a waste is processed at high temperatures, for example, vitrification into a homogeneous glass ,glass-ceramic, or ceramic waste form. This includes waste forms produced by ex-situ vitrification (ESV), in-situ vitrification (ISV), slagging, plasma-arc, hot-isostatic pressing (HIP) and/or cold-pressing and sintering technologies. Note that this guide does not specifically address high temperature waste treatment by incineration but several of the analyses described in this guide may be useful diagnostic methods to determine incinerator off-gas composition and concentrations. The characterization of the waste(s) recommended in this guide can be used to (1) choose and develop the appropriate thermal treatment methodology, (2) determine if waste pretreatment is needed prior to thermal treatment, (3) aid in development of thermal treatment process control, (4) develop surrogate wa...

  13. Development of radioactive standards in epoxy matrix for the control of quality of activimeters; Desenvolvimento de padroes radioativos em matriz epoxi para controle da qualidade de ativimetros

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fragoso, Maria da Conceicao de Farias; Monteiro, Luciane Carollyne de Oliveira Reis; Oliveira, Marcia Liane de, E-mail: mcfragoso@cnen.gov.br [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    In the present study, a new approach for development of the standards for positron emitting radionuclides in epoxy matrix is presented. Different formulations were prepared using epoxy resin (bisphenol A diglycidyl ether - DGEBA) and curing agents, to immobilize the radioactive material. The efficiency curve and standard sample methods were applied for activity determination of a long-lived positron emitter ({sup 22}Na). Satisfactory results were obtained in the 3{sup rd} combination. Thus, these radioactive standards can be used to evaluate the metrological behavior of the systems used for the measurement of the radiopharmaceuticals (activimeters) in the production centers and in nuclear medicine services. (author)

  14. The development of the American national standard, ''control of radioactive surface contamination on materials, equipment and facilities to be released for uncontrolled use''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, J.

    1980-01-01

    The American National Standard, Control of Radioactive Surface Contamination on Materials, Equipment and Facilities to be Released for Uncontrolled Use, was developed under the procedures of ANSI for ANSI Main Committee N13 (Radiation Protection) by a working group of the Health Physics Society Standards Committee. This standard provides criteria for the control of materials, equipment and facilities contaminated with radioactivity proposed to be released for uncontrolled use. Permissible contamination limits are specified as well as methods assessing the levels of contamination. This paper reviews the proceedings of the Subcommittee on Radioactive Surface Contamination, the comments received by reviewers of the standard, the resolution of the committee, and the bases for reaching the final limits, recommendations, and measurement procedures. (H.K.)

  15. Radioactive waste management: a summary of state laws and administration. National Low-Level Radioactive Waste Mangement Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-05-01

    This is the first quarterly update of Radioactive Waste Management: A Summary of State Laws and Administration. Because states have been very active on waste management issues, the whole report is being reissued in this update. It covers the administration, the legislature and the laws in the 50 states related to radioactive waste. The report for each state is divided into four sections: Cover Page; Administrative; Legislative; and Applicable Legislation. The cover page indicates whether or not it is an Agreement State, the low-level waste compacts in which the state is listed as an eligible state, and the high-level waste repository site screening regions in which the state or a portion of it is located. The administrative section provides information on the governor, lead agencies, other involved administrative agencies, relevant commissions, boards and councils and various contacts. The Legislative section provides general information on the legislature and lists legislative leaders, the relevant committees and their chairs and a legislative contact. In the section covering Applicable Legislation, laws related to radiation protection, low-level waste and high-level waste have been summarized. Hazardous waste siting laws are included for states that do not have a siting law covering radioactive waste. The section also contains summaries of relevant bills introduced in 1982 and 1983 legislative sessions and their disposition. In general, the information in this report is accurate as of 15 April 1983

  16. International program: Feasibility of the evacuation of high-level radioactive wastes under the ocean depths. (Seabed Program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbreau, A.

    1990-01-01

    The Seabed feasibility program is an international scientific program of research on the feasibility of the disposal of high-level radioactive wastes into the geological formations making up the floor of the great abyssal plains of the oceans. Decided in 1977, the program is aimed at answering the three following questions: 1) are there potentially favourable sites. 2) is the disposal of wastes possible. 3) does the operation present safety guarantees. First initiated by four countries (USA, UK, Japan and France), the program sponsored by the OECD nuclear energy agency was gathering ten countries and the Commission of the European communities in 1988. The techniques of waste disposal by means of drilling in consolidated sediments and penetrators in loose sediments have been studied. The penetrator technique has been the most thoroughly studied, especially through in situ experiments in the Atlantic ocean. The various factors affecting safety have been studied and the radiological consequences of a burial operation assessed through models. It has been concluded that such an operation could be carried out technically under quite satisfying conditions [fr

  17. The Radioactive Ion Beams in Brazil (RIBRAS) facility. Description, program, main results, future plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepine-Szily, A.; Lichtenthaeler, R.; Guimaraes, V. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    RIBRAS (Radioactive Ion Beams in Brazil) is a facility installed at the Institute of Physics of the University of Sao Paulo (IFUSP), Brazil. The RIBRAS system consists of two superconducting solenoids and uses the ''in-flight method'' to produce radioactive ion beams using the primary beam provided by the 8UD Pelletron Tandem of IFUSP. The ion beams produced so far by RIBRAS are {sup 6}He, {sup 8}Li, {sup 7}Be, {sup 10}Be, {sup 8}B, {sup 12}B with intensities that can vary from 10{sup 4} to 10{sup 6} pps. Initially the experimental program covered the study of elastic and inelastic scattering with the objective to study the interaction potential and the reaction mechanisms between weakly bound (RIB) and halo ({sup 6}He and {sup 8}B) projectiles on light, medium and heavy mass targets. With highly purified beams, the study of resonant elastic scattering and resonant transfer reactions, using inverse kinematics and thick targets, has also been included in our experimental program. Also, transfer reactions of astrophysical interest and fusion reactions induced by halo nuclei are part of the near-future research program. Our recent results on elastic scattering, alpha-particle production and total reaction cross sections, as well as the resonant elastic and transfer reactions, are presented. Our plans for the near future are related to the installation of a new beam line and a cave for gamma-ray detection. We intend to place in operation a large area neutron detector available in our laboratory. The long-range plans could be the move of the RIBRAS system to the more energetic beam line of the LINAC post-accelerator (10MeV/nucleon primary beams) still in construction in our laboratory. (orig.)

  18. The Radioactive Ion Beams in Brazil (RIBRAS) facility. Description, program, main results, future plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lépine-Szily, A.; Lichtenthäler, R.; Guimarães, V.

    2014-08-01

    RIBRAS (Radioactive Ion Beams in Brazil) is a facility installed at the Institute of Physics of the University of São Paulo (IFUSP), Brazil. The RIBRAS system consists of two superconducting solenoids and uses the "in-flight method" to produce radioactive ion beams using the primary beam provided by the 8UD Pelletron Tandem of IFUSP. The ion beams produced so far by RIBRAS are 6He, 8Li, 7Be, 10Be, 8B, 12B with intensities that can vary from 104 to 106 pps. Initially the experimental program covered the study of elastic and inelastic scattering with the objective to study the interaction potential and the reaction mechanisms between weakly bound (RIB) and halo (6He and 8B projectiles on light, medium and heavy mass targets. With highly purified beams, the study of resonant elastic scattering and resonant transfer reactions, using inverse kinematics and thick targets, has also been included in our experimental program. Also, transfer reactions of astrophysical interest and fusion reactions induced by halo nuclei are part of the near-future research program. Our recent results on elastic scattering, alpha-particle production and total reaction cross sections, as well as the resonant elastic and transfer reactions, are presented. Our plans for the near future are related to the installation of a new beam line and a cave for gamma-ray detection. We intend to place in operation a large area neutron detector available in our laboratory. The long-range plans could be the move of the RIBRAS system to the more energetic beam line of the LINAC post-accelerator (10MeV/nucleon primary beams) still in construction in our laboratory.

  19. Unified programs nationally? Strengths and weaknesses of the learning standards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Polo Martínez

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The inclusion of measurable learning standards as an element of the curriculum has definitely opened the door to the connection between the curriculum and external assessments. Since its origin, the potential impact of that element in improving our educational system has been defended and criticized. The truth is that in our country, though all regions are based on the same Royal Decree of core curriculum, and therefore the same reference for the evaluation, curriculum that ultimately applies to students ( teaching-learning- assessment from the different regions can have significant differences . This article proposes, from the analysis of various research , training programs, the plan of action for inspection and the author's own experience in processes of curriculum specifications , assess the potential strengths and weaknesses of the learning standards.

  20. Standard Review Plan Update and Development Program. Implementing Procedures Document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-05-01

    This implementing procedures document (IPD) was prepared for use in implementing tasks under the standard review plan update and development program (SRP-UDP). The IPD provides comprehensive guidance and detailed procedures for SRP-UDP tasks. The IPD is mandatory for contractors performing work for the SRP-UDP. It is guidance for the staff. At the completion of the SRP-UDP, the IPD will be revised (to remove the UDP aspects) and will replace NRR Office Letter No. 800 as long-term maintenance procedures.

  1. U.S. Department of Energy's 'initiatives for proliferation prevention' program: solidification technologies for radioactive waste treatment in Russia - 16037

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pokhitonov, Yuri; Kelley, Dennis

    2009-01-01

    Large amounts of liquid radioactive waste have existed in the U.S. and Russia since the 1950's as a result of the Cold War. Comprehensive action to treat and dispose of waste products has been lacking due to insufficient funding, ineffective technologies or no proven technologies, low priority by governments among others. Today the U.S. and Russian governments seek new, more reliable methods to treat liquid waste, in particular the legacy waste streams. A primary objective of waste generators and regulators is to find economical and proven technologies that can provide long-term stability for repository storage. In 2001, the V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute (Khlopin), St. Petersburg, Russia, and Pacific Nuclear Solutions (PNS), Indianapolis, Indiana, began extensive research and test programs to determine the validity of polymer technology for the absorption and immobilization of standard and complex waste streams. Over 60 liquid compositions have been tested including extensive irradiation tests to verify polymer stability and possible degradation. With conclusive scientific evidence of the polymer's effectiveness in treating liquid waste, both parties have decided to enter the Russian market and offer the solidification technology to nuclear sites for waste treatment and disposal. In conjunction with these efforts, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) will join Khlopin and PNS to explore opportunities for direct application of the polymers at predetermined sites and to conduct research for new product development. Under DOE's 'Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention' (IPP) program, funding will be provided to the Russian participants over a three year period to implement the program plan. This paper will present updated details of U.S. DOE's IPP program, the project structure and its objectives both short and long-term, polymer tests and applications for LLW, ILW and HLW, and new product development initiatives. (authors)

  2. Rehabilitation of radioactive objects of Kirovo-Chepetsky chemical plant preliminary program of works

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chesnokov, F.V.; Ivanov, O.P.; Pavlenko, V.I.; Semenov, S.G.; Stepanov, V.E.; Volkov, V.G.; Volkovich, A.G.; Zverkov, Yu.A.

    2008-01-01

    In 2007, the specialists of RRC Kurchatov Institute, jointly with MosNPO Radon, launched works on the radiation survey of radiation-contaminated objects and areas on the site of Kirovo-Chetetsky Chemical Plant (KCCP). This survey was launched with the object of subsequent development of the rehabilitation program and concept for buildings and storage sites left from shutdown uranium-processing facilities, as well as for sludge storage facilities and repositories of radioactive waste produced as a result of these facilities operation. Besides, radioactive contamination caused by the preceding operations involving radwaste and equipment contaminated at early stages of uranium hexafluoride (UHF) and tetrafluoride (UTF) processing technology mastering was detected in some spots at KCCP site. The radiation survey was performed in order to assess the amount of rehabilitation works, to identify the most critical objects and areas at KCCP site, and to develop the sequence of measures to be implemented in order to enhance the radiation safety of people living in the Kirov Region. (author)

  3. Standards for the control of radioactive discharges to the environment a changing situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, C.; Cabiance, T.; Linsley, G.

    2004-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is the organization within the UN family with a statutory mandate to establish standards for the protection of health and property against ionizing radiation, and to provide for the application of those standards. As part of these functions, the IAEA periodically reviews the status and continued relevance of its standards to the needs of Member States. Recent work on the development of a framework for the protection of non-human species, and on practical guidance for setting discharge limits, has highlighted a number of issues that have a bearing on the further development and application of standards for the control of discharges of radionuclides to the environment. The status of IAEA work on the protection of non-human species and the main findings of the International Conference on Protection of the Environment from the Effects of Ionizing Radiation, held in Stockholm, Sweden in October 2003 are presented. As part of a parallel programme of work, in support of existing standards on the regulatory control of discharges, a review of relevant national experience has been undertaken. This suggests that societal pressures and regulatory practicalities have resulted in discharge controls that are often more restrictive that those that would be implied by formal optimization techniques. A number of factors taken into account in setting discharge limits are identified and the application of the optimization principle to discharge regulation is discussed. The possible form of future standards that address both these developments is explored. (Author) 28 refs

  4. Data Standards for the Genomes to Life Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arkin, Adam; Ambrosiano, John; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Frank, Ed; Geist,Al; Giometti, Carol; Jacobsen, Janet; Samatova, Nagiza; Slater, Nancy; Taylor, Ron

    2004-01-31

    Existing GTL Projects already have produced volumes of dataand, over the course of the next five years, will produce an estimatedhundreds, or possibly thousands, of terabytes of data from hundreds ofexperiments conducted at dozens of laboratories in National Labs anduniversities across the nation. These data will be the basis forpublications by individual researchers, research groups, andmulti-institutional collaborations, and the basis for future DOEdecisions on funding further research in bioremediation. The short-termand long-term value of the data to project participants, to the DOE, andto the nation depends, however, on being able to access the data and onhow, or whether, the data are archived. The ability to access data is thestarting point for data analysis and interpretation, data integration,data mining, and development of data-driven models. Limited orinefficient data access means that less data are analyzed in acost-effective and timely manner. Data production in the GTL Program willlikely outstrip, or may have already outstripped, the ability to analyzethe data. Being able to access data depends on two key factors: datastandards and implementation of the data standards. For the purpose ofthis proposal, a data standard is defined as a standard, documented wayin which data and information about the data are describe. The attributesof the experiment in which the data were collected need to be known andthe measurements corresponding to the data collected need to bedescribed. In general terms, a data standard could be a form (electronicor paper) that is completed by a researcher or a document that prescribeshow a protocol or experiment should be described in writing.Datastandards are critical to data access because they provide a frameworkfor organizing and managing data. Researchers spend significant amountsof time managing data and information about experiments using labnotebooks, computer files, Excel spreadsheets, etc. In addition, dataoutput format

  5. Identifying Strategies Programs Adopt to Meet Healthy Eating and Physical Activity Standards in Afterschool Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Robert G; Moore, Justin B; Turner-McGrievy, Brie; Saunders, Ruth; Beighle, Aaron; Khan, M Mahmud; Chandler, Jessica; Brazendale, Keith; Randell, Allison; Webster, Collin; Beets, Michael W

    2017-08-01

    The YMCA of USA has adopted Healthy Eating and Physical Activity (HEPA) Standards for its afterschool programs (ASPs). Little is known about strategies YMCA ASPs are implementing to achieve Standards and these strategies' effectiveness. (1) Identify strategies implemented in YMCA ASPs and (2) evaluate the relationship between strategy implementation and meeting Standards. HEPA was measured via accelerometer (moderate-to-vigorous-physical-activity [MVPA]) and direct observation (snacks served) in 20 ASPs. Strategies were identified and mapped onto a capacity building framework ( Strategies To Enhance Practice [STEPs]). Mixed-effects regression estimated increases in HEPA outcomes as implementation increased. Model-implied estimates were calculated for high (i.e., highest implementation score achieved), moderate (median implementation score across programs), and low (lowest implementation score achieved) implementation for both HEPA separately. Programs implemented a variety of strategies identified in STEPs. For every 1-point increase in implementation score 1.45% (95% confidence interval = 0.33% to 2.55%, p ≤ .001) more girls accumulated 30 min/day of MVPA and fruits and/or vegetables were served on 0.11 more days (95% confidence interval = 0.11-0.45, p ≤ .01). Relationships between implementation and other HEPA outcomes did not reach statistical significance. Still regression estimates indicated that desserts are served on 1.94 fewer days (i.e., 0.40 vs. 2.34) in the highest implementing program than the lowest implementing program and water is served 0.73 more days (i.e., 2.37 vs. 1.64). Adopting HEPA Standards at the national level does not lead to changes in routine practice in all programs. Practical strategies that programs could adopt to more fully comply with the HEPA Standards are identified.

  6. Program for closure of an inactive radioactive waste disposal site at the Savannah River Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    The 643-G Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility was operated at the Savannah River Plant from 1952 through 1974, and has been inactive since that time. The actions leading to closure of 643-G will involve a combination of activities consisting of limited waste removal, stabilization, capping, and monitoring. The overall effect of these closure actions will be to place the 643-G site in a physically and chemically stable state which will remain stable over a long period of time. During a one-hundred year institutional control period surveillance and monitoring of the site will be carried out to verify that the performance of the system is acceptable, and access of the general public to the site will be restricted. The program described in this paper is a recommendation; the actual closure plan will be negotiated with regulatory authorities. 2 figs., 1 tab

  7. OCRWM [Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management] transportation program reference: Glossary, acronym list, bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-07-01

    A successful transportation system for nuclear waste must be safe, efficient, and widely acceptable. To achieve the necessary public understanding, there must be an exchange of information and an identification of issues. This booklet has been developed to assist in that exchange of information and help in the communication of issues. It will provide a glossary of commonly used terms, a list of acronyms, a bibliography selected from the public information developed by the OCRWM Program, and contacts for additional information. Transportation is an integral and essential part of the projected waste management system. The United States has a long history of transporting radioactive material. Commercial spent fuel has been shipped for over 20 years and high-level waste from defense activities for an even longer period. These shipments have been conducted without any accidents causing death or environmental damage because of the radiological nature of the cargo. DOE is taking measures to ensure that this safety record continues. 24 refs

  8. FINCRUSH : a computer program for impact analysis of radioactive material transport cask with fins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikushima, Takeshi

    1997-05-01

    In drop impact analyses for radioactive material transport cask with cooling fins, relationship between fin plastic deformation and fin energy absorption is used. This relationship was obtained by ORNL experiments and MONSER Co. in Canada. Based on ORNL experiments, a computer program FINCRUSH has been developed for rapid safety analysis of cask drop impact to obtain the maximum impact acceleration and the maximum fin deformation. Main features of FINCRUSH are as follows: (1) annulus fins on a cylindrical shell and plate fins on a disk can be treated, (2) it is capable of graphical representations for calculation results and fin absorption energy data and (3) not only main frame computer but also work stations (OS UNIX) and personal computer (OS Windows) are available for use of the FINCRUSH. In the paper, brief illustration of calculation method of FINCRUSH is presented. The second section presents comparisons between FINCRUSH and experimental results. The third section provides a use's guide for FINCRUSH. (author)

  9. FINCRUSH : a computer program for impact analysis of radioactive material transport cask with fins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikushima, Takeshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-05-01

    In drop impact analyses for radioactive material transport cask with cooling fins, relationship between fin plastic deformation and fin energy absorption is used. This relationship was obtained by ORNL experiments and MONSER Co. in Canada. Based on ORNL experiments, a computer program FINCRUSH has been developed for rapid safety analysis of cask drop impact to obtain the maximum impact acceleration and the maximum fin deformation. Main features of FINCRUSH are as follows: (1) annulus fins on a cylindrical shell and plate fins on a disk can be treated, (2) it is capable of graphical representations for calculation results and fin absorption energy data and (3) not only main frame computer but also work stations (OS UNIX) and personal computer (OS Windows) are available for use of the FINCRUSH. In the paper, brief illustration of calculation method of FINCRUSH is presented. The second section presents comparisons between FINCRUSH and experimental results. The third section provides a use`s guide for FINCRUSH. (author)

  10. Radioactive waste isolation in salt: peer review of Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation's Socioeconomic Program Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winter, R.; Fenster, D.; O'Hare, M.; Zillman, D.; Harrison, W.; Tisue, M.

    1984-02-01

    The ONWI Socioeconomic Program Plan spells out DOE's approach to analyzing the socioeconomic impacts from siting, constructing, and operating radioactive waste repositories and discusses mitigation strategies. The peer review indicated the following modifications should be made to the Plan: encourage active public participation in the decision-making processes leading to repository site selection; clearly define mechanisms for incorporating the concerns of local residents, state and local governments, and other potentially interested parties into the early stages of the site selection process; place significantly greater emphasis on using primary socioeconomic data during the site selection process, reversing the current overemphasis on secondary data collection, description of socioeconomic conditions at potential locations, and development of analytical methodologies; recognize that mitigation mechanisms other than compensation and incentives may be effective; as soon as potential sites are identified, the US Department of Energy (DOE) should begin discussing impact mitigation agreements with local officials and other interested parties; and comply fully with the pertinent provisions of NWPA

  11. The advantages of using standardized review procedures in certifying type B radioactive material packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Easton, E.P.; Faille, S.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the advantages of adopting well-documented standardized review practices for reviewing Type B package designs. The US experience using standardized review plans and guidance has shown them to be a valuable tool in achieving more consistent and efficient package reviews, in training and qualifying technical reviewers, and in enhancing public and industry understanding of the package certification process. In addition, the standardized review practices, as living documents, have proven to be an effective method of incorporating new technical advances into the review process, and have provided a vehicle to make that knowledge widely available to fellow reviewers, the public and industry. Canada implemented a new internal review process in early 2003 to standardize the review of applications for certification of Type B Packages. Based on the similarity of these approaches, the United States and Canada have started discussions on a A North American System for the unilateral approval of Type B (U) packages. This initiative is looking into how each country is currently reviewing transportation package applications to see if agreement can be reached on accepting Type B certifications on a reciprocal basis, i.e., without additional review. Based on the experience in Canada and the United States, the authors believe that the use of standardized review processes, coupled with the knowledge and experience resident in IAEA's Transportation Advisory Material (TS-G-1.1) and series of TECDOCS, could also be used to develop a standard internationally accepted review process that could enhance the acceptance of unilateral approvals for Type B packages

  12. The advantages of using standardized review procedures in certifying type B radioactive material packages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Easton, E.P. [United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States); Faille, S. [Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Ottawa (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    This paper presents the advantages of adopting well-documented standardized review practices for reviewing Type B package designs. The US experience using standardized review plans and guidance has shown them to be a valuable tool in achieving more consistent and efficient package reviews, in training and qualifying technical reviewers, and in enhancing public and industry understanding of the package certification process. In addition, the standardized review practices, as living documents, have proven to be an effective method of incorporating new technical advances into the review process, and have provided a vehicle to make that knowledge widely available to fellow reviewers, the public and industry. Canada implemented a new internal review process in early 2003 to standardize the review of applications for certification of Type B Packages. Based on the similarity of these approaches, the United States and Canada have started discussions on a A North American System for the unilateral approval of Type B (U) packages. This initiative is looking into how each country is currently reviewing transportation package applications to see if agreement can be reached on accepting Type B certifications on a reciprocal basis, i.e., without additional review. Based on the experience in Canada and the United States, the authors believe that the use of standardized review processes, coupled with the knowledge and experience resident in IAEA's Transportation Advisory Material (TS-G-1.1) and series of TECDOCS, could also be used to develop a standard internationally accepted review process that could enhance the acceptance of unilateral approvals for Type B packages.

  13. United States high-level radioactive waste management program: Current status and plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, J.

    1992-01-01

    The inventory of spent fuel in storage at reactor sites in the United States is approximately 20,000 metric tons heavy metal (MTHM). It is increasing at a rate of 1700 to 2100 MTHM per year. According to current projections, by the time the last license for the current generation of nuclear reactors expires, there will be an estimated total of 84,000 MTHm. No commercial reprocessing capacity exists or is planned in the US. Therefore, the continued storage of spent fuel is required. The majority of spent fuel remains in the spent fuel pools of the utilities that generated it. Three utilities are presently supplementing pool capacity with on-site dry storage technologies, and four others are planning dry storage. Commercial utilities are responsible for managing their spent fuel until the Federal waste management system, now under development, accepts spent fuel for storage and disposal. Federal legislation charges the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) within the US Department of Energy (DOE) with responsibility for developing a system to permanently dispose of spent fuel and high level radioactive waste in a manner that protects the health and safety of the public and the quality of the environment. We are developing a waste management system consisting for three components: a mined geologic repository, with a projected start date of 2010; a monitored retrievable storage facility (MRS), scheduled to begin waste acceptance in 1998; and a transportation system to support MRS and repository operations. This paper discusses the background and framework for the program, as well as the current status and plans for management of spent nuclear fuel at commercial utilities; the OCRWM's development of a permanent geologic repository, an MRS, and a transportation system; the OCRWM's safety approach; the OCRWM's program management initiatives; and the OCRWM's external relations activities

  14. Strategic program for deep geological disposal of high level radioactive waste in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Ju

    2004-01-01

    A strategic program for deep geological disposal of high level radioactive waste in China is proposed in this paper. A '3-step technical strategy': site selection and site characterization-site specific underground research laboratory-final repository, is proposed for the development of China's high level radioactive waste repository. The activities related with site selection and site characterization for the repository can be combined with those for the underground research laboratory. The goal of the strategy is to build China's repository around 2040, while the activities can be divided into 4 phases: 1) site selection and site characterization; 2) site confirmation and construction of underground research laboratory, 3) in-situ experiment and disposal demonstration, and 4) construction of repository. The targets and tasks for each phase are proposed. The logistic relationship among the activities is discussed. It is pointed out that the site selection and site characterization provide the basis for the program, the fundamental study and underground research laboratory study are the key support, the performance assessment plays a guiding role, while the construction of a qualified repository is the final goal. The site selection can be divided into 3 stages: comparison among pre-selected areas, comparison among pre-selected sites and confirmation of the final site. According to this strategy, the final site for China's underground research laboratory and repository will be confirmed in 2015, where the construction of an underground laboratory will be started. In 2025 the underground laboratory will have been constructed, while in around 2040, the construction of a final repository is to be completed

  15. Standard Review Plan for the review of a license application for a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-04-01

    The Standard Review Plan (SRP) (NUREG-1200) provides guidance to staff reviewers in the Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards who perform safety reviews of applications to construct and operate low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. The SRP ensures the quality and uniformity of the staff reviews and presents a well-defined base from which to evaluate proposed changes in the scope and requirements of the staff reviews. The SRP makes information about the regulatory licensing process widely available and serves to improve the understanding of the staff's review process by interested members of the public and the industry. Each individual SRP addresses the responsibilities of persons performing the review, the matters that are reviewed, the Commission's regulations and acceptance criteria necessary for the review, how the review is accomplished, the conclusions that are appropriate, and the implementation requirements

  16. Appraisal for Japan of the safety of transport of radioactive material. Provision for the application of the IAEA safety standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The IAEA's Statute authorizes it to provide for the application of its standards at the request of any State. The objective of a TranSAS appraisal is to assist any requesting State to achieve a high level of safety in the transport of radioactive material by reviewing its implementation of the Transport Regulations and by making recommendations for improvement where appropriate.The IAEA discharges this statutory function through a number of mechanisms, including rendering independent peer review appraisal services to determine the status of compliance with its standards. The appraisal for Japan in December 2005 on the safety of the transport of radioactive material is the seventh TranSAS mission since the inception of the service. This report presents its findings. The TranSAS appraisal team completed a comprehensive appraisal of the implementation of the Transport Regulations in Japan. The cooperation of the authorities in Japan, and of all those who participated in the discussions, was excellent and contributed to the success of the appraisal. The comprehensive legal framework, with responsibilities identified in considerable detail and with clear lines of authority to minimize overlap of responsibilities, provides a sound basis for the implementation of the Transport Regulations. Generally, the Transport Regulations are implemented in accordance with IAEA requirements. Some areas for possible improvement have been identified. These areas relate mainly to reduction of regulations, quality management systems, training, compliance assurance and lessening the administrative burden for incorporating amendments to the IMDG Code. The findings include a considerable number of good practices, in particular in the area of maritime transport

  17. U.S. EPA Superfund Program's Policy for Community Involvement at Radioactively Contaminated Sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, K.; Walker, St.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the EPA Superfund program's statutory requirements for community involvement. It also discusses the efforts the Superfund program has made that go beyond these statutory requirements to involve communities, and what lessons have been learned by EPA when trying to conduct meaningful community involvement at sites. In addition, it discusses tools that EPA has designed to specifically enhance community involvement at radioactively contaminated Superfund sites. In summary, the Superfund program devotes substantial resources to involving the local community in the site cleanup decision making process. We believe community involvement provides us with highly valuable information that must be available to carefully consider remedial alternatives at a site. We also find our employees enjoy their jobs more. Rather than fighting with an angry public they can work collaboratively to solve the problems created by the hazardous waste sites. We have learned the time and resources we devote at the beginning of a project to developing relationships with the local community, and learning about their issues and concerns is time and resources well spent. We believe the evidence shows this up-front investment helps us make better cleanup decisions, and avoids last minute efforts to work with a hostile community who feels left out of the decision-making process. (authors)

  18. Analysis of the total system life cycle cost for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-05-01

    The total-system life-cycle cost (TSLCC) analysis for the Department of Energy's (DOE) Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program is an ongoing activity that helps determine whether the revenue-producing mechanism established by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 -- a fee levied on electricity generated in commercial nuclear power plants -- is sufficient to cover the cost of the program. This report provides cost estimates for the sixth annual evaluation of the adequacy of the fee and is consistent with the program strategy and plans contained in the DOE's Draft 1988 Mission Plan Amendment. The total-system cost for the system with a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a facility for monitored retrievable storage (MRS), and a transportation system is estimated at $24 billion (expressed in constant 1988 dollars). In the event that a second repository is required and is authorized by the Congress, the total-system cost is estimated at $31 to $33 billion, depending on the quantity of spent fuel to be disposed of. The $7 billion cost savings for the single-repository system in comparison with the two-repository system is due to the elimination of $3 billion for second-repository development and $7 billion for the second-repository facility. These savings are offset by $2 billion in additional costs at the first repository and $1 billion in combined higher costs for the MRS facility and transportation. 55 refs., 2 figs., 24 tabs

  19. United States program for the safety assessment of geologic disposal of commercial radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claiborne, H.C.

    1977-01-01

    The safe disposal of commercial radioactive wastes in deep geologic formations is the goal of the National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) Program. A comprehensive safety assessment program has been established which will proceed on a schedule consistent with the start-up of two waste repositories in late 1985. Safety assessment begins with selection of a disposal site; that is, all geologic and hydrologic factors must indicate long-term stability of the formation and prospective isolation of wastes from circulating around waters for hundreds of thousands of years. The long-term stability of each site must be demonstrated by sophisticated rock mechanics analyses. To help provide answers on the mechanism and consequences of an unlikely breach in the integrity of the repository, a Waste Isolation Safety Assessment Program (WISAP) is being sponsored at the Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories. Methods and data necessary to characterize the safety of generic geological waste disposal concepts, which are to be applied in the assessment of specific sties, will be developed. Other long-term safety-related studies that complement WISAP are in progress, for example, borehole plugging, salt dissolutioning, and salt transport in vertical boreholes. Requirements for licensing are in the process of being formulated by the NRC

  20. Directory of Certificates of Compliance for Radioactive-Materials Packages. Summary report of NRC approved quality assurance programs for radioactive material packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    This directory contains a Summary Report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Approved Packages (Volume I), all Certificates of Compliance (Volume 2), and Summary Report of NRC Approved Quality Assurance Programs (Volume 3) for Radioactive Material Packages effective December 31, 1982. The purpose of this directory is to make available a convenient source of information on packagings which have been approved by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. To assist in identifying packaging, an index by Model Number and corresponding Certificate of Compliance Number is included at the back of Volumes 1 and 2 of the directory. A listing by packaging types is included in the back of Volume 2. An alphabetical listing by Company name is included in the back of Volume 3 for approved QA programs. The Summary Reports include a listing of all users of each package design and approved QA programs prior to the publication date of the directory

  1. A review of a radioactive material shipping container including design, testing, upgrading compliance program and shipping logistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celovsky, A.; Lesco, R.; Gale, B.; Sypes, J.

    2003-01-01

    Ten years ago Atomic Energy of Canada developed a Type B(U)-85 shipping container for the global transport of highly radioactive materials. This paper reviews the development of the container, including a summary of the design requirements, a review of the selected materials and key design elements, and the results of the major qualification tests (drop testing, fire test, leak tightness testing, and shielding integrity tests). As a result of the testing, improvements to the structural, thermal and containment design were made. Such improvements, and reasons thereof, are noted. Also provided is a summary of the additional analysis work required to upgrade the package from a Type B(U) to a Type B(F), i.e. essentially upgrading the container to include fissile radioisotopes to the authorized radioactive contents list. Having a certified shipping container is only one aspect governing the global shipments of radioactive material. By necessity the shipment of radioactive material is a highly regulated environment. This paper also explores the experiences with other key aspects of radioactive shipments, including the service procedures used to maintain the container certification, the associated compliance program for radioactive material shipments, and the shipping logistics involved in the transport. (author)

  2. Status of environmental response efforts at radioactively contaminated sites in the united states air force installation restoration program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowe, W.D. Jr.; McEntee, T.E. Jr.; Johnson, B.; Manning, L.

    1995-01-01

    The United States Air Force has identified approximately 170 radioactively contaminated sites at its domestic installations. These sites contain a variety of low level radioactive and mixed wastes and are classified as burial sites, landfills, buildings, and other disposal sites. Of these 170, approximately 70 are presently being evaluated under the Air Force Installation Restoration Program (IRP) in accordance with applicable laws and regulations. Removal and/or remedial actions have been taken at specific sites using site-specific residual radioactivity criteria. The remaining sites are either under investigation to determine the need for possible action or have been classified as response complete based on restricted or unrestricted future use. This paper describes past Air Force operations that generated radioactive waste materials; examines the current inventory of resulting radioactively contaminated sites in the Air Force IRP; reviews criteria used to evaluate sites for removal and/or remedial actions; provides summary information on actions taken at sites; and focuses on response actions and cleanup levels at two completed sites. The paper concludes with an assessment of outstanding issues relevant to the remediation of radioactively contaminated sites. (author)

  3. Suggestions for inclulsion of radon exhalation control target in building materials radioactivity standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Fudong; Liu Senlin; Pan Ziqiang; Zhang Yonggui

    2010-01-01

    The specific-activity and radon exhalation rate from 26 building material samples from different areas were measured with high pure germanium (HPGe) gamma spectrometer and activated carbon cartridge. It is shown that the radium content is not completely relevant to radon exhalation rate from some building material. The existing national standards on 'The Limit of Radionuclides in Building Materials' (GB 6566-2001) only present internal exposure index as control target but not for radon exhalation rate; in fact, the radon exhalation rate from building materials is closely nearly related to indoor radon concentration. So we suggest that the radon exhalation control target should be included in the national standards on 'The Limit of Radionuclides in Building Materials'. (authors)

  4. Legal standards concerning health and ecological implications of radioactively contaminated environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorian, T.F.

    1991-01-01

    The author decided to explore legal standards in this paper because they are to only norms but also representations or levels of requirements, excellence or attainment. They thus present a way to look at things, to measure them against others, and to set goals for them. In other words, legal standards, whether in legislation are a part of agency requirements, set goals for getting the job done and then can be used as measures about whether or not it is getting done right. When dealing with the multifaceted problems before us, it is important to put it into perspective. We need to look at it from many points of view but with a stable focus-just as one looks through a microscope or a telescope with different magnifications and fields of vision. To have a point of vie, however, both the experts and the general public need to have some way to judge issues. One way they can do so is to use legal standards

  5. Italian Antarctic Research Program: environmental radioactivity survey around the Italian base (1987-1991) Terra Nova Bay - Ross Sea region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tubertini, O.; Bettoli, M.G.; Cantelli, L. [Bologna Univ. (Italy)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Investigations have been carried out by the Italian Antartic Research Program to determine the natural and artificial radioactivity levels of both the marine and terrestrial environments. Also, natural and anthropogenic fluxes of aerosol particles onto the Antartic surface have been examined. (Author).

  6. Italian Antarctic Research Program: environmental radioactivity survey around the Italian base (1987-1991) Terra Nova Bay - Ross Sea region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tubertini, O.; Bettoli, M.G.; Cantelli, L.

    1995-01-01

    Investigations have been carried out by the Italian Antartic Research Program to determine the natural and artificial radioactivity levels of both the marine and terrestrial environments. Also, natural and anthropogenic fluxes of aerosol particles onto the Antartic surface have been examined. (Author)

  7. Directory of certificates of compliance for radioactive materials packages. Volume 3, revision 1. Summary report of NRC approved quality assurance programs for radioactive material packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-12-01

    The directory contains a Summary Report of NRC approved Packages (Volume 1), Certificates of Compliance (Volume 2), and a Summary Report of NRC Approved Quality Assurance Programs for Radioactive Material Packages (Volume 3). The purpose of this directory is to make available a convenient source of information on packagings which have been approved by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. To assist in identifying packaging, and index by Model Number and corresponding Certificate of Compliance number is included at the back of each volume of the directory. The Summary Report includes a listing of all users of each package design prior to the publication date of the directory

  8. 75 FR 18850 - National Protection and Programs Directorate; Chemical Facility Anti-Terrorism Standards...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-13

    ... Directorate; Chemical Facility Anti-Terrorism Standards Personnel Surety Program AGENCY: National Protection...-terrorism Vulnerability Information (CVI), Sensitive Security Information (SSI), or Protected Critical... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Program Description The Chemical Facility Anti-Terrorism Standards (CFATS), 6 CFR...

  9. Final report of the Department of Energy pilot internship program on radioactive waste at Vanderbilt University (September 1, 1993-08/31, 1994)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank Parker

    1999-08-31

    This final report summarizes Vanderbilt's ten year program in radioactive waste management. The report describes the interns selected for the program, the interns' course of study, and their assignments.

  10. The health physics program at the National Bureau of Standards LINAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobbs, T.G.

    1981-01-01

    A three-person Accelerator Health Physics team provides continuous radiation safety service for the National Bureau of Standards 150-MeV linear electron accelerator (Linac), which operates on a five days per week, 24 hours per day schedule, with one day per month downtime scheduled for maintenance. This team also serves the synchrotron ultraviolet light radiation facility (SURF), two Van de Graaffs, some other electrostatic accelerators, and several high-energy x-ray generators. Although the Linac is not licensed by a safety-regulating agency, as is the NBS Research Reactor, Health Physics makes no distinction between the two sources in providing coverage. Various regulations do impact on operations, e.g., the NRC dose totals and effluent releases and the OSHA requirements. Film, thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD), and direct-reading pocket dosimeters are used for personnel dosimetry. The usual array of portable and fixed radiation survey meters and activation devices and some of the high-energy multi-particle activation techniques are used for area monitoring. Environmental surveillance is performed with TLD's, tissue-equivalent ion chamber, and a grass and soil assay program. Integrated Health Physics programs for all the NBS radiation facilities do instrument calibrations, training for Health Physics and operating staffs, administrative control of radioactive materials, waste management, and data compilations

  11. Standardization of radioactive gaseous waste radiation monitoring equipment from the International Electrotechnical Commission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitoussi, L.

    1983-01-01

    After having introduced the works performed by the International Electrotechnical Commission, the authors report on the results of the studies carried out to achieve the standardization of the radiation monitoring equipment concerning the control of the gaseous waste from nuclear installations. The authors present the most interesting aspects of the regulations and recommendations, which include not only a description of the minimum permissible levels of sensitivity for the monitors, but also a description of the set of assays to be established in order to verify the level of performance of the monitors

  12. International Review of Standards and Labeling Programs for Distribution Transformers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Letschert, Virginie [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Scholand, Michael [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Carreño, Ana María [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Hernandez, Carolina [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2017-06-20

    Transmission and distribution (T&D) losses in electricity networks represent 8.5% of final energy consumption in the world. In Latin America, T&D losses range between 6% and 20% of final energy consumption, and represent 7% in Chile. Because approximately one-third of T&D losses take place in distribution transformers alone, there is significant potential to save energy and reduce costs and carbon emissions through policy intervention to increase distribution transformer efficiency. A large number of economies around the world have recognized the significant impact of addressing distribution losses and have implemented policies to support market transformation towards more efficient distribution transformers. As a result, there is considerable international experience to be shared and leveraged to inform countries interested in reducing distribution losses through policy intervention. The report builds upon past international studies of standards and labeling (S&L) programs for distribution transformers to present the current energy efficiency programs for distribution transformers around the world.

  13. A Method for Developing Standard Patient Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lura, Carolina Bryne; Hauch, Sophie Misser Pallesgaard; Gøeg, Kirstine Rosenbeck; Pape-Haugaard, Louise

    2018-01-01

    In Denmark, patients being treated on Haematology Outpatients Departments get instructed to self-manage their blood sample collection from Central Venous Catheter (CVC). However, this is a complex and risky procedure, which can jeopardize patient safety. The aim of the study was to suggest a method for developing standard digital patient education programs for patients in self-administration of blood samples drawn from CVC. The Design Science Research Paradigm was used to develop a digital patient education program, called PAVIOSY, to increase patient safety during execution of the blood sample collection procedure by using videos for teaching as well as procedural support. A step-by-step guide was developed and used as basis for making the videos. Quality assurance through evaluation with a nurse was conducted on both the step-by-step guide and the videos. The quality assurance evaluation of the videos showed; 1) Errors due to the order of the procedure can be determined by reviewing the videos despite that the guide was followed. 2) Videos can be used to identify errors - important for patient safety - in the procedure, which are not identifiable in a written script. To ensure correct clinical content of the educational patient system, health professionals must be engaged early in the development of content and design phase.

  14. Site characterization program at the radioactive waste management complex of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McElroy, D.L.; Rawson, S.A.; Hubbell, J.M.; Minkin, S.C.; Baca, R.G.; Vigil, M.J.; Bonzon, C.J.; Landon, J.L.; Laney, P.T.

    1989-07-01

    The Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) Site Characterization Program is a continuation of the Subsurface Investigation Program (SIP). The scope of the SIP has broadened in response to the results of past work that identified hazardous as well as radionuclide contaminants in the subsurface environment and in response to the need to meet regulatory requirements. Two deep boreholes were cored at the RWMC during FY-1988. Selected sediment samples were submitted for Appendix IX of 40 CFR Part 264 and radionuclide analyses. Detailed geologic logging of archived core was initiated. Stratigraphic studies of the unsaturated zone were conducted. Studies to determine hydrologic properties of sediments and basalts were conducted. Geochemical studies and analyses were initiated to evaluate contaminant and radionuclide speciation and migration in the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) geochemical environment. Analyses of interbed sediments in boreholes D15 and 8801D did not confirm the presence of radionuclide contamination in the 240-ft interbed. Analyses of subsurface air and groundwater samples identified five volatile organic compounds of concern: carbon tetrachloride, trichloroethylene, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, chloroform, and tetrachloroethylene. 33 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  15. Site characterization program at the radioactive waste management complex of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McElroy, D.L.; Rawson, S.A.; Hubbell, J.M.; Minkin, S.C.; Baca, R.G.; Vigil, M.J.; Bonzon, C.J.; Landon, J.L.; Laney, P.T.

    1989-07-01

    The Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) Site Characterization Program is a continuation of the Subsurface Investigation Program (SIP). The scope of the SIP has broadened in response to the results of past work that identified hazardous as well as radionuclide contaminants in the subsurface environment and in response to the need to meet regulatory requirements. Two deep boreholes were cored at the RWMC during FY-1988. Selected sediment samples were submitted for Appendix IX of 40 CFR Part 264 and radionuclide analyses. Detailed geologic logging of archived core was initiated. Stratigraphic studies of the unsaturated zone were conducted. Studies to determine hydrologic properties of sediments and basalts were conducted. Geochemical studies and analyses were initiated to evaluate contaminant and radionuclide speciation and migration in the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) geochemical environment. Analyses of interbed sediments in boreholes D15 and 8801D did not confirm the presence of radionuclide contamination in the 240-ft interbed. Analyses of subsurface air and groundwater samples identified five volatile organic compounds of concern: carbon tetrachloride, trichloroethylene, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, chloroform, and tetrachloroethylene. 33 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Taiwan industrial cooperation program technology transfer for low-level radioactive waste final disposal - phase I.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knowlton, Robert G.; Cochran, John Russell; Arnold, Bill Walter; Jow, Hong-Nian; Mattie, Patrick D.; Schelling, Frank Joseph Jr. (; .)

    2007-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories and the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taiwan have collaborated in a technology transfer program related to low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal in Taiwan. Phase I of this program included regulatory analysis of LLW final disposal, development of LLW disposal performance assessment capabilities, and preliminary performance assessments of two potential disposal sites. Performance objectives were based on regulations in Taiwan and comparisons to those in the United States. Probabilistic performance assessment models were constructed based on limited site data using software including GoldSim, BLT-MS, FEHM, and HELP. These software codes provided the probabilistic framework, container degradation, waste-form leaching, groundwater flow, radionuclide transport, and cover infiltration simulation capabilities in the performance assessment. Preliminary performance assessment analyses were conducted for a near-surface disposal system and a mined cavern disposal system at two representative sites in Taiwan. Results of example calculations indicate peak simulated concentrations to a receptor within a few hundred years of LLW disposal, primarily from highly soluble, non-sorbing radionuclides.

  17. Primary radioactivity standardization and gamma intensities determination of {sup 124}Sb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwahara, A. [Laboratorio Nacional de Metrologia das Radiacoes Ionizantes (LNMRI)/Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD)/Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear - CNEN, Av. Salvador Allende, s/no, Recreio, CEP 22780-160, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)], E-mail: iwahara@ird.gov.br; Delgado, J.U.; Poledna, R.; Silva, C.J. da; Almeida, M.C.M. de; Silva, R.L. da [Laboratorio Nacional de Metrologia das Radiacoes Ionizantes (LNMRI)/Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD)/Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear - CNEN, Av. Salvador Allende, s/no, Recreio, CEP 22780-160, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2009-04-21

    A solution containing {sup 124}Sb was primarily standardized by the 4{pi}{beta}-{gamma} coincidence and anticoincidence extrapolation methods in the frame of the EUROMET 907 international comparison organized by Laboratoire National Henri Bequerel (LNHB)/France, in 2007. The main purposes of this exercise are the improvement in the uncertainties on the gamma-ray emission intensities and they clarify the discrepancies verified among the intensity values for many weak gamma rays reported in the literature. In this work the results of the activity obtained were used to determine the absolute and relative gamma-ray intensities using a planar and coaxial HPGe detectors calibrated by {sup 152}Eu and {sup 116m}Ho multi-gamma standard sources covering the energy range from 20 to 1408 keV. Additionally the half-life of {sup 124}Sb was determined following the decay of a solution of {sup 124}Sb contained in a glass ampoule over a period of three half-lives using two 4{pi}{gamma} ionization chambers.

  18. 41 CFR 102-194.5 - What is the Standard and Optional Forms Management Program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is the Standard and Optional Forms Management Program? 102-194.5 Section 102-194.5 Public Contracts and Property Management... PROGRAMS 194-STANDARD AND OPTIONAL FORMS MANAGEMENT PROGRAM § 102-194.5 What is the Standard and Optional...

  19. 40 CFR 131.8 - Requirements for Indian Tribes to administer a water quality standards program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... administer a water quality standards program. 131.8 Section 131.8 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS WATER QUALITY STANDARDS General Provisions § 131.8 Requirements for Indian Tribes to administer a water quality standards program. (a) The Regional Administrator, as...

  20. 75 FR 37733 - Regulation of Fuels and Fuel Additives: Modifications to Renewable Fuel Standard Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-30

    ... Regulation of Fuels and Fuel Additives: Modifications to Renewable Fuel Standard Program AGENCY... direct final rule to amend the Renewable Fuel Standard program requirements on May 10, 2010. Because EPA... Fuel Standard program requirements, published on May 10, 2010. We stated in that direct final rule that...

  1. Review of predialysis education programs: a need for standardization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van den Bosch J

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Judith Van den Bosch,1 D Simone Warren,1 Peter A Rutherford21Pallas Health Research and Consultancy BV, Rotterdam, the Netherlands; 2Baxter Healthcare SA, Zürich, SwitzerlandAbstract: To make an informed decision on renal replacement therapy, patients should receive education about dialysis options in a structured program covering all modalities. Many patients do not receive such education, and there is disparity in the information they receive. This review aims to compile evidence on effective components of predialysis education programs as related to modality choice and outcomes. PubMed MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, and Ovid searches (from January 1, 1995 to December 31, 2013 with the main search terms of “predialysis”, “peritoneal dialysis”, “home dialysis”, “education”, “information”, and “decision” were performed. Of the 1,005 articles returned from the initial search, 110 were given full text reviews as they potentially met inclusion criteria (for example, they included adults or predialysis patients, or the details of an education program were reported. Only 29 out of the 110 studies met inclusion criteria. Ten out of 13 studies using a comparative design, showed an increase in home dialysis choice after predialysis education. Descriptions of the educational process varied and included individual and group education, multidisciplinary intervention, and varying duration and frequency of sessions. Problem-solving group sessions seem to be an effective component for enhancing the proportion of home dialysis choice. Evidence is lacking for many components, such as timing and staff competencies. There is a need for a standardized approach to evaluate the effect of predialysis educational interventions.Keywords: dialysis, end-stage renal disease, informed decision, modality choice

  2. Programs of recovery of radioactive wastes from the trenches and land decontamination of the radioactive waste storage center; Programas de recuperacion de los desechos radiactivos de las trincheras y de descontaminacion del predio del centro de almacenamiento de desechos radiactivos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez D, J.; Reyes L, J. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    1999-06-15

    In this report there are the decontamination program of the land of the Radioactive Waste Storage Center, the Program of Recovery of the radioactive waste of the trenches, the recovery of polluted bar with cobalt 60, the recovery of minerals and tailings of uranium and of earth with minerals and tailings of uranium, the recovery of worn out sealed sources and the waste recovery with the accustomed corresponding actions are presented. (Author)

  3. Directory of certificates of compliance for radioactive materials packages: summary report of NRC approved quality-assurance programs for radioactive-material packages. Volume 3, Revision 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-09-01

    This directory contains a Summary Report of NRC Approved Packages (Volume 1), Certificates of Compliance (Volume 2), and a Summary Report of NRC Approved Quality Assurance Programs for Radioactive Material Packages (Volume 3). The purpose of this directory is to make available a convenient source of information on packagings which have been approved by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. To assist in identifying packaging, an index by Model Number and corresponding Certificate of Compliance number is included at the back of each volume of the directory. The Summary Report includes a listing of all users of each package design prior to the publication date of the directory. Shipments of radioactive material utilizing these packagings must be in accordance with the provisions of 49 CFR 173.471 and 10 CFR Part 71, as applicable. In satisfying the requirements of Section 71.12, it is the responsibility of the licensees to insure them in accordance with an NRC approved quality assurance program. Copies of the current approval may be obtained from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Public Document Room files (see Docket No. listed on each certificate) at 1717 H Street, Washington, DC 20555. Note that the general license of 10 CFR 71.12 does not authorize the receipt, possession, use or transfer of byproduct source, or special nuclear material; such authorization must be obtained pursuant to 10 CFR Parts 30 to 36, 40, 50, or 70

  4. Directory of certificates of compliance for radioactive materials packages. Summary report of NRC approved quality assurance programs for radioactive material packages. Volume 3, Revision 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-10-01

    This directory contains a Summary Report of NRC Approved Packages (Volumes 1), Certificates of Compliance (Volume 2), and a Summary Report of NRC Approved Quality Assurance Programs for Radioactive Material Packages (Volume 3). The purpose of this directory is to make available a convenient source of information on packagings which have been approved by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. To assist in identifying packaging, an index by Model Number and corresponding Certificate of Compliance number is included at the back of each volume of the directory. The Summary Report includes a listing of all users of each package design prior to the publication date of the directory. Shipments of radioactive material utilizing these packagings must be in accordance with the provisions of 49 CFR 173.471 and 10 CFR Part 71, as applicable. In satisfying the requirements of Section 71.12, it is the responsibility of the licensees to insure them that have a copy of the current approval and conduct their transportation activities in accordance with an NRC approved quality assurance program. Copies of the current approval may be obtained from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Public Document Room files (see Docket No. listed on each certificate) at 1717 H Street, Washington, DC 20555. Note that the general license of 10 CFR 71.12 does not authorize the receipt, possession, use of transfer of byproduct source, or special nuclear material; such authorization must be obtained pursuant to 10 CFR Parts 30 to 36, 40, 50, or 70

  5. Directory of certificates of compliance for radioactive materials packages. Summary report of NRC approved quality assurance programs for radioactive material packages. Volume 3, Revision 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-11-01

    This directory contains a Summary Report of NRC Approved Packages (Volume 1), Certificates of Compliance (Volume 2), and a Summary Report of NRC Approved Quality Assurance Programs for Radioactive Material Packages (Volume 3). The purpose of this directory is to make available a convenient source of information on packagings which have been approved by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. To assist in identifying packaging, an index by Model Number and corresponding Certificate of Compliance number is included at the back of each volume of the directory. The Summary Report includes a listing of all users of each package design prior to the publication date of the directory. Shipments of radioactive material utilizing these packagings must be in accordance with the provisions of 49 CFR 173.471 and 10 CFR Part 71, as applicable. In satisfying the requirements of Section 71.12, it is the responsibility of the licensees to insure they have a copy of the current approval and conduct their transportation activities in accordance with an NRC approved quality assurance program. Copies of the current approval may be obtained from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Public Document Room files (see Docket No. listed on each certificate) at 1717 H Street, Washington, DC 20555. Note that the general license of 10 CFR 71.12 does not authorize the receipt, possession, use or transfer of byproduct source, or special nuclear material; such authorization must be obtained pursuant to 10 CFR Parts 30 to 36, 40, 50, or 70

  6. DOE [Department of Energy]-Nuclear Energy Standards Program annual assessment, FY 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, D.L. Jr.

    1990-11-01

    To meet the objectives of the programs funded by the Department of Energy (DOE)-Nuclear Energy (NE) Technology Support Programs, the Performance Assurance Project Office (PAPO) administers a nuclear standards program and related activities and fosters the development and application of standards. This standards program is carried out in accordance with the principles in DOE Order 1300.2, Department of Energy Standards Program, December 18, 1980. The purposes of this effort, as set forth in three subtasks, are to (1) manage the NE Standards Program, (2) manage the development and maintenance of NE standards, and (3) operate an NE Standards Information Program. This report assesses the Performance Assurance Project Office (PAPO) activities in terms of the objectives of the Department of Energy-Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) funded programs. To meet these objectives, PAPO administers a nuclear standards program and related activities and fosters the development and application of standards. This task is carried out in accordance with the principles set forth in DOE Order 1300.2, Department of Energy Standards Program, December 18, 1980, and DOE memorandum, Implementation of DOE Orders on Quality Assurance, Standards, and Unusual Occurrence Reporting for Nuclear Energy Programs, March 3, 1982, and with guidance from the DOE-NE Technology Support Programs. 1 tab. (JF)

  7. Contribution to the study on and evaluation of radioactive waste generation in connection with the Brazilian Nuclear Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melo, J.M.D. de.

    1978-12-01

    A general description is given of the causes of pollution in the nuclear industry. Emphasis was given to the radioactive pollution, especially radioactivity of fission products (FP). Physical mathematical models were established to calculate the FP activities 'in' and 'out' of the reactor and the yearly accumulated activities. To calculate FP activities 'in' reactor, all physical process of formation and destruction of nuclides were considered: nuclear fission; neutron absorption and radioactivity decay. The necessary input data were analysed and criticised. The specific activities of the discharged fuel were calculated and also their evolution outside reactor. The annual accumulation of FP activities were also calculated for the reference case: the Brazilian Nuclear Program for a 50 year horizon. The results were commented and specific discussions and comparison with other similar studies were made. (Author) [pt

  8. Current status and prospect on the radioactive waste management program in the Republic of Korea. Focusing on recent development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hyun-Soo; Chang, In-Soon

    1996-01-01

    Since its first commercial operation at Kori near the city of Pusan in 1978, nuclear energy has become one of the prime resources for the electricity. However, proper treatment of its byproducts, radioactive wastes, has been the national concern. Despite vigorous effort by the Korean Government and NEMAC(Nuclear Environment Management Center), the series of attempts for the site selection to build the national radioactive waste complex has been ruined. After the failure at Guleop Island, the Government recently amended its policy so that the major tasks on the management program of radioactive wastes shall be transferred to KEPCO(Korea Electric Power Corporation), sole national electric utility, while the current authority, KAERI(Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute)/NEMAC is limited to focus on the research and development in the safe management of spent fuels. Detailed plan to support the Government redirection is under discussion among concerned institutes. (author)

  9. International program to study subseabed disposal of high-level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlin, E.M.; Hinga, K.R.; Knauss, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    This report provides an overview of the international program to study seabed disposal of nuclear wastes. Its purpose is to inform legislators, other policy makers, and the general public as to the history of the program, technological requirements necessary for feasibility assessment, legal questions involved, international coordination of research, national policies, and research and development activities. Each of these major aspects of the program is presented in a separate section. The objective of seabed burial, similar to its continental counterparts, is to contain and to isolate the wastes. The subseabed option should not be confuesed with past practices of ocean dumping which have introduced wastes into ocean waters. Seabed disposal refers to the emplacement of solidified high-level radioactive waste (with or without reprocessing) in certain geologically stable sediments of the deep ocean floor. Specially designed surface ships would transport waste canisters from a port facility to the disposal site. Canisters would be buried from a few tens to a few hundreds of meters below the surface of ocean bottom sediments, and hence would not be in contact with the overlying ocean water. The concept is a multi-barrier approach for disposal. Barriers, including waste form, canister, ad deep ocean sediments, will separate wastes from the ocean environment. High-level wastes (HLW) would be stabilized by conversion into a leach-resistant solid form such as glass. This solid would be placed inside a metallic canister or other type of package which represents a second barrier. The deep ocean sediments, a third barrier, are discussed in the Feasibility Assessment section. The waste form and canister would provide a barrier for several hundred years, and the sediments would be relied upon as a barrier for thousands of years. 62 references, 3 figures, 2 tables

  10. Directory of Certificates of Compliance for Radioactive Materials Packages. Summary Report of NRC Approved Quality Assurance Programs for Radioactive Material Packages. Volume 3. Revision 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-10-01

    This directory contains a Summary Report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Approved Packages (Volume I), all Certificates of Compliance (Volume 2), and Summary Report of NRC Approved Quality Assurance Programs (Volume 3) for Radioactive Material Packages effective October 1, 1985. The purpose of this directory is to make available a convenient source of information on packagings which have been approved by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. To assist in identifying packaging, an index by Model Number and corresponding Certificate of Compliance Number is included at the back of Volumes 1 and 2 of the directory. A listing by packaging types is included in the back of Volume 2. An alphabetical listing by Company name is included in the back of Volume 3 for approved QA programs. The Summary Reports include a listing of all users of each package design and approved QA programs prior to the publication date of the directory. Shipments of radioactive material utilizing these packages must be in accordance with the provisions of 49 CFR Section 173.471 and 10 CFR Part 71, as applicable. In satisfying the requirements of Section 71.12, it is the responsibility of the licensees to insure themselves that they have a copy of the current approval and conduct their transportation activities in accordance with a Nuclear Regulatory Commission approved quality assurance program. Copies of the current approval may be obtained from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Public Document Room files (see Docket No. listed on each certificate) at 1717 H Street, Washington, DC 20555. Note that the general license of 10 CFR Section 71.12 does not authorize the receipt, possession, use or transfer of byproduct, source or special nuclear material; such authorization must be obtained pursuant to 10 CFR Parts 30 to 36, 40, or 70

  11. Standard test method for nondestructive assay of radioactive material by tomographic gamma scanning

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This test method describes the nondestructive assay (NDA) of gamma ray emitting radionuclides inside containers using tomographic gamma scanning (TGS). High resolution gamma ray spectroscopy is used to detect and quantify the radionuclides of interest. The attenuation of an external gamma ray transmission source is used to correct the measurement of the emission gamma rays from radionuclides to arrive at a quantitative determination of the radionuclides present in the item. 1.2 The TGS technique covered by the test method may be used to assay scrap or waste material in cans or drums in the 1 to 500 litre volume range. Other items may be assayed as well. 1.3 The test method will cover two implementations of the TGS procedure: (1) Isotope Specific Calibration that uses standards of known radionuclide masses (or activities) to determine system response in a mass (or activity) versus corrected count rate calibration, that applies to only those specific radionuclides for which it is calibrated, and (2) Respo...

  12. Directory of certificates of compliance for radioactive materials packages: Report of NRC approved quality assurance programs for radioactive materials packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-10-01

    The purpose of this directory is to make available a convenient source of information on packagings which have been approved by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. To assist in identifying packaging, an index by Model Number and corresponding Certificate of compliance Number is included at the front of Volume 2 of the directory. A listing by packaging types is included in the back of Volume 2. An alphabetical listing by Company name is included in the back of Volume 3 for approved QA programs. The Reports include a listing of all users of each package design and approved QA programs prior to the publication date of the directory

  13. Directory of certificates of compliance for radioactive materials packages: Report of NRC approved quality assurance programs for radioactive materials packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-10-01

    The purpose of this directory is to make available a convenient source of information on packaging which have been approved by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. To assist in identifying packaging, an index by Model Number and corresponding Certificate of Compliance Number is included at the front of Volume 2 of the directory. A listing by packaging types is included in the back of Volume 2. An alphabetical listing by Company name is included in the back of Volume 3 for approved QA programs. The Reports include a listing of all users of each package design and approved QA programs prior to the publication date of the directory

  14. Biocoder: A programming language for standardizing and automating biology protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananthanarayanan, Vaishnavi; Thies, William

    2010-11-08

    Published descriptions of biology protocols are often ambiguous and incomplete, making them difficult to replicate in other laboratories. However, there is increasing benefit to formalizing the descriptions of protocols, as laboratory automation systems (such as microfluidic chips) are becoming increasingly capable of executing them. Our goal in this paper is to improve both the reproducibility and automation of biology experiments by using a programming language to express the precise series of steps taken. We have developed BioCoder, a C++ library that enables biologists to express the exact steps needed to execute a protocol. In addition to being suitable for automation, BioCoder converts the code into a readable, English-language description for use by biologists. We have implemented over 65 protocols in BioCoder; the most complex of these was successfully executed by a biologist in the laboratory using BioCoder as the only reference. We argue that BioCoder exposes and resolves ambiguities in existing protocols, and could provide the software foundations for future automation platforms. BioCoder is freely available for download at http://research.microsoft.com/en-us/um/india/projects/biocoder/. BioCoder represents the first practical programming system for standardizing and automating biology protocols. Our vision is to change the way that experimental methods are communicated: rather than publishing a written account of the protocols used, researchers will simply publish the code. Our experience suggests that this practice is tractable and offers many benefits. We invite other researchers to leverage BioCoder to improve the precision and completeness of their protocols, and also to adapt and extend BioCoder to new domains.

  15. Indian program on management of high level radioactive waste - emphasis on value recovery for societal applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaushik, C.P.; Tomar, Neelima Singh; Kumar, Amar; Wadhwa, S.; Diwan, Jyoti

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear Power Programme in India is based on 'closed fuel cycle'. Closed fuel cycle involves reprocessing and recycling of Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) coming out of nuclear reactors. During reprocessing, uranium and plutonium, constituting bulk of the SNF are separated and subsequently recycled. The remaining small portion constitutes high level radioactive waste containing most of the fission products and minor actinides. A three-step strategy involving immobilization, interim storage followed by ultimate disposal has been adopted in India for management of High Level Waste (HLW). Borosilicate glass matrix has been identified for immobilization of HLW owing to optimal waste loading, adequate leach resistance and long term stability of the product. An interim storage facility is in operation for storage and surveillance of VWP. A comprehensive program based on screening of different materials like granite, argillite, clay with respect to sorption of different radionuclides is being pursued to identify the suitable areas of disposal of the conditioned waste products. Separation of useful radionuclides like "1"3"7Cs, "9"0Sr, "9"0Y, "1"0"6Ru etc and its utilization for societal applications is being practiced in India. (author)

  16. Joint Assessment of Renewable Energy and Water Desalination Research Center (REWDC) Program Capabilities and Facilities In Radioactive Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bissani, M; Fischer, R; Kidd, S; Merrigan, J

    2006-01-01

    The primary goal of this visit was to perform a joint assessment of the Renewable Energy and Water Desalination Center's (REWDC) program in radioactive waste management. The visit represented the fourth technical and scientific interaction with Libya under the DOE/NNSA Sister Laboratory Arrangement. Specific topics addressed during the visit focused on Action Sheet P-05-5, ''Radioactive Waste Management''. The Team, comprised of Mo Bissani (Team Lead), Robert Fischer, Scott Kidd, and Jim Merrigan, consulted with REWDC management and staff. The team collected information, discussed particulars of the technical collaboration and toured the Tajura facility. The tour included the waste treatment facility, waste storage/disposal facility, research reactor facility, hot cells and analytical labs. The assessment team conducted the first phase of Task A for Action Sheet 5, which involved a joint assessment of the Radioactive Waste Management Program. The assessment included review of the facilities dedicated to the management of radioactive waste at the Tourja site, the waste management practices, proposed projects for the facility and potential impacts on waste generation and management

  17. 18th U.S. Department of Energy Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Conference. Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    None

    1997-01-01

    This conference explored the latest developments in low-level radioactive waste management through presentations from professionals in both the public and the private sectors and special guests. The conference included two continuing education seminars, a workshop, exhibits, and a tour of Envirocare of Utah, Inc., one of America's three commercial low-level radioactive waste depositories

  18. 18th U.S. Department of Energy Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Conference. Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1997-05-20

    This conference explored the latest developments in low-level radioactive waste management through presentations from professionals in both the public and the private sectors and special guests. The conference included two continuing education seminars, a workshop, exhibits, and a tour of Envirocare of Utah, Inc., one of America's three commercial low-level radioactive waste depositories.

  19. Standard Review Plan for a petition for rulemaking on radioactive waste streams below regulatory concern: Expedited review in accordance with Appendix B to 10 CFR, Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larkins, P.M.

    1989-10-01

    The Standard Review Plan (SRP) provides guidance to staff reviewers acting on rulemaking petitions in an expeditious manner to exempt from regulation radioactive waste determined to be Below Regulatory Concern (BRC), as called for in the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985. The review plan is designed to ensure the quality and uniformity of staff reviews and to present a well-defined basis for the staff's evaluation of BRC petitions. The plan serves to improve the understanding of the staff's review by interested members of the public and the industry. It also provides information about the BRC rulemaking process to a wider audience. 6 refs., 7 figs

  20. Radioactivity in consumer products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moghissi, A.A.; Paras, P.; Carter, M.W.; Barker, R.F. (eds.)

    1978-08-01

    Papers presented at the conference dealt with regulations and standards; general and biological risks; radioluminous materials; mining, agricultural, and construction materials containing radioactivity; and various products containing radioactive sources.

  1. Development of Standards for Textiles and Clothing Postsecondary Programs. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iowa State Univ. of Science and Technology, Ames. Dept. of Home Economics Education.

    A project was conducted to validate program standards and performance standards for four postsecondary occupational areas--fashion merchandising, fashion design, apparel, and window treatment services. Returns from 117 questionnaires from postsecondary institutions in fifty states were used to develop program standards statements and to provide…

  2. 24 CFR 200.950 - Building product standards and certification program for solar water heating system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... PROGRAMS Minimum Property Standards § 200.950 Building product standards and certification program for...) concerning labeling of a product, the administrator's validation mark and the manufacturer's certification of... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Building product standards and...

  3. 24 CFR 200.948 - Building product standards and certification program for carpet cushion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Minimum Property Standards § 200.948 Building product standards and certification program for carpet... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Building product standards and certification program for carpet cushion. 200.948 Section 200.948 Housing and Urban Development Regulations...

  4. USL/DBMS NASA/PC R and D project C programming standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominick, Wayne D. (Editor); Moreau, Dennis R.

    1984-01-01

    A set of programming standards intended to promote reliability, readability, and portability of C programs written for PC research and development projects is established. These standards must be adhered to except where reasons for deviation are clearly identified and approved by the PC team. Any approved deviation from these standards must also be clearly documented in the pertinent source code.

  5. 78 FR 73589 - Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Commercial and Industrial Electric...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-06

    ... Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Commercial and Industrial Electric Motors; Proposed... Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Commercial and Industrial Electric Motors AGENCY... proposes energy conservation standards for a number of different groups of electric motors that DOE has not...

  6. Transportation risk assessment of radioactive wastes generated by the N-Reactor stabilization program at the Hanford Site, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheeler, T.

    1994-12-01

    The potential radiological and nonradiological risks associated with specific radioactive waste shipping campaigns at the Hanford Site are estimated. The shipping campaigns analyzed are associated with the transportation of wastes from the N-Reactor site at the 200-W Area, both within the Hanford Reservation, for disposal. The analysis is based on waste that would be generated from the N-Reactor stabilization program

  7. Standardized Testing Program for Solid-State Hydrogen Storage Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Michael A. [Southwest Research Institute; Page, Richard A. [Southwest Research Institute

    2012-07-30

    In the US and abroad, major research and development initiatives toward establishing a hydrogen-based transportation infrastructure have been undertaken, encompassing key technological challenges in hydrogen production and delivery, fuel cells, and hydrogen storage. However, the principal obstacle to the implementation of a safe, low-pressure hydrogen fueling system for fuel-cell powered vehicles remains storage under conditions of near-ambient temperature and moderate pressure. The choices for viable hydrogen storage systems at the present time are limited to compressed gas storage tanks, cryogenic liquid hydrogen storage tanks, chemical hydrogen storage, and hydrogen absorbed or adsorbed in a solid-state material (a.k.a. solid-state storage). Solid-state hydrogen storage may offer overriding benefits in terms of storage capacity, kinetics and, most importantly, safety.The fervor among the research community to develop novel storage materials had, in many instances, the unfortunate consequence of making erroneous, if not wild, claims on the reported storage capacities achievable in such materials, to the extent that the potential viability of emerging materials was difficult to assess. This problem led to a widespread need to establish a capability to accurately and independently assess the storage behavior of a wide array of different classes of solid-state storage materials, employing qualified methods, thus allowing development efforts to focus on those materials that showed the most promise. However, standard guidelines, dedicated facilities, or certification programs specifically aimed at testing and assessing the performance, safety, and life cycle of these emergent materials had not been established. To address the stated need, the Testing Laboratory for Solid-State Hydrogen Storage Technologies was commissioned as a national-level focal point for evaluating new materials emerging from the designated Materials Centers of Excellence (MCoE) according to

  8. Technical summary of Groundwater Quality Protection Program at Savannah River Plant. Volume II. Radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stone, J.A.; Christensen, E.J.

    1983-12-01

    This report (Volume II) presents representative monitoring data for radioactivity in groundwater at SRP. Four major groups of radioactive waste disposal sites and three minor sites are described. Much of the geohydrological and and other background information given in Volume I is applicable to these sites and is incorporated by reference. Several of the sites that contain mixed chemical and radioactive wastes are discussed in both Volumes I and II. Bulk unirradiated uranium is considered primarily a chemical waste which is addressed in Volume I, but generally not in Volume II

  9. The radioactive waste management program of The Commission of the European Communities: Past, present, and future trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlowski, S.M.

    1983-01-01

    The radioactive waste management program started in the mid-1970s is being carried out by the Commission of European Communities (CEC) Joint Research Centre and by research bodies within the European community under CEC coordination and partial financing. The program deals with the management of the radioactive waste resulting from uranium-plutonium fuel cycle. During its first phase (1973-1979), various treatment and conditioning processes were investigated; high temperature incineration and acid digestion of alpha-bearing waste, immobilization of highly active waste in borosilicate glasses, inter alia, appeared promising. Geological disposal was recognized as a feasible option; transmutation of long-lived products did not appear to be an advantageous alternative to geological disposal, and the studies were discontinued. The second phase (1980-1984) of the program is a followup to the first. The needs of the European nuclear industry and of the national radioactive waste agencies or operators recently created are, however, taken into account. The continuity of the RandD effort is ensured by a ''Community plan of action on waste management,'' (1980-1992). A third phase, 1984-1989, should demonstrate the availability and validity of the waste management techniques and be convincing about their safety

  10. Review of the Commission program for standardization of nuclear power plants and recommendations to improve standardization concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-02-01

    This is a report of a staff study describing the need and utility of specific changes to the Commission's standardization program. The various matters considered in the study include: (1) A discussion of industry use to date of the standardization program. (2) A discussion of the experience to date with each of the standardization concepts. (3) A review of public comments on the standardization program and the staff response to each principal comment. (4) A review of the need for standardization considering the likely number of license applications to be submitted in the coming years. (5) A discussion of the reference system concept, including review of applicable experience and recommended changes to the concept. (6) A discussion of the duplicate plant concept, including review of applicable experience and recommended changes to the concept. (7) A discussion of the manufacturing license concept, including review of applicable experience and recommended changes to the concept. (8) A discussion of the replicate plant concept, including review of applicable experience and recommended changes to the concept. (9) A discussion of the effective periods for approved designs under all four standardization concepts. (10) A description of continuing staff activities related to the standardization program

  11. Different training programs for the transport of radioactive goods proposed by the INSTN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimmel, O.

    2004-01-01

    To meet the statutory requirements of the ADR pertaining to training, the INSTN (National Institute for Nuclear Sciences and Technology) proposes different courses on the transport of radioactive materials

  12. Geochemical modeling (EQ3/6) plan: Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKenzie, W.F.; Wolery, T.J.; Delany, J.M.; Silva, R.J.; Jackson, K.J.; Bourcier, W.L.; Emerson, D.O.

    1986-01-01

    This plan replaces an earlier plan for the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Project. It includes activities for all repository projects in the Office of Geologic Repositories: NNWSI, the Basalt Waste Isolation Project, the Salt Repository Project, and the Crystalline Project. Each of these projects is part of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Program. The scope of work for fiscal years 1986 to 1992 includes the work required to upgrade the geochemical codes and supporting data bases, to permit modeling of chemical processes associated with nuclear waste repositories in four geological environments: tuff, salt, basalt, and crystalline rock. Planned tasks include theoretical studies and code development to take account of the effects of precipitation kinetics, sorption, solid solutions, glass/water interactions, variable gas fugacities, and simple mass transport. Recent progress has been made in the ability of the codes to account for precipitation kinetics, highly-saline solutions, and solid solutions. Transition state theory was re-examined resulting in new insights that will provide the foundation for further improvements necessary to model chemical kinetics. Currently there is an increased effort that is concentrated on the supporting data base. For aqueous species and solid phases, specific to nuclear waste, requisite thermodynamic values reported in the literature are being evaluated and for cases where essential data is lacking, laboratory measurements will be carried out. Significant modifications and expansions have been made to the data base. During FY86, the total number of species in the data base has almost doubled and many improvements have been made with regard to consistency, organization, user applications, and documentation. Two Ridge computers using a RISC implementation of UNIX were installed; they are completely dedicated EQ3/6 machines

  13. Geochemical modeling (EQ3/6) plan: Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKenzie, W.F.; Wolery, T.J.; Delany, J.M.; Silva, R.J.; Jackson, K.J.; Bourcier, W.L.; Emerson, D.O.

    1986-08-28

    This plan replaces an earlier plan for the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Project. It includes activities for all repository projects in the Office of Geologic Repositories: NNWSI, the Basalt Waste Isolation Project, the Salt Repository Project, and the Crystalline Project. Each of these projects is part of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Program. The scope of work for fiscal years 1986 to 1992 includes the work required to upgrade the geochemical codes and supporting data bases, to permit modeling of chemical processes associated with nuclear waste repositories in four geological environments: tuff, salt, basalt, and crystalline rock. Planned tasks include theoretical studies and code development to take account of the effects of precipitation kinetics, sorption, solid solutions, glass/water interactions, variable gas fugacities, and simple mass transport. Recent progress has been made in the ability of the codes to account for precipitation kinetics, highly-saline solutions, and solid solutions. Transition state theory was re-examined resulting in new insights that will provide the foundation for further improvements necessary to model chemical kinetics. Currently there is an increased effort that is concentrated on the supporting data base. For aqueous species and solid phases, specific to nuclear waste, requisite thermodynamic values reported in the literature are being evaluated and for cases where essential data is lacking, laboratory measurements will be carried out. Significant modifications and expansions have been made to the data base. During FY86, the total number of species in the data base has almost doubled and many improvements have been made with regard to consistency, organization, user applications, and documentation. Two Ridge computers using a RISC implementation of UNIX were installed; they are completely dedicated EQ3/6 machines.

  14. Intruder dose pathway analysis for the onsite disposal of radioactive wastes: the ONSITE/MAXI1 computer program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Napier, B.A.; Peloquin, R.A.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Neuder, S.M.

    1984-10-01

    Because of uncertainties associated with assessing the potential risks from onsite burials of radioactive waste, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has amended its regulations to provide greater assurance that buried radioactive material will not present a hazard to public health and safety. The amended regulations now require licensees to apply for approval of proposed procedures for onsite disposal pursuant to 10 CFR 20.302. The NRC technically reviews these requests on a case-by-case basis. These technical reviews require modeling potential pathways to man and projecting radiation dose commitments. This document contains a summary of our efforts to develop human-intrusion scenarios and to modify a version of the MAXI computer program for potential use by the NRC in reviewing applications for onsite radioactive waste disposal. The documentation of the ONSITE/MAXI computer program is written for two audiences. The first (Audience A) includes persons concerned with the mathematical models and computer algorithms. The second (Audience B) includes persons concerned with exercising the computer program and scenarios for specific onsite disposal applications. Five sample problems are presented and discussed to assist the user in operating the computer program. Summaries of the input and output for the sample problems are included along with a discussion of the hand calculations performed to verify the correct operation of the computer program. Computer listings of the ONSITE/MAXI1 computer program with an abbreviated data base listing are included as Appendix 1 to this document. Finally, complete listings of the data base with listings of the special codes used to create the data base are included in Appendix 2 as a microfiche attachment to this document

  15. PROGER - Management program for radioactive wastes in research institutions; PROGER - Programa para gerenciamento de rejeitos em instituicoes de pesquisa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Rubemar S.; Costa, Maria Regina Ferro; Ramos Junior, Anthenor C.; Esposito, Irapoan; Vaz, Solange dos Reis e; Pontedeiro, Elizabeth May; Gomes, Carlos de Almeida [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Superintendencia de Licenciamento e Controle. Supervisao de Rejeitos Radioativos

    1997-12-31

    This article demonstrates the feasibility of a program, denominated PROGER, and aimed at the improvement of radioactive waste management activities in research institutions in Brazil. This program involves implementation, correction and updating of waste management techniques in those institutions that already possess a waste management system or its full set-up for the institutions where it is non-existent. Partial results are presented, concerning characteristics and quantities of wastes, and the methodology utilized by PROGER discussed 6 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Radiation damage studies on natural rock salt from various geological localities of interest to the radioactive waste disposal program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, P.W.

    1981-01-01

    As part of a program to investigate radiation damage in geological materials of interest to the radioactive waste disposal program, radiation damage, particularly radiation induced sodium metal colloid formation, has been studied in 14 natural rock salt samples. All measurements were made with equipment for making optical absorption and other measurements on samples, in a temperature controlled irradiation chamber, during and after 0.5 to 3.0 MeV electron irradiation. Samples were chosen for practical and scientific purposes, from localities that are potential repository sites and from different horizons at certain localities

  17. The development of the American National Standard 'control of radioactive surface contamination on materials equipment and facilities to be released for uncontrolled use'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, J.

    1980-01-01

    A new standard submitted by the Health Physics Society Standards Committee to the American National Standards Institute concerning radioactive surface contamination of materials and equipment is discussed. The chronological events in the development of this standard are given. The standard provides criteria for the release for uncontrolled use of materials, equipment and facilities contaminated or potentially contaminated with radioactivity. Permissible contamination limits are specified for: 1) long lived alpha emitters except natural uranium and thorium, 2) more hazardous beta-gamma emitters, 3) less hazardous beta-gamma emitters and 4) natural uranium and thorium. A contamination reference level of 1000 dpm/100 cm 2 for 90 Sr was set as the basis for assigning limits to radionuclides presenting an ingestion hazard and other radionuclides were grouped based on the values of their maximum permissible concentration (MPC) in water relative to 90 Sr. The contamination limit for 239 Pu was chosen as the basis for assigning limits based on MPC in air to radionuclides presenting an inhalation hazard; a value of 100 dpm/100 cm 2 was adopted in the standard. An upper limit of 5000 dpm/100 cm 2 for surface contamination was selected for the standard. (UK)

  18. ETV Program Report: Coatings for Wastewater Collection Systems - Standard Cement Materials, Epoxy Coating 4553

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Standard Cement Materials, Inc. Standard Epoxy Coating 4553™ (SEC 4553) epoxy coating used for wastewater collection system rehabilitation was evaluated by EPA’s Environmental Technology Verification Program under laboratory conditions at the Center for Innovative Grouting Ma...

  19. 24 CFR 200.947 - Building product standards and certification program for polystyrene foam insulation board.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... INTRODUCTION TO FHA PROGRAMS Minimum Property Standards § 200.947 Building product standards and certification... product, the administrator's certification of compliance with the applicable standards and the type of... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Building product standards and...

  20. Construction and equipment requirements for installations and laboratories handling unsealed radioactive materials in low and medium activity - Proposal of an Israeli standard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Shlomo, A; Schlesinger, T; Barshad, M [Soreq Nuclear Research Center, Yavne (Israel)

    1993-10-01

    Working with unsealed radioactive materials involves risks of internal or external exposure to ionizing radiation. Exposure of human beings to ionizing radiation involves adverse health effects and must be prevented or at least reduced to reasonable levels. Radiation sources in this work are unsealed radioactive materials, that may be solids, liquid or in gaseous states, and in varying toxic levels. Various works and actions that are performed on the unsealed radioactive materials have varying potentials of dispersion, contamination and exposure, so that the combination of the type of work activity, isotope characteristics and physical state dictate the internal and external exposure risks. In order to limit the exposure of the personnel of installations and laboratories which deals with unsealed radioactive materials, national and international authorities and organizations standards and procedures for the requirements of construction and equipment of such installations and laboratories. This document means to be a proposal for an Israeli standard requirements for equipment and construction of installations working with low and medium activity unsealed radioactive materials. The targets for defining the, construction and equipment, requirements are: a. Safety and proper protection of personnel and public from external and internal exposure while the work is done properly. Proper protection against the risk of contaminating the environment. c. Standardization of requirements. d. Proper design of installations and laboratories. e. Supply means for evaluation and reduction of construction costs.The equipment detailed here refers to fixed (none movable) equipment which is a part of the construction of the laboratory or installation, unless specified otherwise. The document starts with a review of the recommendations of some international organizations (WHO, IAEA, NRPB) for construction and equipment requirements for these laboratories and installations. Then the

  1. Development of a standard for computer program verification and control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunn, T.E.; Ozer, O.

    1980-01-01

    It is expected that adherence to the guidelines of the ANS 10.4 will: 1. Provide confidence that the program conforms to its requirements specification; 2. Provide confidence that the computer program has been adequately evaluated and tested; 3. Provide confidence that program changes are adequately evaluated, tested, and controlled; and 4. Enhance assurance that reliable data will be produced for engineering, scientific, and safety analysis purposes

  2. Defense Standardization Program Journal. October/December 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Barriers to Trade ( TBT ).The WTO TBT agreement establishes principles for interna- tional standardization processes using attributes similar to those...WTO TBT agreement, the proposed standardization regulation states that public authorities should make best use of the full range of relevant

  3. A Linear Programming Reformulation of the Standard Quadratic Optimization Problem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Klerk, E.; Pasechnik, D.V.

    2005-01-01

    The problem of minimizing a quadratic form over the standard simplex is known as the standard quadratic optimization problem (SQO).It is NPhard, and contains the maximum stable set problem in graphs as a special case.In this note we show that the SQO problem may be reformulated as an (exponentially

  4. Radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawakami, Yutaka

    2008-01-01

    Radioactive waste generated from utilization of radioisotopes and each step of the nuclear fuel cycle and decommissioning of nuclear facilities are presented. On the safe management of radioactive waste management, international safety standards are established such as ''The Principles of Radioactive Waste Management (IAEA)'' and T he Joint Convention on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management . Basic steps of radioactive waste management consist of treatment, conditioning and disposal. Disposal is the final step of radioactive waste management and its safety is confirmed by safety assessment in the licensing process. Safety assessment means evaluation of radiation dose rate caused by radioactive materials contained in disposed radioactive waste. The results of the safety assessment are compared with dose limits. The key issues of radioactive waste disposal are establishment of long term national strategies and regulations for safe management of radioactive waste, siting of repository, continuity of management activities and financial bases for long term, and security of human resources. (Author)

  5. Final Hanford Site Solid (Radioactive and Hazardous) Waste Program Environmental Impact Statement Richland, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, M.S.; Borgstrom, C.M.

    2004-01-01

    The Hanford Site Solid (Radioactive and Hazardous) Waste Program Environmental Impact Statement (HSW EIS) provides environmental and technical information concerning U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposed waste management practices at the Hanford Site. The HSW EIS updates analyses of environmental consequences from previous documents and provides evaluations for activities that may be implemented consistent with the Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS) Records of Decision (RODs). Waste types considered in the HSW EIS include operational low-level radioactive waste (LLW), mixed low-level waste (MLLW), immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW), and transuranic (TRU) waste (including TRU mixed waste). MLLW contains chemically hazardous components in addition to radionuclides. Alternatives for management of these wastes at the Hanford Site, including the alternative of No Action, are analyzed in detail. The LLW, MLLW, and TRU waste alternatives are evaluated for a range of waste volumes, representing quantities of waste that could be managed at the Hanford Site. A single maximum forecast volume is evaluated for ILAW. The No Action Alternative considers continuation of ongoing waste management practices at the Hanford Site and ceasing some operations when the limits of existing capabilities are reached. The No Action Alternative provides for continued storage of some waste types. The other alternatives evaluate expanded waste management practices including treatment and disposal of most wastes. The potential environmental consequences of the alternatives are generally similar. The major differences occur with respect to the consequences of disposal versus continued storage and with respect to the range of waste volumes managed under the alternatives. DOE's preferred alternative is to dispose of LLW, MLLW, and ILAW in a single, modular, lined facility near PUREX on Hanford's Central Plateau; to treat MLLW using a combination of onsite and

  6. 76 FR 77999 - Standardizing Program Reporting Requirements for Broadcast Licensees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-15

    ... concerns, and in view of advances in technology and the revisions to the form we discuss here, should not... within each news program, i.e. the length of each story? How should the term ``program segment'' be... reporting, since some stories reported on the local news are more national in character, and would not fit...

  7. 38 CFR 1.15 - Standards for program evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... program operates. (3) Validity. The degree of statistical validity should be assessed within the research... intent, contain a method to measure fulfillment of the objectives, ascertain the degree to which goals... the data. (f) Each program evaluation requires a systematic research design to collect the data...

  8. Implementation of the program law from June 28, 2006 on the sustainable management of radioactive materials and wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-07-01

    This presentation, given by the national agency of radioactive waste management (ANDRA) at the meeting of July 1, 2009 of the high committee for the nuclear safety transparency and information (HCTISN), describes the two projects of the ANDRA in the framework of the program law of June 28, 2006 about the sustainable management of radioactive materials and wastes. The first project is a reversible deep geologic waste disposal facility for high level/long living wastes. The second project is a low depth waste storage facility for low level/long living wastes. For each project, the site selection, the type of waste and its conditioning, and the concept and specifications of the facility are presented. (J.S.)

  9. Defense Standardization Program Journal. October/December 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    Trade Organization (WTO) Committee on Technical Bar- riers to Trade ( TBT ),’ they are less likely to create unnecessary barriers to trade. International...standards can also increase efficiency, enhance the quality of life and transfer technology from developed to developing countries. The TBT ...its commitment to the TBT principles for the development of international stan- dards2 and the Code of Good Practice.1 The U.S.—based standardization

  10. Defense Standardization Program Journal. April/September 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    were magnified. In 1905, a committee of the National Fire Protection Association established a national standard for the diameter and threads per inch...for fire hydrants and hose couplings. The standard specifies that fire hydrants have 2.5-inch hose connections with 7.5 threads per inch and that...dsp.dla.mil I Field of view, lens material haze, luminous transmittance, and lens abrasion resistance (APR) I Communications (APR) I Fogging (APR

  11. NRC high-level radioactive waste program. Annual progress report: Fiscal Year 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagar, B.

    1997-01-01

    This annual status report for fiscal year 1996 documents technical work performed on ten key technical issues (KTI) that are most important to performance of the proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. This report has been prepared jointly by the staff of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Division of Waste Management and the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses. The programmatic aspects of restructuring the NRC repository program in terms of KTIs is discussed and a brief summary of work accomplished is provided. The other ten chapters provide a comprehensive summary of the work in each KTI. Discussions on probability of future volcanic activity and its consequences, impacts of structural deformation and seismicity, the nature of of the near-field environment and its effects on container life and source term, flow and transport including effects of thermal loading, aspects of repository design, estimates of system performance, and activities related to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency standard are provided

  12. Related Rules and Programs that Help States Attain PM Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA’s national and regional rules to reduce emissions of pollutants that form particle pollution will help state and local governments meet the PM NAAQS. A number of voluntary programs also are helping areas reduce fine PM pollution.

  13. The USCG/environment Canada/ASTM standards development program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whittaker, H.

    1992-01-01

    Environment Canada's Emergencies Engineering Division (EED) has been charged, as a result of the Public Review Panel on Tanker Safety and Marine Emergency Response report, with increased R ampersand D in marine oil spills. This activity will, of necessity, include development of standards and guidelines for the testing and/or usage of oil spill cleanup equipment. The United States Coast Guard (USCG) has been charged with implementing the provisions of the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 (OPA-90), as it pertains to marine transportation vessels and facilities. Among the provisions are requirements for vessel and facility owners and operators to develop comprehensive response plans that specifically match response resources to spill removal requirements. Meeting the response plan provisions of OPA-90 requires common standards for testing, selecting and assigning resources to anticipated response needs and objectively evaluating response plans for adequacy. In August of 1991, the USCG OPA-90 office approached ASTM to determine the feasibility of developing standards through that organizations procedures. Meetings were then held between the OPA-90 staff and members of the ASTM Committee F-20 on Hazardous Substances and Oil Spill Response. An agreement was reached to commence standards development in the areas of: Barriers, Skimmers, Treating Agents, Pumps, Beach Clean-up, Sorbents, Bioremediation, In-situ Burning, Temporary Storage Devices, Communications, Remote Sensing. It was recognized that ASTM and other organizational standards existed in several of these areas, but there were those where none were known to exist. Standards development was, therefore, expected to be a complicated and time-consuming process. Both the USCG OPA-90 and EC/EED offices required standards to be developed quickly, without subverting the ASTM process. Mechanical containment and recovery was considered to be the primary area of concern for both groups

  14. Nevada National Security Site 2014 Data Report: Groundwater Monitoring Program Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudson, David [National Security Technologies, LLC. (NSTec), Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2015-02-01

    This report is a compilation of the groundwater sampling results from the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada. Groundwater samples from the aquifer immediately below the Area 5 RWMS have been collected and analyzed and static water levels have been measured in this aquifer since 1993. This report updates these data to include the 2014 results. Analysis results for leachate contaminants collected from the mixed-waste cell at the Area 5 RWMS (Cell 18) are also included. During 2014, groundwater samples were collected and static water levels were measured at three wells surrounding the Area 5 RWMS. Groundwater samples were collected at wells UE5PW-1, UE5PW-2, and UE5PW-3 on March 11 and August 12, 2014, and static water levels were measured at each of these wells on March 10, June 2, August 11, and October 14, 2014. Groundwater samples were analyzed for the following indicators of contamination: pH, specific conductance, total organic carbon, total organic halides, and tritium. General water chemistry (cations and anions) was also measured. Results from samples collected in 2014 are within the limits established by agreement with the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for each analyte. The data from the shallow aquifer indicate that there has been no measurable impact to the uppermost aquifer from the Area 5 RWMS, and there were no significant changes in measured groundwater parameters compared to previous years. Leachate from above the primary liner of Cell 18 drains into a sump and is collected in a tank at the ground surface. Cell 18 began receiving waste in January 2011. Samples were collected from the tank when the leachate volume approached the 3,000-gallon tank capacity. Leachate samples have been collected 16 times since January 2011. During 2014, samples were collected on February 25, March 5, May 20, August 12, September 16, November 11, and December 16. Each leachate sample was

  15. Standard interfaces for program-modular multiprocessor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernykh, E.V.

    1982-01-01

    The peculiarities of the structures of existing and developed standard interfaces used in automation systems for nuclear physical experiments are considered. general structural characteristics of multiprocessor system interfaces are revealed. The comparison of the existing system CAMAC crate and designed standards of COMPEX, E3S and FASTBUS interfaces by capacity and relative cost is carried out. The analysis of the given data shows that operation of any interface is more advantageous at the rates close to capacity values, the relative cost being minimum. In this case the advantage is on the side of interfaces with greater capacity values for which at a moderated decrease of the exchange or requests processing rate the relative costs grow slower. A higher capacity of one-cycle exchange is provided with functional data way specialization in the interface. The conclusion is drawn that most perspective trend in the development of automation systems for high energy physics experiments is using FASTBUS standard

  16. Evaluation of four building energy analysis computer programs against ASHRAE standard 140-2007

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Szewczuk, S

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available ) standard or code of practice. Agrément requested the CSIR to evaluate a range of building energy simulation computer programs. The standard against which these computer programs were to be evaluated was developed by the American Society of Heating...

  17. Cartographic standards to improve maps produced by the Forest Inventory and Analysis program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles H. (Hobie) Perry; Mark D. Nelson

    2009-01-01

    The Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture's Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program is incorporating an increasing number of cartographic products in reports, publications, and presentations. To create greater quality and consistency within the national FIA program, a Geospatial Standards team developed cartographic design standards for FIA map...

  18. Environmental standards for management and disposal of spent nuclear fuel, high-level and transuranic radioactive wastes, 40 CFR part 191: draft environmental impact statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1982-01-01

    The establishment of environmental standards for management and disposal of spent nuclear reactor fuel and high-level and transuranic radioactive wastes is proposed. The standards would require that maximum individual doses from all normal operations be limited to 25 millirem to the whole body, 75 millirem to the thyroid, and 25 millirem to any other organ. Regarding disposal of subject materials in geologic sites, the standards would include numerical containment requirements for the first 10,000 years following disposal, assurance requirements, and procedural requirements. The assurance requirements would provide seven principles necessary for developing confidence that long-term containment requirements would be upheld. The principles would call for well-designed, multiple-barrier disposal systems that would not rely on future generations for maintenance and would not be located near potential valuable resources. The principles would also require that future generations be provided with information about the location and dangers of the wastes and an option to recover the wastes if necessary. Procedural requirements would be developed to assure that the containment requirements were upheld. The implementation of the standards would protect public health and the environment against emissions of radioactivity. The maximum impact expected from a disposal system complying with the proposed standards would be less than 1000 premature cancer deaths over the first 10,000 years for disposal of high-level wastes produced by all currently operating reactors over their lifetime

  19. Standard format and content for a license application to store spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-09-01

    Subpart B, ''License Application, Form, and Contents,'' of 10 CFR Part 72, ''Licensing Requirements for the Independent Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste,'' specifies the information to be covered in an application for a license to store spent fuel in an independent spent fuel storage installation (ISFSI) or to store spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste in a monitored retrievable storage facility (MRS). However, Part 72 does not specify the format to be followed in the license application. This regulatory guide suggests a format acceptable to the NRC staff for submitting the information specified in Part 72 for license application to store spent fuel in an ISFSI or to store spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste in an MRS

  20. Defense Standardization Program Journal. January-March 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    example, the team added standardized qualification and performance verification procedures, such as edge-reten- tion verification, cathodic disbondment...edge retention. In addition, they incorporated cathodic disbondment tests used to verify the performance of pipeline coatings into the specification...pure electrodeposited aluminum—were identified as being suitable plating finishing options for replacing cadmium. DLA Land and Maritime added these

  1. 76 FR 11502 - Notice of Vitamin D Standardization Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-02

    ... that can be used for calibration and trueness control by laboratories measuring 25(OH)D. These... done in national health surveys, it also allows for participation of clinical, public health, research and commercial laboratories and commercial trade organizations in the standardization effort. FOR...

  2. The application of sanctions for violations of the regulatory standards in the industrial uses of radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truppa, Walter Adrian

    2013-01-01

    This work describe the mechanisms used for to apply the penalties in industrial uses of radioactive materials, the experience gained in recent years in various administrative steps, as well as relevant aspects of some cases and / or exceptional situations that were detected by the ARN during regulatory inspections by complaints or other means, and that led to the imposition of administrative penalties in such industrial applications. This scheme covers various types of sanctions that depending on the severity of the fault may be: warnings, fines, suspension or cancellation of permits or permissions, and if necessary arrest and / or decommissioning of radioactive material

  3. The Michigan high-level radioactive waste program: Final technical progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This report comprises the state of Michigan's final technical report on the location of a proposed high-level radioactive waste disposal site. Included are a list of Michigan's efforts to review the DOE proposal and a detailed report on the application of geographic information systems analysis techniques to the review process

  4. Operational programs for national radioactive waste and spent fuel management programme in Slovenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeleznik, Nadja; Kralj, Metka; Mele, Irena

    2007-01-01

    The first separate National Radioactive Waste and Spent Fuel Management Programme (National Programme) was prepared in Slovenia in 2005 as a supplementary part of the National Environmental Action Programme and was adopted in February 2006 by the Slovenian Parliament. The new National Programme includes all topics being relevant for the management of the radioactive waste and spent fuel which are produced in Slovenia, from the legislation and identification of different waste streams, to the management of radioactive waste and spent fuel, the decommissioning of nuclear facilities and management of (TE)NORM in the near future from 2006 up to the 2015. The National Programme identified the existing and possible future problems and proposed the technical solutions and action plans for two distinctive periods: 2006-2009 and 2010- 2015. According to the requirement of Act on Protection against Ionising Radiation and Nuclear Safety the national Agency for Radwaste Management (ARAO) prepared the operational programmes for the four year period with technical details on implementation of the National programme. ARAO gained the detailed plans of different involved holders and proposed 9 operational programmes with aims, measures, individual organizations in charge, expenses and resources for each of the programmes. The Operational programmes were already reviewed by the Ministry of Environment and Physical Planning and are under acceptance. The orientation of the radioactive waste management according to the National Programme and operational activities within additional limitations based on the strategical decisions of Slovenian Government is presented in the paper. (authors)

  5. Development of threshold guidance: National Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-09-01

    The current study has been conducted to provide DOE with a technical basis for the development of threshold guidance. The objective of the study was to develop the necessary background information and recommendations to assist the DOE in implementing the threshold limit concept for the disposal of DOE wastes at DOE facilities. The nature of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) varies greatly in both form and radionuclide content. While some low-level waste streams can contain substantial quantities of radioactive constituents, a potentially significant fraction of low-level waste is contaminated either very slightly or not at all. There is a strong likelihood that managing wastes with extremely low levels of radioactivity as nonradioactive waste would pose no significant safety problems and could result in substantial cost savings relative to its handling as LLW. Since all materials, including waste products, contain some radioactivity, it is necessary to distinguish between those wastes that would require disposal as LLW and those that have sufficiently low levels of radiological content to be managed according to their nonradiological properties. 131 refs., 9 figs., 24 tabs

  6. China's deep geological disposal program for high level radioactive waste, background and status 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju Wang; Xu Guoqing; Guo Yonghai

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the background and progress made in the study of China's high level radioactive waste, including site screening, site evaluation, the study on radionuclide migration, bentonite, natural analogue studies, and performance assessment, etc. The study on Beishan area, the potential area for China's geological repository, is also presented in this paper. (author)

  7. The health physics programs in low-level radioactive waste management at the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Republic of China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, W-L.

    1986-01-01

    The primary mission of the health physics programs in low-level radioactive management is to ensure radiation safety for personnel and environment of the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER), and also for the general public surrounding INER. In view of the above, the Health Physics programs in low-level radioactive waste management are divided into three sub-programs: the radiation control program, the environmental survey and bioassay program, and the radiation dosimetry supporting program. The general guidelines, responsibilities, and performance of these programs will be discussed in this paper in the following order. The responsibility of radiation control group is to conduct area monitoring and radiation surveillance for the radioactive waste treatment workers. It includes the control of radiation field level of the working area, servicing personnel dosimeters, instruction on radiation safety, and handling of radiation accidents. The responsibility of the environmental survey and bioassay group is to perform environmental surveys and bioassays. Environmental gamma monitoring stations were installed both on-site and off-site at INER. For bioassays, urine samples are taken from radioactive waste treatment workers, and for internal contamination checks of workers, total body counting systems are being used. The main responsibility of the radiation dosimetry group is to provide radiation dosimetrical support to the radiation control group and the environmental survey and bioassay group. Some typical work of the radiation dosimetry group is the qualitative assay and quantitative determination of radioactive samples, and calibration of dosimeters and survey meters

  8. Evaluation of low-level radioactive waste characterization and classification programs of the West Valley Demonstration Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taie, K.R.

    1994-01-01

    The West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) is preparing to upgrade their low-level radioactive waste (LLW) characterization and classification program. This thesis describes a survey study of three other DOE sites conducted in support of this effort. The LLW characterization/classification programs of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Savannah River Site, and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory were critically evaluated. The evaluation was accomplished through tours of each site facility and personnel interviews. Comparative evaluation of the individual characterization/classification programs suggests the WVDP should purchase a real-time radiography unit and a passive/active neutron detection system, make additional mechanical modifications to the segmented gamma spectroscopy assay system, provide a separate building to house characterization equipment and perform assays away from waste storage, develop and document a new LLW characterization/classification methodology, and make use of the supercompactor owned by WVDP

  9. Research strategies and programs related to the National Plan of Management of Radioactive Materials and Wastes. Issue 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    After having recalled the legal context defining the requirements of the PNGMDR (Plan national de gestion des matieres et dechets radioactifs, national plan of management of radioactive materials and wastes), this report presents several research programs which address various domains: waste packaging and behaviour (decontamination, waste characterization, waste processing, the storage sizing inventory model, parcel behaviour, used fuel evolution, future wastes), warehousing and storage in deep geological formation (characterization of the Meuse/Haute-Marne site, scientific program, simulation programs, measurement means for storage monitoring, knowledge base, security and reversibility options for storage design, security studies, warehousing options), storage of radiferous and graphite wastes, investigation of separation/transmutation scenarios, investigations related to separation, investigations related to fuel fabrication, investigations related to the transmutation of minor actinides, researches in social and human sciences

  10. Radioprotection guidelines to the elaboration of a specific standard for the licensing of radioactive facilities on the practice of oil and gas well logging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, Rogerio dos Santos; Gomes, Joana D'Arc Ramos Lopes; Costa, Mara Lucia de Lara; Miranda, Marcia Valeria F.E. Sa

    2011-01-01

    The regulatory process in oil and gas well logging has shown the need for specific standard for the issuance of a license authorizing the use of sealed sources in well logging activities, in order to guarantee the quality of many factors from the point of view of radiation protection. Currently, have been used only generic radiation protection standards, but are not comprehensive or technically suitable for a well logging licensing purpose. The lack of a specific standard for licensing in radioactive well logging operations in Brazil, weakens the nuclear regulatory body in your aim of regulate and licensing the activity. This work establish, as main objective, a guideline for the future Brazilian radioprotection code in well logging operations, presenting relevant aspects not covered by generic radiation protection standards. (author)

  11. Radioprotection guidelines to the elaboration of a specific standard for the licensing of radioactive facilities on the practice of oil and gas well logging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, Rogerio dos Santos; Gomes, Joana D'Arc Ramos Lopes; Costa, Mara Lucia de Lara; Miranda, Marcia Valeria F.E. Sa

    2011-01-01

    The regulatory process in oil and gas well logging has shown the need for specific standard for the issuance of a license authorizing the use of sealed sources in well logging activities, in order to guarantee the quality of many factors from the point of view of radiation protection. Currently, have been used only generic radiation protection standards, but are not comprehensive or technically suitable for a well logging licensing purpose. The lack of a specific standard for licensing in radioactive well logging operations in Brazil, weakens the nuclear regulatory body in your aim of regulate and licensing the activity. This work establish, as main objective, a guideline for the future Brazilian radioprotection code in well logging operations, presenting relevant aspects not covered by genetic radiation protection standards. (author)

  12. The standardization methods of radioactive sources (125I, 131I, 99mTc, and 18F) for calibrating nuclear medicine equipment in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wurdiyanto, G; Candra, H

    2016-01-01

    The standardization of radioactive sources ( 125 I, 131 I, 99m Tc and 18 F) to calibrate the nuclear medicine equipment had been carried out in PTKMR-BATAN. This is necessary because the radioactive sources used in the field of nuclear medicine has a very short half-life in other that to obtain a quality measurement results require special treatment. Besides that, the use of nuclear medicine techniques in Indonesia develop rapidly. All the radioactive sources were prepared by gravimetric methods. Standardization of 125 I has been carried out by photon- photon coincidence methods, while the others have been carried out by gamma spectrometry methods. The standar sources are used to calibrate a Capintec CRC-7BT radionuclide calibrator. The results shows that calibration factor for Capintec CRC-7BT dose calibrator is 1,03; 1,02; 1,06; and 1,04 for 125 I, 131 I, 99m Tc and 18 F respectively, by about 5 to 6% of the expanded uncertainties. (paper)

  13. The standardization methods of radioactive sources (125I, 131I, 99mTc, and 18F) for calibrating nuclear medicine equipment in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurdiyanto, G.; Candra, H.

    2016-03-01

    The standardization of radioactive sources (125I, 131I, 99mTc and 18F) to calibrate the nuclear medicine equipment had been carried out in PTKMR-BATAN. This is necessary because the radioactive sources used in the field of nuclear medicine has a very short half-life in other that to obtain a quality measurement results require special treatment. Besides that, the use of nuclear medicine techniques in Indonesia develop rapidly. All the radioactive sources were prepared by gravimetric methods. Standardization of 125I has been carried out by photon- photon coincidence methods, while the others have been carried out by gamma spectrometry methods. The standar sources are used to calibrate a Capintec CRC-7BT radionuclide calibrator. The results shows that calibration factor for Capintec CRC-7BT dose calibrator is 1,03; 1,02; 1,06; and 1,04 for 125I, 131I, 99mTc and 18F respectively, by about 5 to 6% of the expanded uncertainties.

  14. Proposal of programming standards for a computerized protection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrenberger, W.; Voges, U.

    1975-05-01

    In process computer systems with high safety and reliability requirements, correctness of the software has to be proved. During the development of a program specific guidelines should be met in order to facilitate the verification of its correctness. This paper is a collection of relevant proposals. (orig.) [de

  15. National screening program vs. standardized neurodevelopmental follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maschke, Cornelia; Ellenrieder, Birte; Hecher, Kurt; Bartmann, Peter

    Background: Long-term follow-up is urgently needed to decide on the consequences of new therapies. Objective: This study assesses the use of a national child development screening program for a follow-up examination of a defined patient group. Patients and methods: Neurodevelopmental outcome of 139

  16. Quality Assurance Plans under the Renewable Fuel Standard Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quality Assurance Plan or (QAP) is a voluntary program where independent third-parties may audit and verify that RINs have been properly generated and are valid for compliance purposes. RINs verified under a QAP may be purchased by regulated parties.

  17. A Revised Admissions Standard for One Community College Nursing Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lown, Maris A.

    2010-01-01

    Predicting success on the NCLEX-RN is of paramount importance to nursing programs as they are held accountable for this outcome by accrediting agencies and by boards of nursing. This action research study examined the relationship between the NET admission test, anatomy and physiology grades, grade point average (GPA) on admission to the program…

  18. Subsurface Investigations Program at the radioactive waste management complex of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Annual progress report, FY-1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubbell, J.M.; Hull, L.C.; Humphrey, T.G.; Russell, B.F.; Pittman, J.R.; Cannon, K.M.

    1985-12-01

    This report describes work conducted in FY-85 in support of the Subsurface Investigation Program at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The work is part of a continuing effort to define and predict radionuclide migration from buried waste. The Subsurface Investigation Program is a cooperative study conducted by EG and G Idaho and the US Geological Survey, INEL Office. EG and G is responsible for the shallow drilling, solution chemistry, and net downward flux portions of this program, while the US Geological Survey is responsible for the weighing lysimeters and test trench. Data collection was initiated by drilling, sampling, and instrumenting shallow wells, continuing the installation of test trenches, and modifying the two weighing lysimeters. Twenty-one shallow auger holes were around the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) to evaluate radionuclide content in the surficial sediments, to determine the geologic and hydrologic characteristics of the surficial sediments, and to provide as monitoring sites for moisture in these sediments. Eighteen porous cup lysimeters were installed in 12 auger holes to collect soil water samples from the surficial sediments. Fourteen auger holes were instrumented with tensiometers, gypsum blocks and/or psychrometers at various depths throughout the RWMC. Readings from these instruments are taken on a monthly basis

  19. 75 FR 17036 - Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Small Electric Motors; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-05

    ... Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Small Electric Motors; Correction AGENCY: Office of... standards for small electric motors, which was published on March 9, 2010. In that final rule, the U.S... titled ``Energy Conservation Standards for Small Electric Motors.'' 75 FR 10874. Since the publication of...

  20. 77 FR 59712 - Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Dishwashers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    ... amended energy conservation standards, DOE conducted a market survey using all available public... Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Dishwashers AGENCY: Office of Energy... establish amended energy conservation standards for dishwashers in the Federal Register on May 30, 2012. DOE...

  1. RECOMMENDED FOUNDATION FILL MATERIALS CONSTRUCTION STANDARD OF THE FLORIDA RADON RESEARCH PROGRAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report summarizes the technical basis for a recommended foundation fill materials standard for new construction houses in Florida. he radon-control construction standard was developed by the Florida Radon Research Program (FRRP). ill material standards are formulated for: (1)...

  2. Bibliography of studies for the Salt Repository Project Office of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program, April 1978-May 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-10-01

    DOE/CH/10140-05 is an annotated bibliography of approved reports that have been produced for the US Department of Energy Salt Repository Project Office of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program since April 1978. This document is intended for use by the US Department of Energy, State and local officials, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, contractors to the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation, concerned citizens, and others who need a comprehensive listing of reports related to a nuclear waste repository in salt. This document consists of a main report listing, appendixes with Work Breakdown Structure lists, and a topical index

  3. Bibliography of studies for the Salt Repository Project Office of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program, April 1978-December 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-06-01

    This document is an annotated bibliography of approved reports that have been produced for the US Department of Energy Salt Repository Project Office of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program since April 1978. This document is intended for use by the US Department of Energy, State and local officials, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, contractors to the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation, concerned citizens, and others who need a comprehensive listing of reports related to a nuclear waste repository in salt. This document consists of a main report listing, appendixes with Work Breakdown Structure lists, and a topical index

  4. ROCKING. A computer program for seismic response analysis of radioactive materials transport AND/OR storage casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikushima, Takeshi

    1995-11-01

    The computer program ROCKING has been developed for seismic response analysis, which includes rocking and sliding behavior, of radioactive materials transport and/or storage casks. Main features of ROCKING are as follows; (1) Cask is treated as a rigid body. (2) Rocking and sliding behavior are considered. (3) Impact forces are represented by the spring dashpot model located at impact points. (4) Friction force is calculated at interface between a cask and a floor. (5) Forces of wire ropes against tip-over work only as tensile loads. In the paper, the calculation model, the calculation equations, validity calculations and user's manual are shown. (author)

  5. Defense Standardization Program Journal. April/June 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    years, the seven winners have played an integral part in keeping our men and women in uniform sate and in providing them the tools they need to get...supporting our men and women in uniform, helping to multiply capability through interoperability, and saving money tor the taxpayer. 1 hope that reading...committee chair of ASTM B687, "Standard Specifi- cation for Brass, Copper, and Chromium-Plated Pipe Nipples " (FSC 4730), to incor- porate eight additional

  6. Global Potential of Energy Efficiency Standards and Labeling Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNeil, Michael A; McNeil, Michael A.; Letschert, Virginie; de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2008-06-15

    This report estimates the global potential reductions in greenhouse gas emissions by 2030 for energy efficiency improvements associated with equipment (appliances, lighting, and HVAC) in buildings by means of energy efficiency standards and labels (EES&L). A consensus has emerged among the world's scientists and many corporate and political leaders regarding the need to address the threat of climate change through emissions mitigation and adaptation. A further consensus has emerged that a central component of these strategies must be focused around energy, which is the primary generator of greenhouse gas emissions. Two important questions result from this consensus: 'what kinds of policies encourage the appropriate transformation to energy efficiency' and 'how much impact can these policies have'? This report aims to contribute to the dialogue surrounding these issues by considering the potential impacts of a single policy type, applied on a global scale. The policy addressed in this report is Energy Efficient Standards and Labeling (EES&L) for energy-consuming equipment, which has now been implemented in over 60 countries. Mandatory energy performance standards are important because they contribute positively to a nation's economy and provide relative certainty about the outcome (both timing and magnitudes). Labels also contribute positively to a nation's economy and importantly increase the awareness of the energy-consuming public. Other policies not analyzed here (utility incentives, tax credits) are complimentary to standards and labels and also contribute in significant ways to reducing greenhouse gas emissions. We believe the analysis reported here to be the first systematic attempt to evaluate the potential of savings from EES&L for all countries and for such a large set of products. The goal of the analysis is to provide an assessment that is sufficiently well-quantified and accurate to allow comparison and integration

  7. Defense Standardization Program Journal. October/December 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    Franchisee ! Distributor Contract Manufacturer Independent Distributor or Stocking Distributor g Highest Confidence in Authority Ewest...continued by suppliers. Although the FWG-IDR is focused on digital radiography, its work on data standardization and management will benefit all methods of...obtain funding to gain long-term benefits in periods of constrained funding. The most important task in technology migration is the identification

  8. Appraisal for France of the safety of the transport of radioactive material. Provision for the application of the IAEA safety standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The IAEA has the specific statutory function within the United Nations system of establishing standards of safety for the protection of health against exposure to ionizing radiation. As part of this mandate, the IAEA has issued Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material, and has also established the Transport Safety Appraisal Service (TranSAS) to carry out, at the request of States, appraisals of the implementation of these regulations. The IAEA carried out such an appraisal in France from 27 March to 8 April 2004. The appraisal addressed all relevant transport activities in France, both national and international, for all modes of transport, with special emphasis on the maritime transport and air transport of radioactive material. This report summarizes the findings of the 13 independent experts who participated in the appraisal

  9. Proposed Accreditation Standards for Degree-Granting Correspondence Programs Offered by Accredited Institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGraw-Hill Continuing Education Center, Washington, DC.

    A study on proposed accreditation standards grew out of a need to (1) stimulate the growth of quality correspondence degree programs; and (2) provide a policy for accreditation of correspondence degree programs so that graduates would be encouraged to pursue advanced degree programs offered elsewhere by educational institutions. The study focused…

  10. NRC Task Force report on review of the federal/state program for regulation of commercial low-level radioactive waste burial grounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The underlying issue explored in this report is that of Federal vs State regulation of commercial radioactive waste burial grounds. The need for research and development, a comprehensive set of standards and criteria, a national plan for low-level waste management, and perpetual care funding are closely related to the central issue and are also discussed. Five of the six commercial burial grounds are regulated by Agreement States; the sixth is regulated solely by the NRC (NRC also regulates Special Nuclear Material at the sites). The sites are operated commercially. The operators contribute to the perpetual care funds for the sites at varying rates. The States have commitments for the perpetual care of the decommissioned sites except for one site, located on Federally owned land. Three conclusions are reached. Federal control over the disposal of low-level waste should be increased by requiring joint Federal/State site approval, NRC licensing, Federal ownership of the land, and a Federally administered perpetual care program. The NRC should accelerate the development of its regulatory program for the disposal of low-level waste. The undisciplined proliferation of low-level burial sites must be avoided. NRC should evaluate alternative disposal methods, conduct necessary studies, and develop a comprehensive low-level waste regulatory program (i.e., accomplish the above recommendations) prior to the licensing of new disposal sites

  11. Programming standards for effective S-3D game development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Neil; Matveev, Alexander

    2008-02-01

    When a video game is in development, more often than not it is being rendered in three dimensions - complete with volumetric depth. It's the PC monitor that is taking this three-dimensional information, and artificially displaying it in a flat, two-dimensional format. Stereoscopic drivers take the three-dimensional information captured from DirectX and OpenGL calls and properly display it with a unique left and right sided view for each eye so a proper stereoscopic 3D image can be seen by the gamer. The two-dimensional limitation of how information is displayed on screen has encouraged programming short-cuts and work-arounds that stifle this stereoscopic 3D effect, and the purpose of this guide is to outline techniques to get the best of both worlds. While the programming requirements do not significantly add to the game development time, following these guidelines will greatly enhance your customer's stereoscopic 3D experience, increase your likelihood of earning Meant to be Seen certification, and give you instant cost-free access to the industry's most valued consumer base. While this outline is mostly based on NVIDIA's programming guide and iZ3D resources, it is designed to work with all stereoscopic 3D hardware solutions and is not proprietary in any way.

  12. UY 114 Standard: Panoramics irradiation industrial plants design, class IV, with radioactive source under water deposited: approved by the resolution of the Ministry of Industry, Energy and Mining of 22/5/03

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    This standard is emploi fix irradiation plants design, panoramics class IV with radioactive source under water, uruguaian Regulation Authoritie establish general requirements and practices relating with the radiological safety

  13. Nuclear waste. DOE's program to prepare high-level radioactive waste for final disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bannerman, Carl J.; Owens, Ronald M.; Dowd, Leonard L.; Herndobler, Christopher S.; Purvine, Nancy R.; Stenersen, Stanley G.

    1989-11-01

    In summary, as of December 1988, the four sites collectively stored about 95 million gallons of high-level waste in underground tanks and bins. Approximately 57 million gallons are stored at Hanford, 34 million gallons at Savannah River, 3 million gallons at INEL, and 6 million gallons at West Valley. The waste is in several forms, including liquid, sludge, and dry granular materials, that make it unsuitable for permanent storage in its current state at these locations. Leaks from the tanks, designed for temporary storage, can pose an environmental hazard to surrounding land and water for thousands of years. DOE expects that when its waste processes at Savannah River, West Valley, and Hanford become operational, the high-level radioactive waste stored at these sites will be blended with other materials to immobilize it by forming a glass-like substance. The glass form will minimize the risk of environmental damage and make the waste more acceptable for permanent disposal in a geologic repository. At INEL, DOE is still considering various other immobilization and permanent disposal approaches. In July 1989, DOE estimated that it would cost about $13 billion (in fiscal year 1988 dollars) to retrieve, process, immobilize, and store the high-level waste until it can be moved to a permanent disposal site: about $5.3 billion is expected to be spent at Savannah River, $0.9 billion at West Valley, $2.8 billion at Hanford, and $4.0 billion at INEL. DOE has started construction at Savannah River and West Valley for facilities that will be used to transform the waste into glass (a process known as vitrification). These sites have each encountered schedule delays, and one has encountered a significant cost increase over earlier estimates. More specifically, the Savannah River facility is scheduled to begin high-level waste vitrification in 1992; the West Valley project, based on a January 1989 estimate, is scheduled to begin high-level waste vitrification in 1996, about 8

  14. Environmental monitoring radiological programs for the nuclear centre and the low level radioactive waste facility in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quintero, E.; Cervantes, L.; Rojas, V.

    2006-01-01

    The National Institute of Nuclear Research of Mexico (ININ) has its Laboratory of Environmental Radiological Monitoring, (LVRA), to assure the critical population and the environment they are not exposed to radiation doses greater than the limits established by the national and international legislation, this laboratory carries out environmental monitoring radiological programs the Nuclear Centre and its surroundings and the Low Level Radioactive Waste Facility (CADER) and its around. In order to carry out these programs the LVRA has rooms for evaporation, drying, grinding, ashing of environmental and food samples, and a laboratory for gamma ray spectrometry, liquid scintillation, alpha-beta gross counting and computer room. Since the year 2000 the (ININ) has tried to implant the quality system ISO 9001:2000 including a its (LVRA). This quality system includes: a Plan of Quality, Quality Manual, programs of technical and administrative document elaboration, technical and administrative procedures, technical and administrative qualification programmes for the laboratory staff, maintenance and calibration programs for measurement systems and finally participation in national and international exercises of intercomparison. The ININ counts with the management of quality assurance to verify these programs, in addition, our Nuclear Regulatory Commission (CNSNS) carries out periodic audits to authorize the of use and handling of radioactive and nuclear material licenses of these facilities. In this work we presented the advances and difficulties found in the implantation of the quality system, also we present the benefits obtained with uses of this system, the samples analyses results, and the calculation of the annual dose to the critical population for the last five years. In addition, we presented the calculation the radionuclides concentration tendencies in different sample types, according to our (CNSNS) requirements. In the same way the results of the calibrations

  15. Greater-than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste Program 1992 baseline strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-02-01

    This baseline strategy document describes Department of Energy (DOE) goals, objectives, and strategy for fulfilling its responsibility to dispose of greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW) according to the requirements of Section 3(b) of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985, Public Law 99-240. This document describes the baseline strategy being employed at the end of FY 1992. The strategy for fulfilling the above responsibility consists of three tasks: interim storage of limited quantities of GTCC LLW at a currently operating DOE facility to eliminate a potential public health and safety threcceptance of GTCC LLW for storage in a DOE dedicated facility on an as-needed basis pending disposal; and disposal in a facility licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The objectives, assumptions, and strategies for each of these tasks are presented in this plan

  16. Development of the program for underground disposal of radioactive wastes in Slovenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marc, D.; Loose, A.; Mele, I.

    1995-01-01

    In Slovenia, three of four steps of surface low and intermediate level radioactive wastes (LILW) repository site selection have already been completed . Since the fourth step is stopped due to the strong public opposition, an option of underground disposal is now being considered. In 1994, Agency for Rad waste Management started with preparation of basic guidelines for site selection of an underground LILW repository in Slovenia. The guidelines consist of general and geological criteria. General criteria are similar to those used for surface repository site selection, while geological criteria, based strongly on International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) recommendations, include some changes. Mainly they are less rigorous and more qualitative. A set of basic geological recommendations and guidelines for an underground disposal of radioactive wastes is presented in this paper. A comparison between proposed geological criteria for underground repository site selection and geological criteria used for surface repository site selection is given as well. (author)

  17. The High Altitude Sampling Program: Radioactivity in the stratosphere: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leifer, R.; Juzdan, Z.R.

    1986-12-01

    Radioactivity data are presented from Project Airstream (aircraft) for the year 1983 and for Project Ashcan (balloon) for the years 1982 and 1984. Due to budgetary constraints both Projects Airstream and Ashcan have been terminated. This will be the final report containing radioactivity data collected during projects airstream and ashcan. Included are gross gamma, gamma spectral and radiochemical analyses of filter samples. Quality control samples submitted along with the air filter samples were analyzed and the results are presented. Low activity on many of the filters precludes the estimation of the stratospheric inventories of /sup 239,240/Pu and 90 Sr. Based on data with count errors 90 Sr and /sup 239,240/Pu concentration for November 1983 was 0.2 +- 0.1 and 0.009 +- 0.006 Bq/1000 scm, respectively

  18. Proceedings of the 2. International symposium on the radioactive accident in Goiania. Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This 2. International symposium on the radioactive accident with cesium-137 brings together in Goiania renowned international and Brazilian specialists. These are recognized professionals of Medicine, Physics, Biology and Psychology who, gathered around a strictly scientific event, will discuss the complex problems originated by a serious accident, exchanging experiences and searching for definite solutions for the issues. The main topics are: the environmental and social impacts; technical and medical procedures; victims contamination and biological radiation effects in the body of the victims

  19. Secondary calibration laboratory for ionizing radiation laboratory accreitation program National Institute of Standards and Technology National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, P.R.

    1993-12-31

    This paper presents an overview of the procedures and requirements for accreditation under the Secondary Calibration Laboratory for Ionizing Radiation Program (SCLIR LAP). The requirements for a quality system, proficiency testing and the onsite assessment are discussed. The purpose of the accreditation program is to establish a network of secondary calibration laboratories that can provide calibrations traceable to the primary national standards.

  20. Secondary calibration laboratory for ionizing radiation laboratory accreitation program National Institute of Standards and Technology National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, P.R.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the procedures and requirements for accreditation under the Secondary Calibration Laboratory for Ionizing Radiation Program (SCLIR LAP). The requirements for a quality system, proficiency testing and the onsite assessment are discussed. The purpose of the accreditation program is to establish a network of secondary calibration laboratories that can provide calibrations traceable to the primary national standards

  1. Study of radioactivity among te Bulgarian Black Sea coastal zone - results from the NIMH monitoring program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veleva, B.; Kolarova, M.; Mungov, G. [National Institute of Meteorology and Hydrology, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2011-07-01

    In the frame of the NIMH at BAS investigations of the Black sea radioactivity were initiated in 1978 with a development of a monitoring campaign. Samples of sea waters, sediments and algae were collected from several sampling sites along the coastal zone and measured by gamma-spectrometry. Results on gamma-emitting radio-nuclide's measurements in the Black sea coastal waters were published in the 80's. After the Chernobyl accident during the period between 1986-1989 seasonal-fields sampling campaigns were organised and radioactivity of algae and bottom sediments was estimated. Harmonized sampling strategies, analytical procedures and related data information exchange for radioactivity of seawater, sediment and biota in coastal areas of Black Sea countries were developed under the IAEA TCP Black Sea Project. The present work reports results of the monitoring programme of the NIMH of Bulgaria developed in the frame of the IAEA projects for the Black Sea basin. From 1993 to 2005 regular seasonal sampling was performed in 5 sampling sites along the Bulgarian Black Sea shore. Results of the dissolved '1'3'7Cs concentrations in sea water, sand, algae, and fish samples are discussed. The data for the different radio-isotopes measured in algae, fish and sea sediment samples are given in comparison with other investigations. A complex assessment of Cs-137 concentrations as important tracer and indicator of the marine processes is made on a long-term basis. (author)

  2. Study of radioactivity among te Bulgarian Black Sea coastal zone - results from the NIMH monitoring program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veleva, B.; Kolarova, M.; Mungov, G.

    2011-01-01

    In the frame of the NIMH at BAS investigations of the Black sea radioactivity were initiated in 1978 with a development of a monitoring campaign. Samples of sea waters, sediments and algae were collected from several sampling sites along the coastal zone and measured by gamma-spectrometry. Results on gamma-emitting radio-nuclide's measurements in the Black sea coastal waters were published in the 80's. After the Chernobyl accident during the period between 1986-1989 seasonal-fields sampling campaigns were organised and radioactivity of algae and bottom sediments was estimated. Harmonized sampling strategies, analytical procedures and related data information exchange for radioactivity of seawater, sediment and biota in coastal areas of Black Sea countries were developed under the IAEA TCP Black Sea Project. The present work reports results of the monitoring programme of the NIMH of Bulgaria developed in the frame of the IAEA projects for the Black Sea basin. From 1993 to 2005 regular seasonal sampling was performed in 5 sampling sites along the Bulgarian Black Sea shore. Results of the dissolved '1'3'7Cs concentrations in sea water, sand, algae, and fish samples are discussed. The data for the different radio-isotopes measured in algae, fish and sea sediment samples are given in comparison with other investigations. A complex assessment of Cs-137 concentrations as important tracer and indicator of the marine processes is made on a long-term basis. (author)

  3. DOE standard: The Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program for radiobioassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-12-01

    This technical standard describes the US Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP) for Radiobioassay, for use by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE Contractor radiobioassay programs. This standard is intended to be used in conjunction with the general administrative technical standard that describes the overall DOELAP accreditation process--DOE-STD-1111-98, Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program Administration. This technical standard pertains to radiobioassay service laboratories that provide either direct or indirect (in vivo or in vitro) radiobioassay measurements in support of internal dosimetry programs at DOE facilities or for DOE and DOE contractors. Similar technical standards have been developed for other DOELAP dosimetry programs. This program consists of providing an accreditation to DOE radiobioassay programs based on successful completion of a performance-testing process and an on-site evaluation by technical experts. This standard describes the technical requirements and processes specific to the DOELAP Radiobioassay Accreditation Program as required by 10 CFR 835 and as specified generically in DOE-STD-1111-98

  4. Intruder dose pathway analysis for the onsite disposal of radioactive wastes: The ONSITE/MAXI1 computer program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Peloquin, R.A.; Napier, B.A.; Neuder, S.M.

    1987-02-01

    This document summarizes initial efforts to develop human-intrusion scenarios and a modified version of the MAXI computer program for potential use by the NRC in reviewing applications for onsite radioactive waste disposal. Supplement 1 of NUREG/CR-3620 (1986) summarized modifications and improvements to the ONSITE/MAXI1 software package. This document summarizes a modified version of the ONSITE/MAXI1 computer program. This modified version of the computer program operates on a personal computer and permits the user to optionally select radiation dose conversion factors published by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in their Publication No. 30 (ICRP 1979-1982) in place of those published by the ICRP in their Publication No. 2 (ICRP 1959) (as implemented in the previous versions of the ONSITE/MAXI1 computer program). The pathway-to-human models used in the computer program have not been changed from those described previously. Computer listings of the ONSITE/MAXI1 computer program and supporting data bases are included in the appendices of this document

  5. Reliability-based maintenance evaluations and standard preventive maintenance programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varno, M.; McKinley, M.

    1993-01-01

    Due to recent issuance of 10CFR50.65, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission maintenance rule (Rule), and the open-quotes Industry Guideline for Monitoring the Effectiveness of Maintenance at Nuclear Power Plantsclose quotes prepared by the Nuclear Management and Resources Council, many utilities are undertaking review or evaluation of current preventive maintenance (PM) programs. Although PM optimization and documentation are not specifically required by the Rule, an appropriate and effective PM program (PMP) will be the cornerstone of the successful and cost-effective implementation of the Rule. Currently, a project is being conducted at the Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Station (VYNPS) in conjunction with Quadrex Energy Services to evaluate, optimize, and document the PMP. The project began in March 1993 and is scheduled for completion in mid-1995. The initial scope for the project is the evaluation of those structures, systems, and components that are within the scope of the Rule. Because of the number of systems to be evaluated (∼50), the desired completion schedule, and cost considerations, a streamlined approach to PM optimization and documentation is being utilized

  6. ABACC laboratories quality assurance through Secondary Standards Exchange Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guidicini, Olga Mafra; Thompson, Jay; Soriano, Michael

    2003-01-01

    In September 1999, the Brazilian-Argentine Agency for Accounting and Control of Nuclear Materials (ABACC), with assistance from the New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL) of the U.S. Department of Energy, started a new cooperative activity with, among other objectives, the production and characterization of a traceable uranium secondary standard and the performance of the Third Round Robin for ABACC's laboratory network. Brazil and Argentina have fabricated UO 2 pellets for use as a secondary standard. Samples from the two batches were sent to NBL for the determination of the reference values for both uranium concentration (%U) and isotopic composition for each batch. ABACC and NBL then organized the Third ABACC Round Robin for Brazilian and Argentine laboratories that are part of the ABACC network. The laboratories comprising the network can be used to analyze real samples collected during the ABACC inspections. The Brazilian and Argentine pellets were distributed to all the laboratories together with the protocol to be followed for the uranium concentration analysis, the forms for reporting the measurement results, and natural UO 2 pellets (CETAMA OU1) to be used as reference material. For the laboratories with capability of measuring isotopics, NBL reference material CRM 125-A was provided. Several laboratories from each country provided results. As soon as the measurement results were sent to the organizers, they were statistically evaluated by NBL. During a meeting held at ABACC headquarters with the participation of NBL representatives, the ABACC technical support officer, and representatives of all the participant laboratories, the results were discussed and compared with the reference values. All the laboratories had the occasion, in an open discussion, to explain and show the difficulties and problems they faced during the exercise. ABACC had the opportunity not only to judge the quality of the measurements these laboratories performed, but also to determine

  7. Comparative evaluations of surface contamination detectors calibration with radioactive sources - used in the Goiania accident, and standard sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, P.H.B.; Marecha, M.H.H.

    1997-01-01

    The construction of Cs-137 standard flat sources for calibration of surface contamination detectors, used in the Goiania accident in 1987, is described and the procedures adopted are reported. At that time, standard sources were not available. Nowadays the Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria has standard sources acquired from Amersham which are used as calibration standards for surface contamination detectors. Comparative evaluations between the standard flat sources constructed for the accident and the calibrated ones are presented

  8. Integrated Data Analysis (IDCA) Program - PETN Class 4 Standard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandstrom, Mary M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Brown, Geoffrey W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Preston, Daniel N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Pollard, Colin J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Warner, Kirstin F. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC), Indian Head, MD (United States). Indian Head Division; Sorensen, Daniel N. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC), Indian Head, MD (United States). Indian Head Division; Remmers, Daniel L. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC), Indian Head, MD (United States). Indian Head Division; Shelley, Timothy J. [Air Force Research Lab. (AFRL), Tyndall AFB, FL (United States); Reyes, Jose A. [Applied Research Associates, Tyndall AFB, FL (United States); Phillips, Jason J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hsu, Peter C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Reynolds, John G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2012-08-01

    The Integrated Data Collection Analysis (IDCA) program is conducting a proficiency study for Small- Scale Safety and Thermal (SSST) testing of homemade explosives (HMEs). Described here are the results for impact, friction, electrostatic discharge, and differential scanning calorimetry analysis of PETN Class 4. The PETN was found to have: 1) an impact sensitivity (DH50) range of 6 to 12 cm, 2) a BAM friction sensitivity (F50) range 7 to 11 kg, TIL (0/10) of 3.7 to 7.2 kg, 3) a ABL friction sensitivity threshold of 5 or less psig at 8 fps, 4) an ABL ESD sensitivity threshold of 0.031 to 0.326 j/g, and 5) a thermal sensitivity of an endothermic feature with Tmin = ~ 141 °C, and a exothermic feature with a Tmax = ~205°C.

  9. Scinfi, a program to calculate the standardization curve in liquid scintillation counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grau Carles, A.; Grau Malonda, A.

    1984-01-01

    A code, Scinfi, was developed, written in Basic, to compute the efficiency-quench standardization curve for any radionuclide. The program requires the standardization curve for 3 H and the polynomial relations between counting efficiency and figure of merit for both 3 H and the problem (e.g. 14 C). The program is applied to the computation of the efficiency-quench standardization curve for 14 C. Five different liquid scintillation spectrometers and two scintillator solutions have been checked. The computation results are compared with the experimental values obtained with a set of 14 C standardized samples. (author)

  10. SCINFI, a program to calculate the standardization curve in liquid scintillation counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grau Carles, A.; Grau Malonda, A.

    1984-01-01

    A code, SCINFI, was developed, written in BASIC, to compute the efficiency- quench standardization curve for any radionuclide. The program requires the standardization curve for 3H and the polynomial relations between counting efficiency and figure of merit for both 3H and the problem (e.g. 14 C ). The program is applied to the computation of the efficiency-quench standardization curve for 14 c . Five different liquid scintillation spectrometers and two scintillator solutions have bean checked. The computation results are compared with the experimental values obtained with a set of 14 c standardized samples. (Author)

  11. The new revision of NPP Krsko decommissioning, radioactive waste and spent fuel management program: analyses and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeleznik, Nadja; Kralj, Metka; Lokner, Vladimir; Levanat, Ivica; Rapic, Andrea; Mele, Irena

    2010-01-01

    The preparation of the new revision of the Decommissioning and Spent Fuel (SF) and Low and Intermediate level Waste (LILW) Disposal Program for the NPP Krsko (Program) started in September 2008 after the acceptance of the Term of Reference for the work by Intergovernmental Committee responsible for implementation of the Agreement between the governments of Slovenia and Croatia on the status and other legal issues related to investment, exploitation, and decommissioning of the Nuclear power plant Krsko. The responsible organizations, APO and ARAO together with NEK prepared all new technical and financial data and relevant inputs for the new revision in which several scenarios based on the accepted boundary conditions were investigated. The strategy of immediate dismantling was analyzed for planned and extended NPP life time together with linked radioactive waste and spent fuel management to calculate yearly annuity to be paid by the owners into the decommissioning funds in Slovenia and Croatia. The new Program incorporated among others new data on the LILW repository including the costs for siting, construction and operation of silos at the location Vrbina in Krsko municipality, the site specific Preliminary Decommissioning Plan for NPP Krsko which included besides dismantling and decontamination approaches also site specific activated and contaminated radioactive waste, and results from the referenced scenario for spent fuel disposal but at very early stage. Important inputs for calculations presented also new amounts of compensations to the local communities for different nuclear facilities which were taken from the supplemented Slovenian regulation and updated fiscal parameters (inflation, interest, discount factors) used in the financial model based on the current development in economical environment. From the obtained data the nominal and discounted costs for the whole nuclear program related to NPP Krsko which is jointly owned by Slovenia and Croatia have

  12. Physical Fitness Reference Standards in French Youth: The BOUGE Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhelst, Jérémy; Labreuche, Julien; Béghin, Laurent; Drumez, Elodie; Fardy, Paul S; Chapelot, Didier; Mikulovic, Jacques; Ulmer, Zékya

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to establish sex- and age-specific physical fitness percentiles in French youth. A sample of 11,186 children and adolescents (5,546 boys and 5,640 girls), aged between 10 and 15 years, was assessed in the French national BOUGE study. Participants were tested for their cardiorespiratory fitness, muscular endurance, speed, flexibility, and agility using the following tests: 20-m shuttle run tests, curl-ups test, 50-m sprint test, back-saver sit and reach test, and 10 × 5-m shuttle run test. Percentile values were estimated for French youth as a function of age stratified by sex using the generalized additive model for location, scale, and shape (GAMLSS). In general, physical fitness was better in boys than in girls, except for the back-saver sit and reach test, in which girls performed better. Except for the back-saver sit and reach test and 10 × 5-m shuttle run test, physical fitness performance was significantly associated with age. Sex- and age-specific normative values for physical fitness tests in French youth expressed as percentiles from the fifth to the 95th are provided. Reference values provide normative data for French youth. The data are useful in identifying special needs for appropriate intervention programs.

  13. Toxicity regulation of radioactive liquid waste effluent from CANDU stations - lessons from Ontario's MISA program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodgers, D.W.

    2009-01-01

    Toxicity testing became an issue for Ontario's CANDU stations, when it was required under Ontario's MISA regulations for the Electricity Generation Sector. In initial tests, radioactive liquid waste (RLW) effluent was intermittently toxic to both rainbow trout and Daphnia. Significant differences in RLW toxicity were apparent among stations and contributing streams. Specific treatment systems were designed for three stations, with the fourth electing to use existing treatment systems. Stations now use a combination of chemical analysis and treatment to regulate RLW toxicity. Studies of Ontario CANDU stations provide a basis for minimizing costs and environmental effects of new nuclear stations. (author)

  14. Guidance document for revision of DOE Order 5820.2A, Radioactive Waste Technical Support Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudera, D.E.; McMurtrey, C.D.; Meagher, B.G.

    1993-04-01

    This document provides guidance for the revision of DOE Order 5820.2A, ''Radioactive Waste Management.'' Technical Working Groups have been established and are responsible for writing the revised order. The Technical Working Groups will use this document as a reference for polices and procedures that have been established for the revision process. The overall intent of this guidance is to outline how the order will be revised and how the revision process will be managed. In addition, this document outlines technical issues considered for inclusion by a Department of Energy Steering Committee

  15. 34 CFR 369.44 - What wage and hour standards apply to community rehabilitation programs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION SERVICE PROJECTS What Conditions Must Be Met by a Grantee? § 369.44 What wage and... hour standards must be observed in projects carried out in community rehabilitation programs...

  16. The Brazilian time and frequency atomic standards program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mushtaq Ahmed

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Cesium atomic beam clocks have been the workhorse for many demanding applications in science and technology for the past four decades. Tests of the fundamental laws of physics and the search for minute changes in fundamental constants, the synchronization of telecommunication networks, and realization of the satellite-based global positioning system would not be possible without atomic clocks. The adoption of optical cooling and trapping techniques, has produced a major advance in atomic clock precision. Cold-atom fountain and compact cold-atom clocks have also been developed. Measurement precision of a few parts in 10(15 has been demonstrated for a cold-atom fountain clock. We present here an overview of the time and frequency metrology program based on cesium atoms under development at USP São Carlos. This activity consists of construction and characterization of atomic-beam, and several variations of cold-atom clocks. We discuss the basic working principles, construction, evaluation, and important applications of atomic clocks in the Brazilian program.Relógios atômicos de feixe de Césio têm sido a base para diversas aplicações em ciência e tecnologia nas últimas quatro décadas. Testes de leis fundamentais de física, buscas por mínimas variações em constantes fundamentais, sincronização de redes de telecomunicações e o funcionamento do sistema de posicionamento global, baseado em satélites de navegação, não seriam possíveis sem os relógios atômicos. A adoção de técnicas de aprisionamento e resfriamento ópticos tem permitido um grande avanço na precisão dos relógios atômicos. Chafarizes de átomos frios e relógios compactos de átomos frios também têm sido desenvolvidos. Precisões de medida de algumas partes em 1015 foram demonstradas para relógios do tipo chafariz de átomos frios. Apresentamos uma visão geral do programa de metrologia de tempo e freqüência baseado em átomos de césio, em

  17. Program criteria for subseabed disposal of radioactive waste: research strategies and review processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-09-01

    The Subseabed Disposal Program follows the policies and criteria of the National Waste Terminal Storage program for the development of land-based repositories, except where the technical differences between land and ocean geologic disposal make different approaches or criteria necessary. This is the first of a series of documents describing the procedures and criteria for the Subseabed Disposal Program

  18. Radioactive hazards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gill, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    The use of radioactive substances in hospital laboratories is discussed and the attendant hazards and necessary precautions examined. The new legislation under the Health and Safety at Work Act which, it is proposed, will replace existing legal requirements in the field of health and safety at work by a system of regulations and approved codes of practice designed to maintain or improve the standards of health, safety and welfare already established, is considered with particular reference to protection against ionising radiations. (UK)

  19. Considerations of human inturison in U.S. programs for deep geologic disposal of radioactive waste.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swift, Peter N.

    2013-01-01

    Regulations in the United States that govern the permanent disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste in deep geologic repositories require the explicit consideration of hypothetical future human intrusions that disrupt the waste. Specific regulatory requirements regarding the consideration of human intrusion differ in the two sets of regulations currently in effect in the United States; one defined by the Environmental Protection Agencys 40 Code of Federal Regulations part 197, applied only to the formerly proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, and the other defined by the Environmental Protection Agencys 40 Code of Federal Regulations part 191, applied to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico and potentially applicable to any repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste in the United States other than the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain. This report reviews the regulatory requirements relevant to human intrusion and the approaches taken by the Department of Energy to demonstrating compliance with those requirements.

  20. Standard format and content of a license application for a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility: Safety analysis report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This document discusses the information that should be provided in the Safety Analysis Report and establishes a uniform format for presenting the information necessary to fulfill the licensing requirements for land disposal of radioactive waste called for in 10 CFR 61. The uniform format will (1) help ensure that the Safety Analysis Report contains the information required by 10 CFR 61, (2) aid the applicant and NRC staff in ensuring that the information is complete, (3) help persons reading the Safety Analysis Report to locate information, and (4) contribute to shortening the time needed for the review process

  1. Standard format and content of a license application for a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility: Safety analysis report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This document discusses the information that should be provided in the Safety Analysis Report and establishes a uniform format for presenting the information necessary to fulfill the licensing requirements for land disposal of radioactive waste called for in 10 CFR 61. The uniform format will (1) help ensure that the Safety Analysis Report contains the information required by 10 CFR 61, (2) aid the applicant and NRC staff in ensuring that the information is complete, (3) help persons reading the Safety Analysis Report to locate information, and (4) contribute to shortening the time needed for the review process

  2. Long-term leach testing of solidified radioactive waste forms (International Standard Publication ISO 6961:1982)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanik, J.

    2001-01-01

    Processes are developed for the immobilization of radionuclides by solidification of radioactive wastes. The resulting solidification products are characterized by strong resistance to leaching aimed at low release rates of the radionuclides to the environment. To measure this resistance to leaching of the solidified materials: glass, glass-ceramics, bitumen, cement, concrete, plastics, a long-term leach test is presented. The long-term leach test is aimed at: a) the comparison of different kinds or compositions of solidified waste forms; b) the intercomparison between leach test results from different laboratories on one product; c) the intercomparison between leach test results on products from different processes

  3. 78 FR 51463 - Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Metal Halide Lamp Fixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-20

    ... merging the metal halide lamp fixture and the high-intensity discharge (HID) lamp rulemakings. This NOPR... Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Metal Halide Lamp Fixtures; Proposed Rule #0;#0;Federal...: Energy Conservation Standards for Metal Halide Lamp Fixtures AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and...

  4. Do School-Based Tutoring Programs Significantly Improve Student Performance on Standardized Tests?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothman, Terri; Henderson, Mary

    2011-01-01

    This study used a pre-post, nonequivalent control group design to examine the impact of an in-district, after-school tutoring program on eighth grade students' standardized test scores in language arts and mathematics. Students who had scored in the near-passing range on either the language arts or mathematics aspect of a standardized test at the…

  5. 75 FR 20111 - Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Residential Water Heaters, Direct...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-16

    ... Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Residential Water Heaters, Direct Heating Equipment, and Pool... heating equipment and pool heaters. Table I.1--Amended Energy Conservation Standards for Residential Water... for national energy and water conservation; and 7. Other factors the Secretary of Energy (Secretary...

  6. 77 FR 10997 - Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Distribution Transformers; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-24

    ... Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Distribution Transformers; Correction AGENCY: Office of... standards for distribution transformers. It was recently discovered that values in certain tables of the...,'' including distribution transformers. The Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT 1992), Public Law 102-486, amended...

  7. 78 FR 63999 - Notice of Vitamin D Standardization Program (VDSP) Symposium: Tools To Improve Laboratory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Notice of Vitamin D... Vitamin D Standardization Program (VDSP) to those with an interest in the effort to standardize vitamin D... laboratory personnel; vitamin D researchers; and members of professional societies with clinical and public...

  8. Analysis of Evidence Supporting the Educational Leadership Constituent Council 2011 Educational Leadership Program Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Pamela D.; Anderson, Erin; Reynolds, Amy L.; Mawhinney, Hanne

    2016-01-01

    This document analysis provides a summary of the research from high-impact journals published between 2008 and 2013 with the explicit purpose of determining the extent to which the current empirical evidence supports the individual 2011 Educational Leadership Constituent Council Program Standards and their elements. We found that the standards are…

  9. Safety Analysis of 'Older/Aged' Handling and Transportation Equipment for Heavy Loads, Radioactive Waste and Materials in Accordance with German Nuclear Standards KTA 3902, 3903 and 3905

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macias, P.; Prucker, E.; Stang, W.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a general safety analysis of important handling and transportation processes and their related equipment ('load chains' consisting of cranes, load-bearing equipment and load-attaching points). This project was arranged by the responsible Bavarian ministry for environment, health and consumer protection (StMUGV) in agreement with the power plant operators of all Bavarian nuclear power plants to work out potential safety improvements. The range of the equipment (e.g. reactor building, crane, refuelling machine, load-bearing equipment and load-attaching points) covers the handling and transportation of fuel elements (e. g. with fuel flasks), heavy loads (e.g. reactor pressure vessel closure head, shielding slabs) and radioactive materials and waste (e.g. waste flasks, control elements, fuel channels, structure elements). The handling equipment was subjected to a general safety analysis taking into account the ageing of the equipment and the progress of standards. Compliance with the current valid requirements of the state of science and technology as required by German Atomic Act and particularly of the nuclear safety KTA-standards (3902, 3903 and 3905) was examined. The higher protection aims 'safe handling and transportation of heavy loads and safe handling of radioactive materials and waste' of the whole analysis are to avoid a criticality accident, the release of radioactivity and inadmissible effects on important technical equipment and buildings. The scope of the analysis was to check whether these protection aims were fulfilled for all important technical handling and transportation processes. In particularly the design and manufacturing of the components and the regulations of the handling itself were examined. (authors)

  10. Analysis of the total system life cycle cost for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program: executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-04-01

    The total-system life-cycle cost (TSLCC) analysis for the Department of Energy's Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Progrram is an ongoing activity that helps determine whether the revenue-producing mechanism established by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 is sufficient to cover the cost of the program. This report is an input into the third evaluation of the adequacy of the fee. The total-system cost for the reference waste-management program in this analysis is estimated to be 24 to 30 billion (1984) dollars. For the sensitivity cases studied in this report, the costs could be as high as 35 billion dollars and as low as 21 billion dollars. Because factors like repository location, the quantity of waste generated, transportation-cask technology, and repository startup dates exert substantial impacts on total-system costs, there are several tradeoffs between these factors, and these tradeoffs can greatly influence the total cost of the program. The total-system cost for the reference program described in this report is higher by 3 to 5 billion dollars, or 15 to 20%, than the cost for the reference program of the TSLCC analysis of April 1984. More than two-thirds of this increase is in the cost of repository construction and operation. These repository costs have increased because of changing design concepts, different assumptions about the effort required to perform the necessary activities, and a change in the source data on which the earlier analysis was based. Development and evaluation costs have similarly increased because of a net addition to the work content. Transportation costs have increased because of different assumptions about repository locations and several characteristics of the transportation system. It is expected that the estimates of total-system costs will continue to change in response to both an evolving program strategy and better definition of the work required to achieve the program objectives

  11. PAVAN: an atmospheric-dispersion program for evaluating design-basis accidental releases of radioactive materials from nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bander, T.J.

    1982-11-01

    This report provides a user's guide for the NRC computer program, PAVAN, which is a program used by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to estimate downwind ground-level air concentrations for potential accidental releases of radioactive material from nuclear facilities. Such an assessment is required by 10 CFR Part 100 and 10 CFR Part 50. The program implements the guidance provided in Regulatory Guide 1.145, Atmospheric Dispersion Models for Potential Accident Consequence Assessments at Nuclear Power Plants. Using joint frequency distributions of wind direction and wind speed by atmospheric stability, the program provides relative air concentration (X/Q) values as functions of direction for various time periods at the exclusion area boundary (EAB) and the outer boundary of the low population zone (LPZ). Calculations of X/Q values can be made for assumed ground-level releases (e.g., through building penetrations and vents) or elevated releases from free-standing stacks. Various options may be selected by the user. They can account for variation in the location of release points, additional plume dispersion due to building wakes, plume meander under low wind speed conditions, and adjustments to consider non-straight trajectories. It computes an effective plume height using the physical release height which can be reduced by inputted terrain features. It cannot handle multiple emission sources. A description of the main program and all subroutines is provided. Also included as appendices are a complete listing of the program and two test cases with the required data inputs and the resulting program outputs

  12. Radioactive waste isolation in salt: rationale and methodology for Argonne-conducted reviews of site characterization programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, W.; Ditmars, J.D.; Tisue, M.W.; Hambley, D.F.; Fenster, D.F.; Rote, D.M.

    1985-07-01

    Both regulatory and technical concerns must be addressed in Argonne-conducted peer reviews of site characterization programs for individual sites for a high-level radioactive waste repository in salt. This report describes the regulatory framework within which reviews must be conducted and presents background information on the structure and purpose of site characterization programs as found in US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Regulatory Guide 4.17 and Title 10, Part 60, of the Code of Federal Regulations. It also presents a methodology to assist reviewers in addressing technical concerns relating to their respective areas of expertise. The methodology concentrates on elements of prime importance to the US Department of Energy's advocacy of a given salt repository system during the NRC licensing process. Instructions are given for reviewing 12 site characterization program elements, starting with performance objectives, performance issues, and levels of performance of repository subsystem components; progressing through performance assessment; and ending with plans for data acquisition and evaluation. The success of a site characterization program in resolving repository performance issues will be determined by judging the likelihood that the proposed data acquisition activities will reduce uncertainties in the performance predictions. 8 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs

  13. Development programs in the United States of America for the application of cement-based grouts in radioactive waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dole, L.R.; Row, T.H.

    1984-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews seven cement-based waste form development programs at six of the US Department of Energy (DOE) sites. These sites have developed a variety of processes that range from producing 25 mm (1 in.) diameter pellets in a glove box to producing 240 m (800 ft.) diameter grout sheets within the bedding planes of a deep shale formation. These successful applications of cement-based waste forms to the many radioactive waste streams from nuclear facilities bear witness to the flexibility and reliability of this class of materials. This paper also discusses the major issues regarding the application of cement-based waste forms to radioactive waste management problems. These issues are (1) leachability, (2) radiation stability, (3) thermal stability, (4) phase complexity of the matrix, and (5) effects of the waste stream composition. A cursory review of current research in each of these areas is given This paper also discusses future trends in cement-based waste form development and applications. 31 references, 11 figures.

  14. Development programs in the United States of America for the application of cement-based grouts in radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dole, L.R.; Row, T.H.

    1984-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews seven cement-based waste form development programs at six of the US Department of Energy (DOE) sites. These sites have developed a variety of processes that range from producing 25 mm (1 in.) diameter pellets in a glove box to producing 240 m (800 ft.) diameter grout sheets within the bedding planes of a deep shale formation. These successful applications of cement-based waste forms to the many radioactive waste streams from nuclear facilities bear witness to the flexibility and reliability of this class of materials. This paper also discusses the major issues regarding the application of cement-based waste forms to radioactive waste management problems. These issues are (1) leachability, (2) radiation stability, (3) thermal stability, (4) phase complexity of the matrix, and (5) effects of the waste stream composition. A cursory review of current research in each of these areas is given This paper also discusses future trends in cement-based waste form development and applications. 31 references, 11 figures

  15. Development of a natural analogue database to support the safety case of the Korean radioactive waste disposal program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baik, M.H.; Park, T.J.; Kim, I.Y.; Jeong, J. [Korea Atomic Research Institute, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, K.W. [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    In this study, the status of natural analogue studies in Korea is briefly summarized and applicability of existing natural analogue information to the Korean safety case has been evaluated. To enable effective application of natural analogue information to the overall evaluation of long-term safety (the 'safety case') for the geological disposal of radioactive wastes, a natural analogue database has been developed by collecting, classifying, and evaluating relevant data. The natural analogue data collected were classified into categories based on site information, components/processes of the disposal system, properties/phenomena, reference, safety case application, application method, and suitability to a safety case. Suitability of the natural analogue data to a specific safety case was evaluated based upon the importance and the applicability to the Korean safety case. As a result, 75 natural analogue datasets were selected as important for the Korean safety case. The database developed can now be utilized in the RD and D (Research, Development, and Demonstration) program development for natural analogue studies. In addition, the methodology developed and the database compiled in this study may assist in the development of safety case including safety assessment for high-level radioactive waste disposal in Korea as well as in other countries. (authors)

  16. Development of a natural analogue database to support the safety case of the Korean radioactive waste disposal program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baik, M.H.; Park, T.J.; Kim, I.Y.; Jeong, J.; Choi, K.W.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the status of natural analogue studies in Korea is briefly summarized and applicability of existing natural analogue information to the Korean safety case has been evaluated. To enable effective application of natural analogue information to the overall evaluation of long-term safety (the 'safety case') for the geological disposal of radioactive wastes, a natural analogue database has been developed by collecting, classifying, and evaluating relevant data. The natural analogue data collected were classified into categories based on site information, components/processes of the disposal system, properties/phenomena, reference, safety case application, application method, and suitability to a safety case. Suitability of the natural analogue data to a specific safety case was evaluated based upon the importance and the applicability to the Korean safety case. As a result, 75 natural analogue datasets were selected as important for the Korean safety case. The database developed can now be utilized in the RD and D (Research, Development, and Demonstration) program development for natural analogue studies. In addition, the methodology developed and the database compiled in this study may assist in the development of safety case including safety assessment for high-level radioactive waste disposal in Korea as well as in other countries. (authors)

  17. Radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devarakonda, M.S.; Melvin, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    This paper is part of the Annual Literature Review issue of Water Environment Research. The review attempts to provide a concise summary of important water-related environmental science and engineering literature of the past year, of which 40 separate topics are discussed. On the topic of radioactive wastes, the present paper deals with the following aspects: national programs; waste repositories; mixed wastes; waste processing and decommissioning; environmental occurrence and transport of radionuclides; and remedial actions and treatment. 178 refs

  18. Study on Design and Implementation of JAVA Programming Procedural Assessment Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tingting, Xu; Hua, Ma; Xiujuan, Wang; Jing, Wang

    2015-01-01

    The traditional JAVA course examination is just a list of questions from which we cannot know students' skills of programming. According to the eight abilities in curriculum objectives, we designed an assessment standard of JAVA programming course that is based on employment orientation and apply it to practical teaching to check the teaching…

  19. 77 FR 38743 - Energy Efficiency Program for Consumer Products: Energy Conservation Standards for Battery...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-29

    ... Efficiency Program for Consumer Products: Energy Conservation Standards for Battery Chargers and External Power Supplies AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION... Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program, EE-2J, 1000 Independence Avenue SW...

  20. 78 FR 9631 - Energy Efficiency Program for Consumer Products: Energy Conservation Standards for Residential...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-11

    ... Efficiency Program for Consumer Products: Energy Conservation Standards for Residential Boilers AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of public meeting.... Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program, EE-2J...

  1. Levels of concern for radioactive contaminations in soil according to soil protection standards; Besorgniswerte fuer Radionuklide in Boeden nach bodenschutzrechtlichen Massstaeben

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gellermann, R. [Nuclear Control and Consulting GmbH, Braunschweig (Germany); Barkowski, D.; Machtolf, M. [IFUA-Projekt-GmbH Bielefeld (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    In the paper the question is examined whether the established soil protection standards for carcinogenic substances are also applicable to the assessment of radioactive soil contamination. Referring to the methods applied in soil protection for evaluation of dose-effectrelations and estimations of carcinogenic risks as well as the calculation methods for test values in soil protection ''levels of concern'' for soil contamination by artificial radionuclides are derived. The values obtained are significantly larger than the values for unrestricted clearance of ground according to the German Radiation Protection Ordinance (StrlSchV). The thesis that soil is protected according to environmental standards provided that radiation protection requirements are met needs further checks but can be probably confirmed if the radiation protection requirements are clearly defined.

  2. Decree 2210: by means of which technical standards and allowed proceedings for radioactive material handling are issued

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This Decree has the regulation and handling of radioactive material as object, in order to protect the health of people as well as the atmosphere. These regulations are applicable to: all natural or artificial person, public or private, that imports, manufacture, transport, store, trade, transfer or use with industrial, commercial, scientific, medical or any other aim; apparatuses capable to generate ionizing radiations whose quantum energy is superior to 5 k lo electron volts (KeV) or materials that contain radionuclides whose activities surpass the maxim exempt registration; notification and license concession. It includes: definitions; signalizing by means of basic symbol that must be included in all object, material and their mixtures, that emit ionizing radiations; control; production; import and export; trade; use; and transport of activities that involve materials and apparatuses capable to generate ionizing radiations; the category and labeled of bundles; the limits of activity for excepted bundles; the corresponding values for the different radionuclides; the limits of activity for the means of material haulage; the storage; and the handling of radioactive waste [es

  3. Human factors programs for high-level radioactive waste handling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pond, D.J.

    1992-01-01

    Human Factors is the discipline concerned with the acquisition of knowledge about human capabilities and limitations, and the application of such knowledge to the design of systems. This paper discusses the range of human factors issues relevant to high-level radioactive waste (HLRW) management systems and, based on examples form other organizations, presents mechanisms through which to assure application of such expertise in the safe, efficient, and effective management and disposal of high-level waste. Additionally, specific attention is directed toward consideration of who might be classified as a human factors specialist, why human factors expertise is critical to the success of the HLRW management system, and determining when human factors specialists should become involved in the design and development process

  4. Human factors programs for high-level radioactive waste handling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pond, D.J.

    1992-04-01

    Human Factors is the discipline concerned with the acquisition of knowledge about human capabilities and limitations, and the application of such knowledge to the design of systems. This paper discusses the range of human factors issues relevant to high-level radioactive waste (HLRW) management systems and, based on examples from other organizations, presents mechanisms through which to assure application of such expertise in the safe, efficient, and effective management and disposal of high-level waste. Additionally, specific attention is directed toward consideration of who might be classified as a human factors specialist, why human factors expertise is critical to the success of the HLRW management system, and determining when human factors specialists should become involved in the design and development process

  5. Safety implications of standardized continuous quality improvement programs in community pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Todd A; Ho, Certina; Mackinnon, Neil J; Mahaffey, Thomas; Taylor, Jeffrey M

    2013-06-01

    Standardized continuous quality improvement (CQI) programs combine Web-based technologies and standardized improvement processes, tools, and expectations to enable quality-related events (QREs) occurring in individual pharmacies to be shared with pharmacies in other jurisdictions. Because standardized CQI programs are still new to community pharmacy, little is known about how they impact medication safety. This research identifies key aspects of medication safety that change as a result of implementing a standardized CQI program. Fifty-three community pharmacies in Nova Scotia, Canada, adopted the SafetyNET-Rx standardized CQI program in April 2010. The Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) Canada's Medication Safety Self-Assessment (MSSA) survey was administered to these pharmacies before and 1 year into their use of the SafetyNET-Rx program. The nonparametric Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to explore where changes in patient safety occurred as a result of SafetyNETRx use. Significant improvements occurred with quality processes and risk management, staff competence, and education, and communication of drug orders and other information. Patient education, environmental factors, and the use of devices did not show statistically significant changes. As CQI programs are designed to share learning from QREs, it is reassuring to see that the largest improvements are related to quality processes, risk management, staff competence, and education.

  6. Evaluation model applied to TRANSPETRO's Marine Terminals Standardization Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, Maria Fatima Ludovico de; Mueller, Gabriela [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro (PUC-Rio), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Instituto Tecnologico; Garcia, Luciano Maldonado [TRANSPETRO - PETROBRAS Transporte S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    This paper describes an innovative evaluation model applied to TRANSPETRO's 'Marine Terminals Standardization Program' based on updating approaches of programs evaluation and organizational learning. Since the program was launched in 2004, the need for having an evaluation model able to evaluate its implementation progress, to measure the degree of standards compliance and its potential economic, social and environmental impacts has become evident. Within a vision of safe and environmentally responsible operations of marine terminals, this evaluation model was jointly designed by TRANSPETRO and PUC-Rio to promote continuous improvement and learning in operational practices and in the standardization process itself. TRANSPETRO believes that standardization supports its services and management innovation capability by creating objective and internationally recognized parameters, targets and metrology for its business activities. The conceptual model and application guidelines for this important tool are presented in this paper, as well as the next steps towards its implementation. (author)

  7. Comment response document for the Secretary of Energy's ''Report to Congress on Reassessment of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-11-01

    On November 29, 1989, the Secretary of Energy published his ''Report to Congress on the Reassessment of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program'' (Report), and sent copies to numerous interested parties for their review and comment. This document summarizes comments received on the Report and presents the DOE's current responses to those comments as a basis for further discussions. Included as appendixes are a list of commenters, a crosswalk showing where each comment is addressed, the comment letters themselves with specific comments delineated, and the DOE's response to those letters. Twenty-five individuals or organizations submitted comments on the Report. The DOE identified 130 individual comments and classified them into the following seven categories: Management, Institutional, Regulatory, Transportation, Monitored Retrievable Storage, Scheduling, and Yucca Mountain. For the responses, comments were than grouped into more specific topics under each of the major headings. The DOE attempted to respond to all comments

  8. Comparison of the MARC and CRAC2 programs for assessing the radiological consequences of accidental releases of radioactive material

    CERN Document Server

    Hemming, C R; Charles, D; Ostmeyer, R M

    1983-01-01

    This report describes a comparison of the MARC (Methodology for Assessing Radiological Consequences) and CRAC2 (Calculation of Reactor Accident Consequences, version 2) computer programs for assessing the radiological consequences of accidental releases of radioactive material. A qualitative comparison has been made of the features of the constituent sub-models of the two codes, and potentially the most important differences identified. The influence of these differences has been investigated quantitatively by comparison of the predictions of the two codes in a wide variety of circumstances. Both intermediate quantities and endpoints used as a measure of risk have been compared in order to separate the variables more clearly. The results indicate that, in general, the predictions of MARC and CRAC2 are in good agreement.

  9. Management of radioactive material safety programs at medical facilities. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camper, L.W.; Schlueter, J.; Woods, S.

    1997-05-01

    A Task Force, comprising eight US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and two Agreement State program staff members, developed the guidance contained in this report. This report describes a systematic approach for effectively managing radiation safety programs at medical facilities. This is accomplished by defining and emphasizing the roles of an institution's executive management, radiation safety committee, and radiation safety officer. Various aspects of program management are discussed and guidance is offered on selecting the radiation safety officer, determining adequate resources for the program, using such contractual services as consultants and service companies, conducting audits, and establishing the roles of authorized users and supervised individuals; NRC's reporting and notification requirements are discussed, and a general description is given of how NRC's licensing, inspection and enforcement programs work

  10. Management of radioactive material safety programs at medical facilities. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camper, L.W.; Schlueter, J.; Woods, S. [and others

    1997-05-01

    A Task Force, comprising eight US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and two Agreement State program staff members, developed the guidance contained in this report. This report describes a systematic approach for effectively managing radiation safety programs at medical facilities. This is accomplished by defining and emphasizing the roles of an institution`s executive management, radiation safety committee, and radiation safety officer. Various aspects of program management are discussed and guidance is offered on selecting the radiation safety officer, determining adequate resources for the program, using such contractual services as consultants and service companies, conducting audits, and establishing the roles of authorized users and supervised individuals; NRC`s reporting and notification requirements are discussed, and a general description is given of how NRC`s licensing, inspection and enforcement programs work.

  11. Review of standards and guidelines pertinent to DOE's remedial action programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soldat, J.K.; Denham, D.H.

    1984-10-01

    A number of radiological standards, guidelines, and dose criteria have been promulgated that may be relevant to the Department of Energy's (DOE) Remedial Action programs. Some of these will be applied to remedial actions undertaken by DOE to ensure that health and safety aspects will be adequately addressed. Pacific Northwest Laboratory staff are reviewing and evaluating existing and proposed environmental radiological standards and criteria for their applicability. National and international environmental standards and criteria, and studies conducted by other DOE contractors are being evaluated. The aim of the review is to identify gaps in these standards and guidelines and to recommend further development as necessary. This paper provides a summary of the standards and guidelines evaluated for applicability to DOE's Remedial Action programs. 33 references, 5 tables

  12. NAGC Pre-K-Grade 12 Gifted Education Programming Standards: A Guide to Planning and Implementing High-Quality Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsen, Susan K., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    The new Pre-K-Grade 12 Gifted Education Programming Standards should be part of every school district's repertoire of standards to ensure that the learning needs of advanced students are being met. "NAGC Pre-K-Grade 12 Gifted Education Programming Standards: A Guide to Planning and Implementing High-Quality Services" details six standards that…

  13. International Review of the Development and Implementation of Energy Efficiency Standards and Labeling Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Nan; Zheng, Nina; Fridley, David

    2012-02-28

    Appliance energy efficiency standards and labeling (S&L) programs have been important policy tools for regulating the efficiency of energy-using products for over 40 years and continue to expand in terms of geographic and product coverage. The most common S&L programs include mandatory minimum energy performance standards (MEPS) that seek to push the market for efficient products, and energy information and endorsement labels that seek to pull the market. This study seeks to review and compare some of the earliest and most well-developed S&L programs in three countries and one region: the U.S. MEPS and ENERGY STAR, Australia MEPS and Energy Label, European Union MEPS and Ecodesign requirements and Energy Label and Japanese Top Runner programs. For each program, key elements of S&L programs are evaluated and comparative analyses across the programs undertaken to identify best practice examples of individual elements as well as cross-cutting factors for success and lessons learned in international S&L program development and implementation. The international review and comparative analysis identified several overarching themes and highlighted some common factors behind successful program elements. First, standard-setting and programmatic implementation can benefit significantly from a legal framework that stipulates a specific timeline or schedule for standard-setting and revision, product coverage and legal sanctions for non-compliance. Second, the different MEPS programs revealed similarities in targeting efficiency gains that are technically feasible and economically justified as the principle for choosing a standard level, in many cases at a level that no product on the current market could reach. Third, detailed survey data such as the U.S. Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) and rigorous analyses provide a strong foundation for standard-setting while incorporating the participation of different groups of stakeholders further strengthen the process

  14. Suggested state requirements and criteria for a low-level radioactive waste disposal site regulatory program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ratliff, R.A.; Dornsife, B.; Autry, V.; Gronemyer, L.; Vaden, J.; Cashman, T.

    1985-08-01

    Description of criteria and procedure is presented for a state to follow in the development of a program to regulate a LLW disposal site. This would include identifying those portions of the NRC regulations that should be matters of compatibility, identifying the various expertise and disciplines that will be necessary to effectively regulate a disposal site, identifying the resources necessary for conducting a confirmatory monitoring program, and providing suggestions in other areas which, based on experiences, would result in a more effective regulatory program

  15. Program to assess the effects of extraordinary environments on radioactive material shipping systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandoval, R.P.; Reese, R.T.

    1980-01-01

    The highlights of the Transportation System Safety Evaluation (TSSE) Program at Sandia National Laboratories are reviewed and the origins of the program and the relationships to other programs addressing safety concerns are outlined. The areas of current activity in the assessment of possible effects an intentional act or extreme environment could have on nuclear material shipping systems are described. Early information has been obtained on the formation of aerosols, and a significant body of experimentally determined source term data will be available for radiological consequence evaluations

  16. Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program Cost and Schedule Baseline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-09-01

    The purpose of this document is to establish quantitative expressions of proposed costs and schedule to serve as a basis for measurement of program performance. It identifies the components of the Program Cost and Schedule Baseline (PCSB) that will be subject to change control by the Executive (Level 0) and Program (Level 1) Change Control Boards (CCBS) and establishes their baseline values. This document also details PCSB reporting, monitoring, and corrective action requirements. The Program technical baseline contained in the Waste Management System Description (WMSD), the Waste Management System Requirements (WMSR), and the Physical System Requirements documents provide the technical basis for the PCSB. Changes to the PCSB will be approved by the Pregrain Change Control Board (PCCB)In addition to the PCCB, the Energy System Acquisition Advisory Board Baseline CCB (ESAAB BCCB) will perform control functions relating to Total Project Cost (TPC) and major schedule milestones for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project and the Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) Project

  17. Application of the 4 pigammaMethod to the Absolute Standardization of Radioactive Sources of Positron Emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peyres Medina, V.; Garcia-Torano Martinez, E.; Roteta Ibarra, M.

    2006-01-01

    We discuss the application of the method known as 4 p i g amma c ounting t o the standardization of positron emitters. Monte Carlo simulations are used to calculate the detection efficiency of positrons emitted by the nuclides 22Na and 18F. Two experimental setups are used, both based on a NaI(Tl) well detector. The results of the standardizations are in good agreement with those obtained by other methods. It is shown that the 4 p i g amma m ethod can be successfully used for the absolute standardization of sources of positron emitters. (Author) 23 refs

  18. Efigie: a computer program for calculating end-isotope accumulation by neutron irradiation and radioactive decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ropero, M.

    1978-01-01

    Efigie is a program written in Fortran V which can calculate the concentration of radionuclides produced by neutron irradiation of a target made of either a single isotope or several isotopes. The program includes optimization criteria that can be applied when the goal is the production of a single nuclide. The effect of a cooling time before chemical processing of the target is also accounted for.(author) [es

  19. A review of standardized patients in clinical education: Implications for speech-language pathology programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Anne E; Davidson, Bronwyn J; Theodoros, Deborah G

    2010-06-01

    The use of standardized patients has been reported as a viable addition to traditional models of professional practice education in medicine, nursing and allied health programs. Educational programs rely on the inclusion of work-integrated learning components in order to graduate competent practitioners. Allied health programs world-wide have reported increasing difficulty in attaining sufficient traditional placements for students within the workplace. In response to this, allied health professionals are challenged to be innovative and problem-solving in the development and maintenance of clinical education placements and to consider potential alternative learning opportunities for students. Whilst there is a bank of literature describing the use of standardized patients in medicine and nursing, reports of its use in speech-language pathology clinical education are limited. Therefore, this paper aims to (1) provide a review of literature reporting on the use of standardized patients within medical and allied health professions with particular reference to use in speech-language pathology, (2) discuss methodological and practical issues involved in establishing and maintaining a standardized patient program and (3) identify future directions for research and clinical programs using standardized patients to build foundation clinical skills such as communication, interpersonal interaction and interviewing.

  20. Environmental Radiation Protection Standards for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes (40 CFR Part 191)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This regulation sets environmental standards for public protection from the management and disposal of spent nuclear fuel, high-level wastes and wastes that contain elements with atomic numbers higher than uranium (transuranic wastes).